Citation
The History of Sandford and Merton

Material Information

Title:
The History of Sandford and Merton
Series Title:
Warne's national books
Added title page title:
Sandford and Merton
Creator:
Day, Thomas, 1748-1789
Dalziel, Edward, 1817-1905
Dalziel, George, 1815-1902
Frederick Warne (Firm) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Frederick Warne and Co., Bedford Street, Strand
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[10], 269, [7] p., [8] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prejudices -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Moral tales -- 1891 ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Fables ( fast )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Approximate date established from Brown, P. London publishers and printers c.1800-1870.
General Note:
Half-title.
General Note:
Series statement from publisher's binding.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisement: p. [9], preceding text. Also: [7] pages following text; the first three of which are included in the final text gathering.
General Note:
Includes preface; table of contents.
General Note:
Cf. Osborne Coll., p. 243-244; 874-875.
General Note:
Cf. Gumuchian, 2064-2088.
General Note:
Cf. Welch, D.A. Amer. children's books, 269.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Thomas Day ; with original illustrations, printed in colours by Dalziel Brothers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027216732 ( ALEPH )
ALK0534 ( NOTIS )
31192218 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




Bd la po wel
aL i ok oe al



e
B:
3
3
a
2
&





ee : ay
fle oe om
us mo

—~

Re
i



Uniform with “SANDFORD AND MERTON."

EVENINGS AT HOME:
TALES AND STORIES

FOR THE INSTRUCTION AND AMUSEMENT
OF YOUNG PEOPLE.

By Dr. AIKEN anp Mrs, BARBAULD.

With Coloured Mlustrations.



THE HISTORY

OF

SANDFORD AND MERTON.





Front, HARRY RELIEVING THE POOR COTTAGERS.



THE HISTORY

OF

SANDFORD AND MERTON.

By THOMAS DAY.

WITH ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS,

PRINTED IN COLOURS BY DALZIEL BROTHERS.



LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO,,
BEDFORD STREET, STRAND,.







PREFACE.
—~-—

HE great popularity which the “ History of Sandford

and Merton” has possessed with the young since its

first publication, in the latter half of the last century, has

induced the Publishers to add a New Edition of it to their
series of National Books,

It is hoped that the few liberties taken with the text,
in the way of alteration, may not diminish its value, but
that it may be welcome, as of old, to the Young Readers
of England,





CONTENTS:

THE FLIES AND THE ANTS. . . . .
THE GENTLEMAN AND THE BASKET-MAKER
THE HISTORY OF THE TWO DOGS
ANDROCLES AND THE LION
THE STORY OF CYRUS .

THE TWO BROTHERS

EXTRACTS FROM A NARRATIVE OF THE EXTRAORDINARY

ADVENTURES OF FOUR RUSSIAN SAILORS, WHO WERE .

CAST AWAY ON THE DESERT ISLAND OF EAST SPITZ-

~

BERGEN . . . . . . .
THE GOOD-NATURED LITTLE BOY
THE ILL-NATURED BOY . . . . .
THE STORY OF THE GRATEFUL TURK . . .
CONTINUATION OF THE HISTORY OF THE GRATEFUL TURK

HISTORY OF A SURPRISING CURE OF THE Gout
HISTORY OF AGESILAUS

e . . . .

THE HISTORY OF LEONIDAS, KING OF SPARTA . .
SOPHRON AND TIGRANES

. . . . .

THE CONCLUSION OF THE STORY OF SOPHRON AND TIGRANES



Page
ro

12
17
22
29
34

39
53
57
64
79

94
127

130
180
239





LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS,

—@~—

Harry relieving the poor Cottagers

Harry saving Tommy from the Snake

The First Day at Mr. Barlow’s

Androcles and the Lion . . .
Shipwrecked Mariners killing a White Bear
Tommy encounters the Bear and Monkey
Falling of an Avalanche

Tommy and Harry at Mr. Merton’s

. Front.

Harry saving Tommy from the Bull, the Negro ge 7

Rescue of Harry's Lamb .
. The Highlander running from the Prairie Fire
Harry and Tommy making up their quarrel



Page

22

84
116
150
174
206
224
256



THE HISTORY
OF
SANDFORD AND MERTON.

In the western part of England lived, many years ago, a gentleman
of great fortune, whose name was Merton. He had a large estate
in the Island of Jamaica, where he had passed the greater part of

his life, and was master of many servants, who cultivated sugar and.

other valuable things for his advantage. He had only one son, of
whom he was excessively fond; and to educate his child properly
was the reason of his determining to stay some years in England.

Tommy Merton, who, at the time he came from Jamaica, was only’

six years old, was naturally a very good-tempered boy, but unfortu-
nately had been spoiled by too much indulgence. While-he lived in
Jamaica, he had several black servants to wait upon him, who were
forbidden upon any account to contradict him. If he walked, there
always went two negroes with him; one of whom carried a large
umbrella to keep the sun from him, and the other was to carry him
in his arms whenever he was tired. Besides this, he was always
dressed in silk or laced clothes, and had a fine gilded carriage, which
was borne upon men’s shoulders, in which he made visits to his play-
fellows. His mother was so excessively fond of him, that she gave
him everything he cried for, and would never let him learn to read
because he complained that it made his head ache. :

The consequence of this was, that, though Master Merton had
everything he wanted, he became very fretful and unhappy. Some-
times he ate sweetmeats till he made himself ill, and then he suffered
a great deal of pain, because he would not take bitter physic to make

7 4q
rs 2



2 THE HISTORY OF

him well. Sometimes he cried for things that it was impossible to
give him, and then, as he had never been used to be contradicted,
jt was many hours before he could be pacified. When any company
came to dine at the house, he was always helped first, and to have
the most delicaté parts of the meat, otherwise he would make such a
noise as disturbed the whole company. When his father and mother
were sitting at the tea-table with their friends, instead of waiting till
they were at leisure to attend to him, he would scramble upon the
table, seize the cake and bread and butter, and frequently upset the
tea-cups. By these pranks he not only made himself disagreeable
to everybody else, but often met with very dangerous accidents.
Frequently he cut himself with knives, at other times threw heavy
things upon his head, and once he narrowly escaped being scalded to
death by a kettle of boiling water. He was also so delicately brought
up, that he was perpetually ill: the least wind or rain gave hima
cold, and the least sun was sure to throw him into a fever. Instead
of playing about, and jumping, and running, like other children, he
was taught to sit still for fear of spoiling his clothes, and _to stay in
the house for fear of injuring His complexion. By this kind of educa-
tion, when Master Merton came over to England he could neither
write nor read nor cipher ; he could use none of his limbs with ease,
not bear any degree of fatigue ; but he was very proud, fretful, and
impatient.

Very near to Mr. Merton's seat lived a plain, honest farmer, whose
name was Sandford. This man had, like Mr. Merton, an only son,
not much older than Master Merton, whose name was Harry. Harry,
as he had been always accustomed to run about in the fields, to follow
the labourers while they were ploughing, and to drive the sheep to
their pastures, was active, strong, hardy, and fresh-coloured. He
was neither so fair nor so delicately shaped as Master Merton ; but
he had an honest good-natured countenance, which made everybody
love him, was never out of humour, and took the greatest pleasure
in obliging everybody. If little Harry saw a poor wretch who wanted
victuals while he was eating his dinner, he was sure to give him half,
and sometimes the whole; nay, so very good-natured was he to
everything, that he would never go into the fields to take the eggs of
poor birds, or their young ones, nor practise any other kind of sport
which gave pain to poor animals, who are as capable of feeling as
we ourselves, though they have no words to express their sufferings.
Once, indeed, Harry was caught twirling a cockchafer round, which
he had fastened bya crooked pin to along piece of thread ; but, then,
this was through ignorance and want of thought ; for, as soon as his



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 3

father told him that the poor helpless insect felt as much or more
than he would do, were a knife thrust through his hand, he burst
into tears, and took the poor cockchafer home, where he fed him
during a fortnight upon fresh leaves; and when he was perfectly
recovered, turned him out to enjoy liberty and fresh air. Ever
since that time, Harry was so careful and considerate that he would
step out of the way for fear of hurting a worm, and employed him-
self in doing kind offices to all the animals in the neighbourhood.
He used to stroke the horses as they were at work, and fill his
pockets with acorns for the pigs ; if he walked in the fields he was
sure to gather green boughs for the sheep, who were so fond of him,
that they followed him wherever he went. In the winter-time, when
the ground was covered with frost and snow, and the poor little
birds could get at no food, he would often go supperless to bed, that
he might feed the robin redbreasts; even toads, and frogs, and
spiders, and such kinds of disagreeable creatures, which most people
destroy wherever they find them, were perfectly, safe with Harry: he
used to say they had a right to live as well as we, and that it was
eruel and unjust to kill creatures only because we did not like them.

These sentiments made little Harry a great favourite with every-
body ; particularly with the clergyman of the parish, who became so
fond of him that he taught him to read and write, and had him
almost always with him. Indeed, it was not surprising that Mr.
Barlow showed so particular an affection for him ; for besides learning
with the greatest readiness everything that was taught him, little
Harry was the most honest, obliging creature in the world. He was
never discontented, nor did he ever grumble, whatever he was desired
todo. And then you might believe Harry in everything he said ; for
though he could have gained a plum cake by telling an untruth, and
was sure that speaking the truth would expose him to a severe whip-
ping, he never hesitated in declaring it. Nor was he like many other
children, who place their whole happiness in eating; for give him
but a morsel of dry bread for his dinner, and he would be satisfied,
though you placed sweetmeats and fruit, and every other nicety, in
his way.

With this little boy Master Merton became acquainted in the fol-_;

lowing manner :—As he and the maid were once walking in the fields
on a fine summer's morning, diverting themselves with gathering
different kinds of wild flowers, and running after butterflies, a large
snake on a sudden started up from among some long grass, and
coiled itself round little Tommy's leg. You may imagine the fright
they were both in at this accident : the maid ran away shrieking for



‘

4 THE HISTORY OF

help, while the child, who was in an agony of terror, did not dare to
stir from the place where he was standing. Harry, who happened
to be walking near the place, came running up, and asked what was
the matter. Tommy, who was sobbing most piteously, could not find
words to tell him, but pointed to his leg, and made Harry sensible
of what had happened. Harry, who, though young, was a boy of a
most courageous spirit, told him not to be frightened, and instantly
seizing the snake by the neck, with as much dexterity as resolution,
tore him from Tommy's leg, and threw him to a great distance off.

Just as this happened, Mrs, Merton and all the family, alarmed by
the servant's cries, came running breathless to the place, as Tommy
was recovering his spirits, and thanking his brave little deliverer.
Her first emotions were to catch her darling up in her arms, and.
after giving him a thousand kisses, to ask him whether he had
teceived any hurt.

“No,” said Tommy, ‘‘indeed I have not, mamma ; but I believe
that nasty ugly beast would have bitten me, if that little boy had not
come and pulled him off.”

“And who are you, my dear,” said she, ‘‘to whom we are all so
obliged?”

‘ Harry Sandford, madam.”

‘Well, my child, you are a dear, brave little creature, and you
shall go home and dine with us.”

‘* No, thank you, madam ; my father will want me.”

‘* And who is your father, my sweet boy?”

‘Parmer Sandford, madam, that lives at the bottom of the hill.”

‘Well, my dear, you.shall be my child henceforth ; will you?”

“Tf you please, madam, if 1 may have my own father and mother
too.”

"Mrs. Merton instantly dispatched a servant to the farmer’s ; and,
taking little Harry by the hand, she led him to the mansion-house,
where she found Mr. Merton, whom she entertained with a long
account of Tommy's danger and Harry's bravery.

Harry was now in a new scene of life. He was carried through
costly apartments, where everything that could please the eye, or
contribute to convenience, was assembled. He saw large looking-
glasses in gilded frames, carved tables and chairs, curtains made of
the finest silk, and the very plates and knives and forks were of silver.
At dinner he was placed close to Mrs. Merton, who took care to
supply him with the choicest bits, and engaged him to eat, with the
most endearing kindness; but, to the astonishment of everybody,
he neither appeared pleased nor surprised at anything he saw. Mrs.









HARRY SAVING TOMMY FROM THE SNAKE.—p. 4



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 5
+

Merton could not conceal her disappointment; for, ag she had
always been used to a great degree of finery herself, she had ex-
pected it should make the same impression upon everybody else.
‘After dinner, Mrs. Merton filled a large glass of wine, and giving it
to Harry, bade him drink it up; but he thanked her, and said he
was not dry.

‘‘ But, my dear,” said she, ‘‘ this is very sweet and pleasant, and,
as you are a good boy, you may drink it up.”

“ Ay, but, madam, Mr. Barlow says that we must only eat when
we are hungry, and drink when we are dry ; and that we must only
eat and drink such things as are easily met with ; otherwise we shall
grow peevish and vexed when we can’t get them, And this was the
way that the Apostles did, who were all very good men.”

Mr. Merton laughed at this. '

‘* And pray,” said he, ‘‘little man, do you know who the Aposties
were?”

‘‘Oh! yes, to be sure I do.”

‘« And who were they?”

‘“Why, sir, there was a time when people were grown so very
wicked, that they did not care what they did; and the great folks
were all proud, and minded nothing but eating and drinking and
sleeping, and amusing themselves ; and took no care of the poor,
and would not give a morsel of bread to hinder a beggar from starv-
ing; and the poor were all lazy and loved to be idle better than to
work ; and little boys were disobedient to their parents, and their
parents took no care to teach them anything that was good; and
all the world was very bad, very bad indeed. And then the Lord
Jesus Christ came upon earth, and He went about doing good to
everybody, and curing people of all sorts of diseases, and taught
them what they ought to do; and He chose out twelve very good
men, and called them Apostles; and these Apostles went about the
world doing as He did, and teaching people as He taught them.
And they never minded what they ate or drank, but lived upon dry
bread and water; and when anybody offered them money, they
would not take it, but told them to be good, and give it to the poor
and sick; and so they made the world a great deal better. And
therefore it is not fit to mind what we live upon, but we should take
what we can get, and be contented—just as the beasts and birds do,
who lodge in the open air, and live upon herbs, and drink nothing
but water ; and yet they are strong, and active, and healthy.”

“‘ Upon my word,” said Mr. Merton, '' this little man is a great
philosopher ; and we should be much obliged to Mr. Barlow if he



6 “ THE HISTORY OF

would take our Tommy under his care, for he grows a great boy,
and it is time that he should know something. What say you,
Tommy, should you like to be a philosopher?”

‘‘ Indeed, papa, I don’t know what a philosopher is; but I should
like to be a king, because he’s finer and richer than anybody else,
and. has nothing to do, and everybody waits upon him and is afraid
of him.” :

‘Well said, my dear,” replied Mrs. Merton, and rose and kissed
him ; “and a king you deserve to be with such a spirit; and here's
a glass of wine for you for making such a pretty answer. And
should you not like to be a king, too, little Harry?”

“Indeed, madam, I don’t know; but I hope I shall soon be big
enough to go to plough, and get my own living; and then I shall
want nobody to wait upon me.”

“What a difference between the children of farmers and gentle-
men !”' whispered Mrs. Merton to her husband, looking rather con-
temptuously upon Harry.

‘Tam not sure,” said Mr. Merton, ‘‘ that for this time the advan-
tage is on the side of our son.”

In the evening, little Harry was sent home to his father, who asked
him what he had seen at the great house, and how he liked being
there.

‘‘Why,” replied Harry, ‘‘ they were all very kind to me, for which
I’m much obliged to them; but I had rather have been at home, for
I never was so troubled in all my life to geta dinner. There was one
man to take away my plate, and another to give me drink, and
another to stand behind my chair, just as if I had been lame or
blind, and could not have waited upon myself ; and then there was
so much to do with putting this thing on, and taking another off, I
thought it would never have been over; and, after dinner, I was
obliged to sit two whole hours without ever stirring, while the lady
was talking to me, not as Mr. Barlow does, but wanting me to love
fine clothes, and to be a king.”

But at the mansion-house, much of the conversation, in the mean-
time, was employed in examining the merits of little Harry. Mrs.
Merton acknowledged his bravery and openness of temper; she was
also struck with the good-nature and benevolence of his character ;
but she contended that he had a certain grossness and indelicacy in
his ideas, which distinguish the children of the lower and middling
classes of people fronr those of persons of rank. Mr. Merton, on the
contrary, maintained that he had never before seen a child whose
sentiments and disposition would do so much honour even to the



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 7

most elevated station. Nothing, he affirmed, was more easily ac-
quired than those external manners, and that superficial address,
upon which too many of the higher classes pride themselves as their
greatest, or even as their only accomplishment ; ‘‘ Nay, so easily are
they picked up,” said he, ‘‘ that we frequently see them descend with
the cast clothes to maids and valets, between whom and their masters
and mistresses there is little other difference than what results from
the former wearing soiled clothes and healthier countenances. In-
deed, the real seat of all superiority, even of manners, must be placed
in the mind: dignified sentiments, superior courage, accompanied
with genuine and universal courtesy, are always necessary to consti-
tute the real gentleman; and where these are wanting, it is the
greatest absurdity to think they can be supplied by affected tones of
voice, particularly grimaces, or extravagant and unnatural modes of
dress—which, far from becoming the real test of gentility, have in
general no other origin than the caprice of barbers, tailors, actors,
opera-dancers, milliners, fiddlers, and French servants of both sexes.
Icannot help, therefore, asserting,” said he, very seriously, ‘* that this
little country boy has within his mind the seeds of true gentility and
dignity of character ;. and though I shall also wish that our son may
possess all the common accomplishments of his rank, nothing would
give me more pleasure than a certainty that he would never in any
respect fall below the son of Farmer Sandford.”

Whether Mrs. Merton fully acceded to these observations of her
husband I cannot decide ; but, without waiting to hear her particular
sentiments, he thus went on :—

“Should I appear more warm than usual upon this subject, you
must pardon me, my dear, and attribute it to the interest I feel in
the welfare of our little Tommy. 1 am too sensible that our mutual
fondness has hitherto treated him with rather too much indulgence.
While we have been over-solicitous to remove from him every painful
and disagreeable impression, we have made him too delicate and.
fretful: our desire of constantly consulting his inclinations has made
us gratify even his caprices and humours; and while we have been
too studious to preserve him from restraint and opposition, we have
in reality been ourselves the cause that he has not acquired even the
common attainments of his age and station. All this I have long
observed in silence, but have hitherto concealed, both from my fond-
ness for our child, and my fear of offending you; but at length a
considerstion of his real interests has prevailed over every other
motive, and has compelled me to embrace a resolution, which I hope
will not be disagreeable to you,—-that of sending him directly to Mr.



8 THE HISTORY OF

Barlow, provided he would take care of him; and I think this acci-
dental acquaintance with young Sandford may prove the luckiest
thing in the world, as he is so nearly the age and size of our Tommy,
1 will therefore propose to the farmer that I will for some years pay
for the board and education of his little boy, that he may be a con-
stant companion to our son,”

As Mr. Merton said this with a certain degree of firmness, and the
proposal was in itself so reasonable and necessary, Mrs. Merton did
not make any objection to it, but consented, although very reluctantly,
to part with her son. Mr. Barlow was accordingly invited to dinner
the next Sunday, and Mr. Merton took an opportunity of intro-
ducing the subject, and making the proposal to him ; assuring him,
at the same time, that though there was no return within the bounds
of his fortune which he would not willingly make, yet the education
and improvement of his son were objects of so much importance to
him, that he should always consider himself the obliged party.

To this Mr. Barlow, after thanking Mr. Merton for the confidence
and liberality with which he treated him, answered him in the follow-
ing manner :—

“‘T should be little worthy of the distinguished regard with which
you treat me, did I not with the greatest sincerity assure you that I
feel myself totally unqualified for the task. Iam, sir, a minister of
the Gospel, and I would not exchange that character, and the severe
duties it enjoins, for any other situation in life. But you must be
sensible that the retired manner of life which I have led for these
twenty years, in consequence of my profession, at a distance from
the capital, is little adapted to form such a tutor as the manners and
opinions of the world require for your son. Nevertheless, Iam con-
tented to take him for some nonths under my care, and to endeavour
by every means within my pywer to improve him. But there is one
circumstance which is indispensable, that you permut me to have the
pleasure of serving you as a friend. If you approve of my ideas and
conduct, I will keep him as long as you desire, In the meantime,
as there are, I fear, some little cireumstances which have grown up,
by too much tenderness and indulgence, to be altered in his character,
I think that-I shall possess more of the necessary influence and
authority, if I, for the present, appear to him and your whole family
rather in the light of a friend than that of a schoolmaster.”

However disagreeable this proposal was to the generosity of Mr.
Merton, he was obliged to consent to it; and littke Tommy was
accordingly sent the next day to the vicarage, which was at the
distance of about two miles from his father’s house.











THE FIRST DAY AT MR. BARLOW’S.—p. 8



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 9

The day after Tommy came to Mr. Barlow's, as soon as breakfast
was over, he took him and Harry into the garden: when he was
there, he took a spade into his own hand, and giving Harry a hoe,
they both began to work with great eagerness.

“ Everybody that eats,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ ought to assist in pro-
curing food ; and therefore little Harry and I begin our daily work
This 1s my bed, and that other is his ; we work upon it every day,
and he that raises the most out of it will deserve to fare the best.
Now, Tommy, if you choose to join us, I will mark you out a piece
of ground, which you shall have to yourself, and all the produce shall
be your own.”

*‘No, indeed,” said Tommy, very sulkily, ‘I am a gentleman,
and don’t choose to. slave like a plough-boy.”

‘‘Just as you please, Mr. Gentleman,” said Mr. Barlow; ‘but
Harry and I, who are not above being useful, will mind our
work.”

. In about two hours, Mr. Barlow said it was time to leave off ; and
taking Harry by the hand, he led him into a very pleasant summer-
house, where they sat down; and Mr. Barlow, taking out a plate
of very fine ripe cherries, divided them between Harry and him-
self, .

Tommy, who had followed, and expected his share, when he saw
them both eating without taking any notice of him, could no longer
restrain his passion, but burst into a violent fit of sobbing and crying.

‘‘What is the matter?” said Mr. Barlow very coolly to him.

Tommy looked upon him very sulkily, but returned no answer.

‘Oh! sir, if you don't choose to give me an answer, you may be
silent ; nobody is obliged to speak here."

Tommy became still more disconcerted at this, and, being unable
to conceal his anger, ran out of the summer-house, and wandered
very disconsolately about the garden, equally surprised and vexed
to find that he was now in a place where nobody felt any concern
whether he was pleased or the contrary.

‘When all the cherries were eaten, little Harry said, ‘ You promised
to be so good as to hear me read when we had done working in the
garden ; and, if it is agreeable to you, I will now read the story of
the Flies and the Ants.”

“With all my heart,” said Mr. Barlow: ‘remember to read it
slowly and distinctly, without hesitating or pronouncing the words
wrong ; and be sure to read it in such a manner as to show that you
understand it.”

Harry then took up the book, and read as follows :-—



Jo THE HISTORY OF

THE FLIES AND THE ANTS.

In the corner of a farmer's garden, there once happened to be a nest
of ants, who, during the fine weather of the summer, were employed
all day long in drawing little secds and grains of corn into their hole.
Near them there happened to be a bed of flowers, upon which a great
quantity of flies used to be always sporting and humming, and
diverting themselves by flying from one flower to another. A little
boy, who was the farmer's son, used frequently to observe the diffe-
rent employments of these animals ; and, as he was very young and
ignorant, he one day thus expresscd himself :—‘‘ Can any creature
be so simple as these ants? All day long they are working and toil-
ing, instead of enjoying the fine weather, and diverting themselves
like these flies, who are the happiest creatures in the world.” Some
time after he had made this observation, the weather grew extremely
cold, the sun was scarcely seen to shine, and the nights were chill
and frosty. The same little boy, walking then in the garden, did
not see a single ant, but all the flies lay scattered up and down,
either dead or dying. As he was very good-natured, he could not
help pitying the unfortunate insects, and asking, at the same time,
what had happened to the ants that he used to see in the same
place. The father said, ‘'‘ The flies are all dead, because they were
careless animals, who gave themselves no trouble about laying up
provisions, and were too idle to work ; but the ants, who had been
busy all the summer in providing for their maintenance during the
winter, are all alive and well; and you will see them as soon as the
warm weather returns.”

"Very well, Harry,” said Mr. Barlow; ‘‘ we wil! now take a walk.”

They accordingly rambled out into the fields, where Mr. Barlow
made Harry take notice of several kinds of plants, and told him the
names and nature of them. At last Harry, who had observed some
very pretty purple berries upon a plant that bore a purple flower, and
grew in the hedges, brought them to Mr. Barlow, and asked whether
they were good to eat.

“It is very lucky,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ young man, that you asked
the question before you put them into your mouth ; for had you tasted
them, they would have given you violent pains in your head and
stomach, and perhaps have killed you, as they grow upon a plant
called nightshade, which is a rank poison."

‘Sir,’ said Harry, ‘‘I take care never to eat anything without



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 1X

knowing what it is, and I hope, if you will be so good as to continue
to teach me, I shall very soon know the names and qualities of all
the herbs which grow.”

As they were returning home, Harry saw a very large bird called
a kite, upon the ground, who seemed to have something in his claws,
which he was tearing to pieces. Harry, who knew him to be one of
those ravenous creatures which prey upon others, ran up to him,
shouting as loud as he could; and the bird, being frightened, flew
away, and lefta chicken behind him, very much hurt indeed, but still
alive.

‘* Look, sir,” said Harry, ‘if that cruel creature has not almost
killed this poor chicken ; see how he bleeds, and hangs his wings !
J will put him into my bosorh to recover him, and carry him home ;
and he shall have part of my dinner every day till he is well, and able
to shift for himself.” ‘

As soon as they came home, the first care of little Harry was to
put his wounded chicken into a basket with some fresh straw, some
water, and some bread. After that Mr. Barlow and he went to
dinner.

In the meantime, Tommy, who had been skulking about all day,
very much mortified and uneasy, came in, and being very hungry,
was going to sit down to the table with the rest; but Mr. Barlow
stopped him, and said,

‘*No, sir, as you are too much of a gentleman to work, we, who
are not so, do not choose to work for the idle.” ‘

Upon this Tommy, retired into a corner, crying as if his heart
would break, but more from grief than passion, as he began to per-
ceive that nobody minded his iil temper.

But little Harry, who could not bear to see his friend so unhappy,
looked up half-crying into Mr. Barlow's face, and said, ‘' Pray, sir,
may I do as I please with my share of the dinner?”

‘Yes, to be sure, child.”

“Why, then,” said he, getting up, ‘I will give it all to poor
Tommy, who wants it more than I do.”

Saying this, he gave it to him as he sat in the corner; and Tommy
took it, and thanked him without ever turning his eyes from off the
ground.

“T see," said Mr. Barlow, ‘that though gentlemen are above
being of any use themselves, they are not above taking the bread
that other people have been working hard for."

At this Tommy cried still more bitterly than before.

The next day Mr. Barlow and Harry went to work as before ; but



We

12 THE HISTORY OF

they had scarcely begun before Tommy came to them, and desired
that he might have a hoe too, which Mr. Barlow gave him; but as
he had never before learned to handle one, he was very awkward in
the use of it, and hit himself several strokes upon his legs. Mr.
Barlow then laid down his own spade, and showed him how to hold
and use it, by which means, in a short time, he became very expert,
and worked with the greatest pleasure. When their work was over
they retired all three to the summer-house; and Tommy felt the
greatest joy imaginable when the fruit was produced, and he was in-
yited to take his share, which seemed to him the most delicious he
had ever tasted, because working in the air had given him an.appetite.

As soon as they had done eating, Mr. Barlow took up a book, and
asked Tommy whether he would read them a story out of it; but he,
looking a little ashamed, said he had never learned to read.

‘‘Tam very sorry for it,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘because you lose a
very great pleasure ; then Harry shall read to you.”

Harry accordingly took up the book, and read the following
story :—

THE GENTLEMAN AND THE BASKET-MAKER.

THERE was, in the Eastern part of the world, a rich man, who lived
im a fine house, and spent his whole time in eating, drinking, sleep-
ing, and amusing himself. As he had a great many servants to wait
upon him, who treated him with the greatest respect, and did what-
ever they were ordered, and as he had never been taught the truth,
nor accustomed to hear it, he grew very proud, insolent, and capri-
cious, imagining that he had a right to command all the world, and
that the poor were only born to serve and obey him.

Near this rich man’s house there lived an honest and industrious
poor man, who gained his livelihood by making little baskets out of
dried reeds, which grew upon a piece of marshy ground close to his
cottage. But though he was obliged to. labour from morning’ to
night to earn food enough to support him, and though he seldom
fared better than upon dry bread, or rice, or pulse, and had no other
bed than the remains of the rushes of which he made baskets, yet
was he always happy, cheerful, and contented ; for his labour gave
him so good an appetite, that the coarsest fare appeared to him
delicious ; and he went to bed so tired that he would have slept
soundly even upon the ground. Besides this, he was a good and
virtuous man, humane to everybody, honest in his dealings, always



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 13

accustomed to speak the truth, and therefore beloved and respected
by all his neighbours. .

The rich man, on the contrary, though he lay upon the softest bed,
yet could not sleep, because he had passed the day in idleness ; and
though the nicest dishes were presented to him, yet could he not eat
with any pleasure, because he did not wait till nature gave him an
appetite, nor use exercise, nor go into the open air, Besides this, as
he was a great sluggard and glutton, he was almost always ill; and,
as he did good to nobody, he had no friends ; and even his servants
spoke ill of him behind his back, and all his neighbours, whom he
oppressed, hated him. For these reasons he was sullen, melancholy,
and unhappy, and became displeased with all who appeared more
cheerful than himself. When he was carried out in his palanquin
(a kind of bed, borne upon the shoulders of men) he frequently passed
by the cottage of the poor basket-maker, who was always sitting at
the door, and singing as he wove the baskets. The rich man could
not behold this without anger.

“What!” said he, ‘‘shall a wretch, a peasant, a low-born fellow,
that weaves bulrushes for a scanty subsistence, be always happy and
pleased, while I, that am a gentleman, possessed of riches and power,
and of more consequence than a million of reptiles like him, am
always melancholy and discontented !"

This reflection arose so often in his mind that at last he began to
feel the greatest degree of hatred towards the poor man; and, as he
had never been accustomed to conquer his own passions, however
improper or unjust they might be, he at last determined to punish
the basket-maker for being happier than himself.

With this wicked design he one night gave orders to his servants
(who did not dare to disobey him) to set fire to the rushes which sur-
rounded the poor man's house. As it was summer, and the weather
in that country extremely hot, the fire soon spread over the whole
marsh, and not only consumed all the rushes, but soon extended to
the cottage itself, and the poor basket-maker was obliged to run out
almost naked to save his life.

You may judge of the surprise and grief of the poor man, when he
found himself entirely deprived of his subsistence by the wickedness
of his rich neighbour, whom he had never offended ; but, as he was
unable to punish him for this injustice, he set out and walked on foot
to the chief magistrate of that country, to whom, with many tears, he
told his pitiful case. © The magistrate, who was a good and just man,
immediately ordered the rich man to be brought before him; and
when he found that he could not deny the wickedness of which he



14 THE HISTORY OF

was accused, -he thus spoke to the poor man: ‘As this proud and
wicked man has been puffed up with the opinion of his own import-
ance, and attempted to commit the most scandalous injustice from
his contempt of the poor, I am willing to teach him of how little
value he is to anybody, and how vile and contemptible a creature he
really is; but, for this purpose, it is necessary that you should con-
sent to the plan I have formed, and go with him to the place whither
I intend to send you both.”

The poor man replied, ‘'I never had much; but the little I once
had is now lost by the mischievous disposition of this proud and
oppressive man. Iam entirely ruined; 1 have no means left in the
world of procuring myself a morsel of bread the next time IT am
hungry ; therefore I am ready to go wherever you plese to send
me; and, though I would not treat this man as he has treated me,
yet should I rejoice to teach him more justice and humanity, and to
prevent his injuring the poor a second ‘time.”

The magistrate then ordered them both to be put on board a ship,
and carried to a distant country, which was inhabited by a rude and
savage kind of men, who lived in huts, were strangers to riches, and
got their living by fishing.

As soon as they were set on shore, the sailors left them as they had
been ordered, and the inhabitants of the country came round them
in great numbers. The rich man seeing himself thus exposed, with-
out assistance or defence, in the midst of a barbarous people, whose
language he did not understand, and in whose power he was, began
to cry and wring his hands in the most abject manner ; but the poor
basket-maker, who had always been accustomed to hardships and
dangers from his infancy, made signs to the people that he was their
friend, and was willing io work for them and be their servant. Upon
this the natives made signs to them that they would do them no hurt,
but would make use of their assistance in fishing and carrying wood.

Accordingly, they led them both to a wood at some distance, and
showing them several logs, ordered them to transport them to
their cabins. They both immediately set about their tasks, and
the poor man, who was strong and active, very soon had finished his
share ; while the rich man, whose limbs were tender and delicate,
and never accustomed to any kind of labour, had scarcely done a
quarter as much, The savages, who were witnesses to this, began
to think that the basket-maker would prove very useful to them, and
therefore presented him with a large portion of fish and several of
their choicest roots ; while to the rich man they gave scarcely enough
to support him, because they thought him capable of being of very



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 15

little service to them: however, as he had now fasted several hours,
he ate what they gave him with a better appetite than he had ever
felt before at his own table. "

The next day they were set to work again, and as the basket-
maker had the same advantage over his companion, he was highly
caressed and well treated by the natives, while they showed every
mark of contempt towards the other, whose delicate and luxurious
habits had rendered him very unfit for labour. :

The rich man now began to perceive with how little reason he had
before valued himself, and despised his fellow-creatures; and an
accident that fell out shortly after tended to complete his mortifica-
tion. It happened that one of the savages had found something:like
a fillet, with which he adorned his forehead, and seemed to think
himself extremely fine: the basket-maker, who had perceived this
appearance of vanity, pulled up some reeds, and sitting down to
work, in ashort time finished a very elegant wreath, which he placed
upon the head of the first inhabitant he chanced to meet. This man
was so pleased with his new acquisition, that he danced and capered
with joy, and ran away to seek the rest, who were all- struck with
astonishment at this new and elegant piece of finery. It was not long
before another came to the basket-maker, making signs that he
wanted to be ornamented like his companion ; and with such: plea-
sure were these chaplets considered by the whole nation, that the
basket-maker was released from his former drudgery, and continually
employed in weaving them. In return for the pleasure which he
conferred upon them, the grateful savages brought him every kind
of food their country afforded, built him a hut, and showed him
every demonstration of gratitude and kindness. But the rich man,
who possessed neither talents to please nor strength to labour was
condemned to be the basket-maker's servant, and to cut him reeds
to supply the continual demand for chaplets.

After having passed some months in this manner, they were again
transported to their own country, by the orders of the magistrate, and
brought before him. He then looked sternly upon the rich man, and
said: ‘‘Having now taught you how helpless, contemptible, and
feeble a creature you are, as well as how inferior to the man you in-
sulted, I shall proceed to make reparation to him for the injury you
have inflicted upon him. Did I treat you as you deserve, I should
take from you all the riches that you possess, as you wantonly deprived
this poor man of his whole subsistence; but, hoping that you will
become more humane for the future, I sentence you to give half your
fortune to this man, whom you endeavoured to ruin."



16 THE HISTORY OF

Upon this the basket-maker said, after thanking the magistrate
for his goodness, ‘‘I, having been bred up in poverty, and accus-
tomed to labour, have no desire to acquire riches, which I should
not know how to use; all, therefore, that I require of this man is,
to put me into the same situation I was in before, and to learn more.
humanity.”

The rich man. could not help being astonished at this generosity
and, having acquired wisdom by his misfortunes, not only treated
the basket-maker as a friend during the rest of his life, but employed
his riches in relieving the poor and benefiting his fellow-creatures,

The story being ended, Tommy said it was very pretty ; but that,
had he been the good basket-maker, he would have taken the naughty
rich man's fortune and kept it.

“So would not I,” said Harry, ‘‘for fear of growing as proud, and
wicked, and idle as the other.”

From this time forward Mr. Barlow and his two pupils used con-
stantly to work in their garden every morning ; and when they were
fatigued they retired to the summer-house, where little Harry, who
improved every day in reading, used to entertain them with some
pleasant story or other, which Tommy always listened to with the
greatest pleasure. But little Harry going home for a week, Tommy
and Mr. Barlow were left alone.

The next day, after they had done work, and retired to the sum-
mer-house as usual, Tommy expected Mr. Barlow would read to
him ; but, to his great disappointment, found that he was busy and
could not. The next day the same accident was renewed, and the
day after that. At this Tommy lost all patience, and said to himself,
‘‘Now, if I could but read like little Harry Sandford, I should not
need to ask anybody to do it for me, and then I could divert my-
self: and why (thinks he) may not I do what another has done?
To be sure little Harry is clever; but he could not have read if he
had not been taught; and if I am taught I daresay I shall learn to
read as well as he. Well, as soon as ever he comes home I am
determined to ask him about it.”

The next day little Harry returned, and as soon as Tommy had
an opportunity of being alone with him, ‘‘Pray, Harry,” said
Tommy, ‘how came you to be able to read?”

_ Harry. Why; Mr. Barlow taught me my letters, and then spell-
ing; and then, by putting syllables together, I learnt to read.

Tommy. And could not you show me my letters?

Afarry. Yes, very willingly. ol



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 17

Harry then took up a book, and Tommy was so eager and atten-
tive, that at the very first lesson he learned the whole alphabet: He
was infinitely pleased with his first experiment, and could scarcely
forbear running to Mr. Barlow, to let him know the improvement
he had made ; but he thought he should ‘surprise him more if he said
nothing about the matter till he was able to read a whole story. He
therefore applied himself with such diligence, and little Harry, who
spared no pains.to assist his friend, was so good a master, that in
about two months he determined to surprise Mr. Barlow with a dis- !
play of his talents. Accordingly, one day, when they were all as- .
sembled in the summer-house, and the book was given to Harry,
Tommy stood up and said that if Mr, Barlow pleased, he would try
to read.

“Oh, very willingly,” said Mr. Barlow; “but I should as soon
expect you to fly as to read.”

‘Tommy smiled with a consciousness of his own proficiency, and,
taking up the book, read with great fluency—

THE HISTORY OF THE TWO DOGS.

In a part of the world where there are many strong and fierce wild
beasts, a poor man happened to bring up two puppies, of that kind
which is most valued for size and courage. As they appeared to
possess more than common strength and agility, he thought that he
should make an acceptable present to his landlord, who was a rich
man, living in a great city, by giving him one of them, which was
called Jowler; while he brought up the other, named Keeper, to
guard his own flocks.

From this time the manner of living was entirely altered between
the brother whelps. Jowler was sent into a plentiful kitchen, where
he quickly became the favourite of the servants, who diverted them-
selves with his little tricks and wanton gambols, and rewarded him
with great quantities of pot-liquor and broken victuals; by which
means, as he was stuffing from morning till night, he increased con-
siderably in size, and grew sleek and comely ; he was, indeed, rather
unwieldy, and so cowardly that he would run away from a dog only
half as big as himself: he was much addicted to gluttony, and was
often beaten for the thefts he committed jn the pantry ; but, as he
had learned to fawn upon the footmen, and would stand upon his
hind legs to beg when he was ordered, and, besides this, would
fetch and carry, he was mightily caressed by all the neighbourhood.

2



18 THE HISTORY OF

Keeper, in the meantime, who lived at a cottage in the country,
neither fared so well, looked so plump, nor had learned all these
little tricks to recommend him; but as his master was too poor to
maintain anything but what was useful, and was obliged to be con-
tinually in the air, subject to all kinds of weather, and labouring hard
for a livelihood, Keeper grew hardy, active, and diligent ; he was
also exposed to continual danger from the wolves, from whom he.
had received many a severe bite while guarding the flocks. These
continual combats gave him that degree of intrepidity, that no
enemy could make him tum his back. His care and assiduity so
well defended the sheep of his master, that not one had ever been
missing since they were placed under his protection. His honesty,
too, was so great, that no temptation could overpower it; and,
though he was left alone in the kitchen while the meat was roasting,
he never attempted to taste it, but received with thankfulness what-
ever his master chose to give him. From a continual life in the air,
he was become so hardy that no tempest could drive him to shelter
when he ought to be watching the flocks ; and he would plunge into
the most rapid river, in the coldest weather of the winter, at the
slightest sign from his master.

About this time it happened that the landlord of the poor man
went to examine his estate in the country, and brought Jowler with
him to the place of his birth. At his arrival there he could not help
viewing with great contempt the rough ragged appearance of Keeper,
and his awkward look, which discovered nothing of the address for
which he so much admired Jowler. This opinion, however, was
altered by means of an accident which happened to him. As he
was one day walking in a thick wood, with no other company than
the two dogs, a hungry wolf, with eyes that sparkled like fire, brist-
ling hair, and a horrid snarl that made the gentleman tremble,
rushed out of a neighbouring thicket, and seemed ready to devour
him. The unfortunate man gave himself over for lost, more espe-
‘cially when he saw that his faithful Jowler, instead of coming to his
assistance, ran sneaking away, with his tail between his legs, howling
with fear. But in this moment of despair, the undaunted Keeper,
who had followed him humbly and unobserved at a distance, flew
to his assistance, and attacked the wolf with so much courage and
skill, that he was compelled to exert all his strength in his own de-
fence. ‘The battle was long and bloody, but in the end Keeper laid
the wolf dead at his feet, though not without receiving several severe
wounds himself, and presenting a bloody and mangled spectacle to
the eyes of his master, who came up at that instant. The gentle-



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 1

man was filled with joy for his escape and gratitude to his brave
deliverer ; and learned by his own experience that appearances are
not always to be trusted, and that great virtues and good disposi-
tions may sometimes be found where we least expect them.

“Very well, indeed,” said Mr. Barlow. ‘‘I find that when young
gentlemen choose to take pains, they can do things almost as well as
other people. But what do you say to the story you have been
reading, Tommy? Would you rather have owned the genteel dog
that left his master to be devoured, or the poor, rough, ragged.
meagre, neglected cur that exposed his own life in his defence?”

‘Indeed, sir,” said Tommy, ‘I would have rather had Keeper ;
but then I would have fed him, and washed him, and combed him,
till he had looked as well as Jowler."

“But then, perhaps, he would have grown idle, and fat, and
cowardly, like him,” said Mr. Barlow. ‘But here is some more of
it, let us read to the end of the story.”

Tommy then went on thus :—

The gentleman was so pleased with the noble behaviour of Keeper,
that he desired the poor man to make him a present of the dog;
which, though with some reluctance, he complied with. Keeper was
therefore taken to the city, where he was caressed and fed by every-
body, and the disgraced Jowler was left at the cottage, with strict
injunctions to the man to hang him up, as a worthless unprofitable
cur.

As soon as the gentleman had departed, the poor man was going
to execute his commission ; but considering the noble size and comely
look of the dog, and above all, being moved with pity for the poor
animal, who wagged his tail, and licked his new master’s feet, just
as he was putting the cord about his neck, he determined to, spare
his life, and see whether a different treatment might not produce
different manners. From this day Jowler was in every respect treated
as his brother Keeper had been before. He was fed but scantily ;
and from this spare diet soon grew more active and fond of exercise.
The first shower he was in he ran away as he had been accustomed
to do, and sneaked to the fireside ; but the farmer's wife soon drove
him out of doors, and compelled him to bear the rigour of the
weather. In consequence of this he daily became more vigorous and
hardy, and in a few months regarded cold and rain no more than if
he had been brought up in the country.

Changed as he already was in many respects for the better, he still
992

“a



20 THE HISTORY OF

retained an insurmountable dread of wild beasts; till one day, as he
was wandering through a wood alone, he was attacked by a large
and fierce wolf, who, jumping out of a thicket, seized him by the
neck with fury. Jowler would fain have run, but his enemy was too
swift and violent to suffer him to escape. Necessity makes even.
cowards brave. Jowler being thus stopped in his retreat, turned
upon his enemy, and very luckily seizing him by the throat, strangled
him in an instant. His master then coming up, and being witness
of his exploit, praised him, and stroked him witha degree of fondness
he had never done before. Animated by this victory, and by the
approbation of his master, Jowler from that time became as brave as
he had before been. pusillanimous ; and there was very soon no dog
in the country who was so great a terror to beasts of prey. .

In the meantime Keeper, instead of hunting wild beasts or looking
after sheep, did nothing but eat and sleep, which he was permitted
to do, from a remembrance of his past services. As all qualities both
of mind and body are lost if not continually exercised, he soon ceased.
to be that hardy, courageous animal he was before, and acquired all *
the faults which are the consequences of idleness and gluttony.

About this time the gentleman went again into the country, and
taking his dog with him, was willing that he should exercise his
prowess once more against his ancient enemies the wolves, Ac-
cordingly, the country people having quickly found one in a neigh-
bouring wood, the gentleman went thither with Keeper, expecting
to see him behave as he had done the year before. But how great
was his surprise when, at the first onset, he saw his beloved dog run
away with every mark of timidity! At this moment another dog
sprang forward, and seizing the wolf with the greatest intrepidity,
after a bloody contest, left him dead upon the ground. The gentlé-
man could not help lamenting the cowardice of his favourite, and
admiring the noble spirit of the other dog, whom, to his infinite sur-
prise, he found to be the same Jowler that he had discarded the
year before.

‘«T now see,” said he to the farmer, ‘‘that it is in vain to expect
courage in those who live a life of indolence and repose, and that
constant exercise and proper discipline are frequently able to change
contemptible characters into good ones,”

‘‘Indeed," said Mr. Barlow, when the story was ended, ‘‘I am
sincerely glad to find that Tommy has made this acquisition. He
will now depend upon nobody, but be able to divert himself when-
ever he pleases. All that has ever been written in our own language



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 2r

will be from this time in his power, whether he chooses to read little
entertaining stories like what we have heard to-day, or to read the
actions of great and good men in history, or to make himself ac-
quainted with the nature of wild beasts and birds which are found
in other countries, and have been described in books, In short, I
scarcely know of anything which from this moment will not be in his
power, and I do not despair of one day seeing him a very sensible
man, capable of teaching and instructing others.” ‘ ,

“Yes,” said Tommy, something elated by all this praise, ‘Iam
determined to make myself as clever as anybody ; and I don't doubt,
though I am such a little fellow, that I know more already than
many grown-up people; and I am sure, though there are no less
than six blacks in our house, that there is not one of them who can
read a story like me.”

Mr. Barlow looked a little grave at this sudden display of vanity,
and said rather coolly, '‘ Pray, who has attempted to teach them
anything ?"

“Nobody, I believe,” said Tommy,

“Where is the great wonder, then, if they are ignorant?” replied
Mr. Barlow: ‘you would probably have never known anything had
you not been assisted ; and even now you know very little.”

In this manner did Mr. Barlow begin the education of Tommy
Merton, who had naturally very good dispositions, although he had
been suffered to acquire many bad habits, that sometimes prevented
them from appearing. He was in particular very passionate, and
thought he had a right to command everybody that was not dressed
as fine as himself. “This opinion often led him into inconveniences,
and once was the occasion of his being severely mortified.

This accident happened in the following manner :—One day as
Tommy was striking a ball with his bat, he struck it over a hedge
into an adjoining field, and seeing a little ragged boy walking along
on that side, he ordered him, ina very peremptory tone, to bring it to
him. The little boy, without taking any notice of what was said,
walked on, and left the ball; upon which Tommy called out more
loudly than before, and asked if he did not hear what was said.

“Yes,” said the boy, '‘for the matter of that I am not deaf.”

“Oh! you are not?” replied Tommy ; ‘‘then bring me my hall
directly,” 2
‘I don’t choose it,” said'the boy.

‘“But,” sdid Tommy, ‘if I come to you, I shall make you choose
!

it. :
‘Perhaps not, my pretty little master,” said the boy.



a

22 VHE HISTORY OF

“You little rascal!” said Tommy, who now began to be very
angry, ‘‘if I come over the hedge, 1 will thrash you within an inch
of your life.”

To this the other made no answer but by a Joud laugh, which pro-
voked Tommy so much that he clambered over the hedge and jumped
precipitately down, intending to have leaped into the field ; but un-
fortunately his foot slipped, and down he rolled into a wet ditch,
which was full of mud and water. There poor Tommy tumbled
about for some time, endeavouring to get out ; but it was to no pur-
pose, for his feet stuck in the mud or slipped off from the bank ; his
fine waistcoat was dirtied all over, his white stockings covered with
mire, his breeches filled with puddle-water ; and, to add to his dis-
tress, he first lost one shoe and then the other—his laced hat tumbled
off from his head and was completely spoiled. In. this distress he
must probably have remained a considerable time, had not the little
ragged boy taken pity on him and helped him out. Tommy was so
vexed and ashamed that he could not say a word, but ran home in
such a plight that Mr. Barlow, who happened to meet him, was
afraid he had been considerably hurt ; but when he heard the accident
which had happened, he could not help smiling, and he advised
Tommy to be careful for the future how he attempted to thrash little
tagged boys.

The next day Mr. Barlow desired Harry, when they were all to-
gether in the arbour, to read the following story of—

ANDROCLES AND THE LION.

THERE was a certain slave named Androcles, who was so ill treated
by his master that his life became insupportable. Finding no remedy
for what he suffered, he at length said to himself,—''It is better to
die than to continue to live in such hardships and misery as 1 am
obliged to suffer. Iam determined, therefore, to run away from my
master. If I am taken again, I know that I shall be punished with
a cruel death ; but it is better to die at once than to live in misery.
If I escape, I must betike myself to deserts and woods, inhabited
only by beasts ; but they cannot use me more. cruelly than I have
been used by my fellow-creatures ; therefore I will rather trust my-
self with them, than continue to be a miserable slave.”

Having formed this resolution, he took an opportunity of leaving
his master’s house, and hid himself in a thick forest, which was at
some miles distance from the city. But here the unhappy man found





ANDROCLES AND THE LION,—p, 22



at

SANDFORD AND MERTON. 23

that he hadonly escaped from one kind of misery to experience another.
He wandered about all day through a vast and trackless wood, where
his flesh was continually torn by thorns and brambles : he grew
hungry, but could find no food in this dreary solitude! At length
he was ready to die with fatigue, and lay down in despair in a large
cavern which he found by accident.

‘Poor man!” said Harry, whose little heart could scarcely con-
tain itself at this mournful recital, ‘1 wish I could have met with
him; I.would have given him all my dinner, and he should have
had my bed. But pray, sir, tell me why does one man behave so
cruelly to another, and why should one person be the servant of
another, and bear so much ill treatment?”

“As to that,” said Tommy, ‘‘some folks are born gentlemen, and
then they must command others ; and some are born servants, and
then they must do as they are bid. 1 remember, before I came
hither, that there were a great many black men and women, that my
mother said were only born to wait upon me; and I used to beat them,
and kick them, and throw things at them whenever I was angry ;
and they never dared strike me again, because they were slaves,” *

“And pray, young man,” said Mr. Barlow, “how came these
people to be slaves?”

Tommy. Because my father bought them with his money.

Mr. Barlow. So, then, people that are bought with money are
slaves, are they?

Tommy. Yes,

Mr. Barlow. And those that buy them have a right to kick them,
and beat them, and do as they please with them?

Tommy. Yes.

Mr. Barlow. Then if I was to take and sell you to Farmer Sand-
ford, he would have a right to do what he pleased with you.

‘No, sir,” said Tommy, somewhat warmly ; ‘‘ but you would have
no right to sell me, nor he to buy me."

Ur, Barlow. Then it is nota person’s being bought or sold that
gives another aright to use him ill, but one person's having aright to
sell another, and the man who buys having a right to purchase?

Tommy. Yes, sir.

Mr. Barlow. And what right have the people who sold the poor
negroes f9. your father to sell them, or what right had your father to
buy them ? ‘

% At the period when Tommy Merton lived, slavery was not abolished in our West
Indian possessions.—[ EDITOR. ]



24 THE HISTORY OF

Here Tommy seemed to be a good deal puzzled, but at length he
said, ‘They are brought from a country that is a great way off, in
ships, and so they become slaves."

“Then,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘if I take you to another country in a
ship, I shall have a right to sell you?”

fommy. No, but you won't, sir, because I was born a gentleman.

‘Wr. Barlow. What do you mean by that, Tommy ?

‘‘Why,” said Tommy, a little confounded, ‘‘ to have a fine house
and fine clothes, and a coach and a great deal of money, as my papa
has.”

Mr. Barlow, Then it you were no longer to have a fine house, nor
fine clothes, nor a great deal of money, somebody that had all these
things might make you a slave, and use you ill, and beat you, and
insult you, and do whatever he liked with you ?

Tommy. No, sir, that would not be right neither, that anybody
should use me ill.

Mr. Barlow, Then one person should not use another ill?

Tommy. No, sir. .

Ur, Barlow, To make a slave of anybody is to use him ill, is it
not?

Tommy. I think so.

Alr, Barlow. ‘Then no one ought to make a slave of you?

Tommy. No, indeed, sir.

Mr, Barlow. But if no one should use another ill, and making a
slave is using him ill, neither ought you to make a slave of any one
else. ; ‘

Tommy. Indeed, sir, I think not; and for the future I never will
. use our black William ill, nor pinch him, nor kick him, as I used to
do.

Mr, Barlow. Then you will be a very good boy. But let us now
continue our story.

This unfortunate man had not Jain long quiet in the cavern before
he heard a dreadful! noise, which seemed to be the roar of some wild
beast, and terrified him very much. He started up with a design to
escape, and had already reached the mouth of the cave, when he saw
coming towards him a lion of prodigious size, who prevented any pos-
sibility of retreat. The unfortunate man now believed his destruction
to be inevitable ; but, to his great astonishment, the beast advanced
towards him with a gentle pace, without any mark of enmity or rage,
and uttered a kind of mournful voice, as if he demanded the assist-
ance of the man.



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 25

Androcles, who was naturally of a resolute disposition, acquired
courage from this circumstance to examine his monstrous guest, who
gave him sufficient leisure for that purpose. He saw, as the lion
approached him, that he seemed to limp upon one of his legs, and
that the foot was extremely swelled, as if it had been wounded,
Acquiring still more fortitude from the gentle demeanour of the
beast, he advanced up to him, and took hold of the wounded paw,
as a surgeon would examine a patient. He then perceived that a
thorn of uncommon size had penetrated the ball of the foot, and was
the occasion of the swelling and lameness which he had observed.
Androcles found that the beast, far from resenting this familiarity,
received it with the greatest gentleness, and seemed to invite him by
his blandishments to proceed. He therefore extracted the thorn,
and, pressing the swelling, discharged a considerable quantity of
matter, which had been the cause of so much pain and uneasiness,

As soon as the beast felt himself thus relieved, he began to testify
his joy and gratitude by every expression within his power. He
Jumped about like a wanton spaniel, wagged his enormous tail, and
licked’ the feet and hands of his physician. Nor was he contented
with these demonstrations of kindness: from this moment Andro-
cles became his guest ; nor did the lion ever sally forth in quest of
prey without bringing home the produce of his chase, and sharing
it with his friend. In this savage state of hospitality did the man
continue to live during the space of several months. At length,
wandering unguardedly through the woods, he met with a company
of soldiers sent out to apprehend him, and was by them taken
prisoner and conducted back to his master. The laws of that
country being very severe against slaves, he was tried and found
guilty of having fled from his master, and, as a punishment for his
pretended crime, he was sentenced to be torn in pieces by a furious
lion, kept many days without food, to inspire him with additional
Tage.

When the destined moment arrived, the unhappy man was ex-
posed, unarmed, in the midst of a spacious area, enclosed on every
side, round which many thousand people were assembled to view:
the mournful spectacle.

Presently a dreadful yell was heard, which struck the spectators
with horror ; and a monstrous lion rushed out of a den, which was
purposely set open, and darted forward with erected mane and
flaming eyes, and jaws that gaped like an open sepulchre. A mourn-
ful silence instantly prevailed! All eyes were directly turned upon
the destined victim, whose destruction now appeared inevitable.



26 THE HISTORY OF

But the pity of the multitude was soon converted into astonishment,
when they beheld the lion, instead of destroying his defenceless prey,
crouch submissively at his feet, fawn upon him as a faithful dog
would do upon his master, and rejoice over him as a mother that
unexpectedly recovers her offspring. The governor of the town, who
was present, then called out with a loud voice, and ordered Andro-
cles to explain to them this unintelligible mystery, and how a savage
of the fiercest and most unpitying nature should thus in a moment
have forgotten his innate disposition, and be converted into a harm-
less and inoffensive animal.

Androcles then related to the assembly every circumstance of his
adventures in the woods, and concluded by saying, that the very
lion which now stood before them had been his friend and entertainer
in the woods. All the persons present were astonished and delighted
with the story, to find that even the fiercest beasts are capable of
being softened by gratitude and moved by humanity; and they
unanimously joined to entreat for the pardon of the unhappy man
from the governor of the place. This was immediately granted to
him; and he was also presented with the lion, who had in this
manner twice saved the life of Androcles.

‘*Upon my word,” said Tommy, ‘‘ this is a very pretty story ; but
I never should have thought that a lion could have grown so tame :
I thought that they, and tigers, and wolves, had been so fierce and
cruel that they would haye torn everything they met to pieces.”

‘““When they are hungry,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘they kill every
animal they meet: but this is to devour it; for they can only live
upon flesh, like dogs and cats, and many other kinds of animals.
When they are not hungry they seldom meddle with anything, or do
unnecessary mischief; therefore they are much less cruel than many
persons that I have seen, and even than many children, who plague
and torment animals, without any reason whatsoever.”

“Indeed, sir,” said Harry, ‘I think so. And 1 remember, as I
was walking along the road some days past, I saw a little naughty
boy that used a poor jackass very ill indeed. The poor animal was
so lame that he could hardly stir; and yet the boy beat him with a
great stick as violently as he was able, to make him go on faster.”

‘* And what did you say to him?” said Mr. Barlow.

Harry. Why, sir, I told him how naughty and cruel it was; and
T asked him how he would like to be beaten in that manner by some-
body that was stronger than himself.

Myr. Barlow, And what answer did he make you?



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 27

flarry. He said that it was his daddy's ass, and so that he hada
right to beat it; and that-if I said a word more he would beat me.

Afr, Barlow, And what answer did you make—any ?

Harry. 1 told him, if it was his father’s ass, he should not use it
ill; for that we were all God's creatures, and that we should love
each other, as He loved us all ; and that as to beating me, if he struck
me I had a right to strike him again, and would do it, though he was
almost as big again as I was.

Mr. Barlow, And did he strike you?

flarry. Yes, sir. He endeavoured to strike me upon the head
with his stick, but I dodged, and so it fell upon my shoulder; and
he was going to strike me again, but 1 darted at him, and knocked
him down, and then he began blubbering, and begged me not to hurt
him.

Mr. Barlow. It is not uncommon for those who are most cruel to
be at the same time most cowardly ; but what did you?

Harry. Six, L told him I did not want to hurt him; but that as he
had meddled with me, I would not let him rise till he had promised
not to hurt the poor beast any more, which he did, and then I let
him go about his business,

“You did very right,” said Mr. Barlow. ‘ And I suppose the boy
looked as foolish, when he was rising, as Tommy did the other day
when the little ragged boy that he was going to beat helped him out
of the ditch.”

“Sir,” answered Tommy, a little confused, ‘‘I should not have
attempted to beat him, only he would not bring me my ball.”

: ear ee And what right had you to oblige him to bring your
ball?

Tommy. He was a little ragged boy, and I am a gentleman.

Mr. Barlow. So then, every gentleman has a right to command
little ragged boys?

Tommy. To be sure, sir.

ur. Barlow. Then if your clothes should wear out and become
ragged, every gentleman will have a right to command you?

_ Tommy: looked a little foolish, and said, ‘‘ But he might have done
it, as he was on that side of the hedge.”

ur. Barlow. And so he probably would have done if you had
asked him civilly to do it; but when persons speak in a haughty tone,
they will ind few inclined to serve them. But, as the boy was poor
and ragged, I suppose you hired him with money to fetch your ball?

Tommy, Indeed, sir, I did not; I neither gave him anything nor
offered him anything.



28 THE HISTORY OF

Mr. Barlow, Probably you had nothing to give him?

Tommy. Yes, I had, though; I had ail this money (pulling out
several shillings). ‘

Mr. Barlow. Perhaps the boy was as rich as you?

Tommy. No, he was not, sit, 1am sure; for he had no coat, and
his waistcoat and breeches were all tattered and ragged ; besides, he
had no stockings, and his shoes were full of holes,

Mr. Barlow. So, now I see what constitutes a gentleman. A gen-
tleman is one that, when he has abundance of everything, keeps it
all to himself; beats poor people if they don't serve him for nothing;
and when they have done him the greatest favour, in spite of his in-
solence, never feels any gratitude, or does them any good in return.
I find that Androcles' lion was no gentleman.

Tommy was so affected with this rebuke that he could hardly con-
tain his tears; and, as he was really a boy of a generous temper, he
determined to give the little ragged boy something the very first time
he should see him again. He did not long wait for an opportunity;
for, as he was walking out that very afternoon, he saw him at some
distance gathering blackberries, and, going up to him, accosted him
thus :—

‘« Little boy, I want to know why you are so ragged: have you no
other clothes?” .

‘No, indeed,” said the boy. ‘‘I have seven brothers and sisters,
and they are all as ragged as myself; but I should not much mind
that if I could have food enough.”

Tommy. And why cannot you have food enough? .

Little Boy. Because daddy's ill of a fever, and can't work this har-
vest. So that mammy says we must all starve if God Almighty does
not take care of us. b

Tommy made no answer, but ran full speed to the house, whence
he presently returned, loaded with a loaf of bread and a complete
suit of his own clothes.

‘* Here, little boy,” said he, ‘‘ you were very good-natured to me ;
and so I will give you all this, because I am a gentleman, and have
many niore.”

Tommy did not wait for the little boy's acknowledgment, but
hastened away, and told Mr. Barlow, with an air of exultation, what
he had done. .

Mr. Barlow coolly answered, ‘‘ You have done well in giving the
little boy clothes, because they are your own; but what right have
you to give away my loaf of bread without asking my consent?

Tommy. Why, sir, I did it because the little boy said he was very



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 29

hungry, and had seven brothers and sisters, and that his father was
ill and could not work.

Mr, Barlow, This is avery good reason why you should give them
what belongs to yourself, but not why you should give them what is
another's, What would you say if Harry were to give away all your
clothes without asking your leave?

Tommy. I should not like it at all; and I will not give away your
things any more without asking your leave. ;

‘* You will do well," said Mr. Barlow; ‘and here is a little story
you may read upon this very subject.”

THE STORY OF CYRUS.

Cyrus was a little boy of good dispositions and humane temper.
He was very fond of drawing, and often went into the fields for the
purpose of taking sketches of trees, houses, &c., which he would
show to his parents. On one occasion he had retired into a shed at
the back of his father's house, and was so much absorbed in plan-
ning something with his compasses, as not to be for a long time
aware of his father's presence. He had several masters, who en-
deavoured to teach him everything that was good; and he was
educated with several little boys about his own age. One evening
his father asked him what he had done or learned that day.

“Sir,” said Cyrus, ‘1 was ppnished to-day for deciding unjustly.”

‘‘How so?” said his father.

Cyrus. There were two boys, one of whom was a great and the
other a little'boy. Now, it happened that the little boy had a coat
that was much too big for him, but the great boy had one that
scarcely reached below his middle, and was too tight for him in every
part ; upon which the great boy proposed to the little boy to change
coats with him, ‘‘ because then,” said he, ‘‘ we shall be both exact! ly
fitted ; for your coat is as much too big for you as mine is too little
for me.”

The little boy would not consent to the proposal, on which the
great boy took his.coat away by force, and gave his own to the little
boy in exchange. While they were disputing upon this subject I
chanced to pass by, and they agreed to make me judge of the affair,
But I decided that the little boy should keep the little coat, and the
great boy the great one—for which judgment my master punished me.

‘‘Why so?” said Cyrus's father; ‘was not the little coat most
proper for the little boy, and the large coat for the great boy?”



30 , THE HISTORY OF

“Yes, sir,” answered Cyrus; ‘but my master told me I was not
made judge to examine which coat best fitted either of the boys, but
to decide whether it was just that the great boy should take away
the coat of the little one against his consent ; and therefore I decided
unjustly, and deserved to be punished.”

Just as the story was finished, they were surprised to see a little
ragged boy come running up to them with a bundle of clothes under
his arm. His eyes were black, as if he had been severely beaten, his
nose was swelled, his shirt was bloody, and his waistcoat did but
just hang upon his back, so much was it torn. He came running up
to Tommy, and threw down the bundle before him, saying, '‘ Here,
master, take your clothes again ; and I wish they hac been at the
bottom of the ditch I pulled you out of, instead of upon my back ;
but I never will put such frippery on again as long as I have breath
in my body.” >

“What's the matter?” said Mr. Barlow, who perceived that some

‘unfortunate accident had happened in consequence of Tommy's
present. .

"Sir," answered the little boy, ‘‘ my little master here was going
to beat me, because I would not fetch his ball. Now, as to the
matter of that, I would have brought his ball with all my heart, if
he had but asked me civilly. But though I am poor, 1 am not bound
to be his slave, as they say black William is; and so I would not;
upon which little master here was jumping over the hedge to lick
me; but, instead of that, he soused into the ditch, and there he lay
rolling about till I helped him out; and so he gave me these clothes
here, all out of good-will; and I put them on, like a fool as I was,
for they are all made of silk, and look so fine, that all the little boys
followed me, and hallooed as I went; and Jack Dowset threw a
handful of dirt at me, and dirtied me all over. ‘Oh!’ says I,
‘Jacky, are you at that work?’—and with that I hit him a good
thump, and sent him roaring away. But Billy Gibson and Ned Kelly
came up, and said I Jooked like a Frenchman; and so we began
fighting, and I beat them till they both gave out; but I don’t choose
to be hallooed after wherever I go, and to look like a Frenchman;
and so I have brought master his clothes again.”

Mr. Barlow asked the little boy where his father lived; and he
told him that his: father lived about two. miles off, across the com-
mon, at the end of Runny Lane; on which Mr. Barlow told Harry
that he would send the poor man some broth and victuals if he
would carry it when it was ready.



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 3z

“That I will,” said Harry, ‘‘if it were five times as far.”

So Mr. Barlow went into the house to give orders about it.

In the meantime Tommy, who had eyed the little boy for some
time in silence, said, ‘‘So, my poor boy, you have been beaten and
hurt till you are all over blood, only because I gave you my clothes.
Tam really very sorry for it.”

‘' Thank you, little master,” said the boy, ‘‘ but it can’t be helped.
You did not intend me any hurt, I know; and I am not such a
chicken as to mind a beating ; so I wish you a good afternoon with
all my heart.”

As soon as the little boy was gone, Tommy said, ‘‘T wish I had
but some clothes that the poor boy could wear, for he seems very
good-natured ; I would give them to him.” Z .

‘That you may very easily have,” said Harry, ‘‘ for there is a shop
in the village hard by where they sell all manner of clothes for the
poor people ; and as you have money, you may easily buy some.”

Harry and Tommy then agreed to go early the next morning to
buy some clothes for the poor children. And when they reached the
village, Tommy laid out all his money, amounting to fifteen shillings
and sixpence, in buying some clothes for the little ragged boy and
his brothers, which were made up in a bundle and given to him; but
he desired Harry to carry them for him.

“That I will,” said Harry; ‘‘but why don’t you choose to carry
them yourself?” 3

Tommy. Why, it is not fit fora gentleman to carry things him--
self.

Harry. Why, what hurt does it do him, if he is but strong
enough ?

Tommy. 1 do not know ; but I believe it is that he may not look
like the common people.

Harry, Then he should not have hands, or feet, or ears, or mouth,
because the common people have the same.

Tommy. No, no; he must have all these, because they are useful.

Harry. And is it not useful to be able to do things for ourselves?

Tommy. Yes; but gentlemen have others to do what they want for
them. ;

Harry, Then I should think it must be a bad thing to bea gentle-
man.

Tommy. Why so?

Hlarry, Because, if all were gentlemen, nobody would do anything,
and then we should be all starved.

Tommy. Starved !



32 THE HISTORY OF

Harry, Yes: why, you could not live, could you, without bread ?

Tommy. No; I know that very well.

ffarry, And bread is made of a plant that grows in the earth, and
it is called wheat.

Tommy. Why, then I would gather it and eat it.

flarry. Then you must do something for yourself ; but that would
not do, for wheat is a small hard grain, like the oats which you have
sometimes given to Mr. Barlow's horse ; and you would not like to
eat them. .

Tommy. No, certainly ; but how comes bread, then?

flarry.’ Why, they send the corn to the mill.

Tommy, What is a mill? :

flarry. What! did you never see a mill?

Tommy. No, never ; but I should like to see one, that I may know
how they make bread.

larry. There is one at a little distance; and if you ask Mr,
Barlow, he will go with you, for he knows the miller very well,

Tommy. That I will, for I should like to see them make bread.

As it was not far out of their way, they agreed to call at the poor
man's cottage, whom they found much better, as Mr. Barlow had
been there the preceding night, and given him such medicines as he
judged proper for his disease. Tommy then asked for the little boy,
and on his coming in, told him that he had now brought him some
clothes which he might wear without fear of being called a French-
man, as well as some more for his little brothers. ‘The pleasure with
which they were received was so great, and the acknowledgments
and blessings of the good woman and poor man, who had just begun
to sit up, were so many, that little Tommy could not help shedding
tears of compassion, in which he was joined by Harry. As they were
returning, Tommy said that he had never spent any money with sa
much pleasure as that with which he had purchased clothes for this
poor family, and that for the future he would take care of all the
money that was given him for that purpose, instead of laying it out
in eatables and playthings.

Some days after this, as Mr. Barlow and the two boys were walk-
ing out together, they happened to pass near a windmill ; and, upon
Harry's telling Tommy what it was, Tommy desired leave to go into
it and look at it. Mr. Barlow consented to this, and being acquainted
with the miller, they all went in and examined every part of it with
great curiosity ; and there little Tommy saw with astonishment that
the sails of the mill, being constantly turned round by the wind,
moved a great flat stone, which by rubbing upon another stone,



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 33

bruised all the corn that was put between them till it became a fine
powder. : steer

‘Oh, dear !" said Tommy, ‘‘is this the way they make bread?"

Mr. Barlow told him this was the method by which the corn was
prepared for making bread ; but that many other things were neces-
sary before it arrived at that state. ‘‘ You see that what mins from
these millstones is only a fine powder, very different from bread,
which is a solid and tolerably hard substance.”

As they were going home Tommy said to Harry, ‘‘So you see
now, if nobody chose to work, or do anything for himself, we should
have no bread to eat; but you could not even have the corn to make
it of without a great deal of pains and labour. é

Tommy, Why not? does not corn grow in the ground itself?

Harry, Corn grows in the ground; but then first it is necessary
to plough the ground, to break it to pieces.

Lommy, What is ploughing ?

Harry. Did you never see three or four horses drawing something
along the fields in a straight line, while one man drove, and another
walked behind holding the thing by two handles ?

Tommy, Yes, 1 have. And is that ploughing?

flarry, Tt is; and there is a sharp iron underneath, which runs
into the ground and turns it up all the way it goes.

Tommy, Well, and what then?

larry. When the ground is thus prepared, they sow the seed all
over it, and then they rake it over to cover the seed, and then the
seed begins to grow, and shoots up very high; and at last the corn
tipens, and they reap it and carry it home.

Tommy. That must be very curious! I should like to sow some
seed myself, and see it grow: do you think I could?

ffarry. Yes, certainly; and if you will dig the ground to-morrow,
I will go home to my father in order to procure some seed for
you. :

The next morning Tommy was up almost as soon as it was light,
and wert to work in a corner of the garden, where he dug with great
perseverance till breakfast: when he came in, he could not help tell-
ing Mr, Barlow what he had done, and asking him whether he was
not a very good boy for working so hard to raise corn.

“That,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘ depends upon the use you intend to
make of it when you have raised it: what is it you intend doing with
it?”

“Why, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘I intend to send it to the mill that we
saw, and have it ground into flour; and then I will get you to show

3



34 THE HISTORY OF
me hew to make bread of it, and then I will eat it, that 1 may tell
my father that I have eaten bread out of corn of my own sowing.”

“That will be very well done,” said Mr. Barlow; ‘' but where will
be the great goodness that you sow corn for your own eating? That
is no more than all the people round continually do, and if they did
not do it they would be obliged to fast."

“But then,” said Tommy, ‘‘ they are nat gentlemen, as I am.”

‘“What, then,” answered Mr, Barlow, ‘‘must not gentlemen eat
as well as others, and therefore is it not for their interest to know
how to procure food as well as other people?”

“Yes, sir,” answered Tommy; ‘‘ but they can have other people
to raise it for them, so that they are not obliged to work for them-
selves.”

«« How does that happen?” said Mr. Barlow

Tommy. Why, sir, they pay other people to work for them, or buy
bread when it is made, as much as they want.

Mr. Barlow. Then they pay for it with money?

Tommy, Ves, sit.

Mr. Barlow. Then they must have money before they can buy
corn ?

Tommy. Certainly, sir.

Mr. Barlow. But have all gentlemen money?

Tommy hesitated some time at this question; at last he said, ‘‘I
believe not always, sir."

Mr. Barlow. Why, then, if they have not money, they will find it
difficult to procure corn, unless they raise it for themselves.

“Indeed,” said Tommy, ‘‘I believe they will; for perhaps they
may not find anybody good-natured enough to give it them.”

“But,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘tas we are talking on this subject, I will
tell you a story that I heard a little time past, if you choose ta hear
it.”

Tommy said he should be very glad if Mr. Barlow would take the
trouble of telling it to him, and Mr. Barlow told him the following
history of

THE TWO BROTHERS.

Axourt the time that many people went over to South America, with
the hopes of finding gold and silver, there was a Spaniard, whose
name was Pizarro, who had a great inclination to try his fortune like
the rest; but as he had an elder brother, for whom he had a very
great affection, he went to him, told him his design, and solicited him



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 35

very: much to.go.along with him, promising him that he should have
an equal share of all the riches they found. The brother, whose narac
was Alonzo, was aman of a contented temper and a good under-
standing ; he did not, therefore, much approve of the project, and
endeavoured to dissuade Pizarro from it, by setting before him the
danger to which he exposed himself, and the uncertainty of his suc-
ceeding ; but finding all that he said was vain, he agreed to go with
him, but told him at the same time that he wanted no part of the
riches which he might find, and would ask no other favour than to
have his baggage and a few. servants taken on board the vessel with
him. Pizarro then sold all that he had, bought a vessel, and em-
barked with several other adventurers, who had all great expectations,
like himself, of soon becoming rich. As to Alonzo, he took nothing
with him but a few ploughs,-harrows, and other tools, and some
corn, together with a large quantity of potatoes, and some seeds of
different vegetables, Pizarro thought these very odd preparatiqns
for a voyage ; but as he did not think proper to expostulate with his
brother, he said nothing.

After sailing some time with prosperous winds, they put into the
last port where they were ta stop, before they came to the country
where they were to search for gold. Here Pizarro bought a great
number more of pickaxes, shovels, and various other tools for digging,
melting, and refining the gold he expected to find, besides hiring an
additional number of labourers to assist him in the work, Alonzo,

* en the contrary, bought only a few sheep, and four stout oxen, with

their harness, and food enough to subsist them till they should
arrive at land.
__ As it happened, they met with a favourable voyage, and all landed
in perfect health in America, Alonzo then told his brother that, as he
had only come to accompany and serve him, he would stay near the
shore with his servants and cattle, while he went to search for gold,
and when he had acquired as much as he desired, should be always
ready to embark for Spain with him. E

Pizarro accordingly: set out, not without feeling so great a contempt
for his brother, that he could not help expressing it to his com-
panions. s .

“T always thought,” said he, ‘that my brother had been a man
of sense ; he bore that character in Spain, but I find people were
strangely mistaken in him. Here he is going to divert himself with
his sheep and his oxen, as if he was living quietly upon his farm
at home, and had nothing else to do than to raise cucumbers and
melons, But-we know better what to do with our time ; so, come

3-—2



36 THE HISTORY OF

along, my lads, and if we have but good luck, we shall soon be en-
tiched for the rest of our lives,"

All that were present applauded Pizarro’s speech, and declared
themselves ready to follow wherever he went ; only one old Spaniard
shook his head as he went, and told him he doubted whether he
would find his brother so great a fool as he thought.

They then travelled on several days’ march into the country—
sometimes obliged to cross rivers, at others to pass mountains and
forests, where they could find no path ; sometimes scorched by the
violent heat of the sun, and then wetted to the skin by violent
showers of rain. These difficulties, however, did not discourage
them so much as to hinder them from trying in several places for
gold, which they were at length lucky enough to find in a consider-
able quantity. This success animated them very much, and they
continued working upon that spot till all their provisions were con-
sumed ; they gathered daily large quantities of ore, but then they
suffered very much from hunger. Still, however, they persevered in
their labours, and sustained themselves with such roots and berries as
they could find. At last even this resource failed them ; and, after
several of their company had died from want and hardship, the rest
were just able to craw! back to the place where they had left Alonzo,
carrying with them the gold, to acquire which they had suffered so
many miseries.

But while they had been employed in this manner, Alonzo, who
foresaw what would happen, had been industriously toiling toa very
different purpose. His skill in husbandry had easily enabled him to
find a spot of considerable extent and fertile soil, which he ploughed
up with the oxen he had brought with him, and the assistance of his
servants. He then sowed the different seeds he had brought, and
planted the potatoes, which prospered beyond what he could have
expected, and yielded him a most abundant harvest. His sheep
he had turned out in a very fine meadow near the sea, and every one of
them had brought him a couple of lambs. Besides that, he and his
servants, at leisure times, employed themselves in fishing; and the
fish they had caught were all dried, and salted with salt they had
found upon the sea-shore ; so that, by the time of Pizarro’s return,
they had laid up a very considerable quantity of provisions.

When Pizarro returned, his brother received him with the greatest
cordiality, and asked him what success he had had. Pizarro told
him that they had found an immense quantity of gold, but that
several of his companions had perished, and that the rest were
almost starved from the want of provisions, He then requested that



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 37

his brother would immediately give him something to eat, as he
assured him he had tasted no food for the last two days, excepting
the roots and bark of trees, Alonzo then very coolly answered that
he should remember that, when they set out, they had made an
agreement that neither should interfere with the other ; that he had
never desired to have any share of the gold which Pizarro might
acquire, and therefore he wondered that Pizarro should expect to be
supplied with the provisions that he had procured with so much care
and labour; “but,” added he, ‘‘if you choose to exchange some of
the gold you have found for provisions, I shall perhaps be able to
accommodate you.”

Pizarro thought this behaviour very unkind in his brother ; but as
he and his companions were almost starved, they were obliged to
comply with his demands, which were so exorbitant, that .in a very
short time they parted with all the gold they had brought with them,
merely to purchase food. Alonzo then proposed to his brother to
embark for Spain in the vessel which had brought them thither, as
the winds and weather seemed to be most favourable ; but Pizarro,
with an angry look, told him that since he had deprived him of every-
thing he had gained, and treated him in so unfriendly a manner, he
should go without him ; for, as to himself, he would rather perish
upon that desert shore than embark with so inhuman a brother,

But Alonzo, instead of resenting these reproaches, embraced his
brother with the greatest tenderness, and spoke to him in the follow-
ing manner : :

“Could you, then, believe, my dearest Pizarro, that I really meant
to deprive you of the fruits of all your labours, which you have ac-
quired with so much toil and danger? Rather may all the gold in
the universe perish than I should be capable of such behaviour to my
dearest brother. But I saw the rash, impetuous desire you had of
tiches, and wished to correct this fault in you, and serve you at the
same time. You despised my prudence and industry, and imagined
that nothing could be wanting to him that had once acquired wealth ;
but you have now learned that without that foresight and industry;
all the gold you have brought with you would not have prevented
you from perishing miserably. You are now, I hope, wiser; and
therefore take back your riches, which I hope you have now learned
to make a proper use of.”

Pizarro was equally filled with gratitude and astonishment at this
generosity of his brother, and he acknowledged from experience that
industry was better than gold, They then embarked for Spain,
where they all safely arrived. During the voyage Pizarro often



38 THE HISTORY OF

solicited his brother to accept of half his riches, which Alonzo con-
stantly refused, telling him that he could raise food enough to main-
tain himself, and was in no want of gold.

“Indeed,” said Tommy, when Mr. Barlow had finished the story,
‘*T think Alonzo was a very sensible man; and, if it had not been
for him, his brother and all his companions must have been starved;
but, then, this was only because they were in a desert uninhabited
country. ‘This could never have happened in England; there they
could always have had as much corn or bread as they chose for theit
money.”

‘* But,” says Mr. Barlow, “is aman sure to be always in England,
or some place where he can purchase bread?"

Tommy. I believe so, sir.

Mr. Barlow. Why, are there not countries in the world where
there are no inhabitants, and where no corn is raised ?

Tommy. Certainly, sir; this country which the two brothers went
to, was such a place,

Mr. Barlow. And there are many other such countries in the
world.

Lommy. But, then, a man need not go to them; he may stay at
home.

Mr, Barlow, Then he must not pass the seas in a ship.

Tommy, Why so, sir?

Mr. Barlow, Because the ship may happen to be wrecked on some
such country, where there are no inhabitants; and then, although
he should escape the danger of the sea, what will he do for food?

Yommy. And have such accidents sometimes happened ? ‘

Mr. Barlow, Yes, several; there was, in particular, one Selkirk,
who was shipwrecked, and obliged to live several years upon a desert
island. Buta still more extraordinary story is that of some Russians,
who were left on the coast of Spitzbergen, where they were obliged
to stay several years,

Lommy. Where is Spitzbergen, sir?

Mr, Barlow. It is a country very far to the north, which is con-
stantly covered with snow and. ice, because the weather is unremit-.
tingly severe. Scarcely any vegetables will grow upon the soil, and
scarcely any animals are found in the country. ‘To add to this, a
great part of the year it is covered with perpetual darkness, and it is
inaccessible to ships: so that it is impossible to conceive a more
dreary country, or where it must be more difficult to support human
life. Yet four men were capable of struggling with all these difficul:



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 39

ties during several years, and three of them returned at last safe to
their own country.

Tommy. This must be a very curious story indeed ; I would give
anything to be able to see it.

Mr. Barlow. That you may very easily. When I read it, I copied
off several parts of it, I thought it so curious and interesting, which
I can easily find, and will show you. Here it is; but it is necessary
first to inform you, that those northern seas, from the intense cold of
the climate, are so full of ice as frequently to render it extremely
dangerous to ships, lest they should be crushed between two pieces
of immense size, or so completely surrounded as not to be able to
extricate themselves. Having given you this previous information,
you will easily understand the distresstul situation of a Russian ship,
which, as it was sailing om those seas, was ona sudden so surrounded
by ice as not to be able to move. My extracts begin here, and you

may read them.

Extracts from a Narrative of the Extraordinary Adventures of
Four Russian Sailors, who were cast away on the Desert Island
of Hast Spitzbergen. ‘

“In this alarming state (that is, when the ship was surtounded
with ice) a council was held, when the mate, Alexis Hinkof, informed
them, that he recollected to have heard that some of the people of
Meseh, some time before, having formed a resolution of wintering
upon this island, had carried from that city timber proper for build-
ing a hut, and had actually erected one at some distance from the
shore. This information induced the whole company to resolve on
wintering there, if the hut, as they hoped, still existed; for they
clearly perceived the imminent danger they were in, and that they
must inevitably, perish if they continued in the ship. They dis-
patched, therefore, four of their crew in search of the hut, or any
other succour they could meet with. These were Alexis Hinkof, the
mate, Iwan Hinkof, his godson, Stephen Scharassof, and Feodor
.Weregin. 3

‘“As the shore on which they were to land was uninhabited, it
was necessaty that they should make some provision for their ex-
pedition. They had almost two miles to travel over those ridges of
ice, which being raised by the waves, and driven against each other
by the wind, rendered the way equally difficult and dangerous;
prudence, thefefore, forbade their loading themselves too much, lest,



40 THE HISTORY OF

by being overburdened, they might sink in between the pieces of ice,
and perish, Having thus maturely considered the nature of their
undertaking, they provided themselves with a musket, and powder-
horn containing twelve charges of powder, with as many balls, an
axe, a small kettle, a bag with about twenty pounds of flour, a knife,
a tinder-box and tinder, a bladder filled with tobacco, and every man
his wooden pipe. :

‘“Thus accoutred, these four sailors quickly arrived on the island,
little expecting the misfortunes that would befall them. They began
with exploring the country, and soon discovered the hut they were
in search of, about an English mile and a half from the shore. It
was thirty-six feet in length, eighteen feet in height, and as many
in breadth: it contained a small antechamber, about twelve feet
broad, which had two doors, the one to shut it up from the outer air,
the other to form a communication with the inner room: this con-
tributed greatly to keep the large room warm when once heated. In
the large room was an earthen stove, constructed in the Russian
manner ; that is, a kind of oven without a chimney, which served
occasionally either for baking, for heating the room, or, as is cus-
tomary among the Russian peasants in very cold weather, for a place
to sleep upon. Our adventurers rejoiced greatly at having dis-
covered the hut, which had, however, suffered much from the
weather, it having now been built a considerable time; they, how-
ever, contrived to pass the night in it.

‘'Early next morning they hastened to the shore, impatient to
inform their comrades of their success, and also to procure from their
vessel such provision, ammunition, and other necessaries, as might
better enable them to winter on the island. I leave my readers to
figure to themselves the astonishment and agony of mind these poor
people must have felt, when, on reaching the place of their landing,
they saw nothing but an open sea, free from the ice, which but the
day before had covered the ocean. risen during the night, had certainly been the cause of this disastrous
event ; but they could not tell whether the ice, which had before
hemmed in the vessel, agitated by the violence of the waves, had
been driven against her, and shattered her to pieces ; or whether she
had been carried by the current into the main—a circumstance which
frequently happens in those seas. Whatever accident had befallen
the ship, they saw her no more; and as no tidings were ever after-
wards received of her, it is most probable that she sank, and that all
on board of her perished.

“This melancholy event depriving the unhappy men of all hope



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 41

of ever being able to quit the island, they returned to the hut whence
they had come, full of horror and despair.

“ Thejt first attention was employed, as may easily be imagined,
in devising means of providing subsistence, and for repairing their
hut. The twelve charges of powder which they had brought with
thgin’soon procured them as many reindeer—the island, fortunately

Pai them, abounding in these animals. I have before observed that
? the hut, which the sailors were so fortunate as to find, had sustained
some damage, and it was this: there were cracks in many places
between the boards of the building, which freely admitted the air.
This inconvenience was, however, easily remedied, as they had an
axe, and the beams were still sound (for wood in those cold climates
continues through a length of years unimpaired by worms or decay),
so it was easy for them to make the boards join again very tolerably ;
besides, moss growing in great abundance all over the island, there
was more than sufficient to stop up the crevices, which wooden
houses must always be liable to. Repairs of this kind cost the
unhappy men less trouble, as they were Russians ; for all Russian
peasants are known to be good carpenters: they build their own
houses, and are very expert in handling the axe. The intense cold,
which makes these climates habitable to so few species of animals,
renders them equally unfit for the production of vegetables. No
species of tree or even shrub is found in any of the islands of Spitz-
bergen—a circumstance of the most alarming nature to our sailors.
‘" Without fire it was impossible to resist the rigour of the climate,
and, without wood, how was the fire to be produced or supported ?
However, in wandering along the beach, they collected plenty of
wood, which had been driven ashore by the waves, and which at
first consisted of the wrecks of ships, and afterwards of whole trees
with their roots—the produce of some hospitable (but to them.un-
known) climate, which the overflowings of rivers or other acci-
dents had sent into the ocean, Nothing proved of more essential
service to these unfortunate men, during the first year of their exile,
than some boards they found upen the beach, having a long iron
hook, some nails of about five or s.:. :. shes long, and proportionably
thick, and other bits of old iron fixed in them—the melancholy relics
of some vessels cast away in those remote parts. These were thrown *
ashore by the waves at the time when the want of powder gave our
men reason to apprehend that they must fall a prey to hunger, as
they had nearly consumed those reindeer they had killed. This
lucky circumstance was attended with another equally fortunate:
they found on the shore the root of a fir-tree, which nearly approached



42 THE HISTORY OF

to the figure of a bow. As necessity has ever been the mother of in-
vention, so they soon fashioned this root to a good bow by the help
of a knife ; but still they wanted a string and arrows. Not knowing
how to procure them at present, they resolved upon making a couple
of lances, to defend themselves against the white bears, by far the
most ferocious of their kind, whose attacks they had great reason to
dread. Finding they could neither make the heads of their lances
nor of their arrows without the help of a hammer, they contrived to
form the above-mentioned large iron hook into one, by beating it,
and widening a hole it happened to have about its middle with the
help of one of their largest nails—this received the handle ; a round
button at one end of the hook served for the face of the hammer. A
large pebble supplied the place of an anvil, and a couple of rein-
deers’ horns made the tongs. By the means of such tools they made
two heads of spears, and, after polishing and sharpening them on
stones, they tied them as fast as possible, with thongs made of rein-
deers’ skins, to sticks about the thickness of a man’s arm, which
they got from some branches of trees that had been cast on shore.
Thus | equipped with spears, they resolved to attack a white bear,
and, after a most dangerous encounter, they killed the formidable
creature, and thereby ‘made a new supply of provisions. The flesh
of this animal they relished exceedingly, as they thought it much re-
sembled beefi n taste and flavour. The tendons, they saw with much
pleasure, could, with little or no trouble, be divided into filaments
of what fineness they thought fit. This, perhaps, was the most
fortunate discovery these men could have made, for, besides other
advantages, which will be hereafter mentioned, they were hereby
furnished with strings for their bow.

‘«The success of our unfortunate islanders in making the spears,
and the use these proved of, encouraged them to proceed, and forge
some pieces of iron into heads of arrows of the same shape, though |
somewhat smaller in size than the spears above mentioned, Having
ground and sharpened these like the former, they tied them with the
sinews of the white bears to pieces of fir, to which, by the help of fine
threads of the same, they fastened feathers of sea-fowl, and thus be-
came possessed of a complete bow and arrows, Their ingenuity in
this respect was crowned with success far beyond their expectation ;
for, during the time of their continuance upon the island, with these
arrows they killed no less than two hundred and fifty reindeer, besides
a great number of blue and white foxes. The flesh of these animals
served them also for food, and their skins for clothing and other
necessary preservatives against the intense coldness of a climate so









SHIPWRECKED MARINERS KILLING A WHITE BEAR,—p. 42



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 43

near the Pole. They killed, however, not more than ten white bears
in all, and that not without the utmost danger ; for these animals,
being prodigiously strong, defended themselves with astonishing
vigour and fury. . The first our men attacked designedly ; the other
nine they slew in defending themselves from their assaults, for some
of these creatures even ventured to enter the outer room of the hut
in order to devour them. It is true that all the bears did not show
{if I may be allowed the expression) equal intrepidity, either owing
to some being less pressed by hunger, or to their being by nature less
carnivorous than the others ; for some of them which entered the
hut immediately betook themselves to flight on the first attempt of
the sailors to drive them away. A ‘repetition, however, of these
ferocious attacks threw the poor men into great terror and anxiety,
as they were in almost a perpetual danger of being devoured.

“The three different kinds of animals above mentioned—viz., the
reindeer, the blue and white foxes, and the white bears—were the
only food these wretched mariners tasted during their continuance in
this dreary abode. We do not at once see every resource; it is
generally necessity which quickens our invention, opening by degrees
our eyes, and pointing out expedients which otherwise might never
have occurred to our thoughts. The truth of this observation our
four sailors experienced in various instances. They were fot some
time reduced to the necessity of eating their meat almost raw, and
without either bread ‘or salt, for they were quite destitute of both.
The intenseness of the cold, together with the want of proper con-
veniences, prevented them from cooking their victuals in a proper
manner. There was but one stove in the hut, and that being set up
agreeable to the Russian taste, was more like an oven, and conse-
quently not well adapted for boiling anything. Weod also was too
precious a commodity to be wasted in keeping up two fires ; and the
one they might have made out of their habitation to dress their
victuals would in no way have served to warm them. Another reason
against their cooking in the open air was the continual danger of an
attack from the white bears.

“And here I must observe that, suppose they had made the
attempt, it would have still been practicable for only some part of
the year; for the cold, which in such a climate for some mohths
scarcely ever abates, from the long ahsence of the sun, then enlight-
ening the opposite hemisphere,—the inconceivable quantity of snow,
which is continually falling through the greatest part of the winter,
together with the almost incessant rains at certain seasons,—all these
were almost insurmountable to that expedient. To remedy, there-



44 THE HISTORY OF

fore, in some degree the hardship of eating their meat raw, they be-
thought themselves of drying some of their provisions during the
summer in the open air, and afterwards of hanging it up in the upper
part of the hut, which, as I mentioned before, was continually filled
with smoke down to the windows: it was thus dried thoroughly by
the help of that smoke. This meat, so prepared, they used for bread,
and it made them relish their other flesh the better, as they could
only half dress it. Finding this experiment answer in every respect
to their wishes, they continued to practise it during the whole time
of their confinement upon the island, and always kept up, by that
means, a sufficient stock of provisions. Water they had in summer
from small rivulets that fell from the rocks, and in winter from the
snow and ice thawed. This was of course their only beverage ; and

. their small kettle was the only vessel they could make use of for this
and other purposes.

“‘I have mentioned above that our sailors brought a small bag of
flour with them to the island. Of this they had consumed about
one-half with their meat ; the remainder they employed in a different
manner equally useful. They soon saw the necessity of keeping up
a continual fire in so cold a climate, and found that, if it should un-
fortunately go out, they had no means of lighting it again; for
though they had a steel and flints, yet they wanted both matches
and tinder. In their excursions through the island they had met
with a slimy loam, or a kind of clay, nearly in the middle of it. Out
of this they found means to form a utensil which might serve for a
lamp, and they proposed to keep it constantly burning with the fat
of the animals they should kill. This was certainly the most rational
scheme they could have thought of; for to be without a light ina
climate where, during winter, darkness reigns for several months
together, would have added much to their other calamities.

“ Having therefore fashioned a kind of lamp, they filled it with
reindeer’s fat, and stuck into it some twisted linen shaped into a
wick ; but they had the mortification to find that, as soon as the fat
melted, it not only soaked into the clay but fairly ran out of it on’
all sides. The thing, therefore, was to devise some means of pre-
venting this inconvenience, not arising “from cracks, but from the
substance of which the lamp was made being too porous. They
made, therefore, a new one, dried it thoroughly in the air, then
heated it red-hot, and afterwards quenched it in their kettle, wherein
they had boiled a quantity of flour down to the consistence of thin
starch, The lamp being thus dried and filled with melted fat, they
now found, to their great joy, that it did not leak; but for greater



‘SANDFORD AND MERTON. 45

security they dipped linen rags in their paste, and with them covered.
all its outside. Succeeding in this attempt, they immediately made
another lamp for fear of an accident, that at all events they might
not be destitute of light; and, when they had done so much, they
thought proper to save the remainder of their flour for similar
purposes. As they had carefully collected whatever happened to be
cast on shore to supply them with fuel, they had found amongst the
wrecks of vessels some cordage and asmall quantity of oakum (a kind.
of hemp used for caulking ships), which served them to make wicks
for their lamps. When these stores began to fail, their shirts and
their drawers (which are worn by almost all the Russian peasants)
were employed to make good the deficiency. By these means they
kept their lamp burning without intermission, from the day they
first made it (a work they set about soon after their arrival on the
island) until that of their embarkation for their native country.

“The necessity of converting the most essential part of their cloth-
ing, such as their shirts and drawers, to the use above specified, ex-
posed them the more to the rigour of the climate. They also found
themselves in want of shoes, boots, and other articles of dress ; and,
as winter was approaching, they were again obliged to have recourse
to that ingenuity which necessity suggests, and which seldom fails
in the trying hour of distress. They had skins of reindeer and foxes
in plenty, that had hitherto served them for bedding, and which
they now thought of employing in some more essential service ; but
the question was how to tan them. After deliberating on this subject,
they took to the following method: They soaked the skins for several
days in fresh water till they could pull oft the hair very easily ; they
then rubbed the wet leather with their hands till it was nearly dry,
when they spread some melted reindeer fat over it, and again rubbed.
it well. By this process the leather became soft, pliant, and supple
—proper for answering every purpose they wanted it for. Those
skins which they designed for furs they only soaked one day to pre-
pare them for being wrought, and then proceeded in the manner
before mentioned, except only that they did not remove the hair.

‘« Thus they soon provided themselves with the necessary materials
for all the parts of dress they wanted. But here another difficulty
occurred: they had neither aw!s for making shoes or boots, nor
needles for sewing their garments. This want, however, they soon
supplie by means of the pieces of iron they had occasionally collected.
Out of these they made both, and by their industry even brought
them to a certain degree of perfection. The making eyes to their
needles gave them indeed no little trouble, but this they also per-



46 FHE HISTORY OF

formed with the assistance of their knife; for, having ground it to.a
very sharp point, and heated red hot a kind of wire forged for that
purpose, they pierced a hole through one end ; and by whetting and
smoothing it on stones, brought the other to a point, and thus gave

2 whole needle a very tolerable form. Scissors to cut out the skin
were what they next had occasion for; but, having none, their place
they supplied with the knife; and, though there was neither shoe-
maker nor tailor amongst them, yet they had contrived to cut out the
leather and furs well enough for their purpose. The sinews of the
bears and, the reindeer—which, as I mentioned before, they had
found means to split—served them for thread; and thus provided
wo the necessary implements, they proceeded to make their new
clothes.”

«“These,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘are the extracts which I have made
from this very extraordinary story ; and they are sufficient to show
both the many accidents to which men are exposed, and the wonder-
ful expedients which may be found out, even in the most dismal
circumstances.”

“Tt is very true, indeed,” answered Tommy ; ‘‘but pray what
became of these poor men at last?”

i « After they had lived more than six years upon this dreary and in-

hospitable coast," answered Mr. Barlow, ‘‘a ship arrived there by
accident, which took three of them on board, and carried them in
safety to their own country.”

‘And what became of the fourth?” said Tommy.

“He,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ was seized with a dangerous disease
called the scurvy ; and, being of an indolent temper, and therefore
not using the exercise which was necessary to preserve his life, after
having lingered some time, died, and was buried in the snow by his
companions.”

Here little Harry came in from his father’s house, and brought
with him the chicken which, it has been mentioned, he had saved
from the claws of the kite. The little animal was now perfectly re-
covered of the hurt it had received, and showed so great a degree of
affection to its protector, that it would run after him like a dog, hop
upon his shoulder, nestle in his bosom, and eat crumbs out of his
hand. Tommy was extremely surprised and pleased to remark its
tameness and docility, and asked by what means it had been made
so gentle. Harry told him he had taken no particular pains about
it; but that, as the poor little creature had been sadly hurt, he had
fed it every day till it was well; and that, in consequence of that



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 47

kindness, it had conceived a great degree of affection towards
him.

“Indeed,” said Tommy, ‘that is very surprising ; for I thought
all birds flew away whenever a man came near them, and that even
the fowls which are kept at home wauld never let you touch them,”

Mr: Barlow. And what do you imagine is the reason of that?

Tommy. Because they are wild.

Mr. Barlow. And what is a fowl’s being wild?

Tommy. When he will not let you come near him.

Mr. Bariow, But I want to know what is the reason of his being
wild?

Tommy. Indeed, sir, I cannot tell, unless it is because they are
naturally so.

Mr. Barlow. But if they were naturally so, this fowl could not be
fond of Harry.

Tommy, That is because he is so good to it.

Mr, Barlow. Very likely. Then it is not natural for an animal t
run away from a person that is good to him? :

Tommy. No, sir; I believe not.

Mr. Barlow. But when a person is not good to him, or endeavours
to hurt him, it is natural for an animal to run away from him, is it
not?

Tommy. Ves.

Afr. Barlow, And then you say he is wild, do you not?

Tommy. Yes, sir.

Mr, Barlow. Why, then, it is probable that animals are only wild
because they are afraid of being hurt, and that they only run away
from the fear of danger. Therefore, if you want to tame animals,
you must be good to them, and treat them kindly, and then the, will
no longer fear you, but come to you and love you.

“Indeed,” said Harry, ‘‘ that is very true ; for I knew a little boy
that took a great fancy to a snake that lived in his father's garden ;
and, when he had his milk for breakfast, he used to sit under a nut-
tree and whistle, and the snake would come to him and eat out of
his bowl.”

Tommy, And did it not bite him?

., Harry. No: he sometimes used to give it a pat with his spoon, if
it ate too fast ; but it never hurt him.

Tommy was much pleased with this conversation ; and being both
good-natured and desirous of making experiments, he determined to
try his skill in taming animals. Accordingly, he took a large slice of

bread in his hand, and went out to seek some animal that he might



48 THE HISTORY OF

_ give it to. The first thing that he happened to meet was a sucking

pig that had rambled from its mother, and was basking in the sun,
Tommy would not neglect the opportunity of showing his talents;
he therefore called, ‘‘ Pig, pig, pig ! come hither, little pig!"’ But the
pig, who did not exactly comprehend his intentions, only grunted and
ran away.

‘Vou little ungrateful thing,” said Tommy, ‘‘do you treat me in
this manner, when I want to feed you? If you do not know your
friends, I must teach you.”

So saying this, he sprang at the pig, and caught him by the hind
leg, intending to have given him the bread which he had in his hand ;
but the pig, who was not used to be treated in that manner, began
struggling and squeaking to that degree, that the sow, who was within
hearing, came running to the place, with all the rest of the litter at
her heels. As Tommy did not know whether she would be pleased
with his civilities to her young one or not, he thought it most prudent
to let it go; and the pig, endeavouring to escape as speedily as
possible, unfortunately ran between his legs and threw him down.
The place where this accident happened was extremely wet ; therefore
Tommy, in falling, dirtied himself from head to foot; and the sow,
who came up at that instant, passed over him, as he attempted to rise,
and rolled him back again into the mire. ;

Tommy, who was not the coolest in his temper, was extremely
provoked at this ungrateful return for his intended kindness ; and,
losing all patience, he seized the sow by the hind leg and began
pommelling her with all his might, as she attempted toescape. The.
sow, as may be imagined, did not relish such treatment, but en-
deavoured with all her force to escape; but Tommy still keeping
his aold and continuing his discipline, she struggled with such violence
as to drag him several yards, squeaking at the same time in the most
lamentable manner, in which she was joined by the whole litter of
pigs. ;

During the heat of this contest a large flock ot geese happened to
be crossing the road, into the midst of which the affrighted sow ran
headlong, dragging the enraged Tommy at her heels, ‘The goslings
retreated with the greatest precipitation, joining their mournful cack-
ling to the general noise; but a gander of more than common size
and courage, resenting the unprovoked attack which had been made
upon his family, flew at Tommy and gave him several severe strokes
with his bill. s F

Tommy, whose courage had hitherto been unconquerable, being
thus unexpectedly attacked by a new enemy, was obliged to yield to



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 49

fortune, and not knowing the precise extent of his danger, he not
only suffered the sow to escape, but joined his vociferations to the
general scream. This alarmed Mr. Barlow, who, coming up to the
place, found his pupil in the most woeful plight, daubed from head
to foot, with his face and hands as black as those of any chimney-
sweeper. He inquired what was the matter; and Tommy, as soon
ashe had recovered breath enough to speak, answered in this manner:
“ wanted to make them tame and gentle, and to love me, and you see
the consequences.”
“Indeed,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘I see you have been ill treated, but
T hope you are not hut ; and if it is owing to anything I have said,
I shall feel the more concern.”
“No,” said Tommy, ‘‘I cannot say that I am much hurt.”
“Why, then,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ you had better go and wasli
yourself; and, when you are clean, we will talk over the affair
together.”
When Tommy had returned, Mr. Barlow asked him how the ac-
cident had happened ; and when he had heard the story, he said, ‘I
| am very sorry for your misfortune; but I do not perceive that I was
| the cause of it, for 1 do not remember that I ever advised you to
. catch pigs by the hinder leg.”
Tommy. No, sir; but you told me that feeding animals was the
| way to make them love me ; and so I wanted to feed the pig.
; Mr. Barlow. But it was not my fault that you attempted it ina
wrong manner. The animal did not know your intentions, and
therefore, when you seized him in so violent a manner, he naturally
attempted to escape, and his mother, hearing his cries, very naturally
came to his assistance. All that happened was owing to your inex-
perience. Before you meddle with any animal, you should make
yourself acquainted with his nature and disposition, otherwise you
may fare like the little boy that, in attempting to catch flies, was
stung by a wasp; or like another that, seeing an adder asleep upon
a bank, took it for an cel, and was bitten by it, which had nearly cost
him his life.
Tommy. But, sir, 1 thought Harry had mentioned a little boy that
used to feed a snake, without receiving any hurt from it.
; Mr. Barlow. That might very well happen: there is scarcely any
‘| creature tha* will do hurt, unless it is attacked or wants food; and
» some of these reptiles are entirely harmless, others are not; therefore
the best way is not to meddle with any till you are perfectly acquainted
with its nature. Had you observed this rule, you never would have

4







50 ' THE HISTORY OF

attempted to catch the pig by the hinder leg, in order to tame it ;
and it is very lucky that you did not make the experiment upon a
larger animal, otherwise you might have been as badly treated as the
tailor was by the elephant.

Tommy. Pray, sir, what is this curious story? But first tell me,
if you please, what kind of animal an elephant is?

‘« An elephant,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘is the largest land animal that
we are acquainted with. It is many times thicker than an ox, and
grows to the height of eleven or twelve feet. Its strength, as may be
easily imagined, is prodigious ; but it is at the same time so very
gentle that it rarely does hurt to anything, even in the woods where
it resides. It does not eat flesh, but lives upon the fruits and branches
of trees. But what is most singular about its make is that, instead
of a nose, it has a long hollow piece of flesh, which grows over its
mouth to the length of three or four feet; this is called the trunk of
the elephant, and he is capable of bending it in every direction.
When he wants to break off the branch of a tree, he twists his trunk
round it, and snaps it off directly ; when he wants to drink, he lets
it down into the water, sucks up several gallons at a time, and then,
doubling the end of it back, discharges it all into his mouth,”

“But if he is so large and strong,” said Tommy, ‘‘1 should sup-
pose it must be impossible ever to tame him.”

“So perhaps it would,” replied Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ did they not instruct
those that have already been tamed to assist in catching others.
When they have discovered a forest where these animals resort, they
make a large enclosure with strong pales and a deep ditch, leaving
only one entrance to it, which has a strong gate left purposely open.
They then let one or two of their tame elephants loose, who join the
wild ones, and gradually entice them into the enclosure. As soon as
one of these has entered, a man, who stands ready, shuts the gate,
and takes him prisoner. The animal, finding himself thus entrapped,
begins to grow furious, and attempts to escape; but immediately two
tame ones, of the largest size and greatest strength, who have been
placed there on purpose, come up to him, one on each side, and beat
him with their trunks till he becomes more quiet. A man then comes
behind, ties a very large cord to each of his hind legs, and fastens
the other end of it to two great trees. He is then left without food
for some hours, and in that time generally becomes so docile as to
suffer himself to be conducted to the stable that is prepared for him,
where he lives the rest of his life like a horse, or any other sort of
domestic animal,”

Tommy, And pray, sir, what did the elephant do to the tailor?





SANDFORD AND MERTON. 5r

««There was,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘at Surat, a city where many of
these tame elephants-are kept, a tailor, who used to sit and work in
his shed close to the place to which these elephants were led every
day to drink. This man contracted a kind of acquaintance with one
of the largest of these beasts, and used to present him with fruits and
other vegetables whenever the elephant passed by his door. The
elephant was accustomed to put his long trunk in at the window, and
to receive in that manner whatever his friend chose to give. But one
day the tailor happened to be in a more than ordinary ill humour,
and not considering how dangerous it might prove to provoke an
animal of that size and strength, when the clephant put his trunk in
at the window as usual, instead of giving him anything to eat, he
pricked him with his needle. The elephant instantly withdrew his
trunk, and, without showing any marks of resentment, went on with
the rest to drink ; but after he had quenched his thirst, he collected
a large quantity of the dirtiest water he could find in his trank—
which I have already told you is capable of holding many gallons—
and when he passed by the tailor’s shop, in his return, he discharged
it full in his face, with so true an aim, that he wetted him all over,
and almost drowned him ; thus justly punishing the man for his il-
nature and breach of friendship.”

“Indeed,” said Harry, ‘‘considering the strength of the animal,
he must have had a great moderation and generosity not to have
punished the man more severely ; and therefore I think it is a very
great shame to mien ever to be cruel to animals, when they are so
affectionate and humane to them.” f

“You are very right,” said Mr. Barlow; ‘‘and I remember an-—
other story of an elephant, which, if truc, is still more extraordinary.
These animals, although in general they are as docile and obedient
to the person that takes care of them as a dog, are sometimes scized
with a species of impatience which makes them absolutely ungovern-
able. It is then dangerous to come near them, and very difficult to
restrain them. I should have mentioned, that in the Eastern parts
of the world, where elephants are found, the kings and princes keep
them to ride upon as we do horses: a kind of tent or pavilion is
fixed upon the back of the animal, in which one or more persons are
' placed; and the keeper that is used to manage him sits upon the
* neck of the elephant, and guides him by means of a pole with an iron
hook at the end. Now, as these animals are of great value, the
keeper is frequently severely punished if any accident happens to the
animal by his carelessness. But one day, one of the largest elephants,
being seized with a sudden fit of passion, had broken loose ; and, as

A—2



52 THE HISTORY OF

the keeper was not in the way, nobody was able ie appease him, or
dared to come near him. While, therefore, he was running about
in this manner, he chanced to see the wife of his keeper (who had
often fed him as well as her husband), with her young child in her
arms, with which she was endeavouring to escape from his fury. The
‘m ran as fast as she was able; but, finding that it was im-

sible for her to escape,—because these beasts, although so very
lurge, are able to run very fast,—she resolutely turned about, and
rowing her child down before the elephant, thus accosted him, as
if he had been capable of understanding her: ‘You ungrateful
beast, is this the return you make for all the benefits we have be-
stowed? Have we fed you, and taken care of you, by day and night,
during so many years, only that you may at last destroy us all?
(rush, then, this poor innocent child and me, in return for the
services that my husband has done you!’ While she was making
these passionate exclamations, the elephant approached the place
where the little infant lay; but instead of trampling upon him, he
stopped short, and looked at him with earnestness, as if he had
been sensible of shame and confusion ; and his fury from that instant
abating, he suffered himself to be led without opposition to his
stable.”

Tommy thanked Mr, Barlow for these two stories, and promised
for the future to use more discretion in his kindness to animals.

The next day Tommy and Harry went into the garden to sow the
wheat which Harry had brought with him.

While they were at work, Tommy said, ‘‘ Pray, Harry, did you
ever hear the story of the men that were obliged to live six years upon
that terribly cold country (I forget the name of it), where there is
nothing but snow and ice, and scarcely any animals but great bears.”

dlarry. Yes, I have.

Yommy. Did not the very thoughts of it frighten you dreadfully ?

ffarry. No; I cannot say they did.

fommy. Why, should you like to live in such a country?

flarry, No, certainly; I am very happy that I was born in such a
country as this, where the weather is scarcely ever too hot or too
cold; but a man must bear patiently whatever is his lot in this world.

fommy. That is true. But should you not cry, and be very much
afflicted, if you were left upon such a country?

ffarry. I should certainly be very sorry if I was Jeft there alone,
more especially as lam not big enough, or strong enough, to defend
myself against such fierce animals; but the crying would do me no
good : it would be better to do something, and try to help myself.























SANDFORD AND MERTON. 53

Tommy, Indeed I think it would; but what could you do?

Harry. Why, l would endeavour to build myself a house, if I could
find myself materials. ‘ ;

Tommy. And what materials is a house made of ?

Harry. You know there are houses of different sizes. The houses
that the poor people live in are very different from your father's house.

Tommy. Yes; they are little, nasty, dirty, disagreeable places; I
should not like to live in them at all.

Harry, And yet the poor are in general as strong and healthy as
the rich. But if you could have no other, you would rather live in one
of them than be exposed to the weather?

Tommy. Yes, certainly. And how would you make one of them?

Harry. lf I could get any wood, and had a hatchet, I would cut
down some branches of trees, and stick them upright in the ground,
near to each other. I would get other branches, more full of small
wood; and these I would interweave between them, just as we make
hurdles to confine the sheep; and then, as that might not be warm
enough to resist the wind and cold, I would cover them over, both
within and without, with clay. /

Tommy. Really, I should like to try to make a house ; do you think,
Harry; that you and I could make one?

Hlarry. Yes, if I had wood and clay enough, I think I could, and
a small hatchet to sharpen the stakes and make them enter the ground,
Mr. Barlow then called them in to read, and told Tommy that, as
he had been talking so much about good-nature to animals, he had
looked him out a very pretty story upon the subject, and begged
that be would read it well.

“That I will,” said Tommy, ‘‘for I begin to like reading cx-
tremely ; and I think that I am happier, too, since I learned it, for
now I can always divert myself.”

“Indeed,” answered Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ most people find it so. When
any one can read he will not find the knowledge any burden to him,
and it is his own fault if he is not constantly amused.”

Tommy then read, with a clear and distinct voice, the following
story of

THE GOOD-NATURED LITTLE BOY.

A LITTLE boy went out one morning to walk to a village about five

| miles from the place where he lived, and carried with him in a basket

the provision that was to serve him the whole day. As he was walk-
ng along, a poor little half-starved dog came up to him, wagging



54 THE HISTORY OF

his tail, and sceming to cntreat him to take compassion on him, The
little boy at first took no notice of him, but at length, remarking how
lean and famished the creature seemed to be, he said, '‘ This animal
is certainly in very great necessity : if I give him part of my provision,
I shall be obliged to go home hungry myself; however, as he seems
to want it more than I do, he shall partake with me.” Saying this,
he gave the dog part of what he had in the basket, who ate it as if
he had not tasted victuals for a fortnight.

The little boy then went on a little farther, his dog still following
him, and fawning upon him with the greatest gratitude and affec-
tion, when he saw a poor old horse lying upon the ground and
groaning as if he was very ill; he went up to him, and saw that he
was almost starved, and so weak that he was unable torise. ‘Tam
very much afraid,” said the little boy, ‘“if I stay to assist this horse,
that it will be dark before I can return ; and I have heard that there
are several thieves in the neighbourhood ; however, I will try—it is
doing a good action to attempt to relieve him, and God Almighty
will take care of me.” He then went and gathered some grass, which
he brought to the horse's mouth, who immediately began to eat with
as much relish as if his chief disease was hunger. He then fetched
some water in his hat, which the animal drank up, and seemed im-
mediately to be so much refreshed that, after a few trials, he got up
and began grazing.

The little boy then went ona little farther, and saw a man wading
about in a pond of water without being able to get out of it, in spite
of all his endeavours. ‘‘ What is the matter, good man?” said the
little boy to him ; ‘‘can’t you find your way out of this pond?”

“No, God bless you. my worthy master, or miss,” said the man,
‘for such I take you to be by your voice ; I have fallen into this
pond, and know not how to get out again, as Tam quite blind, and
I am almost afraid to move for fear of being drowned.”

“‘ Well,” said. the little boy, ‘‘ though I shall be wetted to the skin,
if you will throw me your stick, I will try to help you out of it.”

The blind man then threw the stick to that side on which he heard
the voice; the little boy caught it, and went into the water, feeling
very carefully before him, lest he should unguardedly go beyond_his
depth ; at length he reached the blind man, took him very carefully
by the hand, and led him out. The blind man then gave hima
thousand blessings, and told him he could grope out his way home ;
‘and the little boy ran on as hard as he could to prevent being
benighted.

But he had not proceeded far before he saw a poor sailor, who had











;

SANDFORD AND MERTON. 55

"Jost both his legs in an engagement by sea, hopping along upon

crutches,

“God bless you, my little master!’’ said the sailor; ‘‘I have
fought many a battle with the French to defend poor old England,
but now I am crippled, as you see, and have neither victuals nor
money, although I am almost famished.”

The little boy could not resist the inclination to relieve him, so he
gave. him all his remaining victuals, and said, ‘‘God help you, poor
man! this is all I have, otherwise you should have more.” He then
ran along, and presently arrived at the town he was going to, did his
business, and returned towards his own home with all the expedition
he was able.

But he had not gone much more than half-way before the night
shut in extremely dark, without either moon or stars to light him.
The poor little boy used his utmost endeavours to find his way, but
unfortunately missed it in turning down a lane which brought him
into a wood, where he wandered about a great while without being
able to find any path tolead him out. Tired out at last, and hungry,
he felt himself so feeble that he could go no farther, but set himself
down upon the ground, crying most bitterly. In this situation he
remained for some time, till at last the little dog, who had never for-
saken him, came up to him wagging his tail, and holding something
in his mouth. The little boy took it from him, and saw it wasa
handkerchief nicely pinned together, which somebody had dropped, *
and the dog had picked up, and on opening it he found several slices
of bread and meat, which the little boy ate with great satisfaction,
and felt himself extremely refreshed with his meal.

“So,” said the little boy, ‘‘ I see that if I have given you a break-
fast, you have given me a supper; and a good turn is never lost,
done even to a dog.”

He then once more attempted to escape from the wood, but it was
to no purpose ; he only scratched his legs with briars and slipped
down in the dirt, without being able to find his‘way out. He was
just going to give up all further attempts in despair, when he hap-
pened to see a horse feeding before him, and, going up to him, saw,
by the light of the moon, which just.then began to shine a little, that
it was the very same he had fed in the morning.

“Perhaps,” said the little boy, ‘‘this creature, as I have been so
good to hin, will let me get upon his back, and he may bring me
out of the wood, as he is accustomed to feed in this neighbourhood.”

The little boy then went up to the horse, speaking to him and
stroking him, and the horse let him mount his back without opposi-



56 THE HISTORY OF

tion, and then proceeded slowly through the wood, grazing as he
went, till he brought him to an opening which led to the high road.
‘The little boy was much rejoiced at this, and said, ‘If I had not
saved this creature's life in the morning, I should have been obliged
to have stayed here all night ; I see by this that a good turn is never
lost.” *

But the poor little boy had yet a greater danger to undergo; for,
as he was going down a solitary lane, two men rushed out upon him,
laid hold of him, and were going to strip him of his clothes; but
just as they were beginning to do it, the little dog bit the leg of one
of the men with so much violence, that he left the little boy and pur-
sued the dog, that ran howling and barking away. In this instant a
voice was heard that cried out, ‘‘ There the rascals are! let us knock
them down!" which frightened the remaining man so much that he
ran away, and his companion followed him. The little boy then
looked up, and saw that it was the sailor whom he had relieved in
the morning, carried upon the shoulders of the blind man whom he
had helped out of the pond.

“There, my little dear,” said the sailor, ‘‘God be thanked! we have
come in time to do youa service, in return for what you did us in the
morning. bing a little boy, who, from the description, I concluded must be
you; but I was so lame that I should not have been able to come in
time enough to help you if I had not met this honest blind man, who
took me upon his back while I showed him the way.”

The little boy thanked him very sincerely for thus defending him ;
and they went all together to his father’s house, which was not far
off, where they were all kindly entertained with a supper and a bed.
The little boy took care of his faithful dog as long as he lived, and
never forgot the importance and necessity of doing good to others if
we wish them to do the same to us.

‘Upon my word,” said Tommy, when he had finished, ‘‘I] am
very much pleased with this story, and I think that it may very likely
be true, for I have myself observed that everything seems to love little
Harry here, merely because he is good-natured to it. I was much
surprised to see the great dog the other day, which I have never
dared to touch for fear of being bitten, fawning upon him and licking
ak all over ; it put me in mind of the story of Androcles and the
ion.

“That dog,’’ said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ will be equally fond of you if you
are kind to him, for nothing equals the sagacity and gratitude of a





SANDFORD AND MERTON. 57

dog.. But since you have read a story about a good-natured boy,
Harry shall read you another concerning a boy of a contrarv disposi-
tion.”

Harry read the following story of

THE ILL-NATURED BOY.

THERE was once a little boy who was so-unfortunate as to have a
very bad man for his father, who was always surly and ill tempered, ,
-and never gave his children either good instruction or good example;
in consequence of which this little boy, who might otherwise have
been happier and better, became ill-natured, quarrelsome, and dis-
agreeable to everybody. He very often was severely beaten for his
impertinence by boys that were bigger than himself, and sometimes
by boys that were less ; for though he was very abusive and quarrel-
some, he did not much like fighting, and generally trusted more to
his heels than his courage when he had engaged himself in a quarrel.
This little boy had a cur dog that was the exact image of himself:
he was the most troublesome, surly creature imaginable, always
barking at the heels of every horse he came near, and worrying every
sheep he could meet with, for which reason both the dog and the boy
were disliked by all the neighbourhood.

One morning his father got up early to go to the alehouse, where
he intended to stay till night, as it was a holiday ; but before he went
out he gave his son some bread and cold meat and sixpence, and
told him he might go and divert himself as he would the whole day.
The little boy was much pleased with this liberty ; and as it was a
very fine morning, he called his dog Tiger to follow him, and began
his walk.

He had not proceeded far before he meta little boy that was driving
a flock of sheep towards a gate that he wanted them to enter.

“Pray, master,” said the little boy, ‘‘ stand still and keep your dog
close to you, for fear you frighten my sheep.”

‘Oh, yes, to be sure,” answered the ill-natured boy; ‘‘I am to
wait here all the morning till you and your sheep have passed, I
_ Suppose. Here, Tiger, seize them, boy!”

_ Tiger at this sprang forth into the middle of the flock, barking and
biting on every side, and the sheep, in a general consternation,
hurried each.a separate way. ‘Tiger seemed to enjoy this sport
equally with his master ; but in the midst of his triumph he happened
unguardedly to attack an old ram that had more courage than the



38 THE HISTORY OF

rest of the tfock; le, instead of running away, faced about, and
aimed a blow with his forehead at his enemy with so much force and
dexterity, that he knocked Tiger over and over, and, butting him
several times while he was down, obliged him to limp howling
away. .

The ill-natured little boy who was not capable of loving anything,
had been much diverted with the trepidation of the sheep ; but now
he laughed heartily at the misfortune of his dog ; and he would have
laughed much longer, had not the other little boy, provoked beyond.
his patience at this treatment, thrown a stone at him, which hit him
full upon the temple, and almost knocked him down. He imme-
diately began to cry, in concert with his dog, and perceiving a man
coming towards them, who he fancied might be the owner of
the sheep, he thought it most prudent to escape as speedily as
possible.

But he had scarcely recovered from the smart which the blow had
occasioned, before his former mischievous disposition returned,
which he determined to gratify to the utmost. He had not gone far
before he saw a little girl standing bya stile with a large pot of milk
at her feet.

“Pray,” said the little girl, ‘‘help me up with this pot of milk:
my mother sent me out to fetch it this morning, and I have brought
it above a mile upon my head; but I am so tired that I have been
obliged to stop at this stile to rest me; and if I don't return home
presently, we shall have no pudding to-day, and besides, my mother
will. be very angry with me.”

‘‘What,” said the boy, ‘‘ you are to have a pudding to-day, are
you, miss?”

“Yes,” said the girl, ‘and a fine piece of roast beef; for there’s
uncle Will, and uncle John, and grandfather, and all my cousins,
to dine with us, and .we shall be very merry in the evening, I can
assure you; so pray help me up as speedily as possible.”

‘That I will, miss,” said the boy; and, taking up the jug, he
pretended to fix it upon her head ; but just as she had hold of it, he
gave it a little push, as if he had stumbled, and overturned it upon ~
her. The little girl began to cry violently, but the mischievous boy
ran away laughing heartily, and saying, ‘‘Good bye, little miss; -
give my humble service to uncle Will, and grandfather, and the
dear little cousins.”

This prank encouraged him very much; for he thought he had
now certainly escaped without any bad consequences ; so he went on
applauding his own ingenuity, and came to a green, where several





Oe

SANDFORD AND MERTON. 59

little boys were at play. He desired leave to play with them, which
they allowed him to do. But he could not be contented long with-
out exerting his evil disposition ; so, taking an opportunity when it
was his turn to fling the ball, instead of flinging it in the way he
ought to have done, he threw it into a deep muddy ditch. The
little boys ran in a great hurry to see what was become of it; and
as they were standing together upon the brink, he gave the outer-
most boy a violent push against his neighbour ; he, not being able
to resist the violence, tumbled against another, by which means
they were all soused into the ditch together. They soon scrambled
out, although ina dirty plight, and were going to have punished
him for his ill behaviour; but he patted Tiger upon the back, who
began snarling and growling in such a manner as made them desist.
Thus this. mischievous little boy escaped a second time with im-
punity, |

The next thing that he met with was a poor jackass, feeding very
quietly ina ditch. The little boy, seeing that nobody was within
sight, thought this was an opportunity of plaguing an animal that
was not to be lost ; so he went and cut a large bunch of thorns,
which he contrived to fix upon the poor beast’s tail, and then, set-
ting Tiger at him, he was extremely diverted to see the fright and
agony the creature was in. But it did not fare so well with Tiger,
who, while he was baying and biting the animal's heels, received so
severe a kick upon his forehead as laid him dead upon the spot.
The boy, who had no affection for his dog, left him with the greatest
unconcern when he saw what had happened, and, finding himself
hungry, sat down by the wayside to eat his dinner.

He had not been long there before a poor blind man came groping
his way out with a couple of sticks.

‘Good morning to you, gaffer,” said the boy: ‘‘ pray, did you |
see a little girl come this road, with a basket of eggs upon her head,
dressed in a green gown, with a straw hat upon her head?”

‘“*God bless you, master,” said the beggar, ‘‘I am so blind that
I can see nothing; I have been blind these twenty years, and they
call me poor old blind Richard.” :

Though this poor man was such an object of charity and compassion,
yet the little boy determined, as usual, to :play him some trick ; and,
as he was a great liar and deceiver, he spoke to him thus:

“Poor old Richard, I am heartily sorry for you with all my heart.
Tam just rating my breakfast, and if you will sit down by me I will
give you part and feed you myself.”

“Thank you, with all my heart,” said the poor man ; ‘‘and if you



$0 : THE HISTORY OF

will give me your hand, I will sit by you with great pleasure, my
dear, good little master!” (

The little boy then gave him his hand, and pretending to direct
him, guided him to sit down in a large heap of wet manure that lay
by the roadside.

' There,” said he, ‘'now you are nicely seated, and I will feed
you.”

So, taking a little in his fingers, he was going to put it into the
blind man’s mouth ; but the man, who now perceived the trick that
had been played him, made a sudden snap at his fingers, and,
getting them between his teeth, bit them so severely that the wicked
boy roared out for mercy, and promised never more to be guilty of
such wickedness.

At last the blind man, after he had put him to very severe pain,
consented to let him go, saying as he went, ‘' Are you not ashamed,
you little scoundrel, to attempt to do hurt to those who have never
injured you, and to want to add to the sufferings of those who are
‘already sufficiently miserable? Although you escape now, be assured
that if you do not repent and mend your manners, you will meet
with a severe punishment for your bad behaviour.”

One would think that this punishment should have cured him
entirely of his mischievous disposition ; but, unfortunately, nothing
is so difficult to overcome as bad habits that have been long indulged.
He had not gone far before he saw a lame beggar, that just made a
shift to support himself by means of a couple of sticks. The beggar
asked him to give him something, and the little mischievous boy,
pulling out his sixpence, threw it down just before him, as if he in-
tended to make him a present of it; but while the poor man was
stooping with difficulty to pick it up, this wicked little boy knocked
the stick away, by which means the beggar fell down upon his face ;
and then, snatching up the sixpence, the boy ran away, laughing
very heartily at the accident.

This was the last trick this ungracious boy had it in his power to
play; for, seeing two men come up to the beggar and enter into dis-
course with him, he was afraid of being pursued, and therefore ran
as fast as he was able over several fields. At last he came into a lane
which led into a farmer’s orchard, and as he was preparing to clamber
over the fence, a large dog seized him by the leg and held him fast.
He cried out in an agony of terror, which brought the farmer out,
who called the dog off, but seized him very roughly, saying, ‘‘ So,
sir, you are caught at last, are you? You thought you might come
day after day and steal my apples without detection ; but it seems



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 6x

you are mistaken, and now you shall receive the punishment you
have so long deserved.”

The farmer then began to chastise him very severely with a whip
he had in his hand, and the boy in vain protested he was innocent,
and begged for mercy. At last the farmer asked who he was
and where he lived; but when he heard his name he cried out,
“What! are you the little rascal that frightened my sheep this
morning, by which means several of them are lost? and do you think
to escape?"

Saying this, he lashed him more scverely than before, in spite of
all his cries and protestations, At length, thinking he had punished
him enough, he turned him out of the orchard, bade him go home,
and frighten sheep again if he liked the consequences.

The little boy slunk away, crying very bitterly (for he had been
very severely beaten), and now began to find that no one can long
hurt others with impunity; so he determined to go quietly home, and
behave better for the future.

But his sufferings were not yet at an end; for as he jumped down
from a stile, he felt himself very roughly seized, and, looking up,
found that he was in the power of the lame beggar whom he had
thrown upon his face. It was in vain that he now cried, entreated,
and begged pardon ; the man, who had been much hurt by his fall,
thrashed him very severely with his stick before he would part with
him. He now again went on, crying and roaring with pain, but at
least expected to escape without further damage. But here he was
mistaken, for as he was walking slowly through a lane, just as he
turned a corner, he found himself in the middle of the very troop of
boys that he had used so ill in the morning. They all set up a shout
as soon as they saw their enemy in their power without his dog, and
began persecuting him in a thousand various ways. Some pulled
him by the hair, others pinched him; some whipped his legs with
their handkerchiefs, while others covered him with handfuls of dirt.
In vain did he attempt to escape ; they were still at his heels, and,
surrounding him on every side, continued their persecutions.

At length, while he was in this disagreeable situation, he happened
to come up to the same jackass he had seen in the morning, and,
making a sudden spring, jumped upon his back, hoping by these
means to escape. ‘The boys immediately renewed their shouts, and
the ass, wLo was frightened at the noise, began galloping with all his
might, and presently bore him from the reach of his enemies. But

_he had little reason to rejoice at his escape, for he found it impossible

to stop the animal, and was every instant afraid of being thrown off



é2 THE HISTORY OF

and dashed upon the ground. After he had keen thus hurried along
a considerable time, the ass on a sudden stopped short at the door of
acottage, and began kicking and prancing with so much fury that
the little boy was presently thrown to the ground, and broke his leg
in the fall. His cries immediately brought the family out, among
whom was the very little girl he had used so ill in the morning. But
she, with the greatest good-nature, seeing him in sucha pitiable situ-
ation, assisted in bringing him in and laying him upon the bed.
There this unfortunate boy had leisure to recollect himself, and re-
flect upon his own bad behaviour, which in one day's time had ex-
posed him to such a variety of misfortunes; and he determined with
great sincerity, that, if he ever recovered from his present accident,
he would be as careful to take every opportunity of doing good as he
had before been to commit every species of mischief.

When the story was ended, Tommy said it was very surprising to
see how differently the two little boys fared. The one little boy was
good-natured, and therefore everything he met with became his friend
and assisted him in return; the other, who was ill-natured, made
everything his enemy, and therefore he met with nothing but misfor-
tunes and vexations, and nobody seemed to feel any compassion for
him, excepting the poor little girl that assisted him at last, which was
very kind indeed of her, considering how ill she had been used.

“That is very true indeed,” said Mr. Barlow: ‘nobody is loved
in this world unless he loves others and does good to them; and no-
body can tell but one time or other he may want the assistance of the
meanest and lowest; therefore every sensible man will behave well
to everything around him, because it is his duty to do it, because
every benevolent person feels the greatest pleasure in doing good,
and even because it is his own interest to make as many friends as
possible. No one can tell, however secure his present situation may
appear, how soon it may alter, and he may have occasion for the
compassion of those who are now infinitely below him. 1 could show
you a story to that purpose; but you have read enough, and there-
fore you must go out and use some exercise.”

“Oh, pray, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘do let me hear the story: I think
I could now tread for ever without being tired.”

‘'No,” said Mr. Barlow: ‘‘ everything has its turn; to-morrow you
shall read, but now we must work in the garden.”

“Then pray, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘ may I ask a favour of you?”

“Certainly,” said Mr, Barlow: ‘‘if it is proper for you to have,
there is nothing can give me greater pleasure than to grant it.”





'

SANDFORD AND MERTON, 63

“Why, then,” said Tommy, ‘‘I have been thinking that a man
should know how to do everything in the world.”

Afr. Barlow. Very right: the more knowledge he acquires the
better.

Tommy. And therefore Harry and I are going to build a house.

wr. Barlow. To build a house! Well, and have you laid ina
sufficient quantity of bricks and mortar?

‘"No, no,” said Tommy, smiling, ‘‘ Harry and I can build houses
without bricks and mortar.”

Mr, Barlow, What are they to be made of, then—cards?

“Dear sir,” answered Tommy, ‘‘do you think we are such little
children as to want card houses? No: we are going to build real
houses, fit for people to live in. And then, you know, if ever we
should be thrown upona desert coast, as the poor men were, we shall
be able to supply ourselves with necessaries till some ship comes to
take us away.”

ir. Barlow. And if no ship should come, what then?

Tommy. Why, then, we must stay there all our lives, I am afraid.

Afr. Barlow. If you wish to prepare yourselves against the event,
you are much in the right, for nobody knows what may happen to
him in this world. What is it, then, you want to make your house?

Tommy. The first thing we want, sir, is wood and a hatchet.

Afr. Barlow. Wood you shall have in plenty; but did ever you
use a hatchet? .

Tommy. No, sir.

Mr. Barlow. Then I am afraid to let you have one, because it is
a very dangerous kind of tool; and if you are not expert in the use
of it, you may wound yourself severely. But if you will let me
know what you want, I, who am more strong and expert, will take
the hatchet and cut down the wood for you.

“Thank you, sir,” said Tommy; ‘‘you are very good to me,
indeed.”

And away Harry and he ran to the copse at the bottom of the
garden.

Mr. Barlow then went to work, and presently, by Harry's direc-
tion, cut down several poles about as thick as a man’s wrist, and
about cight feet long; these he sharpened at the end, in order to
run into the ground ; and so eager were the two little boys at the
business, that, ina very short time, they had transported them all
to the bottom of the garden; and Tommy entirely forgot he was a
gentleman, and worked with the greatest eagerness,

“Now,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ where will you fix your house? *



Sy THE HISTORY OF

‘Here, I think," answered Tommy, ‘‘just at the bottom of this
bill, because it will be warm and sheltered.” ,

So Harry took the stakes and began to thrust them into the ground
at about the distance of 2 foot, and in this manner he encloseda
piece of ground which was about ten feet long and eight feet wide
leaving an opening in the middle, of three feet wide, for a door.
After this was done they gathered up the brushwood that was cut
off, and by Harry’s direction they interwove it between the poles in
such 4 manner as to form a compact kind of fence. This labour, as
may be imagined, took them up several days ; however, they worked
at it very hard every day, and every day the work advanced, which
filled Tommy’s heart with so much pleasure that he thought himself
the happiest little boy in the universe.

But this employment did not make Tommy unmindful of the story
which Mr. Barlow had promised him ; it was to this purport :—

THE STORY OF THE GRATEFUL TURK.

Ir happened some centuries ago that a Venetian ship had taken
many of the Turks prisoners, and according to the barbarous
customs of those ages these unhappy men had been sold to different
persons in the city. By accident, one of the slaves lived opposite
to the house of a rich Venetian, who had an only son of the age of
about twelve years. It happened that this little boy used frequently
to stop as he passed near Hamet (for that was the namie of the slave),
and gaze at him very attentively. Hamet, who remarked in the face
of the child the appearance of good-nature and compassion, used
always to salute him with the greatest courtesy, and testified the
greatest pleasure in his company. At length the little boy took such
a fancy to the slave that he used to visit him several times in the
day, and brought him such little presents as he had it in his power
to make, and which he thought would be of use to his friend.

But though Hamet seemed always to take the greatest delight in
the innocent caresses of his little friend, yet the child could not help
remarking that Hamet was frequently extremely sorrowful, and he
often surprised him on a sudden when tears were trickling down his
face, although he did his utmost to conceal them. The little boy
was at length so much affected with the repetition of this sight that
he spoke of it to his father, and begged him, if he had it in his
power, to make poor Hamet happy. The father, who was extremely





SANDFORD AND MERTON. oe)

fond of his son, and besides had observed that he seldom requested.
anything that was not generous and humane, determined to see the
Turk himself and talk to him. .

Accordingly he went to him the next day, and, observing him for
some time in silence, was struck with the extraordinary appearance
of mildness and honesty which his countenance discovered. At
Jength he said to him, ‘‘ Are you that Hamet of whom my son is so
fond, and of whose gentleness and courtesy I have so often heard
him talk?”

‘*Ves,” said the Turk, ‘‘I am that unfortunate Hamet, who have
now been for three years a captive: during that space of time your
son (if you are his father) is the only human being that seems to have
felt any compassion for my sufferings ; therefore, I must confess, he
is the only object to which I am attached in this barbarous country ;
and night and morning I pray that Power who is equally the God
of Turks and Christians, to grant him every blessing he deserves,
and to preserve him from all the miseries I suffer.”

“Indeed, Hamet,” said the merchant, ‘‘he is much obliged to
you, although, from his present circumstances, he does not appear
much exposed to danger. But tell me, for 1 wish to do you good,
in what I can assist you? for my son informs me that you are the
prey of continual regret and sorrow.”

“Ts it wonderful,” answered the Turk with a glow of generous
indignation that suddenly animated his countenance, ‘‘is it wonder-"
ful that I should pine in silence, and mourn my fate, who am bereft
of the first and noblest present of nature—my liberty?”

«And yet,” answered the Venetian, ‘‘how many thousands of our
nation do you retain in fetters !"

“Tam not answerable,” said the Turk, ‘‘for the cruelty of my
countrymen, more than you are for the barbarity of yours. But as
to myself, I have never practised the inhuman custom of enslaving
my fellow-creatures ; I have never spoiled the Venetian merchants
of their property to increase my riches ; I have always respected the
rights of nature, and therefore it is the more severe.” Here a tear
started from his eye, and wetted his manly cheek: instantly, how-
ever, he recollected himself, and folding his arms upon his bosom,
and gently bowing his head, he added, ‘‘God is good, and man’
must submit to His decrees.”

The Venetian was affected with this appearance of manly fortitude,
;and said, ‘‘ Hamet, I pity your sufferings, and may perhaps be able
‘to relieve them. What would you do to regain your liberty?”

“What would I do?” answered Hamet ; ‘‘by theeternal Majesty

5






















66 THE HISTORY OF

of Heaven, I would confront every pain and danger that can appal
the heart of man !”

“Nay,” answered the merchant, “you will not be exposed toa
trial. The means of your deliverance are certain, provided your
courage does not belie your appearance.”

“Name them! name them !” cried the impatient Hamet ; ‘‘ place
death before me in every horrid shape, and if I shrink”

‘ Patience,” answered the merchant: ‘‘we shall be observed ; but
hear me attentively. I have in this city an inveterate foe, who has
heaped upon me every injury which can most bitterly sting the heart
of man. This man is as brave as he is haughty ; and I must confess
the dread of his strength and valour has hitherto deterred me from
resenting his insults as they deserve. Now, Hamet, your look, your
form, your words, convince me that you were born for manly daring.
‘Take this dagger: as soon as the shades of night involve the city I
will.myself conduct you to the place where you may at once revenge
your friend and regain your freedom.”

At this proposal, scom and shame flashed from the kindling eye
of Hamet, and passion for a considerable time deprived him of the
power of utterance ; at length he lifted his arm as high as his chains
would permit, and cried with an indignant tone, ‘ Mighty Prophet !
and are these the wretches to whom you permit your faithful votaries
to be enslaved! Go, base Christian, and know that Hamet would
not stoop to the vile trade of an assassin for all the weaith of Venice!
no! not to purchase the freedom of all his race !”

At these words the merchant, without seeming much abashed,
told him he was sorry he had offended him ; but he thought freedom
had been dearer to him than he found it was.

“However,” added he, as he turned his back, ‘‘ you will reflect
upon my proposal, and perhaps by to-morrow you may change your
mind.”

Hamet disdained to answer ; and the merchant went his way.

The next day, however, he returned in company with his son, and
mildly accosted Hamet thus: i

“The abruptness of the proposal I yesterday made you might
perhaps astonish you, but I am now come to discourse the: matter
more calmly with you, and IJ doubt not, when you have heard my
reasons——”

“Christian,” interrupted Hamet, with a severe but composed
countenance, “cease at length to insult the miserable with proposals
more shocking than even these chains. If thy religion permit such |
acts as. those, know that they are execrable and abominable to the |





















SANDFORD AND MERTON. 67

soul of every Mohammedan: therefore from this moment let us
break off all further intercourse, and be strangers to each other.”
‘*No,” answered the merchant, flinging himself into the arms 0° -
Hamet, ‘‘let us from this moment be more closely linked than ever !
Generous man, whose virtues may at once disarm and enlighten thy
enemies ! fondness for my son first made me interested in thy fate ;
but from the moment that I saw thee yesterday I determined to set
thee free: therefore, pardon me this unnccessary trial of thy virtue,
which has anly raised thee higher in my esteem, Francisco has a
soul which is as averse to deeds of treachery and blood as even
Hamet himself. From this moment, generous man, thou art free ;
thy ransom is already paid, with no other obligation than that of
remembering the affection of this thy young and faithful friend ; and
perhaps hereafter, when thou seest an unhappy Christian groaning
in Turkish fetters, thy generosity may make thee think of Venice.”
It is impossible to describe the ecstacies or the gratitude of Hamet
at this unexpected deliverance : I will not, therefore, attempt to repeat
what he said to his benefactors; I will only add that he was that
day set free, and Francisco embarked him on board a ship which
was going to one of the Grecian islands, took leave of him with the
greatest tenderness, and forced him to accept a purse of gold to pay
his expenses. Nor was it withou’. the greatest regret that Hamet
parted from his young friend, whose disinterested kindness had thus
procured his freedom ; he embraced him with an agony of tender-
ness, wept over him at parting, and prayed for every blessing upon
1 his head.
| About six months after this transaction a sudden fire burst forth
} in the house of this generous merchant. It was early in the morning,
when sleep is the most profound, and none of the family perceived
it till almost the whole of the building was involved in flames. The
frightened servants had just time to waken the merchant and hurry
him downstairs, and the instant he was down, the staircase itself
% gave way, and sank with a horrid crash into the midst of the fire.
But if Francisco congratulated himself for an instant upon his
escape, it was only to resign himself immediately after to the most
deep despair, when he found upon inquiry, that his son, who slept
in an upper apartment, had been neglected in the general tumult,
and was yet amongst the flames, No words can describe the father’s
agony: he wculd have rushed head’ong into the fire, but was re-
strained by his servants; he then -aved in an agony of grief, and
offered half his fortune to the intrepid man who would risk his life
to save his child. As Francisco was known to be immensely rich,

5—2



68 THE HISTORY OF

several ladders were in the instant raised, and several daring spirits,
incited by the vast reward, attempted the adventure. The violence
of the flames, however, which burst forth at every window, together
with the ruins that fell on every side, drove them all back; and the
unfortunate youth, who now appeared upon the battlements, stretch-
ing out his arms and imploring aid, seemed to be destined to certain
destruction.

The unhappy father now lost all perception, and sank down in a
state of insensibility, when, in this dreadful moment of general sus-
pense and agony, a man rushed through the opening crowd, mounted
the tallest of the ladders with an intrepidity that showed he was re-
solved to succeed or perish, and instantly disappeared. A sudden
gust of smoke and fiame burst forth immediately after, which made
the people imagine he was lost; when, on a sudden, they beheld
him emerge again with the child in his arms, and descend the ladder
without any material damage. A universal shout of applause now
resounded to the skies ; but what words can give an adequate idea
of the father’s feelings, when, on recovering his senses, he found his
darling miraculously preserved, and safe within his arms?

After the first effusions of his tenderness were over, he asked for
his deliverer, and was shown a man ofa noble stature, but dressed
in mean attire, and his features were so begrimed with smoke and
filth that it was impossible to distinguish them. Francisco, however,
accosted him with courtesy, and, presenting him with a purse of gold,
begged he would accept of that for the present, and that the next
day he should receive to the utmost of his promised reward.

‘*No, generous merchant,’’ answered the stranger, ‘‘I do not sell
my blood.”

‘'Gracious heavens!” cried the merchant, ‘‘sure I should know
that voice? It is——”

‘'Yes,” exclaimed the son, throwing himself into the arms of his
deliverer, ‘‘ it is my Hamet!”

It was indeed Hamet, who stood before them in the same mean
attire which he had worn six months before, when the first generosity
of the merchant had redeemed him from slavery. Nothing could
equal the astonishment and gratitude of Francisco; but as they were
then surrounded by a large concourse of people, he desired Hamet
to go with him to the house of one of his friends, and when they

. were alone he embraced him tenderly, and asked by what extra-
ordinary chance he had thus been enslaved a second time, adding a
kind of reproach for his not informing him of his captivity.

“‘T bless God for that captivity,” answered Hamet, ‘'since it has



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 69

given me an opportunity of showing that 1 was not altogether unde-
serving of your kindness, and of preserving the life of that dear youth,
that I value a thousand times beyond my own, But it is now fit that
my generous patron should be informed of the whole truth. Know,
then, that when the unfortunate Hamet was taken by your galleys,
his aged father shared his captivity—it was his fate which so often
made me shed those tears which first attracted the notice of your son ;
and when your unexampled bounty had set me free, I flew to find
the Christian who had purchased him. I represented to him that I
was young and vigorous, while he was aged and infirm ; I added,
too, the gold which I_had received from your bounty: ina word, I
prevailed upon the Christian to send back my father in that ship
which was intended for me, without acquainting him with the means
of his freedom: since that time I have stayed here to discharge the
debt of nature and gratitude, a willing slave——"

At this part of the story Harry, who had with difficulty restrained
himself before, burst into such a fit of crying, and Tommy himself
was so much affected, that Mr. Barlow told them they had better
leave off for the present, and go to some other employment. They
therefore went into the garden to resume the labour of their house,
but found, to their unspeakable regret, that during their absence an
accident had happened which had entirely destroyed all their labours:
a violent storm of wind and rain had risen that morning, which, blow-
ing full against the walls of the newly constructed house, had levelled
it with the ground. Tommy could scarcely refrain from crying when
he saw the ruins lying around; but Harry, who bore the loss with
more composure, told him not to mind it, for it could easily be re-
paired, and they would build it stronger the next time.

Harry then went up to the spot, and after examining it some time,
told Tommy that he believed he had found out the reason of their
misfortune.

‘What is it?” said Tommy.

‘‘Why,” said Harry, ‘it is only because we did not drive these
stakes, which are to bear the whole weight of our house, far enough
into the ground ; and therefore, when the wind blew agains. the flat
side of it with so much violence, it could not resist. And now I re-
member to have seen the workmen, when they begin a building, dig
a considerable way into thé ground, to lay the foundation fast; and
T should think that, if we drove these stakes a great way. into the
ground, it would produce the same effect, and we should have no-
thing to fear from any future storms."



70 THE HISTORY OF

Mr. Barlow then came into the garden, and the two boys showed
him their misfortune, and asked him whether he did not think that
driving the stakes further in would prevent such an accident for the
future. Mr. Barlow told them he thought it would; and that, as
they were too short to reach the top of the stakes, he would assist
them. He then went and brought a wooden mallet, with which he
struck the tops of the stakes, and drove them so fast into the ground
that there was no longer any danger of their being shaken by the
weather. Harry and Tommy then applied themselves with so much
assiduity to their work that they in a very short time had repaired all
the damage, and advanced it as far as it had been before.

The next thing that was necessary to be done was putting on a
roof, for hitherto they had constructed nothing but the walls. For
this purpose they took several long poles, which they laid across their
-building where it was most narrow, and upon these they placed straw
in considerable quantities, so that they now imagined they had con-
structed a house that would completely screen them from the wea-
ther. But in this, unfortunately, they were again mistaken ;:for a
very violent shower of rain coming on just as they had completed
their building, they took shelter under it, and remarked for some
time, with infinite pleasure, how dry and comfortable it kept them ;
but at last the straw that covered it being completely soaked through,
and the water having no vent to run off, by reason of the flatness of
the roof, the rain began to penetrate in considerable quantities.

For some time Harry and Tommy bore the inconvenience, but it
increased so much that they were soon obliged to leave it and seek
for shelter in the house. When they were thus secured, they began
again to consider the affair of the house, and Tommy said that it
surely must be because they had not put straw enough upon it.

“No,” said Harry, ‘‘I think that cannot be the reason ; I rather
imagine it must be owing to our roof lying so flat; for I have ob-
served that all houses that I have ever seen have their roofs ina
shelving posture, by which means the wet continually runs off from
them and falls to the ground; whereas ours, being quite flat, detained
almost all the rain that fell upon it, which must necessarily soak
deeper and deeper into the straw till it penetrated quite through.”

They therefore agreed to remedy this defect ; and for this purpose
they took several poles of an equal length, the one end of which they
fastened to the side of the house, and let the other two ends meet in
the middle, by which means they formed a roof exactly like that
which we commonly see upon buildings; they also took several
poles, which they tied across the others, to keep them firm in their



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 4

places, and give the roof additional strength ; and lastly, they covered
the whole with straw or thatch; and for fear the thatch should be
blown away, they stuck several pegs in different: places, and put
small pieces of stick crosswise from peg to peg, to keep the straw in
its place. When this was done they found they had avery tolerable
house ; only the sides, being formed of brushwood alone, did not
sufficiently exclude the wind. To remedy this inconvenience, Harry,
who was chief architect, procured some clay, and mixing it up with
water, to render it sufficiently soft, he daubed it all over the walls,
both within and without, by which means the wind was excluded and
the house rendered much warmer than before.

Some time had now elapsed since the seeds of the wheat were
sown, and they, began to shoot so vigorously that the blade of the
corn appeared green’ above the ground, and increased every day ‘in
strength. Tommy went to look at it every morning, and remarked
its gradual increase with the greatest satisfaction.

“ Now,” he said to Harry, ‘‘I think we should soon be able to live
if we were upon a desert island. Here is a house to shelter us from
the weather, and we shall soon have some corn for food.”

**Yes,” answered Harry; ‘‘ but there are a great many things still
wanting to enable us to make bread.”

Mr. Barlow had a very large garden and an orchard full of the
finest fruit-trees ; and he had another piece of ground where he used
to sow seeds in order to raise trees, and then they were carefully
planted out in beds till they were big enough to be moved into the
orchard and produce fruit. Tommy had often eaten of the fruit of
the orchard, and thought it delicious, and this led him to think that
it would be a great improvement to their house if he had a few trees
that he might set near it, and which would shelter it from the sun
and hereafter produce fruit; so he desired Mr. Barlow to give him
a couple of trees, and Mr. Barlow told him to go into the nursery
and take his choice. Accordingly Tommy went, and chose out two
of the strongest-looking trees he could find, which, with Harry's
assistance, he transplanted into the garden in the following manner:
They both took their spades, and very carefully dug the trees up
without injuring their roots; then they dug two large holes in the
place where they chose the trees should stand, and very carefully
broke the earth to pieces, that it might lie light upon the roots; then
the tree was placed in the middle of the hole, and Tommy held it
upright while Harry gently threw the earth over the roots, which he
trod down with his feet in order to cover them well. Lastly, he
stuck a large stake in the ground and tied the tree to it, from the



72 THE HISTORV OF

fear that the wintry wind might injure it, or perhaps entirely blow it
out of the ground. ?

Nor did they bound their attention here. There was a little spring
of water which burst from the upper ground in the garden, and ran
down the side of the hill in a small stream. Harry and Tommy
Jaboured very hard for several days to form a new channel, to lead
the water near the roots of their trees, for it happened to be hot dry
weather, and they feared they might perish from want of moisture.

Mr. Barlow saw them employed in this manner with the greatest
Satisfaction. He told them that in many parts of the world the ex-
' cessive heat burned up the ground so much that nothing would sTow
unless the soil was watered in that manner. ‘‘There is,” said he, ‘‘a
country in particular, called Egypt, which has always been famous for
its fertility, and for the quantity of corn that grows in it, which is
naturally watered in the following extraordinary manner. There is
2 great river called the Nile, which flows through the whole extent of
the country ; the river, at a particular time of the year, begins to over-
flow its banks, and, as the whole country is flat, it very soon covers
it all with its waters. These waters remain in this situation several
weeks before they have entirely drained off; and when that happens,
they leave the soil so rich that everything that is planted in it flourishes
and produces with the greatest abundance.”

‘Is not that the country, sir,” said Harry, ‘‘where that cruel ani-
mail the crocodile is found ?”

“*Yes,”” answered Mr. Barlow.

‘What is that, sir?” said Tommy.

“It is an animal,” answered Mr. Barlow, ‘‘that lives someimes
upon the land, sometimes in the water. It comes originally from an
egg, which the old one lays and buries in the sand. The heat of the
sun then warms it during several days, and at last a young crocodile
is hatched. This animal is at first very small; it has a long body and
four short legs, which serve it both to walk with upon the land and to
swim with in the waters. It has, besides, a long tail, or rather the
body is extremely long, and gradually grows thinner till it ends ina
point. Its shape is exactly like that of a lizard: or, if you have never
seen a lizard, did you never observe a small animal, of some inches
Jong, which lives at the bottom of ditches and ponds?”

“Yes, sir, I have,” answered Tommy, ‘‘and I once caught one
with my hand, taking it for a fish; but when I had it near me, I saw
it had four little legs, so I threw it into the water again, for fear the
animal should be hurt.”

‘This animal,” answered Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ may give you an exact
idea of a young crocodile; but as it grows older it gradually becomes



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 73

bigger, till at last, as I have been informed, it reaches the length of
twenty or thirty feet.”

‘That is very large,” said Tommy; ‘‘and does it do any harm?”

“Yes,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘itisa very voracious animal, and devours
everything it can seize. It frequently comes out of the water and lives
upon the shore, where it resembles a large log of wood ; and if any
animal unguardedly comes near, it snaps at it on a sudden, and if it
can catch the poor creature, devours it.”

Tommy. And does it never devour men?

Mr. Barlow. Sometimes, if it surprises them; but those who are
accustomed to meet with them frequently easily escape. They run
round in a circle, or turn short on a sudden, by which means the
animal is left far behind ; because, although he can run tolerably fast
in a straight line, the great length of his body prevents him from turn-
ing with ease.

‘Tommy. This must bea dreadful animal to meet with: is it possible
for a man to defend himself against it?

Mr. Barlow, Everything is possible to those that have courage and
coolness; therefore many of the inhabitants of those countries carry
long spears in their hands in order to defend themselves from those
‘animals. The crocodile opens his wide voracious jaws in order to
devour the man, but the man takes this opportunity and thrusts the
point of his spear into the creature’s mouth, by which means he is
generally killed upon the spot. Nay, I have even heard that some
will carry their hardiness so far as to go into the water in order to
fight the crocodile there. They take a large splinter of wood about
a foot in length, strong in the middle, and sharpened at both ends;
to this they tiea long and tough cord. The man who intends to fight
the crocodile takes this piece of wood in his right hand, and goes into
the river, where he wades till one of these creatures perceives him.
As soon as that happens the animal comes up to him to seize him,
extending his wide and horrid jaws, which are armed with several
rows of pointed teeth; but the man, with the greatest intrepidity,
waits for his enemy, and the instant he approaches thrusts his hand,
armed with the splinter of wood, into his terrible mouth, which the
creature closes directly, and by these means forces the sharp points
into each of his jaws, where they stick fast. He is then incapable of
doing hurt, and they pull him to the shore by the cord.

‘Pray, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘is this dreadful animal capable of
being tamed?”

“Yes,” answered Mr. Barlow. ‘'I believe, as I have before told
you, there is no animal that may not be rendered mild and inoffensive



74 THE HISTORY OF

by good usuage. There are several parts of Egypt where tame cro-
codiles are kept.

This account diverted Tommy very much. He thanked Mr. Barlow
for giving him this description of the crocodile, and said he should
like to see every animal in the world. ‘That,” answered Mr. Barlow,
“‘would be-extremely difficult, as almost every country produces some
kind which is not found in other parts of the world ; but if you will
be contented to read the descriptions of them which have been written,
you may easily gratify your curiosity.”

It happened about this time that Tommy and Harry rose early
one morning, and went to take a long walk before breakfast, as they
used frequently to do; they rambled so far that at last they both
found themselves tired, and sat down under a hedge to rest. While
they were here a very clean and decently dressed woman passed by,
who, seeing two little boys sitting by themselves, stopped to look at
them ; and, after considering them attentively, she said, ‘‘ You seem,
my little dears, to be either tired or to have lost your way.”

‘No, madam,” said Harry, ‘“‘we have not lost our way, but we
have walked farther than usual this morning, and we wait here a
little while to rest ourselves.”

“Well,” said the woman, ‘‘if you will come into my little house
—that you see a few yards farther on—you may sit more comfort-
ably ; and as my daughter has by this time milked the cows, she
shall give you a mess of bread and milk.”

Tommy, who was by this time extremely hungry as well as tired,
told Harry that he should like to accept the good woman's invita-
tion ; so they followed her to a small but clean-looking farmhouse
which stood at a little distance. Here they entered a clean kitchen,
furnished with very plain but convenient furniture, and were desired
to sit down by a warm and comfortable fire, which was made of turf.
Tommy, who had never seen such a fire, could not help inquiring
about it, and the good woman told him that poor people like her
were unable to purchase many coals ; “therefore,” said she, “we
go and pare the surface of the commons, which is full of grass and
heath and other vegetables, together with their roots all matted

‘together ; these we dry in small pieces by leaving them exposed to
tke summer's sun, and then we bring them home and put them under
the cover of a shed, and use them for our fires,”

But," said Tommy, ‘I should think you would hardly have fire
enough by these means to dress your dinner ; for I have by accident
Seen in my father’s kitchen when they were dressing the dinner, and
I saw a fire that blazed up to the very top of the chimney.”



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 75

The poor woman smiled at this, and said, “ Your father, I sup-
pose, master, is some rich man, who has a great deal of victuals to
dress, but we poor people must be more easily contented,”

“Why,” said Tommy, ‘‘you must at least want to roast meat
every day.”

“No,” said the poor woman, ‘‘we seldom see roast beef at our
house ; but we are very well contented if we can havea bit of fat
pork every day, boiled in a pot with turnips ; and we bless God that
we fare so well, for there are many poor souls, who are as good as
we, that can scarcely get a morsel of dry bread.”

While they were talking a little clean girl came and brought
Tommy an earthen porringer full of new milk, with a large slice of
brown bread. Tommy took it, and ate with so good a relish that.
he thought he had never made a better breakfast in his life. ‘

When Harry and he had eaten their breakfast, Tommy told him
it was time they should return home, so he thanked the good woman
for her kindness, and putting his hand into his pocket, pulled out a
shilling, which he desired her to accept. 4

“No, God bless you, my little dear!" said the woman, “T will
not take a farthing of you for the world. What though my husband
and I are poor, yet we are able to get a living by our labour, and
give a mess of milk to a traveller without hurting ourselves.”

Tommy thanked her again, and was just going away, when a
couple of surly-looking men came in and asked the woman if her
name was Tosse?.

“Ves, itis,” said the woman: “I have never been ashamed of
qe:

‘“Why, then,” said one of the men, pulling a paper out of his
pocket, ‘‘Here is an execution against you, on the part of Mr.
Richard Gruff; and if your husband does not instantly discharge
the debt, with interest and all costs, amounting altogether to the
sum of thirty-nine pounds ten shillings, we shall take an inventory of
all you have, and proceed to sell it by auction for the discharge of
the debt.” 5

“Indeed,” said the poor woman, looking a little confused, ‘‘ this
must certainly be a mistake, for I never heard of Mr. Richard Gruff
in all my life, nor do I believe that my husband owes a fathing in the
world, unless to his landlord ; and I know that he has almost made
up half a year’s rent to him ; so that I do not think he would go to
trouble a poor man.”

“No, no, mistress,” said. the man, shaking his head, ‘‘ we know
our business too well to make these kind of mistakes ; but when your



76 THE HISTORY OF

husband comes in we'll talk with him; in the meantime we must go
on with our inventory.”

The two men then went into the next room, and immediately after
a stout comely-looking man, of about the age of forty, came in, with
a good-humoured countenance, and asked it his breakfast was ready.

‘Oh, my poor dear William!” said the woman, ‘‘here is a sad
breakfast for you! But I think it cannot be true that you owe any-
thing; so what the fellows told me must be false about Richard
Gruff.”

At this name the man instantly started, and his countenance, which
was before ruddy, became pale as a sheet.

“Surely,” said the woman, ‘it cannot be true that you owe forty
pounds to Richard Gruff?"

‘‘Alas !” answered the man, ‘'I do not know the exact sum ; but
when your brother Peter failed, and his creditors seized all that he
had, this Richard Gruff was going-to send him to jail, had not I
agreed to be bound for him, which enabled him to go to sea. He
indeed promised to remit his wages to me, to prevent my getting into
any trouble on that account; but you know it is now three years
since he went, and in all that time we have heard nothing about
him.”

‘‘Then,” said the woman, bursting into tears, ‘you and ail your
poor dear children are ruined for my ungrateful brother, for here are
two bailiffs in the house, who have come to take possession of all you
have, and to sell it.”

At this the man's face became red as scarlet, and seizing an old
sword which hung over the chimney, he cried out, ‘ No, it shall not
be! I will die first ! I will make these villains know what it is to make
honest men desperate.”

He then drew the sword, and was going out in a fit of madness,
which might have proved fatal either to himself or to the bailiffs, but
his wife flung herself upon her knees before him, and, catching hold
of his legs, besought him to be more composed.

‘‘Oh, for Heaven's sake, my dear, dear husband," said she, ‘‘con-
sider what you are doing. You can neither do me nor your children
any service by this violence ; instead of that, should you be so un-
fortunate as to kill either of these men, would it not be murder, and
would not our lot be a thousand times harder than it is at present?”

This remonstrance seemed to have some effect upon the farmer;
his children, too, although too young to understand the cause of all
this confusion, gathered round him and hung about him, sobbing in
concert with their mother. Little Harry, too, although a stranger to



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 17

the poor man before, yet with the tenderest sympathy took him by
the hand and bathed it with his tears. At length, softened and over-
come by the sorrows of those he loved so well, and by his own cooler
reflections, he resigned the fatal instrument, and sat himself down
upon a chair, covering his face with his hands, and only saying,
“The will of God be done!”

Tommy had beheld this affecting scene with the greatest attention,
although he had not said a word ; and now beckoning Harry away,
he went silently out of the house, and took the road which led to
Mr. Barlow's. While he was on the way, he seemed to be so full of
the scene which he had just witnessed that he did not open his lips ;
but when he came home he instantly went to Mr. Barlow and desired.
that he would directly send him to his father’s. Mr. Barlow stared
at the request, and asked him what was the occasion of his being so
suddenly tirec with his residence at the vicarage.

“Sir,” answered Tommy, ‘‘l am not the least tired, I assure you;
you have been extremely kind to me, and I shall always remember it
with the greatest gratitude; but I want to see my father immediately,
and Iam sure when you come to know the occasion, you will not
disapprove of it.”

Mr. Barlow did not press him any further, but ordered a careful
servant to saddle a horse directly and take Tommy home before him.

Mr, and Mrs. Merton were extremely surprised and overjoyed at
the sight of their son, who thus unexpectedly arrived at home ; but
‘Tommy, whose mind was full of the project he had formed, as soon
as he had answered their first questions, accosted his father thus:

“Pray, sir, will you be angry with me if I ask you for a great
favour?”

‘No, surely,” said Mr. Merton, ‘! that I will not.”

“Why, then,” said Tommy, ‘‘as I have often heard you say that
you were very rich, and that if I was good I should be rich too, will
you give me some money?”

“ Money!" said Mr. Merton: ‘‘ yes, to be sure ; how much do you
want?”

“Why, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘I want a very large sum indeed.”

‘Perhaps a guinea,” answered Mr. Merton.

Tommy. No, sir, a great deal more—a great many guineas,

Mfr. Merton. Let us, however, see.

Tommy. Why, sir, 1 want at least forty pounds.

“Bless the boy!" answered Mrs. Merton; ‘‘ surely Mr. Barlow

must have taught him tobe ten times more extravagant than he was
before.”



7d VHE HISTORY OF

Tommy. Indeed, madam, Mr. Barlow knows nothing about the
matter. ‘

“ But,” said Mr. Merton, ‘‘ what can such an urchin as you want
with, such a large sum of money?” ;

“ Sir,” answered Tommy, ‘that is a secret; but Iam sure when
you come tohear it, you will approve of the use I intend to make of it.”

Mr. Merton. That I very much doubt.

Tommy. But, sir, if you please, you may let me have this money,
and I will pay you again by degrees.

Mr. Merton. How will you ever be able to pay me such a sum?

Tommy. Why, sir, you know you are so kind as frequently to give
me new clothes and pocket-money ; now, if you will only let me
have this money, I will neither want new clothes, nor anything else,
till I have made it up.

Mr. Merton. But what can such a child as you want with all this
money?

Tommy. Pray, sir, wait a few days, and you shall know ; and if I
make a bad use of it, never believe me again as long as I live.

Mr. Merton was extremely struck with the earnestness with which
his son persevered in the demand ; and, as he was both very rich and
liberal, he determined to hazard the experiment, and comply with
his request. He accordingly went and fetched him the money which
he asked for, and put it into his hands, telling him at the same time
that he expected to be acquainted with the use he put it to; and
that, if he was not satisfied with the account, he would never ‘trust
him again. Tommy appeared in ecstacies at the confidence that
was reposed in him, and, after thanking his father for his extra-
ordinary goodness, he desired leave to go back again with Mr.
Barlow’s servant. 5

When he arrived at Mr. Barlow’s, his first care was to desire Harry
to accompany him again to the farmer's house. Thither the two
little boys went with the greatest expedition; and, on their entering
the house, found the unhappy family in the same situation as before.
But Tommy, who had hitherto suppressed his feelings, finding him-
self now enabled: to execute the project he had formed, went up to
the good woman of the house, who sat sobbing in a corner of the
room, and, taking her gently by the hand, said,

My good woman, you were very kind to me in the morning, and
therefore I am determined to be kind to you in return.”

“God bless you, my little master,” said the woman, ‘‘ you are
very welcome to what you had ; but you are not able to do anything
to relieve our distress.”



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 79

“How do you know that?” said Tommy; ‘perhaps I can do
more for you than you imagine.”

“ Alas!” answered the woman, ‘'I believe you would do all you
could ; but all our goods will be seized and sold, unless we can im-
mediately raise the sum of forty pounds ; and that is impossible, for
we have no earthly friend to assist us; therefore my poor babes and
I must soon be turned out of doors, and God alone can keep them
from starving.” :

Tommy's little heart was too much affected to keep the woman
longer in suspense; therefore, pulling out his bag of money, he
poured it into her lap, saying, ‘Here, my good woman, take this
and pay your debts, and God: bless you and your children !”

It is impossible to express the surprise of the poor woman at the
sight : she stared wildly around her and upon her little benefactor,
and, clasping her hands together in an agony of gratitude and feel-
ing, she fell back in her chair with a kind of convulsive motion: Her
husband, who was in the next room, seeing her in this condition, ran
up to her, and catching her in his arms, asked her with the greatest
tenderness what was the matter ; but she, springing ona sudden from
his embraces, threw herself upon her knees before the little boy, sob-
bing and blessing with a brokem inarticulate: voice, embracing his
knees and kissing his feet. The husband, who did not know what
had happened, imagined that his wife had: lost her senses ; and the
little children, who had before been skulking about the room, ran up
to their mother, pulling her by the gown, and hiding their faces in
her bosom. But the woman, at the sight of them, seemed’ to recollect
herself, and cried ‘out, ‘* My children, you must alf have been. starved
without the assistanceof this little angel’; why do you-not join with
me in thanking him?”

At this the husband said, ‘‘Surely, Mary, you must have Tost. your
senses. What can this young gentleman. do for us, or to prevent
cour wretched babes from perishing?”

“Qh, William,” said the woman, * T-am not mad, though I may
appear so; but look here, William, look what Providence has sent
us by the hands of this little angel; and’ then wonder not that § should
be wild.”

Saying this, she held up: the money, and at the sight ber husband
looked as wild and astonished as she.

But Tommy went up to the man, and taking him by the hand,
said, ‘‘ My good friend; you are very welcome to this; T freely give
it you ; and I hope it will.enable you to pay what you owe, and to
preserve these poor little-children.”



so THE HISTORY OF

But the man, who had before appeared to bear his misfortunes
with silent dignity, now burst into tears and sobbed like his wife and
children ; but Tommy, who now began to be pained with this excess
of gratitude, went silently out of the house, followed by Harry, and,
Bee the poor family perceived what had become of him, was out
of sight.

When he came back to Mr. Barlow's, that gentleman received
him with the greatest affection, and when he had inquired after the
health of Mr. and Mrs. Merton, asked T ommy whether he had for-
gotten the story of the grateful Turk. Tommy told him he had not,
and should now be very glad to hear the remainder ; which Mr.
Barlow gave him to read, and which was as follows :—

CONTINUATION OF THE HISTORY OF THE GRATEFUL TURK,

WHEN Hamet had thus finished his story, the Venetian was as-
tonished at the virtue and elevation of his mind; and after saying
everything that his gratitude and admiration suggested, he concluded
with pressing him to accept the half of his fortune, and to settle in
Venice for the remainder of his life. This offer Hamet refused with
the greatest respect, but with a generous disdain ; and told his friend
that, in what he had done, he had only discharged a debt of grati-
tude and friendship.

‘* You were,” said he, ‘‘my generous benefactor ; you hada claim
upon my life by the benefit you had already conferred: that life
would have been well bestowed had it been lost in your service ; but
since Providence hath otherwise decreed, it is a sufficient recompense
to me to have proved that Hamet is not ungrateful, and to have
been instrumental to the preservation of your happiness.”

But though the disinterestedness of Hamet made him underrate
his own exertions, the merchant could not remain contented without
showing his gratitude by all the means within his power. He there-
fore once more purchased the freedom of Hamet, and freighted a
ship on purpose to send him back to his own country ; he and his
son then embraced him with all the affection that gratitude could
inspire, and bade him as they thought an eternal adieu.

Many years had now elapsed since the departure of Hamet into
his own country, without their seeing him, or receiving any intelli-
gence from him. In the meantime the young Francisco, the son
of the merchant, grew up to manhood; and as he had acquired
every accomplishment which tends to improve the mind or form the



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 8x

manners, added to an excellent disposition, he was generally Beloved
and esteemed.

It happened that some business about this time made it necessary
for him and his father to go to a neighbouring maritime city ; and
as they thought a passage by sea would be more expeditious, they
both embarked in a Venetian vessel which was on the point of sailing
to that place. They set sail, therefore, with favourable winds, and
every appearence of a happy passage ; but they had not proceeded
more than half their intended voyage before a Turkish corsair (a
ship purposely fitted out for war) was seen bearing down upon them,
and as the enemy exceeded them much in swiftness, they soon found
that it was impossible to escape. The greater part of the crew be-
longing to the Venetian vessel were struck with consternation, and
seemed already overcome with fear ; but the young Francisco, draw-
ing his sword, reproached his comrades with their cowardice, and
so effectually encouraged them that they determined to defend their
liberty by a desperate resistance. The Turkish vessel now ap-
proached them in awful silence, but in an instant the dreadful noise
of the artillery was heard, and the heavens were obscured with smoke
intermixed with transitory flashes of fire. Three times did the Turks
leap with their horrid shouts upon the deck of the Venetian vessel,
and three times were they driven back by the desperate resistance of
the crew, headed by young Francisco. “At length the slaughter of
their men was so great that they seemed disposed to discontinue the
fight, and were actually taking another course. The Venetians be-
held their flight with the greatest joy, and were congratulating each
other upon their successful valour and merited escape, when two
more ships on a sudden appeared in sight, bearing down upon them
with incredible swiftness before the wind. Every heart was now
chilled with new terrors, when, on their nearer approach, they dis-
covered the fatal ensigns of their enemies, and knew that there was
no longer any possibility of either resistance or escape. They there-
fore lowered their flag (the sign of surrendering their ship), and in an
instant sew themselves in the power of their enemies, who came
pouring in on every side with the rage and violence of beasts of
prey. All that remained alive of the brave Venetian crew were
loaded with fetters, and closely guarded in the hold of the ship
till it arrived at Tunis, They were then brought out in chains, and.
exposed in the public market to be sold for slaves. They had there
the mortification to see their companions picked out one by one,
according to their apparent strength and vigeur, and sold. to different
masters. At length a Turk approached, who, from his look and

6



82 THE HISTORY OF

habit, appeared to be of superior rank, and after glancing his eye
over the rest with an expression of compassion, he fixed them at last
upon young Francisco, and demanded of the captain of the ship what
was the price of that young man. The captain answered that he
would not take less than five hundred pieces of gold for that captive.

‘« That,” said the Turk, ‘‘is very extraordinary, since I have seen
you sell those that much exceed him in vigour for less than a fifth
part of that sum.”

Yes,” answered the captain, ‘‘ but he shall either pay me some
part of the damage he has occasioned, or labour for life at the oar.”

‘What damage,” answered the other, ‘‘ can he have done you
more than all the rest whom you have prized so cheaply?”

“He it was,” replied the captain, ‘‘ who animated the Christians
to the desperate resistance which cost me the lives of so many of my
brave sailors. ‘Three times did we leap upon their deck with a fury
that seemed irresistible, and three times did that youth attack us with
such cool determined opposition that we were obliged to retreat in-
gloriously, leaving at every charge twenty of our number behind.
Therefore, I repeat it, L,will either have that price for him, great as
it may appear, or else I will gratify my revenge by seeing him drudge
for life in my victorious galley.” '

At this the Turk examined young Francisco with new attention ;
and he, who had hitherto fixed his eyes upon the ground in sullen
silence, now lifted them up ; but scarcely had he beheld the person
that was talking to the captain when he uttered a loud cry and
repeated the name of Hamet. The Turk, with equal emotion,
surveyed him for a moment, and then, catching him in his arms,
embraced him with the transports of a parent who unexpectedly
recovers a long-lost child.

It is unnecessary to repeat all that gratitude and affection inspired
Hamet ,to say, but when he heard that his ancient benefactor was
amongst the number of those unhappy Venetians who stood before
him, he hid his face for a moment under his vest and seemed over-
qwhelmed with sorrow and astonishment, when, recollecting himself,
he raised his arms to heaven and blessed that Providence which had
made him the instrument of safety to his ancient benefactor. He
then instantly flew to that part of the market where Francisco stood
waiting for his fate with a manly, mute despair. He called him his
friend, his benefactor, and every endearing name which friendship
and gratitude could inspire ; and ordering his chains to be instantly
taken off, he conducted him and his son to a magnificent house
which belonged to him in the city.



SANDFORD AND MERTON. 83

As soon as they were alone, and had time for an explanation of
their mutual fortunes, Hamet told the Venetians that, when he was
set at liberty by their generosity, and restored to his country, he
had accepted a command in the®Lurkish armies; and that, having
had the good fortune to distinguish himself on several occasions, he
had gradually been promoted, through various offices, to the dignity
of Bashaw of Tunis.

‘Since I have enjoyed this post,” added he, ‘there is nothing
which I find in it so agreeable as the power it gives me of alleviating
the misfortunes of those unhappy Christians who are taken prisoners
byour corsairs, Whenever a ship arrives, which brings with it any
of these sufferers, I constantly visit the markets and redeem a certain.
number of the captives, whom I restore to liberty. And gracious
Allah has shown that He approves of these faint endeavours to dis-
charge the sacred duties of gratitude for my own redemption, by
putting it in my power to serve the best and dearest of men.”

Ten days were Francisco and his son entertained in the house of
Hamet, during which time he put in practice everything within his
power to please and interest them; but when he found they were
desirous of returning home, he told them he would no longer detain
them from their country, but that they should embark the next day
ina ship that was setting sail for Venice. Accordingly, on the morrow
he dismissed them, with many embraces and much reluctance, and
ordered a chosen party of his own guards to conduct them on board
their vessel. When they arrived there, their joy and admiration were
considerably increased on finding that, by the generosity of Hamet,
not only the ship which had been taken, but the whole crew were
redeemed and restored to freedom. Francisco and his son embarked,
and after a favourable voyage, arrived without accident in their own
country, where they lived many years respected and esteemed, con-
tinually mindful of the vicissitudes of human affairs, and attentive to
discharge their duties to their fellow-creatures.

When this story was concluded, Mr. Barlow and his pupils went
out to walk upon the high road, but they had not gone far before
they discovered three men, who seemed each to lead a large and
shaggy beast by a string, followed by a crowd of boys and women,
whom the novelty of the sight had drawn together. When they
approached more near, Mr. Barlow discovered that the beasts were
‘three tame bears, Jed by as many Savoyards, who get their living by
exhibiting them. Upon the head of each of these formidable animals
was seated a monkey, who grinned and chattered, and by his strange

6—2



84 THE HISTORY OF

grimaces excited the mirth of the whole assembly. Tommy, who
had never before seen one of these creatures, was very much surprised
and entertained, but still more so when he saw the animal rise upon
his hind legs at the word of command, and dance about in a strange,
uncouth manner, to the sound of music.

After having satisfied themselves with the spectacle they proceeded
on their way, and Tommy asked Mr, Barlow whether a bear was an
animal easily tamed, and that did mischief in those places where he
was wild.

“The bear,” replied Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ is not an animal quite so for-
midable or destructive as a lion ora tiger; he is, however, sufficiently
dangerous, and will frequently kill women and children, and even men,
when he has an opportunity. These creatures are generally found
in cold countries, and it is observed that the colder the climate is, the
greater size and fierceness do they attain to. There is a remarkable
Account of one of these animals suddenly attacking a soldier when
on duty, but it was fortunate for the poor fellow that the first blow
he struck the bear felled it to the ground, and the soldier immediately
plunged his sword into its heart, which of course killed it. In those
northern countries, which are perpetually covered with snow and ice,
a species of bear is found, which is white in colour, and of amazing
strength as well as fierceness. These animals are often seen clambering
over the huge pieces of ice that almost cover those seas, and preying
upon fish and other sea animals.”

While they were conversing in this manner they beheld a crowd
of women and children running away in the greatest trepidation, and,
looking behind them, saw that one of the bears had broken his chain,
and was running after them, growling all the time in a very disagree-
able manner. Mr. Barlow, who had a good stick in his hand, and
was a man of an intrepid character, perceiving this, bade his pupils
remain quiet, and instantly ran up to the bear, who stopped in the
middle of his career, and seemed inclined to attack Mr. Barlow for
his interference ; but this gentleman struck him two or three blows,
rating him at the same time in a loud and severe tone of voice, and
seizing the end of the chain with equal boldness and dexterity, the
animal quietly submitted, and suffered himself to be taken prisoner.
Presently the keeper of the bear came up, into whose hands Mr. Bar-
low consigned him, charging him for the future to be more careful in
guarding so dangerous a creature.

While this was doing, the boys had remained quiet spectators at a
distance, but by accident the monkey, who used to be perched upon
the head of the bear, and was shaken off when the beast broke









TOMMY ENCOUNTERS ‘THE BEAR AND MONKEY.—p. 84



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'2011-10-14T08:52:13-04:00'
describe
'2418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDK' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
87c726000bcb5cdfa17b67733cdf337a
81c9a7f0d726cb540456b98aef56bfe19d36e5a5
describe
'190547' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDL' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
9ee7d74ff3e57690fa55e6963b8a11a2
0209743b40aa3581b718f30223495ffdca7fee45
'2011-10-14T08:51:34-04:00'
describe
'124690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDM' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
5cd37d3c408e7e5ec833d6e9a64094c6
0ea7d43693b913ce14402fc834e7c697bae375f1
'2011-10-14T08:51:44-04:00'
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDN' 'sip-files00008.pro'
fc222297134c853b0b0ebd871cc2cb83
2d3a2f520be84b2e00603fdc10073d199692ac75
'2011-10-14T08:55:50-04:00'
describe
'33376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDO' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
b3d8d0fcd8c5372a1a2c6aa291d7a226
9a98fbb7e296cde33aabdbcc46ceef0e3466bf93
'2011-10-14T08:51:11-04:00'
describe
'4587160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDP' 'sip-files00008.tif'
9e920ad189d2313548b6cc427a96801f
7b2c39bf5165db42dd0ea2ef8567c9c9bc5dd4b3
'2011-10-14T08:52:47-04:00'
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDQ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
e6a59dfdf5b007d2beaa14743a3cfde7
a2764acd84538a13bdfdd0cc7caca9aae6575edc
'2011-10-14T08:54:47-04:00'
describe
'8300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDR' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
bf2cf055651ab0d416472f124c52944c
f42bff8198866890423ed1e59cd85494d4ab0bff
'2011-10-14T08:52:48-04:00'
describe
'186452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDS' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
68efde014ab610326b24b9a6e811e948
3c78269367c6935db383c124a1d025e87706f9a9
'2011-10-14T08:52:44-04:00'
describe
'43497' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDT' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
07f2af8a954014c4b98bff148c29d11c
adaf59f65c5a2e959502c3133db371955fcf36fb
'2011-10-14T08:51:57-04:00'
describe
'5097' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDU' 'sip-files00009.pro'
ff3ecd5a567fb8614e63f28bb3fe36d0
93fa95cbceb1f2ca5b2e583f7071108d207577a1
'2011-10-14T08:52:46-04:00'
describe
'14866' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDV' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
86c8447d21c59961e7c9401369592060
ff90df4033bf82c9c451feddbf5afaa5d5340671
'2011-10-14T08:49:44-04:00'
describe
'1500568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDW' 'sip-files00009.tif'
c8d55b6c1c844f6782bbefc837fb53ee
e34475562ac499c946a9ea4dd2455b6438b0416e
'2011-10-14T08:50:56-04:00'
describe
'296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDX' 'sip-files00009.txt'
fa8be4bcd262462b0aaffd3849438ff6
dffcbee0ca6eb632cfafc76da37d64dfc93dd203
'2011-10-14T08:50:42-04:00'
describe
'5536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDY' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
6aa7b7707c0e01831d54f757e021ca01
e777238a589f78502fe19512edb5b5e328321828
'2011-10-14T08:50:07-04:00'
describe
'186439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARDZ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
e7d243519ce9711cc9ceed409832d3f8
b568a77c45b8b6ca22916d0d7abd11e0fd16b2f8
'2011-10-14T08:54:20-04:00'
describe
'26616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREA' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
8d6e1978ba228de01bcdf42a3dfbf10c
8fe88654e2f363bffeb88b7f6b79c5dd87e565e5
'2011-10-14T08:55:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREB' 'sip-files00010.pro'
cd32d8d63dc43cd1a2a7e7261cafc4c4
f7e59976202b95faf1f229b3c59de2e16638b944
'2011-10-14T08:53:13-04:00'
describe
'7320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREC' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
fe9ab67d890931acf2e4ecd5ef068262
7ad904ed86ebc194f9d123196879510c9564ada5
describe
'1499052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARED' 'sip-files00010.tif'
6d49c194e737103f8b9602469b7be33b
8516382188819c0cf9a1fd56205743a3f2450eea
'2011-10-14T08:55:41-04:00'
describe
'2062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREE' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
424eafe66037573f266c9febfaf43d41
c7501a4bd88981b5592a41521905e6170ca38da8
describe
'186325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREF' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d8a66901fe4e53c071010b02e53f8774
18a666a290ce63d5454f64b8c310fe37272192b2
'2011-10-14T08:55:27-04:00'
describe
'59194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREG' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
2424a7433b98efc459cc16ad41384c96
31163e270d095d126b5f65ac5e36c1b2060f8cd8
'2011-10-14T08:53:10-04:00'
describe
'11485' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREH' 'sip-files00011.pro'
6238f33aca4959925fecba132fefec04
57f6cfc4569d9208e28450470c97205222378610
'2011-10-14T08:54:58-04:00'
describe
'20309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREI' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
b5d69c2dc8e830b753416b9fc36ad558
bb84f1fecb4457a1da6881700b4ab086be0cf584
'2011-10-14T08:49:46-04:00'
describe
'1499432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREJ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
85edb93dc63930c0d97507bc7e3d9277
287bc3ad095f5fc5741eace9698cc3554c344822
'2011-10-14T08:55:39-04:00'
describe
'536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREK' 'sip-files00011.txt'
e0ce6e9353285964bdffe2709355c6b7
128c77fdafbc170feee1c89ba6d16a7471191363
describe
'5693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREL' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f752a9dd827372e916a3b3a1c582d37c
1121e71238cab263c9aa07a9454b8853540c5631
describe
'186498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
17e8481b3ade66425758694b589d5a82
03a1fe66ad933c2b03939d3d3138d00c01fa1e1c
'2011-10-14T08:49:54-04:00'
describe
'78834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREN' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
7062b74b879e03b2c6f415729fb51da2
e5ec708573f612f28f40e2c7bedfe92390e869bf
'2011-10-14T08:53:07-04:00'
describe
'21306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREO' 'sip-files00013.pro'
020082f89f636a9be5d1e38978d1cb11
f02d06351d312754353b5e695378f29ad6819332
'2011-10-14T08:53:29-04:00'
describe
'29076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREP' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0c8583b32bc140b278e2237161c3658b
b0a4a816d19dbe2e1df8cb63f806447a9afb60f4
'2011-10-14T08:52:54-04:00'
describe
'1501868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREQ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
bde612af6bb932a13d4bdf1d275134e9
23215f947347bad90710ed9e2be8d6cbb701ed86
'2011-10-14T08:50:28-04:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARER' 'sip-files00013.txt'
c301605846a1f21ed81be0769a74071d
3a9bbbfedd4addfa071fcc133c6070a16f0904be
describe
'8081' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARES' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
1de80964796ab0f241f3cd787f8811ba
1a724b39ca30f90b9b474657f2f83fa9b399e781
'2011-10-14T08:56:16-04:00'
describe
'186298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARET' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
3523bca0308531b8ed4d445a1502fa00
448a476db37bb1a1340f3409ac78cfcbace746a0
describe
'61429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREU' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
570a00de5517fb9c892f8682ffa41f22
a7af7cb26155b708f94498764372e61b7fadaa1c
'2011-10-14T08:55:09-04:00'
describe
'15979' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREV' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f71feeb5bde43c885583e4baefc7d6c0
b9737878c8f888f3bd0398b827335c4a8fd22b6e
'2011-10-14T08:56:00-04:00'
describe
'25056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREW' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
58f87acc1c7e820e1fc114e4f1e70f62
ebfec94b813741f8fc97a7500772647a470e2be9
'2011-10-14T08:50:11-04:00'
describe
'1499816' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREX' 'sip-files00015.tif'
e869226f3fe7bd2091117b1b95ad86a7
e1b0f86f599eb450ca038448d4c63cce78157b56
'2011-10-14T08:51:36-04:00'
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREY' 'sip-files00015.txt'
adc283aec4a74cfb224d1a4e9cac87c3
4df56843662b6e19b9a26d7344a4ad1df993bc6a
describe
Invalid character
'6488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAREZ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
47399b6a7e3eb5a3ef1aff02e4bc7cad
d7d93d38e7d2029eb1d38e87cf9d9f15c7e68d1f
'2011-10-14T08:53:12-04:00'
describe
'186103' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
bb025b1a49f0dcca178391c759dafb76
f9ab98d09a9d1c002b218f4e547f12299a2b6aa8
'2011-10-14T08:52:06-04:00'
describe
'129607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFB' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
5ca3f1bb0e283664fb0bfc97d59ca847
c4ed38f17d8246d9a970257bad89c772901357eb
'2011-10-14T08:54:27-04:00'
describe
'40005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFC' 'sip-files00017.pro'
89ef191bcbcdabc617de7e586d8647f6
259704a6d4a4fb091241103829368673110f1702
'2011-10-14T08:49:53-04:00'
describe
'38766' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFD' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
02332e43ead6270669495e0c989fba2e
7da74cb1af8b02325ae1fc066bdb05dfdf82b496
describe
'1500592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
8e901fb71a7a6f647b63e0c75d3e866d
b8431b81cad7f953ecc42a4d617058963a138c82
'2011-10-14T08:53:43-04:00'
describe
'1721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFF' 'sip-files00017.txt'
2db5812c3ead775676c57020434138ca
43ed8e08637101d0ddd86513a67e58c9b4d7332f
'2011-10-14T08:53:51-04:00'
describe
'8634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFG' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
11d2a51c813fd0aa9755a10bdf50ff96
6418e3d2ece972928cbc7dcdc020c0273f6bc46a
'2011-10-14T08:53:20-04:00'
describe
'186414' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFH' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
3e8403ccc15c973d95498fe4b1795d1a
8c633457ff3670251160f3aedbe88c2c12b349da
'2011-10-14T08:49:47-04:00'
describe
'206359' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFI' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
3b563bab2fde7aaedcbb8bf0217a83cc
6473dd9c02482d4642d98cbd3c90aec81bbb870f
'2011-10-14T08:51:18-04:00'
describe
'69163' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFJ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
043e923fcd52f43408651a57aea19e7c
3c4a11342f4002e7eaca0ce9208407c64e728da2
'2011-10-14T08:51:54-04:00'
describe
'58452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFK' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d5596fd3e9ff3288525155c2f464d10e
d2af91b73668f735fe82584e9885efe89f952f59
'2011-10-14T08:52:03-04:00'
describe
'1503616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFL' 'sip-files00018.tif'
8a2ee93ee1d545df1b13465d63668210
56843233b4c2cf7ca30b2540be5b13ff5dbc0538
'2011-10-14T08:51:53-04:00'
describe
'2882' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFM' 'sip-files00018.txt'
05cf0ef36cc0e152af63700b1d30003e
5af0690f724c4050910f4f3d06e17e270e94052b
'2011-10-14T08:52:52-04:00'
describe
'13010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFN' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
90d1762a15621f8aebd45600aea7e490
13cf9e0f1b67bc411ca93e5fac62b537eaf8a3b5
describe
'186281' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
4d1e37b2e3a6e7f3d52a645960d1a2d3
f39219f1a326336be7a9d9b856668b08b10cbdee
'2011-10-14T08:56:19-04:00'
describe
'203774' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFP' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
2f9e50ced9440747af34aeb530f2236f
ee298d50e9681df6eff8b893073441bdaee1cefd
'2011-10-14T08:53:00-04:00'
describe
'68494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
3df95d16ed753e1c787135545c8a8d56
41ddadf3291d5f41e62951ef0a1389befedf15ba
describe
'58064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFR' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
b651e76eca9729c84f585b67258269fe
9230b5063be2efc7132f4df9f19e99bd6de3d318
'2011-10-14T08:51:00-04:00'
describe
'1502260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFS' 'sip-files00019.tif'
976b75952f35feb09f952548ed05b12b
25eb8651592674c0744e205a8cf900891a7b5be6
'2011-10-14T08:53:53-04:00'
describe
'2855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFT' 'sip-files00019.txt'
c122b3d0e6119b036526ead3f2a74b47
d4e23f37a928e473e38284b82776dc94cbc46a61
describe
'13065' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFU' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
709d778b9794ba55915f4c52d4f26e0d
b915eee55c86eb3c3909aaa37369854ebfde05d3
'2011-10-14T08:50:31-04:00'
describe
'186496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFV' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
4c3992a8cfebd70f6fb4e82ab8d6e6fa
0d692fc0a67550736fb4f39e74c31cb333c3b776
'2011-10-14T08:53:48-04:00'
describe
'183289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
6bfd4fa7a20fb8936ac4ee19094da158
204e77892a77b28c0aff57e6dd95412f40795a4d
'2011-10-14T08:51:50-04:00'
describe
'60735' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
82ba420707550c23a4dda2600c8ee338
26ec60569cf47c2243847b256578d2239ec32f9f
'2011-10-14T08:49:59-04:00'
describe
'54417' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
db29e7ed69b5ba3bf689527ca72fbca1
5cb92bd61e1f6d6d1ffb040ec5050b0825b1507b
describe
'1503524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARFZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
453147727d4e223f2fa8caa6769c4607
013a3d7efcc35429d91e8739ad583abcb0bdabb0
'2011-10-14T08:52:10-04:00'
describe
'2555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
63870eabefd8df40ba933cc1296eec0c
4324b4527d2408610b8be2e52d6c9b7743155f61
'2011-10-14T08:50:25-04:00'
describe
'12639' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGB' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
eb59b633cc708d39f5416a1f81f43b10
5f99a418f01df02835d2ed8151c191038d1670ca
'2011-10-14T08:51:26-04:00'
describe
'197142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
f221da5aac42aaa940881aae43937059
0637316686271cc91008d2e060c147907b2c4d74
'2011-10-14T08:50:06-04:00'
describe
'128605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGD' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
beb09516faa20b285bc2f03d1aebefb4
fdc8361d45b455f3f18a9d640e8693dac1efd7a5
'2011-10-14T08:50:53-04:00'
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGE' 'sip-files00021.pro'
985486d460ae640ce78ee925e23a2048
d5dd08b54ba555f4fe6401f9426181b73b0dd43d
describe
'34609' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGF' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
dc4a431754fde566589151194161eff8
bc218a712ea4a943ff02aede4dc807f062a80115
describe
'4742672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGG' 'sip-files00021.tif'
3f45cb3b1f6e1226473b0c57163a37fd
acbfebd89d42fcbc92a1facff2b5018c45d0bf18
'2011-10-14T08:53:33-04:00'
describe
'118' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGH' 'sip-files00021.txt'
0d86ae1625d8f095f008476d5adc73d0
0acccd718f952e582673a2997a72b2799ed3f778
'2011-10-14T08:52:30-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGI' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
35ff021d75cdf9f69c5f15e0d7d5d140
bc74b7125e25e5f2ba104661bc44b0174b394669
'2011-10-14T08:52:17-04:00'
describe
'186324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGJ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
3ddf9be6895c7cee0862f355e3956797
97096562cde667d8d46bdb49b16700ee16e956be
'2011-10-14T08:52:19-04:00'
describe
'186530' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGK' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
dc214650596107294f3d8db6cca6ec54
059943575485f94e44781dd59f5cc65e533b93e7
describe
'61512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGL' 'sip-files00023.pro'
69c77897a749076480d452ed4b0f3953
4f7615e6d443813a68fb51e44ef27d70eff8919f
'2011-10-14T08:54:06-04:00'
describe
'54817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGM' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
a336a95ac86ea87f81854549710dde0e
41a0a5263f33667862ec2dbf77b5646bf8fad395
'2011-10-14T08:54:12-04:00'
describe
'1501840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
a847d3669c5e20cd2dca79d9c5745ce9
8d7f69facba5e30f31501992640d2a3d9625c527
'2011-10-14T08:50:15-04:00'
describe
'2588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGO' 'sip-files00023.txt'
4ea97c52a1c69da6ba80bda92a2ccd0a
a961b7823d2913944395a2be1082007bb235532d
describe
'12621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGP' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
9078053b5481673e5917706907544a40
20b1ceafe02bdf36ab95846df01c454d2ddc74a3
describe
'186426' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGQ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
1dbb27f09325fb7546dff3bbb9817852
97f036a7238a21ea71f4d157d4771bdd51239a20
describe
'181394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGR' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
3b8047775649864ad728ef419eb022e1
1255aaed4ee1ba7ec01042881e827744f38fc2ae
'2011-10-14T08:51:02-04:00'
describe
'61303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGS' 'sip-files00024.pro'
6da9c95463db391fe9e7a543c17dcd6e
75db1a3e07ef22f6cfc4340b57aa0ec1762b77a7
'2011-10-14T08:52:25-04:00'
describe
'52179' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGT' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
c9a90cc084084fe0ab5669929a213660
40f9b58caeb8187727c9fd452d4270e5067b400e
'2011-10-14T08:55:59-04:00'
describe
'1503196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGU' 'sip-files00024.tif'
b7d4529b6c8daf267aaa7185a6b10b48
ac7e524dfac20687d00feffdef53df19e42d3ceb
'2011-10-14T08:49:43-04:00'
describe
'2570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGV' 'sip-files00024.txt'
b2cdf52842a250ceb5d462384068c7ca
22c0ea66f37e0c3f9e97da8c5d98125ae6c5f385
'2011-10-14T08:51:31-04:00'
describe
'12049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGW' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
a9aa7c654fa54c0149b95220a967b3cc
9ea22f7cfed3b763919a353bb28c10a1f7081952
'2011-10-14T08:51:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGX' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
c83aab27ca988705d61dc7b3925da70d
f8afab59722c017904f739f7470d7d08727dc06d
describe
'202081' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGY' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
76a9b09d314c73c5b6a02f4e68a68fa0
8077bdb6ff762c82c5bf2b84da9870be19e484bb
describe
'69321' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARGZ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
470f1f788df09888d491fe399d5618f2
a334993ff39a74a7438378cbc3d06920994057fb
'2011-10-14T08:55:00-04:00'
describe
'56251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHA' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
84a862cb8252b49d0183dc4e6b79f4be
93b5df0223ce81eee30cfeee68a8e2ab6ce8f0a2
describe
'1501808' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHB' 'sip-files00025.tif'
66d0cf2ee0c646170192c9b028237210
216c320bdb86daa751c2aceee96325a68f2d7c43
'2011-10-14T08:56:30-04:00'
describe
'2922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHC' 'sip-files00025.txt'
7b434ae95466fa3c7fcd59f73d763a96
f87608a5cb396ba1bb9a12ae3f6104d8018ccd58
'2011-10-14T08:52:28-04:00'
describe
'12674' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHD' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
a37bb47a5112029749bc6d8a9cd2693c
b48a879f781dad7252e307eb290a85e7baab4ab5
'2011-10-14T08:52:59-04:00'
describe
'186368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHE' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
095a66e5b08a24155234cf2dba81e4fa
95b0f020d5aae0c09ec6018e078e41bff55a7881
describe
'197630' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHF' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
f2f21e025e3bb0bcbef7672892658097
2062566836f0855c9a71291b174284f06f41bd91
'2011-10-14T08:50:00-04:00'
describe
'67559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHG' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e4686bcc1288ad87637150e18211791e
216932daf3efef52834a1e5313bec7a20947f5a5
describe
'56595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHH' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
a865ec1787b3c8395169c4292e21d1a8
3947f87add50f60b3d98cd3af409691615fe7f92
describe
'1503204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHI' 'sip-files00026.tif'
c734ea40ad67c8d692dc7e279e0c2c3b
17b135612c2ffd868937cdd6468f15b10ae5639a
'2011-10-14T08:53:37-04:00'
describe
'2815' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHJ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
d4c3f531f68048b0bebc52d9baa3a036
44438520ea56937cf7e121b30c592a11b744f90a
describe
'12641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHK' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
1f2497634ce7d21ca3f8a8139b40facd
488508ec7cd225e31c4d2843d64ee80243a05be7
'2011-10-14T08:53:56-04:00'
describe
'195247' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
cdf983c96c8fdbfed7ee4385f8250cb7
aedbdf6907a3c0defb12220ea70244bbca3e3a53
describe
'118818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHM' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
e0d958c91268f64cd4adbb75a717795f
f87e47c036bf951a39d18af6b8dc364f82787bcf
'2011-10-14T08:55:11-04:00'
describe
'1643' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHN' 'sip-files00027.pro'
6ec2059ac7da1af468b9c86cabaae03f
af9b513130f0dea6d32bc5771b644207e7bb5daf
'2011-10-14T08:51:33-04:00'
describe
'31386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHO' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
4edf173d710cdb69ba68703a027eaf66
2bec70febac2762b61bf987463950f717204fb2b
'2011-10-14T08:55:07-04:00'
describe
'4697940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHP' 'sip-files00027.tif'
e0db264b1533764f5fa61102a29cd89e
b4c31ff1f4d77306202451be4cefb5fa7d957d72
'2011-10-14T08:54:02-04:00'
describe
'68' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHQ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
c2287fa712dfc2c3c90a3f80b7e615d0
99e904354b716bc2e3744732a5dd1e43e7fbc282
'2011-10-14T08:51:41-04:00'
describe
'7990' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHR' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
da32f4ae303756689403e4d0706afff8
6b83e23fa0e6c389819d22e84a0f755c1e7b2bbf
'2011-10-14T08:54:03-04:00'
describe
'186513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHS' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
557bf7fe9423b3c450f77b98d615428d
8ffc17d8801fcd555bc3b11aa5a40cd185f2989a
'2011-10-14T08:54:52-04:00'
describe
'179145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHT' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
b1cfd60a472300e867446071f3d5b404
1a39a0384dd72d2ccb429f48ffa3decb1264abba
'2011-10-14T08:49:56-04:00'
describe
'59251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHU' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a31c56de4265ae8e6b6eded86c6f0779
64c197ba69738c18b83a0bcfc35cb61d090d2639
'2011-10-14T08:56:02-04:00'
describe
'53519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHV' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
413411e126116ca192e61067d3cda3cd
e9dd2ec2262fa2ae2a681987ad0df3f6a905163d
describe
'1503476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHW' 'sip-files00029.tif'
fb544b4a4d690939a0cadf444dd5e833
bd5fea854573cd680d2b828a46360783f94da585
'2011-10-14T08:51:59-04:00'
describe
'2523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHX' 'sip-files00029.txt'
8f53d0df750fd3f9afe865de6e46511e
b13e25436e964bbf7ee9d5959d13b029351c705e
describe
'12372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHY' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
93807d721394cbf1e1b55aece997cbaf
adde81bea921569d959ce35a26d791bbef5dd032
'2011-10-14T08:55:15-04:00'
describe
'186393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARHZ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
a7c158824b0e6738102d92eb4efa9686
148fcd93315c0afb093416bbeacf79f04d222f7f
'2011-10-14T08:53:22-04:00'
describe
'179680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIA' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
feb98020e906a88f5a534711f04e85e3
be544b9213131c03248e8bb939adf7867d4dabdf
'2011-10-14T08:52:35-04:00'
describe
'60901' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
1f15042adbd72cf5d85b5f51ba744dae
ccdede31dd56a1aae8d77532a964809f1f41bf92
'2011-10-14T08:54:57-04:00'
describe
'50553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
a13bb3338c316fb883b93245b944be1e
4c3d2301f7b18d6e22f50698c31fdc1c706cb988
'2011-10-14T08:53:39-04:00'
describe
'1502968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARID' 'sip-files00030.tif'
b92d51e08832bd5e13056f867d19711f
400673968878f78233b0666c70ec1476d7ee4f1a
'2011-10-14T08:54:16-04:00'
describe
'2563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIE' 'sip-files00030.txt'
4661887ff8f6dd19cb16d5b0dcaf45ba
f95dffd54ec857b100ebd1c60e5dece4eff8f396
'2011-10-14T08:52:07-04:00'
describe
'12029' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIF' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
0dbb9dc0777ae79c5df9c226d7863720
1e6c58b0d0ac803d0f11d7120de435b4a0faab66
'2011-10-14T08:51:38-04:00'
describe
'186460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIG' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
354636ec9ca77da2bada48d69a49610e
1c094cfffbca78a5d3bf7a1568002b1909e8332f
'2011-10-14T08:56:08-04:00'
describe
'167957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIH' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e135281fed504266300b4ce00b510394
4f35caae181f59457d94ccf9bcc0ad2468739559
'2011-10-14T08:55:21-04:00'
describe
'57287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARII' 'sip-files00031.pro'
9af0323e398bae42edaef25c1644c60d
c8777ea1733d0178531e0e6a0b86f5637fe5032b
describe
'49778' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIJ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
af8364ffaefebc384bcbcbe06eb430d2
ca71fb60bc9becbef31fa1fed4bc5aa49d981413
describe
'1502908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIK' 'sip-files00031.tif'
8e08a2693fb6835f1ba0cb62fcabeec3
9d7b592e62e79150b8508c4c906103802c80a729
'2011-10-14T08:55:38-04:00'
describe
'2436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIL' 'sip-files00031.txt'
23c0b607b04d4ad99c429d887b3b056b
7f656cef89c238915b43e2a461c10b957bc3f2ad
'2011-10-14T08:55:58-04:00'
describe
'12072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIM' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d9b4384adc84d446c0ab9a5385b90f80
fa15803890e1f53c6fdd97fa73697a2b24b62f86
'2011-10-14T08:50:43-04:00'
describe
'186470' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIN' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
e760e5cbfcabf6a7fd0398f22fe749c8
799e8f531fcfda9d5978f1e9c35f32b59070bead
'2011-10-14T08:55:57-04:00'
describe
'183231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIO' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
25f4562a79e28c1c03570bbbf8635e5e
b92d66ea1bf5c1de19e646d2ed23d3968cc4b671
'2011-10-14T08:55:08-04:00'
describe
'61045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIP' 'sip-files00032.pro'
88f09f35efe3df14af1fa5277800cf1a
5506e83d91186fa3e8d0c840eb71c833bd641f7d
'2011-10-14T08:49:55-04:00'
describe
'52566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIQ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
bd4625020b4304d509e40c8e20b25cd5
6559d5f1fb9377bb4b681cb77d0012cc0042a098
'2011-10-14T08:51:03-04:00'
describe
'1503244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIR' 'sip-files00032.tif'
98cd33ba45912dce92ae6256f1e3df9b
960f35610f686986f69d27415bff4bdef82344a5
'2011-10-14T08:53:41-04:00'
describe
'2670' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIS' 'sip-files00032.txt'
cf14c174371b186888bb8190cbe669a6
9173aba7d19da0d270717c9d9e18d4ac36624182
describe
'11922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIT' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
9606be6725b110dd002cd7e89b151917
681f88da442736364186f72bb2f25711f61e95f3
'2011-10-14T08:56:29-04:00'
describe
'186392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIU' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
12ec7bb04b1f558c51aa17afe79925fd
e84d0c62b1ad9fe3fe6ba1f67174bbee92b9d550
describe
'196089' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIV' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
57645244b1701f14839c3732070dbdf7
d6b88ee6d73bbfe0dc6a8a9c169b7d049435f723
'2011-10-14T08:51:08-04:00'
describe
'66225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIW' 'sip-files00033.pro'
537a05b37d6157d594fbf1b11c3b3a7b
dfc8e08698bbab3b174d831bb6d38e3c6652e669
describe
'56414' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIX' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
4d37ee11a444f0cf2b7fcc6637566fd6
721f7f1fb80a6aebae57c516616bf29ad8be4283
'2011-10-14T08:51:16-04:00'
describe
'1503488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIY' 'sip-files00033.tif'
24f92264da878a10f3c996e04bb4ce09
8e68091a622a9ddba462e13d5112ce14e3fffec8
'2011-10-14T08:50:22-04:00'
describe
'2776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARIZ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
0c338cefe8f9ed25e458142a8ac6d802
09b82dcfb6fbc1b48832c36f2fa955425c32f11d
describe
'12548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
818907550108c4a3ff86f9f7ccec270a
37b3a61695bd6edc5a104b5b200c9d5949dfc4d8
'2011-10-14T08:51:51-04:00'
describe
'186469' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
5b8f2d38713a4febefa1ef7e7952285a
b906568ab01cf65756d0621f5625e4bdbcbde16f
'2011-10-14T08:55:18-04:00'
describe
'196769' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
a356a5dad27119dd323fb021ff49a15b
f4fb5aff81800979a3c38d5beb5c2ee4ec9a2ddf
'2011-10-14T08:51:06-04:00'
describe
'67068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJD' 'sip-files00034.pro'
087ead0c60845dfa3af6aba60839a179
7f07ce93b59621efb602d4e907fd93dd6b995efd
'2011-10-14T08:50:41-04:00'
describe
'56466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJE' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
b46f233f34304f546bfa0d396cc0eb16
d8cfedcc1fa0cb157a4b52b1745451fa5b77355b
describe
'1503356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
edaf510da8631792b1f40247303c3a1e
c0e9c0ad2b59303f51bc236691f69e2040d4a1ae
describe
'2799' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
ec3b95f460b68f43bdb423b2351d3821
fdec283af859ee207f7296c7b12f472110ae45e5
'2011-10-14T08:53:50-04:00'
describe
'12224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
679a3173d148a5850619900710adb281
68b5068770aa186cecb1c03a56bb880309e7dca4
describe
'186301' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
90b3b17cbe156476e18973c66149251b
92995edeefd56fe253f0c23109bda778d137b01f
describe
'199594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJJ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
5c4b0446e052ef78c775fbbb0e75ca28
5cc704e2322f617df17b9070884e27feb6ff96be
'2011-10-14T08:54:15-04:00'
describe
'67261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJK' 'sip-files00035.pro'
ebf39658ea0d086171aa01ab73dcefb8
cdb67ce1c07f697dc609a63f51d52e9086d4f75a
'2011-10-14T08:50:47-04:00'
describe
'56933' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJL' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
64fd490f11312bb59ea138c357391a36
fca0923a1826d42f82af51307af4d76e97ea52b9
'2011-10-14T08:54:33-04:00'
describe
'1502060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJM' 'sip-files00035.tif'
2d56f1b72a62bb68928fd9f75eebd718
5553228e128f80816ad68c613052b8564847e6e5
describe
'2813' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJN' 'sip-files00035.txt'
24fdfbb194e3f4f1f5e883d42c681b8d
811963a28d8c128b89a8bc78c6f913249445c367
describe
'12691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJO' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
f42dedd0c8414dece5c816cf5dde91bd
b5e63ca720bbd4b99a8fd9f4832bae88200f09f2
'2011-10-14T08:54:23-04:00'
describe
'186346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJP' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a5b070c9bb49f41de6132b143fa3cfc8
6d579d8a8e1d83db37a325ff24966eea7f54a5b0
'2011-10-14T08:55:01-04:00'
describe
'180096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJQ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
2a498dd0cd9f30a2204e93b8aa3b8bce
9b56b81a6e2c2eadfa60b3a987f07536e3047002
'2011-10-14T08:56:05-04:00'
describe
'60036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJR' 'sip-files00036.pro'
3632536794abf63d5dc61cabeced2760
b1e8ab81e7480fd7548d191f0ccc83620145c55c
'2011-10-14T08:55:17-04:00'
describe
'52724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJS' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
b3f354389609fd0ce356b4b519a3977b
3db432e063919f3bbb5f2e139757f5609422a6c8
'2011-10-14T08:54:40-04:00'
describe
'1503268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJT' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f084ebd89c72bc60f4a48809563d26b7
164714a6a85e35c58a2caad5b4fc79069242022d
describe
'2546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJU' 'sip-files00036.txt'
a716f8f7642c93c9283cc53e24554cca
61cdc81f53e597f0b8a0e3c2c0da1efc75092d9c
'2011-10-14T08:56:23-04:00'
describe
'12293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJV' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
8e46566864d66973e05aebb71dde7778
f868452aeb1ac835581e02385b09aa8df8750b80
describe
'186381' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJW' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
c91a69ce5ae49d5277fff696851a962f
4c3e47282cead0f52c57d0110ee849b0300f9feb
describe
'178287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
f90069fae4ca1bc1564e3a250ad1b0d9
0c6bed88bb65f589d591e16917db42db3d8d598f
'2011-10-14T08:54:56-04:00'
describe
'59498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
0c03bb0e4e299c19ca3a8c87ac8e0eb5
8e48d2a6b4bf70ef6d314d7addf0a910061b8065
'2011-10-14T08:52:45-04:00'
describe
'53117' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARJZ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
5bdcf384086e3b4423202b85421991f7
b7428a1c0edb11e16fdbbe7a71db1b174c063426
describe
'1503344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
9675bc069780e44c1395466f4d0f75db
24156714c31c434f25622c0f61482999ff5cd0e0
describe
'2593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKB' 'sip-files00037.txt'
e65d6cc19b750298652e7c1b4362551e
fe3b892c0ae1ba7770a97f4c44b1e2dd51432f7e
describe
'12267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKC' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
60500c4263e68f0103c4f3c570401941
89e0a0c674ca430f2554133539de32b08ca6bf2b
'2011-10-14T08:53:57-04:00'
describe
'186499' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKD' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
7e238e57f6b31f67ec004f3ddbc31d56
e2e15a068962d77604582ccb9dc798d907c483c6
'2011-10-14T08:50:23-04:00'
describe
'202796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKE' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
8e3bc74464a5a78d2a28258c7cc225b8
45363f318146caa1a82f2e15027ab2ca08e1e41c
'2011-10-14T08:53:28-04:00'
describe
'68276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKF' 'sip-files00038.pro'
ddff2330fb45b8e71972eefaefb185fb
071aba7c89dd2f450a2bd5a79e174d2df990ba06
describe
'58414' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
ec5fa2de69638949429d0ca50d0dd4fe
d6be1d44bf77169bd36f644454f5e9e406c3300c
'2011-10-14T08:53:42-04:00'
describe
'1503492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKH' 'sip-files00038.tif'
2b7eed1db6fcecae99ac6d8f8ef3f1a7
23ed81b6f47b87ae78904f3e26d5e9a561928871
'2011-10-14T08:53:18-04:00'
describe
'2938' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
91085d50f6c8f5ddb53edbc1dc194262
8715020b6a4b5e0b9fee5d1f7d174dd309a33c58
'2011-10-14T08:54:26-04:00'
describe
'12531' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKJ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
b87ac73e9628114709d3875a416f44c5
21f73c632dd3410d36044988a364622e90f761b4
describe
'186506' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
8abc46feb9f83ec346d7392e7aff9292
6bd961eb7240f79900fca321ff512afdcc66e3b7
describe
'180164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKL' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
3e40cd39db09fc47b05d35bc41ee0f72
920bfd56326c513d21af80be64ffa404b6f083a3
'2011-10-14T08:54:24-04:00'
describe
'60954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKM' 'sip-files00039.pro'
be3b3862596cfc1483eb2eaa245932f6
6e9eb9b4054a943e3febe4061fad933985085ec1
'2011-10-14T08:51:19-04:00'
describe
'51722' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKN' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ebff4db5e55c17d415ec48e26b41e418
25ecba4be724464e2d3901ec39986008c6feb6ab
'2011-10-14T08:56:06-04:00'
describe
'1503156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKO' 'sip-files00039.tif'
f67d2c978d2bc6e80027250138efb0fd
0b460d1d00797921e1cc24dc7e2a4c458daf8429
describe
'2619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKP' 'sip-files00039.txt'
25d57d02a103fe642edea09c099b157d
bb1eb98da3699b8e8f076a40e0b4bf4871f19f7d
describe
'12009' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKQ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f022692e0852a71158fd288d4b363e8e
1f5f46960f0b0e4861aed817f7d0ee766f6a64d8
'2011-10-14T08:56:10-04:00'
describe
'186404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKR' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
b516797df98bdbba836f0318c119cc87
fd07555c5442403778718dc2a02913cb5d4d9f68
'2011-10-14T08:54:08-04:00'
describe
'194037' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKS' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
36b77a89ac3415d90ba6329c4b8dbb6a
0208119fb2d57d9a82b25f6ab89c6c96fe66ccc3
'2011-10-14T08:54:19-04:00'
describe
'65471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKT' 'sip-files00040.pro'
0218651b1316f92e2eaab903e48c6937
50ef90e02a0015afb50b5cae10a7a6d03dd80c83
describe
'56099' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKU' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
ff6b97717fb31acdb3890663f80f8355
5346efff15903d200dc534027c87a427f3def4db
'2011-10-14T08:51:35-04:00'
describe
'1503352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKV' 'sip-files00040.tif'
db656d02033244da231ed08ce0ff5980
2df6719cc3bb631e4a44a2a27cfcb3118ad95575
'2011-10-14T08:50:49-04:00'
describe
'2725' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKW' 'sip-files00040.txt'
a484d1d33b4343d7310ce43d3d57cbe6
f02616d78afbcd822b649b6472276529ea5f9e0e
describe
'12610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKX' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7992bad9585f8e754c62f18b1a8c7470
e06f282fbd87558f3bc098b97d4e5b786a9ae0a6
'2011-10-14T08:51:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKY' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
6d74d5165cbc1cc085c3210a913ab782
cf9ceaa66cfb5533f7189186be8ae9b6bf2c46fb
'2011-10-14T08:49:50-04:00'
describe
'181589' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARKZ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
319870ff40cf071faaff9b0efb0e681f
4db120c6c9631782b0e573c135051e802d1a8589
'2011-10-14T08:54:13-04:00'
describe
'60568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLA' 'sip-files00041.pro'
db44af7c932e496257549357620a7ff3
b5c9a22150a69aeebc9b7ca72c31ca30c9450dc2
'2011-10-14T08:53:59-04:00'
describe
'52687' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLB' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
33f21d7a5cab7064f7895b4b1a7e8624
96f40705a5ab2083dbee15e0fc5f2596bc5e3eae
describe
'1501812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLC' 'sip-files00041.tif'
9727f788c70ae9e1c022854e4730fc28
d8b782419ccf489fac7ce87fc79aa48b27bd8294
'2011-10-14T08:56:04-04:00'
describe
'2577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLD' 'sip-files00041.txt'
326b809da185950917106aeeee3171bb
2d45310f0aa35fde323b8a715ad6c559717b2171
describe
'12403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLE' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
d4c6cc4462f21e5c7369ab77b0a3d1ab
16ca96785e00d47f23a230559f445a3d825824be
'2011-10-14T08:52:18-04:00'
describe
'186440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLF' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
636053ebac0efd6ee192120feec10f37
f10ffbafa03f2ad3b3305b82174e6a908e6e5656
describe
'177189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLG' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
6bf51d5aadced01a475a6ea2c1ab8578
d3655a6732966154abb18a2a0af27fb46abf9a1d
describe
'60093' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLH' 'sip-files00042.pro'
02de46c8fc70ed8707f96b4167024c84
cfbf047346769629be087f8883b8fa0c687a20c9
describe
'50266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLI' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
f028c8eba71be682ee8c132e011cab6f
110bd8b1e76bdb07ca2a5dbafba2556218e00b68
'2011-10-14T08:54:37-04:00'
describe
'1502860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLJ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
6c9fe62c8b1d516b4cf2b55b5e9bf268
3e6c23bf2370503717aca2b5554aa3294d1b6394
'2011-10-14T08:54:11-04:00'
describe
'2552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLK' 'sip-files00042.txt'
64b327ea87b12828d060c8d4c615c0a0
15d7f2bdabea30068f347b322b99e4249d32f4cb
'2011-10-14T08:54:30-04:00'
describe
'11548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLL' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
b27173f2dc314218623626898db06f64
43c7c53e26f1baf4f55459b284edecbf1f43ffd4
describe
'189533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLM' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
3b777eaa889cb1a2ac0ad8b7f1b0e58e
86b51eec8785a4e411d76ec059f9ae2d1275cb59
describe
'117005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLN' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
d6b1abf1bb596094d6943cef79f05e3e
fff1c183bdb67c372d2b0a1d71b86fc75fc5ba93
'2011-10-14T08:49:57-04:00'
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLO' 'sip-files00043.pro'
bde6dd52586c29c57b15e26abff9106d
4ba03699fc090118e2fc270cdc8bc487e2a1cb0c
'2011-10-14T08:52:40-04:00'
describe
'30562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLP' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c3ed6c8454170fbfef31f9efe00fe268
1dcf96842019d59402360a79924746754e590c45
'2011-10-14T08:51:29-04:00'
describe
'4557404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLQ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
fef8bb63a3ffb852bcb73455fa96953f
1c8d095393d9c06ffbfb3c480e5d6101be90fb06
'2011-10-14T08:50:16-04:00'
describe
'165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLR' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c90d58fb6322cb4226e51ccd372b8ad4
b476889df3805087945a8c6951b5f75175609f50
'2011-10-14T08:55:53-04:00'
describe
'7916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLS' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
ff8af8bcbcc9b4038032bfd2ce16cba1
97772014830a1d7ebdd3278dce6265608013f31b
'2011-10-14T08:49:58-04:00'
describe
'186287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLT' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
93a64170f612e4c583344e71406458f7
b21503746d61b68b8fa9f9506a2e8a1b6ecffb62
describe
'166696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLU' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
e1e64b80120d0a5ece225288f37247c2
7d0869868a9a5719ab8c6d4b89676ee4ab1848cb
describe
'55825' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLV' 'sip-files00045.pro'
369ee2c72d50454ebdc9b7241fffc794
79030f286c5b7b6363323de837b7ac0563caa840
describe
'49448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
7a8a32fa5e69e380bf81d720d4f8599c
e4f37c3fba95542bc9a1cbcdb05ab8a87852009a
'2011-10-14T08:50:03-04:00'
describe
'1501804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
eab659701cdc4cc7fe63f8f36449fd6d
8179cf79f8a6781a86117778ae6841b53707e673
'2011-10-14T08:56:01-04:00'
describe
'2397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
21f68458a91177cd08b8bc3fca59c296
11cfaf48fc5ac324007152dd163ee353b03678b1
describe
'12012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARLZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
4318d430d28e8c153539efa5fcc7a3bc
7dcbe7469c7c2f39cfb43e1d665ba445dcaa39b2
describe
'186514' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
63f22f9d85857ec13b2e2ff20ba736d7
f4b7f58e513413e6ebaeee291e9b765fcde185de
'2011-10-14T08:50:59-04:00'
describe
'156580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
e69f09bb95a6c95a41141925ae8cf2ad
01b84e1f76b5c8dec09c098a8d2be0e12efbf492
'2011-10-14T08:55:16-04:00'
describe
'51783' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMC' 'sip-files00046.pro'
7fe0736e4d6354e32ea57b89dfb90e08
af584aaf4181ff2f54cf9dba65c99f28babce472
'2011-10-14T08:52:36-04:00'
describe
'47238' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMD' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
77f907f2e1c60e23acb5d367ee55d7f2
383e88bf43992690c23f2439f1670de7247e62b3
'2011-10-14T08:53:16-04:00'
describe
'1503008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARME' 'sip-files00046.tif'
8f70e2bbe64db91ec9f8853435bd97ad
8f354766fd4d640da8bfbc0609ede5b2abdb959d
'2011-10-14T08:51:47-04:00'
describe
'2203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMF' 'sip-files00046.txt'
42f94099667c60c323ce991c52b265e3
edb02cc41e9f832e9f5227473fae9a7d2f4b786b
'2011-10-14T08:51:07-04:00'
describe
'11505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMG' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
2dc501a85d3d3f16cfa9f7171e698a2c
6f1171e756efa6f2feba01bbdefe64762482a02d
'2011-10-14T08:56:27-04:00'
describe
'186210' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
cca2f85b5c9a2954b458de480b54892b
5aad1c134d4a7b351b44719f5c85e537bb1b8eef
describe
'197638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
80a5c32128b70c98260904e80545a9f9
ee339fa6a0a05855bb6dc6e494ff266bfac31bb8
describe
'65957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMJ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
9fa6a21fc9538c5a439074021eecd03d
cf12af61b41e027e37023c48518c688c16e7e591
'2011-10-14T08:54:46-04:00'
describe
'56905' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMK' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
70af9311d6db66cf1ff4bf906e502326
92a2203381030a08648a1d0232888238aa55643b
'2011-10-14T08:54:41-04:00'
describe
'1501996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARML' 'sip-files00047.tif'
d2758381122fb52372c345328a59f152
98e44c1d67bcc5936aca9d38b80908dbd5ca6195
'2011-10-14T08:51:42-04:00'
describe
'2797' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMM' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0420d2c9db95a7952e67171a10c59107
08f5317263b69ee8c2ca84b0ca02e12ce99fbc99
'2011-10-14T08:54:09-04:00'
describe
'12571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMN' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
98f2e3163d842293a49561217b8f16fb
6e73243de78afa44591f88c29d4d5d674905550b
'2011-10-14T08:52:49-04:00'
describe
'186410' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9c9075abfcce1e378eb08f06c3c9ac1b
9f2714c33733ef0818fc1342094a7de6aa86ceec
describe
'190616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
759172f2cfc082e79621d27078c79151
c77301bf5c27fb3a83463f0090ce405e629de1fa
'2011-10-14T08:56:28-04:00'
describe
'63758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMQ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
592d35908832d0dd05fb0f218a513e3d
ea94792acd8ffdff1f3f64b465844bf7fd5c1c88
'2011-10-14T08:55:22-04:00'
describe
'54287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMR' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
8f9863d19aebb029b9f7171d90a4da37
b2965615e60c20fa5a2cae945e54a8707e0ee010
'2011-10-14T08:55:47-04:00'
describe
'1503188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMS' 'sip-files00048.tif'
963249af69883a8ecce11f49660fb432
30fbbede800787521cd0eacd58d4f47f9dda8521
'2011-10-14T08:50:10-04:00'
describe
'2674' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMT' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c0c12f1be9e128d1c3b36066e9777860
d75fdc43c5d4ef39479bfde399abd89037b8f38f
'2011-10-14T08:54:35-04:00'
describe
'12351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMU' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
eb14f767797f025e4ca128577df748c3
f2327345754569f44d97af6e74d51f103f8e03c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMV' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
819181af5c266884f3800cd2aa4e7697
b765ada95f46d8d7b2ae6d78ecd7c10384cdc932
describe
'168919' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMW' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8cdf42cc23915c0c314a2be8b9241d07
4e859c88bf646e9a16046f96eca464accec26d50
describe
'56826' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
6650e9c1776cd343e2c3b0fa7e51404c
08d5435ca956ef4acfd62d1c1ab846f466351b2f
describe
'50129' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMY' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
0f1fe8e550fc06f44169cb9afec01329
328402536923e6678013deca2b9327f214e8ab53
describe
'1502984' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARMZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
19f09cc70228f868f56d503edaaef861
947ee0fdb1ad133a08b3d00e588973a6043218fc
describe
'2435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNA' 'sip-files00049.txt'
3753f61a85e7539aa79ad56cc056ff9b
d4f96738a8c0935fbff38b6fdb1e90344c2346dc
'2011-10-14T08:53:19-04:00'
describe
'11805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNB' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
b2d10ea71df3bf41a3074a88f4ae9f9e
bbee0a0011f8548257e8544527a955c97a2f84d3
'2011-10-14T08:49:49-04:00'
describe
'186502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNC' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
06ed8a94d80cc0de70a6c63f57590173
b80fe27b72e2539fc4e4a858f0643f033867598a
'2011-10-14T08:54:32-04:00'
describe
'172500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARND' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
24a75916972d4d36321db00de05116db
3df2f553645c7488471f0521498e02cf6490c1c8
describe
'57786' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNE' 'sip-files00050.pro'
4af1f36c85ad57044137aec4a69b9224
d1ecab6ea03c7f1ad367cfdb4e8fbbaa2ff30487
'2011-10-14T08:50:45-04:00'
describe
'50427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNF' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
220cc86c890a0e0b6b21e4b75969fb34
f75cea2db1be68c05372968bed20278b8f46bd51
'2011-10-14T08:53:05-04:00'
describe
'1503316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNG' 'sip-files00050.tif'
e4d6d77a4810923fcd8d56fb22783614
1e51342fd608ec4be55f8e4889394270fb9dce9c
describe
'2424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNH' 'sip-files00050.txt'
c30a0bf09e63952a873b45e0a08796a3
c0694549de926809f7a4c3974ae8639d7dc9ee99
'2011-10-14T08:55:28-04:00'
describe
'12188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNI' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
956a9a14e5d90a4c462fb8dafb0071e6
66e2ad482779bf103eba8ac267f5375422493279
describe
'186468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNJ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
52dbd675607a001074c64eb3d7f351ab
86816f594fece44697fdc5be177edde87600f931
describe
'172242' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNK' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
48aa2000e791c4a51d35d4270c1ce7c7
43d41602f74a67912405fa5dd185e30286afd050
'2011-10-14T08:55:40-04:00'
describe
'57620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNL' 'sip-files00051.pro'
5aa090c7e16babb1b85258db109d1524
b12738f70178d0b8b4c5db74e24e386c10cc2e47
describe
'50916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNM' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
bfbf7da39974018e9aa9d5a8776d9a8b
2aa72789a8890f5f76db6a10236bb75a0d2a4dc6
describe
'1503192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNN' 'sip-files00051.tif'
655d492c863223996b7d8bacc4f7d88b
2adf98db20e741a91bbd7755ff3ee6f7429f60a0
'2011-10-14T08:54:21-04:00'
describe
'2472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNO' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a7195c02e53adcc6308267fd3118c38c
571a485c2936ee9a767721f0406f86d482965970
'2011-10-14T08:55:20-04:00'
describe
'11892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNP' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
0269fdc11256355fa863062aff13b419
72e4e6f2b95fb0649d6d19109d1ea8e8d2933c1b
describe
'186485' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNQ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
1e418a2029b0b88baf3c4ce9e8729083
035380e46a822e8c2c71b64e47e4b7611912ecff
describe
'185163' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNR' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
2c3b43557464ffad5fa4095901146e9e
257bd6307e9b3204d7c52fe894cf0b21089532d7
'2011-10-14T08:51:30-04:00'
describe
'62575' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
776bb4ad46a8c5360081bd243dd1e5d9
d00f01b685065e401810b7459a41505934e1f470
'2011-10-14T08:54:44-04:00'
describe
'53678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNT' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
e0c0fb7170cf52c3fbe5251bd9a6af13
90ccede380ef4d60152c3cf14e43d91fa881529b
'2011-10-14T08:51:56-04:00'
describe
'1503128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNU' 'sip-files00052.tif'
530242f3cc4aac6727969ac755c6d17e
95c579d5c9ed97dc695de1418d997c21382ddcab
describe
'2626' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNV' 'sip-files00052.txt'
bcac3be8c86b967220ee9726b32cd81e
2a401345fb2ad63f7bec6070e14b3a0cb660bf10
describe
'12234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNW' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
06561f2bdc889b0d2c313c9382cc1352
c1b6666675adf84301a576550f63bc1d086d04b2
describe
'186480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNX' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
5970496333f051beb7596a46d8fb9998
570b703231d4a031722b8fd0ddc2d5135a1eea93
describe
'160200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNY' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
b2ebd87936f85db5c90bc39be0fc6e6e
ab4e1b225207a468a2958e009d32f1c428d27b84
describe
'52823' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARNZ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
eb35e3f1e1405f3e1eac62132ce1e9db
874a3ce363f71dc87cd3398943425c275668c42b
describe
'48751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROA' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
321cb6a4b27b4ee904db58d1c08c47d4
5a3e1c106050016225813d683dbeaaad43b99a7f
describe
'1503100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROB' 'sip-files00053.tif'
18161b88f8fd93f3d5d958555e1235cc
4bb3786b43f2a2667958e7d007201333e3a50004
'2011-10-14T08:51:58-04:00'
describe
'2258' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROC' 'sip-files00053.txt'
6368a065f3dc80ea5c173b9c6be32752
32679376c24eb60fb4327ad5cff84d0958fc1ed6
'2011-10-14T08:51:14-04:00'
describe
'11734' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROD' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
2aace4f12495c3e9a3560fbb80337c4b
02f291f7943f6cfe46b30d1bc11027f68bf5241d
'2011-10-14T08:51:09-04:00'
describe
'186512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
2560a496ea7b4f982a381a570234f82f
6499386dd655d57df9282b4e9991463c7cc5cd3e
'2011-10-14T08:52:08-04:00'
describe
'183734' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROF' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
7f66b8ca885afde1dc7a11fb9290b543
bb5b54a00cfa22a3458be82f35ae7874771ba512
'2011-10-14T08:53:17-04:00'
describe
'60467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROG' 'sip-files00054.pro'
2af1d4bf87704beaf527203113fa4230
799d4c56c56b472f0ca160fe44997b7a1ef34ad2
describe
'54012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROH' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
84fec68a526eb6c5512a5c8ab2830733
2a0e7e0f3147caed7e5a77eef2e84222aa90183d
'2011-10-14T08:50:12-04:00'
describe
'1503496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
cae41b2ef6f98dafdd9da7fe99340d0b
a62a7a9d112da29ed28cd75f18bafe0916da5d25
describe
'2576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROJ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
977a8178258fa85abcace2cc9c448e0b
390a92040f23c1d78dd5b011bb904c67057459cb
describe
'12176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROK' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
4d339d8066543361268af49b566e0079
62db7b9ef1426e3ab9d55cb82de7a9f78e520d2e
describe
'186429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROL' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
fe934e72ede8e8dbcd716a346761a0ae
4855553db9628c4d0f64d8c977e208c934d6f7ea
'2011-10-14T08:54:54-04:00'
describe
'177525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROM' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
e4cc6b8e73c958465968fcfcdb3380fd
b504e12f91473d108c9ac6722bb84d972d74e8b1
describe
'58402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARON' 'sip-files00055.pro'
6818b4541483ce9c752519909a31873d
b5a06552ccb12120357dd359758d7cdefb112548
describe
'52467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROO' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
33723f1ea27e774c0dbe2376a83a49ed
97b6842303d83cfc0957d21194256193a48a017e
'2011-10-14T08:54:43-04:00'
describe
'1503528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROP' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2237acf69f385fb6e9ef89764aefb8c8
56cf3519555b05318e4fa12f7e88633b2dd5b8d1
'2011-10-14T08:55:46-04:00'
describe
'2565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROQ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
acf0006007e9d54b38b3ebf16788b904
b0e353dbbd1ad139a194aa08563e450a4c8fa9e4
describe
'12231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROR' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
c64210c70cb536780e1fedcad5403f33
740316cae3b823dc6169fbdb1f8f4fe740317616
describe
'186494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROS' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
32a4dc984b09ebb9ee2892de94b974a3
04bfe81f9e4fc34822b48473bef92231a6fd4e23
describe
'155381' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROT' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
750aac4a4dad6bfad1ae58fe285d94d4
846a9fcb5b66f1d00c0b8e3f7c803e74abbc0058
describe
'51958' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
92712c17699854533a60eed0023f3b86
b6b5d0c4c10c200fdad0aa0347db74013e45d47d
describe
'46615' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROV' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
db076904e8457c34a92851293f0442e5
863a0f347445d46977ba5d32dde8f9c905033ecd
describe
'1503220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROW' 'sip-files00056.tif'
cfa209638b7f8eaece24ce1b84568247
30f22ce9df461760331d457833433a9311ed6a3f
describe
'2249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROX' 'sip-files00056.txt'
1f61ac84141e74d0cdd8aefb3b2e7eb1
dda212103657b0414ca2f6bdb42f13e60f01bc06
'2011-10-14T08:50:44-04:00'
describe
'11287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
4d1b1cfa4505bfb305c55c619cfc9d0d
125e3ba9209729ff2a62a5bdec2f802894b35fb1
'2011-10-14T08:54:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAROZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
e941ebef797587a22eb403dc26581b2e
c808d76774ea9deba108d3ee2b4f86fab9c0ade3
describe
'196740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
b16f7819c855067126665786a7b66742
69362aa9841c3e1cedbe8889665ecc87d4c00460
'2011-10-14T08:51:25-04:00'
describe
'65434' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
1e4dc1e0664804442b4b1dc8775e03cc
c86d38f82cf1dea7f6877c8ae6ccf29b46c22cea
describe
'56307' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
a345dbbba03c6022600fa8b25a4b898a
8eb3fbbe6a34b56992a4a7d2f9859440be9a1168
'2011-10-14T08:50:01-04:00'
describe
'1503716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
192c1c5e887827cb52169baef857da3d
0ef471bdec4f2ea06e2858dd8938fbf0f76e3aa8
'2011-10-14T08:50:46-04:00'
describe
'2826' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
154f05a3084b64738df59454ad0d4e7e
7bdcd5d535e27715c4efbfe905a7eae9b523616d
describe
'12646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
00d4328f2b7a7413da85a119e877d484
94790e45b8355488f4387dd932f13a86ff8c4da4
describe
'186471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
d33a011ef1fe6a0acd7769999e4756a8
91fd077a329a5cd1fae40ed7c62216e4ffd7dd4b
describe
'199305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
ac85d16f7ccaadb43f0dc3b008063f8e
0e69f11d4768f0a6f2f3a40bebe01590349c719e
describe
'66661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPI' 'sip-files00058.pro'
c1d15d5a0889ec54eac875fe5eec7e0b
3d7e256cbc5f6ba06f3056e3503044416f72d276
describe
'57651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPJ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
607903ac8e57ebc5ddaab371ecfbd709
a90932ec710f33fe54a645826fda2ba61398b52a
describe
'1503452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPK' 'sip-files00058.tif'
5b3b3e5913d5de82d405f5af41fb6aad
797a1a5e07115970817bc09061c7295c68051050
'2011-10-14T08:52:24-04:00'
describe
'2768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
b89740dfbaa3c1e4be9e8aebb3a1af9a
76f3c47c8f51682f3cf23370079b8e9b6b571cb1
describe
'12492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPM' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
4854cf29c501bf1b2e9dbb98f1579ec3
3a6552f47cd5047b45a76115e2084b46a5249888
describe
'186504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPN' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
06d65dc0c2fc025e76c25f0048b2c429
069ed2bba3e4523d730eed83cbe5ec720c09f2cd
describe
'198061' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPO' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
af2f6b2b6d2803a1f7d1cb1526b3078d
71b5fe28b60ff83d70cc98173dac6fa43f4e25d5
describe
'65666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPP' 'sip-files00059.pro'
99ae4b0fd6b6ad84af3dbec79bfa06ad
de34a581b0bcc0ac224841d57cf66750193248ef
describe
'56643' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPQ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
f10e0ab902500772af198e4cb26b49fb
22eaab9e8d750b30007a5a700b2fec952894a163
describe
'1503520' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPR' 'sip-files00059.tif'
5f054be5ea87d735cac9ca0216d39d5b
a0ffef5ece6d7cd692a6a35b59edc693670b2140
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPS' 'sip-files00059.txt'
7867c3098ec1439824aebd9127a1d13d
6bb400d2a3ae6dcdbad421e29953dd5527928b8a
'2011-10-14T08:51:48-04:00'
describe
'12737' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPT' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
43468454f72258698f8b215467d767ed
7a8ffaa6bcd1d565ef46464459edfbfbac705812
'2011-10-14T08:54:49-04:00'
describe
'186479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
66985c0ffeb308ca6ff14b5354072f84
e4412ad8c5e110343a12dc306532fe334a583ed6
describe
'167082' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
4ae8052d043006de5073ad1ea090dc6a
b0750fa6fd69187ef201db35c17e84594ce1c7ea
describe
'56085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPW' 'sip-files00060.pro'
bf54f576231129471ab2c76cd96de277
13b75a88509abcb633e8f83d066e44e52804cce9
describe
'49432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
d20d937ece0de738cc82929c2a4506b7
72a480b8d171fb6c079a64f412bd89d569ac6d36
'2011-10-14T08:55:51-04:00'
describe
'1503308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
bf1b66251c9baa5d0c341001f29dccf0
72be85d7739b4c584a493249727449d51d1b7c57
'2011-10-14T08:52:53-04:00'
describe
'2362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARPZ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
c74678c6dda59e60acd2a8d380924091
611b0b51c730cb55f905d0c79d0882cb28122475
'2011-10-14T08:54:00-04:00'
describe
'11886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQA' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
969a927abca53004702040cb45b64599
b5ed918cb0b2bdc80b676f11bc78868bf8379cfa
describe
'186263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQB' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
e117d2a3ab7dfdab2ef853c1fc548399
41624fe8b008c45af18b029205fc5ddf57081a54
describe
'174096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
563ebd3a45e144cc61108a3d1c3ca44a
ca6cbd02a4b00e774c1cac1a872fcb3a0652cd4e
'2011-10-14T08:52:21-04:00'
describe
'59273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQD' 'sip-files00061.pro'
92aea7ed4765d1091c383c05d3e50da6
e90023b3c57624a979937b50c0eb8d154dcba017
describe
'50145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQE' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
0110682b8d1fe73d2a8e7e2b6072377b
a8760e83987a64edc1eb6cc64fe6d7c7cf7aa1a2
'2011-10-14T08:52:12-04:00'
describe
'1501796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQF' 'sip-files00061.tif'
67df686f16fc09aa36beb2c6453b5a33
050f951ac793f508e64f8ea767e35e7beb26ccc3
'2011-10-14T08:50:40-04:00'
describe
'2517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
2946a08a64df698eaf2c1ca3bcc05b50
7189a2d79eaf72ae91845d0de35fbff17ab5cb4e
'2011-10-14T08:53:31-04:00'
describe
'11602' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQH' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3b0afd99b8ba5a7cb7282c57febb03f4
d20f36fb337a424a91f0f709a3fab5f72baaeb75
'2011-10-14T08:54:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQI' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
e5f6b11d3e68119579dd0f5a540f7323
c68b1a5445c37ba08e9505022409b55d5b81b411
describe
'199955' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQJ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
3778bd3f0499699aae1fafa4bdb6cb2b
446f53b9104a3e5e493840fb5b44444ba786616e
'2011-10-14T08:55:14-04:00'
describe
'66840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQK' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8f3cb503585fc5a84f643b83b5828131
4b9c5e2a8ea9460539329e3f01917ec098b88eae
describe
'58261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQL' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
9cf089834b81ca8e778710e327d89765
deaf05cee6e2ae5110e9bf98fc7ede91f91db421
describe
'1503500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQM' 'sip-files00062.tif'
b6f801ea7287bb3aa9a1bd210e993cda
5dde7841583b99418c596be58f65bc1b60cad7da
describe
'2774' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQN' 'sip-files00062.txt'
4e874349c161d5911e8ba2c2fbce82a5
0fefafd109259ec67d9f44a2efdc43a8afc0535c
describe
'12810' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQO' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
d5fa6a6f166d0eb15a2557a6d7c6acf8
9469b0d134111e3d741867d65f26ca21249f2fd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQP' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1308d0fbe6eaea45ea1d3f49fe28d978
cc37961a4cb8bd8035dccc726ff6bc9c307fddfd
'2011-10-14T08:53:11-04:00'
describe
'202887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
2c784c6eb8e91f704aa03a4a72fd8cb5
093e78cc1fbf3173a433ccbea1eef3908b03410d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQR' 'sip-files00063.pro'
915a47c39e3d8e5512ab3e39f6b489b6
f8671a65b66cf9865fa4901c40f614a42f9d15ad
'2011-10-14T08:51:05-04:00'
describe
'57861' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQS' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
6f25797201dfd27fca1b3c938ce8882f
64db75a13d50b99953cf1e66076017b42090a375
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQT' 'sip-files00063.tif'
80547a6c89379989123ef7f9b268f4ac
53ed786cf69cb540cb3121a188cc5b29772eba56
describe
'2972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQU' 'sip-files00063.txt'
32a05d24071984f524d0a293cd0a4a76
dc4845d22960df09e0ceffdefc034ec4083cd48a
describe
'12770' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQV' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
33067507af088e0aa654f5898c56adb4
e4725fd19b81e55bee9d4db1f5e278fb25567f56
'2011-10-14T08:54:10-04:00'
describe
'186411' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQW' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
cabb881c7dddd7e062937cae758c02ef
a5857b078f33c986723c27caf606334f46db6a42
'2011-10-14T08:50:04-04:00'
describe
'203169' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQX' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
64d4dc17cb2d8d49b1c08afd3bc2277c
b8bdb7d034e726be99106296773477f1ba78bbb4
'2011-10-14T08:51:13-04:00'
describe
'69549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQY' 'sip-files00064.pro'
38e9eaf8dfe3c502de717d501c63e6c7
f95e7838bbf9a69afc15084074a4a93f9ff588e7
describe
'57421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARQZ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
2d536bd0818f24a902953a89d31f5a83
6a68cdbe50869c878df92dc3b8dff7d6bc086b0a
describe
'1503460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRA' 'sip-files00064.tif'
edf1b24a408d97f8cc679d00d47a498c
09d7651f37c5a71baedf3645efcb10c003d1cdcb
'2011-10-14T08:52:02-04:00'
describe
'2898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRB' 'sip-files00064.txt'
abba9c7f1ba01e71104354c068d1dff7
ad5746384814630c50ddda0ce8239f69ad732697
'2011-10-14T08:55:19-04:00'
describe
'12502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRC' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
bca3f2422f2315782c9b0958413fb98e
6ae12042b3a9276770452ebc4ad784b31a2c087d
describe
'188611' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRD' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
cc3a362491d9ce120b6dbb15180f0c0f
edae71834aec3460d3e31d62f3627a3911cdb7a5
describe
'119308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRE' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
72135003d02e3cbb7a8a61bd26fa9b06
61617c5e1ad1f120eff04e6cd74f646105493472
'2011-10-14T08:54:34-04:00'
describe
'2187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRF' 'sip-files00065.pro'
e3070d870426e2603ae8b75d7a136a53
6157604b3373b4d1679f748aaa1e7b5143737be5
describe
'31630' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRG' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
1f85171501d74022047c7e0c402a4a08
720c5bc0250417458743d0fa2d52b36ced0802fb
describe
'4535748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRH' 'sip-files00065.tif'
d738bf9a0bacbc60fa47f967f83ef3e5
688946549ad5c4bf8e32d1acd059c091feb66b56
'2011-10-14T08:50:30-04:00'
describe
'96' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRI' 'sip-files00065.txt'
6b674f976249f278b8e538a54ef62fc2
9e0b91d30958b61991c993f00b5514b4c4a11f78
describe
'8012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRJ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
54e3732a73013cef75c9cda3014b973a
43b955fbe15548f36c3fd6ef91fce190bc22a0d9
'2011-10-14T08:56:03-04:00'
describe
'189987' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRK' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
dc447add25f86993c6af5bf4054cd7f6
491925c81830309d8b5bb8a69000f3060672e17f
'2011-10-14T08:55:24-04:00'
describe
'199840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRL' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
58e68b1ae243dd21cb521301310741e0
1006ab7d6fca54f644a751193c1e6b15cb5ea6f2
describe
'68847' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRM' 'sip-files00067.pro'
2455dc50d825b152cb61ed7e2b484adc
f4127773d86a9119db70503443645819a7b92341
'2011-10-14T08:51:22-04:00'
describe
'56317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
639d0b9f5700e93862dafc0694360200
d6577c455d4b2fefbf115bdf1b57570a5ee5000e
'2011-10-14T08:52:27-04:00'
describe
'1531988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRO' 'sip-files00067.tif'
2db61dc90929bec95805dc0fdb97f980
36adceefca2f6157d12cbc9477e05e84dfab52c9
describe
'2894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRP' 'sip-files00067.txt'
4d14d5f071b3864b119790e8ac116eaf
259f8c70a2ee6edc349207e19d47cec0f64c34f9
'2011-10-14T08:52:34-04:00'
describe
'12251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRQ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
2e1899fb9a6100c6c227437da89a3c40
58a23e9ab701e1bc7be383bd1d9a73a3044eaf85
describe
'188641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
c237a2798be4a2fc11aadc13ca975fd3
b6eef0b03c81ffee60dd52c0c02d4d95f9c22c94
'2011-10-14T08:56:18-04:00'
describe
'198869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
f19656c0dea659fe6d5d76031f6e971c
704162b2de4c6accab444a58bdcfa50583205c30
'2011-10-14T08:49:41-04:00'
describe
'68843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
bdf176cf38d8544d2a3b27c5a8c4fc23
e4e783c5b0e6090f094f16240cf27d2325737a7b
describe
'56125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRU' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
c88670ff7bfe379903c216d690052c43
76fec7fbb4f46586213bc66f21e4b70d83b2b229
'2011-10-14T08:51:01-04:00'
describe
'1521028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
bfccf51afe0b2fe500d984accbc65223
5b3b75198c9545fbc33e1df7135fc7159798e683
describe
'2856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRW' 'sip-files00068.txt'
c7e752dbebe7d5cb96d02d8199719094
64513ffddd7b39825106bbef0dcfa3edd7250dde
describe
'12447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
bc718b29921ecdf0264470cca4c64219
61acea948db86b719ff9c8e29c10c856ba12a3a7
describe
'186488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d86897f676589b2dd2e75b46bd5c04cb
d0a782f092a89ab3dfbea39c9ae3216182d4bf24
describe
'207174' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARRZ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
834163a82c5b15ff8d6b0f2397482e20
efe8afe96b6ec48b1183047859f8f2247db71f6e
describe
'70453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSA' 'sip-files00069.pro'
f106c988e6576d46673b835a054f8fba
b6fa2a73855cfdd749894558767444ee388d7883
describe
'59015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSB' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
99ea2b005ed9d8ab336fd255435992e5
efd3178de2f111bf466e73ee52b73ff73dfdb963
'2011-10-14T08:50:26-04:00'
describe
'1503372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
b9cdcb5cd13052af3fab2e35a639415e
5cf6f835e28cec155b511356b80ddf42e8df53ff
describe
'2940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSD' 'sip-files00069.txt'
5ab8093b438fbdcacf7a46678db96128
901a03054372d23d0b8c6617c66c6fa780985864
'2011-10-14T08:53:58-04:00'
describe
'12724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSE' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
838aaf9f726994d99fd7dbd883d0af7a
a3628a8f145126ea019960e7f52e338369737490
describe
'186501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSF' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e5818af301072e60c98ab5dd9c66150a
b832557d06db65dec93ae4bc16e9dd1f99ea8af6
describe
'182701' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSG' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
846b405675402f63416b78020b4c7cef
42e6085b406b3300c6633351405dbd36f617d1e4
describe
'61565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSH' 'sip-files00070.pro'
f6726e0c68377d8df15fd6ad7e7dd511
4dd0c8e1c9c56c808b0e5d408461224095f83cf3
describe
'52219' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSI' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
92f0b0978c8957d39dac11cc8bb3f2ed
f1e52e9a34cc3e815157989fd5fb596d7fe3dc17
describe
'1502980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSJ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
188846243fc1de925b15f4c2660a8d68
ff2794f054465e9b9ea5918298853bdfb73517b7
'2011-10-14T08:52:43-04:00'
describe
'2591' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSK' 'sip-files00070.txt'
7f7a305a6b628e5b173bae41ffebb4b9
366d34882e49af15de84e7e410dbb1b76e236170
describe
'12080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSL' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
80abb056267c059a6cd4330b0be092de
458f52b623e5e8359c8713d877ba66a8ceb59575
'2011-10-14T08:54:51-04:00'
describe
'186507' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSM' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
75a7aaf69f3e5e5130919d1f54bb1b3c
025fc31f8a3ffac4287c5e355e99a32a9e99c073
'2011-10-14T08:52:00-04:00'
describe
'158311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSN' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
2383ca0c0570ae2d89cfcfe55bc962cf
ec5d84ed7465831cf4e15e1298fe9187d4524943
describe
'52277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSO' 'sip-files00071.pro'
bcbad0edc6de610a508a14089ff02baa
ff049b06726c229bfe91bf0464e0749e52b120fe
describe
'47655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSP' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
8d7f2fe0d1cf793937d4b1b3589c6d82
790c69b377398145a0598c49607f7e902a9f3431
describe
'1503148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSQ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
ed72f631e5828db9974d46f785acc74a
6bcd5913583fd17bdf87713c03483c11f8d7bb8e
describe
'2234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSR' 'sip-files00071.txt'
9ef9c94865f3aa0079b6817723f14622
4c04f5e11e3c7a0154e429ef2e96ccb0d5751363
'2011-10-14T08:55:34-04:00'
describe
'11666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSS' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
ef34a29f309dda3db8481579ed2151a0
d34d63a0b37df3a4c028b5ccc686fb05c9e20ff0
'2011-10-14T08:53:55-04:00'
describe
'186376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARST' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
dc9780c65caec13e0e6aeda1ae443781
12007c2ef6baa36d1f24bac2c8ed344f943e1516
describe
'193647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSU' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c7ff4ea42c421e0c60f34c8b70733e9b
6a0c37e0eb6cfbac755469eb80886779565ad0a3
'2011-10-14T08:52:33-04:00'
describe
'64087' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSV' 'sip-files00072.pro'
711d1556a96e56929607446327da12c3
5b58b99c0a8cd03859497080af45cc003cfdc664
describe
'55978' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSW' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
781165fc642eb4c1e3f4e07c93476d47
9c6505627924991972d083d3eae4b3fefd286541
describe
'1503380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSX' 'sip-files00072.tif'
44ac3045186e71ef9e44e44f1173e63c
4a5a75acf0ed6013060331d88d3f35fc94bc5deb
'2011-10-14T08:50:27-04:00'
describe
'2686' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSY' 'sip-files00072.txt'
e8a9e4a8c5776d9d3596dcb01be5900c
443aff527d73b680f3f11d3f5b1685baae95fdd9
describe
'12539' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARSZ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
c9b70d010a17d29539df01fb94a7708f
3f517504ee33b0ea7c95a2875ba347accb51cb10
'2011-10-14T08:55:13-04:00'
describe
'186290' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTA' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
d81f3db4701897f3d41dce7feaf4c38c
2a15d02a5aa440fac92973f6c71c325aaf3be732
'2011-10-14T08:54:31-04:00'
describe
'186319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTB' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f4cda9dda0453a6a95e16e30243d60a4
f2a69203eb99378f232a656e8be3447e0739f573
'2011-10-14T08:53:09-04:00'
describe
'63186' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTC' 'sip-files00073.pro'
5b5049c94fd327e4b3a6631d7b84ce2e
cf150e69269a4ee4b2c952874ab87f7ae177420d
describe
'54629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTD' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
31ffa2dbb32a4561731a181bf71f8d97
a1d71427561f73d7e15543390c418740642a33f8
describe
'1501920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTE' 'sip-files00073.tif'
4132d78449195a70dd2aa7485605773f
7e2f1754dd8e2f47cc6e55a45d5195de12329403
'2011-10-14T08:52:20-04:00'
describe
'2687' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTF' 'sip-files00073.txt'
8a902c21108d262a72a9e38175aac694
74e66ecc8e50a95731c74a911a8a915f2934d12c
describe
'12582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTG' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
be00cb30d90b511b084b82de0d2e4254
12a31dba1bdbec13d1c320c5afce891d6d2acf53
describe
'186489' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTH' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
dfb70412ff2d61b83a2a23cdd3209971
e063bdd6783d237e17ce69835bebfccf003bebbc
describe
'194420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTI' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
52af9c3ff088e063e0bd088695694717
aebc8c4a496e4e36308723bffac7b8d526ecb8fc
'2011-10-14T08:50:08-04:00'
describe
'68185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTJ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
2fc4fa285a392af1a66ed0de662a84d3
6f0e052fb731cec52ba38d03294c8c2a322a77cd
'2011-10-14T08:54:45-04:00'
describe
'55424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTK' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
d81418ba0cb0b5b76cd3093fc12e70f5
d0628ba52cd04fd3dd45a95b6c3680be805fcdb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTL' 'sip-files00074.tif'
c6d5ee4ae7445817fa6306ff2d5c6529
64f34ad6150edb31a4bbb8a5c6337b2702c191b6
describe
'2846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTM' 'sip-files00074.txt'
884e46941a797057ca226e42d26ee84b
eb94990a4e2c11c3be1d7e6edeff96337616db4b
'2011-10-14T08:54:55-04:00'
describe
'12341' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTN' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
6f19a2e91ffa2208fb91c38eaa3a4036
c0b98ca9a83fdebbc96b6c096b0d5c0e57e668ef
'2011-10-14T08:52:11-04:00'
describe
'186435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTO' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
ddb9bb8f1de8a9a78620bf93641f2f55
486531b700babb4393afbabbebe5d1813dc28869
describe
'200682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTP' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
84b43d4d044579294f60f88e88d63878
019f432b69741bf68cb54be911931a9c1c7848be
describe
'68768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTQ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
a57dacf73034d46002bb969d7dfe957e
8e0d57de726b31dd2addfe0174a8b8a07b8b3836
describe
'57830' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTR' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
93e6203fb63ea6aee23fc7fbf46e1075
8eb58c49b30f609ad6a0d9ba9f1649081e7174a7
describe
'1503280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTS' 'sip-files00075.tif'
e1aa677bed7d04e28a5f751947318fdf
28bd5ebfe5e26c980a8cd800522dae7ccb162fcc
'2011-10-14T08:51:52-04:00'
describe
'2989' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTT' 'sip-files00075.txt'
98339307cf49c650453753eae5f763bd
93fda0451ccf9de993d41fb0c994903e4764fae1
describe
Invalid character
'12577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTU' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
318a95ddd2504470d7a8c17ae550767a
fa6da24c3a89903538bcd2e3adb61419a15e2282
'2011-10-14T08:55:33-04:00'
describe
'186379' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTV' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
dce4acb83b9a8818360487d83a29fa86
92a2bfcc680dfaf239d5656cc4bd230914763e85
describe
'187139' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTW' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
27afccd4935007234fdea6f52964eae6
296636a58c70359ac248333b1dc57512bfa0c0ee
describe
'64498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTX' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0aece3346453969b48d1a769b7e509d5
91db959f0827d84fee7c0fa6decc9e353ec6acb5
'2011-10-14T08:54:25-04:00'
describe
'53455' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTY' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
b3271ab29b66d51d4469cf2305a31b3f
21239521915b8f403da9b574e97e2416fe21f781
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARTZ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
2fa57a0b493b0c59fdec4e4e13ffcb99
2699e97f1d94bd5806c71df876742cf7f46b43ec
describe
'2693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUA' 'sip-files00076.txt'
069e946cf0b120ec9127fafbaf67506e
9e7c210d75c94db567e65e319dcc36ba513e15da
describe
'11929' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUB' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
95343600462527f7a9cbf0793a1cb9c6
9a8fcb41483eded8b97c6af9fc6c7670c7f147ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUC' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
ea3d43cef37fd55196495bdd10fe4d22
8b60055248ed3fb54ed5d2b7cc8b68fd773c37ad
'2011-10-14T08:55:31-04:00'
describe
'174069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUD' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
b62778e9533a1ef8d3478b2ff839a81a
ddb0b218708e9dba2bfc0cae680cc0f42d1868fb
describe
'57247' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUE' 'sip-files00077.pro'
8f2918b94d506b62d7d402c6dc9788f9
476f6c55b85f9f28c22f0e347c4eb0bc50435b78
describe
'52422' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUF' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
1a2610219d68545636f143822d539a80
91b3132f19b4bcdb5f4423f0fa9338f7d2701f95
describe
'1503212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUG' 'sip-files00077.tif'
d64cf8b144681de4d75da98a71b1287e
bf4ef4b3e4c74d4eb9517547c96b305cecc97a9f
describe
'2514' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUH' 'sip-files00077.txt'
605a89f31e26e270bb607d85581d836d
e51f26b37b0629e26808131445f2d722f4d0a3f6
'2011-10-14T08:50:05-04:00'
describe
'12345' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUI' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
84fcf04e02604fc6f4cd74bfdd91b2ed
93ce1858529c139e88bc695ab5077d3883dfae2f
describe
'192208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUJ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
b1023d64030e48d3831abff92f16fa1f
b0ad4159652eccd96a039e58bcbb206c2b71bbdb
describe
'184097' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUK' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f1ae669db608e1654d1b1bd53a9fe7f9
a6c1f5693cb1a97ec4839ad555417e379de079fb
describe
'66945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUL' 'sip-files00078.pro'
e22a89b2af5c917de7d8e3ff8ecae9f2
d64abc6f044d66bb5898ae7791135d4cc6c7d9e7
describe
'51242' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUM' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
0c59ac823674932b8f22b0259540955e
225f199112cbae1be0b25b6e33958b0de076ab05
'2011-10-14T08:50:09-04:00'
describe
'1549536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUN' 'sip-files00078.tif'
02bd100b8bf58f0c3b5d6fa60ae35cec
0008bf1a3c2c705a95598fee0c440fe354e2f7f9
describe
'2798' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUO' 'sip-files00078.txt'
d585b0dd15e51057ac8159286b141085
1844c58588c90247de5f14a2d0689b36210d7d2f
describe
'11274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUP' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
5ed79e14cf896dc1999f57b638db8f23
371134973ab09732a21aece4f0f2432d0ac83178
describe
'186427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUQ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
892d9fd9da9cb6da991795e6f8041a60
d104bf1a588560ea2e3a10a7cf380d5124e158f8
'2011-10-14T08:54:59-04:00'
describe
'191188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUR' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
a734209564c3dc853fa51047503e6cf0
3271e8828c35595bf721e5a70611cd57e7b684ee
'2011-10-14T08:50:17-04:00'
describe
'64701' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUS' 'sip-files00079.pro'
1f62d3003dc5ee0778f562efd424a0ca
c895a515643e8ecac89b24b4207a904b24c1f7fd
describe
'55420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUT' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
92b5a50c3fba2e326c6f221970bd1a1a
a9057cd8bc3fd08cb3f1b7b4124c12d527174a1e
'2011-10-14T08:55:56-04:00'
describe
'1503276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUU' 'sip-files00079.tif'
ddfffecef179c0916d8efdbfef502eec
cfe7ee5b07c5527dd071dbef5534f364dd661d83
'2011-10-14T08:53:49-04:00'
describe
'2714' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUV' 'sip-files00079.txt'
36dbd0a06282c3b7c1bf5d815f111c6b
62cf7f816fd25635bcac39aac85bbb0c55129981
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUW' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
d3333d4d6d708cd7510a7685b4cbee5e
64a8b214e9202bc84f625d3c4cca980ad714ed9e
describe
'189390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUX' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
627f046bbcc9b43283de267e3965c4f7
83a2a48a855e3e8a053714da19919228a441d062
describe
'184268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUY' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
b010cea046e9ac3898b0327861d39a41
39a0b9e8abf8fe6a7a3ca4242024a32aa188ad6a
describe
'63619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARUZ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
b7fc1da65b89d118b3098dd8fc17a2b3
3b43c8610604b5efcd8e64673a4461bd0580e7b5
describe
'52692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVA' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
dd043a4a1fc5b7dcef6a614301e644c5
7afccb7b89a353649d31345c7c749bcb3e1e69e7
describe
'1526508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVB' 'sip-files00080.tif'
d007d9aabac41daa33aba49ed3b02e62
a1518502836629274873979d0928d96d34450a0e
'2011-10-14T08:52:16-04:00'
describe
'2655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVC' 'sip-files00080.txt'
e1c9b410bd31f800b1b22674cdffee9b
5e994e51f0a95251e3ee66d33bb26f52f0dffebc
describe
'12153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVD' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
474f91c57f261cb63c4d53d5d9c2532a
276bda614989e4b350a660ed75b717f55466fcc2
describe
'191559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVE' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
dfd60388faa4e01823cdf944ce2e7e27
d0ddecc824d21d264afd38dc6fc1fc78da03ef6d
describe
'170719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVF' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
9ede1b4348141548531a968c8aa3a729
0e41981da3cdbb9b1c8646d00a4e6f410ab8c3bf
describe
'58553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVG' 'sip-files00081.pro'
bfd8112bb5390e8da13849ea786e2075
83bdf748a09c42cab70b8acfc105d22cfc8a2130
describe
'49316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVH' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
7fea6cf256322dbed00c1068e0d3647a
669ebf939615b8fc082442aa9152c0ef659df50e
'2011-10-14T08:53:15-04:00'
describe
'1543688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVI' 'sip-files00081.tif'
e9ac2b060d7bcce9db7438418f8f25d5
f886cc7c25366f9e79bbed1d21b6ad8efbe429ed
describe
'2479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVJ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
5ce0630135247a0028cc07b2d4bfff4b
0df3d52a4578e363352c4aa3a3c224b35f42d182
describe
'11246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVK' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
dea23a19760856aab40e94ab749779c5
cc26c8c2fff4e70a3e2547feba5cd2c2b8c2fb2c
describe
'190113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVL' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
e3cfd895373c80766789e14fa97d16d6
d0adab9c7ebe663ca74f658dc533ab7cad9ca9c9
'2011-10-14T08:55:54-04:00'
describe
'176394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVM' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
9e4ff493d8f486856763c829014c4b66
47c6ff17a74142e7b4f4ad685f658971f6f1a489
describe
'61131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVN' 'sip-files00082.pro'
16d1ecca76493ecad53bebc09da4c8d3
bca3f1125ae3d7af320f16f46b34e480680c7905
describe
'50617' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVO' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
24bd0bff87046f72932ef46092298104
1cef234a8ff1032360bd05d4f37dfeb069422e31
describe
'1532156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
f1c104f1a7fb75e241ddee15c035d9e4
dcc7a490af9aa96f2ee33f49d3ee9e2c8a6f9922
'2011-10-14T08:49:45-04:00'
describe
'2566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVQ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
81048db4132fadfcdad9c47c3c041afe
877be0d385fd5e54d243e873f69ebdb3981826f3
'2011-10-14T08:51:21-04:00'
describe
'11648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVR' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
21050f954fa627161e7672d6cd3dfbad
1d5c72e258c644b69de168f4725146287861db59
describe
'190085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVS' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
80bc6466b5c208bc8d73849628750643
4a1943414022c80739c725776fbfcb1f73ba982b
describe
'190708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVT' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
caad8b43e220030237834c1100a5fcf6
36d780b614a6b61318cefe26f7c8f0fd8ad73060
'2011-10-14T08:50:20-04:00'
describe
'64772' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVU' 'sip-files00083.pro'
b27834699c4fcfe71d623fa0edf851ad
a04c21c98e3b7bb8aa1e8f9ad4bd506beed583d9
describe
'54467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVV' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
26d92953134b3a2945530a9e2c54dfdf
17e8c5eb6f46c37a6369d14c98cc0b97de95c6ef
describe
'1532080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVW' 'sip-files00083.tif'
2d678f0f314bf06d8d10cee88c02c251
db21903260426af21efb321e6cff4a40c259263c
describe
'2762' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVX' 'sip-files00083.txt'
f1c4e719b39fde574d15d0b48a2a4e79
5c397fca20e0b255f535c4f2a761f6694e22fdc0
'2011-10-14T08:55:45-04:00'
describe
'12400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVY' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
1ad6c6d323dea17a9621807b1d6557b7
ce70afcb3a769f10fa771d9ba8146350522069e9
'2011-10-14T08:54:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARVZ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
521772ce82231469147ca811e7249d2e
1d82b582038d38b96cca8479ef43c19c5bb89d32
describe
'189838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWA' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
a5a42d96f8bb1768a5404a84c55c4e4a
46103885038c75c7602460175454ab499bcbe070
describe
'63469' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWB' 'sip-files00084.pro'
1a5b2207fa4acc7ee18c2dc04d1bde01
4454f0b1a25ff8570ada20548d214bcc645e76e3
describe
'55972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWC' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
5591766f320373277756052e25fccec7
6a4a3f588baa7b33098d1913e425a9a6776b9957
'2011-10-14T08:52:32-04:00'
describe
'1503248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWD' 'sip-files00084.tif'
afb81bd9cb5ff28fe4d03f25dfb99c59
bbab9947519f216464be881636c478ebfb43bb8b
'2011-10-14T08:52:41-04:00'
describe
'2652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWE' 'sip-files00084.txt'
ddea9b2b9d2880c58b141465f355f8e1
0c2536379c6c96c6e4bf881c72c3f5bb4133608e
describe
'12801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWF' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
d82e39c6ad6db4e6c4be54cf807d68ca
aa8d33982d0cc39268a05b451d42f6a40169ff1d
describe
'191469' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWG' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
98a84247bf0e1da873b3d7787e339eee
d0a3254f71587dd5a6556f19fd3a1f08594ce451
describe
'188307' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWH' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
09531f90c1ae17ff918d342a03bf140b
55d4a7e82503c237e94562a76b770c207382bd28
describe
'65638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWI' 'sip-files00085.pro'
ab2ce9a9298b91b315a3382a5a8bfc63
530fee8d592f3e657481dec03e142c073162ef2d
describe
'52536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWJ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
418b5895dd345db54b69a246b633eb7b
c547d9c64f124624934b2f141e445aa406253279
describe
'1543972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWK' 'sip-files00085.tif'
53532fabcdda7c0c037503753068194e
897e8c45c3db0b37c6ad8dd25b21ebc149c6118e
describe
'2745' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWL' 'sip-files00085.txt'
647e1c3d8930655ddca6734bd961f97b
e9968f6577af17675f8ea20661d4dabe32634513
describe
'11966' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWM' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
a8881db2267b55d17ed8e87836cc3a26
cea0cd3ebbd8597b749fad0dafda581a27a4a992
describe
'194390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWN' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
7b086181a43fcf7bc06bde2a626c1e1c
d2d512bc5aa19bb2223f42e0af3bc12ef36d6a7c
'2011-10-14T08:53:26-04:00'
describe
'183451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWO' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
19098011f38a3567b434a72f97aa596d
ee13dcb08e202508fb5b381f808191a3936392b5
describe
'66568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWP' 'sip-files00086.pro'
39a99643c02202c09d220e2046d45260
a8cd0c46778428d7ad14d60ee053efbf8797c841
'2011-10-14T08:52:42-04:00'
describe
'51131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWQ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
1a1043cff2fdc31a612529953e43c239
938948ab1d769475d0ad4b6dbe5b7f80226fe612
describe
'1566928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWR' 'sip-files00086.tif'
2eb739664a865ccf766b6f3a9e84ce00
2bbb3cc1b6b9bafd044b8249c2253b0c5f3d48a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWS' 'sip-files00086.txt'
ec59c2571b3fb7308bc09ccc220a29c6
fe960629f9085f3d3826d9091b85fff6331039c2
describe
'11420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWT' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
f168be545e2ee712b0c2c49bf5b581cb
0f778d4f8e5a182eee99d075a80235d4b8b1dfe2
'2011-10-14T08:51:15-04:00'
describe
'191380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWU' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
cc40eb5bdd5f84a0718acef0057d063d
bc058c272bab81fe750d03f1565559a2b993b4b8
describe
'164478' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWV' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
eacfe47d95c919188f0ac0152405d9de
76b2944273d3e7bf8dfcef5270eabbca927f012e
'2011-10-14T08:53:06-04:00'
describe
'56162' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWW' 'sip-files00087.pro'
5085c6bcf419ec0e42c331e4c1da89ea
1e15aff1c1512b444927a6f5b0acee20c0576e4e
describe
'48973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWX' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
cf80b4496bece052a709899831affd16
0cd278c8240ce47b850186358d39d67834c48f67
describe
'1542472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWY' 'sip-files00087.tif'
a9fea9c0fc8814719c266f61ad43d0e5
752c196ca5dc386839d532a88210d5b9acc43f45
describe
'2475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARWZ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
f58efeae11249faf70d42308110df09a
c133fc5e78d376ddaab71758294661fd90f94f50
describe
'11409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXA' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
285aa7f447b0c44a8dc2b92dc9ccd34b
d06e2df937522c59d1599ac2be9cf7fb9192c0ca
describe
'186394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXB' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
8ded505e00091af8006687d687d2f459
ad0c75d5f54af7ffab0d58eb3278277dc7a12509
'2011-10-14T08:55:36-04:00'
describe
'180359' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXC' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
e26259cdc4082e71c8d5967d8884d507
11d1760db33aea76bc165c2484276f7b5d8e9e82
describe
'60468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXD' 'sip-files00088.pro'
9bd925c25f48f9a3e033e661499c9565
c041e6952dee2988d37594922f143958a014b8e0
describe
'52395' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXE' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
e8d72f8df27a10ab1ff9e94c83c126d3
83e2307544b9a6572d6718a3d0081754ca1b1b64
describe
'1503088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXF' 'sip-files00088.tif'
d8b3e406c471dfa220f0b92dc7eb06bd
f8aba27ef2071c99ee4081416cd186038b1fb281
'2011-10-14T08:53:54-04:00'
describe
'2541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
dda03eec05db359ba1ff20078e32e599
65f37c42b40d7e41556f9d01c7641fef1238216d
describe
'12003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXH' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
977478a256aa55ae3714e635c113ff6b
85f764030a8ac3613a540f6b206d5b399db23c28
describe
'194681' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXI' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
7e54d9fa3db37059e4422f4085f33c29
fdab003c1cc72719c795b58d697aebe608c5870a
'2011-10-14T08:51:17-04:00'
describe
'191668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXJ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
1aaf4c0a40d55109358fd9f7c496b872
15658d9e1c36c17ac433bd461dcb413669baa2e7
describe
'64970' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXK' 'sip-files00089.pro'
d10e71387f2275d878d8a744fec68a8b
dc5b4f4853a861338f3a6fc2feb46148f621f33a
describe
'54775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXL' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
32522b9dc4579c76e9c5a4bef39eb8c1
86f0526aada6254eace80e61e523beb73d08b44e
describe
'1569524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXM' 'sip-files00089.tif'
d994caa28014bb168e0197ad92a4009a
df2a0dd60574698f3960b579f8d4dc4b53c74dcd
describe
'2775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXN' 'sip-files00089.txt'
af7ec3e329c37253e368b3d439189470
32ecadf9d2e7c0b5208829a8b784faeabafec4e6
describe
'12354' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXO' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
b5969b5836df6b7cf90606e2c579f6d7
4269731a6a990c9ab9d277cc634c23d1212fb550
describe
'186492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXP' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
bbb2fedca3d4e46d6d7f398b708a712c
b31a573f3c1d8ea0916d774522952766368b9b0a
describe
'189069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXQ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
e6850d18e14bbfd39145c972fd84e7ae
252a667bfc8d0c98bedfd9f5f62070a60149ac1b
describe
'60969' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXR' 'sip-files00090.pro'
eadb58797a3810dddba26f1ea1bd2394
61705f20bd78b40a951b1f2b2c80492557e23be7
'2011-10-14T08:53:04-04:00'
describe
'55540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXS' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
f8cb98958bf911a17b057e33c70e5b93
6cb6e049e386896d744a03cf10e85221fd125641
'2011-10-14T08:50:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXT' 'sip-files00090.tif'
904a92826c11f01312b1a9992ca7307d
0758b6c2c09e12a57b630cfa704b81a7ae25ae37
describe
'2597' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXU' 'sip-files00090.txt'
fce4a01e274b95444055da61b84f92a4
50c53c8edc48e1c92408aefac9301d56506926de
describe
'13152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXV' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
d4b2711e8b6ad6e6d9df8fa0cc53b2cb
ab70fb1aa86d80f4a3af276a251285f7092d6dd1
describe
'194033' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXW' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
be832d3d558a2469ec5d18325707f6fc
bf6307fa11bb5447d9bd260e3c26e0b0ec72fb42
describe
'201662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXX' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
706036b33403de3e942d4beffc2ec0c6
2ec3d8fb6feb3b29c08420abca933452ce11830a
describe
'68355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXY' 'sip-files00091.pro'
9639356b84e513ce3a1f70cd09cae295
918def4907166692485f247d1ae9ba45307ef98d
describe
'56922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARXZ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
93a39f5ecdb978adabfbb975f83ce928
248139cc2f6094b9a12a2598710c913827b500c4
describe
'1565260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYA' 'sip-files00091.tif'
dfc03b59cc82649cfc64a3978a3a3f6e
cd87894020663b002a92b9d64138d425e6d13105
describe
'2961' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYB' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c1fa529052eed812db9d06b7bcc66a5a
56d14c5bba1b6ee0d92996780d970d8e6e70598c
describe
'12112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYC' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
457cad121d5db735c281204b4daef2c4
502ab7697f013f057af9fa19b564f57da3d7d587
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYD' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
c313a4f0fcbf4f7ffc894cef7462a924
1fbddf3bf77d95561997ab9be8222657ee7a5a22
'2011-10-14T08:51:43-04:00'
describe
'195831' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYE' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
adc7822e60c71eeaed9a6e0bd920aaa6
49b6fb3cd823fb1aa6d7333ddb68817942ea5a7d
'2011-10-14T08:51:28-04:00'
describe
'64139' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYF' 'sip-files00092.pro'
47b47201d69a42b3feda3ec0aa96b1f2
f0c390e3900347389197d838b7c85e2d909a4bf3
describe
'55631' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYG' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
b93b3cf8bfd1be59bf01f26bba24bc04
b8c07114e5b589a5694708f4485378b84d00bec8
'2011-10-14T08:55:37-04:00'
describe
'1503612' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYH' 'sip-files00092.tif'
34946d4af4b0b90eeaaee162defc22ad
773044207d39d622a1ac78b5dd57b2d05ce32851
'2011-10-14T08:50:29-04:00'
describe
'2703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYI' 'sip-files00092.txt'
dbc3702c1e037ee2779b11edbe46eaab
5cdbb8cd0911af1dd4be8eef2e8cce4fbb3eac93
describe
'12856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYJ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
9c6171b828b551c71898dc26ae0d4429
b88067070551f548837f5e98ffe81c420519870c
describe
'186464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYK' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
7c0ade9f950c303e370b54c07780128b
7a8687ef099e2a40a832ed68db9c0ee9ccedc803
describe
'194455' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYL' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
21c606a57e8992bd430d0bfcfae054b4
1484636c9d772515703ecc9b40289bd698fbfe3b
describe
'64666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYM' 'sip-files00093.pro'
cb9f207b972834eea5737288ce31dae8
7f9c02c76ee6e9510c03f693fee473eaa6792557
describe
'55818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYN' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
79727c5985b1a05a33da85e47f48f59b
91ecc0687a2e421fce6810a515c68d6209c874a2
describe
'1503608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYO' 'sip-files00093.tif'
c8f5360a5dca767a31e29d90e0cae56e
43593214da0f13765f46656518fdc9702ffa4cac
describe
'2730' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYP' 'sip-files00093.txt'
096b583546b17bd76ce5ed93aa528fb1
6f749cd27df80ed1d2d98d92de5251ff910fea98
describe
'12866' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
92051dd373fcf8dc3ce653ec884d42de
3ae012434214161a5fb66c241e190ed7783aa55c
describe
'186416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYR' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
d1918093eeb2e63033fd5ad6142e3c14
835e9b262315d19b7972b45896fdefc6b4f64039
describe
'203648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYS' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f2184f4997a27eb289b16daa9dc23a35
75fb893c2393db0384b7c76030312e1a2fa5d9e1
describe
'69505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYT' 'sip-files00094.pro'
60720be1b9fd897c429d51299ba36636
f3e3b0232b3d204e3a7181a2dd2bb95c223b06f3
describe
'57454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYU' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
085239f943d72149166b5a3dc3f4fec1
28ce3aaca2b83a0d83d80d8557064b3a917f2d8c
describe
'1503320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
290cd9462ef1ab4ab1e5568bef7b99e9
3e09777f1a95b1558d431d0aa414da9f0d5639e9
describe
'2883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYW' 'sip-files00094.txt'
c0e500c754686cd4a15a0f3fb6e38a7b
e1c6aac564d06538411ee255c34e61595ec45e7a
describe
'12417' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYX' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
27b1ca6f0afdf7f9b85e65b8213f3b08
98138a86b39bec156d786cedceb5a451fc0156f2
'2011-10-14T08:53:45-04:00'
describe
'186511' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYY' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
1efaa33699e841aae0712580e3a0fc14
c447308ff8ec52c4bddcaff302412b7b9110a414
describe
'202449' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARYZ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
197c71dd3be83a25d72aa8472cb3c325
ba37dbe53a562ace53741af285f5a5bea570c1ef
describe
'68125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZA' 'sip-files00095.pro'
1abf59fccf2b7a9defa3c6bcaefd15d6
c393cd3d2195e7cb0f0ce24dec411c0bb08965da
describe
'58887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZB' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
3bdbdcfec50ee70365ff565dd4a012b6
68edef54aee23a8cb554f8850c1cfff9579ec996
'2011-10-14T08:53:40-04:00'
describe
'1503728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZC' 'sip-files00095.tif'
55063765baee4708af81dcb2df8394bc
9fe93ac3a8ae80888cea1dab9a5b443a60e045ea
describe
'2849' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZD' 'sip-files00095.txt'
91508dd7404463879d30bb5ec1fe5e8d
5373714c42f6a659af6b3944d112702f55aa5c25
describe
'12846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZE' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
9bf25d04d6b08a9c2430804b4392502c
f06834bdd9943a3e861237067aa29f32676b905b
describe
'186455' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZF' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
9caa7b25e3322ff9eaf1477092a9f621
c5722ead444847190fb0acd3562b717e404f38ee
describe
'198782' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZG' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a43f3f3bd60dbc5408ee4535dba91f38
d312036cc7d46f4e8346e6a7d7e65f3c7c51d0de
describe
'67120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZH' 'sip-files00096.pro'
e6ae9c83adafa0089161567797e28d00
4ec6671857f751585af249334a81b018731b3890
describe
'58062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZI' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
4a3d647aaaec5e64c27eefee840f8957
0d0160b937883ff306d72f22bfc7768cbb4a1a38
'2011-10-14T08:52:14-04:00'
describe
'1503848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZJ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
6370e22734259516e638443e90bfb172
55b96b59784b8199afe68e6f739bd5a27aa31d03
'2011-10-14T08:50:50-04:00'
describe
'2836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZK' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4068c637795cf1550fd33b11e96dd71d
b7c8fffe55341bbec9fceadab011374a1c3c82f4
describe
'13114' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZL' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
2b29f50160a0a725d88e6b018681c824
08e1319c1032c7b7c0c60c721d576a38347fcd55
'2011-10-14T08:55:35-04:00'
describe
'186467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZM' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
cfae884e2ce3cbefa91c5d33ed979286
44b165e1065bc3c22edc57a1091885df56fad396
describe
'194638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZN' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
e1dc9a297723a263f83a0e12aeb5b685
a2a14f8958fe3c2aafce45b0784bb12d838db102
describe
'64841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZO' 'sip-files00097.pro'
b9c27d0fc08738418c017630cfe63d13
334f4cbf729aef476910ea0c294687488ceedfc4
describe
'58161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZP' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
7da0602bbea4df8186701cea69750683
bf0592e911ff9d6f4e852788c53978c8aee5d2c5
describe
'1503804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZQ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
d3417aa7364ead2748554ae378baf3cd
c0082b23a850cd023262c9addcee5979895e2175
'2011-10-14T08:53:52-04:00'
describe
'2726' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZR' 'sip-files00097.txt'
99d2675119535fe2cf2464952a2ad1f7
e0ba0dffceb9dadea69e34525e85df1663aedacd
describe
'12806' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZS' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
e4194d295ddd7baeebac87878deb1b70
48916669715b578e74f11ebcb91c1303d8c25d52
describe
'186451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZT' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
0d25dc11400fcca3873ef3a64c246f1f
1258fa51d45bc8f7e7a27d5dc83d8fa4b4074a34
describe
'195607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZU' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
b9f6d0fc0986d252aa5e08f335501c26
5a3d808c208c92361f8bd44b0a6b6e06c83441e7
describe
'65301' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZV' 'sip-files00098.pro'
28904581219a0de919a27ec8d8eb6c6f
af7f5e8e67489438c9b27fa66e84a9a0362fe9af
describe
'56593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZW' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
87effbd01351fb9d86e7572e585c5775
abe2fc0f559836212775d97c6999efc80e2ba496
describe
'1503660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZX' 'sip-files00098.tif'
fa5bfb525b27c1d5fedb00b6c41d74db
8f7d623723a6e5334ccef9494cdfb918f1401370
'2011-10-14T08:52:50-04:00'
describe
'2736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZY' 'sip-files00098.txt'
14a98fd8211fd12f59b2eaa889882bc5
90d3be1b996154be31e29d701b16f7b39cd55cfa
describe
'12763' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAARZZ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
da49526cde6b5a793bde63772693c9d0
f894257465c6ca74897d140babc30eb890be19a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAA' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
660add8087c9afc9ae5306aa8dc38440
38330b895106de639e30049b64d1b709fdf631c5
describe
'180657' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAB' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
e14965382011a399749bcc223b502910
f5a6af581f72b0fb0543ebdca5e0fd7f0c8a1d31
describe
'60595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAC' 'sip-files00099.pro'
ada4fb438a203ca05017b6ff993895eb
6ada820e4980a6d186c2c6ab8c39ff00337f03ad
'2011-10-14T08:55:52-04:00'
describe
'52965' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAD' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
02773dc62baabdb8544aed5789b8c0d6
560bda43a32901b9b590e2ca57ebfa55c6127c68
describe
'1503480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAE' 'sip-files00099.tif'
19669d07dbda88446c2d7858c6d6dbbe
6f9bc9bf2b68400f0385b477568b4b1cfdd49501
describe
'2581' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAF' 'sip-files00099.txt'
4df110d600dfe245a832ec8b21d17e69
c0a667d25a723e699763966883c63c4f194522ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAG' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
478816adaad127a708e6e285acbdc364
55d184160c405174c4a809f5fd6987fd2122935b
describe
'186433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAH' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
72f0a964d67003ecfc1e3e3e1407fc87
c4f3cd91f4eb612bfe9abe8a9e36b968ad419d69
'2011-10-14T08:51:55-04:00'
describe
'183013' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAI' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
24c93b086896cc79c35160f7cd27dd7c
af0d2f5406ea65aabdfd2926611b2ddf91f19781
'2011-10-14T08:52:57-04:00'
describe
'61551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAJ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
bdb573d5c93cb770c912b218355b9426
be2dc0c6462095d2d496e869b06e47a017cb88e5
describe
'54671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAK' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
5ec7a3555e8ffc1b73b6cca04d7cf13f
ff0686131909bec298edab4cbe3bbba17b12029d
describe
'1503508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAL' 'sip-files00100.tif'
65e630cf773534e7451d441d12675c00
b32f5a978e7bde3cd935c579e05409f01f41b4e6
'2011-10-14T08:53:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAM' 'sip-files00100.txt'
402c8100dfe634c13b9b4a1b11d332f8
5b461b5a0cacff3644e45afa9d458f29f58d940d
describe
'12387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAN' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
51d90e418e383d66c4ef4c2eddb34301
831b1fcef60c19e359b7c1dc7db82227e6c146f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAO' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
d49f051db39b32c71118f46fb06c1053
f92be90a9eb70d1ceb284cddc3010ca21b348829
describe
'177273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAP' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
988e1597fb616c5a1b5982d2f2805487
ffe843add01b4eb2342ca7ebc2ccb0ea14bfc9c4
'2011-10-14T08:50:36-04:00'
describe
'58710' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAQ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
fcf405c70bd67c862f18a2c7236d5793
ec768ee8a1c64e9faf7ac74b96a5b444fdd93d8c
describe
'51715' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAR' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
9a0cff2479713fda76f7b01bd0fb4c72
f8a7ef02c3261bbf20f19fe831c1090bf5d19a9f
'2011-10-14T08:54:50-04:00'
describe
'1501788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAS' 'sip-files00101.tif'
71bb6bc187f1bca1f5cf26c61c85b0df
896cfaa6c3fdfe1534be118077c209f4dad33f04
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAT' 'sip-files00101.txt'
df48ece0b264f1e9f30b4486e6bf43a4
94c1a7fd4ff00db6df12abc480edf2584591cf66
describe
'11932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAU' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
e59b724791a7c6ceae96f3dddc8d3e58
5e8ae6b0707a2d8e60bc28da8e9ba6ec1938abe7
describe
'186424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAV' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
45cd60639177d0968c1cd6876884717b
e185fff30873824d919bde2d58252a4cd51b041e
describe
'177816' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAW' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
cc873b53507fa8e235b6b2c63b1b6441
712d17fe0f2f49d998a081bd67784540e4148e1e
describe
'59246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAX' 'sip-files00102.pro'
d767e23511c525e2932efbd6d4be643f
6d7b229c2833a2e51da4e70a7cd58d0e20f61dc0
describe
'52381' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAY' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
7c6f1acf85700367ed0e1880c0b638a0
942c18411b31341ba1db78c6eda16d0efffc7651
'2011-10-14T08:52:26-04:00'
describe
'1503272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASAZ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
469b13a4b7f988854a1e4094a6c50e86
0a13a60677937429e50db820bffa6d658b703bbc
describe
'2494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBA' 'sip-files00102.txt'
41733bad99b8eb115d6a96cbeaa31fb7
8a9a9690105cce2b7a0d484e6764cbd751190a57
describe
'12389' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBB' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
1304450a23abf5d96c19a5052b2c1046
772c21e79b115d5aa92b2a2f253b9129d91e448a
describe
'186224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBC' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
980ad0ab42c227cdeafe0c302915b396
01e79a63a5a1286f665c59fa36d11205048bb85d
describe
'189457' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBD' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
5c5ae71d3a8ee35e09eb941162851691
e9d2f115eefb86825daa234c85730ebf364f71bf
describe
'62637' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBE' 'sip-files00103.pro'
c8fddd3be71ab0d12abe38db6fc8a98f
14f9696dec1165efb1a728d49059e053e95912d7
describe
'54333' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBF' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
491f62a7e925bc52d0689d6a59c57a1c
c8decb5e1a2a474ead5142b4e881a6d9c61773ae
describe
'1502036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBG' 'sip-files00103.tif'
25a318dac9385eb3117d34e7df2ca3fb
c2ae6a52cf107a04d00dfaf3fad1468d3f409f7f
describe
'2647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBH' 'sip-files00103.txt'
b93382d6b90505459c3ba02b9bccd18e
47e52d5eec01abd5e9085d0a3aaba72ce031b62e
'2011-10-14T08:55:26-04:00'
describe
'12965' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBI' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
ce5b0e6d6fcc7d5337a7f6a321fd8114
133d5145ac271ea90e44eb496e97c8992411b130
describe
'186387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBJ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
9d65c4dd7464377f9333ef5ba4d89295
3cf18e382400acdad13e4ef9d5f93b797279c9fa
describe
'184244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBK' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
5c08f03a9abba0b2de01c074ddf02a8a
3e26f7548986f14f726fae7f775de3658bc2165e
'2011-10-14T08:52:23-04:00'
describe
'60029' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBL' 'sip-files00104.pro'
cac7459170dcf7618c142f30f6680131
32b195bf942490b762e7240853b2da9e3b3cfa7e
'2011-10-14T08:52:58-04:00'
describe
'53500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBM' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
adb126f910a6f57708b4fc60ef1672e0
2acf15c33a9c5e640b5224d47e549dae11c7a3d7
describe
'1503404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBN' 'sip-files00104.tif'
07d4ab21b4d8d8e8b0fedc9b506a0520
b622f41cc704fcac659068eabcfe4c61db3378e9
'2011-10-14T08:52:38-04:00'
describe
'2530' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBO' 'sip-files00104.txt'
ecf3f6010ac328d0b6bd97a5bc913991
7b07603d2e2e8643dcaadf4550f9a90c288aa561
describe
'12431' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBP' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
4d665428801c8c1f4150980280451737
0d4bd907d3ce61936cbe1b968bc1ccb2aeebacac
describe
'186315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBQ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
40be4410fa2433227f03c323de7e31cc
b14583db82fa1b1f1298d2a6afd3cd49e7d5da68
describe
'205071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBR' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
42ef2630e6d3de8b3550bc2184a53b39
1156a7fc005b11d62f85f01e6184baeb3b869d97
describe
'68456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBS' 'sip-files00105.pro'
c094d25316d99af603fc74a82f17c41a
e4126e4791ee2e88d9e13f8373739dccc6c18329
describe
'59056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBT' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
a383fcf714b488827637043d3ea3b305
75717e6cc3cb429594262596bf6124b971a557da
'2011-10-14T08:51:27-04:00'
describe
'1502152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBU' 'sip-files00105.tif'
8c6a121a1c1e9e5a1fa4f1768f09e50b
6e3424650e306c42aa529eed4f231751e9a0862b
describe
'2860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBV' 'sip-files00105.txt'
bb1822a404c75dab0d1db2706367ff79
c65d113ae5ff8e92810d3735f6ac8a9bf6aaffe5
'2011-10-14T08:55:44-04:00'
describe
'13363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBW' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
6ddf4adbdbbc54924707ff076744eb33
56f9b3de14c4928699905b6e257dc962b2167987
describe
'186347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBX' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
4a6d364616855159038acc3813fc3a56
9e09130bf34ae9277983a21851fb087e28a7fd2a
'2011-10-14T08:55:02-04:00'
describe
'196038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBY' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
828b199d825a93cb5502d4bba5bf3e8b
aad376c4d77f24f739d0e6cad24e23afdc35ab85
'2011-10-14T08:51:23-04:00'
describe
'65215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASBZ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
e70829de6ec6de80a68c4aec85090efa
1e24cb05b797216c4ea5399ca63f85ef6dad949d
describe
'56238' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCA' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
1aef8126cf9e476b046ef2d7497333af
01355ef2e76d3b6a20065f056c0eaba1cef3a0bd
describe
'1503456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCB' 'sip-files00106.tif'
eb556ef7a275152a7cb6e0979c0f27c1
44527a07685f92657dec22f0532ebb843bbac8c0
'2011-10-14T08:54:39-04:00'
describe
'2717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCC' 'sip-files00106.txt'
8481e3aef533dd363acd10f6964a07ed
79e53d024367b5048c6a3b4af6458a47d1faa3cb
describe
'12563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCD' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
38b3d57d7d95d9c00a0acf2e1a9e2311
3568d7c8916df1286a0c0f983cc2fddb8d916ed6
describe
'186262' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCE' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
8ac800c62d9aa33f395a72b1cc62ae37
d4c9352be99327c13671a88ffcb542ab90bf192b
describe
'198788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCF' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
08c7aad3c40465608122bc82930715c6
a80106b00e12fc018dbcab23c658fb255b2d2801
describe
'66368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCG' 'sip-files00107.pro'
15c6e541ecab0043335c704c0a705229
6e6ae53f6f5e151f7ef27fb373c5180017e3295b
describe
'56858' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCH' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
f1a1d8243771039d2c0672f37b04e2b9
13a585beaeca0561d80524cae674e843f6d75220
'2011-10-14T08:55:49-04:00'
describe
'1502044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCI' 'sip-files00107.tif'
5fedbe5f2a4105b9db30d1f339a45b3c
ee8381c616eab318109a39a264cd31eb721dacc7
describe
'2878' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCJ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
5e6f1bfcea1ce109bf9d2bab7e674222
13d0cd68337051d96db9eec55e296f7007e7f80a
describe
'12862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCK' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
2adc9df6ebbd1cfdb9a601015986a0d2
2073d488607caaae4a1f94a3749d9a04882cd809
describe
'186458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCL' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
8e459bc2c8bcb4e1d4717aa751def59e
cb6291ae37da9841c9e789b13722b24f56831972
describe
'198233' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCM' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
fe310b6cf5693b41df505bed37eabff0
923e9e624b10a5a2082b4b3ce74780bc34b20ef5
describe
'67278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCN' 'sip-files00108.pro'
908db78ad12d5cef0fa2d02f7c4a2a38
a37c36725255216cb1f4348ef303f1524ae22ef9
describe
'56173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCO' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
01948d8b108c971d065dce7b9e780a17
f86c5c9fe2ec9b027d7cedefaab8bbed33b4eb9b
describe
'1503516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCP' 'sip-files00108.tif'
336d12eeeac4637fc5a094334369a1f9
21b463ab38dd06caa85c1901894fc3d548cf10d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCQ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
952d0a6a0b578b5e637eae322fc59950
06092556aa681e5df1b7843d6b6406afd9bb92cb
describe
'12399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCR' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
e679433eac67ff5bf4db04ab7c206cb7
a6bbe01790e9c42df4bae419c2a332fc70cceee4
describe
'192102' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCS' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
710aa2349b9cec6934c31d27873fb066
0688188b3ead22f9e65572a2be5cf6e6df4b8937
describe
'117507' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCT' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
a5bcd947f2ddc3c6a0b7ca6b84fab660
37e2e3b15c585a6cb9a6f875b90461d8dd2f5b02
describe
'3538' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCU' 'sip-files00109.pro'
7539f71cc0b88a695c643cd43f5dac2d
83a2ede6b46c41e7a50b61a4004d8f806c9757fb
describe
'29973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
4d57ce31298c044262d166812ec8834a
fcde3671f4deee34c9b12a9095a6b7b4669cb8eb
describe
'4620732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCW' 'sip-files00109.tif'
dafd2c963fae662444951503f97b9175
88a5ef9e241fbff4714b7d4e21a3c4723ee65d55
describe
'280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCX' 'sip-files00109.txt'
72e37b49c3b9d9574da5b24f4c02579e
542b1f4175aea5cf984b46ee6c9529af0b7045e9
describe
Invalid character
'7324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCY' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
0b7bb36ef2f973d1c2878bb7a5e7b76a
0b32d514bc00f80651039871d7f536c816beeb4a
describe
'186302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASCZ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
ce6b27a14ce00e8c30b0dc7dde0fbc03
dd3fc103272871caaf69d44b47075169e5229999
describe
'188398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDA' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
4243ba0e9dd6992b6da268b9d9e20e6d
175f31698db891aa576708e3fbfffcef3d661420
'2011-10-14T08:49:52-04:00'
describe
'62873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDB' 'sip-files00111.pro'
0b4b3c6390d88e673dafd7ac386ab761
50a46596006e510aef61f7d66657b3d12b17623a
describe
'54380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDC' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
33645854686c06cc185e3f563172a716
26c70c2c6d615efe9058dfa1382c48534ec95611
'2011-10-14T08:50:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDD' 'sip-files00111.tif'
afdf7f296ade3c1010640d36e99d7afd
2b7bf53b71cc91b40ad9d3eed8adbeb0e250ad80
describe
'2668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDE' 'sip-files00111.txt'
5b24a4395ed4c1c10b348d0d41764f0c
8e6843cdb07465d42e56a8e4a93b1fe9a8caccdc
'2011-10-14T08:50:21-04:00'
describe
'12365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDF' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
73988d7ece066a4f9eb672eed3ee074c
254976990d7b5df650226f7f4da81c0008c0410c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDG' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
0d4b466628c0b6f518091f4704c2656d
80946e2c996310c6704735ea03dd331b21c61baa
describe
'187911' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDH' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
8a9539a4a4b3e7740be17b401482f7a1
a38fce3e5335181a1d22cd72cb374b2c7bebd036
describe
'62071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDI' 'sip-files00112.pro'
894de9661a97b2afb21257d0a3bc700e
7f70b9faf556d33b8b3cdcdef3cbacf3ecf03056
describe
'53628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDJ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
7abb0969552a6769fd3db4f42aa43ca3
00d225d2c1cd463f89c339215ce24dd576b733c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDK' 'sip-files00112.tif'
8ca09f51395d9e845f65535166b84988
81b6b4ae4b3e63d09e3ed75376e00496849fcfc1
describe
'2587' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDL' 'sip-files00112.txt'
e4c4bf14cd860ecf906b181acdb15556
a8550ce5c0b06c55da898243ea3b7df3fdb2361e
describe
'12202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDM' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
4aa17cf2bc61debcf3e332a1353a3713
5a33fd88957836ec11449ced7f343e20d4fe7670
'2011-10-14T08:50:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDN' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
56880d90eade07b28a03535779e18c15
b97e6e1a45a052dc18c66a777c81c2e5b1213034
describe
'205193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
4dca6b3601639e6dc8a94fa84c406698
1d9748bdc9fcef535e8fff1f5b3471dcf6e3b7e5
describe
'69948' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDP' 'sip-files00113.pro'
99a50ab7823ffd476936102e4c6f0117
62c4151812fb1ba8f2bcadc46672bf3bc20c1fe2
describe
'58488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDQ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
1f8ba4fba9cb2275298ad3efb5c3b161
5aa61e5f625fa008a1b840dbcab355787cb0422a
describe
'1503732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDR' 'sip-files00113.tif'
cf888b1c350ed64f1e6ff6e786d0f5aa
1f76fd64a0688f386c818e5896a3b984bdd99408
'2011-10-14T08:50:52-04:00'
describe
'2944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDS' 'sip-files00113.txt'
80522763335e14bf1c8dca4822daca9e
7ccb62a1e7e8ba13b58d15d0b2b1686e187aa217
describe
'12716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDT' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
ffe12dce23b61987338f06f43f003b39
cc0bbf3d6ab8a90cf220e3bf15ee85a7479a047c
'2011-10-14T08:55:03-04:00'
describe
'186364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDU' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
ef55f10f647396d7e6ba30fa0a0d5bcb
bece08a563e8e001e7828d231138626d7aee3bdf
describe
'207089' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDV' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
3c27e16a6665b4b39303bbabd781bd26
ae9d4873f6b08a932c6f878cf1342b6662f362bf
describe
'68372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDW' 'sip-files00114.pro'
90ba8f620c971dd0d5827826b1c64e36
aeae2789ca07075fa1e0d4356ca847082695fa44
describe
'59008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDX' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
328f27208f858316d84d98aea808dd08
cab50aa7ba4c736d4412fcb2844a42c5354694cf
describe
'1503664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDY' 'sip-files00114.tif'
a4ea7a1fbf6f652c292c4deae11cb25f
e999835d2b47788c8b470fd9e0c5e34206b65c45
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASDZ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
e98c16115da78355c706678d8de64b58
9e46bf864d47690027845c8ab34f8f9c4054fc49
describe
'12794' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEA' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
872f2874315c84ac528fa2a22d23b12a
1bed888e0916f7af5014eaeb98cbffb9bb2a5a2a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEB' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
5ca4cd67dfa776cba072965a8e67d02f
db5f061b4cb1594769fcedf8e9058909e001fe3e
describe
'201968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEC' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
7676a1f93bca13173611a343147e7803
28d1a06f5b23086de3c470c3f686848d2153c49d
describe
'67811' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASED' 'sip-files00115.pro'
fa02e76e7caf22491bdd18685b7368f1
762356be0fc197337d3d4cf1e4face4bbb915b5e
describe
'57090' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEE' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
1a88ae473860f07023ef151d46fef814
d9e889cd6c64b3bcf84622925d5bd8dbdbe5731a
describe
'1503552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEF' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e4825dd6cf02aa24ec214d7326d1d388
8ceadb0e0d951f204e28787b0c079bea3245226c
describe
'2843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEG' 'sip-files00115.txt'
c1d76a79ab4d1608806d2eb0ba994a34
a5bb460eb3c51a8d1c151213eca788141c08c07a
describe
'12657' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
ed8622932f18f04341fe0299798b44c1
7535c9021d4eb71aac7f563ce2b7cbf13d7debb9
describe
'186456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEI' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
92a726f8659eb4a19a28826c40133a96
473ef43ffffb7ef5ec8bc8e90f94bea8d3c1b73b
'2011-10-14T08:49:42-04:00'
describe
'180663' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEJ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f763074667c0ca271aeee3c83e1179db
86603a688cbda9f470c6760e037f574ab1329672
describe
'59580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEK' 'sip-files00116.pro'
325b400bfedb9e8ef934fa430a6b9a30
8da66487d2fed3e4df6feae8a14bb8c796c8174f
describe
'54486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEL' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
b00cdd1956c26645323e40a2c9844d75
6d2969d85d6d0fc58d99e01a8be738b77262c015
describe
'1503544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEM' 'sip-files00116.tif'
a3a8f4d39200cf04b0b94c6861fe2443
8b1ad8aef8471be7ddac5a0d075b7ec47b3b9a65
'2011-10-14T08:50:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEN' 'sip-files00116.txt'
b4fdff93060a860009288256c46a4826
d0afa26b6dddb008ce0064e58387c26ab0b3e084
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEO' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
9c7d3342fe0ea8361ff9d4204b8d8fd4
3ad03a2b0a040fb765aa1faaf04f00d421f4eb7e
describe
'186505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
5b15898f75b16df86ae424e5bda979b2
11587cd135307d5a0e0eb62d15c67198bdf10d6f
describe
'185278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEQ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
3b325b31b69fa4e8fed5ca4137542a9d
8938877c5943b701e3923669555bcc2f70d6f4ee
describe
'62732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASER' 'sip-files00117.pro'
0fc92d63d66924ffb2bc792e3adc1fc2
925ab12ff94f60160f4b4240a15d4d9b5a47e9ca
describe
'54430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASES' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
5462a318e9d3917b0072f47e77260f40
db656e6b03bcf22bc1a7fbd9d2931550cc37984b
describe
'1503548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASET' 'sip-files00117.tif'
9c70afc99fd2daafca2fb3268af29dc1
9e25fc4198018e2b343b50896958fe42b58ab209
describe
'2651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEU' 'sip-files00117.txt'
1fa7e1c7a75be33d3ec9815fc01cba1e
7e7bd5e08c8032fe8cdf6eacd9d6487d3d3a12e7
describe
'12395' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEV' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
c77370b8895c98baff725a3effdd3b45
c137c7338268332ebaf15d2405d6edcb65a76065
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEW' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
4f9c0123b91b3a85aa37bfa132430705
f5f0ebdbafa36ddf6107075236d3b376caafdd82
describe
'202501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEX' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
25d3e359b3a63f365bd7414d6741590f
02eae7424df260158d00d74dbd05fa25b08e2a6f
describe
'68154' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEY' 'sip-files00118.pro'
ff5a3419b025a1b57d68575447942618
f3e80afa5451775661d6f765773544faef9b28a6
describe
'58099' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASEZ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
ced00a1c5312d81dc2caadfc9b63caba
08214ec4b790d229f3efd9624d31a83b6657e4e0
describe
'1503504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFA' 'sip-files00118.tif'
44c093bb9a6f79af1d7b870711f6a55a
12c074b5a589cfa6a9645d56f9e13893f8dd2b60
describe
'2828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFB' 'sip-files00118.txt'
231f4b6eddb68aab87e0e8a7e04a7b35
a6d26e836dd7fddda09bcf2c85bbb7946d7f3f68
describe
'12758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFC' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
05a718f97d80c9b69eef6aa8c90175c3
2f6bd55c2ce8782bc46d4ba17e570316ea166536
describe
'186417' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFD' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
903bce0f46f36b4abbdb9e5714ee4ed2
8261e59d7d734e689f00d490765fbaf06d5445ff
describe
'192467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFE' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
77fbe3ab90307dea37703c7385058909
16f4de8504f9dd6454ed59a124e3d13b228f110d
describe
'64379' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFF' 'sip-files00119.pro'
784e08261a3eadb3f9c428eeeab715cb
4fc9babcd7f2a1f02c8f7c153fa05116e2bec76e
describe
'55415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFG' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
b0a9ee84c35f93ab35c619dab1cefb76
72899db9163a722c6c800f601cfa086f7c9e9b22
'2011-10-14T08:55:43-04:00'
describe
'1503440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFH' 'sip-files00119.tif'
bbc0beb50ba1c703b7df9f9a09112b6a
d67323b797f8ec92844ae2589eb3da92a9114850
describe
'2734' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFI' 'sip-files00119.txt'
cd38645e03dcf7d8b77925f0f8f53b12
d2fda2e957784a84c12a6ec4573f31e8bb4cb24d
describe
'12652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFJ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
69a1b6cc48ce285bba30e8814d14effa
219a7b78049fed3f1b53e642b3538349b19d4ea1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFK' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
42992b155eb87f2b516dcb66ab99d4a4
5b40f5e3cf19b31e5d7d70077f3c9627f1945064
describe
'205959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFL' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
26e3f01a9fe264f2f44222b47a8faea6
e9fe8e378602637815e49673e3323b287c2a93b0
describe
'69351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFM' 'sip-files00120.pro'
4afd58160bf2a43cc5f30c7bde8538e7
7a5a7562d06e28472ac4c7f6b4ee962ebcbb58f4
'2011-10-14T08:55:48-04:00'
describe
'58626' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFN' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
8e1ba97034db72aada8234f5eb66c7fe
0bf2f999bc7b89c854d41e19efd2bdf29e7c33a9
describe
'1503672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFO' 'sip-files00120.tif'
da186af06f7cda350833a9017a30e8c7
73dbc315013ca4a418e4b65723be877f2497f064
describe
'2890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFP' 'sip-files00120.txt'
fb20b9949006d9f1887492a42360df52
00c674b3a5e1ef211316901e0c34679ddd70bcd1
describe
'12921' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFQ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
1fbc7d9cbf5ff4332ae6fe22a2fa5290
9c48c6c940eaf696e4d684bb0b382ed7e9720f95
describe
'186401' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFR' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
8e481d334c3475b047f7244fb068e6b7
2c6e8b5bf89b23cb9b496559f8233150a65e02d9
'2011-10-14T08:52:39-04:00'
describe
'186192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFS' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
dbacc3ae2b19f5faa11af4c6487e85fc
b1b4cfa7b715deb22e0af590464cf00baf898683
describe
'61335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFT' 'sip-files00121.pro'
8d5c60007175658c9230be75b722a27e
fa59a99b7f1a847c16b7643164479bd49808fc97
describe
'53873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFU' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
24d0e1936d13213f5af770af2e40f8ff
4f22d5b8492d4313b6602fac9a384cb659066a9f
describe
'1503532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFV' 'sip-files00121.tif'
05acf2364e9b225a19ce4729a8af11df
7c7fe71ed98ff2f606a8823f740f79dea867656d
describe
'2592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFW' 'sip-files00121.txt'
fb08508893fa2aa3415650ad5340a5ad
e984c7f1a1d21c74b79bba0b6a3bc4dcd754249f
describe
'11888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFX' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
c4d12afd12beeb2a64a88438dabb8aec
579aca32b9afd9420b3e43a81b52ade9dd459463
describe
'186367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFY' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
980ce906a02f73c068e17f7eaefdbbea
c9b305b8918e2b610dfc5ec6f59d40543bda1034
describe
'198028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASFZ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
77c1aad2d1f25b4c087e51e2baf649c1
94356e7c3e28b0234ea02faafb9aa2de4eb44e90
describe
'65764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGA' 'sip-files00122.pro'
eb9a9e06050f26b53851da0c501cc983
30d782f8eb0a2f01ac0593355ac75cf51caf8f7f
describe
'57224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGB' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
8be4f16f8d22251a485c7aba8ec64c3b
d0d34dd32db9f2a3bc511f0c677d2c3b7bd0ddb3
describe
'1503744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGC' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6c8338d5419508408fbee0779d8bedf7
10597f629775ba23bc2f1e3067d55aeef9f32e99
'2011-10-14T08:52:22-04:00'
describe
'2753' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGD' 'sip-files00122.txt'
0c28fbf00a3542999fa6152ba86aad2f
21cedbb426bb963d3c857b53975fbb0caf0230d7
describe
'13067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGE' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
6b6534f5fcc68162b36da8c9ca65f69a
6a6426e221750a79adb460dd42b9ad6b09738c82
describe
'186390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGF' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
6dfb1a1f7d52d776928c733b61a77119
48d8a274e5fee77f798cbd6a36bb0212722b5985
describe
'196640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGG' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
c03bb0971f85f63780b08d3e1c4df919
189b001a068eec35fd0b7d4d7cf16ab7900cd946
describe
'66296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGH' 'sip-files00123.pro'
9f894d6b191400076aee4be0849628b8
69f47da7b15d2f9bc78aeaa380be0ddc1f28f88f
describe
'57940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGI' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
2eba483f022c5801e1fc0c06007a0d6a
b574b53792922b67e617acbe345cf684ab462e61
describe
'1503872' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGJ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
c9ec0d047f584efa2d970792b039d289
dc3074757fb50f5b026dcf7966145c3e6c996dba
describe
'2872' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGK' 'sip-files00123.txt'
b7c04a17c18e0c7d910fd44adec5d616
a64e9eac62d9c3842a1ac76a2cbe7adc56ecd875
describe
'13456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGL' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
6079a252cc7d2de001799cf343b566a6
7e82b535ecd291404e67ebef63ede1cd2ace456d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGM' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
cc868bd9f30a227632ca8875500deaea
a7b13327432b8bca74da3b9a4ec9e332e51343cb
describe
'192212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGN' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
2ee1aa6496883df95a5cc197ec2b6f9b
ddc6233873eb94af80d1683e84d126028c3cad74
describe
'65599' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGO' 'sip-files00124.pro'
d6c5ebf8fcbd1cf2dfded852aea163d7
f4a0b4e9d12b7bdb174290f9c01cf1a4a588adb3
describe
'55728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGP' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
5827e89ca524f2119321c48d38f9eb7a
5a7cd6e893cfdd3f0e7286dabb192aff4c3cea22
describe
'1503584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGQ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
8f38e8a5279f8184fd1959d54b02920e
d6ceac2c47221195f8cfde675cdb4c048a27b177
describe
'2743' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGR' 'sip-files00124.txt'
caa1a40f2d1f19118965d33c8cb05c5b
6440a4d1ff13855a1117f84f757b042648bf809e
describe
Invalid character
'13189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGS' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
0b685fcf020846a5e78aebc0a537384d
89cc4bd0f10508b0371ff66e89312e7526c87001
describe
'186370' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGT' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
de3b7fc7541ab23addb2e6d40c7c05ea
438a7897e2a9b743e4ca8c61ba49a61917007aa9
describe
'184801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGU' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
ebce6e083a2d6cf3882a8825f9d05604
6304b8de82bf47d7371fb9724eae7fc3fbc2ccfd
describe
'62515' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGV' 'sip-files00125.pro'
8aa71345ba02aaef9e0984c43978cb9a
4c61a7a214e2dee77e91c9dba116b8127997a31a
'2011-10-14T08:50:58-04:00'
describe
'53545' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGW' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
90aa8a63c920c5d8110be91496575226
7b07a7cc0579b87f98641d2a69391273e8908189
describe
'1503172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGX' 'sip-files00125.tif'
6308708086c6c27a21116ef212df3ea7
dcda79e98f0029323a3db429b8597dbd9a397524
'2011-10-14T08:56:17-04:00'
describe
'2629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGY' 'sip-files00125.txt'
3a22187e471ae6019f7408f691ea606e
d5e1f767445c347c2379607931811d285ccfaa25
'2011-10-14T08:56:26-04:00'
describe
'12201' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASGZ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
6857e85e556505a8a3ed8013cbd8ec73
c8f86e55f596baee5a2f169bb9238789ab1e761a
describe
'186497' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHA' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
4533264b6a2e33d3ad25e76202c7e6c5
9feb33af398f03af7f72d49b2cbd07d4239a21e3
describe
'194089' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHB' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
a5bd09fc1bb3ac301ee2e16182ffc026
313f41151c49a761d031bc942a10badb3f31a121
'2011-10-14T08:56:21-04:00'
describe
'64586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHC' 'sip-files00126.pro'
b151fa5e0b9778d9dad9d1e76715f92a
c1d5d1d888052390dc861cff1be60dc4b96ac363
describe
'55993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHD' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
f70251a97e44f5f7b330b7235aa26fb2
2a035038e304345b113c19bdf6ed96ea78ed6729
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHE' 'sip-files00126.tif'
871b4bab9df189a45ba0ad75d6d286d5
fabd8ad1a4688b7571a51ffac07f2277ca1117a6
describe
'2694' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHF' 'sip-files00126.txt'
b98f11fbab7d6bca30911cbcf2290c6f
831a76ef9ae52d3c81df161ef2f5ef7163238f54
describe
'12894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHG' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
d8b12fffe881da85142102ff29c367eb
0b545aa70d663f43c17fc8fc428351dc2f5cd32d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHH' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
2694ec4d065b26a391dc31842612807f
54a62e49883fbc3e71f4b351bf26fae6f6c544e6
describe
'186089' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHI' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
e25b2248a3217f14e3011097b71be1f8
adb640f1a76c95698b74e4c477c2ca6ed655f4a6
describe
'62611' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHJ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
7d95748d9f91d89b8870bd11d7e1a7f4
5a4383bf94217065e241c7335d02dc626a486104
describe
'54593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHK' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
71be9ac69fef9a9f7d637bd9af6a05a4
c8a27f7cdb31b05f815ab9f0c80a537273e9cd1c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHL' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b93c1efcbf8d20200ad2b09b93647eb2
dda03c39f9942e5fc639f7701f1e4847526a578d
describe
'2640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHM' 'sip-files00127.txt'
852e58c294d341823e211b03aeebd1c5
57e5381d1129eea1255c41f443492c48932bac63
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHN' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
364da0b0ffac9312f6cae0c5120831ad
7c1fa455c7e02ed9e0b966fb1e848afceaaae135
describe
'186450' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHO' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
427022b74e8a2e18d4133d02fff399ff
d1a542e4cb45017b9fb6b7ce22c3cd91116f7b31
describe
'194016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHP' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
310071adb2058bdd0a3f5a855ac819d4
787d61712b18e4d39afb388d25bf9a473181d925
describe
'65266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHQ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
55dea99fd09d07f321c98bcf32cefe84
e285a106e19d6bbbedc0e15eed2286ca353d853f
describe
'55240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHR' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
da695101f9e6ba03d4edb4f05fe0f6f9
8162e6b5cda29750a6ed1aec05a9fd3ada835761
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHS' 'sip-files00128.tif'
4f9d58f3afc61046aa9c4555bed07dbb
0a6cd37cd5144bd8a1e5aa5917f08b9c684c8626
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHT' 'sip-files00128.txt'
c65c268d89395a3d684906ab508a1110
1ab27166f3b228f8e5ae8b60c3a2c863f4296d4a
describe
'12392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHU' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
d272db28ec66255dc9db6d2b40a205a0
6f60c5961f7e8ac6ce26ea7e3c8d6dd9a7159246
describe
'186474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHV' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
6e313a4fba3a7cb3801966a705abb832
4440c551af552b0fc8ed5e1aaaf2f62a835271b0
describe
'188952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHW' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
6a560bd66cc2ee39ed65d8de14885ad0
8f90812567f79a420864eb15bf046f8fea7a17cd
describe
'63941' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHX' 'sip-files00129.pro'
44b6bb7394baa3d842437f72456d6bde
25a16e5e6b1fe861ed1cbed01c426210a965e54c
'2011-10-14T08:55:55-04:00'
describe
'54183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHY' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
c448608c49abdbcb51cc000757aaa483
9ca17014f5f907ebbef17228adef5f7863db3536
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASHZ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
1a2dffaeec3dac10b4c4a0365b8725f1
f335a75ddd7b780d5388d129b4701587a644d428
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIA' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d810963b89f5af0a5706bffa08abbaf3
46ff62bdc6517a76d607c0ddbeb3f3046c4dd0b6
describe
'12624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIB' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
6249544cf4df51f7c1114975f69b019e
c494d9ddce8cefbe4aae9bb630e9ef2cfa6ad8b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIC' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
e8750bc5e1f6938d02c91c3ca93b9193
66e8e97c7381ba896ad324977bce87a9e7d6d416
'2011-10-14T08:53:25-04:00'
describe
'189553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASID' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
ea698f1d66bc5ee4dcacc50f3e34dcf7
b00836bd479e9e5bf1f0cfa13b3ad35341aef353
describe
'63203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIE' 'sip-files00130.pro'
c26e4f953d296d9aa4ac9c3c33427a45
8516cb01b9e74215ad7e365accfbeb8266c05c4f
describe
'54243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIF' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
0aeb82b20e374d5552f528807cfa3e4a
bf4abd9fe870303660e4cb2ca1b482433393edf0
describe
'1503424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIG' 'sip-files00130.tif'
90e75b6cc3d90bc3968de697acbc6421
5efe1e057c45814fbc24539a81cdf2446937f18c
describe
'2636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIH' 'sip-files00130.txt'
2980839a8ee998aa9da389035206c90f
87bbe96f5b68f6b884808abf03d0a3c0abcb0b90
describe
'12628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASII' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
5906aaeadc71267a0bab45b694af5ae7
f4a9f7c116352aa39417fce06bd43ce0f2a2a29e
describe
'191510' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIJ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
8df53c4f49950593f0f2c0ef2e28752b
a2a054fa2b8c7e6297a316ee0ebf55c068a03c6e
describe
'192401' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIK' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
621ad30acad24d63c2b650635fa47b0e
87f553ba518ffbf6f9b9b889964eec54c107935d
'2011-10-14T08:54:01-04:00'
describe
'67280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIL' 'sip-files00131.pro'
fa9c8b6f967b2ac612d97476af534a24
66a634f1e15e25ea4ac0fab792398c79628aa0ea
describe
'55435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIM' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
e82604c6daf6b71538c26220e7e469e8
3e29307094e462ee261539f6c85eb4c9bd07391c
describe
'1543940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIN' 'sip-files00131.tif'
1aecf7cede10707e199073b2c7e8b617
29ed95f3d1c2db9f35622de955aaa40fff76d475
describe
'2880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIO' 'sip-files00131.txt'
90fffd8493699e846d43f5a784764f9a
f9dec24124206b5b683fdb2513febb1e34dca33c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIP' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
f79442e73c3510e7c47a7cf856eb1ea9
1b611ed40a473fceb3a74f25752283139fb9d655
describe
'186448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIQ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
211c8c4782d61f1dcdae17265e12c9c0
189b6c288af6ebf5b49ad199aebcbb4bb3ca03b9
describe
'187342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIR' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
dea8d053967e9f88dc477683331e3d78
bb911a8a8eee53a3c70bdbd2d60ee9c9e85bab95
'2011-10-14T08:55:05-04:00'
describe
'63017' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIS' 'sip-files00132.pro'
cc3fdde77f091e15ecf5c94a05102581
0c1e0e2ed9bb38fbdf982e3a7a996e552a482196
describe
'54475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIT' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
60befe76762cf3e5d30674776c3c191a
6951a0c081aaf131a830d9ad1e84015c247a76a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIU' 'sip-files00132.tif'
3e71d254e0bc7e7c4a7e966624593cf3
e12197e25072353e73956c7f2d8f141e0ceeebfd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIV' 'sip-files00132.txt'
00615a72e2a6482079df386ba6f3c308
933934ed934cd729fa34559a8b4a96fab24e8c41
describe
'12800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIW' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
41719f92e92c83b2fd56e562edc4309c
4cd8d20964dc551542142186b08f62f8191db46d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIX' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
275c8bb8dadb1be898681ab7291161f8
865e1e7d781ff3e13d043a7fc0b486a97c9f144a
'2011-10-14T08:53:08-04:00'
describe
'187530' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIY' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
d57911e6c5a724f26b3e81c8e3cbcbc7
773261b0ff7fa93d83f3e61f96b06b2b800bd68b
describe
'63181' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASIZ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
261289952aab2da8546f331a6ed2f5f2
7932780e28e87184fd0ffff11f7e4b583b37528e
describe
'54213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJA' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
53b66b2aeff54501209ae34f21ed3690
a361fd0c3aefd621a14f6aed347a6c31669d3dd4
'2011-10-14T08:54:07-04:00'
describe
'1503484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJB' 'sip-files00133.tif'
4aceecba15d57cdcb3999a491c1b4c9c
dc5ac4d566483502fff43e3897a41cc45374cfd7
describe
'2695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
be45ca0db620a6fb9865d5567872291b
ceda8b0ffcfe6588a45300e055cc38be59c827ab
describe
'12598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJD' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
462e4e88b421135e6bf1c5ac80333348
f62d758ce1b608e2377e3e9b2d4b710e0e1c8c1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJE' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
74c2143db1729056acdaaf81d8dc26c0
94b3e07e71650d796215f16a5cf0b066a28a4332
describe
'191182' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJF' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
e0d4020d4d3aa9225988a8093f5df6d3
c0f7f8e461e3d343933657dbf1a0a6f98c89faa8
describe
'64278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJG' 'sip-files00134.pro'
4489b605b327f97f1eb755adf9df6a93
81fb169afeba57fc59527944128846bac687b0b0
describe
'55623' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJH' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
cd8b46abdda067dc67423aaeebcfe14d
11afcbe3b4d74c6ea5214c0691379ac6c78f54b0
describe
'1503408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJI' 'sip-files00134.tif'
63db09fa8686529444bf5ceb97148c98
a0526b79e7e1a43e533a9a691489fdd3862bf738
'2011-10-14T08:51:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJJ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
cf9c518e0afa2c93d47c6bea581ab51c
0a0d28cbcbab5250c68fcfd341114b7efe6b6560
describe
'12684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJK' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
7dd0c10859fc9ac8df40711dcae9c228
4b78c6ed6651f84e374b533f2c3ffa01b68264ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJL' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
041d364560f1631d30b2870f8bb62dba
84e7fd91cd0cb520ba06fe0ba06112e6561fb571
describe
'190644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJM' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
5559d93b6630e61b1d5d656822a6267b
8ddea9408097702808715ff95e4cfce358e20b3a
describe
'63446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJN' 'sip-files00135.pro'
9697b8e7028750d8b9783126c204c08e
d61183eb9409caa04ec13f2bcb6e9d611d88ad73
describe
'56204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJO' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
2b766e7949eb83e5f385dd37625847cb
0d1f1710aa0026addb599a9ced6c5bbc386ab2ca
describe
'1503572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJP' 'sip-files00135.tif'
071c61bbd043561c58c67f1d4ef4f98c
392662dd5314fbd2338b61cb7d57689b5cb56ba9
'2011-10-14T08:56:15-04:00'
describe
'2728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJQ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
436b6264a2024ac922b17c7fdd6e3686
d9f65602bdd70e05fce1aa17d141cddde0404d7d
describe
'12752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJR' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
b94266f1ee9ceed7ff0b670c1d8ee1ed
14d6bbb5a504cead10aa063aa3747d935059b99b
'2011-10-14T08:51:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJS' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
75c118960a97e5856a0d1b3c65b7c939
f6cc1fe33fb8da58cb8b8d1d731a2a042e1ec394
describe
'191820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJT' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
da77c7b7fa0438a7ba449407984fbeb5
b20cc2a22270667317f01486803d826fd597570e
describe
'63866' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJU' 'sip-files00136.pro'
1e2dee2dde04a6c8b0ac9eb7df09a6e9
f6d8629724a36732894dead722f99c747e34fb7b
describe
'56166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJV' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
ecdf134a018554c9fcd2893da3549f2a
d0712cc113ea124cb314d538f7beb5fb374af9c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJW' 'sip-files00136.tif'
18e1543d2c747306f29efdfb24053a15
d18b2e5e35cf53463709346d6be83d709fecaa41
describe
'2682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJX' 'sip-files00136.txt'
21ec9aceb0ca8ef598a32e32b0c430c4
509aabaa49ddff85e277ec8381cafa086eda0dca
describe
'12860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJY' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
291a256c278cf12d71617de79627ab16
6168ce1e3a33afe6856e87b0255025d037671b4a
describe
'186457' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASJZ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
84251663c6ac060d96484355106eceea
2cdf1442d3b444320112016fc4d2ae0c0de8bf34
describe
'185107' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKA' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
16c0f09bfa6fbd95384a77e197c1abc0
c6f34c0a93fc79f98a76b62d87a7f8e73d24b6f7
describe
'61339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKB' 'sip-files00137.pro'
829f29b1aef1597724d4f35b0de1de37
bebe80a8547a92b3646070b983409d8c45d96b28
describe
'54597' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKC' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
6c983de013feb3ccbcceb3a0912d785c
31a703307c00e47ec0b25676a59790dee5a1739f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKD' 'sip-files00137.tif'
3546176b647823b72be8f2b0766293d2
7688f5bb9f6e68b6c62f440992df68c471853b0b
describe
'2596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKE' 'sip-files00137.txt'
6dc462f0d5fd40c87f0c86583ef3ffd2
e71849c0917dbb71bb367ea866e2c0164abb75f0
describe
'12790' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKF' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
32ef38702b27368beb79aeea3b8a8557
72b0e36d1c6b19d047b6cadbda3394a8a5243951
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKG' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
82d5a5fedc8747b33c75b172eff04654
036776ec55094b33e6f8c1e69a855a45516a6cc5
describe
'156935' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKH' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
4910faf4fb85f7ca597b989448325d61
8a39b7fb36decf31b86da43346087730be7faed3
describe
'52140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKI' 'sip-files00138.pro'
8442b0784a77e684cb832e2acdbcb5f1
124b1cbb2ac91944a137ff2267004c6f5ea3b7cd
describe
'48388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKJ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
52cd2e5e80660e6c5143a4958ea67d3a
cb906b9174398bb68aa03ff645dee6e27daa9226
'2011-10-14T08:54:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKK' 'sip-files00138.tif'
333b8a8a7ab08ddec06c448ce28a4b5f
e530d84b959de9b5180d85937029500e8004ba30
describe
'2210' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKL' 'sip-files00138.txt'
80ce81e7f2d58772a50452c2a2928742
17fc58da60191a9ee1d65aa9b794ca27b98036a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKM' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
d9d82b20bf165fb980dd782a7697a7ab
0ba6d4e8e2ceaf2dc986cfd3d0354209a553d970
describe
'186484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKN' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
2adce39f09181c235b1f7a932865a3a7
77bac42e6a1ac441bf6c161982d873da321e237b
describe
'171733' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKO' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
759c8774b29a77cca92f58782ebe35fd
83e29b685204727ac44dedb0183e360d75ab6563
describe
'57739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKP' 'sip-files00139.pro'
c62c542cc8d49cd145a398bcf95fd524
53399a2c352029e9b954e9b935539c17e8fdacc6
describe
'51626' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKQ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
c80f002d5dd85e45aafd58321491c674
0d74a319e9405f786e6e9902096f1e6ddc10dba5
describe
'1503536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKR' 'sip-files00139.tif'
9b4be0ba4023848ada5758c0288f245c
438e606049d00729ec6b8af6f2a15e753c499457
describe
'2548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKS' 'sip-files00139.txt'
6f7e43bb902bf3eaa01826bb124c4936
631391f71633e8ea8f840cf71abf903936aff9f7
describe
'12630' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKT' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
627bceeb7e35649be8189e357ee26bd4
01a39d3d4c902c29cd493b3654d6a8e2e7cf8b3f
describe
'186386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKU' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
e3265096c736fde8fc0814f69e4ed84e
42dfff6a446921ce58e0c128094b5c8ecca4e67c
describe
'193192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKV' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
55841e4ffda2678b06c1110e85f733ae
34b2e3153b7167506977a2290ef1d40da76a6585
describe
'65689' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKW' 'sip-files00140.pro'
43b622b8269e3f9b59da0b100542cb45
6c3d1bb0375c419c0b31cffa300a44f92f8da09e
describe
'55021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKX' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
4dcaf8eb4bc9e6d7857add07e5daa8b1
b87e0df21570e459f0cdd4ac98452b41ff3704df
describe
'1503328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKY' 'sip-files00140.tif'
8851cd8333bc5e28df568dd026dba70e
c9a550cc5a01233d973f553885365eac8adf681a
describe
'2732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASKZ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
642e64d448a57e266618930239a0a9bd
4829334ffb90f9e26a75d8907d23f9ed535a1450
describe
'12373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLA' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
54cb652a70b86558531b9ae54f5cb1c7
a9792d31137b3791bbd44e5909f5214fcc66a3e0
describe
'191427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLB' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
d6e7e879513bfab492738cac237552b8
cb83fe4088a9fd68130d7b29a4a412553e000c10
describe
'198798' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLC' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
3cbdc51195371f8a3afe49adc5224d5a
8abca0f4fc4605529e569533a721ca1d1954cfc8
'2011-10-14T08:52:15-04:00'
describe
'70959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLD' 'sip-files00141.pro'
85e6d228f2b32512e2cf58b5ca6257cb
e164903cc68d16bc166f2620cf965f7c045e8c06
describe
'54815' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLE' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
88bc6fa43adc72af55eafe3eb3a99477
8bc7283533c2dbc317a38bbcf0339ad4f2ae3e12
describe
'1544008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLF' 'sip-files00141.tif'
f18a8bab577629503fce4dbb3b2451b4
46669613c5373afc6198a2ee6b3862d022307a3f
describe
'2983' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLG' 'sip-files00141.txt'
8347ef2fe2afea3efd92cdcefb1ce5d7
3a913331424a1288573b52dc9d4c627ad587ec2d
describe
'12155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLH' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
d2a3832fb235ff10f0f4ac4318fb4a66
cd4305fefbc241c48c6bc56465a40537ed290ac4
describe
'186466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLI' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
7d7dc39db75189424acba2d7745e19d4
9268c4f97a3dd4391db819bafdbe0a97c241f8fc
'2011-10-14T08:52:55-04:00'
describe
'181073' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLJ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
fc719dddaebff7de6dc12e4a97a7374a
41f4124275285e47a72dbf839ce32489870b7576
describe
'60291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLK' 'sip-files00142.pro'
08715ee3003e898b195c1393597c5ce2
3876e85481ad9ed5e0ae2ea0f31886bc0a8b46a8
describe
'53533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLL' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
6718774c2b9145ecff89c45f43b21113
8a68ca6b381c6c4c2635c213315593bd5b802ae2
'2011-10-14T08:56:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLM' 'sip-files00142.tif'
7375f710406e7f24ca52f394f751975d
601b3edddbe455d2c89551e8a0454e28c4e48ea8
describe
'2526' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLN' 'sip-files00142.txt'
af9ec93fae9ad4b868d50dcc8362bbe9
68da7accab9e5323a0cf290d83237400340bf3f5
describe
'12146' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLO' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
f2e093e69723bb9d184bcaa38bf2fe19
19a60002d8cba36bc748db9d25d6fb0d9b1d2086
describe
'193976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLP' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
d31e43580bf8f2d477d91ef8a3b56c72
cfe5caf55f38a14da383fc64dbd37843053eb311
describe
'112007' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLQ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
76aa9e42ee6dd30e390ad4923808b9f3
97fa3a2b37e981b9b95b6b4ccdd5ac315fbe6fe0
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLR' 'sip-files00143.pro'
da540680c2d96d12c456495aa44efd51
3feb4a7c74916bfdfcd7e7e5961e66c34310a458
describe
'29135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLS' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
06b479d59a5e99ac840e211aa499141a
e79dda79959bee9dd7d578d4f5354a8648eec38b
describe
'4663912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLT' 'sip-files00143.tif'
d6d2a18a66caaf737dc81af8996c6faa
63ed84c39a50b881f14306d833fdfa9113bb146f
describe
'143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLU' 'sip-files00143.txt'
629e13f31020444aae7edafc994b5b8a
7209a592fa8109ba7a1b7a039a07351930509a75
describe
'7475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLV' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
b1442569b6a5114e6e5d3f2b4ff3e2a9
097329b1fccbac9769b85551810b83bf1db6428e
describe
'186236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLW' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
7b87c8e03654209a97d590f24507e437
6f0383f22a6e3015c9efb768f98b9a283f75977e
describe
'200961' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLX' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
abfa7990a3c95258b6d1172331969485
d2be9171ecb8904c7ccce9a28f7afde9c0f35712
describe
'67878' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLY' 'sip-files00145.pro'
ca6c2b1f954dbb679c9f0486ec0e5641
7a1b83396777a17c2ee94b3064c33853d8d97dc2
describe
'56966' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASLZ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
ba08a735af1bfa6180863783cd6318c2
714dd35be357f7c36d50dce0ab83bf5c16aeaf48
describe
'1501924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMA' 'sip-files00145.tif'
ebd37ad687828275321c816c6d93260f
90816c6a5d26ac2f9cf745b082171def5ecb5b28
describe
'2837' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMB' 'sip-files00145.txt'
3422e5dc8ae1dd565c439042ae66215e
9029e8bf9c3177f6c8c027daadc5ecef997a1e45
describe
'12935' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMC' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
6755c152db52e3d5ac86601864a957d7
2e642f90a1794236e40c2629010a193f6f7eb684
describe
'186503' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMD' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
200c70f53f14ed7b608b7b730061dd76
8950faf7a95b09ca133537f9a3bba75839edc033
describe
'200527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASME' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
120ef42d8195eaeed10f54c743da50a9
fd86eb0a239e7e662723b3723b53cd8231c70b73
describe
'68751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMF' 'sip-files00146.pro'
49735a72ff9e9d8673576b222638a15f
1ca535dc64446c66083673a2bd7b561cffa4d5a5
describe
'56518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMG' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
2eb11ba3e8a782be0697343f2df9b0d2
1f4f362b50a83d790f6a5e3485ee9e6687b1c28e
describe
'1503312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMH' 'sip-files00146.tif'
202c6039772e67691f830600ece633c4
2529362cd7f17ac3ae7f57d9340c6ce82784e199
describe
'2873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMI' 'sip-files00146.txt'
cbcd7d9362d7b57e39a4d043f12d2559
fea6972668d04fcdc432a2e8b3917423979c227f
describe
'12317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMJ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
f97af1e64b00f06e0ea462df5d8e58d2
3d3a082e5680de6170647f0661eb99253a7eb9bd
describe
'186267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMK' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
65707e154c04961b48f1a8c90b99d301
f797c227954f8f377f0f05bdef666d95aa447c99
'2011-10-14T08:52:56-04:00'
describe
'196046' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASML' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
f53ad838fedfd7702621a1d7d8afde7a
8445ebd4b9cd0de783294e6beb096357f5697b0b
describe
'67421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMM' 'sip-files00147.pro'
9070c0e57edb83cf5e78852067f5d106
4fab702d65cd3753afeffd3d620b9c9d1e025cc1
describe
'56732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMN' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
a84f65ed08d781f2a7cacecc7422f816
07bb2fe2964a4523f96982862300a418da3a83f1
describe
'1501748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMO' 'sip-files00147.tif'
67405fa6ac12f61bf9f9ca6dc957c77d
af70bf02d1a8301a03a2a4afb96ef292d5c4d058
'2011-10-14T08:54:14-04:00'
describe
'2823' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMP' 'sip-files00147.txt'
12562828cbd955085ef2d56fab8d8cc4
0576695ed61404eaabe951cdd5fd6fc30dcdb96a
describe
'12649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMQ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
de76191da4b5093a01fe965cf23b4ca1
07f223407b0ce562db3fc3cfa954fd943dcf776f
describe
'186432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMR' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
dbe6d68a073bbebc104744941163250a
aa99ca39c444f22c13f9d9ca5172a03b06a1d937
describe
'185592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMS' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
7e1f95d7c3dda87bb200f3ac68c17aa3
415fc7e1b36c88fba0b2fcaf663edc138c7c98f2
describe
'63067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMT' 'sip-files00148.pro'
5aba3de6f2d21785753266ff425e6010
6498b4aae89c8b5fddcb2db12c144316cb3dd41e
describe
'54492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMU' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
53edf1393c83e990233bad93a69f192a
99d1587350e972d5023ff415593f0fa75e5f04aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMV' 'sip-files00148.tif'
ff371346b431fb442e2ab1a922f06ab4
db6c02f7ece8bad89308d47dd315ef3309cbf786
describe
'2638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMW' 'sip-files00148.txt'
4e522098e981553bd89a1a61cb0ad404
c70f7fddde853f8feb3ec8975f345f79b1b2a090
describe
'12482' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMX' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
908eafca75218dcf487f8bee0ca7d487
b9bf04d2e08a729c18f1c5ba3004a29c5bbb6bc5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMY' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
b4a2ac6f6f0fd4fc547a25b7a6e0555f
1c66a69538d9d960451370c8597fcf6c671573f8
describe
'178298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASMZ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
08bb496e54ff45ba75262f85d386aa35
2ea1176919acb54e8c27edd35c9b9c450645fefe
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNA' 'sip-files00149.pro'
324c4e5a25f126babe3731a5aa624f02
06b525d928dc152ea75fc7daa8cecc001bace4c8
describe
'52385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNB' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
6b23a936aaa17567da5e2c0851b2af2a
1f868135737c3d43115424968478de65427e3975
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNC' 'sip-files00149.tif'
6500355896f803251f241b0af5ec1180
f87587fa14ff9b9d6895305d9f1578a64fff177a
describe
'2534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASND' 'sip-files00149.txt'
6013106eb2d25c23b46d183be9382b05
792e23ec6469cb60b57c8dbabf44f8af4c3ae91b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNE' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
6ddbfab5ab0d6bcba086361455de9b4a
f465265d743d09a23572bd72ffdfffd999cd81b4
describe
'186487' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNF' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
699581eb8e0889c7db575f09159f13b3
9b24066e51f8cfe3f72e9de4ef2aef72801397c7
'2011-10-14T08:52:09-04:00'
describe
'189746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNG' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
6d1e14cc38a7c93d6b02a963554eab60
cde45f20c41029a68f403fce46dec47e9bf26ac1
describe
'63836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNH' 'sip-files00150.pro'
367951c4a97a93e5747d540b041eea3e
37a30b3da98908805036b39a29473a2e6d465b16
describe
'54972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNI' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
5d8df9e12b6a0a2244f2d5ee0a176f96
b038c93d542cfae2fc7908da7806515a1b92f62b
describe
'1503112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNJ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
d0ece83d28826ad3f28327adb2307596
f8bf97d299ba0fb587acf94373a9b463345c2b5a
describe
'2692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNK' 'sip-files00150.txt'
e181f45b2797c6ba2194f64d319559f2
8cb10002d68bb82c5377bea6a4646bad5b70ceb5
describe
'12678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNL' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
fd13ff04499bc14a26f54471ece0f86a
61d2acd278bf38c48298ff7016619798eb360de0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNM' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
7d048e4a4d35ee7ad2226d9cd330775a
cbffef470bf55d286be9b2091538b67bedb76a7a
describe
'189275' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNN' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
fccc3545fe07deaaa2247a8eca4bed54
02524e1c4d462a8490b170875308f57247867fe9
describe
'63651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNO' 'sip-files00151.pro'
1d8e8a9fdb3439c4c50488bc925eee25
4a53eaf9e52eee10fa9516388f7d4413a8733e2e
'2011-10-14T08:55:06-04:00'
describe
'54466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNP' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
fa82e96078dfff7cac686065bfee4dad
8cfc5d99882c73680dcbee5d7705203260df8323
describe
'1501816' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNQ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
c0f5f65949d1f73a9c238b5ab0c763e3
7ee703e95984914398b02cff94a728dc438491d9
describe
'2678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNR' 'sip-files00151.txt'
50f2bf974e9d807483194d16fbb0cce5
0cb4555f5e6656ad42b964806949065e46e9d329
describe
'12618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNS' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
a22f15f1bb7e0e967ae59e2665e17433
5fe72285ae6b06628dd4079a37226c2b32912c2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNT' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
36e543db7088e949ede4c71f7f4d93b2
c5e4c0f500328986964b5b33dea1eeec2840efa5
describe
'182436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNU' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
59f736e43ef91349b1eec6b66d85bc1a
8c7832c8767749a838589a9d1c5d811401ec40ec
describe
'61913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNV' 'sip-files00152.pro'
d0c161dacaca8147a4d0500ca4472411
25ecbb614fdec62aca71c79bc7c68a48607ef840
'2011-10-14T08:50:13-04:00'
describe
'53622' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNW' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
027400376658d2a30ca0540ac689fef7
db551d4bf5c37c0121dac41b839e6b16445d2a81
'2011-10-14T08:53:24-04:00'
describe
'1503420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNX' 'sip-files00152.tif'
1b8e97a88fe4d2369c68146b3e88aec9
190863befb575f8f1a769a2977375fe8a41eca97
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNY' 'sip-files00152.txt'
3b07c387e71d282030d1738c4445b0f4
021dd7f506114496011fe373479ea6f18f2a343f
describe
'12562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASNZ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
4e783c59540607c43c3d4b9e87ee0238
53c263743452fbf1844c702620ee2fc6e3e3f578
describe
'186327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOA' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
1d297cd71a80c5b6be8261f8addca3dd
d05cac98495546ed1a7df44eb5d685324d1aa87f
describe
'149070' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOB' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
6e70f8c409c1084e2f468fd242ce9113
ce85b338b0919f251f92163e35018c929ea0e65c
'2011-10-14T08:54:05-04:00'
describe
'48027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOC' 'sip-files00153.pro'
65e95427b7e9483cdcb2ccbf99c9a775
f19ba0fa0e13d1b811116f46c756e101a919e58e
describe
'46117' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOD' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
68d10ed2fcbd6dd905b06485432c33be
0f8759dea62965551e98e6519a34b55665a7d259
describe
'1501684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOE' 'sip-files00153.tif'
7e3d668f78341aca88e1aad85e86abeb
3c1508f56cfb31d36e50bc488fec040116706c74
describe
'2098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOF' 'sip-files00153.txt'
f6a233b202dea2fd0ef144ab575e91f8
ab565ba0456ae7774df9819127ebb8e6667c007d
'2011-10-14T08:53:02-04:00'
describe
'11436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOG' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
513d1eb8a4b75af34c86997293f86995
635a16b0eb648fbc68f7f1d1588b2ebae8ad4bb9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOH' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
b3511c57852600cfcbdc44dbba7efc25
3311c5e72b32847a9ee774391c3d8fad8cdf3e25
describe
'195839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOI' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
a293590e8229be80acb8acd252209b8b
ace66221958fd75fed09f4e06c9aae6dbdc1f20e
describe
'66694' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOJ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
a099bdf1f9598859d05da95889a811bc
0fc3f4091d74095354d93a7fea486cc841f80458
describe
'55671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOK' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
90e6fd0da4fff6e471c88c5b5a1d369b
dd21c535c1ba6a6b4f037fba2785c9cd9ffe48e5
describe
'1503252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOL' 'sip-files00154.tif'
2defd59acafcfb54d5c8c4a4a810b488
1817e0f32546b86937c33a2a0bc790ea3a65361f
describe
'2784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOM' 'sip-files00154.txt'
b982ab5fbcc5d624f3bd78c774b50432
40f7dad0e3839f7291eb4ed1dc43eb8ba6a6519e
describe
'12294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASON' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
394193a10e30c9c3065fe1a8f6c0a5f8
dddac8e96614a815b819f91a9ca2b49025ba56fb
describe
'186326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOO' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
01e75724027df51fb59c612265108e79
9c4777692555009c6cfeb54d4d720380edbb5b4f
describe
'200523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOP' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
6038ac87e67da97d49e968dff6f6b175
5f40acfb880b9ae44323bff011b845ba30af9dbc
describe
'67665' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOQ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
823170774ad0a932f4466372cd3eb8bc
702d0809902e8157f79505811c2fd188f27c5f5b
'2011-10-14T08:55:04-04:00'
describe
'57170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOR' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
2e936da266251813846eb846e56d2b35
afeff3d42ffe9592cd2a220e9bd4e4f1a55fc3b5
describe
'1502016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOS' 'sip-files00155.tif'
36002c51137b462c4cec645a25a9ef5c
ee043154ec8805c52280eb7dedaac1e94ca12193
'2011-10-14T08:55:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOT' 'sip-files00155.txt'
43bd5376cf64fb0603e478da2a59c2c4
b31b937ff0910cbe22437724d72b4c7fcb8f01ec
describe
'12566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOU' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
34d852e7baa814e9dca274c6d84e2612
65260e41a71c8b23b5fdd1e62702568e81561bb8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOV' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
cc250dbb92bcefb7b123c684101deb29
4ef297985d246567eb2953da4059ca3fff4873a8
describe
'181419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOW' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
8f427ba54e3b0692d9668b5305c9d05b
95e6d774ffd6fccba445e41f96ded261116ac295
describe
'60598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOX' 'sip-files00156.pro'
c693eba799fb9c5b755f3264f57af99c
a68c97b71e573769b89993595c0eff3a5ba56f8e
describe
'52837' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOY' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
4943e58d99aacad146b2b4843c2f2139
314f7c6a15221db5158177af0bc5df27cf2f45ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASOZ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
e8bb01605bf2043a7ba03b116686cd63
7cb8030a034702fc2ab78115019d7a6d092f589e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPA' 'sip-files00156.txt'
d282f6d56380f0295f344944010d8fad
7be62572eb158877d672afa256815ce8613347c3
describe
'12409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPB' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
6c70560d13bfe1c308e8933984d2f823
d945f7c55ed29cb1315b8826c57643c79144c650
describe
'186275' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPC' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
acfe80086e9ec4fac843c44971a8866b
0fb2124bcf429bcbf45a770c4964d259c5391be9
describe
'207411' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPD' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
3dbcea02dce14b1ad97f2ece292c7261
0c42d60a35e1dc47ab76d6604959023097030f79
describe
'70168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPE' 'sip-files00157.pro'
af0492fee70d5f3c0e33f53286d0d5c2
0f7590dacc455e82ee1cc58fa0915c27c4ca36c2
describe
'58895' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPF' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
cea711fc599cd21d498ec5b066e81974
52a6cc6178fd965db19ededb81a26b08e5c78456
describe
'1501984' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPG' 'sip-files00157.tif'
cf8476cb9ce0c5602238883c442507fd
b48a4dbfe09054320cccdde7b652fc0754eadc2b
describe
'2939' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPH' 'sip-files00157.txt'
1a434bc9f19fb39f6947927f99ba98fb
df7a52dd6f995fae81b1a19a0b5b3f7eb6098b8a
describe
'13041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPI' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
8d099f1e50ae5c3990a1e1619ba08592
c6703e824655bc19906e955d9002e9d5b473f8b2
describe
'186428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPJ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
7eece56b9f1bc209da57f89b6ff06195
7adf5f757967bab5cd9abb7808f40b47adb7cadc
describe
'193267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPK' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
c5a83fe6b9efefdc9b859ae072e4ee57
f5b38e4954006a87139e309f23d818f9ac08100c
describe
'65151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPL' 'sip-files00158.pro'
4b40b94f0d8638316278e47291cc54d0
0d9a7d618fd8ec417371fc2eea6058d65f1c4b7c
describe
'54678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPM' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
4b7d17f4f305e1ee47355076c8224a7e
d015ebce8b7b9bbf5f18eacf02e34c27ac58d34a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPN' 'sip-files00158.tif'
4c57e159107392b624125cd477ca111f
39d98d0be73ca721358d9bc1921094582b179eb1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPO' 'sip-files00158.txt'
70dd9f4d860ae301055f07e0374608cd
3fa8a75ab42bc49c210c6e25c79d1b672acd1d06
describe
'12520' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPP' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
620dced8a7e9a7156a872b0e5579ab0f
185b219a1b8c86fd3416fc1545b9f9ef8565e97d
describe
'186516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPQ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
ffdcfb643e4c653ec0f18277e7cfa510
faabba851406829bef3d6209fe204ebc445411b8
describe
'180896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPR' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
1444455e69570a46027361c836cd65d1
a02b16752a410418099436554a473fd95616ec2a
describe
'60503' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPS' 'sip-files00159.pro'
8119c68aea94df0a7bc846971584eaa2
8c2c67285f001011681f3c45af69ea139971e8fd
describe
'52434' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPT' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
90eb429fc7568d7d97ca6ec5ce4e9c71
216faae9c52157f16c7e904882faa84de2b0cf8b
describe
'1503072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPU' 'sip-files00159.tif'
3e8975c8cd20171d2c6ff2a33533843b
2cf46bfe1480569dce17592645a553b30d91d7bd
describe
'2631' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPV' 'sip-files00159.txt'
ea786e73400d06481ad9228b985706a2
61978086301b1715222a21a11e4a8c1b857cd164
describe
'11864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPW' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
a1185710c54a2a8a9acdb52e50d11f9f
8200768ddc3c09f1b8f53550160f2bdef5858e27
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPX' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
dc89b2dcfce909cad0987bdbd865b0b2
60db0c84dc6c03ca7bac846293633a76fb351a3c
describe
'196157' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPY' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
57ff9399851c076cc9083bcf1386dfc9
7978df410fcc42e3d0af148b65356968b58c6625
describe
'65643' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASPZ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
15d0b3cc2b0ac17ac3ad1a9479fda7c8
8a4d2ee1eda049def751ad3b69fae422436d0ac9
describe
'56200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQA' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
3e7ec4902540f6e3bb0d8462b6a7ab13
b397d4896a03cf0543e97904ea414625692d40f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQB' 'sip-files00160.tif'
99af999c26eb0ce973ed21ba175e9dd0
589b17698f8a3390ae3f08eb3d368142b5e4d98d
'2011-10-14T08:56:31-04:00'
describe
'2740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQC' 'sip-files00160.txt'
14c0ff32cc941ad83e6c5edeae587630
fed3ef5b74e93edddcf63ee1a57e1ce4c284e55f
describe
'13055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQD' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
a34418c115e06ea37289faaa0d489802
245e8afd919159a63e9fef93c053899717439d00
describe
'186391' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQE' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
0e0c764092bcf27a3e865171849d289b
2943e36e147ed07aa6c759c78396248441e925f7
describe
'199963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQF' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
214019d243fe12b5d0883d3791d96b6f
9be45f5a5ca85c0ca0a944f6c39d829a2beed74c
describe
'66832' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQG' 'sip-files00161.pro'
385b6dba68cd20f6934bf26a6efd6c69
37bf4dc8ae80d06252a762d553751e7600273152
describe
'57358' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQH' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
ea9679055e8a0a905c96498da7c0bf5b
a913bdcc186394c0d8129099abadda2a21b46459
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQI' 'sip-files00161.tif'
05fb64b2f35f3b8df90b85e1f8de10b5
a8e10d547fc2d13ff438cae6096858633935fcab
'2011-10-14T08:55:32-04:00'
describe
'2821' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQJ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
7930cfde7a29c4f0f9efd6fa64b47b6e
041ebe188d694de838030e2f5e8bc8abaa9a10d9
describe
'13042' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQK' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
7e48ba24e96ac58016455dec880aa407
1b44252d472753e00179933b47242e0feca5feb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQL' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
584b616b47609e0802e5d54bc988c6bd
8c0567dca22216b91eb067fba9e261166578f173
describe
'205665' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQM' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
2340a3f7aba31bfa41a4c436efacc04c
7eb3222ccfe12a9b6134396853b8a562df79c61d
describe
'69516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQN' 'sip-files00162.pro'
89483dd53c5a0d755e56484fce901cf8
456f4c75e3b98856892fee8e536bdb31216a9391
describe
'58391' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQO' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
47e2baebd69d7879ff54f15ea84811ed
70d93a412f2e34c2015d1b9aff2070e2d5fc41dc
describe
'1503472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQP' 'sip-files00162.tif'
b1dc0abef063bf9bf59226b40bf0dbb4
51dadc202d4902cf47dd440f1ec066bf18c6a4cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQQ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
f7018a31ce67c3406ad8004526d2bb91
af923728f160e7259968eddccf025355a9adfee6
describe
'12826' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQR' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
b3f933b3ebea115d4ca6e5d1bd791636
63c6cd4cdb3d28d7e4cbb8ad509633c82654eb5d
describe
'186491' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQS' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
b52eea5b49df36eedf42540883a606bf
d004636f6f014efee6149138cc3ef6789aa6121d
describe
'176674' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQT' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
dcc01c77f3a3ccedeeabb4c62c2aad9f
8eda5411b183262c70af03654f00283b6519f507
describe
'59536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQU' 'sip-files00163.pro'
184bb0f978aa3afdcbf0404936b56bf8
3a67e8feb29e4c38a152d868a96f80831cc150f2
describe
'50698' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQV' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
dc526a91f61cfb7028a097d86cca0b55
696c184397e26d8d1ca90affff6b39f2387287a6
describe
'1503068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQW' 'sip-files00163.tif'
d636f83ceec41940f647b6994a4f12e4
cd57c2c2e85b6477ba1052477a470819c7b529fe
describe
'2539' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQX' 'sip-files00163.txt'
f17b49a822715df93fd7830b61efba49
7df478e19e611b5ff47b801d18921f1b12de869c
describe
'11753' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQY' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
ba2adc982e92f961f155f6e862206d4e
334a61cc364c3b300de2e0e8550dbd525a2e71c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASQZ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
95dd86e4a1118d0fe68599d1c2e266da
1de29ee1b9ae238e0e479c9f00f8ef62df71b180
describe
'179467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRA' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
37102a9f64e2808ef8a91c7ed59c0d73
84b6c25fcb6bcc9cc5591ff17628bbe370aa48a1
'2011-10-14T08:49:48-04:00'
describe
'60972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRB' 'sip-files00164.pro'
85ffc205d6358369b82e71fc454ad180
3e217d5d896c4270e3aae339ff5d05b42da4fb03
describe
'53764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRC' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
0f2096ac30d49f54cc4152b70a55b2f0
15bf1140d4c6ecfd38bea23072b89d5f6e1b6ae7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRD' 'sip-files00164.tif'
f9c4d2f60a24b12d4bf653ce008a1a84
e5945121b936856987a50af7dc2c7a4d2e881687
describe
'2557' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRE' 'sip-files00164.txt'
2ceaa4e178bd19c3c0ec72381ac4a991
0ed99c833d20abe902073cc52b52c8ec711ef625
describe
'12328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRF' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
98bc07d3d6d89190082819aee9af62c7
161406b179fc3e1d112c151f1a6e28b4dbd9692f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRG' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
353102d95d1e79675f47d2d578847500
756322256e4eac332ddb8a626d94bfaa5dd4a1ed
describe
'170906' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRH' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
0502905ca6226809fb8e5a28f73f03cd
dbf12fa862a8833a0faa4e4288ca55ce454255a3
describe
'55807' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRI' 'sip-files00165.pro'
c838b504a7a72b00a111f92089773948
f5888b69ee0783920bdcd26392a07653562f0580
describe
'50345' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRJ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
6dbb143c87102ecd907349d9399d3fca
0e3fa0e5c35a31bc0085242b44bb1963d833c30e
describe
'1503256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRK' 'sip-files00165.tif'
6191b643e0113030ebbbd1ac408f60be
372746ad8c4771e7ead7441968b66ae0ad6827f2
describe
'2376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRL' 'sip-files00165.txt'
401a4935e8a42973ad9729752f53fde0
d983e4a1ba60abb3d0b197f5897ae734d948abb9
describe
'12156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRM' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
8263802be73e1d7f42ec2c69c69a95ad
40c09a009b2d15dc36718aefda3d644da0dd76b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRN' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
38047fb419dc5bff868de91f92251d5a
011fae17d807a98ed4579a29c2b291cec38ec4a6
describe
'156507' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRO' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
96b0006bf17af69a56809c9a3f3c7317
0a0770499cfd2ce67710dd409a02aa1d38d9929e
describe
'52497' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRP' 'sip-files00166.pro'
adb48ac57a34b822791a942ec3355142
56fcc2d19ab0dfb6c537d2d32a41be64651796a3
describe
'46388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRQ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
5788b929c818ff5e8c48aacbe7e62d28
360bfeb542734583384c376a58627c9b72530c34
describe
'1502684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRR' 'sip-files00166.tif'
9e0653218e608b4f54ce43f2a8ca446e
4c543f82b184d6c672d24b42dc65e3cc0e28e3fb
'2011-10-14T08:53:14-04:00'
describe
'2237' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRS' 'sip-files00166.txt'
7be7e605c420886f0ec2b7b8ccc1e158
64a50a05f28ebc06d764631e9a78fa28940f931b
describe
'11202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRT' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
3ef38c11d697e164a135e738a8cb987a
7678c65748b43fa2527da97cb486407d1cb53f4c
describe
'186320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRU' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
d2c8de77e329458d5ed48781aa328afb
6ee8a06dec11a15b903be5d3667c37188fe339a4
describe
'183032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRV' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
3636444d8722279583c6ef3f2e1b5b87
b8bdb9d28e0cd8b258b80c6ad57f71becffcae30
describe
'61775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRW' 'sip-files00167.pro'
8e5b275244e488e1665ba678f8ff8ef9
1b860c433a87e117e523fe270b365c8419915d11
describe
'53254' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRX' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
77003b013317e378991ddaf0b8858da1
875f15081bc1e70bb2294a9f7c10add0795e29d7
describe
'1501596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRY' 'sip-files00167.tif'
a79b567e093afd7d3858ca305c04b472
d81026a7c0e2fc5fe0ecba03a80abbaa59c35569
describe
'2632' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASRZ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
e8e6e9f09ee78e42e7fbb8155f6a29e6
ea102d4cb46cdfb73e7df809ade45d128cc3ece2
describe
'12332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSA' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
0cf37914686f3d4dace8b211f6d6c393
86f112c312e8b02fcb23a3d03ade7c493a3a3420
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSB' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
8b5b87643636bf63b09e9c7897934fcb
888ab32bc4ec8ce596d23e0b2819ed82a62a9df6
describe
'203898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSC' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
bfff715fa18a0abdc8292dd2d5dc70e4
6c07e62ae2655b13ccffbee0fd571d62ac16e02a
describe
'69349' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSD' 'sip-files00168.pro'
1eb0323e913d43898bd7895d729a0836
91f065bfde1edf0966e60c24d20e1e6cd39a6074
describe
'57375' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSE' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
193a6c5a82e74cdd44a53d0a86a46c7d
18d5f3d5d2533eff9eda04c27da10b658da28085
describe
'1503436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSF' 'sip-files00168.tif'
3fe40f2af0dc076994fe66dbab5d6b68
16400b01d0336ffa80b847fddeec2279795ccd9d
describe
'2888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSG' 'sip-files00168.txt'
943ec95d6c08a84179c36b4a6932c2dd
0d1ea14cb8c2456f8a7c78fef025429241b008cc
describe
'12564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSH' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
d539cc2a7960531b7097f5c13a717c1d
4e271aad04658dc0dda0f58cdded58b0900956a6
describe
'186211' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSI' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
4cdba9fae95e032ecafe1a2a98904f5b
99e3a2c49d161698f1ea73b4b5eac32b753ae7f2
describe
'202622' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSJ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
d6282bd1c7879ce32d87a7b58bd51fd9
2907111ba97ffe1a595547ba13c97afe2f8fe380
describe
'69175' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSK' 'sip-files00169.pro'
a8c0edbab304a641e6d09db8dc05885b
4fbd855f9c4616c0e92b81fcfa12586f1b71c46f
describe
'57751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
8c1b09b26fbbc887010bf9c5ab6f1f75
88e5e38cabccd2d735d62be4ae367668eb0903ab
describe
'1501964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSM' 'sip-files00169.tif'
586f2f6c88e5f0e83cf2b55f99009306
95f61cd4a87ee4bfc817e1404352f0ba956666b9
describe
'2887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSN' 'sip-files00169.txt'
484eb32a2fa35ee23da71e7d2cb55e44
ec485d8159a706afdbd42870e727b2042615dd06
describe
'12626' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSO' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
cf9c63f6163301f4823a35a2e493c8b3
9082113108ea0228896a7a8110d4bc3427411694
describe
'186361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSP' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
f04e87132a90687f39a265ab3cb35f38
05c673213588d3467acd2d24417cc5c923ba3d28
describe
'183652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSQ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
555c24f728a4c63cfbf90311fec1a16d
16edaa2b3ef6f63260aa5eb26e8c3f685a4835ef
describe
'61685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSR' 'sip-files00170.pro'
72f02eb21bf3109d47090754916578a3
dc9cfb4eab76c42809492c1ef056ca322a248732
describe
'52982' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSS' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
966c08afa9c9afbd9292ad3006f0f993
1e1482176af6d1db45d619000ba85d961f55daae
describe
'1503292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASST' 'sip-files00170.tif'
2e4513603d41516d5a51165fb91ce556
b1f3528fac21a4c1908acaf3a5b876bad9967321
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSU' 'sip-files00170.txt'
8abc882cfa1cd0998d9c6669a9417429
8c165611da7419a4d037210ab529d13f52f0777a
describe
'12137' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSV' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
4b7f6ee8badca7b60b2fdeb1e419e348
1e40dfb367c5e232dfa976be5430db550ea22f85
describe
'186252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSW' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
4f50202b58cb8a201637dfb375e6b974
0a90deafbe167eceb95e9f63f31d7541d7c6e4cc
describe
'186717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSX' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
1f69022f6dbc9ff25792476cca8d2308
d09297dc78ffc2cca1fc838e7ac01ff0052213c0
describe
'64090' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSY' 'sip-files00171.pro'
34d1bcefba23913c5542ce2b2b728799
88a50636f2cfee5d371ffb2084703938bcb9e7f1
describe
'54263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASSZ' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
f95ca84be643f948b2c02b14a6d3df81
318e6483a831941b36b00ef5e4c3bf64dabc225c
describe
'1501716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTA' 'sip-files00171.tif'
181acad56ebac40b32d7bc561aa225dd
e40b03af3bbf992be275cca1d1d97bcff6d08de0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTB' 'sip-files00171.txt'
7f4580f14239772c60eeed85092f8c70
680ee852ad6481e76bec7ad8ff2d72703ee1baf1
describe
'12005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTC' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
1d1d83bb35c4f6404e6c13ba55084492
ba068015568d1619acf280ebdf50f2709400f416
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTD' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
db7fbe847d871e737f34e27a1f0a77be
8497c50676617433ce3dc91456ea922413d167fe
describe
'189644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTE' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
ed561e57a0a97e2ea5c6eccd9a6bf643
1514225150ef610d5e51dcf0ec638f36e807508e
describe
'63519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTF' 'sip-files00172.pro'
63f69b2b4d65d617b01a920df1da42de
e933adf95f24a54783cdcee6dd76f9d8992356b0
describe
'54721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTG' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
d4598df8cf4b5e4d148f203cba0de155
b18b288c3ef8f3bece4c39c2c5b2661913132cb6
describe
'1503464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTH' 'sip-files00172.tif'
5ca6b32f86867c2e68ede6e75485d24c
7c6943ac5b5d3d651af88143c522a29a4b91ae75
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTI' 'sip-files00172.txt'
bd621bbd3663c5571d3b26eaa6eaec48
547dfc55f9ec9537cb3d46cd9d3d151c9d0d20e1
describe
'12842' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTJ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
ed9ee5959870ed3cfa546c6680184104
6ec9307c9128399b6654535a0b5c785578fec495
describe
'186251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTK' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
60a3cef9766b76ad00b9bde05581865c
352b2e929c6cc1478d73cd78a1f71ed06b3dfc17
describe
'207235' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTL' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
1b2f79fd15ca6e35f04fc22ed376c22f
44c1f88224a8dea9d54dbd87abf98aef4cc7136b
describe
'70686' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTM' 'sip-files00173.pro'
128f89e7700d79369d5cefa2cb35c317
ad7ffc25a9f1ba20858e8ecbeb885c0d450819fb
describe
'57731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTN' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
a65606486f4c4f0de9b3e1ed9b09c7a2
1ed8f827378124a25ac6f8372aafa5ec684e078e
describe
'1502188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTO' 'sip-files00173.tif'
9e28955243f36b1fe10d72195bf3a2e2
ebdbc1de0350c86d1ca09e0a9bbc6d247cc2962e
describe
'3008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTP' 'sip-files00173.txt'
f063763cb9653025307530408d925c11
1def8f116aefcb23196f10cd6aa82af50003193a
describe
'12764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTQ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
1db9c34cb2aed632644d2c97875c1982
5da12436aa33f3f79db695e4c110e6db21b690a4
describe
'186438' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTR' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
30147dc8906dee324a484c88b3fd8e5b
e256ee2926dbf85edf3629634e168533d46f1e7d
describe
'195987' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTS' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
d1a077300aa0649cfc9aa4b9f6ff22ed
8534b461bde4a21669e6b80bb49b52d5dc4c7df3
describe
'66161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTT' 'sip-files00174.pro'
ec5489b345a60664dd73c1bd0df9f283
605e9540475a0976e51ce8f3bf8e42aa4a1fdc25
describe
'55775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTU' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
12c2efee8b4a03ef5fbfd96c6cf4cf69
813ea4b360839b5c7974ef3e948deae3ebd8966f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTV' 'sip-files00174.tif'
0e6d4bfa2b0f13f60719ca69db9562b1
8d7feaeb9916fd5e8cb4976bf6cba847d987274e
describe
'2769' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTW' 'sip-files00174.txt'
3a67173546b7e1b771e3ba0adea79a18
d2c43028b06d88540f452800dd2c1d491e7c7b86
describe
'12469' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTX' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
67265b6f61859693b3dd53eb7b936f27
e18713e6784911fdc89f83b9b97ed797cd4cbdcc
describe
'189932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTY' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
d3eb9f29fd4a8c3d1b82167cf8aaa4cf
c93d6678177c69f38300ed1de76da32eb07fa021
describe
'201675' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASTZ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
d020b2946ec7e4eee29c96a6ac6d7453
a33bd4722673d98c51d576ec79fea38e6932ac98
describe
'69607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUA' 'sip-files00175.pro'
05368c5200775d396dbd7d51546cbc77
2e9bb51370f62041b546bd897eee7e608b2130fe
describe
'55977' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUB' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
18cd53e00c0b88960023eb487dee8e63
1e8974a144781fbf732ff725bb53f54be6490829
'2011-10-14T08:55:25-04:00'
describe
'1530712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUC' 'sip-files00175.tif'
74cdf2ac3f54f19df5ba162a80ac14ee
23b2bf13d4c67dd1dacdd5aa0d77de47110c2ca1
describe
'2988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUD' 'sip-files00175.txt'
a7f8c0de05128c1915b9389bafa3fbd1
bc09eeb9396c7da5be6f3befe603e9c49f00bc47
describe
'12398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUE' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
6daa9f8e968bfb9844d6ecda21748b7c
3ae70cd20169e96f330186f5aac77cf685fa3c9b
describe
'192147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUF' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
2b100bbaee869403b8f4109353cabc09
d015d0bfc470247537519ad46fa7ce99c8986da3
describe
'200761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUG' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
36ae9a929a35391576eb7047cd9fce75
057bd0fee1cd5d29c49daa85ada6fe968eb8353c
describe
'70169' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUH' 'sip-files00176.pro'
c838eeae1fd02b09f8933b52700cecdf
302cfdc929186c4201e0800355e39e3652da9a0c
describe
'54916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUI' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
304b2074400ea5da62b7f832e54bc904
5dba5c49e3b7deb237ef3508fe55ef4730f4629e
'2011-10-14T08:53:36-04:00'
describe
'1549784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUJ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
627e3d075f08f57fef750efca12e2de6
a88d08a441e7ddff5a170ee16efe5d1cc8342593
describe
'2924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUK' 'sip-files00176.txt'
57e8cdfbc0bf29f9cd65b8ea43e8d657
f8b8bb1be0dad86d996d29918ab3cf306f05038c
describe
'11981' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUL' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
e2e010341dc5306ce202dde68364863c
8cb0e012bd824af1ddda363fbe2ec57167ce5342
describe
'189126' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUM' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
6a6bde12b378acbcdce1d23feee6c859
d492e1e08cb240b12c29e97d7762755dde0379f4
describe
'193761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUN' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
1c2dd3ab7898f4bf34c448343f35f5f9
2e73b8f0636307676dc722ffe04201c3d573b6dc
describe
'65791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUO' 'sip-files00177.pro'
b737cd78b866ce255d47c6c4c231d134
d52fb956ae7f0d92a22fed2c08d3add96af60c3e
describe
'54385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUP' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
c5aae1251df136c4efef1f05eca92804
cf63e98eb04d427724e73c1889aa18f2f5984c1f
describe
'1525260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUQ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
9885e7e9c936b7ebc0944bcb3f062b2d
f0f4da766c70710d090076418769a218965b2cb6
'2011-10-14T08:52:37-04:00'
describe
'2761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUR' 'sip-files00177.txt'
b44d25b8c06096bf89cb063a5c92ea23
839d11ef7d48ee87ed9eca18ee8137c007210af8
describe
'12384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUS' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
b285353e4b3164ed731beb6dd4503ad6
7357cf505c22054967db7fdaef10a33d40a26b7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUT' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
0de29acec8dfbd1e02077addb1407670
be7d6e1fb1561a1f58f093d3d2b41aaf15922f80
describe
'193202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUU' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
32a7853ac016e993c9a5ac659c4a5fd1
3baa81f00fbecc7c7ff0b3997cd03a145cbcd62f
'2011-10-14T08:56:13-04:00'
describe
'66344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUV' 'sip-files00178.pro'
480f25a5a421bf5f199ac7b9852571c9
f3529013f9f12bea891dacca1faeede9308333c0
describe
'54144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUW' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
aadfdf432724cd768ce073d87afa9066
b8c108f9c56e90300ea00c2b627c606132c43349
describe
'1503224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUX' 'sip-files00178.tif'
ab9831468648d9f30f5dc67e2c2ac8ff
ea470559fdadfe27b5bafd3c71c3eaff3ebae7aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUY' 'sip-files00178.txt'
440707f038d91a3c61dff77e852c9a42
0d2a97f53db63f2360a290b0a4e18eb1fea4e8dc
describe
'12370' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASUZ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
5476a28dad95abedd6394908ad77ac28
1410ba8858c6acedbd85a620721ff563f0415e14
describe
'186209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVA' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
891f17246c9c37d58849e0c38f0a18dc
06dce41edb0c0b57fc8aa5c03ef5d87e923e1854
describe
'200718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVB' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
5c57b6169604a46526a66b71c223d990
0e73bc4837919aac622dadff04766f0d4d356763
describe
'67749' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVC' 'sip-files00179.pro'
933c57ccc4a761acdf390a05b0b0f056
7fd75f74d47dbe8325e39ef8785f57f7d077b996
describe
'57295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVD' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
9952b24adf5e1145e145c73d592e575d
b1e40d48b9e8abdfba0eb61e9d7d75c6967f9434
describe
'1501756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVE' 'sip-files00179.tif'
ec685d8a7865b318fe27522bbbf4b7a4
7fc6d1544c9a3503696522f91bba03ae888a239f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVF' 'sip-files00179.txt'
95a5b2e6200507fb9b88bddfb63f3d24
cd478bc3c669f683af7a0b3159a8373269c28c35
describe
'12440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVG' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
bb862bd2b1c893cb078c209a8d29373b
edaba462999830b0c57361837a34920250eb6e74
describe
'190819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVH' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
35cfa678ecdd863be92b8f03bb086c8a
4569b256720c4bfb148cae0cec0e8ecb5e0fb3f2
describe
'200592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVI' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
c3f931302ea4c57c31525be16621a181
330651436abdb7402cbc0ec4b232f33c1f1702a1
describe
'69055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVJ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
bcecb8a638988a9f9d2b21f7b0868dfc
a26e369c9cd14bda1e410094b8be6ec94cc1cec3
describe
'56165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVK' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
34fd4ca97f09ad38182ba915786ea566
96efc63ae9573ec0761b41daaa91af64192cfac3
describe
'1538344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVL' 'sip-files00180.tif'
f7febaf4d0719cf82e4d632383e583f1
8feb3cd1d79717d1ed860d9ce268e6b963f1d965
describe
'2862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVM' 'sip-files00180.txt'
67fbc11f97b210fb741d2c14009efc43
984df33406ec73477f0f8668283828fb9971cceb
describe
'12200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVN' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
7e02e8f333deffba0bf6f0c492b6a7fb
85fb08fe1ee5a6f3019055a2e02521875eb5cbc3
'2011-10-14T08:56:34-04:00'
describe
'189263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVO' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
d8d19a7c914b456c0f0b655e9aa8656b
b157e2704de4c76e4411a3697a4d6262cce3fedd
describe
'124165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVP' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
d12ff74d2b07a4d4ff834b3b042c9c48
8f02b0b92cd69252d52b70abe9f82e0bf6251ee1
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVQ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
8b0a82475909413709b5963295814d02
1e6c02485bd52cc9feb1a9bc153a9ea3a95a9d7a
describe
'32934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVR' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
99262803fb23dd24679011db4ce2832b
6adea813dd21c05392c68f0ad55bbf05a335533d
describe
'4551700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVS' 'sip-files00181.tif'
3d59cd438ed67b6cdf88df1002243e8c
47c999f4f70a339ff776f85733a7ab4d5a0855c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVT' 'sip-files00181.txt'
c087cd0a34519a91fbb9fc34248ce34c
22138433980b165d21ac9d9fc1d79965ac12151d
describe
Invalid character
'8066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVU' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
db53faa9a261309c65b5ba69bd7ac950
a9da3fa3646e9d7da95639a6699d49bd795b1112
describe
'189764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVV' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
2062fec231f7b506dec29e3f2eca6f34
6fa75259ee97296f822b6801407d3c78ea51fca2
describe
'199536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVW' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
33f570e64058f6d5574f31d54a9235c8
9e07e322b5b6e49bcaf0c2fe4632f200573d747f
describe
'67542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVX' 'sip-files00183.pro'
ab7bdc6440fd47b8975d992ce8340026
2a81d91df697a86ab286ef8a1189016bf79adcaa
describe
'56291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVY' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
f59418f562ab876a7ad2f86f4fb4eaaa
df5f93b996fdabb6874db297b3d1cef9a7136986
describe
'1531060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASVZ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
c5c259772a59c9fa6a95c4d07af97856
6cadbb8550b36abc89f076cbde9f9604c83cf303
describe
'2814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWA' 'sip-files00183.txt'
f7157563d5d9f5db1e03613619d04c0b
1d1710846affa0a941d66749bfaa13f60d9f625a
describe
'12593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWB' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
0ca2eba9b3523e978242c9f73fa73ec1
f5a3a514fc8bb2cc28e78d79bda8ca3013b72a0c
'2011-10-14T08:56:07-04:00'
describe
'186380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWC' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
d7c9989e387db65b593bcffb2fafb213
36dc5b697764e0e7f21a523bb3c9cdd3eff5a0ef
describe
'204297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWD' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
ece0c88ec251e0aaba35a385f469075b
6c156082f8b0b607ff5842c34c40a8577b4c9a33
'2011-10-14T08:53:35-04:00'
describe
'67117' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWE' 'sip-files00184.pro'
bef2c041596b4526715cd44429c1dd36
32194ae280737a02467dc77e63e339ac2ee97a63
describe
'57559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWF' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
ea67ee3f95cef4ea40db293a6bc8bfd2
db6c3dec42ea90a420afce08642bd9d5c9ae75dd
describe
'1503700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWG' 'sip-files00184.tif'
e0b130bfdabbb7ba1cfd0a7e823e934f
570da9fb75f529cf4e8be350efe1008f373e3b21
describe
'2802' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWH' 'sip-files00184.txt'
ec6b20923ec532eb766d9bea781741b4
a2a9e4ac1f11953aa5781e7d3ef4043413e49839
describe
'12755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWI' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
c6ad61e251ea3ca1fc7bc1d07927cab9
331c89ed47641fef57aac31ebe97cf4b689efc76
describe
'186194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWJ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
8fad4f50333f3019cf5811f9f2f3dc70
972334285013596084bf1d3a9b659c451cad4f14
describe
'199432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWK' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
c6eaf2b52bf81ffc9b71c7c533f84f7d
d87b221a1f447a5cba4a42dbcfab898a9e80a428
describe
'65212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWL' 'sip-files00185.pro'
1cc3b8f7d57e7d6f1b26e674196683c6
b1f6a6206ed32139f679e6ec4af367c1b7d7b97f
describe
'56326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWM' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
abfbcfbca3119e47aa3665c0445d4d6a
93ae491797effe86376a38bd6ec8b85f18db4261
describe
'1502196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWN' 'sip-files00185.tif'
13c3821e769ebd29d5e0bce6dc34fa90
8185b42b2599fc8b800f9d1d19b196606b5203ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWO' 'sip-files00185.txt'
32096639ec73f13bc9d60b84fd987fd0
23590fd9fcdd6f63ab180634623395c337179105
describe
'12495' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWP' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
c8a36b7518b6fdef611481831569d7e6
9643f94da9c54df7f429f6ea017592a138b18304
describe
'186430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWQ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
4b12d20dc984466d61343ed41d9148ca
00c7034872d1f560d6e50f823f5b60601bf7697a
describe
'197170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWR' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
c2749635a0e8ace1918e870c4890714a
f3bf17f4c12788bb595950e111e3f85e108d7bda
describe
'66518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWS' 'sip-files00186.pro'
e1001f981f7ffee026e4b3b0684e2744
13b3347b00a8f8ca5a985e719a04c13e794db412
describe
'56634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWT' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
554201c0e49d965736345f48b034952c
255c40241eac4901e6bd7adefc7fdfd94cc14354
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWU' 'sip-files00186.tif'
55c5e3b668b512c324aff327b843244a
fb745690d8390738563e6306f09b937dd06b1951
describe
'2816' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWV' 'sip-files00186.txt'
4de5e3630e4d3ea4b1e491b39ffd9b5b
520ab4229d94d775c934adf4426953872a926dcb
describe
'12557' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWW' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
2fb62f4c5f2ea037c41c26614b4bdcc2
6bca3b81be74032268dac4aa84605984dbe04de6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWX' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
d541bb3238b8483e2e0c0d018e045018
b0d0e07fca936698542aaea0b2a31297f0591a52
describe
'203101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWY' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
445513619316421372eab0532ae47286
6dc2a7475a9126c9fe3444ed4c9f30629a3c12fd
describe
'67393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASWZ' 'sip-files00187.pro'
4f9893d73bf341babe1b80c2890a30a1
9ab6cbcf852bb70ae055bc14d976ac74f41c3764
'2011-10-14T08:56:22-04:00'
describe
'57495' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXA' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
50420c743364d3ca2d2cd654a8bd9193
8634af1fff2e2bcd0cecf902f9d6e975eb410e3b
describe
'1501824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXB' 'sip-files00187.tif'
99799311fdd0b6142859ad52c65ed69a
b43829cb75b2bee659ddfd043948bd5a80ef78a8
describe
'2822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXC' 'sip-files00187.txt'
9e892998efdc9c2938d194bbe1a4034b
d6d5ab1f2cd01aba67cf42cee3e172cc13e2575d
describe
'12671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXD' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
51a21a16dd2613c70aae91f09e02b9ba
64689de1f5aba47e3055c507cf6779e2dee19903
'2011-10-14T08:51:40-04:00'
describe
'192884' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXE' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
b6859046f9d9d6a2efeae2a5f1ef1381
20b8e3e64df64020a94c2b28871e3556d4d2940d
describe
'179320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXF' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
61bfe06b0d5f724188df4fcd7d47a524
178d82749e0be87780e140dbdf82169d2c07c25d
describe
'63362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXG' 'sip-files00188.pro'
c7c3b2715720ff37ab4619be55ed4f59
33b4b4b02f671a05b5d5031d4760ab286176489b
describe
'50435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXH' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
8b0737d066245d8f768658c6d1ca12e9
c96b089cea6219fa692281ee9e5052d6b29f474b
describe
'1555328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXI' 'sip-files00188.tif'
566e99d48cce0af2f8b51605536713a7
6a9252f0b21154a3a8aa1339462eddf22dde8ff1
describe
'2649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXJ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
1a178d0b476ee37eb0406324cf5abec7
e5568723f2c75c153bb09695a68e155dc0cde310
describe
'11423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXK' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
52087ffbaae54e735dfdd5cf81f7de0c
578a93b5bfb719527cccccb5174769f088cc098e
describe
'187817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXL' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
20d2c5c5db85911e24c77610e810a796
883e02e86233e2345cc1ab8d2ccb6d30a45b520e
describe
'194311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXM' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
36ca997ead5ae5b0324a00ea3e1f46ab
1b75f41595691f0539068e34fd042c4d94cdfdd9
describe
'67031' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXN' 'sip-files00189.pro'
5a0f7b09673279e9b45ab1bc7b6c1a01
0ec20ed68f4b9060d18379a4340ab32ed1239032
describe
'54606' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXO' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
597e42c8adfc97c0b0684b86a8f7ae9b
bc0406f9dc663b776b518a6cbb9a6a8d3eb72480
describe
'1514172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXP' 'sip-files00189.tif'
de8cd46c8752be48dcf2ffebf9f2feae
a019b5fd891656075baaf188fc8194ba845ab681
describe
'2807' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXQ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
02dc578d1e36a72afefb16040f70924e
2c2a7d3bb97afacfc8943da6a48607cf84f5b5ec
describe
'12139' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXR' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
87b455a235e65899cc5b3155e08067bd
284a7ceccc9b225b6f5f44d7e9fb83ffcd1781af
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXS' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
e4d9e53d83c40184e3c12ca8114bf8ea
62d538c1ea465dc0892c3d5201f5bdbb75896a3d
describe
'181625' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXT' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
194a9c7ed3ba027f4ca3de5126fa8223
23af4baa57182bdea6bf257a71ac5bba7921a007
describe
'60506' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXU' 'sip-files00190.pro'
1bcf629a7868b21ebac7d3d9079e904b
7ac5369f033f3f501a11427b9f3b1bf499362c44
describe
'53283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXV' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
e784342ea81df49ebb86a0c182d01e1e
ce6f06eacaa1628f071d38bc89e5a56a25c650a8
'2011-10-14T08:55:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXW' 'sip-files00190.tif'
66d3380ea9b95fa56d6e80e283e99ad9
4b3dd00bbfe957a468e135aff2fb46e5fad71447
describe
'2573' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXX' 'sip-files00190.txt'
7f8c4adeb88b27608c69ff285f0bff5c
09cead88fce1face5335fb2bd66e5a190bc5a7dc
describe
'12361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXY' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
e7b131f2df9c8d1cb7ef2a52d01ec3c2
cec6b5144c4455392a3d3454e9bf827923836d12
describe
'186266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASXZ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
a284dbb075c8ea06a5b9a06dc7223d9b
d328b670fd4c5bb6e74ba5fe208202a43fd3bcb5
describe
'197457' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYA' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
0b824d83dd6f9439efc4887923daf582
0b1a21647655285a14e3bc77cfd4f6f95dcaecda
describe
'65695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYB' 'sip-files00191.pro'
80cbc2aa25ad04adc5957386ded53e32
2311cc30969478910ddf6d45c8138558667bab57
describe
'56410' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYC' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
4275f711d1e7610e9d2c977ba191a916
343b801720819278377fec1323cb5c2b865501c0
describe
'1502000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYD' 'sip-files00191.tif'
05e65908767a2943a823555bbd68f424
55c36f972c101efa6cfd9ca8b5081ed938f8fc30
describe
'2805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYE' 'sip-files00191.txt'
deb0edcf17eb596681fe95d844b1a86c
6bc8f42c81f95cade46d1ae3c935daff08d41628
describe
'12663' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYF' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
e3777b82f4a8bcb22c54c05be28a2954
93c1eead0b2f696a49b6042ffbe13e8bcf3a67b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYG' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
88701e347a7c0067511448ff46424d10
7fd092a872190b8b38fad0cc4532d1df61b309b1
describe
'191360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYH' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
cd812bf6a688765365c9ee1d2b73020b
77dfd9593994955d07357d8e5287ef68be8453c4
describe
'64440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYI' 'sip-files00192.pro'
91b699f38622cdf2dab22cf4cef313ab
c0cb4e66a19ea174d18dfd4034f86239ea78d32c
describe
'55451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYJ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
578902b100d5e90f2dac8487c29979c7
50b2a3fd14d3d3383734a7bd870674f13af3ad31
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYK' 'sip-files00192.tif'
656b2f7f437eb8dc89eeccbc5b2a89b6
c0e2e60463546afe3ed9e7dfe3cdf34d86e03320
'2011-10-14T08:56:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYL' 'sip-files00192.txt'
38121887fe302d9a390e5ba41b4c0ed7
d72f9e1e00c301cf11108040c03990356a4d149e
describe
'12209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYM' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
866a903228b4cf4cea5788f00081545f
9f9025f6bc5ef860620dd410a45b262c9d7131f4
describe
'186189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYN' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
5fcaf37e7b2df5c2e9289dc8b5289ee0
278e6a740a239a2bbfc74d049ec33a068d617846
describe
'203210' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYO' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
7abbd902dc9f0e438a27ccf0b3ab23b6
92cfccf669bfcc9c68a658303e18e9a6196b04d8
describe
'69234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYP' 'sip-files00193.pro'
9bca2e70c7fc72ec4caf7f2f2f701cee
6631deb9b98eb6f134767721cf46581e0c81721b
describe
'56756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYQ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
c3b482815743af851c3a0469a36714b3
1f42c3cdead1092c04c01156fda9299b8bc1a393
describe
'1501792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYR' 'sip-files00193.tif'
07ae5810718707d62c42c73295c2b9e5
a06053c33f4b862da004c6eafaf2b3dc5baa619d
describe
'2966' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYS' 'sip-files00193.txt'
f26be95a4bc67907abcac499aa864edb
295991b223b9ef9481a97259295bf85f206e4e05
describe
'12656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYT' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
8cac6bea0470a4c746af00e181b18b93
e413f6453e4205f285701b2bbbbd30a7f9004703
describe
'186398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYU' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
063ac90ffdf0ad431f069bf810959046
144ecd4413bee3b02dbdc200e09ae56247496dba
describe
'200332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYV' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
d134b83a3ec34bdf2479265c3943ed85
a891c6469cc7b26da6f4ba0ec28ec37a14bbe084
describe
'67771' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYW' 'sip-files00194.pro'
9fd704d9d9519c895fc35c7d61d784a4
6994b784479e5bbf0fc12d4e46c2082bbb35be41
describe
'56525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYX' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
6944b44932c9a6026b0619638a22f721
0c617a6a9b5e654c7c42fc2ffdfb417c7089d625
describe
'1503428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYY' 'sip-files00194.tif'
7548bf8c879c2918c35cb901dfc43bda
7725f1c97ea715ad022d504d0eac0e83d4e3bca0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASYZ' 'sip-files00194.txt'
4930d0269c87b383f02c24b296a6a857
60fb663570ca56a6c21a90454a2267aac5b98fa3
describe
'12617' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZA' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
37757f822929baa31f046476c051ad87
2c2ad4ff91ce329b9d68dee5744eff799953e81b
'2011-10-14T08:52:01-04:00'
describe
'186285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZB' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
0c98910718240ad1b614f19013c4b59f
f95b9bb9cf7e5c5a10ddfac11f83bbcbd23bf6a0
describe
'187004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZC' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
79894f40bebcbbd067cd0061fe32f3d7
52acda6a99f2fa1f1bd384e3853e8d52fde1af80
describe
'63373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZD' 'sip-files00195.pro'
f3957939c255855e10e9cb81e0941987
dfcd925a029d853e464756be8028b66826722794
describe
'53802' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZE' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
7734b73176828c9ca36dcf2c79720640
faa6065b6fe8f907f439a62249ba8d2e7222bb54
describe
'1501900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZF' 'sip-files00195.tif'
0d7793d9a848c911b3ea94c2032c9733
30f8e6e34aa489070f3c35cb944b055419c30340
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZG' 'sip-files00195.txt'
1343afa5cbe51e9c89b56861908f2a88
c81ce7c4d593ef106d845f7870ff85fe451f44b7
describe
'12434' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZH' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
34bbe5caa06eca40b6503f9462e7fcb2
01873b6db9de84abfdd151f34a8c0bd9c720a586
describe
'186444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZI' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
5db26f779679d12ff5efd3e53f69a66e
b3d82e4da4826841ed5da2ddde61e9a585e52d03
describe
'203783' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZJ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
63058d503a14e0587a49a705152c603e
3c8ad004407e32dc0e538a4be64de2a164be257a
describe
'70136' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZK' 'sip-files00196.pro'
bf7b76799eb6c7ffb8aadccfdd5c4916
a9e7c80951c899b12f5680d50529a98be54f0d2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZL' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
29af0804d25ebeeeb7e029b8aaba461a
452b50e5eec1dcf0f28b1b67e2d649b5d7ef96d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZM' 'sip-files00196.tif'
706ebf0ba014e8447996acb893d169fa
25fd146784ef458ade219785fd89608bd6758739
describe
'2945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZN' 'sip-files00196.txt'
0eba4ac4f7fc1d0f1172697bd5f13459
5e55f796e27e8497727f9adf0ef1d0f3398565f3
describe
'12603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZO' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
9b4189abac833f1ca6bf49850345b2eb
bae41b23c90252ec90858e2af71e3b57c012d25b
describe
'186286' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZP' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
9581785e9a4fe4d49c2a1657eb1eb6cb
3b88a6a553e11dc334f2dd29213aa7f592a2b8cc
describe
'200490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZQ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
629da10f06fa22a43a9ca0ac3f8b8822
693430997f8969e3c5182b6ced31c56851b15895
describe
'67696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZR' 'sip-files00197.pro'
0d73c28a3cd714e15727e38e775d7ded
6264b0c62be7716522a0e271ed53b1adef036745
describe
'55994' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZS' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
c888ff2b80f56a9e0bf2d2aa478fd002
b05bf896ec71d02fa14a2f6bb5c796057f4f8287
describe
'1501656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZT' 'sip-files00197.tif'
d430b3ea11242e4ab1b39fbdd17fc718
e20fba7c03a2912f5bcc73ab815afed2bf802699
describe
'2841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZU' 'sip-files00197.txt'
3691825897c44e1a92334f6cb5992476
cd624bc04ce0a46982a063e22af9aa653b57deb9
describe
'12418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZV' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
fd91f131522b26712b7ee5e879255955
fc825fc160587fb0ee5af0d5b6382087bab2c15f
describe
'186510' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZW' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
716b2c346466da5c3c79b376aae585ee
c3861b86051c28094139e5455c92ce82200e4b2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZX' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
9e9f9d0fe7196e7283f1559d05c903db
cd003ea2df945d38aa118c51c3feee98f59e866e
describe
'66373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZY' 'sip-files00198.pro'
fbd289a4e684d5447d76e4ca4506d26b
9cf9b33af77ac341a95a487b5daf40978b0ec56e
describe
'56809' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAASZZ' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
6ad5a88863582d943b8347b211489adc
1fc706d154a174d72b9c93ebba3af9c4301f416a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAA' 'sip-files00198.tif'
9dbeb0de474a1bbae722767d4a734411
4585cd3ca6f5a43c6ab37b3604d99cb7869a2a22
describe
'2789' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAB' 'sip-files00198.txt'
db792fa5ff7bb96bf5f09829d8b33486
b3e85d7c7efb0987c0f2795920ec7c440ce42462
describe
'12743' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAC' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
0e19a762cd601c23fa6ca6330b3951b0
464b30a1fb8d3a2a2e6a8d06806735aeedd336a9
describe
'186187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAD' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
edd81a3417ca79ffb04c045aed53f3d3
c0b8393838ac5d0a011ccb0fe1223dd40b76df9e
describe
'178639' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAE' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
a4dc32133445fa924e26f374982a6ddf
2afb5223bee55faac33cd16e0b091f93f973ff8d
describe
'60540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAF' 'sip-files00199.pro'
3c2a4e0d9fba457c1fc74bbcbf00897d
1e691a5b870d6867d8847e90054a821d6bb2295c
describe
'52945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAG' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
ba326a65d2c77f6f52dbef6f89fe7db6
eaf27950de38bab29c9d7e88c406024bb62e7d37
describe
'1501852' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAH' 'sip-files00199.tif'
7ccc0b195985fe85bee86547a12fb089
8cffdd80d6567a3f072a9cc64b63d303d101a1ca
describe
'2571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAI' 'sip-files00199.txt'
fd9d86b37524450a43122a7b547927bb
ce1e07f380d0cf10b17f92d6a2d548bb7ea8c2b3
describe
'12296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAJ' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
32efeb07358d7cfcd0c20e24fbcc423a
d27a8987aff53f483bf9ef49c35c8cfa3efbd5d5
describe
'186483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAK' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
75e0096be946f9cf76913c9d3c88f2e8
9872698969246d9e4a8e107e1a18e30e6801fede
describe
'181751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAL' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
7097b723ae249a58b12aa3e383094cf2
f29297ebd1acdb39488e23444687cc3abe8aad97
describe
'60752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAM' 'sip-files00200.pro'
8c5ed2b236867b507821a8897000d038
55f96bd337660009149d2f1be081a9fd2d9755f4
describe
'53016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAN' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
c90547652e7700e4c20d86bdf38a394f
e32bc6679f6ab3c3df889af6d18ff9e9ffddb9e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAO' 'sip-files00200.tif'
a7ff30f50e8c22f787cb81f757732827
89f576a00fd262a8f0bb686b2fb2ba904eaca7ec
describe
'2553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAP' 'sip-files00200.txt'
a27aa28707f9e5811837ec04d883f5b7
c22bb554e5fbc91555dc9c336156319bde8c8f11
describe
'11803' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAQ' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
68fdcd4821f7a1e3907d0cd1ffc07400
ea190cf6641acd79795be95b5ea045b2f02dea9a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAR' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
e28a62f8f4190ef7048f3e7448982b50
7e92600f77e8b8852c4bb8a692edee8fbbe1413c
describe
'197376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAS' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
ce836923a316cc364f0af207640cbf27
cff43d0aeb2a7629997b1783cc47a3aee6b68acc
describe
'66574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAT' 'sip-files00201.pro'
04e41d73beedc53fa9040d542aed34f3
8370ad6dd1d0ed98288d472889b40c59059eaffa
describe
'56328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAU' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
63810d33041d90b420438658edbc7215
d6d0be1a2cc8ea0a222a72dc27a778115daa0f50
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAV' 'sip-files00201.tif'
a293062aeb9d5e9a2d78880476960092
130be2f6397613fe0d162c077b56011d98640896
describe
'2792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAW' 'sip-files00201.txt'
eaa7c60a9e2fc74bb7971308f657719e
02234b640b179ed70d60697981969454fd99440c
describe
'12601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAX' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
53517f33bb0a4c223292ac7ca76b2890
f8bcf781c4ef1a3d347f056bfd6bcc0401d6bc41
describe
'186445' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAY' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
a5cebdf22b2b54a2ade18454b010494a
9bdaeccda6577be6cae5546ff84c815accce2a3e
describe
'198859' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATAZ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
6520912723edd5d12522601496df5b10
4de10e79dfeb5b74fbc3f653115a3d98ed0521db
describe
'67347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBA' 'sip-files00202.pro'
609573ac4028d36367cc329e060df363
17986cfc8c77ad724925ec08f3b09c95c4ec5711
describe
'55620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBB' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
27bcae868b5dab269c8a17da9aefc293
e059cd835dbf52d089aa0c3d06e34f258e059e09
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBC' 'sip-files00202.tif'
8a60cda172e38b736b5dab71532f2383
b0bf07d32f9c1723f939164ed6e947cbce614186
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBD' 'sip-files00202.txt'
ef3ad51c5ab6fe2189503dfc62a9c03c
99589705736ac2c43836fa1ba6f891585ad17887
describe
'12481' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBE' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
f0bd780c45929fe7bbe5da672575303b
31b31c471c96019b7e84f866e08d93d11462be98
describe
'186259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBF' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
1199563105f56eaed116c481819c2027
9fa5d0af12eef49e63a26072f4d1fe692a13a726
describe
'194543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBG' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
509ce96ab81d86bdaee07b64653912fe
43449b5122fa5227ca0f538cefe68507d74e9dd8
describe
'66634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBH' 'sip-files00203.pro'
55dc46066e45e0bb0994ef6f0895f0e9
49a47f5c19ca250c8464bef728a25332281f84d3
describe
'55487' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBI' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
e96457b5446628b7c8ff7d3c48af5a9d
0b6ea2639ee723117cc8cee082253ca03fda9ed5
describe
'1501776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBJ' 'sip-files00203.tif'
879fd46a0930d8294d8ad1d6743aa887
28ff0c69a91cbc39944261feafcd7ab52d736708
describe
'2795' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBK' 'sip-files00203.txt'
35c154d0412e96eaa1cee5bb06524791
6c74fcb98e38e7b43b2aaee08e6d2058db9ed763
describe
'12326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBL' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
8e38c8905bd74d6c9c5016c8f9e0f1dc
2b644f7b158cce057d6d108b4ab9a7aaeae72f4a
describe
'186446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBM' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
7e9ab4ae7963ad3204ed4a4f243029ec
c0f416309ad7b39a7884a7f384179593d9126fd1
describe
'200573' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBN' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
67a939381dc14ef796a0071227041547
f1099456f3d5db19d25dcf2d09d984d0b36b7f8c
describe
'68315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBO' 'sip-files00204.pro'
68821b86507472ba9ca62c7dcc688e4d
ca47fb2566f89813124eeabecd9f71afa213ee50
describe
'56693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBP' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
aa7fd857821abb24546fafd54bf00817
6563fcb12e9a5ff5b1484508ac902b83c5f13810
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBQ' 'sip-files00204.tif'
175585a2e641394a72f869a027986d8a
060eda13733f7d44ec2784a3194abd7d25ac3425
describe
'2959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBR' 'sip-files00204.txt'
b4fa76be37da55c706054d6759d6ef42
6b077a7829cfaab13a80184c344656210079034f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBS' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
f2b415dcb26a78c1a2ff2b89eb536330
f2f7b528999d55e66654d62944ddd0d1e92dd0c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBT' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
327bf7f98d35808c4455c8bfdd534255
fac1424e189a835c6e4873659b54986786a9c7af
'2011-10-14T08:53:44-04:00'
describe
'120708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBU' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
562d555cb425336ef078ecd46352a03b
0df40bc9df108a7d778d573f9fb3e7dca3773447
describe
'1976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBV' 'sip-files00205.pro'
c88d68133f91068c912560d49c2af550
52676e6a0c24ba9ea3b9e104928d28dc8bdbec1f
describe
'33280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBW' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
b9411fecaf4bf5078ee4c4c0d65523d5
f19c56d49ca47c74058a67b73ffc64340c344c30
describe
'4549516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBX' 'sip-files00205.tif'
3bba8e3035da9df4caa4d3f3df1656d0
0898a7b077160c33f87efd0569b83543ba3418b0
describe
'161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBY' 'sip-files00205.txt'
b0ae1d0e50ddbc3b4fa1d956d0dca377
31333d59afdbe165e6900249cb85a66dc445b9d3
describe
'8361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATBZ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
ae9db7e59b400cb99dd51ab177cffa68
c2edabee83343904276c9e117f37a61a94337383
describe
'186273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCA' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
51206ec11e3a00b6d5ac06ce0ced1c71
e949e2713aa6bbb65a06af9e3e714c6b3cdca237
describe
'199927' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCB' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
b599f502876a9f4fbd055cd7b6a3ec33
4b902cedd3ca98adc7a5819de92fa6bee6ee27e0
describe
'68506' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCC' 'sip-files00207.pro'
019d06eac5b28210f5af6f3e500ea245
ac3d7a7b1f45b19d0ca3660a4527215e0c551fa2
describe
'56012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCD' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
ddf9ad65c284be469247c10532d3c6de
1897f92cc1ac137200e93bd17dd350a32cf84146
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCE' 'sip-files00207.tif'
dcf7da4c1b63b184cbe813a8a98d8905
35562cc26683d4853d0ca78249c636dd3224f51c
describe
'2869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCF' 'sip-files00207.txt'
5fb51f0345ca10ae785d51942826cfef
46cd72fa8ac4652cad0bbd23a671072d89c809e1
describe
'12511' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCG' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
d86725fe97a04cbb9158e13129b9ee0e
24cdf8ab342c04ff27b4b6ad32252d63e77fd75f
describe
'186443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCH' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
e0f09fc15cb0e66b54037e3275c4bd6f
17cbe8d3897be55320609f092f0025ffd885619d
describe
'193373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCI' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
ccce59b5ff2e0054171cb8e1b71ddd6c
6083537f00b12e5d27c0b0c7e7a2f7a2ca39c364
describe
'61827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCJ' 'sip-files00208.pro'
6dfde4ca951e9d0105eed7a347e3dba0
d8eccce74b1ac2a987bb11358b82b791d0061154
describe
'55548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCK' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
f6d8231601c4ba2b8e696902daa94e2a
eddd57469175ce138db136defb63f8d84583349f
describe
'1503336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCL' 'sip-files00208.tif'
1252ce2c14680009525206cd9734c871
350aa55e93d6dbd6ba74542c86c2d237aae103cb
describe
'2601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCM' 'sip-files00208.txt'
e7ab09ab9f8e1a20597c830a6204d2b5
dbbbfa2872e6603f0ff799bac2fa77bea0916c6e
describe
'12705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCN' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
561e3c0933e62f5b7ee6ccd79ebfa4e8
69d10ddf709c803729c607318cab2d5cc62b767e
describe
'186282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCO' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
d061f0835166a8f70f6b751dbf946676
dcd333b2b0d504a9c56693124a7723780968477e
describe
'198248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCP' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
f6a3ce96f6d6b8bf733521a72cb51656
9548cee31134e7cf896bd1063b12273d8df627ad
describe
'63892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCQ' 'sip-files00209.pro'
05170d00ad2263125ea53265cd8c3e9b
91021af2d5b6aa6ccff85b7a078c0fb66b6f6849
describe
'56507' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCR' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
b5571c48993b0932937bf8c0fa2fef50
1f8fd71a1d1d7dd4ddba403a7a1624262531ceab
describe
'1502352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCS' 'sip-files00209.tif'
b68a3fe4fa8ab55f03f111832346697f
32c09409315893120a999fccbb8ee3271dec95bf
describe
'2793' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCT' 'sip-files00209.txt'
a6551c5ea5fafc3bcd889401a4eca978
0ba582c32402742fa0794b0f44a1b431e24b080c
describe
'13069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCU' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
92b7a617a580b650960f01f285f99e1a
7a70065e1b4b0201193dc816697d469e792e153e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCV' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
31cda4fcf09a236b5f81bb4443bb67cf
0c2c493b5f6d3a2f7d2b28709384dc4b5310b42d
describe
'188642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCW' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
4da45f6e1bc0f616c0d93df9bdc45dd4
7eb47226c353e5bc72936d7c60e7b111228c4cd7
describe
'64603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCX' 'sip-files00210.pro'
81880292fee96170178bb5a6500f7ff4
9d67437d68fa9880e1aa64c423bf16e120806682
describe
'54095' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCY' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
f03eaa7a0872b16db20c72477c9f003d
38954dd06ce716ee75131b773651cd2482ef85d7
describe
'1503116' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATCZ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
b2d2bcb09a9f709cb48e1acbda6dac82
565d701063fa13d094e063226e765dd50c81e00d
describe
'2685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDA' 'sip-files00210.txt'
f2551a148d1a418c0442bf160126de17
320b972d9b243275f6bfeed5914ea2bf46102568
describe
'12284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDB' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
01fe797e0e184c7e632cd7498952a6ed
491b13ada103e226ea5e1b4fe3304558ded305fe
describe
'186129' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDC' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
cc890f4ccdfa45045b0661c05d4c5350
efc45664ea90cb68bf57ec29c9c90b9588eee6fd
describe
'193517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDD' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
cb1da0073c438f5b848e82d97aaf9bc6
76ac29974b4572927d593a6a4f2ffb9b39460d6b
describe
'66194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDE' 'sip-files00211.pro'
70f22309e990b55125d069fce4274b05
85e62b2cffa5d5b1a649e501dde4768029a789c5
describe
'55148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDF' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
66b0365b75079701c29cc6e5422528f2
4120ccdc9170610402f57ff7964f73b191c5b423
describe
'1501760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDG' 'sip-files00211.tif'
24d8f1a3649bb36c6a3417998966566e
ccad20d81f87add743405a13c091bdfc37a64b2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDH' 'sip-files00211.txt'
9f4504984c775f21cb414cb8547fa623
e8d1d8e300e6551eaa7ae8b280a41aa9e3fff3e5
describe
'12488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDI' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
039c5625e016f71f7a3629b07a6ba845
1aca5b88e69258a375bae3479b6e8171e964d13a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDJ' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
c688586e854715947cded7ddc2d70f87
e705f174c3e138a648aa7accc752aed4629e82d4
describe
'190445' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDK' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
a0a33cfaa5cf6eb822e3dd319349c1a1
b212650066c320874ae393ace3dad23cd02f4d8a
describe
'64931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDL' 'sip-files00212.pro'
d89384737821cb074ac668ac147964cd
f435fd02c300d166988c3e5001b8abc94bfc2986
describe
'54887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDM' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
c3cdd9abe2bbf68c25f35bde2cdc5aed
e9bbe4f3a24cdfa72d9e13c3d017bd67a05f6582
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDN' 'sip-files00212.tif'
e6c5d2500d276885295dd89fa981c627
3bc308419741b605f932b3276329165ab5d40ba5
describe
'2738' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDO' 'sip-files00212.txt'
b1fa3df1ce09a1d6b615780b71796ec7
b2f1505d21752b0bb3f4aa1314ef38c2f4bd814b
describe
'12426' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDP' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
698060d25f660e7e8a4d532f76b9703e
68aa4c5b2ec5a0ae0a5c7a462ce2784806417f7a
describe
'186330' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDQ' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
f11cacaf385bead74b3072c3ccdab59d
e90928b9bb52ead29ba8ade369c4d5aa421936a6
describe
'182065' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDR' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
c39f8ca390ce61dbd74194dcaf09656c
c8448be7b56dc773ffd7c1eecf91d2d61188cf4e
describe
'59725' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDS' 'sip-files00213.pro'
c5af21f0d3351751968a80e67bfc5a8a
a12f82fd0b1f1ab12500195ee78b5ef2eeb792d0
describe
'52768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDT' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
cd4620ddaa1f79515eaf3c6a4e2d7f92
2a301e8f58158b8a55b33e55408da209b96c2ae9
describe
'1501800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDU' 'sip-files00213.tif'
65c6d67619d5622319359657452ce78a
abc09c71068e718824b2d4d78235c9e30288f705
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDV' 'sip-files00213.txt'
f93bce64e4cd3b4f700046068afb0d90
5107c0339e266415f0cad708ea36d5077ca22ef1
describe
'12004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDW' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
70d8222804b33690e6980fef70b68d88
2dc80dac11846b5b5fe8242a1a3e8b97a6f6157b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDX' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
fd1a64ed831dd9d408a07d8dd54eb53e
0d36273ec2cb4fc06500b69173e1bfdf21d179f2
describe
'191919' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDY' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
d126e576b8733e8baf21e486a0ea3aff
c4c53f78917be2df15476438590e8b8dc7067067
describe
'66448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATDZ' 'sip-files00214.pro'
eb9df23dc54963812b25da6fcbc2ca44
8108c1ede54a6f5bfca7084f6dc5ec6cd94e5202
describe
'53505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEA' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
8d7f6197604ee46590801bd3677c97e7
ba55ea50d834b452bcba520955d5472f2e1372f3
describe
'1502888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEB' 'sip-files00214.tif'
841438ef877460c7bcd35391e9723577
018b405c445fb5984593930a8e58ed03f45c41d7
describe
'2771' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEC' 'sip-files00214.txt'
8f30f0b158970aa29f627495e8d22a79
71f7e8d256c9d83d27bc1538eae6463d134849ed
describe
'11828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATED' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
83bb4461ce04285998b4fe9541de5357
b50647795b22e3aac32131a6b9229e57d879cb7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEE' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
7d0a3770f3a27c864a5d9322ede8f491
d063e75f1290b1b59687f3449ba2ba19db01d575
describe
'202325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEF' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
cde97858475e4e51fd81a9001d635e39
5d6601b74b2c2ef5bd4186384df4f7f5d3667b21
describe
'69441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEG' 'sip-files00215.pro'
3b5cf0619805f08487a59b8c60df9cf3
6e14673138a2f4d77aa042ce7e94faa08fde039d
describe
'57041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEH' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
07871caba99dd65399a435c8c213df91
2b3e8646bf05d2a68dbf52d774f9fb6414272c0d
describe
'1503084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEI' 'sip-files00215.tif'
ac3e9370d0ed057ec2059d1c16785a3d
a97d7a3378abf15a005d1103af386893707ca5e5
describe
'2900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEJ' 'sip-files00215.txt'
bf5ed818e7c5da48ac3351f29b25cab1
3f8b94a2e2ee1b2d2837388ecdebab5ca8854bfc
describe
Invalid character
'12276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEK' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
7de94af1b0ae5b0bfe0a6e853a26f03b
08c572c6a710d425e3d0ee7138751a2ecce7b538
describe
'186395' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEL' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
bfe591005ffd0fd658c65015d2833048
91a119638a0c4a511a345b626fd7387a28c882b3
describe
'195721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEM' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
f3ec6c67d10950b372f92d3ea87fb6dd
5c0b0f85633926358e47b4b4e5ec44f6fdf6351f
describe
'66202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEN' 'sip-files00216.pro'
222b9d0b93b90b5ac9f5a081f2c91668
fdc592798688c7a02817a3e8de31e70307b9e31e
describe
'55464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEO' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
bb6dee3c648ddf27ea43d5959e0d2d5c
08e5307eb534ff7d302cddca245089406893cd2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEP' 'sip-files00216.tif'
b8ec63275bb80c5fb18338279dac096c
4473119f140825dd17e50f89920efd465b17043b
describe
'2778' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEQ' 'sip-files00216.txt'
56cc3022afd8162c3f04afe562e062f4
ad6270a6515e1f69a65145ddf2aa74837b068d7e
describe
'12238' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATER' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
24d6ca0ec9b8e44b1e20888618c36d86
299ad07f13885714e9375bfe651efc8ef0a0f8fe
describe
'186299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATES' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
0ca989361d7597dafe84dae1a765f869
a8919b79c4f386eccc1ff7318f5549f5836ccd3d
describe
'185781' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATET' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
7dfeaf7b6590650fd999e74f6182e538
c89db500a172982e063cfdccd5a6243fd3f1a1a9
describe
'62701' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEU' 'sip-files00217.pro'
6b487e9f2455d7dc5410a0a907ec4c16
46417f1f882684576a6128da043efd748eb84d52
describe
'53017' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEV' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
e79a426d99148688bf45bcce1fd50487
2e0e1dc91a8f0e4706876a2956eeec94b628e113
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEW' 'sip-files00217.tif'
78fe82a28b7e351889814abc60a5fef6
a16f61ea091edea605aaad22752104f2a3f853fb
describe
'2637' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEX' 'sip-files00217.txt'
789d1518e15173a8254838a8dbf5533e
b1a1a787f78ca8bcfe81c6202e2a883e16172209
describe
'12232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEY' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
c69d546a6a91201934440f94e2e3c91a
f947f490d631180b2f923f2ab2de86a353b273d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATEZ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
b83c0da03911abb9b8f933f4360537f6
f69e8419c5cc757febf5cba9d8ddd2f0066ebcce
describe
'185719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFA' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
2d7809113e1aac8dc2c8ed70186cae31
c7b6c472f8500d8edf8ace644e0ffdee6d18c04d
describe
'64862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFB' 'sip-files00218.pro'
a5cb28f4423702055294b67549c5a1b3
210901a42ee11dfd636dd965d54c5c82501fac3f
describe
'52231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFC' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
e577a3ccccb85ea4d3c3b8e638e2f3e8
e784d5ce10788608c07d37657352715b2d63e630
describe
'1502780' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFD' 'sip-files00218.tif'
81a45ce3d2e22bbad3fd54d655c8ed35
205860fa97a8ed13203026d3783e0c912084a730
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFE' 'sip-files00218.txt'
20f259639c95c18f86508df3dc4a9294
e78f18952580b2a6f997d025715e5d9e2fc4e0ab
describe
'11592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFF' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
de442ab35953b81749dc297620fbb350
f15e255155c650b8c731bdbe79c5a8c8927d92e7
'2011-10-14T08:51:46-04:00'
describe
'189204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFG' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
a78f7ce5a93253e58188bee40fbe0643
ca44704a4ac6b65aacda6407a1990938d6c99c97
describe
'196974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFH' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
942acab607bbe71ec595d78288c383e9
0e29f2d6c99e8cd85a4a94a21939685466551df2
describe
'68446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFI' 'sip-files00219.pro'
295e93e9ca794a43e25efeea26d873da
f7157c400489c37917813a71f86caf441ecd6fb8
describe
'54587' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFJ' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
591ecd385d20b22442b9921f9ad020db
6c4395df595e283c9d89c9aa5143a4a2d4bfe93a
describe
'1524912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFK' 'sip-files00219.tif'
c3c601183d4c7761d6d4711409450cfa
a832964613d9cdc00789cfe03eb8c3d239d01b7f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFL' 'sip-files00219.txt'
fcf9bf7044a3a85debdf44f257a4b19f
af0ff67df5da9bc234866022797e9f84f6c619d0
describe
'12174' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFM' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
9d9d9141880406d5a8306c2d5b335992
b165e24f68ccb8f2799cf41486f59a92aa7e8fcd
describe
'186481' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFN' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
f56f3cdc8ddb9f113efb110408ede27e
26422e1db1ee7eb7db5444d0f1295aba849bc44c
describe
'206174' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFO' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
4ed5068515def5b07358a98c520c51d7
bd6a1c297cfff02cbfe4f84d248012768fe338b3
describe
'68906' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFP' 'sip-files00220.pro'
ad8bfc9933c18318c195e7258800a6c9
15b5ceb2d4eb8e40da4c11fb01540562bd9a26fd
describe
'58606' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFQ' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
d5abf1e23fe650cbe6e34d1657d179f1
9b091e4fc5f6ec8b27afdfdd628e864e5f11b6c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFR' 'sip-files00220.tif'
dfa7cfb66c4af7d67cbecb808a0a9330
d8ab4bc42b4cb25b5c94fed274357c9628a8aca4
describe
'2857' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFS' 'sip-files00220.txt'
4dc339c295e8428960daa19f92acd333
3fb65adc6a54636e16df92c6c69f9489c3db5e73
describe
'12682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFT' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
f2598c9a525eed32406b0a5f991fa9a4
b73716857f926c398301a8bc0572d5a516e9078f
describe
'186185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFU' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
1cc598bdd56785f6b9a8e36e86201126
28191938c079ef663741812c8a6f79d62cee35c3
describe
'185464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFV' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
26b6b17bc8539e742d67b97723cdfc4b
fc08170918a2ab3944f6f02ef097f2db90dc8f04
describe
'61041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFW' 'sip-files00221.pro'
3893f7828da420d668849ae98bede6a6
75f7a57b9347e1e9e7559f85a910d5bbde547b92
describe
'53640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFX' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
e552404c8c310af04be772e33d730618
dbc9d9ca6a5004efac951ab05c3ecaf1906cf44d
describe
'1501940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFY' 'sip-files00221.tif'
4375fc3c11cf41be780542bde525b745
e4dd350f76b67bcb7a9efcec9e7230d70168a233
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATFZ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
fc8b567f37266c0902dec3b2b2ce3558
0f47207fca7795951bbbe2bd17363d5d0604de74
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGA' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
2b39aab7259bb2bb0511b6362b2cd609
d5190165747f60bff747dba5db3a158209c791a2
describe
'186373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGB' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
c997f0d32960b6abe4ded479db07d596
50a2c86ab472146679046558f8ccbe52d4bb9955
describe
'207883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGC' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
6a14f29356cd7fb9981ee2d0e32d8a03
377a9a99b8ed0f9b339abb2b6f97de823872655b
describe
'70700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGD' 'sip-files00222.pro'
d81fbfcb6693ee19220e3970da1cdf0c
61f1f270acf90792b02b49d86a2ca170cc18fc08
describe
'56679' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGE' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
3d1d1de1411e4b3097dff9b288de8f43
08364f685ffb724e792679ccc768cf5d2e54a664
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGF' 'sip-files00222.tif'
a28da8785dcb4886c4b3720c2009b81c
bacd53724b8301d4271d0931bd80679607443ad9
describe
'2935' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGG' 'sip-files00222.txt'
18acf648c89fea5c1d6c462c4edd3ded
4a156e43f3aadd2ef4b58ced873c77661c9d2b85
describe
'12304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGH' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
01471e7e70e34ad137db65f9a18bf6e6
84818a96fcb7d0f5a9b582974d90928888bfd005
describe
'191368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGI' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
cc5cb09735083887ac8341aa711c3c8d
7cef3a6090e3cc9456bad6f80fab6843502a187f
describe
'194978' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGJ' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
de51962d9429b5b3c9c069820eb4f415
f593577763d31731597dc87311ca484f1676c3c2
describe
'70271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGK' 'sip-files00223.pro'
661467fd57e223edca26f5aee18971e6
ec4104a065a5e6ba5cdcc5fcd39de9870f34067a
describe
'53182' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGL' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
9bc522e1486f1eb5ba2da2d72a603b88
18b1d442432df8e757fe5329b9dea6b9973d5a67
describe
'1542040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGM' 'sip-files00223.tif'
f691e2169ccab71c11f0f539ca72777f
3fd253028e9c66d7a9845c892a9b1ab2fb0c49f2
describe
'2931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGN' 'sip-files00223.txt'
5863a47454e1f172354b36529b80b48c
726e69849ac41e9c8167453c23f23fe97aa33378
describe
'11808' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGO' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
ab880c6f07a3e804ae0545a911542076
3a748e48e2293c00c6ea74efcab375d2a4755d15
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGP' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
7b5d4bccf89d860c48b11febafe6588f
db5c2b68360fdcfd80d0874ebc8f1e0ffe5cd935
describe
'200487' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGQ' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
b888c6d915d1f14fc8f8820db7bde88d
f32a8cf9bff6f0b62c5b85733c8c465ce1f9530b
describe
'67465' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGR' 'sip-files00224.pro'
76bca9f6ee846050203de89980574b2f
088f64a240f44d6115bd3285324845317f4cb063
describe
'56784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGS' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
42595c4011e0fd32560a37fad7933c57
b615937a90b1d7ab1cdaffe519605d883346f645
describe
'1503120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGT' 'sip-files00224.tif'
ca389737084e169f15c70e6e94a27124
23c161e51e3c6bf8ba65be1f7fe26d9785d54286
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGU' 'sip-files00224.txt'
23d3c4fca3244f986b7738b3985398d6
e9e65eb577c31dc90f04d0c9b8dc261bf80e7997
describe
'12781' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGV' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
d621a4f0c97959059e4590b92cfc723e
3a2f53606f088f576042f1c0ed7471fd3e161c44
describe
'186249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGW' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
fc97dfbe34a5eb7f51c6da832861a63e
f300775b19f1f239772222f44aa592554fb3905c
describe
'206800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGX' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
d96a06b65e45febe6ce8a6ccc6eda436
2edc9f52f11db28b252427150998b4f3799c92a2
describe
'69073' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGY' 'sip-files00225.pro'
e87ae8ead35e9085ec935e1c136b88f5
df5fad0be6e85c0e3c2cdcc46fa8e901928849c8
describe
'57766' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATGZ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
ea037846699bc184f588c88a760da30b
d25364385cff8d52abafe3140150f869e5263c9b
describe
'1502180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHA' 'sip-files00225.tif'
31d92c688c4d2c8162320d983e336db7
777a45e3e41bed786576bdf68aac3f1ad9c7abd6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHB' 'sip-files00225.txt'
dab791b7461ce19c248a680e32140355
31f3e030f217b256d6fa1e328bfd2d5a8a434a46
describe
'13093' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHC' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
8ec68687dcaf86d48aca180ed16a1e6b
b8184966fef5e98c785ef6ba580439b88f79974e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHD' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
e51cf7c6dc7fdadaba31c91bb8e9c84f
a9085dbf2077042374b222a0b0769deec18e99d6
describe
'212127' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHE' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
f793ff55e7935e4a3c492d0eb0c3f9fc
89830e90319df77d8fb06c2a443e64cb44a04a48
describe
'73665' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHF' 'sip-files00226.pro'
3382f2c15013c412af225dbc2463fc92
440bf604e6703274f633cd73fb7eb79027899656
describe
'59307' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHG' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
b871aded22abd5c7f7f6224bfbc3c175
4ae08b8a06a250ca66f24fa8bc4091859efbc067
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHH' 'sip-files00226.tif'
0d6940fd77993d8ec08e50b7ba551b47
e3e1ae2899168f0ab6ebb2cc192cfb737eebbbc8
describe
'3050' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHI' 'sip-files00226.txt'
8fc2995df0113699f229d457da7605df
03098d3e1b351e7a9430648436ec5d90397a92df
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHJ' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
013210b7839c71aa86dbeeee98ee4d8f
258716ff799190e6d2992b168b1f1cb2b430b34b
describe
'186358' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHK' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
c2c74e71c6da0713d274a50d6e48626b
e0f7a6fe8a0751109e9c3769f7806384d1995b67
describe
'210730' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHL' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
48b00bb1a312f0f5a4c846ca4be06f36
b23ce3410b61b4f947499d2bb67e53243a059906
describe
'71509' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHM' 'sip-files00227.pro'
e9dd7d6c0143912dc1ac225acf7b8aca
99573b14371c03335ed33fd846695ab78783c592
describe
'59710' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHN' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
781375c20c2be595e61fd4223eb1d09e
163eadd0498eed1a3095733f9ee2ab80f6e722c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHO' 'sip-files00227.tif'
60b194c8a30a88b10a00a5d861f72dba
f40a4a07e3658cd2bdfda0ff61316c7c8a37ffad
'2011-10-14T08:50:38-04:00'
describe
'3035' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHP' 'sip-files00227.txt'
68cc9eae260bd40e3b8cd2d1d836c157
39e37dcc692d3cb2a1365e597e73035a4962b445
describe
'13151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHQ' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
2708248845c1bff685e566705137a54c
ebe43af623291221cf9b8043fdcf832caabcd2a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHR' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
f5260173dc43dd9eaf63b939f94a0e8c
854810fe27137a9bf56d86b138eb4595301e4dde
describe
'210534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHS' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
661acf01be38940821a0541d88f7cb34
2430b33e90c09347ec7e587f9f155bb088024684
describe
'70585' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHT' 'sip-files00228.pro'
b9823815df4841598c9a4011c85186e9
9cd87d10e08bc1246d63da2e2e1e66f9a39185f2
describe
'59744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHU' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
589057ae1a1f18e15d15de0ee4687547
c568f9d86151dfac35dc6889b856a5ab8e0146ec
describe
'1503832' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHV' 'sip-files00228.tif'
391ac5094f754900622d2efa9bab3265
818313c975eb5ee6a98c8fafb3b3690f18afe5ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHW' 'sip-files00228.txt'
a20fc5e0839107cf30b2c7978fd37b8f
5059c7d2175964c266d1d055f527a2991547ee0e
describe
'13366' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHX' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
b78fce72462586a763e37efac03a756b
0080a3c368593df97be286e91c480a8c14249f0d
describe
'186482' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHY' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
7e142d4bda1974afa851a24720e20829
a369fb5625da0d362c2febaaa5f2fadf94f0a39e
describe
'206006' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATHZ' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
81743e0281a54303e6570225394dfd81
b5d821b4e97920f4b319316a5cbaad8e13b128d2
describe
'69655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIA' 'sip-files00229.pro'
ab78639a1b99acdc54ffe1cf0bc41d23
8b508a6c865d8f4d49f89c5cee5028ff815796e3
describe
'58027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIB' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
b656737e0b21a97998e7d5fcc0961107
b9437c963e67a6d399ad6b60089b439e26f0c3f4
describe
'1503644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIC' 'sip-files00229.tif'
d9ce65272bb562891042e33021b95c5b
6f45313b02e49d1b5e6105b07dfd86f4b7e38de7
describe
'2909' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATID' 'sip-files00229.txt'
b188064541aaad272ed6a607249061e6
9c30e5c48032346fc53eb0867e30f58d861be6c2
describe
'13085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIE' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
dfe62597c6fa3b558e705057783cddf2
c6966073316e5797bfbd195d4f176d3030e44c92
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIF' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
0ad1ebcd3cc74db182cdd850581dedf1
2f443d88ebafe88e6f746d0e8d31847d7def35e6
describe
'201683' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIG' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
db60f78544cf565702a701995a866d77
3d9f84d0c9449dbded2181ce38b3fd88f6946dbd
describe
'68271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIH' 'sip-files00230.pro'
94235bb8b2c66b40cbe80a1ab1817da5
bcee5af111aded0a0fb5502178c01e149e0d5d64
'2011-10-14T08:53:21-04:00'
describe
'56910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATII' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
5565e7000f0eec42ef98c2c620ec11cb
a9b0353a0ed80a7aeeb4ce8826786d1d827c3376
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIJ' 'sip-files00230.tif'
15ca399bf006ad7bfd8fb7f602dca4b9
a5e06ec02b8d2d829710ea1b16ec30ea687c2159
describe
'2848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIK' 'sip-files00230.txt'
9d3e4d2f2055e41cfcacb513f09355ba
c9b660a68864f3707015b182460a540a1bf11007
describe
'12876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIL' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
f466ab95b881048b6a9788733b56eea0
7b7d6d3d7ca5ad2d237a52e93f599c8d58fa7f57
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIM' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
4281005bee520663ba0666cfe5fb30d6
cb4c874945e6dc763cfe9f02060ec3d3054f0fa9
describe
'206045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIN' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
c4b04a5262726d0b8de8e708feaa57c2
3622779d3eaece02fb7394e5b9410389ce83c948
describe
'70732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIO' 'sip-files00231.pro'
c206b20cd07eeac9bb90416ee0539bfc
40145a94c26635f197e559d8513e442bd08128cc
describe
'57365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIP' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
f9481c5fa2d85fc326c88debd4e2a2de
0b3f3d7842ee0c4a284fcd7a6034f9ce5b255fd0
describe
'1502928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIQ' 'sip-files00231.tif'
2878cecb10ca813e5007efeab26cbef9
81263bd9c3f68a1b943156469eb62503502ee907
describe
'2946' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIR' 'sip-files00231.txt'
933fe71b26e38aaf97268d2294d4459f
e64027268aa5e5141085dd76b80a91887b402739
describe
'12508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIS' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
777343b36ea0773e75924b5151df1585
5a2f7a12d8413f0925960b31fcd7942b3bfbffac
'2011-10-14T08:56:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIT' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
fba427d44cf4f78112d16e47c83a045d
e13b09f02d787145dabbf77e38ff95d1b77db27a
describe
'190798' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIU' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
b24243efc4aa686c7c495735d1dc906d
b6377d128c463642e30e662b5de0ee3c0ce10298
describe
'64651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIV' 'sip-files00232.pro'
54b0ad43b195d4fefc6b0778aabdd24b
54b920a063b7373b44af1185aca48d96f4f19037
describe
'54548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIW' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
783f11dca89a33923b606e9908de0b02
aeeaed05e8ca6c3a4bf228252e8503349aed47a0
describe
'1503448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIX' 'sip-files00232.tif'
9bf56c8c52f6699d53e2f4e41fc6efad
a0560a11adc5ec671369419b2a88ce81619e14da
describe
'2699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIY' 'sip-files00232.txt'
a825783417e0f9163ee48c5f4c05d0c5
e648a662ef5e1a7d1b3b0c6c202ad931444a0d5e
describe
'12157' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATIZ' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
b6c598037a5df5d05cb6bdfca28ee7de
e6bbe7b22226244ffc873379b46369747c647a11
describe
'186289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJA' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
ba86e279c6a035198f9d89373f75e72f
e541bcf908088064292f1b38d7a6d959c6ff2272
describe
'174983' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJB' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
28256c36a52bcb216fdb342e172b2045
ed104adae26c6082a255776c9c24c1349cecac84
describe
'58742' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJC' 'sip-files00233.pro'
334e2246d7fa58f57b8441ddc3aa266e
a455246e11a4cda2919532df9564cda1bd2572ce
describe
'51231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJD' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
3ffc1631770feca5ee7de1ba4597664b
b432d03ee06fec0cf0ad16afa4d03ba9c664e9ed
describe
'1501928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJE' 'sip-files00233.tif'
5a5b0177ab5b6763921314bccb350859
8b9dfc2c8b26584cd8e6c977b5279470e224dedd
describe
'2513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJF' 'sip-files00233.txt'
495d8df73e11d1492d7ad88df1efaf36
05a8e37de8ca8ef1411c1c6009c4149f34a19f35
describe
'12282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJG' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
05f8fc05eed83587d01e5af41a51af6b
bc662727678b81399640e4775735738ce8931aea
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJH' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
10b3dd7865ca6b5915b12ecccb968711
e55ae25a82831aeba3fd9eab29bc9a9ec008a2ca
describe
'170179' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJI' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
b7cc9f1b3fd6f010c24763925e329b7d
e20518dd2bcd2736daefa4fa5fad4f99362a1dc9
describe
'57442' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJJ' 'sip-files00234.pro'
94dd7916077194c8f41c66efc9b94b49
012c16d5dfe96c20d406c9f96f332b3290c8d6aa
describe
'50482' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJK' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
9c1f39636e5bc56476db719c1a5caa4d
73f0d4f539678c9a9df9abf87563ab038d95c719
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJL' 'sip-files00234.tif'
38339d7b25112fc5cc01ba531e041f08
99b534622be47188be1e15d4cee85d0cd9082d3d
describe
'2437' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJM' 'sip-files00234.txt'
d8cfc7ea8be7dcb9fbbf4639c2f819b7
8ad87635322f01604be93d7f1f800fc02cb9031a
describe
'11587' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJN' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
b6efbcc0a0c1e472f377d8e8fdc2de04
d7374112e228e6bf5bdde088178efc2d02fb1277
describe
'186155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJO' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
06a594112a694aeacf430f4b47847c63
fa5c55748ed0325a9190d85584fc3f8086a2f005
describe
'200963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJP' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
eb085bdea3cdc32fb3fe522e445e6006
d32b4084a3d0ea49293cf863af95d79b4a41c8ee
describe
'67415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJQ' 'sip-files00235.pro'
8c4bb4fd18d62c491d5cdf479e8e43c5
a16613888af94af4416fe1ef8ef3c137b3c019b0
describe
'56361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJR' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
16f85e265a12d44285c8474540747964
b03f7ceca93ba4d68978e382a06cb50e12fb5974
describe
'1501956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJS' 'sip-files00235.tif'
603e8bb2e092f83dfdc3720f58f4df3b
81bbce9ae24be88c288399cec45aebe15ab67381
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJT' 'sip-files00235.txt'
0210f8ce67ff6dcd291efd962f524e36
bb05c7bf1ecc77b229dfb11cd42666ca068cfdff
describe
'12729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJU' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
c1b78fc4f9d65891ffd0f7ba704263ba
5b985e4e5503ec22be2087c16c16fb19df58fa58
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJV' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
1b64d8f63defa453a9b795538e10bc69
7057c4d968da77c4362f095ec6c7c8027eef43fd
'2011-10-14T08:54:38-04:00'
describe
'197025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJW' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
755e39a6d8d0a38bf23ecc4cf871843f
a5d9f0d8584a9ef813cf4cf66c3b3ad847cae239
describe
'66113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJX' 'sip-files00236.pro'
98b202a5088d99a4dacfc11048cb00b3
625ffcd1240576ff89cdc19e42584afdf1c71c25
describe
'56885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJY' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
ca0800a3c022782941ee972090288715
df960513132ac7ea72871f17f736ba5b292270d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATJZ' 'sip-files00236.tif'
1863b0d461b5fc66db28b172f35a3c2c
f28db4559a4eebd9cf0d4867824b97e5ed3f1863
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKA' 'sip-files00236.txt'
849bdc88bacebbd357d7ddb75577e310
5f4e02cc49cc990508f3c4cfb98d60ee76cb0f49
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKB' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
ccaea728b4aefc24793fada889592c73
2c2092bdc4597f6e916f1345d941b37ef6f35509
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKC' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
884d0db26dec08156b5fb18680d3b291
2a5912e36ee18b209d6e9fc45e024c6bfe1935e5
describe
'202041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKD' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
eca40525cbd877ce04c46e8b73437618
9f93fe4bffa569db80a7f73cb6dca873623f9d63
describe
'68105' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKE' 'sip-files00237.pro'
efe42cac4cee28602c42adffba10e7a4
12e8ddc19dda308b819cc197b9afebb6a8e82690
describe
'56909' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKF' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
0c8b65769c6486cfd7ef25685f017801
c86d93309128e83c5cce3c75eae06ccc289a82a2
describe
'1503512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKG' 'sip-files00237.tif'
0b349dab28973202c2ba69619b8e89ea
6ca608e780998b982559a5212ec62a2161d6a771
describe
'2885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKH' 'sip-files00237.txt'
3e499631a0ce0c7e6789acb879f649a9
eeee2e3521f248cb0c40db174d09a6592d508aef
describe
'12669' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKI' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
8291a2bf064d674839e6b12d6ece08c7
83390d6ffcbc94a41f327b1d29c8219b8062b34c
describe
'186333' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKJ' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
fdd24133124bfc0c69166b9ea8c98df6
59e831fe3f547506a5ede6362427640c10d82f5f
describe
'200904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKK' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
6b4fdcfe142e8c72bea14c680a830539
bb9f298769113602193173c39ff46872526a8df6
describe
'68434' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKL' 'sip-files00238.pro'
4d266faab5c38aebbc891127dcbde0f5
5c4bd0235e7c5f285c95660c0b945e2fb718efb5
describe
'55897' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKM' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
c143f003d7c3392241a9a063fe217b41
7e0ee924538974d0b749cd24651afc971a7d3fbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKN' 'sip-files00238.tif'
ba90b537c6d772ec47fd81754ce6adf2
85d484e31b5dfb7cb4753c5fd78300533458730a
describe
'2850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKO' 'sip-files00238.txt'
e99f57a65fc3f55925f35aec6360e55c
59790140ecd697a8a431c9887ae975cde963e584
describe
'12363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKP' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
0cdafe3011daf4cf615d9bdec31fa240
0beae6209781c02f026933db3b177848311c0755
describe
'190592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKQ' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
7d52ba0e140a15a807ea2c9674b95d3c
c8e920cfaba6fa99393fce0546efe9ff9b8b27ae
describe
'123477' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKR' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
8923bb96fdc684593f1f352ff7bc5c9d
c35e8d976de90ae6741e73a15c051555c62e2553
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKS' 'sip-files00239.pro'
d1a31d96a85bad61c5e67e42712efa85
1b982b612c1d991d00c639cdce232077b1676b59
describe
'33120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKT' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
4406b89ed87077c82957311962a66e33
9057370c598b988a1d701c3a7f5f43dbf4f9044b
describe
'4586516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKU' 'sip-files00239.tif'
158a8f4a8aee6aaabd6d2eaf5b3aac83
6e296205c5d799fe85034469ab48cf9cbb49f263
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKV' 'sip-files00239.txt'
f65acfbd923d59b43875683c148a8e57
afebbd9acd5c3d9f60e50045b66fc49c21bd6d5f
describe
'8416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKW' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
e571d725410277afe6b37c50152bbe7a
1bf9a5610eed7d4ee6c7bf5c7f514368f25d9ebc
describe
'189914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKX' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
d876aa670c528b99cdeeadd71fff53a0
ba70e85f5580e22b1b981e8fb9760f81f291c803
describe
'188979' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKY' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
94b1abd3e09e9e7920b735d1dad4f432
6db10aa84c601c5da5157cf781ce2e634d3e08d3
describe
'64951' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATKZ' 'sip-files00241.pro'
8c1e76be549f203458380c955d959dae
0578a8e5113de25104e1f338888d735d10e3527d
describe
'53094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLA' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
39206aa54e5a0362a834df6403bd27e3
a16304633e3110524b5db4abb2e094c907c697ab
describe
'1530924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLB' 'sip-files00241.tif'
2851128cbe7599b703ee46b76edb526c
df44445a34eb15ac1d5c221c1c462f96116307bb
describe
'2755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLC' 'sip-files00241.txt'
5fa447e2f09945f42a772ef12791e4c1
b9782a0811ee94dff7e592ff4311e43a6a6226ad
describe
'12327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLD' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
2b04455ceff0550c0cfea2e4d31cf656
a77e9b156fd68047cffcc24c8fb056e9eeebd704
describe
'186461' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLE' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
9e086ef57e8987b76ef963ca1592fbff
ccc3119ea3d621386401441d20b2646c64c82f5e
describe
'192497' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLF' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
d7cfab4d39856c20679c852488bac543
9a2dc5a538048fb9d1ae47bed0480d46ee9ea9d0
describe
'64787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLG' 'sip-files00242.pro'
028cf2e39fed1a875a0009f9c5f13e41
2550499bd609483eb4c18f3fdb412e56621519c9
describe
'56737' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLH' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
fac7a058e29e00e0ef584034aa88d7eb
68ccd56b7bc90be728163b2c0aa6dddd8016b2f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLI' 'sip-files00242.tif'
16a1a8e827bcf77a60e72be93ab79db4
b665f4e490250f6b5aaa9a5727de17cec587e9a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLJ' 'sip-files00242.txt'
4fd69092939e13f0f268c2fc9785e4a3
ef8438a60946216b8081984215f2660b56132b9b
describe
'12798' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLK' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
381f017deac9730f5f798d03e89d40b5
0d410fae2cda509d3e8a672bf718d29478cbd768
describe
'186408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLL' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
f5dbb96a2ce70312b4618ee5ed8d589e
293c435f9245cb75fd036b4438b1de58bd54ab8a
describe
'204327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLM' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
c7529c33a37be4dc1c2b917bb1f95ca5
9c74e100ad87705e1da0d35adbde0e935d9341d4
describe
'69525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLN' 'sip-files00243.pro'
d1487d0153fd22884f61d3051cb8160e
81db0f555201be61e5029ce1eb2685e8e7bc5349
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLO' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
c851c50b20628cc33d63e0f23e1015c3
69225004feba4bcde9108bb2a1e4b8a2049b77ee
describe
'1503376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLP' 'sip-files00243.tif'
df7ff5fb5e1130148c32e506b7da5663
6733139a9bf4b07db06ae7a137cb5206f08a0338
describe
'2914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLQ' 'sip-files00243.txt'
1c2d93f8f2ef99cd167c36d74ee5424a
edb9618befdb86322c5aeb631c50aa9e7f6746b4
describe
'12805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLR' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
20b2d1c5876c0ef1570e0022ae931d2f
7b53f7f7ba78422111d39ff1285885d639200ca5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLS' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
ce12fa40e1f58b31d9cb4f810e600dec
4432f7330f690172baf2793d5a4e0e03b86442d1
describe
'198812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLT' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
a882940f6a211e945e07cdff6447427c
573ccc0b030b3bb5316163b8c759e3e2502cd128
'2011-10-14T08:50:51-04:00'
describe
'68422' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLU' 'sip-files00244.pro'
4c0be78bb10460a46e42e09f6fca687c
b7a2d5e529543015086cbe37e8f0fa34c981f2dc
describe
'55925' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLV' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
f1908b64ecdbfdef0c30d15fedf29edd
ab2c2c29392b57c2bb05fb795e82b5a33e46c89b
describe
'1503152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLW' 'sip-files00244.tif'
099bc684d39734207bb25e9b0d6e5c11
14789dee34e4bd202e4e6abe5f519a08b90d685a
describe
'2842' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLX' 'sip-files00244.txt'
0cb26261fe6e51fab14906feea975c4a
dcc045d332c2ee22f23cfc363d49abb3836cd27d
describe
'12371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLY' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
e1a881633822199dd77e6f94ab1e8a67
790dc609dbbedab010a9650c155169cb97548f09
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATLZ' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
7918a558711e324522eb90a311a4a9e9
deecb280c618d96c7d9654a1036897157b65ed10
describe
'193132' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMA' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
1397888490ab2c506201a2e67c336c8c
6b15fbf64153563e02c407cfaa1a92bcd5d3941a
describe
'67241' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMB' 'sip-files00245.pro'
6811ba9298f052d916562a0ee328df0c
59814aaeb0cfd3f02ffe902c7955ffd750a7dd60
describe
'54600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMC' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
32352ea0cf0040aa9d23c35f1dfb16df
10f2e58db46bc2d2a43fa544aa594734e58fc8e6
describe
'1503284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMD' 'sip-files00245.tif'
559f19dc823337d3ed88a6b09ea00d7f
147e14e73ebf9d75a7a38256deff7e99a28ca9e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATME' 'sip-files00245.txt'
1d9805abfdacc8ae69fc3e598acffc14
d884ee87c4149b8fa5c17b74bde1fa182cbd874d
describe
'12422' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMF' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
2914891f7a2e4848d2c6ae07e17b485b
40deb4adfad4f785a9c724f4703871360593bf09
describe
'186342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMG' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
ae926d977010e03052a490a2a0688330
328e9e6f24e4f758b70b8d6ec60befb5dcfa11e6
describe
'199074' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMH' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
c547e02fd73a135031526c487ebbeaa5
57efb5ca6b720b266f4027b35a66292eacc96e7f
describe
'67147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMI' 'sip-files00246.pro'
0e3aeb45264e60cecb6c12da50f12e3c
cd68b4a5e2d1020fe25135aa1688371173805794
describe
'57339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMJ' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
aabe12205109d8411e9e169e592fb90c
721591b4fdd73b2a1d469b2bb32067e8e5a96440
describe
'1503776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMK' 'sip-files00246.tif'
624f5c7821b74341a5c21395301fe202
42a1f017a4acc42d2c962e1d69e8e13bec5ef1ce
describe
'2817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATML' 'sip-files00246.txt'
42eee055ad5ac4649f2047925898b0e0
90b67bbbfd2149901d7650af318a8bb6ca6d63df
describe
'13230' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMM' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
ca5be3b0e9136177a1b7333712233273
e8a379b803d3255ccd1e65137e4f2295177feab8
describe
'190769' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMN' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
7fdb24f8f123b05b45c66dd63119d346
a800b906d1032abb9ce94a28af897507f8aefe81
describe
'192285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMO' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
8579f7889d2be73a22ef4794edbcc228
765fcae13c375566d5ea9937e0ce642c4f94a5b5
describe
'68464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMP' 'sip-files00247.pro'
361f2ddc12da8f10c2987605f0d861c3
23ea2c33d97e6653f3896332183f7edecbd089a6
describe
'53840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMQ' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
3e35ffffdcb013fc94a1065f6f60d7ef
bdf7815817df36ffc20880855b4afce7c1243d85
describe
'1538188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMR' 'sip-files00247.tif'
52927239857270bf5d67be61bc927d7f
d180cd918f95eb01d846e413da4251bf4dd12145
describe
'2859' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMS' 'sip-files00247.txt'
69d28424f796a23074e78530f422913c
3c9c29c03b1d2f553ad86846598adb7e305ed069
describe
'12166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMT' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
9fff4714d79e153aa775b58c4259f721
924ce3f614d58400a091c9de8603346bfc750ace
describe
'186500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMU' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
3f7f88f279cc176ed45fb86b1f3f0b0a
75828d422bd2c9933b20024dfc4fe8e6ad3ba7e6
describe
'203750' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMV' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
d80f81aa1ff60b65c0574cf8dae412f1
245f921ce066d6fdbafda30bff64018a421a7595
describe
'70707' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMW' 'sip-files00248.pro'
571e60085921309bac6926a607eedd44
8fb9b33d7eb6e3e9ac7045e47913968391ded204
describe
'56994' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMX' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
366db1e262afd7599094d9995f3f4807
d0600930a9980efea6bb7f5b43a6215681324cf7
describe
'1503228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMY' 'sip-files00248.tif'
86ee2bfa24ee5c5e4a05cfbc9f62b9fa
d981d1da97914ee35dc8b76b77ebeb3e84d54457
describe
'2947' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATMZ' 'sip-files00248.txt'
74f894f9b08058ed479c615dfc9b555c
b1582afdd8d8c4aba6ef4761a3624027c4aa37cc
describe
'12177' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNA' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
0ef18cb64afb830c5b6ba7dc840af363
d49fb1fe1e9ef2c30ad53171b83ac47df306f5f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNB' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
9a93ee2985195faf77a2e4f208341874
2809577d28456d35a672380771d292d08b87128d
describe
'199544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNC' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
492342ad5b390baf29fef0eafbe072d3
fd76385672a969b60c87eb9a67299ce2e3a235b3
describe
'67880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATND' 'sip-files00249.pro'
2bec8539edba0e11fb30d59daae700da
8917b7cf57f5207aa8a5a14e9607ad91650b7ba5
describe
'57021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNE' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
a21be537b143f4807770fb792074ef37
85ef0440316797fa9d1472ee76c6a69a04c2cb5a
describe
'1503216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNF' 'sip-files00249.tif'
286484318df7aa22bb47e8f3648e0b3b
ab39735acc094bca90b08239d16258497a60798a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNG' 'sip-files00249.txt'
f43003089aef93459d53a29b0a1afbe4
d2adf32c903861fa3d1a5910984a9d3293eceb66
describe
'12522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNH' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
b44376ae577303f67d2c6e2de64b003b
5720f9afeabcb1f0e7ff297739711968672e6630
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNI' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
72c0c1dc344aa2f3331bd00e0712ae9a
25c6d12e3c039c5abc6eb4fcd707361d2c519203
describe
'200953' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNJ' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
5feabf760b18fd3b3102c31bcd00d8e5
02cda8a0ed8ac939d4556a6ba2ad5a45340a4545
describe
'68223' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNK' 'sip-files00250.pro'
aa669110e8e6afb196b9bd91c23b430b
152ea2a7b372d784a0e1f91d995225af83e774f4
describe
'57928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNL' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
cc41fb6d373122e0ab3a284192e00861
7a830247cdb11c2a8d8cb5af1c146cda151c6246
describe
'1503360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNM' 'sip-files00250.tif'
4b8fbbd22492f9fc02b0a7e4b4985500
90ca24900026b51f4830e56ebf18e786c37dc1d3
describe
'2838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNN' 'sip-files00250.txt'
eb08db998b4efd6bcb86b94a96497a3b
d5ddc2ae7926bee1458ad419fea71c3ffb9a4a1d
describe
'12839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNO' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
d1ca1a7cb100a991349f37ce19947b9c
2fdf286d0343b2f08b7a33add2dacb6f6ac84b63
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNP' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
75fca27bb60f3d56d1320fb34841dd0b
929dd8f256397f4e115b9d9ef38780fca4f0431d
describe
'204972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNQ' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
ab3e66bffafd0aa554c49ac086bc9df4
f0bd6c8b93b1164b6f3df6526afc31474808d75b
describe
'68050' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNR' 'sip-files00251.pro'
1a527087d99d408a3994c95fca56e3ef
fd998cea988ae054470fe380215744e7c92d7cd3
describe
'57915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNS' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
66e086d9bc688f91dc54cc95c380a9e7
9fc4589cf517673156cdff086fc88a062b8b2289
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNT' 'sip-files00251.tif'
364c4612317d4d46ba457c2f3b85dce1
24247d74f6cec9ad5782382b701148fd23d0803a
'2011-10-14T08:50:39-04:00'
describe
'2876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNU' 'sip-files00251.txt'
4ea74ca1482284e0f2f15847c0929431
5acf359ad6f9d65fd57d525009545d28946e8221
describe
'12797' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNV' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
0689b061cdbad93d2311c47f4cf2703d
9637a913f178cf2779d279791fbe9e3379a4f724
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNW' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
2e3517111d0e8ce580367d4ca5a23ba5
60c092dbb17f13cba59c7e78be64dc44cbe13812
describe
'200915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNX' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
7fcdf3728e906877609527b1ef810bc5
665c261f9cf2642777f2535507990216fcdaa999
describe
'68137' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNY' 'sip-files00252.pro'
677574dfbae0efdee03137ca31ca6538
6baee31573f78e32c627c971ad6b731c36c147d6
describe
'55924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATNZ' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
e1ec24b54bcd00659ca1f64e00ad98b9
6c9c258e9d31700b96c247ac46389610ba632890
describe
'1503200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOA' 'sip-files00252.tif'
874d523e8c456f301ee928352b57e836
1122b23e5f2336c412f11058b5bcab0efb3fe912
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOB' 'sip-files00252.txt'
9bd574ed6120282dda8f6a9945af4e34
f3537c13609038aac7c6aaaaba6ae8483da27764
describe
'12369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOC' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
5a8be9a5900ca48731b22dbd057453f5
824ebf006a9563afb9f8950e0fe6fdec0b227396
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOD' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
9884899fd1fa1f167db910b7085b8e80
73983b8ed3237039be7977a7ca83b7d38e1ebf99
describe
'202929' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOE' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
12a99da0e160a19e9ae6a2ea092ee6a6
5e2e4730cc64f5b6b1a438c374561cddfd1be053
describe
'69424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOF' 'sip-files00253.pro'
2cc6e2e2b316bdea57dd3ebe53ccde16
49b9d78807cf1aa9c7aaf00438a2ee8969515e80
describe
'56790' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOG' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
84e34c8e60915001ae7922eec24d3e53
eaab878d52e0705ea658ba767ee472c66609308e
describe
'1503176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOH' 'sip-files00253.tif'
6573b4d048bffcbefe4bcb4299c10e7c
a1ba2e7dd5ee7c2e2f17ae2e0a8dc1f93d2779cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOI' 'sip-files00253.txt'
593bc6c665f904265a0f5aeb1af1a087
d7b7279645aaca0317efb5730c942340ac5e0917
describe
'12739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOJ' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
bb1c155f7b4d30fef843f1b0ca7e5e4d
6b8466ecdb5dedd40eb01d7565d79d8c6863dd12
describe
'186366' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOK' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
d8924325f6b954e757a2dd985bb1ce3d
72b01d01789e37bca2761280bac16af174eb1af8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOL' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
8eef89d07b2d4e37fae6da0d5335e94c
4cc3f6459cad164f1a71babcc3f1d294b6204d76
describe
'67402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOM' 'sip-files00254.pro'
7205407fea40fcb36f74052dd04dd0f2
5e9db395ecbcbbd32f0cb13d443e4164e49d2252
describe
'56407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATON' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
d7c46614e1563d42cca59e5be777ddd8
2977e04cc94869158dba2e0953d2fcbd0ffce213
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOO' 'sip-files00254.tif'
55b43d5df613a9e7855ce48aab85fd09
9f20929e1a5f6eacbc7c3d774b9736d487a11cb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOP' 'sip-files00254.txt'
3ce9448b58ee26b48ed16987461ff0ee
2753329f481816bbf843616f27617c5ebd2f67f2
describe
'12402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOQ' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
53dd6f0827bacb1de418001123d53404
709216687480b1559b64270fcbc30b82b565ed90
describe
'186144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOR' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
123ae818853096020beafdd9f8fb174f
689e27063b6f6adb39ea4682d7bf0cb825ffeb54
describe
'195960' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOS' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
ff2683807c22829a17142aa58f4a8315
256eeee7e98a79251428e48c1be62fb33b78dde2
describe
'66198' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOT' 'sip-files00255.pro'
c4554bb7345ca4d34fddeb68ee71aaba
cd42d01eeeb9e324e1ce7c0e49e7316a6879bd09
describe
'56366' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOU' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
7d40ae112a3f943e50c87af645ee226f
913ada6587970bc76141684014410e2b2c879a42
describe
'1502004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOV' 'sip-files00255.tif'
1784dd774e123f4dad449e257e6586a2
67194c0acda3dd552ffed725b3182062994bb1d4
describe
'2750' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOW' 'sip-files00255.txt'
a69b991d7939017fadd8c9f7fcc78a41
7e54ed88f8ff55437c78bf0865cb0c3e5ae53355
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOX' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
ebe77fcaeaf29f4be834b5fd6a9eb684
a3166d9e9baddee1b92108522a37b8fa302b713a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOY' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
50fec3ea1611d3919d71006fb9c95d42
d6068d9ea18b1bd04839c297c4451176cea16cac
describe
'201329' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATOZ' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
c505d82111d0c419ad96a15789e550c0
34fbd5c02a8d616f59c92d0b6bdee9e46bd800ba
describe
'69779' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPA' 'sip-files00256.pro'
b9ca74d28f29698f3cd9cb6d8cc5b378
bb45faab0cc3fb02b45c932b90bdb84ac2d3eb06
describe
'56329' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPB' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
003b60ad83f0fd540743989664582b78
fcf9410abadf6f6097fabfdd535beae3faeca781
describe
'1503232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPC' 'sip-files00256.tif'
53e40368bf95027e3cf071553aade203
a9072b2be4842dcaf2c4f1da66e09640339fa97e
describe
'2891' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPD' 'sip-files00256.txt'
819600bf0525eb984b00c56b9b48e8cc
94480073648f481d015cbc5ceda0b83def96ec9c
describe
'12453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPE' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
e71a517ef1b0787b466ee4e808981c70
600c5fc6c24d1979c0e18f0382876fe9c78d43e5
describe
'186212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPF' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
8f06bff45cfe15d66d38ecbad23ed9e7
e3a6e782a686297b7f53df28654cf29f0840ab70
describe
'200504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPG' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
28b1b0c099fcc5a1c230998e348d6b19
5c9de5ea2613fb6a571a3d23982ec0923092e6ee
describe
'68516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPH' 'sip-files00257.pro'
6c19dbdabcaa0ebda4bd12dfd8e7a7fc
12aea655b1bf4e02dbba3f51a9ab6c68136ff0dc
describe
'56580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPI' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
943ecc031319919f2fa1f7f3a22d2b70
1e64f3cfa18725446923ddd68f35b450fe3f4b05
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPJ' 'sip-files00257.tif'
d46d9860fba7c15070664e819ccc695c
59ebbf13bc0c2954760ebd5ed3cec62588aaa951
describe
'2868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPK' 'sip-files00257.txt'
35c9b5a9468fbb0b4cd7ab4b7db9ce9a
0a6b49466d72726e009ef7ba044195bd1da6e83d
describe
'12711' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPL' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
8425344a4e20631d54419d3799a8349c
74997f44b1e93cab60d4db2ba07b458ca5a4bf98
describe
'186413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPM' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
9265248ac03b8c33fbc15e5df9af81a4
bed5337e1879f1e97158a6f205fdcaf0593974b1
describe
'207847' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPN' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
dd1bf720c198b3bdb8aed91eb78944bc
c3d8c633df5db0582fe01030e57e1682af936fd4
describe
'70043' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPO' 'sip-files00258.pro'
e532aa69c4671fa38ba6f55328096b1d
12dd7f17c533d063bd0165d40ca832c4a8346128
describe
'58753' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPP' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
9a098839e4506193d44f9e7e011bf429
de718f4ce19c1832ec3079d19574ad3335a4aa4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPQ' 'sip-files00258.tif'
77e853df41972df7974f3fad9bc02c17
da79bbcbcbdedff835c5155b7701bc41e583941a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPR' 'sip-files00258.txt'
e0301f302461f1081c21c18b47216fbc
b00ba1ae35a12a001da69af97f264a11a7fb965c
describe
'12660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPS' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
9509cbd2f36ee964b8c2fbf2325b5611
5b5b920994dc47faf66765ff7ec34036039cb3a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPT' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
4b6815507cb7e5d469d063b246a75968
f4af9a9f9740166aa77b50fbbc7cc6063f42262d
describe
'120654' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPU' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
63e879b6e364163c9262e7de01db5ce2
d26ae4d4c1944a933e172951fb4beb816c6fce8c
describe
'3302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPV' 'sip-files00259.pro'
1b6326a41c9513942d7dd7f7aa962c6d
23cb975f8bd7e666375aaf27abdd889c7fc409f4
describe
'31377' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPW' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
1056c1ad4ae1d7fd1b98f8fee661458b
24359184d6969286dd82e88a52ada35b12426121
describe
'4483212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPX' 'sip-files00259.tif'
f51d8e6d5ab449d7609e07ec48548b75
32aac6601867085e0a5f6bbda35bb16bfbd6d5ab
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPY' 'sip-files00259.txt'
b3e8544b38259d562150888dd4d9ce28
783ac192569147d95eda85d1b148dd94bd4965a5
describe
Invalid character
'7996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATPZ' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
5482eac0308727fe1d8acc62d5313720
301c187ef8313c7f0c5cb019c191d2a927b3a168
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQA' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
38e689b67c0d2fd42b048ef8d8c53bb4
fe88f52b580a522942e94e6b870028cdc5e97611
describe
'210875' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQB' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
f0354be6e1f2f336ef0f2a276cb8b757
1958bc6768550077188cc30455633674464960b3
describe
'71469' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQC' 'sip-files00261.pro'
196076117ef962fae340e225eb329d93
8bbc4176f68972e1d548cd9b66bbdb670e5a1c72
describe
'59477' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQD' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
b54e0219e34367b163c85bd81bc7e352
b31c9620f3b86bc3180364161c5a46028cb3d04b
describe
'1502144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQE' 'sip-files00261.tif'
2b893dd68e69e4301f509cd5fa8010a4
0507793130f89b15c51a1332ca00c46ef99d146c
describe
'2980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQF' 'sip-files00261.txt'
4b78ad7ebd931cf5ba8b3dbfd9f62be5
0f903119241732577a187f012061a463cf71cd33
describe
'13298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQG' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
c6325e0cf01702b06b39b125715945b4
e40d8fb15023e09e0366d108c1eba0cac40b2557
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQH' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
95c113793ccfc0a4d603e7e487da214e
c796de53bbfc6a03863f8e97476b93879e94d147
describe
'208412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQI' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
018903859ea32f1135a5b0e230360d65
24d4472ccc22792813d4b8c210ed53bbcde49b5c
describe
'68614' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQJ' 'sip-files00262.pro'
7538fb6be3f34fe7ce43bd52628abe9c
a1d5af0325d884b84b3914772e4c5271ce810ad4
describe
'59419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQK' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
825148410ba91dffa045a62d8f3be4f9
78e2fbf6767349cf9bbd3389ec76e07d7017033f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQL' 'sip-files00262.tif'
253f229ed885f8bc71270856bc8d63cd
247792272404d972f1cd210d31617cd9f8b210e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQM' 'sip-files00262.txt'
877b1a556dd67460533fe295049b5204
2b2ac3a154b546be39ad043ccb1dffc048b278fb
describe
'13212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQN' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
683b528031b083d5908c10abd255ab83
b024a256ba1304716d3ede03ce13103ad2d8d312
describe
'194145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQO' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
cfdc47dcc1f7c4efd87da86867e372cd
e456713ee79404cea7427092977afd7ee4e48090
describe
'200117' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQP' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
ca1139ca088eb1d237a4a239817cb10a
b35c07e765d708baa3045a08f64a77b3eac5ed04
describe
'69759' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQQ' 'sip-files00263.pro'
dda669e9c184e467d8fc626c74339624
65fedc7c70ed397986818c468a1e1be56082683e
describe
'55133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQR' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
ac5d30ec5a9f3bb3dc8a075b5fa4c111
2ce7d814f5be84a4d351af5984045cad558b8714
describe
'1566264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQS' 'sip-files00263.tif'
33a6f0ac96701deee89bc033a72fcf03
23cbcac3c231740116dcd6978c5e3a92d03cf6bd
describe
'2903' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQT' 'sip-files00263.txt'
0a6a0a7c2c1256e1b283211fcc1d4e0a
827de3e0682ddbec1a3ac8acf699978162c3f1ee
describe
Invalid character
'11843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQU' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
c4321c9dcf8bf2743a3e6c767906a220
5c6c581ea513fe6a4b4291b0fbb81e07dc8f63b1
describe
'191516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQV' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
d87cc6ddfa9906cb668bc3a930ccdcaa
7bc26eed1054379f96a4bfea1b914bb3f161ce21
describe
'203167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQW' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
109efef8ceffa5690859370c287f3e8e
bd05aec3224b202e4629fbdd9cbb05ebb2bb4790
describe
'70602' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQX' 'sip-files00264.pro'
0fa4237238ed103208ed37c3be75241f
329aa59446912a767a6cd86dc7e26e0166ba0f51
describe
'56527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQY' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
473a7eaed2e71ece34e885fc58e8d8c0
fea416282461c92140e91926f2696f2f6e579d27
describe
'1544308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATQZ' 'sip-files00264.tif'
09f7480ed0dc33f725cc51b4a77e0b80
14f1e49f40cab092b5636746221f37540fd5922f
describe
'2929' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRA' 'sip-files00264.txt'
d97b3a2964b165e6038933ff28aa9e3d
410fa7da0aecc73741b688f1b043b98427b3265e
describe
'12553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRB' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
95e8271c62284aa67ac79d71f86d1542
fef8b1ebe16df1f77544f6a7298685b9f0ecb68a
describe
'190657' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRC' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
eb8a1d030fbb6eb5744dbdb2dfa7bebc
b48f1be7d935be6ea6514a1c1b914f18b03a517f
describe
'207038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRD' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
33bbb1215263329a9a1fb5d1f4dee170
20e8916791118efdedfdf96b7b33ea15d941a876
describe
'70954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRE' 'sip-files00265.pro'
47a535fd1a2543de24a464109e2ab1bd
aa1c5bdd31f6a77022cd49399dcde61c57b93b90
describe
'58211' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRF' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
df9634a0f25539412357084444c124d6
6d592454c7558106a5fa79c6dd8c43fca3f86622
describe
'1536952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRG' 'sip-files00265.tif'
1ba77ab054b4aa2a2874eaefcfc88f9c
d08d10828d71eb3180dfc531174a09fc173e9932
describe
'2953' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRH' 'sip-files00265.txt'
b7a715f0b2463c09ee63d76120bd3388
8688a5c762ed0ff58ea9bdafed7ef290ab3263b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRI' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
f763030935106b3eadf151bda87e0b34
1f7e58ea11ea92bc33ed20318464c984252e8318
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRJ' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
9c894cb79d5d86dd9fe5657664903754
5a0f1718d94e9ab6fa34044bc0c20575bab658e0
describe
'196786' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRK' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
13b84436d052b3d1f8adf80248b11724
9f5bb5f1fbbcfb461fdf56705b61236c9f19ff61
describe
'65679' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRL' 'sip-files00266.pro'
7b52cd014cc29b4ad13d7f1701a315f3
78782171d3c9aa6476a0b00bbe72bbdc8458e05f
describe
'54658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRM' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
476d3039a6df6cba6880a11905f42a83
c8012f2ee927439dd5462b1e57732de40553e322
describe
'1503364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRN' 'sip-files00266.tif'
2de4d466eff18f404bd33e6a1af2f641
a3b1cdb83a3f55f9e578416f444ef5bb52d5c8bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRO' 'sip-files00266.txt'
904fbcc7e93383130fc13c8bc1613ee5
17dd7d0d54f9ecfb2368e13f17b2b496f39a7596
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRP' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
9973f1cfa8162728272ca8b2c3145a32
c5841acdc477ea67d366f9d89dd0e334f61c2d3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRQ' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
8c7f3dc9dfc8fc2e7a0552cf0d9a95aa
ec92d48ac65c79def0362c95f669767bc16248a5
describe
'195119' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRR' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
134707812af7ea83ee16262147428344
5accf05811830e055be6d640b5d232a66945fcb4
describe
'65816' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRS' 'sip-files00267.pro'
3d959ad7a3e57c5ec1fbff34c26c38f1
25a4736e6774912226b5e0bad3931f74c259a31a
describe
'54856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRT' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
612dff900821c5d66f9ff8205d453c3f
4d70b885bceb1f6941ecff988b16b8fd2506729d
describe
'1501836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRU' 'sip-files00267.tif'
7b6e5a3573c9b1a7b6cc5b565c28e5ae
abd9b397e1cfc08da37fabc4abf989ed6fa426a2
'2011-10-14T08:56:11-04:00'
describe
'2760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRV' 'sip-files00267.txt'
fd23df700ac8ecd7e0aa8456aa36e137
42196f9609087fb9ef3453f965c4b7b82b8222bd
describe
'12509' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRW' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
98f8290aa70f66debfafc8683234f0c6
799aedd65a927445048a4ed0b03b9909a7a71e99
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRX' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
cbb44626b3ef4038a8cb7d84979258a5
f08a07797264d5ce89289eafcaa5b821a5709bb8
describe
'187608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRY' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
c71323b86b4671af3ee215a2dd309bbb
fdf248a7784300d1d8b0db5537e468cb971d8485
describe
'62392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATRZ' 'sip-files00268.pro'
64c2168d6b5902ef1c7875ad1a4b3bc8
f100e29460b3d9149c3031ee274524664f9c3061
describe
'54759' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSA' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
8e2222bf091ffa69d648601654b882ed
f168eaf7e175e55b40ae30014ccd77773f53ac95
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSB' 'sip-files00268.tif'
9d00ff13cca72646e048a3265eb72f35
f2d064924334a79ef29363e9ed00528b21d77be3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSC' 'sip-files00268.txt'
e8dbc9b4f0e5dba6a3f2d2657570507f
7c1f5f1f1969435da4ea998c4f51194feebb727e
describe
'12623' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSD' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
a8c36061c48b3c4d38cac1715337fa13
4fd65b53333835df6ddb6e48984d677504e6a6dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSE' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
77b88b9fa4b276b5b7211b4d574afcff
0fa6bf990d602a00541afc42a92cb5147fd9bb51
describe
'188211' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSF' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
452b78ce34e04c0b62f0b0b786fd15be
b6f2df3ebc5b579d03ee3b5b0edb178d3cf863d6
describe
'61870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSG' 'sip-files00269.pro'
ba0f31584d0107e36f6cdcca377d4d1d
81202502b92c30e9cb191d074c24e3977d770eae
describe
'55261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSH' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
1ce68a86c4dedc8ea993a23438c8ccde
30ab476e86a941eaded2609678b82147b728fe7d
describe
'1503600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSI' 'sip-files00269.tif'
3d936f124e1f6bbe57b0eb0562c44016
830696735acb8d475f6bc0cdc48ca65bae1a7b29
describe
'2621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSJ' 'sip-files00269.txt'
dbdd1ba8add87669597687230bfeb55c
5a25270bf5d5d161b3a1c854b3f731d67f6fcdc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSK' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
f257c4e11df98c711e09c7a8003a95e1
8f449b3ba0443451bf40e7d1e250a4fda7496b0d
'2011-10-14T08:50:37-04:00'
describe
'186486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSL' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
c0aec9eb4de5ed941e751240930d8132
cdc5ae9331cc1b352f329071e9406fae2586ebdc
describe
'181623' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSM' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
0c7593e79186e94de2fc83af3ea224af
b64d53f5643d2440b3d0d05bef17af0e1aaa71f4
describe
'60852' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSN' 'sip-files00270.pro'
6cca33166e171f3a15870e209840a231
7e450a5301abcd17ddf072736ee2686315eeafc5
describe
'52791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSO' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
99fc77540037a6f12f324cdb8b9982cb
2933b256d6552fccc6665112ecb0bb77b0e88db6
describe
'1503184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSP' 'sip-files00270.tif'
ff273e8e65c79d8c6efef69838d71c6f
ab4263ed5165ee2ee8c322cdcb4374eb5eb4557d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSQ' 'sip-files00270.txt'
407768c922e20a9a52bd49230354093a
c9e8b025d97ea9808ce90cac16473207479cdd17
describe
'12095' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSR' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
b228e1562e1f0974b91ef014c42313a9
a4def90d403a821ad03fe8c8a2cc5b0f4713aa05
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSS' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
0e265a4935640f0ac903b8879c1239c8
2d2502656161cf394778e9e06f08de37353889d4
describe
'192961' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATST' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
4021923415855c36c401ef31d05bb645
9ab54a5b77640bf4d5832b3350e64b1e24cfddcc
describe
'64182' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSU' 'sip-files00271.pro'
d87900a984b728b5ca8eddaf08baa1aa
fbeaaf511e88b09a369d66a871524603d628ac5b
describe
'54895' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSV' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
e9ac02e89dbd49958d936d30175a383f
484c80c2896f8fc1cd3b5f3ece2436a1846bed44
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSW' 'sip-files00271.tif'
ef6440f9a0583380be6a38d8f22c5c3c
356187cc4926c7c86bbade9b8c74492a920df724
describe
'2729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSX' 'sip-files00271.txt'
d7840e6461a676590c1e4fbc5f970e72
58325e068c200be3edfd7f8b83ee8c3a2190fa63
describe
'12891' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSY' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
da188c0dbc7f337fc3a5d0e5fa516857
51a027575fb172d5e16db392f154dc5701743478
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATSZ' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
7e97cf43433dfd3be0a32dfba3f386f3
8e7a8a5324008c2b0a0db06c395e681bfce055a2
describe
'189464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTA' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
64b8bed7f9020a1f9e44deb764fd9003
d73b392c301951025eb2e73c9646d9b2277453f4
describe
'62894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTB' 'sip-files00272.pro'
17a6d017ac8fa847b33637963a945a64
b23780a1605637ddc51cfcb569bb6aef3db9bcab
describe
'55121' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTC' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
aa6cf101618a9e909922ee42ecaad75a
85002c2ed14a7a92122343cef07de05d6ddd8450
describe
'1503624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTD' 'sip-files00272.tif'
641c5f5e7d0fc3827fd13e3cc89754da
8dac839ad942254100dabe53c1030940295358dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTE' 'sip-files00272.txt'
79ebee4d2984968861140c23e397f669
a59df3f9edb1a453e60ba2d63aaf155ddf815097
describe
'12845' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTF' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
d6757d81e7ddefba30e9020117b68750
7e6820fa082b82cd921749517491acb8184b7287
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTG' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
8c93584063329243eb672187f969eb2b
c65d4c83ee2458da15fe17b6ecb1efc104024d9f
describe
'195462' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTH' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
06cc71fc0e8d66a4f6bb0160a1246fa9
b25e8d583dbe03499f16d8391d15d2880afcc4cb
describe
'64634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTI' 'sip-files00273.pro'
a8ed9d75d3715688f1af981ebfe95506
90e9000638206992c3cc2b31aa8a705a72e43d61
describe
'57453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTJ' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
b660cc8e98056c0a3ce18719d29ad5d7
a1c52ac6cac14cd6fafa2cd82b6fe4240fd35e15
describe
'1502396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTK' 'sip-files00273.tif'
b9704df5d6234ba67fbf4cd8dbe9faa6
0e3cf8f477e848c19adbeb66230461d21f094e8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTL' 'sip-files00273.txt'
5967525120ef9f8f58488b5723e877b4
f5dc376cfae3f9fba1532dbfe7ed276d5aaed947
describe
'13198' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTM' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
8517fab8a9e7af34568a48b3f55ea061
05472ebdeb1af1b21680f044d60ff32608e69e5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTN' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
28a3e72d7317bbacf1b2eb45f4dcfee1
63fa0fe2219cd5e996a620cbf40cf42d20224633
describe
'188535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTO' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
80c4d1ba1eac76906bca4bd4af41269f
e5d157fc06e21beeb028d1ba1538e299fa36e12c
describe
'63416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTP' 'sip-files00274.pro'
0e9799b0fd9f07e57d0eb24b8d724fb5
b770eed1c8210d8c53720a0e9ba0e7c0b927a55c
describe
'54959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTQ' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
9308f95c4b8911eb2180db45d39d47a1
9a1538c483faea6a00849d1215209788604345b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTR' 'sip-files00274.tif'
88ec8f1060d5cba35c37f905b06c1530
25b13b0864739193d291cd7b74020b4c332a7a4d
describe
'2658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTS' 'sip-files00274.txt'
c9cbd734df382aa63111d69ceaa299ca
97f1b619a828f405e3c2629022a040533484ddf3
describe
'12580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTT' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
d2874ef33e56ddff8393074b7541cd60
2a843c8233f3ce3d81e4bdbb43f8065791e6a89a
describe
'186314' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTU' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
3104ec07d9b5a0fdbc507d6b5919134c
1cef7e91087fdca9076138dbe1a438ff1e86951d
describe
'196077' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTV' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
6a3ee7f73e04e4cd56f4cd07d419b6a7
7035a2a492155fe58f3f05efc5538602d396fabb
describe
'66154' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTW' 'sip-files00275.pro'
d35a38b20034f17565ce86a47fc7d78d
82496f64134cf9662cb7257f41efc3419e1df151
describe
'56069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTX' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
90cc0bc43656633e11d49503dd518fda
a9790f4bce002b26e459a957d78f626974348d6a
describe
'1501860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTY' 'sip-files00275.tif'
df5c417d493f2d4ff90a2a9b96d6ef32
3cbcdaf8353cf7e028ecfa285a051f3174804234
describe
'2779' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATTZ' 'sip-files00275.txt'
141f90ed64fff0d8f424a169726b3e47
c00fb0c61df7c22844412b48055596ef9e257620
describe
'12523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUA' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
1d41ab8b001ed805ace3e5b80c48fe98
a825e365d936cca45c91f169443eb5b3757a3d4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUB' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
00c5519d7cbe5a236df5bd5f32666cc7
a7698c0bc35f9f540e6db001c776da61817b0ff6
describe
'188920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUC' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
49625a43e5ef7a35b5d028b758dd30e3
fa370036ac460ae42f7412e5258e304ff842ae5f
describe
'62358' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUD' 'sip-files00276.pro'
998dc2d136befce734389e2c3589a23c
fc338ef6af93f8c735a4d12f90ba4a1324691637
describe
'54896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUE' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
c0e07fac1b1cc5d54778538a4d570f87
23b06c0be14f1cf610bb34eba44ed8e44a0fa1ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUF' 'sip-files00276.tif'
97fcf5d0e49a1b0bac0833ebe9e0f4a5
92a757a6f8ef27abc591a828573c2e6919d5bffc
describe
'2615' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUG' 'sip-files00276.txt'
eef4462408e57102f43faafeab2199d6
ab204be163e2999d86481dc064347697eb6e86d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUH' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
7adf2195624142237a3365a1321331e0
9d52fb21fb5df9a082f20144222a672492a31623
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUI' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
96056b17d910015609adbe13196e9a88
4b084090d9da2535596c8f959d4c5992842029bf
describe
'207279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUJ' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
8dec80abb7ba977829c8b03e9e23d5c4
c11d2eea386f8f8bf2b5a8dbdf2c5ba36e718db9
describe
'68994' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUK' 'sip-files00277.pro'
2479ae1c32ecfeedd8d8ea2b2d1a8847
3a5df33be983c66c75dadfb3158cad6f2b8968cf
describe
'58922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUL' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
35e66fa734f8df2d1621bafcc5c32d6e
78d0c650a8d310606e57acf88d888722e8417c20
describe
'1503704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUM' 'sip-files00277.tif'
93befcf788dbfa68670a540d53e29af9
f37ab4c7b4c28a2190903822b899efa0c348e72e
describe
'2934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUN' 'sip-files00277.txt'
5aaa7597fb5126a06cbc550df1bd7156
9036efa857bc22ed63cc15df30d9c8a0f457c73f
describe
'13121' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUO' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
c35edcdf86c40832f615ffc9fb0805d8
421823afd240ca1391b5031ee9e5bf1a4280592d
describe
'189228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUP' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
8d0db744958e2647fa1c0e5b0272e937
032ebf693a18c50fa7a97bd99a29b3dfd48e9edd
describe
'194906' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUQ' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
86fd391c0476afbd9a2cd90211bfbe54
5d4e2783e3199d78ac66606d8a9d88ebdeaf2cdf
describe
'68410' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUR' 'sip-files00278.pro'
2aadbeac27e2ea7622c178a1383dc000
1b2fc5127fabcb95f99c43d9c35d18274927639f
describe
'55421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUS' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
2170a1cbd07c3c8d4f98ece838eaf8ab
9067482ff89f7ce54823014c03935a2446c52e49
describe
'1526468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUT' 'sip-files00278.tif'
5e2e5169cd2342abac0c8ff117e18753
76f2ce5e40f124979a97c792681323103e3e4957
describe
'2854' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUU' 'sip-files00278.txt'
72617dcb64fc993dd7ad6bd6a7d86b6b
ed4f970245c48c8b67a17d638793fa8b0ff95748
describe
'12226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUV' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
8a5fbe3002fc95f9f9cd6c8144b912be
bad165dd4163e9bbd426065cbd41f3292cf4c9e5
describe
'186265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUW' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
19d82134060ae96f0ef782e5d7f2b085
4d9665948f6d1a209e843577d38419b5bbbfee23
describe
'196810' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUX' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
9133769f62bbcb08fe015016f1409619
b4a3bd273a511e44c357a08f0661b5f95a707135
describe
'66931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUY' 'sip-files00279.pro'
cf560a2b437b66e96aea3cae6f55ac7b
c48fe9236cb24df9fc808d3708160669366c4e86
describe
'55895' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATUZ' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
0d42fb8a87f4ac37e055b4ce261d5be7
93fbc148ff3876d536b0f05659551f9303c3a0e8
describe
'1501844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVA' 'sip-files00279.tif'
f9a80c59625de3334974ea31142dc6a0
6c7f385367c8dac7aa4c18384dea89f7cfc31543
describe
'2827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVB' 'sip-files00279.txt'
a6542676ccb91ed05fef4ac04b1be61d
8232bfee07c98cebd25881b27f5bef946a493f90
describe
'12465' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVC' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
1d72d6cacfc0f68f032a18e4ff45b0c7
667f795cb76e64d13f66d3d9f1dcb94ce3c31e17
describe
'186378' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVD' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
5e481f0979e5d7c70690b1d2b220061e
7b5dfceddc9bd7feafe0cd40cd1ff26a0f48dcc1
describe
'207142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVE' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
0e72d0b1f1a9df8180964fac0fc5e955
7df4ccf16ceb780d943443a77050243d9c84f11f
describe
'70537' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVF' 'sip-files00280.pro'
eb92fae3695e79264d618dc9fb05f49a
49ef83ec1c609c6ca349e76c8233501b9614cf08
describe
'59122' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVG' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
4987ba7b1c3f5a5876f5ce2b4a11ae12
e76dbbe8ffa4a01a7297f3ef6db1bc71bb0e04e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVH' 'sip-files00280.tif'
53df639ad4e69703f147c57a56ba6862
7d76e81fbbe1ead21060ba8bf50fc4247c71de10
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVI' 'sip-files00280.txt'
c9533bec90c6baa2e0529a807868117c
4e780b44cebf7ce1b0377e713c496804413c4bc7
describe
'13145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVJ' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
32385dd0b4ed20c92245e4c534f30d81
41896976a388b53d120d09d94d817097067bb152
describe
'186207' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVK' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
dcf01b1952f163279c311d0dc5299ab7
df62609d7ad284db0085aeb1cc3f84c59fba57f9
describe
'211963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVL' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
5b33c95900f89578c2fe25289e2485ce
14cd436cb42948935abdabc02c1fae62ff00df8f
describe
'70967' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVM' 'sip-files00281.pro'
25b4344852193e81ee97db354f1f2ce0
1cf9ee7837d29158066e2bf02a6f93d3c651dd73
describe
'60261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVN' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
2c2e4800f6a4401678adbb85e24bc0e9
e165b22afd74a946af5d05b4c800c042a6c599e1
describe
'1502380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVO' 'sip-files00281.tif'
c7eec49fb01aaa0cdf34656cbf5385ae
21688c0decb25beea174a588a8ca569aee275d3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVP' 'sip-files00281.txt'
eeb81c3a365efe7585eff29a3817a2c0
7307a93f1116a88cabb0d5b80974cbcac179012e
describe
'13083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVQ' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
8dc5d28ec7ab788d33276a4505d98748
8a32b45698ec3d381229e5fa849316c803aaf60e
describe
'186490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVR' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
8076573ed6ca697ce72d30c2c9b81a81
1d74d88ef204abc44f4992b110123fdbcaae72c1
describe
'203801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVS' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
5a5d235b7e9f8416514f04532f446cc2
3d13debef0caa012b412fecd6240f5eba8898264
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVT' 'sip-files00282.pro'
270644c2fa3d4067f0b24f4ca953fb25
ceab3554e18a5fde93be785f3acdf4a4a8570497
describe
'57221' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVU' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
31f2992a60c2294ca72ac026735fc08f
4ed2f26d7e99f0e671f909efffeebf590dd407e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVV' 'sip-files00282.tif'
f6830d6028bf7b112ec6f82f61ba93f9
a98e9de86c4d63d67a6f57596a6b876b2eeacf90
describe
'2950' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVW' 'sip-files00282.txt'
e52f420257e8803e8c912246651a1bdd
574ff3ae2e055a0cbb767a53837825ccf4bbaa64
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVX' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
3bf16f4e983ff39b7d602968d82249f7
8d11474420d1c96a8fd6e1c477e12eb34dc941f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVY' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
9840a3cdee4bd38be9532ddcf0614499
6d028ecf9bb0a8cc55b832d9883132d7e716d1dc
describe
'208481' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATVZ' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
e6839bc4fdfdabdc105dc469b90dc26f
50776770d85a3815f34e647047d3a7818f25384d
describe
'70754' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWA' 'sip-files00283.pro'
d57438b9e1e0d04a7ed3b9413d94f0d2
0fcb72c66654686e73d5de2828aaf23a8e9e12ea
describe
'57790' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWB' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
43353966038b04bbe395d8b20708daef
ce64ec16f83dde5b32d811b722b04bfca9c03376
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWC' 'sip-files00283.tif'
0907df837be26c964ece4781e969bd61
00e21943269ea2a3055590805bca5630e26db034
describe
'2954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWD' 'sip-files00283.txt'
78b07a453b3f7b3c09a1a3fd8e8496cc
3cb9f68f074546c9b9463c2d250cd02405fef34e
describe
'12559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWE' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
385b3e007d50b261a8ac2f9b1f028200
a4aad30294e38c18335c2a96465cd37e04fcbe2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWF' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
87c282a2bffe9e06d5da41ffd82b694b
15da5f12c5a98e8de99362a81b579ccd4cac23d2
describe
'194846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWG' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
2cff02310150fa4b1eaeed3495eeeef9
da7fbfbae8e20b8215d593b0f67337718ddfbb9a
describe
'65213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWH' 'sip-files00284.pro'
bdcccca0befbeb86e829b4894488a42c
ec3491d06f6750836a23b1fc04d66016560f21b6
describe
'55765' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWI' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
38796b216bd75cb15448c3d607c56829
87a75e4f35eadf2a15ef6633cb08e74e5ce9eaed
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWJ' 'sip-files00284.tif'
941ad2873cea6743eb7c1127666688be
47e590cad0b0517207a66f48a79952757a340d82
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWK' 'sip-files00284.txt'
1fe0ec6676ee515ed267122ba58f8bfe
39e787c78f6b42769ae22a9823db46dca5371f73
describe
'12574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWL' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
7f8a12e17cf47b37e533d0f73456e377
13a17da9647645b0b4da7c67dc3ce088ec041a45
describe
'186225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWM' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
305e6c0e3f23ac095fe0869b864169eb
11a24004d48a927183e7fd4750e3ed1f2391ef27
describe
'206556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWN' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
86d47d6f6aaf194c207a6fb467bbffe3
1145a92cf5ef3a810aef2e8424b79726aa97a6a2
describe
'69938' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWO' 'sip-files00285.pro'
6273f5e063212df43f4a6b62c5049211
d270ffeae492d942d6b5d371e162b5c966916a3c
describe
'57864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWP' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
7b3d39e829f0986ccc422809277e71a0
7fa81b86f0621ac5030fefd07d74fac76bd5c048
describe
'1502220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWQ' 'sip-files00285.tif'
172c6c9e5e112530a3f60ef2f5e12935
0b174fd4db679d84637d7a18f1fd9ed98aa754f2
describe
'2921' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWR' 'sip-files00285.txt'
5f479acb3dedaea053208864f6594563
f5cd14cffabe12ab66b4804c506c15cf1e9aaea0
describe
'12977' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWS' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
38c1d409c7c10b3e193bf7d1fc817fe4
5934b0adc1b836b82e121a8e2f6a85bf1c93f743
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWT' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
a620eca5ffa080ac24a3d265ad522d29
b7fe2617a92e3711892fff5554ce2f364c732823
describe
'188729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWU' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
d8b1c940f0efcc7d5ca2a93b91b0f11a
a56e87ffea50ce84f4f2a343303934d0b37b6480
describe
'63829' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWV' 'sip-files00286.pro'
024cab9eb471b3b654a38e80d97730d7
496ca8bb68b9cdbafe30c971c344e68bb1cf763d
describe
'54199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWW' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
c1890ee38dd2ac36b17bcaa0fa314307
9dc40efe40e9bea26737f0bc4070098907fba415
describe
'1503104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWX' 'sip-files00286.tif'
d3ce6fa478f5f23f427f4c3685ff7783
bdc5530ee9ea7c4e4c9f7f4ac37e426e519bc732
describe
'2679' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWY' 'sip-files00286.txt'
d06ba7d4485a8d99f758ec409733b498
8a18df5e50df9d1c047bcc1fa341001468063bb7
describe
'12068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATWZ' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
5df77ae0666fd39e823f11b55bfdcd24
a3e6e9405581b1a6bebae53143a262094548d49a
describe
'186260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXA' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
c4491e12d3c11ced40c2d614b84f984e
acd42eab5150d7003118965b20ad1147662e0301
describe
'196957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXB' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
0c1d7392ab8062e7dc980d6d4057f99f
23434ec46aa5c8aca6391cac76c9ba6c04bdea1d
describe
'67159' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXC' 'sip-files00287.pro'
c3faaee385cb23eea71fba441a59410a
f2cea8d13547798aeee7a8623958fb0a785c047d
describe
'55407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXD' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
4e68e86c5e9258cf5f22211b02e71696
c36eb9c577d8cee128dc33dac5b07e12bfcc67a5
describe
'1501888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXE' 'sip-files00287.tif'
fa2c04c22204c0c6ee351a8449490086
d1b285c17b005bfeda6ce6f1ee9f97af9c4564c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXF' 'sip-files00287.txt'
dc2a5db9799b275426e5dedca1a5c954
c8a8f5ca1d03940d92e2c56ac4a21f90fab43997
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXG' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
1fafe2f3994cf9f1e1720281ab92a681
f650eea63887ff7086dfed03104777825d28b5cc
describe
'186509' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXH' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
333ccd559efa1811b2865eb18cf1d7c7
3aa8033100c024b31889dd1bf38c899a2979547e
describe
'203635' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXI' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
78c667dac324aac47c99990dbe022dc3
969b046f1eec76a75cb468acc5bd1ba9ec3ace07
describe
'68204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXJ' 'sip-files00288.pro'
a6c12a96bcdde262ba4943ba353b15f5
7f293e346dd9004d53ef3071b7034867641d4bfb
describe
'58217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXK' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
3ee4e78dd8343d47a77029a7dfe0044b
a6fc82c0418e759c2c2967eb4dae4231b9840501
describe
'1503468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXL' 'sip-files00288.tif'
7b6244d1b90020792a43f4ff0fe3a86e
80e534685ae4f604d7e69231739c5ee0a8dace28
describe
'2864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXM' 'sip-files00288.txt'
c8274f7961c67fa0b42d095ad39cdca1
d4e0dfb1433fbdeed0d09787bf3e7e3cc726b745
describe
'12707' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXN' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
5169bc3c8d1f3eaa6d5a0370c9188faa
bdcd597cb392a52270a8d8dd7d50c9363711ddac
describe
'186415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXO' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
922986a15767ef66686570c15cae80d6
f8ccec0311e9c295bdc9c58b2a14b0e214feee72
describe
'206862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXP' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
3ede45584ffd7366182bb585c1a7c35e
8f0c835b234521f5ec61002c8d37dae2f56358a3
describe
'68827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXQ' 'sip-files00289.pro'
422288083dbc310b18142aeb0ffbe3f8
77c871077b4888b5d1537e877387d1aef7f6fbdf
describe
'59266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXR' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
764c70f32f441426974009b1cc6b96e9
5b4ea8febad1d34c9c16c7b60f606c71b0d57eda
describe
'1503736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXS' 'sip-files00289.tif'
7695b1f50f5632a648837cb34e91faba
75e91e1548bd5e3be962e0ba4a346ef091a4eb1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXT' 'sip-files00289.txt'
e6c5bef8b656c805e0228eae05fa6587
a70b56691fe9f4a107f9eb3df8c7da6eca63620a
describe
'12974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXU' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
d866117421fb01aad7014f8d740199d6
6f392db7e68f36bedd3ad9b3b1aff43f8ea42a1e
describe
'186402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXV' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
ca4dd70fcbea24acd30e0e65fb0fd3f9
1ac8e4863be3c312928c0ef23a44041196b99edd
describe
'198609' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXW' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
718046465d82a9fb6399facce9df507a
f0773c0c50624dee3c4bfb5d494950db6728ea65
describe
'66467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXX' 'sip-files00290.pro'
847f36fe37f6f0e0a643894153bb7a41
12aca3fea714b63a7ce8b7abe64dfeffd21c1865
describe
'57202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXY' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
bbbbe0015f01a79dab0618add3c2b5db
359690a5645122ae89ca26b497a246df4b4936b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATXZ' 'sip-files00290.tif'
cee1e680810dfaea62cf2d369149475b
a8964dcefecdf73ce54016694de68a4767dc87a3
describe
'2773' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYA' 'sip-files00290.txt'
e7b07762ff34ffe9980b2fd66fdbbb48
7b29cc3d9d7aed79e6b141a5de8d184480fc9401
describe
'13076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYB' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
57ecb2d19a774a228952284989dc99db
bc97610b4a97f2d1262fe8fad70239874c96a36a
describe
'186227' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYC' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
2e16534117ae6803f3fa59474cd0382a
58712f97bf65fff4df47c9511b74c905981f304f
describe
'192353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYD' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
ddcd52a740da616713043883bb58e73d
4c24ca5722dfa63a5b406d1b72454b353feed1af
describe
'64540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYE' 'sip-files00291.pro'
0047ca68b2e6343dd6ae1e80a608d069
3374e9fb4d5257ad95920b50ca700d6ad65778f4
describe
'53934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYF' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
446fdc88118aa3007e90a03a48c2993a
a3d1a8c180d6316c09951318a6dbe23acf09d0bc
describe
'1501828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYG' 'sip-files00291.tif'
e8ef82e53c3515559413d9e236b153ac
ea308b3a5023bfc0f33e4599547635fe1d411c27
describe
'2741' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYH' 'sip-files00291.txt'
a53eb4fd3ee0f630b8148cd4063bfb78
ee708dbee8105b93929a24e52346a05ff5ed017f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYI' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
33efd50df6021aab5d584e5e59cc1197
f14ae1d4f190f5c3c16f1c21e8613cb3b1bac004
describe
'186372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYJ' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
6df70e2d1ee25df7fe445cce43613c6e
56f8a32d1bc8ced311e4a417edb26fba2f18bee2
describe
'198512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYK' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
57665a08af683fa5af262969c8136c1a
36506a4fa52a278ab8a670c6c213ba24ab80cacf
describe
'66084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYL' 'sip-files00292.pro'
5071d094fcf1346d5bb3c3379595cff6
a46bfe5c8ff72ad8923684cb25a41499e1432550
describe
'57152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYM' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
1af77571a5586fc47279c9bc38256ed0
8fa12ba5d7e72a9698d4f2e741eb35ee4f40454a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYN' 'sip-files00292.tif'
36d12d7f37ee9a95c362b15c97e3139a
dddad437af557d5934acf0157117dff15422b082
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYO' 'sip-files00292.txt'
c2da51a1b31fd440741bff9b040eba86
ed6d54c36def560bbc7f65002b40e86a72a71a77
describe
Invalid character
'12942' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYP' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
8504a2d2ec91cbb9acbddc5a80fc210b
62855fd639a57fdc23fb14308ad7b88a071ff312
describe
'186161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYQ' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
4709bbdc47254cdf4c8ce37b5078859c
49fc9df6dc844d5f63ea3c08d1f03a11303d895f
describe
'207731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYR' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
b8827e96138f6e2e669614a2b8e0d0a7
b87fe794ca38bb8186bda3d132a263cee8c1a0e5
describe
'68646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYS' 'sip-files00293.pro'
dca43be09148cca72509c13dc36cb7a7
269e46fcdfc7710d049e4ba3c62679aca42e0b74
describe
'58183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYT' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
808dcf721a4a1172dacb96b18e8534cc
4864593cb1947db8ff858ebf200097607ddb026f
describe
'1502252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYU' 'sip-files00293.tif'
c0051f974310876fce7c2ce47de9107b
d064c9b89f5540bebb6ef3b4113feadc66ee0e01
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYV' 'sip-files00293.txt'
9556fd141701cecb4f7464aa00afe374
7a1c697f7fb101d412dcd411630cc7acca42f37e
describe
'13353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYW' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
db30f2feb78dd5df7d76d2a93d49eb31
774306e36c07944da60c5784fbed7a79d42a80a3
describe
'190111' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYX' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
a08787370597cc417342cb8c3cad8e73
4c23574e080701c308535dcc687067fee56bcc79
describe
'178577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYY' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
78bc993e26520afa07d0a117bfd6069b
2b76879823adba6c27386e75e923465cc96c6ef5
describe
'60181' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATYZ' 'sip-files00294.pro'
c2e18dbc2d3ffa14ab37581bb72b1d58
ae25235a3491f5b7b742a8b9755c0c8ca7039f6c
describe
'53184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZA' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
482a68e1f2b2758b90598af284945d5c
86d6c4669b872e969a8fceb7090e3e4039026327
describe
'1532492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZB' 'sip-files00294.tif'
920d219bebf45847f84878d0a87d948c
b3af734b12eb6d6573fc09a45f9082219e6d822d
describe
'2518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZC' 'sip-files00294.txt'
e476fe92ce52df479c63458b88ccf4c4
631d6388e19bd2a017be3eb6845a479308bf5de1
describe
'12298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZD' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
a7b52c2e857603c250b71c86d4019a82
81a196493ba8a49835750c454aa7557c7322b3ab
describe
'189977' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZE' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
334d192d6767d46814443b15497cf980
6d1f3e2b90c46428fc2af5542fc5683ce21ea82a
describe
'128311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZF' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
f68f499c9bb7c956a282a80954b035bf
b19f2d212a32233bbc8bea96ea62f2145d2b9cd5
describe
'2031' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZG' 'sip-files00295.pro'
fa0e8516cbd38c48ba8e18ae2877f69e
a4e7b4db1dba6c75330dd24a965ce0a3ec22b041
describe
'34234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZH' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
abe6cd63b9428971503825abb48c1912
e6da5ec8cfff4727d9313248c8c49e9d9bba7fd8
describe
'4569516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZI' 'sip-files00295.tif'
2876d2139df66674a0fdaac472062c56
02ad802e074a56e45e8914c2826775b77e81b0bb
describe
'101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZJ' 'sip-files00295.txt'
b7da91e371dcdae9e53f608585a6306b
6a1ea796cdd5b1861d61ce169e3324161e5a210f
'2011-10-14T08:50:34-04:00'
describe
'8444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZK' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
f652f0d860221199f9117ebaaf32b5a8
87bc916e9a94416459ff1c53f734adc76f812cf2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZL' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
f73a62a485821cb8cece05b43ddc5d94
f4dd39f59371a9052cac33db7f94e76fb464e19d
describe
'206919' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZM' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
ed6f6fc9db6de01116ea4674e400671b
69de7746e5e2f59fe212e0aca1c8b962becb6864
describe
'67968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZN' 'sip-files00297.pro'
54110db21ccec3bd1ff1256deca02dc2
56e3626d16c6e32202680bca630a1a290ec210e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZO' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
5da12a05435e9f848eb9f11f763f7ae1
8ccc520254a26e8e76f941e9ce0ccfdfc44e17d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZP' 'sip-files00297.tif'
780071ad61accde939debfd1125074bd
172aee71f5bb0fd61b996b9cfa38476dd9dc781b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZQ' 'sip-files00297.txt'
215a56613cf328bac1342fa52ee4ed01
706efb9855ba212d5821495e1c732c1bdbae4e62
describe
'13330' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZR' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
37b20dff107d7d374bebc6892841b247
a17250c0856eeea6a892f812da69767e620d80a4
describe
'186421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZS' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
fba635d99582ae99253cf10ba1361490
5009a1f3b3e94fecce07bb6394365669f580b0ad
describe
'202862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZT' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
e089dba5ac4431e064806fb7f7c61678
d3e4b362f44c5b3933325e99b125e4741a10b1a7
describe
'67401' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZU' 'sip-files00298.pro'
ab3ccd605e27369dce301fa615474471
fcad263d8584be0dd10587ee848cb193a502479c
describe
'58450' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZV' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
71f850c2b02712cda335ef3834c98cac
4aaa71eb4b4c401c88a0fcfe86750e89794becdd
describe
'1503760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZW' 'sip-files00298.tif'
19f36e0b68394c7b8316a549c43816b3
7d8c46379b1a99775f65b87e2291f0bf67063bfe
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZX' 'sip-files00298.txt'
5c212775cae6c5c941f6f76048df3093
be6175af78f838b987f911031dffa90464bcd40f
describe
'12986' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZY' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
ebd5b9b70c989e86b162611617b7ec3f
bdb501ec6ebd4bbd1af12e4bef62b344e281cd87
describe
'186215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAATZZ' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
dc6afd99b9341adf9b5f7e149ecde296
de3edc54d4c69bcbc3c9edd79f560529bcc53993
describe
'202261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAA' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
76b9a9bfb01b31818545aaa185b3b53d
1a966adf7adfda83dfc285eec617a116cc53f22e
describe
'67764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAB' 'sip-files00299.pro'
f2cef56313ffcbce69c9ab7105a674cc
3424f5015e126fe31ed859d8ae0aadd90feafba1
describe
'57259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAC' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
15945efe82e8530db61c42a47c783789
e8676b9b6e60c8bfe6da96604731d85c5e98b35c
describe
'1502280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAD' 'sip-files00299.tif'
e52a95fe268d14010bd51a32b158c687
4a59bb4856a3aa09f23c899f701ce19c9911edef
describe
'2863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAE' 'sip-files00299.txt'
ffe011f1cc65609ec5e20e6e34293e20
a82dcf19986e08d5465e76538c9f9d7e423861a7
describe
'12834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAF' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
5091d8f6eb1a49b7a11b888f264c9b74
0e0e07a98226d6e29d1aff8cc1ed1a49518623c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAG' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
320f3b52319bb67cb45cce3bf2cff7c6
c3c4cc9e4aa4e98fdc7226ff1f9fefe5266d3633
describe
'203844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAH' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
ca4e92e4a5f37ff849402fa66e43e2dc
6c1df86584fd83b3d151d4b2440dffd14f54cc8d
describe
'68392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAI' 'sip-files00300.pro'
2db189657492a649323298d8d6a07ea1
2c1a05039046813bf207380a3cfd47c8980074ee
describe
'57840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
960812dd918e8c98cf2e07d995bd0eb3
66b1895fb0ce584a970feb22b7b6ccec2908821e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAK' 'sip-files00300.tif'
943068f92da857fd1ded611b281d9eae
9d2bcfec328c70e61d12fd473cd1f036e7ad6f31
describe
'2853' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAL' 'sip-files00300.txt'
4184156bf2398ac9583af4e347b1e5ba
612145c22b2477ba50efdcb7e1de4de860900a7f
describe
'12832' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAM' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
802078ef06bd4acf3ceea9f943220541
cb6de0245f7a777785b1cf64737e737a2d86ad6c
describe
'186237' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAN' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
8ecc03f0635f288e9463a7ae6266d744
14ae65028aa509deb35f8daadfeb0bc73def17af
describe
'204356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAO' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
e4ccb859378c12cbd313c17020efdaca
79427ddbfb904b29c425ee8efdb1125e5534b41f
describe
'69036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAP' 'sip-files00301.pro'
76eb4fd7e84a5faabf8e8ffb63472133
3f99090dfc822e544cafda110a029bbe759d9ac3
describe
'58792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
40513fb775aac16698db118a0f0ce8a9
404fa6f04e62e48714a1823c01b6a24b3e267869
describe
'1502216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAR' 'sip-files00301.tif'
ff7597980faa3adaa46116c062116493
fcadb2b596c310f331e0f2edd9288e7020d5898b
describe
'2907' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAS' 'sip-files00301.txt'
53431f60fc6618cb3b4c78138cdd64e5
9cfb306e9c235a5b52ebec77acdf3b228de13f0c
describe
'13124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAT' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
124529c20fb1645874b2ea3b9c6f3cfb
051207a2b55492d8bee9e60a023e6befca8043a6
describe
'186441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAU' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
ef0216832dda86fd23708d199f207e32
6cdc62cf5f1dceafc000a30fd8874bfefd653ecd
describe
'200705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAV' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
1aadc733b8021cd46e11064d33430141
030ae5bdbb1adb6341e2c9eeba066155c95c216c
describe
'67251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAW' 'sip-files00302.pro'
a12befb543aa9827dd8a34025d2ab4db
c1c5a4a51b3ee8554e2c7c41dd089b5a15ccc8fc
describe
'57263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAX' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
13d9722a2287f629dc0ec87ec79f9239
d1d7e450dbad9e2a22e94666ea86b0d0d9aacadf
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAY' 'sip-files00302.tif'
2d4c3728895df38ae2d02598b72a83c3
bd30892ba149bcd3739be6701d293184965d0f30
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files00302.txt'
4be43d9341a49992d44a846fcf6456a4
4ab269481260630644831d332e90906a210589fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBA' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
2b8525c5d9b7cf43920ccebdaeb7e1f3
4ffd1139d1fef2348ac133351205c153027ebf31
describe
'186255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBB' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
8ef0c62413c9154f0a30f69ba939e9fc
0c8ed9265f1ff973261672e9f587d393fd8a41d1
describe
'183845' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBC' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
19a3f44963126e6231b7367fdfed2f85
663164b3a369b70fededbe195af4779f4e7e1559
describe
'61613' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBD' 'sip-files00303.pro'
ad74332c11b2757724f297ce16f9a01c
6ad6b21e947e0b0e940d7875dda2333be7d9dc4a
describe
'53594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBE' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
d73d1dc268267ce36d53bf2ffcf6b2bd
19fff692c78438ca226d64700afc3d07befd3f57
describe
'1502272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBF' 'sip-files00303.tif'
fdd1ea341999334d934cab03d2b3864a
9e8ee40e335c9565cc4225651c2f54ac66c360a2
describe
'2603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBG' 'sip-files00303.txt'
d784e755ca857dea9f5bace8c829ec49
d5b716c9d082473f16ea99db5f2d302a96c3928b
describe
'12733' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBH' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
3eac140be5158d6d9714f805bdeaafb3
8692cba5f7014c36789748ce62bb54c67ac844ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBI' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
b871321a1cf27b4a21a29c5580157252
8081fc04da281eeec8d5d844bd987f4d54e716d4
describe
'204568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
cf3cbfb54a7e4676e9f071e7ac39ecfb
f3188db5d80891631434e8aeed148a67f63d8add
describe
'69026' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBK' 'sip-files00304.pro'
aeb168e7a45dfe98e8ced71abf77bdf8
7cd6e7e6e780eda42e8143deadffb489c077bb11
describe
'58489' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBL' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
c6c99c9b4787c4b74f1a7042d481cc80
096c4ebced957d1ce0fcc748f0f10fcec7bc48e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBM' 'sip-files00304.tif'
5a2ab88528fcd1abb5d199058da22fdf
8383bf1ee603869966307a589a1e730db29f2772
describe
'2870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBN' 'sip-files00304.txt'
4d9ee67bb3fb08b48c2c304e140f2e84
b9756afc73deced7e1d6803214774e921dda2d10
describe
'12869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBO' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
5d778f95c657fea08bfbb91abd24a2c3
38879155c94bbf3ac7218967b0575df72fc84b32
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBP' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
27f23f885b6ab77ecc4a0e2028be9ed8
fe66bc7bbfb3f0a15e715dd19ad74ec2d065d5ee
describe
'202628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
a0b5f155d9c933307f900fda82f5cda1
2eaaa5a8beda31d07d189ff10ced50de04bdc5f9
describe
'67946' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBR' 'sip-files00305.pro'
77fddf9682bd24645e6336afdd2e595c
b92ddcff79b5232d31578b6daf96b948fc791c5f
describe
'58774' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBS' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
9cd3210716c69cbfaf5755895c3725ea
83437760988e5d44c21fe1bf23af740656d16c4a
describe
'1502332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBT' 'sip-files00305.tif'
fbcf588f8229654c8b299b0f60f7797a
df49d084507e139f744b0663bd76a746a3fd258f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBU' 'sip-files00305.txt'
32c2de4c16f56534fd9a2684ebe3685c
583858aa4a637ba4eb3f5f5c855740f2709e3c1d
describe
'13024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBV' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
6c94c5440acb63cfa3a50b73e801608a
213150cc9e54c975b417fa7241243bb29a785a03
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBW' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
5a63e0696262dfd1efd0ac5606a5ccf0
4c8a6b593fd404a41eb09f3422758f91a79a5d0c
describe
'188311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBX' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
c83eb213830ee5b70c54cdff94daa4b7
c35f1b42c741ecd3fe2510972f946547373ab8a9
describe
'62383' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBY' 'sip-files00306.pro'
3b3b310067464abb7680173e445d5ac0
510af94222a96125383879443b067f7f073d3ae9
describe
'54283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
f55379a5693ce387b257ada72e3feedc
47ef151420b15471ef7bc52735f6fdbaa2913d09
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCA' 'sip-files00306.tif'
4b4d71a15d513c851e5bf5817b18c9db
fa4495e4bca5d30ff93949b91cf54f923e2b86d7
describe
'2622' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCB' 'sip-files00306.txt'
e7d67d3ee81631431ea23f871741d7f0
cd62c3dd048823427b61bc59999c9c69de9a14d3
describe
'12654' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCC' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
1d500b7897ffea258123025b0e7b4442
792c0581fa84fec1d7ecc40950491be1a8bdd681
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCD' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
9782548e1d8f71a1f6e8f4a0fbddcd6b
d9be0cb1f54d9ebe0c54c99acf76a2341fc3e177
describe
'159600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCE' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
f090a405148f789a5efa4f1a57a72bf6
7d87c39a8143c6f0367c4ccd2242a32fa8d8e7ed
describe
'48282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCF' 'sip-files00307.pro'
205ba380bac021c70ad87aaff76c5b71
1c2671ccd1779ada51889171dbcc93ba9dc5a273
describe
'47538' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCG' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
6a06ac87c7e054c10a541a556877016e
0801ca99ccb880f17b72029dc083d3b0129d8f9c
describe
'1501512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCH' 'sip-files00307.tif'
cb45ccafe3f1fdc27b8dcbca8ed449e1
2935d09af24d3ca7ee313f2e9b1f69bd3c974636
describe
'2041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCI' 'sip-files00307.txt'
7e523354099781ef7fd49555ec02e8b6
944cb4bc760ca1c5b91c629bb0e5d069a771b9f0
describe
'11108' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
dddfa82f8b7633e0c64bdb427e8d89ea
ca16d7a6f7f670671f447bce9ae5b9f8a447790c
describe
'188513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCK' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
3a5c76aba5421b38c65fc820fbc73049
beb6f142b918c7ab2ecb6e2cb1fd460d87ca1067
describe
'125458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCQfileF20080402_AAAUCL' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
09d075376f0d7da4a328a9a72118e0f7
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Bd la po wel
aL i ok oe al
e
B:
3
3
a
2
&


ee : ay
fle oe om
us mo

—~

Re
i
Uniform with “SANDFORD AND MERTON."

EVENINGS AT HOME:
TALES AND STORIES

FOR THE INSTRUCTION AND AMUSEMENT
OF YOUNG PEOPLE.

By Dr. AIKEN anp Mrs, BARBAULD.

With Coloured Mlustrations.
THE HISTORY

OF

SANDFORD AND MERTON.


Front, HARRY RELIEVING THE POOR COTTAGERS.
THE HISTORY

OF

SANDFORD AND MERTON.

By THOMAS DAY.

WITH ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS,

PRINTED IN COLOURS BY DALZIEL BROTHERS.



LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO,,
BEDFORD STREET, STRAND,.

PREFACE.
—~-—

HE great popularity which the “ History of Sandford

and Merton” has possessed with the young since its

first publication, in the latter half of the last century, has

induced the Publishers to add a New Edition of it to their
series of National Books,

It is hoped that the few liberties taken with the text,
in the way of alteration, may not diminish its value, but
that it may be welcome, as of old, to the Young Readers
of England,


CONTENTS:

THE FLIES AND THE ANTS. . . . .
THE GENTLEMAN AND THE BASKET-MAKER
THE HISTORY OF THE TWO DOGS
ANDROCLES AND THE LION
THE STORY OF CYRUS .

THE TWO BROTHERS

EXTRACTS FROM A NARRATIVE OF THE EXTRAORDINARY

ADVENTURES OF FOUR RUSSIAN SAILORS, WHO WERE .

CAST AWAY ON THE DESERT ISLAND OF EAST SPITZ-

~

BERGEN . . . . . . .
THE GOOD-NATURED LITTLE BOY
THE ILL-NATURED BOY . . . . .
THE STORY OF THE GRATEFUL TURK . . .
CONTINUATION OF THE HISTORY OF THE GRATEFUL TURK

HISTORY OF A SURPRISING CURE OF THE Gout
HISTORY OF AGESILAUS

e . . . .

THE HISTORY OF LEONIDAS, KING OF SPARTA . .
SOPHRON AND TIGRANES

. . . . .

THE CONCLUSION OF THE STORY OF SOPHRON AND TIGRANES



Page
ro

12
17
22
29
34

39
53
57
64
79

94
127

130
180
239


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS,

—@~—

Harry relieving the poor Cottagers

Harry saving Tommy from the Snake

The First Day at Mr. Barlow’s

Androcles and the Lion . . .
Shipwrecked Mariners killing a White Bear
Tommy encounters the Bear and Monkey
Falling of an Avalanche

Tommy and Harry at Mr. Merton’s

. Front.

Harry saving Tommy from the Bull, the Negro ge 7

Rescue of Harry's Lamb .
. The Highlander running from the Prairie Fire
Harry and Tommy making up their quarrel



Page

22

84
116
150
174
206
224
256
THE HISTORY
OF
SANDFORD AND MERTON.

In the western part of England lived, many years ago, a gentleman
of great fortune, whose name was Merton. He had a large estate
in the Island of Jamaica, where he had passed the greater part of

his life, and was master of many servants, who cultivated sugar and.

other valuable things for his advantage. He had only one son, of
whom he was excessively fond; and to educate his child properly
was the reason of his determining to stay some years in England.

Tommy Merton, who, at the time he came from Jamaica, was only’

six years old, was naturally a very good-tempered boy, but unfortu-
nately had been spoiled by too much indulgence. While-he lived in
Jamaica, he had several black servants to wait upon him, who were
forbidden upon any account to contradict him. If he walked, there
always went two negroes with him; one of whom carried a large
umbrella to keep the sun from him, and the other was to carry him
in his arms whenever he was tired. Besides this, he was always
dressed in silk or laced clothes, and had a fine gilded carriage, which
was borne upon men’s shoulders, in which he made visits to his play-
fellows. His mother was so excessively fond of him, that she gave
him everything he cried for, and would never let him learn to read
because he complained that it made his head ache. :

The consequence of this was, that, though Master Merton had
everything he wanted, he became very fretful and unhappy. Some-
times he ate sweetmeats till he made himself ill, and then he suffered
a great deal of pain, because he would not take bitter physic to make

7 4q
rs 2
2 THE HISTORY OF

him well. Sometimes he cried for things that it was impossible to
give him, and then, as he had never been used to be contradicted,
jt was many hours before he could be pacified. When any company
came to dine at the house, he was always helped first, and to have
the most delicaté parts of the meat, otherwise he would make such a
noise as disturbed the whole company. When his father and mother
were sitting at the tea-table with their friends, instead of waiting till
they were at leisure to attend to him, he would scramble upon the
table, seize the cake and bread and butter, and frequently upset the
tea-cups. By these pranks he not only made himself disagreeable
to everybody else, but often met with very dangerous accidents.
Frequently he cut himself with knives, at other times threw heavy
things upon his head, and once he narrowly escaped being scalded to
death by a kettle of boiling water. He was also so delicately brought
up, that he was perpetually ill: the least wind or rain gave hima
cold, and the least sun was sure to throw him into a fever. Instead
of playing about, and jumping, and running, like other children, he
was taught to sit still for fear of spoiling his clothes, and _to stay in
the house for fear of injuring His complexion. By this kind of educa-
tion, when Master Merton came over to England he could neither
write nor read nor cipher ; he could use none of his limbs with ease,
not bear any degree of fatigue ; but he was very proud, fretful, and
impatient.

Very near to Mr. Merton's seat lived a plain, honest farmer, whose
name was Sandford. This man had, like Mr. Merton, an only son,
not much older than Master Merton, whose name was Harry. Harry,
as he had been always accustomed to run about in the fields, to follow
the labourers while they were ploughing, and to drive the sheep to
their pastures, was active, strong, hardy, and fresh-coloured. He
was neither so fair nor so delicately shaped as Master Merton ; but
he had an honest good-natured countenance, which made everybody
love him, was never out of humour, and took the greatest pleasure
in obliging everybody. If little Harry saw a poor wretch who wanted
victuals while he was eating his dinner, he was sure to give him half,
and sometimes the whole; nay, so very good-natured was he to
everything, that he would never go into the fields to take the eggs of
poor birds, or their young ones, nor practise any other kind of sport
which gave pain to poor animals, who are as capable of feeling as
we ourselves, though they have no words to express their sufferings.
Once, indeed, Harry was caught twirling a cockchafer round, which
he had fastened bya crooked pin to along piece of thread ; but, then,
this was through ignorance and want of thought ; for, as soon as his
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 3

father told him that the poor helpless insect felt as much or more
than he would do, were a knife thrust through his hand, he burst
into tears, and took the poor cockchafer home, where he fed him
during a fortnight upon fresh leaves; and when he was perfectly
recovered, turned him out to enjoy liberty and fresh air. Ever
since that time, Harry was so careful and considerate that he would
step out of the way for fear of hurting a worm, and employed him-
self in doing kind offices to all the animals in the neighbourhood.
He used to stroke the horses as they were at work, and fill his
pockets with acorns for the pigs ; if he walked in the fields he was
sure to gather green boughs for the sheep, who were so fond of him,
that they followed him wherever he went. In the winter-time, when
the ground was covered with frost and snow, and the poor little
birds could get at no food, he would often go supperless to bed, that
he might feed the robin redbreasts; even toads, and frogs, and
spiders, and such kinds of disagreeable creatures, which most people
destroy wherever they find them, were perfectly, safe with Harry: he
used to say they had a right to live as well as we, and that it was
eruel and unjust to kill creatures only because we did not like them.

These sentiments made little Harry a great favourite with every-
body ; particularly with the clergyman of the parish, who became so
fond of him that he taught him to read and write, and had him
almost always with him. Indeed, it was not surprising that Mr.
Barlow showed so particular an affection for him ; for besides learning
with the greatest readiness everything that was taught him, little
Harry was the most honest, obliging creature in the world. He was
never discontented, nor did he ever grumble, whatever he was desired
todo. And then you might believe Harry in everything he said ; for
though he could have gained a plum cake by telling an untruth, and
was sure that speaking the truth would expose him to a severe whip-
ping, he never hesitated in declaring it. Nor was he like many other
children, who place their whole happiness in eating; for give him
but a morsel of dry bread for his dinner, and he would be satisfied,
though you placed sweetmeats and fruit, and every other nicety, in
his way.

With this little boy Master Merton became acquainted in the fol-_;

lowing manner :—As he and the maid were once walking in the fields
on a fine summer's morning, diverting themselves with gathering
different kinds of wild flowers, and running after butterflies, a large
snake on a sudden started up from among some long grass, and
coiled itself round little Tommy's leg. You may imagine the fright
they were both in at this accident : the maid ran away shrieking for
‘

4 THE HISTORY OF

help, while the child, who was in an agony of terror, did not dare to
stir from the place where he was standing. Harry, who happened
to be walking near the place, came running up, and asked what was
the matter. Tommy, who was sobbing most piteously, could not find
words to tell him, but pointed to his leg, and made Harry sensible
of what had happened. Harry, who, though young, was a boy of a
most courageous spirit, told him not to be frightened, and instantly
seizing the snake by the neck, with as much dexterity as resolution,
tore him from Tommy's leg, and threw him to a great distance off.

Just as this happened, Mrs, Merton and all the family, alarmed by
the servant's cries, came running breathless to the place, as Tommy
was recovering his spirits, and thanking his brave little deliverer.
Her first emotions were to catch her darling up in her arms, and.
after giving him a thousand kisses, to ask him whether he had
teceived any hurt.

“No,” said Tommy, ‘‘indeed I have not, mamma ; but I believe
that nasty ugly beast would have bitten me, if that little boy had not
come and pulled him off.”

“And who are you, my dear,” said she, ‘‘to whom we are all so
obliged?”

‘ Harry Sandford, madam.”

‘Well, my child, you are a dear, brave little creature, and you
shall go home and dine with us.”

‘* No, thank you, madam ; my father will want me.”

‘* And who is your father, my sweet boy?”

‘Parmer Sandford, madam, that lives at the bottom of the hill.”

‘Well, my dear, you.shall be my child henceforth ; will you?”

“Tf you please, madam, if 1 may have my own father and mother
too.”

"Mrs. Merton instantly dispatched a servant to the farmer’s ; and,
taking little Harry by the hand, she led him to the mansion-house,
where she found Mr. Merton, whom she entertained with a long
account of Tommy's danger and Harry's bravery.

Harry was now in a new scene of life. He was carried through
costly apartments, where everything that could please the eye, or
contribute to convenience, was assembled. He saw large looking-
glasses in gilded frames, carved tables and chairs, curtains made of
the finest silk, and the very plates and knives and forks were of silver.
At dinner he was placed close to Mrs. Merton, who took care to
supply him with the choicest bits, and engaged him to eat, with the
most endearing kindness; but, to the astonishment of everybody,
he neither appeared pleased nor surprised at anything he saw. Mrs.






HARRY SAVING TOMMY FROM THE SNAKE.—p. 4
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 5
+

Merton could not conceal her disappointment; for, ag she had
always been used to a great degree of finery herself, she had ex-
pected it should make the same impression upon everybody else.
‘After dinner, Mrs. Merton filled a large glass of wine, and giving it
to Harry, bade him drink it up; but he thanked her, and said he
was not dry.

‘‘ But, my dear,” said she, ‘‘ this is very sweet and pleasant, and,
as you are a good boy, you may drink it up.”

“ Ay, but, madam, Mr. Barlow says that we must only eat when
we are hungry, and drink when we are dry ; and that we must only
eat and drink such things as are easily met with ; otherwise we shall
grow peevish and vexed when we can’t get them, And this was the
way that the Apostles did, who were all very good men.”

Mr. Merton laughed at this. '

‘* And pray,” said he, ‘‘little man, do you know who the Aposties
were?”

‘‘Oh! yes, to be sure I do.”

‘« And who were they?”

‘“Why, sir, there was a time when people were grown so very
wicked, that they did not care what they did; and the great folks
were all proud, and minded nothing but eating and drinking and
sleeping, and amusing themselves ; and took no care of the poor,
and would not give a morsel of bread to hinder a beggar from starv-
ing; and the poor were all lazy and loved to be idle better than to
work ; and little boys were disobedient to their parents, and their
parents took no care to teach them anything that was good; and
all the world was very bad, very bad indeed. And then the Lord
Jesus Christ came upon earth, and He went about doing good to
everybody, and curing people of all sorts of diseases, and taught
them what they ought to do; and He chose out twelve very good
men, and called them Apostles; and these Apostles went about the
world doing as He did, and teaching people as He taught them.
And they never minded what they ate or drank, but lived upon dry
bread and water; and when anybody offered them money, they
would not take it, but told them to be good, and give it to the poor
and sick; and so they made the world a great deal better. And
therefore it is not fit to mind what we live upon, but we should take
what we can get, and be contented—just as the beasts and birds do,
who lodge in the open air, and live upon herbs, and drink nothing
but water ; and yet they are strong, and active, and healthy.”

“‘ Upon my word,” said Mr. Merton, '' this little man is a great
philosopher ; and we should be much obliged to Mr. Barlow if he
6 “ THE HISTORY OF

would take our Tommy under his care, for he grows a great boy,
and it is time that he should know something. What say you,
Tommy, should you like to be a philosopher?”

‘‘ Indeed, papa, I don’t know what a philosopher is; but I should
like to be a king, because he’s finer and richer than anybody else,
and. has nothing to do, and everybody waits upon him and is afraid
of him.” :

‘Well said, my dear,” replied Mrs. Merton, and rose and kissed
him ; “and a king you deserve to be with such a spirit; and here's
a glass of wine for you for making such a pretty answer. And
should you not like to be a king, too, little Harry?”

“Indeed, madam, I don’t know; but I hope I shall soon be big
enough to go to plough, and get my own living; and then I shall
want nobody to wait upon me.”

“What a difference between the children of farmers and gentle-
men !”' whispered Mrs. Merton to her husband, looking rather con-
temptuously upon Harry.

‘Tam not sure,” said Mr. Merton, ‘‘ that for this time the advan-
tage is on the side of our son.”

In the evening, little Harry was sent home to his father, who asked
him what he had seen at the great house, and how he liked being
there.

‘‘Why,” replied Harry, ‘‘ they were all very kind to me, for which
I’m much obliged to them; but I had rather have been at home, for
I never was so troubled in all my life to geta dinner. There was one
man to take away my plate, and another to give me drink, and
another to stand behind my chair, just as if I had been lame or
blind, and could not have waited upon myself ; and then there was
so much to do with putting this thing on, and taking another off, I
thought it would never have been over; and, after dinner, I was
obliged to sit two whole hours without ever stirring, while the lady
was talking to me, not as Mr. Barlow does, but wanting me to love
fine clothes, and to be a king.”

But at the mansion-house, much of the conversation, in the mean-
time, was employed in examining the merits of little Harry. Mrs.
Merton acknowledged his bravery and openness of temper; she was
also struck with the good-nature and benevolence of his character ;
but she contended that he had a certain grossness and indelicacy in
his ideas, which distinguish the children of the lower and middling
classes of people fronr those of persons of rank. Mr. Merton, on the
contrary, maintained that he had never before seen a child whose
sentiments and disposition would do so much honour even to the
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 7

most elevated station. Nothing, he affirmed, was more easily ac-
quired than those external manners, and that superficial address,
upon which too many of the higher classes pride themselves as their
greatest, or even as their only accomplishment ; ‘‘ Nay, so easily are
they picked up,” said he, ‘‘ that we frequently see them descend with
the cast clothes to maids and valets, between whom and their masters
and mistresses there is little other difference than what results from
the former wearing soiled clothes and healthier countenances. In-
deed, the real seat of all superiority, even of manners, must be placed
in the mind: dignified sentiments, superior courage, accompanied
with genuine and universal courtesy, are always necessary to consti-
tute the real gentleman; and where these are wanting, it is the
greatest absurdity to think they can be supplied by affected tones of
voice, particularly grimaces, or extravagant and unnatural modes of
dress—which, far from becoming the real test of gentility, have in
general no other origin than the caprice of barbers, tailors, actors,
opera-dancers, milliners, fiddlers, and French servants of both sexes.
Icannot help, therefore, asserting,” said he, very seriously, ‘* that this
little country boy has within his mind the seeds of true gentility and
dignity of character ;. and though I shall also wish that our son may
possess all the common accomplishments of his rank, nothing would
give me more pleasure than a certainty that he would never in any
respect fall below the son of Farmer Sandford.”

Whether Mrs. Merton fully acceded to these observations of her
husband I cannot decide ; but, without waiting to hear her particular
sentiments, he thus went on :—

“Should I appear more warm than usual upon this subject, you
must pardon me, my dear, and attribute it to the interest I feel in
the welfare of our little Tommy. 1 am too sensible that our mutual
fondness has hitherto treated him with rather too much indulgence.
While we have been over-solicitous to remove from him every painful
and disagreeable impression, we have made him too delicate and.
fretful: our desire of constantly consulting his inclinations has made
us gratify even his caprices and humours; and while we have been
too studious to preserve him from restraint and opposition, we have
in reality been ourselves the cause that he has not acquired even the
common attainments of his age and station. All this I have long
observed in silence, but have hitherto concealed, both from my fond-
ness for our child, and my fear of offending you; but at length a
considerstion of his real interests has prevailed over every other
motive, and has compelled me to embrace a resolution, which I hope
will not be disagreeable to you,—-that of sending him directly to Mr.
8 THE HISTORY OF

Barlow, provided he would take care of him; and I think this acci-
dental acquaintance with young Sandford may prove the luckiest
thing in the world, as he is so nearly the age and size of our Tommy,
1 will therefore propose to the farmer that I will for some years pay
for the board and education of his little boy, that he may be a con-
stant companion to our son,”

As Mr. Merton said this with a certain degree of firmness, and the
proposal was in itself so reasonable and necessary, Mrs. Merton did
not make any objection to it, but consented, although very reluctantly,
to part with her son. Mr. Barlow was accordingly invited to dinner
the next Sunday, and Mr. Merton took an opportunity of intro-
ducing the subject, and making the proposal to him ; assuring him,
at the same time, that though there was no return within the bounds
of his fortune which he would not willingly make, yet the education
and improvement of his son were objects of so much importance to
him, that he should always consider himself the obliged party.

To this Mr. Barlow, after thanking Mr. Merton for the confidence
and liberality with which he treated him, answered him in the follow-
ing manner :—

“‘T should be little worthy of the distinguished regard with which
you treat me, did I not with the greatest sincerity assure you that I
feel myself totally unqualified for the task. Iam, sir, a minister of
the Gospel, and I would not exchange that character, and the severe
duties it enjoins, for any other situation in life. But you must be
sensible that the retired manner of life which I have led for these
twenty years, in consequence of my profession, at a distance from
the capital, is little adapted to form such a tutor as the manners and
opinions of the world require for your son. Nevertheless, Iam con-
tented to take him for some nonths under my care, and to endeavour
by every means within my pywer to improve him. But there is one
circumstance which is indispensable, that you permut me to have the
pleasure of serving you as a friend. If you approve of my ideas and
conduct, I will keep him as long as you desire, In the meantime,
as there are, I fear, some little cireumstances which have grown up,
by too much tenderness and indulgence, to be altered in his character,
I think that-I shall possess more of the necessary influence and
authority, if I, for the present, appear to him and your whole family
rather in the light of a friend than that of a schoolmaster.”

However disagreeable this proposal was to the generosity of Mr.
Merton, he was obliged to consent to it; and littke Tommy was
accordingly sent the next day to the vicarage, which was at the
distance of about two miles from his father’s house.








THE FIRST DAY AT MR. BARLOW’S.—p. 8
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 9

The day after Tommy came to Mr. Barlow's, as soon as breakfast
was over, he took him and Harry into the garden: when he was
there, he took a spade into his own hand, and giving Harry a hoe,
they both began to work with great eagerness.

“ Everybody that eats,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ ought to assist in pro-
curing food ; and therefore little Harry and I begin our daily work
This 1s my bed, and that other is his ; we work upon it every day,
and he that raises the most out of it will deserve to fare the best.
Now, Tommy, if you choose to join us, I will mark you out a piece
of ground, which you shall have to yourself, and all the produce shall
be your own.”

*‘No, indeed,” said Tommy, very sulkily, ‘I am a gentleman,
and don’t choose to. slave like a plough-boy.”

‘‘Just as you please, Mr. Gentleman,” said Mr. Barlow; ‘but
Harry and I, who are not above being useful, will mind our
work.”

. In about two hours, Mr. Barlow said it was time to leave off ; and
taking Harry by the hand, he led him into a very pleasant summer-
house, where they sat down; and Mr. Barlow, taking out a plate
of very fine ripe cherries, divided them between Harry and him-
self, .

Tommy, who had followed, and expected his share, when he saw
them both eating without taking any notice of him, could no longer
restrain his passion, but burst into a violent fit of sobbing and crying.

‘‘What is the matter?” said Mr. Barlow very coolly to him.

Tommy looked upon him very sulkily, but returned no answer.

‘Oh! sir, if you don't choose to give me an answer, you may be
silent ; nobody is obliged to speak here."

Tommy became still more disconcerted at this, and, being unable
to conceal his anger, ran out of the summer-house, and wandered
very disconsolately about the garden, equally surprised and vexed
to find that he was now in a place where nobody felt any concern
whether he was pleased or the contrary.

‘When all the cherries were eaten, little Harry said, ‘ You promised
to be so good as to hear me read when we had done working in the
garden ; and, if it is agreeable to you, I will now read the story of
the Flies and the Ants.”

“With all my heart,” said Mr. Barlow: ‘remember to read it
slowly and distinctly, without hesitating or pronouncing the words
wrong ; and be sure to read it in such a manner as to show that you
understand it.”

Harry then took up the book, and read as follows :-—
Jo THE HISTORY OF

THE FLIES AND THE ANTS.

In the corner of a farmer's garden, there once happened to be a nest
of ants, who, during the fine weather of the summer, were employed
all day long in drawing little secds and grains of corn into their hole.
Near them there happened to be a bed of flowers, upon which a great
quantity of flies used to be always sporting and humming, and
diverting themselves by flying from one flower to another. A little
boy, who was the farmer's son, used frequently to observe the diffe-
rent employments of these animals ; and, as he was very young and
ignorant, he one day thus expresscd himself :—‘‘ Can any creature
be so simple as these ants? All day long they are working and toil-
ing, instead of enjoying the fine weather, and diverting themselves
like these flies, who are the happiest creatures in the world.” Some
time after he had made this observation, the weather grew extremely
cold, the sun was scarcely seen to shine, and the nights were chill
and frosty. The same little boy, walking then in the garden, did
not see a single ant, but all the flies lay scattered up and down,
either dead or dying. As he was very good-natured, he could not
help pitying the unfortunate insects, and asking, at the same time,
what had happened to the ants that he used to see in the same
place. The father said, ‘'‘ The flies are all dead, because they were
careless animals, who gave themselves no trouble about laying up
provisions, and were too idle to work ; but the ants, who had been
busy all the summer in providing for their maintenance during the
winter, are all alive and well; and you will see them as soon as the
warm weather returns.”

"Very well, Harry,” said Mr. Barlow; ‘‘ we wil! now take a walk.”

They accordingly rambled out into the fields, where Mr. Barlow
made Harry take notice of several kinds of plants, and told him the
names and nature of them. At last Harry, who had observed some
very pretty purple berries upon a plant that bore a purple flower, and
grew in the hedges, brought them to Mr. Barlow, and asked whether
they were good to eat.

“It is very lucky,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ young man, that you asked
the question before you put them into your mouth ; for had you tasted
them, they would have given you violent pains in your head and
stomach, and perhaps have killed you, as they grow upon a plant
called nightshade, which is a rank poison."

‘Sir,’ said Harry, ‘‘I take care never to eat anything without
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 1X

knowing what it is, and I hope, if you will be so good as to continue
to teach me, I shall very soon know the names and qualities of all
the herbs which grow.”

As they were returning home, Harry saw a very large bird called
a kite, upon the ground, who seemed to have something in his claws,
which he was tearing to pieces. Harry, who knew him to be one of
those ravenous creatures which prey upon others, ran up to him,
shouting as loud as he could; and the bird, being frightened, flew
away, and lefta chicken behind him, very much hurt indeed, but still
alive.

‘* Look, sir,” said Harry, ‘if that cruel creature has not almost
killed this poor chicken ; see how he bleeds, and hangs his wings !
J will put him into my bosorh to recover him, and carry him home ;
and he shall have part of my dinner every day till he is well, and able
to shift for himself.” ‘

As soon as they came home, the first care of little Harry was to
put his wounded chicken into a basket with some fresh straw, some
water, and some bread. After that Mr. Barlow and he went to
dinner.

In the meantime, Tommy, who had been skulking about all day,
very much mortified and uneasy, came in, and being very hungry,
was going to sit down to the table with the rest; but Mr. Barlow
stopped him, and said,

‘*No, sir, as you are too much of a gentleman to work, we, who
are not so, do not choose to work for the idle.” ‘

Upon this Tommy, retired into a corner, crying as if his heart
would break, but more from grief than passion, as he began to per-
ceive that nobody minded his iil temper.

But little Harry, who could not bear to see his friend so unhappy,
looked up half-crying into Mr. Barlow's face, and said, ‘' Pray, sir,
may I do as I please with my share of the dinner?”

‘Yes, to be sure, child.”

“Why, then,” said he, getting up, ‘I will give it all to poor
Tommy, who wants it more than I do.”

Saying this, he gave it to him as he sat in the corner; and Tommy
took it, and thanked him without ever turning his eyes from off the
ground.

“T see," said Mr. Barlow, ‘that though gentlemen are above
being of any use themselves, they are not above taking the bread
that other people have been working hard for."

At this Tommy cried still more bitterly than before.

The next day Mr. Barlow and Harry went to work as before ; but
We

12 THE HISTORY OF

they had scarcely begun before Tommy came to them, and desired
that he might have a hoe too, which Mr. Barlow gave him; but as
he had never before learned to handle one, he was very awkward in
the use of it, and hit himself several strokes upon his legs. Mr.
Barlow then laid down his own spade, and showed him how to hold
and use it, by which means, in a short time, he became very expert,
and worked with the greatest pleasure. When their work was over
they retired all three to the summer-house; and Tommy felt the
greatest joy imaginable when the fruit was produced, and he was in-
yited to take his share, which seemed to him the most delicious he
had ever tasted, because working in the air had given him an.appetite.

As soon as they had done eating, Mr. Barlow took up a book, and
asked Tommy whether he would read them a story out of it; but he,
looking a little ashamed, said he had never learned to read.

‘‘Tam very sorry for it,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘because you lose a
very great pleasure ; then Harry shall read to you.”

Harry accordingly took up the book, and read the following
story :—

THE GENTLEMAN AND THE BASKET-MAKER.

THERE was, in the Eastern part of the world, a rich man, who lived
im a fine house, and spent his whole time in eating, drinking, sleep-
ing, and amusing himself. As he had a great many servants to wait
upon him, who treated him with the greatest respect, and did what-
ever they were ordered, and as he had never been taught the truth,
nor accustomed to hear it, he grew very proud, insolent, and capri-
cious, imagining that he had a right to command all the world, and
that the poor were only born to serve and obey him.

Near this rich man’s house there lived an honest and industrious
poor man, who gained his livelihood by making little baskets out of
dried reeds, which grew upon a piece of marshy ground close to his
cottage. But though he was obliged to. labour from morning’ to
night to earn food enough to support him, and though he seldom
fared better than upon dry bread, or rice, or pulse, and had no other
bed than the remains of the rushes of which he made baskets, yet
was he always happy, cheerful, and contented ; for his labour gave
him so good an appetite, that the coarsest fare appeared to him
delicious ; and he went to bed so tired that he would have slept
soundly even upon the ground. Besides this, he was a good and
virtuous man, humane to everybody, honest in his dealings, always
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 13

accustomed to speak the truth, and therefore beloved and respected
by all his neighbours. .

The rich man, on the contrary, though he lay upon the softest bed,
yet could not sleep, because he had passed the day in idleness ; and
though the nicest dishes were presented to him, yet could he not eat
with any pleasure, because he did not wait till nature gave him an
appetite, nor use exercise, nor go into the open air, Besides this, as
he was a great sluggard and glutton, he was almost always ill; and,
as he did good to nobody, he had no friends ; and even his servants
spoke ill of him behind his back, and all his neighbours, whom he
oppressed, hated him. For these reasons he was sullen, melancholy,
and unhappy, and became displeased with all who appeared more
cheerful than himself. When he was carried out in his palanquin
(a kind of bed, borne upon the shoulders of men) he frequently passed
by the cottage of the poor basket-maker, who was always sitting at
the door, and singing as he wove the baskets. The rich man could
not behold this without anger.

“What!” said he, ‘‘shall a wretch, a peasant, a low-born fellow,
that weaves bulrushes for a scanty subsistence, be always happy and
pleased, while I, that am a gentleman, possessed of riches and power,
and of more consequence than a million of reptiles like him, am
always melancholy and discontented !"

This reflection arose so often in his mind that at last he began to
feel the greatest degree of hatred towards the poor man; and, as he
had never been accustomed to conquer his own passions, however
improper or unjust they might be, he at last determined to punish
the basket-maker for being happier than himself.

With this wicked design he one night gave orders to his servants
(who did not dare to disobey him) to set fire to the rushes which sur-
rounded the poor man's house. As it was summer, and the weather
in that country extremely hot, the fire soon spread over the whole
marsh, and not only consumed all the rushes, but soon extended to
the cottage itself, and the poor basket-maker was obliged to run out
almost naked to save his life.

You may judge of the surprise and grief of the poor man, when he
found himself entirely deprived of his subsistence by the wickedness
of his rich neighbour, whom he had never offended ; but, as he was
unable to punish him for this injustice, he set out and walked on foot
to the chief magistrate of that country, to whom, with many tears, he
told his pitiful case. © The magistrate, who was a good and just man,
immediately ordered the rich man to be brought before him; and
when he found that he could not deny the wickedness of which he
14 THE HISTORY OF

was accused, -he thus spoke to the poor man: ‘As this proud and
wicked man has been puffed up with the opinion of his own import-
ance, and attempted to commit the most scandalous injustice from
his contempt of the poor, I am willing to teach him of how little
value he is to anybody, and how vile and contemptible a creature he
really is; but, for this purpose, it is necessary that you should con-
sent to the plan I have formed, and go with him to the place whither
I intend to send you both.”

The poor man replied, ‘'I never had much; but the little I once
had is now lost by the mischievous disposition of this proud and
oppressive man. Iam entirely ruined; 1 have no means left in the
world of procuring myself a morsel of bread the next time IT am
hungry ; therefore I am ready to go wherever you plese to send
me; and, though I would not treat this man as he has treated me,
yet should I rejoice to teach him more justice and humanity, and to
prevent his injuring the poor a second ‘time.”

The magistrate then ordered them both to be put on board a ship,
and carried to a distant country, which was inhabited by a rude and
savage kind of men, who lived in huts, were strangers to riches, and
got their living by fishing.

As soon as they were set on shore, the sailors left them as they had
been ordered, and the inhabitants of the country came round them
in great numbers. The rich man seeing himself thus exposed, with-
out assistance or defence, in the midst of a barbarous people, whose
language he did not understand, and in whose power he was, began
to cry and wring his hands in the most abject manner ; but the poor
basket-maker, who had always been accustomed to hardships and
dangers from his infancy, made signs to the people that he was their
friend, and was willing io work for them and be their servant. Upon
this the natives made signs to them that they would do them no hurt,
but would make use of their assistance in fishing and carrying wood.

Accordingly, they led them both to a wood at some distance, and
showing them several logs, ordered them to transport them to
their cabins. They both immediately set about their tasks, and
the poor man, who was strong and active, very soon had finished his
share ; while the rich man, whose limbs were tender and delicate,
and never accustomed to any kind of labour, had scarcely done a
quarter as much, The savages, who were witnesses to this, began
to think that the basket-maker would prove very useful to them, and
therefore presented him with a large portion of fish and several of
their choicest roots ; while to the rich man they gave scarcely enough
to support him, because they thought him capable of being of very
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 15

little service to them: however, as he had now fasted several hours,
he ate what they gave him with a better appetite than he had ever
felt before at his own table. "

The next day they were set to work again, and as the basket-
maker had the same advantage over his companion, he was highly
caressed and well treated by the natives, while they showed every
mark of contempt towards the other, whose delicate and luxurious
habits had rendered him very unfit for labour. :

The rich man now began to perceive with how little reason he had
before valued himself, and despised his fellow-creatures; and an
accident that fell out shortly after tended to complete his mortifica-
tion. It happened that one of the savages had found something:like
a fillet, with which he adorned his forehead, and seemed to think
himself extremely fine: the basket-maker, who had perceived this
appearance of vanity, pulled up some reeds, and sitting down to
work, in ashort time finished a very elegant wreath, which he placed
upon the head of the first inhabitant he chanced to meet. This man
was so pleased with his new acquisition, that he danced and capered
with joy, and ran away to seek the rest, who were all- struck with
astonishment at this new and elegant piece of finery. It was not long
before another came to the basket-maker, making signs that he
wanted to be ornamented like his companion ; and with such: plea-
sure were these chaplets considered by the whole nation, that the
basket-maker was released from his former drudgery, and continually
employed in weaving them. In return for the pleasure which he
conferred upon them, the grateful savages brought him every kind
of food their country afforded, built him a hut, and showed him
every demonstration of gratitude and kindness. But the rich man,
who possessed neither talents to please nor strength to labour was
condemned to be the basket-maker's servant, and to cut him reeds
to supply the continual demand for chaplets.

After having passed some months in this manner, they were again
transported to their own country, by the orders of the magistrate, and
brought before him. He then looked sternly upon the rich man, and
said: ‘‘Having now taught you how helpless, contemptible, and
feeble a creature you are, as well as how inferior to the man you in-
sulted, I shall proceed to make reparation to him for the injury you
have inflicted upon him. Did I treat you as you deserve, I should
take from you all the riches that you possess, as you wantonly deprived
this poor man of his whole subsistence; but, hoping that you will
become more humane for the future, I sentence you to give half your
fortune to this man, whom you endeavoured to ruin."
16 THE HISTORY OF

Upon this the basket-maker said, after thanking the magistrate
for his goodness, ‘‘I, having been bred up in poverty, and accus-
tomed to labour, have no desire to acquire riches, which I should
not know how to use; all, therefore, that I require of this man is,
to put me into the same situation I was in before, and to learn more.
humanity.”

The rich man. could not help being astonished at this generosity
and, having acquired wisdom by his misfortunes, not only treated
the basket-maker as a friend during the rest of his life, but employed
his riches in relieving the poor and benefiting his fellow-creatures,

The story being ended, Tommy said it was very pretty ; but that,
had he been the good basket-maker, he would have taken the naughty
rich man's fortune and kept it.

“So would not I,” said Harry, ‘‘for fear of growing as proud, and
wicked, and idle as the other.”

From this time forward Mr. Barlow and his two pupils used con-
stantly to work in their garden every morning ; and when they were
fatigued they retired to the summer-house, where little Harry, who
improved every day in reading, used to entertain them with some
pleasant story or other, which Tommy always listened to with the
greatest pleasure. But little Harry going home for a week, Tommy
and Mr. Barlow were left alone.

The next day, after they had done work, and retired to the sum-
mer-house as usual, Tommy expected Mr. Barlow would read to
him ; but, to his great disappointment, found that he was busy and
could not. The next day the same accident was renewed, and the
day after that. At this Tommy lost all patience, and said to himself,
‘‘Now, if I could but read like little Harry Sandford, I should not
need to ask anybody to do it for me, and then I could divert my-
self: and why (thinks he) may not I do what another has done?
To be sure little Harry is clever; but he could not have read if he
had not been taught; and if I am taught I daresay I shall learn to
read as well as he. Well, as soon as ever he comes home I am
determined to ask him about it.”

The next day little Harry returned, and as soon as Tommy had
an opportunity of being alone with him, ‘‘Pray, Harry,” said
Tommy, ‘how came you to be able to read?”

_ Harry. Why; Mr. Barlow taught me my letters, and then spell-
ing; and then, by putting syllables together, I learnt to read.

Tommy. And could not you show me my letters?

Afarry. Yes, very willingly. ol
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 17

Harry then took up a book, and Tommy was so eager and atten-
tive, that at the very first lesson he learned the whole alphabet: He
was infinitely pleased with his first experiment, and could scarcely
forbear running to Mr. Barlow, to let him know the improvement
he had made ; but he thought he should ‘surprise him more if he said
nothing about the matter till he was able to read a whole story. He
therefore applied himself with such diligence, and little Harry, who
spared no pains.to assist his friend, was so good a master, that in
about two months he determined to surprise Mr. Barlow with a dis- !
play of his talents. Accordingly, one day, when they were all as- .
sembled in the summer-house, and the book was given to Harry,
Tommy stood up and said that if Mr, Barlow pleased, he would try
to read.

“Oh, very willingly,” said Mr. Barlow; “but I should as soon
expect you to fly as to read.”

‘Tommy smiled with a consciousness of his own proficiency, and,
taking up the book, read with great fluency—

THE HISTORY OF THE TWO DOGS.

In a part of the world where there are many strong and fierce wild
beasts, a poor man happened to bring up two puppies, of that kind
which is most valued for size and courage. As they appeared to
possess more than common strength and agility, he thought that he
should make an acceptable present to his landlord, who was a rich
man, living in a great city, by giving him one of them, which was
called Jowler; while he brought up the other, named Keeper, to
guard his own flocks.

From this time the manner of living was entirely altered between
the brother whelps. Jowler was sent into a plentiful kitchen, where
he quickly became the favourite of the servants, who diverted them-
selves with his little tricks and wanton gambols, and rewarded him
with great quantities of pot-liquor and broken victuals; by which
means, as he was stuffing from morning till night, he increased con-
siderably in size, and grew sleek and comely ; he was, indeed, rather
unwieldy, and so cowardly that he would run away from a dog only
half as big as himself: he was much addicted to gluttony, and was
often beaten for the thefts he committed jn the pantry ; but, as he
had learned to fawn upon the footmen, and would stand upon his
hind legs to beg when he was ordered, and, besides this, would
fetch and carry, he was mightily caressed by all the neighbourhood.

2
18 THE HISTORY OF

Keeper, in the meantime, who lived at a cottage in the country,
neither fared so well, looked so plump, nor had learned all these
little tricks to recommend him; but as his master was too poor to
maintain anything but what was useful, and was obliged to be con-
tinually in the air, subject to all kinds of weather, and labouring hard
for a livelihood, Keeper grew hardy, active, and diligent ; he was
also exposed to continual danger from the wolves, from whom he.
had received many a severe bite while guarding the flocks. These
continual combats gave him that degree of intrepidity, that no
enemy could make him tum his back. His care and assiduity so
well defended the sheep of his master, that not one had ever been
missing since they were placed under his protection. His honesty,
too, was so great, that no temptation could overpower it; and,
though he was left alone in the kitchen while the meat was roasting,
he never attempted to taste it, but received with thankfulness what-
ever his master chose to give him. From a continual life in the air,
he was become so hardy that no tempest could drive him to shelter
when he ought to be watching the flocks ; and he would plunge into
the most rapid river, in the coldest weather of the winter, at the
slightest sign from his master.

About this time it happened that the landlord of the poor man
went to examine his estate in the country, and brought Jowler with
him to the place of his birth. At his arrival there he could not help
viewing with great contempt the rough ragged appearance of Keeper,
and his awkward look, which discovered nothing of the address for
which he so much admired Jowler. This opinion, however, was
altered by means of an accident which happened to him. As he
was one day walking in a thick wood, with no other company than
the two dogs, a hungry wolf, with eyes that sparkled like fire, brist-
ling hair, and a horrid snarl that made the gentleman tremble,
rushed out of a neighbouring thicket, and seemed ready to devour
him. The unfortunate man gave himself over for lost, more espe-
‘cially when he saw that his faithful Jowler, instead of coming to his
assistance, ran sneaking away, with his tail between his legs, howling
with fear. But in this moment of despair, the undaunted Keeper,
who had followed him humbly and unobserved at a distance, flew
to his assistance, and attacked the wolf with so much courage and
skill, that he was compelled to exert all his strength in his own de-
fence. ‘The battle was long and bloody, but in the end Keeper laid
the wolf dead at his feet, though not without receiving several severe
wounds himself, and presenting a bloody and mangled spectacle to
the eyes of his master, who came up at that instant. The gentle-
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 1

man was filled with joy for his escape and gratitude to his brave
deliverer ; and learned by his own experience that appearances are
not always to be trusted, and that great virtues and good disposi-
tions may sometimes be found where we least expect them.

“Very well, indeed,” said Mr. Barlow. ‘‘I find that when young
gentlemen choose to take pains, they can do things almost as well as
other people. But what do you say to the story you have been
reading, Tommy? Would you rather have owned the genteel dog
that left his master to be devoured, or the poor, rough, ragged.
meagre, neglected cur that exposed his own life in his defence?”

‘Indeed, sir,” said Tommy, ‘I would have rather had Keeper ;
but then I would have fed him, and washed him, and combed him,
till he had looked as well as Jowler."

“But then, perhaps, he would have grown idle, and fat, and
cowardly, like him,” said Mr. Barlow. ‘But here is some more of
it, let us read to the end of the story.”

Tommy then went on thus :—

The gentleman was so pleased with the noble behaviour of Keeper,
that he desired the poor man to make him a present of the dog;
which, though with some reluctance, he complied with. Keeper was
therefore taken to the city, where he was caressed and fed by every-
body, and the disgraced Jowler was left at the cottage, with strict
injunctions to the man to hang him up, as a worthless unprofitable
cur.

As soon as the gentleman had departed, the poor man was going
to execute his commission ; but considering the noble size and comely
look of the dog, and above all, being moved with pity for the poor
animal, who wagged his tail, and licked his new master’s feet, just
as he was putting the cord about his neck, he determined to, spare
his life, and see whether a different treatment might not produce
different manners. From this day Jowler was in every respect treated
as his brother Keeper had been before. He was fed but scantily ;
and from this spare diet soon grew more active and fond of exercise.
The first shower he was in he ran away as he had been accustomed
to do, and sneaked to the fireside ; but the farmer's wife soon drove
him out of doors, and compelled him to bear the rigour of the
weather. In consequence of this he daily became more vigorous and
hardy, and in a few months regarded cold and rain no more than if
he had been brought up in the country.

Changed as he already was in many respects for the better, he still
992

“a
20 THE HISTORY OF

retained an insurmountable dread of wild beasts; till one day, as he
was wandering through a wood alone, he was attacked by a large
and fierce wolf, who, jumping out of a thicket, seized him by the
neck with fury. Jowler would fain have run, but his enemy was too
swift and violent to suffer him to escape. Necessity makes even.
cowards brave. Jowler being thus stopped in his retreat, turned
upon his enemy, and very luckily seizing him by the throat, strangled
him in an instant. His master then coming up, and being witness
of his exploit, praised him, and stroked him witha degree of fondness
he had never done before. Animated by this victory, and by the
approbation of his master, Jowler from that time became as brave as
he had before been. pusillanimous ; and there was very soon no dog
in the country who was so great a terror to beasts of prey. .

In the meantime Keeper, instead of hunting wild beasts or looking
after sheep, did nothing but eat and sleep, which he was permitted
to do, from a remembrance of his past services. As all qualities both
of mind and body are lost if not continually exercised, he soon ceased.
to be that hardy, courageous animal he was before, and acquired all *
the faults which are the consequences of idleness and gluttony.

About this time the gentleman went again into the country, and
taking his dog with him, was willing that he should exercise his
prowess once more against his ancient enemies the wolves, Ac-
cordingly, the country people having quickly found one in a neigh-
bouring wood, the gentleman went thither with Keeper, expecting
to see him behave as he had done the year before. But how great
was his surprise when, at the first onset, he saw his beloved dog run
away with every mark of timidity! At this moment another dog
sprang forward, and seizing the wolf with the greatest intrepidity,
after a bloody contest, left him dead upon the ground. The gentlé-
man could not help lamenting the cowardice of his favourite, and
admiring the noble spirit of the other dog, whom, to his infinite sur-
prise, he found to be the same Jowler that he had discarded the
year before.

‘«T now see,” said he to the farmer, ‘‘that it is in vain to expect
courage in those who live a life of indolence and repose, and that
constant exercise and proper discipline are frequently able to change
contemptible characters into good ones,”

‘‘Indeed," said Mr. Barlow, when the story was ended, ‘‘I am
sincerely glad to find that Tommy has made this acquisition. He
will now depend upon nobody, but be able to divert himself when-
ever he pleases. All that has ever been written in our own language
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 2r

will be from this time in his power, whether he chooses to read little
entertaining stories like what we have heard to-day, or to read the
actions of great and good men in history, or to make himself ac-
quainted with the nature of wild beasts and birds which are found
in other countries, and have been described in books, In short, I
scarcely know of anything which from this moment will not be in his
power, and I do not despair of one day seeing him a very sensible
man, capable of teaching and instructing others.” ‘ ,

“Yes,” said Tommy, something elated by all this praise, ‘Iam
determined to make myself as clever as anybody ; and I don't doubt,
though I am such a little fellow, that I know more already than
many grown-up people; and I am sure, though there are no less
than six blacks in our house, that there is not one of them who can
read a story like me.”

Mr. Barlow looked a little grave at this sudden display of vanity,
and said rather coolly, '‘ Pray, who has attempted to teach them
anything ?"

“Nobody, I believe,” said Tommy,

“Where is the great wonder, then, if they are ignorant?” replied
Mr. Barlow: ‘you would probably have never known anything had
you not been assisted ; and even now you know very little.”

In this manner did Mr. Barlow begin the education of Tommy
Merton, who had naturally very good dispositions, although he had
been suffered to acquire many bad habits, that sometimes prevented
them from appearing. He was in particular very passionate, and
thought he had a right to command everybody that was not dressed
as fine as himself. “This opinion often led him into inconveniences,
and once was the occasion of his being severely mortified.

This accident happened in the following manner :—One day as
Tommy was striking a ball with his bat, he struck it over a hedge
into an adjoining field, and seeing a little ragged boy walking along
on that side, he ordered him, ina very peremptory tone, to bring it to
him. The little boy, without taking any notice of what was said,
walked on, and left the ball; upon which Tommy called out more
loudly than before, and asked if he did not hear what was said.

“Yes,” said the boy, '‘for the matter of that I am not deaf.”

“Oh! you are not?” replied Tommy ; ‘‘then bring me my hall
directly,” 2
‘I don’t choose it,” said'the boy.

‘“But,” sdid Tommy, ‘if I come to you, I shall make you choose
!

it. :
‘Perhaps not, my pretty little master,” said the boy.
a

22 VHE HISTORY OF

“You little rascal!” said Tommy, who now began to be very
angry, ‘‘if I come over the hedge, 1 will thrash you within an inch
of your life.”

To this the other made no answer but by a Joud laugh, which pro-
voked Tommy so much that he clambered over the hedge and jumped
precipitately down, intending to have leaped into the field ; but un-
fortunately his foot slipped, and down he rolled into a wet ditch,
which was full of mud and water. There poor Tommy tumbled
about for some time, endeavouring to get out ; but it was to no pur-
pose, for his feet stuck in the mud or slipped off from the bank ; his
fine waistcoat was dirtied all over, his white stockings covered with
mire, his breeches filled with puddle-water ; and, to add to his dis-
tress, he first lost one shoe and then the other—his laced hat tumbled
off from his head and was completely spoiled. In. this distress he
must probably have remained a considerable time, had not the little
ragged boy taken pity on him and helped him out. Tommy was so
vexed and ashamed that he could not say a word, but ran home in
such a plight that Mr. Barlow, who happened to meet him, was
afraid he had been considerably hurt ; but when he heard the accident
which had happened, he could not help smiling, and he advised
Tommy to be careful for the future how he attempted to thrash little
tagged boys.

The next day Mr. Barlow desired Harry, when they were all to-
gether in the arbour, to read the following story of—

ANDROCLES AND THE LION.

THERE was a certain slave named Androcles, who was so ill treated
by his master that his life became insupportable. Finding no remedy
for what he suffered, he at length said to himself,—''It is better to
die than to continue to live in such hardships and misery as 1 am
obliged to suffer. Iam determined, therefore, to run away from my
master. If I am taken again, I know that I shall be punished with
a cruel death ; but it is better to die at once than to live in misery.
If I escape, I must betike myself to deserts and woods, inhabited
only by beasts ; but they cannot use me more. cruelly than I have
been used by my fellow-creatures ; therefore I will rather trust my-
self with them, than continue to be a miserable slave.”

Having formed this resolution, he took an opportunity of leaving
his master’s house, and hid himself in a thick forest, which was at
some miles distance from the city. But here the unhappy man found


ANDROCLES AND THE LION,—p, 22
at

SANDFORD AND MERTON. 23

that he hadonly escaped from one kind of misery to experience another.
He wandered about all day through a vast and trackless wood, where
his flesh was continually torn by thorns and brambles : he grew
hungry, but could find no food in this dreary solitude! At length
he was ready to die with fatigue, and lay down in despair in a large
cavern which he found by accident.

‘Poor man!” said Harry, whose little heart could scarcely con-
tain itself at this mournful recital, ‘1 wish I could have met with
him; I.would have given him all my dinner, and he should have
had my bed. But pray, sir, tell me why does one man behave so
cruelly to another, and why should one person be the servant of
another, and bear so much ill treatment?”

“As to that,” said Tommy, ‘‘some folks are born gentlemen, and
then they must command others ; and some are born servants, and
then they must do as they are bid. 1 remember, before I came
hither, that there were a great many black men and women, that my
mother said were only born to wait upon me; and I used to beat them,
and kick them, and throw things at them whenever I was angry ;
and they never dared strike me again, because they were slaves,” *

“And pray, young man,” said Mr. Barlow, “how came these
people to be slaves?”

Tommy. Because my father bought them with his money.

Mr. Barlow. So, then, people that are bought with money are
slaves, are they?

Tommy. Yes,

Mr. Barlow. And those that buy them have a right to kick them,
and beat them, and do as they please with them?

Tommy. Yes.

Mr. Barlow. Then if I was to take and sell you to Farmer Sand-
ford, he would have a right to do what he pleased with you.

‘No, sir,” said Tommy, somewhat warmly ; ‘‘ but you would have
no right to sell me, nor he to buy me."

Ur, Barlow. Then it is nota person’s being bought or sold that
gives another aright to use him ill, but one person's having aright to
sell another, and the man who buys having a right to purchase?

Tommy. Yes, sir.

Mr. Barlow. And what right have the people who sold the poor
negroes f9. your father to sell them, or what right had your father to
buy them ? ‘

% At the period when Tommy Merton lived, slavery was not abolished in our West
Indian possessions.—[ EDITOR. ]
24 THE HISTORY OF

Here Tommy seemed to be a good deal puzzled, but at length he
said, ‘They are brought from a country that is a great way off, in
ships, and so they become slaves."

“Then,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘if I take you to another country in a
ship, I shall have a right to sell you?”

fommy. No, but you won't, sir, because I was born a gentleman.

‘Wr. Barlow. What do you mean by that, Tommy ?

‘‘Why,” said Tommy, a little confounded, ‘‘ to have a fine house
and fine clothes, and a coach and a great deal of money, as my papa
has.”

Mr. Barlow, Then it you were no longer to have a fine house, nor
fine clothes, nor a great deal of money, somebody that had all these
things might make you a slave, and use you ill, and beat you, and
insult you, and do whatever he liked with you ?

Tommy. No, sir, that would not be right neither, that anybody
should use me ill.

Mr. Barlow, Then one person should not use another ill?

Tommy. No, sir. .

Ur, Barlow, To make a slave of anybody is to use him ill, is it
not?

Tommy. I think so.

Alr, Barlow. ‘Then no one ought to make a slave of you?

Tommy. No, indeed, sir.

Mr, Barlow. But if no one should use another ill, and making a
slave is using him ill, neither ought you to make a slave of any one
else. ; ‘

Tommy. Indeed, sir, I think not; and for the future I never will
. use our black William ill, nor pinch him, nor kick him, as I used to
do.

Mr, Barlow. Then you will be a very good boy. But let us now
continue our story.

This unfortunate man had not Jain long quiet in the cavern before
he heard a dreadful! noise, which seemed to be the roar of some wild
beast, and terrified him very much. He started up with a design to
escape, and had already reached the mouth of the cave, when he saw
coming towards him a lion of prodigious size, who prevented any pos-
sibility of retreat. The unfortunate man now believed his destruction
to be inevitable ; but, to his great astonishment, the beast advanced
towards him with a gentle pace, without any mark of enmity or rage,
and uttered a kind of mournful voice, as if he demanded the assist-
ance of the man.
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 25

Androcles, who was naturally of a resolute disposition, acquired
courage from this circumstance to examine his monstrous guest, who
gave him sufficient leisure for that purpose. He saw, as the lion
approached him, that he seemed to limp upon one of his legs, and
that the foot was extremely swelled, as if it had been wounded,
Acquiring still more fortitude from the gentle demeanour of the
beast, he advanced up to him, and took hold of the wounded paw,
as a surgeon would examine a patient. He then perceived that a
thorn of uncommon size had penetrated the ball of the foot, and was
the occasion of the swelling and lameness which he had observed.
Androcles found that the beast, far from resenting this familiarity,
received it with the greatest gentleness, and seemed to invite him by
his blandishments to proceed. He therefore extracted the thorn,
and, pressing the swelling, discharged a considerable quantity of
matter, which had been the cause of so much pain and uneasiness,

As soon as the beast felt himself thus relieved, he began to testify
his joy and gratitude by every expression within his power. He
Jumped about like a wanton spaniel, wagged his enormous tail, and
licked’ the feet and hands of his physician. Nor was he contented
with these demonstrations of kindness: from this moment Andro-
cles became his guest ; nor did the lion ever sally forth in quest of
prey without bringing home the produce of his chase, and sharing
it with his friend. In this savage state of hospitality did the man
continue to live during the space of several months. At length,
wandering unguardedly through the woods, he met with a company
of soldiers sent out to apprehend him, and was by them taken
prisoner and conducted back to his master. The laws of that
country being very severe against slaves, he was tried and found
guilty of having fled from his master, and, as a punishment for his
pretended crime, he was sentenced to be torn in pieces by a furious
lion, kept many days without food, to inspire him with additional
Tage.

When the destined moment arrived, the unhappy man was ex-
posed, unarmed, in the midst of a spacious area, enclosed on every
side, round which many thousand people were assembled to view:
the mournful spectacle.

Presently a dreadful yell was heard, which struck the spectators
with horror ; and a monstrous lion rushed out of a den, which was
purposely set open, and darted forward with erected mane and
flaming eyes, and jaws that gaped like an open sepulchre. A mourn-
ful silence instantly prevailed! All eyes were directly turned upon
the destined victim, whose destruction now appeared inevitable.
26 THE HISTORY OF

But the pity of the multitude was soon converted into astonishment,
when they beheld the lion, instead of destroying his defenceless prey,
crouch submissively at his feet, fawn upon him as a faithful dog
would do upon his master, and rejoice over him as a mother that
unexpectedly recovers her offspring. The governor of the town, who
was present, then called out with a loud voice, and ordered Andro-
cles to explain to them this unintelligible mystery, and how a savage
of the fiercest and most unpitying nature should thus in a moment
have forgotten his innate disposition, and be converted into a harm-
less and inoffensive animal.

Androcles then related to the assembly every circumstance of his
adventures in the woods, and concluded by saying, that the very
lion which now stood before them had been his friend and entertainer
in the woods. All the persons present were astonished and delighted
with the story, to find that even the fiercest beasts are capable of
being softened by gratitude and moved by humanity; and they
unanimously joined to entreat for the pardon of the unhappy man
from the governor of the place. This was immediately granted to
him; and he was also presented with the lion, who had in this
manner twice saved the life of Androcles.

‘*Upon my word,” said Tommy, ‘‘ this is a very pretty story ; but
I never should have thought that a lion could have grown so tame :
I thought that they, and tigers, and wolves, had been so fierce and
cruel that they would haye torn everything they met to pieces.”

‘““When they are hungry,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘they kill every
animal they meet: but this is to devour it; for they can only live
upon flesh, like dogs and cats, and many other kinds of animals.
When they are not hungry they seldom meddle with anything, or do
unnecessary mischief; therefore they are much less cruel than many
persons that I have seen, and even than many children, who plague
and torment animals, without any reason whatsoever.”

“Indeed, sir,” said Harry, ‘I think so. And 1 remember, as I
was walking along the road some days past, I saw a little naughty
boy that used a poor jackass very ill indeed. The poor animal was
so lame that he could hardly stir; and yet the boy beat him with a
great stick as violently as he was able, to make him go on faster.”

‘* And what did you say to him?” said Mr. Barlow.

Harry. Why, sir, I told him how naughty and cruel it was; and
T asked him how he would like to be beaten in that manner by some-
body that was stronger than himself.

Myr. Barlow, And what answer did he make you?
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 27

flarry. He said that it was his daddy's ass, and so that he hada
right to beat it; and that-if I said a word more he would beat me.

Afr, Barlow, And what answer did you make—any ?

Harry. 1 told him, if it was his father’s ass, he should not use it
ill; for that we were all God's creatures, and that we should love
each other, as He loved us all ; and that as to beating me, if he struck
me I had a right to strike him again, and would do it, though he was
almost as big again as I was.

Mr. Barlow, And did he strike you?

flarry. Yes, sir. He endeavoured to strike me upon the head
with his stick, but I dodged, and so it fell upon my shoulder; and
he was going to strike me again, but 1 darted at him, and knocked
him down, and then he began blubbering, and begged me not to hurt
him.

Mr. Barlow. It is not uncommon for those who are most cruel to
be at the same time most cowardly ; but what did you?

Harry. Six, L told him I did not want to hurt him; but that as he
had meddled with me, I would not let him rise till he had promised
not to hurt the poor beast any more, which he did, and then I let
him go about his business,

“You did very right,” said Mr. Barlow. ‘ And I suppose the boy
looked as foolish, when he was rising, as Tommy did the other day
when the little ragged boy that he was going to beat helped him out
of the ditch.”

“Sir,” answered Tommy, a little confused, ‘‘I should not have
attempted to beat him, only he would not bring me my ball.”

: ear ee And what right had you to oblige him to bring your
ball?

Tommy. He was a little ragged boy, and I am a gentleman.

Mr. Barlow. So then, every gentleman has a right to command
little ragged boys?

Tommy. To be sure, sir.

ur. Barlow. Then if your clothes should wear out and become
ragged, every gentleman will have a right to command you?

_ Tommy: looked a little foolish, and said, ‘‘ But he might have done
it, as he was on that side of the hedge.”

ur. Barlow. And so he probably would have done if you had
asked him civilly to do it; but when persons speak in a haughty tone,
they will ind few inclined to serve them. But, as the boy was poor
and ragged, I suppose you hired him with money to fetch your ball?

Tommy, Indeed, sir, I did not; I neither gave him anything nor
offered him anything.
28 THE HISTORY OF

Mr. Barlow, Probably you had nothing to give him?

Tommy. Yes, I had, though; I had ail this money (pulling out
several shillings). ‘

Mr. Barlow. Perhaps the boy was as rich as you?

Tommy. No, he was not, sit, 1am sure; for he had no coat, and
his waistcoat and breeches were all tattered and ragged ; besides, he
had no stockings, and his shoes were full of holes,

Mr. Barlow. So, now I see what constitutes a gentleman. A gen-
tleman is one that, when he has abundance of everything, keeps it
all to himself; beats poor people if they don't serve him for nothing;
and when they have done him the greatest favour, in spite of his in-
solence, never feels any gratitude, or does them any good in return.
I find that Androcles' lion was no gentleman.

Tommy was so affected with this rebuke that he could hardly con-
tain his tears; and, as he was really a boy of a generous temper, he
determined to give the little ragged boy something the very first time
he should see him again. He did not long wait for an opportunity;
for, as he was walking out that very afternoon, he saw him at some
distance gathering blackberries, and, going up to him, accosted him
thus :—

‘« Little boy, I want to know why you are so ragged: have you no
other clothes?” .

‘No, indeed,” said the boy. ‘‘I have seven brothers and sisters,
and they are all as ragged as myself; but I should not much mind
that if I could have food enough.”

Tommy. And why cannot you have food enough? .

Little Boy. Because daddy's ill of a fever, and can't work this har-
vest. So that mammy says we must all starve if God Almighty does
not take care of us. b

Tommy made no answer, but ran full speed to the house, whence
he presently returned, loaded with a loaf of bread and a complete
suit of his own clothes.

‘* Here, little boy,” said he, ‘‘ you were very good-natured to me ;
and so I will give you all this, because I am a gentleman, and have
many niore.”

Tommy did not wait for the little boy's acknowledgment, but
hastened away, and told Mr. Barlow, with an air of exultation, what
he had done. .

Mr. Barlow coolly answered, ‘‘ You have done well in giving the
little boy clothes, because they are your own; but what right have
you to give away my loaf of bread without asking my consent?

Tommy. Why, sir, I did it because the little boy said he was very
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 29

hungry, and had seven brothers and sisters, and that his father was
ill and could not work.

Mr, Barlow, This is avery good reason why you should give them
what belongs to yourself, but not why you should give them what is
another's, What would you say if Harry were to give away all your
clothes without asking your leave?

Tommy. I should not like it at all; and I will not give away your
things any more without asking your leave. ;

‘* You will do well," said Mr. Barlow; ‘and here is a little story
you may read upon this very subject.”

THE STORY OF CYRUS.

Cyrus was a little boy of good dispositions and humane temper.
He was very fond of drawing, and often went into the fields for the
purpose of taking sketches of trees, houses, &c., which he would
show to his parents. On one occasion he had retired into a shed at
the back of his father's house, and was so much absorbed in plan-
ning something with his compasses, as not to be for a long time
aware of his father's presence. He had several masters, who en-
deavoured to teach him everything that was good; and he was
educated with several little boys about his own age. One evening
his father asked him what he had done or learned that day.

“Sir,” said Cyrus, ‘1 was ppnished to-day for deciding unjustly.”

‘‘How so?” said his father.

Cyrus. There were two boys, one of whom was a great and the
other a little'boy. Now, it happened that the little boy had a coat
that was much too big for him, but the great boy had one that
scarcely reached below his middle, and was too tight for him in every
part ; upon which the great boy proposed to the little boy to change
coats with him, ‘‘ because then,” said he, ‘‘ we shall be both exact! ly
fitted ; for your coat is as much too big for you as mine is too little
for me.”

The little boy would not consent to the proposal, on which the
great boy took his.coat away by force, and gave his own to the little
boy in exchange. While they were disputing upon this subject I
chanced to pass by, and they agreed to make me judge of the affair,
But I decided that the little boy should keep the little coat, and the
great boy the great one—for which judgment my master punished me.

‘‘Why so?” said Cyrus's father; ‘was not the little coat most
proper for the little boy, and the large coat for the great boy?”
30 , THE HISTORY OF

“Yes, sir,” answered Cyrus; ‘but my master told me I was not
made judge to examine which coat best fitted either of the boys, but
to decide whether it was just that the great boy should take away
the coat of the little one against his consent ; and therefore I decided
unjustly, and deserved to be punished.”

Just as the story was finished, they were surprised to see a little
ragged boy come running up to them with a bundle of clothes under
his arm. His eyes were black, as if he had been severely beaten, his
nose was swelled, his shirt was bloody, and his waistcoat did but
just hang upon his back, so much was it torn. He came running up
to Tommy, and threw down the bundle before him, saying, '‘ Here,
master, take your clothes again ; and I wish they hac been at the
bottom of the ditch I pulled you out of, instead of upon my back ;
but I never will put such frippery on again as long as I have breath
in my body.” >

“What's the matter?” said Mr. Barlow, who perceived that some

‘unfortunate accident had happened in consequence of Tommy's
present. .

"Sir," answered the little boy, ‘‘ my little master here was going
to beat me, because I would not fetch his ball. Now, as to the
matter of that, I would have brought his ball with all my heart, if
he had but asked me civilly. But though I am poor, 1 am not bound
to be his slave, as they say black William is; and so I would not;
upon which little master here was jumping over the hedge to lick
me; but, instead of that, he soused into the ditch, and there he lay
rolling about till I helped him out; and so he gave me these clothes
here, all out of good-will; and I put them on, like a fool as I was,
for they are all made of silk, and look so fine, that all the little boys
followed me, and hallooed as I went; and Jack Dowset threw a
handful of dirt at me, and dirtied me all over. ‘Oh!’ says I,
‘Jacky, are you at that work?’—and with that I hit him a good
thump, and sent him roaring away. But Billy Gibson and Ned Kelly
came up, and said I Jooked like a Frenchman; and so we began
fighting, and I beat them till they both gave out; but I don’t choose
to be hallooed after wherever I go, and to look like a Frenchman;
and so I have brought master his clothes again.”

Mr. Barlow asked the little boy where his father lived; and he
told him that his: father lived about two. miles off, across the com-
mon, at the end of Runny Lane; on which Mr. Barlow told Harry
that he would send the poor man some broth and victuals if he
would carry it when it was ready.
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 3z

“That I will,” said Harry, ‘‘if it were five times as far.”

So Mr. Barlow went into the house to give orders about it.

In the meantime Tommy, who had eyed the little boy for some
time in silence, said, ‘‘So, my poor boy, you have been beaten and
hurt till you are all over blood, only because I gave you my clothes.
Tam really very sorry for it.”

‘' Thank you, little master,” said the boy, ‘‘ but it can’t be helped.
You did not intend me any hurt, I know; and I am not such a
chicken as to mind a beating ; so I wish you a good afternoon with
all my heart.”

As soon as the little boy was gone, Tommy said, ‘‘T wish I had
but some clothes that the poor boy could wear, for he seems very
good-natured ; I would give them to him.” Z .

‘That you may very easily have,” said Harry, ‘‘ for there is a shop
in the village hard by where they sell all manner of clothes for the
poor people ; and as you have money, you may easily buy some.”

Harry and Tommy then agreed to go early the next morning to
buy some clothes for the poor children. And when they reached the
village, Tommy laid out all his money, amounting to fifteen shillings
and sixpence, in buying some clothes for the little ragged boy and
his brothers, which were made up in a bundle and given to him; but
he desired Harry to carry them for him.

“That I will,” said Harry; ‘‘but why don’t you choose to carry
them yourself?” 3

Tommy. Why, it is not fit fora gentleman to carry things him--
self.

Harry. Why, what hurt does it do him, if he is but strong
enough ?

Tommy. 1 do not know ; but I believe it is that he may not look
like the common people.

Harry, Then he should not have hands, or feet, or ears, or mouth,
because the common people have the same.

Tommy. No, no; he must have all these, because they are useful.

Harry. And is it not useful to be able to do things for ourselves?

Tommy. Yes; but gentlemen have others to do what they want for
them. ;

Harry, Then I should think it must be a bad thing to bea gentle-
man.

Tommy. Why so?

Hlarry, Because, if all were gentlemen, nobody would do anything,
and then we should be all starved.

Tommy. Starved !
32 THE HISTORY OF

Harry, Yes: why, you could not live, could you, without bread ?

Tommy. No; I know that very well.

ffarry, And bread is made of a plant that grows in the earth, and
it is called wheat.

Tommy. Why, then I would gather it and eat it.

flarry. Then you must do something for yourself ; but that would
not do, for wheat is a small hard grain, like the oats which you have
sometimes given to Mr. Barlow's horse ; and you would not like to
eat them. .

Tommy. No, certainly ; but how comes bread, then?

flarry.’ Why, they send the corn to the mill.

Tommy, What is a mill? :

flarry. What! did you never see a mill?

Tommy. No, never ; but I should like to see one, that I may know
how they make bread.

larry. There is one at a little distance; and if you ask Mr,
Barlow, he will go with you, for he knows the miller very well,

Tommy. That I will, for I should like to see them make bread.

As it was not far out of their way, they agreed to call at the poor
man's cottage, whom they found much better, as Mr. Barlow had
been there the preceding night, and given him such medicines as he
judged proper for his disease. Tommy then asked for the little boy,
and on his coming in, told him that he had now brought him some
clothes which he might wear without fear of being called a French-
man, as well as some more for his little brothers. ‘The pleasure with
which they were received was so great, and the acknowledgments
and blessings of the good woman and poor man, who had just begun
to sit up, were so many, that little Tommy could not help shedding
tears of compassion, in which he was joined by Harry. As they were
returning, Tommy said that he had never spent any money with sa
much pleasure as that with which he had purchased clothes for this
poor family, and that for the future he would take care of all the
money that was given him for that purpose, instead of laying it out
in eatables and playthings.

Some days after this, as Mr. Barlow and the two boys were walk-
ing out together, they happened to pass near a windmill ; and, upon
Harry's telling Tommy what it was, Tommy desired leave to go into
it and look at it. Mr. Barlow consented to this, and being acquainted
with the miller, they all went in and examined every part of it with
great curiosity ; and there little Tommy saw with astonishment that
the sails of the mill, being constantly turned round by the wind,
moved a great flat stone, which by rubbing upon another stone,
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 33

bruised all the corn that was put between them till it became a fine
powder. : steer

‘Oh, dear !" said Tommy, ‘‘is this the way they make bread?"

Mr. Barlow told him this was the method by which the corn was
prepared for making bread ; but that many other things were neces-
sary before it arrived at that state. ‘‘ You see that what mins from
these millstones is only a fine powder, very different from bread,
which is a solid and tolerably hard substance.”

As they were going home Tommy said to Harry, ‘‘So you see
now, if nobody chose to work, or do anything for himself, we should
have no bread to eat; but you could not even have the corn to make
it of without a great deal of pains and labour. é

Tommy, Why not? does not corn grow in the ground itself?

Harry, Corn grows in the ground; but then first it is necessary
to plough the ground, to break it to pieces.

Lommy, What is ploughing ?

Harry. Did you never see three or four horses drawing something
along the fields in a straight line, while one man drove, and another
walked behind holding the thing by two handles ?

Tommy, Yes, 1 have. And is that ploughing?

flarry, Tt is; and there is a sharp iron underneath, which runs
into the ground and turns it up all the way it goes.

Tommy, Well, and what then?

larry. When the ground is thus prepared, they sow the seed all
over it, and then they rake it over to cover the seed, and then the
seed begins to grow, and shoots up very high; and at last the corn
tipens, and they reap it and carry it home.

Tommy. That must be very curious! I should like to sow some
seed myself, and see it grow: do you think I could?

ffarry. Yes, certainly; and if you will dig the ground to-morrow,
I will go home to my father in order to procure some seed for
you. :

The next morning Tommy was up almost as soon as it was light,
and wert to work in a corner of the garden, where he dug with great
perseverance till breakfast: when he came in, he could not help tell-
ing Mr, Barlow what he had done, and asking him whether he was
not a very good boy for working so hard to raise corn.

“That,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘ depends upon the use you intend to
make of it when you have raised it: what is it you intend doing with
it?”

“Why, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘I intend to send it to the mill that we
saw, and have it ground into flour; and then I will get you to show

3
34 THE HISTORY OF
me hew to make bread of it, and then I will eat it, that 1 may tell
my father that I have eaten bread out of corn of my own sowing.”

“That will be very well done,” said Mr. Barlow; ‘' but where will
be the great goodness that you sow corn for your own eating? That
is no more than all the people round continually do, and if they did
not do it they would be obliged to fast."

“But then,” said Tommy, ‘‘ they are nat gentlemen, as I am.”

‘“What, then,” answered Mr, Barlow, ‘‘must not gentlemen eat
as well as others, and therefore is it not for their interest to know
how to procure food as well as other people?”

“Yes, sir,” answered Tommy; ‘‘ but they can have other people
to raise it for them, so that they are not obliged to work for them-
selves.”

«« How does that happen?” said Mr. Barlow

Tommy. Why, sir, they pay other people to work for them, or buy
bread when it is made, as much as they want.

Mr. Barlow. Then they pay for it with money?

Tommy, Ves, sit.

Mr. Barlow. Then they must have money before they can buy
corn ?

Tommy. Certainly, sir.

Mr. Barlow. But have all gentlemen money?

Tommy hesitated some time at this question; at last he said, ‘‘I
believe not always, sir."

Mr. Barlow. Why, then, if they have not money, they will find it
difficult to procure corn, unless they raise it for themselves.

“Indeed,” said Tommy, ‘‘I believe they will; for perhaps they
may not find anybody good-natured enough to give it them.”

“But,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘tas we are talking on this subject, I will
tell you a story that I heard a little time past, if you choose ta hear
it.”

Tommy said he should be very glad if Mr. Barlow would take the
trouble of telling it to him, and Mr. Barlow told him the following
history of

THE TWO BROTHERS.

Axourt the time that many people went over to South America, with
the hopes of finding gold and silver, there was a Spaniard, whose
name was Pizarro, who had a great inclination to try his fortune like
the rest; but as he had an elder brother, for whom he had a very
great affection, he went to him, told him his design, and solicited him
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 35

very: much to.go.along with him, promising him that he should have
an equal share of all the riches they found. The brother, whose narac
was Alonzo, was aman of a contented temper and a good under-
standing ; he did not, therefore, much approve of the project, and
endeavoured to dissuade Pizarro from it, by setting before him the
danger to which he exposed himself, and the uncertainty of his suc-
ceeding ; but finding all that he said was vain, he agreed to go with
him, but told him at the same time that he wanted no part of the
riches which he might find, and would ask no other favour than to
have his baggage and a few. servants taken on board the vessel with
him. Pizarro then sold all that he had, bought a vessel, and em-
barked with several other adventurers, who had all great expectations,
like himself, of soon becoming rich. As to Alonzo, he took nothing
with him but a few ploughs,-harrows, and other tools, and some
corn, together with a large quantity of potatoes, and some seeds of
different vegetables, Pizarro thought these very odd preparatiqns
for a voyage ; but as he did not think proper to expostulate with his
brother, he said nothing.

After sailing some time with prosperous winds, they put into the
last port where they were ta stop, before they came to the country
where they were to search for gold. Here Pizarro bought a great
number more of pickaxes, shovels, and various other tools for digging,
melting, and refining the gold he expected to find, besides hiring an
additional number of labourers to assist him in the work, Alonzo,

* en the contrary, bought only a few sheep, and four stout oxen, with

their harness, and food enough to subsist them till they should
arrive at land.
__ As it happened, they met with a favourable voyage, and all landed
in perfect health in America, Alonzo then told his brother that, as he
had only come to accompany and serve him, he would stay near the
shore with his servants and cattle, while he went to search for gold,
and when he had acquired as much as he desired, should be always
ready to embark for Spain with him. E

Pizarro accordingly: set out, not without feeling so great a contempt
for his brother, that he could not help expressing it to his com-
panions. s .

“T always thought,” said he, ‘that my brother had been a man
of sense ; he bore that character in Spain, but I find people were
strangely mistaken in him. Here he is going to divert himself with
his sheep and his oxen, as if he was living quietly upon his farm
at home, and had nothing else to do than to raise cucumbers and
melons, But-we know better what to do with our time ; so, come

3-—2
36 THE HISTORY OF

along, my lads, and if we have but good luck, we shall soon be en-
tiched for the rest of our lives,"

All that were present applauded Pizarro’s speech, and declared
themselves ready to follow wherever he went ; only one old Spaniard
shook his head as he went, and told him he doubted whether he
would find his brother so great a fool as he thought.

They then travelled on several days’ march into the country—
sometimes obliged to cross rivers, at others to pass mountains and
forests, where they could find no path ; sometimes scorched by the
violent heat of the sun, and then wetted to the skin by violent
showers of rain. These difficulties, however, did not discourage
them so much as to hinder them from trying in several places for
gold, which they were at length lucky enough to find in a consider-
able quantity. This success animated them very much, and they
continued working upon that spot till all their provisions were con-
sumed ; they gathered daily large quantities of ore, but then they
suffered very much from hunger. Still, however, they persevered in
their labours, and sustained themselves with such roots and berries as
they could find. At last even this resource failed them ; and, after
several of their company had died from want and hardship, the rest
were just able to craw! back to the place where they had left Alonzo,
carrying with them the gold, to acquire which they had suffered so
many miseries.

But while they had been employed in this manner, Alonzo, who
foresaw what would happen, had been industriously toiling toa very
different purpose. His skill in husbandry had easily enabled him to
find a spot of considerable extent and fertile soil, which he ploughed
up with the oxen he had brought with him, and the assistance of his
servants. He then sowed the different seeds he had brought, and
planted the potatoes, which prospered beyond what he could have
expected, and yielded him a most abundant harvest. His sheep
he had turned out in a very fine meadow near the sea, and every one of
them had brought him a couple of lambs. Besides that, he and his
servants, at leisure times, employed themselves in fishing; and the
fish they had caught were all dried, and salted with salt they had
found upon the sea-shore ; so that, by the time of Pizarro’s return,
they had laid up a very considerable quantity of provisions.

When Pizarro returned, his brother received him with the greatest
cordiality, and asked him what success he had had. Pizarro told
him that they had found an immense quantity of gold, but that
several of his companions had perished, and that the rest were
almost starved from the want of provisions, He then requested that
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 37

his brother would immediately give him something to eat, as he
assured him he had tasted no food for the last two days, excepting
the roots and bark of trees, Alonzo then very coolly answered that
he should remember that, when they set out, they had made an
agreement that neither should interfere with the other ; that he had
never desired to have any share of the gold which Pizarro might
acquire, and therefore he wondered that Pizarro should expect to be
supplied with the provisions that he had procured with so much care
and labour; “but,” added he, ‘‘if you choose to exchange some of
the gold you have found for provisions, I shall perhaps be able to
accommodate you.”

Pizarro thought this behaviour very unkind in his brother ; but as
he and his companions were almost starved, they were obliged to
comply with his demands, which were so exorbitant, that .in a very
short time they parted with all the gold they had brought with them,
merely to purchase food. Alonzo then proposed to his brother to
embark for Spain in the vessel which had brought them thither, as
the winds and weather seemed to be most favourable ; but Pizarro,
with an angry look, told him that since he had deprived him of every-
thing he had gained, and treated him in so unfriendly a manner, he
should go without him ; for, as to himself, he would rather perish
upon that desert shore than embark with so inhuman a brother,

But Alonzo, instead of resenting these reproaches, embraced his
brother with the greatest tenderness, and spoke to him in the follow-
ing manner : :

“Could you, then, believe, my dearest Pizarro, that I really meant
to deprive you of the fruits of all your labours, which you have ac-
quired with so much toil and danger? Rather may all the gold in
the universe perish than I should be capable of such behaviour to my
dearest brother. But I saw the rash, impetuous desire you had of
tiches, and wished to correct this fault in you, and serve you at the
same time. You despised my prudence and industry, and imagined
that nothing could be wanting to him that had once acquired wealth ;
but you have now learned that without that foresight and industry;
all the gold you have brought with you would not have prevented
you from perishing miserably. You are now, I hope, wiser; and
therefore take back your riches, which I hope you have now learned
to make a proper use of.”

Pizarro was equally filled with gratitude and astonishment at this
generosity of his brother, and he acknowledged from experience that
industry was better than gold, They then embarked for Spain,
where they all safely arrived. During the voyage Pizarro often
38 THE HISTORY OF

solicited his brother to accept of half his riches, which Alonzo con-
stantly refused, telling him that he could raise food enough to main-
tain himself, and was in no want of gold.

“Indeed,” said Tommy, when Mr. Barlow had finished the story,
‘*T think Alonzo was a very sensible man; and, if it had not been
for him, his brother and all his companions must have been starved;
but, then, this was only because they were in a desert uninhabited
country. ‘This could never have happened in England; there they
could always have had as much corn or bread as they chose for theit
money.”

‘* But,” says Mr. Barlow, “is aman sure to be always in England,
or some place where he can purchase bread?"

Tommy. I believe so, sir.

Mr. Barlow. Why, are there not countries in the world where
there are no inhabitants, and where no corn is raised ?

Tommy. Certainly, sir; this country which the two brothers went
to, was such a place,

Mr. Barlow. And there are many other such countries in the
world.

Lommy. But, then, a man need not go to them; he may stay at
home.

Mr, Barlow, Then he must not pass the seas in a ship.

Tommy, Why so, sir?

Mr. Barlow, Because the ship may happen to be wrecked on some
such country, where there are no inhabitants; and then, although
he should escape the danger of the sea, what will he do for food?

Yommy. And have such accidents sometimes happened ? ‘

Mr. Barlow, Yes, several; there was, in particular, one Selkirk,
who was shipwrecked, and obliged to live several years upon a desert
island. Buta still more extraordinary story is that of some Russians,
who were left on the coast of Spitzbergen, where they were obliged
to stay several years,

Lommy. Where is Spitzbergen, sir?

Mr, Barlow. It is a country very far to the north, which is con-
stantly covered with snow and. ice, because the weather is unremit-.
tingly severe. Scarcely any vegetables will grow upon the soil, and
scarcely any animals are found in the country. ‘To add to this, a
great part of the year it is covered with perpetual darkness, and it is
inaccessible to ships: so that it is impossible to conceive a more
dreary country, or where it must be more difficult to support human
life. Yet four men were capable of struggling with all these difficul:
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 39

ties during several years, and three of them returned at last safe to
their own country.

Tommy. This must be a very curious story indeed ; I would give
anything to be able to see it.

Mr. Barlow. That you may very easily. When I read it, I copied
off several parts of it, I thought it so curious and interesting, which
I can easily find, and will show you. Here it is; but it is necessary
first to inform you, that those northern seas, from the intense cold of
the climate, are so full of ice as frequently to render it extremely
dangerous to ships, lest they should be crushed between two pieces
of immense size, or so completely surrounded as not to be able to
extricate themselves. Having given you this previous information,
you will easily understand the distresstul situation of a Russian ship,
which, as it was sailing om those seas, was ona sudden so surrounded
by ice as not to be able to move. My extracts begin here, and you

may read them.

Extracts from a Narrative of the Extraordinary Adventures of
Four Russian Sailors, who were cast away on the Desert Island
of Hast Spitzbergen. ‘

“In this alarming state (that is, when the ship was surtounded
with ice) a council was held, when the mate, Alexis Hinkof, informed
them, that he recollected to have heard that some of the people of
Meseh, some time before, having formed a resolution of wintering
upon this island, had carried from that city timber proper for build-
ing a hut, and had actually erected one at some distance from the
shore. This information induced the whole company to resolve on
wintering there, if the hut, as they hoped, still existed; for they
clearly perceived the imminent danger they were in, and that they
must inevitably, perish if they continued in the ship. They dis-
patched, therefore, four of their crew in search of the hut, or any
other succour they could meet with. These were Alexis Hinkof, the
mate, Iwan Hinkof, his godson, Stephen Scharassof, and Feodor
.Weregin. 3

‘“As the shore on which they were to land was uninhabited, it
was necessaty that they should make some provision for their ex-
pedition. They had almost two miles to travel over those ridges of
ice, which being raised by the waves, and driven against each other
by the wind, rendered the way equally difficult and dangerous;
prudence, thefefore, forbade their loading themselves too much, lest,
40 THE HISTORY OF

by being overburdened, they might sink in between the pieces of ice,
and perish, Having thus maturely considered the nature of their
undertaking, they provided themselves with a musket, and powder-
horn containing twelve charges of powder, with as many balls, an
axe, a small kettle, a bag with about twenty pounds of flour, a knife,
a tinder-box and tinder, a bladder filled with tobacco, and every man
his wooden pipe. :

‘“Thus accoutred, these four sailors quickly arrived on the island,
little expecting the misfortunes that would befall them. They began
with exploring the country, and soon discovered the hut they were
in search of, about an English mile and a half from the shore. It
was thirty-six feet in length, eighteen feet in height, and as many
in breadth: it contained a small antechamber, about twelve feet
broad, which had two doors, the one to shut it up from the outer air,
the other to form a communication with the inner room: this con-
tributed greatly to keep the large room warm when once heated. In
the large room was an earthen stove, constructed in the Russian
manner ; that is, a kind of oven without a chimney, which served
occasionally either for baking, for heating the room, or, as is cus-
tomary among the Russian peasants in very cold weather, for a place
to sleep upon. Our adventurers rejoiced greatly at having dis-
covered the hut, which had, however, suffered much from the
weather, it having now been built a considerable time; they, how-
ever, contrived to pass the night in it.

‘'Early next morning they hastened to the shore, impatient to
inform their comrades of their success, and also to procure from their
vessel such provision, ammunition, and other necessaries, as might
better enable them to winter on the island. I leave my readers to
figure to themselves the astonishment and agony of mind these poor
people must have felt, when, on reaching the place of their landing,
they saw nothing but an open sea, free from the ice, which but the
day before had covered the ocean. risen during the night, had certainly been the cause of this disastrous
event ; but they could not tell whether the ice, which had before
hemmed in the vessel, agitated by the violence of the waves, had
been driven against her, and shattered her to pieces ; or whether she
had been carried by the current into the main—a circumstance which
frequently happens in those seas. Whatever accident had befallen
the ship, they saw her no more; and as no tidings were ever after-
wards received of her, it is most probable that she sank, and that all
on board of her perished.

“This melancholy event depriving the unhappy men of all hope
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 41

of ever being able to quit the island, they returned to the hut whence
they had come, full of horror and despair.

“ Thejt first attention was employed, as may easily be imagined,
in devising means of providing subsistence, and for repairing their
hut. The twelve charges of powder which they had brought with
thgin’soon procured them as many reindeer—the island, fortunately

Pai them, abounding in these animals. I have before observed that
? the hut, which the sailors were so fortunate as to find, had sustained
some damage, and it was this: there were cracks in many places
between the boards of the building, which freely admitted the air.
This inconvenience was, however, easily remedied, as they had an
axe, and the beams were still sound (for wood in those cold climates
continues through a length of years unimpaired by worms or decay),
so it was easy for them to make the boards join again very tolerably ;
besides, moss growing in great abundance all over the island, there
was more than sufficient to stop up the crevices, which wooden
houses must always be liable to. Repairs of this kind cost the
unhappy men less trouble, as they were Russians ; for all Russian
peasants are known to be good carpenters: they build their own
houses, and are very expert in handling the axe. The intense cold,
which makes these climates habitable to so few species of animals,
renders them equally unfit for the production of vegetables. No
species of tree or even shrub is found in any of the islands of Spitz-
bergen—a circumstance of the most alarming nature to our sailors.
‘" Without fire it was impossible to resist the rigour of the climate,
and, without wood, how was the fire to be produced or supported ?
However, in wandering along the beach, they collected plenty of
wood, which had been driven ashore by the waves, and which at
first consisted of the wrecks of ships, and afterwards of whole trees
with their roots—the produce of some hospitable (but to them.un-
known) climate, which the overflowings of rivers or other acci-
dents had sent into the ocean, Nothing proved of more essential
service to these unfortunate men, during the first year of their exile,
than some boards they found upen the beach, having a long iron
hook, some nails of about five or s.:. :. shes long, and proportionably
thick, and other bits of old iron fixed in them—the melancholy relics
of some vessels cast away in those remote parts. These were thrown *
ashore by the waves at the time when the want of powder gave our
men reason to apprehend that they must fall a prey to hunger, as
they had nearly consumed those reindeer they had killed. This
lucky circumstance was attended with another equally fortunate:
they found on the shore the root of a fir-tree, which nearly approached
42 THE HISTORY OF

to the figure of a bow. As necessity has ever been the mother of in-
vention, so they soon fashioned this root to a good bow by the help
of a knife ; but still they wanted a string and arrows. Not knowing
how to procure them at present, they resolved upon making a couple
of lances, to defend themselves against the white bears, by far the
most ferocious of their kind, whose attacks they had great reason to
dread. Finding they could neither make the heads of their lances
nor of their arrows without the help of a hammer, they contrived to
form the above-mentioned large iron hook into one, by beating it,
and widening a hole it happened to have about its middle with the
help of one of their largest nails—this received the handle ; a round
button at one end of the hook served for the face of the hammer. A
large pebble supplied the place of an anvil, and a couple of rein-
deers’ horns made the tongs. By the means of such tools they made
two heads of spears, and, after polishing and sharpening them on
stones, they tied them as fast as possible, with thongs made of rein-
deers’ skins, to sticks about the thickness of a man’s arm, which
they got from some branches of trees that had been cast on shore.
Thus | equipped with spears, they resolved to attack a white bear,
and, after a most dangerous encounter, they killed the formidable
creature, and thereby ‘made a new supply of provisions. The flesh
of this animal they relished exceedingly, as they thought it much re-
sembled beefi n taste and flavour. The tendons, they saw with much
pleasure, could, with little or no trouble, be divided into filaments
of what fineness they thought fit. This, perhaps, was the most
fortunate discovery these men could have made, for, besides other
advantages, which will be hereafter mentioned, they were hereby
furnished with strings for their bow.

‘«The success of our unfortunate islanders in making the spears,
and the use these proved of, encouraged them to proceed, and forge
some pieces of iron into heads of arrows of the same shape, though |
somewhat smaller in size than the spears above mentioned, Having
ground and sharpened these like the former, they tied them with the
sinews of the white bears to pieces of fir, to which, by the help of fine
threads of the same, they fastened feathers of sea-fowl, and thus be-
came possessed of a complete bow and arrows, Their ingenuity in
this respect was crowned with success far beyond their expectation ;
for, during the time of their continuance upon the island, with these
arrows they killed no less than two hundred and fifty reindeer, besides
a great number of blue and white foxes. The flesh of these animals
served them also for food, and their skins for clothing and other
necessary preservatives against the intense coldness of a climate so






SHIPWRECKED MARINERS KILLING A WHITE BEAR,—p. 42
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 43

near the Pole. They killed, however, not more than ten white bears
in all, and that not without the utmost danger ; for these animals,
being prodigiously strong, defended themselves with astonishing
vigour and fury. . The first our men attacked designedly ; the other
nine they slew in defending themselves from their assaults, for some
of these creatures even ventured to enter the outer room of the hut
in order to devour them. It is true that all the bears did not show
{if I may be allowed the expression) equal intrepidity, either owing
to some being less pressed by hunger, or to their being by nature less
carnivorous than the others ; for some of them which entered the
hut immediately betook themselves to flight on the first attempt of
the sailors to drive them away. A ‘repetition, however, of these
ferocious attacks threw the poor men into great terror and anxiety,
as they were in almost a perpetual danger of being devoured.

“The three different kinds of animals above mentioned—viz., the
reindeer, the blue and white foxes, and the white bears—were the
only food these wretched mariners tasted during their continuance in
this dreary abode. We do not at once see every resource; it is
generally necessity which quickens our invention, opening by degrees
our eyes, and pointing out expedients which otherwise might never
have occurred to our thoughts. The truth of this observation our
four sailors experienced in various instances. They were fot some
time reduced to the necessity of eating their meat almost raw, and
without either bread ‘or salt, for they were quite destitute of both.
The intenseness of the cold, together with the want of proper con-
veniences, prevented them from cooking their victuals in a proper
manner. There was but one stove in the hut, and that being set up
agreeable to the Russian taste, was more like an oven, and conse-
quently not well adapted for boiling anything. Weod also was too
precious a commodity to be wasted in keeping up two fires ; and the
one they might have made out of their habitation to dress their
victuals would in no way have served to warm them. Another reason
against their cooking in the open air was the continual danger of an
attack from the white bears.

“And here I must observe that, suppose they had made the
attempt, it would have still been practicable for only some part of
the year; for the cold, which in such a climate for some mohths
scarcely ever abates, from the long ahsence of the sun, then enlight-
ening the opposite hemisphere,—the inconceivable quantity of snow,
which is continually falling through the greatest part of the winter,
together with the almost incessant rains at certain seasons,—all these
were almost insurmountable to that expedient. To remedy, there-
44 THE HISTORY OF

fore, in some degree the hardship of eating their meat raw, they be-
thought themselves of drying some of their provisions during the
summer in the open air, and afterwards of hanging it up in the upper
part of the hut, which, as I mentioned before, was continually filled
with smoke down to the windows: it was thus dried thoroughly by
the help of that smoke. This meat, so prepared, they used for bread,
and it made them relish their other flesh the better, as they could
only half dress it. Finding this experiment answer in every respect
to their wishes, they continued to practise it during the whole time
of their confinement upon the island, and always kept up, by that
means, a sufficient stock of provisions. Water they had in summer
from small rivulets that fell from the rocks, and in winter from the
snow and ice thawed. This was of course their only beverage ; and

. their small kettle was the only vessel they could make use of for this
and other purposes.

“‘I have mentioned above that our sailors brought a small bag of
flour with them to the island. Of this they had consumed about
one-half with their meat ; the remainder they employed in a different
manner equally useful. They soon saw the necessity of keeping up
a continual fire in so cold a climate, and found that, if it should un-
fortunately go out, they had no means of lighting it again; for
though they had a steel and flints, yet they wanted both matches
and tinder. In their excursions through the island they had met
with a slimy loam, or a kind of clay, nearly in the middle of it. Out
of this they found means to form a utensil which might serve for a
lamp, and they proposed to keep it constantly burning with the fat
of the animals they should kill. This was certainly the most rational
scheme they could have thought of; for to be without a light ina
climate where, during winter, darkness reigns for several months
together, would have added much to their other calamities.

“ Having therefore fashioned a kind of lamp, they filled it with
reindeer’s fat, and stuck into it some twisted linen shaped into a
wick ; but they had the mortification to find that, as soon as the fat
melted, it not only soaked into the clay but fairly ran out of it on’
all sides. The thing, therefore, was to devise some means of pre-
venting this inconvenience, not arising “from cracks, but from the
substance of which the lamp was made being too porous. They
made, therefore, a new one, dried it thoroughly in the air, then
heated it red-hot, and afterwards quenched it in their kettle, wherein
they had boiled a quantity of flour down to the consistence of thin
starch, The lamp being thus dried and filled with melted fat, they
now found, to their great joy, that it did not leak; but for greater
‘SANDFORD AND MERTON. 45

security they dipped linen rags in their paste, and with them covered.
all its outside. Succeeding in this attempt, they immediately made
another lamp for fear of an accident, that at all events they might
not be destitute of light; and, when they had done so much, they
thought proper to save the remainder of their flour for similar
purposes. As they had carefully collected whatever happened to be
cast on shore to supply them with fuel, they had found amongst the
wrecks of vessels some cordage and asmall quantity of oakum (a kind.
of hemp used for caulking ships), which served them to make wicks
for their lamps. When these stores began to fail, their shirts and
their drawers (which are worn by almost all the Russian peasants)
were employed to make good the deficiency. By these means they
kept their lamp burning without intermission, from the day they
first made it (a work they set about soon after their arrival on the
island) until that of their embarkation for their native country.

“The necessity of converting the most essential part of their cloth-
ing, such as their shirts and drawers, to the use above specified, ex-
posed them the more to the rigour of the climate. They also found
themselves in want of shoes, boots, and other articles of dress ; and,
as winter was approaching, they were again obliged to have recourse
to that ingenuity which necessity suggests, and which seldom fails
in the trying hour of distress. They had skins of reindeer and foxes
in plenty, that had hitherto served them for bedding, and which
they now thought of employing in some more essential service ; but
the question was how to tan them. After deliberating on this subject,
they took to the following method: They soaked the skins for several
days in fresh water till they could pull oft the hair very easily ; they
then rubbed the wet leather with their hands till it was nearly dry,
when they spread some melted reindeer fat over it, and again rubbed.
it well. By this process the leather became soft, pliant, and supple
—proper for answering every purpose they wanted it for. Those
skins which they designed for furs they only soaked one day to pre-
pare them for being wrought, and then proceeded in the manner
before mentioned, except only that they did not remove the hair.

‘« Thus they soon provided themselves with the necessary materials
for all the parts of dress they wanted. But here another difficulty
occurred: they had neither aw!s for making shoes or boots, nor
needles for sewing their garments. This want, however, they soon
supplie by means of the pieces of iron they had occasionally collected.
Out of these they made both, and by their industry even brought
them to a certain degree of perfection. The making eyes to their
needles gave them indeed no little trouble, but this they also per-
46 FHE HISTORY OF

formed with the assistance of their knife; for, having ground it to.a
very sharp point, and heated red hot a kind of wire forged for that
purpose, they pierced a hole through one end ; and by whetting and
smoothing it on stones, brought the other to a point, and thus gave

2 whole needle a very tolerable form. Scissors to cut out the skin
were what they next had occasion for; but, having none, their place
they supplied with the knife; and, though there was neither shoe-
maker nor tailor amongst them, yet they had contrived to cut out the
leather and furs well enough for their purpose. The sinews of the
bears and, the reindeer—which, as I mentioned before, they had
found means to split—served them for thread; and thus provided
wo the necessary implements, they proceeded to make their new
clothes.”

«“These,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘are the extracts which I have made
from this very extraordinary story ; and they are sufficient to show
both the many accidents to which men are exposed, and the wonder-
ful expedients which may be found out, even in the most dismal
circumstances.”

“Tt is very true, indeed,” answered Tommy ; ‘‘but pray what
became of these poor men at last?”

i « After they had lived more than six years upon this dreary and in-

hospitable coast," answered Mr. Barlow, ‘‘a ship arrived there by
accident, which took three of them on board, and carried them in
safety to their own country.”

‘And what became of the fourth?” said Tommy.

“He,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ was seized with a dangerous disease
called the scurvy ; and, being of an indolent temper, and therefore
not using the exercise which was necessary to preserve his life, after
having lingered some time, died, and was buried in the snow by his
companions.”

Here little Harry came in from his father’s house, and brought
with him the chicken which, it has been mentioned, he had saved
from the claws of the kite. The little animal was now perfectly re-
covered of the hurt it had received, and showed so great a degree of
affection to its protector, that it would run after him like a dog, hop
upon his shoulder, nestle in his bosom, and eat crumbs out of his
hand. Tommy was extremely surprised and pleased to remark its
tameness and docility, and asked by what means it had been made
so gentle. Harry told him he had taken no particular pains about
it; but that, as the poor little creature had been sadly hurt, he had
fed it every day till it was well; and that, in consequence of that
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 47

kindness, it had conceived a great degree of affection towards
him.

“Indeed,” said Tommy, ‘that is very surprising ; for I thought
all birds flew away whenever a man came near them, and that even
the fowls which are kept at home wauld never let you touch them,”

Mr: Barlow. And what do you imagine is the reason of that?

Tommy. Because they are wild.

Mr. Barlow. And what is a fowl’s being wild?

Tommy. When he will not let you come near him.

Mr. Bariow, But I want to know what is the reason of his being
wild?

Tommy. Indeed, sir, I cannot tell, unless it is because they are
naturally so.

Mr. Barlow. But if they were naturally so, this fowl could not be
fond of Harry.

Tommy, That is because he is so good to it.

Mr, Barlow. Very likely. Then it is not natural for an animal t
run away from a person that is good to him? :

Tommy. No, sir; I believe not.

Mr. Barlow. But when a person is not good to him, or endeavours
to hurt him, it is natural for an animal to run away from him, is it
not?

Tommy. Ves.

Afr. Barlow, And then you say he is wild, do you not?

Tommy. Yes, sir.

Mr, Barlow. Why, then, it is probable that animals are only wild
because they are afraid of being hurt, and that they only run away
from the fear of danger. Therefore, if you want to tame animals,
you must be good to them, and treat them kindly, and then the, will
no longer fear you, but come to you and love you.

“Indeed,” said Harry, ‘‘ that is very true ; for I knew a little boy
that took a great fancy to a snake that lived in his father's garden ;
and, when he had his milk for breakfast, he used to sit under a nut-
tree and whistle, and the snake would come to him and eat out of
his bowl.”

Tommy, And did it not bite him?

., Harry. No: he sometimes used to give it a pat with his spoon, if
it ate too fast ; but it never hurt him.

Tommy was much pleased with this conversation ; and being both
good-natured and desirous of making experiments, he determined to
try his skill in taming animals. Accordingly, he took a large slice of

bread in his hand, and went out to seek some animal that he might
48 THE HISTORY OF

_ give it to. The first thing that he happened to meet was a sucking

pig that had rambled from its mother, and was basking in the sun,
Tommy would not neglect the opportunity of showing his talents;
he therefore called, ‘‘ Pig, pig, pig ! come hither, little pig!"’ But the
pig, who did not exactly comprehend his intentions, only grunted and
ran away.

‘Vou little ungrateful thing,” said Tommy, ‘‘do you treat me in
this manner, when I want to feed you? If you do not know your
friends, I must teach you.”

So saying this, he sprang at the pig, and caught him by the hind
leg, intending to have given him the bread which he had in his hand ;
but the pig, who was not used to be treated in that manner, began
struggling and squeaking to that degree, that the sow, who was within
hearing, came running to the place, with all the rest of the litter at
her heels. As Tommy did not know whether she would be pleased
with his civilities to her young one or not, he thought it most prudent
to let it go; and the pig, endeavouring to escape as speedily as
possible, unfortunately ran between his legs and threw him down.
The place where this accident happened was extremely wet ; therefore
Tommy, in falling, dirtied himself from head to foot; and the sow,
who came up at that instant, passed over him, as he attempted to rise,
and rolled him back again into the mire. ;

Tommy, who was not the coolest in his temper, was extremely
provoked at this ungrateful return for his intended kindness ; and,
losing all patience, he seized the sow by the hind leg and began
pommelling her with all his might, as she attempted toescape. The.
sow, as may be imagined, did not relish such treatment, but en-
deavoured with all her force to escape; but Tommy still keeping
his aold and continuing his discipline, she struggled with such violence
as to drag him several yards, squeaking at the same time in the most
lamentable manner, in which she was joined by the whole litter of
pigs. ;

During the heat of this contest a large flock ot geese happened to
be crossing the road, into the midst of which the affrighted sow ran
headlong, dragging the enraged Tommy at her heels, ‘The goslings
retreated with the greatest precipitation, joining their mournful cack-
ling to the general noise; but a gander of more than common size
and courage, resenting the unprovoked attack which had been made
upon his family, flew at Tommy and gave him several severe strokes
with his bill. s F

Tommy, whose courage had hitherto been unconquerable, being
thus unexpectedly attacked by a new enemy, was obliged to yield to
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 49

fortune, and not knowing the precise extent of his danger, he not
only suffered the sow to escape, but joined his vociferations to the
general scream. This alarmed Mr. Barlow, who, coming up to the
place, found his pupil in the most woeful plight, daubed from head
to foot, with his face and hands as black as those of any chimney-
sweeper. He inquired what was the matter; and Tommy, as soon
ashe had recovered breath enough to speak, answered in this manner:
“ wanted to make them tame and gentle, and to love me, and you see
the consequences.”
“Indeed,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘I see you have been ill treated, but
T hope you are not hut ; and if it is owing to anything I have said,
I shall feel the more concern.”
“No,” said Tommy, ‘‘I cannot say that I am much hurt.”
“Why, then,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ you had better go and wasli
yourself; and, when you are clean, we will talk over the affair
together.”
When Tommy had returned, Mr. Barlow asked him how the ac-
cident had happened ; and when he had heard the story, he said, ‘I
| am very sorry for your misfortune; but I do not perceive that I was
| the cause of it, for 1 do not remember that I ever advised you to
. catch pigs by the hinder leg.”
Tommy. No, sir; but you told me that feeding animals was the
| way to make them love me ; and so I wanted to feed the pig.
; Mr. Barlow. But it was not my fault that you attempted it ina
wrong manner. The animal did not know your intentions, and
therefore, when you seized him in so violent a manner, he naturally
attempted to escape, and his mother, hearing his cries, very naturally
came to his assistance. All that happened was owing to your inex-
perience. Before you meddle with any animal, you should make
yourself acquainted with his nature and disposition, otherwise you
may fare like the little boy that, in attempting to catch flies, was
stung by a wasp; or like another that, seeing an adder asleep upon
a bank, took it for an cel, and was bitten by it, which had nearly cost
him his life.
Tommy. But, sir, 1 thought Harry had mentioned a little boy that
used to feed a snake, without receiving any hurt from it.
; Mr. Barlow. That might very well happen: there is scarcely any
‘| creature tha* will do hurt, unless it is attacked or wants food; and
» some of these reptiles are entirely harmless, others are not; therefore
the best way is not to meddle with any till you are perfectly acquainted
with its nature. Had you observed this rule, you never would have

4




50 ' THE HISTORY OF

attempted to catch the pig by the hinder leg, in order to tame it ;
and it is very lucky that you did not make the experiment upon a
larger animal, otherwise you might have been as badly treated as the
tailor was by the elephant.

Tommy. Pray, sir, what is this curious story? But first tell me,
if you please, what kind of animal an elephant is?

‘« An elephant,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘is the largest land animal that
we are acquainted with. It is many times thicker than an ox, and
grows to the height of eleven or twelve feet. Its strength, as may be
easily imagined, is prodigious ; but it is at the same time so very
gentle that it rarely does hurt to anything, even in the woods where
it resides. It does not eat flesh, but lives upon the fruits and branches
of trees. But what is most singular about its make is that, instead
of a nose, it has a long hollow piece of flesh, which grows over its
mouth to the length of three or four feet; this is called the trunk of
the elephant, and he is capable of bending it in every direction.
When he wants to break off the branch of a tree, he twists his trunk
round it, and snaps it off directly ; when he wants to drink, he lets
it down into the water, sucks up several gallons at a time, and then,
doubling the end of it back, discharges it all into his mouth,”

“But if he is so large and strong,” said Tommy, ‘‘1 should sup-
pose it must be impossible ever to tame him.”

“So perhaps it would,” replied Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ did they not instruct
those that have already been tamed to assist in catching others.
When they have discovered a forest where these animals resort, they
make a large enclosure with strong pales and a deep ditch, leaving
only one entrance to it, which has a strong gate left purposely open.
They then let one or two of their tame elephants loose, who join the
wild ones, and gradually entice them into the enclosure. As soon as
one of these has entered, a man, who stands ready, shuts the gate,
and takes him prisoner. The animal, finding himself thus entrapped,
begins to grow furious, and attempts to escape; but immediately two
tame ones, of the largest size and greatest strength, who have been
placed there on purpose, come up to him, one on each side, and beat
him with their trunks till he becomes more quiet. A man then comes
behind, ties a very large cord to each of his hind legs, and fastens
the other end of it to two great trees. He is then left without food
for some hours, and in that time generally becomes so docile as to
suffer himself to be conducted to the stable that is prepared for him,
where he lives the rest of his life like a horse, or any other sort of
domestic animal,”

Tommy, And pray, sir, what did the elephant do to the tailor?


SANDFORD AND MERTON. 5r

««There was,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘at Surat, a city where many of
these tame elephants-are kept, a tailor, who used to sit and work in
his shed close to the place to which these elephants were led every
day to drink. This man contracted a kind of acquaintance with one
of the largest of these beasts, and used to present him with fruits and
other vegetables whenever the elephant passed by his door. The
elephant was accustomed to put his long trunk in at the window, and
to receive in that manner whatever his friend chose to give. But one
day the tailor happened to be in a more than ordinary ill humour,
and not considering how dangerous it might prove to provoke an
animal of that size and strength, when the clephant put his trunk in
at the window as usual, instead of giving him anything to eat, he
pricked him with his needle. The elephant instantly withdrew his
trunk, and, without showing any marks of resentment, went on with
the rest to drink ; but after he had quenched his thirst, he collected
a large quantity of the dirtiest water he could find in his trank—
which I have already told you is capable of holding many gallons—
and when he passed by the tailor’s shop, in his return, he discharged
it full in his face, with so true an aim, that he wetted him all over,
and almost drowned him ; thus justly punishing the man for his il-
nature and breach of friendship.”

“Indeed,” said Harry, ‘‘considering the strength of the animal,
he must have had a great moderation and generosity not to have
punished the man more severely ; and therefore I think it is a very
great shame to mien ever to be cruel to animals, when they are so
affectionate and humane to them.” f

“You are very right,” said Mr. Barlow; ‘‘and I remember an-—
other story of an elephant, which, if truc, is still more extraordinary.
These animals, although in general they are as docile and obedient
to the person that takes care of them as a dog, are sometimes scized
with a species of impatience which makes them absolutely ungovern-
able. It is then dangerous to come near them, and very difficult to
restrain them. I should have mentioned, that in the Eastern parts
of the world, where elephants are found, the kings and princes keep
them to ride upon as we do horses: a kind of tent or pavilion is
fixed upon the back of the animal, in which one or more persons are
' placed; and the keeper that is used to manage him sits upon the
* neck of the elephant, and guides him by means of a pole with an iron
hook at the end. Now, as these animals are of great value, the
keeper is frequently severely punished if any accident happens to the
animal by his carelessness. But one day, one of the largest elephants,
being seized with a sudden fit of passion, had broken loose ; and, as

A—2
52 THE HISTORY OF

the keeper was not in the way, nobody was able ie appease him, or
dared to come near him. While, therefore, he was running about
in this manner, he chanced to see the wife of his keeper (who had
often fed him as well as her husband), with her young child in her
arms, with which she was endeavouring to escape from his fury. The
‘m ran as fast as she was able; but, finding that it was im-

sible for her to escape,—because these beasts, although so very
lurge, are able to run very fast,—she resolutely turned about, and
rowing her child down before the elephant, thus accosted him, as
if he had been capable of understanding her: ‘You ungrateful
beast, is this the return you make for all the benefits we have be-
stowed? Have we fed you, and taken care of you, by day and night,
during so many years, only that you may at last destroy us all?
(rush, then, this poor innocent child and me, in return for the
services that my husband has done you!’ While she was making
these passionate exclamations, the elephant approached the place
where the little infant lay; but instead of trampling upon him, he
stopped short, and looked at him with earnestness, as if he had
been sensible of shame and confusion ; and his fury from that instant
abating, he suffered himself to be led without opposition to his
stable.”

Tommy thanked Mr, Barlow for these two stories, and promised
for the future to use more discretion in his kindness to animals.

The next day Tommy and Harry went into the garden to sow the
wheat which Harry had brought with him.

While they were at work, Tommy said, ‘‘ Pray, Harry, did you
ever hear the story of the men that were obliged to live six years upon
that terribly cold country (I forget the name of it), where there is
nothing but snow and ice, and scarcely any animals but great bears.”

dlarry. Yes, I have.

Yommy. Did not the very thoughts of it frighten you dreadfully ?

ffarry. No; I cannot say they did.

fommy. Why, should you like to live in such a country?

flarry, No, certainly; I am very happy that I was born in such a
country as this, where the weather is scarcely ever too hot or too
cold; but a man must bear patiently whatever is his lot in this world.

fommy. That is true. But should you not cry, and be very much
afflicted, if you were left upon such a country?

ffarry. I should certainly be very sorry if I was Jeft there alone,
more especially as lam not big enough, or strong enough, to defend
myself against such fierce animals; but the crying would do me no
good : it would be better to do something, and try to help myself.




















SANDFORD AND MERTON. 53

Tommy, Indeed I think it would; but what could you do?

Harry. Why, l would endeavour to build myself a house, if I could
find myself materials. ‘ ;

Tommy. And what materials is a house made of ?

Harry. You know there are houses of different sizes. The houses
that the poor people live in are very different from your father's house.

Tommy. Yes; they are little, nasty, dirty, disagreeable places; I
should not like to live in them at all.

Harry, And yet the poor are in general as strong and healthy as
the rich. But if you could have no other, you would rather live in one
of them than be exposed to the weather?

Tommy. Yes, certainly. And how would you make one of them?

Harry. lf I could get any wood, and had a hatchet, I would cut
down some branches of trees, and stick them upright in the ground,
near to each other. I would get other branches, more full of small
wood; and these I would interweave between them, just as we make
hurdles to confine the sheep; and then, as that might not be warm
enough to resist the wind and cold, I would cover them over, both
within and without, with clay. /

Tommy. Really, I should like to try to make a house ; do you think,
Harry; that you and I could make one?

Hlarry. Yes, if I had wood and clay enough, I think I could, and
a small hatchet to sharpen the stakes and make them enter the ground,
Mr. Barlow then called them in to read, and told Tommy that, as
he had been talking so much about good-nature to animals, he had
looked him out a very pretty story upon the subject, and begged
that be would read it well.

“That I will,” said Tommy, ‘‘for I begin to like reading cx-
tremely ; and I think that I am happier, too, since I learned it, for
now I can always divert myself.”

“Indeed,” answered Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ most people find it so. When
any one can read he will not find the knowledge any burden to him,
and it is his own fault if he is not constantly amused.”

Tommy then read, with a clear and distinct voice, the following
story of

THE GOOD-NATURED LITTLE BOY.

A LITTLE boy went out one morning to walk to a village about five

| miles from the place where he lived, and carried with him in a basket

the provision that was to serve him the whole day. As he was walk-
ng along, a poor little half-starved dog came up to him, wagging
54 THE HISTORY OF

his tail, and sceming to cntreat him to take compassion on him, The
little boy at first took no notice of him, but at length, remarking how
lean and famished the creature seemed to be, he said, '‘ This animal
is certainly in very great necessity : if I give him part of my provision,
I shall be obliged to go home hungry myself; however, as he seems
to want it more than I do, he shall partake with me.” Saying this,
he gave the dog part of what he had in the basket, who ate it as if
he had not tasted victuals for a fortnight.

The little boy then went on a little farther, his dog still following
him, and fawning upon him with the greatest gratitude and affec-
tion, when he saw a poor old horse lying upon the ground and
groaning as if he was very ill; he went up to him, and saw that he
was almost starved, and so weak that he was unable torise. ‘Tam
very much afraid,” said the little boy, ‘“if I stay to assist this horse,
that it will be dark before I can return ; and I have heard that there
are several thieves in the neighbourhood ; however, I will try—it is
doing a good action to attempt to relieve him, and God Almighty
will take care of me.” He then went and gathered some grass, which
he brought to the horse's mouth, who immediately began to eat with
as much relish as if his chief disease was hunger. He then fetched
some water in his hat, which the animal drank up, and seemed im-
mediately to be so much refreshed that, after a few trials, he got up
and began grazing.

The little boy then went ona little farther, and saw a man wading
about in a pond of water without being able to get out of it, in spite
of all his endeavours. ‘‘ What is the matter, good man?” said the
little boy to him ; ‘‘can’t you find your way out of this pond?”

“No, God bless you. my worthy master, or miss,” said the man,
‘for such I take you to be by your voice ; I have fallen into this
pond, and know not how to get out again, as Tam quite blind, and
I am almost afraid to move for fear of being drowned.”

“‘ Well,” said. the little boy, ‘‘ though I shall be wetted to the skin,
if you will throw me your stick, I will try to help you out of it.”

The blind man then threw the stick to that side on which he heard
the voice; the little boy caught it, and went into the water, feeling
very carefully before him, lest he should unguardedly go beyond_his
depth ; at length he reached the blind man, took him very carefully
by the hand, and led him out. The blind man then gave hima
thousand blessings, and told him he could grope out his way home ;
‘and the little boy ran on as hard as he could to prevent being
benighted.

But he had not proceeded far before he saw a poor sailor, who had








;

SANDFORD AND MERTON. 55

"Jost both his legs in an engagement by sea, hopping along upon

crutches,

“God bless you, my little master!’’ said the sailor; ‘‘I have
fought many a battle with the French to defend poor old England,
but now I am crippled, as you see, and have neither victuals nor
money, although I am almost famished.”

The little boy could not resist the inclination to relieve him, so he
gave. him all his remaining victuals, and said, ‘‘God help you, poor
man! this is all I have, otherwise you should have more.” He then
ran along, and presently arrived at the town he was going to, did his
business, and returned towards his own home with all the expedition
he was able.

But he had not gone much more than half-way before the night
shut in extremely dark, without either moon or stars to light him.
The poor little boy used his utmost endeavours to find his way, but
unfortunately missed it in turning down a lane which brought him
into a wood, where he wandered about a great while without being
able to find any path tolead him out. Tired out at last, and hungry,
he felt himself so feeble that he could go no farther, but set himself
down upon the ground, crying most bitterly. In this situation he
remained for some time, till at last the little dog, who had never for-
saken him, came up to him wagging his tail, and holding something
in his mouth. The little boy took it from him, and saw it wasa
handkerchief nicely pinned together, which somebody had dropped, *
and the dog had picked up, and on opening it he found several slices
of bread and meat, which the little boy ate with great satisfaction,
and felt himself extremely refreshed with his meal.

“So,” said the little boy, ‘‘ I see that if I have given you a break-
fast, you have given me a supper; and a good turn is never lost,
done even to a dog.”

He then once more attempted to escape from the wood, but it was
to no purpose ; he only scratched his legs with briars and slipped
down in the dirt, without being able to find his‘way out. He was
just going to give up all further attempts in despair, when he hap-
pened to see a horse feeding before him, and, going up to him, saw,
by the light of the moon, which just.then began to shine a little, that
it was the very same he had fed in the morning.

“Perhaps,” said the little boy, ‘‘this creature, as I have been so
good to hin, will let me get upon his back, and he may bring me
out of the wood, as he is accustomed to feed in this neighbourhood.”

The little boy then went up to the horse, speaking to him and
stroking him, and the horse let him mount his back without opposi-
56 THE HISTORY OF

tion, and then proceeded slowly through the wood, grazing as he
went, till he brought him to an opening which led to the high road.
‘The little boy was much rejoiced at this, and said, ‘If I had not
saved this creature's life in the morning, I should have been obliged
to have stayed here all night ; I see by this that a good turn is never
lost.” *

But the poor little boy had yet a greater danger to undergo; for,
as he was going down a solitary lane, two men rushed out upon him,
laid hold of him, and were going to strip him of his clothes; but
just as they were beginning to do it, the little dog bit the leg of one
of the men with so much violence, that he left the little boy and pur-
sued the dog, that ran howling and barking away. In this instant a
voice was heard that cried out, ‘‘ There the rascals are! let us knock
them down!" which frightened the remaining man so much that he
ran away, and his companion followed him. The little boy then
looked up, and saw that it was the sailor whom he had relieved in
the morning, carried upon the shoulders of the blind man whom he
had helped out of the pond.

“There, my little dear,” said the sailor, ‘‘God be thanked! we have
come in time to do youa service, in return for what you did us in the
morning. bing a little boy, who, from the description, I concluded must be
you; but I was so lame that I should not have been able to come in
time enough to help you if I had not met this honest blind man, who
took me upon his back while I showed him the way.”

The little boy thanked him very sincerely for thus defending him ;
and they went all together to his father’s house, which was not far
off, where they were all kindly entertained with a supper and a bed.
The little boy took care of his faithful dog as long as he lived, and
never forgot the importance and necessity of doing good to others if
we wish them to do the same to us.

‘Upon my word,” said Tommy, when he had finished, ‘‘I] am
very much pleased with this story, and I think that it may very likely
be true, for I have myself observed that everything seems to love little
Harry here, merely because he is good-natured to it. I was much
surprised to see the great dog the other day, which I have never
dared to touch for fear of being bitten, fawning upon him and licking
ak all over ; it put me in mind of the story of Androcles and the
ion.

“That dog,’’ said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ will be equally fond of you if you
are kind to him, for nothing equals the sagacity and gratitude of a


SANDFORD AND MERTON. 57

dog.. But since you have read a story about a good-natured boy,
Harry shall read you another concerning a boy of a contrarv disposi-
tion.”

Harry read the following story of

THE ILL-NATURED BOY.

THERE was once a little boy who was so-unfortunate as to have a
very bad man for his father, who was always surly and ill tempered, ,
-and never gave his children either good instruction or good example;
in consequence of which this little boy, who might otherwise have
been happier and better, became ill-natured, quarrelsome, and dis-
agreeable to everybody. He very often was severely beaten for his
impertinence by boys that were bigger than himself, and sometimes
by boys that were less ; for though he was very abusive and quarrel-
some, he did not much like fighting, and generally trusted more to
his heels than his courage when he had engaged himself in a quarrel.
This little boy had a cur dog that was the exact image of himself:
he was the most troublesome, surly creature imaginable, always
barking at the heels of every horse he came near, and worrying every
sheep he could meet with, for which reason both the dog and the boy
were disliked by all the neighbourhood.

One morning his father got up early to go to the alehouse, where
he intended to stay till night, as it was a holiday ; but before he went
out he gave his son some bread and cold meat and sixpence, and
told him he might go and divert himself as he would the whole day.
The little boy was much pleased with this liberty ; and as it was a
very fine morning, he called his dog Tiger to follow him, and began
his walk.

He had not proceeded far before he meta little boy that was driving
a flock of sheep towards a gate that he wanted them to enter.

“Pray, master,” said the little boy, ‘‘ stand still and keep your dog
close to you, for fear you frighten my sheep.”

‘Oh, yes, to be sure,” answered the ill-natured boy; ‘‘I am to
wait here all the morning till you and your sheep have passed, I
_ Suppose. Here, Tiger, seize them, boy!”

_ Tiger at this sprang forth into the middle of the flock, barking and
biting on every side, and the sheep, in a general consternation,
hurried each.a separate way. ‘Tiger seemed to enjoy this sport
equally with his master ; but in the midst of his triumph he happened
unguardedly to attack an old ram that had more courage than the
38 THE HISTORY OF

rest of the tfock; le, instead of running away, faced about, and
aimed a blow with his forehead at his enemy with so much force and
dexterity, that he knocked Tiger over and over, and, butting him
several times while he was down, obliged him to limp howling
away. .

The ill-natured little boy who was not capable of loving anything,
had been much diverted with the trepidation of the sheep ; but now
he laughed heartily at the misfortune of his dog ; and he would have
laughed much longer, had not the other little boy, provoked beyond.
his patience at this treatment, thrown a stone at him, which hit him
full upon the temple, and almost knocked him down. He imme-
diately began to cry, in concert with his dog, and perceiving a man
coming towards them, who he fancied might be the owner of
the sheep, he thought it most prudent to escape as speedily as
possible.

But he had scarcely recovered from the smart which the blow had
occasioned, before his former mischievous disposition returned,
which he determined to gratify to the utmost. He had not gone far
before he saw a little girl standing bya stile with a large pot of milk
at her feet.

“Pray,” said the little girl, ‘‘help me up with this pot of milk:
my mother sent me out to fetch it this morning, and I have brought
it above a mile upon my head; but I am so tired that I have been
obliged to stop at this stile to rest me; and if I don't return home
presently, we shall have no pudding to-day, and besides, my mother
will. be very angry with me.”

‘‘What,” said the boy, ‘‘ you are to have a pudding to-day, are
you, miss?”

“Yes,” said the girl, ‘and a fine piece of roast beef; for there’s
uncle Will, and uncle John, and grandfather, and all my cousins,
to dine with us, and .we shall be very merry in the evening, I can
assure you; so pray help me up as speedily as possible.”

‘That I will, miss,” said the boy; and, taking up the jug, he
pretended to fix it upon her head ; but just as she had hold of it, he
gave it a little push, as if he had stumbled, and overturned it upon ~
her. The little girl began to cry violently, but the mischievous boy
ran away laughing heartily, and saying, ‘‘Good bye, little miss; -
give my humble service to uncle Will, and grandfather, and the
dear little cousins.”

This prank encouraged him very much; for he thought he had
now certainly escaped without any bad consequences ; so he went on
applauding his own ingenuity, and came to a green, where several


Oe

SANDFORD AND MERTON. 59

little boys were at play. He desired leave to play with them, which
they allowed him to do. But he could not be contented long with-
out exerting his evil disposition ; so, taking an opportunity when it
was his turn to fling the ball, instead of flinging it in the way he
ought to have done, he threw it into a deep muddy ditch. The
little boys ran in a great hurry to see what was become of it; and
as they were standing together upon the brink, he gave the outer-
most boy a violent push against his neighbour ; he, not being able
to resist the violence, tumbled against another, by which means
they were all soused into the ditch together. They soon scrambled
out, although ina dirty plight, and were going to have punished
him for his ill behaviour; but he patted Tiger upon the back, who
began snarling and growling in such a manner as made them desist.
Thus this. mischievous little boy escaped a second time with im-
punity, |

The next thing that he met with was a poor jackass, feeding very
quietly ina ditch. The little boy, seeing that nobody was within
sight, thought this was an opportunity of plaguing an animal that
was not to be lost ; so he went and cut a large bunch of thorns,
which he contrived to fix upon the poor beast’s tail, and then, set-
ting Tiger at him, he was extremely diverted to see the fright and
agony the creature was in. But it did not fare so well with Tiger,
who, while he was baying and biting the animal's heels, received so
severe a kick upon his forehead as laid him dead upon the spot.
The boy, who had no affection for his dog, left him with the greatest
unconcern when he saw what had happened, and, finding himself
hungry, sat down by the wayside to eat his dinner.

He had not been long there before a poor blind man came groping
his way out with a couple of sticks.

‘Good morning to you, gaffer,” said the boy: ‘‘ pray, did you |
see a little girl come this road, with a basket of eggs upon her head,
dressed in a green gown, with a straw hat upon her head?”

‘“*God bless you, master,” said the beggar, ‘‘I am so blind that
I can see nothing; I have been blind these twenty years, and they
call me poor old blind Richard.” :

Though this poor man was such an object of charity and compassion,
yet the little boy determined, as usual, to :play him some trick ; and,
as he was a great liar and deceiver, he spoke to him thus:

“Poor old Richard, I am heartily sorry for you with all my heart.
Tam just rating my breakfast, and if you will sit down by me I will
give you part and feed you myself.”

“Thank you, with all my heart,” said the poor man ; ‘‘and if you
$0 : THE HISTORY OF

will give me your hand, I will sit by you with great pleasure, my
dear, good little master!” (

The little boy then gave him his hand, and pretending to direct
him, guided him to sit down in a large heap of wet manure that lay
by the roadside.

' There,” said he, ‘'now you are nicely seated, and I will feed
you.”

So, taking a little in his fingers, he was going to put it into the
blind man’s mouth ; but the man, who now perceived the trick that
had been played him, made a sudden snap at his fingers, and,
getting them between his teeth, bit them so severely that the wicked
boy roared out for mercy, and promised never more to be guilty of
such wickedness.

At last the blind man, after he had put him to very severe pain,
consented to let him go, saying as he went, ‘' Are you not ashamed,
you little scoundrel, to attempt to do hurt to those who have never
injured you, and to want to add to the sufferings of those who are
‘already sufficiently miserable? Although you escape now, be assured
that if you do not repent and mend your manners, you will meet
with a severe punishment for your bad behaviour.”

One would think that this punishment should have cured him
entirely of his mischievous disposition ; but, unfortunately, nothing
is so difficult to overcome as bad habits that have been long indulged.
He had not gone far before he saw a lame beggar, that just made a
shift to support himself by means of a couple of sticks. The beggar
asked him to give him something, and the little mischievous boy,
pulling out his sixpence, threw it down just before him, as if he in-
tended to make him a present of it; but while the poor man was
stooping with difficulty to pick it up, this wicked little boy knocked
the stick away, by which means the beggar fell down upon his face ;
and then, snatching up the sixpence, the boy ran away, laughing
very heartily at the accident.

This was the last trick this ungracious boy had it in his power to
play; for, seeing two men come up to the beggar and enter into dis-
course with him, he was afraid of being pursued, and therefore ran
as fast as he was able over several fields. At last he came into a lane
which led into a farmer’s orchard, and as he was preparing to clamber
over the fence, a large dog seized him by the leg and held him fast.
He cried out in an agony of terror, which brought the farmer out,
who called the dog off, but seized him very roughly, saying, ‘‘ So,
sir, you are caught at last, are you? You thought you might come
day after day and steal my apples without detection ; but it seems
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 6x

you are mistaken, and now you shall receive the punishment you
have so long deserved.”

The farmer then began to chastise him very severely with a whip
he had in his hand, and the boy in vain protested he was innocent,
and begged for mercy. At last the farmer asked who he was
and where he lived; but when he heard his name he cried out,
“What! are you the little rascal that frightened my sheep this
morning, by which means several of them are lost? and do you think
to escape?"

Saying this, he lashed him more scverely than before, in spite of
all his cries and protestations, At length, thinking he had punished
him enough, he turned him out of the orchard, bade him go home,
and frighten sheep again if he liked the consequences.

The little boy slunk away, crying very bitterly (for he had been
very severely beaten), and now began to find that no one can long
hurt others with impunity; so he determined to go quietly home, and
behave better for the future.

But his sufferings were not yet at an end; for as he jumped down
from a stile, he felt himself very roughly seized, and, looking up,
found that he was in the power of the lame beggar whom he had
thrown upon his face. It was in vain that he now cried, entreated,
and begged pardon ; the man, who had been much hurt by his fall,
thrashed him very severely with his stick before he would part with
him. He now again went on, crying and roaring with pain, but at
least expected to escape without further damage. But here he was
mistaken, for as he was walking slowly through a lane, just as he
turned a corner, he found himself in the middle of the very troop of
boys that he had used so ill in the morning. They all set up a shout
as soon as they saw their enemy in their power without his dog, and
began persecuting him in a thousand various ways. Some pulled
him by the hair, others pinched him; some whipped his legs with
their handkerchiefs, while others covered him with handfuls of dirt.
In vain did he attempt to escape ; they were still at his heels, and,
surrounding him on every side, continued their persecutions.

At length, while he was in this disagreeable situation, he happened
to come up to the same jackass he had seen in the morning, and,
making a sudden spring, jumped upon his back, hoping by these
means to escape. ‘The boys immediately renewed their shouts, and
the ass, wLo was frightened at the noise, began galloping with all his
might, and presently bore him from the reach of his enemies. But

_he had little reason to rejoice at his escape, for he found it impossible

to stop the animal, and was every instant afraid of being thrown off
é2 THE HISTORY OF

and dashed upon the ground. After he had keen thus hurried along
a considerable time, the ass on a sudden stopped short at the door of
acottage, and began kicking and prancing with so much fury that
the little boy was presently thrown to the ground, and broke his leg
in the fall. His cries immediately brought the family out, among
whom was the very little girl he had used so ill in the morning. But
she, with the greatest good-nature, seeing him in sucha pitiable situ-
ation, assisted in bringing him in and laying him upon the bed.
There this unfortunate boy had leisure to recollect himself, and re-
flect upon his own bad behaviour, which in one day's time had ex-
posed him to such a variety of misfortunes; and he determined with
great sincerity, that, if he ever recovered from his present accident,
he would be as careful to take every opportunity of doing good as he
had before been to commit every species of mischief.

When the story was ended, Tommy said it was very surprising to
see how differently the two little boys fared. The one little boy was
good-natured, and therefore everything he met with became his friend
and assisted him in return; the other, who was ill-natured, made
everything his enemy, and therefore he met with nothing but misfor-
tunes and vexations, and nobody seemed to feel any compassion for
him, excepting the poor little girl that assisted him at last, which was
very kind indeed of her, considering how ill she had been used.

“That is very true indeed,” said Mr. Barlow: ‘nobody is loved
in this world unless he loves others and does good to them; and no-
body can tell but one time or other he may want the assistance of the
meanest and lowest; therefore every sensible man will behave well
to everything around him, because it is his duty to do it, because
every benevolent person feels the greatest pleasure in doing good,
and even because it is his own interest to make as many friends as
possible. No one can tell, however secure his present situation may
appear, how soon it may alter, and he may have occasion for the
compassion of those who are now infinitely below him. 1 could show
you a story to that purpose; but you have read enough, and there-
fore you must go out and use some exercise.”

“Oh, pray, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘do let me hear the story: I think
I could now tread for ever without being tired.”

‘'No,” said Mr. Barlow: ‘‘ everything has its turn; to-morrow you
shall read, but now we must work in the garden.”

“Then pray, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘ may I ask a favour of you?”

“Certainly,” said Mr, Barlow: ‘‘if it is proper for you to have,
there is nothing can give me greater pleasure than to grant it.”


'

SANDFORD AND MERTON, 63

“Why, then,” said Tommy, ‘‘I have been thinking that a man
should know how to do everything in the world.”

Afr. Barlow. Very right: the more knowledge he acquires the
better.

Tommy. And therefore Harry and I are going to build a house.

wr. Barlow. To build a house! Well, and have you laid ina
sufficient quantity of bricks and mortar?

‘"No, no,” said Tommy, smiling, ‘‘ Harry and I can build houses
without bricks and mortar.”

Mr, Barlow, What are they to be made of, then—cards?

“Dear sir,” answered Tommy, ‘‘do you think we are such little
children as to want card houses? No: we are going to build real
houses, fit for people to live in. And then, you know, if ever we
should be thrown upona desert coast, as the poor men were, we shall
be able to supply ourselves with necessaries till some ship comes to
take us away.”

ir. Barlow. And if no ship should come, what then?

Tommy. Why, then, we must stay there all our lives, I am afraid.

Afr. Barlow. If you wish to prepare yourselves against the event,
you are much in the right, for nobody knows what may happen to
him in this world. What is it, then, you want to make your house?

Tommy. The first thing we want, sir, is wood and a hatchet.

Afr. Barlow. Wood you shall have in plenty; but did ever you
use a hatchet? .

Tommy. No, sir.

Mr. Barlow. Then I am afraid to let you have one, because it is
a very dangerous kind of tool; and if you are not expert in the use
of it, you may wound yourself severely. But if you will let me
know what you want, I, who am more strong and expert, will take
the hatchet and cut down the wood for you.

“Thank you, sir,” said Tommy; ‘‘you are very good to me,
indeed.”

And away Harry and he ran to the copse at the bottom of the
garden.

Mr. Barlow then went to work, and presently, by Harry's direc-
tion, cut down several poles about as thick as a man’s wrist, and
about cight feet long; these he sharpened at the end, in order to
run into the ground ; and so eager were the two little boys at the
business, that, ina very short time, they had transported them all
to the bottom of the garden; and Tommy entirely forgot he was a
gentleman, and worked with the greatest eagerness,

“Now,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ where will you fix your house? *
Sy THE HISTORY OF

‘Here, I think," answered Tommy, ‘‘just at the bottom of this
bill, because it will be warm and sheltered.” ,

So Harry took the stakes and began to thrust them into the ground
at about the distance of 2 foot, and in this manner he encloseda
piece of ground which was about ten feet long and eight feet wide
leaving an opening in the middle, of three feet wide, for a door.
After this was done they gathered up the brushwood that was cut
off, and by Harry’s direction they interwove it between the poles in
such 4 manner as to form a compact kind of fence. This labour, as
may be imagined, took them up several days ; however, they worked
at it very hard every day, and every day the work advanced, which
filled Tommy’s heart with so much pleasure that he thought himself
the happiest little boy in the universe.

But this employment did not make Tommy unmindful of the story
which Mr. Barlow had promised him ; it was to this purport :—

THE STORY OF THE GRATEFUL TURK.

Ir happened some centuries ago that a Venetian ship had taken
many of the Turks prisoners, and according to the barbarous
customs of those ages these unhappy men had been sold to different
persons in the city. By accident, one of the slaves lived opposite
to the house of a rich Venetian, who had an only son of the age of
about twelve years. It happened that this little boy used frequently
to stop as he passed near Hamet (for that was the namie of the slave),
and gaze at him very attentively. Hamet, who remarked in the face
of the child the appearance of good-nature and compassion, used
always to salute him with the greatest courtesy, and testified the
greatest pleasure in his company. At length the little boy took such
a fancy to the slave that he used to visit him several times in the
day, and brought him such little presents as he had it in his power
to make, and which he thought would be of use to his friend.

But though Hamet seemed always to take the greatest delight in
the innocent caresses of his little friend, yet the child could not help
remarking that Hamet was frequently extremely sorrowful, and he
often surprised him on a sudden when tears were trickling down his
face, although he did his utmost to conceal them. The little boy
was at length so much affected with the repetition of this sight that
he spoke of it to his father, and begged him, if he had it in his
power, to make poor Hamet happy. The father, who was extremely


SANDFORD AND MERTON. oe)

fond of his son, and besides had observed that he seldom requested.
anything that was not generous and humane, determined to see the
Turk himself and talk to him. .

Accordingly he went to him the next day, and, observing him for
some time in silence, was struck with the extraordinary appearance
of mildness and honesty which his countenance discovered. At
Jength he said to him, ‘‘ Are you that Hamet of whom my son is so
fond, and of whose gentleness and courtesy I have so often heard
him talk?”

‘*Ves,” said the Turk, ‘‘I am that unfortunate Hamet, who have
now been for three years a captive: during that space of time your
son (if you are his father) is the only human being that seems to have
felt any compassion for my sufferings ; therefore, I must confess, he
is the only object to which I am attached in this barbarous country ;
and night and morning I pray that Power who is equally the God
of Turks and Christians, to grant him every blessing he deserves,
and to preserve him from all the miseries I suffer.”

“Indeed, Hamet,” said the merchant, ‘‘he is much obliged to
you, although, from his present circumstances, he does not appear
much exposed to danger. But tell me, for 1 wish to do you good,
in what I can assist you? for my son informs me that you are the
prey of continual regret and sorrow.”

“Ts it wonderful,” answered the Turk with a glow of generous
indignation that suddenly animated his countenance, ‘‘is it wonder-"
ful that I should pine in silence, and mourn my fate, who am bereft
of the first and noblest present of nature—my liberty?”

«And yet,” answered the Venetian, ‘‘how many thousands of our
nation do you retain in fetters !"

“Tam not answerable,” said the Turk, ‘‘for the cruelty of my
countrymen, more than you are for the barbarity of yours. But as
to myself, I have never practised the inhuman custom of enslaving
my fellow-creatures ; I have never spoiled the Venetian merchants
of their property to increase my riches ; I have always respected the
rights of nature, and therefore it is the more severe.” Here a tear
started from his eye, and wetted his manly cheek: instantly, how-
ever, he recollected himself, and folding his arms upon his bosom,
and gently bowing his head, he added, ‘‘God is good, and man’
must submit to His decrees.”

The Venetian was affected with this appearance of manly fortitude,
;and said, ‘‘ Hamet, I pity your sufferings, and may perhaps be able
‘to relieve them. What would you do to regain your liberty?”

“What would I do?” answered Hamet ; ‘‘by theeternal Majesty

5



















66 THE HISTORY OF

of Heaven, I would confront every pain and danger that can appal
the heart of man !”

“Nay,” answered the merchant, “you will not be exposed toa
trial. The means of your deliverance are certain, provided your
courage does not belie your appearance.”

“Name them! name them !” cried the impatient Hamet ; ‘‘ place
death before me in every horrid shape, and if I shrink”

‘ Patience,” answered the merchant: ‘‘we shall be observed ; but
hear me attentively. I have in this city an inveterate foe, who has
heaped upon me every injury which can most bitterly sting the heart
of man. This man is as brave as he is haughty ; and I must confess
the dread of his strength and valour has hitherto deterred me from
resenting his insults as they deserve. Now, Hamet, your look, your
form, your words, convince me that you were born for manly daring.
‘Take this dagger: as soon as the shades of night involve the city I
will.myself conduct you to the place where you may at once revenge
your friend and regain your freedom.”

At this proposal, scom and shame flashed from the kindling eye
of Hamet, and passion for a considerable time deprived him of the
power of utterance ; at length he lifted his arm as high as his chains
would permit, and cried with an indignant tone, ‘ Mighty Prophet !
and are these the wretches to whom you permit your faithful votaries
to be enslaved! Go, base Christian, and know that Hamet would
not stoop to the vile trade of an assassin for all the weaith of Venice!
no! not to purchase the freedom of all his race !”

At these words the merchant, without seeming much abashed,
told him he was sorry he had offended him ; but he thought freedom
had been dearer to him than he found it was.

“However,” added he, as he turned his back, ‘‘ you will reflect
upon my proposal, and perhaps by to-morrow you may change your
mind.”

Hamet disdained to answer ; and the merchant went his way.

The next day, however, he returned in company with his son, and
mildly accosted Hamet thus: i

“The abruptness of the proposal I yesterday made you might
perhaps astonish you, but I am now come to discourse the: matter
more calmly with you, and IJ doubt not, when you have heard my
reasons——”

“Christian,” interrupted Hamet, with a severe but composed
countenance, “cease at length to insult the miserable with proposals
more shocking than even these chains. If thy religion permit such |
acts as. those, know that they are execrable and abominable to the |


















SANDFORD AND MERTON. 67

soul of every Mohammedan: therefore from this moment let us
break off all further intercourse, and be strangers to each other.”
‘*No,” answered the merchant, flinging himself into the arms 0° -
Hamet, ‘‘let us from this moment be more closely linked than ever !
Generous man, whose virtues may at once disarm and enlighten thy
enemies ! fondness for my son first made me interested in thy fate ;
but from the moment that I saw thee yesterday I determined to set
thee free: therefore, pardon me this unnccessary trial of thy virtue,
which has anly raised thee higher in my esteem, Francisco has a
soul which is as averse to deeds of treachery and blood as even
Hamet himself. From this moment, generous man, thou art free ;
thy ransom is already paid, with no other obligation than that of
remembering the affection of this thy young and faithful friend ; and
perhaps hereafter, when thou seest an unhappy Christian groaning
in Turkish fetters, thy generosity may make thee think of Venice.”
It is impossible to describe the ecstacies or the gratitude of Hamet
at this unexpected deliverance : I will not, therefore, attempt to repeat
what he said to his benefactors; I will only add that he was that
day set free, and Francisco embarked him on board a ship which
was going to one of the Grecian islands, took leave of him with the
greatest tenderness, and forced him to accept a purse of gold to pay
his expenses. Nor was it withou’. the greatest regret that Hamet
parted from his young friend, whose disinterested kindness had thus
procured his freedom ; he embraced him with an agony of tender-
ness, wept over him at parting, and prayed for every blessing upon
1 his head.
| About six months after this transaction a sudden fire burst forth
} in the house of this generous merchant. It was early in the morning,
when sleep is the most profound, and none of the family perceived
it till almost the whole of the building was involved in flames. The
frightened servants had just time to waken the merchant and hurry
him downstairs, and the instant he was down, the staircase itself
% gave way, and sank with a horrid crash into the midst of the fire.
But if Francisco congratulated himself for an instant upon his
escape, it was only to resign himself immediately after to the most
deep despair, when he found upon inquiry, that his son, who slept
in an upper apartment, had been neglected in the general tumult,
and was yet amongst the flames, No words can describe the father’s
agony: he wculd have rushed head’ong into the fire, but was re-
strained by his servants; he then -aved in an agony of grief, and
offered half his fortune to the intrepid man who would risk his life
to save his child. As Francisco was known to be immensely rich,

5—2
68 THE HISTORY OF

several ladders were in the instant raised, and several daring spirits,
incited by the vast reward, attempted the adventure. The violence
of the flames, however, which burst forth at every window, together
with the ruins that fell on every side, drove them all back; and the
unfortunate youth, who now appeared upon the battlements, stretch-
ing out his arms and imploring aid, seemed to be destined to certain
destruction.

The unhappy father now lost all perception, and sank down in a
state of insensibility, when, in this dreadful moment of general sus-
pense and agony, a man rushed through the opening crowd, mounted
the tallest of the ladders with an intrepidity that showed he was re-
solved to succeed or perish, and instantly disappeared. A sudden
gust of smoke and fiame burst forth immediately after, which made
the people imagine he was lost; when, on a sudden, they beheld
him emerge again with the child in his arms, and descend the ladder
without any material damage. A universal shout of applause now
resounded to the skies ; but what words can give an adequate idea
of the father’s feelings, when, on recovering his senses, he found his
darling miraculously preserved, and safe within his arms?

After the first effusions of his tenderness were over, he asked for
his deliverer, and was shown a man ofa noble stature, but dressed
in mean attire, and his features were so begrimed with smoke and
filth that it was impossible to distinguish them. Francisco, however,
accosted him with courtesy, and, presenting him with a purse of gold,
begged he would accept of that for the present, and that the next
day he should receive to the utmost of his promised reward.

‘*No, generous merchant,’’ answered the stranger, ‘‘I do not sell
my blood.”

‘'Gracious heavens!” cried the merchant, ‘‘sure I should know
that voice? It is——”

‘'Yes,” exclaimed the son, throwing himself into the arms of his
deliverer, ‘‘ it is my Hamet!”

It was indeed Hamet, who stood before them in the same mean
attire which he had worn six months before, when the first generosity
of the merchant had redeemed him from slavery. Nothing could
equal the astonishment and gratitude of Francisco; but as they were
then surrounded by a large concourse of people, he desired Hamet
to go with him to the house of one of his friends, and when they

. were alone he embraced him tenderly, and asked by what extra-
ordinary chance he had thus been enslaved a second time, adding a
kind of reproach for his not informing him of his captivity.

“‘T bless God for that captivity,” answered Hamet, ‘'since it has
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 69

given me an opportunity of showing that 1 was not altogether unde-
serving of your kindness, and of preserving the life of that dear youth,
that I value a thousand times beyond my own, But it is now fit that
my generous patron should be informed of the whole truth. Know,
then, that when the unfortunate Hamet was taken by your galleys,
his aged father shared his captivity—it was his fate which so often
made me shed those tears which first attracted the notice of your son ;
and when your unexampled bounty had set me free, I flew to find
the Christian who had purchased him. I represented to him that I
was young and vigorous, while he was aged and infirm ; I added,
too, the gold which I_had received from your bounty: ina word, I
prevailed upon the Christian to send back my father in that ship
which was intended for me, without acquainting him with the means
of his freedom: since that time I have stayed here to discharge the
debt of nature and gratitude, a willing slave——"

At this part of the story Harry, who had with difficulty restrained
himself before, burst into such a fit of crying, and Tommy himself
was so much affected, that Mr. Barlow told them they had better
leave off for the present, and go to some other employment. They
therefore went into the garden to resume the labour of their house,
but found, to their unspeakable regret, that during their absence an
accident had happened which had entirely destroyed all their labours:
a violent storm of wind and rain had risen that morning, which, blow-
ing full against the walls of the newly constructed house, had levelled
it with the ground. Tommy could scarcely refrain from crying when
he saw the ruins lying around; but Harry, who bore the loss with
more composure, told him not to mind it, for it could easily be re-
paired, and they would build it stronger the next time.

Harry then went up to the spot, and after examining it some time,
told Tommy that he believed he had found out the reason of their
misfortune.

‘What is it?” said Tommy.

‘‘Why,” said Harry, ‘it is only because we did not drive these
stakes, which are to bear the whole weight of our house, far enough
into the ground ; and therefore, when the wind blew agains. the flat
side of it with so much violence, it could not resist. And now I re-
member to have seen the workmen, when they begin a building, dig
a considerable way into thé ground, to lay the foundation fast; and
T should think that, if we drove these stakes a great way. into the
ground, it would produce the same effect, and we should have no-
thing to fear from any future storms."
70 THE HISTORY OF

Mr. Barlow then came into the garden, and the two boys showed
him their misfortune, and asked him whether he did not think that
driving the stakes further in would prevent such an accident for the
future. Mr. Barlow told them he thought it would; and that, as
they were too short to reach the top of the stakes, he would assist
them. He then went and brought a wooden mallet, with which he
struck the tops of the stakes, and drove them so fast into the ground
that there was no longer any danger of their being shaken by the
weather. Harry and Tommy then applied themselves with so much
assiduity to their work that they in a very short time had repaired all
the damage, and advanced it as far as it had been before.

The next thing that was necessary to be done was putting on a
roof, for hitherto they had constructed nothing but the walls. For
this purpose they took several long poles, which they laid across their
-building where it was most narrow, and upon these they placed straw
in considerable quantities, so that they now imagined they had con-
structed a house that would completely screen them from the wea-
ther. But in this, unfortunately, they were again mistaken ;:for a
very violent shower of rain coming on just as they had completed
their building, they took shelter under it, and remarked for some
time, with infinite pleasure, how dry and comfortable it kept them ;
but at last the straw that covered it being completely soaked through,
and the water having no vent to run off, by reason of the flatness of
the roof, the rain began to penetrate in considerable quantities.

For some time Harry and Tommy bore the inconvenience, but it
increased so much that they were soon obliged to leave it and seek
for shelter in the house. When they were thus secured, they began
again to consider the affair of the house, and Tommy said that it
surely must be because they had not put straw enough upon it.

“No,” said Harry, ‘‘I think that cannot be the reason ; I rather
imagine it must be owing to our roof lying so flat; for I have ob-
served that all houses that I have ever seen have their roofs ina
shelving posture, by which means the wet continually runs off from
them and falls to the ground; whereas ours, being quite flat, detained
almost all the rain that fell upon it, which must necessarily soak
deeper and deeper into the straw till it penetrated quite through.”

They therefore agreed to remedy this defect ; and for this purpose
they took several poles of an equal length, the one end of which they
fastened to the side of the house, and let the other two ends meet in
the middle, by which means they formed a roof exactly like that
which we commonly see upon buildings; they also took several
poles, which they tied across the others, to keep them firm in their
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 4

places, and give the roof additional strength ; and lastly, they covered
the whole with straw or thatch; and for fear the thatch should be
blown away, they stuck several pegs in different: places, and put
small pieces of stick crosswise from peg to peg, to keep the straw in
its place. When this was done they found they had avery tolerable
house ; only the sides, being formed of brushwood alone, did not
sufficiently exclude the wind. To remedy this inconvenience, Harry,
who was chief architect, procured some clay, and mixing it up with
water, to render it sufficiently soft, he daubed it all over the walls,
both within and without, by which means the wind was excluded and
the house rendered much warmer than before.

Some time had now elapsed since the seeds of the wheat were
sown, and they, began to shoot so vigorously that the blade of the
corn appeared green’ above the ground, and increased every day ‘in
strength. Tommy went to look at it every morning, and remarked
its gradual increase with the greatest satisfaction.

“ Now,” he said to Harry, ‘‘I think we should soon be able to live
if we were upon a desert island. Here is a house to shelter us from
the weather, and we shall soon have some corn for food.”

**Yes,” answered Harry; ‘‘ but there are a great many things still
wanting to enable us to make bread.”

Mr. Barlow had a very large garden and an orchard full of the
finest fruit-trees ; and he had another piece of ground where he used
to sow seeds in order to raise trees, and then they were carefully
planted out in beds till they were big enough to be moved into the
orchard and produce fruit. Tommy had often eaten of the fruit of
the orchard, and thought it delicious, and this led him to think that
it would be a great improvement to their house if he had a few trees
that he might set near it, and which would shelter it from the sun
and hereafter produce fruit; so he desired Mr. Barlow to give him
a couple of trees, and Mr. Barlow told him to go into the nursery
and take his choice. Accordingly Tommy went, and chose out two
of the strongest-looking trees he could find, which, with Harry's
assistance, he transplanted into the garden in the following manner:
They both took their spades, and very carefully dug the trees up
without injuring their roots; then they dug two large holes in the
place where they chose the trees should stand, and very carefully
broke the earth to pieces, that it might lie light upon the roots; then
the tree was placed in the middle of the hole, and Tommy held it
upright while Harry gently threw the earth over the roots, which he
trod down with his feet in order to cover them well. Lastly, he
stuck a large stake in the ground and tied the tree to it, from the
72 THE HISTORV OF

fear that the wintry wind might injure it, or perhaps entirely blow it
out of the ground. ?

Nor did they bound their attention here. There was a little spring
of water which burst from the upper ground in the garden, and ran
down the side of the hill in a small stream. Harry and Tommy
Jaboured very hard for several days to form a new channel, to lead
the water near the roots of their trees, for it happened to be hot dry
weather, and they feared they might perish from want of moisture.

Mr. Barlow saw them employed in this manner with the greatest
Satisfaction. He told them that in many parts of the world the ex-
' cessive heat burned up the ground so much that nothing would sTow
unless the soil was watered in that manner. ‘‘There is,” said he, ‘‘a
country in particular, called Egypt, which has always been famous for
its fertility, and for the quantity of corn that grows in it, which is
naturally watered in the following extraordinary manner. There is
2 great river called the Nile, which flows through the whole extent of
the country ; the river, at a particular time of the year, begins to over-
flow its banks, and, as the whole country is flat, it very soon covers
it all with its waters. These waters remain in this situation several
weeks before they have entirely drained off; and when that happens,
they leave the soil so rich that everything that is planted in it flourishes
and produces with the greatest abundance.”

‘Is not that the country, sir,” said Harry, ‘‘where that cruel ani-
mail the crocodile is found ?”

“*Yes,”” answered Mr. Barlow.

‘What is that, sir?” said Tommy.

“It is an animal,” answered Mr. Barlow, ‘‘that lives someimes
upon the land, sometimes in the water. It comes originally from an
egg, which the old one lays and buries in the sand. The heat of the
sun then warms it during several days, and at last a young crocodile
is hatched. This animal is at first very small; it has a long body and
four short legs, which serve it both to walk with upon the land and to
swim with in the waters. It has, besides, a long tail, or rather the
body is extremely long, and gradually grows thinner till it ends ina
point. Its shape is exactly like that of a lizard: or, if you have never
seen a lizard, did you never observe a small animal, of some inches
Jong, which lives at the bottom of ditches and ponds?”

“Yes, sir, I have,” answered Tommy, ‘‘and I once caught one
with my hand, taking it for a fish; but when I had it near me, I saw
it had four little legs, so I threw it into the water again, for fear the
animal should be hurt.”

‘This animal,” answered Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ may give you an exact
idea of a young crocodile; but as it grows older it gradually becomes
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 73

bigger, till at last, as I have been informed, it reaches the length of
twenty or thirty feet.”

‘That is very large,” said Tommy; ‘‘and does it do any harm?”

“Yes,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘itisa very voracious animal, and devours
everything it can seize. It frequently comes out of the water and lives
upon the shore, where it resembles a large log of wood ; and if any
animal unguardedly comes near, it snaps at it on a sudden, and if it
can catch the poor creature, devours it.”

Tommy. And does it never devour men?

Mr. Barlow. Sometimes, if it surprises them; but those who are
accustomed to meet with them frequently easily escape. They run
round in a circle, or turn short on a sudden, by which means the
animal is left far behind ; because, although he can run tolerably fast
in a straight line, the great length of his body prevents him from turn-
ing with ease.

‘Tommy. This must bea dreadful animal to meet with: is it possible
for a man to defend himself against it?

Mr. Barlow, Everything is possible to those that have courage and
coolness; therefore many of the inhabitants of those countries carry
long spears in their hands in order to defend themselves from those
‘animals. The crocodile opens his wide voracious jaws in order to
devour the man, but the man takes this opportunity and thrusts the
point of his spear into the creature’s mouth, by which means he is
generally killed upon the spot. Nay, I have even heard that some
will carry their hardiness so far as to go into the water in order to
fight the crocodile there. They take a large splinter of wood about
a foot in length, strong in the middle, and sharpened at both ends;
to this they tiea long and tough cord. The man who intends to fight
the crocodile takes this piece of wood in his right hand, and goes into
the river, where he wades till one of these creatures perceives him.
As soon as that happens the animal comes up to him to seize him,
extending his wide and horrid jaws, which are armed with several
rows of pointed teeth; but the man, with the greatest intrepidity,
waits for his enemy, and the instant he approaches thrusts his hand,
armed with the splinter of wood, into his terrible mouth, which the
creature closes directly, and by these means forces the sharp points
into each of his jaws, where they stick fast. He is then incapable of
doing hurt, and they pull him to the shore by the cord.

‘Pray, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘is this dreadful animal capable of
being tamed?”

“Yes,” answered Mr. Barlow. ‘'I believe, as I have before told
you, there is no animal that may not be rendered mild and inoffensive
74 THE HISTORY OF

by good usuage. There are several parts of Egypt where tame cro-
codiles are kept.

This account diverted Tommy very much. He thanked Mr. Barlow
for giving him this description of the crocodile, and said he should
like to see every animal in the world. ‘That,” answered Mr. Barlow,
“‘would be-extremely difficult, as almost every country produces some
kind which is not found in other parts of the world ; but if you will
be contented to read the descriptions of them which have been written,
you may easily gratify your curiosity.”

It happened about this time that Tommy and Harry rose early
one morning, and went to take a long walk before breakfast, as they
used frequently to do; they rambled so far that at last they both
found themselves tired, and sat down under a hedge to rest. While
they were here a very clean and decently dressed woman passed by,
who, seeing two little boys sitting by themselves, stopped to look at
them ; and, after considering them attentively, she said, ‘‘ You seem,
my little dears, to be either tired or to have lost your way.”

‘No, madam,” said Harry, ‘“‘we have not lost our way, but we
have walked farther than usual this morning, and we wait here a
little while to rest ourselves.”

“Well,” said the woman, ‘‘if you will come into my little house
—that you see a few yards farther on—you may sit more comfort-
ably ; and as my daughter has by this time milked the cows, she
shall give you a mess of bread and milk.”

Tommy, who was by this time extremely hungry as well as tired,
told Harry that he should like to accept the good woman's invita-
tion ; so they followed her to a small but clean-looking farmhouse
which stood at a little distance. Here they entered a clean kitchen,
furnished with very plain but convenient furniture, and were desired
to sit down by a warm and comfortable fire, which was made of turf.
Tommy, who had never seen such a fire, could not help inquiring
about it, and the good woman told him that poor people like her
were unable to purchase many coals ; “therefore,” said she, “we
go and pare the surface of the commons, which is full of grass and
heath and other vegetables, together with their roots all matted

‘together ; these we dry in small pieces by leaving them exposed to
tke summer's sun, and then we bring them home and put them under
the cover of a shed, and use them for our fires,”

But," said Tommy, ‘I should think you would hardly have fire
enough by these means to dress your dinner ; for I have by accident
Seen in my father’s kitchen when they were dressing the dinner, and
I saw a fire that blazed up to the very top of the chimney.”
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 75

The poor woman smiled at this, and said, “ Your father, I sup-
pose, master, is some rich man, who has a great deal of victuals to
dress, but we poor people must be more easily contented,”

“Why,” said Tommy, ‘‘you must at least want to roast meat
every day.”

“No,” said the poor woman, ‘‘we seldom see roast beef at our
house ; but we are very well contented if we can havea bit of fat
pork every day, boiled in a pot with turnips ; and we bless God that
we fare so well, for there are many poor souls, who are as good as
we, that can scarcely get a morsel of dry bread.”

While they were talking a little clean girl came and brought
Tommy an earthen porringer full of new milk, with a large slice of
brown bread. Tommy took it, and ate with so good a relish that.
he thought he had never made a better breakfast in his life. ‘

When Harry and he had eaten their breakfast, Tommy told him
it was time they should return home, so he thanked the good woman
for her kindness, and putting his hand into his pocket, pulled out a
shilling, which he desired her to accept. 4

“No, God bless you, my little dear!" said the woman, “T will
not take a farthing of you for the world. What though my husband
and I are poor, yet we are able to get a living by our labour, and
give a mess of milk to a traveller without hurting ourselves.”

Tommy thanked her again, and was just going away, when a
couple of surly-looking men came in and asked the woman if her
name was Tosse?.

“Ves, itis,” said the woman: “I have never been ashamed of
qe:

‘“Why, then,” said one of the men, pulling a paper out of his
pocket, ‘‘Here is an execution against you, on the part of Mr.
Richard Gruff; and if your husband does not instantly discharge
the debt, with interest and all costs, amounting altogether to the
sum of thirty-nine pounds ten shillings, we shall take an inventory of
all you have, and proceed to sell it by auction for the discharge of
the debt.” 5

“Indeed,” said the poor woman, looking a little confused, ‘‘ this
must certainly be a mistake, for I never heard of Mr. Richard Gruff
in all my life, nor do I believe that my husband owes a fathing in the
world, unless to his landlord ; and I know that he has almost made
up half a year’s rent to him ; so that I do not think he would go to
trouble a poor man.”

“No, no, mistress,” said. the man, shaking his head, ‘‘ we know
our business too well to make these kind of mistakes ; but when your
76 THE HISTORY OF

husband comes in we'll talk with him; in the meantime we must go
on with our inventory.”

The two men then went into the next room, and immediately after
a stout comely-looking man, of about the age of forty, came in, with
a good-humoured countenance, and asked it his breakfast was ready.

‘Oh, my poor dear William!” said the woman, ‘‘here is a sad
breakfast for you! But I think it cannot be true that you owe any-
thing; so what the fellows told me must be false about Richard
Gruff.”

At this name the man instantly started, and his countenance, which
was before ruddy, became pale as a sheet.

“Surely,” said the woman, ‘it cannot be true that you owe forty
pounds to Richard Gruff?"

‘‘Alas !” answered the man, ‘'I do not know the exact sum ; but
when your brother Peter failed, and his creditors seized all that he
had, this Richard Gruff was going-to send him to jail, had not I
agreed to be bound for him, which enabled him to go to sea. He
indeed promised to remit his wages to me, to prevent my getting into
any trouble on that account; but you know it is now three years
since he went, and in all that time we have heard nothing about
him.”

‘‘Then,” said the woman, bursting into tears, ‘you and ail your
poor dear children are ruined for my ungrateful brother, for here are
two bailiffs in the house, who have come to take possession of all you
have, and to sell it.”

At this the man's face became red as scarlet, and seizing an old
sword which hung over the chimney, he cried out, ‘ No, it shall not
be! I will die first ! I will make these villains know what it is to make
honest men desperate.”

He then drew the sword, and was going out in a fit of madness,
which might have proved fatal either to himself or to the bailiffs, but
his wife flung herself upon her knees before him, and, catching hold
of his legs, besought him to be more composed.

‘‘Oh, for Heaven's sake, my dear, dear husband," said she, ‘‘con-
sider what you are doing. You can neither do me nor your children
any service by this violence ; instead of that, should you be so un-
fortunate as to kill either of these men, would it not be murder, and
would not our lot be a thousand times harder than it is at present?”

This remonstrance seemed to have some effect upon the farmer;
his children, too, although too young to understand the cause of all
this confusion, gathered round him and hung about him, sobbing in
concert with their mother. Little Harry, too, although a stranger to
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 17

the poor man before, yet with the tenderest sympathy took him by
the hand and bathed it with his tears. At length, softened and over-
come by the sorrows of those he loved so well, and by his own cooler
reflections, he resigned the fatal instrument, and sat himself down
upon a chair, covering his face with his hands, and only saying,
“The will of God be done!”

Tommy had beheld this affecting scene with the greatest attention,
although he had not said a word ; and now beckoning Harry away,
he went silently out of the house, and took the road which led to
Mr. Barlow's. While he was on the way, he seemed to be so full of
the scene which he had just witnessed that he did not open his lips ;
but when he came home he instantly went to Mr. Barlow and desired.
that he would directly send him to his father’s. Mr. Barlow stared
at the request, and asked him what was the occasion of his being so
suddenly tirec with his residence at the vicarage.

“Sir,” answered Tommy, ‘‘l am not the least tired, I assure you;
you have been extremely kind to me, and I shall always remember it
with the greatest gratitude; but I want to see my father immediately,
and Iam sure when you come to know the occasion, you will not
disapprove of it.”

Mr. Barlow did not press him any further, but ordered a careful
servant to saddle a horse directly and take Tommy home before him.

Mr, and Mrs. Merton were extremely surprised and overjoyed at
the sight of their son, who thus unexpectedly arrived at home ; but
‘Tommy, whose mind was full of the project he had formed, as soon
as he had answered their first questions, accosted his father thus:

“Pray, sir, will you be angry with me if I ask you for a great
favour?”

‘No, surely,” said Mr. Merton, ‘! that I will not.”

“Why, then,” said Tommy, ‘‘as I have often heard you say that
you were very rich, and that if I was good I should be rich too, will
you give me some money?”

“ Money!" said Mr. Merton: ‘‘ yes, to be sure ; how much do you
want?”

“Why, sir,” said Tommy, ‘‘I want a very large sum indeed.”

‘Perhaps a guinea,” answered Mr. Merton.

Tommy. No, sir, a great deal more—a great many guineas,

Mfr. Merton. Let us, however, see.

Tommy. Why, sir, 1 want at least forty pounds.

“Bless the boy!" answered Mrs. Merton; ‘‘ surely Mr. Barlow

must have taught him tobe ten times more extravagant than he was
before.”
7d VHE HISTORY OF

Tommy. Indeed, madam, Mr. Barlow knows nothing about the
matter. ‘

“ But,” said Mr. Merton, ‘‘ what can such an urchin as you want
with, such a large sum of money?” ;

“ Sir,” answered Tommy, ‘that is a secret; but Iam sure when
you come tohear it, you will approve of the use I intend to make of it.”

Mr. Merton. That I very much doubt.

Tommy. But, sir, if you please, you may let me have this money,
and I will pay you again by degrees.

Mr. Merton. How will you ever be able to pay me such a sum?

Tommy. Why, sir, you know you are so kind as frequently to give
me new clothes and pocket-money ; now, if you will only let me
have this money, I will neither want new clothes, nor anything else,
till I have made it up.

Mr. Merton. But what can such a child as you want with all this
money?

Tommy. Pray, sir, wait a few days, and you shall know ; and if I
make a bad use of it, never believe me again as long as I live.

Mr. Merton was extremely struck with the earnestness with which
his son persevered in the demand ; and, as he was both very rich and
liberal, he determined to hazard the experiment, and comply with
his request. He accordingly went and fetched him the money which
he asked for, and put it into his hands, telling him at the same time
that he expected to be acquainted with the use he put it to; and
that, if he was not satisfied with the account, he would never ‘trust
him again. Tommy appeared in ecstacies at the confidence that
was reposed in him, and, after thanking his father for his extra-
ordinary goodness, he desired leave to go back again with Mr.
Barlow’s servant. 5

When he arrived at Mr. Barlow’s, his first care was to desire Harry
to accompany him again to the farmer's house. Thither the two
little boys went with the greatest expedition; and, on their entering
the house, found the unhappy family in the same situation as before.
But Tommy, who had hitherto suppressed his feelings, finding him-
self now enabled: to execute the project he had formed, went up to
the good woman of the house, who sat sobbing in a corner of the
room, and, taking her gently by the hand, said,

My good woman, you were very kind to me in the morning, and
therefore I am determined to be kind to you in return.”

“God bless you, my little master,” said the woman, ‘‘ you are
very welcome to what you had ; but you are not able to do anything
to relieve our distress.”
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 79

“How do you know that?” said Tommy; ‘perhaps I can do
more for you than you imagine.”

“ Alas!” answered the woman, ‘'I believe you would do all you
could ; but all our goods will be seized and sold, unless we can im-
mediately raise the sum of forty pounds ; and that is impossible, for
we have no earthly friend to assist us; therefore my poor babes and
I must soon be turned out of doors, and God alone can keep them
from starving.” :

Tommy's little heart was too much affected to keep the woman
longer in suspense; therefore, pulling out his bag of money, he
poured it into her lap, saying, ‘Here, my good woman, take this
and pay your debts, and God: bless you and your children !”

It is impossible to express the surprise of the poor woman at the
sight : she stared wildly around her and upon her little benefactor,
and, clasping her hands together in an agony of gratitude and feel-
ing, she fell back in her chair with a kind of convulsive motion: Her
husband, who was in the next room, seeing her in this condition, ran
up to her, and catching her in his arms, asked her with the greatest
tenderness what was the matter ; but she, springing ona sudden from
his embraces, threw herself upon her knees before the little boy, sob-
bing and blessing with a brokem inarticulate: voice, embracing his
knees and kissing his feet. The husband, who did not know what
had happened, imagined that his wife had: lost her senses ; and the
little children, who had before been skulking about the room, ran up
to their mother, pulling her by the gown, and hiding their faces in
her bosom. But the woman, at the sight of them, seemed’ to recollect
herself, and cried ‘out, ‘* My children, you must alf have been. starved
without the assistanceof this little angel’; why do you-not join with
me in thanking him?”

At this the husband said, ‘‘Surely, Mary, you must have Tost. your
senses. What can this young gentleman. do for us, or to prevent
cour wretched babes from perishing?”

“Qh, William,” said the woman, * T-am not mad, though I may
appear so; but look here, William, look what Providence has sent
us by the hands of this little angel; and’ then wonder not that § should
be wild.”

Saying this, she held up: the money, and at the sight ber husband
looked as wild and astonished as she.

But Tommy went up to the man, and taking him by the hand,
said, ‘‘ My good friend; you are very welcome to this; T freely give
it you ; and I hope it will.enable you to pay what you owe, and to
preserve these poor little-children.”
so THE HISTORY OF

But the man, who had before appeared to bear his misfortunes
with silent dignity, now burst into tears and sobbed like his wife and
children ; but Tommy, who now began to be pained with this excess
of gratitude, went silently out of the house, followed by Harry, and,
Bee the poor family perceived what had become of him, was out
of sight.

When he came back to Mr. Barlow's, that gentleman received
him with the greatest affection, and when he had inquired after the
health of Mr. and Mrs. Merton, asked T ommy whether he had for-
gotten the story of the grateful Turk. Tommy told him he had not,
and should now be very glad to hear the remainder ; which Mr.
Barlow gave him to read, and which was as follows :—

CONTINUATION OF THE HISTORY OF THE GRATEFUL TURK,

WHEN Hamet had thus finished his story, the Venetian was as-
tonished at the virtue and elevation of his mind; and after saying
everything that his gratitude and admiration suggested, he concluded
with pressing him to accept the half of his fortune, and to settle in
Venice for the remainder of his life. This offer Hamet refused with
the greatest respect, but with a generous disdain ; and told his friend
that, in what he had done, he had only discharged a debt of grati-
tude and friendship.

‘* You were,” said he, ‘‘my generous benefactor ; you hada claim
upon my life by the benefit you had already conferred: that life
would have been well bestowed had it been lost in your service ; but
since Providence hath otherwise decreed, it is a sufficient recompense
to me to have proved that Hamet is not ungrateful, and to have
been instrumental to the preservation of your happiness.”

But though the disinterestedness of Hamet made him underrate
his own exertions, the merchant could not remain contented without
showing his gratitude by all the means within his power. He there-
fore once more purchased the freedom of Hamet, and freighted a
ship on purpose to send him back to his own country ; he and his
son then embraced him with all the affection that gratitude could
inspire, and bade him as they thought an eternal adieu.

Many years had now elapsed since the departure of Hamet into
his own country, without their seeing him, or receiving any intelli-
gence from him. In the meantime the young Francisco, the son
of the merchant, grew up to manhood; and as he had acquired
every accomplishment which tends to improve the mind or form the
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 8x

manners, added to an excellent disposition, he was generally Beloved
and esteemed.

It happened that some business about this time made it necessary
for him and his father to go to a neighbouring maritime city ; and
as they thought a passage by sea would be more expeditious, they
both embarked in a Venetian vessel which was on the point of sailing
to that place. They set sail, therefore, with favourable winds, and
every appearence of a happy passage ; but they had not proceeded
more than half their intended voyage before a Turkish corsair (a
ship purposely fitted out for war) was seen bearing down upon them,
and as the enemy exceeded them much in swiftness, they soon found
that it was impossible to escape. The greater part of the crew be-
longing to the Venetian vessel were struck with consternation, and
seemed already overcome with fear ; but the young Francisco, draw-
ing his sword, reproached his comrades with their cowardice, and
so effectually encouraged them that they determined to defend their
liberty by a desperate resistance. The Turkish vessel now ap-
proached them in awful silence, but in an instant the dreadful noise
of the artillery was heard, and the heavens were obscured with smoke
intermixed with transitory flashes of fire. Three times did the Turks
leap with their horrid shouts upon the deck of the Venetian vessel,
and three times were they driven back by the desperate resistance of
the crew, headed by young Francisco. “At length the slaughter of
their men was so great that they seemed disposed to discontinue the
fight, and were actually taking another course. The Venetians be-
held their flight with the greatest joy, and were congratulating each
other upon their successful valour and merited escape, when two
more ships on a sudden appeared in sight, bearing down upon them
with incredible swiftness before the wind. Every heart was now
chilled with new terrors, when, on their nearer approach, they dis-
covered the fatal ensigns of their enemies, and knew that there was
no longer any possibility of either resistance or escape. They there-
fore lowered their flag (the sign of surrendering their ship), and in an
instant sew themselves in the power of their enemies, who came
pouring in on every side with the rage and violence of beasts of
prey. All that remained alive of the brave Venetian crew were
loaded with fetters, and closely guarded in the hold of the ship
till it arrived at Tunis, They were then brought out in chains, and.
exposed in the public market to be sold for slaves. They had there
the mortification to see their companions picked out one by one,
according to their apparent strength and vigeur, and sold. to different
masters. At length a Turk approached, who, from his look and

6
82 THE HISTORY OF

habit, appeared to be of superior rank, and after glancing his eye
over the rest with an expression of compassion, he fixed them at last
upon young Francisco, and demanded of the captain of the ship what
was the price of that young man. The captain answered that he
would not take less than five hundred pieces of gold for that captive.

‘« That,” said the Turk, ‘‘is very extraordinary, since I have seen
you sell those that much exceed him in vigour for less than a fifth
part of that sum.”

Yes,” answered the captain, ‘‘ but he shall either pay me some
part of the damage he has occasioned, or labour for life at the oar.”

‘What damage,” answered the other, ‘‘ can he have done you
more than all the rest whom you have prized so cheaply?”

“He it was,” replied the captain, ‘‘ who animated the Christians
to the desperate resistance which cost me the lives of so many of my
brave sailors. ‘Three times did we leap upon their deck with a fury
that seemed irresistible, and three times did that youth attack us with
such cool determined opposition that we were obliged to retreat in-
gloriously, leaving at every charge twenty of our number behind.
Therefore, I repeat it, L,will either have that price for him, great as
it may appear, or else I will gratify my revenge by seeing him drudge
for life in my victorious galley.” '

At this the Turk examined young Francisco with new attention ;
and he, who had hitherto fixed his eyes upon the ground in sullen
silence, now lifted them up ; but scarcely had he beheld the person
that was talking to the captain when he uttered a loud cry and
repeated the name of Hamet. The Turk, with equal emotion,
surveyed him for a moment, and then, catching him in his arms,
embraced him with the transports of a parent who unexpectedly
recovers a long-lost child.

It is unnecessary to repeat all that gratitude and affection inspired
Hamet ,to say, but when he heard that his ancient benefactor was
amongst the number of those unhappy Venetians who stood before
him, he hid his face for a moment under his vest and seemed over-
qwhelmed with sorrow and astonishment, when, recollecting himself,
he raised his arms to heaven and blessed that Providence which had
made him the instrument of safety to his ancient benefactor. He
then instantly flew to that part of the market where Francisco stood
waiting for his fate with a manly, mute despair. He called him his
friend, his benefactor, and every endearing name which friendship
and gratitude could inspire ; and ordering his chains to be instantly
taken off, he conducted him and his son to a magnificent house
which belonged to him in the city.
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 83

As soon as they were alone, and had time for an explanation of
their mutual fortunes, Hamet told the Venetians that, when he was
set at liberty by their generosity, and restored to his country, he
had accepted a command in the®Lurkish armies; and that, having
had the good fortune to distinguish himself on several occasions, he
had gradually been promoted, through various offices, to the dignity
of Bashaw of Tunis.

‘Since I have enjoyed this post,” added he, ‘there is nothing
which I find in it so agreeable as the power it gives me of alleviating
the misfortunes of those unhappy Christians who are taken prisoners
byour corsairs, Whenever a ship arrives, which brings with it any
of these sufferers, I constantly visit the markets and redeem a certain.
number of the captives, whom I restore to liberty. And gracious
Allah has shown that He approves of these faint endeavours to dis-
charge the sacred duties of gratitude for my own redemption, by
putting it in my power to serve the best and dearest of men.”

Ten days were Francisco and his son entertained in the house of
Hamet, during which time he put in practice everything within his
power to please and interest them; but when he found they were
desirous of returning home, he told them he would no longer detain
them from their country, but that they should embark the next day
ina ship that was setting sail for Venice. Accordingly, on the morrow
he dismissed them, with many embraces and much reluctance, and
ordered a chosen party of his own guards to conduct them on board
their vessel. When they arrived there, their joy and admiration were
considerably increased on finding that, by the generosity of Hamet,
not only the ship which had been taken, but the whole crew were
redeemed and restored to freedom. Francisco and his son embarked,
and after a favourable voyage, arrived without accident in their own
country, where they lived many years respected and esteemed, con-
tinually mindful of the vicissitudes of human affairs, and attentive to
discharge their duties to their fellow-creatures.

When this story was concluded, Mr. Barlow and his pupils went
out to walk upon the high road, but they had not gone far before
they discovered three men, who seemed each to lead a large and
shaggy beast by a string, followed by a crowd of boys and women,
whom the novelty of the sight had drawn together. When they
approached more near, Mr. Barlow discovered that the beasts were
‘three tame bears, Jed by as many Savoyards, who get their living by
exhibiting them. Upon the head of each of these formidable animals
was seated a monkey, who grinned and chattered, and by his strange

6—2
84 THE HISTORY OF

grimaces excited the mirth of the whole assembly. Tommy, who
had never before seen one of these creatures, was very much surprised
and entertained, but still more so when he saw the animal rise upon
his hind legs at the word of command, and dance about in a strange,
uncouth manner, to the sound of music.

After having satisfied themselves with the spectacle they proceeded
on their way, and Tommy asked Mr, Barlow whether a bear was an
animal easily tamed, and that did mischief in those places where he
was wild.

“The bear,” replied Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ is not an animal quite so for-
midable or destructive as a lion ora tiger; he is, however, sufficiently
dangerous, and will frequently kill women and children, and even men,
when he has an opportunity. These creatures are generally found
in cold countries, and it is observed that the colder the climate is, the
greater size and fierceness do they attain to. There is a remarkable
Account of one of these animals suddenly attacking a soldier when
on duty, but it was fortunate for the poor fellow that the first blow
he struck the bear felled it to the ground, and the soldier immediately
plunged his sword into its heart, which of course killed it. In those
northern countries, which are perpetually covered with snow and ice,
a species of bear is found, which is white in colour, and of amazing
strength as well as fierceness. These animals are often seen clambering
over the huge pieces of ice that almost cover those seas, and preying
upon fish and other sea animals.”

While they were conversing in this manner they beheld a crowd
of women and children running away in the greatest trepidation, and,
looking behind them, saw that one of the bears had broken his chain,
and was running after them, growling all the time in a very disagree-
able manner. Mr. Barlow, who had a good stick in his hand, and
was a man of an intrepid character, perceiving this, bade his pupils
remain quiet, and instantly ran up to the bear, who stopped in the
middle of his career, and seemed inclined to attack Mr. Barlow for
his interference ; but this gentleman struck him two or three blows,
rating him at the same time in a loud and severe tone of voice, and
seizing the end of the chain with equal boldness and dexterity, the
animal quietly submitted, and suffered himself to be taken prisoner.
Presently the keeper of the bear came up, into whose hands Mr. Bar-
low consigned him, charging him for the future to be more careful in
guarding so dangerous a creature.

While this was doing, the boys had remained quiet spectators at a
distance, but by accident the monkey, who used to be perched upon
the head of the bear, and was shaken off when the beast broke






TOMMY ENCOUNTERS ‘THE BEAR AND MONKEY.—p. 84
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 85

loose, came running that way, playing a thousand antic grimaces as
he passed. Tommy, who was determined not to be outdone by Mr.
Barlow, ran very resolutely up, and seized a string which was tied
round the loins of the animal; but he, not choosing to be taken
prisoner, instantly snapped at Tommy’s arm, and almost made his
teeth meet in the fleshy part of it. Yet Tommy, who was now greatly
improved in courage and the use of his limbs, instead of letting his '
enemy escape, began thrashing him very severely with the stick which
he had in his hand, till the monkey, secing he had a resolute antago-
nist to deal with, desisted from opposition, and suffered himself to
be led captive like his friend the bear.

As they were returning home, Tommy asked Mr. Barlow whether
he did not think it very dangerous to ~.eddle with such an animal
when he was loose. Mr. Barlow told him it was not without danger,
but that it was much less so than people would imagine.

“‘Most animals,” said he, ‘‘are easily awed by the appearance of
intrepidity, while they are invited to pursue by marks of fear and
apprehension.”

“That, I believe, is very true,” answered Harry; “for I have very
often observed the behaviour of dogs to each other. When two
strange dogs meet they generally approach with caution, as if they
were mutually afraid ; but as sure as either of them runs away, the
other will pursue him with the greatest insolence and fury.”

“ This is not confined to dogs,” replied Mr. Barlow: ‘‘almost all
wild beasts are subject to receive the sudden impression of terror ;
and therefore men who have been obliged to travel without arms
through forests that abound with dangerous animals, have frequently
escaped unhurt by shouting aloud whenever they met with any of
them on their way.”” But what I chiefly depended on was, the educas
tion which the bear had received since he left his own country.”

‘Yommy laughed heartily at this idea, and Mr. Barlow went on.

‘‘ Whenever an animal is taught anything that is not natural to
him, this is properly receiving an education. Did you ever observe
colts running about wild upon the common?"

Tommy. Yes, sir, very often.

ir. Barlow. And do you think it would be an easy matter for any
one to mount upon their backs or ride them?

Tommy. By no means; I think that they would kick and prance
to that degree that they would throw any person down.

Mr, Barlow, And yet your little horse very frequently takes you
upon his back, and carries you very safely between this and your
father's house.
26 THE HISTORY OF

Tommy. That is because he is used to it.

Mr. Barlow. But he was not always used to it; he was oncea colt,
and then he ran about as wild and unrestrained as any of those upon
the common.

Tommy. Yes, sir.

Mr, Barlow. How came he then to be so altered as to submit to
bear you upon his back?

Tommy. I do not know, unless it was by feeding him.

Mr. Barlow. That is one method; but that isnot all. They first
accustom the colt, who naturally follows his mother, to come into the
stable with her; then they stroke him and feed him till he gradually
becomes gentle, and will suffer himself to be handled ; then they take
an opportunity of putting a halter upon his head, and accustom him
to stand quietly in the stable, and to be tied to the manger. Thus
they gradually proceed from one thing to another, till they teach him
to bear the bridle and the saddle, and to be commanded by his rider.
This may very properly be called the education of an animal, since by
these means he is obliged to acquire habits which he would never have
learned had he been left to himself. Now, I knew that the poor
bear had been frequently beaten and very ill used, in order to make
him submit to be led about with a string and exhibited as a sight.
I knew that he had been accustomed to submit to man, and to tremble
at the sound of the human voice, and I depended upon the force of
these impressions for making him submit without resistance to the
authority I assumed over him. You saw I was not deceived in my
opinion, and by these means [ probably prevented the mischief that
he might otherwise have done to some of those poor women or chil-
dren.

As Mr. Barlow was speaking, he perceived that Tommy’s arm was
bloody; and inquiring into the reason, he heard the history of his
adventure with the monkey. Mr. Barlow then looked at the wound,
which he found of no great consequence, and told Tommy that he
was sorry for his accident, and imagined that he was now too coura-
geous to be daunted by a trifling hurt. Tommy assured him he was,
and proceeded to ask some questions concerning the nature of the
monkey, which Mr. Barlow proceeded to answer in the following
manner :—

“The monkey is a very extraordinary animal, which closely re-
sembles a man in his shape and appearance, as perhaps you may
have observed. He is always found to inhabit hot countries, the
forests of which, in many parts of the world, are filled with innume-
sable bands of these animals. He is extremely active, and his for¢
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 87

legs exactly resemble the arms of a man; so that he not only uses
them to walk upon, but frequently to climb trces, to hang by the
branches, and to take hold of his food with. He supports himself
‘upon almost every species of wild fruit which is found in those coun-
tries, so that it is necessary he should be continually scrambling up
and down the highest trees, in order to procure himself a subsistence.
Nor is he contented always with the diet which he finds in the forest
where he makes his residence. Large bands of these creatures will
frequently sally out to plunder the gardens in the neighbourhood,
and many wonderful stories are told of their ingenuity and contri-
vance, It is said that they proceed with all the caution and regularity
which could be found in men themselves. Some of these animals are
placed as spies to give notice to the rest in case any human being
should approach the garden, and should that happen, one of the sen-
tinels informs them by a peculiar chattering, and they: all escape in
an instant.”

‘*T can easily believe that,” answered Harry, ‘‘ for I have observed
that when a flock of rooks alight upon a farmer's field of corn, two
or three of them always take their station upon the highest tree they
can find, and if any one approaches, they instantly give notice: by
their cawing, and all the rest take wing directly, and fly away.”

‘*But,” answered Mr. Barlow, ‘‘the monkeys are said to be yet
more ingenious in their thefts, for they station some of their body at
a small distance from each other, in a line that reaches quite from
the forest they inhabit to the particular garden they wish to plunder.
‘When this is done, several of them mount the fairest fruit-trees, and,
picking the fruit, throw it down to their companions who stand below;
these again cast it to others at a little distance, and thus it flies from
hand to hand till it is safely deposited in the woods or mountains
whence they came, When they are taken very young they are.easily
tamed, but always retain a great disposition to mischief, as well as
to imitate everything they see done by men. Many ridiculous stories
are told of them in this respect. I have heard of a monkey that
resided .n a gentleman’s family, and that frequently observed his
master undergo the operation of shaving. The imitative animal one
day took it into his head to turn barber, and, seizing in one hand a
cat that lived in the same house, and a bottle of ink in the other, he
carried her up to the top of avery fine marble staircase. The servants
were all attracted by the screams of the cat, who did not relish the
operation which was going forward, and running out, were equally
surprised and diverted to see the monkey gravely seated upon the
landing-place of the stairs, and holding the cat fast in one of his
83 THE HISTORY OF

paws, while with the other he continually applied ink to puss’s face,
rubbing it all over, just as he had observed the barber do to his
master. Whenever the cat struggled to escape, the monkey gave
her a pat with his paw, chattering all the time, and making the most
ridiculous grimaces ; and when she was quiet, he applied himself to
his bottle, and continued the operation. But I have heard a more
tragic story of the imitative genius of these animals. One of them
lived in a fortified town, and used frequently torun up and down upon
the ramparts, where he had observed the gunner discharge the great
guns that defended the town. One day he got possession of the
lighted match with which the man used to perform his business, and,
applying it to the touch-hole of a gun, he ran to the mouth of it to
see the explosion; but the cannon, which happened to be loaded,
instantly went off, and blew the poor monkey into a thousand pieces.”

‘When they came back to Mr. Barlow’s they found Master Merton's
servant and horses waiting to bring him home. When he arrived
there he was received with the greatest joy and tenderness by his
parents; but though he gave them an account of everything else that
had happened, he did not say a word about the money he had given
to the farmer. But the next day being Sunday, Mr, and Mrs. Mer-
ton and Tommy went together to the parish church, which they had
scarcely entered when a general whisper ran through the congrega-
tion, and all eyes were in an instant turned upon the little boy. Mr.
and Mrs. Merton were very much astonished at this, but they forbore
to inquire till the end of the service; then, as they were going out of
the church together, Mr. Merton asked his son what could be the
reason of the general attention which he excited at his entrance into
church. Tommy had no time to answer, for at that instant a very
decent-looking woman ran up and threw herself at his feet, calling
him her guardian angel and preserver, and praying that Heaven
would shower down upon his head all the blessings which he deserved.
It was some time before Mr. and Mrs. Merton could understand the
nature of this extraordinary scene; but when they at length under-
stood the secret of their son’s generosity, they seemed to be scarcely
Jess affected than the woman herself, and, shedding tears of transport ,
and affection, they embraced their son, without attending to the’
crowd that surrounded them; but immediately recollecting them-'
selves, they took their leave of the poor woman and hurried to their
coach with such sensations as it is more easy to conceive than to
describe.

_ The summer had now completely passed away, and the winter had
set in with unusual severity: the water was all frozen into a solid
SANDSURD AND HERTON. . 89

mags of ice; the earth was bare of food, and the little birds, that
used to chirp with gladness, seemed to lament in silence the incle-
mency of the weather. As Tommy was one day reading the Life of
Napoleon Bonaparte, particularly the famous anecdote of the fortress
of snow, in which Napoleon is described as undertaking the siege,
and giving directions to his schoolfellows how to make the attack,
he was surprised to find a pretty bird flying about the chamber in
which he was reading. He immediately went downstairs and in-
formed Mr. Barlow of the circumstance, who, after he had seen the
bird, told him that it was called a robin redbreast, and that it was
naturally more tame and disposed to cultivate the society of men
than any other species; ‘‘but at present,” added he, ‘‘ the little
fellow is in want of food, because the earthis too hard to furnish him
any assistance, and hunger inspires him with this unusual boldness.”

“Why, then, sir,” said Tommy, ‘if you will give me leave, I will
fetch a piece of bread and feed him.”

“Do so,” answered Mr. Barlow; ‘‘but first set the window open,
that he may see you do not intend to make him prisoner.”

Tommy accordingly opened his window, and, scattering a few
erumbs of bread about the room, had the satisfaction of seeing his
guest hop down and make a very hearty meal: he then flew out of
the room, and settled upon a neighbouring tree, singing all the time,
as if to return thanks for the hospitality he had met with.

Tommy was greatly delighted with his new acquaintance, and
from this time never failed to set his window open every morning
and scatter some crumbs about the room, which the bird perceiving,
hopped fearlessly in, and regaled himself under the protection of his
benefactor. By degrees the intimacy increased so much that little
tobin would alight on Tommy's shoulder and whistle his notes in
that situation, or eat out of his hand—all which gave Tommy so
much satisfaction that he would frequently call Mr. Barlow and
Harry to be witness of his favourite’s caresses; nor did he ever eat
his own meals without reserving a part for his little friend.

It he-vever happened that one day Tommy went upstairs after
dinner, intending to feed his bird as usual, but as soon as he opened
the door of his chamber he discovered a sight that pierced him to
the very heart. His little friend and innocent companion lay dead
upon the floor, and torn in pieces; and a large cat, taking that op-
portunity to escape, soon directed his suspicions towards the mur-
derer. Tommy instantly ran down with tears in his eyes to relate
the unfortunate death of his favourite to Mr. Barlow, and to demand
vengeance against the wicked cat that had occasioned it. Mr,
go THE HISTORY OF

Barlow heard him with great compassion, but asked what punish-
ment he wished to inflict upon the cat.

Tommy. Oh, sir! nothing can be too bad for that cruel animal.
I would have her killed as she killed the poor bird.

Mr. Barlow. But do you imagine that she did it out of any par-
ticular malice to your bird, or merely because she was hungry, and
accustomed to catch her prey in that manner?

Tommy considered some time, but at last he owned that he did
not suspect the cat of having any particular spite against his bird,
and therefore he supposed she had been impelled by hunger.

ir. Barlow, Have you never observed that it was the property of
that species to prey upon mice and other little animals?

Tommy. Yes, sir, very often.

Mr. Barlow, And have you ever corrected her for so doing, or ,
attempted to teach her other habits? n

Tommy. I cannot say I have. Indeed, I have seen little Harry,
when she had caught a mouse and was tormenting it, take it from
her and give it liberty ; but I have never meddled with her myself.

Mr. Barlow, Are you not, then, more to be blamed than the cat
herself? You have observed that it was common to the whole
species to destroy mice and little birds, whenever they could. surprise
them ; yet you have taken no pains to secure your favourite from the

~ danger; on the contrary, by rendering him tame, and accustoming
him to be fed, you have exposed him to a violent death, which he
would probably have avoided had he remained wild. Would it not
then be just, and more reasonable, to endeavour to teach the cat
that she must no longer prey upon little birds, than to put her to
death for what you have never taught her was an offence?

Tommy. But is that possible >?

Mr. Barlow. Very possible, I should imagine; but we may at least
try the experiment.

Tommy. But.why should such a mischievous creature live at all?

Mr. Barlow, Because if you destroy every creature that preys
upon others, you would leave few alive.

Tommy. Surely, sir, the poor bird which that natighty cat has
killed was never guilty of such a cruelty.

Mér. Barlow. 1 will not answer for that. Let us observe what
they live upon in the fields, we shall then be able to give'a better
account,

Mr. Barlow then went to the window and desired Tommy to come
to him, and observe a robin which was then hopping about the grass
with something in its mouth, and asked him what he thought it was.
SANDFORD AND MERTON. gx

Tommy. I protest, sir, it is a large worm. And now he has
swallowed it! I should never have thought that such a pretty bird
could have been so cruel.

Mr. Barlow. Do you imagine that the bird is conscious of all that
js suffered by the insect?

Tommy. No, sir. i

Mr. Barlow. In him, then, it is not the same cruelty which it
would be in you, who are endowed with reason and reflection.
Nature has given him a propensity for animal food, which he obeys .
in the same manner as the sheep and ox when they feed upon grass,
or as the ass when he browses upon the furze or thistles.

Tommy. Why, then, perhaps the cat did not know the cruelty
she was guilty of in tearing that poor bird to pieces? “

Mr. Barlow. No more than the bird we have just seen is conscious
of his cruelty to the insect. ‘The natural food of cats consists in rats, .
mice, birds, and such small animals as they can seize by violence or
catch by craft. It was impossible she should know the value you
set upon your bird, and therefore she had no more intention of
offending you than had she caught a mouse.

Tommy. But if that is the case, should I have another tame bird,
she would kill it as she has done this poor fellow.

Mr. Barlow. That perhaps may be prevented. I have heard
people that deal in birds affirm there is a way of preventing cats
from meddling with them.

Tommy. Oh, dear sir, I should like to try it. Will you not show
me how to prevent the cat from killing any more birds ?

Mr. Barlow. Most willingly: it is certainly better to correct the
faults of an animal than to destroy it. Besides, I have a particular
affection for this cat, because 1 found her when she was a kitten,
and have bred her up so tame and gentle that she will follow me
about like a dog. She comes every morning to my chamber door
and mews till she is let in; and she sits upon the table at breakfast
and dinner as grave and polite as a visitor, without offering to touch
the mcat. Indeed, before she was guilty of this offence, I have
often seen you stroke and caress her with great affection ; and puss,
who is by no means of an ungrateful temper, would always purr and
arch her tail, as if she were sensible of your attention,

In afew days after this conversation another robin, suffering like
the former from the inclemency of the season, flew into the house
and commenced acquaintance with Tommy. But he, who recol-
lected the mournful fate of his former bird, would not encourage it to
any familiarity, till he had claimed the promise of Mr, Barlow, in
92 THE HISTORY OF
order to preserve it trom danger. Mr. Barlow, therefore, enticed
the new guest into a small wire cage, and, as soon as he had entered
it, shut the door in order to prevent his escaping. He then took a
small gridiron, such as is used to broil meat upon, and, having
almost heated it red hot, placed it erect upon the ground, before the
cage in which the bird was confined. He then contrived to entice the
cat into the room, and observing that she fixed her eye upon the bird,
which she destined to become her prey, he withdrew the two little
boys in order to leave her unrestrained in her operations. They did
not retire far, but observed her from the door fix her eyes upon the
cage, and begin to approach it in silence, bending her body to the
ground, and almost touching it as she crawled along. When she
judged herself within a proper distance, she exerted all her agility in
‘a violent spring, which would probably have been fatal to the bird,
had not the gridiron, placed before the cage, received the impres-
sion of her attack. Nor was the disappointment the only punish-
ment she was destined to undergo: the bars of the gridiron had
been so thoroughly heated, that, in rushing against them, she felt
herself burned in several parts of her body, and retired from the
field of battle mewing dreadfully and full of pain; and such was
the impression which this adventure produced, that, from this time,
she was never again known to attempt to destroy birds.

The coldness of the weather still continuing, all the wild animals
began to perceive the effects, and, compelled by hunger, approached
nearer to the habitations of man and the places they had been
accustomed to aveid. A multitude of hares—the most timorous of
all animals—were frequently seen scudding about the garden in
search of the scanty vegetables which the severity of the season had
spared. In a short time they had devoured all the green herbs
which could be found, and, hunger still oppressing them, they began
to gnaw the very bark of the trees for food. One day, as Tommy
was walking in the garden, he found that even the beloved tree which
_he had planted with his own hands, and from which he had promised

himself so plentiful a produce of fruit, had not escaped the general
depredation, but had been gnawed round at the root and killed.

Tommy, who could ill brook disappointment, was so enraged to
see his labours prove abortive, that he ran with tears in his eyes to
Mr. Barlow, to demand vengeance against the devouring hares.

Indeed,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘l am sorry for what they have‘done,
but it is now too late to prevent it,”

“Yes,” answered Tommy, ‘‘but you may have all those mis-
chievous creatures shot, that they may do no further damage.”
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 53

** A little while ago,” replied Mr. Barlow, ‘“ you wanted to destroy
the cat, because she was cruel and preyed upon living animals, and
now you would murder all the hares, merely because they are in-
nocent, inoffensive animals that subsist upon vegetables.”

Tommy looked a little foolish, but said, ‘‘he did not want to hurt
them for living upon vegetables, but for destroying his tree,”

‘‘ But,” said Mr. Barlow, ‘‘ how can you expect the animal to dis-
tinguish your trees from any other? You should therefore have
fenced them round in such a manner as might have prevented the
hares from reaching them; besides, in such extreme distress as
animals now suffer from the want of food, I think they may be
forgiven if they trespass a little more than usual.”

Mr. Barlow then took Tommy by the hand and led him intoa
field at some distance, which belonged to him, and which was sown
with turnips. Scarcely had they entered the field before a flock of larks
rose up in such innumerable quantities as almost darkened the air.

“See,” said Mr, Barlow, ‘these little fellows are trespassing
upon my turnips in such numbers, that in a short time they will
destroy every bit of green about the field; yet I would not hurt them
on any account. Look round the whole extent of the country, you
will see nothing but a barren waste, which presents no food either
to bird or beast. ‘These little creatures, therefore, assemble in multi-
tudes here, where they find a scanty subsistence, and though they
do me some mischief, they are welcome to what they can find. In
the spring they will enliven our walks by their agreeable songs.

Tommy. How dreary and uncomfortable is this season of winter !
I wish it were always summer.

Afr, Barlow. There is a country called Lapland, which extends a
great deal farther north than any part of England, which is covered
with perpetual snows during all ‘the year, yet the inhabitants would
not exchange it for any other portion of the globe.

Tommy, How do they live in so disagreeable a country? .I should
like very much to hear, if Harry will be so good as to tell me.

Harry, You must know, then, Master Tommy, that in the greatest
part of this country which is called Lapland, the inhabitants neither
sow nor reap; they are totally unacquainted with the use of corn,
and know not how to make bread; they have no trees which bear
fruit, and scarcely any of the herbs which grow in our gardens in
Hogland nor do they possess either sheep, goats, hogs, cows, or

easts,

Tommy. That must be a disagreeable country indeed. What,
then, have they to live upon?
94 THE HISTORY OF

Harry. They have a species of deer, which is bigger than the
largest stags which you may have seen in the gentlemen's parks in
England, and very strong. These animals are called recudeer, and
are of so gentle a nature that they are easily tamed, and taught to
live together in herds, and to obey their masters. In the short sum-
mer which they enjoy, the Laplanders lead them out to pasture in
the valleys, where the grass grows very high and luxuriant. In the
winter, when the ground is all covered over with snow, the deer have
Jearned to scratch away the snow, and find a sort of moss which
grows underneath it, and upon this they subsist. These creatures
afford not only food, but raiment, and even houses, to their masters.
In the summer the Laplander milks his herds and lives upon the pro-
duce; sometimes he Jays by the milk in wooden vessels, to serve him
for food in winter. This is soon frozen so hard, that when they would
use it they are obliged to cut it in pieces with a hatchet. Some-
times the winters are so severe that the poor deer can scarcely find
even moss, and then the master is obliged to kill part of them and
live upon the flesh. Of the skins he makes warm garments for him-
self and his family, and strews them thick upon the ground, to sleep
upon. ‘Their houses are only poles stuck slanting into the ground,
and almost joined at the top, except a little hole which they leave to
Jet out the smoke. ‘These poles are either covered with the skins of
animals or coarse cloth, or sometimes with turf and the bark of trées.
There is a little hole left in one side, through which the family creep
jnto their tent, and they make a comfortable fire to warm them in the
middle. People that are so easily contented are totally ignorant of
most of the things that are thought so necessary here. The Lap-
landers have neither gold, nor silver, nor carpets, nor carved work in
their houses ; every man makes for himself all that the real wants of
life require, and with his own hands performs everything that is
necessary to be done. ‘Their food consists either in frozen milk, or
the flesh of the reindeer, or that of the bear, which they frequently
hunt and kill. Instead of bread, they strip off the bark of firs, which
are almost the only trees that grow upon those dismal mountains, and,
boiling the ward and more tender skin, they eat it with their flesh.

Tommy. Poor people! how I pity them, to live such an unhappy °

life. I should think the fatigues and hardships they undergo must
kill them in a very short space of time.

Mr. Barlow. Have you, then, observed that those who eat and
drink the most, are the most free from disease?

Tommy. Not always ; for I remember that there are two or three
gentlemen who come to dine at my father’s, who eat an amazing
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 95

quantity of meat, besides drinking a great deal of wine, and these
poor gentlemen have lost the use of almost all their limbs. Their
legs are so swelled, that they are almost as big as their bodies ; their
feet are so tender, that they cannot set them to the ground; and
their.knees so stiff, that they cannot bend them. When they arrive,
they are obliged to be helped out of their coaches by two or three
people, and they come hobbling in upon crutches. But I never heard
them talk about anything but eating and drinking in all my life.

Mér. Barlow. And did you ever observe that any of the poor had
lost the use of their limbs by the same disease?

Tommy. I cannot say I have.

Mr, Barlow. Then, perhaps, the being confined toa scanty diet,
to hardship, and to exercise, may not be so desperate as you imagine.
This way of life is even much less so than the intemperance in which
too many of the rich continually indulge themselves. I remember
lately reading a story on this subject, which, if you please, you shall
hear.

Mr. Barlow then read the following :—

HISTORY OF A SURPRISING CURE OF THE GOUT.

In one of the provinces of ly there lived a wealthy gentleman,
who, having no taste either fér improving his mind or exercising his
body, acquired a habit of eating almost all day long. The whole
extent of his thoughts was what he should eat for dinner, and how
he should procure the greatest delicacies. Italy produces excellent
wine, but these were not enough for our epicure; he settled agents
in different parts of France and Spain, to buy upall the most generous
and costly wines of those countries. He had correspondence with all
the maritime cities, that he might be constantly supplied with every
species of fish; every poulterer and fishmonger in the town was under
articles to let him have his choice of rarities. He also employed a
man on purpose to give directions for his pastry and desserts. As
soon as he had bréakfasted in the morning, it was his constant prac-
tice to retire to his library (for he, too, had a library, although he
never opened a book), When he was there, he gravely seated him-
self in an easy chair, and, tucking a napkin under his chin, ordered
his head cook tobe sent into him. The head cook instantly appeared,
attended by a couple of footmen, who carried each a silver salver
of prodigious size, on which were cups containing sauces of every
difterent flavour which could be devised. The gentleman, withrthe
96 THE HISTORY OF

greatest solemnity, used to dip a piece of bread in each, and taste
it, giving his orders upon the subject with as much earnestness and
precision as if he had been signing papers for the government of a
kingdom, When this important affair was thus concluded, he would
throw himself upon a couch, to repair the fatigues of such an exer-
tion and refresh himself against dinner. When that delightful hour
arrived, it is impossible to describe either the variety of fish, flesh,
and fowl which was set before him, or the surprising greediness with
which he ate of all; stimulating his appetite with the highest sauces
and richest wines, till at length he was obliged to desist, not from
being satisfied, but from mere inability to contain more.

This kind of life he had long pursued, but at last became so cor-
pulent that he could hardly move: his belly appeared prominent like
a mountain, his face was bloated, and his legs, though swelled to
the size of columns, seemed unable to support the prodigious weight
of his body. Added to this, he was troubled with continual indiges-
tions and racking pains in several of his limbs, which at length ter-
minated in a violent fit of the gout. The pains, indeed, at length
abated, and this unfortunate epicure returned to all his former habits
of intemperance. ‘The interval of ease, however, was short, and the
attacks of his disease becoming more and more frequent, he was at
length deprived of the use of almost all his limbs.

In this unhappy state he determined to consult a physician that
lived in the same town, and had the reputation of performing many
surprising cures.

“Doctor,” said the gentleman to the physician, when he arrived,
‘you see the miserable state to which I am reduced.”

‘‘T do, indeed,” answered the physician, ‘‘and I suppose you have
contributed to it by your intemperance.”

‘As to intemperance,” replied the gentleman, ‘‘I believe few have
less to answer for than myself: I indeed love a moderate dinner and
supper, but J never was intoxicated with liquor in my life.”

‘Probably, then, you sleep too much?" said the physician.

‘As to sleep,” said the gentleman, ‘‘I am in bed nearly twelve
hours every night, because I find the sharpness of the morning air
extremely injurious to my constitution ; but I am so troubled with a
plaguy flatulency and heartburn, that I am scarcely able to close my
eyes all night ; or if I do, I find myself almost strangled with wind,
and awake in agonies.”

‘‘That is a very alarming symptom, indeed,” replied the doctor ;
“T wonder so many restless nights do not entirely wear you out.”

“They would, indeed,” answered the gentleman, “if I did not
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 97

make shift to procure a little sleep two or three times a day, which
enables me to hold out a little longer."

‘* As to exercise,” continued the doctor, ‘I fear you are not able
to use a great deal.”

‘Alas |" answered the sick man, ‘‘ while I was able, I never failed
to go out in my carriage once or twice a week, but in my present
situation I can no longer bear the gentlest motion ; besides disorder-
ing my whole frame, it gives me such intolerable twitches in my
limbs, that you would imagine I was absolutely falling to pieces."

“Your case,” answered the physician, ‘‘is indeed bad, but not
quite desperate, and if you could abridge the quantity of your food
and sleep, you would in a short time find yourself much better,”

‘* Alas!” answered the sick man, ‘‘I find you little know the deli-
cacy of my constitution, or you would not put me upon a method
which will infallibly destroy me. When I rise in the morning, I feel
as if all the powers of life were extinguished within me: my stomach
is oppressed with nausea, my head with aches and swimming, and
above all, I feel such an intolerable sinking in my spirits, that, with-
out the assistance of two or three cordials, and some restorative
soup, I am confident I never could get through the morning. Now,
doctor, I have such confidence in your skill, that there is no pill or
potion you can order me which I will not take with pleasure, but as
to a change in my diet, that is impossible.”

‘That is,” answered the physician, ‘‘ you wish for health without
being at the trouble of acquiring it, and imagine that all the con-
sequences of an ill-spent life are to be washed away by a julep, ora
decoction of senna. But as I cannot cure you upon those terms, I
will not deceive you for an instant. Your ‘case is out of the power
of medicine, and you can only be relieved by your own exertions.”

“ How hard fs this,” said the gentleman, ‘‘to be thus abandoned
to despair even in the prime of life! Cruel and unfeeling doctor !
will you not attempt anything to procure me ease?”

“Sir,” answered the physician, ‘I have already told you every-
thing I know upon the subject. I must, however, acquaint you that
J have a brother physician that lives at Padua, a man of the greatest
learning and integrity, who is particularly famous for curing the gout.
Tf you think it worth your while to consult him, I will give you a letter
of recommendation, for he never stirs from home, even to attend a
prince.”

Here the conversation ended ; for the gentleman, who did not like
the trouble of the journey, took his leave of the physician, and re-
turned home very much dispirited. In a little while he either was,

a
98 THE HISTORY OF

or fancied ‘himself, worse ; and as the idea of the Paduan physician
had never left his head, he at Jast reschmtely determined to set out on
the journey. ‘For ‘this purpose ‘he had a litter so contrived that he
could lie recumbent, or recline at his ease, and eat his meals. The
alistance was not above one day's tolerable journey, ‘but the gentle-

. man wisely resolved to make four‘of it, for fear of over-fatiguing ‘him-
self. He had, besides, a loaded waggon attending, filled with every-
thing that constitutes good eating ; and two of his cooks went with
him, that nothing might be wanting to his accommodation on the
road.

After a wearisome journey he at length arrived within sight of
Padua, and eagerly inquiring after the house of Doctor Ramozini,
was.soon directed ‘to the spot ; then, having been helped out of his
carriage by half a dozen of his ‘servants, he was shown intoa neat
ibut plain parlour, from which he had the prospect of twenty or thirty
people at dinner in a spacious ‘hall. In the middle of them was the
Jearned doctor himself, who with much complaisance invited the com-
pany to eat heartily.

“CMy good friend,” said the doctor to a pale-looking man on his
wight hand, “you must eat three slices more of this roast beef, or you
will never lose your ague. My friend,” said he to another, ‘ drink
‘off this pilass of porter ; it is just arrived from England, and is a spe-
cific for nervous fevers. Do not stuff your child so with macaroni,”
added he, turning to a woman, ‘‘if you wish to cure him of the scro-
fula. Good man,” toa fourth, ‘how goes on the ulcer in your leg?”

“Much better, indeed,” replied the man, ‘‘since-I have lived.at
your honour’s table.” ;

“Well,” replied the physician, ‘‘in.a ‘fortnight you will be com-
pletely cured, if you do but drink wine enough.”

“Thank Heaven!” said the gentleman, who had heard all this
with infinite pleasure, ‘‘I have at last met with a reasonable phy-
sician: he will not confine mé to bread and water, nor starve me
under pretence of curing me, like that confounded quack from whose
‘dlutches I have so luckily escaped.”

At length the doctor dismissed his company, who retired loading
‘um with thanks and blessings. He then approached the gentleman,
and welcomed him with the greatest politeness, who presented him
with his letters of recommendation, which after the physician had
perused, he thus accosted him :—

“Sir, the letter-of my learned friend ‘has fully instructed me in the
particulars of your case: it is indeed a difficult one, but I think you
hhave no reason to despair of a perfect recovery. If you choose to put
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 99

yourself under my care, 1 will employ all the secrets of my art for
your assistance, But one condition is absolutely indispensable : you
must send away all your servants, and solemnly engage to follow my
prescriptions for at least-a month: without this compliance I would
not undertake the cure even of a monarch.”

“Doctor,” answered the gentleman, ‘‘ what I have seen of your
profession does not, I confess, much prejudice me in their favour ;
and I should hesitate to agree to such a proposal from any other in-
dividual.”

‘Do as you like, sir,” answered the physician: ‘the employing
me or not is entirely voluntary on your part ; but as I am above the
common mercenary views of gain, I never stake the reputation of so
noble an art without arational prospect of success ; and what success
can I hope for in so obstinate‘a disorder, unless the patient will con-
sent to a fair experiment of what I can effect?”

“Indeed,” replied the gentleman, ‘‘ what you say is so candid, and
your whole behaviour so much interests me in your favour, that I will
immediately give you proofs of the most unbounded confidence.”

He then sent for his servants and ordered them to return home,
and not to come near him till a whole month was elapsed. When
they were gone, the physician asked him how he supported the
journey.

‘Why, really,” answered he, ‘‘much better than I could have
expected. But I feel myself unusually hungry ; and therefore, with
your permission, shall beg to have the hour of supper a little
hastened.”

‘Most willingly,” answered the doctor ; ‘‘at eight o’clock every-
thing shall be ready for your entertainment. In the meantime you
will permit me to visit my patients.”

While the physician was absent, the gentleman was pleasing his im-
agination with the thoughts of the excellent supper he should make.

“Doubtless,” said he to himself, ‘‘if Signor Ramozini treats the
poor in such a hospitable manner, he will spare nothing for the en-

" tertainment of a man of my importance. I have heard there are
delicious trouts and ortolans in this part of Italy: I make no doubt
but the doctor keeps an excellent cook, and I shall have no reason
to repent the dismission of my servants.”

With these ideas he kept himself some time amused ; at length his
appetite growing keener and keener every instant, from fasting longer
than ordinary, he lost all patience, and calling one of the servants of
the house, inquired for some little nice thing to stay his stomach till
the hour of supper. y e
ra

100 THE HISTORY OF

‘'Sir,” said the servant, ‘‘I would gladly oblige you; but it is as
much as my place is worth: my master is the best and most generous
of men, but sq great is his attention to his house patients, that he
will not suffer one of them to eat unless in his presence. However,
sir, have patience ; in two hours more the supper will be ready, and
then you may indemnify yourself for all.”

Thus was the gentleman compelled to pass two hours more without.

‘food—a degree of abstinence he had not practised for almost twenty

years. He complained bitterly of the slowness of time, and was
continually inquiring what was the hour.

At length the doctor returned punctual to his time, and ordered
the supper to be brought in. Accordingly six dishes were set upon
the table with great solemnity, all under cover; and the gentleman
flattered himself he should now be rewarded for his long abstinence.
As they were sitting down to table, the learned Ramozini thus ac-
costed his guest :— ‘

‘Before you give a loose to your appetite, sir, I must acquaint
you that, as the most effectual method of subduing this obstinate
disease, all your food and drink will be mixed up with such medicinal
substances as your case requires. They will not be indeed discover-
able by any of your senses; but as their effects are equally strong '
and certain, I must recommend to you to eat with moderation.”

Having said this, he ordered the dishes to be uncovered, which,
to the extreme astonishment of the gentleman, contained nothing
but olives, dried figs, dates, some roasted apples, a few boiled eggs,
and a piece of hard cheese !

‘Heaven and earth!” cried the gentleman, losing all patience at
this mortifying spectacle, ‘‘is this the entertainment you have pre-
pared for me, with so many speeches and prefaces? Do you imagine
that a person of my fortune can sup on such contemptible fare as
would hardly satisfy the wretched peasants whom I saw at dinner in
your hall?”

‘‘ Have patience, my dear sir,” replied the physician; ‘‘it is the
extreme anxiety I have for your welfare that compels me to treat you
with this apparent incivility. Your blood is all in a ferment with the
violent exercise you have undergone ; and were I rashly to indulge
your craving appetite, a fever or a pleurisy might be the consequence.
But to-morrow I hope you will be cooler, and then you may live in
a style more adapted to your quality.”

The gentleman began to comfort himself with this reflection, and,
as'there was no help, he at last determined to wait with patience
another night. He accordingly tasted a few of the dates and olives,
SANDFORD AND MERTON. 1Or

ate a piece of cheese with a slice of excellent bread, and found him-
self more refreshed than he could have imagined was possible from
such a homely meal. When he had nearly supped, he wanted some-
thing to drink, and observing nothing but water upon the table
desired one of the servants to bring him a little wine.

“Not as you value the life of this illustrious gentleman,” cried ow,
the physician. ‘‘Sir,” added he, turning to his guest, ‘‘it is witli
inexpressible reluctance that I contradict you, but wine would be at
present a mortal poison ; therefore, please to content yourself, foy
one night only, with a glass of this most excellent and refreshing
mineral water.”

The gentleman was again compelled to submit, and drank the
water with a variety of strange grimaces. After the cloth was re-
moved, Signor Ramozini entertained the gentleman with some agree-
able and improving conversation for about an hour, and then pro-
posed to his patient that he should retire to rest. This proposal the
gentleman gladly accepted, as he found himself fatigued with his
journey, and unusually disposed to sleep. The doctor then retired,
and ordered one of his servants to show the gentleman to his
chamber.

He was accordingly conducted into a neighbouring coom, where
there was little to be seen but a homely bed, without furniture, with
nothing to sleep upon but a mattress almost as hard as the floor. At
this the gentleman burst into a violent passion again.

“Villain !” said he to the servant, ‘‘it is impossible your master
should dare to confine me to sueh a wretched dog-hole! Show me
into another room immediately !”

“Sir,” answered the servant, with profound humility, ‘‘I am
heartily sorry the clfamber does not please you, but I am morally
certain I have not mistaken my master’s order; and I have too
great a respect for you to think of disobeying him ina point whict.
concerns your precious life.” .

Saying this he went out of the room, and shutting the door on the
outside, left the gentleman to his meditations. They were not very
agreeable at first ; however, as he saw no remedy, he undressed him-
self and entered the wretched bed, where he presently fell asleep,
winis he was meditating revenge upon the doctor and his whole
amily. f ;

The gentleman slept so soundly that he did not awake till morn-
ing; and then the physician came into his room, and with the
ereatest tenderness and civility inquired after his health. He had
indeed fallen asleep in very ill humour; but his night's rest had
102 THE HISTORY OF

much composed his mind, and the effect of this was increased by the
extreme politeness of the doctor, so that he answered with tolerable
temper, only making bitter complaints of the homeliness of his
accommodation. :

‘*My dearest sir,” answered the physician, ‘‘did I not make a
previous agreement with you that you should submit to my manage-
ment? Can you imagine that I have any other end in view than the.
improvement of your health? It is not possible that you should in
everything perceive the reasons of my conduct, which is founded
upon the most accurate theory and experience. However, in this
case, I must inform you that I have found out the art of making my
very beds medicinal; and this you must confess, from the excellent
night you have passed. [I cannot impart the same salutary virtues to
down or silk, and therefore, though very much against my inclina-
tions, I have been compelled to lodge you in this homely manner.
But now, if you please, it is time to rise.”

Ramozini then rang for the servants, and the gentleman suffered
himself to be dressed. At breakfast the gentleman expected to fare
a little better, but his relentless guardian would suffer him to taste
nothing but a slice of bread and a porringer of water grucl—all
which he defended, very little to his guest’s satisfaction, upon the
most unerring principles of medical science.

After breakfast had been some time finished, Dr. Ramozini told
his patient it was time to begin the great work of restoring him to
the use of his limbs. He accordingly had him carried into a little
room, where he desired the gentleman to attempt to-stand.

‘That is impossible,” answered the patient, “for I have not been
able to use a leg these three years.”

‘*Prop yourself, then, upon your crutches, and lean against the
wall to support yourself,” answered the physician.

The gentleman did so, and the doctor went abruptly but, and
locked the door after him. He had not been long in this situation
before he felt the floor of the chamber, which he had not before per-
ceived to be composed of plates of iron, grow immoderately hot
under his feet. He called the doctor and his servants, but to no
purpose ; he then began to utter loud vociferations and menaces,
but all was equally ineffectual ; he raved, he swore, he promised, he
entreated, but nobody came to his assistance, and the heat grew
more intense every instant. At length necessity compelled him to
hop upon one leg in order to rest the other, and this he did with
greater agility than he could conceive was possible ; presently the
other leg began to burn, and then he hopped again upon the other.


SANDFORD AND MERTON. 103:

Thus he went on, hopping about with this involuntary exercise, till
he had stretched every sinew and muscle more than he had done
for several years before, and thrown himself into a profuse perspi-
ration.

When the doctor was satisfied with the exertions of his: patient, he
sent into the floor an easy chair for him to rest upon, and suffered
the floor to cool as gradually as it had been heated. Then it was; that
the sick man for the first time began to be sensible of the. real use'and
pleasure of repose: he had earned it by fatigue, without which it cam
never prove either salutary or agreeable.

At dinner the doctor appeared again to his patient, and. made him
a thousand apologies for the liberties he had taken with his: person.
These excuses he received with a kind of sullen civility. However,
his anger was a little mitigated by the smell of a roasted. pullet, which
was brought to table and set before him. He now, from exercise
and abstinence, began to find a relish in his victuals which he had
never done before, and the doctor permitted him to mingle a little
wine with his water. These compliances, however, were so extremely
irksome to his temper, that the month seemed to pass away as slowly
as a year. When it was expired, and his servants came to ask his
orders, he instantly threw himself into his carriage without taking
leave either of the doctor or of his family. When he came to reflect
upon the treatment he had received, his forced exercises, his invalua-
tary abstinence, and all the other mortifications he had undergone,
he could not conceive but it must be a plot of the physician he had
left behind, and, full of rage and indignation, drove directly to his
house in order to reproach him with it.

The physician happened to be at home, but scarcely knew his pa-
tient again, though after so short an absence. He had shrunk to
half his former bulk, his look and colour were mended, and’ he: had:
entirely thrown away his crutches. When he had given vent to alt
- that his anger could suggest, the: physician coolly answered in the
following manner :—

‘IL know not, sir, what right you have to make me these reproaches,
since it was not by my persuasion that you put yourself under the
care of Doctor Ramozini.”

“Yes, sir, but you gave me a high character of his skill and in-
tegrity.”

‘* Has he then deceived you in either, or do you find yourself worse
than when you put yourself under his care?”

‘*T.cannot say that,” answered the gentleman. ‘‘I am, to be sure,
surprisingly improved in my digestion ; I sleep. better than ever I did
To4 THE HISTORY OF

before; I eat with an appetite; and Ican walk almost as Well as ever
¥ could in my life.”

‘*And do you seriously come,” said the physician, ‘‘to complain
of a man that has effected all these miracles for you in so short a
time, and, unless you are now wanting to yourself, has given you a
degree of life and health which you had not the smallest reason to
expect?” ;

‘The gentleman, who had not sufficiently considered all these ad-
vantages, began to look a little confused, and the physician thus
went on :—

‘* All that you have to complain of is that you have been involun-
tarily your own dupe, and cheated into health and happiness. You
went to Dr. Ramozini, and saw a parcel of miserable wretches com-
fortably at dinner. That great and worthy man is the father of all
about him: he knows that most of the diseases of the poor originate
in their want of food and necessaries, and therefore benevolently
assists them with better diet and clothing. The rich, on the contrary,
are generally the victims of their own sloth and intemperance, and
therefore he finds it necessary to use a contrary method of cure—ex-
ercise, abstinence, and mortification. You, sir, have indeed been
treated like a child, but it has been for your own advantage. Neither
your bed, nor meat, nor drink has ever been medicated ; all the won-
derful change that has been produced has been by giving you better
habits, and rousing the slumbering powers of your own constitution.
As to deception, you have none to complain of, except what pro-
ceeded from your own foolish imagination, which persuaded you that
a physician was to regulate his conduct by the folly and intemperance
of his patient. As to all the rest, he only promised to exert all the
secrets of his art for your cure; and this, I am witness, he has done
so effectually, that, were you to reward him with half your fortune,
it would hardly be too much for his deserts.”

The gentleman, who did not want either