Citation
Forget-me-not stories for young folks

Material Information

Title:
Forget-me-not stories for young folks
Creator:
Syndicate Trading Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Syndicate Trading Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[41] p. : ill., music ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Contains stories, poems and a song.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026622744 ( ALEPH )
ALG3701 ( NOTIS )
54641804 ( OCLC )

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The Baldwin Library

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Forget-me-Not Stories

for

Young Folks



SYNDICATE TRADING COMPANY
NEW YORK



Copyright 1891 by
SYNDICATE TRADING COMPANY









/ iy
hmm

y AWE Wax dil



OUR PONY.

WE have a pony whose name is Duke. He was very
skittish when we first had him. There are four of us chil-
dren who ride him, — Mamie, Winnie, Arthur, and myself.
We have another little sister, Florence; but she is not old
enough to ride, being only five years old.

Winnie is a nice little rider. Duke was Mamie’s birth-
day present. We were all very much pleased when he
came. We danced round him, and clapped our hands.
Mamma wanted to surprise us: so, while we were at dinner,
she had the pony brought up and put in the barn.

Ni



OUR PONY.

After dinner we went out to play; and Winnie saw the
whip and the saddles, and then she suspected something.
So she began looking around in the stalls. There she found
the pony, and then came running in to mamma to ask if
it was really ours. Mamma said, Yes.

Then we were very much pleased, and said we eronlel ride
him. Winnie rode him up to the house first; then Mamie
wanted to ride, so she got on the boys’ saddle. Duke
would not stand still for her; and, when she got on, he went
galloping down to the barn. Her hat flew off, and she was
very much frightened. She kept calling out, “ Stop him!”
but he would not stop until he reached the barn. Duke
was frightened too, because we shouted at him.

Mamie is thirteen, but is more afraid to ride than Winnie,
who is only seven. Mamie asks if boys always ride better
than girls. I say, “No! Look at Winnie.” Once we tied
Dee to the swing ; and then he got his nose pulled by get-
ting the rope twisted round it. Sometimes we have a good
frolic with him in the pasture. He never kicks us.

Mamie loves to feed Duke ; but she wants Arthur to hold
him carefully by the bridle while she does it. As for Win-
nie, she loves to gallop over the hills and far away. Some-
times she lets me ride behind her. Duke seems to love the

bold Winnie, and will do whatever she tells him to. anew.





DREAMING AND DOING.

Amy was a dear good girl in many things; but she had
one bad habit: she was too apt to waste time in dreaming
of doing, instead of doing. |

In the village where she lived, Mr. Thornton kept a small
shop, where he sold fruit of all kinds, including berries in
their season.

One day he said to Amy, “‘ Would you like to make some
money ?”

“Of course I would!” said Amy; “ for my dear mother
often has to deprive herself of things she needs, so that she
may buy shoes or clothes for me.”

“¢ Well, Amy, I noticed some fine ripe blackberries along
by the stone walls in Mr. Green’s five-acre lot; and he said
that I or anybody else was welcome to them. Now, if you
will pick the ripest and best, I will pay you sixteen cents a

quart for them.”
_ Amy was delighted at the thought, and ran home and
got her basket, and called her little dog Quilp, with the .
intention of going at once to pick the blackberries.

Then she thought she would like to find out, with the aid
of her slate and pencil, how much money she should make,
if she were to pick five quarts. She found she should make
eighty cents, — almost enough to buy a new calico dress.

‘“ But supposing I should pick a dozen quarts: how much
should I earn then?” So she stopped and figured that out.
“Dear me! It would come to a dollar and ninety-two
cents!”

Amy then wanted to know how much fifty, a hundred,
two hundred, quarts would give her; and then, how much
she should get if she were to put thirty-two dollars in the
savings bank, and receive six per cent interest on it.



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DREAMING AND DOING.



BOBOLINK.

Quilp grew very impatient, but Amy did not heed his
barking ; and, when she was at last ready to start, she found
it was so near to dinner-time that she must put off her enter-

prise till the afternoon.

As soon as dinner was over, she took her basket, and, hur-
ried to the five-acre lot; but a whole troop of boys from the
public school were fers before her. It was Saturday after-
noon. School did not keep; and they were all out with their
baskets.

Amy soon found that all the large ripe berries had been
gathered. Not enough to make up a single quart could she
find. The boys had swept the bushes clean. All Amy’s
grand dreams of making a fortune by picking blackberries
were at an end. Slowly and sadly she made her way home,
recalling on the way the words of her teacher, who once said

to her, “ One doer is better than a hundred dreamers.”
ANNA LIVINGSTON.

—20$840-0——__

BOBOLINK.

Bozotinx, Bobolink !
Are you tipsy with drink ?

Or why do you swagger round so?
You've a nest in the grass
Somewhere near where I pass,

And fear I'll molest it, I know.

Bobolink, Bobolink !

Do you think, do you think,
Id trouble your dear little nest?

Oh! I would not do that ;

For I am not a cat :

So please let your mind be at rest.
AunT CLARA.



















PRAIRIE-DOGS.

Annie and her baby-brother went to ride with their papa
and mamma. They crossed the river on a long bridge; and
beyond it they saw. horses and cows feeding on the green
prairie.

“What are all these heaps of dirt for?” said Annie.

“We are just entering ‘ dog-town,’” said her papa; “and
those are the houses of the inhabitants. Do you see the
two little fellows sitting up on that mound ?”

“Yes,” said Annie; “ but they look like little fat squirrels ;
don’t they, mamma?” —

Baby pointed his little chubby finger, and said, “Ish!”

“They are prairie-dogs,” said mamma; “but are some-
times called the ‘ wish-ton-wish’ and ‘ prairie marmot,’ and
sometimes ‘ prairie marmot squirrel.’ It is like the marmot
because it burrows in the ground, and like the squirrel
because it has cheek-pouches.”

“ Well, what do they call them dogs for ?”’ said Annie.

“Let us stop and watch them,” said her papa. “Hark!
do you hear them bark ?”

“Yes: it is a little squeaking bark,” said Annie. “It
sounds like ‘chip-chip-chip.”” — ~

“ Now see,” said her papa, “ how funnily that little fellew
sits up, with his fore-paws hanging down, and watches us. ’

Annie shook the whip; and the prairie-dog scampered into



PRAIRIE-DOGS.

his hole. Up he popped his head again in a moment, and
jerked his short tail, and barked.

This seemed a signal for the whole town. On almost
every mound appeared two or three dogs; and they set up
such a barking and jerking of tails, that everybody in the
wagon laughed and shouted.

“ Now we will ride up close to the mound,” said papa, as
he started up old Fox, and sung a bit of the old song : —

“The prairie-dogs in dog-town
Will wag each little tail,
And think there’s something coming
Riding on a rail.”

There were several bushels of dirt in the mound. In
the centre of it was the hole, which was very large at the
‘entrance. The earth all around was worn very smooth and
hard.

Here the little dogs sit and bark and jerk, ready to dodge
into their hole in a moment. They all looked fat and
clumsy. Their color is reddish-brown. Owls and rattle-
snakes are often found living with them; but Annie did not

pee any. Mrs. O. HowARD.-







































THE BLACKBERRY FROLIC.

“‘ Wiy, where are you going, Nelly?” asked Martin Ray
of his sister, as, with a plate of pudding for him, she entered
his chamber where he was confined to his bed. .

Poor Martin had broken his leg by a fall from a tree, and
he had to keep very still.

“We have made up a blackberry-party,” said Nelly.
“The girls and boys are waiting for me at the door; and
I can only stop a minute to say that you must be good,
and not fret while am away.”

“Don’t be late in returning home,” said Martin; “ for
mother is going to take me down stairs for the first time, this
afternoon ; and I want to see you before I go up to bed.”

“ All the sweetest berries I can find shall be saved for
you,” said Nelly, as she tied the little scarf about her neck, -
put on her hat, and kissed Martin for good-by.

Nelly’s companions were waiting impatiently for her at



THE BLACKBERRY FROLIC.

the door; and, when she came, they raised a shout of “ Here
she is!” Then they set off, through a shady lane, on their
walk to Squire Atherton’s woods, along the borders of
which the blackberries grew in great profusion.

Soon they came toa place where a brook crossed between
two fields, with such a narrow plank for a bridge that some
of the girls did not half like going over it; for the brook
seemed to be quite full and deep.

«What a fuss you girls make about trifles!” cried Rob-



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ert Wood. “Who but a girl would think of being frightened
at a bridge like this?” .

“Stop that, Robert,” said Harry Thorp. “I will help
them across in a way that will prevent all danger.”

Harry plucked up a stout bulrush that grew near by, and
held it out over the plank to the girls to serve as a kind of
support for them to hold by. Susan Maples was the first to
lay hold of the thick end of the bulrush, by which Harry
led her across. Then the other girls followed; but, just as



THE BLACKBERRY FROLIC.

Nelly got on, Robert Wood shook the plank, and tried to
scare her.

He did not succeed in this; for Nelly was thinking of her
dear brother at home with his broken leg, and she felt that
she would not be afraid of a much more dangerous crossing
than that over the plank.

After a walk of a mile, they came to the edge of the
wood. “Jewels of jet! Look here!” cried Harry Thorp.
“See the bouncers! Here’s sweetness! Here’s blackness!
Here’s richness ! ”



And, true enough, there they were. Never were high-
bush blackberries finer or riper; but the largest and ripest
seemed always the hardest to get at. The boys cut hooked .
sticks, with which they pulled down the branches; and their
mouths were soon black with the juice of the berries. Then
the girls began filling their baskets.

The sun was low in the west when Nelly remembered
her promise to Martin, and said, “ Now for home!” to which
the rest cried, “ Agreed!”



THE BLACKBERRY FROLIC.

But the girls had not gone far before they began eating
the berries from their baskets, and offering them to one
another, —all but Nelly Ray. She did not eat any of her
blackberries, nor did she give any away; and yet she had
the best*basketful of all.

She had, besides, a branch of a bush, with berries on it,
-which she was carrying very carefully; so that she kept a
few steps behind the other girls.

When Nelly reached home, she looked in at the open
door, and saw Martin down stairs for the first time since his
accident. He was wrapped in shawls; and Nelly said, as she
put the full basket on his knees, and waved the branch be-
fore his eyes, ‘Why, brother, they have wrapped you up
so, and your face is so pale, that you look like a girl.”

“ Looks are nothing: behavior is all,” said Martin, laugh-
ing. “ Why, Nelly, what a splendid feast we shall have!
What big ones! Thank you, dear, dear sister.”

As she heard those words, and saw his pleased looks,
Nelly felt she was well repaid for all her trouble. 45, may.





THE QUEER THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO
NELLY.

a\KLLY BURTON had been weeding in the gar-
den nearly all the summer forenoon; and she
was quite tired out. “Oh, if I could only be
dressed up in fine clothes, and not have to.
work!” thought she.

No sooner had the thought passed through her mind, than,
as she looked down on the closely-mown grass by the edge
of the pond, she saw the queerest sight that child ever
beheld. |

A carriage, the body of which was made of the half of a
large walnut-shell, brightly gilt, was moving along, dragged
by six beetles with backs glistening with all the colors of
the rainbow.

Seated in the carriage, and carrying a wand, was a young
lady not larger than a child’s little finger, but so beautiful
that no humming-bird could equal her in beauty. She had
the bluest of blue eyes, and yellow crinkled hair that shone
like gold.

She stopped her team of beetles, and, standing upright, —
said to Nelly, “ Listen to me. My name is Pitpat; and I am
a fairy. Isee how tired you are with work. Your father,
though a good man, is a blacksmith; and there is often a
smirch on his face when he stoops to kiss you. Your mother
wears calico dresses, and doesn’t fix her hair with false
braids and waterfalls. Would you not like to be the daugh-
ter of a king and queen, and live in a palace?”

“Oh, yes, you beautiful Pitpat! I would like that ever so
much!” exclaimed Nelly. “Then I should be a princess,
and have nothing to do but amuse myself all day.”



















































































































































































































































































THE QUEER THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO NELLY.



QUEER THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO NELLY.

“Take the end of my wand, and touch your eyes with it,”
said the little fairy.

Nelly obeyed; and in a moment, before she could wink,
she found herself in a beautiful room, with mirrors reaching
from the ceiling to the floor. By these she saw that she
was no longer clad in an old dingy dress, nor were her feet
bare; but she had on a beautiful skirt of light-blue velvet,
and a bodice of the most costly lace, trimmed with ribbons ;
while diamonds were in her hair, and a pair of gold slippers
on her feet.

Servants were in attendance on her, one of whom said,
“May it please your Highness, his Majesty, your royal
father, iscoming.” Nelly’s heart fluttered. The door opened,
and, preceded by two or three lackeys, a pompous old gen-
tleman entered, clad in rich -robes, a golden crown on his
head, and no smirch on his face.

But, dear me, instead of catching her up in his arms, and
calling her his own precious little Nelly, his eae simply
gave her his hand to kiss, and passed on.

The queen followed in his steps. Her hair was done up
in a tower of top-knots and waterfalls ; and there was drapery
enough on the back of her dress to ponies an upholsterer.
Instead of calling Nelly “her darling,” as Nelly’s first
mother used to do, the queen merely said, as she swept by,
“Where are your manners, child?” for you must know
that poor Nelly had forgotten to courtesy.

Nelly put her face in her hands, and began to cry. “ Oh,
you cruel Pitpat!” said she, “why did you tempt me? Oh!
give me back my own dear mother in her calico dress, my
own dear father with the smirch on his face, my doll Angel-
ica, my black-and-white kitten Dainty, and my own dear,
dear home beside the lovely ee where the air is so ) sweet
and the bushes are so green.’



ROSE’S SONG.

“Take the end of my wand again, and touch your eyes
with it,” said the voice of Pitpat. And there on the carpet,
in her little gilded carriage, stood the fairy once more with
her wand held out. Nelly seized it eagerly, and touched
her eyes. _

“ Why, Dainty, what are you about?” said Nelly, as she
felt the kitten’s head against her arm; and then, opening
her eyes, she started to find herself in the old wood-shed,
seated with her back against the door, Angelica in her lap,
and the soft breeze from the pond fanning her cheek and
bosom. She looked at her feet. Ah! the golden slippers
had disappeared. ‘“ Dear me! I must have been dream-
ing,” said Nelly.

Ipa Fay.

——2oreo0o—_

ROSE'S SONG.

So it’s hush-a-by, baby,
Hush-a-by now,
Mamma’s gone to buy something Bsa:
And she will not forget
Her own darling pet,
But will buy her a bonny blue hood:
Yes, she’ll buy her a bonny blue hood.
Oh! she will not forget
Her own baby pet,
But will buy her a bonny blue hood.

Then it’s crow away, baby,
Crow away, sweet,
Papa he is coming to-night ;
And he’ll bring home a kiss,
Like this and like this,
For his sweet little Minnie so bright,
For his dear little Minnie so bright.
Oh! he’s many a kiss,
Like this and like this,

For his sweet little Minnie to-night.
Gko. BENNETT.



PITCHER-PLANTS AND MONKEY-POTS.

PITCHER-PLANTS are so called, because, at
{ the end of the leaves, the midrib which runs
through them is formed into a cup shape; and
in some it looks very like a pitcher or water-
jug. You will understand this better if you
look at the drawing.



There are various kinds of pitcher-plants. Some are
shorter and broader than others; but they are all green like
true leaves, and hold water as ere as a jug or glass.
They grow in Borneo and Sumatra, hot islands in the East.
The one shown in the drawing grows in Ceylon.

Some grow in America; but they are altogether different
from those in Borneo and Ceylon. One beautiful little
pitcher-plant grows in Australia: but this is also very dif:
ferent from all the rest; for the pitchers, instead of being at -
the end of the leaves, are clustered round the bottom of the
plant, close to the ground.

All these pitcher-plants, though very beautiful to look at,

are very cruel enemies to insects: for the pitchers nearly
always have water in them; and flies and small insects are
constantly falling into them, and getting drowned.
- Monkey-pots are hard, woody fruits; some as large and
round as a cannon-ball, and some shaped like abowl. They
grow on large trees in Brazil and other parts of South
America; and the natives take out the seeds, and use the
fruits for holding water, or to wash themselves in.

They are called monkey-pots because monkeys are very
fond of the seeds. Some of the seeds are so good, that they
are collected, and sent to London and other places, where
they are sold in the markets. The Brazil-nut is one of
them. J.B, J.







































































































































































THE SIX DUCKS.

In the pond near Emily’s house six tame ducks used to
have a fine time swimming about, except in winter, when
the pond was frozen. Emily had a name for each one of
them. They used to run to her when she called; for they
knew she loved them all, and would treat them well.

Among these six happy ducks there was a white one
that was at one time of his life a wild duck. Hmily named
him Albus ; for albus is Latin for white. I will tell you how
Albus happened to become tamed.



THE SIX DUCKS.

“‘ He was once on his way to the South with a large flock
of his wild companions, when, as they were alighting near
a creek, Albus was shot in the wing by Dick Barker, a
sportsman who was out gunning. Dick ran with his dog
Spot to pick up the poor wounded bird; but Albus was not
so much hurt that he could not fly a little.

He flew and flew till he came to Emily’s little oa 4
and then he fell at her feet, faint, but not dead, as if plead-
ing for protection. Emily took him up in her arms, though
she soiled her apron with blood in so doing. Dick and Spot
came up; and Dick said roughly, “Give me up that duck.”

“The duck has flown to my feet for protection; and I
would be shot myself before I would betray him and give
him up,” said Emily. “I shall keep him, and heal his
wounds.” : Ee oes

Mr. Dick Barker scolded wildly; but it was of no use.
He had to go off duckless. As for Albus, he soon grew well
under Emily’s tender care; but his wing was not as strong
as it used to be: so he concluded he would become a tame
bird, and not try to fly off again with his wild companions.
He had a happy home, a kind mistress, and pleasant duck
acquaintances. So, like a good sensible waddler, he was

content. EMILy CARTER.





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THE BUNCH OF GRAPES.

“Tam thinking what I shall do with this beautiful bunch
of grapes,” said Reka Lane as. she sat on the bench near
the arbor. Her real name was Rebecca; but they called
her, for shortness, Reka. :

“T know what I should do with it,” said little Matilda,
who had been wading in the brook, and was without shoes
and stockings. “I should divide it among the present com-
pany.” : 4

“Good for Matty!” exclaimed brother Henry. “The
best use you can put grapes to is to eat them before they
spoil. Come, Reka, divide, divide.”

“T am not sure that I shall do that,” said Reka.



THE BUNCH OF GRAPES.

“ Look at that queer dog!” said Matty. “He has crept
under the shawl on the ground, and looks like a head with
no body to it.”

“That shawl was left there the other day by old Mrs.
Merton,” said Reka. “The dog is her son’s terrier; and his
name is Beauty.”

“ He is any thing but a Ee said ee “T think
him the ugliest dog I ever saw.’ .

“T suppose they call him Beauty to make up for the bad
word he gets from every one as being ugly,” said Reka.
“ He is a good dog, nevertheless; and ie knows that shawl
belongs to his mistress. — Don’t you, Beauty ?”’

Here Beauty tore out from under the shawl, and began
barking in a very intelligent manner.

“ Now I will tell you what we will do,” said Reka. “Put
on your shoes and stockings, Matty, and we will all go and
call on Mrs. Merton, who is ill; and we'll take back her
shawl, and give her this beautiful bunch of grapes.”

“Bow, wow, wow!” cried Beauty, jumping up, and try-
ing to lick Reka’s face.

When the children left Mrs. Merton’s, after they had pre-
sented the grapes, Henry Lane made this remark, “Tl
tell you what it is, girls, to see that old lady so pleased
by our attention gave me more pleasure than a big feast on
grapes, ice-creams, and sponge-cake, with lemonade thrown

= >
in. Dora BURNSIDE.















A TRUE STORY ABOUT A DOG.

I am a middle-aged gentleman who is blessed with only
one child, a little girl now nearly six years old. Her name
is Fanny; and her cousin Gracie, who is about the same
age, lives with us.

Both of these little girls are very fond of having me tell
them stories ; and I have often told them about a dog I once
had. They liked this story so much, that they made me
promise I would send it to be printed, so that a great
many little girls and boys might hear it also. This is the
story : — i

When I was a little boy, not more than eight years old, my mother con-
sented to my having a dog which a friend offered to give me. He was a
little pup then, not more than five weeks old. I fed him on milk for
a while, and he grew very fast. I named him Cesar.

When he got to be six months old, he became very mischievous. Things

were.constantly being missed from the house. Handkerchiefs, slippers,
shoes, towels, aprons, and napkins disappeared; and no one could tell what



A TRUE. STORY ABOUT A DOG.

became of them. One day Cesar was seen going into the garden with a
slipper in his mouth ; and I followed him to a far-off corner where stood
a large currant-bush.

T looked under the bush, and saw Cesar digging a hole, into which he
put the slipper, and then covered it up with earth. Upon digging under
this bush, I found all the things that had been missed.

A neighbor’s dog, called “Dr. Wiseman,” was Cesar’s particular
friend. One day we Heard a loud scratching at the front-door; and, when
we opened it, in walked Casar and Dr. Wiseman. Cesar took the
Doctor by the ear, and led him up to each of the family, just as if he were
introducing him, and then led him into the garden, and treated him to a
bone.

Although Ceasar did many naughty things, we all loved him; for he
was quite affectionate as well as intelligent: but our neighbors complained
of him because he chased their chickens, bit their pigs, and scared their
horses. .A farmer who came to our house one day with a load of potatoes
took a great fancy to him. He wanted him for a watch-dog on his farm,
which was only four miles from our house.

As he promised to treat him kindly, my mother thought it was best to
let him have the dog; and I finally consented, although I believe I cried
a good deal about it.

So Cesar was put into the farmer’s wagon, much against his will; and
off he went into the country. . About three months afterwards, when there
was a foot of snow on the ground, there came a great scratching at the front-
door of our house, early in the morning, before I was up; and, when the
servant opened the door, in bounded Cesar with a rope around his neck,
and a large chunk of wood fastened to the other end of it.

He ran by the servant, and up the stairs, with the piece of wood going
bump, bump, all the way, dashed into my room, jumped right up on my
bed, and began licking my face.

I was very glad to see my dog again. He staid with us several days;
and, when the farmer came for him, he lay down on the floor, closed his.
eyes, and pretended to be dead; but the farmer took him back to the farm
in his wagon.

About a year and a half after that, when I came home for a vacation, we
all went up to the farm, hoping to see Cesar; but we never saw him again.
The farmer had shot him, because he killed the chickens, and chased the
sheep, and would not mind any thing that was said to him. Thus you
see, children, that Caesar came to a bad end, although he had every
advantage of good society in his early youth.

Cc. R. W.





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, UNDER THE CHERRY-TREE.

“‘ Now is the time to pick the cherries!” shouted Charles
as he came running in from the garden one July afternoon.
“Are they quite ripe ?”’ said his mother.

“Ripe? I should think so. Just look at them!” an-
swered Charles, pointing to the trees.

“QO mamma!” said Mary, “the birds are getting them
all. We must have them picked at once.”

“Never fear, little girl,” said her mother. “There will
be enough for the birds and ourselves and our neighbors
too. But it really is time to begin to pick them. So,



UNDER THE CHERRY-TREE.

Charles, get a basket, and we will all go out under the
cherry-tree.”

So out they all went,—Charles and Mary and Ellen
and Julia and Ruth; and mamma followed with the baby.

“JT told the gardener to bring a ladder,” said mamma.
“He will be here in a moment, Charles. You can’t pick
cherries without a ladder, you know.” |

“Of course,” said that saucy boy. “Nobody can pick
cherries without a ladder.” And with that he gave a spring,
and in about half a minute had climbed up into the tree.

“ Now, girls, hold your aprons,” said he. And down came
a shower of the delicious fruit.

Then what a glorious scramble those little girls had!
How they laughed and jumped and knocked heads together
in picking up the cherries! They ate as many as they
wanted; and still Charles kept throwing down more.

“Have you had enough?” said he. “So have I. Now
it’s time to think about filling the basket. Ah! here comes
the ladder at last, with a man under it. Tee





RAMBLES IN THE WOODS.

-Racuet has been used to a life in the city, but she is
now on a visit to her uncle’s in the country; and she has
fine times rambling through the woods and fields.

Her cousin Paul takes her to pick berries, and tells her
_ the names of the things she sees. “Smell of these leaves,”
Paul will say, breaking a twig from a shrub, somewhat like
a huckleberry-bush, and crushing the leaves in his hand.
“This is the bayberry-shrub. How fragrant the leaves are !
It bears a berry with a gray wax-like coating; and in Nova
Scotia this wax is much used instead of tallow, or mixed
with tallow, to make candles.”

“ But what is this little red berry on the ground?” asked
Rachel once when they were on one of their rambles. “It
has a dark glossy leaf; and I like the taste and the smell
of it very much.”

“That is the checkerberry,” said Paul. “Some people
call it the boxberry ; and some call it wintergreen. It has a
flavor like that of the black birch. It is used to scent soap,
and sometimes to flavor candy. It is an evergreen plant.”

“What do you mean by an evergreen ?” asked Rachel.

“T mean, it is green the whole year round: it does not
dry up and fall off, like the leaves of the strawberry-plant,”
said Paul.

“What other sweet-smelling plants are there about
here?” asked Rachel.

“Did you ever taste the bark of the sassafras-tree?”
asked Paul. “If not, here is one; and I will break off a twig
for you to chew. The color of the inner bark, near the root,

is red, like cinnamon. A beer is made from it; and it is also ©

used in soaps.”



WHAT I SAW AT THE SHASHORE.

“J like the odor of it very much,” said Rachel.

“‘ Here is a black-birch tree,” cried Paul. “Some people
call it the sweet-birch. I will cut off a piece of the bark
for you to taste.”

“Why, it tastes like checkerberry-leaves,” said Rachel.

“Yes,” replied Paul. “It isa beautiful tree, and is good
for fuel. But here is a white-birch. See how white the bark
is! It grows on poor land, and is a very pretty tree when
well taken care of.”

Here there was the sound of a horn; and Rachel asked,
“‘ What is the meaning of that sound?”

“Tt means that we must run home to dinner,” said Paul.
‘So give me your hand, Cousin Rachel. You need not be
afraid of snakes. There are none here that can do any
harm. Come, we will make a short cut through the grove
to the house.” ; . ' UNCLE CHARLES,

—_06400-——



WHAT I SAW AT THE SEASHORE.

Last summer I went to spend a few weeks at a quiet
little island on the New-England coast. Every morning I
used to go to the beach, and sit on the sands, and watch the
blue sea with its sparkling waves, and listen to the surf
breaking in white foam all along the shore.

On pleasant days the beach was lively with bathers, shout-
ing and laughing as they plunged into the cool waves; and



WHAT I SAW AT THE SEASHORE.

little boys and girls playing in the clean sand, digging with
their shovels, and loading and unloading their wagons, or
picking up shells and sea-mosses to carry home.

On the brightest days of all, I noticed a pale-faced inte
who came to sit a while in the sunshine, propped up with
shawls and pillows. She always brought with her a little
sky-terrier, of which she seemed as fond as if it had been a
real baby. .

After a while, I got acquainted with the invalid lady, and
found that her name was Miss Dean, and that her dog
was named Skye. He was a shagey-looking little creature ;
but he had very bright eyes, and he knew almost as much
as the children who played with him. He was very fond of
his mistress, and very thoughtful of her comfort.

Let me tell you one thing about him that made me think
so. Skye slept in the room with his mistress, on a soft
cushion, with a little blanket spread over him; and in the
morning, when he woke, if she was still asleep, he never
‘ disturbed her. He just sat up on his cushion as still as he
could be, and watched her till she woke. As soon as she
opened her eyes, he gave a little bark, for “good-morning,”’
_ and sprang up on her bed, to be loved and petted.

Well, Skye was a good little dog; and we all learned to
love him; and none of us would have hurt him for the world.
But one day, as we were walking up from the beach, ladies
and gentlemen and children and all, Skye ran down a lane,
out of sight; and a thoughtless, wicked boy, who had a stone
in his hand, and wanted to hit something with it, threw it
with all his might at poor Skye, and broke one of his legs.

Skye cried out with the pain; and we all hurried back to
see what was the matter. There we found him, whining
and howling, and trying to limp along on three legs; and we
just caught sight of the bad boy, running away far down

' NB : :



WHAT I SAW AT THE SEASHORE.

the lane. Miss Dean picked up her poor little darling, and
carried him bome.








Ss Now, it happened that
. there was a very skilful sur-
geon staying at the hotel,
who had come down to the

_~ island for a short vacation.

a Miss Dean sent for him,
iy and begged him to set poor
A | Skye’s broken leg. He was
la kind-hearted man, and
could not refuse to, use his
skill to relieve the dumb
|) little sufferer.
So Miss Dean took Skye
= on her lap, and stroked him
gently, and talked lovingly
to him, calling him “ Poor
doggy!” and “Dear Skye,” while the doctor made the
splints, and pressed the broken bones back into their place.
Then the doctor sent for some plaster of Paris, and made a
soft mortar of it, and put it all around the mended leg, and
let it harden into a little case, so that the bones would have
to stay just as he put them till they grew together again.

All the time the doctor was doing this, Skye kept as still
as a mouse; but, when it was all done, the little creature
laid his head on Miss Dean’s shoulder, and cried great tears,
just like a child. Miss Dean had to cry, too, at the help-
lessness of her poor dumb darling.

For a good many weeks, Skye could only hobble about on
three legs, and had to keep still on his cushion, or lie on his
mistress’ lap, most of the time; but he was very patient.
And at last, when the good doctor said it would do to re-






















BLOSSOM AND I.

move the plaster and the splints, we did so; and Skye ran
around the room as well and lively as ever. Wasn’t he
glad to have his liberty again ! Scpareie



—c0sg400—_

BLOSSOM AND I.

I witt tell you a true story about my’sister and me. I am
five years old, and Fanny (papa calls her Blossom) is three.
We are in Germany now, but our home is in America;
and, when I go out to play with the boys here, they call me
.“ America.” We came over the ocean in a big ship. Papa
and mamma were seasick; but Fanny and I were not, and
we liked to live on the water.

When mamma packed our

trunks, I wanted her to put
in my little pails and wheel- ;
barrow; and she said there
,wasn’troom,but that we could
’ bring as many nice picture-
books as we pleased. So we
brought all we had.

We have used them so
much, that papa says they
will not last long; but I
don’t want to put them away on a shelf to be kept nice. I
like to have them every day; and so does Fanny. .









BLOSSOM AND 1.

When we were coming on the steamer, Fanny used to sit
in the captain’s lap, and tell him the stories.
Our auntie sends us a new book every year. One was





































































































































A

lost, and we were very sorry; for we can’t read other picture-
_ books so well. Fanny always has a volume to take to bed
with her; and in the morning, when I wake up, I hear her
talking to the boys and girls in the pictures. co











HOW NORMAN BECAME AN ARTIST.

TuE landscape-painter sat on a camp-stool with an um-
brella over his head. His palette and his box of paints
were on the ground by his side. He was there to draw a
picture of the village of F

Hardly had he begun his crayon outline when he heard a
boy’s voice behind him. “May TI look on, sir?” said the
boy. “Yes, look as much as you please, but don’t talk,”
said the painter without turning his head. |





HOW NORMAN BECAME AN ARTIST.

The boy had a basket strapped to his back, and stood
looking intently, with both hands resting on his knees. His
‘name was Norman Blake. Other boys, and a young woman,
soon came up, and joined him as spectators.

Norman studied every movement of the painter’s hand;
and, when he got home, he took a piece of charcoal, and
tried to draw a picture on the wall. Rather a rough picture
it was, but pretty good for a first attempt.

The next day Norman went again, and looked on while
the painter sketched. “ You’ve got that line wrong,” cried
Norman all at once, forgetting that the painter had told
him not to talk. .

“What do you know about it, you young vagabond?”
cried the painter angrily. “Out of this! Run, scamper,
and don’t show your rogue’s face here again! But stop.
Before you go, come here, and point out what struck you
as wrong.” ;

Norman pointed to a certain line which made the village
church seem a little out of its right place in the picture.
The landscape-painter seized him by the ear, and said, “ You
little scamp, how did you find that out? You are right,
sir! But what business have you to criticise my picture ?
I am hesitating whether to thrash you, or to make a painter
of you.”

“Make a painter of me, by all means;” said Norman,

laughing ; for he saw that the honest painter was only half
in earnest.
_ Well, the end of it was, that Norman accompanied the
painter to the city, and began to study drawing and _paint-
ing. He succeeded so well, that, after he had been studying
six years, he one day brought to his friend the painter the
sketch which we have had copied above.

“ Do you remember that?” asked Norman.



THE BOOT-RACE.

“Of course I do!” said the painter. “It represents our
first meeting. Little did I think that the young vagabond
with the basket on his back would one day beat me in
sketching.” ALFRED SELWYN.



“Now, WHEN SHE COMES OUT, I SHALL BE SURE OF HER! *





THE FISHERMEN’S CHILDREN.

THERE were three children on the beach looking out to
see the boats of the fishermen sail off to the fishing-grounds.
Little Joe Bourne and his sister Susan stood side by side,
watching their father’s boat. Rachel, who was with them,
was not their sister, but an orphan-child, whose grandfather,
Mr. Harrison, was in one of the boats.

It was a windy day in November. The waves broke with
a great noise on the shingly beach. Soon the wind rose
higher: the sea rose too, and the rain fell fast. The chil-
dren walked back to the village; and there the old men said,
shaking their heads, “ We shall have a storm.”

That night, all the boats came safely back into the harbor,
excepting the boat in which Rachel’s grandfather had sailed.
It was a long, sad night for poor Rachel. The next day
and the next passed by; and no grandfather came back to
take care of her, and find her in food and clothes, and
carry her in his strong arms when she was tired out with
walking.



THE FISHERMEN’S CHILDREN.

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Susan and Joe in their own house felt sad for the little
orphan. One day their mother went to market. Baby was
in the cradle, and Susan was rocking it, whilst Joe was cut-
ting out a boat with an old jack-knife. The kettle on the
_stove began to sing; and Susan and Joe began to talk. °

“‘Poor Rachel will have to be sent to the workhouse
now,” said Joe.

“T hope not,” said Susan. “I hope father will give her
a home in our own house.”

“Why, he says he can hardly earn enough to feed his
own family,” said Joe.

“ But can’t we do something to help him?” asked Susan.

“IT know of nothing children like us can do,” said Joe.

When their mother came home, Susan begged so earnestly
to have Rachel come and stay with them, that Mrs. Bourne
at last replied, “ Well, we will take her in for a week or two,
and see; but mind, Susan, you must try and earn a little
money somehow. You will now have less time to play on
the sands, remember.”



THE FISHERMEN’S CHILDREN.



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So Susan went and found Rachel, and brought her home
to live with them all. The poor little orphan was a bright,

joyous child. She had a strange hope that she should see

her grandfather again; that he was not lost; for he had told
her many stories of his escape from great dangers at.sea.

“Why, grandfather was on,a wreck once a whole week,”
said Rachel: “he was cast away once on an island where
he had to live on clams a Jong while before he was rescued,
I think we shall hear from him soon.” .

One day Joe caught a fine basket of perch from the rocks,
and went round to try and sell them. But all the folks in the
village told him they could get as many fish as they wanted
without buying them. So Joe walked off to a town four
miles away from the sea, and there he sold his fish.

He told a kind blind lady, to whom he sold some, that his
sister wanted to get work, so that she could help a poor little
orphan-girl. The kind lady sent Susan half a dozen hand-
kerchiefs to hem; and the next morning Susan rose early,
and sewed by candle-light, while the other children were in
bed and asleep.



THE FISHERMEN’S CHILDREN.

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_ For three years the poor Bourne family gave Rachel a
nice happy home in their little house; and they would have
kept her longer, but one day, while the children were all
playing on the beach, they heard a great shouting, and ran
to see what it was about.

It was all in honor of Grandfather Harrison. He had
come back, as Rachel had always said he would. He had
been picked tip at sea in his sinking boat by a ship bound
for Australia. The old man was carried to that far country.
He went to the mines, and helped some men dig gold. He
made a good deal of money, thinking it would be a good
thing if he could only be rich enough to send his dear little
grand-daughter to school.

But Rachel was not, the only one who was benefited by
his good fortune. The Bournes shared in it. Joe and Susan,
and all the rest of the children, were sent to school also; and
they studied with a will. It was always a happy thought
to Rachel that the great kindness. of these good people did
not miss its reward even in this life. eae





YOUNG LAZYBONES.

Music by T, CRAMPTON,

Cheerfully. mf





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2. Then little Maggie sings to him,

And plays upon the harp ;

While rapid Robert, keen and slim,
Cries, “ Lazybones, look sharp!”

And Lucy tickles with her wand,
This sleepy, lazy boy;

And one and all with tricks and jokes
In teasing him take joy.



6-5
3. But Lazybones must take his nap
Before he goes to bed:
He does not move his weary limbs
Or lift his heavy head.
And though a dozen brewers’ drays
Should rumble o’er the stones,
Not all the noise that they can make
Would rouse Young Lazybones,



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Full Text







The Baldwin Library

University
mB 2
Florida




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Forget-me-Not Stories

for

Young Folks



SYNDICATE TRADING COMPANY
NEW YORK
Copyright 1891 by
SYNDICATE TRADING COMPANY






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OUR PONY.

WE have a pony whose name is Duke. He was very
skittish when we first had him. There are four of us chil-
dren who ride him, — Mamie, Winnie, Arthur, and myself.
We have another little sister, Florence; but she is not old
enough to ride, being only five years old.

Winnie is a nice little rider. Duke was Mamie’s birth-
day present. We were all very much pleased when he
came. We danced round him, and clapped our hands.
Mamma wanted to surprise us: so, while we were at dinner,
she had the pony brought up and put in the barn.

Ni
OUR PONY.

After dinner we went out to play; and Winnie saw the
whip and the saddles, and then she suspected something.
So she began looking around in the stalls. There she found
the pony, and then came running in to mamma to ask if
it was really ours. Mamma said, Yes.

Then we were very much pleased, and said we eronlel ride
him. Winnie rode him up to the house first; then Mamie
wanted to ride, so she got on the boys’ saddle. Duke
would not stand still for her; and, when she got on, he went
galloping down to the barn. Her hat flew off, and she was
very much frightened. She kept calling out, “ Stop him!”
but he would not stop until he reached the barn. Duke
was frightened too, because we shouted at him.

Mamie is thirteen, but is more afraid to ride than Winnie,
who is only seven. Mamie asks if boys always ride better
than girls. I say, “No! Look at Winnie.” Once we tied
Dee to the swing ; and then he got his nose pulled by get-
ting the rope twisted round it. Sometimes we have a good
frolic with him in the pasture. He never kicks us.

Mamie loves to feed Duke ; but she wants Arthur to hold
him carefully by the bridle while she does it. As for Win-
nie, she loves to gallop over the hills and far away. Some-
times she lets me ride behind her. Duke seems to love the

bold Winnie, and will do whatever she tells him to. anew.


DREAMING AND DOING.

Amy was a dear good girl in many things; but she had
one bad habit: she was too apt to waste time in dreaming
of doing, instead of doing. |

In the village where she lived, Mr. Thornton kept a small
shop, where he sold fruit of all kinds, including berries in
their season.

One day he said to Amy, “‘ Would you like to make some
money ?”

“Of course I would!” said Amy; “ for my dear mother
often has to deprive herself of things she needs, so that she
may buy shoes or clothes for me.”

“¢ Well, Amy, I noticed some fine ripe blackberries along
by the stone walls in Mr. Green’s five-acre lot; and he said
that I or anybody else was welcome to them. Now, if you
will pick the ripest and best, I will pay you sixteen cents a

quart for them.”
_ Amy was delighted at the thought, and ran home and
got her basket, and called her little dog Quilp, with the .
intention of going at once to pick the blackberries.

Then she thought she would like to find out, with the aid
of her slate and pencil, how much money she should make,
if she were to pick five quarts. She found she should make
eighty cents, — almost enough to buy a new calico dress.

‘“ But supposing I should pick a dozen quarts: how much
should I earn then?” So she stopped and figured that out.
“Dear me! It would come to a dollar and ninety-two
cents!”

Amy then wanted to know how much fifty, a hundred,
two hundred, quarts would give her; and then, how much
she should get if she were to put thirty-two dollars in the
savings bank, and receive six per cent interest on it.
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DREAMING AND DOING.
BOBOLINK.

Quilp grew very impatient, but Amy did not heed his
barking ; and, when she was at last ready to start, she found
it was so near to dinner-time that she must put off her enter-

prise till the afternoon.

As soon as dinner was over, she took her basket, and, hur-
ried to the five-acre lot; but a whole troop of boys from the
public school were fers before her. It was Saturday after-
noon. School did not keep; and they were all out with their
baskets.

Amy soon found that all the large ripe berries had been
gathered. Not enough to make up a single quart could she
find. The boys had swept the bushes clean. All Amy’s
grand dreams of making a fortune by picking blackberries
were at an end. Slowly and sadly she made her way home,
recalling on the way the words of her teacher, who once said

to her, “ One doer is better than a hundred dreamers.”
ANNA LIVINGSTON.

—20$840-0——__

BOBOLINK.

Bozotinx, Bobolink !
Are you tipsy with drink ?

Or why do you swagger round so?
You've a nest in the grass
Somewhere near where I pass,

And fear I'll molest it, I know.

Bobolink, Bobolink !

Do you think, do you think,
Id trouble your dear little nest?

Oh! I would not do that ;

For I am not a cat :

So please let your mind be at rest.
AunT CLARA.
















PRAIRIE-DOGS.

Annie and her baby-brother went to ride with their papa
and mamma. They crossed the river on a long bridge; and
beyond it they saw. horses and cows feeding on the green
prairie.

“What are all these heaps of dirt for?” said Annie.

“We are just entering ‘ dog-town,’” said her papa; “and
those are the houses of the inhabitants. Do you see the
two little fellows sitting up on that mound ?”

“Yes,” said Annie; “ but they look like little fat squirrels ;
don’t they, mamma?” —

Baby pointed his little chubby finger, and said, “Ish!”

“They are prairie-dogs,” said mamma; “but are some-
times called the ‘ wish-ton-wish’ and ‘ prairie marmot,’ and
sometimes ‘ prairie marmot squirrel.’ It is like the marmot
because it burrows in the ground, and like the squirrel
because it has cheek-pouches.”

“ Well, what do they call them dogs for ?”’ said Annie.

“Let us stop and watch them,” said her papa. “Hark!
do you hear them bark ?”

“Yes: it is a little squeaking bark,” said Annie. “It
sounds like ‘chip-chip-chip.”” — ~

“ Now see,” said her papa, “ how funnily that little fellew
sits up, with his fore-paws hanging down, and watches us. ’

Annie shook the whip; and the prairie-dog scampered into
PRAIRIE-DOGS.

his hole. Up he popped his head again in a moment, and
jerked his short tail, and barked.

This seemed a signal for the whole town. On almost
every mound appeared two or three dogs; and they set up
such a barking and jerking of tails, that everybody in the
wagon laughed and shouted.

“ Now we will ride up close to the mound,” said papa, as
he started up old Fox, and sung a bit of the old song : —

“The prairie-dogs in dog-town
Will wag each little tail,
And think there’s something coming
Riding on a rail.”

There were several bushels of dirt in the mound. In
the centre of it was the hole, which was very large at the
‘entrance. The earth all around was worn very smooth and
hard.

Here the little dogs sit and bark and jerk, ready to dodge
into their hole in a moment. They all looked fat and
clumsy. Their color is reddish-brown. Owls and rattle-
snakes are often found living with them; but Annie did not

pee any. Mrs. O. HowARD.-




































THE BLACKBERRY FROLIC.

“‘ Wiy, where are you going, Nelly?” asked Martin Ray
of his sister, as, with a plate of pudding for him, she entered
his chamber where he was confined to his bed. .

Poor Martin had broken his leg by a fall from a tree, and
he had to keep very still.

“We have made up a blackberry-party,” said Nelly.
“The girls and boys are waiting for me at the door; and
I can only stop a minute to say that you must be good,
and not fret while am away.”

“Don’t be late in returning home,” said Martin; “ for
mother is going to take me down stairs for the first time, this
afternoon ; and I want to see you before I go up to bed.”

“ All the sweetest berries I can find shall be saved for
you,” said Nelly, as she tied the little scarf about her neck, -
put on her hat, and kissed Martin for good-by.

Nelly’s companions were waiting impatiently for her at
THE BLACKBERRY FROLIC.

the door; and, when she came, they raised a shout of “ Here
she is!” Then they set off, through a shady lane, on their
walk to Squire Atherton’s woods, along the borders of
which the blackberries grew in great profusion.

Soon they came toa place where a brook crossed between
two fields, with such a narrow plank for a bridge that some
of the girls did not half like going over it; for the brook
seemed to be quite full and deep.

«What a fuss you girls make about trifles!” cried Rob-



ZN =
WN .

ert Wood. “Who but a girl would think of being frightened
at a bridge like this?” .

“Stop that, Robert,” said Harry Thorp. “I will help
them across in a way that will prevent all danger.”

Harry plucked up a stout bulrush that grew near by, and
held it out over the plank to the girls to serve as a kind of
support for them to hold by. Susan Maples was the first to
lay hold of the thick end of the bulrush, by which Harry
led her across. Then the other girls followed; but, just as
THE BLACKBERRY FROLIC.

Nelly got on, Robert Wood shook the plank, and tried to
scare her.

He did not succeed in this; for Nelly was thinking of her
dear brother at home with his broken leg, and she felt that
she would not be afraid of a much more dangerous crossing
than that over the plank.

After a walk of a mile, they came to the edge of the
wood. “Jewels of jet! Look here!” cried Harry Thorp.
“See the bouncers! Here’s sweetness! Here’s blackness!
Here’s richness ! ”



And, true enough, there they were. Never were high-
bush blackberries finer or riper; but the largest and ripest
seemed always the hardest to get at. The boys cut hooked .
sticks, with which they pulled down the branches; and their
mouths were soon black with the juice of the berries. Then
the girls began filling their baskets.

The sun was low in the west when Nelly remembered
her promise to Martin, and said, “ Now for home!” to which
the rest cried, “ Agreed!”
THE BLACKBERRY FROLIC.

But the girls had not gone far before they began eating
the berries from their baskets, and offering them to one
another, —all but Nelly Ray. She did not eat any of her
blackberries, nor did she give any away; and yet she had
the best*basketful of all.

She had, besides, a branch of a bush, with berries on it,
-which she was carrying very carefully; so that she kept a
few steps behind the other girls.

When Nelly reached home, she looked in at the open
door, and saw Martin down stairs for the first time since his
accident. He was wrapped in shawls; and Nelly said, as she
put the full basket on his knees, and waved the branch be-
fore his eyes, ‘Why, brother, they have wrapped you up
so, and your face is so pale, that you look like a girl.”

“ Looks are nothing: behavior is all,” said Martin, laugh-
ing. “ Why, Nelly, what a splendid feast we shall have!
What big ones! Thank you, dear, dear sister.”

As she heard those words, and saw his pleased looks,
Nelly felt she was well repaid for all her trouble. 45, may.


THE QUEER THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO
NELLY.

a\KLLY BURTON had been weeding in the gar-
den nearly all the summer forenoon; and she
was quite tired out. “Oh, if I could only be
dressed up in fine clothes, and not have to.
work!” thought she.

No sooner had the thought passed through her mind, than,
as she looked down on the closely-mown grass by the edge
of the pond, she saw the queerest sight that child ever
beheld. |

A carriage, the body of which was made of the half of a
large walnut-shell, brightly gilt, was moving along, dragged
by six beetles with backs glistening with all the colors of
the rainbow.

Seated in the carriage, and carrying a wand, was a young
lady not larger than a child’s little finger, but so beautiful
that no humming-bird could equal her in beauty. She had
the bluest of blue eyes, and yellow crinkled hair that shone
like gold.

She stopped her team of beetles, and, standing upright, —
said to Nelly, “ Listen to me. My name is Pitpat; and I am
a fairy. Isee how tired you are with work. Your father,
though a good man, is a blacksmith; and there is often a
smirch on his face when he stoops to kiss you. Your mother
wears calico dresses, and doesn’t fix her hair with false
braids and waterfalls. Would you not like to be the daugh-
ter of a king and queen, and live in a palace?”

“Oh, yes, you beautiful Pitpat! I would like that ever so
much!” exclaimed Nelly. “Then I should be a princess,
and have nothing to do but amuse myself all day.”
















































































































































































































































































THE QUEER THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO NELLY.
QUEER THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO NELLY.

“Take the end of my wand, and touch your eyes with it,”
said the little fairy.

Nelly obeyed; and in a moment, before she could wink,
she found herself in a beautiful room, with mirrors reaching
from the ceiling to the floor. By these she saw that she
was no longer clad in an old dingy dress, nor were her feet
bare; but she had on a beautiful skirt of light-blue velvet,
and a bodice of the most costly lace, trimmed with ribbons ;
while diamonds were in her hair, and a pair of gold slippers
on her feet.

Servants were in attendance on her, one of whom said,
“May it please your Highness, his Majesty, your royal
father, iscoming.” Nelly’s heart fluttered. The door opened,
and, preceded by two or three lackeys, a pompous old gen-
tleman entered, clad in rich -robes, a golden crown on his
head, and no smirch on his face.

But, dear me, instead of catching her up in his arms, and
calling her his own precious little Nelly, his eae simply
gave her his hand to kiss, and passed on.

The queen followed in his steps. Her hair was done up
in a tower of top-knots and waterfalls ; and there was drapery
enough on the back of her dress to ponies an upholsterer.
Instead of calling Nelly “her darling,” as Nelly’s first
mother used to do, the queen merely said, as she swept by,
“Where are your manners, child?” for you must know
that poor Nelly had forgotten to courtesy.

Nelly put her face in her hands, and began to cry. “ Oh,
you cruel Pitpat!” said she, “why did you tempt me? Oh!
give me back my own dear mother in her calico dress, my
own dear father with the smirch on his face, my doll Angel-
ica, my black-and-white kitten Dainty, and my own dear,
dear home beside the lovely ee where the air is so ) sweet
and the bushes are so green.’
ROSE’S SONG.

“Take the end of my wand again, and touch your eyes
with it,” said the voice of Pitpat. And there on the carpet,
in her little gilded carriage, stood the fairy once more with
her wand held out. Nelly seized it eagerly, and touched
her eyes. _

“ Why, Dainty, what are you about?” said Nelly, as she
felt the kitten’s head against her arm; and then, opening
her eyes, she started to find herself in the old wood-shed,
seated with her back against the door, Angelica in her lap,
and the soft breeze from the pond fanning her cheek and
bosom. She looked at her feet. Ah! the golden slippers
had disappeared. ‘“ Dear me! I must have been dream-
ing,” said Nelly.

Ipa Fay.

——2oreo0o—_

ROSE'S SONG.

So it’s hush-a-by, baby,
Hush-a-by now,
Mamma’s gone to buy something Bsa:
And she will not forget
Her own darling pet,
But will buy her a bonny blue hood:
Yes, she’ll buy her a bonny blue hood.
Oh! she will not forget
Her own baby pet,
But will buy her a bonny blue hood.

Then it’s crow away, baby,
Crow away, sweet,
Papa he is coming to-night ;
And he’ll bring home a kiss,
Like this and like this,
For his sweet little Minnie so bright,
For his dear little Minnie so bright.
Oh! he’s many a kiss,
Like this and like this,

For his sweet little Minnie to-night.
Gko. BENNETT.
PITCHER-PLANTS AND MONKEY-POTS.

PITCHER-PLANTS are so called, because, at
{ the end of the leaves, the midrib which runs
through them is formed into a cup shape; and
in some it looks very like a pitcher or water-
jug. You will understand this better if you
look at the drawing.



There are various kinds of pitcher-plants. Some are
shorter and broader than others; but they are all green like
true leaves, and hold water as ere as a jug or glass.
They grow in Borneo and Sumatra, hot islands in the East.
The one shown in the drawing grows in Ceylon.

Some grow in America; but they are altogether different
from those in Borneo and Ceylon. One beautiful little
pitcher-plant grows in Australia: but this is also very dif:
ferent from all the rest; for the pitchers, instead of being at -
the end of the leaves, are clustered round the bottom of the
plant, close to the ground.

All these pitcher-plants, though very beautiful to look at,

are very cruel enemies to insects: for the pitchers nearly
always have water in them; and flies and small insects are
constantly falling into them, and getting drowned.
- Monkey-pots are hard, woody fruits; some as large and
round as a cannon-ball, and some shaped like abowl. They
grow on large trees in Brazil and other parts of South
America; and the natives take out the seeds, and use the
fruits for holding water, or to wash themselves in.

They are called monkey-pots because monkeys are very
fond of the seeds. Some of the seeds are so good, that they
are collected, and sent to London and other places, where
they are sold in the markets. The Brazil-nut is one of
them. J.B, J.




































































































































































THE SIX DUCKS.

In the pond near Emily’s house six tame ducks used to
have a fine time swimming about, except in winter, when
the pond was frozen. Emily had a name for each one of
them. They used to run to her when she called; for they
knew she loved them all, and would treat them well.

Among these six happy ducks there was a white one
that was at one time of his life a wild duck. Hmily named
him Albus ; for albus is Latin for white. I will tell you how
Albus happened to become tamed.
THE SIX DUCKS.

“‘ He was once on his way to the South with a large flock
of his wild companions, when, as they were alighting near
a creek, Albus was shot in the wing by Dick Barker, a
sportsman who was out gunning. Dick ran with his dog
Spot to pick up the poor wounded bird; but Albus was not
so much hurt that he could not fly a little.

He flew and flew till he came to Emily’s little oa 4
and then he fell at her feet, faint, but not dead, as if plead-
ing for protection. Emily took him up in her arms, though
she soiled her apron with blood in so doing. Dick and Spot
came up; and Dick said roughly, “Give me up that duck.”

“The duck has flown to my feet for protection; and I
would be shot myself before I would betray him and give
him up,” said Emily. “I shall keep him, and heal his
wounds.” : Ee oes

Mr. Dick Barker scolded wildly; but it was of no use.
He had to go off duckless. As for Albus, he soon grew well
under Emily’s tender care; but his wing was not as strong
as it used to be: so he concluded he would become a tame
bird, and not try to fly off again with his wild companions.
He had a happy home, a kind mistress, and pleasant duck
acquaintances. So, like a good sensible waddler, he was

content. EMILy CARTER.


ees

i
}

Ni
|



THE BUNCH OF GRAPES.

“Tam thinking what I shall do with this beautiful bunch
of grapes,” said Reka Lane as. she sat on the bench near
the arbor. Her real name was Rebecca; but they called
her, for shortness, Reka. :

“T know what I should do with it,” said little Matilda,
who had been wading in the brook, and was without shoes
and stockings. “I should divide it among the present com-
pany.” : 4

“Good for Matty!” exclaimed brother Henry. “The
best use you can put grapes to is to eat them before they
spoil. Come, Reka, divide, divide.”

“T am not sure that I shall do that,” said Reka.
THE BUNCH OF GRAPES.

“ Look at that queer dog!” said Matty. “He has crept
under the shawl on the ground, and looks like a head with
no body to it.”

“That shawl was left there the other day by old Mrs.
Merton,” said Reka. “The dog is her son’s terrier; and his
name is Beauty.”

“ He is any thing but a Ee said ee “T think
him the ugliest dog I ever saw.’ .

“T suppose they call him Beauty to make up for the bad
word he gets from every one as being ugly,” said Reka.
“ He is a good dog, nevertheless; and ie knows that shawl
belongs to his mistress. — Don’t you, Beauty ?”’

Here Beauty tore out from under the shawl, and began
barking in a very intelligent manner.

“ Now I will tell you what we will do,” said Reka. “Put
on your shoes and stockings, Matty, and we will all go and
call on Mrs. Merton, who is ill; and we'll take back her
shawl, and give her this beautiful bunch of grapes.”

“Bow, wow, wow!” cried Beauty, jumping up, and try-
ing to lick Reka’s face.

When the children left Mrs. Merton’s, after they had pre-
sented the grapes, Henry Lane made this remark, “Tl
tell you what it is, girls, to see that old lady so pleased
by our attention gave me more pleasure than a big feast on
grapes, ice-creams, and sponge-cake, with lemonade thrown

= >
in. Dora BURNSIDE.












A TRUE STORY ABOUT A DOG.

I am a middle-aged gentleman who is blessed with only
one child, a little girl now nearly six years old. Her name
is Fanny; and her cousin Gracie, who is about the same
age, lives with us.

Both of these little girls are very fond of having me tell
them stories ; and I have often told them about a dog I once
had. They liked this story so much, that they made me
promise I would send it to be printed, so that a great
many little girls and boys might hear it also. This is the
story : — i

When I was a little boy, not more than eight years old, my mother con-
sented to my having a dog which a friend offered to give me. He was a
little pup then, not more than five weeks old. I fed him on milk for
a while, and he grew very fast. I named him Cesar.

When he got to be six months old, he became very mischievous. Things

were.constantly being missed from the house. Handkerchiefs, slippers,
shoes, towels, aprons, and napkins disappeared; and no one could tell what
A TRUE. STORY ABOUT A DOG.

became of them. One day Cesar was seen going into the garden with a
slipper in his mouth ; and I followed him to a far-off corner where stood
a large currant-bush.

T looked under the bush, and saw Cesar digging a hole, into which he
put the slipper, and then covered it up with earth. Upon digging under
this bush, I found all the things that had been missed.

A neighbor’s dog, called “Dr. Wiseman,” was Cesar’s particular
friend. One day we Heard a loud scratching at the front-door; and, when
we opened it, in walked Casar and Dr. Wiseman. Cesar took the
Doctor by the ear, and led him up to each of the family, just as if he were
introducing him, and then led him into the garden, and treated him to a
bone.

Although Ceasar did many naughty things, we all loved him; for he
was quite affectionate as well as intelligent: but our neighbors complained
of him because he chased their chickens, bit their pigs, and scared their
horses. .A farmer who came to our house one day with a load of potatoes
took a great fancy to him. He wanted him for a watch-dog on his farm,
which was only four miles from our house.

As he promised to treat him kindly, my mother thought it was best to
let him have the dog; and I finally consented, although I believe I cried
a good deal about it.

So Cesar was put into the farmer’s wagon, much against his will; and
off he went into the country. . About three months afterwards, when there
was a foot of snow on the ground, there came a great scratching at the front-
door of our house, early in the morning, before I was up; and, when the
servant opened the door, in bounded Cesar with a rope around his neck,
and a large chunk of wood fastened to the other end of it.

He ran by the servant, and up the stairs, with the piece of wood going
bump, bump, all the way, dashed into my room, jumped right up on my
bed, and began licking my face.

I was very glad to see my dog again. He staid with us several days;
and, when the farmer came for him, he lay down on the floor, closed his.
eyes, and pretended to be dead; but the farmer took him back to the farm
in his wagon.

About a year and a half after that, when I came home for a vacation, we
all went up to the farm, hoping to see Cesar; but we never saw him again.
The farmer had shot him, because he killed the chickens, and chased the
sheep, and would not mind any thing that was said to him. Thus you
see, children, that Caesar came to a bad end, although he had every
advantage of good society in his early youth.

Cc. R. W.


i i\yt

\)
VI
eRe Aa we





, UNDER THE CHERRY-TREE.

“‘ Now is the time to pick the cherries!” shouted Charles
as he came running in from the garden one July afternoon.
“Are they quite ripe ?”’ said his mother.

“Ripe? I should think so. Just look at them!” an-
swered Charles, pointing to the trees.

“QO mamma!” said Mary, “the birds are getting them
all. We must have them picked at once.”

“Never fear, little girl,” said her mother. “There will
be enough for the birds and ourselves and our neighbors
too. But it really is time to begin to pick them. So,
UNDER THE CHERRY-TREE.

Charles, get a basket, and we will all go out under the
cherry-tree.”

So out they all went,—Charles and Mary and Ellen
and Julia and Ruth; and mamma followed with the baby.

“JT told the gardener to bring a ladder,” said mamma.
“He will be here in a moment, Charles. You can’t pick
cherries without a ladder, you know.” |

“Of course,” said that saucy boy. “Nobody can pick
cherries without a ladder.” And with that he gave a spring,
and in about half a minute had climbed up into the tree.

“ Now, girls, hold your aprons,” said he. And down came
a shower of the delicious fruit.

Then what a glorious scramble those little girls had!
How they laughed and jumped and knocked heads together
in picking up the cherries! They ate as many as they
wanted; and still Charles kept throwing down more.

“Have you had enough?” said he. “So have I. Now
it’s time to think about filling the basket. Ah! here comes
the ladder at last, with a man under it. Tee


RAMBLES IN THE WOODS.

-Racuet has been used to a life in the city, but she is
now on a visit to her uncle’s in the country; and she has
fine times rambling through the woods and fields.

Her cousin Paul takes her to pick berries, and tells her
_ the names of the things she sees. “Smell of these leaves,”
Paul will say, breaking a twig from a shrub, somewhat like
a huckleberry-bush, and crushing the leaves in his hand.
“This is the bayberry-shrub. How fragrant the leaves are !
It bears a berry with a gray wax-like coating; and in Nova
Scotia this wax is much used instead of tallow, or mixed
with tallow, to make candles.”

“ But what is this little red berry on the ground?” asked
Rachel once when they were on one of their rambles. “It
has a dark glossy leaf; and I like the taste and the smell
of it very much.”

“That is the checkerberry,” said Paul. “Some people
call it the boxberry ; and some call it wintergreen. It has a
flavor like that of the black birch. It is used to scent soap,
and sometimes to flavor candy. It is an evergreen plant.”

“What do you mean by an evergreen ?” asked Rachel.

“T mean, it is green the whole year round: it does not
dry up and fall off, like the leaves of the strawberry-plant,”
said Paul.

“What other sweet-smelling plants are there about
here?” asked Rachel.

“Did you ever taste the bark of the sassafras-tree?”
asked Paul. “If not, here is one; and I will break off a twig
for you to chew. The color of the inner bark, near the root,

is red, like cinnamon. A beer is made from it; and it is also ©

used in soaps.”
WHAT I SAW AT THE SHASHORE.

“J like the odor of it very much,” said Rachel.

“‘ Here is a black-birch tree,” cried Paul. “Some people
call it the sweet-birch. I will cut off a piece of the bark
for you to taste.”

“Why, it tastes like checkerberry-leaves,” said Rachel.

“Yes,” replied Paul. “It isa beautiful tree, and is good
for fuel. But here is a white-birch. See how white the bark
is! It grows on poor land, and is a very pretty tree when
well taken care of.”

Here there was the sound of a horn; and Rachel asked,
“‘ What is the meaning of that sound?”

“Tt means that we must run home to dinner,” said Paul.
‘So give me your hand, Cousin Rachel. You need not be
afraid of snakes. There are none here that can do any
harm. Come, we will make a short cut through the grove
to the house.” ; . ' UNCLE CHARLES,

—_06400-——



WHAT I SAW AT THE SEASHORE.

Last summer I went to spend a few weeks at a quiet
little island on the New-England coast. Every morning I
used to go to the beach, and sit on the sands, and watch the
blue sea with its sparkling waves, and listen to the surf
breaking in white foam all along the shore.

On pleasant days the beach was lively with bathers, shout-
ing and laughing as they plunged into the cool waves; and
WHAT I SAW AT THE SEASHORE.

little boys and girls playing in the clean sand, digging with
their shovels, and loading and unloading their wagons, or
picking up shells and sea-mosses to carry home.

On the brightest days of all, I noticed a pale-faced inte
who came to sit a while in the sunshine, propped up with
shawls and pillows. She always brought with her a little
sky-terrier, of which she seemed as fond as if it had been a
real baby. .

After a while, I got acquainted with the invalid lady, and
found that her name was Miss Dean, and that her dog
was named Skye. He was a shagey-looking little creature ;
but he had very bright eyes, and he knew almost as much
as the children who played with him. He was very fond of
his mistress, and very thoughtful of her comfort.

Let me tell you one thing about him that made me think
so. Skye slept in the room with his mistress, on a soft
cushion, with a little blanket spread over him; and in the
morning, when he woke, if she was still asleep, he never
‘ disturbed her. He just sat up on his cushion as still as he
could be, and watched her till she woke. As soon as she
opened her eyes, he gave a little bark, for “good-morning,”’
_ and sprang up on her bed, to be loved and petted.

Well, Skye was a good little dog; and we all learned to
love him; and none of us would have hurt him for the world.
But one day, as we were walking up from the beach, ladies
and gentlemen and children and all, Skye ran down a lane,
out of sight; and a thoughtless, wicked boy, who had a stone
in his hand, and wanted to hit something with it, threw it
with all his might at poor Skye, and broke one of his legs.

Skye cried out with the pain; and we all hurried back to
see what was the matter. There we found him, whining
and howling, and trying to limp along on three legs; and we
just caught sight of the bad boy, running away far down

' NB : :
WHAT I SAW AT THE SEASHORE.

the lane. Miss Dean picked up her poor little darling, and
carried him bome.








Ss Now, it happened that
. there was a very skilful sur-
geon staying at the hotel,
who had come down to the

_~ island for a short vacation.

a Miss Dean sent for him,
iy and begged him to set poor
A | Skye’s broken leg. He was
la kind-hearted man, and
could not refuse to, use his
skill to relieve the dumb
|) little sufferer.
So Miss Dean took Skye
= on her lap, and stroked him
gently, and talked lovingly
to him, calling him “ Poor
doggy!” and “Dear Skye,” while the doctor made the
splints, and pressed the broken bones back into their place.
Then the doctor sent for some plaster of Paris, and made a
soft mortar of it, and put it all around the mended leg, and
let it harden into a little case, so that the bones would have
to stay just as he put them till they grew together again.

All the time the doctor was doing this, Skye kept as still
as a mouse; but, when it was all done, the little creature
laid his head on Miss Dean’s shoulder, and cried great tears,
just like a child. Miss Dean had to cry, too, at the help-
lessness of her poor dumb darling.

For a good many weeks, Skye could only hobble about on
three legs, and had to keep still on his cushion, or lie on his
mistress’ lap, most of the time; but he was very patient.
And at last, when the good doctor said it would do to re-



















BLOSSOM AND I.

move the plaster and the splints, we did so; and Skye ran
around the room as well and lively as ever. Wasn’t he
glad to have his liberty again ! Scpareie



—c0sg400—_

BLOSSOM AND I.

I witt tell you a true story about my’sister and me. I am
five years old, and Fanny (papa calls her Blossom) is three.
We are in Germany now, but our home is in America;
and, when I go out to play with the boys here, they call me
.“ America.” We came over the ocean in a big ship. Papa
and mamma were seasick; but Fanny and I were not, and
we liked to live on the water.

When mamma packed our

trunks, I wanted her to put
in my little pails and wheel- ;
barrow; and she said there
,wasn’troom,but that we could
’ bring as many nice picture-
books as we pleased. So we
brought all we had.

We have used them so
much, that papa says they
will not last long; but I
don’t want to put them away on a shelf to be kept nice. I
like to have them every day; and so does Fanny. .






BLOSSOM AND 1.

When we were coming on the steamer, Fanny used to sit
in the captain’s lap, and tell him the stories.
Our auntie sends us a new book every year. One was





































































































































A

lost, and we were very sorry; for we can’t read other picture-
_ books so well. Fanny always has a volume to take to bed
with her; and in the morning, when I wake up, I hear her
talking to the boys and girls in the pictures. co








HOW NORMAN BECAME AN ARTIST.

TuE landscape-painter sat on a camp-stool with an um-
brella over his head. His palette and his box of paints
were on the ground by his side. He was there to draw a
picture of the village of F

Hardly had he begun his crayon outline when he heard a
boy’s voice behind him. “May TI look on, sir?” said the
boy. “Yes, look as much as you please, but don’t talk,”
said the painter without turning his head. |


HOW NORMAN BECAME AN ARTIST.

The boy had a basket strapped to his back, and stood
looking intently, with both hands resting on his knees. His
‘name was Norman Blake. Other boys, and a young woman,
soon came up, and joined him as spectators.

Norman studied every movement of the painter’s hand;
and, when he got home, he took a piece of charcoal, and
tried to draw a picture on the wall. Rather a rough picture
it was, but pretty good for a first attempt.

The next day Norman went again, and looked on while
the painter sketched. “ You’ve got that line wrong,” cried
Norman all at once, forgetting that the painter had told
him not to talk. .

“What do you know about it, you young vagabond?”
cried the painter angrily. “Out of this! Run, scamper,
and don’t show your rogue’s face here again! But stop.
Before you go, come here, and point out what struck you
as wrong.” ;

Norman pointed to a certain line which made the village
church seem a little out of its right place in the picture.
The landscape-painter seized him by the ear, and said, “ You
little scamp, how did you find that out? You are right,
sir! But what business have you to criticise my picture ?
I am hesitating whether to thrash you, or to make a painter
of you.”

“Make a painter of me, by all means;” said Norman,

laughing ; for he saw that the honest painter was only half
in earnest.
_ Well, the end of it was, that Norman accompanied the
painter to the city, and began to study drawing and _paint-
ing. He succeeded so well, that, after he had been studying
six years, he one day brought to his friend the painter the
sketch which we have had copied above.

“ Do you remember that?” asked Norman.
THE BOOT-RACE.

“Of course I do!” said the painter. “It represents our
first meeting. Little did I think that the young vagabond
with the basket on his back would one day beat me in
sketching.” ALFRED SELWYN.



“Now, WHEN SHE COMES OUT, I SHALL BE SURE OF HER! *


THE FISHERMEN’S CHILDREN.

THERE were three children on the beach looking out to
see the boats of the fishermen sail off to the fishing-grounds.
Little Joe Bourne and his sister Susan stood side by side,
watching their father’s boat. Rachel, who was with them,
was not their sister, but an orphan-child, whose grandfather,
Mr. Harrison, was in one of the boats.

It was a windy day in November. The waves broke with
a great noise on the shingly beach. Soon the wind rose
higher: the sea rose too, and the rain fell fast. The chil-
dren walked back to the village; and there the old men said,
shaking their heads, “ We shall have a storm.”

That night, all the boats came safely back into the harbor,
excepting the boat in which Rachel’s grandfather had sailed.
It was a long, sad night for poor Rachel. The next day
and the next passed by; and no grandfather came back to
take care of her, and find her in food and clothes, and
carry her in his strong arms when she was tired out with
walking.
THE FISHERMEN’S CHILDREN.

ie

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t



Susan and Joe in their own house felt sad for the little
orphan. One day their mother went to market. Baby was
in the cradle, and Susan was rocking it, whilst Joe was cut-
ting out a boat with an old jack-knife. The kettle on the
_stove began to sing; and Susan and Joe began to talk. °

“‘Poor Rachel will have to be sent to the workhouse
now,” said Joe.

“T hope not,” said Susan. “I hope father will give her
a home in our own house.”

“Why, he says he can hardly earn enough to feed his
own family,” said Joe.

“ But can’t we do something to help him?” asked Susan.

“IT know of nothing children like us can do,” said Joe.

When their mother came home, Susan begged so earnestly
to have Rachel come and stay with them, that Mrs. Bourne
at last replied, “ Well, we will take her in for a week or two,
and see; but mind, Susan, you must try and earn a little
money somehow. You will now have less time to play on
the sands, remember.”
THE FISHERMEN’S CHILDREN.



e—
\\

SN

So Susan went and found Rachel, and brought her home
to live with them all. The poor little orphan was a bright,

joyous child. She had a strange hope that she should see

her grandfather again; that he was not lost; for he had told
her many stories of his escape from great dangers at.sea.

“Why, grandfather was on,a wreck once a whole week,”
said Rachel: “he was cast away once on an island where
he had to live on clams a Jong while before he was rescued,
I think we shall hear from him soon.” .

One day Joe caught a fine basket of perch from the rocks,
and went round to try and sell them. But all the folks in the
village told him they could get as many fish as they wanted
without buying them. So Joe walked off to a town four
miles away from the sea, and there he sold his fish.

He told a kind blind lady, to whom he sold some, that his
sister wanted to get work, so that she could help a poor little
orphan-girl. The kind lady sent Susan half a dozen hand-
kerchiefs to hem; and the next morning Susan rose early,
and sewed by candle-light, while the other children were in
bed and asleep.
THE FISHERMEN’S CHILDREN.

i fh i
Aue













































































_ For three years the poor Bourne family gave Rachel a
nice happy home in their little house; and they would have
kept her longer, but one day, while the children were all
playing on the beach, they heard a great shouting, and ran
to see what it was about.

It was all in honor of Grandfather Harrison. He had
come back, as Rachel had always said he would. He had
been picked tip at sea in his sinking boat by a ship bound
for Australia. The old man was carried to that far country.
He went to the mines, and helped some men dig gold. He
made a good deal of money, thinking it would be a good
thing if he could only be rich enough to send his dear little
grand-daughter to school.

But Rachel was not, the only one who was benefited by
his good fortune. The Bournes shared in it. Joe and Susan,
and all the rest of the children, were sent to school also; and
they studied with a will. It was always a happy thought
to Rachel that the great kindness. of these good people did
not miss its reward even in this life. eae


YOUNG LAZYBONES.

Music by T, CRAMPTON,

Cheerfully. mf





s Ei paar
=

=
5 3
Pees ees eiee| el Oe are
oC -@ @

-0- -0- -0--d— —0- -— =



-@- -o--9- -@- -4- -g-

1. Young Lazybones is smooth and sleek, Young Lazybones is fab; His eye sitsdrowsing

a ee

op --— =--—3
ete SE Se





j= p= res —F

dae — abe



=
eat ae





_-———, —. ol aac
: ‘Pa es
“tgs —-3—s — 4

+

P =
ga ep ane On ae

-o- -@-
La-zy-bones he keeps his state All









2. Then little Maggie sings to him,

And plays upon the harp ;

While rapid Robert, keen and slim,
Cries, “ Lazybones, look sharp!”

And Lucy tickles with her wand,
This sleepy, lazy boy;

And one and all with tricks and jokes
In teasing him take joy.



6-5
3. But Lazybones must take his nap
Before he goes to bed:
He does not move his weary limbs
Or lift his heavy head.
And though a dozen brewers’ drays
Should rumble o’er the stones,
Not all the noise that they can make
Would rouse Young Lazybones,
eee

3


=... Became couraiy

aA id ot dh CO NK N75 ree







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8bc54c86994012272f42386b218a5261
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describe
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6bbf4807b15fa2a5372d345c7cae6e83
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bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
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'2011-10-20T04:56:45-04:00'
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acfeb364419e6d93e61bd96e4609bf12
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'2011-10-20T04:56:00-04:00'
describe
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8140f9ddacf21620b4d1a20fdb88da8d
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'2011-10-20T04:56:46-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-20T04:55:47-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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11fbd2a42e72a4b99e1a824100b5ab75
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-20T04:55:56-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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0f17baec23a436d9299a1a721324fdf18f46c9a1
describe
'4255692' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPC' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f00ec7d30869a9062d82a341ef752611
86c41a3b7f5bf79f38e19da16b9387e8e4911330
describe
'176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPD' 'sip-files00010.txt'
c1e55b1bb5426b950729a366c227c8e8
23f92f2c2abef5b311d243eff64f89672510bb9c
describe
'10307' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPE' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
60a9c160c887976bff45e785d902b4c4
67ae87128190607c38fca97418f6cf6e1af886ba
'2011-10-20T04:56:32-04:00'
describe
'529177' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPF' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
26b1ae3620770eab22b575c09790db0e
df1e20d1de746183c1f6acf5280c002bf859698a
describe
'96831' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPG' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
0339f6827809ada1ba4f360367976453
b017abdd5ff5fea634946c973687bbc6eaa05a8e
describe
'33042' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPH' 'sip-files00011.pro'
5d6247caf9528d89b52ec6c584832dcc
822b3471d5f43192298fc47c3932b3e8506d8735
'2011-10-20T04:56:30-04:00'
describe
'30432' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPI' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
7ed7cdadc7983cb99e9811be0b1ada77
6ebfd0f00c4305a904d98aaed5eacfbb08c7565a
'2011-10-20T04:56:02-04:00'
describe
'4254672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPJ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
f30ce4eb66789189ab500b2e8c0b7b15
a89138728f686a133c83566be3b711f85bb41b9c
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPK' 'sip-files00011.txt'
2faf9045936c3aa719e6ac2c3983ff88
e6aaf018e71b980a962b84ca2fd2d033c8e8ed57
describe
'7501' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPL' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
fd75f1697cc8f29ff0fc3f6cacaab2c3
4dd1fb85e17445fabb39a57b3eaeb269fdbc5103
'2011-10-20T04:56:51-04:00'
describe
'529202' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPM' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
c37b6e96ebe8ad285598129518a4e5a2
7e69fc2c704126af182d66f11c024ab05fd6e4ce
describe
'126567' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPN' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
401f2c8060a9a14d8f1d0240837afbbd
de198b8b3e6210f4fdff4e01bb466ad54ba6e6bd
'2011-10-20T04:56:18-04:00'
describe
'33711' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPO' 'sip-files00012.pro'
e72138f1df8f40ca16b27bbd26d5f195
6a4fd40950961b061d3198f5dc64e92f3df99b80
'2011-10-20T04:56:26-04:00'
describe
'35951' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPP' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
961e376884b5f61b399422fc9b62be06
2dab8184ba4a8dc1d8327b5ecde17477ffc15c9f
describe
'4255412' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPQ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
745c315faad850bdd9f61ab64489b585
69e204f4e6fa681388e4deca0beafc2924a919db
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPR' 'sip-files00012.txt'
bc36c5582844c47a41cc3e775e5078d9
a3ff11bd5d43cbf0f266c6a75a8225b76acf1c66
'2011-10-20T04:56:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPS' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
3a16fa8e31ca2b6508aed6f2f76431fb
b65200670a633f2f35b32a70d6e800a8cf933067
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPT' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
c9a5ed8d385ca676191cbad26c6fef02
27ff9dfa1d0f461d74f9141c641ab7e8832cde54
describe
'101721' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPU' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
bbc1ee7943b4da38be440fdcc4d8761e
b0b604b78b1343af2c3e1853f0e71ec828f251da
'2011-10-20T04:56:33-04:00'
describe
'25694' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPV' 'sip-files00013.pro'
cb0b463111a1f39712c8a663db56baa3
1081686b3c2981dff08c83239ac6734e1db7e28f
'2011-10-20T04:56:44-04:00'
describe
'28871' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPW' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
d5fc4a09057dd95c1f05e373114f37f1
234f2d03766bc0259ce9f80950d7ccd78db674fe
describe
'4254528' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPX' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ccb4d634a445df3a471c78937241549e
f19247d82adab14cc3cb27416dd3237de88d8e53
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPY' 'sip-files00013.txt'
f14d74ffd86e891900cd9c13fb546889
753a977464eb7372a3cdf8c141ad1c6c1b40484d
describe
'7482' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANPZ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
caedca01ac434778d3ea8067b70fbde7
f90042d1ca35238d92eb908e6156bffd0343f2f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQA' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
5c0cc7156554e9b54eb9783d612b0bed
8cd2180402b597e4ba3ec717653e98ec2702b4c9
describe
'120270' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQB' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f5cdfe4a51c284727c464ff05ca1cb22
1b643f71d428bc02e035b5ba791726232f2e5d76
describe
'22940' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQC' 'sip-files00014.pro'
014445c85f026d29f7a093b0b2f0d8fc
c06346d8001699d11fa72f42dfb32c9d6ffa2963
'2011-10-20T04:56:57-04:00'
describe
'33370' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQD' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
67d7ddfc56ac60038fc4839438061b18
09abfc77dba926ea04d7cac7c5479a036459198f
'2011-10-20T04:56:40-04:00'
describe
'4255096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQE' 'sip-files00014.tif'
bff4468256ba34ba2ebb0974949b4abd
650c069710bd28fe7e8a167a138b10f3169f5f7a
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQF' 'sip-files00014.txt'
4df0006c68f81f5b538334b33709e545
ff518a2835dafa5a80af18ab7320b57359116a58
describe
'8400' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQG' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
7c9737a61416186d805c5266f8e9488d
69eb80307394745a99001ef1817eb8bdcdacba23
describe
'529168' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQH' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
2391a8c2a1fa595784de1189af13e639
44a5fd82a731c02efd1a77452567928dcec211b4
describe
'130822' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQI' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
1f196c6e8beba033d97d7d69600ed1e6
bde6ae43de0dba20cb371101fc21e5442871055f
describe
'26418' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQJ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
13034be5d6ab7ece887342bcf2dd4c5f
c06f5607fbfd4ff1f71b04f746bcd0389ce90c0e
'2011-10-20T04:56:49-04:00'
describe
'36574' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQK' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
99d693aed02ca1e5647005b02bb17d33
3426a15c87d78dbcb1fa9ffb6eef07436b5cbb5b
describe
'4255404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQL' 'sip-files00015.tif'
c76d905f17d634617bcc1a5c00dec035
71047c2317d706ac7b6527dc7c257c6294ba5c11
'2011-10-20T04:56:52-04:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQM' 'sip-files00015.txt'
15514ced797d9359b6516d135788164a
8a691b7d0fe67468bf4b2a89c59804f9dd6aba22
describe
'8961' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQN' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
630f5ed85a9a98499fe590ffdf904649
08d4143749463fe0d3394370e332a4b144b4405a
describe
'529149' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQO' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
40f7f70d805f2ea0b196768fd29edcf4
301c5ab02f8f93e35296da2856100afddcda011b
describe
'127590' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQP' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
bf2d3061937862183b3f6524841cf298
9ecaae2de5d6fdf0ccdd3ee303e9d2efc30558d1
describe
'25144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQQ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
b44994f2f464b282bd8c906f9a105201
a38af696e0986862de13f7a8e5d02ea4f66e1cbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQR' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
5242d6286930d25f7eb4270be2da56e5
f16606c9fd7fd8a92de13281db2aae7dc18333f6
describe
'4255616' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQS' 'sip-files00016.tif'
62277eef5181d6a2bf41f4f33773313b
884532aa64e975308201b6e04c165220f121e89f
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQT' 'sip-files00016.txt'
08bd57d5732a7c089bc9714be9eab1ef
dd235acc64ed00a58cceb35af6be14f3be861592
describe
'8912' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQU' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
a9f2763d7a84c608d91e2afa4a179204
7e38166b31ca1487eca2e719304bf9eb9f9147cc
describe
'529150' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQV' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
614d129fedc7388ab80ce87da8d8c69d
2bedadc8117597e667499b50877cf08fc7c4b055
describe
'136466' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQW' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b1ae1ef6eeb3ced8752314c0fb7884ba
9abf3a256f2183d9ee5dd315a593256ab1a826a3
describe
'27628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQX' 'sip-files00017.pro'
c63558a661fef6f5886efa27524b6ac4
ca4c1a4f8ae6f67dce6a8de52e70caabd6d00fad
describe
'37532' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQY' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
e0706667f43ba3e6d9b3d1d99c5e90a7
5750028b3ef9247d510d78184a8d81e48ed3f028
'2011-10-20T04:56:19-04:00'
describe
'4255604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANQZ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
a1f42aa37612332c56ddca77c0e82da5
cef500bf37ab2914989c914cde2052f8ca557470
'2011-10-20T04:56:37-04:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRA' 'sip-files00017.txt'
2372826e243ec390beb8a22b3cfae9cb
1db0c576e78c71bd6727b997a8bc790fc1425f19
describe
'8889' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRB' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
53dcf948fdc8025884de6cb0672f8fec
a6b7938aee34f1c3b9e5e5e31a358968b103b1dd
describe
'529179' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRC' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
eedcbcc714d4823b710f6082500d1da6
e9f59da7c0fa1c6b41117a03d8baf2d18d0ad141
describe
'123232' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRD' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
b49ab46109fd6380c6653d2e752d2b58
9e540804e38d160d8e5487dab0beec89cde83253
'2011-10-20T04:56:39-04:00'
describe
'39025' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRE' 'sip-files00018.pro'
d66b36ecb54f29fdee73f091f99cb64a
0760721dcb5ee356d2cdf21ef9dd8698453ee61b
describe
'37285' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRF' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
e09e4c1006df5d9593b1733f9927672b
60e9e80b77bbbd3faecfe03380cbc1ff7fc33613
describe
'4255516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRG' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3aa27f722729a7643409bacf4c429938
53e9ad80ed8be53309a178d1ad0b556f4e15408c
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRH' 'sip-files00018.txt'
fb00da808b54759333bc87e738b41967
5486005389d3c410eef60df5c819f3ab8df897ad
describe
'8686' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRI' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
6767d1336e215fdc1de91e5b9bc1059a
2091108edebdd202e9c8914a21fd5f913ce98894
describe
'529133' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRJ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
646be96258f284cb09236157855ef215
12ba0b07605189d285de052b0b3d83a92556f0be
describe
'191767' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRK' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
5b4935a553e37161752eb9dd6bbf2b43
6ec2fcceba4f2a17708468d66e13e2ffc10c591e
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRL' 'sip-files00019.pro'
1fb77585f5bffa8b1ca04de7f6f94047
3989af8ee90f6016407f139bfd8ae22884a41383
describe
'43986' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRM' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
7ec1871998bb9c4caf02eab3ded2aada
4e7e690e7f8aa57f70618362ff70576eb193e94b
describe
'4255600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRN' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d098c9237f397f56557668a48e1c2be8
81d39de4d00b968757dc4ecae48b772b29813a96
describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRO' 'sip-files00019.txt'
81ffd2907a6feee39ca7b1125198c96f
64ef55c8e9e11c78081ca381fa54edea9685a341
describe
'10196' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRP' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
94cdbc085237c70026d475896d0b4398
f9965dc61a857a3ca64ba51810e25c6a5e3a7a47
describe
'529200' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRQ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
7e38bc6d156c4b0d361f888fec3a94ee
4063b7a097366d8b5f1c94376d1ca4a2b1056532
describe
'140504' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRR' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
ce9d8a4434d938a942644af3a55aaa45
c19f445bff90aaa583022d78be7e051ebd0e6eb2
describe
'47130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRS' 'sip-files00020.pro'
a01fdd610d4df5d2105a00cd577e039a
68bd1f51d89a97e3ddccd912fa0f545d6e920d57
describe
'40934' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRT' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
6a81e08fccf7f8b8b52274b10f9e07dd
b17fe3f74d17c08c679571a521729142e3a3b481
describe
'4255736' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRU' 'sip-files00020.tif'
8e8b2ec9c99883502a84984a1450f55b
1157d26bc0182e2af779262b30dbc30df9f15f8c
'2011-10-20T04:56:38-04:00'
describe
'1854' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRV' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0cd3f878b6f9ed39a152761b20727a2c
b3d8f2c4ecb1174a0559d4fe4456ecb4f17753e1
'2011-10-20T04:56:28-04:00'
describe
'9808' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRW' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
53e160462f630bb6496b399f464efdcd
c4e003e2e80130e8956e0246b38c9c1e768cbd24
describe
'529161' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRX' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
289154db3921ec41e5a874dbeee1f212
92859c855f31e3a2a8f65565e7e460a32a3f0644
describe
'92722' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRY' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
1df3df128c18e71c2a173d94392cd7e9
92c666912000a5f4cb1183c73f8075163384532d
describe
'33656' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANRZ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
aa1a234034fd17dce0d641f288f23fcc
fcd2730293a9c71bd0601f714ed2d2a90ed3bb35
describe
'27132' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSA' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
c9dc39d1815859931fb760f8b4156ae5
4a6938bfb4a2ea42938dc082dbfd125700c3e028
describe
'4254048' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSB' 'sip-files00021.tif'
3fe28a20ccb53a7f9f02a9a87b42e23d
80f9447570353702be85e5cd871dd8833285716e
describe
'1762' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSC' 'sip-files00021.txt'
9d9cfe902a9bc8e7ebd84c3fda449056
ef581dfae5c5273a0752e967d13196b78c73027f
describe
'6636' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSD' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
30f8de14025c491b7adf7b6407d20c7a
94dcb8865950554f9351c084e1fa0f36399a71c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSE' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
0e3036f11fc1433a856c937768060a9d
b8e266348fca649f85fe8170abae3b9ce004ec59
describe
'134108' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSF' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c08d7cfffa4df0a3fa738cd025684816
e2c53044c291b3c105df43b8990f37b414258563
describe
'43576' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSG' 'sip-files00022.pro'
6f5a9f7c7f67f1e67900c470a12413d2
4a15022b0c7ef0e6bb3e584d88ba4edd00f8b0eb
describe
'40595' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSH' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7943b6ce0d156842777cdd6a34c9cdbf
125512be91fa635eec31906bbdf5e00b01b5786c
describe
'4255656' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSI' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e884ccefa1e1fbbdcc040cf1c6ecbc76
d797410ac1b610a314135d86dca3bc4f9cfb04c3
describe
'1813' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSJ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
439d56b9893ba46c795604fc9eeec578
dff42f98e307d4c1dc4dc884ed53dbe7b737e6ae
describe
'9454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSK' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
8feb29269fdf5f5c44a5672b3811caef
1530d16a9e177a4103f98539eed0ea213295541a
describe
'529187' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSL' 'sip-files0023.jp2'
c21ae50a71db926cfdcf39212602e069
5eb1552f0207f9221c83a9a0c99ce47d7e8478cf
describe
'140340' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSM' 'sip-files0023.jpg'
45ea75dc73c129126d66a0fded886a30
a9a1091ebd0313e624db2b75a123b15d36af98a9
describe
'13271' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSN' 'sip-files0023.pro'
f79b7a49517a20ac07d3256ff086821a
f4f7afb0536ffadeb82a4ff857cc3bb4dceafdcd
'2011-10-20T04:56:05-04:00'
describe
'36015' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSO' 'sip-files0023.QC.jpg'
430758fed1cf0c29eaf920de539d011f
30d0b73a114830a1e3d69794d1ffa70734732927
describe
'4255256' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSP' 'sip-files0023.tif'
7420711b1024035566040faf97a31db6
13871fa7e98ba6b31fe1bb581675ee2bdc031f95
describe
'587' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSQ' 'sip-files0023.txt'
7d92d0f61d2472ea147c8d6d3231d59b
6d1708d0f3a3d4e8d06283f64e75dce42545fac7
describe
Invalid character
'8719' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSR' 'sip-files0023thm.jpg'
6cdec0dd436ae69ef7d530859be666db
167c6b0b9164f1d4225bb37a9c9e57562058c1a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSS' 'sip-files0024.jp2'
1fb8fe279fac2e4e1146f0f4ac86e0f0
ae399537ac07f73741a1076d36d85ec3c5eeea0d
describe
'112114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANST' 'sip-files0024.jpg'
f0a12dffbaf6e832bffa7dda5e5ab7ca
cca6972e713b82cc78cadb8789f992dedf0223c7
describe
'33059' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSU' 'sip-files0024.pro'
32fb408c6ee5e08fb78ae3946706f603
849c5dd7612f3990a7308365ebf3f2d4c8d48948
describe
'32620' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSV' 'sip-files0024.QC.jpg'
ac8eae40f8986c0d7685db14eeaea057
e13227bbb8b989120dada169476f9bcdde342d51
describe
'4254992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSW' 'sip-files0024.tif'
2e239b974df5754d0ae1ace65ea0ddf3
fa00203d44b2f21a1d2f18119456079bf2723ce0
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSX' 'sip-files0024.txt'
352688beb16b163b15d1b1b39d34d3bc
3079fa7b4d7816b33d12249cfdb771d44b0c9a42
describe
'8041' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSY' 'sip-files0024thm.jpg'
db6fd07a1527240a44eb935ccde738d4
e83a4888703fe373f2c14b6c40b100c9ce25a84e
describe
'529185' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANSZ' 'sip-files0025.jp2'
148a29bde9be01352c8d0e85f84feae7
5800cd8e0519f4d398ac0cc1a2959b1f280f8e25
describe
'154962' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTA' 'sip-files0025.jpg'
ee788148beb76332a2a789d00a042104
799dce976e2cc0e39de5a890f3583db556aa8cc3
describe
'15853' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTB' 'sip-files0025.pro'
9e4b4eaa95c75a88586acee01e1ee05d
76cd3528219b0a026165b47ff5baba6b7d9a2cb3
describe
'40763' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTC' 'sip-files0025.QC.jpg'
80c6a772dc32d671444db10245504d3b
228dcfd9fcd67f2a85efda8c95268369c4a9315f
describe
'4256312' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTD' 'sip-files0025.tif'
4da2ca404f447dd13b679d826a4054b0
5d932a7e1fe7c47d23f43115b291919143e18b72
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTE' 'sip-files0025.txt'
925a6f719f70bc06609297e9bd12e488
62b7c3af9da57be4aad708177580bc8c2cc454a7
'2011-10-20T04:56:20-04:00'
describe
'9862' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTF' 'sip-files0025thm.jpg'
dcf03895da95d4c7ed9d1475b9509951
1579110bf81bf4968418fccffbc78715f7eded58
describe
'529130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTG' 'sip-files0026.jp2'
c461f35c132d785fc059c0bc4663e6fb
9694d2bd88f84b7a4e72b6bb5abfbe0467f4306b
describe
'112562' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTH' 'sip-files0026.jpg'
c62d25f3e1d0ed152bc9e2261129c15c
80021b9637d87a73e36eab8e01d896ca198d7f35
describe
'34426' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTI' 'sip-files0026.pro'
dc333e167a92a46a7719499f8649ba7b
ffc040b79a2135200eee57b55de0d6fcf188bbd2
describe
'33491' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTJ' 'sip-files0026.QC.jpg'
199c594b04588f88259da0e86b72d472
2cc313fca6f9f6dfa2b50c600dcf1ec08d37db51
describe
'4255120' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTK' 'sip-files0026.tif'
697f7bdf0adeb7e088002a4247d44b6d
6bec017f805d5a7ae3938854fec97a32f585ec19
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTL' 'sip-files0026.txt'
49bdd59000f0b716b9392f09faa4d0cf
66eeb3e068e80b8d0988c14b792bf761340b268e
describe
'8274' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTM' 'sip-files0026thm.jpg'
67125d65fc504fbf11d751b76481fd85
6572b1937c851a86c42bb9969292247c0e601485
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTN' 'sip-files0027.jp2'
853a0379b9f4853fe1ea49d557c02251
d9b2ea692561534dada03975d084ed87515684c3
describe
'127675' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTO' 'sip-files0027.jpg'
eb7986d7169cfefdc4d2cd4a14619fa3
27f54a5bb7af5514bfaa87f8aab0175a04e29af0
describe
'25489' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTP' 'sip-files0027.pro'
baafddbf0b8bbc3fe454c56b254fc79f
c760124639c86c0cc098c246046b9e339ee9b37e
describe
'33764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTQ' 'sip-files0027.QC.jpg'
ba865124dcd992bc3cb92b3d63eb3c54
2d4dc394f139a631e97cd0e9ca2d5f63cf7751dc
describe
'4255160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTR' 'sip-files0027.tif'
cca5bda2cdeef9fcfa5076d226070710
d3449b5dc294605ca15364d157e2ad59fb015f57
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTS' 'sip-files0027.txt'
e484cca0fc32f74aa548eb7d1e165af3
e117d4eb0797819dbdd2541925f877b2fed5a40c
'2011-10-20T04:56:01-04:00'
describe
'8116' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTT' 'sip-files0027thm.jpg'
f72a8cb24224e857352b82a32b2fde44
bd485ade202ee7a331d4a09346afd7ef615bbde9
describe
'529198' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTU' 'sip-files0028.jp2'
e9419db3c22f8e52220f6a6e6b150a0f
02c9538ec3dbe90d7c45463b0a867587c7223782
describe
'137092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTV' 'sip-files0028.jpg'
04948efd1e22ec22bbd010b3e322cd0f
1b804ff1dfbd1b686a9ef7450637bfa893adb63e
describe
'64423' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTW' 'sip-files0028.pro'
c64bcb92ac5b8e54f66e37d1af5e74eb
9392ff179a7523ea4b9c2743dd3f4d182dcc9e03
describe
'40028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTX' 'sip-files0028.QC.jpg'
fb590c2bbc3097a501507e32818e324c
57d32d499ac06ab39d49bd3fad007f39acf40cb7
describe
'4255744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTY' 'sip-files0028.tif'
b1c0f93790acc36e7972c2966f42054c
3083b2d2f57c7cc79ca6a7500f39a8578488afab
'2011-10-20T04:56:55-04:00'
describe
'2689' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANTZ' 'sip-files0028.txt'
d7e027477b7fb851e5b64a1ad7d82ddb
3f23c9d69ec4100de364e6d32c6631ef15238f87
describe
'9331' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUA' 'sip-files0028thm.jpg'
f74a03967735d11f64eef951057e727d
29585f61710fc19bcfa5d759b2e28e97abe14df0
describe
'529184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUB' 'sip-files0029.jp2'
126eba1326d5743efec66976dddd1b78
09491ad66717a9dfc9f60ce8f924b55ba0c6fd45
describe
'144093' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUC' 'sip-files0029.jpg'
92a16008df573d0a2f752f725c4149bd
6978cb96f93994dbdabb4a6be7026e5fe124b56d
describe
'14178' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUD' 'sip-files0029.pro'
ecff28a24988640f721a4e1900f15e40
4b3160e23e9f2d161b3afd043a91b58f85a87240
'2011-10-20T04:56:29-04:00'
describe
'39146' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUE' 'sip-files0029.QC.jpg'
0b5b9a5d732be47ecc0d8248726a9b15
c7f3123d7b9bcfc19b145edfccf0aa3a31bb626a
describe
'4256028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUF' 'sip-files0029.tif'
a17fb302695e2b32beee6d98172a41be
4ba8dabe4ec0ff0fab7948886a92f638f45a744b
describe
'619' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUG' 'sip-files0029.txt'
ff906a0ff096f52adc68ed54ceb49e79
c4ed510601da3aa9841c882170f23b9d2206bb23
describe
'9605' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUH' 'sip-files0029thm.jpg'
30f8ceb301fbf7d9d9dc04de407036e1
066b7201b57757a957e0eb6248dfced295eacf58
describe
'529068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUI' 'sip-files0030.jp2'
5f78153df0cf4898736b03c161f8a00a
ea6e753e76180c738d51c1f3ad2bf8cc6c783e7f
describe
'99158' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUJ' 'sip-files0030.jpg'
ed344894fd5845cb2728bfee382942fb
1b5b016b0ed816c55f93f66ef48a568a33f2fcf8
describe
'26105' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUK' 'sip-files0030.pro'
e4ed4719da3a9019d1ec59a6e048d990
c475ee51ac461876837525798e14053201fef2e7
describe
'29396' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUL' 'sip-files0030.QC.jpg'
3e0e8e4fac90a1360f32b0900fed6990
3ecc0ffd6cfde84f38230eafff0baccffe96282e
describe
'4254584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUM' 'sip-files0030.tif'
62aac2f49f75c63a6673bb7092f58c64
23550025690d4f720ce6c7bee8f7d5083f628d09
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUN' 'sip-files0030.txt'
5dc93cf709e8db74916680dc906d80a7
d232c40154f434814fd65bd1cc463ecb4ec5d56a
describe
'6970' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUO' 'sip-files0030thm.jpg'
a0dd2597a22e07f8cc823917572881d6
c6787c60eba4667241b70d64c8f572a0898c804b
describe
'529155' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUP' 'sip-files0031.jp2'
d21d3a59f59064acaf902c5cef6d07a9
737a04ef2463c1fbb64f0e445264fe5c02988f46
describe
'122077' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUQ' 'sip-files0031.jpg'
47f105a925d54bce8bf9e62fc08f17aa
df4e396ee34e566f3f440972347f0f2bd5c1c26f
describe
'41021' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUR' 'sip-files0031.pro'
57361a412beaf20839d5afedf701919e
0adc10837aa7fa33b071c81233508585a5877c02
describe
'36878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUS' 'sip-files0031.QC.jpg'
5cc2e6e7924bd8e51ad81075a0bb93e0
b2ae04a2f0d17652196a3cf7239a8ba0f925286b
describe
'4255380' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUT' 'sip-files0031.tif'
28e9aa0b0bd91cce0ed557a8cc71d24a
34d7715197922d294bf037cd723449a5048c684a
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUU' 'sip-files0031.txt'
6a0b07695e754835cfda31e60eec3ec0
a2ba18ee2023daa3b4d6568d0a48b1178a4b49df
describe
'8996' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUV' 'sip-files0031thm.jpg'
7e39343c4586eeabbf702b493f83432d
dc99decad670a74692b21856f3858c95b72aa9c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUW' 'sip-files0032.jp2'
057675798abe867e7cecb15ff03b8e09
b007d65335206d5072ea68566cb1d34fa8131a86
describe
'129111' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUX' 'sip-files0032.jpg'
f18b5460989114e0b3152704320fc602
d1142954f352610c0f4e6345d0f226c0e9a7ddbd
describe
'32794' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUY' 'sip-files0032.pro'
30429923c912cd964e0f406fe9c2845e
f8b006c320099b356ee32ab3dc27a1e05070adee
describe
'36895' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANUZ' 'sip-files0032.QC.jpg'
266320ce390019826c23e5a2d0638676
faa702d494cf992f97bd4d5a5efd94c0b4505bb8
'2011-10-20T04:56:09-04:00'
describe
'4255620' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVA' 'sip-files0032.tif'
4c8a1e8a47a7d1b7d0886f5b320d4c8a
909772c51c5ccff9b1f3ed7b7a97bc4e9e07d6e2
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVB' 'sip-files0032.txt'
2226e277c6589ead813815b3fd240b18
b754ae42e18e409b366549adb031ab3a36365f6f
'2011-10-20T04:55:54-04:00'
describe
'9369' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVC' 'sip-files0032thm.jpg'
c75a30398ac1a41656fe78c2e632cbe7
99fa521bf456d45016f61d04b03a54ba09424cc4
describe
'529192' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVD' 'sip-files0033.jp2'
70599e9a0469d8fb2d92d1e07999fd2e
ae0c7358c797009d3ba38e631e2ea0080e6f549f
describe
'145514' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVE' 'sip-files0033.jpg'
f85aadebeaf045aab17e766b97a7ee9d
1cd6581dd4247fdba19ee8800b738165e475eb01
describe
'48970' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVF' 'sip-files0033.pro'
42c45c77f6671129f2caf98d31777090
798750bf9c289ac75b093fd2bb1655561c6ff54a
describe
'43898' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVG' 'sip-files0033.QC.jpg'
1624c462e7034fa69c38944f60a85bcf
21b39293778d721789389f643414a10f680cdd0b
describe
'4256268' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVH' 'sip-files0033.tif'
76f1e918ddc3df016decdd85bbb255e8
172ee7effb0f94bb765656ea9b07a7745fea1c0d
describe
'1941' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVI' 'sip-files0033.txt'
4194a6ed94f4085bd88bab9f0fc12604
eaa64ec8a975723d0b27b5717f13a1bab6e7d614
describe
'10353' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVJ' 'sip-files0033thm.jpg'
533be400f752b6f99bdab1f8e97fd3dd
78c3a5358596fc6cf269210da2d46c3c35c43852
describe
'529147' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVK' 'sip-files0034.jp2'
08473d1109d8a0ff125836c289811098
3bd3ce70873c507543195f6c7640fe1b3dce2c8b
describe
'144140' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVL' 'sip-files0034.jpg'
bfba933ba888fc2c600c89312d900084
f0cf09fbd51206e8fc8b346ca68d0a6dd68e7a27
describe
'37641' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVM' 'sip-files0034.pro'
8cf2813d4fce1fbf879d4d44aaa2ea4f
0d60d00ceac4eec741f9b2ad64f2e97d74707396
describe
'40547' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVN' 'sip-files0034.QC.jpg'
2d028d433e71fd40e01cf1fed931187e
901e0acc4f7ec8fd2037d9bd31ffe70fcff8dc7c
describe
'4255796' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVO' 'sip-files0034.tif'
365052635a5ab537f32d758f787fa787
66b7126e27f70f5f225b4af57fa9a6acb9b1f223
'2011-10-20T04:55:49-04:00'
describe
'1902' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVP' 'sip-files0034.txt'
199a22dd2a5e2f22e930ee989a234d4b
ca1a40a27f770a7f465b3a4c51e9d9bdbfb9c8c0
describe
'9574' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVQ' 'sip-files0034thm.jpg'
b3d5406a01128121200043e577816623
a8ce8f3b9d475e8425157b0dff644277765d8e69
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVR' 'sip-files0035.jp2'
7f266214fe83058c5627e94fbd3434a8
e3b98a6e98dcb09efabaa1ed16015d6b512b855e
describe
'110029' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVS' 'sip-files0035.jpg'
7b2a56593e55e9e1aa163c9aeda293ff
60a7d4356151c67fcd1e9fdd924849fc5da28c5a
describe
'25512' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVT' 'sip-files0035.pro'
418bf1840149a7dce5f64b86600d1d3e
f8e7333a141aadca79d626b8954eba48bb9bf855
describe
'31100' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVU' 'sip-files0035.QC.jpg'
22be88d8e3e8a591461c3b1c5925b7e8
e7232f7e40e933a9e17305da17be7ce2e47f5a56
describe
'4254728' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVV' 'sip-files0035.tif'
8a15c02a81a83a0dfcc56a630572056a
3d9948a96d37e87f5f787b3915ba567b5ae718d0
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVW' 'sip-files0035.txt'
d5cba0277dce96302af7399574433e94
84f6b8b8a2de86d81e58ab806c6d5eb3cfd9bb69
describe
'7799' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVX' 'sip-files0035thm.jpg'
0f372d31073defbf5104e7903cd95de7
ca09e8a26247273f21ace90dd04814a0ccc84d95
describe
'529152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVY' 'sip-files0036.jp2'
edaccc790da2dbf8b63bc80f660c1eff
a929a07b5800b10a7f233dfb1043ce77dae3d350
describe
'138977' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANVZ' 'sip-files0036.jpg'
23caeb6b3177e092eae06546d197c062
9cc3b74c12fabfb69f6d1f71531adcfd7419931b
describe
'10818' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWA' 'sip-files0036.pro'
b2de079839782397957ceb792a1bdcca
19c9d234230dfcb7d6e673a9bf9941464309ea5a
describe
'35229' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWB' 'sip-files0036.QC.jpg'
ac67148343f1bfbb9590f6959536067a
ce86b742f9a12222a5ac7375fb803572bbcbd8a2
describe
'4255288' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWC' 'sip-files0036.tif'
9ecee9a1e64a2c2646733c2b2c603c49
e28e1b5c9f5ff07c87aceb0e745537959017a41b
describe
'430' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWD' 'sip-files0036.txt'
5fc82c966b2464ea397bec0dbc468143
dbbcf0d52650b7f33b6a275195521024d5a377a7
describe
'8407' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWE' 'sip-files0036thm.jpg'
090943295b11132ac56985c8e1628988
38de6ed3ffaf11637fa01c150035f71bba92db03
describe
'529175' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWF' 'sip-files0037.jp2'
eacbee27aa0f408ab7969874d01fe5ac
c3ea3a5caa3bf3a448261bd726952f26e01a638e
describe
'132710' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWG' 'sip-files0037.jpg'
f5c928040b70ff279625067897311647
40d75ad50de1f8ad73772235096b809249992129
describe
'12153' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWH' 'sip-files0037.pro'
3c9a21634fc958c3075e807467ebdb41
444c8714fdeb471f938253191083392faaff5226
describe
'35225' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWI' 'sip-files0037.QC.jpg'
93fb892c7c6995980dc39d8d15631dbb
29f2812efdc8a162d0c2fef4dcc0b3701734cafa
describe
'4255720' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWJ' 'sip-files0037.tif'
49cfec61c73e4faccde37dd9f26b8a0a
222966220517725dd938454ea203fc54a10a75e6
describe
'549' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWK' 'sip-files0037.txt'
b94bf311944bcef93c1ff3e92b9b4765
bde1286197ad74fcc22a9cf11fc14cfba3f0f1b5
describe
'8497' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWL' 'sip-files0037thm.jpg'
cb0b8a3f97819be3a3500408e26ba4de
c55973292b8ec870c538d15893774c6f11c41107
describe
'529153' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWM' 'sip-files0038.jp2'
6e9a605a2402be92c62306393d7166ed
7864e5d3193464062bc16343694728c3801c1d61
describe
'125104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWN' 'sip-files0038.jpg'
548e6c26d10a4aac6fc717544315c0b7
e587fcfdc4ca79560708589a59bc8a14ab0eff7b
describe
'43885' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWO' 'sip-files0038.pro'
35601ff15ca40344d1b21bae23447346
b479a1ed2145a08cc03108d065801b1a6790164b
describe
'38360' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWP' 'sip-files0038.QC.jpg'
0995e01c1d2360bddf426e4d8f629179
59698afd2681eb121740150709ef211eebcb1fed
describe
'4255400' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWQ' 'sip-files0038.tif'
7d8e8695105f187409991aeb417350b5
33eeda4249f4015c6fb8fd114d4c4ae35c21afac
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWR' 'sip-files0038.txt'
8eb7d274f911a7653c5ff30bbf07a422
9a71a19d394ad91e2ba475619074c93bf27264b4
describe
'9209' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWS' 'sip-files0038thm.jpg'
2f80da170f4f8d07d6ebb792c03b14e5
4017666ee68bd3cd534487c03cb6fd9ad2b4f678
describe
'529039' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWT' 'sip-files0039.jp2'
87fc113f93fb33df57c8c3b85db9708a
b2b2636a33c604f74a307c339d60e9b4f8744898
describe
'150422' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWU' 'sip-files0039.jpg'
c8d436615284cd438ed8b313f5df2be4
e4d683380db5e0c1ddb71a59b01496467283f59c
describe
'8954' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWV' 'sip-files0039.pro'
fc363c44e5fe7d64e22f3a85e7f0fb5e
30d6154686ab8851e18907de95a200275c960e1e
describe
'37387' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWW' 'sip-files0039.QC.jpg'
9510316f27a5a5304b81fafb432b9773
ae35f7e3d93538b3a33843821047e4aebe4162f7
describe
'4255372' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWX' 'sip-files0039.tif'
f9eb06d5ac55aebf6af882c75a0645a1
3c28d04d49ac6862458e902e2dac55def8b291cf
describe
'387' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWY' 'sip-files0039.txt'
b71b8a9583c41668a4ed9edbb23ca186
4808e9cd0ec1036e9603a39ebfaff635b76b7f3a
describe
'9081' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANWZ' 'sip-files0039thm.jpg'
5e4166c5de2da43de2a52dbe6e52c50d
c038933ffd9a4b9af99db1f6bf70c34c690a4562
describe
'529165' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXA' 'sip-files0040.jp2'
6f4aa21136a682e40e99279143b1c7ea
22151e3c44583b150065057eeb484e9c5ece370f
describe
'129725' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXB' 'sip-files0040.jpg'
52b92088458c12285b200be5c9c04a90
23d8e73813dea91da62348a603928fa3353f9141
describe
'26325' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXC' 'sip-files0040.pro'
736c82832cb8dac2806658a0ec14dae7
8eca519081060fbb6ea091a29b048560d2408ad9
describe
'36471' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXD' 'sip-files0040.QC.jpg'
d006e1ab50610293084fb5c8a242b815
eeb1de721197c80c598eb3c42c74b7cba844dfaf
describe
'4255452' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXE' 'sip-files0040.tif'
5360b2c0d57f4a0da3e725abbd9443a0
ee963d4d5630a359e042ef9eaacbf0238606b470
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXF' 'sip-files0040.txt'
08ce84b40766338bc911ceca072b16aa
ed9128ec586b9a141da7853e42830a3e8d56eee8
describe
'8736' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXG' 'sip-files0040thm.jpg'
6ef52b4e6a3df812847cadfc0a2910bd
f11362c72863e8435ec127ae6073a745be3e1b74
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXH' 'sip-files0041.jp2'
0a1b9d5ac5b4d9e8c381730a8612cc63
aebfceaf9a3347b789ff3965b2231c4391e3447b
describe
'131826' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXI' 'sip-files0041.jpg'
a36d787d3244fc20538ccfc1878ac1e4
021d888c21666adb7ee521fee4c8619530688f14
describe
'25305' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXJ' 'sip-files0041.pro'
df7756634f26d6a591c558c9f0391d4d
6b4f04858c8e2e16d9ebbd174d16c64923d176dd
describe
'36459' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXK' 'sip-files0041.QC.jpg'
cd6c66b8891e375163582d778e653902
ff0d8322bd2363e3d7edbc23a952a28d417fcdde
describe
'4255688' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXL' 'sip-files0041.tif'
576a509c51d58665fc2ef7355529d971
38d83dfcc6660098f56d56a5408ab47c702966d6
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXM' 'sip-files0041.txt'
6e91dd6c0ac0f6f753b01509c2f128f9
b47007ba8cbb300a2605b2709a773a5bd26663c6
describe
'9030' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXN' 'sip-files0041thm.jpg'
2b36e8b95353367063d8d58e2aabf7f8
784d77a9848bab17f07b24948c54b9d5112c5833
describe
'529173' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXO' 'sip-files0042.jp2'
0ee3192d22cd5a1473cd23d82f914465
b41eb510ccf6aa55975b1efc5f1ced884523e6fe
describe
'134196' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXP' 'sip-files0042.jpg'
3677b759a5476913f12b4a15e9213b00
b38678a84c56935a6f30cc6ea2bf8141a54bab57
describe
'32102' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXQ' 'sip-files0042.pro'
e8fc05d6fb45c6abca22a21f850c154a
d97be781cf8d0ec3b6330a8fe8a7fddd284f23cb
describe
'37062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXR' 'sip-files0042.QC.jpg'
8b9b3620c57dce683a4710af88705128
af96ccf24efa51e2637cc398e08b5ee6b0be88b1
describe
'4255364' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXS' 'sip-files0042.tif'
28e318e0d3dacfad803b6ba370bfd4f8
b38a21caca27577618decdbd437162147f369fc7
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXT' 'sip-files0042.txt'
1084fc984038ccdbbb7c24f19d9f499f
96098e4625d7b0b2811b736e75414757a1567060
'2011-10-20T04:56:36-04:00'
describe
'8769' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXU' 'sip-files0042thm.jpg'
5ac8fb58e7057aaabea3bf6ea06bb546
882d5f8e4dc9cd5256a3ea021556131ea5d82a95
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXV' 'sip-files0043.jp2'
1ecf952f7dca26585f3f3c9039947431
c770e7ebcd9c9da9fb8352c78df6873c7730bd9a
describe
'134515' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXW' 'sip-files0043.jpg'
7a3e40267328f8f15ba68abebb983b51
f507176aa656aa133aaaa4e2f030c8086534b8ca
describe
'27777' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXX' 'sip-files0043.pro'
95cc6954ee1d00f017185008ecc2298c
875ec21a250bf0fa8a034e8b48b9de495035ef1b
describe
'36576' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXY' 'sip-files0043.QC.jpg'
2a2e8c6cf7457f4b8161178b542c9103
121383ace3fe9011a835425907d9f34bc1ed7ef0
describe
'4255104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANXZ' 'sip-files0043.tif'
17be0cf976f7ac114b214bc3b84e75d8
c64a61b211b7135a6b285096a937285050e6283c
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYA' 'sip-files0043.txt'
258f60d64b5990fdbee7e79abec671e1
bd3068afb742991362b1b06a59e9ac093d1a2689
describe
'9038' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYB' 'sip-files0043thm.jpg'
7aa7782a495c4b0cf1cd121876cc4eab
70f5b7f0d7d748b6db91cfa8893a577fc97ffb28
describe
'529190' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYC' 'sip-files0044.jp2'
aa4dcc3ad4e2bf6fe781da6bb4df5abb
06ce4494c59bd0173df24e6d333222f12f092af7
describe
'148886' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYD' 'sip-files0044.jpg'
e90463ac916a4bacba4f555d018f793c
ee9664c98feb17fbd2af5a66a77e4fc75460c842
describe
'29744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYE' 'sip-files0044.pro'
0b9935afe147e4b96e1f4b57a90e7656
cc3cd879f1af0d6017929db2a983fc2c6d5b2280
describe
'40538' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYF' 'sip-files0044.QC.jpg'
962865991b5db1875f467abb048b29b7
37e2f7be867ceec3d52dde89e006a4b5fe829f82
describe
'4256404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYG' 'sip-files0044.tif'
7c410f99aff0875e15ff2a13e3becd64
c3686f4c13bc8808f20de13bfe38bf0e8770ed5f
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYH' 'sip-files0044.txt'
ce77c7191815fd337e4631b9b363cecc
38231563f84aba5621d27dedc6d3bcaa1159123b
describe
Invalid character
'9964' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYI' 'sip-files0044thm.jpg'
a88a62e5bceee6af574fdd05ea7aa30d
dda563f7539b1a155c270e8bf3058480a0ca13de
describe
'608490' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYJ' 'sip-files0047.jp2'
a40775d12f52a8e78bd553fee1890f17
475bcdf30c36d2c1c7758ecc941b96993e420290
describe
'79326' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYK' 'sip-files0047.jpg'
60aab05799d8a836df8072167b508a6c
02715a3e721ffd37458c2e1287e159ea374fe4aa
describe
'16842' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYL' 'sip-files0047.QC.jpg'
b3dafb0fd307e090d1fe4a5382cadec9
879e41e4d55c15d7b3618cdde61e6dce17636d5f
describe
'14620876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYM' 'sip-files0047.tif'
5a198e462469c963965809766466e3fb
121d13a72033d66ac8ba63ff7dddc56dddf0fc29
describe
'3757' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYN' 'sip-files0047thm.jpg'
4693d24a0e05705d3445f25c1795ed71
fe5ab52190d19eefb15331f65cac98fb0f06b5e9
describe
'619064' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYO' 'sip-files0048.jp2'
84c5075a44489463965acad3dfe7b008
ba5d9d6836ba7a1d8ede2534308cb38e6defd1ae
describe
'158739' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYP' 'sip-files0048.jpg'
06698526f7395da86d2a511e21ce4d53
d0c01b171ec984e94ccf555e5c39b8671c5434bf
describe
'457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYQ' 'sip-files0048.pro'
a31cf4e493bd66659d810c8e9574a409
a0bb1e893fa024f7ed936eeae71b310a508ef354
describe
'37359' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYR' 'sip-files0048.QC.jpg'
37fcb283379e89d5c6290a08a1bbf6eb
69ac45620bc3d2012712bad934ca72dcd167c396
describe
'14881900' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYS' 'sip-files0048.tif'
e6a36eefe144707890987ab06bffa7c2
67c12d2010ee8306f3f0c8d67e15fbfa46148e62
describe
'142' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYT' 'sip-files0048.txt'
1d098ad5c89806c82dd70680d03666ef
3af902ae004492539e0254761920f919bcc0e7b9
describe
'9370' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYU' 'sip-files0048thm.jpg'
0b599712dd0ddca4adb0202c71d1aed4
c82bf979aa343dc8887881ec78b04a022c5fc695
describe
'23' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYV' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
76add17c7561012569fc592a242757d3
26115e13f1589791cdfeaf304a6dd5e29e481e6a
describe
'81783' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYW' 'sip-filesUF00081065_00001.mets'
3fe70e318e34eb007d081dc6189be71f
5c4af42edf0d4e6abee3060d705a644417b85437
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T08:01:34-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'103023' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAESfileF20080328_AAANYZ' 'sip-filesUF00081065_00001.xml'
e0ee8d71480a93919474a13930c19f12
211da376d34710ef484912b81157fde799e099f0
describe
'2013-12-19T08:01:35-05:00'
xml resolution