Citation
Swallow-tails and skippers

Material Information

Title:
Swallow-tails and skippers
Creator:
Dale, Darley, 1848-1931
Francis, Lucy ( Illustrator )
Morrison and Gibb ( Publisher )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
The Religious Tract Society
Manufacturer:
Morrison and Gibb
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
158, [6] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Butterflies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Teachers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Caterpillars -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Students -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Darley Dale ; with a coloured frontispiece by Miss Lucy Francis.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026664215 ( ALEPH )
ALG5435 ( NOTIS )
190846771 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library

Rm B bad





The Misses Maughans School,

5 RANDOLPH CLIFF,

_SESSIO N 1890- 9/

we

la LL 157/





SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS





1 Swallow-tail. 2. Red Admiral. 3 & 3a. Grizzled Skipper. 4, Dingy Skipper.
5 & 5a. Small Skipper. 6. Large Skipper. 6a. (Female) Large Skipper.



SWALLOW-TAILS

AND

SKIPPERS

BY

DARLEY DALE

AUTHOR OF ‘THE GREAT AUK’S EGGS,’ ETC.

With a Coloured Frontispiece
BY
MISS LUCY FRANCIS

LONDON
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY

56 PATERNosTER Row, 65 St. Pavu’s CHURCHYARD
AND 164 PrccADILLyY





SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

——90——

CHAPTER I.

‘Child of the sun, pursue thy rapturous flight,
Mingling with her thou lov’st in fields of light.

Yet wert thou once a worm, a thing that crept
On the base earth, then wrought a tomb and slept.
And such is man ; soon from his cell of clay

To burst a seraph in the blaze of day.’—Rovzrs.

| A\R. PALMER'S was a private school, the
| numbers were limited to twenty, and it



was the boast of Mrs. Palmer, who was
a young and pretty woman, that the boys were as
happy at school as they were at home ; In fact, she
looked upon them as her family, for she had no

children of her own, and always spoke of her



6 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

husband’s pupils as ‘my boys. Needless to say
that the boys all but worshipped her, and to be in
disgrace with her, when such a rare occurrence did
take place, was a far more terrible misfortune than
the severest punishment Mr. Palmer ever inflicted.
The Palmers lived at Brighton, in a large house
_ facing the sea, at the extreme end of Kemp Town :
the schoolroom was built out at the back of the
house, with which it was connected by means of a
long covered passage; there was a gymnasium and
a tennis-court, and these occupied the space which
was intended for a garden. Mrs. Palmer, however,
contented herself with a conservatory, and never
erudged the boys the piece of ground, though she
dearly loved flowers, having lived in the country
until her marriage.

The boys were assembled in the schoolroom half-
an-hour before preparation-time one evening at the
end of April. It was the first day of the summer
term, and those who had been away for the Easter
holidays had only just returned. The noise and
hubbub, when they found themselves all together
again, and without the restraining influence of any

master, were tremendous.



SWALLOW-TLTAILS AND SKIPPERS. 7

Suddenly a tall handsome boy of fourteen,
evidently the dux of the school, who had been
leaning against the chimney - piece, shouted out,
‘Silence! Just listen here, boys.’ As he spoke he
held up a small notice-board his eyes had lighted
on, and read as follows:

‘Mrs. Palmer, wishing to encourage the study of
natural history, has kindly promised a prize of
books, to the value of five pounds, to be awarded to
the boy who shall produce the best collection of
British butterflies at the end of the midsummer
term next year. The butterflies must be bond fide
collected by some boy in this school, no bought
specimens will be admitted, and the manner in
which they are arranged and labelled will be taken
into consideration in awarding the prize. The
prize books will be limited to works on Natural
History, but beyond this restriction the winner
will be allowed to select what he pleases.’

‘Three cheers for Mrs. Palmer! hip, hip, hurrah !’
was the unanimous response to this announcement ;
and when the excitement had to some extent
subsided, there arose a general appeal to Lionel

Neville, the first speaker, to read the notice again.



8 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

Neville threw his thick, wavy hair off his brow
with a shake of his head, a trick he had, and,
handing the notice to a quiet little boy in the
background, said, ‘Let Martin read it this time ; he
is more likely to win it than any of us. Here,
Martin.’ .

‘Except you, Dux; it is safe to be you or Martin,’
was the general answer as Martin advanced to the
front.

They were certainly a great contrast, these two,
Martin and Neville. In age Neville had the
advantage by one year only, though, as he was
a tall, fine lad for his age, while Martin was small
and delicate, he looked to be the senior by several
years. Neville was handsome, with dark, flashing
eyes, and a bright, happy expression, which seemed
to say he took life rather easily. He had an
easy manner, and would have been equally at home in
a crowded drawing-room among his elders, as he was
here in the little circle where he was the acknow-
ledged king. Martin, on the contrary, was shy and
retiring, with a nervous manner; he was pale and
delicate-looking, and, a casual observer would have
said, plain, but this would have been unjust, for he



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 9

already possessed that highest kind of beauty
which is only seen in perfection late in life, when
culture and study have increased it,—the beauty of
intellect. His whole face was lighted up with pleasure
now as he re-read the notice to the eager throng of
listeners.

‘Are you going in for it, Dux?’ asked a round-:
cheeked, merry-faced boy named Strickland, the
pickle of-the school.

‘Rather! I know nothing about butterflies, no
more than I do of Sanskrit, but I shall certainly
have a try, for the fun of the thing; some of you
little fellows who have no chance yourselves will
help me, I daresay,’ said Neville.

Enthusiastic proffers of help from at least a
dozen small boys.

‘Easy, my friends!’ cried Strickland ; ‘ just wait
a moment. I have a proposition to make, but
first let me ask a question. Is there any aspiring
youth here who knows a butterfly from a moth?
When I say knows, I mean, of course, knows the
scientific difference between them. . Now don’t
all speak at once, but those who do hold up their
hands.’



10 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

One little brown hand, belonging to Willy
Martin, was the solitary answer to this appeal.

‘I thought as much; but before I go any further
in placing my resolution before this meeting,
perhaps Martin will kindly enlighten your ignor-
ance. Observe, I say your ignorance; needless to
add, I know all about the matter myself.’

Derisive cheers and shouts of ‘Tell us, then.’

‘My natural modesty and retiring disposition
prevent me, but Martin will, I am sure, throw a
glimmer of light on your darkened understandings,
and then to my proposal. Now, Martin, what is
the scientific difference between a moth and a
butterfly 2’

‘There are several ’—began Martin.

‘Gently, Martin, break it to them by degrees ;
they'll never bear it all at once,’ said Strickland.

‘Be quiet, Strick, I want to hear what Martin
has to say, said Neville.

‘First there are the antenne, in butterflies ’"—

‘Speak English, Martin; no one here knows
what antenne are except you and I,’ said the incor-
rigible Strickland.

‘Don’t be an idiot, Strick; we all know the



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. II

antennee are the feelers on the animal’s head. What
about them, -Martin ?’

‘Well, the antenne of butterflies always have a
little knob at the end, those of moths have not;
and moths can fold them up and hide them under
their wings when they are asleep, but butterflies
can’t. Then butterflies always fly by day, never by
night, and very rarely in rainy weather, whereas
most moths are nocturnal in their habits ; butter-
flies turn their wings upwards when they are rest-
ing, and moths turn theirs downwards and fold
them round their bodies. I don’t remember any
more differences just now, said Martin.

‘Quite enough, my dear fellow, for our feeble
minds. I happen to know one other myself,
though: butterflies have waists, and moths have
not; of course I could put that fact into scieutific
language if I chose, but no one would understand
me if I did. Now for my idea. I propose. that, as
there is only one prize, and it is morally certain
Dux or Martin will win it, it is useless for any of
us to try; so I vote we divide into two parties,
and let each side do its utmost for its chief;

there'll be plenty to do, you know, collecting



12 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

butterflies and caterpillars. What do you all say to
my plan ?’ :

They all had so much to say, and said it so
noisily, that it was some minutes before it was
clearly understood that the plan was thoroughly
approved of; after which it was decided Neville
and Martin should in turns choose their partisans,
and this they proceeded at once to do, Neville
allowing Martin to have first choice. Martin at
once chose Strickland as his lieutenant ; knowing
his propensity for practical joking, he preferred to
have him as a friend rather than as an opponent.

The boys were now divided into two gangs of
ten each, and stood on opposite sides of the room;
when Neville stepped into the midst, and proposed
that every boy should now promise faithfully two
things. .

‘First, that he will renounce the’— began
Strickland.

‘Silence, Strick! don’t be profane.’

‘I beg your pardon; my religious mind at once
reverted to the Catechism when you spoke of
promises,’

‘Nonsense ! do be serious. I want every fellow



| SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 13

now to promise that he will bring every butterfly
and caterpillar or chrysalis he finds to his chief.
Of course I take it for granted we are all going to
do our best to find all we can. And in the next
place to promise he will willingly undertake any
work which may assist his chief in winning the
prize.’

The required promises were duly made, and
Neville, who hated trouble of any kind, then asked
lazily what was to be done next.

‘I should suggest we get some literature on the
subject. I have White’s Selborne; can any one
beat that ?’ said Strickland.

‘I have one very good book on butterflies, said
Martin, :

‘Happy thought, Strick! of course we must
have books. Ill write to my people to-night, and
tell them to send me at once the best books out
on butterflies, with coloured illustrations. You
can ,identify the creatures at a glance then. I
can’t be bothered to wade through a volume every
time some youngster brings me a specimen. By
the way, you boys on my side, I shall expect you
always to know the name of everything you bring



14 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

me; it will be splendid practice for you, and will
save me a heap of trouble. You'll have to get
some cheap editions of your own. I shan’t allow .
any one not in the first to touch my best books —
when they come. Martin and his first-class
fellows may have the use of them.’

‘Thank you, Dux; that is just like you; but TL
invest in a regular good one for our side, if Willy
likes, said Jack Strickland.

‘I can’t afford to get one; but mine is a very
good book ; it tells us everything we shall want to
know, only it has no coloured pictures; but it is
awfully good of Dux to lend us his,’ said Martin.

‘Yes; but well have one of our own. Those
other fellows are sure to be wanting Neville’s just
when we do. Besides, I suppose that will be the
only investment we shall have to make ?’

‘The first, but not the only one; the first use of
the books will be to tell us what else we shall
want, There are heaps of things I can think of:
cabinets to keep the creatures in, a tray to put the
collection in for the prize, boxes for the cater-
pillars ’—began Neville.

“All those I shall make for myself. That will

\ a NA

~ t
} \

Re



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 15

be one of the things I shall want you to help me
in, said Martin.

‘Then there are butterfly-nets to catch them in,
poisons to poison them with, and, I expect, a
regular paraphernalia for mounting them with ;
isn’t there, Martin ?’

‘They advertise a host of things, but very few
are absolutely necessary: for instance, cork saddles
are capital things to set the butterflies out on ; but
strips of cardboard, which you can cut yourself, do
nearly as well. The -setting-bristle any one can
make; it is only a cat’s whisker, mounted by a
small pin on a piece of cork; it is a necessary
thing for pushing the insect into its place while
setting out; the proper pins, too, are necessaries,
but not expensive ones. Luckily for me, an
ordinary darning-needle makes a very good setting-
needle; and as for nets, you can spend as much
money as you like on them, Dux; but I have an
old cae upstairs somewhere which I expect will do
for me. I shall go in more for caterpillars. You
get much more perfect specimens if you rear them
yourself than by catching the butterfly, which is
almost sure to get damaged in taking,’ .



16 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

‘But, my dear fellow, you might rear a hundred
caterpillars, and only one, perhaps, be worth keep-
ing, objected Strickland.

‘No, you might not, if you knew what the cater-
pillars were ; and I should try and find out before
I decided to rear them; they vary as much as the
butterflies.’

‘How did you come to’ know all this, Martin ?
You are quite up in butterflyology already.’

‘No, Iam not. I learnt the little I know from
an uncle of mine, who has a very good collection.
Look here, Dux; don’t you think it would be a
good plan if we each call our party after a family
of butterflies ?’

This suggestion met with universal approval,
and led to a warm discussion on the merits of the
different names, the generality being in favour of
Red and White Admirals; but Martin would not
agree to this, because the Red Admiral is only a
species, not a family. ‘What do you say to
Ringlets and Hairstreaks ?’

‘All very well if we had three parties; but
Ringlets divorced from Tortoiseshells would be a

very ragged lot, said Strickland.



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 17

‘I can’t think of any more families. Oh yes,
there are the Skippers; that is a very good name.
Well be the Skippers; that is decided. Now
then, Dux, old fellow, what is your side to be
called ?’ said Martin.

‘Apollos or Peacocks, either suits me,’ said
Neville.

‘They are only species; and Apollo is not
British, according to Newman. I have it, Neville;
what do you say to Swallow-tails? You are the
only one of us who lives up to them. Will you
be the Swallow-tails??

‘Bravo, Martin! adopted nem. con., at least I
advise no one to contradict it, for it is striking
seven; we shall have Newman here directly. We
will have another meeting to-morrow to make
some more arrangements. Here comes Newman.’

Mr. Newman was the tutor, a quiet, studious
“man, who had never succeeded in making the boys
love him, and who took but little interest in them
or their pursuits, so long as they. prepared their
lessons carefully ; and with his entrance the butter-
flies were forgotten, and the attention of the boys

turned to Latin and Euclid.
B



18 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

Another meeting was held the next day, but
they agreed little more could be done until
Neville’s books arrived at the énd of the week,
after a brief study of which on Saturday afternoon,
he ordered all the Swallow-tails to be in readi-
ness to accompany him on a hunting expedition
for caterpillars and butterflies on the following
Wednesday, their first half-holiday.

Meanwhile, on Sunday evening, he and Martin
were invited to supper with Mr. and Mrs. Palmer ;
it was a regular institution for two or three boys to
be invited to supper on Sunday ; and from the fact
of Mrs. Palmer choosing the two head boys the first
Sunday, they concluded she had something to say
to them about her prize, and they were right; for
when Mr. Palmer had retired, as he always did
after supper, leaving the boys to the chat they
enjoyed as much as any part of the entertainment,
Mrs. Palmer immediately introduced the subject.

‘Well, boys, so I hear you have divided the
school: into two parties, and have already settled
that my prize is to be won by one of you 2?

“Yes, I hope you don’t object to the plan, Mrs.

Palmer, but they all said directly none of them had



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 19

a chance against us, and already our sides take as
much interest in the prize as if each boy was
working for himself”

‘No, I don’t object; on the contrary, I think it is
rather a good plan; it is certainly good for the
other boys, for it is very unselfish of them to work
for you two instead of for themselves, and I am sure
the rivalry between you and Willy will be amicable’

‘Oh yes! Willy and I are too old friends to be
jealous even of such a splendid prize as this,’

‘What made you choose butterflies, Mrs. Palmer 2’
asked Willy.

-“ Well, several things, Willy; I know a little
about them myself,—a very little, not half so much
as you do very likely, 80 please don’t put me through
my facings. Then they are such beautiful creatures,
these “nurslings of a day,” that I thought it would
do all you boys good to learn to love their beauty ;
for I never think boys have such an innate love of
beauty as girls, and they are too full of cricket and
football to pause to think of the exquisité loveliness
of a little butterfly; they would almost think it
beneath their dignity to do go.

‘Yes, I believe we should ; we should call it frivo-



20 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

lous and girlish, and girls are such idiots—I don’t
mean women, you know, Mrs. Palmer, said Neville.

‘I know, Leo, said Mrs. Palmer, smiling, for she
was still only a girl in years. ‘But I had another
reason for choosing butterflies, for, while the pursuit
of any branch of Natural History cannot fail, I
think, to teach us. more of the goodness and
lovingkindness of God,—and to know Him better
is the real end of all knowledge which is worth
having—there are so many special lessons to be
learnt from butterflies. The doctrine of the resur-
rection of the body is so beautifully shadowed forth
in the life of the butterfly: first the caterpillar,
whose sole thought seems to be how to get food,
the type of our grovelling life on earth; then the
intermediate state of the chrysalis, or pupa, when
the creature is swathed in its own silky web and
lies dormant, and, to all appearance, dead—this
corresponds with the sleep of death; and lastly,
the perfect state of the imago, when the winged
creature, decked in its brilliant colours, bursts the
case which held it imprisoned, and soars aloft,
joyous and beautiful, no longer to be careful and

troubled about its daily food, as when a caterpillar,



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 21

but now an emblem of perfect joy, and of the
human soul when it rises from the dead, happy and
glorious in its perfect life. The analogy might be
drawn out at much greater length than this; for
instance, as I daresay you know, the caterpillar is
subject to many changes, certainly troublesome and
probably painful to it. These changes are types of
our troubles in this life of change; its incessant
eating, and its absorbing care for its own caterpillar
life, are only too like our anxiety and interest in
the things of this world. Then the apparent death-
like state of the chrysalis is very significant of that
intermediate state of which we know so little; in
fact, all that we really know is that the soul is
alive, though the body be dead. Then. the glorious
beauty of the perfect butterfly speaks to us of that
glorious body which, we are told, shall be ours
hereafter. I have often thought, too, that the
compound eye of the butterfly, with its seventeen
hundred lenses, each of which, naturalists think,
has the properties of a single eye, is a beautiful
emblem of the illumination of mind we may hope
to enjoy when “we shall know even as we are

known ;” for, as light has ever been considered the



22 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

type of knowledge, so is bodily vision an emblem
of mental perception, and one of the great joys of
heaven will, I think, be our increased mental
powers,—an eternal joy, for they will be ever
growing, a joy of which we have a faint foretaste
here when we feel we have made real intelleétual
progress. But I am reading you a lecture, which I
think I may truly say is not usually a fault of
mine. What are you thinking of, Willy ?’

‘I was wondering why the Greeks had the same
word, Psyche, for the soul and for a butterfly 2’

‘Because even they saw the analogy between
the two: you know they often carved a butterfly
flying away on their tombstones, evidently meaning
it for a symbol of the soul flying to its home. But
it is getting late, and I have not said half I had to
say to you. Whose side is Temple, the new boy, on ?’

‘Mine, said Neville. ‘He seems a sharp little
fellow enough.’ :

‘So he is, I believe ; he has a very good character,
but he is terribly careless. I hope you'll look after
him, Leo, or he will get into trouble with Mr.
Newman, I fear. There is the prayer-bell, we
must go.’





CHAPTER IL

‘The lovely toy so fiercely sought

Has lost its charm by being caught,
For every touch that wooed its stay
Has brushed its brightest hues away.

?

—Bynon.

various shapes and sizes arrived for



Neville; butterfly-nets, umbrella - nets
for sweeping, collecting-boxes for larvee, cages,
lanterns, and phials, cork saddles, pins and braces
enough to set out a museumful of butterflies,
bottles containing chloroform, carbolic acid, ben-
zole, and various other preparations supposed to
be useful in killing or preserving specimens, and,
lastly, a very handsome cabinet, which, as Jack
Strickland said, quite took one’s breath away, and

made one feel like the Queen of Sheba when she
23



24 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

saw all King Solomon’s treasures. Mr. Palmer
confiscated one or two-of the poisons, promising to
let Neville have them when required, and at the
same time comforting the Skippers, whose hearts
were rather failing them, by saying he thought the
Swallow-tails were beginning at the wrong end in
buying a cabinet before they had any butterflies to
put in it.

‘Dux, my boy, there is a very old proverb which
says, “ First catch your hare, and then cook it:” that
is the plan we Skippers mean to go upon,’ said
Strickland, as Neville distributed some of his
paraphernalia to his flock on starting for their
first butterfly-hunt.

‘All right, Strick! you go and catch your hare
this afternoon, and we'll see what our side can do.’

‘If you don’t bring home a cabinetful of butter-
flies and pails of caterpillars with all those nets
and contrivances, it will be a shame, that is all I
have to say. Here we have only two nets and some
pill-boxes.’ .

‘Never mind, Strick, we have some sticks and
an umbrella or two, they do as well for beating for

larvee as those nets of Dux’s. But now, before we



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 25

start, if all the Skippers. are here, I want to give
you a few hints. And first, please remember our
principal object to-day is caterpillars, not butterflies,
though, of course, if we come across any rare ones,
we may as well try and secure them, but it is no
‘use wasting time chasing Common Skippers or
Common Blues; it will be far better to get them—
because, of course, we must have specimens of every
kind we can get—in the larva state. Now, what I
want you to do is to open an umbrella under a
_ bushi, and then shake the caterpillars gently into it,—
your pocket-handkerchief is big enough to spread
under a small plant; then pick out the caterpillars
and put them into your boxes, but mind always put a
leaf of the bush you found the larve on into the
hox with them; you may put as many caterpillars
into the box as it will hold comfortably until we
eet home, but mind, never mix the larve of different
bushes. Do you all understand that clearly ?’ said
the head of the Skippers.

‘Yes, yes!’ shouted the boys, who were all’
impatient to be off.

‘All right. Well, now, I want two of the little
boys, Wood and Trevor will do, to get a stock of



26 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

all the leaves we find any larve on, because, you
know, they are very dainty creatures to feed; for
instance, the Fritillaries, which feed on the wild
violet, won’t look at a cabbage leaf. You may come
across some chrysalides; of course, if you do you'll
box them. I shall take a magnifying-elass, and see
if I can’t find some eggs. And now let us be off,
said Martin, whose pale face was flushed with excite-
ment in anticipation of the sport he promised himself.

‘Isn’t it rather hopeless work looking for butter-
flies’ eggs ? they are such tiny things, Willy, asked
Strickland.

‘It would be unless you knew exactly where to
look for them, but I think I do, and anyhow I am
sure to come across some with this glass, in beat-
ing bushes. By the way, Strick, I want you to
help me to make some braces for setting out
any butterflies we may catch; I can’t afford to
buy saddles and braces, like Dux.’

‘To be sure I will! if I don’t bring you a saddle
‘and braces which will lick Dux’s into fits, my
name is not Strickland, said Jack, as the boys
started to take the train to a place a few miles out
of Brighton.



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 27

It was in the early summer, and on the long
days the boys were allowed to be out till eight ;
Mr. Newman went with them, but when they
reached their destination he left them to their own
devices, only telling them they were all to be at
the station again at a certain time, whereupon the
Skippers took themselves off in one direction, —
and the Swallow-tails disappeared in the opposite.
Their time was limited to three hours, and it was
wonderful how quickly it fled, now that they had
an absorbing interest in their walk; indeed, the
Skippers were only just back in time to catch the
train, when they were bundled by the tutor into a
compartment by themselves, and when they reached
Brighton they were obliged to walk in twos, so
they could not compare notes till they got home.

‘Well, Dux, what luck 2’ asked Strickland.

‘Splendid. I caught a Red Admiral as my first
prize.

‘Draw it mild, Dux! Red Admirals don’t come
out till August, do they, Willy ?’ said Strickland.

‘This year’s don’t, but they hybernate as butter-
flies, so very likely Dux is right. May I see it?’

‘Yes, here he is, Lupton Minor, run and get me



28 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

my British Butterfly book; I am sure it is a Red
Admiral’ ;

‘Oh yes, it is, Dux, and a beauty too. I wonder
he is included in the Angle-wings, for only the
fore-wings are angled.’ ;

‘Angled! I call them scalloped; but I angled
very well to catch him so neatly—he is not injured
_ at all; that chloroform concern of mine is capital.
Now I must mount him,’

‘You ought to get another if you can, Dux; the
under side of Atalanta is so beautiful, such pretty
colours, grey and pink and brown, What else
have you got?’

‘Two Peacocks, some Tortoiseshells, and some
little blue and white and brown things, which I
have told my first-class Swallow-tails to look out,
and keep any that are worth having. Oh, I
forgot! we have found a White Admiral?

‘Bravo, Dux! why, that is the best of all, it is
so rare; it is rather damaged, though, I see; that is
the worst of taking them in the butterfly state.

‘Yes, but my plan is to catch every one you see ;
you can’t tell at a distance what they are, and you
may hit on a very rare one, and perhaps catch it



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 29

without injuring; anyhow, a damaged specimen is
better than none. But now let us see your lot.’

‘We have only a few butterflies, but we have
plenty of caterpillars, a few chrysalides, some eggs,
and a stock of food for the caterpillars, so we have
not done go badly, though it does not look much
by the side of your spoil.’

‘Did any of you young Swallow-tails think to

bring home some leaves for the caterpillars?’
asked Neville.
' But it appeared no one had done so, except one
little fellow, who had brought home some mulberry
leaves it is to be feared he had poached from a
garden, under the impression that all caterpillars
should be fed like silkworms, an idea his chief
seemed to share.

‘Bravo, little Gordon! you go and feed them now
before supper. ,

‘But, Dux, surely you know caterpillars won't
eat just anything; they each have a special food, that
is the wonderful part of it; every species of butter-
fly lays its eggs on the particular bush or tree or
grass ,that its caterpillar likes best, and they won’t
thrive. on any other.- If your caterpillars are not



30 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. -

put on their native leaves they won’t live, I am
afraid.

‘Thunder and lightning, Willy! why didn’t you,
tell me that? However, my caterpillars must take
their chance, I can’t humour their fads and fancies ;
they must eat what they can get or starve, as we
have to do when we don’t like our grub here,
which, I am bound to say, is very seldom. How
did you kill your specimens, Willy ?’

‘Gave them a nip with my finger and thumb
just under the wings; you can do it through the
net, and death is instantaneous if you do it
properly. Your butterflies would have travelled
home better, Dux, if you had pinned them into one
of your cork-lined boxes; one pin is sufficient, it
keeps them firm, and they don’t shake about and

_lose the scales of their wings.’

‘What do you mean by the scales, please,
Martin?’ asked a small boy, who was looking on,
all eyes and ears.

‘You call it the fluff or bloom, I daresay, but
if you were to put it under a microscope you
would see the wing of a butterfly is covered with

little tiny scales set in rows overlapping each other,



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 31

so that one row throws a shadow over the next,
and in this way the beautiful shading of the wings
is obtained; the outside scales are longer, more
like feathers or plumes. All the colours of the
Wings are in these scales; if you rub them off
nothing but a thin membrane stretched over veins,
like a fly’s wing, remains; see here, in this damaged
specimen, said Willy, gently removing the scales
off a butterfly to show the truth of his words.

‘If you please, Martin, Strickland says if you'll

-come into the class-room, he has got the braces
and saddles ready, and he’ll help you to set out our
specimens,’ interrupted a Skipper.

‘May I come and take a lesson, Willy, before I
do mine?’ asked Neville; and on Martin’s assent
they went to.the class-room, where they found
Strickland gravely seated at a table before a donkey
saddle he had been at great pains to borrow; a pile
of braces, borrowed from Skippers and Swallow-tails
indiscriminately, lay by his side, and on the top of
the saddle was perched a tiny little green Hair-
streak, at which Strickland was gazing intently.
A roar of laughter from the group of boys who had

followed their chiefs into the room made him look



. 32 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

up and ask, with a great assumption of innocence,
what amused them all so much.

‘What an idiot you are, Jack! I do wish you
would be serious. You might have made straps
enough to set all we found to-day, instead of
wasting your time in this. way. But it does not
matter, Dux; I have some braces, I'll show you how
I do the four-strap setting, if Strickland will clear
this lumber away; I may have time before the
supper-bell rings.’

So saying —while Jack pretended to grumble that
it was very hard he never did anything right, and
all his trouble was wasted, and how was he to know
a saddle meant two little pieces of cork bevelled at
the edges, and gummed on to cardboard, with a
space between for the butterfly’s body—he would not
like to ride on that saddle; or how was he to know
that little wedge-shaped pieces of cardboard were
called braces,—Willy deftly mounted a butterfly.
He first fastened a pair of braces on to a slip of
wood with mounting-pins, then he placed the butter-
fly over these, so that one brace came lengthwise
under each wing; this done, he thrust a pin through

the thorax of the insect, slanting it with the head



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 33

forwards, two more pins kept the antenne in
position, the wings were now arranged with setting-
needle and bristle, and the second pair of braces
or straps were applied over the wings, and nearer
the outer edge than the under ones,

‘There now, I shall add all we have worth keep-
ing to this piece of wood, and keep them in a well-
ventilated box till they are thoroughly dry, then I
can transfer them to the box I mean to show them
in, said Willy.

‘Box! why, we have a splendid cabinet for
ours!’ cried the Swallow-tails.

‘But you can’t mount them like Martin, shoutcd
the Skippers. .

‘I am not so sure about that, now Willy has .
~ shown me how to do it, said Dux,

‘Yes, it is all very fine of Martin; but if he is
going to put your side up to all the tips, and you
have the advantage of a splendid plant into the
bargain, whereas all our machinery is some pill-
boxes. and a few slips of cardboard and wood, I’
should like to know how we are to have a chance
of the prize, grumbled Strickland, half in earnest.

After supper Martin arranged his caterpillars in
Cc



34 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

boxes, giving them a supply of the leaves on which
they were found; but Neville was tired with his
exertions, and contented himself with ordering the
new boy Temple and little Gordon to put their
collection all together on the mulberry leaves, and
leave them to their fate. Martin also told off two
Skippers, whose duties were to be to feed the cater-
pillars; but he took good care ‘to inspect them
himself every night and morning, not trusting to
the memories of his subordinates. As might have
been supposed, by the end of the week all Neville’s
caterpillars, with the exception of one or two which
were less fanciful than the others, sickened and
died; while Martin’s throve and grew to admiration
on their natural diet.
‘Pampered creatures! do you know what any of
them are? I daresay they'll turn out common
things, not worth the trouble of keeping,’ said Neville.
‘We must have common butterflies to make the
collection complete, but I hope some of mine may
turn out prizes ; for instance, all these in this box
are Fritillaries of some kind, for they were found on
wild violets or plants of that order. See, these are

violet leaves.’



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 35

‘It seems to me you want to know botany if you
take up butterflies. I am sure I have not the
faintest idea what some of your animals are feeding
on. What's this plant now 2’

‘Lotus, or bird’s-foot trefoil; these are probably
the caterpillars of Red-horns. They all feed on
trefoils and clovers and plants of the leguminous
order—pea and bean tribe, that is. Some may be
Skippers ; they like various kinds of food?

‘Why, some of your creatures are actually feeding
on grass! What are they ?’

‘Oh, Satyrs, or perhaps Skippers ; they both prefer
grasses. I have only a few of those at present, some
I got myself. Imust get some of my Skippers to search
the grass for their namesakes to-morrow afternoon.’

“Martin, what plant do the Swallow-tails prefer ?
We want to get a specimen of one if possible,’ asked
Gordon-major.

‘Milk-parsley, I believe, is the only plant you
are likely to find Machaon on; but it is so rare in
this county I doubt your finding it; if you do, you
can feed the caterpillar on carrot leaves, so my book
says. Iam going to set the Skippers to beat the
sallows for Purple Emperors t2-morrow’



36 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

‘Do be quiet, Willy. I declare you don’t deserve
to win the prize, when you will make the Swallow-
tails a present of our only capital



information,’ put

~ “in Strickland,

‘My dear Strick, don’t pretend to be so selfish.
You know Dux would willingly share his plant with
us if I would let him,’

‘Yes; but as you won't, I think it is unfair of
me to learn all your tips, which you have had the
trouble of finding out; however, as neither I nor
any of my crew know what a sallow is, it does
not much matter in this case. Henceforth, Martin,
unless you'll accept some cases or cork saddles in
- payment, I won’t listen to your information, tempting
as it is,’ . .

‘Stuff, Dux! I like telling you the little I
know, and, after all, Mrs. Palmer’s object is to teach
us entomology ; besides, I really wish to make all
I require for my collection myself. I am not well
off, and it is far better for me to learn to do the
best I can with as few appliances as possible. You
must know the sallow, Dux; it is a willow, the
Great Goat willow, bearing catkins in the spring,

and the fruit is all covered with down in the autumn,



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 37

3

Another caterpillar I am going to search for to-
morrow is the Duke of Burgundy; he belongs to
the Dryads, and they are to be found on primrose
or cowslip leaves. Hairstreaks are to be found on
brambles, oaks, or elms; the Fritillaries on any of
the germanders or violets, the Whites on cabbages,
vetches, or wild mignonette, the Blues on the rest-
harrow, and the White Admiral on a variety of
plants.’

‘That is right, Martin. Have it all out ; you have
been through all the families now except one, the
Angle-wings,’ said Strickland.

‘Well, they are to be found on hemp-wort, elm-
wort, and hops; but there is the school bell. Tl
tell you more about caterpillars to-morrow, Dux,
when we come back from our hunt, if you like,
said Martin.







CHAPTER ITI.

Turn, tum, thy hasty foot aside,
Nor crush that helpless worm ;

The frame thy scornful thoughts deride
From G received its form,

SAY the White Admirals are a distinct

family, the only genus we have in



England,’ cried Martin.

‘And I don’t care what you say, I am certain
Red and White Admirals both belong to the Angle-
wings. I don’t profess to know much, but that
little I do know; and if any one dares to contradict
me, I'll knock him down!’ said Neville, working
himself into a passion.

To his amazement a lady’s voice behind him
answered gravely, ‘You are quite mistaken ; White

Admirals are a distinct family ;’ and, turning round,
38



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS, 39

he saw pretty Mrs. Palmer standing in the door-
way.

Neville coloured violently, partly with angcr,
partly with shame at having been caught losing his
temper by Mrs. Palmer; but the truth was, he had
been put out in the morning because he did not
know his Latin, and Martin construed a passage
correctly he failed in. Mr. Palmer had reproved
him for not working, which did not tend to improve
his temper; and this afternoon, perhaps because it
was very warm, the Swallow-tails had been lazy in
beating for caterpillars, and had allowed two or
three butterflies to escape them, which, with a little
trouble, they might have caught.

The Skippers, on the contrary, had been. very
active; and when Martin announced that he had
found a White Admiral caterpillar, this was the
last straw, and Dux replied angrily, ‘It was nothing
to make such a fuss about, as all Admirals were
common enough.’ Martin had then explained that
Red and White Admirals did not belong to the
same family, whereupon the above result.

Neville would have made his escape if he could
have done so, but Mrs. Palmer blocked the doorway,



40 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

and Martin, seeing who it was, begged her to come
in and look at the afternoon’s spoils,

‘With pleasure, if Dux will show me his too,
said Mrs. Palmer ; and Neville was obliged to comply
nosens volens,

‘I think Willy is right about the White Admiral,
she continued, taking up a piece of honeysuckle on
which a large fat caterpillar, covered with branching
“spines, was voraciously feeding. ‘And a very
clever caterpillar he is too. He has been asleep all
through the winter in the cleverest cradle of his
own making. You know the leaves of the honey-
suckle fall off during the winter; well, the cater-
pillar, young and small as he is in the autumn,
knows this too, and he also knows that if the leaves
on which he is fecding were to fall to the ground,
he would perish, so what do you think he does ?
He spins a number of fine silken threads round and
round the leaf-stalk and twig on which it is growing;
then, having first of all eaten about three-quarters
of the leaf, with the part which remains, and some
of his own silk, he makes himself a tiny cradle in
which to pass the winter. In due course the time
for the leaves to fall arrives, but the caterpillar’s

,



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS, Al

cradle only falls as far as the silken net allows it,
and there he hangs swinging in his cot snugly and
safely all through snow and frost, rain and wind,
until April, when he wakes, and eats for two
months. This one will, I think, begin to spin in a
day or two, he seems full-grown.’

‘Oh, please stay and tell us more about cater-
pillars, Mrs. Palmer,’ said Willy Martin.

‘Yes, do, please; itll be fair enough if we all
hear,’ said Strickland.

‘Iam not sure that I know as much as you
big boys do, so you must forgive me if I
tell you stale news. In the first place, all the
caterpillars of butterflies are made up of thirteen
rings, called in science segments; the head is the
first ring, and has two antenne or horns, two
feelers, two jaws, and twelve tiny eyes, as you
can see with the help of a microscope; the other
rings are made up of legs, claspers, and spiracles.’

‘What are spiracles? Don’t all speak at once,’
interrupted Strickland.

‘They are oval holes through which the cater-
pillar breathes, I think, said Martin.

‘Right, Willy. As you must have noticed



42 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

already, caterpillars vary very much in shape,
but entomologists divide them into two great
classes, Exposers and Concealers. The Exposers
are naked chrysalides; the Concealers, which are
very scarce in this country, envelop themselves in
a cocoon of silk before they change. The Exposers,
again, are divided into Suspenders and Girted. The
Suspenders hang themselves up by the tail only,
with the head downwards; the Girted are hung
by the tail and also by a rope of silk slung round
the middle of the body,’

‘But you can’t tell whether they are Suspenders
or Girted till they change to chrysalides, can you ?’
asked Strickland.

‘Oh yes, you can, because all the Suspenders
are either covered with spines or are shaped like
a slug, while the Girted are either like wood-lice
or like cylinders. The most remarkable in ap-
pearance is the Purple Emperor, which you may
find enthroned on an oak tree; he is a slug-shaped
Suspender, with two very long horns and a coronet
on his forehead, but my favourites are those fluffy,
spiny fellows like the Peacock, Painted Lady, Red
Admiral, and the Silver Fritillaries. I don’t like



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 43

those little short, fat creatures, too like wood-lice for
my taste, the caterpillars of the Blues, Hairstreaks,
and Coppers. I see you have some, Dux; certainly,
_ if you rear all these, you will have a capital
collection, but you are suré to lose some. The
worst enemy of all, in the natural state, is the
ichneumon-fly, which lays its eggs in the soft body
of the caterpillar without killing the poor little
creature. When the eggs are hatched, the tiny
larvee feed on the caterpillar until they turn into
_ ehrysalides ; and then one fine morning out fly a
host of these insects, instead of a butterfly, whose
caterpillar is dead before this. However, this is
not so likely to happen to your caterpillars as
starvation, through forgetfulness on your part to
feed them.’

Of course all the boys protested this was not
likely to occur; but in the sequel Mrs. Palmer
turned out to be right.

‘If you keep them till they turn to chrysalides,
you may be rewarded by secing some of them
change, and the way in which they do it is very
wonderful, so elaborate are their preparations; but
when we think that the creature is taught by the



44. SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

Creator how to perform this change, our wonder is
changed to adoration of God for the loving care
which He bestows on so insignificant a thing as a
mere caterpillar, which we often heedlessly tread
under our feet. One great reason why I chose a
branch of Natural History as the subject of my
prize was because, in studying the habits of any
of God’s creatures, we are constantly led up to the
thought of God Himself; we find Him in His
works.’

‘Mrs. Palmer, how shall we know when the
caterpillars are going to change?’ asked a small
boy.

‘Tn the first place, a caterpillar leaves off eating;
and, in the next, it is very restless, and wanders
about, as if seeking a safe place in which to
perform the act of transformation; then it spins a
little silken pillow, and clings to this with its last
claspers for a day or two, till the chrysalis is
formed, when it slowly emerges from the cater-
pillar skin, which slips down to the bottom of the
chrysalis. The next step is to climb up to the
silk pillow, which, as the chrysalis is smaller

than the caterpillar, is above it; this it does by

)



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 45

means of its tail, which is armed with little hooks
or feelers, with which it clings to the silken threads
and swings itself up, till it hangs safely on its
silken pillow. It then very often tries to get rid
of its old caterpillar skin, by twisting itself roud
and round, so as to break the threads which hold the
skin, after which it remains quiet, perhaps through
the winter, but at any rate for some days (a fort-
night in the spring, seven days in the summer), until
it emerges as a butterfly from its prison-house,’

‘I can make chrysalides whirl round by tickling
them,’ said little Gordon.

‘Don’t let me catch you playing any tricks
on my caterpillars when they have changed, or Pu
tickle you, I promise you, young man, said Dux.

‘Little Gordon is right in his" facts, though,
Neville; some chrysalides can be induced to perform
that feat by irritation at any stage, bub for the
most part they lie quiescent and apparently lifeless.
They are very unattractive, indeed, repulsive, in this
stage, which answers to the intermediate state with
us; but to change from a poor crawling caterpillar,
even though it be such a handsome creature as

some of those are which you call Woolly Bears, to



46 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

a beautiful butterfly with its jewelled wings, is
well worth the penalty of being a chrysalis’

‘I wonder if the butterfly remembers its caterpillar
life,” said Jack Strickland.

‘I think not; but what is more important is the
fact that we shall certainly remember our earthly
life when we are changed.’

‘Do you know why old naturalists used to call
the chrysalis the aurelia stage, Mrs. Palmer 2?’ asked
Martin.

‘What is the Latin for gold, Willy? I will
answer your question by asking another,’

‘Aurum, and chrysos is the Greek for gold; of
course I might have guessed that they meant the
same thing; but why do they call a chrysalis
a golden stage 2’

‘I believe because the Vanessas and Fritillaries
and some others are gilded. There is another
word used now very often—pupa, which means
tied up, or swathed, because the creature is bound
up in its pupa state, its different parts being packed
up in the neatest possible way; its antenne folded
down by its wings, which are very small, on each
side of the body. But I have been giving you



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 47

quite a lecture on butterflies; now, before I go, I
want you to show me your cabinets and all your
paraphernalia, will you ?’

‘Neville will; I have nothing to show,’ said Willy.

But when Mrs. Palmer had’seen Neville’s things,
she made Willy bring out his, and although, as he
explained, it was too early to judge of them in
their present unfinished condition, still they were
all so neatly executed, that her admiration of them
was as sincere as that she bestowed on Neville’s
bought appliances, Willy’s cardboard braces were
almost as good as Neville’s, and his setting-board,
made of a strip of wood lined with two rows of
cork, answered all the purpose of cork saddles;
while the case he had made to keep his specimens
invafter they were dried was really very ingenious.
It was simply a_ shallow deal box with a
close-fitting lid, the bottom of which was lined
with small square pieces of cork gummed on in
straight rows; these had been cut out of old corks
begged from the housekeeper, sheet cork being
dear; to these pieces of cork a few butterflies were
already fixed, and here they were to remain for the
present at any rate, though Willy intended if



48 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

possible to construct a more permanent case before
the prize was awarded.

‘I wonder how many of the sixty-five true
British butterflies you will succeed in getting ?’

‘Oh, all, I should hope!’ said Dux.

‘If we get fifty between us, I shall think we
have done well; we shan’t be able to do much
more in the collecting way this term, for the
examinations will be coming on,’

‘And you must not neglect your work, or
Mr. Palmer will want me to withdraw my promise ;
he rather complains now that this butterfly craze,
as he calls it, absorbs too much of your time and
thoughts, and I believe Mr. Newman will never
quite forgive me for offering such a bait.’

The boys were loud in their complaints of the
tutor’s wish to throw cold water on their plan ; but
there was some excuse for him, for, as he complained,
he was constantly finding tiny caterpillars crawling
on the jackets of small boys who had, in the ardour
of their exertions, put the eggs to hatch-in their
breast pockets, Then the dormitories were never
tidy since it was permitted to keep caterpillars in
various stages of growth in them; while the water-



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 49

jugs were always full of the various plants the
different caterpillars lived on, and Mr. Newman
was as anxious as Swallow-tails and Skippers for
the caterpillars to reach the pupa stage, when they
would require less attention and could be relegated
to the lower regions.

But to his disgust he found the chrysalides
absorbed more of the boys’ attention than the
caterpillars, after a week, when they might be
expected, in the hot weather they were having, to
emerge. The interest then in watching for the
eventful change was great, and the excitement
when it actually took place intense, and the disputes
which often arose as to the name of the new-born
butterfly were loud and long, only settled by an appeal
from Willy to one of Dux’s books. No sooner was
the unhappy butterfly fairly alive than it received
its cowp de grdce from some little finger and thumb,
whose owner doubtless delighted in the operation,
and this annoyed the tutor, who declared butterfly-



hunting was one thing,—fair sport perhaps it might

be called,



but raising insects for the mere pleasure
of killing them as soon as they were born’ was

uite another. Perhaps he never was so glad to
| I 8
D



50 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

see the close of a term as one day in the end of
July, when Swallow-tails and Skippers, with their
caterpillars and chrysalides, took themselves home
for the holidays; while the butterflies duly mounted
were left under lock and key in Mrs, Palmer's care
till their owners returned.

The cats shared Mr. Newman’s joy at the
departure of the boys, for they had had a very bad
time that term, their whiskers being in. great
request for setting-bristles; an instrument most of
the boys, great and small alike, took great pleasure
in making, and considered it an indispensable part

of their butterfly paraphernalia.







CHAPTER IV.

‘Why, lovely insect, dost thou stand
And wave thy quiv’ring wing,

As half afraid thou wert “aloft
On fields of air to spring ?

But now has reached thy slender form
A sunbeam warm and bright,

And instant thou hast upward sprung
Towards the source of light.

Thus in the portals of the tomb
The trembling soul shall stand,

Till beams of faith and mercy point
Its way to the promised land,’

EVILLE’S parents lived near Monmouth,
at a place called Bicknor Court, which




is actually in the county of Gloucester-

shire, though close to the border-land between the

two counties. It is one of the prettiest parts of |

England, for the lovely Wye, winds through the

valleys at the foot of the richly-wooded hills ;
51



52 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

while beyond the Gloucestershire hills the Welsh
mountains, range after range, stand out against the
distant horizon. Nothing seems wanting to com-
plete the beauty of the landscape; wood, water,
hill, and dale all combine to make a piece of
mountain scenery, which, although on a smaller
scale, is equal in beauty to many parts of Scotland.
It had been arranged before the boys left Brighton
that Martin should spend the latter part of the
holidays at Bickmor Court, and accordingly he
arrived there in the middle of August, and found
Neville all excitement about a large picnic to the
Forest of Dean, which was to take place the next
day.

‘Perhaps we may find some butterflies, Dux;
so I shall take my net. I brought a box or two
with me, in case I had any luck, but my mother is
taking care of my chrysalides ; nearly all mine have
turned, except the White Admiral which I lost,
and a few I expect will not come out till next
spring. How are yours getting on ?’

‘IT don’t know. I gave mine to Gordon to look
after, as I could not .be bothered with them in the
holidays ; but I have been out butterfly-hunting



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 53

two or three times, and have found several Duke of
Burgundys and Marbled Whites, and some rather
good Hairstreaks,’

‘I expect this is a good place for butterflies.
I mean to have plenty of hunts while I am here.

‘Yes; I knew you would want to, so I waited
till you came. By the way, I believe the Purple
Emperor has been found in Dean Forest ; we may
come across him to-morrow.’

And so they did; but the wary monarch was, as
usual, taking such high flights from his favourite
seat on the uppermost branches of a mighty oak,
that Neville, after looking at him for a few minutes
in disgust at his soaring habits, turned away, and
would have abandoned all thought of him but for
Willy, who, to comfort himself, suggested that
perhaps it was not the Iris after all.

‘The grapes are sour, Leo,’ laughed Colonel Neville,
‘It is Iris, sure enough; the question is how to
catch him. Now if I only had a dead stoat or a
weasel we would bring him down fast enough. He
is not very nice in his feeding for a butterfly; dirty
puddles and small birds or stoats, well advanced in

decomposition, are some of his favourite dishes.



54 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

Perhaps I could get some bait at the Speech
House ; it is worth trying,

Accordingly Willy went back to the Speech
House, and presently returned in high glee with a
piece of rabbit skin and the wing of a dead thrush,
which he nailed to the trunk of the oak; and then,
with his net by his side, sat down at a little
distance to watch the effect. In ten minutes’ time
not one but three Purple Emperors were regaling
themselves on these tit-bits, and, watching his-oppor-
tunity, Willy slipped forward, and with a dexterous
movement swept all three prizes into his net. He
then nipped one after the other through the thorax
as quickly as possible, lest through fluttering about
in the net they should rub any of the scales off
their beautiful wings.

All these had the purple lustre from which the
monarch takes his title over the groundwork of
their wings, which proclaimed them to be males,—
in the females this ground colour is rusty black ;
the seven white spots on the fore-wing and the
band which crosses the hind-wings obliquely,
_ extending into the fore, were pure white, without

the yellow tinge which is another mark of the



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 55

female; the under side was very different to the
upper, the black here shaded to pale grey; the
antennee were very long and gradually clubbed,
which gave them an aristocratic air of refinement,
and is probably the butterfly’s sign that ‘blue
blood’ is in his veins. They were evidently not
intended to walk like mere ordinary plebeian
butterflies, for their fore-feet had no claws, and
were quite unfitted for walking. ,

‘Well done, Willy! I have always heard that
Iris is one of the most difficult butterflies to net.
You managed that very neatly, said Colonel
Neville, as Willy secured his prey in a box he had
brought with him.

‘You shall have one, Dux, if you'll accept it;
perhaps you may get another here between this
and the time we are to send in our collections.’

‘One is enough for me, thanks; but do you think
I ought to ought to take it, father?’

‘Well, Willy won’t want more than two for
himself, will you ?’

‘Oh no; but I wish we could get another, Dux,
for you; you see the under side varies so, that we

ought to have two specimens; I mean to try for



56 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

duplicates of all mine, so as to mount one flat and
one with the wings set up showing the under side.’

‘Are there any more of this family to look for, -
Willy 2’

‘No; the Emperors are a family all by them-
selves, and I believe Iris is the only British species,’

‘Oh, well, we have done with the Apaturide then,
thank goodness! I am as glad when we have
finished a family as I am when I have had a tooth
out.’

‘I am afraid, Leo, you are not a very ardent
entomologist,’ said Colonel Neville.

‘No, Iam not; I don’t care for the trouble, I own,
but I should like to win the prize very much, all
the same; five pounds’ worth of. books is not to be
despised, especially when the giver is as pretty
and nice as Mrs. Palmer. Perhaps this is a good.
hunting-ground, Willy; we may as well make hay
while the sun shines, so, if you like, we'll have some
butterfly hunts in the next few days.’

This they did, and on the whole had very fine
sport, for, as money was no object to the Nevilles,
the boys went by the train to another part of the
country every day. One of their best bags was



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 57

made in the neighbourhood of Stroud, where they
found several Marbled Whites, which they caught
in rough pastures. Neville had previously found
some of these, but Martin was glad to get some
specimens of both male and female, and Leo had not
noticed that the black and white wings of the latter
differed from the males’ by being thickly covered
round the wings with gold dust. They also found
one or two Comma Butterflies that day : these are the
most angle-winged of the Angle-wings, and are red-
dish-brown in colour, with two little white comma-
like marks on the under-surface of their hind-wings.
Willy thought they were hybernating specimens, as
it was too early in the year to find, those hatched
in the preceding spring. The Chalk-hill Blue and
tle Pale Clouded Yellow were also among the spoil.

The next day they went to Clifton, and there
Willy, after a long, tiring search, was rewarded by
finding on a piece of cow-parsnip two of the
yellowish-green chrysalides of the Swallow-tail
Butterfly ; these were girted and attached by the
tail to the plant, their eared heads drooping down-
wards. These Willy expected to hatch the following
May, and he was very glad to have found them in



5

58 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

this stage, as, from their power of emitting a very
powerful scent in the caterpillar stage, they are
interesting to watch ; moreover, he was anxious to
obtain perfect specimens of this handsome butterfly.

On the whole, the boys were well satisfied with
their sport in Gloucestershire, and if their helpers
had only helped as well in other parts of England,
the collection ought to be growing apace; but of ©
this they were not very hopeful. However, a letter
from Strickland, who was spending his holidays at
his home in Norfolk, reassured them, at least as
far as he was concerned; still, the style of the
epistle was so characteristic of the writer that they
had great difficulty in deciding how much of it
was truth and how much fiction,

It ran as follows :—

‘BurnuamM Recrory, Great YarMoutit.
‘My Dear Fretitows,—When shall we three
meet again? Alas! only too soon, for time flies
like butterflies in the holidays. How about the
holiday task? That Martin is slaving away at his,
I know; just pinch him for me, Dux, While as for

you, you idle son of a gunner (the Colonel was in the



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 59

R.A., I think), I am just as sure yours is not begun.
“Tt is as forward as Strick’s anyway,” I hear you
say; but gently, my boys, gently; dear, good, in-
dustrious Strick’s is done, essay composed, written,
and neatly copied by—his sister. Go up top,
Strick. I mean to, my boys, mean to. Nice sister
mine, quite a kid too, and very much at the service
of her darling brother. Wouldn’t I let her know
it if she weren’t? Id cut her hair for her, and
buy her cayenne-pepper sweets, and amuse her pet
cat by the half-hour making setting-bristles, if she
didn’t do my holiday task for me; and she knows

it. Always manage your womenkind, or your "
womenkind will manage you; that is one of my
dad’s maxims, and I follow it, as I do all his ex-
cellent advice. Ahem! good, obedient, pious boy that
Strick. Bravo, Strick! Swallow-tails and Skippers,
Admirals Red and White, Ringlets and Tortoiseshells.
I declare I have written two pages, and only once
mentioned butterflies, the real object of my letter.
Now to business. What sport, my friends, what
sport? This child has done his little best, and
with rather good results, I flatter myself. Is it
Painted Ladies you want? come to Yarmouth; here



60 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

2

in the season they are as common as flies, and much,
oh, much dearer! though the cabbies put it on
pretty considerably, I can tell you. Or is it
Peacocks ? here they are male and female, sunning
themselves on the jetty. Talking of Peacocks
reminds me of a splendid joke I accidentally played
on my Pater the other day. One of the Skippers
sent me a post-card to say he had just’ sent me a
brace of splendid Peacocks, and he hoped they
would arrive undamaged. The Pater reads the
card, and when I come down I find him raging
against me, my friend, and the Peacocks. Did I
suppose I should be allowed to keep peacocks in
his garden? didn’t I know they played ducks and
drakes with the flowers? Useless for me meekly to
urge I knew my Peacocks would not injure so
much as a blossom; I was ordered to hold my
tongue and not talk such twaddle. I was to
let him know the instant the birds (brutes he
called them) arrived, and he would send them
back immediately; they should not set foot in
his garden. I could not resist saying they
would prefer flying to walking, whereupon I was

told to leave the room, as the head of the family



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 61

hadn’t patience to listen to such folly; peacocks
flying about his garden indeed! and I to speak of it
as if they were sparrows; didn’t believe I knew
what a peacock was. For the sake of peace I left
the table, inwardly chuckling, and when an hour
later the parcel post arrived with my Peacocks, I
went into his study, and, holding out the box, said,
“Here are the Peacocks, father.” His face was a
study, but he ended in a fit of laughter. Served
him right for reading my post-card. But to
business again. Greenhorns here predominate
over Red-horns. I can secure an unlimited supply
of the former; as for Ringlets, I could obtain every
variety if I only had the courage to ask for them,
I am on intimate terms with several Skippers,
one Grizzled Skipper in particular takes me out for
a sail occasionally. I met. two Admirals at a
musical party the other day. The Camberwell
Beauty is lodging in our parish, and I hear there
is a Duke at the Grand Hotel; no doubt it is
Burgundy. I often get- the Blues when I think
how soon the holidays will be over, and I enclose

”

some inverted Commas—“ By-bye.

‘ JACK STRICKLAND.’



62 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

‘Now who on earth is to know what Jack has
really done? How much of his letter is true, I
wonder ?’ cried Martin when they finished Jack’s
effusion, —

‘Precious little; if he has kept the Peacocks
that is about all he has done, I expect we shall
find when we get back to school,’

A week later the boys were all assembled again
at Mr. Palmer's, entertaining each other the first day
with an account of the way in which they had spent
their holidays, and even the Butterflies were for-
gotten that first evening.







CHAPTER V.

‘From every chink
And secret corner, where they slept away
The wintry storms ; or rising from their tombs
To higher life; by myriads forth at once
Swarming they pour; of all the varied hues
Their beauty-beaming parent can disclose.’--THoMson.

(ACK was very mysterious as:to his butter-
fly collection ; he assured Skippers and



Swallow-tails he had made a splendid
one in the holidays, but he would not let any one
see it until it was all properly arranged, and then,
he said, it would be so good that he should exhibit
it one half-holiday at a penny a peep, for the
benefit of Mrs. Palmer’s missionary-box. No
entreaties could induce Jack to show one single
specimen, or even to whisper the name of any, until

a certain Saturday afternoon, when, having per-
63



64 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

suaded Mr. Newman to let him have the class-
room for his exhibition, he locked himself up, to
arrange his specimens. By this time, though’
Skippers and Swallow-tails all agreed it was a
hoax, their curiosity was so excited by Jack’s
tempting and judicious hints that they all gladly
paid the penny entrance-fee.

The collection was laid out on the long table in
partitions made of books and slates, the name of
each specimen was written beneath it, and the
whole were arranged in classes.

First of all came the pretty bell-shaped wild
flower labelled duly, Common Fritillary ; the next
was another flower of the same plant washed
over with silver paint, and called Silver-washed
Fritillary ; then a likeness of the Queen of Spain
cut out of one of the illustrated papers, labelled
Her Majesty Argynius Lathonia, Queen of Spain ;
then followed another piece of Fritillary, daubed all
over with hair-oil, and labelled Greasy Fritillary ;
next a blank sheet of paper with an enormous
comma painted on it; then a small piece of tortoise-
shell, labelled Small Tortoiseshell, then a large |
tortoiseshell card-case, labelled Large Tortoise-



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 65

shell; next a photograph of a very pretty girl
headed Camberwell Beauty; then the most attrac-
‘tive object in the exhibition, a stuffed peacock in a
screen, which took up a large piece of the table, and
had been .borrowed from Mrs. Palmer’s drawing-
room,—this was labelled simply Vanessa Io, its
common name being so obvious it was unnecessary
to repeat it; then came a print of an Admiral of
the Fleet in cocked hat and naval uniform, painted
a brilliant vermilion, and, needless to add, named
the Red Admiral; further on was another copy of
the same print painted white on a green ground, to
do duty for the White Admiral. This gentleman
was framed and very ostentatiously placed by him-
self, while a notice was appended to him stating he
was the only member of his family in this country.
Dividing the Admirals was a coloured photograph
of an actress, labelled Painted Lady; then came a
likeness of the Emperor’ of Germany . coloured
purple by Jack; then a piece of marbled staircloth
labelled Marbled White; then some ringlets made
out of tow, and coloured and duly labelled, Small
Ringlet, Brown Ringlet, ete. Then a small fish,

with difficulty obtained in the Brighton fish-market,
BE



66 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

labelled rightly the Grayling; then some pieces of
heath, called Large and Small Heath; a copper
kettle labelled Large Copper, a penny labelled
Common Copper, a farthing called Small Copper,
followed the Heaths: these, with a piece of brim-
stone for the Brimstone Butterfly, a dress-coat
for the Swallow-tailed, some blank sheets of white
paper for the Whites, and some grasshoppers
secured by a silk thread to represent the Skippers,
were the moc_ remarkable features of the show;
and the roars of laughter the collection produced
amply repaid Jack Strickland for the time and
trouble he had wasted on it.

Even Mr. Palmer honoured the exhibition with
his presence, and enjoyed it as much as any
of the boys. The only person who did not quite
approve of it was Willy Martin. He thought
butterflies much too serious a subject for his
aide-de-camp to joke about, and was also dis-
appointed to find Jack had been so idle during
the holidays.

‘Idle, my dear Skipper! I assure you the amount
of thought I have given to this work of art is more
than I give to’—



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 67

‘Your studies throughout the term, ch, Strick-
land?’ interrupted Mr. Palmer.

‘Yes, sir. Attimes I was buoyed up with the hope
that Mrs. Palmer might bestow the prize upon me
in consideration of the talent displayed here,
although it is before the time.’

‘I am sorry for your disappointment then, so is
' Martin apparently,’

‘No, sir; I am sorry Strick has nothing else to
show, only this rubbish, after leading me to think
he had added to the collection in the holidays,’

‘So I have, Martin, honour bright. I have
taken up a new branch of the subject, and a very
interesting one it is: I have been going in for
butterflies’ eggs this vacation; it is not such excit-
ing sport as bird-nesting perhaps, and I should be
sorry to breakfast off them, but it is great fun all
the same when you go in for it in a scientific way,
not in the hap-hazard fashion adopted by some of
you little fellows who have been hatching all
manner of eggs into grubs. as useless as yourselves.

By the same token, some of my best eges are
~ Swallow-tails ; there is a place on one of the Broads
near Yarmouth where they abound, so one day I



68 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

watched a lady Swallow-tail who I knew by her
busy air had some important business on hand.
Presently my lady settled on a piece of milk-
patsley and laid some eggs. I did not disturb her,
but I marked the spot, and when she had dis-
appeared I secured the plant with some little pale
green oval eggs on it. I took the milk-parsley
home bodily and planted it in my own garden, well
out of my Pater’s sight. In a day or two they
changed to blue, then to black, and in about a week
the caterpillars began to be hatched, then I thought
it time to secure them, so I took them up to my
room and gave my sister charge of them.’

‘And where are they now, pray ?’

‘Upstairs safe and sound, and beauties they are
too, splendid colours, but greedy little wretches; the
first thing they did was to eat their own egg-shells
the moment they were hatched. I brought a good
supply of food for them, and they ought to turn
goon.’

‘They are very late; Swallow-tails often lay in
May, said Martin.

‘Yes, they are; but all the better, for they'll
remain in the chrysalis state all through the



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 69

winter. By the way, Martin, did you know, if you
touch these caterpillars they can throw out a
strong smell of fennel from one of their horns? it
is such a lark, I often stir mine up on purpose.’

‘Proper science that, eh, Martin? Like old
Strick, though ; I never thought he could be serious
for long,’ said. Dux.

‘I like that, when I am teaching you all; I
have gone in for it thoroughly, I tell you,’

‘Oh, all right! tell us some more then,

‘Well, perhaps none of you know that if the
butterfly is in a great hurry to lay her eges, and
can’t find the particular plant her caterpillars like,
she chooses the nearest she can find to it ; and to
be sure the eggs remain on the plant she glues them
to it,’

‘The Marbled White does not; she drops her
eggs anywhere among the grass, interrupted
Martin.

‘Another fact I have observed is, butterflies
seldom live long after laying their eggs. Then my
father has a microscope, so I got him to
examine some eggs for me, and we found the shell

is very like the skin which lines a bird’s egg, and



70» SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS:

the inside very like the white of ‘one, but it had no
yolk. But the most curious thing was, no two
eggs of a different species were alike when under
the microscope; some are round, some oval, others
pear-shaped, some are like a miniature melon,.
fluted just in the same way too; some are quite
smooth, some covered all over with little specks;
a few have a tiny lid at the top for the convenience
of the young caterpillar on his entrance into the
world, :

‘Oh, come, draw it mild, Strick! You don’t
suppose we think you saw all these eges under
your Pater’s microscope.’ .

‘IT did not say I did. Isaw a good many though,
and he told me the rest. I daresay you won’t
believe it, but some of these eges, about the size of
a pin’s head, are most exquisitely ornamented.’

‘Yes, I believe it, I have seen them under a
microscope ; the Queen of Spain egg is like a tiny
white wicker basket. One of the wonderful things
about these eges is, no amount of heat or cold will
kill them, for numbers live all through our hardest
winters. Do you know, Strick, your Swallow-
tailed chrysalides are awfully pretty to watch in the



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 71

spring, when they are beginning to change; the
colours of the butterfly show through the chrysalis
for some days, and later on the pattern of the
upper wings does the same, and when he does come
out, he is as much out of his clement as Dux was
the first day he put on his swallow-tails’

‘There is evidently something in the name, if
men and Swallow-tail butterflies all make their
début into society as if they were ashamed of
themselves,’ said Dux.

‘Men! I do lke that, don’t you, Strick? I can
tell you the cause of the butterfly’s shyness, though ;
his wings are so small when he first comes out from
his shell, that they can’t support his body. ‘I know
you will all say I am fudging, but it is as true as
steel, that you can see the wings grow, and in an
hour they are full-size.

‘Well, we have heard enough about Swallow-
tails. Just tell us a little about Skippers and their
egos, Martin; we may as well try to find some,’ said
Gordon.

‘Yes, tell us about ourselves, Martin,’ cried the
Skippers.

‘To begin with, we are Concealers, that is, the



92 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

chrysalis is enclosed in silk, The egg of the
Grizzled Skipper is laid on brambles, but it is such
a common butterfly, you need not trouble after the
eggs. The Small Skipper lays on the grass, and
the caterpillar passes the winter there, The
Lulworth is the rarest of the Skippers; I don’t sup-
pose we shall get one, as none of us come from
Dorsetshire or Devonshire, and those are the only
counties, except perhaps Warwickshire, where it is
found. But the principal thing I want my Skippers
to do this term and next, is to look for hybernating
species of caterpillars, chrysalides, and butterflies,
and help me to get on with the case I am making
for the prize, and to prepare braces and boxes for
setting all the specimens we hope to get in the
spring.’

‘I mean to go in for caterpillars next year ; I
have come to the conclusion you get much better
specimens if you rear them yourself than you do
if you catch the butterfly ever so carefully, so you
Swallow-tails can look out for hybernating cater-
pillars, said Dux.

‘Yes, that is all very fine, but where are we to
look ?’ said Gordon,



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS, 73

‘Yes, tell us that please, Martin,’ cried a chorus
of Skippers and Swallow-tails.

‘So I will, when I have found out the 3 most
likely places, but not to-day; any more butterfly-
ology on the top of Strick’s intellectual treat, which
he gave us in his exhibition, would be too much
for your minds; moreover, I hope we are going in
for some football before the afternoon is wasted.

This suggestion met with universal approval,
Jack Strickland excepted, and he tried in vain to
induce some of the others to remain and help him

to clear away his exhibition,





CHAPTER VI,

‘Observe the insect race, ordained to keep
The lazy Sabbath of a half-year’s sleep,
Intombed beneath the filmy web they lie,
And wait the influence of a kinder sky.’
Mns., BARBAULD.

JOR the. next few weeks football was all



the rage, and absorbed so much of the
boys’ leisure, that, except Willy Martin,
_they were all too much occupied to think of their
butterflies, whether living, dead, or hybernating.
However, one day a boy named Jennings had his
arm broken by a kick, whereupon Mr, Palmer put
a stop to football for the rest of the term, to the
indignation of the boys and the delight of Mrs,
Palmer, who openly told the boys if she were her
husband, they should never play such a horribly

dangerous game.
74



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 75

“A nice slow term we shall have, all through
that little muff breaking his arm: no football, and
of course there is no cricket and no swimming in
the winter, no anything but Euclid and Cesar,
Cresar and Euclid, day after day, varied by
arithmetic and algebra!’ grumbled -Neville one
wet half-holiday, after the football had been
stopped.

‘Poor old Dux, it is hard lines. Can’t we do
anything in the lepidopteral line ?—fine word that,
Dux, make a note of it, my boy, to’ vary the
monotony. How about hybernation, Martin ?
Have you found anything to tell us about that?’
said Strickland.

‘Yes, plenty, and as we are all here Ill
tell you all I know, if you like, and next half
holiday we'll ask to go into the country and have
a bunt.’

‘All right! fire away, Willy. ‘I don’t feel very
keen about anything except football just now,’ said
Neville. ; ,

‘To hybernate, as you all know, I suppose,
means to pass the winter. Well, all butterflies

live through a winter in some state, because



76 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

the life of a butterfly from beginning to end lasts
a year,

‘I thought a butterfly lived only for a day
till we took up the subject, interrupted Strick.
land.

‘When I say a year, I mean from the time the
egg was laid to the time the young butterfly lays
its own eges and dies, Well, some pass the
winter in the egg-state,—eight do,—but we need not
bother about them; it would be silly to look for
hybernating butterflies’ eggs. Twenty-five hyber-
nate in the caterpillar state, ten in the chrysalis
state, and ten in the butterfly state. Of course TI
am speaking only of British species,’

“OF course, but where on earth do they hyber-
nate? That is what I want to know,’ said Strick-
land.

‘I am coming to that, but first let me tell you
that any given species of butterfly always hybernates
in the same stage; for instance, Io hybernates as a
butterfly, so all the future generations of Peacocks
will hybernate as butterflies; the Grayling hyber-
nates as a caterpillar, and all its descendants will
do the same. The caterpillars hybernate on their



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 77

own peculiar plants, so that when they wake up
they may find a good breakfast ready to hand after
their long night; the chrysalides hang themselves
up on railings, fences, outhouses, or on hedge-
mustard, reeds, vetches, or other plants; and
butterflies choose all manner of places, from a
church ‘to a pigsty, though they seem greatly to
prefer a pigsty. A hollow oak tree is a favourite
place for Peacocks ; indeed, any hollow trees seem to
suit all hybernating butterflies, also barns, stables,
any building where they are not likely to be dis-
turbed, will do for them. Unless you are on the
look-out very sharply, it is very difficult to find
them, for they choose places as near as possible the
colour of their wings when folded up back to back,
which is the attitude in which they pass the
winter, and that colour in nearly all the hybernators
is some shade of brown,’

‘Do you mean to say a butterfly will stop for
six or seven months in a barn or a pigsty without
moving 2’

‘Well, if an unusually warm day occurs, they
will come out of their holes, and perhaps even fly
a little distance, but they soon find their way



78 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

back to their hiding-places, unless they are caught
or meet with some accident. As a rule, if we.
wait till the spring, and then find a hybernator
who has lived through the winter, his wings are
almost sure to have lost some of their beauty, but
I fancy if we could catch them napping now, at
thé beginning of the winter, they would be all
right,’

‘Tell us which are the ten hybernators, then
we shall have some idea if they are worth the
trouble of looking for in pigstys and barns,’ said
Neville.



egan Martin.



‘English names, please, or the little ones will
be all at sea,’ interrupted Strickland, with a comical
grin.

‘The Comma Butterfly, Camberwell Beauty,
Peacock, srimstone, Clouded Sulphur, Clouded
‘Yellow, Large Lortoiseshell, Small Tortoiseshell,
Painted Lady, and Red Admiral, N. ow, the Comma
does not like the sea, so it is not known. in this
county, therefore we need not look for that; nor
need we trouble about Antiopa, which is very
rare, and generally taken in Kent; we might by



SWALLO W-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 79

chance find some Large Tortoiseshells; Edusa we
are not likely to get in Sussex; all the others we
may have the luck to pop upon. Ihave heard of
eight or nine Peacocks being found in one stump
of an oak,

‘I have heard of diamonds being found, but I
never yet met the man who found them; so, my
dear Skippers, if you like to hunt pigstys and
churches for hybernating butterflies, you can, but
the Swallow-tails will, I think, wait till the spring
before they resume their lepidopteral labours, as

trick calls them,’

‘Well, Dux, at any rate you will be spared the
error most beginners fall into of supposing all
hybernators are double-brooded, and you will know
the hybernated Brimstones, which appear occasion-
ally in the winter and.in the spring, are not the
children of the autumn species—-another popular
delusion, But I shall search for hybernating
caterpillars and chrysalides chiefly, because the
butterflies are never so fresh as those which are
hatched in the spring,’

‘Let us hear which pass the winter in -the
chrysalis state,’



$0 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

‘The Swallow-tail; he braces himself up among
the reeds near his favourite hog’s fennel. The
Wood White is a very beautiful chrysalis, slender,
and of a lovely pale green colour with some
pink rings round it; it fastens itself up by the
tail, with the thread round the body; this is a
good one to try for, because as a butterfly it is
rarely, if ever, seen to settle. The Large White
—by the way, Dux, did you know some butter-
flies migrate like birds, actually cross the
Channel ?’ ,

‘No; I don’t believe it, said Neville, who was
still hankering after football, and not in the best
of humours.

‘It is true, though; the Large White is one of
the migrators, the Small White and the Green-
veined White, are the others which have been
seen arriving on the beach in numbers; they alight
on and rise from the sea as easily as on land,
generally choosing a calm day for the passage.
These three Whites all hybernate as chrysalides,
the Large and Small on cabbages or wild
mignonette, and, as they are the commonest and

most mischievous of all our butterflies, the more



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 81

we clear away of their chrysalides the better. The
Green-veined White has nearly as bad a name as
the Large and Small, but Newman says he is not
_ half so’—

‘White as he is painted, interrupted Strick-
land.

‘Just so, and he is to be found on the water-
cress or hedge-garlic or some of the crucifera;
those who don’t know what are the cruciferous
plants must find out for themselves.’

‘Of course we can’t expect Martin to be
professor of botany as well as of natural history ; as
“it is, I think Palmer ought to give him a salary.
Shall we memorialize him on the subject?’ asked
Strickland.

‘Be quiet, Strick, unless you have heard enough
about hybernating for to-day,’ said Willy..

‘Yes, do listen, Strick; it is a nice easy way
of getting information, and, since we have nothing
else to do, no football, no anything, we may as
well hear all Willy has to tell us, echoed
Dux.

‘That is very little, my stock of information is

nearly exhausted. The Green-chequered White is
TF



82 SWALLOW.TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

one we have as good a chance of finding here as
anywhere, for Sussex is its favourite county, Kent
and Sussex opposite the coast of France. There
are really two broods of this in the year, and it is
the second brood which passes the winter in the
chrysalis state, tying itself up by a belt round the
middle of its body, and also by its feelers to the
wild mignonette. The chrysalis is pale brown,
spotted black. Then Orange-tip, which is another
White ’—

‘Thanks for that news,—orange is white! Go on,
my boy, go on; if you told us black was white, we
should all meekly bow our heads in dignified
silence, interrupted Strick, as he bowed his own
in a very undignified fashion, to avoid the book
Dux threw at him.

‘Orange-tip is also to be found on any of the
cruciferous plants all over the kingdom; it is a
very queer-shaped chrysalis, pointed at both ends,
dingy green in colour, The Duke of Burgundy
is to be found in the chrysalis state on the
under side of primrose and cowslip leaves during
the winter; he is pretty common, saving his

grace ’—



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 83

‘That is what we all wish to do, said the
not-to-be-silenced Strickland.

‘And the chrysalis is a very delicate yellowish-
brown covered with hairs.’

‘His grace evidently shirks shaving in the winter
—finds it too cold, like Dux and me, hence these
beards,’

‘Pl have you out of the room, my boy, if
you don’t take care. Go on, Martin, don’t pay
any attention to poor Strick’s feeble witticisms,
cried Dux, as Strickland sat stroking his chin,

‘Azure Blue, which is common in the south of
England, has been known to hybernate as a
chrysalis, so there is no harm in searching holly-
trees, which, with the ivy, are its favourite food;
and lastly, the Grizzled Skipper, which passes the
winter on the bramble or the wild raspberry in
the chrysalis state. And that is all I have
to tell you to-day,’

‘By the way, Martin, how do hybernating
caterpillars manage to get on when there are no
leaves for them to eat during the winter ?’

‘Most of them have to fast, and make up for

lost time in the spring. That reminds me that the



84 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

caterpillars of the Black-veined White are very
curious creatures; they are gregarious, and live in
small communities, spinning themselves a summer
tent for the warm weather, and a heavier one
under which they pass the winter packed close
together. In the spring they separate for ever,
and each goes his own sweet way, to feed on the
hawthorn. The Glanville Fritillary also makes a
ten tin which to hybernate, but its tent is shaped
like a ball, and blades of grass are woven in to
make it more substantial; sometimes not more
than a dozen, and sometimes as many as fifty or
sixty, are found inside these tents, which are made
on the narrow-leaved plantain.’

‘I shall certainly have a look for these cater-
pillars, if it is only to see their tents,’ said
Neville.

‘You won't find the Glanville Fritillary, it is
only known in three counties, Hampshire, Kent,
and Wiltshire; but I believe there are a great
many caterpillars which make some kind of shelter
for themselves; for instance, the Heath Fritillary
makes a little house by drawing down two or three
of the scabious leaves on which it feeds, and joining



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 85

them together with a web; it then eats the leaves
and moves on to make another house. In the
winter it spins a web to shelter it; and now I am
off ;’ and Martin, tired of teaching, went to amuse

himself.







CHAPTER VII.

‘A beautiful creature,
That is gentle by nature,
From flower to flower let him fly,
, Beneath the summer sky,
*Tis all that he wishes to do.’
Worpsworvtit.

HE butterfly mania lay dormant, like some
of the butterflies and caterpillars during



the winter months, in spite of Martin’s
lecture on hybernation. True, he and some of the
Skippers made some excursions and secured some
specimens of hybernating butterflies, chrysalides,
and caterpillars, but the Swallow-tails were content
to follow the lead of their chief, and rest from
their labours. In the spring, however, the quest
for butterflies in every guise was renewed with

even more ardour than it had been prosecuted
86



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 87

with the previous year, and as the time for the
rival collections to be given in drew nearer, the
excitement began to get very great.

One morning in May, Mr. Newman appeared to
be troubled with a very bad cold while hearing
the younger boys their lessons; at last, after a
deal of sniffing he could stand it no longer, but
broke out,—

‘What on earth is this extraordinary smell?
it is enough to poison us all. Do any of you boys
notice it? I daresay not; boys have no noses,’

To his surprise, however, there was an almost
unanimous cry from the class that they all noticed
it, though no one could account for it.

‘Please, sir, it is up in our dormitory too, and I
believe it comes from some of the caterpillars, said
little Gordon.

‘OF course, no doubt of it; one of you has some
caterpillars in his pockets, I suppose. Any one who
has, will have the kindness to produce them at once,
or I'll search the whole class. Now turn out your
pockets, and put the contents here on my desk.
Miller, you are the top of the class, you begin.’

Accordingly little Miller obeyed, and five boys



88 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

one after the other produced a heterogeneous mass
of string, knives, bulls-eyes, marbles, catapults,
dirty pocket-handkerchiefs, and, in some cases, a
few infant caterpillars in process of hatching, at all
of which Mr. Newman looked in profound disgust,
but contemptuously allowed the owners to retain
their possessions. At last a boy named Murray
advanced and‘ produced a pill-box, in which, even
before he had removed the lid, it was evident the
offending object lay. Holding his handkerchief to his
nose, the irate tutor peeped into the box and beheld
a very large smooth caterpillar of a reddish-brown
colour, which emitted a. very strong and offensive
odour.

‘Pray where did you get this disgusting grub from?’

‘ Off a willow-tree, sir; I think it is a very rare
butterfly, so I am keeping it for Neville.’

‘Rare indeed! the rarer the better for the
olfactory nerves of humanity. Go and fetch Martin ;
he may know what it is, and if valuable it may be
kept in some outhouse. Pray have you any more
specimens upstairs ?’

‘No, sir; I carry this about because the other
fellows won’t have it in the box with the rest of the



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 89

caterpillars,’ said Murray apologetically, as he went
to fetch Martin.

‘Now, Martin, do you want this abominable
insect ? if not, let it be thrown -away at once, it
scents the school.’

Martin glanced at the caterpillar and answered,—

‘No, sir, it is the larva of the Goat-Moth; we
don’t collect moths for the prize, only butterflies.
You won’t lose the smell, Murray, for days, if you
ever do; it clings to the ground and the wood
these moths bore in for years.’

‘This is pleasant. Now, Murray, go and bury
that thing as deep as you can in the yard, then
change all your clothes, and give those you have
on to the servants to be purified and fumigated
befure you put them on again,’ said Mr. Newman,
after which Murray retired amid the suppressed
laughter of the rest of the class.

But this was only the beginning of Murray’s
troubles with regard to caterpillars, for he aud
Gordon had charge of Neville’s, and it was their
duty to search for the proper food every half-
holiday, and to feed the caterpillars every morning.

If the supply ran short in the week, as had



go SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

happened once or twice, one or other of them had
to ask leave and go on a foraging expedition
between or after school hours. A week or two
after the episode of the Goat-Moth, little Gordon
was ill for a few days, and Murray, whose ardour
had somewhat relaxed, forgot to feed the cater-
pillars, which, by Mr. Newman’s orders, had been
turned out of the dormitory and transferred to a
cupboard in one of the class-rooms. So one
Saturday afternoon, when Murray went to the cup-
board to see how his caterpillars were off for food,
to his horror he found one boxful dead from
starvation. Now Neville was known to have a
very passionate temper, though he did not often
indulge it, but Murray, who was a timid little boy,
felt he had given provocation too strong for his
chief to resist, for the loss would, in all probability,
spoil Neville’s chance of the prize, as there were
one or two rather rare specimens in the box, and
how to break the news to Dux he did not know.
He could not consult little Gordon, for he was in
quarantine for a few days, lest the sore throat from
which he was suffering should develop into anything
more serious. At last he decided to take Martin



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. gI

into his confidence, perhaps he could suggest some
way of repairing the loss ; but just as he was going
to seek Martin for the purpose, Dux came bustling
-in, a sudden fit having seized him to examine his
caterpillars himself.

‘Here, Murray, you have charge of my cater-
pillars, just go and fetch them here; I want to sce
how they are getting on.’

The caterpillars were in the cupboard of the room
Neville was in, but Murray, not daring to confess
the accident which had befallen them, went out on
pretence of getting them, but in reality to get out
of Dux’s way till the storm had blown over,
resolving to take refuge among the Skippers, for he
knew all the Swallow-tails would be too indignant
with bim for his carelessness to stand between him
and Neville. The Skippers might screen him, and
Martin, who was very good-natured, would very
likely help him to repair some of the mischief he
had done by transferring some of his own cater-
pillars to him, or, at least, telling him where he was
likely to find the kinds he had suffered to perish.

He found Martin and Strickland busy making
part of the case in which th butterflies were to be



92 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

finally arranged, in an outhouse, and in fear and
trembling he made his confession.

‘ Abominably careless of you too, Murray ; Pd lick
you well if you were a Skipper,’ said Strickland.

‘I expect Neville will be awfully savage ; you
had better keep out of his way for a while. What
caterpillars are they ?’ said Martin.

‘Violets, said Murray meekly.

‘Violets! what on earth do you mean ?’

‘I mean they live on wild violets and wild
heartsease, and it is a long way to go for the leaves,
and Gordon is ill, and I forgot to look at them, and
they are dead; all the other boxes are alive.’

‘Live boxes and violet caterpillars! your lan-
guage is involved, young man. Are they rare ones,
Martin, do you think ?’ said Strickland.

_‘ Fritillaries chiefly, I suppose, and I believe Dux
told me he had one or two good ones, but I doubt if
he will know what his loss is ; how many were there ?’

‘Twelve ; there were one or two Queens of Spain, I
think. Do tell me where to find some more, Martin,
please; I am awfully sorry, but if I can only find
some of them again, perhaps Dux won't lose the

prize,’



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 93

‘Hullo! here comes Dux; I can hear him storm-
ing; he is in one of his baits, you had better get out
of the way, Murray,’ said Strickland.

‘Where am I to go? he is coming across the
yard, said Murray, looking vainly round for a
chance of escape.

‘Get behind here; I won’t let him touch you,
said Martin kindly, for he knew when Neville was
in a rage he was not likely to have much mercy.

Murray stepped behind Martin into the corner
he had pointed out, just as Neville, armed with the
first stick he had caught up, and a very formidable-
looking one it was, burst into the building pale
with fury.

‘Martin, have you seen that little wretch Murray ?
Tll break every bone in his skin when I find him!
He has killed all my caterpillars. Oh, there he is!
if I don’t half kill him my name isn’t— How now,
Strickland! what do you mean by standing in my
way?’ Ke

‘ Gently, Dux, gently! a little gentle chastisement
won't hurt the boy, but. I am not going to look
on and see you beat a little delicate fellow like
Murray with that blunderbuss.’



94 SWALLOW-.TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

‘You are not going to look on! what do you
mean ? How dare you talk to me like this? I'll lick
you as well as Murray if you don’t move out of my
way ;’ and as he spoke Neville attempted to ‘push
past Strickland, almost knocking him over in the
attempt, but Martin caught hold of his arm and
held him back.

‘Wait a bit, Neville; you'll be sorry for it, if you
attack Murray while you are in a white heat,

“Two to one, are you? I believe itis a planned
thing; you have bribed Murray to kill my cater-
pillars. T’'ll fight you both, and settle him afterwards,’
said Dux, struggling with Martin and Strickland,
who were trying to hold him.

Meanwhile some other boys had found their way
to the outhouse on hearing the noise, and Dux, ©
fearing them, called out, ‘Swallow-tails to: the
rescue !?

‘Two can play at that game; Skippers to the
rescue!’ cried Strickland, and in a few minutes every
boy in the school except little Gordon, and Murray,
the cause of the fray, was engaged in the battle.
Fighting and struggling, they soon got out into the

yard, where there was more scope for action, and for



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 98

ten minutes the battle raged fiercely. Sometimes
in single combats, sometimes mass against mass, the
boys struggled together in wild confusion, shouting
with rage and pain, wrestling, and using their fists
very. freely, for their blood was up, and none of
them were responsible for their actions.

In the midst of this melée a window was thrown
open, and Mrs. Palmer, putting her head out, called
out entreating them to stop ; but they were all much
too excited to pay any attention, if in the noise
they heard’ her voice; whereupon, greatly to her
reoret, Mrs. Palmer, who was afraid the boys would
hurt each other seriously, for already some noses
were bleeding, went to her husband and sent him
to the scene of action.

“Boys, what is the meaning of this? Stop this
moment! do you hearme? Stop, I say!’ cried Mr.
“Palmer; but even he had to speak several times
before the struggling mass separated, and even then .
one or two rushed forward on to their opponents
again and again before he at length succeeded in
stopping the fight.

At last there they stood, panting and perspiring,
two or three with black eyes, some with noses and



96 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

lips bleeding, all very much dishevelled, with burn-
ing cheeks, and glaring angrily at each other, still
too angry to feel ashamed of themselves,

‘Murray, come here; you appear to be a spectator
only, tell me the meaning of all this, said Mr.
Palmer.

‘Please, sir, it is all my fault, said Murray,
looking very much inclined to ery, though he had
secretly been longing to take part in the fray, if he
could only have decided which side to take, but
his conscience would not let him go against the
Skippers, who were protecting him, and of course he
could not fight against his own side.

For in truth the rivalry between Skippers and
Swallowtails had been waxing very great lately, and
there had been a good deal of bitterness, especially ~
this term, as the prize: was to be awarded at the
end of it; so perhaps all the boys had readily

seized this opportunity of avenging their imaginary
wrongs.

‘No, sir, it is the Skippers’ fault; there has been
a vile plot’—began Neville.

‘Be quiet, Neville! I am not addressing you,
said Mr. Palmer sternly. ‘Now, Murray, tell me



SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 97

how this fight originated’ he continued, while
Neville bit his lip and raged inwardly, though he
dared not speak again, while Murray told his
tale.

‘Oh, it is a fight about this butterfly prize! Very
well, I shall know how to deal with that. And
apparently Neville, Martin, and Strickland were the
authors of it; is this so?’ .

‘ Yes, sir, answered the three culprits.

‘I shall know how to deal with them also.
You three will come to my study at twelve o’clock
to-morrow’; the rest of the school will remain in the
big schoolroom till tea-time, and employ their half-
holiday in writing out some Students’ Hume: the
first and second classes will write two hundred
lines each, the juniors one hundred, and they will
be brought to me to-morrow morning after prayers,
when I shall have more to say to you all on this
subject. Those who are hurt go indoors and wash
yourselves ; the others go at once to the schoolroom.
Murray, you will do the same imposition as the
other juniors. There is to be perfect silence until
tea-time ; I shall stay with you, to see that it is
observed.’ So saying, Mr. Palmer followed the boys

G



98 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

into the schoolroom, where they sat down to their
impositions in solemn silence.

As a rule, Mr, Palmer was very lenient with the
boys, but if he did take it into his head to be
severe, the occasions were generally remembered
for some time to come. Fighting was strictly
forbidden, so the present offence was a very great
one, and, as the boys all knew, Neville, Strickland,
and Martin were in for a flogging, for that was the
meaning of the appointment at twelve in Mr.
Palmer’s study. That was unpleasant enough for
the trio at any rate, but in addition to this the
boys all felt pretty sure, from Mr. Palmer’s manner
and remarks, that he intended to withdraw the
promised butterfly prize, which was the severest
punishment next to expulsion he could have hit
upon, and this silence which he had imposed upon
them prevented them from talking the matter over
and seeing if anything could be done to avert such
a calamity.

In the confusion and excitement both master and
boys had forgotten it was a Saturday, so a gleam
of hope burst in upon them when Mr. Palmer,

remembering it, announced,—



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f3f00a3f96e0752489c1ef620e949c8a
f646b2ee319a9614b24848dad9fd656b4c8b6a0e
'2011-10-13T22:11:43-04:00'
describe
'9660340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOBZ' 'sip-files00001.tif'
aba6157f7d030af6371fd8579bd11226
57ce8cdb67cc6983a9eec6a22d7ac42c322e465d
'2011-10-13T22:11:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCA' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-13T22:11:38-04:00'
describe
'17610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCB' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
e2f6800319d6dd8eb871a55e3917ac34
32486c886a9549f7697f66d7800ca12994966981
'2011-10-13T22:10:19-04:00'
describe
'408320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCC' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
fbef3af02842315dbc3de072f5ce4368
413a9fdff2934378ee20cbdd5e69a0e9abc406bb
'2011-10-13T22:13:03-04:00'
describe
'91201' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCD' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
5ec8487cb194805ca67b373d8f9b03d5
b6178d8d1df2b92b5d3ee72f8bd844997371a719
'2011-10-13T22:11:26-04:00'
describe
'25870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
fb1ae8f3c7917ea488db849ef1abb793
7bb46f79a3a64674de40ebdab9e9c59449b51b83
'2011-10-13T22:12:28-04:00'
describe
'9806848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
574d874c307f7adc39d7e8651c42e04a
573108a36ed8af84f0cd0c9a2e03244ebf162b01
'2011-10-13T22:11:32-04:00'
describe
'12335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCG' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
0695c3d3435bf89ecda488d3f949a4ac
75577b4cdfd9cd9b8505df944fb30ff13d9496c7
'2011-10-13T22:11:04-04:00'
describe
'353751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCH' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
d4168d387878fc57a9b018d966b4a9e8
c218ffa5b68dc72f033f4d8253625ee1e9a13967
'2011-10-13T22:12:47-04:00'
describe
'123715' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCI' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
070abb29ddab8736b3d14051b19d04a6
37ec2b4848e64b0dffe28ecbcaa4e492101b66fa
describe
'3693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCJ' 'sip-files00003.pro'
08ce36f2106c5c147040e5301d330555
09b3bfb52a71c54f908364ce5d93991d00f22991
'2011-10-13T22:11:03-04:00'
describe
'34779' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCK' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
85f76384863566393ba01b55f7f24c3f
c1a0dba92dcaf49d7473870f13c2cb9a661ebc9c
'2011-10-13T22:11:27-04:00'
describe
'8502444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCL' 'sip-files00003.tif'
5126f91b4d1f607c6de373e83fa98c3a
884aeb438e090ad6b43a49bf7aa5503d5b94653d
'2011-10-13T22:09:34-04:00'
describe
'245' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCM' 'sip-files00003.txt'
0da3ac484c75f49ea13082519e4e127b
790aa80188a19367db95f774c73b7f9e63b12a40
'2011-10-13T22:12:38-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'14792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCN' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
08d9ef8e36c594873fc5c3ffd2108311
bb5de3c1383fb2769f69d142eeda17c15d2fe293
'2011-10-13T22:11:42-04:00'
describe
'52308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCO' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
d35bf6352e63970b76ba91c72e29c7c6
034b649043801dbdcee69b71019b65ebd0eab6b2
'2011-10-13T22:12:57-04:00'
describe
'17370' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCP' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
09e099b3b323ecb5006d99b05450e782
83f616410ac9392e57069e68aae6fafadbd9992e
'2011-10-13T22:10:29-04:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCQ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
c3164dd07722ad8e17c3b27fbacdb2e4
4249ecdd5a3f11ebaaf7fc707631f50f7e18ae7f
'2011-10-13T22:12:34-04:00'
describe
'10484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCR' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
a181f1267a1b6baed336bb648a44aab1
fa0a47e0a409278b9fe735c056146d29cc33e965
'2011-10-13T22:10:31-04:00'
describe
'2648144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCS' 'sip-files00005.tif'
121f2685892af3cacc80df084ab10b73
0029c772907af32a7f57041f4795291290a8b2c1
'2011-10-13T22:10:52-04:00'
describe
'67' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCT' 'sip-files00005.txt'
2ab0a5a91b8dd4eabe311e59f9a4fdfe
493c0a548a5d5ebb2089d0c4bf6edf6ac84bc215
describe
'7923' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCU' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
274eff69d6aa5d6be27b2dfb9ae237fc
f492b760b66c830d5c05f9540df1a75e0b85a1f5
describe
'345806' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCV' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
cc99e4a930eccbd3e6c250e197278f1e
b1784357493794b32de88d5a2f222ea219ab8e01
'2011-10-13T22:09:32-04:00'
describe
'161961' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCW' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
a42e4ab918361762d1cf787d82cee0cd
0619f8761573da1bded7b42d381d00adc3d0a04c
'2011-10-13T22:09:49-04:00'
describe
'4228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCX' 'sip-files00006.pro'
a0a79f4a8d89e7ebfed8f1624bd8d6ba
0305e9bf3e38988f018feddc8ef1ede87b3c3658
'2011-10-13T22:11:30-04:00'
describe
'52396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCY' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
04ef5253c67459580e06d3acae682719
228f9617cfb6f54bcc7b7d62108d74c7ccbdc4b0
'2011-10-13T22:12:51-04:00'
describe
'8307796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOCZ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
2350fc4185a7bd5106eaa9afdcb472f6
f7a0be0ae17af0f5932ee9e91b270507f3d37742
'2011-10-13T22:10:23-04:00'
describe
'312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODA' 'sip-files00006.txt'
32eed2af0f5a5a1f7644be834214ebec
3f23cf30a8f4b0308edb09263a6df0dc54b5f02c
'2011-10-13T22:10:27-04:00'
describe
'23090' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODB' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
fc06ab7a47b754b86eed38199c71fbd8
acaaec77cfc84025a373fbf21433a0ea67bee609
'2011-10-13T22:11:09-04:00'
describe
'194299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODC' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
54d100ff60f1fd84275afe8b84e2ee79
11c2c81fc513c11f556ae689d5ec07981092f65d
'2011-10-13T22:10:45-04:00'
describe
'46989' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODD' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
b80ac1e0821be770309eed28db760b61
b7a6f0fb2ee1edf47c0ca2832a88d6014f3a0512
'2011-10-13T22:11:47-04:00'
describe
'6255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODE' 'sip-files00007.pro'
afda75a533dae2ee64bc8e9bba55662c
631149649540b21b6e63fc7b1d65248012197179
'2011-10-13T22:12:54-04:00'
describe
'22347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODF' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
0875805fb802baf2339fc95db2901edd
6d58676e6718e89aae2f7306094632295527e2de
'2011-10-13T22:10:26-04:00'
describe
'2649464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODG' 'sip-files00007.tif'
f8b7a842fe9fc42ddb0a44a5119e501c
b08a398857a5f71f6e496dcd7f0b5371d5c588b8
'2011-10-13T22:09:39-04:00'
describe
'439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODH' 'sip-files00007.txt'
d7417432757a4fb0377778ddddcd92ae
07fb8ba5f0b9e643a20400fccdf7e778262c50f6
'2011-10-13T22:11:00-04:00'
describe
'12364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODI' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
bafcd24a5e8c32e2d5a43af83d09279e
e5c1e60053e3691caf7d9ddc9161adf17b790056
'2011-10-13T22:11:57-04:00'
describe
'330165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODJ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
dfb3c143e1d1b48c9373ebbeb91a5a1f
0a62735f924d65907e10874ea46f35abfa1fb981
'2011-10-13T22:10:57-04:00'
describe
'109726' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODK' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
c21e018890cd7efa07cee63df90c520e
36dd79602f0a6badfcbceb8d47229db79557dd92
describe
'16676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODL' 'sip-files00009.pro'
3560e8ed75aae772de99fe14ecaa0e62
ea69b64e967ed318a64e68a0261fe896e5fcb693
'2011-10-13T22:10:15-04:00'
describe
'39992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODM' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
93b101700ecd81c19be73b238db4f594
50588e932ae1fc899c7b107f9eddcb51eaf460dc
'2011-10-13T22:10:54-04:00'
describe
'2650288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODN' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ca0fd4e31661cdc5fe42d7559bc2918d
0a8f269ad9b5be426490fb11b034867ea98c746c
'2011-10-13T22:09:50-04:00'
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODO' 'sip-files00009.txt'
bd2e32a40324a53ac128b2cb910827cb
9c23bde3c7c432c0672f2a4143d15f420882546f
'2011-10-13T22:12:05-04:00'
describe
'16975' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODP' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
b5076d3bde6f026eba7027db15e03f4b
7f9ded84fc14ce9a87adac914501b54e6be40230
'2011-10-13T22:10:04-04:00'
describe
'330378' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODQ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
3dc26eb187f3cf2281b9748a6bd0bd1a
6691bf8650518882aa2adc5bb61b9b710b776d85
'2011-10-13T22:11:10-04:00'
describe
'132893' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODR' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
d7db0b26bb725eb4f7d57c39a3276d71
5601e1c18df51f05c5c050c5690d8fdfbe2aab94
'2011-10-13T22:10:07-04:00'
describe
'30564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODS' 'sip-files00010.pro'
3604dfa7822c938cdf6cf2777dcbbd3e
c1e3eda7008fc8a20399e9313f979e8958d58f92
describe
'54066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODT' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a5d11123cd38880cf883c19131ad32d0
1e09afed288bd84d1087ee19e62f10220ef64809
describe
'2652696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODU' 'sip-files00010.tif'
66e7f710fec209a928fd6d59ab32b166
f6ff74bff599d2edf6e0ee2925d6fe1bda6be465
'2011-10-13T22:09:38-04:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODV' 'sip-files00010.txt'
1499fbc2737afe5611adde406607847d
f8abe55e727e85274d7cf021281512606a45c635
describe
'19536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODW' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
837a32a63df6e2b1c80ba11f67ec0294
10447a87667e1a670b543cb3586785e68b4f9a5f
'2011-10-13T22:12:48-04:00'
describe
'330215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODX' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
664b29b0972aa764ba21395f9fd5334e
f13be98e09c91801dc207009d6e4c9a30b136545
'2011-10-13T22:10:05-04:00'
describe
'129586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODY' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
7492c967f3afced34a7bbe672a495423
d945f181058c3bc4a3ad48984f7e6f292021b057
'2011-10-13T22:09:58-04:00'
describe
'30825' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACODZ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
f385c338e19d22b707d81adf55368978
37712242764f27ff84cc12e5f3c2f28decf76109
describe
'52385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEA' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
8c94f3d1edfc13c9799542133b9c7d7f
a00d6d7526cb552b9f2d29c3397609e24101240f
'2011-10-13T22:12:01-04:00'
describe
'2650600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
bfb62d97cbe3c6f55e91608d81ecb557
cfe7bd37d683181bbffe6f5c6cfd57ca50c95f99
'2011-10-13T22:09:36-04:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEC' 'sip-files00011.txt'
41952058a114f5e7f50d706e193d454f
a7e8d3f9654912456900574e4f505fd1aa1c8cb4
describe
'19427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOED' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f693c4c852aba64a9f5f7158b178ca2c
f27828031b5165d7ef01378176622d0c32ae2253
'2011-10-13T22:10:18-04:00'
describe
'330207' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEE' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
11ab49fd4846264f46d79bb9ccdfbee6
83ade1f146b66797c7951891ce73c25de4838c29
'2011-10-13T22:10:14-04:00'
describe
'130289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEF' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
9af0ca024ab05ebe9ce71656a5754114
e4d003b64a4897c990f7a9beea4e715e795c0943
'2011-10-13T22:10:34-04:00'
describe
'29898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEG' 'sip-files00012.pro'
eaa4456938ca7bd698ccff90742357cc
e1e899ada998f9c5bf35a0d16baf319d8e2eea6a
describe
'52714' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEH' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
a784cec94a2424f8eccf06c062dbf1c5
39204978df72c4dd1109650caff6636f1fc990ca
'2011-10-13T22:12:00-04:00'
describe
'2650648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEI' 'sip-files00012.tif'
4b081b5ac99c50f3efba38491fff2965
148ceb4af40c394d55e154c4f6b35a3b86ed362b
'2011-10-13T22:09:42-04:00'
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEJ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
bebc6964329c9bf48097372a87ff8ce8
b39e70aaef9094f73412493824db4de4c6b8a332
'2011-10-13T22:11:22-04:00'
describe
'20030' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEK' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
e46b599d69510ae6a997a662b001731d
575fc452e0937ef44093250b8085d2ee7cb57d94
'2011-10-13T22:11:18-04:00'
describe
'330170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEL' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
ae887e4b9115d5f130ec5efe388b9cd6
b56a517a1bd3f3f461371e0b4b85b698ab44d559
'2011-10-13T22:09:29-04:00'
describe
'121155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEM' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
080a31794962d0ad275e967e83019062
277a521be4866c8baa130964b849c553c705001d
'2011-10-13T22:10:50-04:00'
describe
'27731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEN' 'sip-files00013.pro'
e2fc9c5317537d840a8afdd7ca27baa3
d8ae943190c89c8ce03ca797e2158c8d48c38d32
'2011-10-13T22:10:06-04:00'
describe
'50191' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEO' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
db2999d698e6a4f048c93db604ac09f7
b41f65ee79da14a0c2348060a9662acfe0c7f875
'2011-10-13T22:09:40-04:00'
describe
'2650588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEP' 'sip-files00013.tif'
927dbd13cfad2fadfe0e900f0db6c843
e041934a2eebdbe5caef1f5616639aa4a0e48370
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEQ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
e3cdc4110d72645e6053d4c227370e6d
668c12929eb0dff749057909d112701511de1d24
'2011-10-13T22:11:15-04:00'
describe
'19007' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOER' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
c0496970548ee1d8895efff0b3aac875
ad3cc20557ccd4810e956bfef77630f11dff0227
'2011-10-13T22:10:09-04:00'
describe
'330213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOES' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
12b2b5643df20a4cafb86d65842e975e
2f0f32a7e2b2a4691386686ecafa3eda5e4fbc5e
describe
'122632' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOET' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
0fb7019c4a63a8d9a3232636f73f9bc6
bf548f8fabcda7d013fd8afefc83d3ff93265bf1
'2011-10-13T22:13:01-04:00'
describe
'28362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEU' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a1cace4b53603467677f6dc664c27d27
a2ffbbffdc03c30e4a9d0268ec87cf9b3ca15872
'2011-10-13T22:09:41-04:00'
describe
'50595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEV' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
29fe063b843293f6091208a8582de364
80c1936b210ef469a055cdb378f61f691716e2b7
'2011-10-13T22:10:44-04:00'
describe
'2650696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEW' 'sip-files00014.tif'
d97bdf2ec38f26e6cf600db8b1a8464c
875a66b3b47e5cf8063b2b43cff1a9739d2be01c
'2011-10-13T22:10:43-04:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEX' 'sip-files00014.txt'
056d2e0e3e4e21183c072846f337ef54
9022df7769d3512119088226eac1ea449bb80585
'2011-10-13T22:10:48-04:00'
describe
'19356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEY' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
9e9fdc59e4b86522b8f11a877585f46a
bfa1a46b3c26cafb19b171c43f60be23f738a01b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOEZ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
7ab07fcfca1fa7ff20aab27b00c6791c
467496bba47b9dabe9eb319cc006953ee499b74f
describe
'130453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFA' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
50851fbf8482db3031e0190ff2254fdc
80a8b71264d925893cec79348fc3f02e71c735b6
'2011-10-13T22:10:38-04:00'
describe
'30787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFB' 'sip-files00015.pro'
715086eae07b9237e4439b643bc4f33a
f5bcdebf13d150e136bfc66fb8e4e7ef598f9830
describe
'52758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFC' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
7af24012cb211da26eaf8ff799895a40
64ddbaba772ef67b6273e4f6c77610534ce7c624
'2011-10-13T22:10:01-04:00'
describe
'2650636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFD' 'sip-files00015.tif'
ad5300bcdc1dfdfc52eee406c6503262
4501cd7761a4debc6f9454464a0903f1f924f4b8
'2011-10-13T22:11:35-04:00'
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFE' 'sip-files00015.txt'
948e11ccbe45908e2eb99a7724a5f6da
9e852475e0d12597f31517b04ce815aaeb19b144
'2011-10-13T22:11:17-04:00'
describe
'19801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFF' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
16ba8f95c6240fd3b43dc7a24b3c827b
5888e17a6b21ba2b9b035c9c39a675004db48da0
'2011-10-13T22:11:53-04:00'
describe
'330151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFG' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
bd7af560ec2662856153f8bdc8500ae6
fd368bc853268d0ca0cff4d85695d11403ba4d9f
describe
'119135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFH' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
b283e768be0ca72353e42430fa26337c
69158b432a6a053ca5188dead3ad7daab96a877b
'2011-10-13T22:09:48-04:00'
describe
'27164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFI' 'sip-files00016.pro'
fcb6782cc12992cbdccea6b49c340ead
bd92bc8ce9144eb8c0994dcaea8f5a066be1d712
'2011-10-13T22:10:28-04:00'
describe
'48050' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFJ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
0c3dc4511efc6a84d59f304f7ec43a63
6cfe7b56c195fbced34c58cc7f69510c0954d26d
'2011-10-13T22:10:36-04:00'
describe
'2650732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFK' 'sip-files00016.tif'
91cbbd6983b3b29fbde2411dd1e364a2
3dc4033d4c3ecc873dc6d0f53cda848eb7f99542
'2011-10-13T22:10:40-04:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFL' 'sip-files00016.txt'
900de802a572506a8aa0c72666c09399
edd8fd1a1e40790db5ef716167e46ab2cb006a24
describe
'19459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFM' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
8c4d40c2b1888cea61e511d3630ad60b
eff8e1000064d70d42c2daa8b5e59e2128c9e3df
describe
'330155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFN' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
558896870a36720e8091304432aa2cdd
bf583dc83f16f5aa591db0543e4756ad6b6882bd
describe
'124256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFO' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7e2ae401d73f51058f3f5943c4bed182
0aefd71aef4a60efab1167f5c538c100b2f4a928
describe
'28245' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFP' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e90cf9b28b1b66782d8c5c15f5d90b53
23534d8528d450b36c28a1176d9fa80bada0b451
describe
'51969' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFQ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
768c2586e0b7d407492e8736bdcf9269
57f6d7690aade1166bbf2071baa972a861d4d0b4
'2011-10-13T22:12:30-04:00'
describe
'2650684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFR' 'sip-files00017.tif'
850222fe706df4c07bfc37d1d0628444
04722441203be87d66301f557bd5f049a5b96aa2
'2011-10-13T22:12:02-04:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFS' 'sip-files00017.txt'
9c6a6099614aea81e93ae2fe0510232d
65846b43c9c598c15b16dc1b57af949c001de8c3
describe
'19778' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFT' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
10c87aac1e0678a19394a9372e2353de
9119f0a291a241ff135f37b0b9b83e20b48ba521
describe
'330419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
c650d0499be00032a63cb0c7e032d887
81138f34131996a240dcc44d4d5f633b1ab2b7c2
'2011-10-13T22:10:10-04:00'
describe
'130083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFV' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
26fb89964117333abefcf02030ba14af
545a3037fd33a40aa53453ffad7f04de8efd72c5
'2011-10-13T22:11:45-04:00'
describe
'30885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFW' 'sip-files00018.pro'
14aa8648e0493fe779db6ce43feb5c82
27b8f6669308f803148d97733e305406ce8406e7
'2011-10-13T22:10:32-04:00'
describe
'53921' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFX' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
52d983a4adbd4b998c9fae009f7030fb
0b85226b5636f57a29f332c524da2b6ca9e8b45a
'2011-10-13T22:12:55-04:00'
describe
'2652900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFY' 'sip-files00018.tif'
8a54c7bd23415ff99421853902c54833
4dfa96e6919f35bc0a0d0348b04019c1af9bc940
'2011-10-13T22:09:56-04:00'
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOFZ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
12d65f5368e534e49708a897780183a2
12f9b14d377a9abefd2abd5b2395f2aeb8dcd7a5
describe
'20049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGA' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
75f9a2500a5490ef73ef83c95cd86e03
89b5db78a7288c5fe7f920ed514b491d18b0e5c9
'2011-10-13T22:11:40-04:00'
describe
'318018' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGB' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
888ff10de8b255a95ced4f73c3078257
d18afae1fd8b6a44c55c0903cafd760979c14ebe
'2011-10-13T22:10:41-04:00'
describe
'127282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGC' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
53e9362f06194e44095bb0e8416dcbe7
6589d9b7a753c98f80feb9e8a79eedf3fc5a6eb8
'2011-10-13T22:12:41-04:00'
describe
'29852' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGD' 'sip-files00019.pro'
88846f6ec59fd2c2c12b6c7d2c347a68
b473f69920198c370841bce6769bda28b17b435c
'2011-10-13T22:12:03-04:00'
describe
'50315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGE' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
799e9c8975c4fb0cb9e9e5e82fa75b77
1656611885e9a48744160225a5f5eae8f9cd6065
'2011-10-13T22:11:31-04:00'
describe
'2553616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGF' 'sip-files00019.tif'
bb34c3a463be254668f04257efecaf9e
dc9d0ca3afff27e3d48dface20547cd180977d50
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGG' 'sip-files00019.txt'
29fbcbcde09aaf3f85e3905345fa7455
5957fe4481c1b0a183aab3bc356c576f0e1e5d39
'2011-10-13T22:10:03-04:00'
describe
'20506' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGH' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
d836e31f964fc96ab1295683aeec994a
c8e6d9dbd0cfc8e82e4804df1542a209685fc3af
'2011-10-13T22:12:33-04:00'
describe
'330186' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGI' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
dd0eabb94d4a096df8ee0d42fcdfd644
879054e94dec9500914f1cd7d79b422de931cae0
'2011-10-13T22:09:57-04:00'
describe
'120888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGJ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
ed3b89ae6fa80fa12dba97d50209977a
4c039e91d1b662438444fe4bf9b79682017a215f
'2011-10-13T22:12:23-04:00'
describe
'28102' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
9e4d167ae65eb6b6386db09b7576cff3
5c7720de6d3de6dfc63b583be71d87ce734f94b0
'2011-10-13T22:10:33-04:00'
describe
'47563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGL' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
195db5c61cc236ceb40f8527b78e508d
b329590c2b5f09c3ca0a2f522497b600a695334f
'2011-10-13T22:12:25-04:00'
describe
'2650572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGM' 'sip-files00020.tif'
05a542818f6f51029ec10025273f9a02
32cea491db35b396d2cef52e66069fd97b07624e
'2011-10-13T22:09:37-04:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGN' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0213ab302e0b65dfd4706f582730a9e3
0aeeeb69bf0d85f7a7bad3eec4fbef580b512f2d
'2011-10-13T22:09:55-04:00'
describe
'19000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGO' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
844fca4943ba1019f5c618673908ed17
fcccb0f444d934225c810e666d5c7da76d07c158
describe
'319555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGP' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e2397ab1d728d1340a2bc7fac0bd93c1
41fb0f61b42dc5d8c137919fba55d039bee0a68c
'2011-10-13T22:12:49-04:00'
describe
'122804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
2ddb01d9d4cbd36bed02df49e4d20811
113044968eb6c34ee6b56532871e0b3f99f567de
'2011-10-13T22:12:08-04:00'
describe
'28194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGR' 'sip-files00021.pro'
716088c821ace6d09f1078c0b54547b2
540a27ffc84a01b6f0a03e18c9edec9b023da9ed
describe
'50701' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGS' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
17e813aa63f0cde17eaa1e84626a8391
685f156675410058716bc1cb9084fa2897b98b8d
describe
'2565896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGT' 'sip-files00021.tif'
01ad92d57096e214c78c17aac0a953f8
cbdb99e7e719facafd9b8a44aff208861562c74c
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGU' 'sip-files00021.txt'
53a50e04d15d8aff5b9f79e5053f9ac3
e2f3f307489c4b125d260880269e5d84a13600e4
describe
'20154' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGV' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
f94bd8c6fee24fa3a26f527e667c8d77
1dcde3ac47d08b33f062db6b5396653a4f14306a
'2011-10-13T22:11:29-04:00'
describe
'330211' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGW' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
03dc218988146b21f0626adf3fd18b26
0dc38224fdcfcad73e50b767ea0a6bcebe6ce7fd
'2011-10-13T22:10:42-04:00'
describe
'133705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGX' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
ae43da6d69a02fbd2ddc3d9d58e8f47c
830a61fa6ca52b2b77fb82a4582c1473b48dfed5
'2011-10-13T22:12:24-04:00'
describe
'31170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGY' 'sip-files00022.pro'
23104b1ec8242bb566a772f1bed998af
745973721a4a69a290c9f4ff185025cd1de04cdd
'2011-10-13T22:10:12-04:00'
describe
'52089' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOGZ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
d7fddba79e68fed1a678854530739794
60b85e901a3c0f6bba30bffe9d12772dbf2c8984
'2011-10-13T22:09:33-04:00'
describe
'2650752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHA' 'sip-files00022.tif'
118835b470d8bf8ec02fc7755f461890
54818c2e8137ddf316e725d6c95a0571629140c3
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHB' 'sip-files00022.txt'
1e96b92427299246c3b3a1db15b257b4
ce042979c1f881f5954ccee672f61ed32f757046
'2011-10-13T22:11:37-04:00'
describe
'19914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHC' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
73374675bf5f9bf9153e34d52da58f7f
6ec6a75a8f4d7132b7e255fe63076d3f5ebd73dc
describe
'330160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHD' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
0560522aeb9ad46793bd4228226cd228
a8ef35bf2fb7568f1a006790ae39b7b107816b62
'2011-10-13T22:11:34-04:00'
describe
'129668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHE' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
0f6bac17ff6c83cd9efae587bdcea499
8c64015411e06615c843324987a7126cdbec87ec
describe
'30640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHF' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c63a8e44fa5e8562509ea368413cc5bc
9500ec58a5ef662639349a12a109c42605c07d00
describe
'51846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHG' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
655bc5f779a5e5de1b30b0aa585c0c30
b14d0bd84761d7ca6cbe866bd163f56ea141956b
'2011-10-13T22:11:58-04:00'
describe
'2650668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHH' 'sip-files00023.tif'
8f8608e82e57160efa3dcc18302c32c3
c5e6c6a431ed90400aae9c52e337a58835f8e67a
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHI' 'sip-files00023.txt'
2468ba3254a4aae036c21eca22208e7a
72e713d7f92baa66f07850fe50675248d10dea91
'2011-10-13T22:12:40-04:00'
describe
'19790' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHJ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
d7248d64fb9e4028289bf124e9731447
aaab5efa157f296f32663929ebfdbd14b7b80e70
describe
'330446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHK' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
d019a756eca51f3b74828370b2d80fe5
54ce1b7e49c052484ae9fc4023f868907b8f0ca8
describe
'137836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHL' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
9cce16552f1d43c730c44a2a84331ad8
f70b1dd4249b930551922864e396d3955346da19
describe
'32653' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHM' 'sip-files00024.pro'
70189e17365d771f563167360715369c
cdd4ae7bff73f502e752453b6633774f4f40c982
describe
'54459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHN' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e4637826a359cdc508337a96f5adf0de
0d47da88155479d2f955be033ecd182fe4ac9ec1
describe
'2653004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHO' 'sip-files00024.tif'
4277359cbd3fbf2afbf13432f2578591
0b9db093701a8f7da6068c8d54ef1e79d0559cdd
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHP' 'sip-files00024.txt'
617f431600e5302287aefdbb6324cdc6
b07442d23dd2b697455d89c8beb246c4239fb388
describe
'20274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHQ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
f064185caba2d0a2757afe0160988c50
021f343eaf9721b205e9d6f6e6cc1fd4d6f2d9e2
'2011-10-13T22:11:50-04:00'
describe
'330154' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHR' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
2a1dba05d364c1a9ba85fba658b9661e
f32904c2e6c65555aca893ee8ecdb87a453bc151
describe
'136458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHS' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
3996651e13999fa6684d734da9df522d
aa9930a89871b063bc6e434784f9f9fbea368152
'2011-10-13T22:12:50-04:00'
describe
'32540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHT' 'sip-files00025.pro'
5c6466ce8cb47cb959e740feee3a44d1
173fc8489f679994b72f4886e301a8e66c10246b
describe
'52975' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHU' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
7fec033e00d92a6530aaa1bad5f0c3fa
78db044a4ef7dfe86e9a51fc44eddc0562cb5fe7
describe
'2650628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHV' 'sip-files00025.tif'
6612a288d97b133e4be45a8f3fb07b8b
ec7f60e5c12ac06dd5f879401e81a829a73b038b
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHW' 'sip-files00025.txt'
2bee879535725d6f12a6c357b9ca2a1e
934e7169ec20851a6496a32a03a774e6d97c52d6
'2011-10-13T22:10:37-04:00'
describe
'19849' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHX' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
6808d1ce8eb24264a21ad2b9a44dcf8c
fe5ad08b4e9bb73cdb553af9e13c1b4f1fca17be
describe
'330137' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d4eb57d2f39c7fccbfd88db4925aa5ac
8af5e073c5b07eabfa1bb72a152c3d31b1a46955
'2011-10-13T22:10:17-04:00'
describe
'127307' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOHZ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
7636fe92f3eea4343245d7280780afdf
0227bf3b7bdfd2440bf1100e79d6a2f07b4add3e
describe
'29881' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIA' 'sip-files00026.pro'
2fb20cd63a3826394774b45e30bb994e
a6260950147fbb9543303c65b05572af71639ef7
describe
'51780' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIB' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
7bba4f29fa92520febf5be0af41be802
4b400bb7d68bd098978db874c913f6454b03eafd
'2011-10-13T22:11:13-04:00'
describe
'2650764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIC' 'sip-files00026.tif'
ef5e78478cd4f9d7230509a246e70b77
e3f98c4fe4339f634de455e71f611a64fa44861a
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOID' 'sip-files00026.txt'
8a0c273f112ef4a4317c6591a4678ca0
d93ef06defef872bcb158e240bfda7e78921cd1c
'2011-10-13T22:12:13-04:00'
describe
'19829' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIE' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
d70945b6d751516898552bc7e3a0619b
ca9ed4777d3389055898eeacc6c09bc047dff9b5
'2011-10-13T22:12:53-04:00'
describe
'330212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIF' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d16067e4be26c93c43a784f67811e106
b619e4364d1f8e6882dbbe961e25266a0218b1ef
'2011-10-13T22:12:11-04:00'
describe
'123355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
521c9c067d2e49f0696694b49ccfc498
14694e9f86d3322c0f86f1b780d397b4a589ee7d
describe
'19313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIH' 'sip-files00027.pro'
5b848278183d238ffb4d2581cc25da92
0deb27a8abe534d8289634baefef8e7abad5bc6c
describe
'44744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOII' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
0a8f16b390b0ddb605614095ef304489
5038ba56a9ffaf0789fd438856ea53ad5ab59408
describe
'2650324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIJ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
7f4c4544bf1a35694a095ad348fefac5
a9e268bbd11a36f5c6fe519beacc072be625dcb4
'2011-10-13T22:10:20-04:00'
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIK' 'sip-files00027.txt'
19f8ebc012e34471ad3343753564e70f
e586725c0ca4279304c755df7c48af4a5c109182
describe
'17980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIL' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
b612daececddef7876b72e875ad94358
8a3f0a44d4e2d4b1c592c28d131c1e3cac01bd1e
describe
'330208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIM' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a7a8765f60e804db7364b9e94c6efdb6
1229aee2262cc3519267975722004f714fb630d0
'2011-10-13T22:12:37-04:00'
describe
'124570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIN' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c4b310927c12fa8c9f9b9ba7bebf5b19
c7d0fe84152697406ad5fe346384198c0a40c826
describe
'29408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIO' 'sip-files00028.pro'
d0235ea4334ebe1a8f9bc41a1235b6e3
e5f61c97741f1373727373f61a80e673b14ecb42
describe
'49084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
d26f1143a03506bacaeca315d0393300
c3fb3e307edf7ec79ea5665901c05861992768a9
'2011-10-13T22:10:47-04:00'
describe
'2650468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIQ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
d985dc1c4334fb81c9488275c3a11322
c25576646dcad8a458e6526621a4638494df7d5e
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIR' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ede60ab7298f84c649c484ac5e7a631e
5b14a4056de6db9cc03780c1b5513bb845302a85
'2011-10-13T22:11:02-04:00'
describe
'18927' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIS' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
4d6197e259d274bddaa65267f6d2e844
570734002154c3b73d54fbbdd0f8639c237c6efc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIT' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
f07f97ada88982ffe849fe5c53382ab3
d65b73fdc860ec1a63cde1be491ff5dd46877d3e
'2011-10-13T22:09:27-04:00'
describe
'130638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIU' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
95e3fcbcddfcf964a546ee4d0f3b2c50
43589f592afd1ab976b0392f332de622cd096740
'2011-10-13T22:11:25-04:00'
describe
'30974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIV' 'sip-files00029.pro'
630e32a5bf25841f48a9c8c94c7ea72d
0f29742fa60210f6f4e5e691b3cc883d7cea45cd
'2011-10-13T22:11:23-04:00'
describe
'52595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIW' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
0abb066b83108605ead0ec8612a1706c
754a9a116f43a1cd3b433078f55fa066b3bdec68
describe
'2650608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIX' 'sip-files00029.tif'
1059e0ba876e18fd05ffa4747b584bb2
9b17428279752990586c97dc7e0ebb71e82e9f78
'2011-10-13T22:10:13-04:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIY' 'sip-files00029.txt'
275b9519abaa142e06c3e3f91ae07d06
abe4637e3c503caa1539661a5fcc3c1b9e325ed9
'2011-10-13T22:10:08-04:00'
describe
'19400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOIZ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
bb4e3e965ead0257b730339a82f85b70
749615232f21a559a2a619e22063e63d15ed6ecd
'2011-10-13T22:12:35-04:00'
describe
'330195' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJA' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
faf9a8700aed5fb4ac368429c39d83b7
eb2fc25bc34baa9aa5dc8372ed9f3c2444027824
'2011-10-13T22:11:07-04:00'
describe
'127326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJB' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
37412d8116fe84d3c6db39803b09f71d
c7ee06cd5516b7ec1341d66b3de10410b6bb2087
describe
'30262' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJC' 'sip-files00030.pro'
3cf53c88f7160f1efa4b0374148a97b4
26c9cd1ffeb29aeeb3a9bef90b63f1041a3942f7
describe
'48880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJD' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
16c614300087def1af1a085d266bd291
133b0a0df0aa2ebd3dcd94851ec622ef1d09cecf
'2011-10-13T22:09:30-04:00'
describe
'2650504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJE' 'sip-files00030.tif'
99c8ee552eba4a53e0d32d92e79a3aec
7eaae5803470082318a0a8209608ea2f32a42f2b
'2011-10-13T22:10:39-04:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJF' 'sip-files00030.txt'
007879604a5ddbc0cb52c0901c51e33e
bd965f5a59912e172b5d282e1920cd3ab7ccccd3
describe
'19098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJG' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
566c08d0e052fb9645a493d0e5392988
053c74662ebfb05a566bbb303dabc4e68bd6d622
'2011-10-13T22:11:41-04:00'
describe
'330157' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJH' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f07d49221cc87356f0c371aa4f556f7a
90552eb913b787df7aab6c16a5744b950f24daf2
describe
'128552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJI' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
4135ada80754cfad323b9306efba0eb9
8710845c0f85c86be45172ea9f0054cdd1321f02
describe
'30446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJJ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
f2283a7428e6eb1faf721e7606fe8d5b
d15c8664cb45e5c36ab72248d2969f3577d48d5d
describe
'50528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJK' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e20032629b24579f8a6c0a34395cfbea
5432ec2786b96426913e80c5a264973a63e070f3
'2011-10-13T22:12:09-04:00'
describe
'2650488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJL' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e5675889484d30d20f4a463be4ec7b7e
16d6bf7dc330036eaacdf889332af7ed48c5de94
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJM' 'sip-files00031.txt'
d2a848a3ee81990f7672e197ca765ae3
51fa6ec8624557976c82a752fb8d9ebd11a37d93
'2011-10-13T22:12:14-04:00'
describe
'19281' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJN' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
60f2da39873972c4262d6933626a93b8
318afcbc73170d62254e6cb1e1c9a9a1561b97db
describe
'330447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJO' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
2791bb87805f8fdbd88a572e65210e71
9317ce1bb2678a26c34dcde5e90f6c145c66369c
describe
'123343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJP' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
cc93c30103bc778fc15c8fb431c178f5
e0642f5d9bd075b2d847081b8f28000b5cabbe8d
describe
'28507' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJQ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
4e7872d99b13d99764febca42e4588ea
e5fc611741e20b952c6ea2d03171103af89b3a60
describe
'50551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJR' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a321b426192d5e152061c60c532194db
53f15afe51d4097d35d27fbc64810be93a17c161
'2011-10-13T22:11:55-04:00'
describe
'2652756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJS' 'sip-files00032.tif'
0ab382410891014abbc695888f741c44
bd825d3c6f19614c16bff67757dd43537fbe5a03
'2011-10-13T22:11:16-04:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJT' 'sip-files00032.txt'
b8a0d6da7a573317dec27e66b8daaa69
93f9b0ff823fe04771e3bc4a1583cf24e0f78ef7
describe
'19533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJU' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
793a4ef37ea0648e215b54b028900b99
6c84eda455e9b093fffb46774507d0bc21c917f6
describe
'330214' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJV' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
52e031171714936bdbd81ba2192bd0eb
a9681cef6e6d166fb32c25243d0ce1066a7bd01e
'2011-10-13T22:11:19-04:00'
describe
'125830' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJW' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
89b507911c591ecbbb2b8905d24120e7
54b6366b805b1124b25fd8a35a5bde68405e207d
describe
'28933' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJX' 'sip-files00033.pro'
5bff36c019f75b8d1966c9dc9c5fbb60
cd74d02404564ab09c94dc588ec94db46356aed4
describe
'50606' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJY' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
5cf715461c7e281ef0e061bf4c82f4da
ab6bf8c0ead9672057ae926dd7abf7ec61bd3894
describe
'2650728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOJZ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
6f44447fbba179e3ae1a673bfc285bfc
a69ff8115efa3bdd98bd34422e75ca60a00d978d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKA' 'sip-files00033.txt'
6e60cea5dd021f2e6d5c75dec7f5d843
0d863dbf7f95bdc175738defdec9534e1cd8def1
'2011-10-13T22:10:30-04:00'
describe
'19623' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKB' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
29c17618e1e52997b4fb1708d8bed802
754f24b90a89a67b444f0ffd5b2e26a64881fcfc
describe
'330441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKC' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
9235f8fe67ae98688e0051f571389c7f
c618c98b9c6d82308a55dc711d1022bc8c75b981
'2011-10-13T22:12:45-04:00'
describe
'123918' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKD' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
ce891ad86cf2554752258c04689b070b
0fb2cdf71d6764b9300c7611ebe42ab006f133ac
describe
'28900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKE' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e409ff0ee6b5d8ea2137ca932377c0ae
d7934e24a6a484f0303497434e331f1f17e803b1
describe
'49887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKF' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
e78eb016e104b71ad6278066d61b6c11
af93e6844069de969fdfb564b25f53cda37a413b
'2011-10-13T22:13:00-04:00'
describe
'2652720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKG' 'sip-files00034.tif'
76827eb3da7af52203fbc01de3beb09d
fbc27f3ea6a31bf330107bd139fc4da2a02b3504
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKH' 'sip-files00034.txt'
390778c692dbdd345845e7fb9d6e10e5
7d87bd2115b3b417f678d611be3e0c68be66f2d0
describe
'19511' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKI' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
d2e15c81cac5b92c6d3a83c89f74c339
0e7c5ee55340a0a654283589b36332f30a25600f
'2011-10-13T22:11:20-04:00'
describe
'330203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKJ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
bef35d62836c182ec14dc0c603e807f6
08f2d7549922ab44bde1776f698daa4e23fdf3bf
describe
'135511' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKK' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
fd3c1c3d6b03747a6b66318e1bde1a9b
c889ff5cafe48b9cdf301e84f48a222251a82a0f
'2011-10-13T22:10:53-04:00'
describe
'31762' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKL' 'sip-files00035.pro'
b98364c9a4a9fa30b5bf6332f356de48
c271528d572156b48eb5c7cde20aa90a1136df5e
'2011-10-13T22:12:04-04:00'
describe
'52730' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKM' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
4988496e274ce431049b740643bfcd29
a0caf4e61ffb7ffeca9021d7bc2dc0659e9a62a8
describe
'2650644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKN' 'sip-files00035.tif'
0b624e34b6b479940b9f1a6dc39d512d
e578086aa5c0bfbdf8a23ee58b9e7c7d2129b2d1
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKO' 'sip-files00035.txt'
f2bd7d62a5e624ba2a2ddf8df869b32c
142374ce3ab08e81cc6d29dc7416eb414e1c4cf3
'2011-10-13T22:09:47-04:00'
describe
'19522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKP' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
05017ffede2838e8df640432baccd508
330ed00c095bf8196f6c0d12d781ae0ed228af2b
'2011-10-13T22:11:33-04:00'
describe
'330473' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKQ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
d284ac2d65c02c34948b1b30e3aa2250
9bd9b95e5863da2530026cf50e6619ebeb970659
describe
'134265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKR' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
de180b3d50a1ed658ab5173413d9d7cc
ff6f1f567811284a436383115db8dbea6ac56b70
'2011-10-13T22:09:59-04:00'
describe
'30872' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKS' 'sip-files00036.pro'
b1d43490639fde7ec11517d472cb30b0
8cc2193b1047843922857a1212f9ea822a6073ff
describe
'53546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKT' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
668fc1a23cd7472b95586e3b5b941420
9a6e3c304b904a21d8eaef02fd749f616cfc524a
describe
'2652832' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKU' 'sip-files00036.tif'
eec5d302b63e2a454256ed5397e78870
41015ad500365cb6926818279c2e64f877caeba1
'2011-10-13T22:11:05-04:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKV' 'sip-files00036.txt'
879c244ed02651fa8fe2c53d81f86bdb
38ff16ef8ab83106ba1228a54298c3cdbdd1ccd8
describe
'19955' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKW' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
8fcfe49094f60c1062f39ad90ea5ef2a
7fed4decc215202221e21748691392438167be13
'2011-10-13T22:12:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKX' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
47d193298a8d82fa8d1e206b3668fa45
b07b365c410c01af0578d80ab8c91a721865cb9c
describe
'127112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKY' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
aea01d915b819e5457995ccb24fce0db
0ba3e73f71d66eb7d3b64ab52f85422af949a41d
describe
'28784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOKZ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9921ca865337e6474ee1b6c96c3e7312
427e82dbb11976306fa99cfa9da0f65f271007e6
describe
'48630' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLA' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
eda7ed2e9431f145b8061ae3de10b48c
fb00f9bbaeae1b90ac7a63af165a41f75874baad
describe
'2650556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLB' 'sip-files00037.tif'
48da0516dd49ddee99fca9f1c148a845
608949defa79e39418e16305d9f5a821d5217b16
'2011-10-13T22:11:24-04:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLC' 'sip-files00037.txt'
62f1f0ab593c37f64c1962b6b34ee357
0f35fbceffc962dc609011e932f5db130994440f
describe
'19022' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLD' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
032f42c860e970b4f18355c7344a2476
f61951bcd59838792bed68e0985b65c0bdc66984
'2011-10-13T22:12:07-04:00'
describe
'330393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLE' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
5f9b9bfcf17c5a5f56c28223d47da299
da8f7eb7b979936353bf6b6e7086a5eb17aeb983
'2011-10-13T22:12:12-04:00'
describe
'132303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLF' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
3c52df30d0b749f9bc3de3092a143bac
96ab0d68af8ad9c32fee03c7f2c1e7cf46e1c3af
'2011-10-13T22:10:11-04:00'
describe
'31081' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLG' 'sip-files00038.pro'
897d9907b58759b92636abbcc59f0014
2b1e636fcb2c670a10adcb73e5680be6a9dc3aeb
'2011-10-13T22:11:46-04:00'
describe
'53251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLH' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
8fbe755be41fae327391f567c61a707f
b203a62c0f632b3064e7d4682bfb9444e801d957
describe
'2652868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLI' 'sip-files00038.tif'
b55d973125806adacdabb991dcccff34
d5c45d0a34e66aa1d2d6d2d8a4a39106e4853470
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLJ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
473bdfdd2d3ad0bb361614cae9014de0
8f944066a3b34547cce1e0d135eabb61db3ffcd0
describe
'19982' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLK' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
88b460cd0db68d7a17794d1e318c3434
19e9bd83050732bc723495bb3bdace356bbeba08
'2011-10-13T22:12:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLL' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
b5159968b21dab98731e59c83dc22c04
83ac9610c5deb9041f58e56be716817bb20749db
describe
'128199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLM' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
10815678c3d027ed6a24c3256c7b678a
fecf3e901e8335a1fa3789f154e5dc36a9206383
describe
'30277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLN' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1c8cd8dba30e953f030c28c75b1f23c8
db2de3292f0e8cba80146b9e3ca57442b7cd6511
describe
'50226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLO' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
100cee053b720ca619ce665137c0015c
3b9807ad16ee16a698f979bfd6941738311c5a3f
describe
'2650400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLP' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b505b41e55ce60ee9ac474e11552ed6d
b1388e5d3c33e8cfe7522f7d902db1d0d9678f36
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLQ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
abd06ae6c1014e3dc5f46087b448345f
3ec3b99b21e1a70ca5c5fb7df40363d5266418b7
describe
'19216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLR' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
9b98885a8bd4d1fc58b950960af258a4
4936cb4dc39976ac7cf3671157463aac7e53a267
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLS' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
101009e38a5fa05db7520893d4eb09ff
f19abe2e4d663f10c38cd0da4fc89f2880318953
describe
'125043' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLT' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
487ab074fed4080209ba9f57de99292d
cd4c828bf7fd3c796f358102e3b831eaf739d8ce
'2011-10-13T22:11:48-04:00'
describe
'30106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLU' 'sip-files00040.pro'
248ceecb6d71664de045696b743f2c0c
4acd7e95d0c6bdebb129c58672f3e4cc0c962a04
describe
'50072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLV' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
a4315033177488668b4723691acab17f
a8ff35997353e5a0ae9562c1e9cf384f4338133f
describe
'2650656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLW' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d37a256ec2fcca20e692282836cfee0a
c487960fc0b74f9afcf4e8af83002ff36cbe8734
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLX' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d2bffcd21adcdf3a2bad1743c3a5912e
1bc41e0d595f649e0e2c5f62c7cbe10245bc391e
describe
'19363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLY' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
4c3bb2a37e46c2033b1c49702a245c03
44526745a8e2cec2cb832da811a93299d295af2f
describe
'330175' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOLZ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b849662c6fc09cb0082fd56398e77517
ecf031e1b980b5ea821fce1545c60cdd062c9235
describe
'95595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMA' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
253cca442641df5b8a9f583c9c6b5175
c4847ba640b7454af959a6d80668a0cd8aec1af7
'2011-10-13T22:10:59-04:00'
describe
'20486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMB' 'sip-files00041.pro'
ec0abb22803420fa9186dd9d1be2dc34
57d1ecfcc85189270cdfa7cf85529c94c7f61d5f
'2011-10-13T22:10:35-04:00'
describe
'38572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMC' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
8c10abc56857d50c13391d0129730468
4ff6ac91ecad4053c943e4d0b5497924e7d08e39
describe
'2649900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMD' 'sip-files00041.tif'
ccb2573258471a189d60c981944ab218
662033041b4a0e0f7e41707119f67d1694795af4
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOME' 'sip-files00041.txt'
cd10de59768bcfceff3dff9d8a5d7eae
62a66674b28f1b57905717b778d17e01c7930756
describe
'16048' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMF' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
ea6b827d16d9703219792b0f79569c71
6bef1662d6b72a6dbb2b32a5861aca9c6d53eb29
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMG' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
335dba5d7515711a0bf73dac72af596b
f981c4108efd93efe9b0ea313e4d17d00d0ac755
describe
'112105' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMH' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
eab9af2f6f479ec3c3379cf6f1532523
fcadc9f48199075c4b86d2ac6f1c9f41c9c23132
describe
'17549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMI' 'sip-files00042.pro'
e5a52fb0cde70ed07414b4cb2e6935a0
47a43b43185dbbdcd406f82ba67d886b4ffdf069
describe
'41074' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMJ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
0e8d16b47df112b106a7212d67af0cac
04f5fb14e0e4fe855c180a95e89065adf57500cf
describe
'2650184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMK' 'sip-files00042.tif'
b608b0829159e495732e6714f77f17fc
358412c055dccb32c6d0f3d2d996f09ef937d751
'2011-10-13T22:10:25-04:00'
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOML' 'sip-files00042.txt'
e6fab1e0b571350ed18bdd73f3856102
f313eca9c5ae7121ac091b4ee9ad3381e127285c
describe
'17098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMM' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
e2e6e47cbf501069f0511b28aaa768db
8f6eebc2af951df869fabd5bc48b448ac044fc29
describe
'330197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMN' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
6e503b25262d6e76b57987cb70b06cf6
6676a20a41bd6f0191fb9d823a4cb17f7b478ecd
'2011-10-13T22:12:43-04:00'
describe
'129190' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMO' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
d3852a51cccb9e729d0420f2e1ad4f37
8423de9478291346b9c351462c34ad96094f0bda
'2011-10-13T22:10:56-04:00'
describe
'29851' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMP' 'sip-files00043.pro'
2d3557a43cf93bf04ce413a193dc5f8e
9556482571022f6adf08399c6f461525c178e96f
'2011-10-13T22:10:51-04:00'
describe
'52464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMQ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
7b1250a50291d9b005215690961632f2
90e4e0786cbba6745b48f9261ed3991a159bc95b
'2011-10-13T22:09:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMR' 'sip-files00043.tif'
fa0159fefa492bf4aa78f55245d1993d
760f2005dca6084fa7374186c4a31744fd08c5fe
'2011-10-13T22:12:42-04:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMS' 'sip-files00043.txt'
0d97c82ff13f3ccf4517053265124021
79a374aa912a228dcdc96ed5b4ba119d9508be18
describe
'19401' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMT' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b770eb9512ecc1ba0674a5994a79699e
31ce13fd1777109b42bf9b4dc7c3c3190fd8094e
describe
'330164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
1827b967f4978dfb0745f4c57a2b6b5f
48836bcae93f192c2387700158a7cde4af27e171
describe
'133299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMV' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
4463922015e73b23f0c3edc8fbf3b488
cb5b572c335edfe8a6ac7733c308fbbc8e2d66e6
describe
'31669' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMW' 'sip-files00044.pro'
53e836d992f32d4c344bfb4df81d0a37
6ac325f4e13f9943a1f2e9c7b3380a652193ab43
describe
'51525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMX' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
2062d3625124573edfe85e949dc2b075
c0497e3fb3721bd2a3a86b4e973d44949e170d2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMY' 'sip-files00044.tif'
3aad94669453cb1a3980f9ab8e59a226
a56a256b6bacacf2cfa725d4864c16b977640acf
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOMZ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
a9f0644107b617962af47a07fc887da9
af058a4895594754cb1c1b20c1dce7a3ad1c10e5
describe
'19500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONA' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
73bed88390b98b23bb46c75b3e8725e4
3482745a49ae43b98fc9cc06f5b0f2384ab96088
'2011-10-13T22:12:56-04:00'
describe
'330190' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONB' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
32ae241311dd24e7249f4cbc02a168c9
71f0c21cdeee0129558d515c82328090913c7980
describe
'122202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONC' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
5b258b9fa2ac5046added945147ff9fe
6af33543f1603f483e6530f28c24f5965a59e583
describe
'29709' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOND' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f1287fbbc6ff388b9cce1eb59961ead4
36b5e7634f1563504fd9dec2358c3a91e755a5f4
describe
'50193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONE' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
2c0a54212e35f5f3eafe559f20da81d0
0328cdd3bb53b6d75924a2d2ccacb213af020667
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONF' 'sip-files00045.tif'
be1f62476304ef9bea8b93c1988c593b
3ca8eb159d8c2a1a1594af193c91eabbf27498ed
'2011-10-13T22:10:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONG' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d65d587ab588d54e0187445085e13cf0
2da1ddae740421b22a00784f07b5f655b5c74f56
'2011-10-13T22:13:05-04:00'
describe
'18871' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONH' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9b454eb33a6148d56a92964afaaffacc
ba46157128bfdacbd01f44976e2ea2df28844b66
'2011-10-13T22:10:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONI' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
58f21bef07481f99e98437d66906afc9
b74ded1865052ddf1cc128c9d27052764f79c20f
describe
'131561' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONJ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
fb769af3c94e789b359d3a19fb419fca
25e7de71446af98db23835968db5b2d2a1df3d8b
describe
'30656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
2350bebd9b204c2c2aeab046a5d11af1
4e6f4ae8a4f9b94d2cabee9d79fdf7ae8bf01a3b
'2011-10-13T22:12:06-04:00'
describe
'51155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONL' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
c31f5f7f704e4f1dcb316b2e130bdb72
5c1d4abcaddb48ac5b748a1ff560203239a126d2
describe
'2650704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONM' 'sip-files00046.tif'
532c688da8fd0fc982e019ad5b452452
962bbb89174ac1a12e7166511285411016e10d68
'2011-10-13T22:10:46-04:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONN' 'sip-files00046.txt'
7b28fd652e31f0e5d543f578a838b2e9
12e5b5a743889c7429cb8bbc5dbb235c9749d109
describe
'19486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONO' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8b435244d973a7b750bbacd53a1c264f
f05ed3e297f4d8e03fedfe627b035ee9e4059294
'2011-10-13T22:11:51-04:00'
describe
'330189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONP' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
8225f31d2a2c5a3a3bbb5f3e9e17c87e
04ba82d5bcbc78106ccad3f0f567b637562f2dd0
describe
'127915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e52a80f770a877ed534989cdc3305bcf
cac2b9a97fd6bd8cf80d31e99d24680e5c4ac0b7
'2011-10-13T22:12:46-04:00'
describe
'30422' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONR' 'sip-files00047.pro'
9aca2d3b998840a3fca0d8325126fff7
65689cf58db06390e4e43fbfbebfede430914409
'2011-10-13T22:12:29-04:00'
describe
'52441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONS' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
b32edd6a941c96411d82eb6f1731dbd6
7c4da495373132e13acdb2cedf6e8d195cea020b
'2011-10-13T22:12:36-04:00'
describe
'2650544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONT' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c5aacdac59da23eaba9695a21ef62715
6783cf1c6991e006e9caaa807e82127e073b7661
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONU' 'sip-files00047.txt'
229da34d4c56fe5c23dd00c281f76ce4
fb3a090597abe8366ec2fd4a524805dcda54b9aa
'2011-10-13T22:12:17-04:00'
describe
'19534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONV' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
7ba72dd3f6eaa43421233af36c23c0a7
1f388516940a31b69e4822675f021c7585d2652f
'2011-10-13T22:11:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONW' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
0350fbbf9d0ce1b5276bf0778039a666
a72bf468d26297481c3c5e2c599c2b219fa8b402
describe
'125312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONX' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
eb54b2bcce310c5c68d6cd24e6275a19
5a6dabf015ae2c95e802b3402a40447447ac89a7
'2011-10-13T22:11:12-04:00'
describe
'29817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONY' 'sip-files00048.pro'
1057b6ff94a84902e229e9da891c1720
688022884009247b7209dc5dbf98bc5db70c9012
describe
'52237' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACONZ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
aa2d68f2ea9acd5b1205340f0919e2e5
101c47fe96eda115818a391892a3cc05ae1b8b66
describe
'2650744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOA' 'sip-files00048.tif'
67f821e806d31e6d7dd4e4b7b5a32e50
db30247456ea73e79acd0e77c9a1c2dfe84da4c6
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
56a05ec52a37770042f63fd3877eabb2
1204ae3e4fbdbe938fd984a1645fe889ca20e090
'2011-10-13T22:13:04-04:00'
describe
'19414' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOC' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
2d61832954602d81add9b8ad9ec43ff9
f9c536cc8b9ab5e66b9da62c14ce8f93ff68da3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOD' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
4183615394571dd3a983beaa6195938e
ed3d30792548585fcf7e8fc908658d6087942caf
describe
'135930' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
62e0b9b1af9680d510dc739c21d6e2f2
b4949590abcfa267a66fcf51797da3d5aed905f2
'2011-10-13T22:10:24-04:00'
describe
'32445' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOF' 'sip-files00049.pro'
a91fa0b376f8a2879f1bfec9b0337565
0db96936a039bd1dd70c56dcfd4949178ccf8bfe
describe
'53152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
1977a84e948ed9c5fabde66d53950925
d696f5a2f91fb77203084982c1330872083172a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOH' 'sip-files00049.tif'
85be31aa0af0526869cd33b4e83a639d
f4b967f73d15bed08871dad4e7caa2d4a08368fb
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOI' 'sip-files00049.txt'
655bee66138bba5199fec1e2174f5518
20f19489f7a8b688cefe2324ab0ed611237f1e27
describe
'19399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOJ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8bffc8db795928e25c0c2461951179da
014130a71c597e48f80aac43f93f3ce25372bea2
'2011-10-13T22:11:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOK' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
aa31949b4227777453f5f5287cb4f3d0
3a1b7b8c505b855b3163ac62f6849e6f9e9e919f
describe
'121188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOL' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
cefe0a1a59fbaed7edf7789fe01d3fc1
4ddcd59c9e75b54b7b18b4754c0c12ecf7ed3a20
'2011-10-13T22:12:15-04:00'
describe
'28552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOM' 'sip-files00050.pro'
b431fa75d8f50cd985f7fe028dfda0d5
3bccfd5dac5f3ea5206e9095b94bcd544907e1e3
describe
'47841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOON' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
96a7cbe0f9e9624bf1dd34f40c82207e
85fca68ba7ea16a8f458e85f8faa263679fc2f36
describe
'2650552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
8b06c89f401da8a125e579f9ddb0db0a
02b17cccf30626f84868aabff02709041262c2fd
'2011-10-13T22:09:31-04:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOP' 'sip-files00050.txt'
2ebeead948843eebf6849103be64282f
57ac4620851533f61741f8df2d16d43b7186cae3
describe
'19008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
60a6e81d420ba9be3f378b344b6e190a
8d2cfa502bfc401dca95991509fb6b5775bac12d
describe
'330167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOR' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
0195032b6c68eb23f80723d05f7678d8
5b191bb6f8943b26e70791719552222b8df0a108
'2011-10-13T22:11:54-04:00'
describe
'134209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOS' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
20796e10ac5f6be356ca8332759f7200
6a07a27e4fee5722d7a9882a985ad971fd8f244d
describe
'31287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOT' 'sip-files00051.pro'
590f909b1844e3402601fda9fc1a07a2
a9ac66ab3fb1ec71d923e4c9b1ce0b717f6177c6
'2011-10-13T22:12:19-04:00'
describe
'54388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOU' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
bd3884bb1b863973c2eaf1ab6a90ec9c
0fe7a008b85877638d2cc10d3d7414d7acc1c016
describe
'2650688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOV' 'sip-files00051.tif'
c8747e2c3a8eb098e3b6d62c1a8061af
5f2dd91bf3084881fe59aac1d97def827b064db5
'2011-10-13T22:09:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOW' 'sip-files00051.txt'
90db15c329775a8f524aec3ef9864ddc
87e7431e5bbe428a1561d31f5504f275dd824455
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOX' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
eb68c3997c76f57e695a876bc2dc516f
911554534e1ff22096f7b19989444fe9dadf9a96
describe
'330196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOY' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
951c661188550918dd64b5c6b9a8be79
9b7cb9c7a20d316414371a69ff3724d5720f85db
describe
'130183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOOZ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
dea1774ab5826ea5c2eea86492f54b2d
67e6b22878d4de02d11bf630b6c31aaf410b6c20
describe
'30267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPA' 'sip-files00052.pro'
b110af048770efe7922963d2a9f123e3
f5e0accb7f305c8ccb235a167e527036002c989d
describe
'51501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPB' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
02ccf5e373cb6404eb9ce631347dd518
f9ad3c6aec79157d48fab7082740c12510db411a
describe
'2650564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
8e9c73d77dcd6dce184511c3adc5c590
5d279601458bd65b2858d4e3f7cd121c2310c885
'2011-10-13T22:09:43-04:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPD' 'sip-files00052.txt'
67995bd80ae7c5469a7314f789c7bfb2
473b3ba44e732cc8b7015d94fd263b8e3318a59a
describe
'19458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPE' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
b8a2a6df927cf486be2956fbd8274af7
8a231a2afc608cbf02ed0b6a0f257b688485be31
'2011-10-13T22:11:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPF' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
5dc8700e2535b8027185b3b544b5e392
6cae24aa6c4b0b783e823e4a3351ad87485f5ab8
describe
'134746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
dda4e7e9a33f94aedf4f138051466e60
4e20b9c59a23bac0975bfaf9e4f49cf4917d0fe3
describe
'31398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPH' 'sip-files00053.pro'
0e5fd90f4c87c0a6e975ab809f4cf17b
c0fb239de9c98a8a5a1171f6fed0f21c512d9468
describe
'51286' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPI' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5f3f1fce95fd7a7a37e1c5637686c803
6d8cafda17c57443ade16c1cd6809707e8886b72
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPJ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
bfe5b0a63e54dfa93491714bffaa7d65
418454fa4baf2ccb5582c90b1690c03cf37f2ed8
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPK' 'sip-files00053.txt'
3d335cf7cbf3f9d19b2a3578798ce727
c2f9e1c518cc29afe9f64f14f3a81515a6f4cecd
describe
'20011' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPL' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
91109167161c5e6ba65917c1ba47012d
8aa7cae3c5135d3141b167d0c4eb0c5e8b2db3a4
describe
'330188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPM' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
a8e5743cb1eeefcbaad8195bfdbd20dc
0a7df8cb0952afd49c7890fced07c6a64e1fc997
describe
'92024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPN' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
9658b1602318cf3a458418978773eb61
f391b926d3cc47c2f8346b5dde0ad758ef058a3d
describe
'17631' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPO' 'sip-files00054.pro'
08a82572177d311be748cc62730f3ee7
1158ccf66d2e24d781c95379f1f01f39a32ceb4c
describe
'36030' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
15ad44e98bae0d5fda6e486fe0560e44
b9b2aa7923c9396e6080ea185146090b1aaae90d
describe
'2649624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPQ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
07861edd81eec2de9330cd2b69de4211
0ee9ef3f1d5381d78e382eaaf53562f59379594a
describe
'738' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPR' 'sip-files00054.txt'
c786089599217286effe1b9fbd01567b
26547528bc748d8902ead4027228e1c6e668621b
describe
Invalid character
'15125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPS' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
a7bb828825ef38681d642415556bf33c
3813bfbf2f87526744d39843acd04813c5281b85
describe
'330101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPT' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
86b2bba1ddbc6e37c6c6bb3625c2e8a1
971b10164fd5524671899e7df4f3035a5121a7e6
describe
'114256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPU' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1ca738e154e9fda54e583bf0ca111c35
0a29d527898957477e2a2f77d3ca9bc83ea3585b
describe
'18700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPV' 'sip-files00055.pro'
68727a5b76efab0c28c74c16c80fef1b
0912c387e6bfc83e617b4149049ec5274ff73d3d
describe
'40291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPW' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
bc5598f95d76469cf4f53846deca922e
59161704a1892d211b8a42b3028be5915d10f060
describe
'2650020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPX' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b54d856e0e36c79c17055fec0aa207f9
480275071464e6f2e7f0ccbc72754cb79bcade29
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPY' 'sip-files00055.txt'
7f8458f65a7cf71a373218f20d8d3f90
beae0cd4cc516d1aa2a02f200dd0fcfbcf6138e6
describe
'16540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOPZ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
0b9565a46c273ddb6d84fdddf6a88097
17279dde69cabc9e2d3a319b0247774cd21d7e97
describe
'330179' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQA' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
a43af1b7b6ea873d70491a2fa3cd98b4
2487d10ef87dff7ee27f0566f953bdd01ad953b3
describe
'128076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQB' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
d49c898f6ffdf857f42028d558f11acf
0d03a0496711d20e5e113b7d0b2e4f2b99adf9fb
describe
'30113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQC' 'sip-files00056.pro'
c1527ee0545599339852bd5a99c3fbbc
4bd9e755fe581c79c68cd7d1266672020b06af20
describe
'49802' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
66f2f104c13d0851854217a7f7137741
c053ed27007c8c26900fceb883177acd8f806217
describe
'2650672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQE' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f722c75ac19ae32a22bc98e27b61bc87
8046ba4e3a3edc2ffdf1bcbd715a3198a0e64661
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQF' 'sip-files00056.txt'
b0aff091f3d9c9c8181b862d48e1b5e8
38fb3b132ff3dbe5eb580d553956a1c358855114
'2011-10-13T22:09:46-04:00'
describe
'19505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQG' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
e27f95af53eb1c71c698623b1bb08c64
5ec4a51c9ba654125d7560377d7631017c9982b1
'2011-10-13T22:11:44-04:00'
describe
'330193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
ac92b4581de17f1d29526b1e74c4ce3a
dc0b6b2d7076efd6585a8c9ea66432e3cc36d77a
describe
'127153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQI' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
aadcbcbb9440030ef3b62879725986a3
123471ba563eea1cc74ae3d9a99311724fd777c1
'2011-10-13T22:11:36-04:00'
describe
'30044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQJ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
face874ea89e5406f8abbf7050b6aa70
79117d04419791af2ba986da4ff556472f1a7770
describe
'49382' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQK' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
c9ad32d098c01c214407283f31ea322b
eae5fd192ccd5f88d9f651594365851cc1ffe960
describe
'2650516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQL' 'sip-files00057.tif'
f867a6b4d294f862ff30e590689969e6
e1dd68777ca74975fd6c551a6422eac774359777
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQM' 'sip-files00057.txt'
f14abcdd1407d56bfbd0b4570361bdcf
7d0d9f0a8751aed74b347b882c551fb1e6beb225
describe
'19315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQN' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
23cc8922db63163c98f78e7d225637e7
d8ba79dcbc624a08e49a5a869f97e848de51f66e
describe
'330161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQO' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f5e670b04cb7ec9ba0c09ad6b6874be7
50af7142d292a2d4c0bbe5b3b1f05b80d3c422c8
describe
'131009' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQP' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
0c8e8afb5ea74e0747fd0af9e2c0f205
8fd46aadc8b60708969d9bd3e51185d490b8bdda
'2011-10-13T22:12:58-04:00'
describe
'30831' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQQ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
31f5410dfa569fb1e5019980e3a801ce
2ba3ed3866c28bb95aabe979dbf8a4a46e92463d
'2011-10-13T22:12:20-04:00'
describe
'51860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQR' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
bd11e9c08c609b3c9f4a599cd4b62195
b3026439196c76aa0fdfea43b3a20fa85d3e1f1f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQS' 'sip-files00058.tif'
9f8e3cddad7ad56512840e3f13933e81
b20c666eb951a8e6d7f74368f9f709759d90bbf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQT' 'sip-files00058.txt'
df5d3829e9ec0e5db37270acf368eb5d
fd7c2c33b2de1ab295ecadb6672bf8065b4c64e8
describe
'19364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQU' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
30568fba4144764d4e3c0ca4f4b30187
966c62cdc13cc241601edaf6dd060ea2294406b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQV' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
ff195c075bc7cd26529da04f904df001
7bcc1aa4e728b4d9a2ef4d34dadb2fd3ade1dcea
describe
'124718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQW' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
289588919cadd8424799bad84d8fb1a2
0a436d5e891678e11113890fa6b8446c7204b8f1
describe
'29118' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
6f21d06eb5f44f0e8522c8dc4a2b134a
813fb74d317b3f64d379ff55e86c4529f0a026be
describe
'50408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQY' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
0a8a5673d664212e3d313797b44b62d6
6054bc8e9a11f5c2abb0f69ddc3aa7e456e57342
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOQZ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
24e01b23ddeba159bc7edd1ff551cf66
eb7a14d1d945dab3077c53ea482ae94c1de95c3a
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORA' 'sip-files00059.txt'
1d218e366a68f4f5857956bac5fdfd09
bfa5e4ae219a591d2ed217a6e5b18fa1fea5bc3f
describe
'19263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORB' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
fe17c68cd7717b548bdcc14e129044b2
f244f10092d15a288110c39cb81b850a6d7e78c1
'2011-10-13T22:10:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORC' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
c42f8331aa85095b87ab702a2ae14b27
35a4546537916cb1bc07f10014d002e993416e03
'2011-10-13T22:10:58-04:00'
describe
'124266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORD' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
2cd7f96bc7e13fb3771f79c90ce28a98
2eb05dee4d1847199e083b003e3edd047bd4cfb5
describe
'29266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORE' 'sip-files00060.pro'
7abc94a4aeaed9ff2439279ca7c76210
5a65e9e48c37e7cc0980d8fb96d65c4666843b44
describe
'50575' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORF' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8b67ac3adf2e6e8c0847131849be412f
05c70c8a23c782c5cf62b137d294003b1c11ce47
describe
'2650620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORG' 'sip-files00060.tif'
3ed43341540d133d7ddacd6e4f281ebf
9fad28d0563c4da0a8ebb3046c50f57e6d8af81e
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORH' 'sip-files00060.txt'
39869db7f9cf4d0fb80ec21d93ed6140
905a6608e478c91fc0a484e3786bae3be1c1f927
'2011-10-13T22:12:31-04:00'
describe
'19086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORI' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
50ce75535963ef1e71cd801864eadf51
2e2de49841310ce1fbd8ded1ce6133bff4fdfe4b
describe
'330163' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORJ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
6985054b1d4ec6ee753f39ef95b963b2
9349f2da23f34b0b464a6a292244a1de8edb5612
describe
'138336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORK' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e8e3af4723b42619919f3d7ad5d2f794
d33f9132ca2e40f238c038e0be8355c73328a845
describe
'32420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORL' 'sip-files00061.pro'
28e28ab4c4b67405e64a96a9e39d1fb0
9faa58c562de182d540310afea0c426efe408cdb
describe
'52924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORM' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3a14ecd019452a9829486891ff014e2a
4a0b9c1067c1c8efaa92b65b249914914c03fc60
describe
'2650592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORN' 'sip-files00061.tif'
9895cd0a3a120e87a310cd90710008a2
b99b17d7e36f4a57e4f1a07471c185392f8f3ae9
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORO' 'sip-files00061.txt'
e3dd93821ff5f60d8e6a0353ae1ecd15
71e2fe96f4c66765a91fe50f25d9a427bc391f34
describe
'19702' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORP' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
05ed89ef4159392187753f6903543b22
47e6376ba514eea5092b9871eee3d834dd3a0dd0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORQ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
61126da8a47511c6255d4ce99a35c7a1
ecf5661542d27da58c31393c55efbb77eeea5565
describe
'126174' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORR' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
1b5f44274626d84355dd63c17f86e2b0
aa27833e335483e5366d2fdcfcea8dc83346fefa
describe
'29719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORS' 'sip-files00062.pro'
6e2cdf20855732fc8e45bedb36f8b437
3cbd0b0ce04db1e3ee01fc93e9d17b3d6e0caad8
describe
'51577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORT' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
0c4d2c8a4dcf5206006c78ffe06ace03
867ca0897de0635f4666b096d7797d4014e1030c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORU' 'sip-files00062.tif'
92ae9e71915cefe0c71605a03bd5cae5
135f95dcdcedd71f08b654c5a65e0c33e0f70687
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORV' 'sip-files00062.txt'
3bccdc8ab8a2557e2700aa5892194685
1013202db43531a0740afbc76c206a644dc12a88
describe
'19117' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORW' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
28655480fc1e661acb54c1a077a4f260
ddcaa5f5ee65602b9071d1aac62c5624b79302b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORX' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
ac2c47a748c929add4c11f57cc3de9ef
060064c360dc1a7b9799bf067b1af3b72defaaaf
describe
'136650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORY' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
0ddd7a8b58ae73504398b90b51006e45
1663b23d57b438c1e9c54dcc77f14e6ceb178695
describe
'32465' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACORZ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
89e7eef7cc43cd7c86ba15fe344e4e1d
26bdfa6e116a5589734cee3ff42995237798a49b
'2011-10-13T22:09:52-04:00'
describe
'51919' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSA' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
4f5796986405c44245e8bf525a5470a0
099b404f7dc368545f0879752c867d6ec5c0fc4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
37ca8703f633cde4526a4a30e59f861e
ff6598140a13b231cc15ec2da102e8957ce33cfc
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSC' 'sip-files00063.txt'
9f53d39db34dbe95063c238e1a08c44f
33a4e583a8737d5fa713ec84ff5897d0426ba7d0
'2011-10-13T22:11:21-04:00'
describe
'19587' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSD' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
1a74c441544290a06a5c44a84cfa63fb
4c830dfb35d48a3f4a105b0c8d91466b356e31fb
describe
'330461' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSE' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
42c304729d9eac79d0a219a7aa706ac3
2a0651fd87306e1a9c767242b6fbc43d423134bb
describe
'130292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSF' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
a747d7445618712fa1809072c83f88de
9c31416303e25ad46dae588f098bbc0bd799c28c
describe
'30677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSG' 'sip-files00064.pro'
ff41a6f7edb7201f20e4463f0d9bdcbe
ad8ce042247d9c1445710c096d0993ca5efa3eff
describe
'51282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSH' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
e7d54ae107bf4f12f0452461fa8fe80b
5fe1239db6079399e48195f8f128057773c22f51
describe
'2652424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSI' 'sip-files00064.tif'
78e81b9bb28fdb1f57660c1b03bbf798
62fa4a48ecb5905a7b6ca015aecec6c95408d193
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSJ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
9f5b74d1d21eb0db4c2e70c0f24f09ae
aec9d4797418e7a3dd96a2ae76a1617d06e83a83
'2011-10-13T22:12:21-04:00'
describe
'19196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSK' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
010d9f39562721cba9dc5b31eab7496b
f8cec739821853ea46c9ca0e47b6630ed6f022a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSL' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
f26acdb9265bffdc4fd20ba124fd5de4
baa22238215280f461480c759dc446997dd38994
describe
'129661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSM' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
adf07f3a3801cb88c12af108d20dee86
ac2e0e1cd5b34806a1fe136c556553a7baa12f3a
describe
'30646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSN' 'sip-files00065.pro'
44baa346accb244392b586a2b999009c
853ba57f096ae9e4c438c862f748cd12082981a6
describe
'52784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSO' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
5a09cd4d94e4a2082f48804aff9ea608
6880c4a3edfdf3e9600d8ff0a2fbc089b7550e0b
describe
'2650452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
c47b7b9bdfca4e3886264c95025a2d37
3fab2f6caee541e3e741d306d0d51e8b9d8d489f
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSQ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
439a5845874315aa652e21ae8ca36303
c57ab65518f87d8ad6eaa8ed3ed914b19845eef6
describe
'19123' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
a3e736b856ece098092203d377a22c6c
b493dd24373c2ec0e9b917ae288d790bd88d60fe
'2011-10-13T22:12:18-04:00'
describe
'330412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
ceb9121b471242d27e7d70e6b24753e4
780cb5b6678c54d749f6ed761867868903705b38
describe
'76624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOST' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
c60755bcccbb4300c4fa11bb1d248523
b266dbe79c16efc81b339abe0d4b176e082cc07e
describe
'14409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSU' 'sip-files00066.pro'
8be51da93ad2d1133cab77c58a6f936f
368336773dd0af59eea48cec01fdca6c9ec27431
describe
'32249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSV' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
cc420ce20927651310f9a7a78e28b325
eef1d08e1672c5830bacbafb1ed65d578cb700c2
describe
'2651620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSW' 'sip-files00066.tif'
bed9efbfd2791725f6c46a8c98f90fb5
47ca3645e5bb7de2283d04d271da2c96ff1fa17b
describe
'581' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSX' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7068157e3658514a8855a94f4479be25
55e9ae09d5708fa53da22ad9ac4d8d4f86cd736c
'2011-10-13T22:09:28-04:00'
describe
'14273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSY' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
163a90233ab963d273e3e995fbd8f6e9
79c3bd55f8666293509a827c16947be9ef594601
describe
'330191' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOSZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
1726b2e46a5dbf09a134d31d4dd3003a
66420d14a9d4619a016ce2ace381f37b0ac5430b
describe
'121116' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
28ff8ac5a3011a2098daf247839ba051
1f72f7b969b515df82692ae19c0d7d1f9efb0976
describe
'20359' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
18bfbfc7dcc9ff4e6a46a09f4b7fa161
6d519bf43aa1cd41f024555ce47f046fdc1e5c6d
describe
'45123' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTC' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
e016b09e5e8ccef4694c28c499b6c8bb
729ffc8d2450b8acc95d150d1fd16aa2ab8be0d6
describe
'2650196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTD' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f0b47d00439ea6d42de63474cb9fc547
52ce1ab3d0c89985e154f546a97b72fb3cd8fb8d
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTE' 'sip-files00067.txt'
3a87d107a42eebf3e8025ac0da16c579
a4a87eb1c3d5554488b6a45b7797f79e186694e0
describe
'17368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTF' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e36fd8fa9610c517d969557c3253fe5b
509da3addd90cf1ed67494bac139e848e3ca95cb
describe
'330459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTG' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
42d77b03b65a24bdb23624a3bef416b4
9b4df2de04ddb12f2cab6dfba0078cbf06528f50
describe
'132850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTH' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
7c4b959e9c35b7310abcd41042602a4a
288aac1779af8fed1865f072dd480f628c11827f
describe
'30981' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTI' 'sip-files00068.pro'
7a294aae9d9a2487d7dd98579c06d1c0
6c119eabbfe9da0957916593da32a96ccbfc79d3
describe
'53635' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTJ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
ecf850f0b6e7c28a21c4241e7a68886c
1cc9b9884da7bd40a0fdf0b6695fee0c79fcdc52
'2011-10-13T22:12:16-04:00'
describe
'2652748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTK' 'sip-files00068.tif'
267e3045573e2b965a97b1486411c359
d77f9070a9da92ad2741764e36023f42233648df
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTL' 'sip-files00068.txt'
597d6fc0c70a262c9cd6eaf18351d5be
f32d7012c03304618026691c734e31bebef8f10b
describe
'19608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTM' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
7313647e0aa05b1ef6621b0b68e78aac
42a346818fccb8baefb043f89faf8d83117497f3
describe
'330168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTN' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
42eaa2d99e452e5ec9209763e26b798a
32f7e7af08da15999e8e221c2b1a28fe8e25e44d
describe
'139569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTO' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
3fc7543c86443b6ba62afcea8c9f7c8e
a8cd8317845d63e3a720b11703398f3a868e216d
describe
'32054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTP' 'sip-files00069.pro'
08cf9aa95aac059585d28960b19cc496
382088e443f8edb212df968942deaf60bea1049e
describe
'53249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTQ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c6500c33219afdc21635693b3e92894b
a896ba4ef5a14fecb18afb8ade921012ed9ad838
describe
'2650584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTR' 'sip-files00069.tif'
880ac5cf59e138adef61ed05d4b780f8
ab983b8e33764c360146d77f2397f6922cb9479f
'2011-10-13T22:12:44-04:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTS' 'sip-files00069.txt'
9d452a9a479757589591ca79e9d2c0c5
accd10a787315df21634a759bac66a0ab15792bd
describe
'19779' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTT' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
df229f66068dca734d7a0bf80eb49e0e
b79952dd6ed018cbdba49a6a71c1543113ff85c4
describe
'330457' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTU' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
3ad85db49a5d955fbf3f5f8be58b431d
f41ee0cf897034d40e1f3706f9a16e19d48616b0
describe
'126603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTV' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
9f41cb8f9cfc7131442ae4b9e9261e67
19858e42d1a5c968b7af4da13d7967b2d99c6236
describe
'29110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTW' 'sip-files00070.pro'
aab253fb687b472203cd3930db37a74b
2b4b258802b2c0ce6be06a66e5754319b5083ce9
describe
'50446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTX' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1a1c65cd0e93a2565bfbad8c8e26e498
e66386bde9fd4a75debf41c17cf6ce3361ba6b0a
describe
'2652664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTY' 'sip-files00070.tif'
66b1c7b0d7a25682776f25e7184935e4
381b4dd27626841b476f056b95e999ce4875e8ac
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOTZ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
7c0a1c7969a7093205c022c4e37d9a4f
d54684a3ff640efba6df263dc40d6808a5d8f8cd
'2011-10-13T22:09:45-04:00'
describe
'19247' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUA' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
f82b29302daff60cd2d6eabd9dbfebb0
c05c4deae306450a11d790894cef89b3679f885a
'2011-10-13T22:12:27-04:00'
describe
'330210' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUB' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
81f6579a5b8a5754e9e4dd350a5e9207
10af8b0e394bb2964e48730c3033a7779c19e1c6
describe
'128385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUC' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
db550726c3cc7dfa5e8ae7cad2fc2bb5
c69510f4a7a632bc8491249216a9351fc02bfc6b
'2011-10-13T22:11:59-04:00'
describe
'30268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
92ea6724ec3fd3ab12e899b026748f91
27fb8e37ba45e0408b839afb6f40442c004dd500
describe
'50291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUE' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
019c623bcd384acb2219308ac832419f
ee07b0a44b24c0823f2a26967d514615710bb238
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUF' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b2c2ae7bc5dad1f8f21d1948c4e41ab3
a7c72d641c53e368aa4f2cfd97bfb838a792b050
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUG' 'sip-files00071.txt'
88c5266e82bccd6ff8bbd9175ea99234
a17097c8c7ab0923afe0c519720b7c953410cc8a
describe
'19443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUH' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
ea5aa73d9ea12c046b70d5e5a1f8f86b
1bcd4743b4afb869005924d9e1d8699cd7f5018d
describe
'330200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUI' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
298ba29c31185eb516194b4f09830044
0ec6c7c9cb47e7e7e7e6e932e5375e3d4e27c065
describe
'125223' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUJ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
24c09b50dd17ab89bd2b5bf9b1055fb7
612f2b10f2d6a062c0c2d7bbcb801e042c56ac49
'2011-10-13T22:09:44-04:00'
describe
'29025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUK' 'sip-files00072.pro'
fdadf62a20f7501c903f1a0bfd78e70a
d730c4436e80b65dc5182233b398f6269f30cbe0
describe
'50973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
b475186c5afab7e299af6b1baf965a4f
aef7f74e83d957d3bc95a87c92efb8fe9e9c7a14
describe
'2650548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUM' 'sip-files00072.tif'
d61c76d4617a0189d2014124abdd9512
fc2ee922f1c725a9e031a9faf8249e9bc47d8f0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUN' 'sip-files00072.txt'
15806aef992e2df5daf0f1c9e160687d
308845f3e95693dc2414a2bf4474f5704a99965a
describe
'19151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUO' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
7cebd257cae8cddc008667ba37f765a1
ffd34ae5efc576337ae597cf4ee115047e4e568f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUP' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
0b3dbe55cfac3385a229af49f6b3d08e
08b5003b3d5fbbac11aece98625dee1f41d50621
describe
'117199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUQ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
595a5bba778564c604c5446d5d719fdf
572011bf10014c29849b5816dfa0c58b01abe130
describe
'28573' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUR' 'sip-files00073.pro'
4a104438353de7907a20a9d4138a2b02
018df42b364dc464f011fbf986334c21fc35b901
describe
'46685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUS' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
847efaa040dc96e67daa48c7111c0236
1c5e9e4d9d8460d714c82ae27b6ea808933d8145
describe
'2650356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUT' 'sip-files00073.tif'
083905649ce2683063c111a9788bd89a
824fb279910037864098304b2a49dd15ade013d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUU' 'sip-files00073.txt'
e30dd95775313f57c7899d1a7478645d
e4794b56d0fe127038d19d64ab043baf61ccded8
describe
'18602' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUV' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
9d5ce222b2ab5c1ddae683918215be84
1cace34e441c1a6766a0fac2b23d09a09ab5212f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUW' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
00bf0d9ffe53b31d1bd6e4757f2b9930
dce5274957a216b9f30a670416d8f084e26d025a
describe
'128041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUX' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
b4f7420073045a31f443faf0cb759dce
3dfc5cb88cbdb90e0d4862a0a8b0529f419cc403
describe
'30206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUY' 'sip-files00074.pro'
7981f0fa3be12b55cfb69b7053b4788d
fd6abb23e12e8c7da37984c5d6116f837b42e05d
describe
'52553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOUZ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
c002975241a9381f90945f50fda8be4f
a7014c5122f15174f57ea6b1a6bfb7838d73e587
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVA' 'sip-files00074.tif'
c31f28f53a08fb62e8f4f520a355b22a
9313d9b682694eda35fc7a7611b2d0aebf106ba1
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
1471da8abcf359e03af2b270412a7117
ec3e955cab85328f6cce156c8fe6fe777b32e926
'2011-10-13T22:12:10-04:00'
describe
'19241' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVC' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
75a4dc2f1c671f2e57874eb7db7a2f95
a7d8129ef328deb2f7149846c4596421e9cde8aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVD' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
1d26fb8571c8f46819ba9bf4345aeddc
8ee4b7d7e67d864d1f3b44ede4ced19a3baea5f3
describe
'119901' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVE' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7a5b6a36761691e6b98630cc7158bf24
f2c5f787575f1dbc9854dbdbc7ef21faed360250
describe
'28586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVF' 'sip-files00075.pro'
d7137fd39d5833f30084adff066b9afd
043898cacaab00a1d74eaef100c5b76cd6bb6ead
describe
'47364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVG' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
eaf0dba873b51ebf916e93f28c8acaa0
0bbacd114b31e6dc377096bd3715fe17c5ce86d3
'2011-10-13T22:12:59-04:00'
describe
'2650464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVH' 'sip-files00075.tif'
8f43b63d4cf5cc7160ab49ed5fcbafe9
8dbb45bdc4701db343dccc0549f5f2ae6b9f1769
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVI' 'sip-files00075.txt'
ad69de7189450052f1c35e5722da85a6
9eb4554601f5eedfb5a68d90702666efa388f9b6
describe
'18742' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVJ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
df1f49c53612357052b22ef23b983eea
8d472f55ae72e9f84d64636ed2aefaa2691d9125
describe
'330145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVK' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
186ea5524e34ac8f3738ccab2ea92bd5
26171e34383a0df36cf52e97ceb0b2498d3a34d1
describe
'125589' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVL' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
6ca513836aa8ac9a9c5b5b2b9cc7a0e4
2b8a3928f31d108f212aaf13de79c1e235e5a27d
describe
'29763' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVM' 'sip-files00076.pro'
ce951ea970e3f3ed6a1be514dc83e8c4
1a616db80c5242759d3a0087573d429d7cad61fa
describe
'49405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVN' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
e251087385dd310d6d2b8740d400d660
48b3704a02d373874ecd07d0713dcceace942f02
describe
'2650416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVO' 'sip-files00076.tif'
0fcbae0bf653356b60feca6d1598da23
3c8ca40e13bfed1bb71bda9c0b8046c310cfd6ba
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVP' 'sip-files00076.txt'
d6a15f2d47982da29d563b85e84fa307
354f7a1e9b5e3280f0b7f5687d4813ab7847a875
describe
'19047' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVQ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
e53a5e93f150712bfd92c4047915e2fc
10e7f3857cfd41f0e77b69c10e2c5fe949f027a0
describe
'321062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVR' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
6d465067e1331bb1ce93751dd5beebff
5618f0a60563c969294e3d01e15226086855c797
describe
'76298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVS' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
abc64c06f1bfc2276c40b673be58b65f
cdd4bdef5097e2214da1592b568ccefe51043a46
describe
'15409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVT' 'sip-files00077.pro'
db1166b10bec6b6a5f2db5ad6896cf45
181b73bc49501f9fc62bc064b05ea3d2732e8f15
describe
'32790' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVU' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
589c6322bc6814c88502b590056a43fb
2adaf006e976f8f66e2d72288f0ffe936f4758a1
describe
'2649460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVV' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f78994872a3809761b883f69d60bc6c5
c14eb04f021a9c5ee7a82acebbe9bd05693f5570
describe
'620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
1d6a0b8e2081bc24efa3d69c77ae10a1
934c4463f40583ee082dabe5a4b29a373d848463
describe
'14045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVX' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
65d9fb4dab5cd507625ac328753c0a49
80cdedc9890bc594386236e57b36c782c7895c07
describe
'330192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVY' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
0ec684c35a44003752b00a1b1f1e9a28
5844b2ae6a8f21bddb76538588bbd48304ff3662
describe
'118540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOVZ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3556f27359d267b6b2dbdf7274d48496
adc801bbc7292d121c7375b090ee3660b7290305
describe
'19185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWA' 'sip-files00078.pro'
58c571a5fbf640c459ebb1309cc8bad1
81493566edcb13ca55ec23171339db08966612f4
describe
'43681' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWB' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
7fe6b6a1f445f5b97d4c9886e6c30b15
fe925be474bb2a1602a43a50fc1d6d217996d4d1
describe
'2650200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWC' 'sip-files00078.tif'
e768bd3fc13360521d6946e810779a26
b54294d9c05089b82a4b45c6aab142bdb168f119
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWD' 'sip-files00078.txt'
d5eb6d33fc047488cf22d2195dde7640
ef4c100354acc0ecf0baae7b3f8ef10fbb0bf357
describe
'17505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWE' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
ffde120b9ebd7f6cc3c8e0b9bf2b8a96
a0594b85e97600af5213cb97a473f81715da6620
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWF' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
74e10b78295bda1918fa88ebe9192883
a6366623670514996905cb292938e142f15890af
describe
'115574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWG' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d3d22aa5ce93d07d972f0e41ac15f078
0e4544045239837b7b1b600caad26d5b25c88ee5
describe
'27040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWH' 'sip-files00079.pro'
9695fb0874239e9e5126165abffbcd3d
e3aacbbfc0567908f920ee24622d272d1d347ea6
describe
'45722' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWI' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
e9aa584f7ffd873dcab9ed73621a27ef
113fdb8077b616fdaf2e80542ea27dc38f113cd6
'2011-10-13T22:11:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWJ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
7c28834ef4e29c9a87f657f06a048ffc
f8dde8c2472179f5379fef6c711917bb05ae21ea
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWK' 'sip-files00079.txt'
8e7a9d79d37a3fe333c21ae61be0baba
8564fdf9c4085d3ec25837bdca41dd7e2cbdb9e8
describe
'18657' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWL' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
2b5409c1b2389b0b93fe3332bbdcd5e6
caa099befd020520ae1f022e0f407461d3caf740
describe
'330205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWM' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8490af805d9f66688e335d8c26e68dbf
c32e83a745fd9a40edc1afbc7704f918a18dde89
describe
'119584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWN' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
92f0ca107f336cc090f5bc311b618de5
8a03b297e2c6911d27a06d64c1caf8537c769002
describe
'28656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWO' 'sip-files00080.pro'
765e9b360b2f78aa0ef51b8a76600b92
638dfe40e9334eac5ff99fd0b1c50b1bf35731ab
describe
'47380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWP' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
13a24bd26308d7b24f9b9d7d25c238ed
9079bfea7f8252f72b079475f33cc667f917ec74
describe
'2650368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWQ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
6ddcfe5baaccb0b6d8f334de210ce63b
3260266e84b72d032636f058f708cf7bcdb6744c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWR' 'sip-files00080.txt'
601865ac3354d65fe2231b02c769f2b9
21ad570babcdb6d6c5f56ee07334851977afef99
describe
'18677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWS' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
8c05a0bc29cfae1ceb12ebf6a1dfef90
77543f8b4fa8bd547ed14ee7dbffd3c83cf8cf74
describe
'330209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWT' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
3560d6e0b16b24b8a173637c14caa36f
1f50a5e8e5f72b7b4a098fdb2cd4aaf7223d59e5
describe
'128679' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWU' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
992a612176b8eaf14767115cc8c9d265
4e09399d5174c615f241ae8d47b0a18248be8726
'2011-10-13T22:11:08-04:00'
describe
'30517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWV' 'sip-files00081.pro'
19f47b616c469c856061e0db0960d4d5
ae71adb2e0b62935fbad546f412fe57d2ddea031
describe
'50298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWW' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
715ef68d23fcb7c1aef98b576aee701e
5e9c005b0264277d64bfdebc2e4ac07103409903
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWX' 'sip-files00081.tif'
9f29bca64fa35c412c084674b4c66792
f6e00d522306e69699f2541adf3e7a47b4a75df9
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWY' 'sip-files00081.txt'
2decacc1ed3f5913deced80dc7b791d0
a1e55ef8cc7e49234adaf0120f329d7c4a6c2b3d
describe
'19796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOWZ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
86d0b32949f1ee77247acc86b1ea2184
47da5cbb0b167fdeb1ef4d15dfbb5ac2e82ba102
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXA' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b79cb28372ab43a074f40dabb83869b7
89c013b7b167045e2341e4692b61d60ca4816def
describe
'119651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXB' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
3c25ff33e73a123b640661e06be1c97c
1e78bd11d33b1ad3273a17fceee33619e3e6c76d
'2011-10-13T22:12:52-04:00'
describe
'28015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXC' 'sip-files00082.pro'
9395cfb24c5e2c0d1880d49aeeb04808
3bd3faf190933869f765a6b36c02e5d9bac33554
describe
'48552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXD' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
c3fc8d6a0370e809e4490ef385797617
ed6767682888dd045c615c7db7773e9a88f9ec21
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXE' 'sip-files00082.tif'
2cc94d498545f15f46febed560390f7d
b476648cc0c7950be71b9b0f61947a1fc5d00198
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXF' 'sip-files00082.txt'
ac4881e5abb0db686f210b1636cc1cf5
85ff0a951e6cf39494e3f32d10692d7ff5d63b07
describe
'18870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXG' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
a8f5fd83df4e6a164d41914718416309
b9e5f6d72b5fab56f5e253785de747087e2e68da
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
c018cb164b5c4fbaaa49b33e5f90e874
1b4d0616e1231601d5a2f1fe763b56b2e3ee8f08
describe
'120551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXI' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
5a07defc72835bc6bbf6a0420c29b66d
6e53f650ff75472ef9d6fc8bca7f9da02c6b1feb
describe
'28198' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXJ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
5bc383ff22164ea86c3e17a5f5912a20
cf9b3246f0833d56fbb025af2265a02c0b57f9d2
describe
'49342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXK' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
8cf9a275faf9d989fdfe805ed03371a6
d556982fa15df79255c98d78428b87a90449ef40
describe
'2650320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXL' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e041d3b515e1445729db8f94cddb1d71
84e3bb66cb6eef99fb01b07953c9fd87fe5cf4d6
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXM' 'sip-files00083.txt'
8f0ad349d4833f2bfc4f3eacd1476124
63550a89429674033b39e11973ab08e18c546296
describe
'18221' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXN' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
9c02b3606674a0b321aed4b4d0394c23
15b6eac8fb13376251d341b84186caff2edb7169
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXO' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
d1a6a693cf316126052409721345750b
3741a3b55b1fcbc9cf49e054ee8c081ad9017a1d
describe
'122990' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXP' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
dd2ebfa2117e20620b9fba163945188c
16cb92c4b64e1067d1bd884138401bf4daaae250
describe
'29278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXQ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
c41c2b44cd99faa16c7a4b44d0960830
20558e2f6c28f8a21ec132860a359fdefebff8c2
describe
'49248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXR' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
5e992bb506ef39e244147f30f45e6717
dccec2435bc60529440adf0b6bbb978025c6a48b
describe
'2650540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXS' 'sip-files00084.tif'
8e8383b4fce96c369f0dac82c1fe9e4a
af885ceeb799dfb0e45976f9d09c4b1848a9573b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXT' 'sip-files00084.txt'
5cf96e4dbc4751ffbcb50721ff7df3f0
d39410abd915933d48c734030812ca2c730ceb9a
describe
'18953' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXU' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
604e84852db0ce7ebd8fe1bba180c467
526b9785dfc584030848c4f68896e2eea633b35b
describe
'330182' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXV' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
d586904a6072a2d31d71c27fdaa9b150
0d9ca32e4c4c861505830ca4e1f4bcc3d5926034
describe
'113930' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXW' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
7c6fa43ea4969d0532de7acee4c7dd66
d968e1edf11cfd7bacc737e16e8a9e3dd2bfb805
describe
'26711' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
38556fab680bcc157aa19a2f052372cb
8ccdf065e22c141de0b8f846856423a4554fac8e
describe
'45402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXY' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
b1c553ec6c21a4ecee0dd7ad5ad24549
1708da36b2777f16450c489f7ba7cc4f52791c3f
describe
'2650420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOXZ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
2d18c81e4fcc4147525ccd6879459e6f
a51ca64764813cceabd6d630b97e09848fd6d583
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYA' 'sip-files00085.txt'
57f3836e280c70bafc612807e25950a4
ff10b1f6f6127ef734ea13e139db2b099dc37445
'2011-10-13T22:10:49-04:00'
describe
'18605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYB' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
d686c06922b6c41807e5db6c2e0c3715
f9bbf859b829440a378278bcb2c1f3f0d9f1fa33
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYC' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
9da10507811972d76801c75f1fe67e60
6a999e2ecaa4423b786d9307cdc57eb25ad26632
describe
'123703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYD' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
9ffbd90964b1daa72b6e6d6bf5b4fff2
753663978374286a2198e61cd61fd322ee3246d2
describe
'28633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYE' 'sip-files00086.pro'
39437167e39ecc4bbd1e355784376110
389b092546157b4b982162fbb9393c957874b9b5
describe
'49115' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYF' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
4e263ecf84d7b32bcde02f5185e9b9f4
c1978ad11e787135b345848f322f3c4b98789235
'2011-10-13T22:12:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYG' 'sip-files00086.tif'
6611c9d05425639ccf421e9f3f6e7bcb
ae22d448434119dbfc9f5b12b01aac4a9caea9a2
'2011-10-13T22:09:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYH' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c3008437d86945cef0b6234f54075aeb
0e05aa3656d8ba2b541bd84b940858a57476c723
describe
'18913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYI' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
edd6944f9ca0ecc8d5a08abe91731a9d
88f981aef0d0e321eee342fc974cff7566a6cfae
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYJ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
e7bf916f7adac69c4e063813611c1869
a15c8f61bc83a65008b2df6a22695fb3aea4aaa4
describe
'119373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYK' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
ff4f56b47080078654bcefe84f0f3413
d23ed7c58a863347808d24347c445f5d4da37429
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYL' 'sip-files00087.pro'
56f4de9752e5d9deaf6295a1d30cb9e9
795f37f617555ca20e016dd457ef0b9863870261
describe
'47333' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYM' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
3090d697efdac22ce0cee6edff1d09f3
479e79a06d7e865842e74cc0ab09504ace8429fa
describe
'2650340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYN' 'sip-files00087.tif'
5453d14b8d7dbe4167b71cc5dc82a8e2
0b70c12d069fbc23dd5fdbddcec35568a99ce546
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYO' 'sip-files00087.txt'
38a1266b0a642c15b39cba94952d3988
12bef5f1adc5be26664e13242741ab8e8b064979
describe
'18892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYP' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
7dafed935088f5cc2bfdcb3a260239ae
7dac4f7865c25931d99596ad72d00d713a92d74d
describe
'330204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYQ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
bc4083ac692addedd97ea1dab6cf6933
2a8e83ec4684be205669de8446377075d52cbd14
describe
'128829' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYR' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
2cdcaf99ee9f3d25aae6a423bea7671c
d260381487ea541d62d9930869f0cb19257cebb2
describe
'30365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYS' 'sip-files00088.pro'
9943fa8378313246add65070151d0809
f331bb9c4eb8d871e2ab28a13de7ae8ec62c108b
describe
'52804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYT' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
4d360c4456b1285b4761258746b8ebab
001f82268fa3311924935eb6cb2674072bb470c6
describe
'2650720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYU' 'sip-files00088.tif'
d309d0557ca4c3c5847058529ea1e91e
6e12bf3e9f4f6b2eba26ac1bf68f85ad58b7cc2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYV' 'sip-files00088.txt'
a31835450a9e26a07e46edf4c5b63b81
01bb21bd8f5a3fe973354da3681254168b8baf29
describe
'19694' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYW' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
4354ada105521990b95277629416d9f5
7c7cc45b6ffd326357b0d1280767cfb10e38bbab
describe
'185443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYX' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
8c284d18766aab1556505daf342de1ab
bb5cecafd4effb935503863ff970759d84aac9ce
describe
'45531' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYY' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
26de66db88d47f643df1759b85045773
37793f91657d2d6a45c3278fa1851d356a882f03
describe
'6544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOYZ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
98cfd869c474b3745b2356dd1f56a215
d712a2d56f1ccd1893e0b15a848b92ca60d8c2da
describe
'19329' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZA' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
cb947e0448c0d1bcd728a6aca09e80d4
652ba635ecdeb9e22a754c1c83e5fa74aa0dbc73
describe
'2648852' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZB' 'sip-files00089.tif'
5294132dabadc83611b702a0df639e8a
9696e6916d45947fec6e087b9144ce98a6661fb2
describe
'276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZC' 'sip-files00089.txt'
ebfee6e5e5d9f0d53629ddcbbaa45a1b
903613fcc1002a8e08ca5c05ab54455a8cdc1924
describe
'11185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZD' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
c9ba6d702e486535fc1f35b2f37ed13b
c1efded70e95faaf135e04fb0454660eba86c39a
describe
'330462' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZE' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
4cd872b5aa5c8059db28930a07d8444a
299df287157b2ae91fb52b9feca1ed84f4b0f039
describe
'113351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZF' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
6cc00947abff168d52d6f62695ad26fb
d6c891e5f3e7f1180bc9fb1ef2e74f37878fde6e
describe
'18268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZG' 'sip-files00090.pro'
67ba009aefa0f1efd39e5e347b5e0cd9
3833e06a63986606b7f8fe0e2b3552a9ef5403b7
describe
'40010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZH' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
0531de059b6153635898ea6b8e063488
4489c4b8ec60c2f1dff7205ffc5150d46b24024f
describe
'2652152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZI' 'sip-files00090.tif'
be5880ff3eff6ea157ed74344b367762
162746b1f146bf0341a182ba6ca995b557aa06bf
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZJ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2a3957523299d98a8a2eae67738739a2
836e36128ee07958466c784339527aafbbc6f127
describe
'16873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
3e53d6102810a6e7382cda29d4ee3e2c
04c7423ef53073bc0980f96e41355471c3b95cb9
'2011-10-13T22:11:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZL' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
74b2a9495acdf0f1934b2750652019d6
9aba45e1a4fbf1cf2790d5deb4e487af2d21a13d
describe
'123080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZM' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
1c385b97bb001f27137d8b804857b65f
330c359a3523ccb6ba286d76dbeb11923d6966bd
describe
'29257' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZN' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c0b641cb396f79866834e3e8627afea0
2f3dc2385c4d6863ea6293fa73711b2eb563cff6
describe
'49430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZO' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
17884576ccb3393d2939e5fdfd26854f
87e5ddb4f4e859690249af90584f45de0a6dbd91
describe
'2650528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZP' 'sip-files00091.tif'
96db90fcbe69d0db856804ce83d44a97
df5fdb7cca836eafba6434e2d0719bfef47cd489
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZQ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
1fa8100a5146678eb14d166ae633ac1f
9b166f7b7d65941d4269bbe8bed9927f96080958
describe
'19205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZR' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
5db6668cf04f83bec9a1100dcd589116
8d6e755becd0dc55af12606bb309cabd1df67f6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZS' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
6030917d2dc12621c565f8713322a34c
35febcfc1d7f9f7a8613561dd101b32494cb3fd9
describe
'128682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
6efe89cef3e364ec2c4d507862714f9a
9a8e467a66c8b18d84be20b2ed272e5e96b56630
describe
'30363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZU' 'sip-files00092.pro'
eb23dc269351544c68fa08773683c5ad
9fda37176d7bd52cfb0c522e4ec3bd806577a80d
describe
'51405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
c3fa3771d2625165174d13d8fdd624fa
d5b836a39723f669ec2035056c0c6e992a8e7672
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZW' 'sip-files00092.tif'
5016a21313d114c1c5da51eac859a980
952429cf95f601f08864b2ce7644854f1976d8aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZX' 'sip-files00092.txt'
045131d41b5919604e4f61bf21a907ab
81a509c32872d5f375cb2ea7c3ed2c29394b681b
describe
'18972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZY' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
dc8a1d6aac87903790f7aa2878a3e7f1
c27983a462a3f16393e40709b624a4ee17d2b7ec
describe
'330139' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACOZZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
36643558464871d82cde0c0e6576c1d7
9710a34b35aead94665097644fbc01ab6a12b27a
describe
'122842' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAA' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
faad7a4c0daeb96918ae95eafbd7516c
0af52ba48c92559d53c4bef2284e1b85b69d039f
describe
'28778' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAB' 'sip-files00093.pro'
dd420b0744d1106b7aeb6c01f41ae1bf
c86b4e61ec355c2734ec7c7cf8ca0e633d2e87ce
'2011-10-13T22:13:02-04:00'
describe
'49249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAC' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
9c56e4f306feafdf9ef8f74ab4114f92
2ec76f424d344fc0846ce39b1695317a63f316a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAD' 'sip-files00093.tif'
2981eaf5172469566473ac4c0792ba0e
f7ac0604a8858128b49e17d52146f4b17d2e0986
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAE' 'sip-files00093.txt'
83fbdf13bdc53da1a1d87bc114cc15dc
5c86f3db0bf4d65e2465b728630d495cdea68261
describe
'18998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAF' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
54dcf031ce20660e1408af2ee38ac76b
6ff5851e6d9291cfb5f3d03efde429b1a39a6c41
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAG' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
4e0f93ad518e452071f085514b922021
76ad83b75e326669e9177ff151b5dd5dfa49bade
describe
'134350' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAH' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
05f123147e108b095525417d02c85b94
f54af8d0a1e19912a5c474fa84a97f2c4e54330a
describe
'31875' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAI' 'sip-files00094.pro'
5e128d5198782fbbd3b21641860eed5e
4bd421361658c65f697dffcd8a1385abe467d652
describe
'54021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAJ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
c33e3b3e7c0848eb6c13e272749ca419
ecb258a5043b95418764e030294018dacaca3e06
describe
'2650568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAK' 'sip-files00094.tif'
d912ee13f65d5ae6ef61c68e02d89cc5
82108ce480ca9b5f5d3a06156dbd69c93bed5b55
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAL' 'sip-files00094.txt'
383a91c43336f68693abccf5c2c67225
8fa0de700de624c7f3af726c0953a055756cedb4
describe
'19627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAM' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
42d6e0de947f6148804487f0acf57213
bafb461bf59468c1ee7fbb85471b1ee8506090fb
describe
'330451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAN' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
e42c22a80944ea56298220c27c610d75
9f0734f2e91426534c29058237ed5ac42ba264ab
describe
'131428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAO' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c77bb09c9c0c2e53151f9af328d08161
7c88d7dce55b3cbdfd49ae7afdadfa42c163718c
describe
'30708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAP' 'sip-files00095.pro'
2bd8f3c1c16258de311bbc3e7a17834c
0efea8fcd5584404a5fedccd4bdd3b56e088b707
describe
'52300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAQ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
56fb52bc677091ca3c464561c553c916
31fce1059a171dba32370ae3486159f662ef06b7
describe
'2652592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAR' 'sip-files00095.tif'
bc19e31581cf936f166920e422a52f41
70a6e26263266141716afc2f88af39087807429b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAS' 'sip-files00095.txt'
f402637c4782ed8f86fbcbe55694b0a5
a3be469eba96c9744cdcc121fd23e856cf99cf98
describe
'19083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAT' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
8792d583e3cf7823fde0b105a7ee61aa
a48b956c7687f4b73fed90ac4375714e1daa810e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
ec97277692f101535c6715f76b76f047
30654e1a2a24647d9a699d530318914b3b574f2f
describe
'123153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAV' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
52370e2df23716c0195eeef1853b0263
a8125bd05fac8bbc929df25a86eebc4eef3aef6d
describe
'29645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAW' 'sip-files00096.pro'
640ca857122c9b1a00128f365e48ff6d
037fc090e5ba98adaf52ae3d67fada40c5f25645
describe
'49244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAX' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
4d7fc982bafbc205c7f27f17207a8912
23a065a8c1895a81600b5296039900f6206742fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAY' 'sip-files00096.tif'
8a295eca913c85f7150402d3b4b123e6
daba2410381ee75363c713f7a5fe89c5ddead2f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPAZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
54a6e203d83e28afd11a35c63f5c4177
43587b21e78c5629637865748a3c03e9ad1485eb
describe
'18439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBA' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
cf47ebaffc3487ec21e35dc050071e01
f759c41dbab2644b4b87b629fb791c39bda65da3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBB' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
50fd13a8f560e801ef8f388869f6102e
fa5a6e46efbe32a9f7a18c420c62401e30b4f411
describe
'123158' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBC' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
504305c1b02e5cf23a64d590f38bab84
ac50df38b83c6e84e7a6091dc2daa1ee283cb4ed
describe
'28193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBD' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ae47e8cc866b760d3d9735f76a6816b6
16b367a17dfbb8a5f2265ee49655795f9403bf57
describe
'47479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBE' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
588aa10a206331fcd31b460787f22a81
84c27cd75fa6dad8b542da07ec35a232627e170c
describe
'2650456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBF' 'sip-files00097.tif'
1b553d819fb3453e4bb00c486c7ecdbf
25169427768f6165449cd3648a7eb4ee813c71ae
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
d0f88737422259f3ec3a0372da8219a1
c91a6ddfcacda0fb680ace46f3e0ed310995c4b6
describe
'19160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBH' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
a0f7f6e154471649395f43db37ffb075
c04f3ece1284842d04f16328ccdbdc08e1544301
describe
'330383' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBI' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
6c9c1dcea077438ab240f921b15ecf58
c99e56dbc2c82fe5f304a05a451b5b30d96e30ea
describe
'128936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBJ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
fcc07af06cd2ffb52084377ae982ea1c
a919723a54cd50ee65efd394e760ab97c3c2abd3
describe
'29613' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
942bbb4ea3db303389fa02a88f9986a0
9b3d3c2147cb58a8a51fad5f31b1b41ae3a99d25
describe
'51556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBL' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
ff89dd3afeb2917651dabd7c48292898
743037be5f106d84bd25759d560784571e82ff9a
describe
'2652760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBM' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d76ff0063d8ab324c1cc2c49dc6185b5
5e3e16e00f307571aec239ffad3cdfcb4177d1e6
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBN' 'sip-files00098.txt'
6029371296ab50c99514c40d7bf70981
836fa93169f2deb91fd19e417155ee601c905fd5
describe
'19418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBO' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
f72ecfd6f94235c3c4d8e8589241e3d0
f3ec6330de06394bb6a2d55a5d25242a17ef0011
describe
'330185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBP' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
b8a3132b7b2ecd4142761c9ffc86e712
cde4cbde2505c9bfdd29775c7838d32d7d01959a
describe
'134636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
ca033278d5a10ceff8805a7c975e3ea9
fb2a3ac046a11280af94a5d84a8e6f451fecb171
describe
'30571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBR' 'sip-files00099.pro'
66fd57ae0f1e3b1ed2fd2a1a0077251d
43b5822511384810b367c2da319a58f172614b29
describe
'53864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBS' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
b41595cc4f5f3edc8e117af7bfb29b9b
00c4d928d3f64a3b777ab94677930aa9ffbfc5c7
describe
'2650788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBT' 'sip-files00099.tif'
019e2c5692f3ac132d4f79107ebe320e
263439c6c2b3f284290328ac98a040aed299a658
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBU' 'sip-files00099.txt'
05c47280b7dbdf31cf00b3eec856ca4e
9d1c1e6d807a847053784a72e0d70d3897982f76
describe
Invalid character
'19699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBV' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
91e592a78bf79bf50c5ca5e5f3a90c17
4c603eff40fcd84a64dfe66446c6a342457160b7
describe
'330471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBW' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
c6c3d167d60e315960e48362fc5fcbb1
c85b168f529f31f74423ff518626e636a0176bf2
describe
'125632' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBX' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
c1ae98f69cb6ff1bda06529eb06e82d8
5a93e20c100e9e8d8f99c8a8cf65635aa6d11a22
describe
'29106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
974805ae30885aa83fe8c2c00152c572
39fce4750a01754390fe0e82f12ad90cfc315dbf
describe
'50010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPBZ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
6d718a21f7b0c1da6e9f1730312f34eb
3a8d1339a1a5a0d0d9a5f13ca9395bd2f7511332
describe
'2652768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCA' 'sip-files00100.tif'
04ff36fdf1f144404fa2694661ab676b
b453888ca6658f8d0820472c1c95fc0202d37543
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
942930185e56593d4f4e8453c433687d
78322bcc99953126f83c532a3ed55f59aa0944f4
describe
'19232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCC' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
0325f61b79e2b38b32c665affe9beb41
333614f636dee4a1a1c3bea0e49ae10c4b3ebaf1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCD' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
b6a2d0e1866bed047760bdce5b146479
596e796fb9d012ad6d79eb55bcf9c1871ab782ad
describe
'128459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
f5c1eef35d7af5f57b4c143e7bb381c1
041cee46a6f484d526798798b4c9f33618b6022d
describe
'30128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCF' 'sip-files00101.pro'
b44a72242f1a61ca106c41ce56929feb
fa0ad837e741d028f6985da01b244f3de66a3613
describe
'50067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCG' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
004d54f0d735d1b0214d05651b104112
0c289380d6de3656ad5ab272191842b9f99da2b5
describe
'2650476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
30378e1cffd0d915446d2748f1b557db
87c3e2944543a29f30a566bbdfc0ccbfe85a2199
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
683c5331efa8398cdfe62deb35b6e3c2
d931a9b0642ff7c62ca47e9c900cd9f64f8cd024
describe
'19102' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCJ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
109516d2d4a06fde9ecf6eedc2ec1f96
3d84940a5334f29169eb6d4d480ccd72ce98c7e5
describe
'330464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCK' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
d6574219af86d9516c602797cb064d56
e300e97ae5bcae6604216eafab14e0dce78ae7b3
describe
'126950' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCL' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f92b6109d47f63953b77d059812f542f
49889b594f2b9d48b5b208598b2c48c384dca366
describe
'29780' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCM' 'sip-files00102.pro'
7d0ca98849cf7ca64a283edf8800727d
fdcff4ef32f51e7a34855f276e1c0c7e2aadc7fe
describe
'50317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
ec3e4b28c6343f927bbc9308dfdacd6c
5d1bf5b83b9c54e2259cc1a4b782b6123dd7105c
describe
'2652692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
cfe38474e464a41d49d5e411e08649b4
edcbb7b1416dc7a5858da5f2e16a002dd97190e5
'2011-10-13T22:11:28-04:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCP' 'sip-files00102.txt'
191461de9ee6cd0da97d43f98ea2d7f3
5f579c669f95543131a205e15315c703151549bb
describe
'19305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
79eee41ec6970ec52cd25ebd8cf41973
dd8dbaac189ca6ae7ff5ddabb4b147549235b2f2
describe
'220552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
6273e1776c91c5613ea30c1a4e44de55
8bc0c8434f187fa68c1683b7e74a6ffd74d6fea7
describe
'53415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCS' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
6809bc01e4e3a2749082f8783525ddd0
8671cdaec1a25877dfe035e59816597b1bd55b02
describe
'8058' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCT' 'sip-files00103.pro'
8b417e34d8269c9ca16b050c695c48de
be1ad4f554c351f4da61b9d7f451febb7062f0be
describe
'24106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCU' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
71c68b1106efa562311ce699e25304d9
123312b97badebcccb79cd3f1bfb00d4b5572bfb
describe
'2649060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCV' 'sip-files00103.tif'
47903251ff9b7068daef7ca83fb4430d
771295e434c2890416102c01fb86473d470e34c4
describe
'340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCW' 'sip-files00103.txt'
b5a1c72b1f91fc90aa4253e13f390a8c
bcfabbcd17e1d8da295909ebf13b21add11c5408
describe
'11933' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCX' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
43cdf9fe18007bc5480805f1a1856f41
1018ba46dbce5c8b76825f50c2229b7cb1ac7677
describe
'330435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCY' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
9de86373f29c595845cf83fdca49e768
12484d563b48de5884be83dc80c4feb370588142
describe
'121544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPCZ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
60594a6c603268177e9fb4f26048cb3b
719f39a76e232312085b17f1149a45115b9b27ce
describe
'18627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDA' 'sip-files00104.pro'
14ea38a27dd3ecf5fcea9fafc2a44d39
3f80aa2fedc865479809faefc3d73c205e9f7960
describe
'45080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDB' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
b45ebaccaa28e1d99c17f3a83d9ee21f
06c2bc1f47a9560a67d24ea7864ba35fbd8581b3
describe
'2652464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDC' 'sip-files00104.tif'
6146ec7aaa8f7d87f033498b24a12015
8244cd836403edb05dc6b4a9b12db3f9e997de20
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDD' 'sip-files00104.txt'
e0919179d1995faf38ec36160982729d
78c08557963cf3a3a75823e7d15bddb763d66abb
describe
'17629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDE' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
2412a8753d810b6a439cf33d6c2abc0f
c6d2c4ac43590c49445ae1c9567486a2a98f0744
describe
'330187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDF' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
5208e08ffcf106fb06a811b27902fc09
d9c7d7c8dae4e0bdc6ee3cabc320a825774fa6fd
describe
'129005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
295fa84402dc975e921258a5e7942efc
269fbec8ece8fa76b1a19ff9a680bf3b54a83ddb
describe
'30625' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDH' 'sip-files00105.pro'
0339e35197577e35824c99afd02d2d33
2ba5950aec0b56035eade2adcf756cea880e3187
describe
'50992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDI' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
643c55429effacdc5b3ecb8e9b12285b
5b5c9a546654def6a928e5543d0bf61fb5aa0d0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDJ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
83c30ca84c1f985da624113d9c26c3ac
d90f8b9be7977e208757bb468632f1a2879521ac
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDK' 'sip-files00105.txt'
51f711dc94af5128c09c14c23c19c879
0b84195382a4cdd50c0c767d4175f42971813863
describe
'19322' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDL' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
caef5140aee8ccf6351d042db05e62de
96b46cde9718f38c4e1d9471f91fde36193c2b45
describe
'330433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDM' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
9079d7d5ee1639a2a88336970ee7b649
cbcad22cbdfae9c5970ad3a3c64547b2ea6e7809
describe
'119943' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDN' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
045bd0e956dd05fa3240dd561727fe40
9b8db04ac0010240e031dc6c987bd9b64f346cd9
describe
'28001' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDO' 'sip-files00106.pro'
b450af9c80aeaf0caac0d39296909085
a72ff453a8dae8c554a710f13d0b32dd79c83aac
describe
'48121' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
25358ed7f8d7bfb6710adfecdb47f59f
f8fdf7786a37c85d6452ca01d009a538d4dc4790
describe
'2652628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
06c00f6bb2c37da80eed58f774aec2ee
16a8e7466f593d7d61ed0cfe7694aef1f1969acf
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDR' 'sip-files00106.txt'
fa257940efbb155af5bc0dd33d882137
7e5aadb560e402a35422c2944860999dd44ad779
describe
'19058' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDS' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
a1c633bc06f4ca9501c13b341c123a19
f5878aa60a9fd73fabbfebb917d447b59febddcc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDT' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
bdba12c452231cdc9c80ba4dbe0b3332
f2c98643da0dc3b74413dbe2ef8c542516ec852e
describe
'125023' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDU' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
026e9123a82903a5bb87a080cc06d7d7
13c961bbe9e532967a7721cca2eee8b909fd1f55
'2011-10-13T22:11:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDV' 'sip-files00107.pro'
69a654d581bb5060f9d505710ec74257
8f0baf9d84344104df5757dde9a798635bfe9057
describe
'49433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
c4c16d929cc94bd558f10234d8456798
09511211563ba110bb8c33909457739293458dff
describe
'2650508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
413b5300bfda557177a09dc5033e42ef
6a910b6c61f2c24bac88daa1dee785e8ed3b6aab
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDY' 'sip-files00107.txt'
af8ec8b9be59f2643c09146b1e9b5de9
66ca1f65232fd5cc7ab3264f1f8bc567faa50775
describe
'19323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPDZ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
15be6a1715059a8ca08c0c58d99064e0
5d1b1cf21cfff1d8f423cb89e6d9e2a9d6bf5ea7
describe
'330143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
fa4a4da20d05e07c12981d8657acdfa4
460b8e9d3db6a549e57f5771081254ef1d284884
describe
'133249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEB' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
fc972001b2d33975ca5ca773ea8b2dfc
f7433b93dafb72e2bf9932ef47d6a4db679afa70
describe
'31001' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
1bdf279dd087b94286d679c096f9e7fc
247301cb630dde4f56b881816148ca365bfcfc32
describe
'50909' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPED' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
1a9c500391d4f0daab864f85738a3e60
207c3e5ab1b91d71cfff4d48aeeeca205d29c06b
describe
'2650676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
516483dfc9f2b2168ac08e8ef0bd6168
478e7d016eaa0a74e6908bfe94c53f5107684bf6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEF' 'sip-files00108.txt'
70a33b3a50f696ab86cae70276227c23
6c862c213c96e17ce72dc15f3434a2176721188f
describe
'19649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEG' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
4b647cd0a48b88d49d6b108e3516eb03
5b89718cf4868c84bf2c17cc153d2abdda1a3d14
describe
'330146' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
077cae23f504c5d8ccc274559ba2e70b
bb159364eff228a185c60d637b691aa07342c22a
describe
'121140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
1d8590cd3cb1c520023ec61374bb10a9
8d6c8ba34eb3283024c01cc54b83dced4c20d618
describe
'28716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEJ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
8126410fcbcc5601d63a981a901db1f7
f2d366e21b5b0f2df9a67445fa6f2fa6a6e9d15d
describe
'47635' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEK' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
cc50f62be21cb935faa5c4e7cf56f19e
29dd3def260750a722f234b88c46f7ac34a86e91
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEL' 'sip-files00109.tif'
7ffdeece7e6591aac2b3136c6fcdb4d8
5243ed48b1f231e37ee96080abf53fc14bbbd7bc
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEM' 'sip-files00109.txt'
0ba45d5c3e5597ceb232c3f39825374d
3ff1a7ba154169d619e974c236912dcbff050c48
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEN' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
2fb814b57d0a5cfc2b00adc4597bd659
13a3de68379b3a7d448a467f7225020b25bb5584
'2011-10-13T22:10:16-04:00'
describe
'330418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEO' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
38f1300d43c39e73e3cb46441bc8e563
b71306a8153dc7253e892f21da343cb5c61acaf6
describe
'128755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEP' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
ecdbe5100e74673e01262915e0e7c8cf
71759420b87c9ad4ec7d78e20a98dd6a0738dbf1
describe
'30261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEQ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
ec6ec37692c35d17d6c07672d8692d24
c604167d2b74561ce833421932c2cf3fe3830893
describe
'49236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPER' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
3f0bfe2df7e9d095bfcbcc87b1e851af
725fd18eee388b4d4720a683d05fc1c32ed01345
describe
'2652660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPES' 'sip-files00110.tif'
e2e154d87b6ed50fa0bfa9b078e69bce
74f4a4c94ed40955265e7c52902011e9f286a0cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPET' 'sip-files00110.txt'
f45219e1187eced30222d6dcd9bc98fd
166b11889ec30c5becfb909541225f2a1de5b4c5
describe
'19301' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEU' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
db521c2e04d042c4e6117c499fcea6e4
388fbef01a9d653b9737169453e7bffda62aac22
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEV' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
7be64d3b3c70b337530d60898fa225b9
2e5b6981d153af6ab1ecd7aa727036e1fc5503f6
describe
'129796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEW' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
23a600dbdc0b7c9f903a8691d38da21b
9fa80b0ff5bbd4638194b38568888863f98df32b
describe
'30645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
497f17b0cc10e7decef48a5263ad93e9
c1ec0f38a42f20d82de34678c6afc6c261da6b4d
describe
'50279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
4363c8cc30b4653725c5360b9ba1baf4
e6e568c68366e69ccc353822e3784bb8fd839dfe
describe
'2650500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPEZ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
8bf573186773c226534da58fec7a959d
ea1b0d3df19119337efb3ea96cb9d97e4308dde6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFA' 'sip-files00111.txt'
b0360fc6e7a951604b90ea402212cdfa
e3fc297966f97340ed9bd6d1c9fa4e2c5271af4e
describe
'19619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFB' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
f18b925d2de03c1b7355b98df48c9817
fe1c7ee68865f47e212b5ddf349e9455916054c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFC' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
58906d8c486d06cde493022e9c735da9
1d2803f5ace129ed465e138b913de9d7782cd781
describe
'125501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFD' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
8aa4503dbaeb0e45d942a79b6836c696
201884a982761446a29d08d07dfff3e5532138d5
describe
'29043' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFE' 'sip-files00112.pro'
0fd2aaa4bdbf6b05d8014137d3b0e04a
68ffd6c65fd79bd7f76843925fe4862ae44f1e57
describe
'51418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFF' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
a74b74da1f13a48f6b5af9b8f4febe06
d1d34f2884983e67aac728bc2ac44451f2b79b97
describe
'2652788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFG' 'sip-files00112.tif'
83474c7c4fc06d156fec0d0d0f70288a
07ca4b68bae8e3a426f0c4a5514158988c7a2e87
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFH' 'sip-files00112.txt'
b7fc9cbb7bacb723a15659e77126e3f8
56865139d95cd4f24f99d67a2a2d2eeebfcc0ee4
describe
'19492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFI' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
7d13057004c4468d0665a640d67236f1
0a9a207ea2ab3d182687b8b199469f5b07de9e5d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
96420f7714c1fdad4093ac026532cc54
7ecf2789ad58c394a05ed7c00a543098f7007053
describe
'126757' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
ad0ad0b6604a369cc54d29be27ffdfa7
e2c5368fd371632ce7307c63da062736f464c463
describe
'29796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFL' 'sip-files00113.pro'
3acb94aa917ad1bb8ae5fbcc072d95d2
e6f84abf0e05b63064f174e4e209191088851fb0
describe
'50156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
0e78ba247ee6de6f9b031fbc50451bce
2c83c577be092fdea4dbd6d200920ca203beb302
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
5a9f64266d02aae224fd0fef3c6e7d1d
0a90cae676fbca0a5e91f1aaaf7d586f0e055673
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
8f38080b9682e425a220a4755afd5c4d
0463824a18bdc5532062551c2f914bd27a4ec285
describe
'18985' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFP' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
1345c299f21f1fbb3191d44707e8c533
74398d75d3843907131e1e54060f6f7a29138c18
describe
'330463' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
f537d6284f1b34e2f56890b350ea3d30
aef7cc490213ce7f7312021c8a5659f8124366f3
describe
'117995' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFR' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
058de1f169d9c19ec40cb2ac461b5249
03a64ca0a3fef123c6f9b4925f9b676eebf08f9d
describe
'27201' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFS' 'sip-files00114.pro'
72b64b2ca2770e8978b3cec9b42c9b6e
f61ab429f81396baed3d26c402a1797c137b5330
describe
'49729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFT' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
dfee5e981637985048f2fa57f199f401
7d2ba851fd52add578edb70192f1d0e637d044f8
describe
'2652688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFU' 'sip-files00114.tif'
f219b0f5a68471288a288a52c7aa5c81
8a820055cde766196bc4b94bb1fb86b4aff0e126
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFV' 'sip-files00114.txt'
071f6ae414fe59018703ad24c897869f
c5ba9be5a4ea42c2e118626212d4d94fb2ce06bb
describe
'18894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
631cfc810d423a503f536c990e0fc56d
6e7aa32b2dca5eb3f4bb84b45703d5a778e2902e
describe
'221624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFX' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
e0b5f6cf02c77e7686013ec29dc3e4ac
18c2602b64094d112f6633e0c712abddccb48ff9
describe
'51957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFY' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
8a39d517b7385742af068718a4e63004
0fdff99ab1b29f5e2334523e58659ec58247413d
describe
'8041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPFZ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
e2ef396508c63a9558ac8b2918fb5b67
ce12743672950a50b183a03b72385bd7d99a6188
describe
'23473' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGA' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
d30cab494f91b85d401e70aa43773e5d
0a14b17f927c3a2c9ee848af26e779ed70882233
describe
'2648944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
7e24e139042234690b0c7b36538eb4c7
5034bc0e669747e98b21039a23a866731c06fb5c
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGC' 'sip-files00115.txt'
137e18f4d97e391c36d4fb6b7a3512a0
87bad2eb4819b342e301e321dbcbfd31034120dd
describe
'11412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGD' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
ef979e7eed9e1fdafdb4b11e5c20cdbb
8a583b34a3d926054f66e4b500899b5f3ec8f711
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGE' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
70bca70492528cff5479e51838334499
720cab83e44b7eafa9c4eaeb2a90e0e5605ad5f5
describe
'111435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGF' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
1ebe7f46d9bd7ab1bfc0e8e184ca1940
12449b736562d4df5124646de96e38c2062c8df8
describe
'17054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGG' 'sip-files00116.pro'
256a259c8502a4ad27b587ece12f419f
a4436ddf493f158869477bf22a36e4959763c517
describe
'41567' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGH' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
1c060d06746cf718df9d631215662d2e
0731944ae2caffdd32211c553d38b71cb4655c26
describe
'2650100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGI' 'sip-files00116.tif'
d8610668013cc642ae6baa6f72acb4e9
62a42724c15e3ce006449af0dead1c325c3ac550
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGJ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
5af5adbf07468e016ce5045fca76ffd9
fa0c01f5a969986b95def17bacb19c35ee7f63e4
describe
'16595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
68c093b2bf923e4681c3d680458012bf
44b7aa0fec3652b2e5401418b5f9cc6954299ac6
describe
'330174' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGL' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
f7ff5202ab73427f861f95268e7e578a
2e30b976faffa4e6677b4dccd5292edab171a593
describe
'123319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGM' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
37e6527695c12cd2ee7b86ed00cffd12
3fbee3c693bc999d555c9404e8c9ce6f51ecf9dd
describe
'28163' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGN' 'sip-files00117.pro'
cd081e40184d6627830c45111de0017b
766b45d3b5d7a80b63315087e1a0d0500285e018
describe
'48720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGO' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
b8c23ec0bd4e83c949481fcc0ea10400
afcbc95798a661d26e6a89e8720b720210b55762
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGP' 'sip-files00117.tif'
9e6c4dc3c945604bcaa94ddb6eb3b5e0
bbd58f8b891c6032d175d4adc7e7c51b0af115b0
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGQ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
fb8c3494cccbe267e902de57f1dbde27
76f6dbdb40fe677d5b918e05428a5813962cd06d
describe
'19192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGR' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
e26fb98ed258ac095408164b54277c9f
d87ba995069543f51e686d0321dc3f4d1c8da803
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGS' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
8488a9f4fb6621d73d584b332e93011b
911d8a2c2fc5be199a5a525822d3d8364766a23a
describe
'131194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
bd35e23c68838b6947f7019ff12b5ad9
9563f79da6de69126c4b4d408dd20b65520a11e8
describe
'29998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGU' 'sip-files00118.pro'
2d307260e9c1cd12eb45ab0117d60926
774e77a03ca1d4a9d0fe7e9a3a112769fc1f1a94
describe
'51685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGV' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
d94e6b7978b8eac64e397e7ec3518051
2c2a9baaa3b70fc066afcb7852a474182a24eeb3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGW' 'sip-files00118.tif'
4613826675e23ac6e2ed1344df402f29
dfa96c3cec0cc0ae4dd41ef24445e653ea3ea366
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGX' 'sip-files00118.txt'
af36c13206d47e13cc53029a6df4c630
c86f0bad32d0cba46072bdc17f65f1d5f6593713
describe
'19993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGY' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
5c04f5753782dd915010fe6dbe112048
9e1275c3f7c50cbaab66aa0d48ff2bce51d96a9b
describe
'330194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPGZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
d51d020b8a40d0358ef21507b02ca7e7
05b3266478ecc8db5533fd88ac5c4c5f3563c527
describe
'128409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHA' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
d98a3c3ed7ff30a5c3dc18f534f082cf
9cba2300d24529dca6f7cf25d9593965336a77a0
describe
'29099' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHB' 'sip-files00119.pro'
ef852247ff9c27106d2d7b1ab1757d37
3a9ff4ad0e31928fd5a5295dd3d41097e32c469d
describe
'49662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHC' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
7234f21d3a0e537548a59e9705ac4d41
51d19e9748d47b5f792e083e6f15f301e0155a8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHD' 'sip-files00119.tif'
4bf90632f420a54178e36018b317a8df
4e5ac398c58e621dec8109bd6848914dc4298539
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHE' 'sip-files00119.txt'
c3e5231b852e50d1f26a71f922aaca95
7bbe225161ced1b6a985ea9014c8646e5beccc3e
describe
'19731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHF' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
47a76db26a71c1dbc7188c5d7d4c0243
c023b2d7182d4974b26f2945495002ff96cc7c27
describe
'330178' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHG' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
1d14c65429a966770f85824440c52c8d
fbbf3b60e7bafe128bc0a00f37a2b7275feec6eb
describe
'132348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHH' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
59cf75b8b9d24b1db1e84f278ca7d993
1f2ab750878553436c4988f70fec0bb5a9d8b171
describe
'29831' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHI' 'sip-files00120.pro'
51842276e924738caacc304db5181b40
944ab86252c4221f5a30cb9c08c3b2d293ca0cb2
describe
'53439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHJ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
bb585c75bd40d99ada56abfed4f4fdb3
758ae8e7eb608e734ca6289f8d4818f9e0b8624f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHK' 'sip-files00120.tif'
fdde8d751406c5ab358cea4a1d0e1a2b
50efe66ba2524e60f24aabe09e2329b2c92692cd
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHL' 'sip-files00120.txt'
b305783ad361ee1e438a380dedb78d0c
e8eb750308e6b3a8aa8bf7c84c45358ab5179525
describe
'19782' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHM' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
2ea8aa3b281c4b50d60e30a15f373745
f69483faefcf3bfc270f034debaca82f296f3701
describe
'330166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
8001c2c3474f4e555dd3800ac197a201
1756764bc9821cc0ad318e9f112075ebc7c3edee
describe
'111014' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHO' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
9fb57b0c438af0a3fe72df1931aaaa8e
3db68441328341f257b95e38e7ca0bc22e4e4779
describe
'24803' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHP' 'sip-files00121.pro'
2b22cf38e2c0957d03b068b90edad103
e5e7966ee6e21c2cf5cc9a80a75cc38760a8c1c9
describe
'44351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHQ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
22c452971bc091a7e3789b22338d7dba
f19c9a671f42f52bb63e88b8cad68fbe36be9751
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHR' 'sip-files00121.tif'
fe11823eaf7f54fc0a4f7aef691d5b2c
8d735abf6c52b265914866da25265132b53edb2a
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHS' 'sip-files00121.txt'
52335a7e15741d89153be661be7b249d
0bc222e48508dce9eb2ca85926f42c9c260803e7
describe
'18412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHT' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
ebd3b6bcc09459934b0eafce9304ec29
a59c8cee24a64cfc5bfeb41435243c28f2ae64b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
996b7a6e3d518371e4fd7cf56e184ef9
a63c95df1fcb135381d7beb36664c5315d92708f
describe
'126574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHV' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
f08f7c7de3e442f85a6a81b0826b695a
e79bd296e7151efa677f3d8089e646a00cbcd1cd
describe
'28886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHW' 'sip-files00122.pro'
727b1915ceaf680cc093e0d05468256b
5199566195aec077332b9b97c8d3cc44577c7c36
describe
'50167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHX' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
e56d63f64f5ac6a25aee90907bc3140d
005500e29cefcac59a20d246512b6c0945016d6b
describe
'2650664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHY' 'sip-files00122.tif'
7cb5d64142191b1d962c99f9b2eab146
5beba5000d057895902ced8cb517a3e3f669bdb4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPHZ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
94ebfbe2081b0c7b7e295d1f1e3587d9
38b7b5d0ad23d2de2f8a426768f85527510e2964
describe
'19275' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
53d75e3edfd72e8d688f4292fff3fc17
26b85aefd9cb2bfd69220665f7a5cce164d59361
describe
'330148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIB' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
a51ffcd5c4d0f599d32ff59a783ff535
d0a4d876da795891cab50503640393769f1587e9
describe
'131099' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIC' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
10e63a014306a541e6bde2c33fec8519
18907159e11c1c01be797dc1bbf091c96dac064f
describe
'30043' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPID' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e9f24073cdf9025aff4d9fa768dbcc56
5727fbb37c3bb2d7dcdf5fde9f100cc9cad7793f
describe
'52169' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIE' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
daaa6ef4bde5068ea4b0fd896163f10c
defcf1d157e001ad730c65511b3007539c4d9f11
describe
'2650712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIF' 'sip-files00123.tif'
3ce24a3e1d3229c54b63147f3a5ac689
9a204ac0109b06be7c9f76d2fd36d1751067818b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIG' 'sip-files00123.txt'
0d22d4f6da3c908ad91c724cc1cf0947
8d68fbf1111136a373eca28c8972d031c7742851
describe
'19624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIH' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
04fe9a8844508a6eeb25131cd85d4dad
49041f567901a15e109d58e8a9e899b98b02f5cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPII' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
326008df0023d1b5a204e0147fb74021
fe2628150c4243e43163ec799697caea56acf510
describe
'126267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIJ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
debf0d01afa51c053a9504f71769c977
c5889a55d9c3427136e043b8e5344a8553aefdee
describe
'29659' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIK' 'sip-files00124.pro'
415e0bac2f7b8b3cd9e1a71f57d605f1
69319b032c875bca18c5d7cc818c610b6bea01f9
describe
'50011' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIL' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
2216d1aef4991ac375861d95fe030345
477b834da3a124ea2bbf9af819d3b3fe413a3a85
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIM' 'sip-files00124.tif'
cb95969c405944ed2b87f292402434ea
695aae59d1295e0abd66402b794e5bbc53671e6c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIN' 'sip-files00124.txt'
8307868fcb271cb455b3a284c78a0ab7
a28dfedcf17197d7149f4c7ed88c23ba3e11eb81
describe
'19010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIO' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
77c3c7b609eaaa7ef56207bfab1d96f5
622f1c09e22a02098156cf945beb6cc65d685c23
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
3a1e5ae40e6156136098654ff4ea2d06
dd4c0c08c8b4b02fb854b1fb615bcaecfc9644c9
describe
'123018' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIQ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
a23a7abdb78525b3ceed9f8aa8204647
0224b82aef3607e15376b5d71b68b7a1a5364431
describe
'28962' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIR' 'sip-files00125.pro'
e921af1aca5759c570227407baf1029b
d0c5269de2afc668412e4e21c2aae405e0f9a75f
describe
'49475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIS' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
b6ad778aa076ca0fce34244285807e72
741cddc375e4a81432ef351573d93fa335706e5e
describe
'2650492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIT' 'sip-files00125.tif'
abb4e689252cf5f587de11acaa341708
b003898b188c36825776f597f08f8a7aa513b80d
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIU' 'sip-files00125.txt'
6d35b0112dadd090d53b190c2a4baf24
fdce68a30a80c94de3679b4f2c4574bbd98e4896
describe
'18746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIV' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
d85bcb2f4ca8387da533927ea2b5ef33
fffb23772fcaf105b96bbecf7fe35fc9f5a41cd4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIW' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
2fbf464befd29e50a922f710cc4c372e
38d9a21658fc0098652de62ffb778849e31e9d26
describe
'126864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIX' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
44b3234ae833a5dd9a346747219db113
7f4912a3870ba1195e269374591f81eb503aa2b7
describe
'30013' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIY' 'sip-files00126.pro'
24195dd7a947c9ed4dc7bf695eea1b99
01c41b0ad6adc96eb0b510c2b11691f1423587bd
describe
'51025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPIZ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
0c0195595acecd3098b02d679e3dff41
d8c4a28c8fa1906125554a60224019e47a08ad62
describe
'2650428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJA' 'sip-files00126.tif'
760e45a7568963aaa7493740862b7e1b
e473264e5c62c48e8a51bfa9670f8f1c8fe9920a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJB' 'sip-files00126.txt'
ab83b480a70535135eba722172f646b5
c91f527478f73549fb3ba3d22e2a06b51a6ae70e
describe
'18608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJC' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
1d60e839cf06829529876528a7ede29c
45735b53c5335558c70f8c84b75b765b733c9810
describe
'330465' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJD' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
4d88a2ffdd9dd9dd84888eb18b36dc07
a35f50eaf98fb1953a54c10a164a353f8438ad2e
describe
'125864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJE' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
47785f4686227e2c010663e913f45b38
05420c8a607989842af0faebd46afc17cb4863ff
describe
'29444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJF' 'sip-files00127.pro'
d06618270eaea2e65ba76d26f83c3014
3dc4bed0994b1c944a64cabf4fc129b43f19db01
describe
'48247' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJG' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
030c7c72caa5dd7ca118a59012027401
04faca03250e69cb3af5381e0abde3d9ebc12ef5
describe
'2652524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJH' 'sip-files00127.tif'
6314a893e49c47efe2fd24b98e47fd57
d9cb19f6943bfac81a998c86b88eb69b354dff94
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJI' 'sip-files00127.txt'
e6fb3f13b0918397f240e611ca12c4cb
44761aad068a1a248be884a6bea647c5b450215a
describe
'19003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJJ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
83e1e3eadf66be3cb72810897e53aa7d
692d99561c03d4dc7752ba0a44ed889af95b18ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJK' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
378a8cdb65ee36df489bd5a5e20e2bbb
b84f276b87bf018bebf47e600624e26d968bb8d2
describe
'132822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJL' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
cfd616c5e7de085717d1c68d85893443
50e6a1e4b71cbad14e6fe5d2dc0f81f8ffb83faa
describe
'30971' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJM' 'sip-files00128.pro'
27a79304e1e06787fd9c6bd34b6058ea
d72132a1dff3cf0c8ded140a55cc03915ad300dc
describe
'54371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJN' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
23953d63ec30c3c354b362618f5ce11d
c7cdd91bbb6cea1263fc5a59749dda23642a4b50
describe
'2652744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJO' 'sip-files00128.tif'
cd537b1156066147b94f796e59f33aae
cb0513b13aa002b0c2c4047919f1870368931c2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJP' 'sip-files00128.txt'
3cd67a02bdeb7b247fb138772a7f1663
c12f00ee8141b56f93100ac5616a6d589765e1d6
describe
'19602' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJQ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
37b4f789eb45c7a8b63085ff4b06c31c
bfb1bfb57c6d599d2b56296c94eee99fc6b422a6
describe
'291153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJR' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
ca7600512f88c60ea8c8f27944ae1c8f
d989498f6bd8a8edee6c6adbffc3cb7ed5a74fd7
describe
'68350' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJS' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
afbd304c6411d984d1d19c0698969ecc
4bb661b92543b7cbb15cc47c9ea250b187420608
describe
'13042' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJT' 'sip-files00129.pro'
514c65e20e6008b0e612065f028f43dc
fd7e48dedaaa7b610559999b21e30967ad8ceda1
describe
'28718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJU' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
45f21ca01ba9f2e78bca756ad58fc784
a8aa7078e3a339ae3b102593abb3529d16010906
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJV' 'sip-files00129.tif'
1162b97d8584ea49cc0dca998507956a
f44516241c9ef2cb380848b7aec0134848982a49
describe
'527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJW' 'sip-files00129.txt'
7e5d9a087c0db3a4b8b42fd7e3607f0e
219d441db972984617aa26c531d19d9e626fed2f
describe
'13554' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJX' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
20439238bb6ec69acd7247c55677a529
475cede724358d75b230de8fc3efa8c1206e3f85
describe
'330201' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJY' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
082081dfed80c712a8f7708fbd537324
f191c96c30eeb2572e15f42bfae1cea64021a958
describe
'121045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPJZ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
72dfeb04e3084884b2ae3c82edbde8b8
aff54f12810102a3a4af6d19de2042c9112c05e1
describe
'17874' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKA' 'sip-files00130.pro'
4e6a8553267ff3c65a573f4e0f29897e
420ebe239b8aca4a5d7809279015d9172fa3ad72
describe
'45166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKB' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
b0a31dad81be85f13976abb46ad712d9
3623fffaf6b74e9c2d641b9e19eea289b6bdd5c4
describe
'2650352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKC' 'sip-files00130.tif'
d14166e43f31949d650de793a19cdee9
cec97ea570eb88ef675bf56ae46f79eb09ea0770
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKD' 'sip-files00130.txt'
3e4b75367a7dbf548fdfabbddcc5f62e
5a7f54a5e2c24dea38dbe4f223ea3564f930115b
describe
'17716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKE' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
9feb438b81860f87f9fd34266c198950
a500abb3a121d8932a5b3843d2284a5faf8b12b5
describe
'344158' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKF' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
cf5a25dcb1934d9b16d6488b360a78bc
27da10f489ae4cc5156b8e11fc95d79c359c2eea
describe
'121261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKG' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
45ea36eaac9ca12a2bb96b25b4df223d
8c9999255c5f7356b58018ebc34041df99a399a5
describe
'29774' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKH' 'sip-files00131.pro'
aebb3dfb8e30b1feeadb943d06ce5e10
a831249e7bb13e72a29d474756e3b4d63eb79855
describe
'48185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKI' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
cf65825c0b1cbc9cd4c774c9154c7f80
1b2c272b57822cdc5bcb019d6231b73222ea15aa
describe
'2762284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKJ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
a8c0ad357157d31a7a537ca6a77639ac
9e6f4b2e6ccb2be6fb843de8aec309c906379e2f
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKK' 'sip-files00131.txt'
afe9f8761feb0780799790a6748a29b4
56d74d6a3f128d6cb80c3e8394b71747be46436d
describe
'18251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKL' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
cafc0b850e3e05c964622e35d76329e3
fe1ae337f693c6b7f470f4f153024bcc0d5ecdf7
'2011-10-13T22:09:51-04:00'
describe
'342538' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKM' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
2c1abad816f0d141133c50ee65674215
00e70111f6f46d7636db345850d39202d20fc8fa
describe
'116669' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKN' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
4f9b64f927dc0263dcf6e73f57c955eb
54a91133a4f856cc1803fe24fdf39bf562e676a4
describe
'27867' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKO' 'sip-files00132.pro'
0a98f2ab88fcf25db098dad3a8466528
ac6bbe4a33103a80e7c1453a8c2050d5efde8ea6
describe
'47384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKP' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
de3361e8b85308226efb8f7b47484557
33fdec771188cdf610da9fb20d2d11a3914d5092
describe
'2749916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKQ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
344926fa1f7fe94ea3f276aa2f4f8796
dca89a46c054acc8265ed21b386860e7787c28a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKR' 'sip-files00132.txt'
6f9c20ce3fb8a998f4c46355e1c33875
99a28195a82fc179250070442e262df32f9bbbb0
describe
'18196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKS' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
b07eee8275dcd01b4c985e5ef8d1ee34
0f66dc29a3a4c0f1e8de9ed47fc08ed020234923
describe
'339504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKT' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
df36527efa7256d15ba06cc5bec2b637
55e970bdd481888748d12948e4380884bf777626
describe
'123394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKU' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
a4980d8bbbd0d120e751cbf8db92713f
e2d042610afeadabda323c36be354e3a7ba1644d
describe
'29115' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKV' 'sip-files00133.pro'
38e88b669d1fb95b3686f2fc9c2d93d9
21e0d71c6c7bdf3f2de3da31ed282ce94f88f5ab
describe
'50026' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKW' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
6ba8a3f889a07fdabc20bfb3eb28c399
eb59e4b6b2e8ea7ebfcdb75a74eefff2bb3dbcd1
describe
'2725036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKX' 'sip-files00133.tif'
24d932bca08835fcba2e5460ee7b1f19
b246afa002ea2f1243aabab00b784dcf9b79ebab
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKY' 'sip-files00133.txt'
6879fd3f60de5978e15199791b616fb9
41c185e1e17299d63141bdc2b57e79747b15d42b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPKZ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
9f93d0409613c0ffe09efda4d4c42859
ce5651d91b4346012d648dba97577e6e2c842bec
describe
'350361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLA' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
476afbe00116010ffbe15a1a9bad9e0d
7d7b5dd9deef62e133360f6e2aba04a48b4c2e1d
describe
'114586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLB' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
cf9dcb56ab5ad11de98410cc6c27d7ac
4a7c9835976b79ca5cac592ac4ac6346813ec826
describe
'34976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLC' 'sip-files00134.pro'
b0c770637beccf6bf5a51f627d02229b
00bf188b5eb4c4654e431675f8eb378a53b1ecaf
describe
'40975' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLD' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
5cfaf31bfaf06c45e983994defc4c466
81a036847532f256a3c74d26c5dd949af92a618b
describe
'2811808' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLE' 'sip-files00134.tif'
b0ab9df5fce9c1d1cd63fed528c2683b
0cb59f33a62a84ccab901d70e8ae3fd53bb8d86c
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLF' 'sip-files00134.txt'
e533904d10682a18601674b2c2a686ff
ef1b0bf32af421a63573502b61f63f37e8a66242
describe
'17664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLG' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
dba09781c41821618969c5c6b6944933
579525e39080e034fec71fbfbd94aa0df26a6c11
describe
'341006' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLH' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
4b648eaa3c36d6ccec052fcf94fb64d9
578497715af86bc766f4c24ad1332d9615ab032a
describe
'115114' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLI' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
fe2a58ff4b32f6ac4c07deaa572a25e2
5beba4d1a26f4824cbaf10302d0eb1740d803dc4
describe
'33603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLJ' 'sip-files00135.pro'
ddede6fed5218e29b1a0936668e2178b
d8c0b8944413c289e70a72fb2bc70ec7776d2be3
describe
'43690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLK' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
33623bb42ab16fca0731f586bd35dcd1
e18ad3917323b79d2a2b2048a57c74ffabada7d1
describe
'2737380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLL' 'sip-files00135.tif'
0b6abb7b1d4652a094d4816581078589
8dad5c54f4546ae0ef60087f5a096c5b59f1d276
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLM' 'sip-files00135.txt'
f23b0c810d02ff30f7659ca4d8b7921d
3965e550a32332be80a430be06bbdc63befe431e
describe
'17659' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLN' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
778fccf19e46ca64158d890bdc10d5c0
a0e17635e20768368cf2ed13103cca7dd6795947
describe
'347262' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLO' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
ef2338ac7d5be83fd1225d1474339d9f
c91b81f304fb770070a95dc533fb9f0c9469df7d
describe
'125079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLP' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
91c65f72339e542d6e86307dc6d7815f
713ce24022e99b9e26c335b49078ab269d5bd8b3
describe
'39721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLQ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
75856f58a0b059ecef864e50cc8a276b
b8d5cab5bbd62564fa1137e845cd69dbae4eec21
describe
'45274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLR' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
dbfc8b9987fd7691867949ab79135678
45ba2bff15368df114ed70a77a9c2872fee573d8
describe
'2787196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLS' 'sip-files00136.tif'
4adaf0828e4c41e616a8ced22ac65dee
2bec7d85bb598631b62d7bf724d0bcb288a7c07b
describe
'1858' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLT' 'sip-files00136.txt'
de4b0f788d359f554fadf971480b0d6d
74d5d3e488b9c4f31f8c9242f8089a21f566c5c7
describe
Invalid character
'18754' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLU' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
b4ce4ff46d613b199913b7c78a5db204
6832ca3c0671ccd9695366c94d266dc81bf2d42d
describe
'342617' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLV' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
dd6907796e3d0c8ccc9c6b4408fce70c
c03148228de3bdb3532f8369833ecce5da51dfd4
describe
'140422' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLW' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
e0e18917a175da37a83541e20784170a
a94ffe565c2a36c3bce52b4ac7dbdd035e880e05
describe
'46528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLX' 'sip-files00137.pro'
7b31e46b94868d4d0e8f654edca79f1c
649a014afa75fc913815cb04f82cd50f43d7e8ad
describe
'49804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLY' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
639228b9b3ca4a13ec818e7e65b1f9bb
c89e8de93afd7e3453723a6353d168afcabf1e8f
describe
'2750116' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPLZ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
bfe5400f1857097404a631c4a0c21f1c
cbfaeb96b2633d2ff49ccfa671b78035818df419
describe
'2169' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMA' 'sip-files00137.txt'
07e97fe16e7a7620d6693cf4919b2753
489b9bb0e6f7bc8732ec089035364ac84553d4e1
describe
'19485' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMB' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
153f683d5b474082c20aa6f3e8e3afa4
7ed7441fc36794f4dcbc2414b8eb02c96d11df6f
describe
'350342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMC' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
b975959c8c29db18ca45a82723b6c1ee
d6516059249dbddcb8dce7014f890ee8d78f4947
describe
'127143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMD' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
dafd1d1638ff0cb15fa80f620d190e8e
1b26e96eaf5f6d828d223f5a75da5d12c90b4cf9
describe
'40569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPME' 'sip-files00138.pro'
de3b6c749c5b5718201a417b402b34c4
d4b19847fa6070bdc3ecf254a1d93819483b5475
describe
'45762' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMF' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
39e2f0145e88a5befce9aaa9a8715268
c9a295f09713d24246ef91653d35af6faef97f88
describe
'2811980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMG' 'sip-files00138.tif'
767413e2e5fc1f1e89f01ddc0dded7fb
8b73312703bae86c2900803fb93f4cfa3ac76b15
describe
'1876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMH' 'sip-files00138.txt'
a6de9891f4ba6bd6ff17ea9c36a2b452
c8ae8e36168ade3e7dd458a516f071813fb3615a
describe
'18388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMI' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
8f0ef4b243259c7d4690e1cbcb0e9244
7c3ae17efd42b27313030c186ae3ac9bf63d5d92
describe
'345589' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMJ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
7a674a7a9cdd31b1f0622454351f4b0f
0269235f23b7cb2a3769c4324f1476614eb1ff96
describe
'117217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMK' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
7f51f3e8fe7d3851d7e5844819d391a2
2eb77d2bbce226f765d9795e8e23367286d863c5
describe
'34590' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPML' 'sip-files00139.pro'
83d6386b6a1195cea8221987fb8bafb4
80bda2c3a0f4bdf09f92daea088af51703586a26
describe
'44017' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMM' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
8f057ee42e4f0703632071fe8a686944
bf58e7805f3ceff5864dfe02b126efdcf08d146b
describe
'2773636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMN' 'sip-files00139.tif'
6e97aff580984e0f0f90371616062450
1e5679a7f8d3e6f9b1e854c1fdafcb08f4bb08f7
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMO' 'sip-files00139.txt'
04724a78e0abb7c7e5477757f4621735
d920eb4d80c191ea88c7d1f925048d78acab6515
describe
'18192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMP' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
62525b952578095dd7c32c16d8c560ce
e6d410bf8f46bf3d6f8ead4c7e5363a18308977d
describe
'336397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMQ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
7560acf51d33b6369a9182d7cba803a5
56dd2fc1dc4654bfbc3aaee412fd03af98fd89fc
describe
'142554' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMR' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
fcb1411a8d11e03109c9d0e13d21080e
7798f09696c567471bd27a7c151f1922c1edf9c8
describe
'44930' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMS' 'sip-files00140.pro'
715e63fad2a1eac5479c484e72610f23
44e1f796517c97726f2fc8db206bd990db547667
describe
'50293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMT' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
b6898826fceb0be36e55a628b7edad9a
9259a50453e1959d37a0a316e93d52e525b74837
describe
'2700500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMU' 'sip-files00140.tif'
71893eb524aeec7fb660d7ee9771d100
f5df1f20741201060a31c762b86b5838d04b4bea
describe
'2069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMV' 'sip-files00140.txt'
5f82c10cdd03882ef1e8b21980a2c4d2
8b744c04f1f564f1693f4cd97a510cdeee8f1175
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMW' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
634bd8aa835c451d94ff4af8e8b02bb9
be2bae041a8e6f09ccd1bc47180626eb63d5d596
describe
'347189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMX' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
2b1aff6fb20d4d0a19a0c92a23469485
320c20aedd8690c793f72a05ecde83c76815dbab
describe
'124595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMY' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
20a15df529c92a63fd406a6a2d94fb82
4277f71315be06095686486bf7fc66c56f74cf3b
describe
'40138' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPMZ' 'sip-files00141.pro'
55892ac14151f9c798404935cb4f5879
5a12c9b67a107e813ce365f6c718c9d69c6d7789
describe
'45267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNA' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
9369d59cef1f240bebb1ddcb1bbc4ae7
63d309c304fbad76bb473cced9bf1c6088a6b75f
describe
'2787028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNB' 'sip-files00141.tif'
a0b6ebd7c154bd2f65f4260683f93536
e0534d88a8e7ca7e080e40c32393cdb9bfb2128e
describe
'1902' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNC' 'sip-files00141.txt'
ecb4a3c0fd02c0994e339f8b1676886e
e80bb1c3724697bd31d4b66a00c202fcd5e3071e
describe
'18328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPND' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
7caf42960f46093bac33ef8803d7b61f
6663cd1a75d74ccd432f3bb9c81a0ddfffc254bd
describe
'319114' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNE' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
09ca6c8b96693a7ce8299d9634e9079c
1787f861306f73308cd47c8f49c9380e32be995b
describe
'74038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNF' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
cad0d297acb22e90285fde898bfb8993
16d348fc93d1b78427d4a94f913fa78014001a28
describe
'14225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNG' 'sip-files00142.pro'
dc6d1213d33d3e2363edca690595863a
3b1c12bc3706cae42f9bef9b88408b54f1ad4822
describe
'30150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNH' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
22f7e48b307b18345843658e3cc2172e
89e8d96df42bb608f80f83d6b93ba05979a3c82e
describe
'2649372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNI' 'sip-files00142.tif'
9bbcbef65857158c69ab7d564e5716ec
380e5e969efba90c722d74208940c514aa4a121a
describe
'603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNJ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
1fc49f34c1df688b266e815f278eccd7
06865cf557bd837e14a4dfc4fdb7139a22b3984d
describe
'13660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNK' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
7d553efd57d35414e1d49908724c861b
c5badbd59dddec28fc077bca7388c58e07f08bf3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNL' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
c88f56f61145078996e3fede87daec6f
20cb35b17c6203607946853bf89d614abf08b257
describe
'109393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNM' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
0eb5df37b860133772e8618ae0064b34
67e5a1b5d343c7cbd379833c42205ed4d455bb54
describe
'16996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNN' 'sip-files00143.pro'
56240ee43e8535aaf61bf4bcdce7e5ba
0bd0382cd6bc5b88f019e45b8773efb608498552
describe
'40956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNO' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
a3042770163d5c862fa5ea2fbc38fa88
40e91d2e82736bdf418dcce1f6b93b11e205b916
describe
'2650140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNP' 'sip-files00143.tif'
9f5016d00100572fe007974508d2a71a
60b5aa190538d55183d3a54672a229f019eeb78b
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNQ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
c56a7c9f2e1599bea0329d900a5dc06a
da950a3e363a37d25e5b772e125af593890d3b5a
describe
'16937' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNR' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
cdcb2cefdc4cbb7f62e41399bc2e1652
2d5602149272efaac752fbebf536f7145eab32a7
describe
'330088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNS' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
07f1845e52001362b8ba414bbf77e0b8
b3ed9e1248480efdc6a5cc93188bc6f1f9477403
describe
'117100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNT' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
30bfca05366dc0866a58d14b556b96cc
1168cf6856d1cf4daf7a8f4b6b1b1a96fa9ad03c
describe
'28387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNU' 'sip-files00144.pro'
79ffef1a12972c44273517f354a6cc77
505c779e47160dad6d631678d89047a330d8d234
describe
'47489' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNV' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
43237a14c6b87cfa85d9438f55bf841f
6aef5b9443f53732fc76de877214bc8e8ece3e86
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNW' 'sip-files00144.tif'
d20a3d072686e615ec3d9047365cdbd4
9a7d05e96a89294ddee78ca9886edc72a00337eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNX' 'sip-files00144.txt'
66d6168ef2f92170fe6e116bfb01d3f2
29901ed27c5d708dde95fe7ce7ba74e608441286
describe
'19009' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNY' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
e184dd140e35ecbe11d8422754ae877a
80f9c77ef287cda20f5335d8bac120bac11353e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPNZ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
3f0a4f9b96450ef22b616f7b4cfd96ab
889651c7db85c3505c3118ae90a3fb3f62e13201
describe
'118543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOA' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
648c547e0f11786ce253d989d5496bd2
47d475305fe1bc903e4bd1fde794a8d5043fc8d0
describe
'27494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOB' 'sip-files00145.pro'
7a75ae53523240e3cc51233be6b4b5f6
51efa0636cc205500c87d7e58cb2517af248ec50
describe
'49695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOC' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
756eabc69a847f12850b5ef0ef932ee0
1f6760554c6a7602193f55597a4b0c6f7c492962
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOD' 'sip-files00145.tif'
c873b318f150fe488b0904ab0fca9f56
5b12438bf7f6c1f970a2b9275f272fd0774a486e
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOE' 'sip-files00145.txt'
a5c949849060cd3e27dbc4c79b379dcb
8be47afbbc1a2c320dba9bd95bc01da214c4711d
describe
'19332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOF' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
38b0e4185e8f39c9991d884b3c52e2de
f47f6dcc1f819b0b3b134402fa5f2a76235a5f87
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOG' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
b7b83761ac2195278d7d798ba2517e9e
1ab475e5c933a8f434c94bedb06c8d1f5e0cc077
describe
'129926' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOH' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
7c275017c5d41ccb4f2e8ad9bb0bd57a
37529a1ca603a91da85850e2be665bc621f8e470
describe
'29850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOI' 'sip-files00146.pro'
7658ab4212db5a2add0683b983f33015
6b32c80c039bbf4779f84bc736c9894dfa2c8bb4
describe
'53776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOJ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
0559376d4eb09c8fe27f5df9c990d0d4
b9ba8293c3d15c6c73bc86681c19da08810e8244
describe
'2650824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOK' 'sip-files00146.tif'
637438ab98e1e3150243b20d69a49e50
adb6625abff1b8e263d3bf9347b62210f72fbd02
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOL' 'sip-files00146.txt'
7b9056ce5d46194e133afba3a3cc888c
b2ed704cb4c6583e74daf24f2fb604556ab5e957
describe
'19988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOM' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
f8abfb410a0b437a836fdb486a9134de
aaf35580a74edf5e8662892e391d74c554613433
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPON' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
510c0a37e37ddb1007136f89c9a36045
e82c5073e3eebff3075a2fbcf5bc3ffcdc1dfa31
describe
'107969' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOO' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
dc1919c5da9976f035057aad59393579
21405d23bc8114ce7eb07447052647b15cac08b2
describe
'23922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOP' 'sip-files00147.pro'
d1ee9635e817be22d7141a49a197ff19
67ae86ecbf545f6c2156da0e2b2e8f77d9b93428
describe
'42929' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOQ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
c5438e473cd04a03737670b732de4c15
bafbf359a321393a411082a355de54560b89d934
describe
'2650236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOR' 'sip-files00147.tif'
3a33c03d70c40756d315a2f8a2cba6ca
b61e756852dcfdad82c1ae731ac7547782e31242
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOS' 'sip-files00147.txt'
e7d6e5fef59646b6da366d1bc08bb407
8f0c75ebff797bec00945473fbced63be9355866
describe
'17458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOT' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
6dd6191a830c20e7a443fd8d372c190f
8f41c00cbc5fe398c22c2455b6614abfea7e7d38
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOU' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
56574fb0cd6d1537d0ac6dfda1d7ed37
43a906ba12b4b41be9eaba2b6542162ced7bf9d8
describe
'129021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOV' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
3f2435740811df5fe28593cd77e14a00
89ed8b016e9d6095d3da51edba43dd94f816b2b4
describe
'29889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOW' 'sip-files00148.pro'
2ae9ae0680831a0157aeea63b70f7b4b
14dec70b1e6debe3ce6803ba82fbeace7a029def
describe
'50246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOX' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
5be6adcccfee02f4492d37ab309dc6d3
522c4ce39313e6e1d12740695e0053ee3256b53c
describe
'2650748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOY' 'sip-files00148.tif'
46ec43f9ddebb5c45c999840a822ced4
00cb087eb6ad6937fcf802f2f3135fae7702d123
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPOZ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
60b8aee587254f6420ea8a4c0797c2f4
298d66119735c7f0cb99105080e139b0e8b7b053
describe
'19531' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPA' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
453dde38529dc0de23f7a0555dba6746
b9e97a111c160416e3f0d036e8f9dc4bad8b883c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPB' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
76048e5a912417d74ca2953713cbd08d
d5710ced8fcbe713f9660a44c6ef9777193adee3
describe
'126660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPC' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
83ecde0d2a4d9accf9449b2e2bf999bc
cef3c4b9c43eefc3a71b8af9c6fee5848ff3ff70
describe
'28488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPD' 'sip-files00149.pro'
0ff3649f36c01221028038e7adcd36ff
bbf71d799ebc9c7f2342e4bb34a6974a184f74b5
describe
'49818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPE' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
2fbde7d3098669da1420e793dbee5a00
9ca69512a9f52b8b694531252d825a58ecf11557
describe
'2650692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPF' 'sip-files00149.tif'
a623115b1db46eba27c2b3390b69b961
0d6a725e57c2cd31b8ea57513286520c1039f0cc
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPG' 'sip-files00149.txt'
7c82bf91a2f75f06ddf7bfbb8e333c73
8d9aad39dae5f9e746823bdbb22adca509b10f23
describe
'20120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPH' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
372cf0a807afb5a980ab29b25a7d5113
0785876562e49b54606d4082362076f8b3d4e209
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPI' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
5c4fcbbdfc547d1f2b5c50aca272a684
d06d2fe45d18130b2cea35488fc84e92c5be901a
describe
'115787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPJ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
79a7327258d9020a0fff25f7f6a18a4a
b3ba28fb57a5c8076ff29efa1ae4f4b8fe8b099d
describe
'26744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPK' 'sip-files00150.pro'
e08634ad30d825a93087a98a5a1c8b5e
a9d6198fad812fc790c67ecd59b9267e3da02bcd
describe
'46072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPL' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
c4370d2d83c3a6c3b527dd2a17290d31
cf95b383efd21049f33f9f0bbd767019aafd98f6
describe
'2650612' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPM' 'sip-files00150.tif'
99ae780815525676ba02224d059a2587
e2af1c74d187ec948b301ac07cd36bfb18059775
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPN' 'sip-files00150.txt'
8d9ab18499870dcc4ee1b2cf2d555dd0
d67a1626cb48a7e36d1c60e5c2e323de597a044f
describe
'19288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPO' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
e6d0ac4ddf84a45a6d93fcf3549ae54e
afd7f2636c09688552519964e7816bda366828fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPP' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
31392dce7746325db38b1aefc40dfdf6
d3091ca9be22b53ec39bc592fb0094a7dc6651ca
describe
'118323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPQ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
190ce77e5e8c84cd20c8fa3788bab2dd
bab2ec9d6796bdedf27fac0222b9c7632c6ae756
describe
'27598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPR' 'sip-files00151.pro'
e48f5e7e0a8e3034c6e1d92677a5136d
ba89cf929a9041151191732dfa84fdf0850b5d6e
describe
'47697' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPS' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
001fdeb8eca890b08c45eaf205e5580a
3514e2f137e4bf4311a7e1c72a69ae956571dfa6
describe
'2650524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPT' 'sip-files00151.tif'
1d11d2cc4009a85268dbd93ad7efd183
f2ed1bbecbaed1891aba1ec895bf4cea14415526
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPU' 'sip-files00151.txt'
e38c1f36d585d33d5aa784a59d122c9f
a59d690eec0e57b4aa76989f2260c2bb050eccec
describe
'19302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPV' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
79036d62f1f4580349e626a62e620ecc
fde70cdf3add787916d7d3c49cf19d01a54a910f
describe
'330183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPW' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
03867b898d8fcc1fb3a53f5170a211ac
2ebfd387b3ee7dfb338bbd282a993629077cb583
describe
'136441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPX' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
1ad3cda133fa9eb742e486c8ce19f86e
f3e8e77f63c7f648971cf773284bddd051da5b0d
describe
'31731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPY' 'sip-files00152.pro'
c92ddaa9755bdd3ba4dcee1d7c1f9338
ac5e5a19aee529d2336c02075ad3273cbd10c841
describe
'53121' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPPZ' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
0c9a32822ed4b2189a600fe60e35dfec
f14aa14a930adf1125eccdc81a87abf4531dc4be
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQA' 'sip-files00152.tif'
01c3e190912e548e183430dc86160633
b9b8b81979f07f624a59c7d6d23c7477715536c9
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQB' 'sip-files00152.txt'
3392f703ba966d09367ea84f1e657065
d5a7e52489091eb0273f701d694f8de9b4f0cea5
describe
'20218' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQC' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
08ebb2f760e1ce595fd4e05026c37074
48af3111345b58d9a87c975a56f6d72d8e228b13
describe
'330147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQD' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
47496dbbe014eaf2d6287e12d856f930
aec9b7882cc3a2625ab51153eaf3a5ca25d41a2a
describe
'136805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQE' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
30e67315eecd2118a6d90eaae25af980
906136dcf1e8b5542a6d3e3b7f8afd1cf06d45fd
describe
'31876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQF' 'sip-files00153.pro'
e6b50826aee658ad36bbc2e0c17188f0
c41c520805db78c8fc37d8f4e24a4704c3a4c6ed
describe
'51775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQG' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
fbbc4ffe73712af8a8a64628308b69d1
e1f3bf4368b894c71b51eb11fcddbd307bd6e82c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQH' 'sip-files00153.tif'
930006795364cfb5af0c7f324981f8bc
39437fe4cf418c2c1de0babb01a115e1a5cbcb98
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQI' 'sip-files00153.txt'
8916c98bd4082d08b8b5ccb42f2006eb
97a9427d402b0f5c67568c9e0cbc2c58b753a87e
describe
'19861' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQJ' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
6004857e693e95e7ba436986dd2d26c3
a439cfd99ca758831a3925922107f1c3fbebf1d8
describe
'275545' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQK' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
351cbccc4f92c83c95d7691c0615654c
cafef70ef824714cfa8420c0516706e12b8bf3a3
describe
'61913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQL' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
20a4c8ddcc0d42c9334cd49cf2b17dcb
b923d63261e20b27d4c1b67e6ebffbb85e7358d4
describe
'8651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQM' 'sip-files00154.pro'
979ebdf78f86945e3c6e156d288a9e25
aaa8cb05800d38fd0fa85d648e1014b850b92e38
describe
'26672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQN' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
66519d78d0021722ce8b540376e8bbaf
35a3718d2428d422ad754a1c5c45fd60afafccfb
describe
'2651212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQO' 'sip-files00154.tif'
27c4f9276a6b2461c39ea0eb9427cd5e
f18cd04ba7da7cef9e9e0b4df65f935849a79129
describe
'351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQP' 'sip-files00154.txt'
1954549d1d74d8d5d0fcec64fa03a8f9
0840d10baea57a416a9423b61853b8c083c3c699
describe
'12387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQQ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
2b4e637571d401f1d2451e22bb65236d
b5c1ddef48e88720c0084a31464f1e758d4bc1c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQR' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
9867d0e53fa0d10168de34322e605ef2
b154d74178d18792df6c6f3fc191cad4da488459
describe
'107874' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQS' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
8d247fb662f7b706674dcf6914765a53
28b207da9aa22af2d3b69dc0a9ee89ec0e9a601e
describe
'15976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQT' 'sip-files00155.pro'
bf3b795bbd33defbb4e16465c43711eb
10d7e16fa3186cbb2bec2eddccecbee3f4e3ef03
describe
'41196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQU' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
bb8316e3356fe142f620222ad570601a
f46eb25cd778470275e66f10e7745756b5d7d397
describe
'2650220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQV' 'sip-files00155.tif'
d8c5b39ad31d7e033c4147cc2c9984c7
c58319f3790cbd154d595171b22773871a54cc93
describe
'777' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQW' 'sip-files00155.txt'
d46029a174172dd2d575e7245664ffd0
49eda2ff290082d479594ca2fe157471733a83ae
describe
'16792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQX' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
92a0c6c24baeddfb82280a0899e75744
de073e7d80e79cf3ff6a3a95ddc65b51809528b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQY' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
022952cc09a7ebd5409a2d0b426de019
cb89795c7ae801a3dac169fecd639be68e6b7cc0
describe
'130218' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPQZ' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
8461e72f3a10cc7604f3562eeb0a74d6
6fdb56669dd456e8733e0dd7435de00ba83f6fc4
describe
'29883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRA' 'sip-files00156.pro'
3101c19d475bd6e46e99b60f97ed2b51
68bd680ace7e7a94e7afcfe2c88a35a11803b7e4
describe
'52266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRB' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
370c1267cfa564d05b6897aa300827a8
6c1dccd5803c5b457a95aa50d3c2c7613f381d96
describe
'2652680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRC' 'sip-files00156.tif'
468d0bf24105cb5fded3523823ac2471
8fa1c8b4e3b0b625f1172caaefe6246f5aa7e1a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRD' 'sip-files00156.txt'
0091218526bc2815dd15de8ee43f7eec
fa26cabf3a2b5602d2f417b3f9133d41f0b26c8c
describe
'19638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRE' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
2b97b3d22afeef9a1636793264a156c1
5881bb02e6753bd9002c468b553d6433a5431d76
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRF' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
2a49349b1c0e9e1017758d4b9bad74a8
8f89375ab78c69deaab5cb7ac8b34f7b5aeca28d
describe
'131319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRG' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
16af12b98076a014a68815269506f664
21e33753337da236115343c1af346596071115c7
describe
'29915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRH' 'sip-files00157.pro'
31ce6d040dc9ad3d3cb007d0618163f3
11b66d17f63b9cf903c720443eac92a2e7cf6fe2
describe
'53376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRI' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
ee0df2dce324b49afbfd46d236d79941
ed1f37c0c1ee1433fea52e85f63336ee4e21cdd3
describe
'2650580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRJ' 'sip-files00157.tif'
14ca5f32af0397397e3793f6aca0620c
0147b5804947e2ba587b8d7ae6a5114168e77edc
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRK' 'sip-files00157.txt'
a176ea40c0199609dc2c1b95bcb3c671
3ea2621c744bb7c921d7d8a9b558bbf1aed40219
describe
'19719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRL' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
a1890f6ea882232454861b0a1ab00857
f7e5b2893e0598c54b0fb5277b1413eb1c4443aa
describe
'330466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRM' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
25026bb9f30dafc84c722401745276e0
3920ad48e8d5b3d0013a472f038a86e0c326582a
describe
'122264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRN' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
969eb021e076f51a567b3451ce396fdc
1f9ab2c9ad6c74c378233bc3442837bf5ec51c7b
describe
'26775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRO' 'sip-files00158.pro'
1a582763f227b7f7b8df0572ce3a5093
0f504f5669abf92c4e816a1aa74256a2447ea091
describe
'48433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRP' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
ea902b335dd2a850af4e82270cbac877
4978afcec5cc3c1f1212d3869d34cddd7a8a9f73
describe
'2652528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRQ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
67db83daa1dcecdce042df77afd1f5e3
451143c84b1057272e53d3e2ce5f9a99647be9e2
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRR' 'sip-files00158.txt'
cc8e1dedd38ef664c253dc1c11e6d2e4
b834db297f30ef39b4645fbe35d1ae147bd0613c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRS' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
6b571e06c914e47fac55bfe807808b2e
505449875646919d5c9df6b66b15c892a83927c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRT' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
c4020b929071cd4f384b4c8fe21f6bf1
4f4bbca02cef348bc3949e62b0f95d8b99b29561
describe
'129744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRU' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
b72432fcf3a6de26baa20498d564e907
6f79f425a6a3459d9513e400b2946b166d74a8e9
describe
'28658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRV' 'sip-files00159.pro'
7f591b122f8bb77931627292ff1bff8f
9f0c8ab101045902833646ef1d2119aeddca3b4a
describe
'51084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRW' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
33deef1104e913e0ba3381dd64651945
fd8942faadbb895a92c23478235e37ed8624f3cc
describe
'2650412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRX' 'sip-files00159.tif'
dd9387d2381b5517e4f474e761558567
f71c53a3761420c3361735d56d65a369fbea4c10
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRY' 'sip-files00159.txt'
792167e3f74831f55e18761036d66ce6
eab48e60d38ff32c13ed7365d8e378b5dd14e131
describe
'18859' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPRZ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
3b26d62d0f49ae7e79864da9b10be7bf
eb492fc9babfdd2f32f229902dcdd6955ba15f8b
describe
'330452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSA' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
b9748a6aa9844f4f179bd6c94a3fb9d8
e3de06eac0d473f2e4285d5424c79c41287c08cd
describe
'108661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSB' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
ecdf0ba637c9a0916a38ef2948dbb497
5660c71e2003bf17ca81cbc6f0d4dc75b1b49fe8
describe
'24517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSC' 'sip-files00160.pro'
6bf5f4c3221ad052f5d29dc9e6559035
a25af57ae4a2a429924ecee55aa19203a09fac67
describe
'45768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSD' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
a94a0aba14ab00cd4ef1934656d0568a
234ce542dbf576ed4f893fcd4fe9748ec54925ca
describe
'2652620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSE' 'sip-files00160.tif'
5b937be39d4721564dffcdf3ce72c860
b49bb95a98b009285c1767c12a3322281a4cd0f2
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSF' 'sip-files00160.txt'
4750ec45dec72cd4143b2c13c1426bfa
866e06057443a643ebd4f3354dbf6bf1afaedc35
describe
'18357' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSG' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
96adcf63c79b129b5a7a6e252641e7b4
6ac980d2ac36349999aed1262a2d7d702af3c6e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSH' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
9227d9cabb6e550fd0c3e696c73a81fd
1c4d7ad7e4656b186916a3dbd76352b845e0565c
describe
'122594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSI' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
322e1d30218bd58b3a8126d625e7d15d
d933f05af96132fe3a4bd062b942ca38542304be
describe
'27724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSJ' 'sip-files00161.pro'
5f80680b7da63a13bc58f51e552f0050
85c858e74ff4411591d921586f5fb468774e3dea
describe
'49139' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSK' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
34b91a91cd205719f207c3dc16661a6f
d4d54158e59b69e2d7210b09a5cc7c729091e0c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSL' 'sip-files00161.tif'
05c81db003d8ed870692ae389447704c
6e7db9282ad639586d529dd09f785958d093f4c3
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSM' 'sip-files00161.txt'
832a5530742760941f62ab7453c4d469
a7e86d03d957e4dafef5e258a0b8e95df524c638
describe
'18785' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSN' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
8e66d70828952f0a58ddabb151d93b3f
094b0e4a3c4f2af21a42c13989b7fa770bd65753
describe
'188922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSO' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
6ad5ae7e58bb4bc8b1eaaf388fc2d3f5
61fb5a39624f5f445335aa035aab5fc3d29ec4c6
describe
'45907' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSP' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
2992041f39264791c8e6641dc690b5ee
17b4a23f0992c6381bbf69daad008415823688fd
describe
'8115' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSQ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
fcea53489791e9e1e468800dfd0c2957
fc03990798530d894e0291ab9040525f9a9663c6
describe
'19426' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSR' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
b89526d6c0e681e0a05514903c97f2e2
3f5b2252a61b1e9ac5dcd9c220f772bfe699da49
describe
'2648736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSS' 'sip-files00162.tif'
36ee0b28248e3d3f9cf461069ce0b73d
44bf0421d3529d922ac72f5608f60dd4ab965c14
describe
'372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPST' 'sip-files00162.txt'
36e64f1e82ab800a0cb0d6fbeb10d9e6
d63eab66f48b2d2bc9913cc9597c889af51e9e8a
describe
'11066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSU' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
fe7a71004df981a2c818f5fc768d4bf1
b548e8144d03eeb3781bd76fe16116a59646f8d9
describe
'63512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSV' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
c7ce61640a72f54a82d8acaee119d5a7
288a12ec9c9586851eb68cbb7ec0934050dc3c63
describe
'18442' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSW' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
9bca647fedfa703021161b5db1d96bf9
8b7d082c56de29d43302a00f175b13570210368d
describe
'2142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSX' 'sip-files00163.pro'
a488299bf0271e52c1857192ac903a75
92d2bb06f5cbe323abd6104280a6e38c6d43fd43
describe
'10239' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSY' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
2f3196fd99dffcf76b0194f712ff1167
86d606478115d9c3f2fadf1cf5242faef253bbfd
describe
'2648152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPSZ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
8ac95674aa2326c7e8a407a096a06dbb
830f0d556e54e07bb8b06c7170357c30568850d4
describe
'171' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPTA' 'sip-files00163.txt'
2bf2235ae48460f5c752e35c62d23f9c
052961fb90656eccbcd99fcc801eaaed1c744c97
describe
'8000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPTB' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
edd687df684cf3c2c68f6442d1bdf1b7
f74c2b6bc9e4511d6b788c0530a39fb5f2eafd96
describe
'390192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCBfileF20080401_AACPTC' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
473761af27f331e5289991c2cc7f24e2
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The Baldwin Library

Rm B bad


The Misses Maughans School,

5 RANDOLPH CLIFF,

_SESSIO N 1890- 9/

we

la LL 157/


SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS


1 Swallow-tail. 2. Red Admiral. 3 & 3a. Grizzled Skipper. 4, Dingy Skipper.
5 & 5a. Small Skipper. 6. Large Skipper. 6a. (Female) Large Skipper.
SWALLOW-TAILS

AND

SKIPPERS

BY

DARLEY DALE

AUTHOR OF ‘THE GREAT AUK’S EGGS,’ ETC.

With a Coloured Frontispiece
BY
MISS LUCY FRANCIS

LONDON
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY

56 PATERNosTER Row, 65 St. Pavu’s CHURCHYARD
AND 164 PrccADILLyY


SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

——90——

CHAPTER I.

‘Child of the sun, pursue thy rapturous flight,
Mingling with her thou lov’st in fields of light.

Yet wert thou once a worm, a thing that crept
On the base earth, then wrought a tomb and slept.
And such is man ; soon from his cell of clay

To burst a seraph in the blaze of day.’—Rovzrs.

| A\R. PALMER'S was a private school, the
| numbers were limited to twenty, and it



was the boast of Mrs. Palmer, who was
a young and pretty woman, that the boys were as
happy at school as they were at home ; In fact, she
looked upon them as her family, for she had no

children of her own, and always spoke of her
6 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

husband’s pupils as ‘my boys. Needless to say
that the boys all but worshipped her, and to be in
disgrace with her, when such a rare occurrence did
take place, was a far more terrible misfortune than
the severest punishment Mr. Palmer ever inflicted.
The Palmers lived at Brighton, in a large house
_ facing the sea, at the extreme end of Kemp Town :
the schoolroom was built out at the back of the
house, with which it was connected by means of a
long covered passage; there was a gymnasium and
a tennis-court, and these occupied the space which
was intended for a garden. Mrs. Palmer, however,
contented herself with a conservatory, and never
erudged the boys the piece of ground, though she
dearly loved flowers, having lived in the country
until her marriage.

The boys were assembled in the schoolroom half-
an-hour before preparation-time one evening at the
end of April. It was the first day of the summer
term, and those who had been away for the Easter
holidays had only just returned. The noise and
hubbub, when they found themselves all together
again, and without the restraining influence of any

master, were tremendous.
SWALLOW-TLTAILS AND SKIPPERS. 7

Suddenly a tall handsome boy of fourteen,
evidently the dux of the school, who had been
leaning against the chimney - piece, shouted out,
‘Silence! Just listen here, boys.’ As he spoke he
held up a small notice-board his eyes had lighted
on, and read as follows:

‘Mrs. Palmer, wishing to encourage the study of
natural history, has kindly promised a prize of
books, to the value of five pounds, to be awarded to
the boy who shall produce the best collection of
British butterflies at the end of the midsummer
term next year. The butterflies must be bond fide
collected by some boy in this school, no bought
specimens will be admitted, and the manner in
which they are arranged and labelled will be taken
into consideration in awarding the prize. The
prize books will be limited to works on Natural
History, but beyond this restriction the winner
will be allowed to select what he pleases.’

‘Three cheers for Mrs. Palmer! hip, hip, hurrah !’
was the unanimous response to this announcement ;
and when the excitement had to some extent
subsided, there arose a general appeal to Lionel

Neville, the first speaker, to read the notice again.
8 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

Neville threw his thick, wavy hair off his brow
with a shake of his head, a trick he had, and,
handing the notice to a quiet little boy in the
background, said, ‘Let Martin read it this time ; he
is more likely to win it than any of us. Here,
Martin.’ .

‘Except you, Dux; it is safe to be you or Martin,’
was the general answer as Martin advanced to the
front.

They were certainly a great contrast, these two,
Martin and Neville. In age Neville had the
advantage by one year only, though, as he was
a tall, fine lad for his age, while Martin was small
and delicate, he looked to be the senior by several
years. Neville was handsome, with dark, flashing
eyes, and a bright, happy expression, which seemed
to say he took life rather easily. He had an
easy manner, and would have been equally at home in
a crowded drawing-room among his elders, as he was
here in the little circle where he was the acknow-
ledged king. Martin, on the contrary, was shy and
retiring, with a nervous manner; he was pale and
delicate-looking, and, a casual observer would have
said, plain, but this would have been unjust, for he
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 9

already possessed that highest kind of beauty
which is only seen in perfection late in life, when
culture and study have increased it,—the beauty of
intellect. His whole face was lighted up with pleasure
now as he re-read the notice to the eager throng of
listeners.

‘Are you going in for it, Dux?’ asked a round-:
cheeked, merry-faced boy named Strickland, the
pickle of-the school.

‘Rather! I know nothing about butterflies, no
more than I do of Sanskrit, but I shall certainly
have a try, for the fun of the thing; some of you
little fellows who have no chance yourselves will
help me, I daresay,’ said Neville.

Enthusiastic proffers of help from at least a
dozen small boys.

‘Easy, my friends!’ cried Strickland ; ‘ just wait
a moment. I have a proposition to make, but
first let me ask a question. Is there any aspiring
youth here who knows a butterfly from a moth?
When I say knows, I mean, of course, knows the
scientific difference between them. . Now don’t
all speak at once, but those who do hold up their
hands.’
10 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

One little brown hand, belonging to Willy
Martin, was the solitary answer to this appeal.

‘I thought as much; but before I go any further
in placing my resolution before this meeting,
perhaps Martin will kindly enlighten your ignor-
ance. Observe, I say your ignorance; needless to
add, I know all about the matter myself.’

Derisive cheers and shouts of ‘Tell us, then.’

‘My natural modesty and retiring disposition
prevent me, but Martin will, I am sure, throw a
glimmer of light on your darkened understandings,
and then to my proposal. Now, Martin, what is
the scientific difference between a moth and a
butterfly 2’

‘There are several ’—began Martin.

‘Gently, Martin, break it to them by degrees ;
they'll never bear it all at once,’ said Strickland.

‘Be quiet, Strick, I want to hear what Martin
has to say, said Neville.

‘First there are the antenne, in butterflies ’"—

‘Speak English, Martin; no one here knows
what antenne are except you and I,’ said the incor-
rigible Strickland.

‘Don’t be an idiot, Strick; we all know the
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. II

antennee are the feelers on the animal’s head. What
about them, -Martin ?’

‘Well, the antenne of butterflies always have a
little knob at the end, those of moths have not;
and moths can fold them up and hide them under
their wings when they are asleep, but butterflies
can’t. Then butterflies always fly by day, never by
night, and very rarely in rainy weather, whereas
most moths are nocturnal in their habits ; butter-
flies turn their wings upwards when they are rest-
ing, and moths turn theirs downwards and fold
them round their bodies. I don’t remember any
more differences just now, said Martin.

‘Quite enough, my dear fellow, for our feeble
minds. I happen to know one other myself,
though: butterflies have waists, and moths have
not; of course I could put that fact into scieutific
language if I chose, but no one would understand
me if I did. Now for my idea. I propose. that, as
there is only one prize, and it is morally certain
Dux or Martin will win it, it is useless for any of
us to try; so I vote we divide into two parties,
and let each side do its utmost for its chief;

there'll be plenty to do, you know, collecting
12 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

butterflies and caterpillars. What do you all say to
my plan ?’ :

They all had so much to say, and said it so
noisily, that it was some minutes before it was
clearly understood that the plan was thoroughly
approved of; after which it was decided Neville
and Martin should in turns choose their partisans,
and this they proceeded at once to do, Neville
allowing Martin to have first choice. Martin at
once chose Strickland as his lieutenant ; knowing
his propensity for practical joking, he preferred to
have him as a friend rather than as an opponent.

The boys were now divided into two gangs of
ten each, and stood on opposite sides of the room;
when Neville stepped into the midst, and proposed
that every boy should now promise faithfully two
things. .

‘First, that he will renounce the’— began
Strickland.

‘Silence, Strick! don’t be profane.’

‘I beg your pardon; my religious mind at once
reverted to the Catechism when you spoke of
promises,’

‘Nonsense ! do be serious. I want every fellow
| SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 13

now to promise that he will bring every butterfly
and caterpillar or chrysalis he finds to his chief.
Of course I take it for granted we are all going to
do our best to find all we can. And in the next
place to promise he will willingly undertake any
work which may assist his chief in winning the
prize.’

The required promises were duly made, and
Neville, who hated trouble of any kind, then asked
lazily what was to be done next.

‘I should suggest we get some literature on the
subject. I have White’s Selborne; can any one
beat that ?’ said Strickland.

‘I have one very good book on butterflies, said
Martin, :

‘Happy thought, Strick! of course we must
have books. Ill write to my people to-night, and
tell them to send me at once the best books out
on butterflies, with coloured illustrations. You
can ,identify the creatures at a glance then. I
can’t be bothered to wade through a volume every
time some youngster brings me a specimen. By
the way, you boys on my side, I shall expect you
always to know the name of everything you bring
14 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

me; it will be splendid practice for you, and will
save me a heap of trouble. You'll have to get
some cheap editions of your own. I shan’t allow .
any one not in the first to touch my best books —
when they come. Martin and his first-class
fellows may have the use of them.’

‘Thank you, Dux; that is just like you; but TL
invest in a regular good one for our side, if Willy
likes, said Jack Strickland.

‘I can’t afford to get one; but mine is a very
good book ; it tells us everything we shall want to
know, only it has no coloured pictures; but it is
awfully good of Dux to lend us his,’ said Martin.

‘Yes; but well have one of our own. Those
other fellows are sure to be wanting Neville’s just
when we do. Besides, I suppose that will be the
only investment we shall have to make ?’

‘The first, but not the only one; the first use of
the books will be to tell us what else we shall
want, There are heaps of things I can think of:
cabinets to keep the creatures in, a tray to put the
collection in for the prize, boxes for the cater-
pillars ’—began Neville.

“All those I shall make for myself. That will

\ a NA

~ t
} \

Re
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 15

be one of the things I shall want you to help me
in, said Martin.

‘Then there are butterfly-nets to catch them in,
poisons to poison them with, and, I expect, a
regular paraphernalia for mounting them with ;
isn’t there, Martin ?’

‘They advertise a host of things, but very few
are absolutely necessary: for instance, cork saddles
are capital things to set the butterflies out on ; but
strips of cardboard, which you can cut yourself, do
nearly as well. The -setting-bristle any one can
make; it is only a cat’s whisker, mounted by a
small pin on a piece of cork; it is a necessary
thing for pushing the insect into its place while
setting out; the proper pins, too, are necessaries,
but not expensive ones. Luckily for me, an
ordinary darning-needle makes a very good setting-
needle; and as for nets, you can spend as much
money as you like on them, Dux; but I have an
old cae upstairs somewhere which I expect will do
for me. I shall go in more for caterpillars. You
get much more perfect specimens if you rear them
yourself than by catching the butterfly, which is
almost sure to get damaged in taking,’ .
16 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

‘But, my dear fellow, you might rear a hundred
caterpillars, and only one, perhaps, be worth keep-
ing, objected Strickland.

‘No, you might not, if you knew what the cater-
pillars were ; and I should try and find out before
I decided to rear them; they vary as much as the
butterflies.’

‘How did you come to’ know all this, Martin ?
You are quite up in butterflyology already.’

‘No, Iam not. I learnt the little I know from
an uncle of mine, who has a very good collection.
Look here, Dux; don’t you think it would be a
good plan if we each call our party after a family
of butterflies ?’

This suggestion met with universal approval,
and led to a warm discussion on the merits of the
different names, the generality being in favour of
Red and White Admirals; but Martin would not
agree to this, because the Red Admiral is only a
species, not a family. ‘What do you say to
Ringlets and Hairstreaks ?’

‘All very well if we had three parties; but
Ringlets divorced from Tortoiseshells would be a

very ragged lot, said Strickland.
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 17

‘I can’t think of any more families. Oh yes,
there are the Skippers; that is a very good name.
Well be the Skippers; that is decided. Now
then, Dux, old fellow, what is your side to be
called ?’ said Martin.

‘Apollos or Peacocks, either suits me,’ said
Neville.

‘They are only species; and Apollo is not
British, according to Newman. I have it, Neville;
what do you say to Swallow-tails? You are the
only one of us who lives up to them. Will you
be the Swallow-tails??

‘Bravo, Martin! adopted nem. con., at least I
advise no one to contradict it, for it is striking
seven; we shall have Newman here directly. We
will have another meeting to-morrow to make
some more arrangements. Here comes Newman.’

Mr. Newman was the tutor, a quiet, studious
“man, who had never succeeded in making the boys
love him, and who took but little interest in them
or their pursuits, so long as they. prepared their
lessons carefully ; and with his entrance the butter-
flies were forgotten, and the attention of the boys

turned to Latin and Euclid.
B
18 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

Another meeting was held the next day, but
they agreed little more could be done until
Neville’s books arrived at the énd of the week,
after a brief study of which on Saturday afternoon,
he ordered all the Swallow-tails to be in readi-
ness to accompany him on a hunting expedition
for caterpillars and butterflies on the following
Wednesday, their first half-holiday.

Meanwhile, on Sunday evening, he and Martin
were invited to supper with Mr. and Mrs. Palmer ;
it was a regular institution for two or three boys to
be invited to supper on Sunday ; and from the fact
of Mrs. Palmer choosing the two head boys the first
Sunday, they concluded she had something to say
to them about her prize, and they were right; for
when Mr. Palmer had retired, as he always did
after supper, leaving the boys to the chat they
enjoyed as much as any part of the entertainment,
Mrs. Palmer immediately introduced the subject.

‘Well, boys, so I hear you have divided the
school: into two parties, and have already settled
that my prize is to be won by one of you 2?

“Yes, I hope you don’t object to the plan, Mrs.

Palmer, but they all said directly none of them had
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 19

a chance against us, and already our sides take as
much interest in the prize as if each boy was
working for himself”

‘No, I don’t object; on the contrary, I think it is
rather a good plan; it is certainly good for the
other boys, for it is very unselfish of them to work
for you two instead of for themselves, and I am sure
the rivalry between you and Willy will be amicable’

‘Oh yes! Willy and I are too old friends to be
jealous even of such a splendid prize as this,’

‘What made you choose butterflies, Mrs. Palmer 2’
asked Willy.

-“ Well, several things, Willy; I know a little
about them myself,—a very little, not half so much
as you do very likely, 80 please don’t put me through
my facings. Then they are such beautiful creatures,
these “nurslings of a day,” that I thought it would
do all you boys good to learn to love their beauty ;
for I never think boys have such an innate love of
beauty as girls, and they are too full of cricket and
football to pause to think of the exquisité loveliness
of a little butterfly; they would almost think it
beneath their dignity to do go.

‘Yes, I believe we should ; we should call it frivo-
20 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

lous and girlish, and girls are such idiots—I don’t
mean women, you know, Mrs. Palmer, said Neville.

‘I know, Leo, said Mrs. Palmer, smiling, for she
was still only a girl in years. ‘But I had another
reason for choosing butterflies, for, while the pursuit
of any branch of Natural History cannot fail, I
think, to teach us. more of the goodness and
lovingkindness of God,—and to know Him better
is the real end of all knowledge which is worth
having—there are so many special lessons to be
learnt from butterflies. The doctrine of the resur-
rection of the body is so beautifully shadowed forth
in the life of the butterfly: first the caterpillar,
whose sole thought seems to be how to get food,
the type of our grovelling life on earth; then the
intermediate state of the chrysalis, or pupa, when
the creature is swathed in its own silky web and
lies dormant, and, to all appearance, dead—this
corresponds with the sleep of death; and lastly,
the perfect state of the imago, when the winged
creature, decked in its brilliant colours, bursts the
case which held it imprisoned, and soars aloft,
joyous and beautiful, no longer to be careful and

troubled about its daily food, as when a caterpillar,
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 21

but now an emblem of perfect joy, and of the
human soul when it rises from the dead, happy and
glorious in its perfect life. The analogy might be
drawn out at much greater length than this; for
instance, as I daresay you know, the caterpillar is
subject to many changes, certainly troublesome and
probably painful to it. These changes are types of
our troubles in this life of change; its incessant
eating, and its absorbing care for its own caterpillar
life, are only too like our anxiety and interest in
the things of this world. Then the apparent death-
like state of the chrysalis is very significant of that
intermediate state of which we know so little; in
fact, all that we really know is that the soul is
alive, though the body be dead. Then. the glorious
beauty of the perfect butterfly speaks to us of that
glorious body which, we are told, shall be ours
hereafter. I have often thought, too, that the
compound eye of the butterfly, with its seventeen
hundred lenses, each of which, naturalists think,
has the properties of a single eye, is a beautiful
emblem of the illumination of mind we may hope
to enjoy when “we shall know even as we are

known ;” for, as light has ever been considered the
22 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

type of knowledge, so is bodily vision an emblem
of mental perception, and one of the great joys of
heaven will, I think, be our increased mental
powers,—an eternal joy, for they will be ever
growing, a joy of which we have a faint foretaste
here when we feel we have made real intelleétual
progress. But I am reading you a lecture, which I
think I may truly say is not usually a fault of
mine. What are you thinking of, Willy ?’

‘I was wondering why the Greeks had the same
word, Psyche, for the soul and for a butterfly 2’

‘Because even they saw the analogy between
the two: you know they often carved a butterfly
flying away on their tombstones, evidently meaning
it for a symbol of the soul flying to its home. But
it is getting late, and I have not said half I had to
say to you. Whose side is Temple, the new boy, on ?’

‘Mine, said Neville. ‘He seems a sharp little
fellow enough.’ :

‘So he is, I believe ; he has a very good character,
but he is terribly careless. I hope you'll look after
him, Leo, or he will get into trouble with Mr.
Newman, I fear. There is the prayer-bell, we
must go.’


CHAPTER IL

‘The lovely toy so fiercely sought

Has lost its charm by being caught,
For every touch that wooed its stay
Has brushed its brightest hues away.

?

—Bynon.

various shapes and sizes arrived for



Neville; butterfly-nets, umbrella - nets
for sweeping, collecting-boxes for larvee, cages,
lanterns, and phials, cork saddles, pins and braces
enough to set out a museumful of butterflies,
bottles containing chloroform, carbolic acid, ben-
zole, and various other preparations supposed to
be useful in killing or preserving specimens, and,
lastly, a very handsome cabinet, which, as Jack
Strickland said, quite took one’s breath away, and

made one feel like the Queen of Sheba when she
23
24 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

saw all King Solomon’s treasures. Mr. Palmer
confiscated one or two-of the poisons, promising to
let Neville have them when required, and at the
same time comforting the Skippers, whose hearts
were rather failing them, by saying he thought the
Swallow-tails were beginning at the wrong end in
buying a cabinet before they had any butterflies to
put in it.

‘Dux, my boy, there is a very old proverb which
says, “ First catch your hare, and then cook it:” that
is the plan we Skippers mean to go upon,’ said
Strickland, as Neville distributed some of his
paraphernalia to his flock on starting for their
first butterfly-hunt.

‘All right, Strick! you go and catch your hare
this afternoon, and we'll see what our side can do.’

‘If you don’t bring home a cabinetful of butter-
flies and pails of caterpillars with all those nets
and contrivances, it will be a shame, that is all I
have to say. Here we have only two nets and some
pill-boxes.’ .

‘Never mind, Strick, we have some sticks and
an umbrella or two, they do as well for beating for

larvee as those nets of Dux’s. But now, before we
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 25

start, if all the Skippers. are here, I want to give
you a few hints. And first, please remember our
principal object to-day is caterpillars, not butterflies,
though, of course, if we come across any rare ones,
we may as well try and secure them, but it is no
‘use wasting time chasing Common Skippers or
Common Blues; it will be far better to get them—
because, of course, we must have specimens of every
kind we can get—in the larva state. Now, what I
want you to do is to open an umbrella under a
_ bushi, and then shake the caterpillars gently into it,—
your pocket-handkerchief is big enough to spread
under a small plant; then pick out the caterpillars
and put them into your boxes, but mind always put a
leaf of the bush you found the larve on into the
hox with them; you may put as many caterpillars
into the box as it will hold comfortably until we
eet home, but mind, never mix the larve of different
bushes. Do you all understand that clearly ?’ said
the head of the Skippers.

‘Yes, yes!’ shouted the boys, who were all’
impatient to be off.

‘All right. Well, now, I want two of the little
boys, Wood and Trevor will do, to get a stock of
26 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

all the leaves we find any larve on, because, you
know, they are very dainty creatures to feed; for
instance, the Fritillaries, which feed on the wild
violet, won’t look at a cabbage leaf. You may come
across some chrysalides; of course, if you do you'll
box them. I shall take a magnifying-elass, and see
if I can’t find some eggs. And now let us be off,
said Martin, whose pale face was flushed with excite-
ment in anticipation of the sport he promised himself.

‘Isn’t it rather hopeless work looking for butter-
flies’ eggs ? they are such tiny things, Willy, asked
Strickland.

‘It would be unless you knew exactly where to
look for them, but I think I do, and anyhow I am
sure to come across some with this glass, in beat-
ing bushes. By the way, Strick, I want you to
help me to make some braces for setting out
any butterflies we may catch; I can’t afford to
buy saddles and braces, like Dux.’

‘To be sure I will! if I don’t bring you a saddle
‘and braces which will lick Dux’s into fits, my
name is not Strickland, said Jack, as the boys
started to take the train to a place a few miles out
of Brighton.
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 27

It was in the early summer, and on the long
days the boys were allowed to be out till eight ;
Mr. Newman went with them, but when they
reached their destination he left them to their own
devices, only telling them they were all to be at
the station again at a certain time, whereupon the
Skippers took themselves off in one direction, —
and the Swallow-tails disappeared in the opposite.
Their time was limited to three hours, and it was
wonderful how quickly it fled, now that they had
an absorbing interest in their walk; indeed, the
Skippers were only just back in time to catch the
train, when they were bundled by the tutor into a
compartment by themselves, and when they reached
Brighton they were obliged to walk in twos, so
they could not compare notes till they got home.

‘Well, Dux, what luck 2’ asked Strickland.

‘Splendid. I caught a Red Admiral as my first
prize.

‘Draw it mild, Dux! Red Admirals don’t come
out till August, do they, Willy ?’ said Strickland.

‘This year’s don’t, but they hybernate as butter-
flies, so very likely Dux is right. May I see it?’

‘Yes, here he is, Lupton Minor, run and get me
28 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

my British Butterfly book; I am sure it is a Red
Admiral’ ;

‘Oh yes, it is, Dux, and a beauty too. I wonder
he is included in the Angle-wings, for only the
fore-wings are angled.’ ;

‘Angled! I call them scalloped; but I angled
very well to catch him so neatly—he is not injured
_ at all; that chloroform concern of mine is capital.
Now I must mount him,’

‘You ought to get another if you can, Dux; the
under side of Atalanta is so beautiful, such pretty
colours, grey and pink and brown, What else
have you got?’

‘Two Peacocks, some Tortoiseshells, and some
little blue and white and brown things, which I
have told my first-class Swallow-tails to look out,
and keep any that are worth having. Oh, I
forgot! we have found a White Admiral?

‘Bravo, Dux! why, that is the best of all, it is
so rare; it is rather damaged, though, I see; that is
the worst of taking them in the butterfly state.

‘Yes, but my plan is to catch every one you see ;
you can’t tell at a distance what they are, and you
may hit on a very rare one, and perhaps catch it
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 29

without injuring; anyhow, a damaged specimen is
better than none. But now let us see your lot.’

‘We have only a few butterflies, but we have
plenty of caterpillars, a few chrysalides, some eggs,
and a stock of food for the caterpillars, so we have
not done go badly, though it does not look much
by the side of your spoil.’

‘Did any of you young Swallow-tails think to

bring home some leaves for the caterpillars?’
asked Neville.
' But it appeared no one had done so, except one
little fellow, who had brought home some mulberry
leaves it is to be feared he had poached from a
garden, under the impression that all caterpillars
should be fed like silkworms, an idea his chief
seemed to share.

‘Bravo, little Gordon! you go and feed them now
before supper. ,

‘But, Dux, surely you know caterpillars won't
eat just anything; they each have a special food, that
is the wonderful part of it; every species of butter-
fly lays its eggs on the particular bush or tree or
grass ,that its caterpillar likes best, and they won’t
thrive. on any other.- If your caterpillars are not
30 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. -

put on their native leaves they won’t live, I am
afraid.

‘Thunder and lightning, Willy! why didn’t you,
tell me that? However, my caterpillars must take
their chance, I can’t humour their fads and fancies ;
they must eat what they can get or starve, as we
have to do when we don’t like our grub here,
which, I am bound to say, is very seldom. How
did you kill your specimens, Willy ?’

‘Gave them a nip with my finger and thumb
just under the wings; you can do it through the
net, and death is instantaneous if you do it
properly. Your butterflies would have travelled
home better, Dux, if you had pinned them into one
of your cork-lined boxes; one pin is sufficient, it
keeps them firm, and they don’t shake about and

_lose the scales of their wings.’

‘What do you mean by the scales, please,
Martin?’ asked a small boy, who was looking on,
all eyes and ears.

‘You call it the fluff or bloom, I daresay, but
if you were to put it under a microscope you
would see the wing of a butterfly is covered with

little tiny scales set in rows overlapping each other,
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 31

so that one row throws a shadow over the next,
and in this way the beautiful shading of the wings
is obtained; the outside scales are longer, more
like feathers or plumes. All the colours of the
Wings are in these scales; if you rub them off
nothing but a thin membrane stretched over veins,
like a fly’s wing, remains; see here, in this damaged
specimen, said Willy, gently removing the scales
off a butterfly to show the truth of his words.

‘If you please, Martin, Strickland says if you'll

-come into the class-room, he has got the braces
and saddles ready, and he’ll help you to set out our
specimens,’ interrupted a Skipper.

‘May I come and take a lesson, Willy, before I
do mine?’ asked Neville; and on Martin’s assent
they went to.the class-room, where they found
Strickland gravely seated at a table before a donkey
saddle he had been at great pains to borrow; a pile
of braces, borrowed from Skippers and Swallow-tails
indiscriminately, lay by his side, and on the top of
the saddle was perched a tiny little green Hair-
streak, at which Strickland was gazing intently.
A roar of laughter from the group of boys who had

followed their chiefs into the room made him look
. 32 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

up and ask, with a great assumption of innocence,
what amused them all so much.

‘What an idiot you are, Jack! I do wish you
would be serious. You might have made straps
enough to set all we found to-day, instead of
wasting your time in this. way. But it does not
matter, Dux; I have some braces, I'll show you how
I do the four-strap setting, if Strickland will clear
this lumber away; I may have time before the
supper-bell rings.’

So saying —while Jack pretended to grumble that
it was very hard he never did anything right, and
all his trouble was wasted, and how was he to know
a saddle meant two little pieces of cork bevelled at
the edges, and gummed on to cardboard, with a
space between for the butterfly’s body—he would not
like to ride on that saddle; or how was he to know
that little wedge-shaped pieces of cardboard were
called braces,—Willy deftly mounted a butterfly.
He first fastened a pair of braces on to a slip of
wood with mounting-pins, then he placed the butter-
fly over these, so that one brace came lengthwise
under each wing; this done, he thrust a pin through

the thorax of the insect, slanting it with the head
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 33

forwards, two more pins kept the antenne in
position, the wings were now arranged with setting-
needle and bristle, and the second pair of braces
or straps were applied over the wings, and nearer
the outer edge than the under ones,

‘There now, I shall add all we have worth keep-
ing to this piece of wood, and keep them in a well-
ventilated box till they are thoroughly dry, then I
can transfer them to the box I mean to show them
in, said Willy.

‘Box! why, we have a splendid cabinet for
ours!’ cried the Swallow-tails.

‘But you can’t mount them like Martin, shoutcd
the Skippers. .

‘I am not so sure about that, now Willy has .
~ shown me how to do it, said Dux,

‘Yes, it is all very fine of Martin; but if he is
going to put your side up to all the tips, and you
have the advantage of a splendid plant into the
bargain, whereas all our machinery is some pill-
boxes. and a few slips of cardboard and wood, I’
should like to know how we are to have a chance
of the prize, grumbled Strickland, half in earnest.

After supper Martin arranged his caterpillars in
Cc
34 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

boxes, giving them a supply of the leaves on which
they were found; but Neville was tired with his
exertions, and contented himself with ordering the
new boy Temple and little Gordon to put their
collection all together on the mulberry leaves, and
leave them to their fate. Martin also told off two
Skippers, whose duties were to be to feed the cater-
pillars; but he took good care ‘to inspect them
himself every night and morning, not trusting to
the memories of his subordinates. As might have
been supposed, by the end of the week all Neville’s
caterpillars, with the exception of one or two which
were less fanciful than the others, sickened and
died; while Martin’s throve and grew to admiration
on their natural diet.
‘Pampered creatures! do you know what any of
them are? I daresay they'll turn out common
things, not worth the trouble of keeping,’ said Neville.
‘We must have common butterflies to make the
collection complete, but I hope some of mine may
turn out prizes ; for instance, all these in this box
are Fritillaries of some kind, for they were found on
wild violets or plants of that order. See, these are

violet leaves.’
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 35

‘It seems to me you want to know botany if you
take up butterflies. I am sure I have not the
faintest idea what some of your animals are feeding
on. What's this plant now 2’

‘Lotus, or bird’s-foot trefoil; these are probably
the caterpillars of Red-horns. They all feed on
trefoils and clovers and plants of the leguminous
order—pea and bean tribe, that is. Some may be
Skippers ; they like various kinds of food?

‘Why, some of your creatures are actually feeding
on grass! What are they ?’

‘Oh, Satyrs, or perhaps Skippers ; they both prefer
grasses. I have only a few of those at present, some
I got myself. Imust get some of my Skippers to search
the grass for their namesakes to-morrow afternoon.’

“Martin, what plant do the Swallow-tails prefer ?
We want to get a specimen of one if possible,’ asked
Gordon-major.

‘Milk-parsley, I believe, is the only plant you
are likely to find Machaon on; but it is so rare in
this county I doubt your finding it; if you do, you
can feed the caterpillar on carrot leaves, so my book
says. Iam going to set the Skippers to beat the
sallows for Purple Emperors t2-morrow’
36 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

‘Do be quiet, Willy. I declare you don’t deserve
to win the prize, when you will make the Swallow-
tails a present of our only capital



information,’ put

~ “in Strickland,

‘My dear Strick, don’t pretend to be so selfish.
You know Dux would willingly share his plant with
us if I would let him,’

‘Yes; but as you won't, I think it is unfair of
me to learn all your tips, which you have had the
trouble of finding out; however, as neither I nor
any of my crew know what a sallow is, it does
not much matter in this case. Henceforth, Martin,
unless you'll accept some cases or cork saddles in
- payment, I won’t listen to your information, tempting
as it is,’ . .

‘Stuff, Dux! I like telling you the little I
know, and, after all, Mrs. Palmer’s object is to teach
us entomology ; besides, I really wish to make all
I require for my collection myself. I am not well
off, and it is far better for me to learn to do the
best I can with as few appliances as possible. You
must know the sallow, Dux; it is a willow, the
Great Goat willow, bearing catkins in the spring,

and the fruit is all covered with down in the autumn,
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 37

3

Another caterpillar I am going to search for to-
morrow is the Duke of Burgundy; he belongs to
the Dryads, and they are to be found on primrose
or cowslip leaves. Hairstreaks are to be found on
brambles, oaks, or elms; the Fritillaries on any of
the germanders or violets, the Whites on cabbages,
vetches, or wild mignonette, the Blues on the rest-
harrow, and the White Admiral on a variety of
plants.’

‘That is right, Martin. Have it all out ; you have
been through all the families now except one, the
Angle-wings,’ said Strickland.

‘Well, they are to be found on hemp-wort, elm-
wort, and hops; but there is the school bell. Tl
tell you more about caterpillars to-morrow, Dux,
when we come back from our hunt, if you like,
said Martin.




CHAPTER ITI.

Turn, tum, thy hasty foot aside,
Nor crush that helpless worm ;

The frame thy scornful thoughts deride
From G received its form,

SAY the White Admirals are a distinct

family, the only genus we have in



England,’ cried Martin.

‘And I don’t care what you say, I am certain
Red and White Admirals both belong to the Angle-
wings. I don’t profess to know much, but that
little I do know; and if any one dares to contradict
me, I'll knock him down!’ said Neville, working
himself into a passion.

To his amazement a lady’s voice behind him
answered gravely, ‘You are quite mistaken ; White

Admirals are a distinct family ;’ and, turning round,
38
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS, 39

he saw pretty Mrs. Palmer standing in the door-
way.

Neville coloured violently, partly with angcr,
partly with shame at having been caught losing his
temper by Mrs. Palmer; but the truth was, he had
been put out in the morning because he did not
know his Latin, and Martin construed a passage
correctly he failed in. Mr. Palmer had reproved
him for not working, which did not tend to improve
his temper; and this afternoon, perhaps because it
was very warm, the Swallow-tails had been lazy in
beating for caterpillars, and had allowed two or
three butterflies to escape them, which, with a little
trouble, they might have caught.

The Skippers, on the contrary, had been. very
active; and when Martin announced that he had
found a White Admiral caterpillar, this was the
last straw, and Dux replied angrily, ‘It was nothing
to make such a fuss about, as all Admirals were
common enough.’ Martin had then explained that
Red and White Admirals did not belong to the
same family, whereupon the above result.

Neville would have made his escape if he could
have done so, but Mrs. Palmer blocked the doorway,
40 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

and Martin, seeing who it was, begged her to come
in and look at the afternoon’s spoils,

‘With pleasure, if Dux will show me his too,
said Mrs. Palmer ; and Neville was obliged to comply
nosens volens,

‘I think Willy is right about the White Admiral,
she continued, taking up a piece of honeysuckle on
which a large fat caterpillar, covered with branching
“spines, was voraciously feeding. ‘And a very
clever caterpillar he is too. He has been asleep all
through the winter in the cleverest cradle of his
own making. You know the leaves of the honey-
suckle fall off during the winter; well, the cater-
pillar, young and small as he is in the autumn,
knows this too, and he also knows that if the leaves
on which he is fecding were to fall to the ground,
he would perish, so what do you think he does ?
He spins a number of fine silken threads round and
round the leaf-stalk and twig on which it is growing;
then, having first of all eaten about three-quarters
of the leaf, with the part which remains, and some
of his own silk, he makes himself a tiny cradle in
which to pass the winter. In due course the time
for the leaves to fall arrives, but the caterpillar’s

,
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS, Al

cradle only falls as far as the silken net allows it,
and there he hangs swinging in his cot snugly and
safely all through snow and frost, rain and wind,
until April, when he wakes, and eats for two
months. This one will, I think, begin to spin in a
day or two, he seems full-grown.’

‘Oh, please stay and tell us more about cater-
pillars, Mrs. Palmer,’ said Willy Martin.

‘Yes, do, please; itll be fair enough if we all
hear,’ said Strickland.

‘Iam not sure that I know as much as you
big boys do, so you must forgive me if I
tell you stale news. In the first place, all the
caterpillars of butterflies are made up of thirteen
rings, called in science segments; the head is the
first ring, and has two antenne or horns, two
feelers, two jaws, and twelve tiny eyes, as you
can see with the help of a microscope; the other
rings are made up of legs, claspers, and spiracles.’

‘What are spiracles? Don’t all speak at once,’
interrupted Strickland.

‘They are oval holes through which the cater-
pillar breathes, I think, said Martin.

‘Right, Willy. As you must have noticed
42 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

already, caterpillars vary very much in shape,
but entomologists divide them into two great
classes, Exposers and Concealers. The Exposers
are naked chrysalides; the Concealers, which are
very scarce in this country, envelop themselves in
a cocoon of silk before they change. The Exposers,
again, are divided into Suspenders and Girted. The
Suspenders hang themselves up by the tail only,
with the head downwards; the Girted are hung
by the tail and also by a rope of silk slung round
the middle of the body,’

‘But you can’t tell whether they are Suspenders
or Girted till they change to chrysalides, can you ?’
asked Strickland.

‘Oh yes, you can, because all the Suspenders
are either covered with spines or are shaped like
a slug, while the Girted are either like wood-lice
or like cylinders. The most remarkable in ap-
pearance is the Purple Emperor, which you may
find enthroned on an oak tree; he is a slug-shaped
Suspender, with two very long horns and a coronet
on his forehead, but my favourites are those fluffy,
spiny fellows like the Peacock, Painted Lady, Red
Admiral, and the Silver Fritillaries. I don’t like
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 43

those little short, fat creatures, too like wood-lice for
my taste, the caterpillars of the Blues, Hairstreaks,
and Coppers. I see you have some, Dux; certainly,
_ if you rear all these, you will have a capital
collection, but you are suré to lose some. The
worst enemy of all, in the natural state, is the
ichneumon-fly, which lays its eggs in the soft body
of the caterpillar without killing the poor little
creature. When the eggs are hatched, the tiny
larvee feed on the caterpillar until they turn into
_ ehrysalides ; and then one fine morning out fly a
host of these insects, instead of a butterfly, whose
caterpillar is dead before this. However, this is
not so likely to happen to your caterpillars as
starvation, through forgetfulness on your part to
feed them.’

Of course all the boys protested this was not
likely to occur; but in the sequel Mrs. Palmer
turned out to be right.

‘If you keep them till they turn to chrysalides,
you may be rewarded by secing some of them
change, and the way in which they do it is very
wonderful, so elaborate are their preparations; but
when we think that the creature is taught by the
44. SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

Creator how to perform this change, our wonder is
changed to adoration of God for the loving care
which He bestows on so insignificant a thing as a
mere caterpillar, which we often heedlessly tread
under our feet. One great reason why I chose a
branch of Natural History as the subject of my
prize was because, in studying the habits of any
of God’s creatures, we are constantly led up to the
thought of God Himself; we find Him in His
works.’

‘Mrs. Palmer, how shall we know when the
caterpillars are going to change?’ asked a small
boy.

‘Tn the first place, a caterpillar leaves off eating;
and, in the next, it is very restless, and wanders
about, as if seeking a safe place in which to
perform the act of transformation; then it spins a
little silken pillow, and clings to this with its last
claspers for a day or two, till the chrysalis is
formed, when it slowly emerges from the cater-
pillar skin, which slips down to the bottom of the
chrysalis. The next step is to climb up to the
silk pillow, which, as the chrysalis is smaller

than the caterpillar, is above it; this it does by

)
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 45

means of its tail, which is armed with little hooks
or feelers, with which it clings to the silken threads
and swings itself up, till it hangs safely on its
silken pillow. It then very often tries to get rid
of its old caterpillar skin, by twisting itself roud
and round, so as to break the threads which hold the
skin, after which it remains quiet, perhaps through
the winter, but at any rate for some days (a fort-
night in the spring, seven days in the summer), until
it emerges as a butterfly from its prison-house,’

‘I can make chrysalides whirl round by tickling
them,’ said little Gordon.

‘Don’t let me catch you playing any tricks
on my caterpillars when they have changed, or Pu
tickle you, I promise you, young man, said Dux.

‘Little Gordon is right in his" facts, though,
Neville; some chrysalides can be induced to perform
that feat by irritation at any stage, bub for the
most part they lie quiescent and apparently lifeless.
They are very unattractive, indeed, repulsive, in this
stage, which answers to the intermediate state with
us; but to change from a poor crawling caterpillar,
even though it be such a handsome creature as

some of those are which you call Woolly Bears, to
46 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

a beautiful butterfly with its jewelled wings, is
well worth the penalty of being a chrysalis’

‘I wonder if the butterfly remembers its caterpillar
life,” said Jack Strickland.

‘I think not; but what is more important is the
fact that we shall certainly remember our earthly
life when we are changed.’

‘Do you know why old naturalists used to call
the chrysalis the aurelia stage, Mrs. Palmer 2?’ asked
Martin.

‘What is the Latin for gold, Willy? I will
answer your question by asking another,’

‘Aurum, and chrysos is the Greek for gold; of
course I might have guessed that they meant the
same thing; but why do they call a chrysalis
a golden stage 2’

‘I believe because the Vanessas and Fritillaries
and some others are gilded. There is another
word used now very often—pupa, which means
tied up, or swathed, because the creature is bound
up in its pupa state, its different parts being packed
up in the neatest possible way; its antenne folded
down by its wings, which are very small, on each
side of the body. But I have been giving you
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 47

quite a lecture on butterflies; now, before I go, I
want you to show me your cabinets and all your
paraphernalia, will you ?’

‘Neville will; I have nothing to show,’ said Willy.

But when Mrs. Palmer had’seen Neville’s things,
she made Willy bring out his, and although, as he
explained, it was too early to judge of them in
their present unfinished condition, still they were
all so neatly executed, that her admiration of them
was as sincere as that she bestowed on Neville’s
bought appliances, Willy’s cardboard braces were
almost as good as Neville’s, and his setting-board,
made of a strip of wood lined with two rows of
cork, answered all the purpose of cork saddles;
while the case he had made to keep his specimens
invafter they were dried was really very ingenious.
It was simply a_ shallow deal box with a
close-fitting lid, the bottom of which was lined
with small square pieces of cork gummed on in
straight rows; these had been cut out of old corks
begged from the housekeeper, sheet cork being
dear; to these pieces of cork a few butterflies were
already fixed, and here they were to remain for the
present at any rate, though Willy intended if
48 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

possible to construct a more permanent case before
the prize was awarded.

‘I wonder how many of the sixty-five true
British butterflies you will succeed in getting ?’

‘Oh, all, I should hope!’ said Dux.

‘If we get fifty between us, I shall think we
have done well; we shan’t be able to do much
more in the collecting way this term, for the
examinations will be coming on,’

‘And you must not neglect your work, or
Mr. Palmer will want me to withdraw my promise ;
he rather complains now that this butterfly craze,
as he calls it, absorbs too much of your time and
thoughts, and I believe Mr. Newman will never
quite forgive me for offering such a bait.’

The boys were loud in their complaints of the
tutor’s wish to throw cold water on their plan ; but
there was some excuse for him, for, as he complained,
he was constantly finding tiny caterpillars crawling
on the jackets of small boys who had, in the ardour
of their exertions, put the eggs to hatch-in their
breast pockets, Then the dormitories were never
tidy since it was permitted to keep caterpillars in
various stages of growth in them; while the water-
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 49

jugs were always full of the various plants the
different caterpillars lived on, and Mr. Newman
was as anxious as Swallow-tails and Skippers for
the caterpillars to reach the pupa stage, when they
would require less attention and could be relegated
to the lower regions.

But to his disgust he found the chrysalides
absorbed more of the boys’ attention than the
caterpillars, after a week, when they might be
expected, in the hot weather they were having, to
emerge. The interest then in watching for the
eventful change was great, and the excitement
when it actually took place intense, and the disputes
which often arose as to the name of the new-born
butterfly were loud and long, only settled by an appeal
from Willy to one of Dux’s books. No sooner was
the unhappy butterfly fairly alive than it received
its cowp de grdce from some little finger and thumb,
whose owner doubtless delighted in the operation,
and this annoyed the tutor, who declared butterfly-



hunting was one thing,—fair sport perhaps it might

be called,



but raising insects for the mere pleasure
of killing them as soon as they were born’ was

uite another. Perhaps he never was so glad to
| I 8
D
50 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

see the close of a term as one day in the end of
July, when Swallow-tails and Skippers, with their
caterpillars and chrysalides, took themselves home
for the holidays; while the butterflies duly mounted
were left under lock and key in Mrs, Palmer's care
till their owners returned.

The cats shared Mr. Newman’s joy at the
departure of the boys, for they had had a very bad
time that term, their whiskers being in. great
request for setting-bristles; an instrument most of
the boys, great and small alike, took great pleasure
in making, and considered it an indispensable part

of their butterfly paraphernalia.




CHAPTER IV.

‘Why, lovely insect, dost thou stand
And wave thy quiv’ring wing,

As half afraid thou wert “aloft
On fields of air to spring ?

But now has reached thy slender form
A sunbeam warm and bright,

And instant thou hast upward sprung
Towards the source of light.

Thus in the portals of the tomb
The trembling soul shall stand,

Till beams of faith and mercy point
Its way to the promised land,’

EVILLE’S parents lived near Monmouth,
at a place called Bicknor Court, which




is actually in the county of Gloucester-

shire, though close to the border-land between the

two counties. It is one of the prettiest parts of |

England, for the lovely Wye, winds through the

valleys at the foot of the richly-wooded hills ;
51
52 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

while beyond the Gloucestershire hills the Welsh
mountains, range after range, stand out against the
distant horizon. Nothing seems wanting to com-
plete the beauty of the landscape; wood, water,
hill, and dale all combine to make a piece of
mountain scenery, which, although on a smaller
scale, is equal in beauty to many parts of Scotland.
It had been arranged before the boys left Brighton
that Martin should spend the latter part of the
holidays at Bickmor Court, and accordingly he
arrived there in the middle of August, and found
Neville all excitement about a large picnic to the
Forest of Dean, which was to take place the next
day.

‘Perhaps we may find some butterflies, Dux;
so I shall take my net. I brought a box or two
with me, in case I had any luck, but my mother is
taking care of my chrysalides ; nearly all mine have
turned, except the White Admiral which I lost,
and a few I expect will not come out till next
spring. How are yours getting on ?’

‘IT don’t know. I gave mine to Gordon to look
after, as I could not .be bothered with them in the
holidays ; but I have been out butterfly-hunting
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 53

two or three times, and have found several Duke of
Burgundys and Marbled Whites, and some rather
good Hairstreaks,’

‘I expect this is a good place for butterflies.
I mean to have plenty of hunts while I am here.

‘Yes; I knew you would want to, so I waited
till you came. By the way, I believe the Purple
Emperor has been found in Dean Forest ; we may
come across him to-morrow.’

And so they did; but the wary monarch was, as
usual, taking such high flights from his favourite
seat on the uppermost branches of a mighty oak,
that Neville, after looking at him for a few minutes
in disgust at his soaring habits, turned away, and
would have abandoned all thought of him but for
Willy, who, to comfort himself, suggested that
perhaps it was not the Iris after all.

‘The grapes are sour, Leo,’ laughed Colonel Neville,
‘It is Iris, sure enough; the question is how to
catch him. Now if I only had a dead stoat or a
weasel we would bring him down fast enough. He
is not very nice in his feeding for a butterfly; dirty
puddles and small birds or stoats, well advanced in

decomposition, are some of his favourite dishes.
54 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

Perhaps I could get some bait at the Speech
House ; it is worth trying,

Accordingly Willy went back to the Speech
House, and presently returned in high glee with a
piece of rabbit skin and the wing of a dead thrush,
which he nailed to the trunk of the oak; and then,
with his net by his side, sat down at a little
distance to watch the effect. In ten minutes’ time
not one but three Purple Emperors were regaling
themselves on these tit-bits, and, watching his-oppor-
tunity, Willy slipped forward, and with a dexterous
movement swept all three prizes into his net. He
then nipped one after the other through the thorax
as quickly as possible, lest through fluttering about
in the net they should rub any of the scales off
their beautiful wings.

All these had the purple lustre from which the
monarch takes his title over the groundwork of
their wings, which proclaimed them to be males,—
in the females this ground colour is rusty black ;
the seven white spots on the fore-wing and the
band which crosses the hind-wings obliquely,
_ extending into the fore, were pure white, without

the yellow tinge which is another mark of the
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 55

female; the under side was very different to the
upper, the black here shaded to pale grey; the
antennee were very long and gradually clubbed,
which gave them an aristocratic air of refinement,
and is probably the butterfly’s sign that ‘blue
blood’ is in his veins. They were evidently not
intended to walk like mere ordinary plebeian
butterflies, for their fore-feet had no claws, and
were quite unfitted for walking. ,

‘Well done, Willy! I have always heard that
Iris is one of the most difficult butterflies to net.
You managed that very neatly, said Colonel
Neville, as Willy secured his prey in a box he had
brought with him.

‘You shall have one, Dux, if you'll accept it;
perhaps you may get another here between this
and the time we are to send in our collections.’

‘One is enough for me, thanks; but do you think
I ought to ought to take it, father?’

‘Well, Willy won’t want more than two for
himself, will you ?’

‘Oh no; but I wish we could get another, Dux,
for you; you see the under side varies so, that we

ought to have two specimens; I mean to try for
56 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

duplicates of all mine, so as to mount one flat and
one with the wings set up showing the under side.’

‘Are there any more of this family to look for, -
Willy 2’

‘No; the Emperors are a family all by them-
selves, and I believe Iris is the only British species,’

‘Oh, well, we have done with the Apaturide then,
thank goodness! I am as glad when we have
finished a family as I am when I have had a tooth
out.’

‘I am afraid, Leo, you are not a very ardent
entomologist,’ said Colonel Neville.

‘No, Iam not; I don’t care for the trouble, I own,
but I should like to win the prize very much, all
the same; five pounds’ worth of. books is not to be
despised, especially when the giver is as pretty
and nice as Mrs. Palmer. Perhaps this is a good.
hunting-ground, Willy; we may as well make hay
while the sun shines, so, if you like, we'll have some
butterfly hunts in the next few days.’

This they did, and on the whole had very fine
sport, for, as money was no object to the Nevilles,
the boys went by the train to another part of the
country every day. One of their best bags was
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 57

made in the neighbourhood of Stroud, where they
found several Marbled Whites, which they caught
in rough pastures. Neville had previously found
some of these, but Martin was glad to get some
specimens of both male and female, and Leo had not
noticed that the black and white wings of the latter
differed from the males’ by being thickly covered
round the wings with gold dust. They also found
one or two Comma Butterflies that day : these are the
most angle-winged of the Angle-wings, and are red-
dish-brown in colour, with two little white comma-
like marks on the under-surface of their hind-wings.
Willy thought they were hybernating specimens, as
it was too early in the year to find, those hatched
in the preceding spring. The Chalk-hill Blue and
tle Pale Clouded Yellow were also among the spoil.

The next day they went to Clifton, and there
Willy, after a long, tiring search, was rewarded by
finding on a piece of cow-parsnip two of the
yellowish-green chrysalides of the Swallow-tail
Butterfly ; these were girted and attached by the
tail to the plant, their eared heads drooping down-
wards. These Willy expected to hatch the following
May, and he was very glad to have found them in
5

58 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

this stage, as, from their power of emitting a very
powerful scent in the caterpillar stage, they are
interesting to watch ; moreover, he was anxious to
obtain perfect specimens of this handsome butterfly.

On the whole, the boys were well satisfied with
their sport in Gloucestershire, and if their helpers
had only helped as well in other parts of England,
the collection ought to be growing apace; but of ©
this they were not very hopeful. However, a letter
from Strickland, who was spending his holidays at
his home in Norfolk, reassured them, at least as
far as he was concerned; still, the style of the
epistle was so characteristic of the writer that they
had great difficulty in deciding how much of it
was truth and how much fiction,

It ran as follows :—

‘BurnuamM Recrory, Great YarMoutit.
‘My Dear Fretitows,—When shall we three
meet again? Alas! only too soon, for time flies
like butterflies in the holidays. How about the
holiday task? That Martin is slaving away at his,
I know; just pinch him for me, Dux, While as for

you, you idle son of a gunner (the Colonel was in the
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 59

R.A., I think), I am just as sure yours is not begun.
“Tt is as forward as Strick’s anyway,” I hear you
say; but gently, my boys, gently; dear, good, in-
dustrious Strick’s is done, essay composed, written,
and neatly copied by—his sister. Go up top,
Strick. I mean to, my boys, mean to. Nice sister
mine, quite a kid too, and very much at the service
of her darling brother. Wouldn’t I let her know
it if she weren’t? Id cut her hair for her, and
buy her cayenne-pepper sweets, and amuse her pet
cat by the half-hour making setting-bristles, if she
didn’t do my holiday task for me; and she knows

it. Always manage your womenkind, or your "
womenkind will manage you; that is one of my
dad’s maxims, and I follow it, as I do all his ex-
cellent advice. Ahem! good, obedient, pious boy that
Strick. Bravo, Strick! Swallow-tails and Skippers,
Admirals Red and White, Ringlets and Tortoiseshells.
I declare I have written two pages, and only once
mentioned butterflies, the real object of my letter.
Now to business. What sport, my friends, what
sport? This child has done his little best, and
with rather good results, I flatter myself. Is it
Painted Ladies you want? come to Yarmouth; here
60 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

2

in the season they are as common as flies, and much,
oh, much dearer! though the cabbies put it on
pretty considerably, I can tell you. Or is it
Peacocks ? here they are male and female, sunning
themselves on the jetty. Talking of Peacocks
reminds me of a splendid joke I accidentally played
on my Pater the other day. One of the Skippers
sent me a post-card to say he had just’ sent me a
brace of splendid Peacocks, and he hoped they
would arrive undamaged. The Pater reads the
card, and when I come down I find him raging
against me, my friend, and the Peacocks. Did I
suppose I should be allowed to keep peacocks in
his garden? didn’t I know they played ducks and
drakes with the flowers? Useless for me meekly to
urge I knew my Peacocks would not injure so
much as a blossom; I was ordered to hold my
tongue and not talk such twaddle. I was to
let him know the instant the birds (brutes he
called them) arrived, and he would send them
back immediately; they should not set foot in
his garden. I could not resist saying they
would prefer flying to walking, whereupon I was

told to leave the room, as the head of the family
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 61

hadn’t patience to listen to such folly; peacocks
flying about his garden indeed! and I to speak of it
as if they were sparrows; didn’t believe I knew
what a peacock was. For the sake of peace I left
the table, inwardly chuckling, and when an hour
later the parcel post arrived with my Peacocks, I
went into his study, and, holding out the box, said,
“Here are the Peacocks, father.” His face was a
study, but he ended in a fit of laughter. Served
him right for reading my post-card. But to
business again. Greenhorns here predominate
over Red-horns. I can secure an unlimited supply
of the former; as for Ringlets, I could obtain every
variety if I only had the courage to ask for them,
I am on intimate terms with several Skippers,
one Grizzled Skipper in particular takes me out for
a sail occasionally. I met. two Admirals at a
musical party the other day. The Camberwell
Beauty is lodging in our parish, and I hear there
is a Duke at the Grand Hotel; no doubt it is
Burgundy. I often get- the Blues when I think
how soon the holidays will be over, and I enclose

”

some inverted Commas—“ By-bye.

‘ JACK STRICKLAND.’
62 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

‘Now who on earth is to know what Jack has
really done? How much of his letter is true, I
wonder ?’ cried Martin when they finished Jack’s
effusion, —

‘Precious little; if he has kept the Peacocks
that is about all he has done, I expect we shall
find when we get back to school,’

A week later the boys were all assembled again
at Mr. Palmer's, entertaining each other the first day
with an account of the way in which they had spent
their holidays, and even the Butterflies were for-
gotten that first evening.




CHAPTER V.

‘From every chink
And secret corner, where they slept away
The wintry storms ; or rising from their tombs
To higher life; by myriads forth at once
Swarming they pour; of all the varied hues
Their beauty-beaming parent can disclose.’--THoMson.

(ACK was very mysterious as:to his butter-
fly collection ; he assured Skippers and



Swallow-tails he had made a splendid
one in the holidays, but he would not let any one
see it until it was all properly arranged, and then,
he said, it would be so good that he should exhibit
it one half-holiday at a penny a peep, for the
benefit of Mrs. Palmer’s missionary-box. No
entreaties could induce Jack to show one single
specimen, or even to whisper the name of any, until

a certain Saturday afternoon, when, having per-
63
64 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

suaded Mr. Newman to let him have the class-
room for his exhibition, he locked himself up, to
arrange his specimens. By this time, though’
Skippers and Swallow-tails all agreed it was a
hoax, their curiosity was so excited by Jack’s
tempting and judicious hints that they all gladly
paid the penny entrance-fee.

The collection was laid out on the long table in
partitions made of books and slates, the name of
each specimen was written beneath it, and the
whole were arranged in classes.

First of all came the pretty bell-shaped wild
flower labelled duly, Common Fritillary ; the next
was another flower of the same plant washed
over with silver paint, and called Silver-washed
Fritillary ; then a likeness of the Queen of Spain
cut out of one of the illustrated papers, labelled
Her Majesty Argynius Lathonia, Queen of Spain ;
then followed another piece of Fritillary, daubed all
over with hair-oil, and labelled Greasy Fritillary ;
next a blank sheet of paper with an enormous
comma painted on it; then a small piece of tortoise-
shell, labelled Small Tortoiseshell, then a large |
tortoiseshell card-case, labelled Large Tortoise-
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 65

shell; next a photograph of a very pretty girl
headed Camberwell Beauty; then the most attrac-
‘tive object in the exhibition, a stuffed peacock in a
screen, which took up a large piece of the table, and
had been .borrowed from Mrs. Palmer’s drawing-
room,—this was labelled simply Vanessa Io, its
common name being so obvious it was unnecessary
to repeat it; then came a print of an Admiral of
the Fleet in cocked hat and naval uniform, painted
a brilliant vermilion, and, needless to add, named
the Red Admiral; further on was another copy of
the same print painted white on a green ground, to
do duty for the White Admiral. This gentleman
was framed and very ostentatiously placed by him-
self, while a notice was appended to him stating he
was the only member of his family in this country.
Dividing the Admirals was a coloured photograph
of an actress, labelled Painted Lady; then came a
likeness of the Emperor’ of Germany . coloured
purple by Jack; then a piece of marbled staircloth
labelled Marbled White; then some ringlets made
out of tow, and coloured and duly labelled, Small
Ringlet, Brown Ringlet, ete. Then a small fish,

with difficulty obtained in the Brighton fish-market,
BE
66 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

labelled rightly the Grayling; then some pieces of
heath, called Large and Small Heath; a copper
kettle labelled Large Copper, a penny labelled
Common Copper, a farthing called Small Copper,
followed the Heaths: these, with a piece of brim-
stone for the Brimstone Butterfly, a dress-coat
for the Swallow-tailed, some blank sheets of white
paper for the Whites, and some grasshoppers
secured by a silk thread to represent the Skippers,
were the moc_ remarkable features of the show;
and the roars of laughter the collection produced
amply repaid Jack Strickland for the time and
trouble he had wasted on it.

Even Mr. Palmer honoured the exhibition with
his presence, and enjoyed it as much as any
of the boys. The only person who did not quite
approve of it was Willy Martin. He thought
butterflies much too serious a subject for his
aide-de-camp to joke about, and was also dis-
appointed to find Jack had been so idle during
the holidays.

‘Idle, my dear Skipper! I assure you the amount
of thought I have given to this work of art is more
than I give to’—
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 67

‘Your studies throughout the term, ch, Strick-
land?’ interrupted Mr. Palmer.

‘Yes, sir. Attimes I was buoyed up with the hope
that Mrs. Palmer might bestow the prize upon me
in consideration of the talent displayed here,
although it is before the time.’

‘I am sorry for your disappointment then, so is
' Martin apparently,’

‘No, sir; I am sorry Strick has nothing else to
show, only this rubbish, after leading me to think
he had added to the collection in the holidays,’

‘So I have, Martin, honour bright. I have
taken up a new branch of the subject, and a very
interesting one it is: I have been going in for
butterflies’ eggs this vacation; it is not such excit-
ing sport as bird-nesting perhaps, and I should be
sorry to breakfast off them, but it is great fun all
the same when you go in for it in a scientific way,
not in the hap-hazard fashion adopted by some of
you little fellows who have been hatching all
manner of eggs into grubs. as useless as yourselves.

By the same token, some of my best eges are
~ Swallow-tails ; there is a place on one of the Broads
near Yarmouth where they abound, so one day I
68 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

watched a lady Swallow-tail who I knew by her
busy air had some important business on hand.
Presently my lady settled on a piece of milk-
patsley and laid some eggs. I did not disturb her,
but I marked the spot, and when she had dis-
appeared I secured the plant with some little pale
green oval eggs on it. I took the milk-parsley
home bodily and planted it in my own garden, well
out of my Pater’s sight. In a day or two they
changed to blue, then to black, and in about a week
the caterpillars began to be hatched, then I thought
it time to secure them, so I took them up to my
room and gave my sister charge of them.’

‘And where are they now, pray ?’

‘Upstairs safe and sound, and beauties they are
too, splendid colours, but greedy little wretches; the
first thing they did was to eat their own egg-shells
the moment they were hatched. I brought a good
supply of food for them, and they ought to turn
goon.’

‘They are very late; Swallow-tails often lay in
May, said Martin.

‘Yes, they are; but all the better, for they'll
remain in the chrysalis state all through the
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 69

winter. By the way, Martin, did you know, if you
touch these caterpillars they can throw out a
strong smell of fennel from one of their horns? it
is such a lark, I often stir mine up on purpose.’

‘Proper science that, eh, Martin? Like old
Strick, though ; I never thought he could be serious
for long,’ said. Dux.

‘I like that, when I am teaching you all; I
have gone in for it thoroughly, I tell you,’

‘Oh, all right! tell us some more then,

‘Well, perhaps none of you know that if the
butterfly is in a great hurry to lay her eges, and
can’t find the particular plant her caterpillars like,
she chooses the nearest she can find to it ; and to
be sure the eggs remain on the plant she glues them
to it,’

‘The Marbled White does not; she drops her
eggs anywhere among the grass, interrupted
Martin.

‘Another fact I have observed is, butterflies
seldom live long after laying their eggs. Then my
father has a microscope, so I got him to
examine some eggs for me, and we found the shell

is very like the skin which lines a bird’s egg, and
70» SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS:

the inside very like the white of ‘one, but it had no
yolk. But the most curious thing was, no two
eggs of a different species were alike when under
the microscope; some are round, some oval, others
pear-shaped, some are like a miniature melon,.
fluted just in the same way too; some are quite
smooth, some covered all over with little specks;
a few have a tiny lid at the top for the convenience
of the young caterpillar on his entrance into the
world, :

‘Oh, come, draw it mild, Strick! You don’t
suppose we think you saw all these eges under
your Pater’s microscope.’ .

‘IT did not say I did. Isaw a good many though,
and he told me the rest. I daresay you won’t
believe it, but some of these eges, about the size of
a pin’s head, are most exquisitely ornamented.’

‘Yes, I believe it, I have seen them under a
microscope ; the Queen of Spain egg is like a tiny
white wicker basket. One of the wonderful things
about these eges is, no amount of heat or cold will
kill them, for numbers live all through our hardest
winters. Do you know, Strick, your Swallow-
tailed chrysalides are awfully pretty to watch in the
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 71

spring, when they are beginning to change; the
colours of the butterfly show through the chrysalis
for some days, and later on the pattern of the
upper wings does the same, and when he does come
out, he is as much out of his clement as Dux was
the first day he put on his swallow-tails’

‘There is evidently something in the name, if
men and Swallow-tail butterflies all make their
début into society as if they were ashamed of
themselves,’ said Dux.

‘Men! I do lke that, don’t you, Strick? I can
tell you the cause of the butterfly’s shyness, though ;
his wings are so small when he first comes out from
his shell, that they can’t support his body. ‘I know
you will all say I am fudging, but it is as true as
steel, that you can see the wings grow, and in an
hour they are full-size.

‘Well, we have heard enough about Swallow-
tails. Just tell us a little about Skippers and their
egos, Martin; we may as well try to find some,’ said
Gordon.

‘Yes, tell us about ourselves, Martin,’ cried the
Skippers.

‘To begin with, we are Concealers, that is, the
92 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

chrysalis is enclosed in silk, The egg of the
Grizzled Skipper is laid on brambles, but it is such
a common butterfly, you need not trouble after the
eggs. The Small Skipper lays on the grass, and
the caterpillar passes the winter there, The
Lulworth is the rarest of the Skippers; I don’t sup-
pose we shall get one, as none of us come from
Dorsetshire or Devonshire, and those are the only
counties, except perhaps Warwickshire, where it is
found. But the principal thing I want my Skippers
to do this term and next, is to look for hybernating
species of caterpillars, chrysalides, and butterflies,
and help me to get on with the case I am making
for the prize, and to prepare braces and boxes for
setting all the specimens we hope to get in the
spring.’

‘I mean to go in for caterpillars next year ; I
have come to the conclusion you get much better
specimens if you rear them yourself than you do
if you catch the butterfly ever so carefully, so you
Swallow-tails can look out for hybernating cater-
pillars, said Dux.

‘Yes, that is all very fine, but where are we to
look ?’ said Gordon,
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS, 73

‘Yes, tell us that please, Martin,’ cried a chorus
of Skippers and Swallow-tails.

‘So I will, when I have found out the 3 most
likely places, but not to-day; any more butterfly-
ology on the top of Strick’s intellectual treat, which
he gave us in his exhibition, would be too much
for your minds; moreover, I hope we are going in
for some football before the afternoon is wasted.

This suggestion met with universal approval,
Jack Strickland excepted, and he tried in vain to
induce some of the others to remain and help him

to clear away his exhibition,


CHAPTER VI,

‘Observe the insect race, ordained to keep
The lazy Sabbath of a half-year’s sleep,
Intombed beneath the filmy web they lie,
And wait the influence of a kinder sky.’
Mns., BARBAULD.

JOR the. next few weeks football was all



the rage, and absorbed so much of the
boys’ leisure, that, except Willy Martin,
_they were all too much occupied to think of their
butterflies, whether living, dead, or hybernating.
However, one day a boy named Jennings had his
arm broken by a kick, whereupon Mr, Palmer put
a stop to football for the rest of the term, to the
indignation of the boys and the delight of Mrs,
Palmer, who openly told the boys if she were her
husband, they should never play such a horribly

dangerous game.
74
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 75

“A nice slow term we shall have, all through
that little muff breaking his arm: no football, and
of course there is no cricket and no swimming in
the winter, no anything but Euclid and Cesar,
Cresar and Euclid, day after day, varied by
arithmetic and algebra!’ grumbled -Neville one
wet half-holiday, after the football had been
stopped.

‘Poor old Dux, it is hard lines. Can’t we do
anything in the lepidopteral line ?—fine word that,
Dux, make a note of it, my boy, to’ vary the
monotony. How about hybernation, Martin ?
Have you found anything to tell us about that?’
said Strickland.

‘Yes, plenty, and as we are all here Ill
tell you all I know, if you like, and next half
holiday we'll ask to go into the country and have
a bunt.’

‘All right! fire away, Willy. ‘I don’t feel very
keen about anything except football just now,’ said
Neville. ; ,

‘To hybernate, as you all know, I suppose,
means to pass the winter. Well, all butterflies

live through a winter in some state, because
76 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

the life of a butterfly from beginning to end lasts
a year,

‘I thought a butterfly lived only for a day
till we took up the subject, interrupted Strick.
land.

‘When I say a year, I mean from the time the
egg was laid to the time the young butterfly lays
its own eges and dies, Well, some pass the
winter in the egg-state,—eight do,—but we need not
bother about them; it would be silly to look for
hybernating butterflies’ eggs. Twenty-five hyber-
nate in the caterpillar state, ten in the chrysalis
state, and ten in the butterfly state. Of course TI
am speaking only of British species,’

“OF course, but where on earth do they hyber-
nate? That is what I want to know,’ said Strick-
land.

‘I am coming to that, but first let me tell you
that any given species of butterfly always hybernates
in the same stage; for instance, Io hybernates as a
butterfly, so all the future generations of Peacocks
will hybernate as butterflies; the Grayling hyber-
nates as a caterpillar, and all its descendants will
do the same. The caterpillars hybernate on their
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 77

own peculiar plants, so that when they wake up
they may find a good breakfast ready to hand after
their long night; the chrysalides hang themselves
up on railings, fences, outhouses, or on hedge-
mustard, reeds, vetches, or other plants; and
butterflies choose all manner of places, from a
church ‘to a pigsty, though they seem greatly to
prefer a pigsty. A hollow oak tree is a favourite
place for Peacocks ; indeed, any hollow trees seem to
suit all hybernating butterflies, also barns, stables,
any building where they are not likely to be dis-
turbed, will do for them. Unless you are on the
look-out very sharply, it is very difficult to find
them, for they choose places as near as possible the
colour of their wings when folded up back to back,
which is the attitude in which they pass the
winter, and that colour in nearly all the hybernators
is some shade of brown,’

‘Do you mean to say a butterfly will stop for
six or seven months in a barn or a pigsty without
moving 2’

‘Well, if an unusually warm day occurs, they
will come out of their holes, and perhaps even fly
a little distance, but they soon find their way
78 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

back to their hiding-places, unless they are caught
or meet with some accident. As a rule, if we.
wait till the spring, and then find a hybernator
who has lived through the winter, his wings are
almost sure to have lost some of their beauty, but
I fancy if we could catch them napping now, at
thé beginning of the winter, they would be all
right,’

‘Tell us which are the ten hybernators, then
we shall have some idea if they are worth the
trouble of looking for in pigstys and barns,’ said
Neville.



egan Martin.



‘English names, please, or the little ones will
be all at sea,’ interrupted Strickland, with a comical
grin.

‘The Comma Butterfly, Camberwell Beauty,
Peacock, srimstone, Clouded Sulphur, Clouded
‘Yellow, Large Lortoiseshell, Small Tortoiseshell,
Painted Lady, and Red Admiral, N. ow, the Comma
does not like the sea, so it is not known. in this
county, therefore we need not look for that; nor
need we trouble about Antiopa, which is very
rare, and generally taken in Kent; we might by
SWALLO W-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 79

chance find some Large Tortoiseshells; Edusa we
are not likely to get in Sussex; all the others we
may have the luck to pop upon. Ihave heard of
eight or nine Peacocks being found in one stump
of an oak,

‘I have heard of diamonds being found, but I
never yet met the man who found them; so, my
dear Skippers, if you like to hunt pigstys and
churches for hybernating butterflies, you can, but
the Swallow-tails will, I think, wait till the spring
before they resume their lepidopteral labours, as

trick calls them,’

‘Well, Dux, at any rate you will be spared the
error most beginners fall into of supposing all
hybernators are double-brooded, and you will know
the hybernated Brimstones, which appear occasion-
ally in the winter and.in the spring, are not the
children of the autumn species—-another popular
delusion, But I shall search for hybernating
caterpillars and chrysalides chiefly, because the
butterflies are never so fresh as those which are
hatched in the spring,’

‘Let us hear which pass the winter in -the
chrysalis state,’
$0 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

‘The Swallow-tail; he braces himself up among
the reeds near his favourite hog’s fennel. The
Wood White is a very beautiful chrysalis, slender,
and of a lovely pale green colour with some
pink rings round it; it fastens itself up by the
tail, with the thread round the body; this is a
good one to try for, because as a butterfly it is
rarely, if ever, seen to settle. The Large White
—by the way, Dux, did you know some butter-
flies migrate like birds, actually cross the
Channel ?’ ,

‘No; I don’t believe it, said Neville, who was
still hankering after football, and not in the best
of humours.

‘It is true, though; the Large White is one of
the migrators, the Small White and the Green-
veined White, are the others which have been
seen arriving on the beach in numbers; they alight
on and rise from the sea as easily as on land,
generally choosing a calm day for the passage.
These three Whites all hybernate as chrysalides,
the Large and Small on cabbages or wild
mignonette, and, as they are the commonest and

most mischievous of all our butterflies, the more
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 81

we clear away of their chrysalides the better. The
Green-veined White has nearly as bad a name as
the Large and Small, but Newman says he is not
_ half so’—

‘White as he is painted, interrupted Strick-
land.

‘Just so, and he is to be found on the water-
cress or hedge-garlic or some of the crucifera;
those who don’t know what are the cruciferous
plants must find out for themselves.’

‘Of course we can’t expect Martin to be
professor of botany as well as of natural history ; as
“it is, I think Palmer ought to give him a salary.
Shall we memorialize him on the subject?’ asked
Strickland.

‘Be quiet, Strick, unless you have heard enough
about hybernating for to-day,’ said Willy..

‘Yes, do listen, Strick; it is a nice easy way
of getting information, and, since we have nothing
else to do, no football, no anything, we may as
well hear all Willy has to tell us, echoed
Dux.

‘That is very little, my stock of information is

nearly exhausted. The Green-chequered White is
TF
82 SWALLOW.TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

one we have as good a chance of finding here as
anywhere, for Sussex is its favourite county, Kent
and Sussex opposite the coast of France. There
are really two broods of this in the year, and it is
the second brood which passes the winter in the
chrysalis state, tying itself up by a belt round the
middle of its body, and also by its feelers to the
wild mignonette. The chrysalis is pale brown,
spotted black. Then Orange-tip, which is another
White ’—

‘Thanks for that news,—orange is white! Go on,
my boy, go on; if you told us black was white, we
should all meekly bow our heads in dignified
silence, interrupted Strick, as he bowed his own
in a very undignified fashion, to avoid the book
Dux threw at him.

‘Orange-tip is also to be found on any of the
cruciferous plants all over the kingdom; it is a
very queer-shaped chrysalis, pointed at both ends,
dingy green in colour, The Duke of Burgundy
is to be found in the chrysalis state on the
under side of primrose and cowslip leaves during
the winter; he is pretty common, saving his

grace ’—
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 83

‘That is what we all wish to do, said the
not-to-be-silenced Strickland.

‘And the chrysalis is a very delicate yellowish-
brown covered with hairs.’

‘His grace evidently shirks shaving in the winter
—finds it too cold, like Dux and me, hence these
beards,’

‘Pl have you out of the room, my boy, if
you don’t take care. Go on, Martin, don’t pay
any attention to poor Strick’s feeble witticisms,
cried Dux, as Strickland sat stroking his chin,

‘Azure Blue, which is common in the south of
England, has been known to hybernate as a
chrysalis, so there is no harm in searching holly-
trees, which, with the ivy, are its favourite food;
and lastly, the Grizzled Skipper, which passes the
winter on the bramble or the wild raspberry in
the chrysalis state. And that is all I have
to tell you to-day,’

‘By the way, Martin, how do hybernating
caterpillars manage to get on when there are no
leaves for them to eat during the winter ?’

‘Most of them have to fast, and make up for

lost time in the spring. That reminds me that the
84 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

caterpillars of the Black-veined White are very
curious creatures; they are gregarious, and live in
small communities, spinning themselves a summer
tent for the warm weather, and a heavier one
under which they pass the winter packed close
together. In the spring they separate for ever,
and each goes his own sweet way, to feed on the
hawthorn. The Glanville Fritillary also makes a
ten tin which to hybernate, but its tent is shaped
like a ball, and blades of grass are woven in to
make it more substantial; sometimes not more
than a dozen, and sometimes as many as fifty or
sixty, are found inside these tents, which are made
on the narrow-leaved plantain.’

‘I shall certainly have a look for these cater-
pillars, if it is only to see their tents,’ said
Neville.

‘You won't find the Glanville Fritillary, it is
only known in three counties, Hampshire, Kent,
and Wiltshire; but I believe there are a great
many caterpillars which make some kind of shelter
for themselves; for instance, the Heath Fritillary
makes a little house by drawing down two or three
of the scabious leaves on which it feeds, and joining
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 85

them together with a web; it then eats the leaves
and moves on to make another house. In the
winter it spins a web to shelter it; and now I am
off ;’ and Martin, tired of teaching, went to amuse

himself.




CHAPTER VII.

‘A beautiful creature,
That is gentle by nature,
From flower to flower let him fly,
, Beneath the summer sky,
*Tis all that he wishes to do.’
Worpsworvtit.

HE butterfly mania lay dormant, like some
of the butterflies and caterpillars during



the winter months, in spite of Martin’s
lecture on hybernation. True, he and some of the
Skippers made some excursions and secured some
specimens of hybernating butterflies, chrysalides,
and caterpillars, but the Swallow-tails were content
to follow the lead of their chief, and rest from
their labours. In the spring, however, the quest
for butterflies in every guise was renewed with

even more ardour than it had been prosecuted
86
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 87

with the previous year, and as the time for the
rival collections to be given in drew nearer, the
excitement began to get very great.

One morning in May, Mr. Newman appeared to
be troubled with a very bad cold while hearing
the younger boys their lessons; at last, after a
deal of sniffing he could stand it no longer, but
broke out,—

‘What on earth is this extraordinary smell?
it is enough to poison us all. Do any of you boys
notice it? I daresay not; boys have no noses,’

To his surprise, however, there was an almost
unanimous cry from the class that they all noticed
it, though no one could account for it.

‘Please, sir, it is up in our dormitory too, and I
believe it comes from some of the caterpillars, said
little Gordon.

‘OF course, no doubt of it; one of you has some
caterpillars in his pockets, I suppose. Any one who
has, will have the kindness to produce them at once,
or I'll search the whole class. Now turn out your
pockets, and put the contents here on my desk.
Miller, you are the top of the class, you begin.’

Accordingly little Miller obeyed, and five boys
88 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

one after the other produced a heterogeneous mass
of string, knives, bulls-eyes, marbles, catapults,
dirty pocket-handkerchiefs, and, in some cases, a
few infant caterpillars in process of hatching, at all
of which Mr. Newman looked in profound disgust,
but contemptuously allowed the owners to retain
their possessions. At last a boy named Murray
advanced and‘ produced a pill-box, in which, even
before he had removed the lid, it was evident the
offending object lay. Holding his handkerchief to his
nose, the irate tutor peeped into the box and beheld
a very large smooth caterpillar of a reddish-brown
colour, which emitted a. very strong and offensive
odour.

‘Pray where did you get this disgusting grub from?’

‘ Off a willow-tree, sir; I think it is a very rare
butterfly, so I am keeping it for Neville.’

‘Rare indeed! the rarer the better for the
olfactory nerves of humanity. Go and fetch Martin ;
he may know what it is, and if valuable it may be
kept in some outhouse. Pray have you any more
specimens upstairs ?’

‘No, sir; I carry this about because the other
fellows won’t have it in the box with the rest of the
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 89

caterpillars,’ said Murray apologetically, as he went
to fetch Martin.

‘Now, Martin, do you want this abominable
insect ? if not, let it be thrown -away at once, it
scents the school.’

Martin glanced at the caterpillar and answered,—

‘No, sir, it is the larva of the Goat-Moth; we
don’t collect moths for the prize, only butterflies.
You won’t lose the smell, Murray, for days, if you
ever do; it clings to the ground and the wood
these moths bore in for years.’

‘This is pleasant. Now, Murray, go and bury
that thing as deep as you can in the yard, then
change all your clothes, and give those you have
on to the servants to be purified and fumigated
befure you put them on again,’ said Mr. Newman,
after which Murray retired amid the suppressed
laughter of the rest of the class.

But this was only the beginning of Murray’s
troubles with regard to caterpillars, for he aud
Gordon had charge of Neville’s, and it was their
duty to search for the proper food every half-
holiday, and to feed the caterpillars every morning.

If the supply ran short in the week, as had
go SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

happened once or twice, one or other of them had
to ask leave and go on a foraging expedition
between or after school hours. A week or two
after the episode of the Goat-Moth, little Gordon
was ill for a few days, and Murray, whose ardour
had somewhat relaxed, forgot to feed the cater-
pillars, which, by Mr. Newman’s orders, had been
turned out of the dormitory and transferred to a
cupboard in one of the class-rooms. So one
Saturday afternoon, when Murray went to the cup-
board to see how his caterpillars were off for food,
to his horror he found one boxful dead from
starvation. Now Neville was known to have a
very passionate temper, though he did not often
indulge it, but Murray, who was a timid little boy,
felt he had given provocation too strong for his
chief to resist, for the loss would, in all probability,
spoil Neville’s chance of the prize, as there were
one or two rather rare specimens in the box, and
how to break the news to Dux he did not know.
He could not consult little Gordon, for he was in
quarantine for a few days, lest the sore throat from
which he was suffering should develop into anything
more serious. At last he decided to take Martin
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. gI

into his confidence, perhaps he could suggest some
way of repairing the loss ; but just as he was going
to seek Martin for the purpose, Dux came bustling
-in, a sudden fit having seized him to examine his
caterpillars himself.

‘Here, Murray, you have charge of my cater-
pillars, just go and fetch them here; I want to sce
how they are getting on.’

The caterpillars were in the cupboard of the room
Neville was in, but Murray, not daring to confess
the accident which had befallen them, went out on
pretence of getting them, but in reality to get out
of Dux’s way till the storm had blown over,
resolving to take refuge among the Skippers, for he
knew all the Swallow-tails would be too indignant
with bim for his carelessness to stand between him
and Neville. The Skippers might screen him, and
Martin, who was very good-natured, would very
likely help him to repair some of the mischief he
had done by transferring some of his own cater-
pillars to him, or, at least, telling him where he was
likely to find the kinds he had suffered to perish.

He found Martin and Strickland busy making
part of the case in which th butterflies were to be
92 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

finally arranged, in an outhouse, and in fear and
trembling he made his confession.

‘ Abominably careless of you too, Murray ; Pd lick
you well if you were a Skipper,’ said Strickland.

‘I expect Neville will be awfully savage ; you
had better keep out of his way for a while. What
caterpillars are they ?’ said Martin.

‘Violets, said Murray meekly.

‘Violets! what on earth do you mean ?’

‘I mean they live on wild violets and wild
heartsease, and it is a long way to go for the leaves,
and Gordon is ill, and I forgot to look at them, and
they are dead; all the other boxes are alive.’

‘Live boxes and violet caterpillars! your lan-
guage is involved, young man. Are they rare ones,
Martin, do you think ?’ said Strickland.

_‘ Fritillaries chiefly, I suppose, and I believe Dux
told me he had one or two good ones, but I doubt if
he will know what his loss is ; how many were there ?’

‘Twelve ; there were one or two Queens of Spain, I
think. Do tell me where to find some more, Martin,
please; I am awfully sorry, but if I can only find
some of them again, perhaps Dux won't lose the

prize,’
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 93

‘Hullo! here comes Dux; I can hear him storm-
ing; he is in one of his baits, you had better get out
of the way, Murray,’ said Strickland.

‘Where am I to go? he is coming across the
yard, said Murray, looking vainly round for a
chance of escape.

‘Get behind here; I won’t let him touch you,
said Martin kindly, for he knew when Neville was
in a rage he was not likely to have much mercy.

Murray stepped behind Martin into the corner
he had pointed out, just as Neville, armed with the
first stick he had caught up, and a very formidable-
looking one it was, burst into the building pale
with fury.

‘Martin, have you seen that little wretch Murray ?
Tll break every bone in his skin when I find him!
He has killed all my caterpillars. Oh, there he is!
if I don’t half kill him my name isn’t— How now,
Strickland! what do you mean by standing in my
way?’ Ke

‘ Gently, Dux, gently! a little gentle chastisement
won't hurt the boy, but. I am not going to look
on and see you beat a little delicate fellow like
Murray with that blunderbuss.’
94 SWALLOW-.TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

‘You are not going to look on! what do you
mean ? How dare you talk to me like this? I'll lick
you as well as Murray if you don’t move out of my
way ;’ and as he spoke Neville attempted to ‘push
past Strickland, almost knocking him over in the
attempt, but Martin caught hold of his arm and
held him back.

‘Wait a bit, Neville; you'll be sorry for it, if you
attack Murray while you are in a white heat,

“Two to one, are you? I believe itis a planned
thing; you have bribed Murray to kill my cater-
pillars. T’'ll fight you both, and settle him afterwards,’
said Dux, struggling with Martin and Strickland,
who were trying to hold him.

Meanwhile some other boys had found their way
to the outhouse on hearing the noise, and Dux, ©
fearing them, called out, ‘Swallow-tails to: the
rescue !?

‘Two can play at that game; Skippers to the
rescue!’ cried Strickland, and in a few minutes every
boy in the school except little Gordon, and Murray,
the cause of the fray, was engaged in the battle.
Fighting and struggling, they soon got out into the

yard, where there was more scope for action, and for
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 98

ten minutes the battle raged fiercely. Sometimes
in single combats, sometimes mass against mass, the
boys struggled together in wild confusion, shouting
with rage and pain, wrestling, and using their fists
very. freely, for their blood was up, and none of
them were responsible for their actions.

In the midst of this melée a window was thrown
open, and Mrs. Palmer, putting her head out, called
out entreating them to stop ; but they were all much
too excited to pay any attention, if in the noise
they heard’ her voice; whereupon, greatly to her
reoret, Mrs. Palmer, who was afraid the boys would
hurt each other seriously, for already some noses
were bleeding, went to her husband and sent him
to the scene of action.

“Boys, what is the meaning of this? Stop this
moment! do you hearme? Stop, I say!’ cried Mr.
“Palmer; but even he had to speak several times
before the struggling mass separated, and even then .
one or two rushed forward on to their opponents
again and again before he at length succeeded in
stopping the fight.

At last there they stood, panting and perspiring,
two or three with black eyes, some with noses and
96 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

lips bleeding, all very much dishevelled, with burn-
ing cheeks, and glaring angrily at each other, still
too angry to feel ashamed of themselves,

‘Murray, come here; you appear to be a spectator
only, tell me the meaning of all this, said Mr.
Palmer.

‘Please, sir, it is all my fault, said Murray,
looking very much inclined to ery, though he had
secretly been longing to take part in the fray, if he
could only have decided which side to take, but
his conscience would not let him go against the
Skippers, who were protecting him, and of course he
could not fight against his own side.

For in truth the rivalry between Skippers and
Swallowtails had been waxing very great lately, and
there had been a good deal of bitterness, especially ~
this term, as the prize: was to be awarded at the
end of it; so perhaps all the boys had readily

seized this opportunity of avenging their imaginary
wrongs.

‘No, sir, it is the Skippers’ fault; there has been
a vile plot’—began Neville.

‘Be quiet, Neville! I am not addressing you,
said Mr. Palmer sternly. ‘Now, Murray, tell me
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 97

how this fight originated’ he continued, while
Neville bit his lip and raged inwardly, though he
dared not speak again, while Murray told his
tale.

‘Oh, it is a fight about this butterfly prize! Very
well, I shall know how to deal with that. And
apparently Neville, Martin, and Strickland were the
authors of it; is this so?’ .

‘ Yes, sir, answered the three culprits.

‘I shall know how to deal with them also.
You three will come to my study at twelve o’clock
to-morrow’; the rest of the school will remain in the
big schoolroom till tea-time, and employ their half-
holiday in writing out some Students’ Hume: the
first and second classes will write two hundred
lines each, the juniors one hundred, and they will
be brought to me to-morrow morning after prayers,
when I shall have more to say to you all on this
subject. Those who are hurt go indoors and wash
yourselves ; the others go at once to the schoolroom.
Murray, you will do the same imposition as the
other juniors. There is to be perfect silence until
tea-time ; I shall stay with you, to see that it is
observed.’ So saying, Mr. Palmer followed the boys

G
98 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

into the schoolroom, where they sat down to their
impositions in solemn silence.

As a rule, Mr, Palmer was very lenient with the
boys, but if he did take it into his head to be
severe, the occasions were generally remembered
for some time to come. Fighting was strictly
forbidden, so the present offence was a very great
one, and, as the boys all knew, Neville, Strickland,
and Martin were in for a flogging, for that was the
meaning of the appointment at twelve in Mr.
Palmer’s study. That was unpleasant enough for
the trio at any rate, but in addition to this the
boys all felt pretty sure, from Mr. Palmer’s manner
and remarks, that he intended to withdraw the
promised butterfly prize, which was the severest
punishment next to expulsion he could have hit
upon, and this silence which he had imposed upon
them prevented them from talking the matter over
and seeing if anything could be done to avert such
a calamity.

In the confusion and excitement both master and
boys had forgotten it was a Saturday, so a gleam
of hope burst in upon them when Mr. Palmer,

remembering it, announced,—
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 99

‘I forgot this is Saturday; I shall therefore
require the impositions to-night. Neville, Strickland,
and Martin will, however, come to my study on
Monday morning at twelve’

This was a respite; perhaps on Sunday Mrs
Palmer might be persuaded to intercede for them.




CHAPTER VIIL

‘ Other creatures all day long

Roan idle, unemployed, and less need rest,

Man hath his daily work of body or mind.’
MiLrTon.

HE impositions did not take so long as
Mr. Palmer had anticipated, and as one



boy after the other advanced to his
desk with his lines written out, he was told he
could go into the playground until tea-time,
otherwise the boys would have had no exercise on
their half-holiday. No one, however, seemed disposed
fora game. The Swallow-tails kept aloof from the
Skippers until Dux should appear and set an ex-
ample of how to treat his enemies by his own
conduct; but he was doing his lines in a very

leisurely manner, until, seeing he was likely to be
100
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 101

left téte-c-téte with Mr. Palmer, he hurried over the
remainder to avoid such an unpleasantness, and
then sauntered into the playground, feeling very
miserable.

In the first place, the coming interview at noon
on Monday was not pleasant food for reflection ;
then he felt sure, from Mr. Palmer’s manner, he
intended to withdraw the prize for the butterflies,
so that all the labour of the past twelve months
was wasted, so far as the prize was concerned, and
this was a bitter disappointment not only to
Neville, but, as he knew, to the whole school, and,
as he also knew, he was the chief cause of the
punishment—another depressing thought. Then
again, after an outbreak of temper such as this,
Neville was always in a subdued frame of mind;
he was ashamed of himself for having indulged
in it, and aware that he had been very unjust
in his accusations against Martin and Strickland.
And, after all, what a stupid little thing it was
that had caused all this trouble: the loss of a
dozen caterpillars, which, since the prize was to be
withdrawn, was of no consequence. But as the

Swallow-tails crowded round their chief and asked
Io2 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

him if he thought there was any chance of
Mr. Palmer's allowing the prize to be given, not-
withstanding the breach of discipline they had
all been guilty of, Neville made a sudden resolu-
tion.

“Yes, he said, ‘there is one chance; I'll go and
try it.

So saying, he returned to the schoolroom, as
anxious now for a private interview with his
master as a few minutes before he had been to
avoid one. On reaching the schoolroom, he found
Mr. Palmer talking very gravely to little Murray,
who, by the pleading expression on his pale little
tear-stained face, seemed to have been interceding
for the others.

‘No, Murray; it was very careless of you, no
doubt, but the fighting was no fault of yours. You
may go. Now, Neville, what have you come back
for?’ said Mr. Palmer, changing his tone as he
turned to Neville.

‘To speak to you, sir, please. I came to say the
fight was entirely my fault, and to ask you to let
Strickland and Martin off, and allow my collection
of butterflies to be given to one of the Swallow-tails.
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 103

The whole school will be so disappointed if the prize
is withdrawn.’

‘The whole school was engaged in the fight, said
Mr. Palmer coldly.

‘Yes, sir, but I began it; Martin and Strickland
were obliged to fight after what I said to them.’

‘Well, I will consider their case, but I don’t see
my way to make any promises with regard to the
prize. After such gross insubordination and such
a wilful breach of the rules of the school, I should ,
think your own consciences must tell you all you
deserve to lose the prize. Go out now till tea,
which will be an hour later than usual.’

Neville retired, feeling very miserable. Never had
Mr. Palmer spoken so coldly and sternly to him
before, and though he longed to say something to
thaw this icy manner, yet he could not bring him-
self to express moré regret than he had done,
particularly as it would look as if he were spelling
to be let off his flogging on Monday, and he was
much too proud to do that, so he went back to the
playground with a heavy heart.

‘It was no use; I am afraid he has made up his

mind to stop Mrs. Palmer’s prize,’
To4 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

General cries of indignation from all the Swallow-
tails, in which the Skippers joined, their common
trouble bringing them together, interrupted Neville.

‘Have you asked him not to stop the prize, then,
Dux? That is just like you, old fellow! Shake
hands, said Strickland, coming forward, whereupon
Neville readily shook hands with him and Martin,
at which signal general peace was restored, and
Skippers and Swallow-tails, once more united, now
held a council as to what measures could be taken
to avert the dreaded calamity. ,

The universal opinion was that their sole hope
lay with Mrs. Palmer ; if she could be persuaded to
take their part, perhaps she might succeed in induc-
ing Mr. Palmer to overlook the offence; but
unfortunately fighting was a thing she had a great
horror of, and, as they knew, she would require a
great deal of conciliating before she would be
inclined to smile upon them again.

‘How are we to get hold of her? that is the
question, It is my turn to have supper there to-
morrow,—mine and Gordon’s,—but I don’t believe
we shall be asked now,’ said Strickland.

‘If you please, Strickland, Mr. Palmer told me
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS, - 105

I was to go to supper to-morrow, said little Murray
meekly.

‘Well, now, Murray, look here. I know you
are awfully sorry about those caterpillars of mine,
but if you'll do this you'll never hear another word
about them. You ask Mrs. Palmer if she'll let
Martin and me come and see her after supper
to-morrow, and we'll see if we can get her round.
Yowll have to ask very nicely, or she won't grant
us an interview, for we are in her black books, but
you do your best, will you?’ said Dux in a tone
which assured little Murray his carelessness was
forgiven.

‘By the way, Dux, if you'll accept them, I have
some Fritillaries you may have; I have more than
IT want. We will havea look at them after tea,’ said
Martin.

‘Thanks, but I am afraid it’ll be no good; I feel
sure Mrs. Palmer’s prize will be stopped, and all
our labour will have been wasted.’

‘Oh no, it won’t be wasted, even if the prize be
stopped, because we shall have learnt a good deal
about butterflies, and have laid the foundation of a

good collection into the bargain. I shall go on col-
106 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

lecting, prize or no prize; it takes years to get a
good collection, for there dre so many things to
contend against, even when you have obtained your
specimens.’

‘They may be starved, like mine,’ said Neville.

‘Or mites or mildew may destroy your butter-
flies, which is worse. I wonder what enemies
butterflies and caterpillars have in a natural state ;

2

do you know, Martin?’ asked a Skipper.

‘Wind is an enemy to butterflies; many of them
suffer from high winds, especially the Blues, whose
delicate plumage is easily damaged. Then Purple
Emperors fight each other,—two males never meet
without engaging in a duel; and of course bad
weather is often fatal to them. But really they
have more enemies in the caterpillar stage, for not
only do birds prey on them, but other insects also:
first, there is the ichneumon fly, which lays its eggs
in the infant caterpillar, and the grubs feed on it
without killing it outright, so the poor thing dies a
lingering death. Some of the Fritillaries are de-
stroyed by two necrophagous beetles ’"—

‘Hold hard! what does necrophagous mean ?
anything to do with necropolis ?’
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 107

‘Same root; it means burying; these beetles
bury themselves in the ground. Then there is a
large ground spider which destroys the Glanville
Fritillary when it comes to the butterfly stage; it
lies in wait for it, and, when the butterfly alights
on or near the ground, makes a dart at it, seizes
it by the neck, and either spider or butterfly, but
generally the butterfly, perishes before they will
relax their hold. Then, though you can hardly
call it an enemy, one of the dangers of caterpillar-
life is moulting, a process which has to be gone
through four or five times, as the skin becomes too
tight for the body, and, unless the caterpillar is in
good health at the time, he perishes in the process,
and is found hanging by his claspers to the
web he spins for the occasion, dead as a door-
nail? ~:

‘I believe if we were going to be hanged on
Monday, Martin would go on lecturing on butter-
flies; for my part, I sincerely wish there weren’t
such things—a frame of mind I shall continue in
until after noon on Monday,’ said Strickland.

But Dux didn’t-tell either him or Martin that
he had interceded for them, and successfully, as
108: SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

he hoped; on this point he maintained silence,
knowing that if Strickland and Martin knew what
he had done, they would go and beg him off also,
and in that case’ Mr. Palmer might justly say he
had spoken six words for them and half-a-dozen
for himself.

When Sunday evening came, Dux and Martin
were anxiously looking out for a summons to the
drawing-room, if little Murray only succeeded in
obtaining an interview for them; but for some
while after supper they waited in vain. At last,
to their delight, Murray came rushing into the
schoolroom to say Dux, Martin, and Strickland
could all go and see Mrs. Palmer if they liked,
before they went to bed.

‘Dux, I hope you won’t mind, but Mrs. Palmer
asked me to tell her all about the fight, how it
began, and everything, so I did; I told her it was
all my fault. She is so sorry about it, whispered
Murray as Neville passed him.

‘Well, boys, come and sit down, and tell me all
about your troubles. I am so sorry about it; I
hoped my prize would have been nothing but a

pleasure to you all, instead of which it seems to
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 109

have brought discord between two old friends who
never quarrelled before, said Mrs. Palmer when
they came into her presence.

‘I don’t think we ever shall again. It was all so
sudden, we were in the middle of a fight before
we knew where we were, said Martin.

‘Yes, but you should try and think before you
rush at each other like infuriated animals, and
behave in a way I am sure you are very much
ashamed of, now you think it all calmly over. Mr.
Palmer and I are both very sorry it has occurred ; it
was such a terrible breach of the rules, and you know
nothing makes Mr. Palmer so angry as disobedience ;
he always says it is one of the things he cannot
allow to pass unpunished, and of course he is
right, for there would be no discipline at all in
the school otherwise. But I didn’t send for you
to lecture you; little Murray told me you had
something to say to me; what is it ?’

‘We wanted to tell you how sorry we are about
it, and to ask you to beg Mr. Palmer not to with-
draw your prize, because that will punish the
whole school, said Neville.

‘But how if I withdraw the prize myself?’
IIo SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

‘Oh, Mrs. Palmer, please don’t! do overlook it
this once,’ said Strickland.

‘We will never allow another fight, we promise,
said Martin.

‘I am sure you are too kind to withdraw the
prize, it would be such a disappointment to us
all,’ said Dux.

‘Iam not sure that it wouldn’t be the kinder
course; however, I don’t mean to adopt it. But
tell me, did Mr. Palmer say positively he would
withdraw my prize ?’

‘He threatened to; I don’t think he did positively
say he would,

‘Then perhaps I may prevail upon him to forgive
you; under ordinary circumstances I should not
dare to interfere, but, as the prize is mine, I think
this is a privileged occasion; at any rate, I will
try. But I don’t think he will allow me to tell
you the result of my efforts; he will probably
prefer to make that known to you himself on
Monday. I hope I may succeed, for it would be
quite as great a punishment to me as to any of
you, if I am not allowed to give the prize. But
there is the bell for prayers. Good-night !’
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. Il

And the three boys shook hands in turn with
Mrs. Palmer, considerably relieved to find their peace
was made with her, though, as Strickland lamented
with a comic expression of sadness, there was a
very disagreeable quarter of an hour in store for
them at the best.




CHAPTER IX.

‘If I were thou, O butterfly,

And poised my purple wing to spy,

The sweetest flowers that live and die,

I would not waste my strength on those,
As thou.’

Mrs, BROWNING.

A\ONDAY morning was never a favourite
time with the boys: Mr. Newman was



always in a bad temper, and Mr. Palmer
was generally apt to be what the boys called fussy
on Monday ; but on this particular Monday he was
unusually grave and stern, while Neville, Martin,
and Strickland were in a state of depression and
unpleasant excitement, which increased as twelve
o’clock approached, and the rest of the school was

almost as anxious, judging, from the head-master's
112
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 113

manner, that the prize was to be withdrawn. The
only person who seemed happy was Mr. Newman,
and he was in very good cue, cracking jokes
which in the opinion of the boys were very ill-
timed, and, to his secret annoyance, they studiously
refrained from laughing at them.

At last, to the relief of all, twelve o’clock struck,
and at a signal from Mr. Palmer all rose to
their feet.

‘I need not detain you, Mr. Newman, was the
preface to his remarks; and when, to the delight of
the boys, that gentleman had reluctantly taken the
hint and left the room, Mr. Palmer continued,—

‘Now, boys, you have all been guilty of a gréat
breach of rules, but I am willing to believe that,
flagrant as it was, it was not a deliberate, wilful
act ; you were, I think, carried away by excitement,
and without thinking you plunged one after the
other headlong into that disgraceful fight, which to
my sorrow and your shame I witnessed on Saturday.
Am I right in thinking so?’

‘Yes, sir, from all the boys.

‘And are you all sorry for your conduct?’

‘Yes, sir,’
H
14 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

‘And thoroughly ashamed of yourselves?
Answer, please.’ ‘

‘Yes, sir,” in more subdued tones.

‘Very well, then, as Mrs. Palmer has been
pleading very eloquently for you, I forgive you;
but you must thank her, for I had fully made up
my mind to withdraw the prize. And now, mind,
I shall expect, in return for my clemency, that you
all do your duties more zealously than ever for the
rest of the term, and pay special attention to the
rules of the school. You have turned what was
intended as an act of kindness into an occasion of
sinning; don’t abuse Mrs, Palmer’s kindness a
second time, but try to show your gratitude by
your good conduct. Neville, go to my study;
Strickland, come to me when Neville comes out;
Martin, remain here for the present, till I send for
you; the rest go into the playground,’

Strickland and Martin resumed their seats in
silence, too absorbed in their own immediate fate
to share in the joy and relief of the other boys on
hearing. the prize was not to be withheld, while
Neville, with flushed cheeks and pursed-up lips, °
walked haughtily out of the schoolroom to the
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. IIs

study, which Mr, Palmer entered by a private door
from the schoolroom, a shorter way, so that. he
was seated at his writing-table when Neville
entered by the other door,

Now, Neville had never been flogged, so he did
not know what the method of proceeding was;
Strickland, who could have enlightened him from
his own personal experiences, had he chosen, having
declined to do so; therefore he was somewhat
surprised when Mr, Palmer, having signed to him to
come close to him, turned himself round in his chair
and asked,—

‘Well, Neville, do you know any reason why I
should not proceed to execute my threat 2’

‘No, sir, I- know of none,’ said Neville proudly in
a low voice.

‘Happily for you, I do. Didn’t I tell you all
just now I forgave you? I don’t generally do
things by halves; but, my dear boy, I sent for you
now to warn you to try and conquer that passionate
temper of yours, which will otherwise bring you
great trouble if you allow it to get the mastery over
you. I know as well as you, perhaps better, how
hard it is to curb, and you know we can’t do it in
116 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

our own strength, but there is One who is always
ready to help us if we will only ask Him to do so;
promise me that you will before you go to rest
to-night.’

Neville bent his head in a gesture of assent, not
trusting himself to speak, for there was a lump in
his throat which refused to be swallowed, and he
was exerting all his self-control to keep back the
tears which would fill his eyes, for his was one of
those natures easily touched by kindness, but
hardened by severity; and as Mr. Palmer watched
him, he congratulated himself on his wisdom in
having decided not to resort to corporal punishment.

He rose and put his arm round Neville’s neck,
saying as he did so, ‘God bless you, Leo!’ at which
those tiresome tears would overstep their boundary.

‘You may go, my boy. Send Strickland here,’ said
Mr. Palmer aloud; and when Leo was gone-he
added in an undertone, ‘I might have flogged for
ever before I had drawn one tear from him;
Strickland can’t be reached by any other means,
young scamp.’

The young scamp in question now came in, in
fear and trembling, for the flushed face Neville had
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 117

just shown for a moment when he summoned him,
had told Strickland he was, as he expressed it, ‘in
for it pretty smartly this time.’

‘Well, Strickland, how long is it since I last had
you in here for a like purpose ?’

‘ About two months, sir,’

‘I must try and make more impression upon you
to-day. Iam going to try a new method, I am
going—Now what do you think I purpose doing ?’

»

‘I don’t know, sir;’ wondering what new instru-
ment of torture was to be employed.

‘I am going to forgive you.

There was dead silence after this announcement,
Jack not daring to hope he was to be let off even
now.

‘Well, Jack, what have you to say now ?’

‘Do you mean you are going to let me off
entirely, sir?’

‘Yex. Dux has been pleading for you and
Martin, added to which I wish to try this new
system on you. Now, have you anything to say
to me?’

‘Thank you, sir, and [ll try and keep out of
scrapes for the future.’
118 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

‘Then you may go, and send Martin here,’

Martin, who was a delicate boy, was suffering
from a nervous headache, brought on by the various
excitements of the morning, and was lying with
his head on his arms over one of the desks, when
Strickland threw open the door and turned head
over heels into the middle of the room.

‘Go on, my boy! your turn next; don’t keep him
waiting, he exclaimed, as he walked round to
Martin on his hands, with his heels in the
air,

‘Really, Strick, I believe if you were going to be
hanged you’d turn a somersault on the gallows,
said Martin with a ghastly smile, as he obeyed his
summons,

His interview was a very brief one, for it was:
the first time he had ever been guilty of any
serious offence, so Mr. Palmer contented himself
with telling the boy this was, he hoped and thought,
the first and last time he should ever have to
reprimand him; and then, finding he had a bad
nervous headache, from which he suffered occasion-
ally, he sent him to Mrs. Palmer to be nursed.
Under her skilful treatment his headache got better,
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 119

and, after a téte-d-téte dinner with her, went away
entirely, so that he was well enough to get his
caterpillars and show her.

‘Do you know, Mrs. Palmer, I believe insects
have tempers. I am sure wasps and bees have,
and caterpillars have too, though I did not know it
till I kept them. Did you?’

‘No, indeed, I didn’t, Willy. What kind of
temper predominates ?’ , :

‘Oh, sulky! There are several of them which
turn sulky when you annoy them; they curl them-
selves up and remain perfectly motionless, some-
times feigning death, like the Marbled White, which
in the natural state drops to the ground when
annoyed, and remains as still as death till it thinks
the danger is past, or, I suppose, as caterpillars can’t
think, I ought to say, till instinct tells it so. The
Northern Brown has a similar trick, only he won't
drop to the ground unless you make him, but
holds on by his claspers tighter than ever; when
you make him let go, he drops and curls himself
into a crescent and lies motionless. The Marsh
Ringlet drops off its food-plant if annoyed, and lies
what I call sulking for a long while after; the
120 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

Duke of Burgundy does the same, so does the
Chalk-hill Blue,’

‘This is the Chalk-hill Blue caterpillar, isn’t it ?
asked Mrs. Palmer, pointing to a pinkish brown
caterpillar, with light brown hairs, and a black spot
Just above its brown head.

‘No, that is the Large Blue; I have several, see,
I am very proud of those, for I reared them from
eggs. I got Dux to bring me back some wild
thyme from Rodborough Common, near his home,
and, as I expected, with a glass I found some eggs,
I wasn’t sure that they were the Large Blue at
first, but I am now that they have made their final
moult. I am so glad we found the eggs, for it is
hardly worth taking as a butterfly, its plumage is so
delicate and so easily damaged. Iam rearing some
of these for Dux,’

I am glad you are doing that, Willy ; the more
you help each other the better I shall be pleased ;
I want the rivalry between you two candidates to
be as amicable as possible. What is this pretty
green caterpillar, shaped like a wood-louse, with a
black head, and covered with delicate hairs ?’

‘The Black Hairstreak; that is another of my
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 121

nurslings. I found the eggs glued to the twig of an
elm-tree near here, in the winter; it was the
merest fluke my finding them, though I knew they
had been found there. I caught a butterfly on that
identical tree last summer, probably the parent of
my eggs, which are white and round like a ball
flattened at the top.

‘What is that fat creature with a black face,
erey and reddish-brown body, black legs, red
claspers, and a white mark down the middle of the
back ?’

‘A Comma; I got that from one of my Skippers
who lives in York, where it is common; the eggs
are laid on the hop-plants and red-currant bushes,
and it is one of those which hybernate as a butter-
fly, so there is a dispute among lepidopterists as to
whether it is double-brooded or not. I believe it
is myself, for this is very early for one of the
autumn brood to have reached this stage; it is —
very capricious, but common in most hop-growing
countries.’

‘I see you have several Peacocks; how do you
manage to provide them with their strange food ?’

said Mrs. Palmer, pointing to some black velvety
122 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

caterpillars, cylindrical in shape, and covered with
tiny white warts and black spines, which were
feeding on stinging-nettles.

‘I generally cater for them myself,—Strick would
make a joke on that if he were here,—for I can’t
make my Skippers believe if you grasp a nettle
firmly it won’t sting. I can’t make out, though,
how the caterpillars escape being stung, for they
crawl all over the nettle’

‘Perhaps they possess some antidote, or perhaps
their own spines protect them,’

‘I never thought of that; they are certainly
fonder of nettles than most people, for if you shake
them off they climb up again immediately. I
found these this month (June); they will be chang-
ing early in July; they will spin a little silken
cushion to the lid of their box, and then hang
themselves up by the hindermost claspers,’

‘They change their colour, too, don’t they ?’

‘Yes; the chrysalis is apple-green. They
generally forsake their nettles for their transforma-
tion scene. The Red Admiral is also found on
nettles; but they remain there for the chrysalis

stage, gnawing a branch nearly through, so that it
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 123

hangs down, and then hanging themselves upon the
withering branch. I think there are some here
with the Peacocks. Yes; there they are,—greenish
bodies, pink underneath, black legs and heads, but
their colouring varies; they make very pretty
chrysalides,—a rich grey, mottled with black and
golden spots. But aren’t you tired of my cater-
pillars? I don’t want all these for the prize; but I
‘am keeping them to watch their changes and habits.’

‘Quite right, Willy, that is the way to learn ;
an ounce of experience is worth pounds of book
lore. Show me some more. Have you any
Painted Ladies ?’

‘Yes; let me see. Oh, here they are on the
thistle. They are very odd creatures: they make
themselves a sort of tent by knitting the leaves
together with a web; but they soon weary of that,
and, moving higher up the plant, construct a fresh
one. I believe you never find two caterpillars on
the same plant, so they appear to be restless,
unsociable insects.’

‘They are not very beautiful either,—brown, with
yellow stripes; and how thorny they are, too!. .
What is the chrysalis like _
124 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

‘Brown or grey, with silver spots. My Purple
Emperors have changed already into chrysalides ;
here they are, said Willy, showing some green
chrysalides, shaped something like a shell, and
suspended to a silken pad spun on the lid of th3
box in which they were confined. ‘I found them
on the sallow. soon after they were hatched last
summer. They were little dark brown things then,
but they soon changed their skin, and at the same
time their horns appeared. They were exactly the
colour of the sallow leaf after this change. Then
they fastened themselves tightly to the leaf-stalk,
so that when the leaf fell in autumn they did not
fall with it; and then they went to sleep for the
winter. Isn't it odd that they should act in
captivity just as they do in a state of nature ?
But I suppose instinct is stronger than their
reasoning powers. When they are annoyed they
double up their bodies in a very peculiar way,
looking very ugly and sulky; and I really think
that is all I have to show you, except my éase and
collection for the prize, and that I would rather not
show till the day comes.’

‘Certainly not; I would not look at it now,
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 125

great as my curiosity is; but I have not very
long to wait, only another month, and that will
pass very quickly, to you boys at any rate;
for I suppose you will soon be busy at the
examinations ?’

‘Not just yet; they don’t begin for another fort-
night. But it is nearly two o’clock. By the time
I have put my treasures away the school bell will
ring; it is our drawing lesson, and I don’t wish to
miss it,’ said Willy, as he gathered up his trays and
boxes, .


CHAPTER X.,

‘We are kindly things.
Witness these hearts embroidered on our wings.’—Hoon,

iHAT peace should follow war, a calm




succeed a storm, is one of the laws of
nature; and the time immediately suc-
ceeding the battle of Swallow-tails and Skippers was
no exception to this rule. All were most amicably
disposed towards each other; a truce to all rivalries
seemed to have been established; and the boys
worked together in their leisure hours in a far
more generous spirit than they had done before the
row. One slight contretemps occurred which vexed
Martin considerably, particularly as it was too late
to remedy the evil.

He was engaged in mounting some specimens
126
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 127

one day, while Leo looked on admiringly, when
suddenly one of the Skippers came in and threw a
large card on the table. Something on it caught
Leo’s eye; and, taking it up, he said, in a surprised
tone, ‘ Holloa, Martin! what is this ?’

‘What is what?’ said Martin, pausing with his
setting-bristle in his hand, as he reluctantly looked
up from his work, ‘That card? why, that is a list
of all the food-plants, localities, dates, and descrip-
tion of all the different caterpillars, which I drew
up for my Skippers last year,’

‘I wish I had known. I might have done some-
thing of the kind, or got Gordon to do so, for the
benefit of my Swallow-tails. It must have been a
great help,

‘Of course it was; by it they knew where and
when to look for eggs, caterpillars and chrysalides,
too, in most cases; but your Swallow-tails have been
using it, I believe.’

‘I am sure they have not. I don’t believe one
of them knows of its existence.’

‘We'll soon see. Let us call a meeting at once,
I gave “my Skippers strict orders to Ict all*the
Swallow-tails see it, I should like to know if they
128 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

did, for I have been under the impression all
the school were using it; and, to tell the truth, I
was rather proud of it. I knew you would not
take the trouble to draw up one. Call the fellows
in while I finish, will you?’

Dux protested that it did not in the least matter ;
but, seeing Willie seemed bent on knowing the truth,
though he was sure himself no Swallow-tail’s eye
had rested on the document, he at last called all
the rest of the boys in from the playground.

‘Now, Swallow-tails, have you ever seen this
card?’ said Dux, when the boys were quiet.

‘What is it?’

‘A table of when and where to find all the
British caterpillars,” explained Willie.

‘No; never!’ was the unanimous answer.

‘Now, Skippers, what is the meaning of this?
Did I tell you to let the Swallow-tails have the use
of this table, or not? Please to answer,’

‘Yes, you told us to.’

‘Then why have you disobeyed my orders ?’

‘Because we didn’t think it fair to you, said
Strickland; ‘and I am sure Dux will agree with

me it was not,’
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 129

‘Yes, I do; but I think you should have told
me; so that I might at least have tried to make a
table for the Swallow-tails,’ said Dux.

‘Certainly. Of course they should!’ cried the
Swallow-tails, glancing with admiration at the table
now given on pages 130 to 137.

It certainly was a most complete guide to cater-
pillar knowledge, as will be seen by a glance, and
must have taken Willy a long time to draw up;
for he had compiled it carefully from a large
edition of Newman’s British Butterflies, reducing it
to simple language for the comprehension of his
Skippers.

‘And of course I thought they had done so,
when I specially told them to do so. However, to
punish you, Skippers, for your meanness, I don’t
allow the table to be shown for the prize—not if
Dux makes one on the same or a better system, as
I sincerely hope he will, said Willy, his pale
cheeks growing pink with annoyance.

‘IT certainly shan’t take the trouble to do
anything of the kind so late as this, said Dux.

‘If you like to cut your own throat by not

showing it, you must do so. It was my fault,
I
130

SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

TABLE OF WHERE, HOW, AND: WHEN, TO FIND

Species of Caterpillar.

Food-plant on which Eggs,
Caterpillars, and probably
Chrysalides, may
be found.

Locality.



Silver-washed Fritillary
(Argynnis Paphia).

Dark Green Fritillary
(Argynnis Aglaia).

Niobe
(Argynnis Niobe).

High-brown Fritillary
(Argynnis Adippe).

Queen of Spain
(Argynnis Lathonia).

Pearl-bordered Fritillary
(Argynnis Euphrosyne).

Small Pearl - bordered
Fritillary
(Argynnis Selene).
Greasy Fritillary
(Melita Artemis).

Glanville Fritillary
(Melitea Cinzia).

Heath Fritillary
(Melitea Athalia).

Comma Butterfly
(Grapta C— album).

Small Tortoiseshell
(Vanessa Urtice).



Dog-violet; sweet violet.
Dog-violet.
Wild heart’s-case,

Dog-violet.

Wild heart’s-ease; dog-

violet ; sweet violet ; |.

saintfoin.
Dog-violet.

Dog-violet.
Devil’s bit scabious.
Narrow-leaved plantain.

Wood-sage ; germander
speedwell; narrow
and broad - leaved
plantain.

Hop; red-currant; elm.

Stinging-nettle.



Woods in every county,
Hill-sides ; sand-hills by
sea-side.

Very rare ; but has been
taken in New Forest.

Woods and hill-sides.

Clover-fields near the
sea; rare.

Woods; very common,
but seldom found on
food-plant.

Less common than Euph-
rosyne ; woods.

Damp meadows.
Very rare ; cliffs.

Open woods; very local.

Local; apparently prefers
inland counties,

Nettle-beds everywhere.


SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.







131
CATERPILLARS OF BRITISH BUTTERFLIES.
Time a 8 Colour of Caterpillar. Shape'of Caterpillar,
|
August to following | Black; spiny; yellow | Cylindrical.
June. Hybernates as lines on back.
caterpillar.
From August to June. | Dark purplish - grey ;.| Cylindrical.
Hybernates at roots orange blotch below
of plants. spiracles.
Unknown. Brownish - black, with | Cylindrical.
long-branched white
spines,
August to June. Pinkish - brown, with | Cylindrical.
black spots and white .
stripe down back.
Thorny.
Hybernates very small; | Brown, striped with | Cylindrical.
spring best time to white ; yellowish
search. spines.
June to following May. | Black, with white dots | Cylindrical.
° and stripes.
July to following May. | Dark brown ; spiny. Cylindrical.
June to following April. | Velvety - black, with | Cylindrical.
Hybernatesundertent.| white spots; black
bristles. :
August to May. Hyber- | Head red; body black, | Cylindrical.
nates under tent. with bands of white
dots; warts, spiny.
August to May or June. | Black, with white dots; | Cylindrical.
orange and white :
spines.
July and August. Grey and reddish- | Stout, obese, head
brown, with broad horned.
white stripe down
back.
Double-brooded. May, | Black and grey, with | Cylindrical.

June, July, August.



yellow dots andstripes.






132 . SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,



Food-plant on which Eggs,
Caterpillars, and probably



Species of Caterpillar, Chrysalides, may Locality.
be found,
Large Tortoiseshell Trees, e.g. elm, aspen, | Midland and eastern

(Vanessa Polychloros).

Camberwell Beauty
(Vanessa Antiopa).

Peacock
(Vanessa Io).

Red Admiral
(Pyrameis Atalanta).

Painted Lady
(Pyrameis Cardui).

White Admiral
(Limenitis Sibylla).

Purple Emperor
(Apatura Iris).

Marbled White

(Melanagria Galathea)|.

Small Ringlet
(Erebia Epiphron.)

Northern Brown
(Erebia Medea).

Speckled Wood
(Pyrarga Egeria).
The Wall
(Purarga Megeera).

The Grayling
(Satyrus Semele).

Meadow Brown
(Epinephele Janira).
The Large Heath
(Epinephele Tithonus).
The Ringlet
(Epinephele Hyperanthus)



sallow, cherry, pear.

Nettle ; white willow ;
birch.

Stinging-nettle,

Stinging-nettle.

Field thistle.

Honeysuckle.
Great goat-willow.

Any grass or low-grow-
ing herbage.

Small rushes; meadow
grass; sheep’s fescue
grass ; mat grass.

Grasses ;_ chiefly brown
bent grass.

Various grasses,

Cock’s-foot grass.

Grasses 5 couch grass,

Grasses,
Grasses.

Grasses ; couch grass in
particular.





counties,

Very uncertain ; neigh-
bourhood of London
frequently.

Very common every-
where.

Universal in England.

Irregular, but cosmo-
politan.

Rare.

Oak woods in midland,
eastern, and southern
counties.

Rough ground; and
seldom in northern
counties. :

Very local.
Rare.
Common ; every county.

Common
England.

throughout

Waste ground; poor
pastures ; common.
Any meadow; most
common.
Hedge-banks.

Common, but local.




SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 133



Time of Caterpillar’s
Life.

Colour of Caterpillar.

Shape of Caterpillar.





June.

Early spring and again
in early autumn.

June, July.

June, J uly, August.

June.

August to end of May;
hybernates.
April, May, June.

Winter and spring.

Autumn and spring.

September, October to
next June.

In winter hybernating
till end of March.
First brood hybernating
winter; second brood
in June.

Autumn, winter, and
spring.

Autumn, winter, and
spring.

June.

May and June; but

feeds at night.



Head black; body pale
brown, with black

stripes.
Black, with dull red
stripe.

Black,
warts,

Head black ; body grey-
ish - green, yellow
stripes; varies very
much.

Black, sometimes spotted
with white ; legs and
claspers red.

Green; narrow white
stripes ; reddish spines.

Bright green; seven
oblique yellowish -
white stripes on sides.

Head, legs, and claspers
dull red; body dull
green, with yellowish
stripes.

Pale green, with darker
lines and white lines.

with white

Yellowish-brown; warts,
with narrow black
stripe.

Dull brownish - green,
with white stripes.

Apple-green.

‘Yellowish - drab, with
black and greenish
stripes.

Apple - green; white
hairs.

Grey-green body; pale
brown head.

Pale yellowish-brown.



Cylindrical ; yellow
spines, covered with
warts.

Cylindrical; | long
branched spines.

Cylindrical; hairy; warts,
spines.

Cylindrical ; spiny.

Cylindrical; branched
whitish spines.

Cylindrical ; bristly
spines.

Stout body; horned
head ; tapering tail ;
smooth.

Cylindrical, but taper-
ing ; velvety surface.

Cylindrical, tapering.

Thick in centre, taper-
ing at both ends.

Thick in centre, taper-
ing at both ends.

Same as above; tiny
warts, each with a
bristle.

Same as above, with
very tapering tail.

Same as above ; warts.
Same as above; short

bristles.
Same as above ; bristly.




134

SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.



Food-plant on which Eggs,
Caterpillars, and probably



Species of Caterpillar. Chrysalides, may Locality.
be found.

Marsh Ringlet Beak-rush. Rare; moors in northern
(Cenonympha Davus). counties more often.
Small Heath Grasses; knot grass;| Heaths and rough
(Cenonympha Pam- mat grass. meadows ; common,

philus).
Duke of Burgundy -Cowslip ; primrose. ‘Woods, wide range.
(Nemeobius Lucina).
Green Hairstreak Yellow cistus or rock- | Very generally dis-
(Lhecla Rubi). rose 5 crowberry ; tributed.
bramble.
Purple Hairstreak Oak, Woods ; common,
(Lhecla Quercus).
Dark Hairstreak Blackthorn. Northamptonshire,
(Lhecla Pruni). Derbyshire, Monmouth-
shire, Huntingdon,
Suffolk,
Black Hairstreak Elm; wych elm, Abundant, but not
(Thecla W— album). common,

Brown Hairstreak
(Lhecla Betule).

Common Copper
(Polyommatus Phiceas).
Silver-studded Blue
(Lyceena Aigon).
Brown Argus
(Polyommatus Ayestis),
Scotch Brown Argus
(Lycceena Artamerzxes),
Common Blue
(Lycceena Icarus).
Clifden Blue
(Lyceena Adonis).
Chalk-hill Blue
(Lyccena Corydon).

Mazarine Blue

(Lycena Acis),
Small Blue

(Lyceena Alsus).
Azure Blue

(Lycena Argiolus).





Blackthorn.

Dock ; several species.
Bird’s-foot trefoil.
Hemleck storksbill.
Common cistus,
Rest-harrow.
Leguminous
vetches, etc.

Trefoil ; kidney vetch,
ete,

plants,

Unknown.
Vetches.
Holly ; ivy.





Lanes; hedges.

Common.
Capricious; woods; chalk-
downs of Kent,

Common.

Scotland.

Fields; waste ground;
common everywhere,

Chalk districts,

Chalk districts,

Old pastures,
Not uncommon.

South of England.




SWALLOW-TAILS. AND SKIPPERS.

135





Time of Caterpillar’s
Life.

Colour of Caterpillar.

Shape of Caterpillar.



June, July, August.

July ; often later also.

June, July, August.

June and July; hyber-
nates as chrysalis.

June.

May, June.

June.
May, June.

From May to September;
treble-brooded.
June and early July.

April,
August.
June.

May, July,
May, June, July.

April, May.

May, June.

May, June.
May.
First brood when holly

flowers, second when
ivy flowcrs.



Apple-green.

Pale apple-green, with
wide darker stripes.
Drabbish - white, with

darker stripes.
Black head; green body.

Dull olive-green, with
pinkish marks.
Pale green.

Head black; body pea-
green; hairy; yellow
bars.

Head brown; body
apple- green, narrow
white stripes.

Green; white warts;
brown bristles.

Yellow - green ; white
lines.

Pale green; purplish
stripe down back.

Black head ; body green ;
pink stripes.

Head black; body green.

Green.

Dull green; yellow
spots; head dark
brown.

Unknown.

Head black; body green.

Greenish-yellow ; head
and legs black.



Cylindrical ; smooth.

Tapering cylinder ;
pointed tail.
Wood-louse shape.

Wood-louse shape.

Shell-like.
Wood-louse. shape.

Wood-louse shape.
Same as above.

Same as above.
Shell-like.
Wood-louse shape.
Same as above.
Shell-like.
Uncertain.

Wood-louse shaped.

Unknown.
Wood-louse shaped.

Same as above.




136

SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,



Species of Caterpillar.

Food-plant on which Eggs,
Caterpillars, and probably
Chrysalides, may
be found.

Locatity.



Large Blue
(Lyceena Arion).

Pale Clouded Yellow
(Colias Hyale).
Clouded Yellow
(Colias Edusa).
Brimstone
(Rhodocera Rhamni).
Swallow-tail
(Papilio Machaon).

Wood White
(Leucophasia Sinapis).

Orange-tip
(Anthocharis Cardamines)
Green Chequered White
' (Pieris Daplidice).

Green-veined White
(Pieris Napi).
Small White
(Pieris Rape).
Large White
(Pieris Brassicw).
Black-veined White
(Aporia Cratcgi).
Grizzled Skipper
(Hesperia Malve).
Dingy Skipper
(Hesperia Tages).
Chequered Skipper
(Hesperia Paniscus).

Large Skipper
(Hesperia Sylvanus).
Silver-spotted Skipper
(Hesperia Comma).

Lulworth Skipper
(Hesperia Actcon).

Small Skipper
(Hesperia Linea).





Wild thyme probably.

Clover ; trefoil.

Clovers.

Buckthorn.

Milk-parsley.

Tufted-vetch; bird’s: foot
trefoil ; bitter vetch.

Hedge garlic; cresses ;

lady’s smock.
Wild mignonette.

Hedge garlic; water-
cress ; wintercress.
Cabbage, mignonette,
and other cruciferze.

Cabbage, cresses, etc.
White-thorn.
Common bramble.
Bird’s-foot trefoil.

Broad-leaved plantain.

Grasses.
Bird’s-foot trefoil.

Wood small-reed.

Grasses,



SouthDevon, Gloucester-
shire, Northampton-

shire, etc.

Chalky districts near
the sea.

Clover and lucerne
fields.

Woods and fences.

Norfolk, Cambridgeshire,
Huntingdonshire.

Woods, lanes, hedges.

Meadows, Janes; very
common.

Rough ground near coast
in Kent and Sussex
chiefly.

Plentiful in most parts
of England.

Gardens in all paits.

Gardens ; the most com-
mon British species.
Rarer than the other

whites.
Hedge-rows everywhere.
Chalk-banks.

Midland counties.

Common.
Chalk districts.

Devonshire, Dorsetshire.

Swamps, reedy places.






SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

137



Time of Caterpillar’s
Life.

Colour of Caterpillar.

Shape of Caterpillar. -







May, June.

Unknown.
July to October.
May, June.

Summer.
August, September.

June, July.
April, May, August.

May, June,
September.
April, May,

August.
April, May,

August.
April, May.

April.

August,
July,
July,

April.

“May.

April, July.
June, July.
June, July.

July to following June.



Pinkish ; black marks
behind head, which is
brown.

Olive-green, with black
dots.

Grass - green; narrow
white side-stripes.

Green, with tiny black
warts ; white bristles.

Beautiful green; black
rings. spotted red ;
very handsome.

Beautiful green, with
darker stripe down
back. .

Dull green ; white side-
stripe.

Dull blue, with four
yellow stripes.

Dull green; yellow ring
round spiracles.
Dark dull green; yellow
spots; black warts.
Green, with three yellow
stripes.

Grey sides ; black back ;
two red stripes.

Black head; brown or
green body.

Pale green; yellow
stripes ; black spots.

Brown; two yellow
stripes down back;
black head.

Large brown head ; green
body ; white spots.
Large black head ; olive-

green body.

Pale green, with yellow
lines; two white
spots.

Green, with six white
stripes.



Uncertain.

Cylindrical.

Same as above, with
tiny black warts.

Tapering at both ends.

Cylindrical.
Cylindrical ; small.

Cylindrical ; bristles.

Cylindrical ; warts.

Cylindrical.

Cylindrical.

Cylindrical ; with black
pointed warts.

Cylindrical, covered
with white hairs.

Shuttle-shaped.

Cylindrical.

Cylindrical.

Cylindrical.
Qylindrical.
Cylindrical.

Shuttle-shaped.




138 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS,

Willy, so you can pitch into me to your heart’s
content; but I suppose the Skippers can go. My
back is broad enough to bear the blame,’ said
Strickland; but he found Willy was seriously
annoyed ; and, if it had not been for Leo’s inter-
vention, there would probably have been a quarrel
between Jack and his chief,

Leo, however, had had enough of quarrelling ;
and by dint of assuring Martin he quite exonerated
him from all suspicion of stealing a march on him
peace was again established.




CHAPTER XI.

‘In all the liveries decked of summer's pride,
With spots of gold and purple, azure and green.’
MILrTon.

JILLY, will you lend me your caterpillar
table ?’ said Dux, a day or two after he



first saw it; and on Willy’s handing
him the list he took it there and then to Mrs.
Palmer to show it to her.

‘Tsn’t it a capital idea? I wanted you to see ib
because Willy won’t show it up with our collections,
now he finds the Skippers kept it a secret. You
see by a glance they can tell where and when to
look for any caterpillar, and what the creature is
like when they have found it.’

‘Yes, indeed, it seems to me an excellent table;
139
140 - SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

it could be used in ege-hunting too, for, of
course, the eggs are to be found on the same
plants as the caterpillars, only earlier in the
year.’

‘Yes, it would do for eggs, only the best way
to find them is to watch the butterfly laying them,
for they are such tiny things you can’t always find
them without a glass. I haven’t patience to do
much in the egg-hunting line, but Willy has
reared a great many of his from eggs. By the
way, Mrs. Palmer, can you tell me how to remove
grease from my butterflies? I find some of them
are so greasy,’

‘I know how to prevent them from getting
greasy, and as “prevention is better than cure,”
perhaps that may help you, particularly as I
dare-say it is not too late in this case to use the
preventive method now. If the insects are not
thoroughly dry, just cut the body open near the
tail, and remove all the inside, then fill it up
with cotton- wool; it is a job which requires
a good deal of nicety, but I believe you
will not be troubled with grease if you do
it.”
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. IAI

‘But I am afraid most of my greasy insects are
last year’s. Can't you soak them in some spirit
which will absorb the grease ?’

‘If it is only the bodies, you can, because you
can break them off, and soak them in benzole or
rectified spirits of naphtha, which will, I believe,
remove the grease. How has Martin managed
his ?’ .

‘T think he stuffed all his in the first instance ;
trust him for taking every possible precaution. I
wish you could see his cabinet, Mrs. Palmer, I
would much rather have made his than have
bought mine.’

‘Dux, you don’t know how glad I am to find :
you speaking so nicely of Willy; I am so pleased
that you have risen above all petty jealousy,
though I felt certain you would. I can tell
you, I am longing to see the collections as
much as you are to show them; however, we
have only a week longer to wait,’ said Mrs.
Palmer, as Leo was summoned to the school-
room. -

As he said, Martin’s case really was worth
seeing, if a series of drawers can be called a case,
142 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

for at present that was what his cabinet consisted
of, These drawers he had made as he wanted
them, out of mahogany-wood previously well
seasoned; it had cost more in the first instance,
but Willy judged rightly that the additional expense
was worth incurring, for mahogany is by far the
best wood for the purpose, while cedar is the worst,
as it contains resinous matter, which after a little
while exudes and spoils the butterflies; after
mahogany, common deal is as good as any wood
for cabinets, provided it be thoroughly well
seasoned.

Willy had got his pattern drawer from Leo’s
cabinet, and had made his from it; the glass lids
he had had made by a joiner, as they were required
to fit very tightly, and to have separate frames, to
exclude mites and dust; the drawers were lined
at the bottom with cork, over which plain white
paper was pasted. Altogether, Willy had made
twelve of these drawers, but the cabinet in which
to fit them was beyond his powers, and he meant
to wait until he could afford to have one made
by a good cabinet-maker, as it would then last
his life.
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 143

The butterflies were then arranged in perpen-

dicular columns, in families, in the following

order :—

1.

. Gregarious Fritillaries (Meliteide).

H oo bo

1
1

Silver-spotted Fritillaries (Argynnide).

. Angle-wings (Vanesside).

White Admirals (Weptide).

5. Emperors (Apaturide).
6. Satyrs (Satyride).

7. Dryads (Erycinide).

8.
9
0
1

Areus Butterflies (Lycwnide).

. Red-horns (Rhodoceride).

. Swallow-tails (Papilionide),
. Whites (Pieridae)

12.

Skippers (Hesperide).

The names of each family were neatly gummed

in the corner of each drawer, and beneath each

butterfly its English name and its Latin specific and

generic names were written on labels gummed to the

bottom of the drawer. Where he had been fortunate

enough tosecure several specimens of the same species,

Willy had given one of each set, and also showed the

under surface of both, for in most butterflies the
T44 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

under surface varies very much from the
upper.

In a separate drawer he had a collection of eggs
and chrysalides, though these were not half so
complete as the butterflies; for, in the first place,
they were not included in the conditions of com-
petition, and, moreover, if he had butterflies enough
to fill his twelve drawers before the prize “was
awarded, there would be no room for the eggs and

. chrysalides, which would then be relegated to a
deal box.

The eggs, which were mounted on coloured note-
paper, to show their delicate pale green, or white
or pale yellow colour,had been killed by dipping
them in boiling water. The chrysalides had been
preserved in the same manner, though, as many of
them had lost their glazed appearance after death,
Willy had varnished them and then gummed them
on to paper, with their names written beneath them.

Leo’s collection was arranged on very much the
game plan as Martin’s, only in his case the places
for the names of species, genus, and family, were
all ruled by the cabinetmaker; and, while Willy

had arranged his according to Newman’s method of
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 145

classification, Dux had followed another system,
perhaps a better one. Martin had chosen Newman’s
because he had the book, and knew it to be a very
good one, if not the best, and it certainly possessed
one advantage—it was very simple.

Both Dux and Martin were very busy putting
the finishing touches to their collection, the last few
days which intervened before the prize was to be
decided, and up to the very night before the prize
was given additions were made, one or two
chrysalides which had been anxiously watched
coming off just in the nick of time. Moreover, a
few new specimens were brought in every day by
Swallow-tails and Skippers, whose exertions, now
that the eventful day was so close, were redoubled.

‘How many different species have you, Dux ?’
asked Martin the night before the collections were
to be handed in,

‘Forty-one; how many have you ?’

‘Forty; pretty close, isn’t it?’

‘Why, I thought you'd ever so many more than
I have, Willy; you must have made a mistake!’
cried Dux, ,

‘No, he hasn’t;. we have only thirty different

K
146. SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

species; and as I suppose that will decide the
matter, we may as well hide our diminished heads ;
not that I ever expected to win,’ said Strickland.

‘Forty and forty-one out of sixty-six known
British species; I don’t think it is so bad, said
Willy. ‘How many specimens have you altogether,
Dux ?’

‘A hundred and one or two; and you?’

‘Oh, we beat you there; we have close upon a
hundred and fifty, haven’t we, Strick ?’

‘A hundred and forty-nine. What do you
consider your rarest specimen, Dux ?’

‘Well, I don’t know, Purple Emperor and the
Queen of Spain are pretty rare, aren’t they ?’

‘We have both those. Pea-pod Argus is one of
our best. I wonder what you have that we have
not ?’

‘Well, I have the White Admiral; have you?’
said Dux.

‘No, I lost my caterpillar one ; haven’t you one
to spare, Dux?’ said Strickland.

‘Rather not ; I like your calmness, Strick ! it is so
likely I should cut. my own throat so neatly as to
hand my White Admiral over to you, when in all
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 147

probability, if I have a chance at all, the White
Admiral is it. No, thank you.’

‘Of course he won’t do that, Strick. Now look
here, Dux, Mr. Palmer says we may lock our
collections up in this room after we have finished
them, and keep: the key till to-morrow, when Mrs.
Palmer and two friends of hers who are to be the
judges are to be admitted. Will you take care of
the key, or shall I?’

‘I don’t care, you can if you like, said Dux
carelessly.

‘No, let Dux keep it, Willy ; he is head boy, and
then, if anything does happen—spontaneous com-
bustion or any little games of the kind on the part
of the butterflies—why, he is responsible, and we are
out of it.’

‘All right, he shall keep it, then, only don’t you
forget to lock the door, Leo; we don’t want all the
Swallow-tails and Skippers in here admiring and
perhaps disarranging things just as we have
finished,’ |

‘Trust me not to forget, I know what the young
fry are too well. Have you fellows finished ?’

‘Yes, I don’t see what more we can do. I wish
148 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

we could have afforded a cabinet for the drawers
but it can’t be helped; after all, there is one
advantage, they are easier to examine spread out on
the table than yours are in the case, said Martin,
looking with pardonable pride on his row of drawers
with the beautiful insects all neatly spread out
under the glass lids.

‘Yes, they are; however, I'll give you the benefit
of that advantage, I shan’t range my drawers out on
the other end of the table. I have nearly finished
now; I shall be with you fellows directly,’ added
Dux, as the other boys left the room.

After they were gone he fidgeted about at his
cabinet, first opening one drawer and peeping at it,
then shutting it up and pulling out another,
apparently in a most undecided frame of mind.
Then he got up and went to the table and looked at
Martin’s collection, finally stopping before the drawer
headed ‘Emperors ;’ here was a blank space left in
the left-hand side for ‘White Admirals,’ as the label
in the corner indicated. The empty space seemed
to contain some charm for Leo, he stood so long
gazing at it. At last he rose abruptly from the table
on which he had been leaning, and went to his own
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 149

cabinet, where he pulled open the drawer containing
his White Admirals, for he had two specimens,
though he had not told the Skippers so.

Both were exactly alike, but one was mounted
to display the upper side, the other to show the
under surface, which varies very much in this
species, and is very beautiful. Here again Leo
made a long pause; at last he came to a decision
suddenly, and, muttering half aloud, ‘I'll do it, he
very carefully removed the reversed White Admiral
from his own cabinet and transferred it successfully
to Martin’s, mounting it there with the upper
surface uppermost, like his own remaining specimen.
It was a delicate operation, and required very nice
manipulation to effect the move without damaging
any of the butterflies, and Leo’s fingers trembled
with excitement and nervousness. When he had
finished he found all that remained to be done was
to write the Latin and English names underneath ;
this he hesitated to do, first for fear of touching any
of the other specimens, and secondly, because his
own handwriting was so unlike Martin’s that it
would be at once recognised, and would probably
lead to a discussion which would reveal what he
150 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

had done; so he decided to leave the specimen
unlabelled, in the hope it would be considered an
oversight, if the judges observed it. And then,
with a purer joy than winning the prize which he
felt he had just renounced would have brought
him, Leo carefully locked the door and left the.

room,




CHAPTER XII.

‘We be the handmaids of the spring,

In sign whereof, May, the quaint broideress,

Hath wrought her samplers on our gauzy wing.’
. Hoop,

EO’S first action the next morning was to

hand the key of the room in which the



collections were to Mr. Palmer, fearing
lest Martin might otherwise go in to take a
farewell look at his treasures, and, finding the
White Admiral in his case, refuse to accept
it.

‘The judges are coming at twelve, and the
decision will be announced at one o'clock before
dinner, so let the school be assembled in the big

schcolroom a little before one. You can go out at
151
152 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

- twelve as usual,’ said Mr. Palmer to Dux when he
took the key.

The result of the examinations and the other
prizes were not to be made known ‘till the following
day, Mr. Palmer declaring that the interest in the
butterfly prize was so absorbing, the boys would
not care about the other prizes till this was settled,
And although school was held as usual, it was an
understood thing that very little real work was
done on what was practically the last day, for on
the following, as soon as the prize-giving was over,
the boys went to their several homes for the -
summer holidays. On this occasion both Swallow-
tails and Skippers were much too full of butterflies
‘to have any attention to bestow on such matters
as Latin grammar and arithmetic, and perhaps the
masters were as glad as the boys when twelve
o'clock struck and the latter were dismissed.
Needless to say, they were all back in their places
again long before one o’clock, when the result was
to be made known. Shortly before the appointed
time, Mr, and Mrs, Palmer, with the two gentlemen
who had acted as judges, entered the schoolroom
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS, 153

amid the vociferous cheers of the boys. As soon
as order was restored, Mr. Palmer rose to address
the school.

‘Well, boys,’ he began, ‘I am glad to tell you that
we are all delighted with the result of your labours
in the branch of science we have had before us to-day.
I can only say, if your other studies were prosecuted
with the same zeal, I should indeed be a proud
man ; however, perhaps that is too much to expect.
At any rate, my friends here agree with me that
the collections of butterflies we have been examin-
ing, and which have been made within two years,
do you all very great credit, and I may remark in
parenthesis that your plan of dividing into two
parties was a first-rate one; by this means you
have produced two really valuable collections
instead of twenty inferior ones. Union is strength,
you know, and you have proved the truth of the .
proverb. I may also say that, with one single
exception, to which I will not allude more fully, as
it is one you and I equally regret,—with that one
exception, I think I may safely say the struggle
for the prize has been carried on with such
154 °° SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

good-feeling and good-temper, such. an absence,
particularly among the principals, of ‘all petty .
jealousy, as to make me feel very proud of my
boys, and very thankful that they have so well
attended to’ the moral and religious instruction I
have done my best to impart. And now, to come
to the point at which I know you are all
anxious I should arrive, namely, the decision as to
the prize, I may tell you we have had some
difficulty in deciding, for, though the Skippers
have. more specimens on the whole than the
Swallow - tails, yet the number of species each
party has collected is exactly the same, forty-
one ’—

Here there was such a hubbub among the boys
that Mr. Palmer could not proceed, and finally
Willy stepped forward, in spite of Leo’s efforts to
detain him.

‘Well, Martin, what is it ?’

‘Please, sir, the Skippers have only forty, one
~ less than the Swallow-tails.’

‘No, no, no, it is all right; you counted yours
wrong. You forgot to label one,a White Admiral, I
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. - “155!

think it.was, said Mr. Palmer. impatiently, for he
was no fonder of being interrupted 3 in the. midst of
a speech than other orators. mg

But this was too much for the other Skippers ;
they exclaimed with one voice,—

‘We hadn’t a White Admiral, sir’

‘ Well, never mind what it was. Silence, please,
and don’t interrupt again ; it might have been a Red
Admiral. At any rate,‘the number of different
species ‘collected by both parties is forty-one, and,
this being the case, we have decided that, though
there is really very little to choose, for the Swallow-
tails have one or two very rare specimens among
their collection, the prize must be given to the
Skippers, that is, to Willy Martin, whose ingenuity
in making his own cabinet deserves very great
credit. Willy, come here, and Mrs. Palmer will
give you the five sovereigns, to be spent in buying
books on Natural History,’

Willy came forward, looking very nervous and
unhappy, and, instead of putting out his hand to
receive the money, stammered out,—

‘Please, sir, I know there is some mistake. I had
156 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

only forty different species; we counted them over
and over again, and we certainly hadn’t a Whito
Admiral.’

‘Oh yes! both collections possess a White
Admiral,’ exclaimed the judges simultaneously.

‘May Willy fetch his drawer with the White
Admiral in, then perhaps he will believe us?’ said
Mrs. Palmer to her husband; and on his assent
Willy quickly left the room, returning with
the drawer and a mystified expression on his
face,

‘Well, Martin, who is right?’ asked Mr.
Palmer.
‘IT don’t know, sir, there is a White Admiral
sure enough, but it is not ours, and I am certain
it was not there last night when I left my
collection,’ ,

‘This is very odd! why, no one had access to the
room but you and Neville. Neville, do you know
how this White Admiral came here? It was
hardly obliging enough to fly in at the window and
impale itself, I apprehend. Can you explain the

mystery ?’
SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS. 157

‘I put it there, sir; I had two, said Neville
reluctantly.

This announcement caused quite a commotion ;
the boys whispered and chattered like so many
magpies, while their elders held a brief consultation
in subdued tones, when suddenly the rather
awkward pause was broken by the incorrigible
Strickland shouting, ‘Three cheers for old Dux!’
which were given most lustily, Mr. Palmer and the -
judges joining in.

‘Leo, you have placed us in rather a dilemma by
your generous action, but Mrs. Palmer has suggested
a way out of it: she proposes to give two prizes,
the original one of five pounds to Willy Martin,
and a gold butterfly mounted as a pin to Neville.
Martin, come forward again and take your prize;
Neville shall have -his pin before he leaves. And
now, I have no more to say to you except this, that
such actions as the one you rightly cheered so
heartily just now are far more eloquent. than
volumes of sermons, and my earnest wish and
prayer for you all is, that you may all strive to go
and do likewise,’
158 SWALLOW-TAILS AND SKIPPERS.

With this Mr. Palmer concluded his speech, and
with his speech ends this little book, which, if it
supplies some information on the habits and
history of butterflies, with a few of the lessons to
be derived from their study, will have. fulfilled its
object.

THE END.
MORRISON AND GIBB, EDINBURGH,
PRINTERS TO HER MAJESTY’S STATIONERY OFFICE,
Ah 6707