Citation
In the spring-time

Material Information

Title:
In the spring-time a collection of stories and pictures for young readers
Creator:
Syndicate Trading Company ( Publisher )
Forbes Lithograph Manufacturing Company ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Syndicate Trading Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill., music ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Contains prose and verse.
General Note:
Cover lithographed by Forbes Lith. Co.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026634649 ( ALEPH )
ALG4206 ( NOTIS )
189641547 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




The Baldwin Library
University

RMB eke





ay

eater

Reet
a

Spans
Hees

4
ae
35

e

fas ey S

Seite senate
atts
qe





it

naa
BNR
i a

I
i i |







THE BOOK AUNT MARY SENT.



INTHE SPRING-TIME,
S = pagans

FOR

YOUNG READERS



SYNDICATE TRADING COMPANY -

- NEW YORK





Copyright 1891 by

’ SYNDICATE TrRApING CoMPANY







SING-SONG TO BABY NED.

_ Bssy Nw! Baby Ned!
With the busy little head,
Amd the twinlklimg little eyes that shine, shine, shine :
Hold your morsel of am ear,
Im your fiashion that's so queer,
Amd! be canefiull that: you hear
These wery serious words of mime, mime, mine,
wil



SING-SONG TO BABY NED.

Baby dear! Baby dear!
Did you ever chance to hear
How Willie Winkie goes round the town, town, town,
And, where’er he makes a call,
All the little eyelids fall, —
And the babies one and all
In their cosy little nests cuddle down, down, down?

Then the sand-man comes along,
Crooning out a drowsy song,
And seals each blinking eye that tries to peep, peep, peep ;
Then through the long, long night,
Even till the morning light,
Every blessed little wight
Does nothing in the world but sleep, sleep, sleep. |

Baby Ned! Baby Ned!
With the busy little head,
Here comes Willie Winkie now, little man, man, man;
Ask him quick to stay with you;
Ask the good old sand-man too ;
Never let. them bid adieu, -
And learn to sleep o’nights, if you can, can, can. yn.





- from her friends in the woods.

HAZEL HOLLOW.

NCE there was a little girl named Mabel; and,
one Saturday afternoon in autumn, she asked
her mother if she might go with some of the

school-girls to pick hazel-nuts.
~ Mabel was such a good little girl, that her
mother did not like to refuse her any thing ; and so told her
she might go if she would take care not to get separated



“Do not fear for me, mother mine,” said Mabel ; and off
_ the little girl tripped, and joined her friends, Susan Lane,
Lucy Manning, and I know not how many more. school-girls,
—all ready for a frolic. ;
They walked two miles be.ore they came to the place ©
where the hazel-nuts grew in plenty; and then they all went
into a low dell, or hollow, where the nuts grew thick, though
the sunshine could hardly send one of its rays into the close
bushes. .
Mabel was so delighted at. the sight, that she began. to
pick the nuts, and fill her apron with them ; for, in her hur-
ry, she had forgotten to take a basket, smote
She was so intent on picking the nuts, that she did not
hotice that the buzz of the voices of her friends was no
longer heard. But all .at once she looked round, and saw
that she was all alone. No trace of one of her friends could
she see. She called “Susan! Lucy!” but no one answered.
“You are trying to frighten me!” cried Mabel. « Susan !
Mary! answer me! You have kept the joke up long
enough.” But no sound could Mabel hear except the song
of a distant thrush, and the tapping of a woodpecker on
the trunk of a tree near by.



HAZEL HOLLOW. ; a

She now began to get distressed; for Hazel Hollow was a
dark and lonely place, and far from any house. Then, hold-.
ing her nuts still in her apron, she climbed up out of the
hollow, and found herself in a wood. She aid not- know
which path to take.

She walked a few steps, when she heard a loud rattling
noise. “Ah! that must be a rattlesnake,” thought: poor
Mabel; and off she ran in another direction, and sat down
on a rock.

But she had not sat there long, when she heard a growl
that seemed to come from behind a bush. “ What can that’
be?” thought Mabel. “I'll not be afraid if I can help it”
Then came a loud hissing noise, and then another growl.

“Tm not afraid of any wild beast that dwells in these
woods,” thought Mabel; “for my mother told me that there —
were none here but rabbits and squirrels, ane I’m sure they
would run from me if they were to see me.”

So Mabel picked up a stick, and was running round by
the bush, when she stumbled over something that was alive,

_and that seized hold of her, and began to growl. It acted
as if it wanted to scratch and bite her; but it did no
harm

“Oh, you needn’t try to scare me!” cried Mabel. “If you
can’t growl better than that, you had better not try to play
the wild beast again. I know you, Lucy Manning! And
there are the rest of you hiding there behind the trunks of
trees. Oh, you ought to be ashamed of yourselves!”

Yes: there were all the girls; and I think they ought to
have known better than to try to frighten a little girl like
Mabel. They all came up and began to laugh, when they
found that she was not to be fooled. It is not a good plan to j
play such jokes on children; for, if Mabel had been a timid
child, she might have been seriously harmed. ;

Anna LrIvINnesTon.
f









HAZEL HOLLOW.



FROGS AT SCHOOL.

Twenty froggies went to school,
Down beside a rushy pool.
Twenty little coats of green;
Twenty vests, all white and clean.
“We must be in time,” said they:
“ First we study, then we play;
That is how we keep the rule,
When we froggies go to school.”

_ Master Bullfrog, grave and stern,

~ Called the classes in their turn;

- Taught them how to nobly strive,
Likewise how to leap and dive ;

From his seat upon a log,

Showed them how to say “ Ker- nee! «
Also how to dodge a blow

From the sticks which bad boys throw.

Twenty froggies grew up fast;
Bullfrogs they became at last ;
Not one dunce among the lot,
Not one lesson they forgot ;
Polished in a high degree,

As each froggie ought to be:
Now they sit on other logs,
Teaching other little frogs,

Gzorce Cooper.







COOSIE AND GARRIR.

Cousin CHaruzs said, “Come and see the sheep.” So I
went to where he was standing on the front porch, and call-
ing ¢ Co-nan, co-nan, co-nan!” The gate was open; and the
sheep and lambs were coming into the yard.

I asked, “ Why do you tell John to drive the: sheep into
_the yard?” Charles answered, “ Because it has been rain-
ing hard; and the brook in the meadow has grown so big,
that Iam afraid the sheep will get drowned in it.

_ “Last year we found a sheep lying dead in the brook.
Her two lambs were standing near by, crying for her.
We took them to the house, and fed them with milk. We
named them Coosie and Carrie. Mother can tell you about
them.” :

Then I ran to auntie, and said, “Oh! tell me all about
Coosie and Carrie.” So my aunt told me.about them; and
this is what she said : — .

When the two little lambs were first brought in, Mary, the cook, made
_ anice bed for them in one corner of the kitchen, Then she put some
warm milk in a bottle, and took one of tle lambs up in her lap and fed it.
Oh, how pleased it was! And the other lamb stood by crying until its
turn came, A

. The lambs soon grew fat and strong, and ran about the yard. But they
made themselves quite at home in the house ; and we could not keep them
out. owl

One day I went into my room; and there were Coosie and Carrie jump-
ing up and down upon my spring-bed.

I sat down and laughed heartily; and the lambs kept on jumping, and
looked as if they were trying to laugh too. But I could not have such
saucy lambs about the house any longer: so they were driven to the
meadow with the rest of the flock.

Auntie and I laughed again to think of the lambs’ frolic ;



COOSIE AND CARRIE.

and I said, “O auntie! how I wish they would eat out of
my hand now! Do you think they will?”

“Tam afraid not,” said she. “They have been with the
flock a whole year, and I suppose are no poner tame ; but
you can try. Take some apples to them.”

So, with some apples in my hand, I went out, calling
“Co-nan, co-nan!” The sheep were afraid, and walked
away, crying “ Baa-a-ah;” and the little lambs answered,
“ Baa-a-ah.”





a] * ma



I followed slowly ; and at last one sheep stood still. |
went up close to her, calling “ Coosie, Carrie!” for 1 knew
it must be one or the other. She ate the apples out of my
hand, and let me pat her head, and feel her soft wool.

The next time I went out with apples, two sheep came to
my call. They looked exactly alike to me; but Mary told
me which was Coosie, and which was Cane: After that,



THE FOURTH OF JULY CAKR.

they did not wait to be called, but came running up as soon
as they saw mes.

When the sheep were driven away into the meadow-lot
again, I stood near the gate to see them go. The old sheep
walked along quietly ; but the lambs jumped and frisked
about, and kicked up their heels in a very funny way. The
sheep called out “Baa-a-ah!” and the lambs answered,
“Baa-a-ah!” and sometimes it sounded like « Maa-a-ah.”

Coosie and Carrie ran up, and licked my hand as I said
good-by. Now, were they not dear little pets?

AVF. A..



——00 502-0.

THE FOURTH. OF JULY CAKE.

Fred. —- Oh! look here, Bessy and Maggy: come and see
the splendid Fourth of July cake that mother has made!

Bessy.— You must not touch it, Fred: mother will be
displeased if you touch it.

Fred. —1I want to see if she has salted it well. Look at
the currants and the raisins!

Bessy. — And how nicely it is sugared and frosted !

Maggy.— Me see; me see!

Fred. — There! Maggy has put her whole hand in.
What will mother say ?'

Bessy. — Tt will do no harm now for me to taste it.

Fred. —Isn’t it nice ?

w2



THE FOURTH OF JULY CAKE.



Maggy. — Me want plum.

Bessy. — Maggy mustn’t stick her hand in. She will
spoil mamma’s nice cake. oe

Maggy.— Me want taste. You and Fred taste.

Fred. — Hark! I hear mother’s step on the stairs. Now
scatter, all three! Lick your fingers clean, and run.

Bessy. —I wish we hadn’t touched the cake.

(Enter Moruer.)
Mother. — What’s this? Who has been at my cake, —

my cake that I took so much pains to make handsome ?
Bessy. — Fred wanted to see if it was properly salted.





THE FOURTH OF JULY CAKE.

"Mother. —Here’s the mark of Maggy’s hand! And
here’s a deep hole which Fred’s naughty finger must have
made! And here, Bessy, are your marks. I’m ashamed
of you all. Meddling with my nice cake. without leave.

ee. —Tm very sorry I touched it, mother. ‘

| Fred. — So. am I; but I wanted to see if it was well
seasoned. =

- Mother. — Well Ronde sip? coe deserve to be well
seasoned with a rod. Now, your punishment shall be, not
to taste a crumb of this nice cake, any one cr ye T shall

give it to the poor fainily. opposite.”

Fred. — Hoo-00-00-00 !.. Oh, don’t!

Maggy. —Don’t, mamma ; don’t!

Bessy. — Such a beautiful ‘cake!

Mother. — The cake shall be given to the. poor; and you
must be contented with your bread and water.

Fred. — Forgive us this once, mother. Remember it’s
the Fourth of July, —a day when we all want to be jolly.

Mother. — They who would be jolly, must begin by
being good. The: cake goes to those who need it much
more than we do.

(The children ail cry.) Ge aera:







REMEMBERING THE SICK.

WORKS OF ART FOR CHILDREN.

I HAVE a little daughter who never returns from a walk in
the woods without bringing a bunch of gay flowers. I have
taught her to make of them many little works of art, which
you may also like to learn, dear reader. —

Here is the first. Certainly there must grow in your
neighborhood some larch or spruce trees. If we look sharp,
we shall soon find on them a handsome half-open cone. In
the small openings of this cone we stick delicate flowers and
grasses which we find in the meadows and fields.

When our nosegay is ready, we lay the cone with the
flowers very carefully in a dish of water.

' After an hour, the cone is so closely shut, that the flowers
are held as fast in its scales as if they had always grown
there. This makes a very nice present. :



.







OOS OE ee
= rou a
0 be is Cy

T will tell you how to make another pretty thing. You
know what a burr is. Alas! it has often played you many a
naughty trick, — woven itself provokingly into your clotlies,
or perhaps into your hair. I can teach you to make a better
use of" it.

Pluck an apron full: lay them one against another so that
they shall stick fast together, and make in this manner the
bottom of a small basket of any shape you like, — round,
square, or oval. | |

Now build the burrs up around the edge to form the
sides. When this is finished, make also the handle of
burrs. A lovely little basket stands before you, which you
can fill with flowers or berries from the fields, and carry
home to your mother. Of course you know how to make
wreaths and bouquets; but to make them tastefully is a
true work of art, in which all childrén should try to become
skilful.

Anna LIVINGSTON,





CHERRY AND FAIR-STAR.

I couLD not have been quite six years old when I became
the possessor of a canary-bird, to which I gave the name of
Cherry.

There were three children of Ue mpielt (the oldest),
Arthur, and baby.. My father was at sea; and my mother
had charge of us all in her little house near the ocean. -

Well do I remember one cold day in winter when we were
all gathered j in the one little apartment that served us for
nursery, dining-room, and, sitting-room. Arthur, who had
overslept himself, was at his breakfast; mother was feeding
baby ; and I was looking at my dear Cherry § in his cage. :

Pots of hyacinths in bloom were on the table; Mr. Panch,
Arthur’s Christmas present, lay as if watching the cat on
baby’s pillow in the basket; and Muff, the old cat, with Fair-
Star her kitten, were lapping milk from a basin on the floor.

My dear mother had taught Muff to be good to Cherry;
and Muff seemed to have overcome her natural propensities
so far as to let Cherry even light on her head, and there
sing a few notes of a song.

“So, on the day I am peaking of J I let Cherry out of his
cage; and he flew round, and at last lighted on the kitten’s
head. At this Muff seemed much pleased; and Fair-Star
herself was not disturbed by the liberty the little bird took.

But all at once Muff sprang upon Cherry, and, seizing him
in her mouth, jumped up on the bureau. At last it would
seem as if the old cat had chosen her time to kill and eat my
poor. little bird.

No such thing! Our good Muff was all right. A neigh-.
bor, who had come to borrow our axe, had left the back-door
open; and a hungry old stray cat had suddenly made her



hn =
t

SEZ,









































Ry Ss
— RS 4,





AN Sw
a vit \\
= Fy \

\ i
iN : f
6

SN
\\
\

\y

A

“yy ;
|
S S SS

ae SS
Yn
~ WN
S

— ny \

Ns
has :
We



THE FAT LITTLE PIGGIES.

appearance. Muff saw that Cherry was in danger, and
seized him so that the strange cat should not harm. him.

Cherry was not only not hurt, but not frightened. Well
do J remember how my mother placed baby on the pillows,
drove out. the strange cat, and then took up Muff, and petted
and praised her till Muff’s purr of please was loud as the
noise of a spinning-wheel.

Aftes that adventure, Cherry and Muff and Fair-Star were
all better friends than ever. ' ~ Lucy Korner.

S00 0,0-0-——

8

‘THE FAT LITTLE PIGGIES.

Sarp a sow to her piggies so white, /
“Oh! the chilly winds whistle around,
There is ice on the old miller’s dam,

. And there’s snow on the hard frozen ground;
But a warm, sheltered stackyard have we,
Where all day you may play hide-and-seek :

So away, little piggies, my white little piggies, .
For a gambol and scramble and squeak.

“You have all had your breakfasts, I know ;
For your trough was full, up to the top,
Of the sweetest potatoes and milk ;
And you've not left a bit or a drop; -
But, though an old sow, I'll not grunt:
So begone round the barn for a freak,
- And T’ll watch you, dear piggies, fat, curly-tailed piggies,
As you hurry and scurry and squeak.”





THE FAT LITTLE PIGGIES.

















































































































































































































So at once, ’mid the fresh-sprinkled straw,

The young pettitoes scampered away; |

And they rooted and burrowed and hid,

Then all quiet a minute they lay:

Soon their pink-pointed noses peeped out ;

Then their bodies, so plump and so sleek.

Oh the glad little piggies, the mad little piggies —

How they snuffle and scuffle and squeak ! ;
GrorcEe BENNETT.





LITTLE GILBERT. ©
A TRUE Sone

- Many years ago a little boy, named Gilbert, lived in a
small town in New Brunswick, on the banks of the St. J ohn
River. The river is deep and swift; and Gilbert’s papa had
often warned him not to go too near the brink.

One day, when the little fellow was about six years old,
he went with his papa down to the river ; and, while his papa
stopped to talk ie a friend, Gilbert andercd along the
shore.

He took with him his fend and thought it woe Be
fine fun to catch a fish all by himself: so he went close to
the edge of the water, and dropped in his line.

After waiting a few minutes without getting a bite, he
thought he would walk out on a raft that he saw close by,
and try his luck in a new spot. He crept along till he
reached the outer edge of the raft; but then, as he threw out
his line, his little bare feet slipped, and over he went, plump
into the river. A splash, a scream, and down he went.

At the time of this story, there were a good many Indians
in New Brunswick; and a party of them were in camp in the
woods near the river. They were harmless, peaceable In-
dians, and very friendly to the boys of the neighborhood,
who liked to visit their tents, and see. them weave baskets,
and make bows and arrows, and scarlet, slippers, and other
pretty things.

Luckily for Gilbert, an Indian boy Rapreced to be fish-
-ing near the raft, and saw him slip off into the water. Al-
though the Indian boy was not much older than Gilbert,
he was larger andstronger, and he knew how to swim. In.





LITTLE. GILBERT.







\v
x
a eS a \
x ie aas A) Su
ANGE IPS
) x AS yh wie
N Mo Seva t. ANY nee,
= Kis Za ( = La Ce od
Bae ees ‘iy VA 0 ie Way
et Dy \ pri :
ns, RE :

an instant he plunged into the river, seized the poor little
drowning boy, and brought him to the land safe and sound.

His papa took him in Tis arms, all wet and dripping, and,
after thanking the brave Indian boy for his noble deed,
hurried home, scolding Gilbert by the way for disobedience.
Poor little Gilbert was very miserable. It was not at all nice
to be wet and frightened and scolded all at once; and, worse
than all, he feared he would be punished when he got home.

So, when his papa carried him into the kitchen, it was
a great comfort to the little fellow to see his good grand-
mother sitting by the fire. She was very fond of Gilbert;
and, when she saw what a plight he was in, she begged his
papa not to punish the dear child this time, saying she
was sure he had been punished enough already by his fright
and his ducking.

His papa was so happy to have his little boy alive and
safe, that it was easy to forgive him; and in a little while



WHAT BIRDIE SAW IN TOWN.

Gilbert was dressed in dry clothes, and sat down on his little
stool before the fire to eat a red apple which his grand-
mother had brought him. : ;

That night, when little Gilbert said his prayer, he put in
at the end, “ God bless the brave Indian boy who saved my
life t” ae | | Muz-muz.

—_003400———

WHAT BIRDIE SAW IN TOWN.

“‘ BIRDIE,” you must know, is a little girl three and a half
years old. Her real name is Maud; but “ Birdie” is her pet
name, :

One day she went to the city in the horse-cars with her
mamma. They waited on the corner of the street till a car
came in sight; then Birdie held up her little fat finger, and —
the conductor saw it, and stopped the car. :

After they were seated, the conductor called out, Fares,
ladies!”” And Maud said to him, “ Here is mamma’s ticket ;
and won’t you please leave us at grandpa’s house?” He
' smiled, and nodded his head, and Birdie felt satisfied ; for
she thought he must know, of course, where grandpa lived. —

When they reached town, mamma took her into a store
where birds are kept for sale; and Birdie saw, to her great
delight, hundreds of canary-birds, and a good many bright-
colored parrots. It was very funny indeed to hear them all »
singing and chattering together. :

There were two beautiful birds in a large cage, taking
their morning bath. They would jump down into their little
bath-tub, dip their heads in the water, and then plunge
in all over ; then they would perch on the side of the tub,
shake the bright drops from their feathers, and seem to be
enjoying themselves as much. as Birdie herself does when
mamma puts her into her bath-tub.



WHAT BIRDIE SAW IN TOWN.







cx

FDI
WE

























Then there were some squirrels in a cage that went round
and round; and Birdie thought she should never get tired
of looking at them, with their bushy tails and bright black
eyes. She saw them crack some nuts with their little sharp
teeth. :

There were also a great many goldfishes in a little pond;
and Birdie watched them darting through the water, and
thought how nice it would be to have some of them at home.

One thing more Birdie saw, which pleased her very much.

. On the corner of the street stood a man with a basket on his

arm; and in it were four or five little black-and-white pup-
pies (“ baby-dogs” Birdie called them), all cuddled up in a
heap, and looking very comfortable in their wicker-carriage.

The little girl took good care to point out all the sights
to Daisy, her doll, whom she carried in her arms, and who

. always has to take an airing when her little mistress does.

FLORENCE.






Mi
| Serr RTT

NAAN







| OG Eee
cel ! ee
i CY




\

BERTHA TO BABY.

O LITTLE, little mother! I was once as small as you;
And I loved my dolly dearly, as you are loving too ;
And they fed me with a spoon, because no teeth I had;

And a rattle or a sugar-plum would make me very glad.

But now I’m old and very wise, —yes, four years old am I:
My shoes and stockings I put on; I do not often cry ;
And I can read in my book; and I can draw a house;

And with my pen and paper can be quiet as a mouse.

I have a little garden; it is planted full of flowers ;
And there, each pleasant afternoon, I pass some happy hours;
And soon I hope, my little pet, that you'll be large enough

To go with me and play, when the weather is not rough.
Dora BURNSIDE.









Y N a
ann AHORER- SON.

A JOURNEY TO CALIFORNIA.

Two little girls, Annette and Lisette, went to California
with their parents in 1849. There was no Pacific Railroad
at that time; and the journey across the plains was a long
and a hard one.

Annette and Lisette rode in the great wagon drawn by
oxen. They thought that fine fun. At night they slept in
a tent. On-pleasant days they walked with their mamma
for miles over the green prairies, plucking wild-flowers as
they went along.

They saw great numbers of the funny little prairie- dogs
sitting in the doors of their cunning houses; sometimes -
they caught sight of an antelope ; aud they often passed
great herds of shag sy buffaloes.

They liked the prairie-dogs and the antelopes; but they



A JOURNEY TO CALIFORNIA.

were afraid of the buffaloes; and, when their papa went out
to shoot one, they would almost cry for fear he would get
hurt. But, when he came back with plenty of nice buffalo-
_. meat, they had a real feast; for they had had no meat but
‘salt-pork for many a day, an they did not: like that very
well.

Sometimes a storm would come up with fearful hals of
thunder, and flashes of lightning. More than once the tent
was blown down, and the rain came pouring on ‘them; but
the little girls put their heads under the bed-clothes, and
crept. close to their mamma, and never minded the storm.

After travelling in this way three or four months, they
_ were still many, many days’ journey away from California,
and Annette and Lisette began to wish themselves back in
their old home; for now the plains were no longer green
and bright with flowers, but hot, sandy, and dusty, with
- only ugly little aes called “‘sage-bushes,” growing on
them.

Sometimes they would have to go all day without water ;
for the water was so warm and impure, that nobody could
drink it, not even the cattle. They saw several hot
springs, so hot that they could not put their hands in
them; but their mamma oun them very nice for washing
lathes.

Late in the fall they crossed ie Sierra Nevada Mountains;
and, oh! how steep and narrow and rough the road was!
Often their papa had to fasten logs of wood to the wagons
to keep them from: going down the mountains too fast.
Sometimes a wagon would upset, and go rolling down
hill.

Yet the children enjoyed being in the mountains; for
they liked to play under the tall pine-trees, picking up the
cones, and hunting for lumps of pine-gum, and hearing all

— a+ PIA Oe







A JOURNEY TO CALIFORNIA.

the time the sweet music of the wind as it sang in the
branches.

But in a few days the weather got very cold. Heavy
snow-storms came on. One night twenty head of cattle
-were frozen to death ; and as there were few oxen left, and
the flour was almost gone, the little girls began to be very
much afraid that they should perish too.

Luckily their papa shot some fat deer, which gave them
plenty to eat; and, after many hardships, the whole party
reached the Sacramento River in safety. Here they got on
board .of a flat-boat, and went to Sacramento City, where
they lived in a tent for many months. I may. some time tell
you how they went to the mines. ;

A journey to California is a very easy matter now-a-days.
You may go by railroad all the way, and have every com-
fort by day and night. :

Annette and Lisette have made the journey more than
once in a palace car; but they often think of the times
when they were two happy little girls riding over the prai-
ries in a baggage-wagon, or playing together under the
mountain pines. a













5S »%
THE CHILDREN AND THE CHICKENS.

CHILDREN five, and chickens three,
In the sunshine you may see:
Playing in that narrow ground,
See them run and run around !
Without stockings, without shoes,
They are free their feet to use.
Children, chickens, tell me which,
Are in happiness most rich ?

Food the chickens try to find ;
But the children, they have dined:
So I think we must allow,

That they are the gayest now.





















GRANDPA’S BOOTS...

How the stars did snap that December night! The moon
was up too; and how cold and white she looked!

And how busy Jack Frost was! No one saw him swing
a hammer; no one heard him drive a nail: but, by the
time morning had come, he had laid right across the ponds
and the river a floor of ice smoother than any wooden floor
ever put down by the joiners of Norridgewock.

All the boys were out sliding. Ed Peet had come from
over the river; Fred Danforth was there from the tavern;
and George Sawtelle came running up from the big house
under the willow. Others were there too, slipping along on
Jack Frost’s floor.

Little Albert looked out of the window, and saw the boys
at their play. Why couldn’t he go out too?



GRANDPA’S BOOTS.

“ Shall I go, mother?” he asked.

“ Your slippers are too thin, Albert.” |

“Oh! I can put on grandpa’s boots.”

“Yes, you can go, but be careful. You are too young
for such rough sport.”

Off scampered the eager feet, and on went the big boots.
A smile must have lighted up the mother’s eyes as she
heard her little boy tramping over the floor in the heavy
boots. ;

The boys were taking their turn at sliding. Away down
at the end of the line stood Albert. They were sliding
carefully, not running too hard; for a little way out the ice
was thin. After a while, it was Albert’s turn. “Tl beat
those big, clumsy boys,” he thought.

Taking along run, driving ahead with all his force, he
shouted, “ Now see your grandpa go!” And, sure enough,
grandpa’s boots went and went, out where the ice was thin,
and down went Albert into the water! The water was not
deep, though. He was out again ina moment; and there
he stood, cold and dripping like an icicle in a January thaw.

I can hear the boys laughing, and I seem to see the smile
lizhting up the mother’s brown eyes still more merrily,
when her little boy came home. Albert never forgot it.
In after-years he would say, “ Whenever I am inclined to
show off, I think of grandpa’s boots.” ee



0S Ee ee





WR

=



BY THE WINTER FIRE.

By the winter fire they sit,

Care not for the storm a whit:
Winter wars and raves without,
But within they laugh and shout.

Pussy jumps on Ellen’s shoulder,
Purring, rubbing; just behold her!
Jenny lets old Carlo in,

And would warm his frozen shin.

Mary is the story-teller :

Now she tells what once befell her.
Tommy sits, and stares, and listens; _
Andrew’s eye with wonder glistens.

Hear the snow against the pane!
Hear the moaning winds complain!
Winter, winter, cease your din!
You can’t come in; you can’t come in!
EMILY CARTER.



SLEEPYTOWN.

I am the old man you see in the picture. I was born in
Sleepytown, and in Sleepytown I have lived all my days.
Those two tall poplar-trees were planted by my father when
I was a boy.

There was a time when we thought Sleepytown was
going to be a great and famous city. In those days we
changed its name to Grandville. We laid out house-lots,
planted trees, and offered to sell land by the foot.

* We had our Main Street, our Washington Street, and our
Central Park. We planned a splendid bridge over Coon
River. We were told, you see, that a great railroad was to
pass through our town; but it was laid through a village
six miles off, and so Sleepytown remains Sleepytown still.

I am afraid, if you were to stay here a week, you would
call Sleepytown dull. It is not often that business is as
brisk as the artist has made it in the picture. I have a ferry
across Coon River; and sometimes I take hay across, and

.sometimes people, and sometimes both. The fare is a cent ;
for children half-price.

There are a good many children in our town; and, if it
were not for them, I think we should all go to sleep. They
help to make things lively. A good many of them cross the
river in my boat; for they all know that Uncle Silas will take ©
good care of them, and see that they do not fall overboard.
On the Fourth of July we are to send up a rocket, and fire
off a good many crackers; and a boy is to send up a balloon.

Lately we have had rumors that another railroad is to be
built, and that it is to pass along Coon River straight through
Sleepytown. Now is your chance, if you want to buy house
lots. They can be had cheap. Apply quick to

SLEEPYTOWN gets Uxoie Sias.





































































































































































































































































































































































































LEFT BEHIND.

SIOOR Ponto! It made him sad to be left be-
hind, and I do not wonder at it. One bright
autumn day his little master, Henry, had said
to him, “ Ponto, would you like to go to the
beach? Uncle Charles and I are going to the



beach.”

Now, if there was any thing that Ponto liked more than
another, it was going to the beach, and chasing the little
birds along the wet sand, and seeing the foamy waves come
up and chase him, as if they were saying, “Leave those

little birds alone.”

And so, when Henry spoke of going to the beach, Ponto
jumped up and barked with delight, and tried to lick his
little master’s face with his tongue. Then he ran round as
if he wanted to say, “Oh, I’m so glad, so glad! for I do
_love to go the beach.”

But there is many a slip between the cup and the lip.
Now, it happened that Mr. Cross was to-make one of the
_ party to the beach, and Mr. Cross did net like dogs. He
said he would not have a dog with him: so Uncle Charles

had to tell Henry that Ponto must stay at home. |

Henry was greatly disappointed at hearing this. “Poor
Ponto!” he said, “after all, I cannot take you with me to
the beach. You will have to stay at home.”

Ponto did not quite understand these words; but when
Henry tied a string to his collar, and fastened it to a ring
in the wood-shed, then Ponto understood that his little mas-
ter had changed his mind, and would not take his dear dog
- with him to’ the beach.

Ponto whined and cried when he found he was not to go,







LEFT BEHIND. we fe

and felt sad enough, when, through the open window of the
wood-shed, he saw Henry, Uncle Charles, Mr. Cross, and all

Henry’s brothers and sisters, going off to the steamboat that

was to take them to the beach.

“This is too bad!” thought Ponto. He tugged .at his
rope, but could not break it; then he lay down on the floor;
then he jumped up, and barked; and then he gnawed at
the rope. “I do so like to frolic on the beach with my dear
master!” thought Ponto.

For more than twenty minutes he tried to get away ; and
when at last he had almost given up trying, the rope broke,
and Ponto was free. With the rope dangling at his collar
he ran at once down to the wharf; but the steamboat had
started. Ponto saw it, and barked long and loud; but
Henry could not see nor hear him.

Henry and his party arrived at the beach without Mr.
Cross; for, just as they were starting, a summons from his
wife compelled Mr. Cross to leave. It was now too late to
get Ponto, and Henry missed him so much that he was sad.

But that forenoon while he was in the water with his uncle,

learning to swim, he saw all at once a dog running along

the sand. “Can that be Ponto?” cried Henry. Yes, it was
indeed Ponto! As soon as the boat returned to the wharf,
Ponto got in, and on its next trip sailed down to the beach
without paying his fare, for the captain supposed he be-
longed to some one of the passengers.

How glad Ponto was to see his yoting master! And how
glad was Henry to see Ponto! They had a fine time to-
gether in the water. Was not Ponto a clever dog to find his
way all alone to the beach? and to know, that, by staying on
board the boat, it would take him where he could find Henry ?
I think I never knew so bright and good a dog as Ponto.

Emity CARTER.





THE TRAVELLING BEAR.

I’ve been a wanderer from a cub,
When Carl, my master, bought me;

And up to bearhood I have grown,
And practice what is taught me.

I’m muzzled, and around my neck
‘An ugly chain I’m wearing :

It’s very hard a gentle bear
Should bear what I am bearing.

You may admire my stately steps,
When timed to pipe and tabor;

But, oh, I’d scramble through a wood
With less than half the labor. |



THE TRAVELLING BEAR.

I'm not a Polar bear, good folks,
And yet a pole I shoulder,
And on my hind-feet stalk about,
To please each rude beholder.
I wonder how old Carl would feel,
If my grim sire had found him,
And wade him dance upon all-fours,
With chattering monkeys round him;
And, with a ring slipped through his nose,
Through beardom drove, or led him,
And cuffed and worried him all day,
And very sparsely fed him. -

From town to town I’m led and shown,
To bring my master- money;

Ah! could I roam my native woods,
And taste the sweets of honey,

Or clamber up the mountain sides
On tender scions browsing,

And sleep within some hollow tree,
No ruthless keeper rousing!

But on my head a sounding blow
Strikes all my dreams in ruin;

And I must tramp.away once more,

A tame and patient Bruin.
GEORGE BENNETT.



WASHING-DAY AMON G THE LITTLE ONES.

TERE were four little sisters hard at work. It was wash-
ing-day ; and what do you think they were doing? Two of —
them were washing out clothes; one was hanging the
clothes out on a line tied to two chairs; and baby sat on
the floor with her doll half undressed. .

You may see it all in the picture. There is mother in
the outer room, stirring the clothes that are in the boiler;
but the children are in the old-fashioned kitchen. Make
out, if you can, what those things are on the shelf. I can
see a candlestick, a teacup, and several other things.

On the floor I see, besides the baby, the doll’s hat and
dress, four clothes-pins, and the high-chair baby sits in at
meal-time. Do you think those are the doll’s clothes on the
line? Are they not rather too large for dolly? On the
whole, I think they must belong to baby. That little girl
at the wash-tub, who is the eldest of the sisters, could in-
form us if her picture could only speak.

I must tell you about that little girl. Her name is Mary.
She can read and write; butshe is not so fond of books that
she cannot find time to help her mother.

Who is up first of the family in the morning? Mary,
of course. Who sees that her younger sisters are all nicely
washed and dressed? Nobody but Mary. Who gets break-
fast? Mary again. Who never grumbles nor complains ?

That darling Mary, I tell you.
' And when work is over, and it is time to play, whose
laugh rings the loudest? and who helps most to cheer and
amuse all the others? Itis that same Mary; and I wish
that all little girls were like her, —as ready to oblige, and
as free to give their hands to useful work. — aswa Livincsrom.







See

ie















































































































THE OLD WORLD SAYS “GOOD-MORNING.” |

Come, Dimple-Chin and Merry-Eyes:
God’s glory lighteth up the skies,
And little folks like you should rise,

For the old world says, “ Good-morning.”

See how the saucy sunbeams peep,
- And round behind the curtains creep,
. Surprised to find you still asleep,
While the old world says, “ Good-morning.”

Of course the downy pillows coax,
And drowsy-headed little folks
Are apt to think it all a hoax,
When the old world says, “ Good-morning.”.

The soft bed whispers, “ Longer stay,
You'll surely not come back to-day:
There’s surely time enough for play,
Though the old world says, ‘ Good-morning.’ ”’

Haste, children! early hours are fleet ;
They tarry not with lazy feet,
That they the sleepy ones may greet,
With the old world’s sweet “ Good-morning.”

Oh, Dimple-Chin and Merry-Eyes:
- Swiftly away the morning flies;
Soon fades God’s glory from the skies,
When the old world says, “ Good-morning.”

RutTH ARGYLE.





MY MOUSE.

A TRUE STORY.

Last summer, when I was in
North Adams, I asked my papa
,. if he would buy me a trap that

“would catch mice without killing
them, so Abat 1 could feed and keep them constantly. These
traps are made of wire, with a drop-door, and a small ring
for the mice to “run in,”’— such as are ff squirrel-cages.

One night this year, I set my trap in my bedroom, where
I had seen a mouse. The trap was well baited; and in the
middle of the night, to my great delight, I heard the mouse
turning the wheel.

My father got up, and put the cage in a chair by my win-
dow, and put a stick in the wheel to keep it from running,
as it made a loud noise which kept me awake. In the
morning, I dressed quickly, and took my cage down stairs,
and gave the mouse a hearty meal of corn and bread.

I have taken good care of him ever since, and he seems
to be quite at home in his cage. He keeps up the squeak-
ing of the wheel both day and night. His cage is in a box
with bars across, and so arranged, that I‘can put my hand
through and get the cage, and then slip the bars into their
places again.

One day my sister’s cat, which, Re other cats, is very
fond of mice, went in front of the box, and, after watching
it some time, stuck her paw through the bars; but, as she
could do no harm, I let her sit there:

Perhaps I will tell you next month more abdut my

mouse. If you want to see him, you will only have to come
to Williamstown.



Sanny G. TENNEY



THE SKIPPER’S DAUGHTER.

IORA’S father used to go to sea. He was what
is called a “skipper ” but I think a better name
than that is “ captain ;” for he was the captain of
“The Daystar,” a fishing-schooner, that sailed
out of Gloucester on Cape Ann.

He loved his little Dora so much, that he did not like to
leave her: but then she needed good warm clothes for win-
ter, and she needed plenty to eat and drink both summer
and winter; so her father had to earn money with which
to buy clothes and food both for Dora and for Dora’s
mamma.

Unlike many little girls, Dora loved to play with boats.
Wherever she could find a good deep puddle, she would
take her little boat, and sail it there. When other little girls
had dolls in their arms, Dora usually had a boat.

Dora was very fond of her papa, and was always sad when
he had to leave her to go on a fishing-voyage. Once he
went away, and did not come back at the right time. Every
day Dora would go down to the beach, and watch; but no
sign could she see of her papa’s schooner. She used to
know it by a red streak painted on its sides.

One day, seeing that her mamma had been weeping, Dora
asked, “What are you crying for, dear?” The little girl
used to call her mother “ dear.”

“T am crying for your papa, my child,” said her mother.
“We have had bad news from the fishing-grounds. There
has been a great storm, and many vessels have been lost;
and to-day I hear that your father’s vesse] is among them.
We shall never see your poor father again, my little girl.”

“ Yes, we shall, dear: I know we shall,” said Dora. “There,













Nh
A:















THE SKIPPER’S DAUGHTER.
wA





THE SKIPPER’S DAUGHTER.

don’t you cry any more. You shall see him, dear. You
shall see him very soon.”

“But how do you know that?” asked her mother.

“I don’t know it, I only feel it,” said Dora. “I woke up
last night, and felt it so much, that I was quite happy.”

The mother kissed her little girl, and was quite cheered
by her confident words. Still a week went by, and no papa
came; and the mother once more grew sad.

Bots no longer went to the beach to look out for the
schooner streaked with red. But when her mother said,
“ down in her, in that dreadful storm,’ Dora replied, “ Don't
give it up yet, dear. Papa will come.”

How Dora knew that her papa would come, I cannot say.
I only know that this is a true story, and that Dora proved
to be right.

The next day, after sundown as her mother was putting
her to bed, Dora started up, and cried, “Hark! whose voice
is that? Don’t you hear him? He’s talking to somebody.
It is my own papa, my own papa!”

And, sure enough, 2 step was heard at the outer reer
the door was pushed open; and in rushed the captain of the
lost “ Daystar,” well and hearty, with a plenty of kisses for
his little girl and her mother.

He and his crew had been ‘saved in the long-boat, and,
after some delay, had taken passage for home. “And the
best of it is,” said papa, “I am not going to sea any more ;
for I have found good employment on land, and now I can
see little Dora and her good mamma every day of any.
life.”

“T told you, dear, he would come back,” said Dora, patting
her mamma on the head. As for mamma, she tried to speak,
but could not. Joy would not let her. Skxpy Bay,







HOW BLUE-EYES SOLD HER DOLL...

TurrE was once a little girl whose mother called her Blue-
eyes; and she had a doll whose name was Belvidera.

Blue-eyes wore a string of amber-beads round her neck ;
and her yellow curls were tied with a blue ribbon round hee
head.

She was so fond of her doll, that she took her with her
wherever she went; and one day she took her to a fair
which some kind ladies were giving for the relief of some
poor children who had lost their father and mother.

Blue-eyes laid her doll down on one of the tables where
things were offered for sale; and an old lady came up, and,
thinking that the doll was for sale, said, “Here is just the
kind of doll I want to buy for my little niece. I will give
five dollars for it.”.

“That doll is not for sale,” said the lady who’ kept the
table. “It belongs to little Blue-eyes yonder.”

“But the poor children want the five dollars more than I
want the doll,” said Blue-eyes. “I will run and ask my
mother if I may sell the doll.”

So she ran and asked her mother; and her mother said,
if she wanted to get the money to help the poor children,
she might sell the doll.

So Blue-eyes sold it; and with the money she bought
three nice dresses, hich: she gave to the children: ¢ for,” said
little Blue- -eyes, “the children need their warm dresses much
more than I want Belvidera.”

I should not wonder if Blue-eyes were to wake on Christ-
mas morning, and find a new do.. —one much prettier than
Belvidera — in the stocking which shv ~vill hang up.

JANE OLIVER.





MOTHER'S CHRISTMAS-PRESENT.

Armuiur’s uncle has a studio; for he is a painter. A studio
is the painter’s work-room, where-he has his easel, and his
palette, and his paints. The easel is the wooden frame, or
sliding-rack, on which pictures are placed while being
painted.

The palette is a thin, oval-shaped board, or tablet, with a

-thumb-hole at one end for holding it, on which a painter
lays and mixes his paints.

One day Arthur went into his uncle’s studio, and, finding
no one present, thought he would try to paint a likeness of
his own father. So he took up the brush and the palette, |
and, striking an attitude such as he had seen his uncle take,
went to work. }

He became so much interested, that he did not hear his
uncle comein. Uncle Thomas crept up, and, star.ding behind
Arthur, watched him a minute, and then clapped his hands.

Arthur started at the noise, turned round, and, seeing his
uncle, dropped the palette and the brush, and ran for his cap.

But Uncle Thomas stopped him, and said, “ Bravo, little man!
you will make a painter. You have begun well. Let me
give you a little instruction.”

So Uncle Thomas gave him a lesson in drawing, and then

said, “Now, you must finish that picture, and make a Christ
mas-present of it to your mother.”

Arthur consented, and he is now hard at work upon it;
but this is a secret. It is to be a surprise to his mother, and
I hope none of you will tell her about it beforehand.

If Arthur means to be a painter, he will have to work
hard ; for there are a great many good painters in these days,

and only those that excel can hope to win fame and profit.
UNCLE CHARLES





















































































































































































































































THE CHILD AND THE GARDENER.

I PLANTED once a little tree He said. “A plant that has no root
Out in the air and sunshine free: Will die, and bear no flowers or fruit.” |
I gave it water every day;
But still.it pined and pined away. Thung my head, and blushed for shame:
“But, child,” said he, “you’re not to
- blame:

Our gardener had a wise old head:

I carried it to him, and said,

“ Take this into the greenhouse hot.”
Ile pulled it from the flower-pot,

Full many an older head I’ve seen,
As simple quite as you have been.

‘You must in future wiser be,
And not plant flowers to make a tree; -

But choose the roots, and wait, my dear,
“A pretty gardener you would be!” | Until the little buds appear.”

And, smiling, held it up to me:









_y EN MI)

WTiTij, |

/),
y



ve
N

——









See

- ~~: Li.



















Y Yy Ys y YY _ Yyp — 4 i





It was

JOHNNY'S DRUM.
Somupopy gave Johnny a drum one Christmas. After that

there was no more peace to be found in the house.
kitchen, in the nursery. The baby could not get a wink of |

rub-a-dub-dub before you were up in the morning, and the
last thing at night, —rub-a-dub-dub in the parlor, in the
sleep; and visitors could hardly hear themselves talk.



JOHNNY’S DRUM.

But by and by Johnny’s small bump of curiosity became
excited. “ What’s inside of the drum?” he asked one day.

“ An awful noise!” said Ellen the maid.

“ What does a noise look like ?”

“Bless me! I never saw one; and, if it looks as bad as it.
sounds, I don’t want to either.”

“JT want to see it,’ said Johnny; “and I mean to.”

Then he took his drum into a closet, and closed the door
after him till the light could only creep through a crack.

“[’m just going to see where the noise comes from, ’cause
it wakes up the baby,” said he.

So he went to work. Presently somebody called, “Johnny,
Johnny!” It was his mother, who had begun to wonder
what he was about; for, when Johnny was quiet so long, it
was a sure sign of mischief. ~ |

“T’m too busy to come,” shouted Johnny. “I’m engaged.”

“Tn the closet, Johnny!” cried his mother, coming upon
him suddenly, with a fear for her jars of preserves and sweet
pickles. “What are you doing there, child ?”

“Tm only seeing what’s inside of my drum,” said Johnny.
“Tve made a big hole through it; and there isn’t any thing
in it at all!” And, sure enough, he had put his foot through
the drum-head, and rub-a-dub-dub was at an end.

Johnny was heart-broken when nothing further could be
coaxed out of the drum. “The music’s all done,” said he,
trying to hide the tears.

“But you know now where it came from,” said his mother.

“Never mind,” said Uncle Jack : “ you shall have another
drum the first of April.”

“Oh, don’t!” cried the household.

“Oh, do!” shouted Johnny.

And when April Fool Day came, Uncle Jack brought him
home, — a drum of figs! MNP.





ROBERT AT THE GYMNASIUM.

Rosert’s mother promised ‘him, if he would learn his lesson
well, she would take him to the gymnasium.

He did learn his lesson well, and she kept her promise.
In the gymnasium, she let him mount the ladder; and then
she let him climb a short way up a pole.

Boys should take great care not to hurt or strain them-
selves at the gymnasium or in their sports. I have known
boys to be so eager in playing at foot-ball or cricket as to
hurt themselves badly.

Robert took great care, and was not hurt. His mother



PLAYING AT HORSES.

was with him to see that he did not run a risk by trying to
do too much.

It is well to add to the strength of one’s limbs by use, and
+ gain skill and ease in climbing and jumping; but it is

not well to run risks, or to overtask one’s strength.
Rozert’s MorHer.





PLAYING AT HORSES.

Tom and Harry were playing at horses. Tom was the
horse, and was very frisky. Just as they were turning the
corner of the garden, frisky Tom knocked over a flower-pot
with a very pretty plant in it.

His mother came te the window just as Harry was call-
ing to Tom to stop, that he might pick up the pieces.

The plant was. broken. The boys were very sorry, and
so was their mother; but sorrow could not mend the plant.

When children are allowed to play in gardens, they should
be very careful no» te spoil the plants and flowers. amy,























































Ture little lady-birds,

On a summer day :
See them on the blades of grass,
_ Going out to play!

Came a little maiden
Down the lane so green,

And the song she sang was this;
But what did it mean? — i

“Fly away, lady-birds,
Over flowers and fern:
Your house, it is on fire;
Your children, they will burn.”
Nonsense, little maiden !
They no house do own;
And their grown-up children
All away have flown.

“ Fly away, lady-birds,”
Sang the maiden still,
Skipping down the shady lane,
Skipping up the hill:
“Fly away, lady-birds,
Over flower and fern:
Your house, it is on fire;
Your children, they will burn.”

EMILY CARTER,



WHAT JULIA DID WITH THE POND-LILIES.

“What do you want so many pond-lilies for, Cousin
Julia?” asked Albert Vane, as he guided the boat so that his
brother Charles could pull-up some of the sweet-smelling
flowers. ‘ : :

“JT do not choose to tell you what I want them for, .
Albert,” said Julia. “You may be sure I want them for
good, and not for harm.”

Julia sat, smelling of a pond- nye at thesternof the boat,
while her Cousin Emma leaned over the side, and tried to
pull up a lily; and little Mary Gray called to the dog Cato,
swimming near, and asked him if he would save her if she
were to fall overboard. Cato would have done it gladly, I
think.

It was a lovely day in July, and it did not pa the little
party long to gather fifty fine lilies.

“ Now, children,” said Julia, “you will please bear in mind
that these are all mine. If you want any more lilies for
yourselves, there they are in the pond, —a plenty of them.”
The children laughed; and Albert said that Cousin Julia

seemed to have grown very grasping all at once, which was
not at all her usual way.

They soon got out of the boat, and went back to their
uncle’s pleasant cottage on the edge of the pond. Then
_ Julia, with her fifty flowers in a basket, bade her uncle, her
aunt and cousins, good-by, and started in the cars for her
Home in the city.

It was more than a week after that before Albert learned
what she had wanted all those pond-lilies for.

He had been to the city, and, on his return to the cottage,































































































































































































































THE SQUIRREL.

he said to his mother, “What do you think our dear Julia
did with those fifty lilies?”

- “Tam not good at guessing. Tell me at once,” said Mrs.
Vane.

“JT found out her secret, not from herself, but from Dr.
Brown,” said Albert. “It seems she took her whole basket-
ful to the new hospital, and went round among the patients,
distributing lilies to each. Was not that sweet of her?”

“Yes, sweet as the pond-lily itself” said Mrs. Vane. “I
felt sure shé had not got all those flowers for her own en-
joyment.”

“‘T knew she was plotting something,” said Albert; “ but
what it was I could not find out till to-day. Oh! she is her-
self the sweetest lily of all.” ABR Lucerne

THE SQUIRREL.

Hiau, high, and as near to the sky
As the tallest branches reach ;

See, see, how nimble and free

The squirrel climbs the beech!
Bright, bright, as the diamond’s light,
You may see his quick eyes play;
Still, still, as the whispering rill, |
Or he'll flit like a bird away.

Down, down, to the oak’s leafy crown;
There he thinks he’s out of sight ;
Swing, swing, O the blithe-hearted thing!
How he chuckles witb delight!





Tat SQUIRREL.



Crack, crack, with his tail on his back,
’Mong the acorns crisp and fine ;
“Sweet, sweet!” ah! it must be a treat
In his own green bowers to dine.

Blow, blow. and the leaves they lie low

In the autumn’s chilly blast ;

Drear, drear, to the eye and the ear,

Ail the-wood’s green life is past ;

Deep, deep, now the squirrel doth sleep,

So snug in the hollow tree ;

Calm, calm, till the spring sun is warm,

And the king-cups gem the lea. REQESE RENSEE:








eu
e

E



























































































































































































































































THE BLACKBOARD.

In the children’s play-room at Mr. Brown's, there isa blac -
‘board on the wall; for the children often ask their father
what a thing means: and then he takes a piece of chalk,
and tries to make the thing clear to them.

When Johnny asked him the other day what the printed



HARRY’S DOG

notes of music meant, Mr. Brown took his piece of chaik,

and showed him how a certain sound in music has a certain
written or printed sign by which it may be known. .

A blackboard is a very good thing, not only in a schooi-
room but in a play-room; for though the song which says,
“Work while you work, and play while you play,” gives
good ad-vice, yet I do not ob-ject to learn’ing all I can from

play, - EMILY Carrer.

—0Le{0-0——-

HARRY’S DOG.

Harry has a little dog, —

_ Such a cunning fellow!
With a very shaggy coat,
Streaked with white and yellow.

Harry’s dog has shining eyes,
And a nose so funny!

Marry wouldn’t sell, his dog
For a mint of money.

Harry’s dog will never bark,
Never bite a stranger :

So he’d be of no account
Where there’s any danger.

Harry has a little dog, —
Such a cunning fellow !
But his dog is made of wood.

Painted white and yellow. Josmrmine POLLARD,
wd



WILD FLOWERS IN COLORADO.

“Here we are, with no use for our nice little ditches. It
has been raining from the clouds just as it does East,” said
Maggie pettishly. “I thought we were in a rainiess region.’

“The old settlers say we have a great deal of rain some
years,” said Homer. “But we can keep the weeds out of
ouy garden; and I will show you the wild flowers I told you ~
about.”

“Wild flowers? It seems as if I should go wild to think
of them,” said Maggie. “I’ve had to take off my shoes and
stockings mauy a time to pull the cactus-thorns out of my
feet.”

“ Well,” said Robbie, “the horses learn to step over and
around them, and J suppose we shall after a while.”

“JT am going to send my biggest cigar-cactus to grandma.
It is all budded, and has beautiful red blossoms,” said Homer. -
“ How do you think ske can touch it, with the thorns stick-
ing every way from the end of each cigar?” asked Maggie. |

“ With the tongs,” said Robbie.

«Do you remember the bear’s-grass that grandma thinks
so much of ?” said Homer.

“Yes, I do,” said Maggie. “Aunt Delia calls it Adam’s
thread-and-needle, and has it in her garden.”

“Well, here it is, growing wale on these plains. Papa
says its real name is the yucca.”

“T want a bed of these little blue flowers,” said Mamie.

“ And you shall have it,” said her brother. “Oh! it is the

spider-lily. Our garden will look like our old one at home.
I guess mamma will be glad.”
Then the children went home with their arms full of flow-

ers, and a basket of roots for their garden.
Mrs. OLiver Howaerb.













































THE SEA-SHELL.

Hotp to your ear the beautiful shell :
Listen! What does its murmur tell ?
Hark! Does it echo the billows’ roar,

As they roll and break on the sandy shore ?

Does it bring to your mind the tossing spray
Of waves that dance in the breezes’ play ?
Or the quiet depths where the coral grows,

_ And never a ray of sunshine glows?



WINKIE AND THE MOUSE.

Hark again to the beautiful shell :

Does it speak of the ocean’s stormy swell,
Of the sea-bird’s scream, of the rushing gale,
Of the broken mast and the riven sail?

Sights and sounds of the restless sea,

Vast and gloomy, and grand and free,

How they gather at Fancy’s spell,

Waked by the voice of this little shell! LW.

WINKIE AND THE MOUSE.

Biacx-ryeD Winkie, a little five years’ old boy, woke up
in the middle of the night, not long ago, screaming with
pain.. He ran to his mamma’s room, crying out, “O mamma!
there is a hot iron in my ear, or some boiling water : oh, dear,
dear! what shall I do?”

His mother knew at once that it was the earache that dis-
tressed her boy ; for he had been out rather too long the day
before, trying to make a snow-man.

She met the poor screaming boy at his nursery-door, took
him in her arms, and tried to quiet him a little, while she
put him in her warm bed.

Then she lighted the gas, and put some sweet-oil on a soft
bit of cotton, and, after warming it a moment, pressed it
down snugly in the little dark room in Winkie’s aching ear.
Then he cuddled down on his mother’s arm, and after a few
more twinges of pain, and a few more screams, he began to
feel better, arid only said, “Oh, dear, oh, dear!” once in 4

while.
Pretty soon, as it grew stiller, he jeard a little nibbling



WINKIE AND THE MOUSE. ~

noise across the room. “ What is that, mamma?” said Win.
kie. “Lie still and listen,” replied mamma.

After a minute or two, the noise came again, — nibble,
nibble, nibble. “It is a little mouse in the chimney, I think,”
_said mamma.

“What is he up for in the night?” said Winkie. “Why
doesn’t he go to bed, like bigger people?” -

“Perhaps he had the earache,” said mamma, “and got up
- to tell his mother.”

“Well, I hope she will put in some cotton, and cuddle him
down in her bed, and cure the pain,” said Winkie.

“Oh! I-think she will,” said mamma: “she will try to
make her poor little Brownie teei better.” aes

“Will she be as good a mother-mouse as you are?” said
Winkie, laughing nearly as loud as he had cried. Winkie
kept awake half an hour or more, talking about the mouse
and its earache. So at last his own aches all went away.

He fell asleep, and dreamed he was'climbing into a hole
among the chimney-bricks, nibbling crackers ; and that in his
mamma’s bed, cuddled down on his mamma’s arm, a, little

mouse was just going to sleep with cotton in boin ears.
Mamma.



















AUR



















































SEA-BIRD CATCHING.

Tux Faroe Isles, a group of islands belonging to Denmark,

‘are situated in the Atlantic Ocean, about three hundred and

fifty miles south-east from Iceland. The people of these
islands support themselves chiefly by catching sea-birds,
which flock in great numbers upon the: steep rocks of the

- coast.



SIX-IN-HAND.

It is a very dangerous pursuit. Hvery year many of the
Faroese lose their lives in it.

The fowlers provide themselves with a long cable two
inches thick, on which is fastened a kind of seat. A beam
is placed at the edge of the rock to peas the rope being
cut by the rough stone.

The bird- taker, seated on the end of the cable, is let down
by six men. He holds a small cord in his hand, by means
of which he can make certain signs agreed upon with his
comrades.

On reaching a ledge, the bird-taker ties the rope to any
convenient point, and then kills as many birds as he can,
catching them in his net, or seizing them with his hands.

If he sees a hollow or a niche beyond his reach, where
many birds are perched, he sits down again on his little
plank, and, by jerking the rope, swings himself to the spot
he wishes to explore.

The birds when killed are thrown to the men below, who
are ready for them in a boat under the cliff. ee ene ica



SIX-IN-HAND.















































MY DOLL.

I am going to tell you about my doll. Her name is Lily, ©
and she is very beautiful: so I think, and so do all my little
friends. She was sent to me from New Orleans. I got her
when I was only four years old. She is nearly as large
as my little sister, who is five months old.

My little sister’s name is Hatty. She is very pretty, and
has curly hair like my doll. She already says, “Mamma,”
and laughs when she sees me coming home from school. I
love her very much, and long to have the summer-days
come, when Rover and I can take her to ride.

Rover is our big black dog. He is a noble dog, and a
very kind dog too. I had a little sister Jenny. Rover used
to take her to ride; so for her sake we all love Rover very
much. We shall teach him to love Hatty, me is my only
little sister now.

I am making some new things for my doll; for I mean
to give her to Hatty for a birthday ee I am nine years
old, and my name is fen

Sypney, C.B.



UNCLE JOHN’S DOG SKYE.

Wuen first I knew Skye, he,

was. a young dog, and full of
fun. He would run and jump
and frisk, and look like a ball
of wool at play; and no walk
— was too long for Skye then.
_ Skye was a good dog, and
a ==> would do just as he was bid.
Soinstinies Uncle J. abn would say to him, “Sit down, Skye,
and I will give you a bit of cake.”

Down Skye would sit. “Beg, Skye.” Up Skye would sit
_ on his hind-legs. Then Uncle John would pay a bit of cake
on this little dog’s nose.

‘And Uncle J ait would say to him, “ Now, Skye, you must
not eat that cake till I count six. Now: one, two”

Skye would sit as grave as you please, his fore-paws in
the air, and the cake on his nose. Then Uncle John would
say, “ Three, four, five ” —

Skye would look hard at Uncle John, as much as to say,
“One more, and the cake is mine.” But he would not bark
nor move; no, not if Uncle John made him wait a long,
long time. ;

But when Uncle John said “Six,” the dog would throw the
cake up in the air, and catch it in his mouth, and eat it up;
oh, so fast, so fast! It was rare fun to see Skye catch his
cake,

Now, years went by, and Skye grew old, and ie could not
run and jump and frisk, and catch cake, as in times past; but
he was a good dog and a great pet, for all that.

When Uncle John went for a walk, Skye went with him;





UNCLE JOHN’S DOG SKY».

till one day Uncle John took a walk which was too long for
Skye, and, when Skye got home, he was quite tired out.

Some time went by; and then Uncle John and his girls
went for the same long walk which had tired Skye so much.

“Stay at home, Skye,” said Uncle John; but Skye did not
want to stay at home, and, of course, he did not know that
they were going to take so long a walk. So Skye set off to
go with them.

By and by they turned into a lane. “Ho, ho!” thought
Skye, “ that'is where you are going; is it? You may go by
yourself then. I shall not go with you.”

But Skye did not want to show that the walk was too
long for him. He thought to himself,“I can plan a trick
by which they will not know I do not want to take so long
a walk.” He was a proud dog, you see.

So Skye ran to a part of the lane by himself; and then he
stood still, and looked in the hedge; and then he gave the
earth a scratch; and then he put down his head to smell.

He acted as if he would like to say to the folks, “I have
got a rat here: I must catch this rat. You can go on for
your walk, and I must stay and catch the rat.”

And, all the time, there was no more a rat in that hole
than there is a rat in the room here. It was just a sly trick
to hide the truth that Skye had found out that the walk
would be too far for him.

For, so soon as he thought that his master had got out of
sight, Skye set off to walk home by himself. But his mas-
ter saw him forall that; and Skye was found out in his want
of truth.

Was he notasly dog? Yes; and-he did his trick in such
a sly way, too, that you could not but laugh to see him hunt

for the rat. when he knew that there was no rat there at all.
Trorrie’s Aunt











‘GINX’S HARNESS.

Wuart wonderful steed
Comes flying with speed
Down the walk with a scarlet harness on?
Scamper or trot,
It matters not,
Gallop, or caper, or prance, or run.

Such trappings fine!
They glitter and shine:
The bells are golden, the reins are red,
And tassels gay
Swing every way ;
And merrily tosses the curly head.



GINX’S HARNESS.

Those bells of gold,
Be it hot, or cold,
- Midsummer weather, or winter snow,
Ring with swinging,
And swing with ringing,
Whenever this steed starts out to go.

Does he stand in a stall,

I wonder, at all,
And eat from a manger oats and hay?
‘Ah, no, indeed!

This wonderful steed

Sits at my table every day. -

. And with haste so great, :
That he cannot wait
Even to lay his harness by,
He goes to work,
With spoon or fork, -
At the nearest dish, be it pickles or pie.

a ap

There is, I admit,
Excuse for it,
For Ginx has a deal of eating to do;
And more, besides,
Whenever he rides,
He has to be horse and driver too.

CLARA Doty BAtTEs.



























































































































































































































































































HOW UNCLE PETER SAVED THE CHILDREN.

Watter should have known better; but he was always a
rash boy. I will tell you what he did last month, at the sea-
side, where he was staying with his mother. He persuaded
his two little sisters, Emma and Eliza, to go with him on to
a rock on the beach, near the water’s edge.

There they staid, playing in the sand, till, all at once, they
looked up, and saw that the water of the ocean was all about
them. The tide had come up, and crept round the rock, so
that they could not get to the dry land without going through
water; and that they were afraid to do.

Soon the little girls began to cry. The sea-birds swept
down near them ; and now and then a fish would come up
by the rock as if he did not fear them at all. Walter told



HOW UNOLE PETER SAVED THE CHILDREN.

the little girls not to make a fuss; though he began to feel
a little anxious himself.

All at once he cried out, “There’s a boat with some men
in it! But it isn’t. coming this way. A man with a spy-
glass stands at the bow. He is spying out something.
Why can’t he look this way? Halloo, halloo!”





==

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Walter shouted as loud as he could; and then the three
children shouted all together: but nobody seemed to hear
them. On and on went the little boat before a good breeze ;
but not one of the five men in it seemed to take notice of
the three children on the rock. ;

“ What shall we do now? Shall we have to stay here all
night ?” asked Emma, the elder sister.



HOW UNCLE PETER SAVED THE CHILDREN.

“We couldn’t stay here all night,” said Walter, “because,
you see, the rock will be all covered with water at high tide ;
and, if we don’t get off before high tide, we shall have to be
drowned.”

“J don’t want to be drowned,” sobbed Emma. é

“Neither do I’want to be drowned,” said Walter ; “but
there’s no use in crying. Tears will only add more water to
the sea, and there’s more water in it already than we want.”

The little girl stopped crying at these words, and took
care that no more tears should fall from her eyes. She
looked at Walter with surprise to see him so brave,

But the little fellow was sly: he had cause for his cour-
age. The boat with men in it had sailed far away; but not.
far off he saw Uncle Peter, waving his arms at him. Then
he saw Uncle Peter take off his boots, and pull up his
trousers. Walter well knew that all would be right, the
moment Uncle Peter got sight of them on the rock.

Uncle Peter was a clever old fisherman, who caught fish
for the hotel, where the children were stopping. He was
fond of children; and, having none of his own, he made
much of those of other people. He had taken such a liking
to Walter and his sisters, that he was on the watch for them
a good part of the time, to see that they did not get into
mischief.

“TI declare, there’s Uncle Peter coming!” shouted Emm

with delight. 7

“Uncle Peter? Nonsense!” said Walter. “Where’s
Uncle Peter ?” ny

Now, Walter knew very well that Uncle Peter was coming,
and Walter ought not to have pretended that he did not see
him. But he wanted to seem brave. Ah, Walter! you had
better be than seem.

“Well, here’s a scrape, you little rogues!” said Uncle Pe-



WHERE IS HE?

ter, as he waded up to the rock, and took one child, and then
another, in his arms. “Here’s a scrape, indeed! What would
“you have done if I had not been on the lookout for you?”

Then, with his arms full of children, Uncle Peter waded
back through the salt water, to the beach, and put them all
down on the warm, dry sand, where their mother and father
were waiting for them.

The parents kissed them all round; and then little Emma
said, “I think Uncle Peter ought to be kissed too.” “So he
ought, my dear,” said her mother, laughing ; “ and you shall
give him kisses for all” So Emma gave Uncle Peter five
kisses; and Uncle Peter was so pleased, that his face shone
like a jolly full moon. Rate: CARTER.



WHERE IS HE?

“Wuo has seen little Ray ?

T left him here at play,
Keeping a candy-store ;

Here are his pennies four ;

And here is his little red purse:
Tll go and ask old nurse.

“Nurse, where is Ray ?”
“Indeed, ma’am, I can’t say.



WHERE IS HE?

He came in just about three,
As wet as wet could be,
From playing in the brook :
Tll go and ask cook.

“ Cook, is Ray hereabout?”

“He was; but he has gone out.

It’s just about half an hour

Since I found him with water and flour,
Stirring it up to ‘make dough :’
Perhaps the coachman may know.

“Thomas, is Ray with you?

_ Here’s his nurse in a stew.”

“ No: he’s just gone through the gate,
I caught him riding black Kate ;

She was tied fast, that’s well :

Maybe the gardener can tell.

“James, have you seen Ray ?”

“No: [ve not seen him all day ;

I’ve to watch the fruit every minute,
So many robins are in it. c
What’s that that looks so red
‘Bobbing round in the strawberry-bed ?
Hallo! Tom, cook, nurse, I say,

Here’s that little mischief, Ray !”

ELIZABETH SILL



w6



EMILY'S STORY.

OW tell me a story, my own mother,” said little
Emily.

“But do you not see, Emily, that I am read-
ing? It is not polite to disturb one who is
reading,” said her mother.

“ And it is not polite to read in company,” said Emily.

“What!” said her mother, laughing, “must I look upon
my little Emily as company ?”

“But do you not see this fine lady on the sofa, who has
come to make you a visit?” asked Emily.

“Oh! Miss Lily, your proud doll, must be treated as com-
pany, and entertained; must she?” asked mamma.

“Yes, mother : so tell us a story,” said the little girl. .

Mamma could not refuse Emily any longer. “I will tell
you,” said she, “the story of



“¢Tar Lirrte Gin WHO ENTERTAINED HERSELF.’

“Once there was a litile girl named Hope, who had a
bad fall from the top of the stairs, and hurt herself so much,
that she could not walk. but had to be dragged round in a
little carriage.

“Qn fine sunny days in spring, they would drag her in
the carriage out on the lawn; and then Hope would say,
‘Now leave me, for I can entertain myself’

“ But how did the little girl entertain herself? She had
no books, no pictures, no toys, no doll, — nothing pat some
crumbs and some canary-seed in a bag.

“This is what she did: she made the acquaintance of
some little birds, — blue-birds, yellow-birds, and gray spar
rows, to whom she gave the crumbs and the seed.

+





EMILY’S STORY.

“By and by, aleve grew so tame and so bold, that they
would fly up on her lap, and eat; and at last they would
stand on her finger, and peck ue the seed from the hollow
of her hand.

“ But there was a little sparrow to whom Hope had given
the name of Tot; and he was so quarrelsome, that she had
to scold him. He wanted to drive off all the blue-birds and
yellow-birds, so that none but gray-birds should have the
seed. He was a Know-nothing, you see.

“He was so bold, that he was not at all afraid of Hope.
Once, when she had a bit of bread in her mouth, Tot flew
up and pecked at her lips, as much as to say, ‘ Give me that
bit of bread: I want it myself’? Was he not a saucy bird?

“Hope laughed a good deal to see Tot so eager. But she
did not punish him. She only talked to him, and tried to
teach him to be good to birds of a different color from
himself.

“When it grew near to sunset, and the birds had to fly
away to their nests, Hope would watch the clouds, and try
to see the evening star. Then her mother would come and
take her into the house, and give her some bread and milk.

“The sunshine and the fresh air did her so much good,
that Hope at last began to grow strong, and at last she
could walk as well as anybody.

“The birds were frightened, at first, to see her walk ; but
they soon found that she was their own dear little Hope,
and then they would light on her shoulder, and be as fear-
less and free as when she had to sit all the time in her
carriage. ;

“When Hope grew quite well she did not lose the habit of
learning to entertain herself. She loved the birds and the
flowers and the trees so much, that she found them always
good company.





A TALK ABOUT THE MOON.

« While her mother was occupied, Hope never had to go
and tease her to tell her a story. She wanted no better
stories, you see, than the birds and the flowers and the trees

could tell her. You must try to do as Hope did.”

Eminy CARTER.



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A TALK ABOUT THE MOON.

“Tyrre, don’t you see those dark places on the moon? 1]
do,” said Henry.

“Those,” said his mother, “ are mountains, with deep cav-
erns, or valleys, by their side. .

“Nobody can live in the moon, because an atmosphere is
needed to sustain life; and the moon has no atmosphere.

“The air we breathe is the atmosphere about our earth;
and, if it were not for the air, we could not breathe at all.

«When a man goes very high up in a balloon, he gets
nearer and nearer to the place where our atmosphere. ends;





TOT’S ALMANAC.

and then he finds he can’t breathe as well as he could down
near the earth.

“The moon is not nearly as large as our earth; but it is
four hundred times nearer to us than the sun is. No water
and no clouds-are to be seen on the moon. It must be a
very dry place there. .

“The moon we now see is a full moon. Soon she will

begin to wane ; then she will get between us and the sun,
so that we cannot see her bright side. She is then said to
change.

“Days will pass by, and at last she will turn a bright edge
toward us; and that we call a new moon. This will grow
in breadth till we have a hajf moon ; and, not long after-
wards, we shall have the dear old friend we are now looking
at — the full moon — back again.” Nips CREWER.

0.079300

TOT’S ALMANAC.

Wuewn January’s here, While July stays,
Snow-men appear ; Flies have curious ways ;
While February’s waiting, When August comes,
We'll have some skating. Look out for plums!
When March comes this way, While September wears,
Breezes are at play; ° Help get in the pears;
During April hours When October grieves,

_ Expect sun-showers. Help bind up the sheaves.
When May-flowers hide, Ere November flies,
Search far and wide! You shall see mince-pies ;
When the year’s at June, ’ When December’s knocking,

Half the world’s in tune. Then hang up your stocking.

Mary N. Presoorr.





-







































































































































































BOHNANDREW-SON.=





PLAYING ROBINSON CRUSOE.

Pray this is my little island
In the middle of the floor ;
And this arm-chair is my castle,
With the ladder up before.

Play the cat is my man Friday ;
And the broom shall be my gun;
T’ve some wooden goats and a parrot:
Please to call me Robinson.

Play I’m ‘sighing for a vessel,
And I’m on the watch for her;
Then the table is my big. boat,
Which I’ve tried in vain to stir.



3 A DUCK STORY.

Play the savages are coming:
: They are making for the land!
Now, I’m going to fire among them
When they gather on the sand.

Oh! it’s jolly on this island
For an hour or so to stay ;
But to live so far from mother ! —
I am glad it’s only play ! Gastar Chosen

























A DUCK STORY.

Lirriz Appts W. was five years old. She lived on a farm,
and took great delight in feeding and petting the lambs,
chickens, and ducks. They all learned to know and love
her. This made Addie very happy.

One morning, she was much pleased at finding in the barn
eight little ducklings, — eight little puffs of down, with queer
little bills, bright bead-like eyes, and the cunningest little



A DUCK STORY.

web feet. She laughed with delight as they waddled about
on the hay. .

Then she ran to the house to tell mamma; and soon
brother James had fixed a pen to keep the little ducks in.
Addie placed some boards over the corner of the pen to
shade them from the hot sun. Then she fed and watered
them, and felt as though she could hardly leave them long
enough to eat her own dinner.

Every day she watched and tended them; but, when they
were about three days old, she began to feel very sorry that
the poor little things had no place to swim in. They would
dip their little heads into the drinking-dish ; then crowd into
it, and try so hard to swim, that Addie thought she must
find some way to gratify them.

So, after thinking a little, she ran to the house and bor-
rowed mamma’s hatchet and fire-shovel; then she climbed
into the pen, and began to chop away at the ground in one
corner. After she had loosened a portion of it, she threw it
out of the pen with the shovel; then she loosened more;
and worked away until she had taken out earth enough to
leave a hole as large round as a bucket, and nearly as deep.
Then she brought water, and filled the hole quite full.

When all was ready, she drove the ducks down toward
their little pond. As soon as they saw the water, they -
plunged into it, and seemed so happy, that the poor little
girl felt well paid for her trouble. She watched them a
while; and then, feeling tired with her work in the hot sun,
she went back to the house. ;

When, two hours later, she went to look again at her
treasures, she found that her pond had all dried up, and the
poor little ducks were glad enough to be taken out of the
hole.

This was their first lesson in swimming; but Alice did not



THE TAME SNAKE.

try to give them a bath again. They soon grew-:large
enough to swim in the big pond; and by and by, to Alice’s
delight, they had a new brood of ducklings to take to the
water with them. ; 5. M.D.

—voitKoo——















































































































































































THE TAME SNAKE.

Most people dislike snakes’ very much. Some snakes are
harmless; but the bite of some kinds is so poisonous as to
cause death. So it is best'to have as little to do as possible
with snakes.

But snakes may be tamed; and I have heard a true story
of a lady who tamed a little green snake so that it would



HARRY AND CHASE.

follow her wherever she went. If she went in a boat, it
‘would swim after her; and, if she put out her arm in the
water, it would creep up, and wind itself round her neck.

T do not think I could ever like a snake so well as to let it
do such things; but the fact shows that kind treatment will
make even snakes show love and confidence.

The lady I speak of was so kind to all living things, that
they all seemed to know she was their friend. An old horse
that was very skittish when any man mounted his back
would stand quite still while this lady mounted.

T have heard a true story of a little girl who was sitting
out of doors one day, eating her bread and milk from a bowl, ©
when a, large snake came up, curved-his head over into the
bowl, and lapped the milk. The little girl was not fright-
ened: she only said, “Take a spoon, snake.” The snake
did not hurt her. As soon as he had got milk. enough, he
went off. ‘ i Ipa Fay.

——.050300-—_

HARRY AND CHASE.

Harry and Cuasz are two little boys about
five years old, who live in the same town,
and quite near each other. They are great
friends, and very fond of playing together.
Harry’s mamma is an English lady ; and he
has chubby red cheeks, and dark hair and
» eyes: Chase’s mamma is a French lady; and
he has light hair, large blue eyes, and less
rosy cheeks than Harry. :

Harry’s papa is building a railroad a long way off from
home, and one day he sent Harry’s mamma two paroquets.
Do you know what a paroquet is? It is a beautiful bird







A DONKEY RACE.

with bright red and yellow feathers, and looks very much
like a poll parrot: indeed, it is a sort of parrot. ;

Harry’s mamma put the two paroquets in a wooden box
- till she could get a cage for them; but they did not seem
happy in the box, and would take but very little food. In
_a few days one of them died. The other one picked and
picked at the wooden box with its strong bill, till it made a
hole and got away. It flew out of the window, and was gone
_ In a minute.
_ Harry and Chase set out to hunt it; and, after some
time, they found it in a peach-tree some distance from
the house; but they could not catch it. It flew about
the neighborhood all day, making a strange, loud noise,
and towards evening it lighted on the roof of a barn near
Harry’s house.

After dark, Fred, the hired man, climbed up, and caught
the paroquet in his hands. They have a tin cage for him

now, so he cannot bite his way out any more.
©. M. W.

























































































































































































































































































































































A DONKEY RACE.































A BASKET OF KITTENS. ;

“Pussy, Pussy!” called Willie one morning to his cat.
Pussy stuck her head out of the closet-door, and said,
“ Purr, purr, purr.”
“What makes you stay in the closet, Pussy?” said Willie.
“Purr, purr, purr,” answered Pussy.
Willie went to the closet, and opened the door ; and there,
in a box where mamma kept a beautiful white shawl, were
two cunning little kittens. ;
Pussy was very much pleased that Willie had found them ;_
and she rubbed against his legs, and said, “ Purr, purr, purr.”
Willie ran and told his mamma. When she came, she
said, “Dear me! kittens on my best shawl: that won’t do.
Run, Willie, and get the basket that you keep your toys in.”
Willie brought the basket, and mamma made a soft bed
init. The basket was just big enough for Pussy to curl up
in it with her kittens.
Willie ran around with the baskets, showing Pussy and her
kittens to every one. ¥



THE BOY AND THE AUK.

Pussy loved Willie very much, because he had been good

to her. She liked to have him carry her about; and she said,

“ Purr, purr, purr,” all the time.

Willie said that he liked to have “live toys” in his basket
better than tops and balls and tin soldiers; and he ‘sat out
in the woodshed with the basket i in hig arms nearly all day
long. / BETH.

—oottoo——.

THE BOY AND THE AUK.

“ Aux, auk, why don’t you walk?
Why don’t you walk or fiy?
Can it be nice to live on the ice
Where the great sea-waves roll by ?”

“Boy, boy, hobbledehoy,

: My wings are’short and small :
- If I were to try, not far could I fly;
And I have no legs at all.”



“ Auk, auk, I wish you could walk:
I'd find you a pleasanter home,

Far from the shore where the cold winds roar,
And the great green sea-waves come.”

“ Boy, boy, hobbledehoy,
This home is for me the best:
One wiser than you directs what I do,

And teaches me where to rest.”
Mrs. A. M. WELLS,














~s yf

) S
ste.



































OLD JACK, THE MULE.

He belongs to us boys, and we drive him as much as we
please. He is a very safe animal to drive, for he never runs
away; and it is as much as we can do to make him run at
all. A slow walk is his favorite pace.

In the picture you may see us taking a ride in the mule-
cart, Just as we looked when we were photographed the
other day. We wanted to have little Lucy in the picture:
so George and I took her on the seat between us, and Harry
stood up behind. I took off my hat, you see, because it
came right in front of Harry’s face.

We all sat still while the picture was taken; and old ag ack
stood as still as a statue. Standing still is one of his strong
points. He is not a match for a cace-horse in spéed; but he
cai’t be beat at standing still.

Harry says he should like him better if there were more
“go” in him; and so should I. . But we like him very well
as he is; for he is a good old mule, and gives us many a nice

ride. FRANK.



UNCAN has a nose,
Points my finger at it:

4] Has a nose the hare,
He will let you pat it.





Peacock has a nose,
Very proud he’s feeling.



Has a nose the bull,
Soon he will be lowing.



Has a nose the fox, Has a nose the hog,
He is very knowing. ‘Soon will he bé squealing.

Tell me which of all these noses -
Duncan now the best supposes.





THE SISTERS. -

CE there lived near the fields and woods of a
| small village a poor woman who had three daugh-
ters. ‘Though good, she was so simple, that she
| was ready to believe all that people told her.

~ One day a peddler came to her house, and
tried to get her to buy a wooden clock; but she said she
had one already: then he tried to make her buy some tin-
ware; but she told him she was well supplied: and at last
he offered to tell her fortune and that of her three daughters
for a quarter of a dollar.

This seemed to the poor woman very cheap; for she was
not wise enough to know that a foolish thing is dear at any
price. So she consented to give him a quarter of a dollar
if he would tell them all their fortunes.

“Here are my three little girls, — Anna, Bella, and Celia,”
— said the mother.



“Why don’t you call them A, B, and C ?” asked the ped-
dler: “that would save time; and time is money, you know.

Come here, Anna, and give me your hand.”

Then Anna gave him her hand; and he looked at the lines
on the palm, and said, “ You, Anna, are born to great riches.
Dear me! How rich you will be!. What piles of gold. I see
hid away all for you to handle!”

Then Bella came forward, and gave the peddler her hand;
and he looked at the lines of the palm, and said, “ Well, I
declare! what a golden family you are going to be! *Noth-
ing but gold, gold, gold, can I find in these lines. There,
Bella, your fortune is told.” |

Little Celia now let him take her hand; and, as he looked



ee



anh :
ANN

ny Ne UR

Wk SS ay
ww wr WS )
ees “aL A\il

NY YO x

{ y
oe \ =

Nine SK

h Ve
A iit gia |
ae lea i\\ age

A ut

SORE



i AN i ‘ pe “
eS

X SS SN
‘THE SISTERS.



THE SISTERS.

at. Het palm, he put on his Benniee saying, i These lines
are so fine, that I ought to charge double price for studying
them. However, a bargain is a bargain. You, Celia, are
going to be the richest of all.”

“And how is it with me ?” asked the good mother, hold-
ing out her hand, and at the same time paying a peddler
his quarter cf a dollar.

“Oh!” said he, looking carelessly at her hand, and then
taking up his pack, “you are rich enough already !”

And with these words the saucy petal put the Money
in his pocket, and departed.

That ‘next summer, on a lovely day in ae the three
sisters strolled out near the edge of a wood to pick wild
flowers and make dandelion-chains.

As they sat on a bank under a tree, ae began to talk
of the peddler and: the fortunes he had promised. They
were too wise to believe what he had said; and ig tey laughed
merrily at his impudence.

“To think of his telling Sothor that she was rich enough
already!” said Celia.

“An idea strikes me,” replied Anna. “The neddicr was
right after all, —right in a certain sense. What he meant
was, that mother was rich in love. By gold he meant tove) ;
which is something better than gold, you know.”

“Yes,” said Bella; “and, when he said we should be rich,
he meant we aroal dearly love one another. And don’t
we love one another? And isn’t this little Celia the richest
of all inlove? Yes: Inow see what the peddler meant, and
I do not grudge him his quarter of a dollar. We are all
rich, oh, very rich, in love!” a

Then the sisters rose ang sauntered home with arms
around one another’s necks to tell their mother of the
bright discovery which they had made. Dora Burwsioe.







A WAYSIDE INN.

Was ever host so kind as mine,
With whom I tarried lately? |

A golden apple, as his sign,
From a high bough swung stately.

It was the goodly apple-tree,
Whose shelter thus invited:

There sweetest fare was given me,
And freshest drink delighted.

Guests came unto this green roof-tree,
Full many lightly winging:

They feasted, danced, and sang with glee,
Till all the air was ringing.

For my repose I sought a bed;
A grassy couch was found me;

My host himself a cover spread
Of cooling shade around me.

And, when I asked what I should pay,
He shook his crown benignly:

May he be blest till his last day,
And root and shoot thrive finely !

M. A. C. (FRoM THE GERMAN oF UBLAND.)





AN ARMFUL OF KITTENS.

Our Emma has only one fault: she is too fond of kittens.
She always wants a troop of kittens about the house; and
as I like order, and do not like to have my spools of thread
rolled ‘about the carpet, I am a foe to kittens.

The other day I heard a great noise from the old cat.
She was whining and-crying as if in distress. I went into
_ the barn to see what was the matter; and there was Emma
with three new-born kittens in her arms.

She was so greedy, that she could not be content with
holding one at a time: she must have them all. No won-
_ der the old cat protested against such grasping conduct. -

Emma has a dog: Turk is his name. He is a little bit of
‘a fellow, but brave as a lion. The other day, a great dog
came into the yard, and ran for a kitten. The old cat was
in the barn at the time, and did not see him.

Round the yard and into the garden he ran, Emma trying
in vain to stop him, and the poor little kitten frightened
almost to death, and scampering for dear life.

But, just as the big coward of a dog got a few hairs of the
’ kitten’s fur in his-mouth, he all at once came to grief.

What do you think took place? Why, little Turk flew
straight at his throat, and gave him such a nip, that he howled
with pain. Just then the old cat came up, and, seeing what
was going on, bristled with rage, and would have scratched
out the dog’s eyes if he had not run out of the yard.

_ Then the old cat went up to Turk, and purred as if to
thank him for what he had done. She had not been very
- friendly to him before.

Ever since that test of his courage and good will, she lets
him come to the swill-pail without growling or spitting at
him. I think she would share her last bone with him now.

Emma's AUNT.











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































UQHN ANDRE W— SOM

AN ARMFUL OF KITTENS.



THE KITTENS.

“O papa!” said Emma, running up to her father one
day : “our old cat has got five dear fade kittens. Isn’t it
nice ?”

Much to Emma’s surprise, her father did not seem to be
pleased at all. He was not fond of cats.

“Well, my dear,” said he,“I think they had better be
disposed of. One cat in the house is enough.”

“But these are not cats,” said Emma. “ They are cunning
little kittens ; and I don’t want to have them disposed of.”

Here Emme’s mother put in a word. “They will soon
grow up to be cats,” said she. “We cannot keep five more
cats. We must get rid of three or four of them at once.” °

But Emma wanted to keep them all. Five kittens, she
said, were none too many. There was one for herself, one
for little Ann, one for Johnny, one for the baby, and one for
the old cat. What could be nicer?

In spite of Emma’s entreaties, in which the ofher children
joined with great clamor, papa insisted upon it that the
kittens must be “disposed of” What did he mean by that?
T heard him say something to Patrick the man-servant about
chloroform. Could that have had any thing to do with it?

I don’t know. - But, if Pat was expected to “dispose of”
‘those kittens, he had a wonderful knack at forgetting it.
He had a tender heart, and he was very fond of the children.
He had a great deal to do. How could he think: of every
thing?

So day after ae cease and the kittens were not aispoe
of. The children made them such pets and playmates, and
grew so fond of them, that even papa had to give in at last,
and accept them as members of the family.



Full Text

The Baldwin Library
University

RMB eke


ay

eater

Reet
a

Spans
Hees

4
ae
35

e

fas ey S

Seite senate
atts
qe


it

naa
BNR
i a

I
i i |







THE BOOK AUNT MARY SENT.
INTHE SPRING-TIME,
S = pagans

FOR

YOUNG READERS



SYNDICATE TRADING COMPANY -

- NEW YORK


Copyright 1891 by

’ SYNDICATE TrRApING CoMPANY




SING-SONG TO BABY NED.

_ Bssy Nw! Baby Ned!
With the busy little head,
Amd the twinlklimg little eyes that shine, shine, shine :
Hold your morsel of am ear,
Im your fiashion that's so queer,
Amd! be canefiull that: you hear
These wery serious words of mime, mime, mine,
wil
SING-SONG TO BABY NED.

Baby dear! Baby dear!
Did you ever chance to hear
How Willie Winkie goes round the town, town, town,
And, where’er he makes a call,
All the little eyelids fall, —
And the babies one and all
In their cosy little nests cuddle down, down, down?

Then the sand-man comes along,
Crooning out a drowsy song,
And seals each blinking eye that tries to peep, peep, peep ;
Then through the long, long night,
Even till the morning light,
Every blessed little wight
Does nothing in the world but sleep, sleep, sleep. |

Baby Ned! Baby Ned!
With the busy little head,
Here comes Willie Winkie now, little man, man, man;
Ask him quick to stay with you;
Ask the good old sand-man too ;
Never let. them bid adieu, -
And learn to sleep o’nights, if you can, can, can. yn.


- from her friends in the woods.

HAZEL HOLLOW.

NCE there was a little girl named Mabel; and,
one Saturday afternoon in autumn, she asked
her mother if she might go with some of the

school-girls to pick hazel-nuts.
~ Mabel was such a good little girl, that her
mother did not like to refuse her any thing ; and so told her
she might go if she would take care not to get separated



“Do not fear for me, mother mine,” said Mabel ; and off
_ the little girl tripped, and joined her friends, Susan Lane,
Lucy Manning, and I know not how many more. school-girls,
—all ready for a frolic. ;
They walked two miles be.ore they came to the place ©
where the hazel-nuts grew in plenty; and then they all went
into a low dell, or hollow, where the nuts grew thick, though
the sunshine could hardly send one of its rays into the close
bushes. .
Mabel was so delighted at. the sight, that she began. to
pick the nuts, and fill her apron with them ; for, in her hur-
ry, she had forgotten to take a basket, smote
She was so intent on picking the nuts, that she did not
hotice that the buzz of the voices of her friends was no
longer heard. But all .at once she looked round, and saw
that she was all alone. No trace of one of her friends could
she see. She called “Susan! Lucy!” but no one answered.
“You are trying to frighten me!” cried Mabel. « Susan !
Mary! answer me! You have kept the joke up long
enough.” But no sound could Mabel hear except the song
of a distant thrush, and the tapping of a woodpecker on
the trunk of a tree near by.
HAZEL HOLLOW. ; a

She now began to get distressed; for Hazel Hollow was a
dark and lonely place, and far from any house. Then, hold-.
ing her nuts still in her apron, she climbed up out of the
hollow, and found herself in a wood. She aid not- know
which path to take.

She walked a few steps, when she heard a loud rattling
noise. “Ah! that must be a rattlesnake,” thought: poor
Mabel; and off she ran in another direction, and sat down
on a rock.

But she had not sat there long, when she heard a growl
that seemed to come from behind a bush. “ What can that’
be?” thought Mabel. “I'll not be afraid if I can help it”
Then came a loud hissing noise, and then another growl.

“Tm not afraid of any wild beast that dwells in these
woods,” thought Mabel; “for my mother told me that there —
were none here but rabbits and squirrels, ane I’m sure they
would run from me if they were to see me.”

So Mabel picked up a stick, and was running round by
the bush, when she stumbled over something that was alive,

_and that seized hold of her, and began to growl. It acted
as if it wanted to scratch and bite her; but it did no
harm

“Oh, you needn’t try to scare me!” cried Mabel. “If you
can’t growl better than that, you had better not try to play
the wild beast again. I know you, Lucy Manning! And
there are the rest of you hiding there behind the trunks of
trees. Oh, you ought to be ashamed of yourselves!”

Yes: there were all the girls; and I think they ought to
have known better than to try to frighten a little girl like
Mabel. They all came up and began to laugh, when they
found that she was not to be fooled. It is not a good plan to j
play such jokes on children; for, if Mabel had been a timid
child, she might have been seriously harmed. ;

Anna LrIvINnesTon.
f






HAZEL HOLLOW.
FROGS AT SCHOOL.

Twenty froggies went to school,
Down beside a rushy pool.
Twenty little coats of green;
Twenty vests, all white and clean.
“We must be in time,” said they:
“ First we study, then we play;
That is how we keep the rule,
When we froggies go to school.”

_ Master Bullfrog, grave and stern,

~ Called the classes in their turn;

- Taught them how to nobly strive,
Likewise how to leap and dive ;

From his seat upon a log,

Showed them how to say “ Ker- nee! «
Also how to dodge a blow

From the sticks which bad boys throw.

Twenty froggies grew up fast;
Bullfrogs they became at last ;
Not one dunce among the lot,
Not one lesson they forgot ;
Polished in a high degree,

As each froggie ought to be:
Now they sit on other logs,
Teaching other little frogs,

Gzorce Cooper.




COOSIE AND GARRIR.

Cousin CHaruzs said, “Come and see the sheep.” So I
went to where he was standing on the front porch, and call-
ing ¢ Co-nan, co-nan, co-nan!” The gate was open; and the
sheep and lambs were coming into the yard.

I asked, “ Why do you tell John to drive the: sheep into
_the yard?” Charles answered, “ Because it has been rain-
ing hard; and the brook in the meadow has grown so big,
that Iam afraid the sheep will get drowned in it.

_ “Last year we found a sheep lying dead in the brook.
Her two lambs were standing near by, crying for her.
We took them to the house, and fed them with milk. We
named them Coosie and Carrie. Mother can tell you about
them.” :

Then I ran to auntie, and said, “Oh! tell me all about
Coosie and Carrie.” So my aunt told me.about them; and
this is what she said : — .

When the two little lambs were first brought in, Mary, the cook, made
_ anice bed for them in one corner of the kitchen, Then she put some
warm milk in a bottle, and took one of tle lambs up in her lap and fed it.
Oh, how pleased it was! And the other lamb stood by crying until its
turn came, A

. The lambs soon grew fat and strong, and ran about the yard. But they
made themselves quite at home in the house ; and we could not keep them
out. owl

One day I went into my room; and there were Coosie and Carrie jump-
ing up and down upon my spring-bed.

I sat down and laughed heartily; and the lambs kept on jumping, and
looked as if they were trying to laugh too. But I could not have such
saucy lambs about the house any longer: so they were driven to the
meadow with the rest of the flock.

Auntie and I laughed again to think of the lambs’ frolic ;
COOSIE AND CARRIE.

and I said, “O auntie! how I wish they would eat out of
my hand now! Do you think they will?”

“Tam afraid not,” said she. “They have been with the
flock a whole year, and I suppose are no poner tame ; but
you can try. Take some apples to them.”

So, with some apples in my hand, I went out, calling
“Co-nan, co-nan!” The sheep were afraid, and walked
away, crying “ Baa-a-ah;” and the little lambs answered,
“ Baa-a-ah.”





a] * ma



I followed slowly ; and at last one sheep stood still. |
went up close to her, calling “ Coosie, Carrie!” for 1 knew
it must be one or the other. She ate the apples out of my
hand, and let me pat her head, and feel her soft wool.

The next time I went out with apples, two sheep came to
my call. They looked exactly alike to me; but Mary told
me which was Coosie, and which was Cane: After that,
THE FOURTH OF JULY CAKR.

they did not wait to be called, but came running up as soon
as they saw mes.

When the sheep were driven away into the meadow-lot
again, I stood near the gate to see them go. The old sheep
walked along quietly ; but the lambs jumped and frisked
about, and kicked up their heels in a very funny way. The
sheep called out “Baa-a-ah!” and the lambs answered,
“Baa-a-ah!” and sometimes it sounded like « Maa-a-ah.”

Coosie and Carrie ran up, and licked my hand as I said
good-by. Now, were they not dear little pets?

AVF. A..



——00 502-0.

THE FOURTH. OF JULY CAKE.

Fred. —- Oh! look here, Bessy and Maggy: come and see
the splendid Fourth of July cake that mother has made!

Bessy.— You must not touch it, Fred: mother will be
displeased if you touch it.

Fred. —1I want to see if she has salted it well. Look at
the currants and the raisins!

Bessy. — And how nicely it is sugared and frosted !

Maggy.— Me see; me see!

Fred. — There! Maggy has put her whole hand in.
What will mother say ?'

Bessy. — Tt will do no harm now for me to taste it.

Fred. —Isn’t it nice ?

w2
THE FOURTH OF JULY CAKE.



Maggy. — Me want plum.

Bessy. — Maggy mustn’t stick her hand in. She will
spoil mamma’s nice cake. oe

Maggy.— Me want taste. You and Fred taste.

Fred. — Hark! I hear mother’s step on the stairs. Now
scatter, all three! Lick your fingers clean, and run.

Bessy. —I wish we hadn’t touched the cake.

(Enter Moruer.)
Mother. — What’s this? Who has been at my cake, —

my cake that I took so much pains to make handsome ?
Bessy. — Fred wanted to see if it was properly salted.


THE FOURTH OF JULY CAKE.

"Mother. —Here’s the mark of Maggy’s hand! And
here’s a deep hole which Fred’s naughty finger must have
made! And here, Bessy, are your marks. I’m ashamed
of you all. Meddling with my nice cake. without leave.

ee. —Tm very sorry I touched it, mother. ‘

| Fred. — So. am I; but I wanted to see if it was well
seasoned. =

- Mother. — Well Ronde sip? coe deserve to be well
seasoned with a rod. Now, your punishment shall be, not
to taste a crumb of this nice cake, any one cr ye T shall

give it to the poor fainily. opposite.”

Fred. — Hoo-00-00-00 !.. Oh, don’t!

Maggy. —Don’t, mamma ; don’t!

Bessy. — Such a beautiful ‘cake!

Mother. — The cake shall be given to the. poor; and you
must be contented with your bread and water.

Fred. — Forgive us this once, mother. Remember it’s
the Fourth of July, —a day when we all want to be jolly.

Mother. — They who would be jolly, must begin by
being good. The: cake goes to those who need it much
more than we do.

(The children ail cry.) Ge aera:




REMEMBERING THE SICK.

WORKS OF ART FOR CHILDREN.

I HAVE a little daughter who never returns from a walk in
the woods without bringing a bunch of gay flowers. I have
taught her to make of them many little works of art, which
you may also like to learn, dear reader. —

Here is the first. Certainly there must grow in your
neighborhood some larch or spruce trees. If we look sharp,
we shall soon find on them a handsome half-open cone. In
the small openings of this cone we stick delicate flowers and
grasses which we find in the meadows and fields.

When our nosegay is ready, we lay the cone with the
flowers very carefully in a dish of water.

' After an hour, the cone is so closely shut, that the flowers
are held as fast in its scales as if they had always grown
there. This makes a very nice present. :
.







OOS OE ee
= rou a
0 be is Cy

T will tell you how to make another pretty thing. You
know what a burr is. Alas! it has often played you many a
naughty trick, — woven itself provokingly into your clotlies,
or perhaps into your hair. I can teach you to make a better
use of" it.

Pluck an apron full: lay them one against another so that
they shall stick fast together, and make in this manner the
bottom of a small basket of any shape you like, — round,
square, or oval. | |

Now build the burrs up around the edge to form the
sides. When this is finished, make also the handle of
burrs. A lovely little basket stands before you, which you
can fill with flowers or berries from the fields, and carry
home to your mother. Of course you know how to make
wreaths and bouquets; but to make them tastefully is a
true work of art, in which all childrén should try to become
skilful.

Anna LIVINGSTON,


CHERRY AND FAIR-STAR.

I couLD not have been quite six years old when I became
the possessor of a canary-bird, to which I gave the name of
Cherry.

There were three children of Ue mpielt (the oldest),
Arthur, and baby.. My father was at sea; and my mother
had charge of us all in her little house near the ocean. -

Well do I remember one cold day in winter when we were
all gathered j in the one little apartment that served us for
nursery, dining-room, and, sitting-room. Arthur, who had
overslept himself, was at his breakfast; mother was feeding
baby ; and I was looking at my dear Cherry § in his cage. :

Pots of hyacinths in bloom were on the table; Mr. Panch,
Arthur’s Christmas present, lay as if watching the cat on
baby’s pillow in the basket; and Muff, the old cat, with Fair-
Star her kitten, were lapping milk from a basin on the floor.

My dear mother had taught Muff to be good to Cherry;
and Muff seemed to have overcome her natural propensities
so far as to let Cherry even light on her head, and there
sing a few notes of a song.

“So, on the day I am peaking of J I let Cherry out of his
cage; and he flew round, and at last lighted on the kitten’s
head. At this Muff seemed much pleased; and Fair-Star
herself was not disturbed by the liberty the little bird took.

But all at once Muff sprang upon Cherry, and, seizing him
in her mouth, jumped up on the bureau. At last it would
seem as if the old cat had chosen her time to kill and eat my
poor. little bird.

No such thing! Our good Muff was all right. A neigh-.
bor, who had come to borrow our axe, had left the back-door
open; and a hungry old stray cat had suddenly made her
hn =
t

SEZ,









































Ry Ss
— RS 4,





AN Sw
a vit \\
= Fy \

\ i
iN : f
6

SN
\\
\

\y

A

“yy ;
|
S S SS

ae SS
Yn
~ WN
S

— ny \

Ns
has :
We
THE FAT LITTLE PIGGIES.

appearance. Muff saw that Cherry was in danger, and
seized him so that the strange cat should not harm. him.

Cherry was not only not hurt, but not frightened. Well
do J remember how my mother placed baby on the pillows,
drove out. the strange cat, and then took up Muff, and petted
and praised her till Muff’s purr of please was loud as the
noise of a spinning-wheel.

Aftes that adventure, Cherry and Muff and Fair-Star were
all better friends than ever. ' ~ Lucy Korner.

S00 0,0-0-——

8

‘THE FAT LITTLE PIGGIES.

Sarp a sow to her piggies so white, /
“Oh! the chilly winds whistle around,
There is ice on the old miller’s dam,

. And there’s snow on the hard frozen ground;
But a warm, sheltered stackyard have we,
Where all day you may play hide-and-seek :

So away, little piggies, my white little piggies, .
For a gambol and scramble and squeak.

“You have all had your breakfasts, I know ;
For your trough was full, up to the top,
Of the sweetest potatoes and milk ;
And you've not left a bit or a drop; -
But, though an old sow, I'll not grunt:
So begone round the barn for a freak,
- And T’ll watch you, dear piggies, fat, curly-tailed piggies,
As you hurry and scurry and squeak.”


THE FAT LITTLE PIGGIES.

















































































































































































































So at once, ’mid the fresh-sprinkled straw,

The young pettitoes scampered away; |

And they rooted and burrowed and hid,

Then all quiet a minute they lay:

Soon their pink-pointed noses peeped out ;

Then their bodies, so plump and so sleek.

Oh the glad little piggies, the mad little piggies —

How they snuffle and scuffle and squeak ! ;
GrorcEe BENNETT.


LITTLE GILBERT. ©
A TRUE Sone

- Many years ago a little boy, named Gilbert, lived in a
small town in New Brunswick, on the banks of the St. J ohn
River. The river is deep and swift; and Gilbert’s papa had
often warned him not to go too near the brink.

One day, when the little fellow was about six years old,
he went with his papa down to the river ; and, while his papa
stopped to talk ie a friend, Gilbert andercd along the
shore.

He took with him his fend and thought it woe Be
fine fun to catch a fish all by himself: so he went close to
the edge of the water, and dropped in his line.

After waiting a few minutes without getting a bite, he
thought he would walk out on a raft that he saw close by,
and try his luck in a new spot. He crept along till he
reached the outer edge of the raft; but then, as he threw out
his line, his little bare feet slipped, and over he went, plump
into the river. A splash, a scream, and down he went.

At the time of this story, there were a good many Indians
in New Brunswick; and a party of them were in camp in the
woods near the river. They were harmless, peaceable In-
dians, and very friendly to the boys of the neighborhood,
who liked to visit their tents, and see. them weave baskets,
and make bows and arrows, and scarlet, slippers, and other
pretty things.

Luckily for Gilbert, an Indian boy Rapreced to be fish-
-ing near the raft, and saw him slip off into the water. Al-
though the Indian boy was not much older than Gilbert,
he was larger andstronger, and he knew how to swim. In.


LITTLE. GILBERT.







\v
x
a eS a \
x ie aas A) Su
ANGE IPS
) x AS yh wie
N Mo Seva t. ANY nee,
= Kis Za ( = La Ce od
Bae ees ‘iy VA 0 ie Way
et Dy \ pri :
ns, RE :

an instant he plunged into the river, seized the poor little
drowning boy, and brought him to the land safe and sound.

His papa took him in Tis arms, all wet and dripping, and,
after thanking the brave Indian boy for his noble deed,
hurried home, scolding Gilbert by the way for disobedience.
Poor little Gilbert was very miserable. It was not at all nice
to be wet and frightened and scolded all at once; and, worse
than all, he feared he would be punished when he got home.

So, when his papa carried him into the kitchen, it was
a great comfort to the little fellow to see his good grand-
mother sitting by the fire. She was very fond of Gilbert;
and, when she saw what a plight he was in, she begged his
papa not to punish the dear child this time, saying she
was sure he had been punished enough already by his fright
and his ducking.

His papa was so happy to have his little boy alive and
safe, that it was easy to forgive him; and in a little while
WHAT BIRDIE SAW IN TOWN.

Gilbert was dressed in dry clothes, and sat down on his little
stool before the fire to eat a red apple which his grand-
mother had brought him. : ;

That night, when little Gilbert said his prayer, he put in
at the end, “ God bless the brave Indian boy who saved my
life t” ae | | Muz-muz.

—_003400———

WHAT BIRDIE SAW IN TOWN.

“‘ BIRDIE,” you must know, is a little girl three and a half
years old. Her real name is Maud; but “ Birdie” is her pet
name, :

One day she went to the city in the horse-cars with her
mamma. They waited on the corner of the street till a car
came in sight; then Birdie held up her little fat finger, and —
the conductor saw it, and stopped the car. :

After they were seated, the conductor called out, Fares,
ladies!”” And Maud said to him, “ Here is mamma’s ticket ;
and won’t you please leave us at grandpa’s house?” He
' smiled, and nodded his head, and Birdie felt satisfied ; for
she thought he must know, of course, where grandpa lived. —

When they reached town, mamma took her into a store
where birds are kept for sale; and Birdie saw, to her great
delight, hundreds of canary-birds, and a good many bright-
colored parrots. It was very funny indeed to hear them all »
singing and chattering together. :

There were two beautiful birds in a large cage, taking
their morning bath. They would jump down into their little
bath-tub, dip their heads in the water, and then plunge
in all over ; then they would perch on the side of the tub,
shake the bright drops from their feathers, and seem to be
enjoying themselves as much. as Birdie herself does when
mamma puts her into her bath-tub.
WHAT BIRDIE SAW IN TOWN.







cx

FDI
WE

























Then there were some squirrels in a cage that went round
and round; and Birdie thought she should never get tired
of looking at them, with their bushy tails and bright black
eyes. She saw them crack some nuts with their little sharp
teeth. :

There were also a great many goldfishes in a little pond;
and Birdie watched them darting through the water, and
thought how nice it would be to have some of them at home.

One thing more Birdie saw, which pleased her very much.

. On the corner of the street stood a man with a basket on his

arm; and in it were four or five little black-and-white pup-
pies (“ baby-dogs” Birdie called them), all cuddled up in a
heap, and looking very comfortable in their wicker-carriage.

The little girl took good care to point out all the sights
to Daisy, her doll, whom she carried in her arms, and who

. always has to take an airing when her little mistress does.

FLORENCE.



Mi
| Serr RTT

NAAN







| OG Eee
cel ! ee
i CY




\

BERTHA TO BABY.

O LITTLE, little mother! I was once as small as you;
And I loved my dolly dearly, as you are loving too ;
And they fed me with a spoon, because no teeth I had;

And a rattle or a sugar-plum would make me very glad.

But now I’m old and very wise, —yes, four years old am I:
My shoes and stockings I put on; I do not often cry ;
And I can read in my book; and I can draw a house;

And with my pen and paper can be quiet as a mouse.

I have a little garden; it is planted full of flowers ;
And there, each pleasant afternoon, I pass some happy hours;
And soon I hope, my little pet, that you'll be large enough

To go with me and play, when the weather is not rough.
Dora BURNSIDE.






Y N a
ann AHORER- SON.

A JOURNEY TO CALIFORNIA.

Two little girls, Annette and Lisette, went to California
with their parents in 1849. There was no Pacific Railroad
at that time; and the journey across the plains was a long
and a hard one.

Annette and Lisette rode in the great wagon drawn by
oxen. They thought that fine fun. At night they slept in
a tent. On-pleasant days they walked with their mamma
for miles over the green prairies, plucking wild-flowers as
they went along.

They saw great numbers of the funny little prairie- dogs
sitting in the doors of their cunning houses; sometimes -
they caught sight of an antelope ; aud they often passed
great herds of shag sy buffaloes.

They liked the prairie-dogs and the antelopes; but they
A JOURNEY TO CALIFORNIA.

were afraid of the buffaloes; and, when their papa went out
to shoot one, they would almost cry for fear he would get
hurt. But, when he came back with plenty of nice buffalo-
_. meat, they had a real feast; for they had had no meat but
‘salt-pork for many a day, an they did not: like that very
well.

Sometimes a storm would come up with fearful hals of
thunder, and flashes of lightning. More than once the tent
was blown down, and the rain came pouring on ‘them; but
the little girls put their heads under the bed-clothes, and
crept. close to their mamma, and never minded the storm.

After travelling in this way three or four months, they
_ were still many, many days’ journey away from California,
and Annette and Lisette began to wish themselves back in
their old home; for now the plains were no longer green
and bright with flowers, but hot, sandy, and dusty, with
- only ugly little aes called “‘sage-bushes,” growing on
them.

Sometimes they would have to go all day without water ;
for the water was so warm and impure, that nobody could
drink it, not even the cattle. They saw several hot
springs, so hot that they could not put their hands in
them; but their mamma oun them very nice for washing
lathes.

Late in the fall they crossed ie Sierra Nevada Mountains;
and, oh! how steep and narrow and rough the road was!
Often their papa had to fasten logs of wood to the wagons
to keep them from: going down the mountains too fast.
Sometimes a wagon would upset, and go rolling down
hill.

Yet the children enjoyed being in the mountains; for
they liked to play under the tall pine-trees, picking up the
cones, and hunting for lumps of pine-gum, and hearing all

— a+ PIA Oe




A JOURNEY TO CALIFORNIA.

the time the sweet music of the wind as it sang in the
branches.

But in a few days the weather got very cold. Heavy
snow-storms came on. One night twenty head of cattle
-were frozen to death ; and as there were few oxen left, and
the flour was almost gone, the little girls began to be very
much afraid that they should perish too.

Luckily their papa shot some fat deer, which gave them
plenty to eat; and, after many hardships, the whole party
reached the Sacramento River in safety. Here they got on
board .of a flat-boat, and went to Sacramento City, where
they lived in a tent for many months. I may. some time tell
you how they went to the mines. ;

A journey to California is a very easy matter now-a-days.
You may go by railroad all the way, and have every com-
fort by day and night. :

Annette and Lisette have made the journey more than
once in a palace car; but they often think of the times
when they were two happy little girls riding over the prai-
ries in a baggage-wagon, or playing together under the
mountain pines. a










5S »%
THE CHILDREN AND THE CHICKENS.

CHILDREN five, and chickens three,
In the sunshine you may see:
Playing in that narrow ground,
See them run and run around !
Without stockings, without shoes,
They are free their feet to use.
Children, chickens, tell me which,
Are in happiness most rich ?

Food the chickens try to find ;
But the children, they have dined:
So I think we must allow,

That they are the gayest now.


















GRANDPA’S BOOTS...

How the stars did snap that December night! The moon
was up too; and how cold and white she looked!

And how busy Jack Frost was! No one saw him swing
a hammer; no one heard him drive a nail: but, by the
time morning had come, he had laid right across the ponds
and the river a floor of ice smoother than any wooden floor
ever put down by the joiners of Norridgewock.

All the boys were out sliding. Ed Peet had come from
over the river; Fred Danforth was there from the tavern;
and George Sawtelle came running up from the big house
under the willow. Others were there too, slipping along on
Jack Frost’s floor.

Little Albert looked out of the window, and saw the boys
at their play. Why couldn’t he go out too?
GRANDPA’S BOOTS.

“ Shall I go, mother?” he asked.

“ Your slippers are too thin, Albert.” |

“Oh! I can put on grandpa’s boots.”

“Yes, you can go, but be careful. You are too young
for such rough sport.”

Off scampered the eager feet, and on went the big boots.
A smile must have lighted up the mother’s eyes as she
heard her little boy tramping over the floor in the heavy
boots. ;

The boys were taking their turn at sliding. Away down
at the end of the line stood Albert. They were sliding
carefully, not running too hard; for a little way out the ice
was thin. After a while, it was Albert’s turn. “Tl beat
those big, clumsy boys,” he thought.

Taking along run, driving ahead with all his force, he
shouted, “ Now see your grandpa go!” And, sure enough,
grandpa’s boots went and went, out where the ice was thin,
and down went Albert into the water! The water was not
deep, though. He was out again ina moment; and there
he stood, cold and dripping like an icicle in a January thaw.

I can hear the boys laughing, and I seem to see the smile
lizhting up the mother’s brown eyes still more merrily,
when her little boy came home. Albert never forgot it.
In after-years he would say, “ Whenever I am inclined to
show off, I think of grandpa’s boots.” ee



0S Ee ee


WR

=



BY THE WINTER FIRE.

By the winter fire they sit,

Care not for the storm a whit:
Winter wars and raves without,
But within they laugh and shout.

Pussy jumps on Ellen’s shoulder,
Purring, rubbing; just behold her!
Jenny lets old Carlo in,

And would warm his frozen shin.

Mary is the story-teller :

Now she tells what once befell her.
Tommy sits, and stares, and listens; _
Andrew’s eye with wonder glistens.

Hear the snow against the pane!
Hear the moaning winds complain!
Winter, winter, cease your din!
You can’t come in; you can’t come in!
EMILY CARTER.
SLEEPYTOWN.

I am the old man you see in the picture. I was born in
Sleepytown, and in Sleepytown I have lived all my days.
Those two tall poplar-trees were planted by my father when
I was a boy.

There was a time when we thought Sleepytown was
going to be a great and famous city. In those days we
changed its name to Grandville. We laid out house-lots,
planted trees, and offered to sell land by the foot.

* We had our Main Street, our Washington Street, and our
Central Park. We planned a splendid bridge over Coon
River. We were told, you see, that a great railroad was to
pass through our town; but it was laid through a village
six miles off, and so Sleepytown remains Sleepytown still.

I am afraid, if you were to stay here a week, you would
call Sleepytown dull. It is not often that business is as
brisk as the artist has made it in the picture. I have a ferry
across Coon River; and sometimes I take hay across, and

.sometimes people, and sometimes both. The fare is a cent ;
for children half-price.

There are a good many children in our town; and, if it
were not for them, I think we should all go to sleep. They
help to make things lively. A good many of them cross the
river in my boat; for they all know that Uncle Silas will take ©
good care of them, and see that they do not fall overboard.
On the Fourth of July we are to send up a rocket, and fire
off a good many crackers; and a boy is to send up a balloon.

Lately we have had rumors that another railroad is to be
built, and that it is to pass along Coon River straight through
Sleepytown. Now is your chance, if you want to buy house
lots. They can be had cheap. Apply quick to

SLEEPYTOWN gets Uxoie Sias.































































































































































































































































































































































































LEFT BEHIND.

SIOOR Ponto! It made him sad to be left be-
hind, and I do not wonder at it. One bright
autumn day his little master, Henry, had said
to him, “ Ponto, would you like to go to the
beach? Uncle Charles and I are going to the



beach.”

Now, if there was any thing that Ponto liked more than
another, it was going to the beach, and chasing the little
birds along the wet sand, and seeing the foamy waves come
up and chase him, as if they were saying, “Leave those

little birds alone.”

And so, when Henry spoke of going to the beach, Ponto
jumped up and barked with delight, and tried to lick his
little master’s face with his tongue. Then he ran round as
if he wanted to say, “Oh, I’m so glad, so glad! for I do
_love to go the beach.”

But there is many a slip between the cup and the lip.
Now, it happened that Mr. Cross was to-make one of the
_ party to the beach, and Mr. Cross did net like dogs. He
said he would not have a dog with him: so Uncle Charles

had to tell Henry that Ponto must stay at home. |

Henry was greatly disappointed at hearing this. “Poor
Ponto!” he said, “after all, I cannot take you with me to
the beach. You will have to stay at home.”

Ponto did not quite understand these words; but when
Henry tied a string to his collar, and fastened it to a ring
in the wood-shed, then Ponto understood that his little mas-
ter had changed his mind, and would not take his dear dog
- with him to’ the beach.

Ponto whined and cried when he found he was not to go,




LEFT BEHIND. we fe

and felt sad enough, when, through the open window of the
wood-shed, he saw Henry, Uncle Charles, Mr. Cross, and all

Henry’s brothers and sisters, going off to the steamboat that

was to take them to the beach.

“This is too bad!” thought Ponto. He tugged .at his
rope, but could not break it; then he lay down on the floor;
then he jumped up, and barked; and then he gnawed at
the rope. “I do so like to frolic on the beach with my dear
master!” thought Ponto.

For more than twenty minutes he tried to get away ; and
when at last he had almost given up trying, the rope broke,
and Ponto was free. With the rope dangling at his collar
he ran at once down to the wharf; but the steamboat had
started. Ponto saw it, and barked long and loud; but
Henry could not see nor hear him.

Henry and his party arrived at the beach without Mr.
Cross; for, just as they were starting, a summons from his
wife compelled Mr. Cross to leave. It was now too late to
get Ponto, and Henry missed him so much that he was sad.

But that forenoon while he was in the water with his uncle,

learning to swim, he saw all at once a dog running along

the sand. “Can that be Ponto?” cried Henry. Yes, it was
indeed Ponto! As soon as the boat returned to the wharf,
Ponto got in, and on its next trip sailed down to the beach
without paying his fare, for the captain supposed he be-
longed to some one of the passengers.

How glad Ponto was to see his yoting master! And how
glad was Henry to see Ponto! They had a fine time to-
gether in the water. Was not Ponto a clever dog to find his
way all alone to the beach? and to know, that, by staying on
board the boat, it would take him where he could find Henry ?
I think I never knew so bright and good a dog as Ponto.

Emity CARTER.


THE TRAVELLING BEAR.

I’ve been a wanderer from a cub,
When Carl, my master, bought me;

And up to bearhood I have grown,
And practice what is taught me.

I’m muzzled, and around my neck
‘An ugly chain I’m wearing :

It’s very hard a gentle bear
Should bear what I am bearing.

You may admire my stately steps,
When timed to pipe and tabor;

But, oh, I’d scramble through a wood
With less than half the labor. |
THE TRAVELLING BEAR.

I'm not a Polar bear, good folks,
And yet a pole I shoulder,
And on my hind-feet stalk about,
To please each rude beholder.
I wonder how old Carl would feel,
If my grim sire had found him,
And wade him dance upon all-fours,
With chattering monkeys round him;
And, with a ring slipped through his nose,
Through beardom drove, or led him,
And cuffed and worried him all day,
And very sparsely fed him. -

From town to town I’m led and shown,
To bring my master- money;

Ah! could I roam my native woods,
And taste the sweets of honey,

Or clamber up the mountain sides
On tender scions browsing,

And sleep within some hollow tree,
No ruthless keeper rousing!

But on my head a sounding blow
Strikes all my dreams in ruin;

And I must tramp.away once more,

A tame and patient Bruin.
GEORGE BENNETT.
WASHING-DAY AMON G THE LITTLE ONES.

TERE were four little sisters hard at work. It was wash-
ing-day ; and what do you think they were doing? Two of —
them were washing out clothes; one was hanging the
clothes out on a line tied to two chairs; and baby sat on
the floor with her doll half undressed. .

You may see it all in the picture. There is mother in
the outer room, stirring the clothes that are in the boiler;
but the children are in the old-fashioned kitchen. Make
out, if you can, what those things are on the shelf. I can
see a candlestick, a teacup, and several other things.

On the floor I see, besides the baby, the doll’s hat and
dress, four clothes-pins, and the high-chair baby sits in at
meal-time. Do you think those are the doll’s clothes on the
line? Are they not rather too large for dolly? On the
whole, I think they must belong to baby. That little girl
at the wash-tub, who is the eldest of the sisters, could in-
form us if her picture could only speak.

I must tell you about that little girl. Her name is Mary.
She can read and write; butshe is not so fond of books that
she cannot find time to help her mother.

Who is up first of the family in the morning? Mary,
of course. Who sees that her younger sisters are all nicely
washed and dressed? Nobody but Mary. Who gets break-
fast? Mary again. Who never grumbles nor complains ?

That darling Mary, I tell you.
' And when work is over, and it is time to play, whose
laugh rings the loudest? and who helps most to cheer and
amuse all the others? Itis that same Mary; and I wish
that all little girls were like her, —as ready to oblige, and
as free to give their hands to useful work. — aswa Livincsrom.




See

ie












































































































THE OLD WORLD SAYS “GOOD-MORNING.” |

Come, Dimple-Chin and Merry-Eyes:
God’s glory lighteth up the skies,
And little folks like you should rise,

For the old world says, “ Good-morning.”

See how the saucy sunbeams peep,
- And round behind the curtains creep,
. Surprised to find you still asleep,
While the old world says, “ Good-morning.”

Of course the downy pillows coax,
And drowsy-headed little folks
Are apt to think it all a hoax,
When the old world says, “ Good-morning.”.

The soft bed whispers, “ Longer stay,
You'll surely not come back to-day:
There’s surely time enough for play,
Though the old world says, ‘ Good-morning.’ ”’

Haste, children! early hours are fleet ;
They tarry not with lazy feet,
That they the sleepy ones may greet,
With the old world’s sweet “ Good-morning.”

Oh, Dimple-Chin and Merry-Eyes:
- Swiftly away the morning flies;
Soon fades God’s glory from the skies,
When the old world says, “ Good-morning.”

RutTH ARGYLE.


MY MOUSE.

A TRUE STORY.

Last summer, when I was in
North Adams, I asked my papa
,. if he would buy me a trap that

“would catch mice without killing
them, so Abat 1 could feed and keep them constantly. These
traps are made of wire, with a drop-door, and a small ring
for the mice to “run in,”’— such as are ff squirrel-cages.

One night this year, I set my trap in my bedroom, where
I had seen a mouse. The trap was well baited; and in the
middle of the night, to my great delight, I heard the mouse
turning the wheel.

My father got up, and put the cage in a chair by my win-
dow, and put a stick in the wheel to keep it from running,
as it made a loud noise which kept me awake. In the
morning, I dressed quickly, and took my cage down stairs,
and gave the mouse a hearty meal of corn and bread.

I have taken good care of him ever since, and he seems
to be quite at home in his cage. He keeps up the squeak-
ing of the wheel both day and night. His cage is in a box
with bars across, and so arranged, that I‘can put my hand
through and get the cage, and then slip the bars into their
places again.

One day my sister’s cat, which, Re other cats, is very
fond of mice, went in front of the box, and, after watching
it some time, stuck her paw through the bars; but, as she
could do no harm, I let her sit there:

Perhaps I will tell you next month more abdut my

mouse. If you want to see him, you will only have to come
to Williamstown.



Sanny G. TENNEY
THE SKIPPER’S DAUGHTER.

IORA’S father used to go to sea. He was what
is called a “skipper ” but I think a better name
than that is “ captain ;” for he was the captain of
“The Daystar,” a fishing-schooner, that sailed
out of Gloucester on Cape Ann.

He loved his little Dora so much, that he did not like to
leave her: but then she needed good warm clothes for win-
ter, and she needed plenty to eat and drink both summer
and winter; so her father had to earn money with which
to buy clothes and food both for Dora and for Dora’s
mamma.

Unlike many little girls, Dora loved to play with boats.
Wherever she could find a good deep puddle, she would
take her little boat, and sail it there. When other little girls
had dolls in their arms, Dora usually had a boat.

Dora was very fond of her papa, and was always sad when
he had to leave her to go on a fishing-voyage. Once he
went away, and did not come back at the right time. Every
day Dora would go down to the beach, and watch; but no
sign could she see of her papa’s schooner. She used to
know it by a red streak painted on its sides.

One day, seeing that her mamma had been weeping, Dora
asked, “What are you crying for, dear?” The little girl
used to call her mother “ dear.”

“T am crying for your papa, my child,” said her mother.
“We have had bad news from the fishing-grounds. There
has been a great storm, and many vessels have been lost;
and to-day I hear that your father’s vesse] is among them.
We shall never see your poor father again, my little girl.”

“ Yes, we shall, dear: I know we shall,” said Dora. “There,










Nh
A:















THE SKIPPER’S DAUGHTER.
wA


THE SKIPPER’S DAUGHTER.

don’t you cry any more. You shall see him, dear. You
shall see him very soon.”

“But how do you know that?” asked her mother.

“I don’t know it, I only feel it,” said Dora. “I woke up
last night, and felt it so much, that I was quite happy.”

The mother kissed her little girl, and was quite cheered
by her confident words. Still a week went by, and no papa
came; and the mother once more grew sad.

Bots no longer went to the beach to look out for the
schooner streaked with red. But when her mother said,
“ down in her, in that dreadful storm,’ Dora replied, “ Don't
give it up yet, dear. Papa will come.”

How Dora knew that her papa would come, I cannot say.
I only know that this is a true story, and that Dora proved
to be right.

The next day, after sundown as her mother was putting
her to bed, Dora started up, and cried, “Hark! whose voice
is that? Don’t you hear him? He’s talking to somebody.
It is my own papa, my own papa!”

And, sure enough, 2 step was heard at the outer reer
the door was pushed open; and in rushed the captain of the
lost “ Daystar,” well and hearty, with a plenty of kisses for
his little girl and her mother.

He and his crew had been ‘saved in the long-boat, and,
after some delay, had taken passage for home. “And the
best of it is,” said papa, “I am not going to sea any more ;
for I have found good employment on land, and now I can
see little Dora and her good mamma every day of any.
life.”

“T told you, dear, he would come back,” said Dora, patting
her mamma on the head. As for mamma, she tried to speak,
but could not. Joy would not let her. Skxpy Bay,




HOW BLUE-EYES SOLD HER DOLL...

TurrE was once a little girl whose mother called her Blue-
eyes; and she had a doll whose name was Belvidera.

Blue-eyes wore a string of amber-beads round her neck ;
and her yellow curls were tied with a blue ribbon round hee
head.

She was so fond of her doll, that she took her with her
wherever she went; and one day she took her to a fair
which some kind ladies were giving for the relief of some
poor children who had lost their father and mother.

Blue-eyes laid her doll down on one of the tables where
things were offered for sale; and an old lady came up, and,
thinking that the doll was for sale, said, “Here is just the
kind of doll I want to buy for my little niece. I will give
five dollars for it.”.

“That doll is not for sale,” said the lady who’ kept the
table. “It belongs to little Blue-eyes yonder.”

“But the poor children want the five dollars more than I
want the doll,” said Blue-eyes. “I will run and ask my
mother if I may sell the doll.”

So she ran and asked her mother; and her mother said,
if she wanted to get the money to help the poor children,
she might sell the doll.

So Blue-eyes sold it; and with the money she bought
three nice dresses, hich: she gave to the children: ¢ for,” said
little Blue- -eyes, “the children need their warm dresses much
more than I want Belvidera.”

I should not wonder if Blue-eyes were to wake on Christ-
mas morning, and find a new do.. —one much prettier than
Belvidera — in the stocking which shv ~vill hang up.

JANE OLIVER.


MOTHER'S CHRISTMAS-PRESENT.

Armuiur’s uncle has a studio; for he is a painter. A studio
is the painter’s work-room, where-he has his easel, and his
palette, and his paints. The easel is the wooden frame, or
sliding-rack, on which pictures are placed while being
painted.

The palette is a thin, oval-shaped board, or tablet, with a

-thumb-hole at one end for holding it, on which a painter
lays and mixes his paints.

One day Arthur went into his uncle’s studio, and, finding
no one present, thought he would try to paint a likeness of
his own father. So he took up the brush and the palette, |
and, striking an attitude such as he had seen his uncle take,
went to work. }

He became so much interested, that he did not hear his
uncle comein. Uncle Thomas crept up, and, star.ding behind
Arthur, watched him a minute, and then clapped his hands.

Arthur started at the noise, turned round, and, seeing his
uncle, dropped the palette and the brush, and ran for his cap.

But Uncle Thomas stopped him, and said, “ Bravo, little man!
you will make a painter. You have begun well. Let me
give you a little instruction.”

So Uncle Thomas gave him a lesson in drawing, and then

said, “Now, you must finish that picture, and make a Christ
mas-present of it to your mother.”

Arthur consented, and he is now hard at work upon it;
but this is a secret. It is to be a surprise to his mother, and
I hope none of you will tell her about it beforehand.

If Arthur means to be a painter, he will have to work
hard ; for there are a great many good painters in these days,

and only those that excel can hope to win fame and profit.
UNCLE CHARLES















































































































































































































































THE CHILD AND THE GARDENER.

I PLANTED once a little tree He said. “A plant that has no root
Out in the air and sunshine free: Will die, and bear no flowers or fruit.” |
I gave it water every day;
But still.it pined and pined away. Thung my head, and blushed for shame:
“But, child,” said he, “you’re not to
- blame:

Our gardener had a wise old head:

I carried it to him, and said,

“ Take this into the greenhouse hot.”
Ile pulled it from the flower-pot,

Full many an older head I’ve seen,
As simple quite as you have been.

‘You must in future wiser be,
And not plant flowers to make a tree; -

But choose the roots, and wait, my dear,
“A pretty gardener you would be!” | Until the little buds appear.”

And, smiling, held it up to me:






_y EN MI)

WTiTij, |

/),
y



ve
N

——









See

- ~~: Li.



















Y Yy Ys y YY _ Yyp — 4 i





It was

JOHNNY'S DRUM.
Somupopy gave Johnny a drum one Christmas. After that

there was no more peace to be found in the house.
kitchen, in the nursery. The baby could not get a wink of |

rub-a-dub-dub before you were up in the morning, and the
last thing at night, —rub-a-dub-dub in the parlor, in the
sleep; and visitors could hardly hear themselves talk.
JOHNNY’S DRUM.

But by and by Johnny’s small bump of curiosity became
excited. “ What’s inside of the drum?” he asked one day.

“ An awful noise!” said Ellen the maid.

“ What does a noise look like ?”

“Bless me! I never saw one; and, if it looks as bad as it.
sounds, I don’t want to either.”

“JT want to see it,’ said Johnny; “and I mean to.”

Then he took his drum into a closet, and closed the door
after him till the light could only creep through a crack.

“[’m just going to see where the noise comes from, ’cause
it wakes up the baby,” said he.

So he went to work. Presently somebody called, “Johnny,
Johnny!” It was his mother, who had begun to wonder
what he was about; for, when Johnny was quiet so long, it
was a sure sign of mischief. ~ |

“T’m too busy to come,” shouted Johnny. “I’m engaged.”

“Tn the closet, Johnny!” cried his mother, coming upon
him suddenly, with a fear for her jars of preserves and sweet
pickles. “What are you doing there, child ?”

“Tm only seeing what’s inside of my drum,” said Johnny.
“Tve made a big hole through it; and there isn’t any thing
in it at all!” And, sure enough, he had put his foot through
the drum-head, and rub-a-dub-dub was at an end.

Johnny was heart-broken when nothing further could be
coaxed out of the drum. “The music’s all done,” said he,
trying to hide the tears.

“But you know now where it came from,” said his mother.

“Never mind,” said Uncle Jack : “ you shall have another
drum the first of April.”

“Oh, don’t!” cried the household.

“Oh, do!” shouted Johnny.

And when April Fool Day came, Uncle Jack brought him
home, — a drum of figs! MNP.


ROBERT AT THE GYMNASIUM.

Rosert’s mother promised ‘him, if he would learn his lesson
well, she would take him to the gymnasium.

He did learn his lesson well, and she kept her promise.
In the gymnasium, she let him mount the ladder; and then
she let him climb a short way up a pole.

Boys should take great care not to hurt or strain them-
selves at the gymnasium or in their sports. I have known
boys to be so eager in playing at foot-ball or cricket as to
hurt themselves badly.

Robert took great care, and was not hurt. His mother
PLAYING AT HORSES.

was with him to see that he did not run a risk by trying to
do too much.

It is well to add to the strength of one’s limbs by use, and
+ gain skill and ease in climbing and jumping; but it is

not well to run risks, or to overtask one’s strength.
Rozert’s MorHer.





PLAYING AT HORSES.

Tom and Harry were playing at horses. Tom was the
horse, and was very frisky. Just as they were turning the
corner of the garden, frisky Tom knocked over a flower-pot
with a very pretty plant in it.

His mother came te the window just as Harry was call-
ing to Tom to stop, that he might pick up the pieces.

The plant was. broken. The boys were very sorry, and
so was their mother; but sorrow could not mend the plant.

When children are allowed to play in gardens, they should
be very careful no» te spoil the plants and flowers. amy,




















































Ture little lady-birds,

On a summer day :
See them on the blades of grass,
_ Going out to play!

Came a little maiden
Down the lane so green,

And the song she sang was this;
But what did it mean? — i

“Fly away, lady-birds,
Over flowers and fern:
Your house, it is on fire;
Your children, they will burn.”
Nonsense, little maiden !
They no house do own;
And their grown-up children
All away have flown.

“ Fly away, lady-birds,”
Sang the maiden still,
Skipping down the shady lane,
Skipping up the hill:
“Fly away, lady-birds,
Over flower and fern:
Your house, it is on fire;
Your children, they will burn.”

EMILY CARTER,
WHAT JULIA DID WITH THE POND-LILIES.

“What do you want so many pond-lilies for, Cousin
Julia?” asked Albert Vane, as he guided the boat so that his
brother Charles could pull-up some of the sweet-smelling
flowers. ‘ : :

“JT do not choose to tell you what I want them for, .
Albert,” said Julia. “You may be sure I want them for
good, and not for harm.”

Julia sat, smelling of a pond- nye at thesternof the boat,
while her Cousin Emma leaned over the side, and tried to
pull up a lily; and little Mary Gray called to the dog Cato,
swimming near, and asked him if he would save her if she
were to fall overboard. Cato would have done it gladly, I
think.

It was a lovely day in July, and it did not pa the little
party long to gather fifty fine lilies.

“ Now, children,” said Julia, “you will please bear in mind
that these are all mine. If you want any more lilies for
yourselves, there they are in the pond, —a plenty of them.”
The children laughed; and Albert said that Cousin Julia

seemed to have grown very grasping all at once, which was
not at all her usual way.

They soon got out of the boat, and went back to their
uncle’s pleasant cottage on the edge of the pond. Then
_ Julia, with her fifty flowers in a basket, bade her uncle, her
aunt and cousins, good-by, and started in the cars for her
Home in the city.

It was more than a week after that before Albert learned
what she had wanted all those pond-lilies for.

He had been to the city, and, on his return to the cottage,

























































































































































































































THE SQUIRREL.

he said to his mother, “What do you think our dear Julia
did with those fifty lilies?”

- “Tam not good at guessing. Tell me at once,” said Mrs.
Vane.

“JT found out her secret, not from herself, but from Dr.
Brown,” said Albert. “It seems she took her whole basket-
ful to the new hospital, and went round among the patients,
distributing lilies to each. Was not that sweet of her?”

“Yes, sweet as the pond-lily itself” said Mrs. Vane. “I
felt sure shé had not got all those flowers for her own en-
joyment.”

“‘T knew she was plotting something,” said Albert; “ but
what it was I could not find out till to-day. Oh! she is her-
self the sweetest lily of all.” ABR Lucerne

THE SQUIRREL.

Hiau, high, and as near to the sky
As the tallest branches reach ;

See, see, how nimble and free

The squirrel climbs the beech!
Bright, bright, as the diamond’s light,
You may see his quick eyes play;
Still, still, as the whispering rill, |
Or he'll flit like a bird away.

Down, down, to the oak’s leafy crown;
There he thinks he’s out of sight ;
Swing, swing, O the blithe-hearted thing!
How he chuckles witb delight!


Tat SQUIRREL.



Crack, crack, with his tail on his back,
’Mong the acorns crisp and fine ;
“Sweet, sweet!” ah! it must be a treat
In his own green bowers to dine.

Blow, blow. and the leaves they lie low

In the autumn’s chilly blast ;

Drear, drear, to the eye and the ear,

Ail the-wood’s green life is past ;

Deep, deep, now the squirrel doth sleep,

So snug in the hollow tree ;

Calm, calm, till the spring sun is warm,

And the king-cups gem the lea. REQESE RENSEE:





eu
e

E



























































































































































































































































THE BLACKBOARD.

In the children’s play-room at Mr. Brown's, there isa blac -
‘board on the wall; for the children often ask their father
what a thing means: and then he takes a piece of chalk,
and tries to make the thing clear to them.

When Johnny asked him the other day what the printed
HARRY’S DOG

notes of music meant, Mr. Brown took his piece of chaik,

and showed him how a certain sound in music has a certain
written or printed sign by which it may be known. .

A blackboard is a very good thing, not only in a schooi-
room but in a play-room; for though the song which says,
“Work while you work, and play while you play,” gives
good ad-vice, yet I do not ob-ject to learn’ing all I can from

play, - EMILY Carrer.

—0Le{0-0——-

HARRY’S DOG.

Harry has a little dog, —

_ Such a cunning fellow!
With a very shaggy coat,
Streaked with white and yellow.

Harry’s dog has shining eyes,
And a nose so funny!

Marry wouldn’t sell, his dog
For a mint of money.

Harry’s dog will never bark,
Never bite a stranger :

So he’d be of no account
Where there’s any danger.

Harry has a little dog, —
Such a cunning fellow !
But his dog is made of wood.

Painted white and yellow. Josmrmine POLLARD,
wd
WILD FLOWERS IN COLORADO.

“Here we are, with no use for our nice little ditches. It
has been raining from the clouds just as it does East,” said
Maggie pettishly. “I thought we were in a rainiess region.’

“The old settlers say we have a great deal of rain some
years,” said Homer. “But we can keep the weeds out of
ouy garden; and I will show you the wild flowers I told you ~
about.”

“Wild flowers? It seems as if I should go wild to think
of them,” said Maggie. “I’ve had to take off my shoes and
stockings mauy a time to pull the cactus-thorns out of my
feet.”

“ Well,” said Robbie, “the horses learn to step over and
around them, and J suppose we shall after a while.”

“JT am going to send my biggest cigar-cactus to grandma.
It is all budded, and has beautiful red blossoms,” said Homer. -
“ How do you think ske can touch it, with the thorns stick-
ing every way from the end of each cigar?” asked Maggie. |

“ With the tongs,” said Robbie.

«Do you remember the bear’s-grass that grandma thinks
so much of ?” said Homer.

“Yes, I do,” said Maggie. “Aunt Delia calls it Adam’s
thread-and-needle, and has it in her garden.”

“Well, here it is, growing wale on these plains. Papa
says its real name is the yucca.”

“T want a bed of these little blue flowers,” said Mamie.

“ And you shall have it,” said her brother. “Oh! it is the

spider-lily. Our garden will look like our old one at home.
I guess mamma will be glad.”
Then the children went home with their arms full of flow-

ers, and a basket of roots for their garden.
Mrs. OLiver Howaerb.










































THE SEA-SHELL.

Hotp to your ear the beautiful shell :
Listen! What does its murmur tell ?
Hark! Does it echo the billows’ roar,

As they roll and break on the sandy shore ?

Does it bring to your mind the tossing spray
Of waves that dance in the breezes’ play ?
Or the quiet depths where the coral grows,

_ And never a ray of sunshine glows?
WINKIE AND THE MOUSE.

Hark again to the beautiful shell :

Does it speak of the ocean’s stormy swell,
Of the sea-bird’s scream, of the rushing gale,
Of the broken mast and the riven sail?

Sights and sounds of the restless sea,

Vast and gloomy, and grand and free,

How they gather at Fancy’s spell,

Waked by the voice of this little shell! LW.

WINKIE AND THE MOUSE.

Biacx-ryeD Winkie, a little five years’ old boy, woke up
in the middle of the night, not long ago, screaming with
pain.. He ran to his mamma’s room, crying out, “O mamma!
there is a hot iron in my ear, or some boiling water : oh, dear,
dear! what shall I do?”

His mother knew at once that it was the earache that dis-
tressed her boy ; for he had been out rather too long the day
before, trying to make a snow-man.

She met the poor screaming boy at his nursery-door, took
him in her arms, and tried to quiet him a little, while she
put him in her warm bed.

Then she lighted the gas, and put some sweet-oil on a soft
bit of cotton, and, after warming it a moment, pressed it
down snugly in the little dark room in Winkie’s aching ear.
Then he cuddled down on his mother’s arm, and after a few
more twinges of pain, and a few more screams, he began to
feel better, arid only said, “Oh, dear, oh, dear!” once in 4

while.
Pretty soon, as it grew stiller, he jeard a little nibbling
WINKIE AND THE MOUSE. ~

noise across the room. “ What is that, mamma?” said Win.
kie. “Lie still and listen,” replied mamma.

After a minute or two, the noise came again, — nibble,
nibble, nibble. “It is a little mouse in the chimney, I think,”
_said mamma.

“What is he up for in the night?” said Winkie. “Why
doesn’t he go to bed, like bigger people?” -

“Perhaps he had the earache,” said mamma, “and got up
- to tell his mother.”

“Well, I hope she will put in some cotton, and cuddle him
down in her bed, and cure the pain,” said Winkie.

“Oh! I-think she will,” said mamma: “she will try to
make her poor little Brownie teei better.” aes

“Will she be as good a mother-mouse as you are?” said
Winkie, laughing nearly as loud as he had cried. Winkie
kept awake half an hour or more, talking about the mouse
and its earache. So at last his own aches all went away.

He fell asleep, and dreamed he was'climbing into a hole
among the chimney-bricks, nibbling crackers ; and that in his
mamma’s bed, cuddled down on his mamma’s arm, a, little

mouse was just going to sleep with cotton in boin ears.
Mamma.
















AUR



















































SEA-BIRD CATCHING.

Tux Faroe Isles, a group of islands belonging to Denmark,

‘are situated in the Atlantic Ocean, about three hundred and

fifty miles south-east from Iceland. The people of these
islands support themselves chiefly by catching sea-birds,
which flock in great numbers upon the: steep rocks of the

- coast.
SIX-IN-HAND.

It is a very dangerous pursuit. Hvery year many of the
Faroese lose their lives in it.

The fowlers provide themselves with a long cable two
inches thick, on which is fastened a kind of seat. A beam
is placed at the edge of the rock to peas the rope being
cut by the rough stone.

The bird- taker, seated on the end of the cable, is let down
by six men. He holds a small cord in his hand, by means
of which he can make certain signs agreed upon with his
comrades.

On reaching a ledge, the bird-taker ties the rope to any
convenient point, and then kills as many birds as he can,
catching them in his net, or seizing them with his hands.

If he sees a hollow or a niche beyond his reach, where
many birds are perched, he sits down again on his little
plank, and, by jerking the rope, swings himself to the spot
he wishes to explore.

The birds when killed are thrown to the men below, who
are ready for them in a boat under the cliff. ee ene ica



SIX-IN-HAND.












































MY DOLL.

I am going to tell you about my doll. Her name is Lily, ©
and she is very beautiful: so I think, and so do all my little
friends. She was sent to me from New Orleans. I got her
when I was only four years old. She is nearly as large
as my little sister, who is five months old.

My little sister’s name is Hatty. She is very pretty, and
has curly hair like my doll. She already says, “Mamma,”
and laughs when she sees me coming home from school. I
love her very much, and long to have the summer-days
come, when Rover and I can take her to ride.

Rover is our big black dog. He is a noble dog, and a
very kind dog too. I had a little sister Jenny. Rover used
to take her to ride; so for her sake we all love Rover very
much. We shall teach him to love Hatty, me is my only
little sister now.

I am making some new things for my doll; for I mean
to give her to Hatty for a birthday ee I am nine years
old, and my name is fen

Sypney, C.B.
UNCLE JOHN’S DOG SKYE.

Wuen first I knew Skye, he,

was. a young dog, and full of
fun. He would run and jump
and frisk, and look like a ball
of wool at play; and no walk
— was too long for Skye then.
_ Skye was a good dog, and
a ==> would do just as he was bid.
Soinstinies Uncle J. abn would say to him, “Sit down, Skye,
and I will give you a bit of cake.”

Down Skye would sit. “Beg, Skye.” Up Skye would sit
_ on his hind-legs. Then Uncle John would pay a bit of cake
on this little dog’s nose.

‘And Uncle J ait would say to him, “ Now, Skye, you must
not eat that cake till I count six. Now: one, two”

Skye would sit as grave as you please, his fore-paws in
the air, and the cake on his nose. Then Uncle John would
say, “ Three, four, five ” —

Skye would look hard at Uncle John, as much as to say,
“One more, and the cake is mine.” But he would not bark
nor move; no, not if Uncle John made him wait a long,
long time. ;

But when Uncle John said “Six,” the dog would throw the
cake up in the air, and catch it in his mouth, and eat it up;
oh, so fast, so fast! It was rare fun to see Skye catch his
cake,

Now, years went by, and Skye grew old, and ie could not
run and jump and frisk, and catch cake, as in times past; but
he was a good dog and a great pet, for all that.

When Uncle John went for a walk, Skye went with him;


UNCLE JOHN’S DOG SKY».

till one day Uncle John took a walk which was too long for
Skye, and, when Skye got home, he was quite tired out.

Some time went by; and then Uncle John and his girls
went for the same long walk which had tired Skye so much.

“Stay at home, Skye,” said Uncle John; but Skye did not
want to stay at home, and, of course, he did not know that
they were going to take so long a walk. So Skye set off to
go with them.

By and by they turned into a lane. “Ho, ho!” thought
Skye, “ that'is where you are going; is it? You may go by
yourself then. I shall not go with you.”

But Skye did not want to show that the walk was too
long for him. He thought to himself,“I can plan a trick
by which they will not know I do not want to take so long
a walk.” He was a proud dog, you see.

So Skye ran to a part of the lane by himself; and then he
stood still, and looked in the hedge; and then he gave the
earth a scratch; and then he put down his head to smell.

He acted as if he would like to say to the folks, “I have
got a rat here: I must catch this rat. You can go on for
your walk, and I must stay and catch the rat.”

And, all the time, there was no more a rat in that hole
than there is a rat in the room here. It was just a sly trick
to hide the truth that Skye had found out that the walk
would be too far for him.

For, so soon as he thought that his master had got out of
sight, Skye set off to walk home by himself. But his mas-
ter saw him forall that; and Skye was found out in his want
of truth.

Was he notasly dog? Yes; and-he did his trick in such
a sly way, too, that you could not but laugh to see him hunt

for the rat. when he knew that there was no rat there at all.
Trorrie’s Aunt








‘GINX’S HARNESS.

Wuart wonderful steed
Comes flying with speed
Down the walk with a scarlet harness on?
Scamper or trot,
It matters not,
Gallop, or caper, or prance, or run.

Such trappings fine!
They glitter and shine:
The bells are golden, the reins are red,
And tassels gay
Swing every way ;
And merrily tosses the curly head.
GINX’S HARNESS.

Those bells of gold,
Be it hot, or cold,
- Midsummer weather, or winter snow,
Ring with swinging,
And swing with ringing,
Whenever this steed starts out to go.

Does he stand in a stall,

I wonder, at all,
And eat from a manger oats and hay?
‘Ah, no, indeed!

This wonderful steed

Sits at my table every day. -

. And with haste so great, :
That he cannot wait
Even to lay his harness by,
He goes to work,
With spoon or fork, -
At the nearest dish, be it pickles or pie.

a ap

There is, I admit,
Excuse for it,
For Ginx has a deal of eating to do;
And more, besides,
Whenever he rides,
He has to be horse and driver too.

CLARA Doty BAtTEs.
























































































































































































































































































HOW UNCLE PETER SAVED THE CHILDREN.

Watter should have known better; but he was always a
rash boy. I will tell you what he did last month, at the sea-
side, where he was staying with his mother. He persuaded
his two little sisters, Emma and Eliza, to go with him on to
a rock on the beach, near the water’s edge.

There they staid, playing in the sand, till, all at once, they
looked up, and saw that the water of the ocean was all about
them. The tide had come up, and crept round the rock, so
that they could not get to the dry land without going through
water; and that they were afraid to do.

Soon the little girls began to cry. The sea-birds swept
down near them ; and now and then a fish would come up
by the rock as if he did not fear them at all. Walter told
HOW UNOLE PETER SAVED THE CHILDREN.

the little girls not to make a fuss; though he began to feel
a little anxious himself.

All at once he cried out, “There’s a boat with some men
in it! But it isn’t. coming this way. A man with a spy-
glass stands at the bow. He is spying out something.
Why can’t he look this way? Halloo, halloo!”





==

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Walter shouted as loud as he could; and then the three
children shouted all together: but nobody seemed to hear
them. On and on went the little boat before a good breeze ;
but not one of the five men in it seemed to take notice of
the three children on the rock. ;

“ What shall we do now? Shall we have to stay here all
night ?” asked Emma, the elder sister.
HOW UNCLE PETER SAVED THE CHILDREN.

“We couldn’t stay here all night,” said Walter, “because,
you see, the rock will be all covered with water at high tide ;
and, if we don’t get off before high tide, we shall have to be
drowned.”

“J don’t want to be drowned,” sobbed Emma. é

“Neither do I’want to be drowned,” said Walter ; “but
there’s no use in crying. Tears will only add more water to
the sea, and there’s more water in it already than we want.”

The little girl stopped crying at these words, and took
care that no more tears should fall from her eyes. She
looked at Walter with surprise to see him so brave,

But the little fellow was sly: he had cause for his cour-
age. The boat with men in it had sailed far away; but not.
far off he saw Uncle Peter, waving his arms at him. Then
he saw Uncle Peter take off his boots, and pull up his
trousers. Walter well knew that all would be right, the
moment Uncle Peter got sight of them on the rock.

Uncle Peter was a clever old fisherman, who caught fish
for the hotel, where the children were stopping. He was
fond of children; and, having none of his own, he made
much of those of other people. He had taken such a liking
to Walter and his sisters, that he was on the watch for them
a good part of the time, to see that they did not get into
mischief.

“TI declare, there’s Uncle Peter coming!” shouted Emm

with delight. 7

“Uncle Peter? Nonsense!” said Walter. “Where’s
Uncle Peter ?” ny

Now, Walter knew very well that Uncle Peter was coming,
and Walter ought not to have pretended that he did not see
him. But he wanted to seem brave. Ah, Walter! you had
better be than seem.

“Well, here’s a scrape, you little rogues!” said Uncle Pe-
WHERE IS HE?

ter, as he waded up to the rock, and took one child, and then
another, in his arms. “Here’s a scrape, indeed! What would
“you have done if I had not been on the lookout for you?”

Then, with his arms full of children, Uncle Peter waded
back through the salt water, to the beach, and put them all
down on the warm, dry sand, where their mother and father
were waiting for them.

The parents kissed them all round; and then little Emma
said, “I think Uncle Peter ought to be kissed too.” “So he
ought, my dear,” said her mother, laughing ; “ and you shall
give him kisses for all” So Emma gave Uncle Peter five
kisses; and Uncle Peter was so pleased, that his face shone
like a jolly full moon. Rate: CARTER.



WHERE IS HE?

“Wuo has seen little Ray ?

T left him here at play,
Keeping a candy-store ;

Here are his pennies four ;

And here is his little red purse:
Tll go and ask old nurse.

“Nurse, where is Ray ?”
“Indeed, ma’am, I can’t say.
WHERE IS HE?

He came in just about three,
As wet as wet could be,
From playing in the brook :
Tll go and ask cook.

“ Cook, is Ray hereabout?”

“He was; but he has gone out.

It’s just about half an hour

Since I found him with water and flour,
Stirring it up to ‘make dough :’
Perhaps the coachman may know.

“Thomas, is Ray with you?

_ Here’s his nurse in a stew.”

“ No: he’s just gone through the gate,
I caught him riding black Kate ;

She was tied fast, that’s well :

Maybe the gardener can tell.

“James, have you seen Ray ?”

“No: [ve not seen him all day ;

I’ve to watch the fruit every minute,
So many robins are in it. c
What’s that that looks so red
‘Bobbing round in the strawberry-bed ?
Hallo! Tom, cook, nurse, I say,

Here’s that little mischief, Ray !”

ELIZABETH SILL



w6
EMILY'S STORY.

OW tell me a story, my own mother,” said little
Emily.

“But do you not see, Emily, that I am read-
ing? It is not polite to disturb one who is
reading,” said her mother.

“ And it is not polite to read in company,” said Emily.

“What!” said her mother, laughing, “must I look upon
my little Emily as company ?”

“But do you not see this fine lady on the sofa, who has
come to make you a visit?” asked Emily.

“Oh! Miss Lily, your proud doll, must be treated as com-
pany, and entertained; must she?” asked mamma.

“Yes, mother : so tell us a story,” said the little girl. .

Mamma could not refuse Emily any longer. “I will tell
you,” said she, “the story of



“¢Tar Lirrte Gin WHO ENTERTAINED HERSELF.’

“Once there was a litile girl named Hope, who had a
bad fall from the top of the stairs, and hurt herself so much,
that she could not walk. but had to be dragged round in a
little carriage.

“Qn fine sunny days in spring, they would drag her in
the carriage out on the lawn; and then Hope would say,
‘Now leave me, for I can entertain myself’

“ But how did the little girl entertain herself? She had
no books, no pictures, no toys, no doll, — nothing pat some
crumbs and some canary-seed in a bag.

“This is what she did: she made the acquaintance of
some little birds, — blue-birds, yellow-birds, and gray spar
rows, to whom she gave the crumbs and the seed.

+


EMILY’S STORY.

“By and by, aleve grew so tame and so bold, that they
would fly up on her lap, and eat; and at last they would
stand on her finger, and peck ue the seed from the hollow
of her hand.

“ But there was a little sparrow to whom Hope had given
the name of Tot; and he was so quarrelsome, that she had
to scold him. He wanted to drive off all the blue-birds and
yellow-birds, so that none but gray-birds should have the
seed. He was a Know-nothing, you see.

“He was so bold, that he was not at all afraid of Hope.
Once, when she had a bit of bread in her mouth, Tot flew
up and pecked at her lips, as much as to say, ‘ Give me that
bit of bread: I want it myself’? Was he not a saucy bird?

“Hope laughed a good deal to see Tot so eager. But she
did not punish him. She only talked to him, and tried to
teach him to be good to birds of a different color from
himself.

“When it grew near to sunset, and the birds had to fly
away to their nests, Hope would watch the clouds, and try
to see the evening star. Then her mother would come and
take her into the house, and give her some bread and milk.

“The sunshine and the fresh air did her so much good,
that Hope at last began to grow strong, and at last she
could walk as well as anybody.

“The birds were frightened, at first, to see her walk ; but
they soon found that she was their own dear little Hope,
and then they would light on her shoulder, and be as fear-
less and free as when she had to sit all the time in her
carriage. ;

“When Hope grew quite well she did not lose the habit of
learning to entertain herself. She loved the birds and the
flowers and the trees so much, that she found them always
good company.


A TALK ABOUT THE MOON.

« While her mother was occupied, Hope never had to go
and tease her to tell her a story. She wanted no better
stories, you see, than the birds and the flowers and the trees

could tell her. You must try to do as Hope did.”

Eminy CARTER.



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A TALK ABOUT THE MOON.

“Tyrre, don’t you see those dark places on the moon? 1]
do,” said Henry.

“Those,” said his mother, “ are mountains, with deep cav-
erns, or valleys, by their side. .

“Nobody can live in the moon, because an atmosphere is
needed to sustain life; and the moon has no atmosphere.

“The air we breathe is the atmosphere about our earth;
and, if it were not for the air, we could not breathe at all.

«When a man goes very high up in a balloon, he gets
nearer and nearer to the place where our atmosphere. ends;


TOT’S ALMANAC.

and then he finds he can’t breathe as well as he could down
near the earth.

“The moon is not nearly as large as our earth; but it is
four hundred times nearer to us than the sun is. No water
and no clouds-are to be seen on the moon. It must be a
very dry place there. .

“The moon we now see is a full moon. Soon she will

begin to wane ; then she will get between us and the sun,
so that we cannot see her bright side. She is then said to
change.

“Days will pass by, and at last she will turn a bright edge
toward us; and that we call a new moon. This will grow
in breadth till we have a hajf moon ; and, not long after-
wards, we shall have the dear old friend we are now looking
at — the full moon — back again.” Nips CREWER.

0.079300

TOT’S ALMANAC.

Wuewn January’s here, While July stays,
Snow-men appear ; Flies have curious ways ;
While February’s waiting, When August comes,
We'll have some skating. Look out for plums!
When March comes this way, While September wears,
Breezes are at play; ° Help get in the pears;
During April hours When October grieves,

_ Expect sun-showers. Help bind up the sheaves.
When May-flowers hide, Ere November flies,
Search far and wide! You shall see mince-pies ;
When the year’s at June, ’ When December’s knocking,

Half the world’s in tune. Then hang up your stocking.

Mary N. Presoorr.


-







































































































































































BOHNANDREW-SON.=





PLAYING ROBINSON CRUSOE.

Pray this is my little island
In the middle of the floor ;
And this arm-chair is my castle,
With the ladder up before.

Play the cat is my man Friday ;
And the broom shall be my gun;
T’ve some wooden goats and a parrot:
Please to call me Robinson.

Play I’m ‘sighing for a vessel,
And I’m on the watch for her;
Then the table is my big. boat,
Which I’ve tried in vain to stir.
3 A DUCK STORY.

Play the savages are coming:
: They are making for the land!
Now, I’m going to fire among them
When they gather on the sand.

Oh! it’s jolly on this island
For an hour or so to stay ;
But to live so far from mother ! —
I am glad it’s only play ! Gastar Chosen

























A DUCK STORY.

Lirriz Appts W. was five years old. She lived on a farm,
and took great delight in feeding and petting the lambs,
chickens, and ducks. They all learned to know and love
her. This made Addie very happy.

One morning, she was much pleased at finding in the barn
eight little ducklings, — eight little puffs of down, with queer
little bills, bright bead-like eyes, and the cunningest little
A DUCK STORY.

web feet. She laughed with delight as they waddled about
on the hay. .

Then she ran to the house to tell mamma; and soon
brother James had fixed a pen to keep the little ducks in.
Addie placed some boards over the corner of the pen to
shade them from the hot sun. Then she fed and watered
them, and felt as though she could hardly leave them long
enough to eat her own dinner.

Every day she watched and tended them; but, when they
were about three days old, she began to feel very sorry that
the poor little things had no place to swim in. They would
dip their little heads into the drinking-dish ; then crowd into
it, and try so hard to swim, that Addie thought she must
find some way to gratify them.

So, after thinking a little, she ran to the house and bor-
rowed mamma’s hatchet and fire-shovel; then she climbed
into the pen, and began to chop away at the ground in one
corner. After she had loosened a portion of it, she threw it
out of the pen with the shovel; then she loosened more;
and worked away until she had taken out earth enough to
leave a hole as large round as a bucket, and nearly as deep.
Then she brought water, and filled the hole quite full.

When all was ready, she drove the ducks down toward
their little pond. As soon as they saw the water, they -
plunged into it, and seemed so happy, that the poor little
girl felt well paid for her trouble. She watched them a
while; and then, feeling tired with her work in the hot sun,
she went back to the house. ;

When, two hours later, she went to look again at her
treasures, she found that her pond had all dried up, and the
poor little ducks were glad enough to be taken out of the
hole.

This was their first lesson in swimming; but Alice did not
THE TAME SNAKE.

try to give them a bath again. They soon grew-:large
enough to swim in the big pond; and by and by, to Alice’s
delight, they had a new brood of ducklings to take to the
water with them. ; 5. M.D.

—voitKoo——















































































































































































THE TAME SNAKE.

Most people dislike snakes’ very much. Some snakes are
harmless; but the bite of some kinds is so poisonous as to
cause death. So it is best'to have as little to do as possible
with snakes.

But snakes may be tamed; and I have heard a true story
of a lady who tamed a little green snake so that it would
HARRY AND CHASE.

follow her wherever she went. If she went in a boat, it
‘would swim after her; and, if she put out her arm in the
water, it would creep up, and wind itself round her neck.

T do not think I could ever like a snake so well as to let it
do such things; but the fact shows that kind treatment will
make even snakes show love and confidence.

The lady I speak of was so kind to all living things, that
they all seemed to know she was their friend. An old horse
that was very skittish when any man mounted his back
would stand quite still while this lady mounted.

T have heard a true story of a little girl who was sitting
out of doors one day, eating her bread and milk from a bowl, ©
when a, large snake came up, curved-his head over into the
bowl, and lapped the milk. The little girl was not fright-
ened: she only said, “Take a spoon, snake.” The snake
did not hurt her. As soon as he had got milk. enough, he
went off. ‘ i Ipa Fay.

——.050300-—_

HARRY AND CHASE.

Harry and Cuasz are two little boys about
five years old, who live in the same town,
and quite near each other. They are great
friends, and very fond of playing together.
Harry’s mamma is an English lady ; and he
has chubby red cheeks, and dark hair and
» eyes: Chase’s mamma is a French lady; and
he has light hair, large blue eyes, and less
rosy cheeks than Harry. :

Harry’s papa is building a railroad a long way off from
home, and one day he sent Harry’s mamma two paroquets.
Do you know what a paroquet is? It is a beautiful bird




A DONKEY RACE.

with bright red and yellow feathers, and looks very much
like a poll parrot: indeed, it is a sort of parrot. ;

Harry’s mamma put the two paroquets in a wooden box
- till she could get a cage for them; but they did not seem
happy in the box, and would take but very little food. In
_a few days one of them died. The other one picked and
picked at the wooden box with its strong bill, till it made a
hole and got away. It flew out of the window, and was gone
_ In a minute.
_ Harry and Chase set out to hunt it; and, after some
time, they found it in a peach-tree some distance from
the house; but they could not catch it. It flew about
the neighborhood all day, making a strange, loud noise,
and towards evening it lighted on the roof of a barn near
Harry’s house.

After dark, Fred, the hired man, climbed up, and caught
the paroquet in his hands. They have a tin cage for him

now, so he cannot bite his way out any more.
©. M. W.

























































































































































































































































































































































A DONKEY RACE.




























A BASKET OF KITTENS. ;

“Pussy, Pussy!” called Willie one morning to his cat.
Pussy stuck her head out of the closet-door, and said,
“ Purr, purr, purr.”
“What makes you stay in the closet, Pussy?” said Willie.
“Purr, purr, purr,” answered Pussy.
Willie went to the closet, and opened the door ; and there,
in a box where mamma kept a beautiful white shawl, were
two cunning little kittens. ;
Pussy was very much pleased that Willie had found them ;_
and she rubbed against his legs, and said, “ Purr, purr, purr.”
Willie ran and told his mamma. When she came, she
said, “Dear me! kittens on my best shawl: that won’t do.
Run, Willie, and get the basket that you keep your toys in.”
Willie brought the basket, and mamma made a soft bed
init. The basket was just big enough for Pussy to curl up
in it with her kittens.
Willie ran around with the baskets, showing Pussy and her
kittens to every one. ¥
THE BOY AND THE AUK.

Pussy loved Willie very much, because he had been good

to her. She liked to have him carry her about; and she said,

“ Purr, purr, purr,” all the time.

Willie said that he liked to have “live toys” in his basket
better than tops and balls and tin soldiers; and he ‘sat out
in the woodshed with the basket i in hig arms nearly all day
long. / BETH.

—oottoo——.

THE BOY AND THE AUK.

“ Aux, auk, why don’t you walk?
Why don’t you walk or fiy?
Can it be nice to live on the ice
Where the great sea-waves roll by ?”

“Boy, boy, hobbledehoy,

: My wings are’short and small :
- If I were to try, not far could I fly;
And I have no legs at all.”



“ Auk, auk, I wish you could walk:
I'd find you a pleasanter home,

Far from the shore where the cold winds roar,
And the great green sea-waves come.”

“ Boy, boy, hobbledehoy,
This home is for me the best:
One wiser than you directs what I do,

And teaches me where to rest.”
Mrs. A. M. WELLS,











~s yf

) S
ste.



































OLD JACK, THE MULE.

He belongs to us boys, and we drive him as much as we
please. He is a very safe animal to drive, for he never runs
away; and it is as much as we can do to make him run at
all. A slow walk is his favorite pace.

In the picture you may see us taking a ride in the mule-
cart, Just as we looked when we were photographed the
other day. We wanted to have little Lucy in the picture:
so George and I took her on the seat between us, and Harry
stood up behind. I took off my hat, you see, because it
came right in front of Harry’s face.

We all sat still while the picture was taken; and old ag ack
stood as still as a statue. Standing still is one of his strong
points. He is not a match for a cace-horse in spéed; but he
cai’t be beat at standing still.

Harry says he should like him better if there were more
“go” in him; and so should I. . But we like him very well
as he is; for he is a good old mule, and gives us many a nice

ride. FRANK.
UNCAN has a nose,
Points my finger at it:

4] Has a nose the hare,
He will let you pat it.





Peacock has a nose,
Very proud he’s feeling.



Has a nose the bull,
Soon he will be lowing.



Has a nose the fox, Has a nose the hog,
He is very knowing. ‘Soon will he bé squealing.

Tell me which of all these noses -
Duncan now the best supposes.


THE SISTERS. -

CE there lived near the fields and woods of a
| small village a poor woman who had three daugh-
ters. ‘Though good, she was so simple, that she
| was ready to believe all that people told her.

~ One day a peddler came to her house, and
tried to get her to buy a wooden clock; but she said she
had one already: then he tried to make her buy some tin-
ware; but she told him she was well supplied: and at last
he offered to tell her fortune and that of her three daughters
for a quarter of a dollar.

This seemed to the poor woman very cheap; for she was
not wise enough to know that a foolish thing is dear at any
price. So she consented to give him a quarter of a dollar
if he would tell them all their fortunes.

“Here are my three little girls, — Anna, Bella, and Celia,”
— said the mother.



“Why don’t you call them A, B, and C ?” asked the ped-
dler: “that would save time; and time is money, you know.

Come here, Anna, and give me your hand.”

Then Anna gave him her hand; and he looked at the lines
on the palm, and said, “ You, Anna, are born to great riches.
Dear me! How rich you will be!. What piles of gold. I see
hid away all for you to handle!”

Then Bella came forward, and gave the peddler her hand;
and he looked at the lines of the palm, and said, “ Well, I
declare! what a golden family you are going to be! *Noth-
ing but gold, gold, gold, can I find in these lines. There,
Bella, your fortune is told.” |

Little Celia now let him take her hand; and, as he looked
ee



anh :
ANN

ny Ne UR

Wk SS ay
ww wr WS )
ees “aL A\il

NY YO x

{ y
oe \ =

Nine SK

h Ve
A iit gia |
ae lea i\\ age

A ut

SORE



i AN i ‘ pe “
eS

X SS SN
‘THE SISTERS.
THE SISTERS.

at. Het palm, he put on his Benniee saying, i These lines
are so fine, that I ought to charge double price for studying
them. However, a bargain is a bargain. You, Celia, are
going to be the richest of all.”

“And how is it with me ?” asked the good mother, hold-
ing out her hand, and at the same time paying a peddler
his quarter cf a dollar.

“Oh!” said he, looking carelessly at her hand, and then
taking up his pack, “you are rich enough already !”

And with these words the saucy petal put the Money
in his pocket, and departed.

That ‘next summer, on a lovely day in ae the three
sisters strolled out near the edge of a wood to pick wild
flowers and make dandelion-chains.

As they sat on a bank under a tree, ae began to talk
of the peddler and: the fortunes he had promised. They
were too wise to believe what he had said; and ig tey laughed
merrily at his impudence.

“To think of his telling Sothor that she was rich enough
already!” said Celia.

“An idea strikes me,” replied Anna. “The neddicr was
right after all, —right in a certain sense. What he meant
was, that mother was rich in love. By gold he meant tove) ;
which is something better than gold, you know.”

“Yes,” said Bella; “and, when he said we should be rich,
he meant we aroal dearly love one another. And don’t
we love one another? And isn’t this little Celia the richest
of all inlove? Yes: Inow see what the peddler meant, and
I do not grudge him his quarter of a dollar. We are all
rich, oh, very rich, in love!” a

Then the sisters rose ang sauntered home with arms
around one another’s necks to tell their mother of the
bright discovery which they had made. Dora Burwsioe.




A WAYSIDE INN.

Was ever host so kind as mine,
With whom I tarried lately? |

A golden apple, as his sign,
From a high bough swung stately.

It was the goodly apple-tree,
Whose shelter thus invited:

There sweetest fare was given me,
And freshest drink delighted.

Guests came unto this green roof-tree,
Full many lightly winging:

They feasted, danced, and sang with glee,
Till all the air was ringing.

For my repose I sought a bed;
A grassy couch was found me;

My host himself a cover spread
Of cooling shade around me.

And, when I asked what I should pay,
He shook his crown benignly:

May he be blest till his last day,
And root and shoot thrive finely !

M. A. C. (FRoM THE GERMAN oF UBLAND.)


AN ARMFUL OF KITTENS.

Our Emma has only one fault: she is too fond of kittens.
She always wants a troop of kittens about the house; and
as I like order, and do not like to have my spools of thread
rolled ‘about the carpet, I am a foe to kittens.

The other day I heard a great noise from the old cat.
She was whining and-crying as if in distress. I went into
_ the barn to see what was the matter; and there was Emma
with three new-born kittens in her arms.

She was so greedy, that she could not be content with
holding one at a time: she must have them all. No won-
_ der the old cat protested against such grasping conduct. -

Emma has a dog: Turk is his name. He is a little bit of
‘a fellow, but brave as a lion. The other day, a great dog
came into the yard, and ran for a kitten. The old cat was
in the barn at the time, and did not see him.

Round the yard and into the garden he ran, Emma trying
in vain to stop him, and the poor little kitten frightened
almost to death, and scampering for dear life.

But, just as the big coward of a dog got a few hairs of the
’ kitten’s fur in his-mouth, he all at once came to grief.

What do you think took place? Why, little Turk flew
straight at his throat, and gave him such a nip, that he howled
with pain. Just then the old cat came up, and, seeing what
was going on, bristled with rage, and would have scratched
out the dog’s eyes if he had not run out of the yard.

_ Then the old cat went up to Turk, and purred as if to
thank him for what he had done. She had not been very
- friendly to him before.

Ever since that test of his courage and good will, she lets
him come to the swill-pail without growling or spitting at
him. I think she would share her last bone with him now.

Emma's AUNT.








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































UQHN ANDRE W— SOM

AN ARMFUL OF KITTENS.
THE KITTENS.

“O papa!” said Emma, running up to her father one
day : “our old cat has got five dear fade kittens. Isn’t it
nice ?”

Much to Emma’s surprise, her father did not seem to be
pleased at all. He was not fond of cats.

“Well, my dear,” said he,“I think they had better be
disposed of. One cat in the house is enough.”

“But these are not cats,” said Emma. “ They are cunning
little kittens ; and I don’t want to have them disposed of.”

Here Emme’s mother put in a word. “They will soon
grow up to be cats,” said she. “We cannot keep five more
cats. We must get rid of three or four of them at once.” °

But Emma wanted to keep them all. Five kittens, she
said, were none too many. There was one for herself, one
for little Ann, one for Johnny, one for the baby, and one for
the old cat. What could be nicer?

In spite of Emma’s entreaties, in which the ofher children
joined with great clamor, papa insisted upon it that the
kittens must be “disposed of” What did he mean by that?
T heard him say something to Patrick the man-servant about
chloroform. Could that have had any thing to do with it?

I don’t know. - But, if Pat was expected to “dispose of”
‘those kittens, he had a wonderful knack at forgetting it.
He had a tender heart, and he was very fond of the children.
He had a great deal to do. How could he think: of every
thing?

So day after ae cease and the kittens were not aispoe
of. The children made them such pets and playmates, and
grew so fond of them, that even papa had to give in at last,
and accept them as members of the family.










































THE KITTENS.
THE KITTENS.

Look at the picture, and you will see the children and —
the kittens having a good time together. There is the baby
comfortably seated on the pillows: she and Johnny have
a kitten between them. There is Emma with a kitten in
her arms; and there is little Ann hurrying down stairs as
though Bie was afraid the kittens would all be“ og of”
Berane she gets there.

What is Emma saying? Hark! This isit: —

“Now, kitty, you are more than three weeks old, and you
ought to know yourname. Look me right in the face while
I tell it to you. Your name is ‘Floss’? Will you remem- |
ber it? Say Mew, and I shall know that you mean yes.
That's right: you are a good kitten.”

So’each of the kittens has a name given to it by Emma.
The two that sit by their mother’s side, washing their faces,
are Pet and Spot; the thoughtful little kitty sitting by
herself is Tabby; and the one that J eDuny, and ‘the pEby.
are making much of is Downy.

I think this is a fine lot of kittens, and fooE they il all -
live to grow up, and be a credit to their mother.
~ Now, here comes Susan: with a pail of milk on her. head ;
and we must give some milk to the kittens, for they ine
all been good. nee URGES Aur waite:














BABY’S RIDE...

Our blue-eyed darling, Baby May,
Thought she would take a ride to-day:
~ So she pulled off a stocking,
And pulled off a shoe,
And harnessed her toes
With a ribbon of blue.
“Get up, get up!” says Baby May,
The very first words we've heard her say.
She shook the reins, and laughed in glee,
And roguishly looked around to see
If we were watching her ride away,
With her little pink toes for horses gay.

E. L. 8. P.




THE DOG WHO RANG FOR HIS DINNER.

In France there was once a
little dog whose name was Fido.
He belonged to a poor woman
who did not always have food
enough to give him.

Fido must have thought it
over to himself much in this
way :.“ My mistress loves me ;
but she is so poor, that often
she does not have food enough
| I) ) 60) for her own dinner. How, then,

ie YS can she afford to give me mine?
I am a strong dog, and a wise
dog too; andI must get my
dinner without troubling my
good mistress.” :

Not far from the place where he lived, there was a con-
vent, which was the home of some good nuns: and one
day, as Fido sat near by in the sun, he saw a beggar go and
ring the bell of the convent-door; and soon a woman came,
and brought a bowl of soup and meat, and gave it to the
beggar. i

Fido trotted up and looked in the beggar’s face, as much
as to say, “ Couldn’t you spare one of those bones ?” But
the beggar did not see things in the light that Fido did.
“Go away, sir!” said the beggar : so Fido trotted back to
his place in the sun, and lay down.

But he was very hungry. He had not had any thing to
eat for twelve hours. The beggar over the way, as soon as
THE DOG WHO RANG FOR HIS DINNER.

he had Baton his food. put the bowl in a hole over the door,
and then walked off. -

“Those must be good women to give food to beggars,”
thought Fido. “I wonder if they oy give me a bowl
of soup. There’s nothing like trying.”

So Fido trotted across the street, and, putting up his paw.
rang the bell. “Ding, dong, ding!” What a noise he made!
'.“ There’s another beggar after food!” thought the good
nun; and out she came with a plate of boiled meat, and
looked round “'There’s nobody here, after all!” said the
woman, shutting the door.

“She calls mé nobody,” thought poor Fido. “I must
try again.” So he jumped up, and rang the bell once more.
“ Ding, dong, ding, dong!” It made a much louder noise
than before.

' But nobody came. The woman stood watching at a back-
, window to see who was ringing the bell. Fido waited a
while; and then jumped up again, and gave the bell a a
pull.

Then the woman came out, and laughed to find that a
dog had been ringing the bell. “ What do you want, sir?”
asked she. “Bow, wow, wow!” said Fido. “I know what.
that means,” said the woman: “ you want some dinner.”

So she gave the dog some dinner; and, every day after -
that, he would come at a certain hour, and ring the bell, and
the woman would feed him; and one day aie put some
food in a basket, and said, “ Now, sir, take that home to .
your mistress.”

And the dog took it home aatelee ; and his mistress had a
good dinner that day, as well as Fido himself. Folks would
come from a great distance to see him ring the bell for his
dinner. I would like to own as bright a dog as Fido;
would not you 2 Uncie CHARLES.




GEORGE'S NEW NEIGHBOR.

In the early summer-time a young squirrel ventured out
of the hollow tree where it was born. Its mother was away.
If she had been at. home, she would not have let her little
one go out alone. As it was, there was no one to hinder:
so the tiny fellow crept down the trunk of the great oak-
tree, swung about a while amid the saplings and: under-
brush, and then ran around on the ground among the ferns
and mosses.

Two boys came along that way, and spied it. The wee
creature ran from them as fast as it could; but they ran
faster, and soon caught it. They held it very gently, and
tried not to hurt it; but they took it out of the woods, and
far away from the old oak-tree.

By and by they gave their frightened captive to a tender-
hearted child named George. He fed it, and treated it kind-
GEORGE’S NEW NEIGHBOR.

ly, and did all he could to make up for the loss of its mother.
So Bunny long ago learned to love George.

By this time Bunny has grown to. be a full-sized squirrel,
and feels at home with George at the farm-house. He doer
not require a cage to keep him, but has made a nest of
leaves in one of the trees in the dooryard, and sleeps there
as snug as can be. © .

He comes into the house when he pleases, and is not
afraid of any one; but he will not let anybody take hold of
~ him, or put a hand upon him. If any one tries to, he leaps
away, asif to say, “Don’t touch me!”

If Bunny is not fed when he wants to be, he will jump
upon the breakfast-table, and whisk off a great deal more
bread than he can carry. So he is not as polite as he should
be.

If anybody chases him after he has been so rude and
_ naughty, he will scamper up the stairway, and. leap from a
- chamber-window into the tree where his nest is.

George loves to watch Bunny play in the trees in the
dooryard. He thinks it is “real cunning” to have a squirrel
for such a near neighbor. He will be very sorry when
Bunny makes up his mind to leave, as we suppose he will;
for, when winter comes, his nest will not be warm enough,

and he will wish for a hollow tree in which to spend the cold
weather.

Nobody wants Bunny to move away, and forsake the farm-
house and his friends there.

~ Would not it be a good plan, Bunny, to move into the
barn, and hide your nuts in a haymow? The cows would
not be sorry to have you live there, nor the hens that scratch
straw on the barn-floor; and George would be delighted to
have you so near at hand.

That is what his Uncle Daniel thinks. | DDE


\ ee




YI ce, :
IN AR ANUS AAU

KITTY AND HIS BOTTLE.

Wun the little gray kitten was three weeks old, the old
mother-cat died. What was to be done? It seemed very
hard to drown the poor little thing: but it would not do to
let it starve; and it cried so loud, “Mee-ow, mee-ow!” that
Aunt Lizzie, who has a very soft spot in her heart for dumb
creatures, could not bear to hear it.

She tried feeding him with a spoon; but kitty did not
like that at all: he choked and squirmed, and most of the
milk ran down on his neck and breast, and made him very
wet and uncomfortable.

At last she said to herself, “Babies suck milk out of bot-
tles, and why should not kitties?” She got a small bottle,
filled it with warm milk and water, and put a little piece
of sponge in the top like a cork. Then she put it to kitty’s
mouth. Oh, how pleased he was! He held the bottle fast’
in his two little fore-paws, and sucked away until all the milk
was gone.

Then Aunt Lizzie wrapped him up in a warm cloth, laid
THE UNBENDING DOLL.

him in a deep box, and he went to sleep as cosily as could
be. Ina few days he learned ‘to know the bottle, and would
seize it, and draw it up close, as soon as he caught sight
of it.

Everybody who. saw this funny sight laughed heartily ;
and kitty and his bottle had to be brought up to the parlor
to be admired almost every day. He was fed in this way
for more than two weeks, until hé could lap milk out of a
saucer ; and, as he never knew any other mother than Aunt
Lizzie, we sometimes thought he took her for the ‘old cat.

And what do you think this kitty’s name is? He was
born about the time of the Princess Louise’s marriage ; and
his name is Marquis of Lorne. Fen he

——-059,00-——.

THE UNBENDING DOLL.

Oncr there was a doll that could not bend: so, when she
wanted to sit down, she could only slant in a chair, thus: —



The other dolls laughed at her for this; but their mother
said, “My dears, you should never laugh at such things.
For it is the way she was made; and perhaps she can stand
better than you can.”
[HE OAT AND THE MILK.

This proved to be the case. One day the dolls were all
requested to stand ina row. Only one could do so, — the
one that had been laughed at. The rest all had to sit down,

es : gn
stl ry)

Nh Ny

i i
& yo |
| ae

i




' ah " \

ie
ne ob ly




























ih aay Val

4 | Lae a wo A

‘es a
Se

You see, the one that was laughed at stands beautifully,
and can laugh at the rest, that are so loose in the soins, they
have to sit.

Little dolls should learn not to lien at each Sten
Miss H.



My DEAR LITTLE PUSSY, YOU NEEDN'T SAY “ MEW:”
\
THE MILK IN THIS PITCHER, IT ISN’T FOR YOU.


A WINTRY DAY.

' Brnorp the gray branches that stretch from the trees!
Nor blossom nor verdure they wear :

They rattle and shake to the northerly breeze,
And wave their long arms in the air.

The sun hides his face in a mantle of cloud ;
The roar of the ocean is heard ;

The wind through the wood bellows hoarsely and loud,
And over-land sails the sea-bird.

Come in, little Charles, for the snow flutters down ;
No paths in the garden remain :

The streets and the houses are white in the town,
And white are the fields and the plain!

Come in, little Charles, from the tempest of snow ;
"Tis dark, and the shutters we’ll close ;

We'll put a fresh fagot to make the fire glow,
Secure from the storm as it blows.

—1059300-——

HOW THE DOG GOT THE STICK.

A rrimnp of mine took his dog out for a walk, and they

- came to a stream which ran quite fast. My friend threw a
stick in the stream, and them said to his dog, “Go, Jack, and
fetch me that stick.”

In jumped the dog into the stream; and he swam, and he

swam, and he swam. But, swim as fast as he could, he could
not swim so fast as the stream could flow: and so he could
not get up to the stick to take hold of it; no, not though he
swam as fast as he could. — Horas

w8
HOW THE DOG GOT THE STIOK.

a

So he must have thought to himself, “This will not do: I.
shall swim and swim till my strength is all gone, and yet
I shall not get up to the stick. I know what I will do so
that I shall yet win the race.” ‘

So the dog swam to land. And, as soon as he was on dry
ground, he ran, and he ran, and he ran, — oh, so fast! — till
he had run past the stick a good long way; and then he
jumped into the stream once more, and swam up to meet
the stick ; and soon he saw the stick come floating down.

« Ah, ah, Mr. Stick! I think I have you now,” thought the
dog; and with that he took the stick in his mouth, and swam
to land; and then he ran up to his mas‘ter, and put down
the stick at his feet, and looked up in his face, and wagged
his tail, as much as to say, “ What do you think of me now?
Do you not think I was a wise dog to play the stick such a
trick as that ?”

And his master gave Jack a pat on the head, and said,
“Good old Jack, wise old Jack!” And Jack was so glad,
that he began to bound and jump and bark for joy to think
what a wise, good dog he had been. ; TRoprre’s AuNT





Ar “Ay
z

4

ANN,




































THE PLEASANT AUTUMN TIME.

Wuen the maple-leaf is red, and the oak-leaf yellow;
When the nuts begin to drop, and the pears are mellow;
When the crows cry caw/ to see empty corn-fields merely :
That’s the pleasant autumn-time, — season I love dearly.

Not too warm, and not too cool, is the charming weather ;
Haze and sunshine, not too bright, seem to blend together:
You may see the squirrel run up the trees so fleetly ;

You may hear the crickets chirp, and the birds sing sweetly.

Sky and earth and fragrant air all are us inviting;
See! not yet the golden-rod has felt the winter's blighting;
Violets we yet may find beside the brooklet growing:

Come and join me in my walk: children, I am going!
i RACHEL OSBORN. _


Aa SERN
THE LITTLE FORTUNE-SEEKERS.

Youne as Alan was, he had heard from his uncle Paul
many a story about people seeking their fortune: so, one
fine summer day, he set off with his brother Owen and
his sister Amy a-fortune-seeking. Alan carried a stick; and
Amy had a little basket on her arm.

Alan led the way, telling Owen and Amy to: keep close
to him, and to fear nothing. As they passed by-Lakin’s
pond, a duck gave a loud quack; when they came to the
great ash-tree, a bee buzzed by them : but neither the quack-
ing nor the buzzing frightened the bold Alan; and on he
went, holding up his stick.

They had almost reached the sawyer’s cottage, when a
black animal ran out towards them. Alan asked if he should
attack the tiger? Owen would have it that it was only a
puppy dog: but Alan said that did not matter; for it had four
legs and a head and a tail, and so had a tiger. Owen thought
THE LITTLE FORTUNE-SHEKERS.

he had better let it alone; and Amy tamed the tiger at once
by giving it a bit of bread from her basket. :

Suddenly they came to a spot where five or six geese and
a few goslings were waddling about. The gander came
towards them, stretching out his neck, and hissing loudly. |
Owen and Amy ran back, followed by Alan, who told them,
that, if he had hit the gander with his stick, he would have
frightened the sees:



‘As there was a stile near, leading into a field, they all
got over the stile, and thus passed the geese.

““T wonder how that gander would like it,” said Alan, “if
I were to turn back, and lay hold of him by his long neck,
and shake him?” Amy begged of him by no means to
think of such a thing; and so Alan told her that he would
not. Little did the gander know of his narrow escape !

Ah, me! what perils await. those who go on their travels
to seek their fortunes! A little brook was now before them ;
and Alan said, “This river must be crossed, and I hope that
THE LITTLE FORTUNE-SEEKERS.

none of us will be carried away by the current. What we
shall do if an Indian springs from behind the bushes, or a
crocodile comes out of the sedge, I don’t know. Here is
the narrowest part of the river. I will lay my stick across
it; and, if we make believe very much, it will do fora
bridge.” za

“ But I can’t walk along your stick,” said Amy. “Never
mind that,” said Alan: “a bridge is a bridge, whether we
walk along it or not.” So Alan laid his stick across the
narrow part, and then jumped over the brook, followed by
Owen and Amy. No Indian sprang from the bush, no croc-
odile came out of the sedge; and the river was crossed with-
out one of them being drowned.

All at once it came into Alan’s head that Uncle Paul had
once been attacked by a wolf, and that they ought to have
an adventure of the same kind: he therefore asked Owen
if he would consent to be eaten up by a wolf. Owen said he
did not like it: he thought Alan ought to be eaten, for he was
the biggest. Alan said that would never do; for then there
would be nobody to care for him and Amy. : ,

But, besides this difficulty, there was another: they had
no wolf; and, where to get one, they did not know. At last
it was settled. Owen was to be the wolf, and to spring on
Amy; but before he had eaten her up, or even so much as
snapped off her little finger, Alan was to rush upon him
with his stick, and drive him back into the woods.

Amy was now left alone, that Owen might get behind one
bush, and Alan behind another. No sooner was this done,
than, with her basket on her arm, she went on her j journey.
_ And now Amy was almost come to the bush behind which
Owen was crouching. For a moment she made a stop, as
though she hardly durst go by; but at last she went on.
Suddenly the wolf leaped out, and caught hold of her.
THE LITTLE FORTUNE-SEEKERS,

What was poor. Amy to do? Well was it for her that
Alan happened to come up. Many people are frightened
at wolves; but Alan did not seem frightened at all.

It was a hard struggle; for the wolf pulled poor Amy one
way, and Alan pulled her the other; but at length Alan won
the day. “Shall I kill the wolf, Amy ?” cried he, lifting
up his stick. “No, no!” cried Amy: “he has not hurt me
a bit. He is not a real wolf, but only my brother Owen.”

The affair of the wolf having passed off so well, Alan

8








cA
hie
began to bethink himself of other adventures. So much
had he heard from Uncle Paul about Indians, that his heart
was set on going among them. ;
- Both Owen and Amy wondered where he would find the
Indians; but Alan said, “That thicket yonder is quite as
likely a place to find them-in as any that I know.”
“We have not seen one yet,” said Owen. “No,” replied
Alan: “Tndians always get behind the trees.” This made
Owen and Amy look about them, as if they feared every
tree had an Indian behind it.



SS
“SAY


THE LITTLE FORTUNE-SEEKERS.

Alan set off for the thicket, while Owen and Amy sat
down to talk over their travels; but it was not long before
Alan again joined them. Whether the Indians were absent
on some expedition, or whatever else might be the cause,
certain it was that Alan had found no Indians. He had,
however, torn the leg of one of his stockings: so he asked
Amy to bind up his wounds.

“ But you have not hurt your leg,” said Amy: “you have
only torn a hole in your stocking.” =



“Never mind that!” replied Alan: “We are out on our
travels, seeking our fortunes, and must make the most of
every thing. Bind up my wounded leg.’

Little Amy tied up his leg with his handkerchief; and,
considering that she had never bound up a wound before,
it did her great credit.

It is due to Alan to say that the misfortune of his wounded

- leg by no means cooled his courage. “ What is the use,”
said he, “of complaining? Those who go to seek their
fortunes must learn to bear pain.”
THE LITTLE FORTUNE-SEEKERS.

_ One of Alan’s plans was to find a treasure; and, as they

had neither spade nor pickaxe with them to dig for gold, he
thought the best way would be for them to find a bag of
money. Amy said, if they found a bag of money, she should
like to take Dolly some. This being generously agreed to
- by Alan and Owen, they proceeded with their plan.

_ Alan took Amy’s handkerchief, and tied up some grass in
it. He then told Owen to go on a little way and drop it;
and this Owen did. “Hi!” cried Alan, when he came up
to the spot: “what have we here? Who would have
thought that a merchant would have dropped a bag of
money in such a place as this?”

All at once Owen and Amy bethought themselves that

they had no right to the gold, as it belonged to the mer-
chant who had lost it; ‘but Alan met this objection by say-
_ing that they could easily inquire for the merchant as they
went along, and give up the money if they found him. Thus
pacified, Owen and Amy allowed Alan to lift the heavy bag -
of money into the basket: this he seemed to do with great
difficulty.

But how was the basket to be carried with so heavy a
weight in it? Said Alan, “ Where there is a will, there is a
way.” Astick was procured, and passed through the handle
of the basket, one end of it resting on Owen’s shoulder, and
the other end on the shoulder of Amy.

Alan with his leg tied up, leaning on his stick for support,
_ hobbled onward; and Owen and Amy appeared to toil with
might and main, bending under their load.

They had almost come to the turn. by the birch-trees,
' when suddenly-Dash, their own favorite dog, came barking
joyfully towards them. At that very moment their parents
‘were waiting for them with the pony-chaise at the end of
the lane.
_ No sooner did our little fortune-seekers set éyes on the
pony-chaise than off they set in a scamper, strangely forget-

ful of what had passed. It was wonderful to see how nimble ©

Alan was in spite of his wounded leg; and with what ease
Owen and Amy ran along with that heavy load of gold, -
which before had well-nigh weighed them down ie the
ground.



: “Rock-a-by baby in the tree-top,
j When the wind blows the cradle will rock.”

——-0.059400-——

THE OCEAN AFTER A STORM.

Artur Bias was a little boy who had never seen the
ocean: so, one day, his aunt took him to the beach; and
there, for the first time, he saw the ocean, of which he had
heard so much.

A strong gale from the east had been blow’ing the day
before ; and the waves beat high, and threw their foam over
the rocks. Arthur walked on the sand with his aunt, and
thought the sight so grand, that he did not.want to go home.

All at once he dropped her hand, and ran to the rocks, on
which the spray of the ocean fell fast and thick. His aunt
called to him to come back. Arthur did not heed her, but
went high up on to the rocks,
THE OCEAN AFTER A STORM

No sooner had he got there than a huge wave rolled up,
and threw its spray so far, that he was wet with the salt wa-
ter. He thought this fine fun ; but his aunt knew that an-
other wave-might AME) him off his feet, and place him in
great danger.

How should she get him away from the rocks? She did
not know. ‘The tide was coming in fast. The néxt wave |
might dash up much farther than the 1 wave that. came .
before it.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































All at once, Arthur thought he would run back to his aunt,
and ask her if he might take off his shoes and stockings, and
wade in the water. So he ran away from the rocks.

It was well for him that he did so just at the right time ;
for, when he stood by the side of his aunt, they both looked
at the rocks which he had left,and there a huge wave was
rolling up, that would have swept Arthur back with it if he
had still been standing there. He promised his aunt he
would not be so care’less again.




















1, I kmew a boy in our town, His name was Bil-ly Hood ;He had asword all made of tin, A

















































2, Now very brave this Billy was,—At least so __ Bil-ly thought, And he was not afraid, not he, Of
3. But ah! one day this Billy went Where six old geese did stray,And on his noisy drum began Some -
5 a
@ i} A s—
eee | pero
a
ope eae
ee
musket made of wood. His drum would always let you know When Billy Hood was coming, For the
an- y thing that fought, ‘With this good sword and gun,” said he,‘'I’ll fight untill die ; Let
what tooloud to play, An old goose chas’d him from the field, And Billy screaming ran, . Till up -
aH 9 — + -
of — @ + 4 =
oie a
oe I mare hes @.
{ —a 5 : g
neighbours al-ways used to say, I wish hed stop that drumming;Row de dow, dow,
man or beast come on, who cares? Not Bil - ly Hood ; not I!” “Row de dow, dow,
- on the kitchen floor he sank, This valiant lit- tle man! Row de dow, dow,
Se ee Ng NN NER haRA
2 eS ee ee ee
3 J fo oo ae fat
-é- a
Row, dow, dow! Row de dow de, row de, dow de, row, dow, dow]!











ekg sao = aaa
preg ea ee:

\





xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080328_AAAAFP' PACKAGE 'UF00080711_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-03-28T22:04:56-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:06:41-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297984; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-19T06:27:26-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '647861' DFID 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00128.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 6072b0f75a108740b96e889dfa5863a4
'SHA-1' f0c9eb086f4c2da16430aa21be7635bb506b9a9a
EVENT '2011-10-14T02:08:09-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-10-14T02:05:31-04:00'
redup
'323' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfile1' 'sip-files00128.txt'
d37501ea1898ba36d35a3709c5f98305
2010421a88d99c8e357967f7800290f2e089e74c
'2011-10-14T02:07:30-04:00'
describe
'2011-10-14T02:05:33-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWE' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
6072b0f75a108740b96e889dfa5863a4
f0c9eb086f4c2da16430aa21be7635bb506b9a9a
'2011-10-14T02:08:20-04:00'
describe
'515835' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWF' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
89cdc0cd8796c22f874ff2cd30b31a54
e9caffc5306c949964b5f0827016f738300a08f7
'2011-10-14T02:06:54-04:00'
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWG' 'sip-files00001.pro'
130c3ec32f21b259b1d2d3d455475299
9ab29b7638e1130efa5a547949dcfe05f967416e
'2011-10-14T02:07:38-04:00'
describe
'130210' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWH' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
02c1d345e981f6a52e1ad3f7699d1558
7344d33142a77a70fb0199599621528f73430761
'2011-10-14T02:08:03-04:00'
describe
'15559900' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWI' 'sip-files00001.tif'
1636a4cf295c4c318352354faab94c76
a4a1563b102fc6365b804133a17ce197afcceb9a
'2011-10-14T02:08:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWJ' 'sip-files00001.txt'
d37501ea1898ba36d35a3709c5f98305
2010421a88d99c8e357967f7800290f2e089e74c
'2011-10-14T02:08:30-04:00'
describe
'34213' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWK' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
0f7264dad2755acb1fe54dc4a1cac526
9749a3f1a67f2b15a7272a8570112b390f579172
'2011-10-14T02:06:53-04:00'
describe
'682618' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWL' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
20a3e26c9d132fb09d96c147e57e87d8
f3bcd97e229eb2d66022b499326d32665dac5d4f
'2011-10-14T02:06:42-04:00'
describe
'400836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWM' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
add646b907066015c81d5d8e01c1d566
b1f140af4a7a2bc4638f03fdcc8ba7a60b04be6c
'2011-10-14T02:06:37-04:00'
describe
'92546' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWN' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
ba79fc7ab9706419eaba92212f1abe2c
492671860f9890a92d1435d409568ffcd36399fe
describe
'16388432' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWO' 'sip-files00002.tif'
cccd7efe37d22a7f3798f1b0d6d6f6ba
7a51bd332669c2c3524ed9fe7c6ee2890c4e0a77
'2011-10-14T02:08:24-04:00'
describe
'22304' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWP' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
476b9292af2d834924a79d56f6112f63
2d775e68de47c2ea0c6f09ac0227b2c21cc3a494
'2011-10-14T02:07:57-04:00'
describe
'587980' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWQ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
8f8c8998295db7e94c0c37dadc58d296
ecbc16f4393da5a337f2510ff89bec867e2d55bd
'2011-10-14T02:07:02-04:00'
describe
'411494' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWR' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
7fb45cd272129513678e6d1e10f8a273
a08d4d1343a1887055cf0f80e3e68652d3414ac2
'2011-10-14T02:06:16-04:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWS' 'sip-files00003.pro'
3b22b8ada8dac57c2096aa04c427faeb
3d50347f7b1d01d325e82d22b8174ec9b2f3e8b0
'2011-10-14T02:06:27-04:00'
describe
'93161' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWT' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
ce6b7ebfee2d6a223113edbdd312dd73
084b7504d3bdfa5d0cb4f933669003fdd6ec8dfb
'2011-10-14T02:07:23-04:00'
describe
'14117356' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWU' 'sip-files00003.tif'
bdff1a7d95c460ea2f3d686437005a4d
6e1712cf8ef95036eafb635167feadd2c3c70c9d
'2011-10-14T02:05:36-04:00'
describe
'432' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWV' 'sip-files00003.txt'
4527898f3a46fd342c44ba20a1a5a25d
03321d8ab5070a69819393262699cd35e456307a
'2011-10-14T02:05:41-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'21062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWW' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
899feade03c0ec15bc840d5710b1ae27
eb08d6c7e2c0b0832454133984db9cdc4a0c81e9
'2011-10-14T02:06:14-04:00'
describe
'559771' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWX' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
676e8503bad57f54114f90db12acabef
7c75be07b5476bf0b5e370f0bd25fb803c64ae19
describe
'463476' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWY' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
4ef367b55421e50b82057639975ded56
22468a2642bf5217c5010d47d3777766cb5e759f
'2011-10-14T02:06:57-04:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJWZ' 'sip-files00006.pro'
c16d06b6372651b63b2bb7b1d506aac0
f3e8e05372e637ca5bb5021c8257998435e9f841
'2011-10-14T02:06:11-04:00'
describe
'113280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXA' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
df5dbd386efbf4a0869d7d09d445c70b
d855e5bb59ca39dcdbb256af63d63fcf5dfe95a8
'2011-10-14T02:06:07-04:00'
describe
'4487672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXB' 'sip-files00006.tif'
d8253fcd9de74166d232392783fd7d7a
3226f0a74b52812c0b1421007f4176725fd9f01d
'2011-10-14T02:05:49-04:00'
describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXC' 'sip-files00006.txt'
5c18d39e1202cf56a72497d5f7a9438c
029c757bf75ce1687e3caa5b502200cbeabf66c8
'2011-10-14T02:06:52-04:00'
describe
'28868' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXD' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
77e61a6d3a3f62d7efba343e0ac85fba
a9fd0e010ac0b11c1636d9746084f55b3f32ae90
'2011-10-14T02:05:53-04:00'
describe
'567312' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXE' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
336a03e81291565a507fa83dd093daf9
f6b8a1e7c443691dc768b064e05f386492fad3b3
describe
'359347' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXF' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
a8f7463f8e1b429c1d6cd175c4183b16
aa3935258d12a755dc805266911c5b7b4343f40b
'2011-10-14T02:06:04-04:00'
describe
'2648' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXG' 'sip-files00007.pro'
86df328ec8c87b150da0155ef7c9bc78
c98a074e49b93333aaa4b209c1fe11f3640aa0b3
'2011-10-14T02:08:00-04:00'
describe
'87452' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXH' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
0da576040677bf7b4ff472571097e4a6
956173b15eb345706a4a85eb9f94651835686e66
'2011-10-14T02:08:38-04:00'
describe
'4546484' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXI' 'sip-files00007.tif'
c0e721692ed21a79f3a193a9b1521b32
28c2b684348617a0492586b41e8ac099cf7469c0
'2011-10-14T02:06:21-04:00'
describe
'124' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXJ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
19b33ace656d2ece16d978fd12a9dea1
a8c91091d8ae8b9dbd87ac887858206b9ecbd76d
'2011-10-14T02:08:29-04:00'
describe
'21920' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXK' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
19729f631457e3ad845763419090b489
206e1bc430ce3c2092d33535d424c9ce09d25cb8
'2011-10-14T02:08:43-04:00'
describe
'577009' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXL' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
58a5ea89ce0b8915bdb96d95f02bf0c8
8aedd98ffd51aca21d0f64ea4392e512e7ac522a
'2011-10-14T02:05:42-04:00'
describe
'288491' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXM' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
212eae77fcc611709e0c23048caacf7c
ba8352c9ddcaf0df51d23dc77dae173fe9f71dfe
'2011-10-14T02:07:09-04:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXN' 'sip-files00008.pro'
94a9cb08a31aa0c3e2f4c58bfcb0b056
78689f39c3317c3277aeed93150093acd7ddda61
describe
'66256' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXO' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
f41600dd60156f4c8261b96499adaf6b
8769bd71379bad3628cd2f227346a55ed1b9e5fb
'2011-10-14T02:06:09-04:00'
describe
'4622744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXP' 'sip-files00008.tif'
29ff4b4b5114ab81b56bcebdc896c76a
0ad6326a5fd0495da34bc35884c07c82e32ebf33
describe
'123' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXQ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
2f6b52ad686b653673034cfdf9bc5ce1
63638bf9ac76b24e7da100bcb4f20f384c7499ff
'2011-10-14T02:08:32-04:00'
describe
'14854' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXR' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
6556e4b85c570669a71a3cf5361b3f11
96c9cae5781db7ea70093b50e481ca4035a9708c
'2011-10-14T02:05:38-04:00'
describe
'553281' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXS' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
973aa202a2ef2e26d085558c0c14f690
19fb47a64df3398d6e9fd02cc8a5dc20dda9b99b
'2011-10-14T02:07:42-04:00'
describe
'387232' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXT' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
db723fe561ea9713d94c828b451f3149
5d349d6a37f13e07c44be5cd25dcf6ece46985b2
'2011-10-14T02:06:41-04:00'
describe
'6509' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXU' 'sip-files00009.pro'
b2e5fff34a311aa51a91ba6d11535ade
df7fae63ca945c96c1bd5b8008f41b3482a1505c
'2011-10-14T02:07:27-04:00'
describe
'96867' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXV' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
90df466b6a74be4d8dde0358bcc4ba7e
1de219b9b5384787315c276f3997ac554e01cf93
'2011-10-14T02:07:52-04:00'
describe
'4435164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXW' 'sip-files00009.tif'
adffa2ca67ece4ccac9fc8cb2aaa6bf0
40ecd510143ffb085c29cc70b57517a6edece094
'2011-10-14T02:06:13-04:00'
describe
'339' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXX' 'sip-files00009.txt'
bdca1d0c59f6e35b866b5f42a95db554
cb9c23a5c5a95a51b827d8ed09edfa4bdba8dca5
describe
Invalid character
'26107' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXY' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
906c3a0225b8ae94d4bcfe6be7921de5
0bd74953458e62445c16d345360a8fda1b027e68
'2011-10-14T02:06:33-04:00'
describe
'581334' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJXZ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
b1756841e906cd87641f1b5f8022faac
b32836eae1f79eab8c96e13817d01367aac41788
'2011-10-14T02:07:55-04:00'
describe
'389539' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYA' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
5d2a0f514da4ac97556f674582bf0f5e
7de66416a62303c6a776a3aa907c4fc9d01cb73c
'2011-10-14T02:06:31-04:00'
describe
'20730' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYB' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f4476d1bd656b84e66ea6637ad709723
f02b32e0b1e1a6047ae9b708a3b63f0182eba848
'2011-10-14T02:07:51-04:00'
describe
'99992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYC' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
8e56043e934c73e5858446c6151f8281
06d94476684ba7b91ee25aff89ce63a924c03055
'2011-10-14T02:08:28-04:00'
describe
'4660328' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYD' 'sip-files00010.tif'
a8104e757f6358bf8d0b7b93f8665119
782954ee3bb8de2d2c68ecc249068d3ba6893e72
'2011-10-14T02:06:30-04:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYE' 'sip-files00010.txt'
d075293a93b86037b590f1f26699ce0c
253d4823460559ec0c1fa8085fe04adb69025b35
'2011-10-14T02:05:55-04:00'
describe
'26405' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYF' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
3e50e7d22ac46e90c0d6b7ddde254644
5aaf11cd949cf7a3ae602443af5f098e26497f66
'2011-10-14T02:05:40-04:00'
describe
'560390' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYG' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
34c803d1b5d914fdd606f5c7f8202990
1a4a4415be33710696f8c909fbb75ad639725804
describe
'446041' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYH' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
a1b9f8d9629df013bdaf6dfad8dfe101
7873f1acca9c3db7fea0d3164cd1a2ac649db19a
'2011-10-14T02:07:44-04:00'
describe
'39707' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYI' 'sip-files00011.pro'
9037c39ecc21cc1c5d7f5ffe521e2eb9
652708f54d9c0a14c56a4b00bcf3fa79d2f63e23
describe
'117572' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
f20a83fd2f0add86a7674270ca56252f
c4d800b97e4b5688ba6432bfda85794089effc23
'2011-10-14T02:06:24-04:00'
describe
'4492596' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYK' 'sip-files00011.tif'
7f79fc34b6460ad51eb356275ff5cbf3
7aa92b9f619a3243c253781e44a5de40ede86fd1
'2011-10-14T02:06:43-04:00'
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYL' 'sip-files00011.txt'
da8652996de2fe2f9c6fd78e1f33e629
70c15b32f94f5e8d1670f6ba27f605c272258b88
'2011-10-14T02:07:13-04:00'
describe
'29451' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYM' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
9118c7a7f0f5a0156e5c80d1aeb04927
525ca691c0f2a78fc2bc9ebeb6f07f1d1f34681a
'2011-10-14T02:06:02-04:00'
describe
'606224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYN' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
aac3344c07f63c582861884057627177
72b5303beb5ad50b46b26127c0fcd376d2550f8c
'2011-10-14T02:07:43-04:00'
describe
'418162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
14340efaa287a98f69522fb6c6774afe
dc65a948c8f4f3fcf75ca4b8f3f4d1bf465a8bd9
describe
'46666' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYP' 'sip-files00012.pro'
f0a3059192ca64b311ea4d0fc63dbb6e
22f24b85ec1a28e72c3d2722b67dff06b6985b1b
describe
'109544' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
f608e4f41f2b807dd8862ce339e4ee9d
1aee6b2413fd4bc48b66ce1d38d40e082c14b531
'2011-10-14T02:07:45-04:00'
describe
'4859560' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a66fffe3afca103365d71bacc923783a
95e28160b4d8651611697b8021eb8404b0aa8c84
describe
'1910' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYS' 'sip-files00012.txt'
57491cec3e00cbc302d8ac49bd124d5a
46ab2c650c1753a18b43641981d86158e2e2e169
'2011-10-14T02:07:54-04:00'
describe
'28498' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYT' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
ea2b0abc9d7c6d00092595ce6197821c
f79190dbb319d4cbce42cbb76f72a9cfda3516f0
'2011-10-14T02:06:15-04:00'
describe
'558413' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
9ca99a42cfe9c4e4aef3365cd8dab505
248110109d970e4dc96f67af3d4e25192273b427
describe
'501375' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
f48c3c5af8e9385269e27b75404a79e0
cbce0f4cd72d024f38991cc042525d6f73e2f938
'2011-10-14T02:07:17-04:00'
describe
'802' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9a41b8a5982a973ae7d52a2b2ed49b53
5e668aac6d596e5111d107e5f7dbdfeebb2c3cd1
'2011-10-14T02:08:27-04:00'
describe
'121557' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
9218ad43b48dfd897aba0e191d4c4a30
da18f74deea8e87cb56656a82618549342a3c73d
'2011-10-14T02:06:29-04:00'
describe
'4477448' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
12f921a084b7712c0f986a6d0158f738
b08d077ea0fbe1411a8970096ad287793f01f59c
'2011-10-14T02:06:08-04:00'
describe
'221' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJYZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
73c670c22c4170c405091d81ce49a992
5f397a00b505a6371cb8c8f06476930d5a0f7387
'2011-10-14T02:06:18-04:00'
describe
'31104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
84319dc748c6194748a55b83d8b006fe
1f6cf6346a37e5caf0ad4a8e9f2a9eca1cec231b
'2011-10-14T02:06:36-04:00'
describe
'603114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZB' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
c435d5eb22143a49cf831c5d73743d36
8df791e79c5236eed0e67370f902ffd1c9912110
'2011-10-14T02:06:51-04:00'
describe
'344654' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e80273a086aad7984a86f3b196a14165
0d4faa9173bbc9d1a5a4e9dcd9e3ce551542ab00
'2011-10-14T02:06:46-04:00'
describe
'20723' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZD' 'sip-files00014.pro'
34a579a0f2b5ae6c0ef2da6e9d6ce156
f8bc72db20b81f84ac2aeb6a8e3744280bea9e7f
describe
'87056' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
265360088e37633bc58a37afc713a029
52c35509e2fdb83f5c7e15b7a90c008cd9ffed83
'2011-10-14T02:07:28-04:00'
describe
'4833888' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZF' 'sip-files00014.tif'
2753dddf03274bc02330d36a9224f9b4
b3e59e1ba6c130d403ffa9fbd84f21ba4a91e2fb
'2011-10-14T02:08:22-04:00'
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZG' 'sip-files00014.txt'
83fb58af449129752c963edbb1c8f194
0029dc580ef83b2340876eb66248dfdf6c2ad63d
'2011-10-14T02:08:08-04:00'
describe
'21791' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZH' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
c3a6fcfcb748060f310c1f3d82a73c47
7da5f697bb9de84826f5b7a9f188f3370cacce35
describe
'540403' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZI' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
ee71ed33cc9d5281ded790d3af0cd3f8
ec9aeadf797a4e2500eee5d0cf550bc71619bb02
'2011-10-14T02:05:43-04:00'
describe
'446483' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
bf60f8bef92a9933b568ab2fcbbc4b00
20f0a45a19c1033a58b083f6fc7b70e0ba6f0b4d
'2011-10-14T02:06:58-04:00'
describe
'42956' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
bd1ee22baece18f28719303896ffed1c
2be2a6dc236206a2eafb2ddbe18c34ceea41cfd9
'2011-10-14T02:06:01-04:00'
describe
'117660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZL' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
a752bc2f6f128a3e273eb47360418b1d
b1de0e1a2e9b5ccdfe2f485130487ee7cd6cf855
'2011-10-14T02:06:19-04:00'
describe
'4333160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZM' 'sip-files00015.tif'
6a505f0960de953e752f93f0af034d6b
5610df174e10c12c4510bc6599bf1d00068aa4bc
describe
'1778' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZN' 'sip-files00015.txt'
3e5e7ae846246ab924d43313ce1f1b6f
d921f7fb04150b0a69bb0c15306e8c72c0169d0c
describe
'30111' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZO' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4db48e0eb8a06abd787ea08167fdde76
8216301d80ce58de4b7386bd210d17384705f2e0
'2011-10-14T02:08:01-04:00'
describe
'547172' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
671a967419a999be5aa39c301737ab59
71dcc338a4d93bccd2c5935e09c6b4834834a6a5
'2011-10-14T02:07:16-04:00'
describe
'457038' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
8a60497170ac2dc1bd89e21a052c8ed6
8e5fd8248e7a7a116926f6d3bebe182db3eeab6e
'2011-10-14T02:08:37-04:00'
describe
'23157' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZR' 'sip-files00016.pro'
b0e7ee80d4dc7703e5b819359f6d591d
e3621add089b27b782dab0823740b8c1cba230de
describe
'117764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZS' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
23a2d697a3e0c9b0b881d6cc363f8925
c4aaea8d5a74ff4aa558a718fddf3eebcc120647
'2011-10-14T02:08:04-04:00'
describe
'4387160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZT' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a4510c1c2cfa71b6b809170553f56cd2
63acb6ebd4a7106816e625b73b976bc50f799158
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZU' 'sip-files00016.txt'
4bc580d7ac9ef1511415a204fda0f7f5
afe9faf16d24e1ff44ff6b313caddaaef8fe5dee
'2011-10-14T02:06:26-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'30294' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZV' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
21abb952833340bf54ee3eeab7c5c176
56def3e01ec561e83d422366811db754a382d89e
describe
'555078' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
fe6bbe15b83460b07d96346b53c3facc
dfb26a19ce8f12fa8a651cb4e8434821b49ad9c1
'2011-10-14T02:06:05-04:00'
describe
'399773' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZX' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
4e763c8becc0f8b16090fc45f1501cfd
ed498e0264891e9ea3e9fb5919f989d50ba00977
'2011-10-14T02:08:13-04:00'
describe
'28519' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZY' 'sip-files00017.pro'
f0599cc923335384de04d62d4965c3bb
8fd53a0f3ed007257d2ac83ae722d1fba00e1995
'2011-10-14T02:05:46-04:00'
describe
'104618' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAJZZ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4170030eb8cdebcbb684f9a7c0070cba
ee1106ff285107318bac9c2bbf7faff1a041d1f9
describe
'4450904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAA' 'sip-files00017.tif'
18f2195461155ae5a4ef284f9114fe5d
da3581c1065b5da06e78832d7fbb5e6eff5bd970
'2011-10-14T02:08:42-04:00'
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAB' 'sip-files00017.txt'
6a137bcb2f61c67dbdad24cc45400b28
eb8d98ff4673b5400befd00d874c05c7e7280047
'2011-10-14T02:08:21-04:00'
describe
'27388' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAC' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
4433d4baf086f887705deff7f90d0cc6
a8fd529dd61c99456f92c69b30a869affb78f5cc
'2011-10-14T02:05:37-04:00'
describe
'552275' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAD' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
fcf68c1a1f29bca6eab8077d0ba57236
542724ca13b7258722a99a03686916b9879a6159
'2011-10-14T02:08:41-04:00'
describe
'409380' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
922a97bce79f7510727ef65143a87b6e
f23e21bdeb0ae4ff803cebc4ffc881a6b5649447
describe
'14267' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
58feef01ff2900cbe1d89bb9d1359a5d
41d1ab92690ce180df8c732909db0344e909c95f
'2011-10-14T02:07:08-04:00'
describe
'103403' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAG' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
ccdde2d94aca954c65da90f596fc73b6
59047e208a3fcb978345392c8a377f6a432d176c
'2011-10-14T02:06:35-04:00'
describe
'4427448' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
c9f6630810a7811053ce0db4e23249eb
f284abbb68f2348513152b368abacc62306b0891
'2011-10-14T02:08:10-04:00'
describe
'596' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
4f342cd48fdfd07fbb73030e8e11c9eb
9df97b87939a07a84c546080ff87bf88dc63e7ec
describe
Invalid character
'27272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAJ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
22469b7a10f80ff102c0f44899db2f2d
f4136e1e6ee5c0960eedfca52df1b0fe2a2adf58
'2011-10-14T02:05:54-04:00'
describe
'560702' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
62b99c17056299839c543271927e016c
0c5f511d7120f3fab41f1e6068f57cdff1d7fc22
describe
'418771' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAL' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
373a831354e31432157ae1093aeef075
a3420f24adbc75f349ac4672f7044e0bcac7adfc
'2011-10-14T02:07:00-04:00'
describe
'27025' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAM' 'sip-files00019.pro'
89b6244227cd8bf72f83d4007a5d37d6
9a10b3aa64e63996274f60f6ec1f20f7e84878e9
'2011-10-14T02:08:17-04:00'
describe
'109017' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAN' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
7bac7a93c9912603b8774bed7b558ba3
9b391ff728a65402863ae0d8ed527c8c60221260
'2011-10-14T02:07:10-04:00'
describe
'4494624' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
40d736ba9b7125a10e24682a52254444
cf6d85af1943271542bc2882136288e27872e6f1
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAP' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4fd59f9736923e978da2a351adfac8dc
50b0f8a62b8223d9f5e6b5b281df5e7be92495ad
'2011-10-14T02:08:33-04:00'
describe
'27587' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAQ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8ab20a07bbdbd6dbe00801c315ddbd74
74a6d0b2759e7295c9c945e09fc1f3544c41d61d
describe
'539489' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
ffc1c8605cfc874c5f8d7afeda735e7f
b2842d3def9a40b78664c91ec8917482466318ef
'2011-10-14T02:07:07-04:00'
describe
'426138' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAS' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
73c875867d4af4999fdb793c18471701
eb24b085b5ce8bf78a1f7d3c493af7600a53ae1c
'2011-10-14T02:07:41-04:00'
describe
'21315' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAT' 'sip-files00020.pro'
1ce891b40bdbbc56664d79484a1dadd1
d9477bb20693ee5361244c34bec51731c29817c0
describe
'109906' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAU' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
654db642abe3bc09dfb7f10d39ddfae3
f130cd27b37b22df81a1fc4cc4819fda6710daac
describe
'4325344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAV' 'sip-files00020.tif'
a5de01446d0d8db100d115b6e402e3b4
64d627f090102f37b0642d6bec44bdd81a4b9cc1
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAW' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b27c31a3a51a12cd2e017c6f2d3c3269
ecbcf4ee02e90f0ba90dcc979854a74e1877e656
'2011-10-14T02:05:57-04:00'
describe
'28411' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAX' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
381ee716e0390c675e1095bd5b39ac7a
ff0ce5cd491ad46383c93b37ceaeef477216b009
'2011-10-14T02:08:19-04:00'
describe
'544286' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAY' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
29e243a55e50246b8b1967e21f9b26e5
be042accb47bb2c600ad3e054ad99267f716d9ac
'2011-10-14T02:07:40-04:00'
describe
'459497' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKAZ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
83f5fa33cf6d9cd0e2e66975ab3f2c5d
6a4abd8b81f61664ef61370f95dc4eac67df14b2
'2011-10-14T02:07:46-04:00'
describe
'24132' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBA' 'sip-files00021.pro'
32c075d3759b4a379a684967b937dfac
7bedf3d0fd9cee1434a9184caa294e097f234b64
describe
'118229' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
9a0cf7b488b157d27040cc30f9b64ca5
594922ebc804e78b731c4dff1ca8206baaa0a0f5
'2011-10-14T02:07:11-04:00'
describe
'4363968' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBC' 'sip-files00021.tif'
8923d458f3d86117f530216eaa8f1043
629b4308d0e320a37f5642c2b51cfd879038bc50
'2011-10-14T02:07:53-04:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBD' 'sip-files00021.txt'
55f4942e6ee12d77334964732cc98e15
5a5ee7d0a28dbe73abe587b9a75a0ed3b0f1f16f
describe
Invalid character
'30771' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBE' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
0e789b3a2a780cf06bf95f0b46bb197d
0211f1ae4bda73cc3d45ebe925c7b615f02bfc2e
describe
'544281' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBF' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
be1e4e03f144809e5eeef4994f7948c3
2d7fc9bc94a610fad19d213b923cae0cc396416b
describe
'462203' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBG' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
1d6b91bf627fa5fbb9c7a9b9151c256f
b651259255a432c4734b7d545376ed471c651c75
describe
'43355' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBH' 'sip-files00022.pro'
7f40787ca0eb8c7781e5e6db3581b763
7ef4638f4d012e7e857eecead1bc54832996dfbd
'2011-10-14T02:07:12-04:00'
describe
'121770' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBI' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
3458314db6553cae69e3416289ff9762
ab592c2e717c8f61a383eb7f4abd4ef1e5b3bc8c
'2011-10-14T02:05:48-04:00'
describe
'4363668' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBJ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
fe02076032ace71a2d8699e7d91a2dfe
8234e53c60a3a3d485a9dba5a04ada84630eebbc
'2011-10-14T02:06:06-04:00'
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBK' 'sip-files00022.txt'
0c7a0bb2e74e3d82fe12046c5add635f
c6cad02abee2d214f484bd25ebc4c614d2e89fba
'2011-10-14T02:07:58-04:00'
describe
'30062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBL' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
a52f6041a98402c33ccd2c015d27195a
a18d87395fe0a6723a3a8d7758dfed31cb16778a
describe
'543315' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBM' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
57530ada1b335ec936cd573d18b33c5d
4a55e771e9c25aab7f304fa1f46cd2ab6cf2fba5
'2011-10-14T02:08:25-04:00'
describe
'211513' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
ec6b5a3945512ac03ed341813ac81637
1d0a0bb2bde86456880caaa49f23533ef60f8ce6
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBO' 'sip-files00023.pro'
0e280840aaadd783501e04311ba3581b
a98c9926bae7a8fc94ae9dbc94799f0bf65bedfa
describe
'53608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
4bf56dd61cf42d5d8e282fd1734215be
3877bd5353ff01001908ecba4d491bcec8987dfb
'2011-10-14T02:07:37-04:00'
describe
'4356576' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBQ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e658f26e2a6cd19fcbcb672fe7cc610a
816ebd805b753a91b9073cec81e4cad28b733de3
'2011-10-14T02:05:58-04:00'
describe
'639' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBR' 'sip-files00023.txt'
db586e0e293bf61658ffcf25023be238
87c9d112bfee06d3eb7e184f39928dcb43c8b283
describe
Invalid character
'16945' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBS' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
65ac7ac24628a37f5a2123732d533f33
3b9aec6dcf9ddaad18691353b0efcac8d0d2471d
'2011-10-14T02:08:34-04:00'
describe
'548596' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBT' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
80e9fb86043c81a4e29cc513cc099b26
112e1c22ef075972261a7795817a8b79b60ac607
describe
'412741' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBU' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
e0a4c932f0bad90010c97e61f595d697
9154ae822c16be88fa328239383d11a9499e17c9
describe
'31592' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
78659d5ae20fa4678c52d6327989f5db
1cdb3957e61d73a1f096a675b0d7c3cb2a0802e0
'2011-10-14T02:08:23-04:00'
describe
'106698' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
11ce0667e2b7673d6b261a49b7f0cd8c
e09e8a72f3afea58d4e6cbc0040472ea318afa00
describe
'4401028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
3c9f4251b69fa556a081cf3a66b4839b
f5f7fb5396e016cc1aa2af73df78863c477f62aa
'2011-10-14T02:06:45-04:00'
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBY' 'sip-files00024.txt'
0cd9f16d51703befa5d5adda6e75a3a2
e6cc65bbbc72db417baf0f49d0fba0a7aeff7453
'2011-10-14T02:05:52-04:00'
describe
'26883' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKBZ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
7aad50dbd09bef1aff71fa0ed7edfe0c
aefd0f853c5cac8199b6a23c686929d9f32d37bc
describe
'538537' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCA' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
d2196c2014eb3257ef9ef764a3eb8d76
a5a2deaf9908f8877d06ffccebd69bdc867c1a67
describe
'444775' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b35985e21f4bebdeb81b2a4787c107c4
c0d82a3b0e9d9ad688edc002a29e4032b8881a08
'2011-10-14T02:06:12-04:00'
describe
'10070' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCC' 'sip-files00025.pro'
12648ff50e7f35dd77a18e27bd5e2b30
ad7e100b5b22168311e35c169e52eda33dfe3f6c
describe
'108711' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f3936e8779171b26c385ec09b4243d9f
092d45dd7621f8953361838d93bed3af24087d75
'2011-10-14T02:07:47-04:00'
describe
'4317836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
51d69ecea2de9a2b81f64f4aebf2c612
a860a782c0c924031e74fa755a3a3a5ba9f04ec8
describe
'438' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCF' 'sip-files00025.txt'
16236b4dd047d73878f4dd13f1d9dd6b
5dfbbdfa6ae70f6410c432855c241d9e645be805
'2011-10-14T02:06:03-04:00'
describe
'27877' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCG' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
3958d63a52eaf158e09167ae35bb58c5
b5104edf1d9dffee5b91c9e8cae6985d4f1f29c2
describe
'539762' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
3be655e00e3ed6f82c202411dd323c82
9b1b9a7b113d53058e128db2dee19c373daf5415
'2011-10-14T02:05:59-04:00'
describe
'449803' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCI' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
32c4eb04e3b3531b52b46a49b26443f9
1ec6480140e731d7495f2e88835bf0e2248cb3fa
describe
'40700' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCJ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
608629386a9b147d37ab25a25496bc98
d07d6ced3e11967378ce952af236075424ce1fe4
describe
'118625' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCK' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
1096289410340fa36833912f0bb49e0f
9a49600aded7787e04470486bddb5f8552b6ae6b
'2011-10-14T02:06:32-04:00'
describe
'4328016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCL' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b724d9cc44be962baa465e73a866dda8
9665dc618802ba7c937904fa606853acb1fc588f
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCM' 'sip-files00026.txt'
26a00eb1a661c2938dbbcbb780160398
968640e343e857d3db32e80fcdd5b81fcf4467d2
describe
'29587' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCN' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
483c8e7d24517a9396f5ca2074de50db
b19c284a94374791c81efd1126810f94a3bfc2c3
describe
'531149' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCO' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
23d9e68ae40be13b6e2c5230611999b9
f3e28dea11b8d3d681be86377c1bdc1716f697ef
'2011-10-14T02:05:35-04:00'
describe
'491243' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCP' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
2c92a51560a06790c40de2a4b37722da
2a8d8fc68de808bcdf7c6b5adb8b330bf7ee2290
'2011-10-14T02:07:01-04:00'
describe
'25887' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCQ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
abb8b007d44d233af8a58c7a070f5510
f6383de1c999bafb69d9179761f4127cffbde5b9
'2011-10-14T02:07:24-04:00'
describe
'127538' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCR' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
b02a42d7e92529104c128f06efbc29da
89e230870a45ae47fb171ebfed22ff942528a06f
'2011-10-14T02:07:03-04:00'
describe
'4259004' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCS' 'sip-files00027.tif'
a24059b96d2fd3565f196e7533027399
dafc67729e3083f281ec9ef6d0c943c2166b90a0
'2011-10-14T02:08:18-04:00'
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCT' 'sip-files00027.txt'
342e206cbfdaf5fa31858f068cae221d
4835fdf246cff59d079c4f61969478d27fa59704
'2011-10-14T02:06:38-04:00'
describe
'32468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCU' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
238e20495af06e2f55cd720217b4af80
f3ec0b4c9bea263cc57970041a12dfea35d3a257
describe
'540426' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCV' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
ccfb4275445fc9a4a78c87cfffb28ff2
a015b04242275d848337523231327206876ced65
'2011-10-14T02:06:47-04:00'
describe
'455492' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCW' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c5ad47c96966f0a1e9b6281b131a353a
70884af4ea69b06d13ee633cbd83b61b358c01ea
'2011-10-14T02:06:10-04:00'
describe
'43155' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCX' 'sip-files00028.pro'
f13bb9b78b7355cc9512a69bdd4e1060
0e434aefc729f9dd94f8e33de526e0745d7cd12f
describe
'121047' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
1b11c35d7ba3197d208ee4c7e6000aa9
1e0e2662dc6504410d0c3f046ba0381d6069ff26
describe
'4332808' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKCZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
56992a7fc0cb67378c1df5013673e7ef
8c1c96ecd1ebc7ff95004a6322f8735dae632fab
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDA' 'sip-files00028.txt'
9b843a4d586075f50f7a319f3ea98e19
ef294421b34ce9ceb74770e2a810fd32aff30a79
'2011-10-14T02:07:19-04:00'
describe
'30354' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDB' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
c1818a97d9e1ce850eeaad364bfbea3b
f0d14733b12d5d7a5d6cca427cd76822c07fbb13
describe
'520617' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d293a754ec2cce198a94469c372d141a
2d45b2b14ed45c6dbe02c6945da42bfb45078844
describe
'485733' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDD' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
4d2de740034161c6ed62467b08bcfed9
3a350d734b223fb10f8ac163e36e812cb67ee4ed
describe
'24365' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDE' 'sip-files00029.pro'
16bd630137ac2a7576f09108cc89447c
7dd5713694f77e9f2224ff10afbd3494c8f81db4
'2011-10-14T02:05:51-04:00'
describe
'123709' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDF' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
926a58e425eed1cfbc445119d0545d3a
9383200babcc35b04477cd380837d898ab008c80
'2011-10-14T02:08:26-04:00'
describe
'4174508' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDG' 'sip-files00029.tif'
dd0cfeeee00e2186b9a4f83eb42dd329
59fb59a8271fe3ec82daf60906218e5166702faa
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDH' 'sip-files00029.txt'
b692bc2315b3cfa15dda1a8a9e71631f
52403127b696fae3ebc1878be75977f1af8b8c06
describe
'31593' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDI' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
cdd904accfcb70ba277f675396aceba4
1ddf28a31d5187515f649c7fc5f42581cc40e81b
describe
'523247' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
cb30dddd31870f83f580f825f3374ed9
8128f1bf85039a3616ea29fccc884e268d5cedf6
describe
'409717' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDK' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
5a88d703b2f7898038e1e178f1479d91
b657a672a4769a18bf7f0d243240db66aaa121fa
describe
'17905' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDL' 'sip-files00030.pro'
1dc91ca84d31b5698c489473acea7a6a
6db305c22df60ec5b9fa9eb14c694c7b31ab28c7
describe
'103629' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDM' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
95bced2df69436111d8c2b92a46c9d28
8798d2d5b2e8b2c301cb0f598b261d036e0f9e27
'2011-10-14T02:06:23-04:00'
describe
'4194440' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
331d9cb22801a744ae9e01822660770d
7f790d74e4cd37ec92eaf7b0f7e9eee0a8ec1e3d
'2011-10-14T02:08:05-04:00'
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
2651d11e11e66b88f15ac249116601d8
d5d80819dba2b413d7ee719e77d73e02f620abdd
'2011-10-14T02:06:49-04:00'
describe
'26212' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDP' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
d476a54620e8e08bab4eb721f4b670e8
6d7998bafe658d5bf8240d7af2b2ad118c3b8c7b
'2011-10-14T02:07:49-04:00'
describe
'544887' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f10018bbe6f6dd826b76d75ca5f404b1
15c8fa2a7fe74406e10c3925f2d0a2ca3ac4cdbf
describe
'464125' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
660aac1f14247c43da5e97813443932b
23cd4fc86df5188dcba1d64ed9d3a14815fd1e17
describe
'18925' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
d34c691db9c8c169c3e3373bf2303fa3
40858d97ac7201f4db5713063ecf9c9fb8e301f1
'2011-10-14T02:08:31-04:00'
describe
'119421' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDT' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
def7e62f31ba4a4b8aca44cdade14df0
0b518ad0c99b4fb04d822b19f6b9ba98d19efeff
describe
'4369084' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
95ddc35cc5694de0b5727f6809956690
58e32f7366d658d1de5dbe6242fc520760351520
'2011-10-14T02:05:45-04:00'
describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
211cc7af8076f7bf2ed3528c18b5561e
e282f19395eedb80300fb5452cc02f3d58386d5e
describe
'30327' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
554fc03b30542b989729409256545779
a08cdd97c4c77c420a1f292b74b7809d2c7f2534
'2011-10-14T02:07:56-04:00'
describe
'536660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
0f1f790a1b7b053be7206ec5eb550ac5
d51bfd47a268b8c593a7d0dc478bacccaa6c929b
describe
'464795' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDY' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
cd0f606ab66b25e38bf04a8b65e1c80e
567fa0fc6c3318023d588cedbce2d5a0fc823e64
describe
'44824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKDZ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
e8a40968633bf0fb370ae7276b3c6a71
bb0190dbedff4f0b0b7077f218ee3b12f29570c6
describe
'126157' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEA' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
8693e4be0e71ca70a805920077e0eeb5
2167721543a758082b622a153c2a7e674b829cce
'2011-10-14T02:08:35-04:00'
describe
'4303048' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEB' 'sip-files00032.tif'
a405e683f4d15d32167d3b94c95a5e13
e1eab53d246b54733192a1e62e4291bca332c4b7
describe
'1757' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEC' 'sip-files00032.txt'
d2ffca6fafb7c4308db4a5b7e16eebfc
2b53b8f7b23733ac12d236a32f639580e473b0d6
describe
'32060' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKED' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
e6aa073bfae236aac435961f5347da57
b8d99971d67825c25d7ac1c40d1f3c1dd202ba40
'2011-10-14T02:07:06-04:00'
describe
'520188' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEE' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
1d894f83bc3c8bc42e25c51aaa512b23
4f7b79c76ba8ab53821f38ddc2dc74a9650f3891
describe
'436119' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEF' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
75acd91eadb094b9f1eda604511a1335
49b2725d9477fec6ea5e2c140a6725c0b86b2e34
describe
'28429' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEG' 'sip-files00033.pro'
548d93959a11ff895fa723745c54b5c7
b2d400691409e2f400bf4dc44613ea732587173a
describe
'112404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEH' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
ae581515b3e058a8c52cb80ffa2cc091
7a0067fd25631ea71c4c2079790877e4566b9822
'2011-10-14T02:07:50-04:00'
describe
'4170848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEI' 'sip-files00033.tif'
eaaa3718650e738e7feb9cec264c039e
d5ca9fa759152192405012853066154a665bf9d7
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEJ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
2c12604f5c78ef863f1f784db50238fe
bba0148f761f89ee28cffb6c831e5f589bfccf2e
'2011-10-14T02:06:48-04:00'
describe
'28404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEK' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
b39adac27f4d8df189e53e46ea5cd53f
005e23f2dd0fc8390acfab765499789ed41fed58
'2011-10-14T02:07:48-04:00'
describe
'520057' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEL' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
d89eef332af9ee682a0af975a929eaaf
fb221c5764d4f442bdc67a30e6aea2ce9a22219a
describe
'468663' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEM' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
6e557111cb3962c208fa45c728f37eab
b9dbc3c932a31d1bf0f621c41bb9027a81f5284a
'2011-10-14T02:08:36-04:00'
describe
'10702' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEN' 'sip-files00034.pro'
29acc1b7790e90abb86381088b1947c5
68341958e6530bb23f004b0f0f9352e7ed1df45e
describe
'115332' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEO' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
eb5c151cbb67aabc06ef7a0fbe732136
52c86c16e6cffaa9e9e83a00b99ed9387c2b8fb0
'2011-10-14T02:06:44-04:00'
describe
'4169896' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEP' 'sip-files00034.tif'
942aec7de90397296f1212ef1d572b44
4a1d57ef8b87468dc7c76897349bd0213b42b28d
describe
'615' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEQ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
5966aaf749e76c5a8bdf8423e7d68bd4
c940e4b0a819714726954dc8907ec2e8e33ae1a4
describe
'29642' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKER' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
fab22b0a9ab81b36f8faf53d092f20f3
3f4c9ff30c9b4d35078958d9bdf526849d91d228
'2011-10-14T02:07:36-04:00'
describe
'524289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKES' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
59dd514b3247184a153e029a1fe3ed0d
6b57389456f187bf35a3784bdd277a14ba18c247
describe
'484447' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKET' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
aaa88b47e11bf63b776ad3d7aeaba5ba
511f2c681e795d83916ac2b44feae875ea82e24a
'2011-10-14T02:08:14-04:00'
describe
'19781' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEU' 'sip-files00035.pro'
84e9d70b57f7c12cc4380a4acbeec7e6
b1c23bfb86c2712f99bb1c4b3e57be5f72674dd1
describe
'125478' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEV' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
812004187f469b4e1c5dc44ffb1d2b30
d183fe820c6549e32b15eb70c6df34f3f9ecc118
describe
'4203712' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEW' 'sip-files00035.tif'
094d55e01d8c149e85688bf75f01a471
9be21fa0f23a10d62db105e8ced5d8b43361ce96
describe
'887' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEX' 'sip-files00035.txt'
03b3b50fd9011ac788d01f625c78d629
ffba3b1d05b5087ee6597c52f155dcca774e9b89
describe
Invalid character
'31645' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEY' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
87b8e8358d7aa41ac3b3a73976e2d20e
bb31c9feedadf3b5cf47a755652a31c3c7fa6fde
describe
'538502' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKEZ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3fc545bda0c41c2a7a62a605ca56ba15
98d64ca15d43e4b479f851f8eb33364249d2dec0
describe
'430171' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFA' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
808468bf17cd346852f5732c44135856
0c2bb7682ec76103efce03e919dd2ed51db7dc93
describe
'33573' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFB' 'sip-files00036.pro'
809d3d0b0a4aef79e177aa1cb4fda253
51ae5adcc78ec770bcd08ff45a4ad0d0798587a6
'2011-10-14T02:08:02-04:00'
describe
'113401' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
68ff90d3dd5eab5b6650878426f1bb62
5dfc8b9fd3f2f6b8d1029ea50a7a3bd065662555
'2011-10-14T02:05:39-04:00'
describe
'4317148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFD' 'sip-files00036.tif'
a0a5d9569cf30754c0f98fb75f77f75e
a669e14a5e78b1585dd1dab46fe1ba761bdf780f
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFE' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3fc3d2c3b8322e8fbc31416faacc03a6
ea635d18d6f3943291a9c08cadf5fe4a61f86a79
describe
'28858' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFF' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
37567768e8efffe27cab51f5cd588206
978840af6a70a196c822c065cc8b12652f834ad2
'2011-10-14T02:07:25-04:00'
describe
'531426' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
b0e67d06cd30362c6359971b2e63fb25
7a078d3fcb5df5dc8b263940c2274a7d07f1a759
describe
'402785' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFH' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
b2e6aa57bb45fac1c84ebb63dae6e077
a274a5ef2dadb8ea4ba52b0a8bec908ad9ce7ae8
describe
'14860' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
5ca4e2ac779436e023414c5f1ca56d4d
230160486a35642feee6eb63305afe4f20308039
'2011-10-14T02:08:12-04:00'
describe
'100378' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
cae83c5857672ad710fabd9ec911e307
4f16f24398f47fd5fa6a91ec9b6333e30ec68d86
describe
'4260168' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFK' 'sip-files00037.tif'
41fa4f8a8e22eb2505bd6d0b1a1944e4
e8958e6ad148b6381416cab219cb5ef8fdf5e1c3
describe
'657' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFL' 'sip-files00037.txt'
8d8381d43b11bb61681c8c6633ae201c
8fd30ba3a05dcde584c6a224d2ac06f6aa866dc2
describe
'25345' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFM' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
45588c4de7c3e5c39ec59acdc71ebf10
43bf24f234ba1d5754435abeeb46fbf683e5ffa1
describe
'539622' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFN' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
1230fd2642a04b24f4927f7a3c24f000
0665dfdb6726ea4d77c829f6e8763b1a41b0e7c2
describe
'452033' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
0def55ab4abe58d6ef4802575378065e
930e423621e5932b0512b1a59ffab998237668f7
describe
'44258' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFP' 'sip-files00038.pro'
09284522c98a2dfd011f1b6df01453f2
d7c6728c2890ae9eaed25ed20283432e56de7410
describe
'120951' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFQ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
9625dd24d44cd2eac8323c3464409616
6090bc48411d4fc375354f1a6b3aedbd209349f3
describe
'4328060' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7808ae8bbb994c1cd1a0628213207172
34755132282c69a957a46ac2014dd203fc2dd00b
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFS' 'sip-files00038.txt'
e227f1b2b6f441880e564bcb255464b2
090941a307ff7d5ff2e61cd52977df2c38e97933
describe
'30416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFT' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
7e6b2151c12e42bceac67dafe67a768c
3fc41aa4ab52b33a8ce66e698b63d2f1eafea812
describe
'548503' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
6b1db15bd3af89d254f3ef94c802494d
64d46998bf37f7bfd81e662ca78d2309a13f6fe4
describe
'214140' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
96d82d15b6588b51d8ad7bec2c849e56
df146c43590e8d5bd42fc33723a19656a09c2266
'2011-10-14T02:06:40-04:00'
describe
'1930' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFW' 'sip-files00039.pro'
deab67f46bf2dd3c43ae1ada77704495
339488a784a04c07f914d83a6d0ebd4968545cd7
describe
'55185' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFX' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
7144a9757fef4147c7309e296c0d0cb2
37a21aa4faeb9dd39f00a703ef4361a9b8f5b571
'2011-10-14T02:06:17-04:00'
describe
'4398100' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFY' 'sip-files00039.tif'
8b5e15abe8a20087e5890c973eb676a1
c9ce91ba03eee1a2d0211b124aa1748f4ecb7b29
describe
'262' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKFZ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
7ed9876be9d1f0e174cc13362dd76abd
6e103796255b21e529cbe0de69935c29e15e4d2a
describe
Invalid character
'17126' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGA' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f2b231f8d7b4c17664522ad5666c3309
8eee69aa0dc70a0627c9926daee8c8b23b36c3da
describe
'517965' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGB' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
bfd8749f8fbf12a1fa3e319e9d8437a1
fc89fd4a6322384808182f8f0e1055007ba5b515
describe
'459430' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
5615b3a13a559cfec5c01d2d2203fca9
e09af073abc66a1f08cf4bc9cbbfd94980bba07b
describe
'39138' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGD' 'sip-files00040.pro'
5e5dc1a8bba4fb7134ac1c9c5002a5e4
087d2048fafc9c8005eb9c326baf3c37dfd1e65a
'2011-10-14T02:06:00-04:00'
describe
'124184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGE' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
23d5c10e9dd2a573bd85f0ca459b07d3
7dd4b284ebf26d7df558e5e479de096a96ae3461
'2011-10-14T02:05:56-04:00'
describe
'4153268' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGF' 'sip-files00040.tif'
067f2f5ea167c7f2b38011b8113c899f
91e066493f316a1e24560f7afc20cb7b07aa4536
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGG' 'sip-files00040.txt'
414fa30d11bb10e873a589bc2515b1bb
41c2c9e0946a84ff1955d8af00bcbd1839f9a38a
describe
'31023' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGH' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
40c504772486a4198e4cb87a9c5f06e3
a9b1e1ba8c9a400ddea3221fd352575234913c30
describe
'541681' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGI' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b58b9dc3799fa56a5b57f476ae787b9f
7dc2094b898378e85671bf7d9b5affbbd2acc4c3
describe
'466850' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
29d8cf9a011287d837ef5f2f4900b6b1
3673c9a23fd17f12ffaf1e610a951e579daa8d5c
describe
'46191' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
c0655df157c7bc0c6de1bd31c598554b
18aa9e232789d7ca03a58c3046326bbf9867e8d7
describe
'125254' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGL' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
29dbbc0783cb58d3931cef464390b73a
a94cd5cc17ffff8cac3ca1f440f15786051604e8
describe
'4343136' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
a4b34abf9183145ca67e54a11977e732
b8c6205cd0670c8e93288d566b36a0dede5f24ee
describe
'1864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
5c7117df67f1bf2f83284a8d66a85a31
7216608db35f4729d5a7009741740408ea3b19f7
describe
'31797' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
9ca8109fd0e8f063098cd7cdc8c3648c
cbb05018c2099291164118808c3bb973f93df1a8
describe
'534729' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
044111fb6d7c952c772bc3262d4a38d9
f7433f73a3f6e3df971ac3d6c933a5771d3a59e0
describe
'401756' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
1a922863a962621e6013d605c4e01376
22645083a695a5dd2d84c6e19191d50d14f940aa
describe
'11277' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
ba1ea4fa0cff14e2e9b055acbb2102c3
cf706432372cbce48e8f3458f6b0a84cd2353620
describe
'101556' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
c691375d8869159bf35724efeccab2a4
3757ae1960e8009f58f1b4fb86fae35cc71b1b74
describe
'4286600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
e961d095af7051ee4a22a2797ac571ad
e390ec65dc4d5ac9f0d89f532d0a05ba83847b89
'2011-10-14T02:08:15-04:00'
describe
'488' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
d6276ff23f26a26f5007d176b03a6e73
275181c66d54e9c52ca6fd74a733b3fef3ba7547
describe
'25959' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
2c9527b4c050875af3dbebe074efaf31
939f9a3ed728fe9a31a3667d50bd0ca2b98f6ee2
describe
'533783' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
47e84a5132413b185915bfe9e824c4e7
5434565b52f5e36b589cdde5a33d0005faba089e
describe
'388902' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
022b5c67d663c722cbcf339c80489bfa
2d8dd9a8ae86eec6dbbe698cfc7c69b0e36b2948
'2011-10-14T02:07:04-04:00'
describe
'21645' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
82801234d66d35981876b2a69ce33024
0e3234083f8e2c985473ef812db37ea71c454695
describe
'102465' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKGZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
f4572b54ac8f194de8d19e3d8e50cf5c
a72660d63cfdefcdd3112dd8261c7172864fd03e
describe
'4278596' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
e80ae0f95c4078bb1410e904cad21900
be0fb309a2a450d09de248306940acf495df0b06
'2011-10-14T02:05:47-04:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
5e250ecbbdecae554e77cd299d4d5008
1efcaaf97bb64fb181f3047fba1d1ac48d63a04d
'2011-10-14T02:08:40-04:00'
describe
'25454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b0225971d151280aff10802201c1b54b
31c2f5885467ce8a93a8c4e8616ed756d9154bb2
describe
'543339' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
a575bdc161ce1984d1308491d1051fba
027653bbcc28021e0acf434d095a9a7f10a3a4fc
describe
'470368' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
b284f5fe56f44a51105c4333e9ab8f9a
e647fe6610a09ec86c62bcd71ff1b60ed36a1ac5
describe
'44205' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b3a4668436587cdae81899add321ffd2
565eeb477c7f6b33df98b644350b6772834fb363
describe
'126169' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHG' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
ed7ed2edc2a54c20ff24054eb1f117a6
f8a0c1abc823002e4bbf398da9fc4492d5fac4d6
describe
'4356252' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
0cd36bd085375639c66a4d39ccf35a60
12e1e9a4ad1ce66b16e136a5ba25b8d5ba759295
describe
'1739' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
23bcccd83dd3d173c0173b9e4b7acde4
999faabe71643d53c5f4f43a6f12c1b888921fb0
'2011-10-14T02:07:20-04:00'
describe
'31217' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHJ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
9617ac312f89bb36fd7fd8ff2c34e433
1af7b485885ed8577f4b6df4f68468d261f83ce3
'2011-10-14T02:07:59-04:00'
describe
'560334' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
b4cc3494b2afad1583ed85436cad6730
f4c12f3f6bbc95263fb27dbb54a321485aa899a5
describe
'219088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b12791e87e565561910190af757dcef9
d18e21253263662d2db0ecbc23c2d0a29022707e
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHM' 'sip-files00045.pro'
a64303f699ba059946e8802d042e4231
bb7a2a3a6630d0c85b078b630c0161c75b1dd312
describe
'56493' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHN' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4b4ba79e9143541356ed6e36b5d6f0ed
174edc770800c7c5808a4ba59242569a8aea5858
describe
'4492472' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHO' 'sip-files00045.tif'
cf6557df4df1a4e248a2232cab6ede82
7c7fda61fd1eee2d418d81d331c9f3c88a4f0abd
describe
'149' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
203fe4b9b5ed3c51a51e66abea11ea23
460c4d3b40c2316577c3f3d6beb4712d5a97f32b
describe
'17526' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHQ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
f9b143b12c8620d8093f03a13bf50028
1d554ed82f13c075d8e027425ea30e5da6d6af89
'2011-10-14T02:06:28-04:00'
describe
'540301' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
f0385f0adaaf5fe2fd55ead32d8f625d
1b768d32da904943ecbd0aa317adc811632f2d38
describe
'396140' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHS' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
a66621b714f3a6069e5042e16f62b9de
3fa9903b2af39f8faacbd53439edf57980585755
describe
'25064' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHT' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3d20e438df3af714055c5540de2df52c
98bd79646e996ca4f84aea3e357e3e59fb4f237b
'2011-10-14T02:07:33-04:00'
describe
'104521' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHU' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
b9336339e7e2ba84a3fd5d42f38eb9c7
eb29a7998994e7292f6ca88f0c53ceb5a55b3fad
describe
'4331064' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHV' 'sip-files00046.tif'
f0ebc68c4c5a47b1868a3f4d313ab062
4ddb31f454fa28d87d8b8f397a18961d41784d05
'2011-10-14T02:05:50-04:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHW' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3495440e9e9a28af4d5c484e77e96045
759c6e391bd112b7bb6038bd093cd2f3c078360c
'2011-10-14T02:08:11-04:00'
describe
'26466' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHX' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
b460e5a09aa43ac24deb634cacd22aa6
6be01118ab386ab0c0663c79339e2cd0ff3eb352
describe
'544220' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHY' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
dd3e65d82e8dd7f079e07368a872ea70
292f75984f80e6bf743ae5c44b877c77725b109e
describe
'446543' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKHZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
1508b24527dbf43817779a01cb49890f
413117ff9e49df4831831d26eddcdf4397747bd5
'2011-10-14T02:06:25-04:00'
describe
'38168' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIA' 'sip-files00047.pro'
8a6bd494b052f5f69ae89962342fcdab
7859c477377d2924890a86944ad07f2d3da9aa05
describe
'118568' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
8e23cd78e72daefc9d1cb3f3285b2ba9
e1c1a22f85f5845c948768dfe2cf40bc6db5ee5a
'2011-10-14T02:05:44-04:00'
describe
'4363708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIC' 'sip-files00047.tif'
547d412bc879cd57963cdae56d294b18
fc13771ef0619b10d9f9cf23b393ebba15d2bb3f
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKID' 'sip-files00047.txt'
d84fc53f281f14e06df2db5b5418936c
2f9bcc51be6dd57efd552e5938b4f3d1d17c1482
describe
'30039' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIE' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
5d461ce24120ac45742efb852c4b11cb
40669a9ac497b4faa17d12b52c5a36b7e9ab47ab
describe
'547373' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIF' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
61d1682c9ce3f0725781962f6154f447
bf7ec8052009973cad26eb17c4fda2cb72807743
describe
'453714' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIG' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
93b838c1509e02265a94da89c099083c
050fc9347cd845378d51ffb335ca6429e3dd2712
describe
'41730' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIH' 'sip-files00048.pro'
506e678d861c07fc650dae632ee4dbb0
4c4eec02ab7b9cd80ee7a2e8493c48ac39fce5f1
describe
'120396' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKII' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
09ff032c69be2b5e809eec9f3f6a1498
9604bd54d99d112111576f7879acc53635eab19a
describe
'4388608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIJ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
630dd8dce7fe8f1732a8bd61fdb684af
56629031b66c4ee50f8925d877689a6a6d206618
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIK' 'sip-files00048.txt'
95e9a5bf3c53edcb8b276c40e52a613b
a661e814f4e37847fed53467197d974abb09db45
describe
'30036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
e624573da68a47b59b3933ab67ab4614
da3054befef0036ec222b606f4aa32c058a788e5
describe
'538574' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIM' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
40e990e38978234e56871ae197610258
1470e672d0b4e019c0fcc6d416eeb9cc60d9a0fb
describe
'486628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIN' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
0ca5e0c89ffee2e7f0785f155ed14553
aa6d0f4e3e1e9099e75bf79f82a36f0cef9dbcd1
describe
'854' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIO' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e85fbeeda24f05584b6a87cb6771b724
2a1d1fa2232516fc07f9c2c7e82d179a54ccb5a6
describe
'115037' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ea52275fec7f54e1b1e3386363e2d613
abeba7f3e800627a4919be530ff3ae1284f9444f
describe
'4317920' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIQ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
bea4ade079e70158c876d4e7a7026fbb
7a75a09716621df054e95834530f12ad2905a956
describe
'150' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIR' 'sip-files00049.txt'
fc0e070fe012280f9c561d851c17ef8b
384efdc8af82375e0f600423d1d2fe6c78eff020
'2011-10-14T02:07:34-04:00'
describe
'29176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIS' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
35edc91bf2eb7f0511fae7aa6a407028
b2aeb0404d77cd9dc2d2b05b8ebb9e378df5474a
describe
'535392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIT' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
e4910fea62db830bed21d91c6bf5549e
c1185fb07b4f671e20e4c52a868a229ff5cf3a81
describe
'470430' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIU' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b41f5dac1c3384b2f39847a20b2404ec
ac81ae536bf9c46754d18f9440cafa033ad33741
'2011-10-14T02:06:20-04:00'
describe
'44271' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIV' 'sip-files00050.pro'
52c48e2e7799a1e477ddde7827bc957d
31e2bb37206d8c0fb3b15c904fdfb75e4bdf97de
describe
'127080' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIW' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
944bfc331a7e71ca980c514ae80cec57
2b244e574793fec9537b5382281977f3d1f3b0f3
describe
'4292660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIX' 'sip-files00050.tif'
5367ae5f32effd5946407d1fcf79c61b
0933fd2d60ee74b781bf7851aa30482ee160a192
describe
'1748' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIY' 'sip-files00050.txt'
6660d1fb153b59cc013894388c23296a
2565bf9a9e30c22e80348899b55194bf908148e3
describe
'32236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKIZ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
8bfe84e1ecedb1ce2083377fe839d834
9dad9ee15b591db221f08468bfe69320f474de9c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJA' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
f97453c717dae469487b2ba4162e2c2d
9aac956874815dd16109da243c4a27a52532cf72
describe
'442712' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJB' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
531d0e1ccbe6d3b3872bc1c550a533b0
0a9c4054946c88d57bd56d32c252a3769719336a
'2011-10-14T02:07:18-04:00'
describe
'39479' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJC' 'sip-files00051.pro'
7607753f558c5dad439f62cfe5fe21b3
1560db1cfd5ca8e05429ce0cfbd53302de059b39
describe
'118505' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJD' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
f7962a0f89bc3a5e0b5e350d4d939712
0b0d59ae83289383dab375902f9fb0c1b669f553
describe
'4292800' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJE' 'sip-files00051.tif'
9afba52463bfb76630ce9a4b5426244c
0c0fe9f82430f9e5db6b28b241da10c62612569e
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJF' 'sip-files00051.txt'
2896c3d6f876819267696ce9dbcf19a6
156ca93117bdadd15e66e120f83f51648135e47a
describe
'30046' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJG' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
9489691eaf55c7b56bae0150f147f31e
89d05491e97ae0eda1354e53cf53c43e52b46293
'2011-10-14T02:06:39-04:00'
describe
'533399' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJH' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
bb2bc57532d9b7053c660ad11462af10
3b3f828cdb81dbd8723751c073dfd2266f2d88b8
describe
'449085' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJI' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
13a91d925d22e20bc146195c906b8d00
aacc70427f191645a21586cbb993ed6a8c4b1356
describe
'42836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJJ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
5bd0c3c99f2754d007444377065d7fec
14bc0095321797ec64928eebebe1468ed853b8f8
describe
'120192' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJK' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
9c61983159174b295beb4ad037b3c236
e0ca01e28b43a5e3128534245361b3184d1c0510
describe
'4276604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJL' 'sip-files00052.tif'
3fc7a98cc312f8340256456826e1f1ea
83c74ec7797e04d3af6d165aaa62c70f49e0596b
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJM' 'sip-files00052.txt'
9ceb170a2de7327df57cc65edb63000c
b05d226c825e3252fb9fcec74ce3571a49ba8727
describe
'30395' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJN' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
7d22754a561bc476a81dc873f3cfce86
dbb59b1eb1102562500c4bb01abc4798aa5af0f8
describe
'541114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJO' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
eb7fa05f5fbbdbfcd2e08c93bc906ece
e9b3b15765cd95de9516a379f84a9ff4068a26a8
describe
'509284' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJP' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
daa53f15b2d39535a37095154d82c948
eeef2e14c0c3f79320682ae1380bb5aca3078ca7
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJQ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
488caca96a409503f40e08e719cd42e1
845e51fbb3a7d2e6a48dd0f99e25104cd46def06
describe
'119899' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJR' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
27ae16d96e5a34119424ceae3eab5786
475ea8523b45981d97edce9365116ccb6907b2ea
describe
'4338416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJS' 'sip-files00053.tif'
8eaba6623180a328c63ebccec13f8236
7a2e683fe89a9b2c99b57b2b54c84d612a6ef462
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJT' 'sip-files00053.txt'
96104949812b7de724b48cd0488fa481
59812c6d3bbbf5ef736a2eb41516bc768caa2a1f
describe
Invalid character
'30061' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJU' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
66425726824af98403b7276179fefb1b
45eca279ac1e783c14bb12c1119b4d5ef2a83331
describe
'533113' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJV' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
44e3f0515b855e959897fb590e9c559d
ec2bd90269ddb84d784200679591360f24d2fdb9
describe
'419053' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJW' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
049b06d4dcc3ffa1e84b5ce9bdd501e7
47b68906f36535c11642215d6cd6fb8bf3bfd06e
'2011-10-14T02:08:39-04:00'
describe
'19737' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJX' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c33a8c27d22e9bf7571a33d5581ff2b6
f1a9681c7d2775e1deaed9274a9f8cb1b1a8d1e9
'2011-10-14T02:06:34-04:00'
describe
'105808' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJY' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a61f09e9b740fa3143dd97cb08892683
2b3031597cabafac7b703b1a0dfbe156abdc43d6
describe
'4274160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKJZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
4b037a6d8339edaa9d9a0b13f2501fd0
9f9070976a3469ecd54a4bd3d356667f883f55b0
'2011-10-14T02:06:55-04:00'
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKA' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5319b3738ebca4d1b88131048b9bef68
96ee207cf045c0c7749ec3b5a87d363099d2675c
describe
Invalid character
'27661' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKB' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
7980ff300d816c17c6bb2a1346672331
4d6c60cfe5d397f1d9a89660aa7ccc33b6fbafcc
describe
'541666' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKC' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
79adcd6c112ac9a84203220815c7203f
9a00430010f8a44f4a326160c3f94be49cc44a20
describe
'439751' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKD' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
439c20100b862724dbaf1478547e3754
9901e0767b1003f47f3a106f853c4a22bc36ac57
describe
'13826' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKE' 'sip-files00055.pro'
0ae1c01a0d61922f9f94dadf82a5f099
b7dbf18f560b89a54e4f4880e570e473deb2f14e
describe
'104097' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKF' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
6d354046b012a40ef37cedbea458d8f2
01ddbf9f253c1651069a9ac2c32923cabcbb502b
describe
'4342812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKG' 'sip-files00055.tif'
419c2f18fe5d413b1756e221fc6d4481
b7dd1b5a8f0732083d7e0f7f5609d390b7e710e6
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKH' 'sip-files00055.txt'
c105be526cfb4e216ed403ba0cb06560
b8045484179a564ecb58b09f3fb8c7a0289797c6
describe
Invalid character
'26065' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKI' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
11ea908e872466c801ebafd50cf1efb6
2b088351dea27a08f912ff280a4a56ad53b88e57
describe
'511272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKJ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ff5576c84e04c4ad438288733873eef9
d5e5b5e19c155dfc13e378807d86cf814a7f336b
'2011-10-14T02:07:29-04:00'
describe
'443318' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKK' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
01563c99f95421ebc334cbebd4bf5055
fd9d8a27c37d6a09274712de6cac0842e821b5cf
describe
'42840' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKL' 'sip-files00056.pro'
fe9042e8cef536a5109dc4e4a0460713
986931f6b17f89118c6f7d3c9d029b3d3b48e308
describe
'119450' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKM' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f2cdd57a2447348d49a06280ad64949d
4c79f6b56cfacff287ca17333c7b2201982d8557
describe
'4099792' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKN' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f7a0d5709cc925867300fd3ef02214d5
728e187bd3552d4ede5cd0c31f357a8efa5f3747
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKO' 'sip-files00056.txt'
6c26933df307efd3ec47457f08370ee4
5d6ce90367f927268064a8b1253a2fa141f4cb29
describe
'30557' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKP' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
65dc1b10dacc3a48bcdc983b8703e0fd
6ed61d9fbf8a6ea4c5a72fa3914ef5a65eeb294e
describe
'519000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKQ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2076cbba8b26cccd03af59d47e196812
143cddb6e9c8226d18e194533e7c908937adb322
describe
'421946' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKR' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
e88eb40ee4e439dbab19a79bf39c8b6b
22c67081eece8579d11d969e6c32a4cc0fd1e7b4
describe
'14352' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKS' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d11d1bfb933f4fdbace7a7481dbad836
bf40cf5dd8e7d91940b25c4b9afd4883db4fb5e7
describe
'108781' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKT' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
ebf478ce10a81305491c8b48fb5f16c7
2dd99da1cbd1552ea2cf30d1a6c928827df22474
describe
'4161904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKU' 'sip-files00057.tif'
b7ae4238d01126200b8164591967d1da
27891e36d87fcc4c98d4026d785737929bcec094
'2011-10-14T02:06:22-04:00'
describe
'647' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKV' 'sip-files00057.txt'
a62504054313817599abe684ebc46504
e4db166b157759b4d39117c3bf4c9b56b24ee2c6
describe
'28494' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKW' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
bf7d84498e7f9696dda90ac1508dc40e
642d77194c32629da48d11d09e5a39c8a307d9bf
describe
'520881' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKX' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
d4425fdd21110c83b893e581610ba474
3438f354e9cdc61cdd1c1a14059885b60461070a
describe
'417141' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKY' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
7caf9e51d4b39e30834a64f8b7c28a23
f1d44d72e195f17181fe9cac5d4661aac1b6f21a
describe
'24979' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKKZ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
a99807db1da5658522173a44de3df5cc
08620b7d8019751cb2e034eaff18f4d7a99b2334
describe
'107495' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLA' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
20042009bc7c8f38cdda9efade8109e8
5e6012af4e47773f6420536a1df780ac64ac3a04
'2011-10-14T02:07:31-04:00'
describe
'4176548' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLB' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b6d18beaa95555570345e14b8eab3415
df2a313671c1293c484c98f6e9dc013894cb3755
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLC' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c48b45b1da123aae54aa0b9c7a306220
a67640296e2ac1ad0c3d4599658aa002a6292950
describe
Invalid character
'27410' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLD' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
64058f5bb5897522593ff1dfb30acc2f
112e3a9b870e42207ba28f6812478e5d522c1126
describe
'515331' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLE' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
027df8b1f24d01a7b38b2977baee8511
68c777304655d83f1a3b4aeae96cf80843777cd8
describe
'433706' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLF' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
7b1e6079ae625fdc069c27d2e2a3b24c
00375800b0321ee2786cba4d6db560adb284d12d
describe
'17195' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLG' 'sip-files00059.pro'
0876650b649750c99fcf08e2330c596a
a143b5cf0305222fb920546031bace3039dd136a
describe
'110797' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLH' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
2b129e8591fb51f4cc9a695012b871a6
33d1ed1c45cc1249a6ce3d3aa4d16b830a7b8247
describe
'4131920' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLI' 'sip-files00059.tif'
b45b7546e2952ce4dbdc2ccbd5e21531
517cebb9362237b812cda1919b005d20354f73c4
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLJ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
fbdec733639ac2d1aede6658a595c5e5
93375934c44252a702c4bae719061999e3f7b871
describe
'28576' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLK' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
687d8f018f9259c464f13d91571d5b23
8f280c1bc624decbff49761faba50ab8a3d7a571
describe
'528068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLL' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
378080e212ccdb8bc5dffa13d2a14596
560f1d6d393e604e2e438573bf78c7bb4e823219
describe
'422254' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLM' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
0aee212273ec4d6e7d448ea08b8e8bc7
f9896ea386d0f4f50ea0d60377b86a29e6557ae4
describe
'39116' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLN' 'sip-files00060.pro'
0e295d64a4c5bbfd628125862f024b7d
5d24bb9f4d27d0da114903dd0961f2f0d06285f0
describe
'112775' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLO' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
9a3dc73991a7a33cbc76aeac54b0a0ad
d611a8b6a4efa43912fc4b4f96b2a13ea46c5b5a
describe
'4234136' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLP' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a2a3f0e721f2057669b70135453f2aa2
a5b5dbd4b531a14f236e5a9ede4f0e044f6117b4
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLQ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
e46c40d4455f862d64dc34fd783e32a3
6cbf876e371b363453f0faba3ae55d3727e631bd
describe
'29269' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLR' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
3f02eb48b049d37f95938ae0609c1a58
baa31c3889b09898fdbfb56e7e4095ec852ecab6
describe
'542218' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLS' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
1bb7939406213bb4222bb898f5902d20
72642391c28d593cb98d889e992a65893e0cd9a5
describe
'229159' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLT' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
460bca2c0a1b89bf56c67f34d6547872
c24807f1c5ef8d84c8feb14514c67d7eb67e31da
describe
'2596' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLU' 'sip-files00061.pro'
02f4ef5d3f67b6e4861806230752080b
0f46e0cc40501d9b28d8eecbbf9c233caf070c27
describe
'57461' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLV' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c8212a93265a49ecb465d07542558b8f
e1d9771df553ec4b1509a3605b5e7f5738ed84ee
describe
'4348520' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLW' 'sip-files00061.tif'
17bc0377fedc77b6687530b7bd78dd94
88f5d034fbf3408567fd4cf2cafebb6150ccd408
describe
'242' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLX' 'sip-files00061.txt'
d6e6b5a327783203aae957c0916f0d87
2bd1ed30bf734b1e93688b18c47655ccbfc032cc
describe
Invalid character
'17358' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLY' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
9114ea64854a82185c1833dee5650eea
d2c7d795cf3321c65d5277209e5094ded7f93e3f
describe
'530265' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKLZ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
9b5de6c4558d35c1bb4e5571882780f5
cf9406223a6bc28032a1d7726f95d57a7475783d
describe
'384426' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMA' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
a598afa00cedcb731db60b6dc3dd7d99
67a87a2f0533e873d04be3da9ac582614cf58cd8
describe
'29941' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMB' 'sip-files00062.pro'
ab98d28f9a718e6c816a37143a22eb2f
9a088936337d8ed7c9692a3b3c869918added53d
describe
'102936' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMC' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
bd01c0fee4454bf3b6ce942357f57a65
e2108520e505b6d214cbfce295399a85321ee183
describe
'4251216' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMD' 'sip-files00062.tif'
676b36f8b3e87257b42f783a63ac83ce
39a54bcb9f4e9081d1afb838a067733d3ab84013
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKME' 'sip-files00062.txt'
d3b4f100fc149e260b3482e3af50b525
78f127862e6f15a8c1f10066fb48fc53668ecbd5
describe
'26988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMF' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
89c31bc6fd5f6b00301648b4f174943b
2478598b3f0761869b7587500acdef4ed857085c
describe
'528285' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMG' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
f5f4d6cbbf89a2c65696fa1caa0ea702
41987601de1fae0afe30266f9d5d2adb12cf74a2
describe
'416541' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMH' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
3de9fbf909f090cf64a544b6cc6c837a
beaffdf2eb786b3d0e24dd208dd2517a6e022e8e
describe
'15146' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMI' 'sip-files00063.pro'
e951d27cc15bef7b5c1957112544444a
305381ee8c4154b3a12c9e289f1f1d7a041c5ec9
describe
'103282' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
2a888bc0853faf213eedc53adb8a87ff
c863ee1e9997f9a52df124c64dcfced35afb8b93
describe
'4236180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMK' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a290f434c544113e404124637dfafd07
352be28783d0d31e8e05a58fad635619c574daa7
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKML' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e9bfa0b48a7bd8562e09e1a2cb36e5b6
6895eed39cbaf24ac018b41f8882247d479dbdaa
describe
'26293' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMM' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
d68ac8648da5180aee28235a37ac1a18
ede7a30df64d2e8a56fdefb9bd4923749bcb8588
'2011-10-14T02:07:05-04:00'
describe
'530206' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMN' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
5513d213ce6399d29b91140fe3a40753
07325a8bbd76c36fbc2f3631688a957e1f244c50
describe
'436785' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMO' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
115543be088033dba65f021aa2ce67d0
04ff3609a5f97712b38f7addb96ab8da3871be25
describe
'7892' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMP' 'sip-files00064.pro'
0c6b8c59b39a9e283e080ffc53021422
9caa7ad766bbe19e808c7d0706dbe815e338a08a
describe
'105250' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMQ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
bdde6e108d2bcd147cf430a56c2fd47b
667434fdb607d00be85afd53dd3860b2e4303445
describe
'4251080' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMR' 'sip-files00064.tif'
65b7fb5b30b882ec5f7ffff564f9f6ae
b61c343655aa399f50483bbdd643497b1ffc829f
describe
'374' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMS' 'sip-files00064.txt'
107c9952dfa57ef1d1438558c7293f55
75536a50c5b6bf5876dd494108b970c132726e29
describe
'26650' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMT' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
37bca87465d415c5a7dce7fce38ff1c9
978e7abd01f0d418ba35d298ba2f6827ef185d74
'2011-10-14T02:06:50-04:00'
describe
'550786' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
7e6535eefb55f9c13af4e9293248f091
1db1fcc0efd8e5428b13f01126d05d408a6250a0
describe
'342451' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMV' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
063a3e9407b33502110356572884d75d
9840b7fc46255837bc705b1733f8b87ecf812934
describe
'23908' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMW' 'sip-files00065.pro'
7ed1d208b06ec07038e1b4c6194eed3e
e3108507bb143adf183a6c0e432058a3907b9257
describe
'89148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMX' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
cf759dfc782c20219781d39e937d6e8e
a35aa107f92861f762ef45edc14973d2049db28e
describe
'4414996' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMY' 'sip-files00065.tif'
2b311ccc6bf38c0e7ead3e9199b4bbcf
ed209a945827d74cddfbda41d83dcff46c12a19f
'2011-10-14T02:06:56-04:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKMZ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
9848f168052f51be73e88d9ce1fb9bd7
acee06eb2775ff9ebda6a707c032faf671fde8e3
describe
'23040' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNA' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
b3bbe3992ddf6c922fc5a528cf03ecd9
441a8db6a1c2f4d4a38548a00810c366ed599b17
describe
'526515' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNB' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
5ae90f19117f5ba72d03659427aff1f6
c49f0a0de0d49554012236eb6fbcf0c521209abb
describe
'426124' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNC' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
50c3d8555c3575360e6ca46aa83df88f
3ca971cf51f9eb3fe74af95cd0bb3a0be62eab1c
describe
'40717' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKND' 'sip-files00066.pro'
6036c5a3d605dcb2f38ef60e42f0e44c
5775ed70908f3f82639318fac4bfa81609490e56
describe
'114009' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNE' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
bfe59da3cb4fe14c48a98e5d1c73b268
dc90136b39eb1693d5f3eb4edda4f57de1ae8d7e
describe
'4221872' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNF' 'sip-files00066.tif'
82e376574e14229f3ca7ba05d45abc87
d2b7bd55eaea35c54b986a9b11eb63414eec6679
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNG' 'sip-files00066.txt'
282acd01aec19e6f84c20e1f9eb2b694
0e37a3ba3b3fc1a9ac4d60b7c1f22ca48b6b36f4
describe
'29943' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNH' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
e78fde7d4873eca91f1d947f73a17426
5f5c3c21b5a5232e2775b2b3374a31d90230f315
describe
'534001' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNI' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
72152efbee6b51efd44c27ff4cbe2ce2
1a272d36cf817e3053ca0d8faca616e05b342313
'2011-10-14T02:07:15-04:00'
describe
'382204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNJ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
8cea66cef695ae84dd8e9531744a0d00
74eb35eeeb764cede1082c4bfd6261ad2b294a0e
describe
'9706' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNK' 'sip-files00067.pro'
dbe54381e665ee1db69c92957d185cf8
f3418408b84f53c2b6f20f390cae5e1ee908da7b
describe
'94974' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNL' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
bd7e0651f29cbb3edcd7db2798b3da73
7c8d873be84c06adc7526bf65b30efcca892dd45
describe
'4280724' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNM' 'sip-files00067.tif'
e7a7d74ff7982e705e2ffa65e6793101
304bc5c8f070d2ed94dbe985a3e74091e38e889b
describe
'468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNN' 'sip-files00067.txt'
f67aee1fb7c0839b09d2d205f25b23fa
4400a0cc4da760310c72ba078fd03a8ca3168477
describe
Invalid character
'24793' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNO' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
4bb9d2e6267493f2bfa15cf844f525af
3f48be1e2bf927c800c3dd8d578fa4db88e19c34
'2011-10-14T02:08:06-04:00'
describe
'533684' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNP' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
8187bd2690852b01548971d2fb47f14b
8b779a55a99d9de6454e49d9949afb66514cb3a8
describe
'396263' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNQ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
602f570460cad349dbac0d4fc61434c5
308bdaea0990dc8a9210e212c9ea25ba43c57303
describe
'35660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNR' 'sip-files00068.pro'
306c99dad04f253bbf100cdfb2e262a0
57d0cc1b05cd0858b82484975ff45278ef0c2f0b
describe
'104755' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNS' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
1fcea01a82b586da9290cf2a62eaa616
6b2d3515f06b3cad9b86f6db7b3a4dc040eec24c
describe
'4278760' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNT' 'sip-files00068.tif'
ddf5c23e2a8ef3637703e97350b6fc33
ed4e0fb72c547745a2e6ba89ccd234c9e0e487cc
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNU' 'sip-files00068.txt'
084834f1903f5d2e829fd0d2dc6c5392
224d5c7ab7b2414bc3b698d26664c8e6f170a5d2
describe
'27673' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNV' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
7d7eaac10fb7592db97bd7eb5da06e61
e94f1109209d34470ea9156086fd0fde8f6ece32
describe
'537401' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNW' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
7f16484fa8a399386af7ca30280f0ef4
0001a4926b64ec25ad18e3ea5a09ec1056fe760d
describe
'394702' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNX' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
6b008045cff41f51bc900fd090aa1c42
927a7f1cf5f6dbba6f326ec382983a8d4edaf85d
describe
'28673' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNY' 'sip-files00069.pro'
c714c43609b7d002169b4ec27a1b67b3
c00424cf6edda73ccd3a46c765e84b9681371f0b
describe
'103617' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKNZ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3ec14b8dde11ff8a2587c9957cba7fc8
03b556f21865b90b26ed80fa174e4abc8318b32e
describe
'4308532' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOA' 'sip-files00069.tif'
7d96bd3d69eb2605f23f04960563b164
893dea4e43aadc1353623e6e051f0cceaceb3f3a
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOB' 'sip-files00069.txt'
e00774b5a42cadb29427a0a1b8a8a5b3
00686834536b1c3dd1eaa0599f906273edd4c9b1
'2011-10-14T02:06:59-04:00'
describe
'26098' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOC' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
6239d5ecdee8c93b49acfdd5b30ed05a
047e1147d673efef647ce9954b0105ceaa935377
describe
'561224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOD' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
b4dbeb33a57a65d2e855186d97bc41f9
bbbb0f77de034535e9a78d338b23d1e3a2e0fecd
describe
'414942' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOE' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
e04b6f80186286c8c47c990adf7c1b5b
ddf59f20ed00f74445a967686c561a34c61c63d0
describe
'8622' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOF' 'sip-files00070.pro'
886ec9c632ef1f1a7d0452f9e978fa36
23f0cb089e05ac96456a8b56a127fa1a1b194376
describe
'100805' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOG' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
ce1167235269bfba081b7b82ef296001
b779fd26a65a4c11afaa6776874bdf94b9ecd122
describe
'4499728' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOH' 'sip-files00070.tif'
5be557acd99ab4c256f1624039fefceb
2e635d8003c3195c9df6fb91816e346aa12d8ec4
describe
'404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOI' 'sip-files00070.txt'
2df18b3fe6fac5a6d9cc293030f99058
15c07477df9da0a6a8c5286e0b000209aa7759ec
describe
'26162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOJ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
1864917d21af36276f9b7320ef8f641e
04708bbb2024f0e68579aa31907664e413b3d888
describe
'537421' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOK' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
e752a131a679c44207debc1507108d6f
81a64ecece0d76929d33d428ba2e572f9e9ab9b0
describe
'396668' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOL' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
e6a1cae766c1b427cb35115e9030b9c3
6b914a1384027114c4736f83e881a6b64c112116
describe
'25823' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOM' 'sip-files00071.pro'
7eb044cc65dffb7cb6157ed19df57fb8
962c7a606abf058c0a42912cb9be6a290ef6d0dd
describe
'104787' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKON' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
fb26aeca31df46b7c107e811658b51dc
01adcc9b6c9d0108c0346ed082f6739ff6c9b411
describe
'4308884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOO' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b1479eaf7f222c30d764e80df924e28a
7da775d8944a6458fccd8bbb830c03441fa1a866
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOP' 'sip-files00071.txt'
0d40282e5340a8abf0400a8e15eb1149
1c87f8cb05ee29b9ff9e5e0b8210e2bc1b0d4735
describe
'27543' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOQ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
6cd6cf7a843b622ee9992fec8941534c
78fd8b614df9d5dc0b8a63831c4fd4f874554d5e
describe
'532104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOR' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
e96e68791a30062c09d3c107c8bc4125
3fa17ccbfb7398de997e41a977deeb304e3707de
describe
'401547' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOS' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
4f9579ee40c64407a19dd5566c17d786
35e7eccfcd6af73b491233444f49a854f29fb583
describe
'25079' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOT' 'sip-files00072.pro'
1b80deba0e0c4e6be9154e684fd4d4b3
ecf60b5900fb2b8fce5a3d0efd5f84b0cb2f6cd8
describe
'103856' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOU' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
d7e518a9fe692eda512404e619cd4f98
7550531df003152c39038bdb7bd9710e7cf75b3e
describe
'4266144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOV' 'sip-files00072.tif'
0d9e18b60ac9721a1f62f14f3f154431
34f15d2eb58a2ee61b7d7f11ccff5f6caf54dca1
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOW' 'sip-files00072.txt'
227000446e859b563183602dbd021eef
998e2a30e1cc73fad8bff0bd2c5e8184a65f0df0
describe
'26630' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOX' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
844addab670c040a1ada9762bb56b56b
7d8c7a7d443ddf655ee62c3994f0eae7bac95570
describe
'548236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOY' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
3b0c86a6d20fa86b9d6a854b9f42fc49
8f81d12ec7228b9ff4b421ad0507b12aa4b10ada
describe
'413202' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKOZ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
8d0301dc2b8b5be3d39f594096d61567
4c8a017bce580fa336644a64c557e784851aed0e
describe
'34683' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPA' 'sip-files00073.pro'
036f952f458d0b904dce694215d88998
e2b77b54689ed0bfe1a16a203ddece883f47d43c
describe
'109198' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPB' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
746e00cc346efbda95618d8ee016559d
5a4c527678463c9cc757d1211d6c58ff00860d40
describe
'4395624' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPC' 'sip-files00073.tif'
1eba6ac5097a424756636c55c3125403
2c5085662238efee5a77c3ffd045c0d2c357a7a4
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPD' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5f0c9c2ebf9f5059642a13e9b2262094
d27afa43ab8e14d59fb7ba162e3b199a0bb20f2a
describe
'28454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPE' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
1190412672a2b68f2ba8535ea75c86b9
16516da75803375687861d2e976e5b4bbf475b88
describe
'537709' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPF' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
31ab1ecd6bd69d7f3327e19ae4f385c5
c8fca4620a27ac0c020476569e078bc2c62e8737
describe
'430498' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPG' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
eb2d99c573bbb9d063d596f116c3b451
b4d6f6da15a35a85e5c192bc6dc43d75d860f379
describe
'45260' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPH' 'sip-files00074.pro'
7622dcd50f44117d49155bf17259423e
3dafbf4ed429c9402fd9cd829db6be5db1cc8e23
describe
'115636' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPI' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
696f7c83850972a62eaf924cdd742ab7
0a2a296cbaeefa1ca5f0fb53f32fbab2ffb3ebdc
describe
'4311552' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPJ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
9a5ede03e0cda80ed1a877c189eeb995
7979a19bf7d91f33965b7524c9dd43a58287934e
describe
'1821' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPK' 'sip-files00074.txt'
38107a3a43353a3a495decd6798ce3b5
e0bc4763c38f6f806dbe31942fd5eeba3337b053
describe
'29578' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPL' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
9b2fc14b3e53816690d3087afc5517d8
1d8cf99f964811569e535a997f23c1fc07c0ff24
describe
'528363' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPM' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
98bc028af7de6a2af7ab5d4d84285cb8
6255590076f143374c8f839b7612990b82ba2c15
describe
'390850' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPN' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
1e4df04749e8d88723dc4dfaeec91e58
838e7790a48314f17f66b962f683ad52142fea26
describe
'8972' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPO' 'sip-files00075.pro'
dbd4edf4255f6a2e8af80d20a32271cd
b423441db52681228d9a6ef582e98f64b32d58b6
describe
'99118' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPP' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8cb569255393d7e060ff78a08875eb0f
1bf3fb29a40fc4193999635174a49f56163dae32
describe
'4236120' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPQ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
ec28111fcde4be945d5bc109ca7e2431
154a3a583d775624fff96a22ecac89c35b974762
describe
'430' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPR' 'sip-files00075.txt'
f12eb8848efcbcd23b3d35f3053ec422
66e554dc334edcef8e2ce7c17b88d2f2160603bf
describe
'26046' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPS' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
dde8297cc9facca3d55ba64f57aa6763
412e86eae17d4fb73d9e567f16f14e817cf3a562
describe
'531817' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPT' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
2eb5792354ebc45ea6dc74c953ca5c1f
efbdd79e0ff39d99f1ede3e98c559192f16faea6
describe
'331737' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPU' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
7770ece8939caa85f336f0bf9c1bf0a7
fe0470722a15165440998f0eccab0326ff6e83a6
describe
'17123' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPV' 'sip-files00076.pro'
c8974f55a3333d971b72a02aa9eb6cbc
8fdf010db39ff0c9d4fe7860ca2c23177c76610d
describe
'85902' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPW' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
36bbd1c3d54a17fa8b9aac5ccefb96c6
f117e7ddddf069481114062976c7dd4f389d3873
describe
'4262684' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPX' 'sip-files00076.tif'
1761a3a12641d875ac44095c8d7a5279
df0bef0480abe8468f92e41f004117aba253d82a
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPY' 'sip-files00076.txt'
a0d2b726e89885018fb158a506d21557
f7b09da30aa5e27bf7eb870b6e90e06b28ecfe31
describe
'22221' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKPZ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
a5a423fb4b989d8ef2e2cacbd9adc1f1
46c7924fe987a1630604f1e073dba5b739d83536
describe
'533990' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQA' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
a126531791b83931c13b6c4f05754942
ae29351056b6984cb201e0ad756e145c8be0ca66
describe
'426136' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQB' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
b212b3ea91f645683c80255da61354f2
27b81446e245dd21a013de95d84a5b52ce844c2e
describe
'20230' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQC' 'sip-files00077.pro'
2a23cac0d34809202e28ac7ae0cb4794
4cb697eac77a029202937298ce1a34919b472ecf
describe
'107601' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQD' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
9761f38642fcfa785165fc9acbd51a9d
fc485ed3c659c4748f1fb741d64fc4e17766ec4e
describe
'4281152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQE' 'sip-files00077.tif'
d26a8b7634d282442e6edfb009e217c9
8994a116ae5dc81b4380f12d5cc165c6889e87c8
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQF' 'sip-files00077.txt'
82cc6cf165e3c4bf1f27948d8310ad33
2aff0c11139cb65d5085a16e313c3730f3fe82dd
describe
'27365' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQG' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2f23f767e8a4ce551121cc1d9d2ff213
fedb2cfcc704b388a7726df092ebbb0a82432e2a
describe
'541381' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQH' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
80729f2eecfd38f80c9dd1a72611ec1e
1cc40d7d1f0e5a97bced1aaa39c3c0a9846c7ccc
describe
'414465' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQI' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
40783d9f33eaeb62fbf7146ff9bf7c68
11039f493bc7093188e0dbfd892eb8b9bb298990
describe
'18766' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQJ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
ed4391de26d7a59dd7dfca73a30ae280
742c824b1e1acf85ecd3b11dd147b07dd72cde11
describe
'105269' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQK' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
df6edcc1e55a6d6d4ab850378d0d893c
89ea1f5577a054bdd4f054197cd3aeb71eec9618
'2011-10-14T02:07:14-04:00'
describe
'4340792' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQL' 'sip-files00078.tif'
f2dd4702f1445a6ac6b77791afec6cd4
6a6b6eb8a1b9013492fecd805123327b8f5b7ac4
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQM' 'sip-files00078.txt'
9d0736117507e38a90e8add63f78e3ea
6e10e29043046f47e2420419d49924664dd76ffa
describe
'26844' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQN' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
47fa6d178414ebf9a5c8f00392c34ffa
84616ba9898c73ba28d8072d2d204aa258796828
describe
'545103' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQO' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
7f74a33bf4d70988fc3f05967c562085
bf3154349294c9a44031584f5503b059f34b004e
describe
'434181' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQP' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
3a27209702ea0da9e02d2f74ff6d99db
f3bfc97f081624c55763414ad96da41ea3d4a247
describe
'44066' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQQ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
0d7f4af428dd0058a30f697073b7736b
8d0483e4ff635d2fde6b7df29131fc86236aa265
describe
'117095' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQR' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
8ef1e817b2f73d199fa847ab94a0bbd9
fb69eb95964d9153f6948953b790badee4f77cc3
describe
'4371048' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQS' 'sip-files00079.tif'
dc62d25488f69e6eb6c7d2d3bd4cfb13
6d80abf563abc9944798385e11321e3e8c5148fd
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQT' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f12aef830239d16c94a8187ddd833e04
325bec80f02163d2afac71fa7084004702d68c9f
describe
'29832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQU' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
b54e3ad79859bb4ae99c4468bdc4bcd5
fbb1b2342083f3b85899bb485acb29c1151f21b9
describe
'537714' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQV' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d9c0ac901788e61832dbf54152200273
760e112df46f42fccea67374e01570c32cff2b78
describe
'381352' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQW' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
77bc8d07494b957b8e5451c9bf3e6af5
15dd24677fe5d64bdf24544fcc7ad0bffcdacfbc
describe
'25812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQX' 'sip-files00080.pro'
2675070a0650b61b3a326b90addcfee4
92823cb82081ba3907da435ae6a0bcbf5bc2187e
describe
'98848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQY' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
062c7e5fcee44357e77aa567770e45e8
e6d3657e60fca20846096267103220ad4a29e8d9
describe
'4310812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKQZ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
dde990f7be9c0c1a8d05f5cad10aeaf8
b7cb6c8547d1eeae34b0acfa236389c92cb9c2c5
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRA' 'sip-files00080.txt'
379b3377e08fb055e45dc607db8e9593
5277d8b36aa0b7afb891f10fcc757b384931de67
describe
'25706' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRB' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
3d77a4bf580b5b4f052f4343fac3fe63
045b435b6abc52e6fecfdbadfcf5dbb92ae224ec
describe
'550709' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRC' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
fb81cf6a29c508e450858295438fe2ad
42fddf5ea26d3c6d72aaf6e8bfae4866ba2ef117
describe
'347898' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRD' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
1794a305a2c5a9c8ba991bbb9272b492
21063b69043215a905079d59d485c0488f42cd28
describe
'20575' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRE' 'sip-files00081.pro'
846032840c68b8de086c477c14cdcd1e
0eee0a745333510cd1cb51a2e7dcee41e0dd2f35
describe
'89063' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRF' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
0ee83be50b9ad2969ec914e8cc3f8ae6
b211b4348e4c9ca2a156e1bd22b87f7c1ffd774c
describe
'4414740' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRG' 'sip-files00081.tif'
2bf227a7390f2cee1e66e26350fa08e7
d6e2000be673c010d97b8c8ae7c2c8d4faed69c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRH' 'sip-files00081.txt'
41a3cb5416cd92e9f587479d52703e64
8208155f5a3863c60428a7644ebbacb71977baef
describe
'22435' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRI' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
2de96d3498300089121c2a42b0f6e77e
5e9fda4f0545758ad42faabfda292a108974fe6d
describe
'537720' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRJ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
66420c10b408f56dab2bff3112f1dee3
80f6a453ccec0f9d9a7660907f391e5912706042
describe
'411711' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRK' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
94d5a96c3e298e0aefe0300426ba51d1
4886d4e87c7b5b2e73ef93a658e702e1a9006dfb
describe
'36332' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRL' 'sip-files00082.pro'
e035bf35b0201800e9e304cbd98f7a8c
d78a7b05410138bb335736e3ba910a927622484a
describe
'109832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRM' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
4ae93d6adfcc52f9dde92b3779aa2624
845f9c8356b2e564ce45d57017991dcb70735802
describe
'4311304' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRN' 'sip-files00082.tif'
d200db0fa21574df15259027c9d7aa4e
dd319b565e3d316a102f00f94061e3457bc4e2bd
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRO' 'sip-files00082.txt'
717f5eefd942dfa481b0fb715daccedf
9fa8089cf92df3514e44589c6615d6366a75f0ce
describe
'28149' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRP' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
5fcef77517c0d4c8770e3d0b10632dc1
99487bd413c0a90e1467f5032e8d386ac86add5d
describe
'550798' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRQ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
04e528fca1528180034cf8506a53132f
01d79532c6725d5fc91bbba9e6fdc0afccd495f9
describe
'428844' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRR' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
b4f2847bb167f77507a7722ec26a4425
498fdd5f66501a019ed271291f85c07c3e812013
describe
'43925' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRS' 'sip-files00083.pro'
3cb9d7a894179d9fd91e6931e2938c56
4424b8ceccac0fd953c24aa1880a030a5847949b
describe
'114284' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRT' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
bbfa8a1c6a759e5664b74c1d2397caa0
c757fc83bbcad5a8e2b27ccf4d60572e217f8218
describe
'4416168' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRU' 'sip-files00083.tif'
3c9fc05b47d743a0ac33d8ed294de9bd
5fa7e29bb2c402e286e9359402edc361b1131eff
describe
'1751' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRV' 'sip-files00083.txt'
81d676963823490bd0319c0b40d8966d
a86a14948c0c1abb82052fc7b76b7cf9ad59f286
describe
'29636' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRW' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
8422b9f760ec028a53b47db5d617a126
67ac43d04409e8f3925e95e21ecf6aac143b852a
describe
'541133' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRX' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
4449c7099f1fd9e92b6c4338d2168bfe
97eb9e5ec35e0487d72b0eecc9422e41b83305bb
describe
'419401' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRY' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
40677cbd185aa1f236151041fd8fbdd0
8265745f88af5961ebc085c9aca6b85ce7e10212
describe
'20948' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKRZ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
564b3ec7983e31937fdb8d88d6dd45d3
ebbd2e3b394783f293d13aa4bef47e87ce18155c
describe
'109487' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSA' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d88a68cc21c2f2e20ab124f7f4680289
af6afb6b2c345c332cf3bd31906d8038e793268b
describe
'4338972' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSB' 'sip-files00084.tif'
388c3f2a2b2f44723b8e313d0335a61d
d121496bf81f21382a5829258f58a8658a971095
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSC' 'sip-files00084.txt'
e80ab8b9053ad21125d51b691602bb7b
bd658df7b8af1efe04e715278e5855ce5a025a94
describe
'29034' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSD' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
b29997b168a5120a4e70c786d7ac0043
d0d7c6ffcd6a5285a16234b5877aaa43202d4d1e
describe
'535843' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSE' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
b417d4c90310920381a618cfba35d147
d72b47dc470f58f386fc33295061c22733474781
describe
'387175' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSF' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
b1ae70ec2fe63f1e774a1b7d22d4b278
89483fc76735db41378af16726b673b69ac7aaaa
describe
'34660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSG' 'sip-files00085.pro'
90206aaef881520af72e526543606bd1
4fa4da0262a50cc2e3001489ee24cfbc8f95ecdc
describe
'102402' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSH' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
c992af3141f788e60770c8f0fe9976ae
92af77a4c3684fc26159ee40c23bc0b7e95cd8c7
describe
'4296048' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSI' 'sip-files00085.tif'
6fe1b0684e49caa2327637423db9899c
31202d2c9f7446a8f8fcfedbdfd135efa64da22a
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSJ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
6197de83780208db0c55944744216ea0
ea788ba1b47b5b56ceb1d51d11d3f70659d62721
describe
'26937' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSK' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
8951fabfa23090116c2d77ca1f16d3a2
1e647b940accd568b704b5a81a835c12bf6b7d7f
describe
'541109' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSL' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
8582d414327913efd05a22ddb21935b4
236b16b27c734588a44270fb507906b8a454c24f
describe
'404832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSM' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
b0e8b80f590a407895f0691dba99d4ca
32d18602dd8c83c3ec8c42b22105039f03b59596
describe
'11085' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSN' 'sip-files00086.pro'
0807dfbc6f614d0050d80f6788f9f5a3
da3365d2f2963ce07bc1efced0b782b1da03404c
describe
'101555' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSO' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
d6ae485417c6379318af04669808ccf3
1b98ec0c419ac18da6c9a75bda42fe1196316de6
describe
'4338380' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSP' 'sip-files00086.tif'
881c08ad6295de0fdbd257366462fe96
249b112a1effab4bbdeade2f97efd8c203a8a30e
describe
'502' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSQ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
8324d6f3ec6a43ffb0d6f1ceaf9ce561
ff8234cbb4a97ad93e94af54107e9866a05b7702
describe
'25854' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSR' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
fa5d6f612fc96a0ed3d99aa9f1bc6951
69de8c0cca1d141e55cebf0e276796a0bad9ff9c
describe
'522801' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSS' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
68b7ab622d01b7f4f600a67df31af726
d0fda421f5b202a06991602f7f8c64d52fca2388
describe
'440156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKST' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a450a3ae99f7009c53e453b389143f6e
95be0e0db935e8959ea2c9e90a15c435c7aeca7f
describe
'18193' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSU' 'sip-files00087.pro'
9268eb3fa9c36757e378c7cf92d8793e
b0925929cd8e6b5700e46b0de28b7091b30db4b9
describe
'111054' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSV' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
2df323a0929120db7eeb9631142e4f67
878056c56a26b3efd828330a1c0b6a6515c28910
describe
'4191520' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSW' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b797dda1033dd49f626be94827515781
c73879b9fc1bae76ce61ada2495ba749b30267eb
'2011-10-14T02:08:16-04:00'
describe
'735' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSX' 'sip-files00087.txt'
689e66c196c59ecc6f92286632c76789
b4fc1775892aa5debf3c69a4e04ffca17fc0a656
describe
'27832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSY' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
ab2cc4c4fc216f5aa2686d931a8b7af2
3d4c84b3b0414a07c3306304072e262bd93ee9cd
describe
'535812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKSZ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
321c53bc91db84d8693f438c51650758
27aaf683833c360f84883143284a608cf6e42016
describe
'434865' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTA' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
62d3f9459529fe79ffb1d05880e3f9ba
c71597b0884fbdc7e901d70975c2f0d5c1ea15fb
describe
'45623' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTB' 'sip-files00088.pro'
712eeb19b352f9692c934fd355f6579e
46daf6c9604bcf0515d94e287d0bb11296c1ed0c
describe
'116282' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTC' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
bcd47cde1f5de29e91fddfa95769b648
bde1f1171a37988759adf115f4b318e493a2f271
describe
'4296636' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00088.tif'
45404b3ae1f5cfaf23b6de45cfb9dc98
6d6e39c503c4bd4cbf0103c313c73e8db3015a58
describe
'1806' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00088.txt'
4fb84a9bcef95eb5383b969e96494b33
7db5fe59da1fbe2af12013e984df5279669ab968
describe
'29653' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
3d12e2064dbeb12b01bd808ecd52fb1f
f06188be108479976d2e53b7a719f0bd3e38f7dc
describe
'539579' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
d14706b94eaae1aff59be529a4f95e63
e6864efd04a7a674dfe9c518ad17d378ab99820f
describe
'410558' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
bc0ea6bcb58c15f35a3923327ff8fdd2
75276ba60e48345eaed7d1e49feffe70b4254ffe
describe
'15724' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00089.pro'
176db94dc2821cf1934ee2013f89082f
085e59ea3b313746c6add2120564d738cf54dbf3
describe
'104102' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
370639f8b2e2add9d1da4fdfa9a8fdd1
25705417bdd52bfce004b96c8e29e813459551d8
describe
'4325932' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00089.tif'
f8925788028da088562010f754518105
56c5cebfda499e660c0b761ba281f32b54a0bbd7
describe
'664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00089.txt'
8f11e3d0099cd57edc661a9ee107c599
ce29dea6bad3259f370db7d13b02f5bf75f8d101
describe
Invalid character
'26889' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
9e01c65c0924667a3bba37fd8609f2e1
a0b6e90e9cbc48313b06b0e7ac3333badcebc2f6
describe
'541098' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
1cf44f2507ef60999d7575a7293dc0f5
6f674f657e2ef70dc0c09be93e24892700207b4b
describe
'427055' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
a0b8883d100bfe9b009ed287e3398016
4a41c4083e5d9bcf8f6aab3a26a12209dbe284b0
describe
'40048' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00090.pro'
29a0cd8646911b8e158a91fc00001576
aca7ea80ce801e570d21277f34d72f5cff2b684c
describe
'113676' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
601ca71e462ea93c539ed713be3034db
682a87541f364ca22e9cc74f39e47c7ec59a7ce6
describe
'4338816' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00090.tif'
4c858472728cd0ff4de4a2ac968899bd
450602dc19a5268cee07e1589d6d5167235225a2
describe
'1766' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d6bcb2b751b250b38cdc359ca617896f
a5418e27520ab1bbf8d861eb7fc52b26bb3fc089
describe
'29365' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
9d6ece64a0b4b785c178032b4f2f30d2
bbb899c00cf83c4f7d5ca4c35d4f7edc0c4ad0a4
describe
'531791' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
8f66a4f07f21344ad78809227e71b00d
f29396aa8ac79021828789204dced0385661fcd4
describe
'425345' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
a99595e708843f9ab535f50a06070223
1ba8a09360256a8826a1425a7db1231f4aebc1c4
describe
'25684' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00091.pro'
3b6dbce427d2c3ff2c40052b7d9e4e66
feff58b5216d8adfa91fc6af8189d644678c8daf
'2011-10-14T02:07:21-04:00'
describe
'111972' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
969b666c73d86e22d751c4fd57426f20
be2e526afec2c4bc934ecdbbe5e83e2aad15c4e5
describe
'4264076' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00091.tif'
d219a583d68fa6db92f4c475f9a699db
4485e5209a16e8fd46ca27aa9eb0707f72876cc8
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
64518b735ca606fb465e16e95a9d6495
928cf0f8f5cdb580fce491c5aa2962b8b304a353
describe
'28685' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
9ffd86145409866e3b23401ef04cc96f
ddbdd115c6135d7183960f1a5c03fbe1078f28d2
describe
'529923' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
df992aacf7cd2bff1d43ea628cfd9830
08264d5dfebcbd7643d2a13156e5d85a31498de1
describe
'415608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
a92390ae5922456f3222d1da7466e3dd
f1be6e6280f6fbba2d9102b0a969c71cd533559c
describe
'24713' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00092.pro'
843c4440a45791a0424bac4e7b96126f
3a07b2e932ab06bc5d2659c5ff19c29883694909
describe
'108346' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2fd6ba9dd0759b97c58ddecf969f95f7
b7cf34a111bcc8a855404964fbec4f08028fda17
describe
'4248988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00092.tif'
40e0960cd64335974f1ab38ed679444f
1eac9601ebec1e44b9e31fd5f9293fddb08fac95
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00092.txt'
1dddd7e21ac4936cf8250f233908758d
6efe479b2246ba51b3e1d5c49103849d50ecd88e
describe
Invalid character
'28256' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
7e381c39e258729912074c21ded5b893
91cd65e18721d13def4c246ba920f1302479f4cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
655e795602fd9142cf04e44a449de2dd
8470995806541abda06c689bce132574263fa750
describe
'373908' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
319d199a863484a9eb1757151207f270
e33c9283c67f624588682bcbe5eab1f48aef50b3
describe
'25331' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00093.pro'
4e31f0a7b1eded0e44832f4460e80197
19190cbf2ba53fae5e4737f36d0d7380bab92889
describe
'99220' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
a9eaa9ce610b6fca7ee97060e8367b5c
aae47dbf01505e80e6bfe03c66ba8d195fdc1b25
describe
'4415600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00093.tif'
1f6be5521e6cf16e2a69778b899c84d1
7e78c867be385358a190c9ffbfd1c29748994f6d
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00093.txt'
764ee29082f99318c40c0dc09bba8283
5e842162a4a521ff6421e3ee549617cfd8166936
describe
'26202' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
37e72e1c00be149c423b65df2817632b
a985863f76bf21214bf62bf57273f68f381daa70
describe
'550764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
d498e41ae52b71a5f86c1a78c59d6900
b0ebf6b32442387625d795748e1cdfc55d53329e
describe
'424409' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
1b66aa2ead21733550baa43b11f16e3e
aa8dae18937ea265eb7c8b39834725a2f37745ca
describe
'26458' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00094.pro'
b48f1c7a810eb0a4f72f0b065da5eb07
6d74a96e1d150ca2627c39eccf557d615ee3b5b7
describe
'111185' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
48af0700e52b440db8f04e1a2e8166e7
1894f877c24eeca2bf79eef4baa8a20903d58754
describe
'4416160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00094.tif'
5e1dab6bb5c8013dfb6665f533a2ed44
10bf3cd804571fcea38c9de42f04ab624481a2d8
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00094.txt'
0ffda5f95d62cc69f6c3f5e2818c0254
aa5e472acd26c884f70a06335eb333aebf68b4af
describe
'29360' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
c681315f39d9398b8fbff0ad3368666e
e6e5e28c76e59e2d92840d79c136a5fe6253c8d7
describe
'550801' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
198234f8953f1dea18c2a5268aad8bf9
b90a6f6cd382aa556f78da541066b7a18b85a471
describe
'386520' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
e72c01c53dae2046f67b3df601230759
d7fc159da6d1e5d6752d6a50cebc7c571ee2f568
describe
'10049' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00095.pro'
619fcbc82b927f41f8ebfb1897ee5dbf
46f66ebc36ebef46eec4b6c0617ebc7b4fab2acd
describe
'98630' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
beb566c1b84d7ebd4a8c40072504e7f4
7130baecb5f7ad4d8d5513f60db5cc9dc3d82515
describe
'4415680' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00095.tif'
7f47020eab369882096729d14e38e8b5
08c8ea6cdbed0b408694ce4c865c3388a89df360
describe
'660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00095.txt'
47584a80722bfdd6949c76742bc50bc9
05a5cb899ef0cb6dc1a7738accc565a9806bbee8
describe
Invalid character
'26437' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
7a1bff3d6d102285134f13a9762a1580
a838d87a0d8975910e8725240c8716bce9450038
describe
'550489' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
b1ff7076b3bbfd725e9864524ee2a6b2
9081ab14911bb28eee804f90073417b1fe6db7d7
describe
'418545' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
b0a6899133140fd153a3946008da57bc
00e6c591603809720c40682e4a1034c02a54718a
describe
'39309' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00096.pro'
9b1f3b29a76c65544abc69292e250c8b
16bb1303f1a343f22a623df7447d89043bfa1cca
describe
'110452' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
9264c88d2dea9b0dc148bd66a2a5c7ea
24618946515127c3fa09bb1271a57a35f671df2e
describe
'4413280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00096.tif'
125d262b6979c1ab3c222f4709c0bc52
0d843f4a7d14cb33c5cd3744d6bc0f827fc058d7
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00096.txt'
33d7088a8e8c6e119d8fb573d7982633
e3d7fc94f1d1503eecb4d7926865ec2a3631a875
describe
'28542' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
9a1e22d2234704e87f7d480645b97403
aae05bc600f61aa722986f02e5f1c5643fd6ca6c
describe
'550787' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVK' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
b8d9894fee2f6739686582c2bc950af6
56a4b003b876e216ecbc0a4a887564d65dcd5694
describe
'480575' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVL' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
77e6d3a15307089f622d8d44e7c9135e
04e8d0a80d3c18cd5ded02ef6881e3f04bd273be
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVM' 'sip-files00097.pro'
cb1e772e593077c3394f505556b956df
a9a294f10ac1fbce9b9993a8dfa630d72803ec35
describe
'117415' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVN' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
e8e63b9e7d97562eccbaef0c51334ba6
22794c61bb47081aa2c5bfec11438fa66b6030dc
describe
'4416632' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVO' 'sip-files00097.tif'
c2d82fd5c130608b3351fc1123a4fa05
37e53bf26acd5e9aeb802361ed12213177cbea2c
describe
'166' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVP' 'sip-files00097.txt'
6ee7bbcee57d27b6b67f11058e4d94c0
656a59e0604b16153393f3219c16984111644417
describe
'30732' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVQ' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
59d911bbc0d672aa70660d0f5542f2f3
a868e868c6722c2e9f0581bcbe30dec20ec48227
describe
'531800' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVR' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
4a76e082eae7e92841f2fae5216dbaff
dfb06ab90e8a40652d5473d3f439da539302f47b
describe
'440109' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVS' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
cfed89312c3f900b3186a047c04ac7ad
a8aa3f12888a78f7585bc19539bc698122127aa5
describe
'44296' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVT' 'sip-files00098.pro'
5b973f4dd2f48cb161af02225f3e51a0
6cb7835b1c844a1ff71ff4cbe82213794211a360
describe
'118288' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVU' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
cfd92a120db144edec4fa1eecda6b44e
ef7919eac4eeb9ec7386bb1cc78f72d8df0847c9
describe
'4264324' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVV' 'sip-files00098.tif'
ff172cb8b12ea703011ac02d0115ee47
25bbc5f62ca511a5a2c84dd257bab006426bf2a8
'2011-10-14T02:07:35-04:00'
describe
'1758' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVW' 'sip-files00098.txt'
8776cfd9464ff0ae24f4e9f0ca535b50
f61c620962a1b8645246e4dd3c81ebb7db68b5ed
describe
'30367' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVX' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
f8ae73df2149483597c14b4c3df3ccb5
cb777324acac67c42457121398476b2dad454afb
describe
'535859' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVY' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c494212418dd63c88e2b7ee587110723
8133adfef5b1481bbe5d5a376cc792a99464cd4f
describe
'403372' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKVZ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
341fa978e2314412312fa2956b6d6da8
c88e488a8781f1dac93b2a6ffdbb891e5274944a
describe
'18481' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWA' 'sip-files00099.pro'
e804470625bd34c2a0ff60c34fa1ed1c
4cfc8dd25e8c256a8f1a8e78deee2872c12837ef
describe
'102897' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWB' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
76c2ddf731eb3d16cd5393343801ad72
550baf704b8097d5b0e68beb121072d25c32d3e8
describe
'4295868' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWC' 'sip-files00099.tif'
2b413d766e6caf248eae9143bb743848
ff966e1fcddb1e9c77aa8dca474c34ff7f0590bb
describe
'801' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWD' 'sip-files00099.txt'
165b081566cbc9a84555f5fa0141c737
bbc32923f84c7ad7fc19f38a302703797932221d
describe
'26430' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWE' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
938ad669228279c53757cb9dea3dd209
1037499dd77c24ecce4db15041fd18063a97fd57
describe
'539274' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWF' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
db80af61b169966325e796de4c93d02e
326480e2aa2676b6d1104a9c2fb12460eb15d065
describe
'433319' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWG' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
a310b86bc626f304b1d27f88e327117c
e87dc9570b4e777e5bb59f3ab26d20817c6110a5
describe
'45685' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWH' 'sip-files00100.pro'
e77d659af8f9de1190ade74542eaa521
706e568ea637f92225adf13e5116fe3936cca45b
describe
'115890' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWI' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
58bef0f97c2b2b147350c4de6cd8947c
4e8d61a943fbd93cd61517dceeebe96a30b588c3
describe
'4323980' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWJ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
04ef5128eb8d3f2cbc93fb3091d053ba
96e5266bfcb36d39862eec0b3708ec4b397a4565
describe
'1855' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWK' 'sip-files00100.txt'
4ac47e4db24b90dcc2f33a19b31037c4
9ef71145392738c1b99eceb665d39dc98c502c09
describe
'29381' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWL' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
af0eee4428be052f5bd3366f17a87e51
6c7619dc9edb610d654485c0ba4ddb63883c750a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWM' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
91a03e7f4e992f22e839ed51baa0b2c1
904138ecfedfeb8891a813af71179f0e4d2a1624
describe
'449860' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWN' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
4b5a47a184db9070e0f44348ffef798b
0ab1d65553a11e50507d28c95b0abb90f6d39765
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWO' 'sip-files00101.pro'
4191079782c72a32d72c78c92867aae7
b5a20e975b397c80a2d72f56e0565d86a0275e6a
describe
'105587' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWP' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
ce59fdd6eaee9a8af8b8f253060bdb58
1aba2ea842e154aab1c1be94243480df35621898
describe
'4415572' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWQ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
f177f2cd6d9d036e791d88895e26462c
a3783f8f3ea01bbf91483d10b29dcf087e247e05
describe
'138' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWR' 'sip-files00101.txt'
b701267bb9114806a2ea65dd70866671
4d5ef4311a158e4f3677157b481a7172317f4978
describe
'27085' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWS' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
7a55deaeff698d1ada8430232e3331aa
b02ec9ae02f5c63422dc2b36272da5806baca065
describe
'531731' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWT' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
760ec01ac32cc70b73a30ea75ddc600e
b8e3373218ddc8c2658e6e43c85ced59fad8132c
describe
'437171' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWU' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
12217169792b11d9f09d36f67331b788
06240250f71260071fdb1283bbcdc8cc075feea8
describe
'41348' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWV' 'sip-files00102.pro'
fa18e21f62d3c5ef4e077f1b6d7f37bb
aacc582596ab771124d39927b0461b1f88401456
describe
'116358' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWW' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
083eb0192a9f403bbfe4a44275258525
97ace3b084b3b41e3c8d8c95b2bea47c09b5d269
describe
'4264080' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWX' 'sip-files00102.tif'
7dfe15b0dccb56faadff1ea90fa8f5a7
a2172e0b1b528e843b2f151abb5a443d16812e63
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWY' 'sip-files00102.txt'
54a68c9c250e5456459a3862edc93118
21f2da8c57a7533a359728045abce94de6c53e11
describe
'29969' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKWZ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
03259206a22c0145b50400b340aed51b
426249f1e8ccbe340249aace5b5bead2c12e5fa3
describe
'539594' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXA' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
f6896f173d09920cd8a7a3a2a60900ea
1c3798d31275713ff9ad1c3e4da80193d8a3e552
describe
'461640' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXB' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
40aaa17ccc9a392b9348790e144497b9
839dc106f671dbf2a7e2742fe1d018aa2199452e
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXC' 'sip-files00103.pro'
7a8f1647b07fa688ad65f13719ab1658
8f26f510d114ffae1f9a1d3479db60ea49438676
describe
'114308' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXD' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
27c415d98322ee53618f096cc69515f8
4ba1e59f4fbe43eca43afbf033a911fc24ec7493
describe
'4326664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXE' 'sip-files00103.tif'
95c65964daa97a98476d28ee3a678039
e2b2c2a3541a43a7614b5ed75a32ed6e1e68648c
describe
'212' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXF' 'sip-files00103.txt'
86a15d8b592f85d0e593cbe23f797b9f
bf43a9e2fe1b58904c8c90ea49b6bf1b7f7c9e29
describe
'29366' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXG' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f5efb0217613fb49302a8278656b16a3
3fa686b482bfa69c8f22af6fb46e059af6304538
describe
'537367' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXH' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
41d6a8893fd4f332307654d0d1e2b378
aaac59ce151d8e6b3de13c266bea03b4b0e516ce
describe
'411644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXI' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
a43a89ae71a73939885023573644e771
5cb2740a9f2da8facda6415bc202f1ed88b3ed57
describe
'32000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXJ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
b4f012e6837e4028de1759397cf83424
6a77e5491f4d54919a31c3d0bedf4eea08da69d8
describe
'106854' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXK' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
735e8bed278f9739569e3e39f9eaf084
491c3264337cdb79439584322f3cc683769640e3
describe
'4308512' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXL' 'sip-files00104.tif'
99f02e169c8d9df6da07779986db5a96
742a17bccea6bd619b205bfc5c18b35e1fba0303
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXM' 'sip-files00104.txt'
dff61688336921161e3e6e6d29f26a38
59fc0da50736e208c4b70e21c7bd02b961c42e27
describe
'26760' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXN' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
06307932b0e8000f2f9c64bbbc936b4b
dd2633ad89139d7b22bf4438b5947442f4f1762a
describe
'531764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXO' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
281b5568ab5be7fbad9b65fd5a0dd4fb
8d75d5c50c81567e0de721a795967708bd4ab519
describe
'403564' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXP' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
fde1bd2bc26b32b8e731f5a7b2c40b1e
c034e6457c5788feffa61039669aaaf02d84a085
describe
'11959' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXQ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
030bd70ebc4680c03cc35d1e1d0be961
abc979dcbfec50a22bf3fb21ae4cb38950c6b64e
describe
'103187' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXR' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
fd7dee707eb6a24d7c0f0e5ca9473575
cdc0290262d40e1e2667f952472754a5518777d2
describe
'4263456' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXS' 'sip-files00105.tif'
d6319047593a374a1be3f234c9134db1
32b9cc1a3c5805f6e77c657f83912fa1188fe2d4
describe
'543' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXT' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ba736bf5b89489c81590264e26e2c820
9f6f8419cc821700768611d3efba4a8e646301a4
describe
'26400' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXU' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
d036c1d2fa1f670408d3da0d65075e84
34ec7102520639866999a2d9d20cf4da2e0a56c5
describe
'550399' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXV' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
e6693278bb0fba0973fc972c057b91e3
1d61713839bc39b17107288c92de3b109037db36
describe
'419962' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXW' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c04c62023c454112abf61d6cbfdc9ff2
9ebcc144dbcb8066670716bda4d4a0a18ed265d2
describe
'31470' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXX' 'sip-files00106.pro'
e8de3c470e3ea153aaaf53592e84ff09
4634733b06e2086fa576405d35d7a2c9521acd62
describe
'109982' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXY' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
f92af9f1a763e0b4f62d207db95bbc92
ceb70748d09abf4ca73eb1020799e9a58dcdc4ef
describe
'4413444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKXZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
d7186626584d60025c70399dc8061221
b31e57b4e6ab72ebcefa65c57cd789fcfeb61521
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYA' 'sip-files00106.txt'
b27cd9f50d9c8965902cecec2d1d174b
48ac5532b95f8c65e28b1f9bb340e58fe6612525
describe
Invalid character
'28476' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYB' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
4a049e60c7a6348a7c6d9e0f3d5c7e33
72f5bac9da5c515f6a92855a422e99b78e442eb7
describe
'550484' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYC' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
cc4eaa097e29a9c1d62133c21537a10a
90198534be5ab441ad876d2eff119079d00bd4a9
describe
'432439' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYD' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
e78d1f95cf937243ab5fb0da1a339294
4eaeadf4d0a9fefb6a57a15b760b386570935565
describe
'43525' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYE' 'sip-files00107.pro'
5e27166626c26ca452b1f20358daaf4e
0026cebbe3b5353a8b78fec3c1d0b893f65f51c9
describe
'115981' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYF' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
75a167b1efb7e7215b5f39a9f0c91ebd
1d9c1177ef45f3547ae77140a6b76c499475c5ec
describe
'4413696' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYG' 'sip-files00107.tif'
b3d6b6e3de97963a6d259e6bd7e21a05
64fc0db127a21d2dbe532c61fcb36b564a2833f0
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYH' 'sip-files00107.txt'
14038b4d9f400e821a97fe268be78009
25ca36e19a71d1c780d0c8934afae653b1288351
describe
'29992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYI' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c2a5c308b479e93a86197c3c82834e3e
188470c6a8e10febb4e73c3f793d050ccfd768c4
describe
'543020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYJ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
e973827543139f8adf11bef313019d52
23a1fb1c134d261b8d8eeed746aadbcc5eaf1627
describe
'465315' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
da0c31b0a0a213e8684a49e41f322748
6d81be3b8a0b27a01e5a6e54c01bf09f2a0ea071
describe
'23720' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00108.pro'
7b373861a9114af2575281b02a4e120a
91077c1393fab21c897b7124b9cf295e507c225e
describe
'117636' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
18b8ca892e7bf666f1495474611dae15
67caab62800951a5f4c241ff87648c7ea823b690
describe
'4354176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00108.tif'
f801f16aef59e742c00250b1a37fe3b5
4bd15eaede061f740eb2d9f73c8f700acbed5ccb
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00108.txt'
a057fdd2a896d9faf043e601ccb6f438
9d17b6ecd5a471474ab3c85c92094c2662e9c8aa
describe
Invalid character
'30267' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
dbc92d22910d2adbb9e401d771cc0775
3f1f0b6ed5addd8cd8801af856833abe4eca0536
describe
'550423' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
1eb53408dd99c830ef340e57803bcdde
6281de5d52d597e3a39491fae4ac491c151575f4
describe
'429409' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
005f3cf342c7f6443c7fb5f22913c2b3
1a14e1f534ace2d8caa11267e58213be52f50673
describe
'44075' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00109.pro'
a82c8302974604aea310b2858dcc30c2
5ba478d34511d5dfd8627db05f9df4cb6bdc3a82
describe
'115071' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
f1b3d8444d6c27eb3ef195b943fb761c
0e71d2506f89fa922b2c601b449beece45d92687
describe
'4413700' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00109.tif'
6c12f1d976e56a63bcea9d85838c5ad2
9537aafc83e67c35b71102055a04bfd539b6d26c
describe
'1752' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00109.txt'
354c9f84115ece3116306b88809e87ed
7130d0b11ea43648768c0d933805b3a9823eaeb8
describe
'30155' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
77c0d54625cc2516ee51e617d1198174
4c4c7cdf77c78e1a1cac541b35d5886284d32ffb
'2011-10-14T02:08:44-04:00'
describe
'550442' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
f2b88af9a42203bf9abda51bb9731b73
47f25a7cad24aa4060838f6a20819754156dcdc5
describe
'413442' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
b77a7ae09730854122988a19fd4ea91b
de8279ddd4f7878971944f7666805577443edb75
describe
'25729' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
02f955fdca5084fe63cf903b35a16d46
6962d98d759301951bac0e81b5e410ba330507f0
describe
'106882' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
8f6acc3f5ae362852d38bbb208eea5fc
9d50a074725882594d92978728f453eb09a0636c
describe
'4413316' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00110.tif'
6c84970848916e3efab6c00d4daabf45
53f2d990b64097cadeef30229b96f0b4cbbb457f
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
d60f48389563163e1f82e736b4f03469
ad2477627ef3826356ae0c8fd10f2388cd1258ab
describe
Invalid character
'27619' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
d83cd8710ad07e946af34330d8db74a1
5a0b3a9d2443b597f71bd14700d077b4069574a3
describe
'550795' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
8c74753d119649299ed0d1a46d9d0bd9
bf117428aad5725d86a6a4b365ef1a22b5a4f220
describe
'393478' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
fa732626ce0d29c9c7743cb0e6433c4c
88ad9d90608b1d3cdc63dcf127d72b0c3107bb38
describe
'27896' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00111.pro'
ceb4c4c9f69b67361b4d2a8e2c7595e3
891dbf2cdc810c86b5346d10c168e5181e823f37
describe
'102869' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ac519e0457f9f37ed33eff0ced2257fa
ce678b9c8fca41dc5cea67d76a7bfd8e5685109e
describe
'4415604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00111.tif'
9c6c3de58f26fea3389e2429aa8d773c
ded9f96ed86b4e681b02677311a0be329a5a3252
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
ae68914181c3ddfca04b60df3ecc21b8
fa0b5a50642e2c0afa18b8cb934c95f233253f2a
describe
'26692' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
ffb9132d852e55cd5f042e4fe8fe1f6d
80ba111a7415467d465fa09534d8c1c551c01462
describe
'550485' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
ac03b38062232f8a7c19268996b3ea3d
46aba746789d89d44e22e8dbe7dc9823339b7970
describe
'396046' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
0b208cf3612206dfb3149942404eb616
6d438d6f28cf93eb5d7fd0552135f176ea8f3b04
describe
'13176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00112.pro'
3cd57501ff82342b28d535999e8c35df
64986793457dfcc40e8bb131d0987fa6ea634caa
describe
'99779' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
f43f233ad64c8b16429de2df66fb338d
0d730a1de3ef252a33e87ca1be20619df8505552
describe
'4412848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2f5044f689e93b74dd7b8ac79084235b
267f78e31ecc8a41f3801dced4ef69465c30dba5
describe
'619' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00112.txt'
134bcc393877b39bd1c7002c2049c0e5
e8d2ef46a5c5f694f2506896dba96a51ea77d57c
describe
'25591' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
c36b2b60cebb8392a02aa06ed8ae845b
4351d149ae804f1f9f77a01f30c4b6193f359ba8
describe
'539559' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
3b2477f4def876334c2d785795981465
1fa156c0d4b205c6478f632d6864783f9e527e11
describe
'378919' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
195062456f3b1b7ee2db69cffc975cda
8f19d4a2e2501c53e0f36542098b596865734112
describe
'31864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00113.pro'
abedfd02b8c7f771609ba91b04f34740
eb64b316d090e43ae6a267c92fa5ed044611d480
describe
'98345' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
2f317ea03950c706df38502ca5dfde45
bed148693ad9996406975ad58ecf8dde04d25b1f
describe
'4325768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00113.tif'
1f09f3879f20e4dfb0688d12bccdcf51
d8d95565825e2cf4e886b6ab817b9793ea4b9d1b
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00113.txt'
fc77c6ccfb85b303f4c730487a4937b3
3c2cccd98d7fcf790f073469276d4d8dfe08ee29
describe
'26165' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
ab769b0ea2e18af6dc5496b46faf2a6b
6e592e4877a89f39f5a7646f085f1f8a02fb8884
describe
'550473' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
519638bae3b0fa2c7d0ef9674fc0349b
ebbc085e7cdc17f80b42db907c3f775bc47f88a1
describe
'407864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAA' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
200bfa2d6ddf2e8482ff951e68722ada
f55869b14d9d7827b18b77de537c15fc99d37c17
describe
'29421' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAB' 'sip-files00114.pro'
0ba5d036a1f4d66b91bee866eba153d4
4c75fb97161107351e904c54143914e5d523d70f
describe
'105423' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAC' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
882b490d54ba7eb88087dd5fbcdf1e00
b5255fb27dc70226de62f3b232c4be5ad772f044
describe
'4413432' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAD' 'sip-files00114.tif'
6e2f7aff5ea7a643c17cea2313854bab
e67a208e8b86d1734310b807b329c360280a432a
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAE' 'sip-files00114.txt'
6d5b08dd64ff0d6a7ebe42023feecc29
86f5b3543be1b556618ceb57eba7e07b0ab9450f
describe
'27473' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAF' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
348e3ae4cf3a454645a9c326e3bf42c2
7042d812fa0eb23c0b09085c77e97f9e33828c5e
'2011-10-14T02:07:26-04:00'
describe
'550800' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAG' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
8ddbe8f02bfdb7399a2c075c3e9a43ea
d5fbc2e1609f05ff0de4ea27b67197a1dce52d6c
describe
'440084' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAH' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ea445b058ee1889252dfe3f9edbd6844
2a076c23f3a344394a6be0a118ffc7108411621d
describe
'18863' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAI' 'sip-files00115.pro'
85be474675fec31e32b0bd61cc7ba3f7
a0a9da0da9756a9c7bc23956bf0557f57ea8fa99
describe
'108379' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
22bb16609437357ebeac7f0f45268a3c
fe26fbf087f30089c8da9c960abe9448c71f04a1
describe
'4415704' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAK' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e64f244ccfa3c1faff2e2debea069824
de50c641e43ed6e217775179e0fae09c121d9940
describe
'836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAL' 'sip-files00115.txt'
dc3d6f8104f5c678eff558ef952b1719
5bc888f062fbb9bbbcf963c50c1b826b92ccf8ff
describe
'27156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAM' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
001ef9375e7b314284498af26006650c
deffb88582daa2bace0c5c5e9e2a76e4e5c8e988
describe
'537417' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAN' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
ee8fd45394c2381bbc3e07c01cf072ae
7cc3b1e68783c4291fd5aec0946f05760c1611d4
describe
'413197' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAO' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
fa58e267eac205a80c8a5aa10894aeb6
ee0b2dd6a4a4acfc14575c0aeca99b7f6868940f
describe
'23587' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAP' 'sip-files00116.pro'
6327f0e2d9cf9824abac9f77d838b23a
5cad7726dba6a36fa1c57dc36d8db1e30c6f8a45
describe
'105896' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
2f4d70b88c678512995ef4cd28d7b95e
13dbc6e328fb8d6dac57654a459726b88f7a2d17
describe
'4308672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAR' 'sip-files00116.tif'
3e4c1489fd4b1d7a9746211d405b8915
aebc7d98271000383a52b977dcab2149dcb31b49
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAS' 'sip-files00116.txt'
79574b60b505a6210dd77cf153ccf3ad
e4b67a55e7b21fc04ac21dfe5beb9da48571cb7c
describe
'27030' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAT' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
87860e8cd5cd45001779b80757153990
eeff4cd050cb45cb60727b9845d08d82114a96db
describe
'550477' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAU' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
bfbb12d12339b026fbea1294b4e9aa03
9b23c5e5256484f5a32c5359c86d09722c26c6a5
describe
'414524' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAV' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
a5573a89dc6358491a09cb23b49eaab6
d874e34a020260f6ecc0de9c179ec1d12dd8fb05
describe
'25824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAW' 'sip-files00117.pro'
5b822b8508fc6853ae81460e54f0d328
b49db05fc7ed6a60535e5f67792867b519f20247
describe
'106165' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAX' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
f658772b43a1ffd0c132a54e3b241a89
91468a537c6f3c4aefad3d225f1359bb815714a9
describe
'4413480' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAY' 'sip-files00117.tif'
46c084e0804826922278d4363c4d3c5e
97e0667e547caa5baba1b39d0f7ae40f92220edc
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
e26896f4effe0b0d6fed08ce1d07d732
577d5c8ab15467b351f70160eb25dd6449b76741
describe
'27016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBA' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
aadc7f433edbf39438ba4a5cbace1699
66112683afd76ed9227c90d714c92a5b13e52373
describe
'555795' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBB' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
453f083b80a9b89d8b78c169cb0bbb4c
bf295088d9b314ca9daebb82806d234d28936e7a
describe
'429720' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBC' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
73a1825b2bd683a805f3bca438cbe826
ddca56bbb93de9173937d44f05f7699e2773271d
describe
'47936' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBD' 'sip-files00118.pro'
48b62f39ae3df422cc04444b7d05ab88
3a690ff586d4ca1334b9177b66dc7f95e694cbb4
describe
'113584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBE' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
d0498cef1cfa0c3c173887ec1f3cc631
b056757c313d726b95e384d02f369a1d0a714a8b
describe
'4456036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBF' 'sip-files00118.tif'
3b98b73459153090e3dd79a48468531d
0d2eb8ec31d56d077aa40ccd02c6e2977cf0456a
describe
'1888' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBG' 'sip-files00118.txt'
3fecde60941ee33553b5f58c6247c561
5d2e9e3f0d725421b88b1210bb91227577744c37
describe
'29115' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBH' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
23a1afe6fb265f547e3272a7887111f4
a5b328867b457d519c678d8385169f069d1f00c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBI' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
a6cd523e9e152e3b8d6059dceafa13e5
2229219b8c97177788c296db52bc1f84e082ac42
describe
'421714' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
509c3d6c4434550e74aa143f11940986
967a5fde3515ec282fc7faafe29cb446924ad10a
describe
'27793' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBK' 'sip-files00119.pro'
8b31f5874a76478d53c435319985be96
b219212006291a94e2810c8de83ad28f0385619b
describe
'109003' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBL' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
338d2d5b74920565888356b8bb89600e
e0d3baca9b8fdedd1d0eae45f9e4a78e0ee1092b
describe
'4416012' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBM' 'sip-files00119.tif'
45fe7758852d98758de8fc1d3cbba7cd
507b3cba4b07c47d71494d48910b9a2ce4a3cede
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBN' 'sip-files00119.txt'
ab6cebedec62181fe73864930b16dd96
8ac7dd3ddb3f8cf1108973d29710fa5d51ea1705
describe
'28114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBO' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
a64b55c213acb1d8f0d1e9d3f5d54b29
fd5a696c49746f44ee75224844dd4806da20d470
describe
'550486' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBP' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
de5883a02f4737b3441353b52ebc3cc6
312cedc31ccaef6ca7aa4620d598f5eab3d9429d
describe
'415164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
8d713e06935d12356729f08a4d01541f
b42be7171aba621a62024ccb39c5cbe7f4996431
describe
'26804' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBR' 'sip-files00120.pro'
14fa0ec49198bce7fbaf10adc95e2461
8edd25a467e764d8ef8b842d1d7a7560d65a5fd0
describe
'106690' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBS' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
9a7ddb5dcb04d4ce0724682af06ea8cc
398a58b7f97215978ae1a4bcd727696708ae975a
describe
'4413348' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBT' 'sip-files00120.tif'
40097e705cbb87114c3696c9a7cc9ebd
236c97600288f47720b48e7565a2ec0bb1a5265b
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBU' 'sip-files00120.txt'
ac6a7ce2efb0b4aa9a83a19cc3388ba2
0ebfe5c71ad97568dbf6edc883ac5c98a998e23c
describe
'27568' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBV' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
c16d74923d1ab1247864be1b826b9afe
35368f239e333d0aca39ef11025222bac43ad9aa
describe
'537696' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBW' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
61ac9b54d1b13f9f9cabe00e51c0a77f
0a4df9984f132246f71b7e0a77d3e4f5b26c7c83
describe
'440785' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBX' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
9117f0432afae1463e68a5c6643ed0ff
c43061719fab181d6d3f27c1db3d218f169d47e7
describe
'45896' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBY' 'sip-files00121.pro'
fbe355994000a9553351edf181d12210
3339fabd127da917cd0a4eb96bb6186f24237138
describe
'116540' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
38d0c88a38fb30879b2fa7c862d61d1b
d222e8fa3ee06ae7977abc6a79370d8941631437
describe
'4311408' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCA' 'sip-files00121.tif'
5bc9b8e1166822330d4f10df54af38a2
e9647600e4d7903a5e3317055f97751c47487ad9
describe
'1823' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCB' 'sip-files00121.txt'
07caa8723da8e6882cc78329f62a0776
1a862a182c77c21236e2cfeb27750b9bb6536bac
describe
'29488' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCC' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
b4b8c628f0b1025ecb70e1a52d5ec292
41585087515591d402dfda0fca6f09dbfd905e91
describe
'550802' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCD' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a28931319e672985b6e69b4d3d04f6cd
fe87d8188b7eb630d041b542cfe0d4b5a1bed311
describe
'390301' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCE' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
50081289fe244371a4b8c54ca4072723
234ad9a660a0b8d1092b5ef32aa849575ffcefb7
describe
'28141' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
80eedd226abfc086d1748c2e9015190c
29bc9d0e3fd89d55a84c57b7f10a574ae7781331
describe
'101921' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCG' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
4886e65d03e0448a724e006f1206e16f
1dc83f805ce4d3186c043cfaee132d7bdd634158
describe
'4415648' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCH' 'sip-files00122.tif'
1c9e98afe6bc4d316052db97d80adaf5
b08d7ea32bbdc6ee0486d8888b17deb371edae42
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCI' 'sip-files00122.txt'
6091c511f9e5c111adaf3ab70d863e07
9a0117c6159e0ab59ada421e58ff5186d7fc4cc0
describe
'26206' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
3ba4d4fb0137d98681b6ea3e34052d8b
bccdcf7b3e9c45eace94117bf4f5e9a6ba8bef32
describe
'554180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCK' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
d55f3683d002bcf54ae76525f93f19da
19c2267528a9c09e08720a15214c908505b9f505
describe
'425606' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCL' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
16a5b2c16785f547879e802b0f4a56f2
dc3f00a3919df9d3a46d9a5a7a668fbd02458900
describe
'24863' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCM' 'sip-files00123.pro'
bedce2759bcca80c649b8398846515bd
6f6c26b3ebc4f21fbadee6425c554e9633afed79
describe
'108637' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCN' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
d2621f945effbbeef911e877b0385ebd
89ad6b77d701d45793af3cd85c4dca9b6f3d0fae
describe
'4443292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
e9958209ed9f3f6f070a7953b15d9a74
9377eb9c2940db321a21e1ea413af620e094022a
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCP' 'sip-files00123.txt'
9a53a96d476b729386f00c25c3d58d89
a0f1b72a60d07cfdcf79dddce2bd764bfe38bd93
describe
'27919' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
83c79f5e1c9911d59392c8e70bcb09c3
af256f26873ff772c4dc9a02e0bbefbdb50b309e
describe
'573114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCR' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
2952b9a448d63dd15185e9e214b9398d
9630582a329222fb18cdea2367a2775e024209b0
describe
'398950' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCS' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
e0fc6d2340fd485a22911e4a32e8c080
26b286f55cb55d4185af55774dd9556f78be977e
describe
'28163' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCT' 'sip-files00124.pro'
58107d11c3c4b680f8e8345c44ab38bd
93f2966eb2c671a3155533a40049164a60931689
describe
'104490' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCU' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
ca96053df893a17876d2572d970effca
f988990527b55ec1d3ced3fef5c2ecc5addddb38
describe
'4595816' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCV' 'sip-files00124.tif'
2c30a1d14a1041e2426e03f2d267f1b8
218492d24ed153bc4e6fef7fe8aaf0dbb5e9ec26
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCW' 'sip-files00124.txt'
07cc34a8c6eb3325027880d217cbb155
e880b490eddea64b61043c05d3fb50a2990e1231
describe
Invalid character
'28603' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCX' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
332358fc65412975a744e83aafea26d7
4e8e1a2617d7b0d4c6ed558872efeea92edc224e
describe
'691125' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCY' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
93e42b304c9283de72f9007988e0985d
ce88297dfc95b996e8cee0d6da69f986c3628644
describe
'413913' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
8d6117c9b85f98cef21bd4b8fa3636a8
5eb886c97f9cdff534bfe3b2b6161b7e1234ad84
describe
'94830' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDA' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
fe8428a5d153de64e8115c891c0db479
9531df05df0b34f31ba94a4dec1a87cd3cd7bf7a
describe
'16592592' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDB' 'sip-files00127.tif'
7b3adf7e6e0b678ed433fb2db499d29c
253343d713b04bf444a2eed7aff951a032eb004f
describe
'22196' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDC' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
69407743da21baf10f8302e6a31cc0ab
cc564a46acd827f63b433ed361ebbc9f7e82c7c5
describe
'515815' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDD' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
caf9c829dfa720408905f0372c1c76a3
84e29883e890f1b85a091a7523c4534486aa9a81
describe
'785' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDE' 'sip-files00128.pro'
74bd928e6cd2550d124e5261f3454281
f17ec683f6adc89a23cabe1258e4e470804aa3d5
describe
'130190' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDF' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
124fc04d8b944a0e8dc092734cb02199
ea21b8792a5016b9f5ee8b9975fe8c58b0f7318b
describe
'15559860' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDG' 'sip-files00128.tif'
68d8e565f8d8c84e4a9f8741e1009086
c277d61fec952f7416fc935ba4bd864fcee93f06
describe
'34193' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDH' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
80e3f43a473d8cb4c0d8b68bca65cf1e
178ae577d64d222558078664951fafd5595ce82f
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDI' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
b1f60da81839b312c9c1db051c5d0380
8cd4c2ff59b013490b0745d3932ad8ae83cc349d
describe
'214303' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDJ' 'sip-filesUF00080711_00001.mets'
4721372e095fb9ca5feba691cd658583
962f589d3845594041448aa8676612cda84ed1bb
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T06:19:58-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'274419' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFPfileF20080329_AAALDM' 'sip-filesUF00080711_00001.xml'
9a1784461d83acfe37e70792fb75901e
04ad354b79f1d0b941c9610eac43734267a315b2
describe
'2013-12-19T06:19:56-05:00'
xml resolution