Citation
Feet and wings

Material Information

Title:
Feet and wings
Series Title:
Four footed friends series
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[14] p. : col. ill. ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre:
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027991800 ( ALEPH )
02673815 ( OCLC )
AJH5624 ( NOTIS )

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Ae McLOUGHLIN, BROS.
eee NEW YORK



’

FE

A CONTENTED DONKEY

F I were not already one,
A donkey I would be;
For oh! it is a happy life,
Contented if not free.
I’m useful, if not beautiful,
I think you will agree
That I am wise whene’er I say,
‘“ A donkey’s life for me! ”

It’s true that some folk laugh at me— —

I know my ears are long,
I have no voice, but you will find
I’m patient and I’m strong.
The children love me dearly, for
They like to ride on me;
If I’d my choice, I would not change—
A donkey I would be!





I do the work my master bids,
And never kick or bite;
You never knew me run away,
I don’t think it’s polite.

Mine is a pleasant busy life,
The farm is home you see;

I’m not a donkey when I say,
““A donkey’s life for me!”

SOMETHING ABOUT DONKEYS

LTHOUGH the donkey is not very

common in this country, it is,

taking the world over, nearly as much in use
as the horse as a beast of burden.

In cold countries it is quite small in size,
and is covered with rough, shaggy hair,
but in warm climates it grows almost as
large as a horse, and has a smooth, glossy
coat.

The donkey is not very choice in its diet,
and will eat weeds and thistles that a horse
would not touch. ‘For this reason, as well
as its size, it is much used in Europe by
the poorer classes, who cannot afford to
keep an expensive animal.

The donkey has the name of being
obstinate, and probably deserves it, but
many persons contend that the trait comes
from ill-usage rather than from nature.
It certainly has a good memory and often
shows great intelligence. mos

| ereaige Sis

ei. |







FEET AND WINGS



Here is a story of one that showed both
obstinacy and a good memory. His master
used to stop regularly at a certain place to
get some beer, and he always gave a little
to the donkey. At length the master turned
teetotaler, and then, of course, it was against
But the
donkey did not propose to lose his treat on

his principles to stop for beer.

account of his master’s conversion; and |

when they came to the usual halting-place,
he would stop, and no amount of beating

would make him go on till he had received Zz

his customary allowance.

A GOOD COACHMAN NEEDS NO
WHIP

HEN we think of all that the horse

does for us, and reflect on the kind-

ness of the Divine Being in giving us so

strong and noble a creature to be our willing

and patient servant, it seems a most un-

grateful return that it should so often be

cruelly treated, and have so much needless
hardship inflicted upon it.

Those who know the horse best say that
it needs neither whip nor spur when it and
Yet we
sometimes have to witness the painful

its driver understand each other.

sight of a poor animal receiving an un-
merciful lashing, although it is plainly
straining every nerve to do what is required
of it.

But it is gratifying to, be able to say that
we much oftener have the pleasure of seeing
kind and humane drivers, between whom





and their horses the best terms of friend-

Such a one is shown
in the picture on this page.

ship seem to exist.
Besides train-
ing his team to advance, back, go to right
or left, or even to turn the van completely
round, without a touch of the rein or whip,
he had taught them to perform a little trick
which greatly amused onlookers.

Standing in front of the pair, he would

- call out, ‘‘ Now, Tom, shake hands!’ when

instantly the near horse would lift up
his right foot. After a good shake, the
driver would say, ‘‘ Now the other foot,
Tom!” and at once the left foot went up.
Then he would go to the other horse, and
a similar performance would take place
with him.







THe Don KEY.









FEET AND WINGS

THE ELEPHANT
HIS immense animal is the largest
T and strongest of four-footed beasts.
In spite of its great size and strength it
is easly tamed, and when kindly treated
makes an obedient and useful servant. It
is, of course, costly to maintain, and out-
side of India is not much used as a beast
of burden.
The most striking feature of the elephant
is its trunk, which is a continuation of its

nose and upper lip into an appendage some-
what like a tail.
service to the animal, as with it it brings
both food and drink to its mouth, and can
lift immense weights as well as pick up the

It is of the greatest possible



smallest objects, such as a single blade
of grass

In intelligence the elephant ranks high
amongst animals, being little, if any, in-
ferior to the dog. An interesting story is
told of one that was employed to haul
timber to build a chapel in India. The
wife of tbe missionary who had obtained
the loan of the animal saw it fed every day,
lest the food should be stolen by its attendant.
One day the quantity of rice seemed to be
short, and the lady spoke of it to the at-
tendant. He pretended to be greatly hurt
that she sbould suspect him of taking the
rice, and loudly denied that he had done
so. The elephant seemed to know what
the talk was about, and while the keeper
was still proclaiming his innocence, slyly
stretched out his trunk, and unfastened the
man’s waist-cloth, and shook it out. The
missing rice was spilled out of it, and the

‘fellow’s dishonesty thus exposed.

Another elephant, which is shown in
the picture on this page, displayed its
gratitude toward a soldier who had been in
the habit of giving it a part of his allowance
of liquor, by protecting him from arrest
once when be had become tipsy. The
soldier had fallen beneath the elephant’s
body and gone to sleep, and the animal
kept waving its trunk in a threatenging
manner at every one that tried to come near
him till he woke up after several hours.



FEET AND WINGS

BABY ELEPHANTS

ILD elephants live in herds.
a herd is traveling the
young ones trot

a'ong between the
forelegs of their —

These ‘7:
great beasts are

mothers.

very kind to their
lf a: lit=
tle one cries the

young.

whole herd is disturbed; if one is tired the
herd halts to let it rest. When a hill has
to be climbed, the mothers help the babies
up carefully. But it is when they come to
a swift river they need most attention.
They would surely be swept down stream
if left alone. But their fathers and mothers
are there. Those too young to swim well,
climb on the backs of the old ones and ride.
The very youngest neither swim nor ride.
They are carried across, some grasped in
the trunk of the mother, some borne on
the tusks of the father, and held above the

surface of the water so they cannot drown.

THE CAMEL

HE Arabs call the camel ‘the ship

of the desert,’ as it can travel over

hot sandy parts of the earth which no other
animal can cross. Its spreading feet keep

it from sinking in the sand, and it can store

When







up a supply of water in its stomach so that

it does not suffer from thirst.

Camels have to carry heavy burdens
on their backs, and they are so tall that they
must kneel down to be loaded. They are
trained to do this when. quite young, and
the Arab children take part in teaching
them. The little camels are first kept on
their knees for a while every day, a carpet
being placed over them with heavy weights
on its edges, to prevent them from getting
up.

After about four months of this training
they are put together in a large enclosure,
where the chidren feed them twice a day
with milk When the little camels have
drunk their share, the children touch them
upon the legs wth switches they carry.
They
are so obedient that they will soon kneel

Down they all. drop on their knees

or lie down at only a signal from the switch,
just as their little keepers wish.









_ Tue JREINDEER.



FEET AND WINGS



THE REINDEER IN LAPLAND

HE reindeer is found in its wild state
in the northern parts of Europe,
Asia, and America. In Lapland it has been
tamed, and there it takes the place of the
horse, the cow, the sheep, and the goat,
for none of these animals could subsist
in that cold land, where the sun does not
rise for months. The reindeer is able to
live upon the lichen, a plant which grows
in those otherwise barren regions. Al-
though this lichen may be deeply covered
with snow, the animal will grub for it with
its snout, as it prefers it to any sort of
dry food,
The uses to which the Laplanders put
the reindeer are very many. It draws the

sledge, laden with heavy burdens, over the —

frozen snow, swifter than any horse could
gallop. The people live largely on its milk;
the flesh is.good to eat; the fat is used for
lighting the houses during the long winter
night; the skin makes warm beds and





clothing; the sinews, cords and harness;
and the horns and bones are formed into
spoons, cups, and other useful articles.

HOW THE INDIANS HUNT THE
REINDEER

HE Dog-rib Indians use a curious
method of hunting the reindeer, or

caribou, as the American variety is called.

The hunters go in pairs, the foremost man
carrying in one hand the horns and skin of
the head of a deer, and in the other a bundle
of twigs. His comrade follows, holding
the guns of both in a level position, so that
the muzzles project under the arms of
the one ahead. They approach a herd of

reindeer by degrees, imitating the tread of

the animals. If any of the herd look at
the strange object approaching, they stop,

_ and the one with the head and horns begins

to rub them against the twigs, and bend
them back like a deer licking its shoulders,
and by other move-
ments copies the ges-
tures of the animals.
In this way the hunt-
ers get close to the
1,94 herd without alarm-
‘ S © ing them. The man
' behind then pushes
his comrade’s gun
forward, the head is
dropped, and the two
men fire together.



FEET AND WINGS

THE MISCHIEVOUS MONKEY

ONKEYS are of different kinds as

to size, color, and general habits.

They are very numerous in hot countries;

there is scarcely a forest that does not swarm
with them.

Some monkeys are fierce and powerful,
and all are fond of mischief. They like
particularly to tease all other animals that
live near them, and many strange stories
have been told of their tricks on creatures
more simple than themselves.

Ships coming from Africa often have
monkeys aboard. A lady who made the
voyage found several of the tribe on the
ship, and has related some of their curious
pranks. One of them was named Jack,
and he, she says, was ‘the prince of them
all” for mischief. ©

Jack began the day by overturning the
parrot’s cage, in order to secure the lump
of sugar, which then roiled cut. He then
went between decks, and jerked off the
sailors’ night caps as they lay asleep, or
ran away with their knives and clothes.

On two days in the week, some pigs which
were aboard were let run about the deck,
and then Jack would have fine sport.
Hiding behind a cask, he would suddenly
spring on the back of one of them, his face
to the tail, and in this way enjoy a ride
on the frightened animal.
laughed at his pranks, he would stare with
a look of wonder, as much as to say, “‘ What
can you find to laugh at?”

It the sailors





He was very fond of creeping in- *
to the galley, and stealing a hot
cake outof the oven; though he sometimes
burned his fingers in the attempt, which
served to keep him out of mischief for a
few days at least.

One of his tricks was played on a poor
little black monkey. A sailor left a pot
of white paint and some brushes on deck,
Jack invited the
little monkey to come to him, and seizing

while hé went to dinner.

him with one hand, painted him from head
to foot with the other.
realize that he had done wrong, he ran up
the rigging to thé maintop, where he stood

Then seeming to

looking down with his nose between the
bars. There he stayed for three days, till
hunger made him descend, when he put
on a very humble look, as if he felt that
he ought to ask pardon for what he had
done.

Be







<=

AEN:

THE Roos









FEET AND WINGS



POULTRY
\F all winged creatures,the poultry
tribe are, no doubt, the most useful
to man. Besides the common domestic
fowl, the hen and rooster, the tribe includes
the turkey, the guinea-fowl, and several

sorts of wild fowl, such as the quail and

the partridge.
All are valued for their flesh, while the
hen, in addition, furnishes us in fts eggs

with an important article of food. No

other bird equals the hen in the readiness
with which it can be induced to go on lay-
ing eggs beyond the number proper for a
brood, and this fact greatly enhances the
value of the species. Some hens will lay
more than two hundred eggs in the course
of a year.





@ the closest bonds of affection.
‘grew worse, and at last died; and then

When we observe the small heads and
expressionless eyes of birds, we are not
inclined to expect any great amount of
intelligence among them. They are, how-
ever, moved by the same passions as larger
creatures, and often show thought, reason-
ing power, and affection.

THE KiND BANTAM

HAT even a fowl may possess the virtue

of benevolence, and that toward a
creature of very different nature, is proved
by the following story.
A little terrier dog was so sick that it
had to be confined to its kennel. A bantam
rooster which lived in the yard observed

it, and gazed at it with looks of deep com-

passion.

At length the bantam managed to squeeze
through the bars which enclosed the front
of the kennel. The dog plainly undertsocd
the feeling that prompted the action, and
from that day the bantam took up his abode
in the dog’s prison, and seldom left it except

to pick up its food.

To keep the dog warm, the bantam would

take its place between its fore-legs, and
. the poor invalid would settle down on the
Wy bird, appearing to enjoy the warmth it

afforded. Day after day thus passed in
The terrier

the bantam appeared inconsolable at the-
loss of its friend, and it was some time
before it recovered its usual spirits.



—— SO ee ee



FEET AND WINGS

THE HEN AND HER CHICKENS

EE the chickens round the gate
For their morning portion wait;
Fill the basket from the store,
Open wide the cottage door!

Throw out crumbs and scatter seed;
Let the hungry chickens feed.

Call them;—see how fast they run,
Gladly, quickly, every one!

‘Eager, busy hen and chick,

Every little morsel pick.
See the hen with tender brood,
To her young how kind and good!

With what care their steps she Ieads!
Them, and not herself, she feeds;
Picking here, and picking there,
Where the nicest morsels are.

As she calls, they flock around,
Bustling all along the ground;
Till their daily labors cease,
And at night they rest in peace.

All the little tiny things

Nestling close beneath her wings;
There she keeps them safe and warm,
Free from fear and free from harm.

A MOTHERLY ROOSTER

HE hen is usually a model mother.

She seems scarcely to think of her

own wants, and to be anxious only that
her little ones should be fed.

But there are exceptions to this as to

most other rules, and once in a while a




j S Hlen will be found
who neglects or even
entirely forsakes her off-
spring. The young ones are in bad luck
in such a case, unless some one takes the
place of the unnatural mother.

An interesting story is told of a kind
rooster which took the charge of a brood
whose mother had thus deserted them.
The young ones wandered about, not know-
ing what to think of it. Dick, as the rooster
was Called, saw that they were left to them-
selves. He stalked up to them, and acted
so fatherly that the chickens gladly took
refuge under, his wings.

It was amusing to’ see how tenderly
he eyed them. He had been in the habit,
before the mother left them, of picking
bugs and worms for them. Now he fed
them better still, and they followed him all
day, and at night crept under his wings.
Was he not good thus to take upon himself
the care of these little orphans?

=
ey:
=<









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describe
Invalid character
'64146' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUK' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
89cfc7f04306fe131bfef4881a1ec89f
eccbcbe6bf7a8b76eb4bae6aa427f7c4826790f7
'2011-10-16T02:31:03-04:00'
describe
'943904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUL' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
f9fb6b302e6c17695a0cdbf287fca83b
8a12f43f2ea9988c91b5f77d055811e0d37d542f
describe
'669414' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUM' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
3e012f9bc038ac2155927adc5712859e
071ab18cd11ced9ededde5459749a43f5b5df8e2
describe
'2804' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUN' 'sip-files00005.pro'
b6391d27c2df9b9868d2b7a3de9a0c5b
ad5f1ac2849bfa276c73819d0407fb1157ff055a
'2011-10-16T02:31:28-04:00'
describe
'196765' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUO' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
f25d2198cb6a5263864e2991c513b33b
a75429b831cc2c82dc30369120550e6eba6ef1d8
'2011-10-16T02:31:11-04:00'
describe
'22676888' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUP' 'sip-files00005.tif'
d877b5fcc5ad5f0e02ba76de6634e9f9
ef940bdbb186334c7ff9fb109c51b085de06deed
'2011-10-16T02:31:08-04:00'
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUQ' 'sip-files00005.txt'
d9b262592ec80cf53057bcd38ed361ff
0eacb9b58c6b5d30c990b7cd5f06b27448b60f51
'2011-10-16T02:31:30-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'67740' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUR' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
35142b7302f75de1bf4f2f1f029ba141
5f37c779c3a7d603332092adc6ceb61580692df7
'2011-10-16T02:31:21-04:00'
describe
'943876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUS' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
035b58d71c7b0e66079ae17ea9b2989c
372957571a89271dff648ede711617962548cf9f
describe
'630145' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUT' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
53f8815d807645c2b892b8b6c220dcd7
6ea19fd730bad38c6129affa4094bb9aeb79503b
describe
'52518' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUU' 'sip-files00006.pro'
3f7dd2ea9001824e89b0d622f9ec324e
2ae55d402cca1600f036161da378150e75bddc01
describe
'200474' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUV' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
4ebad6757e540602654d5e50c3b90359
b7519ffac4e070b3a28e95493d9093f629aad668
'2011-10-16T02:31:35-04:00'
describe
'22677104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
f4c0a3a89e5e285a1c25ef426f7ea41c
ad8a31c1c2f003730b25eab541cef5c78f0c3303
'2011-10-16T02:31:14-04:00'
describe
'2057' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUX' 'sip-files00006.txt'
f75341af55511ffee5c64569a2a9e48a
c9694a7d217e348faea709ee8b554252fe2bd3c5
'2011-10-16T02:31:05-04:00'
describe
'68327' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUY' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
4543a73345c5e7d0de0039a425b0c0b3
b72020ae21954a8813b1b50091693c47cfeb9319
describe
'943917' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGUZ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
16cc3a83901efc657af187e3a5413bea
376d6f0d18aa9dc89fd648f7cc7991a99b5790f4
'2011-10-16T02:31:15-04:00'
describe
'619738' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVA' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
771ec167a39168c33dbc8c7ab6e2284f
5eae6a610ee1bdd196b0f770a893dd9068874343
describe
'51818' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVB' 'sip-files00007.pro'
55f09c7bf20540d1a4d93931a3d75ef7
b229c5678cacdf3cb20f2e90ed471959133f66b9
describe
'194597' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVC' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
58891a86745a566c9b91e3ba54212f08
e75c9f3bec95a2e6a32ffffd8f0e64cae312af20
describe
'22676772' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVD' 'sip-files00007.tif'
7952921cbf67483e230c1dd29296522b
fd037ddb5878a969b2cb18ba211034b81d2b7005
describe
'2059' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVE' 'sip-files00007.txt'
4ee9ed387501ef92f2b3384bfb352679
1c6614949c6b45680b26d8b7745387414e68e684
describe
Invalid character
'67362' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
1dc5831757dd31e347b259d306ead74d
1b806f197f8898d3c66c64e1744fce67d15f94c2
describe
'943909' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVG' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
f7ab4c17fa7d587fe8dd2f21ad6ccb51
f0e210d3ac091f309c17dbbc429db2624c04c083
describe
'598094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVH' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
714bc207ce6f651a8755a1d24589e1ad
8c01fb549c3ae0dedf1aa207a356ddc5cf979b9b
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVI' 'sip-files00008.pro'
a48c25cc4f3a1048b705e1bd0cdc13ee
7a320e402988c2f59d40b02c8d864d8ffc936858
describe
'177457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVJ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
777351306f03e057e59519636457b86f
5f4f440ca8a5e9b922b7bc4e148b352fffbe31e5
describe
'22675528' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVK' 'sip-files00008.tif'
0964d5f66e27c1795c639e91efd93e97
cf6de800c3d278eef8e1f3e7da3be8ffb81c027a
'2011-10-16T02:31:19-04:00'
describe
'128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVL' 'sip-files00008.txt'
2e0510a55a623bcae4a057b5fab6d4ed
8592321552b4c0d44b3d308f3801f924253c03fc
'2011-10-16T02:31:02-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'62457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVM' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
b4dabb5510c2820c1f0aa442b8c224cf
e96e6ddc4256bee7a539ead460e8628eb8e38533
describe
'943912' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVN' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
901019510fd6a5f4bcfbd67a358ccdc5
1e92876a007fecde89723ffc1d354eaffb95fae7
describe
'572700' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVO' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
0ee17ca0273ba6f5f5e58e8809efec84
516b764cc3c09e9cb6c1b36fa2ec103c2a0440d3
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVP' 'sip-files00009.pro'
5ced4014cc85c965fa8ad9962280ec59
19f8d0b56a9a033aca3915d902456a525c59550d
describe
'171600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVQ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
374482eacf39eefa0a287201fe38af0c
001ae8ba0156c3b597244214d9836fbbd518a2ea
describe
'22675544' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVR' 'sip-files00009.tif'
c67a5851c0351e10c01278a353e78e78
d29ef6c3953047aae590c0ce26b3a2a77395cc74
'2011-10-16T02:31:38-04:00'
describe
'205' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVS' 'sip-files00009.txt'
c7cf31cfb671d087ecede292fd90cf63
7ac338ac547fedf512d6debfcd47bc1161144ef9
describe
Invalid character
'60727' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVT' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
5f946f2858e3edc6297a22e8f8ed8373
7ef8cf52ab6f4a10418d7e52a8275bcdbd2f63ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVU' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
158e932f978d0fa5db4aeeba720b22cc
4ae3ddd2a6f5e9a04bb3db7a732f660f0566f63d
describe
'626051' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVV' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
d77769fa2631b9ecb4d4c24a2b0b5956
d8daf4b2bb628ce2138476ef87a680ae526afb80
describe
'55107' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVW' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f80d3a8d45c928506e6c43315fd9c757
6d3c8f9b489a78276391a83c2da93382bada765d
describe
'196542' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVX' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
ce2bb87fdecf887a6b59d6e71b24a7ff
5a88ae994325d2ca2f929a2d9d48eba111bff7dc
describe
'22677028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVY' 'sip-files00010.tif'
cba2bb7560a6524872703ca7fa8045f6
4fc32652751d8b72b920343fb218efe33c543992
'2011-10-16T02:31:25-04:00'
describe
'2464' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGVZ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
4109e79e83350713ea00577ef61320ec
486c262f6bf659c1960f437069c3acd3f23d1b6c
describe
'67922' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWA' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
b8f55ce6de7a430aa74a087e3cfddef2
7776e5bcf79d75e080af80ae8389f8f11e062cbf
describe
'943945' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
3fefc977ddca7381d583e7f0a0a17826
0f98cadd6af9498abffd9d349562a58bc0f2af16
describe
'638138' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
f5c824545b4875510944d06da53bcf37
1010cf7157123e64b2bf4cde00896d71946ef614
'2011-10-16T02:31:09-04:00'
describe
'57227' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWD' 'sip-files00011.pro'
cd6caaea89f9887bf27729a7e8928984
89717037d4d4f23872be41717fb0ec0f0ae068ce
describe
'199761' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
1ce33f179983f2fddc999b910750c80e
98857857d7b0b29bffcf4fdcb793a5ddd12b07fa
describe
'22677224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWF' 'sip-files00011.tif'
d198160d2a713957637346e75c55a987
e0674e55d50d605a4670a10687188f99470e4b6b
'2011-10-16T02:31:27-04:00'
describe
'2236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWG' 'sip-files00011.txt'
9356a17af7ee4c79880ca287ddf59899
4df4b88a88beff68090995206b052369c77bc10c
describe
'68535' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWH' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
7b2a16c792d8907c6b0085d5ac17e31e
fefe29e0992cf08bbb2a9b60f8428906cd47003b
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWI' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
f48ded6a62e499964c38bcb581e9c88d
58d81cbf460b05f5c243aadc3f44ba518d8d3884
'2011-10-16T02:31:18-04:00'
describe
'563987' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWJ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
df174a42d3d07177926272fbfe2e1f5c
47debc86f4c500c87a4b12be0ac397e6792d43d5
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWK' 'sip-files00012.pro'
5a61d70034394e19280f6e5f399d72eb
d73c53cabfd2528b64641869c889e8983f88b529
describe
'169399' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWL' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
cd4bb8f8cf596bdb9fa14d7571c78643
513f57d501727ccc1112cd61e206a2956a6d53cf
describe
'22675504' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWM' 'sip-files00012.tif'
6a2c57f9eaaa1f28f1278e241c60eead
c6a4458d655311a06eb94869eceade2f0151e3c6
describe
'164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWN' 'sip-files00012.txt'
79d8345fced301521156b54f16bdafcc
a6f882bddb3b85c497de7bb8cb7cbd0d0b244aa6
describe
'60601' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWO' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8153ba5e1e50dec8c3574c26f8eca406
b371f267bded48689043b6fa981d5adf447b0e80
describe
'943887' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
1d3fac5b2c0f41af176855726800e6ac
3396e3e2f7e7dea50a68766ed06dc643d2d1a34a
describe
'612957' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
9ca2737ae28f049a4739c458f380ea08
3c006eb370ae58cc136a25d61719e5d035da33d7
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWR' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b0d722dfae06ecfe2a3f0af263cc5734
5d844ca1b4e3f5c26c07affb79946438613b4d87
describe
'184083' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWS' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c07961101a18b3d6296cc4cd7805326b
17367578e86cd63e2607fc4db1db1eb1b57a17c4
describe
'22676564' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWT' 'sip-files00013.tif'
3bcc5292e80938be45900f41e3b6ef57
b514df1f2603f4553a35556f77ea8ecb313d79f0
'2011-10-16T02:31:31-04:00'
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWU' 'sip-files00013.txt'
0fc0ab89b7478843389c20edf5f276d2
e3d96da099b6bbf760fe50ab235a2929f6d9a6b6
'2011-10-16T02:31:40-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'64400' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
dd7bcc29b9dbbfe839a9ebd973ebe339
4e9e053e0577f2e9ff05dcb5789a2f6f53d8958d
describe
'943938' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWW' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
53cf626ab8fce7128e6e5fea4fe1dbd6
646a118e7f5bb185252b8ff4a65c9c7dc3e3b035
describe
'638821' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWX' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
8af41132fdf6d38063d600374e535876
651bca45c968958c18cad6edadd39c78cb4ce424
describe
'52473' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWY' 'sip-files00014.pro'
f1b1480b34454b85c8d5f7c9aa3d617b
8446b3ad8f5740dc9fd79177313128919bcb35af
describe
'197159' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGWZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
f520151dda8318963a810767745a91ce
f4f9761473472d325c5861a342220ba3f1c116c1
describe
'22676860' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
7ea12529dea7c95700a9535e9d3933de
840f1df757032801de32740bfd2b33bf2ce56830
describe
'2115' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
6d195d5d3774a4250a736179eec2365c
f617a6420c7ab0c25d0af7203a14a0e9b3e613e5
describe
'67749' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXC' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
2d58748f50e6d28fcccb7b7a04251e29
9af5cb9a2377f325b49f5e8fecad653a525d4bf8
describe
'943911' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
19a4d2cf7738c12158541ee4843d71e0
3bf9129c6f9fd66f9fcc5a7f41a9b8bc1ad134d7
describe
'683778' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
9e78b577aff3638f085ce4a39c0878cc
8fe414b317645271603f54d84b2bc319a094760f
describe
'51809' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
d0b6c49ee68f82e68a9bd1292e6c820d
16bd60f5914f2d571d38da3d1595623c5ff6fe49
describe
'208032' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
86ef44d977cc121fb3be4b209c042829
15346ddcea06409dd2cd21f7a08373c1476ecc0a
describe
'22677380' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXH' 'sip-files00015.tif'
fbe014ee2200a0326298873e8aec18c9
d6bd4896d3df89144720fec8368d6c3e19843b45
describe
'2139' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
1f7d0cc381d583f370abafdcaa2dfc2f
03b1355d8ef9157194cf0af648ec8552e9865312
describe
'70764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
2d4562e9f7740d53bf79aa3d74caab00
ced4ce476ecd91b66e0b0e6c216310372e5320d5
describe
'958775' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXK' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
28a2e197870262e1eea48f9ecf341eda
b2f14e08814bd523748aa537466d633982edb79d
describe
'553733' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
99d2a7104aee72ca56a02b886ec4b228
3ed3cb2d48b225508178ef1f81843bfeca789dc0
describe
'159484' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXM' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
7c415626a0e41136fa1ee89f33db9952
68bca25f59ab09d27134d18883bcf9256f9f5e3b
describe
'23029104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXN' 'sip-files00016.tif'
d02e49b64e6e8db3793f9366a3f7fc52
28d21f36a3d5649fe7b35b0cb28e08ba1c33de13
describe
'55110' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXO' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
878448ef0ee19fb92a2869c8c20c9aa2
b8b1ccb5516e24e55182dc72bca7a0be87838311
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXP' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
8c6aa287f1632c5d4efd1e63cf1bd7cb
1cca39fb03f716333df23753e54b7ad6d8137ac2
describe
'32887' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAADQfileF20080328_AAAGXQ' 'sip-filesUF00080490_00001.mets'
0e20d82f0b670470898de89c95f11c91
73af66debe00604fe3d07d5949f5ca593336cdf2
describe
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Ae McLOUGHLIN, BROS.
eee NEW YORK
’

FE

A CONTENTED DONKEY

F I were not already one,
A donkey I would be;
For oh! it is a happy life,
Contented if not free.
I’m useful, if not beautiful,
I think you will agree
That I am wise whene’er I say,
‘“ A donkey’s life for me! ”

It’s true that some folk laugh at me— —

I know my ears are long,
I have no voice, but you will find
I’m patient and I’m strong.
The children love me dearly, for
They like to ride on me;
If I’d my choice, I would not change—
A donkey I would be!





I do the work my master bids,
And never kick or bite;
You never knew me run away,
I don’t think it’s polite.

Mine is a pleasant busy life,
The farm is home you see;

I’m not a donkey when I say,
““A donkey’s life for me!”

SOMETHING ABOUT DONKEYS

LTHOUGH the donkey is not very

common in this country, it is,

taking the world over, nearly as much in use
as the horse as a beast of burden.

In cold countries it is quite small in size,
and is covered with rough, shaggy hair,
but in warm climates it grows almost as
large as a horse, and has a smooth, glossy
coat.

The donkey is not very choice in its diet,
and will eat weeds and thistles that a horse
would not touch. ‘For this reason, as well
as its size, it is much used in Europe by
the poorer classes, who cannot afford to
keep an expensive animal.

The donkey has the name of being
obstinate, and probably deserves it, but
many persons contend that the trait comes
from ill-usage rather than from nature.
It certainly has a good memory and often
shows great intelligence. mos

| ereaige Sis

ei. |




FEET AND WINGS



Here is a story of one that showed both
obstinacy and a good memory. His master
used to stop regularly at a certain place to
get some beer, and he always gave a little
to the donkey. At length the master turned
teetotaler, and then, of course, it was against
But the
donkey did not propose to lose his treat on

his principles to stop for beer.

account of his master’s conversion; and |

when they came to the usual halting-place,
he would stop, and no amount of beating

would make him go on till he had received Zz

his customary allowance.

A GOOD COACHMAN NEEDS NO
WHIP

HEN we think of all that the horse

does for us, and reflect on the kind-

ness of the Divine Being in giving us so

strong and noble a creature to be our willing

and patient servant, it seems a most un-

grateful return that it should so often be

cruelly treated, and have so much needless
hardship inflicted upon it.

Those who know the horse best say that
it needs neither whip nor spur when it and
Yet we
sometimes have to witness the painful

its driver understand each other.

sight of a poor animal receiving an un-
merciful lashing, although it is plainly
straining every nerve to do what is required
of it.

But it is gratifying to, be able to say that
we much oftener have the pleasure of seeing
kind and humane drivers, between whom





and their horses the best terms of friend-

Such a one is shown
in the picture on this page.

ship seem to exist.
Besides train-
ing his team to advance, back, go to right
or left, or even to turn the van completely
round, without a touch of the rein or whip,
he had taught them to perform a little trick
which greatly amused onlookers.

Standing in front of the pair, he would

- call out, ‘‘ Now, Tom, shake hands!’ when

instantly the near horse would lift up
his right foot. After a good shake, the
driver would say, ‘‘ Now the other foot,
Tom!” and at once the left foot went up.
Then he would go to the other horse, and
a similar performance would take place
with him.




THe Don KEY.



FEET AND WINGS

THE ELEPHANT
HIS immense animal is the largest
T and strongest of four-footed beasts.
In spite of its great size and strength it
is easly tamed, and when kindly treated
makes an obedient and useful servant. It
is, of course, costly to maintain, and out-
side of India is not much used as a beast
of burden.
The most striking feature of the elephant
is its trunk, which is a continuation of its

nose and upper lip into an appendage some-
what like a tail.
service to the animal, as with it it brings
both food and drink to its mouth, and can
lift immense weights as well as pick up the

It is of the greatest possible



smallest objects, such as a single blade
of grass

In intelligence the elephant ranks high
amongst animals, being little, if any, in-
ferior to the dog. An interesting story is
told of one that was employed to haul
timber to build a chapel in India. The
wife of tbe missionary who had obtained
the loan of the animal saw it fed every day,
lest the food should be stolen by its attendant.
One day the quantity of rice seemed to be
short, and the lady spoke of it to the at-
tendant. He pretended to be greatly hurt
that she sbould suspect him of taking the
rice, and loudly denied that he had done
so. The elephant seemed to know what
the talk was about, and while the keeper
was still proclaiming his innocence, slyly
stretched out his trunk, and unfastened the
man’s waist-cloth, and shook it out. The
missing rice was spilled out of it, and the

‘fellow’s dishonesty thus exposed.

Another elephant, which is shown in
the picture on this page, displayed its
gratitude toward a soldier who had been in
the habit of giving it a part of his allowance
of liquor, by protecting him from arrest
once when be had become tipsy. The
soldier had fallen beneath the elephant’s
body and gone to sleep, and the animal
kept waving its trunk in a threatenging
manner at every one that tried to come near
him till he woke up after several hours.
FEET AND WINGS

BABY ELEPHANTS

ILD elephants live in herds.
a herd is traveling the
young ones trot

a'ong between the
forelegs of their —

These ‘7:
great beasts are

mothers.

very kind to their
lf a: lit=
tle one cries the

young.

whole herd is disturbed; if one is tired the
herd halts to let it rest. When a hill has
to be climbed, the mothers help the babies
up carefully. But it is when they come to
a swift river they need most attention.
They would surely be swept down stream
if left alone. But their fathers and mothers
are there. Those too young to swim well,
climb on the backs of the old ones and ride.
The very youngest neither swim nor ride.
They are carried across, some grasped in
the trunk of the mother, some borne on
the tusks of the father, and held above the

surface of the water so they cannot drown.

THE CAMEL

HE Arabs call the camel ‘the ship

of the desert,’ as it can travel over

hot sandy parts of the earth which no other
animal can cross. Its spreading feet keep

it from sinking in the sand, and it can store

When







up a supply of water in its stomach so that

it does not suffer from thirst.

Camels have to carry heavy burdens
on their backs, and they are so tall that they
must kneel down to be loaded. They are
trained to do this when. quite young, and
the Arab children take part in teaching
them. The little camels are first kept on
their knees for a while every day, a carpet
being placed over them with heavy weights
on its edges, to prevent them from getting
up.

After about four months of this training
they are put together in a large enclosure,
where the chidren feed them twice a day
with milk When the little camels have
drunk their share, the children touch them
upon the legs wth switches they carry.
They
are so obedient that they will soon kneel

Down they all. drop on their knees

or lie down at only a signal from the switch,
just as their little keepers wish.



_ Tue JREINDEER.
FEET AND WINGS



THE REINDEER IN LAPLAND

HE reindeer is found in its wild state
in the northern parts of Europe,
Asia, and America. In Lapland it has been
tamed, and there it takes the place of the
horse, the cow, the sheep, and the goat,
for none of these animals could subsist
in that cold land, where the sun does not
rise for months. The reindeer is able to
live upon the lichen, a plant which grows
in those otherwise barren regions. Al-
though this lichen may be deeply covered
with snow, the animal will grub for it with
its snout, as it prefers it to any sort of
dry food,
The uses to which the Laplanders put
the reindeer are very many. It draws the

sledge, laden with heavy burdens, over the —

frozen snow, swifter than any horse could
gallop. The people live largely on its milk;
the flesh is.good to eat; the fat is used for
lighting the houses during the long winter
night; the skin makes warm beds and





clothing; the sinews, cords and harness;
and the horns and bones are formed into
spoons, cups, and other useful articles.

HOW THE INDIANS HUNT THE
REINDEER

HE Dog-rib Indians use a curious
method of hunting the reindeer, or

caribou, as the American variety is called.

The hunters go in pairs, the foremost man
carrying in one hand the horns and skin of
the head of a deer, and in the other a bundle
of twigs. His comrade follows, holding
the guns of both in a level position, so that
the muzzles project under the arms of
the one ahead. They approach a herd of

reindeer by degrees, imitating the tread of

the animals. If any of the herd look at
the strange object approaching, they stop,

_ and the one with the head and horns begins

to rub them against the twigs, and bend
them back like a deer licking its shoulders,
and by other move-
ments copies the ges-
tures of the animals.
In this way the hunt-
ers get close to the
1,94 herd without alarm-
‘ S © ing them. The man
' behind then pushes
his comrade’s gun
forward, the head is
dropped, and the two
men fire together.
FEET AND WINGS

THE MISCHIEVOUS MONKEY

ONKEYS are of different kinds as

to size, color, and general habits.

They are very numerous in hot countries;

there is scarcely a forest that does not swarm
with them.

Some monkeys are fierce and powerful,
and all are fond of mischief. They like
particularly to tease all other animals that
live near them, and many strange stories
have been told of their tricks on creatures
more simple than themselves.

Ships coming from Africa often have
monkeys aboard. A lady who made the
voyage found several of the tribe on the
ship, and has related some of their curious
pranks. One of them was named Jack,
and he, she says, was ‘the prince of them
all” for mischief. ©

Jack began the day by overturning the
parrot’s cage, in order to secure the lump
of sugar, which then roiled cut. He then
went between decks, and jerked off the
sailors’ night caps as they lay asleep, or
ran away with their knives and clothes.

On two days in the week, some pigs which
were aboard were let run about the deck,
and then Jack would have fine sport.
Hiding behind a cask, he would suddenly
spring on the back of one of them, his face
to the tail, and in this way enjoy a ride
on the frightened animal.
laughed at his pranks, he would stare with
a look of wonder, as much as to say, “‘ What
can you find to laugh at?”

It the sailors





He was very fond of creeping in- *
to the galley, and stealing a hot
cake outof the oven; though he sometimes
burned his fingers in the attempt, which
served to keep him out of mischief for a
few days at least.

One of his tricks was played on a poor
little black monkey. A sailor left a pot
of white paint and some brushes on deck,
Jack invited the
little monkey to come to him, and seizing

while hé went to dinner.

him with one hand, painted him from head
to foot with the other.
realize that he had done wrong, he ran up
the rigging to thé maintop, where he stood

Then seeming to

looking down with his nose between the
bars. There he stayed for three days, till
hunger made him descend, when he put
on a very humble look, as if he felt that
he ought to ask pardon for what he had
done.

Be




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AEN:

THE Roos



FEET AND WINGS



POULTRY
\F all winged creatures,the poultry
tribe are, no doubt, the most useful
to man. Besides the common domestic
fowl, the hen and rooster, the tribe includes
the turkey, the guinea-fowl, and several

sorts of wild fowl, such as the quail and

the partridge.
All are valued for their flesh, while the
hen, in addition, furnishes us in fts eggs

with an important article of food. No

other bird equals the hen in the readiness
with which it can be induced to go on lay-
ing eggs beyond the number proper for a
brood, and this fact greatly enhances the
value of the species. Some hens will lay
more than two hundred eggs in the course
of a year.





@ the closest bonds of affection.
‘grew worse, and at last died; and then

When we observe the small heads and
expressionless eyes of birds, we are not
inclined to expect any great amount of
intelligence among them. They are, how-
ever, moved by the same passions as larger
creatures, and often show thought, reason-
ing power, and affection.

THE KiND BANTAM

HAT even a fowl may possess the virtue

of benevolence, and that toward a
creature of very different nature, is proved
by the following story.
A little terrier dog was so sick that it
had to be confined to its kennel. A bantam
rooster which lived in the yard observed

it, and gazed at it with looks of deep com-

passion.

At length the bantam managed to squeeze
through the bars which enclosed the front
of the kennel. The dog plainly undertsocd
the feeling that prompted the action, and
from that day the bantam took up his abode
in the dog’s prison, and seldom left it except

to pick up its food.

To keep the dog warm, the bantam would

take its place between its fore-legs, and
. the poor invalid would settle down on the
Wy bird, appearing to enjoy the warmth it

afforded. Day after day thus passed in
The terrier

the bantam appeared inconsolable at the-
loss of its friend, and it was some time
before it recovered its usual spirits.
—— SO ee ee



FEET AND WINGS

THE HEN AND HER CHICKENS

EE the chickens round the gate
For their morning portion wait;
Fill the basket from the store,
Open wide the cottage door!

Throw out crumbs and scatter seed;
Let the hungry chickens feed.

Call them;—see how fast they run,
Gladly, quickly, every one!

‘Eager, busy hen and chick,

Every little morsel pick.
See the hen with tender brood,
To her young how kind and good!

With what care their steps she Ieads!
Them, and not herself, she feeds;
Picking here, and picking there,
Where the nicest morsels are.

As she calls, they flock around,
Bustling all along the ground;
Till their daily labors cease,
And at night they rest in peace.

All the little tiny things

Nestling close beneath her wings;
There she keeps them safe and warm,
Free from fear and free from harm.

A MOTHERLY ROOSTER

HE hen is usually a model mother.

She seems scarcely to think of her

own wants, and to be anxious only that
her little ones should be fed.

But there are exceptions to this as to

most other rules, and once in a while a




j S Hlen will be found
who neglects or even
entirely forsakes her off-
spring. The young ones are in bad luck
in such a case, unless some one takes the
place of the unnatural mother.

An interesting story is told of a kind
rooster which took the charge of a brood
whose mother had thus deserted them.
The young ones wandered about, not know-
ing what to think of it. Dick, as the rooster
was Called, saw that they were left to them-
selves. He stalked up to them, and acted
so fatherly that the chickens gladly took
refuge under, his wings.

It was amusing to’ see how tenderly
he eyed them. He had been in the habit,
before the mother left them, of picking
bugs and worms for them. Now he fed
them better still, and they followed him all
day, and at night crept under his wings.
Was he not good thus to take upon himself
the care of these little orphans?

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