Citation
The Swiss family Robinson

Material Information

Title:
The Swiss family Robinson adventures on a desert island
Series Title:
Old stories told anew
Uniform Title:
Schweizerische Robinson
Creator:
Wyss, Johann David, 1743-1818
Maplestone, Florence ( Illustrator )
Rae, Julia S. E ( Editor )
Trischler & Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Trischler & Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
66 p., [6] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 x 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Robinsonades -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Robinsonades ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Germany -- Bavaria
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Translation of Schweizerische Robinson by Johann David Wyss.
Statement of Responsibility:
edited by Julia S.E. Rae ; with original illustrations by Florence Mapleston.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027029787 ( ALEPH )
ALJ0684 ( NOTIS )
11215379 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library

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See Page 3

Nearing Land in ihe Tub “boat.







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(Printed in [davavier



PREV ACE

to

‘OLD STORIES TOLD ANEW?

—s>O<>—

In the revision of this short series of old stories, enjoying unrivalled popularity
in their original form, the incidents, plot and dialogue have throughout been carefully
preserved as far as possible; the object of the omissions made in the text being to
simplify and adapt it to the modern tastes of younger readers of the present generation,
to whom the new and interesting style of the illustrations will especially appeal.

EDITOR.



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Ere ee

Ox Aw Pf WN



Ke

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

. Nearing land on raft .

. Jack and the crab

. Turk kills a monkey

7 SUppels time a: 5

. Bringing animals fom wreck i
. Falcon’s Nest

Rock House

. The stranded Whale .
. The Boa Constrictor .
. The Lions

. Farewell

. Review of Animals

PAGE,
Frontispiece
9
15
20
24
29
34
39
49
54
59
64



Che Swiss Family Robinson.

See

CHAPTER I.



see he Storm had lasted for six days, and still raged around us. The ship
Mig WaS leaking fast, and all on board gave themselves up for lost. My
<=) poor wife and four boys clung to me in terror, and I tried to give them
courage, and to pray to God to help us. Suddenly we heard above the
storm the glad cry of “land” “land” and at the same moment the ship
struck, and when the first shock was over we found that she had
become fixed firmly between the rocks. Then the boats were
launched, and before I could fight my way on deck, I found that the
crew had all left the ship. A sailor was just cutting the last rope of the last
boat, and although I shouted to him that we had been forgotten, my voice was
lost in the roar of the wind and waves. Trying to shake off my terror at the
thought of being thus forsaken on the sinking ship, I went back to my family and
reminded them that we were quite near some land to the south of us, and that



2 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

aS part of the ship was still well above water we should perhaps be able to-
land the next day when the storm was over. The boys soon went to their berths
and fell asleep, but my wife and I sat up all night, in dread of what might happen
at any moment. At the first break of dawn I went on deck, and found that the
wind and sea were both much calmer, and we then began to prepare some means
of leaving the ship. My eldest son Fritz, a brave boy of fifteen, had proposed
that he and I should swim to shore and that we should contrive some way of
floating the others in tubs or making a raft of some kind for them. First we
searched the ship for stores of anything likely to be of use to us. Fritz collected
guns, pistols, powder and shot. Ernest, who was about 12 years old, found tools
and nails in the carpenters shop. Little Frank, the youngest, who was only Six,
brought a box of fish-hooks and lines: while Jack, a bright boy of ten discovered
two large dogs in the Captains cabin. My wife fuund a cow, a donkey, two goats,
a Sheep, a ram and a sow, all very hungry, to whom she gave food and water,
just in time to Save their lives.

Then we all went down to the hold where many empty casks were floating
about, and raised four of them to the lower deck, where with Fritz’s help | sawed
each of them in two and then we fixed the eight tubs in pairs, four in a row
lengthways with planks nailed along them outside until they formed a sort of boat
in eight divisions, It was not easy to launch this but at last we made wooden
rollers over which it rushed into the sea. It was some time before we could right
our vessel so that it could put to sea in safety, but by fastening other casks around



LANDING ) 3

it to balance the weight more evenly, the boat at last floated steadily upon the
sea. It was too late however to start that evening, so we had to pass one more
night on the wreck. At daybreak I prayed with my family for protection from
heaven before we prepared to leave the ship. We fed all the poor animals, and
left them food for a few days, in case we were able to fetch them later on, should
we get safely to land. We each took a large bag of food, besides as much portable
soup and biscuits as we could carry, canvas for a tent and iron pot, some knives,
hatchets etc. Several guns, a barrel of powder, and three’ pairs of pistols. At
the last minute we decided to take the poultry with us, so we put ten hens and
two cocks into a tub covered with a wooden grating. We let the geese, ducks,
and pigeons loose to get to land by flying or swimming. Then we all got into
our tubs I cut the rope that held the boat, and we rowed towards land. We each
had a Swimming belt of empty bottles and barrels in case of accident. The dogs
were too big to take on board but as soon as they saw us Start, they leaped
into the sea and swam after us. Turk was an English mastiff and Bill a
Danish dog. I was afraid they would not be able to swim so far, but now
and then they rested their paws on the barrels floating around us and so kept
up very well. :

We were some time getting to land, and as we drew nearer to the coast,
we were thankful to see fine trees of, vanclus ling palms. A strong current led
us to a small bay among the rocks, where we all landed safely and happily.
We knelt down on the shore to thank God for His care of us, and pray for His



4 THE SWISS EAMILY ROBINS ON.



continued protection. We set up a tent to shelter us for the night, and while the
children collected dry grass and moss for us to lie upon I made a hearth of stones
for a fire, outside the tent. Upon this fire my wife cooked supper for us of the
soup jelly we had brought from the ship, as it was being prepared Fritz who had
loaded the guns took one and went along by the river, while Jack turned towards
the rocks to look for mussels, and soon we heard him shrieking with terror in
the distance. When I went to his assistance I found him in a pool up to his
knees, an enormous crab holding him tightly by the leg.

“Papa do come here—I have caught such an immense thing’—he cried, half
in triumph and half in fear—

“Well then bring it here’—said I.
“I can’t it has caught me.”

I could not help laughing to see the captor taken captive in this way,
but as I waded into the water to help him, the creature let go, and tried to escape,
but I struck it a blow with a hatchet, and drew it ashore to Jack’s great joy. He
took hold of it to carry it to his mother but received such a violent blow from
the crab that he lay at full length on the sand and roared again. Then he took
up a Stone killed his foe, and carried it home in triumph.

“Here everybody—l have caught a great crab” take care, Frank—he will
bite you”, cried Jack, as all came round to look at his prize. Ernest meanwhile
had found some oysters. Fritz soon returned with a little animal he had shot



PIR Sa NEG HA ON EA ND, 5

which he thought was a pig but it proved to be an agouti, and very good to eat.
The dogs however began to devour it at once, and Fritz punished them so cruelly
for it that I was obliged to scold him severely. We noticed after supper that it
grew suddenly dark, without any twilight, so 1 knew that we could not be far
from the Equator, where the sun’s rays fall so straight down upon the land beneath
that they disperse very quickly. We were all tired and soon slept soundly.



CHAPTER IL.



ihe crowing of the cocks awoke me at daybreak, and my first thought
4 was that we should seek for some of our shipwrecked companions, and
2 at the same time explore the country, before arranging what we would
do: but I only wished to take Fritz on this expedition, so my wife agreed
to stay at home with the other boys. We decided that Turk should go
with us, and Bill be left to take care of the rest of the family.
Fritz took a gun, game bag and hatchet, with a pair of pistols
a) in his belt, and I did the same, with a bottle of water and some biscuits.
AS soon aS we had said prayers, and had breakfast, we started, not knowing
what dangers might await us in this unknown land. We were not able to cross
the river for some time, as the banks in some places were high and steep, and
on the other side we found some very long grass. Here we went down on the
beach without finding any traces of our late companions, and then entered a
small wood full of beautiful birds, whose song was not so Sweet as that of those
of our own country. We often had to cut our way through the numberless boughs
that crossed our path, and at every step Some new Sirange plant or tree appeared.
“What are those trees with curious swellings on the trunk” cried Fritz,
as we were coming out of the wood towards the seashore. AS we drew near



OUR FIRST PXCURSION 7

them I was delighted to find that they were gourdtrees, and explained to Fritz
that from the shell of these gourds we should be able to make plates, cups and
bottles. Then we tried to shape them into these things, and I Shewed Fritz how
the savages split the gourds by tying a cord tightly round the part of the fruit
they wish to divide and the pulling or cutting it asunder. We made a quantity
of bowls and jars of different sizes, and filling them with fine sand to keep
them in shape, left them to dry in the sun until our return. In about four hours
more we went up a hill of considerable height on a cape stretching out towards the
sea: and from this point we could see far around us on every side of the island,
which was fruitful and lovely. Next we came to a boggy march full of long
grass and reeds, and when I cut one of the thickest I could find to use as a
staff a sticky liquid oozed from it, which | tasted, and found to be sugar: | did
not tell Fritz that we were passing through a grove of sugar canes, but advised
him to cut a stick for himself, and then he too made this pleasant discovery. He
sucked so much of the juice that I was afraid he would make himself ill, and
then he cut down about «a dozen of the finest canes to carry home to the others.
We soon reached a thicket of palms where we rested for some time, and refreshed
ourselves with something to eat. Suddenly a tribe of large monkeys, frightened
at our approach and the barking of Turk, climbed up the trees so fast that we
could hardly follow their movements. Once safely up there they ground their teeth
with horrid cries. The trees were cocoa-nut palms, and I at once resolved to
make the monkeys pluck the fruit for us. Fritz was going to shoot at the grinning



8 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

apes, but I advised him to throw stones at them instead, with the result as I had
forseen that they pelted us with cocoa-nuts, some of which we thoroughly enjoyed
then and there, taking away as many we could carry for those at home presently —
we made our way back to the place where we had left our gourds, and found
them so dry and hard that we easily could take them with us. But as we entered
the little wood again, Turk darted amongst.a troop of monkeys, who were playing
about, heedless of our approach, and before we could get up to him, he had
strangled a poor old mother, who was nursing her little ape. Fritz ran as hard
as he could to save her from the dog, but it was too late: the poor ape who was
watching the death of his poor mother no sooner saw Fritz than it jumped upon
his back, and clung so tightly to his hair that he could not get rid of his new
acquaintance I could not help laughing at this strange scene and said to Fritz—

“The poor thing has lost his mother, and evidently wishes you to be a
father to it. I wonder if he thinks you at all like himself”

“I suppose he means to pay me a compliment, but I wish you could induce
him to leave off tearing my hair in this way’—said Fritz good naturedly. |! petted
the creature, offered it something to eat, and at length coaxed it to set Fritz free.
It was not bigger than a kitten and quite unable to care for itself. Fritz begged
my consent to take it home, and promised to feed it as well as he could, so I
allowed him to keep his protégé. Turk meanwhile finished his horrid meal, for he
was very hungry, and when he had eaten all he cuuld of the poor monkey quickly
joined us again. The little one was terrified when he saw his enemy come near



AAR TB B02 MOON Ke Nes: 9



SeTUaeT Ree geersiss
Se eae

him, and took refuge in Fritz’s
arms. The boy took a cord
and passed it round Turk’s
neck, put the monkey on the dog’s back
and the cord in the rider’s hand, and
told Turk that as he had eaten up this
poor little monkeys mother, he was bound to
be a kind protector to the orphan, and Turk
seemed quite to understand what was expected of
him, and carried his burden gently.

“We shall return to the tent like showmen from See Pages “4
a fair,” said I to Fritz, “your brothers will be delighted with the new pet.”
When we came to the river again our dear ones were waiting for us
on the opposite side, and scarcely had the children seen what we brought when
they jumped for joy at the sight of the little ape.

“A real live monkey? How did you get him Fritz’ said Jack. “And what
are those sticks, and the great bowls that Papa is carrying?” added little Frank.








10 TILE: SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON:





Jack took my gun, Ernest seized the cocoa-nuts, Frank took the gourds
and my wife the gun bags. Fritz distributed the sugar canes, and shewed how
to suck out the sugar. ;

When we reached the tent we found a capital supper ready for us. One
side of the fire several sorts of fish were cooking on a wooden spit: on the other
side waS a goose roasting, and an iron pot hung over the fire with some good
soup. My wife had opened one of the chests, which was filled with Dutch cheeses
carefully packed in tins. I praised all these arrangments for our comfort, and
only expressing some regret at the sacrifice of one of our few geese, but my
wife replied:

«You need not worry about that, for the goose is only a wild bird
Ernest. caught, which he said was good to eat, and Frank caught the fish.”

“I believe the bird was one of those stupid penguins,” said Ernest, who
had a great taste for natural history, and liked to display it. It had webbed
feet, like all water birds and a long flat strung beak. It is just like the pictures
I have seen of the penguins.”

We sat down upon the ground and enjoyed our supper, which we ate
out of our gourds. The children broke two cocoa-nuts, and found them very good,
and then fed the little monkey with some of the cocoa-nut milk. The fish was
rather nice, but the penguin turned out tough and fishy, though we tried to eat
some of it. The sun disappeared suddenly soon after supper, and we prepared
to go to bed. The hens went to roost at the top of the tent, the ducks and geese



SPACED BY) ACK ALS: 11

went off to the rushes, and after our evening prayer we lay down in the tent
with the monkey which Fritz had decided to call Knips.

We had not been long asleep when the cackling of the hens and barking
of the dogs awoke us. Fritz and I each seized a gun and rushed outside. By
the moonlight we saw our two brave dogs surrounded by a whole troop of jackals
of which they had killed three or four. Fritz and [ both fired together, two
jackals rolled over on the sand dead, others were wounded, and the rest ran away.
We then went to sleep again, and were not disturbed any more after that.

In the morning the children found the great jackal that Fritz had shot
Standing stiff up against the door where he had placed it, the night before, and
Ernest called it a yellow fox, Jack took it for a wolf, and Frank for a dog, and as
the jackal is like all these animals in nature, I told them all they had all
, made very good guesses.

We were hungry when breakfast time came, and glad to find plenty of
butter in one of our casks to eat with our ship biscuit. The poor dogs had been
hurt in fighting the jackals and it was some days before their wounds were quite
healed. I had made up my mind to pay a visit to the wreck with Fritz that day.
For although my poor wife did not like us to run any risk, | felt it right to try
and get all we could that would be of use in our desolate state. While Fritz was
getting our boat of tubs ready I set up a flagstaff on the beach with a piece of
canvaS as a flag signal while we were on the ship. It was to be lowered in case °
of danger, and three or four shots would bring us back at once. We took only



12 THe SWISS PAMILTY ROBINSON.

our guns with us, and Fritz carried the monkey to give it some fresh milk from
the cow on board. We reached the ship safely and made fast our boat, and went
on board. The animals were delighted to see us, and we gave them fresh water
and food, and then we took something to eat ourselves. We next fixed a Sail in
our boat, to help us in our return journey, and then we made a Signal to my wife
that we were going to stay on board the night, by putting up a flag.

We took everything from the ship that seemed most likely to be of use
to us, knives, forks, spoons, and cooking vessels, also a quantity of hams, sausages,
and some sacks of maize and other grain. Then we took some hammocks and
blankets, some more powder, matches, cord, and a roll of canvas. After this we
each put on a cork jacket, and being afraid to spend the night on the sinking ship got
into our tubs to be ready in case of any sudden danger, but the night passed
without any cause for alarm.

Pt SS ae



CHAPTER IML



| he next morning early we looked owt for the signal that all was well
| with our dear ones on shore, and then we set to work to try and save
the animals on board. The plan we thought of was to let them swim
on shore, and lest their strength should fail if tired, we fixed a cask
on each side of the animals which enabled them to float with less fatigue,
and thus they all got safely to land. There was a cow, an aSs, a Sow,
and several sheep and goats, and when we had started them all one by
one, we Sprang into our boat and cut the cables, and having fastened
towing ropes to all the animals, guided them towards land: All at once we saw
an enormous fish swimming with great speed towards one of our sheep, but Fritz
fired with so good an aim that the bullets struck the monster in the head, and
he only rose once or twice feebly to the surface before he disappeared for ever.
We then met with no further difficulty, and soon landed safely. The boys all
came running to greet us, and admired our mast and sail and flag, and then Jack
went down to the beach to take the swimming jackets off the sheep and goats, going into
fits of laughter at the donkey’s efforts to rid himself of his casks. Jack had made



14 PTE 3S WoESS) FAVE LY RO BaONss O.N-

himself a belt of the jackals skin, and collars for the dogs of the same fur, spiked
with nails to protect them in their fights with wild beasts. The ham we had
brought, with some tortoise’s eggs found by the party at home in our absence,
made a grand feast for that evening, and the animals picked up what fragments
they could. After supper my wife told me that she and the boys had made a long
excursion with the two dogs across the river into the woods on the other side, and
that she had been quite delighted with the country, and with the wonderful trees
that grew at an immense height above the ground, supported upon roots as thick
as the largest trunks, one being thirty-four feet round in one part, and eighty feet
in another, while the height of the tree from the ground must have been about a
hundred and fifty feet. The foliage was thick and gave pleasant shade and my
wife thought that we could not find a better abode in this climate than in one of
these trees, for the tent could not be long suitable for a really comfortable shelter. —
1 was amused at this idea, and asked how she proposed to get up into the tree every
night without either wings ora balloon: but she declared that she had often heard
of huts like Robinson Crusoe’s built in a tree with a ladder leading up to it. In
the morning I said to my wife:

‘T have been thinking over what you Say, but it seems to me we might
do worse than stay where we are. On one side we have the sea, with a river
near for our wants, and much still on the wreck that may be useful to us.”

“That may be so” replied my wife, “but you are out all day with Fritz,
and forget how great the heat is under this tent in the middle of the day. We

9



FICE BRED GE, 15



have nothing to eat except mus-
“.» sels and oysters, and the jackals,
aS you know, have already
‘found us out: I expect lions and
tigers here before long. As to
the ship’s stores, | never know
a moment's peace while you are on
that wreck.”
[ assured her that if she wished it so
much, we would go and live in the woods, and
make a sort of fort of the rocks around
our tent. But before this I proposed
to build a bridge across the river, which
would otherwise be impassable when
floods came in the rainy season. To
get planks for this I made another
journey to the wreck with Fritz and
Ernest, and on our way home we picked up many floating pieces of wood and spars,
but it was not easy to haul up on shore such large masses of timber, and we
made the cow and donkey drag some of it to land. We measured the width of
- the river by means of a ball of twine with a stone fastened to one end of the
String, which we threw to the opposite bank, and found the distance from one side to






See Page 8



16 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



the other to be about eighteen feet, and there were planks long enough to cross it
and leave some feet on each bank to fix the bridge firmly. It was difficult
to place the first plank across, but after that we soon finished our bridge, in one
hard days work, and the following day we collected all our animals and stores,

and loaded the cow and donkey with all they could carry, little Frank too riding
on the donkeys back. Fritz and his mother marched first—then came the cow, and

ass with it’s rider: following them the goats led by Jack, the monkey riding one
of the goats. After him came Ernest with the sheep, and I walked last, while the
dogs ran here and there on the look-out. So we got to the bridge, and here we
were joined by the pig who would not come with us at first, and now shewed her
discontent by constant grunts. The bridge was passed safely, but the animals
strayed in every direction on the other side to enjoy the fresh sweet grass, and
but for our faithful dogs, we should never have been able to get them together
- again. Suddenly the dogs darted away into the grass, and began to bark and
howl as if they were hurt. Fritz shouldered his gun, and ran towards them Jack
following him, and by the time I got to them Jack cried out that there was an
enormous porcupine. The dogs with bleeding jaws were leaping round it, and.
whenever they attacked the animal it rolled itself up into a ball, with a sharp
cry, offering nothing but spikes to his enemies, so that the brave dogs could not
touch him.

Jack instantly drew a pistol from his Gickeesan belt, took aim and shot
the porcupine through the head, so that it fell dead on the spot.



THE PORCUPINE. 17

“Is it possible’—cried Jack rather boastfully, «that I have killed a por-
cupine? look how it’s armed on all sides, and what a fine crest it has on its head.”

“What are you going to do with it,” said I.

‘IT hope we may take it with us’, said Jack in reply so we covered it
with a thick layer of grass then rolled it in a piece of canvas, and Placed it in
a. bag on the donkeys back.

I was charmed with the spot my wife had chosen for our new abode,
and agreed with her that if we could live in one of those magnificent trees we
should certainly be safe from all wild beasts, as not even a bear could climb so

high upon those smooth trunks. We found that they were wild fig trees and
thousands of figs were strewn in the grass around. We were now quite ready
for dinner, but until we had had time to make a rope ladder I saw no prospect
of being able to climb into the tree which we had selected as our future abode.

oe ef



CHAPTER IV.

it was impossible to get up into the tree that night I slung our hammocks-
that we might have shelter at all events from the dew and insects. Then
2 1 went up with Fritz and Ernest to look for the wood we should want
to make our ladder, and fortunately we found a bundle of bamboos,

would do, so I cut them into lengths of about four or five feet. Just then
Bill, who was with us, rushing suddenly into the thicket, started a flock of
flamingoes which rose quickly in the air. Fritz instantly fired, and hit
two of tnem. One was killed, and the other was only wounded in the wing. It
ran away at a great pace, but with Bill’s help I succeeded in catching it at last.
The boys were delighted with the live flamingo and Ernest undertook to get him
the small fish and insects with which he would have to be fed. Fritz asked if
all flamingoes had plumage of the same brilliant red as this one, and I told him
that I thought the young birds were generally white, and only put on their finery
when they were full grown.

When we got back to our camp with our bamboo canes and the flamingo,



half buried in the sand. They were so strong that we ‘thought they — :



DE hk ORE tA DER: 1

I set to work to measure the height of the lower branches of the tree from the
ground, and found it to be no less than forty feet, so that at least eighty feet of
rope would be required for the rope ladder we had to make. I madea bow with
one of the bamboo canes and half a dozen arrows of reeds tipped with feathers,
and with these shot a long string right over the branch of the tree to the ground,
by which we could be more sure of the exact height—:

We divided the rope into two lengths of about fifty feet each and laid
them on the ground with a few inches space between them, and then we cut the
bamboos into pieces about two feet long, and knotted them firmly on each side to
_ the rope. In a short time our forty-feet ladder was made and safely fastened to
the tree, and very soon tested first by Jack, then by Fritz, and myself.

My wife had prepared a good supper for us of the porcupine killed the
day before, and then we all got into our hammocks for the night, after lighting
a great fire to Scare away the wild beasts, as the savages do. The next day was
employed in building our new house in the branches of the tree which in itself
afforded so much shelter that our task waS an easy one. The roof was formed of
some of the higher branches of the tree woven together at the top and covered
with a strong canvas covering, beneath which hung our hammocks, and by evening
the work was completed.. Of the planks remaining we made a table and two forms
at the root of the tree. My wife was greatly pleased with our castle in the air,
and said she should feel quite safe up there, and then reminded me that we should
all take a good rest after our hard work the next day, which was Sunday. We



20 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON:

spent our Sunday morning in reading some parts of the Holy Bible which I thought
most suitable to our present condition, and then | allowed my boys to enjoy a little
amusement which would prevent them from feeling the time pass heavily or slowly
on their hands. They wished very much to learn to use the bows and arrows I
had made, and I thought it wise to teach them to shoot well with these weapons
while they were young, that we might be able to do without powder when our
supply was all gone. Indeed Ernest succeeded in hitting two birds, (called ortolans),
like small pigeons, and although I forbadethem to kill any more of them that
day, we were glad to find a new and delicious kind of food within our reach. We
then employed ourselves in finding names for the places on our island. The bay
where we landed we called Safety Bay: our first encampment we named Zelt—heim,
or Tent House. The little island near which Fritz killed the shark, became Shark
Island, and the marsh where he shot the flamingo, Flamingo Marsh: and the river
near which the jackals attacked us, Jackal River Last of all we chose the name
of Falcon’s Nest for our new abode. In the cool of the evening we took an excur-
sion to Zeltheim, with all the animals, including the flamingo, whe had now grown
quite tame, and followed me with a stately strut. We went by a new road to the
sea-Shore, and on the way made a valuable discovery of potatoes. Further on we
came to many beautiful plants and shrubs growing among the rocks, and to the
boys delight found some pineapples. From Zeltheim we carried back to the
Falcon’s Nest a fresh supply of salt, all the ducks and geese we had left there,
and once more mounting our ladder, had a comfortable night’s rest on our aerial home.





Supper time after the First Expedition.



BALCONS NEST | , 3 21

My next task was to make a sledge that. could be used to convey the
heavy casks of butter and other stores still at Zeltheim, and as soon as it was
finished Ernest and I harnessed the donkey and cow to it, and set off along the
sea-shore. We loaded our sledge with all the stores it would hold, and then en-
joyed a good bathe in the sea, after which Ernest cleverly caught a fine salmon,
and on-our way back just as we had crossed the bridge, Bill, who was with us
Started a curious animal, that proved to be a kangaroo. We both fired, and
Ernests shot brought it down, so we carried the prize home in triumph to Falcon’s
Nest, where we had part of it for supper and with the salmon and some potatoes
we all did very well.



_ CHAPTER V.





e next morning Fritz went over to the wreck again, intending to make a
raft this time that would hold three times as much as our boat of tubs
4 and it took us the whole day to do this. We were so tired when night
came that we slept on board the ship in the Captain’s cabin, and enjoyed
a most comfortable nights rest. We took away everything belonging to
ourselves on board, and several boxes of money and jewels from the
j officers’ cabins, but the carpenter’s chest of tools of all kinds, some
5D) sacks of grain and a number of fine European fruit-trees, ready for
planting, were of more real value in our eyes. When the boat and raft were both
full of the most useful things we could put in them, Fritz asked to be allowed
to bring a new net and towing-rope, to which a harpoon was fixed so that he
might use it if necessary, and then we set out on our return journey. The wind
was favorable and we were Sailing quietly along when we came near an enormous
turtle, floating on the surface of the water, and to my great surprise I suddenly
felt an enormous shock, our boat was dragged quickly away, and then Fritz exclaimed.
“I have got him, he can’t escape me now” I at once saw that the boyhad
harpooned the turtle, and was going to cut the cord and let it go, but Fritz begged
so earnestly for a chance of securing the turtle, which was towing us along atan



TOW EDR YA TUR TE. 23

immense rate, that I managed to steer the boat in the direction of Falcons Nest,
and aS our pilot exhausted by swimming, was about to, crawl upon land, I gave
him a severe blow on the head with my hatchet, and cut off his head. We then
made fast the boat and raft, and loading the sledge with all it could carry, the
turtle alone weighing about three hundreed pounds. So we returned to our Nest
intriumph, and our first care was to prepare some turtle for supper, after which Fritz
made up his mind that the shell should be turned into a bath to be fixed on the
river bank, Ernest was eager to shew us some yams he had found, from which —
we could make cassava bread. That night and the next morning we carried all

the things on shore we had brought from the wreck, and as the sea was calm
and the weather fine | risked another visit on board with Jack and Fritz, and
then we made an important discovery of a pinnance stowed away amongst the
timber. It had been taken to pieces, so we had not time to put it together and
launch it that day, but we found many useful things, amongst others three wheel-
barrows, some tobacco graters, and large iron plates, which | meant to turn to
account in a way of my own. My wife was not much pleased to hear of the
pinnance, as she never liked our going often to the wreck, bui | changed the
subject by telling her how I thought we could make good bread by grinding the
solid parts of the yams into flour with the tobacco scrapers and afterwards baking
it in an oven made by the iron plates and this plan succeeded so well that we
had plenty of nice bread and biscuits of our own baking in a little while. |
could not rest now until we had put the pinnance together and made it our own,



24 TRE SOW hes PAM iY OBEN S 0 Nc

but it took us a week to do this, and then we were delighted with this pretty,
light boat, so different from our clumsey old tub-raft. The difficulty was to
launch her from the ship, but at last I made up my mind to lay a train of gun-
powder, and blow up the side of the wreck where the beautiful pinnace lay shut
up, and this I did secretly, setting fire to the slow match as we left the ship. We
had just landed at Zeltheim when the explosion took place. My wife and the
boys were all wondering what it could be, and then [ proposed rowing out to see
for ourselves. All the boys came with me and as we got near the wrecked vessel,
I found to my great joy that the pinnace lay open to our view, without being at
all injured by the explosion around her. We soon managed to launch her into the
sea, and then mooring her to the wreck, went home. During the next two days
we put up her rigging and sails, and mounted the two small cannonsbelonging to
her, and then taking our old boat of tubs in tow, we sailed in state over to Zelt-
heim, and aS we entered the bay fired a.royal salute from our guns to announce
our arrival. My wife welcomed us back very warmly, admired the pinnace as
much aS we did, and the next day we all joyfully returned to our favourite
Falcon’s Nest, where we found plenty to do. We soon made an expedition into the
country, and caught a very fine bustard on our way to the Monkey Wood to get a
supply of cocoa-nuts. Here we met with an enormous land-crab which we killed,
and then collected more gourds, to be made into useful vessels to hold our food
and milk. The boys were looking for some fresh water to drink when they came
upon what they thought was a crocidile asleep upon a rock but I found it was an





See Page 13

Bringing the animals from the Wreck.



CAPTURING AN ICU AN & 25

iguana, one of the large richiy coloured lizards of tropical America, which are said
‘to be very good to eat, so I supplied a noose for his head whistling softly all the
time to tame him, for these are known to listen most attentively to any kind of
musical sound. The monster made great resistance but we got the better of him
at last, although his formidable row of teeth was enough to terrify the boys. As
we had no other way of carrying off our prize I hoisted the iguana on my shoulders,
like a great purple robe, the boys in turn holding up the long tail behind. We
then returned with our spoils to Falcon’s Nest. On our next excursion we found
' candle-berries, growing on the myrica cerefera or wax-plant, and of these we made
‘a large store for candles, which we had wanted very much until now. We also
discovered india-rubber trees, with their élastic gum oozing from the bark of
which I could make waterproof boots and shoes. and many other useful things.

eS



CHAPTER VIL




uring the next few weeks we employed ourselves in planting trees all
round our encampment at Zeltheim as a protection in case of being attacked
at any time, and we also fixed the sledge upon wheels which we had
brought from the ship, and thus turned it into a waggon. In time too our
clothes began to wear out very fast, and we made our last expedition
to the ship to carry away all the chests of linen, etc. we could find
on board, and secure some of the smaller cannon also: and when we
Ao had stripped the old ship, of everything likely to be of use.to us |
boldly resolved to blow up the rest of the wreck, that the pieces of timber and
other valuables yet remaining in her might in time be washed ashore on our island.
So we rolled a cask of gunpowder into the hold, and fixed it to a long
fuse that would .burn for sume hours, and having lighted it returned as quickly
as possible to Safety Bay. We had our supper on a hill where we could see the
explosion well, and at night fall a tremendous explosion and bright flash of. fire
told us that the ship was gone!
But we felt grieved to see the last of her and in silence returned to our
tent, sorry to have- parted from an old and faithful friend. After storing up the
wreckage where we thought it would be most useful to us, We again went back



HERD OF BUR RAL OBS. on

- to Falcon’s Nest, and soon made a further expedition from thence in search of
sugar-canes, guavas, and candleberries for our household’ Ernest distinguished
himself by finding a palm cabbage for us and bringing down from the tree where
it grew, the delicious liquid that flows from it, when cut. We decided to camp
out that night, ‘under shelter of a hut of branches and leaves, and aS we were
preparing this, the donkey behaved in a most extraordinary manner, and after,
kicking and jumping about, gave a loud “hee-haw,” dashed off at full gallop into
the forest, and disappeared. As the dogs did not seem inclined to hunt their old

: companion like a wild beast, and darkness had fallen upon us, we left the donkey
to its fate, and loading the guns tighted a fire, stretched ourselves upon our grassy
beds for the night, and slept soundly and safely. In the morning we found traces
of the donkey’s hoofs, which led to a plain of great extent, where a wide river
flowed down to the sea. Here Jack and | found footprints of the ass in the
wet sand, mixed with other marks of different form and size, and across
the immense prairie that now lay before us we could see, far away in the distance,
a herd of wild animals like cows, that we had not before met with. We tried to
approach these buffaloes, for such they were, without being seen by them, for
viant rushes as thick as a man’s body, grew on the marshy ground to a
height of ten or twelve feet. At last we were within about forty paces of the
herd, who looked so wild and. strong that I felt not a little alarmed but the
burfaloes, who Seemed never to have seen man before, did not attempt either to
advance or retreat. I had made up my mind to retire quietly when unfortunately



28 EHE SWISS FAMILY ROBINS ON,

Turk and Bill came up. The buffaloes at once began to bellow and paw the ground,
and toss their heads about in a frightful way, but the dogs bravely attacked a
young buffalo a few paces in front of the herd, and seizing it by the ears, held
fast to it, and tried to drag it towards us. The fight was begun and we could
not forsake our poor dogs, so with loudly beating hearts we both fired at the
same instant at the buffaloes, and to our unspeakable joy we saw them halt, and
then turning away,- gallop over the plain at full speed to the range of hills in the
distance. But one of the herd, probably the mother of the calf attacked by. the
dogs, had been wounded, and furiously charging upon the dogs, she would no doubt
have killed them outright had I not by a timely shot rolled her over as she rushed
forward, and at once put an end to her sufferings with a pistol shot.

It was only then that we really felt the danger we had escaped. I was
surprised at the coolness Jack had shewn in facing death without any sign of
terror or alarm, but we had no time to lose in hastening to the help of the poor
dogs, and Jack came to their rescue by cleverly casting his sling around the
animal's hind legs, so that he fell to the ground, and we were then able to tie his
legs tightly enough to prevent his escape. —

“It is lucky we have managed to catch this young bull,” said Jack, “as
we can’t find our runaway donkey. Now we shall be able to yoke our buffalo
to the cow instead.”

“I don't know how you mean to get him to Falcon’s Nest,” I replied.





TAMING A BUPRFALG 29





“The only
way I can by
think of is os wt
try and tame woot
him as the natives
subdue wild
buffaloes.” -

Then holding him
down with the help of the
dogs, with my sharp pointed knife,
I slit a hole through his nose, and
passed a cord through it and as
the slightest twitch of the cord hurt be
him very much, he was soon glad to keep —
quiet and allowed me to lead him away
easily. Before we started for Falcon’s
Nest I tried to cut up some of the
best parts of the dead buffalo.
I took out the tongue and salted \
it, and also cut some fine .
steaks, and afterwards got
off some of the skin from

See Page 19



30 EHE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the legs to make boots and shoes. It was then so late that we gave up any
further search for the ass, and hastened home. On our way the dogs found a
jackal’s den, and falling upon the mother and little ones, killed all except one
baby jackal that Jack begged to be allowed to tame and bring up to hunt other
animals.

On our return we found that Fritz had caught a fine young eagle which
he wished to train. to catch birds. The buffalo soon became very friendly with
the cow, and quite happy. —

In a little while he became tame enough to carry loads on his backs for
us, and at last he allowed the boys all to ride him, although not until he had
done his best to throw them many times. He even became affectionate to the
children, and would trot or gallop with them, just as they liked. Fritz had given
up his’monkey to Ernest, in return for his help in training the eagle: and by degrees
master Knips was taught by his new master to carry a basket and its contents on
his back, wherever it was wanted. Jack could not induce his jackal to hunt except
for his own benifit, for he only brought home the skin of any animal killed, after
devouring its flesh.

Qne morning we heard some curious sounds in the distance and
after trying in vain to discover what they were, our old friend the donkey came
in Sight, bringing with him a companion something like himself, only stronger and
more graceful. It was an Onagra, and we were all anxious to secure him, so Fritz
went up gently, carrying a noose ready to throw over the Onagra’s head when near



MAKING AUS 1A Baek. 31

enough, and in the other some corn and salt which the donkey took at once, and
then the Onagra, also coming up Fritz instantly cast the noose over it and made
it a prisoner. It was no easy task however to tame it, and we were about to
give up our efforts to do so as useless when | made a last attempt to bring it to
reason by the savages plan of biting it's ear until the blood flowed, and to my
Surprise this had the desired effect. Proud of thus having subdued this high-
spirited animal, 1 gave it to Fritz, and had the pleasure of seeing him enjoy many
a ride on his swift steed, which he named Lightfoot.

The rainy season waS now drawing near, and all the trouble we had
taken to train the animals would be lost if we could not shelter them from the
bad weather. So we made them a comfortable stable among the spreading roots
of the banyan-tree at the foot of our Nest, with a solid roof of clay covered with
pitch. This shed was divided into stalls for the animals, with room for storing
the food they would want during the season when we should be unable to procure
it for them.

When the torrents of rain fell around us, and storms swept the forest, we
found our aerial castle a most uncomfortable place to live in, indeed we were
soon obliged to take refuge at night in the shed below with the animals, where the
rain did not come through, in spite of the disagreeable smells and want of air.

However we made the best of it during this winter not without many sad



32 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



recollections of the pleasant houses of our native land, only resolving to try and
find some more Suitable home by the time the rainy Season came again.

We had some hope of Cerone a cave like Robinson Crusoe’s when we
could get out once more.

oe a $$
Gita ee



CHAPTER VIL.



After being shut up for many long weeks we at length saw again with
delight the clear sky and aesel earth and inhaled the sweet air of the
first spring day.

: We were restored to life and liberty, and the boys rejoiced in
aly; the scents of countless flowers, and the songs of hundreds of birds flying
\\e . hither and thither‘on gaudy wings.

Our house in the tree was half filled with dry leaves, but we
soon returned to it for the summer. Our first excursion was to Zeltheim,
which we found in a sad State. The tent was upset, a quantity of our provisions
had been spoiled by the rain, and had to be thrown away. Fortunately our pretty
little pinnace waS aS good as ever, but the tub-boat was so injured that it was
quite useless. The loss we most regretted was that of two casks of gunpowder,
which we had not stored away among the rocks. We at once began to try and
bore out a cave by the sea-shore deep enough to hold all our powder safely, and
we toiled away at the rock until in a few days we had actually reached a depth
of seven feet, when we found that the hole we had made had pierced right through
the rock to some open space beyond. I put my head to the opening and feeling
a giddiness caused by the foul air within, our first care was to purify it before



34 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

venturing to enter the cave. We threw in some shells and rockets from the
ship’s store of signals, which exploded with many echoes, and the poisonous air
rushed out with the smoke, until at length a fire would burn in the cave, and
we knew the air was pure. Then we saw that the walls of the cave glittered
like diamonds, and we longed to explore our new fairy palace, but first I sent
Jack upon his buffalo for a supply of candles to Falcon’s Nest, to tell his mother of
our discovery, and beg her to come and see the place for herself. In about four
hours Jack returned on his buffalo, but first came the cart drawn by the cow
with Ernest for its driver, and in it was my wife with little Frank. Meanwhile
Fritz and I had not been idle: we had enlarged the entrance, carrying away loose
stones and earth near it. We each took two candles, flint, steel and tinder, and
then entered the cave and here a glorious sight met our view. The floor was of
white transparent granite covered with fine dry sand with pillars of the same
supporting the roof, from which hung crystals glittering like diamonds. Upon
breaking and tasting these crystals, I found that our enchanted grotto was really
a Sali-mine, Fritz fairly jumped for joy, and embracing his mother exclaimed —

“It is the most beautiful winter palace in the world”!

“And God made it my boy,’—added his mother with a loving kiss.

The rainy season had now no terrors for us but we decided to spend our
summers as before at Falcon’s Nest. We planned a door in the Rock for our new
house, and divided the cave into two parts, one for ourselves, the other for kitchens,
and stables, and at the end we fitted up cellars and store rooms. The space was



ars tensa

9
Z







TE CAN Oe 35

large enough to give us ample room for ourselves and belongings, and we spent
- nearly all our time in making our home as comfortable as possible. We laid
up great stores of turtle, of herrings, salmon and other fine fish, some of which
we carefully salted and put away for food in the rainy season. All our crops and
plants grew and flourished well, especially maize, sugar-canes, bananas, melons
and cucumbers. We had now so many animals that I decided to find a suitable
spot to make a colony of those we did not require in our daily life, and there
we built a bark house among the trees, and in exploring new country found (among
other valuable things) the cotton-plant, and delicious strawberries. We were
returning from this Successful expedition when we went up a hill that commanded
a fine view of the whole country, towards Falcons Nest on one side and the sea
and cape on the other, and this we named Prospect Hill. I was very anxious to
make a light bark canoe, in which Fritz or I could cruise about the coast in a
way we could not do in the pinnace. For this purpose we chose a kind of oak like
a cork tree, the trunk of which was about five feet round. With a saw I cut
through the bark all round the foot of the stem, and then Fritz went up a rope
ladder and did the same about eighteen feet higher up. I next cut through the
bark in a straight upward line from one circle to the other, until we were by
degrees able to strip the tree completely of its bark. Then | folded the bark
together at each end until [had made a sharp bow and stern for my canoe, and
I shaped the delicate boat, lined it with fibre, and pitched it thoroughly with
resinous gum. I added wood to strengthen the boat outside, and for a keel, put



36 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON:

in stones for ballast, and fitted it with boards and moveable benches. In the
midst waS:a mast with a three—cornered sail and there was also a rudder. To
make my light boat still lighter we filled some skins of the dog-fish with air, and
fixed them round her, and these bladders not only gave her buoyancy, but kept
her from capsizing.

We had now a pretty calf, and as Ernest had his ape, Fritz the onagra, |
Jack both the buffalo and jackal, Frank gladly undertook the charge of the calf,
and gave him the name of Brummer. At the same time Jack decided to call the
buffalo “Storm”. It took us two months to prepare our Rock House for the rainy
season, and we intended to make it as pretty as we could inside, during the
weeks when we should have to live entirely within doors.

(Stee Cass eee et
: LS 2 « e+



CHAPTER VIIL

Oe year had passed since we had been wrecked (at the end of January),
f and as I had no Almanack for the new year we had to keep account of
f the days for ourselves as well as we could. I wished to make the
anniversary of the day on which our lives had been so mercifully
Spared, a day of joy and gratitude for the many benefits we had Since
enjoyed, and after solemn thanks-giving to God I arranged various games
of skill for the boys, which would serve to display all the useful arts
they had learned during our stay on this pleasant island. They began
by shooting with gun and pistol at about a hundred paces. The target was a
plank roughly cut into the shape of an animal, with two pieces of wood sticking
up like ears, and a strap for a tail. The three eldest boys were to have two
shots each, and Fritz hit the mark twice in the head— Ernest once in the body,
‘while Jack shot off the ears, much to our amusement.

They next shot with bows and arrows, and little Frank took part in this.
A race came next, in which Fritz and Ernest did very well, and ran from the
grotto to Falcon’s Nest and back in fifty minutes, although I always allowed thirty-
_ five minutes for one journey the shortest way.
In riding Fritz and Jack fairly surprised me by galloping without saddle





38 DHE SWISS PAMILY ROBINS ON

or bridle, jumping off and on the animals by seizing the mane. Frank too, shewed
some very clever tricks with his young bull, which he had taught to walk slowly,
trot, or gallop, also to stop short at the boy’s command, fall on his knees like a
camel, get up and bellow, turn his tail round in a. circle, and pretend to toss
up his head aS if it already had horns. Next came throwing the lasso, in which
none of the boys were very skilful as yet, and last of all we had a swimming
match, in which Fritz had no rival. My wife distributed the prizes at the end of
the day, Fritz receiving a gun and hunting knife for shooting and swimming,
Ernest, the winner in the race and lasso throwing, a gold watch, Jack for riding, a pair
of steel spurs and a whip; and Frank a pair of stirrups and a whip, for training
the bull. I offered my wife a lady's companion with thimbles, scissors, needles, etc.
as a token of love and gratitude for her affectionate devotion to us all, and the
day ended happily and peacefully with prayer and praise to the Giver of all
good things.

Soon after this holiday, we thought the season was come to chase some
more of the delicate ortolans that would be So agreeable an addition to our winter
fare, and to Save our powder collected a quantity of india-rubber juice to mix
with oil and make bird-lime to catch, instead of shooting, the birds. :

This we spread on switches, and fixing them on the branches of a great
fig-tree, where the ortolans came in great numbers, the poor birds soon got caught
by the sticky Substance and fell helpless at our feet. We also got up a torch-
light chase, in which we startled the birds after they had gone to roost for the



BIRD CATCHING. 39



night by the sudden glare
of torches, and then struck |
them down with bamboo
canes until we had secured
aS many aS we required. The
following day we roasted all our
delicious game and packed away a large cask
oe full of ortolans preserved in butter for future
aa | supply. :
But we. now had to wage a terrible war
against the monkeys, who had done no end of mischief upon our farm, and taking
the three eldest boys with me, | started on this painful expedition.

Fritz was the first to see a troop of our malicious enemies in a field of
rice we had planted, and we set to work to lay snares for the apes, by preparing
tempting food upon trees where we placed bird-lime in sufficient quantities to
prevent any creature from getting away that once stuck fast to it. It was comical
to see the efforts the poor animals made to free themselves, but the scene became
horrible indeed when the dogs attacked and killed the unfortunate apes in large
numbers My sons and I put an end to their sufferings as soon as we could, but
the whole field of battle was a horrid sight, and my boys turned with dis-
gust from it.

Fritz declared that he hoped it would never again be necessary to commit





ENG See Pagous=”!



40 THE SWISS FAMILY kOBIN S00.



so cruel a deed. I reminded him that the slaughter of the poor ortolans was
no less cruel, but Fritz replied, that each ape he had Kew cried so like a man
that he felt it was murder.

We dug a large ditch about three feet deep in which we buried the
monkeys, and then returned with sad hearts to the farm.

A great many pigeons were then caught, some by the eagle, and others
by bird-lime, so that we had always enough of them for food when required.
Jack had a curious adventure about this time, which might have cost him his life.
He went down to Flamingo Marsh alone with his jackal to get some reeds to
make a dove-cote, and came home covered with black mud from head to foot.
He looked most woe-begone, and I begged him to tell us how he came to be in
this sad plight. He replied. “I wanted to get some long straight reeds that grew
in the centre of the marsh, and in trying to reach them I slipped into the bog, —
and really thought it would swallow me up. I cut off a great armful of reeds
and kept myself up as well as [ could. My good jackal was running about in a
terrible state of mind on the bank, as if he knew that I could not get out, so I
called to him and took hold of his tail, and by his struggles to get away he
dragged me ashore.” We could not help being amused at the way he saved him-
self, although it was really a serious danger he had escaped.

The rainy Season was now drawing near, and we hurried on the last
preparations for our stay in the Rock House. The greatest difficulty we had was
want of light-as it had only four openings, including the door, but we fixed a



ROCK 0 US. 44



long bamboo pole to the top of the grotto, and hoisted up a lantern irom the
wreck with a lamp inside, which lighted up the place very well. Ernest and
Frank made shelves for the many very good books we had; my wife and Jack
put the kitchen in order, and I with Fritz fitted the workshop with the fine turning
lathe, forge, and tools we had saved from the ship. Much of our time was passed
in reading and study, and the rest in useful work, and training our numerous
family of animals and birds. As far as I could find out by the maps we had,
our Island was in the Indian archipelago, near the Straits of Malacca, and I tried
to learn a little of the Malay language, in case we should ever meet with natives.



——



CHAPTER: IX.

owards the end of August, when we expected the rainy season to be over
the weather became more stormy than ever, but at length the clouds
dispersed, and all was sunny and bright once more.

AS we were walking along the rocks on the seashore, after our
long imprisonment, we saw on a little sandy isle near, a round object
of great size, which we resolved to examine more closly, So we unmoored
the canoe, and having baled out the water, rigged it up, and the next
morning, very early I set out with Ernest, Fritz and Jack. AS Soon as
we were nearer to the strange object, I saw that it was a stranded whale. The
little island was only a few inches above the water, and could be crossed in ten
or twelve minutes, but it was full of beautiful plants. and a number of sea-birds
had made their nests upon it. We landed and took a good look at the whale, but could
not do anything with it until we had some proper weapons to use. The boys found
coral shells, which they collected to carry home, to my wife, who agreed to ac-
company us to the islet the next day. | particularly wished to get the whale oil
for our lamps, so we took sume empty tubs in tow of our canoe, which was rather
heavily laden with all the tools we wanted for our troublesome work.





IE Wor AE: 43



After we had secured the canoe and tubs, we went up to the enormous
animal, and I saw by its back, fins and black tail, that it was a Greenland whale,
{ reckoned that the monster must be at least seventy feet long, and thirty wide.
We were most struck with the immense size of its head, and smallness of its eyes.
His jaws were about ten feet long, filled with black flexible bones called whale-
bone. Fritz and Jack climbed on the whales back, and cutting away at the head
with hatchets and knives, removed the, upper jaw and took out some of the whale-
bone, my wife and little Frank carried it to the canoe, while Ernest cut from the
flanks of the whale two immense pieces of blubber about three feet thick. Suddenly
a flock of birds flew around us trying to get possession of the prey, and of these
bold intruders we killed not a few. I then cut a long strip of skin from the head
to the tail of the animal, to use for harness and soles for our shoes.

We took away all we could of our spoils, but the smell of the oil was
horrible, and the air was quite poisoned by it. We pressed out all the oil we
could from the blubber, and then threw it into the Jackal River. My wife proposed
turning Whale Island into a store-house for the oil and that we should have a planta-
tion on it aS well, and this we did.

We next found a very fine turtle, which we landed and killed.

His shell made a beautiful basin for fresh water at the entrance of the
Brollo, while the flesh supplied us with delicious food for many days.

We were one day busily engaged in basket-making when Fritz’s sharp
eye noticed something moving in the path leading towards Falcon’s Nest, which



a EHECSWISS PAMIEY RO BAN SON.

came on with a rolling bounding motion.

‘It is very curious’, said Fritz, “the thing looks almost like a great cable
rolled out upon the ground— Now it has stopped— What do you think of it Papa?”

“[ think the best thing we can do is to shut ourselves up in the Rock
Grotto— I have no doubt this is a great serpent.”

Fritz wanted to get his gun and hatchet ready to attack the monster, but
I made him join my wife and the other boys in the cave, and then after displacing
the planks of the bridge also retired. The monster advanced slowly but surely,
from time to time raising his head high in the air, and darting out his forked
tongue. It had come within fifty paces of us when Ernest suddenly fired— then
Jack and Frank, and to my surprise my wife also, shot off their guns, and at this
salute the serpent fled with great speed, and almost instantly, disappeared in the
reeds of Wild-Duck Marsh. I was much annoyed at having missed the monster,
for we could not feel safe while it was hanging about the neighbourhood, and |
forbade any one to venture out of the grotto without my permission, indeed we hardly
left it for a moment during three long days. But for the uneasiness of the ducks
and geese on the lake, we should have thought the boa had made its escape, but
aS it evidently was still not far off. we had not dared to fetch the usual supplies
of food for the animais as well as ourselves, and yet it could no longer be done
without, so we resolved to let the animals cross the river at the ford above the
bridge, and seek food for themselves. My brave Fritz on his onagra led the way,
and had orders, should the enemy be seen anywhere near, to gallop as fast as he



TE BO A CONS TRIE CT OR: 45





could to Falcon’s Nest. The other boys and their mother were to stay indoors
and fire from the windows, should the serpent show itself on that side. I took
up a post on a rock where I had a view of the marsh, and loading my gun with
large bullets, prepared to set out. Unluckily my wife opened the door a little
too soon and the donkey, fresh and lively after his three days rest, rushed out
kicking up his heels in a reckless way, and fled at a mad gallop to the Duek’s
Marsh. Fritz hurried after him, but I had to call him back, for as soon as the
ass reached the marsh we saw the terrible Serpent raise his head, look round
with glittering eyes, and dart out his tongue with malicious fury. The wretched
donkey suddenly stopped and gave a loud hee-haw; as if to mock us, and at that
moment the boa sprang upon him, folded him in its deadly embrace, squeezed him
tighter and tighter, skilfully avoiding his mad kicks. The children and their
mother struck with terror and grief, begged me to shoot the serpent and save our
poor old donkey. But I was obliged to tell them that it was now too late to save,
and that we should gain nothing by turning the boas attention to ourselves,
where as we should be able to kill it when it began to swallow it’s victim, and
was unable to move quickly.

«But how can a Serpent Swallow his prey at a Single mouthful?” asked Fritz.

“It squeezes its victims into one mass which it swallows by degrees, as
this boa now does our poor old friend”.

“I cannot bear this horrible sight’, said my wife, hurrying away with
Frank. It was indeed a terrible scene to look upon, as the boa, who had coiled



46 THESSWISS PAM ELDY hOB UNS ON:





his tail-round a large stone to increase his power over the ass, enveloped and struck
again and again the wretched brute in its grip, until he lay dead on the sand
after a few last convulsive movements. The serpent at once crushed the body
into a Shapeless mass, licked it all over, and then opening his enormous jaws be-
gan by swallowing the hind legs and body of the ass until nothing but the head
remained visible. I thought this a favourable moment to attack the serpent, for
J had only looked upon this terrible sight for the sake of killing our enemy as
soon aS we could safely do so. I now saw that it was as I supposed a _ boa-
constrictor, the king of serpents, and when we were within eighteen or twenty
feet of it, Fritz and I both fired, and our shots entered the head, and soon put an
end to our formidable enemy. The boys wished to stuff his beautiful skin which
they did by hanging the serpent up by the head to a tree and then sliding down
his body stripping off the skin with a knife. Having cleaned and dried it well
the boys stuffed it with moss and dried leaves, with plaster marbles for eyes, and
a piece of iron wire painted red with cochineal for a tongue. The boa was placed
on stands of wood around which we coiled the uplifted head as if about to strike
its prey, and it looked so natural that the dogs rushed at it barking, and the
buffalo was on the point of butting it wiih his horns. We afterwards placed the
poa in our museum of stuffed birds and animals, amongst the other wonderful
creatures we had met with on our Island.

(A
= Tee as =—





CHAPTER X.





OF pon making another excursion to our farm at Prospect Hill, we found
lk; had again been invaded by the monkeys, who had been as destructive
=i and mischievious as ever. However, we put off punishing them for the
iE present, as we had made up our minds to explore a new part of the
( country. We came upon a hot sandy desert, where tired and dispirited .
A 4 we were lying under the shadow of rock to rest and refresh ourselves,
S| < %d when a troop of ostriches approached. I knew that it would be hopeless
) for the boys to try and catch any of them, unless well mounted, but the
dogs rushed madly upon the male ostrich, remarkable for variety of his feathers,
and all the birds fled with extraordinary speed. We had almost lost sight of them
when Fritz unhooded his eagle, which at once pursued them and fastened upon the
ostrich. When we got up to him we found the poor bird rolling in the dust,
severely wounded in the neck and shoulders, and all hope of saving his life being
at an end, I put him out of his pain. We took out the beautiful tail feathers, and
carried them in our old hats.
“What a pity it is we could not keep him alive,’ said Fritz, Te is six

feet high, and I could easily have ridden him.”
Ernest and Jack, who had gone on with the jackal, suddenly stopped and





48 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

waving their hats in the air, called out to us, “Come quickly — we have found an
ostrich’s nest. This nest was only a hole scratched in the ground, and the eggs,
about thirty in number, were so placed as to take up the space and retain the
heat. Each egg waS aS large as a baby’s head, and the jackal had broken some
of them before we came up. “We may aS well carry away these eggs, and hatch
them in the sun,” said Jack. “You forget,” said I, “that each egg weighs about three
pounds, and how can we carry them without breaking them’? The boys however
took one each, which they slung on their arms in a handkerchief, and after a short
rest we went on our way. Upon leaving this desert plain we saw a lovely valley
lying before us with thick grass and pleasant trees. The Jackal Grotto as we
called it, was not far off, and Ernest was going on in front with one of the dogs
when suddenly he ran into my arms with a loud cry of terror— “A bear’— close
behind me”!was all he could say. I was going forward with my gun to meet the
bear, when to my dismay, another came out of the grotto to meet us. The dogs
were already near them, but Fritz and I only slightly wounded one of the bears
with our first shots, and rising on ‘their hind legs they came forward with extended
claws, and then turning their rage against the dogs, wounded them severely. Fritz
and I then fired again, and broke the jaw of one bear, and shattered the shoulder
of the other, then the dogs held them down, while we shot them dead, much to our
relief, for we had been in terrible danger of our lives. We resolved to return
the next day to carry off the fine soft fur of the bears, and were very thankful to
return to our tent for the night. The next day we found a flock of vultures



Ae OFS eR be. 49

hovering over the
dead bears at the
entrance of the grotto.
It took us all day to skin, and prepare
the flesh of the two bears. We cut
off the parts considered good to eat,
salted and smoked them, and then left
the remains of the bears to be devoured
by the birds of prey, who soon picked
their bones very clean.

Before the rainy season came on I went once
more with Fritz, Jack and Frank to the desert plain
where we had seen the ostriches, this time riding our
animals. Fritz, who waS very anxious to take an ostrich
alive this time, got his eagle ready, and tied up his beak. Before very long we saw
here and there flying masses darting through the wood. At length four magnificent
ostriches rose and came towards us at a tremendous pace, and we soon chose the one
we wished to capture. Fritz then let fly his eagle, which plunged down upon the
ostrich, and gave him so tremendous blows with its wings that he was almost stunned
and staggered as if about to fall. Then Jack threw his ball sling around the bird’s





See Page 45



50 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

legs, and made him a prisoner. At last I thought of throwing my handkerchief
over his head, and as soon as the bird was deprived of light, the victory was ours.
I passed a belt round his body with straps on each side, and we tied also a cord
round his legs tight enough to prevent him running away.

‘| doubt whether we shall ever tame this great bird to be of use to us,”
Said Fritz.

‘Do you not know” said I, “that the Indians tame elephants by placing a
wild one between two tame ones, who help their riders to keep him in order. [
think the bull and buffalo will serve the same. purpose,” and Jack and Frank each
with a whip can take the place of the elephant drivers.” -

I then tied the ostrich to the horns of Storm and Brummer, put the boys
on the saddles, and took off the handkerchief. He started up quickly and tried
to escape, but finding all his attempts to run or fly useless, he made up his
mind to walk with his companions, and at length broke into a sort of gallop with
them, much to our joy. My wife and Ernest were delighted with our splendid
prize, and the next day we broke up our summer camp and took our treasures
home. The ostrich had to be blind folded and tied to his two guardians, and
altogether our caravan was a very strange one. After two days march we reached
our dear rock house, where we hoped to make a long Stay, the ostrich was tied
up under the trees and by degrees we lengthened his cord until he became quite
tame. We had sometimes to stupify him with tobacco smoke: but while he still



ees kk AC Aa 51
had to be tied up we placed the food and water he liked best always within his
reach, although for more than three days he would not eat, but afterwards became
almost greedy. Then we taught him to carry burdens, to walk, trot or gallop as
he was told and at the end of a month he became quite educated to do what we
wished. At last he was trained to carry one of the boys upon his back, and made
very Swift journeys between Falcon’s Nest and Rock House. Jack generally rode
him but upon condition that his brothers should sometimes mount him too, if
necessary. During this rainy season I proposed to employ the boys in making a
small canoe, called by the Greenlanders a Kaiak, in which we could occasionally
cruise about the coast. The framework of this little boat was made of curved
whalebone and bamboo, with alight deck of wood and a hole in the centre where
the rower was to Sit, and the outer covering was of sealskin dried in the sun,
and covered with melted resin. It was lined with sealskin and floated upon the
water like a balloon, but I made it a rule that the rower should always wear a
Swimming jacket in case of any accident to the. canoe. The boat was fitted with
a locker to carry food, fresh water, and firearms, and with strong harpoons.
Fritz was the first to try the new vessel, dressed in his seal-skin water— proof
suit, and it was shoved gaily into the sea by the three other boys, and went along
at a tremendous pace. Fritz showed perfect control over the canoe, but when he
was carried out to sea by the current, | set out with Jack and Ernest in the other
boat, to keep him in sight if we could. He had however disappeared behind
some reefS, but we soon heard two pistol shots about three quarters of a mile



52 THE SWiss FAMILY ROBINSON.

off, and a few minutes afterwards rejoined Fritz, and were not a little surprised
to see on a rock near him the body of a large walrus he had shot We could
not remove this monster, which was about fifteen feet long, but Fritz carried off
his head with its two beautiful ivory tusks, which he afterwards fixed upon his
kaiak as a trophy of his brave deed.

CaN Ga Ca CS



CHAPTER XI.

en years passed by, bringing more or less of adventure to us all on our
island. The boys were stronger and. more robust than they ever would
=. have become in Europe, and my wife and I were also in very good
health. Fritz was now 24, and though not tall was muscular and strong.
Ernest was slighter and less energetic: Jack full of life and spirit, though
.& more delicately made than Fritz: and Frank, who was seventeen, was
“Gors’> like all his brothers in some way or other. We still spent the summers
Xo: at Falcon’s Nest, and the rainy seasons at Felsenheim, Our Rock House.
Our Gardens and plantations, full of beautiful trees and plants, reached from the
Grotto to the source of the Jackal River. At first when we had not much corn or
fruit, we had to wage war against the birds by day and the bats by night: but
later on we allowed the little thieves to take what they pleased. All our animals
were well and happy and the boys took as much delight as ever in riding their
favourite creatures. We had not yet given up the hope of some day returning to
civilised life, and with this idea had stored up a quantity of fine ostrich feathers,
Spices, india—rubber, and other produce of our island. The boys now often made
excursions to some distance om their own account. One day Fritz went off in his
canoe to Felsenheim for the whole day, and on his return we all went down to the





54 : THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON



beach to welcome him, and land the spoils. He told us how he had made his
way round the cape, and there met with every kind of marine animal, basking on
the rocks in the sun, Sea--lions, sea—elephants, sea—bears, and all sorts of seals,
with countless numbers of sea birds. He had also brought some oyster shells
containing magnificent pearls of great size and fine colour, from a bay to which
he had given the name of Bay of Pearls, Then he told us how he had struck
down a beautiful albatross, and afterwards asked me to come with him toaquiet
spot near, where he wished to tell me only, a very curious incident that had
happened, He said that a piece of linen was tied round one of the legs of this
albatross with these words written in English upon it: “Whoever you are to whom
God sends this message, come to the help of an unfortunate English woman, who
is cast away upon the volcanic island you may know by the fire escaping from
one of its craters. Save the forlorn one on the smoking rock.” His first idea
was to write upon the linen, with a feather dipped in blood— the words in
English— “have faith in God. Help is not far off.” Then he tied it again to the
birds leg, as he felt sure it was a tame one, and would return to the lady on the
rock, and the albatross soon flew away so quickly towards the west, that it would
have been hopeless to try and follow it. I was much pleased with the sense my
son had shown in not telling his story to his mother and brothers, until he knew.
more aS to whether the lady still lived or could be found, and I assured him

that for the future | should look upon him as a man, able to act upon his own ~

judgement, and no longer offer to control, but only to advise him as to his conduct.







Sil O.02 1 NGA FON: 55



Fritz waS quite overcome by this mark of my confidence in him, and we soon
joined the rest of the family in collecting and admiring the treasures he had brought.

We decided to make another expedition to the Bay of Pearls and Fritz
and Jack led the way in the little canoe— to which Fritz had lately added a
second seat—while I followed them in the larger boat. We soon reached the bay
and the gigantic cliffs around it, and after fishing for pearls and other sea—spoils
until evening we retired to our boat for the night under a canvas awning we had
put up after lighting a large fire on shore. Suddenly we heard a terrible roar
re—echoing from the forest near, which was soon repeated even nearer than before.
Then we saw Knips followed by the jackal and dogs, rush down to the fire in
great alarm. The monkey took refuge on a table, but the jackal and dogs kept
a watch upon the forest, howling whining and occasionallybarking, while their hair
stood on end with fear. Before long we were Startled by the appearance of
an immense lion that rushed forward with a terrific roar. The fire seemed to
excite his rage, and he sat up like a cat and fixed his eyes angrily upon the dogs,
lashing his sides with his great tail. After a time the king of beasts began to
pace to and fro, as if he were about to spring. Then Fritz fired, the lion sprang
up and roared, then Staggered, fell on his knees and at last sank at full length
upon the ground, shot through the heart, telling the boys to remain in the boat, I
landed quickly and went up to the fire The dogs seemed pleased to see me, but
almost at once turning towards the forest, they began to howl piteously. Immediately
afterwards I saw a lioness, rapidly approaching, and quickly discovering her dead



56 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

mate, she licked his paws, with most lamentable cries, gnashing her teeth all the
while, as though longing to avenge his death. A second. shot was heard, the right
paw of the lioness was broken, and I had scarcely time to fire another shot, which
proke her jaw, when the dogs were upon her, and a fearful fight began. One of
the animals terrible paws tore open poor Bill’s chest, and he fell at the moment his
enemy bit the dust. I went forward with my hunting knife in my hand as Fritz
was coming to meet me with his loaded gun. I took his hand, and begged him
to give thanks with me for our merciful rescue from a great danger. We announced
the victory to the others who came ashore to rejoice in our safety, and to our grief
found that poor Bill faithful and brave to the last died holding fast to the neck
of the lioness.

“We have much to be thankful for” said Fritz, gravely to-morrow we can
take the spoils of our dreadful foes, but let us first bury our poor dog by
torchlight.”

The boys placed our faithful old Bill in his grave and put up a tombstone
to mark the spot, with the following words written by Ernest upon it:

“Here lies Bill—a dog renowned for his courage and devotion. He perished
beneath the claws of a formidable lioness, dying in the moment of victory,”

This done we lay down for a few hours on board the boat, and at sunrise,
Stripped the lions of their skins, and then soon weighed anchor and left the
bay of Pearls. Fritz led the way in his little canoe, and when we had safely
returned, handed me a note to say that he was going to make an attempt to find







CHAPTER XI. 57

the Shipwrecked lady, and before J could stop him, he had taken himself off.
Towards evening we had reached Safety Bay, and my wife’s pleasure at seeing us
was rather spoilt by the absence of Fritz, while Frank was much distressed at
poor Bills tragic death. We heard nothing of Fritz for five days, and then we
all, including my wife, set out for Pearl Bay where we thought it most likely we
should meet him. AS we drew near the Bay we were Sailing slowly along the
coaston account of the rocks, when at a distance we Saw as we thought a savage
in a canoe, who dissappeared behind a reef as if to watch us. We kept a sharp
look out, and soon again saw a canoe with a single roweras before. I shouteda
few words of welcome in the Malay language, which I had learnt from a bouk,
but it had no effect. and then Jack seized the speaking trumpet, and called out a
few rough sailors phrases, upon which the savage waved a green branch, and paddled
towards us. We looked at him with curiosity and burst into a merry fit of laughter
when we discovered that the smail hump—backed man with black face and hands,
riding upon a walrus, was no other than Fritz.

My wife, who had been anxiously watching the stranger, now smiled with
tears of joy running down her cheeks, as we took our boy and his canoe on board
our boat, and kissed until our faces and hands were almost as black as his own.

+See eee



CHAPTER All.

; asked Fritz aside if he had succeeded in his object, to which he replied
# that he had, and then | wanted to know why he had played us such a
4 trick. He replied

“| really took you for Malay pirates, and disguised myself to
deceive you. ! meant to go back to fetch the English Lady during the
night, for I have found her, and she is now on a small island awaiting
my return.” I wished to ask more questions but my wife insisted on her
son taking off his paint, for she could not bear to see him dressed up
like . savage. We now decided to anchor our boat at a convenient point, and Fritz
proposed the island where he had left his fair companion. [ could not help
_ Smiling at this, but I felt glad to carry out what he had so well begun. Fritz
jumped eagerly into his canoe to guide us to the landing place on a small pretty
island in the great Pearl Bay, and there we fastened our boat to a tree.

Fritz sprang ashore, and went direct to a small wood, where under the
shade of the palm— trees was a small hut made of branches. We followed him
and saw in front of the hut a stone fire place, and on the fire an immense shell
as a Sauce—pan. Fritz was still calling out to some one among the trees, and
then there was a rustling in the boughs of a tree from which a young man dressed





THE S TRANG ER: 59



PRES RISS AT ear a ke Serene

aS a Sailor, quickly came
down. The young stranger
= seemed rather uncertain
how to receive an armed troop like
ourselves, but Fritz throwing his hat
into the air cried out— Long live
the young Lord Montrose of the
smoking rock: shall we not welcome
him as a friend and a brother.

“He is welcome’: We all said
at once, and he then came up to us
with much ease and grace of manner.
As head of the family I shook hands
with him, and greeted him as I might have done a child, of my own, and then
turning timidly to my wife, he asked her also to be kind to him.

My wife and I both understood that Fritz wished his brothers not to know
who the stranger really was, and the boys did all they could to make their

See Page 6x



60 -THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

companion feel at home. Our supper was quite a feast, and the merriment after
a time became so boisterous that I put an end to it for the sake of our guest,
whom my wife invited on board for the night. When the brothers were left alone
they teased Fritz with so many questions that he told them about the albatross,
and called ihe stranger “Miss Jenny” so often that his brothers found out his secret,
and gave three cheers for the charming sister who had joined the family.

The next morning the three younger boys mischievously greeted the young
‘lady as Miss Jenny, and she blushingly confessed it to be her name.

The day was spent in preparing to return to Felsenheim, and looking at
all Miss Jenny’s treasures, saved from the wreck, or made of materials she had
picked up. Among the most useful things there were some long tresses of hair
made into fishing lines, with muther of pearl hooks, needles made of fish—bones,
bodkins of birds beaks, small needle cases of pelicans feathers and seal bones, a
Shell made into a saucepan, and many smaller shells used for eating and drinking
purposes. There was also a hat made of the pelican’s pouch worn as a kind of
hood with feathers.shading the face and neck, and other feather ornaments, with
shoes and belts of sealskin: and she had some beautiful tortoise—shells. Another
surprise for us was a tame cormorant, which Jenny had taught to catch fish for
he., and she promised my wife some fish for dinner. Jumping lightly into the
canoe with her cormorant she pushed off into the bay, and it was a pretty sight
to see how the bird plunged into the sea from time to time, bringing up a large
fish which he gave to his mistress. She had fastened a ring round his neck which



MISS JENNYS ADVENTURES. 61



prevented his swallowing the fish until she chose to free him, and give him some
as a reward.. We made Fritz tell us all about his great voyage of discovery.
He first spent two or three days in cruising about in search of a smoking island,
during which time he landed for a short time, and met with a tiger, who would
probably have killed him but for his faithful eagle, who flew at the tiger to tear
out its eyes, but unluckily Fritz shot the poor bird also as he fired at the tiger,
to his great sorrow. Soon he forgot this sad loss in the joy of seeing in the far
distance a little rocky isle from which arose a thin column of smoke. Here he
soon landed and saw with joyful surprise the first strange face he had looked
upon for so many years. The poor girl thankfully awaited his approach, and
although she did not understand all he said, he soon induced her to embark in the
canoe with him. Miss Jenny had spent about two years alone on this rock, and
her contrivances of many things for use were as clever as those of the famous
Crusoe. She afterwards told us herself that having lost her mother when she was
scarcely seven years old, she went to India with her father Sir William Montrose,
who was an officer, and after ten years Spent in travelling with him from
place to place, in the care of a very devoted nurse. who taught her many
womanly occupations she could not otherwise have learnt in her wandering
life, she alone was Saved in a shipwreck off the island where she was
found by Fritz. Her father had returned home in a troop ship in command
of his regiment sending her at the same time in a fine vessel in charge
of her old attendant. The horror in finding herself thus alone in this desolate



62 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

place had at first almost crushed the brave girl’s spirit but the constant
exertion necessary to obtain food and shelter for herself had kept her well and
strong, and she had never lost the hope that God, who had so wonderfully spared
her life would not leave her to perish.

During our return to the Rock House Miss Jenny was delighted aah all
she saw, and shewed great pleasure in our various animals. Fritz and Frank went
on before us to Felsenheim, where they prepared a feast for our arrival in honour
of Miss Jenny. We next paid a visit to Falcon’s Nest, and then the rainy passed

happily in the society of our new cereus

a EO



CHAPTER XIll.





he rains were over, and the boys went to look at the cannon on Shark
Island, and to fire them off, as they occasionally did,in the hope of some
day being heard by a passing ship.
Bi This time there was a distinct answer to their two shots, and
gic they all hastened home to announce the wonderful event. We were on
the look-out all the night for any new signals, but a storm came on
6 which lasted two days and nights, and prevented our going near the sea.
Although on the third day I resolved to fire three shots again,
and then we listened attentively, and actually counted seven shots in reply. Then
Fritz and I set out in the kaiak to discover who the strangers were, for we feared
they might be pirates. We had disguised ourselves aS Savages, and rowed round
the cape near Duck's Marsh, when we came in Sight of a fine ship at anchor,
flying the English flag As soon as those on board saw us they made signs to us
to supply them with potatoes, cocoanuts, figs, and other fruits, upon which we
retired for a while, and rowed home with all speed. Jenny was convinced that
the ship had been sent by her father to look for her, and then we decided that
we would go altogether in our boat with a present of fresh fruits, and look as
important as we could. Fritz dressed as a naval officer, went before us as pilot



64 THEE Ss Wolesis) PsA IY ROBINSON.



in his canoe. In our boat we were all dressed as Sailors, lightly armed, and we
steered straight up to the ship, saluting it with a ringing cheer, which was warmly
returned. Fritz and I flying the white flag paid our respects to the Commander,
who received us hospitably, and asked how it was that we were living in this out-
of-the-way-place, where he only expected to meet savages. In as few words as
possibly I told him our story and that of Miss Jenny, which | thought might interest
him more than ours. He then told me that he had heard of the young lady and
her father, and had been asked to look out during his command of Her
Majesty’s ship “Unicorn” for any trace of the Ship in which Miss Montrose was
wrecked off this desolate coast. The Captain seemed delighted to have met her
and said that when he heard our cannon shot, he had expected it was the crew
of the wrecked vessel that had taken refuge here. I then invited the Captain to
come on board my boat, which he soon did and we all became friendly at once.
We returned to our island after a stay of two days near the “Unicorn”, during
which time we not only made the aquaintance of the Captain, but of a gentleman
with his wife and two young daughters, who had been rescued from a ship-wreck
and were now on their way home on board the frigate. The Captain and his
guests had so great a wish to See our home that Fritz in his canoe sailed to the
“Unicorn” the day after our return to the island, and acted as pilot to the Captain
and his party. On landing we all went out to see receive them with honour, the
boys aS usual riding their animals and the ostrich, to the great delight of the
Strangers. The English family had an earnest wish to take up their abode with





Q

and. Animals before the Captai

rr



FAREWELLS. : 65



us on the island, to which we gladly agreed, and my wife too begged to end her
days there with me and two of the boys, while the other two might go to Europe
and Send out to us some good people to found a colony we decided to call New
Switzerland. It was hard to part with- either of our sons, and still harder to
choose who should go or Stay, but that question was soon setiled by themselves. We
had dined all together, and I then spoke of our wish to stay in New Switzerland.
«Long live New Switzerland” and we drank the toast joyously. “Long life to those
who wish to remain here’ added Ernest, clinking his glass against his mother’s and
mine, as he said: “Yes—l have made up my mind to stay with you here”

‘I should like to stay here, but still England has greater attractions for
me” said Miss Jenny. :

Fritz replied “All happiness to the dear pastor's family here.”

“Fritz will go—” said I “he has a taste for travelling—but he will always
be welcome back to New Switzerland, to his first and best friends. But what
will Jack do’?

‘Jack is going to stay here”, was the reply— “He will be the best rider,
the best shot, and the best climber, when Fritz is gone. I do not want to go to
school in Europe.”

“That's just what I want to do,” said Frank— “I think one of the family
‘should settle in the old country— That is if my father pleases.”

“‘T shall take you at your word my boys, and may God bless you, whether
you go or stay.”



66 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON:

The Captain was quite willing to take charge of the three wanderer's and
anxious to Set out as Soon as possible, so we bestowed all the gifts we could upon
our departing friends, and supplied the “Unicorn” with all the provisions we could spare.

I was very sad at losing my dear sons, and begged them to remember
the good principles | had tried to impress upon their minds, and to lead
Christian lives.

On the last evening we invited the Captain and Officers to a farewell
supper, after which I placed the journal I had written of our life and adventures
on the island in the hands of Fritz begging him to have it some day printed in
Europe, in the hope that others might find comfort and pleasure in reading of the
many blessings and happiness that God had sent to us in the new world where
under His Providence we had spent so many useful and profitable years of our lives.

Sarees ast
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Full Text



The Baldwin Library

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See Page 3

Nearing Land in ihe Tub “boat.




Onxp Stories TOLD ae

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1891



(Printed in [davavier
PREV ACE

to

‘OLD STORIES TOLD ANEW?

—s>O<>—

In the revision of this short series of old stories, enjoying unrivalled popularity
in their original form, the incidents, plot and dialogue have throughout been carefully
preserved as far as possible; the object of the omissions made in the text being to
simplify and adapt it to the modern tastes of younger readers of the present generation,
to whom the new and interesting style of the illustrations will especially appeal.

EDITOR.
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Ere ee

Ox Aw Pf WN



Ke

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

. Nearing land on raft .

. Jack and the crab

. Turk kills a monkey

7 SUppels time a: 5

. Bringing animals fom wreck i
. Falcon’s Nest

Rock House

. The stranded Whale .
. The Boa Constrictor .
. The Lions

. Farewell

. Review of Animals

PAGE,
Frontispiece
9
15
20
24
29
34
39
49
54
59
64
Che Swiss Family Robinson.

See

CHAPTER I.



see he Storm had lasted for six days, and still raged around us. The ship
Mig WaS leaking fast, and all on board gave themselves up for lost. My
<=) poor wife and four boys clung to me in terror, and I tried to give them
courage, and to pray to God to help us. Suddenly we heard above the
storm the glad cry of “land” “land” and at the same moment the ship
struck, and when the first shock was over we found that she had
become fixed firmly between the rocks. Then the boats were
launched, and before I could fight my way on deck, I found that the
crew had all left the ship. A sailor was just cutting the last rope of the last
boat, and although I shouted to him that we had been forgotten, my voice was
lost in the roar of the wind and waves. Trying to shake off my terror at the
thought of being thus forsaken on the sinking ship, I went back to my family and
reminded them that we were quite near some land to the south of us, and that
2 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

aS part of the ship was still well above water we should perhaps be able to-
land the next day when the storm was over. The boys soon went to their berths
and fell asleep, but my wife and I sat up all night, in dread of what might happen
at any moment. At the first break of dawn I went on deck, and found that the
wind and sea were both much calmer, and we then began to prepare some means
of leaving the ship. My eldest son Fritz, a brave boy of fifteen, had proposed
that he and I should swim to shore and that we should contrive some way of
floating the others in tubs or making a raft of some kind for them. First we
searched the ship for stores of anything likely to be of use to us. Fritz collected
guns, pistols, powder and shot. Ernest, who was about 12 years old, found tools
and nails in the carpenters shop. Little Frank, the youngest, who was only Six,
brought a box of fish-hooks and lines: while Jack, a bright boy of ten discovered
two large dogs in the Captains cabin. My wife fuund a cow, a donkey, two goats,
a Sheep, a ram and a sow, all very hungry, to whom she gave food and water,
just in time to Save their lives.

Then we all went down to the hold where many empty casks were floating
about, and raised four of them to the lower deck, where with Fritz’s help | sawed
each of them in two and then we fixed the eight tubs in pairs, four in a row
lengthways with planks nailed along them outside until they formed a sort of boat
in eight divisions, It was not easy to launch this but at last we made wooden
rollers over which it rushed into the sea. It was some time before we could right
our vessel so that it could put to sea in safety, but by fastening other casks around
LANDING ) 3

it to balance the weight more evenly, the boat at last floated steadily upon the
sea. It was too late however to start that evening, so we had to pass one more
night on the wreck. At daybreak I prayed with my family for protection from
heaven before we prepared to leave the ship. We fed all the poor animals, and
left them food for a few days, in case we were able to fetch them later on, should
we get safely to land. We each took a large bag of food, besides as much portable
soup and biscuits as we could carry, canvas for a tent and iron pot, some knives,
hatchets etc. Several guns, a barrel of powder, and three’ pairs of pistols. At
the last minute we decided to take the poultry with us, so we put ten hens and
two cocks into a tub covered with a wooden grating. We let the geese, ducks,
and pigeons loose to get to land by flying or swimming. Then we all got into
our tubs I cut the rope that held the boat, and we rowed towards land. We each
had a Swimming belt of empty bottles and barrels in case of accident. The dogs
were too big to take on board but as soon as they saw us Start, they leaped
into the sea and swam after us. Turk was an English mastiff and Bill a
Danish dog. I was afraid they would not be able to swim so far, but now
and then they rested their paws on the barrels floating around us and so kept
up very well. :

We were some time getting to land, and as we drew nearer to the coast,
we were thankful to see fine trees of, vanclus ling palms. A strong current led
us to a small bay among the rocks, where we all landed safely and happily.
We knelt down on the shore to thank God for His care of us, and pray for His
4 THE SWISS EAMILY ROBINS ON.



continued protection. We set up a tent to shelter us for the night, and while the
children collected dry grass and moss for us to lie upon I made a hearth of stones
for a fire, outside the tent. Upon this fire my wife cooked supper for us of the
soup jelly we had brought from the ship, as it was being prepared Fritz who had
loaded the guns took one and went along by the river, while Jack turned towards
the rocks to look for mussels, and soon we heard him shrieking with terror in
the distance. When I went to his assistance I found him in a pool up to his
knees, an enormous crab holding him tightly by the leg.

“Papa do come here—I have caught such an immense thing’—he cried, half
in triumph and half in fear—

“Well then bring it here’—said I.
“I can’t it has caught me.”

I could not help laughing to see the captor taken captive in this way,
but as I waded into the water to help him, the creature let go, and tried to escape,
but I struck it a blow with a hatchet, and drew it ashore to Jack’s great joy. He
took hold of it to carry it to his mother but received such a violent blow from
the crab that he lay at full length on the sand and roared again. Then he took
up a Stone killed his foe, and carried it home in triumph.

“Here everybody—l have caught a great crab” take care, Frank—he will
bite you”, cried Jack, as all came round to look at his prize. Ernest meanwhile
had found some oysters. Fritz soon returned with a little animal he had shot
PIR Sa NEG HA ON EA ND, 5

which he thought was a pig but it proved to be an agouti, and very good to eat.
The dogs however began to devour it at once, and Fritz punished them so cruelly
for it that I was obliged to scold him severely. We noticed after supper that it
grew suddenly dark, without any twilight, so 1 knew that we could not be far
from the Equator, where the sun’s rays fall so straight down upon the land beneath
that they disperse very quickly. We were all tired and soon slept soundly.
CHAPTER IL.



ihe crowing of the cocks awoke me at daybreak, and my first thought
4 was that we should seek for some of our shipwrecked companions, and
2 at the same time explore the country, before arranging what we would
do: but I only wished to take Fritz on this expedition, so my wife agreed
to stay at home with the other boys. We decided that Turk should go
with us, and Bill be left to take care of the rest of the family.
Fritz took a gun, game bag and hatchet, with a pair of pistols
a) in his belt, and I did the same, with a bottle of water and some biscuits.
AS soon aS we had said prayers, and had breakfast, we started, not knowing
what dangers might await us in this unknown land. We were not able to cross
the river for some time, as the banks in some places were high and steep, and
on the other side we found some very long grass. Here we went down on the
beach without finding any traces of our late companions, and then entered a
small wood full of beautiful birds, whose song was not so Sweet as that of those
of our own country. We often had to cut our way through the numberless boughs
that crossed our path, and at every step Some new Sirange plant or tree appeared.
“What are those trees with curious swellings on the trunk” cried Fritz,
as we were coming out of the wood towards the seashore. AS we drew near
OUR FIRST PXCURSION 7

them I was delighted to find that they were gourdtrees, and explained to Fritz
that from the shell of these gourds we should be able to make plates, cups and
bottles. Then we tried to shape them into these things, and I Shewed Fritz how
the savages split the gourds by tying a cord tightly round the part of the fruit
they wish to divide and the pulling or cutting it asunder. We made a quantity
of bowls and jars of different sizes, and filling them with fine sand to keep
them in shape, left them to dry in the sun until our return. In about four hours
more we went up a hill of considerable height on a cape stretching out towards the
sea: and from this point we could see far around us on every side of the island,
which was fruitful and lovely. Next we came to a boggy march full of long
grass and reeds, and when I cut one of the thickest I could find to use as a
staff a sticky liquid oozed from it, which | tasted, and found to be sugar: | did
not tell Fritz that we were passing through a grove of sugar canes, but advised
him to cut a stick for himself, and then he too made this pleasant discovery. He
sucked so much of the juice that I was afraid he would make himself ill, and
then he cut down about «a dozen of the finest canes to carry home to the others.
We soon reached a thicket of palms where we rested for some time, and refreshed
ourselves with something to eat. Suddenly a tribe of large monkeys, frightened
at our approach and the barking of Turk, climbed up the trees so fast that we
could hardly follow their movements. Once safely up there they ground their teeth
with horrid cries. The trees were cocoa-nut palms, and I at once resolved to
make the monkeys pluck the fruit for us. Fritz was going to shoot at the grinning
8 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

apes, but I advised him to throw stones at them instead, with the result as I had
forseen that they pelted us with cocoa-nuts, some of which we thoroughly enjoyed
then and there, taking away as many we could carry for those at home presently —
we made our way back to the place where we had left our gourds, and found
them so dry and hard that we easily could take them with us. But as we entered
the little wood again, Turk darted amongst.a troop of monkeys, who were playing
about, heedless of our approach, and before we could get up to him, he had
strangled a poor old mother, who was nursing her little ape. Fritz ran as hard
as he could to save her from the dog, but it was too late: the poor ape who was
watching the death of his poor mother no sooner saw Fritz than it jumped upon
his back, and clung so tightly to his hair that he could not get rid of his new
acquaintance I could not help laughing at this strange scene and said to Fritz—

“The poor thing has lost his mother, and evidently wishes you to be a
father to it. I wonder if he thinks you at all like himself”

“I suppose he means to pay me a compliment, but I wish you could induce
him to leave off tearing my hair in this way’—said Fritz good naturedly. |! petted
the creature, offered it something to eat, and at length coaxed it to set Fritz free.
It was not bigger than a kitten and quite unable to care for itself. Fritz begged
my consent to take it home, and promised to feed it as well as he could, so I
allowed him to keep his protégé. Turk meanwhile finished his horrid meal, for he
was very hungry, and when he had eaten all he cuuld of the poor monkey quickly
joined us again. The little one was terrified when he saw his enemy come near
AAR TB B02 MOON Ke Nes: 9



SeTUaeT Ree geersiss
Se eae

him, and took refuge in Fritz’s
arms. The boy took a cord
and passed it round Turk’s
neck, put the monkey on the dog’s back
and the cord in the rider’s hand, and
told Turk that as he had eaten up this
poor little monkeys mother, he was bound to
be a kind protector to the orphan, and Turk
seemed quite to understand what was expected of
him, and carried his burden gently.

“We shall return to the tent like showmen from See Pages “4
a fair,” said I to Fritz, “your brothers will be delighted with the new pet.”
When we came to the river again our dear ones were waiting for us
on the opposite side, and scarcely had the children seen what we brought when
they jumped for joy at the sight of the little ape.

“A real live monkey? How did you get him Fritz’ said Jack. “And what
are those sticks, and the great bowls that Papa is carrying?” added little Frank.





10 TILE: SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON:





Jack took my gun, Ernest seized the cocoa-nuts, Frank took the gourds
and my wife the gun bags. Fritz distributed the sugar canes, and shewed how
to suck out the sugar. ;

When we reached the tent we found a capital supper ready for us. One
side of the fire several sorts of fish were cooking on a wooden spit: on the other
side waS a goose roasting, and an iron pot hung over the fire with some good
soup. My wife had opened one of the chests, which was filled with Dutch cheeses
carefully packed in tins. I praised all these arrangments for our comfort, and
only expressing some regret at the sacrifice of one of our few geese, but my
wife replied:

«You need not worry about that, for the goose is only a wild bird
Ernest. caught, which he said was good to eat, and Frank caught the fish.”

“I believe the bird was one of those stupid penguins,” said Ernest, who
had a great taste for natural history, and liked to display it. It had webbed
feet, like all water birds and a long flat strung beak. It is just like the pictures
I have seen of the penguins.”

We sat down upon the ground and enjoyed our supper, which we ate
out of our gourds. The children broke two cocoa-nuts, and found them very good,
and then fed the little monkey with some of the cocoa-nut milk. The fish was
rather nice, but the penguin turned out tough and fishy, though we tried to eat
some of it. The sun disappeared suddenly soon after supper, and we prepared
to go to bed. The hens went to roost at the top of the tent, the ducks and geese
SPACED BY) ACK ALS: 11

went off to the rushes, and after our evening prayer we lay down in the tent
with the monkey which Fritz had decided to call Knips.

We had not been long asleep when the cackling of the hens and barking
of the dogs awoke us. Fritz and I each seized a gun and rushed outside. By
the moonlight we saw our two brave dogs surrounded by a whole troop of jackals
of which they had killed three or four. Fritz and [ both fired together, two
jackals rolled over on the sand dead, others were wounded, and the rest ran away.
We then went to sleep again, and were not disturbed any more after that.

In the morning the children found the great jackal that Fritz had shot
Standing stiff up against the door where he had placed it, the night before, and
Ernest called it a yellow fox, Jack took it for a wolf, and Frank for a dog, and as
the jackal is like all these animals in nature, I told them all they had all
, made very good guesses.

We were hungry when breakfast time came, and glad to find plenty of
butter in one of our casks to eat with our ship biscuit. The poor dogs had been
hurt in fighting the jackals and it was some days before their wounds were quite
healed. I had made up my mind to pay a visit to the wreck with Fritz that day.
For although my poor wife did not like us to run any risk, | felt it right to try
and get all we could that would be of use in our desolate state. While Fritz was
getting our boat of tubs ready I set up a flagstaff on the beach with a piece of
canvaS as a flag signal while we were on the ship. It was to be lowered in case °
of danger, and three or four shots would bring us back at once. We took only
12 THe SWISS PAMILTY ROBINSON.

our guns with us, and Fritz carried the monkey to give it some fresh milk from
the cow on board. We reached the ship safely and made fast our boat, and went
on board. The animals were delighted to see us, and we gave them fresh water
and food, and then we took something to eat ourselves. We next fixed a Sail in
our boat, to help us in our return journey, and then we made a Signal to my wife
that we were going to stay on board the night, by putting up a flag.

We took everything from the ship that seemed most likely to be of use
to us, knives, forks, spoons, and cooking vessels, also a quantity of hams, sausages,
and some sacks of maize and other grain. Then we took some hammocks and
blankets, some more powder, matches, cord, and a roll of canvas. After this we
each put on a cork jacket, and being afraid to spend the night on the sinking ship got
into our tubs to be ready in case of any sudden danger, but the night passed
without any cause for alarm.

Pt SS ae
CHAPTER IML



| he next morning early we looked owt for the signal that all was well
| with our dear ones on shore, and then we set to work to try and save
the animals on board. The plan we thought of was to let them swim
on shore, and lest their strength should fail if tired, we fixed a cask
on each side of the animals which enabled them to float with less fatigue,
and thus they all got safely to land. There was a cow, an aSs, a Sow,
and several sheep and goats, and when we had started them all one by
one, we Sprang into our boat and cut the cables, and having fastened
towing ropes to all the animals, guided them towards land: All at once we saw
an enormous fish swimming with great speed towards one of our sheep, but Fritz
fired with so good an aim that the bullets struck the monster in the head, and
he only rose once or twice feebly to the surface before he disappeared for ever.
We then met with no further difficulty, and soon landed safely. The boys all
came running to greet us, and admired our mast and sail and flag, and then Jack
went down to the beach to take the swimming jackets off the sheep and goats, going into
fits of laughter at the donkey’s efforts to rid himself of his casks. Jack had made
14 PTE 3S WoESS) FAVE LY RO BaONss O.N-

himself a belt of the jackals skin, and collars for the dogs of the same fur, spiked
with nails to protect them in their fights with wild beasts. The ham we had
brought, with some tortoise’s eggs found by the party at home in our absence,
made a grand feast for that evening, and the animals picked up what fragments
they could. After supper my wife told me that she and the boys had made a long
excursion with the two dogs across the river into the woods on the other side, and
that she had been quite delighted with the country, and with the wonderful trees
that grew at an immense height above the ground, supported upon roots as thick
as the largest trunks, one being thirty-four feet round in one part, and eighty feet
in another, while the height of the tree from the ground must have been about a
hundred and fifty feet. The foliage was thick and gave pleasant shade and my
wife thought that we could not find a better abode in this climate than in one of
these trees, for the tent could not be long suitable for a really comfortable shelter. —
1 was amused at this idea, and asked how she proposed to get up into the tree every
night without either wings ora balloon: but she declared that she had often heard
of huts like Robinson Crusoe’s built in a tree with a ladder leading up to it. In
the morning I said to my wife:

‘T have been thinking over what you Say, but it seems to me we might
do worse than stay where we are. On one side we have the sea, with a river
near for our wants, and much still on the wreck that may be useful to us.”

“That may be so” replied my wife, “but you are out all day with Fritz,
and forget how great the heat is under this tent in the middle of the day. We

9
FICE BRED GE, 15



have nothing to eat except mus-
“.» sels and oysters, and the jackals,
aS you know, have already
‘found us out: I expect lions and
tigers here before long. As to
the ship’s stores, | never know
a moment's peace while you are on
that wreck.”
[ assured her that if she wished it so
much, we would go and live in the woods, and
make a sort of fort of the rocks around
our tent. But before this I proposed
to build a bridge across the river, which
would otherwise be impassable when
floods came in the rainy season. To
get planks for this I made another
journey to the wreck with Fritz and
Ernest, and on our way home we picked up many floating pieces of wood and spars,
but it was not easy to haul up on shore such large masses of timber, and we
made the cow and donkey drag some of it to land. We measured the width of
- the river by means of a ball of twine with a stone fastened to one end of the
String, which we threw to the opposite bank, and found the distance from one side to






See Page 8
16 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



the other to be about eighteen feet, and there were planks long enough to cross it
and leave some feet on each bank to fix the bridge firmly. It was difficult
to place the first plank across, but after that we soon finished our bridge, in one
hard days work, and the following day we collected all our animals and stores,

and loaded the cow and donkey with all they could carry, little Frank too riding
on the donkeys back. Fritz and his mother marched first—then came the cow, and

ass with it’s rider: following them the goats led by Jack, the monkey riding one
of the goats. After him came Ernest with the sheep, and I walked last, while the
dogs ran here and there on the look-out. So we got to the bridge, and here we
were joined by the pig who would not come with us at first, and now shewed her
discontent by constant grunts. The bridge was passed safely, but the animals
strayed in every direction on the other side to enjoy the fresh sweet grass, and
but for our faithful dogs, we should never have been able to get them together
- again. Suddenly the dogs darted away into the grass, and began to bark and
howl as if they were hurt. Fritz shouldered his gun, and ran towards them Jack
following him, and by the time I got to them Jack cried out that there was an
enormous porcupine. The dogs with bleeding jaws were leaping round it, and.
whenever they attacked the animal it rolled itself up into a ball, with a sharp
cry, offering nothing but spikes to his enemies, so that the brave dogs could not
touch him.

Jack instantly drew a pistol from his Gickeesan belt, took aim and shot
the porcupine through the head, so that it fell dead on the spot.
THE PORCUPINE. 17

“Is it possible’—cried Jack rather boastfully, «that I have killed a por-
cupine? look how it’s armed on all sides, and what a fine crest it has on its head.”

“What are you going to do with it,” said I.

‘IT hope we may take it with us’, said Jack in reply so we covered it
with a thick layer of grass then rolled it in a piece of canvas, and Placed it in
a. bag on the donkeys back.

I was charmed with the spot my wife had chosen for our new abode,
and agreed with her that if we could live in one of those magnificent trees we
should certainly be safe from all wild beasts, as not even a bear could climb so

high upon those smooth trunks. We found that they were wild fig trees and
thousands of figs were strewn in the grass around. We were now quite ready
for dinner, but until we had had time to make a rope ladder I saw no prospect
of being able to climb into the tree which we had selected as our future abode.

oe ef
CHAPTER IV.

it was impossible to get up into the tree that night I slung our hammocks-
that we might have shelter at all events from the dew and insects. Then
2 1 went up with Fritz and Ernest to look for the wood we should want
to make our ladder, and fortunately we found a bundle of bamboos,

would do, so I cut them into lengths of about four or five feet. Just then
Bill, who was with us, rushing suddenly into the thicket, started a flock of
flamingoes which rose quickly in the air. Fritz instantly fired, and hit
two of tnem. One was killed, and the other was only wounded in the wing. It
ran away at a great pace, but with Bill’s help I succeeded in catching it at last.
The boys were delighted with the live flamingo and Ernest undertook to get him
the small fish and insects with which he would have to be fed. Fritz asked if
all flamingoes had plumage of the same brilliant red as this one, and I told him
that I thought the young birds were generally white, and only put on their finery
when they were full grown.

When we got back to our camp with our bamboo canes and the flamingo,



half buried in the sand. They were so strong that we ‘thought they — :
DE hk ORE tA DER: 1

I set to work to measure the height of the lower branches of the tree from the
ground, and found it to be no less than forty feet, so that at least eighty feet of
rope would be required for the rope ladder we had to make. I madea bow with
one of the bamboo canes and half a dozen arrows of reeds tipped with feathers,
and with these shot a long string right over the branch of the tree to the ground,
by which we could be more sure of the exact height—:

We divided the rope into two lengths of about fifty feet each and laid
them on the ground with a few inches space between them, and then we cut the
bamboos into pieces about two feet long, and knotted them firmly on each side to
_ the rope. In a short time our forty-feet ladder was made and safely fastened to
the tree, and very soon tested first by Jack, then by Fritz, and myself.

My wife had prepared a good supper for us of the porcupine killed the
day before, and then we all got into our hammocks for the night, after lighting
a great fire to Scare away the wild beasts, as the savages do. The next day was
employed in building our new house in the branches of the tree which in itself
afforded so much shelter that our task waS an easy one. The roof was formed of
some of the higher branches of the tree woven together at the top and covered
with a strong canvas covering, beneath which hung our hammocks, and by evening
the work was completed.. Of the planks remaining we made a table and two forms
at the root of the tree. My wife was greatly pleased with our castle in the air,
and said she should feel quite safe up there, and then reminded me that we should
all take a good rest after our hard work the next day, which was Sunday. We
20 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON:

spent our Sunday morning in reading some parts of the Holy Bible which I thought
most suitable to our present condition, and then | allowed my boys to enjoy a little
amusement which would prevent them from feeling the time pass heavily or slowly
on their hands. They wished very much to learn to use the bows and arrows I
had made, and I thought it wise to teach them to shoot well with these weapons
while they were young, that we might be able to do without powder when our
supply was all gone. Indeed Ernest succeeded in hitting two birds, (called ortolans),
like small pigeons, and although I forbadethem to kill any more of them that
day, we were glad to find a new and delicious kind of food within our reach. We
then employed ourselves in finding names for the places on our island. The bay
where we landed we called Safety Bay: our first encampment we named Zelt—heim,
or Tent House. The little island near which Fritz killed the shark, became Shark
Island, and the marsh where he shot the flamingo, Flamingo Marsh: and the river
near which the jackals attacked us, Jackal River Last of all we chose the name
of Falcon’s Nest for our new abode. In the cool of the evening we took an excur-
sion to Zeltheim, with all the animals, including the flamingo, whe had now grown
quite tame, and followed me with a stately strut. We went by a new road to the
sea-Shore, and on the way made a valuable discovery of potatoes. Further on we
came to many beautiful plants and shrubs growing among the rocks, and to the
boys delight found some pineapples. From Zeltheim we carried back to the
Falcon’s Nest a fresh supply of salt, all the ducks and geese we had left there,
and once more mounting our ladder, had a comfortable night’s rest on our aerial home.


Supper time after the First Expedition.
BALCONS NEST | , 3 21

My next task was to make a sledge that. could be used to convey the
heavy casks of butter and other stores still at Zeltheim, and as soon as it was
finished Ernest and I harnessed the donkey and cow to it, and set off along the
sea-shore. We loaded our sledge with all the stores it would hold, and then en-
joyed a good bathe in the sea, after which Ernest cleverly caught a fine salmon,
and on-our way back just as we had crossed the bridge, Bill, who was with us
Started a curious animal, that proved to be a kangaroo. We both fired, and
Ernests shot brought it down, so we carried the prize home in triumph to Falcon’s
Nest, where we had part of it for supper and with the salmon and some potatoes
we all did very well.
_ CHAPTER V.





e next morning Fritz went over to the wreck again, intending to make a
raft this time that would hold three times as much as our boat of tubs
4 and it took us the whole day to do this. We were so tired when night
came that we slept on board the ship in the Captain’s cabin, and enjoyed
a most comfortable nights rest. We took away everything belonging to
ourselves on board, and several boxes of money and jewels from the
j officers’ cabins, but the carpenter’s chest of tools of all kinds, some
5D) sacks of grain and a number of fine European fruit-trees, ready for
planting, were of more real value in our eyes. When the boat and raft were both
full of the most useful things we could put in them, Fritz asked to be allowed
to bring a new net and towing-rope, to which a harpoon was fixed so that he
might use it if necessary, and then we set out on our return journey. The wind
was favorable and we were Sailing quietly along when we came near an enormous
turtle, floating on the surface of the water, and to my great surprise I suddenly
felt an enormous shock, our boat was dragged quickly away, and then Fritz exclaimed.
“I have got him, he can’t escape me now” I at once saw that the boyhad
harpooned the turtle, and was going to cut the cord and let it go, but Fritz begged
so earnestly for a chance of securing the turtle, which was towing us along atan
TOW EDR YA TUR TE. 23

immense rate, that I managed to steer the boat in the direction of Falcons Nest,
and aS our pilot exhausted by swimming, was about to, crawl upon land, I gave
him a severe blow on the head with my hatchet, and cut off his head. We then
made fast the boat and raft, and loading the sledge with all it could carry, the
turtle alone weighing about three hundreed pounds. So we returned to our Nest
intriumph, and our first care was to prepare some turtle for supper, after which Fritz
made up his mind that the shell should be turned into a bath to be fixed on the
river bank, Ernest was eager to shew us some yams he had found, from which —
we could make cassava bread. That night and the next morning we carried all

the things on shore we had brought from the wreck, and as the sea was calm
and the weather fine | risked another visit on board with Jack and Fritz, and
then we made an important discovery of a pinnance stowed away amongst the
timber. It had been taken to pieces, so we had not time to put it together and
launch it that day, but we found many useful things, amongst others three wheel-
barrows, some tobacco graters, and large iron plates, which | meant to turn to
account in a way of my own. My wife was not much pleased to hear of the
pinnance, as she never liked our going often to the wreck, bui | changed the
subject by telling her how I thought we could make good bread by grinding the
solid parts of the yams into flour with the tobacco scrapers and afterwards baking
it in an oven made by the iron plates and this plan succeeded so well that we
had plenty of nice bread and biscuits of our own baking in a little while. |
could not rest now until we had put the pinnance together and made it our own,
24 TRE SOW hes PAM iY OBEN S 0 Nc

but it took us a week to do this, and then we were delighted with this pretty,
light boat, so different from our clumsey old tub-raft. The difficulty was to
launch her from the ship, but at last I made up my mind to lay a train of gun-
powder, and blow up the side of the wreck where the beautiful pinnace lay shut
up, and this I did secretly, setting fire to the slow match as we left the ship. We
had just landed at Zeltheim when the explosion took place. My wife and the
boys were all wondering what it could be, and then [ proposed rowing out to see
for ourselves. All the boys came with me and as we got near the wrecked vessel,
I found to my great joy that the pinnace lay open to our view, without being at
all injured by the explosion around her. We soon managed to launch her into the
sea, and then mooring her to the wreck, went home. During the next two days
we put up her rigging and sails, and mounted the two small cannonsbelonging to
her, and then taking our old boat of tubs in tow, we sailed in state over to Zelt-
heim, and aS we entered the bay fired a.royal salute from our guns to announce
our arrival. My wife welcomed us back very warmly, admired the pinnace as
much aS we did, and the next day we all joyfully returned to our favourite
Falcon’s Nest, where we found plenty to do. We soon made an expedition into the
country, and caught a very fine bustard on our way to the Monkey Wood to get a
supply of cocoa-nuts. Here we met with an enormous land-crab which we killed,
and then collected more gourds, to be made into useful vessels to hold our food
and milk. The boys were looking for some fresh water to drink when they came
upon what they thought was a crocidile asleep upon a rock but I found it was an


See Page 13

Bringing the animals from the Wreck.
CAPTURING AN ICU AN & 25

iguana, one of the large richiy coloured lizards of tropical America, which are said
‘to be very good to eat, so I supplied a noose for his head whistling softly all the
time to tame him, for these are known to listen most attentively to any kind of
musical sound. The monster made great resistance but we got the better of him
at last, although his formidable row of teeth was enough to terrify the boys. As
we had no other way of carrying off our prize I hoisted the iguana on my shoulders,
like a great purple robe, the boys in turn holding up the long tail behind. We
then returned with our spoils to Falcon’s Nest. On our next excursion we found
' candle-berries, growing on the myrica cerefera or wax-plant, and of these we made
‘a large store for candles, which we had wanted very much until now. We also
discovered india-rubber trees, with their élastic gum oozing from the bark of
which I could make waterproof boots and shoes. and many other useful things.

eS
CHAPTER VIL




uring the next few weeks we employed ourselves in planting trees all
round our encampment at Zeltheim as a protection in case of being attacked
at any time, and we also fixed the sledge upon wheels which we had
brought from the ship, and thus turned it into a waggon. In time too our
clothes began to wear out very fast, and we made our last expedition
to the ship to carry away all the chests of linen, etc. we could find
on board, and secure some of the smaller cannon also: and when we
Ao had stripped the old ship, of everything likely to be of use.to us |
boldly resolved to blow up the rest of the wreck, that the pieces of timber and
other valuables yet remaining in her might in time be washed ashore on our island.
So we rolled a cask of gunpowder into the hold, and fixed it to a long
fuse that would .burn for sume hours, and having lighted it returned as quickly
as possible to Safety Bay. We had our supper on a hill where we could see the
explosion well, and at night fall a tremendous explosion and bright flash of. fire
told us that the ship was gone!
But we felt grieved to see the last of her and in silence returned to our
tent, sorry to have- parted from an old and faithful friend. After storing up the
wreckage where we thought it would be most useful to us, We again went back
HERD OF BUR RAL OBS. on

- to Falcon’s Nest, and soon made a further expedition from thence in search of
sugar-canes, guavas, and candleberries for our household’ Ernest distinguished
himself by finding a palm cabbage for us and bringing down from the tree where
it grew, the delicious liquid that flows from it, when cut. We decided to camp
out that night, ‘under shelter of a hut of branches and leaves, and aS we were
preparing this, the donkey behaved in a most extraordinary manner, and after,
kicking and jumping about, gave a loud “hee-haw,” dashed off at full gallop into
the forest, and disappeared. As the dogs did not seem inclined to hunt their old

: companion like a wild beast, and darkness had fallen upon us, we left the donkey
to its fate, and loading the guns tighted a fire, stretched ourselves upon our grassy
beds for the night, and slept soundly and safely. In the morning we found traces
of the donkey’s hoofs, which led to a plain of great extent, where a wide river
flowed down to the sea. Here Jack and | found footprints of the ass in the
wet sand, mixed with other marks of different form and size, and across
the immense prairie that now lay before us we could see, far away in the distance,
a herd of wild animals like cows, that we had not before met with. We tried to
approach these buffaloes, for such they were, without being seen by them, for
viant rushes as thick as a man’s body, grew on the marshy ground to a
height of ten or twelve feet. At last we were within about forty paces of the
herd, who looked so wild and. strong that I felt not a little alarmed but the
burfaloes, who Seemed never to have seen man before, did not attempt either to
advance or retreat. I had made up my mind to retire quietly when unfortunately
28 EHE SWISS FAMILY ROBINS ON,

Turk and Bill came up. The buffaloes at once began to bellow and paw the ground,
and toss their heads about in a frightful way, but the dogs bravely attacked a
young buffalo a few paces in front of the herd, and seizing it by the ears, held
fast to it, and tried to drag it towards us. The fight was begun and we could
not forsake our poor dogs, so with loudly beating hearts we both fired at the
same instant at the buffaloes, and to our unspeakable joy we saw them halt, and
then turning away,- gallop over the plain at full speed to the range of hills in the
distance. But one of the herd, probably the mother of the calf attacked by. the
dogs, had been wounded, and furiously charging upon the dogs, she would no doubt
have killed them outright had I not by a timely shot rolled her over as she rushed
forward, and at once put an end to her sufferings with a pistol shot.

It was only then that we really felt the danger we had escaped. I was
surprised at the coolness Jack had shewn in facing death without any sign of
terror or alarm, but we had no time to lose in hastening to the help of the poor
dogs, and Jack came to their rescue by cleverly casting his sling around the
animal's hind legs, so that he fell to the ground, and we were then able to tie his
legs tightly enough to prevent his escape. —

“It is lucky we have managed to catch this young bull,” said Jack, “as
we can’t find our runaway donkey. Now we shall be able to yoke our buffalo
to the cow instead.”

“I don't know how you mean to get him to Falcon’s Nest,” I replied.


TAMING A BUPRFALG 29





“The only
way I can by
think of is os wt
try and tame woot
him as the natives
subdue wild
buffaloes.” -

Then holding him
down with the help of the
dogs, with my sharp pointed knife,
I slit a hole through his nose, and
passed a cord through it and as
the slightest twitch of the cord hurt be
him very much, he was soon glad to keep —
quiet and allowed me to lead him away
easily. Before we started for Falcon’s
Nest I tried to cut up some of the
best parts of the dead buffalo.
I took out the tongue and salted \
it, and also cut some fine .
steaks, and afterwards got
off some of the skin from

See Page 19
30 EHE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the legs to make boots and shoes. It was then so late that we gave up any
further search for the ass, and hastened home. On our way the dogs found a
jackal’s den, and falling upon the mother and little ones, killed all except one
baby jackal that Jack begged to be allowed to tame and bring up to hunt other
animals.

On our return we found that Fritz had caught a fine young eagle which
he wished to train. to catch birds. The buffalo soon became very friendly with
the cow, and quite happy. —

In a little while he became tame enough to carry loads on his backs for
us, and at last he allowed the boys all to ride him, although not until he had
done his best to throw them many times. He even became affectionate to the
children, and would trot or gallop with them, just as they liked. Fritz had given
up his’monkey to Ernest, in return for his help in training the eagle: and by degrees
master Knips was taught by his new master to carry a basket and its contents on
his back, wherever it was wanted. Jack could not induce his jackal to hunt except
for his own benifit, for he only brought home the skin of any animal killed, after
devouring its flesh.

Qne morning we heard some curious sounds in the distance and
after trying in vain to discover what they were, our old friend the donkey came
in Sight, bringing with him a companion something like himself, only stronger and
more graceful. It was an Onagra, and we were all anxious to secure him, so Fritz
went up gently, carrying a noose ready to throw over the Onagra’s head when near
MAKING AUS 1A Baek. 31

enough, and in the other some corn and salt which the donkey took at once, and
then the Onagra, also coming up Fritz instantly cast the noose over it and made
it a prisoner. It was no easy task however to tame it, and we were about to
give up our efforts to do so as useless when | made a last attempt to bring it to
reason by the savages plan of biting it's ear until the blood flowed, and to my
Surprise this had the desired effect. Proud of thus having subdued this high-
spirited animal, 1 gave it to Fritz, and had the pleasure of seeing him enjoy many
a ride on his swift steed, which he named Lightfoot.

The rainy season waS now drawing near, and all the trouble we had
taken to train the animals would be lost if we could not shelter them from the
bad weather. So we made them a comfortable stable among the spreading roots
of the banyan-tree at the foot of our Nest, with a solid roof of clay covered with
pitch. This shed was divided into stalls for the animals, with room for storing
the food they would want during the season when we should be unable to procure
it for them.

When the torrents of rain fell around us, and storms swept the forest, we
found our aerial castle a most uncomfortable place to live in, indeed we were
soon obliged to take refuge at night in the shed below with the animals, where the
rain did not come through, in spite of the disagreeable smells and want of air.

However we made the best of it during this winter not without many sad
32 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



recollections of the pleasant houses of our native land, only resolving to try and
find some more Suitable home by the time the rainy Season came again.

We had some hope of Cerone a cave like Robinson Crusoe’s when we
could get out once more.

oe a $$
Gita ee
CHAPTER VIL.



After being shut up for many long weeks we at length saw again with
delight the clear sky and aesel earth and inhaled the sweet air of the
first spring day.

: We were restored to life and liberty, and the boys rejoiced in
aly; the scents of countless flowers, and the songs of hundreds of birds flying
\\e . hither and thither‘on gaudy wings.

Our house in the tree was half filled with dry leaves, but we
soon returned to it for the summer. Our first excursion was to Zeltheim,
which we found in a sad State. The tent was upset, a quantity of our provisions
had been spoiled by the rain, and had to be thrown away. Fortunately our pretty
little pinnace waS aS good as ever, but the tub-boat was so injured that it was
quite useless. The loss we most regretted was that of two casks of gunpowder,
which we had not stored away among the rocks. We at once began to try and
bore out a cave by the sea-shore deep enough to hold all our powder safely, and
we toiled away at the rock until in a few days we had actually reached a depth
of seven feet, when we found that the hole we had made had pierced right through
the rock to some open space beyond. I put my head to the opening and feeling
a giddiness caused by the foul air within, our first care was to purify it before
34 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

venturing to enter the cave. We threw in some shells and rockets from the
ship’s store of signals, which exploded with many echoes, and the poisonous air
rushed out with the smoke, until at length a fire would burn in the cave, and
we knew the air was pure. Then we saw that the walls of the cave glittered
like diamonds, and we longed to explore our new fairy palace, but first I sent
Jack upon his buffalo for a supply of candles to Falcon’s Nest, to tell his mother of
our discovery, and beg her to come and see the place for herself. In about four
hours Jack returned on his buffalo, but first came the cart drawn by the cow
with Ernest for its driver, and in it was my wife with little Frank. Meanwhile
Fritz and I had not been idle: we had enlarged the entrance, carrying away loose
stones and earth near it. We each took two candles, flint, steel and tinder, and
then entered the cave and here a glorious sight met our view. The floor was of
white transparent granite covered with fine dry sand with pillars of the same
supporting the roof, from which hung crystals glittering like diamonds. Upon
breaking and tasting these crystals, I found that our enchanted grotto was really
a Sali-mine, Fritz fairly jumped for joy, and embracing his mother exclaimed —

“It is the most beautiful winter palace in the world”!

“And God made it my boy,’—added his mother with a loving kiss.

The rainy season had now no terrors for us but we decided to spend our
summers as before at Falcon’s Nest. We planned a door in the Rock for our new
house, and divided the cave into two parts, one for ourselves, the other for kitchens,
and stables, and at the end we fitted up cellars and store rooms. The space was
ars tensa

9
Z




TE CAN Oe 35

large enough to give us ample room for ourselves and belongings, and we spent
- nearly all our time in making our home as comfortable as possible. We laid
up great stores of turtle, of herrings, salmon and other fine fish, some of which
we carefully salted and put away for food in the rainy season. All our crops and
plants grew and flourished well, especially maize, sugar-canes, bananas, melons
and cucumbers. We had now so many animals that I decided to find a suitable
spot to make a colony of those we did not require in our daily life, and there
we built a bark house among the trees, and in exploring new country found (among
other valuable things) the cotton-plant, and delicious strawberries. We were
returning from this Successful expedition when we went up a hill that commanded
a fine view of the whole country, towards Falcons Nest on one side and the sea
and cape on the other, and this we named Prospect Hill. I was very anxious to
make a light bark canoe, in which Fritz or I could cruise about the coast in a
way we could not do in the pinnace. For this purpose we chose a kind of oak like
a cork tree, the trunk of which was about five feet round. With a saw I cut
through the bark all round the foot of the stem, and then Fritz went up a rope
ladder and did the same about eighteen feet higher up. I next cut through the
bark in a straight upward line from one circle to the other, until we were by
degrees able to strip the tree completely of its bark. Then | folded the bark
together at each end until [had made a sharp bow and stern for my canoe, and
I shaped the delicate boat, lined it with fibre, and pitched it thoroughly with
resinous gum. I added wood to strengthen the boat outside, and for a keel, put
36 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON:

in stones for ballast, and fitted it with boards and moveable benches. In the
midst waS:a mast with a three—cornered sail and there was also a rudder. To
make my light boat still lighter we filled some skins of the dog-fish with air, and
fixed them round her, and these bladders not only gave her buoyancy, but kept
her from capsizing.

We had now a pretty calf, and as Ernest had his ape, Fritz the onagra, |
Jack both the buffalo and jackal, Frank gladly undertook the charge of the calf,
and gave him the name of Brummer. At the same time Jack decided to call the
buffalo “Storm”. It took us two months to prepare our Rock House for the rainy
season, and we intended to make it as pretty as we could inside, during the
weeks when we should have to live entirely within doors.

(Stee Cass eee et
: LS 2 « e+
CHAPTER VIIL

Oe year had passed since we had been wrecked (at the end of January),
f and as I had no Almanack for the new year we had to keep account of
f the days for ourselves as well as we could. I wished to make the
anniversary of the day on which our lives had been so mercifully
Spared, a day of joy and gratitude for the many benefits we had Since
enjoyed, and after solemn thanks-giving to God I arranged various games
of skill for the boys, which would serve to display all the useful arts
they had learned during our stay on this pleasant island. They began
by shooting with gun and pistol at about a hundred paces. The target was a
plank roughly cut into the shape of an animal, with two pieces of wood sticking
up like ears, and a strap for a tail. The three eldest boys were to have two
shots each, and Fritz hit the mark twice in the head— Ernest once in the body,
‘while Jack shot off the ears, much to our amusement.

They next shot with bows and arrows, and little Frank took part in this.
A race came next, in which Fritz and Ernest did very well, and ran from the
grotto to Falcon’s Nest and back in fifty minutes, although I always allowed thirty-
_ five minutes for one journey the shortest way.
In riding Fritz and Jack fairly surprised me by galloping without saddle


38 DHE SWISS PAMILY ROBINS ON

or bridle, jumping off and on the animals by seizing the mane. Frank too, shewed
some very clever tricks with his young bull, which he had taught to walk slowly,
trot, or gallop, also to stop short at the boy’s command, fall on his knees like a
camel, get up and bellow, turn his tail round in a. circle, and pretend to toss
up his head aS if it already had horns. Next came throwing the lasso, in which
none of the boys were very skilful as yet, and last of all we had a swimming
match, in which Fritz had no rival. My wife distributed the prizes at the end of
the day, Fritz receiving a gun and hunting knife for shooting and swimming,
Ernest, the winner in the race and lasso throwing, a gold watch, Jack for riding, a pair
of steel spurs and a whip; and Frank a pair of stirrups and a whip, for training
the bull. I offered my wife a lady's companion with thimbles, scissors, needles, etc.
as a token of love and gratitude for her affectionate devotion to us all, and the
day ended happily and peacefully with prayer and praise to the Giver of all
good things.

Soon after this holiday, we thought the season was come to chase some
more of the delicate ortolans that would be So agreeable an addition to our winter
fare, and to Save our powder collected a quantity of india-rubber juice to mix
with oil and make bird-lime to catch, instead of shooting, the birds. :

This we spread on switches, and fixing them on the branches of a great
fig-tree, where the ortolans came in great numbers, the poor birds soon got caught
by the sticky Substance and fell helpless at our feet. We also got up a torch-
light chase, in which we startled the birds after they had gone to roost for the
BIRD CATCHING. 39



night by the sudden glare
of torches, and then struck |
them down with bamboo
canes until we had secured
aS many aS we required. The
following day we roasted all our
delicious game and packed away a large cask
oe full of ortolans preserved in butter for future
aa | supply. :
But we. now had to wage a terrible war
against the monkeys, who had done no end of mischief upon our farm, and taking
the three eldest boys with me, | started on this painful expedition.

Fritz was the first to see a troop of our malicious enemies in a field of
rice we had planted, and we set to work to lay snares for the apes, by preparing
tempting food upon trees where we placed bird-lime in sufficient quantities to
prevent any creature from getting away that once stuck fast to it. It was comical
to see the efforts the poor animals made to free themselves, but the scene became
horrible indeed when the dogs attacked and killed the unfortunate apes in large
numbers My sons and I put an end to their sufferings as soon as we could, but
the whole field of battle was a horrid sight, and my boys turned with dis-
gust from it.

Fritz declared that he hoped it would never again be necessary to commit





ENG See Pagous=”!
40 THE SWISS FAMILY kOBIN S00.



so cruel a deed. I reminded him that the slaughter of the poor ortolans was
no less cruel, but Fritz replied, that each ape he had Kew cried so like a man
that he felt it was murder.

We dug a large ditch about three feet deep in which we buried the
monkeys, and then returned with sad hearts to the farm.

A great many pigeons were then caught, some by the eagle, and others
by bird-lime, so that we had always enough of them for food when required.
Jack had a curious adventure about this time, which might have cost him his life.
He went down to Flamingo Marsh alone with his jackal to get some reeds to
make a dove-cote, and came home covered with black mud from head to foot.
He looked most woe-begone, and I begged him to tell us how he came to be in
this sad plight. He replied. “I wanted to get some long straight reeds that grew
in the centre of the marsh, and in trying to reach them I slipped into the bog, —
and really thought it would swallow me up. I cut off a great armful of reeds
and kept myself up as well as [ could. My good jackal was running about in a
terrible state of mind on the bank, as if he knew that I could not get out, so I
called to him and took hold of his tail, and by his struggles to get away he
dragged me ashore.” We could not help being amused at the way he saved him-
self, although it was really a serious danger he had escaped.

The rainy Season was now drawing near, and we hurried on the last
preparations for our stay in the Rock House. The greatest difficulty we had was
want of light-as it had only four openings, including the door, but we fixed a
ROCK 0 US. 44



long bamboo pole to the top of the grotto, and hoisted up a lantern irom the
wreck with a lamp inside, which lighted up the place very well. Ernest and
Frank made shelves for the many very good books we had; my wife and Jack
put the kitchen in order, and I with Fritz fitted the workshop with the fine turning
lathe, forge, and tools we had saved from the ship. Much of our time was passed
in reading and study, and the rest in useful work, and training our numerous
family of animals and birds. As far as I could find out by the maps we had,
our Island was in the Indian archipelago, near the Straits of Malacca, and I tried
to learn a little of the Malay language, in case we should ever meet with natives.



——
CHAPTER: IX.

owards the end of August, when we expected the rainy season to be over
the weather became more stormy than ever, but at length the clouds
dispersed, and all was sunny and bright once more.

AS we were walking along the rocks on the seashore, after our
long imprisonment, we saw on a little sandy isle near, a round object
of great size, which we resolved to examine more closly, So we unmoored
the canoe, and having baled out the water, rigged it up, and the next
morning, very early I set out with Ernest, Fritz and Jack. AS Soon as
we were nearer to the strange object, I saw that it was a stranded whale. The
little island was only a few inches above the water, and could be crossed in ten
or twelve minutes, but it was full of beautiful plants. and a number of sea-birds
had made their nests upon it. We landed and took a good look at the whale, but could
not do anything with it until we had some proper weapons to use. The boys found
coral shells, which they collected to carry home, to my wife, who agreed to ac-
company us to the islet the next day. | particularly wished to get the whale oil
for our lamps, so we took sume empty tubs in tow of our canoe, which was rather
heavily laden with all the tools we wanted for our troublesome work.


IE Wor AE: 43



After we had secured the canoe and tubs, we went up to the enormous
animal, and I saw by its back, fins and black tail, that it was a Greenland whale,
{ reckoned that the monster must be at least seventy feet long, and thirty wide.
We were most struck with the immense size of its head, and smallness of its eyes.
His jaws were about ten feet long, filled with black flexible bones called whale-
bone. Fritz and Jack climbed on the whales back, and cutting away at the head
with hatchets and knives, removed the, upper jaw and took out some of the whale-
bone, my wife and little Frank carried it to the canoe, while Ernest cut from the
flanks of the whale two immense pieces of blubber about three feet thick. Suddenly
a flock of birds flew around us trying to get possession of the prey, and of these
bold intruders we killed not a few. I then cut a long strip of skin from the head
to the tail of the animal, to use for harness and soles for our shoes.

We took away all we could of our spoils, but the smell of the oil was
horrible, and the air was quite poisoned by it. We pressed out all the oil we
could from the blubber, and then threw it into the Jackal River. My wife proposed
turning Whale Island into a store-house for the oil and that we should have a planta-
tion on it aS well, and this we did.

We next found a very fine turtle, which we landed and killed.

His shell made a beautiful basin for fresh water at the entrance of the
Brollo, while the flesh supplied us with delicious food for many days.

We were one day busily engaged in basket-making when Fritz’s sharp
eye noticed something moving in the path leading towards Falcon’s Nest, which
a EHECSWISS PAMIEY RO BAN SON.

came on with a rolling bounding motion.

‘It is very curious’, said Fritz, “the thing looks almost like a great cable
rolled out upon the ground— Now it has stopped— What do you think of it Papa?”

“[ think the best thing we can do is to shut ourselves up in the Rock
Grotto— I have no doubt this is a great serpent.”

Fritz wanted to get his gun and hatchet ready to attack the monster, but
I made him join my wife and the other boys in the cave, and then after displacing
the planks of the bridge also retired. The monster advanced slowly but surely,
from time to time raising his head high in the air, and darting out his forked
tongue. It had come within fifty paces of us when Ernest suddenly fired— then
Jack and Frank, and to my surprise my wife also, shot off their guns, and at this
salute the serpent fled with great speed, and almost instantly, disappeared in the
reeds of Wild-Duck Marsh. I was much annoyed at having missed the monster,
for we could not feel safe while it was hanging about the neighbourhood, and |
forbade any one to venture out of the grotto without my permission, indeed we hardly
left it for a moment during three long days. But for the uneasiness of the ducks
and geese on the lake, we should have thought the boa had made its escape, but
aS it evidently was still not far off. we had not dared to fetch the usual supplies
of food for the animais as well as ourselves, and yet it could no longer be done
without, so we resolved to let the animals cross the river at the ford above the
bridge, and seek food for themselves. My brave Fritz on his onagra led the way,
and had orders, should the enemy be seen anywhere near, to gallop as fast as he
TE BO A CONS TRIE CT OR: 45





could to Falcon’s Nest. The other boys and their mother were to stay indoors
and fire from the windows, should the serpent show itself on that side. I took
up a post on a rock where I had a view of the marsh, and loading my gun with
large bullets, prepared to set out. Unluckily my wife opened the door a little
too soon and the donkey, fresh and lively after his three days rest, rushed out
kicking up his heels in a reckless way, and fled at a mad gallop to the Duek’s
Marsh. Fritz hurried after him, but I had to call him back, for as soon as the
ass reached the marsh we saw the terrible Serpent raise his head, look round
with glittering eyes, and dart out his tongue with malicious fury. The wretched
donkey suddenly stopped and gave a loud hee-haw; as if to mock us, and at that
moment the boa sprang upon him, folded him in its deadly embrace, squeezed him
tighter and tighter, skilfully avoiding his mad kicks. The children and their
mother struck with terror and grief, begged me to shoot the serpent and save our
poor old donkey. But I was obliged to tell them that it was now too late to save,
and that we should gain nothing by turning the boas attention to ourselves,
where as we should be able to kill it when it began to swallow it’s victim, and
was unable to move quickly.

«But how can a Serpent Swallow his prey at a Single mouthful?” asked Fritz.

“It squeezes its victims into one mass which it swallows by degrees, as
this boa now does our poor old friend”.

“I cannot bear this horrible sight’, said my wife, hurrying away with
Frank. It was indeed a terrible scene to look upon, as the boa, who had coiled
46 THESSWISS PAM ELDY hOB UNS ON:





his tail-round a large stone to increase his power over the ass, enveloped and struck
again and again the wretched brute in its grip, until he lay dead on the sand
after a few last convulsive movements. The serpent at once crushed the body
into a Shapeless mass, licked it all over, and then opening his enormous jaws be-
gan by swallowing the hind legs and body of the ass until nothing but the head
remained visible. I thought this a favourable moment to attack the serpent, for
J had only looked upon this terrible sight for the sake of killing our enemy as
soon aS we could safely do so. I now saw that it was as I supposed a _ boa-
constrictor, the king of serpents, and when we were within eighteen or twenty
feet of it, Fritz and I both fired, and our shots entered the head, and soon put an
end to our formidable enemy. The boys wished to stuff his beautiful skin which
they did by hanging the serpent up by the head to a tree and then sliding down
his body stripping off the skin with a knife. Having cleaned and dried it well
the boys stuffed it with moss and dried leaves, with plaster marbles for eyes, and
a piece of iron wire painted red with cochineal for a tongue. The boa was placed
on stands of wood around which we coiled the uplifted head as if about to strike
its prey, and it looked so natural that the dogs rushed at it barking, and the
buffalo was on the point of butting it wiih his horns. We afterwards placed the
poa in our museum of stuffed birds and animals, amongst the other wonderful
creatures we had met with on our Island.

(A
= Tee as =—


CHAPTER X.





OF pon making another excursion to our farm at Prospect Hill, we found
lk; had again been invaded by the monkeys, who had been as destructive
=i and mischievious as ever. However, we put off punishing them for the
iE present, as we had made up our minds to explore a new part of the
( country. We came upon a hot sandy desert, where tired and dispirited .
A 4 we were lying under the shadow of rock to rest and refresh ourselves,
S| < %d when a troop of ostriches approached. I knew that it would be hopeless
) for the boys to try and catch any of them, unless well mounted, but the
dogs rushed madly upon the male ostrich, remarkable for variety of his feathers,
and all the birds fled with extraordinary speed. We had almost lost sight of them
when Fritz unhooded his eagle, which at once pursued them and fastened upon the
ostrich. When we got up to him we found the poor bird rolling in the dust,
severely wounded in the neck and shoulders, and all hope of saving his life being
at an end, I put him out of his pain. We took out the beautiful tail feathers, and
carried them in our old hats.
“What a pity it is we could not keep him alive,’ said Fritz, Te is six

feet high, and I could easily have ridden him.”
Ernest and Jack, who had gone on with the jackal, suddenly stopped and


48 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

waving their hats in the air, called out to us, “Come quickly — we have found an
ostrich’s nest. This nest was only a hole scratched in the ground, and the eggs,
about thirty in number, were so placed as to take up the space and retain the
heat. Each egg waS aS large as a baby’s head, and the jackal had broken some
of them before we came up. “We may aS well carry away these eggs, and hatch
them in the sun,” said Jack. “You forget,” said I, “that each egg weighs about three
pounds, and how can we carry them without breaking them’? The boys however
took one each, which they slung on their arms in a handkerchief, and after a short
rest we went on our way. Upon leaving this desert plain we saw a lovely valley
lying before us with thick grass and pleasant trees. The Jackal Grotto as we
called it, was not far off, and Ernest was going on in front with one of the dogs
when suddenly he ran into my arms with a loud cry of terror— “A bear’— close
behind me”!was all he could say. I was going forward with my gun to meet the
bear, when to my dismay, another came out of the grotto to meet us. The dogs
were already near them, but Fritz and I only slightly wounded one of the bears
with our first shots, and rising on ‘their hind legs they came forward with extended
claws, and then turning their rage against the dogs, wounded them severely. Fritz
and I then fired again, and broke the jaw of one bear, and shattered the shoulder
of the other, then the dogs held them down, while we shot them dead, much to our
relief, for we had been in terrible danger of our lives. We resolved to return
the next day to carry off the fine soft fur of the bears, and were very thankful to
return to our tent for the night. The next day we found a flock of vultures
Ae OFS eR be. 49

hovering over the
dead bears at the
entrance of the grotto.
It took us all day to skin, and prepare
the flesh of the two bears. We cut
off the parts considered good to eat,
salted and smoked them, and then left
the remains of the bears to be devoured
by the birds of prey, who soon picked
their bones very clean.

Before the rainy season came on I went once
more with Fritz, Jack and Frank to the desert plain
where we had seen the ostriches, this time riding our
animals. Fritz, who waS very anxious to take an ostrich
alive this time, got his eagle ready, and tied up his beak. Before very long we saw
here and there flying masses darting through the wood. At length four magnificent
ostriches rose and came towards us at a tremendous pace, and we soon chose the one
we wished to capture. Fritz then let fly his eagle, which plunged down upon the
ostrich, and gave him so tremendous blows with its wings that he was almost stunned
and staggered as if about to fall. Then Jack threw his ball sling around the bird’s





See Page 45
50 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

legs, and made him a prisoner. At last I thought of throwing my handkerchief
over his head, and as soon as the bird was deprived of light, the victory was ours.
I passed a belt round his body with straps on each side, and we tied also a cord
round his legs tight enough to prevent him running away.

‘| doubt whether we shall ever tame this great bird to be of use to us,”
Said Fritz.

‘Do you not know” said I, “that the Indians tame elephants by placing a
wild one between two tame ones, who help their riders to keep him in order. [
think the bull and buffalo will serve the same. purpose,” and Jack and Frank each
with a whip can take the place of the elephant drivers.” -

I then tied the ostrich to the horns of Storm and Brummer, put the boys
on the saddles, and took off the handkerchief. He started up quickly and tried
to escape, but finding all his attempts to run or fly useless, he made up his
mind to walk with his companions, and at length broke into a sort of gallop with
them, much to our joy. My wife and Ernest were delighted with our splendid
prize, and the next day we broke up our summer camp and took our treasures
home. The ostrich had to be blind folded and tied to his two guardians, and
altogether our caravan was a very strange one. After two days march we reached
our dear rock house, where we hoped to make a long Stay, the ostrich was tied
up under the trees and by degrees we lengthened his cord until he became quite
tame. We had sometimes to stupify him with tobacco smoke: but while he still
ees kk AC Aa 51
had to be tied up we placed the food and water he liked best always within his
reach, although for more than three days he would not eat, but afterwards became
almost greedy. Then we taught him to carry burdens, to walk, trot or gallop as
he was told and at the end of a month he became quite educated to do what we
wished. At last he was trained to carry one of the boys upon his back, and made
very Swift journeys between Falcon’s Nest and Rock House. Jack generally rode
him but upon condition that his brothers should sometimes mount him too, if
necessary. During this rainy season I proposed to employ the boys in making a
small canoe, called by the Greenlanders a Kaiak, in which we could occasionally
cruise about the coast. The framework of this little boat was made of curved
whalebone and bamboo, with alight deck of wood and a hole in the centre where
the rower was to Sit, and the outer covering was of sealskin dried in the sun,
and covered with melted resin. It was lined with sealskin and floated upon the
water like a balloon, but I made it a rule that the rower should always wear a
Swimming jacket in case of any accident to the. canoe. The boat was fitted with
a locker to carry food, fresh water, and firearms, and with strong harpoons.
Fritz was the first to try the new vessel, dressed in his seal-skin water— proof
suit, and it was shoved gaily into the sea by the three other boys, and went along
at a tremendous pace. Fritz showed perfect control over the canoe, but when he
was carried out to sea by the current, | set out with Jack and Ernest in the other
boat, to keep him in sight if we could. He had however disappeared behind
some reefS, but we soon heard two pistol shots about three quarters of a mile
52 THE SWiss FAMILY ROBINSON.

off, and a few minutes afterwards rejoined Fritz, and were not a little surprised
to see on a rock near him the body of a large walrus he had shot We could
not remove this monster, which was about fifteen feet long, but Fritz carried off
his head with its two beautiful ivory tusks, which he afterwards fixed upon his
kaiak as a trophy of his brave deed.

CaN Ga Ca CS
CHAPTER XI.

en years passed by, bringing more or less of adventure to us all on our
island. The boys were stronger and. more robust than they ever would
=. have become in Europe, and my wife and I were also in very good
health. Fritz was now 24, and though not tall was muscular and strong.
Ernest was slighter and less energetic: Jack full of life and spirit, though
.& more delicately made than Fritz: and Frank, who was seventeen, was
“Gors’> like all his brothers in some way or other. We still spent the summers
Xo: at Falcon’s Nest, and the rainy seasons at Felsenheim, Our Rock House.
Our Gardens and plantations, full of beautiful trees and plants, reached from the
Grotto to the source of the Jackal River. At first when we had not much corn or
fruit, we had to wage war against the birds by day and the bats by night: but
later on we allowed the little thieves to take what they pleased. All our animals
were well and happy and the boys took as much delight as ever in riding their
favourite creatures. We had not yet given up the hope of some day returning to
civilised life, and with this idea had stored up a quantity of fine ostrich feathers,
Spices, india—rubber, and other produce of our island. The boys now often made
excursions to some distance om their own account. One day Fritz went off in his
canoe to Felsenheim for the whole day, and on his return we all went down to the


54 : THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON



beach to welcome him, and land the spoils. He told us how he had made his
way round the cape, and there met with every kind of marine animal, basking on
the rocks in the sun, Sea--lions, sea—elephants, sea—bears, and all sorts of seals,
with countless numbers of sea birds. He had also brought some oyster shells
containing magnificent pearls of great size and fine colour, from a bay to which
he had given the name of Bay of Pearls, Then he told us how he had struck
down a beautiful albatross, and afterwards asked me to come with him toaquiet
spot near, where he wished to tell me only, a very curious incident that had
happened, He said that a piece of linen was tied round one of the legs of this
albatross with these words written in English upon it: “Whoever you are to whom
God sends this message, come to the help of an unfortunate English woman, who
is cast away upon the volcanic island you may know by the fire escaping from
one of its craters. Save the forlorn one on the smoking rock.” His first idea
was to write upon the linen, with a feather dipped in blood— the words in
English— “have faith in God. Help is not far off.” Then he tied it again to the
birds leg, as he felt sure it was a tame one, and would return to the lady on the
rock, and the albatross soon flew away so quickly towards the west, that it would
have been hopeless to try and follow it. I was much pleased with the sense my
son had shown in not telling his story to his mother and brothers, until he knew.
more aS to whether the lady still lived or could be found, and I assured him

that for the future | should look upon him as a man, able to act upon his own ~

judgement, and no longer offer to control, but only to advise him as to his conduct.

Sil O.02 1 NGA FON: 55



Fritz waS quite overcome by this mark of my confidence in him, and we soon
joined the rest of the family in collecting and admiring the treasures he had brought.

We decided to make another expedition to the Bay of Pearls and Fritz
and Jack led the way in the little canoe— to which Fritz had lately added a
second seat—while I followed them in the larger boat. We soon reached the bay
and the gigantic cliffs around it, and after fishing for pearls and other sea—spoils
until evening we retired to our boat for the night under a canvas awning we had
put up after lighting a large fire on shore. Suddenly we heard a terrible roar
re—echoing from the forest near, which was soon repeated even nearer than before.
Then we saw Knips followed by the jackal and dogs, rush down to the fire in
great alarm. The monkey took refuge on a table, but the jackal and dogs kept
a watch upon the forest, howling whining and occasionallybarking, while their hair
stood on end with fear. Before long we were Startled by the appearance of
an immense lion that rushed forward with a terrific roar. The fire seemed to
excite his rage, and he sat up like a cat and fixed his eyes angrily upon the dogs,
lashing his sides with his great tail. After a time the king of beasts began to
pace to and fro, as if he were about to spring. Then Fritz fired, the lion sprang
up and roared, then Staggered, fell on his knees and at last sank at full length
upon the ground, shot through the heart, telling the boys to remain in the boat, I
landed quickly and went up to the fire The dogs seemed pleased to see me, but
almost at once turning towards the forest, they began to howl piteously. Immediately
afterwards I saw a lioness, rapidly approaching, and quickly discovering her dead
56 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

mate, she licked his paws, with most lamentable cries, gnashing her teeth all the
while, as though longing to avenge his death. A second. shot was heard, the right
paw of the lioness was broken, and I had scarcely time to fire another shot, which
proke her jaw, when the dogs were upon her, and a fearful fight began. One of
the animals terrible paws tore open poor Bill’s chest, and he fell at the moment his
enemy bit the dust. I went forward with my hunting knife in my hand as Fritz
was coming to meet me with his loaded gun. I took his hand, and begged him
to give thanks with me for our merciful rescue from a great danger. We announced
the victory to the others who came ashore to rejoice in our safety, and to our grief
found that poor Bill faithful and brave to the last died holding fast to the neck
of the lioness.

“We have much to be thankful for” said Fritz, gravely to-morrow we can
take the spoils of our dreadful foes, but let us first bury our poor dog by
torchlight.”

The boys placed our faithful old Bill in his grave and put up a tombstone
to mark the spot, with the following words written by Ernest upon it:

“Here lies Bill—a dog renowned for his courage and devotion. He perished
beneath the claws of a formidable lioness, dying in the moment of victory,”

This done we lay down for a few hours on board the boat, and at sunrise,
Stripped the lions of their skins, and then soon weighed anchor and left the
bay of Pearls. Fritz led the way in his little canoe, and when we had safely
returned, handed me a note to say that he was going to make an attempt to find




CHAPTER XI. 57

the Shipwrecked lady, and before J could stop him, he had taken himself off.
Towards evening we had reached Safety Bay, and my wife’s pleasure at seeing us
was rather spoilt by the absence of Fritz, while Frank was much distressed at
poor Bills tragic death. We heard nothing of Fritz for five days, and then we
all, including my wife, set out for Pearl Bay where we thought it most likely we
should meet him. AS we drew near the Bay we were Sailing slowly along the
coaston account of the rocks, when at a distance we Saw as we thought a savage
in a canoe, who dissappeared behind a reef as if to watch us. We kept a sharp
look out, and soon again saw a canoe with a single roweras before. I shouteda
few words of welcome in the Malay language, which I had learnt from a bouk,
but it had no effect. and then Jack seized the speaking trumpet, and called out a
few rough sailors phrases, upon which the savage waved a green branch, and paddled
towards us. We looked at him with curiosity and burst into a merry fit of laughter
when we discovered that the smail hump—backed man with black face and hands,
riding upon a walrus, was no other than Fritz.

My wife, who had been anxiously watching the stranger, now smiled with
tears of joy running down her cheeks, as we took our boy and his canoe on board
our boat, and kissed until our faces and hands were almost as black as his own.

+See eee
CHAPTER All.

; asked Fritz aside if he had succeeded in his object, to which he replied
# that he had, and then | wanted to know why he had played us such a
4 trick. He replied

“| really took you for Malay pirates, and disguised myself to
deceive you. ! meant to go back to fetch the English Lady during the
night, for I have found her, and she is now on a small island awaiting
my return.” I wished to ask more questions but my wife insisted on her
son taking off his paint, for she could not bear to see him dressed up
like . savage. We now decided to anchor our boat at a convenient point, and Fritz
proposed the island where he had left his fair companion. [ could not help
_ Smiling at this, but I felt glad to carry out what he had so well begun. Fritz
jumped eagerly into his canoe to guide us to the landing place on a small pretty
island in the great Pearl Bay, and there we fastened our boat to a tree.

Fritz sprang ashore, and went direct to a small wood, where under the
shade of the palm— trees was a small hut made of branches. We followed him
and saw in front of the hut a stone fire place, and on the fire an immense shell
as a Sauce—pan. Fritz was still calling out to some one among the trees, and
then there was a rustling in the boughs of a tree from which a young man dressed


THE S TRANG ER: 59



PRES RISS AT ear a ke Serene

aS a Sailor, quickly came
down. The young stranger
= seemed rather uncertain
how to receive an armed troop like
ourselves, but Fritz throwing his hat
into the air cried out— Long live
the young Lord Montrose of the
smoking rock: shall we not welcome
him as a friend and a brother.

“He is welcome’: We all said
at once, and he then came up to us
with much ease and grace of manner.
As head of the family I shook hands
with him, and greeted him as I might have done a child, of my own, and then
turning timidly to my wife, he asked her also to be kind to him.

My wife and I both understood that Fritz wished his brothers not to know
who the stranger really was, and the boys did all they could to make their

See Page 6x
60 -THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

companion feel at home. Our supper was quite a feast, and the merriment after
a time became so boisterous that I put an end to it for the sake of our guest,
whom my wife invited on board for the night. When the brothers were left alone
they teased Fritz with so many questions that he told them about the albatross,
and called ihe stranger “Miss Jenny” so often that his brothers found out his secret,
and gave three cheers for the charming sister who had joined the family.

The next morning the three younger boys mischievously greeted the young
‘lady as Miss Jenny, and she blushingly confessed it to be her name.

The day was spent in preparing to return to Felsenheim, and looking at
all Miss Jenny’s treasures, saved from the wreck, or made of materials she had
picked up. Among the most useful things there were some long tresses of hair
made into fishing lines, with muther of pearl hooks, needles made of fish—bones,
bodkins of birds beaks, small needle cases of pelicans feathers and seal bones, a
Shell made into a saucepan, and many smaller shells used for eating and drinking
purposes. There was also a hat made of the pelican’s pouch worn as a kind of
hood with feathers.shading the face and neck, and other feather ornaments, with
shoes and belts of sealskin: and she had some beautiful tortoise—shells. Another
surprise for us was a tame cormorant, which Jenny had taught to catch fish for
he., and she promised my wife some fish for dinner. Jumping lightly into the
canoe with her cormorant she pushed off into the bay, and it was a pretty sight
to see how the bird plunged into the sea from time to time, bringing up a large
fish which he gave to his mistress. She had fastened a ring round his neck which
MISS JENNYS ADVENTURES. 61



prevented his swallowing the fish until she chose to free him, and give him some
as a reward.. We made Fritz tell us all about his great voyage of discovery.
He first spent two or three days in cruising about in search of a smoking island,
during which time he landed for a short time, and met with a tiger, who would
probably have killed him but for his faithful eagle, who flew at the tiger to tear
out its eyes, but unluckily Fritz shot the poor bird also as he fired at the tiger,
to his great sorrow. Soon he forgot this sad loss in the joy of seeing in the far
distance a little rocky isle from which arose a thin column of smoke. Here he
soon landed and saw with joyful surprise the first strange face he had looked
upon for so many years. The poor girl thankfully awaited his approach, and
although she did not understand all he said, he soon induced her to embark in the
canoe with him. Miss Jenny had spent about two years alone on this rock, and
her contrivances of many things for use were as clever as those of the famous
Crusoe. She afterwards told us herself that having lost her mother when she was
scarcely seven years old, she went to India with her father Sir William Montrose,
who was an officer, and after ten years Spent in travelling with him from
place to place, in the care of a very devoted nurse. who taught her many
womanly occupations she could not otherwise have learnt in her wandering
life, she alone was Saved in a shipwreck off the island where she was
found by Fritz. Her father had returned home in a troop ship in command
of his regiment sending her at the same time in a fine vessel in charge
of her old attendant. The horror in finding herself thus alone in this desolate
62 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

place had at first almost crushed the brave girl’s spirit but the constant
exertion necessary to obtain food and shelter for herself had kept her well and
strong, and she had never lost the hope that God, who had so wonderfully spared
her life would not leave her to perish.

During our return to the Rock House Miss Jenny was delighted aah all
she saw, and shewed great pleasure in our various animals. Fritz and Frank went
on before us to Felsenheim, where they prepared a feast for our arrival in honour
of Miss Jenny. We next paid a visit to Falcon’s Nest, and then the rainy passed

happily in the society of our new cereus

a EO
CHAPTER XIll.





he rains were over, and the boys went to look at the cannon on Shark
Island, and to fire them off, as they occasionally did,in the hope of some
day being heard by a passing ship.
Bi This time there was a distinct answer to their two shots, and
gic they all hastened home to announce the wonderful event. We were on
the look-out all the night for any new signals, but a storm came on
6 which lasted two days and nights, and prevented our going near the sea.
Although on the third day I resolved to fire three shots again,
and then we listened attentively, and actually counted seven shots in reply. Then
Fritz and I set out in the kaiak to discover who the strangers were, for we feared
they might be pirates. We had disguised ourselves aS Savages, and rowed round
the cape near Duck's Marsh, when we came in Sight of a fine ship at anchor,
flying the English flag As soon as those on board saw us they made signs to us
to supply them with potatoes, cocoanuts, figs, and other fruits, upon which we
retired for a while, and rowed home with all speed. Jenny was convinced that
the ship had been sent by her father to look for her, and then we decided that
we would go altogether in our boat with a present of fresh fruits, and look as
important as we could. Fritz dressed as a naval officer, went before us as pilot
64 THEE Ss Wolesis) PsA IY ROBINSON.



in his canoe. In our boat we were all dressed as Sailors, lightly armed, and we
steered straight up to the ship, saluting it with a ringing cheer, which was warmly
returned. Fritz and I flying the white flag paid our respects to the Commander,
who received us hospitably, and asked how it was that we were living in this out-
of-the-way-place, where he only expected to meet savages. In as few words as
possibly I told him our story and that of Miss Jenny, which | thought might interest
him more than ours. He then told me that he had heard of the young lady and
her father, and had been asked to look out during his command of Her
Majesty’s ship “Unicorn” for any trace of the Ship in which Miss Montrose was
wrecked off this desolate coast. The Captain seemed delighted to have met her
and said that when he heard our cannon shot, he had expected it was the crew
of the wrecked vessel that had taken refuge here. I then invited the Captain to
come on board my boat, which he soon did and we all became friendly at once.
We returned to our island after a stay of two days near the “Unicorn”, during
which time we not only made the aquaintance of the Captain, but of a gentleman
with his wife and two young daughters, who had been rescued from a ship-wreck
and were now on their way home on board the frigate. The Captain and his
guests had so great a wish to See our home that Fritz in his canoe sailed to the
“Unicorn” the day after our return to the island, and acted as pilot to the Captain
and his party. On landing we all went out to see receive them with honour, the
boys aS usual riding their animals and the ostrich, to the great delight of the
Strangers. The English family had an earnest wish to take up their abode with


Q

and. Animals before the Captai

rr
FAREWELLS. : 65



us on the island, to which we gladly agreed, and my wife too begged to end her
days there with me and two of the boys, while the other two might go to Europe
and Send out to us some good people to found a colony we decided to call New
Switzerland. It was hard to part with- either of our sons, and still harder to
choose who should go or Stay, but that question was soon setiled by themselves. We
had dined all together, and I then spoke of our wish to stay in New Switzerland.
«Long live New Switzerland” and we drank the toast joyously. “Long life to those
who wish to remain here’ added Ernest, clinking his glass against his mother’s and
mine, as he said: “Yes—l have made up my mind to stay with you here”

‘I should like to stay here, but still England has greater attractions for
me” said Miss Jenny. :

Fritz replied “All happiness to the dear pastor's family here.”

“Fritz will go—” said I “he has a taste for travelling—but he will always
be welcome back to New Switzerland, to his first and best friends. But what
will Jack do’?

‘Jack is going to stay here”, was the reply— “He will be the best rider,
the best shot, and the best climber, when Fritz is gone. I do not want to go to
school in Europe.”

“That's just what I want to do,” said Frank— “I think one of the family
‘should settle in the old country— That is if my father pleases.”

“‘T shall take you at your word my boys, and may God bless you, whether
you go or stay.”
66 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON:

The Captain was quite willing to take charge of the three wanderer's and
anxious to Set out as Soon as possible, so we bestowed all the gifts we could upon
our departing friends, and supplied the “Unicorn” with all the provisions we could spare.

I was very sad at losing my dear sons, and begged them to remember
the good principles | had tried to impress upon their minds, and to lead
Christian lives.

On the last evening we invited the Captain and Officers to a farewell
supper, after which I placed the journal I had written of our life and adventures
on the island in the hands of Fritz begging him to have it some day printed in
Europe, in the hope that others might find comfort and pleasure in reading of the
many blessings and happiness that God had sent to us in the new world where
under His Providence we had spent so many useful and profitable years of our lives.

Sarees ast
Se
yo 20535







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DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080328_AAAAFB' PACKAGE 'UF00080482_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-03-28T19:36:50-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:06:27-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297972; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
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FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00099.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-10-16T21:49:44-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-10-16T21:47:27-04:00'
redup
'675114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATQZ' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
68def02b498e67269b44cbfcb85a67b7
97e3b204d27f3ec2837cba5c7e9c94bdc9a53382
'2011-10-16T21:48:04-04:00'
describe
'92371' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRA' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
b819b2baa3354958ece14ebfc3082fdd
19344ce9c9f668e9a252bfb55db71f366854982e
'2011-10-16T21:49:49-04:00'
describe
'226' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRB' 'sip-files00001.pro'
6e6a01edb12fe5e083e6be32d98bf3a9
35229aeef4648bc030ad79b0e7e88498e6170549
'2011-10-16T21:48:34-04:00'
describe
'39694' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRC' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
df3efa89033b4ad0c9cad8366b5b5c87
f55fdf7c73cf18cc4b4cead82f2022f18dc4b519
'2011-10-16T21:49:53-04:00'
describe
'16225696' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRD' 'sip-files00001.tif'
e2a580f9b69f26c116ba388d3f1efad4
2286191c495cd2b632b2d6e400557d41411ef7ab
'2011-10-16T21:49:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRE' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-16T21:49:56-04:00'
describe
'26185' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRF' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
d4a6048ba9655453b8d8ba5ac9847633
d6e94af7912380d5fd7b8bdb90a93a7b853ef675
'2011-10-16T21:48:06-04:00'
describe
'677457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRG' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
c3a0aff08f0d88f5b9871bcda551112b
ae8f4e2513288acac9c18d3e756313353b428460
'2011-10-16T21:49:38-04:00'
describe
'47615' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRH' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
5ac5f3edc25c365dd66a49d1a0b59356
f16a4c694ea0812523258642d88622f824a51269
'2011-10-16T21:49:21-04:00'
describe
'26342' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRI' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
d5946bd2ed3ab4f5d5ca27687ac04ff7
08680b86c8bf7ee467fd86f1536dfb6ccff8405b
'2011-10-16T21:48:08-04:00'
describe
'16283908' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRJ' 'sip-files00002.tif'
ce2d23cc1a057855bc19863a6462edb9
341de167423f573a4bbff3421abf8bcfb4b43681
'2011-10-16T21:47:31-04:00'
describe
'21094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRK' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
24d1dd1f0e84822416edb84796c5119c
24b28c60c9e6e252d962fbd765b774e36da9277e
'2011-10-16T21:47:44-04:00'
describe
'599960' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRL' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
1623a7fb2ab0ab74283fcda7863320ba
91998639e0fa225599392512e01758ea425f85bb
describe
'42543' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRM' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
564be8e2f6dabf0e656fedef202451fa
b97019468c8d3afd6b1d33c0bf3f075927644682
'2011-10-16T21:49:28-04:00'
describe
'2304' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRN' 'sip-files00003.pro'
08c98f9550bb7bcba94fb3651bb8909d
901833c00aa1e361b28afa351259702ad07855f9
'2011-10-16T21:50:01-04:00'
describe
'25456' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRO' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
70871a7fe62087abcfd0cbccb9d12d70
21cce0da5da5b99dde3a014846230569a7e6fae1
'2011-10-16T21:49:33-04:00'
describe
'14419352' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRP' 'sip-files00003.tif'
e5ae1890eec60070788678d8d65f2cda
8206d2a5e672a676fbc21ebdb0e8cab8774a97a1
'2011-10-16T21:48:47-04:00'
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRQ' 'sip-files00003.txt'
157e1766f7fa8bd2ebc540998e4c5635
c99acd3138581dc1731d599426770b53481470b2
'2011-10-16T21:49:57-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'21109' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRR' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
162255878a7b610f3bff2a789ac059fe
326eec583fdc2ea5f438f18a99e0dcb4c6146837
'2011-10-16T21:48:15-04:00'
describe
'588898' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRS' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
a88d74277d582a0e74c19bdb565f9045
9eea5f443e7fe156ebd732ee446a03019ec219d8
'2011-10-16T21:47:40-04:00'
describe
'97289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRT' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
053b2a00367f67cff1555fe1840d903b
a51c68148778bc7b6b4d22b3682f0278cb9d0dd5
'2011-10-16T21:48:09-04:00'
describe
'4503' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRU' 'sip-files00006.pro'
f05b9c2a37ea45ca837f8af5cccc5d42
71cd4a4e557daad0e94a6536144300318532523c
'2011-10-16T21:48:18-04:00'
describe
'39628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRV' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
d34c36b640f9dd7263236f243be12ae2
c21f2816854dddc27c5ad8b3a33deb410859d208
'2011-10-16T21:47:54-04:00'
describe
'14156756' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
571eef08883834d51c4238529ff8f631
e953a5f4b2152e613197d705edf1c03b12c83c83
'2011-10-16T21:49:02-04:00'
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRX' 'sip-files00006.txt'
5baca317ce12d91b840b29eba31fc318
59b7c0e5e09e95a0a108c4d5c90cea08db10739c
'2011-10-16T21:49:13-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'26730' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRY' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
96186cdb0d0d28a258c62f55c8013b33
9e63f5a01901b95561290812cbd107e8676b8ae5
'2011-10-16T21:47:59-04:00'
describe
'589331' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATRZ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
a859a7c9758b94052f8c53017e351831
cbefe97f521538241b9b64ca9731b9217eda8056
'2011-10-16T21:48:58-04:00'
describe
'95511' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
f53021fa0016b4e76d1584ea0614ad6d
f0b83e4b9db121deae36918a830500ed40907d5c
'2011-10-16T21:48:02-04:00'
describe
'4798' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSB' 'sip-files00009.pro'
d9bb9412d7b7df8d5f2c318e4320be86
ce9b947f0937278b1e2ae4a48e4e29df8c162f4d
describe
'40803' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSC' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
0e954166591194311d5155476bb28bc3
c165a80917540359240e6fe510cf4900184fbc4e
'2011-10-16T21:47:35-04:00'
describe
'14164884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSD' 'sip-files00009.tif'
d5189be7462c850422f7b6e5d8f8b26f
05690f0230c5eb3af9c6f7879b4d4e86e81851f2
describe
'272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSE' 'sip-files00009.txt'
1d82350796ef0fee584f1b4ff14047ae
6043d83160abb313d0861d6c835e8725631f3915
'2011-10-16T21:48:56-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'26862' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSF' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
109df5607aea31805751e0fa4d0b84df
5c95317def64d12533537f6923d11f4c2b9522f9
'2011-10-16T21:48:03-04:00'
describe
'600104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSG' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
a00b09daae27e221e49e22cc8c029b6b
5a8604ecaa8409ac8366d600f28218e163931ce8
'2011-10-16T21:47:32-04:00'
describe
'62338' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSH' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
f7bf43e7251203e44f6ce2a39d107388
a61896f379f226162d8d9189e419218ff22c06b3
describe
'13799' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSI' 'sip-files00011.pro'
a7a618463c3268a329bdb69ce937f552
16730324570331c3c79cac80b700a6273b615132
describe
'29806' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
ab5bc260a96225e6fa4e8811eae1a49b
ee2f0ff118c49220c8c5b96af6f00fe1b1322773
'2011-10-16T21:48:48-04:00'
describe
'14419764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSK' 'sip-files00011.tif'
cf5ab5537dfc0464a7e89d1e761806ce
bcc90acccef198119db3c46bd3c5be915ade2e3a
'2011-10-16T21:48:32-04:00'
describe
'666' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSL' 'sip-files00011.txt'
2d3077993312cd2664457d2892f35712
d76831ea2f71499239571966bdd650ffe0b2de98
'2011-10-16T21:48:20-04:00'
describe
'21906' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSM' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
9919f41dd66e9d13b08f815ba86c6f2f
10d8c15b372efdacf9c6b9b864a06e2a870163cf
'2011-10-16T21:49:24-04:00'
describe
'585345' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSN' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
e7b9cf8e310713ea7f0ce431382e038c
1b853cbacb03a63a1bca9458bc0f98b1f9e19cf4
'2011-10-16T21:48:33-04:00'
describe
'58680' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
55b0d7de301939f73b8f04831543cd6d
48b171c6b19e46536f6addcb5539c9e1442cb7ef
'2011-10-16T21:49:47-04:00'
describe
'14151' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSP' 'sip-files00012.pro'
897fd6ba61d3f0dfc7a5188b31be6634
b7970b161f5d83c521b4547505f9fd26d7412cf1
'2011-10-16T21:50:02-04:00'
describe
'28393' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
d436e193c0d048428f078574c57ae7e9
40b1eefc256bfe80615918cbe830e7937305881f
'2011-10-16T21:50:00-04:00'
describe
'14065764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
f7b93a214391c77243abcadb50abff70
4cede3f5e723398bcee9ea9cd79ba6d7476d24f9
'2011-10-16T21:48:30-04:00'
describe
'618' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSS' 'sip-files00012.txt'
f4cfbb929926535bcc2bde440e0bd30a
1a8092fe6cd0fc912af32ede0c589c01d12c3ee0
'2011-10-16T21:48:19-04:00'
describe
'21791' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATST' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
dd0b4c81c45654e098dc46b0bfaaa7e8
c48bd8ed0df59ed84f6f27e4008480b11294aef7
'2011-10-16T21:50:03-04:00'
describe
'600105' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
ac2059f1535b1f5b71dc754ef29f6bc8
1315f08b712ebdcb5ee61573f543eee6b46545fe
describe
'96759' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
77ab95e0c2f6446015f12a9519c24723
869de223e98f31c64bd12bb5ff1142612478bd88
'2011-10-16T21:48:55-04:00'
describe
'26461' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
7ad014166271f70bfc6801e84324c287
d1ae2fb11e90d4b33ff656d37fc391fc80e452be
'2011-10-16T21:47:52-04:00'
describe
'39632' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8fb0aceb238f28891f3fa2dcf9b7c9bc
f89c72ce9f6b2a44c9367da087daf4e11d75d61a
'2011-10-16T21:49:55-04:00'
describe
'14422016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
a9a09d616eefd80585ce5edd62abfa04
468435d035e6320f1c335c60cdc6a8724456c15b
'2011-10-16T21:49:51-04:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATSZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
26566634316e8f99b0783f81e527bb4f
df452a41fb77132bfad595e6bf224730a48d77bd
'2011-10-16T21:48:37-04:00'
describe
'26012' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
a95389db08435cb6d9d38b5ea48fbdb0
b71487bdaa7051a99416a2af5a5bafbcbe5f29c5
'2011-10-16T21:47:28-04:00'
describe
'600095' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTB' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
0359b3ced8f0336130c3aa62ca8cc9d2
c182bc728455dd194227fc6c5f07cda32f75f2c4
'2011-10-16T21:49:59-04:00'
describe
'121954' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
b77416c76d66945e7dc4bfa5570be3d1
80cf5703ce672ce09a488b63860d0b72a6698371
'2011-10-16T21:49:04-04:00'
describe
'45640' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTD' 'sip-files00014.pro'
55221c029f0e2edaa781dc1e9453c94e
886834651e3ab5293e06c60ad9fa8c64327f19b2
describe
'46986' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
ca06e820871fbae3a206ded86c2ea7b9
dc1d05a71dd20430f4e988647e8696362fef9534
describe
'14423096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTF' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e50dd31398d38360119254042933f06d
fcc1a66d9246c49a7fc31551742373b9c6ade5f1
'2011-10-16T21:49:22-04:00'
describe
'1789' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTG' 'sip-files00014.txt'
3a8645cb23d20cd99fbe3ad966c8410a
083a3c15bcf77911a24e52ba38033eeabed51185
'2011-10-16T21:49:43-04:00'
describe
'27857' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTH' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
a93e9c382ebe41146c551acf9d75417e
04a2fd2c371494902a026ebce9d5aab347509a57
describe
'600020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTI' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
0ed86bee4a84ee4ddac1e91cd54eada1
b1363ad5b0dfbeb07ede4937172817a4cc0c1128
describe
'123102' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
379113e687f92d83f4f072d66045fe5d
1a51cc492fc362792d59558cec3763f5e82e7f2e
'2011-10-16T21:49:09-04:00'
describe
'44042' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f21da3cdb04d392ea8c11eb30bf555f8
ea4cc1e6d084512bba16e8ebff49e687ae84101b
'2011-10-16T21:47:45-04:00'
describe
'47008' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTL' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f1d429d714b8f33382f9ca4d827e2c01
fd16c718a2d00b8495a2cd132db2099ed5db366c
'2011-10-16T21:49:46-04:00'
describe
'14423160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTM' 'sip-files00015.tif'
eb99aaae61e2b4e6084ca331f1485f50
66625b6bfd13e15d0427914fdb38f9f746989bdd
describe
'1770' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTN' 'sip-files00015.txt'
de34bbce46547f2a9e29f381a25fbdda
bc115a3889cd21a9c850d1c214b7601d17efd446
describe
'28030' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTO' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
b79a0ee8d50aea629036c3f74df5ff6e
7d4cbba1552088f97e2ad3d2e799712e1e9129ba
describe
'599962' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
027067568b8908ac1affd2387e741b89
1f8d7b30648be5ef1e840476c8f4501704290b3c
describe
'110551' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
e3223e60f0e05d195a3ef0aadcac3044
023d10f08f4fbd57bea49cf6be4fda506232558d
'2011-10-16T21:48:26-04:00'
describe
'39436' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTR' 'sip-files00016.pro'
a5600b433599e97ee633d7d0885bbe0a
540d2728a69f044644d80533d82a2eb0e45f8235
describe
'44314' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTS' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
ff30d8e015638ec8ffe3f0a321ac8632
f58bae503b01b8f098d0b086c42070be7928f9a5
'2011-10-16T21:48:44-04:00'
describe
'14422652' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTT' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a12e7ad22496055fb309df693d8390e6
203256a507396529e8f2b2457ba3f454c05d0f0e
'2011-10-16T21:49:48-04:00'
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTU' 'sip-files00016.txt'
8eb778e01cb82537bfcff86097c78f86
7e6c560949f889e48a656f6598e77add7eb788c2
'2011-10-16T21:49:36-04:00'
describe
'27242' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTV' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
9a455e91b9ddd7eca6718981cae6fa3a
54a7f61f339266db40ef46d5ce38dcc7ddc7592f
describe
'600045' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
49ed2f996a8969be5a5b945bfaecf2eb
abdc6dd39f31158c2091fdd313171480ff496d94
describe
'61516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTX' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
22861dd95f4f03ae94f65cd228f98c9a
32b769988d4852dfb694f1e760ddb0d77dbc3baf
'2011-10-16T21:48:16-04:00'
describe
'14041' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTY' 'sip-files00017.pro'
ee096be045d55db2435c062aa26afdcc
6e602667701d496b80795f9e4fb41315372a0003
'2011-10-16T21:47:37-04:00'
describe
'29712' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATTZ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
cdd0331507fcf7eb95d89e4286f3a92f
0ac8a490546927d4b2b64f6aa212052f2861c1aa
'2011-10-16T21:48:40-04:00'
describe
'14419896' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUA' 'sip-files00017.tif'
949d3b0bf1482053067e3feb49a485f2
60120dd168742f51583d4b3102b550335be0c382
describe
'592' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUB' 'sip-files00017.txt'
2a7df849fae652d46ebff1e39e1fff31
cb5aebd6f9798e26db57e5951a7b3db26a72a3f1
'2011-10-16T21:49:52-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'22190' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUC' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
0d477fa2e6febc4675c6f8cf23597eeb
1919287c85e492be0cc8f416706eec5ca0a82f9e
'2011-10-16T21:48:07-04:00'
describe
'599990' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUD' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
ae6098365ecf1bac9cbb77f01f0cb7c4
20e99e97d172a24c1f87c768b0e4fff9e4d30b8c
'2011-10-16T21:48:38-04:00'
describe
'106637' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
60b02ac8bd6b026a1c20746b13b9a813
0613ca63cc7f68b52271a898c13f3a21d811f5ec
describe
'35678' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c5f2100b7b99fc2d3f2a638d7aacbc3b
ba01f05ef439c84797be16bf88d1372d85949c3b
describe
'40867' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUG' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
5dfaa2908bdaedee14a297803cc63d78
7f457c58c9e98c96b17c49ff1e4e63e90ceecf0e
describe
'14421864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
7e5a9bddd16a1f883beda4768d619fec
37f24e89cccd6b591c557c8bcfc756317b99b8a3
'2011-10-16T21:48:54-04:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
581ddf0775b8bbd20e486c06a35b8ca3
96c5c505b4c1b448e2f96b2fc5eb58658036530a
'2011-10-16T21:48:12-04:00'
describe
'25716' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUJ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
1c5debe0fe05b40e8d0fa41b033b9163
e235f65b57fd43b34263347a696c3f2a4508a304
'2011-10-16T21:49:39-04:00'
describe
'600099' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
fdd2847c6090f24c1873f23d7dad329e
a52cd0a0cc4b07f656def31cb5ab41c3db302635
'2011-10-16T21:49:37-04:00'
describe
'119963' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUL' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
715a0f89830f67abae8e3572b53c04a1
99d51abc921f912ad5f0f7923faffefa23e6d0fd
'2011-10-16T21:47:30-04:00'
describe
'46910' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUM' 'sip-files00019.pro'
cdc619cedabd1337a5005c88de95d9b1
eb16c284c8bae889433554ed1a52c7db01c761b3
'2011-10-16T21:49:34-04:00'
describe
'45885' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUN' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
cecfa4c5700d6632af144410a944aa51
fc56b1b7ba8d011e48116f599c16c4c54d3b7d4a
'2011-10-16T21:49:20-04:00'
describe
'14422952' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
a795b3eda2d82bef36a70d9c0a0c3ac5
5abfff8a978715198de3974951ab396fef00162d
'2011-10-16T21:49:40-04:00'
describe
'1864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUP' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8fca071f15a76293dd169f2b46be4acd
48a05b803f5444a617b430c923598d0557d93530
describe
'27538' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUQ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
dd3b31792a716b3c244492fb2e80e6e7
3d7356bf305bec16c597e16138c9a77bd59426e9
describe
'600093' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
62594fd60d192107a4ed8e15f916b7ad
8c478ca69bfb9c4d581e31ad4d711ff55d33e73f
'2011-10-16T21:48:13-04:00'
describe
'121701' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUS' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
75a6b41bbebb44a7ca257eee4942c9a4
cafd2143943a6299829ec902b9af6c293b6afaa6
describe
'46147' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUT' 'sip-files00020.pro'
216f082ac1b2a8d6f88d1a7cab0211cb
6e0a9b7d0a18958ec179eb813067e12c3178ce46
'2011-10-16T21:49:45-04:00'
describe
'46559' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUU' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
aba08cf9787f35f1799b82b8eb27f391
1b53ce722c42954fea5b778f6810a20a9312dd22
describe
'14423032' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUV' 'sip-files00020.tif'
f918fced15a8ebd8b5408055694863ce
6d4170cbf2d9cfab2f691f5013f94cfa74c646e0
'2011-10-16T21:49:11-04:00'
describe
'1816' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUW' 'sip-files00020.txt'
11429bc418082fc515c4a73d7da06272
502779b44b5ece9e49c84b00b72ae5b63532c331
describe
'27882' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUX' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
fbe334accd07b5782b252af9a6a9bddb
15d4036e5f1a6918cf161041e5eceda573a2aec2
'2011-10-16T21:48:59-04:00'
describe
'587232' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUY' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
aee70e660b46eb1dd200ca234ca08fe2
d86ff7831a8ebf10ff928a50dfd53f694c152e8b
describe
'100362' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATUZ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0159664607890117eb84afacfeed8eff
f30d883549d58cee24a95980b3fe2e5d5e08fdb1
'2011-10-16T21:48:57-04:00'
describe
'25289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVA' 'sip-files00021.pro'
6528125b9d200b3edba5e7e437140963
b1c4d72a1ed23fa9f429ee4d672484fe5dbcc3bc
'2011-10-16T21:48:49-04:00'
describe
'41429' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
7d80f9a1ad04f379dd84a0130d08c5c5
761db7094007103a9579f2eafcc293fb864317a9
'2011-10-16T21:48:39-04:00'
describe
'14117880' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVC' 'sip-files00021.tif'
c75632be848145f55496bd1d7109ab17
bbddea5670530a21891d7e587c5fe4f412e05021
'2011-10-16T21:48:50-04:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVD' 'sip-files00021.txt'
836d2aa2740ac6bb38f44ad5d8b4b5c2
548326a42bdae4a5545959b6591b5f38fc62e0c6
'2011-10-16T21:48:01-04:00'
describe
'26901' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVE' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
96c32274c887f260c917206cdfaeb099
5c45b4026b74e8160de71a278174d77688d23a50
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVF' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
efe7ce078d756b1650bd55ad661d5532
1d159ca548659b66263465f754aef28602e90048
describe
'115135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVG' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
be4a2b7aa07462be19daec52473fb4fe
e8d1941b4ec2a3a3f9b9a0591ff83bd5c09a6184
'2011-10-16T21:49:32-04:00'
describe
'41032' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVH' 'sip-files00022.pro'
7972d4a23ea9f411a9c8ab6c6b6c3c88
69d477081f867ce84e3590c6a8ea742456fd0448
describe
'45189' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVI' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
d5a6034eda38e049e63a854a5c4e469b
3efa7b0e02d347ca3151af4a0d46f150d337cab2
describe
'14423124' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVJ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e5b7b83f6616b13c949ad6623f207424
73218c36628873b650ecc2875bd3d0e60ceab456
'2011-10-16T21:48:41-04:00'
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVK' 'sip-files00022.txt'
340f2b3ba8d71e026647150dbd9c83d0
9da621d4b9fe134c8e3161c86c4db4ac0f76fa1c
describe
'28007' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVL' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
ea098f84a986360c0d3fd6b04c942fbc
d6a708191eec45b1e5e1d75d331ae01f67e2694d
describe
'593221' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVM' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
36f7490d32a50841beda57861637fe76
6e1dea0d5a9f7ee57f9f659e64e5abfd018c1099
'2011-10-16T21:49:54-04:00'
describe
'116380' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
d68b005806ead73785bd69e7333cedfc
3ebf6b54207a5a261f4df4a04c28c69ae9bb4e8d
'2011-10-16T21:49:12-04:00'
describe
'43904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVO' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3474674b01ba0816593646ba45ab73de
20872bdfcc60c74138961aa9dd108b8ff410f3b2
'2011-10-16T21:48:24-04:00'
describe
'45088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
1b1688092d3626df210a5f5cfbe59647
61bddfd1815df241ef14ef158672f92bfdfbf876
describe
'14258896' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVQ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e3f54dc9ec2d85d183f9d4b7a67ee7a5
f0fd24c224433de73b78f13d61ca33fce49a4c63
'2011-10-16T21:47:49-04:00'
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVR' 'sip-files00023.txt'
d8a026fe273d4e6560ccaca1a13ac4f5
9da8b4d0afe64bd61e8941deb53a6451a92dd394
'2011-10-16T21:49:14-04:00'
describe
'27471' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVS' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
3090291dfffbd7449a0421da9b0a1205
e92ace86a39c4ee127bc692bf4bc34bd7a033e0c
'2011-10-16T21:48:17-04:00'
describe
'600071' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVT' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ebb6dd96c22a267bf741aed2a9084c0a
d1a62c819fca6c2b9d865a5de891b820287aa701
describe
'85452' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVU' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
32e3b0e5033b4fd2bd73243fe1184410
0a6a19bcde44bdededc63d99d4981a01652ce7f4
describe
'26558' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
0a10203aa33c1335b9a928af16101bd9
20f3adf3ff647a247faee797be09a321bf5a1580
describe
'36403' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
a9e01bb268482258b1ddb50220a87c92
6327ef5c239a789a563e065cca4394f2ad3594dc
'2011-10-16T21:48:35-04:00'
describe
'14421016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
3bcfa1498929558181ac483d88107293
f974726ec70eeeb70f0c5c10cce2af5d8afc8056
'2011-10-16T21:48:05-04:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVY' 'sip-files00024.txt'
789978745aac3921c79e16e172830854
41af6c13484ac7f48574c994f144bc4100c9e8d1
'2011-10-16T21:49:00-04:00'
describe
'24144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATVZ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
7bf750e53d7a3c3a9a305230f48db41b
df6938795b359362dc1fb5eaaa9086aab73f0036
describe
'594241' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWA' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
eee023cf5bb07cbe4c713806ae6b8f5d
032385617498a4b0cca6c1f3297918997e5e0854
describe
'94757' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
9b7c055a7be016dff0c1abb98e5a53af
16212a35c0aecb931933aa2eba5326e1d2ebb5a7
describe
'32487' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWC' 'sip-files00025.pro'
0289de4f14beeb2a7adf2af791b65c0d
0c3d9dc1c3372a74130056dc81d2e3bcc0c20d17
'2011-10-16T21:48:53-04:00'
describe
'38317' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
156ed1185ea4806e200e2d5281167b17
3fc1f59d6c33f5ac5d6c725f0780f49042c93f62
'2011-10-16T21:49:01-04:00'
describe
'14280884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
78bb2d5795cf0839397a07375ea718bf
0dfeb4e6916d0e39ce32dce3d69b41b032599093
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWF' 'sip-files00025.txt'
07edc48386382f00e9370bd6800a2cb0
382dcccb3cfc7d2c0216397584b32c31ebab1a24
describe
'24817' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWG' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
746998ef51d5647850fa75c1690c7d16
ea32d96239e1be845a8c51d88dc787a65657b22f
describe
'600091' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
46af5cecc413e2779f0ec71b85c12b20
45e23f0d9ed0db51e3b1203e8dd6d1b05cb0e9f3
describe
'118509' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWI' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
cea2051070b986477c8152050d5b6e63
81db7ddd2e29d04fdc4828da282f0d8be85f5d29
describe
'45735' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWJ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
325f14f650a736f940577f28968d614e
618b84e5a982bb26b68cb5f2c332f348a3d21dd2
'2011-10-16T21:49:05-04:00'
describe
'45333' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWK' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
2c4c48385bb01da3b5e5c71d16010c76
571fe7131414df3f93436478ff0312a11dad7bec
'2011-10-16T21:48:52-04:00'
describe
'14422748' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWL' 'sip-files00026.tif'
a283f700a47bba7555f9038114b738a8
e7bddd10e9d4d25eae5bed286cc65d0400e8ee0f
describe
'1799' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWM' 'sip-files00026.txt'
295bacfc102b13831faadc821a5e811c
d179b08259482869c135107feb8e0551772cb1a5
describe
'27345' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWN' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
9796ebcca11842ca0cfc725da7e3e7b1
f727b33a48f0242e3dd4d5b9007b6ea10e771d38
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWO' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
3a3fe3858d804a9c116f28414ab3b756
99db91900b84c42295fdc7f8f6bd1ce704ed6e02
'2011-10-16T21:48:51-04:00'
describe
'111446' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWP' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
9372fe33da656ea9f824664a20802649
83753e0b4137b6bdfbc33e537ea5c75cf11cf5ba
describe
'29178' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWQ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d2c0b764f443aa3d3c21381fb08a6504
f2140938b577ac752fea6bd6a134985ccf9f35af
describe
'44447' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWR' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
500dabce87336cec1ac8e5ce8501d0ac
7820033dbe8bf897e3fe5deee229596565144f30
'2011-10-16T21:49:41-04:00'
describe
'14422836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWS' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1b7945cf3d92b4c69dee2fdc4ffcf7c9
fda3b3ff8f871791ac63d0724d468a566368eadd
'2011-10-16T21:48:28-04:00'
describe
'1842' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWT' 'sip-files00027.txt'
5e7c6e4f2feaa2541985a72ab0e1b73e
8badc0259185efe13f83527fc25a4c224becbf07
'2011-10-16T21:49:15-04:00'
describe
'27606' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWU' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
0cf90e0752259f2ed73b8089bb74acd7
df36ef57505c9f1a729d973225cc947fbbdc6706
'2011-10-16T21:48:42-04:00'
describe
'600048' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWV' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
03d5ac81b7c0c629ca33fd0366ddafd0
55f53af4d17c4ff07c3d25300b110a0c4010401f
'2011-10-16T21:47:46-04:00'
describe
'121194' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWW' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
a8d8cd81cb9a7ee1fa6fb7604cd7fa91
00985f5812462874d77f55ec93c87a1406ce2ac8
describe
'44534' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWX' 'sip-files00028.pro'
147a152aa3dc3821c4d1e663765763c0
09b0330efa05f7232353b597a9b4d28d8e794171
describe
'46785' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
c9c732bcb89f6d6c1eb8e9225ab802c8
b40a939b05747a83c4ccc9009bbebfc2cb3126a4
describe
'14423024' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATWZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
e794782cd9cef3e6651ba3d4f67a2ba9
fbe0d9354ebaf15e38006d44552b5b842dacc969
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXA' 'sip-files00028.txt'
746b4c395efa97d57d4d787dceba6123
89da4721e1aa8152693777885588a495d898663f
describe
'27806' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXB' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
48c948c1c304a46a05bb5bb2b0fc552e
9a64d063fd36d8e0345392a2b7b6847252dd4e6d
'2011-10-16T21:48:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
e2c2d15a1d998412c53b25ac304d63c4
b95bf336ee4e048bb67d554ec236617fdb249596
'2011-10-16T21:47:42-04:00'
describe
'82744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXD' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
efb882c4f898f5137401dad3eaf6e08f
c5a0a47804a683e821d9e70bd8e84eeeea013627
describe
'25540' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXE' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9dccd9100ce358ce2d265147526a4383
65d4e37be5d17823a93afbe60587e3a7424fb704
describe
'36790' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXF' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
ef38f551b6aad454391354388f6df60f
29af9b1dd91534c1e7c569f00823d76dcb636677
describe
'14421496' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXG' 'sip-files00029.tif'
c89a525fdb5eeb55c59550f4f10fdb14
488d1c8f5e327ddbc86a49970a2d51108e240b17
'2011-10-16T21:47:36-04:00'
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXH' 'sip-files00029.txt'
b0705c1388fc5f83957306abd100132c
0edf35c863ad17e2dddc92302871494e666a61b7
describe
Invalid character
'24878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXI' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
617dac95771e98f614659b30d26fcf36
8f0ee7bf407a20b09eba76f46b4b42369393daa6
describe
'600056' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ec6933d7db025c5342304cba108ff5d0
7dc0bf6fd13babc876f545dcce63a0f99739d505
describe
'97424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXK' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
8358fd264b8df3d4da42a137a9758ca9
f1a3f640529e6109b9ce42a62ccda47e0f0690b2
describe
'31401' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXL' 'sip-files00030.pro'
64c403386898276207cf0613f834e506
215ef8b1507bcdcf7ffd8293b8c21e3397e9a673
describe
'38575' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXM' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
2b9d17c11ef6c4e658c6c39f0b5c89c2
943145acf99657169f8c1241532c9bf837cabcd8
describe
'14421696' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
4cbf8e8dbfbcf56768b80704bab4b758
e6de752f86991822d91b2f6a85286021b5e46120
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
48990ef0d3041b7206a16e65938558d0
961081fd6753610626133273d492e75ae2c122db
describe
'25171' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXP' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
0c761eb2eea62dc9a5e8798b8fc220af
e88ce876d3138c1c7baf7d3e3fa8108edb81d5f8
describe
'600101' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
d5a7b8118a4f2859ce2449dd94d0dc2e
e801874a7150021e1e5f1622a6f2ab40e2b7783a
'2011-10-16T21:47:39-04:00'
describe
'117246' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
b8775ce174bc86f5caaf995d811e6044
21f3752813d6e61483a3fbe7ab72bd51ece90251
describe
'45650' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
789b1ef62e6fc639cd367357245fb40d
b274ff3b4de50c2c27a13103ea77c7cd96082bed
'2011-10-16T21:47:48-04:00'
describe
'45149' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXT' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
dc69cf63924fcff11572f9455efde8b2
bd86ad254d1c1ddbbd393076fe23d7823be39473
describe
'14422744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
a9ab546841b0b0582eb312328f508022
c44621315d9cee2261925e1ce6daea5b2f60dc3e
describe
'1834' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
62593b46aa8bf64c73a20ef63766f7f9
3f6692660e8b24aaec034bec224ffa5388651350
describe
'27299' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d9ea6f1f5712356b57450840907cf10d
2cf25b33d7cc7325940ef5730147ee2135fd7812
describe
'600073' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
533f86b960448bf408ae51bd367613df
ed9b62cb2585cf506b94f76385357def108d0a9b
'2011-10-16T21:47:34-04:00'
describe
'121456' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXY' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
4484d02f06ea2b98ab12bc9513908d97
c62cd304f5ca6faa59e3f5554fa49ca834e81647
describe
'47157' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATXZ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
671c8f88c26ed6dd26882600502ab210
2b2a7ec47f773232f97d45b9dfbca275e4e8b1ba
describe
'46630' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYA' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d327d52b8a04203c7db16cbd6063469b
029dad0ef388f4ddbe887a96d21a7a316711616c
'2011-10-16T21:47:47-04:00'
describe
'14422984' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYB' 'sip-files00032.tif'
ce7c890e21a60151cef53a171316c309
980d19113a8a65ce291445410c9a10d06f12bcb6
describe
'1836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYC' 'sip-files00032.txt'
fb5f70b56e821b5b6b30c338cadaf6e7
16986a03714a213d6871eefa1107e078f7f31abb
describe
'27813' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYD' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
fe796a9ef44bfe339ad9279f1367195f
1428b71fdef165f4ec68373a8e6ff3a5cb024cac
describe
'600032' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYE' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ab7415b34ea9a247ead46069eab12059
e0084bb069b7fd907c2275fba7f6919da92d4f96
'2011-10-16T21:47:51-04:00'
describe
'98466' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYF' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
5374d18145083e5010fdc08420731f16
02f2f28fe91ddfc4b58413f4ad7bc1261f0d3020
describe
'1957' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYG' 'sip-files00033.pro'
b0b1049dd0142dbf41829157eb583242
91fdcb442ec4f945e3f62d9b77b6d42a9fce2770
'2011-10-16T21:49:07-04:00'
describe
'41718' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYH' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
c3bb1bea59e1e7e2e7be601750d04440
1f3ef2a65f9ec1b1aeaf2a51074751495fd7be8c
describe
'14423012' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYI' 'sip-files00033.tif'
343c863c0a1a7be35f07740fe4abcaa8
5b1b2800d7baf47ce4089d5a37c9ff24e87d292a
describe
'132' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYJ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
9c12804231314bf830b9724fa3b9bf78
d1a117f288e1a9b45e716b842ec41b1bc3a8fee4
describe
Invalid character
'28039' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYK' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
406aafec36f9e3700d1119bbb240787e
34b45f379d4b183d8d32fa02c48c844876352c8f
describe
'586538' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYL' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
047d863ce83828fa8978e42694a5e145
50da8d2e347531f27979eebf3695a3a6574594a7
describe
'78825' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYM' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
4990802a7b1e46362b80c4876a1611b6
b26583d4e3b40993fc45bbe38e004fa937f6839f
describe
'20836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYN' 'sip-files00035.pro'
851df1bf4ed9220e89a8ff3acd27ad24
9e9ef910e38b7f3cb92f864386922322c7251455
describe
'33401' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYO' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
8aeefbd059790c8f43e9c6182775dc0a
d9e29facc4b7ce182eb51b3d65a7bf32900b9dce
describe
'14096016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYP' 'sip-files00035.tif'
ddd07ba1d9e333844a7d8f9ada070b12
c99b4224aded4fe5dcbb98930304de48a5973a73
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYQ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
bb5f956e9d8195259589351df7c3ffe9
e281124f6d92a53870025a1d5560293da59fdef5
describe
'23314' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYR' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
03cd2ae3ec4ba2de448c4cf5dd5fa5d1
abb8e7bbf25943a2adfb999aee03974f783ef2d9
describe
'600083' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYS' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
8f000f88bc3e3dfe1808ae2ed80244db
d342bf05917b1b34d53b2f818fb70af525bd94fe
describe
'108501' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYT' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
b10366b1a7c07fd5d3db2632098764b0
9cd154308ba07cff8edc3d9a87cebf833e2735ed
describe
'36126' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYU' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d072179882d54fd677c7dbdccece4212
9d3e390041f7a5690085caded0bec3c616aa2a10
describe
'41837' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYV' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
abdf6c165f1612435c8629c665b1ce9c
d50d32400b5e3e66550e95ca920bea7e3c722634
describe
'14422056' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYW' 'sip-files00036.tif'
96f053c1e73061608d36439590635721
bea3c29396dbe9d5165485c02f8b3e6be31fbaa1
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYX' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c33b6ac82580ea63ba6838b34c5c7eb9
9ecc252a839a7e923df1b391c039a619a04aa8bf
'2011-10-16T21:47:53-04:00'
describe
'25986' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYY' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
3ee5bee9a0359daece3e20223976c197
3727588edd2e2820000bd7d6a6b93099fab93a68
'2011-10-16T21:48:31-04:00'
describe
'600085' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATYZ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
14637643c91ec8ead7d7d885b683feff
04f1f83a0bd4494334af9bbaf8d92e34dcdca32d
describe
'121223' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZA' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
df1d7addd2a8b07e5c74edbf25ff8ad4
6f54821bd6d9e89d435bea1b03f68a368975b61c
'2011-10-16T21:47:43-04:00'
describe
'45880' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZB' 'sip-files00037.pro'
44c8a8b9f5c3ffaad1be7be5a05c5e7a
740aac532dfe115fd5f18bfb4d021333538b7ddd
describe
'45453' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZC' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
003f6ae838470fb2e2d201bd566f4057
9bf8aea9c670831e3c35758901a69ed1ce954498
'2011-10-16T21:48:27-04:00'
describe
'14422872' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZD' 'sip-files00037.tif'
9e33f86486dd42a5d9a38991856578ed
3a78cb4e73206768d4fc92ac9631d229605caa86
describe
'1781' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZE' 'sip-files00037.txt'
58a65a90d1b1f98c99cf9615dca2878e
ac212e8846a802fd5670cc64bc6f9a4cc578a0f3
describe
'27375' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZF' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
3763b80816c2c9d12213d4efc71d96a5
ef0c72590c7ebc7310bcd54591bde99674fdc9ea
describe
'645325' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZG' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
3d6fa0f40c5f5807cd4b59d253dce720
d68eac1e154639dc06b351b395171ffe8741e89d
describe
'103089' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZH' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f8be110fa06340b0689201d8a971503c
22e098f1237ea37158c9a7230eb97fa4a5415ffb
describe
'46625' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZI' 'sip-files00038.pro'
8dbb09e93427cd70f39be2cd533d0326
0ed5b0310257c05b54696aec23ceef41d35bbd51
'2011-10-16T21:48:29-04:00'
describe
'15499764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
5a1d46eeb181334a31d0085e60658a74
9f7775995c470ed384349d61c3886427405e8226
'2011-10-16T21:48:14-04:00'
describe
'1815' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
bdb6247bdffd9ed687158a5fb3cac554
4f29d3fb9b827b9c8062b98fa15699fc226aa9bf
describe
'620999' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZL' 'sip-files00038a.jp2'
c08929811577cbd8d04560e2228e5700
5a07bdce574bcd555167e5dc921480f75bd9a727
describe
'68941' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZM' 'sip-files00038a.jpg'
5d083504450dd6ed04a79c31b7d85001
00d6095427fd446e5744282ce01680808d9faf28
describe
'2533' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZN' 'sip-files00038a.pro'
1ee7b57c7580499c6de3cc29565edd9f
4ec8e0554302a782ff4530ededba7ec6f3b9024c
describe
'27327' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZO' 'sip-files00038a.QC.jpg'
2effc6b095d235be34a4125608ba1c3c
16c10297138cc68accd87a87fb8739a65c080ed3
describe
'14913844' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZP' 'sip-files00038a.tif'
a3d7d9590b1c9b712cf1f688237c0325
7ddcceecf72175e067e26c467c95d366565f0f9c
describe
'128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZQ' 'sip-files00038a.txt'
19b49faad76d7c6470e3750033f62287
7c2a2daafe94ade13c082e63093be4b33e0cdf7a
describe
Invalid character
'16505' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZR' 'sip-files00038athm.jpg'
510cf75b3e4fe677b1dd96c52c8f0dc4
ba5077aeff5f1282f9c1dec92d18acec365e6d4f
describe
'18545' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZS' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
cf31f9766cf74769d6afda20bcda9e39
b3b8aaf652b44bf972da5d955cb35b0d5fed961c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZT' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
248724853692207999665f93850069c9
9fb7e30640f7e3ac87aaab6fc29a6ef5d6788625
describe
'84458' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZU' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
bab4ce7d45879456a70dd5be738e53ce
45ffe8177935ec9bfff901f0df79b03cbc663b38
describe
'27006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZV' 'sip-files00039.pro'
edacd3d60da3083c61f7317967a9f49f
5e8481f6b296478d849e0e584ca92c2982715875
describe
'36111' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZW' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
601fc5737d42eb25105ab123f7f2b2fe
1f9d7e11c1992a0533ac36b35f232e95a8061c82
describe
'14421008' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZX' 'sip-files00039.tif'
35dc767ef4a87f8914568a6bd6a6230c
2ee7ba614429f181ddd53ac831fc5382c1f4c311
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZY' 'sip-files00039.txt'
d6b3b8b129e2e83b03ebde48e3997bed
55db3b1211c2763809e54fb0c8ad3e81ff23c5eb
describe
'24164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAATZZ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
80c893adda95bb907fbea4bab64c0299
3619805a1af0ca6a3abec07822a29a1ab08b5a6e
'2011-10-16T21:49:06-04:00'
describe
'600043' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAA' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d0597a55c3fb724a347b91d9c0b2b65f
29ce1421af90591e64283ada932c6a6c7d3ce9a7
describe
'101669' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAB' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4828deeb57eae01cb6772b28afa0e06d
c7fb593495ec6941ace8bf619e85e132bf5063dc
'2011-10-16T21:49:50-04:00'
describe
'35190' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAC' 'sip-files00040.pro'
b2c5f13f438401f3203f7ac2a57043bf
72bb9ad304084d2d1de1936658afbfc18cff088d
describe
'41078' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAD' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
e97b5e8ac4a6f530ab467aece1b99648
fb761adbf660d3d5b89ce9427c7c3ecbd808daa3
'2011-10-16T21:47:50-04:00'
describe
'14421924' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAE' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d927714d24209c8c7d7f0b924cdaffd0
0bdfed931fb77190adb7b66c93fb987b27e00d7d
'2011-10-16T21:49:26-04:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAF' 'sip-files00040.txt'
1088b7499566db64d518ca3193173773
1450a30f4d2cc301f4091a801fde0d456fed2858
describe
'25718' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAG' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
9c463e3dd00ed5c4bce4822d7773277a
9e4a4bb31f2167b3a7445913963950ef9b2b1151
'2011-10-16T21:49:03-04:00'
describe
'600050' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAH' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
3a7105cc1c00975339bf14ef381a1f1a
1a0650380c2cbcc3b4a38a62d13ecd484f64f435
describe
'117474' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAI' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
2e58e3d571bff0955b77dc2df598705d
347636b279abfcfa3bad3bf6f22d510be4175b3f
'2011-10-16T21:49:16-04:00'
describe
'46958' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
8f7af7afd04c30ef3c38c830f22f222e
74225f547ebb639642d76b151914cb3a6cc0b610
describe
'44986' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAK' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
4071e061b7ca9d7ca3d10e2c73d87086
7387b212a509f4aa893658b07272ea1306f36393
'2011-10-16T21:49:30-04:00'
describe
'14422564' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAL' 'sip-files00041.tif'
a1f15c50d767b20b7febe2819f686f07
efb4b175a7a43b9b55ba9f244e1750c4e664099b
describe
'1875' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAM' 'sip-files00041.txt'
760331036dc63c44fe7ad8d45a4a96f6
47ee9f53103ff680616a1212c6103fa581210f94
'2011-10-16T21:49:58-04:00'
describe
'26929' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAN' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
efd14eb6ccfcada5b3a961295dd5dffe
cbac0665ac7d2050a2b451bf42de33f7420e11a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAO' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
0c1d0654b80cf086b2e1181e67c8c1a4
95e7870efa40853a38767b4af650e099ce0dfb73
'2011-10-16T21:49:10-04:00'
describe
'117864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAP' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
851f2d1316897a33d727a352e256585b
2d5cbb2b5dc8c65305cb74bc920f97b396c5945b
describe
'41538' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
2bc7113c4f5ade7f960ef2c494e94557
330cfb7dccf9fd9715302d5f693214c2310f85ed
describe
'45491' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAR' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
24394841dd90e20b9aed299c3b5647ac
d1d9c56c7a0f015662dc5aabb61d5e6f67535ebd
describe
'14422816' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAS' 'sip-files00042.tif'
0283f3bdd94811232afdd2e012f5ef59
7b8ec48c0c1ea82761c6475b9d3b16b1a4407ad0
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAT' 'sip-files00042.txt'
3d0375eaf6898ef3efccc551be2074b5
cbc780df77ef6d070ad47b05dc7993b2853ff6d9
describe
'27387' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAU' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
8b153ad6e1648f0df250fee2cdc25b7f
c36efa3c441576baba3830c5a0fe7db305b481c9
describe
'600086' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAV' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
e176ff9eabce43c8f1276434a0feaf11
6789a6b905d6c059b3850754be46e25f91828a62
describe
'105291' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAW' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
0a8b1199806c2baf7b53ecb108e66832
785df48719368438b7743da40b87fffd760eb426
describe
'17164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAX' 'sip-files00043.pro'
3e755dc0f1fb07243ad7a552890a143e
b9701a617c6055e51ca697a057835d159c9ea530
describe
'43702' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
5b57eb0ddee0617ce1c873aceb6d9183
ef05a4178b766816274acd0d87f937e897a246e9
describe
'14423020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
caef0c71aee3ef15fd59fa8f63ab9438
1d7cb6236731ef5d9fe4994e73104dc966d27a7a
'2011-10-16T21:49:19-04:00'
describe
'707' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBA' 'sip-files00043.txt'
a0ef9264772b7f592963daa2fd958b37
0ce643272d52a2e643d867eb2cf71bb96464d2f9
describe
'27850' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBB' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
83a23280c60180e00cc6da916c67dfc0
fab50e90f9f9b6a763adc98d343e27e3d6c3ec60
describe
'582852' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBC' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
a6a51734837bf60af69dbafd96a04ed2
b935a79f793b5dd3d2daafc83cbb80bb71ecd563
describe
'116000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBD' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
1216ed64d5426b95cb7fd02f2f77f55e
298991b424e3d58fd30276a2d2706c811501a6e2
describe
'41172' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBE' 'sip-files00044.pro'
07c885a26f22b68e303b9e72563c06c4
ef2b3a34744d1f6e68fe24fb166cdabb84f031a5
describe
'44877' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBF' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
3bfe9d62a9fcaa346e2afcec6a1fefa3
6f93a62008f284469819f61aaadf5a64f2878ebf
'2011-10-16T21:49:18-04:00'
describe
'14009656' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBG' 'sip-files00044.tif'
b4a9bd9d6a2bb27ce5f581e9d0476ccf
44ac41f36deae4547104dae2a22475470dc9d99e
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBH' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ad9ca877aaf4219e9fb2bb55648fe22c
441b110b5bd3d951656af5d22b4e1f47aa1e3cee
describe
'27369' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBI' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
23d9be5593ecb1cb6f35c319d11bb2bb
76e0f07d0b5415435b5aea4096ac77b2b7580b9f
describe
'600068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
eb406866ffdc36c6567c0a8ce91842bc
5f92de5b7a2d5356f40f92066e652bc03e897ff3
describe
'113563' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBK' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
1e09023a219dda2b1c300c5c2eb88acd
db815f0c0347d9d062f7d67f3150f382ef548ec8
'2011-10-16T21:49:29-04:00'
describe
'39732' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBL' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c99c4ba07ed1d14fb004aa942ddab207
2cc54acbcdffb59b0abf9940b065faf3e3721e4d
describe
'45111' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBM' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d14fd8405b988f703512634808755b78
1b32be77dd87670bb8cfb0ba1a4667fcaed734db
describe
'14423000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBN' 'sip-files00045.tif'
6660668af0d72d5d46634dc4574b4ed4
3ff2bc7ba26e6173a461d86bd377c16a7bfddf4c
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBO' 'sip-files00045.txt'
889ac492db0b171fd805adb8547d89a4
1b4d89e0b7f850edaaf39f6b0be87ba38ff6bb05
describe
'27768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBP' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
3b529cbf1f025b3b6b7091136cae9d5d
ff8da8cbe75bec710f91891b021e5560171d9b50
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
0765dc42b9f7d6517a466d1d674e78ae
edf752d565054e08df06bbce73de02075bb26bd0
'2011-10-16T21:48:36-04:00'
describe
'58065' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBR' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
96a8456f2d9e91e4262a143a72a166af
1bdb88311f5d2eb86fda74bdb65f39b40909d2d8
'2011-10-16T21:48:43-04:00'
describe
'7889' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBS' 'sip-files00046.pro'
fa8af251b75a2075fae69aeb36bf7b3e
0d699147bc4ab83f090b93ab6c08711511716776
describe
'27461' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBT' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
f065f0cc8ce59857350952b88f909278
4e412bef7abe8a9773983a0f7764809ed9ae1826
describe
'14419440' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBU' 'sip-files00046.tif'
88daa2791982835e738781f4a58a0f3e
cdbcacda9cc6ec7f9d8711f084e8fbccd36a10cb
describe
'326' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBV' 'sip-files00046.txt'
59dfe5febbc07acf331faca53b5b712a
bdd1f85e00d344f1a4406bec4bf5f06a3f607583
describe
'21256' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBW' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
653ab49fc15ca6b2d90c8b58078e1310
fbeda0dcb0c070d82b27f2c22d64f6cfa6c98370
describe
'599901' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
738220e736b387830c8a4cd015a4c525
3604fbac92ef4b38d74194986baffef5108405e3
describe
'103730' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBY' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
db45a80a7824dbf2338cd95f4dba4e5f
72985829f608d38801febdc6e46a4e5b1402cac7
describe
'33546' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
e0d806e8cfd702b97b7d21fb2598ecd8
57654e7621c419cca78bef7ed61698790e602bd2
'2011-10-16T21:48:25-04:00'
describe
'42176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCA' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c8b38685965f1395b606a202423e59a9
13e095e1d0e622c026ce837a24f275e39708fad3
describe
'14422208' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCB' 'sip-files00047.tif'
517bfae4d9a68dba93141a578175d61a
d2b8c097632ae4df19a82ac1b7ab0c2cb28978a6
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCC' 'sip-files00047.txt'
e89f073313aa1138fe7d70362befdf64
2fb083ca0efc07071e009fb523fb69f5478e6b1f
describe
'26335' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCD' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0398b586200b7892cd9563587149f949
d36d2d5aa8bcb84910fd0bad508f602aa4d3f5c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCE' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
99ce441adc9c81d4aa2a990d23ca0315
7c9c3a0c6d49461d4bf92b33c12881d76bd3d8e8
describe
'122549' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCF' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
0c14a91eeb58e874f0ac5e5a323dbdeb
3223f8c3b4115ac3553daa14a60c01da366ad94d
describe
'45608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCG' 'sip-files00048.pro'
e065fe843d8f5899e5d198f8a5e7ecdd
0daf77d6df515c145c8b8f9f7b0b6908c2a7d895
describe
'46500' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCH' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
3f65beb407c21b1ba139d4f4e308d2b2
c9af93aee6a0ae86f35adbe9c96d08750ea59f80
'2011-10-16T21:49:31-04:00'
describe
'14422992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCI' 'sip-files00048.tif'
6f1dc1fd4de0642ed06d738e0247a071
31e99e83e62829a3dff05126416fad0a016d4285
describe
'1806' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
91c780e324f151e75d9317049abc66f5
0bd52604886cdb47f7129709baae9b9d89c29fb1
describe
'27729' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCK' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
6d95620e61f1a615d3916ce73a647e62
0e46e8b1b4b9ad7c22708b7fab77f76be2fdbd5d
describe
'600079' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
542a98eb6bdbfbd3bbdd233a50d76402
af6bf9c1653ea8bbfe8f2dcfc8c9ef4ac58ab4de
describe
'111933' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
e3012861b5405079b7d54fe7e778ffac
f02a611515cd99661047af0dae9b3dbae7b843cf
describe
'11694' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCN' 'sip-files00051.pro'
aeb81748d63b4184a38a55b19e784cee
10f77c15b9b205906659302d13e645db6b81ba1e
'2011-10-16T21:47:38-04:00'
describe
'45848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1504e921808769f519fd868d6766d228
a0cdb9ff235139a7224cd7bfe57e4a15d7643b8c
describe
'14424068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
1a7316163c9e1dcfc22568919b11fb36
c4968390488f6db4f9464f5f25cca2bc20e3fb3b
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCQ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c5c5a9289fa93b21ebd4bd07c28afc8e
68cc0f6c609a37f13e8f4f60e9e036f0fac1e266
describe
Invalid character
'29803' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
b7d5ef1f75dc3fde7a3f86135a5efc41
be993e5d973bfd9ce4c4208d2063726a3fdb9bf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
66da8e8b2208a9ceb6a80b951d3cfc07
171bbb12ff9ae2d11ad987544fa1d1a6d247fc31
describe
'118261' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
abc752a8ca92e4d3f7638b090ba7d21c
53440f86a2887bb5bd9b18cbc40c689c15f45587
describe
'46351' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
496dd9b96299f174bb494c9b04a0ce5d
d33fa1e232e22ddad5dee2fd9937b6289a0c4888
describe
'45180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
2c9ebca24ee654cbbcc7290518a2ded1
cbe2a6dcc28a26f08de4fb38da93051a190ec863
describe
'14422724' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ee0764cf5769a635cdfdfde093d31ba1
2f92eebc3a0ca8ba18e019f84a45cfb888f17906
describe
'1847' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f4638026bb8acb49e0f1d61188b1fe88
6796ec4f18bb2c2537a3c7222b7210c5ddf4ccf6
'2011-10-16T21:48:10-04:00'
describe
'27191' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
a5dd90992985a3717cc007c6d9434b82
e799003c4fa946b0ea4e9c136ce771e8fdd38aca
describe
'599958' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUCZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
903c27d799cc7b806221fbdf64738b4c
db7c07d787ea2fbbe3493f53e65080ca83e0ed01
'2011-10-16T21:48:22-04:00'
describe
'84900' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
fad19233c2abf76a25fad4fff2d76a6b
7d265d224f290c0b30b6f9c0e5c5851627fc7541
describe
'21459' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c2181b994622abd8619e711591b64058
d5971fd0fc27e716ed4710ef1e317ee0e7ac5342
'2011-10-16T21:49:35-04:00'
describe
'34548' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
59547d8b5bffacc905d644dbff9f27c6
666b822ad0923ba3983cda547dd38633820ca78a
describe
'14420800' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
0c30918ffdf890e7b7a1c751c1d20c3f
8926d1588c0b478ccc254494223350e26dd3d84f
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDE' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2b4ae9cfdad5ef619d5bc7f6a3f34022
be08a1ac507e3916b6a60a17b2ba703f7fb5482f
describe
'23827' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
947f1e91029f88bc6cace53edbd55146
8a890e213b335b1d7eed85dba5052ea4e6817e1b
describe
'599898' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
50a2ec68da7a05004b33ce90c50c4b6b
2d8bfa5adf4312ebdeb4cd44e305d94e2bbaee31
describe
'108313' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
43d5ed3bfd368c4dc5ad35b31519de09
6613df19f8639fbda55edc48f2b7905c4bb567fc
describe
'33922' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDI' 'sip-files00055.pro'
4e7c9909ea8a8fab66f8b29b81882895
c5aa7c2b1456b856f9df9d18ace3c4b5b52eeedc
describe
'41878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
5c798e5dad7775e00657381aa1a86b6e
0ebfb264036f679a9c2103c4b0425bf3f826b2a0
describe
'14422128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
e6da0b5e3de4c56f55db24eee52537e0
ad27fcc891749a33d0f7baea41454d4abea5537d
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
96b35d7124509f326772df3dc9caba23
c5c6fc3acd50b7a737d51cd7ab6b628eba778d34
describe
'26259' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
a4375612e093b381686e3fb2cdb96126
738f205a9661bf50296d579b456862a4633debb7
describe
'600059' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
c4693a7b2eb6f4e0ce26d5c4734adca0
da645acd8067b05ad0389dcafc51bc0d6b606c0b
describe
'120551' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
6ac50ca8868d30f7b8b1adcde51c1964
42dd13cc2e9df8d45613d41f7eb0d95902bfb0c7
'2011-10-16T21:48:00-04:00'
describe
'45292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
12f32d42d2736ddc90afebbf8eb9589f
8bc6f8a34d87b05aa6665aa7cc5c265227d29161
describe
'45967' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
300f250eb0a0a985a56d9fa2af2f9878
403888eec0d6abb269238e70f46f7b66b5541d7c
describe
'14422904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
43ac144b7e06eeb00998fae713768f46
a678e99765153464709921b310b688337ccfe645
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
cfa2505de327204ae57480bde66ec543
9c7e464c46d847c6500eff07d7f2a8cd915768c9
describe
'27602' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
07079a5ddd7cb6482527b56e7d401688
af6406772b3a9256e12bd0d428c945b27fec74a1
describe
'600097' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
8040db6943dc5a6d20b1656f238a8a45
9fea671fd7178b34c3e23ba9a3d4397afc27177a
describe
'110452' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6b1562a5f5ba21bffd711010e28a6c5a
3ec01680746c047ae1cdc79ca2498a1b72eefd01
describe
'33006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
56f8587a2e1c34865f49fc520bf4418c
eb42c1ef7cf3bee2b99ff7a674086d8745646606
describe
'43302' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
0ee515719c64c563ae57649a9256c159
2f0f85a5874660ae8603a2cb55c96e4b168db0c2
describe
'14422516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
6ad7e442002edc28d586c7a1491e768a
59f1681c05ade27677c630f8de3cd8ec9936b225
'2011-10-16T21:50:05-04:00'
describe
'1759' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUDZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
2abc31707a532e78472094cacccb2b0c
45bb668ad7d2613d1a7d729d82e2906db6ce1462
describe
'26926' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
2a29d02b4218fa8213edec48dd622bf1
1467d27cff24c439d7deb24929e2467ff5a38851
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
baa510bef948dc12292a567b8ceadce5
87a1ed1b78ba93b7378a28f43d3cb4ca46905732
describe
'116323' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
113691f551c9ddaf1b18fb2a6d4412d8
cb7695cf1bb628ce2bf4d3e7f78c91bfd74d3b99
describe
'42644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUED' 'sip-files00058.pro'
065bdfa368ca29da21653eb680b21b09
abd351a649fd3d120c68ed94cb7cffd9ddc6b3d0
describe
'44709' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
93ba3b1fb761cf8105c0e91341262ffd
6434bf2a4a3717b5c8ba69311ebcff4be076520a
describe
'14422684' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
05ee1b8f3fdc41a35e3d40c41ee24e4a
43930c3529b0eb19181eff25a29b138bf62c89e9
'2011-10-16T21:47:33-04:00'
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
5b4b531ba5d92fac551f1e1efaa17fc1
2af86c83df6fe5c0567db00c5eebcc74882f9472
describe
'27239' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
af21f11c74b1a5ca560fe83ef382f288
e626ae8acbd0bb10b35509a8d97cff0fc78bff54
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
a5ab23ebf0c27479d6a5ffb78841f25f
5477d97994c4007191a08e8d798cf23bc1fa05d2
describe
'68249' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
50bd6ac5e51bc75526fe6ef6871d5dfa
8d8427433841f11235b87b2b4379fa636802c3d6
describe
'20138' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
8f771fbfccb3f7b7496f788a8610885e
03b135063e649776ff254988c36c4b62b4accbdf
describe
'31461' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
0939c5c42275a80d284d4cc7a07d7e39
3b20f42db4357c9e86ca59045ae266f2b32bf0cb
describe
'14420156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
b6917c1d5690a42c78dfcb6036faa0e0
26155cda9f055e8bfdce806367504cd4f4083d85
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
541058b09499787095a4006793576c05
37c2fbb657776601a06ba26ccd392130fe1fdc4c
describe
'22509' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
8d9bbd76f98111bc0c9649e7711a08cc
52a7c3de3091b5ed8b71737a5c6201d64a502c2f
describe
'600052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
30dbd6ac641d2c553d225823c1168051
4936f7ebd2e8a610e07d3687b7166ab1ab6d550c
describe
'98131' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
5c4e5dbfb790df395dbd5e9fd08bdf28
ff71df12acb79e844d78eebde7bf9a5249ce11cc
describe
'34567' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUER' 'sip-files00060.pro'
78ffbfb81966890af8098521f15f647e
2caf86f2dd1cccb65382d775d7b524df06cafe77
describe
'37321' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUES' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
9e677af901624f2a998578b4276ec34a
f92d4ec83562a6bb4b12240bd53dda08dd73b461
describe
'14421180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUET' 'sip-files00060.tif'
67665a0b0aaa98b47140f3e88072d50c
f6127de5380dcbd0213fd84b260255466a89b34d
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEU' 'sip-files00060.txt'
1a654e698039c34d4346b1b4c3050191
be941c0f08bee8114d71e05811525246c3579b4a
describe
'24545' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
dbfbbb5ee84beed9765b3558c2ba19b3
07c66a1b6fb8a272ea399c76674a96da7e5b97e7
describe
'600040' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
b6361eab2b048cc264a340a293cbe847
78b3aaf5ffebb7fd11bf1f2c254d4376caa6994a
describe
'113251' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
4d3373ba1edc6f451b494a12a6188bf4
4068d997a76b1ea0a0d06cb57af1a9d4191ba389
describe
'44099' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
c61f7471d399fba0c46a80627946f757
07588286ac5b1eae308ca99c25017dfdefd50588
describe
'44216' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
ea3b9eb9f0a4b5774919c58d4b4b4a86
e38b6ad184c264309d100c040f6413118edcaff6
'2011-10-16T21:49:42-04:00'
describe
'14422520' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
47205fd67b9128b5c71d912b14441c11
952efc009fedb89dcddf730711ef3c73dd71fc9a
'2011-10-16T21:47:58-04:00'
describe
'1760' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
ec9bb8c41b6f778d828154b1b13f16b2
cad68d2903ac24faf28b9d66abffc58ec55eed57
describe
'26994' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
f45ee475ad180957fe04e0793a942803
dbcf49584abfa46bbb0069c6c1273c4a24c91431
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
7964dee8b0d29eef42d4401fd95324a1
063a2f9f9891171200bf9c5ace55bbf851fecaf6
describe
'114819' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
add39cea417557907046fe1ef46d7d53
91e8e3860ff34953146e466ac6050824378d5252
describe
'44950' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
7ca778a5a23014892b001b6912f1a73a
e4ec4fd1977d82cbb150a4c0afb78085551b67ca
describe
'44559' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
db99d93497f9f57a745e115b1bf7d818
fc0de7ef74f036a91154db0069b41ead5d7bf03b
describe
'14422540' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
694fddc7b19ef0dd18c0a988d0981070
335ea5126ba54ac4dc3a03de4197d5e08d8d6374
describe
'1771' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
d5da123eb0f205172636ecfe222a4ecf
fdae45b0af32a5dce22802235e85ca67309ea2b4
describe
'26986' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
357ed1cf49a50877768bc14ae7d18339
d4d4ec1005478a16ae3e7988480d6615bf893317
describe
'599887' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
03ea090af341418e4ca74e153beea0d6
d9552e4645241f79abeadb6313ed30a14a093f22
describe
'114995' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e08b3295b529ed68c6c3e794225fa0b5
8b7d088952e3ff75607487fe6f39a723912c5181
describe
'43451' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
a2ca3fcd44d9d89d3ac15a7278fdb7fe
773e3c2eebacda47522ee9f729b8c825977f45c0
describe
'45094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
3b8a5caa5339f2d58d1425c7ff9579bc
61e38bc192f9201634818520191095220aa7a7f1
describe
'14422648' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
4db5521714a66dbd8f4c3349d950d4e4
d74b96362d3e6337725e3372c03748241dbcd82c
describe
'1715' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
7e54147f94bcbb337703ba14233de15b
e34e555965369be312391eb3948e1f48a38a7a67
describe
'27192' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
89b824f6c7b9ad7aa3eddedd64389e1e
f54ea007c1e7b47e8d292fdce6b7371c19f28337
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
0e2da6238b00600e9d2f3474d8ec7506
0137db29e9947fd9b558f29ca87f9a51d4718507
describe
'115428' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
f6958d46a29795a68ca5741a8aadcd89
93ae53a3d89c5dcd429526c605f8971053027f98
describe
'42442' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
ce11aaeac417dbf1f045b36052efef8e
f7e84a378a11a104e9158d319c197fb00f95e574
describe
'43420' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
9ec576014aa88e85a52d4a034b054d63
b13c88b22597816d19aa237c4001ce0e6b946176
'2011-10-16T21:49:08-04:00'
describe
'14422360' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
2bcac13311836d6153017174c99ac9e8
517d4a200b626db1ce55503085cdabec9b90115c
'2011-10-16T21:49:25-04:00'
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFW' 'sip-files00064.txt'
8a12c796ba83216ac651d7f1320c43a1
0ae2e411aaa1dc4120aff30af669f80a8d7367c1
describe
Invalid character
'26619' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFX' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
d5b9488480f4739005bba9a577dcfc5c
7f352352b45659b5cbe68accc013bce69c2c0d6b
describe
'599794' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
4a5abbcec19ee881cf838f9303a0c63d
b5d1a57fc4ad548b3cde325d36cc5e6727f02c64
describe
'100599' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
55ca27f28f12879ce6b694cac9d03612
88902fe322e267f4ec207b665de2f1adadb53072
describe
'34223' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
b8be37a06d6b5aab75be6f986f3c177b
05d7dcee9cf8bde83936cde69e41460b13caaf75
describe
'39052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
e4ac166ac1b90da3fb5444f6f619a784
16ea39a4b4d4e8c2c5641e89b3be20dd5c6bec04
describe
'14421608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e87be8363ee8771c3c06083ecc5387cb
58457ffff9ea6a24da848bf73fad708d0da1e09e
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGD' 'sip-files00065.txt'
450d0b26c2c6f322aa1c3d9945100576
02dd6ee72ee9cbf7d97fea015c803015a515c945
describe
'25175' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
eb6f3415c96a6aa1a27de0763dd571d9
60a434380f1e3f9499d2c721771068ba049a3989
describe
'600096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
190dc8884148f3f3b78b4fb51103a5c2
8c17d9007f15460f4ea8e59a170622530ef19ae0
describe
'122386' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
249b3971936d48b41dd9a32aa95f54a6
e94f7732d757d88930b41d675e24ae9e048b206b
describe
'46923' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
062f3fc7a45be48c3740a2b9046a83f5
93ae16d02c9f8e0be892ceea96e81cca2fc2126e
describe
'46397' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
d257d440b596314137da07d9a9bd4db4
bb8daaf99b4835ebfb59d48394acd86113fa8253
describe
'14422948' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
3a4a7c14b02ef9f3977a2b506343cfe9
630afd039d8a13f0c6d5e7754fab9ac864c6b069
'2011-10-16T21:47:41-04:00'
describe
'1821' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
a48b78a1719b4c178c36016f41bfcee6
e1135fe2cdddc99d2d614f79f97cd14ecfb6421f
describe
'27595' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
5078da06d92c879b0c2ec81b8a5bc331
c66cc643a7de00c65f9f806263cd750d96019695
describe
'600067' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
0138e2443dd95ccfaf8c6b680d4a79f5
bc1ac9f567e188da0bfa6947dc39f783eb06781f
describe
'108713' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGN' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
73249ee31f5b82af4a5fe1cc65bbf2ee
97664e3d4a0707667fbc240221379405e6b1203e
describe
'30093' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
573a3e41d2c5b37959344a673b0ff576
92b5799960c1f1f5effd40a2bf2738dc7318bd88
describe
'43543' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
98433fa70a9e74d56a19d515ba10f3e2
cc55268cc426d60c52f9653d989d582c3d8c5559
describe
'14422708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
dfea3bb33d2fcb107e0edcd2f2d21bee
b71fc9e2b8f0d4c73e2f31135c2bb51b1843c2d4
'2011-10-16T21:47:56-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
82fad48681e376405c4029682c2a72e8
2d4c0340f21fe7f97cb0f49f1c321f8f7c16e084
'2011-10-16T21:48:46-04:00'
describe
'27365' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGS' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e918deef19ef120360d5b24c3ab6141a
764c4e128f4d10cb9ea211a3daad5872ed1bea05
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGT' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
f3c10245e6d63ed86160c7a0c6c31340
6744bc7b7b8df2840b803e67d7eb61a7691642c9
describe
'120188' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
1fbfb0ad9c38a254b0908cb5a59c81b1
cdbecc6f17ca6e89c2bd9d39dc7ce926b1cedba0
describe
'41007' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
d2df968b3d8fcebf7c9a88a00401c86e
7c07750461eb8862c3514dfb86e7330016c867e1
describe
'47273' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
9e4b7fab14f9c8e74599dcda6779a80c
6c7f805b91fc5487ad2bb3e4fc091ebbdf073de3
describe
'14423600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGX' 'sip-files00068.tif'
ffa01cd97612eb3d2cabd824aefbcc2e
c1d8aca82b32808fb638631faaaa54cc93c15b3b
'2011-10-16T21:48:23-04:00'
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
eb8914a996b8c644ed2570c359535e4a
fa92b60874bf2e1ce973ff58ebc9a58fb6046a07
describe
'28696' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUGZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
27de31ee53b0e4940593a34ee434e604
31565cd797b7d10b46961946ead1467bd51b6f81
describe
'600094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
9ff77c9056fe408916c13b699b04fc9a
60a96a7d4cf724fa5a6854f64170382808192ef1
describe
'118286' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
fb0d41d01fcdabee8153b25347eb7100
31a4761a0a54d5ffa3a2c7a360292f5e03521b7a
describe
'46380' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
000839fda9ff285040455465b48d2ca8
0aa45fc07b477f8d60a0f4e3577d8440a0ea8961
describe
'44840' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
b1b6cf069c394245a97860f241b8670e
43e21bef61db8de1914f6b800fed27ac6a88295d
describe
'14422496' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
73d8c60414b3860d4028356eb3409e20
562d31140612a725f08d9dac0e62932d7399d06d
describe
'1851' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHF' 'sip-files00069.txt'
fed6f55c98cea2782af863e065bacb7e
78e59dd3ce97c4ed1c6415210eaab96892f44254
describe
'26834' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
9ba36d87f9423f65acc53e7ef06975c3
3cd0bb025e460bef74272df84d1a2f579c55b4ef
describe
'600103' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
46ee436df2693e34976640d18547b79e
0557c0c246b2104d491e8faa5253234cd232bfc9
describe
'60303' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
c6437c066cf34137d8bb6b69638ac27f
bd24cd1633baa685cbda1a21bcf14ef338faa2c9
describe
'11033' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
b7571939a7cf034c6b8f9a22ac33c9a1
b6f37b11cc09013eca875fafa4c029cfbb52b5d2
describe
'27739' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
90480cb60beec9f7184919e5d16daaeb
f9f67962a584fe31024b34e5556494b9761fe5d4
describe
'14419572' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
56cd4eb6de57b130024f2495d174df24
7dc21f51b9800a0c4def8bac8c6fbeeaa4125d00
describe
'450' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
7ee81cae7ec7619dc59acee945f98c13
50414b867285dd91f4341ce6c259785e9f9eb73f
describe
'21507' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHN' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
51c6ffda81937dcac956970a3f7b4afd
157d59c68a1c75e34e250b8f7555e95b200d3e89
describe
'600092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
274f2ea57ce6b97e94ff08a24cdc2d8f
02a4f0db2ca0f6e07cf4f8cf58ca394b96a1b542
describe
'105531' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHP' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
6117d7df4d650bd9ffa4daad6d999575
5fae8142a469d80784366dbf2c84ef8749f13a46
describe
'36698' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
52c72b32003968c10e6d11334e989e00
7c3c56c1f668ccec4c0331398ddbd6e6ef6af950
describe
'40690' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
4d5e990599e1c7d02bece0d76f3dd069
2ab16dcaa6b267bca6759fcde45f537e56630911
describe
'14421816' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHS' 'sip-files00071.tif'
8c58dee2b12415056c6c98c22b155e39
2a5c7bdd190c9febd3ece3f0b7d35672a879d839
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHT' 'sip-files00071.txt'
7a2bffc0609d9dbae841bcd58a1c2f0b
f98d58e635605d98dcc8f428e3fb11964c2413b2
describe
'25640' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
95f3967e45876cd4850a725b1f819fad
8ccad094fae8a13502a9d9e814ebbe8bceb4e4d8
describe
'600082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
02e3eec1a12bb6b8536b5bcb403fc93e
88a6fc28f6b4e2f03ff6d9db4fe96908a67744fb
describe
'123981' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
d817ceb0f205479fb61be9223cfaefb1
49a50c2c4fe0da6df1e95c138a9c7577548ca74b
describe
'46822' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
94e223e10c809c90e414cbf2a3c20331
3cd2b93e29086261b3663d22145e91afdcc8650f
describe
'46252' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a63ed03e38f8f9b59b9e4065b9cf22b1
d346c2275595f043ad048d6bdaa00ad21f8c3d6c
describe
'14422812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUHZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
a07e43243dce31af2474b5681a467f7b
0e0d21868fa2d1c70467368be95fe46826d332e6
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
030f7d55953cf91d37958255679dbd66
e2b2667b4d0cbbec4958da7bfff86ccaac57f145
describe
'27474' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIB' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
4555c5a7c53a7a46242798f450e463c8
72dc0490811c19c1fc8a87bc14862826ec94029b
describe
'600077' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIC' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
70a645accac2f92739506547d200c5a4
8d1e1195d1640da84223b18948d4cac2539c75f9
describe
'112683' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUID' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
c03b0d8a6adbef60c25598f976473b14
c7744a86e1fa26334878e08d6ed83c28d23fbfda
describe
'3621' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIE' 'sip-files00075.pro'
c2219781530eec611067a50833a4dce7
18824ad77d53a70ce5a0be1c28603065d41386f2
describe
'45541' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIF' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
bf230dec0dc8919a0f377de40188226b
68db362307ae585ee9ce0f4d9d1f894f8af8fb83
describe
'14423792' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIG' 'sip-files00075.tif'
e82981a89f8fae60af502b65c74e6710
0d8ed4798612c63dfa2e15d1a616c54677338c6b
describe
'490' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIH' 'sip-files00075.txt'
c29dd09f2b7e3824a4b90124f906ded2
80862bc5c2fda845af50972b7ac82dccbb190736
describe
Invalid character
'29138' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUII' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
05cd249fa13cc2b2ec14da356ee304f1
5fa1de1daf8f2f851f035612872e978c72967de0
describe
'600088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIJ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
768244b09ae9bcc745ae89a52306cd01
0e45b2ea29ecce546c5f76dc9228c0db764ea4bd
describe
'124937' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIK' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
373214ab6e3f7418ca1a04548854f3cc
326bb930e70dcb5f0f8f5bd55ae9c65dd8c070b8
describe
'46606' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIL' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6f7155253ea2262de225aca9e76a1998
61585043999047ed79f4a4ca5a144af43a4e8b5b
'2011-10-16T21:49:27-04:00'
describe
'46637' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIM' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
fb01db204fef4d51f3f10e525efb5ba1
d27a4d73b89f7fe5b5a5286a5f54a4c2f38e76f3
describe
'14422936' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIN' 'sip-files00077.tif'
5f8cd658013d80ac4d25c61079ba1e6c
4f5cc99ec0e64a2482d3ebc4d2ea6e7f64a18273
describe
'1820' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIO' 'sip-files00077.txt'
91bb5306aa1b8686d50d302707b974c8
f7cc7c8e45353d37d9eeb68b602ee255a5bd07ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIP' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
9a472bfcf5a7e858f8cf83c9dc957c9c
635e8a23da1e40b93d3e3225e0f6a1f8f3fcf077
describe
'600057' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIQ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
922e2fa241a3248e34336fe52bd24c1f
ff6133717e7e6f73453e6991ab54e04d28c4490f
describe
'114547' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIR' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
d305add44e22e32677aa59720a09bd03
dd19422a2c38a7bc5b85245cb5f0a36a6416abeb
describe
'42462' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIS' 'sip-files00078.pro'
7e7a2996f5b9cd623686fec3d1a72189
3ebd3321f4d9e7ae5e8d21dee2a9f41e3a3bf23d
describe
'45002' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIT' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
9c9e277e21481d0e6ea1e0148c3340e5
0600fa454d12d08cd5ae7169417560ce6af1c30d
describe
'14422672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIU' 'sip-files00078.tif'
1a1c26bf9ee8dc036146837470bcf7de
93b102813091c9d3c49df2a00740b60ce49ac1d8
'2011-10-16T21:47:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIV' 'sip-files00078.txt'
934554c2767b1faf761d8c39d6373ebb
1d3538666cdec29fa3bb152c0acb6956b512816d
describe
'27280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIW' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
2403aac894178d7c8652d37ffde04e4a
c8d66595b8d01d6f5f33044574e649f7b1882c76
describe
'600098' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIX' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
60dc73338af6c993599cb22aca37912c
68feba9e78ae4babff85649523b0f196499a8246
describe
'108711' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIY' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
dbdaf086f62db739b6b3f6902b800e57
effa0bb49318d222b8538de31ad1f817921c38bf
describe
'37655' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUIZ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
a3818e28a8e3386f805418a9b900772f
48a24e11c94186b7f3f71631530b5f7588ea219a
describe
'42583' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJA' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
77d469acf0a59ac176cb4f7fdaea72d5
0b47f6de7c7069f9847197dd03c3438f8f1c6991
describe
'14422428' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJB' 'sip-files00079.tif'
2c14a43215eb4f862405b566fa5ef315
eded79a8902dc3742e49124e7480dc6418aa4b30
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJC' 'sip-files00079.txt'
e0a8be9895acb95671d82d8be9d3ccc9
e9b024b7e713d4ade5bea49c3acadc1d35071e68
describe
Invalid character
'26495' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJD' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
44afdece5471255b44e81635744fc4fa
2f16346c496c9853c29767da5ca1ff7b91a03e41
describe
'599954' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJE' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
1f6dee7c6c4cf698cc84facb9562e014
2aae88f1b4b02cefcbd2d591096ab3e5e219f999
describe
'100098' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJF' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
02a1aeee64e94107cc3de34d3c28abeb
4d855ab7fe9f9513930c93e70b237ccec2746c0a
describe
'34638' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJG' 'sip-files00080.pro'
a6342500f436ff08ebea0674f091305f
57fa30e2d7ab625149a685521003f08890707f8e
describe
'39472' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJH' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
864c74de7f8d66b705a764a48ece1100
4aea07a5f9a5715ae32865c89f8f5f672ba9bf24
describe
'14421660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJI' 'sip-files00080.tif'
e85d4387e09e626175bb3f9fe6eb2cbb
fa974835530fed8f555635db5e88c730f425625c
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJJ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
c2aaaeaf39511d39f801054de89bf31a
0c8e298cbc57360c140ca03561a93f9717e324bb
describe
'25363' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJK' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
8631dcecfb38970ea6896de4bff1909c
4dac9423612a02ad9ffe64e8bf1af8c4346a8793
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJL' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
54012dcc1ba60fdebe8738001701064d
fdbb5e8bc89ba739c299e941ef423511bf993f14
'2011-10-16T21:47:29-04:00'
describe
'96994' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJM' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
58196e9ac626903c027aca044128b5e8
725581d034ffb55af4b250875283362c40b705f4
describe
'19077' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJN' 'sip-files00081.pro'
70af9717465d2763957b6c2e4321b0e3
a31fdc60b52db6789c62760b9b4eb7c2587e309d
describe
'39850' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJO' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e3240418f7014da04e03e2f7edf0bfe9
5d5e6dcf60f7d269dafc4ead8c9fbb3b9b0f6f67
describe
'14422144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJP' 'sip-files00081.tif'
b16752d69905b1a095ecbf706f468aad
9dfb3e7094600fef216798b8283231b163016789
'2011-10-16T21:49:17-04:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJQ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
70c13ecc9fdbf6d3a003d41da5cd7bd5
682e19245bbbf43b7d27778c8ace6d6bf8215d26
describe
'26413' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJR' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
7700334d5f662b8b9d5158a6b5e00d0e
a4898b9fce0eaaf4350027e2464d0ac4c9a6da17
describe
'600070' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJS' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
0f52802a84dcdcc9e22e17fb81914a0f
396be38843a85b52c117434941375a0b093db25c
describe
'130811' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJT' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
c02dce2a36716a79462504b9d5edd842
28813f21936d8f635427714d20d9a46dde95de85
describe
'46199' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
80198f9a7eea5a90c290d1137a47047d
18a5914dd159e0474ab8265c0a05ae6c933bf586
describe
'48278' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJV' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
78f85fdae2224e149c55ed0f4445c130
642a84dfdb691e5cae531aa8e40268051d43e87f
'2011-10-16T21:47:55-04:00'
describe
'14423272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJW' 'sip-files00082.tif'
79d74f97f1f8760c16347d7ce18821e6
7d45768cf80370412cd862cb1a5a857cbec28def
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJX' 'sip-files00082.txt'
94acaf4fccb298bc595e8d441cda410e
d52b3a1c9dd408f1760fe80ec3190547b4b757cc
describe
'28231' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJY' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
e034007277425bc52db826b4d68b1881
ec70b43c4b9ba907bcd8f2ec5777459869786218
describe
'600039' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUJZ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
f5328bffb781a88a72dc790448c5c7da
aeb28a88fbbfe47cfc105e91be7d97d8534f19d3
describe
'118942' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKA' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
9b51a94bb1c09e02385c3b24048ca375
499669c8521b40272fdaaa642b6d34ff8a14c493
describe
'46180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKB' 'sip-files00083.pro'
6cc5733bf42fd920e186319c58bb7ccc
76b9d64648780ba99eff01f22a3f01fd32ebf0f1
describe
'43908' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKC' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
a9e9ed12e30902d9f8ac58359690b939
7854d589f5cbd3941f2ff036294dcc2f8cf7df7e
describe
'14422424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKD' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e631775af9506d017836ba46a14f7137
90ad029829cc61f275087480e40c8ac01dedd127
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKE' 'sip-files00083.txt'
17aebcfe3d828be1017e2be14ed06fc1
c582f2e93f14564b1ddf0bd8e9535f92caeb9aae
describe
'26571' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKF' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
9caed7faba03c351233193465a79e9a0
99bc4783f5685047d05d130cdb16b3b74aa4c09b
describe
'600053' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKG' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
ed36ebf4b2241e61938a4237681cd1fb
4a46206fb193b6bd4aed177db9f2491fdeb17f92
describe
'77510' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKH' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
97b83c962b40397381763e520b1a4dbf
31f86b741ffde53ebcfffc224d5f20d4afd23bf6
describe
'18593' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKI' 'sip-files00084.pro'
1e944bd837ea88d71fb87cd89734e793
65b286332a37f334e607971b05f900b890fbeaea
describe
'32643' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKJ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
83f71d6b8e71172345f66a237ed1412b
ac79cb971baa0a00d7de88d474c63ffce8abf033
describe
'14420472' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKK' 'sip-files00084.tif'
3fda11f4943189c36ef2ee3d9f5856f5
32f60dd04803cf0fbb3c3592b90f5ce37e119341
describe
'744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
039b37de9a2f53bb8b661c04ae1b4bed
2673473900b02c9d5d4607e10cae403d34c3f0d1
describe
'23080' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKM' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
21efffd037aae5c26dc1b8d2bc643daf
835222dbefd95cd0344b006360eef65337fb4d9b
describe
'600069' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKN' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
d21e9222cc63794aa8ff45090f857cc6
2cfaac4b07fef8560f8889d492426e13752a29cf
describe
'107867' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKO' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
dbc81a2c7a8fff0fd023db7a7dc892c9
ba399949d6e175a85e0481bddba956872ff41a4a
describe
'34877' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKP' 'sip-files00085.pro'
e60a139382fa6c9e965c1d15a1e634d0
19dae3c48673943c84bc89a58648523d9b5746de
describe
'42139' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKQ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
5764f76480acadd4e863b66c69b139a3
bdc9dba8698bb44ab146211a1fe29bdf12e65c9b
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKR' 'sip-files00085.tif'
ce06ddd1090c72eca073147f931ccbc4
134a5292f26b5b52b8a0877b8714fbd05dd271a8
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKS' 'sip-files00085.txt'
85909b5f2aac8bb6b5ca1afbb574f151
97672702d6f4808982de087e9474c41a63ea6c67
describe
'26055' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKT' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
0d56715b21e3cabc6231e7078b46830f
867a6d1d318df2c85c1bd0ef64d717e13d80a116
describe
'600049' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKU' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e1449dfc515905fa8ddaed53e189f8d7
de930aaf80da61bf9759e7d37d02103ce6bc6c37
describe
'123496' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKV' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ee143b30e6d0e1031bebb2e84f1ead25
3a34181f92fc3bf6ffe348efea202af9ca5b7251
describe
'46426' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKW' 'sip-files00086.pro'
3d5de7bc79f5d24f39213ef1d88dc2eb
0628aaaf8264875f87da91b8a90073102c037b31
describe
'44855' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKX' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
81acf073cab626dd7bf31ec14a3de4cb
3ab698083b78f01152fef8a1154116e2d35ac07b
describe
'14422472' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKY' 'sip-files00086.tif'
7a53c68ff6189bfd9e1958a4dc7763ab
4f928f531d853fccb23993a8c61e88534723dbb9
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUKZ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
6869599e48f72c812625678a5e9e4dbf
2874688d78979dc8b3cb373c6113119f94ac9947
describe
'26853' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULA' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
3fcea21f5032433ef3bec5d7d9dd5151
35fcdc357465822d311cd604fea1fbf6a23bb41f
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULB' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
2022d5ec6f8f5f0949ccb2c93c55b563
5e95c4d3ba889676e5bd281340662cf0323db29b
describe
'110445' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULC' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
79f2daad626aaa2df1a2e5a47f3476d2
cd4bb0ab8189bffd8e9c2494e3d36c1e1af0e2b4
describe
'5405' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULD' 'sip-files00089.pro'
f3dc465061c28cd641b5a70825d811ff
3caf05dd7f287da316885a67f86fe607d6c986c5
describe
'45961' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULE' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
b18148af50eeebae0f7619743c75d539
e99cb3837ed1a2c25698d028fd9c62c3b532e62e
describe
'14424100' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULF' 'sip-files00089.tif'
a81f93ed3f93dfda3143e5f54c5c6d86
e8e80f4f38042596b0e1b20d8238e2ccd366e47f
'2011-10-16T21:48:11-04:00'
describe
'308' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULG' 'sip-files00089.txt'
403c0d6d06212b614d7a87c6a524633e
ea8064bc2df6adde4a69d9f238e54e4c4b8661da
describe
'29729' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULH' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
4e7a05f204a704d7cf2bc35966e5e12e
249eed0dab19c29ad7484a239dd9257d90f88108
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
e45508a75f7809a3b3ad1abc334d820c
bfea074554174c9bca148320237fea83fd337019
describe
'104823' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULJ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c8aa1e7f676d25bc92e0cd72cb3d8c10
1b0b79a6553c457116f724019eee0104cab4c383
describe
'38114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
41332bd8ad0fb4e12cbf654f7a597452
bec9303a11f26ebfe83386763cf301037c6229cd
describe
'40817' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
1c3bf78233df6bb4b33c75e5fa77e235
c3cd9f60f906c0d7d1939e1d5d341dea8aa971a5
describe
'14422068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULM' 'sip-files00091.tif'
f377750777cd80efd9497f58ef4ae26a
aa7de731223e0edce56ba53724983abe36053a66
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULN' 'sip-files00091.txt'
3b68d37c21df76ee33738368e735ebc4
1c60b2d71ebdfbd57ce1addfc63b4ae7863bc2a0
describe
'26016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
d343c57825daaf76bf179244b019bfcc
4899351a703a0304eff43ee10121dbd5d69fdef9
describe
'600062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULP' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
120ae45e42b85cd72fda5fcf50cd2ce4
95d13f2ccb91d3eea288f0297f459b41a42b7310
describe
'84135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULQ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
7b56a6591640591923f586da541a7a7a
4d406b057b7e75c4511a4253af390358f7570b8d
describe
'24977' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULR' 'sip-files00092.pro'
c0976a190b76e508f6e94efecf4785ad
85d9afccab2ac8bcb60c5f831ae4482ddaa41f72
describe
'35875' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULS' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
255fb51a0de51eacf220fcc618ee03d8
15cb9cd1a78bc68f7a78188cb3a6159ddbc623c6
describe
'14421028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULT' 'sip-files00092.tif'
83b7c0bd64547e20034b5cf281a7f311
28539ddc69c3a3580fca17ab727e94eee4c60c44
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULU' 'sip-files00092.txt'
2cdf086402eb7093d12cb1bf739d4cb6
b37257df8a988db3e4fa9953ee5b1c7dea76b111
describe
'24241' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULV' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
14230484d1dafaf3a8b890babe632de6
c6b5366f865f4cf6755763b042510ea72119fa83
describe
'673167' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULW' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
45282351e58e8a75769aca9cc412b4b6
b61d8044c4b4e378f6f1b80d3aa32931b2fa9f2b
describe
'48264' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULX' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8f4fcfd3656c52eb7bc0c0e010f89e2e
4ca162c92c7e15b2f1796e6a8a4afd661940700f
describe
'26272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
e5fedde0dbcc82563ddb2626b9b8066a
e86f541ab66b744bfc35b3331f840aaf8c72f7de
describe
'16172800' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAULZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
9e616f09cb690ed3abb12143c704c0e8
77c58ea910075337b7886d21c57316af24f25a37
describe
'21132' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMA' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
a2e7a34b1059a7eabc90e015c433e4e7
1493f411e3ce04bf3676ecdf5874197a571ae044
describe
'659901' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMB' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
eda1dcc0cae794745b3bc6f980986bf1
73a91f913d9df26886b277b83c814c7daaf427ee
describe
'51799' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMC' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
80f52221b796a4d037c2e15df5a39e11
4cf0958cbacf08382d8237b5b4fe2b256e1db233
describe
'24062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMD' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
b6757f60535597f44b157b786c4a38cf
867b84e2aa6d0c32e209edef4c37080fab0dfb4b
describe
'15855588' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUME' 'sip-files00098.tif'
56c8dabeac4e38ebc90a935fcacab7d8
92cdc9338f05a0b2418f9aa1df12a708f62cc790
'2011-10-16T21:48:21-04:00'
describe
'19840' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
ff8ae239f6ea6ededd7b6d4e61667e47
e7876bc3dc31bb4fb98c217264f3f2a10bd823a3
describe
'53277' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMG' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
4cc318c06e0ffb5946397bc477deff72
25ecb2dc39c48bd8412dd119358f46ab2ec0c9c4
describe
'52680' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMH' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
4dfe6d9a6d7cb2cdccfb164eac6bf580
fa9242b8c39dd66c08e342472bfa553cd69c1186
describe
'222' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMI' 'sip-files00099.pro'
787e805b4b024275ea82c9412f5c5734
994f7f23ab5e8f87079a8269bca813ae2b13f217
describe
'24907' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMJ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
38211fb3fa759789d552780b56123036
dc8acb8d618149b2e2306819dc7e44e1e4379225
describe
'1300708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMK' 'sip-files00099.tif'
58d21bd88951ff736d056d15b4da3e75
254bdafaeca5bbf4f44fc67d438cbbfc2ac0f314
describe
'20403' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUML' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
55ea595718db69b81ff0746577a6b407
e0d3922470ab39e80ecfcc788c17224090b86a58
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMM' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
39d2a1c09990334675da5ea1d894f858
55957b400bd934c27c4e3547fb17c0bf31b29b44
describe
'136838' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMN' 'sip-filesUF00080482_00001.mets'
220341f90aa04421f2b9cde39725d6a1
d92009a38a27cb4c0d2b976477d0e578300877b5
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T06:09:13-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'175278' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFBfileF20080328_AAAUMQ' 'sip-filesUF00080482_00001.xml'
463133e7c25cf3932ef22c9406f2a39a
0484b72030eacf02b05841ac43e3b0237aca26b0
describe
'2013-12-19T06:09:12-05:00'
xml resolution