Citation
Tales from the Arabian nights' entertainments

Material Information

Title:
Tales from the Arabian nights' entertainments
Series Title:
Castle series
Uniform Title:
Arabian nights
Cover title:
Arabian nights
Creator:
Gall & Inglis ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh
Publisher:
Gall & Inglis
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
252 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Arabs -- Folklore -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Folklore -- Juvenile fiction -- Arab countries ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1891 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Children's stories
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscripiton.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Statement of Responsibility:
with illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026568232 ( ALEPH )
ALG1491 ( NOTIS )
187308788 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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The Baldwin Library

University
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Florida





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TUE

ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS





“ While ascending with the princess into the air, he'said, “ Sultan
of Cashmire, when you wish to espouse princesses who implore your
protection, learn first to obtain their consent,”—The Enchanted Horse,



TALES

FROM THE

ARABIAY NIGHTS

ENTERTAINMENTS

Wits J-LusTRATIONS

Te ondon
GALL AND INGLIS, 25 PATERNOSTER SQUARE;
AND EDINBURGH.







CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION, . ¢ . .
Tue FABLE or THE Ass, THE Ox, AND THE Diouwin:

Tur Srory oF THE MreRCHANT AND THE GENIUS, ;
Tue Hisrory or tue First OLD Man AND THE Hinp, f
Tur Hisrory or THE Second OLD Man snp THE Two

Brack Docs, . é 2 : 4
Tur History CF THE saneat AN, 3 ‘ .
Tur History oF THE GREEK KING AND Doak AN THE Puy-

SICIAN, : : : ; : : : : ‘

Tur History or THE HusBAND AND THE PaRRor,

Tue History oF THE VIZIER WHO WAS PUNISHED,

Tur Hisrory or Tue Youne Kine or tHE Biacx Isies,

Tur Hisrory or tie THREE CALENDERS, Sons oF Kryas,
AND oF I'tvE Lapres or Bacpan, .

Tur Hisrory or rue First CALENDER, THE Soy OF A Kine,

Tur Hisrory or THE SECOND CALENDER, THE SON OF A ia,

Tur Hisvory or tue Exvious MAN AND OF HIM WHO WAS
ENVIED, ; ‘ ; : : . : : :

Ture History or THE TurrD CALENDER, THE Son or A KING,

Tur History or ZOBEIDE,

Tne History or AMINE, . é ‘ Fs ‘ :

Tue Hisrory or SINDBAD THE 8: AILOR,

Tap First VoyaGE OF SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

THE SECOND VOYAGE OF SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

Tur Tutrp VoyacE or SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

THe FourtH VoyacE oF SINDBAD THE SAILOR, .

Tue Firria Voyace or SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

Tue Sixtu Voyace or SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

THE SeventH VoYAGE or SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

THe Turee APPLES, . ; ‘ .
Tur History or THE LADY WHO WAS MURDERED, AND OF
THE Younc MAN HER HuSBAND, . : 7 : ,

Tre History or NouREDDIN ALI AND BEDREDDIN Hassan,
Tit Hisrory or rur Liretz HuncHpack, i a z

24
26

27

37

56
61

67
77

97
106
108
lil
115
120
126
130
135
140

143
146
173



lv CONTENTS.

pac
Tue STORY TOLD BY THE PURVEYOR OF THE SULTAN OF CasGARr, 178
Tus STORY TOLD BY THE JEWISH PHYSICIAN, . . . 1S8
Tue STORY TOLD BY THE TAILOR, . . - : : 191
Tur History oF THE BARBER, . . . . . 203
Tur History oF THE BARBER’S First BRoruer, . . 205
Tur Hisrory OF THE BARBER’s SECOND BROTHER, . : 208
Tar Hisrory or THE BARbEr’s TurrD Broruer, . : 212
Tur Hisrory or tuE Barser’s Fourri Brotuer, . 7 216
Ture Hisrory oF THE BARBER’S Firru BRroruer, : . 219
Tue Hisrory oF THE Barzer’s StxtH BROTHER, ; : 92

Tur Story oF THE ENCHANTED Horse. . . : 234.



THE

ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS,

+4

ir is written in the chronicles of the Sassanians, those ancient
monarchs of Persia, who extended their empire over the continent
and islands of India, beyond the Ganges, and almost to China, that
there once lived an illustrious prince of that powerful house, who
was as much beloved by his subjects for his wisdom and prudence,
as he was feared by the surrounding states, from the report of hig
bravery, and the reputation of his hardy and well-disciplined army.

This king died after a long and glorious reign, and Schahriar, his
eldest son, who was endowed with all the virtues of his father,
reigned in his stead. Not long after he ascended the throne, he
married a beautiful lady, and for ten years lived very happily with
her as his queen. But having discovered that she held secret inter-
course with one of his officers, he ordered them loth to be executed,
and in his rage vowed, that in order to prevent the possibility of
such an occurrence in future, he would marry a wife every night,
and have her strangled in the morning.

The sultan failed not to observe the cruel law he had imposed
on himself, and ordered his grand vizier to bring him the daughter
of one of his generals. The vizier obeyed ; and the sultan next
morning delivered her into the hands of the vizier for execution,
and commanded him to procure another against the following night,
However repugnant these commands might be to the vizier, he was
obliged to submit. He then brought the sultan the daughter of a
subaltern officer, who, as usual, suffered death the next morning.
The next was the daughter of a citizen. And thus every day was
a maiden married, and every day a wife sacrificed.

The report of this unexampled inhumanity spread a universal
consternation through the city. In one place a wretched father
was in tears for the loss of his daughter, in another the air resounded
with the groans of tender mothers, who dreaded lest the same fate
should attend their offspring. In this manner, instead of the praises
wd blessings with which, till now, they loaded their monarch, all
his subjects poured out imprecations on his head.

The grand vizier, who, as has been mentioned, was the unwilling
-agent of this horrid injustice, had two daughters ; the elder was
called Scheherazadé, and the youngest Dinarzadé. The latter was
by no means deficient in merit : bus Scheherazadé was possessed of



(6 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

a degree of courage beyond her sex, She had read much, and was
possessed of so great a memory that she never forgot anything once
learned. Besides this, her beauty was incomparable ; and all these
valuable qualities were crowned by her virtuous disposition.

The vizier was passionately fond of so deserving a daughter. As
they were conversing together one day, she addressed him in these
words: ‘‘I have a favour to ask of you, my father; and I entreat
you not to refuse me.” ‘‘ I will not refuse you,” replied he, ‘‘pro-
vided the request be just and reasonable.” ‘It is impossible,”
added Scheherazadé, ‘to be more just, as you will judge from the
motives I have in making it. My design is to put a stop to this
dreadful barbarity which the sultan exercises over the inhabitants
of this city. I wish to dispel the just apprehension which all
mothers entertain for the safety of their daughters.” ‘‘ Your inten-
tion, my child,” said the vizier, ‘‘is very laudable; but the evil
which you wish to cure seems to me without a remedy ; how would
you set about it?” ‘Since, by your means,” replied Scheherazadé,
“the sultan celebrates a fresh marriage every day, I conjure you,
by the tender affection you have for me, to procure me the honour
of being his bride.” This speech filled the vizier with horror, and
he imagined she had lost her senses to make so dangerous a request ;
but to all his remonstrances she replied, ‘“‘I am aware of the
danger I run, but it does not deter me from my purpose. If I die,
my death will be glorious; and if I succeed, I shall render my
country an important service.” ‘‘ Your obstinacy,” replied he,
“excites my anger; why can you wish thus to rush to your own
destruction? They who do not look forward to the end of a dan-
gerous enterprise, know not how to bring it to a fortunate con-
clusion, The same thing will, I fear, happen to you which did to
the ass.” ‘What happened to the ass?” replied Scheherazade.
“Listen to me,” answered the vizier, ‘and I will relate the story.”

The Fuble of the Ass, the Ox, und the Labourer.

A very rich merchant had several houses in the country, where
he bred a considerable number of cattle of various descriptions.
He understood the language of beasts; but obtained this privilege
only on the condition of not imparting what he heard to any one,
under the penalty of death.

He had put by chance an ox and an ass into the same stall; and
being one day seated near them, he heard the ox say to the ass:
‘How happy do I think your lot, when I consider the repose you
enjoy, and the little labour you are required to perform. A servant
looks after you with great care, washes you, feeds you with fine
sifted barley, and gives you fresh and clean water; your greatest
task is to carry the merchant, our master, when he has occasion to
take a short journey ; but for that your whole life would be passed
in idleness. “How different now is the manner in which they treat
mé my condition is as unfortunate as yours is pleasant. They



FABLE OF THE ASS, THE OX, ETC. q

yoke me to a plough, with which they make me turn up the ground
the whole day ; while the labourer, who is constantly behind, con-
tinually urges me on with his goad. The weight and force of the
plough, too, chafes all the skin from my neck. When I have worked
from morning till night, they give me unwholesome dirty beans, or .
even something worse; and to complete my misery, after having
been obliged to satisfy my hunger upon such uninviting food, I am
compelled to pass the night in a filthy stall. Have I not then
reason to envy your lot?”

The ass suffered the ox to say what he pleased, without interrup-
tion; and when he had finished, addressed him in these words:
“(In truth, they are not much out when they call you an idiot,
since you pass your life just as they please, and cannot take thought
on your own behalf. What benefit, pray, do you derive from all
your indignities? You even destroy yourself for the ease, pleasure,
and profit of those who do not thank you for it. Believe me, they
would not treat you thus, if you possessed as much courage as
strength. When they come to tie you to the manger, what resist-
ance, pray, do you ever make? Do you ever put them in mind of
your horns? Do you ever show your anger by stamping on the
ground with your feet? Why don’t you terrify them with your
bellowing? Nature has given you the means of making yourseli
respected, and yet you neglect to use them. They bring you bad
beans and chaff; well, do not eat them, smell at them only, and
leave them, Thus, if you follow my plans you will soon perceive
a change, which you will thank me for.” ‘Che ox took the advice
of the ass very kindly, and declared himself much obliged to him.
‘‘My dear companion,” added he, ‘I will not fail to do as you bid
me, and you shall see how I acquit myself.” After this conversation,
of which the merchant lost not a word, they were silent.

Early the next morning the labourer came for the ox, and yoked
him to the plough, and set him to work as usual. The latter, who
had not forgotten the advice he had received, was very unruly the
whole day ; and at night, when the labourer attempted to fasten
him as usual to the stall, the malicious animal, instead of turning
his horns towards him for that purpose, began to be outrageous,
and ran roaring back; he even put down his horns to strike him $
in short, he did exactly as the ass had advised him. The day
following, when the man came, he found the manger still full of
beans and chaff, and the ox lying on the ground, with his legs
stretched out, and making a strange groaning. The labourer thought
him very ill, and that it would be useless to take him to work ; he
therefore immediately went and informed the merchant of it.

The latter perceived that the bad advice of the ass had been
followed ; and in order to punish him as he deserved, he told the
labourer to go and take the ass instead of the ox, and not fail to
give him plenty of exercise. The man obeyed; and the ass was
obliged to drag the plough the whole day, which tired him the more,
because he was unaccustomed to it ; besides which, he was so
handsomely beaten that he could scarcely support himself when he
came back,



8 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

In the meantime the ox was very well satistied; he ate all that
wag in his rack, and rested the whole day. He was highly pleased
with himself for having followed the advice of the ass, and blessed
him a thousand times for the good he bad procured him, As soon
as he saw him return, he did not fail to repeat his thanks. The ass
was so enraged at the treatment he had experienced, that he would
not answer a word. ‘My own imprudence,” said he to himself,
‘has alone brought this misfortune upon me. I lived happily,
everything was pleasant, I had all I wished for, and I may thank
myself only for this reverse. If I cannot contrive some trick to get
out of this scrape, my destruction is inevitable.” In saying this,
his strength was so much exhausted that he fell down in his stall,
half dead.

Here the grand vizier said to Scheherazadé, “You are, my child,
just like this ass, and would expose yourself to destruction, Trust
to me; and remain here in safety, without seeking your own ruin.”
“Sir,” replied Scheherazadé, ‘the example which you have brought
does not alter my resolution, and I shall not cease importuning you
till I have obtained from you the favour of presenting me to the
sultan as his consort.” The vizier, finding her persist in her request,
said, ‘‘ Well, then, since you will remain thus obstinate, I shall be
obliged to treat you as the merchant I mentioned did his wife.” ~

Being told in what a miserable state the ass was, he was curious
to know what passed between him and the ox ; after supper, there-
fore, he went out by moonlight, accompanied by his wite, and sat
down near them; on his arrival, he heard the ass say to the ox,
“Tell me, brother, what you mean to do when the labourer brings
you food to-morrow?” ‘‘ Mean to do?” replied the ox, “why, what
you taught me.” ‘Take care,” interrupted the ass, ‘‘ what you are
about, lest you destroy yourself; for in coming home yesterday
evening, I heard the merchant, our master, say what made me
tremble for you.” ‘¢ What did you hear?” asked the latter ; ‘‘con-
ceal nothing from me, I entreat you.” “ Our master,” replied the
ass, ‘‘addressed his labourer in these words: ‘Since the ox can
neither eat nor support himself, I wish him to be killed to-morrow ;
we will give his flesh as an alms to the poor ; and you shall carry
nis skin, which will be useful, to the currier; do not, therefore, fail
to send for the butcher.’ This is what I heard; and the interest I
take in your safety, and the friendship I have for you, induces me
to mention it, and offer you my opinion on the subject. At first,
when they bring you beans and chaff, get up, and begin eating
directly. Our master, by this, will suppose that you have recovered,
and will, without doubt. revoke the sentence for your death; in my
opinion, if you act otherwise, it is all over with you.”

This speech produced the intended effect ; the ox was much
troubled, and lowed with fear. The merchant, who had listened
to everything with great attention, burst into a fit of laughter that
quite surprised bis wife. ‘‘ Tell me,” said she, ‘‘ what you laugh
at, that I may join in it.” _‘‘ Be satisfied,” he answered, ‘‘at hear-
ing me.” ‘No, no,” she added, ‘‘ I wish to know the cause.” ‘That
satisfaction,” replied the husband, ‘‘T cannot afford you: I can



FABLE OF THE ass, THE OX, ETO. §

only tell you that T langhed at wnat the ass said to the ox ; the rest
is a secret which I must not reveal.” ‘‘ And why not?” asked his
wife. ‘‘ Because, if I tell you, it will cost me my life.” ‘You
trifle with me,” added she; ‘‘this can never be true; and if you do
not immediately inform me what you laughed at, I swear by Allah
that we live together no longer.”

In saying this, she went back to the house in a pet, shut herself
up, and cried the whole night. Her husband, finding that she con-
tinued in the same state the next day, said, ‘‘ How foolish it is to
afflict yourself in this way: do I not seriously tell you, that if I
were to yield to your foolish importunities, it would cost me my
life?” ‘* Whatever happens rests with God,” said she; “but I
shall not alter my mind.” He then sent for the parents and other
relations of his wife ; when they were all assembled, he explained
to them his motives for calling them together, and requested them
to use all their influence with his wife, and endeavour to convince
her of the folly of her conduct. She rejected them all, and said she
had rather die than give up this point to her husband. Each of her
parents urged every argument, and used every persuasion in their
power ; but they could make no impression either by theirauthority
or eloquence. When her children saw that nothing could alter her
resolution, they began to lament most bitterly ; the merchant him-
self knew not what to do.

A little while afterwards he was sitting by chance at the door of
his house, considering whether he should not even sacrifice himself,
in order to save his wife, whom he so tenderly loved. This mer-
chant had fifty hens and only one cock, and also a very faithful
dog. While he was sitting at the door, meditating what plan to
pursue, he saw the dog run towards the cock, and heard him de-
scribe his wife’s obstinacy and his own danger.

‘Our master is a fool,” replied the cock; ‘‘he has but one wife,
and cannot gain his point; while I have fifty, and do just as I
please.” ‘* What would you do?” said the dog. ‘* What?” an-
swered the cock ; ‘‘why, let him only go into the room where his wife
is, and, after shutting the door, take a good-sized stick and give
her a smart thrashing. I will answer for it she will soon know
better, and not worry him to reveal what he ought to keep secret.”
The merchant no sooner heard what the cock said, than he got up,
and taking rather a large stick, went to his wife, who was still
weeping. Having shut the door, he applied the remedy so effectually
that she soon exclaimed, ‘‘ Enough, enough, my husband, leave me,
and T will never ask the question more.” ‘* You deserve, my daugh-
eee the grand vizier, “to be treated like the merchant's
wife.

‘‘Do not, sir,” answered Scheherazadé, ‘think ill of me, if I
still persist in my sentiments. The history of this woman does not
shake my resolution. Pardon me, too, if I add, that your opposi-
tion will be useless; for if paternal tenderness should refuse the
request I make, I will present myself to the sultan.” At length,
the vizier, overcome by his daughter’s firmness, yielded to her en-
treaties ; and, although he was much afflicted at not being able te



10 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

conquer her resolution, he immediately went to Schahriar, and
announced to him that Scheherazadé herself would be his bride on
the following night.

The sultan was much astonished at the sacrifice of the grand vizier.
“Ts it possible,” said he, “that you can give up your own child?”
‘« Sire,” replied the vizier, ‘‘she has herself made the offer. The
dreadful fate that hangs over her does not alarm her; and she pre-
fers, even to her existence, the honour of being the consort of your
majesty, though it be but for one night.” ‘* Vizier,” said the
sultan, ‘‘do not deceive yourself with any hopes; for be assured,
that in delivering Scheherazadé into your charge to-morrow, it will
be with an order for her death; and if you disobey, your own head
will be the forfeit.”

When the grand vizier carried this intelligence to Scheherazade,
she seemed as much rejoiced as if it had been of the most pleasant
character: she thanked her father for obliging her so greatly; and
observing him to be much afflicted, she consoled him by saying, that
she hoped he would be so far from repenting her marriage with the
sultan, that it would become a subject of joy to him for the re-
’ mainder of his life.

She now occupied herself with the manner in which she should
appear before the sultan; but before she went to the palace, she
called her sister, Dinarzadé, aside, and said, ‘‘I am in vreat want
of your assistance, my dear sister, in a very important affair; and
I hope you will not refuse me. My father is going to conduct me
to the palace as the wife of the sultan. Do not let this news alarm
you, but attend rather to what Isay. As soon asIshall have presented
myself before the sultan, I shall entreat him to suffer you to sleep
in the bridal chamber that I may enjoy for the last time your com-
pany. If I obtain this favour, as 1 expect, remember to awaken
ie to-morrow morning an hour before daybreak, and address some
such words as these to me:—‘If you are not asleep, my sister, |
beg of you, till the morning appears, to recount to me one of those
delightful stories you know.’ I will immediately begin to tell one:
and I flatter myself that by these means I shall free the kingdom
from the consternation in which it is.” Dinarzadé promised to do
with pleasure what she required.

When the hour of retiring approached, the grand vizier conducted
Scheherazadé to the palace, and after introducing her to the sultan’s
apartment, took his leave. They were no sooner alone, than the
sultan ordered her to take off her veil. He was charmed with her
beauty ; but perceiving her in tears, he demanded the cause of them.
“Sire,” answered Scheherazade, ‘‘I have a sister whom I tenderly
love, and whose attachment to me is equally strong; I earnestly
wish that she might be permitted to pass the night in this apart-
ment, that we may again see each other, and once more take a
tender farewell. Wull you then consent, that I shall have the con-
solation of giving her this last proof of my affection?” Schahriar
having agreed to it, they sent for Dinarzadé, who came directly.
The sultan passed the night with Scheherazadé on an elevated
couch, as was the custom among the eastern monarchs, and











THE MERCHANT AND THE GENIUS. il

Dinarzadé slept at the foot of it, on a mattress prepared for the
purpose.

Dinarzadé, having awoke about an hour before day, did not fail
to do what her sister had ordered her. ‘‘My dear sister,” she
said, ‘‘if you are not asleep, I entreat you, as it will soon be light,
to relate to me one of those dclightful tales you know. It will,
alas, be the last time I shall receive that pleasure.”

Instead of returning any answer to her sister, Scheherazadé ad-
dressed these words to the sultan :—‘‘ Will your majesty permit me
to indulge my sister in her request?” ‘‘Freely,” replied he. Sche-
herazadé then desired her sister to attend, and, addressing herself
to the sultan, began as follows.

Che Story of the Merchant and the Genius.

There was formerly, sire, a merchant, who was possessed of great
wealth, in land, merchandise, and ready money. He had a numer-
ous set of clerks, factors, and slaves; and, from the great extent of
his commercial transactions, he was from time to time obliged to
take various journeys, in order to arrange his affairs in person with
his correspondents, Having one day an affair of great importance
to settle at a considerable distance from home, he mounted his horse,
and with only a sort of cloak-bag behind him, in which he had puta
few biscuits and dates, he began his journey. This provision was
absolutely necessary, as he was obliged to pass over a desert, where
it was impossible to procure any kind of food. He arrived without
any accident at the place of his destination; and having finished
his business, he set out on his return.

On the fourth day of his journey, he felt himself so incommoded
by the sun, and the heated surface of the earth, that he turned out
of his road, in order to rest and refresh himself under some trees,
which he saw at a distance. At the foot of a large walnut-tree he
perceived a very transparent and cool fountain, He immediately
alighted, and tying his horse to a branch of the tree, sat down on
its bank, having first taken some biscuits and dates from his little
store. While he was thus satisfying his hunger, he amused himself
with throwing about the stones of the fruit with considerable velo-
city, When he had finished his frugal repast, he washed his hands,
his face, and his feet, and repeated a prayer, like a good Mussulman.

He had hardly made an end, and was still on his knees, when he
saw a Genius, white with age, and of an enormous stature, advane-
ing towards him, with a scimitar in his hand. As soon as he was
close to him, he said in a most terrible tone: ‘Get up, that I may
kill thee with this scimitar, as thou hast caused the death of my
son.” He accompanied these words with a dreadful yell. The
merchant, alarmed by the horrible figure of this monster, as well as
the words he heard, replied in trembling accents: ‘Of what crime,
my good lord, alas, can I have heen guilty towards you, to deserve
the loss of life?” ‘] have sworn to kill thee, as thou hast slain Ly











12 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

gon.” “How could Ihave slain him?” answered the merchant. ‘ 1
do not know him, nor have I ever seen him.” ‘ Didst thou not,”
replied the monster, “‘on thine arrival here, sit down, and take
some dates from thy wallet; and after eating them didst thou not
throw the stones about on all sides?” ‘‘ This is all true,” replied
the merchant; ‘Ido not deny it.” ‘ Well, then,” said the other,
“T tell thee, thou hast killed my son; for while thou wast throwing
about the stones, my son passed. by ; one of them struck him in the
eye, and caused his death, and thus hast thou slain my son.” ‘‘Ah,
sire, forgiveme,” cried the merchant. ‘‘ [haveneither forgiveness nor
mercy,” added the monster; ‘and is it not just that he who has
inflicted death should suffer it?” ‘‘Igrant this; yet surely I have
not done so: and even if I have, I have done so innocently, and
therefore I entreat you to pardon me, and suffer me to live.” ‘‘No,
no,” cried the Genius, still persisting in his resolution, ‘‘I must
destroy thee, as thou hast done my son.” At these words, he took
the merchant in his arms, and having thrown him with his face on
the ground, he lifted up his sabre, in order to strike off his head.

The merchant, in the meantime, bathed in tears, protested his .
innocence, and lamenting his wife and children, tried the most per-
suasive means to avert his fate. The Genius, still holding up the
sabre, waited, however, till he had ended his complaints, though it
altered not his purpose. ‘‘All thy lamentations are vain,” he cried ;
“were thine eyes to weep blood, it would not prevent my killing
thee, as thou hast slain my son.” ‘‘ Can nothing, then,” replied the
merchant, ‘soften you? Must you shed the plood of a poor inno-
cent being?” ‘‘ Yes,” he added, ‘I am resolved.”

Scheherazadé, at this instant, perceiving it was day, and know-
ing that the sultan rose early to his prayers, and then to hold a
council, broke off. ‘‘ What a wonderful story,” said Dinarzadé,
“have you pitched upon!” ‘‘ The conclusion,” answered Schehera-
zadé, ‘‘is still more surprising, as you would confess, if the sultan
would suffer me to live another day, and in the morning permit me
to continue the relation.” Schahriar, who had listened with much
pleasure to the narration, determined in his own mind to wait till
to-morrow, intending to order her execution after she had finished
her story. Having resolved to defer her death till the following
day, he arose, and having prayed, went to the council.

The grand vizier, in the meantime, was in a state of cruel sus-
pense. Unable to sleep, he passed the night in lamenting the ap-
proaching fate of his daughter, whose executioner he was compelled
to be. Dreading, therefore, in this melancholy situation, to mect
the sultan, how great was his surprise in seeing him enter the
council-chamber without giving him the horrible orders he ex-
pected.

The sultan spent the day, as usual, in regulating the affairs of hia
kingdom, and on the approach of night, retired with Scheherazadé
to his apartment. The next morning, before the day appeared,
Dinarzadé did not fail to remind her sister: ‘‘My dear sister,”
she said, ‘‘ if you are not asleep, I entreat you, before the morning
breaks, to continue your story.” The sultan did not wait for Sche



THE MERCHANT AND THE GENIUS. 13

herazadé to ask permission, but said, ‘‘Finish the tale of the Geniue
and the merchant: I am curious to hear the end of it.” * Schehera-
zadé immediately went on as follows.

When the merchant, sire, perceived that the Genius was about to
execute his purpose, he cried aloud, ‘‘One word more, I entreat
you ; have the goodness to grant me a little delay ; give me only
time to go and take leave of my wife and children, and divide my
estates among them, as I have not yet made my will, that they may
not be obliged to have recourse to any legal process after my death ;
and when IJ have done this, I promise to return to this spot, and sub-
mit myself entirely to your pleasure.” ‘‘ But if I grant you the re-
spite you demand,” replied the Genius, ‘‘I fear you will not return.”
“Tf my oath will assure you of it,” added the merchant, ‘‘ I swear
by the God of heaven and earth, that I will not fail to repair hither.”
«‘ What length of time do you require,” said the Genius. ‘‘ It will
take me a full year to arrange everything, and enable me to bear
with composure the loss of life. I therefore promise you, that you
shall find me to-morrow twelvemonth under these trees, waiting to
deliver myself into your hands.” ‘‘ Take thy God to witness of the
promise thou hast made me,” said the other. ‘‘ Again I swear,”
replied he, ‘‘and you may rely on my oath.” On this, the Genius
left him near the fountain, and immediately disappeared.

The merchant, having recovered from his fright, mounted his
horse, and continued his journey.—But if, on the one hand, he re-
joiced at escaping from the great peril he was in, he was, on the
other, much distressed when he recollected the fatal oath he had
taken. When he arrived at home, his wife and family received him
with signs of the greatest joy; but instead of returning their em-
braces, he wept so bitterly, that they supposed something very
extraordinary had happened. His wife inquired the cause of his
tears, and of his violent grief.—‘‘ We were rejoicing,” she said, ‘‘ at
your return, and you alarm us all by the situation we see you in;
explain, [ entreat you, the cause of your violent sorrow.” ‘‘ Alas!”
he replied, ‘‘ how should I feel otherwise, when I have only a year
to live?” He then related to them what had passed, and that he had
given his word to return at the end of a year, to receive his death.

When they heard this melancholy tale, they were in despair.
The wife uttered the most lamentable groans, tearing her hair, and
beating her breast ; the children made the house resound with their
grief ; while the father, overcome by affection, mingled his tears
with theirs.

The next day, the merchant began to settle his affairs, and, first
vf all, to pay his debts. He made many presents to his different
friends, and large donations to the poor. He set at liberty many of
his slaves of both sexes ; divided his property among his children ;
appointed guardians for such as were young ; and besides returning

* In the original work, there are continual interruptions to the stories by the
supposed appearance of daylight, which obliged the sultan to rise, aud attend to
the affairs of the state. As these interruptions would have recurred many hundred
times, and thus unpleasantly have broken in upon the unity and continued interest
6v essential to tales of this nature, they have been omitted.



14 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

to his wife all the fortune she brought him, he added as much more
as the law would permit.

The year soon passed away, and he was compelled to depart. He
took in his wallet the garment he wished to be buried in ; but when
he attempted to take leave of his wife and children, his grief quite
overcame him. They could not bear his loss, and almost resolved
to accompany him, and all perish together. Compelled at length
to tear himself away from objects so dear, he set out, and arrived at
the destined spot, on the very day he had promised. He got off
his horse, and seating himself by the side of the fountain, with
such sorrowful sensations as may easily be imagined, he awaited the
arrival of the Genius.

While he was kept in this cruel suspense, there appeared an old
man leading a hind, who came near to him. Having saluted each
other, the old man said, ‘‘ May I ask of you, brother, what brought
you to this desert place, which is so full of evil Genii that there is
no safety. From the appearance of these trees, one might suppose
it was inhabited ; but it is, in fact, a solitude, where it is dangerous
to stay long.”

The merchant satisfied the old man’s curiosity, and related his
adventure. He listened with astonishment to the account, and
having heard it, he said, ‘‘ Surely nothing in the world can be more
surprising; and you have kept your oath inviolable! In truth, I
should like to be a witness to your interview with the Genius.”
Having said this, he sat down near the merchant, and while they
were talking, another old man, followed by two black dogs, came
in sight. As soon as he was near enough he saluted them, and in-
quired the reason of their stay in that place. The first old man
related the adventure of the merchant, exactly as he had told it;
and added, that this was the appointed day, and that he was there-
fore determined to remain in orde. to see the event. The second
old man, thinking it also very curious, resolved to do the same; and
sitting down, joined in the conversation.

Soon they perceived towards the plain, a thick vapour or smoke,
like a column of dust raised by the wind. This vapour approached
them, and then suddenly disappearing, they saw the Genius, who,
without noticing them, went toward the merchant with his scimitar
in his hand; and taking him by the arm, ‘‘ Get up,” said he, ‘ that
I may kill thee, as thou hast slain my son.” Both the merchant
and the two old men were struck with terror, they began to weep
and fill the air with their lamentations.

When the old_ man who conducted the hind, saw the Genius lay
hold of the merchant, and about to murder him without mercy, he
threw himself at the monster’s feet, and, kissing them, said, ‘‘Prince
of the Genii, I humbly entreat you to suspend your rage, and do
me the favour to listen tome. I wish to relate my own history, and
that of the hind, which you see ; and if you find it more wonderful
and surprising than the adventure of this merchant, whose life you
wish to take, may I not hope that you will at least remit a-half of
the punishment of this unfortunate man?” After meditating some
time, the Genius answered, ‘‘ Well theu, I agree to it.”



THE FIRST OLD MAN AND THE HIND. 15

The Wistory of the first Old War and the Hind.

The hind, whom you see here, is my cousin; nay more, she is my
wife. When I married her, she was only twelve years old, and shoe.
ought, therefore, not only to look upon me as her relation and
husband, but even as her father.

We lived together thirty years without having any children ;
this, however, was no drawback upon my kindness and regard.
Still my desire of offspring was so great, that for this purpose, and
for this only, I purchased a female slave, who bore me a son, of
great promise and expectation. Soon after, my wife became infected
with jealousy, and consequently took a great aversion to both
mother and child; yet she so well concealed her sentiments, that I
became acquainted with them, alas, too late.

In the meantime my son grew up; and he was about ten years
old when I was obliged to make a journey. I recommended both
the slave and the child to my wife before my departure, as I had
no distrust of her; and prayed her to take great care of them during
my absence, which would not be less than a-year. During this
time she endeavoured to satiate her hatred. She applied herself
to the study of magic; and when she was sufficiently skilled in that
diabolical art to execute the horrible design she meditated, the
wretch carried my son to a distant place. When there, by her
enchantments, she changed him into a calf, gave him to my steward,
and ordered him to bring him up as a calf, which she said she had
bought. She was not, however, satisfied with this infamous action,
but metamorphosed the slave into a cow, which she also sent to my
steward,

Immediately on my return, I inquired after my child and his
mother. ‘‘ Your slave is dead,” said she, ‘‘and it is now more than
two months since I have beheld your son; nor do I know what is
become of him.” I was sensibly affected at the death of the slave ;
Iut as my son had only disappeared, I flattered myself that he
would soon be found. Hight months, however, passed, and he did
not return ; nor could I learn any tidings of him. In order tu
celebrate ‘che festival of the great Bairam, which was approaching,
T ordered my steward to bring me the fattest cow I possessed, for a
sacrifice. He obeyed my commands, and the cow he brought me
was my own slave, the unfortunate mother of my son. Having
bound her, I was about to make the sacrifice, when at the very
instant she lowed most sorrowfully, and the tears even fell from
her eyes. This seemed to me so extraordinary, that I could not
but feel compassion for her, and was unable to give the fatal blow.
I therefore ordered her to be taken away, and another brought.

My wife, who was present, seemed angry at my compassion, and
»ppo: ed an order which defeated her malice. ‘* What are you about,
my husband?” said she, ‘‘why not sacrifice this cow? Your
steward has not a more beautiful one, nor one more proper for the
purpose.” Wishing to oblige my wife, I again approached the
sow: and struggling with my pity, which suspended the sacrifice,

B











16 TUE ARABIAN NIGHTS EN LERTAINMENTS.

L was again going to give the mortal blow, when the victim a second
time disarmed me by her redoubled tears and moanings. I then
delivered the instruments into the hands of my steward, ‘‘Take
them,” I cried, ‘‘and make the sacrifice yourself ; the lamentations
and tears of the animal have overcome me.”

The steward was less compassionate, and sacrificed her. On
taking off the skin we found hardly anything but hones, though she
appeared very fat. ‘Take her away,” said I to the steward, truly
chagrined, ‘‘I give her to you to do as you please with; regale both
yourself and whomsoever you wish; and if you have a very fat calf,
bring it in her place.” I did not inquire what he did with the cow,
but he had not been gone long before I saw a remarkably fine calf
brought. Although I was ignorant that this calf was my own son,
yet T felt a sensation of pity arise in my breast at first sight. As
soon, also, as he perceived me, he made so great an effort to come
to me that be broke his cord. He lay down at my feet, with his
head on the ground, as if he endeavoured to excite my compassion,
and not have the cruclty to take away his life: striving in this
manner to make me comprehend that he was my son.

I was still more surprised and affected by this action than I had
been by the tears of the cow. JI felt a kind of tender pity, which
interested me much for him; or, to speak more correctly, my blood
guided me to what was my duty. ‘*Go back,” I cried, ‘and take
all possible care of this calf, and in its room bring another directly.”

My wife, however, continued to demand his sacrifice so obstinately,
that [ was compelled to yield. I bound the calf, and taking the fatal
gnife, was going to bury it in the throat of my son, when he turned
his eyes, filled with tears, so persuasively upon me, that I had no
Fower to execute my intention. The knife fell from my hand, and
1 told my wife I was determined to have another calf; but promised,
for the sake of appeasing her, to sacrifice this calf at the feast of
Bairam on the following year.

The next morning my steward desired to speak with me in private.
«‘T am come,” said he, “to give you some information, which, J
trust, will afford you pleasure. I have a daughter, who has some
little knowledge of magic; and as I was bringing the calf back
yesterday, which you were unwilling to sacrifice, 1 observed that
she smiled at seeing it, and the next moment began to weep. I
inquired of her the cause of these two contrary emotions. ‘My
dear father,’ she answered, ‘that calf, which you bring back, is the
gon of our master; I smiled with joy at seeing him still alive, and
wept at the recollection of his mother, who was yesterday sacrificed
in the shape of a cow. These two metamorphoses have been con-
trived by the enchantments of our master’s wife, who hated both
the mother and the child.’ ‘ This,” continued the steward, ‘‘is
what my daughter said, and I come to report it to you.” Imagine,
O Genius, my surprise at hearing these words: I immediately set
out with my steward, to speak to his daughter myself. On my
arrival, I went first to the stable, where my son had been placed ;
he could not return my caresses, but he received them in a way
shich convinced me that he was really my son.



THE FIRST OLD MAN AND THE HIND. 17

When the daughter of the steward made her appearance, I asked
her if she could restore him to his former shape. ‘‘ Yes,” replied
she, “I can.” “Ah,” exclaimed I, ‘if you can perform such a
miracle, I will make you the mistress of all I possess.” She then
answered with a smile, ‘‘You are our master, and I know how
much we are bound to you; but I must mention, that I can restore
your son to his own form only on two conditions; first, that you
hestow him upon me for my husband, and secondly, that I may be
permitted to punish her who changed him into a calf.” “To the
lirst,” I replied, ‘*T agree with all my heart; I will still do more,
[will give you, for your own separate use, a considerable sum of
money, independent of what I destined for my son. I agree also
to that which regards my wife; I only entreat you to spare her
life.” ‘I will treat her, then,” she said, ‘in the same manner as
she has treated your son.” ‘To this I gave my consent, provided
she first restored my son to me.

The damsel then took a vessel full of water, and pronouncing over
it some words I did not understand, she thus addressed herself to
the calf: ‘*O calf, if thou hast been created by the all-powerful
Sovereign of the world, as thou now appearest, retain that form ;
but if thou art a man, and hast been changed by enchantment into a
calf, resume, by permission of thy divine Creator, thy natural
igure!” In saying this, she threw the water over him, and he in-
stantly regained his own form.

‘‘My child ! my dear child,” I immediately exclaimed, and em.
braced him with a transport I could not restrain, “it is the Al-
mighty who hath sent this damsel to us, to destroy the horrible
charm with which you were surrounded. I am sure your gratitude
will induce you to accept her for a wife, as I have already promised
for you.” He joyfully consented ; but before they were united, the
damsel changed my wife into this hind, which you see here. 1
wished her to have this form in preference to any other more un-
pleasant, that we might see her, without repugnance, in our family,

Since this, my son has become a widower, and is now travelling.
Many years have passed since I have heard anything of him; |
have therefore now set out with a view to gain some information ;
and as I did not like to trust my wife to the care of any one during
my search, I thought proper to carry her along with me. This is
the history of myself and this hind: can anything be more wonder-
ful? “TI agree with you,” said the Genius, “and in consequence, I
grant one-half of my pardon to this merchant,”

“As soon as the first old man, sire, had finished his history,”
continued the sultana, ‘the second, who led the two black dogs,
sud to the Genius, ‘I will relate to you what has happened to me
and these two dogs which you see, and I am sure you will find my
history still more astonishing than that which you have heard.
But when I have told it, will you grant to this merchant another
half of his pardon?’ ‘Yes,’ answered the Genius, ‘ provided your
history surpasses that of the hind.’ This being settled, the second
old man began as follows.”



15 THE AKAKIAN NIGHTS ENTERLAINMENTS.

The History of the Second Old Man anv the
Two Black Togs.

Great Prince of the Genii, you must know, that these two black
dogs, which you see here, and myself, are three brothers. Our
father left us, when he died, one thousand sequins each. -With this
sum we all embarked in the same profession, namely, as merchants.
Soon after we had opened our warehouse, my eldest brother, who
is now one of these dogs, resolved to travel, and carry on his busi-
ness in foreign countries. With this view he sold all his goods, and
bought such other sorts of merchandise as were adapted to the
different countries he proposed visiting.

He set out, and was absent a whole year. At the eud of this
time, a poor man, who seemed to me to be asking charity, presented
himself at my warehouse. ‘‘ 1s it possible you do not know me?”
he asked. On looking attentively at him, I recognised his person.
» Ah, my brother,” I cried, embracing him, ‘‘ how should I possibly
know you in this state?” I made him come in directly, and in-
quired both after his health and the success of his voyage. ‘‘ Do
not ask me,” he replied ; ‘‘in beholding me you sce the whole. To
enter into a detail of all the misfortunes that I have suffered in the
last year, and which have reduced me to the state you see, would
only be to renew my aftiction.”

I instantly shut up my shop, and neglecting everything else, I
took him to the bath, and dressed him in the best apparel my ward-
vobe afforded. I examined the state of my business, and finding by
my accounts that I had just doubled my capital, that is, that Twas
now worth two thousand sequins, I presented him with the half.
‘* Let this, my brother,” I said, ‘make you forget your losses.” Ie
joyfully accepted the thousand sequins, again settled his affairs, and
we lived together as before.

Some time after this, my second brother, who is the other of
these black dogs, wished also to dispose of his property. Both his
elder brother and myself tried everything in our power to dissuade
him from it, but in vain. He sold all, and with the money he
bought such merchandise as he wished for his journey. He took his
departure, and joined a caravan, At the end of a year he also
returned in the same condition as his brother had done. I furnished
him with clothes; and as I had gained another thousand sequins, 1
gave them to him. He directly bought a shop, and continued to
exercise his business.

One day both my brothers came to me, and proposed that I should
make a voyage with them, for the purpose of traffic. ‘* You have
travelled,” said I, at once rejecting the scheme, ‘‘and what have
you gained? Who will insure that I shall be more fortunate than
you?” In vain did they use every argument they thought could
induce me to try my fortune. I still refused to consent to their
design, They returned, however, so often to the subject, that, after
having withstood their solicitations for five years, Iat length yielded.



THE SECOND OLD MAN AND THit [WO BLACK DOGS. 19

When it became necessary to prepare for the voyage, and we were
consulting on the sort of merchandise to be bought, I discovered that
they had consumed their capital, and that nothing remained of the
thousand sequins I had given to each, I did not, however, reproach
them ; on the contrary, as my capital was increased to six thousand
sequins, I divided the half with them, and said, “‘We must, my
brothers, risk only three thousand sequins, and endeavour to conceal
the other in some secure place, that if our voyage be not more suc-
cessful than those you have already made, we shall, with this sum,
be able to console ourselves and begin our former profession. I will
give one thousand sequins to each, and keep one myself; and I will
conceal the other three thousand in a corner of my house.” We
purchased our goods, embarked in a vessel, which we ourselves
freighted, and set sail with a favourable wind. After sailing about
a month, we arrived, without any accident, at a port, where we
landed, and had a most advantageous sale for our merchandise. 1,
in particular, sold mine so well, that I gained ten for one. We then
purchased the produce of that country, in order to traffic with it in
our own,

About the time that we were ready to embark on our return, I
accidentally met on the sea-shore a female, of a very fine figure, but
poorly dressed. She accosted me by kissing my hand, and entreated
ine most earnestly to permit her to go with me, and take her for ny
wife. I started many difficulties to such a plan; but at length she
said so much to persuade me that I ought not to regard her poverty,
md that I should be well satisfied with her conduct, I was quite
overcome. I directly procured proper dresses for her, and after
marrying her in due form, she embarked with me, and we set sail.

During our voyage, I found my wife possessed of so many good
qualities, that I loved her every day more and more. In the mean-
time, my two brothers, who had not traded so advantageously as
myself, and who were jealous of my prosperity, began to feel ex-
ceedingly envious. They even went so far as to conspire against
my life ; for one night, while my wife and I were asleep, they threw
us into the sea.

My wife proved to be a fairy, consequently possessed of super-
natural power ; you may therefore imagine she was not hurt. As
for myself, I should certainly have perished without her aid, Ihad
hardly, however, fallen into the water before she took me up, and
transported me into an island, As soon as it was day, the fairy thus
addressed_me :—‘‘ You may observe, my husband, that in saving
your life, I have not ill rewarded the good you have done me. You
must know, that I am a fairy, and being upon the shore when you
were about to sail, I felt a great inclination for you. I wished to
try the goodness of your heart, and for this purpose I presented
myself before you in the disguise you saw. You acted most gener-
ously, and I am therefore delighted in finding an occasion of show-
ing my gratitude: but I am enraged against your brothers, nor
shall I be satisfied till I have taken their lives.”

I listened with astonishment to the discourse of the fairy, and
thauked her, as well as T was able, for the great obligation she had



20 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

conferred on me. ‘‘ But, madam,” said I to her, ‘‘I must entreat
you to pardon my brothers; for although I have the greatest reason
to complain of their conduct, yet I am not so cruel as to wish their
destruction.” Irelated to her what I had done for each of them,
but my account only increased her anger. ‘‘I must instantly fly
after these ungrateful wretches,” cried she, ‘‘and bring them to a
just punishment ; I will sink their vessel, and precipitate them to
the bottom of the sea.” ‘*No, beautiful lady,” replied I, ‘‘ moder-
ate your indignation, and do not execute so dreadful an intention ;
remember they are still my brothers, and that we are bound to re-
turn good for evil.”

I appeased the tairy by these words; and no sooner had I pro-
nounced them, than she transported me in an instant from the
island, where we were, to the top of my own house, which was
terraced, and then disappeared. I descended, opened the doors,
and dug up the three thousand sequins which I had hidden. I
afterwards repaired to my shop, opened it, and received the congrat-
ulations of the merchants in the neighbourhood on my arrival.
When I returned home, I perceived these two black dogs, which
came towards me with a submissive air. I could not imagine what
this meant, but the fairy, who soon appeared, satisfied my curiosity.
‘‘My dear husband,” said she, ‘be not surprised at seeing these
two dogs in your house; they are your brothers.” My blood ran
eold on hearing this, and I inquired by what power they had been
transformed into that state. ‘‘It is I,” replied the fairy, ‘‘ who
have done it; at least it is one of my sisters, to whom I gave the
commission, and she has also sunk their ship; you will lose the
merchandise it contained, but I shall recompense you in some other
way ; as to your brothers, I have condemned them to remain under
this form for ten years, as a punishment for their perfidy.” Then
informing me where I might hear of her, she disappeared.

The ten years are now completed, and I am travelling in search
of her. As I was passing this way, I met this merchant and the
good old man who is leading his hind, and here I staid. ‘‘This, O
Prince of the Genii, is my history; does it not appear to you of a
most extraordinary nature?” ‘' Yes,” replied the Genius, ‘‘I con-
fess it is most wonderful, and therefore I remit the second part of
the merchant’s punishment.” Having said this, he disappeared, to
the great joy of the whole party.

The merchant did not omit to bestow many thanks upon his liber-
ators. They rejoiced with him at being out of danger, and then
bidding him adieu, each went his own way. The merchant re-
turned home to his wife and children, and spent the remainder of
his days with them in tranquillity. ‘‘But, sire,” added Schehera-
zade, ‘‘ however beautiful those tales which I have related to your
majesty may he, they are not equal to that of the fisherman.” Dinar-
zadé, observing that the sultan made no answer, said, ‘‘Since there
is still some time, my sister, pray recount his history; the sultan, |
hope, will not object to it.” Schahriar consented to it, and Sche.
herazad¢ went on as follows.



THE FISUERMAN. |

The History of the fisherman.

There was formerly, sire, an aged fisherman, who was so poor
that he could barely obtain food for himself, his wife, and three
children, of which his family consisted. He went out early every
morning to his employment; and he had imposed a rule upon him-
self never to cast his nets above four times a day.

One morning he set out before the moon had disappeared: when
he had got to the sea-shore, he undressed himself, and threw his
nets. In drawing them to land, he perceived a considerable resist-
ance, and began to imagine he should have an excellent haul, at
which he was much pleased. But the moment after, finding that,
instead of fish, he had got nothing but the carcase of an ass in his
nets, he was much vexed and afflicted at having had so badadraught.
When he had mended his nets, which the weight of the ass had torn ir
many places, he threw them a second time. He again found con-
siderable resistance in drawing them up, and again he thought they
were filled with fish; how great, then, was his disappointment in
discovering only a large pannier or basket, filled with sand and
mud,

He threw them a third time, and brought up only stones, shells,
and filth. It is impossible to describe his despair, which almost
deprived him of his senses. The day now began to break, and, like
a good Mussulman, he did not neglect his prayers. When he had
finished, he threw his nets for the fourth time. Again he supposed
he had caught a great quantity of fish, as he drew them with as
much difficulty as before. He nevertheless found none; but dis-
covered a vase of yellow copper, which seemed, from its weight, to
be filled with something; and he observed that it was shut up and
fastened with lead, on which there was the impression of a scal.
‘JT will sell this to a founder,” said he, with joy, ‘and with the
money I shall get for it I will purchase a measure of corn.”

He examined the vase on all sides; he shook it, in order ‘to dis-
cover whether its contents would rattle. He could hear nothing ;
nnd this, together with the impression of the seal on the lead, made
him think it was filled with something valuable. In order to find
this out, he took his knife, and got it open without much difficulty.
He directly turned the top downwards, and was much surprised to
find nothing come out; he then set it down before him, and while
he was attentively observing it, there issued from it so thick a
smoke that he was obliged to step back a few paces. This smoke,
by degrees, rose almost to the clouds, and spread itself over both
the water and the shore, appearing like a thick fog. The fisherman,
us may easily be imagined, was a good deal surprised at this sight.
When the smoke had all come out from the vase, it again collected
itself, and became a solid body, and then took the shape of a Genius,
twice as large as any of the giants. At the appearance of so cnor-
mous a monster, the fisherman wished to run away, but his fears
were so great, he was unable to move.



22 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

‘Solomon, Solomon,” cried the Genius, ‘‘ great prophet, pardon,
I pray. I never more will oppose thy will, but will obey all thy
commands,”

The fisherman, sire, had no sooner heard these words spoken by
the Genius than he regained his courage, and said, ‘‘ Proud spirit,
what is this thou sayest? Solomon has been dead more than eight-
teen hundred years.—Inform me, I pray, of thine history, and on
what account thou wast shut up in this vase.”

To this speech, the Genius, looking disdainfully at the fisherman,
answered, ‘Thou art very bold to call me a proud spirit; speak to
me more civilly, before I kill thee.” ‘* And for what reason, pray,
will you kill me?” answered the fisherman; ‘‘have you already
forgotten that I have set you at liberty?” ‘‘ I remember it very
well,” returned he; ‘but that shall not prevent my destroying
thee, and I will only grant thee one favour.” ‘‘ And pray, what is
that?” said the fisherman. ‘‘It is,” replied the Genius, ‘‘ to per-
mit thee to choose the manner of thy death.” ‘‘ But in what, added
the other, ‘‘ have I offended you? Is it thus thou wouldst recom-
pense me for the good I have done thee?” ‘‘I can treat thee no
otherwise,” said the Genius ; ‘‘and to convince thee of it, attend
to my history.

“Tam one of those spirits who rebelled against the sovereignty
of God. All the other Genii acknowledged the great Solomon, the
prophet of God, and submitted to him. Sacar and myself were the
only ones who were above humbling ourselves. In order to revenge
himself, this powerful monarch charged Assaf, the son of Baraknia,
his first minister, to come and seize me. This was done ; and Assaf
took and brought me, in spite of myself, before the throne of the
king, his master.

“Solomon, the son of David, commanded me to quit my mode of
life, acknowledge his authority, and submit to his laws. I haughtily
refused to obey him, and rather exposed myself to his resentment
than take the oath of fidelity and submission which he required of
me. In order, therefore, to punish me, he enclosed me in this
copper vase; and, to prevent my forcing my way out, he put upon
the leaden cover the impression of his seal, on which the great
name of God is engraven. This done, he gave the vase to one of
those Genii who obeyed him, and ordered him to cast me into the
sea; which, to my great sorrow, was performed directly.

‘‘ During the first period of my captivity, I swore thatif any one
delivered me before the first hundred years were passed, I would
make him rich. The time elapsed, and no one assisted me: during
the second century, I swore that if any released me, I would dis-
cover to him all the treasures of the earth; still I was not more
fortunate. During the third, I promised to make my deliverer a
most powerful monarch, to be always hovering near him, and to
vrant him every day any three requests he chose. This age too,
like the former, passed away, and I remained in the same situation.
Euraged, at last, to be so long a prisoner, I swore that I would,
without mercy, kill whoever should in future release me, and that
the only favour T would grant him should be, to choose what man-



THE PTSHERMAN. 23

ner of death he pleased. Since, therefore, thou hast come here
to-day, and hast delivered me, fix upon whatever kind of death
thou wilt.”

The fisherman was much afflicted at this speech. ‘‘ How un-
fortunate,” he exclaimed, ‘‘am I, to come here and render so great
a service to such an ungrateful object? Consider, I entreat you,
your injustice, and revoke so unreasonable an oath.” ‘ No,”
auswered the Genius, ‘‘thy death is certain; determine only how
I shall kill thee.” The fisherman was in great distress at finding
him thus resolved on his death. He still endeavoured to appease
the Genius. ‘ Alas!” he cried, ‘‘ have pity on me, in consideration
of what I have done for thee.” ‘TI have already told thee,” re-
plied the Genius, ‘‘ that it is for that very reason that I am obliged
to take thy life. Let us lose no time, your arguments will not
alter my resolution. Make haste and tell me how you wish to
die.”

Necessity is the spur to invention; and the fisherman thought of
a stratagem. ‘‘Since then,” said he, ‘I cannot escape death, I
submit to the will of God; but before I choose the sort of death, I
konjure you, by the great name of God, which is graven upon the
seal of the prophet Solomon, the son of David, answer me truly to
a question Lam going to put to you.” The Genius trembled at this
adjuration, and felt that he should be compelled to answer positively.
He then said to the fisherman, ‘‘ Ask what thou wilt, and male
haste.”

The Genius had no sooner promised to speak the truth than the
fisherman said to him, ‘“‘I wish to know whether you really were
in that vase; dare you swear it by the great name of God?”
“Yes,” answered the Genius, ‘‘I swear by the great name of God
that I most certainly was.” ‘In truth,” replied the fisherman,
“T cannot believe you. This vase cannot contain one of your feet ;
how then can it hold your whole body?” ‘I swear to thee, not-
withstanding,” replied he, ‘‘ that I was there just as thou seest m:.
Wilt thou not believe me after the solemn oath I have taken?”
“No, truly,” added the fisherman, ‘‘I shall not believe you unless
1 were to sce it.”

Immediately the form of the Genius began to change into smoke,
and extended itself, as before, over both the shore and the sea ;
and then, collecting itself, began to enter the vase, and continued
to do so, in a slow and equal manner, till nothing remained without.
A voice immediately issued forth, saying, ‘‘ Now, then, thou in-
credulous fisherman, dost thou believe me now I am in the vase?”
But, instead of answering the Genius, he immediately took the
leaden cover, and put it on the vase. ‘‘Genius,” he cried, ‘it is
now your turn to ask pardon, and choose what sort of death is most
agreeable to you. But no; it is better that I should throw you
again into the sea, and I will build, on the very spot where you are
cast, a house upon the shore, in which I will live, to warn all
fishermen that shall come and throw their nets, not to fish up so
wicked a Genius as thou art, who makest an oath to kill the man
who shall sct thee at liberty.’



24 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS,

At this offensive speech, the enraged Genius tried every method
to get out of the vase, but in vain; for the impression of the seal of
Solomon, the prophet, the son of David, prevented him. Knowing
then that the fisherman had the advantage over him, he began to
conceal his rage. ‘‘Take care,” said he, in a softened tone, “what
you are about, fisherman. Whatever I did was merely in joke,
and you ought not to take it seriously.” ‘*O Genius,” answered
the fisherman, ‘you who were a moment ago the greatest of all the
Genii, are now the most insignificant; and do not suppose that your
flattering speeches will be of any use to you. You shall assuredly
return to the sea; and if you passed all the time there which you
have stated, you may as well remain till the day of judgment. I
entreated you, in the name of God, not to take my life, and you
rejected my prayers; I now reject yours, likewise.”

The Genius tried every argument to move the fisherman’s pity,
but in vain. “I conjure you to open the vase,” said he; “if you
give me my liberty again, you shall have reason to be satisfied with
my gratitude.” ‘You are too treacherous for me to trust you,”
returned the fisherman; ‘‘I should deserve to lose my life if I had
the imprudence to put it in your power a second time. You would
most likely treat me as a Greek king treated Douban the physician.
Listen, and I will tell you the story.”



Che History of the Greek Ring, and Donban
the “bnsicia.

In the country of Zouman, in Persia, there lived a king, whose
subjects were originally Greeks. This king was sorely afilicted
with a leprosy, and his physicians had unsuccessfully tried every
remedy they were acquainted with, when a very ingenious physician,
called Douban, arrived at the court.

He had acquired his profound learning by studying different
authors in the Greek, Latin, Persian, Arabic, Turkish. Syriac, and
Hebrew languages ; and besides having a consummate knowledze
of philosophy, he was well acquainted with the good and bad pro-
perties of all kinds of plants and drugs.

As soon as he was informed of the king’s illness, and that the
physicians had given him up, he dressed himself as neatly as pos-
sible, and obtained permission to be presented to the king. “Sire,”
said he, ‘I know that all the physicians who have attended your
majesty, have been unable to remove your leprosy ; but if you will
do me the honour to accept of my services, I will engage to cure
you without either internal doses, or outward applications.” The
king, pleased with this proposition, replied, If you are really so
skilful as you pretend, I promise to confer afilucnce on you and
your posterity ; and without reckoning the presents you will have,
you shall be my first favourite; but do you assure me, then, that
you will remove my leprosy without making me swallow any potion,
or applying any remedy externally?” “Yes, sire,” replied the



THE GREEK KING AND THE PHYSICIAN. 25

physician, ‘‘I flatter myself I shall succeed, with the help of God ;
and to-morrow I will begin my operations.”

Douban returned to his house, and made a sort of racket or bat,
with a hollow in the handle, to admit the drug he meant to use;
that being done, on the following day he presented himself before
the king, and having made a profound reverence, told him that he
must ride on horseback to the place where he was accustomed to
play at bowls. The king did as he was desired; and when he had
reached the bowling-green, the physician approached him, and
putting into his hand the bat which he had prepared, “‘ Sire,” said
he, ‘exercise yourself with striking that bowl about with this bat
till you find yourself in a profuse perspiration. When the remedy
I have enclosed in its handle is warmed by your hand, it will pene-
trate through your whole body; you may then leave off, for the
drug will have taken effect; and when you return to your palace,
get into a warm bath, and be well rubbed and washed; then go to
bed, and to-morrow you will be quite cured.”

The king took the bat, and spurred his horse after the bowl till
he struck it; it was sent back again to him by the officers who
were playing with him, and he struck it again; and thus the game
continued for a considerable time, till he found his hand as well as
his whole body in a perspiration, which made the remedy in the bat
operate as the physician had said; the king then left the game,
returned to the palace, bathed, and observed very punctually all
the directions that had been given him.

He soon found the good effects of the prescription; for when he
arose the next morning, he perceived, with equal surprise and joy,
that his leprosy was entirely cured, and that his body was as clear
as if he had never been attacked by that malady. As soon as he
was dressed, he went into the audience-room, where he mounted his
throne and received the congratulations of all his courtiers, who had
assembled on that day, partly to gratify their curiosity, and partly
to testify them joy.

Douban entered, and went to prostrate himself at the foot of the
throne, with his face towards the ground. The king, seeing him,
called to him, and made him sit by his side; and showing him to
the assembly, gave him in that public way all the praise he so well
deserved ; nay, he did not stop here, for there being a grand enter-
tainment at court on that day, he placed him at his own table to
dine only with him.

The Greek king (proceeded the fisherman), was not satisfied with
admitting the physician to his own table; towards evening, when
the courtiers were about to depart, he put on him a long rich robe,
resembling that which the courtiers usually wore in his presence,
and, in addition, made him a present of two thousand sequins. The
following days he did nothing but caress him; in short, this prince,
thinking he could never repay the obligations he owed to so skilful
a physician, was continually conferring on him some fresh proof of
his gratitude.

The king had a grand vizier who was avaricious, envious, and
capable of every species of crime. He observed. not withont pain,



26 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS,

the presents which had been bestowed upon the physician. To
accomplish his ruin, he went to him, and said in private that he had
some intelligence of the greatest moment to communicate. The
king asked him what it was. ‘‘Sire,” replied he, “it is very
dangerous for a monarch to place any confidence in a man of whose
fidelity he is not assured. In overwhelming the physician Douban
with your favours, and bestowing all this kindness and regard upon
him, you know not but he may be a traitor, who has introduced
himself to the court in order to assassinate you.” ‘ What is this
you dare tell me?” answered the king. <‘‘Recollect to whom you
speak, and that you advance an assertion to which I shall not easily
give credit.” “Sire,” added the vizier, ‘I am accurately informe:
of what I have the honour to represent to you; do not therefore
continue to repose such a dangerous confidence in him. If your
majesty is, as ib were, in a dream, it is time to awake; for I again
repeat, that the physician Douban has not travelled from the farther
part of Greece, his own country, but for the horrible design I have
mentioned,”

“No, no, vizier,” interrupted the king ; ‘I am sure this man,
whom you consider as a hypocrite and traitor, is one of the most
virtuous and best of men. You’ know by what remedy, or rather
by what miracle, le cured me of my leprosy; and if he had sought
my life, why did he thus save it. Cease, then, from endeavouring to
instil unjust suspicions. From this very day I bestow upon him a
pension of one thousand sequins a month for the rest of his life ;
and were I to share all my riches, and even my kingdoms with
him, I could never sufliciently repay what he has done for me. J
sce what it is, his virtue excites your envy; but do not suppose that
I shall suiter myself to be prejudiced against him. I well remember
what a vizier said to King Sinbad, who, at the instigation of his
mother-in-law, was about to give orders for the death of his son.”

Ghe Vistory of the Busband und the Warrot.
ye g y ye 3 ye 4

There lived once a good man who had a beautiful wife, of whom
he was so passionately fond that he could scarcely bear to have
her out of his sight. One day, when some particular business
obliged him to leave her, he went to a place where they sold all
sorts uf birds ; he purchased a parrot, which was not only highly
accomplished in the art of talking, but also possessed the rare sift
of telling everything that was done in its presence. The husband
took it home in a cage to his wife, and begged of her to keep it in
her chamber, and take great care of it during His absence; after
this he set out on his journey.

On his return, he did not fail to interrogate the parrot on what
had passed while he was away; and the bird very expertly related
a few circumstances which occasioned the husband to reprimand
his wife. She supposed that some of her slaves had exposed her,
but they all assured her they were faithful. and agreed in charging



THE VIZIER WItO WAS PUNISHED. 27

the parrot with the crime. Desirous of being convinced of the
truth of this matter, the wife advised a method of quieting the
suspicions of her husband, and at the same time of revenging her-
self on the parrot, if he were the culprit. The next time the hus-
band was absent, she ordered one of her slaves, during the night,
to turn a handmill under the bird’s cage, and another to throw
water over it like rain, and a third to wave a looking-glass before
the parrot by the light of a candle. ‘The slaves were employed the
greatest part of the night in doing what their mistress had ordered
them, and succeeded to her satisfaction.

The following day, when the husband returned, he again applied
to the parrot to be informed of what had taken place. The bird
replied, ‘‘My dear master, the lightning, the thunder, and the
vain, have so disturbed me the whole night, that I cannot tell you
how much I have suffered.” The husband, who knew there had
been no storm that night, became convinced that the parrot did
not always relate facts ; and that having told an untruth in this
particular, he had also deceived him with respect to his wife : being
therefore extremely enraged with it, he took the bird out of the
cage, and, dashing it on the floor, killed it. He, however, after-
wards learnt from his neighbours, that the poor parrot had told
no falsehood in reference to his wife’s conduct, which made him
repent of having destroyed it.

“* When the Greek king,” said the fisherman to the Genius, “had
finished the story of the parrot,” he added, “ You, vizier, through
envy of Douban, who has done you no evil, wish me to order his
death, but I will take good care lest, like the husband who killed
his parrot, I should afterwards repent.” _‘* Sire,” replicd the vizier,
“the loss of the parrot was of little importance, nor do I think his
master could long have regretted it. But when the life of a king is
in question, a bare suspicion ought to be equal toa certainty. But
this, sire, by no means rests on an uncertainty. The physician,
Douban, positively wishes to assassinate you. It is not envy that
makes me hostile to him, it is the interest alone that I take in
your majesty’s preservation. If my information is false, I deserve
the same punishment that a certain vizier underwent formerly.”
“What had that vizier done worthy of chastisement?” said the
Greek king. ‘I will tell your majesty,” answered the vizier, ‘‘ if
you will have the goodness to listen.”



Che History of the Vizier Who fous Punished.

There was formerly a king, whose son was passionately fond of
hunting. His father, therefore, often indulged him in this civersion ;
but at the same time gave positive orders to his grand vizier always
to accompany, and never lose sight of him, .

One hunting morning, the prickers roused a stag, and the prince
set off in pursuit, thinking that the vizier was following him. He
galoped so long, and his cagerncss carried him go far, that he at



98 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

last found himself quite alone. He immediately stopped, and
observing that he had lost his way, he endeavoured to return back
by the same, in order to join the vizier, who had not been suffi-
ciently attentive in following him. He was, however, unable to find
it; and riding about on all sides, without getting into the right
track, he by chance met a lady, not ill made, who was weeping
most bitterly. The prince immediately checked his horse, and
inquired of her who she was, what she did alone in that place, and
whether he could assist her. ‘‘I am,” she answered, ‘the daugh-

ter of an Indian king. In riding out into the country, I was over-

come with sleep, and fell from my horse. He has run away, and 1
know not what has become of him.” The young prince was sorry
for her misfortune, and proposed to take her up behind him, an
offer which she accepted.

As they passed by an old ruined building, the lady made some
excuse to alight; the prince therefore stopped, and suffered her to
get down. ‘He ‘also alighted, and walked towards the building,
holding his horse by the bridle. Imagine, then, what was his
astonishment when he heard the female pronounce these words
from within the walls: ‘‘ Rejoice, my children, I have brought you a
very nice fat youth.” And directly afterwards other voices answered,
st Where as he, mamma? Let us eat him instantly, for we are very
hungry.’

The prince had heard enough to convince him of the danger he
was in: he plainly perceived that she, who represented herself as
the daughter of an Indian king, was no other than the wife of one
of those § savage demons called ‘Ogres, who live in desert places, and
make ase of a thousand wiles to surprise and devour the unfortunate
passengers. He trembled with fear, and instantly mounted his
horse.

The pretended princess at that moment made her appearance,
on which the young prince lifted up his hands towards heaven, and
said, ‘*Cast thine eyes upon me, O all-powerful Lord, and deliver
me from this my enemy!” At this prayer, the Ogre went back to
the ruin, and the prince rode off as fast as possible. He fortunately
discovered the right roa4, and arrived safely at home, and related
to his father the great danger he had encountered "through the
neglect of the grand vizier. “The king was so enraged at him, that
he « ordered this minister to be instantly strangled.

“Sire,” continued the vizier of the Greek king, “‘ to return to
the physician Douban ; if you do not take care, the confidence you
place in him will turn out unfortunate. I well know that he is a
spy, sent by your enemies to attempt your majesty’s life. He has
cured you, you say; but who can tell that? He has perhaps only
cured you in appearance, and not radically; and who can tell
whether this remedy in the end will not produce the most pernicious
effects ?”

The Greek king was naturally rather weak, and had not pene-
tration enough to discover the wicked intention of his vizier, nor
sufficient firmness to persist in his first opinion. This conversation
staggered him. ‘‘ You are right, vizier,” said he, ‘he may be



TUE GREEK KING AND THE PHYSICIAN. 24

come for the express purpose of taking my life, which he can exsily
accomplish, even by the mere smell of some of his drugs. We must
consider what is to be done in this conjuncture.”

When the vizier perceived the king in the disposition he wished,
he said to him, ‘‘The best and most certain means, sire, to ensure
your repose, and put your person in safety, is instantly to send t:
Douban, and on his appearance, order him to be beheaded.*
‘‘Indeed,” replied the king, “I think I ought to prevent his
designs.” Having said this, he called one of his officers, and ordered
him to find the physician, who, without knowing what the king
wished, hastened to the palace.

“‘ Knowest thou,” said the king as soon as he saw him, “why I
sent for thee here?” ‘‘ No, sire,” answered Douban, ‘‘and I wait till
your majesty pleases to instruct me.” ‘ [have ordered thee to come,”
replied the king, ‘to free myself from thy snares, by taking thy life.”

{tis impossible to express the astonishment of Douban at hearing
the sentence of his death. ‘‘For what reason, sire,” replied he,
‘does your majesty condemn me to death? What crime have 1
been guilty of?” ‘I have been well informed,” added the king,
‘that you are a.spy, and that you have come to my court in order
to take away my life; but to prevent that, I will first deprive you
of yours, Strike,” added he to an officer who was by, ‘‘and deliver
me from a treacherous wretch, who has introduced himself here only
to assassinate me.”

At hearing this, the physician at once surmised that the honours
and riches which had been heaped upon him had excited some
enemies against him, and that the king, through weakness, had
suffered himself to be guided by them; nor was he wrong. He’
began to repent having cured him; but that feeling came too late.
“Is it thus,” he cried, “that you recompense the good I have done
you?” The king, however, paid no attention, and desired the
oficer, a second time, to execute his orders. The physician had
then recourse to prayers. ‘Ah, sire,” he cried, “if you prolong
my life, God will prolong yours; do not kill me, lest God should
treat you after the same manner,”

**You see, then,” said the fisherman, breaking off his story in
this place, and addressing himself to the Genius, “that what has
passed between the Greek king and the physician Douban, is
exactly the same as what has happened between us.”

The Greek king, however, continued he, instead of regarding the
entreaties the physician urged in conjuring him, in the name of
God, to relent, exclaimed, ‘No, no, you must die, or you will take
away my life.” Douban in the meantime bathed in tears, com-
plained much at finding his important services so ill requited, and
at last prepared for death. The officer then put a bandage over his
eyes, tied his hands, and was going to draw his scimitar. The
courtiers, however, who were present, felt so much for him, that
they entreated the king to pardon him, assuring his majesty he
was not guilty, and that they would answer for his innocence. But
the king was inflexible, and spoke so peremptorily, that they dared
not reply.



8U) THE ARABIAN NIGHTS MNTERTAINML NTS.

The physician being on his knees, his eyes bandaged, and ready
to receive the stroke that was to terminate his life, once more
addressed the king. ‘Since your majesty, sire, will not revoke the
order for my death, I entreat you at least to give me leave to return
home to arrange my funeral, take a last farewell of my family,
bestow some charity, and leave my books to those who will know
how to make a good use of them. There is one of them which 1
wish to make a present to your majesty. It is a very rare ana
curious work, and worthy of being kept even in your treasury with
the greatest care.” ‘What book can there be,” replied the king,
‘so valuable as you mention?” ‘‘ Sire,” answered the physician,
‘it contains things of the most curious nature, and one of the
principal is, that when my head shall be struck off, if your majesty
will take the trouble to open the book at the sixth leaf, and read
the third line on the left-hand page, my head will answer every
question you wish to ask.” The king was so desirous of seeing
such a wonderful thing, that he put otf his death till the next day,
and sent him home under a strong guard.

The physician then arranged all his aflairs, and as the news got
abroad that an unheard-of prodigy was to happen after his execution,
the viziers, emirs, officers of the guard, in short, allthe court, flocked
the next day to the hall or audience to witness such an extraordinary
event. 7

Douban the physician appeared directly after, and advanced to
the foot of the throne with a very large volume in his hand. He
then placed it on a vase, and unfolded the cover on which the book
was wrapped ; and in presenting it he thus addressed the king :
“Tf it be your pleasure, sire, receive this book ; and as soon
as my head shall be struck off, order one of your officers to
place it on the vase upon the cover of the book ; as soon as it 18
there, the blood will cease to flow: then open the book, and my
head shall answer all your questions. But, sire,” added Douban,
‘‘permit me once more to implore your mercy. Consider, I beg of
you, in the name of God, that I protest to you I am innocent.”
‘Thy prayers,” answered the king, “are useless, and were it only
to hear thy head speak after thy death, I should wish for thy exe-
cution.” ‘In saying this, he took the book from the hands of the
physician, and ordered the officer to do his duty.

The head was so adroitly cut off, that it fell into the vase, and it
had hardly been on the cover an instant before the blood stopped.
‘Then, to the astonishment of the king, and all the spectators, it
opened its eyes, and said, ‘Will your majesty now open the book.”
The king did so, and finding that the first leaf stuck to the second,
he put his finger to his mouth, and moistened it, in order to turn
it over more easily. He went on doing so till he came to the sixth
leaf; and observing nothing written upon the appointed page,
“‘ Physician,” said he to the head, “there is no writing.” “ Turn
over then a few more leaves,” replied the head, The king con-
tinued turning them over, still putting his finger frequently to his
mouth, till the poison, in which each leaf had been dipped, began
to produce its effect. The prince then felt himself suddenly agitated





THE FISHERMAN AND THE GENIUS. 31

in a most extraordinary manner; his sight failed him, and he fell
at the foot of the throne in the greatest convulsions.

When the physician Douban, or rather his head, saw that the
poison had taken effect, and that the king had only a few minutes
to live, ‘‘ Tyrant,” he exclaimed, ‘behold how those princes are
treated who abuse their power and sacrifice the innocent. God,
sooner or later, punishes their injustice and their cruelty.” The
head had no sooner repeated these words than the king expired ;
and, at the same time, the small portion of life that remained in the
head itself was wasted.

As soon as the fisherman had finished the history of the Greek
king and the physician Douban, he applied it to the Genius, whom
he still kept confined in the vase. “If,” said he, “the Greek king
had permitted Douban to live, God would also have bestowed the
sume benefit on him: but he rejected the humble prayers of the
physician; God therefore punished him. ‘his, O Genius, is the
vase with yourself. If I had been able to make you relent, and
could have obtained the favour I asked of you, I should have pitied
the state in which you now are; but since you persisted in your
determination to kill me, in spite of the obligation you were wider
to me for setting you at liberty, I ought, in my turn, to show no
merey, In leaving you within this vase, and casting you into the
sea, I shall deprive you of the use of your existence till the end of
time. This is the revenge you yourself have taught me.”

“Once more, my good friend,” replied the Genius, ‘‘I entreat
you not to be guilty of so cruel an act ; remember that revenge is
not a part of virtue; on the contrary, it is praiseworthy to return
good for evil. Do not, then, serve me as Imma formerly treated
Ateca,” ‘And how was that?” asked the fisherman. ~ “If you
wish to be informed of it, open this vase,” answered the Genius;
‘do you think that I am in the humour, while confined in this
narrow prison, to relate stories? I will tell you as many as you
please when you shall have letme out.” « No, no,” said the fisher.
man, “I will not release you; it is better for me to cast you to the
bottom of the sea.” “One word more, fisherman,” cried the
Genius: ‘TI will teach you how to become as rich as possible.”

The hope of being no longer in want, at once disarmed the fisher-
man. “I would listen to you,” he evied, ‘‘if I had the least
ground to believe you; swear to me by the great name of God that
you will faithfully observe what you say, and I will open the vase.
I do not believe that you will be sufficiently bold to violate such
an oath.” The Genius did so; and the fisherman immediately took
off the covering. The smoke instantly issued from it, and the first
thing the Genius did, after he had resumed his usual form, was to
kick the vase into the sea, an action which rather alarmed the
fisherman. ‘* What do you mean, O Genius, by this ; do you not
intend to keep the oath you have taken? Or must T address the
same words to you which the physician Douban did to the Greek
king, “Suffer me to live, and God will prolong your days?”

__ The fear expressed by him made the Genius laugh. ‘Be of good
heart, fisherman,” auswered he, ‘ Ll have thrown the vase into the
¢c



82 VHE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

sea only for diversion, and to see whether you would be alarmed.
but to show you that I intend to keep my word, take your nets and
follow me.” °'They passed by the city and went over the top of a
mountain, from whence they descended into a vast plain, which
led them to a pond, situated between four small hills.

‘When they were arrived’on the borders of the pond, the Genius
said to the fisherman, ‘‘‘Throw your nets, and catch fish.” The
fisherman did not doubt that he should take some, for he saw a
creat quantity in the pond; but how great was his surprise at find-
ing them of four different colours—white, red, blue, and yellow. He
threw his nets and caught four, one of each colour. As he had
vever seen any similar to them, he could hardly cease admiring
them; and judging that he could dispose of them for a considerable
sum, he expressed great joy. ‘‘ Carry these fish to the palace,”
suid the Genius, ‘‘and present them to the sultan, and he will give
you more money than you ever handled in all your life. You may
come every day and fish in this pond, but beware of casting your
nets more than once each day: if you act otherwise, some evil will
befall you: therefore take care. This is my advice, and if you
follow it exactly you will do well.” Having said this, he struck his
foot against the ground, which opened, and having sunk into it, the
earth closed as before.

The fisherman resolved to observe the advice and. instructions of
the Genius in every point, and take care never to throw his nets a
second time, He went back to the town very well satistied with
his success, and making a thousand yeflections on his adventure.
He went directly and presented his fish at the sultan’s palace.

L leave it to your majesty to imagine how much the sultan was
surprised when he saw the four fish brought him by the fisherman.
He took them one by one, and observed them most attentively ;
and after admiring them a long time, he said to his first vizier,
“Take these fish and carry them to that excellent cook which the
emperor of the Greeks sent me ; T think they must be equally good
as they are beautiful.” :

The vizier took them, and delivered them into the hands of the
cook, ‘Here are four fish,” said he, ‘which have been presented
to the sultan; he commands you te dress them.” He then returned
to the sultan his master, who desired him to give the fisherman
four hundred pieces of gold. The fisherman, who was never before
in possession of so large a sum of money at once, could not conceal
his joy, and thought it alla dream. He soon, however, proved it
to hea reality by the good purpose to which he applied the gold,
in relieving the wants of his family.

As soon as the cook had cleaned the fish which the vizier had
brought, she put them in a vessel, with some oil, over the fire to
fry. When she thought they were sufficiently done on one side,
she turned them. She had hardly done so, when, wonderful to
relate, the wall of the kitchen appeared to separate, and a beautiful
and majestic young damsel came out of the opening, She was
dressed in a satin robe, embroidered with flowers after the Egyptian

manner, and adorned with ear-rings and a necklace of large pearls,







THE FISHERMAN AND THE GENIUS. 33

and gold bracelets set with rubies; she held a rod of myrtle in her
hand, Approaching the vessel, to the great astonishment of the
cook, who remained motionless at the sight, and striking one of the
fish with her rod, she said, “ Fish, fish, art thou doing thy duty ?”
The fish answering not a word, she again repeated it, when the four
fish all raised themselves up, and said very distinctly, ‘Yes, yes,
if you reckon, we reckon; if you pay your debts, we pay ours ; if
you fly, we conquer, and are content.” “As soon as they had spoken
these words, the damsel overturned the vessel, and went back
through the wall, which immediately closed up, and was in the
same state as before. ;

The cook, whom all these wonders alarmed, having in some
measure recovered from her fright, went to take up the fish, which
had fallen upon the hot ashes; but she found them blacker and
more burnt than the coals themselves, and not at all in a state to
send to the sultan. At this she was greatly distressed, and began
to ery with all her might. ‘‘ Alas,” said she, “what will become
ofme? Iam sure, when I relate to the sultan what I have seen,
that he will not believe me. How enraged also will he be with me !”

While she was in this distress, the grand vizier entered, and asked
if the fish were ready. The cook then related all that had taken
place, at which, as we may naturally suppose, he was much as-
tonished: but without telling the sultan anything about it, he
invented some excuse which satisfied him. He then sent directly
for the fisherman; to whom, when he was come, he said, ‘‘ Bring
me four more fish, like those you brought before, for an accident
has happened which prevents their being served up to the sultan.”
The fisherman did not tell him what the Genius had strictly advised
him to do, but pleaded the length of the way as an excuse for not
being able to procure any more that day; he promised, however, to
bring them the next morning,

The fisherman, in order to be in time, set out before it was day,
and went to the pond. He threw his nets, and drawing them out,
found four more fish, like those he had taken the day before, cach
of a different colour. He returned directly, and brought them to
the grand vizier by the time he had promised. The minister took
them, and carried them into the kitchen, where he shut himself up
with only the cook, who prepared to dress them before him. She
put them on the fire as she had done the others on the preceding
day. When they were dressed on one side, she turned them, and
immediately the wall of the kitchen opened, and the same damsel]
appeared, with her myrtle in her hand. She approached the vessel
in which the fish were, and striking one of them, addressed the
same words to it she had before done ; when they all, raising their
heads, made the same answer. The damsel overturned the vessel
with her rod as she had done before, and went back through the
opening in the wall, where she had entered. The grand vizier
witnessed all that passed. “This ig very surprising,” he cried,
“and too extraordinary to be kept secret from the sultan’s ears,
I will myself go and inform him of this prodigy.” We immediately
therefore, went, and gave an exact relation of all that had passed.



34 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

The sultan was much astonished, and became very anxious to see
this wonder. For this purpose he again sent for the fisherman :
“Friend,” said he to him, when he came, ‘canst thou net bring
me four more fish of different colours?” ‘If your majesty,”
answered the fisherman, ‘will grant me three days, I can promise
to do so.” He obtained the time he wished, and went again, for
the third time, to the pond. He was not less successful than before,
and he caught four fish of different colours the first time he threw
his nets. He neglected not to carry them directly to the sultan,
who expressed the greater pleasure at seeing them, as he did not
expect them so soon, and he ordered four hundred picces of money
to be given to the fisherman.

As goon as the sultan had got the fish, he had them taken into
his own cabinet, together with the different things that were neces-
sary to dress them. Tere he shut himself up with the grand vizier,
who began to cook them, and put them on the fire in a proper vessel,
As soon as they were done on one side, he turned them on the other.
‘The wall of the cabinct immediately opened; but, instead of the
beautiful damsel, there appeared a black, who was in the habit of
a slave. This black was very large and gigantic, and held a large
green rod in his hand. He advanced to the vessel, and touching
one of the fish with his rod, he criea out in a terrible tone, “ Fish,
fish, art thou doing thy duty?” At these words, the fish lifted up
their heads, and answered, ‘‘ Yes, yes, we are: if you reckon, we
reckon; if you pay your debts, we pay ours ; if you fly, we conquer,
and are content.” "The fish had scarcely said this, when the black
overturned the vessel into the middle of the cabinet, and reduced
the fish to the state of cinders. Having done so, he haughtily
retired through the opening of the wall, which instantly closed, and
appeared as perfect as before.
< After what I have seen,” said the sultan to his grand vizier,
“it is in vain for me to think of remaining at ease. It is certain
that these fish signify something very extraordinary, which I wish
to discover.” He sent for the fisherman, and when he arrived, he
said to him, ‘The fish thou hast brought me have caused me great
uneasiness; where dost thou catch them?” ‘I caught them, sire,”
answered he, ‘‘in a pond, which is situated in the midst of four
small hills, beyond the mountain you may see from hence.” ‘* Do
you know that pond?” said the sultan to the vizier. ‘‘No, sire,”
answered he; ‘‘I have never even heard it mentioned, though I
have hunted in the vicinity of the mountain, and beyond it, near
sixty years.” The sultan asked the fisherman about what distance
the pond was from the palace; he replied that it was not more than
three hours’ journey. With this assurance, as there was still time
to arrive there before night, the sultan ordered his whole court to
get ready, while the fisherman served as a guide.

They all ascended the mountain, and in going down on the other
side, they were much surprised by the appearance of a large plain,
which no one had ever before remarked. They at length arrived
at the pond, which they found situated exactly among four hills,
as the fisherman hac reported. Its water was so transparent, that





THE FISHERMAN AND THE GENIUS. 35
they remarked all the fish to be of the same colours as those the
fisherman had brought to the palace.

The sultan halted on the side of the pond; and, after observing
the fish with signs of great admiration, he inquired of his emirs and
all his courtiers if it could be possible that they had never seen this
pond, which was so close to the city.—They all said they had never
heard it even mentioned. ‘Since you all agree, then,” said he,
‘that you have never. heard it spoken of, and since I am not less
astonished than you are at this novelty, 1 am resolved not to return
to my palace till I have discovered for what reason this pond is now
placed here, and why there are fish of only four colours in it.”
After having thus spoken, he ordered them to encamp around it:
his own pavilion, and the tents of his immediate household, were
pitched on the borders of the pond.

When the day closed, the sultan retired to his pavilion, and
entered into a particular conversation with his vizier. “My mind,”
said he, ‘‘is much disturbed; this pond, suddenly placed here;
this black, who appeared to us in my cabinet; these fish, too,
whom we heard speak ; all this so much excites my curiosity that 1
cannot conquer my impatience to be satisfied. I shall go quite
nlone from my camp, and order you to keep my departure a pro-
found secret. Remain in my pavilion, and when my emirs and
courtiers present themselves at the entrance to-morrow morning,
send them away, and say I have a slight indisposition, and wish to
remain alone. You will also continue to do so every day till my;
return.”

The grand vizier endeavoured, by many arguments, to persuade
the sultan not to do as he intended. He represented the great
danger to which he exposed himself, and the unnecessary trouble
and difficulties he might thus encounter, and probably to no pur-
pose, All his eloquence, however, was exhausted, to no effect ; the
sultan did not alter his resohition, but prepared to set out. He
put on a proper dress for walking, and armed himself with a sabre;
and as soon as he found that everything in the camp was quiet, he
departed, unaccompanied by any one.

He bent his course towards one of the small hills, which he as-
cended without much difficulty, and the descent on the other sidewas
still easier. He then pursued his way over a plain, till the sun rose.
He now perceived, in the distance before him, a large building, the
sight of which filled him with joy, from the hopes of being able to
gain some intelligence of what he wished to know. When he came
near, he remarked that it was a magnificent palace, or rather a
strong castle, built with polished black marble, and covered with
fine steel, so bright that it was like a mirror. Delighted with having
so soon met with something at least worthy his curiosity, he stopped
opposite the front, and considered it with much attention ; he then
advanced towards the folding doors, one of which was open. Though
he might have gone in, he thought it better to knock. At first, he
knocked gently, and waited some time; but, finding no one appear,
he thought they might not have heard 3 he therefore knocked a
second time, much louder; still no one came. He redoubled his





86 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

efforts, but in vain. At this he was mucb astonished, as he could
not imagine that a castle so well built as that was, could be de-
serted.—‘‘ If there be no person there,” said the sultan to himself,
“‘T have nothing to fear; and if there be any one, I have arms to
defend myself with.”

At last he entered, and when he was in the vestibule, he called
out, ‘* Is there no one here to receive a stranger, who is in want of
refreshment on his journey?” He repeated it two or three times,
as loud as he could; still there was no answer. This silence in-
creased his astonishment, He passed on to a very spacious court,
and looking on all sides, he could not discover a living creature.
He then entered, and passed through some large halls, the carpets
of which were of silk, the recesses and sofas entirely covered with
the stuffs of Mecca, and the curtains before the doors of the richest
manufactures of India, embroidered with gold and silver. He went
on, and came to a most wonderful saloon, in the midst of which
there was a large reservoir, with a lion of massive gold at each
corner. Streams of water issued from the mouths of the four lions,
and in falling, appeared to break in a thousand diamonds and pearls,
which formed a good addition to a fountain that sprung from the
middle of the basin, and rose almost to the top of a dome, beauti-
fully painted in the arabesque style.

The castle was surrounded on three sides by a garden, which was
embellished with all kinds of flowers, fountains, groves, and many
other beauties; but what rendered this spot still more enchanting
was the multitude of birds, which filled the air with the sweetest
notes. This was their constant habitation, because there were nets
thrown entirely over the trees, which prevented their escape.

The sultan continued walking a long time from one apartment to
another, where everything was grand and magnificent. Being
rather fatigued, he sat dowr in an open cabinet, which looked into
the garden, Here he meditated upon all he had seen, when sud-
deuly a plaintive voice, accompanied by the most heart-rending
cries, struck his ear. He listened attentively, and distinctly heard
these melancholy words :—‘‘ O fortune, thou hast not suffered me
long to enjoy my happy lot, but hast rendered me the most wretched
of men; cease, I entreat thee, thus to persecute me, and, by a
speedy death, put an end to my sufferings. Alas! is it possible I
can still exist, after all the torments I have suffered ?”

The sultan, much affected by these lamentable complaints, im-
mediately got up, and went towards the spot whence they issued.
He came to the entrance of a iarge hall ; he drew the door-curtain
aside, and saw a young man seated upon a sort of throne, raised a
little from the ground. He appeared well made, and was very
richly dressed, but deep sorrow was impressed on his countenance.
The sultan approached, and saluted him. The youth returned the
compliment by bending his head very low, but did not rise. ‘I
am sure, sir,” said he to the sultan, ‘I ought to get up to reccive
you, and show you all possible respect, but a most powerful reason
prevents me ; you will not, therefore, 1 trust, take it il.” ‘I feel
myself highly honoured, sir,” replicd the sultan, ‘‘ by the good



THE KING ur THE BLAOK ISLES. 87
opinion you express of me. Whatever may be your motive for not
rising, I willingly receive your apologies. Attracted by your com-
plaints, I come to offer you my assistance. I flatter myself you
will not object to relate the history of your sorrows tome. But,
in the first place, I beg of you to inform me what that pond which
is near this castle means, where there are fish of four different
colours ; how, also, this castle came here, and you thus in it, and
alone!”

Instead of answering these questions, the young man began to weep
most bitterly. The sultan, touched with compassion at his situa-
tion, requested him again to relate the cause of such sorrow. ‘Alas,
my lord !” answered the youth, ‘‘ can I be otherwise than afflicted,
or can these eyes ever cease from shedding tears?” At these words,
he lifted up his robe, and the sultan perceived he was a man only
to his waist, and that from thence to his feet he was changed into
black marble.

‘You may easily imagine that the sultan was much surprised when
he saw the deplorable state of the young man. ‘‘ What you show
me,” said he to him, ‘fills me with horror, but at the same time
excites my curiosity. Iam impatient to learn your history, which
must, no doubt, be very singular; and I am persuaded that the
pond and the fish have some connexion with it. I entreat you,
therefore, to relate it ; and you may find consolation by doing so,
for the unhappy often experience some relief in communicating
their sorrows.” ‘‘I will not refuse you this satisfaction,” replied
the young man, ‘although I cannot impart it without renewing
the most poignant grief.”

The Vistory of the Poung Ming of ihe Wlach Msles.

I must first inform you (continued he), that my father, who was
called Mahmoud, was the king of this state. It is the kingdom of
the Black Isles, which takes its name from four small neighbouring
mountains, that were formerly islands; and the capital where my
father resided was situated on the spot which is now occupied by
that pond. You will know how these changes took place as I pro-
ceed with my history.

The king, my father, died at the age of seventy years. I had no
sooner taken his place than I married, and the person whom I chose
to partake of the royal dignities with me was my cousin, I had
every reason to be satisfied with the proofs of aifection I had re-
ceived from her, and, on my part, I returned them with equal
tenderness. Our happy union continued for five years, when I
began to perceive that the queen, my cousin, no longer loved me.

One day after dinner, when she was gone to bathe, I felt mysclf
inclined to sleep, and threw myself ona sofa ; two of her women, who
happened to be in the room, seated themselves, one at my head and
the other at my fect, to fan me, as well for the purpose of reiresh-
ing me, as to keep off the flies, which might have disturhed my



B8 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS FNTERTAINMENTS.

slumbers, They then, supposing me asleep, began to talk softly
but I had only closed my eyes, and so overheard their whole con
versation.

“Ts it not a pity,” said one of them to the other, ‘‘that the
queen does not love our king, who is such an amiable prince?”
“ Surely it is,” replied the other; ‘‘and I cannot conceive why she
goes out every night and leaves him; does he not perceive it?”
“ How should he perceive it?” resumed the first; ‘‘she mixes in
his drink, every night, the juice of a certain herb, which makes
him sleep all night, so profoundly that she has time to go wherever
she likes ; and when, at break of day she returns to him, she awakes
him by passing a particular scent under his nose.”

You may judge, my lord, of the surprise which this discourse
occasioned, as well as the sentiments with which it inspired me:
nevertheless I had sufficient command over myself to suppress my
emotions; I pretended to awake without having heard the conver-
sation.

The queen returned from the bath; we supped together, and be-
fore we went to rest she presented me with a cup of water, which it
was usual for me to take; but instead of drinking it, I approached
a window that was open, and threw it out without her perceiving
me. I then returned the cup into her own hands, that she might
suppose I had drank the contents. We soon retired, and shortly
aiter, supposing that I was asleep, although I was not, she got up,
with so little precaution that she said aloud, ‘‘ Sleep, and mayest
thou never wake more.” She dressed herself quickly, and left the
chamber.

The queen had no sooner quitted me than I got up, and dressed
myself as speedily as possible, and taking my scimitar, I followed
her so closely that I heard her footsteps just before me, when,
regulating my steps by hers, J walked softly for fear of being heard.
She passed through several doors, which opened by virtue of some
magic words she pronounced; the last she opencd was that of the
garden, which she entered. I stopped at this door, that she might
not see me, while she crossed a parterre; and following her with my
eyes, as well as the obscurity of the night would permit, I re-
marked that she went into a little wood, the walks of which were
enclosed by a thick hedge. I repaired thither by another way, and
hiding myself behind the hedge of one of the paths, I perceived that
she was walking with a man,

I did not fail to listen attentively to their discourse, from which
T learned that she was an enchantress. Having reached the end of
the walk they turned to enter another, and passed before me: I had
already drawn my scimitar, and as the lover was next me, I struck
him on the neck, and he fell. I believed I had killed him, and
with this persuasion, I retired precipitately, without discovering
myself to the queen, whom I wished to spare, as she was my
cousin,

Although her lover’s wound was mortal, she yet contrived by her
enchantment to preserve in him that kind of existence which can be
called neither dead nor alive. When I reached my chainber, 1



THE KING OF THE BLACK ISLES. 39

went again to bed, and feeling satisfied with the punishmert ‘ had
inflicted on the wretch who had offended me, | tell asicep. On
waking next morning, 1 found the queen by my side; I cannot say
whether she was asicep, or feigned it, but 1 got up without disturb-
ing her, and retired to my closet, where I finished dressing: I
afterwards attended the council ; and on my return, the queen,
dressed in mourning, her hair dishevelled and torn, presented her-
self before me. ‘‘Sire,” said she, ‘‘ I come to entreat your majesty
not to be displeased at the state in which you now sce me. I have
just received intelligence of three events, which occasion the grief |
so strongly feel, but can ill express.” ‘‘ What are these events,
madam?” I inquired. ‘‘The death of the queen, my beloved
mother,” replied she; ‘‘that of the king, my father, who was
killed in battle ; and also of my brother, who fell down a pre-
cipice.”

I was not sorry that she had invented this pretext to conceal the
true cause of her affliction, and I imagined that she did not suspect
me of having been the murderer of her lover. ‘* Madam,” said I,
“T do not blame your sorrow. I should be much surprised if you
were not affected by such a loss; weep, for your tears are an un-
doubted proof of your good heart; I hope, nevertheless, that time
and reason will restore to you your wonted cheerfulness.”

She retired to her apartment, where, abandoning herself to her
grief, she passed a whole year in weeping and bewailing the fate of
her lover. At the expiration of that time, she requested my per-
mission to build a mausoleum for herself in the centre of the palace,
where she said she wished to pass the remainder of her days. I did
not refuse her, and she erected a magnilicent palace with a dome,
which may be seen from hence, and she called it the Palace of
Tears.

When it was finished, she had her lover removed from the place
whither she had transported him on the night I wounded him, and
brought to this mausoleum. She had till that period preserved his
life by giving him certain potions, which she administered herself,
aud continued to give him daily after his removal to the Palace of
Tears. All her enchantments, however, did not avail, for he was
not only unable to walk or stand, but had also lost the use of his
speech, and gave no signs of life but by looks.

Excited by my curiosity, I went one day to the Palace of Tears,
to know what was the occupation of the princess, and concealing
myself in a part where I could sce and hear what passed, I heard
her address her lover in the tenderest manner. I avow to you, my
lord, that I was enraged at her words; for in truth this cherished
lover, was not at all what you would imagine. He was a black
Indian, one of the original inhabitants of this country. I was, as
i have said, so enraged at this speech, that I suddenly showed
myself, and addressing myself in a similar manner to the tomb, 1
said, ‘‘ Why dost thou not, O tomb, swallow up this monster, who
is even disgusting to human nature? or rather, why dost thou not
consume both the lover and the mistress.”

1 had hardly finished these words when the ance, who was



40 THE ARABIAN NIGUTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

seated near the black, started up like a fury. ‘Ah, wretch!” said
she to me, ‘it is thou who hast been the cause of my grief; think
not that Iam ignorant of it. I have already dissembled too long,
It was thy barbarous hand which reduced the object of my affection
to the miserable state he now is in. And hast thou the cruelty to
come and insult my despair?” ‘‘ Yes,” cried I, interrupting. her,
and transported with anger, ‘‘I have ‘chastised the monster as he
deserved, and I ought to treat thee in the same manner. I repent
not having already ‘done it, for thou hast too long abused my good-
ness.” In saying this, I drew my scimitar, and “yaised my arm to
punish her, ‘‘ Moderate thy rage,” said she to me, with a disdainful
smile, and regarding my motions with a tranquil air; at the
same instant she pronounced some words which I did not understand,
and added, ‘‘ By virtue of my enchantments, I command thee from
this moment to become half marble, and half man.” Immediately,
my lord, Iwas changed to what you see me; already dead among
the living, and living among the dead.

As soon as this cruel enchantress, for she is unworthy of bearing
the title of queen, had thus transformed me, and by means of her
magic had conveyed me to this apartinent, she destroyed my capital,
which was both flourishing and well inhabited; she annihilated the
palaces, public places, and markets; turned the whole place into a
lake, or pond, and rendered the country, as you may perceive, quite
a desert. The four sorts of fish which are in the pond are four
different classes of inhabitants who professed different religions,
and inhabited the capital. The white were Mussulmen; the red,
Persians, who worship fire; the blue, Christians; and the yellow,
Jews; the four little hills were four islands, whence the name of
the kingdom originated. I was informed of all this by the enchan-
tress, who herself related the effects of her rage. Nor was even
this all; she did not confine her fury to the destruction of my
empire, and to my enchantment, for she comes every day and gives
me a hundred blows with a thong, made of a bull’s hide, upon my
shoulders, from whence she draws blood at every stroke. As soon
as she has finished this punishment, she covers me with a thick
stuli, made of goats’ hair, and puts a robe of rich brocade over it,
not for the sake of honouring, but of mocking me,

‘“‘Inform me,” cried the sultan, affected by the recital of so
strange a story, and eager to avenge such injuries, ‘‘inform me
where this perfidious enchantress resides, and where also is this
infamous lover, whom she has entombed before his death.” ‘‘ My
lord,” answered the prince, ‘‘he, as I have before mentioned, is at
the Palace of Tears, in a tomb formed like a dome; and this palace
has a communication with the castle on the side towards the
entrance.”

“*No one, prince,” replied the sultan, ‘‘deserves greater com-
miseration than yourself ; nor can any one be more sensible of your
misfortune than Lam. One thing only is wanting, and that is for you
to be avenged; nor will I leave ‘anything untried to accomplish it.”
The sultan having first informed the prince who he was, and the
reason of his entering the castle, consulted with him on the best



THE KING OF THE BLACK ISLES. 4]

means of affording hin a just revenge; and a plan occurred to the
sultan, which he directly communicated. They then agreed upon
the steps it was necessary to take in order to ensure success ; and
they deferred the execution of the plan till the following day. In
the meantime, as the night was far advanced, the sultan took some
vepose, The young prince, as usual, passed his time in continual
watchfulness, for he was unable to sleep since his enchantment:
the hopes, however slight, which he cherished of being soon relieved
from his suffermgs, constantly occupied his thoughts.

The sultan rose as soon as it was day; and having concealed his
robe and external dress, which might encumber him, he went to the
Palace of Tears. He found it illuminated by a multitude of torches
of white wax ; and a delicious perfume, issuing from various beautiful
golden vases, regularly arranged, struck his senses. As soon as he
perceived the bed on which the black was laid, he drew his sabre,
and destroyed, without resistance, the little remains of life in this
wretch. He then dragged the body into the court of the castle,
and threw it into a well) Having done this, he returned, and lay
down in the black’s place, hiding he sabre under the covering, and
remained there in order to complete what he projected. The
enchantress arrived soon after: her first business was to go into the
apartment where the king of the Black Isles, her husband, was.
She directly stripped him, and with her usual barbarity began to
inflict upon his shoulders the accustomed number of blows. The
poor prince filled the whole building with his cries, and conjured

er, in the most pathetic manner, to have pity on him: the wretch,
however, ceased not to beat him till she had completed the hundred,
‘Thou hadst no compassion on my lover,” said she, ‘expect there-
fore none from me.” As soon as she had finished, she threw the
coarse garment made of goat-skin over him, and then the robe of
brocade. She next went to the Palace of Tears; and, on entering,
began to renew her lamentations. ‘Alas !” she exclaimed, address-
ing herself to the sultan, whom she took for the black, ‘wilt thou
always, light of my life, preserve this silence? Art thou resolved
to let me die without the consolation of hearing thee again declare
that thou lovest me. Utter at ieast one word, I conjure thee.”

The sultan then, pretending to awake from a profound sleep, and
imitating the language of the blacks, answered the queen in a solemn
tone. ‘There is no might, or power, but in God alone, who is al]
powerful.” At these words the enchantress, to whom they were
unexpected, gave a violent scream through excess of joy. “My
dear lord,” she exclaimed, “do you deceive me? is what I hear
true? Is it really you whe speak?” ‘ Wretched woman,” replied
the sultan, ‘art thou worthy of an answer?” “What!” cried the
queen, ‘‘dost thou reproach me?” ‘The cries, the tears, the groans
of thy husband,” answered the supposed black, “whom you every
day beat with so much indignity and barbarity, continually prevent
ny rest; I should have been cured long since, and recovered the
use of my tongue, if you had disenchanted him, This, and this
only, is the cause of my silence, and of which you so continually
complain,” ‘Well, then,” said the enchantress, “to satisfy you,





42 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

T am ready to do what you command: do you wish him to re-assume
his first form?” ‘‘Yes,” replied the sultan: ‘‘and hasten to set
him free, that I may no longer be disturbed ly his cries.”

The queen immediately went out from the Palace of Tears; and
taking a vessel of water, she pronounced over it some words, which
caused it instantly to boil, as if it had been placed on a fire. She
proceeded to the apartment where the young king, her husband,
was. ‘If the Creator of all things,” said she, throwing the water
over him, “hath formed thee as thou now art, or if he is angry
with thee, do not change; but if thou art in that state by virtue
of my enchantment, re-assume thy natural form, and become the
same as before.” She had hardly concluded, when the prince,
recovering his first shape, rose up, with all possible joy, and returned
thanks to God. ‘‘Go,” said the enchantress, addressing him,
“hasten from this castle, and never return, lest it should cost thee
thy life.” The young king yielded to necessity, and left the queen
without replying a word. He concealed himself in some secure spot,
where he immediately awaited the completion of the sultan’s design,
the commencement of which had been so successful.

The enchantress then returned to the Palace of Tears; and on
entering, said to him whom she supposed to be the black, ‘T have
done, my love, what you ordered me: nothing, therefore, now pre-
vents your getting up.” The sultan, still imitating the language of
the blacks, answered in rather a sharp tone, ‘‘ What you have yet
done is not sufficient for my cure. You have destroyed only a part
of the evil, but you must strike at the root.” ‘ What do you incan
by the root?” answered she. ‘‘ What can I mean,” he eried, ‘‘ but
the city and its inhabitants, and the four isles, which you have
destroyed by your magic? Every day towards midnight the fish
constantly raise their heads out of the peud, and call for vengeance
against us both. ‘This is the real cause of the delay of my recovery.
Go quickly, and re-estallish everything in its former site; and on
thy return I will give you my hand, and you shall assist me in
rising.”

The queen, exulting in the expectations these words produced,
joyfully exclaimed, ‘ You shall soon then, my life, recover your
health, for I will instantly go and do what you have commanded.”
She weut the very next moment, and when she arrived on the border
of the pond, she took a little water in her hand, and scattered it
about. She had no sooner done so, and pronounced certain words
over the fish and the pond, than the city instantly appeared. The
fish became men, women, and children; Mahometans, Christians,
Persians, and Jews; freemen or slaves; in short, cach took his
natural form. The houses and shops became filled with inhabitants,
who found everything in the same situation and order in which they
were previous to the change. The officers and attendants of the
sultan, who were very numerous, and who were encamped directly
where the great place or square happened to be, were astonished at
finding themselves on a sudden in the midst of a large, well built,
and inhabited city.

As goon as she had completed this change. she hastened back to

a





THE KING OF THE BLACK ISLES. 43

the Palace of Tears, to enjoy the reward of her Iabours. ‘My dear
lord,” she cried on entering, ‘‘I am returned to participate in the
pleasure of your renewed health, for I have done all you have
required of me; arise, and give me your hand.” ‘Come near,
then,” said the sultan, still imitating the manner of the blacks.
She did so. ‘‘ Nearer still,” he cried. She obeyed. Then raisin g
himself up, he seized her so suddenly by the arms that she had no
opportunity of recognising who it was; and with one stroke of his
sabre, he smote her in twain, the picces falling on each side of him.
Having done this, he left the carcase in the same place, and went
to seek for the prince of the Black Isles, who waited with the
greatest impatience for him. ‘* Rejoice, prince,” said he, embracing
hin, ‘‘you have nothing more to fear, for your cruel enemy no
longer exists.”

The young prince thanked the sultan in a way which proved that
his heart was truly penetrated with gratitude; and as a reward for
the important service he had rendered him, he wished him a long
hfe, and the greatest prosperity. ‘‘ May you too live happily and
at peace in your capital,” replied the sultan to him; ‘and should
you hereafter have a wish to visit mine, which is so near, I shall
receive you with the truest pleasure, and you shall be as highly
honoured and respected as in your own.” © ‘Powerful monarch,”
answered the prince, ‘to whom I am so much indebted, do you
think you are very near your capital?” “Certainly,” replied the
sultan, ‘‘I think so, at least that I am not more than four or five
hours’ journey.” ‘It is a whole year’s journey,” added the prince,
‘although I believe you might come here in the time you mention,
because mine was enchanted; but since it is no longer so, things
are changed. ‘This, however, shall not prevent my following you,
were it necessary to go to the very extremity of the earth. You
are my liberator; and to show you every mark of my gratitude as
long as I live, I shall freely accompany you, and resign my kingdom
without regret.”

‘The sultan was extremely surprised to find that he was so distant
from his dominions, and could not comprehend how it happened ;
but the young king of the Black Isles convinced him so fully of the
possibility, that he no longer doubted it. ‘*It matters not, then,”
resumed the sultan; ‘the trouble of returning to my dominions
will be sufliciently recompensed by the satisfaction arising from
having assisted you, and from having acquired a son in you; for, as
you will do me the honour to accompany me, I shall look upon you
as such; and having no children of my own, I from this moment
make you my heir and successor.” This interview between the
sultan and the king of the Black Isles was terminated by the most
affectionate embraces, after which the young prince prepared for
his journey. In three weeks he was ready to depart, greatly re-
gretted by his court and subjects, who received from his hands a
near relation of his as their king.

At length the sultan and the prince, and the officers and attend
ants of the sultan, set out with a hundred camels laden with ines:
timable riches, which had been selected from the treasury of the



44 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

young king, who was accompanied by fifty handsome nobles, well
mounted and equipped. Their journey was a pleasant one; and
when the sultan, who had despatched couriers to give notice of his
arrival, and relate the reason of his delay, drew near to his capital,
the principal officers, whom he had left there, came to receive him,
and to assure him that his long absence had not occasioned any
change in his empire. The inhabitants, also, crowded to meet him,
and welcome him with acclamations and every demonstration of joy,
which lasted for several days.

The day after his arrival, the sultan assembled his courtiers, and
gave them an ample detail of the occurrences which, contrary to his
wishes, had delayed his return: he then declared to them his in-
tention of adopting the king of the four Black Isles, who had left a
large kingdom to accompany and live with him; and at last, to re-
ward the fidelity with which they served him, he bestowed presents
on all, according to their rank and station.

With regard to the fisherman, as he had been the first cause of
the deliverance of the young prince, the sultan overwhelmed him
with rewards, and made him and his family happy and comfortable
for the rest of their days.

The History of the Chree Calenders, Sons of ings,
and of five Hadies of Angdar.

_ During the reign of the Caliph Haroun Alraschid there lived at
Bagdad a porter, who, notwithstanding his low and laborious pro-
fession, was nevertheless a man of wit and humour. One morning,
when he was standing with a large basket before him, in a place
where he usually waited for employment, a young lady of a fine
figure, covered with a large muslin veil, came up to him, and said
with a pleasing air, ‘‘ Porter, take up your basket and follow me.”
The porter, delighted with these few words, pronounced in so
agreeable a manner, put it on his head, and went. after the lady,
saying, ‘Oh, happy day! Oh, happy meeting !”

The lady stopped at a closed door, and knocked. A venerable
Christian with a long white beard opened it, and she put some
money into his hands without saying a single word ; but the Chris-
tian, who knew what she wanted, went in, and shortly after
brought out a large jar of excellent wine. ‘‘ Take this jar,” said
the lady to the porter, ‘“‘and put it in the basket.” This being
done, she desired him to follow her, and walked on; the porter still
exclaiming, ‘‘ Oh, day of happiness! Oh, day of agreeable surprise
and joy!”

The lady stopped at the shop of a seller of fruits and flowers,
where she chose various sorts of apples, apricots, peaches, lemons,
citrons, oranges, myrtles, sweet basil, lilics, jessamine, and some

* Calendcrs are privileged beggars or fakirs.



THE THREE CALENDERS AND FIVE LADIES, 45

, other sweet-scented flowers and plants. She told the porter to put
all those things in his basket and follow her. Passing by a butcher’s
shop, she ordered five and twenty pounds of his finest meat to be
weighed, which was also put into the porter’s basket.

At another shop she bought some capers, small cucumbers, pars-
ley, and other herbs, pickled in vmegar: at another, some pista-
chios, walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, kernels of the pine, and other
similar fruits : at a third she purchased all sorts of almond patties.
The porter, in putting all these things into his basket, said, ‘‘ My
good lady, you should have told me that you intended buying so
many things, and I would have provided a horse, or rather a camel,
to carry them. I shall have more than I can lift if you add much
to what is already here.” The lady laughed at this speech, and
again desired him to follow her.

She then went into a druggist’s, where she furnished herself with
all sorts of sweet-scentcd waters, with cloves, nutmeg, pepper,
ginger, a large piece of ambergris, and several other Indian spices,
which completely filled the porter’s basket, whom she still ordered
to follow her. He did so till they arrived at a magnificent house,
the front of which was ornamented with handsome columns, and at
the entrance was a door of ivory. Here they stopped, and the lady
gave a gentle knock at the door. While they waited for it to be
opened, the porter’s mind was filled with a thousand different
thoughts. He was surprised that a lady, dressed as this was,
should perform the oflice of the housekeeper, for he conceived it
impossible for her to be a slave. Her air was so noble that he sup-
posed her free, if not a person of distinction. He was wishing to ask
her some questions concerning her quality and situation, but just
as he was preparing to speak, another female, who opened the door,
appeared to him so beautiful that he was silent through astonish-
ment, or rather he was so struck with the brilliancy of her charms
that he was very near letting his basket and all that was in it fall,
so much did this object. make him forget himself. He thought he
had never seen any beauty in his whole life that equalled her who
was before him. The lady who had brought the porter, observed
the disturbed state of his mind, and well knew the cause of it.
This discovery diverted her; and she took so much pleasure in ex-
amining the countenance of the porter, that she forgot the door was
open. “Come in, sister,” said the beautiful portress. ‘What do
you wait for? Don’t you see that this poor man is so heavily laden
he can hardly bear it?”

As soon as she and the porter were come in, the lady who opened
the door shut it; and all three, after passing through a handsome
vestibule, crossed a very spacious court, surrounded by an open
gallery, or corridor, which communicated with many magnificent
apartments, all on the same floor. At the bottom of this court there
was a sort of cabinet richly furnished, with a throne of amber in the
middle, supported by four ebony pillars, enriched with diamonds
and pearls of an extraordinary size, and covered with red satin,
relieved by a bordering of Indian gold of admirable workmanship.
In the middle of the court there was a large basin lined with white



46 Vim ARABIAN NIGHIS ENTHRVAINMENIS.

marble, and full of the finest transparent water, which rushed from .
the mouth of a lion of gilt bronze.

Although the porter was so laden, it did not prevent him from
admiring the magnificence of this house, and the neatness and
regularity with which everything was arranged; but what principally
attracted his attention was a third lady, who appeared still more
beautiful than the second, and who was seated on the throne before
mentioned, As soon as she perceived the other two females, she
came down from the throne, and advanced towards them. The
porter conjectured from the looks and behaviour of the two first
ladies that his was the principal personage; and he was not mis-
taken. This lady was called Zobeidé, she who opened the door was
called Satic, and the name of the one who had been for the provisions
was Amine,

“You do not, my dear sisters,” said Zobeide, accosting the other
two, “perceive that this man is almost fainting under his load?
Why do you not discharge him?” Aminé and Safié then took the
basket, one before and the other behind; Zobeidé also assisted, and
all three put it on the ground. ‘They then began to empty it, and
when they had done, the agreeable Aminé took out her purse and
rewarded the porter very liberally, He was well satisfied with
what he received, and was taking up his basket to_go, but could
not muster sufficient resolution, so much was he delighted by the
sight of three such rare beauties, who now appeared to him equally
charming ; for Aminé had also taken off her veil, and he found her
quite as handsome as the others. The thing that puzzled him most
was not seeing any man in the house ; and yet a great part of the
provisions he brought, such as dried fruits, cakes, and sweetmeats,
were most adapted to those who wish to drink much and feast.

Zobeide at first thought the porter was waiting to get breath, but
observing him remain a long time, she asked him what he waited
for, and whether he was sufficiently paid. “Give him something
more,” added she, speaking to Aminé, ‘and let him be satisfied.”
“Madam,” answered the porter, ‘it is not that which detains me ;
T am already almost too well paid for my trouble. I know very
well that [ am guilty of an incivility in staying where I ought not ;
but I hope you will have the goodness to pardon it, from the as-
tonishment I experience in observing no man among three ladies of
such uncommon beauty. A party of ladies without men is as
melancholy and stupid as a party of men without ladies.” To this
he added some pleasantries in proof of what he advanced. He did
not forget to repeat what they say at Bagdad, that there was no
comfort at table unless there were four ; and he concluded by saying,
that as there were three they had the greatest want of a fourth.

The ladies laughed heartily at the reasoning of the porter. Zoheide,
however, then addressed him in a serious manner. ‘‘ You carry
your fooleries, my friend, a little too far; but though you do not
‘leserve that I should enter into any explanation with you, I will at
once inform you that we are three sisters, who arrange all our own
affairs without imparting them to anyone. An established author,
whom we have read, says: ‘ Keep thy own secret and tell it to no



THE THREE CALENDERS AND FIVE LADIES. 47
one; for he who reveals a secret is no longer master of it. If thy
own breast cannot contain thy secret, how can the breast of him to
whom you entrust it?”

‘‘ Ladies,” replied the porter, “from your appearance alone, ]
thought you possessed a singular degree of merit; and I perceive
that | am not mistaken, Although fortune has not been go propi-
tious to me as to bring me up to any profession superior to the ona
I follow, yet I have cultivated my mind as much as I was able, by
reading books of science and history; and permit me, I cutreat, to
say, that I also have read in another a maxim which I have always
happily practised : ‘Conceal thy secret,’ he says, ‘only from such ag
are known to be indiscreet, and who will abuse thy confidence ; but
make no d:fliculty in discovering it to prudent men, because they
know how to keep it.’ The secret, then, with me, is as sufe as if
locked wp in a cabinet, the key of which is lost, and the door sealed.”

Zobeideé saw that the porter was not deficient in cleverness ; but
thinking that he was desirous of being at the entertainment they
were going to have, she good-humouredly replied, “You know that
we are preparing to regale ourselves, and you must also know we
cannot do this but at a considerable expense; and it would not be
just that you should partake of the feast without bearing part of
the cost.” The beautiful Safié was of the same opinion as her sister,
‘My friend,” she said to the porter, ‘‘have you never heard the
common saying, ‘If you bring something, you shall return with
something ; if you bring nothing, you shall carry nothing back ??”

Lhe porter would have been obliged to retire in confusion, in
spite of his rhetoric, had it not been for Aminé, who took his part
very strongly, ** My dear sisters,” she said to Zobeidé and Safié,
““T entreat you to permit him to remain with us. It is unnecessary
to tell you he will divert us, for you must see he is capable of it.
T assure you, that had it not been’for his readiness, quickness, and
courage in following me, I should not have executed so many commniis-
sions in so short a time. Besides, if I were to repeat to you all the
amusing things he said to me on the way, you would not be auch
surprised that I am become his advocate.”

At this speech of Aminé’s, the porter, in a transport of joy, fell
on his knees, and kissed the ground at the fect of this charming
female. ‘My dear lady,” said he, raising himself, ‘you have from
this moment begun my happiness, and placed it almost at: its sum-
mit, by so generous an act, for which [ can never sufficiently express
my gratitude. In short, ladies,” added he, addressing the three
sisters at once, ‘do not suppose, because you have done me so great
an honour, that I will abuse it, and that T shall consider myself as
a man who is worthy of it; on the contrary, I shall ever regard
myself as the humblest of your slaves.” In saying this, he wished
to return the money he had received ; but the grave Zobeidé ordered
him to keep it. What we have once given,” she said, “as a
recompense to those who have rendered us any service, never returns.
But, in agreeing that you should remain with us, it is not only on
condition that you keep the secret we are going to entrust you with,
but wo also require that you shall strictly observe the rulos of pro:

L



48 THE ARABIAN NIGITS ENTERTAINMENTS.

priety and decorum.” While she was speaking, the beautiful Amine
took off her walking dress, and fastening her robe to her girdle, in
order to be more at liberty to prepare the table, she placed on it
various kinds of meat, and put some bottles of wine and several
golden eups upon a sideboard. ‘This done, the ladies seated them-
selves round the table, and made the porter place himself by their
side, who was delighted beyond measure at finding himself at table
with three persons of such extraordinary beauty.

They had scarcely begun to eat, when Aminé, who had placed
herself near the buffet, or sideboard, took a bottle and goblet, and
poured some for herself. Having drank the first glass, according to
the Arabian custom, she then poured out one for each of her sisters,
who drank it, one after the other. Then, filling the same goblet for
the fourth time, she presented it tothe porter, who, in taking it, kissed
her hand, and before he drank it, sung a song, the meaning of which
was, that as the wind carried with it the odour of any perfumed spot
over which it passed, so the wine which he was about to drink.
coming from her hand, acquired a more exquisite flavour than it
naturally possessed. ‘This song pleased them very much, and they
each sung in their turn. In short, the whole company were in most
excellent spirits during the repast, which lasted a long time, and
was accompanied with everything that could render it agreeable.

The day began to close, when Safid, in the name of her sisters,
said to the porter, ‘‘ Arise, and go; it is time to retire.” To this the
porter, not having resolution to quit them, answered, ‘“ Ah, ladies !
where would you command me to go? I am almost beside myself,
from gazing on you, and the good cheer you have given me; and I
shall never find the way to my own house. Allow me the night to
recover myself in; I will pass it wherever you please; but less time
will not restore me to the state I was in when I came here, and even
then, I doubt I shall leave the better part of myself behind.”

Aminé again took the part of the porter. ‘He is right, my
sister,” she exclaimed; ‘*I am convinced of the propriety of his
demand. He has sufficiently diverted us; and if you wish to believe
me, or rather if you love me, I am sure you will suffer him to
pass the evening with us.” ‘*We cannot refuse any request of
yours, my sister,” replied Zobeids. ‘* Porter,” she added, address-
ing herself to him, ‘‘ we wish to grant you even this favour, but we
must premise a fresh condition: whatever we may do in your
presence, with respect to yourself or anything else, take great care
that you do not ask the reason; for in questioning us about things
that do not at all concern you, you may hear what will not please
you. Take care, therefore, and be not too curious in attempting
to discover the motives of our actions.”

“Madam,” replied the porter, “my tongue shall be motionless,
and my eyes shall be like a mirror, that preserves no part of the
objects it receives.” ‘*To let you see,” said Zobeidé, with a serious
air, ‘that what we require of you is not newly established among
us, observe what is written over the door, on the inside.” The
porter went and read these words, which were written in large
letters of gold :- WHOEVER TALKS ABOUT WHAT DOES NOT CONCLEN



THE THRE CALMNDERS AND FIVE LADIES. 49

HIM, OFIEN HEARS WHAT DOES NOT PLEASE IM! He came back
directly, and said to the three sisters, ‘* 1 swear to you, ladies, that
you shall not hear me speak a word concerning anything which
does not regard me, and in which you haye any interest.”

This being settled, Aminé brought supper; and when she had
lighted up the hall with numerous candles, prepared with aloes and
ambergris, which scattered a very agreeable perfume, and cast a
brilliant light, she seated herself at the table, with her sisters and
the porter. They began to eat, drink, sing, and recite verses. The
ladies took pleasure in making the porter intoxicated, under the
pretence of making him drink to their health, Wit and repartee
were not wanting. They were at length allin the best humour,
when they suddenly heard a knocking at the gate. ‘They instantly
got up, and Safié, to whom this oflice more particularly belonged,
ran to open it. She soon returned. ‘‘ A charming opportunity, my
sisters, offers itself, to spend a great part of the night very pleasantly,
There are three calenders at the door; at least, they appear so by
their dress ; but what will doubtless surprise you is, that they are all
three blind of the right eye, and have their heads, beards, and eye-
brows shaved. They say that they are only just arrived at Bagdad,
where they have never been before; and as it is dark, and they
know not where to lodge, they knocked at our door by chance; and
entreat us to have the charity to take them in, They care not where
we put them, provided they are under cover; and ‘will be satisfied
even witha stable. They are young and well made, and appear to
possess some spirit; but [ cannot, without laughing, think of their
unusing and uniform figures. It is impossible buf that, with such
men, we shall iinish the day still better than we began it, They
will divert us very much, and they will be of no expense to us, since
they only ask a lodging for one night, and it is their intention to leave
us as soon as it is day.”

Zobeidé and Aminé made some difficulty in agreeing to the request
of Safid, and she herself well knew the reason of it, but expressed so
great a desire to have her way that they could not refuse her.
““Go,” said Zobeidé to her, “and let them come in; but do not fail
to caution them not to speak about what does not concern them, and
make them read the inscription over the inside of the door.” At
these words, Safié joyfully ran to open the door, and soon returned,
accompanied by the three calenders.

On entering they made a low bow to the sisters, who had risen to
receive them, and who obligingly told them they were welcome,
and that they were happy in being able to oblige them and contribute.
towards lessening the fatigue of their journey. They then invited
their new guests to sit down with them. The magnificence of the
place and the kindness of the ladies gave the calenders a very high
ulea of the beautiful hostess and her sisters; but before they took
their places, having by chance cast their eyes towards the porter, and
observing that he was dressed very like those calenders, from whom
they differed in many points of discipline, as in not shaving their
beard and eyebrows, one of them said, “This man appears to be one
of our Arabian brethren who revolted.”



56 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERVAINVENTS.

The porter, half-asleep, and heated with the wine he had drunk,
said to the calenders, casting at the same time a fierce look at them,
‘* Seat yourselves, and meddle not with what does not concern you,
Have you not read the inscription over the door? Do not pretend,
then, to make the world live after your fashion.” ‘* My good friend,”
replied the calender who had before spoken, ‘‘do not be angry, for
we should be very sorry to give you any cause; on the contrary, we
are ready to receive your commands.” The dispute would not have
ened here had not the ladies interfered and pacified all parties.

When the crlenders were seated, the sisters helped them, and the
delighted Sati, in particular, took care to supply them with wine.
When they had both eaten and drunk as much as they wished, they
intimated that they should be happy to give them some music if
they had any instruments, and would order them to be brought.
They accepted the offer with pleasure; and the beautiful Safid im-
mediately got wp and returned the next moment, and offered them a
flute of that country, also another used in Persia, and a tambour.
Each calender received from her hand that instrument he liked best,
and they all began to play a little air. The females were acquainted
with the words, which were very lively, and accompanied the air
with their voices, frequently interrupting each other with fits of
laughter from the nature of the words.

In the midst of this entertainment, and when the party were
highly delighted, they heard a knock at the door. Safid immedi-
ately left off singing, and went to see who it was.

The caliph Haroun Alraschid made it a practice to go very often,
during the night, through the city, in discuise, in order to discover
whether everything was quiet. On this evening, therefore, the
caliph set out from his palace at his accustomed hour, accompanied
by Giafar, his grand vizier, and Mesrour, chicf of the eunuchs, all
three disguised as merchants. In passing through the street where
these ladies lived, the prince heard the sound of the instruments,
interrupted by laughter, and said to his vizier, ‘Go and knock at
the door of that house, where I hear so much noise; I wish to gai
admittance, and learn the cause of it.” The vizier endeavoured to
persuade the caliph that they were only women who were making
merry that evening; and that they ought not to expose themselves
where it was probable they might meet with some insult. ‘Never .
mind,” said the caliph; ‘knock, as I order you.”

It was, then, the grand vizier Giafar, who had knocked at the
door by order of the caliph. Safit opened it, and the vizier ob-
served by the light of a candle she carried, that she was very beauti-
ful. He played his part very well. He tirst made a most profound
reverence, and then with a respectful air he said, ‘‘ Madam, we are
three merchants of Moussoul, and arrived here about ten days ago,
with some very rich merchandise, which we have deposited in a
khan, where we have taken up our lodging. We have been to spend
the day with a merchant of this city, who invited us to go to sce
him, He treated us with a fine collation ; and as the wine we drunk
put us into a very good humour, he sent for a company of dancers.
‘the night was already far advanced, and while we were playing on



ay

THE THREE CALENDERS AND FIVE LADIES. 5]

our instruments, the others dancing, and the whole company mak-
ing a great noise, the watch happened to pass by, and obliged us to
open the door. Some of the company were arrested: we were,
however, so fortunate as to escape, by getting over a wall. But,
as we are strangers,” added the vizier, “we are afraid of mecting
with the watch before we arrive at our khan, which is at a consider-
able distance from hence. And we should even then get there to
no purpose, for the gate would be shut, and whoever may come
there, they will not open it till morning. This is the reason, madam,
thatas we heard, in passing by, the sound of instruments and voices,
we thought all those who belonged to the house were not yet re-
tired; and we took the liberty to knock, to beg you to afford us a
retreat till the morning. If we appear to you worthy of taking a
part in your amusements, we will endeavour, as far as we are able,
to contribute to it, in order to repair the interruption we have
caused; if not, do us at least the favour to suffer us to pass the
night under the cover of your vestibule.”

During this speech of Giafar, the beautiful Safid had an oppor-
tunity of examining the vizier and the two persons, whom he also
called merchants, and judging from their countenances, that they
were not common men, she said that she was not mistress, but if
they would give themselves a moment’s patience she would return
and bring the answer. Safit went and related all this to her sisters,
who hesitated some time as to what they ought to do. But they
were naturally kind, and as they had conferred the same favour ou
the three calenders, they resolved to permit these also to come in.
‘The caliph, the grand vizier, and the chief of the eunuchs, being in-
troduced by the beautiful Saft, saluted the ladies and the caleuders
with great civility. They, supposing them merchants, returned it
in the same manner; and Zobcidé, as the principal person, with that
yrave and serious air which so well suited her, said, “ You are wel-
come, but in the first place, do not take it ill if we ask of you one
favour.” ‘ What favour,” cried the vizier, ‘can we refuse to such
beautiful ladies ?” ‘It is,” replied Zobeidé, “to have only eyes, and
no specch; to forbear from asking questions about what you may see,
in order to learn the cause; and not to speak about what does not con-
cern you, for fear you should hear what will not be pleasant to you.”
‘“ You shall be obeyed, madam,” replied the vizier. It is enough
for us to attend to our own business, without meddling with what
docs not regard us.” After this, each seated himself, and the conversa-
tion became general, and they drank to the health of the new guests.

While the vizier Giafar entertained them, the caliph ceased not
from admiring the extraordinary beauty, the great elegance, the
lively disposition and spirit of the ladies 3 while the appearance of
the three calenders, all blind of the right eye, surprised him very
much. He anxiously wished to learn the cause of this singularity,
but the conditions they had imposed upon him and his companions
prevented any inquiry, Besides all this, when he reflected upou
the richness of the services and furniture, with the regularity and
arrangement everywhere apparent, he could hardly persuade him
self jt was not the effect of enchantment,



52 THE ARAPTAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

The conversation having fallen upon the various sorts of amuse-
ment, and the different modes of enjoying life, the calenders got up
and danced in their peculiar way, which much augmented the good
opmion the ladies had already conceived of them, and attracted also
the applause and esteem of the caliph and his company. As soon as
the calenders had finished, Zobeidé got up, and taking Aminé by
the hand, said to her, ‘‘Come, sister, the company shall not think
that we will put them under any restraint, nor shall their presence
prevent us from doing as we have always been accustomed.” Aminé,
who perfectly understood what her sister meant, got wp and took
away the dishes, tables, bottles, glasses, and also the instruments
on which the calenders had played. Nor did Safié remain idle; she
swept the hall, put everything in its proper place, snuffed the
candles, and added more aloe-wood and ambergris. Having done
this, she requested the three calenders to sit on a sofa on one side,
and the caliph and his company on the other. ‘Get wp,” said she
then to the porter, looking at him, ‘and be ready to assist in what-
ever we want you; a man like you, as strong as the house, ought
never to remain idle.” ‘*I am ready,” he cried, ‘‘ to do anything
you please.” ‘* That is well,” answered Safié, ‘and you shall not
remain long with your arms crossed.” came in with a sort of seat, which she placed in the middle of the
room, She then went to the door of a closet, and having opened it,
she made a sign to the porter to approach. ‘‘ Come and assist me,”
she cried. He did so, and went in with her, and returned a mo.
ment after, followed by two black dogs, each of which had a collar
with a chain fastened to it, by which he held them. He brought
these dogs, which appeared to have been very ill-used, into tha
middle of the room.

Zobeide, who was sitting between the calenders and the caliph,
then got up, and approaching the porter in a very grave manner,
‘*\We must,” cried she, with a deep sigh, ‘‘do our duty.” She then
turned up her sleeves, so as to uncover her arms up to the elbow,
and after taking a whip which Safié presented to her, ‘‘ Porter,”
she said, ‘‘ take one of these dogs to my sister Aminé, and then
come to me with the other.” The porter did as he was ordered ;
and as he approached Zobeidé, the dog which he held immediately
began to howl, and, turning towards her, lifted up its head in a
most supplicating manner. But she, without regarding the melan-
choly expressions of the dog, which must have excited pity, or its
cries, which filled the whole house, flogged it till she was out of
breath; and when she had not strength left to beat it any more. she
threw away the whip; then, taking the chain from the porter, she
took up the dog by the paws, and both looking at each other with
a melancholy air, they mingled their tears together. Zobeide, after
this, took out her handkerchief, wiped the tears from its eyes, and
kissed it ; then, returning the chain to the porter, she desired him to
lead that back from whence he had taken it, and bring her the other.

The porter carried the one that had been beaten back to the closet,
and, in returning, took the other from the hands of Aminé, and pre-
sented it to Zobeidé, who was waiting for it. ‘Hold it as you did



THE THREW CALENDIERS AND FIVE LADIES. 538

the tirst,” said she; then, taking the whip, she served this in the
same manner. She then wept with it, dried its tears, kissed it, and
returned it to the porter, who was saved the trouble of carrying it
back to the closet by the agreeable Aminé, who took it herself.

The three calenders, as well as the caliph and his party, were much
astonished atthisceremony. They couldnot comprehend why Zobeide,
after having whipped with so much violence the two dogs, which,
according to the tenets of the Mussulman religion, are impure
animals, should afterwards wecp with them, kiss them, and dry
their tears. They conversed together about it, and the caliph, in
particular, was very desirous of knowing the reason of an action which
appeared to him so singular. He made signs to the vizier to inquire,
but he turned his head another way, till at last, importuned by re-
peated signs, he answered in the same manner, that it was not yet
time to satisfy his curiosity.

Zobeidé remained for some time in the middle of the room, as if to
rest from her fatigue in beating the two dogs. ‘‘My dear sister,”
said the beautiful Safie, ‘‘ will you not return to your place, that I
may also perform my part?” ‘ Yes,” replied Zobeidé, and seated
herself on the sofa, with the caliph, Giafar, and Mesrour on her right
hand, and the three calenders and the porter on her left.

The company continued for some time silent ; at length Safié, who
had placed herself on the seat in the middle of the room, said to
Aminé, ‘Sister, get up; you understand what I mean.” Amine
rose, and went into a different closet from that whence the dogs were
brought; she returned with a case, covered with yellow satin, and
richly ornamented with an embroidery of green and gold. She opened
it, and took out a lute, which she presented to her sister. Safié took
it, and after having tuned it, began to accompany it with her voice;
she sung an air, on the torments of absence, in so agrecable a, style
that the caliph and the rest of the company were enchanted. When
she had finished, as she had sung with a great deal of action as well
as passion, she offered the lute to Aminé, saying, ‘Sister, my voice
fails me; do you take it, and oblige the company by playing and
singing instead of me.”

Amimné, having played a little prelude, to hear if the instrument
was in tune, sung for some time on the same subject; but she became
so affected by the words she uttered, that she had not power to finish
the air. Zobeidé began to praise her sister: ‘* You have done won-
ders,” said she; ‘it is easy to perceive that you feel the griefs you
express.” Aminé had not time to reply to this speech; she felt
herself so oppressed at that moment that she could think of nothing
but giving herself air, and opening her robe, she exposed a bosom,
not white, as the beautiful Aminé ought to have had, but covered
with scars. This, however, gave her no relief, and she fainted away.

Whilst Zobeidé and Safié ran to assist their sister, one of the
calenders exclaimed, “We had better have slept in the open air than
come licre to witness such a spectacle.”

The caliph, who heard him, drew near, and inquired what all this
meant. ‘We know no more than you,” replied the calender.
“What,” resumed the caliph, ‘do not you belong tc the house?





5: THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

Cannot you inform me about these two black dogs, and this lady,
who appears to have been so ill-treated?” Sir,” said the calender,
‘‘we never were in this house before now, and entered it only a few
minutes sooner than you did.” ‘his increased the astonishment of
the caliph. ‘‘ Perhaps,” said he, ‘‘the man who is with you can
give you some information.” The calender made signs to the porter
to draw near, and asked him if he knew why the black dogs had
been beaten, and why the bosom of Aminé was so scarred, ‘‘ Sir,”
replied the porter, “ I swear that if you know nothing of the matter,
we are all equally ignorant. It is true that I live in this city; but
before to-day i never entered this house.”

The caliph, whatever might be the consequence, resolved to satisfy
his curiosity. ‘‘ Attend to me,” he said to the rest; ‘‘ we are seven
men, and there are only three women; let us, then, compel them to
give us the information we request, and if they refuse to comply with
a good grace, we can force them to it.” The grand vizier, Giafar,
opposed this plan, and explained the consequences of it to the caliph,
without discovering to the calenders who he was, as he always ad-
dressed him like a merchant. ‘‘ Consider, sir, I beg,” said he, ‘that
we have our reputation to preserve. You know on what condition
these ladies suffered us to become their guests, and we accepted the
terms. What will they say to us if we infringe the compact? And
we should be still more to blame if any misfortune should happen to
us in consequence of it. It is not to be supposed that they would
require such a promise from us, unless they should be able to make
us repent if we broke it.”

The vizier now drew the caliph a little aside, and spoke to him in
a low voice: ‘‘ The night, my lord, will not last long, if your majesty
will but have a little patience; I will then come and bring these
women before you, when on your throne, and you may learn from
them whatever you wish.” Although this advice was very judicious,
the caliph rejected it, and desired the vizier to be silent, and said he
would not wait so long, but would that instant have the information
he wished. The next question was, who should first make the inquiry.
The caliph endeavoured to persuade the calenders to speak first, but
they excused themselves. At last they all agreed that it should be
the porter. At this moment, Zobeidé, after having assisted Aminé,
who had recovered from her fainting, approached them. As she
had heard them speak in rather a loud and warm manner, she said
to them, ‘‘ What are you talking of?—what is your contest about?”

The porter then addressed her as follows :—‘‘ These gentlemen,
madam, entreat you to have the goodness to explain to them why you
wept with those dogs, after having treated them so ill; and how it nas
happened that the lady who fainted has her bosom covered with scars.
This, madam, is what I have been required by them to ask of you.”

At these words, Zobeidé, in the most haughty manner, turned to
the caliph and the calenders, ‘Is it true, gentlemen,” she asked,
‘that you have commissioned this man to require this information
of me?” They all answered it was, except the vizier Giafar, who
did not open his lips. Upon this she replied to them, in a tone which
showed how much she was offended, ‘Before we granted you the



Hi THREE CALENDERS AND FIVE LADIES. 5A

favour you requested of us, and in order to prevent any discontent
on your parts, we made one positive condition; that you should not
apeak about what did not concern you, lest you should hear what
would not please you—yet, after having both received and entertained
you as well as we possibly could, you do not scruple to break your
word.” + Having said this, she struck the floor with her foot, and
clapped her hands three times, and called out, ‘‘ Enter quickly!” A
door immediately opened, and seven strong powerful black slaves
rushed in, with scimitars in their hand, and each seized one of the
company. They threw them to the ground, drew them into the
middle of the hall, and were preparing to take off their heads.

We may easily conceive what was the alarm of the caliph. He
repented, but too late, at not having followed the advice of his vizier.
In the meantime this prince, Giafar, Mesrour, the porter, and three
calenders, were about to pay with their lives for their indiscreet
curiosity ; but before they received the fatal stroke, one of the slaves
said to Zoheidé and her sisters, ‘* High, powerful, and respected
mistresses, what do you command us todo?” “Stop,” answered
Zobeidé, ‘it is necessary first to interrogate them.” ‘‘Madam,” cried
the aftrighted porter, ‘‘do not make me die for the crime of another.
[ am innocent, and they only are guilty. Alas!” he continued,
weeping, ‘‘we were passing the time so agreeably. These one-eyed
calenders are the cause of this misfortune; there is not even a city
that would not be rnined by men of such ill-favoured countenances.
Tentreat you, madam, not to confound the first with the last, and
remember, if is much more commendable to pardon a miserable
wretch like me, than to sacrifice him to your resentment.”

Zobeide, in spite of her anger, could not help laughing inwardly
at the lamentations of the porter. But without paying any attention
to him, she addressed herself again to the others. ‘ Answer me,”
said she, ‘‘and tell me who you are; if not, you have only an instant
to live. I cannot believe that you are honourable men, or persons of
authority or distinction in whatever country you call your own. If
that had been the case, you would have paid more attention and
more respect to us.”

The caliph, being naturally impatient, suffered infinitely more than
the rest, at finding his life depending upon the commands of an
offended and justly irritated woman; but he began to conceive there
were some hopes when he found that she wished to know who they
all were, as he imagined she would not take away his life, when she
should be informed of his rank. For this reason he whispered to his’
vizier, who was near him, instantly to declare who he was. But this
wise and prudent minister, wishing to preserve the honour of his
master, was unwilling to make public the great affront he had brought
upon himself. But when, in obedience to the caliph, he was about
to speak, Zobeidé addressed herself to the three calenders, and asked
if they were brothers. ‘No, madam,” answered one of them for the
rest, ‘we are not brothers by blood, but only in consequence of being
calenders.” ‘* Have you,” said she, speaking to one of them in par
ticular, ‘lost the sight of one eye from your birth?” «N 0, indeed,
madam,” he answered; “I became so through a most surprising



56 TNE ARABIAN NIGITS ENLERTAINMENTS,

adventure, by the recital or perusal of which, were it written, every
one must derive advantage. After this misfortune, I shaved my beard
and eyebrows, and taking up the habit I wear, became a calender.”

Zobeidé put the same question to the others, who returned her the
same answer as the first. But the last who spoke, added, ‘‘To inform
you, madam, that we are not common persons, and in order that you
should have some pity for us, we must tell you, that we are all the
sons of kings. Although we have never seen each other before this
evening, we have had sufficient time to become acquainted with this
circumstance ; and I can assure you that the kings, who have given
us birth, have made some noise in the world !”

During this speech Zobeidé became less angry, and told the slaves
to set them at liberty, but at the same time to remain where they
were. ‘‘They,” said she, ‘‘who recount their history to me, and
explain the motives which brought them to this house, shall suffer
no harm, but have permission to go where they please; but such
as shall refuse to give us that satisfaction shall not be spared.”

The three calenders, the caliph, the grand vizier Giafar, the eunuch
Mesrour, and the porter, were all on the carpet in the middle of the
hall before the three ladies, who sat on a sofa, with the slaves behind
them, ready to execute any orders they might receive.

The porter, understanding that he had only to relate his history
in order to be delivered from so great a danger, spoke first. ‘You
are already acquainted, madam,” he said, “with my history, and
what brought me to your house. What Ihave to relate, therefore,
will soon be finished. Your sister engaged me this morning at the
place where I take my stand in quality of a porter, by which [
endeavour to gain a living. I followed her to a wine merchant’s, to
anherbseller’s, toan orange merchant’s, and to those who sell almonds.
nuts, and other dried frnits. We then went to a confectioner’s, and
to a druggist’s, from thence with my basket on my head, as full as
it well could be, I came here, where you had the goodness to suffer
me to remain till now, a favour I shall never forget. This is the
whole of my history.”

Wher. the porter had concluded, Zobeidé, very well satisfied with
him, said, ‘‘ Save thyself and begone, nor ever let us see thee again.”
*T beg of you, madam,” replied he, ‘‘to let me remain a little longer.
Tt wonld be unfair that I should not hear their histories, after they
have had the pleasure of hearing mine.” In saying this he took his
place at the end of the sofa, truly delighted at finding himself free
from the danger which so much alarmed him. One of the calenders
next spoke, and addressing himself to Zobeidé as the principal person,
who had commanded them to give an account of themselves, began
his history as follows.

The History of the first Calender, the Sow of a Ating.

In order to inform you, madam, how T lost my right eye, and the
reason that I have been obliged to take the habit of a calender, 1
must begin by telling you that Tam the son of a king. My father





VHE FIRST CALENDER. 57

bad a brother who, like himself, was a monarch over a neighbouring
state. This brother had two children, a son and a daughter, the
former of whom was near my age. :

When I had gone through all my exercises, and the king, my father,
thought fit to allow me a certain degree of liberty, I went regularly
every year to see my uncle, and passed a month or two at his court,
after which I returned home. ‘These visits produced between the
prince, my cousin, and myself, the most intimate friendship. ‘the
last time I saw him, he received me with demonstrations of the
greatest joy and tenderness, more so indeed than ever; and wishing
one day to amuse me by some great entertainment, he made extra-
ordinary preparations for it. We remained a Jong time at table, and
after we had both supped, ‘You can never, my cousin,” he said to
me, ‘possibly imagine what has occupied my thoughts, since your
last journey. Since you were here last, I have erected a building,
which is just finished, and we shall soon be able to lodge there:
you will not be sorry to see it, but you must first take an oath that
you will be both secret and faithful; these two things I must re-
quire of you.”

The friendship and familiarity in which we lived, did not permit
me to refuse him anything; I took, therefore, without hesitation,
the oath he required, ‘‘ Wait for me in this place,” he cried, ‘and
I will be with you ina moment.” He did not, in fact, detain me
long, but returned with a female in his hand, of very great beauty,
and most magnificently dressed.

He did not say who she was, nor did I think it right to inquire.
We again sat down to the table with the lady, and remained there
some time, talking of different things, and drinking bumpers to
each other’s health. The prince then said to me, ‘‘ We have no
time to lose ; oblige me by taking this lady with you, and conduct
her, by such a way, tc a place where you will sce a tomb, newly
erected, in the shape of adome. You will easily know it, as the
door is open. Enter there together, and wait for me; I will return
directly.”

Faithful to my oath, I did not wish to know more. I presented
my hand to the lady, and following the instructions, which the
prince, my cousin, had given me, I conducted her safely, by the
light of the moon, without any mistake. We had scareely got to
the tomb, when we saw the prince, who had followed us, with a
small vessel full of water, a hoe or spade, and a small sack, in which
there was some lime, or mortar. The spade served him to destroy
the empty sepulchre, which was in the middle of the tomb; he
took the stones away, one by one, and placed them in one corner,
When he had taken them all away, he made a hole in the ground,
and I perceived a trap-door under the sepulchre. He lifted it up,
and discovered the beginning of a winding staircase. My cousin,
then addressing himself to the lady, said, ‘“This is the way, madam,
that leads to the place I have mentioned to you.” At these words
the lady approached and descended the stairs. The prince was
just going to follow her, but first turning to me, ‘‘I am infinitely
obliged to you, my cousin,” said he, “for the trouble you have



58 THE AWABLAN NIGHYS BNTMRTAINMENTS.

had; receive my best thanks for it, and farewell.” ‘My dear

cousin,” I cried, ‘what does all this mean?” ‘* That is of no

consequence,” he answered; ‘‘ you may return by the same way
. you came.”

Iwas unable to learn anything more from him, and was obliged
to take my leave of him. In returning to my unele’s palace, the
vapour of the wine I had before drunk began to affect my head. J
nevertheless reached my apartment, and retired to rest. On waking
the next morning, I made many reflections on the occurrences of the
night before, and recalled all the circumstances of so singular an
adventure, The whole appeared to me to beadream. Iwas so

- much persuaded of it, that I sent to know if the prince, my cousin,
was yet dressed. But when they brought me word that he had
not slept at home, nor did they know what was become of him, and
were very much distressed at it, I concluded that the strange ad-
venture of the tomb was too true. This afflicted me very much,
and keeping myself in private, I went secretly to the public ceme-
tery, or burial-place, where there were a great many tombs similar
to that which I had before seen. I passed the day in examining
them all, but was unable to discover the one I searched for. I spent
four days in the same useless pursuit. ;

Tt is necessary for me to inform you, that the king, my uncle, was
absent during the whole of this time. He had been for some time
on a hunting party. I was very unwilling to wait for his coming
back, and having requested his ministers to make my excuses for
going, T set out on my return to my father’s court, from which I was
not accustomed to make so longa stay. I left my uncle’s ministers
very much distressed at not being able to discover what was become
of the prince; but as I could not violate the oath I had taken to
keep the secret, I dared not lessen their anxiety by informing them
of any part of what I knew.

[arrived at the capital of my father, and, contrary to the usual
custom, I discovered at the gate of the palace a large guard, by
whom I was immediately surrounded. I demanded the reason of
this, when an officer answered, ‘‘The army, prince, has acknowledged
the grand vizier as king in the room of your father who is dead, and
I arrest you as prisoner on behalf of the new king.” At these words
the guards seized me, and conducted me before the tyrant. ‘Judge,
madam, what was my surprise and grief.”

This rebellious vizier had conceived a strong hatred against me,
which he had for a long time cherished. The canse of it was as
follows. When I was very young I was fond of shooting with a
cross-bow. One day I took one to the top of the palace, and amused
myself with it on the terrace.
[ shot at it, but missed: and the arrow by chance struck the vizier
in the eye, and put it out, as he was taking the air on the terrace of
his own house. As soon as I was informed of this accident, I went
and made my apologies to him in person. He did not, however, fail
to preserve a strong resentment against me, of which he gave every
proof he could when any opportunity occurred. When he now found
me in his power, he ani it in the most barbarous manner As



THE FIRST CALENDER. 59

soon as he saw me he ran towards me in the utmost rage, and tore
out my right eye from the socket. It was in this way that I be-
came blind. : : }

But the usurper did not confine his cruelty to this action alone.
He ordered me to be imprisoned in a sort of cage, and to be carried
in this manner to some distant place, where the executioner, after
cutting off my head, was to leave my body exposed to the birds of
prey. The executioner mounted his horse, accompanied by another
man, and carried me with him. He did not stop till he came to a
place proper for the execution of his order. I made, however, so
good a use of entreaties, prayers, and tears, that I excited his com-
passion. ‘‘Go,” said he to me, ‘‘depart instantly out of the kingdom,
and take care never to return; if you do you will only encounter
certain destruction, and will be the cause of mine.” I thanked him
for the favour he did me, and I was no sooner alone than I consoled
myself for the loss of my eye, by retlecting that I had just escaped
from a greater misfortune.

In the state in which Iwas I could not get on very fast. During
the day I concealed myself in unfrequented and secret places, and
travelled by night as far as my strength would permit me. At
length I arrived in the country belonging to the king, my uncle,
and I proceeded directly to the capital.

I gave a long detail of the dreadful cause of my return, and of the
miserable state in which he saw me. ‘‘ Alas!” cried he, “was it
not sufficient to lose my son; but must I now learn the death of a
brother, whom I dearly loved, and find you in the deplorable state
to which you are reduced?” He informed me of the distress he had
suffered from not being able to learn any tidings of his son, in spite
of all the inquiries he had made, and all the diligence he had used.
The tears ran from the eyes of this unfortunate father in giving me
this account, and he appeared to me so much afflicted that I could
not resist his grief, nor could I keep the oath I had pledged to my
cousin, I then related to the king everything that had formerly
passed.

He listened to me with some sort of consolation, and when I had
finished, he said, “ The recital, my dear nephew, you haye given me
affords me some little hope. I well know that my son built such a
tomb, and I know very nearly on what spot. With the recollection,
also, which you may have, I flatter myself we may discover it. But
since he has done all this so secretly, and required you also to keep it
unknown, I am of opinion that we two only should make the search,
in order to avoid its being generally known and talked of.” He
had also another reason, which he did not inform me of, for wishing
to keep this a secret.

We each of us disguised ourselves, and went out by a garden gate
which opened into the fields. We were fortunate enough very soon
to discover the object of our search. I immediately recognised the
tomb, at which I was the more rejoiced as I had before searched for
it so long to no purpose. We entered, and found the iron trap-door
shut down upon the opening to the stairs, We had great difficulty
in lifting it up, because the prince had cemented it down with the



60 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

lime and the water, which I mentioned his having carried: at last,
however, we got it up. My uncle was the first who descended, and |
followed We went down about fifty steps, when we found our-
selves at the bottom of the stairs in a sort of ante-room, which was
full of a thick smoke, very unpleasant to the smell, and which ob-
scured the light thrown from a very brilliant lustre.

From this antechamber we passed on to one much larger, the roof
of which was supported by large columns, and illuminated by many
lustres. In the middle there’ was a cistern, and on each side we
observed various sorts of provisions. We were much surprised at not
seeing any one. Opposite to us, there was a raised sofa, to which

- they ascended by some steps, and beyond this there appeared « very
large bed, the curtains of which were drawn. ‘The king went up,
and undrawing them, discovered the prince, his son, and the lacy,
but both quite dead.

' The king wept bitterly at this sight, and I mingled my tears with
his. Some time after he cast his eyes on me: ‘‘ But, my dear
nephew,” resumed he, embracing me, ‘‘if I have lost an unworthy
son, I may find in you a happy reparation of my loss.”

We ascended the same staircase, and quitted this dismal abode.
We put the iron trap-door in its place, and covered it with earth and
the rubbish of the building. We returned to the palace before our
absence had been observed, and shortly after we heard a confused
noise of trumpets, cymbals, drums, and other warlike instruments.
A thick dust, which obscured the air, soon informed us what it was,
and announced the arrival of a formidable army. It was the same
vizier who had dethroned my father, and taken possession of his
dominions, and who came now with a large number of troops ta
seize those of my uncle.

This prince, who had only his usual guard, could not resist so
many enemies. They invested the city, and as the gates were opened
to them without resistance, they soon took possession of it. They
had not much difficulty in penetrating to the palace of the king, who
attempted to defend himself, but he was killed, after having dearly
sold his life. On my part, T fought for some time, but seeing that [
must surrender if I continued, I retired, and had the good fortune
to escape, and take refuge in the house of an officer of the king, on
whose fidelity I could depend.

Overcome with grief, and persecuted by fortune, I had recourse to
a stratagem, which was the last resource to preserve mmy life. I
shaved my beard and my eyebrows, and put on the habit of a calen-
der, under which disguise I left the city without being recognised.
After that, it was no difficult matter to quit the dominions of the
king, my uncle, by unfrequented roads. I avoided the towns till I
arrived in the empire of the powerful sovereign of all believers, the
glorious and renowned Caliph Haroun Alraschid, when T ceased to
fear. I considered what was my best plan, and I resolved to come
to Bagdad and throw myself at the feet of this great monarch, whose
generosity is everywhere admired.

«After a journey of several months, I arrived to-day at the gates of
the city ; when the evening came on I entered, and having rested a



THE SECOND CALENDER. 61

little time to recover my spirits, and deliberate which way I should
turn my steps, this other calender, who is next to me, arrived also.
He saluted me, and I returned the compliment. ‘You appear,” said
I, “astranger like myself.” ‘You are not mistaken,” returned he.
At the very moment he made this reply, the third calender.
whom you sce, came towards us. He saluted us, and acquainted us
that he, too, was a stranger, and just arrived at Bagdad. Like
brothers we united together, and resolved never to separate.

But it was late, and we did not know where to go for a lodging
in a city where we never had been before. Our good fortune, how-
ever, having conducted us to your door, we took the liberty of
knocking; you have received us with so much benevolence and
charity that we cannot sufficiently thank you. ‘This, madam, is
what you desied me to relate ; this was the way in which I lost my
right eye; this was the reason I have my beard and eyebrows
shaved, and why T am at this moment in your company.” ’

“Enough,” said Zobeidé; ‘* we thank you, and you may retire
whenever you please.” ‘The calender excused himself, and entreated
the lady to allow him to stay and hear the history of his two com-
panions, whom he could not well abandon, as well as that of the
three other persons of the party.

The history of the first calender appeared very suprising to the
whole company, and particularly to the caliph. The presence of the
slaves armed with their scimitars, did not prevent him from saying
in a whisper to the vizier, ‘As long as I can remember, I never
heard anything to compare with this history of the calender, though
{ have been all my life in the habit of hearing similar narratives.”
He had no sooner finished than the second calender began, and
addressing himself to Zobeide, spoke as follows.

Che Aistory of the Second Calender, the Son
of u dling.

To obey your commands, madam, and to inform you by what
strange adventure I lost my right eye, is te give you an account of
my whole life.

I was scarcely more than an infant when the king, my father (for
I too am a prince by birth), observing that I possessed great
quickness of intellect, spared no pains in its cultivation, — He
collected from every part of his dominions, whoever was famous for
science, and a knowledge of the fine arts, for the purpose of instruct-
ing me. I no sooner knew how to read and write, than I learnt by
heart the whole of the Koran, that admirable book in which we
find the basis, precepts, and regulations of our religion. I perused
the works of the most approved authors, who have written on the
same subject. I added an acquaintance with all the traditions, re-
ceived from the mouth of our prophet, by those illustrious men, who
were his contemporaries. I made also a particular study of our his-
bories, and became master of polite literature, of poetry, and versifi-



§2 THE ARALIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

cation. Lthen applied myself to geography and chronology ; and
all this without neglecting those exercises which are so suited to a
prince. There was, however, one thing in which I most delighted,
and at length excelled, and that was in forming the characters of
our Arabie language; and I surpassed all the writing masters of
our kingdom, who had acquired the greatest reputation.

Fame bestowed upon me even more honour than I deserved. She
was not satished with spreading a report of my talents throughout
the dominions of the king my father, but even carried the account of
them to the court of the Indies, whose powerful monarch became so
eurious to sce me that. he sent an ambassador, accompanied with the
richest presents to my father, to request me of him. This embassy,
for many reasons, delighted him, He was persuaded that it was the
best possible thing for a prince of my age to travel to foreign courts 5
ani he was also very well satisfied at forming a friendship with the
sultan of India, 1 set out with the ambassador, but with very few
attendants, and little baggage, on account of the length and diffi-
culties of the way.

We had been about a month on our journey when we saw in the
distance an immense cloud of dust, and soon after we discovered fifty
horsemen, well armed. They were robbers, who approached us at
full speed. As we had ten horses Jaden with our baggage, and the
presents which I was to make to the sultan in my father’s name, and
as our party consisted but of very few, you may easily imagine that
the robbers attacked us without hesitation. Not bemg able to re-
pel force by force, we told them we were ambassadors of the sultan
of India, and we hoped they would do nothing contrary to the re-
spect they owed to him. By this we thought we should preserve
both our equipage and lives; but the robbers insolently answered,
«“ Why do you wish us to respect the sultan your master? Weare
not his subjects, nor even within his realm.” Having said this,
they immediately surrounded and attacked us on all sides. I
defended myself as long as I could, but finding that I was
wounded, and seeing the ambassador and all our attendants ovcr-
thrown, { took advantage of the remaining strength of my horse,
who was also wounded, and escaped from them, I pushed him on
as far ag he would carry me, he then suddenly fell under my weight
quite dead from fatigue, and the blood he had lost. I disentangled
myself as fast as possible, and observing that no one pursued mec, |
supposed the robbers did not choose to neglect the plunder they had
acquired.

Imagine me, then, madam, alone, wounded, destitute of every
help, and in a country where I was an entire stranger. I was
afraid of regaining the great road, from the dread of falling once
more into the hands of the robbers. After having bound up my
wound, which was not dangerous, I walked on the rest of the day,
and in the evening I arrived at the foot of a mountain, on one side
of which I discovered agort of cave, Twentin, and passed the night
without any disturbance, after having eaten some fruits, which 1
had gathered as I came along.

For some days following I continued my journey without meeting



‘ou SECOND CALENDER. 68

with any place where I could rest ; but at the end of about a month T
urived at a very large city, well inhabited, and most delightfully
and ‘advantageously situated, as several rivers flowed round it, and
caused a perpetual spring, ‘Tlie number of agreeable objects which
presented themselves to my eyes, excited so great a joy, that it sus-
pended for a moment the poignant regret 1 felt at finding myself
i such a miserable situation. My whole face, as well as my hands
and feet, were of a brown tawny colour, for the sun had quite burnt
me; and my slippers were so completely worn out by walking,
that I was obliged to travel barefoot; besides this, my clothes were
all in rags.

Tentered the town in order to learn the language spoken, and
thence to find out where I was. TIaddressed myself to a tailor, who
was at work in his shop. On account of my youth, and a certain
manner about me, which intimated I was something better than I
appeared, he made me sit down near him. Heasked me whoI was,
where I came from, and what had brought me to that place. I con-
cealed nothing from him, but informed him of every circumstance
that had happened to me, and did not even hesitate at discovering
my name. ‘The tailor listened to me very attentively; but when I
finished my narration, instead of giving me any consolation, he aug-
mented my troubles. ‘Take care,” said he to me, ‘that you do
not place the same confidence in any one else that you have in me,
for the prince who reigns in this kingdom is the greatest enemy of
the king, your father; and if he should be informed of your arrival
in this city, I doubt not but he will inflict some evil upon you.” I
readily believed the sincerity of the tailor, when he told me the
name of the prince; but as the enmity between my father and him
has no connexion with my adventures, I shall not, madam, enter
into any detail of it.

Tthanked the tailor for the advice he had given me, and told
him that I placed implicit faith in his good counsel, and should
never forget the favour I received from him. As he supposed I was
not deficient in appetite, he brought me something to eat, and
offered me even an apartment at his house, which I accepted.

Some days after my arrival, the tailor, remarking that I was toler-
wbly recovered from the effects of my long and painful journey,
wd being aware that most of the princes of our religion had the
precaution, in order to guard against any reverse of fortune, to make
themselves acquainted with some art or trade, to assist them in case
of want, asked me if I knew anything by which I could acquire a
livelihood, without being chargeable to anybody. I told him that
I was well versed in the science of laws, both human and divine,
that I was a grammarian, a poet, and, above all, that I wrote remark-
ably well. ‘With all this,” he replied, ‘you will not in this country
procure @ morsel of bread; nothing is more useless here than this
kind of knowledge. If you wish to follow my advice,” he added,
“you will procure a short jacket, and as you are strong and of a
good constitution, you may go into the neighbouring forest, and cut
wood for fuel. You may then go and expose it for sale in the mar-
ket. and T assure you that you may acquire a small income, but

07



64 THE ARABIAN NIGUTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

suflicient to enable you to live independently of every one. By
these means, you will be enabled to wait till heaven shall become
favourable to you; and till the cloud of bad fortune, which hangs
over you, and obliges you to conceal your birth, shall have blown
over, I will furnish you with a cord and hatchet.”

‘The fear of being known, and the necessity of supporting myself,
determined me to pursue this plan, in spite of the degradation and
pain which were attached to it.

The next day the tailor brought mea hatchet and a cord, and
also a short jacket, and recommending me to some poor people who
obtained their livelihood in the same manner, he requested them to
take me with them. They conducted me to the forest, and from
this time I regularly brought back upon my head a large bundle of
wood, which I sold for a small piece of gold money, current in that
country ; for although the forest was not far off, wood was never-
theless dear in that city, because there were few men who gave
themselves the trouble of going to cut it. I soon acquired a consi-
derable sum, and was enabled to repay the tailor what he had
expended on my account.

[bad passed more than a year in this mode of life, when having
one day gone deeper into the forest than usual, I came to a very
pleasant spot, where I began to cut my wood. In cutting up the
root of a tree, I discovered an iron ring fastened to a trap-door of
the same material. I immediately cleared away the earth that
covered it, and on lifting it up, I perceived a staircase, by which |
descended, with my hatchet in my hand. When I got to the bottom
’ of the stairs, I found myself in a vast palace, which struck me very
much by the great brilliancy with which it was illuminated, as
much so indeed as if it had been built on the most open spot above
ground, I went forward, along a gallery supported on columns of
jasper, the bases and capitals of which were of massive gold, but
stopped suddenly on beholding a lady, who appeared to have so
noble and graceful an air, and to possess such extraordinary beauty,
that my attention was taken off from every other object, and my
eyes fixed on her alone.

To prevent this beantiful lady from having the trouble of coming
to me, I made haste towards her; and while I was making a most
respectful reverence, she said to me, ‘‘ Who are you, a man ora
Genius?” ‘Tama man, madam,” [ answered, getting up, ‘‘ nor
have I any commerce with Genii.” ‘‘ By what adventure,” replied
she, with a deep sigh, ‘“‘have you come here? I have remained
here more than twenty-five years, and during the whole of that
time I have seen no other man than yourself.”

Her great beauty, which had already made a deep impression on
me, together with the mildness and good humour with which she
received me, made me bold enough to say, ‘‘ Before, madam, I have
the honour of satisfying your curiosity, permit me to tell you, that
T feel highly delighted at this unexpected interview.” I then faith-
fully related to her by what strange accident she saw in me the son
of a king, why I appeared to her in that condition, and how acci-
dent lad discovered to me the cutrance into tle magnificent prison





THE SECOND CALTNDER. 65

in which I found her, and ot which, from all appearance, she was
heartily tired. ‘Alas, prince,” she replied, again sighing, “you
may truly say this rich and superb prison is unpleasing and weari-
some. The most enchanting spots cannot afford delight when we
are there against our wills. Is it possible you have never heard any
one speak of the great Epitimarus, king of the Ebony Isle, a place
so called from the great quantity of that precious wood which it
produces? I am the princess, his daughter.”

“The king, my father, had chosen for my husband a prince, who
was my cousin ; but on the very night of our nuptials, in the midst
of the rejoicings of the court and capital of the Isle of Ebony, and
before I had been given to my husband, a Genius took me away.
I fainted almost the same moment, and lost all recollection, and
when I recovered my senses, I found myself in this place. Fora
long time I was inconsolable; but habit and necessity have recon-
ciled me to the sight and company of the Genius. Twenty-five
years have passed, as I have already told you, since I first was
brought to this place, in which I must own that I have, even by
wishing, not only everythin necessary for life, but whatever can
satisfy a princess who is fond of decoration and dress.”

** avery ten days,” continued the princess, ‘‘ the Genius comes to
visit me. In the meantime, if I have any occasion for him, I have
only to touch a talisman, which is placed at the entrance of my
chamber, and he appears. It is now four days since he was here,
and I have therefore to wait six days more before he again makes
his appearance. You therefore may remain five with me, if it be
agreeable to you, in order to keep me company ; and I will endea-
vour to regale and entertain you equal to your merit and quality.”
_ The princess then conducted me to a bath, the most elegant,

convenient, and at the same time sumptuous you can possibly ima-
gine. When I came out, I found instead of my own dress, another
very rich one, which I put on, less for its magnificence than to
render myself more worthy of her notice. We seated ourselves on
a sofa, covered with superb drapery; the cushions of which were
of the richest Indian brocade ; She then set before me a variety of
the most delicate and rare dishes. We ate together, and passed the
remainder of the day and evening very agreeably.

The next day, in order to entertain me, she produced, at dinner,
a flask of very old wine, the finest I ever tasted ; and to please me,
she drank several glasses with me. I no sooner found my head
heated with this agreeable liquor, than I said, ‘‘ Beautiful princess,
you have been buried here alive much too long ; follow me, and go
and enjoy the brightness of the genuine day, of which for so many
years you have been deprived. Abandon this false though brilliant
light you have here.” Let us talk no more, prince,” she answered,
smiling, ‘on this subject. I value not the most beautiful day in
the world, if you will pass nine with me here, and give up the tenth
to the Genius.” “Princess,” T replied, ‘‘I see very well that it is
the dread you have of the Genius which makes you hold this lan-
guage. As for myself, I fear him so little, that I am determined to
break his talisman in pieces, with the magic spell that is inscribed



66 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS “WNTERTAINMENTS.

upon it. Let him then come; I will wait for him: and however
brave, however formidable he may be, I will make him feel the
weight of my arm. I have taken an oath to exterminate all the
Genii in the world, and he shall be the first.” The princess, who
knew the consequence of this conduct, conjured me not to touch the
talisman. ‘‘ Alas!” she cried, ‘‘it will be the means of destroying
both you and myself. I am better acquainted with the dispositions
of Genii than you can be.” The wine I had drunk prevented me
from acknowledging the propriety of her reasons; I kicked down
the talisman, and broke it in pieces.

This was no sooner done than the whole palace shook, as if ready
to fall to atoms, accompanied with a most dreadful noise like thunder,
and flashes of lightning, which heightened still more the intermediate
gloom. This in a moment dissipated the fumes of the wine, and
made me own, though too late, the fault I had committed. ‘‘ Prin-
cess,” I exclaimed, ‘‘what does all this mean?” Alarmed for me,
she, in a fright, answered, ‘Alas, it is all over with you, unless
you save yourself by flight.”

I followed her advice; and my fear was so great that I forgot
my hatchet and my cord. I had hardly gained the staircase by
which J descended, than the enchanted palace opened to afford a
passage to the Genius, and I heard him say in an angry tone, ‘‘ What
has happened to you, and why have you called me?” and then, still
more angrily, ‘‘how came this hatchet and this cord here?” TI has-
tened up the staircase, shut down the trap-door, covered it over
with the earth, and returned to the city with a load of wood
which I collected, without even knowing what I was about, so
rouch was I absorbed and afflicted at what had happened.

My host, the tailor, expressed great joy at my return. ‘‘ Your
absence,” said he, ‘‘has caused me much uneasiness on account of
the secret of your birth, with which you have entrusted me. I knew
not what to think, and began to fear some one might have recognised
you.” I thanked him much for his zeal and affection, but did not
inform him of anything that had happened ; nor of the reason why
[ returned without my hatchet and cord. I retired to my chamber,
where I reproached myself a thousand times for my great imprudence.

While I was abandoning myself to these afflicting thoughts, the
tailor entered my apartment, and said that an old man, whom he
did not know, had brought my hatchet and cord, which he had
found on his way. ‘‘Come and speak to him, as he wishes to deliver
them into your own hands.” At this speech I changed colour, and
trembled from head to foot. The tailor inquired the cause, when
suddenly the door of my chamber opened, The old man, who had
not the patience to wait, appeared, and presented himself to us with
the hatchet and cord. ‘Is not this thy hatchet?” added he, ad-
dressing me, ‘‘and is not this thy cord?”

The Genius, for it was he who had come in disguise, gave me no
time to answer these questions. He took me by the middle of my
body, and dragging me out of the chamber, sprang into the air, and
varried me up to a great height; he then descended towards the
earth; and having caused it to open, by striking his foot against it,



THE ENVIOUS MAN. 67

he sank into it, and I instantly fuund myself in the enchanted palace,
and in the presence of the beautiful princess of the Isle of Hbony,
But alas! what asight! It pierced my very inmost heart. She wag
covered with blood, and lying on the ground more dead than alive,

The Genius heaped reproaches on us both, and first bade the lady
kill me with a scimitar, and then, when she refused, put it into my
hand to kill her, but I threw it on the ground.

At this, the monster took up the scimitar, and cut off one of the
hands of the princess, who had barely time to bid me an eternal
farewell with the other, before she expired. I fainted at the
sight.

“When I returned to my senses, I cried, ‘‘ Strike! I am ready to
receive the mortal wound, and expect it from you as the greatest
favour you can bestow.” ‘‘No,” answered the Genius, ‘I shall
content myself with changing you into a dog, an ass, a lion, or a
lird. Make your choice.” These words gave me some hopes of
softening him ; I said, ‘‘ Moderate, O powerful Genius, your wrath,
and grant me my life in a generous manner, If you pardon me, I
shall always remember your clemency, as one of the best of men
pardoned his neighbour, who bore him a most deadly envy.” The
(Genius then asked me what had passed between these two neigh-
bours, when I told him, if he would have the patience to listen to
me, I would relate the history.

Che Aistory of the Enbions Man, and of Yim
obo f&as Enbred.

In a town of 110 inconsiderable importance, there were two men,
who lived next door to each other. One of them was so excessively
envious of the other, that the latter resolved to change his abode,
and go and reside at some distance from him, supposing that near-
ness of residence alone was the cause of his neighbour's animosity ;
for although he was continually doing him some friendly office, he
perceived that he was not the less hated. He therefore sold his
house and the small estate he had there, and went to the capital of
the kingdom, which was at no great distance, and bought a small
piece of ground about half a league from the town, on which there
stood a very convenient house. He had also a good garden and a
moderate court, in which there was a deep cistern, that was not
how used,

The good man having made this purchase, put on the habit of a
dervise, in order to pass his life more quietly, and made, also, many
cells in his house, where he soon established a small community of
dervises. The report of his virtue was soon more generally spread
abroad, and failed not to attract the attention and visits of great
numbers of the principal inhabitants as well as common people. At
length he became honoured and noticed by almost every one. They
came from a great distance to request him to offer up his prayers



68 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTNRTAINMENTS,

for them ; and all who remained in retirement with him published
an account of the biessings they thought they received from Heaven
through his means,

The great reputation of this man at length reached the town from
whence he came, and the envious man was so vexed, that he left his
house, with the determination to go and destroy him. Tor this
purpose he went to the convent of dervises, whose chief, his former
neighbour, received him with every possible mark of friendship.
The envious man told him that he was come with the express design
of communicating an affair of great importance to him, and which
he could only inform him of in private. ‘In order,” said he, ‘that
no one may hear us, let us, I beg of you, walk in your court: and
when night comes on, order all the dervises to their cells.” The
chief of the dervises did as he requested.

When the envious man found himself alone with the good man,
he began to relate to him whatever came into his thoughts, while
they walked from one end of the court to the other, till observing
they were just at the edge of the well, he gave him a push and
threw him into it. No witness beheld this wicked deed, and he
directly went away, reached the gate of the house, passed out un-
seen, and returned home, highly pleased that the object of his envy
was at length no more. In this, however, he was deceived.

Fortunately for the dervise, this well was inhabited by fairies
and Genii, who caught and supported him in their arms, in such a
way that he received not the least injury. He naturally supposed
there was something very extraordinary in his preservation after
such a fall as ought to have cost him his life, and yet he could
neither see nor perceive anything. He soon after, however, heard
a voice say, ‘‘ Do you know anything of this man to whom we have
been so serviceable?” when some other voices answered, ‘‘ No.”
The first then informed them of his history, and how the envious
man had attempted to murder him, and said, ‘“ His reputation is so
great that the sultan, who resides in the neighbouring town, was
coming to visit him to-morrow, in order to recommend the princess,
his daughter, to his prayers.”

Another voice then asked what occasion the princess had for the
prayers of the dervise, to which the first answered: ‘Are you
ignorant, then, that she is possessed by the power of the Genius -
Maimoun, the son of Dimdim, who has fallen in love with her?
But I know how this good dervise can cure her. The thing is by
no means difficult, as I will inform you. In his monastery there is
a black cat, which has a white spot at the end of her tail, about the
size of a small piece of money. Let him only pull out seven hairs
irom this white spot and burn them, and then with the smoke per-
fume the head of the princess. From that moment she will be so
thoroughly cured, and free from Maimoun, the son of Dimdim, that
he will never again be able to come near her.”

The chief of the dervises did not lose a single syllable of this con-
versation between the fairies and the Geni, who from this time
remained silent the whole night. The next morning, as soon as the
day began to break, and difierent objects became discernible, the



THE SECOND CALENDER. 69

dervise perceived, as the wall was decayed in many places, a hole,
by which he could get out without any difficulty.

The other dervises, who were secking after him, were delighted
at his appearance. He related to them, in a few words, the cunning
wickedness of the guest he had entertained the day before, and then
retired to his cell. It was not long before the black cat, which had
been mentioned in the discourse of the fairies and Genii, came to
him to be taken notice of as usual. He then took it up, and plucked
out seven hairs from the white spot in its tail, and put them aside,
in order to make use of whenever he should have occasion for them,

The sun had not long risen above the horizon when the sultan,
who wished to neglect nothing from which he thought there was any
chance of curing the princess, arrived at the gate. He ordered his
guards to stop, and went in with the principal officers who accom-
panied him. The dervises received him with the greatest respect.
{he sultan directly took the chief aside, and said to him, ‘‘ Worthy
sheikh, you are perhaps already acquainted with the cause of my
visit.’—**Tf, sire,” the dervise modestly answered, ‘‘I do not deceive
myself, it is the malady of the princess that has been the occasion
of my seeing you, an honour of which J am unworthy.” ‘‘It is so,”
replied the sultan; ‘‘and you will restore almost my life to me if,
by means of your prayers, I shall obtain the re-establishment of my
laughter’s health.” ‘‘Tf your majesty,” answered the worthy man,
‘will have the goodness to suffer her to come here, I flatter myself
that, with the help and favour of God, she shall return in perfect
health.”

The prince, transported with joy, immediately sent for his daughter,
who soon appeared, accompanied by a numerous train of females and
eunuchs, and veiled in such a manner that her face could not be
seen. The chief of the dervises made them hold a shovel over the
head of the princess, and he no sooncr threw the seven white hairs
upon some burning coals, which he had ordered to be brought in it,
then the Genius Maimoun, the son of Dimdim, uttered a violent
scream, and left the princess quite at liberty. In the meantime
nothing at all could be seen. The first thing she did was to put her
hand to the veil which covered her face, and lift it wp to see where
she was. ‘Where amI,” she cried; ‘‘ who has brought me here?”
At these words the sultan could not conceal his joy; he embraced
his daughter, he kissed her eyes, and then took the hand of the
dervise and kissed that. ‘Give me,” said he to his oflicers, ‘‘ your
opinion; what return does he deserve, who has cured my daughter.”
They all answered that he was worthy of her hand. ‘‘ This is the
very thing I was meditating,” he cried, ‘‘and from this moment 1
claim him for my son-in-law.”

Soon after this the first vizier died, and the sultan immediately
advanced the dervise to the situation. The sultan himself afterwards
dying without any male issue, this excellent man was proclaimed
sultan by the general voice of the different religious and military
orders.

The good dervise, being thus raised to the throne of his father-in-
law, observed one day, as he was walking with his courtiers, the



70 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

envious man among the crowd who were in the road. He called
one of his viziers who accompanied him, told him in a whisper to
bring that man whom he pointed out to him, and to be sure not to
alarm him, The vizier obeyed; and when the envious man was in
the presence of the sultan, the latter addressed him in these words:
“T am very happy, my friend, to see you: go,” said he, speaking
to an officer, ‘‘and count out directly from my treasury a thousand
pieces of gold. Nay, more, deliver to him twenty bales of the most
valuable merchandise my magazines contain, and let a sufficient
guard escort him home.” After having given the officer this com-
mission, he took his leave of the envious man, and continued his walk.

When I had told this his story to the Genius who had murdered
the princess of the Isle of Ebony, I made the application to myself:
“*O Genius,” I said to him, ‘you may observe how this benevolent
monarch acted towards the envious man, and was not only satisfied
in forgetting that he had attempted his life, but even sent him back
with every benefit and advantage I have mentioned.” But all my
eloquence to persuade him to imitate so excellent an example was
in vain.

‘All that I can do for you,” he said, ‘‘is to spare your life. T
must, at least, make you feel what I can do by means of my en-
chantments.” At these words he violently seized me, and carrying
me through the vaulted roof of the subterranean palace, which
opened at his approach, he elevated me so high that the earth ap-
peared to me only like a small white cloud. From this height he
vgain descended as quick as lightning, and alighted on the top of a
mountain. On this spot he took up a handful of earth, and mutter.
ing certain words, of which T could not comprehend the meaning,
threw it over me: ‘* Quit,” he cried, ‘‘the figure of a man, and as-
sune that of an ape.” He immediately disappeared, and I remained
quite alone, changed into an ape, overwhelmed with grief, in an
unknown country, and ignorant whether I was near the dominions
of the king, my father.

I descended the mountain and came to a flat, level country, the
extremity of which [ did not reach till I had travelled a month, when
T arrived at the sea-coast. There was at this time a profound calm,
and I perceived a vessel about half a league from the shore. That 1
might not omit taking advantage of so fortunate a circumstance, 1
broke off a large branch from a tree, and dragged it after me to the
sea-side. I then got astride it, with a stick in each hand by way of
oar. In this manner I rowed myself along towards the vessel, and
when I was sufficiently near to be seen, I presented a most extra-
ordinary sight to the sailors and passengers who were upon deck.
They looked at me with great admiration and astonishment. Tn the
meantime I got alongside, and taking hold of a rope, I climbed up to
the deck. But as I could not speak, I found myself in the greatest
embarrassment. And, in fact, the danger I now ran was not less
maminent than what I had before experienced when I was in the
power of the Genius.

The merchants who were on board were superstitious, and th ought
that T should be the cause of some misfortunes happening to them



THE SECOND CALENDER. 71

during their voyage if they received me. ‘I will kill him,” cried one,
“with a blow of this handspike.” ‘‘ Let me shoot an arrow through
his body,” exclaimed another; ‘‘and then let us throw him into the
sea,” said a third. Nor would they have desisted from executing
their threats if I had not run to the captain, and thrown myself pro-
strate at his feet. In this supplicating posture I laid hold of the
bottom of his dress, and he was so struck with this action, as well
as with the tears that fell from my eyes, that he took me under his
protection, declaring he would make any one repent who should
offer me the least injury. He even caressed and encouraged me.
In order to make up for the loss of speech, I in return showed him
by means of signs how much I was obliged to him.

The wind which succeeded this calm was not a strong, but it was
a favourable one. It did not change for fifty days, and we then
happily arrived in the harbour of a large, commercial, well-built, and
populous city. Here we cast anchor. The city was of still more
considerable importance, as it was the capital of a powerful kingdom.
Our vessel was immediately surrounded with a multitude of small
boats, filled with those who came either to congratulate their friends
on their arrival, or to inquire of whom and what they had seen in
the country they had come from—or simply from mere curiosity to
see a ship which had arrived from a distance.

Among the rest some officers came on board, who desired, in the
name of the sultan, to speak to the merchants that were with us.
‘The sultan, our sovereign,” said one of them to the merchants who
immediately appeared, ‘has charged us_ to express to you how
much pleasure your arrival gives him, and entreats each of you te
take the trouble of writing upon this roll of paper a few lines. In
order to make you understand his motive for this, I must inform
you that he had a first vizier, who, besides his great abilities in the
management of affairs, wrotein the greatest perfection. This minister
died a few days since. The sultan is very much afflicted at it, and,
as he values perfection in writing beyond everything, he has taken a
solemn oath to appoint any person to the same situation who shal]
write as well. Many have presented specimens of their abilities, but
he has not yet found any one throughout the empire whom he has
thought worthy to occupy the vizier’s place.”

Each of those merchants, who thought they could write well
cnough to aspire to this high dignity, wrote whatever they thought
proper. When they had done, I advanced and took the paper from
the hands of him who held it. Everybody, and particularly the mer-
chants who had written, thinking that I meant either to destroy it
or throw it into the water, instantly called out; but they were soon
satisfied when they saw me hold the paper very properly, and make
a sign that also wished to write in my turn. Their fears were now
changed to astonishment. Yet, as they had never seen an ape that
could write, they wished to take the roll from my hands—but the
captain still continued to take my part. ‘‘ Suffer him to try,” he
said, ‘let him write; if he only blots the paper I promise you 1
will instantly punish him.”

Binding that no one any Jonger opposed my design, T took the pen,



72, THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

and did not leave off till I had given an example of six different sorts
of writing used in Arabia. Hach specimen contained a distich, or
impromptu stanza of four lines, in praise of the sultan. My writ-
ing uot onty excelled that of the merchants, but I dave say they had
never seen any so beautiful, even in that country. When I had
finished, the otlicers took the roll, and carried it to the sultan.

The monarch paid no attention to any of the writing except mine,
which pleased him so much that he said to the officers, ‘‘ Take the
finest and most richly caparisoned horse from my stable, and also
the most magnificent robe of brocade possible for him who has written
these six varieties, and bring him to me.” At this order of the sul-
tan, the officers could not forbear laughing, which irritated him so
much that he would have punished them, had they not said, ‘* We
entreat your majesty to pardon us; these are not written by a man,
but by anape.” ‘* What do you say?” cried the sultan; ‘‘ we assure
your majesty,” answered one of the officers, ‘‘ that we saw an ape
write them.” This appeared so wonderful to the sultan that he said
to them, ‘‘ Hasten to bring me this extraordinary ape.” .

The officers returned to the vessel, and showed their order to the
captain, who said the sultan should be obeyed, They immediately
dressed me in a robe of very rich brocade, and carried me on shore,
where they set me on the horse of the sultan, who was waiting in his
palace for me, with a considerable number of people belonging to the
court, whom he had assembled to do me the more honour. ‘The march
commenced, while the gate, streets, public buildings, windows, and
terraces of both the palaces and houses were all filled with an immense
number of persons, of every age and sex, whom curiosity had drawn
together from all quarters of the town, to see me, for the report was
spread in an instant that the sultan had chosen an ape for his grand
vizier. After having afforded so uncommon a sight to all these
people, who ceased not to express their surprise by violent and con-
tinued shouting, I arrived at the sultan’s palace.

I found the sultan seated on his throne, in the midst of the nobles
of his court; I made him three low bows, and the last time I pros-
trated myself, kissed the earth by his feet. I then got wp, and seated
myself exactly likeanape. No part of the assembly could withhold
their admiration, nor did they comprehend how it was possible for
an ape to be so well acquainted with the form and respect attached
to sovereigns; nor was the sultan the least astonished. The whole
ceremony of audience would have been complete if I had only been
ableto add speech tomy actions; but apes neverspeak, and the advan-
tage of having once been a man did not now afford me that privilege.

The sultan took leave of the courtiers, and there remained with
him only the chief of his eunuchs, a little young slave, and myself.
He went from the hall of audience into his own apartment, where he
ordered some food to be served up. While he was at table, le made
me a sign to come and eat with him. Asa mark of my obedience, [
got up, kissed the ground, and then seated myself at table; I ate,
however, with much modesty and forbearance,

Before they cleared the table, I perceived a writing desk, which,
by a sign, I requested them to bring me; as soon as I had got it. }



THE SECOND CALENDER. 78

wrote upon a large peach sume lines of my own composition, which
evinced my gratitude to the sultan. His astonishment at reading
them, after I presented the peach to him, was still greater than be-
fore. When the things were taken away, they brought a perticular
sort of liquor, of which he desired them to give me a glass. I drank
1t, and then wrote some fresh verses, which explained the state in
which I now found myself after so many sufferings. The sultan,
having read these also, exclaimed, ‘A man who should be capable
of doing thus would be one of the greatest men that ever lived.”
The prince then ordered a chess-board to be brought, and asked me,
by a sign, if I could play, and would engage with him. _ I kissed
the ground, and putting my hand on my head, I showed him I was
ready to receive that honour. He won the first game, but the second
and third were in my favour. Perceiving that this gave him some
little pain, I wrote a stanza to amuse him, and presented it to him;
in which I said that two powerful armed bodies fought the whole day
with the greatest ardour, but that they made peace in the evening,
and passed the night together very tranquilly wpon the field of battle.

All these circumstances appearing to the sultan much beyond what
he had ever seen or heard of the address and ingenuity of apes, he
wished to have more witnesses of these prodigies. He had a daugh-
ter who was called the Queen of Beauty; he therefore desired the
chief of the eunuchs to fetch her. ‘‘Go,” said he to him, “‘ and bring
your lady here; I wish her to partake of the pleasure I enjoy.” The
chief of the eunuchs went and brought back the princess with him.
Yn entering, her face was uncovered, but she was no sooner within
the apartment than she instantly threw her veil over her, and said to
the sultan, ‘“‘ Your majesty must have forgotten yourself. I am sur-
prised that you order me to appear before men.” ‘ Whatis this, my
daughter?” answered the sultan, ‘‘it seems that you are the person
who has forgotten yourself, There is no one here but the little slave,
the eunuch your governor, and myself, and we are always at liberty
to see your face.” ‘‘Sire,” replied the princess, ‘* your majesty will
be convinced [ am not mistaken, The ape which you see there, al-
though under that form, is not an ape, but a young prince, the son of
a great king. He has been changed into an ape by enchantment, A
Genius has been guilty of this malicious action, after having
cruelly killed the princess of the Isle of Ebony.”

The sultan was astonished at this speech, and turning to me,
asked, but no longer by signs, whether what his daughter said was
true. As I could not speak, | put my hand upon my head to show
that she had spoken the truth, ‘‘ How came you to know, daugh-
ter,” said the king, ‘that this prince had been transformed into
an ape by means of enchantment?” ‘‘Sire,” replied the princess,
“your majesty may recollect, that when I first came from the
nursery, [had an old woman as one of my attendants. She was
very well skilled in magic, and taught me seventy rules of that
science, by virtue of which I could instantly cause your capital to
be transported to the middle of the ocean, ney, beyond Mount
Caucasus. By means of this science, I know every person who is
enchanted, the moment I behold them—not only who they are, but:



t

iA THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

by whom also they were enchanted. Be not, therefore, surprised,
that I have at first sight discovered this prince, in spite of the charm
which prevented him from appearing in your eyes such as he really
is.” ‘My dear daughter,” answered the sultan, “I did not think you
were so skilful ; you can perhaps dissolve the enchantment of this
prince.” ‘*T can, sire,” said she, ‘and restore him to his own form.”
“Do so, then,” interrupted the sultan, “for you cannot give me
greater pleasure, as I wish to have him for my grand vizicr, and
bestow you upon him fora wife.” “Iam ready, sire,” answered
the princess, “to obey you in all things you please to command.”

The Queen of Beauty then went to her apartment, and returned
with a knife, which had some Hebrew characters engraved on the
blade. She desired the sultan, the chief of the eunuchs, the little
slave, and myself, to go down into a secret court of the palace, and
then, leaving us under a gallery which surrounded the court, she
went into the middle of it, where she described a large circle, and
traced several words, both in the ancient Arabic characters and
those which are called the characters of Cleopatra.

When she had done this and prepared the circle in the manner she
wished, she went and placed herself in the midst of it, where she
began making her adjurations, and repeating some verses from the
Koran. By degrees, the air became obscure, as if night was coming
on, and the whole world was vanishing. We were seized with the
greatest fright, and this was the more increased when we saw the
Genius, the son of the daughter of Eblis, suddenly appear, in the
shape of an enormous lion.

‘The princess no sooner perceived this monster than she said to it,
‘‘ Dog, instead of cringing before me, how darest thon present thyself
under this horrible form, thinking to alarm me?” ‘ And how darest
thou,” replied the lion, ‘‘ break the treaty, which we have made ani
confirmed bya solemn oath, not to injure cach other?” ‘Ah, wretch !”
added the princess, ‘‘thou art the person I am to reproach on that
account.” ‘Thou shalt pay dearly,” interrupted the lion, “for the
trouble thou hast given me of coming here.” In saying this, he
opened his horrible jaws, and advanced forward to devour. her; but
she, being on her guard, jumped back, and had just time to pluck
out a hair, and pronouncing two or three words, she changed it
into a sharp scythe, with which she immediately cut the lion in
pieces through the middle.

The two parts of the lion directly disappeared, and the head only
remained, which changed into a large scorpion. ‘The princess then
took the form of a serpent, and began a fierce combat with the
scorpion, which, finding itself in danger of being defeated, changed
into an eagle, and flew away. But the serpent then became another
eagle, black, and more powerful, and went in pursuit of it. We
now lost sight of them for some time,

Shortly after they had disappeared, the earth opened before us,
and a black and white cat appeared, the hairs of which stood quite
on end, and which made a most horrible mewing. A black wolf
directly followed, and gave it no respite. The cat, being hard
pressed, changed into a worm, and, finding iteelf near a pomegranate,



THE SECOND CALENDER. 75

which had fallen by accident from a tree that grew upon the bank
of a deep but narrow canal, instantly made a hole in it, and con-
cealed itself there. The pomegranate immediately began to swell,
and became as large as a gourd, which then rose up as high as the
gallery, and rolled backwards and forwards there several times ; it
then fell down to the bottom of the court, and broke into many pieces.

The wolf, in the meantime, transformed itself into a cock, ran to
the seeds of the pomegranate, and began swallowing them, one after
the other, as fast as possible. When it could see no more, it came
to us, with its wings extended, and making a great noise, as if to
inquire of us whether there were any more seeds. There was one
lying on the border of the canal, which the cock, in going back, per-
ceived, and ran towards it as quick as possible; but at the very
instant in which its beak was upon it, the seed rolled into the canal
and changed into a small fish. The cock then flew into the canal,
and becoming a pike, pursued the little fish. They were both two
hours under water, and we knew not what was become of them,
when we heard the most horrible cries, that made us tremble. Soon
after, we saw the Genius and the princess, all on fire. They threw
the flames against each other with their breath, and at last came to
a close attack. Then the fire increased, and everything about was
encompassed with smoke and flame to a great height. We were
afraid, and not without reason, that the whole palace would be
burnt ; but we soon had a much more dreadful cause of terror, for
the Genius, having disengaged himself from the princess, came to-
wards the gallery where we were, and. blew his flames all over us.
This would have destroyed us, if the princess, running to our assist-
ance, had not compelled him by her cries to retreat to a distance,
and guard himself against her. In spite, however, of all the haste
she made, she could not prevent the sultan from having his head
singed and his face scorched; the chief of the eunuchs too was stifled,
and consumed on the spot; and a spark flew into my right eye, and
blinded me. Both the sultan and myself expected to perish, when
we suddenly heard the ery of ‘‘ Victory, victory !” and the princess
immediately appeared to us in her own form, while the Genius was
reduced to a heap of ashes.

The princess approached us, and in order to lose no time, she asked
for a cup full of water, which was brought by the young slave, whom
the fire had not injured. She took it, and after pronouncing some
words over it, she threw some of the water upon me, and said, ‘If
thou art an ape by enchantment, change thy figure, and take that
of aman, which thou hadst before.” She had hardly concluded,
when I again became a man, the same as before I was changed,
except with the loss of one eye.

Iwas preparing to thank the princess, but she did not give me
time, before she said to the sultan, her father, ‘‘I have gained, sire,
the victory over the Genius, as your majesty may see, but it is a
victory which has cost me dear. I have but a few moments to live,
aid you will not have the satisfaction of completing the marriage
you intended. The fire, in this dreadful combat, has penetrated my
body, and [ feel that it will soon consume me. This would not have



76 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

happened if I had perceived the last seed of the pomegranate, when
L was in the shape of a cock, and had swallowed it as I did the others.
The Genius had fled to it as his last retreat, and on that depended
the success of the combat, which would then have been fortunate,
and without danger to me. This omission obliged me to have recourse
to fire, and fight with that powerful weapon, between heaven and
earth, as you saw me. In spite of his dreadful power and experience.
I have at length conquered and reduced him to ashes, but I cannot
avoid the death which I feel approaching.”

The princess had no sooner finished this account of the battle,
than she suddenly exclaimed, “I burn, I burn.” She perceived that
the fire which consumed her, had at last seized her whole body, and
she did not cease calling out, ‘I burn,” till death put an end to her
almost insupportable sufferings. The effect of this fire was so
extraordinary, that in a few minutes she was reduced, like the
Genius, to a heap of ashes.

I need not say how much this dreadful and melancholy sight
affected us. I would rather have continued an ape, or a dog, my
whole life, than have seen my beuefactress perish in such a horrid
manner. The sultan, too, on his part, was beyond measure afflicted.
Té is almost impossible to conceive what lamentable cries he uttered,
beating himself at the same time most violently on_his head and
breast, till at last, yielding to despair, he fainted, and I feared even
his life would fall a sacrifice. In the meantime the cries of the
sultan brought the eunuchs and officers to his assistance, and they
found great difliculty in recovering hin.

As soon as the knowledge of an event so tragical was spread
through the palace and the city, every one lamented the melancholy
fate of the princess, surnamed the Queen of Beauty, and joined in
the grief of the sultan. They put on mourning for seven days, and
performed many ceremonies; the ashes of the Genius they scattered
in the wind, but collected those of the princess in a costly urn, and
preserved them; this urn was then deposited in a superb mausoleum,
which was erected on the very spot where the ashes had been found.

The grief which preyed upon the sultan for the loss of his daughter,
was the origin of a disease that confined him to his bed for a whole
month. He had not quite recovered his health, when he called me
to him, and said, ‘‘ Listen, prince, and attend to the order which |
am going to give you; if you fail to execute it, your life will be the
forfeit.” I assured him I would obey. ‘‘ My daughter is dead,” he
continued; ‘‘her governor is no more; and I have escaped with my
life only by a miracle. You are the cause of all these misfortunes,
if you remain any longer it will be the cause of my death also, since

| am persuaded your presence is productive only of misfortune.
This is all I have to say to you. Go, and take care you never again
appear in my kingdom; if you do, no consideration shall prevent my
making you repent of it.” I wished to speak, but he prevented me
by uttering some angry words, and I was obliged to leave his palace.

Rejected and abandoned by every one, I knew not what was to
become of me. Before I left the city, I went into a bath, I got my
beard and eyebrows shaved, and put on the dress of a calender. 1



THE THIRD CaLENDER. G7

then began my journcy, lamenting less my own miserable condition,
than the death of the two beautiful princesses, of which I had been
the unhappy cause. I travelled through many countries without
naking myself known; at last I resolved to visit Bagdad, in hopes
of heing able to present myself to the Commander of the Faithful,
and excite his compassion by the recital of so strange a history. 1
arrived here this evening, and the first person I met was the calender,
my brother, who has already related his life. You are acquainted,
madam, with the sequel, and how I came to have the honour of
being at your house.

When the second calender had finished his history, Zobeidé, to
whom he had addressed himself, said, ‘‘ You have done well, and I
give you leave to go whenever you please.” But instead of taking
his departure, he entreated her to grant him the same favour she
had done the other calender, near whom he went and took his place
Then the third calender, knowing it was his turn to speak, addressed
himself like the others to Zobeidé, and began his history as follows.

Che History of the Third Gulender, the Son of x Ring.

What Iam going to relate, most honourable lady, is of a very
different nature from what you have already heard. ‘The two princes
who have recited their histories, have each of them lost an eye, as
it were by destiny; while my loss has been in consequence of my
own fault, in wilfully seeking the cause of misfortune, as you will
find by what I am going to mention.

Tam called Agib, and am the son of a king, whose name was Cassib.
After his death I took possession of his throne, and established my
residence in the same city which he had made his capital. This city,
which is situated on the sea-coast, has a remarkably handsome and
safe harbour, with an arsenal sufliciently extensive to supply an
armament of a hundred and fifty vessels of war, always lying ready
for service on any occasion; and to equip fifty merchantmen, and as
many sloops and yachts, for the purpose of amusement and pleasure
on the water. My kingdom was composed of many beautiful pro-
vinces, and also a number of considerable islands, almost all of which
were situated within sight of my capital.

The first thing I did was to visit the provinces; I then made them
arm and equip my whole fleet, and went round to all my islands, in
order to conciliate the affections of my subjects, and to confirm them
in their duty and allegiance. After having been at home some time,
L went again ; and these voyages, by giving me some slight knowledge
of navigation, infused such a taste for it in my mind, that I resolved
to go in search of discoveries beyond my islands. For this purpose
Ucquipped only ten ships, and embarking in one of them, we set sail.

During forty days our voyage was prosperous ; but on the night of
the forty-first the wind became adverse, and so violent, that we were
driven at the mercy of the tempest, and thought we should have
been lost. At break of day, however, the wind abated, the clouds



qs THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

dispersed, and the sun brought fine weather back with it. We now
landed on an island, where we remained twe days, to take in some
provisions. Having done this, we again put to sea. After ten days’
sail, we began to hope to see land; for since the storm we had en-
countered, [ had altered my intention, and determined to return to
my kingdom, but I then discovered that my pilot knew not where
we were, In fact, a sailor, on the tenth day, who was ordered to the
masthead for the purpose of making discoveries, reported that to the
right and left he could perceive only the sky and sea, which bounded
she horizon, butthat straight before him he observed a great blackness.

At this intelligence the pilot changed colour, and throwing his
turban on the deck with one hand, he smote his face with the other,
and then cried out, ‘Ah, sire, we are lost ; not one of us can pos-
sibly escape the danger in which we are.” I asked him what reason
he had for this despair. ‘Alas, sire,” he answered, ‘‘the tempest
has so driven us from our track, that by midday to-morrow we shall
tind ourselves near that blackness, which is nothing but a black
mountain, consisting entirely of a mass of loadstone, that will soon
attract our fleet, on account of the bolts and nails in the ships.
To-morrow, when we shall come within a certain distance, the power
of the loadstone will be so violent, that all the nails will be drawn
out, and fastened to the mountain; our ships will then fallin pieces,
and sink. This mountain towards the sea is entirely covered with
nails, that belonged to the infinite number of ships of which it has
proved the destruction. It is very steep, and on the summit there
is a large dome, made of fine bronze, which is supported upon co-
lumns of the same metal. Upon the top of the dome there is also
a bronze horse, with the figure of a man upon it; and there isa
tradition, sire,” added he, “that this statue is the principal cause
of the loss of so many vessels and men, and that it will never cease
from being destructive to all who shall have the misfortune to ap-
proach it until it be overthrown.” The pilot having finished his
speech, renewed his tears, which excited those of the whole crew.
As for myself, I did not doubt that I was now approaching the end
of my days.

The next morning we distinctly perceived the black mountain ;
and the idea we had formed of it made it appear still more dreadful
and horrid than it really was. About mid-day we found ourselves
so near it, that we began to perceive what the pilot had foretold.
We saw the nails, and every other piece of iron belonging to the
vessel, fly towards the mountain, against which, by the violence
of the magnetic attraction, they struck with a horrible noise.
The vessel then immediately fell to pieces, and sunk to the bottom
of the sea. All my people were lost; but God had pity upon me,
and suffered me to save myself by laying hold of a plank, which
was driven by the wind directly to the foot of the mountain. I did
not experience the least harm, and had the good fortune to Jand in
a place where there were steps, which led to the summit. I was
much rejoiced at sight of these steps, for there was not the least
piece of land either to the right or left, upon which I could have set
my foot to save myseli. | returned thanks to God, and invoking His



THE THIRD CALENDER. 7S

holy name, bean to ascend the mountain, The path was narros,
and so steep and difficult, that had the wind been at all violent, it
must have blown me into the sea. T arrived at last at the suminit
without any accident, and entering the dome, I prostrated myself
on the ground, and offered my thanks to God for the favour he had
shown me.

I passed the night under this dome; and while I was asleep, a
venerable old man appeared to me, and said, ‘* Agib, attend; when
you awake, dig up the earth under your fect, and you will find a
brazen bow with three leaden arrows, manufactured under certain
constellations, in order to deliver mankind from many evils, which
continually menace them. Shoot these three arrows at the statue:
the man will then fall into the sea, and the horse at your feet, which
you must bury in the same spot from whence you take the bow and
arrows. This being finished, the sea will begin to be agitated, and
will rise as high as the foot of the dome, at the top of the mountain,
When it shall have risen thus high, you will see a small vessel core
towards the shore, with only one man in it, who holds an oar in
each hand. This man will be of brass, but different from the one
shat was overthrown. Hmbark with him without pronouncing the
name of God, and let him conduct you. In ten days he will have
carried you into another sea, where you will find the means of re-
turning to your own country in safety; provided, as T have alreicly
told you, you forbear from mentioning the name of God during the
whole of your voyage.”

Such was the discourse of the old man. As soon as I was awake,
T got up, much consoled by this vision, and did not fail doing as the
old man had ordered me. T uncovered the bow and the arrows, and
shot them at the statue. With the third arrow 1 overthrew the
man, who fell into the sea, while the horse lay at my feet. I buried
it in the place where I found the bow and arrows, and while T was
doing this, the sea rose by degrees, till it-reached the foot of the
dome on the summit of the mountain, I perceived a vessel at a
distance coming towards me. I offered my benedictions to God at
thus seeing my dream in every respect proving a reality. The
vessel at length approached the land, and I saw in it a man made
of brass, as had been described. I embarked, and took particular
care not to pronounce the name of God. I did not even utter a
single word. When I sat down, the brazen figure hegan to row
from the mountain. He continued doing so without intermission
till the ninth day, when I saw some islands, which made me hope |
should soon be free from every danger that I dreaded. ‘The exces
of my joy made me forget the order that had been given me as 2
security, ‘* Blessed be God,” I cried out “God be praised.”

Thad hardly finished these words, when both the vessel and brazen
man sunk to the bottom. I remained in the water, and swam during
the rest of the day towards the nearest island. The night, which
came on, was exceedingly dark; and as T no longer knew where I
was, I continued swimming ata venture. M y strength was at last
yuite exhausted, and I began to despair of being able to save myself,
when, the wind having much increase 1, awave ag large asa mount:

i





80 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

threw me upon a flat, shallow place, and on retiring left me there. T
immediately made haste to get farther on land, for fear another wave
should come and carry me back. The first thing I then did, was to
undress, and wring the water outof my clothes, and spread them upon
the sand, which was still warm from the heat of the preceding day.
The next morning, as soon as the sun had quite dried my dress, I
put it on, and began to reconnoitre; and tried to discover where I
was. L[had not walked far, before I found out I was upon a small
desert island, very pleasant, and where there were many sorts of
fruit-trees, as well as others; but I observed, that it was at a consi-
derable distance from the mainland, which rather lessened the joy 1
felt at having escaped from the sea. I nevertheless trusted in God to
dispose of my fate according to His will: soon afterwards I discovered
a very small vessel, which seemed to come full sail directly from the
mainland, with her prow towards the island where I was. As I had
no doubt they were coming to anchor here, and as I knew not what
sort of people they might be, whether friends or enemies, I deter-
mined at firstnot to shewmyself. I got up, therefore, into avery thick
tree, from whence I could examine their countenances without dan-
ger. The vessel soon sailed up a small creek, or bay, where ten slaves
landed, with a spade and other instruments in their hands, for the
purpose of digging the earth. They went towards the middle of the
island, where I observed them stop, and dig up the earth for some
time; and by their actions, they appeared to me tolift up a trap-door.
They immediately returned to the vessel, from which they landed
various kinds of provisions and furniture, and each taking a load,
they carried them to the place where they had before dug up the
ground. They then seemed to descend, which made me conjecture
there was a subterraneous place. I saw them once more go to the
vessel, and come back with an old man, who brought with him a
youth, seemingly well made, and about fourteen or fifteen years old.
They all descended at the spot where the trap-door had been lifted
up. After they came outagain, they shut down the door, and covered
it with earth as before; and then returned to the creek where the
vessel lay; but I observed that the young man did not come back
with them; whence I concluded, that he remained in the subterrane-
ous place. This circumstance very much excited my astonishment.
The old man and the slaves then embarked, and hoisting the sails,
made way for the mainland. When I found the vessel had got so far
off, that I could not be perceived by the crew, I came down from the
tree, and went directly to the place where I had seen them dig away
the earth. I now did the same thing, and at last discovered a stone
two or three feet square. I lifted it wp, and found that it concealed
the entrance to a flight of stone stairs. I descended, and at the bot-
tom perceived that I was in a large chamber, the floor of which was
covered with a carpet, as was also a sofa and some cushions with a
rich stuff, where I saw a young man sitting down with a fan in his
hand, I distinguished all these things by the light of two torches, as
J did also the fruits and pots of flowers, which were near him. At
the sight of me, the young man was much alarmed; but in order to
vive him courage, I said to him on entering. ‘‘ Whoever you are, fear



THE THIRD CALENDER, @1

nothing, sir: I am incapable of doing you any injury. On the con:
trary, you may esteem it as a most fortunate circumstance that Iam
come here to deliver you from this tomb, where you scem to me to
have been buried alive, I have been a witness to everything that has
passed since you landed on this island, but what I cannot understand
1s, that you seem to have suffered yourself to have been buried here
without making any resistance,”

The young man wasmuch encouraged by this speech, andrequested,
in a pleasing manner, that I would take a seat near him. As soon as
I was seated, he said, “Tam about to inform you of a circumstance,
the singular nature of which, will very much surprise you.

“ My father is a jeweller, who has acquired by his industry and
great skill in his profession a very large fortune. “He had been mar-
ried a long time without having any children, when one night he
dreamed that he should have a son, whose life, however, would be
but short. This dream, when he awoke, gave him great uneasiness,
Some months afterwards I was burn, to the great joy of all the family,
My father having observed the moment of my birth with the great-
est exactness, consulted the astrologers, who answered, ‘ Your son
will live without any accident or misfortune till heis fifteen; but le
will then run a great risk of losing his life, and will not escape from
ié without much difficulty. If, however, he should have the good
fortune not to perish, his life will continue many years. About this
time too,’ they added, ‘the equestrian statue of brass, which stands
on the top of the loadstone mountain, will be overthrown by Prince
Agib, the son of King Cassib, and fall intothe sea; and the stars also
discover, that fifty days afterwards your son will be killed by that
prince.’

“As this prediction agreed with my father’s dream, he was very
much struck and afflicted by it. He did not, however, omit taking
the greatest care of my education till the present moment, which is
the fifteenth year of myage. Hewas yesterday informed that ten days
ago the brazen figure was overthrown by the prince whom I men-
tioned to you: and this intelligence cost him so many tears and
alarms, that he hardly looks like the same man,

“‘ For a long time past, he has taken the precaution to have this
habitation built, in order to conceal me for the fifty days. Ttwas on
this account, that, as soon as he knew what had happened ten days
since, he came here for the purpose of concealing me during the
forty days that remain; and he has promised, at the expiration of
that time, to come and take me back. As for myself,” he added, “I
have the best hopes, for I do not believe that Prince Agib will come
and look for me underground, in the midst of a desert island. This,
my lord, is all I had to inform you of,”

Ticlt myself so very unlikely to verify the prediction of the astro-
.ogers, that he had scarcely finished speaking before I exclaimed with
transport, ‘* Have confidence, my dear sir, in the goodness of God,
and fear nothing. I will not quit you for a moment during the forty
days. During this time I will render you every service in my power,
and afterwards I will take advantage, with your and your father’s
permission, of embarkingin your vessel, in order to return to the Con-



82 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENT .

tinent, and will endeavour to prove mv gratitude by every means in
my power.

Tencouraged him by this discourse, and thus gained his contidence.
{ took care, from the fear of alarming him, not to inform him that
[ was the very person whom he dreaded; nor give him the least
suspicion on the subject. We conversed about various things till
night; and_I easily discovered that the young man possessed a
sensible and well-informed mind. We ate together out of his store
of provisions, which were so abundant that they would have lasted
more than the forty days, had there been other guests beside myself.

We had suilicient time to contract a friendship for each other. |
perceived that he had an inclination for me, and on my side the
regard was so strong that I often said to myself, ‘The astrologers,
who have predicted to the father that his son should be slain by my
hands were impostors, for it was impossible T could commit so horrid
a crime.” In short, we passed thirty-nine days in the pleasantest
manner possible in this subterraneous habitation.

At length, the fortieth arrived. The youth, when he was getting
up, said to me, in a transport of joy, which he could not restrain,
«Behold me now, prince, on the fortieth day, and thank God, and
your good society, Tam not dead. My father will not fail very soon
to acknowledge his obligation to you by every means in his power.
But while we are waiting,” added he, ‘I beg of you to have the
soodness to warm some water, that I may wash my whole body in
the portable bath. T wish to cleanse myself and change my dress,
in order to receive my father with the greater propriety.” I put the
water on the fire, and when it was just warm, J filled the portable
bath. The young man got in: I both washed and rubbed him mysel!.
He then got out, and went into the bed I had prepared for him, and
I threw the cover over him. After he had reposed himself, and slept
for some time, he said to me, ‘*Oblige me, and bring me a melon
and some sugar. I want to cat something to refresh me.”

T chose one of the melons which remained, and put it on a plate,
and as I could not find a knife to ent it, 1 asked the youth, if he
knew where there was one. ‘‘ There is one,” he replied, ‘‘upon the
cornice over my head.” I looked up and perceived one there ; but I
strained myself so much in endeavouring to reach it, that at the
very moment I had it in my hand, my foot by some means got so
entangled in the covering of the bed, that I fell down on the young
man, and pierced him to the heart with the knife. He expired the
very same instant. .

At this sight, I cried most bitterly; I beat my head and breast.
I tore my habit, and threw mysclf on the ground in grief and despair.
“ Alas!” | cried, “a few hours only remained for him to be out of
the danger against which he sought an asylum; and at the very
moment L thought the danger past, Lam become the assassin, and
have caused the prediction to come to pass.” After this misfortune,
death would have heen very acceptable t me, and T should have
met it without dread. But we are neither afflicted with evil, nor
blessed with good fortune always at the moment we may desire it.

In the meantime, reflecting that neither my tears nor sorrow could



THE THIRD CALENDER. 83

‘revive the youth, and that as the forty days were now concluding,
I should be surprised by the father, I quitted the subterraneous
building, and ascended to the top of the stairs. I replaced the large
stone over the entrance, and covered it with the earth. [had scarcely
finished, when, looking towards the mainland, I perceived the vessel,
which was coming for the young man. Meditating what plan |
should pursue, I said to myself, ‘Tf I let them see me, it is probabla
the old man will seize me, and order his slaves to slay me, when he
shall have discovered his son in the state in which I have left him,
Whatever I could allege in my own justification would never per-
suade him of my innocence. It is surely better, then, to withdraw
myself from his sight, while I have the power, than expose myself
to his resentment.”

Near the subterrancous cavern there was a large tree, the thick
foliage of which seemed to me well adapted for concealment.
immediately got up into it, and had no sooner placed myself so as
aot to be seen, than I observed the vessel come to land in the same
place it had before done. The old man and the slaves instantly
caine on shore, and approached the subterraneous dwelling in a
manner that showed they had some hopes. But when they saw
that the ground had been lately disturbed, they changed colour,
especially the oldman. ‘They then lifted up the stone, and descended
the stairs, They called the young man by his name, but no answer
was returned. Their fears redoubled. They searched about, and
at last found him stretched on his couch, with the knife through his
heart, for I had not had the courage to draw it out. On seeing this,
they uttered such lamentable cries, that my tears flowed afresh.
‘The old man fainted, and the slaves brought him out in their arms,
that he might feel the air, and for this purpose they placed him at
the foot of the very tree in which I was. Notwithstanding all their
cares, the unfortunate father remained so long in this state, that
they more than once despaired of his life.

He at length recovered from this long fainting fit. The slaves
then went down, and brought up the body of his son, clothed in the
finest garments, and as soon as the grave, which they made, was
ready, they put the body in. The old man, supported by two slaves,
with his face bathed in tears, threw in the first piece of earth, after
which the slaves filled up the grave. This being done, the furniture
and remainder of the provisions were put on board the vessel. ‘The
old man, overcome with sorrow, was unable to support himself, and
was therefore carried to the vessel, in a sort of litter, by the slaves,
and they immediately put to sea. They soon got to a considerable
distance from the island, and I lost sight of them.

I now remained alone in the island, and passed the following night
in the subterraneous dwelling, which had not been again shut up;
and the next day I took a survey of the whole island, resting in
those places most adapted to the purpose, whenever I felt myself
weary. I spent a whole month in this unpleasant manner; at the
end of which time I perceived the sea considerably diminish, the
island appeared to become sensibly larger, and the mainland ap-
proached nearer, In truth, the water decreased so much, that there



8-1 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

was now only a small channel between me and the continent, and 1
passed over without being deeper than the middie of my leg. I then
walked so far on the flat sand, that Iwas greatly fatigued. I at
last reached firmer ground, and was already at a considerable distance
from the sea, when I saw before me something that appeared like a
large fire. At this I was much rejoiced; ‘For here,” said I to
myself, ‘*I shall certainly find some persons, as a fire cannot light
itself.” But as I went nearer, my mistake began to clear up, and [
soon found out, that what I had taken for a fire was a sort of castle
of red copper, from which the rays of the sun were reflected in such
a manner as to make it appear in flames.

I stopped near this castle, and sat down, as well to consider the
beauty of the building, as in some degree to recover from my fa-
tigue. I had not yet bestowed all the attention upon this magnifi-
cent house which it deserved, when I perceived ten well-made young
men come out for the purpose, as it appeared, of walking ; but what
seemed to me more surprising was, that they were all blind of the
right eye; an old man of rather a large stature, whose appearance
was very venerable, accompanied them.

Iwas very much astonished.at mecting so many people at the same
time, who were not only blind of one eye, but had also Jost the same
eye. While I was endeavouring to discover in my own mind for what
purpose, or by what circumstance, they were thus collected together,
they accosted me; and showed signs of great joy at seeing me.
After the first compliments had passed, they inquired of me what
brought me there: I told them that my history was rather long;
but if they would take the trouble to sit down, I would afford them
the satisfaction they wished. They seated themselves, and I re-
lated to them everything that had happened to me, from the moment
Thad left my own kingdom till that instant. This narration greatly
excited their surprise. When I had finished my story, they en-
treated me to come with them into the castle. I accepted their offer,
and passing through a long suite of halls, antechambers, saloons, and
cabinets, all well furnished and appointed, we came at length to a
large and magnificent apartment, where there were ten small blue
sofas, placed in a circle, but unconnected, which served both to sit
on and rest during the day, and also to sleep upon in the night. In
the midst of this circle there was another sofa, less raised, but of
the same colour, upon which the old man of whom I have spoken
sat, while the young ones seated themselves upon the other ten. As
each sofa held only one person, one of the young men said to me,
‘* Sit down, my friend, upon the carpet in the middle of this place ;
and do not endeavour to inform yourself of anything that regards
us, nor ask the reason why we are all blind of the right eye; be
satisfied with what you see, and do not carry your curiosity any fur-
ther.” The old man did not remain long seated; he got up and went
out, but very soon returned, bringing with him a supper for the ten
young men; to each of whom he distrihuted a certain portion. He
gave me mine in the same way, which, like the rest, Late alone. As
soon as it was finished, the old ~an presented each of us with a
cup of wine.



THE THIRD CALENDER. 85

My history appeared to them so extraordinary, that they made
me repeat it when supper was over. This afterwards led to a con-
versation, which lasted great part of the night. One of the young
men now observing that it was so late, said to the old man, ‘* You
sce that it is time to retire to rest, and yet you do not bring us what
ig necessary for us to discharge ourduty.” At this the old man got
up, and went into a cabinet, from whence he brought upon his head
ten blue basins, one after the other; he placed one of them with a
torch hefore each of the young men. They uncovered their basins,
in which there were some ashes, some charcoal, in powder, and some
lamp-black. They mixed all these altogether, and began to rub them
over their faces, and smear their countenances until their appear-
ance was very frightful. After they had blacked themselves over
in this manner, they began to weep, to make great lamentations, and
to beat their head and breast, calling outincessantly all the time, ‘‘ Be-
hold the consequences of our idleness and debaucheries !”

They passed almost the whole night in this strange occupation ;
at last they gave over, when the old man brought them some water,
in which they washed their faces and hands. They then took off
their dresses, which were much torn, and put on others, so that they
did not appear to have been engaged in those extraordinary occupa-
tions to which I had beena witness. Judge what was my fear dur-
ing all this time, I was tempted a thousand times to break the silence
which they had imposed upon me, for the purpose of asking them
questions; nor could I, during theremainder of thenight, get any rest.

The following morning, as soon as we were up, we went out to
take the air, and I then said unto them, “I must inform you, gen-
tlemen, that I renounce the law you imposed upon me last night, as
I can no longer observe it. You are wise men, and you have given
me sufficient reason to believe that you possess an enlarged under-
standing ; yet, at the same time, I have seen you do things of which
none but madmen would be guilty. Whatever misfortune may hap-
pen to me in consequence, I cannot refrain from inquiring for what
reason you daubed your faces with ashes, charcoal, and black paint,
and how you have all lost an eye. Something very singular must be
the cause of this, I entreat you therefore to satisfy my curiosity.”
Notwithstanding such pressing entreaties, they only answered that
the inquiries I made did not relate to me, that I had no interest in
their actions, and that I might remain in peace. We passed the day
in conversing upon different subjects, and when night approached,
we supped separately, as before, and the old man again brought the
blue basins, with the contents of which the others anointed them-
selves; they then wept, beat themselves, and exclaimed, ‘‘ Behold
the consequences of our idleness and our debaucheries !” The follow-
ing night they repeated the same thing.

I could at last no longer resist my curiosity; and I very seriously
entreated them to satisfy me. One of the young men thus answered
me for the rest: ‘*Do not be astonished at what we do in your pre-
sence: if we have not hitherto yielded to your entreaties, it has
been entirely out of friendship for you; and to spare you from the
regret of being reduced to the same state in which you see us. Tf



86 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

you wish to experience our unfortunate fate, you have only to speak,
and we will give you the satisfaction you require.” I told them, I
was determined to know it at all events. ‘‘ Once more,” replied the
same youngman, “we advise you to restrain your curiosity; for it will
cost you the sight of your right eye.” ‘It is of no consequence,” [
answered, ‘‘and I declare to you, that if this misfortune does hap-
pen, I shallnot consider youas the cause of it, but shall lay the blame
entirely onmyself.” Again he represented to me, that, when I should
have lost my eye, I must not expect to remain with them; even if
[ had thought of it; as their number was complete, and could not
be increased. I told them that it would cause me much regret to
separate myself from such agreeable company, but still, if 1t were
aecessary, | would submit to it; since whatever might be the con-
sequence, I was bent on obtaining the satisfaction I required.

The ten young men, observing that I was not to be shaken in my
resolution, took a sheep, and killed it; after they had taken off the
skin, they gave me the knife they had made use of, and said, ‘¢ Take
this knife; it will serve you for an occasion of which we will soon
inform you. We are going to sew you up in this skin, in which it
is necessary you should be entirely concealed. We shall then leave
you in this place, and retire. Soon afterwards a bird of a most enor-
mous size, which they call a roc, will appear in the air, and, taking
you for a sheep, will plunge down upon you, and lift you up to the
clouds; but do not let this alarm you. The bird will soon return
with his prey towards the earth, and will lay you down on the top
of a mountain. As soon as you shall feel yourself upon the ground,
rip open the skin with the knife, and discover yourself. On seeing
you, the roc will be alarmed, and. fly away, leaving you at liberty.
Do not stop there; but go on until you arrive at a castle of a most
prodigious magnitude, entirely covered with plates of gold, set with
large emeralds and other precious stones. Go to the gate, which is
always open, and enter. All of us who are here have been in this
castle ; but we will tell you nothing of what we saw nor what hap-
pened to us, as you will learn everything yourself. The only thing
we can inform you of is, that it has cost each of us a right eye, and
the penance which you haye witnessed is what we are obliged to
undergo in consequence of our having been there. We cannot now
tell you more.”

As soon as the young man had finished this speech, I wrapped
myself up in the sheep-skin, and took the knife which they had
given me. After they had taken the trouble to sew me up in it,
they left me in that place, and retired into their apartment. It
was not long before the roc, which they had mentioned, made its ap-
pearance, plunged down upon me, took me up in its talons, as if I
wereasheep, and transported me to the summit of a mountain. When
I perceived that I was upon the ground, I did not fail to make use
of the knife. I ripped open the skin, threw it off, and appeared
before the roc, who flew away the instant it saw me. This roc is a
white bird, of an enormous size; its strength is such, that it will
lift up elephants from the ground, and. carry them to the top of
mountains, where it devours them.



THE THIRD CALENDER. 87

My unpatience to arrive at the castle was such, that I reached it
in less than half a day, and I certainly found it much more beauti-
ful than it had been described. The gate was open, and I entered
into a square court, of such vast extent that in if were ninety-nine
doors, made of sandal-wood and aloes, and one of gold, not to reckon
those of many magnificent staircases, which led to the wpper apart-
ments, and some others which I did not see. The hundred doors I
have mentioned formed the entrances, either into the gardens, or
into magazines filled with riches, or some other places, which con-
tained things most surprising to behold.

Opposite to me, I saw an open door, through which I entered into
a large saloon, where forty young females were sitting, whose beauty
was so perfect that it was impossible for the imagination to form to
itself anything beyond it. They were all very magnificently dressed,
and as soon as they perceived me they got up, and, without waiting
for me to pay my compliments, they called out, with appearance of
ureat joy, ‘‘ Welcome, my brave lord, you are welcome ;” and one of
them, speaking for the rest, said, ‘‘ We have a long time expected
a person like you. Your manner sufficiently shows that you possess
all the good qualities we could wish, and we hope that you will not
find our company either disagreeable or unworthy of you.” After
some resistance on my part, they forced me to sit down on a })) :ve
that was more raised than theirs ; and when I shewed them it was
unpleasant to me, they said, ‘It is your place ; from this moment
youare our lord, our master, and our judge; we are your slaves, and
ready to obey your commands.” Nothing in the world could have
astonished me more than the desire and the eagerness these ladies
professed to render me every possible service. One brought me
some warm water to wash my feet; another threw some perfumed
water over my hands; some brought me whatever was necessary
to change my dress; and others served up a magnificent collation ;
while another party presented themselves before me with a goblet
in their hands, ready to pour out the most delicious wine. All this
was done without any confusion, and in such admirable order and
such a pleasant way, that I was quite charmed. I ate and drank ;
after which, all the ladies, placing themselves around me, asked me
to relate the particulars of my journey. I gave them so full an ac-
count, that it lasted till the beginning of night. When I had
lmished the relation of my history to the forty ladies, some of those
who were seated nearest to me waited to entertain me, while others
went out to seek for lights. They returned with such a prodigious
quantity, that they produced almost the brilliancy of day; but they
were arranged with so much symmetry and taste as we could hardly
wish for.

In short, madam, not to tire you, 1 may tell you at once that [
passed a whole year with these forty ladies, and that, during the
whole of this time, the life I led was not interrupted by the least
uneasiness.

Iwas never more surprised than at the end of the year, when
the forty ladies, instead of presenting themselves to me with their
awcustomed good spirits, and making inquiries after my health, one



88 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

morning entered my apartment with their countenances bathed in
tears. They cach came and said, ‘‘ Adieu, dear prince, adieu; we
are now compelled to leave you.”

Their tears affected me very much. I entreated them to inform
me of the cause of their grief, and why they were obliged, as they
said, to leave me. ‘‘My beautiful ladies,” I exclaimed, ‘‘ tell me,
I beseech you, is it in my power to console you? or will my aid and
assistance prove useless?” Instead of answering me in a direct
manner, they said, ‘‘ Would we had never seen or known you.
Many men have done us the honour of visiting us, previous to your-
gelf ; but no one possessed the elegance, the power of pleasing, the
merit, of yourself, nor do we know how we shall be able to live
without you.” Upon this, they renewed their tears. ‘‘ Amiable
ladies,” I cried, ‘*do not, I beg of you, keep me any longer in sus-
pense, but tell me the cause of your sorrow.” ‘Alas !” answered
they, ‘‘ what else could afflict us but the necessity of separating
ourselves from you. Perhaps we shall never meet again. Yet, still,
if you really wished it, and had sufficient command over yourself
for the purpose, it is not absolutely impossible for you to rejoin us.”
«In truth, ladies,” I replied, ‘‘I do not at all understand what you
mean; speak, I conjure you, more openly.” ‘‘ Well, then,” said
one of them, ‘‘to satisfy you, we must inform you we are all prin-
cesses, and the daughters of kings. You have seen in what nf@nner
we live here; but at the end of each year we are compelled to ab.
sent ourselves forty days, to fulfil some duties which cannot be
dispensed with, but which we are not at liberty to reveal; after
this, we again return to this castle. Yesterday the year finished,
aml to-day we must leave you. This is the great cause of our
affliction. Before we go, we will give you the keys of everything,
and particularly of the hundred doors, within which you will find
ample room to gratify your curiosity and amuse your solitude during
our absence. But, for your own sake, and for our particular inte-
rest, we entreat you to refrain from opening the golden door, If
you do open it, we shall never see you again; and the fear we are
in, lest you should, increases our sorrow. Your repose, your hap-
piness, nay, your life, depends upon it ; therefore, be careful. We
conjure you, therefore, not to be guilty of this fault, and to afford
us the consolation of finding you here at the end of the forty days.”

This speech affected me very sensibly. I made them understand
that their absence would cause me much pain, and thanked them
very much for the good advice they gave me. I assured them I
would profit by it, and would perform things much more difficult if
it would procure me the happiness of passing the remainder of my
life with ladies of such rare and extraordinary merit. We took the
most tender leave of each other; I embraced them all, and they
departed from the castle, in which I remained quite alone.

The pleasantness of their company, good living, concerts, and
various amusements, had so entirely engrossed my time during the
whole year, that I had not the least opportunity, nor indeed ineli-
nation, to examine the wonders that were contained in this enchanted
palace. T had not even paid any attention to the multitude of extra-



THE THIRD CALENDER. eg

ordinary objects which were continually before my eyes, so much
was | taken up with the charms and accomplishments of the ladies,
and the pleasure I felt at finding them always employed in endea-
vouring to amuse me, I was very much afflicted at their departure ;
and although their absence was to last only forty days, this time,
when deprived of their society, seemed to me an age.

1 determined, in my own mind, to attend to the advice they had
given me not to open the golden door; but as I was permitted, with
that one exception, to satisfy my curiosity, I took the keys belonging
to the others, which were regularly arranged, and opened the first
door. I entered a fruit garden, to which I thought nothing in the
world was comparable. “The admirable order and arrangement in
which the trees were disposed, the abundance and variety of the
fruits, many of which were unknown to me, together with their
freshness and beauty, and the elegance apparent in every spot,
ravished me with astonishment. Nor must I neglect to. inform you
that this delightful garden was watered in a most singular manner;
small channels, cut out with great art and regularity, and of different
sizes, conveyed the water in great abundance to the roots of some
trees which required it, in order to send forth their first leaves and
flowers ; while others, whose fruits were already set, received it with
a more sparing hand; and those where the fruit was much swelled,
had still less ; while a fourth sort, having the fruit come to its full
size, obtained just what was sufficient to ripen it. The size also
which all the fruits acquired, very much exceeded what we are
accustomed to observe in our gardens. Besides which, those channels
which conducted the water to the trees on which the fruit was ripe,
had barely enough to preserve it in the same state without over-
ripening it.

I then closed that door and opened the next. In the place of a
fruit garden, I now discovered one of flowers, which was not less
singular in its kind. It contained a spacious parterre, not watered
with such abundance as the preceding, but with greater skill and
management, as it did not supply each flower with more than it
wanted. The rose, the jessamine, the violet, the narcissus, the
hyacinth, the ancmone, the tulip, the ranunculus, the carnation,
the lily, and an infinity of other flowers, which in other places
bloom at various times, come all into flower at once in this spot ;
and nothing can be more luxuriously soft than the air you breathe
in this garden.

I then opened the third door, where I discovered a very large
aviary. Tt was paved with different coloured marbles, of the finest
and least common sort. ‘The cages were of sandal-wood and aloes,
and contained a great number of nightingales, goldfinches, canaries,
larks, and other birds, whose notes were sweeter and more melodious
than any I had ever heard before. The vases which contained tl:cir
food and water, were of jasper or the most valuable agate. This
aviary also was kept with the greatest degree of neatness: and from
its vast extent I conceive that it would employ not less than a
hundred persons to keep it in the state it then was, and yet no one
appeared either here or in the other gardeng, in none vf which did |



90 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

observe a single weed that was noxious, nor the least superfluous
thins that could offend the sight.

The sun was already set, and I retired much delighted with the
warbling of the multitude of birds which were then ilying about to
find the most commodious place to perch and enjoy the repose of
the night. I went back to my apartment, and determined to open
all the other doors on the succeeding days, cxvept the hundredth.
The next day I did not fail to go to the fourth door and open it.
But if that which I had scen on the foregoing days was capable of
surprising me, what I now beheld put me in eestasy. I first entered
into a large court, surrounded by buildings of a very singular sort
ef architecture, of which, to avoid being very prolix, I will not give
you a description.

This structure had forty doors all open, each of which was an
entrance into a sort of treasury, containing more riches than many
kingdoms. The first contained large quantities of pearls, and, what
is almost incredible, the most valuable, which were as large as
pigeons’ eggs, were more numerous than the smaller. The secoud
was filled with diamonds, carbuncles, and rubies; the third with
emeralds; the fourth contained gold in ingots; the fifth gold m
money; the sixth ingots in silver, and the two following silver money.
The rest were filled with amethysts, chrysolites, topazes, opals,
turquoises, and every other sort of precious stone we are acquainted
with; not to mention agate, jasper, cornelian, and coral, both m
branches, and whole trees, with which one apartment was entirely
tilled. Struck with surprise and admiration at the sight of all these
riches, I exclaimed, ‘‘ It is impossible that all the treasures of every
potentate in the universe, if they were collected in the same spot,
could equal these! How happy am I in possessing all these treasures,
as well as the love of such charming princesses !”

Twill not detain you, madam, hy giving you an account of all tha
wonderful and valuable things which I saw on the following days ;
L will only inform you that I spent nine-and-thirty days in opening
the ninety-nine doors, and in admiration of everything that offered
itself to my view. There now remained only the hundredth, which
I was forbidden to touch. The fortieth day since the departure of
the charming princesses now arrived. If I had been able, only for
that one day, to have had the power over myself [ ought to have
had, I should have been the happiest instead of the most miscrable
of men. They would have returned the next day, and the pleasure
I should have experienced in receiving them ought to have acted as
a restraint upon my curiosity; but through a weakness, which |
shall never cease to lament, I yielded to the temptation of some evil
spirit, who did nat suffer me to rest till I had subjected myself te
the pain and punishment I have since experienced.

[ opened the fatal door, though I had promised not to attempt it.
Before I even set my foot within, a very agreeable odour struck
me, but so powerful it made me faint. I soon, however, recovered.
but instead of profiting by such warning, instantly shutting the door,
and giving up all idea of satisfying my curiosity, I entered; having
first waited till the odswr was lessened and dispersed through the



THE THIRD CALENDER. 91

aiv, I then felt no inconvenience from it. I found a very large and
vaulted room, the floor of which was strewed with saffron. It was
iuminated with lights made of aloe-wood and ambergris, and placed
on golden stands; these afforded a stong smell. ‘The brightness caused
by these was still farther heightened by many lamps of silver and
gold, which were filled with oil composed of many perfumes.

Among the numerous objects which attracted my attention, was
a black horse, the best-formed and most beautiful] that ever was seen.
I went close to it in order to observe it more attentively. The saddle
and bridle, which were on it, were of massive gold, richly worked.
On one side of its manger there was clean barley and sesame, and
the other was filled with rose-water; I then took hold of its bridle,
and led it towards the light, to cxamine it the better. I mounted
it, and endeavoured to make it go, but as it would not move, I struck
it with a switch, which I had found in its magnificent stable. It
had hardly felt the stroke, before it began to neigh in a most dreadful
manner; then spreading its wings, which I had not till that moment
perceived, it rose so high in the air that J lost sight of the ground.
[ now thought only of holding fast on its back; nox dic T experienc
any injury if I except the great terror with which 1 was seized
At length it began to descend towards the earth, and lighted upon
the terraced roof of a castle; then, without giving me time to get
down, it shook me so violently that I fell off behind, and with the
end of its tail it dashed out my right eye.

This was the way I became blind, and the prediction of the ten
young lords was now instantly brought to my recollection. The
horse itself immediately after spread its wings, took flight, and
disappeared, I rose up much afilicted at the misfortune, which |
had thus voluntarily brought upon myself. I traversed the whole
terrace, keeping my hand up to my eye, as I experienced very con-
siderable pain from the stroke. 1 then went down, and came to a
saloon, which 1 immediately recognised from observing ten sofas
disposed in a circle, and a single one in the middle less elevated; it
was, in fact, in the very castle whence 1 had been carried up by
the roc.

The ten young lords were not in it at that time. I however
waited, and it was not long before they came, acccmpanied by the
old man, They did not seem at all astonished at scemy me, nor at
observing that I had lost my right cye. ‘* We are very sorry,” they
said, ‘*we cannot congratulate you on your return in the manner
we could have wished; but you know we were not the cause of your
misfortune.” ‘It would be,” T replied, ‘‘very wrong in me to
accuse you of it; I brought it entirely upon myself, and the fault
lies with me alone.” ‘‘ [f the unfortunate,” answered they, ‘‘can
derive any consolation from knowing that others are in the same
situation, we can afford you that satisfaction, Whatever may have
happened to you, be assured we have experienced the same. We
have equally enjoyed every species of pleasure for a whole year; and
we should have continued in the enjoyment of the same happiness,
if we had not opened the golden door during ‘the absence of the
princesses. You lave not been more prudent than we were, and



92 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

you have experienced the same punishment. We wish we could
receive you into our society, to undergo the same penance we are
performing, and of which we know not the duration; but we have
before informed you of ‘the motives which prevent us. You must,
therefore, take your departure and go to the court of Bagdad, where
you will meet with the person who will be able to decide your fate.”
They pointed out the road I was to follow; I then took my leave
and departed.

During my journey, I shaved my beard and eyebrows, and put on
the habit of a calender. I was a long time on the road, and it was
only this evening that I arrived in this city. At the entrance of »
one of the gates I encountered these two calenders, my brethren,
who were equally strangers with mysclf. We were all much sur-
prised with each other at the singular circumstance of having each
lost our right eye. We had not, however, much leisure to converse
on the subject of our mutual disgraceful misfortune. We had only
time, madam, to implore your assistance, which you have so gencr-
ously afforded us.

When the third calender had finished the recital of his history,
Zobeide, addressing herself both to him and his brethren, said,
‘Depart, you are all three at liberty to go wherever you please.”
**Pardon, madam,” answered one of them, ‘‘our curiosity, and
permit us to stay and hear the adventures of these gentlemen, who
have not yet spoken.” The lady then turned to the side where
the caliph, the vizier Giafar, and Mesrour were, and desired each of
them to relate his history.

The grand vizier, Giafar, who was always prepared to speak, im-
mediately answered Zobeidé. ‘‘ Madam,” said he, ‘‘ we have only
to repeat to you what we already related before we entered, that we
are merchants of Moussoul, who are come to Bagdad for the purpose
of trading with our merchandise, and happening accidentally to pass
through your street, we heard the sound of gaiety, and determmced
to knock at the door.”

Zobeidé, when he had finished, after some hesitation agreed to
pardon them also, but ordered them all instantly to quit the house,
which they did without replying a word, for the presence of the
seven armed slaves served to make them very respectful. They
had no sooner left the house, and the door was shut, than the caliph
said to the three calenders, ‘‘ What, gentlemen, as you are strangers,
and but just arrived in this city, do you intend to do? and which
way do you think of going, as itis not yet daylight?” ‘This very
thing, sir,” answered they, ‘‘much embarasses us.” ‘Follow us
then,” replied the caliph, ‘‘and we will relieve you from this diffi-
culty.” He then whispered his vizier, and ordered him to conduct
them to his own house, and bring them to the palace in the morn-
ing. ‘‘I wish,” added he, ‘‘to have their adventures written, for
they are worthy of a place in the annals of my reign.”

The vizier Giafar carried the three calenders home, the porter
went to his own house, and the caliph, accompanied by Mesrour,
returned to his palace. He retired to his couch, but his mind was
so entirely ucsupied by all the extraordinary things he had both



THE THREE CALENDERS AND FIVE LADIES. 98

seen and heard, he was unable to close his eyes. ‘Lhe morning at
length broke. He immediatcly got up and went into the room
where he held his councils; he then gave audience, and seated him-
self on his throne.

[t was not long before the grand vizier arrived, who directly went

through the usual ceremonies of respect. ‘‘ Vizier,” said the caliph to
him, ‘the business which is now before us is not very pressing; that
of the three ladies and the two black dogs is of more consequence, nor
will my mind be free from agitation till I am fully informed of
everything that has caused me so much astonishment. Go and order
these ladies to attend, and, at the same time, bring back the three
calenders with you. Begone, and remember I am impatient for
your return.”
__ The vizier, who was well acquainted with the quick and violent
disposition of his master, hastened to obey him. He arrived atthe
house of the ladies, and informed them, with as much politeness as
possible, of the orders he had received to conduct them to the caliph
—but did not hint at anything relative to what had passed the
night before.

The ladies immediately put on their veils and went along with
the vizier, who, in passing his own door, called for the calenders.
They had just learned that they had before seen the caliph, and had
even spoken to him without even knowing it was he. The vizier
brought them all to the palace, and executed his commission, with
so much diligence that the caliph was perfectly satisfied. This prince
ordered the ladies to stand behind the doorway, which led to lis
own apartinent, in order to preserve a certain decorum before the
officers of his household. He kept the three calenders near him, who
made itsufliciently apparent, by their respectful behaviour, that they
were not ignorant in whose presence they had the honour to appear.

When the ladies were seated, the caliph turned himself towards
them, and said, ‘‘ When inform you, ladies, that I introduced my-
self to you last night, disguised as a merchant, I shall, without
doubt, cause you sume alarm: you are afraid, probably, that you
offended me, and you think, perhaps, that I have ordered you to
come here only to show you some marks of my resentment; but be
of good courage, and be assured that I have forgotten what is past,
and that I am even very well satisfied with your conduct. I wish
that all the ladies of Bagdad were possessed of as much sense as I
have observed in you. I shall always remember the moderation
with which you conducted yourselves after the incivility of which
we were guilty towards you. I was then a simple merchant of
Moussoul, but Iam now Haroun Alraschid, the seventh caliph of
the glorious house of Abbas. I have ordered you here only for the
sake of being informed who you are, and to inquire of you for what
reason one of you, after having ill-treated the two black dogs wept
with them. Nor am I less curious to learn why the bosom of an-
other became so covered with scars.”

Though the caliph pronounced these words very distinctly, and
the three ladies understood them very well, the vizier Giafar, as was
the custom, did not fail to repeat them. The prinee had no svoner



9L TH! ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

encouraged Zobeidé by this speech, which he addressed to her, than
she gave him the satisfaction he required, 1 the following manner.

Che History of Robeide.

Commander of the Faithful, the history which I am going to relate
to your majesty is probably one of the most surprising you have
ever heard. The two black dogs and mysclf are three sisters by the
same mother and father; and i shall, in the course of my narration,
inform you by what strange accident they have been transformed
into these animals. The two ladics who live with me, and who are
now here, are also my sisters by the same father, but by a different
mother. She whose bosom is covered with scars is called Aminé,
the name of the other is Safié, and I called Zobeideé.

After the death of our father, the estate which he left us was
equally divided amongst us. When my two half-sisters had re-
ceived their share, they went and lived with their mother; my other
two sisters and I remained with ours, who was still alive, and who,
when she died, left a thousand sequins to cach of us. When we had
received what belonged to us, my two elder sisters, for 1 am the
youngest, married. They of course went to live with their husbands,
and left me alone. Not long after their marriage, the husband of
my eldest sister sold everything he possessed, both of estate and
moveables, and with the money he thus got together, and with what
he received also with my sister, they both of them went over to
Africa, Her husband there squandered away, in good living
and dissipation, not only all his own fortune, but also that which
my sister brought him. At length finding himself reduced tv the
greatest distress, he found ont some pretext for a divorce, and drove
her from him.

She returned to Bagdad, but not without suffering almost in-
credible evils during so long a journey. She came to seck a refuge
at my house, in a state so deserving of pity, that she would have
excited it even in the most obdurate hearts. I received her with
every mark of afiection she could expect from me; and [said to her,
“You are my elder sister, and I shall always look upon you asa
mother. During your absence, God has caused the little fortune
which has fallen to my lot to prosper, and the occupation I have
followed has been that of breeding and bringing up silk-worms. Be
assured that everything I possess is equally yours.”

From this timé we lived together in the same house for many
months in perfect harmony. We often talked about our other
sister, and were much surprised at never hearing anything of her.
At last she unexpectedly arrived, and in as miserable a state as the
eldest had done. Her husband had ill-treated her in a similar man-
ner, and I received her with the same kindness.

A year passed, and we continued on the best terms. Observing
that God had blessed my small fortune, I determined to make a
sea voyage, and risk sume part of it in commercial speculations



TILE HISTORY OF ZOBEIDE, 95

With this view 1 went with my two sisters to Balsora, where I pur-
chased a vessel ready for sea, which I loaded with the merchandise
[had brought with me from Bagdad. We set sail with a favourable
wind, and soon reached the Persian Gulf. When we were in the
open sea, we steered directly for India: and after twenty days’ sail
we made land. The first that appeared was a very high mountain,
it the foot of which we perceived a town of considerable beauty and
magnitude. As the wind was fresh, we soon arrived in the harbour,
where we cast anchor,

I was too impatient to wait till my sisters were ready to accom-
pany me: I therefore disembarked by myself, and went directly to
the gate of the town. I observed rather a numerous guard, most of
them sitting down, and others who were standing with clubs in
their hands. But the aspect of all of them was so hideous, it fright-
ened me. I saw, however, they did not stir, and even that their
eyes were motionless. This gave me courage, and on approaching
still nearer to them, I perceived they were all petrified. I then
entered the town and passed through several streets, in all of which
T observed men in every attitude, but they were without motion,
ud absolutely turned into stone. In the quarter of the town where
the merchants resided, I found many shops shut up; and in some
that were open I perceived other men who were also petrified.
looked up towards the chimneys, and as I perceived no smoke, Icon-
cluded that those who were in the houses were exactly in the same
situation as every one in the streets, and that all the inhabitants
were changed into stone.

Having arrived at a large open place in the middle of the town, I
discovered a great gate, covered with plates of gold, the tv o folding
doors of which were open; a silk curtain seemed drawn before it,
and I could perceive a lamp suspended from the inside of the gate.
After having considered this building some time, I did uot doubt
but it was the palace of the prince to whom this country belonged.
Having been much astonished at not meeting with’ one living
person, I went in there, in the hope of discovering some one.
I drew aside the curtain, and my astonishment was much increased
when Isaw, in the vestibule, a number of porters, or guards, some
of them standing, others sitting down, and every one of them
petrified.

I passed on to a large court, where there were many people: some
seemed in the very act of going out, and others of entering: never-
theless, they all remained in the same place since they also were
turned into stone, in the same manner as those which I had before
seen. I passed on toa second court, and from thence to a third;
but they were both deserted, and a sort of horrid silence reigned
throughout the place. Having advanced to a fourth court, I saw
opposite to me a very beautiful building, the windows of which were
shut with a trellis of massive gold. I concluded that this was the
apartment of the queen. I entered, and going into a large hall, I
saw many black petrified eunuchs; I immediately passed on, and
went into a chamber very richly decorated, in which I perceived a
lady, who was also transiormed to stone: | knew that this was tha

G



Full Text


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DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080331_AAABCP' PACKAGE 'UF00080472_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-04-02T01:38:18-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:07:45-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298036; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-19T05:09:29-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00265.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-10-16T20:55:30-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-10-16T20:50:11-04:00'
redup
'419386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJN' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
35013173f6339978aa35595a3e547af6
295750639436850b600e1f690cf92ee9251840d9
'2011-10-16T20:50:28-04:00'
describe
'243939' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJO' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
7c2a07feaf2ab90aeb2541f2198b0330
e595dcdfd1835d3d2d6bef20947f728682fd3715
'2011-10-16T20:57:11-04:00'
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJP' 'sip-files00001.pro'
275d93f4aa466f94323d6ae0da4891b2
0e25b259d81da59d3773da2b14d19def1cd627de
'2011-10-16T20:52:20-04:00'
describe
'73062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJQ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
12f5036c09c2377dbddc39bb01646294
bd14e566b264a9737a0bed80b6d53ae36937d6ab
'2011-10-16T20:51:28-04:00'
describe
'10094368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJR' 'sip-files00001.tif'
2c7e0552fa27b8bc132458443f0d9965
fe7d470c261e8af301ddd635fabf2dffbe651426
'2011-10-16T20:52:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJS' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-16T20:51:37-04:00'
describe
'34652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJT' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
3aac6c59cb6f6e5177fe4a1b2c82e2d4
f3236f434ff6effdd5791402c5ad27bf190f9c54
'2011-10-16T20:50:52-04:00'
describe
'451551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJU' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
ac187b5fb11f748174726fa4a95e91cc
32f3610d8f3ed23b0f458656509b8b665aec6e75
'2011-10-16T20:50:18-04:00'
describe
'96385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJV' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
39b9116261e08efada52252f48ddf0c9
16ba406fb92fbdc32a0ccf7b089b3525612401dd
'2011-10-16T20:54:34-04:00'
describe
'28970' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJW' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
cfef64a4f149f973327924f778f00d7f
c3dbc0d03c7b0ade8f29005eb87ba94efac8cc27
'2011-10-16T20:54:33-04:00'
describe
'10851984' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJX' 'sip-files00002.tif'
d0bac1dc142dc930bf3282971258a3f6
4196e4f8d4b0663657358e0bd57b7382b0fe000e
'2011-10-16T20:53:43-04:00'
describe
'13274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJY' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
ec08233ca1c35ed2b4418e7ab1a00697
f951962ea52f064a44b449334c92dae265b973c0
'2011-10-16T20:53:38-04:00'
describe
'372608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOJZ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
ff761f0685df78cd90421d453a3901e9
6c4009af9acc48461238419410da914400e1a3e5
'2011-10-16T20:53:24-04:00'
describe
'132914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKA' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
01cbbafd908565e8911de797c815fdf9
e8f1bf593b87fa349dd0918a52194d128a015384
'2011-10-16T20:51:40-04:00'
describe
'2661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKB' 'sip-files00003.pro'
44f5ebedb292280e171e19e5c7d46dc3
479b270dacbf2b7135a11e8b4c4197197ecc4f03
'2011-10-16T20:56:25-04:00'
describe
'49873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKC' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
bb4720346d0fd1691488316afde289b8
17fe84af326310ef0d4c1c3afddb122989dbf7b8
'2011-10-16T20:51:20-04:00'
describe
'3002792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKD' 'sip-files00003.tif'
f87012484fc42f95190ddb667f643098
2ff42a249cd67ae4fec6980db141b808173a227f
describe
'363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKE' 'sip-files00003.txt'
39d8f19de836b1eea0c9b2fad5727e2d
ea6215edeae02024e5270a2c799f084a07220fda
'2011-10-16T20:54:18-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'28945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKF' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
2fda2f9e9ffb4797cdd0bc5204b312af
543c24635d0befeaf59c3c82f6fe90f9d5154d13
'2011-10-16T20:52:09-04:00'
describe
'264224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKG' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
43d97de06050c650bf03b3531aaa2afd
2df26dd96baa1620900a2744f31f27cc8178720a
'2011-10-16T20:56:36-04:00'
describe
'24021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKH' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
2c8ddf84c56771213707038959c6a09c
8306b435dfb3d69b92f1013b359be1f87eb25c97
'2011-10-16T20:52:48-04:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKI' 'sip-files00005.pro'
fc448c7adf183da582df32112a94111c
77e40531e5099ad994b25905aa6a931021e73d88
'2011-10-16T20:57:06-04:00'
describe
'11699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKJ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
82c769b3938eb4dca244bf0dd9650da7
82499a6666e25025cac97f4a7f89d3e8765df758
'2011-10-16T20:56:20-04:00'
describe
'2770372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKK' 'sip-files00005.tif'
815895684872204211a5d6b252cad78e
fc443173e3e929ded0f4e042df633611d56633d6
'2011-10-16T20:57:27-04:00'
describe
'93' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKL' 'sip-files00005.txt'
86b26f418041a0c063a24b727db6ca2e
36f4329dadd60bc0a0cbff39c22e5bbf241ae6e6
'2011-10-16T20:53:03-04:00'
describe
'8624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKM' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
b4bda6d4df0346c23a156e402e66cdf3
f818e0236ac16fa24cf4f9033df81ebe864fe232
'2011-10-16T20:53:31-04:00'
describe
'375419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKN' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
7235aed304fe0d1ac80073824becd38f
0d904ad2bf5fcc54e691979eeab120e708044a4b
'2011-10-16T20:52:02-04:00'
describe
'170663' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKO' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
3012837f523fcc50007351bf70c15637
254c72a8b6ed478006fb541a1d51f4233a887733
describe
'5449' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKP' 'sip-files00006.pro'
b0672609c76a05628dd891896b74c79c
e6ad5cde35ede5c0c995db8e74a807ade4245413
'2011-10-16T20:51:52-04:00'
describe
'55210' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKQ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
734320bb1436a913807285bb8b1f0ebc
e6a6edbd99a0145cf7ceee43d36581815f1176b8
'2011-10-16T20:52:16-04:00'
describe
'9033240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKR' 'sip-files00006.tif'
0470b9ac07eb462f3ec0ede015b362f3
26b04208b262606d01e725c1c194a784753877b5
'2011-10-16T20:50:21-04:00'
describe
'360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKS' 'sip-files00006.txt'
4c4a1c8f10c1a2fe64d79a39c101987d
2312f1a786e9c15124fc875451472217a7b8528f
'2011-10-16T20:50:34-04:00'
describe
'29910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKT' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
bfa9c953d8a9b5d16a64e07fbf6f4acd
1e07c0a46366c7eb539d415fcb859a1008c4b97a
'2011-10-16T20:57:36-04:00'
describe
'345440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKU' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
fd25cc71e676da71b00e00a3c7f220d4
918b7d0a6d6f845feeb168e340f185ef6429ab71
'2011-10-16T20:53:14-04:00'
describe
'44512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKV' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
33f105a315bfc3daa3734055aeeb124e
1120c7794ca597299c8779d72356f98d48a390e1
'2011-10-16T20:53:26-04:00'
describe
'4021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKW' 'sip-files00007.pro'
496276d9db9edfccf3d43eb69faa7456
addddffa4c69480f080b7942b7dec90ab770fb64
'2011-10-16T20:51:36-04:00'
describe
'19486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKX' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
08842b158b2984b9e823e76373054901
f7581b75228650cf8a21fda263651c15d01cd743
'2011-10-16T20:50:56-04:00'
describe
'2771164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKY' 'sip-files00007.tif'
b8e8147591be078ccf75e013fbc65dbf
30f4e16c19ae49659bd3163d3846a4de3f7f8297
describe
'234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOKZ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
7e4909f0a1f522614536d41d36c82969
2eae8632b201246baf83e40cb06d407f5bd133fc
'2011-10-16T20:55:45-04:00'
describe
'11715' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLA' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
424a3eac0033024f548aa29bc1455bb4
dc5b18791d36f8f57e06898cd64868544d92411a
'2011-10-16T20:57:22-04:00'
describe
'239550' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLB' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
01216948b4610ef4893eb0516e65c6c3
6a982e1bd65c8eb707abb9c8b3080567974f8aeb
'2011-10-16T20:52:19-04:00'
describe
'15484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLC' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
5ad95d31b7e274a6c25c563d5ba557f3
3b980479cd782d71e6c1f64c72d04da119f3ef60
'2011-10-16T20:56:19-04:00'
describe
'8459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLD' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
5580e027ecdf06641a7fa87aa720c17c
0213fa474f84d027832a384023d694891e42f4f0
'2011-10-16T20:53:04-04:00'
describe
'2772264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLE' 'sip-files00008.tif'
01147346b02aab133fce8e0f535ec931
4ba8138cab4a3f39039444718e8e86c41d580593
'2011-10-16T20:55:26-04:00'
describe
'7304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLF' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
34b5dab6eb92cbb1564b94bb5dd32c9c
b5860623600ebe1ffb840241167a05995ee22943
'2011-10-16T20:53:07-04:00'
describe
'345288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLG' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
8025decb13161448f9833262b872a6df
c9011850fdd597af9191d2dbc4ee78a7f1eb9db0
describe
'121518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLH' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
58fbf658a309e31c78386d5ecc87704e
39819807d00675f5afa828aab118529c097e3903
'2011-10-16T20:54:42-04:00'
describe
'42988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLI' 'sip-files00009.pro'
853d0fe3caad03c2fd1dc78f488360bb
b57f133423207835973d0fdab5d2a36de3c3ec41
'2011-10-16T20:50:33-04:00'
describe
'41851' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLJ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
b1c5e0736db06ae865a2b5494fe7766f
734e4855879591ba401736c3055e559b6fb707bd
'2011-10-16T20:53:16-04:00'
describe
'2770564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLK' 'sip-files00009.tif'
9d7d1b156b9358d2b111454647cf8f2a
2b70a6d27788aff0979142b2534f7c034f9f2a3d
'2011-10-16T20:52:37-04:00'
describe
'1983' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLL' 'sip-files00009.txt'
0f228c409ef164eeb4eaf20b8158fc58
58a34e3f6510df21c7378abb43c6510ef6fac94f
'2011-10-16T20:57:39-04:00'
describe
'16147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLM' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c71fc2686fbe865417132d7e5da1f10b
966dd32aa8b7eeb8b5cc1441186466853c10708d
'2011-10-16T20:53:48-04:00'
describe
'355086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLN' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
46878ede4d44d9faacb1b5d103743ccd
4055a137022848547e58d3da85acf1630437045a
'2011-10-16T20:50:23-04:00'
describe
'59846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
50e4cfe287071773ac64a19817377a02
b61eaaadb17ae41a86f867ae1f0b5d29e3432cb7
'2011-10-16T20:53:44-04:00'
describe
'15453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLP' 'sip-files00010.pro'
c17ce197db3c6a4dcd5f37b5cd8413c2
3b737d12c685656b693d116e51bd30e006de70fc
'2011-10-16T20:52:42-04:00'
describe
'22050' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLQ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
2c75fcd7c64d7daae80b593cda830cc5
0f7edb81decc8699750f54fbc1afd3eb52343e31
'2011-10-16T20:51:25-04:00'
describe
'2847708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLR' 'sip-files00010.tif'
0c7405225961fe0cbdd6800a77c761e3
386bb9ff90f251ae19d2dd7cad70058370c313e6
'2011-10-16T20:57:10-04:00'
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLS' 'sip-files00010.txt'
a321197078731348591b22d5f57b8c4f
501b4c625d2f2d6e2c829746a84547db7b33aab3
'2011-10-16T20:52:24-04:00'
describe
'10544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLT' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
576aa4361e00321de13156389d237af4
be56ae9bcca4c3177bbc0b8c41c6daa9116f4cd2
'2011-10-16T20:51:39-04:00'
describe
'345482' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLU' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
76760e01548c4ca24c43e3c6df3d4bfa
544271a6a0ccae6845dc3304c20e9d5cd48be387
'2011-10-16T20:52:08-04:00'
describe
'172633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLV' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
138eca83b9a85aa9c17b7b4261529c46
c8b1e7993c6447c25abe626d8589955f4c6fae49
describe
'60832' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLW' 'sip-files00011.pro'
db97c8e52bf5e7f809965643ab3ba290
8a4b04c3ae099354a0d662cabd425d810308f31f
'2011-10-16T20:54:25-04:00'
describe
'50841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLX' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
efe67b23b10da7d5e753c9e071843a90
d86974b8825e5b00e027ed1fdd0bd57229773b40
'2011-10-16T20:51:32-04:00'
describe
'2772384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLY' 'sip-files00011.tif'
08cec43c6ff01fe1c558bab65f7cdf6a
3b0b47517ad3ebe40a7fa5a6164f19ed59dfac0b
'2011-10-16T20:50:49-04:00'
describe
'2564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOLZ' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f0445317ae8ee0c5411e6df6a29389af
418b4b6eecefb66c6b99a7ffb096a25bcc71a989
'2011-10-16T20:53:40-04:00'
describe
'18013' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMA' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
fd156993bb1ad61293f8ae7df04e65bf
0c47afaf18b105a6a694d37cb6e042bc4f5c34c0
'2011-10-16T20:54:13-04:00'
describe
'351909' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMB' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
80e3e108569da639ed96f1bc852438b7
add7cdead3a2ac249ccd14b9e27c295867cabc48
'2011-10-16T20:52:14-04:00'
describe
'210020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMC' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
689f022f426f95e04437064537d019ed
f1736046720b5e3cc5733b4a1f33bbbbd4e4b340
'2011-10-16T20:57:23-04:00'
describe
'76388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMD' 'sip-files00012.pro'
6fe0ea5a074fb250ff747ff8ac0b7b03
da6c3387c5af7569697abd6c1390d6383142ea82
'2011-10-16T20:54:07-04:00'
describe
'60088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOME' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
6fdd2f6bb92497decfac8a3bbb425bb3
00aef101dfab8876cf04dc593b0b511a22127f65
'2011-10-16T20:55:56-04:00'
describe
'2824396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMF' 'sip-files00012.tif'
c337a847962e91f7f44dc6991a91c199
fa5b9519200c82c1a9e16b648f5870ccd8939b0b
'2011-10-16T20:53:29-04:00'
describe
'3146' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMG' 'sip-files00012.txt'
cc4c9224ff0b400a6407edaf548b167c
bda2fd27d8c02f5e9295c82af7910bc79d2eb0ce
'2011-10-16T20:56:48-04:00'
describe
'19859' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMH' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
adf52121dfc5ba7af9d1242c306887cc
6b7f1d934dad3afd65ebbfeddeebe8e042b715a5
'2011-10-16T20:50:53-04:00'
describe
'345425' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMI' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
a33ea4546ac2ff3b2206b57b9ad1d439
ce0be240324ea83908480a9ad4024c99abdab702
'2011-10-16T20:53:05-04:00'
describe
'220199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMJ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
a99043b148f4a38c4933981dc140c6cd
5c8d2ea9458edb002bd05fa87a12d1372ce3f567
'2011-10-16T20:51:50-04:00'
describe
'80447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9aa70226a29be1cf730e91c19d59cf40
19cc1dad751c8e8b56ba05b7691d5bb488a13704
'2011-10-16T20:52:33-04:00'
describe
'62525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOML' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
9b28254700511bc666ae12821c445751
b57f4fba04a0aa991193181d58353dffef5ee9ab
'2011-10-16T20:57:40-04:00'
describe
'2772888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMM' 'sip-files00013.tif'
302e158765c4be388d4a46fbe01bc597
224a0aa309ac4a1d5170c996bdbcaa8deb15ed23
'2011-10-16T20:50:20-04:00'
describe
'3357' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMN' 'sip-files00013.txt'
c5329bb9384fa83520e13d507cd32c96
4deb1cd53a421903e55caeb5463b902fd49684ab
'2011-10-16T20:51:05-04:00'
describe
'20648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
fb2e7d481fee4eb34a48b5ec314b93f8
50064c2e28bf78632bebd14dbae1f7075a86a72d
'2011-10-16T20:51:18-04:00'
describe
'345721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMP' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
28beb75109884fa8390d93463d903e9f
a733c14dc68911d96fd848848960f730b85f879a
'2011-10-16T20:51:29-04:00'
describe
'226046' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMQ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
b125686d30e7770fc875803675c10f8f
3a12ac96fd876439e85230d7f3481497f7e9cec1
'2011-10-16T20:54:57-04:00'
describe
'83593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
b9b72861959641fe6d20488bf6997b63
aeb59ba0d90da0513c6e6fc207a34f6bb503564b
describe
'64481' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
b49d1e2ec99ab845b98c858b454bcb57
787e068ab1f301c69ea8cd41fb25a2742fc2e4d5
'2011-10-16T20:50:16-04:00'
describe
'2775220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e284fa053f9390514199aff68221a544
e1798146999f7a1765a6d3552ac4c85665123ad0
'2011-10-16T20:50:37-04:00'
describe
'3455' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
3edc7fb8ddeda2d49dc4b880b313b672
d15cc10c37ecef62d7a3a8b80bb0b7cefdd2d582
'2011-10-16T20:52:17-04:00'
describe
'21522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMV' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
56cb6b035faf15a4bf426ffbb85c5726
673fa4ae4878b645d9a9cebeb2b802d6de2c1e51
'2011-10-16T20:50:43-04:00'
describe
'345328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
f273b442e87bda956699e54cea417de1
fa90d1127024cd25874210a7a1d882f0a95fda59
'2011-10-16T20:53:41-04:00'
describe
'220015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
054170ed0527a40f42f608ba825a0149
2e8cc5fc7407af999f35b9a8ad3ee0ecbb5d754a
'2011-10-16T20:56:21-04:00'
describe
'81094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
ea479dc23e3aa12caeebe38c9df53e62
18e4c5e6b5a984df89c6d0b9b063710d8ef0f174
'2011-10-16T20:52:06-04:00'
describe
'62809' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOMZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
373281cdeb5651ff80cb6ccc91595c4f
47e302c18d58bcb6e2bba89589bfb15d977e841c
describe
'2773000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONA' 'sip-files00015.tif'
154978086072b6363d7108fbd12d93b5
ebd2d3e3cfebea9cd21f2439f15b63888e679700
'2011-10-16T20:51:47-04:00'
describe
'3369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONB' 'sip-files00015.txt'
e507580bbef34a8085de24092c09d502
a31f5e3fd8c200aa77a6db9ef98d25f8bb7077cb
'2011-10-16T20:56:11-04:00'
describe
'21069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONC' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
2b34777c16292c15aea583ecb2147697
7ff3aaaf0c16d839ddce8cddf16cbb361de92cae
'2011-10-16T20:55:12-04:00'
describe
'345493' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOND' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
7a2ca50cac21d2bfd3f27098f47f8e02
053a7aab5e68937815543c9595efaf6c0b7b7b6d
'2011-10-16T20:55:07-04:00'
describe
'219170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
4b8a44f5ff3c5c7d72e523f62dcd839e
5e536ab2772bc5bb6d02afb9fb48473b9d61530a
'2011-10-16T20:52:11-04:00'
describe
'81201' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONF' 'sip-files00016.pro'
9a6f8aaf16f45158804c475a63ce1555
6550e77f1a72068a0e08c06c585326b9d111f0e0
'2011-10-16T20:51:12-04:00'
describe
'61978' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
42d45bf65857a05bc8f9f3fcf4b8c4eb
ec42f1c9acbec62a4258765a04b2b04fc7e5dea7
'2011-10-16T20:54:22-04:00'
describe
'2773696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a00314b5bee99a6a4f6242d263893a66
83943a4191d7947497927e5c6504182f67150e3b
'2011-10-16T20:55:57-04:00'
describe
'3347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
d4d33a728221979be20f705575374423
4c26f98642069eb61dd8c0caa21f03cf7cbc5907
'2011-10-16T20:51:31-04:00'
describe
'20645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONJ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
82f3743179c2947338018a501c77c0a6
5057c6120ffb631d02a76c973bafdd2ddb078eb8
'2011-10-16T20:50:57-04:00'
describe
'345462' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e22e48c0b980f801924aebc20a718b49
3e7b25dd131c53d018cf9895e8b9034f639f891b
describe
'204185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7084de8c9c674f758d8e142a12fa2fb8
e02cc8616ca847cdb65c79a08ae7c24b6a1a7fa9
describe
'75769' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
0f1f5109009d6603a0bfcb4862e9ee94
1a2973b664adbef3ec979c4d60dab80871ec72d7
'2011-10-16T20:53:20-04:00'
describe
'58701' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
ac06f427eadacf6d7aa94b393a7156a2
55fdd96075dd9c9fe03345e678734d09680bdd87
describe
'2772808' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
689f66c763fbc21bc14fd0975ec37959
7f0b7098390cc13ed9d0ba1e0329058c35aa055a
'2011-10-16T20:53:32-04:00'
describe
'3135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
3087544244c54d35aa61df443eb52260
f717eb883b9e183c1834991e04eb35dd1a481bc2
'2011-10-16T20:52:18-04:00'
describe
'20120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
a695c5dfbb4cff89770f08a188701806
83d8164bbde17a1ec26d5a9001b013997c3f86cc
'2011-10-16T20:51:30-04:00'
describe
'345659' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
09d88b6f4b6e3620d797e43a0e7ecd24
948a6cd917a140e6f1b861bd3f263b13caee82e1
'2011-10-16T20:55:00-04:00'
describe
'229801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
5e66746d398891e6b24a6c65ea8ad00c
50a9c1087f7d9fee8745aef8f3cc0d307162845e
'2011-10-16T20:52:27-04:00'
describe
'83198' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONT' 'sip-files00018.pro'
e0201f4204ca2ac0c0917d45dcd52cf9
1df0ede6f454fbb9e3c61e5a4b975d7fa1c79018
describe
'65198' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
eac420c89f30e2458a024facae2c3951
349a46eae6a56491bc0ae089053449fcd99c25a8
'2011-10-16T20:57:43-04:00'
describe
'2775328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
7777aa6cf474b18423061159b9d91115
24b815cf07b8e46abf80df56bb3cb6bce2b455a8
describe
'3445' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONW' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1d97c3eaa5e4e6399c8fa77c7db1ba05
eff78ef65972a05716f3cc2b6c160385be776d11
'2011-10-16T20:56:43-04:00'
describe
'21676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONX' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
72fb473f0903cfe2fbdc1516ea904bbc
ce2425f9fbb67b46b4fec015054dcdbfa661db71
'2011-10-16T20:52:30-04:00'
describe
'345371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONY' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
a6d9dc309052f174ab0253c50baa76af
5362ae88f43342c18153784abd67c582f5f4e3c9
'2011-10-16T20:54:44-04:00'
describe
'225575' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAONZ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
656ab28e8318d96c4be2c1fcadc8618e
57288e5b7639cf662953ca400bb75a3db2d33a4d
'2011-10-16T20:56:01-04:00'
describe
'84569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOA' 'sip-files00019.pro'
8d0f81d6dc84b0b7e30ca00e0c4dcc08
1b99aa0e4ac6bcbd19d1f48a1faaab362ad9e5ca
'2011-10-16T20:51:22-04:00'
describe
'63399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
609718d7bec0248f6e7a191f1d102ed1
bb6c92f93073fffe015725b927638277f1836ad7
'2011-10-16T20:57:35-04:00'
describe
'2773064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
bca7c86bdd0626ab67147f752182b720
866c1081e25da0f6cec012d10c6e947d3bc8dc5d
'2011-10-16T20:55:18-04:00'
describe
'3489' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOD' 'sip-files00019.txt'
5f1ff4572e237d21e7dc68b11dbb95ce
ec524b1085589bb610e78b442847c1ebdf6cb8f9
'2011-10-16T20:51:08-04:00'
describe
'21342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOE' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
ec0846facb67d44a6494fd2185b4bf77
6de3b90f8e70454e1df99cca3d9a5747a2e8da6a
'2011-10-16T20:53:15-04:00'
describe
'345632' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
0a1a5d60b5e42c1adbf8a881d037256a
bafe2cbfc9119cf38285bdf9543c38769b6d16a4
'2011-10-16T20:56:26-04:00'
describe
'215522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
9dd5b9a0e08c754242a019273f17af40
c52d8cf8d6610e95e448373bf0676e803f8e7f54
describe
'80229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOH' 'sip-files00020.pro'
4b12ca5c37589786b72e15104b1c3e15
f3ca9f712873d46a00fe427b0609194325897912
describe
'61618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOI' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ab6389382bdb1d0b84756e6116660897
62411e54e3dc6335f6649b10ac5d414547b5fde4
describe
'2774832' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c9d0eaad56e7f349b1138671eaa0be5b
afdcd68c9121961890c44c863b714564f64b9f9b
'2011-10-16T20:53:55-04:00'
describe
'3278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOK' 'sip-files00020.txt'
658bf64c8f9de45bf4a2242a0d78fdc9
8b071be5d36386231ba0e2bfdc4f4c48917465c9
describe
'20522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOL' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
0b79c9104c3d31a90612cab317c069a3
c7470ce6628848a982f1cb11677d00f2f96a3631
describe
'345423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
dd5485f0f289a90436bad00f6e1723d8
77fd1480cd6b44438bca21982becf7b959b0a525
'2011-10-16T20:54:49-04:00'
describe
'209072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOON' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
787ff0b29da11bf132238754c63fbbc4
375e4d7a81766567d8bc522819fbeaf2194a3505
'2011-10-16T20:56:12-04:00'
describe
'76724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOO' 'sip-files00021.pro'
4b5f11743f933f199dcdc7c1a4b813d4
9e66773b6d5fc5038cf57ccfa08a005cad785489
'2011-10-16T20:56:35-04:00'
describe
'60186' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOP' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
4ea1008baecf3d42470b522aa15eab51
ad796cdc8700b31b1e4d2bfc68909a4654216fd1
'2011-10-16T20:51:44-04:00'
describe
'2772796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOQ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ed657cd31b7e6a1d7faca49630ef1cdd
468aaa651686127e9cf375f4c03fcb453bc8d481
'2011-10-16T20:54:00-04:00'
describe
'3145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOR' 'sip-files00021.txt'
e91612fc8cccbea72e32df5a34b0398d
36f99b939e5559a922de5d287d165b9b1f93292e
'2011-10-16T20:53:02-04:00'
describe
'20479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOS' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
552f5fba96ce1590ae417813b9eee4e8
0f76cd95b8e7872771e079d6eec7cec357e17b3e
'2011-10-16T20:50:27-04:00'
describe
'345716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOT' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
492a53efa337dc3a5e6d884e5c161c35
3cf4fc36c3601969f4f316d71fc774dbd7218c3f
'2011-10-16T20:52:53-04:00'
describe
'217710' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOU' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
35b8fa6ed59513a60ba78556d3ae9516
4f412aeb102e36d26852bb3e117b5a637597cc5c
'2011-10-16T20:51:24-04:00'
describe
'82863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOV' 'sip-files00022.pro'
fbb9fdfe95f9ee04049115159681b871
4a1dcc0c16ee9fd29760f7ce3866d67e88b24bff
'2011-10-16T20:54:43-04:00'
describe
'61590' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOW' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
da7d9f8a30b47d5ad892deca4b276984
c13e8a2ab0816932f90874e1180aceef7fde9933
'2011-10-16T20:51:42-04:00'
describe
'2774932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOX' 'sip-files00022.tif'
9f95e0202b61cd95f2b29734b2edecb2
3596b84cf7f1e36b79492ae961cf3f86940d839a
'2011-10-16T20:52:39-04:00'
describe
'3407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOY' 'sip-files00022.txt'
210e07cb8732df04cd0a47ae7cc52e64
503220b1fe8446f77870d2fc103bf07ed5ca7276
'2011-10-16T20:50:59-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'20447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOOZ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
cac498a5cc6923b75c46f7e6933312ca
b83f5d55d77894f22d95533389e60abbbf4aac25
'2011-10-16T20:57:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
28af6b0a34329ba413b70ba945099812
228ebb1376876d00cd47f7409fc5528147689a8f
'2011-10-16T20:52:29-04:00'
describe
'211498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
4e4b35c3cd9be2b57ff451622560d959
6f23bf72a3310509752ee361baf8691c55c97d59
'2011-10-16T20:51:03-04:00'
describe
'78997' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPC' 'sip-files00023.pro'
65c3318acf84517577ee0273aa1df89b
21d476758e36f5b212fa10081f670649323bb5a5
'2011-10-16T20:51:27-04:00'
describe
'60263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPD' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
320c4b213ac2976ed5d47f3e5fb1e804
825c02a366e3502729456bd842fc0391b3a790d0
'2011-10-16T20:50:48-04:00'
describe
'2772744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPE' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e876a8d3c18216001376867bd17e788b
d32cc2f33cce05bc02b5944d2f7ce771477fce9d
describe
'3297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPF' 'sip-files00023.txt'
892f12f4ec23c4f4c4184eb1090eca63
0693081d463618514244fcf28e70ed62de14f377
'2011-10-16T20:52:32-04:00'
describe
'20191' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
89112953ac67f167ad4bc1b0401b6809
324f2336d3fafee2a8d00e20f0cb8608e8f7d7f5
'2011-10-16T20:51:43-04:00'
describe
'345729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPH' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
95c24fec50b39827fb907b7653f4237a
99f1a98f09cced9c5c5da502748070f214a004df
'2011-10-16T20:51:01-04:00'
describe
'203242' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPI' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
1f1c97679d27f40978ef995892db391d
f46cc4012dd4362ad27c324a9bf85b751b7f31c4
describe
'74201' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPJ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
bd98243b1fca51ae01e8723ca60426c1
27fb82600995c7e74fcb7ddbab64b9aa11c96a8c
'2011-10-16T20:56:40-04:00'
describe
'58822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPK' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
ccb1aba2339b4b0f4e67a92167ecfd9c
d1f9d27265d9d0a4c6188ed344386cb9ea98e579
describe
'2774868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPL' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2bd87883dceae7a8a1dc62e21da34d5f
0d72ac20e30f09948ad432d1ffcffe4335c30f93
'2011-10-16T20:57:08-04:00'
describe
'3057' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPM' 'sip-files00024.txt'
40dc613377de20089fc9e2361b9c6268
814f471e390074ffc2e748c18d4e14d1030edee3
'2011-10-16T20:50:32-04:00'
describe
'19717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
a99856c29e7ee29f1f54b9baca70a402
8fc17d79d5f1af6f2ec5e372a4785bd5b31ad66c
'2011-10-16T20:54:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPO' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
9403c73824a26c552d377224c973191b
556a8d7265dfe18664085c32dc416eb5ba3f157d
'2011-10-16T20:51:58-04:00'
describe
'213236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPP' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
64b933a555de25aace4c21df70212384
8da1a96456653c40d8cd1253636247223387436a
'2011-10-16T20:56:22-04:00'
describe
'82417' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPQ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
1178065376febd49cf7c08fe7b458f1a
f587104cd114d94e31ee4ee11a83fbaa6f348b5d
describe
'60606' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
281e3c547d471fd16ea560d0051a7492
cc12f06e5614093d88366ca2c01526d6b05b1b80
'2011-10-16T20:53:08-04:00'
describe
'2772672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPS' 'sip-files00025.tif'
baabf77b824ad36121b8cd8b29cc8598
93dfae8174684cbed3dcc8fb7f0b9051c2652274
'2011-10-16T20:56:30-04:00'
describe
'3419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPT' 'sip-files00025.txt'
f5bb356143e223f9b71e9deacf7b9194
774baf40d6cb61de4174abcf8bda5aedc9aec80c
'2011-10-16T20:54:15-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'20316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
cd6bdd4ce2f1e38a2ad57c8cfd67a4a3
966a5801a8ac272ba7ab0b4d17001855605230c2
'2011-10-16T20:53:37-04:00'
describe
'345620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
309b5aba996063d37f6c46e13a801d3f
ab388b5f25a211e18c14c55313233e0b344d885d
describe
'212754' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPW' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
3ccb826bd4a23ae8d44dd8a35116fbcc
e82a628c0a4550fd2a859981544b4b01c7eb3ef0
'2011-10-16T20:53:25-04:00'
describe
'79816' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
61d77514152eafa613bc2109f1e42324
23e571472983e677628c8252994ea2d3af966ebe
'2011-10-16T20:50:22-04:00'
describe
'60226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
6fe362eeaadc6af3d8d2e83d6f2c53a6
0c2049b6a05f34e35400bacb47c61647c77f0b60
'2011-10-16T20:52:54-04:00'
describe
'2774960' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOPZ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
0692957a30b73630d470ed57d9c32c89
f0166d07e655c2b7d9faf173f9864c2fa3fe1e01
describe
'3321' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQA' 'sip-files00026.txt'
e9c4abd32c70858dbd782d899a616e6f
0eb7688bc84cc67f31a646550b0bd2d8624ad0d4
'2011-10-16T20:54:24-04:00'
describe
'20160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQB' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
77c93c4d080a43e1fc4af45c5212b92e
0ffbbe4f591320c973bdbe7ab3868ae3726cde60
describe
'345418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQC' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
a5e1f9e5270dc767962614706bf60706
c82ed93cf30e24ff0d002d334572b464d2f1155e
'2011-10-16T20:51:34-04:00'
describe
'201251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQD' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
5554630997d2042fb47d08d3de9c2d23
933b7ff72656ec265f3e87dea73aee6b27ed4af9
'2011-10-16T20:50:36-04:00'
describe
'76247' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQE' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d1a0d5fa210a0e714e4b865ffdd46093
2c729f239befda5852d70b22ec1881d2bb047967
'2011-10-16T20:50:46-04:00'
describe
'57796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQF' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
564523b05bc17c7b0da9df320479bece
1bc52969ba18a60628f3adf33f8521d5858d84fb
describe
'2772660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
5d705399d5c3922d4ac4b884deccaf6c
de1bba6d585e62f9e394f77bbfc6f72a1eecad94
'2011-10-16T20:51:02-04:00'
describe
'3167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQH' 'sip-files00027.txt'
ce6e4fded735b7c0cf515610e11b942c
d3996c3156a9929f61ba7144b878d6469e528b0f
'2011-10-16T20:53:19-04:00'
describe
'19676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQI' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
8b11aaad509165131faccac74cc28e5e
a428fdce07a083fcdefdb98ed71458c3a912fd2b
'2011-10-16T20:57:32-04:00'
describe
'345642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
07020f6d61137d0c1a348ebd35cbbe3b
3b3ed72e74eef8e096196966697ad6862a56878f
'2011-10-16T20:55:06-04:00'
describe
'211253' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQK' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
bf21ce163622abd0ab1411857395baa9
611c537bb7eb6ade1dc66e0cfd3797c57f11c4d0
'2011-10-16T20:51:55-04:00'
describe
'79879' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQL' 'sip-files00028.pro'
606753345a27ff20a85ea46119062d20
c918d8ecf0b52b864b1f4d0440be74a8611be0e0
'2011-10-16T20:52:41-04:00'
describe
'61446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
ecbbfd2ea490077a663f75d8f4cf13b0
6ea454873e67f71d760cf4fc73c22cf433b42e57
'2011-10-16T20:51:26-04:00'
describe
'2774896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQN' 'sip-files00028.tif'
1eaf6146f65e21ed92935dec012dc3d5
a89505eca63597193ccee95a06ffc669d66ba31e
'2011-10-16T20:56:33-04:00'
describe
'3263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQO' 'sip-files00028.txt'
fc79cd5576196f11ce22d3c83e3b1af9
62e3f76983496b535e2fc8072da62cbe622d877f
'2011-10-16T20:57:29-04:00'
describe
'20605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQP' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
ff6d84684bae26d2b9d0206e66113a1c
c1d9431738785400eb5a6de5694a8e360585020f
describe
'345417' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQQ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
281cae8cefab6d73f7b92161067e4783
fe2b4a01d056a56c1135397a61350b4746d21cca
describe
'199364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
0342c3ac39112962bf0f32c6163cca40
7afcd70dcc37bc3596330c65cb3fe06ead1e4be9
'2011-10-16T20:54:46-04:00'
describe
'77734' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQS' 'sip-files00029.pro'
c97552e97077cd082cfc32255bebadb3
d426b3f5f9cab5ec63fe7f4a7127cd4837683b09
'2011-10-16T20:55:25-04:00'
describe
'58534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQT' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
95d8e1ba64413544c060ecaa8715e474
bb59cea839cb84d7839d3e9d695c67dc9232543c
'2011-10-16T20:52:47-04:00'
describe
'2772676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQU' 'sip-files00029.tif'
35f48d4eb76d75e527e0d4612846fcf5
68bb15aa45fed71233730871c59816c761f4d4f4
'2011-10-16T20:53:39-04:00'
describe
'3218' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQV' 'sip-files00029.txt'
1760b5ddd5bcc5a654d591d99b08ccde
e0c6bfca92c43a50a3b9f6b34733a445aa69856e
describe
'19966' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQW' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
197ddeefb26696b34b63b3f53a541845
de1eab792efb03cc7b09fdb893f206a771bbdead
'2011-10-16T20:54:01-04:00'
describe
'345712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
5ed523c2a8e2617d9d5c381175915d2b
7ddb866d4d14b15d13c6314498f08a3f1c2c763e
'2011-10-16T20:53:21-04:00'
describe
'199545' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQY' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
906de8136abdda735878d0a0d28623b6
35cd117a232871a7dcc187cc63292b214ded159d
'2011-10-16T20:52:45-04:00'
describe
'73287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOQZ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2d58181b9e11ec17a89dc952052d3039
d9d42fff05592e8b1f3a6f4e68c9f96219d541c2
'2011-10-16T20:51:51-04:00'
describe
'57667' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
2bbbc720617ae2b8d404acfec68c7fbf
e56465b169ecfe775c0f50ebdeaa354a8397a4d8
'2011-10-16T20:55:47-04:00'
describe
'2774880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
e6497d065299efb2c8162d15b6413e88
52c10cd2e9f9b8ab7415efcd097ac051087f5cd4
describe
'3040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORC' 'sip-files00030.txt'
5a1d17e5480bb7b4e29d00df0abcf8b5
fbbab92b082d1cf8348edd03dd73c178c544a52d
describe
'19753' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORD' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
daf4b332601b6f1170017c326a417882
be59388c3b6769b7f4471bce6a4edc5d6de8fb2b
'2011-10-16T20:52:43-04:00'
describe
'345463' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORE' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
b19c8bd2fcfbb24829ad50233058b92f
0b53d3a0ef03dfef03e2731f249784c0e1391ee6
describe
'213490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORF' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
f7b159dc664b62440b1731f8587f26a0
5a2d8c5108e73ed394a951e7d8ecdcadd85b261c
'2011-10-16T20:57:03-04:00'
describe
'79835' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORG' 'sip-files00031.pro'
aa3abba8f9807a54d58d8abe9bd6523e
878cb648a3fb591c694e6d195ee6da04b8e2bdd6
'2011-10-16T20:54:21-04:00'
describe
'62005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORH' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
cf0e11c16c42ccf13de65f0acf669c6e
44fd75e3d8b11ab5f0c94023ed25b7479f1f4d43
'2011-10-16T20:57:15-04:00'
describe
'2772904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
729fbeb8621f08665c84fbcd197658bd
37eb0428e151693f396c88eb299e8fa5cc2c6d92
'2011-10-16T20:55:27-04:00'
describe
'3280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORJ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
e72c7303d3989e244d6df4c166de335a
c4780a569cf7d51a7fca7290afe287ec0874358d
describe
'20732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORK' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
96c43e12da21995e0bf77eda42fd0337
ee1c97f4299863cf6910f64acf65f6f08e665b31
'2011-10-16T20:56:09-04:00'
describe
'328845' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORL' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
9c3ce98474e459229f861a862e438122
752adfb413bde832e9646c2cf36d0ade55cadbf0
'2011-10-16T20:51:11-04:00'
describe
'201592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORM' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
bc23fbec60327afa9b57c99213fdad4b
4d6c71de6e54427969308772d88677a1d945e876
'2011-10-16T20:51:49-04:00'
describe
'75405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORN' 'sip-files00032.pro'
a88600d8ad986a8c374afec9df852965
9fbcd2c351428213c1419cf397b7db9d22bc2884
'2011-10-16T20:56:27-04:00'
describe
'59345' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORO' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
f31ec914a2de4646a82fb014cbc2ab2d
0a29f2ee7631fca09b93aeb0923acad8b8df0cea
'2011-10-16T20:51:06-04:00'
describe
'2640452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORP' 'sip-files00032.tif'
7c0de990c13b9825bae455090595f9ea
55f8567617b7d4240ffcf89f1ec4ae4c6e9b1e82
describe
'3113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORQ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e3612c47de0e55a01ed279853c97c35d
607fcf54cddaf4599c6994a081ff800b9f918886
describe
'19613' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORR' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
0c419c34be6d8f1c39c5a7781122ca40
56f9deba339dfa6180296772173a2cc132ad686c
describe
'329636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORS' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
fd659285c7e3799c8c6aea8d5a10ea15
c8a89b61752c5dd24634610f9610e78e30b76597
'2011-10-16T20:51:56-04:00'
describe
'198741' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORT' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
d0337cd35aab74eec533530222012d6b
6ba044dd5cb98448a1112b9eb5f38c21a80d10aa
'2011-10-16T20:54:16-04:00'
describe
'75056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORU' 'sip-files00033.pro'
bc99af646a382e95a7e599f14cc26543
60c3892ee61ba664de0322d499210ebb5b7b35a9
describe
'59511' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORV' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
17a5100d3fc33177e905c3b4ed975863
0e253b4ed9f96d0e7080e288278417209165d733
'2011-10-16T20:50:30-04:00'
describe
'2646256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
abd6b7745f1655bdbeb0ef2d0c12621e
98e633a9b0e8342697247d4749c763528c4d6f5c
'2011-10-16T20:53:35-04:00'
describe
'3142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORX' 'sip-files00033.txt'
f545a3c336acb091d07f1245cf288af7
8667302e7e7f0c7b058936583c6f814ab0d7e8ad
describe
'19818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORY' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
afdf8e9e550518174669991c343338a6
42955a7a134ca04d3ce7d7d6a6ced0c99c3945bb
describe
'345691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAORZ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
363738c8f521d61dcfa84fbb4c3eafb1
03f8df9d8649e0d0115e39fd09d94ae2c9346d82
describe
'213468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSA' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
86b885e65ebc7071e9958f2b587cc68e
3c44a1ee6cc50f5a18dbcefd2a6df62f956d54f5
'2011-10-16T20:54:37-04:00'
describe
'78089' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSB' 'sip-files00034.pro'
484e9429d95197c50a0f42058ce70163
e209b754118703b1483da6bd02a0951a0a516fab
'2011-10-16T20:54:14-04:00'
describe
'61153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSC' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a5c4bded1ca20d55fcff183e93b623ea
2d0f0209d8167a195eeb8e88c0004a7482b99ddb
'2011-10-16T20:57:28-04:00'
describe
'2775068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSD' 'sip-files00034.tif'
8cc174fd37c063f72bb1d991b2306ba5
d2c838ab695961760aefd78f5a27c3ccc6b8741d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSE' 'sip-files00034.txt'
9a855482b6e75a7d5b55c159a4be074e
28ce9c36361f1327c36213b93e745a33373758b7
'2011-10-16T20:55:37-04:00'
describe
'20705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSF' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
b12bd8f410ff1de977b8c1bfa71484e9
36119710bdd3fb326afd6ea993f548845066b5ee
'2011-10-16T20:50:35-04:00'
describe
'345471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSG' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
576f63c2b2dd7534470cf8ede2ff34db
b3b169fc46055439ddc25365bcbfe6c40968ca9c
'2011-10-16T20:55:11-04:00'
describe
'209424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSH' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
87a44778c052897f2a4da839237fd3ef
ff13e9d77bc53ca880ccaa0b08822ac1829a8e57
describe
'79161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSI' 'sip-files00035.pro'
869b74bf005d78b93d60dc2a7da37b90
b7e6911129bb45e18080dfe7f0f90c76deeae8e9
'2011-10-16T20:55:23-04:00'
describe
'60441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
1c1e2518ecea329c70057c346b3cab1f
8704c05954a39bc5c56e0fe8791412f35ced3527
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSK' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d2a1aea4734ebaa71130862a4d0dd265
c995c506ca7937ca048b354d77a9ea8eebb75aa3
'2011-10-16T20:52:03-04:00'
describe
'3287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSL' 'sip-files00035.txt'
15649fa26c3e2c3e5c3ee924ea335d87
3b80e7eafad6b5c4dd8f0ccc8a960aaddbf6559b
describe
'20150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSM' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a8bb8493d5bde7e3b2a0b70011dd8999
52b9a647360e6fa578bd2d45e3887dce470c7343
'2011-10-16T20:55:36-04:00'
describe
'345683' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
ad82fc0e49a23e2351b03a324b55ef62
8389990d94a3c7c100a7579459f61161bc2bcf27
describe
'211091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
5f78e9fc92711d577c35d53ebdfdcff8
270c85d831c41756606e08444735de4b59a90fc9
describe
'83010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSP' 'sip-files00036.pro'
8e3778d402575f6ac34bd1c9e57e7436
9aa7606fc8006631800577a50b8e127f82d776fb
describe
'59910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSQ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
663fa59cba1b47321dff1d482a1fb5d5
9e91d728b84818839a1e5b831e2167874adf5e3c
describe
'2774860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
15da86199026e181d6bf645af747d12c
4606c3ff6e7ee4660c56e94946918c011fea59f6
'2011-10-16T20:54:08-04:00'
describe
'3412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSS' 'sip-files00036.txt'
52f83bd07ca506e0c67e775789ac6626
80f860b54df64e498430d08bd72201b4a05e3d28
'2011-10-16T20:56:17-04:00'
describe
'19943' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOST' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
739012a9e0e05d988a4a8cdcbee5ec88
5c10cc0c37a9789ba00204df00bae82f787dc0f7
describe
'345479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSU' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
491e36004dd2498090319d5fb1278779
8e5f5f5b67011d1eaecd0c5bfdb303b63d35a3e1
describe
'210336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSV' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
ac1962f6d16431a6a2bf4f18e7cea2b8
7785aac75ba8d8e29caa30b2d46f7e0ad8f39bb9
'2011-10-16T20:54:12-04:00'
describe
'81860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSW' 'sip-files00037.pro'
884f89e835780a3253816b119a3c283c
2495e8281498433b118c2012d42310ccacb87478
'2011-10-16T20:53:52-04:00'
describe
'59447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSX' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
f710b0a3b18f0ce1eac88327f756f8d6
cdaf8f41ae516b07ace95e23ec5d09dfe049f7ab
describe
'2772576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSY' 'sip-files00037.tif'
789bab4ab7860a03c39576c78c55c386
857842af65682f0f28ee7c14fd4a5895406a0dc5
describe
'3400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOSZ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
cbb91717d2f4ebc4d8a2f380559781bb
85786f723f81d997d12d69891b845fd01d9894cf
describe
'19645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTA' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
a7b620e70fe97c1fd6cb5aee2870ae7f
c89b1faae2d3e46f7453717bbf866211bf23c906
'2011-10-16T20:50:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTB' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
6aee086bc5d3b84c1c3821eefe5e32fd
e9a3567f3b2c5e1e5881aa8732a3c7bd72cfcd75
describe
'210894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTC' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
31986223fad62cf9bfc5800ee49a05a0
6d883d7819a26e89b60362c71350cd190f0c8f68
describe
'81437' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTD' 'sip-files00038.pro'
bef3252c0b9025873ffb39f7ec9281a7
a36fdfc20881ea531f1ec9eb78db0e142e0fbb04
'2011-10-16T20:54:29-04:00'
describe
'59653' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTE' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
c7145f6f071ebebf392e3f47aefc99b8
0cc5980b99b673650a9957bdcedf7cc723899139
'2011-10-16T20:53:42-04:00'
describe
'2774648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
39d63fd346c6f6892d2f832aa3a73729
aa8dc71267c0abe2c94d070b257dfaab5ac3b7bb
'2011-10-16T20:53:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTG' 'sip-files00038.txt'
3cc4b385f6ac728a7aee91d7fe6596df
56d32362846105c2d23ef0b7eb66f8d59804a5ac
'2011-10-16T20:53:34-04:00'
describe
'19521' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
3ab5cca78c09fdbadeacbc6c725bf3af
0bd32bcb37e76039f3975ffc15e68c366137a785
describe
'345364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTI' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
4babdb8015a726f116061e7825cda7bc
49beb06a075c47fe5b9b979853ea5ac87d11d167
'2011-10-16T20:51:21-04:00'
describe
'217586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTJ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
6277eca3dd3bc51abdc989308ae5acf5
c5327d38360b35199eb1d99758f4bd325dc6aa1f
'2011-10-16T20:56:52-04:00'
describe
'81948' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
3488731b06558ff773083b1b6164473f
e0a1bf01c63cdab3f77ab88d65284ef3af7bdb1a
describe
'61659' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
2bb83e15f1650422f364ed0a279437cf
adedcdcaca15a7956513d2b41c2c17492373a05d
describe
'2772792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTM' 'sip-files00039.tif'
4ca6f570d602fd3cb276ff033eb5d2d4
b3917cea80ed424da84a7f7e1ba59f3c5e751f1b
describe
'3432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c2f6b6a76334d1ef43c2a0c0ed554367
92ff3f7bdb5153edd60e52d7d9dc7c9109ba78c8
describe
'20373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTO' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
078e88ff6c6c4cb15e33d022a3f02f2f
0862a0d8089f5fbbe36785972143e595937995ff
'2011-10-16T20:53:12-04:00'
describe
'345555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTP' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
95dcf9afcc3862a3538848e8cdaee6dd
34cba1c54737a142bd8bb89cbff5e904d089469e
'2011-10-16T20:56:41-04:00'
describe
'213027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
8af4d762d5ee00a795554544e52462a3
d5c246218f142afce9ad695d03cdeda2226476a7
'2011-10-16T20:51:41-04:00'
describe
'83501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
02b2008e6f91d3939b0fefe74c8ae7fd
8dcd190d632387deb974a390c19b18f29eb79560
'2011-10-16T20:52:26-04:00'
describe
'61766' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
02c6b7763c974571a1aac0072732d10a
123a7031cc5695837b83ace7067d84dc3c93951f
'2011-10-16T20:53:23-04:00'
describe
'2773648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1deac7f86af58edd0a2a923c8b810db2
bdb3b724488ff810bd2f495b7ea4e73db7e5a2be
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
90b925fcc4ff3bc4026d12063d00aac5
466cb59abd4f8034d0d30f12755b09490366a6f6
describe
'20098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
abdc76234c9f8b6943b2a0c456b0ee9b
df8bbf91bada41f42a496998fa86fd3c31a1be6c
describe
'345467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
e4e69fe0fdc7b8332ca7649f644bb6d4
3fc73fc3ba1dda0fe9e1c7f1734aa7afc2c3cb24
'2011-10-16T20:52:44-04:00'
describe
'210607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
a7618894f8bd63f2926c9bfd1c671b12
bf47e3fcbdc80d5e8123c6851972d0933d4bc26e
'2011-10-16T20:53:50-04:00'
describe
'81480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
6152589361588b32dfbc641563729778
6801c78bafeef37f5eb3c2a7e47c214e93b74656
'2011-10-16T20:51:10-04:00'
describe
'59735' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOTZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
2ef5850d4987d26f3185afe8793630b3
ce55f3e4b2c39c5a012e9eb2f59b12fdfcae750c
'2011-10-16T20:54:17-04:00'
describe
'2772716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
faab7294968af9ac506636a8eb7e419c
35ced7f144b4f31c566879aaac9d0695a569893e
'2011-10-16T20:51:46-04:00'
describe
'3393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUB' 'sip-files00041.txt'
29a19ab026d656c80cf2cef2177e515d
d51ce14a80ac4c0fc8adc8a1d38af8399fc47711
describe
'20066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUC' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
65e94ef7fb74a6ffbc1f2eedd8ad6f93
77af6c451f2c7208b4ff0d3d5dccad5579802d81
'2011-10-16T20:56:32-04:00'
describe
'345740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUD' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
785fd34f1a025e62f074e8fc6b4aa3eb
843d3c19ef7617a0138c593af97aa715ce9a8533
'2011-10-16T20:52:50-04:00'
describe
'214326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
33a5aafe25736388fa77b6962a0960e2
e418756bdf99d6eab9c10a08c16a16b8636d816c
'2011-10-16T20:50:24-04:00'
describe
'83221' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUF' 'sip-files00042.pro'
a0d43e8a8149d6d19d89ce5d2d3b53bc
75b850940d5bf1c59b00fbe5d42bd16bec01fea5
describe
'61233' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUG' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
6f6a7e21ff822b199aa2dd0d10efaa39
cdbbecfc9e8b19899b3b5aa99ad0bcf7e9b9e4aa
'2011-10-16T20:57:33-04:00'
describe
'2774904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUH' 'sip-files00042.tif'
5652d65a83bd3af1fdd7ecbf2c915150
0b26026ccb13bd508b7655ec45ef238d07728179
describe
'3389' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
24cc472a34deea60767ddd3688aa9b80
5cfd350cd6a420f720a7f1d1d0cd8f97d3abc93d
'2011-10-16T20:53:22-04:00'
describe
'20203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUJ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
96766c196ac3d4a8d47c319224428196
090ead5c19d22b66533f52391ab278bc56f0ca59
describe
'345416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
5ee2db1d0131cdcde9f09c859b939c08
bc3fddb6ba65146f397b5eef87eb594b8e5b60ae
'2011-10-16T20:52:34-04:00'
describe
'189228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
831993384f2591f87522de10b9f2f71c
08dc04d41f713e5ddbbc5ad587a5204fa7c074d5
describe
'73279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
1512788f1270dfd77521bf601db91680
9b71b4bdb2f2819847409ec9084a6435c2eef0a1
'2011-10-16T20:50:25-04:00'
describe
'55641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUN' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
128f33664f1c91b9024dfebb0f85db42
5782c83d5c0669df32496864b60765fe1496d47a
'2011-10-16T20:56:54-04:00'
describe
'2772448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
2b0a15518f0fbb34bf6b61d689a02ec2
86754a242a6f01087835a25eb1f9a24a11f71915
'2011-10-16T20:51:15-04:00'
describe
'3044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
5f2eff6588eaa1949d8789b0593e3d4c
78591d426afdeb9ce332b1870beab8b8ea4be948
'2011-10-16T20:53:00-04:00'
describe
'18838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUQ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
8d41a23b4ee908dd66d963d08ea3abb3
3c600dc2656a3a3c479e6e268e1f968dadf160f2
describe
'345745' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
1a7043c8ab4edec3c7d4f9f23a33d499
6c7c67ce716e944a26f18d2e24d316fc45a2bc90
describe
'205308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUS' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
af51ab3ff3eaac6854f64a5f820f06ec
858efb74ed6d1982f9bae5422c2539bd298cfca6
'2011-10-16T20:53:10-04:00'
describe
'77753' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUT' 'sip-files00044.pro'
854d3ec95489577c275559090cfbfa4a
0a187becfbe4b51f632c279c3340de3730d85fa8
describe
'59443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
0e2a41f4f1718138ec14496d69c90d44
ee04e0d71b9375856ad23fbb684555217d714206
describe
'2775004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
f750fa3e34f5453ae1b0df666bef0176
9c3d63480a701c8165e5fdc37efa13c5e6021801
describe
'3184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
1d9ff333e71633b60484b0114027770e
d8f7b92cfdee062cd1d5abb714feed03a23d1972
describe
'20345' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUX' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d480b3630f3fe54eb1c629df7ba41cba
28e7f5bbf6eaea1b2b081abb3753210eb342cee3
'2011-10-16T20:52:21-04:00'
describe
'345439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
03e32837f26b625a749e5cd0d5d37337
2fac8ba2bfb5a2d3ead695aa92f387a63e0433e9
describe
'209506' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOUZ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
f541bf0917412c309fdb177121ac35b6
26a43b16c168726f1ca9111361b03b7cffcd1819
describe
'80187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
6e6c819e101fc4de2ab6ab603e879690
75e72c921f2644963c9c2b4d653edac903d242d0
describe
'59662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
f8a5dd25d19c52e05661f58ecd36c7ae
ec102de82fcc7eace7671ebed39f884380295ce4
describe
'2772708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVC' 'sip-files00045.tif'
6eb77e8c5abe8834037d9497b0449633
9ed6f88a1829c87471d07e190fe071910089c65f
describe
'3299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVD' 'sip-files00045.txt'
9a29f4fc53d091c7216439ef5f65b3d2
a853e1ab3d2ab95f2742d55699b3b52fff6c5370
'2011-10-16T20:51:17-04:00'
describe
'19922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVE' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
ca9c7beabbd8b47b8560f6dc66ec81fe
4ea9fc6e27c64340b1a631fe953f0f52fb1fb2df
'2011-10-16T20:56:57-04:00'
describe
'345747' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
4e4243702c5617be613e361758e77103
be38e2bf01f9e212894d38a7dd464ad70ff6e9f9
'2011-10-16T20:57:02-04:00'
describe
'214286' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
66b1cb20ff8f6dadac629281b438bb4a
1ea621aa81a46105c305ea212ccbff925ebb512f
'2011-10-16T20:52:59-04:00'
describe
'82079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3ba7f2c9ae169382ae5839e40bcaf5f2
708e804da54e3a1093ac9041c2af1fde11855d7a
describe
'60179' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
67dd377696f872a88bf79ec1cd56f3b0
4c043337c344787d44bff0cf97443b357d4442ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
54d733a3799c8ac3943b6bc0b5bc11cb
ebbc4f07fdc0122983ee8f6cfa284954137cc19f
describe
'3350' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
248af50f31d7593894cd2da0307f3f60
afa197b6e4eabbacbd66c6d07b200d7281d1a4de
describe
'19923' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVL' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
a95411b40dc38e460c6408e50bf7a0c6
5e81633680feafeeca70037de6f38a6aba1fdbc4
describe
'345444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
2c9e1c5619cfb688435cbb4a0d46a3b4
daa72ecb24405bcb4d7f72e82ea5aa11d1403187
'2011-10-16T20:50:51-04:00'
describe
'219084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
01bca424ac520d397aa650d1fa1b889c
add503081f9268ea3a2260246dcea682d732ae22
describe
'84811' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
4b7c1cf97ba7ad092a6b90bcaa32b8cc
8e105e8719026039b1b04738fca9fdf232a86df3
'2011-10-16T20:57:19-04:00'
describe
'61316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVP' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
efa91c00e4aed378158e79d189bcaabb
e66473fa1b77ee253772cb61823fc763074d16e9
describe
'2772740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
8152b9f3b9d19ce6ed9493def503c80c
4cb966dfdab2a292f20c7923a62a5cb14fd38467
describe
'3515' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
e060a8f57444379431c278c514cb8ae2
b4410d398db7727283d42b9db4f5a9de0f1d8739
describe
'20267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVS' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
50fdb998a7a2002041491dfc8722ec4e
1ab316a97f8001efce2a867070455250cb68ce6e
describe
'345720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVT' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
6c98a2c9cbcd8156073fa74268b266d1
498d33f86a9a2c44eb7409079c05cdc37e077a6f
describe
'208955' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVU' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
5fb021208aca05cf1fe3909ab95aa586
97f55a623f60f8b05fa6489886bcd877d61854d8
describe
'81510' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVV' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b30b956a22b447332346526878dc6c1c
4d3f482b6b0504cc53a0483336c45c77f4a14aa6
describe
'59644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVW' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
05449c987ac44bd73073efc4d0e07a77
317946ca1b3863cc3a1713f32ef2ac72e81a6dc1
'2011-10-16T20:53:01-04:00'
describe
'2774640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ff34b151f757c943a69d4601661d47f4
5b5d2f3a9f1b76e88137f4e036691bec2033a214
describe
'3362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
41c70924dc9ab2aad84689cb2c85aa29
c72cfda12990bbf2801a8858539e82b8f7e0bbf4
describe
'19721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOVZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
90f694caadb058f9e0eff8d7b9004491
045264cbb2c367ee4b0f47ddf52b8f4b1d98e671
describe
'345315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
a3f432b18c6dcb1938f22312345ac9d0
36bbf6b7a5aa8f061b4edaeff10306fc24aba013
describe
'206547' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
414dc15efb8969e9505a713a8fd2ad22
9f920ff84950c140080288a53d04a93941897b92
'2011-10-16T20:50:39-04:00'
describe
'81512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
6e26fa482d7649f5b60291f8bdd4adc3
9bcdc9e3aa8579300d23f21a26b8b6ceb0c668d5
'2011-10-16T20:56:03-04:00'
describe
'58907' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
5503bc5d6835d022ca26b57fb99b272e
f6501d7570ddfab645ca1140af7949d9d227d4ea
'2011-10-16T20:57:13-04:00'
describe
'2772580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
833c2291569e39e069396b479ec24dba
5517846e565936905012e02c6a3ed0bc05068a0c
'2011-10-16T20:50:40-04:00'
describe
'3338' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
82ad8399bb39daf7cf7a00b8cfc1140f
8789f75d77bc0ba06240ada913fb0d20bc427ff6
'2011-10-16T20:54:09-04:00'
describe
'19738' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
b04de052195fda7b74f53145676fc69f
4d4d421d78103bea130d06761b482cc7ad18a2a4
describe
'345709' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
a8b81c0f48d9f171b6710788fcb9898b
7c70b25a723a0a586f113515ec39c62cb24816e0
describe
'187748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
e79996b7a7aa1fb7eb5c4c0f03ce5d1d
95526247c97992fd4d82dc432cf4ba627a32d613
'2011-10-16T20:52:31-04:00'
describe
'69264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
4295612539a96f4bfca905225a529951
855e2e86990d66a8cdbcdb97edfda86a76a8ad37
'2011-10-16T20:54:51-04:00'
describe
'54962' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
3509ddff5e45bc79cef85c84493c6c5c
d77961b1be24f0ad9a5e488d0aa8b4dff8bf3f16
describe
'2774660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
f1705847e7000cb3066e364567d3588e
4127d3d85efd928998680a2f7364a492989b7a8d
'2011-10-16T20:57:38-04:00'
describe
'2903' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWM' 'sip-files00050.txt'
7b1933c421e6c0f0c83b93ba73de646b
48119586278235aa6d774efb741be0fea3326168
describe
'19182' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
654c609daa88ecd94c014e3c8215faea
6e590053529aac6eec223fdcb8b8094ac1856486
describe
'345401' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
98391ba312bd7c598f10d02c8e7b83ed
2877a91d4a820e4f078561faf29280c9de3a455a
'2011-10-16T20:50:38-04:00'
describe
'213741' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWP' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
7a1e7e968ff30955d9e345c7317f089a
44e9efd548328b3c7a65332c1fdac824139f429c
'2011-10-16T20:54:52-04:00'
describe
'83752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWQ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
fa36c56c54937ad78677ff834b36753e
54796e52dd7bc1b89373108065ee0691b31c129b
'2011-10-16T20:54:47-04:00'
describe
'60101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d188e51e0bd5c201d02ca980703195e8
9e4c325f7523562c606f0c14b789f3159ce5798a
'2011-10-16T20:55:04-04:00'
describe
'2772572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
c0f81f237ee402c21a833bc4decf478b
23d73ed9bf483d9d6b2c9dd7d62a0751e6a0561f
describe
'3466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWT' 'sip-files00051.txt'
59a16fffdf5aa4f9db549c6063b0fb0e
c07cbf70e3253011dc77fcf3058eafcb676b2302
'2011-10-16T20:56:28-04:00'
describe
'19979' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
639eaf8e732852358d09e5e58cbdbaf1
71648abd4c686c93f71a0edecf5c77cfe8ef15b3
describe
'345670' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
0dd0e1f4aaf0a7cb208f7219efbb606e
f8927ded64f0c85d53ef380759cf62c9a55f929d
describe
'212981' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
06e189dc0f72af198c314fb1b7711ced
77d72a445ae4e3aff434afc5462e165186b2e9c6
'2011-10-16T20:54:20-04:00'
describe
'82837' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
85adbadbd5498f6353bcb8f8778f28a9
5f78c8e2d1d328712f131f2f76e713589fcb5e03
'2011-10-16T20:56:16-04:00'
describe
'60211' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
6ad1fec84bc0e778c639a5584d315bd0
c5bae70363c96ba835b9737f17bd86c599f296c8
describe
'2774808' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOWZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
6147c8f0dfc718205d7cda3bb1f113cc
54d67a3d793c55e3252e15525401ae88f36653b5
'2011-10-16T20:53:18-04:00'
describe
'3406' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
ca1293a30a935efcc2df23287f9bd723
206bae0851fba7b5d8ab918eb9dfaac13547ed75
describe
'19824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXB' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
80ad6ad9e09bab1fb343fa3655e9f332
dd4da8cbcebc793410fbf7450ab6a8d2baf4558e
'2011-10-16T20:53:45-04:00'
describe
'345434' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXC' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
145aa46784e59d6ebbe4b2ed246da57b
6873cb1e6ce691dab8ef25ef525351ec3afda46a
describe
'206428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
894809c3e216fe0711383fc79063180e
3064aa3503229bdac3a8b732968b80c258f42a18
'2011-10-16T20:52:12-04:00'
describe
'84704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXE' 'sip-files00053.pro'
eb919e2c8f84260d1b93f99f5b1ac70c
41f9224876090f4068c9aa245a8677b72420dca6
describe
'58020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXF' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
d90500f14ade320bac526731aba1061c
b276767a59e935681fd85686562822c73a00c32c
'2011-10-16T20:51:19-04:00'
describe
'2772464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
2738bda2b0e8400ac1eed11d02317177
22f29875440f8565930122c0be4144cdc45f1349
describe
'3536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXH' 'sip-files00053.txt'
83ae4bce70bb4265fc8d35764c77c8d8
7ec68902bf6cc9bb589ec37af94bb3aff8425d3f
'2011-10-16T20:50:50-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'19396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
2db2751f5358df421811e954bed6c582
9ce32c64ca0e0744d40596ab663cda8c669ede98
describe
'345595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
5fa33e6db93f9f9a2ca7f0494a3fc58a
b9a59875da4ef48b6214cc59386578ee84e34bb3
describe
'216454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
4e26f2fc567517838234f386df319e3d
ecb9a4a0d6651cdd61fcbd15469f60369853989f
'2011-10-16T20:55:39-04:00'
describe
'84602' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXL' 'sip-files00054.pro'
750ab24d4ee88e7e3e749a06ba4e8272
b19edf466150a1254190a68659dd610137eaf143
describe
'60342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
0c4825eb798af6f6dab74ab4a70817a8
ee824a1e74c0424889db3e4b123cd5c29037fef9
'2011-10-16T20:56:47-04:00'
describe
'2774916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c5ca25d7e89307a4d7d6da81348b9e5f
07451ac4883a3c274de0402372de7aaafc6bc8a6
describe
'3470' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXO' 'sip-files00054.txt'
d6bacc6d5bc34ddec15f2be0631487b8
060a6d0be4337f76ea7726911ad64fd9008342a8
'2011-10-16T20:52:56-04:00'
describe
'20210' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8262ff0357b2acbe32a3505b035c0c56
1a07b07c53b7a8f1ac0d486d0179ff51daa19a29
'2011-10-16T20:54:03-04:00'
describe
'345368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
7c036da87c047a5f25fba00439d61a42
d94de436a872c28d8efc39a772e28593194f8294
describe
'215560' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
9e4bdadd3e7cb04c0f3168282e09e058
4ecfacd26bea5e7880c5c002b14246ba918c74e2
describe
'83997' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXS' 'sip-files00055.pro'
3c3e76e7a662972ba8349ad6b191c2a9
d8f2783786b7aaa5429f13b2ffcb74b6ca96d779
describe
'60535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
29e563a3f84393d611652b8b200c11f3
f723f38d0d88cd04a01532022af5b5d0ecd80fb9
describe
'2772692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXU' 'sip-files00055.tif'
152c39e595a8482c12b4ed6229fc36ac
f8677f8747eec75be1f4335047284bc7ef3fda7d
'2011-10-16T20:57:21-04:00'
describe
'3475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
194a3d73f2a9f05e16894da9cc6faa27
f4822091a42f41e8992a9f1cbb78772511009193
'2011-10-16T20:56:44-04:00'
describe
'20055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
f142d6a6b25c582caef798360e5677f4
b8594d5ea7269c31f69d908391f22bdaf857cc2e
'2011-10-16T20:55:02-04:00'
describe
'345561' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
9d2449cdf0c66fe7d9286e8e5438f94a
ffac5ac613bd3d365eb93a043d533987eea946b3
describe
'216942' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
022fd56ed04f5ccd9943099e70724e92
80f56342cef71ed6644a157685f26c903196f4c3
describe
'84123' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOXZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
8cc656aff51522ab4c97ebf9040b6958
6eb26b56138ec6bf1c78efe9b386599a678f4fa2
describe
'61073' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
127eb83c630600e51db7a5c5d8886d89
2d18ea03cb208558cc39cfae640ec51acb9b82a1
'2011-10-16T20:54:31-04:00'
describe
'2773620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
eda3a0d7f2ed3fb0b2cd27926f17c5e3
dcf5edeeb84157669d960eb063801288d7304a51
describe
'3459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
afa06aca0db7ef9c1dcc7d02ba52a725
f25721a0786eef4b2587e366e6b28ed852e95634
describe
'20142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYD' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
d7a70f0445fbdaae391b09f1797e7d45
cfd5942341bc08a747a303016167522ad783dea6
describe
'345477' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
6efdad3613b837c4726ccd7566e0e44d
56bb0022a481332eebe0e08c505ba92961651899
'2011-10-16T20:52:25-04:00'
describe
'214497' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYF' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
56e9da82cee1beeab35aadbf3ac1d5ad
44cbfa66db88e998b58f3bd5392d1042f895e316
describe
'85317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
6bf9fc7f9ead3f7d62154d43a3e7ec43
7f7769e9e2026352152d2f3f0ae5a6c0e010c4f5
describe
'60242' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
63b47d42b9576a552c34ae1eb85bbd20
86f0dea5c4127e6d05195fd6d82913ca3428feae
'2011-10-16T20:56:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
d77465841062e5f6bc35250bd7087812
7ae2624a177034bbd86fa788c97c305ed5bffa81
'2011-10-16T20:50:47-04:00'
describe
'3656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
b856e239f482c186484459498f9f65cb
bc143605168df3b3213fc556ae1bbfe080fadb16
'2011-10-16T20:52:51-04:00'
describe
'19875' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYK' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f0c63acecb3d4071a7068ff73f273628
044e82b5cbade7c70e34d3b6cc15083f92e3b5b1
'2011-10-16T20:52:00-04:00'
describe
'345743' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYL' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
b88df5be313cc8deedfef9cc20c20f15
0bd606a5fdebe1aa6f6d072f4bb2ed7e14c13d0f
describe
'220923' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYM' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
1eaed3a37eafd3ef4fc69528fc45c049
c42f32401d853d946be23dd8f11ba304f9f4a3a0
describe
'84680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYN' 'sip-files00058.pro'
145a342e7f60d1e54f492faaf0af7b2e
10852784f9f57cff8f4db5a2eb38af5be3588d60
describe
'61738' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYO' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e15db4a352587bbeb11e5945849cb5d2
0dc476543285e7484e1384d5970cacfb6859fd44
describe
'2775028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYP' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b42ebd35d004b2cdfe459294a03bb2dd
1b68210eb3e36aa7d36903141f23e3ddcf6b1d1c
describe
'3440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYQ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
4a5e0f9f954abb9486d79caac2b7a606
821ce5a477d03be67e2c42c60cd9633bb7372ca9
describe
'20234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYR' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
94db22999e0d465dfce21079e5a6bc39
01984d66ea4902d5d99676d29ff1847557a6964b
describe
'345451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYS' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
5c054f61337f893d8c6ed1cca63d17e7
61c0a63df27773be2b692498e9ba7196673af4da
describe
'213877' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYT' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
db287f89c49b3e3507a474d72b8b73b6
55dd02936a6a9c64812428b2308fa95c3bc18424
describe
'83708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYU' 'sip-files00059.pro'
0c380bf7bebcac61dbd41c4ab231c6a3
efb183a6d8679aab955247121603aafcddcfdffe
'2011-10-16T20:52:07-04:00'
describe
'60420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
7f867cbd0d231ce5c0422713adece4a0
55784302aa18ecef4e40e508087ba8c6091d2d26
describe
'2772600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
e4eb4e3de461326f89fed7eec268ea73
658b4acf13014190a17ba9739b35891208ca0f53
describe
'3444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYX' 'sip-files00059.txt'
2a4c9cf81454f4ebb92bc44fcdb451e4
c959d54b9585a3b6b2b3ca54c99c5ad2ba66bee7
describe
'20049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYY' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
ab8209548c5a2b6a18fe0504d37ad9b9
75d64765872dbdafc16b68325267680b9b958476
describe
'345650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOYZ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
caf0ad9cacadf18d67cddd84fe6f0c75
3e1ed486f600765dbabb8cb12c5933a31d97bd09
describe
'214303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZA' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f10c24745145d26baf7689c2b4f81af0
166f87f07eb1f7efd90aefc424ac57e4e2495fb2
describe
'84440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZB' 'sip-files00060.pro'
c95cd9616e61b18064681ff4a92f66e1
176e2fa2be574bd994d4886ccf803e28c35af526
describe
'59325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZC' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
563146e6d9400f159a06cb16cfeb7923
942acc37839309d2f40da42c52e4313358124401
describe
'2774556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZD' 'sip-files00060.tif'
ebf85c132b3eca255cda6a6cf1ed5180
5cade27ff8bfadbc4ccd6f0e906925b933361e74
'2011-10-16T20:54:39-04:00'
describe
'3457' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZE' 'sip-files00060.txt'
f2c7cada96ca634f7195f5cbc2b383c7
1bbb8ae5634ecb7bd3f12cf0c94cebffe30c61ab
describe
'19427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
19748ee99c66d1ec41d462b5673147d9
c08b27f10d95df50109ec9771e0607511f9f7ca9
describe
'345430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
72c2cae2802514c04c3fee820d174064
f432b05b460c78cbc29503b13b8ad47bf8352da3
describe
'218435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZH' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
ff337a7ef250ea0e048d3b5ed62d05dd
b539550135108685496a3bf56ce1b7169de362e6
'2011-10-16T20:52:23-04:00'
describe
'84597' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZI' 'sip-files00061.pro'
a7117e8aefc4beeca818393edd8f32e1
c45df1df12f12143fba5ff19a70f8ba275740473
describe
'60827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
810a420826db55c1d0fe0b0022fe2043
d101a5224bd76bc1ae47fe629e2cb5fbbd5a078b
'2011-10-16T20:57:07-04:00'
describe
'2772596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
2a9a42eb9b654a58063f0215c56ebb86
77d6d8d32fe5486c59fb94a72ea0dc7b6b2000eb
describe
'3514' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZL' 'sip-files00061.txt'
fbc3ad8c71f0ac83a876b736de623a3c
0226a17416c6baa24ea5d4a4bfc1c87adbe2fae4
describe
'19944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZM' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
faea8810973eadac388ca1f315572189
ba11b6965e57bfb4a3b70da2d06ce3309af4afe9
'2011-10-16T20:56:49-04:00'
describe
'345569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
d43c9a571344abf0274d0a5f6eb880de
8ea528326e7ce582abf2bf7eac7fb23308fd9666
describe
'203678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
3e83df61fb9c6b685fe63a9b5785b4c3
d5d707b3ae51f4bc2b80db081837fb266cb0d008
'2011-10-16T20:54:35-04:00'
describe
'79067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8b88f19f747d75ae581c83972937db0d
3690823226ab5196cc46de19dde1e5daedac3874
describe
'58305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a85e6912aa43a598e0d1af42bf58a5b1
1711dc2998d9641df5f1adb2697b66e1438b405a
'2011-10-16T20:52:52-04:00'
describe
'2773540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZR' 'sip-files00062.tif'
5d1a671ba5b43fe73c41957d107dc37a
aa77efbe73d3a945cc4ae22e5afa9861950844d4
'2011-10-16T20:54:45-04:00'
describe
'3231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
3649f5f4ed959a6a326fce720fa105c1
43abac33d5e440f4be8d48adb82acfd98499c34d
describe
'19896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZT' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
b52efcde50821ffdd272c6a08a59988b
a11f3305b417b5dc0083094a6c17b564a073f6cc
describe
'345461' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
70ee5722906fca1f50dd3b0279160542
4bff290761ff533d37c4eb71d2b51c027643e7e6
describe
'208730' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
b36487d48122f48ee1240d6a2dbc79be
a027378032c2cf4d20099ce5502d9d33d9c367bf
'2011-10-16T20:54:40-04:00'
describe
'80066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1eca0803de85b92e2ed58d1ddc6cb27f
48aa5578aa4354d9545716dea1598d28be2bd5b0
describe
'59745' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
95ab343a5199bcc65e42ae4451d641cc
e4cf3f5db4e4c9a62f000bab308747efd1df1bc4
'2011-10-16T20:57:04-04:00'
describe
'2772684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
40db394863778fe8b7011dfc396da2b2
13a6782609ca348373062e5edd5416156dbecbea
describe
'3293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAOZZ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
85c3a79f8941dc88204207af92a3a663
bd03c51f8711a8500d87c0ca4cf6af04884f9a86
describe
'19985' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAA' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
0f1932e28951715fbd6407358308632d
61a3d2a75399e5feeac919c2219800bfe2613169
'2011-10-16T20:54:11-04:00'
describe
'345567' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
c98e5b4b5e313c04153cccea3f1612ee
b559f28d0b5da941867e622876481d2ac41e6812
'2011-10-16T20:50:45-04:00'
describe
'212749' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
c260b763716da97c73915bf02bb6a11f
b6464fe329dc55a3fbcf6a21a9f828bcf34c689b
describe
'81213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAD' 'sip-files00064.pro'
9dc09399da889f0afdd0609581b2f080
d17b634c4c96281759c8f629bfbcfbdf7d2d585f
describe
'60293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1f26318d00e811029ea1630aa029845f
71f994ee4b5c04f2c8766468bd8a20638b4cc0c0
describe
'2774720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
5f32e04459473574a7a60355d06fc18b
43719cafdbbc73abd968417ff4f48e526c6e94ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAG' 'sip-files00064.txt'
0a2762c3110eee40d6b2e7dfc09166db
f4e4cc56e92aed9369b14c7cf14bc0f718876ed5
describe
'20056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAH' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
9676f52a1cfb12c0db636a53eea10b87
16e4c921a7651109e951d9a275658550ae978ba7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
68165041f71297ee3cee0cd804c5adf5
d76df6fb9816316ff21b8690e3893ccb9834b58f
'2011-10-16T20:56:00-04:00'
describe
'204498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
8aa1174a6a7b046a74cbe1d55e2ea1ad
1b0113ea31827be2fcd50277bde985146bd330f6
describe
'80493' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
42de42779040811be8c947271881450f
1eb5e4d7c4392fe5427f4efc7f149e9133fe6576
'2011-10-16T20:53:27-04:00'
describe
'58650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
836f5416fce9a2bc69cd009ae5f2bdad
a7d0b94799ad4ffd24cf74722bfa30532b0a5e30
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
027f189520cb04b2b498099d35051f76
00443aa0a5e4721c7062b79f65f1490725c06b74
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
0a6bc858afd52f1565acb3728d59e59b
945a190f359926f1c4e33350ab1f07d9dffea788
describe
'19814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
910d30d024294181f6b4dbc826f3716d
12ab52b53ce500e456d1d8ea92ac6081ad5b0c15
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
8eeda6944c645dc1a7eb2fdfa3e1c627
ad117c3f6ebe54635736c895011e81e5dac7d906
'2011-10-16T20:57:09-04:00'
describe
'210716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
a9469742c8e176aae66c259cb3067806
5306e797121f5f96e0f96ef5c2930e27b802b68c
'2011-10-16T20:55:40-04:00'
describe
'81537' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAR' 'sip-files00066.pro'
b7acd5dadb28dbe0b949ad6ed2a4330c
2bbe95ec9dc3b6fa432c605dd9db577c95063df1
'2011-10-16T20:56:56-04:00'
describe
'59403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
441cf6d7d391fff0bb2e6da2d1b1292e
dff679309c30956612551842a6a8cd6054e598a4
'2011-10-16T20:53:33-04:00'
describe
'2774876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAT' 'sip-files00066.tif'
0b1339756382e2834905147d10e3c060
5d533ae12ca5f715309427ca7cf8e984b8bf8a7b
describe
'3317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
e022888cd08971fb5e573f3a7a23b32a
35b1074b8a3da790c7fe473dc6a17a2ef20e0a8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
6d5cfaf6f3accff05f7115a3baef5d1c
37cea631e5bb737081eb6effa76e3a3d75138eab
'2011-10-16T20:52:05-04:00'
describe
'345454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
a6e60c7e250cb88ad1287d877ca4703f
63e9a6806f56ff954a2b2e24fa58a7bd674a4699
'2011-10-16T20:52:13-04:00'
describe
'190622' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
24cdc3933605fcc393af63d7dbea29e0
cacf4a7cbd2001081e6d0b0ec96dfe73c6a6e6c0
'2011-10-16T20:54:27-04:00'
describe
'73475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
62fb8e5f1af6ef921e5a1e295976aceb
70e87181179c556d04e62c5f1f5cd4ccfd7bb634
describe
'55540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPAZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
719f193e64021d71a781e27d1d016805
a843515b3e868a7f9b3763a66525e79b8a0c7eae
describe
'2772564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f276a5ff1eebf9df2efe41673d67f79d
9c71015c6ccf5a5c3704fe99912d2d12b45d5233
describe
'3120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBB' 'sip-files00067.txt'
c9eec29ca38ccfe0b21173b359383d98
cd7fca611050c7ba2f73893726de4377add184d7
'2011-10-16T20:51:38-04:00'
describe
'19166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
3bc735d8228ecd6bc883197a9e9fc3ca
263b0787ec59c39577b41eb06be96879646db869
describe
'345678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBD' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
8033d31422d237b8d0ac650c2814601d
8b3bdc548f10009fa5467801145575b6699ee6f7
describe
'209134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
10c3534a0690fc3f66ef05a84af4f247
442038874b381c08ae4900ae28f9795836b2dff8
'2011-10-16T20:52:28-04:00'
describe
'81399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBF' 'sip-files00068.pro'
725ac4569656a31d7f4555bb4cab2a31
a2c736f8638f2086d2bf1c15fa40bd2ffb45226b
describe
'59224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBG' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
7160768421b1a3cdb91d03a55b3c67bd
520a52bf2ab0daae3ab9f8b2db4d769aa8231ad3
describe
'2774716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBH' 'sip-files00068.tif'
2e56a7262d9557d912f644526c78869e
d6dd6fe5f0a872f96b4e65b3fb46703459f4623a
'2011-10-16T20:56:39-04:00'
describe
'3360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBI' 'sip-files00068.txt'
90bf1443372cc678c739c52d76d1f0dc
ab138f3db1734cc6936e0876088666c2d16ba2d8
'2011-10-16T20:50:19-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'19684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBJ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
e0a4a23a1c00684256e2f4fbe5f665ec
35fa44827cf7825bbacaa3c185c2de25c94babea
describe
'345314' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
cf321ddac8788ed1298cbd4e0ddb55c6
2d52a06d46d0a3f5daa33683162b7ab10e9bad8f
describe
'211616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBL' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
62502e8daf96c73e5cf9ce3cb6e9d80c
043483fa6baf627053e0a65211b7b94b2326b702
'2011-10-16T20:52:49-04:00'
describe
'82433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBM' 'sip-files00069.pro'
b43a073be7dd1493540087235ee01120
9345285d310d273157794309075c067c80ceee30
describe
'59939' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBN' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3a89c11d0fce80720ca5d3fc9f3ac578
90e0c1f4be5aca7591dd49d135195013aabc844a
describe
'2772640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
38fd8b76763b1b492a738e27ecb4be89
6c6c1560831d48449659b22c9f99edd2934fc265
describe
'3408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBP' 'sip-files00069.txt'
8afa0ab5a2b3b0ff7ef12a25bff811f4
edc7982fbd7f0487942f81eac824980d2e07a810
describe
'19882' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBQ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
f68154b01e66f14edec98203ed76394d
c302780b51c9b1aee81b528b5f590f2e0ad1c30c
describe
'345648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBR' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7b35dfe19778f782c0a848ffb99e7075
6caee56b8ed111edb948976d085d697944606a3b
describe
'209101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
d1c842a41f8850bc7bfcbb6c1a13d491
9824f817987f096a2d9c73de60ca4c8cba783994
'2011-10-16T20:55:55-04:00'
describe
'80427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBT' 'sip-files00070.pro'
3b78bf1d8411850cc16cdcb6100e054a
747b576ed6be84bbd64c393f4c36b5ac42e19d01
describe
'59570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBU' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
ed24d1f13d8098cd019e1947f160aa26
dc64fd2c35a9f30c5d2521eff936d55f89fbf6a7
describe
'2774752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBV' 'sip-files00070.tif'
0d32a1894f931a5a3bd89b510ab2dacf
638a4f8e37402f9429a976a6733dbb9933984132
describe
'3289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBW' 'sip-files00070.txt'
d334196d4f2b4799e5a6214cb1d14b22
718fe7728073e44c4e6d6d6c27f93d5a0c936fb6
describe
'19744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBX' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
d1fd468a0f13fa71418c063dc316852a
6a606251be39f234ca6c494aa9e1b17f20f2f953
describe
'345325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBY' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
059e94ee689af696a7f98dd4f8020e46
dd3fa62be976d9320b65d8188654322b25293f76
'2011-10-16T20:56:18-04:00'
describe
'215860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPBZ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
ffbf6df8a997314e64f57a2244a41760
ebcdf51064740e2095202e65d1908dffb6f6c239
'2011-10-16T20:56:34-04:00'
describe
'83442' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCA' 'sip-files00071.pro'
7e5f139daaa639f37e4e6bb7b57c6108
4b8db96e6f9c3d6bf5657895f7300d846d7794eb
'2011-10-16T20:52:46-04:00'
describe
'61237' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCB' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
7a5a9a59d9843c1831da29b89552c7d7
26b067601f431cb48966fa81bdc2a75c4c31217a
describe
'2772824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCC' 'sip-files00071.tif'
3450624a4c0af177a8b150fa07a19270
147b0b76272e72375e26ae24290f593c4ec80a2e
describe
'3499' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCD' 'sip-files00071.txt'
56376f5579635f2d2fef6093d91eb267
1fbf6980b688da341c5cc811dba111f97495b51e
describe
'20418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCE' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
1b32c9a037d1679b9757350108d47687
8885a52eb037ea90f64e3a70e8eaf36a52c6adae
describe
'345733' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCF' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8eee5efc6da4c81eab0b36e3badf60a6
bf6a24a8841c61a394ec200326d2fb5c05e80ab4
'2011-10-16T20:51:04-04:00'
describe
'214713' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCG' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
193fb1c4d593865a6faa585af5944c41
9a2e10280ef066e21499458d760b79cb1bf2f52f
describe
'81347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCH' 'sip-files00072.pro'
3102043744b3af4e5070cefd5390c46f
0f275f68c7b641ff4a2ea52d547bc2d8c359ce21
describe
'61150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCI' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
8bb8229152ea8abdcb603a16ffcd2eea
8e87eecc64d0843d6b40e91331cc08e259bf8852
describe
'2774900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
6bd2511e03b77d93f54eb213129ff9d3
f07d6b6d65f4f16b3212b74547d7adaf14f20122
'2011-10-16T20:56:31-04:00'
describe
'3330' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCK' 'sip-files00072.txt'
6e1caa74ebeac7b8a3f36d29765a6357
58248fcbe3925a18af0c89f151759369312f9c91
describe
'20415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCL' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
d529299ae8c5d9fb669151c66727629a
3609abac23669bafb1e335f860f84fc17b98976d
describe
'345474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCM' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
0019754f55f330033cddb58ce9589a07
bcf29e7ee7c0d4e7f3955523b419f659a6bd9e28
describe
'187776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCN' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
b0d64b4d2abe5938db221bfe52735072
49759bc5639af772bae96d738d04f405eab6d29a
describe
'70032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCO' 'sip-files00073.pro'
84eed7280e644456dc07654ce54b6772
7387013f7309020a19aa1a39ac63a2932b20515b
'2011-10-16T20:53:46-04:00'
describe
'54755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCP' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
679e2e60326d0575e81441bb55d5b104
30a69f495a980c5d6bbb9a3b76deba2b7d4c6177
describe
'2772616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCQ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
949651c788056e17b1d9cd3faf1d75d7
c065f410fe7a275e861ba698e76a8879a8b61dfd
'2011-10-16T20:54:26-04:00'
describe
'2947' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCR' 'sip-files00073.txt'
00bcb696194e67565d76121de7097205
1d101a53202c1de93fcf6ae14c426717f52120a8
describe
'19291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCS' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
e285054243bebe3b6dc8bd02d5a12cb5
bf3b216872fe2ff6016964e6966911fcee215dc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCT' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
deba41e2780dff5deb4d323ac4210394
390d4f1d5be3e8898f8cae7cd7a80856cae80fa3
describe
'216340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCU' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
1ffa68f453766d2d579cc72d72c9a026
8fe79faf77c393d20e8f9b831b6aa030d54580b1
'2011-10-16T20:52:38-04:00'
describe
'81387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCV' 'sip-files00074.pro'
b382d32e1635eb5fafa14ea794cc6b6d
4a48179d31310d10362993611bde714c75a270c4
describe
'60911' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCW' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
9b0764cde36f887e41db85c6eb730bc5
e9de7317736ef02ed756f5e6832aa4b81ee4c933
'2011-10-16T20:51:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCX' 'sip-files00074.tif'
bbbc3c197e13f43726d44dd7366e7c70
d28b9ad3fd44cbf98189506a799ea11fe1350543
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCY' 'sip-files00074.txt'
8d39b8589b160f1e92d85e4dcb011811
d1d90e886f3bb88a2745b0d97901fd327d84953b
describe
'20297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPCZ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
a54fde951c2b9dedcff692d3cfc18547
b263e17f75325bf3b44db2d2f799c077749a12e3
describe
'345553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDA' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
3e057502fbf903808b389861312096ba
64aeb78c0c637376dfaf699c8cfa6ed5f335fa10
describe
'207962' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDB' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
27374c8c466a9c4dd37b7a904093163b
cdda3ff6541966ddd5fde67203c87f9244fd8f2c
'2011-10-16T20:51:14-04:00'
describe
'81806' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDC' 'sip-files00075.pro'
955fb009d0755dbac02675900da2cc40
748bf5812e10e87ef84039107639981968e15dcd
describe
'58106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDD' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
79894f59f479e2fac6d0515d79146150
40dbca20b95509e93e95fb2ef3872cda1816495f
describe
'2773264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDE' 'sip-files00075.tif'
17ab18668930edffd1e102555af9cd09
77e1b0b72e7c5d79fd578f9a1905d88033f8fc89
'2011-10-16T20:54:19-04:00'
describe
'3378' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDF' 'sip-files00075.txt'
f04e122dfdadedbe22299a360ae7a23e
21aa533ae28b9a000d7553d66f26ac6e436f88a0
describe
'19213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDG' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
8d37f90d7939b1b6320edeaab767ee23
a31d6f1a847b815514e602e59493c1d575ee07a4
describe
'345571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDH' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
354ae21c35af85b1bc4a8c808dcd1b99
6f8d37bb5bbfae1547c65ba8e38cbcc59f57f1ad
describe
'210120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDI' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
09a2f97ba18e26a84045756b891218c5
40665f1487a1ab6e922bee00cd4508106c91ae60
describe
'81408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDJ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
313d75e3a9141e71e72b074461569c52
64bfe26461a0ad588b68c44a027800de24771612
describe
'58429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDK' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f730da3d0c0d82e503c972676ebe2c1f
895f0cc058bd131ea3bd709bb3ec203cd121df03
describe
'2774664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDL' 'sip-files00076.tif'
c0679a0a8557bb4ae1c787e352e4cde2
c17192e70172b832c25115f1b5f857e54152e479
'2011-10-16T20:53:36-04:00'
describe
'3346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDM' 'sip-files00076.txt'
10942495efdf734b537da973e8d98999
cd658d212ad407512f0f0cb8c46a5036f09999e1
describe
'19751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDN' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
5f1f572c4fc31601dcddb38971d38f73
68a8e12dd05014d56b92bf877d6aec40a4675b18
describe
'345338' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDO' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
98186bcbf9df68f82eb8347bd8d6dcb6
fd26e9a2a06b6ee413e49246af0fe0ca42ae4165
describe
'212463' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDP' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
df098abb51aee73584e83b07b6cd8608
62e9ba69622bf6ed83cdbd3c7c683ffe8c4c3b6b
describe
'83205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDQ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
a95ac7d5442f825d0cfcc82c3bf60108
097cea2db356dbdcf7cdae3c91b7b9fe9b6ee8d5
describe
'59775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDR' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
754af89db837a3e3c70f0f10aabb74ad
247e01d1486de41b6655fb799049c4d1edb1d01f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDS' 'sip-files00077.tif'
be3326fa8bbf685471e9560a91a197ab
08b462d0903d3417035045a9e3e382cbc763c93b
describe
'3464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDT' 'sip-files00077.txt'
023bb800ff324e77b2c1fa17707a54d2
a20c44d6cce467e19a06393917d46cd07b472ee0
'2011-10-16T20:50:31-04:00'
describe
'19855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDU' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
d501729086b54bae5f4c45062c144682
aaee1d39c2cf2b40a65bc2f0a87d256663bb481c
'2011-10-16T20:50:58-04:00'
describe
'345713' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
023a2367e472bf23b627199287a9eae3
429c58309979f14be0cf06eccbf37663c6af3a30
describe
'215493' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDW' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
18489631cce70a267606450eecbbb9b8
b539fca850f0199e14f3995c0d3bbca38c5c0242
describe
'85823' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
3e21939a1325dc92bb5a10e49ab24dd2
9ef494beda09a2a1a3fda0f47c7fcfeb9ff953a6
'2011-10-16T20:53:06-04:00'
describe
'60369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
901bb738dd8354bbfe55bbd3c12142fb
9826249aa14bd823d1278ca8e75feae0442178db
describe
'2774680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPDZ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
0c7a452b42d038e1030b5832462c368d
3f07b40d3e61711710db34ffd2c5e62e9904b79c
describe
'3502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEA' 'sip-files00078.txt'
c2a86c4bbfd6259b897a74ae4c27f806
ec629c754c59109c1abbe2f796687fe679022fa6
'2011-10-16T20:50:42-04:00'
describe
'19761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEB' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
fad9da6194437c6667547b7ef0fb5fef
8eb1962e0dc1a409ee1bebbfad52cf979487116d
describe
'345437' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEC' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
8ca24bb87d5f3901aff0812c9920d977
0789c94a1760fe9b80e6cbcedf4a75cf7cf66d92
describe
'217448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPED' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
76f70beb7ce8265bfb042b66ef628404
d9b3fd4c916ad0ed86052ce2ceb2794e9fabafb7
describe
'84351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEE' 'sip-files00079.pro'
cff1cc87885d704bb684306478898833
b484a389703f68a6acf002510499c2f9036796cd
describe
'60588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEF' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
dc18ab83f0449cf14018556cc8b8f72d
9987597f02ed8970b55d2f7af20a236a7bd5ffad
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
2675cf16a3a4b83170dafda07a24fc36
0993a1526e88a8e394e7baf3747c39a78367346b
describe
'3503' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEH' 'sip-files00079.txt'
579beb149d8e977491eed70c1c549a9a
70f0b0b456e80314c122f8882c19e36524ed94fb
describe
'19920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEI' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
3fdde4b7997e6921a4ebceb264264d35
9c99c23676ecbb834a7697f23a366138b96d9a49
describe
'345626' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEJ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
6d9f0053ee11e5b32c9a8f4221c6655f
ce3e3e8c57937af9cca7d31ff1b9282d6c01e5cf
describe
'213431' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
ee4418f622a64009508885054bf9883f
da478eab9a63985d8a983d0717db556b556a0027
describe
'82271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEL' 'sip-files00080.pro'
b16546380532202ce6ff30003f3d60e1
55a7b2fdbf9140a37ab86fc34683449d89ee2d18
describe
'60122' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEM' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
1a65f2c060ea281e9a775c82b493a865
4712310436dadf17762c09bf34fad0c7fb755de1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
4eb521591f8474f49a585ca8a4fa54d7
489243e30793663258ed4bc9c01577ca4ad4fb8e
describe
'3390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEO' 'sip-files00080.txt'
60abda95b5121fa6224b1725611e032e
3c46b264e8fb427e4aa883a5766a69a1ff83fa06
describe
'19993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEP' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
5fab6de60389773833f4c094d42b5455
6141d95447fb1dc94318c07511d9dcf8a969f761
describe
'345226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEQ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
f7124d69215675d55f657fd841893108
ee46119ed82fba478b80817ceb5001b2ba71d17c
describe
'214149' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPER' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
355929d0765fe139637e395aa8074db3
9d74d93eef1abcba8f56cda212611279442b38d1
describe
'83758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPES' 'sip-files00081.pro'
8e55d9a773b2b483bf449e9c93131cf6
663903b4d83b80af49c385edabbbba3ce9149882
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPET' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
be90246f2c0d937a6320497ee43f3e74
a7725db6e8787d7163ba2804c1ed9a54795af3bf
describe
'2771300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEU' 'sip-files00081.tif'
94e1762d092a66702c2eef9914746d94
7b39c3cad836a20e96492e68f596260cf3074849
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEV' 'sip-files00081.txt'
4c766bb648282cdfe644247615073509
c02c1f409908aeabbd14c01d40b075a19b6627e9
'2011-10-16T20:53:53-04:00'
describe
'19975' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEW' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
a7fc214ae3ae4d486e7d163789814989
25fcb845edc196b93aef570533d3a791e950bf93
describe
'345633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEX' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
6599af3148dd4992acdc155f0ee08ac5
40ee0fde642b16a61ad064b56453454f68396661
describe
'214957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEY' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
4aded316e4ee2a1adac3702363a4ac63
b766da2d98fe8380c8c055780dcae076a947cc50
describe
'83985' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPEZ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
febd33bdcd8f28a7255c339cd3006d56
b8d6794e3a7f96a99f21e8c28e40faa8aa59f012
'2011-10-16T20:53:59-04:00'
describe
'60394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFA' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
2abf642f4071981511403ffb4dbb22dd
f03505d20814aedbc51478be7fccfcdb4ea5cd92
describe
'2774708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
57b62093853900d246273c1c401d4c3d
61eece2079fcd656ee0468dbbe22dc65faca5f6a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFC' 'sip-files00082.txt'
adda8b4eb2907cce90ac4878742cc7dd
08342b52fa5ad3b1832b77e39d1aed9c3589a054
describe
'19784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFD' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
5645e587b4580d3d66860cf5890f09a7
1f27616f8b95da3e64506391dca5d5b25ccf5e54
describe
'345452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFE' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
f7f6756270b1b5ac98e8ff282ac40e1a
c9f70e56967fe3930ccf589a88d4f11adf095533
describe
'199609' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
41339f3b896b401eccefc7fa121efc23
2c1244315ea5061070a60f3aa26470eabf31e078
'2011-10-16T20:50:41-04:00'
describe
'76764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFG' 'sip-files00083.pro'
1f89869894a7e0b58ee3a33f4e23122a
e35e4a70cb188b9348710f57130bea2f84ec0cd4
describe
'56886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFH' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
1bb95ca18b134c3ab8b75827c6cbb0a0
a53e4f42c18f82fdba0eaf4e27dfe7d3d6b9c76b
describe
'2772532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFI' 'sip-files00083.tif'
0f411938a8368b635061569273e8f06a
0ebe5b078a263aae82170a9f918021b33ce97a03
describe
'3228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFJ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1dab6e53c797973489f561cfccbe7b04
4e0294494330e8b55293cbb12fa2315ee948bcaa
describe
'19540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFK' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
df9e824e7b4fa0826c29e8ec0ad3348c
e3c9f172f8d994b303e9d11369c7fc162a3de0ad
describe
'345726' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFL' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
56eda797caafe41c999eccd2c2703893
f9698aa6f966308426a0fc5a41c92c7a167e8716
'2011-10-16T20:54:36-04:00'
describe
'216418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFM' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
458c2d7d4d9d332236e28b2737dd6474
d3ecdeba2081b02ddefb36325037c0f01c36c979
describe
'84886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFN' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a90f73cc17ed921144c177b52dc3bb9a
f869da084ac9ac73e951a7aa8b556dac96a4c2e0
describe
'60945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFO' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
e279c2b8ff0fe6380726f933bf358b60
eda734d22246916aef36067258ea086cdb892373
describe
'2774748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFP' 'sip-files00084.tif'
153f841fe856e071ce9eb3d8922d82d5
20359bc27f9d19767314f80a8b697898c839fd32
'2011-10-16T20:52:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFQ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
65575fb7d2e362e71f295e4f1c085876
9567a749fbf4dfa6c517f034dfeaecf3564f359c
describe
'20004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFR' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
5b270b929d10341c6f141658d4541d1e
5d80c76567ed94b641994093bd0a378ba00efcc5
'2011-10-16T20:51:23-04:00'
describe
'345476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFS' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
d97f3f7f93a262b919fea5b94a80fbdd
cad119fc77ccdc568d2d0b127196895e28fcb3f3
'2011-10-16T20:52:22-04:00'
describe
'202611' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFT' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
fba3dfdad16b8616e2c262d55d23c03e
22392b196f1bf2e8823e01d059fe1999855454cb
describe
'82255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFU' 'sip-files00085.pro'
20f8b4274abd22264cac9129919955d6
44432d05e14a3cdc39190518b635bcfc60965808
describe
'56865' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFV' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
5a20804d6501072208642ec027a76eec
9e077a60e7274e783e097986592775f7ae54f15c
'2011-10-16T20:57:42-04:00'
describe
'2772388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFW' 'sip-files00085.tif'
7a2914788b6611ee46efb6d9f92af860
1e5102f8145de171789ab02dcc3f29297340f577
describe
'3484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFX' 'sip-files00085.txt'
00160e1eab417c4b6e84f8798eade1b2
b3213407f738615f855ba0a50729ab8ee980a91a
describe
'18965' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFY' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
511c14c71fc0f4cff87a249a1719393f
75fe1a81e06f62520c0d2f8bf34536b71109dd9f
describe
'345708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPFZ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
29c7ae96ac87a4dd9ccf7306767003cf
abd45dadec315b5afa9048791e2492875dc73f49
describe
'224435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGA' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
d25b0f8f4baad5687c70f5e64aa79767
ee1bae9a53f2035f3c0a691cfd73ec26f4842aee
'2011-10-16T20:56:05-04:00'
describe
'87142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGB' 'sip-files00086.pro'
35726b5a19bf1ce02015380a975753ee
83e2c00759ec28101a1b085149429cc2f901b329
describe
'62545' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGC' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
fd6f0fb8882d267d294d802ff37cd275
e7b0ec21866c8dd05f32f4d20c0cc43da7c4e851
describe
'2774820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGD' 'sip-files00086.tif'
bcbf198f566a52de0d240980f60c16a4
9059b8ba02a91e26f2f9881319dea8e2e6248111
describe
'3556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGE' 'sip-files00086.txt'
68a5d175021c5f9efbe94fd5b5d1cee0
ecffe318c3a56b156dd1ac99ad915aea0ccdfac8
describe
'20429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGF' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
966fce57107b06e4900ef2436b54e813
9a6c548db72d441ff6f22773b6fa2bc9b298018a
describe
'345365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGG' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1146e03ad1582a5d7f8b3fb496eeba5b
e1772d8a33484c5ed7760e40d5802e2ad3d006cb
describe
'211752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGH' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9407d2a3e71f1a14ddf5de319210cbbd
5a863c45c36c0a4d4c8a4efe2307ff70dbaa7694
describe
'83101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGI' 'sip-files00087.pro'
82d361f9819cfa161d313c5ad7d4f6f3
2b7065bf54f053d2570c24d220143fb251c4554b
describe
'59306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
dfa2a9406ce19b1dca110b26ddd0a9f2
6261ed59364821d44239431f901e7528272aa5cf
'2011-10-16T20:53:57-04:00'
describe
'2772516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
4c1e8ec8806172a313812e52cb57ba8e
047ce81f4383150bbc0e7d13ad6d38e75e0044e1
describe
'3525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGL' 'sip-files00087.txt'
4f287fc44e272c4dcb61bd8411825abc
f8aa30f294c78abf1cb64b80ce581962c242c4cb
describe
'19437' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGM' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
021c6c49fb5c524876f167f6ae7b32f1
52f42ee1d9cb71b7863dcb8f5418511b473a3dd8
'2011-10-16T20:56:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGN' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
8ce16386e9e6f278759c0605ab78524d
0d21e0a7eb51f664bc926293ad40ef02dfff0dc4
describe
'208096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGO' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
901eae03497a37ba928342040645b77c
35af6f96a7620978d3a75fa317049f7d52d0416f
describe
'82717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGP' 'sip-files00088.pro'
d468f06abb4a6214ffa47ed9b1525e87
90b405a7a987a358f714403c96d1a1f339028cd3
describe
'58533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGQ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
2ce87d6d4ffc41c603e19c6c36e052f8
089f792996c9a59d74009098ec6f6b9358b7d9a8
'2011-10-16T20:56:15-04:00'
describe
'2774696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGR' 'sip-files00088.tif'
3b1527a0c00886e0defae63384d7cf30
f33e75bf331cf490c02b6c77d6e6e9722275a453
describe
'3442' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGS' 'sip-files00088.txt'
f61a0caad50ce95d44bb24aa2b154161
859fdf8aba01367c97de22dd8ca68da6670789f6
describe
'19296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGT' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
829f64c1e09ef169b07f31a80bd06082
10de80346fbae816c03500265b404a161e36221e
describe
'345466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGU' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
aa5ff19b6a88743bdc780d0a3a978a05
b60d0b49703fec45a55877d3d3ead173aa874b9c
describe
'212516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGV' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
0da647425828348f1bed02f89dfbdac6
1e90854cb133bb3a41303671abfe6c32b6ed3711
describe
'83326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGW' 'sip-files00089.pro'
f043eab7d7a4eedaca79976779081ff2
23824b5497bf637b4cd8a50344efe30e511ab319
describe
'59131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGX' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
1d6476bf5e9fdec866fd2ddda9286d81
5e29a8ddc2820623091b23bc1bf3c9a634c51ae5
describe
'2772544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGY' 'sip-files00089.tif'
ae1082df54828f8df278a0c7920f4776
487dd1bce767441f3689cb83ff7688c9c1918676
describe
'3472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPGZ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
f5595520c5acbfb6385476232f52064b
0bc3967b327fa38bea356dd9d7295e466f22a0e2
describe
'19474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHA' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
4cb1a5384da99da5893696254a29c32c
8053fea045d0277a296f105860a6f9b409df97d9
describe
'345696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHB' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
3adce3acafe259e390397c5dd5e4d608
5c4822d3d3bb4e724c179507b8939f8388fe766a
describe
'215787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHC' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
5c06ee6de0f9ea0aaa9b33c40da1fa3a
240fc414c9701c7bc11e69db22cf1735ff3ea9c7
describe
'83633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHD' 'sip-files00090.pro'
0686bcc2a27319e61828d3f17d65f17f
db6f75f7ad15cab03d49a4126f94826fbeacad82
describe
'60693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHE' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
b7cb46961b6e8346bf4cef9847ad8027
404b771ab4adb26f4dc790309c75faa2410c029d
describe
'2774768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHF' 'sip-files00090.tif'
4c5d139e5779bc2c4c65844436694dec
b3c856675f491940cc46a9002c271046d1048108
'2011-10-16T20:55:28-04:00'
describe
'3405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHG' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c45fb555ed3f94c7f7a16af466ef1ce8
5aff718a28ce6644c91d2f83e4f3e1a3ca596070
'2011-10-16T20:54:04-04:00'
describe
'19905' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHH' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
227c33664ff62b2d6cfd2617d65ff827
790c72d3fc8038a37875c296785fbb048e8c3a62
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
5faeb4fea522d46e87c4ee8a81de2c37
801ca64310fcd1469628be737ac84a71c03890a2
describe
'221395' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHJ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
fc4a17ac19142abe5ac072d1f03790b8
2750a0a754a0eeeaf1976e7bd0b5c0c008f575d3
describe
'85003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c8515a8f36676ae5eb36c0f735faf2a5
9845c7b6e8ee765099f6be7cca747719306ddaba
'2011-10-16T20:51:07-04:00'
describe
'61232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
fd5b9c7ee190d7e48e15f8359c63cd96
eee04a08d98b34ab93245e02ff330255511e79e6
'2011-10-16T20:54:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHM' 'sip-files00091.tif'
667ce8005a8861db1c39921a2519a3b4
5e340a9f517c8f6332c21d582224b49fc6e607f6
describe
'3519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHN' 'sip-files00091.txt'
650dd8ad72a1c482766c51aaff6ec96b
804fbbc798a53a9309ae3cdbab034c42fb45a187
'2011-10-16T20:53:49-04:00'
describe
'20215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
e388f4af5c4f7ddaae628ddeb455a971
6d55bf7a5f1e843cf42764b933d568cd6aee3fb1
'2011-10-16T20:54:30-04:00'
describe
'345645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHP' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
de07b020c0f6d220316b0b3c3a32ff9f
ce943fb85b8606fa61e6b9d55835376e47494c18
describe
'224355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHQ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
69daea7000472bb8e1a8ab56a6c8a554
e14819efa41a726a8f4ce289993e51af4a1c2bcd
describe
'84212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHR' 'sip-files00092.pro'
5b22280d4a076d2003b7dff7fa45c1da
93728a8d9f6e9c732009cd246643f283e084cd6d
describe
'60669' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHS' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
bc94ce6f4705630895ef1c7d4159a6f0
eae9279e746f9f73cc70b6d8f0873116d6c409cc
describe
'2774760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHT' 'sip-files00092.tif'
a7ee2623c4736b16eaa53da0410e1c27
e0b9f9536e14341a3cc0b5603f8ea05ee43fa0c0
'2011-10-16T20:54:06-04:00'
describe
'3431' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHU' 'sip-files00092.txt'
33fae4ef0f460347975a3f6f8751c05a
8912a394b436b5d7164c989096e326dede35877e
describe
'19928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHV' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
b8c67655c27e0d7412ef59c82bb03319
b8d4508aee833d35031fcbf119c6c0c07b6a6f2c
describe
'345483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHW' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
b0d57bb8f67fc1a97e0c5b122bee92e3
1a1c954f3a2d3f613c8f82a8468c0f9d09d07f04
describe
'219443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
11653a510328d99fe052b8c8e79485ae
a92ab29eac6e8cf16775efaee60f8c54fe9296e8
describe
'82083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHY' 'sip-files00093.pro'
dca1eed71ac68589afa91e741987c95e
747049539f0e8825f635e2685442ddfa03e42907
describe
'60782' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPHZ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c9aa119cc3315e61c35d72fbc0c6fbde
ae2433b21d620feca96c82b46f2badd82ea4c1e7
'2011-10-16T20:55:24-04:00'
describe
'2772612' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIA' 'sip-files00093.tif'
18f38af7684cd16f2a30a06d108025d8
56bb8a5d64aa849a447aa5acd4d4cd0bfe4898f3
'2011-10-16T20:51:35-04:00'
describe
'3415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIB' 'sip-files00093.txt'
722eab648bead67f4e760229d085dc48
fabd4d93ad4c66bbc4aa4349a5a7f1c4ea1ade5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIC' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
c8842d7a67743c7ffb342d98f2d7a208
c43bd42a1f6d670018938d996278ec72ea7a921e
'2011-10-16T20:52:01-04:00'
describe
'345715' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPID' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
001bef62a2d09a02acf2533ea2ebf30d
c203f3b398d5d2786c09ad4bb0ab75551051d967
describe
'215354' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIE' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
3f9e96185d0a6ccdceb3dc75e8c5c327
c52a39aecd95c0a17317e04f1ce9aa173245900c
describe
'84354' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIF' 'sip-files00094.pro'
2c859b91763ef40218c37e5b3686134e
973a4eb490c749f595d2be27debf5978f6cfa871
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIG' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f5d50b616bc89f45a47538ea79ad1309
9647a7a49ea10319b08545dbf671a0fea988eeef
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIH' 'sip-files00094.tif'
747974c58c91e3a3e978d733efe32fc9
003f7523ea4ec8f3a4e6eb4a3c549f8b027fe372
'2011-10-16T20:53:58-04:00'
describe
'3433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPII' 'sip-files00094.txt'
1c55b62414e5bc01db7e042d1e7a136c
f35ac08a5195d84c9cd53c2fdd871c4dc53131b6
'2011-10-16T20:57:00-04:00'
describe
'20094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIJ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
68ff65e477d0fecfcf4ad19df92c04cf
674e2b4992aab00bba0fb0d10009f9398c31a9db
'2011-10-16T20:54:50-04:00'
describe
'345456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIK' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
b19e5358405cc89b7b882cb52cf62953
db122e60ac99ec1db9ebded79666c8060169f10d
describe
'212451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIL' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
5934699f4d57378921e6e39f0227a98d
2e5b03fa8f532549010d21eb411ab0b4d3aca162
describe
'82531' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIM' 'sip-files00095.pro'
c6fe88404a9c9325c9b27b2496d61c30
793c44eaddfa5bc4b4e45ee6b7e02f30222dbec6
describe
'59937' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIN' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
97e25ccd541e4a4bed8bc20c5942257b
12ba3c020c15f44367bf1ada88d216170743b03a
describe
'2772584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
8cfbf087cf14de2c8d4395227251185c
d44b31a07592dd539688ab7d71f59cc7a6425eda
'2011-10-16T20:52:40-04:00'
describe
'3437' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIP' 'sip-files00095.txt'
ff2602128ef9e4439a3bc4a277d6cfd7
abb14dc72cae088c9764cd101871bc9e7bc99610
describe
'19849' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIQ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
abcf0cc414352222bad6356b7b6d80cb
0e3e8d54e442e672968853acb5fffb45d0bf03ba
describe
'345278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
bf5b660a9d60257ab20ccad3eddd214b
e771785e1474d05bfeff4ab8fdf1e2017dd4d431
'2011-10-16T20:54:56-04:00'
describe
'208817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
71071c3dccb556a6e6615c4d92239636
305c87d4b13a1cf0ea9d25ca3e7192c9cd71f337
describe
'83574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIT' 'sip-files00096.pro'
63deb462df4f24e77f27c4b446aacab3
0a2def88e34e7fe7702676f9466041d1a48aa93c
'2011-10-16T20:53:13-04:00'
describe
'59277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIU' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
9e40fdcc31870ae93b7d0cdbac53f1a3
cc7a9d5712950d3711451c0c73822303b577226e
describe
'2771180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIV' 'sip-files00096.tif'
2e4b078845ecb34ce2c3c1b13c6ef004
27fcb6621572839c9776865b21a1a57c2994260d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIW' 'sip-files00096.txt'
d39a24a6003edeaad4653cc4b0dc9189
994d65dbc6e74156481afab1d9486f303c1f4e2e
describe
'19485' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIX' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
c28c4d8d9996a73ebbfdf2f0957188db
8cdf6f1eeb3444bc07c442982be28d8bafb39db9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIY' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
b995f46c8c2997c776e7560664640717
6e1de1423e0bc024ef1300f212004e92a43c82db
describe
'202898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPIZ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
9bd74f040d16cf1acca91ee35fe7708b
750894a6ed134a1d6c253baece0336b97aa75c84
describe
'83118' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJA' 'sip-files00097.pro'
a69e52cb60a1558412085b6c48e2b8fe
5c847ed41096d24698470163b6580c89786c1a6e
describe
'57289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJB' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
b624fd07ce2d755d25df2dd6893a971b
c2a6e0b90de128646c1d772d1f6980278314ce98
describe
'2772408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJC' 'sip-files00097.tif'
b9ab44596be8308053226469b958b79a
706d12a672a4a295aeef95c37b1f7b8517c12a9b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJD' 'sip-files00097.txt'
27035bc6313abefc3b7ef2e83bf3d30d
31adb648a445137f88ec6a9dda0be112a4d30963
describe
'19131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJE' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
6af62f0522496adf0ba2b7ba5d9045ad
3b78dcfbf7615f2d937f873efeed72ccc1d9f56f
'2011-10-16T20:53:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJF' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
d5ef2a4ddc06b469d235be1d1b51e66c
da20e438a4762ebc6220da8d33bc1b23c7eb1742
'2011-10-16T20:51:48-04:00'
describe
'205858' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJG' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
5c715de0fbcd8489e5b0aeafcb525f94
9f4c2f2b50290ea6e4e77686b19133d1ddaae0a3
'2011-10-16T20:57:05-04:00'
describe
'79610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJH' 'sip-files00098.pro'
fe335a35d66813c9bd1077898bc57422
48809f70bfd2e23c332356391a09f79216b928a9
'2011-10-16T20:56:13-04:00'
describe
'59122' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJI' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
1ce5d9fb8974d987b9b8b0e2e2ec703b
fe304e2ae1658a201580ff6e4ee8fefe47a8e01d
describe
'2774704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJJ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
e5f4ac4aecb1f3674041302b331885d3
f7ebe5090501a797075473d2b0757734331ef9d4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJK' 'sip-files00098.txt'
663c5a39dda1dcfd599e745bcd4d758f
c7f28fa4bb74b2b49292fc9c0ddf054322f55deb
describe
'19758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJL' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
217dee45208278f2e1f9fbf7321ac85f
4fad5f9f42d984aed0d2a00ff25bfeff077afe69
describe
'345484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJM' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c591d758affe4cd92a2dfcd1664e50a3
5778b4b0c161368a0c6ba8dd81d98455862a13fb
describe
'209554' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJN' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
2680fd7a411cbb189244954cbb6f65af
6dccae24e7c6b1d50b98380055f02176e4f8de82
describe
'80915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJO' 'sip-files00099.pro'
41157e383bb93b36090d676930bc0166
4f5efeb37779a14c264e410ce22338c3845a0d65
describe
'60305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJP' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
32740271bf75b810a4816c36a22d1f64
a6f69400ca4399bb119e45953667fab9c03d80c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJQ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
5c58f1e56093fbe42a757545ec92ee7e
91609e7d2f9fff13e27257525aa904c48b1f2dc3
describe
'3323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJR' 'sip-files00099.txt'
1784bc17943f7035d247e162e2a2a311
315e611b2c4eb6636cc5072ccbeb8fe1fb9c4a3c
describe
'19894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJS' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
cedc47ed736275872f0411f03bddc62c
1fb741943fbdf902af74fc8f284a52198a47583c
describe
'345690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJT' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
82885da0be30b8184e721a597b08fedf
32aec33dea772172d69a305c98151546e694f656
describe
'191761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJU' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
2bbc85a4a63ad53985f9eaa900c7f5e9
5cddb38e147545aa14e36fa1d5d7c5db079e8b2d
'2011-10-16T20:50:15-04:00'
describe
'74755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJV' 'sip-files00100.pro'
437d2072b2ba2892ad5fed836600358d
3cae795b174697464f1b71e35468218995374fbe
describe
'55576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJW' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
074ab3a587e808b1b507a9b35f777c94
83eac4a40c7ecbe89a9ca0b44974301f27cdcfa1
describe
'2774532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJX' 'sip-files00100.tif'
3f9bbb9d6f678a3ec1a9d0bf63ddf9a5
5a0f5d134eaeeab4483b1daa280a52e6d7cfa235
describe
'3085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJY' 'sip-files00100.txt'
71d5d63ff04271cfad9472a3b7e5f6d2
516340f867d3cfbc5eea6fb646d449896581a1f3
describe
'18863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPJZ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
54ee254572cf5a38ee96abab2c190823
0376c026b9cbdd6c6f98f178a7c8a79405d929e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKA' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
7c7059796ffa9dc3489e4f09ad69e0e4
a6c1c4367fe2145e7f9ac8e649080b39ee72a6c9
'2011-10-16T20:56:55-04:00'
describe
'209624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKB' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
2bddc2b6401e3cee291466bb45a70a2e
fdd44aa26d0b6f865429488391a1edc7a8595f35
describe
'81609' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKC' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d7a8bca2fb77df4cd4317ced20e956e9
9dd5ce5d78a940ef64e8b0a8b718f0c7d008a948
describe
'60060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKD' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
9be00431afe48e3da0a9165a97c569e0
c428f73864494ceeda99944fdd5c7b53326b6da7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKE' 'sip-files00101.tif'
2f4d9c31bb7bff7ab7c93bd3f58bf29c
40a74c21a91a297dfefb7de882719c4cc254ce87
describe
'3399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKF' 'sip-files00101.txt'
4fe56b9fe1daec8488c0a71a8a2df328
05e36f2511858991a02fbbe8b711fd90ade46e09
describe
'20099' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
32fdc0de8411773ee8c0f2a7f40048d1
4be94a09996641de288a9ac159c4745a6623f7c0
describe
'345749' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKH' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
2760a79d06fcbe7c3185c72d66eb2ffc
5eaa7e5210f86c051673d915ee4415c53a45d445
describe
'203980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKI' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
15332dd0f74ae2f886d8f9dffefd8dda
bcf3915c450943f36b5146456b7efc6b43885540
describe
'83983' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKJ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
204d4104dff58b50ffd90d78a56cd02e
9a2f8349f27b183ee204caef4b95b861acd2017e
describe
'56048' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKK' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
5276ff11df76fe1febaadf46050b74d1
894b4020737d0785a1a9fb56d315bfe09b33ff29
describe
'2774436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKL' 'sip-files00102.tif'
88522c91c8e6a5af21788ccc8ae3387b
0524f76e8a1fd0661c02a811f5fb8e5177f67ba8
describe
'3426' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKM' 'sip-files00102.txt'
39dc817ecbd26db6e470bebd9e8252a6
2e707748e7eaff78f06e701b17b55daa00c35a34
'2011-10-16T20:52:04-04:00'
describe
'18656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKN' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
5976cb42850ff73c3f21e9fbe7e145f4
d31679c4bb00e2a2ec6b7fbdfc3026614a9bdba4
describe
'345455' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKO' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
b4bfe072fa60c8a419de7ac4866cac1c
03245bddc432605d684dadee584738008391a49d
describe
'200162' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKP' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
4cab8972a9e362e2c4b1f334b58b42e7
48bbc964108b926fb3711f1f7b284f726573c57d
'2011-10-16T20:50:29-04:00'
describe
'79922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKQ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
fd4c0112bb2ca2e58fad73e87ac57ae5
ee0af4bbe9811255350c197afe9947033a0a8fec
'2011-10-16T20:51:13-04:00'
describe
'57346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKR' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
f41763ec63d9c7e71a3fa3f4d0fc7dcb
2055b3da6ad58b8c63faa083e4b465297b2804bc
describe
'2772428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKS' 'sip-files00103.tif'
9d20cf42918175e23314cd981a97c3d6
e13895756aa103a890d31c5e9d55b6bb62e223b7
'2011-10-16T20:55:17-04:00'
describe
'3304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKT' 'sip-files00103.txt'
4926fd54694ef3eb1baaf654ce1900a5
8025b5286f4901b84d271727e98e16542c258ea1
describe
'19039' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKU' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
d934443b9757bc321ec4ca2a99667191
18e2743b908bd6f16cf78119013cf188d813b92f
'2011-10-16T20:54:23-04:00'
describe
'345723' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKV' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d891d61eab4566f9e1c8198909d1c1c5
2cdb7bed8bff51d8d9f59d6bfbddca770371f688
describe
'215417' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKW' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
efea08a4e2bc3888b75cfc26665d97dd
e0061afa681adea4ecdb32a7da56962cecd53a57
describe
'82427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKX' 'sip-files00104.pro'
8337ad3bbbf24a3e56abf7f986d6ecf3
7bcff2034b56363128ab5a6f85cf5c96eb03453f
describe
'61076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKY' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
a9a046509bbef18205bbeb22ca93b60d
4ebcb559c62581d6cb291dbc5e5fdc88d536d754
describe
'2774796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPKZ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
955b2b1e9cddd03b725c9f60c5126027
f7a796a6e267c7bef1bc383448e1f31a5153d0b6
'2011-10-16T20:50:17-04:00'
describe
'3386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLA' 'sip-files00104.txt'
de3cfa21da33ede81cc6f29142137b6d
fdded288eb4c683d22e47cc1e1ffb3c4c55dbb29
describe
'20143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLB' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
ffd6d70da0741ae9498ed9d461cdcd8a
67d55ec2c822a4647f37e757786d11eec2d54625
describe
'361234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLC' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
150f9270b2fcc4b135b2c6d81e22421b
1350132970925b9110c0824057d766ef37a3aa00
describe
'207187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLD' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
f72d21b27238d183889108dec6851f0b
289d3af3007add2d63b503ae78d6ecbfef70ec87
describe
'84133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLE' 'sip-files00105.pro'
ebb0e89fa6b235d3a11d916db39f7518
1a15de7200fcd46dd3caa5b1d5ab533e004eabca
describe
'58196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLF' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
c3569ca013d81c894f85fe2ac4f59bba
c71fdc1bd75784b632431827cacccaaab306a11c
'2011-10-16T20:53:47-04:00'
describe
'2899644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLG' 'sip-files00105.tif'
fe8bf4a2032fb1f6357d5a0f75fd2552
fcb8befc5d1c35b5f4a7c84bc618041447c15754
describe
'3486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLH' 'sip-files00105.txt'
1c945e5f3f6bef4e1035c381407a3ee7
d6e77916218efb4dc2c5bfe9cc9369fa4da8c18c
'2011-10-16T20:56:58-04:00'
describe
'19393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLI' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
93f011da03fd9b2f85db3a5b939d5f55
68ae6a1631915fc37dd896467e11a0de87c18b14
'2011-10-16T20:52:58-04:00'
describe
'345737' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLJ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
c3130ab5c2ad8669a92d0ab94ddead28
208a8f36beca8bb1c4978750e8b069aaf26db9c2
'2011-10-16T20:50:54-04:00'
describe
'201620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLK' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
00bd961630191dcfd127fe25da0581c3
19b411e6e465297b7aea7656b9db4f04f93ac5f4
'2011-10-16T20:51:59-04:00'
describe
'73627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLL' 'sip-files00106.pro'
2547d11d32a628e8aee4bb53b497159a
9e1ae639ca2c4309bdf4c437000f2ae410bce71a
describe
'58060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLM' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
04a18c8e1b9bced1e320a8d7ce8ce787
a3bfaf56dfec2abee8fffd044cca1fa5b72f2ddc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLN' 'sip-files00106.tif'
d9520f2f135599799e096200c633528e
af718c391afa08713ba950393baa83b124ed1d6d
describe
'3038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLO' 'sip-files00106.txt'
cd454fd3f175746ac48f79b9be85e688
39b6a472cd84221cc83e799f0d07b0002311969b
describe
'19739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLP' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
0a3b43a3ad18a7a60c8d3c0c81888f59
ad32dda63e82c74abf1c47961c5b1852bd634c4c
describe
'345346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLQ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
739a119fc4267f6d08e4f2ab02188208
ed6f0c160f3429b2f0cbae53e5e58c1efad68535
describe
'212776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLR' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
5cc697cea68ef194f37232626afce372
aea60ce12188d600e46c0fdb3e89c3d326523990
'2011-10-16T20:54:32-04:00'
describe
'82530' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLS' 'sip-files00107.pro'
5d85d30dc3224f9ab791d9c931758369
7ff8fc7bfa93d79242e42c012ca32ed73314969c
describe
'59170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLT' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
aec9223881ff2c9d281b185020a1b246
83224ba23818297548602106220c2fa1095daae0
describe
'2772492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLU' 'sip-files00107.tif'
8ae4cc6f98531bfc3548d322a186dcbd
c6f24c40126f561a701f707f134707f328e13c1f
describe
'3434' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLV' 'sip-files00107.txt'
4c5aa0172b449abda5a2c64ae2dea62b
0156f27392db0fab125fab9e47031c1e02769f11
describe
'19351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLW' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
6613380506df484bc99110a11ac80b9f
37b0299837b59c73cb84c35b354b2f2e152cadc1
describe
'345718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLX' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
180ca99f32e13f0e5fa6f024516a3785
fc38774269862194140436fdc80e5a0a2a1c5224
describe
'230996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLY' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
9029da2f9cf89ad402248ae0f5389251
4e56ba5daaaa5123fd7a1703b687a987551942d5
describe
'82317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPLZ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
738e8be7d4e7c0ece526059a5e4a8722
c2bd13ac5a0306ca62d13339a8bdeb001d4db5df
describe
'63132' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMA' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
7d0e09a1946f189294e459d0e099428f
cb402cdec4e6d8971827cfa8124764691e0af234
describe
'2774976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMB' 'sip-files00108.tif'
6470d21a07b0317e8ef6b480ee1dbf60
6a0cb5707bdfdb383ca9aae374c53aa0a93053b1
'2011-10-16T20:51:53-04:00'
describe
'3370' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMC' 'sip-files00108.txt'
d6b2aa6df74a56063ae1e609e176f79c
69eaa1ecc901fb010717760387e89fc6eb73f893
describe
'20914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMD' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
a9ee58960580edc0ebbedadc7e714a80
399b8535e9ecb993145d59ae7415c040e1fe2b3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPME' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
910dd5416fe2d598da6d0587b8fea9ce
7b27d383f0795483df3ce59ab8d26d72f3816717
describe
'221198' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMF' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
a39a9190a0d546889585cc0e6b651570
a4452e6bbd2abfb6bccaac699c9bf7d5110255f6
describe
'80633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMG' 'sip-files00109.pro'
b4f6ba4a43551661f6407d44e12b503e
a920b8d47a994bc4bf7d8176386c3011f25881a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMH' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
670891bcf7830777e00e35f858ca0048
a9313092730df5921bfdc86376bbd2e2b13c0203
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMI' 'sip-files00109.tif'
ba3539ac2a48e1ef3bb20c3dbfc55887
07ef0208035f7d1156831e96a939dd1277e47ef5
describe
'3322' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMJ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
2044afb53bc6ab7a65f0e3adf8e2ac31
153e1172564662c19907017d671661f63852fbc5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMK' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
2a60909aa269076baa55422450ec92ab
e3f9c4b67e2177e7de0cca1ba2279db3c57d08f3
describe
'345750' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPML' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
41d6f0129bd0e487f56c9643be089a97
e5430feabbafe5bc6d860d6d5e2b2996b4e0da07
describe
'206297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMM' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
bfd4255841bf87c11d07780b692c1a99
79e8fa031db13ab67e266979d1a93d9602ebcf74
'2011-10-16T20:54:28-04:00'
describe
'82088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMN' 'sip-files00110.pro'
53528b9f3e94e5be7aad3ee6852f3afd
03018f2b99fc570cfcf56d2b600ad420f2eeca8b
'2011-10-16T20:56:23-04:00'
describe
'58647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMO' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
1b1332ff171e8e43eb2b72cc6d096eaa
6185e9b3d5a9b56292ceb4b2f685566ca86c99fe
describe
'2774576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMP' 'sip-files00110.tif'
94e5c1d9eda5f1e8de4b158f6bb7534a
26107ff8204dfcbeccce6158f5b767cf412aba9b
describe
'3403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMQ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
125ab41a78002c062df0f64a242baaad
95ca7e25aaf329712a2f307870e4cda7a4579ee0
describe
'19572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMR' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
8f7ba94dee5a49bad25a4f82bb3a6497
e54d05107212ff9dc8000902c85d5e5ff9924380
'2011-10-16T20:52:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMS' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
de44c0ca6edc6cb1b9641d05ac75ecc7
09cdfbb5fc7a1f5e26a521f9aef122821a451b19
describe
'208242' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMT' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
56ac599d0c9f0557713e8616432a22e0
eec91934870ee52ba25c51ece0f3f5b45c29bbb1
'2011-10-16T20:54:05-04:00'
describe
'82577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMU' 'sip-files00111.pro'
51cef4fb3f5c8c57deb7ee7c23fbe9cc
5d4a13f1735deaeed364497c1a87f25071393b8d
'2011-10-16T20:52:10-04:00'
describe
'59155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMV' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
537e03f851268c1f6c09d76588e9a877
7740fb8d77c30133573d338fef5f4c8c222f9a9b
describe
'2772524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMW' 'sip-files00111.tif'
14e18e940f0960d688d90e95f0fcf4f4
f30d84ce6761d9deba2311d927fc99a3010c1b15
describe
'3384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMX' 'sip-files00111.txt'
5e83bf18f677909b630eeb9c12ac604e
479f2def1bbab16ded9ac6418501c115c07f8f3b
describe
'19543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMY' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
fe769be96f3cd8403b73106860f99558
a5fdc5b012c74ca00e46815435f77a7df907fad4
describe
'345717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPMZ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
540e29f133f47b504e77b04e15268997
65c8de175c0a5d1a369e47211925e7630001f89b
'2011-10-16T20:55:58-04:00'
describe
'197421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNA' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
a10a934a9bb645fab473d969a2d0a91b
fb625a7c3f3619fc61766acd5d41ff27026313bb
describe
'74229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNB' 'sip-files00112.pro'
048195d8729c242630ee57f0d2898cbc
fffb102c8c2590a39d31c25197e533f896177f4d
describe
'56767' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNC' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
dcb7bcd9bb320890c664e22732c57e45
753a07e65ed414c397ca59a6210c847fd035ca34
describe
'2774740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPND' 'sip-files00112.tif'
bff366b566c5fd3f7953f6bb87cadb35
75a900cd2ab2a73762d794c3d3a5f48b99e78896
describe
'3099' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNE' 'sip-files00112.txt'
e6c394c13e6f7a8f7df80dbcec840050
d10306e2769afce84dc5c9fcf6fb1d47ba45816c
'2011-10-16T20:51:33-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'19638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNF' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
5bdf464bd5c651dab69e0d59db5d7c00
f901da79e2d7efbf966ee2dab7aef647a590cf0f
describe
'345404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNG' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
70d78cfe4543f9b4a654ba975ec19dad
6114267b84e38fe91a44909fff34a13d0a9556d3
describe
'218856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNH' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
8fee513067670c1844ab55fff3e6c679
542bcd3cf689f27fa9f282c77e9d4084dbc1dc75
describe
'83544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNI' 'sip-files00113.pro'
e7cab7df53f56e07a26c06a8d7bed81e
c2b1fe808127e57e77a42e1048f0ca2d4bc3c932
describe
'61432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNJ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
8e01c07bd0865ffd64c84e095c8f442c
7ab5e8782383f6cc340997dfde624733901081cd
describe
'2772700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNK' 'sip-files00113.tif'
7c660c74ae4c944e53a5654406eda2c6
669e866d95e75bea1f3863c4a78f38ae26237e64
'2011-10-16T20:51:00-04:00'
describe
'3423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNL' 'sip-files00113.txt'
13d18c1771e5680bfd934d96a56fc4bd
cfe82cc7dca3cf51f54ebb665077a47f76e55b98
describe
'20125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNM' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
17846ef5db0d6f8816670ce9873da63d
73f2cf0078d0994466b7f842274f91d3f18d2d4a
describe
'345732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNN' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
dc2ed8cd7717cade70e9f6ba63f0e38e
4c14fb1b292f558e7c2d028253e4e94e378f1512
describe
'191732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNO' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
9d99d72c41d5579a03cfbed5c326e0c5
b325245b5d733a3890d557ac9c9fb6b9179ecd89
describe
'76318' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNP' 'sip-files00114.pro'
fe66d295e77184537c7eaeb7f2383710
62dc5e686ad44a909cd83949cfc365239c0c0a22
describe
'53858' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNQ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
8382fa42210ac3824344916533120b1f
cad4b48f31c0e91c966d6f7b42269d19224ed5c4
describe
'2774356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNR' 'sip-files00114.tif'
55f3f6c91c7f7fb63b70a8c7ea64728d
42b59ebcd9da9fcc6c0c731de3cdefdf562ea840
'2011-10-16T20:57:34-04:00'
describe
'3151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNS' 'sip-files00114.txt'
ffbbc005f749fa0477b24b721c924f99
b72e4dc465aa2089c33dd78a67cda9f75fb2fabf
describe
'18306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNT' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
64f2675b92bed77da357bf77bf08eab1
3496565e037d934332b55cd4a9b6779f0f0ff1ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNU' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
c3406c05b5804870931636cf5a344b1d
523b1399bb143fb0c485784abe9529f0ad489d0a
describe
'202389' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNV' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
f9b2f9edeb5bc9975115bb8aef22353b
3a6c602513b007f3e213ac36676c190892990672
describe
'81398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNW' 'sip-files00115.pro'
08396118dcf48a907d8d2cec80329180
2c5eb20a61a14153f4fbde3bb715a57a80374722
describe
'57496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNX' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
114dfbda49ba7bd072719f4d7a86b217
791b7e7aa530b7987f95c98d0134b80ca8517121
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNY' 'sip-files00115.tif'
bb7c47c733a7171c0f8400da0a45a118
d306eaddc6b6ab8b120a918f4fe8ff8cb83b0a77
'2011-10-16T20:56:53-04:00'
describe
'3348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPNZ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
9b2a98b37fc5adf948d0d5b24ca3e0d4
7943bbbc5fc67db6797fdd1331d1df5b379bd7fc
describe
'19148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOA' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
69d65e3fc8f5baa9dd0da48dcafc01b4
6fd8d941d1f00d305977e508708ba87110c38882
describe
'345613' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOB' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
9db84312a006f0595726d86aef556be8
d658b64cf386194c5381eaa5395a25c8b7f2aabd
describe
'215516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOC' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f4fd66cb83fb1cfc57a095973c40a3b1
c22992f1ad3309ddb22bcf05e730640a9930c9ec
describe
'81479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOD' 'sip-files00116.pro'
a6442334dc2e3a8dd06cf165126b6a38
c46ab22ac370597dee0ea70bbe431c8637c373d0
describe
'61284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOE' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
a4190341f3bd81218de67e68f88a7215
efe11daf5b8c8d979c474fd6640914872a29db69
describe
'2774812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOF' 'sip-files00116.tif'
5e49c52538649cd6edb907818f54383a
d33331af49a8bc143beaa48430f31589bc9797e7
describe
'3354' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOG' 'sip-files00116.txt'
ac892c64ad837cc198dd50ebb280033f
242c51d463c414da187ce3a68e069ede226406c6
'2011-10-16T20:51:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOH' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
618b4e957cfa99fc65d9c6f66cdfac02
1ecebe2c0b16ed4c256bcd330acb663a32eeeb8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOI' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
acb9de72c76aa526f6905eeb0bc10bed
46272c1c36505a6ee50eb2497bbab2aaa7b82da2
describe
'189886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOJ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
cc48c5d3dbda641466d6ab5de9de4547
dcaa2b4d166d0323be5101e1a2f327fcca7b50fb
describe
'74862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOK' 'sip-files00117.pro'
f1965d2cc2a0027bd563a6427638e0d4
4d478cb26c460d4876aff160153cb5b8e5d90446
describe
'54015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOL' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
24f80e614220a946b3861fe362b8dd9c
e5897fd00c8753b0549d8f9fd7d974a6e09a5c77
describe
'2772340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOM' 'sip-files00117.tif'
fb23a1c38fcb7b56d0df76593ae8a187
f4d25a49e647b3464edb9eb3e10864dc9d20727c
describe
'3121' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPON' 'sip-files00117.txt'
7732ae42cb84d29bcd4ac134e6f8abd0
8bb0147ec6a5199b476808490c4c9ba803e39877
describe
'18352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOO' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
1f3f3414ad75e01c838f5c6c4bb8843c
fe20d960ab3baa4f8d6d23bbdb05166ca9616643
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOP' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
67b1b6b171d9be09063e5af9a7abf7a6
32c8c02504449464eabe439239c0de0b7ecceba7
describe
'221573' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOQ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
e72bdce9e7ef657182ed4ad5e33483ef
1e8bfe9f84641b9262625db5cab1528b8d4cc54f
'2011-10-16T20:54:58-04:00'
describe
'83978' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOR' 'sip-files00118.pro'
c42eff59efaf28d498d384e1932e932a
4a746d6f3865eba87d10037b77cb9fd5165d502f
describe
'62387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOS' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
c31b8a3947c274ae7a99f306882f36ab
8e3d3c19bbf6017e73fb69c9aace75979c890c99
describe
'2775052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOT' 'sip-files00118.tif'
10133d2911a3663b8b4fe04198fb492b
584708d5eafc5729b8e6f0aacc49063f39467997
describe
'3443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOU' 'sip-files00118.txt'
33f4d47d8654f794db6ce7f971d9a828
69d29d2421d8a92000fd17400b93283acce645d5
describe
'20633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOV' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
60e03b3d4aebb3c6f030b4fbb4362c20
a0648ee3f4b15de54c9c413c54acc1cdeb2b7dcf
'2011-10-16T20:55:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOW' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
0ffc712b4f11e922a80292f5a0498108
16c159f405162e998f48eb42bbc0d4124f0d4c2a
describe
'213519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOX' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
7984620f9d674577836c41173f42411e
757138c1dd76beaca23d683ed5072ed350a59a6a
describe
'82206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOY' 'sip-files00119.pro'
c4c1c55e493f3ff74ef34a6f0918fd0d
752eac3e74815ca67010249c681c4528c6673b72
describe
'59863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPOZ' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
25f064e6d65b26e7d5c56661d04cbc0f
934c332db1b40b2a71cc1c9187f654fa8d29bda5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPA' 'sip-files00119.tif'
33fc4e2dd7f838f5da0c063f92e43c73
b707b42106be4d6ef80fc7cd1023d80c888b009c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPB' 'sip-files00119.txt'
fc0ad6e4fc3d863e1ecd58008c561904
51b3a715c18bfb3e47c6a897103826ef58b770ff
describe
'20074' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPC' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
88d7e3a1ba7c9ebaf1420ccdcbf9a996
97e47ea5e4ad15e2e1662e18d42a76732daef943
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPD' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
c771c2db3ed7d7dc26ede8476e94748f
5a8139724f305e784c3e5bbca4318092ce894bc9
describe
'210219' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPE' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
2043e705e760728479b0f5705319eca5
f97a19075c25532d5d99983d68019c183d5debde
describe
'80578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPF' 'sip-files00120.pro'
a8878774b3c6907d5456b04a3de4c464
bb79f17f0e9412dc96e4aabf52bc9816f1115f7d
describe
'60292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPG' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
db7508243b05f243e14dfa8004bf92d3
2ee8d5f56eb3401d55ad3acae7f664127ff85af7
describe
'2774688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPH' 'sip-files00120.tif'
6ca2c472d9c8fbbaf7a9c838aebfda63
49732a147d5930b25465be230031818a16cdb6bd
describe
'3309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPI' 'sip-files00120.txt'
28e542be347b98d4420481bf0d6c589e
23207964ea86c3b014be20d9a2c3407ae7c3dcb2
describe
'19774' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPJ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
cf738cbf8c6c0bc8d40d4930670f676b
a991ef1d6cec1ec9806e9f0d8f4bbc02a6ba6b8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPK' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
e7d4f274af3c02408bcca35d20dbe5ac
b97690a36e46a34185f22ac1946ab121e6d154bb
describe
'189220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPL' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
8e7597468c766d3a1699867ca79d4045
f1cd8207cc8b9131181f5598bc048decc2a3a33d
describe
'73514' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPM' 'sip-files00121.pro'
fc169152b1af5f326263c3b8c758897b
b4a280578af1ad990cb00150cc03f3d3f3215835
'2011-10-16T20:57:31-04:00'
describe
'54879' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPN' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
acfff355962e223cff3f42e815df6865
4ddcb6332b1b0ccf3373b8a4bc251f35876f29d1
describe
'2772360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPO' 'sip-files00121.tif'
baeb628436d48ffc03ac51fb0294654f
8f4596b1e833886267010c73ca51975591aa58ab
describe
'3070' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPP' 'sip-files00121.txt'
82454f0ecf82d13ead247c2a9d9a72b0
3a7de4487e33bb24dd4763f8a4250ad2afdee8af
describe
'18628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPQ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
db8d7a81955dc8957876dd2815335deb
1c8e7a51d089e03bb789d29548e1c27740dc469e
describe
'345706' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPR' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
7b95661d36bc4f12e6b4e1e0ade4a3c9
0055d140aa65bbb580b740bd37f62a53af5de234
describe
'212525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPS' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
633b20258865db360b9e38b904fd6676
8d2b4bf9dfb1bbc9d6b5b084ac907e861fa9dffb
describe
'80791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPT' 'sip-files00122.pro'
2e5cbb1d435df6a34f083ebd789d28bf
a68ad0db2322dc2a9a1cb45b4c07985a28f78e9a
describe
'60072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPU' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
3bf3c8a05836ae58499648db249516d8
586b280199dd73166a976ba125421e3a104245bd
describe
'2774756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPV' 'sip-files00122.tif'
2a9451997fcc6d504625503112dd1ebc
f0dbfbd6ba5f454e259cad22272857a43d241627
describe
'3326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPW' 'sip-files00122.txt'
84a7abb63ec4fb483962d754aab180ca
08ff8e7465ac6cdaa6256f515ddb4fe028337228
describe
'20007' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPX' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
ffbf3d198ba1eb5c2a822c6483f55699
1f1d9df7109342743d01d94b8d1e6e2575aa3da7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPY' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
b1d5ac184273d2839c7b05f0c246b7f8
0e574a7fe23383794a6853c6cfb082a1608556a8
describe
'212223' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPPZ' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
a91e43b3589d6979abc23d61ba7d8af0
6b55c9c7009f3d78b25ae884097b9e2abf36bf60
describe
'80712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQA' 'sip-files00123.pro'
f4aebd604548af12ad5cf6404a3b299f
e97de420318dd1721bf3d0d2b82d83b8cbbc1a88
describe
'60654' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQB' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
ac8424393634cedd7f8baef12dcb1493
4d9c0e91c992a646f1b3ddaebccd59d3107583ea
'2011-10-16T20:54:10-04:00'
describe
'2772772' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQC' 'sip-files00123.tif'
26a1a2b40bb88a76fb8d9d006621c54a
56c153f8753771582c29e768e6a9c9dfebc571a4
describe
'3361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQD' 'sip-files00123.txt'
b44d4023a72672e0397c80b0bd3ff836
2317c253c2e942385b0a1fa3077393b1e2b80182
describe
'20197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQE' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
2e708c4462f2cfb809068b617b2962e9
c628e2e71535259dd7a4ab39ddacf6f549ac269f
describe
'345699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQF' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
fe1e708d07cdabc6d426224f049f4c6d
3ad0aef2a7ed85a0c17462fffee1db5c82c32604
describe
'203239' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQG' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
05618359f4d28f5dc7efeb46d298ee31
a16ac065831352d50575147d7fbc9b3d8c576eb8
describe
'79764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQH' 'sip-files00124.pro'
dcff6c4bd4e63c9a7a88b568cbeb3456
c362c54e928e4bd263bd2765e9ac63bf6a4ec496
describe
'57812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQI' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
bb6bb4a427a510b06e746010330ee982
ed4d895c0641548611daa9c2e9ee83105f604566
describe
'2774552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQJ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
de5edb92e8b2bfc41400afe605cc0bb6
bacf82cac3d434e3ed4a32898462e134c7800dff
describe
'3252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQK' 'sip-files00124.txt'
add4ff6063a76d24901975cd6f8192e8
39b7fcb546029e84143dbc02377f41d2ac75a9db
describe
'19306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQL' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
93a7ae500c77879f56f730c539def799
67e6f9855f456ac1155644fa9f7233bf5330c38d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQM' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
1750b511f422ab6adc1cfb9232a29a8f
9a6683b47d71fbefb01d73a48f5f8383122a52a2
describe
'206087' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQN' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
150b8fdbbe74f805852a7b01b4346b83
425013a07a7efffd7bc9cebf7e761e5806d39068
describe
'80247' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQO' 'sip-files00125.pro'
7a40c0e1197ca11ff518b5a5c0b02c01
0cb0f77e4b4381d07058c75cf2d70b5917eec024
describe
'58934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQP' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
8b80d8c012daf171b642011612ccb7c4
8e483f88467d39ef86d87201398d84c24d629547
describe
'2772468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQQ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
f7474ab2791b18fd84e47e160d8ebf55
8e9225e843dcb40d773ed4806bc4f965b8046584
describe
'3300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQR' 'sip-files00125.txt'
4d72ded2c1622afe118b1a9974943aa3
cbd0945bd5c77ac6d573c6a31c6853f974f36a03
describe
'19271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQS' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
6668a9814a08001e17fd6ccc74f2e740
9f64d1872da869c185890c619cea372c674bf97a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQT' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
421e5d8c133868f8888be132a557b064
bb7f1bf6d4ee27dbf36c287f9a7bd33aa2a87bfc
describe
'207117' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQU' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
230f27935cbe75e16bdce8f485e0cca4
683241513f0ed916f33d1548d6d4beae8d36f03c
describe
'78543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQV' 'sip-files00126.pro'
9ff95fd454b0d7b56a50757f6a1fd334
252df61ee2f42804240b3a2b42e1df090201a8e7
describe
'59255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQW' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
8a10b319558b376d6a4b9352c872e52c
cff90942f2960ab48d77bb4b9a586844396b5b3a
describe
'2774824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQX' 'sip-files00126.tif'
a6aa964858dd699dea6b62f6a9447b23
8182afeb44435841b45a7d14466abb4396b65cfc
describe
'3248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQY' 'sip-files00126.txt'
a94dc362bf6b04bff0d2ee66b21d64c0
85ac4ddb22dd0561929d69f81f05d2b548c77502
'2011-10-16T20:55:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPQZ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
f5f636e265142877de116369139a070a
9476d562554e2e5c23a241cbb13c213b4cc3d1b3
describe
'345300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRA' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
d8a5435f2f401d34ebf0151f8864f762
477f87cbb7268bda4cd3860b57dcf5addce06da8
describe
'214088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRB' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
df61c0ca3064882f8d20fc1e8fc43def
7e8e28aa409f7204c9bf9eb4283f87374fde43bc
describe
'83744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRC' 'sip-files00127.pro'
ec07b3f0fe81cac8538069b2f9bce6e1
4eb1bb34703ebe895e9424b4d0715d4b0496904c
describe
'60386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRD' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
bb355df4f476588484cea99cc7942c08
cae78961b0b6ba0ba033f9a8207fdcb50a62c6f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRE' 'sip-files00127.tif'
a9fc43b4d1b2a426c4c74acbe625b012
37c5e3e55a7193a567e2a724ace4f72a7de74c6d
describe
'3441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRF' 'sip-files00127.txt'
67a41e096d14d0133270a33399ab0a5f
a703b40af6ad59844d475ed62cdbfec419afd0a1
describe
'19720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
12400859ecfc2c3a777981cebbe6285d
ed977c5c4baa5223adbeafa3b94d3476a39bb806
describe
'345662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRH' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a70492df121f094bb89bf9771997d826
42ef8d7fdbb58a1b432d8f20e2c795f579221588
describe
'207842' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRI' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a6b9a0e9b0707ff3e1b2d0e95525bbc0
361febab489c86ea3dc2a7471b3e0b0fe696c680
describe
'79250' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRJ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
ce8e127af1bac331a7eab6e633982642
8041d2ed7d1b57da9f01a3cf764bd54aa1df3087
'2011-10-16T20:56:29-04:00'
describe
'59423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRK' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
5b88abcf2d7a2aab83266d4495707da7
857657b72c58252e4972974d6a5ff02d66e1b3c7
describe
'2774656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRL' 'sip-files00128.tif'
d37c6af1b80a11b98dc6a5ee96dfcd66
d5181ed4824a66fe6aeacc06564b00377c99b6a1
describe
'3301' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRM' 'sip-files00128.txt'
36156768e7f82e81f64915f4858ffe14
48d8b508aba0f0057bb06648e8a09bb1d6e5dfa9
describe
'19469' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRN' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
d1af07b3bc840f5bbea5e0bc68e7b4d8
55033b62bd118a4e37e3ed8352bc2d4a211a4d5e
describe
'345339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRO' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
2f1c80603a8121995cce92930b7d2193
908a36550328af7588366ea5a074005db36087d1
describe
'210386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRP' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
dec253aebce85a40a6d1fb31266d67cb
488ce54d7b39f8f2fcea6b03923287487c381863
describe
'83061' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRQ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
806a9adbc72537580db8c214dc974281
cf177432b8a9bf7034e90c460d1711d92409dabc
describe
'59038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRR' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
c6ed5a1dbde91391cf5be2d8b3b847c1
fbc469f1ad85b060a49862ce1ac0477b49c84ded
describe
'2772552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRS' 'sip-files00129.tif'
dce64fa0317db73f87b85856ac7310d1
bf87250bfc3611b933eab5139c281c9aa247128b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRT' 'sip-files00129.txt'
4370c1316d1bf414d17b90f373f66d4d
b26fdb50d98c1cec4b26f2f877350167a35dc8f9
describe
'19607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRU' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
942ccf681fd462255f0a3ea5e998a41c
c5c2409306cf63fe93799595f4877c7cce5f6c16
describe
'345651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRV' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
1edab4bb02ff862e8032df920daff0bf
9acbf69219e352896dd160d6aac951e6f19ad25a
'2011-10-16T20:51:09-04:00'
describe
'215209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRW' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
320c607e5cab3134e6095f5412f157f9
89f8919bed769ae7c400ba970695e78d99bf35b4
describe
'81873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRX' 'sip-files00130.pro'
2d547c6acf2e3aa101d32bdaa5b40f7d
b635246bed675de96a0e1097368a8bd42d2264f0
describe
'60813' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRY' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
dbd994e3df2ef2c56dac6c0be6dd5b0a
55ab37c5525b6b709ac9dc3d61c6e453972aabea
describe
'2774828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPRZ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
14579dd6ca2244c49018df243e8a8c94
5c33a699534290f3ea8cec2fbb8b131ba9f024e7
'2011-10-16T20:55:46-04:00'
describe
'3359' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSA' 'sip-files00130.txt'
0982048fe7331c79a9a31d9bf10f3b48
31450fd27747d87df407b1932c36f6becb8a637a
describe
'20276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSB' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
2c4e4edcb60fa29d0f6d60fe2758860a
b22be5dccb0af47bff3ea1aea76f046633fa21b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSC' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
0cd71047e975afba09a3d17ba383da40
062d3a9f7f4b9683f510b4f328afcc87fb17f7ec
describe
'216795' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSD' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
fef77c013a4b6a67073ddd02f67a1bc5
36a3b764a9c0269c9d57138584a704be5b0330c9
'2011-10-16T20:55:01-04:00'
describe
'82677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSE' 'sip-files00131.pro'
a0763911d259efc2b372c8af5ad13e35
faf7746ab4c8904bd4e4f58618057199be0ee8ac
describe
'60513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSF' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
e5b4df06010a8360cf09331cdf1beb38
ab64557e2e3818b6886757b21e5cf93d9b7da972
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSG' 'sip-files00131.tif'
54e8a854073834bdd0bdbb379e7fdc03
d02520e734b04142339055c7ea4d4864e571baa7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSH' 'sip-files00131.txt'
4667836ce696ac6e9b5e827c2df83a3d
eba3fe71fa6aef288cec46f61a89bdebf727df98
describe
'20229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSI' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
98b28fee35cfe30e1fc2f97594fe64da
60a1981c608060cc66a88c98e4ef8a1797a485ed
describe
'345563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSJ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
f4691cc6797ab2258326517bf18ade2c
35e01cedfed57c5673a1071c6bcd171225c54ddc
'2011-10-16T20:55:53-04:00'
describe
'194692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSK' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
a2c9740fbbc76eeecdf99bbcf1ce4416
672e6a303c4a9eec5c6f2d7baedb0f45f3db620c
describe
'75319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSL' 'sip-files00132.pro'
521837d4372ec97c9095e06fdefce743
3974f5d721061d68134d5ee76c7175b9af063efc
describe
'56018' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSM' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
1b059fce5335ee76f3f4e5ba2c932612
6160f774d271b74a9890e8e01fc89809950f84cb
'2011-10-16T20:55:13-04:00'
describe
'2773316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSN' 'sip-files00132.tif'
aac48f2bfad9b9b8a3767b4f354ec677
fa6bc4b45eeb551f2c5714084ddd6a8de70695b0
describe
'3086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSO' 'sip-files00132.txt'
b167e37a1bdd1fca463c5ba6fa71a1bb
d15e4014b8cc1651eaaeb87104daeab11e08e011
describe
'19040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSP' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
7b9940630b820bd5deae605f22862344
1788170cec728192e10b12670c26c6e32e6841f6
describe
'345478' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSQ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
7751e1b466f03e4276447f02eb70de31
57693fadfc4069d6e7f4dd4e8f5ae37089cf7d83
describe
'208040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSR' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
0c5749f49401b1b9714810cf10b0a9e5
7462b5473a4cfc3e98c930b648fd779bb57392ba
describe
'80453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSS' 'sip-files00133.pro'
b9d5fed0419f8b138bda932045b71e32
3ee7d3455aca75f666b73338cbca69522c46267b
describe
'58185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPST' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
3f9e2364d48c71a5f6427e6368896fd1
96c91217435a6e3e5e111d83bc67e620ee6d6230
describe
'2772536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSU' 'sip-files00133.tif'
3e76ebd2a37783d067d2a7feca473f63
db495a3539b07a717285d87787a73b9efaa7ad1d
describe
'3367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSV' 'sip-files00133.txt'
b70c36b6ba12b3c20d9e52d9370835f7
aa0f80fe65ad9c55b51cb874d3878d49b2dae8f3
'2011-10-16T20:55:09-04:00'
describe
'19480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSW' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
bb52096eb83f46569f352b87b07c6793
5b9bf8e8d9352a5cbabbe743e559da642359a988
describe
'345543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSX' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
a333ec871ed3f0f2d090d448fc1eed9c
79261092059eee5ab7cd448dd2c9ed39932a6497
describe
'207412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSY' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
2503888406e9a8e789a2d737cbd86aa0
f7b8ed0f1bf15ed7e9204353925c2152d2d8abd7
describe
'79129' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPSZ' 'sip-files00134.pro'
2555f3bb5033a8c1f67c02d6b50381a3
d52195ab06f93cf9b7033fed76793f03d4960e69
describe
'59543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTA' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
22e992a86bb5e5b06cc5d060b6989acc
6e89bc8c8629545571493a6a54019d32f9f8017a
describe
'2773388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTB' 'sip-files00134.tif'
14bd8971372a4daa365c3958f4fbaa78
b16a456b110d3b3382ae485a6435fd80ab9f6abf
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTC' 'sip-files00134.txt'
5f1ad48096f62c91e47a12f9e51b96e9
f3da00589bf92eeae6251b68f1b054e1bae4d8e8
describe
'19794' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTD' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
6a0f9d91d87dc13a42c3dc31f9c84edd
9af8bc18c4821da5fbdc87fa6b58083f65a6b03d
describe
'357955' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTE' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
de77d586604cfa049b2bf79feebb258c
fabc0a653767e305aa0661257b4ed915b1eeb88d
'2011-10-16T20:50:44-04:00'
describe
'190682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTF' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
a5b2687c9ce3e8d0e0c8b36cb070eba4
36ba10bc0d1c701b696b41149bf74a7093003bd6
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTG' 'sip-files00135.pro'
a0fbc3e764c137e14573eb69a75d1d70
7b4a7f2494b4d8efee768f90df8405604911360f
describe
'51519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTH' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
525a1753d73ed04edd53fce6943d7826
e4bfbd07170966fae569fdce05edfa18c82e8695
describe
'2874124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTI' 'sip-files00135.tif'
78b53e0a8f3abcad35b0e602d59f9210
ad052b6587e4ee7ebd200aa460ef4d0390e4a02e
describe
'78' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTJ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
925563549c9887da00fdb1f4d5ec6230
f645ac5ce6e6f20e1c6af285b5c5e475cbf64a0a
describe
Invalid character
'18228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTK' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
ce13fa6d1efe91d09adfef0a7f0d8cb7
e62b40b9abd03f407689e1f683b3db00d23ca441
'2011-10-16T20:51:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTL' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
a2c26c1feeba49b16ca03af601e08db1
37dc5e8240418b21b2d36411e608b26e396c2f91
describe
'222591' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTM' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
3604a44d2694ecdd99f9535af64b2bb1
f327c364e33120ef949a803931099c367159b886
describe
'79173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTN' 'sip-files00137.pro'
1acc02439583f9b8ea513ea52d82c441
eb20f25f3353cd1a3dae78336398cdfe6f22df7c
describe
'61796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTO' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
daa2d14cfb8dc3cd9c90cfa0e578824d
59ae881b732d5b508d59456de5eaf7bc6e369956
'2011-10-16T20:54:48-04:00'
describe
'2772868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTP' 'sip-files00137.tif'
7481ead6ad5c5fb693a4c792b1b35e52
6fbf30c405c288a2442217f9600c107afb908997
describe
'3332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTQ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
6e4809bd2eec793d7e04431cac300daa
5a275152fb5567d9d6bc2b2600c7c206dcc56bff
describe
'20601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTR' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
07196e4effb45eb20de4f2bbfccf5723
06a9a9bfe4fe7a90ebbfcddd241fb55f5cd95740
describe
'345313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTS' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
1dda84d2ebf2e3967712ab8f03300a54
6a1c756545058f90c8a8453fb6162b4cb75d4d6c
describe
'196978' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTT' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
8c00d15dada5938529021e8fa0595e43
d217c7a94e5451914a2df784886dd4ae764ae27d
describe
'73947' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTU' 'sip-files00138.pro'
27a47ae9be8752cb21edcaa55845590d
c48cbe6b7613908807ff0db496811180b5df3583
describe
'55728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTV' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
bb0d0e4d42e3ce96f663e3378c186d64
cb6f3bdf2ff8271295a9fc22c7f345dd88d46c43
describe
'2771332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTW' 'sip-files00138.tif'
7d0a985f44578cbddf72d1c2d9a9dea5
f10ed94cc9670697bac0bc17400b7a32d35aad4a
'2011-10-16T20:50:55-04:00'
describe
'3035' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTX' 'sip-files00138.txt'
177317ebda896894483ba4de8f253efc
5ac4cb40663c2ef5dc9cb197e79ccc8019329588
describe
'19155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTY' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
2f55b75093e2a7baab0e7fd9d4116bec
2e1e6bc95e15d1248dc1949c8335f617e7ee389f
describe
'345393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPTZ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
96e865b2ced6fb167976ad597d9246fc
f6d91be70067cbab12581f7fa49828eb73d4d0a1
describe
'215367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUA' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
2a759f8a445600403f42df8a4b45d5d2
a7c314f97124bc1344e49b2305d2ae9da15b80d1
describe
'81108' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUB' 'sip-files00139.pro'
83baaeea4a3b69eb3057764e4a54d4e1
a879c1630efcb3d072519c5f31c15d95f2837fe2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUC' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
bb8a9ed3c212906f7301cc670ed85cf8
f0b703b2136590a9e7ab1558406fb862502db7ed
describe
'2772776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUD' 'sip-files00139.tif'
5504ba0471b027c68bae5095bff0591f
4f451601589331262eac510941707cb9937b1b43
describe
'3376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUE' 'sip-files00139.txt'
cc28d9e5ac772603ee0ef7ac61e88bf1
611082a1d552e0193313d53d05d95e77a9366c59
describe
'19940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUF' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
ed5db25a2807cb2ca571a5932181ddb5
4eaa2007627be25e3dd02ed768b7ce3333211bf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUG' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
de672fa9ed5cb372505f41b9e7b2a041
677ec9457d824d94dc71c26bc9a8002a66051aef
describe
'211290' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUH' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
10dc3413d98412852286e0bc5982864d
570194407389dba9b901875c3b1551305d318faa
'2011-10-16T20:57:41-04:00'
describe
'81542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUI' 'sip-files00140.pro'
1355b1c8a29c6d0beb38fa2615eea270
e93a34c30f2e7d823a50d460fb20296601589adc
describe
'60047' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUJ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
9cbf4131ef905d16b8fced6c84cccbd2
2a5f589c18b4874697bf6fc1475975d7bd6e28aa
describe
'2774792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUK' 'sip-files00140.tif'
5890d16c201ec7a3aa63c2531c863fbe
c6f4ad50d6699685137b13c8e20de06166b354b4
describe
'3372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUL' 'sip-files00140.txt'
913e62b84c554ee4aefe039ade0c2ed6
3a2e60db9c0ecb6f5839206d6c68646f2bc766a9
describe
'20077' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUM' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
42c46da57ef573e13b8b66c81f1d12d5
8822debe384670b09ae33cd2d17950909054daf8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUN' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
b7ae5a1763170c1789c4ad05fd8450a5
1e50cf76372b451fc67765d1fcbb327c230e3cab
describe
'211277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUO' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
c7057786ca9d63897a11421a5a16efcc
f41558c16f86adcd7667c701a398f357e00de1eb
describe
'81227' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUP' 'sip-files00141.pro'
0f273e2fedd7078897759031368e7cc1
04ac25b4c5e1b1c532fe66f61aa92e8f854be135
describe
'59757' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUQ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
6b9cb3d91dcd913d01f685d3d5b2c9ac
deb95de43790e07c179f9fabd206826d9b42213c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUR' 'sip-files00141.tif'
e02cc4f148fcaacbe1d210f1b41d6286
f0a2f06acba78c8684a8c266db2e8be8b041617f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUS' 'sip-files00141.txt'
ca9de2d8a11bb465fd4cd96ebaddabdd
41fd3c2d66406e048422c8b658d1c6526a49fc96
describe
'19834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUT' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
30008a48a64c6344d2c82d4194c2ea6c
5d70374de371b88c4cc59d7b7039522a6dffacd9
'2011-10-16T20:52:15-04:00'
describe
'345317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUU' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
85b341ee0cbde12b7467e9dabe56298c
0d8a0bfe9e3ba6850f8f3730714e6e06d98151a5
describe
'208382' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUV' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
837d3b96276d19ca4b1a282d0c036751
c391ea5174b06ffe42ac3d62027aea4c54e56dd1
'2011-10-16T20:54:41-04:00'
describe
'80140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUW' 'sip-files00142.pro'
ed54ad8513b119cb9a1507625d77e0e1
4c3cadf53f8d8aec97c3c8c90cb0f8aaab852ca1
describe
'59297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUX' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
f3591dffec4114f6e1ac0386bf6ba0dd
31dcee95e93e2444362d030e1ee37ad6b8183f26
describe
'2771276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUY' 'sip-files00142.tif'
b8965174dff9bf1a9fe3c8d01a0ab9c4
5ed988fba53ca88e03d0057eb1560c80b9860fe2
describe
'3270' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPUZ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
06194a7356d7fe1af2966500f17b2b95
f727d063f1f8772cd2dcc9897fa79f415223fd1a
describe
'19850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVA' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
5b5701e9bb3a01c73d238ca348f9fc25
06c6a79788794aabbea63d4687e80c06cc90334e
'2011-10-16T20:52:36-04:00'
describe
'345475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVB' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
590537f9b85e30177fa671c60137620f
069863b591055558837ce39769ef5e6452203dae
describe
'191109' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVC' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
1b32056facc073e0fefde836b9b1a8f6
0fffae2f74260ec99738ed6fcf97330e92aa0c38
describe
'71483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVD' 'sip-files00143.pro'
803f538b72474137201ae76ee17223c6
ff35266b9eb44999651413fec36e700e8ce8f3c2
describe
'55623' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVE' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
f7eba18ab8f650bad2c8fe5ddef32967
90568ef014f0a638cd9f4f275bea5f76cb641fd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVF' 'sip-files00143.tif'
983debeb96761416f2210a9a7968d16a
bdd72979780aa13aff242019b77990483cc1cb2d
describe
'2971' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVG' 'sip-files00143.txt'
d5ba5c194e5a0e6dcff9e07989efe3d8
d776b55201a68791ca6637d2e5379ba6f9fec874
describe
Invalid character
'19365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVH' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
a8d1a24cc550ac77a15cc7ff6b3f5e9b
f4b4b12ee00db43d7e13936e6e61c3411f0eb23b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVI' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
f20168df2f5f72204dc8b61a7931a7f7
58034d848b2ebf5a24eb357b9907447437da27ea
describe
'204325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVJ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
e20e7d35514b3807fc0be2321930ce3e
302aa33f1d10212b682569d13452ae342048ced3
describe
'79662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVK' 'sip-files00144.pro'
9a8535d39d0c09e176617e951d97e7f2
81820cb5e82ad64b2904d303b83846e15ff65949
describe
'59373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVL' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
1c1d5384ace5b780af6050f8a90dff96
5208a10e9bddec9e5a4b82d2de1f03fc9df61a21
'2011-10-16T20:57:20-04:00'
describe
'2772460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVM' 'sip-files00144.tif'
35ee590e511da7746dabc1e246cf0303
ef025e0c85d75f2f27bde958cbc2ce55338d4d11
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVN' 'sip-files00144.txt'
6f80461d31410b89c2735f7cdbd2ebf4
a0488f03737c30d183afdfcfc938ded5ce88d75a
describe
'19544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVO' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
4f9050e7a3776c923ced5fefeddbb630
3dc55db1f0496ccdf2bded206120b17f2aa2b3e1
describe
'345348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVP' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
6fa5b6abe762140d4551e6e84ce1f134
dcb32ad2c01dca44422880c87630485d4f755e83
describe
'210625' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVQ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
89200ef34fed7bd3e89013bec2312d03
2f1b1da0312779d5545ad92ddfd228a063101e28
describe
'81708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVR' 'sip-files00145.pro'
b46921f9ca0a29e12f4d7ebcd388a2e8
52ab275358559774e1d6fe35ecfff1ce4b577e9f
describe
'59886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVS' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
881edf5710d81f03638caa7f7bda786d
60624853ae1bc068b54b6619ecd18c17e29ed399
describe
'2772636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVT' 'sip-files00145.tif'
c546777dd3141b36b550a1c498ac5757
929cacbfee4c86ad5379ba5a8118a7f4fdc6a586
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVU' 'sip-files00145.txt'
7b032f19d68720e78200d7e84a3cd783
ce2afbb7027b42e47123d63953bb0a99ad5ae478
describe
'19887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVV' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
ffd79782c3810df1dc8f22fd1a7dc0b0
02f80c2073b85d5e138b27aef8e5ef1bd735250b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVW' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
25d521ef5f4ee0c2b85e1b2c77e7116a
0bb31b5f2dd4aaa9e3041b355ecf26ef182ca9c8
describe
'215494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVX' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
341d0aa90945b71ef4b706ac2c1d61bb
288c49812ddf08f5c89cfc43ffc2c8554b761358
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVY' 'sip-files00146.pro'
d7140f3c823de5e36aacfd2593f61d1d
62735f1c6e5cba40029da6ce2045bc02814588d5
describe
'61402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPVZ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
054568744c028223f5ae5eb3e8bc88fd
c5b3bc086fd860b9b942a9329573210f307d2610
describe
'2773476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWA' 'sip-files00146.tif'
d3ae39703e748230597fb6f837125004
d92162634c0b26edd898758729ea2a48eb120bb5
'2011-10-16T20:57:17-04:00'
describe
'3395' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWB' 'sip-files00146.txt'
52bfcfeffde930c5bba342b322c19096
46c57be95d8d92d7deca4db9492d73815175c33b
describe
'20154' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWC' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
6f5cd008a3927c39dbcfa0f7b321ed1e
36e53321bf8189aa6b4360bcb63e687fc7e73e2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWD' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
c7ea56739ce0f2475cfa708514171730
6307319644f69bcccea65329592616972d2f0da3
describe
'209733' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWE' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
240074a4dbd00dd3fb6ee952b41881a8
9f4f1e071a4631f0e9c39815c6dd58914626b65e
describe
'81148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWF' 'sip-files00147.pro'
ac73f4596f9a71907317784c7d89b46f
de0ef997f73f5ef6b9a9d23ae71b54aa0e4b0c37
'2011-10-16T20:53:56-04:00'
describe
'59317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWG' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
9f8f5bfd96d489bafcda4733f395e21b
71ef40954c675e20df741fed4fdad94fe788edb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWH' 'sip-files00147.tif'
2841bbe4e76e8678258809f3bdeed505
e586bffcb97ea03404f87b4290cdaab5e0eb3475
describe
'3413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWI' 'sip-files00147.txt'
3244a627cd35e14bb735e265cdb520c8
08d71f8be5c7c3b87a2d46a93c852769e838b8a2
describe
'19781' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWJ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
f3ccb1d0005e6249b7f3309fdf9f4944
ed15d5f51293d520d0cf853f3e195b7d870c10fa
describe
'345266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWK' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
8f803d58ed163dafb2afa98fc665e031
0c108000ef102e461a4bfffcf4654c5d8286a83c
describe
'191712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWL' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
64ab8a92d32162464787f6b75c5e44b7
99f8007e44e3e7f97e4fd9c6547ad158565c9a49
describe
'74260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWM' 'sip-files00148.pro'
961493e7023f810df314c0290321d7e7
8c3026ae9c5b56edac59246913f2d105f73acebd
describe
'55032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWN' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
501f92c99c2bf56484f716144da2c8ee
7c064b74a7e82a56a41d446c9d38280b3d58ad1c
describe
'2771304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWO' 'sip-files00148.tif'
cbac59c7eeffe1132287811b76b38b16
483c18eb045727be0276c85e1d807e3c2d39f7cf
'2011-10-16T20:57:37-04:00'
describe
'3090' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWP' 'sip-files00148.txt'
8b7e1b56c950fedf68d8776072127295
cb9d67a2aa6cd4ebe7bf48958e85ead05a94f73c
describe
Invalid character
'19102' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWQ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
440bee849178f5b9488fdd6eabecbecd
ba5008a97b056ba018e77f13c0119fb889937ccf
describe
'345385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWR' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
33237935735d812bea4ce17d7edf3079
29cff6be19fb065620853a53257f1aa85982e65b
describe
'202093' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWS' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
b51edee3b0066bb0086eb86bc1182195
8f3bd29317c5cda6947fcf47523ae31db0fc6871
describe
'81209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWT' 'sip-files00149.pro'
fe8d501e46229c8a5e9500883432d93f
7b662631f2932fe6e01db9652ebb541544598127
describe
'56532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWU' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
108aaaa88fc979d15cca765ac02ce0bb
b854719a1ce192493a883ac32f08fdc8dbbf28c1
'2011-10-16T20:57:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWV' 'sip-files00149.tif'
293a1bd098688097aafb48111d00718d
70f7e81907a06c35af072470788427aee3c65ae3
describe
'3387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWW' 'sip-files00149.txt'
1e1d13cc1844668d68a1aba5bef49fb6
1c39c5d89d6ca4c212f49bce3ffdcc6068996d08
describe
'18730' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWX' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
62346883b1dada01c151af25e379c055
8053e9ae5766b38ccc79342be55bc454e1ecd2a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWY' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
b6934b5bb9ec078621529696f6a53790
d5fefb73472ab757c64a1c09d40614f62f15c491
describe
'208021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPWZ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
6e8ff2f6eb4378db2780e5e47d0875cb
af8ec2057607e0113c30b22a6136755d9bd8410b
describe
'80596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXA' 'sip-files00150.pro'
d0b2986f60d3fbd3d27fba9329385650
c2c718a7cfe9488b69356ab32c9289efcbcdea41
describe
'59646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXB' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
2bfa3b8c954d60d920a85b91662435ab
7b82be4327bbf1bc4f363f1dd4c410b19488af0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXC' 'sip-files00150.tif'
4bd8c50035503b5ed926983ae2a2313f
e35efa98711906614a8f63e7745727988ccdd05f
describe
'3351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXD' 'sip-files00150.txt'
ad03c4f8760510199b2ffc7e5ea28e3e
43d5d43778693923b344bd455288d5b36308fa5b
describe
'19680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXE' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
15e3d16b2dd93c86f97964d043c00c60
8da0af5f5ef6bc1bf98561430968b5f3c72879af
describe
'345480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXF' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
dcb84b2291c4a65929042fdceb27601f
09b3a52f3754a36fa918ee05f2d1871da771fb6b
'2011-10-16T20:57:30-04:00'
describe
'201605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXG' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
a1fb5eabcef994ea7466d6023212af4c
80a952f3bc4247730ddf04054c32a6ca50c24396
describe
'76865' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXH' 'sip-files00151.pro'
3c263a76097b0c2c8cb6d40d921b83d3
a4af839f42e1ed1eb14f139f1044b2ce4e99aabc
describe
'57761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXI' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
a1e184745a04c27ad54ec7fc9ed50ea4
20db2803713451c557384d5ad30664d3cd810f79
describe
'2772588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXJ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
5f6abc924aee983deb1574bf9a34dcd1
da40c499914e0e856bdd6bbffb88431f71d0ecb0
describe
'3205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXK' 'sip-files00151.txt'
85259c08734cdf43f3467d3ada3c2785
b2d19f4cb57fb49bd8a57d6e20784aa83bd143fd
describe
'19561' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXL' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
85b45351cdbf0b768ba69f335910b135
b57beed010a904d881de8a37d77d7d35dc95edf7
describe
'345153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXM' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
d46e0794b775141fa6e63f558bfbab8a
85d98fa984d0f28b6689488ac46753ca2cb9635f
describe
'211167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXN' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
955f2b3e4392c0f5d50111d81fd1f17d
e14793ad1b24ee3bf2880ed78129cd3129bbed31
describe
'82606' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXO' 'sip-files00152.pro'
9befd0296b34fa5a8d0b28af337aa486
086565dacaf0221086a28dd6c79333cad1924ca1
describe
'60241' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXP' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
cc4f07014107d046ef84674193ab7f44
98fd8909db8991607103c548711cb0796c7e3489
describe
'2771316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXQ' 'sip-files00152.tif'
d8bdc5d6e8255958555a6aa22366e813
d08fe1cdfe460d9bf3836919dfb43eeacb573a50
describe
'3383' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXR' 'sip-files00152.txt'
397d38212ab28eccaf05a6d1583dd992
d0c953d4ebfe6cf467697db86d7dc8e3b218facd
describe
'19914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXS' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
83ff72ab07f97f1f92c36a90da71cbdb
5400611b56981c6e91965cdada378030a6138997
describe
'345370' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXT' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
3021adec6718028fd5057a672ecf31db
f40985d5ad99751f6a4943bc785a146436a2fb74
describe
'205000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXU' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
99296f807bd9745c71b486787747ee5e
a882a8d534c118ece9660b261eea04c69ac16d50
describe
'79629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXV' 'sip-files00153.pro'
1f5ec8e063c30d471899d9cd0c7432a5
866688b1c8191e8954d731bfd73ba9d1ed34b917
describe
'59015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXW' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
4a2e649febef74949cbe1b09386c646a
57a844b0c1d8856d8dbe030c41cd03e4ec54b133
describe
'2772736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXX' 'sip-files00153.tif'
1b17652b586853722db034dc6ab45851
fcb9dfe99eff2de83394232c6d9f0b60f424afc3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXY' 'sip-files00153.txt'
a6ec9fa97e348d835556d728ee386806
f9ece6f9115a12d6b297768bf2499468f10c5e17
'2011-10-16T20:56:38-04:00'
describe
'20070' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPXZ' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
7d590a10b8466982edd8804b11eccfae
82f53ae2d0dfe07fb04dff9cb831cb5aeb0a0ea6
describe
'345746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYA' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
cf1f7e544444f3fe299bb79b3f1fe90d
09a9e71d44c11946d6fbb5ce5434067437012648
describe
'196168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYB' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
f57aa83678c9d74ec7674a571057d05c
488d43b33050eb763622da46d6ab9909568d106f
describe
'74577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYC' 'sip-files00154.pro'
84618e3b53d36067a1c4df061306be7e
fb2e35c0e67587a06674a693b8f6c0c1e7bef06a
describe
'57025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYD' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
34ed6af917b0e8800d59c1c24d93556a
f70a047e0fa808d2faf3198bdb67bd8ff1ee0f68
'2011-10-16T20:55:35-04:00'
describe
'2774780' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYE' 'sip-files00154.tif'
b6ef1d4c1a1cb6493e9daa210a5c733d
eca35137eb09c20af10431cbaf147ecf7e4f5132
describe
'3075' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYF' 'sip-files00154.txt'
8efc36920c25412024a90a809d4dd8af
ccfa835c5d8957a3d5cc2654b8056fe1313df2dc
describe
'19330' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYG' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
64f07bc8199f5a44d90c63fdb81f4a67
0dce86956c539390c93b2350c0ebca95fde75a87
'2011-10-16T20:56:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYH' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
4c923a6354ba2519089dccb250b8a4af
bd986756d3308b229ec84d80eab66bcadf0d2ef7
describe
'206693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYI' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
1b9456d55c0bd23fec4f5f58177f1f3d
7f9df8ffffef2d07c2b8e3976dded4755e7d3ce7
describe
'82431' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYJ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
b2597cce127dfff07d233dc14e3f8151
2677df93608a161f80471d3b6916eace97657628
'2011-10-16T20:57:24-04:00'
describe
'58979' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYK' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
6f7f28ea11fc6c5f23860a9200999215
3697698536c47c6a20bde370c991df97d0f19e25
describe
'2772488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYL' 'sip-files00155.tif'
8de991a4afbdd55ff75a240181b089d1
c7b62baf4e93ddc2d9ebd889426001c37f935a99
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYM' 'sip-files00155.txt'
7285420f5eca440e2d983692f0020f88
b33461cf34c62518259b45932730e728083b25df
describe
'19205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYN' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
7a3d54086f40b3b27d505d5597023d8c
84f70825509d9ea2856b38f945249cb43b014adc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYO' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
cd9b9a30c109d8f8bf3d8fe02673e548
09e84927f9592e9fd269f016a5b9e9990fc70fb6
describe
'206035' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYP' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
87509b4f1e95470123d5244d133b720f
b80e7510fa674f5f36fb90a1ce46d6b4281272b4
describe
'81575' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYQ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
64b0d64992dbb07b761bae366430ce25
db449216c1d6060f3656e5f63b24ebf83164f78e
describe
'58326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYR' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
0e10bf6e0517bfd5c71be0fe5d21bfb3
2ada432a0433e00d740a12e4a074916426a8b269
describe
'2774620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYS' 'sip-files00156.tif'
8f5c431d8aff952015c94529742a8db1
2b50d9c77d5372a0d41ab9aa792d82dd96fd5865
describe
'3363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYT' 'sip-files00156.txt'
8e4e208fb9b8b52ba6fd8b7d386466e2
b0c293f038b622b5a648f999ea6aa513741aa606
'2011-10-16T20:56:42-04:00'
describe
'19376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYU' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
cb8b67c585736d31b9e4103b3a1ef528
9a0a323e920bd98f684843bb18714fce6f6073ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYV' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
b79094fbf71566a6d6d3332d148392e4
3a8aade1054b670564971fc13eeee8b8e5348a88
'2011-10-16T20:57:18-04:00'
describe
'212379' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYW' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
e0d7df0bc269a12283a932bc17fdb5b6
93a70a2c49da65086e2582b559d66a991510227b
describe
'81787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYX' 'sip-files00157.pro'
32cea02293baddb61510c3c03e441314
b47f1a9a2aa48401b8c90cf8dcdf175769d2af0a
describe
'59891' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYY' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
9a5556b677f95003ffe50c34e49485ef
fde02d0c2eb7133d3c0aa7df765fb8a87681ce60
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPYZ' 'sip-files00157.tif'
56d1565b0ebc5acfa7464dcdf6ea54bb
484e3c741a363731a702423618b612ea8c5d7f31
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZA' 'sip-files00157.txt'
acf6290338cdb78d53b1a17cb9d25e68
6c4aa17878fa0dcc664c09ce7ecc95fe1765fc69
describe
'19873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZB' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
2412aedbe3190d5bbec3ba04945b6639
29989f4d106b323855c5669e3e8058db1d239d07
describe
'345674' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZC' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
02bc01228ccd689c7e6c74cf15adfc3d
38b3d2a7fee09103f32a6b97edeb1cb2591e5ec9
describe
'207284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZD' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
d4e9f06fccce93fecff20da0ebdb6690
6da921a3436de8ab172b9970806f3b61a390b223
describe
'80645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZE' 'sip-files00158.pro'
58adb618cc1a6f01ab3cdd8ac43d91ab
adcbd69a835c2a1ea618a34596acfe2af78272f7
describe
'58651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZF' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
523d54fd8e22d0936d7be61428f85592
bc1a96115b7133dfb28d688bc55ea081b5d3271b
describe
'2774764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZG' 'sip-files00158.tif'
5ea742c290066b7eed68c8f2ddd2e6e8
2c48b25dddffb3d77d09593c6e89a6daaf9b88df
describe
'3298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZH' 'sip-files00158.txt'
9ee140e7a6170825386fcf4a5e81fde1
732a0c4c6c65e7bf4d692d3100306a728fcbbb75
describe
'19899' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZI' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
9db91ab36f077df077c11dd2c1af358a
7a561196fde6606599e7c6d2e095c3dde98efa3c
describe
'345357' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZJ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
323ef5b8e0417f66619548694a5e18f7
fd2f30e61a58f5c94a951cd197597bf62a95180f
describe
'206486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZK' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
4f32aba8861595b48708b9aceaa03bb1
9fdcdf442bd5de40af971d35c30e9bc5ce3442fa
describe
'79819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZL' 'sip-files00159.pro'
f7e63e81a8c6285ad22721438a10a964
2a3dc34da561824b57030ee6fec58efce50baf7e
describe
'58302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZM' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
03c18f14a537b02af2c56f998c7b6e1c
eeb9f3c6d4f60f8656f64c9e1071d7570aad191a
describe
'2772604' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZN' 'sip-files00159.tif'
f6ffd7c4265a0e4e9f535761a9dfd7a6
14c6d7ac980320825a4c208f20650f3b64d1483b
describe
'3313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZO' 'sip-files00159.txt'
d4ec5c6cbf411f58764e9329d6824c2e
92b4330c031bb5eba86a20e12d9cf613aac1fcc9
describe
'19737' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZP' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
3d40c7123c560382787b9cb5549dbb7a
d05effbd472c521dff6383085da915795e86e6bd
describe
'345660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZQ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
dbfe1eecc33d9c773317faa9d2bfb1fb
a40341cc1347fb1a017f3e89a3a539287ad15fb2
describe
'216318' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZR' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
2859777999cac5835431a867db2da417
b6442be6059d7291083d75c7767ecd33747a0b79
describe
'83390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZS' 'sip-files00160.pro'
2b4ba22ed5ed64862e7c5052dd3ac2c3
02612ba8a49cdcd123b32ccd1be23843d2b92b1a
describe
'60642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZT' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
1d55bc071e0ea1b8b035c6b794bcf42f
06ba3b2e497dfeb5eefe328ca649ea220511b524
describe
'2774848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZU' 'sip-files00160.tif'
b220e3deb0b6ece74796b60648a951ea
3079978f608630389e0d9748ea148329e0370a60
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZV' 'sip-files00160.txt'
7071182d333abdce9ad3ab10055bfc01
27621b96ebdf21fef6c0a187e1fef8ea1b223966
describe
'19926' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZW' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
f69b7b8b0ab5d383bcfdef22ff298d55
412fdaae319569fd9fa167fa978a1404324eaed6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZX' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
a9e80c52cf00d060171eeb8a376b113c
fd3321da52b54227c909319fab79f5f69ca127a5
describe
'203533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZY' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
bfd5de8fc186a3ad8126c6e93b59fa8b
d481477e646fa9cb0ee5eb9c9a028c4cff6f92b7
describe
'79166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAPZZ' 'sip-files00161.pro'
26e50d625b1efa49e3bb04b18d80576c
d5e5f74e582f0dffb752dac3f50e5c176af6912b
describe
'57731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAA' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
b83bd32dadcd2ad1cf9d13b8196f61a4
52306588b5261095db6a7351d0e64f127a73a805
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAB' 'sip-files00161.tif'
c603a7c3dc52c02eed71d903fccea522
8cb35f38c75b60f5afff18cadf60bbb3201c6395
describe
'3319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAC' 'sip-files00161.txt'
276777b4aeb1633c43c6dbc038835275
1a599e19852bedd8004d407a2c9680370abd26cd
describe
'19658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAD' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
437d8c4c501aac766015209f6b8dd895
50c3121118724f7784579bf785e8d71d3fefc41c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAE' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
af6040da9c6ba51df16030b666f74a9a
8fe349125f7e53a30fe85a6a045e26d528c9af18
describe
'208703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAF' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
f3ae168652ea0f64af548d30564366f6
ce1c4185b32668a8e5fd0d02397098402da77e39
describe
'80994' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAG' 'sip-files00162.pro'
83d9c913127789ea4eaf507185033c53
209f6a637148a95afdfb4c9e30adb1fea0dbf76b
describe
'58592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAH' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
de8c56be03a675a926334574e088a310
6ea6cc413d0ca9bb4550e2602125d11ee0b978b0
'2011-10-16T20:54:38-04:00'
describe
'2774744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAI' 'sip-files00162.tif'
ae0ee6ba1c1cc9070dec30f6e312fa61
1814b3919e8392577fbc0d96ce44b0600235af81
describe
'3296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAJ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
89e5728db0d733c974ebadf6d2fcb779
fd58c74a63fa379b70edd2ff8362f50fcc9e142b
describe
'19389' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAK' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
5371e7172c3e7d3bef185229ca29ffb4
c6d9cd9993c9f870bb80898c46e8aa7359516d41
describe
'345319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAL' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
e7a2e3925a97c1af311122130a982f21
0e85d91f83c55aa746f65e821194133b84a13e20
'2011-10-16T20:53:30-04:00'
describe
'210272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAM' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
38fd65ca068dc5c3761ba61c9c91ed8b
d4b99af2ea204ed6f4ef9a30d01f005b78725903
describe
'80927' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAN' 'sip-files00163.pro'
71c82f5b3b1a8add0a21c9f1e8e56a13
d1e65b3f68d4b0f1baf479fc598ff477f131e50d
describe
'59465' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAO' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
74ef780e91a4103a692919191d5468db
1e9d2a11f1a5c052a526fefa43465144ef5bb644
describe
'2772664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAP' 'sip-files00163.tif'
6b899097149a8be84b333a64d2808e35
b64bddc12061cf490cabb6ea6dcba6fb637f02ef
describe
'3364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAQ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
198220a5d5a0898745d9ee0ad7d1c0c8
82229661b2aa7d253151de4978aea9f13d278015
describe
'19898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAR' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
52da6e307c5ff0a72cd5bba038e48c4b
b39453b10c815fb6ac634b7507119bc89e63152d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAS' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
59c97525df47c8151e4840c449490525
51e8bcb5cb6d83605714a9f8ae865ecc8f0f6644
describe
'211365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAT' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
659534c9c32a5dd1f5384e4512780f39
bef9ce55cd7e9933fda9ef4dfa34e50d7f911eea
describe
'82460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAU' 'sip-files00164.pro'
f4d850bfc552be26941c263c22e09b31
f6d5af95e1a234a3c4ccd767e0970ecc692ded83
describe
'59711' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAV' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
4028b739870724ec7209f3166163078c
f4d014b6d4136df9c26be2e10c6ad43cfa125977
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAW' 'sip-files00164.tif'
2fb9ff448c790880aa3dfc7b8667d1fb
ad8bde09a1bae971935bbc6468c3d250e784ee74
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAX' 'sip-files00164.txt'
d7a69cd4341e1367e00a1572fff1367f
d22cfc672e33828e8c7395315917bf381aeb0751
describe
'19900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAY' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
70aea560beb760d6630b010be8e20b3f
1c3db6d1851fac43dfbfe3e7d12e739a3c676cfd
describe
'345400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQAZ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
4b11310b8fc55dc49d0253914f9c55d9
3e1f3f2839732e87ea35dd4f2d6e31c048280da0
describe
'207010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBA' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
044460584f234454ef491ef2fe84c2bb
b37052b2f5641e19af8dd6b92e2f86e87c5cef1d
describe
'82629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBB' 'sip-files00165.pro'
b27e2d6d55fe99dddb264661b477a903
e2a467c2131ba2ac60229f2e0fcb3e10b0cc54e7
describe
'59327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBC' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
e70d836044b652b03b581953642e5f32
f695d5f399a44236e6af67cb4c885b0fb1a8ecf4
describe
'2772512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBD' 'sip-files00165.tif'
438b1c9f92447f58d957da76fa6a6be9
f642e47562f4ac4d824292adaaab2ef82d99478a
describe
'3416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBE' 'sip-files00165.txt'
df26b8910db6cc87ea477048665d8896
11dadc7c09b266690b420a761a7445306da1b492
describe
'19646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBF' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
51205f000f61e5c8a5de41ede97fb9f6
ee6b308169117453fe776bd63cea97aa9745eb0a
describe
'345687' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBG' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
240dfeea495fdd03b1644c98a91971e2
027f1814d83876ed05b24913f25932407c998dbe
describe
'212447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBH' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
af130c200d01a2dd7fe095e3002399ac
7cc6ea8484bcd07143ec2e99a4de08bc2c65bff1
describe
'81065' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBI' 'sip-files00166.pro'
71df35907c8defb62e753f8764954499
f53996f96ecc289de8c1bacbf5ba916f34bd5321
describe
'60319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBJ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
999d305078ab635096737fc83f824972
bfef1557ea94dcffaebc03e5a1f4a0401a5f37c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBK' 'sip-files00166.tif'
f9d460f52792552385a79710a2ea394c
0ea78629ce90dbe131ada65621c5ed636866e332
describe
'3320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBL' 'sip-files00166.txt'
629cd10920c63f716ab9795feda19739
6f4878faf7b0e82d9f09f991de2245185a500a7e
describe
'19962' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBM' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
5ebe66b10d72b4bb9a711f42d448b3ee
974f701ba9069de2ac1fccb05d7db882dbc6a97f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBN' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
28b7c54e1372adbfb35270847391e79e
eb0ad1621dd649858f551a7aaa82fdb47ed25e42
describe
'214271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBO' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
43e205df14465da44e6f2171d2bead06
e7d06aedb18ffb9d5e7467e1dbdf1684f0a3210a
describe
'82322' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBP' 'sip-files00167.pro'
5e32f886e590f0adcb494400431053f5
2f66296a2962b7b45066a56bb59cf1684e9fea4b
describe
'60430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBQ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
aaf9a7477dce60fdc75ad4fec5475370
a56c760bbcf764f54102853b03e285447dd2dc6d
describe
'2772608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBR' 'sip-files00167.tif'
6eeb9a8c93398a22e334b16360f1a021
d9766a0fd54ce281d0e07d9809273c9a013037cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBS' 'sip-files00167.txt'
4dbb608ba5daa7f11b85c767999023b4
959be6248f78644275cc595e481ab810349ad455
describe
'19932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBT' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
2b53fe2e85c60a0990583762bd30671a
dc0726f3e3b031211a60acb004e67c556863e03b
'2011-10-16T20:54:02-04:00'
describe
'345578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBU' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
b4afc6f660bde9f8de3be5994922f12d
7a5d4282f63062f259bb74dc4105e8867d450a8c
describe
'218405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBV' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
8e8eedfeafc7578b1cb1fd6ac3115ed1
f596e39974759b21b6d92400a5f0b28beda69e2a
describe
'83738' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBW' 'sip-files00168.pro'
0178a9e4ba77102c5b1310835dff3950
96ad6ff9a8124ca7a4c16435aea2cd3f33c20fde
describe
'60881' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBX' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
55e8a6a6fd4846ed4183c306d53b30fa
964cdc6cf91dbfcd44fd5b435003d7723c193853
'2011-10-16T20:55:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBY' 'sip-files00168.tif'
329e9e5b6ad4429b70c41a6ffb42f6e5
19855226f09d839bd6b5fb4f6e2292b7dc67ce41
describe
'3450' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQBZ' 'sip-files00168.txt'
d8428a0d262278f3702f4222260a1bd8
bd631ff24c16e478e5df19c818a10bfddd3326a8
describe
'19848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCA' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
f72d0329b5aa89fb64d2f3de0850afcd
aae3d99be49c8bc9451fcdda33709f0d47c94c9b
'2011-10-16T20:56:37-04:00'
describe
'345389' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCB' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
cbffdbf313623e7062eb677da8385f25
90f975602df1764495199d40f949e4a6a6290b36
describe
'207596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCC' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
5e4f0ab95316c2ea0ed82cb128f5c49d
320f1eecc1292c0386315f6bc073db925ac0dddb
describe
'81063' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCD' 'sip-files00169.pro'
fc286ae7b296552b6f1a48f4a4c5e8ee
fad9585f0e02e0521d34087e4e88451c3c712256
describe
'58938' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCE' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
005d5c6d7d64fd9ed10eea8a7fc1a692
89a527510f345f2ea881b8f654235d28bc490fab
describe
'2772504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCF' 'sip-files00169.tif'
12ec9033998d27219cb6eff46b70492f
88528d855f05b4ca96a25df4cc09557b3d515a5d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCG' 'sip-files00169.txt'
f4f8de20bf554b9c479559e562f1744c
56d7c1dd66db1d8e2338ba85ec7edad8f3ecbdb9
'2011-10-16T20:55:19-04:00'
describe
'19616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCH' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
b16eef732ba4f8162fc57633de48162e
33c0b3ce2fcf17d2a1d6ac37a6bd320036738924
describe
'345727' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCI' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
14de6a527a866e0dd2c8fff31736e674
821af0a1a776122f25527f594762684c08fa2761
describe
'214045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCJ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
a87e96a0e10ce5942a93865974659cab
4a1bd0226fcff97135546e66f19d1696294f7462
describe
'80359' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCK' 'sip-files00170.pro'
c32e8fa25b53346381d060e662d291ee
c11cfe943d1fab0a32de4112e1dede5c686282b7
describe
'61834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCL' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
97fc9c1bf2db0b949178d8cde4da2076
5f602c711b46bd4719c71e3265b3594b637dc505
describe
'2774964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCM' 'sip-files00170.tif'
8b9dbbb2fe03a0e9b18ad2af8bbb8f5d
ec45ecd305ba23b677a8393acb013b29a05a170d
describe
'3314' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCN' 'sip-files00170.txt'
b7f8c8784f3effac27cad1f164b2e6d3
10100dcbd11c03a0e6522a50b95362aa38393032
describe
'20582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCO' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
a11cfa538c2c0adbed58dddef209909b
268dfb3919a8fbed1746a8c7becb4e01e0796f05
describe
'345362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCP' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
642221c184f3988e392bd52b26a36255
0a8d37e5b98dc75f3f4a39945cc6f8536f954cca
'2011-10-16T20:56:08-04:00'
describe
'212477' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCQ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
41a3af4ea042ca251ed01bd958761b3e
5253c30017b33d0b03e278a261638c969385c180
describe
'80894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCR' 'sip-files00171.pro'
08db2415e467027d3f1d77beee97effd
397846ac3d614745e3831d9650c9a0b1a76485da
describe
'60745' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCS' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
28987e337afdde6cb2fa55b0f29ca6b1
0a096d4ff537bb2ff3954a76e90ff3429e5aaa56
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCT' 'sip-files00171.tif'
d89a01697a0b856525ab943ade5a72bf
21264f8e6e56ebbaf9ba07c8546d21430c34e2d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCU' 'sip-files00171.txt'
44e22f1c834872e52d44a5960058015f
ffdfe98bc131abc0b86b531f9228ff9f7ac55b28
describe
'20013' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCV' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
ec525f4c384e432ac59073da2fe498ae
93335294ebb8ad81aec59ec91ccadc7797c4bc27
describe
'345619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCW' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
38cfd9a588b6e21306e34aa1e9711a77
6870684abc6cfd44ac526917f535c95a1cc7d11d
describe
'210767' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCX' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
6126bd3a42bf43b6d4903ca22af38f45
596b2dba3d9f682295ccbdc9edf75d53b69d6664
describe
'83499' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCY' 'sip-files00172.pro'
229d243d638e5793178ca13e97f4cdd0
68106d1ef0f90a29fd69978ca5df8b07aa27eeb4
describe
'59206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQCZ' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
7bf7176aa0311e3c0845b6c12f1e5029
3106b711233dc0f209e39415eec3096c2375669f
'2011-10-16T20:53:54-04:00'
describe
'2774512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDA' 'sip-files00172.tif'
ef1001a505735e77ff95c269ad934488
e915c61cb4d8ff5fe893e1f3cbf04afb6eb9e83c
describe
'3435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDB' 'sip-files00172.txt'
313ba9a6d02b689871f31b842db2aa77
1ddf8d85d30a8210f02a9f9e8d00092689613d4e
describe
'19319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDC' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
251aadcbc9785c61daec373ae7ffd320
d4039af133ae8f72e0873fc135b9335b1cba62c7
describe
'345403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDD' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
9ff383d7a3803025a2946998e6b2d992
c5a992b8be58b93bb82e985353f355e560968590
describe
'206937' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDE' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
a68be3aa31182e27f047d2ee4894879f
d437f86f54592fc3141c5ef2b169bdf7429b0734
describe
'81958' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDF' 'sip-files00173.pro'
2f0f764944b0bcc172478935403cfa4a
1afc7aef5f9e30763d471dc5a1cc5a9399859a3c
describe
'57804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDG' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
ffdaffc4db3e6af679079c04f8bfa250
ddef8693e0e9363a7cee1bf3b6e489a52757c0d0
describe
'2772396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDH' 'sip-files00173.tif'
0a2306d247a9e67f97baf76a8d204b48
0ec75f776cf54cda8b5a190f4a0f8099cd0ab65a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDI' 'sip-files00173.txt'
1fe0f1080bea16054eec1e19a15aebce
41e709c6829400c350130142c0dfb4d37b606a2c
describe
'19056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDJ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
01d1f8b79bd24b9c2bbc70b186b8e6aa
f4f3faf278f128600fc8b93712d2243edbf9dbf1
describe
'345638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDK' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
b91252bb0aa6f01c42b028d2206cbbf9
d56387c971a1c0397bb0ad504ca91286948821d5
'2011-10-16T20:56:50-04:00'
describe
'216234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDL' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
f57299f2a7f70a015bbbd4d362b34186
88e90f6057558ceda27079bca4485a7fcef419e3
describe
'81258' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDM' 'sip-files00174.pro'
7832228f0744c3d8ce37bedf251f377f
7aebbc2c865308846f672e8bc5275a21d8fd52a3
describe
'61812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDN' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
5d8e3f60c10a585557225522fecb98f4
b4022ca624527ad63d99394630920582b589cb34
describe
'2774856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDO' 'sip-files00174.tif'
2d264c6937bd85d072b7237cfcf50dc3
12b1f9a25c51fa395cb1a7debb68f31e91d4f905
describe
'3329' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDP' 'sip-files00174.txt'
2b9cb8bc0e4739719a99414d7795228c
eb01e8a52fd5f3cdf9fec73345a7e5015d5b493d
describe
'20167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDQ' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
e24834b38d026405d02b58a94d4fe5cf
470e50513c62d7a974afb7a12e7ec8c46a2b896e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDR' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
58748da8531161777029073fe79e5948
bcd5c2d29b2b6e1f85ecb123ea7ff3ada76212ba
describe
'215699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDS' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
8bd9723c3ae2180698587d4e52739169
acf1fca77bee34dfb35646e6eb51bab48b25e851
describe
'81085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDT' 'sip-files00175.pro'
773d3530c37769759de348fe83f4e639
76dfbc18645676e7be00dffabe4afbc53c592b69
describe
'61259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDU' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
f215b6ac3c2fcd57e8d9e1c0238f3f2e
901df91e361e03e5b10defb29f13f76cf5746269
describe
'2772748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDV' 'sip-files00175.tif'
822fcc224991974db2dbf71b58906215
37eb3e45de251bf5a8a8220e976ea3ed79a0723e
describe
'3385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDW' 'sip-files00175.txt'
b5a0f324a82d807a32ef95f1e7e29142
54ff7a3a01b238f8b250466519bddae6062d790a
describe
'20413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDX' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
8453b9daa44430706ca7b14b3276527e
418f348df1e2442a3e90fc81f779646689699608
describe
'345617' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDY' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
2e6fce5f6bdc9aec3409e32b824a3ae1
2e0a0a13c5f607e16013e4b9f40e4097a0f74763
describe
'215601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQDZ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
40bc3736540226a676cdc82f9ac620e9
33cb40a1f240f917e43919a9e1025ca415920b9c
describe
'84356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEA' 'sip-files00176.pro'
8f5dc4a593976dc96f7fddfa0c4530f1
d8916a3c5ae4514b304f8c5f22ad54e360ed9172
describe
'60790' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEB' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
e283fea838c59abe2bc85fa514452d6a
6d6e8309895208b8c0771b4e80e41accacafd509
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEC' 'sip-files00176.tif'
825d529c23cfb30448bafe06037aa267
12456011e0e9274b7d65c851bf3b8eb6a166a958
describe
'3500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQED' 'sip-files00176.txt'
f79bee9f4ac749bf5d97deb616f6f47a
b87b1f2ca333cc1942ebf3093a89a68166f6e50c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEE' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
e469e7cc184304f12bbb8f78f39f5025
78c97b7b1e264a19d0d4882a3f5aa1c666b56e4d
describe
'345407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEF' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
eba1a2a43eebd3bbbe57ef4574ec21e8
cbefdb0c59875be08c9b5b0f7f761c52ac08a112
describe
'208852' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEG' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
92e18a0eab42eccfe025b4c84751fd87
ed1c7ca82509d82027fb02d618bd1042ae133a13
describe
'80396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEH' 'sip-files00177.pro'
3a95b74e9fc9d804cdcaf8344b489973
5c7796adf4ab532ab0cd81cdaebf3a0b1b5890c3
describe
'59446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEI' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
d619cb0241ae6426ee5fbd4660048d0d
f420ede1ee0c61f7c30df970dec42ae67ae5c919
describe
'2772540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEJ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
71222bd8c614782f6212101b050460d0
38d919656a7ac1b67e739e8e2ef882f72b21165d
describe
'3342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEK' 'sip-files00177.txt'
99d3ccfc5f3a5022c596a9c496887aeb
c10c0a4118fe395d8ae007a29eb82f8f781a0039
describe
'19609' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEL' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
97177e4197eaf3756b54f2fdabf07210
4dfb4255833940a18d4fe2f7e641df39a84ddf4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEM' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
029ef743da7e62d0ed7eadb1f79dc5e0
0a8de0c11397a295461614f3ed84602c1379ea85
describe
'217756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEN' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
7e0ab33a46d517e11f2febe06a673dbc
c32676b3f44f09af1b5966e93723e22254ba7f0b
describe
'81869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEO' 'sip-files00178.pro'
2b85cc1995de384847c9afc2a2c06878
c6b37661affabd3776da7a14fc69f923c4081acb
describe
'61465' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEP' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
d09df9257f0df793c450a77672a6c210
11016cff7b56f81eb75d57d5ee6a39c50f953bec
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEQ' 'sip-files00178.tif'
33cc57f1c0ab5bbfec7d883bceebd128
77e3f50cb4296290b2fc705187f681740c606fa9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQER' 'sip-files00178.txt'
4fcac7086c7ff4483af5b6a624f791bd
c8453b8ccf0f0a9861235c260cfbb52b5d6d4adc
describe
'20332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQES' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
c4bb872887ee8dbae44b07db9aa5dbce
b7feef1ff26c4df34432c831b69631d4c5338f06
describe
'345344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQET' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
58edb4ac98b5224c1d6d96ffbeeb1ed9
d6431351b58c502aba520ddcb2daad310070ee6f
describe
'213110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEU' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
3bc2b0471cc8a19c8a202cfd6568284e
cceada46d731e1e85b3a6f038c5ebf48a44608f9
describe
'80728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEV' 'sip-files00179.pro'
c4481ed20227d964e2483f183d704701
e8491985e6b220fcabfa5b98065aaf01560780c2
describe
'60806' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEW' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
77636e79d173ffa56bda3cdab37880aa
0c2e0a4788381f6ea7705e38b239c6715c530469
describe
'2772712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEX' 'sip-files00179.tif'
43fdac8d1d7677f0a643a7b1c5a5e834
8b1736f64cf0d178f8d04d2ca1eaaa2bd65ff978
describe
'3341' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEY' 'sip-files00179.txt'
0bd6098239d41fd052d4a061c5f825cd
0216ea4ee54b812ff335e05abaa7fa2ce6570568
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQEZ' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
d1a3b480f63283db5347ec7348fc3624
061635c3104089712da2419816faec5d36856521
describe
'345736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFA' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
348bbe4d5a556fc1d516f31e048b3498
91ae6cf6ab07eac534003933dca7985a4f96fdbf
describe
'210926' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFB' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
04dfe44b9889c8826ac8e9e057e6dda9
b26deddce2f78eeaccf33a6b2b1f552d43ccb508
describe
'82138' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFC' 'sip-files00180.pro'
b669235725946f52dd68df5154731803
f7c9801b75738a9ac8eaaf8c08392a6ed39f6ac1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFD' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
3f7e619f8ffa9092f13b27ae0bee3347
69d2ee4f46c721cec808fb4ab4871eaf3347de1e
describe
'2774600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFE' 'sip-files00180.tif'
cb9f0567330ca2970a9fb48eeb165a89
27ff6ec53a8e16cd283d5a09902b8181049721dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFF' 'sip-files00180.txt'
d55df91ce15cf5af01cf9fe164793fa1
20a11d09eb332e0e2d8cf5082d16a299e1258432
describe
'19524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFG' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
2b25275dbbb6b81e5691bba9770e1cc3
7f430db8c1ac5b56524d6ec1209c4a2eada6ed08
describe
'345453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFH' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
7e9dea5268e609b3242719379f5b66b6
b60f41fae65b00714fb416d15d0e4f37ef30187b
describe
'192120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFI' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
dc629ed3733e1922bed564d1dea2f747
e184a09ed118c3a32bff4d5fab5f47c524d9a978
describe
'73448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFJ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
76c80006cd980c415c574fca6e2353ba
b55686faa16cbbc242ebe9f8d048ef826373dc87
describe
'55963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFK' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
037928dc743c570b6069c7507c06dde7
02bb13e05c2f169cd59677241da5a54e8b3b3c0e
describe
'2772508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFL' 'sip-files00181.tif'
8749d16ec4435b6ea1ef4c659d1325ce
700eda56f9b1b26e8fdd55430b28d7c405dac996
describe
'3100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFM' 'sip-files00181.txt'
5ab355dbdd2b477fa9515aad00ef4f79
1fa477b708f6f1f0b9d2666c687add61d57c52e8
describe
'19152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFN' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
9eb218b1fee67c3232ba812054cc58d0
9f83225af1df3ecae214dc292feda5d75c3cb2b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFO' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
f143a5eb10a2f3db00ec15e4a9d13898
095079fd021e662ffc75ef9c9f7b58bc0dbc5fca
'2011-10-16T20:53:09-04:00'
describe
'209226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFP' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
3bf27fa77d26729319c24f726ba52902
7c2c883ce29db10ccb02d843fec4f6f1894f44e5
describe
'81434' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFQ' 'sip-files00182.pro'
32f04076a52191c6fe17f6be059759ab
3962a9ddface84ae3c8effc1fd9257edf687f3c8
describe
'58854' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFR' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
b2bb0ae21bf2510c3a17dd154c8b7687
819c411c7e584c33874479ae2aa80b38c8b69d89
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFS' 'sip-files00182.tif'
dcdf81ffc9ac7da28d512cc6db12207d
0589e6f9314ab9f87ae98250566d5b22498dec16
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFT' 'sip-files00182.txt'
84128f07854de61e47836a00dd63d9d9
94bcf9f4e768b1e81735a92bdd8936e808926815
describe
'19550' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFU' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
51635fe55d387a022839e5ebdf2dc5b3
114ecede0256ae5a4f8738928e449209f7d8410a
describe
'345316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFV' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
64f853537b0b8eefc1082c1e7966eceb
4ff6e76f1f53adf33024fea04143f20b8f1f4fa7
describe
'208194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFW' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
1701b6e26bb308c848a087b9779060fc
4b2db2eb4c82fd7337a9b0491dcf0ef6db90e60c
describe
'81369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFX' 'sip-files00183.pro'
3ff2806e4708f920cd636f8143b91c29
787345906d9c2e4e16476b3da1bd4a447d7f9a3b
describe
'59164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFY' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
91d9dd629ad37bc8081a10b65611e7c1
711f135b4622dcb95c21daed45209e5c5abf1708
describe
'2772500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQFZ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
0228620e0e4f0c27100b830b8d53648b
1b9fb07d4748296d575849e0e17ec928a76fcbd4
describe
'3436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGA' 'sip-files00183.txt'
662d6910c0206533c713ec88f87358b6
c1e7764bf97f6fb6c51b9191f4e50b91fb8e08df
describe
'19339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGB' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
0806731002a7668d92177cf28da16ac8
946f0296ca3f1bb30c57d92d74b999b23b9dd30c
describe
'345508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGC' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
a00ee2f366c91338060e73e61efb9acd
f08468933988dfca3d83502e42eb954a75010032
describe
'214165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGD' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
f8b1434edc27f078ad0259ab5c3c8c8d
da817094dbaeabba202d3c511b8e5a982a915526
describe
'81893' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGE' 'sip-files00184.pro'
fd873d1b9359a84f638b60cf08f0d7bd
dbca55dec7d9dde75ee0c93cd9559ab1ee77dabd
'2011-10-16T20:55:44-04:00'
describe
'60649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGF' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
d2c8b3a21aa0a0df5cf8fed9801a2266
4910f3d48eac371bf620353c7bf58d65df8807be
describe
'2773412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGG' 'sip-files00184.tif'
33a3ab51dc2bbb118429e0a5c3b7774f
b2e2a0c5646f1da4267ad46d36b5926fb7e66b6d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGH' 'sip-files00184.txt'
c21e8835df6d49e235021dd38d397036
8ca7bca8458a93da54aad8b118b71045069790ff
describe
'19991' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGI' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
1165b84879294e7eb17984db87715c33
dc36efc58eb6dec706ef0147f7a9a081c783d211
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGJ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
695394d0c1978e880b9e0b290005e6ab
229084364e68f9307e2458b733e9688acfebcc24
describe
'207541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGK' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
9a6651f37df84e96b6b2a29413d8439d
2d4229fe3c7dec05fa231688e67b80353b653d78
describe
'82107' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGL' 'sip-files00185.pro'
d489086c8cba792ec0787190d5697a4d
5e0e5cec9cd5459d6426bd1afb08fcca534ecf9c
describe
'58483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGM' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
9372cf86fbe75a9720738a8d1a5a2797
d1fdf81d320649cf879231a2dd7348a2e0f641c5
describe
'2772452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGN' 'sip-files00185.tif'
2c59976660109d609d175214d19d3463
0392c2e7f697720ae52c23f7fa7c12c565d49574
describe
'3414' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGO' 'sip-files00185.txt'
c6e4fbbe4d7a2d0e9c1775b0baff439b
875135f5a65055c25e58f609847df2a5f4964f9e
describe
'19249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGP' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
a1cb8c6aaad3a46b2c488a9d0c3f8e84
f5b25dfed48b567e9719d5f78d1a4a8fe1dff3fa
describe
'345695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGQ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
f3341e320a3073f272813976202e8941
c21edd5e1ab05a4e54fba580a650b6393168c6cd
describe
'187881' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGR' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
08700dbf3b92241b3dc4575895266914
7f5397bfd9cf94618fe3dc83c13b486b8c3dfaa3
describe
'72979' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGS' 'sip-files00186.pro'
e757eb97b324314a6d9662e0e4896472
b1c139d24428986c8ef235d5f947d6233756b7f8
'2011-10-16T20:53:11-04:00'
describe
'54367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGT' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
39bfbb484c54e18fea9cabb8b1a01b23
37ffc0e0255ccf47b6fa946afe450dcac286bf7d
describe
'2774432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGU' 'sip-files00186.tif'
44c0c403ee957a35bdb2bf96bb77ad62
c10c20392c0ac0cefbac3c4d98cb2e452bf7d498
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGV' 'sip-files00186.txt'
2eaa120c1e222ff3271478f69357e607
e7c344e144038c6cefc0a70277c1468241318148
describe
'18619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGW' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
0f6280f2468d5db3427c4c4c7c2d22ba
e6c5d2c082d29a5203a0b6a95861546af60b5476
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGX' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
58624bb639d51eae9b5f8c21e0a3596d
5d41080d918a06aea9cc14ca4d26660eff1f652f
describe
'202053' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGY' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
5d6a4bda3f5cc214e8b60340ebc00c99
8ce23bade809a1ae6af997f4e3a88cdc741e11bb
describe
'78527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQGZ' 'sip-files00187.pro'
6236eb2faba4c3c64fb36eb58ff6edb2
23b2a3c2cf2ff210be28013cca36da1189c05735
describe
'57714' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHA' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
9893a0848e89526811628e1e48e22522
2181812f7c80c8b863f60d08cf6db0650afe3c6d
describe
'2772556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHB' 'sip-files00187.tif'
f5bd91d623ad1b8de07875866f64b6e7
ab7d3279551adb27eac6079410833e71061645b0
describe
'3243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHC' 'sip-files00187.txt'
c81dc6a8812d45c94447ebe32dda2ca1
80b7d2f1e837bceab500d3369e9a333d0d0b92b9
describe
'19583' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHD' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
29c55c2039b6df1a7ceff62c3fbca725
f964188d3ed5dd23f1a18a4a51d762b3ead59368
describe
'345725' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHE' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
5aeeb0afabd72d8444aeb11c6d7132c5
df0fa704a723966d01ddd3293f12b246ac08301c
describe
'212106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHF' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
69facc31ad62f2019cd84ae0df5e3b9a
281eac8abe821cc26c792659371c85544c0f47cd
describe
'81871' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHG' 'sip-files00188.pro'
f3bb433c2b99aed444e790fd19e4bcda
c7f7184911d2219ad1fada22337a3c89df22c215
describe
'59558' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHH' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
b8a553fdc377413c63e04897410c0dcf
c86f88f5a40e8bc1a40f97c5d9bf63180bbca413
describe
'2774676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHI' 'sip-files00188.tif'
cdaf9466cd638b1bf53d59bdb45e6190
ef01cfb3da06ac88d373658140f5e43e5918a489
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHJ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
f0e1850f0b5024acd7f2f1ab7d2185e9
88610fc8266461146608d6bbe26c1e57e6d46738
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHK' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
0c877a02aa5e65082d1b656a1490802c
3a3953b56ac73a008f410682ee4597274017756b
describe
'345343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHL' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
5fa72cebf61d9cd364ca8ca6f7b21b47
6050e2d28ae49160bd23bed9a4a3451cd1d265d5
describe
'207203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHM' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
91d56e2b22d694387bac28ee95e05f0e
aac9c2fddef925056fc9002ff97aa5d290b579da
describe
'80388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHN' 'sip-files00189.pro'
237a837f476ec1e6b00fafa698e06b66
0b28cc4184b08b9a4ecd9895395dff0c4781080d
describe
'59144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHO' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
66b654f90885000e8a7bf8688ef43b17
45bef03f3ebf4110c4823c435315abe7df090992
describe
'2772656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHP' 'sip-files00189.tif'
9745caef524ef7b99c91904eb19ec27d
7a1f87125037cb283f6cf1a5718fc0443a299965
describe
'3394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHQ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
3ddc94f0bf245f71df0963d889c61135
e733442026bc55ccb2e1a27e247bc5ffb9b21834
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHR' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
33d12192b1a2ef2fe61cc9ee30c65084
9a165715822866410168e314c2f9003c1eec6e79
describe
'351617' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHS' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
15753cb64ad197f8940afba146085b51
4fe2ef0f10e305f6594836cf18038714d7ff3d50
describe
'209127' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHT' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
12b3f683fa16fb7ad7da8f8fd1e27a96
d95e6a193afea52aee18cc0ac3c5ed7dd38ef390
describe
'81007' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHU' 'sip-files00190.pro'
160dba8e7bea892b1af6751368b72f26
1ab5a1e15538b59bf83413e2a0b56f905837a87e
describe
'58559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHV' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
0028741af9baee2ae7f7cba856425035
818d971127c79ab219e627af5e3308c8eee65a54
describe
'2822088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHW' 'sip-files00190.tif'
eb104de017b80639e27635e40a81f785
4ffa2c6cfa622a489bbd735a8823abc213c0ee3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHX' 'sip-files00190.txt'
e05b6496703b680263e7bec8a642a07e
e26b47debc5f2c820f1a04c1f093743ad0191d70
describe
'19390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHY' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
26005379e04cf6136c6da82e951e0b8f
360c480a24b38c3dd51df94831f35b0510348398
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQHZ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
b1aff82a2ab9cce561b48d3bb3c0590d
9fad9a4ce040bdec348f3f58c9cfb521dc86638f
describe
'208850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIA' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
177de60183324d972a7921c3faccd05e
2b9a8c64b333597dec40350fc5296cd4a1e8fe23
describe
'82129' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIB' 'sip-files00191.pro'
83a14f01b2d3914a7507cb0dc2fc3ccd
d820d2a72eb4451e3fa3fbe72ba00ef1b4c0cf84
describe
'59116' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIC' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
8a1266dee0e22921c7fe09a3686a81b8
26eff5928d83b0b31799c7deb13e08ce4b980745
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQID' 'sip-files00191.tif'
cadb6cdace7a4b447c1f957aef100e05
d28edbeadc0cc5e81b18f109b7a3b0cd9a824498
describe
'3438' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIE' 'sip-files00191.txt'
c6207211a3b06eca56bdd1a075efa3ff
5e7647be45ae8cc8f831891c416075046bfaa1a9
describe
'19756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIF' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
4a32f004d56dd912ff2e8885c08d7e3d
56c7b23c22d796ae5a1eb1ac53553464b81e65b2
describe
'345705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIG' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
a08f5985ebb58716a8e4ace61be6c323
ec269abde4b57f04b5285edaad7459056c971778
describe
'213240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIH' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
42168f0777dd583f3f80023ae39c3b48
a0db71b5576220677a6b4675650a2cdc7f0d37a9
describe
'81618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQII' 'sip-files00192.pro'
69353d956cfc5eceac61fd7069d062ca
18043d5243401d6d7acce26a88343c80f7aa4dbc
describe
'60516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIJ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
2da3b34b919dc8578ed76f656bd8a447
f649dbff3cfac95562ff72da9bdc05c8a58302b0
describe
'2774712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIK' 'sip-files00192.tif'
6242f774473f0a78795a67b85e5b7b5b
791fe7be4505a01a42807d562091efb2dbbbb466
describe
'3380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIL' 'sip-files00192.txt'
887b83543a49302f842731e6c4f71677
eb5546f514d0de2600ef4185b798dcc47e3db1b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIM' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
6fab84cfde7af1bea17beac26a9d0289
9e87cbcb22864a5bfb460490e212eb1087775339
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIN' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
aad543bde6c90099fd01efbf3ff1fa4c
e34e1eabb1c2a1d2033dab379cf5455d301bc284
describe
'213297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIO' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
59cd954e9fe6d536bba3a9204e3ac275
da89d57ba44dbc0415aaf94dc2695c315e387217
describe
'83233' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIP' 'sip-files00193.pro'
951f84975fd8d86fae9a28fc3f017f1f
3f1fb283662022fe609b4492638f1e4f9a5abcfc
describe
'59565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIQ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
398f8a2f6685e2bd6792de1c246d23ad
62ad0cbcf4e23061ed5fa00d3dc34e9b710652d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIR' 'sip-files00193.tif'
6ca6150be035a13746024c805cfd57b6
4a4a3da30905454bdb9f8c5400a62318996a879b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIS' 'sip-files00193.txt'
f063ae3cab025097590ab9ba620ce14a
d8081256be2922d90744c4aa541678fb51e0c5b7
describe
'19714' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIT' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
f5803776456fbbb35fd117a32f515f49
2007396e3b2b4148468e86cdea08994ce2673ddd
describe
'345711' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIU' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
4e194ce9e3999540c55d2c6335ebd9c1
eb223e81aafdab76485fb54e60e5fa8616bf505c
describe
'208912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIV' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
f7fd3f2b0544dbdeeabbf6687de91916
d030a8164ac1ec255f9ba69678550255c93c4134
describe
'82489' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIW' 'sip-files00194.pro'
44b787f6a90f218bcc508d566d4f6148
ec3d1c1a39f75809e8f46364d696ce280521b195
describe
'59087' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIX' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
ef307a7d58eaacfe122e27d9f0f37c39
b6c4f69c6cc4128dadf8c2c0ecabae22fadccbf6
describe
'2774736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIY' 'sip-files00194.tif'
c3726c5e7fbc702ab81de22e1e676d24
b09f14155556a4091c69325a06f34825f63dae56
describe
'3417' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQIZ' 'sip-files00194.txt'
c6ac3a1c092b7a0ddfbaee8af25abaa2
8612d1ef28776f83f99d3803761799df9cfd8ee7
describe
'19580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJA' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
234ac63150f4dcc5c1227e48b3b7d1b7
033e431d53bfac421fff5081261f59085a41f2ea
describe
'345363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJB' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
30e0a77c961677c05f4fc123823b41a3
211f3815360a0414814918f28b7d0559283e2b88
describe
'205814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJC' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
3957be8bb6792b12f1a620afbace1def
f4b9948b27602f5ca05c116f960963b4fdf75c7d
describe
'82614' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJD' 'sip-files00195.pro'
b91e356c7118260bac6a827e5d42640c
c40a98c0f3fd8ff09b64d8814adeeaf96b624755
describe
'58384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJE' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
552bd4d8726528671f0a7acae2e964ca
c6788704d55089f9cb0d35d39cb5067aecc046e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJF' 'sip-files00195.tif'
12268eb0f0f4215f9d7a04addf909304
e9a1edef024c71c499d6eee9e08b4e54d1173f96
describe
'3429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJG' 'sip-files00195.txt'
52e0c10a9507f6d94346cab3b8fd5307
b5e17f9b4678da1dbeb145b0aec7b588ab54ddd8
describe
'19392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJH' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
bfa2536db3cc4a3235b23364ab13b6c1
31c7ae600f5ee8e311b951867b6bfa4a02f43b61
describe
'345565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJI' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
60244cc66674bd96edeee03c096e9ec0
b8be40066ef8ecfd46aa6b1d849e41c42179b4f2
describe
'204999' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJJ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
d89f79df192760ce25fbacfa0feef7d2
5be88192458775d969a830de3a8f990a9f574d74
describe
'77988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJK' 'sip-files00196.pro'
6c2d834b7926a7564a3412d85de67c6c
bbe90cb4e3e7c8a4a2d4ef3d16957033ec9190c5
describe
'58428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJL' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
67c8fa51f1537a5fa8648f338a3c714b
131c70890e6973da2b03051b45a45e672de9b235
describe
'2773508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJM' 'sip-files00196.tif'
4083426fa464a0c6ca82cea68f083e0a
ff4676e4fa82fd0ba0faa126bfae6b0bb6f7893a
describe
'3219' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJN' 'sip-files00196.txt'
b17bfe9364dd52126b03fadcc83261ff
daa3ed998fb197976367990e3e8d5b0084201d53
describe
Invalid character
'19655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJO' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
700b0d5ee609696cf1299a1b9b46a279
e957eb8abb8eece3e1376a4e473ba14ca3607542
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJP' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
e4d2554605b67f3ae425edf2332b0d2e
8fd9fb8127cc11ae9655234c7693273446a00faf
describe
'207451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJQ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
6759d368e685856347a4502f0af61f41
76b88c4c8f532f09c4f4bc9920ab652317b0994b
describe
'80562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJR' 'sip-files00197.pro'
61ec51f0fe1b5a68875c5dbcc57a4cef
f80ac6d88d2e3253d4ace9c24d231003a4f160a9
describe
'59557' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJS' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
9c1de98a2a379f1038ec504f74375a58
b72d8164dea6cbb6d5c90e93ef1d1f25d362b426
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJT' 'sip-files00197.tif'
f8785c4fe8e3e01d9d247d6ed3dc635c
0e2aee48868940b28e8c89266f6909854e358826
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJU' 'sip-files00197.txt'
8b78666207ac37a0ede616516fac6887
161f3729a8980d968f401a9b85a55d05805fba1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJV' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
934a366922a07cd65296e4f57a3aeec3
5a0254c1f87f0847057b6ca548123c4af1c63ea4
describe
'345684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJW' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
57fe50327093993c590547a360726db2
dfa90a30cb7ae171939ec699d56c10aa7ae578c0
describe
'213235' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJX' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
e4176cf0fa6690e32344f13bd3784bed
c266626ee1598cd2682e2d32921bea4801db5647
describe
'80227' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJY' 'sip-files00198.pro'
ad1f53e6b71faab2c9b4e2a038033638
ebc5e9887263ebfe048de345c38bb054e9f90787
describe
'60628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQJZ' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
ef240fbcc5f684e88b8f66674f9eb404
372d14e7a8c84a882f90cc7e24357c7b9840465b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKA' 'sip-files00198.tif'
72dbfba25b7caede3cb90d54689b3830
d9c2c3a7589c2a4512be68fcd6da44de5ddb0063
describe
'3277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKB' 'sip-files00198.txt'
22725d247fa9a30e5bbba1dc64067e25
73b91cb8b0f85fe86757242637a621804e942b36
describe
'20339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKC' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
7fad2b3831577c5fbd129c504dfef3d9
38d07ce4152c546b8851aa5befb9c8ead4f2f64d
describe
'345429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKD' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
e85057e04dbb9c8b724f2c11719a0ff3
a146eb67429a156af8ceb39a6ffc04f85e09819b
describe
'200094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKE' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
2ab89039236a22812ee4bea8e140f5e6
b8ed59741eba22083cd1d512bf50a84d7c2e10ba
describe
'75145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKF' 'sip-files00199.pro'
a9ca5eadfe9e4ef51f736dbd6d23e8f6
d32aa4a97fe7bdba31a2e15d301e64b028950ece
describe
'57509' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKG' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
8b9a3b3c4548a9fc4ecee4a0ceecc810
387af2ee5bfc54fc3967d89fa5331661614cde75
describe
'2772704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKH' 'sip-files00199.tif'
fa2b30fefab84e4b9367ca3f34fa3a8a
f2d9338edf042b1d4eec1bb0589f3f0d944e56c8
describe
'3204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKI' 'sip-files00199.txt'
7a416b2a32703647616267bfef8f2de7
336dce6529e854f5b72e03f9db57500005579c07
describe
'19757' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKJ' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
06b9902512bdcc5b50a12728c049c44c
4f05d6811aba4a9225b623d2469857adce478d1e
describe
'345546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKK' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
eda2474a0dd1cedb43b50cd3bf772f9b
c54fbceffa33cf79760c96124d4c12d2b8f3237a
describe
'215057' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKL' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
02f3efc719e20450d01fbafd261e1793
cb113c0130f4ddda8c8f1d80734036ad266e1b15
describe
'81193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKM' 'sip-files00200.pro'
0dab3ada6b05e72e220173fbe0cc0459
33f2539a198b03fb9e23e6a0729fa3f5ff13e6dd
describe
'61067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKN' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
ab78a6db4db45f8564e068b8992e8621
bdf91bd2d604eb54e3922658e05061213b65082f
'2011-10-16T20:57:25-04:00'
describe
'2773516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKO' 'sip-files00200.tif'
1640002d3bd1968ee5c5ab009f498a57
5d2157bc7b1d24b357c3ea4b7f758bd7909c5b6d
describe
'3318' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKP' 'sip-files00200.txt'
bce54280abf9b81ec066b53ac3d97935
18eb9bac782baa5679a90d192b85a35d5d6f3d5e
describe
'20148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKQ' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
e8a9b3ef64725e5af5384614f0296839
38683f53e230b1bd775d8f7f0147a0e7b48a6023
describe
'345299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKR' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
d03521dc5de46ea4546298b731284311
b7085021da53e6a29a344f6994f17004bd4341d4
describe
'215411' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKS' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
c643f98ed04747de2e446fbe00c3f30e
687e0c9fc36e5899a521b15ea1f7fd866608e6e0
describe
'82296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKT' 'sip-files00201.pro'
2a1add9951e120d81cfde47fdf072830
3d591f0dbdfc7176d7fe1434428d0d86294f0edd
'2011-10-16T20:57:12-04:00'
describe
'61018' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKU' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
ace07151f32f5620817a9963eb2071b3
cd53a020999df2c3ec63cc1f1c844dac5375a7bb
describe
'2771456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKV' 'sip-files00201.tif'
1b8bc5b12efa8361b647107ff71ac1f0
d26b88f0d36d84ec8a82f9c386da3a9df65186b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKW' 'sip-files00201.txt'
2c018cc0662dab822b4ad093b3e0f905
a714d5d852d71a670b123040f4093972a80100e0
describe
'20144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKX' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
d554c0b5f03f9c232d684d57dc006e9a
d7e6546f87b9b6e13a4273f98461e47fd8b6c586
describe
'345465' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKY' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
c7d5b05e1dc5e512fd9ec37ef19dd515
0add05ea308476746eeaabe401d00fe1e9758fcb
describe
'214390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQKZ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
2e40899b846e3695e9b192e96dd1fa27
efad8f75d9a700d3cf497fb07e71f64e9c024659
describe
'82016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLA' 'sip-files00202.pro'
917ab5591b76e58210a814f904929950
f924ff12b589eaa5b422d53289ec2e78bb1bfa75
describe
'62112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLB' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
8f9f5257dd5f1a447bb4609058aa3b94
f31604026f1c823f1771ba36146730da13add569
describe
'2773580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLC' 'sip-files00202.tif'
207aa59d8f86e9d15f862af8eab63d0d
62af8e05e3ab35bdb38ee5917f81322d6413eaa2
describe
'3352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLD' 'sip-files00202.txt'
0926fd3b1af792de678ff2a0b2b3e695
1546edeb7db2bc6a7c19b84825e1545f83281b1f
describe
'20469' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLE' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
f6aabd230477e99600785c94ff826b83
3ed428ff73b2ec5842a1be1884a08edb3dde48fd
describe
'345431' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLF' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
9cef833eee3f3e22700e8cd6ea090d2c
bcb068940c7141efc7ae912bd9605561c322b779
describe
'211373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLG' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
32b88be78747f4fb65607de4a7c1b2f7
340d78cbd5408a3a3161a485ea2ee29b769f7b3a
describe
'82072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLH' 'sip-files00203.pro'
d045c924db12c047fd7c2f55638c0faa
ddac708e9cbc77dafc1f1a156d45cd39fae09fa4
describe
'59785' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLI' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
65813f425126f84dcc4c01198f1b0d41
832bdc30bb24392a7c145cc7a8e3ab8ddd4fa63e
describe
'2772688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLJ' 'sip-files00203.tif'
6c70d94f8dd27db21fc1701c18d221d1
eba7fe7f9ca9d760c5085882125246a51b5392ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLK' 'sip-files00203.txt'
697e0228d88acab5f0652b4f63e7ce47
75fa56ed871c6683efcc8eed02c901850e5eab70
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLL' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
cc6812ae91a201da80bbd71f03a76e78
ba38909b2ff4d5758e01b425b74dd3faede75c11
describe
'345273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLM' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
59ae67d576ed50ca30b3cbc769b73955
11c3cf68353e8f4bcbeb81d6ab43df2e624ffb20
describe
'215200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLN' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
67740eb1565ddf03721cd9d21466b939
d97aa5525c64740ba7c7b1af94dd69e0d7bd4478
describe
'81028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLO' 'sip-files00204.pro'
741adf60a3ffa860709c184c5af86cac
81247f20b8515f82d62509d6fca19f9c1fda20ba
describe
'61451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLP' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
4a742541d61ab07a6a81b0ed3b7fc99f
454d8b796ed1bb06d2dbd67dd31c06baca32ab91
describe
'2771412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLQ' 'sip-files00204.tif'
5d2a1cf741f2f52b1bcce13b842143b8
965d4e080d3b2dcaf4431573de1fb34f76348bba
'2011-10-16T20:54:59-04:00'
describe
'3315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLR' 'sip-files00204.txt'
b97a7514b736397da6634f7e3f38a844
446bbfa359fd55441e71522b755f7f1b4341e962
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLS' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
9f275ff182668f5a8086bcdc7043dbb0
5870d55d9ef1459df8680fbe0c47bf6d08d6dec2
describe
'345402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLT' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
1bab0d28a71f49e9cec93a150ac6f0c8
b8ca51d744a90521531f44271e72ea90526668a2
describe
'212165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLU' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
556cb1d0e0b3062d3124af45a6939260
d8192173a76d48311fcfe0f62736cfa378e9f733
describe
'81433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLV' 'sip-files00205.pro'
0972b811a93a8c6510d970e6cbf75248
a96aff247e932c20f23bcaf037df1e7254ec5737
describe
'60578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLW' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
390c00d45e70240d1fff3656847f8437
1d518e7347ef01a7521c25ab96334aa78cfbc523
describe
'2772812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLX' 'sip-files00205.tif'
2c381cd308bbf481a9353b77d5192785
3fed9ef37379b13dca0d2e80633f0470c1e57fc7
describe
'3371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLY' 'sip-files00205.txt'
c58699c65f818468d49a042d12827b6a
a892b79cff8e922f68a6a50bc303d39e3b738571
describe
'20596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQLZ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
420277a572b6c58daef3e913f9ffbfe1
09ed09365b7660e5987263cc1553ff08b586f9de
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMA' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
dcaab6c0064e22555415152087c6bfe6
eae139ddb6a2c2dbe9130489640af3d365d8ebf4
describe
'218657' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMB' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
ebf5236ca2f8ef771de41a6dae166d39
c46e071dd1714f6f9ccdb4f261407c863f34c927
describe
'84055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMC' 'sip-files00206.pro'
7cfa826186786c17d10b1f3662447497
f16ac22768a4b9e99be6e0d60228a9545dd07e2a
describe
'62277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMD' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
58cce220bf4f19f293f7fb76c6fadadf
b81409ba0346b507011c3501f15cfa6ac9d2b2b8
describe
'2774924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQME' 'sip-files00206.tif'
890e099fefc8023ba62741af90f6e43f
6fbecacc766ca77003599dae5ed93c6af2d3187f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMF' 'sip-files00206.txt'
30cfb364375d328fd0e5efae92120995
94df17e130f4b57750ac61e62a1e2fac873b5050
describe
'20536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMG' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
9e1c7cf96be79fa85993e0049b2cddc5
107ac737965694ee9b8543d51bd3cc463afd9897
describe
'345334' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMH' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
d2c1008de95636a143678254c67bbf12
0e7f816edb91de48adb34618d6b0bbe7f40111df
describe
'215499' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMI' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
7702b4279fcd372d03f073e25ef1f35d
22c1747b06db3ae3477aa89873ab7eadfe38d09d
describe
'81568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMJ' 'sip-files00207.pro'
d3f0822ccfdeda91227576dfc71f9c0e
37e08ae0a06c0ea7b126415ef77d10b48063f8a3
describe
'61815' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMK' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
618fc35d6a40b4cf6815fc448eb04bf1
76a18b4cd2309d9b55fae46b07833fb05c2fb11c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQML' 'sip-files00207.tif'
aa762533033053ff9b54b5e4e4ec1b57
6451af07f2f5329de4077f592c0becf08e6f9d73
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMM' 'sip-files00207.txt'
a4d075f76d2550dcf45b6d7d104f88ca
8db982dd321c2cda32ee50b007a7c35f32d6370f
describe
'20578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMN' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
f8ca7fb6e846e5f4a6fd64ceb70e6498
e6872f36e9ba7f5472a7c16f1c612b32a5cddf28
describe
'345270' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMO' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
5e9b638123d8dfb4dbdfbbe71ad9fad3
131a14c19040f22a20c945ce382d7908c7aa0544
describe
'220726' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMP' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
2a53be0d49aef27d82f92415a7a9f021
813d7d4da537150a4f6aaef3812760aa3a247fb3
describe
'83133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMQ' 'sip-files00208.pro'
64eb69b5c28960541c897dc7fab5927c
f7100086162cf5d546902811994f0a707ce0cf7f
describe
'62155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMR' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
f7d722f9ac290dd7b935093fc5ebf55a
8ba5b494691d428e11f1e567d2636f5afb15e603
describe
'2771556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMS' 'sip-files00208.tif'
84317fdbb195bdf939e9fb53abc70b03
31bacd870477c46c103315589e2bea00c2167006
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMT' 'sip-files00208.txt'
f0de985fe10876e05cdabc2e9c3ff5a8
a01987f51e8a90f572475bd693925a36cbc7ced9
describe
'20729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMU' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
200ed89420720c23fa5c18e5ec297bdf
e90f1d06de05fd963b41481005ab2c81236bc704
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMV' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
2bb2cc43d47c6a0508423820735acccc
3a00dcb2a84824840e3e25a9e0cf5d1ac0659704
describe
'217250' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMW' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
04315a1dc1cfcf72aae799169df299f8
03ae5b8e5346b197fc311ef9c4ab81ced55fa825
describe
'82831' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMX' 'sip-files00209.pro'
f2a36bf48245df1a579d36a81154ab00
33491f23db781ea2952618d9d9cf2e61a261329d
describe
'61068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMY' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
b6ff3283f347a3e64a43e531c550ea8d
74c9c837b9247eae4e12906bbec7f8d4adbdfba6
describe
'2772836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQMZ' 'sip-files00209.tif'
5bba3afa182ca3516a2b07b52a7e6d1f
4daf034f330e345e1faeca9240535b11d8dfee87
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNA' 'sip-files00209.txt'
43f581fcf432e36de72a4c715c5d75c1
1023231fe6fcbde1a1b8ee9694815d0e6abc9d32
describe
'20661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNB' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
5925c10e449be28e1c3bb61bd2f2f0f0
4c7cd20869ac2e8c45d36bbdd052fcc6d18df945
describe
'345308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNC' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
7360218e9a23cc772d035030b917eab0
d058e72a334cc14c52f8f1726977ddda64e4d902
describe
'214224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQND' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
e65f923f9a96417369e1efd997b072b7
452cd7f4ebf9e490783484fc9ceb2f2fb1e8cd6d
describe
'81246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNE' 'sip-files00210.pro'
5376ee68df353ebfb0062b705f05e41c
c19785db8f8014a4184e7bb749df6dcaf94b4dd3
describe
'61136' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNF' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
7f92b7c9d48d04b53815caacde54370a
f634ec40b28143ab720bd27ed49ea77f46d7bc58
describe
'2771392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNG' 'sip-files00210.tif'
91ba169ac54716d0ffd5c963a6074e53
69a630695d9a69d630ccc366302e3a5a9f08ace2
describe
'3324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNH' 'sip-files00210.txt'
204d4562524304e145bb7d951508d7a5
81c3fc8d833eb634bda4e5ecfe2f1e1918628ba0
describe
'20261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNI' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
03df181c91020be44a6a96bc019c66b7
355a054ff9696d239be1c41553c0b940f144422a
describe
'345449' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNJ' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
77432bb64fc0671e2c5941f30a120134
7c548156c0f45b51259dfe0b245dfdf916c23506
describe
'202098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNK' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
b50c0d6cb23f783aef79dc4432016e18
552fe06e4d59c70e47f8eb81f454669e0c7e9710
describe
'76156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNL' 'sip-files00211.pro'
ffafa069175667fbe1a0fa0a8e44f4f0
f448f9bc82f2ab58dd744a189309681fc976e095
describe
'57539' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNM' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
106130d5406d3e551e466cdde51a1f83
082c2554f012ffff4bcf1eaee024450798616e95
describe
'2772568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNN' 'sip-files00211.tif'
71e01eecef91ed665be0b8cc02bb630d
4d502515b47d2000d7dc4b2916fa58e7d481829d
describe
'3177' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNO' 'sip-files00211.txt'
92df0ff7f00b848f059b620d41ac5cda
33055940338b4916b2359756cf3e7ac60cf16c93
describe
Invalid character
'19557' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNP' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
fce378e79dba16bfcae54799205e39d8
810e0a65339c0bf17c0b13c0644a033745826e49
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNQ' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
da7b6125dc6cb87f5aead3e44ca553c5
cbb9d56b831aca4d9b709ee8265426c30df84c5e
describe
'219582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNR' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
450e03e3fadadbab57b3827a62c5daee
4098dd628b4f6cf8acf8e6d50684fee934ff64d0
describe
'83460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNS' 'sip-files00212.pro'
04326525ad5654ddf05c2f34af7a8ead
a655541766a0cf8cd7f1f7dc1ada76692124f590
describe
'61870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNT' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
c48e337e1ba3a8903d61de2aacaa2937
c90f307e68f6a22927d0a2e0af2ae410c2eb9915
describe
'2774908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNU' 'sip-files00212.tif'
c462f53cd221657a037602c2a396a405
e94a4ab4e7eda8937997805cb58db5a65ab7972b
describe
'3420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNV' 'sip-files00212.txt'
496a21513790674127f29e2e34255039
43c1ce6d793c3e74ba3c26df162bfcd09df1ed18
'2011-10-16T20:56:10-04:00'
describe
'20346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNW' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
c63d51a31ff2bacff5e638f1de3b28de
12c9cd28eaef1c7bb971aac3caf34c6fe093a9a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNX' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
c938fdc3edb3e2a3ebb2ee679f8d85ff
49a9944757a1ff4257be5cd5602eb9ba293befef
describe
'196854' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNY' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
9997c67b5d3112652a5616ce65ad59bb
65583a2b37b8bb00bd451d9bbb1c1dcb700a7480
describe
'74907' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQNZ' 'sip-files00213.pro'
ad6e64e50f717ec22b804678ea9b6e13
0009f5843d0af0c31e987c76b5c6d58da43c4aa3
describe
'57337' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOA' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
207227b9001899cd1b478f3cd291c555
0ad5d82cbb51f156150f407bcb2a2cd0296d8a97
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOB' 'sip-files00213.tif'
237fc9b7aa66bee9139ea47e867f1a5a
906507e5e99d141d75eb0f1652aac2ccdf36f89a
describe
'3162' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOC' 'sip-files00213.txt'
fc6b0c67ae4486016a5b8755645af676
a6b2fa2daa0d2335c5e07eb78b1510c6d036db82
describe
'19518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOD' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
ff271cd174aa26cdafa11f9aa29594a7
fdbcc84babdddca0a4096cef914e951d6b8a0279
describe
'345175' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOE' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
edb8bf6621a534ebde5d166cde2ed143
5e8eda448fde33f2e5bc6171627c772d3f8b0a50
describe
'217068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOF' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
1fb95c63b802b83ad1299b47006e8592
06e032f7c2961da68a93b356cb1846e0857ec188
describe
'82341' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOG' 'sip-files00214.pro'
2a1d1951ad90357a8b31ee0d0649dc41
ed80659f001eeaf58c496293e84ad313290ea832
describe
'61355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOH' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
19401a59e61e23b4707841b09c4db868
0c792bc624d623db9939a1da81c75ac14a415ae7
describe
'2771404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOI' 'sip-files00214.tif'
9af0c42c8d50e80c24409a60a0aa3cdb
4b2c358dc5613a67ca350ae180d18a718f390de1
describe
'3374' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOJ' 'sip-files00214.txt'
8fd37e4f3eb7f38721e5458461d09287
ccb4d90559f8b3d655f016b6b2dd0098a3bd2fa3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOK' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
6019d8e2de93bcf585396e2d83d38ffe
9cf632a25a0efcce9945648e564f6064b01a0729
describe
'345448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOL' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
9fc61439b310270c2cf3276e31ff3ecb
c53aa512de898f46e7bc52553f0ad27b2203ce63
describe
'215093' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOM' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
75effdd833ca0ee34e033a02c0ad41d1
add13daad404ab4bdd0d41651c174336afb57b59
describe
'80950' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQON' 'sip-files00215.pro'
9750517596effb3155010da07000dfe2
f76da7a7c6c89a22859e5332aca6f55e138ccf5b
describe
'60831' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOO' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
025e042a5c74c2393e541baf7d05b91d
56d5726f26eb9fbad610dc4fbdd9008693bc6225
describe
'2772668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOP' 'sip-files00215.tif'
6a992e7b27c0d526f0d367dd16f09c0a
ad030ac4149dada9fba4f0358f6fd029b8c6c400
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOQ' 'sip-files00215.txt'
07f34f8bf73a77c131624cd32fadafa6
84b057481c6aac59ba5b5cde816788934ebe0982
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOR' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
f67849fa4acdfd3c51cae3343013bdb7
751b4d083511221ef78a383842f1b6610f2aec82
describe
'345395' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOS' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
565c2cc2ed79738db1a697130a3714e0
791260bde0bdfe4f2e9d7b1ef3840cdac00a7f46
describe
'199911' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOT' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
837db5fdd5e87263118021654b5801e6
b434682f3d34158616a044e9160597e4d2bdf6b5
describe
'74204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOU' 'sip-files00216.pro'
1ab93052935e8261acdc8b85bfe359df
e5454f17c85fa00e972b541065f397295ff4b7d3
describe
'58046' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOV' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
7df1972b85c7ed70094e0262c72792f6
7cf4248088f75e97cc86186863594f77750c42bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOW' 'sip-files00216.tif'
3f5d403ec3c89dc129867efd21af6e83
54d64e48431c2e7b6abc3eb59b8677afe6988b39
describe
'3043' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOX' 'sip-files00216.txt'
4a65fa5246a6bc41e4a5a0a00fb33cfd
df0a957bd1db195d47f6f9b9685dfcf34ab96bcf
describe
'19919' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOY' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
dab5f4d9d4c78e23931aea5a58e3d721
a40f0441fe14173b26f8487e60cceb1cc219bbfe
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQOZ' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
cc319814f8bf346f18c6bb3ff3818a0a
4d43d1b59c9ae1a97564f36348dca4e8425d154a
describe
'213526' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPA' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
6773c522206f07ccc7823f60000fbcf9
788305e88f17cdbb323a6dc78de22c0bbf8face3
describe
'79958' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPB' 'sip-files00217.pro'
5355deaf80442775965376c45f3e71ab
0ca1a2c7d7e7b5096ac0345c2da997698119cd69
describe
'60323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPC' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
55062dfb367b98616e6f1d3a507149dc
3f5d9292c548b73618cd37c427f2a1cba343ebd6
describe
'2772804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPD' 'sip-files00217.tif'
f8fa4dc52129e67fe3d5ec60fb461439
0a65c76e7943c58f49dc5f3f4300acb6e1b7f684
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPE' 'sip-files00217.txt'
46657a565e72500f9e5ad321efbbde39
3e23cf29afcfcba9142902a82b2580f53cb82db6
describe
'20252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPF' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
6a6e732fb96f6fb8639845d8ee2f42a2
d339b93729a91bb39e4943c60f9d576614c64404
describe
'345589' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPG' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
6fbac2530c628cc218e2c9a16bdacf71
377d3d93b48e520b696c5412237fcc242d9f9297
describe
'221047' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPH' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
9729a9a73bd6192d674bcec1929902df
16fc4a5caf59a7a5d45a767e460041f8a8a3a444
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPI' 'sip-files00218.pro'
905792530684bd220d41605ef2adc25f
3ec6429b3a05fab86efee35d2764c7c0410a8bb7
describe
'62478' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPJ' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
1a117ccdf7f36476d177de81af68625a
faef1e0b40e814eeaff08b472eb72a137620fca8
describe
'2774944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPK' 'sip-files00218.tif'
33f1b869a46851f4d6f8cefc185fb7c3
463ab264808fa764cd0f63fbab72c601c6e32b87
describe
'3398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPL' 'sip-files00218.txt'
abb3fd85af58e081f24d55432357c9a7
ce2a0a2c3544c63d8b01098dac2c9f39fea3d5b5
describe
'20744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPM' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
1e14e9f79e781d6820d04f6a8bad82b0
5f99651a21c2489efd4b3f156a52cdca320c2af6
describe
'345353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPN' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
ba40fb2cf7b49090119fe5ff4ba84f3d
2b6ec6f8c20e1641736a75f791cbb6e0a1be0ce2
describe
'218714' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPO' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
d1f170dfc64b82574d5b479afecf80cc
b87a9faaf1ab49e00275a437cbfcbfb5a05cd99f
describe
'81653' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPP' 'sip-files00219.pro'
d189179d15898684d1c2ac8c05cf80a5
4c9c9365dbcad43befaaed6e0e7ba30ef7f64549
describe
'61642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPQ' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
66419cb81dc3aefa91ccfb7506a70bb6
9d555742798381d29cc64623300c84b1fbdfcb5d
describe
'2772864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPR' 'sip-files00219.tif'
b776a8521b8b99042b85af2c3e135ee9
629db7c0aa59b5d26d2cab5185c0351738fdc6cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPS' 'sip-files00219.txt'
6da3783ce580e693987f5f9bccac70cf
8a9c0767d34d960730ecf42d4e0f13e040d40e0d
describe
'20711' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPT' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
69231b165636fa178b5ef599cedf3874
60ca10c76f4c34ab5418a7687240f4cf9bd0f992
describe
'345608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPU' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
42d2748c8ac5b4a1d80b80937e1a3ff4
47c507dbbe7fb655b4ed07d211b732141d5acea5
describe
'198171' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPV' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
3c238636c8ee14af53f8e6b4316fcc20
b00075052cf03a90e2378b6615821e8d2d134f9d
describe
'72302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPW' 'sip-files00220.pro'
ec726db5ac749cacba18046f08bc0413
253daf811b59558658e09833eade95c935eafcd2
describe
'57973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPX' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
bf5bc663cdd4684e7fc0416f5c95c5fd
14c831847c1dd1e67e28010b8f33144527d57bcf
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPY' 'sip-files00220.tif'
8b58b880b0e768c4722acf7a7bbc5673
6833441149e004a6c6f1ce438cc5b5232c50e4ca
describe
'3001' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files00220.txt'
b80a8f68594dd353f7dfc801f3eb1fda
71ded128c7d1e893a26473861d97a419076f06fd
describe
'19886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQA' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
a43074217a5d98fcfeaa15a95f85a90d
9de4b9079de5402e53e75ba826c76bc1af5fece8
describe
'345303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQB' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
6f10ead29a4267b7fd5d81e591161f1e
85a3b93e4a61dd8c94651d2df913f2ccb18d879a
describe
'214293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQC' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
96f92be69fac405624875edc7f9dcb5c
518e8b5f07fc4fac999da74bfe0ff4b7192c4444
describe
'81086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQD' 'sip-files00221.pro'
fcc21680d6d3e590f4fbf55de787bfc9
8bd3384de7b790222b2a376ab9bfaf30f4024a97
describe
'60582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQE' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
c1898980a37f45d620c32784bf3c05b4
400dbd1ffdfaf2bec643d7dabe0b0fde0e378cde
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQF' 'sip-files00221.tif'
1c247e3f45e05e6963e00ad99f803f8c
618fab1b3b54a0c81c0820c742d08e3707835945
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQG' 'sip-files00221.txt'
a5144c5526fbe6d88519867ad7b4c352
e185383ddf0aaace7b73a48e5f372e4e3803b8b3
describe
'20052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQH' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
3cdad484f0344042894894d02ef624cc
0c85096fc0620894e9156c6d098faf5e6fe8f456
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQI' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
eb2238dd88cecfb65762819d6faeca43
650dba9cbe74fc32ffe900f00fe3b4f37110e211
describe
'217223' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
3e8eb25436544f4f8b3edc113fd278f2
f901c92cb8be9d8e955d3a27d77a1ff931f6649b
describe
'82747' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00222.pro'
d7a40bd5a8a98e66fedfa40db69f2fc1
e8094200a9f361228da7a0ba037189851a718475
describe
'61990' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
304934fc47870df3380461017e393dc8
5a7ec9631b6c3592a726a1d1c3fe98a1bad82b82
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00222.tif'
c85e8e39be1e7e36f0b60dfc655ff2a3
650881590c6b94cbc0d9902c2f3f5dd50ebab43b
describe
'3430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00222.txt'
2043cfea5d6984a60c034fb295fc4492
af7091448bbc7ba75e93f479950ef3e00a72c3ce
describe
'20366' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
a9e8da458cb034d44938c75b43db720a
6b45ef490040688363fa963e48573578569e9edb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
8b42509cee3ee6b27148a06ef0e639b0
aaca876164fc1d19ac1079d94cd3e15f96a56e69
describe
'212825' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
5b878dfd11aabf2c438084652b64c2f9
bc9bd7ef18e0fdd598f4c5d34c35bd0256a1059d
describe
'80800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00223.pro'
aaf48ee1e3300118fde5a07004e8ac2b
5e27804ea992bfb1ca730f4f7f51ac8490a4d43f
describe
'60885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
6957261aabac4cb7ca80479b7d57f6ec
db388b457e32be7b55a7cc496308a4ac66ba6924
describe
'2772764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00223.tif'
7fbddf39259b3f10095f523b87dabbc7
1f64e7c8b6e69c458b4810007a80a0b3895383d6
describe
'3325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00223.txt'
1c681c01ab86e3d9357805dc2bd4d835
afcfe1279e7696db711020e1cac11c503d6db836
describe
'20180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
ce717c2d162ec5d64a4bf0b94610cc17
91ac3e7c889aa18f971bd92e6c877a5b800afc0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
e6020c5bd9a1cf166c0388dc70b7ad36
45ea970e8487c598cae73bc26954b1e5f5870446
describe
'194755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
6916eda27b5d77b92a57df717d3f444e
b861f842d85ec9e6acfa02267a1d671d020a7706
describe
'71544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00224.pro'
78666fccd4c40d5f20a23b1e29528137
077fd4253c11f2840da5224a483ce990978ad773
describe
'55888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
e871f98232606864410ce33382084914
3044b73cbcb25acb7d4a06fd01f7620ca42317cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00224.tif'
ecc4b12e097e2b55adde67ed47dddeb5
01af1f84eac2cee0298544ab3c860e64150d265d
'2011-10-16T20:55:03-04:00'
describe
'2956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00224.txt'
5cf6b9d9818c58b9b651e8ae1b01e9f8
84f17b2aa6d9fcfa69367bfbf97e84958f52ff30
describe
'19194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
9a98caf5217f30888a9acadfd87fd819
4606c7b8752a1b3d898497ffc9be761f53a2abab
describe
'345366' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
6edb97124885b4664fc39e00dc342348
acb69f8f254fa33e34808417bb1843d3d255579a
describe
'217533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
e09a94489eab6f50a7c1a839ea92019d
8bfe01f0d481bc1b66b346abdc51f94c5e86af82
'2011-10-16T20:55:08-04:00'
describe
'82972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00225.pro'
5c46ce0db8c315ee9230d9eb743f00a0
8a24d83ed67a4828614c82c60da0c7b4cb0b0ba2
describe
'60916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
47eb5bce5f3fd3faa58bd44da5979e03
a1c379a8dc034698f81ce0489f01869dad126552
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00225.tif'
ec856c95b28464cef89cc60db17287d7
0e1d3cc1cfa5ef7d5fc1b7fd627ef6eac538ac13
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00225.txt'
73125f0d018d4ae6e236762a7bd8115b
715ff4df5be8e0d26e83fbf0a6e46a63277e4856
describe
'20042' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
b50c69cc81a07a8aacdf14db65b45233
ad1c52d09a24e225a371b881f701edaffabfd8ed
describe
'345628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
b2cbb441b7c5215eb2a1bfd18942b786
ed91f7ee931a1ee1b897dbd8b89b1bd5fcf37381
describe
'219142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
4d1c522612239e668a2f4440f6ccdb88
d33c83fb9146aec5457908e38eb3a8d93bf90b76
describe
'83650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00226.pro'
ee93151a441ab6629d06d8a4aa02f68d
7727225452eb524aa635492b0208a33d162175c3
describe
'61522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
9789c426e5170f1c246ede66a442ab7c
5eee5aff5d7623d09018b5dfbbb63b97e6dd0b24
describe
'2774840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00226.tif'
ec82845dd4f25478b03ac4ead224e262
f09074128302e73865112375cf17e8545fe6c537
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00226.txt'
bac7670324a3ed0996f74309d2fc558a
9b84585a1047737728419b7d43f0dee782f3c399
describe
'20317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
73cf3b283b2b5f15279099f8f7aaabe4
43090e073e681f04bcfffa454541a7a146eb8d93
describe
'345469' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
c970736b46e520b24064f8744f128662
984f1415d4be93d45b6cc807b20a69ee3d88b1e7
describe
'198277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
1b4eb5b5a468260a98fbb2f2bc441750
e065aa3f34aef7b590ea72c935690cf304a7b360
describe
'73880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00227.pro'
550dc21765428b35fb7e63ea7c93c943
e81050bebd77f4bb04878b49013fa885ffc02e85
describe
'57286' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
34ec74a685ee1c8986271cedb45270db
e8f3549cd05183dbee157bf8121d340f0e87c4ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00227.tif'
be1b0bd860a84f0c65543eba2f1a67e1
83c506f6b7cf9b0a9a9461be707dcb3ec1160d31
describe
'3083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00227.txt'
b0e51084e16134b5d7f500c11e69158c
da6596d9927b9e1b294eba900f83a55805442bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
fe4889c2d24412dd90114a8cff15a450
fdfd6839dab238db6d7a84344894875a39f57458
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
509a563133fdd57011171f45f5e99283
75ec440deb4435265c3ea46a92755ec173976b82
describe
'215940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
4834d3bfdaedde62746c4b72344b42dd
25d6842c53a0940432eb24c64835ef889cf99437
describe
'85480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00228.pro'
985602c2ef39b01d35bc1f95aa2481e6
013de84368c5c3ecefc5aef2f5107ad339596e9a
describe
'59875' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
9aafb89d13e306ac724c45551d6abdba
69c5c5968d3d5b08d5e303b22c43eaefa84fd2dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00228.tif'
3e102922ebfa56844c7c9d8d152a145a
db10a15d8408032a8b0af2b6301267aa35eac84d
describe
'3527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00228.txt'
3f1d3539c1fe6cf301af1a2b1975b7cc
5df4bbc24ba7cbaaffa6916e3aa986c7b02d18aa
describe
'19715' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
05e4f3e865a5116cb77fb46add2ffa89
cf978e036abe42f4847d6e3cf08357383d6ed283
describe
'345391' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
2012e206ea9930fb5b2fcb5f9f97cc84
69587d01d14a777aef8cffecf10826f4c2229b05
describe
'226031' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
13abce3d2a852edf9220ae67a2ada0cd
943c6ac752aa2ec43a4dcfe335d3c982f0ff6230
describe
'85127' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00229.pro'
0b7867a5c4f22db0ac0b7dfef65b586a
941bcabfae7aeb53458e9e9f14a7eb498d47649d
describe
'63960' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
401a3c356d367417a5e945f2ae210247
70f2584289433ba9d2a5f3dd47b7693cab14a2b1
describe
'2773104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00229.tif'
b890b541a65cc1a935b13f48e1aa49bd
071e936ece27f74d5d14f412bc68a2dee2f07aed
'2011-10-16T20:56:45-04:00'
describe
'3571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSK' 'sip-files00229.txt'
0ff7c6e31f2843706ee21a270ea7eee1
bd20e10295aad8ac5649c37a61f7c4d9947963aa
describe
'21387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSL' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
516c6caccc0e01925f9820dc644f01fd
c2a46bc7f3549147e28921a8242d79e037f05d2c
describe
'345574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSM' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
fcfbac48a31efa366ca035740e550165
cb1cb6d7d82bcb73ed9c6da2521ea553f5c3cab6
describe
'226375' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSN' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
8761c72d686ff8791d7f8371e6f04bef
776e986e0916923c31301b3761947d34d2027550
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSO' 'sip-files00230.pro'
f5b1f43ccc38519c52c8fcb8042d7491
fd45d3172e5714d7fba5cb92f16cd95e920f2fd8
describe
'63973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSP' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
2bb8160eec5bb3619c9933de831be614
9b6b206b87687bbce48f8234d4abfbd3c66910f4
describe
'2775192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files00230.tif'
87f5f3c23fd63ebad965ca640a8b863c
a25605986a44cec7afc0866f183f36bc220f7ab7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSR' 'sip-files00230.txt'
f83e6c43795ec0c58f1b492a3411d396
e64025e569e34322e9a52a0c01d3c74711f2b170
describe
'21320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSS' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
5c7f6371045e661964e2b7b8ef67875f
bccceb1f8aca97b4a311ca5fa3a592c221569e2c
describe
'345235' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQST' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
4230f953c198f96136d272de0c9cc6a9
3e3d172fc57566bfc7a403ae8682fc256124b822
describe
'225187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSU' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
549a507da3ecfc28e9c96840dea2431b
fe240fdf11df58fa790acf03aa0766c2ca027390
describe
'82578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSV' 'sip-files00231.pro'
ce3d035bffd261c8a5925279726a0f3e
89ea81c76c28eb87d6edf2a263c0354ccb901fa0
describe
'63423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSW' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
aa4715cfaed67cff1ce2921351db72e6
e4f294c57f7cee9b07fecc11fa16ebc7e701ab33
describe
'2771768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSX' 'sip-files00231.tif'
fcf101a1ecf487cea9acba2840fffada
723ec89740636be539f2264e83b779bbe78b227c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSY' 'sip-files00231.txt'
38bf3901408d6497b8ef9e94c5d5ef28
939f77bc8b7c798b61cfe05b859892e1956aff61
describe
'21500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
2fa6ff10253326025b5daea726fd3124
b2b81377c9715010ee3397b6069b83da7ea4b033
describe
'345598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTA' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
f7049e91ffd0f54d09ce08fb0feccca7
6c1ae90baf8b7ab8a880a4f7a22eb8e794d7340c
describe
'219974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTB' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
83906fed564573987638f77b718e6588
dc890b8345077506a48e4620def5337fd97018f6
describe
'80867' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTC' 'sip-files00232.pro'
38038fbfecad7cb04874b973fe2b4021
8f9ce38a384fddc820b2aa48d378d9e06a536bba
describe
'63751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTD' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
647882b5343854c2d3daf4ce80f54de0
f27042c60611fc310958c84401a9a59237325370
describe
'2775184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTE' 'sip-files00232.tif'
ac8e4d7de5af18c5afdb4b930547c06d
fed8752bb6a72363d6f5a63c4d6141118b74c31c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTF' 'sip-files00232.txt'
691e255b4d1f5e68aaf8970257aaa71f
4b26d63fb1dfcd12580be35de039b919ded256cb
describe
'21209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTG' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
e3e0de31c4c75c7c6807bf1d1916aac7
7c3a3ea4e2fcec956ac4adb6c6bcd3c60e629402
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTH' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
5718e23328b0761dd69af69f3433dcbb
a156e2ded1a59512493187f1b27d53b275969e85
describe
'223558' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTI' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
bb404236ac0ebc69f59bfa0d8b055352
3d93fd8aa3b75c375d25f40adcadabc64e394c61
describe
'82017' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTJ' 'sip-files00233.pro'
bb99b0d1b3f243e5d52d6a78662605ef
580a75f9253b7e318a8452fd4026c8ae866b71ed
describe
'63815' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTK' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
a62e0043f158ba1bac340374463af3ac
bb682fb86031118d4721a86c8ba81326487ee00c
describe
'2773056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTL' 'sip-files00233.tif'
f202b57f68bd1eaf1ab4cd7f68921b8a
3eb4d464de9e70a20eb31aa22e223854de56a9f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTM' 'sip-files00233.txt'
ba9a078e537490568cceac9021066834
223c1a54efab1f17f8ba9ae0f55ca48f271795be
describe
'21365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTN' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
8f9ce2224ba6d526e6a6e9cc1fd69fac
99d702998faafd6610dc0223f5a42a76383b39a8
describe
'345586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTO' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
828f0ee52a87e36a9777247635151f92
65f243e9b049b3e5b887d48c08e51ca9f76ac2be
describe
'225430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTP' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
808024905287586c0398b919faa36aa7
ac31afdd5a4b9898eea0090a03854f26f7eee255
describe
'82624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTQ' 'sip-files00234.pro'
46f09733e8fa64327039a7ec9646a5b0
f9022edc4a92f720847bdc6ebeed73a45d511b7d
describe
'63630' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTR' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
f848f3461459263f6aa5385a4b26c12d
7c25f36e1804b93a9e0ea91c45cd455904038dd3
describe
'2775112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTS' 'sip-files00234.tif'
542b9a100668e93bfb3805f242a77f7c
504e052e86daea75cdd099640e70e24b4ece4f30
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTT' 'sip-files00234.txt'
da29538bedd03cd7870ecc4a8149afdb
487b3ed988acf1479345c8b0fb9dedda078428c8
describe
'21229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTU' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
a5b8755fc0de7ff2085b004867bba782
4c295310e38a308275aa791c1bb017b8ad1340df
describe
'345413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTV' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
e7f33eb45ee4faab6b4b5b7abbc22b2b
45711e9910607a315f3ff3d19d5f94727447f4e8
describe
'207999' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTW' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
6f0db97073c45023761251e2f16206cc
9a1045a15f1e69c674632667b1c35087231eb7fc
describe
'76595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTX' 'sip-files00235.pro'
27d4742e9aad16cd370a300b850e1fa4
b841e9d4ef3d93681bde35418d7978b79e0cd4cd
describe
'59417' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTY' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
928881442b19d062f153a3206b77da30
9e4cb577b6b213f94ba1ffc90f3bc230e64f2f14
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQTZ' 'sip-files00235.tif'
a6809cc73b5f2a2634ca1268baa346ef
8e6a5b4a397057c8fd148b4ac5d84c9ad90ded3b
describe
'3190' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUA' 'sip-files00235.txt'
2c61799222a3d4165d11207408515184
8a7525535d449962c40acc9e6fefe2821aa6088b
describe
'20235' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUB' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
1f0278f14f7c45ef4454ececf5b6f618
c760c8487eaa812d24c72488adbb7543e28c722c
describe
'345694' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUC' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
387b7ba15338b4347052071e60df1f45
57d34d218b106e7dc54163af94941633185e3bbc
describe
'221481' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUD' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
5743fa0a7df1826b302894b33bff17ab
69d39ad6e613359e5b03f01dc8e935058af03486
describe
'82380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUE' 'sip-files00236.pro'
2a6cd03c478242bcfdd73114a36c41ae
0c7ec2710673b6679f2801449edec19f648fecf7
describe
'63570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUF' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
3117dcc13a47da87e6a59c95c85f0ce4
1bd9006481f709b293bbfb92f601d253fa445645
describe
'2775164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUG' 'sip-files00236.tif'
5c3e3d43e0b88edfb5eccdd5a7d062ee
b887922b7371280020bd48f62c0addc36b7cc054
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00236.txt'
cdf820d1068c07a6e055ab402a671c0e
fe16c7cb0dce6dca63b94016fe3124266ef32c65
describe
'21304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
f619ceea9dc5b7a0e56c54f0335d78d0
1a3aa1f393782b2d093d9cf3147585c74ad9c648
describe
'345473' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
6493f188916fff23cb05798705dfd9d0
45eea5cefbcdeb8e522ad1206c2c4c9dd432758e
describe
'224131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
3169859c77c96dd3289c5215573b1c2e
a3cca19fbf209bc671213fef72dc82aa8ddb3c51
describe
'83296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00237.pro'
7694d44029d3b5fabef99fb634add5dc
fa726b028cee79ef809f9cefec3dae46433e3523
describe
'63727' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
8dc1f4a7de74db6da4f5517d083a4539
ccaa1ca2cb2ff5399f365f64066fc073c6d77474
describe
'2773184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00237.tif'
e345f17fb2ad932e28936942b8f69c2f
5365ff59328786499c4c5c27bd339f918d4d4c63
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00237.txt'
fff7af500841ac2c8611d499adcba664
fc3b36c5b6bfe5f6857730189b4bfe59c979f319
describe
'21784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
0c70daaa68737f3ee44bbef6b231c013
7663cd22fe561cfe111d3a95b9842b49549ce11d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
8132be75ee9c09d79364019f3fab727d
19fd6a5e68d23588e9846e797eaea138035aaa46
describe
'219979' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
36a4e6b509cf84837a791a495717cbd8
0234554c8c24f1b71ac394a19cb1dbbe8e29071d
describe
'82257' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00238.pro'
395071f7a5fc71552b3cd51796f6f802
97b66bcecfbd7db95cd943a932ca05001941535d
describe
'63623' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
7758fabc03770a1bfedfb8adc73d1ed0
ef619156387f3e8b4ac1805fd58fa48784457b31
describe
'2775300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00238.tif'
c6deab0dd45131d711b6ae8131b4445d
65315eaf4e27c6a240fef6df4a32a75e989f18a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00238.txt'
8a28829df9a6fbecb86721954af6b2e1
9285ddcb4fcbc211f06a68f37bc16181cf7f4f07
'2011-10-16T20:51:45-04:00'
describe
'21234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
2e3ba7497c697a1b10e33d206482b121
41a9cdb28d8838dd6458bd65aa8d1dafa4c75a98
describe
'345342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
f677269ea5d971937ff0c78db0b4d77e
70e6549800384bc947a12f2255de6e6f320f67ae
describe
'226421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
a5527f3d510c56bed90345501d596a88
e784a0ff9b01dfac479717938cd0faee1534457a
describe
'84474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00239.pro'
8b1e3baf3229d961dbc3294257a843fd
6d507f133aec3df1d97c5a45e6ab7130ecf47361
describe
'63552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
382af87df76b3e2c7102761e3edf7202
075376ad383044857b6d8219047c4208c7695560
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00239.tif'
8e8086d568d2e6d411d51d71c278b18a
5b8a4b32aa63cd7a7a25d9bd7a9d483dd8741496
describe
'3509' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00239.txt'
7f82ab0762d0894ed81a4211272bc0f0
c393fda344ecff00665fefc18f15ae7280e85854
describe
'20524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
c48244052548946daade7dc9e519edfe
75bba550a6e6d900e941ae114089a0bc742fea65
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
4d92e989313c99b103afee79790d3728
7b77353e28044a2502a1f2dc7c347cbae4f2d046
describe
'214847' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
77fee6804d08ce46d2118f2978ba1c32
0327b35708aa60fed6d917138b4deb034853d296
describe
'79384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00240.pro'
e8e376b6ecdf99ac447fbce208362830
274010b350a1667798e004a87476711dd4fe7486
describe
'63141' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
e5366755a13272e2bb35b661622fbaba
b7bd959f9bb66aa70f356d390d855b090aabc928
describe
'2775188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00240.tif'
d165ede63da879bf0522060d175a895a
a82f614d016545abc76191265166712884ed2b31
describe
'3282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00240.txt'
31c15078915332e2a9e5fc8bd654aa7d
6276c097188edc1c7adc0b9bc3a62cd988286c94
describe
'21371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
53fc27060fab1fc7ee67e088813b2377
84c7ed74f5d1fe5f6dd796b88a851f3ae428a2f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
8bfb153f57c85cc996bb8c247dd8d899
6261dd84dcbafdff94292e7437ba919cbec952e0
describe
'222236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
bd6fa25f27dca05151e1c471a45d32b2
bc613c4f1e0ad2be60db0a200b5d83c04174eecc
describe
'82474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00241.pro'
19b4a5c38cd3f61cafbe0c7786ac9b93
fad80e646fc8b7ff52a5f52c90881c1ec68f4752
describe
'62749' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
54faf689fff2d15fd57ce5dd48bd0bb8
825a546bfdba4508f66326e7f28158b0fef2c739
describe
'2773028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00241.tif'
a50830a87e94ea4303c469af7c903764
160e9c9c7e1ad251c2ebb440243e9ec6900fc20c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00241.txt'
7063e1534f9aa67452575bb612cb4214
190e99bb2d07daa293d7418fa2bf9a8771e5c6b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
67ad94b9762ba4cc698b070557ddd261
6755ba43d12df62725191211955ff7c86979a8a7
describe
'345724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
d689cc73a384fa10a1f9e94d63ffb4f4
bea01f9e0bb76fb075f8a75683e32f582c24e644
describe
'144614' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
defa550a415c333d6c0ba05778f5646f
9f123418de34f7e4bcac76df4f4fb006138cb714
describe
'50324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00242.pro'
8c2be733525faf52071a1f2db46735b7
7afb92a7405c1573dfa4b02de2423574c1f5e9a1
describe
'43439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
f2e7d86413f562da9e79e5ef0359883f
34cc88820148705611841d7b354564a35bbf756f
describe
'2774244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00242.tif'
77c3a954b354a80a74def02a97d5310d
6f5f5d904705529c77556d54de4326eb8944b527
describe
'2131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00242.txt'
d7f935d4f09e8bbbdbe4de7b224f4431
0ff9872791157681dbba583f192abb4e4c1cb9ab
describe
Invalid character
'16531' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
1dc344adf83a40a6b0f501a158d6c6d1
91171b603d91503442da584b0d7de15ca8914acb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
65c5b7ea6c79d5486e9897ed7fc04394
271d0495e8369127f7e4c97d97ed59c23610246e
describe
'224446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
1d05d840367636607a2ce9eb418b5f61
814fc24a3ea16cdbf3e45572cee93d4317d1782f
describe
'84181' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00243.pro'
b1665b137f7d5067de84dbf9dd258306
46c46e033a50c6334121e1c6ce9195da268bfb02
describe
'63183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
e2431c495a5e2a70443bbbd9a1464833
592ac20f2ff119b652b296d3d899f49544a5dd3f
describe
'2772932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00243.tif'
d30d87501a9b3905bca77477ad82996d
6cb08064332eedeef7135337767035d9031f2f87
describe
'3490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00243.txt'
d8cb5926f7e64b61982df98bd6a376c8
c075ce14578539f38739395277982e9393487f4e
describe
'21085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
256b74b7c72c1fece06b60a18cba1d8b
231c104b88ecdab896e5a964ee091840e4eb0700
describe
'345731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
fff14a11c66a39388401d365f5d73e1f
bf50819806795c746cdc7c4a7bcaf7730d5e79db
describe
'222333' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
1bed6fc59b8dab8666ff06e7a309c4cf
eb23721b095a84eac267288ff3d64a3900421382
describe
'82458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00244.pro'
5d591b5369a91249a2cceae77ba54a5b
d3b19373a06a823a746f32d4d650961ede805907
describe
'63471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
51ac9fce94ba3f6b77093653489b0410
5e555a7520d9cd1e49b6546eec087a5045c1460e
describe
'2775036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00244.tif'
d0684c39a02d9d3cfc2c8064330f93e9
ad7003ea973839fad3db2ac4f37153ce12290ec8
describe
'3396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00244.txt'
3eafa84ad07168eadcd78759785ad94e
4290b822724e7bf05289d1c59ab6342cd982e359
describe
'21185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
e1c8f2e4dbc4178ebd6bb449492105ac
db6e0c4b3c3fddbb32fdb48ad190519d310c90d5
describe
'354980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
7f082b5ab391836f159d2351f9385d2f
ba65a912b518005deab7950b604b7a8fbc0b2cc9
describe
'216951' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
d6e880101c85e9540d3148e6350e7bc5
a4bcf89a129d57ea41cf3361fbd547d7d0eaec1a
describe
'83055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00245.pro'
6cae87e0bde3e922b643e3c14ddf69f6
8445ec6cf10f87a50f2985d8dd0241d11a4cbc0a
describe
'61147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
e9208a0d652937486c0c541232f42d47
eda6d3f672659baa2355d1dab761d205bf0115c5
describe
'2848904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00245.tif'
a4142c23b17e2e8539e311493ba345d9
29d151080dd53c1736a86e5411e78d15f0dacbc1
describe
'3427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00245.txt'
4edb65099da334332b495a6190c32883
66e6e345e5b2685d9945f60dacbcd7ec5a164781
describe
'19483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
a8504b6ca67f938a14f39d5485fa3d85
18f88a9aa4a6f0c19b64d2d42dfbec2e3c762c31
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
5b4ac4881903bff9b38f7d13d6983d07
9215691f83de073e2f9b9525030fc74a27a04af9
describe
'227722' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
6e0c13a7a6467a62a4b8128fdaafb196
078f74bf74896b3dedf69944dd9e5978624eae0d
describe
'84598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00246.pro'
3223d394ca9e23758ff55aabc1117b57
baeb672d86c0e09a0ab2a341e436ab0451ad62ed
describe
'63421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
cbc2e7b57156c67a06610b55c374e7dc
b3485fa9c386c1691f8980a03d289f04580215a1
describe
'2774968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00246.tif'
c1ec7e7a61c558814768e11d2d76613c
30591f401863c42c2b6b436cb8198576d7aa072f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00246.txt'
dfc07248e020c0cc08be28469fa4ffa0
627f1a8687f7479557b6a2ff46a6dc3d84986054
describe
'20858' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
3c137897e700f3b795e7437ace3a6973
c1c32247271bf6b71239535e0f0040a4c8ad9603
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
aa9259c37840530ededf9cf337ca4276
c11f7f55314601568792176e4176e7dc0234cced
describe
'222201' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
0b94bef1987a950d40ee3432fa8933e9
ac858da09b2e538bdd5aaa8cbf0d97607175ec64
describe
'83553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00247.pro'
d26e163c26c84615580b5f34d924547a
9b84db05d63857ed0b283fdf5e6987f849e9ae04
describe
'61915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
54189ea3ffb2b89022c13112b381df0e
cb62009a373976cf73899a1577504ae76cca6677
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00247.tif'
cc357bb494eaf5ab37c65ef0e1212570
a60b3a8269b7a34f7b89651e758720ce7ff3d887
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00247.txt'
e1257e9752a2fdfd1368c857f9214a45
ce5be62c2129108a47fa2a9bad4fbff99b620e01
describe
'20207' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
3075af559bedfdefb2a39afadde3e8a1
e9b403b74b6ead69b2f5ccec4e7f20fcea1b1514
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
f305c89127abe4c9f30b880a1899de08
955059e5e9fd1d7f8cb3df71245cc47f01aa15e6
describe
'220693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
b3e07aabb5996dc23bbc1fdf85e817f9
9811d1298d8de8666333f386e55ceafb1ee0faa5
describe
'81312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00248.pro'
81481c871b5a1dc43a67e9815944e5a4
09f83740f03eaa473e71ea05d182da97d7483e60
describe
'62822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
9096c6c81190c35804295768f8281ecb
56e24f0275a0eba8ecbe62a8605a944b9fa79c41
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00248.tif'
cb5b080acad52329232bd65d4c788226
37fc27e75e0f177c3e898ad232fd3b98e372f7b3
describe
'3343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00248.txt'
2b6aa4ad08267b0696046f715f9f05b4
8061b001a5e7ca1e500515fc7db3c855eb9e45fb
describe
'20455' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
b818720a8152b29fa36181a555defe72
0bc65d6e285bc8fb5c1204cb8cf38264b76d6cc5
describe
'345412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
2dafe4a6b280f847b406c1bb69953718
98e672fdff2a49ac71b4d24b94ebbcc41b677dd2
describe
'219289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
6542c9fbbbc49b227cc70091e608ffc3
8e45684218c3f919a8214f9d2114bc700d2fbb18
describe
'81757' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00249.pro'
69fb39fa7fbb1b395c39839ca1ff315a
a7a12f97c69ba0bfc4bcbd424fbcdadb11b79c24
describe
'61889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
b0d0d509bc6a06fbb8d7886acee6f722
887d1ef8b4391c7cf83393db188f7c12661a5d8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00249.tif'
95556eec496f6be916e66bad4b84555f
480fc212bac16ec82732de4c26823e2ff6a511e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00249.txt'
34fc7869dc9b8136590e468a3443fe57
62db50de213a871954221c1df18a0965979ab291
describe
'20501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
f7f631a63228af2d71b9ad6b503aa370
da6b2cb84d3258f0f7f2083e696f915f5a438389
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
9ff4654046137d3c0c705ed9cd436989
e3524d05858d6566f3bb8fb68f62cb798afbc02f
describe
'215187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
18c09af2c7459b13f8adfd2fad6b6fdd
0768b94e90b5ad567436df847748593f291750fd
'2011-10-16T20:55:10-04:00'
describe
'79902' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00250.pro'
1aac02fb8c800bfd675c9dfa95a46ccd
d19798c9d4c88ac7d7771bc716a8b5e60f61166d
describe
'60995' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
821fda6225c6a6ceee67aa2cbde7e15e
7ec83fd5afc633f077e0282e5ebadcb4da639c38
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00250.tif'
34cd032dcf829b214d3617a471824448
52bb60253da1d3c714989883e3c2eedf8f706163
describe
'3283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00250.txt'
1f6f776d8fa2bee6b5a049d02578f661
55f96c65fb7587f29334270e87ea0f1f17c99c54
describe
'20404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
daf28a12f02172010c396cb6354ffd3c
ac2da5a6db7fd28131843a338a63fcf5013e94ad
describe
'345419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
42e2b859b073925b09740692b754ad9e
6a7abd6e6dc263531bd8cec166233e2b0f4ea5f5
describe
'222110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
65aa2d7e975331e0104680955665ce68
293f2aa74e63efa6483befcb220f3431a1acc723
describe
'82706' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00251.pro'
93eed51bb5fd93067e529ed1d411b40c
96c69e67d92d3218abeb359dc3dc8a4552cd9b8c
describe
'61822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
22038f623e826d4ee8c45901afbecdd3
3cd9e4ffdfd30120030601437499088ca47d1eb5
describe
'2772944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00251.tif'
cf61505012ffefc79d9e0049cc3c68a7
d393ad33648b00d81d6183404f5112c7ad1d22fb
describe
'3402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00251.txt'
a1742a847da6a178747db11387931cbf
627b67aff635bac9b62489dc5df166301663a850
describe
'21100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
1acd852b65cfbbe55b87a5495d57ef50
95bfb06d9461e674f862f00f15233cc52eaa45b7
describe
'345671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
bd00bc6b25dc876f4cf74694693217e1
c24731476e56818eb68e9c10cf889e1e322ac12a
describe
'225665' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
a2db7af12a2f7014dc00047d1a1ab369
f54145842fda64efd7c67ffe08c56008e2e7bdc7
describe
'84167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00252.pro'
747e9bf51c799109fc0c3801c79b905e
382f2680819721effa43a7ddbd9c50d47dafda7a
describe
'63483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
5ebca86b0731d66a7b074a3d0bcf7b06
49b0c43dd354b1bfc24cd8f4b66e4605e434c6d2
describe
'2774956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00252.tif'
878fc13a531c34ffaa6eaec83b469f1d
fdc2ec9d3a798430f0c4ddb05c6a58ae7a3555c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00252.txt'
e78a1553cb484bfebd9c1f2451a53178
fd2e6ad839008bcb56107cdcad26626956fc2172
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
f7f9c0cf3b837c9e55b65c4228c07e01
925cd6bf419c92b1cdaed9a3ed751eb89ca561ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
8906f65e66012192914723f1ece886d1
e237d142da1c7afde75697c6cb3dce41a439917c
describe
'220558' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
59745da126004c7ea0fdcda1bfbc234f
e5886f550946c04b82057bc8b377b3c8c91bc4b5
describe
'82523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00253.pro'
9be8c591602e15697aff41f8b7eb046f
366bc1e0f0623af35253dd2c6baf5d5072870371
describe
'61863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
1e4c9d9647c26fc2b2f218a0110c32ca
57c50548be5ed88e11751176fce49a17745ef07b
describe
'2772788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00253.tif'
f9ce7686e63038de69fa2b5a3c641049
1e30120efa7d5526473dd404cb17994db80f8c3e
describe
'3425' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00253.txt'
bb29834a44f5bf40f3ec4c3f2f1f8347
060dda27a71104292cc96e2bf19b20137e88c948
describe
'20499' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
ac3ee7b2398e3395d8eb17ae2d15e457
a9a95b201f7aff77a5e50499d700e68d4be35ce1
describe
'345741' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
19286c85c2f396b3d758962690504c2d
e3ef84e828ad1be02cac635794d24e19ef78862b
describe
'219772' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
4d48a4ad604b8144713c2e9d22fa9826
8354a8bc4e4c93bd6056b9211e2a21561acba007
'2011-10-16T20:55:15-04:00'
describe
'82993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00254.pro'
e02eef4d9b914def2691fa405de760e8
1aeda0fca044191d3e52ed6752b16305b793af65
describe
'61948' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
72f09bc4076428901ea09f2674a805a2
631ae607a2b5b542176614daa9883a8afd75fa86
describe
'2774892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00254.tif'
a91993a2fd51bf92bf79095c8cdbcff4
bc74d410138597b93e2043f8daac7eda75d402b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00254.txt'
996a04c4ee3d91e433ed33e0661d0f63
90a218c8cef650dd31c50408137d351ec99bf93a
describe
'20446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
8bc562a0690c8b54f108bb7e7538f85f
d6d4638f67bd1e98977d7ea7671f129944e63482
describe
'345436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
ae64bff5203ec08d94c65dd56d5907ff
14de7e132db48105984d5dd9fd4b83e0f644a0e8
describe
'216538' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
cf5036fe2a2023393acb9347ddffcdac
011baab69c0e53cf03711863b5709b0db9d3217e
describe
'80777' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00255.pro'
cdebcfde5031051b6af543bdec58d661
f40ce1d8c77407dece89fbad323d9574eb976685
describe
'61527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
e9c618e7139c7ad7109c31df7eb29510
a140aace7a3b13bc34a6c459b1058a37ee4ed18f
describe
'2772844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00255.tif'
d566709236b5122bf5308cc0ab43e89c
288e11fe05c4a1c468be0cee02b1a8f8c83d8e91
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00255.txt'
6ade82f2700c1e7a296d02ebbbe8e30f
5bc962a5bb668fc70a2d5058749074a30ea18b6e
describe
'20568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
91ff846de37e1a65c14e9856a36c690a
c809716cd58738c7110fd95fedc2bdb247098cd5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
725b0bdaa5a13a8bd14e814d7e17b860
7c7401835ead17c68aa10e53d2d17f66375b2ba9
describe
'227939' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
079c27c893aedb8513c0b6b2a1b5251a
316ec7608cf166506c002064a4355f815087850b
describe
'85240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00256.pro'
9128e556cd173a7c5f635e4beec54dd6
2621c4b12f620ba5ac718e1751380a97fe50c26b
describe
'62786' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
33cb478d923b1546c3b3e5a4fa9aff7a
c68c2acc0fd268401fb8b9b65e1ef4ee068ff90a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00256.tif'
97ade02f5c4188ddc328cb3f7fe489c4
4f4963ccd85a3f40bec6016f80706027c77f8992
describe
'3501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00256.txt'
ff985b6a7b7b0dd1def664b85513e32d
ccbd1e4abeda733564d314386b30f058726fb4c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
dfb6324d9a1a4faafd4b0f22dfaba3b3
5312a4d32f7efc19ac675dcd38da9ecca010cc36
describe
'345355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
a2824c2723c20897d2e8c2f8a8be049a
5b375fd0cc623272df8cd75047566caec49eefc2
describe
'217894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
95e2a66838c13866c40482fdc11f22b6
d0dc41978e16fbf1292e3a5e42cb054cb6fbb6b8
describe
'82588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00257.pro'
29778c0f3ac2292792d5d704165d353b
cc1a261fc30791b3b0716e57f511e938553c30ad
describe
'61419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
1549530b655508cdd2d4be1206495800
0460e28246165505dd59abda7b2ca427be1c3a01
describe
'2772732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00257.tif'
ab7c90b3497acb8be82c6e30aa6b9cc5
310227e31cb59d2797ca7f7ba1ef0e757e30a8d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00257.txt'
2ef6be98a39953042b0d48ea1562d2cd
d3c77edfb66f9aa6e7b5c68a2b0a1a57d6411865
describe
'20228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
e61a0c2d51d9944a24b4def185b4bf53
3577ecb61a76343633b6758505ac8f7917baba44
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAA' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
abaaad15db139f1185c8f93afc4ff8e5
d2a8c811eb01098fca4714216175717306d37d3e
describe
'221442' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAB' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
39fbc7ea73b5a56c88b540cf703f66b9
5ead87d11559e914852f6a9789a507270c4477e0
describe
'81850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAC' 'sip-files00258.pro'
9d3fd68c4ea65ecf0bc82ca69e9eee3c
d762b0ae3edb194a3ebde6bca117d0f38de067cd
describe
'62125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAD' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
5ed54df11d330f2d5aa29434ab702c46
4b5cc4d4ddc8d39dbc4bcc50c7ab92a041ec6e7e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAE' 'sip-files00258.tif'
da2091c28f97c4f8cec1067f5fe27905
73f0ad1ffaee108e4c7452db6ef5fd56f22a379f
describe
'3379' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAF' 'sip-files00258.txt'
7a760dd25f3d63639e648f21051f38e2
b10b975fb04ebaa66d63c059d88e734b032f15a7
describe
'20740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAG' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
a4d9f70dca78f34ab42f350425809e6d
72257e15d2271293d478951a8e5ee29ba05ca1f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAH' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
b2a1d11d9dcc3732e0aac23007bae580
f9795676c24190a7f70bc56c9f9cf8a010b49617
describe
'224833' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAI' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
608c5f91c8c594c2f5e744d82a082a24
b4f3d83e4abd6b60f3256c0b611229d8ec1a72bc
describe
'84404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00259.pro'
207eebe141bce1f3da72c94c6060af9c
5a56c3966617fc3f052a665406199eedc974628f
describe
'61724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAK' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
5f8711f005782d9a2770ee6f7bf2be4e
1fcf9ae61fd12085bdf681e2263550a8efabf072
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAL' 'sip-files00259.tif'
f66467bbceecccedc82935a72fb1812d
f521485430196f834e0e5957206af8054c44f886
describe
'3485' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAM' 'sip-files00259.txt'
d78a1e17f6680f77bd5ce8814f28342c
ea0f73ec9ed90d2c0df39d3f925a97939b22b73c
describe
'20075' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAN' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
046a3f45b366f009f21c6d828d86d922
0761dc491acad6dceabf34659013e39610136356
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAO' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
d33c8d66dd1ff293faee496d76045105
723d5ad1d4dbdbe0e2a3e0b8bfb0bd200fce4851
describe
'179498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAP' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
1df525d741a5ff238747f64e672fdc65
7e633c3f9db7a802974a6b7cbc9aa0c526c37273
describe
'66955' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCPfileF20080402_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00260.pro'
704a1d89abcd3776b1a5606281c8c80e
e0255978a9f6a1b32431c9d4c2c905c476e1936c
describe
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ee


The Baldwin Library

University
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Florida


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TUE

ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS


“ While ascending with the princess into the air, he'said, “ Sultan
of Cashmire, when you wish to espouse princesses who implore your
protection, learn first to obtain their consent,”—The Enchanted Horse,
TALES

FROM THE

ARABIAY NIGHTS

ENTERTAINMENTS

Wits J-LusTRATIONS

Te ondon
GALL AND INGLIS, 25 PATERNOSTER SQUARE;
AND EDINBURGH.

CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION, . ¢ . .
Tue FABLE or THE Ass, THE Ox, AND THE Diouwin:

Tur Srory oF THE MreRCHANT AND THE GENIUS, ;
Tue Hisrory or tue First OLD Man AND THE Hinp, f
Tur Hisrory or THE Second OLD Man snp THE Two

Brack Docs, . é 2 : 4
Tur History CF THE saneat AN, 3 ‘ .
Tur History oF THE GREEK KING AND Doak AN THE Puy-

SICIAN, : : : ; : : : : ‘

Tur History or THE HusBAND AND THE PaRRor,

Tue History oF THE VIZIER WHO WAS PUNISHED,

Tur Hisrory or Tue Youne Kine or tHE Biacx Isies,

Tur Hisrory or tie THREE CALENDERS, Sons oF Kryas,
AND oF I'tvE Lapres or Bacpan, .

Tur Hisrory or rue First CALENDER, THE Soy OF A Kine,

Tur Hisrory or THE SECOND CALENDER, THE SON OF A ia,

Tur Hisvory or tue Exvious MAN AND OF HIM WHO WAS
ENVIED, ; ‘ ; : : . : : :

Ture History or THE TurrD CALENDER, THE Son or A KING,

Tur History or ZOBEIDE,

Tne History or AMINE, . é ‘ Fs ‘ :

Tue Hisrory or SINDBAD THE 8: AILOR,

Tap First VoyaGE OF SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

THE SECOND VOYAGE OF SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

Tur Tutrp VoyacE or SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

THe FourtH VoyacE oF SINDBAD THE SAILOR, .

Tue Firria Voyace or SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

Tue Sixtu Voyace or SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

THE SeventH VoYAGE or SINDBAD THE SAILOR,

THe Turee APPLES, . ; ‘ .
Tur History or THE LADY WHO WAS MURDERED, AND OF
THE Younc MAN HER HuSBAND, . : 7 : ,

Tre History or NouREDDIN ALI AND BEDREDDIN Hassan,
Tit Hisrory or rur Liretz HuncHpack, i a z

24
26

27

37

56
61

67
77

97
106
108
lil
115
120
126
130
135
140

143
146
173
lv CONTENTS.

pac
Tue STORY TOLD BY THE PURVEYOR OF THE SULTAN OF CasGARr, 178
Tus STORY TOLD BY THE JEWISH PHYSICIAN, . . . 1S8
Tue STORY TOLD BY THE TAILOR, . . - : : 191
Tur History oF THE BARBER, . . . . . 203
Tur History oF THE BARBER’S First BRoruer, . . 205
Tur Hisrory OF THE BARBER’s SECOND BROTHER, . : 208
Tar Hisrory or THE BARbEr’s TurrD Broruer, . : 212
Tur Hisrory or tuE Barser’s Fourri Brotuer, . 7 216
Ture Hisrory oF THE BARBER’S Firru BRroruer, : . 219
Tue Hisrory oF THE Barzer’s StxtH BROTHER, ; : 92

Tur Story oF THE ENCHANTED Horse. . . : 234.
THE

ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS,

+4

ir is written in the chronicles of the Sassanians, those ancient
monarchs of Persia, who extended their empire over the continent
and islands of India, beyond the Ganges, and almost to China, that
there once lived an illustrious prince of that powerful house, who
was as much beloved by his subjects for his wisdom and prudence,
as he was feared by the surrounding states, from the report of hig
bravery, and the reputation of his hardy and well-disciplined army.

This king died after a long and glorious reign, and Schahriar, his
eldest son, who was endowed with all the virtues of his father,
reigned in his stead. Not long after he ascended the throne, he
married a beautiful lady, and for ten years lived very happily with
her as his queen. But having discovered that she held secret inter-
course with one of his officers, he ordered them loth to be executed,
and in his rage vowed, that in order to prevent the possibility of
such an occurrence in future, he would marry a wife every night,
and have her strangled in the morning.

The sultan failed not to observe the cruel law he had imposed
on himself, and ordered his grand vizier to bring him the daughter
of one of his generals. The vizier obeyed ; and the sultan next
morning delivered her into the hands of the vizier for execution,
and commanded him to procure another against the following night,
However repugnant these commands might be to the vizier, he was
obliged to submit. He then brought the sultan the daughter of a
subaltern officer, who, as usual, suffered death the next morning.
The next was the daughter of a citizen. And thus every day was
a maiden married, and every day a wife sacrificed.

The report of this unexampled inhumanity spread a universal
consternation through the city. In one place a wretched father
was in tears for the loss of his daughter, in another the air resounded
with the groans of tender mothers, who dreaded lest the same fate
should attend their offspring. In this manner, instead of the praises
wd blessings with which, till now, they loaded their monarch, all
his subjects poured out imprecations on his head.

The grand vizier, who, as has been mentioned, was the unwilling
-agent of this horrid injustice, had two daughters ; the elder was
called Scheherazadé, and the youngest Dinarzadé. The latter was
by no means deficient in merit : bus Scheherazadé was possessed of
(6 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

a degree of courage beyond her sex, She had read much, and was
possessed of so great a memory that she never forgot anything once
learned. Besides this, her beauty was incomparable ; and all these
valuable qualities were crowned by her virtuous disposition.

The vizier was passionately fond of so deserving a daughter. As
they were conversing together one day, she addressed him in these
words: ‘‘I have a favour to ask of you, my father; and I entreat
you not to refuse me.” ‘‘ I will not refuse you,” replied he, ‘‘pro-
vided the request be just and reasonable.” ‘It is impossible,”
added Scheherazadé, ‘to be more just, as you will judge from the
motives I have in making it. My design is to put a stop to this
dreadful barbarity which the sultan exercises over the inhabitants
of this city. I wish to dispel the just apprehension which all
mothers entertain for the safety of their daughters.” ‘‘ Your inten-
tion, my child,” said the vizier, ‘‘is very laudable; but the evil
which you wish to cure seems to me without a remedy ; how would
you set about it?” ‘Since, by your means,” replied Scheherazadé,
“the sultan celebrates a fresh marriage every day, I conjure you,
by the tender affection you have for me, to procure me the honour
of being his bride.” This speech filled the vizier with horror, and
he imagined she had lost her senses to make so dangerous a request ;
but to all his remonstrances she replied, ‘“‘I am aware of the
danger I run, but it does not deter me from my purpose. If I die,
my death will be glorious; and if I succeed, I shall render my
country an important service.” ‘‘ Your obstinacy,” replied he,
“excites my anger; why can you wish thus to rush to your own
destruction? They who do not look forward to the end of a dan-
gerous enterprise, know not how to bring it to a fortunate con-
clusion, The same thing will, I fear, happen to you which did to
the ass.” ‘What happened to the ass?” replied Scheherazade.
“Listen to me,” answered the vizier, ‘and I will relate the story.”

The Fuble of the Ass, the Ox, und the Labourer.

A very rich merchant had several houses in the country, where
he bred a considerable number of cattle of various descriptions.
He understood the language of beasts; but obtained this privilege
only on the condition of not imparting what he heard to any one,
under the penalty of death.

He had put by chance an ox and an ass into the same stall; and
being one day seated near them, he heard the ox say to the ass:
‘How happy do I think your lot, when I consider the repose you
enjoy, and the little labour you are required to perform. A servant
looks after you with great care, washes you, feeds you with fine
sifted barley, and gives you fresh and clean water; your greatest
task is to carry the merchant, our master, when he has occasion to
take a short journey ; but for that your whole life would be passed
in idleness. “How different now is the manner in which they treat
mé my condition is as unfortunate as yours is pleasant. They
FABLE OF THE ASS, THE OX, ETC. q

yoke me to a plough, with which they make me turn up the ground
the whole day ; while the labourer, who is constantly behind, con-
tinually urges me on with his goad. The weight and force of the
plough, too, chafes all the skin from my neck. When I have worked
from morning till night, they give me unwholesome dirty beans, or .
even something worse; and to complete my misery, after having
been obliged to satisfy my hunger upon such uninviting food, I am
compelled to pass the night in a filthy stall. Have I not then
reason to envy your lot?”

The ass suffered the ox to say what he pleased, without interrup-
tion; and when he had finished, addressed him in these words:
“(In truth, they are not much out when they call you an idiot,
since you pass your life just as they please, and cannot take thought
on your own behalf. What benefit, pray, do you derive from all
your indignities? You even destroy yourself for the ease, pleasure,
and profit of those who do not thank you for it. Believe me, they
would not treat you thus, if you possessed as much courage as
strength. When they come to tie you to the manger, what resist-
ance, pray, do you ever make? Do you ever put them in mind of
your horns? Do you ever show your anger by stamping on the
ground with your feet? Why don’t you terrify them with your
bellowing? Nature has given you the means of making yourseli
respected, and yet you neglect to use them. They bring you bad
beans and chaff; well, do not eat them, smell at them only, and
leave them, Thus, if you follow my plans you will soon perceive
a change, which you will thank me for.” ‘Che ox took the advice
of the ass very kindly, and declared himself much obliged to him.
‘‘My dear companion,” added he, ‘I will not fail to do as you bid
me, and you shall see how I acquit myself.” After this conversation,
of which the merchant lost not a word, they were silent.

Early the next morning the labourer came for the ox, and yoked
him to the plough, and set him to work as usual. The latter, who
had not forgotten the advice he had received, was very unruly the
whole day ; and at night, when the labourer attempted to fasten
him as usual to the stall, the malicious animal, instead of turning
his horns towards him for that purpose, began to be outrageous,
and ran roaring back; he even put down his horns to strike him $
in short, he did exactly as the ass had advised him. The day
following, when the man came, he found the manger still full of
beans and chaff, and the ox lying on the ground, with his legs
stretched out, and making a strange groaning. The labourer thought
him very ill, and that it would be useless to take him to work ; he
therefore immediately went and informed the merchant of it.

The latter perceived that the bad advice of the ass had been
followed ; and in order to punish him as he deserved, he told the
labourer to go and take the ass instead of the ox, and not fail to
give him plenty of exercise. The man obeyed; and the ass was
obliged to drag the plough the whole day, which tired him the more,
because he was unaccustomed to it ; besides which, he was so
handsomely beaten that he could scarcely support himself when he
came back,
8 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

In the meantime the ox was very well satistied; he ate all that
wag in his rack, and rested the whole day. He was highly pleased
with himself for having followed the advice of the ass, and blessed
him a thousand times for the good he bad procured him, As soon
as he saw him return, he did not fail to repeat his thanks. The ass
was so enraged at the treatment he had experienced, that he would
not answer a word. ‘My own imprudence,” said he to himself,
‘has alone brought this misfortune upon me. I lived happily,
everything was pleasant, I had all I wished for, and I may thank
myself only for this reverse. If I cannot contrive some trick to get
out of this scrape, my destruction is inevitable.” In saying this,
his strength was so much exhausted that he fell down in his stall,
half dead.

Here the grand vizier said to Scheherazadé, “You are, my child,
just like this ass, and would expose yourself to destruction, Trust
to me; and remain here in safety, without seeking your own ruin.”
“Sir,” replied Scheherazadé, ‘the example which you have brought
does not alter my resolution, and I shall not cease importuning you
till I have obtained from you the favour of presenting me to the
sultan as his consort.” The vizier, finding her persist in her request,
said, ‘‘ Well, then, since you will remain thus obstinate, I shall be
obliged to treat you as the merchant I mentioned did his wife.” ~

Being told in what a miserable state the ass was, he was curious
to know what passed between him and the ox ; after supper, there-
fore, he went out by moonlight, accompanied by his wite, and sat
down near them; on his arrival, he heard the ass say to the ox,
“Tell me, brother, what you mean to do when the labourer brings
you food to-morrow?” ‘‘ Mean to do?” replied the ox, “why, what
you taught me.” ‘Take care,” interrupted the ass, ‘‘ what you are
about, lest you destroy yourself; for in coming home yesterday
evening, I heard the merchant, our master, say what made me
tremble for you.” ‘¢ What did you hear?” asked the latter ; ‘‘con-
ceal nothing from me, I entreat you.” “ Our master,” replied the
ass, ‘‘addressed his labourer in these words: ‘Since the ox can
neither eat nor support himself, I wish him to be killed to-morrow ;
we will give his flesh as an alms to the poor ; and you shall carry
nis skin, which will be useful, to the currier; do not, therefore, fail
to send for the butcher.’ This is what I heard; and the interest I
take in your safety, and the friendship I have for you, induces me
to mention it, and offer you my opinion on the subject. At first,
when they bring you beans and chaff, get up, and begin eating
directly. Our master, by this, will suppose that you have recovered,
and will, without doubt. revoke the sentence for your death; in my
opinion, if you act otherwise, it is all over with you.”

This speech produced the intended effect ; the ox was much
troubled, and lowed with fear. The merchant, who had listened
to everything with great attention, burst into a fit of laughter that
quite surprised bis wife. ‘‘ Tell me,” said she, ‘‘ what you laugh
at, that I may join in it.” _‘‘ Be satisfied,” he answered, ‘‘at hear-
ing me.” ‘No, no,” she added, ‘‘ I wish to know the cause.” ‘That
satisfaction,” replied the husband, ‘‘T cannot afford you: I can
FABLE OF THE ass, THE OX, ETO. §

only tell you that T langhed at wnat the ass said to the ox ; the rest
is a secret which I must not reveal.” ‘‘ And why not?” asked his
wife. ‘‘ Because, if I tell you, it will cost me my life.” ‘You
trifle with me,” added she; ‘‘this can never be true; and if you do
not immediately inform me what you laughed at, I swear by Allah
that we live together no longer.”

In saying this, she went back to the house in a pet, shut herself
up, and cried the whole night. Her husband, finding that she con-
tinued in the same state the next day, said, ‘‘ How foolish it is to
afflict yourself in this way: do I not seriously tell you, that if I
were to yield to your foolish importunities, it would cost me my
life?” ‘* Whatever happens rests with God,” said she; “but I
shall not alter my mind.” He then sent for the parents and other
relations of his wife ; when they were all assembled, he explained
to them his motives for calling them together, and requested them
to use all their influence with his wife, and endeavour to convince
her of the folly of her conduct. She rejected them all, and said she
had rather die than give up this point to her husband. Each of her
parents urged every argument, and used every persuasion in their
power ; but they could make no impression either by theirauthority
or eloquence. When her children saw that nothing could alter her
resolution, they began to lament most bitterly ; the merchant him-
self knew not what to do.

A little while afterwards he was sitting by chance at the door of
his house, considering whether he should not even sacrifice himself,
in order to save his wife, whom he so tenderly loved. This mer-
chant had fifty hens and only one cock, and also a very faithful
dog. While he was sitting at the door, meditating what plan to
pursue, he saw the dog run towards the cock, and heard him de-
scribe his wife’s obstinacy and his own danger.

‘Our master is a fool,” replied the cock; ‘‘he has but one wife,
and cannot gain his point; while I have fifty, and do just as I
please.” ‘* What would you do?” said the dog. ‘* What?” an-
swered the cock ; ‘‘why, let him only go into the room where his wife
is, and, after shutting the door, take a good-sized stick and give
her a smart thrashing. I will answer for it she will soon know
better, and not worry him to reveal what he ought to keep secret.”
The merchant no sooner heard what the cock said, than he got up,
and taking rather a large stick, went to his wife, who was still
weeping. Having shut the door, he applied the remedy so effectually
that she soon exclaimed, ‘‘ Enough, enough, my husband, leave me,
and T will never ask the question more.” ‘* You deserve, my daugh-
eee the grand vizier, “to be treated like the merchant's
wife.

‘‘Do not, sir,” answered Scheherazadé, ‘think ill of me, if I
still persist in my sentiments. The history of this woman does not
shake my resolution. Pardon me, too, if I add, that your opposi-
tion will be useless; for if paternal tenderness should refuse the
request I make, I will present myself to the sultan.” At length,
the vizier, overcome by his daughter’s firmness, yielded to her en-
treaties ; and, although he was much afflicted at not being able te
10 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

conquer her resolution, he immediately went to Schahriar, and
announced to him that Scheherazadé herself would be his bride on
the following night.

The sultan was much astonished at the sacrifice of the grand vizier.
“Ts it possible,” said he, “that you can give up your own child?”
‘« Sire,” replied the vizier, ‘‘she has herself made the offer. The
dreadful fate that hangs over her does not alarm her; and she pre-
fers, even to her existence, the honour of being the consort of your
majesty, though it be but for one night.” ‘* Vizier,” said the
sultan, ‘‘do not deceive yourself with any hopes; for be assured,
that in delivering Scheherazadé into your charge to-morrow, it will
be with an order for her death; and if you disobey, your own head
will be the forfeit.”

When the grand vizier carried this intelligence to Scheherazade,
she seemed as much rejoiced as if it had been of the most pleasant
character: she thanked her father for obliging her so greatly; and
observing him to be much afflicted, she consoled him by saying, that
she hoped he would be so far from repenting her marriage with the
sultan, that it would become a subject of joy to him for the re-
’ mainder of his life.

She now occupied herself with the manner in which she should
appear before the sultan; but before she went to the palace, she
called her sister, Dinarzadé, aside, and said, ‘‘I am in vreat want
of your assistance, my dear sister, in a very important affair; and
I hope you will not refuse me. My father is going to conduct me
to the palace as the wife of the sultan. Do not let this news alarm
you, but attend rather to what Isay. As soon asIshall have presented
myself before the sultan, I shall entreat him to suffer you to sleep
in the bridal chamber that I may enjoy for the last time your com-
pany. If I obtain this favour, as 1 expect, remember to awaken
ie to-morrow morning an hour before daybreak, and address some
such words as these to me:—‘If you are not asleep, my sister, |
beg of you, till the morning appears, to recount to me one of those
delightful stories you know.’ I will immediately begin to tell one:
and I flatter myself that by these means I shall free the kingdom
from the consternation in which it is.” Dinarzadé promised to do
with pleasure what she required.

When the hour of retiring approached, the grand vizier conducted
Scheherazadé to the palace, and after introducing her to the sultan’s
apartment, took his leave. They were no sooner alone, than the
sultan ordered her to take off her veil. He was charmed with her
beauty ; but perceiving her in tears, he demanded the cause of them.
“Sire,” answered Scheherazade, ‘‘I have a sister whom I tenderly
love, and whose attachment to me is equally strong; I earnestly
wish that she might be permitted to pass the night in this apart-
ment, that we may again see each other, and once more take a
tender farewell. Wull you then consent, that I shall have the con-
solation of giving her this last proof of my affection?” Schahriar
having agreed to it, they sent for Dinarzadé, who came directly.
The sultan passed the night with Scheherazadé on an elevated
couch, as was the custom among the eastern monarchs, and








THE MERCHANT AND THE GENIUS. il

Dinarzadé slept at the foot of it, on a mattress prepared for the
purpose.

Dinarzadé, having awoke about an hour before day, did not fail
to do what her sister had ordered her. ‘‘My dear sister,” she
said, ‘‘if you are not asleep, I entreat you, as it will soon be light,
to relate to me one of those dclightful tales you know. It will,
alas, be the last time I shall receive that pleasure.”

Instead of returning any answer to her sister, Scheherazadé ad-
dressed these words to the sultan :—‘‘ Will your majesty permit me
to indulge my sister in her request?” ‘‘Freely,” replied he. Sche-
herazadé then desired her sister to attend, and, addressing herself
to the sultan, began as follows.

Che Story of the Merchant and the Genius.

There was formerly, sire, a merchant, who was possessed of great
wealth, in land, merchandise, and ready money. He had a numer-
ous set of clerks, factors, and slaves; and, from the great extent of
his commercial transactions, he was from time to time obliged to
take various journeys, in order to arrange his affairs in person with
his correspondents, Having one day an affair of great importance
to settle at a considerable distance from home, he mounted his horse,
and with only a sort of cloak-bag behind him, in which he had puta
few biscuits and dates, he began his journey. This provision was
absolutely necessary, as he was obliged to pass over a desert, where
it was impossible to procure any kind of food. He arrived without
any accident at the place of his destination; and having finished
his business, he set out on his return.

On the fourth day of his journey, he felt himself so incommoded
by the sun, and the heated surface of the earth, that he turned out
of his road, in order to rest and refresh himself under some trees,
which he saw at a distance. At the foot of a large walnut-tree he
perceived a very transparent and cool fountain, He immediately
alighted, and tying his horse to a branch of the tree, sat down on
its bank, having first taken some biscuits and dates from his little
store. While he was thus satisfying his hunger, he amused himself
with throwing about the stones of the fruit with considerable velo-
city, When he had finished his frugal repast, he washed his hands,
his face, and his feet, and repeated a prayer, like a good Mussulman.

He had hardly made an end, and was still on his knees, when he
saw a Genius, white with age, and of an enormous stature, advane-
ing towards him, with a scimitar in his hand. As soon as he was
close to him, he said in a most terrible tone: ‘Get up, that I may
kill thee with this scimitar, as thou hast caused the death of my
son.” He accompanied these words with a dreadful yell. The
merchant, alarmed by the horrible figure of this monster, as well as
the words he heard, replied in trembling accents: ‘Of what crime,
my good lord, alas, can I have heen guilty towards you, to deserve
the loss of life?” ‘] have sworn to kill thee, as thou hast slain Ly








12 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

gon.” “How could Ihave slain him?” answered the merchant. ‘ 1
do not know him, nor have I ever seen him.” ‘ Didst thou not,”
replied the monster, “‘on thine arrival here, sit down, and take
some dates from thy wallet; and after eating them didst thou not
throw the stones about on all sides?” ‘‘ This is all true,” replied
the merchant; ‘Ido not deny it.” ‘ Well, then,” said the other,
“T tell thee, thou hast killed my son; for while thou wast throwing
about the stones, my son passed. by ; one of them struck him in the
eye, and caused his death, and thus hast thou slain my son.” ‘‘Ah,
sire, forgiveme,” cried the merchant. ‘‘ [haveneither forgiveness nor
mercy,” added the monster; ‘and is it not just that he who has
inflicted death should suffer it?” ‘‘Igrant this; yet surely I have
not done so: and even if I have, I have done so innocently, and
therefore I entreat you to pardon me, and suffer me to live.” ‘‘No,
no,” cried the Genius, still persisting in his resolution, ‘‘I must
destroy thee, as thou hast done my son.” At these words, he took
the merchant in his arms, and having thrown him with his face on
the ground, he lifted up his sabre, in order to strike off his head.

The merchant, in the meantime, bathed in tears, protested his .
innocence, and lamenting his wife and children, tried the most per-
suasive means to avert his fate. The Genius, still holding up the
sabre, waited, however, till he had ended his complaints, though it
altered not his purpose. ‘‘All thy lamentations are vain,” he cried ;
“were thine eyes to weep blood, it would not prevent my killing
thee, as thou hast slain my son.” ‘‘ Can nothing, then,” replied the
merchant, ‘soften you? Must you shed the plood of a poor inno-
cent being?” ‘‘ Yes,” he added, ‘I am resolved.”

Scheherazadé, at this instant, perceiving it was day, and know-
ing that the sultan rose early to his prayers, and then to hold a
council, broke off. ‘‘ What a wonderful story,” said Dinarzadé,
“have you pitched upon!” ‘‘ The conclusion,” answered Schehera-
zadé, ‘‘is still more surprising, as you would confess, if the sultan
would suffer me to live another day, and in the morning permit me
to continue the relation.” Schahriar, who had listened with much
pleasure to the narration, determined in his own mind to wait till
to-morrow, intending to order her execution after she had finished
her story. Having resolved to defer her death till the following
day, he arose, and having prayed, went to the council.

The grand vizier, in the meantime, was in a state of cruel sus-
pense. Unable to sleep, he passed the night in lamenting the ap-
proaching fate of his daughter, whose executioner he was compelled
to be. Dreading, therefore, in this melancholy situation, to mect
the sultan, how great was his surprise in seeing him enter the
council-chamber without giving him the horrible orders he ex-
pected.

The sultan spent the day, as usual, in regulating the affairs of hia
kingdom, and on the approach of night, retired with Scheherazadé
to his apartment. The next morning, before the day appeared,
Dinarzadé did not fail to remind her sister: ‘‘My dear sister,”
she said, ‘‘ if you are not asleep, I entreat you, before the morning
breaks, to continue your story.” The sultan did not wait for Sche
THE MERCHANT AND THE GENIUS. 13

herazadé to ask permission, but said, ‘‘Finish the tale of the Geniue
and the merchant: I am curious to hear the end of it.” * Schehera-
zadé immediately went on as follows.

When the merchant, sire, perceived that the Genius was about to
execute his purpose, he cried aloud, ‘‘One word more, I entreat
you ; have the goodness to grant me a little delay ; give me only
time to go and take leave of my wife and children, and divide my
estates among them, as I have not yet made my will, that they may
not be obliged to have recourse to any legal process after my death ;
and when IJ have done this, I promise to return to this spot, and sub-
mit myself entirely to your pleasure.” ‘‘ But if I grant you the re-
spite you demand,” replied the Genius, ‘‘I fear you will not return.”
“Tf my oath will assure you of it,” added the merchant, ‘‘ I swear
by the God of heaven and earth, that I will not fail to repair hither.”
«‘ What length of time do you require,” said the Genius. ‘‘ It will
take me a full year to arrange everything, and enable me to bear
with composure the loss of life. I therefore promise you, that you
shall find me to-morrow twelvemonth under these trees, waiting to
deliver myself into your hands.” ‘‘ Take thy God to witness of the
promise thou hast made me,” said the other. ‘‘ Again I swear,”
replied he, ‘‘and you may rely on my oath.” On this, the Genius
left him near the fountain, and immediately disappeared.

The merchant, having recovered from his fright, mounted his
horse, and continued his journey.—But if, on the one hand, he re-
joiced at escaping from the great peril he was in, he was, on the
other, much distressed when he recollected the fatal oath he had
taken. When he arrived at home, his wife and family received him
with signs of the greatest joy; but instead of returning their em-
braces, he wept so bitterly, that they supposed something very
extraordinary had happened. His wife inquired the cause of his
tears, and of his violent grief.—‘‘ We were rejoicing,” she said, ‘‘ at
your return, and you alarm us all by the situation we see you in;
explain, [ entreat you, the cause of your violent sorrow.” ‘‘ Alas!”
he replied, ‘‘ how should I feel otherwise, when I have only a year
to live?” He then related to them what had passed, and that he had
given his word to return at the end of a year, to receive his death.

When they heard this melancholy tale, they were in despair.
The wife uttered the most lamentable groans, tearing her hair, and
beating her breast ; the children made the house resound with their
grief ; while the father, overcome by affection, mingled his tears
with theirs.

The next day, the merchant began to settle his affairs, and, first
vf all, to pay his debts. He made many presents to his different
friends, and large donations to the poor. He set at liberty many of
his slaves of both sexes ; divided his property among his children ;
appointed guardians for such as were young ; and besides returning

* In the original work, there are continual interruptions to the stories by the
supposed appearance of daylight, which obliged the sultan to rise, aud attend to
the affairs of the state. As these interruptions would have recurred many hundred
times, and thus unpleasantly have broken in upon the unity and continued interest
6v essential to tales of this nature, they have been omitted.
14 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

to his wife all the fortune she brought him, he added as much more
as the law would permit.

The year soon passed away, and he was compelled to depart. He
took in his wallet the garment he wished to be buried in ; but when
he attempted to take leave of his wife and children, his grief quite
overcame him. They could not bear his loss, and almost resolved
to accompany him, and all perish together. Compelled at length
to tear himself away from objects so dear, he set out, and arrived at
the destined spot, on the very day he had promised. He got off
his horse, and seating himself by the side of the fountain, with
such sorrowful sensations as may easily be imagined, he awaited the
arrival of the Genius.

While he was kept in this cruel suspense, there appeared an old
man leading a hind, who came near to him. Having saluted each
other, the old man said, ‘‘ May I ask of you, brother, what brought
you to this desert place, which is so full of evil Genii that there is
no safety. From the appearance of these trees, one might suppose
it was inhabited ; but it is, in fact, a solitude, where it is dangerous
to stay long.”

The merchant satisfied the old man’s curiosity, and related his
adventure. He listened with astonishment to the account, and
having heard it, he said, ‘‘ Surely nothing in the world can be more
surprising; and you have kept your oath inviolable! In truth, I
should like to be a witness to your interview with the Genius.”
Having said this, he sat down near the merchant, and while they
were talking, another old man, followed by two black dogs, came
in sight. As soon as he was near enough he saluted them, and in-
quired the reason of their stay in that place. The first old man
related the adventure of the merchant, exactly as he had told it;
and added, that this was the appointed day, and that he was there-
fore determined to remain in orde. to see the event. The second
old man, thinking it also very curious, resolved to do the same; and
sitting down, joined in the conversation.

Soon they perceived towards the plain, a thick vapour or smoke,
like a column of dust raised by the wind. This vapour approached
them, and then suddenly disappearing, they saw the Genius, who,
without noticing them, went toward the merchant with his scimitar
in his hand; and taking him by the arm, ‘‘ Get up,” said he, ‘ that
I may kill thee, as thou hast slain my son.” Both the merchant
and the two old men were struck with terror, they began to weep
and fill the air with their lamentations.

When the old_ man who conducted the hind, saw the Genius lay
hold of the merchant, and about to murder him without mercy, he
threw himself at the monster’s feet, and, kissing them, said, ‘‘Prince
of the Genii, I humbly entreat you to suspend your rage, and do
me the favour to listen tome. I wish to relate my own history, and
that of the hind, which you see ; and if you find it more wonderful
and surprising than the adventure of this merchant, whose life you
wish to take, may I not hope that you will at least remit a-half of
the punishment of this unfortunate man?” After meditating some
time, the Genius answered, ‘‘ Well theu, I agree to it.”
THE FIRST OLD MAN AND THE HIND. 15

The Wistory of the first Old War and the Hind.

The hind, whom you see here, is my cousin; nay more, she is my
wife. When I married her, she was only twelve years old, and shoe.
ought, therefore, not only to look upon me as her relation and
husband, but even as her father.

We lived together thirty years without having any children ;
this, however, was no drawback upon my kindness and regard.
Still my desire of offspring was so great, that for this purpose, and
for this only, I purchased a female slave, who bore me a son, of
great promise and expectation. Soon after, my wife became infected
with jealousy, and consequently took a great aversion to both
mother and child; yet she so well concealed her sentiments, that I
became acquainted with them, alas, too late.

In the meantime my son grew up; and he was about ten years
old when I was obliged to make a journey. I recommended both
the slave and the child to my wife before my departure, as I had
no distrust of her; and prayed her to take great care of them during
my absence, which would not be less than a-year. During this
time she endeavoured to satiate her hatred. She applied herself
to the study of magic; and when she was sufficiently skilled in that
diabolical art to execute the horrible design she meditated, the
wretch carried my son to a distant place. When there, by her
enchantments, she changed him into a calf, gave him to my steward,
and ordered him to bring him up as a calf, which she said she had
bought. She was not, however, satisfied with this infamous action,
but metamorphosed the slave into a cow, which she also sent to my
steward,

Immediately on my return, I inquired after my child and his
mother. ‘‘ Your slave is dead,” said she, ‘‘and it is now more than
two months since I have beheld your son; nor do I know what is
become of him.” I was sensibly affected at the death of the slave ;
Iut as my son had only disappeared, I flattered myself that he
would soon be found. Hight months, however, passed, and he did
not return ; nor could I learn any tidings of him. In order tu
celebrate ‘che festival of the great Bairam, which was approaching,
T ordered my steward to bring me the fattest cow I possessed, for a
sacrifice. He obeyed my commands, and the cow he brought me
was my own slave, the unfortunate mother of my son. Having
bound her, I was about to make the sacrifice, when at the very
instant she lowed most sorrowfully, and the tears even fell from
her eyes. This seemed to me so extraordinary, that I could not
but feel compassion for her, and was unable to give the fatal blow.
I therefore ordered her to be taken away, and another brought.

My wife, who was present, seemed angry at my compassion, and
»ppo: ed an order which defeated her malice. ‘* What are you about,
my husband?” said she, ‘‘why not sacrifice this cow? Your
steward has not a more beautiful one, nor one more proper for the
purpose.” Wishing to oblige my wife, I again approached the
sow: and struggling with my pity, which suspended the sacrifice,

B








16 TUE ARABIAN NIGHTS EN LERTAINMENTS.

L was again going to give the mortal blow, when the victim a second
time disarmed me by her redoubled tears and moanings. I then
delivered the instruments into the hands of my steward, ‘‘Take
them,” I cried, ‘‘and make the sacrifice yourself ; the lamentations
and tears of the animal have overcome me.”

The steward was less compassionate, and sacrificed her. On
taking off the skin we found hardly anything but hones, though she
appeared very fat. ‘Take her away,” said I to the steward, truly
chagrined, ‘‘I give her to you to do as you please with; regale both
yourself and whomsoever you wish; and if you have a very fat calf,
bring it in her place.” I did not inquire what he did with the cow,
but he had not been gone long before I saw a remarkably fine calf
brought. Although I was ignorant that this calf was my own son,
yet T felt a sensation of pity arise in my breast at first sight. As
soon, also, as he perceived me, he made so great an effort to come
to me that be broke his cord. He lay down at my feet, with his
head on the ground, as if he endeavoured to excite my compassion,
and not have the cruclty to take away his life: striving in this
manner to make me comprehend that he was my son.

I was still more surprised and affected by this action than I had
been by the tears of the cow. JI felt a kind of tender pity, which
interested me much for him; or, to speak more correctly, my blood
guided me to what was my duty. ‘*Go back,” I cried, ‘and take
all possible care of this calf, and in its room bring another directly.”

My wife, however, continued to demand his sacrifice so obstinately,
that [ was compelled to yield. I bound the calf, and taking the fatal
gnife, was going to bury it in the throat of my son, when he turned
his eyes, filled with tears, so persuasively upon me, that I had no
Fower to execute my intention. The knife fell from my hand, and
1 told my wife I was determined to have another calf; but promised,
for the sake of appeasing her, to sacrifice this calf at the feast of
Bairam on the following year.

The next morning my steward desired to speak with me in private.
«‘T am come,” said he, “to give you some information, which, J
trust, will afford you pleasure. I have a daughter, who has some
little knowledge of magic; and as I was bringing the calf back
yesterday, which you were unwilling to sacrifice, 1 observed that
she smiled at seeing it, and the next moment began to weep. I
inquired of her the cause of these two contrary emotions. ‘My
dear father,’ she answered, ‘that calf, which you bring back, is the
gon of our master; I smiled with joy at seeing him still alive, and
wept at the recollection of his mother, who was yesterday sacrificed
in the shape of a cow. These two metamorphoses have been con-
trived by the enchantments of our master’s wife, who hated both
the mother and the child.’ ‘ This,” continued the steward, ‘‘is
what my daughter said, and I come to report it to you.” Imagine,
O Genius, my surprise at hearing these words: I immediately set
out with my steward, to speak to his daughter myself. On my
arrival, I went first to the stable, where my son had been placed ;
he could not return my caresses, but he received them in a way
shich convinced me that he was really my son.
THE FIRST OLD MAN AND THE HIND. 17

When the daughter of the steward made her appearance, I asked
her if she could restore him to his former shape. ‘‘ Yes,” replied
she, “I can.” “Ah,” exclaimed I, ‘if you can perform such a
miracle, I will make you the mistress of all I possess.” She then
answered with a smile, ‘‘You are our master, and I know how
much we are bound to you; but I must mention, that I can restore
your son to his own form only on two conditions; first, that you
hestow him upon me for my husband, and secondly, that I may be
permitted to punish her who changed him into a calf.” “To the
lirst,” I replied, ‘*T agree with all my heart; I will still do more,
[will give you, for your own separate use, a considerable sum of
money, independent of what I destined for my son. I agree also
to that which regards my wife; I only entreat you to spare her
life.” ‘I will treat her, then,” she said, ‘in the same manner as
she has treated your son.” ‘To this I gave my consent, provided
she first restored my son to me.

The damsel then took a vessel full of water, and pronouncing over
it some words I did not understand, she thus addressed herself to
the calf: ‘*O calf, if thou hast been created by the all-powerful
Sovereign of the world, as thou now appearest, retain that form ;
but if thou art a man, and hast been changed by enchantment into a
calf, resume, by permission of thy divine Creator, thy natural
igure!” In saying this, she threw the water over him, and he in-
stantly regained his own form.

‘‘My child ! my dear child,” I immediately exclaimed, and em.
braced him with a transport I could not restrain, “it is the Al-
mighty who hath sent this damsel to us, to destroy the horrible
charm with which you were surrounded. I am sure your gratitude
will induce you to accept her for a wife, as I have already promised
for you.” He joyfully consented ; but before they were united, the
damsel changed my wife into this hind, which you see here. 1
wished her to have this form in preference to any other more un-
pleasant, that we might see her, without repugnance, in our family,

Since this, my son has become a widower, and is now travelling.
Many years have passed since I have heard anything of him; |
have therefore now set out with a view to gain some information ;
and as I did not like to trust my wife to the care of any one during
my search, I thought proper to carry her along with me. This is
the history of myself and this hind: can anything be more wonder-
ful? “TI agree with you,” said the Genius, “and in consequence, I
grant one-half of my pardon to this merchant,”

“As soon as the first old man, sire, had finished his history,”
continued the sultana, ‘the second, who led the two black dogs,
sud to the Genius, ‘I will relate to you what has happened to me
and these two dogs which you see, and I am sure you will find my
history still more astonishing than that which you have heard.
But when I have told it, will you grant to this merchant another
half of his pardon?’ ‘Yes,’ answered the Genius, ‘ provided your
history surpasses that of the hind.’ This being settled, the second
old man began as follows.”
15 THE AKAKIAN NIGHTS ENTERLAINMENTS.

The History of the Second Old Man anv the
Two Black Togs.

Great Prince of the Genii, you must know, that these two black
dogs, which you see here, and myself, are three brothers. Our
father left us, when he died, one thousand sequins each. -With this
sum we all embarked in the same profession, namely, as merchants.
Soon after we had opened our warehouse, my eldest brother, who
is now one of these dogs, resolved to travel, and carry on his busi-
ness in foreign countries. With this view he sold all his goods, and
bought such other sorts of merchandise as were adapted to the
different countries he proposed visiting.

He set out, and was absent a whole year. At the eud of this
time, a poor man, who seemed to me to be asking charity, presented
himself at my warehouse. ‘‘ 1s it possible you do not know me?”
he asked. On looking attentively at him, I recognised his person.
» Ah, my brother,” I cried, embracing him, ‘‘ how should I possibly
know you in this state?” I made him come in directly, and in-
quired both after his health and the success of his voyage. ‘‘ Do
not ask me,” he replied ; ‘‘in beholding me you sce the whole. To
enter into a detail of all the misfortunes that I have suffered in the
last year, and which have reduced me to the state you see, would
only be to renew my aftiction.”

I instantly shut up my shop, and neglecting everything else, I
took him to the bath, and dressed him in the best apparel my ward-
vobe afforded. I examined the state of my business, and finding by
my accounts that I had just doubled my capital, that is, that Twas
now worth two thousand sequins, I presented him with the half.
‘* Let this, my brother,” I said, ‘make you forget your losses.” Ie
joyfully accepted the thousand sequins, again settled his affairs, and
we lived together as before.

Some time after this, my second brother, who is the other of
these black dogs, wished also to dispose of his property. Both his
elder brother and myself tried everything in our power to dissuade
him from it, but in vain. He sold all, and with the money he
bought such merchandise as he wished for his journey. He took his
departure, and joined a caravan, At the end of a year he also
returned in the same condition as his brother had done. I furnished
him with clothes; and as I had gained another thousand sequins, 1
gave them to him. He directly bought a shop, and continued to
exercise his business.

One day both my brothers came to me, and proposed that I should
make a voyage with them, for the purpose of traffic. ‘* You have
travelled,” said I, at once rejecting the scheme, ‘‘and what have
you gained? Who will insure that I shall be more fortunate than
you?” In vain did they use every argument they thought could
induce me to try my fortune. I still refused to consent to their
design, They returned, however, so often to the subject, that, after
having withstood their solicitations for five years, Iat length yielded.
THE SECOND OLD MAN AND THit [WO BLACK DOGS. 19

When it became necessary to prepare for the voyage, and we were
consulting on the sort of merchandise to be bought, I discovered that
they had consumed their capital, and that nothing remained of the
thousand sequins I had given to each, I did not, however, reproach
them ; on the contrary, as my capital was increased to six thousand
sequins, I divided the half with them, and said, “‘We must, my
brothers, risk only three thousand sequins, and endeavour to conceal
the other in some secure place, that if our voyage be not more suc-
cessful than those you have already made, we shall, with this sum,
be able to console ourselves and begin our former profession. I will
give one thousand sequins to each, and keep one myself; and I will
conceal the other three thousand in a corner of my house.” We
purchased our goods, embarked in a vessel, which we ourselves
freighted, and set sail with a favourable wind. After sailing about
a month, we arrived, without any accident, at a port, where we
landed, and had a most advantageous sale for our merchandise. 1,
in particular, sold mine so well, that I gained ten for one. We then
purchased the produce of that country, in order to traffic with it in
our own,

About the time that we were ready to embark on our return, I
accidentally met on the sea-shore a female, of a very fine figure, but
poorly dressed. She accosted me by kissing my hand, and entreated
ine most earnestly to permit her to go with me, and take her for ny
wife. I started many difficulties to such a plan; but at length she
said so much to persuade me that I ought not to regard her poverty,
md that I should be well satisfied with her conduct, I was quite
overcome. I directly procured proper dresses for her, and after
marrying her in due form, she embarked with me, and we set sail.

During our voyage, I found my wife possessed of so many good
qualities, that I loved her every day more and more. In the mean-
time, my two brothers, who had not traded so advantageously as
myself, and who were jealous of my prosperity, began to feel ex-
ceedingly envious. They even went so far as to conspire against
my life ; for one night, while my wife and I were asleep, they threw
us into the sea.

My wife proved to be a fairy, consequently possessed of super-
natural power ; you may therefore imagine she was not hurt. As
for myself, I should certainly have perished without her aid, Ihad
hardly, however, fallen into the water before she took me up, and
transported me into an island, As soon as it was day, the fairy thus
addressed_me :—‘‘ You may observe, my husband, that in saving
your life, I have not ill rewarded the good you have done me. You
must know, that I am a fairy, and being upon the shore when you
were about to sail, I felt a great inclination for you. I wished to
try the goodness of your heart, and for this purpose I presented
myself before you in the disguise you saw. You acted most gener-
ously, and I am therefore delighted in finding an occasion of show-
ing my gratitude: but I am enraged against your brothers, nor
shall I be satisfied till I have taken their lives.”

I listened with astonishment to the discourse of the fairy, and
thauked her, as well as T was able, for the great obligation she had
20 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

conferred on me. ‘‘ But, madam,” said I to her, ‘‘I must entreat
you to pardon my brothers; for although I have the greatest reason
to complain of their conduct, yet I am not so cruel as to wish their
destruction.” Irelated to her what I had done for each of them,
but my account only increased her anger. ‘‘I must instantly fly
after these ungrateful wretches,” cried she, ‘‘and bring them to a
just punishment ; I will sink their vessel, and precipitate them to
the bottom of the sea.” ‘*No, beautiful lady,” replied I, ‘‘ moder-
ate your indignation, and do not execute so dreadful an intention ;
remember they are still my brothers, and that we are bound to re-
turn good for evil.”

I appeased the tairy by these words; and no sooner had I pro-
nounced them, than she transported me in an instant from the
island, where we were, to the top of my own house, which was
terraced, and then disappeared. I descended, opened the doors,
and dug up the three thousand sequins which I had hidden. I
afterwards repaired to my shop, opened it, and received the congrat-
ulations of the merchants in the neighbourhood on my arrival.
When I returned home, I perceived these two black dogs, which
came towards me with a submissive air. I could not imagine what
this meant, but the fairy, who soon appeared, satisfied my curiosity.
‘‘My dear husband,” said she, ‘be not surprised at seeing these
two dogs in your house; they are your brothers.” My blood ran
eold on hearing this, and I inquired by what power they had been
transformed into that state. ‘‘It is I,” replied the fairy, ‘‘ who
have done it; at least it is one of my sisters, to whom I gave the
commission, and she has also sunk their ship; you will lose the
merchandise it contained, but I shall recompense you in some other
way ; as to your brothers, I have condemned them to remain under
this form for ten years, as a punishment for their perfidy.” Then
informing me where I might hear of her, she disappeared.

The ten years are now completed, and I am travelling in search
of her. As I was passing this way, I met this merchant and the
good old man who is leading his hind, and here I staid. ‘‘This, O
Prince of the Genii, is my history; does it not appear to you of a
most extraordinary nature?” ‘' Yes,” replied the Genius, ‘‘I con-
fess it is most wonderful, and therefore I remit the second part of
the merchant’s punishment.” Having said this, he disappeared, to
the great joy of the whole party.

The merchant did not omit to bestow many thanks upon his liber-
ators. They rejoiced with him at being out of danger, and then
bidding him adieu, each went his own way. The merchant re-
turned home to his wife and children, and spent the remainder of
his days with them in tranquillity. ‘‘But, sire,” added Schehera-
zade, ‘‘ however beautiful those tales which I have related to your
majesty may he, they are not equal to that of the fisherman.” Dinar-
zadé, observing that the sultan made no answer, said, ‘‘Since there
is still some time, my sister, pray recount his history; the sultan, |
hope, will not object to it.” Schahriar consented to it, and Sche.
herazad¢ went on as follows.
THE FISUERMAN. |

The History of the fisherman.

There was formerly, sire, an aged fisherman, who was so poor
that he could barely obtain food for himself, his wife, and three
children, of which his family consisted. He went out early every
morning to his employment; and he had imposed a rule upon him-
self never to cast his nets above four times a day.

One morning he set out before the moon had disappeared: when
he had got to the sea-shore, he undressed himself, and threw his
nets. In drawing them to land, he perceived a considerable resist-
ance, and began to imagine he should have an excellent haul, at
which he was much pleased. But the moment after, finding that,
instead of fish, he had got nothing but the carcase of an ass in his
nets, he was much vexed and afflicted at having had so badadraught.
When he had mended his nets, which the weight of the ass had torn ir
many places, he threw them a second time. He again found con-
siderable resistance in drawing them up, and again he thought they
were filled with fish; how great, then, was his disappointment in
discovering only a large pannier or basket, filled with sand and
mud,

He threw them a third time, and brought up only stones, shells,
and filth. It is impossible to describe his despair, which almost
deprived him of his senses. The day now began to break, and, like
a good Mussulman, he did not neglect his prayers. When he had
finished, he threw his nets for the fourth time. Again he supposed
he had caught a great quantity of fish, as he drew them with as
much difficulty as before. He nevertheless found none; but dis-
covered a vase of yellow copper, which seemed, from its weight, to
be filled with something; and he observed that it was shut up and
fastened with lead, on which there was the impression of a scal.
‘JT will sell this to a founder,” said he, with joy, ‘and with the
money I shall get for it I will purchase a measure of corn.”

He examined the vase on all sides; he shook it, in order ‘to dis-
cover whether its contents would rattle. He could hear nothing ;
nnd this, together with the impression of the seal on the lead, made
him think it was filled with something valuable. In order to find
this out, he took his knife, and got it open without much difficulty.
He directly turned the top downwards, and was much surprised to
find nothing come out; he then set it down before him, and while
he was attentively observing it, there issued from it so thick a
smoke that he was obliged to step back a few paces. This smoke,
by degrees, rose almost to the clouds, and spread itself over both
the water and the shore, appearing like a thick fog. The fisherman,
us may easily be imagined, was a good deal surprised at this sight.
When the smoke had all come out from the vase, it again collected
itself, and became a solid body, and then took the shape of a Genius,
twice as large as any of the giants. At the appearance of so cnor-
mous a monster, the fisherman wished to run away, but his fears
were so great, he was unable to move.
22 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

‘Solomon, Solomon,” cried the Genius, ‘‘ great prophet, pardon,
I pray. I never more will oppose thy will, but will obey all thy
commands,”

The fisherman, sire, had no sooner heard these words spoken by
the Genius than he regained his courage, and said, ‘‘ Proud spirit,
what is this thou sayest? Solomon has been dead more than eight-
teen hundred years.—Inform me, I pray, of thine history, and on
what account thou wast shut up in this vase.”

To this speech, the Genius, looking disdainfully at the fisherman,
answered, ‘Thou art very bold to call me a proud spirit; speak to
me more civilly, before I kill thee.” ‘* And for what reason, pray,
will you kill me?” answered the fisherman; ‘‘have you already
forgotten that I have set you at liberty?” ‘‘ I remember it very
well,” returned he; ‘but that shall not prevent my destroying
thee, and I will only grant thee one favour.” ‘‘ And pray, what is
that?” said the fisherman. ‘‘It is,” replied the Genius, ‘‘ to per-
mit thee to choose the manner of thy death.” ‘‘ But in what, added
the other, ‘‘ have I offended you? Is it thus thou wouldst recom-
pense me for the good I have done thee?” ‘‘I can treat thee no
otherwise,” said the Genius ; ‘‘and to convince thee of it, attend
to my history.

“Tam one of those spirits who rebelled against the sovereignty
of God. All the other Genii acknowledged the great Solomon, the
prophet of God, and submitted to him. Sacar and myself were the
only ones who were above humbling ourselves. In order to revenge
himself, this powerful monarch charged Assaf, the son of Baraknia,
his first minister, to come and seize me. This was done ; and Assaf
took and brought me, in spite of myself, before the throne of the
king, his master.

“Solomon, the son of David, commanded me to quit my mode of
life, acknowledge his authority, and submit to his laws. I haughtily
refused to obey him, and rather exposed myself to his resentment
than take the oath of fidelity and submission which he required of
me. In order, therefore, to punish me, he enclosed me in this
copper vase; and, to prevent my forcing my way out, he put upon
the leaden cover the impression of his seal, on which the great
name of God is engraven. This done, he gave the vase to one of
those Genii who obeyed him, and ordered him to cast me into the
sea; which, to my great sorrow, was performed directly.

‘‘ During the first period of my captivity, I swore thatif any one
delivered me before the first hundred years were passed, I would
make him rich. The time elapsed, and no one assisted me: during
the second century, I swore that if any released me, I would dis-
cover to him all the treasures of the earth; still I was not more
fortunate. During the third, I promised to make my deliverer a
most powerful monarch, to be always hovering near him, and to
vrant him every day any three requests he chose. This age too,
like the former, passed away, and I remained in the same situation.
Euraged, at last, to be so long a prisoner, I swore that I would,
without mercy, kill whoever should in future release me, and that
the only favour T would grant him should be, to choose what man-
THE PTSHERMAN. 23

ner of death he pleased. Since, therefore, thou hast come here
to-day, and hast delivered me, fix upon whatever kind of death
thou wilt.”

The fisherman was much afflicted at this speech. ‘‘ How un-
fortunate,” he exclaimed, ‘‘am I, to come here and render so great
a service to such an ungrateful object? Consider, I entreat you,
your injustice, and revoke so unreasonable an oath.” ‘ No,”
auswered the Genius, ‘‘thy death is certain; determine only how
I shall kill thee.” The fisherman was in great distress at finding
him thus resolved on his death. He still endeavoured to appease
the Genius. ‘ Alas!” he cried, ‘‘ have pity on me, in consideration
of what I have done for thee.” ‘TI have already told thee,” re-
plied the Genius, ‘‘ that it is for that very reason that I am obliged
to take thy life. Let us lose no time, your arguments will not
alter my resolution. Make haste and tell me how you wish to
die.”

Necessity is the spur to invention; and the fisherman thought of
a stratagem. ‘‘Since then,” said he, ‘I cannot escape death, I
submit to the will of God; but before I choose the sort of death, I
konjure you, by the great name of God, which is graven upon the
seal of the prophet Solomon, the son of David, answer me truly to
a question Lam going to put to you.” The Genius trembled at this
adjuration, and felt that he should be compelled to answer positively.
He then said to the fisherman, ‘‘ Ask what thou wilt, and male
haste.”

The Genius had no sooner promised to speak the truth than the
fisherman said to him, ‘“‘I wish to know whether you really were
in that vase; dare you swear it by the great name of God?”
“Yes,” answered the Genius, ‘‘I swear by the great name of God
that I most certainly was.” ‘In truth,” replied the fisherman,
“T cannot believe you. This vase cannot contain one of your feet ;
how then can it hold your whole body?” ‘I swear to thee, not-
withstanding,” replied he, ‘‘ that I was there just as thou seest m:.
Wilt thou not believe me after the solemn oath I have taken?”
“No, truly,” added the fisherman, ‘‘I shall not believe you unless
1 were to sce it.”

Immediately the form of the Genius began to change into smoke,
and extended itself, as before, over both the shore and the sea ;
and then, collecting itself, began to enter the vase, and continued
to do so, in a slow and equal manner, till nothing remained without.
A voice immediately issued forth, saying, ‘‘ Now, then, thou in-
credulous fisherman, dost thou believe me now I am in the vase?”
But, instead of answering the Genius, he immediately took the
leaden cover, and put it on the vase. ‘‘Genius,” he cried, ‘it is
now your turn to ask pardon, and choose what sort of death is most
agreeable to you. But no; it is better that I should throw you
again into the sea, and I will build, on the very spot where you are
cast, a house upon the shore, in which I will live, to warn all
fishermen that shall come and throw their nets, not to fish up so
wicked a Genius as thou art, who makest an oath to kill the man
who shall sct thee at liberty.’
24 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS,

At this offensive speech, the enraged Genius tried every method
to get out of the vase, but in vain; for the impression of the seal of
Solomon, the prophet, the son of David, prevented him. Knowing
then that the fisherman had the advantage over him, he began to
conceal his rage. ‘‘Take care,” said he, in a softened tone, “what
you are about, fisherman. Whatever I did was merely in joke,
and you ought not to take it seriously.” ‘*O Genius,” answered
the fisherman, ‘you who were a moment ago the greatest of all the
Genii, are now the most insignificant; and do not suppose that your
flattering speeches will be of any use to you. You shall assuredly
return to the sea; and if you passed all the time there which you
have stated, you may as well remain till the day of judgment. I
entreated you, in the name of God, not to take my life, and you
rejected my prayers; I now reject yours, likewise.”

The Genius tried every argument to move the fisherman’s pity,
but in vain. “I conjure you to open the vase,” said he; “if you
give me my liberty again, you shall have reason to be satisfied with
my gratitude.” ‘You are too treacherous for me to trust you,”
returned the fisherman; ‘‘I should deserve to lose my life if I had
the imprudence to put it in your power a second time. You would
most likely treat me as a Greek king treated Douban the physician.
Listen, and I will tell you the story.”



Che History of the Greek Ring, and Donban
the “bnsicia.

In the country of Zouman, in Persia, there lived a king, whose
subjects were originally Greeks. This king was sorely afilicted
with a leprosy, and his physicians had unsuccessfully tried every
remedy they were acquainted with, when a very ingenious physician,
called Douban, arrived at the court.

He had acquired his profound learning by studying different
authors in the Greek, Latin, Persian, Arabic, Turkish. Syriac, and
Hebrew languages ; and besides having a consummate knowledze
of philosophy, he was well acquainted with the good and bad pro-
perties of all kinds of plants and drugs.

As soon as he was informed of the king’s illness, and that the
physicians had given him up, he dressed himself as neatly as pos-
sible, and obtained permission to be presented to the king. “Sire,”
said he, ‘I know that all the physicians who have attended your
majesty, have been unable to remove your leprosy ; but if you will
do me the honour to accept of my services, I will engage to cure
you without either internal doses, or outward applications.” The
king, pleased with this proposition, replied, If you are really so
skilful as you pretend, I promise to confer afilucnce on you and
your posterity ; and without reckoning the presents you will have,
you shall be my first favourite; but do you assure me, then, that
you will remove my leprosy without making me swallow any potion,
or applying any remedy externally?” “Yes, sire,” replied the
THE GREEK KING AND THE PHYSICIAN. 25

physician, ‘‘I flatter myself I shall succeed, with the help of God ;
and to-morrow I will begin my operations.”

Douban returned to his house, and made a sort of racket or bat,
with a hollow in the handle, to admit the drug he meant to use;
that being done, on the following day he presented himself before
the king, and having made a profound reverence, told him that he
must ride on horseback to the place where he was accustomed to
play at bowls. The king did as he was desired; and when he had
reached the bowling-green, the physician approached him, and
putting into his hand the bat which he had prepared, “‘ Sire,” said
he, ‘exercise yourself with striking that bowl about with this bat
till you find yourself in a profuse perspiration. When the remedy
I have enclosed in its handle is warmed by your hand, it will pene-
trate through your whole body; you may then leave off, for the
drug will have taken effect; and when you return to your palace,
get into a warm bath, and be well rubbed and washed; then go to
bed, and to-morrow you will be quite cured.”

The king took the bat, and spurred his horse after the bowl till
he struck it; it was sent back again to him by the officers who
were playing with him, and he struck it again; and thus the game
continued for a considerable time, till he found his hand as well as
his whole body in a perspiration, which made the remedy in the bat
operate as the physician had said; the king then left the game,
returned to the palace, bathed, and observed very punctually all
the directions that had been given him.

He soon found the good effects of the prescription; for when he
arose the next morning, he perceived, with equal surprise and joy,
that his leprosy was entirely cured, and that his body was as clear
as if he had never been attacked by that malady. As soon as he
was dressed, he went into the audience-room, where he mounted his
throne and received the congratulations of all his courtiers, who had
assembled on that day, partly to gratify their curiosity, and partly
to testify them joy.

Douban entered, and went to prostrate himself at the foot of the
throne, with his face towards the ground. The king, seeing him,
called to him, and made him sit by his side; and showing him to
the assembly, gave him in that public way all the praise he so well
deserved ; nay, he did not stop here, for there being a grand enter-
tainment at court on that day, he placed him at his own table to
dine only with him.

The Greek king (proceeded the fisherman), was not satisfied with
admitting the physician to his own table; towards evening, when
the courtiers were about to depart, he put on him a long rich robe,
resembling that which the courtiers usually wore in his presence,
and, in addition, made him a present of two thousand sequins. The
following days he did nothing but caress him; in short, this prince,
thinking he could never repay the obligations he owed to so skilful
a physician, was continually conferring on him some fresh proof of
his gratitude.

The king had a grand vizier who was avaricious, envious, and
capable of every species of crime. He observed. not withont pain,
26 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS,

the presents which had been bestowed upon the physician. To
accomplish his ruin, he went to him, and said in private that he had
some intelligence of the greatest moment to communicate. The
king asked him what it was. ‘‘Sire,” replied he, “it is very
dangerous for a monarch to place any confidence in a man of whose
fidelity he is not assured. In overwhelming the physician Douban
with your favours, and bestowing all this kindness and regard upon
him, you know not but he may be a traitor, who has introduced
himself to the court in order to assassinate you.” ‘ What is this
you dare tell me?” answered the king. <‘‘Recollect to whom you
speak, and that you advance an assertion to which I shall not easily
give credit.” “Sire,” added the vizier, ‘I am accurately informe:
of what I have the honour to represent to you; do not therefore
continue to repose such a dangerous confidence in him. If your
majesty is, as ib were, in a dream, it is time to awake; for I again
repeat, that the physician Douban has not travelled from the farther
part of Greece, his own country, but for the horrible design I have
mentioned,”

“No, no, vizier,” interrupted the king ; ‘I am sure this man,
whom you consider as a hypocrite and traitor, is one of the most
virtuous and best of men. You’ know by what remedy, or rather
by what miracle, le cured me of my leprosy; and if he had sought
my life, why did he thus save it. Cease, then, from endeavouring to
instil unjust suspicions. From this very day I bestow upon him a
pension of one thousand sequins a month for the rest of his life ;
and were I to share all my riches, and even my kingdoms with
him, I could never sufliciently repay what he has done for me. J
sce what it is, his virtue excites your envy; but do not suppose that
I shall suiter myself to be prejudiced against him. I well remember
what a vizier said to King Sinbad, who, at the instigation of his
mother-in-law, was about to give orders for the death of his son.”

Ghe Vistory of the Busband und the Warrot.
ye g y ye 3 ye 4

There lived once a good man who had a beautiful wife, of whom
he was so passionately fond that he could scarcely bear to have
her out of his sight. One day, when some particular business
obliged him to leave her, he went to a place where they sold all
sorts uf birds ; he purchased a parrot, which was not only highly
accomplished in the art of talking, but also possessed the rare sift
of telling everything that was done in its presence. The husband
took it home in a cage to his wife, and begged of her to keep it in
her chamber, and take great care of it during His absence; after
this he set out on his journey.

On his return, he did not fail to interrogate the parrot on what
had passed while he was away; and the bird very expertly related
a few circumstances which occasioned the husband to reprimand
his wife. She supposed that some of her slaves had exposed her,
but they all assured her they were faithful. and agreed in charging
THE VIZIER WItO WAS PUNISHED. 27

the parrot with the crime. Desirous of being convinced of the
truth of this matter, the wife advised a method of quieting the
suspicions of her husband, and at the same time of revenging her-
self on the parrot, if he were the culprit. The next time the hus-
band was absent, she ordered one of her slaves, during the night,
to turn a handmill under the bird’s cage, and another to throw
water over it like rain, and a third to wave a looking-glass before
the parrot by the light of a candle. ‘The slaves were employed the
greatest part of the night in doing what their mistress had ordered
them, and succeeded to her satisfaction.

The following day, when the husband returned, he again applied
to the parrot to be informed of what had taken place. The bird
replied, ‘‘My dear master, the lightning, the thunder, and the
vain, have so disturbed me the whole night, that I cannot tell you
how much I have suffered.” The husband, who knew there had
been no storm that night, became convinced that the parrot did
not always relate facts ; and that having told an untruth in this
particular, he had also deceived him with respect to his wife : being
therefore extremely enraged with it, he took the bird out of the
cage, and, dashing it on the floor, killed it. He, however, after-
wards learnt from his neighbours, that the poor parrot had told
no falsehood in reference to his wife’s conduct, which made him
repent of having destroyed it.

“* When the Greek king,” said the fisherman to the Genius, “had
finished the story of the parrot,” he added, “ You, vizier, through
envy of Douban, who has done you no evil, wish me to order his
death, but I will take good care lest, like the husband who killed
his parrot, I should afterwards repent.” _‘* Sire,” replicd the vizier,
“the loss of the parrot was of little importance, nor do I think his
master could long have regretted it. But when the life of a king is
in question, a bare suspicion ought to be equal toa certainty. But
this, sire, by no means rests on an uncertainty. The physician,
Douban, positively wishes to assassinate you. It is not envy that
makes me hostile to him, it is the interest alone that I take in
your majesty’s preservation. If my information is false, I deserve
the same punishment that a certain vizier underwent formerly.”
“What had that vizier done worthy of chastisement?” said the
Greek king. ‘I will tell your majesty,” answered the vizier, ‘‘ if
you will have the goodness to listen.”



Che History of the Vizier Who fous Punished.

There was formerly a king, whose son was passionately fond of
hunting. His father, therefore, often indulged him in this civersion ;
but at the same time gave positive orders to his grand vizier always
to accompany, and never lose sight of him, .

One hunting morning, the prickers roused a stag, and the prince
set off in pursuit, thinking that the vizier was following him. He
galoped so long, and his cagerncss carried him go far, that he at
98 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

last found himself quite alone. He immediately stopped, and
observing that he had lost his way, he endeavoured to return back
by the same, in order to join the vizier, who had not been suffi-
ciently attentive in following him. He was, however, unable to find
it; and riding about on all sides, without getting into the right
track, he by chance met a lady, not ill made, who was weeping
most bitterly. The prince immediately checked his horse, and
inquired of her who she was, what she did alone in that place, and
whether he could assist her. ‘‘I am,” she answered, ‘the daugh-

ter of an Indian king. In riding out into the country, I was over-

come with sleep, and fell from my horse. He has run away, and 1
know not what has become of him.” The young prince was sorry
for her misfortune, and proposed to take her up behind him, an
offer which she accepted.

As they passed by an old ruined building, the lady made some
excuse to alight; the prince therefore stopped, and suffered her to
get down. ‘He ‘also alighted, and walked towards the building,
holding his horse by the bridle. Imagine, then, what was his
astonishment when he heard the female pronounce these words
from within the walls: ‘‘ Rejoice, my children, I have brought you a
very nice fat youth.” And directly afterwards other voices answered,
st Where as he, mamma? Let us eat him instantly, for we are very
hungry.’

The prince had heard enough to convince him of the danger he
was in: he plainly perceived that she, who represented herself as
the daughter of an Indian king, was no other than the wife of one
of those § savage demons called ‘Ogres, who live in desert places, and
make ase of a thousand wiles to surprise and devour the unfortunate
passengers. He trembled with fear, and instantly mounted his
horse.

The pretended princess at that moment made her appearance,
on which the young prince lifted up his hands towards heaven, and
said, ‘*Cast thine eyes upon me, O all-powerful Lord, and deliver
me from this my enemy!” At this prayer, the Ogre went back to
the ruin, and the prince rode off as fast as possible. He fortunately
discovered the right roa4, and arrived safely at home, and related
to his father the great danger he had encountered "through the
neglect of the grand vizier. “The king was so enraged at him, that
he « ordered this minister to be instantly strangled.

“Sire,” continued the vizier of the Greek king, “‘ to return to
the physician Douban ; if you do not take care, the confidence you
place in him will turn out unfortunate. I well know that he is a
spy, sent by your enemies to attempt your majesty’s life. He has
cured you, you say; but who can tell that? He has perhaps only
cured you in appearance, and not radically; and who can tell
whether this remedy in the end will not produce the most pernicious
effects ?”

The Greek king was naturally rather weak, and had not pene-
tration enough to discover the wicked intention of his vizier, nor
sufficient firmness to persist in his first opinion. This conversation
staggered him. ‘‘ You are right, vizier,” said he, ‘he may be
TUE GREEK KING AND THE PHYSICIAN. 24

come for the express purpose of taking my life, which he can exsily
accomplish, even by the mere smell of some of his drugs. We must
consider what is to be done in this conjuncture.”

When the vizier perceived the king in the disposition he wished,
he said to him, ‘‘The best and most certain means, sire, to ensure
your repose, and put your person in safety, is instantly to send t:
Douban, and on his appearance, order him to be beheaded.*
‘‘Indeed,” replied the king, “I think I ought to prevent his
designs.” Having said this, he called one of his officers, and ordered
him to find the physician, who, without knowing what the king
wished, hastened to the palace.

“‘ Knowest thou,” said the king as soon as he saw him, “why I
sent for thee here?” ‘‘ No, sire,” answered Douban, ‘‘and I wait till
your majesty pleases to instruct me.” ‘ [have ordered thee to come,”
replied the king, ‘to free myself from thy snares, by taking thy life.”

{tis impossible to express the astonishment of Douban at hearing
the sentence of his death. ‘‘For what reason, sire,” replied he,
‘does your majesty condemn me to death? What crime have 1
been guilty of?” ‘I have been well informed,” added the king,
‘that you are a.spy, and that you have come to my court in order
to take away my life; but to prevent that, I will first deprive you
of yours, Strike,” added he to an officer who was by, ‘‘and deliver
me from a treacherous wretch, who has introduced himself here only
to assassinate me.”

At hearing this, the physician at once surmised that the honours
and riches which had been heaped upon him had excited some
enemies against him, and that the king, through weakness, had
suffered himself to be guided by them; nor was he wrong. He’
began to repent having cured him; but that feeling came too late.
“Is it thus,” he cried, “that you recompense the good I have done
you?” The king, however, paid no attention, and desired the
oficer, a second time, to execute his orders. The physician had
then recourse to prayers. ‘Ah, sire,” he cried, “if you prolong
my life, God will prolong yours; do not kill me, lest God should
treat you after the same manner,”

**You see, then,” said the fisherman, breaking off his story in
this place, and addressing himself to the Genius, “that what has
passed between the Greek king and the physician Douban, is
exactly the same as what has happened between us.”

The Greek king, however, continued he, instead of regarding the
entreaties the physician urged in conjuring him, in the name of
God, to relent, exclaimed, ‘No, no, you must die, or you will take
away my life.” Douban in the meantime bathed in tears, com-
plained much at finding his important services so ill requited, and
at last prepared for death. The officer then put a bandage over his
eyes, tied his hands, and was going to draw his scimitar. The
courtiers, however, who were present, felt so much for him, that
they entreated the king to pardon him, assuring his majesty he
was not guilty, and that they would answer for his innocence. But
the king was inflexible, and spoke so peremptorily, that they dared
not reply.
8U) THE ARABIAN NIGHTS MNTERTAINML NTS.

The physician being on his knees, his eyes bandaged, and ready
to receive the stroke that was to terminate his life, once more
addressed the king. ‘Since your majesty, sire, will not revoke the
order for my death, I entreat you at least to give me leave to return
home to arrange my funeral, take a last farewell of my family,
bestow some charity, and leave my books to those who will know
how to make a good use of them. There is one of them which 1
wish to make a present to your majesty. It is a very rare ana
curious work, and worthy of being kept even in your treasury with
the greatest care.” ‘What book can there be,” replied the king,
‘so valuable as you mention?” ‘‘ Sire,” answered the physician,
‘it contains things of the most curious nature, and one of the
principal is, that when my head shall be struck off, if your majesty
will take the trouble to open the book at the sixth leaf, and read
the third line on the left-hand page, my head will answer every
question you wish to ask.” The king was so desirous of seeing
such a wonderful thing, that he put otf his death till the next day,
and sent him home under a strong guard.

The physician then arranged all his aflairs, and as the news got
abroad that an unheard-of prodigy was to happen after his execution,
the viziers, emirs, officers of the guard, in short, allthe court, flocked
the next day to the hall or audience to witness such an extraordinary
event. 7

Douban the physician appeared directly after, and advanced to
the foot of the throne with a very large volume in his hand. He
then placed it on a vase, and unfolded the cover on which the book
was wrapped ; and in presenting it he thus addressed the king :
“Tf it be your pleasure, sire, receive this book ; and as soon
as my head shall be struck off, order one of your officers to
place it on the vase upon the cover of the book ; as soon as it 18
there, the blood will cease to flow: then open the book, and my
head shall answer all your questions. But, sire,” added Douban,
‘‘permit me once more to implore your mercy. Consider, I beg of
you, in the name of God, that I protest to you I am innocent.”
‘Thy prayers,” answered the king, “are useless, and were it only
to hear thy head speak after thy death, I should wish for thy exe-
cution.” ‘In saying this, he took the book from the hands of the
physician, and ordered the officer to do his duty.

The head was so adroitly cut off, that it fell into the vase, and it
had hardly been on the cover an instant before the blood stopped.
‘Then, to the astonishment of the king, and all the spectators, it
opened its eyes, and said, ‘Will your majesty now open the book.”
The king did so, and finding that the first leaf stuck to the second,
he put his finger to his mouth, and moistened it, in order to turn
it over more easily. He went on doing so till he came to the sixth
leaf; and observing nothing written upon the appointed page,
“‘ Physician,” said he to the head, “there is no writing.” “ Turn
over then a few more leaves,” replied the head, The king con-
tinued turning them over, still putting his finger frequently to his
mouth, till the poison, in which each leaf had been dipped, began
to produce its effect. The prince then felt himself suddenly agitated


THE FISHERMAN AND THE GENIUS. 31

in a most extraordinary manner; his sight failed him, and he fell
at the foot of the throne in the greatest convulsions.

When the physician Douban, or rather his head, saw that the
poison had taken effect, and that the king had only a few minutes
to live, ‘‘ Tyrant,” he exclaimed, ‘behold how those princes are
treated who abuse their power and sacrifice the innocent. God,
sooner or later, punishes their injustice and their cruelty.” The
head had no sooner repeated these words than the king expired ;
and, at the same time, the small portion of life that remained in the
head itself was wasted.

As soon as the fisherman had finished the history of the Greek
king and the physician Douban, he applied it to the Genius, whom
he still kept confined in the vase. “If,” said he, “the Greek king
had permitted Douban to live, God would also have bestowed the
sume benefit on him: but he rejected the humble prayers of the
physician; God therefore punished him. ‘his, O Genius, is the
vase with yourself. If I had been able to make you relent, and
could have obtained the favour I asked of you, I should have pitied
the state in which you now are; but since you persisted in your
determination to kill me, in spite of the obligation you were wider
to me for setting you at liberty, I ought, in my turn, to show no
merey, In leaving you within this vase, and casting you into the
sea, I shall deprive you of the use of your existence till the end of
time. This is the revenge you yourself have taught me.”

“Once more, my good friend,” replied the Genius, ‘‘I entreat
you not to be guilty of so cruel an act ; remember that revenge is
not a part of virtue; on the contrary, it is praiseworthy to return
good for evil. Do not, then, serve me as Imma formerly treated
Ateca,” ‘And how was that?” asked the fisherman. ~ “If you
wish to be informed of it, open this vase,” answered the Genius;
‘do you think that I am in the humour, while confined in this
narrow prison, to relate stories? I will tell you as many as you
please when you shall have letme out.” « No, no,” said the fisher.
man, “I will not release you; it is better for me to cast you to the
bottom of the sea.” “One word more, fisherman,” cried the
Genius: ‘TI will teach you how to become as rich as possible.”

The hope of being no longer in want, at once disarmed the fisher-
man. “I would listen to you,” he evied, ‘‘if I had the least
ground to believe you; swear to me by the great name of God that
you will faithfully observe what you say, and I will open the vase.
I do not believe that you will be sufficiently bold to violate such
an oath.” The Genius did so; and the fisherman immediately took
off the covering. The smoke instantly issued from it, and the first
thing the Genius did, after he had resumed his usual form, was to
kick the vase into the sea, an action which rather alarmed the
fisherman. ‘* What do you mean, O Genius, by this ; do you not
intend to keep the oath you have taken? Or must T address the
same words to you which the physician Douban did to the Greek
king, “Suffer me to live, and God will prolong your days?”

__ The fear expressed by him made the Genius laugh. ‘Be of good
heart, fisherman,” auswered he, ‘ Ll have thrown the vase into the
¢c
82 VHE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

sea only for diversion, and to see whether you would be alarmed.
but to show you that I intend to keep my word, take your nets and
follow me.” °'They passed by the city and went over the top of a
mountain, from whence they descended into a vast plain, which
led them to a pond, situated between four small hills.

‘When they were arrived’on the borders of the pond, the Genius
said to the fisherman, ‘‘‘Throw your nets, and catch fish.” The
fisherman did not doubt that he should take some, for he saw a
creat quantity in the pond; but how great was his surprise at find-
ing them of four different colours—white, red, blue, and yellow. He
threw his nets and caught four, one of each colour. As he had
vever seen any similar to them, he could hardly cease admiring
them; and judging that he could dispose of them for a considerable
sum, he expressed great joy. ‘‘ Carry these fish to the palace,”
suid the Genius, ‘‘and present them to the sultan, and he will give
you more money than you ever handled in all your life. You may
come every day and fish in this pond, but beware of casting your
nets more than once each day: if you act otherwise, some evil will
befall you: therefore take care. This is my advice, and if you
follow it exactly you will do well.” Having said this, he struck his
foot against the ground, which opened, and having sunk into it, the
earth closed as before.

The fisherman resolved to observe the advice and. instructions of
the Genius in every point, and take care never to throw his nets a
second time, He went back to the town very well satistied with
his success, and making a thousand yeflections on his adventure.
He went directly and presented his fish at the sultan’s palace.

L leave it to your majesty to imagine how much the sultan was
surprised when he saw the four fish brought him by the fisherman.
He took them one by one, and observed them most attentively ;
and after admiring them a long time, he said to his first vizier,
“Take these fish and carry them to that excellent cook which the
emperor of the Greeks sent me ; T think they must be equally good
as they are beautiful.” :

The vizier took them, and delivered them into the hands of the
cook, ‘Here are four fish,” said he, ‘which have been presented
to the sultan; he commands you te dress them.” He then returned
to the sultan his master, who desired him to give the fisherman
four hundred pieces of gold. The fisherman, who was never before
in possession of so large a sum of money at once, could not conceal
his joy, and thought it alla dream. He soon, however, proved it
to hea reality by the good purpose to which he applied the gold,
in relieving the wants of his family.

As soon as the cook had cleaned the fish which the vizier had
brought, she put them in a vessel, with some oil, over the fire to
fry. When she thought they were sufficiently done on one side,
she turned them. She had hardly done so, when, wonderful to
relate, the wall of the kitchen appeared to separate, and a beautiful
and majestic young damsel came out of the opening, She was
dressed in a satin robe, embroidered with flowers after the Egyptian

manner, and adorned with ear-rings and a necklace of large pearls,




THE FISHERMAN AND THE GENIUS. 33

and gold bracelets set with rubies; she held a rod of myrtle in her
hand, Approaching the vessel, to the great astonishment of the
cook, who remained motionless at the sight, and striking one of the
fish with her rod, she said, “ Fish, fish, art thou doing thy duty ?”
The fish answering not a word, she again repeated it, when the four
fish all raised themselves up, and said very distinctly, ‘Yes, yes,
if you reckon, we reckon; if you pay your debts, we pay ours ; if
you fly, we conquer, and are content.” “As soon as they had spoken
these words, the damsel overturned the vessel, and went back
through the wall, which immediately closed up, and was in the
same state as before. ;

The cook, whom all these wonders alarmed, having in some
measure recovered from her fright, went to take up the fish, which
had fallen upon the hot ashes; but she found them blacker and
more burnt than the coals themselves, and not at all in a state to
send to the sultan. At this she was greatly distressed, and began
to ery with all her might. ‘‘ Alas,” said she, “what will become
ofme? Iam sure, when I relate to the sultan what I have seen,
that he will not believe me. How enraged also will he be with me !”

While she was in this distress, the grand vizier entered, and asked
if the fish were ready. The cook then related all that had taken
place, at which, as we may naturally suppose, he was much as-
tonished: but without telling the sultan anything about it, he
invented some excuse which satisfied him. He then sent directly
for the fisherman; to whom, when he was come, he said, ‘‘ Bring
me four more fish, like those you brought before, for an accident
has happened which prevents their being served up to the sultan.”
The fisherman did not tell him what the Genius had strictly advised
him to do, but pleaded the length of the way as an excuse for not
being able to procure any more that day; he promised, however, to
bring them the next morning,

The fisherman, in order to be in time, set out before it was day,
and went to the pond. He threw his nets, and drawing them out,
found four more fish, like those he had taken the day before, cach
of a different colour. He returned directly, and brought them to
the grand vizier by the time he had promised. The minister took
them, and carried them into the kitchen, where he shut himself up
with only the cook, who prepared to dress them before him. She
put them on the fire as she had done the others on the preceding
day. When they were dressed on one side, she turned them, and
immediately the wall of the kitchen opened, and the same damsel]
appeared, with her myrtle in her hand. She approached the vessel
in which the fish were, and striking one of them, addressed the
same words to it she had before done ; when they all, raising their
heads, made the same answer. The damsel overturned the vessel
with her rod as she had done before, and went back through the
opening in the wall, where she had entered. The grand vizier
witnessed all that passed. “This ig very surprising,” he cried,
“and too extraordinary to be kept secret from the sultan’s ears,
I will myself go and inform him of this prodigy.” We immediately
therefore, went, and gave an exact relation of all that had passed.
34 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

The sultan was much astonished, and became very anxious to see
this wonder. For this purpose he again sent for the fisherman :
“Friend,” said he to him, when he came, ‘canst thou net bring
me four more fish of different colours?” ‘If your majesty,”
answered the fisherman, ‘will grant me three days, I can promise
to do so.” He obtained the time he wished, and went again, for
the third time, to the pond. He was not less successful than before,
and he caught four fish of different colours the first time he threw
his nets. He neglected not to carry them directly to the sultan,
who expressed the greater pleasure at seeing them, as he did not
expect them so soon, and he ordered four hundred picces of money
to be given to the fisherman.

As goon as the sultan had got the fish, he had them taken into
his own cabinet, together with the different things that were neces-
sary to dress them. Tere he shut himself up with the grand vizier,
who began to cook them, and put them on the fire in a proper vessel,
As soon as they were done on one side, he turned them on the other.
‘The wall of the cabinct immediately opened; but, instead of the
beautiful damsel, there appeared a black, who was in the habit of
a slave. This black was very large and gigantic, and held a large
green rod in his hand. He advanced to the vessel, and touching
one of the fish with his rod, he criea out in a terrible tone, “ Fish,
fish, art thou doing thy duty?” At these words, the fish lifted up
their heads, and answered, ‘‘ Yes, yes, we are: if you reckon, we
reckon; if you pay your debts, we pay ours ; if you fly, we conquer,
and are content.” "The fish had scarcely said this, when the black
overturned the vessel into the middle of the cabinet, and reduced
the fish to the state of cinders. Having done so, he haughtily
retired through the opening of the wall, which instantly closed, and
appeared as perfect as before.
< After what I have seen,” said the sultan to his grand vizier,
“it is in vain for me to think of remaining at ease. It is certain
that these fish signify something very extraordinary, which I wish
to discover.” He sent for the fisherman, and when he arrived, he
said to him, ‘The fish thou hast brought me have caused me great
uneasiness; where dost thou catch them?” ‘I caught them, sire,”
answered he, ‘‘in a pond, which is situated in the midst of four
small hills, beyond the mountain you may see from hence.” ‘* Do
you know that pond?” said the sultan to the vizier. ‘‘No, sire,”
answered he; ‘‘I have never even heard it mentioned, though I
have hunted in the vicinity of the mountain, and beyond it, near
sixty years.” The sultan asked the fisherman about what distance
the pond was from the palace; he replied that it was not more than
three hours’ journey. With this assurance, as there was still time
to arrive there before night, the sultan ordered his whole court to
get ready, while the fisherman served as a guide.

They all ascended the mountain, and in going down on the other
side, they were much surprised by the appearance of a large plain,
which no one had ever before remarked. They at length arrived
at the pond, which they found situated exactly among four hills,
as the fisherman hac reported. Its water was so transparent, that


THE FISHERMAN AND THE GENIUS. 35
they remarked all the fish to be of the same colours as those the
fisherman had brought to the palace.

The sultan halted on the side of the pond; and, after observing
the fish with signs of great admiration, he inquired of his emirs and
all his courtiers if it could be possible that they had never seen this
pond, which was so close to the city.—They all said they had never
heard it even mentioned. ‘Since you all agree, then,” said he,
‘that you have never. heard it spoken of, and since I am not less
astonished than you are at this novelty, 1 am resolved not to return
to my palace till I have discovered for what reason this pond is now
placed here, and why there are fish of only four colours in it.”
After having thus spoken, he ordered them to encamp around it:
his own pavilion, and the tents of his immediate household, were
pitched on the borders of the pond.

When the day closed, the sultan retired to his pavilion, and
entered into a particular conversation with his vizier. “My mind,”
said he, ‘‘is much disturbed; this pond, suddenly placed here;
this black, who appeared to us in my cabinet; these fish, too,
whom we heard speak ; all this so much excites my curiosity that 1
cannot conquer my impatience to be satisfied. I shall go quite
nlone from my camp, and order you to keep my departure a pro-
found secret. Remain in my pavilion, and when my emirs and
courtiers present themselves at the entrance to-morrow morning,
send them away, and say I have a slight indisposition, and wish to
remain alone. You will also continue to do so every day till my;
return.”

The grand vizier endeavoured, by many arguments, to persuade
the sultan not to do as he intended. He represented the great
danger to which he exposed himself, and the unnecessary trouble
and difficulties he might thus encounter, and probably to no pur-
pose, All his eloquence, however, was exhausted, to no effect ; the
sultan did not alter his resohition, but prepared to set out. He
put on a proper dress for walking, and armed himself with a sabre;
and as soon as he found that everything in the camp was quiet, he
departed, unaccompanied by any one.

He bent his course towards one of the small hills, which he as-
cended without much difficulty, and the descent on the other sidewas
still easier. He then pursued his way over a plain, till the sun rose.
He now perceived, in the distance before him, a large building, the
sight of which filled him with joy, from the hopes of being able to
gain some intelligence of what he wished to know. When he came
near, he remarked that it was a magnificent palace, or rather a
strong castle, built with polished black marble, and covered with
fine steel, so bright that it was like a mirror. Delighted with having
so soon met with something at least worthy his curiosity, he stopped
opposite the front, and considered it with much attention ; he then
advanced towards the folding doors, one of which was open. Though
he might have gone in, he thought it better to knock. At first, he
knocked gently, and waited some time; but, finding no one appear,
he thought they might not have heard 3 he therefore knocked a
second time, much louder; still no one came. He redoubled his


86 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

efforts, but in vain. At this he was mucb astonished, as he could
not imagine that a castle so well built as that was, could be de-
serted.—‘‘ If there be no person there,” said the sultan to himself,
“‘T have nothing to fear; and if there be any one, I have arms to
defend myself with.”

At last he entered, and when he was in the vestibule, he called
out, ‘* Is there no one here to receive a stranger, who is in want of
refreshment on his journey?” He repeated it two or three times,
as loud as he could; still there was no answer. This silence in-
creased his astonishment, He passed on to a very spacious court,
and looking on all sides, he could not discover a living creature.
He then entered, and passed through some large halls, the carpets
of which were of silk, the recesses and sofas entirely covered with
the stuffs of Mecca, and the curtains before the doors of the richest
manufactures of India, embroidered with gold and silver. He went
on, and came to a most wonderful saloon, in the midst of which
there was a large reservoir, with a lion of massive gold at each
corner. Streams of water issued from the mouths of the four lions,
and in falling, appeared to break in a thousand diamonds and pearls,
which formed a good addition to a fountain that sprung from the
middle of the basin, and rose almost to the top of a dome, beauti-
fully painted in the arabesque style.

The castle was surrounded on three sides by a garden, which was
embellished with all kinds of flowers, fountains, groves, and many
other beauties; but what rendered this spot still more enchanting
was the multitude of birds, which filled the air with the sweetest
notes. This was their constant habitation, because there were nets
thrown entirely over the trees, which prevented their escape.

The sultan continued walking a long time from one apartment to
another, where everything was grand and magnificent. Being
rather fatigued, he sat dowr in an open cabinet, which looked into
the garden, Here he meditated upon all he had seen, when sud-
deuly a plaintive voice, accompanied by the most heart-rending
cries, struck his ear. He listened attentively, and distinctly heard
these melancholy words :—‘‘ O fortune, thou hast not suffered me
long to enjoy my happy lot, but hast rendered me the most wretched
of men; cease, I entreat thee, thus to persecute me, and, by a
speedy death, put an end to my sufferings. Alas! is it possible I
can still exist, after all the torments I have suffered ?”

The sultan, much affected by these lamentable complaints, im-
mediately got up, and went towards the spot whence they issued.
He came to the entrance of a iarge hall ; he drew the door-curtain
aside, and saw a young man seated upon a sort of throne, raised a
little from the ground. He appeared well made, and was very
richly dressed, but deep sorrow was impressed on his countenance.
The sultan approached, and saluted him. The youth returned the
compliment by bending his head very low, but did not rise. ‘I
am sure, sir,” said he to the sultan, ‘I ought to get up to reccive
you, and show you all possible respect, but a most powerful reason
prevents me ; you will not, therefore, 1 trust, take it il.” ‘I feel
myself highly honoured, sir,” replicd the sultan, ‘‘ by the good
THE KING ur THE BLAOK ISLES. 87
opinion you express of me. Whatever may be your motive for not
rising, I willingly receive your apologies. Attracted by your com-
plaints, I come to offer you my assistance. I flatter myself you
will not object to relate the history of your sorrows tome. But,
in the first place, I beg of you to inform me what that pond which
is near this castle means, where there are fish of four different
colours ; how, also, this castle came here, and you thus in it, and
alone!”

Instead of answering these questions, the young man began to weep
most bitterly. The sultan, touched with compassion at his situa-
tion, requested him again to relate the cause of such sorrow. ‘Alas,
my lord !” answered the youth, ‘‘ can I be otherwise than afflicted,
or can these eyes ever cease from shedding tears?” At these words,
he lifted up his robe, and the sultan perceived he was a man only
to his waist, and that from thence to his feet he was changed into
black marble.

‘You may easily imagine that the sultan was much surprised when
he saw the deplorable state of the young man. ‘‘ What you show
me,” said he to him, ‘fills me with horror, but at the same time
excites my curiosity. Iam impatient to learn your history, which
must, no doubt, be very singular; and I am persuaded that the
pond and the fish have some connexion with it. I entreat you,
therefore, to relate it ; and you may find consolation by doing so,
for the unhappy often experience some relief in communicating
their sorrows.” ‘‘I will not refuse you this satisfaction,” replied
the young man, ‘although I cannot impart it without renewing
the most poignant grief.”

The Vistory of the Poung Ming of ihe Wlach Msles.

I must first inform you (continued he), that my father, who was
called Mahmoud, was the king of this state. It is the kingdom of
the Black Isles, which takes its name from four small neighbouring
mountains, that were formerly islands; and the capital where my
father resided was situated on the spot which is now occupied by
that pond. You will know how these changes took place as I pro-
ceed with my history.

The king, my father, died at the age of seventy years. I had no
sooner taken his place than I married, and the person whom I chose
to partake of the royal dignities with me was my cousin, I had
every reason to be satisfied with the proofs of aifection I had re-
ceived from her, and, on my part, I returned them with equal
tenderness. Our happy union continued for five years, when I
began to perceive that the queen, my cousin, no longer loved me.

One day after dinner, when she was gone to bathe, I felt mysclf
inclined to sleep, and threw myself ona sofa ; two of her women, who
happened to be in the room, seated themselves, one at my head and
the other at my fect, to fan me, as well for the purpose of reiresh-
ing me, as to keep off the flies, which might have disturhed my
B8 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS FNTERTAINMENTS.

slumbers, They then, supposing me asleep, began to talk softly
but I had only closed my eyes, and so overheard their whole con
versation.

“Ts it not a pity,” said one of them to the other, ‘‘that the
queen does not love our king, who is such an amiable prince?”
“ Surely it is,” replied the other; ‘‘and I cannot conceive why she
goes out every night and leaves him; does he not perceive it?”
“ How should he perceive it?” resumed the first; ‘‘she mixes in
his drink, every night, the juice of a certain herb, which makes
him sleep all night, so profoundly that she has time to go wherever
she likes ; and when, at break of day she returns to him, she awakes
him by passing a particular scent under his nose.”

You may judge, my lord, of the surprise which this discourse
occasioned, as well as the sentiments with which it inspired me:
nevertheless I had sufficient command over myself to suppress my
emotions; I pretended to awake without having heard the conver-
sation.

The queen returned from the bath; we supped together, and be-
fore we went to rest she presented me with a cup of water, which it
was usual for me to take; but instead of drinking it, I approached
a window that was open, and threw it out without her perceiving
me. I then returned the cup into her own hands, that she might
suppose I had drank the contents. We soon retired, and shortly
aiter, supposing that I was asleep, although I was not, she got up,
with so little precaution that she said aloud, ‘‘ Sleep, and mayest
thou never wake more.” She dressed herself quickly, and left the
chamber.

The queen had no sooner quitted me than I got up, and dressed
myself as speedily as possible, and taking my scimitar, I followed
her so closely that I heard her footsteps just before me, when,
regulating my steps by hers, J walked softly for fear of being heard.
She passed through several doors, which opened by virtue of some
magic words she pronounced; the last she opencd was that of the
garden, which she entered. I stopped at this door, that she might
not see me, while she crossed a parterre; and following her with my
eyes, as well as the obscurity of the night would permit, I re-
marked that she went into a little wood, the walks of which were
enclosed by a thick hedge. I repaired thither by another way, and
hiding myself behind the hedge of one of the paths, I perceived that
she was walking with a man,

I did not fail to listen attentively to their discourse, from which
T learned that she was an enchantress. Having reached the end of
the walk they turned to enter another, and passed before me: I had
already drawn my scimitar, and as the lover was next me, I struck
him on the neck, and he fell. I believed I had killed him, and
with this persuasion, I retired precipitately, without discovering
myself to the queen, whom I wished to spare, as she was my
cousin,

Although her lover’s wound was mortal, she yet contrived by her
enchantment to preserve in him that kind of existence which can be
called neither dead nor alive. When I reached my chainber, 1
THE KING OF THE BLACK ISLES. 39

went again to bed, and feeling satisfied with the punishmert ‘ had
inflicted on the wretch who had offended me, | tell asicep. On
waking next morning, 1 found the queen by my side; I cannot say
whether she was asicep, or feigned it, but 1 got up without disturb-
ing her, and retired to my closet, where I finished dressing: I
afterwards attended the council ; and on my return, the queen,
dressed in mourning, her hair dishevelled and torn, presented her-
self before me. ‘‘Sire,” said she, ‘‘ I come to entreat your majesty
not to be displeased at the state in which you now sce me. I have
just received intelligence of three events, which occasion the grief |
so strongly feel, but can ill express.” ‘‘ What are these events,
madam?” I inquired. ‘‘The death of the queen, my beloved
mother,” replied she; ‘‘that of the king, my father, who was
killed in battle ; and also of my brother, who fell down a pre-
cipice.”

I was not sorry that she had invented this pretext to conceal the
true cause of her affliction, and I imagined that she did not suspect
me of having been the murderer of her lover. ‘* Madam,” said I,
“T do not blame your sorrow. I should be much surprised if you
were not affected by such a loss; weep, for your tears are an un-
doubted proof of your good heart; I hope, nevertheless, that time
and reason will restore to you your wonted cheerfulness.”

She retired to her apartment, where, abandoning herself to her
grief, she passed a whole year in weeping and bewailing the fate of
her lover. At the expiration of that time, she requested my per-
mission to build a mausoleum for herself in the centre of the palace,
where she said she wished to pass the remainder of her days. I did
not refuse her, and she erected a magnilicent palace with a dome,
which may be seen from hence, and she called it the Palace of
Tears.

When it was finished, she had her lover removed from the place
whither she had transported him on the night I wounded him, and
brought to this mausoleum. She had till that period preserved his
life by giving him certain potions, which she administered herself,
aud continued to give him daily after his removal to the Palace of
Tears. All her enchantments, however, did not avail, for he was
not only unable to walk or stand, but had also lost the use of his
speech, and gave no signs of life but by looks.

Excited by my curiosity, I went one day to the Palace of Tears,
to know what was the occupation of the princess, and concealing
myself in a part where I could sce and hear what passed, I heard
her address her lover in the tenderest manner. I avow to you, my
lord, that I was enraged at her words; for in truth this cherished
lover, was not at all what you would imagine. He was a black
Indian, one of the original inhabitants of this country. I was, as
i have said, so enraged at this speech, that I suddenly showed
myself, and addressing myself in a similar manner to the tomb, 1
said, ‘‘ Why dost thou not, O tomb, swallow up this monster, who
is even disgusting to human nature? or rather, why dost thou not
consume both the lover and the mistress.”

1 had hardly finished these words when the ance, who was
40 THE ARABIAN NIGUTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

seated near the black, started up like a fury. ‘Ah, wretch!” said
she to me, ‘it is thou who hast been the cause of my grief; think
not that Iam ignorant of it. I have already dissembled too long,
It was thy barbarous hand which reduced the object of my affection
to the miserable state he now is in. And hast thou the cruelty to
come and insult my despair?” ‘‘ Yes,” cried I, interrupting. her,
and transported with anger, ‘‘I have ‘chastised the monster as he
deserved, and I ought to treat thee in the same manner. I repent
not having already ‘done it, for thou hast too long abused my good-
ness.” In saying this, I drew my scimitar, and “yaised my arm to
punish her, ‘‘ Moderate thy rage,” said she to me, with a disdainful
smile, and regarding my motions with a tranquil air; at the
same instant she pronounced some words which I did not understand,
and added, ‘‘ By virtue of my enchantments, I command thee from
this moment to become half marble, and half man.” Immediately,
my lord, Iwas changed to what you see me; already dead among
the living, and living among the dead.

As soon as this cruel enchantress, for she is unworthy of bearing
the title of queen, had thus transformed me, and by means of her
magic had conveyed me to this apartinent, she destroyed my capital,
which was both flourishing and well inhabited; she annihilated the
palaces, public places, and markets; turned the whole place into a
lake, or pond, and rendered the country, as you may perceive, quite
a desert. The four sorts of fish which are in the pond are four
different classes of inhabitants who professed different religions,
and inhabited the capital. The white were Mussulmen; the red,
Persians, who worship fire; the blue, Christians; and the yellow,
Jews; the four little hills were four islands, whence the name of
the kingdom originated. I was informed of all this by the enchan-
tress, who herself related the effects of her rage. Nor was even
this all; she did not confine her fury to the destruction of my
empire, and to my enchantment, for she comes every day and gives
me a hundred blows with a thong, made of a bull’s hide, upon my
shoulders, from whence she draws blood at every stroke. As soon
as she has finished this punishment, she covers me with a thick
stuli, made of goats’ hair, and puts a robe of rich brocade over it,
not for the sake of honouring, but of mocking me,

‘“‘Inform me,” cried the sultan, affected by the recital of so
strange a story, and eager to avenge such injuries, ‘‘inform me
where this perfidious enchantress resides, and where also is this
infamous lover, whom she has entombed before his death.” ‘‘ My
lord,” answered the prince, ‘‘he, as I have before mentioned, is at
the Palace of Tears, in a tomb formed like a dome; and this palace
has a communication with the castle on the side towards the
entrance.”

“*No one, prince,” replied the sultan, ‘‘deserves greater com-
miseration than yourself ; nor can any one be more sensible of your
misfortune than Lam. One thing only is wanting, and that is for you
to be avenged; nor will I leave ‘anything untried to accomplish it.”
The sultan having first informed the prince who he was, and the
reason of his entering the castle, consulted with him on the best
THE KING OF THE BLACK ISLES. 4]

means of affording hin a just revenge; and a plan occurred to the
sultan, which he directly communicated. They then agreed upon
the steps it was necessary to take in order to ensure success ; and
they deferred the execution of the plan till the following day. In
the meantime, as the night was far advanced, the sultan took some
vepose, The young prince, as usual, passed his time in continual
watchfulness, for he was unable to sleep since his enchantment:
the hopes, however slight, which he cherished of being soon relieved
from his suffermgs, constantly occupied his thoughts.

The sultan rose as soon as it was day; and having concealed his
robe and external dress, which might encumber him, he went to the
Palace of Tears. He found it illuminated by a multitude of torches
of white wax ; and a delicious perfume, issuing from various beautiful
golden vases, regularly arranged, struck his senses. As soon as he
perceived the bed on which the black was laid, he drew his sabre,
and destroyed, without resistance, the little remains of life in this
wretch. He then dragged the body into the court of the castle,
and threw it into a well) Having done this, he returned, and lay
down in the black’s place, hiding he sabre under the covering, and
remained there in order to complete what he projected. The
enchantress arrived soon after: her first business was to go into the
apartment where the king of the Black Isles, her husband, was.
She directly stripped him, and with her usual barbarity began to
inflict upon his shoulders the accustomed number of blows. The
poor prince filled the whole building with his cries, and conjured

er, in the most pathetic manner, to have pity on him: the wretch,
however, ceased not to beat him till she had completed the hundred,
‘Thou hadst no compassion on my lover,” said she, ‘expect there-
fore none from me.” As soon as she had finished, she threw the
coarse garment made of goat-skin over him, and then the robe of
brocade. She next went to the Palace of Tears; and, on entering,
began to renew her lamentations. ‘Alas !” she exclaimed, address-
ing herself to the sultan, whom she took for the black, ‘wilt thou
always, light of my life, preserve this silence? Art thou resolved
to let me die without the consolation of hearing thee again declare
that thou lovest me. Utter at ieast one word, I conjure thee.”

The sultan then, pretending to awake from a profound sleep, and
imitating the language of the blacks, answered the queen in a solemn
tone. ‘There is no might, or power, but in God alone, who is al]
powerful.” At these words the enchantress, to whom they were
unexpected, gave a violent scream through excess of joy. “My
dear lord,” she exclaimed, “do you deceive me? is what I hear
true? Is it really you whe speak?” ‘ Wretched woman,” replied
the sultan, ‘art thou worthy of an answer?” “What!” cried the
queen, ‘‘dost thou reproach me?” ‘The cries, the tears, the groans
of thy husband,” answered the supposed black, “whom you every
day beat with so much indignity and barbarity, continually prevent
ny rest; I should have been cured long since, and recovered the
use of my tongue, if you had disenchanted him, This, and this
only, is the cause of my silence, and of which you so continually
complain,” ‘Well, then,” said the enchantress, “to satisfy you,


42 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

T am ready to do what you command: do you wish him to re-assume
his first form?” ‘‘Yes,” replied the sultan: ‘‘and hasten to set
him free, that I may no longer be disturbed ly his cries.”

The queen immediately went out from the Palace of Tears; and
taking a vessel of water, she pronounced over it some words, which
caused it instantly to boil, as if it had been placed on a fire. She
proceeded to the apartment where the young king, her husband,
was. ‘If the Creator of all things,” said she, throwing the water
over him, “hath formed thee as thou now art, or if he is angry
with thee, do not change; but if thou art in that state by virtue
of my enchantment, re-assume thy natural form, and become the
same as before.” She had hardly concluded, when the prince,
recovering his first shape, rose up, with all possible joy, and returned
thanks to God. ‘‘Go,” said the enchantress, addressing him,
“hasten from this castle, and never return, lest it should cost thee
thy life.” The young king yielded to necessity, and left the queen
without replying a word. He concealed himself in some secure spot,
where he immediately awaited the completion of the sultan’s design,
the commencement of which had been so successful.

The enchantress then returned to the Palace of Tears; and on
entering, said to him whom she supposed to be the black, ‘T have
done, my love, what you ordered me: nothing, therefore, now pre-
vents your getting up.” The sultan, still imitating the language of
the blacks, answered in rather a sharp tone, ‘‘ What you have yet
done is not sufficient for my cure. You have destroyed only a part
of the evil, but you must strike at the root.” ‘ What do you incan
by the root?” answered she. ‘‘ What can I mean,” he eried, ‘‘ but
the city and its inhabitants, and the four isles, which you have
destroyed by your magic? Every day towards midnight the fish
constantly raise their heads out of the peud, and call for vengeance
against us both. ‘This is the real cause of the delay of my recovery.
Go quickly, and re-estallish everything in its former site; and on
thy return I will give you my hand, and you shall assist me in
rising.”

The queen, exulting in the expectations these words produced,
joyfully exclaimed, ‘ You shall soon then, my life, recover your
health, for I will instantly go and do what you have commanded.”
She weut the very next moment, and when she arrived on the border
of the pond, she took a little water in her hand, and scattered it
about. She had no sooner done so, and pronounced certain words
over the fish and the pond, than the city instantly appeared. The
fish became men, women, and children; Mahometans, Christians,
Persians, and Jews; freemen or slaves; in short, cach took his
natural form. The houses and shops became filled with inhabitants,
who found everything in the same situation and order in which they
were previous to the change. The officers and attendants of the
sultan, who were very numerous, and who were encamped directly
where the great place or square happened to be, were astonished at
finding themselves on a sudden in the midst of a large, well built,
and inhabited city.

As goon as she had completed this change. she hastened back to

a


THE KING OF THE BLACK ISLES. 43

the Palace of Tears, to enjoy the reward of her Iabours. ‘My dear
lord,” she cried on entering, ‘‘I am returned to participate in the
pleasure of your renewed health, for I have done all you have
required of me; arise, and give me your hand.” ‘Come near,
then,” said the sultan, still imitating the manner of the blacks.
She did so. ‘‘ Nearer still,” he cried. She obeyed. Then raisin g
himself up, he seized her so suddenly by the arms that she had no
opportunity of recognising who it was; and with one stroke of his
sabre, he smote her in twain, the picces falling on each side of him.
Having done this, he left the carcase in the same place, and went
to seek for the prince of the Black Isles, who waited with the
greatest impatience for him. ‘* Rejoice, prince,” said he, embracing
hin, ‘‘you have nothing more to fear, for your cruel enemy no
longer exists.”

The young prince thanked the sultan in a way which proved that
his heart was truly penetrated with gratitude; and as a reward for
the important service he had rendered him, he wished him a long
hfe, and the greatest prosperity. ‘‘ May you too live happily and
at peace in your capital,” replied the sultan to him; ‘and should
you hereafter have a wish to visit mine, which is so near, I shall
receive you with the truest pleasure, and you shall be as highly
honoured and respected as in your own.” © ‘Powerful monarch,”
answered the prince, ‘to whom I am so much indebted, do you
think you are very near your capital?” “Certainly,” replied the
sultan, ‘‘I think so, at least that I am not more than four or five
hours’ journey.” ‘It is a whole year’s journey,” added the prince,
‘although I believe you might come here in the time you mention,
because mine was enchanted; but since it is no longer so, things
are changed. ‘This, however, shall not prevent my following you,
were it necessary to go to the very extremity of the earth. You
are my liberator; and to show you every mark of my gratitude as
long as I live, I shall freely accompany you, and resign my kingdom
without regret.”

‘The sultan was extremely surprised to find that he was so distant
from his dominions, and could not comprehend how it happened ;
but the young king of the Black Isles convinced him so fully of the
possibility, that he no longer doubted it. ‘*It matters not, then,”
resumed the sultan; ‘the trouble of returning to my dominions
will be sufliciently recompensed by the satisfaction arising from
having assisted you, and from having acquired a son in you; for, as
you will do me the honour to accompany me, I shall look upon you
as such; and having no children of my own, I from this moment
make you my heir and successor.” This interview between the
sultan and the king of the Black Isles was terminated by the most
affectionate embraces, after which the young prince prepared for
his journey. In three weeks he was ready to depart, greatly re-
gretted by his court and subjects, who received from his hands a
near relation of his as their king.

At length the sultan and the prince, and the officers and attend
ants of the sultan, set out with a hundred camels laden with ines:
timable riches, which had been selected from the treasury of the
44 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

young king, who was accompanied by fifty handsome nobles, well
mounted and equipped. Their journey was a pleasant one; and
when the sultan, who had despatched couriers to give notice of his
arrival, and relate the reason of his delay, drew near to his capital,
the principal officers, whom he had left there, came to receive him,
and to assure him that his long absence had not occasioned any
change in his empire. The inhabitants, also, crowded to meet him,
and welcome him with acclamations and every demonstration of joy,
which lasted for several days.

The day after his arrival, the sultan assembled his courtiers, and
gave them an ample detail of the occurrences which, contrary to his
wishes, had delayed his return: he then declared to them his in-
tention of adopting the king of the four Black Isles, who had left a
large kingdom to accompany and live with him; and at last, to re-
ward the fidelity with which they served him, he bestowed presents
on all, according to their rank and station.

With regard to the fisherman, as he had been the first cause of
the deliverance of the young prince, the sultan overwhelmed him
with rewards, and made him and his family happy and comfortable
for the rest of their days.

The History of the Chree Calenders, Sons of ings,
and of five Hadies of Angdar.

_ During the reign of the Caliph Haroun Alraschid there lived at
Bagdad a porter, who, notwithstanding his low and laborious pro-
fession, was nevertheless a man of wit and humour. One morning,
when he was standing with a large basket before him, in a place
where he usually waited for employment, a young lady of a fine
figure, covered with a large muslin veil, came up to him, and said
with a pleasing air, ‘‘ Porter, take up your basket and follow me.”
The porter, delighted with these few words, pronounced in so
agreeable a manner, put it on his head, and went. after the lady,
saying, ‘Oh, happy day! Oh, happy meeting !”

The lady stopped at a closed door, and knocked. A venerable
Christian with a long white beard opened it, and she put some
money into his hands without saying a single word ; but the Chris-
tian, who knew what she wanted, went in, and shortly after
brought out a large jar of excellent wine. ‘‘ Take this jar,” said
the lady to the porter, ‘“‘and put it in the basket.” This being
done, she desired him to follow her, and walked on; the porter still
exclaiming, ‘‘ Oh, day of happiness! Oh, day of agreeable surprise
and joy!”

The lady stopped at the shop of a seller of fruits and flowers,
where she chose various sorts of apples, apricots, peaches, lemons,
citrons, oranges, myrtles, sweet basil, lilics, jessamine, and some

* Calendcrs are privileged beggars or fakirs.
THE THREE CALENDERS AND FIVE LADIES, 45

, other sweet-scented flowers and plants. She told the porter to put
all those things in his basket and follow her. Passing by a butcher’s
shop, she ordered five and twenty pounds of his finest meat to be
weighed, which was also put into the porter’s basket.

At another shop she bought some capers, small cucumbers, pars-
ley, and other herbs, pickled in vmegar: at another, some pista-
chios, walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, kernels of the pine, and other
similar fruits : at a third she purchased all sorts of almond patties.
The porter, in putting all these things into his basket, said, ‘‘ My
good lady, you should have told me that you intended buying so
many things, and I would have provided a horse, or rather a camel,
to carry them. I shall have more than I can lift if you add much
to what is already here.” The lady laughed at this speech, and
again desired him to follow her.

She then went into a druggist’s, where she furnished herself with
all sorts of sweet-scentcd waters, with cloves, nutmeg, pepper,
ginger, a large piece of ambergris, and several other Indian spices,
which completely filled the porter’s basket, whom she still ordered
to follow her. He did so till they arrived at a magnificent house,
the front of which was ornamented with handsome columns, and at
the entrance was a door of ivory. Here they stopped, and the lady
gave a gentle knock at the door. While they waited for it to be
opened, the porter’s mind was filled with a thousand different
thoughts. He was surprised that a lady, dressed as this was,
should perform the oflice of the housekeeper, for he conceived it
impossible for her to be a slave. Her air was so noble that he sup-
posed her free, if not a person of distinction. He was wishing to ask
her some questions concerning her quality and situation, but just
as he was preparing to speak, another female, who opened the door,
appeared to him so beautiful that he was silent through astonish-
ment, or rather he was so struck with the brilliancy of her charms
that he was very near letting his basket and all that was in it fall,
so much did this object. make him forget himself. He thought he
had never seen any beauty in his whole life that equalled her who
was before him. The lady who had brought the porter, observed
the disturbed state of his mind, and well knew the cause of it.
This discovery diverted her; and she took so much pleasure in ex-
amining the countenance of the porter, that she forgot the door was
open. “Come in, sister,” said the beautiful portress. ‘What do
you wait for? Don’t you see that this poor man is so heavily laden
he can hardly bear it?”

As soon as she and the porter were come in, the lady who opened
the door shut it; and all three, after passing through a handsome
vestibule, crossed a very spacious court, surrounded by an open
gallery, or corridor, which communicated with many magnificent
apartments, all on the same floor. At the bottom of this court there
was a sort of cabinet richly furnished, with a throne of amber in the
middle, supported by four ebony pillars, enriched with diamonds
and pearls of an extraordinary size, and covered with red satin,
relieved by a bordering of Indian gold of admirable workmanship.
In the middle of the court there was a large basin lined with white
46 Vim ARABIAN NIGHIS ENTHRVAINMENIS.

marble, and full of the finest transparent water, which rushed from .
the mouth of a lion of gilt bronze.

Although the porter was so laden, it did not prevent him from
admiring the magnificence of this house, and the neatness and
regularity with which everything was arranged; but what principally
attracted his attention was a third lady, who appeared still more
beautiful than the second, and who was seated on the throne before
mentioned, As soon as she perceived the other two females, she
came down from the throne, and advanced towards them. The
porter conjectured from the looks and behaviour of the two first
ladies that his was the principal personage; and he was not mis-
taken. This lady was called Zobeidé, she who opened the door was
called Satic, and the name of the one who had been for the provisions
was Amine,

“You do not, my dear sisters,” said Zobeide, accosting the other
two, “perceive that this man is almost fainting under his load?
Why do you not discharge him?” Aminé and Safié then took the
basket, one before and the other behind; Zobeidé also assisted, and
all three put it on the ground. ‘They then began to empty it, and
when they had done, the agreeable Aminé took out her purse and
rewarded the porter very liberally, He was well satisfied with
what he received, and was taking up his basket to_go, but could
not muster sufficient resolution, so much was he delighted by the
sight of three such rare beauties, who now appeared to him equally
charming ; for Aminé had also taken off her veil, and he found her
quite as handsome as the others. The thing that puzzled him most
was not seeing any man in the house ; and yet a great part of the
provisions he brought, such as dried fruits, cakes, and sweetmeats,
were most adapted to those who wish to drink much and feast.

Zobeide at first thought the porter was waiting to get breath, but
observing him remain a long time, she asked him what he waited
for, and whether he was sufficiently paid. “Give him something
more,” added she, speaking to Aminé, ‘and let him be satisfied.”
“Madam,” answered the porter, ‘it is not that which detains me ;
T am already almost too well paid for my trouble. I know very
well that [ am guilty of an incivility in staying where I ought not ;
but I hope you will have the goodness to pardon it, from the as-
tonishment I experience in observing no man among three ladies of
such uncommon beauty. A party of ladies without men is as
melancholy and stupid as a party of men without ladies.” To this
he added some pleasantries in proof of what he advanced. He did
not forget to repeat what they say at Bagdad, that there was no
comfort at table unless there were four ; and he concluded by saying,
that as there were three they had the greatest want of a fourth.

The ladies laughed heartily at the reasoning of the porter. Zoheide,
however, then addressed him in a serious manner. ‘‘ You carry
your fooleries, my friend, a little too far; but though you do not
‘leserve that I should enter into any explanation with you, I will at
once inform you that we are three sisters, who arrange all our own
affairs without imparting them to anyone. An established author,
whom we have read, says: ‘ Keep thy own secret and tell it to no
THE THREE CALENDERS AND FIVE LADIES. 47
one; for he who reveals a secret is no longer master of it. If thy
own breast cannot contain thy secret, how can the breast of him to
whom you entrust it?”

‘‘ Ladies,” replied the porter, “from your appearance alone, ]
thought you possessed a singular degree of merit; and I perceive
that | am not mistaken, Although fortune has not been go propi-
tious to me as to bring me up to any profession superior to the ona
I follow, yet I have cultivated my mind as much as I was able, by
reading books of science and history; and permit me, I cutreat, to
say, that I also have read in another a maxim which I have always
happily practised : ‘Conceal thy secret,’ he says, ‘only from such ag
are known to be indiscreet, and who will abuse thy confidence ; but
make no d:fliculty in discovering it to prudent men, because they
know how to keep it.’ The secret, then, with me, is as sufe as if
locked wp in a cabinet, the key of which is lost, and the door sealed.”

Zobeideé saw that the porter was not deficient in cleverness ; but
thinking that he was desirous of being at the entertainment they
were going to have, she good-humouredly replied, “You know that
we are preparing to regale ourselves, and you must also know we
cannot do this but at a considerable expense; and it would not be
just that you should partake of the feast without bearing part of
the cost.” The beautiful Safié was of the same opinion as her sister,
‘My friend,” she said to the porter, ‘‘have you never heard the
common saying, ‘If you bring something, you shall return with
something ; if you bring nothing, you shall carry nothing back ??”

Lhe porter would have been obliged to retire in confusion, in
spite of his rhetoric, had it not been for Aminé, who took his part
very strongly, ** My dear sisters,” she said to Zobeidé and Safié,
““T entreat you to permit him to remain with us. It is unnecessary
to tell you he will divert us, for you must see he is capable of it.
T assure you, that had it not been’for his readiness, quickness, and
courage in following me, I should not have executed so many commniis-
sions in so short a time. Besides, if I were to repeat to you all the
amusing things he said to me on the way, you would not be auch
surprised that I am become his advocate.”

At this speech of Aminé’s, the porter, in a transport of joy, fell
on his knees, and kissed the ground at the fect of this charming
female. ‘My dear lady,” said he, raising himself, ‘you have from
this moment begun my happiness, and placed it almost at: its sum-
mit, by so generous an act, for which [ can never sufficiently express
my gratitude. In short, ladies,” added he, addressing the three
sisters at once, ‘do not suppose, because you have done me so great
an honour, that I will abuse it, and that T shall consider myself as
a man who is worthy of it; on the contrary, I shall ever regard
myself as the humblest of your slaves.” In saying this, he wished
to return the money he had received ; but the grave Zobeidé ordered
him to keep it. What we have once given,” she said, “as a
recompense to those who have rendered us any service, never returns.
But, in agreeing that you should remain with us, it is not only on
condition that you keep the secret we are going to entrust you with,
but wo also require that you shall strictly observe the rulos of pro:

L
48 THE ARABIAN NIGITS ENTERTAINMENTS.

priety and decorum.” While she was speaking, the beautiful Amine
took off her walking dress, and fastening her robe to her girdle, in
order to be more at liberty to prepare the table, she placed on it
various kinds of meat, and put some bottles of wine and several
golden eups upon a sideboard. ‘This done, the ladies seated them-
selves round the table, and made the porter place himself by their
side, who was delighted beyond measure at finding himself at table
with three persons of such extraordinary beauty.

They had scarcely begun to eat, when Aminé, who had placed
herself near the buffet, or sideboard, took a bottle and goblet, and
poured some for herself. Having drank the first glass, according to
the Arabian custom, she then poured out one for each of her sisters,
who drank it, one after the other. Then, filling the same goblet for
the fourth time, she presented it tothe porter, who, in taking it, kissed
her hand, and before he drank it, sung a song, the meaning of which
was, that as the wind carried with it the odour of any perfumed spot
over which it passed, so the wine which he was about to drink.
coming from her hand, acquired a more exquisite flavour than it
naturally possessed. ‘This song pleased them very much, and they
each sung in their turn. In short, the whole company were in most
excellent spirits during the repast, which lasted a long time, and
was accompanied with everything that could render it agreeable.

The day began to close, when Safid, in the name of her sisters,
said to the porter, ‘‘ Arise, and go; it is time to retire.” To this the
porter, not having resolution to quit them, answered, ‘“ Ah, ladies !
where would you command me to go? I am almost beside myself,
from gazing on you, and the good cheer you have given me; and I
shall never find the way to my own house. Allow me the night to
recover myself in; I will pass it wherever you please; but less time
will not restore me to the state I was in when I came here, and even
then, I doubt I shall leave the better part of myself behind.”

Aminé again took the part of the porter. ‘He is right, my
sister,” she exclaimed; ‘*I am convinced of the propriety of his
demand. He has sufficiently diverted us; and if you wish to believe
me, or rather if you love me, I am sure you will suffer him to
pass the evening with us.” ‘*We cannot refuse any request of
yours, my sister,” replied Zobeids. ‘* Porter,” she added, address-
ing herself to him, ‘‘ we wish to grant you even this favour, but we
must premise a fresh condition: whatever we may do in your
presence, with respect to yourself or anything else, take great care
that you do not ask the reason; for in questioning us about things
that do not at all concern you, you may hear what will not please
you. Take care, therefore, and be not too curious in attempting
to discover the motives of our actions.”

“Madam,” replied the porter, “my tongue shall be motionless,
and my eyes shall be like a mirror, that preserves no part of the
objects it receives.” ‘*To let you see,” said Zobeidé, with a serious
air, ‘that what we require of you is not newly established among
us, observe what is written over the door, on the inside.” The
porter went and read these words, which were written in large
letters of gold :- WHOEVER TALKS ABOUT WHAT DOES NOT CONCLEN
THE THRE CALMNDERS AND FIVE LADIES. 49

HIM, OFIEN HEARS WHAT DOES NOT PLEASE IM! He came back
directly, and said to the three sisters, ‘* 1 swear to you, ladies, that
you shall not hear me speak a word concerning anything which
does not regard me, and in which you haye any interest.”

This being settled, Aminé brought supper; and when she had
lighted up the hall with numerous candles, prepared with aloes and
ambergris, which scattered a very agreeable perfume, and cast a
brilliant light, she seated herself at the table, with her sisters and
the porter. They began to eat, drink, sing, and recite verses. The
ladies took pleasure in making the porter intoxicated, under the
pretence of making him drink to their health, Wit and repartee
were not wanting. They were at length allin the best humour,
when they suddenly heard a knocking at the gate. ‘They instantly
got up, and Safié, to whom this oflice more particularly belonged,
ran to open it. She soon returned. ‘‘ A charming opportunity, my
sisters, offers itself, to spend a great part of the night very pleasantly,
There are three calenders at the door; at least, they appear so by
their dress ; but what will doubtless surprise you is, that they are all
three blind of the right eye, and have their heads, beards, and eye-
brows shaved. They say that they are only just arrived at Bagdad,
where they have never been before; and as it is dark, and they
know not where to lodge, they knocked at our door by chance; and
entreat us to have the charity to take them in, They care not where
we put them, provided they are under cover; and ‘will be satisfied
even witha stable. They are young and well made, and appear to
possess some spirit; but [ cannot, without laughing, think of their
unusing and uniform figures. It is impossible buf that, with such
men, we shall iinish the day still better than we began it, They
will divert us very much, and they will be of no expense to us, since
they only ask a lodging for one night, and it is their intention to leave
us as soon as it is day.”

Zobeidé and Aminé made some difficulty in agreeing to the request
of Safid, and she herself well knew the reason of it, but expressed so
great a desire to have her way that they could not refuse her.
““Go,” said Zobeidé to her, “and let them come in; but do not fail
to caution them not to speak about what does not concern them, and
make them read the inscription over the inside of the door.” At
these words, Safié joyfully ran to open the door, and soon returned,
accompanied by the three calenders.

On entering they made a low bow to the sisters, who had risen to
receive them, and who obligingly told them they were welcome,
and that they were happy in being able to oblige them and contribute.
towards lessening the fatigue of their journey. They then invited
their new guests to sit down with them. The magnificence of the
place and the kindness of the ladies gave the calenders a very high
ulea of the beautiful hostess and her sisters; but before they took
their places, having by chance cast their eyes towards the porter, and
observing that he was dressed very like those calenders, from whom
they differed in many points of discipline, as in not shaving their
beard and eyebrows, one of them said, “This man appears to be one
of our Arabian brethren who revolted.”
56 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERVAINVENTS.

The porter, half-asleep, and heated with the wine he had drunk,
said to the calenders, casting at the same time a fierce look at them,
‘* Seat yourselves, and meddle not with what does not concern you,
Have you not read the inscription over the door? Do not pretend,
then, to make the world live after your fashion.” ‘* My good friend,”
replied the calender who had before spoken, ‘‘do not be angry, for
we should be very sorry to give you any cause; on the contrary, we
are ready to receive your commands.” The dispute would not have
ened here had not the ladies interfered and pacified all parties.

When the crlenders were seated, the sisters helped them, and the
delighted Sati, in particular, took care to supply them with wine.
When they had both eaten and drunk as much as they wished, they
intimated that they should be happy to give them some music if
they had any instruments, and would order them to be brought.
They accepted the offer with pleasure; and the beautiful Safid im-
mediately got wp and returned the next moment, and offered them a
flute of that country, also another used in Persia, and a tambour.
Each calender received from her hand that instrument he liked best,
and they all began to play a little air. The females were acquainted
with the words, which were very lively, and accompanied the air
with their voices, frequently interrupting each other with fits of
laughter from the nature of the words.

In the midst of this entertainment, and when the party were
highly delighted, they heard a knock at the door. Safid immedi-
ately left off singing, and went to see who it was.

The caliph Haroun Alraschid made it a practice to go very often,
during the night, through the city, in discuise, in order to discover
whether everything was quiet. On this evening, therefore, the
caliph set out from his palace at his accustomed hour, accompanied
by Giafar, his grand vizier, and Mesrour, chicf of the eunuchs, all
three disguised as merchants. In passing through the street where
these ladies lived, the prince heard the sound of the instruments,
interrupted by laughter, and said to his vizier, ‘Go and knock at
the door of that house, where I hear so much noise; I wish to gai
admittance, and learn the cause of it.” The vizier endeavoured to
persuade the caliph that they were only women who were making
merry that evening; and that they ought not to expose themselves
where it was probable they might meet with some insult. ‘Never .
mind,” said the caliph; ‘knock, as I order you.”

It was, then, the grand vizier Giafar, who had knocked at the
door by order of the caliph. Safit opened it, and the vizier ob-
served by the light of a candle she carried, that she was very beauti-
ful. He played his part very well. He tirst made a most profound
reverence, and then with a respectful air he said, ‘‘ Madam, we are
three merchants of Moussoul, and arrived here about ten days ago,
with some very rich merchandise, which we have deposited in a
khan, where we have taken up our lodging. We have been to spend
the day with a merchant of this city, who invited us to go to sce
him, He treated us with a fine collation ; and as the wine we drunk
put us into a very good humour, he sent for a company of dancers.
‘the night was already far advanced, and while we were playing on
ay

THE THREE CALENDERS AND FIVE LADIES. 5]

our instruments, the others dancing, and the whole company mak-
ing a great noise, the watch happened to pass by, and obliged us to
open the door. Some of the company were arrested: we were,
however, so fortunate as to escape, by getting over a wall. But,
as we are strangers,” added the vizier, “we are afraid of mecting
with the watch before we arrive at our khan, which is at a consider-
able distance from hence. And we should even then get there to
no purpose, for the gate would be shut, and whoever may come
there, they will not open it till morning. This is the reason, madam,
thatas we heard, in passing by, the sound of instruments and voices,
we thought all those who belonged to the house were not yet re-
tired; and we took the liberty to knock, to beg you to afford us a
retreat till the morning. If we appear to you worthy of taking a
part in your amusements, we will endeavour, as far as we are able,
to contribute to it, in order to repair the interruption we have
caused; if not, do us at least the favour to suffer us to pass the
night under the cover of your vestibule.”

During this speech of Giafar, the beautiful Safid had an oppor-
tunity of examining the vizier and the two persons, whom he also
called merchants, and judging from their countenances, that they
were not common men, she said that she was not mistress, but if
they would give themselves a moment’s patience she would return
and bring the answer. Safit went and related all this to her sisters,
who hesitated some time as to what they ought to do. But they
were naturally kind, and as they had conferred the same favour ou
the three calenders, they resolved to permit these also to come in.
‘The caliph, the grand vizier, and the chief of the eunuchs, being in-
troduced by the beautiful Saft, saluted the ladies and the caleuders
with great civility. They, supposing them merchants, returned it
in the same manner; and Zobcidé, as the principal person, with that
yrave and serious air which so well suited her, said, “ You are wel-
come, but in the first place, do not take it ill if we ask of you one
favour.” ‘ What favour,” cried the vizier, ‘can we refuse to such
beautiful ladies ?” ‘It is,” replied Zobeidé, “to have only eyes, and
no specch; to forbear from asking questions about what you may see,
in order to learn the cause; and not to speak about what does not con-
cern you, for fear you should hear what will not be pleasant to you.”
‘“ You shall be obeyed, madam,” replied the vizier. It is enough
for us to attend to our own business, without meddling with what
docs not regard us.” After this, each seated himself, and the conversa-
tion became general, and they drank to the health of the new guests.

While the vizier Giafar entertained them, the caliph ceased not
from admiring the extraordinary beauty, the great elegance, the
lively disposition and spirit of the ladies 3 while the appearance of
the three calenders, all blind of the right eye, surprised him very
much. He anxiously wished to learn the cause of this singularity,
but the conditions they had imposed upon him and his companions
prevented any inquiry, Besides all this, when he reflected upou
the richness of the services and furniture, with the regularity and
arrangement everywhere apparent, he could hardly persuade him
self jt was not the effect of enchantment,
52 THE ARAPTAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

The conversation having fallen upon the various sorts of amuse-
ment, and the different modes of enjoying life, the calenders got up
and danced in their peculiar way, which much augmented the good
opmion the ladies had already conceived of them, and attracted also
the applause and esteem of the caliph and his company. As soon as
the calenders had finished, Zobeidé got up, and taking Aminé by
the hand, said to her, ‘‘Come, sister, the company shall not think
that we will put them under any restraint, nor shall their presence
prevent us from doing as we have always been accustomed.” Aminé,
who perfectly understood what her sister meant, got wp and took
away the dishes, tables, bottles, glasses, and also the instruments
on which the calenders had played. Nor did Safié remain idle; she
swept the hall, put everything in its proper place, snuffed the
candles, and added more aloe-wood and ambergris. Having done
this, she requested the three calenders to sit on a sofa on one side,
and the caliph and his company on the other. ‘Get wp,” said she
then to the porter, looking at him, ‘and be ready to assist in what-
ever we want you; a man like you, as strong as the house, ought
never to remain idle.” ‘*I am ready,” he cried, ‘‘ to do anything
you please.” ‘* That is well,” answered Safié, ‘and you shall not
remain long with your arms crossed.” came in with a sort of seat, which she placed in the middle of the
room, She then went to the door of a closet, and having opened it,
she made a sign to the porter to approach. ‘‘ Come and assist me,”
she cried. He did so, and went in with her, and returned a mo.
ment after, followed by two black dogs, each of which had a collar
with a chain fastened to it, by which he held them. He brought
these dogs, which appeared to have been very ill-used, into tha
middle of the room.

Zobeide, who was sitting between the calenders and the caliph,
then got up, and approaching the porter in a very grave manner,
‘*\We must,” cried she, with a deep sigh, ‘‘do our duty.” She then
turned up her sleeves, so as to uncover her arms up to the elbow,
and after taking a whip which Safié presented to her, ‘‘ Porter,”
she said, ‘‘ take one of these dogs to my sister Aminé, and then
come to me with the other.” The porter did as he was ordered ;
and as he approached Zobeidé, the dog which he held immediately
began to howl, and, turning towards her, lifted up its head in a
most supplicating manner. But she, without regarding the melan-
choly expressions of the dog, which must have excited pity, or its
cries, which filled the whole house, flogged it till she was out of
breath; and when she had not strength left to beat it any more. she
threw away the whip; then, taking the chain from the porter, she
took up the dog by the paws, and both looking at each other with
a melancholy air, they mingled their tears together. Zobeide, after
this, took out her handkerchief, wiped the tears from its eyes, and
kissed it ; then, returning the chain to the porter, she desired him to
lead that back from whence he had taken it, and bring her the other.

The porter carried the one that had been beaten back to the closet,
and, in returning, took the other from the hands of Aminé, and pre-
sented it to Zobeidé, who was waiting for it. ‘Hold it as you did
THE THREW CALENDIERS AND FIVE LADIES. 538

the tirst,” said she; then, taking the whip, she served this in the
same manner. She then wept with it, dried its tears, kissed it, and
returned it to the porter, who was saved the trouble of carrying it
back to the closet by the agreeable Aminé, who took it herself.

The three calenders, as well as the caliph and his party, were much
astonished atthisceremony. They couldnot comprehend why Zobeide,
after having whipped with so much violence the two dogs, which,
according to the tenets of the Mussulman religion, are impure
animals, should afterwards wecp with them, kiss them, and dry
their tears. They conversed together about it, and the caliph, in
particular, was very desirous of knowing the reason of an action which
appeared to him so singular. He made signs to the vizier to inquire,
but he turned his head another way, till at last, importuned by re-
peated signs, he answered in the same manner, that it was not yet
time to satisfy his curiosity.

Zobeidé remained for some time in the middle of the room, as if to
rest from her fatigue in beating the two dogs. ‘‘My dear sister,”
said the beautiful Safie, ‘‘ will you not return to your place, that I
may also perform my part?” ‘ Yes,” replied Zobeidé, and seated
herself on the sofa, with the caliph, Giafar, and Mesrour on her right
hand, and the three calenders and the porter on her left.

The company continued for some time silent ; at length Safié, who
had placed herself on the seat in the middle of the room, said to
Aminé, ‘Sister, get up; you understand what I mean.” Amine
rose, and went into a different closet from that whence the dogs were
brought; she returned with a case, covered with yellow satin, and
richly ornamented with an embroidery of green and gold. She opened
it, and took out a lute, which she presented to her sister. Safié took
it, and after having tuned it, began to accompany it with her voice;
she sung an air, on the torments of absence, in so agrecable a, style
that the caliph and the rest of the company were enchanted. When
she had finished, as she had sung with a great deal of action as well
as passion, she offered the lute to Aminé, saying, ‘Sister, my voice
fails me; do you take it, and oblige the company by playing and
singing instead of me.”

Amimné, having played a little prelude, to hear if the instrument
was in tune, sung for some time on the same subject; but she became
so affected by the words she uttered, that she had not power to finish
the air. Zobeidé began to praise her sister: ‘* You have done won-
ders,” said she; ‘it is easy to perceive that you feel the griefs you
express.” Aminé had not time to reply to this speech; she felt
herself so oppressed at that moment that she could think of nothing
but giving herself air, and opening her robe, she exposed a bosom,
not white, as the beautiful Aminé ought to have had, but covered
with scars. This, however, gave her no relief, and she fainted away.

Whilst Zobeidé and Safié ran to assist their sister, one of the
calenders exclaimed, “We had better have slept in the open air than
come licre to witness such a spectacle.”

The caliph, who heard him, drew near, and inquired what all this
meant. ‘We know no more than you,” replied the calender.
“What,” resumed the caliph, ‘do not you belong tc the house?


5: THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

Cannot you inform me about these two black dogs, and this lady,
who appears to have been so ill-treated?” Sir,” said the calender,
‘‘we never were in this house before now, and entered it only a few
minutes sooner than you did.” ‘his increased the astonishment of
the caliph. ‘‘ Perhaps,” said he, ‘‘the man who is with you can
give you some information.” The calender made signs to the porter
to draw near, and asked him if he knew why the black dogs had
been beaten, and why the bosom of Aminé was so scarred, ‘‘ Sir,”
replied the porter, “ I swear that if you know nothing of the matter,
we are all equally ignorant. It is true that I live in this city; but
before to-day i never entered this house.”

The caliph, whatever might be the consequence, resolved to satisfy
his curiosity. ‘‘ Attend to me,” he said to the rest; ‘‘ we are seven
men, and there are only three women; let us, then, compel them to
give us the information we request, and if they refuse to comply with
a good grace, we can force them to it.” The grand vizier, Giafar,
opposed this plan, and explained the consequences of it to the caliph,
without discovering to the calenders who he was, as he always ad-
dressed him like a merchant. ‘‘ Consider, sir, I beg,” said he, ‘that
we have our reputation to preserve. You know on what condition
these ladies suffered us to become their guests, and we accepted the
terms. What will they say to us if we infringe the compact? And
we should be still more to blame if any misfortune should happen to
us in consequence of it. It is not to be supposed that they would
require such a promise from us, unless they should be able to make
us repent if we broke it.”

The vizier now drew the caliph a little aside, and spoke to him in
a low voice: ‘‘ The night, my lord, will not last long, if your majesty
will but have a little patience; I will then come and bring these
women before you, when on your throne, and you may learn from
them whatever you wish.” Although this advice was very judicious,
the caliph rejected it, and desired the vizier to be silent, and said he
would not wait so long, but would that instant have the information
he wished. The next question was, who should first make the inquiry.
The caliph endeavoured to persuade the calenders to speak first, but
they excused themselves. At last they all agreed that it should be
the porter. At this moment, Zobeidé, after having assisted Aminé,
who had recovered from her fainting, approached them. As she
had heard them speak in rather a loud and warm manner, she said
to them, ‘‘ What are you talking of?—what is your contest about?”

The porter then addressed her as follows :—‘‘ These gentlemen,
madam, entreat you to have the goodness to explain to them why you
wept with those dogs, after having treated them so ill; and how it nas
happened that the lady who fainted has her bosom covered with scars.
This, madam, is what I have been required by them to ask of you.”

At these words, Zobeidé, in the most haughty manner, turned to
the caliph and the calenders, ‘Is it true, gentlemen,” she asked,
‘that you have commissioned this man to require this information
of me?” They all answered it was, except the vizier Giafar, who
did not open his lips. Upon this she replied to them, in a tone which
showed how much she was offended, ‘Before we granted you the
Hi THREE CALENDERS AND FIVE LADIES. 5A

favour you requested of us, and in order to prevent any discontent
on your parts, we made one positive condition; that you should not
apeak about what did not concern you, lest you should hear what
would not please you—yet, after having both received and entertained
you as well as we possibly could, you do not scruple to break your
word.” + Having said this, she struck the floor with her foot, and
clapped her hands three times, and called out, ‘‘ Enter quickly!” A
door immediately opened, and seven strong powerful black slaves
rushed in, with scimitars in their hand, and each seized one of the
company. They threw them to the ground, drew them into the
middle of the hall, and were preparing to take off their heads.

We may easily conceive what was the alarm of the caliph. He
repented, but too late, at not having followed the advice of his vizier.
In the meantime this prince, Giafar, Mesrour, the porter, and three
calenders, were about to pay with their lives for their indiscreet
curiosity ; but before they received the fatal stroke, one of the slaves
said to Zoheidé and her sisters, ‘* High, powerful, and respected
mistresses, what do you command us todo?” “Stop,” answered
Zobeidé, ‘it is necessary first to interrogate them.” ‘‘Madam,” cried
the aftrighted porter, ‘‘do not make me die for the crime of another.
[ am innocent, and they only are guilty. Alas!” he continued,
weeping, ‘‘we were passing the time so agreeably. These one-eyed
calenders are the cause of this misfortune; there is not even a city
that would not be rnined by men of such ill-favoured countenances.
Tentreat you, madam, not to confound the first with the last, and
remember, if is much more commendable to pardon a miserable
wretch like me, than to sacrifice him to your resentment.”

Zobeide, in spite of her anger, could not help laughing inwardly
at the lamentations of the porter. But without paying any attention
to him, she addressed herself again to the others. ‘ Answer me,”
said she, ‘‘and tell me who you are; if not, you have only an instant
to live. I cannot believe that you are honourable men, or persons of
authority or distinction in whatever country you call your own. If
that had been the case, you would have paid more attention and
more respect to us.”

The caliph, being naturally impatient, suffered infinitely more than
the rest, at finding his life depending upon the commands of an
offended and justly irritated woman; but he began to conceive there
were some hopes when he found that she wished to know who they
all were, as he imagined she would not take away his life, when she
should be informed of his rank. For this reason he whispered to his’
vizier, who was near him, instantly to declare who he was. But this
wise and prudent minister, wishing to preserve the honour of his
master, was unwilling to make public the great affront he had brought
upon himself. But when, in obedience to the caliph, he was about
to speak, Zobeidé addressed herself to the three calenders, and asked
if they were brothers. ‘No, madam,” answered one of them for the
rest, ‘we are not brothers by blood, but only in consequence of being
calenders.” ‘* Have you,” said she, speaking to one of them in par
ticular, ‘lost the sight of one eye from your birth?” «N 0, indeed,
madam,” he answered; “I became so through a most surprising
56 TNE ARABIAN NIGITS ENLERTAINMENTS,

adventure, by the recital or perusal of which, were it written, every
one must derive advantage. After this misfortune, I shaved my beard
and eyebrows, and taking up the habit I wear, became a calender.”

Zobeidé put the same question to the others, who returned her the
same answer as the first. But the last who spoke, added, ‘‘To inform
you, madam, that we are not common persons, and in order that you
should have some pity for us, we must tell you, that we are all the
sons of kings. Although we have never seen each other before this
evening, we have had sufficient time to become acquainted with this
circumstance ; and I can assure you that the kings, who have given
us birth, have made some noise in the world !”

During this speech Zobeidé became less angry, and told the slaves
to set them at liberty, but at the same time to remain where they
were. ‘‘They,” said she, ‘‘who recount their history to me, and
explain the motives which brought them to this house, shall suffer
no harm, but have permission to go where they please; but such
as shall refuse to give us that satisfaction shall not be spared.”

The three calenders, the caliph, the grand vizier Giafar, the eunuch
Mesrour, and the porter, were all on the carpet in the middle of the
hall before the three ladies, who sat on a sofa, with the slaves behind
them, ready to execute any orders they might receive.

The porter, understanding that he had only to relate his history
in order to be delivered from so great a danger, spoke first. ‘You
are already acquainted, madam,” he said, “with my history, and
what brought me to your house. What Ihave to relate, therefore,
will soon be finished. Your sister engaged me this morning at the
place where I take my stand in quality of a porter, by which [
endeavour to gain a living. I followed her to a wine merchant’s, to
anherbseller’s, toan orange merchant’s, and to those who sell almonds.
nuts, and other dried frnits. We then went to a confectioner’s, and
to a druggist’s, from thence with my basket on my head, as full as
it well could be, I came here, where you had the goodness to suffer
me to remain till now, a favour I shall never forget. This is the
whole of my history.”

Wher. the porter had concluded, Zobeidé, very well satisfied with
him, said, ‘‘ Save thyself and begone, nor ever let us see thee again.”
*T beg of you, madam,” replied he, ‘‘to let me remain a little longer.
Tt wonld be unfair that I should not hear their histories, after they
have had the pleasure of hearing mine.” In saying this he took his
place at the end of the sofa, truly delighted at finding himself free
from the danger which so much alarmed him. One of the calenders
next spoke, and addressing himself to Zobeidé as the principal person,
who had commanded them to give an account of themselves, began
his history as follows.

The History of the first Calender, the Sow of a Ating.

In order to inform you, madam, how T lost my right eye, and the
reason that I have been obliged to take the habit of a calender, 1
must begin by telling you that Tam the son of a king. My father


VHE FIRST CALENDER. 57

bad a brother who, like himself, was a monarch over a neighbouring
state. This brother had two children, a son and a daughter, the
former of whom was near my age. :

When I had gone through all my exercises, and the king, my father,
thought fit to allow me a certain degree of liberty, I went regularly
every year to see my uncle, and passed a month or two at his court,
after which I returned home. ‘These visits produced between the
prince, my cousin, and myself, the most intimate friendship. ‘the
last time I saw him, he received me with demonstrations of the
greatest joy and tenderness, more so indeed than ever; and wishing
one day to amuse me by some great entertainment, he made extra-
ordinary preparations for it. We remained a Jong time at table, and
after we had both supped, ‘You can never, my cousin,” he said to
me, ‘possibly imagine what has occupied my thoughts, since your
last journey. Since you were here last, I have erected a building,
which is just finished, and we shall soon be able to lodge there:
you will not be sorry to see it, but you must first take an oath that
you will be both secret and faithful; these two things I must re-
quire of you.”

The friendship and familiarity in which we lived, did not permit
me to refuse him anything; I took, therefore, without hesitation,
the oath he required, ‘‘ Wait for me in this place,” he cried, ‘and
I will be with you ina moment.” He did not, in fact, detain me
long, but returned with a female in his hand, of very great beauty,
and most magnificently dressed.

He did not say who she was, nor did I think it right to inquire.
We again sat down to the table with the lady, and remained there
some time, talking of different things, and drinking bumpers to
each other’s health. The prince then said to me, ‘‘ We have no
time to lose ; oblige me by taking this lady with you, and conduct
her, by such a way, tc a place where you will sce a tomb, newly
erected, in the shape of adome. You will easily know it, as the
door is open. Enter there together, and wait for me; I will return
directly.”

Faithful to my oath, I did not wish to know more. I presented
my hand to the lady, and following the instructions, which the
prince, my cousin, had given me, I conducted her safely, by the
light of the moon, without any mistake. We had scareely got to
the tomb, when we saw the prince, who had followed us, with a
small vessel full of water, a hoe or spade, and a small sack, in which
there was some lime, or mortar. The spade served him to destroy
the empty sepulchre, which was in the middle of the tomb; he
took the stones away, one by one, and placed them in one corner,
When he had taken them all away, he made a hole in the ground,
and I perceived a trap-door under the sepulchre. He lifted it up,
and discovered the beginning of a winding staircase. My cousin,
then addressing himself to the lady, said, ‘“This is the way, madam,
that leads to the place I have mentioned to you.” At these words
the lady approached and descended the stairs. The prince was
just going to follow her, but first turning to me, ‘‘I am infinitely
obliged to you, my cousin,” said he, “for the trouble you have
58 THE AWABLAN NIGHYS BNTMRTAINMENTS.

had; receive my best thanks for it, and farewell.” ‘My dear

cousin,” I cried, ‘what does all this mean?” ‘* That is of no

consequence,” he answered; ‘‘ you may return by the same way
. you came.”

Iwas unable to learn anything more from him, and was obliged
to take my leave of him. In returning to my unele’s palace, the
vapour of the wine I had before drunk began to affect my head. J
nevertheless reached my apartment, and retired to rest. On waking
the next morning, I made many reflections on the occurrences of the
night before, and recalled all the circumstances of so singular an
adventure, The whole appeared to me to beadream. Iwas so

- much persuaded of it, that I sent to know if the prince, my cousin,
was yet dressed. But when they brought me word that he had
not slept at home, nor did they know what was become of him, and
were very much distressed at it, I concluded that the strange ad-
venture of the tomb was too true. This afflicted me very much,
and keeping myself in private, I went secretly to the public ceme-
tery, or burial-place, where there were a great many tombs similar
to that which I had before seen. I passed the day in examining
them all, but was unable to discover the one I searched for. I spent
four days in the same useless pursuit. ;

Tt is necessary for me to inform you, that the king, my uncle, was
absent during the whole of this time. He had been for some time
on a hunting party. I was very unwilling to wait for his coming
back, and having requested his ministers to make my excuses for
going, T set out on my return to my father’s court, from which I was
not accustomed to make so longa stay. I left my uncle’s ministers
very much distressed at not being able to discover what was become
of the prince; but as I could not violate the oath I had taken to
keep the secret, I dared not lessen their anxiety by informing them
of any part of what I knew.

[arrived at the capital of my father, and, contrary to the usual
custom, I discovered at the gate of the palace a large guard, by
whom I was immediately surrounded. I demanded the reason of
this, when an officer answered, ‘‘The army, prince, has acknowledged
the grand vizier as king in the room of your father who is dead, and
I arrest you as prisoner on behalf of the new king.” At these words
the guards seized me, and conducted me before the tyrant. ‘Judge,
madam, what was my surprise and grief.”

This rebellious vizier had conceived a strong hatred against me,
which he had for a long time cherished. The canse of it was as
follows. When I was very young I was fond of shooting with a
cross-bow. One day I took one to the top of the palace, and amused
myself with it on the terrace.
[ shot at it, but missed: and the arrow by chance struck the vizier
in the eye, and put it out, as he was taking the air on the terrace of
his own house. As soon as I was informed of this accident, I went
and made my apologies to him in person. He did not, however, fail
to preserve a strong resentment against me, of which he gave every
proof he could when any opportunity occurred. When he now found
me in his power, he ani it in the most barbarous manner As
THE FIRST CALENDER. 59

soon as he saw me he ran towards me in the utmost rage, and tore
out my right eye from the socket. It was in this way that I be-
came blind. : : }

But the usurper did not confine his cruelty to this action alone.
He ordered me to be imprisoned in a sort of cage, and to be carried
in this manner to some distant place, where the executioner, after
cutting off my head, was to leave my body exposed to the birds of
prey. The executioner mounted his horse, accompanied by another
man, and carried me with him. He did not stop till he came to a
place proper for the execution of his order. I made, however, so
good a use of entreaties, prayers, and tears, that I excited his com-
passion. ‘‘Go,” said he to me, ‘‘depart instantly out of the kingdom,
and take care never to return; if you do you will only encounter
certain destruction, and will be the cause of mine.” I thanked him
for the favour he did me, and I was no sooner alone than I consoled
myself for the loss of my eye, by retlecting that I had just escaped
from a greater misfortune.

In the state in which Iwas I could not get on very fast. During
the day I concealed myself in unfrequented and secret places, and
travelled by night as far as my strength would permit me. At
length I arrived in the country belonging to the king, my uncle,
and I proceeded directly to the capital.

I gave a long detail of the dreadful cause of my return, and of the
miserable state in which he saw me. ‘‘ Alas!” cried he, “was it
not sufficient to lose my son; but must I now learn the death of a
brother, whom I dearly loved, and find you in the deplorable state
to which you are reduced?” He informed me of the distress he had
suffered from not being able to learn any tidings of his son, in spite
of all the inquiries he had made, and all the diligence he had used.
The tears ran from the eyes of this unfortunate father in giving me
this account, and he appeared to me so much afflicted that I could
not resist his grief, nor could I keep the oath I had pledged to my
cousin, I then related to the king everything that had formerly
passed.

He listened to me with some sort of consolation, and when I had
finished, he said, “ The recital, my dear nephew, you haye given me
affords me some little hope. I well know that my son built such a
tomb, and I know very nearly on what spot. With the recollection,
also, which you may have, I flatter myself we may discover it. But
since he has done all this so secretly, and required you also to keep it
unknown, I am of opinion that we two only should make the search,
in order to avoid its being generally known and talked of.” He
had also another reason, which he did not inform me of, for wishing
to keep this a secret.

We each of us disguised ourselves, and went out by a garden gate
which opened into the fields. We were fortunate enough very soon
to discover the object of our search. I immediately recognised the
tomb, at which I was the more rejoiced as I had before searched for
it so long to no purpose. We entered, and found the iron trap-door
shut down upon the opening to the stairs, We had great difficulty
in lifting it up, because the prince had cemented it down with the
60 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

lime and the water, which I mentioned his having carried: at last,
however, we got it up. My uncle was the first who descended, and |
followed We went down about fifty steps, when we found our-
selves at the bottom of the stairs in a sort of ante-room, which was
full of a thick smoke, very unpleasant to the smell, and which ob-
scured the light thrown from a very brilliant lustre.

From this antechamber we passed on to one much larger, the roof
of which was supported by large columns, and illuminated by many
lustres. In the middle there’ was a cistern, and on each side we
observed various sorts of provisions. We were much surprised at not
seeing any one. Opposite to us, there was a raised sofa, to which

- they ascended by some steps, and beyond this there appeared « very
large bed, the curtains of which were drawn. ‘The king went up,
and undrawing them, discovered the prince, his son, and the lacy,
but both quite dead.

' The king wept bitterly at this sight, and I mingled my tears with
his. Some time after he cast his eyes on me: ‘‘ But, my dear
nephew,” resumed he, embracing me, ‘‘if I have lost an unworthy
son, I may find in you a happy reparation of my loss.”

We ascended the same staircase, and quitted this dismal abode.
We put the iron trap-door in its place, and covered it with earth and
the rubbish of the building. We returned to the palace before our
absence had been observed, and shortly after we heard a confused
noise of trumpets, cymbals, drums, and other warlike instruments.
A thick dust, which obscured the air, soon informed us what it was,
and announced the arrival of a formidable army. It was the same
vizier who had dethroned my father, and taken possession of his
dominions, and who came now with a large number of troops ta
seize those of my uncle.

This prince, who had only his usual guard, could not resist so
many enemies. They invested the city, and as the gates were opened
to them without resistance, they soon took possession of it. They
had not much difficulty in penetrating to the palace of the king, who
attempted to defend himself, but he was killed, after having dearly
sold his life. On my part, T fought for some time, but seeing that [
must surrender if I continued, I retired, and had the good fortune
to escape, and take refuge in the house of an officer of the king, on
whose fidelity I could depend.

Overcome with grief, and persecuted by fortune, I had recourse to
a stratagem, which was the last resource to preserve mmy life. I
shaved my beard and my eyebrows, and put on the habit of a calen-
der, under which disguise I left the city without being recognised.
After that, it was no difficult matter to quit the dominions of the
king, my uncle, by unfrequented roads. I avoided the towns till I
arrived in the empire of the powerful sovereign of all believers, the
glorious and renowned Caliph Haroun Alraschid, when T ceased to
fear. I considered what was my best plan, and I resolved to come
to Bagdad and throw myself at the feet of this great monarch, whose
generosity is everywhere admired.

«After a journey of several months, I arrived to-day at the gates of
the city ; when the evening came on I entered, and having rested a
THE SECOND CALENDER. 61

little time to recover my spirits, and deliberate which way I should
turn my steps, this other calender, who is next to me, arrived also.
He saluted me, and I returned the compliment. ‘You appear,” said
I, “astranger like myself.” ‘You are not mistaken,” returned he.
At the very moment he made this reply, the third calender.
whom you sce, came towards us. He saluted us, and acquainted us
that he, too, was a stranger, and just arrived at Bagdad. Like
brothers we united together, and resolved never to separate.

But it was late, and we did not know where to go for a lodging
in a city where we never had been before. Our good fortune, how-
ever, having conducted us to your door, we took the liberty of
knocking; you have received us with so much benevolence and
charity that we cannot sufficiently thank you. ‘This, madam, is
what you desied me to relate ; this was the way in which I lost my
right eye; this was the reason I have my beard and eyebrows
shaved, and why T am at this moment in your company.” ’

“Enough,” said Zobeidé; ‘* we thank you, and you may retire
whenever you please.” ‘The calender excused himself, and entreated
the lady to allow him to stay and hear the history of his two com-
panions, whom he could not well abandon, as well as that of the
three other persons of the party.

The history of the first calender appeared very suprising to the
whole company, and particularly to the caliph. The presence of the
slaves armed with their scimitars, did not prevent him from saying
in a whisper to the vizier, ‘As long as I can remember, I never
heard anything to compare with this history of the calender, though
{ have been all my life in the habit of hearing similar narratives.”
He had no sooner finished than the second calender began, and
addressing himself to Zobeide, spoke as follows.

Che Aistory of the Second Calender, the Son
of u dling.

To obey your commands, madam, and to inform you by what
strange adventure I lost my right eye, is te give you an account of
my whole life.

I was scarcely more than an infant when the king, my father (for
I too am a prince by birth), observing that I possessed great
quickness of intellect, spared no pains in its cultivation, — He
collected from every part of his dominions, whoever was famous for
science, and a knowledge of the fine arts, for the purpose of instruct-
ing me. I no sooner knew how to read and write, than I learnt by
heart the whole of the Koran, that admirable book in which we
find the basis, precepts, and regulations of our religion. I perused
the works of the most approved authors, who have written on the
same subject. I added an acquaintance with all the traditions, re-
ceived from the mouth of our prophet, by those illustrious men, who
were his contemporaries. I made also a particular study of our his-
bories, and became master of polite literature, of poetry, and versifi-
§2 THE ARALIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

cation. Lthen applied myself to geography and chronology ; and
all this without neglecting those exercises which are so suited to a
prince. There was, however, one thing in which I most delighted,
and at length excelled, and that was in forming the characters of
our Arabie language; and I surpassed all the writing masters of
our kingdom, who had acquired the greatest reputation.

Fame bestowed upon me even more honour than I deserved. She
was not satished with spreading a report of my talents throughout
the dominions of the king my father, but even carried the account of
them to the court of the Indies, whose powerful monarch became so
eurious to sce me that. he sent an ambassador, accompanied with the
richest presents to my father, to request me of him. This embassy,
for many reasons, delighted him, He was persuaded that it was the
best possible thing for a prince of my age to travel to foreign courts 5
ani he was also very well satisfied at forming a friendship with the
sultan of India, 1 set out with the ambassador, but with very few
attendants, and little baggage, on account of the length and diffi-
culties of the way.

We had been about a month on our journey when we saw in the
distance an immense cloud of dust, and soon after we discovered fifty
horsemen, well armed. They were robbers, who approached us at
full speed. As we had ten horses Jaden with our baggage, and the
presents which I was to make to the sultan in my father’s name, and
as our party consisted but of very few, you may easily imagine that
the robbers attacked us without hesitation. Not bemg able to re-
pel force by force, we told them we were ambassadors of the sultan
of India, and we hoped they would do nothing contrary to the re-
spect they owed to him. By this we thought we should preserve
both our equipage and lives; but the robbers insolently answered,
«“ Why do you wish us to respect the sultan your master? Weare
not his subjects, nor even within his realm.” Having said this,
they immediately surrounded and attacked us on all sides. I
defended myself as long as I could, but finding that I was
wounded, and seeing the ambassador and all our attendants ovcr-
thrown, { took advantage of the remaining strength of my horse,
who was also wounded, and escaped from them, I pushed him on
as far ag he would carry me, he then suddenly fell under my weight
quite dead from fatigue, and the blood he had lost. I disentangled
myself as fast as possible, and observing that no one pursued mec, |
supposed the robbers did not choose to neglect the plunder they had
acquired.

Imagine me, then, madam, alone, wounded, destitute of every
help, and in a country where I was an entire stranger. I was
afraid of regaining the great road, from the dread of falling once
more into the hands of the robbers. After having bound up my
wound, which was not dangerous, I walked on the rest of the day,
and in the evening I arrived at the foot of a mountain, on one side
of which I discovered agort of cave, Twentin, and passed the night
without any disturbance, after having eaten some fruits, which 1
had gathered as I came along.

For some days following I continued my journey without meeting
‘ou SECOND CALENDER. 68

with any place where I could rest ; but at the end of about a month T
urived at a very large city, well inhabited, and most delightfully
and ‘advantageously situated, as several rivers flowed round it, and
caused a perpetual spring, ‘Tlie number of agreeable objects which
presented themselves to my eyes, excited so great a joy, that it sus-
pended for a moment the poignant regret 1 felt at finding myself
i such a miserable situation. My whole face, as well as my hands
and feet, were of a brown tawny colour, for the sun had quite burnt
me; and my slippers were so completely worn out by walking,
that I was obliged to travel barefoot; besides this, my clothes were
all in rags.

Tentered the town in order to learn the language spoken, and
thence to find out where I was. TIaddressed myself to a tailor, who
was at work in his shop. On account of my youth, and a certain
manner about me, which intimated I was something better than I
appeared, he made me sit down near him. Heasked me whoI was,
where I came from, and what had brought me to that place. I con-
cealed nothing from him, but informed him of every circumstance
that had happened to me, and did not even hesitate at discovering
my name. ‘The tailor listened to me very attentively; but when I
finished my narration, instead of giving me any consolation, he aug-
mented my troubles. ‘Take care,” said he to me, ‘that you do
not place the same confidence in any one else that you have in me,
for the prince who reigns in this kingdom is the greatest enemy of
the king, your father; and if he should be informed of your arrival
in this city, I doubt not but he will inflict some evil upon you.” I
readily believed the sincerity of the tailor, when he told me the
name of the prince; but as the enmity between my father and him
has no connexion with my adventures, I shall not, madam, enter
into any detail of it.

Tthanked the tailor for the advice he had given me, and told
him that I placed implicit faith in his good counsel, and should
never forget the favour I received from him. As he supposed I was
not deficient in appetite, he brought me something to eat, and
offered me even an apartment at his house, which I accepted.

Some days after my arrival, the tailor, remarking that I was toler-
wbly recovered from the effects of my long and painful journey,
wd being aware that most of the princes of our religion had the
precaution, in order to guard against any reverse of fortune, to make
themselves acquainted with some art or trade, to assist them in case
of want, asked me if I knew anything by which I could acquire a
livelihood, without being chargeable to anybody. I told him that
I was well versed in the science of laws, both human and divine,
that I was a grammarian, a poet, and, above all, that I wrote remark-
ably well. ‘With all this,” he replied, ‘you will not in this country
procure @ morsel of bread; nothing is more useless here than this
kind of knowledge. If you wish to follow my advice,” he added,
“you will procure a short jacket, and as you are strong and of a
good constitution, you may go into the neighbouring forest, and cut
wood for fuel. You may then go and expose it for sale in the mar-
ket. and T assure you that you may acquire a small income, but

07
64 THE ARABIAN NIGUTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

suflicient to enable you to live independently of every one. By
these means, you will be enabled to wait till heaven shall become
favourable to you; and till the cloud of bad fortune, which hangs
over you, and obliges you to conceal your birth, shall have blown
over, I will furnish you with a cord and hatchet.”

‘The fear of being known, and the necessity of supporting myself,
determined me to pursue this plan, in spite of the degradation and
pain which were attached to it.

The next day the tailor brought mea hatchet and a cord, and
also a short jacket, and recommending me to some poor people who
obtained their livelihood in the same manner, he requested them to
take me with them. They conducted me to the forest, and from
this time I regularly brought back upon my head a large bundle of
wood, which I sold for a small piece of gold money, current in that
country ; for although the forest was not far off, wood was never-
theless dear in that city, because there were few men who gave
themselves the trouble of going to cut it. I soon acquired a consi-
derable sum, and was enabled to repay the tailor what he had
expended on my account.

[bad passed more than a year in this mode of life, when having
one day gone deeper into the forest than usual, I came to a very
pleasant spot, where I began to cut my wood. In cutting up the
root of a tree, I discovered an iron ring fastened to a trap-door of
the same material. I immediately cleared away the earth that
covered it, and on lifting it up, I perceived a staircase, by which |
descended, with my hatchet in my hand. When I got to the bottom
’ of the stairs, I found myself in a vast palace, which struck me very
much by the great brilliancy with which it was illuminated, as
much so indeed as if it had been built on the most open spot above
ground, I went forward, along a gallery supported on columns of
jasper, the bases and capitals of which were of massive gold, but
stopped suddenly on beholding a lady, who appeared to have so
noble and graceful an air, and to possess such extraordinary beauty,
that my attention was taken off from every other object, and my
eyes fixed on her alone.

To prevent this beantiful lady from having the trouble of coming
to me, I made haste towards her; and while I was making a most
respectful reverence, she said to me, ‘‘ Who are you, a man ora
Genius?” ‘Tama man, madam,” [ answered, getting up, ‘‘ nor
have I any commerce with Genii.” ‘‘ By what adventure,” replied
she, with a deep sigh, ‘“‘have you come here? I have remained
here more than twenty-five years, and during the whole of that
time I have seen no other man than yourself.”

Her great beauty, which had already made a deep impression on
me, together with the mildness and good humour with which she
received me, made me bold enough to say, ‘‘ Before, madam, I have
the honour of satisfying your curiosity, permit me to tell you, that
T feel highly delighted at this unexpected interview.” I then faith-
fully related to her by what strange accident she saw in me the son
of a king, why I appeared to her in that condition, and how acci-
dent lad discovered to me the cutrance into tle magnificent prison


THE SECOND CALTNDER. 65

in which I found her, and ot which, from all appearance, she was
heartily tired. ‘Alas, prince,” she replied, again sighing, “you
may truly say this rich and superb prison is unpleasing and weari-
some. The most enchanting spots cannot afford delight when we
are there against our wills. Is it possible you have never heard any
one speak of the great Epitimarus, king of the Ebony Isle, a place
so called from the great quantity of that precious wood which it
produces? I am the princess, his daughter.”

“The king, my father, had chosen for my husband a prince, who
was my cousin ; but on the very night of our nuptials, in the midst
of the rejoicings of the court and capital of the Isle of Ebony, and
before I had been given to my husband, a Genius took me away.
I fainted almost the same moment, and lost all recollection, and
when I recovered my senses, I found myself in this place. Fora
long time I was inconsolable; but habit and necessity have recon-
ciled me to the sight and company of the Genius. Twenty-five
years have passed, as I have already told you, since I first was
brought to this place, in which I must own that I have, even by
wishing, not only everythin necessary for life, but whatever can
satisfy a princess who is fond of decoration and dress.”

** avery ten days,” continued the princess, ‘‘ the Genius comes to
visit me. In the meantime, if I have any occasion for him, I have
only to touch a talisman, which is placed at the entrance of my
chamber, and he appears. It is now four days since he was here,
and I have therefore to wait six days more before he again makes
his appearance. You therefore may remain five with me, if it be
agreeable to you, in order to keep me company ; and I will endea-
vour to regale and entertain you equal to your merit and quality.”
_ The princess then conducted me to a bath, the most elegant,

convenient, and at the same time sumptuous you can possibly ima-
gine. When I came out, I found instead of my own dress, another
very rich one, which I put on, less for its magnificence than to
render myself more worthy of her notice. We seated ourselves on
a sofa, covered with superb drapery; the cushions of which were
of the richest Indian brocade ; She then set before me a variety of
the most delicate and rare dishes. We ate together, and passed the
remainder of the day and evening very agreeably.

The next day, in order to entertain me, she produced, at dinner,
a flask of very old wine, the finest I ever tasted ; and to please me,
she drank several glasses with me. I no sooner found my head
heated with this agreeable liquor, than I said, ‘‘ Beautiful princess,
you have been buried here alive much too long ; follow me, and go
and enjoy the brightness of the genuine day, of which for so many
years you have been deprived. Abandon this false though brilliant
light you have here.” Let us talk no more, prince,” she answered,
smiling, ‘on this subject. I value not the most beautiful day in
the world, if you will pass nine with me here, and give up the tenth
to the Genius.” “Princess,” T replied, ‘‘I see very well that it is
the dread you have of the Genius which makes you hold this lan-
guage. As for myself, I fear him so little, that I am determined to
break his talisman in pieces, with the magic spell that is inscribed
66 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS “WNTERTAINMENTS.

upon it. Let him then come; I will wait for him: and however
brave, however formidable he may be, I will make him feel the
weight of my arm. I have taken an oath to exterminate all the
Genii in the world, and he shall be the first.” The princess, who
knew the consequence of this conduct, conjured me not to touch the
talisman. ‘‘ Alas!” she cried, ‘‘it will be the means of destroying
both you and myself. I am better acquainted with the dispositions
of Genii than you can be.” The wine I had drunk prevented me
from acknowledging the propriety of her reasons; I kicked down
the talisman, and broke it in pieces.

This was no sooner done than the whole palace shook, as if ready
to fall to atoms, accompanied with a most dreadful noise like thunder,
and flashes of lightning, which heightened still more the intermediate
gloom. This in a moment dissipated the fumes of the wine, and
made me own, though too late, the fault I had committed. ‘‘ Prin-
cess,” I exclaimed, ‘‘what does all this mean?” Alarmed for me,
she, in a fright, answered, ‘Alas, it is all over with you, unless
you save yourself by flight.”

I followed her advice; and my fear was so great that I forgot
my hatchet and my cord. I had hardly gained the staircase by
which J descended, than the enchanted palace opened to afford a
passage to the Genius, and I heard him say in an angry tone, ‘‘ What
has happened to you, and why have you called me?” and then, still
more angrily, ‘‘how came this hatchet and this cord here?” TI has-
tened up the staircase, shut down the trap-door, covered it over
with the earth, and returned to the city with a load of wood
which I collected, without even knowing what I was about, so
rouch was I absorbed and afflicted at what had happened.

My host, the tailor, expressed great joy at my return. ‘‘ Your
absence,” said he, ‘‘has caused me much uneasiness on account of
the secret of your birth, with which you have entrusted me. I knew
not what to think, and began to fear some one might have recognised
you.” I thanked him much for his zeal and affection, but did not
inform him of anything that had happened ; nor of the reason why
[ returned without my hatchet and cord. I retired to my chamber,
where I reproached myself a thousand times for my great imprudence.

While I was abandoning myself to these afflicting thoughts, the
tailor entered my apartment, and said that an old man, whom he
did not know, had brought my hatchet and cord, which he had
found on his way. ‘‘Come and speak to him, as he wishes to deliver
them into your own hands.” At this speech I changed colour, and
trembled from head to foot. The tailor inquired the cause, when
suddenly the door of my chamber opened, The old man, who had
not the patience to wait, appeared, and presented himself to us with
the hatchet and cord. ‘Is not this thy hatchet?” added he, ad-
dressing me, ‘‘and is not this thy cord?”

The Genius, for it was he who had come in disguise, gave me no
time to answer these questions. He took me by the middle of my
body, and dragging me out of the chamber, sprang into the air, and
varried me up to a great height; he then descended towards the
earth; and having caused it to open, by striking his foot against it,
THE ENVIOUS MAN. 67

he sank into it, and I instantly fuund myself in the enchanted palace,
and in the presence of the beautiful princess of the Isle of Hbony,
But alas! what asight! It pierced my very inmost heart. She wag
covered with blood, and lying on the ground more dead than alive,

The Genius heaped reproaches on us both, and first bade the lady
kill me with a scimitar, and then, when she refused, put it into my
hand to kill her, but I threw it on the ground.

At this, the monster took up the scimitar, and cut off one of the
hands of the princess, who had barely time to bid me an eternal
farewell with the other, before she expired. I fainted at the
sight.

“When I returned to my senses, I cried, ‘‘ Strike! I am ready to
receive the mortal wound, and expect it from you as the greatest
favour you can bestow.” ‘‘No,” answered the Genius, ‘I shall
content myself with changing you into a dog, an ass, a lion, or a
lird. Make your choice.” These words gave me some hopes of
softening him ; I said, ‘‘ Moderate, O powerful Genius, your wrath,
and grant me my life in a generous manner, If you pardon me, I
shall always remember your clemency, as one of the best of men
pardoned his neighbour, who bore him a most deadly envy.” The
(Genius then asked me what had passed between these two neigh-
bours, when I told him, if he would have the patience to listen to
me, I would relate the history.

Che Aistory of the Enbions Man, and of Yim
obo f&as Enbred.

In a town of 110 inconsiderable importance, there were two men,
who lived next door to each other. One of them was so excessively
envious of the other, that the latter resolved to change his abode,
and go and reside at some distance from him, supposing that near-
ness of residence alone was the cause of his neighbour's animosity ;
for although he was continually doing him some friendly office, he
perceived that he was not the less hated. He therefore sold his
house and the small estate he had there, and went to the capital of
the kingdom, which was at no great distance, and bought a small
piece of ground about half a league from the town, on which there
stood a very convenient house. He had also a good garden and a
moderate court, in which there was a deep cistern, that was not
how used,

The good man having made this purchase, put on the habit of a
dervise, in order to pass his life more quietly, and made, also, many
cells in his house, where he soon established a small community of
dervises. The report of his virtue was soon more generally spread
abroad, and failed not to attract the attention and visits of great
numbers of the principal inhabitants as well as common people. At
length he became honoured and noticed by almost every one. They
came from a great distance to request him to offer up his prayers
68 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTNRTAINMENTS,

for them ; and all who remained in retirement with him published
an account of the biessings they thought they received from Heaven
through his means,

The great reputation of this man at length reached the town from
whence he came, and the envious man was so vexed, that he left his
house, with the determination to go and destroy him. Tor this
purpose he went to the convent of dervises, whose chief, his former
neighbour, received him with every possible mark of friendship.
The envious man told him that he was come with the express design
of communicating an affair of great importance to him, and which
he could only inform him of in private. ‘In order,” said he, ‘that
no one may hear us, let us, I beg of you, walk in your court: and
when night comes on, order all the dervises to their cells.” The
chief of the dervises did as he requested.

When the envious man found himself alone with the good man,
he began to relate to him whatever came into his thoughts, while
they walked from one end of the court to the other, till observing
they were just at the edge of the well, he gave him a push and
threw him into it. No witness beheld this wicked deed, and he
directly went away, reached the gate of the house, passed out un-
seen, and returned home, highly pleased that the object of his envy
was at length no more. In this, however, he was deceived.

Fortunately for the dervise, this well was inhabited by fairies
and Genii, who caught and supported him in their arms, in such a
way that he received not the least injury. He naturally supposed
there was something very extraordinary in his preservation after
such a fall as ought to have cost him his life, and yet he could
neither see nor perceive anything. He soon after, however, heard
a voice say, ‘‘ Do you know anything of this man to whom we have
been so serviceable?” when some other voices answered, ‘‘ No.”
The first then informed them of his history, and how the envious
man had attempted to murder him, and said, ‘“ His reputation is so
great that the sultan, who resides in the neighbouring town, was
coming to visit him to-morrow, in order to recommend the princess,
his daughter, to his prayers.”

Another voice then asked what occasion the princess had for the
prayers of the dervise, to which the first answered: ‘Are you
ignorant, then, that she is possessed by the power of the Genius -
Maimoun, the son of Dimdim, who has fallen in love with her?
But I know how this good dervise can cure her. The thing is by
no means difficult, as I will inform you. In his monastery there is
a black cat, which has a white spot at the end of her tail, about the
size of a small piece of money. Let him only pull out seven hairs
irom this white spot and burn them, and then with the smoke per-
fume the head of the princess. From that moment she will be so
thoroughly cured, and free from Maimoun, the son of Dimdim, that
he will never again be able to come near her.”

The chief of the dervises did not lose a single syllable of this con-
versation between the fairies and the Geni, who from this time
remained silent the whole night. The next morning, as soon as the
day began to break, and difierent objects became discernible, the
THE SECOND CALENDER. 69

dervise perceived, as the wall was decayed in many places, a hole,
by which he could get out without any difficulty.

The other dervises, who were secking after him, were delighted
at his appearance. He related to them, in a few words, the cunning
wickedness of the guest he had entertained the day before, and then
retired to his cell. It was not long before the black cat, which had
been mentioned in the discourse of the fairies and Genii, came to
him to be taken notice of as usual. He then took it up, and plucked
out seven hairs from the white spot in its tail, and put them aside,
in order to make use of whenever he should have occasion for them,

The sun had not long risen above the horizon when the sultan,
who wished to neglect nothing from which he thought there was any
chance of curing the princess, arrived at the gate. He ordered his
guards to stop, and went in with the principal officers who accom-
panied him. The dervises received him with the greatest respect.
{he sultan directly took the chief aside, and said to him, ‘‘ Worthy
sheikh, you are perhaps already acquainted with the cause of my
visit.’—**Tf, sire,” the dervise modestly answered, ‘‘I do not deceive
myself, it is the malady of the princess that has been the occasion
of my seeing you, an honour of which J am unworthy.” ‘‘It is so,”
replied the sultan; ‘‘and you will restore almost my life to me if,
by means of your prayers, I shall obtain the re-establishment of my
laughter’s health.” ‘‘Tf your majesty,” answered the worthy man,
‘will have the goodness to suffer her to come here, I flatter myself
that, with the help and favour of God, she shall return in perfect
health.”

The prince, transported with joy, immediately sent for his daughter,
who soon appeared, accompanied by a numerous train of females and
eunuchs, and veiled in such a manner that her face could not be
seen. The chief of the dervises made them hold a shovel over the
head of the princess, and he no sooncr threw the seven white hairs
upon some burning coals, which he had ordered to be brought in it,
then the Genius Maimoun, the son of Dimdim, uttered a violent
scream, and left the princess quite at liberty. In the meantime
nothing at all could be seen. The first thing she did was to put her
hand to the veil which covered her face, and lift it wp to see where
she was. ‘Where amI,” she cried; ‘‘ who has brought me here?”
At these words the sultan could not conceal his joy; he embraced
his daughter, he kissed her eyes, and then took the hand of the
dervise and kissed that. ‘Give me,” said he to his oflicers, ‘‘ your
opinion; what return does he deserve, who has cured my daughter.”
They all answered that he was worthy of her hand. ‘‘ This is the
very thing I was meditating,” he cried, ‘‘and from this moment 1
claim him for my son-in-law.”

Soon after this the first vizier died, and the sultan immediately
advanced the dervise to the situation. The sultan himself afterwards
dying without any male issue, this excellent man was proclaimed
sultan by the general voice of the different religious and military
orders.

The good dervise, being thus raised to the throne of his father-in-
law, observed one day, as he was walking with his courtiers, the
70 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

envious man among the crowd who were in the road. He called
one of his viziers who accompanied him, told him in a whisper to
bring that man whom he pointed out to him, and to be sure not to
alarm him, The vizier obeyed; and when the envious man was in
the presence of the sultan, the latter addressed him in these words:
“T am very happy, my friend, to see you: go,” said he, speaking
to an officer, ‘‘and count out directly from my treasury a thousand
pieces of gold. Nay, more, deliver to him twenty bales of the most
valuable merchandise my magazines contain, and let a sufficient
guard escort him home.” After having given the officer this com-
mission, he took his leave of the envious man, and continued his walk.

When I had told this his story to the Genius who had murdered
the princess of the Isle of Ebony, I made the application to myself:
“*O Genius,” I said to him, ‘you may observe how this benevolent
monarch acted towards the envious man, and was not only satisfied
in forgetting that he had attempted his life, but even sent him back
with every benefit and advantage I have mentioned.” But all my
eloquence to persuade him to imitate so excellent an example was
in vain.

‘All that I can do for you,” he said, ‘‘is to spare your life. T
must, at least, make you feel what I can do by means of my en-
chantments.” At these words he violently seized me, and carrying
me through the vaulted roof of the subterranean palace, which
opened at his approach, he elevated me so high that the earth ap-
peared to me only like a small white cloud. From this height he
vgain descended as quick as lightning, and alighted on the top of a
mountain. On this spot he took up a handful of earth, and mutter.
ing certain words, of which T could not comprehend the meaning,
threw it over me: ‘* Quit,” he cried, ‘‘the figure of a man, and as-
sune that of an ape.” He immediately disappeared, and I remained
quite alone, changed into an ape, overwhelmed with grief, in an
unknown country, and ignorant whether I was near the dominions
of the king, my father.

I descended the mountain and came to a flat, level country, the
extremity of which [ did not reach till I had travelled a month, when
T arrived at the sea-coast. There was at this time a profound calm,
and I perceived a vessel about half a league from the shore. That 1
might not omit taking advantage of so fortunate a circumstance, 1
broke off a large branch from a tree, and dragged it after me to the
sea-side. I then got astride it, with a stick in each hand by way of
oar. In this manner I rowed myself along towards the vessel, and
when I was sufficiently near to be seen, I presented a most extra-
ordinary sight to the sailors and passengers who were upon deck.
They looked at me with great admiration and astonishment. Tn the
meantime I got alongside, and taking hold of a rope, I climbed up to
the deck. But as I could not speak, I found myself in the greatest
embarrassment. And, in fact, the danger I now ran was not less
maminent than what I had before experienced when I was in the
power of the Genius.

The merchants who were on board were superstitious, and th ought
that T should be the cause of some misfortunes happening to them
THE SECOND CALENDER. 71

during their voyage if they received me. ‘I will kill him,” cried one,
“with a blow of this handspike.” ‘‘ Let me shoot an arrow through
his body,” exclaimed another; ‘‘and then let us throw him into the
sea,” said a third. Nor would they have desisted from executing
their threats if I had not run to the captain, and thrown myself pro-
strate at his feet. In this supplicating posture I laid hold of the
bottom of his dress, and he was so struck with this action, as well
as with the tears that fell from my eyes, that he took me under his
protection, declaring he would make any one repent who should
offer me the least injury. He even caressed and encouraged me.
In order to make up for the loss of speech, I in return showed him
by means of signs how much I was obliged to him.

The wind which succeeded this calm was not a strong, but it was
a favourable one. It did not change for fifty days, and we then
happily arrived in the harbour of a large, commercial, well-built, and
populous city. Here we cast anchor. The city was of still more
considerable importance, as it was the capital of a powerful kingdom.
Our vessel was immediately surrounded with a multitude of small
boats, filled with those who came either to congratulate their friends
on their arrival, or to inquire of whom and what they had seen in
the country they had come from—or simply from mere curiosity to
see a ship which had arrived from a distance.

Among the rest some officers came on board, who desired, in the
name of the sultan, to speak to the merchants that were with us.
‘The sultan, our sovereign,” said one of them to the merchants who
immediately appeared, ‘has charged us_ to express to you how
much pleasure your arrival gives him, and entreats each of you te
take the trouble of writing upon this roll of paper a few lines. In
order to make you understand his motive for this, I must inform
you that he had a first vizier, who, besides his great abilities in the
management of affairs, wrotein the greatest perfection. This minister
died a few days since. The sultan is very much afflicted at it, and,
as he values perfection in writing beyond everything, he has taken a
solemn oath to appoint any person to the same situation who shal]
write as well. Many have presented specimens of their abilities, but
he has not yet found any one throughout the empire whom he has
thought worthy to occupy the vizier’s place.”

Each of those merchants, who thought they could write well
cnough to aspire to this high dignity, wrote whatever they thought
proper. When they had done, I advanced and took the paper from
the hands of him who held it. Everybody, and particularly the mer-
chants who had written, thinking that I meant either to destroy it
or throw it into the water, instantly called out; but they were soon
satisfied when they saw me hold the paper very properly, and make
a sign that also wished to write in my turn. Their fears were now
changed to astonishment. Yet, as they had never seen an ape that
could write, they wished to take the roll from my hands—but the
captain still continued to take my part. ‘‘ Suffer him to try,” he
said, ‘let him write; if he only blots the paper I promise you 1
will instantly punish him.”

Binding that no one any Jonger opposed my design, T took the pen,
72, THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

and did not leave off till I had given an example of six different sorts
of writing used in Arabia. Hach specimen contained a distich, or
impromptu stanza of four lines, in praise of the sultan. My writ-
ing uot onty excelled that of the merchants, but I dave say they had
never seen any so beautiful, even in that country. When I had
finished, the otlicers took the roll, and carried it to the sultan.

The monarch paid no attention to any of the writing except mine,
which pleased him so much that he said to the officers, ‘‘ Take the
finest and most richly caparisoned horse from my stable, and also
the most magnificent robe of brocade possible for him who has written
these six varieties, and bring him to me.” At this order of the sul-
tan, the officers could not forbear laughing, which irritated him so
much that he would have punished them, had they not said, ‘* We
entreat your majesty to pardon us; these are not written by a man,
but by anape.” ‘* What do you say?” cried the sultan; ‘‘ we assure
your majesty,” answered one of the officers, ‘‘ that we saw an ape
write them.” This appeared so wonderful to the sultan that he said
to them, ‘‘ Hasten to bring me this extraordinary ape.” .

The officers returned to the vessel, and showed their order to the
captain, who said the sultan should be obeyed, They immediately
dressed me in a robe of very rich brocade, and carried me on shore,
where they set me on the horse of the sultan, who was waiting in his
palace for me, with a considerable number of people belonging to the
court, whom he had assembled to do me the more honour. ‘The march
commenced, while the gate, streets, public buildings, windows, and
terraces of both the palaces and houses were all filled with an immense
number of persons, of every age and sex, whom curiosity had drawn
together from all quarters of the town, to see me, for the report was
spread in an instant that the sultan had chosen an ape for his grand
vizier. After having afforded so uncommon a sight to all these
people, who ceased not to express their surprise by violent and con-
tinued shouting, I arrived at the sultan’s palace.

I found the sultan seated on his throne, in the midst of the nobles
of his court; I made him three low bows, and the last time I pros-
trated myself, kissed the earth by his feet. I then got wp, and seated
myself exactly likeanape. No part of the assembly could withhold
their admiration, nor did they comprehend how it was possible for
an ape to be so well acquainted with the form and respect attached
to sovereigns; nor was the sultan the least astonished. The whole
ceremony of audience would have been complete if I had only been
ableto add speech tomy actions; but apes neverspeak, and the advan-
tage of having once been a man did not now afford me that privilege.

The sultan took leave of the courtiers, and there remained with
him only the chief of his eunuchs, a little young slave, and myself.
He went from the hall of audience into his own apartment, where he
ordered some food to be served up. While he was at table, le made
me a sign to come and eat with him. Asa mark of my obedience, [
got up, kissed the ground, and then seated myself at table; I ate,
however, with much modesty and forbearance,

Before they cleared the table, I perceived a writing desk, which,
by a sign, I requested them to bring me; as soon as I had got it. }
THE SECOND CALENDER. 78

wrote upon a large peach sume lines of my own composition, which
evinced my gratitude to the sultan. His astonishment at reading
them, after I presented the peach to him, was still greater than be-
fore. When the things were taken away, they brought a perticular
sort of liquor, of which he desired them to give me a glass. I drank
1t, and then wrote some fresh verses, which explained the state in
which I now found myself after so many sufferings. The sultan,
having read these also, exclaimed, ‘A man who should be capable
of doing thus would be one of the greatest men that ever lived.”
The prince then ordered a chess-board to be brought, and asked me,
by a sign, if I could play, and would engage with him. _ I kissed
the ground, and putting my hand on my head, I showed him I was
ready to receive that honour. He won the first game, but the second
and third were in my favour. Perceiving that this gave him some
little pain, I wrote a stanza to amuse him, and presented it to him;
in which I said that two powerful armed bodies fought the whole day
with the greatest ardour, but that they made peace in the evening,
and passed the night together very tranquilly wpon the field of battle.

All these circumstances appearing to the sultan much beyond what
he had ever seen or heard of the address and ingenuity of apes, he
wished to have more witnesses of these prodigies. He had a daugh-
ter who was called the Queen of Beauty; he therefore desired the
chief of the eunuchs to fetch her. ‘‘Go,” said he to him, “‘ and bring
your lady here; I wish her to partake of the pleasure I enjoy.” The
chief of the eunuchs went and brought back the princess with him.
Yn entering, her face was uncovered, but she was no sooner within
the apartment than she instantly threw her veil over her, and said to
the sultan, ‘“‘ Your majesty must have forgotten yourself. I am sur-
prised that you order me to appear before men.” ‘ Whatis this, my
daughter?” answered the sultan, ‘‘it seems that you are the person
who has forgotten yourself, There is no one here but the little slave,
the eunuch your governor, and myself, and we are always at liberty
to see your face.” ‘‘Sire,” replied the princess, ‘* your majesty will
be convinced [ am not mistaken, The ape which you see there, al-
though under that form, is not an ape, but a young prince, the son of
a great king. He has been changed into an ape by enchantment, A
Genius has been guilty of this malicious action, after having
cruelly killed the princess of the Isle of Ebony.”

The sultan was astonished at this speech, and turning to me,
asked, but no longer by signs, whether what his daughter said was
true. As I could not speak, | put my hand upon my head to show
that she had spoken the truth, ‘‘ How came you to know, daugh-
ter,” said the king, ‘that this prince had been transformed into
an ape by means of enchantment?” ‘‘Sire,” replied the princess,
“your majesty may recollect, that when I first came from the
nursery, [had an old woman as one of my attendants. She was
very well skilled in magic, and taught me seventy rules of that
science, by virtue of which I could instantly cause your capital to
be transported to the middle of the ocean, ney, beyond Mount
Caucasus. By means of this science, I know every person who is
enchanted, the moment I behold them—not only who they are, but:
t

iA THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

by whom also they were enchanted. Be not, therefore, surprised,
that I have at first sight discovered this prince, in spite of the charm
which prevented him from appearing in your eyes such as he really
is.” ‘My dear daughter,” answered the sultan, “I did not think you
were so skilful ; you can perhaps dissolve the enchantment of this
prince.” ‘*T can, sire,” said she, ‘and restore him to his own form.”
“Do so, then,” interrupted the sultan, “for you cannot give me
greater pleasure, as I wish to have him for my grand vizicr, and
bestow you upon him fora wife.” “Iam ready, sire,” answered
the princess, “to obey you in all things you please to command.”

The Queen of Beauty then went to her apartment, and returned
with a knife, which had some Hebrew characters engraved on the
blade. She desired the sultan, the chief of the eunuchs, the little
slave, and myself, to go down into a secret court of the palace, and
then, leaving us under a gallery which surrounded the court, she
went into the middle of it, where she described a large circle, and
traced several words, both in the ancient Arabic characters and
those which are called the characters of Cleopatra.

When she had done this and prepared the circle in the manner she
wished, she went and placed herself in the midst of it, where she
began making her adjurations, and repeating some verses from the
Koran. By degrees, the air became obscure, as if night was coming
on, and the whole world was vanishing. We were seized with the
greatest fright, and this was the more increased when we saw the
Genius, the son of the daughter of Eblis, suddenly appear, in the
shape of an enormous lion.

‘The princess no sooner perceived this monster than she said to it,
‘‘ Dog, instead of cringing before me, how darest thon present thyself
under this horrible form, thinking to alarm me?” ‘ And how darest
thou,” replied the lion, ‘‘ break the treaty, which we have made ani
confirmed bya solemn oath, not to injure cach other?” ‘Ah, wretch !”
added the princess, ‘‘thou art the person I am to reproach on that
account.” ‘Thou shalt pay dearly,” interrupted the lion, “for the
trouble thou hast given me of coming here.” In saying this, he
opened his horrible jaws, and advanced forward to devour. her; but
she, being on her guard, jumped back, and had just time to pluck
out a hair, and pronouncing two or three words, she changed it
into a sharp scythe, with which she immediately cut the lion in
pieces through the middle.

The two parts of the lion directly disappeared, and the head only
remained, which changed into a large scorpion. ‘The princess then
took the form of a serpent, and began a fierce combat with the
scorpion, which, finding itself in danger of being defeated, changed
into an eagle, and flew away. But the serpent then became another
eagle, black, and more powerful, and went in pursuit of it. We
now lost sight of them for some time,

Shortly after they had disappeared, the earth opened before us,
and a black and white cat appeared, the hairs of which stood quite
on end, and which made a most horrible mewing. A black wolf
directly followed, and gave it no respite. The cat, being hard
pressed, changed into a worm, and, finding iteelf near a pomegranate,
THE SECOND CALENDER. 75

which had fallen by accident from a tree that grew upon the bank
of a deep but narrow canal, instantly made a hole in it, and con-
cealed itself there. The pomegranate immediately began to swell,
and became as large as a gourd, which then rose up as high as the
gallery, and rolled backwards and forwards there several times ; it
then fell down to the bottom of the court, and broke into many pieces.

The wolf, in the meantime, transformed itself into a cock, ran to
the seeds of the pomegranate, and began swallowing them, one after
the other, as fast as possible. When it could see no more, it came
to us, with its wings extended, and making a great noise, as if to
inquire of us whether there were any more seeds. There was one
lying on the border of the canal, which the cock, in going back, per-
ceived, and ran towards it as quick as possible; but at the very
instant in which its beak was upon it, the seed rolled into the canal
and changed into a small fish. The cock then flew into the canal,
and becoming a pike, pursued the little fish. They were both two
hours under water, and we knew not what was become of them,
when we heard the most horrible cries, that made us tremble. Soon
after, we saw the Genius and the princess, all on fire. They threw
the flames against each other with their breath, and at last came to
a close attack. Then the fire increased, and everything about was
encompassed with smoke and flame to a great height. We were
afraid, and not without reason, that the whole palace would be
burnt ; but we soon had a much more dreadful cause of terror, for
the Genius, having disengaged himself from the princess, came to-
wards the gallery where we were, and. blew his flames all over us.
This would have destroyed us, if the princess, running to our assist-
ance, had not compelled him by her cries to retreat to a distance,
and guard himself against her. In spite, however, of all the haste
she made, she could not prevent the sultan from having his head
singed and his face scorched; the chief of the eunuchs too was stifled,
and consumed on the spot; and a spark flew into my right eye, and
blinded me. Both the sultan and myself expected to perish, when
we suddenly heard the ery of ‘‘ Victory, victory !” and the princess
immediately appeared to us in her own form, while the Genius was
reduced to a heap of ashes.

The princess approached us, and in order to lose no time, she asked
for a cup full of water, which was brought by the young slave, whom
the fire had not injured. She took it, and after pronouncing some
words over it, she threw some of the water upon me, and said, ‘If
thou art an ape by enchantment, change thy figure, and take that
of aman, which thou hadst before.” She had hardly concluded,
when I again became a man, the same as before I was changed,
except with the loss of one eye.

Iwas preparing to thank the princess, but she did not give me
time, before she said to the sultan, her father, ‘‘I have gained, sire,
the victory over the Genius, as your majesty may see, but it is a
victory which has cost me dear. I have but a few moments to live,
aid you will not have the satisfaction of completing the marriage
you intended. The fire, in this dreadful combat, has penetrated my
body, and [ feel that it will soon consume me. This would not have
76 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

happened if I had perceived the last seed of the pomegranate, when
L was in the shape of a cock, and had swallowed it as I did the others.
The Genius had fled to it as his last retreat, and on that depended
the success of the combat, which would then have been fortunate,
and without danger to me. This omission obliged me to have recourse
to fire, and fight with that powerful weapon, between heaven and
earth, as you saw me. In spite of his dreadful power and experience.
I have at length conquered and reduced him to ashes, but I cannot
avoid the death which I feel approaching.”

The princess had no sooner finished this account of the battle,
than she suddenly exclaimed, “I burn, I burn.” She perceived that
the fire which consumed her, had at last seized her whole body, and
she did not cease calling out, ‘I burn,” till death put an end to her
almost insupportable sufferings. The effect of this fire was so
extraordinary, that in a few minutes she was reduced, like the
Genius, to a heap of ashes.

I need not say how much this dreadful and melancholy sight
affected us. I would rather have continued an ape, or a dog, my
whole life, than have seen my beuefactress perish in such a horrid
manner. The sultan, too, on his part, was beyond measure afflicted.
Té is almost impossible to conceive what lamentable cries he uttered,
beating himself at the same time most violently on_his head and
breast, till at last, yielding to despair, he fainted, and I feared even
his life would fall a sacrifice. In the meantime the cries of the
sultan brought the eunuchs and officers to his assistance, and they
found great difliculty in recovering hin.

As soon as the knowledge of an event so tragical was spread
through the palace and the city, every one lamented the melancholy
fate of the princess, surnamed the Queen of Beauty, and joined in
the grief of the sultan. They put on mourning for seven days, and
performed many ceremonies; the ashes of the Genius they scattered
in the wind, but collected those of the princess in a costly urn, and
preserved them; this urn was then deposited in a superb mausoleum,
which was erected on the very spot where the ashes had been found.

The grief which preyed upon the sultan for the loss of his daughter,
was the origin of a disease that confined him to his bed for a whole
month. He had not quite recovered his health, when he called me
to him, and said, ‘‘ Listen, prince, and attend to the order which |
am going to give you; if you fail to execute it, your life will be the
forfeit.” I assured him I would obey. ‘‘ My daughter is dead,” he
continued; ‘‘her governor is no more; and I have escaped with my
life only by a miracle. You are the cause of all these misfortunes,
if you remain any longer it will be the cause of my death also, since

| am persuaded your presence is productive only of misfortune.
This is all I have to say to you. Go, and take care you never again
appear in my kingdom; if you do, no consideration shall prevent my
making you repent of it.” I wished to speak, but he prevented me
by uttering some angry words, and I was obliged to leave his palace.

Rejected and abandoned by every one, I knew not what was to
become of me. Before I left the city, I went into a bath, I got my
beard and eyebrows shaved, and put on the dress of a calender. 1
THE THIRD CaLENDER. G7

then began my journcy, lamenting less my own miserable condition,
than the death of the two beautiful princesses, of which I had been
the unhappy cause. I travelled through many countries without
naking myself known; at last I resolved to visit Bagdad, in hopes
of heing able to present myself to the Commander of the Faithful,
and excite his compassion by the recital of so strange a history. 1
arrived here this evening, and the first person I met was the calender,
my brother, who has already related his life. You are acquainted,
madam, with the sequel, and how I came to have the honour of
being at your house.

When the second calender had finished his history, Zobeidé, to
whom he had addressed himself, said, ‘‘ You have done well, and I
give you leave to go whenever you please.” But instead of taking
his departure, he entreated her to grant him the same favour she
had done the other calender, near whom he went and took his place
Then the third calender, knowing it was his turn to speak, addressed
himself like the others to Zobeidé, and began his history as follows.

Che History of the Third Gulender, the Son of x Ring.

What Iam going to relate, most honourable lady, is of a very
different nature from what you have already heard. ‘The two princes
who have recited their histories, have each of them lost an eye, as
it were by destiny; while my loss has been in consequence of my
own fault, in wilfully seeking the cause of misfortune, as you will
find by what I am going to mention.

Tam called Agib, and am the son of a king, whose name was Cassib.
After his death I took possession of his throne, and established my
residence in the same city which he had made his capital. This city,
which is situated on the sea-coast, has a remarkably handsome and
safe harbour, with an arsenal sufliciently extensive to supply an
armament of a hundred and fifty vessels of war, always lying ready
for service on any occasion; and to equip fifty merchantmen, and as
many sloops and yachts, for the purpose of amusement and pleasure
on the water. My kingdom was composed of many beautiful pro-
vinces, and also a number of considerable islands, almost all of which
were situated within sight of my capital.

The first thing I did was to visit the provinces; I then made them
arm and equip my whole fleet, and went round to all my islands, in
order to conciliate the affections of my subjects, and to confirm them
in their duty and allegiance. After having been at home some time,
L went again ; and these voyages, by giving me some slight knowledge
of navigation, infused such a taste for it in my mind, that I resolved
to go in search of discoveries beyond my islands. For this purpose
Ucquipped only ten ships, and embarking in one of them, we set sail.

During forty days our voyage was prosperous ; but on the night of
the forty-first the wind became adverse, and so violent, that we were
driven at the mercy of the tempest, and thought we should have
been lost. At break of day, however, the wind abated, the clouds
qs THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

dispersed, and the sun brought fine weather back with it. We now
landed on an island, where we remained twe days, to take in some
provisions. Having done this, we again put to sea. After ten days’
sail, we began to hope to see land; for since the storm we had en-
countered, [ had altered my intention, and determined to return to
my kingdom, but I then discovered that my pilot knew not where
we were, In fact, a sailor, on the tenth day, who was ordered to the
masthead for the purpose of making discoveries, reported that to the
right and left he could perceive only the sky and sea, which bounded
she horizon, butthat straight before him he observed a great blackness.

At this intelligence the pilot changed colour, and throwing his
turban on the deck with one hand, he smote his face with the other,
and then cried out, ‘Ah, sire, we are lost ; not one of us can pos-
sibly escape the danger in which we are.” I asked him what reason
he had for this despair. ‘Alas, sire,” he answered, ‘‘the tempest
has so driven us from our track, that by midday to-morrow we shall
tind ourselves near that blackness, which is nothing but a black
mountain, consisting entirely of a mass of loadstone, that will soon
attract our fleet, on account of the bolts and nails in the ships.
To-morrow, when we shall come within a certain distance, the power
of the loadstone will be so violent, that all the nails will be drawn
out, and fastened to the mountain; our ships will then fallin pieces,
and sink. This mountain towards the sea is entirely covered with
nails, that belonged to the infinite number of ships of which it has
proved the destruction. It is very steep, and on the summit there
is a large dome, made of fine bronze, which is supported upon co-
lumns of the same metal. Upon the top of the dome there is also
a bronze horse, with the figure of a man upon it; and there isa
tradition, sire,” added he, “that this statue is the principal cause
of the loss of so many vessels and men, and that it will never cease
from being destructive to all who shall have the misfortune to ap-
proach it until it be overthrown.” The pilot having finished his
speech, renewed his tears, which excited those of the whole crew.
As for myself, I did not doubt that I was now approaching the end
of my days.

The next morning we distinctly perceived the black mountain ;
and the idea we had formed of it made it appear still more dreadful
and horrid than it really was. About mid-day we found ourselves
so near it, that we began to perceive what the pilot had foretold.
We saw the nails, and every other piece of iron belonging to the
vessel, fly towards the mountain, against which, by the violence
of the magnetic attraction, they struck with a horrible noise.
The vessel then immediately fell to pieces, and sunk to the bottom
of the sea. All my people were lost; but God had pity upon me,
and suffered me to save myself by laying hold of a plank, which
was driven by the wind directly to the foot of the mountain. I did
not experience the least harm, and had the good fortune to Jand in
a place where there were steps, which led to the summit. I was
much rejoiced at sight of these steps, for there was not the least
piece of land either to the right or left, upon which I could have set
my foot to save myseli. | returned thanks to God, and invoking His
THE THIRD CALENDER. 7S

holy name, bean to ascend the mountain, The path was narros,
and so steep and difficult, that had the wind been at all violent, it
must have blown me into the sea. T arriv