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Uncle Ned's stories of the tropics

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Title:
Uncle Ned's stories of the tropics
Running title:
Stories of the tropics
Creator:
Ferrier, Charles A ( Engraver )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Butler and Tanner ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Manufacturer:
Butler and Tanner
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
160 p. 15, [1] : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Plants -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Tropics ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1891 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Frome
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follow text.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by C.A. Farrier.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026971312 ( ALEPH )
ALH8456 ( NOTIS )
183690040 ( OCLC )

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Full Text














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Zo ye beat & eho?
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—————





THE OSTRICH’S BREAKFAST. Page 131,



eR eae







STORIES OF Tie URORICs:

BY THE AUTHOR OF

‘* WONDERS OF THE WATERS,” ‘‘ WONDERS UNDER THE EARTH,”
ETC.



London;

THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY,

56, PATERNOSTER Row; 65, St. PauL’s CHURCHYARD;
AND 164, PICCADILLY.







Butter & TANNER,
Tue Setwoop Printing Works,
Frome, ann Lonpon.





CONEENTS

CHAPTER I.
PAGE
Jiggers—Locusts—White Ants—Goatsuckers—Ant-eater—Nests
of Ants—Soldiers and Labourers—Marching Ants—Mr.
Wallace’s Collection—Uncle Ned’s Promise . ; 5 dentin)

CHAPTER II.

Moonlight Walk in Jamaica—Fire-flies—Praying Mantis—Mos-
quitoes—Yams—The Southern Cross—A Lunar Rainbow—
The Blue Mountain—A Cold Night—Stingless Bees—Brush-
footed Spider—Wisdom of God—The Prisoner and the
Beetle . : ; : : s . : : : . 26

CHAPTER III.

Living Jewels—Uses of Insects—Alice’s Difficulty—Livingstone
and the Lion—A Snake under the Pillow—Snake-charmers
—Adventure with a Python—The Boa Constrictor—The
Secretary Bird—The Ichneumon—Rat-Snakes—The Adjutant
—Jamaica Negroes - . 5 . 5 . : 0 sOnIS2

CHAPTER IV.

Indian Rice Fields—The Rice Bird—Sago—Tapioca—Indian
Corn—Mahogany—Cotton—Pepper and Nutmeg . ; » 79



6 Contents.

CHAPTER V.

PAGE
Gorillas—Capture of Master Joe—Escape from a Crocodile—
Sleeping on a Crocodile—Geckos—Anoles—The Chameleon. 91

CHAPTER VI.

Sandal Trees—The Bamboo—The Baobab—The Traveller’s Tree—
The Banyan Tree—The Basilisk—Humming Birds— Ostriches
—Ostrich Hunting—Story ofa Hippopotamus . . - 113

CHAPTER VII.

A Missionary Story—Madagascar—Malagasy Customs—Cruelty of
King Radama—Missionary Schools—Persecution of Christians
—The First Martyr—Spread of Christianity. . 2 . 137







SLORMES OE trey iRO RECS:

CHAPTER I.

Jiggers—Locusts— White Ants -— Goatsuckers — Ant-eater—
Nests of Ants—Soldiers and Labourers—Marching
Ants—Mr. Wallace’s Collection—Uncle Ned’s Promise.

“HH, UNCLE EDWARD,
do tell us some of
your wonderful travel-
lers’ stories—true ones,
you know. Papa says
you have been half over
the world, and have’
spent years in the tro-
pics, and we want to
hear all about it.”

The speaker was a
bright boy of ten years
old, named Charlie.

Uncle Edward was half dozing in a comfortable

arm-chair by the fire, and Charlie’s papa was peeling
7





8 Stories of the Tropics.



an apple for his little daughter Alice, who was seated
on his lap.

With one bound she was at her uncle’s side. “Dear
Uncle Edward, do—please do,” she said, and lifted
up her little face imploringly. Uncle Edward could
never refuse his little pet anything, so, good-naturedly
rousing himself, and looking at the children very much
with the expression that a great Newfoundland dog
would assume towards two little kittens who disturbed
his slumbers, he muttered :

“All about it,—that is, certainly, a very modest
request, Charlie. Why, I should have to talk night
and day all the time I am here to do that, and not |
finish then. You would be rather tired of listening,
I think,”

‘Oh no, Uncle Edward, we shall never tire,” cried
both children at once.

Uncle Edward regarded them with a curious look,
lifting up his great shaggy eyebrows, “What in-
satiable creatures children are!” he remarked.

“Don’t let them tire you, Ned,” said Mr. Stone.

“No, Vl take care of that ; but where shall I
begin?”

“Oh, tell us first about the insects, said Charlie,
who considered himself a great entomologist, and -
was very fond of capturing butterflies. He had
made quite a large collection of English butterflies
during the last two summers, to which he had received
many contributions from cousins and friends in dif-
ferent parts of England. “I have heard there are
such splendid butterflies in the tropics, and termites,



F1ggers.. 9



and honey ants, and frogs, and beetles, and all sorts
of delightful things.”

“The insects of the tropics are much more delight-
ful to talk about here in England than to meet with
in their own country, I can tell you. They are the
greatest plagues imaginable; in fact, they are worse
than plagues, they are most intolerable nuisances ;
they sting and bite in such a cruel way that they often
cause most serious illness.”

“Tell them about the jiggers, Ned,” said Mr. Stone.

“Oh, those horrid chegoes, or jiggers, that lamed me
in the West Indies. They are little creatures, about
the size of a small flea; they get into one’s feet, bury
themselves under the skin, and there they make their
nests. I found a little tumour on my toe about the
size of a pea, with a dark spot in the centre, which
gave me great pain. I could not imagine what it was
till I showed it to my man-servant, who was used to the
country, and had suffered himself in like manner. He
told me that the negro women are very clever in taking
them out, so I sent for one to operate on me. First
she removed the skin from the little ball, just as we
should peel an orange, then pressing the flesh all
round, she succeeded in getting out the nest without
breaking it, and filled up the hole with tobacco, in

case any of the eggs should remain in the wound and
form a fresh colony.”

“Oh, uncle, how horrible!” cried little cee

“Not so bad asa friend of mine, who was travel-
ling in the interior of Africa, and got a horrid worm
into his foot. His leg and ankle swelled, and, like



10 Stories of the Tropics.



me, he did not at all know what was the matter; but
he put on a plaster, and when he pulled it off, out
came a few inches of the worm. These worms are’
sometimes twelve feet long, and not much thicker
than a horse-hair, so you may imagine the difficulty
of getting the creature out without breaking. Indeed
my friend did not manage to do so; however, he got
it out by degrees, two or three inches at a time, and
it caused him dreadful pain.”

“But worms are not insects, uncle,” interrupted
Charlie.

“No, and I have told you enough of these pests of
hot countries. I will go on to something more inter-
esting. There is a very destructive insect, of which
I dare say you have heard. I mean the locust,
which visits all hot countries, and does a great deal
of mischief. It is called the Migratory Locust, be-
cause of its habit of going in vast armies, like winged
clouds, over the earth. Wherever they alight all
vegetation soon disappears, as the myriads of insect-
jaws commence their destructive work, In some
places the locust is used for food.”

“Oh, uncle!” said Alice, with an expression of dis-
gust, “they must be very nasty.”

“Some people don’t think so, or they would not
eat them. In Africa, large fires are kindled in the
path of the insects, and as they come flying along
the smoke stifles them and they fall in thousands,
and are roasted and eaten. Dr. Livingstone speaks
quite highly of the locust as an article of food, and
says it is superior to shrimps. Sometimes the bodies



Locusts. II

are left in the sun to dry, and then ground into a
powder between two stones. This powder is eaten
with honey, and is said to make very fattening and
wholesome food for man or beast. The food of John

= ==

































































































































































































































































































































































LOCUSTS IN A FIELD OF INDIAN CORN,

the Baptist, when in the wilderness, you know, was
‘locusts and wild honey,’ though some think that this

refers to the locust bean, and not to the insect of that
name,”



12 Stories of the Tropics,



“I did not think the destructive locust was of any
use,” said Charlie.

“There is some wise purpose in everything God
has created, we may be quite sure of that,” replied
Uncle Ned. “Now, would you like to hear about
the termites ?”

What are they, uncle?” asked Alice.

“White ants, to be sure,” responded Chatlie, proud
of his superior knowledge.

“They are called white ants, observed his uncle,
“but they really belong to quite a different order of
insects. They are more allied to dragon-flies, ant-lions
and may-flies. In fact they are not ants at all, except
in name. Still some of their laws, habits, and man-
ners remind us of the ant’s. They are divided into
three distinct classes—labourers, soldiers, and perfect
insects. They build large houses, or rather citadels,
for they contain an immense population: these cita-
dels are sometimes twelve feet high and a hundred
feet in circumference.”

“Why, Uncle Ned, that would be twice as big as
you are; that would be higher than this room.”

“Yes,” Charlie, I know it,” said their uncle, gravely;
“Tam not exaggerating.”

“You are telling no ‘travellers’ tales,’ are you,
Ned? but real sober truth,” remarked Mr. Stone.

“Yes, indeed, truth is often stranger than fiction ;
and if I had not seen them myself, I could hardly
have believed many of the wonders which I am going
to tell you. But first about the arrangement of their
houses, which are built of clay. Only the under part -



White Ants. 13
is inhabited by the white ants; the upper part is
merely built in order to defend them from the wea-
ther, and to keep up the warmth and moisture in the
lower part, which is necessary for hatching the eggs
and rearing the young ones. In the centre of the
building, and almost on a level with the ground, is
the queen’s palace, a large room where she lives in
grandeur with the king her consort, and is waited on
by her attendants with more zeal and loyalty than
any king or queen of the British Isles has ever
received from her devoted subjects. But the poor
queen never leaves her state apartment ; indeed, she



THE QUEEN ANT.

soon grows to such an enormous size that she could
not get out through the doors.”

“Oh, uncle, it is more like a prison than a palace,
I think,” said Alice.

“ And is the poor king obliged to stay with her?”
asked Charlie.

“The king soon dies, but the queen continues to
live and increase in size till she is three inches long,
and wide in proportion, and weighs as much as 30,000
labourers. Then she begins to lay her eggs at the
rate of fifty or sixty a minute, and this goes on night
and day without interruption for many months, so



14 Stories of the Tropics.





you may imagine she has at last a pretty numerous
family.”

“But how can she take care of such a family as
that? It seems quite impossible!”

“Tt is indeed impossible. Luckily for her, she has
nothing to do but to lay her eggs, and there are
plenty of nurses to take care of them and bring up



NESTS OF WHITE ANTS.

the young ones properly. Besides, you must re-
‘member there is but one queen in every colony, and
the labourers and the soldiers have no children.”

“A very fortunate thing, I think,” said Charlie;
“but I don’t quite understand what you mean by the
labourers and the soldiers.” :

“The labourers and the soldiers are not perfect in-



White Ants. 15



sects like the king and queen; they are not fully de-
veloped, and on this account they are called neuters.”

“ What does developed mean, uncle?” asked Alice.

“Tt means unfolded ; just as in a bud every little
leaf is already formed, which is afterwards unfolded
in the flower. So in these insects there are the same
powers as possessed by the king and queen, but they
are not yet unfolded.”














NESTS OF WILITE ANTS.

“Then they all become kings and queens some
day, just as children grow up to be men and women,”
exclaimed Charlie.

“No, indeed; scarcely one in many thousands of
these insects becomes a king or queen. When fully
grown they leave their homes and fly in such clouds
that they would soon fill the earth and destroy every-
thing if they were suffered to live; but, happily for
us, they have many enemies.”



16 Stories of the Tropics.



Here Charlie interrupted his uncle. “But you
never told us they had wings, uncle.”

“No; they possess their wings only for a few
hours. As soon as they are fully grown, or developed,



FORK-TAILED GOAT-SUCKER,

these wings appear (four long narrow wings folded
over each other) ; and then, as I told you, they fly in
clouds ; but while flying, the birds, goat-suckers, and















The Ant-Eater. 17)

bats attack them, and when they have shed their
wings (which always fall off after a few hours), they.
are pursued by ants, toads, spiders, and other ene-
mies. There is one animal, the Ant-Eater, which,
with the assistance of its long tongue, expressly
adapted for the purpose, consumes hundreds of these
white ants in a very short space of time. If the



THE ANT-EATER,

labourers see one fortunate pair survive, they imme-
diately take them to a place of safety, and build
their little palace of clay. Then they are duly elected
king and queen, and a new colony is founded,”

“Ts there any difference between the soldiers and
the labourers?” asked Alice.

B



18 Stories of the Tropics.

Ek,



“Ves, there is; the soldiers are the males, and the
labourers the females.. The soldiers are six times as
large as the labourers; they have powerful jaws pro-
- ceeding from enormous heads, and it
+ is their duty to fight for their friends
and their country, a duty which they
perform very well, I assure you. The
labourers are the nurses. It is their
business to nurse the queen’s children.
} They only have the privilege of en-

SOLDIER ANT. tering her palace, for the doors are
not large enough to admit the soldiers.”

“You have not told us all about their houses yet,
uncle,” remarked Charlie.

“No, I have not had much chance of telling you
‘all about’ anything. You ask too many questions,
Now, don’t interrupt me again for three whole minutes,
and I will give you a description of their houses,”

“Oh, thank you, uncle; we won't say a single
word,” said both the children,

“Well, Pl tell you about the houses, or rather cita-
dels, which I saw myself in Western Africa. They
are twelve feet high, and so strong I used often to
stand on them to get a good view of the surrounding
country.” :

“Was there much to see, uncle?” asked Charlie.

“There now—”

“Oh, I forgot; but was there?”

“Not much where I happened to be at that time,
only a large grassy plain. I told you about the
queen’s palace, which is in the centre of the building.





Soldiers and Labourers. eco
There are numberless rooms encircling the palace,
and in these rooms there is a large train of labourers
and soldiers constantly in attendance. The space
between these rooms and the outer walls is filled with
cells, some of which are used as store-rooms, some as
nurseries. Then there are wonderful subterranean
passages running under the bottom of the hill to a
depth of three or four feet, and carefully lined with.
clay. These subterranean passages are connected
with a number of smaller galleries that looked some-
thing like a corkscrew, winding round and round.
They are not very good climbers, so they make this
kind of spiral staircase to save themselves the steep
walk up-hill.”

“What lazy fellows!” exclaimed Charlie.

“Nobody can accuse them of that, Charlie. No,
the termites work hard enough; they are always
building, or nursing, or waiting on their queen, or
carrying clay, wood, water, and provisions to the
different rooms and galleries.”

“It sounds just as if they were real men and
women we are talking about, uncle. I had no idea
there were such interesting and clever creatures
among the insects,” said little Alice.

“Oh, Alice, that’s so like a girl,” said her brother.
“If you had studied insects as J have, you would
soon have found out they are clever enough even here
in England. But those African fellows are uncom-
_monly sharp, I must own.”

“They arrange all their work so well,” continued
their uncle, “and each has his own work and his own



20 Stories of the Tropves.



place. We may learn a good deal from them, Master
Charlie ; and the soldiers don’t sneer at the labourers,
but help them, and fight for them as men and boys
should for zheir little women. I once made a breach
in a termite’s nest with my hatchet, and then retired
to a little distance to watch the effect. The labourers
retired in alarm, for they cannot fight ; and out came
a soldier, evidently reconnoitring. He gave an alarm,
and two or three more appeared, then a large army
of them, all ready for war. The poor soldiers are
under one great disadvantage, for they are blind, and
it is really amusing to see them tumbling over each
other, sometimes missing their hold and rolling down
the sides of the hill. They soon recover themselves,
however, and bite everything they come near. Their
‘fierceness and courage are really wonderful. For-
tunately, they have no poison glands, or perhaps I
should not have been here to tell the tale.”

“What, uncle, did they bite you?” exclaimed both
the children at once.

“One fellow got on my coat sleeve and bit my
arm. It bit right through the cloth, and hard work I
had to get rid of the creature. But I was determined
to go onwatching. As I made no further breach, the
bustle subsided and the soldiers retired. Then came
the good little labourers, each carrying a load of
tempered mortar half as big as himself, laid it on the
edge of the hole, and hastened back for more. There
were crowds of labourers, all working at the same
moment, and in half an hour the breach I had
made was repaired.”



A Travellers Tale. 21



“ Are there any termites in Europe, uncle?”

“Ves, some have been imported in ships, to the
great sorrow of the French ; they have done all they
could to get rid of them. These mischievous little
creatures have destroyed some valuable documents
belonging to the French government.”

“ But where were these documents kept ?”

“Tn the prefect’s palace.”

“T didn’t know they ever got into houses.”

“Indeed they do; when I was in South Africa my
table was once left too long in one position, and the
rogues destroyed it entirely—swallowed it with as
much ease, and probably as much enjoyment as you
would swallow a plum-pudding.”

“ Oh, uncle, now that zs what papa calls ‘a travel-
ler’s tale’; now you are laughing at us, I am certain.
How could such little creatures swallow a table?”

“T didn’t say they swallowed it whole, did I?
They worked away at the inside, thousands and
thousands of them at once, and left nothing but the
barren shell. They are such sly little creatures. I
had been away on a hunting expedition, and when
I came back there was nothing left of my table but
the outside, which was perfect. I threw my travel-
ling bag on it, and straightway it tumbled to pieces.
However, a friend of mine, who took up his residence
for a time near me, was even worse off than myself;
the termites got into his bed and all his boxes, des-
troyed his books, and at last fairly turned him out of
house and home, for as he could not drive them away,
he was obliged to get a lodging elsewhere.”



22 : Storws of the Tropics.



“J wonder such horrid pests are allowed to live.
Do they ever do any good, uncle?” asked Charlie.

“Yes, they do a great deal of good in those tropi-
cal countries,” replied his uncle ; “no doubt they are
necessary to keep the air pure, for they are always
busy removing decayed vegetable substances. So.
we must not be too hard on them, if now and then
they destroy a few things which they ought to let
alone. But you will like to hear about another kind
of white ant which I once saw. Most of them, as I
told you, live and work under covered galleries, but
the marching termite exposes itself to the light of
day. It is not blind like those I have been speaking
of, Iwas once passing through a thick forest, when
I heard a hiss like that of a serpent. I followed
the noise and found an army of marching white ants
emerging from a hole in the ground, and marching
quickly. After proceeding a little way they divided
into two columns; they walked fourteen or fifteen
abreast, following each other closely and going
straight forward. They were nearly all labourers.”

“Did you find out what made the hissing noise ?”

“Yes; and a most amusing scene it was. Some
soldiers here and there mounted on plants about
a foot from the ground, hung over the army, and by
striking their jaws upon the leaves at intervals, pro-
duced a peculiar noise. It seemed a signal for quick
marching, as the whole army replied with a hiss and
increased their pace. At length the army reunited,
and descended into the earth again. But I have
talked too much about these termites,”



Beetles and Butterflies. 23



“No, uncle; they are so interesting.”

“Yes, they are certainly interesting, but you ought
to hear something about the gorgeous butterflies and
beetles of the tropics. How they would delight your
eyes, Charlie!”

“Oh, I have seen many of them in the British
Museum. But they must look splendid flying about.
How I should like to go over and catch some!”

“A gentleman named Mr. Wallace did go to the
Malay Archipelago on purpose to collect specimens
of various kinds of insects, birds, reptiles, and other
creatures. He came home in 1862, bringing with
him more than a hundred and twenty-five thousand
specimens of natural history, of which more than
thirteen thousand were butterflies.”

“Oh, uncle, how delightful!” exclaimed Charlie.

“He has written a- book about his adventures,
which you will enjoy reading some day, my boy.
Fancy his finding a beetle whose legs spread over
a space of eight inches!”

“Did you ever find one, uncle?”

“No, but I have been to the Moluccas, and the
insects there are wonderfully beautiful. Mr. Wallace
found a beetle such as I have described, and he found
also a splendid bird-winged butterfly, a very rare
insect. The male measures more than seven inches
across the wings, which are velvety black and fiery
orange. Mr, Wallace says that his delight at finding
it was so great that the blood rushed to his head, and
he nearly fainted with excitement.”

“Oh, uncle, I can quite understand it,’ cried



24 Stories of the Tropics.



Charlie; “I ae be pees myself for joy if I
could Gatch one.”

Papa, who had been a most attentive listener, now
puts in a word.

“Come, Ned, the children must fea go to bed;
we shall have this boy flying off to the Moluccas in
search of butterflies, instead of leading a respectable
life in England, improving the state of English law.”

“Just one question, uncle,” pleaded Charlie. “ Did
Mr. Wallace catch the insects all himself, or did he
have anybody to help him?”

“Sometimes he employed the natives to catch
insects for him, in return for which he would give
them tobacco, which they highly valued. They used
to bring him quantities of creeping things in bamboo
boxes ; but, unfortunately, they had generally eaten
each other, like the Kilkenny cats, before they came .
into Mr. Wallace’s possession. Beetles, butterflies,
and other insects were all boxed up together.”

“Oh, what a pity! Now, uncle, you will promise
to tell us something about the tropics every day you
are here, won't you?” begged Charlie.

“That will be a whole week, counting Sunday,”
said his sister; “we shall have six more evenings
before you go, uncle ; do promise.”

“Well, I think I may promise a story some part
of the day; perhaps it will not always be in the
evening.”

“Then we shall feel as if we had spent a whole
week at the tropics,” exclaimed little Alice, delighted ;
“T am sure I shall dream about those clever little



Good-night. 25



termites to-night. Good-night, uncle; I wish I was
a great traveller like you.”

“And I mean ¢o de a great traveller some day,”
said Charlie, “and then, perhaps, I shall make dis-
coveries, and bring home lots of new butterflies and
beetles, more than Mr. Wallace did.”

“Not much fear of that, Charlie,” said his uncle;
“but your papa will put a stop to my stories if they
encourage your roving propensities. You must be
content with fancying you have had a week at
the tropics while you have never stirred from your
own fireside. And I can assure you that it will be
very much more comfortable to sit at home and read
ot hear of the wonders of tropical countries, than to
go and see them for yourself.”







CHAPTER II.

Moonlight Walk in Jamaica—Fire-flies—Praying Mantis—
Mosquitoes—Yams—The Southern Cross—A Lunar
Rainbow—The Blue Mountain—A Cold Night—Stingless
Bees —Brush-footed Spider—Wisdom of God—The

you were in the West Indies?”
asked Charlie the next evening.
“J know you've been there, and its
just the right place for fire-flies.”

“Ves, Charlie, I have seen them,
and very beautiful they are.”

“TJ suppose they’re not a bit like
common flies?” asked Alice.

“They are not really flies, Alice, but beetles,”
replied her brother, who had been getting up the
subject from a book which he had found in his
father’s library. “The Spaniards of South America
call them cucuyos.”

“ Oh, Charlie, you'll be as clever as uncle is, some
day,” said Alice, much impressed. “But if you know
all about fire-flies, you shall tell me when we are

alone, and uncle can talk about something else now,”
26 ;





Night 1 Fanaa. : 27



“No, I want to hear about veal ones, that uncle
has seen with his very own eyes.

“Well, my boy, I saw a good many in Jamaica. I
spent three weeks in that island with my old school-
fellow Horace White. The second evening I spent
at his house I shall never forget. The day had been
intensely hot, and just as I was looking forward to
a quiet night’s rest, Horace (he has the strength of
Hercules, I believe) proposed a walk. Well, I ought
to thank him for dragging me out. I would not have
missed that walk for a great deal. The sky was.a
deep, deep blue, such as you never see in England ;
and the moon, far more beautiful than she appears to
us, was pouring down a flood of light on forest and
sea and mountain. There had been a storm on the
previous day, and the drops of rain, still hanging
from every twig, looked like diamonds in the moon-
light. We walked through a glade surrounded by
woods, and then diverged into a road cut through a
forest, a gloomy place enough even by day. Strange
noises filled the air, proceeding, doubtless, from the
inhabitants of the forest, with whom I did not care
to make closer acquaintance. I turned round to my
friend and suggested that it,was getting near bedtime.”

“Oh, uncle, how could you? I shouldn't have
been afraid,” said Charlie, boldly.

“Well, I’m glad I have such a brave fellow for my
nephew; but I was tired that night, and not at all
disposed for encounters with snakes, robbers, or any
other enemies to mankind ; besides, I was a young
traveller then,”



28 Stories of the Tropics.

“Ah, that makes a difference, certainly,” said
Charlie, graciously excusing his uncle’s weakness.

“But my friend, who is very fond of insects, like
you, Charlie, insisted on taking me to one particular
dell, where, he said, owing to the darkness, we should
see the fire-flies to the best advantage. So, on we
went, and certainly I was rewarded for my trouble.
We stood watching them a long time, flashing along



FIRE-FLY,

like meteors, now giving out their red and green
lights, now hiding themselves in darkness, for I sup-
pose you know, Charlie, that they can blaze out and
become dull at pleasure.”

“Can they really, uncle?” asked Alice, in a
whisper, for she was much awed. She had been
wondering whether, when Charlie grew up to be a
man, he would insist on taking her to these dreadful
forests in search of fire-flies. -

“Did you catch any, uncle?” she continued, half









STORM IN A TROPICAL FOREST.

29)







Five-Flies. 3h



hoping that her uncle might be able to satisfy Charlie
by showing him a specimen.

“Not that night, but one evening several came into
the room where we were sitting, and then I had a
good opportunity of observing them. There was no
moon that night, and we put out the lights in order
to see them the better. It would have been pitch
dark if it were not for these wonderful insects. But
they gave such a brilliant light at times I could have
seen to read by it. I caught one, and the moment I
touched it, it began gradually to give out its light till
it quite dazzled me. I kept it under a glass, but
it displayed very little light the next evening, even
when I handled it.”

“ Perhaps it was sulky, and did not like to be kept
prisoner,” said Alice.

“Poor thing, it was out of spirits, and missed its
food and exercise, I suppose. I let it go, and hope it
recovered itself when it joined its friends.”

“What do they feed on, uncle?” asked Charlie.

“T fancy they are fond of the sugar-cane, for on a
calm night I have often seen them sport about like
falling stars on the sugar plantations.”

“Did you see any other curious insects in Jamaica,
uncle?” asked Alice.

“Yes, I saw a great number; there was a very
interesting one called the Praying Mantis.”

“What a funny name,” said Charlie. “Why do
the people give it such a title?”

“Because of a remarkable habit it has of sitting
with its long flattened fore-legs held up and joined as"



Bo Stortes of the Tropics.



if in the attitude of prayer. There are some curious
stories told about this insect. Some natives of the
countries where the mantis is found, say that if a
traveller has lost himself in a forest, and asks a
mantis to show him the way, the kind little creature
will lift up one of its arms and point in the right



THE PRAYING MANTIS.

direction. An old legend tells us that one of these
insects being met by a celebrated Roman Catholic
saint, and commanded to chant as well as to act
a prayer, at once obeyed. Of course there is no
truth in these stories, which have arisen on account
of the strange habit of the mantis.”



The Praying Mantis. 33



“You did not tell us why the mantis acts so
curiously, uncle,” said Charlie.

“Tt is because it feeds on flies and small insects of
various kinds, which it seizes and pulls to pieces with
its fore-legs, and it is while waiting for its prey that
it assumes the strange attitude which gives it its
name.”

“Did you bring any of these funny insects home,
uncle?” asked Alice. .

“No, my dear, I am no collector of insects, though
I like to notice their ways, but you may see plenty of
specimens, no doubt, at the British Museum.”

“Now, Ned, I think it is my turn,” broke in Mr.
Stone, who had been a most patient listener; “ you
have been discoursing all this time about insects to
please Charlie, and if you can possibly turn your mind
for a few minutes from this absorbing subject, perhaps
you will give me a little idea how you spent your
time in Jamaica, and what sort of place it is where
our old friend Horace has settled down.”

-“Tt is full ten years since I was there, you must
remember. He had a pleasant house on the borders
of Westmoreland.”

“Westmoreland! that’s in England,” exclaimed
both the children together.

“Yes, but it is in Jamaica also,” replied their uncle,
“or rather the people there, who like everything
English, because they are English themselves, are fond
of calling the places by our old English names, I
had avery pleasant time of it. We spent the day
something in this fashion. About six o’clock in the

Cc





34 Stories of the Tropics.



morning a negro servant would bring me a cup of
coffee and a slice of toast, which I took in bed.”

“ And how did you sleep? Were the mosquitoes
troublesome ?” asked Mr. Stone ; “but I am trenching
on a dangerous subject, for Charlie will want to know
all about the manners and habits of mosquitoes.”

“That is soon told; they are the most horrible
pests in the world. It is impossible to sleep without
having a thin net of muslin round the bed. It is
quite a science to get into bed through the smallest
possible opening in the net, and then carefully to
close it up so that nothing can get through. I really
believe that if one were to attempt to sleep in Jamaica
without a mosquito curtain, he would be only fit for
a lunatic asylum by morning. Well, I spent an hour
and a half at least in dressing, and it was generally
eight before I emerged from my room. Then Horace
and I got our morning ride, in which we were
generally accompanied by one or other of his girls.
He has a kind, hospitable wife, and three charming
daughters. At ten we sat down to breakfast, and
a capital one it was—yams, potatoes, eggs, fruit, and
tinned meats from England. The ladies do not
go out between breakfast and dinner, the sun is too
much for them, but I managed to get about on horse-
back, for it is not so frightfully hot in the country,
especially in the hills, as it is in the towns. At
Kingston, and Spanish Town, too, the heat is some-
thing fearful. I never endured such misery in my life
as I did one day under the burning sun in Spanish
Town.”



Yams. ects



“T have a question to ask, uncle, but I don't like
to interrupt him,” said Alice to her brother, in what
she intended to be a whisper, but her uncle’s quick
ears caught the remark.

“So have I,” replied her brother.

“Well, now let me have your questions,” said their
good-natured uncle. Then turning to Mr. Stone:
“John, this is the children’s hour, you must remember,
so they have a right to command me. Now, Alice?’



THE YAM.

“What are yams, uncle?”

“ West Indian vegetables. The roots, or tubers, are
eaten; they are oblong, and sometimes very large,
brown outside and white inside. They are brought
over to England and sold in the shops of London and
Liverpool.”

“ Which is the capital of Jamaica, uncle, Kingston
or Spanish Town ?” asked Charlie.



36 Stories of the Tropics.



“ Kingston is the capital, my boy, and a miserable
place it is; or at least it was when I was there. It is
not lighted at night, and the streets are not paved.
The governor lives at Spanish Town, and that is a
pity. If the seat of government were at Kingston,
perhaps the inhabitants would take a little more pride
in their city. But I was describing how I generally
spent my day. We dined at six, and dressing for





THE SOUTHERN CROSS.



that meal always occupied full a hour. I used to do
it in parts, and sit down between each act. Putting
on one’s boots is a serious exertion over there, I can
assure you; but the most pleasant part of the day is
the evening, the stars are so beautiful in the tropical
world”? |

“Did you see the constellation of the Southern
Cross?” asked Charlie. —

“Yes, I saw it. I must confess I was a little dis-



A Lunar Rainbow. 37



appointed in it; I expected something more striking.
The stars are not very large, and it does not make a
perfect cross; the star on one side scarcely corres-
ponds with the opposite one; it is smaller in size
than I thought; but the constellation must always
be interesting, and I am glad to have seen it. I had
another pleasure, too, in Jamaica, and that was seeing
a lunar rainbow. It is sometimes seen in England,
but I believe it is rather a rare sight even in Jamaica.”

Alice looked puzzled, so her uncle kindly explained:
“A lunar rainbow, my love, is a rainbow caused by
the moonlight instead of the sunlight. You know
that the beautiful coloured arch is the effect of light
on the drops of rain.”

“Ts a lunar rainbow as bright as a solar one?”
asked Charlie.

“The colours were not so clear and decided in the
one I saw, probably they never are. Now I am going
to tell you about an expedition I had up the Blue
Mountain Peak in Jamaica, which I think you will
like to hear ; and then we will go back to our insects
again, my boy.”

“ Hurrah!” shouted Charlie; and Alice, from
sympathy with her brother’s pleasure, made a little
extemporaneous dance round the room clapping her
hands. At last she bethought herself that an inter-
ruption like this to her uncle’s narrative was hardly
proper, especially in a young lady seven years old;
so, demurely seating herself on the rug at her uncle’s
feet, and resting her head against his knee, she
observed ; =



38 Stories of the Tropics.



“A frisk now and then does one good, you know,
uncle; but I’m going to be quiet now, so tell us about
the Blue Mountain.”

“ Ah, that was a ‘frisk’ of mine, and a very foolish
one too.”

“Why did you go up, uncle?” asked Charlie; “and
is it very high ?”

“T went up because I was a blockhead, and my
friend was as bad to take me, and sacrifice himself as
he did, for I found he went entirely for my amuse-
ment. The Peak is said to be 8,000 feet above the
level of the sea.

“Stop a minute, ae I must try and think how
high that is,” said Charlie. “Eight thousand feet.
There are three feet in a yard.” Charlie stopped and
looked puzzled. His papa, uncle, and Alice were
silently awaiting the result of his meditations. At
length he got up. “I can’t do it without a pencil.”

Away flew Alice, and, like a little fairy, produced
pencil and paper in a moment. “ He'll do it, papa,”
she whispered ; “ but, you know, we mustn’t interrupt
him.

“Vou will have to go with Charlie on his butterfly
expeditions, Alice,” returned her father, “he could not
do without you.”

“ But, papa, we are not going. It is much nicer to
sit here by the fire and pretend, for I feel I am in
Jamaica all the time, and we are just ae up the
Blue Mountain.”

Charlie here announced that eight ee feet are
nearly a mile and a half. “Just as far as to Hunt’s





The Llue Mountain. 39



Cottage, Alice; but straight up, as straight as ever
you can go,” pointing with his pencil up to the
ceiling.

“But the mountain does not go straight up, and
you went a roundabout way, I dare say, uncle. What
miles and miles you must have walked!” said Alice,
compassionately. :

“Indeed we did, and pretty footsore and weary we
were when we got to the top, I assure you. We rode
part of the way, however, as far as the house of a
coffee-planter ; it is the highest inhabited house in
the island. He is an hospitable fellow, and gave usa
good breakfast ; but on parting from him we soon got
into the clouds, and we never came out of them till
we reached his dwelling again on our way homewards.
It was nothing but mist, fog, clouds, and rain all the
way. We saw absolutely nothing,

“ Something like the Snowdon expedition, Ned.”

“Yes, but this was infinitely worse. When you
and I got to the top of Snowdon, there was a hut
and a fire ready for us; but on the Blue Mountain
there was nothing of the kind. We had made tre-
mendous preparations for spending the night there, in
order to see the sun rise next morning. Horace took
six negroes, who carried on their heads a grand supply
of eatables, besides wine, firewood, and warm clothing,
When we got to the top, the first thing we did was to
make a fire and set the negroes to work to build a
hut ; but the fellows were thoroughly out of temper.
I suppose the soaking they had had disagreed with
them ; at any rate they were as sulky as bears, and



40 Stories of the Tropics.



as lazy as—as—that animal.” (Uncle Ned at a loss
for a comparison, had looked round the room, and his
eye rested on Jasper, the fat old Pomeranian dog, who
was quietly sleeping by the fire. He poked him with
his foot to give force to his remark).

“Uncle!” exclaimed Alice, indignantly, “how can
you?” and she smothered the old dog with kisses.

“Well,” resumed her uncle, we couldn’t get these
wretched negroes to work at all without constant
supplies of rum, and when that got into their heads
they became quarrelsome. I half wished we had left
them at the bottom of the mountain, but we should
have been worse off without them, for we were sorely
in want of shelter, food, and clothing. We tried to
eat a good supper—dried our clothes, smoked our
pipes, and made the best of it, but it was hard work
to be cheerful under the circumstances, cold, wet, and
tired out as we were.”

“Cold, uncle, in the tropics ?”

“Yes, it was cold enough up there—the cold kept
us awake all night, though we put on all the clothes
and covering we had got.”

“What in the world have you told us this dismal
story for, Ned?” asked Mr. Stone; “I hope the
weather cleared, and you were rewarded by a good
sunrise in the morning.”

“Sunrise! I shall never go up a hill to see the sun
rise again. I have seen nothing but mist from that or
any other mountain. I tell this tale to warn this rash
boy of yours against such excursions. We shall have
Charlie going up all the mountains in his reach before



A Curious Spider. 41



long, so it’s as ‘well he should know beforehand what
he may expect for his pains.”

“Was it any better coming down, uncle?” asked
Alice.

“Tt was only better in this respect, that every step

out of a difficulty is preferable to stepping farther and
farther into it,” replied her uncle.
_ “Geography is much more amusing since you came,
uncle, you make it all real; but I used to think it a
stupid lesson. Now I quite want to get my maps
and find Kingston, and Spanish Town, and the Blue
Mountain Peak, because we’ve been there—haven’t
we, Charlie?”

Charlie was not disposed to assent to this, perhaps
his imagination was less active than his sister's.

“TI mean to go, really,” he answered ; “it may be
very well for you to play about it, but it’s serious to
me.”

“Now, children, it is getting towards bedtime, and
if you want to hear more about the insects, I must
begin at once. There isa much greater variety, and
they are far more beautiful in the Moluccas than in
the West. Indies ; but it is too long a journey to take
_te-night, so I shall confine myself to some wonderful
- bees, and a curious spider that I saw in Jamaica.”

“And you will tell us more about insects to-
morrow ?” asked Charlie, eagerly.

“T am really afraid there will not be time, I have so
many other things to tell. You ought to hear about
the snakes and the grand old forests, and the grass
that grows higher than many of our English trees,”



42 Stories of the Tropics.



“ Oh, how splendid ! snakes are as good as insects,
aren't they, Alice?”

“T wish you were going to stay here always, uncle.
Couldn’t you live here ?” suggested Alice.

“I am afraid not, little woman; but now let me tell
about the bees. My friend Mr. White showed me a
hive in the hollow of an old tree, and as he stood
watching them, two or three settled on his coat. I
was astonished to see him handle them without any
fear. Unwilling to be on the same intimate terms
with them, I stepped back a few paces. Presently
to my great amazement, Mr. White, in the coolest
manner, took up portions of the cells where the young
ones where deposited—the nurseries in fact. Of
course the old nurses were very indignant, and
clustered on his hand in great excitement. ‘You
deserve to be well stung for your audacity,’ I said,
for I was really angry. ‘Yes, I do,’ he answered,
quietly, ‘but these bees have no sting. They are a
peculiar kind, and I doubt if there is another hive
like this in the island. I am told, however, that they
are less uncommon in the East.’”

“ But, uncle,” said Charlie, “bees work in the dark.
How could Mr. White get at the hive? I should
have thought they would have made it low down in
the hole.”

“So they did; but a great part of the tree was
cut away, and the cutting just displayed the upper-
most of the brood cells. The honey was stored away
at the bottom of the hive.

“Before we say good-bye to Jamaica, I must tell

















Brush-footed Spider. 45
you of a splendid spider I saw there ; it was an inch
and a half long without its legs, and those, if spread
out, would have covered a dessert plate. Its body is
very beautiful ; it is covered with round white spots,
each of which is surrounded by a black border, and
you may imagine how pretty these spots look on a
rich green ground. It has very curious legs, a bunch
of black hair is set round the extremity of the first
and second joints like the bristles of a brush. For
this reason it is called, I believe, the Brush-footed
Spider. Its web is more wonderful than itself.
Some of the threads are twelve feet long, and nearly
as thick as sewing silk; they are yellow in colour,
and very strong.”

“J wish, uncle, there were as many beautiful in-
sects here as there are in the tropics,” said Alice,
drawing a deep breath.

“T am very glad you cannot have your wish,
Alice ; we should all be starved if you did.”

“ Starved !” exclaimed Alice, and opened her eyes
in wonder. Charlie thought a minute, and then cried,
“T see it! Of course they couldn’t live without food,
and there are plenty of trees and vegetables for them
over there; it would never do for them to come here
and eat all ours.”

“But still we need not starve,” said Alice; “we
could eat mutton, and chickens, and eggs, and—”

“But, Alice, what would the poor sheep and fowls
live on?” asked her father. “It is a very good thing
for us we cannot always have our wishes, they would
often do us serious harm.”



46 Stories of the Troptes.



“That’s true, Alice,’ said her uncle, carnestly.
“It was many years before I found it out, but I
know it now. You may forget all else I have told
you, but remember this, God knows what is best for
us, and God loves us.”

“ But I knew that before, uncle,” said Alice.

“We think we know it, my dear, till trouble
comes ”——and as her uncle spoke he took her affec-
tionately on his knee—“ but it takes a lifetime to
learn that lesson thoroughly. One of the great
pleasures in studying natural history is that it shows
us so much of God’s wonderful wisdom and love.
Every creature He has made is exactly fitted for its
own particular life, and has just the faculties it wants
to make it happy and useful. Its body is suited in
every respect to the place which it inhabits, and a
tropical bird or butterfly could no more live in an
English climate than you or I could live in Venus or
Mars.”

“ But tropical plants are brought over to England,”
said Charlie.

“Yes, they can do us no harm, so they are per-
mitted to live an unnatural, half-starved life in
greenhouses. But if it were in our power to bring
tropical insects over too, and keep them alive, there
would, perhaps, be men foolish enough to do it, and
we should soon have a famine in the land.”

“ Are insects of any real use, uncle?” asked Alice.

“Yes, my dear, indeed they are. I suppose if
there were no insects there would soon be an end
of all life on this planet.”







A TROVICAL FOREST,

47



eg ae





The Prisoner and the Beetle. 49






















“How wonderful, uncle! but do tell us their

“TI should like you to find some out for yourself.
harlie will help you, and you can tell me to-morrow
vening, I met with a curious story to-day of an
nsect that saved the life of a naturalist. I will read
t to you, and then I have done for to-night. It is
n Figuier’s ‘Insect World.’ You will find the book
n that table, Charlie.”
Charlie gave his uncle the book, and he read as
ollows, making comments as he went on :—Latreille
that is the name of the French naturalist) was de-
ained atthe prison of the Grand Séminaire. In
he same chamber which he occupied there was, at
the time, an old sick bishop whose wounds a surgeon
ame each morning to dress. One day, as the
surgeon was dressing the bishop’s wounds, an insect,
came out of a crack in the boards. Latreille seized
immediately, examined it, stuck it on a cork with
pin, and seemed enchanted at what he had found.
“Ts it a rare insect, then?” said the surgeon.
“Yes,” replied Latreille.
'“In that case you should give it to me,” said the

“Why?”

“Because I have a friend who has a fine collection
of insects, and he would be very pleased with it.” -
“Very well,” said Latreille, “take him this insect,

tell him pee you came by it, and pee him to tell me
its name.”

The surgeon went quickly to his friend’s house.
D



50 Stories of the Tropics.



This friend was Bory de Saint Vincent, a naturalist
who became celebrated afterwards, but who was very
young at that time. He already occupied himself
much with the natural sciences, and in particular
with the classification of insects. The surgeon de-
livered the insect to him, but in spite of all his
researches he was unable to discover to what order
it belonged.

Next day the surgeon, having seen Latreille again
in his prison, confessed to him that in his friend’s
opinion this coleopteron (that means deet/e) had never
been described.

Latreille knew by this answer that Bory de Saint
Vincent was an adept about insects.

As they gave the prisoner neither pen nor paper,
he said to his messenger, “I can see plainly that M.
Bory de Saint Vincent must know my name. You
tell him that I am the Abbé Latreille, and that I am
going to die at Guyana before having published my
book.”

Bory, on receiving this piece of news, took active
steps, and obtained leave for Latreille to come out
of his prison as a convalescent, his uncle and his
father being bail for him, and pledging themselves
formally to deliver up the prisoner the moment they
were summoned to do so by the authorities. The
vessel which was to have conducted Latreille to exile,
or rather to death, was getting ready whilst these
steps were being taken. This was quite providential,
for it foundered at sea, all the prisoners perished, and
the sailors alone were able to save themselves, A



Saved by an Insect. 51



little time afterwards his friends managed to have his
name. scratched cut from the list of exiles.

“So you see this little insect—it was a tiny beetle,
probably not bigger than a pin’s head—saved the
life of Latreille.”

“TI don’t like that story so well as yours, uncle,”
said Alice. “There are so many hard words in it,
and those French people have such funny, long
names, that I can’t remember them.”

But the story had very much interested Charlie,
who borrowed the book and slept with it under his
pillow, so that he might commence reading as soon
as he awoke in the morning,







CHAPTER III.

Living Jewels—Uses of Insects—Alice’s Difficulty—Living-
stone and the Lion—A Snake under the Pillow—Snake
Charmers—Adventure with a Python—The Boa Con-

strictor—The Secretary Bird— The Ich-

_ neumon—Rat — Snakes — The Adjutant —

Jamaica Negroes.







HERE'S a beautiful account of
fire-flies in that book, uncle,”
said Charlie, the next evening ; “you
did not tell us half!”

“T only told you what I saw, my
boy,” replied his uncle; “I have not
read the book; I bought it yesterday,
and was looking through it, when my

/ attention was caught by the anecdote I
read to you. But I shall be glad to hear what you
have to tell about the fire-flies.”

“Well, uncle, it says that, in some countries, people
who have to travel by night and go through dark
forests take the fire-flies and fasten them to their
feet to light them, and to drive away the serpents ;

isn’t that a grand idea?”
52



Living Fewels. 53



“I am sorry you have read that, Charlie,” said
Alice; “it will make you want to go to those ugly
forests more than ever.”

“Well, then there’s another thing, uncle,” con-
tinued Charlie, not heeding his little sister's anxious
face and pleading tones. “What do you think the
Mexican ladies do? Now just guess. They dress
themselves up with fire-flies, they do indeed! make
little net bags and stick them about their gowns
when they go to balls, instead of rubies and emeralds.
Must not they look grand? And they put them in
their hair too. They stick pins under the thorax,
and fasten them in that way; it sounds awfully cruel,
but the book says it does not hurt them. Now what
do you think of that? Isn’t it just like women?” __

Uncle Ned could not help laughing; but Alice,
who had great faith in her mother’s judgment, looked
very grave indeed.

“Never mind, Alice, he will know better some day,”
said her uncle; “men are poor creatures at best
without women to help them; and even now I don’t
know what Charlie would do without you, Alice.”

“No, indeed,” said Charlie, warmly; “but then
you know Alice is—is—”

“She is your sister, and that distinguishes her
above all others of her sex—raises her, in fact,
doesn’t it, Charlie?”

“Uncle, we have thought of some uses of insects,”
said Charlie, giving a turn to the conversation.
“ Alice found out one, and then I found out one.
Tell yours, Alice.”



54 Stories of the Tropics.



“They make food for birds, don’t they, uncle?”

“Yes, indeed they do; if we had no insects we
should soon lose our birds, and that I am sure you
would not like,” replied her uncle. ‘“ Swallows live
on them entirely; I dare say you have noticed them
on the wing pursuing their prey. When the atmo-
sphere is clear and the insects are high the swallows
soar upwards; but when the air is damp and the
insects are low, the swallows just skim the surface of
the earth and water, so one may judge a little of the
weather by the way the swallows fly. Thrushes,
blackbirds, sparrows, and indeed all kinds of birds,

_live chiefly on insects in the spring.”

“T know why you say spring, uncle,” said Alice,
“because the birds qw2// come and peck our cherries
and peaches and gooseberries when they are ripe. I
believe they like fruit best, after all.”

“J don’t know about that, Alice, but I think they
deserve a little fruit, for we should get none ourselves
if it were not for their exertions.”

“ How is that, uncle?” asked Alice.

“Why, my child, there would be such hosts of
insects, if we had no birds, that our gardens would
be quite spoiled, every vegetable and fruit-tree would
be eaten.”

“Tt seems, uncle, as if everything was just right,
doesn’t it?” said the little girl.

“Yes, indeed it is; God has made the world in
such wonderful order and with such perfect wisdom

that I daresay every single insect has its proper work
to do, and contributes in some way or other to our



Uses of Insects. 55



happiness ; of course, we do not always know how
they do this, but we are very ignorant, Alice, you and
I, we know next to nothing.”

Alice looked at her uncle, and her eyes opened
very wide indeed.

“Oh, uncle, you are not ignorant,’ she said at
length; “you seem to know everything.”

“T am beginning to know one thing, Alice, and
that is that God’s wisdom is so great, and His love
so perfect, that where we cannot understand we must
always trust Him. You remember what Jesus Christ
says about God’s care for the sparrows—that not one
of them falls to the ground without Him; and then
He went on to say that we, who are His children,
are of more value than many sparrows. God so
loves us that he not only feeds us and keeps us safe
from harm, but He sent His dear Son to die for us,
so that we may trust Him in all things. ‘He that
spared not His own Son, but gave Him up to die for
us all, how shall He not with Him also freely give us
all things?’ We must learn to believe in Him at all
times, and to trust Him in all things.”

“We must trust about the wasps, I suppose, uncle,”
said little Alice, simply, “for I don’t think even you
can tell me of what use they are.” She had lately
been badly stung by a wasp, and remembered the
pain it gave her.

“T suspect we should be terribly annoyed with
the flies if there were no wasps,” said her uncle. “J
have heard that the butchers in France are glad
enough of the wasps to drive the flies, off their meat,



56 Stories of the Tropics.



But now, Charlie, what was your thought about the
uses of insects? Alice says they are food for birds,
and I will add they are food for fish too, for the
water as well as the air is filled with them.”

“And you have just found out another use too,
uncle,” said Charlie ; “that they destroy other insects
that would plague us. Now I think you will say
mine is a capital use, keeping the air pure for us,
because if we had no burying beetles and ants and
such things to put all the nuisances out of sight, I
suppose we should have the plague or something.”

_ “Certainly we should, my boy ; we should come to
a speedy end altogether. Well, there are other uses,
which of course you know. Bees give honey and
wax, silkworms spin silk for us, and some insects, as
the cochineal, are useful for dyes ; but these uses are
very small compared with those we have been speak-
ing of.”

Alice’s face looked very serious, as if she were
considering some important matter. At length she
said, “It seems dreadful, uncle, that the insects and
creatures are all preying on each other.”

Yes, my dear, that is one of the things about
which we must ¢rwst. But we may see much mercy
even in that, if we think about it a little.”

“Why, uncle, how can that be?” exclaimed both
the children.

“It was a great puzzle to me once,” continued
their uncle; “but when .we consider that in this
world there is death as well as life, and pain as well
as happiness, that ‘the whole creation groaneth and



Alice's Difficulty. 57



travaileth,’ as St. Paul expresses it, we cease to look
for unmixed enjoyment even in the animal world.
And probably they suffer much less than we suppose.
I imagine they do not know what /ear is, the nervous
fear which we feel, and their death is often instan-
taneous, so that I believe they have far more enjoy-
ment than they would have by any other arrange-
ment.”

“Then you think they like being eaten, uncle?”
asked Alice, with a sly look at her papa.

“Well, I believe a fly that is eaten by a wasp has
a happier time of it than one that lives on into the
autumn months to get blind, and decrepit, and old.”

“Uncle, I wonder how you'd like some great giant
to come and eat you,” said Alice, rather indignantly ;
but Charlie, who was much interested in his uncle’s
theory, stopped her in his brotherly, abrupt fashion.

“Hush, Alice, don’t be silly; it’s not the same
thing at all. Insects don’t feel as we do.”

“To see a cat worrying a mouse is the most
puzzling thing to me,” said Mr. Stone.

“Tt looks cruel, but I dare say the mouse is happy
» all the time,” observed Uncle Ned, with the greatest
composure,

Of course he was immediately called on to givea
reason for this very remarkable statement.

“If you will fetch Mr. Wood’s book from the
library, Charlie,” he said—“that big book about
animals, on the lowest shelf near the window—I will
read you what he says about it.”

“What a dear, wise uncle you are,” said Alice,



58 Stories of the Tropics.



coaxingly, when Charlie was gone for the book;
“you find some good reason for everything ; and 1
believe you'll make me want to be a mouse in a
minute or two.” So saying, she skipped away to get
her uncle’s spectacles from a side-table, for the child
had a wonderful faculty of finding out and supplying
the wants of others, which had earned her the name
of the little fairy.

Then her uncle read :-—

“By some merciful and most marvellous provision,
the mode of whose working is at present hidden, the
sense of pain is driven out from the victim as soon
as it is seized or struck by its destroyer. The first
person who seems to have taken this view of the
case was Livingstone, the well-known traveller, who
learned the lesson by personal experience. After
describing an attack made upon him by a lion, he
proceeds :—

‘Starting and looking half round, I saw the lion
just in the act of springing on me. I was upon a
little height ; he caught my shoulder as he sprang,
and we both came down to the ground below together.
Growling horribly close to my ear, he shook me as a
terrier dog does arat. The shock produced a stupor
similar to that which seems to be felt by a mouse
after the first shake of the cat. It causes a sort
of dreaminess, 2 which there was no sense of pain
or feeling of terror, though I was quite conscious of
all that was happening. It was like what patients
partially under the influence of chloroform describe,
who see all the operation, but feel not the knife.











































































































































59

Ny =
Ny >
ESAS
RXV
SE





LIVINGSTONE AND THE LION. a











A Tiger Story. 61

This singular condition was not the result of any
mental process. The shake annihilated fear, and
allowed no sense of horror in looking at the beast.
This peculiar state is probably produced in all
animals killed by the carnivora; and, if so, is a
merciful provision by our benevolent Creator for
lessening the pain of death,’

This fearful experience is, although most valuable,
not a solitary one, and is made more valuable by that
very fact. I am acquainted with a similar story by
an officer of the Indian army, a German nobleman by
birth, who, while in Bengal, was seized and carried
away by atiger. He described the whole scene in
much the same language as that of Livingstone,
saying that, as far as the bodily senses were con-
cerned, the chief sensation was that of a pleasant
drowsiness, rather admixed with curiosity as to the
manner in which the brute was going to eat him.
Only by his reasoning powers, which remained un-
shaken, could he feel that his position was one of
almost helpless danger, and that he ought to attempt
escape. Perhaps in so sudden and overwhelming a
shock, the mind may be startled for a time from its
hold upon the nerves, and be, so to speak, not at
home to receive any impression from the nervous
system. Many men have fallen into the jaws of these
fearful beasts, but very few have survived to tell their
tale.” *

“There, now that I have two such men as Living-
stone and Mr. Wood on my side, I hope you will not

* Wood's Natural Listory—Mammalia,



62 Stories of the Tropics.



think my theory altogether a fancy ; Iam convinced
of its truth myself.”

But Charlie’s whole mind was taken up with Dr.
Livingstone’s wonderful adventure.

“How did Livingstone get away, uncle?” asked
he.

“Mr. Wood says nothing about that,” replied his
uncle, “but I have read the story in Livingstone’s
own work, and, if I remember rightly the lion left
him to attack another man whom he saw at a little
distance trying to shoot him. He bit this man in the
leg, but happily the bullets which had been fired at
the lion took effect before he had killed anybody.”

This story reminded Charlie that his uncle could
tell of escapes and adventures from his own personal
experience.

“Oh, uncle,” he cried, “papa told us once that
when you were in Ceylon you slept all night with a
great serpent in your bed, and you didn’t find it out
till morning. Do tell us about it.”

“Tt’s quite true, Charlie; I have had more than
one narrow escape from a serpent. I lay with a
cobra under my pillow all one night without knowing
it, though several times I fancied I felt something
move. In the morning, to my horror, when I re-
moved the pillow, I saw the creature’s green, glitter-
ing eyes staring at me. Fortunately, I had lain still;
if I had been restless my bed-fellow would soon have
darted at my throat.”

“Would he have killed you, uncle?” asked Alice
breathlessly.





Escape from a Cobra. 63



“Yes, indeed ; I should never have recovered from
a wound such as he could inflict, for cobras have the
most terrible poison fangs. Happily they are of a
sluggish disposition, and are not easily roused.”



THE COBRA,

“T suppose you killed him, uncle?” said Charlie
much excited.

“T did, indeed. I got my chopping-knife and
gave him first a knock on the head, then I chopped



64 Stories of the Tropics.



him across the back. But I was on guard the next
night, I assure you.” .

“ And did you find another?”

“Not under my pillow, but I carefully looked all
round the house as well as inside, for they say if one
is destroyed its companion is sure to be at hand to
avenge its death ; and I ad find another close to the
house, and put an end to him.”

“Charlie, I Zope you will never go to Ceylon,” said
Alice, earnestly.

“The Indians tame these cobras,’ continued her
uncle, “and have no fear of them. They carry the
snakes about in a basket, and when the performance
commences they open the lid, and out creeps the
snake. Then the man, who is called a snake
charmer, sings a kind of monotonous song, or plays
on a little instrument like a flute, which he carries
about with him, and the snake begins to move its
body in the most graceful manner, as if it were danc-
ing. It has a peculiar neck, which is the same size
as the head when at rest; but when excited or
irritated the neck swells, and it raises the fore part of
its body in a pretty, undulating manner.”

“Don’t use such long words, uncle, please,” said
Alice.

“T hardly know a shorter word to express my
meaning, dear. Undulating means up and down, this
way,’ and her uncle moved his hand’ to imitate the
motion of waves.

“T have read of a gentleman,” he continued, “who
allowed an Indian to exhibit a snake of this kind to





















































































































































































































































































sina

we















































































































Wg
Wg

= Fy

f )
2 \
SS '
S g







=\ Wl ee









_——$—SS]|SS—

INDIAN SNAKE CHARMERS.

65

—— |







Adventure with a Python. 67



him while he painted it. The Indian handled it
without the smallest fear, and the gentleman sup-
posed that its poison fangs had been extracted. So
he took hold of it himself to examine more closely
the beauty of its spots. He heard afterwards, how-
ever, that the very snake he had been handling killed
a young woman only the next day.”

“Oh, uncle, how horrible!” éxclaimed Alice, “I

wonder it did not bite him. But do tell us about
your other adventure.”
' “My other escape was from a python, an immense
creature that has no poison fangs, but can twist itself
round the body of a man and crush-it. One of these
monsters I once saw coiled round the posts of the
verandah where I had been taking an afternoon
nap.”

“ How did you kill him, uncle ?” asked Charlie.

“Twas obliged to get help for that. One of my
men made a strong noose with a rope, and poked at
the python with a long pole. Then he managed to
get the noose round his body, and dragged him down.
Having done this, he cleverly caught hold of his tail,
dashed his head against a tree, and finished him up
with a hatchet.”

“What a clever fellow!” said Charlie, admiringly.
“How long was the snake?”

“About ten or eleven feet. My man luckily had
been a good deal in snake countries, and was used to
them.”

“Eleven feet! Why that creature must have been
as big as you and papa together, if papa were stand-



68 Stories of the Tropics.
ing on your head, uncle. Only think of that, Alice ?”

exclaimed Charlie, delighted.
“ There is another snake of the same species as the






:
CW

Sa
a)

38
SSS YZ

IPS Se








It is called the Boa Constrictor, because it

python.
kills its prey, as the python does, by pressure or con-
This reptile is found in the tropical parts

striction.



The Boa Constrector. 69

of America, and has been known, it is said, to attain
the length of thirty feet. Its skin is very beautifully
marked with a number of large black and pale white
spots. The ancient inhabitants of Mexico worshipped
the boa, and called it ‘king’ and ‘emperor,’ and be-
cause of its terrible size and nature, regarded it as
divine.”

“Are all snakes poisonous?” asked Alice. “I
mean all except pythons; they crush people, and
that is quite as bad.”

“I hope they don’t often crush people, my child,
but they have been known to kill even buffaloes
sometimes, they are so fearfully strong. The one I
saw was quite a small one, they are often double the
size. But many snakes are not poisonous at all; in
fact, most of them are perfectly harmless.”

“JT wish snakes had as many enemies as the poor
termites,” said Alice.

_ “They have enemies, I assure you,” replied her
uncle. ‘The secretary bird is one of them. I had
the good fortune once to see a contest between this
bird and a snake—not a python, Alice—for the
secretary himself is only about three feet long. I
was not very near, but fortunately I had an opera
glass with me, which assisted my sight and brought
the whole scene before me. It was in South Africa.
I had taken out my glass to look at some object,
and my attention was arrested by the extraordinary
movements of a bird, which I recognized as the secre-
tary. Knowing his habits, I guessed that a snake
was within his reach, and I soon found my conjecture



70 Stories of the Tropics.



was correct. The bird was making a scries of the
most extraordinary hops to prevent his enemy's
escape. Every time the snake tried to get back to
its hole, the bird made a movement in the same
direction to cut off its retreat. At length the poor
snake, finding it could not get away, prepared to
make a spring on its tormentor. It half raised itself,
and with swelling head and glittering eyes hissed
fearfully.”



z ON ged CGT
THE SECRETARY BIRD.

“Uncle, if you were so far away, you couldn’t hear
it,” said Charlie.

“No, but it is the custom of serpents to hiss when
they are angry, so don’t interrupt my narrative, sir.
Well, the bird protected himself with one wing, and
struck at the snake with the other, till at last it was
quite stunned and exhausted. Then Mr. Secretary
gave it a powerful blow with his beak, split its head
asunder, and swallowed the creature before I put
down my eye-glass.”





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE SECRETARY BIRD AND SERPENT.

qi







The Secretary Bird. “73



“Oh, uncle, I wish I had been there,” said Charlie,
“those secretaries must have pretty strong wings.”

“Yes, and the wings are furnished with horny
protuberances like little clubs, with which the bird
beats his enemies.”

“Why is he called the secretary bird, uncle?”
asked Alice.

“The tufts of feathers at the back of his head have
given rise to his name. They have been thought to



THE ICHNEUMON,

resemble pens behind his ear, but he is more of a
warrior than a scholar.”

s Yes, Iam sure he is a brave warrior; I like him
for killing those horrid snakes,” said Alice. :

“The snakes have more formidable enemies still ;
the adjutant and the ichneumon. The adjutant is
a very large bird, about six feet high, and the
ichneumon is an animal rather like an immense rat.
It leaps on the serpent’s back, and kills him by
fastening its sharp teeth in his head.”



74 Stories of the Tropics.



“T have been thinking snakes could not possibly
be of any use,” said Alice, “ but I suppose they make
food for these creatures.”

“Yes, and they do good service in their lives also,”
said her uncle. “What do you think of people
keeping snakes in their houses, and making pets of
them ?”

“Do they now, veally, uncle?” said Alice.

“T have heard of such things; in fact, I have seex
rat-snakes kept as pets in Ceylon. These snakes,
however, are perfectly harmless. But what do you
think of a cobra, that poisonous creature, being kept
as a protector, instead of a dog?”

“Oh, uncle, I can hardly believe it,” said Alice.

“Tt does seem hard to believe, indeed, but the
fact rests on good authority. It is said that when
domesticated they glide about the house, doing no
harm to the inmates, and frightening away thieves.
The snakes are really very useful in destroying
vermin, and the rat-snake has acquired its name
from its dexterity in catching rats.”

“Well, uncle, I think I will never say anything is
useless again,” said Alice. “If snakes are some good
in the world, I shall have hopes of everybody.” Her
uncle laughed, but applauded his little niece’s wise
resolution.

“Uncle, you spoke of the adjutant just now,” said
Charlie, “is it not a kind of stork 2”

“Yes, my boy, it is; I have read an amusing story
of an adjutant somewhere, which I will tell you. It
was a tame bird belonging to a chief in some tropical



Story of an Adjutant. m5
island. It used always to present itself at dinncr-
time, and take its place behind its master’s chair.
The servants used to watch it, and beat it off if it





TUE ADJUTANT,

tricd to help itself to the delicacies on the table;
‘but one day it snatched a fowl, and swallowed it in
amoment. It used to fly about the island and roost
among the silk-cotton trees, and from thence it would



76 | Stories of the Tropics.

watch when the dinner was being carried across the
court, and get home in time to join its master at
table.”

“ Oh, uncle, how could it swallow the fowl whole ?”
asked Alice. “What a wonderful bird it must be!”

“Tt is an immense bird, my dear. It is nearly as
tall as-I am, and it thinks nothing of swallowing a
cat or a fox whole.”

Alice, who was very fond of cats, thought this
much more unpardonable than helping itself to the
chicken at table. “I wonder the cat does not stick
in its throat. I wish it would next time,” said she.

“How did the chief manage to tame it?” asked
Charlie.

“T believe they are not at all difficult to tame,’
replied his uncle; “they: soon become very sociable.”

“Tf it has a long neck like a stork,” resumed Alice,
who could not forget its cruelty to her pets, “I
should think the cat wozfd stick in its throat some
day.”

“But it has a short neck, my dear. It is like the
stork in its long bill and long legs, and I believe
it belongs to the same family—the herons.”

“Uncle, that’s a good plan,’ said Alice, “to give
them all a sort of surname to make us remember
them better.”

“Well, the cranes, herons, bitterns, spoonbills, and
storks, are all classed by naturalists under the Latin
name Ardea, meaning, ‘of the heron kind’; and the
adjutant is a sort of fourth cousin, I suppose. I hope
they are proud of their tall relative.”



Famaica Negroes. 77



“I’m sure I shouldn’t be proud of him if he does
such cruel things,” said Alice.

“Uncle, is it true that some snakes have two
heads?” asked Charlie. “I am sure I have heard
of a two-headed snake.”

“No, it is only that the tail bears a fancied re-
semblance to a head; the name is a misleading one.
I see, Charlie, you want to bring me back to the
snakes, but I think we have had enough for to-night,
we shall have little Alice dreaming about them. Let
us talk about the little harmless lizards which are so
pretty and playful; I shall have a great deal to tell
you about them.” 5

“T am afraid you must reserve it till to-morrow,
then, Ned,” said Mr. Stone. “Alice looks tired and
ready for bed ; she is quite pale to-night.”

“The truth is, my cat story was an injudicious one.
Let me tell her another to put it out of her head,
and she will sleep all the better.”

“Well, uncle,” said Charlie, “don’t begin the
lizards to-night, because you must not hurry over
them. I know they will want nearly a whole even-
ing to themselves, with frogs and toads, and such
like.”

“So they will, Charlie. What must my story be,
then?” and Uncle Ned threw back his head and
closed his eyes in thought.

“Tell us something about the black people, uncle
—the negroes in Jamaica,” suggested Charlie.

“Happy thought!” responded his uncle. “I can
. tell you an anecdote I read in Trollope’s book which



78 Stories of the Tropics.



I can quite believe from my own observation of their
love of dress. Mr. Anthony Trollope has been to
Jamaica and has written a book about his travels in
the West Indies. He says that one Sunday he was
riding to church with a friend, when he noticed a
negro girl walking either to or from church. She
was dressed in white from head to foot, and looked
very grand indeed. Her gloves, parasol, hat, lace,
and bugles, were all white, and she walked with
great dignity. Behind her walked an attendant,
carrying her prayer-book on her head. ‘ Who is that
princess?’ asked Mr. Trollope of his friend. ‘They
are two girls who work in my mill, answered the
gentleman ; ‘they are sisters, and take it in turns to
act the fine lady on Sunday. Next Sunday they
will change places, and your princess will walk be-
hind in common clothes with the prayer-book, while
her sister will be attired in white, and step with
queenly dignity, enjoying a delightful sense of her
own grandeur and importance.”

Alice laughed very much at this anecdote, and said
she should like to hear more about the black people
some day. Then she went off to bed, and had a
‘confused dream of the black princess walking alone
with a cat on her head, and being swallowed alive
by a “great big stork,’ as she told her uncle the

next day.
site





CHAPTER IV.

Indian Rice Fields— The Rice Bird—Sago—Tapioca—Indian
Corn—Mahogany—Cotton—Pepper and Nutmeg.

wi WE children had nearly done
their dinner the next day when
Uncle Ned came in from a
walk. The table-cloth was not
removed, and Alice was finishing
her rice pudding, while Charlie’s
face wore a look of thoughtful
consideration.

“T say, Alice,” he began, with
the air of one who has made a
grand discovery, “I can see five
things on this very table that have come from the
tropics!” oe

Alice gave an admiring look at her brother.

“Five, Charlie! There’s the pepper; that’s hot
enough for anything. But what else? You mustn’t
count mustard, you know, for we grow that in our
own gardens, with our names on it.”

“You should say we form our names with the
mustard seed ; our names don’t grow ov it,” corrected .
her brother. “But J am not counting the mustard.

79





80 Stories of the Tropics.



Where does your rice pudding come from ?—and my
sago?—and the sugar? I vote we get uncle to tell
us how they all look as they are growing.”

“ But, Charlie, you have only said four things now
— pepper, sugar, rice, and sago; what can the other
be?”

“Why, the table-cloth, to be sure!” answered
Charlie, triumphantly ; “isn’t that made of cotton ?”

“T am afraid not, Charlie,” said his uncle; “it
looks more like linen, I think, and that, you know, we
get from flax, which we grow at home. But Alice’s
frock will do as well, though it is not on the table;
and if the table-cloth does not come from the tropics,
you have the comfort of knowing that it rests on a
tropical tree.”

“Oh, the mahogany tree!” exclaimed Charlie.
“Do tell us all about it.”

“Which shall I begin with?”

“The rice pudding, please, uncle; because it will
soon be gone, and I want to look at it while you are
talking,” said little Alice.

“ By way of assisting the imagination?” asked her
uncle.

“To make your story a real one, Ned,” said her
papa, who was looking on with an amused expression.

“Yes, I believe you all take me to be a romancer
instead of a steady, common-place, matter-of-fact old
proser as I am.”

“You are not old, at any rate, uncle,” said Alice ;
“Tam sure you are not twenty-two yet.”

This assertion made every one laugh, for her uncle



Indian Rice-frelits. 81
rl eh eR
was at least fifty; but children’s ideas on the subject
of age are somewhat vague.

“Well, my child, I will begin, and tell you about
the rice fields which I saw in India.”

“Not the West Indies, you know, Alice,” explained
Charlie. “India isin Asia; it is only another name
for Hindostan.”

“Oh, uncle, you have been nearly all over the
world,” said Alice.

“Not quite, my love; but don’t interrupt me, or
we shall never get through our five subjects.”

“And a lot more I’ve got in my mind,” said
Charlie, half to himself. “ Now, Alice, be quiet.”

“The rice-fields I saw in India,’ continued Uncle
Ned, “lie very low, and are supplied by nature with
abundance of water, being situated in marshy ground.
In one part of the year, during the heavy rains, a
rice-field will appear a per-
fect swamp; you could see
nothing but mud, through
which buffaloes are perhaps
wading, or herons stalking.
But three or four months
later on you see a waving
cornfield, looking very much
like our barley. ‘The cultiva-
tion of rice is unhealthy ; the
alternate flooding and drying ISIS SIE STIN
of the land produces fever, which kills many of the
poor negroes who work on it.”

“J thought the rivers overflowed, uncle, and the |

Fr





82 Stories of the Tropics.

rice grew on their bank,’ remarked Charlie, anxious
to show his learning.

“You are quite right. These are the best rice-
fields,” replied his uncle; but there are others that
depend on the rains only, and others again that are
artificially watered, for rice cannot grow without an
immense quantity of water. It is a very fruitful plant,
and yields a much more abundant harvest than ourcorn.
The natives almost live upon it, and call it paddy.”

“T have heard of the vice-bcrd, uncle. Is that a
bird that feeds on rice?” asked Charlie.

“Yes, it has another name, the ‘Java sparrow.’ It
would amuse you to see how they frighten away
these birds. They put cords in every direction across
the field, to which are attached the most comical
’ scarecrows. Thecords all converge to the middle of
the field, where there is a watch-house built on high
poles. The watchman in his den moves the cords
from time to time, and that sets all the scarecrows in
motion, and frightens the poor little pad who fly
away fast enough.”

af oe what fun! I should like to be the watch-
man,” said Alice.

“Not for long, I fancy. But now, before the sago
pudding is taken away, we must talk about that.”

“T suppose it is just like rice and corn,” said Alice,
“50 I don’t much care about it.”

“No, indeed! Sago is the pith of a palm-tree.
You have been eating pith-pudding, Charlie.”

“Oh, do give mea little now, that I nas taste it,”
said Alice.



The Sago Palm. 83



“You must remember cook has mixed it with
other things—‘sugar and spice and all that’s nice,’ ”
said Charlie, in a sudden burst of what he called
“poetical inspiration.”

“Have you seen the sago tree growing ?—is it
tall?” asked Alice.

“Tts leaves are two or three times as long as your
papa, my dear, so you may imagine it is a good
height. I have seen many, and I was lucky enough
to see the whole preparation too while I was in
Ceram. The sago palm is like rice in one thing,
Alice; it requires a great deal of water, and grows in
swamps. When the tree is about twelve or fifteen
years old it flowers, and this is a sign it is going to
die. They cut it down just before it flowers, and make
the sago. “They clear away the leaves and branches,
take a broad strip of bark off the upper side of the
trunk, and then cut and break up the pith. This they
do with an instrument made on purpose for the
operation. It isa club with a bit of sharp quartz at
the end. With this they clear out all the pith; then
they wash it and separate the starch from the fibre,
which is thrown away.”

“They shouldn’t throw away starch, uncle,” said
Alice, gravely, “it’s a very useful thing ; but perhaps
they don’t want to stiffen their collars and frocks
out there.”

“Tt is the fibre they throw away my child,” said
her uncle, “ because it has no nourishment ; it is like
thread, you know ; the starch is put up very carefully
in bundles to be eaten.”



84 Stories of the Tropics.

“Oh, uncle, now you surely are laughing at me!”
‘said the child.

“No, indeed, many of the things you eat contain
a good deal of starch. Sugar is chiefly composed
of starch, and there is a good deal also in potatoes,
carrots, parsnips, and flour. Starch is very nourish-
ing. Sago, I suppose, is mainly composed of it.”

“Oh, uncle, you tell us such wonderful things,”
said Alice; “I should get quite learned, only my
head will never hold it all.”

“J mean to make notes,” said Charlie. “I shall
begin to-night.”

“But, uncle,’ continued Alice, “starch alone, and
water, like Sarah starches the collars with, would not
be very nice.”

“The raw sago boiled in water must be very like
that stuff,” said Uncle Ned; “but the natives eat it
with salt and limes, and add a little spice sometimes
to make it more agreeable.”

“What are limes, uncle?”

“A kind of lemon, only smaller, and the juice is
very delicious. Sago cakes are very nice, and they
are made in this way: the raw sago is broken up and
dried in the sun, then powdered and sifted. The people
have ovens on purpose for baking these cakes, and
they are made and cooked in about five minutes, when
the sago is ready—that is, dried and refined. You
would like the hot cakes very much, especially when
a little sugar and grated cocoa-nut are mixed with the
powder before baking. But you would not be in-
dulged with fresh cakes every day. Most of the sago





Tapioca and Maize. 85



used in the island is made into biscuits—that is, the
cakes are dried in the sun for several days. In this
state they will keep for years. They are a little hard
and rough, but I used to dip mine in water and toast
them, and in that way they were very eatable.”

“Ts tapioca pudding pith too, uncle?” asked Alice.

“No, that is the root of a curious tree, called the
cassava ; it grows in Brazil and other parts of tropical
America. The strange thing is, that the very same
tree which gives this wholesome food produces at the
same time a most dreadful poison. In order to
prepare the tapioca, they have to draw out first the
poisonous juice, which is easily done. All they have
to do is to cut the root into small pieces, and expose
these to the heat of the sun. If any animal were to
drink the juice that has just been extracted from the
tree, it would die; but the same juice, after being
kept awhile, is often boiled
with meat, and makes quite a
nice soup.”

“Why, uncle, how can that
be?”

“Tt is the effect of heat,
which draws out the poison.
The sun is a wonderful puri-
fier.”

“T suppose you have seen
the Indian corn grow, uncle ?” ;
said Charlie; “the maize, I MAIZE.
mean, that we give to our fowls.”

“Yes, I have; it is a great deal more productive





86 Stories of the Tropics. °



than our corn. Instead of getting twenty grains for
one, as we do, they often get from three to four
hundred. The Indians eat it. It is prepared in
various ways; sometimes they grind it into meal
and make a hasty-pudding of it, sometimes a cake.
Before the grain is ripe and hard, there are several
ways of using it. The tender green ears, stripped
of their leaves and roasted by a quick fire, are con-
sidered quite a delicacy eaten with a little salt or
butter. I have tasted a kind of beer, too, that was
made from it, but it was horribly bitter stuff.”

“J don’t think plants and trees are so interesting
as living creatures, are they, uncle?” said Alice,
rather wearily.

“Yet they ave living creatures,” answered her uncle.

“Yes, but you know what I mean.”

“Oh, I know you are longing to hear about the
lizards and ostriches and crocodiles and lions and
tigers and monkeys, and there will be very little time
left for them all. So I must finish up our subjects
as shortly as I can without any more digressions.
Tapioca and maize are not on the table, you know.”

“No, we have done rice and sago,” said Charlie;
“now there are four—no, five more—for there’s the
nutmeg in the pudding.”

“Don’t sigh, Alice,” said her uncle, “I won’t keep
you long with these; and to-night we will have the
lizards, yes, and ostriches, too, if we have time.”

“With one bound Alice was off her-chair and on
her uncle’s knee, her arms round his neck.

“Oh, Uncle Ned, how kind you are!” she said;



The Mahogany Tree. 587



‘what should we do without you? Fancy, Charlie,
two tropics in one day.”

“Rather hot and strong,’ remarked her papa.
“Why, Ned, while these children are in the house, I
am nobody at all. It is a good thing they go to
bed sometimes. I shall put on the clock to-night
an hour or two.”

Alice looked at her papa to see whether he meant
it, and decided that he did not, so she said nothing.

“Now, uncle, let’s go in for the mahogany-tree,”
said Charlie.

“T can only tell you that it has a pretty, light-
coloured foliage, and is very valuable. I have heard
of the wood of a single tree costing more than twelve
hundred pounds before passing into the hands of the
cabinet-maker.”

“Oh, uncle, how could that be?” asked Alice.

“It was a specially fine one, no doubt; but you
must remember that the cost of felling and carrying
over to England and sawing a very large tree would
be considerable.”

“Then our table must be almost worth its weight
in gold,” said Alice, “for it’s real mahogany,”

“But it’s not all mahogany. Don’t you know how
they manage?” said Charlie. “They veneer—but
you won’t understand that word. I mean, they make
the table of some common wood, and they put just a
thin slip of mahogany over it. Here, you can see
where this bit has been chipped off the sideboard.”

“Oh, what a good plan,” said Alice; “a tree cut
up like that in thin slices would make a good many



88 Stories of the Tropics.



sideboards and tables and beds and chairs too,
wouldn’t it, uncle? But now for the table-cloth—
no, that is linen. Well, my cotton frock, then; we
must have the cotton-plant next.”



THE MAIIOGANY-TREE.

“You can see that in the Kensington Museum, so
I need not spend much time in describing it. The
flowers are yellow and sometimes white, with a purple
centre, in shape rather like a convolvulus. The cotton
fields look very pretty in the autumn, with their dark





Pepper and Nutmeg. 89



folie and white and yellow flowers mixed with the
white down of the cotton from the half-open pod.
The poor negroes have to work hard then, for it is
important to get the cotton early, before its colour
is injured by the heat of the sun. Besides, the wind
would soon scatter it all about if it were not plucked
in good time.”

“Now for the pepper and nutmeg, and then we



THE PEPPER-PLANT.

have done,” said Charlie, “for I can tell Alice all
about sugar just as well as if I had been in the West
Indies myself. Besides, papa has told us, and all
about coffee and tea too, for he talks to us at break-
fast when you are not here, Uncle Ned.”

“T dare say if you dined with your papa every day
I should not have been able to give you much fresh
information about rice and sago.”

“But still they seem more real when you talk about
them,” said Alice, “ because you have seen them, and
papa has not.” '



90 Stories of the Tropics.

“Well, now for a walk in a pepper plantation,
Alice. You must fancy you see a number of trees
with straight tall stems ; these are not pepper-plants,
they are mangoes, and they support the pepper vines
which twine round them. The leaf of the pepper
vine is like ivy; the blossoms appear in June; they
are small, and of a greenish-white. These are suc-
ceeded by berries which grow like currants on little
stalks in bunches. The nutmeg is a tree about fifty
feet high. I suppose
you know that the
mace comes from the
same fruit; it sur-
rounds the shell of the
nut. The nutmeg grows
rather like a walnut,
being surrounded by
a sort of spongy coat.
When this bursts it dis-
closes a shining black

@. THE RIPE FRUIT, BURST. nut encased in a bright
b. THE MACE, ¢ NUTMEG ALONE, scarlet network.”



“Oh, I know, that network is mace,” said Charlie ;
“but it loses its colour when it is dried. Well, uncle,
I am glad you came in to-day, while we were having
our dinner, it’s so stupid to eat things like pigs with-
out knowing whether they are roots or seeds or pith.”

“Charlie, ’'ve got something in my mind,” said
Alice ; “but I won’t tell you till we get upstairs.”





CHAPTER V.

Gorillas—Capture of Master Joe—Escape from a Oroco-
dile—Sleeping on a Crocodile—Geckos—Anoles—The
Chameleon.






m@7 HE children were longer than usual that
Wevening before they made their appear-
ance at dessert, and when they did
“® come down they were transformed into
two little Indians. Faces and hands were
blackened with burnt cork, and Alice wore
a turban, which well concealed her shining
auburn hair. Charlie’s dark curly locks
suited his new character very well. He had dressed
himself like an Indian chief, with coloured rags, beads,
shells, and feathers stuck about him in the most
miscellaneous manner; and Alice, in a plain white
frock, with necklace and bracelets of large coloured
beads, and a white turban setting off her darkened
face, made a perfect little Indian girl.

They refused every fruit except dates, would not
speak a word of English, and offered their uncle, by
signs, a strange-looking compound, which Charlie
carried in a saucer and sipped from time to time
with apparent satisfaction.

Alice’s nurse, who had tried to fill to her the place
QL



92 Stories of the Tropics.

of the mother she had lost at her birth, and who de-
lighted in helping on all Master Charlie’s “grand ideas,”
stood a few moments at the door enjoying the scene.

“Tf you please, sir, that’s thin starch,” she explained
to her master in an undertone; “it’s just flavoured
with lemon-juice and nutmeg, and Master Charles
would insist upon it that it was the proper food for
Indians ; but I’m afraid it will make Miss Alice sick.”
_ “They won’t eat much of it, nurse, you may
’ depend,” said her master, soothingly. Then turning
to his brother, “ This comes of ‘two tropics’ in one
day. You've turned my children into savages, Ned.”

“ Charlie,” whispered Alice to her brother, “I think
we had better speak English, because papa and uncle
wouldn't understand our real Indian, you know.”

“Yes, perhaps we had,” said Charlie, condescend-
ingly.

“Now, uncle, haven’t we done it well? Alice
wanted me to make the raw sago, and I said we had
better be Indians at once, and do the whole thing ;
and so here we are, and I only wish there was a
forest near, for I feel equal to anything.”

“Even to confronting a gorilla >?” said his uncle.

“Oh! uncle, have you seen one?” asked Charlie,
in great excitement.

“No, I have not, sir; I don’t possess your enter-
prising spirit quite to the same extent, and am
content to read about them.”

“T saw a picture of one once,” said Charlie; “it
was horribly like a wild man. But, oh! I showld like
to hear about them.”



Gorillas. FES

“Bring that brown paper parcel to me, Charlie,”
said his uncle. ‘Dear me!” he continued looking
at it with a puzzled expression, “it is directed to
Master Charles Stone.”

Charlie’s eyes glistened, and I suspect his cheeks
turned very red, though that did not show through
the burnt cork.

“Why, it’s ‘Du Chaillu’s Adventures in Africa,
the very book I’ve been wanting for ever so long.
I know there’s no end of fun in it,” said Charlie.
“T just saw it once for two or three minutes, and
oh! how I did long to have it!”

“Charlie, I believe uncle’s given it you,” said Alice,
in a whisper; and then half apologising to her uncle:
“He’s too much taken up with it to thank you
uncle ; but he will presently.”

“Oh, I forgot; but I can’t thank you properly, I
never was so happy in my life,” said Charlie.

“Well, my boy, your pleasure is the best thanks
I can have,” said his uncle; “and Alice looks as
pleased as you do.”

“Tt’s just the same as if you had given it me, you
know, uncle; and I do like to see Charlie happy,”
said Alice.

“You will find a most amusing story of a young
gorilla that was taken alive and brought to Du
Chaillu. He says when he saw the little brute being
dragged towards him, he felt rewarded for all the
hardships he had gone through in Africa, and I am
sure they were many.”

“Oh, uncle, do just read us this one story,” begged

J



94 Stories of the Tropics.



Charlie, “because you know the tropics would not
be perfect without a gorilla.”

“But, before you begin, please tell me what a
gorilla is,” said Alice.

“It is a very large ape, which is found in tropical
Africa. It is about as tall as a man, and is thought
by many of the Africans to be a wild man and not
a brute. They think it gets into the woods, and
pretends to be dumb and stupid in order to escape
work. The one that was brought to Du Chaillu was
a young male, between two and three years old. It
was two feet and a half high. But I shall spoil the
story if I attempt to give it in my own words, so
you shall have Du Chaillu’s own spirited description
of Master Joe, as he called him.

Then Uncle Ned opened the book and began to
read :—“ When I had the little fellow safely locked
in his cage (he had made a bamboo cage for him), I
ventured to approach to say a few encouraging words
to him. He stood in the farthest corner, but as I
approached bellowed and made a precipitate rush at
me, and though I retreated as quickly as I could,
succeeded in catching my trouser-legs, which he
grasped with one of his feet and tore, retreating
immediately to the corner farthest away. This
taught me caution for the present, though I had a
hope still to be able to tame him. He sat in his
corner looking wickedly out of his grey eyes, and I
never saw a more morose or more ill- -tempered face
than had this little beast.

“The first thing was of course to attend. to the





THE GORILLA,

05







Master Foe. 07

zZ



wants of my captive. Isent for some of the forest
berries which these animals are known to prefer, and
placed these and a cup of water within his reach.
He was exceedingly shy, and would neither eat nor
drink till I had removed to a considerable distance.

“The second day found Joe fiercer than the first ;
he rushed savagely at any one who stood even for a
moment near his cage, and seemed ready to tear us
all to pieces. I threw him to-day some pineapple
leaves, of which I noticed he ate only the white parts.
There seemed no difficulty about his food, though he
refused now, and continued during his short life to
refuse, all food except such wild leaves and fruits as
were gathered from his native woods for him.

“The third day he was still morose and savage,
bellowing when any person approached, and either
retiring to a distant corner or rushing to attack,

“On the fourth day, while no one was near, the
little rascal succeeded in forcing apart two of the
bamboo rails which composed his cage, and made
his escape. I came up just as his flight was dis-
covered, and immediately got all the negroes together
for pursuit, determining to surround the wood and
recapture my captive. Running into the house to
get one of my guns, I was startled by an angry growl
issuing from under my low bedstead. It was Master
Joe, who lay there hid, but anxiously watching my _
movements. I instantly shut the windows, and called
to my people to guard the door.

“When Joe saw the crowd of black faces he be-
came furious, and, with his eyes glaring, and every

G



Full Text





Aare Sikes
Zo ye beat & eho?
ee oe a Mile dace
| Lo JEG 7




































































































































































s
LEE

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—————





THE OSTRICH’S BREAKFAST. Page 131,
eR eae







STORIES OF Tie URORICs:

BY THE AUTHOR OF

‘* WONDERS OF THE WATERS,” ‘‘ WONDERS UNDER THE EARTH,”
ETC.



London;

THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY,

56, PATERNOSTER Row; 65, St. PauL’s CHURCHYARD;
AND 164, PICCADILLY.




Butter & TANNER,
Tue Setwoop Printing Works,
Frome, ann Lonpon.


CONEENTS

CHAPTER I.
PAGE
Jiggers—Locusts—White Ants—Goatsuckers—Ant-eater—Nests
of Ants—Soldiers and Labourers—Marching Ants—Mr.
Wallace’s Collection—Uncle Ned’s Promise . ; 5 dentin)

CHAPTER II.

Moonlight Walk in Jamaica—Fire-flies—Praying Mantis—Mos-
quitoes—Yams—The Southern Cross—A Lunar Rainbow—
The Blue Mountain—A Cold Night—Stingless Bees—Brush-
footed Spider—Wisdom of God—The Prisoner and the
Beetle . : ; : : s . : : : . 26

CHAPTER III.

Living Jewels—Uses of Insects—Alice’s Difficulty—Livingstone
and the Lion—A Snake under the Pillow—Snake-charmers
—Adventure with a Python—The Boa Constrictor—The
Secretary Bird—The Ichneumon—Rat-Snakes—The Adjutant
—Jamaica Negroes - . 5 . 5 . : 0 sOnIS2

CHAPTER IV.

Indian Rice Fields—The Rice Bird—Sago—Tapioca—Indian
Corn—Mahogany—Cotton—Pepper and Nutmeg . ; » 79
6 Contents.

CHAPTER V.

PAGE
Gorillas—Capture of Master Joe—Escape from a Crocodile—
Sleeping on a Crocodile—Geckos—Anoles—The Chameleon. 91

CHAPTER VI.

Sandal Trees—The Bamboo—The Baobab—The Traveller’s Tree—
The Banyan Tree—The Basilisk—Humming Birds— Ostriches
—Ostrich Hunting—Story ofa Hippopotamus . . - 113

CHAPTER VII.

A Missionary Story—Madagascar—Malagasy Customs—Cruelty of
King Radama—Missionary Schools—Persecution of Christians
—The First Martyr—Spread of Christianity. . 2 . 137




SLORMES OE trey iRO RECS:

CHAPTER I.

Jiggers—Locusts— White Ants -— Goatsuckers — Ant-eater—
Nests of Ants—Soldiers and Labourers—Marching
Ants—Mr. Wallace’s Collection—Uncle Ned’s Promise.

“HH, UNCLE EDWARD,
do tell us some of
your wonderful travel-
lers’ stories—true ones,
you know. Papa says
you have been half over
the world, and have’
spent years in the tro-
pics, and we want to
hear all about it.”

The speaker was a
bright boy of ten years
old, named Charlie.

Uncle Edward was half dozing in a comfortable

arm-chair by the fire, and Charlie’s papa was peeling
7


8 Stories of the Tropics.



an apple for his little daughter Alice, who was seated
on his lap.

With one bound she was at her uncle’s side. “Dear
Uncle Edward, do—please do,” she said, and lifted
up her little face imploringly. Uncle Edward could
never refuse his little pet anything, so, good-naturedly
rousing himself, and looking at the children very much
with the expression that a great Newfoundland dog
would assume towards two little kittens who disturbed
his slumbers, he muttered :

“All about it,—that is, certainly, a very modest
request, Charlie. Why, I should have to talk night
and day all the time I am here to do that, and not |
finish then. You would be rather tired of listening,
I think,”

‘Oh no, Uncle Edward, we shall never tire,” cried
both children at once.

Uncle Edward regarded them with a curious look,
lifting up his great shaggy eyebrows, “What in-
satiable creatures children are!” he remarked.

“Don’t let them tire you, Ned,” said Mr. Stone.

“No, Vl take care of that ; but where shall I
begin?”

“Oh, tell us first about the insects, said Charlie,
who considered himself a great entomologist, and -
was very fond of capturing butterflies. He had
made quite a large collection of English butterflies
during the last two summers, to which he had received
many contributions from cousins and friends in dif-
ferent parts of England. “I have heard there are
such splendid butterflies in the tropics, and termites,
F1ggers.. 9



and honey ants, and frogs, and beetles, and all sorts
of delightful things.”

“The insects of the tropics are much more delight-
ful to talk about here in England than to meet with
in their own country, I can tell you. They are the
greatest plagues imaginable; in fact, they are worse
than plagues, they are most intolerable nuisances ;
they sting and bite in such a cruel way that they often
cause most serious illness.”

“Tell them about the jiggers, Ned,” said Mr. Stone.

“Oh, those horrid chegoes, or jiggers, that lamed me
in the West Indies. They are little creatures, about
the size of a small flea; they get into one’s feet, bury
themselves under the skin, and there they make their
nests. I found a little tumour on my toe about the
size of a pea, with a dark spot in the centre, which
gave me great pain. I could not imagine what it was
till I showed it to my man-servant, who was used to the
country, and had suffered himself in like manner. He
told me that the negro women are very clever in taking
them out, so I sent for one to operate on me. First
she removed the skin from the little ball, just as we
should peel an orange, then pressing the flesh all
round, she succeeded in getting out the nest without
breaking it, and filled up the hole with tobacco, in

case any of the eggs should remain in the wound and
form a fresh colony.”

“Oh, uncle, how horrible!” cried little cee

“Not so bad asa friend of mine, who was travel-
ling in the interior of Africa, and got a horrid worm
into his foot. His leg and ankle swelled, and, like
10 Stories of the Tropics.



me, he did not at all know what was the matter; but
he put on a plaster, and when he pulled it off, out
came a few inches of the worm. These worms are’
sometimes twelve feet long, and not much thicker
than a horse-hair, so you may imagine the difficulty
of getting the creature out without breaking. Indeed
my friend did not manage to do so; however, he got
it out by degrees, two or three inches at a time, and
it caused him dreadful pain.”

“But worms are not insects, uncle,” interrupted
Charlie.

“No, and I have told you enough of these pests of
hot countries. I will go on to something more inter-
esting. There is a very destructive insect, of which
I dare say you have heard. I mean the locust,
which visits all hot countries, and does a great deal
of mischief. It is called the Migratory Locust, be-
cause of its habit of going in vast armies, like winged
clouds, over the earth. Wherever they alight all
vegetation soon disappears, as the myriads of insect-
jaws commence their destructive work, In some
places the locust is used for food.”

“Oh, uncle!” said Alice, with an expression of dis-
gust, “they must be very nasty.”

“Some people don’t think so, or they would not
eat them. In Africa, large fires are kindled in the
path of the insects, and as they come flying along
the smoke stifles them and they fall in thousands,
and are roasted and eaten. Dr. Livingstone speaks
quite highly of the locust as an article of food, and
says it is superior to shrimps. Sometimes the bodies
Locusts. II

are left in the sun to dry, and then ground into a
powder between two stones. This powder is eaten
with honey, and is said to make very fattening and
wholesome food for man or beast. The food of John

= ==

































































































































































































































































































































































LOCUSTS IN A FIELD OF INDIAN CORN,

the Baptist, when in the wilderness, you know, was
‘locusts and wild honey,’ though some think that this

refers to the locust bean, and not to the insect of that
name,”
12 Stories of the Tropics,



“I did not think the destructive locust was of any
use,” said Charlie.

“There is some wise purpose in everything God
has created, we may be quite sure of that,” replied
Uncle Ned. “Now, would you like to hear about
the termites ?”

What are they, uncle?” asked Alice.

“White ants, to be sure,” responded Chatlie, proud
of his superior knowledge.

“They are called white ants, observed his uncle,
“but they really belong to quite a different order of
insects. They are more allied to dragon-flies, ant-lions
and may-flies. In fact they are not ants at all, except
in name. Still some of their laws, habits, and man-
ners remind us of the ant’s. They are divided into
three distinct classes—labourers, soldiers, and perfect
insects. They build large houses, or rather citadels,
for they contain an immense population: these cita-
dels are sometimes twelve feet high and a hundred
feet in circumference.”

“Why, Uncle Ned, that would be twice as big as
you are; that would be higher than this room.”

“Yes,” Charlie, I know it,” said their uncle, gravely;
“Tam not exaggerating.”

“You are telling no ‘travellers’ tales,’ are you,
Ned? but real sober truth,” remarked Mr. Stone.

“Yes, indeed, truth is often stranger than fiction ;
and if I had not seen them myself, I could hardly
have believed many of the wonders which I am going
to tell you. But first about the arrangement of their
houses, which are built of clay. Only the under part -
White Ants. 13
is inhabited by the white ants; the upper part is
merely built in order to defend them from the wea-
ther, and to keep up the warmth and moisture in the
lower part, which is necessary for hatching the eggs
and rearing the young ones. In the centre of the
building, and almost on a level with the ground, is
the queen’s palace, a large room where she lives in
grandeur with the king her consort, and is waited on
by her attendants with more zeal and loyalty than
any king or queen of the British Isles has ever
received from her devoted subjects. But the poor
queen never leaves her state apartment ; indeed, she



THE QUEEN ANT.

soon grows to such an enormous size that she could
not get out through the doors.”

“Oh, uncle, it is more like a prison than a palace,
I think,” said Alice.

“ And is the poor king obliged to stay with her?”
asked Charlie.

“The king soon dies, but the queen continues to
live and increase in size till she is three inches long,
and wide in proportion, and weighs as much as 30,000
labourers. Then she begins to lay her eggs at the
rate of fifty or sixty a minute, and this goes on night
and day without interruption for many months, so
14 Stories of the Tropics.





you may imagine she has at last a pretty numerous
family.”

“But how can she take care of such a family as
that? It seems quite impossible!”

“Tt is indeed impossible. Luckily for her, she has
nothing to do but to lay her eggs, and there are
plenty of nurses to take care of them and bring up



NESTS OF WHITE ANTS.

the young ones properly. Besides, you must re-
‘member there is but one queen in every colony, and
the labourers and the soldiers have no children.”

“A very fortunate thing, I think,” said Charlie;
“but I don’t quite understand what you mean by the
labourers and the soldiers.” :

“The labourers and the soldiers are not perfect in-
White Ants. 15



sects like the king and queen; they are not fully de-
veloped, and on this account they are called neuters.”

“ What does developed mean, uncle?” asked Alice.

“Tt means unfolded ; just as in a bud every little
leaf is already formed, which is afterwards unfolded
in the flower. So in these insects there are the same
powers as possessed by the king and queen, but they
are not yet unfolded.”














NESTS OF WILITE ANTS.

“Then they all become kings and queens some
day, just as children grow up to be men and women,”
exclaimed Charlie.

“No, indeed; scarcely one in many thousands of
these insects becomes a king or queen. When fully
grown they leave their homes and fly in such clouds
that they would soon fill the earth and destroy every-
thing if they were suffered to live; but, happily for
us, they have many enemies.”
16 Stories of the Tropics.



Here Charlie interrupted his uncle. “But you
never told us they had wings, uncle.”

“No; they possess their wings only for a few
hours. As soon as they are fully grown, or developed,



FORK-TAILED GOAT-SUCKER,

these wings appear (four long narrow wings folded
over each other) ; and then, as I told you, they fly in
clouds ; but while flying, the birds, goat-suckers, and












The Ant-Eater. 17)

bats attack them, and when they have shed their
wings (which always fall off after a few hours), they.
are pursued by ants, toads, spiders, and other ene-
mies. There is one animal, the Ant-Eater, which,
with the assistance of its long tongue, expressly
adapted for the purpose, consumes hundreds of these
white ants in a very short space of time. If the



THE ANT-EATER,

labourers see one fortunate pair survive, they imme-
diately take them to a place of safety, and build
their little palace of clay. Then they are duly elected
king and queen, and a new colony is founded,”

“Ts there any difference between the soldiers and
the labourers?” asked Alice.

B
18 Stories of the Tropics.

Ek,



“Ves, there is; the soldiers are the males, and the
labourers the females.. The soldiers are six times as
large as the labourers; they have powerful jaws pro-
- ceeding from enormous heads, and it
+ is their duty to fight for their friends
and their country, a duty which they
perform very well, I assure you. The
labourers are the nurses. It is their
business to nurse the queen’s children.
} They only have the privilege of en-

SOLDIER ANT. tering her palace, for the doors are
not large enough to admit the soldiers.”

“You have not told us all about their houses yet,
uncle,” remarked Charlie.

“No, I have not had much chance of telling you
‘all about’ anything. You ask too many questions,
Now, don’t interrupt me again for three whole minutes,
and I will give you a description of their houses,”

“Oh, thank you, uncle; we won't say a single
word,” said both the children,

“Well, Pl tell you about the houses, or rather cita-
dels, which I saw myself in Western Africa. They
are twelve feet high, and so strong I used often to
stand on them to get a good view of the surrounding
country.” :

“Was there much to see, uncle?” asked Charlie.

“There now—”

“Oh, I forgot; but was there?”

“Not much where I happened to be at that time,
only a large grassy plain. I told you about the
queen’s palace, which is in the centre of the building.


Soldiers and Labourers. eco
There are numberless rooms encircling the palace,
and in these rooms there is a large train of labourers
and soldiers constantly in attendance. The space
between these rooms and the outer walls is filled with
cells, some of which are used as store-rooms, some as
nurseries. Then there are wonderful subterranean
passages running under the bottom of the hill to a
depth of three or four feet, and carefully lined with.
clay. These subterranean passages are connected
with a number of smaller galleries that looked some-
thing like a corkscrew, winding round and round.
They are not very good climbers, so they make this
kind of spiral staircase to save themselves the steep
walk up-hill.”

“What lazy fellows!” exclaimed Charlie.

“Nobody can accuse them of that, Charlie. No,
the termites work hard enough; they are always
building, or nursing, or waiting on their queen, or
carrying clay, wood, water, and provisions to the
different rooms and galleries.”

“It sounds just as if they were real men and
women we are talking about, uncle. I had no idea
there were such interesting and clever creatures
among the insects,” said little Alice.

“Oh, Alice, that’s so like a girl,” said her brother.
“If you had studied insects as J have, you would
soon have found out they are clever enough even here
in England. But those African fellows are uncom-
_monly sharp, I must own.”

“They arrange all their work so well,” continued
their uncle, “and each has his own work and his own
20 Stories of the Tropves.



place. We may learn a good deal from them, Master
Charlie ; and the soldiers don’t sneer at the labourers,
but help them, and fight for them as men and boys
should for zheir little women. I once made a breach
in a termite’s nest with my hatchet, and then retired
to a little distance to watch the effect. The labourers
retired in alarm, for they cannot fight ; and out came
a soldier, evidently reconnoitring. He gave an alarm,
and two or three more appeared, then a large army
of them, all ready for war. The poor soldiers are
under one great disadvantage, for they are blind, and
it is really amusing to see them tumbling over each
other, sometimes missing their hold and rolling down
the sides of the hill. They soon recover themselves,
however, and bite everything they come near. Their
‘fierceness and courage are really wonderful. For-
tunately, they have no poison glands, or perhaps I
should not have been here to tell the tale.”

“What, uncle, did they bite you?” exclaimed both
the children at once.

“One fellow got on my coat sleeve and bit my
arm. It bit right through the cloth, and hard work I
had to get rid of the creature. But I was determined
to go onwatching. As I made no further breach, the
bustle subsided and the soldiers retired. Then came
the good little labourers, each carrying a load of
tempered mortar half as big as himself, laid it on the
edge of the hole, and hastened back for more. There
were crowds of labourers, all working at the same
moment, and in half an hour the breach I had
made was repaired.”
A Travellers Tale. 21



“ Are there any termites in Europe, uncle?”

“Ves, some have been imported in ships, to the
great sorrow of the French ; they have done all they
could to get rid of them. These mischievous little
creatures have destroyed some valuable documents
belonging to the French government.”

“ But where were these documents kept ?”

“Tn the prefect’s palace.”

“T didn’t know they ever got into houses.”

“Indeed they do; when I was in South Africa my
table was once left too long in one position, and the
rogues destroyed it entirely—swallowed it with as
much ease, and probably as much enjoyment as you
would swallow a plum-pudding.”

“ Oh, uncle, now that zs what papa calls ‘a travel-
ler’s tale’; now you are laughing at us, I am certain.
How could such little creatures swallow a table?”

“T didn’t say they swallowed it whole, did I?
They worked away at the inside, thousands and
thousands of them at once, and left nothing but the
barren shell. They are such sly little creatures. I
had been away on a hunting expedition, and when
I came back there was nothing left of my table but
the outside, which was perfect. I threw my travel-
ling bag on it, and straightway it tumbled to pieces.
However, a friend of mine, who took up his residence
for a time near me, was even worse off than myself;
the termites got into his bed and all his boxes, des-
troyed his books, and at last fairly turned him out of
house and home, for as he could not drive them away,
he was obliged to get a lodging elsewhere.”
22 : Storws of the Tropics.



“J wonder such horrid pests are allowed to live.
Do they ever do any good, uncle?” asked Charlie.

“Yes, they do a great deal of good in those tropi-
cal countries,” replied his uncle ; “no doubt they are
necessary to keep the air pure, for they are always
busy removing decayed vegetable substances. So.
we must not be too hard on them, if now and then
they destroy a few things which they ought to let
alone. But you will like to hear about another kind
of white ant which I once saw. Most of them, as I
told you, live and work under covered galleries, but
the marching termite exposes itself to the light of
day. It is not blind like those I have been speaking
of, Iwas once passing through a thick forest, when
I heard a hiss like that of a serpent. I followed
the noise and found an army of marching white ants
emerging from a hole in the ground, and marching
quickly. After proceeding a little way they divided
into two columns; they walked fourteen or fifteen
abreast, following each other closely and going
straight forward. They were nearly all labourers.”

“Did you find out what made the hissing noise ?”

“Yes; and a most amusing scene it was. Some
soldiers here and there mounted on plants about
a foot from the ground, hung over the army, and by
striking their jaws upon the leaves at intervals, pro-
duced a peculiar noise. It seemed a signal for quick
marching, as the whole army replied with a hiss and
increased their pace. At length the army reunited,
and descended into the earth again. But I have
talked too much about these termites,”
Beetles and Butterflies. 23



“No, uncle; they are so interesting.”

“Yes, they are certainly interesting, but you ought
to hear something about the gorgeous butterflies and
beetles of the tropics. How they would delight your
eyes, Charlie!”

“Oh, I have seen many of them in the British
Museum. But they must look splendid flying about.
How I should like to go over and catch some!”

“A gentleman named Mr. Wallace did go to the
Malay Archipelago on purpose to collect specimens
of various kinds of insects, birds, reptiles, and other
creatures. He came home in 1862, bringing with
him more than a hundred and twenty-five thousand
specimens of natural history, of which more than
thirteen thousand were butterflies.”

“Oh, uncle, how delightful!” exclaimed Charlie.

“He has written a- book about his adventures,
which you will enjoy reading some day, my boy.
Fancy his finding a beetle whose legs spread over
a space of eight inches!”

“Did you ever find one, uncle?”

“No, but I have been to the Moluccas, and the
insects there are wonderfully beautiful. Mr. Wallace
found a beetle such as I have described, and he found
also a splendid bird-winged butterfly, a very rare
insect. The male measures more than seven inches
across the wings, which are velvety black and fiery
orange. Mr, Wallace says that his delight at finding
it was so great that the blood rushed to his head, and
he nearly fainted with excitement.”

“Oh, uncle, I can quite understand it,’ cried
24 Stories of the Tropics.



Charlie; “I ae be pees myself for joy if I
could Gatch one.”

Papa, who had been a most attentive listener, now
puts in a word.

“Come, Ned, the children must fea go to bed;
we shall have this boy flying off to the Moluccas in
search of butterflies, instead of leading a respectable
life in England, improving the state of English law.”

“Just one question, uncle,” pleaded Charlie. “ Did
Mr. Wallace catch the insects all himself, or did he
have anybody to help him?”

“Sometimes he employed the natives to catch
insects for him, in return for which he would give
them tobacco, which they highly valued. They used
to bring him quantities of creeping things in bamboo
boxes ; but, unfortunately, they had generally eaten
each other, like the Kilkenny cats, before they came .
into Mr. Wallace’s possession. Beetles, butterflies,
and other insects were all boxed up together.”

“Oh, what a pity! Now, uncle, you will promise
to tell us something about the tropics every day you
are here, won't you?” begged Charlie.

“That will be a whole week, counting Sunday,”
said his sister; “we shall have six more evenings
before you go, uncle ; do promise.”

“Well, I think I may promise a story some part
of the day; perhaps it will not always be in the
evening.”

“Then we shall feel as if we had spent a whole
week at the tropics,” exclaimed little Alice, delighted ;
“T am sure I shall dream about those clever little
Good-night. 25



termites to-night. Good-night, uncle; I wish I was
a great traveller like you.”

“And I mean ¢o de a great traveller some day,”
said Charlie, “and then, perhaps, I shall make dis-
coveries, and bring home lots of new butterflies and
beetles, more than Mr. Wallace did.”

“Not much fear of that, Charlie,” said his uncle;
“but your papa will put a stop to my stories if they
encourage your roving propensities. You must be
content with fancying you have had a week at
the tropics while you have never stirred from your
own fireside. And I can assure you that it will be
very much more comfortable to sit at home and read
ot hear of the wonders of tropical countries, than to
go and see them for yourself.”




CHAPTER II.

Moonlight Walk in Jamaica—Fire-flies—Praying Mantis—
Mosquitoes—Yams—The Southern Cross—A Lunar
Rainbow—The Blue Mountain—A Cold Night—Stingless
Bees —Brush-footed Spider—Wisdom of God—The

you were in the West Indies?”
asked Charlie the next evening.
“J know you've been there, and its
just the right place for fire-flies.”

“Ves, Charlie, I have seen them,
and very beautiful they are.”

“TJ suppose they’re not a bit like
common flies?” asked Alice.

“They are not really flies, Alice, but beetles,”
replied her brother, who had been getting up the
subject from a book which he had found in his
father’s library. “The Spaniards of South America
call them cucuyos.”

“ Oh, Charlie, you'll be as clever as uncle is, some
day,” said Alice, much impressed. “But if you know
all about fire-flies, you shall tell me when we are

alone, and uncle can talk about something else now,”
26 ;


Night 1 Fanaa. : 27



“No, I want to hear about veal ones, that uncle
has seen with his very own eyes.

“Well, my boy, I saw a good many in Jamaica. I
spent three weeks in that island with my old school-
fellow Horace White. The second evening I spent
at his house I shall never forget. The day had been
intensely hot, and just as I was looking forward to
a quiet night’s rest, Horace (he has the strength of
Hercules, I believe) proposed a walk. Well, I ought
to thank him for dragging me out. I would not have
missed that walk for a great deal. The sky was.a
deep, deep blue, such as you never see in England ;
and the moon, far more beautiful than she appears to
us, was pouring down a flood of light on forest and
sea and mountain. There had been a storm on the
previous day, and the drops of rain, still hanging
from every twig, looked like diamonds in the moon-
light. We walked through a glade surrounded by
woods, and then diverged into a road cut through a
forest, a gloomy place enough even by day. Strange
noises filled the air, proceeding, doubtless, from the
inhabitants of the forest, with whom I did not care
to make closer acquaintance. I turned round to my
friend and suggested that it,was getting near bedtime.”

“Oh, uncle, how could you? I shouldn't have
been afraid,” said Charlie, boldly.

“Well, I’m glad I have such a brave fellow for my
nephew; but I was tired that night, and not at all
disposed for encounters with snakes, robbers, or any
other enemies to mankind ; besides, I was a young
traveller then,”
28 Stories of the Tropics.

“Ah, that makes a difference, certainly,” said
Charlie, graciously excusing his uncle’s weakness.

“But my friend, who is very fond of insects, like
you, Charlie, insisted on taking me to one particular
dell, where, he said, owing to the darkness, we should
see the fire-flies to the best advantage. So, on we
went, and certainly I was rewarded for my trouble.
We stood watching them a long time, flashing along



FIRE-FLY,

like meteors, now giving out their red and green
lights, now hiding themselves in darkness, for I sup-
pose you know, Charlie, that they can blaze out and
become dull at pleasure.”

“Can they really, uncle?” asked Alice, in a
whisper, for she was much awed. She had been
wondering whether, when Charlie grew up to be a
man, he would insist on taking her to these dreadful
forests in search of fire-flies. -

“Did you catch any, uncle?” she continued, half






STORM IN A TROPICAL FOREST.

29)

Five-Flies. 3h



hoping that her uncle might be able to satisfy Charlie
by showing him a specimen.

“Not that night, but one evening several came into
the room where we were sitting, and then I had a
good opportunity of observing them. There was no
moon that night, and we put out the lights in order
to see them the better. It would have been pitch
dark if it were not for these wonderful insects. But
they gave such a brilliant light at times I could have
seen to read by it. I caught one, and the moment I
touched it, it began gradually to give out its light till
it quite dazzled me. I kept it under a glass, but
it displayed very little light the next evening, even
when I handled it.”

“ Perhaps it was sulky, and did not like to be kept
prisoner,” said Alice.

“Poor thing, it was out of spirits, and missed its
food and exercise, I suppose. I let it go, and hope it
recovered itself when it joined its friends.”

“What do they feed on, uncle?” asked Charlie.

“T fancy they are fond of the sugar-cane, for on a
calm night I have often seen them sport about like
falling stars on the sugar plantations.”

“Did you see any other curious insects in Jamaica,
uncle?” asked Alice.

“Yes, I saw a great number; there was a very
interesting one called the Praying Mantis.”

“What a funny name,” said Charlie. “Why do
the people give it such a title?”

“Because of a remarkable habit it has of sitting
with its long flattened fore-legs held up and joined as"
Bo Stortes of the Tropics.



if in the attitude of prayer. There are some curious
stories told about this insect. Some natives of the
countries where the mantis is found, say that if a
traveller has lost himself in a forest, and asks a
mantis to show him the way, the kind little creature
will lift up one of its arms and point in the right



THE PRAYING MANTIS.

direction. An old legend tells us that one of these
insects being met by a celebrated Roman Catholic
saint, and commanded to chant as well as to act
a prayer, at once obeyed. Of course there is no
truth in these stories, which have arisen on account
of the strange habit of the mantis.”
The Praying Mantis. 33



“You did not tell us why the mantis acts so
curiously, uncle,” said Charlie.

“Tt is because it feeds on flies and small insects of
various kinds, which it seizes and pulls to pieces with
its fore-legs, and it is while waiting for its prey that
it assumes the strange attitude which gives it its
name.”

“Did you bring any of these funny insects home,
uncle?” asked Alice. .

“No, my dear, I am no collector of insects, though
I like to notice their ways, but you may see plenty of
specimens, no doubt, at the British Museum.”

“Now, Ned, I think it is my turn,” broke in Mr.
Stone, who had been a most patient listener; “ you
have been discoursing all this time about insects to
please Charlie, and if you can possibly turn your mind
for a few minutes from this absorbing subject, perhaps
you will give me a little idea how you spent your
time in Jamaica, and what sort of place it is where
our old friend Horace has settled down.”

-“Tt is full ten years since I was there, you must
remember. He had a pleasant house on the borders
of Westmoreland.”

“Westmoreland! that’s in England,” exclaimed
both the children together.

“Yes, but it is in Jamaica also,” replied their uncle,
“or rather the people there, who like everything
English, because they are English themselves, are fond
of calling the places by our old English names, I
had avery pleasant time of it. We spent the day
something in this fashion. About six o’clock in the

Cc


34 Stories of the Tropics.



morning a negro servant would bring me a cup of
coffee and a slice of toast, which I took in bed.”

“ And how did you sleep? Were the mosquitoes
troublesome ?” asked Mr. Stone ; “but I am trenching
on a dangerous subject, for Charlie will want to know
all about the manners and habits of mosquitoes.”

“That is soon told; they are the most horrible
pests in the world. It is impossible to sleep without
having a thin net of muslin round the bed. It is
quite a science to get into bed through the smallest
possible opening in the net, and then carefully to
close it up so that nothing can get through. I really
believe that if one were to attempt to sleep in Jamaica
without a mosquito curtain, he would be only fit for
a lunatic asylum by morning. Well, I spent an hour
and a half at least in dressing, and it was generally
eight before I emerged from my room. Then Horace
and I got our morning ride, in which we were
generally accompanied by one or other of his girls.
He has a kind, hospitable wife, and three charming
daughters. At ten we sat down to breakfast, and
a capital one it was—yams, potatoes, eggs, fruit, and
tinned meats from England. The ladies do not
go out between breakfast and dinner, the sun is too
much for them, but I managed to get about on horse-
back, for it is not so frightfully hot in the country,
especially in the hills, as it is in the towns. At
Kingston, and Spanish Town, too, the heat is some-
thing fearful. I never endured such misery in my life
as I did one day under the burning sun in Spanish
Town.”
Yams. ects



“T have a question to ask, uncle, but I don't like
to interrupt him,” said Alice to her brother, in what
she intended to be a whisper, but her uncle’s quick
ears caught the remark.

“So have I,” replied her brother.

“Well, now let me have your questions,” said their
good-natured uncle. Then turning to Mr. Stone:
“John, this is the children’s hour, you must remember,
so they have a right to command me. Now, Alice?’



THE YAM.

“What are yams, uncle?”

“ West Indian vegetables. The roots, or tubers, are
eaten; they are oblong, and sometimes very large,
brown outside and white inside. They are brought
over to England and sold in the shops of London and
Liverpool.”

“ Which is the capital of Jamaica, uncle, Kingston
or Spanish Town ?” asked Charlie.
36 Stories of the Tropics.



“ Kingston is the capital, my boy, and a miserable
place it is; or at least it was when I was there. It is
not lighted at night, and the streets are not paved.
The governor lives at Spanish Town, and that is a
pity. If the seat of government were at Kingston,
perhaps the inhabitants would take a little more pride
in their city. But I was describing how I generally
spent my day. We dined at six, and dressing for





THE SOUTHERN CROSS.



that meal always occupied full a hour. I used to do
it in parts, and sit down between each act. Putting
on one’s boots is a serious exertion over there, I can
assure you; but the most pleasant part of the day is
the evening, the stars are so beautiful in the tropical
world”? |

“Did you see the constellation of the Southern
Cross?” asked Charlie. —

“Yes, I saw it. I must confess I was a little dis-
A Lunar Rainbow. 37



appointed in it; I expected something more striking.
The stars are not very large, and it does not make a
perfect cross; the star on one side scarcely corres-
ponds with the opposite one; it is smaller in size
than I thought; but the constellation must always
be interesting, and I am glad to have seen it. I had
another pleasure, too, in Jamaica, and that was seeing
a lunar rainbow. It is sometimes seen in England,
but I believe it is rather a rare sight even in Jamaica.”

Alice looked puzzled, so her uncle kindly explained:
“A lunar rainbow, my love, is a rainbow caused by
the moonlight instead of the sunlight. You know
that the beautiful coloured arch is the effect of light
on the drops of rain.”

“Ts a lunar rainbow as bright as a solar one?”
asked Charlie.

“The colours were not so clear and decided in the
one I saw, probably they never are. Now I am going
to tell you about an expedition I had up the Blue
Mountain Peak in Jamaica, which I think you will
like to hear ; and then we will go back to our insects
again, my boy.”

“ Hurrah!” shouted Charlie; and Alice, from
sympathy with her brother’s pleasure, made a little
extemporaneous dance round the room clapping her
hands. At last she bethought herself that an inter-
ruption like this to her uncle’s narrative was hardly
proper, especially in a young lady seven years old;
so, demurely seating herself on the rug at her uncle’s
feet, and resting her head against his knee, she
observed ; =
38 Stories of the Tropics.



“A frisk now and then does one good, you know,
uncle; but I’m going to be quiet now, so tell us about
the Blue Mountain.”

“ Ah, that was a ‘frisk’ of mine, and a very foolish
one too.”

“Why did you go up, uncle?” asked Charlie; “and
is it very high ?”

“T went up because I was a blockhead, and my
friend was as bad to take me, and sacrifice himself as
he did, for I found he went entirely for my amuse-
ment. The Peak is said to be 8,000 feet above the
level of the sea.

“Stop a minute, ae I must try and think how
high that is,” said Charlie. “Eight thousand feet.
There are three feet in a yard.” Charlie stopped and
looked puzzled. His papa, uncle, and Alice were
silently awaiting the result of his meditations. At
length he got up. “I can’t do it without a pencil.”

Away flew Alice, and, like a little fairy, produced
pencil and paper in a moment. “ He'll do it, papa,”
she whispered ; “ but, you know, we mustn’t interrupt
him.

“Vou will have to go with Charlie on his butterfly
expeditions, Alice,” returned her father, “he could not
do without you.”

“ But, papa, we are not going. It is much nicer to
sit here by the fire and pretend, for I feel I am in
Jamaica all the time, and we are just ae up the
Blue Mountain.”

Charlie here announced that eight ee feet are
nearly a mile and a half. “Just as far as to Hunt’s


The Llue Mountain. 39



Cottage, Alice; but straight up, as straight as ever
you can go,” pointing with his pencil up to the
ceiling.

“But the mountain does not go straight up, and
you went a roundabout way, I dare say, uncle. What
miles and miles you must have walked!” said Alice,
compassionately. :

“Indeed we did, and pretty footsore and weary we
were when we got to the top, I assure you. We rode
part of the way, however, as far as the house of a
coffee-planter ; it is the highest inhabited house in
the island. He is an hospitable fellow, and gave usa
good breakfast ; but on parting from him we soon got
into the clouds, and we never came out of them till
we reached his dwelling again on our way homewards.
It was nothing but mist, fog, clouds, and rain all the
way. We saw absolutely nothing,

“ Something like the Snowdon expedition, Ned.”

“Yes, but this was infinitely worse. When you
and I got to the top of Snowdon, there was a hut
and a fire ready for us; but on the Blue Mountain
there was nothing of the kind. We had made tre-
mendous preparations for spending the night there, in
order to see the sun rise next morning. Horace took
six negroes, who carried on their heads a grand supply
of eatables, besides wine, firewood, and warm clothing,
When we got to the top, the first thing we did was to
make a fire and set the negroes to work to build a
hut ; but the fellows were thoroughly out of temper.
I suppose the soaking they had had disagreed with
them ; at any rate they were as sulky as bears, and
40 Stories of the Tropics.



as lazy as—as—that animal.” (Uncle Ned at a loss
for a comparison, had looked round the room, and his
eye rested on Jasper, the fat old Pomeranian dog, who
was quietly sleeping by the fire. He poked him with
his foot to give force to his remark).

“Uncle!” exclaimed Alice, indignantly, “how can
you?” and she smothered the old dog with kisses.

“Well,” resumed her uncle, we couldn’t get these
wretched negroes to work at all without constant
supplies of rum, and when that got into their heads
they became quarrelsome. I half wished we had left
them at the bottom of the mountain, but we should
have been worse off without them, for we were sorely
in want of shelter, food, and clothing. We tried to
eat a good supper—dried our clothes, smoked our
pipes, and made the best of it, but it was hard work
to be cheerful under the circumstances, cold, wet, and
tired out as we were.”

“Cold, uncle, in the tropics ?”

“Yes, it was cold enough up there—the cold kept
us awake all night, though we put on all the clothes
and covering we had got.”

“What in the world have you told us this dismal
story for, Ned?” asked Mr. Stone; “I hope the
weather cleared, and you were rewarded by a good
sunrise in the morning.”

“Sunrise! I shall never go up a hill to see the sun
rise again. I have seen nothing but mist from that or
any other mountain. I tell this tale to warn this rash
boy of yours against such excursions. We shall have
Charlie going up all the mountains in his reach before
A Curious Spider. 41



long, so it’s as ‘well he should know beforehand what
he may expect for his pains.”

“Was it any better coming down, uncle?” asked
Alice.

“Tt was only better in this respect, that every step

out of a difficulty is preferable to stepping farther and
farther into it,” replied her uncle.
_ “Geography is much more amusing since you came,
uncle, you make it all real; but I used to think it a
stupid lesson. Now I quite want to get my maps
and find Kingston, and Spanish Town, and the Blue
Mountain Peak, because we’ve been there—haven’t
we, Charlie?”

Charlie was not disposed to assent to this, perhaps
his imagination was less active than his sister's.

“TI mean to go, really,” he answered ; “it may be
very well for you to play about it, but it’s serious to
me.”

“Now, children, it is getting towards bedtime, and
if you want to hear more about the insects, I must
begin at once. There isa much greater variety, and
they are far more beautiful in the Moluccas than in
the West. Indies ; but it is too long a journey to take
_te-night, so I shall confine myself to some wonderful
- bees, and a curious spider that I saw in Jamaica.”

“And you will tell us more about insects to-
morrow ?” asked Charlie, eagerly.

“T am really afraid there will not be time, I have so
many other things to tell. You ought to hear about
the snakes and the grand old forests, and the grass
that grows higher than many of our English trees,”
42 Stories of the Tropics.



“ Oh, how splendid ! snakes are as good as insects,
aren't they, Alice?”

“T wish you were going to stay here always, uncle.
Couldn’t you live here ?” suggested Alice.

“I am afraid not, little woman; but now let me tell
about the bees. My friend Mr. White showed me a
hive in the hollow of an old tree, and as he stood
watching them, two or three settled on his coat. I
was astonished to see him handle them without any
fear. Unwilling to be on the same intimate terms
with them, I stepped back a few paces. Presently
to my great amazement, Mr. White, in the coolest
manner, took up portions of the cells where the young
ones where deposited—the nurseries in fact. Of
course the old nurses were very indignant, and
clustered on his hand in great excitement. ‘You
deserve to be well stung for your audacity,’ I said,
for I was really angry. ‘Yes, I do,’ he answered,
quietly, ‘but these bees have no sting. They are a
peculiar kind, and I doubt if there is another hive
like this in the island. I am told, however, that they
are less uncommon in the East.’”

“ But, uncle,” said Charlie, “bees work in the dark.
How could Mr. White get at the hive? I should
have thought they would have made it low down in
the hole.”

“So they did; but a great part of the tree was
cut away, and the cutting just displayed the upper-
most of the brood cells. The honey was stored away
at the bottom of the hive.

“Before we say good-bye to Jamaica, I must tell








Brush-footed Spider. 45
you of a splendid spider I saw there ; it was an inch
and a half long without its legs, and those, if spread
out, would have covered a dessert plate. Its body is
very beautiful ; it is covered with round white spots,
each of which is surrounded by a black border, and
you may imagine how pretty these spots look on a
rich green ground. It has very curious legs, a bunch
of black hair is set round the extremity of the first
and second joints like the bristles of a brush. For
this reason it is called, I believe, the Brush-footed
Spider. Its web is more wonderful than itself.
Some of the threads are twelve feet long, and nearly
as thick as sewing silk; they are yellow in colour,
and very strong.”

“J wish, uncle, there were as many beautiful in-
sects here as there are in the tropics,” said Alice,
drawing a deep breath.

“T am very glad you cannot have your wish,
Alice ; we should all be starved if you did.”

“ Starved !” exclaimed Alice, and opened her eyes
in wonder. Charlie thought a minute, and then cried,
“T see it! Of course they couldn’t live without food,
and there are plenty of trees and vegetables for them
over there; it would never do for them to come here
and eat all ours.”

“But still we need not starve,” said Alice; “we
could eat mutton, and chickens, and eggs, and—”

“But, Alice, what would the poor sheep and fowls
live on?” asked her father. “It is a very good thing
for us we cannot always have our wishes, they would
often do us serious harm.”
46 Stories of the Troptes.



“That’s true, Alice,’ said her uncle, carnestly.
“It was many years before I found it out, but I
know it now. You may forget all else I have told
you, but remember this, God knows what is best for
us, and God loves us.”

“ But I knew that before, uncle,” said Alice.

“We think we know it, my dear, till trouble
comes ”——and as her uncle spoke he took her affec-
tionately on his knee—“ but it takes a lifetime to
learn that lesson thoroughly. One of the great
pleasures in studying natural history is that it shows
us so much of God’s wonderful wisdom and love.
Every creature He has made is exactly fitted for its
own particular life, and has just the faculties it wants
to make it happy and useful. Its body is suited in
every respect to the place which it inhabits, and a
tropical bird or butterfly could no more live in an
English climate than you or I could live in Venus or
Mars.”

“ But tropical plants are brought over to England,”
said Charlie.

“Yes, they can do us no harm, so they are per-
mitted to live an unnatural, half-starved life in
greenhouses. But if it were in our power to bring
tropical insects over too, and keep them alive, there
would, perhaps, be men foolish enough to do it, and
we should soon have a famine in the land.”

“ Are insects of any real use, uncle?” asked Alice.

“Yes, my dear, indeed they are. I suppose if
there were no insects there would soon be an end
of all life on this planet.”




A TROVICAL FOREST,

47
eg ae


The Prisoner and the Beetle. 49






















“How wonderful, uncle! but do tell us their

“TI should like you to find some out for yourself.
harlie will help you, and you can tell me to-morrow
vening, I met with a curious story to-day of an
nsect that saved the life of a naturalist. I will read
t to you, and then I have done for to-night. It is
n Figuier’s ‘Insect World.’ You will find the book
n that table, Charlie.”
Charlie gave his uncle the book, and he read as
ollows, making comments as he went on :—Latreille
that is the name of the French naturalist) was de-
ained atthe prison of the Grand Séminaire. In
he same chamber which he occupied there was, at
the time, an old sick bishop whose wounds a surgeon
ame each morning to dress. One day, as the
surgeon was dressing the bishop’s wounds, an insect,
came out of a crack in the boards. Latreille seized
immediately, examined it, stuck it on a cork with
pin, and seemed enchanted at what he had found.
“Ts it a rare insect, then?” said the surgeon.
“Yes,” replied Latreille.
'“In that case you should give it to me,” said the

“Why?”

“Because I have a friend who has a fine collection
of insects, and he would be very pleased with it.” -
“Very well,” said Latreille, “take him this insect,

tell him pee you came by it, and pee him to tell me
its name.”

The surgeon went quickly to his friend’s house.
D
50 Stories of the Tropics.



This friend was Bory de Saint Vincent, a naturalist
who became celebrated afterwards, but who was very
young at that time. He already occupied himself
much with the natural sciences, and in particular
with the classification of insects. The surgeon de-
livered the insect to him, but in spite of all his
researches he was unable to discover to what order
it belonged.

Next day the surgeon, having seen Latreille again
in his prison, confessed to him that in his friend’s
opinion this coleopteron (that means deet/e) had never
been described.

Latreille knew by this answer that Bory de Saint
Vincent was an adept about insects.

As they gave the prisoner neither pen nor paper,
he said to his messenger, “I can see plainly that M.
Bory de Saint Vincent must know my name. You
tell him that I am the Abbé Latreille, and that I am
going to die at Guyana before having published my
book.”

Bory, on receiving this piece of news, took active
steps, and obtained leave for Latreille to come out
of his prison as a convalescent, his uncle and his
father being bail for him, and pledging themselves
formally to deliver up the prisoner the moment they
were summoned to do so by the authorities. The
vessel which was to have conducted Latreille to exile,
or rather to death, was getting ready whilst these
steps were being taken. This was quite providential,
for it foundered at sea, all the prisoners perished, and
the sailors alone were able to save themselves, A
Saved by an Insect. 51



little time afterwards his friends managed to have his
name. scratched cut from the list of exiles.

“So you see this little insect—it was a tiny beetle,
probably not bigger than a pin’s head—saved the
life of Latreille.”

“TI don’t like that story so well as yours, uncle,”
said Alice. “There are so many hard words in it,
and those French people have such funny, long
names, that I can’t remember them.”

But the story had very much interested Charlie,
who borrowed the book and slept with it under his
pillow, so that he might commence reading as soon
as he awoke in the morning,




CHAPTER III.

Living Jewels—Uses of Insects—Alice’s Difficulty—Living-
stone and the Lion—A Snake under the Pillow—Snake
Charmers—Adventure with a Python—The Boa Con-

strictor—The Secretary Bird— The Ich-

_ neumon—Rat — Snakes — The Adjutant —

Jamaica Negroes.







HERE'S a beautiful account of
fire-flies in that book, uncle,”
said Charlie, the next evening ; “you
did not tell us half!”

“T only told you what I saw, my
boy,” replied his uncle; “I have not
read the book; I bought it yesterday,
and was looking through it, when my

/ attention was caught by the anecdote I
read to you. But I shall be glad to hear what you
have to tell about the fire-flies.”

“Well, uncle, it says that, in some countries, people
who have to travel by night and go through dark
forests take the fire-flies and fasten them to their
feet to light them, and to drive away the serpents ;

isn’t that a grand idea?”
52
Living Fewels. 53



“I am sorry you have read that, Charlie,” said
Alice; “it will make you want to go to those ugly
forests more than ever.”

“Well, then there’s another thing, uncle,” con-
tinued Charlie, not heeding his little sister's anxious
face and pleading tones. “What do you think the
Mexican ladies do? Now just guess. They dress
themselves up with fire-flies, they do indeed! make
little net bags and stick them about their gowns
when they go to balls, instead of rubies and emeralds.
Must not they look grand? And they put them in
their hair too. They stick pins under the thorax,
and fasten them in that way; it sounds awfully cruel,
but the book says it does not hurt them. Now what
do you think of that? Isn’t it just like women?” __

Uncle Ned could not help laughing; but Alice,
who had great faith in her mother’s judgment, looked
very grave indeed.

“Never mind, Alice, he will know better some day,”
said her uncle; “men are poor creatures at best
without women to help them; and even now I don’t
know what Charlie would do without you, Alice.”

“No, indeed,” said Charlie, warmly; “but then
you know Alice is—is—”

“She is your sister, and that distinguishes her
above all others of her sex—raises her, in fact,
doesn’t it, Charlie?”

“Uncle, we have thought of some uses of insects,”
said Charlie, giving a turn to the conversation.
“ Alice found out one, and then I found out one.
Tell yours, Alice.”
54 Stories of the Tropics.



“They make food for birds, don’t they, uncle?”

“Yes, indeed they do; if we had no insects we
should soon lose our birds, and that I am sure you
would not like,” replied her uncle. ‘“ Swallows live
on them entirely; I dare say you have noticed them
on the wing pursuing their prey. When the atmo-
sphere is clear and the insects are high the swallows
soar upwards; but when the air is damp and the
insects are low, the swallows just skim the surface of
the earth and water, so one may judge a little of the
weather by the way the swallows fly. Thrushes,
blackbirds, sparrows, and indeed all kinds of birds,

_live chiefly on insects in the spring.”

“T know why you say spring, uncle,” said Alice,
“because the birds qw2// come and peck our cherries
and peaches and gooseberries when they are ripe. I
believe they like fruit best, after all.”

“J don’t know about that, Alice, but I think they
deserve a little fruit, for we should get none ourselves
if it were not for their exertions.”

“ How is that, uncle?” asked Alice.

“Why, my child, there would be such hosts of
insects, if we had no birds, that our gardens would
be quite spoiled, every vegetable and fruit-tree would
be eaten.”

“Tt seems, uncle, as if everything was just right,
doesn’t it?” said the little girl.

“Yes, indeed it is; God has made the world in
such wonderful order and with such perfect wisdom

that I daresay every single insect has its proper work
to do, and contributes in some way or other to our
Uses of Insects. 55



happiness ; of course, we do not always know how
they do this, but we are very ignorant, Alice, you and
I, we know next to nothing.”

Alice looked at her uncle, and her eyes opened
very wide indeed.

“Oh, uncle, you are not ignorant,’ she said at
length; “you seem to know everything.”

“T am beginning to know one thing, Alice, and
that is that God’s wisdom is so great, and His love
so perfect, that where we cannot understand we must
always trust Him. You remember what Jesus Christ
says about God’s care for the sparrows—that not one
of them falls to the ground without Him; and then
He went on to say that we, who are His children,
are of more value than many sparrows. God so
loves us that he not only feeds us and keeps us safe
from harm, but He sent His dear Son to die for us,
so that we may trust Him in all things. ‘He that
spared not His own Son, but gave Him up to die for
us all, how shall He not with Him also freely give us
all things?’ We must learn to believe in Him at all
times, and to trust Him in all things.”

“We must trust about the wasps, I suppose, uncle,”
said little Alice, simply, “for I don’t think even you
can tell me of what use they are.” She had lately
been badly stung by a wasp, and remembered the
pain it gave her.

“T suspect we should be terribly annoyed with
the flies if there were no wasps,” said her uncle. “J
have heard that the butchers in France are glad
enough of the wasps to drive the flies, off their meat,
56 Stories of the Tropics.



But now, Charlie, what was your thought about the
uses of insects? Alice says they are food for birds,
and I will add they are food for fish too, for the
water as well as the air is filled with them.”

“And you have just found out another use too,
uncle,” said Charlie ; “that they destroy other insects
that would plague us. Now I think you will say
mine is a capital use, keeping the air pure for us,
because if we had no burying beetles and ants and
such things to put all the nuisances out of sight, I
suppose we should have the plague or something.”

_ “Certainly we should, my boy ; we should come to
a speedy end altogether. Well, there are other uses,
which of course you know. Bees give honey and
wax, silkworms spin silk for us, and some insects, as
the cochineal, are useful for dyes ; but these uses are
very small compared with those we have been speak-
ing of.”

Alice’s face looked very serious, as if she were
considering some important matter. At length she
said, “It seems dreadful, uncle, that the insects and
creatures are all preying on each other.”

Yes, my dear, that is one of the things about
which we must ¢rwst. But we may see much mercy
even in that, if we think about it a little.”

“Why, uncle, how can that be?” exclaimed both
the children.

“It was a great puzzle to me once,” continued
their uncle; “but when .we consider that in this
world there is death as well as life, and pain as well
as happiness, that ‘the whole creation groaneth and
Alice's Difficulty. 57



travaileth,’ as St. Paul expresses it, we cease to look
for unmixed enjoyment even in the animal world.
And probably they suffer much less than we suppose.
I imagine they do not know what /ear is, the nervous
fear which we feel, and their death is often instan-
taneous, so that I believe they have far more enjoy-
ment than they would have by any other arrange-
ment.”

“Then you think they like being eaten, uncle?”
asked Alice, with a sly look at her papa.

“Well, I believe a fly that is eaten by a wasp has
a happier time of it than one that lives on into the
autumn months to get blind, and decrepit, and old.”

“Uncle, I wonder how you'd like some great giant
to come and eat you,” said Alice, rather indignantly ;
but Charlie, who was much interested in his uncle’s
theory, stopped her in his brotherly, abrupt fashion.

“Hush, Alice, don’t be silly; it’s not the same
thing at all. Insects don’t feel as we do.”

“To see a cat worrying a mouse is the most
puzzling thing to me,” said Mr. Stone.

“Tt looks cruel, but I dare say the mouse is happy
» all the time,” observed Uncle Ned, with the greatest
composure,

Of course he was immediately called on to givea
reason for this very remarkable statement.

“If you will fetch Mr. Wood’s book from the
library, Charlie,” he said—“that big book about
animals, on the lowest shelf near the window—I will
read you what he says about it.”

“What a dear, wise uncle you are,” said Alice,
58 Stories of the Tropics.



coaxingly, when Charlie was gone for the book;
“you find some good reason for everything ; and 1
believe you'll make me want to be a mouse in a
minute or two.” So saying, she skipped away to get
her uncle’s spectacles from a side-table, for the child
had a wonderful faculty of finding out and supplying
the wants of others, which had earned her the name
of the little fairy.

Then her uncle read :-—

“By some merciful and most marvellous provision,
the mode of whose working is at present hidden, the
sense of pain is driven out from the victim as soon
as it is seized or struck by its destroyer. The first
person who seems to have taken this view of the
case was Livingstone, the well-known traveller, who
learned the lesson by personal experience. After
describing an attack made upon him by a lion, he
proceeds :—

‘Starting and looking half round, I saw the lion
just in the act of springing on me. I was upon a
little height ; he caught my shoulder as he sprang,
and we both came down to the ground below together.
Growling horribly close to my ear, he shook me as a
terrier dog does arat. The shock produced a stupor
similar to that which seems to be felt by a mouse
after the first shake of the cat. It causes a sort
of dreaminess, 2 which there was no sense of pain
or feeling of terror, though I was quite conscious of
all that was happening. It was like what patients
partially under the influence of chloroform describe,
who see all the operation, but feel not the knife.








































































































































59

Ny =
Ny >
ESAS
RXV
SE





LIVINGSTONE AND THE LION. a





A Tiger Story. 61

This singular condition was not the result of any
mental process. The shake annihilated fear, and
allowed no sense of horror in looking at the beast.
This peculiar state is probably produced in all
animals killed by the carnivora; and, if so, is a
merciful provision by our benevolent Creator for
lessening the pain of death,’

This fearful experience is, although most valuable,
not a solitary one, and is made more valuable by that
very fact. I am acquainted with a similar story by
an officer of the Indian army, a German nobleman by
birth, who, while in Bengal, was seized and carried
away by atiger. He described the whole scene in
much the same language as that of Livingstone,
saying that, as far as the bodily senses were con-
cerned, the chief sensation was that of a pleasant
drowsiness, rather admixed with curiosity as to the
manner in which the brute was going to eat him.
Only by his reasoning powers, which remained un-
shaken, could he feel that his position was one of
almost helpless danger, and that he ought to attempt
escape. Perhaps in so sudden and overwhelming a
shock, the mind may be startled for a time from its
hold upon the nerves, and be, so to speak, not at
home to receive any impression from the nervous
system. Many men have fallen into the jaws of these
fearful beasts, but very few have survived to tell their
tale.” *

“There, now that I have two such men as Living-
stone and Mr. Wood on my side, I hope you will not

* Wood's Natural Listory—Mammalia,
62 Stories of the Tropics.



think my theory altogether a fancy ; Iam convinced
of its truth myself.”

But Charlie’s whole mind was taken up with Dr.
Livingstone’s wonderful adventure.

“How did Livingstone get away, uncle?” asked
he.

“Mr. Wood says nothing about that,” replied his
uncle, “but I have read the story in Livingstone’s
own work, and, if I remember rightly the lion left
him to attack another man whom he saw at a little
distance trying to shoot him. He bit this man in the
leg, but happily the bullets which had been fired at
the lion took effect before he had killed anybody.”

This story reminded Charlie that his uncle could
tell of escapes and adventures from his own personal
experience.

“Oh, uncle,” he cried, “papa told us once that
when you were in Ceylon you slept all night with a
great serpent in your bed, and you didn’t find it out
till morning. Do tell us about it.”

“Tt’s quite true, Charlie; I have had more than
one narrow escape from a serpent. I lay with a
cobra under my pillow all one night without knowing
it, though several times I fancied I felt something
move. In the morning, to my horror, when I re-
moved the pillow, I saw the creature’s green, glitter-
ing eyes staring at me. Fortunately, I had lain still;
if I had been restless my bed-fellow would soon have
darted at my throat.”

“Would he have killed you, uncle?” asked Alice
breathlessly.


Escape from a Cobra. 63



“Yes, indeed ; I should never have recovered from
a wound such as he could inflict, for cobras have the
most terrible poison fangs. Happily they are of a
sluggish disposition, and are not easily roused.”



THE COBRA,

“T suppose you killed him, uncle?” said Charlie
much excited.

“T did, indeed. I got my chopping-knife and
gave him first a knock on the head, then I chopped
64 Stories of the Tropics.



him across the back. But I was on guard the next
night, I assure you.” .

“ And did you find another?”

“Not under my pillow, but I carefully looked all
round the house as well as inside, for they say if one
is destroyed its companion is sure to be at hand to
avenge its death ; and I ad find another close to the
house, and put an end to him.”

“Charlie, I Zope you will never go to Ceylon,” said
Alice, earnestly.

“The Indians tame these cobras,’ continued her
uncle, “and have no fear of them. They carry the
snakes about in a basket, and when the performance
commences they open the lid, and out creeps the
snake. Then the man, who is called a snake
charmer, sings a kind of monotonous song, or plays
on a little instrument like a flute, which he carries
about with him, and the snake begins to move its
body in the most graceful manner, as if it were danc-
ing. It has a peculiar neck, which is the same size
as the head when at rest; but when excited or
irritated the neck swells, and it raises the fore part of
its body in a pretty, undulating manner.”

“Don’t use such long words, uncle, please,” said
Alice.

“T hardly know a shorter word to express my
meaning, dear. Undulating means up and down, this
way,’ and her uncle moved his hand’ to imitate the
motion of waves.

“T have read of a gentleman,” he continued, “who
allowed an Indian to exhibit a snake of this kind to


















































































































































































































































































sina

we















































































































Wg
Wg

= Fy

f )
2 \
SS '
S g







=\ Wl ee









_——$—SS]|SS—

INDIAN SNAKE CHARMERS.

65

—— |

Adventure with a Python. 67



him while he painted it. The Indian handled it
without the smallest fear, and the gentleman sup-
posed that its poison fangs had been extracted. So
he took hold of it himself to examine more closely
the beauty of its spots. He heard afterwards, how-
ever, that the very snake he had been handling killed
a young woman only the next day.”

“Oh, uncle, how horrible!” éxclaimed Alice, “I

wonder it did not bite him. But do tell us about
your other adventure.”
' “My other escape was from a python, an immense
creature that has no poison fangs, but can twist itself
round the body of a man and crush-it. One of these
monsters I once saw coiled round the posts of the
verandah where I had been taking an afternoon
nap.”

“ How did you kill him, uncle ?” asked Charlie.

“Twas obliged to get help for that. One of my
men made a strong noose with a rope, and poked at
the python with a long pole. Then he managed to
get the noose round his body, and dragged him down.
Having done this, he cleverly caught hold of his tail,
dashed his head against a tree, and finished him up
with a hatchet.”

“What a clever fellow!” said Charlie, admiringly.
“How long was the snake?”

“About ten or eleven feet. My man luckily had
been a good deal in snake countries, and was used to
them.”

“Eleven feet! Why that creature must have been
as big as you and papa together, if papa were stand-
68 Stories of the Tropics.
ing on your head, uncle. Only think of that, Alice ?”

exclaimed Charlie, delighted.
“ There is another snake of the same species as the






:
CW

Sa
a)

38
SSS YZ

IPS Se








It is called the Boa Constrictor, because it

python.
kills its prey, as the python does, by pressure or con-
This reptile is found in the tropical parts

striction.
The Boa Constrector. 69

of America, and has been known, it is said, to attain
the length of thirty feet. Its skin is very beautifully
marked with a number of large black and pale white
spots. The ancient inhabitants of Mexico worshipped
the boa, and called it ‘king’ and ‘emperor,’ and be-
cause of its terrible size and nature, regarded it as
divine.”

“Are all snakes poisonous?” asked Alice. “I
mean all except pythons; they crush people, and
that is quite as bad.”

“I hope they don’t often crush people, my child,
but they have been known to kill even buffaloes
sometimes, they are so fearfully strong. The one I
saw was quite a small one, they are often double the
size. But many snakes are not poisonous at all; in
fact, most of them are perfectly harmless.”

“JT wish snakes had as many enemies as the poor
termites,” said Alice.

_ “They have enemies, I assure you,” replied her
uncle. ‘The secretary bird is one of them. I had
the good fortune once to see a contest between this
bird and a snake—not a python, Alice—for the
secretary himself is only about three feet long. I
was not very near, but fortunately I had an opera
glass with me, which assisted my sight and brought
the whole scene before me. It was in South Africa.
I had taken out my glass to look at some object,
and my attention was arrested by the extraordinary
movements of a bird, which I recognized as the secre-
tary. Knowing his habits, I guessed that a snake
was within his reach, and I soon found my conjecture
70 Stories of the Tropics.



was correct. The bird was making a scries of the
most extraordinary hops to prevent his enemy's
escape. Every time the snake tried to get back to
its hole, the bird made a movement in the same
direction to cut off its retreat. At length the poor
snake, finding it could not get away, prepared to
make a spring on its tormentor. It half raised itself,
and with swelling head and glittering eyes hissed
fearfully.”



z ON ged CGT
THE SECRETARY BIRD.

“Uncle, if you were so far away, you couldn’t hear
it,” said Charlie.

“No, but it is the custom of serpents to hiss when
they are angry, so don’t interrupt my narrative, sir.
Well, the bird protected himself with one wing, and
struck at the snake with the other, till at last it was
quite stunned and exhausted. Then Mr. Secretary
gave it a powerful blow with his beak, split its head
asunder, and swallowed the creature before I put
down my eye-glass.”


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE SECRETARY BIRD AND SERPENT.

qi

The Secretary Bird. “73



“Oh, uncle, I wish I had been there,” said Charlie,
“those secretaries must have pretty strong wings.”

“Yes, and the wings are furnished with horny
protuberances like little clubs, with which the bird
beats his enemies.”

“Why is he called the secretary bird, uncle?”
asked Alice.

“The tufts of feathers at the back of his head have
given rise to his name. They have been thought to



THE ICHNEUMON,

resemble pens behind his ear, but he is more of a
warrior than a scholar.”

s Yes, Iam sure he is a brave warrior; I like him
for killing those horrid snakes,” said Alice. :

“The snakes have more formidable enemies still ;
the adjutant and the ichneumon. The adjutant is
a very large bird, about six feet high, and the
ichneumon is an animal rather like an immense rat.
It leaps on the serpent’s back, and kills him by
fastening its sharp teeth in his head.”
74 Stories of the Tropics.



“T have been thinking snakes could not possibly
be of any use,” said Alice, “ but I suppose they make
food for these creatures.”

“Yes, and they do good service in their lives also,”
said her uncle. “What do you think of people
keeping snakes in their houses, and making pets of
them ?”

“Do they now, veally, uncle?” said Alice.

“T have heard of such things; in fact, I have seex
rat-snakes kept as pets in Ceylon. These snakes,
however, are perfectly harmless. But what do you
think of a cobra, that poisonous creature, being kept
as a protector, instead of a dog?”

“Oh, uncle, I can hardly believe it,” said Alice.

“Tt does seem hard to believe, indeed, but the
fact rests on good authority. It is said that when
domesticated they glide about the house, doing no
harm to the inmates, and frightening away thieves.
The snakes are really very useful in destroying
vermin, and the rat-snake has acquired its name
from its dexterity in catching rats.”

“Well, uncle, I think I will never say anything is
useless again,” said Alice. “If snakes are some good
in the world, I shall have hopes of everybody.” Her
uncle laughed, but applauded his little niece’s wise
resolution.

“Uncle, you spoke of the adjutant just now,” said
Charlie, “is it not a kind of stork 2”

“Yes, my boy, it is; I have read an amusing story
of an adjutant somewhere, which I will tell you. It
was a tame bird belonging to a chief in some tropical
Story of an Adjutant. m5
island. It used always to present itself at dinncr-
time, and take its place behind its master’s chair.
The servants used to watch it, and beat it off if it





TUE ADJUTANT,

tricd to help itself to the delicacies on the table;
‘but one day it snatched a fowl, and swallowed it in
amoment. It used to fly about the island and roost
among the silk-cotton trees, and from thence it would
76 | Stories of the Tropics.

watch when the dinner was being carried across the
court, and get home in time to join its master at
table.”

“ Oh, uncle, how could it swallow the fowl whole ?”
asked Alice. “What a wonderful bird it must be!”

“Tt is an immense bird, my dear. It is nearly as
tall as-I am, and it thinks nothing of swallowing a
cat or a fox whole.”

Alice, who was very fond of cats, thought this
much more unpardonable than helping itself to the
chicken at table. “I wonder the cat does not stick
in its throat. I wish it would next time,” said she.

“How did the chief manage to tame it?” asked
Charlie.

“T believe they are not at all difficult to tame,’
replied his uncle; “they: soon become very sociable.”

“Tf it has a long neck like a stork,” resumed Alice,
who could not forget its cruelty to her pets, “I
should think the cat wozfd stick in its throat some
day.”

“But it has a short neck, my dear. It is like the
stork in its long bill and long legs, and I believe
it belongs to the same family—the herons.”

“Uncle, that’s a good plan,’ said Alice, “to give
them all a sort of surname to make us remember
them better.”

“Well, the cranes, herons, bitterns, spoonbills, and
storks, are all classed by naturalists under the Latin
name Ardea, meaning, ‘of the heron kind’; and the
adjutant is a sort of fourth cousin, I suppose. I hope
they are proud of their tall relative.”
Famaica Negroes. 77



“I’m sure I shouldn’t be proud of him if he does
such cruel things,” said Alice.

“Uncle, is it true that some snakes have two
heads?” asked Charlie. “I am sure I have heard
of a two-headed snake.”

“No, it is only that the tail bears a fancied re-
semblance to a head; the name is a misleading one.
I see, Charlie, you want to bring me back to the
snakes, but I think we have had enough for to-night,
we shall have little Alice dreaming about them. Let
us talk about the little harmless lizards which are so
pretty and playful; I shall have a great deal to tell
you about them.” 5

“T am afraid you must reserve it till to-morrow,
then, Ned,” said Mr. Stone. “Alice looks tired and
ready for bed ; she is quite pale to-night.”

“The truth is, my cat story was an injudicious one.
Let me tell her another to put it out of her head,
and she will sleep all the better.”

“Well, uncle,” said Charlie, “don’t begin the
lizards to-night, because you must not hurry over
them. I know they will want nearly a whole even-
ing to themselves, with frogs and toads, and such
like.”

“So they will, Charlie. What must my story be,
then?” and Uncle Ned threw back his head and
closed his eyes in thought.

“Tell us something about the black people, uncle
—the negroes in Jamaica,” suggested Charlie.

“Happy thought!” responded his uncle. “I can
. tell you an anecdote I read in Trollope’s book which
78 Stories of the Tropics.



I can quite believe from my own observation of their
love of dress. Mr. Anthony Trollope has been to
Jamaica and has written a book about his travels in
the West Indies. He says that one Sunday he was
riding to church with a friend, when he noticed a
negro girl walking either to or from church. She
was dressed in white from head to foot, and looked
very grand indeed. Her gloves, parasol, hat, lace,
and bugles, were all white, and she walked with
great dignity. Behind her walked an attendant,
carrying her prayer-book on her head. ‘ Who is that
princess?’ asked Mr. Trollope of his friend. ‘They
are two girls who work in my mill, answered the
gentleman ; ‘they are sisters, and take it in turns to
act the fine lady on Sunday. Next Sunday they
will change places, and your princess will walk be-
hind in common clothes with the prayer-book, while
her sister will be attired in white, and step with
queenly dignity, enjoying a delightful sense of her
own grandeur and importance.”

Alice laughed very much at this anecdote, and said
she should like to hear more about the black people
some day. Then she went off to bed, and had a
‘confused dream of the black princess walking alone
with a cat on her head, and being swallowed alive
by a “great big stork,’ as she told her uncle the

next day.
site


CHAPTER IV.

Indian Rice Fields— The Rice Bird—Sago—Tapioca—Indian
Corn—Mahogany—Cotton—Pepper and Nutmeg.

wi WE children had nearly done
their dinner the next day when
Uncle Ned came in from a
walk. The table-cloth was not
removed, and Alice was finishing
her rice pudding, while Charlie’s
face wore a look of thoughtful
consideration.

“T say, Alice,” he began, with
the air of one who has made a
grand discovery, “I can see five
things on this very table that have come from the
tropics!” oe

Alice gave an admiring look at her brother.

“Five, Charlie! There’s the pepper; that’s hot
enough for anything. But what else? You mustn’t
count mustard, you know, for we grow that in our
own gardens, with our names on it.”

“You should say we form our names with the
mustard seed ; our names don’t grow ov it,” corrected .
her brother. “But J am not counting the mustard.

79


80 Stories of the Tropics.



Where does your rice pudding come from ?—and my
sago?—and the sugar? I vote we get uncle to tell
us how they all look as they are growing.”

“ But, Charlie, you have only said four things now
— pepper, sugar, rice, and sago; what can the other
be?”

“Why, the table-cloth, to be sure!” answered
Charlie, triumphantly ; “isn’t that made of cotton ?”

“T am afraid not, Charlie,” said his uncle; “it
looks more like linen, I think, and that, you know, we
get from flax, which we grow at home. But Alice’s
frock will do as well, though it is not on the table;
and if the table-cloth does not come from the tropics,
you have the comfort of knowing that it rests on a
tropical tree.”

“Oh, the mahogany tree!” exclaimed Charlie.
“Do tell us all about it.”

“Which shall I begin with?”

“The rice pudding, please, uncle; because it will
soon be gone, and I want to look at it while you are
talking,” said little Alice.

“ By way of assisting the imagination?” asked her
uncle.

“To make your story a real one, Ned,” said her
papa, who was looking on with an amused expression.

“Yes, I believe you all take me to be a romancer
instead of a steady, common-place, matter-of-fact old
proser as I am.”

“You are not old, at any rate, uncle,” said Alice ;
“Tam sure you are not twenty-two yet.”

This assertion made every one laugh, for her uncle
Indian Rice-frelits. 81
rl eh eR
was at least fifty; but children’s ideas on the subject
of age are somewhat vague.

“Well, my child, I will begin, and tell you about
the rice fields which I saw in India.”

“Not the West Indies, you know, Alice,” explained
Charlie. “India isin Asia; it is only another name
for Hindostan.”

“Oh, uncle, you have been nearly all over the
world,” said Alice.

“Not quite, my love; but don’t interrupt me, or
we shall never get through our five subjects.”

“And a lot more I’ve got in my mind,” said
Charlie, half to himself. “ Now, Alice, be quiet.”

“The rice-fields I saw in India,’ continued Uncle
Ned, “lie very low, and are supplied by nature with
abundance of water, being situated in marshy ground.
In one part of the year, during the heavy rains, a
rice-field will appear a per-
fect swamp; you could see
nothing but mud, through
which buffaloes are perhaps
wading, or herons stalking.
But three or four months
later on you see a waving
cornfield, looking very much
like our barley. ‘The cultiva-
tion of rice is unhealthy ; the
alternate flooding and drying ISIS SIE STIN
of the land produces fever, which kills many of the
poor negroes who work on it.”

“J thought the rivers overflowed, uncle, and the |

Fr


82 Stories of the Tropics.

rice grew on their bank,’ remarked Charlie, anxious
to show his learning.

“You are quite right. These are the best rice-
fields,” replied his uncle; but there are others that
depend on the rains only, and others again that are
artificially watered, for rice cannot grow without an
immense quantity of water. It is a very fruitful plant,
and yields a much more abundant harvest than ourcorn.
The natives almost live upon it, and call it paddy.”

“T have heard of the vice-bcrd, uncle. Is that a
bird that feeds on rice?” asked Charlie.

“Yes, it has another name, the ‘Java sparrow.’ It
would amuse you to see how they frighten away
these birds. They put cords in every direction across
the field, to which are attached the most comical
’ scarecrows. Thecords all converge to the middle of
the field, where there is a watch-house built on high
poles. The watchman in his den moves the cords
from time to time, and that sets all the scarecrows in
motion, and frightens the poor little pad who fly
away fast enough.”

af oe what fun! I should like to be the watch-
man,” said Alice.

“Not for long, I fancy. But now, before the sago
pudding is taken away, we must talk about that.”

“T suppose it is just like rice and corn,” said Alice,
“50 I don’t much care about it.”

“No, indeed! Sago is the pith of a palm-tree.
You have been eating pith-pudding, Charlie.”

“Oh, do give mea little now, that I nas taste it,”
said Alice.
The Sago Palm. 83



“You must remember cook has mixed it with
other things—‘sugar and spice and all that’s nice,’ ”
said Charlie, in a sudden burst of what he called
“poetical inspiration.”

“Have you seen the sago tree growing ?—is it
tall?” asked Alice.

“Tts leaves are two or three times as long as your
papa, my dear, so you may imagine it is a good
height. I have seen many, and I was lucky enough
to see the whole preparation too while I was in
Ceram. The sago palm is like rice in one thing,
Alice; it requires a great deal of water, and grows in
swamps. When the tree is about twelve or fifteen
years old it flowers, and this is a sign it is going to
die. They cut it down just before it flowers, and make
the sago. “They clear away the leaves and branches,
take a broad strip of bark off the upper side of the
trunk, and then cut and break up the pith. This they
do with an instrument made on purpose for the
operation. It isa club with a bit of sharp quartz at
the end. With this they clear out all the pith; then
they wash it and separate the starch from the fibre,
which is thrown away.”

“They shouldn’t throw away starch, uncle,” said
Alice, gravely, “it’s a very useful thing ; but perhaps
they don’t want to stiffen their collars and frocks
out there.”

“Tt is the fibre they throw away my child,” said
her uncle, “ because it has no nourishment ; it is like
thread, you know ; the starch is put up very carefully
in bundles to be eaten.”
84 Stories of the Tropics.

“Oh, uncle, now you surely are laughing at me!”
‘said the child.

“No, indeed, many of the things you eat contain
a good deal of starch. Sugar is chiefly composed
of starch, and there is a good deal also in potatoes,
carrots, parsnips, and flour. Starch is very nourish-
ing. Sago, I suppose, is mainly composed of it.”

“Oh, uncle, you tell us such wonderful things,”
said Alice; “I should get quite learned, only my
head will never hold it all.”

“J mean to make notes,” said Charlie. “I shall
begin to-night.”

“But, uncle,’ continued Alice, “starch alone, and
water, like Sarah starches the collars with, would not
be very nice.”

“The raw sago boiled in water must be very like
that stuff,” said Uncle Ned; “but the natives eat it
with salt and limes, and add a little spice sometimes
to make it more agreeable.”

“What are limes, uncle?”

“A kind of lemon, only smaller, and the juice is
very delicious. Sago cakes are very nice, and they
are made in this way: the raw sago is broken up and
dried in the sun, then powdered and sifted. The people
have ovens on purpose for baking these cakes, and
they are made and cooked in about five minutes, when
the sago is ready—that is, dried and refined. You
would like the hot cakes very much, especially when
a little sugar and grated cocoa-nut are mixed with the
powder before baking. But you would not be in-
dulged with fresh cakes every day. Most of the sago


Tapioca and Maize. 85



used in the island is made into biscuits—that is, the
cakes are dried in the sun for several days. In this
state they will keep for years. They are a little hard
and rough, but I used to dip mine in water and toast
them, and in that way they were very eatable.”

“Ts tapioca pudding pith too, uncle?” asked Alice.

“No, that is the root of a curious tree, called the
cassava ; it grows in Brazil and other parts of tropical
America. The strange thing is, that the very same
tree which gives this wholesome food produces at the
same time a most dreadful poison. In order to
prepare the tapioca, they have to draw out first the
poisonous juice, which is easily done. All they have
to do is to cut the root into small pieces, and expose
these to the heat of the sun. If any animal were to
drink the juice that has just been extracted from the
tree, it would die; but the same juice, after being
kept awhile, is often boiled
with meat, and makes quite a
nice soup.”

“Why, uncle, how can that
be?”

“Tt is the effect of heat,
which draws out the poison.
The sun is a wonderful puri-
fier.”

“T suppose you have seen
the Indian corn grow, uncle ?” ;
said Charlie; “the maize, I MAIZE.
mean, that we give to our fowls.”

“Yes, I have; it is a great deal more productive


86 Stories of the Tropics. °



than our corn. Instead of getting twenty grains for
one, as we do, they often get from three to four
hundred. The Indians eat it. It is prepared in
various ways; sometimes they grind it into meal
and make a hasty-pudding of it, sometimes a cake.
Before the grain is ripe and hard, there are several
ways of using it. The tender green ears, stripped
of their leaves and roasted by a quick fire, are con-
sidered quite a delicacy eaten with a little salt or
butter. I have tasted a kind of beer, too, that was
made from it, but it was horribly bitter stuff.”

“J don’t think plants and trees are so interesting
as living creatures, are they, uncle?” said Alice,
rather wearily.

“Yet they ave living creatures,” answered her uncle.

“Yes, but you know what I mean.”

“Oh, I know you are longing to hear about the
lizards and ostriches and crocodiles and lions and
tigers and monkeys, and there will be very little time
left for them all. So I must finish up our subjects
as shortly as I can without any more digressions.
Tapioca and maize are not on the table, you know.”

“No, we have done rice and sago,” said Charlie;
“now there are four—no, five more—for there’s the
nutmeg in the pudding.”

“Don’t sigh, Alice,” said her uncle, “I won’t keep
you long with these; and to-night we will have the
lizards, yes, and ostriches, too, if we have time.”

“With one bound Alice was off her-chair and on
her uncle’s knee, her arms round his neck.

“Oh, Uncle Ned, how kind you are!” she said;
The Mahogany Tree. 587



‘what should we do without you? Fancy, Charlie,
two tropics in one day.”

“Rather hot and strong,’ remarked her papa.
“Why, Ned, while these children are in the house, I
am nobody at all. It is a good thing they go to
bed sometimes. I shall put on the clock to-night
an hour or two.”

Alice looked at her papa to see whether he meant
it, and decided that he did not, so she said nothing.

“Now, uncle, let’s go in for the mahogany-tree,”
said Charlie.

“T can only tell you that it has a pretty, light-
coloured foliage, and is very valuable. I have heard
of the wood of a single tree costing more than twelve
hundred pounds before passing into the hands of the
cabinet-maker.”

“Oh, uncle, how could that be?” asked Alice.

“It was a specially fine one, no doubt; but you
must remember that the cost of felling and carrying
over to England and sawing a very large tree would
be considerable.”

“Then our table must be almost worth its weight
in gold,” said Alice, “for it’s real mahogany,”

“But it’s not all mahogany. Don’t you know how
they manage?” said Charlie. “They veneer—but
you won’t understand that word. I mean, they make
the table of some common wood, and they put just a
thin slip of mahogany over it. Here, you can see
where this bit has been chipped off the sideboard.”

“Oh, what a good plan,” said Alice; “a tree cut
up like that in thin slices would make a good many
88 Stories of the Tropics.



sideboards and tables and beds and chairs too,
wouldn’t it, uncle? But now for the table-cloth—
no, that is linen. Well, my cotton frock, then; we
must have the cotton-plant next.”



THE MAIIOGANY-TREE.

“You can see that in the Kensington Museum, so
I need not spend much time in describing it. The
flowers are yellow and sometimes white, with a purple
centre, in shape rather like a convolvulus. The cotton
fields look very pretty in the autumn, with their dark


Pepper and Nutmeg. 89



folie and white and yellow flowers mixed with the
white down of the cotton from the half-open pod.
The poor negroes have to work hard then, for it is
important to get the cotton early, before its colour
is injured by the heat of the sun. Besides, the wind
would soon scatter it all about if it were not plucked
in good time.”

“Now for the pepper and nutmeg, and then we



THE PEPPER-PLANT.

have done,” said Charlie, “for I can tell Alice all
about sugar just as well as if I had been in the West
Indies myself. Besides, papa has told us, and all
about coffee and tea too, for he talks to us at break-
fast when you are not here, Uncle Ned.”

“T dare say if you dined with your papa every day
I should not have been able to give you much fresh
information about rice and sago.”

“But still they seem more real when you talk about
them,” said Alice, “ because you have seen them, and
papa has not.” '
90 Stories of the Tropics.

“Well, now for a walk in a pepper plantation,
Alice. You must fancy you see a number of trees
with straight tall stems ; these are not pepper-plants,
they are mangoes, and they support the pepper vines
which twine round them. The leaf of the pepper
vine is like ivy; the blossoms appear in June; they
are small, and of a greenish-white. These are suc-
ceeded by berries which grow like currants on little
stalks in bunches. The nutmeg is a tree about fifty
feet high. I suppose
you know that the
mace comes from the
same fruit; it sur-
rounds the shell of the
nut. The nutmeg grows
rather like a walnut,
being surrounded by
a sort of spongy coat.
When this bursts it dis-
closes a shining black

@. THE RIPE FRUIT, BURST. nut encased in a bright
b. THE MACE, ¢ NUTMEG ALONE, scarlet network.”



“Oh, I know, that network is mace,” said Charlie ;
“but it loses its colour when it is dried. Well, uncle,
I am glad you came in to-day, while we were having
our dinner, it’s so stupid to eat things like pigs with-
out knowing whether they are roots or seeds or pith.”

“Charlie, ’'ve got something in my mind,” said
Alice ; “but I won’t tell you till we get upstairs.”


CHAPTER V.

Gorillas—Capture of Master Joe—Escape from a Oroco-
dile—Sleeping on a Crocodile—Geckos—Anoles—The
Chameleon.






m@7 HE children were longer than usual that
Wevening before they made their appear-
ance at dessert, and when they did
“® come down they were transformed into
two little Indians. Faces and hands were
blackened with burnt cork, and Alice wore
a turban, which well concealed her shining
auburn hair. Charlie’s dark curly locks
suited his new character very well. He had dressed
himself like an Indian chief, with coloured rags, beads,
shells, and feathers stuck about him in the most
miscellaneous manner; and Alice, in a plain white
frock, with necklace and bracelets of large coloured
beads, and a white turban setting off her darkened
face, made a perfect little Indian girl.

They refused every fruit except dates, would not
speak a word of English, and offered their uncle, by
signs, a strange-looking compound, which Charlie
carried in a saucer and sipped from time to time
with apparent satisfaction.

Alice’s nurse, who had tried to fill to her the place
QL
92 Stories of the Tropics.

of the mother she had lost at her birth, and who de-
lighted in helping on all Master Charlie’s “grand ideas,”
stood a few moments at the door enjoying the scene.

“Tf you please, sir, that’s thin starch,” she explained
to her master in an undertone; “it’s just flavoured
with lemon-juice and nutmeg, and Master Charles
would insist upon it that it was the proper food for
Indians ; but I’m afraid it will make Miss Alice sick.”
_ “They won’t eat much of it, nurse, you may
’ depend,” said her master, soothingly. Then turning
to his brother, “ This comes of ‘two tropics’ in one
day. You've turned my children into savages, Ned.”

“ Charlie,” whispered Alice to her brother, “I think
we had better speak English, because papa and uncle
wouldn't understand our real Indian, you know.”

“Yes, perhaps we had,” said Charlie, condescend-
ingly.

“Now, uncle, haven’t we done it well? Alice
wanted me to make the raw sago, and I said we had
better be Indians at once, and do the whole thing ;
and so here we are, and I only wish there was a
forest near, for I feel equal to anything.”

“Even to confronting a gorilla >?” said his uncle.

“Oh! uncle, have you seen one?” asked Charlie,
in great excitement.

“No, I have not, sir; I don’t possess your enter-
prising spirit quite to the same extent, and am
content to read about them.”

“T saw a picture of one once,” said Charlie; “it
was horribly like a wild man. But, oh! I showld like
to hear about them.”
Gorillas. FES

“Bring that brown paper parcel to me, Charlie,”
said his uncle. ‘Dear me!” he continued looking
at it with a puzzled expression, “it is directed to
Master Charles Stone.”

Charlie’s eyes glistened, and I suspect his cheeks
turned very red, though that did not show through
the burnt cork.

“Why, it’s ‘Du Chaillu’s Adventures in Africa,
the very book I’ve been wanting for ever so long.
I know there’s no end of fun in it,” said Charlie.
“T just saw it once for two or three minutes, and
oh! how I did long to have it!”

“Charlie, I believe uncle’s given it you,” said Alice,
in a whisper; and then half apologising to her uncle:
“He’s too much taken up with it to thank you
uncle ; but he will presently.”

“Oh, I forgot; but I can’t thank you properly, I
never was so happy in my life,” said Charlie.

“Well, my boy, your pleasure is the best thanks
I can have,” said his uncle; “and Alice looks as
pleased as you do.”

“Tt’s just the same as if you had given it me, you
know, uncle; and I do like to see Charlie happy,”
said Alice.

“You will find a most amusing story of a young
gorilla that was taken alive and brought to Du
Chaillu. He says when he saw the little brute being
dragged towards him, he felt rewarded for all the
hardships he had gone through in Africa, and I am
sure they were many.”

“Oh, uncle, do just read us this one story,” begged

J
94 Stories of the Tropics.



Charlie, “because you know the tropics would not
be perfect without a gorilla.”

“But, before you begin, please tell me what a
gorilla is,” said Alice.

“It is a very large ape, which is found in tropical
Africa. It is about as tall as a man, and is thought
by many of the Africans to be a wild man and not
a brute. They think it gets into the woods, and
pretends to be dumb and stupid in order to escape
work. The one that was brought to Du Chaillu was
a young male, between two and three years old. It
was two feet and a half high. But I shall spoil the
story if I attempt to give it in my own words, so
you shall have Du Chaillu’s own spirited description
of Master Joe, as he called him.

Then Uncle Ned opened the book and began to
read :—“ When I had the little fellow safely locked
in his cage (he had made a bamboo cage for him), I
ventured to approach to say a few encouraging words
to him. He stood in the farthest corner, but as I
approached bellowed and made a precipitate rush at
me, and though I retreated as quickly as I could,
succeeded in catching my trouser-legs, which he
grasped with one of his feet and tore, retreating
immediately to the corner farthest away. This
taught me caution for the present, though I had a
hope still to be able to tame him. He sat in his
corner looking wickedly out of his grey eyes, and I
never saw a more morose or more ill- -tempered face
than had this little beast.

“The first thing was of course to attend. to the


THE GORILLA,

05

Master Foe. 07

zZ



wants of my captive. Isent for some of the forest
berries which these animals are known to prefer, and
placed these and a cup of water within his reach.
He was exceedingly shy, and would neither eat nor
drink till I had removed to a considerable distance.

“The second day found Joe fiercer than the first ;
he rushed savagely at any one who stood even for a
moment near his cage, and seemed ready to tear us
all to pieces. I threw him to-day some pineapple
leaves, of which I noticed he ate only the white parts.
There seemed no difficulty about his food, though he
refused now, and continued during his short life to
refuse, all food except such wild leaves and fruits as
were gathered from his native woods for him.

“The third day he was still morose and savage,
bellowing when any person approached, and either
retiring to a distant corner or rushing to attack,

“On the fourth day, while no one was near, the
little rascal succeeded in forcing apart two of the
bamboo rails which composed his cage, and made
his escape. I came up just as his flight was dis-
covered, and immediately got all the negroes together
for pursuit, determining to surround the wood and
recapture my captive. Running into the house to
get one of my guns, I was startled by an angry growl
issuing from under my low bedstead. It was Master
Joe, who lay there hid, but anxiously watching my _
movements. I instantly shut the windows, and called
to my people to guard the door.

“When Joe saw the crowd of black faces he be-
came furious, and, with his eyes glaring, and every

G
98 Stories of the Tropics.



sign of rage in his little face and body, got out from
beneath the bed. We shut the door at the same time
and left him master of the premises, preferring to
devise some plan for his easy capture rather than to
expose ourselves to his terrible teeth, . . . Mean-
while, Joe stood in the middle of the room, looking
about for his enemies, and examining, with some
surprise, the furniture.

“Finally, seeing him quite quiet, I despatched
some fellows for a net, and opening the door quickly,
threw this over his head. Fortunately we succeeded
at the first throw in fatally entangling the young
animal, who roared frightfully, and struck and kicked
in every direction under the net. I took hold of the |
back of his neck, two men seized his arms, and
another the legs, and thus held by four men, this
extraordinary little creature still proved most trouble-
some. We carried him as quickly as we could to the
cage, which had been repaired, and there once more
locked him in. I never saw so furious a beast in my
life as he was. He darted at every one who came
near, bit the bamboos of the house, glared at us with
venomous and sullen eyes, and in every motion
showed a temper thoroughly wicked and malicious.” *

“Poor Joe,” said Alice, “I don’t wonder that he
was savage at being kept in that stupid cage instead
of roaming about the woods !”

“Did his master manage to tame him at_ last,
uncle?” asked Charlie. ‘“ He ought to have starved
him a little.” ;

* Du Chaillu’s Africa.
Escape of Master Foe. 99



“He did try that, but nothing would do. After he
had had him a fortnight Master Joe escaped again,
and was seen running on all fours towards the wood.”

“Oh! I hope they didn’t catch him this time,”
said Alice.

“Yes, they did, and then his master secured him
with a little chain. But he was very kind to him



HEAD OF A GORILLA.

indeed, and used to put a half barrel filled with hay
near him for his bed. The little creature knew its
use at once, and used to shake up the hay and creep
into his nest when he was tired. Then when he was
quite snug in bed, he would take some hay in his
hands and cover himself over.”

“How long did he live?” asked Charlie; “and
how did they manage to catch him at first ?”.
100 Stories of the Tropics.



“He was in his master’s possession about a month
altogether, and died after two days’ illness. The
story of his capture is very interesting, and I ought
to have begun with it, but you must read it for
yourselves. I will only tell you shortly that the
hunters (there were five, I believe) heard the cry of
a young gorilla, and approaching noiselessly, saw
Master Joe seated on the ground, eating some
berries. His mother was near him. They fired at
her, and killed her. Poor little Joe ran to her and
clung to her, hiding his face.”

“There, you see, uncle, poor Joe could be good and
kind after all when he was in his own dear home
in the woods,” said Alice.

“When he saw the hunters he ran up a tree, and
roared at them.”

“Quite right too, I should have done the same,”
said Charlie, entering into Alice’s view of the case,
and decidedly taking part with the little gorilla.

“The way they got him at last was to cut down
the tree, and throw a cloth over his head. While thus
blinded, they secured him, fitted a forked stick about
his neck in such a way that he could not escape, and
so dragged him along.”

“JT shall want to borrow your book, Charlie,” said
Mr. Stone, who had been as much interested as the
children in Master Joe’s history.

“Oh yes, papa; you shall have it first if you like,”
said Charlie, in a sudden burst of generosity; but
Mr. Stone did not accept this munificent offer.

“Now, Uncle Ned, we must have one of your
The Lizard’s Big Relations. 101
stories,” said Alice, coaxingly. “Are you going to
tell us about the lizards now?”

“Certainly, if you like, amu we begin with their
big relations ?”
“Who are they ?” asked 1 Alice













A LIZARD.
“ Crocodiles and aligators, I suppose,” said Charlie.
“Hurrah! I always like to hear about them.”
“ But they can’t be related to the dear little lizards,”
said Alice.

“They all come under the general name of Sau-
102 Stories of the Tropics.



rians,” said Uncle Ned. “I believe Aristotle was the
first to apply that name, and he confined it to the
lizards, but it is now extended to all reptiles having
an elongated body covered with scales or a rough
scaly skin.”

“Look, Alice,” said Charley, “here is a picture of a
lizard, and there is the head of a crocodile. There is
a great family likeness, you see. And they have
each four legs, and the same shaped body and tail.”

“But, oh dear, the crocodile has such a wwecked



HEAD OF A CROCODILE,

look,” said Alice, “with its great ugly head and
dreadful teeth.”

“Yes, its jaws are terrible indeed, and it has no
lips, so that the teeth are always seen. And it has
two most vicious-looking eyes.”

“ Have you ever seen one, uncle?” asked the chil-
dren, breathlessly.

“Ves, I have seen some in the East Indies. The
Nile is the most famous place for them, you know,
but I have never been to the north of Africa, though
I once visited the Cape. It was in Ceylon that I first
made the acquaintance of one, and it was a sight I
Escape from a Crocodile. — 103



shall never forget, for he nearly killed a poor negro
servant of mine. The man acted with great presence
of mind, pressed his fingers tight into the crocodile’s
eyes and blinded him, and the monster, in his great
agony, let go his hold. It makes one shudder to
think of it.”

“T remember reading that Mungo Park’s negro
was saved just in the same way, uncle,” said Charlie.

“Yes, it is a well-known mode of defence, but it
does not always succeed.”

“Tam so glad there are no crocodiles in England,”
said Alice.

“We used to have them in our rivers a great many
years ago, but now the temperate regions are less
warm than they used to be, and the crocodiles have
deserted us.”

“ A very good thing too,” said the little girl, heartily.

But Charlie thought he should like to see one.

“ However, it does not much matter,” he said, “for
I’ve quite made up my mind to one thing, and that
is to be a great traveller some day.”

“Well, if you should ever be pursued by a crocodile,
I'll give you a hint to help your escape. You know
what to do if he drags you into the water. If he fol-
lows you on land, keep running round in a circular
direction. A crocodile is very awkward on land, and
he cannot very easily turn round or move in any other
direction than straight before him.”

“What a capital thing to know! How large was
the crocodile you saw, uncle?”

“T should think about eleven feet: they are some-
104 Stories of the Tropics.

times much longer. But when first they come out of
their shells they are very little things—not so long as
this pencil.”

“Oh, uncle, how extraordinary!” said Alice; “I
should like to see those little tiny baby crocodiles.”

“Ah! but they grow very fast if they get the
chance. But they have so many enemies, very few
survive their babyhood, if even they are allowed to
creep out of their eggshells. The eggs are laid in
holes in the sand to be hatched by the rays of the
sun. Many of them are destroyed by birds and beasts
before they are hatched. As for those that escape, as
.soon as the little crocodile breaks its shell and creeps
towards the water, a hundred to one it is pounced upon
by an ichneumon or heron—you remember I told you
they feed on snakes, and although small crocodiles are
not exactly snakes, they find them quite as nice to
eat. But suppose one poor little crocodile gets safely
into the water, it meets with hosts of enemies there.
Even its own relations try to gobble it up,”

“Well, if they live to grow old they are safe enough,
I should think,” said Alice, “for everybody would be
afraid of attacking them.”

“No, indeed ; they are killed by men for the sake of
their flesh. You may see them hanging in the butchers’
stalls in Siam just as you see mutton and beef here.”

“Oh, how horrid! I hope, uncle, you have never
tasted one,” said Alice, impressively.

“No, I have not, but I hear the meat is not at all
bad. What do you think of an officer Dee his tent
over a crocodile’s body?”
Sleeping on a Crocodile. - 105



“Oh, uncle! he would never do it,’ said Charlie,
decidedly.

“Not on purpose, certainly ; but the crocodile was
buried deep in the sand—they frequently bury them-
selves so in the dry season, and remain in a state of
torpor till the return of the rains. Well, as I said,
there was a crocodile under this officer's tent, though
he did not know it. In the night he felt the earth
move below his bed, and the next day a great croco-
dile made its appearance.”

“ How frightened the poor man must have been,”
said Alice.

“T dare say the crocodile was the more frightened
of the two, for he was out of his own element, and in
the dry season they become very torpid and are easily
killed. One of the most extraordinary facts about
the crocodile—and I believe there is no doubt what-
ever of its truth—is this: that a little bird called the
‘Nile Bird’ is very friendly with it, and eats the in-
sects with which the inside of the crocodile’s mouth
is covered. The little bird goes into its mouth when
itis asleep and kindly performs this service, and the
crocodile never hurts it: there seems to be quite a
good understanding between them. Herodotus the
historian was the first to report this curious fact, but
it was long considered a fable. However, of late
years it has received confirmation from some who
have witnessed it.”

“That is the only good thing I have heard of the
crocodile,” said Alice, “and its kindness to the bird
is only selfishness after all. Now, do tell us about its
ttle relations. I am sure I shall like them best.”
106 Stories of the Tropics.



“She means the lizards, uncle,” said Charlie; “we
saw a common lizard once—such a bright-eyed, active
little creature; I tried to seize him, and his tail snapped
off in a minute.”

“Ves, that is one characteristic of our lizard, and
others, too, of the same race, There is one other
kind in England, called the sand lizard ; it is nearly
twice as large as the one you saw, and is fond of







































THE GECKO.

sandy heaths, from which, of course, it gets its name,
But we are not in England now; you must remember
we are spending a week at the tropics, and must talk
about the lizards there. First, then, I will tell you
about the geckos, which are good, useful little things,
Tho Coutta. 107

though very ugly. People have a foolish fear of them,
but they are perfectly harmless, and do good service
by destroying flies, spiders, and other disagreeable
insects. They hide themselves in the day, as if con-
scious that they have no beauty to boast of, and come
out at night, running along the walls and ceilings.”
“Oh, uncle, do they get into the houses?” asked
Alice.
“Ves, indeed they do!”



TOES AND FEET OF THE GECKO.

“And how can they run up steep places and along
the ceilings without tumbling down?”

“Their feet are peculiarly formed so as to enable
them to do this—on the same principle as your
sucker, Charlie. They have also hooked claws, like
those of a cat, which help them to climb trees, They
are queer little creatures, and make the funniest
noises, smacking their tongues against the palate like
a horseman trying to encourage his steed. They are
very unjustly treated by the world, poor little things,
and it is fortunate for them that their dull colour
108 Stories of the Tropics.



and flexible body enable them to hide themselves
easily, for every one seems anxious to destroy them,
instead of being grateful for the good they do.”

“Uncle, I have heard you say you saw such pretty
lizards in Jamaica,” said Alice.

“Yes, those were the little anoles. You would,
indeed, admire them, and I wish I had one to show
you. They are most elegant little things, full of life
and playfulness, And they change colour, too, ac-
cording to their various moods and conditions of
mind. If angry, or sulky, or frightened, I have seen
them turn a dull brown colour, and while the sulky
fit lasted, they would get more brown and ugly every
minute. Then, perhaps, something would give a turn
to their thoughts, and in a moment they have changed
to a lovely transparent green, with just a purple tint
in the tail. I used to enjoy watching these little
creatures chasing each other about, sometimes play-
ing, sometimes fighting, for they are very quarrel-
some. They used to snap at me and try to bite with
their tiny teeth, but they never succeeded in hurting
me. They have tremendous battles among them-
selves. I used to think that if little Bo-peep had
been taking care of anoles instead of sheep, the loss
of their tails would have been easily accounted for.
Their battles generally end by one or the other losing
its tail, and then the poor little creature looks so
ashamed of Se and seems quite melancholy till
it has grown again.”

“Really, uncle, it’s just like a fae story,” said
Alice. “But if you have seen it, it must be true.”
Lhe Chameleon. — 109



“TI have read about a chameleon changing its colour.
I suppose that is a kind of anolis,” said Charlie.

“No, the chameleon and anolis are related, of course,
for both are saurians, but they are very different in ap-
pearance and habits. The chameleon is a most curious
creature. There are two things about it so wonderful
that I know Alice will open her eyes, and think I am
giving you an Arabian Nights’ entertainment.”

“Oh, no, Uncle Ned; I believe every word you
say,’ said Alice, earnestly; “but I did not know
there were so many wonderful things in the real
world. I shall begin to like natural history books
and travels almost as well as fairy tales.”

“You'll hardly believe it, but I like them even better,”
said her uncle, gravely. “And now about the chame-
leon. Everybody knows it has an extraordinary power
of changing its colour, as Charlie says. It is more
famous in this respect than the anolis; and it can also
change its shape so as one moment to look quite thin
and bony, and the next as fat as a well-fed pig.”

“Our canary does that too,” said Alice.

“That’s quite different,” said Charlie; “it only puffs
out its feathers. How is it, uncle, that the chameleon
can make itself fat or thin just as it chooses?”

“Tts skin hangs rather loosely on its body, and
it takes in the air and inflates itself, as you would
inflate a paper bag by blowing into it. The two
special gifts of a chameleon, however—and they are
really like fairy gifts—are these: two wonderful eyes
which can look in different directions at the same
time, and a tongue which it can stretch to a marvel-
110 Stories of the Tropics.



lous length, and which sometimes it makes longer
than its body.”

Alice could bear it quietly no longer, and jumping
off her uncle’s knee, indulged in what she called “a
good frisk” round the room.

“It’s no use to say there are no fairies in these
days, uncle,” she exclaimed ; “I’m sure the lizards
are fairies in disguise. Oh, I wish I had an anolis
and a chameleon, dear little things; I should call one
the good fairy, and the other the bad one.”

“ But you've heard nothing against the chameleon
yet, Alice,” remonstrated Charlie.

“Oh, who could expect a creature with such eyes
and such a tongue to be anything but a bad-tempered,
spiteful old thing!”

“That’s too bad, Alice,” said her uncle; “but it is
really most amusing to see one eye rolling about
while, perhaps, the other is perfectly still, or one eye
looking down to the ground while the other is fixed
on something overhead. They can see to a great
distance with these wonderful eyes, and they dart out
their tongues with the rapidity of lightning to catch any
unfortunate insect which may be within reach. The
tongue is glutinous, or, in more homely words, sticky,
Alice, so the poor insect has no chance of escape.”

“T said they were cruel,” exclaimed Alice; but she
laughed at her own inconsistency, for she was forced to
confess that her little favourites, the anoles, probably
fed on insects too, an opinion which heruncle confirmed.

“JT have not done with my wonders yet, Alice,”
said Uncle Ned; “it is said that one side of the
chameleon’s body may be asleep while the other is
The Chameleon. III



awake, and the one side may be green while the
other changes to blue.”
“Then I suppose it’s sulky on one side and neces
on the other,” said Alice.
“T do like to know the reasons of things,” said
Charlie, gravely ; “can you tell me what makes the



THE CHAMELEON.

chameleon able to move its eyes like that? I’ve
been trying, but I can’t move mine so, they z7l/
go the same way.”

“Don't play tricks with your eyes, you foolish
fellow, you can’t turn yourself into a chameleon if
you try for a week. But I'll tell you the reason.
There is what is called sympathy between the two
112 Stories of the Tropics.



lobes or divisions cf your brain, Charlie; they must
act in concert. But with the chameleon it is not so,
the two sides are independent of each other.”

“Oh, thank you, uncle. I understand now, for
papa has told me that the brain influences the nerves.
So each side is its own master in the chameleon,
while my two sides act together. And now, can you
tell me why it changes colour?”

“Tt is supposed that the skin consists of two
differently coloured layers, which change their relative
positions when it is excited. The chameleon is much
more deliberate in its movements than the active
little anolis. Your bad fairy, Alice, has a very long
tail, which it uses as a fifth leg. It is extremely
useful in enabling it to swing from branch to branch.
The chameleon is more at home on trees than on
the ground.”

“Well, Ned, I don’t want to interrupt your wonder-
ful stories,” said Mr. Stone, “but these young Indians
must go to bed.” ;

“Oh, papa, I did so want to hear about the flying
dragons.”

“Won't it do to-morrow, my boy ?”

“Why, papa, to-morrow is the last night, you
know, except: Sunday, because uncle and you are
going out on Saturday; and we’ve got to hear about
ostriches, and humming-birds, and basilisks, and
tropical toads, and hippopotami, and ail the trees—”

“ There, stop, boy. You'll have to begin at day-
break, Ned. But off with you to bed now, children,
for nurse will have something to do to rub off your
tropical skin and turn you into little Saxons again.”




CHAPTER VI.

Sandal Trees—The Bamboo—The Baobab—The Traveller's

Tree—The Banyan Tree—The Basilisk—Humming-Birds
—Ostriches — Ostrich Hunting — Story
of a Hippopotamus.



yy HE next evening Uncle Ned pre-
sented his little niece with a beautiful
sandal-wood fan. She was delighted
with its sweet scent, and asked eagerly
if her uncle had ever seen a sandal-
tree. .

“Yes ; it is a pretty tree, and grows
chiefly on rocky hills on the Malabar coast. It would
reach a tolerable size if permitted to grow, but on
account of its great value it is often cut down early.
It has a pretty tapering leaf like that of a willow, and
its blossoms hang in bunches of small red flowers.”

“There is another tree I want to hear about,
uncle,” said Alice ; “and that is the bamboo.”

“Tt is not a tree, it is a wonderful kind of grass,
which sometimes grows.eighty or a hundred feet high,
higher than many of our English trees. The culms
or stalks are often as thick as a man. The jungles
where the tiger and python hide are composed of
bamboo.”

113 H
1 Stortes of the Tropics.

“Is not the bamboo very useful, uncle?” aslzed
Charlie.

“Yes, it is used in building houses and making
furniture—tables, chairs, beds, mats; indeed nearly
everything you can want may be made of bamboo.”

“ Now, uncle, let me think of something they can’t



THE BAMBOO.

make of it,” said Alice. “I know they can make
boxes and baskets of bamboo, so that won't do. Oh,
I know ; they can’t make writing paper.”

“Indeed they do, and much better writing paper
than our own ; now try again.” :

“Well, nobody can eat bamboo, so it doesn’t make
food.” ;
Lhe Cocoa-nut Palm. 115



“That’s hardly fair; but they do eat the seeds,
and the Chinese make pickles of the tender branches.
One of the most remarkable things about the bamboo
is its rapid growth. . One kind is calculated to grow
at the rate of an inch every hour; you may almost
see it grow.”

“Ts bamboo the most useful plant in the world,
uncle?” asked Charlie. “Is it more useful than any
of the trees ?”

“JT think we must give the cocoa-nut palm the
preference over all trees and plants, its uses are so
manifold. The natives of Ceylon, where it grows
most abundantly, declare that it has a real sympathy
with man, and that it pines away when out of the
sound of the human voice. We cannot wonder that
these islanders prize it and have a friendly feeling for
it, almost as if it were a living creature.”

“There, uncle, now you are caught!” said Alice,
clapping her hands. “Didn’t you tell me the other
day trees are living creatures ?”

“Yes. Well, I should have said, as if it were a
thinking, amiable creature that supplies their wants
by its own free will. Some years ago a ship was
entirely built, rigged, provisioned, and laden with the
produce of the cocoa-nut tree.”

“TI wish there were such useful trees in England;
they could do us no harm, at least,” said Alice.

“They would be as much out of place as the
insects,” said her uncle. “If such trees grew freely
here they would make us lazy and good for nothing.
It is a happy thing that in cold climates the earth
116 Stories of the Tropics.



is less productive than in hot ones. It is part of the
order of God’s good providence. In hot countries
it would hurt men to work hard, so they have the
necessaries of life ready to their hand with very little
trouble. But in cold countries it does people good













































THE BAOBAB.

to exert themselves. What do you think of trees

giving water to people in the dry season ie
“ How can they, uncle?” asked Alice.

“There is a tree_in Africa, called the baobab, or
monkey-bread-tree, which makes a capital cistern, for
it begins to decay in the part where the trunk divides
into the larger branches, and the hollow space fills
The Traveller's Tree. | Tey,



with water during the rainy season. Being protected
from the heat of the sun, it keeps a long time. The
people in Congo bore a hole in the trunk, and after
drawing what they require, stop it up again. It is





























Sma ing
THE TRAVELLER’S-TREE.

not a tall tree, but very thick. I have heard of one in
which twenty or thirty men could lie down and sleep.
I have heard of another tree that collects water.”
“Ts it not the traveller’s-tree, uncle?” asked Charlie.
“Yes, that grows in Madagascar, and has refreshed
118 Stories of the Tropics.



many a weary traveller, no doubt. I can show you
a pretty picture of it, for an artist friend sketched
one for me. The dew collects in the hollow foot-
stalks of the leaves. The pitcher plant answers the
same purpose, and is even more curious, for at the
termination of the leaves there is an exquisitely
formed pitcher in which water is found. Such con-
trivances do, indeed,
show the loving-
kindness and wis-
dom of the Creator.
I will not take up
your time by de-
scribing any more
trees, for there is
a good deal to be
done to-night; but .
we must not pass
over the banyan
without a word.
Perhaps you already
know something about it, Charlie?”

“Oh, yes; I can show Alice a picture of one with
all its branches striking root, and making a regular
tent.”

“It is more like a cathedral,” said Uncle Ned,
“and, indeed, is often used as one. I have myself
worshipped under a banyan, and I never enjoyed a
service more. Those gigantic trees fill one with an
indescribable feeling—a sense of one’s own insignifi-
cance, which is very wholesome; and as for a tropical



PITCHER PLANTS.
The Banyan-Tree. 119





forest, it is the most wonderful sight in the world.
The marvellous variety and beauty of the colouring,
the enormous growth of the trees, and the lovely
bright-coloured creepers that cover the trunks and
branches, are quite past my powers of description.





THE BANYAN-TREE,

“Now, Charlie, let us go through the list you gave
us last night. What shall I begin with ?”

“The flying dragon, please, uncle.”

“ Ah, that sounds like a terrible monster; but it is
only a harmless little lizard which spends its time
120 Stories of the Tropes.



in catching flies. It is not very much unlike a bat,
except that it has a very long tail.”

“ And the basilisk is a lizard too, is it not, uncle?”
asked Charlie,

“Yes; but the basilisk belongs to the West, and
the flying dragon to the East. Both are perfectly
inoffensive little creatures, living in the woods, and
doing no harm to anybody except the insects.”

“Uncle, could you tell us anything about the dear
little humming birds?” asked Alice,



THE HUMMING-BIRD,

Uncle Ned’s face brightened up at the suggestion,

“Now, there’s a good little puss,” he said, “for
reminding me; you don’t know how glad I am you
spoke of them,” and he disappeared from the room
in a mysterious manner. Soon he returned, carrying
in his hand a box, which he placed on the table with
a beaming face. Uncle Ned was never so happy as -
when he was giving pleasure.

“Here have I brought this box all the way from
Flumming-Birds, 121



America for you, little puss, and if you had not
spoken about humming-birds, I do believe I should
have taken it away with me.”

So saying, Mr. Morris opened the box and took
out the most exquisite little humming-birds, display-
ing their gorgeous colours till his niece was beside
herself with delight.

“You are the very dearest Uncle Ned in all the
world,” she said; “but what must I do with them?
It is of no use to keep them in that box.”

“JT will have them stuffed for you, dear,” said Mr.
Stone; “but really, Ned, you are too good to these
children.”

“ How splendid they must look flying about!” said
Charlie.

“ Indeed they do; but their flight is so rapid, one
can scarcely follow it with the eye. Now and then
they hover in the air, and seem for a few seconds as
if they were suspended by an invisible thread, then
again they dart away with the rapidity of lightning.
They are most interesting little creatures. I really
tamed one once, and it became quite affectionate, but
the poor little thing did not like captivity, and died.”

“T suppose that one is not in the box, uncle?” said
Alice.

“No, indeed, that is one of my treasures—it is
stuffed, and ornaments my study at home. I shall
expect you all to pay mea visit soon, and then yeu
shall see some of my curiosities.”

“T suppose humming-birds can’t live out of the
tropics?” said Charlie.
122 Stories of the Tropics.



“They belong to the tropics, and chiefly to» Brazil,
but they wander as far north as Canada sometimes.
How-I should like you to see their pretty little nests,
about the size of half a bantam’s egg! Oh, such an
exquisite little home for their young ones, quite
a fairy palace. It is ornamented outside with
grey lichen, and lined within with the down of the
cotton-tree, and it hangs sometimes from a single leaf
or blade of straw. Inside
you would find white eggs
the size of peas, and in a
week or ten days a queer,
weak little animal (you
would never suppose it to
be a humming-bird) creeps
out and seems exhausted
with the effort of coming
into such a humdrum,
matter-of-fact world. This
small being thus introduced
into life is about the size of
a fly. It is blind, and has
no feathers, and it requires
the tenderest care of its parents for the first few
days.

“T assure you there is a great deal of character in
a humming-bird. I respect the little things for their
tenderness and bravery as much as I admire them
for their lovely shape and plumage. While the hen
is sitting, the male bird watches over her like a true
knight, and will attack and drive away an enemy ten



NEST OF THE HUMMING-BIRD,
Lnenwes of FHumming-Lirds. 123



times bigger than himself. It is perfectly wonderful
the spirit those little creatures have.”

“T amsorry the poor humming-birds have enemies,”
said Alice; “who can be so cruel as to attack them?”

“Their worst enemy is a horrible spider whom
they are quite unable to cope with. This great cruel
monster spins its web round their nests, and watches
for the little birds to creep out of their shells. Then
it devours them, and sometimes, if the old birds are
bold enough to attack it, they get killed too. I
watched a spider once making his web near a hum-
ming-bird’s nest, and knowing that he was after no
good, I put an end to him then and there.”

“Oh, I’m so glad,” said Alice.

“T am afraid I must own that- they have one
little fault, these ‘sunbeams,’ as the Indians call
them. They are rather disposed to quarrel over
their flowers.”

“Do they live on honey, uncle?” asked Charlie.

“Not entirely ; I believe they feed on insects too.
I have heard of a young man bringing a humming-
bird over to England with its ‘branch, cradle, and
all’? The dear little bird died as soon as the young
ones crept out of their shells. But the little ones
came alive to England, and were so tame as to feed
from the lips of the lady to whom they were given.
But they died in about two months.”

“Poor little things! How I should like to have
seen them!” said Alice.

“Now I .think I have told you all I know about
these little fairics, so I will go on to a very different
124 Stories of the Tropics.
bird,—the ostrich. You know a good deal about him
already, I dare say, but I think I shall be able to tell
you a few things you do not know.”
~ “Tell us everything, uncle,” said Alice. “I only
know he is a large bird with beautiful white feathers.”
“Most of his feathers are black, Alice,’ said













































THE OSTRICH.

Charlie. “There are only a few of those splendid
white ones that ladies think so much of, and
these are on his wings and tail. I have seen one
in the British Museum, stuffed. But I hardly know
anything about ostriches, uncle, except that they
run very fast, and are called ‘the camels of the
desert.’ So do begin from the very beginning, and
Story of an Ostrich. 125



tell us the whole history of an ostrich—what it feeds
on, and how it is caught, and how tall it is, and
whether it can run as fast as a railway train.”

-“A regular memoir, in fact,” said Uncle Ned.
“Well, Charlie, I will exercise my imagination, and
fancy that 2 was once an ostrich, and relate my
experiences.”

“Oh, that will be fun ! !” said Alice.

“My native place was a large sandy desert, and
my nursery was a snug hole in the sand. When first
I became conscious of life, I-was in this comfortable
nursery in company with thirty or forty other baby
ostriches, sisters, cousins, and friends. For we os-
triches are very sociable, and two or three families
are generally brought up together. It saves trouble
and expense. Well, there I was warming myself in
the burning rays of a tropical sun, thinking what a
oe sandy world I had come into, and feeding on an

egg which my mother had considerately provided for
my breakfast.”

“Oh, uncle, how horrible!” exclaimed “Allee.
“Surely ostriches don’t feed on their own brothers
and sisters ?”

“ That is a hard way of putting it, child. Certainly
my first food was an egg, and I was told that my
mother had left it on purpose for my consumption.
I recollect very little of her; indeed, it is my im-
pression that she troubled herself less about me than
most mothers do about their children. My father
was good-natured, and took us out walking with him
sometimes when we were little.
126 Stories of the 7. 7Optts.

“Almost the first thing I can remember was a
terrible fright we had one evening when I was
about the size of an English hen. I was just be-
ginning to find out I could run, and that pretty
quickly; and well pleased was I at the discovery,
for hitherto I had been used to squat on the ground,
and watch my father’s fine figure as he seemed almost
to fly backwards and forwards to our home. But on
this particular day I, with some dozen of my small
companions, were having a delightful stroll under
the guardianship of my father, when suddenly who
should we see but two horrible monsters coming
towards us. I am naturally of a shy disposition,
and I had seen very little of the world at that time,
for my father brought us up in habits of strict retire-
ment. What was my dismay, then, to see these
_ terrible beings walking on their hind legs, and each
holding a dreadful looking instrument in his fore-
paw. My father afterward told me they were human
beings, and that what I called their fore-legs, are,
properly speaking, arms, but I did not understand
those scientific distinctions then. He said that one
was a very grand and clever doctor, who was explor-
ing the interior of Africa, and writing a big book.”

“Oh, uncle, that’s Dr. Livingstone, I know,” said
Charlie.

“Luckily, we were not far from home, and my
father got us back to the nest before they came up
with us, pretending to be lame himself, so as to take
off their attention from us,” *

* “T have several times seen newly-hatched young in charge
Story of an Ostrich. 127,



“That was a clever dodge,” said Charlic; “ but,
uncle, Dr. Livingstone wouldn’t be walking in the
desert with his friend, would he?”

“T suppose the party had arrived at some station,
and the doctor was taking an evening stroll. He
crossed the desert with a large party in wagons, and
a most dangerous expedition it was. You will like
reading about it when you have finished Du Chaillu’s
book. But I must goon with my story. I spenta
happy childhood and youth, roaming about my
beautiful desert, feeding on pods and seeds, insects,
small reptiles, and sometimes a wild melon, besides
plenty of sand and pebbles to help digestion. When
I had attained my full size I was considered a fine,
handsome bird, well-made and tall, for my head was
seven feet at least from the ground. I could run at
the rate of twenty-six miles an hour; not quite so
fast, perhaps, as a railway train, but faster than a
horse. My sight was so good that I could distinctly
see my enemies at the distance of several miles, so
I managed to keep pretty clear of them, and my
hearing was equally acute. The senses of smell and
taste, however, were imperfect. I had a good strong
back, and have often carried a negro on it. We used
to roam about the desert, two or three hundred of us
together, and enjoyed ourselves amazingly, keeping
always at a safe distance from our enemies. We were
often joined by a party of zebras and antelopes, who



of the cock (ostrich), who made a very good attempt at appear.
ing lame, in the plover fashion, in order to draw off the atten-
tion of pursuers.”—Livingstone’s Travels, p. 154.
128 Stories of the Tropics.



were glad enough to meet with such sharp-sighted
companions. Towards the end of one very happy
autumn, I met with Snowflake, whom I chose as my
companion for life. She was so pretty and gentle,
and her wing-feathers were dazzlingly white. We
reared a rather numerous family, but I had the mis-
fortune to lose her at last in a heart-rending way.
You must understand that though we are so quick-
sighted as to see our enemies at a great distance, the
quickness of our intellect does not correspond with
that of our vision, and when we are pursued we never
know which way to run, and generally run the wrong
way, and the hunters, who know this very well, take
a pleasure in confusing our minds. So it happened
that one day when we were pursued by some horse-
men, after an hour’s chase they got close to us, dashed
in among us, wearied and half-starved as we were,
and I had the misery of seeing my poor Snowflake
beaten down with clubs till she died. It is a wonder
how I myself escaped, for though I got out of the
circle I was pursued by a dog, and in my exhausted
state, it seemed scarcely possible for me to get away.
Indignation, I suppose, lent me momentary strength,
and I gave my pursuer a good sharp kick and broke
his back, then ran a mile or two, and when I ventured
to look round, the hunters were fast disappearing in
an opposite direction. But, alas! our happy party
was broken up, oe my old happy life in the desert
was over for ever.”

“ How could ee be, uncle? Did it die?” asked
Alice.


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































- 2S

= Z Ss 3 LIL) si SN SS



HUNTING THE OSTRICH.



129

An Ostrich’s Breakfast. 131

“No,” said her uncle, “but as your ‘Uncle Ned
became acquainted with the ostrich at that time he
had better finish its story.”

“Then you really saw it,” said Alice, surprised.

“Yes,” said Uncle Ned, speaking in his own person,
“the poor creature had run near a little village where
I was lodging. I found it lamed and sick, and took
it home with me and tamed it. But the poor thing
was troublesome to my hostess, and committed one
serious offence, which I believe, cost its life. My land-
lady had a little brood of ducks in which she specially
delighted, and one morning, hearing an unusual cack-
ling in the yard, she went out to see the cause of
the disturbance. Mr. Ostrich had been eating all her
young ducks, and was just helping himself to the last,
entirely indifferent to the cries of its poor mother.”

“What did your landlady do, uncle?” asked Charlie.

“T am afraid she killed it. She came to my room
two or three days after, and announced with a grave
face that it was dead, but I more than suspect she
had a hand init. My poor ostrich was a great thief,
that was its only fault, and had a most voracious
appetite. It once swallowed a spoon which I had
carelessly left in its way.”

“Oh, uncle, that was enough to kill it,” said Alice.

“No, an ostrich’s powers of digestion are equal to
anything. I have heard of a gentleman who used
every evening to give his ostrich the newspaper for
supper ; and I know mine would eat bits of wood,
iron, anything it could find.”

“ How do they hunt it uncle?” asked Charlie.
132 Stories of the Tropics.



“The bushman of South Africa has a very ingenious
plan of attack. He clothes himself in an ostrich’s
skin, and mimics the bird’s movements so well that
he often succeeds in getting within bow-shot of it
without exciting suspicion, then he shoots it with a
poisoned arrow.”

“But the skin would not fit a man,” said Alice.

“Not without a little arrangement, certainly. He
makes a sort of saddle-shaped cushion, which he covers
with feathers to look like the bird. The head and
the neck are stuffed. Then the man whitens his own
black legs, puts the saddle on his shoulders, takes the
lower part of the neck in his right hand, and the bow
and arrows in his left. I have seen a man thus
dressed imitate the ostrich to perfection. Sometimes
they adopt an easier plan. Having discovered a
nest, they take the eggs, hide in the empty hole, and
wait for the return of the old bird; when he comes
near the nest they shoot him.”

“ Are the eggs of any use, uncle?” asked Alice.

“Yes, the natives eat them, but they are not very
nice toan English taste. They are very large, and
are equal to twenty-four of our common hen’s eggs.
Then they make the shells into water-flasks, cups, and
dishes. A little hole is made at one end which is
corked up with grass, and thus it forms a capital water-
bottle. They bury these shells in the sand at intervals
having filled them with water, and thus refresh them-
selves when they are crossing the desert.”

“That is a good plan, said Alice. “What sort of
voice has the ostrich? Does it cackle like a hen ?”
The Hippopotamus, 133
ee a ee ee ea
“No, its cry is so much like that of a lion in search
of his prey, that only quick ears can tell the differ-
ence.”
“ Uncle Ned, I did want to hear something about
the hippopotamus, and papa is looking at his watch,”
said Charlie, pleadingly.























5





y

ine



—— =

THE HIPPOPOTAMUS.

“Couldn’t you make another memoir?” asked
Alice, “it is so amusing to hear you pretend,”

“Very well,” said her kind uncle. “I am an
African by birth, and if you like to go to the interior
of Africa you may see my relations gambolling and
snorting on the banks of the rivers. They become
particularly lively at night. We are not a beautiful
1 34 Stories of the Tropics.



race; but what do we care for that? We would not
change our rough hide, short stumpy legs, and big
head, for all the fine feathers of the ostrich whose
history I have been hearing. Poor fellow! what a
melancholy life he must lead, his whole existence
spent in a desert; no sweet rushes and reed-grown
coverts, no rivers to bathe in, no anything to make
life pleasant !”

Alice began to laugh.

“Oh, uncle, you are a good pretender,” she said.
“But what would the ostrich say ?—it wouldn’t’ care
a bit for the reeds and rivers, would it?”

“Not a rush!” said Charlie, who was quick in
seeing a joke.

“T’ve been called a ‘hungry, awkward, waddling,
splay-footed beast,” continued Uncle Ned; “what
the last word means I don’t know, but I dare say it is
something rude; it was invented by that little paltry
creature man, who thinks himself superior to us brutes,
but is really a contemptible being. He is so mean
and stingy that he wants. to keep even the fields and
crops to himself. He is heartless and cruel too. I
have known him make pitfalls along our path, and
put a sharp stake in the centre of each. One of my
own brothers fell into one of these pits and was killed.
He died in great agony, but our enemies rejoiced over
his body, cut up the flesh and ate it, and made his
hide into whips. Then they took my poor brother’s
teeth, and I was told that they actually cut them up
and put them into their own little mouths, for it seems
they have no teeth at all to speak of. All this
Story of a Hippopotamus. 135
occurred before I was born, but I have heard my
mother mention it with groans. I cannot tell you
much about my native land, for I was cruelly torn
from my mother when very young, and brought over
to this country, where Iam now made a gazing stock
to the whole English nation.”

“Oh, uncle, you mean the hippopotamus at the
Zoological Gardens,” said Charlie.

“T have the great satisfaction of knowing that I
have put my keepers to immense expense. My
appetite is so enormous that it is a wonder I have not
caused a famine in the land. It would have been
better to leave me in my native haunts. Two cows
and three goats were brought over with me to supply.
me with milk onthe voyage. Oh dear, what a terrible
voyage it was! such a vast expanse of water, quite
different to my native rivers, no reeds or rushes to be
seen. I wonder I did not die from fright and the
grief of being parted from my relations, Do men
think we hippopotami have no feeling ?

“T am now confined in an iron cage, and I feel
that my temper is being soured by captivity. But
I cannot complain of being badly used, for, indeed,
nothing can exceed the anxiety of my masters to
supply all my wants. They have even brought me
over a wife from Africa, and though somewhat sharp-
tempered, I should feel at a loss without her now.
We have not been very successful in bringing up our
family ; we lost two babies, one after the other; but
now we have a third, who seems strong and healthy
at present. There was the greatest excitement all
136 Stories of the Tropics.

‘over England when he was born; likenesses are to
be seen of him everywhere ; in the Lezsure Hour for
March, 1873, you will see one of the best. We are
proud enough of our baby, I can assure you; he is
now (March, 1873) four months old, and just cutting
his teeth. He is very playful and amusing, and once
he played our keepers a fine trick. He sank to the
bottom of the bath, and stayed under water a whole
quarter of an hour. They all thought he was dead,
and a terrible fright they were in. They thought
they must get his body out, and I suppose he would
have lain in state and had a public funeral, as that
is the way with the grand folk in this country. Just
as they were making preparations to let off the water,
what does he do but rise to the top, shaking his ears
and looking as merry as if nothing had happened.”

“Oh, how I should like to see him!” exclaimed
both the children together.

“]T will take you on Monday,” said their papa,
_ glad to terminate the evening by a pleasant antici-
pation ; “and now I think you must go to bed and
dream about him.”




CHAPTER VII.

A Missionary Story—Madagascar—Malagasy Customs—

Cruelty of King Radama—Missionary Schools—Persecu-
tion of Christians—The First Martyr—Spread
of Christianity.





1 HE last evening of Uncle Ned’s visit
1% was Sunday. Alice was seated on her
uncle’s knee, and her face was graver
than usual. “I can’t forget the tropics,
though it is Sunday,” said she; “and
oh, uncle, I’m so sorry you're going
away to-morrow.”

“So am I, dear; but there’s no harm in thinking
and talking about the tropics. I was just wishing
the poor black people could have heard the sermon
we heard this afternoon, or could know the meaning
of the beautiful text, ‘Christ Jesus came into the
world to save sinners,’”

“JT am afraid there are hundreds in England who
have never heard it, and thousands who never think
about its meaning,” said Mr. Stone.

“Will the poor black men go to heaven, aS
asked Alice, anxiously.

“Many of them are Christians, my dear, and God

cares for the poor heathen who have never been
137
138 Stories of the Tropics.



taught, and who remain in ignorance through our.
neglect. God will provide for them in His own way.
He is their father as well as ours, Alice. 2

“But He will be angry with us for neglecting
them,” said the little girl.

“Yes, indeed! If we do not care to teach them
about the Saviour’s love, it seems that our own
hearts must be cold indeed. Besides, we are dis-
obeying His last command, ‘Go ye into all the
world, and preach the gospel to every creature.’”

“Uncle, I want to ask you a question,” said
Charlie. “Do people whe are not Christians know
anything about God?”

“The Jews, you know, worship Ged, though they
do not believe in our Saviour. But they read and
believe in the Old Testament Scriptures, though they
reject the New.”

“But the poor heathen, uncle?”

“Oh, many of them believe in the Great Spirit
who rules the world, and some call Him ‘The
Father’ But knowing that they are sinful creatures,
and not knowing anything of the love of Christ who
died for them, they have no peace. Their religion
(if one may call it by that name) is one of fear, not
love. They look upon God as one who is ever ready
to punish and torment and destroy them.”

“J thought they worshipped idols, uncle,” said
Alice, “and they cannot be afraid of them.”

“Some of the more thoughtful of the heathen say
just what the Roman Catholics do—that they only
use idols as a help to the mind, to assist them in their
Madagascar. 139
worship of the Supreme Being. I was told so myself
by some high-caste Hindoos, whom I met accidentally
in a small Indian village. They defended their idol-
worship by the very same arguments the Romanists
use. ‘To turn the eye of the soul upwards, they
said, ‘we fix the eye of the body on an image,’”

“It has always struck me that the excessive use of
symbols savours more of Paganism than Christianity,”
said Mr. Stone. “Now, children, you should get
your uncle to tell you a missionary story to-night,
Iam sure he can do so.”

“The only difficulty is in knowing which to select,”
said Uncle Ned.

After a few minutes of consideration, he continued :
“T think nothing will show you better the difference
between the darkness of heathenism and the blessed
light of Christianity, than the story of Madagascar.”

“That is the large island on the coast of Africa.
Have you been there, uncle?” asked Charlie,

“Yes, I was there only three years ago; but I
_ must begin at the beginning, and not at the end of my
story, and the beginning goes back to the thirteenth
century, when Marco Polo, a famous Venetian traveller,
first made it known to Europeans.”

“But do tell us something about the appearance
of the island, and the people, uncle, before you begin
with the history,” said Charlie.

“Tt is a fertile island, richly wooded and well
watered, and the chief part of it is in the tropics,
It produces abundance of rice and fruit; but the
marshy swamps near the coast make that part of the
140 Stories of the Tropics.

island very unhealthy. I did not stay there, but
went at once to the chief city, Antananarivo. This
is a pleasant town, built on the sides of a high hill,
and here the king or queen lives. The royal palaces.
were at the top of a hill. At present Madagascar
is governed by a queen, and I am thankful to say, a



































































































































































ANTANANARIVO.

Christian queen. Her name is Ranavalona. But I
must take you back about fifty years, when the first
missionaries went over there.”
“Then you are going to skip six centuries?” said
Charlie. =)
“There is not much to tell about those six cen-
turies. The only European visitors to the island










FOREST SCENERY IN MADAGASCAR. -

34r

>

First Missionaries tn Madagascar. 143

were slave traffickers, and their cruelty naturally in-
spired the natives with perfect horror of the white
men. The first missionaries were sent out by the
London Missionary Society in the year 1818, or
thereabouts. They were two Welshmen, Mr. Jones
and Mr. Bevan, and each had a wife and a little child
who accompanied them. It is a sad story to relate,
for they got there at a most unhealthy season, and
soon after they landed the Bevans all died, father,
mother, and child, and poor Mr. Jones lost his wife
and child, and was left alone, the only English mis-
sionary on the island.”

“The only Briton, you mean, uncle; for, you
know, he was a Welshman,” said Charlie.

“T hope he soon came back again to his native
land,” said Alice.

“He would not be a true Briton if he did,” said
her brother, quickly.

“He was something better even than a Briton,
Charlie; he was a Christian man, and he was not
afraid of death. So he continued in the island, re-
solving to devote himself to the work his Master had
appointed for him. He, however, removed for a
short time to the neighbouring island of Mauritius
to recruit his health.”

' That is quite a small island,” said Charlie.

“Ves, a mere speck on the map to the east of
Madagascar. This little island, however, and the
neighbouring one of Bourbon, have taught many of
our habits and ways to the people in Madagascar.
So you see size is not always a token of superiority,
Master Charlie.”
144 Stories of the Tropics.

“But how did the little islands learn our ways,
uncle?” asked Alice.

“Bourbon belongs to the French, and Mauritius to
the English, and they are chiefly inhabited by English
and French people, with negro or Hindoo servants.
Just about this time, a gentleman, named Mr. Hastie,
was sent over from England with a message to King
Radama, who was then King of Madagascar. Mr.
Hastie was commissioned by the English to make
an agreement, or treaty, with Radama that the slave-
trade should be abolished. It was not very easy to
persuade Radama to forbid his people to sell slaves.
He said the king of England must give him a great
many things to reward him for this. He must have
dollars and guns and horses and suits of clothes to
make up for not selling slaves.

“These things were promised to him, and a treaty
was signed ; so you see our friendship with Madagas-
car opened with an act befitting a Christian people.”

“Yes, indeed, ‘Britons never, never, zever will be
slaves,” shouted Charlie.

“Nor allow slavery either, if they can help it,” added
his father.

“Mr. Hastie took Mr. Jones to Antananarivo, and
introduced him to the king, Radama was quite
pleased that his people should be taught to read and
write, and he himself laid the foundation-stone of a
school, and sent his littke nephews and nieces there to
be instructed. Mr. Jones was soon joined by another
missionary named Griffiths, also a Welshman. The
king gave Mr. Griffiths a piece of land for his house,
State of Madagascar. 145

and the natives began to build it, but were very dilatory
over their work. Inthe meantime the poor man had
a most uncomfortable place to live and to teach in.
He complained to the king, who sent some men to
work and finish the house, and he gave them four
or five bullocks as. an encouragement, for he knew
that they liked beef. So in course of time it was
finished ; and not only a house, but a school-room.

Now, before I tell you any more about the mis-
sionaries, I must give you a little idea of the state
of the island at the time the missionaries came—the
habits and manners and religion of the people. They
were very ignorant and superstitious, and had two
most horrible customs which show the terrible dark-
ness of the human soul before the pure light of Christi-
anity shines into it. One dreadful custom is the use of
the tangena. This is a poison, and all who were accused
of any crime could be made to drink the tangena. If
the man died, it was supposed that he was guilty ; if
the tangena poison did not kill him he was beaten to
death, unless he were sick and brought up three pieces
of a fowl’s skin, which I ought to have told you were
always swallowed whole before the poison was offered.”

“Oh, uncle, how horrible!” said Alice; “I am sure
I should die of fright!”

“It is believed that about three thousand persons
used to perish every year from this monstrous cus-
tom. And no doubt they were generally innocent
persons, for the crimes of which they were accused
were often purely imaginary. The other dreadful
custom is that of murdering babies. If a child

K
146 Stories of the Troptes.

was born on what was considered an unlucky day,
it was suffocated or buried alive to save it from
a life of misery. And yet the Malagasy (as the
people of Madagascar are called) are affectionate,
and have many good qualities. They rejoice greatly





> ASS”
av TV ORE :
COSTUMES OF VARIOUS TRIBES,
when their children are allowed to live, and are very
kind to their sick relatives.”
“How do the people spend their time, and what
sort of houses do they live in, uncle?” asked Charlie.
« And what do they look like?” asked Alice ; “are
they black?”
The Lamba. 147



“There are two or three different races of people in
the island, some black, some brown, but all are called
Malagasy, speak the same language, and have the
same customs. The housesare made of wood or clay,
and the roof thatched with rushes. These huts
generally consist of one room only. The floor is
covered with mats made of rushes, and these are
the only furniture required. They want no chairs,
tables, or beds, the mats do instead. The fireplace is
composed of a few large stones placed in the middle
of the hut, and they have no chimney.”

“Oh, uncle, I am sure Charlie could build a better
house than that!” said Alice. “But what sort of
clothes do they wear ?”

In the villages young children wear none at all.
The grown up people wear loose garments, as they do
in most hot countries. The women have a white or
blue sort of petticoat, and over this is worn the lamba.
This is a long garment worn by men as well as women,
and the natives take pride in weaving these lambas
very beautifully with stripes of different colours.”

“What material do they use?” asked Alice.

“Now, Alice, that’s too bad,” said Charlie, “you
will keep uncle talking about the dress, and he has
never answered my question yet.”

Alice secretly resolved to ask no more questions
for a long time, and she wished her uncle would
answer Charlie first. But she said nothing.

“They make them of silk and cotton,” continued
her uncle, “for they have plenty of cotton-trees and
silkworms ; but the poor people who cannot afford
148 Stories of the Tropics.



these luxuries, clothe themselves with a kind of mat-
ting made from the bark of a tree. The men as well
as the women are fond of ornaments, and they like
silver ones best. Now, my boy,” turning to Charlie,
“surely the Britons always put ladies first, don’t they?”

“ Yes, but Alice never seems to like to be put first,”

BR wy A



WOMEN POUNDING RICE,

“And so she spoils you, does she? But I am not
surprised at that, she’s a true little woman, and finds
all her happiness in pleasing her men-folk. Now,
what was your question, sir?” .

“ How do they spend their time, uncle?”

“They rise early, dine at noon, and sup about six.
King Radama. 149



The men work in the rice fields, and look after the
cattle ; while the women see after the house and cook
the dinner, and weave their mats or lambas. But like all
people in tropical countries, they are not fond of work.”

“What do they have for dinner, uncle?” asked Charlie.

“Chiefly rice, mixed with meat or vegetables. Beef is
their principal meat. Now that I have given you some
idea of the people and their mode of living, I think we
may go back to King Radama and the missionaries.”

“Oh, uncle, do tell us what Radama 1 was like,” said
Charlie.

“He was a little man, with dark complexion, black,
intelligent eyes, and black, curly hair. He was a
very uncommon man, and had a great deal of good
sense and kindness of heart. During his short reign
he did a great many good things for his people. He
abolished the wicked custom of murdering the poor
infants. He agreed to the abolition of the slave-
trade, protected the missionaries, and was glad that
his people should be taught by them. Yet he did
not become a Christian himself. He died at the
early age of thirty-six.”

“Oh, I’m so sorry!” said Alice; “he was a dear,
darling old heathen; the very best that ever lived,
I should think.”

“Tt was a bad day for Madagascar when he died.
But we have not come to that yet; a good deal more
happened in his life which I must tell you. And I
could tell you a certain story about a broken dish,which,
Iam afraid, would not increase your love for Radama.”

“Qh, do tell it us, uncle.”
150 Stories of the Tropics.



“One day a slave who was waiting at table acci-
dentally broke a dish. The king told an officer to take
the man away and see that he never broke another,
The man was immediately killed. And the same
thing happened to a poor slave girl who spilt some
water on the queen’s dress, she was killed too.”

“Oh, I don’t like him at all now,” said Alice.

“See what men are without Christianity ; they are a
great deal worse than the beasts. It is really humili-
ating to know that crimes like these are committed
by people of the same flesh and blood as ourselves.
But let us talk of the missionaries and we shall see
the opposite side. And remember Radama was un-
commonly kind and considerate for a heathen.”

“Tt was a good thing for Mr. Jones that he did not
have to wait on the king at table,” said Alice, “or
he might very soon have lost his head.”

“Yes, but he never broke any dishes nor spoiled
any gowns. Radama was very kind both to him and
to Mr. Griffiths. They gave such pleasant accounts
of their good treatment in their letters home, that
another missionary was induced to go out, and he
took with him a smith and a builder and other men
to teach useful arts. The missionaries continued
very diligent in teaching and learning. Just consider
for a minute the tremendous difficulties they had
to contend with. The Malagasy spoke a language
which the missionaries did not understand. And
how could they learn it? There was no Malagasy
dictionary or grammar, or even alphabet; the lan-
guage had never been written at all.”
Missionary Schools. I5L

“They seem to have pretty long words in their
language. I shall never remember the name of their
chief town,” said Alice.

“Antananarivo. Well, this was what the missionaries
did ; they listened attentively to a word like that, and
then tried to write it down in English letters. Thus,
by degrees, they constructed a written language for
the Malagasy, and the king was much interested in
this work. He himself was learning English from
Mr. Hastie, and French from another gentleman.
As soon as the missionaries had learnt Malagasy well
enough to speak it, they began to have public worship
every Sunday in the school-house. The Malagasy
are very fond of music, and the children were taught
to sing some beautiful hymns.”

“But, uncle,” said Charlie, “you told us they
opened schools directly they got to the capital, and
they did not know the language then. How could
they teach the children anything?”

“They began with teaching the children English,
and succeeded wonderfully well. And I think it
was the best beginning they could have made,
because it pleased the king that his subjects should
be educated, and he became interested in the mis-
sionary work before he knew whither it was tending.
When the missionaries spoke of. the true God and
condemned idol worship, the parents of the scholars
became angry, and the priests were of course opposed
to the new teaching. Zhen, if Radama had not
befriended the missionaries they would certainly have
been killed or turned out of the island, In the year
152 _ “Stortes of the Tropics.



1826 they had a delightful present from England.
It was a printing-press, and was sent, I believe, by
the London Missionary Society. The poor printer
died on his voyage, but the missionaries spent some
of their time in printing lesson books. The first sheet
of the Bible came out in 1828 as a new year’s gift te
the Malagasy, and in the very same year the king died.’

“Then poor Radama never read the Bible?” said
Alice.

“Probably not; I think if he had read the life and
the words of our blessed Lord, he would have become
a Christian, for God seemed to be leading his mind
to what is good. He said that he followed the teach-
ing of his heart. If he had read of the Spirit of God
he might have been led to seek the guidance of that
Holy Spirit, but he distrusted the teaching of men,
and not without reason. His death was a sad blow
to the missionaries.”

“T hope the next king was kind to them,” said Charlie.

“He was succeeded by one of his wives, a very
wicked woman, who had no right at all to the throne,
but in order to get it she murdered some of her
husband’s relations and truest friends. The queen
worshipped idols, but she left the missionaries in
peace for a time. No doubt they worked harder than
ever, for they must have felt that under such a ruler
their time might be short. By the year 1830, five
thousand copies of the New Testament were printed,
besides many other books. And the children who
went to the schools repeated what they had learnt to
their parents at home, and idols began to be lightly
spoken of. In 1831 twenty natives were publicly
Persecution of the Christians. 153,



baptized, and soon afterwards partook of the Lord’s
Supper. Then other natives applied for baptism,
and the hearts of the missionaries were filled with
thankfulness,

“ But now a storm suddenly burst over their heads,
a storm that would have torn up Christianity by the
roots if it were not of God’s own planting. But no
power can destroy His work. The queen was privately
informed that the Christians taught dangerous doc-
trines, and she sent an order that all people, even
children, who lived within sixty miles of the chief
city, must assemble there on Sunday, the first of
March, 1835. Then the cannon was fired, and the
judges and officers advanced towards the people, and
the chief judge read a paper which he held in his hand.” .

“How dreadful it must have been!” said little
Alice. “I hope it was not an order from that wicked
queen to kill all the missionaries.”

“ She would have been afraid to do that,” said Char-
lie. “We should have been down upon her like we
were on King Theodore, if she had killed our people.”

“Well, this was the order that the people were
called to hear,’ continued Uncle Ned: “‘All my.
subjects who have become Christians, who have been
baptized or met together to pray, must come and
confess it within one month. If they do not confess,
and are afterwards found out, they will die’ ”

“T’m sure I would not have confessed,” said Charlie.

“Many of them did, and all these were punished,
but not very heavily. Some were required to pay a
fine, and the officers were reduced in rank, but it was
understood that if they continued among the ‘ pray-
154 Stories of the Tropzes.



ing people,’ as the queen called the Christians, they
would be punished with death.”

“And did they give up praying?” asked Alice,
anxiously.

“No, they used to meet together at midnight and
pray. I must tell you that they were ordered to
give up their Bibles and good books to the queen’s
officers, but many of the Christians dug holes in the
earth and hid the Scriptures there.”

“ And what did the missionaries do?” asked Charlie.

“ They were obliged to leave the island for a time.
When they were about to leave, the poor Malagasy
Christians said to them, ‘the queen thinks we shall
forget the word of God when our teachers have gone ;
she does not know that the best teacher of all, the
Holy Spirit, is still with us.”

_ “We may learn many a lesson from those Mala-
gasy,” said Mr. Stone.

“T suppose they did not forget,” said Alice.

“No, indeed. Do you remember the verse which
says, ‘He shall bring all things to your remem-
brance’? Who is here spoken of ?” ;

“The Holy Ghost, the Comforter,” replied Alice.
“They must have wanted comfort then, poor things.”

“Yes, and the blessed Comforter was with them
and strengthened them. The first martyr was Rasa-
lama. A box of books was discovered hidden in the
earth near her house. I will not tell you all the poor
woman was made to endure before her execution, but
after horrible tortures she was led out to die. She
asked permission to pray, and calmly kneeling down,
commended her spirit into the hands of her Re-
The Martyrs. 155

deemer. Then the executioner’s spear set her free
from the troubles of this mortal life.”

Poor little Alice’s eyes filled with tears.

“Tt is all over now, my child. She is at rest with
~ her Saviour,” said Uncle Ned, “and rejoices, nc
doubt, that. she was found worthy to suffer for His
name. One friend who saw her peaceful death said,
‘If I might die so tranquil and happy a death, I
would willingly die for the Saviour too.’ The queen
continued to persecute the Christians at intervals. I
think the worst persecution was in 1849, when some
were burned, and others thrown from the top of a
high rock and dashed to pieces. But the Saviour
was with them, and so greatly was His presence felt
among them that the fear of death was taken away.
The heathen executioners often declared that there
was some charm in the religion of the white people.”

“JT wonder they didn’t become Christians them-
selves,” said Charlie. “I wonder how the queen’s
family and officers and judges could go on seeing
those poor things suffer without taking their part.”

“Many of them did, my boy. But before I end
this story of the martyrs, I must tell you that heavy
rain was falling while they were being burned, which
more than once put out the flames, and suddenly
- abright triple rainbow was seen, one end of which
seemed to rest on the spot where the martyrs were
giving up their lives.”

“Perhaps God sent it on purpose,” said Alice;
“because you know, uncle, you told me it was a sign
of love; and the Bible says, too, ‘The bow shall be
seen in the cloud,”
156 Stories of the Tropus.



“That was when God promised not to destroy the
world with a flood again,” said Charlie. “I don't see
what that has to do with martyrs.”

Alice could not explain it to him, but she re-
membered something her uncle had once said to her
which made her feel that the rainbow was, as she
expressed it, “like a kiss.”

“Oh, Charlie, but a storm is terrible, and the
bright colours are always so pretty,” was all she said.

“ And storms come in our lives too, my darling,”
said Uncle Ned; “but if we look up we shall
always see a bright coloured bow in the cloud.”

“T know now,” said Charlie, and for a few
minutes there was silence.

“Your father said just now we could learn many
lessons from the Malagasy Christians,” said Uncle
Ned; “I will tell you one. So precious was the
Bible to them, that many persons walked sixty or
a hundred miles to obtain a copy of a single portion
of it, and many more injured their eyes by copying
it in their places of concealment. And why do you
suppose they valued it so much? Because they
were unhappy, and it gave them comfort; they were
weak, and it gave them strength. It was the voice
of God speaking to their souls. You may some day,
Charlie, have the pain of hearing people speak
slightingly of the Bible. Remember they know no
‘more of what they are talking about than a child
knows what it is doing who makes a ball of its
mother’s watch, or throws away her diamonds. It
is those only who search the Scriptures with earnest
prayer, and who try to dive by the light of God’s
Christianity in the Palaces. 157



word, who understand anything of its value. And
they will tell you it is beyond all price. The
treasures it contains do not lie on the surface, they
are unfolded one by one to the eyes of those only
who seek for them. It is most affecting to read of
the earnestness with which, when Mr. Ellis went
over to Madagascar in 1853, the Christians there
begged for copies of the Bible. They almost wept
when they found that he had none to give them, for
many had walked long distances hoping to receive a
copy. When at length he was able to promise them
a supply from England, many of the people went
out to a solitary place to sing for joy.”

“Who is Mr. Ellis, uncle?” asked Alice.

“A good missionary who has been out to Mada-
gascar three times, I believe, and who has written
some most interesting books about the island. I
have been reading one lately, called ‘The Martyr
Church, from which most of my story is taken.
There is another book, called ‘Madagascar and its
People, written by Mr. Sibree, who lived for some
years among the Malagasy, which contains a vast
amount of interesting information. I told you, Charlie,
that many persons of rank, and some of the queen’s
own family, were converts to Christianity, and among’
these was her son. His name was Prince Rakoto.”

“Was not the queen very angry ?” asked Charlie:

“When the Prime Minister told her that Prince
Rakoto read the Bible, and joined the Christians in
prayer, the Queen said, ‘Oh, he is young, he does
not know what is proper, and he is my only son.’
‘But she was very angry with Prince Ramonja, her
158 Stories of the Tropics.



nephew, who had hitherto been a great favourite
with her. He was reduced to the rank of a com-
mon, soldier, and had to suffer many hardships which











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ROYAL PALACES AT ANTANANARIVO.

seriously injured his health. But I must bring my
story to a close, In 1861 the wicked queen died,
and her son ascended the throne, under the name of
Spread of Christianity. 159



Radama II. He invited the missionaries to return
to the island, and they were received with great joy
by the Christians. He was a kind-hearted man, this
Radama IJ., and very much averse to cruelty of any
sort ; but he met with a violent death at the end of a
year, and was barbarously murdered in his bedroom.
His last words
were, ‘I have never
shed blood.’”

“Oh, uncle, how
could they be so
wicked?” said
Alice. “Who killed
him?”

“The priests or
idol- keepers were
angry on account
of the king’s pro-
fession of Christ-
ianity,and they used
to send him pre-
tended messages
from his dead an-
- cestors, saying that
fearful calamities
would come on the country because he had forsaken
the idols. These messages made poor Radama very
miserable. At length, quite early one morning, some
of the conspirators burst suddenly into his bedroom
and killed him.”

“Who succeeded him?” asked Charlie.



MALAGASY IDOL.
160 Stories of the Tropics.



“His widow, who was kind to the Christians,
though she herself worshipped idols. After seven
years she died, and then her sister, a very gentle,
good princess, ascended the throne. She is still
queen, and long may she live! The last news that
I have heard from Madagascar is that the National
idols are burnt, and houses of prayer are being
built in every direction, The people, though very
ignorant, are most eager to learn. I believe there
are now at least 20,000 Christians in Madagascar,
and when we remember that it is scarcely more than
fifty years since that little party of missionaries went
over, and think of all the difficulties they had to go
through, we can only say, ‘ This is the Lord’s doing;
it is marvellous in our eyes.”

“Flow glad Mr. Jones must have been that he
was not frightened, and did not go back when the
others died,” said Alice.

“T think a missionary’s life is the noblest of all,”
said Charlie.

“And your last story is the prettiest of all,”
whispered Alice. I only wish it were not the last.”

“So do I,” said her brother; “but, Uncle Ned,
we shall never forget the delightful week you have
given us at the tropics.”



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“At almost every page we are disposed to stop and exclaim, ‘ How true
and wise this is!’ There is a deep, sound underlying principle throughout,
and the suggestions are such,
that all concerned with homes
as ameans ofinfluencing others _
may well be helped by reading
it.’—The Guardian. :

“





ROMANCE OF\ REAL %,
LIFE. True Incidents in |,
the Lives of the Great and fp
Good. With Illustrations
by well-known artists.
Large Quarto. 3s. 6d. cloth
boards, gilt edges.

A series of twenty-four inte-
resting sketches, giving true
incidents from the lives of men
renowned in the world’s history,
amongst them being Sir John
Franklin, Commodore Goode-
nough, Bisho Hannington,
Sir Henry avelock, John
Knox, President Lincoln, Lord
Shaftesbury, Sampson Wilder,
James Braidwood, and many
others. The admirable lessons
suggested, and the attractive
appearance of the book gene-
rally, well adapt it for Prizes in
Schools and families.

36, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON ; and of all Booksellers.
6 THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST.

‘Sunflowers Series af Stories,

FOR ALL READERS.

The “ Sunflowers Series” ts for Adults, Pate than for Children, The books form very
useful vo umes for Birthday Gifts, and for Presentation at all seasons, to readers, say from
16 to 60, They are in Crown 8vo, with illustrations, pretty cloth covers, and with gilt edges.

OF ALL DEGREES. By Lesuie Keira, Author of ‘Great Grandmamma
Severn,” ‘‘ Ralph Ellison’s Opportunity,” ete. Crown 8vo, 3s. 6d.
ae CASTLE. By Exten L. Davis. Illustrated. 3s. 6d. cloth,

RALPH BE ELLISON’ S OPPORTUNITY, AND Baers AND WEST. By Lesiiz
Keitu. Illustrated. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt ed:

MARCUS STRATFORD’S CHARGE; or, Rea clemiptanien: By EvELYN
E. Green, With Illustrations. ’as. 6d. cloth, gilt.

GENEVIEYVE; or, The Children of Port Royal. "A Story of Old France,
By the Author of “The Spanish Brothers,” ‘‘The King’s Service,’
etc. With Illustrations. Crown 8vo. 3s. éd. cloth, gilt edges.

THE MANSE OF GLEN CLUNIE. By EcLanton THorne. Tilastr uted by
CHARLES WuYMPER. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

TWO ENTHUSIASTS. By E. Everetr Green. Illustrated by Epwarp
Wuymper. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth, gilt edges.

CHATEAU DE LOUARD. A Story of France at the period of the Revoca-
tion of the Edict of Nantes. By H.C. Coapr. Illustrated. ss. cloth, gilt.

goin Sea: By E. Everetr GREEN. Illustrated. 5s. cloth,

JoYEE GRAHAM'S HISTORY; or, Overcoming Evil with Good. By H.
A. Gowrinc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt edge:
ANOTHER KING. By Janet EpeEn. Illustrated by E, HYMPER.

Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.
THE HEAD Rone THE HOUSE. A Story of Victory over Passion and
ride. aa Green. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth, gilt.
IDA NICOLA I. ‘By EcLanton Tuorne. Illustrated. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt

edge’

THE OLD MANUSCRIPT ; or, Anaise Robineau’s History. A Tale of .the
ae uenots of La Vendée. By BLrancue M. MocerincE. Illustrated
py . WHyMPER. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth, gilt edges.

YOUNG SIR RICHARD. By H. FREDERICK CHARLES. Illustrated.
Crown 8vo. ss. cloth, gilt edges.

MADDALENA, THE WALDENSIAN MAIDEN AND HER PEOPLE.
Translated Rete Sutter. Illustrated. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

TURNING POIN'ZS; or, Two Years in Maud Vernon's Life. By L.
SILKE. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. as. €d. cloth, gilt edges.

REAPING THE WHIRLWIND. A Story of Three Ge Illustrated.
Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

ONE DAY AT A TIME. By Brancue E.M.Grene. Illustrated by E.
Wuymrer. Crown 8yvo. Be 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

THE MISTRESS OF LYDGATE PRIORY; or, The Story of a Long Life.
By Evetyn E. GREEN. Crown 8vo. 38. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

THE TWO CROWNS. :'By Ecranton Tuorne. With I] astravions? Crown
8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.

LENORE ANNANDALE’S STORY. By Everyn E. Green. With Illus-
trations. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth, gilt edges.

Canoe By Hespa STRETTON. ith Illustrations. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt

: SUNFLOWERS. A Story of To-day. By G. C. Gener. ‘Illustrated.
Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.



56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON ; and of all Booksellers,
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY’S LIST. 7

bn
oe

ee lf i

at
ime. ‘tu

| eile & i -xe>\y :
E i i { * ai A Ke (i i ae Lats
ca ih ? Sari it Lie



| et
cane & y, La i Ao }

ee il

new BALF-CROWN BOOKS

SUITED FOR ALL READERS.

This is a very cheap Series of Popular Reprints. Each book

contains 884 pages with Illustrations. Crown Svo, 2s. Cdey
_ én bevelled cloth boards, gilt edges.

x THE BLACK TROOPERS, and other Tales.

2 STRANGE TALES OF PERIL AND ADVENTURE.

3 REMARKABLE ADVENTURES FROM REAL LIFE.

4 ADVENTURES ASHORE AND AFLOAT.

5 FINDING HER PLACE. By Howe BENNING.

6 THE MOUNTAIN PATH. By Lity Watson.

7 AMONG THE MONGOLS. By James Gitmour, M.A.

8 WITHIN SEA WALLS. By G. E. Sarcenr and Miss WALSHE.

9 THE FOSTER BROTHERS OF DOON. A Tale of the Irish Rebellion
of 1798. By the Author of ‘‘ Cedar Creek. a

zo CEDAR GREEK. .A Tale of Canadian Life.

11 CHRONICLES OF AN OLD MANOR HOUSE. ByG. E. Sarcenr.
12 A RACE FOR LIFE, and other Tales.

13 THE STORY OF A CITY ARAB. By G. E. Sarcent.

14 MERLE’S CRUSADE. By Rosa NoucHeTTE Carey.

13 ONLY A GIRL WIFE. By Ruty Lams.

16 THE STORY OF A POCKET BIBLE. ByG. E. Sancene:

17 HER OWN CHOICE. By Ruts Lams.

18 THE AWDRIES AND THEIR FRIENDS. By Mrs. Prosser.

ry FRANK LAYTON. An Australian Story. By G. E. SarGeENT.

2o SHADES AND ECHOES OF OLD LONDON. By Joun Sroucuron, D.D.
2x RICHARD HUNNE. By G. E. SarcenrT.

22 ONCE UPON A TIME; or, The Boy’s Book of Adventures.

23 GEORGE BURLEY: an History, Experiences, and Observations. By
G. E, SARGENT.

24 SUNDAY EVENINGS AT NORTHCOURT. By G. E. Sarcent.
25 LUTHER AND THE CARDINAL. Given in English by JuLic SuTTER.

26 GAPTAIN COOK: His Life, Voyages, and Discoveries. By W. H. G.
KincstTon.

27 POMPONIA; or, The Gospel in Czsar’s Household. By Mrs. Wess.

28 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. By Jonn Bunyan, With Illustrations
by Sir Joun GILBERT.





56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON; and of all Booksellers,
8 THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY’S LIST.

Sllustrated « Stories.



5s. each.

A YACHT YOYAGE ROUND ENGLAND. By Wixiiam H. G. Krncston,
Author of ‘Captain Cook: His Life, Voyages, and Discoveries,” etc.
New Edition revised and enlarged, and profusely illustrated. Small
ato. Cloth gilt. 5s.

NO CHOICE. A Story of the Unforeseen. By Rev. T. S. Mittincron,
Author of “Straight to the Mark,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo.
Cloth boards. 5s.

3s. Gd. each.

THE PERCIVALS; or, A Houseful of Girls. By Evetyn Everett
Green, Author of ‘Joint Guardians,” etc, Illustrated. Crown 8vo.
Cloth boards, gilt edges. 3s. 6d.

IDA HATHERLEY AT SCHOOL. By Constance Everyn, Author of
‘“‘ Miss Nettie’s Girls,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. Cloth boards,
gilt edges. 3s. 6d.

NOT BY BREAD ALONE. By IsaBerra Fyvie Mayo, the Author of
“The Occupations of a Retired Life,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo.
Cloth boards. 3s. 6d

A YOUNG OXFORD MAID IN THE DAYS OF THE KING AND THE
PARLIAMENT. By Sarau TytTier. Illustrated. Crown 8vo.
* Cloth boards. 3s. 6d. '

NOT HIS OWN MASTER; or, Ronald’s Experiences. By Mrs. Lucas
SHADWELL, Author of “Golden Sheaves,” etc. Illustrated. Crown
8vo. Cloth boards. 3s. 6d.

FROM PRISON TO PARADISE. A Story of English Peasant Life in 1557.
By Auice Lane, Author of ‘‘ Field Court,” “ Angel Meadow,” etc. Il-
lustrated. Crown 8vo. Cloth boards. 3s. 6d. :

RALPH ELLISON’S OPPORTUNITY, AND EAST AND WEST. By Leste
Keity, Author of ‘Great Grandmamma Severn,” etc. Cloth, gilt
edges. 35. 6d. i

3s. each.

HIS YOUNG NEIGHBOUR. By Eten Louisa Davis, Author of
“Shayning Castle.” Illustrated. Cloth. 3s. :

PETER’S SISTER. By Janet Epren, Author of ‘Another King,” etc,
Illustrated. Cloth. 3s. }

FOR_FRANCE AND FREEDOM. A Tale of the French Revolution. By
Emma Lesuiz. Illustrated. Cloth. 3s. ;
THE TENANTS OF PARADISE ROW. By the Author of ‘Constable
42 Z,” “Adopted,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. Cloth boards. 3s.

2s. 6d. each. '

ADOPTED; or, An Old Soldier’s Embarrassments. By E. A. B. D.,
Author of “ Constable 42 Z,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. Cloth
boards. as. 6d.

TOM DOUGLAS ; or, A Marked Man. By E. A. B. D., Author of “ Young
Ishmael Conway,” ‘Constable 42 Z,” ete, Illustrated. Crown 8vo.
Cloth boards. as. 6d.

MYRTLE AND RUE. A Story for the Young. Illustrating the Twenty-
third Psalm. By Marcarret Scott Haycrarr. Illustrated. Cloth
boards. 2s. 6d. - . ;

A SHADOW ON THE THRESHOLD; or, A Little Leaven. Bv JEssir

ArmstrRonG, Author of ‘Frank Horton’s Vintage,” etc, Illustrated.
Cloth boards. 2s. 6d. j



56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON ; and of all Eooksellers.
ee

THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST. 9



Sllustrated + Stories.

‘ 2s. each.

NESS AND JAMIE. A Story of London Life. By HEnry Jonnson,
Author of ‘ AJ] for Number One,” etc. Illustrated: Cloth. 2s.

HAROLD’S FRIENDS; or, The New Rector of Greythorpe, By C. A.
Burnasy. Illustrated. Cloth boards. as.

CHRISTIE’S NEXT THINGS. By the Author of “ Mrs. Morse’s Girls,”
etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. Cloth, 2s.

DOT-AND-GO-ONE. By M. Brancur Haywarp. Illustrated. Crown
8vo. Cloth Loards. 2s.

THE MUSGROVE RANCH. A Tale of Southern California. By T. M.
Browne. lllustrated. C.oth. 2s. x

ds. Gd. each.

WITHIN SIGHT OF THE SNOW: A stot. of a Swiss Holiday; and “A
Surrey Idyl.” By Lity Watson, ‘Auther of ‘‘The Mountain Vath,”
etc. Crown $vo. Cioth. 1s. 6d.

NOT LIKE OTHER FOLKS. A City Story. By Jessiz Armstrone. Il-
lustrated. Cloth. 1s. 6d.

MR. FARRER’S BIG 0’s. By Emiry Broprg, Author of “ Dandy Blue,”
etc. Iilustrated. Crown 8vo. Cloth. is. 6d.

‘HONOUR NOT HONOURS. By Mrs. Austin Dossoy, Author of “ Cherry-
burn,” etc, Lilustrated. Cloth. 15s. 6d.





9F9OOOHO99O OOO

Large Type Books for
YOUNG READERS.

Each in very large iipe, with Engravings, Small sf0, 1s. in Coloured Covers,
or 1s. 6d, cloth, wilt edges.

WHEN JESUS WAS HERE AMONG MEN. By Mrs. E. M. WaTerwortTH.
THE NAME ABOVE EVERY NAME. By Mrs. E. M. WATERWORTH.

THE BEAUTIFUL HOUSE AND ITS SEVEN PILLARS. By Frances
M. SaviLt.

READINGS WITH THE LITTLE ONES. By Acnss GIBERNE.

STORIES OF BIBLE CHILDREN. A Sunday Book for very Little Chil-
dren. By Mrs. E. M. WATERWORTH.

LISTENING TO JESUS. A Sunday Book for the Little Ones. By E. M.
WATERWORTH.

BLESSINGS FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE LILIES OF THE FIELD, and other Readings for the Little Ones.
WALKING WITH JESUS. A Sunday Pook for Children.

THE THREE BRAVE PRINCES, and other Bible Stories.

SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT ROSE COTTAGE. Bible Talks with Mamma.
By Mrs. WATERWORTH.

THE GHILDREN’S KING, and other Readings for the Young.

56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON; and of all Booksellers.


10 THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST.

ILLUSTRATED BOOKS BY

MRS. O. RF. DALTON,

Anthor of “ Christie's Old Organ,” etc.

‘The Mysterious House. With
Frontispiece by M. E. Epwarps.
Crown 8vo. 1s. cloth boards.

Winter's Folly.
Crown 8vo.

18 Illustrations.
zs. cloth boards.

Golden Threads for Daily
Weaving. A Text, Meditation,
and Verse for each Morning and
Evening of a Week. 6d., ex-
quisitely printed in colours.

Christie's Old Organ ; or, Home,
Sweet Home. 1s. cloth.

Angel’s Christmas. 16mo. 6d.
cloth.

Launch the Lifeboat. With 44
~Coloured Pictures or Vignettes,
4to. »38. Coloured Cover.

Little Dot.
piece. 6d.

Little Faith; or, The Child of the
Toy Stall. xs. cloth.

Coloured Frontis-



Nobody Loves Me. 1s. cloth.

Olive’s Story ; or, Life at Ravens-
cliffe. 2s. cloth, gilt.

Was I Right? Ulustrated. 3s. éd.
cloth, gilt.

Our Gracious Queen: Pictures
and Stories from Her Majesty’s
Life. With many Illustrations.
1s. cloth.

Taken or Left.
cloth.

A_ Peep Behind the Scenes.
Illustrated. Imperial 16mo. 3s. 64.
cloth, gilt edges.

Poppie’s Presents.
xs. cloth,

Saved at Sea. A Lighthouse
Story. New and cheaper Edition.
1s. cloth boards. ;

Shadows. Scenes in the Life of

an Old Arm Chair. Illustrated.
4s. cloth, gilt edges.

Crown 8yo. 1s.

Crown 8vo,



ILLUSTRATED BOOKS BY

HESBA STRETTON,

Author of “ Fessica'’s First Prayer,” etc,

Alone in London. 1s. 6d.

A Miserable Christmas and a
Happy New Year. od.

A Night and @ Day. 94.

A Thorny Path. 2s.

Bede’s Charity. 28. 6d.

Carola, 38s. 6d.

Cassy. 18. 6d.

Christmas Child. 6d.

Children of Cloverley. 28.
Cobwebs and Cables. 5s.

Crew of the Dolphin. 1s. 6d.
Enoch Roden’s Training. 2s.
Fern’s Hollow. 2s.

Fishers of Derby Haven. 2s.
Friends till Death. od.

How Apple-Tree Court was
Won. ¢éd.

Jessica’s First Prayer. 1%.
Left Alone. 6d.
Little Meg’s Children.
Lost Gip. 1s. 6d.

Max Kromer., is, éd.
Michel Lorio’s Cross. 6d.
No Place Like Home. 1s.
Only a Dog. 6d.

Pilgrim Street. 2s.

Sam Franklin’s
Bank. 6d.

Storm of Life. 1s. 6d.

The King’s Servanis. 1s. 6d.
Inder the Old Roof. 1s.

Worth of a Baby. 6d.

18, 6d.

Savings



~56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON; and of ali Booksellers,
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST. 14

CHEAP SERIES Of BOOKS
FOR PRESENTS AND PRIZES.

FOURPENNY BOOKS IN CLOTH BOARDS. A

Series of Thirty-two Story Books, cach with Illustration.

“LITTLE DOT” SERIES OF SIXPENNY BOOKS.
A rretty Series of 112 Story Books, each with Coloured Frontispiece
and Lound in cloth.

NEW NINEPENNY SERIES. A Series of Sixty-two
Children’s Story Books with Coloured Frontispieces and other Illustra-
tions. Bound in attractive cloth boards.

NEW SHILLING SUNDAY BOOKS for Little Children.
Large type. Illustrated. xs, in very attractive coloured paper boards ;
1s, 6d. in c.oth, gilt edges.

SHILLING LARGE-TYPE BOOKS FOR ADULTS.
A Cheap Series of 120 Story and other Books for Working People.
Large crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth boards.

MONTHLY SHILLING VOLUMES FOR THE YOUNG
Upwards of 200 Volumes of Stories. Each Ilustrated and bound in
attractive cloth boards.

“R. T. S.” LIBRARY. A Series of Thirty Books, mos'ly
reprints of Popular Books for Adults. Illustrated. Each book with
192 pages, 3d. in paper covers; 6d. cloth.

.

The Society also issues a great variety of cheap paper-covered
Books for Sunday School Rewards and for distribution.
Amongst these are the

SILVER SERIES OF THREEPENNY BOOKS.
A new Series of 24mo Books for the Young. With Covers
printed, back and front, in Colours, on gold and silver
ground, Each book in clear type with a Frontispiece En-
graving.

“ FLORAL COVER” SERIES OF TWOPENNY
REWARD BOOKS. ‘
Each containing 48 pages of clearly-printed Letterpress,
in simple language for Children. With Nwmerous LEn-
gravings, and in attractive coloured covers.

SIXPENNY AND SHILLING PACKETS OF PIC-
TURE AND STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.

Containing Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing Looks, also
Coloured Leajlets and small Tracts for Children,



56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON ; and of all Booksellers.
12 THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST.

“Popular Annuals. —

These Annuals form a most attractive series of Gift Books.
They each contain SERIAL STORIES BY WELL-KNOWN
WRITERS, which when published separately will sell for
nearly as much each as is now asked for the Volumes con-
taining several of them. Besides Stories and most useful,
interesting, and instructive general Articles, there is a pro-
fusion of Illustrations, and a very attractive binding.

THE LEISURE HOUR ANNUAL.

856 pages. Imperial 8vo. Profusely Illustrated. 7s, in handsome
cloth ; 8s. extra boards, gilt edges; 10s. 6d. half bound in calf,

THE SUNDAY AT HOME ANNUAL.

828 pages. Imperial 8vo. Profusely Illustrated by Coloured and Wood
Engravings. 7s. in handsome cloth; 8s. extra boards, gilt edges;
zos. 6d, half-bound in calf.

THE BOY’S OWN ANNUAL. i

The Volume of the Boy’s Own Paper. 832 pages. With 10 Coloured
and upwards of 500 Wood Engravings. 8s. in handsome cloth; gs. 6d.
gilt sides and edges ; 12s. 6d. half morocco.

THE GIRL’S OWN ANNUAL.

The Volume of the Girt’s Own Paper. 832 pages; profusely illus-
trated. 8s. in handsome cloth; gs. 6d. with gilt sides and edges;
z2s. 6d. half morocco.

THE CHILD’S COMPANION
AND JUVENILE INSTRUCTOR ANNUAL.

A host of Stories and interesting Papers, with superior Engravings,
and Oleograph Frontispiece. xs. 6d. in ornamental cover; 2s. cloth
boards, with coloured design ; 2s. 6d. cloth, e egant, gilt edges.

OUR LITTLE DOTS’ ANNUAL.
Pretty Stories and Pictures for Little Peorle. rs. 6d. in ornamental
cover ; 2s. cloth boards, with coloured design; 2s. 6d. cloth, bevelled
cdges, full gilt. y
THE COTTAGER AND ARTISAN:
THE PEOPLE’S OWN ANNUAL.

144 large pages. Profusely Illustrated. Forming quite a family scrap-
ook. 1s. 6d. in cover, printed in Oil Colours; 2s, 6d. cloth boards,
gilt edges.

FRIENDLY GREETINGS:

Illustrated Reading for the People. Hatr-YEARLY VoLUMES. With
many Large Engravings and Coloured Pictures. 2s. 6d. cloth boards,
The Yearty Votume for 1890, handsomely bound, 5s. cloth boards.

THE TRACT MAGAZINE ANNUAL. -

Short Stories, Biographical Sketches, and interesting Papers. With
many Engravings. 1s. 6d. cloth boards.







56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON ; and of all Booksellers.
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST. 13



This is a Series of Popiutar

‘Reprints from volumes of the BOY’S

OWN PAPER, most of which are -

now quite out of print.\ The Books are very attract‘vely
bound, and are freely illustrated.

ADVENTURES OF A THREE-GUINEA WATCH.
By Tatsot Baines Rerep. Illustrations. New Edition, reduced in
price. Crown 8vo, 38. 6d,

FOOTBALL.
This Volume contains the Rules of the Game, with Papers on how the
Game should be played, by such authorities as C. W. Atcock and Dr.
Irvine. Illustrated. 1s. 6d.

CRICKET.
By Dr. W. G. Grace, Rev. J. Pycrort, Lord Cuartes Russett,
FREDERICK GALE, and others. Many Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 2s.

A GREAT MISTAKE.
By T. S. Mituineton. With many Illustrations. Small ato, 3s. 6d.

THE FIFTH FORM AT ST. DOMINIC’S.
By Tasot B. ReEp, Author of ‘The Adventures of a Three-Guinea
Watch,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 38. 6d.

THROUGH FIRE AND THROUGH WATER.
A Story of Adventure and Peril. By T. S. MrLtincron, Author of
“Straight tothe Mark,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d.

HAROLD, THE BOY EARL.
A Story of Old England. By J. F. Hopexutrs, Author of ‘Edric the
Norseman,” ‘Kornak the Viking,” etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo.
38. 6d.

MY FRIEND SMITH. :
By Tarsot Bainrs Rrep, Author of ‘Adventures of a Three-Guinea
atch,’ etc. With an Introduction by G, A. Hutcuison. Illustrated.

Crown 8vo. 53.

56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON ; and of all Booksellers.
14 THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST.








mm mn
IMA yl =
SAH, Bee IT

“THE GIRLS OWN BOOKSHELF” is a Series of Reprints

of some of the chief stories and articles from “THE GIRLS

OWN PAPER.” As most of the annial volumes of this popular

periodical are now out of print, the Girl’s Own Bookshelf is

the only form in which these productions can be obtained.
They are mostly in imperial iGmo, cloth boards.

MY BROTHER’S FRIEND. By Ecranton Tuorne, Author
of ‘‘ The Old Worcester Jug,” etc. 38. 6d.

HOW TO MAKE COMMON THINGS. A Handy Book
for Girls. With many Illustrations. is.

CORA ; or, Three Years of a Girl's Life. Illustrated by M. E.

Epwarps. 2s. 64.

THE GIRL’S OWN COOKERY BOOK. By Putruis

BROWNE. 1S..
THE QUEEN O’ THE MAY. By Anne Beare, 2s. 6d.
THE MASTER’S SERVICE. A Practical Guide for Girls;

By Lapy Brasazon, Dora Hore, Atice KinG, and Mary
SELWooD. 2s. 6d.

THE SUNBEAM OF THE FACTORY, and other Stories.
2s. 6d.

ESTHER CAMERON’S STORY. By RosaN. Carey, 3. 6d.
SEVEN YEARS FOR RACHAEL. By Anne BEALE.
3s. 6d.

HOME HANDICRAFTS. Fdited by Cuartes Peters,

Editor of ‘‘ The Girl’s Own Indoor Book,” etc. Illustrated. 2s. 6d,
gilt edges.

THE TWIN HOUSES, and other Stories, By ANNE BEALE.

Author of “The Queen o’ the May,” etc. Illustrated. es. éd.
cloth boards.

THE SHEPHERD’S FAIRY. By Darury Dare, Author of
“The Great Auk’s Eggs.” 2s. 6d.

AUNT DIANA. ByRosa Noucuerte Carey, Author of “Not

PEE Girls,” “ Esther Cameron’s Story,” etc. Illustrated.
2s. 6d.

SERVANTS AND SERVICE. By Rutu Lamp, Author of
“Comfortable Mrs. Crook,” etc. 1s. 6d.

HER OBJECT IN LIFE. By Isaperra Fyvie Mayo. 2s. 6d.

50, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON; and of all Booksellers,
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST. _ 15.

SUNDAY BOOKS FOR
YOUNG PEOPLE.




















Our Little Dot's Picture
Scrap=Books.
First anD SECOND SERIES.

Royal 4to, 2s. 6d. each Series,
in handsome coloured boards,
or the TWO Series COMPLETE
in ONE VOLUME, 5s. cloth.

Each series contains a large number of
Pictures by well-known Artists, with
just enough descriptive letterpress to
Suggest an interesting story connected
with each picture. A most useful book
for parents and others who have the care
of young children.

BIBLE STORIES AND PICTURES.
With Twenty-four Coloured page
Pictures and Forty Vignettes. With
simple letterpress in large type. 4s.
handsomely bound, cloth gilt.

BIBLE TALES FOR CHILDREN. With
Forty Illustrations. Small 4to. 3s. 6d.
cloth, gilt edges.

THE HAPPIEST HALF-HOUR; or, Sunday Talks with Children. _ By
FREDERICK LANGBRIDGE, M.A. With many illustrations. Small
ato. 3s. 6d. cloth boards, gilt edges.






















Stepping Stones to Bible ‘bistory,

A series of books for children and young people, intended ‘to cover in
time the whole Bible History. Each volume embraces a period complete in
itself. The writers are selected for their known aptitude in writing for
children, and also for their accurate acquaintance with Scripture, and their
power of making it attractive to the young. The style is such that the

ook can be read by children of eight years old and upwards. It will also
be found very suitable for reading to very litile children,

1. STORIES FROM GENESIS. By Annie R. Butver, Author of
‘Glimpses of Maori Land,” and “Stories of the Children’s Medical

Missions With thirty-nine Illustrations. Small crown 8vo, 2s. 6d.
cloth,

2 THE PROMISED KING: The Story of the Children’s

Saviour. By ANNIE Kk. BuTLer, Author of “ Stories trom Genesis,”
etc. ‘No.2. Wihmany Illustrations. Small crown svo, as. 6d. cloth.
8. STORIES FROM THE LIVES OF MOSES AND JOSHUA.

By JosrepH Jounson, Author of ‘The Master’s Likeness,” ‘' Dibs,”
etc. Illustrated. Crown 8vo, 2s. 6d. cloth,

56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON; and of all Booksellers.
Magazines to every LONE,

Sixpence Monthly. One Penny. New Series. Sixpence Monthly.
Weekly. ¢ teu :
THE : THE

“SUNDAY LEISURE
AT HOME.| ~.. HOUR.

A FAMILY MAGAZINE A MAGAZINE FOR
FOR SABBATH READING. FAMILY & GENERAL READING



















-|. Sixpence Monthly. One Penny _ Sixpence Monthly: One Penny
Weekly. eee Weekly.
THE \ -THE

GIRL’S OWN | BOY'S OWN
PAPER. PAPER.

One Penny Monthly. In Cover. One Penny Monthly.











- New Series.
-THE THE

CH ILD’ S COTTAGER
COMPANION ee han
AND 5 : ARTISAN.

“JUVENILE INSTRUCTOR: ee nye
THe MaGazine ror Lrrtie Forxs. ‘| THE PEOPLE'S OWN. PAPER.

















‘New.Series.. One Penny Monthly. |. Fourpence Monthly. Halfpenny
THE 7 i Weekly.

TRACT FRIENDLY ~
““MAGAZINE.| GREETINGS. |

SPECIALLY USEFUL FOR | ILLUSTRATED READINGS
LOCALISATION. "FOR THE. PEOPLE..

OUR LITTLE DOTS.â„¢ Nev Mutated Magasin

Sixteen Pages. Large Type. Easy Words. One Penny Monthly:









Lonpon : 56, PATERNOSTER’ Row, AND OF ALL NewsacenTs.

HAZELL, WATSON @’VINEY, LD. J i at ve

6.&/6 KIRSY 8T., HATTON GARDEN.







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'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-10-14T22:15:53-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-10-14T22:12:12-04:00'
redup
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describe
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describe
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bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
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'2011-10-14T22:14:05-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:16:22-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:15:47-04:00'
describe
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832ea8517bfde303c24b046669d33de0
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'2011-10-14T22:14:04-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-14T22:16:42-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:13:34-04:00'
describe
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c2e739550e2d8fccfda00b8c412b1772
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'2011-10-14T22:15:36-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-14T22:13:30-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:15:45-04:00'
describe
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b6799960964f84df91a095c25a89b000
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'2011-10-14T22:14:27-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:15:17-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:13:15-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:16:40-04:00'
describe
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describe
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16f4cc7148e078d9ffb3d7a4698307fd
1e6a5efbff64868e2643f2021d3e8ceb2740189f
'2011-10-14T22:15:04-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:13:47-04:00'
describe
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25b4f36345fe9de378807567e8bfc3f2
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'2011-10-14T22:15:14-04:00'
describe
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183742b7016c34292b426a440d9850c3
c509fd3148d2b3cdfea2d46da5473e28b1552370
'2011-10-14T22:14:42-04:00'
describe
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c50e9447f4f740571fe766b96dc62f80
aa3dcac0d40ce5af5e3e27737bf007723a2ea940
'2011-10-14T22:13:04-04:00'
describe
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34a87609322230249f14a5791df7ee38
4fed33b61fbfb6cf98c509ab669f0004dcac90e4
'2011-10-14T22:13:51-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:16:32-04:00'
describe
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53ed573b2028e3f84d7ec1a9487ea059
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'2011-10-14T22:16:23-04:00'
describe
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a07f1a9dee946ac58213824289d73146
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'2011-10-14T22:16:31-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:16:36-04:00'
describe
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77bc1605d2bb8b03e0e2b0cfb5adeb77
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'2011-10-14T22:13:45-04:00'
describe
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5ef000ec26eb278f510149130afe5159
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'2011-10-14T22:13:14-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:13:41-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:15:10-04:00'
describe
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ed80ec4576dc7e4b075d0e0a8e73ff6d
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'2011-10-14T22:15:12-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-10-14T22:14:48-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:15:38-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:16:25-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:14:00-04:00'
describe
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d3b70d606499d130893db6d693c080ab
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'2011-10-14T22:13:53-04:00'
describe
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7efb24878d8bbac0dea1f7104865bfd3
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'2011-10-14T22:14:45-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-10-14T22:12:48-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:16:17-04:00'
describe
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9cc716aebb584004ab8d235e7f16daf4
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'2011-10-14T22:14:08-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:15:40-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:14:16-04:00'
describe
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2578c3458c5bbe2074c369f6066497dd
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'2011-10-14T22:16:35-04:00'
describe
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e92131ecf7353d0502528494d037c9db
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'2011-10-14T22:12:42-04:00'
describe
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45d00fa9e93f789e874bb4c1f7230c7c
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describe
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'2011-10-14T22:14:09-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:13:22-04:00'
describe
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ac45c8035beb87c3e65362584caee06c
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'2011-10-14T22:13:09-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-14T22:14:18-04:00'
describe
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7d2c133d92425911fe9cee6431b456df
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describe
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'2011-10-14T22:15:42-04:00'
describe
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e4053decc38c4478d099f82e65818e53
0366d66da5febd722f8ed065523c0677c8c9da9b
'2011-10-14T22:14:24-04:00'
describe
'188118' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXAY' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
344a335e82ad58f99f539684bac981a7
cb662a1a02ca21c43fc3a32d7ae705f32a820794
'2011-10-14T22:15:41-04:00'
describe
'37902' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXAZ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
2bedee91a8c191a56ac4db03be55c065
f753b782d14a3f06ec919372c96d526d686946b1
'2011-10-14T22:13:13-04:00'
describe
'58668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBA' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
ff304156dc72dd1fa04de7dec17b230b
15f8ce3b2f539e5cd0667087352027b5844597a4
describe
'2824348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBB' 'sip-files00012.tif'
8167ebb5a2c36f95b93b62c7b45c54f7
4549684eb09a82f73e060946c074ff1735656e2c
'2011-10-14T22:14:55-04:00'
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBC' 'sip-files00012.txt'
b96840d828334adbd613f93424809290
7013770e5d2478772b193cc233166d261d4ebd0e
'2011-10-14T22:15:34-04:00'
describe
'19519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBD' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
6a730861839f13c804987b4c88a8b580
a5ddeda9396cd41355815ed709c03206479c7059
'2011-10-14T22:12:59-04:00'
describe
'343855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
34d714807c666773805cf11d3063816e
0a3c0ebecce09a48fee5374ec0372cbe5562bc0a
'2011-10-14T22:12:31-04:00'
describe
'199031' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBF' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
78aa8e3df360cab42c437e570efc3cf4
2637323c78fb05fece723c449fdde25005d206a2
describe
'40616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBG' 'sip-files00013.pro'
1dff44149a7a13b2ef9f900cc1683847
cc57a85c3d396d3f30fd37b57c744312a9f8ba52
'2011-10-14T22:14:19-04:00'
describe
'62094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBH' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
d9d239cc8152fa946cc1160b051f9267
6640443b6559cb83c4f6a8d62eed443192a58d15
'2011-10-14T22:13:44-04:00'
describe
'2760232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBI' 'sip-files00013.tif'
74d7c30d39d90a74e516486fc4857a75
16f237b4c175a6947b08264935560d2eae719577
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBJ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
003414b51ec89505758243e15741047d
775e26a26cc44bf1fb21ebc55ca8d84df0554082
describe
'20113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBK' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
19e01beab2671896e1f34067cc9d52c8
0ab5965db83fda6b53304bbd14e03fadf76df32b
'2011-10-14T22:15:49-04:00'
describe
'344916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBL' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
965e497d3f821d7c646eda037a5c01cb
8ee60a9f5307281ac17274bf2c2d9837a539a73d
describe
'191177' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBM' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
5a8a306d1c91f57cd8e6e5b2483626f2
1316e9533102398d9fe8d6dd40a94ab6eb98e356
'2011-10-14T22:14:14-04:00'
describe
'39949' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBN' 'sip-files00014.pro'
94b71582077a51a14dc740f05ed30385
5adc604fe49a767a7788ac04957f6dea155edd5e
'2011-10-14T22:15:56-04:00'
describe
'62194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBO' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
3cbe83ebfc100ec7ac8bb731b9df0b90
bbebf54e74dc47104498023f42d5a2945202ccce
'2011-10-14T22:15:30-04:00'
describe
'2768856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBP' 'sip-files00014.tif'
b1faadd9234b5b0f87637e1742c3bb5b
e9abdf3a9ef2bef2f1855808bdb1a371b1d54c78
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBQ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
56fb15e5b8c8f318fd5f06e2bd67bfa7
01fe34af5e9f4b7596e555a48ddfdab18bc613ba
describe
'20640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBR' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
170d8210fd20509cadb75585551aa99d
63b0235f33a3e3850d546a21ce8e4922db66245d
'2011-10-14T22:14:37-04:00'
describe
'344719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBS' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
f5e5b4a277158b3d0d92a9de9422c5ef
6e7c46ff560f24247812b7a5235cc65f38c26728
'2011-10-14T22:12:58-04:00'
describe
'213790' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBT' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
e56ed29c0ff6e7485688ed230cbca5eb
2d6fc6b8d777638b05c5f0a722b2de7503f2cf14
'2011-10-14T22:12:37-04:00'
describe
'13458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBU' 'sip-files00015.pro'
88e99bdc3d8a1f7bc8e65c9238e0c30f
5734898d0ade225f643be1e5e8e9491aead30f2c
'2011-10-14T22:12:49-04:00'
describe
'57487' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBV' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
01b357c9ea5e23b0a4fccfbfad938f5a
2f6ef17f438f10bed9a9fb258df53283f2ad4677
'2011-10-14T22:15:09-04:00'
describe
'2767760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBW' 'sip-files00015.tif'
b2c13fb32af52184d88ba0f35b7f54d7
3ad1355e14fdc06852ac940efd3a8ebb77125143
describe
'570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBX' 'sip-files00015.txt'
aa351f325a670051741bfac92b676991
f6b74970e469a970de8933d32d44e54bde2d3689
describe
'20073' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBY' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
8c241097e5095a31a682ed117f8c31c2
51debdad7f8d58bb4cb65f527a619bb89aeaceb4
describe
'353971' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXBZ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
62184fbbe945fe35ebffc15311571f3a
5e7714cf90f82eef694be52254be3a0f12dfe608
describe
'187630' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCA' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
74bc7ee030e49e6a26c3febf0fb0108d
f376ef9dfcefe1dc3b50d92db2e6a246ddd653bf
'2011-10-14T22:13:12-04:00'
describe
'38685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCB' 'sip-files00016.pro'
50bc107ca429b484a13fe11c52d53026
41127ad29806717e292047bfb5e5ad5b072eb702
'2011-10-14T22:12:41-04:00'
describe
'58146' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCC' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
ff6bf4308314a0b673e714ed277ae8a8
745bb92dfc0c42412439952196eb8c7a1cb31088
'2011-10-14T22:14:07-04:00'
describe
'2841128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCD' 'sip-files00016.tif'
fe6d3cf37c64b7a83fadaddb76bfb0bf
35e2e29ebd3f9b1df5a20fbd424a9c26c66bc188
'2011-10-14T22:13:33-04:00'
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCE' 'sip-files00016.txt'
dc2ed0d08a98269a08e7eb193bed9396
3fc494b62af3524de02d62a5a3b781db43657462
describe
'19914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCF' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
6eaad8726dddc992d46a229e9b9d4f3a
5292caaeef48fde90d4119aaf5c5677ab2f1056f
describe
'345600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCG' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
c7550ac32f6e4e324bc70ddf4f2dac7f
48354d54dc54c9c46e6946677697eb8ce63b2d12
'2011-10-14T22:15:13-04:00'
describe
'180265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCH' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
77df5348991038bf48ff4fd548a2fcb2
7037cf72db5171f6b76909b3aee067598a24298f
'2011-10-14T22:13:42-04:00'
describe
'30898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCI' 'sip-files00017.pro'
09c5ccba2bb57cfe112566a37e3d3863
bf46ce861263fdeca950c8e2b9ee2f2f8942d525
'2011-10-14T22:15:18-04:00'
describe
'55917' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCJ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
f670509c6fe56dd742bf1aebabc49566
072fe2c7cff630439713baecfafff431f475f048
'2011-10-14T22:14:32-04:00'
describe
'2773992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCK' 'sip-files00017.tif'
2a8160a59cb91957f2cebbf54090e550
f8412a926683daba989b0352683eaa2835bdee53
'2011-10-14T22:12:51-04:00'
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCL' 'sip-files00017.txt'
196c8d04a683037aef3ef227d6e96d6e
b038299157be4fe86bab2c013f242717c3f8f420
'2011-10-14T22:14:43-04:00'
describe
'19296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCM' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
1a1e3181948c0b067d412d086e7842dc
3d02503b51069cd3cbb20f87a116150034b9618a
'2011-10-14T22:15:29-04:00'
describe
'354786' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCN' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
7628bca2a30d1393cff19febc58968fa
92f1deeaca336dad5b5f7ffc27a2aef00e330a78
'2011-10-14T22:15:48-04:00'
describe
'173060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCO' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
b08fac93d535c7609a0eb34d566d1a0f
7edc8c68d3f72348f2ef4f476a453a8adfe93ee6
'2011-10-14T22:13:50-04:00'
describe
'17944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCP' 'sip-files00018.pro'
b2eb0a3455fa0eb5861add3952aaa8ed
7b22302aead66f11ff2772503859a184b5d5557d
'2011-10-14T22:15:11-04:00'
describe
'48864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCQ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
b4e4fe8b5fe19f2cb13f58fe0b52a2f5
42b1302f09f491d363e408a90cdcbe7a485b6dce
'2011-10-14T22:14:31-04:00'
describe
'2848476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCR' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3e0888d1a63d3d1430b5801e23b45989
d67ccad4ef2b6a395b526cbe554bdd6cf21776d8
'2011-10-14T22:13:18-04:00'
describe
'739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCS' 'sip-files00018.txt'
fbb1d95e020d65b2caff9bfcb411d047
9ae1ec0f77a477370027b256e5de30ea2ac114a1
'2011-10-14T22:14:29-04:00'
describe
'17887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCT' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
432124aeda23edd03f73e09e535a32ea
e8ae255153905a80992a7cf0c65b8d7627566b66
describe
'343871' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCU' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
530b6fcecaf299ca854efc7236a06b3f
11775a52d41d52918f2f951f7a5b9110cf1e6d44
'2011-10-14T22:14:28-04:00'
describe
'171542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCV' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f9c5a20c63afde62a0afb256d7f90f9e
e00764b1b05780c9b42882e6942434d0558dc812
describe
'22342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
df0dce2042d7f42ae932643f6271450f
c29285d5747a8e2231671eb681098f8897cda12b
describe
'49750' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCX' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
2d956ce858146fc5bc371cc4aa50ce01
ca34e2bb7de0a29d18b00f6dab36939dc60a9c2b
describe
'2759788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCY' 'sip-files00019.tif'
0b9effd3dee960fbe3ed0ec7e70ebab7
d1d6650ff0596052613a79faaf3d6958bd156a69
'2011-10-14T22:16:13-04:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXCZ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
5c7f25b6dfcb348befbd283f57a9f633
358ef1b19969b13d0a54917bc675621df3dfd6a5
describe
'17770' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDA' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
d885c35c350a9308dd08d12adada5ea3
a88392a93f25093453aa5f87cfbfdee2f4cfb1c2
describe
'351751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDB' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
19d23490f6b28c68ffc556ea77fc5b29
9bf876483f81612edf342e114a78abdd62e980da
'2011-10-14T22:13:56-04:00'
describe
'141260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDC' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
19c8e2282be73862c0b78f6d78bb6da6
3adecfb7c40b9072e45fcc557074d0ca5b4e265f
'2011-10-14T22:13:58-04:00'
describe
'10962' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDD' 'sip-files00020.pro'
30d92e8f24c80907f1ac4b85b80ca0bf
6dc07360755d150f4ce0e69d794b5d5d171eb89d
describe
'39316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
e673b5b801fbd54a1fa3dcb12b7012e3
af079a4f0ca81e1ff68068bf969a3d9b0a2cc6d7
'2011-10-14T22:13:00-04:00'
describe
'2822600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDF' 'sip-files00020.tif'
a84defccdb1718e77c53366e9139fa4b
2d7abd731e28ab770c2c47e531c9669b4575383a
'2011-10-14T22:14:34-04:00'
describe
'463' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDG' 'sip-files00020.txt'
6197ef3588aa2214688f9142dc4affab
f300c802434bbf45d0243109c3b602dbe9cffb63
'2011-10-14T22:12:38-04:00'
describe
'16081' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDH' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
5b0ff56b249fec8396fa6bf9c352791b
3c79c398d5a7716e651517cbec61cf0080cc1975
describe
'345396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDI' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
82976a63474777be174f9d3e8118f2b8
3f7f688c59b063a20505cd807209e0983d4b6710
'2011-10-14T22:12:29-04:00'
describe
'179839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDJ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
d865bd28dd3d58d6a252e4f54408cda2
153f8fa5c9265e3f7673ce5e03c6958a070a9f42
'2011-10-14T22:16:07-04:00'
describe
'19600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDK' 'sip-files00021.pro'
396ad3fbf7939b329bbc548acc0e4b00
28169c77f9068fea00c205c093ebb51d2c110c16
'2011-10-14T22:14:39-04:00'
describe
'52120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
5ade9cdc28a22dff33c115cb8822a114
590dd027824d06199cc5aa57ce6af5326e9410b6
'2011-10-14T22:14:23-04:00'
describe
'2771932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDM' 'sip-files00021.tif'
991f3bbdd40167479724852779658b99
90d159ba9293cb935fa8b8c51c202ea65f953a8e
'2011-10-14T22:14:21-04:00'
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDN' 'sip-files00021.txt'
66b4f53e83f7cd42f2e65e3afb62b686
6be5785d402b298355f8c081ad3bc5751e4e732f
'2011-10-14T22:12:22-04:00'
describe
'18940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDO' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
b48b38ca9186de66143aea37db8e9fbe
a6462f11218188cbc0ed827f2e7bc777779817b6
describe
'346238' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDP' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c7fef13b82b325c8876622a47fc043bd
127b8b74d838a51474ec83abd0b93a82fbfb4341
describe
'193432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDQ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
febe7fb76e61b4ae207be708ff2e95d6
906804b4ce28bd02e12d50dd8a0f93b71c505c5a
'2011-10-14T22:14:15-04:00'
describe
'36017' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDR' 'sip-files00022.pro'
9444bd9d0ef38b5af608bbfb4703f16e
f210d242b0e498c2176083b05928428d47b7194c
describe
'60904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDS' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
282adc417771b479feb50745bb932b21
8be3e9f9812c86bba23e10a55a93ae50262ad263
'2011-10-14T22:13:10-04:00'
describe
'2779628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDT' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e851881ec4b5e0b6921a1710bf344c26
12f78793a96b31ca929ceb94f8d8449c6acc1919
'2011-10-14T22:15:33-04:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDU' 'sip-files00022.txt'
8419d75affebdb385a64ed170b9f57e0
d630db54b87d5a53dba14817cc50e6ee1fce8c94
'2011-10-14T22:13:26-04:00'
describe
'20532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDV' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
7a09f908ca1f3ed6c6c2cfda5f869940
131e9f57e73ec51bfe38a4b588d71231addbfdd4
'2011-10-14T22:16:41-04:00'
describe
'349736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDW' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
4b25a49ae25f099bfcc137160b65c17a
ac6e41630fd4d224d8761ac9b81112e8a04f822c
describe
'191288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDX' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
0ba9443c80b3d934534d7dfb5fa634f4
c63c8a71209b211e6882ed85152fc1c2decca163
describe
'39477' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDY' 'sip-files00023.pro'
2a2a9dba7c0dbead789185b2180e2d22
5e8fef3b7a2ad5125b6b0072e4e9a044697cbda3
'2011-10-14T22:15:35-04:00'
describe
'60941' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXDZ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
c83691336879a2cb9472cfc6a6dc0485
8b0faa97d6accc177d559225297b81693bf91456
describe
'2807264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEA' 'sip-files00023.tif'
0fc460971f5847533abd35b40dcc0032
1011b829231e3c14116953fdc8848769c23de2f4
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEB' 'sip-files00023.txt'
bc27d00e4756305be1dce4daf9342e20
ff13138f4fc786b3b1835c125c9d05c0f18db215
describe
'20254' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEC' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
c267defaa3350256b48667c59f23f027
e2710f312d58f030bcf7ae4d624467282fc3d917
'2011-10-14T22:15:05-04:00'
describe
'355049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXED' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
d7553e45de8eb861ddb402530e0e3eb0
4f247492b3dedcca67e0b56782f519bf807d29d1
'2011-10-14T22:15:20-04:00'
describe
'201700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEE' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
f76c8999684df92b038b435fcbeb546c
adb3e36872584e4416dd05f0c1fab5cc0da8a593
'2011-10-14T22:15:08-04:00'
describe
'41295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEF' 'sip-files00024.pro'
b700b7f495910d7ad65bb3822fd6cd0e
6ed647261944711273dea9dc67688c3197906dc5
'2011-10-14T22:16:24-04:00'
describe
'62333' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEG' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
441fab60d21c54ce5fc55dfcc64366e4
46d4cff7572d3f4e1518862f6ce9190e9eb5acce
'2011-10-14T22:13:11-04:00'
describe
'2850296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEH' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a16644d0c708d565aee149cde47b3fe8
f912a45671d648f15b56a72b1c2cde67e9854f9a
'2011-10-14T22:12:25-04:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEI' 'sip-files00024.txt'
385bebf257633d1819a44b69fdfc14e0
84410ac4b64e981717c3b9589498652b084e9279
'2011-10-14T22:15:24-04:00'
describe
'20160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEJ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
1e0264425a5abcc2ae704f89fb11538d
dcd5325f780f4003964cb8aa101ac6cfae5c0c43
describe
'350040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
6b72caedb2ae595e0fad091dcde769ed
013c0f901ed3ae3ce9093b04e6fa46ee42318e21
describe
'193202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEL' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
faceef80d320d211b4e138e895554c95
699f42400b46f2374ef1b357481ac7579fcce499
describe
'39987' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEM' 'sip-files00025.pro'
3767da2829703982bc21d8d56551e9a6
3a2d32b9f3c7f62b3947a3b75a28cc965a31e880
'2011-10-14T22:12:32-04:00'
describe
'60824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEN' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
02ae5ec4cfe393aafb7dc4dbd09465b1
aef3c9234bd487f5a9cd936c406cdde74ce273a2
'2011-10-14T22:15:06-04:00'
describe
'2809564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
94f54a08051684de5811f2146c163dc5
1c9021c18b3d58725d2a64250acf48da797cdd8c
'2011-10-14T22:12:45-04:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEP' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d02e87fc9c62d40e5eac1895e389b786
f5433b8a525fe7a7ca63696c20e364a1b7c14724
'2011-10-14T22:16:01-04:00'
describe
'19890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEQ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
64518cd822b5d36f82f9181f1e337c50
af10e2af271a99c840ea59e8d349e2b35a068615
'2011-10-14T22:16:14-04:00'
describe
'341165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXER' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
1cef231aa14d54bf11bb2b680ae87670
53d660cdd610b7046edf377ad0741e08fcf621a3
describe
'203689' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXES' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
2d1cca438439602c203df404b8d6ea4e
5687d288707af6a1d1f14f136bb96e5efc8d808d
describe
'41686' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXET' 'sip-files00026.pro'
43b856c337131241c0719d850544c000
039fd7e5989726fd16171265d55b43a64dd193b5
'2011-10-14T22:16:29-04:00'
describe
'64715' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEU' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b29e1e76d7086dbdc333aab72fbbb2e4
0397bb5c3c392abf72a7e22fe3d955f7f91d9f2b
describe
'2738704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEV' 'sip-files00026.tif'
4b10c7265201b93fafa95acd73e518e4
6abd7cb2db7b51795a40ce30f1f713d6f73c3fb2
'2011-10-14T22:12:19-04:00'
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEW' 'sip-files00026.txt'
212d60cb32a7a29af3230c3f6984fb8f
8c8a525f314f491221620e0ab623d56791639099
'2011-10-14T22:15:28-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'20704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEX' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
497c03577ce0d38934615e20919a6c0a
38646492e00658a53e53e97a09ac3be19e10b2fc
'2011-10-14T22:16:37-04:00'
describe
'360931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEY' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
5818b27b585624a9d0688f6d5771e259
946417169605c06e8b9c78fe61345a2444c647dd
describe
'181054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXEZ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6b132717ff2ffed22143bd14ce793409
3218e7147ff070b4d8ec979e6130e0a2ac26704d
'2011-10-14T22:14:06-04:00'
describe
'38773' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFA' 'sip-files00027.pro'
9d18c40fecb30a880914376b4cd98dfe
87f03ab271cdab37e72f3cf59aa8ab6505421fe1
'2011-10-14T22:13:16-04:00'
describe
'56957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFB' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
d242f406ff127de40f86a47c766b56da
15d7632a54e3fff78e4afd480e1f4275f8219c3d
describe
'2896912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFC' 'sip-files00027.tif'
0a5ba5375436235bce2d6b09e930fecd
24bc42c050d9e8f5ef18d69864bbd09d8fcfcafc
'2011-10-14T22:13:36-04:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFD' 'sip-files00027.txt'
2524bbfc60412809f50ff780c7bd8de2
bb4a4bc8f920dfea1d8fca6ab7e36f677e40b417
'2011-10-14T22:13:01-04:00'
describe
'19636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFE' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
0d008ddee5cd046134433924d9381726
dff6e169f7315b20428c48ee1a4aea4160cc24dc
'2011-10-14T22:14:44-04:00'
describe
'351651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFF' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
b60203a7b2b750985dd5dea7f90981f2
b58e1cfbbbb57a4065062a1000fcfcdc839c6d2a
'2011-10-14T22:15:44-04:00'
describe
'187610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFG' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e0f30ce27b5f6b24c47045e3bb0ec1d3
57b0760725302511d4cd3a1e82ec7862768a354f
'2011-10-14T22:12:34-04:00'
describe
'37892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFH' 'sip-files00028.pro'
de73246d8ead716bee1da7481cbfa76e
0589bd3d589ae179b13d4bcac742876a095a5fcf
describe
'57383' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFI' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
a8eeb5c269d349aea2ec9c7878a30de5
512fcefdc6cd467ca925a072e39951b5eb33eff8
describe
'2823748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFJ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ea161aff9616d770d2622fdc1e6ad460
a1e2b8c9f99e7b40a2d13db43b4a731c9ac19528
'2011-10-14T22:14:53-04:00'
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFK' 'sip-files00028.txt'
df724b9d1a928f8e877e7032f5f610c9
cf811f53577f7eee80ff31d877a23b18cddaef47
describe
'19862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFL' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
663287216c3efdb75d5744e35f1e69b7
b6df73cfd4bcf67427265ebff1b65c7acd49b201
describe
'344638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFM' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
1d0ee2cda0597be511ff56d3357d058e
f8896711fcef1a1f9dc0b5e4f965d2b88689e530
describe
'150052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFN' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
ad2f44204aef1f9b72b5a46a88f83e25
6ecdbf65fe53023241ea1dbb43c122e048adcce5
describe
'19183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFO' 'sip-files00029.pro'
4c71af8ab0cdc1d2bad2729523342498
745bd6ea32a49174f9b4a493e9fd84a9bd05a4f4
describe
'43479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFP' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
9d59edeb60ee52fd8ea0a455b38d32ec
3573494b17fde1599df93c279d20961ddbfb89bf
'2011-10-14T22:13:23-04:00'
describe
'2765576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFQ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
4665941a7886d9eaafd816ef9c577a3a
463c6f699c895b753e181121ffab27c52da3fc5c
'2011-10-14T22:15:50-04:00'
describe
'787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFR' 'sip-files00029.txt'
eade88b56c9d84ef1eca979af33e1704
d1c6465113f645213cb6f4912a5c1105cfd1b9e7
'2011-10-14T22:14:41-04:00'
describe
'15946' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFS' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
61a84be42630b8055fc60da59c59e5e3
b76456fc748cc81cb004db0aaad40e0695d02006
'2011-10-14T22:14:17-04:00'
describe
'354110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFT' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
33945ae1ef58c00b4bab5db97afbcee5
62b8ac150bcff4d8626165a89f2b550a70f47939
describe
'176840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFU' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
28ffb8b37fb3c8a395eee1504863b4a1
fcafc18a629f2c3533bd5988154e8d4c4e2f8851
'2011-10-14T22:13:57-04:00'
describe
'25452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFV' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2631ba513d4b1f3cf5de14b2f1e9315b
f0c07ee889609c9f80ba684c699ccd8845777150
'2011-10-14T22:14:52-04:00'
describe
'52517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFW' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
08373e728753c7c0902a84573514321f
0f52bbf541f5e6f62264662c11fae90dad311c07
describe
'2842344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFX' 'sip-files00030.tif'
aaea7287974aa790b98c8790719c2370
eb1558bd79eebfb699629a021edca769658be418
'2011-10-14T22:13:54-04:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFY' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8c61935b5f6d9a6c900e19fa00993f0d
31082d16d41a53b6f19c49ae8fd1f7f9384902be
'2011-10-14T22:12:52-04:00'
describe
'18941' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXFZ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
173231ed472ecb1af33cdabd7ab2cd25
71cf79847799e8e325bf6a8e8f14d2f0a30d9f1e
describe
'346974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGA' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e9c98cdd9bccd80f4594ca7f5b11278d
1edaeadb85215e1ba5e0d187fc806b6a5c7f7f3c
'2011-10-14T22:14:25-04:00'
describe
'198344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGB' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
fceebc71f981f660fed0155ad614ba2b
02824f7bef5be01c88ba34dc4554bba4f80fa8a5
describe
'40408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGC' 'sip-files00031.pro'
84705bf8df266e3a9fcb97f12380f373
c7df579c14fde342ffa64a564a4d69208521d578
'2011-10-14T22:13:24-04:00'
describe
'63346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGD' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
8fe126d7972be46f3cc4860c142db0f6
5e04d472bd0f197e7360d301db5d671375cb66b2
'2011-10-14T22:12:24-04:00'
describe
'2785584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGE' 'sip-files00031.tif'
ad40c2231eb84a6dde8ec2c36d2abd3b
799d013597d3d51f82f064d295cf30eafd59d386
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGF' 'sip-files00031.txt'
b0951bab139f3d7856e34030e8c80f68
4955e879bdf5c6f787de3f15abf5a08bb4f9dc77
'2011-10-14T22:13:25-04:00'
describe
'20483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGG' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d3418844f310e995c0d0bf2243e2be2a
153ddb7e96dbf72416cc8c132ee6d8110e07bada
'2011-10-14T22:14:13-04:00'
describe
'350834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGH' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
38babb16156e537421acdc6d04fe7066
f976b1cc1f4073b1499094c61205c957dab1d1ed
describe
'173566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGI' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
442a9d908f664463483ad55ddad123e0
44192baf1fb44a31a3ceff52688d03b96eed5878
describe
'23818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGJ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
81586913d778c0cd1147cb2516eb585c
bf8a29a3e67d3b3ab684567bba1c479e3b9409fd
'2011-10-14T22:16:38-04:00'
describe
'51150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGK' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e25a16bdcbe61383570c26f7782b3908
fb1d365b32a4e2423bd28c1e9be75c1fa2b68779
'2011-10-14T22:16:26-04:00'
describe
'2817168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGL' 'sip-files00032.tif'
26ec7560046133d5e30d7435d242c1e1
d7e18d99989199096597d9301b43056dff78ed86
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGM' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a58049538abef07b4c1663a028a74ef8
ec700d016d20d80609bb636681b3ba45d5043b5a
describe
'18355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGN' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
76f6fa5962de330bdbdf9e18429587af
1e0996a7efe6523d5460c0003e49fc8bd6f14112
'2011-10-14T22:12:21-04:00'
describe
'355380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGO' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
f6ac2ac51a7aa53912ac70d7e34ac3ca
9d3a3e5a056e9bab9abec3ec58f4608c2bbc914c
'2011-10-14T22:14:56-04:00'
describe
'220397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGP' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
6d574cd0f1747565bbe5eb36d515481d
8da4917454e133665ab8bd0f00cd6e87182ea12a
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGQ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
11426b61cfbd039de3658d1fce9cbd0d
2e2ce2780c8818d2f288d0b1ab27c429005d646b
describe
'54135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGR' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
5f8264fb549a34122b739ed8324bdd6c
0826981ac3aad289fcf16299b5b2204b9086c93b
describe
'2852240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGS' 'sip-files00033.tif'
af2936c23a3911dcb58b45cef77a3320
35929f4291c2120742c005afd23ecb49548ee890
'2011-10-14T22:14:46-04:00'
describe
'205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGT' 'sip-files00033.txt'
8e8adb8f020dd0d9cd68693e13d55f9f
054ce5d2ae6c11acdbfc2cb134642a723516dcb6
'2011-10-14T22:12:54-04:00'
describe
'18717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGU' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
f34976436885d684de36d0436270bd42
cf09d4cae9f35130f66f29e5fcd7445fd0db058c
describe
'354647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGV' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
a1d48c3bd46e5a09fd0ba5ed612f9c3f
60a1c02a879d61d6c96bddb862e876e9ebb0ebbd
describe
'57325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGW' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
9691a6a3fedc88af27d64e11ab5653ed
16dca5bfd5f52d8454edb3afeeb4692295d0cbf7
'2011-10-14T22:13:40-04:00'
describe
'12091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGX' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
1be6073c5ef721699c216b04c2db4df7
ec44bf6de117b847a9bbc94b51890e248bd74ba0
'2011-10-14T22:13:49-04:00'
describe
'2843688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
81563ffaaedf1890bc1af054b04b3095
b87b38d4646ef182fb67ec33b941557426c331e1
describe
'7731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXGZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
7efa0175fd6916ccafb7cbccf0b2bc89
0434e1ddc3b970fa31155d9637b5ed234d2c09aa
'2011-10-14T22:14:36-04:00'
describe
'341982' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
2c725ef2739234ddf02dcee8a3a430d8
29de2023f9a5bb5bf470cee19a962277ce8b464c
describe
'190283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
5d1677295ac992dcc5afb8586e7e275b
d70854552cc32fd80c89593f46205605f65bb6b7
'2011-10-14T22:14:40-04:00'
describe
'38092' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
d5259d8a9cf2c74e4cd87155aecb99e4
03339e2981db1bfe5e4f82cd1c9899d297252fcf
describe
'59806' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHD' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
9db73aaa4717527e030a16b39939558d
29f221865a846f04d6210142bb8eea4c523c631f
describe
'2745864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHE' 'sip-files00035.tif'
dc37be6a3b21fa8ca59fd58a4c24a760
7b9b2d4c2ad131dab40275e19d03de039cdfcc40
'2011-10-14T22:12:26-04:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHF' 'sip-files00035.txt'
8425fc753327f62effe7ede5ecba0714
45bb28e16c606dd82c4a1f82a474501dbf56e3a2
'2011-10-14T22:13:28-04:00'
describe
'20507' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHG' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
935987e5b4f6ec596bfd81d8212159b3
ecd384764caa60958c68ef48e9d56acc0b2e3a91
'2011-10-14T22:14:51-04:00'
describe
'351730' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
5c1f0b5b885e7a8fe959528d6b5e4cef
3100123a0434e4411d3be1d3742c21b3b407b1a1
describe
'138633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHI' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
51ad04afc52497e1d357682d321fae74
486b91f912ec1afa624458e6589b4bae7d2101b0
'2011-10-14T22:16:44-04:00'
describe
'17145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHJ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
28173cb73d4559504051755d85824bfd
fa46e4c11d8e706936d67569cd2abfb2d6790f0c
describe
'42046' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
9b9ed837dfc1be09cdac0fa04afb55f0
ed10de52d7280d7ec3621153cb8e439dc077e04b
describe
'2822624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHL' 'sip-files00036.tif'
2f79730736fc04f81d1f9c05348ae2d2
386c1609b81893b73bf7824c09e9b22265e4b12d
describe
'679' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHM' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6da59764765a2fe1436c65b356bf638b
ab8e31a8530dc0044d960aceeca1407b894d7cb9
'2011-10-14T22:15:19-04:00'
describe
'16203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHN' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
c0b244fc4d6863b2ddb9021a0b055fb3
224baa17c5db562b827ab53faa3f32490dd36fd2
describe
'338987' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHO' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
9cdc10a5959e890975f8509b3d044dae
984055f41814511cfe5ac502178ec8729f863ffb
describe
'199550' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHP' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
597e3b88c568b51b4a67d2b342e7ac0d
0151c2c674a97c6411d204428ebddbb5a4910e10
describe
'38212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHQ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
af470042361519c381377d6ab5acf624
ebfed5e49b1f972980eb10710b06f042db01229b
describe
'60758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHR' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
e3408c0351f43577e33aea0ab963e3ce
c8ef528bd65cff4a5583e0592637a9929d554252
'2011-10-14T22:15:00-04:00'
describe
'2721828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHS' 'sip-files00037.tif'
9dccc2265fda2bad74459c2e74c664aa
d20c1d982ef3fdac9fa740b9e94d026f5bcd134b
'2011-10-14T22:16:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHT' 'sip-files00037.txt'
a462795921e9604b7b1bb6f7a2400617
fd898443a1159e9732f2930e9f39f9f938e196ce
'2011-10-14T22:14:57-04:00'
describe
'21101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHU' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
f5d1b0cb1daab7a830936dc71172a68a
3107b4d0a9fb34fe40cfdbe58b38869cc616ede4
'2011-10-14T22:16:34-04:00'
describe
'340003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHV' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
46c3858ef6a6c8ecf2d8b8318ffc62c1
6221582d4ecb0481d8834abe54c46b808864e4d7
describe
'200098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHW' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
8622c8cb488d2646543341aaaeba2ad0
3ca26f78638eb3e8ba6503777fcc0601789d2628
'2011-10-14T22:16:00-04:00'
describe
'41170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHX' 'sip-files00038.pro'
737aa7d00fa4e5f983c580d9c9aeb627
f9d1707920cafe5088f51df1fda3638d8bafe367
describe
'64814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHY' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
4086ed5da610df8022a288aae5f7d4f8
48dbf1aa90382113a972a6898280e516f1708171
describe
'2730512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXHZ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
2af8730f059b9a74fb5761bd403cb763
2259b4ec5ed31304832cb581f26b61e79826fb44
'2011-10-14T22:14:02-04:00'
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIA' 'sip-files00038.txt'
3c1d89d5a7a64e7c97effda8ab4d0afd
bb7416591835a6a32b7dae39ba8519cde79e5605
describe
'20819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIB' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
f135a5e590c68589020da775195c58aa
d65e5093131f4b962d12982f9d1da9429b9f846a
'2011-10-14T22:16:21-04:00'
describe
'335727' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIC' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
9f94ac9abbf8cc3d6d7fdcf0ad60ce32
38f3a811219d98d6dfb501c232ea2cf944cfef45
'2011-10-14T22:13:07-04:00'
describe
'158574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXID' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
137da9c1951e595c3893bcc06aa11c18
b5e0d0a0791cd59597478b25126b260becd72653
describe
'20509' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIE' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f597852a0dbbff6cd6b84e7b425c7f0f
f8d8b4d1f01f25ec4cd329bc62aa107f2fe53c09
describe
'48435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIF' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
f4b6e61a4003c095be6829c7c201193e
c5b7effa255a72c5f859dde908641d3d90a1c99f
describe
'2694456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIG' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b99940396e033e855f2bbd2664acdaef
0303c7bb2cdd46885dd409d8727242c04449dd26
'2011-10-14T22:16:18-04:00'
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIH' 'sip-files00039.txt'
b973ac2987b9c6ac46e423fa8d1d7b15
3ea6787e327bcd1f9cd8b0347bc746a99bcb5670
describe
'17789' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXII' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
7baa6ab68686f30b445592472a879175
e58b02288504f57017bdd9be3bc396ccf8bd3302
'2011-10-14T22:12:27-04:00'
describe
'344970' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIJ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
e4a2ea335577dfeb0c9b7fd2cef40167
33e727fc515b63f7db5ea30dfa5e82b65b907634
describe
'152504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIK' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
68847be9d54915d5078d74d7c7c5b8f5
0630ef52ec9a08800f7295cebd7d1c41e9abb7ae
'2011-10-14T22:16:05-04:00'
describe
'22738' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIL' 'sip-files00040.pro'
415aa49583b373636f31aaadf50ef783
a489935377b0f032976988898ae488ff89995312
describe
'46567' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIM' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
65f2cd8a20b4ee186c8bb732e92580b4
d50cb467b060b1f429f146851835a348e48620a4
'2011-10-14T22:15:32-04:00'
describe
'2768500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIN' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d848a71197db5b58cdb002a9a3d7dc76
dc4d26a770eb507e5c47b9b4442ec19a5944dfe5
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIO' 'sip-files00040.txt'
cfc1b326a8ffbbb1b008488278f08ea2
427dc3903b4f4fdbae75c22d9d2a7365a4f0c64f
'2011-10-14T22:15:57-04:00'
describe
'17484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIP' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
712a71dd5f4c00a4ba6cf4369151d8b9
72d9b93d21cb1ad032ab2e427f4390f799ae148d
'2011-10-14T22:14:35-04:00'
describe
'342788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIQ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
1ed38eeb4d0944bac86ee18e62be3233
ed10003c06485092f8c446b5eee1d798155a59e2
describe
'193513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIR' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
6adb0b3a83a90f3724bad7ec288ec339
88198ae4681463177b2a5f7fbafe0decc35a5972
describe
'38847' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIS' 'sip-files00041.pro'
3735a7866626df4c497fa666033b4389
0cad430effc0da71f424b060ce8b756c816a3d74
describe
'60459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIT' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c63b51e75221a1500dcdfc513df883e4
f560fb73ab752458d6b4347cd22f80266068d69b
describe
'2752148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIU' 'sip-files00041.tif'
adf7032adc8d282c0b29d51f4867e68d
ec20807c0c276262b30d91a12479d981be866eef
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIV' 'sip-files00041.txt'
3444c2a8c046bbd938042ae56cd3bcf9
dbc001633f3a86122188105c07dcd91887a54a6f
describe
'20191' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIW' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
34436d886378bba8f943a09c1e203f57
cfd7e4a2ceaec9b248889b3a0086218e0021f1ca
describe
'345151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIX' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
c63a800d6a1da03b885a10b5b11851ab
7d644b3ad934c58935f3c5156ec37e1cb9bc462f
describe
'177946' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIY' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
53ae7dd6f30044b9555177f24faac332
f07a9781b55c2253f611a2f81448b1b325be3890
describe
'35890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXIZ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
2344a6213e30bdb987ba321556757c60
fff6a5b55c451a278cd42e25eae20c0b4aa60dce
'2011-10-14T22:14:49-04:00'
describe
'57814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJA' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
04ddc33105b3bbd7033cfdab8a04973e
5113747e25b233b6ce6c41be2c96296fc5ae54e6
describe
'2770796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJB' 'sip-files00042.tif'
55c5401186856339195bb933cb5292db
f72d14b45db6df40006d74d8782eb2de8cb7b5ee
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJC' 'sip-files00042.txt'
fb99dc2b84b4d1f2bcb2c4317c81d8f1
a9ceb87322898d147113479a3f7d83177a10a3e7
describe
'20141' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJD' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
8443f5ebdf7c1a164127ae8bc4d4fabd
a9da32bab7add7fd5274ed406b2af079c8cacf54
'2011-10-14T22:13:48-04:00'
describe
'339437' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJE' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
0f8c9554b502e310fcba4009727fc5e7
358950224af14aac93dd4d49c91fd9744fca3dbf
'2011-10-14T22:15:16-04:00'
describe
'190264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJF' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
548c1f7cca3a30d5ba16f47105b9fc92
533b00512d91fbb80fa2b2d36528ca90eaf3eb8f
'2011-10-14T22:15:55-04:00'
describe
'39942' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJG' 'sip-files00043.pro'
c550aae550aa1f0161c9cbe1b5826547
03becfc60c8de739e52577703c1bbb5c2d879d5f
'2011-10-14T22:12:43-04:00'
describe
'62479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJH' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
2403ddad48c5ab869d5a9df0fe50d703
18ffd71aaa0e763c98aac795a71724e32f06b9b7
describe
'2725112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJI' 'sip-files00043.tif'
68c8762dda27da5b5238dd535605c20b
9b2e596644bc522d813e7876aff148734ad85c32
'2011-10-14T22:13:31-04:00'
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJJ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
083eca248409132ce1a9799fd7eaea9d
3807d76bb85235111616749710d9363bc7048391
describe
'20735' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJK' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
69eff6aa9e5869ef8bca69e24211a626
b25ad15355ac3f3cc8e1ec508745c8492b448f30
'2011-10-14T22:15:37-04:00'
describe
'334149' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJL' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
5b2d62e8ac49e792422786327b6ff7c2
6c3381bdd748df3911f4814a5d4480072980f4fc
describe
'196840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJM' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
5204f9032db7cfdf834712253d20f3aa
3a206dbe15570fd0c2c02bfa1faa02ba0e428a2e
describe
'39634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJN' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b15cfb17adedd30b55aed6772bf2e959
8babb03370d30ec58f0311e3b097aaf6523f4198
'2011-10-14T22:14:12-04:00'
describe
'62014' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJO' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
af42e3bc812f6c9c2b3c2440e03e6128
4bea54c23134bf3f83b7fe22d29c2f83c89019a1
describe
'2682404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJP' 'sip-files00044.tif'
32eed7c4c272c19dc7321d1c5650332d
86416afb15cb8c4259f966cbd8bd1d9623b0d2a9
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJQ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
2a3153bd0ac15772f17725169e5aff29
98e0ed2cd6d06cb255b4698aa5cf104600cc5e95
describe
'20656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJR' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
3eb3ff94a2d26efa6165efd8cc4842f9
394be8f8ce321eeb5a787da591a82851f24cb607
describe
'357388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJS' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
42a5b67fad3557b85d60db47b649b894
f2d027205b3bdae4cc161795417d1d65d5c9aae3
describe
'183405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJT' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
d0da446a820fd6b4917849abac850fa4
19d4aa24af1e273451ea71ef39ce5dc6f5873ef9
describe
'37786' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJU' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c26d5a43de341e0721592a9ce4a1a7af
6cab144c368e930eda5695c2da76afe275d411b5
describe
'57485' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJV' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d86d529c0bd28536db6494b49ec9f464
5e515b55123d8cbc21f0f9b96b5a64b59b60525a
describe
'2868488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJW' 'sip-files00045.tif'
ce317fc60dfddf809da8dd62c19fc895
f1f3527a67116620092546ee8037af114d111d62
'2011-10-14T22:13:02-04:00'
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJX' 'sip-files00045.txt'
e144a37276ea89d4ebf8e8eba7e7ebfd
9ffdaad6ccc33d34746d8865bf01e688dc7a1493
describe
'19410' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJY' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
03e145cf721c84b87af37a970c3e0f71
495f0d0da7f4cbf499a17c29eb35894e97e624d9
'2011-10-14T22:16:50-04:00'
describe
'359041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXJZ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
8aed65efe4d3e219d3cba775d248d8c9
025c3d6a96a242bbcec6f511526c4e11e07c9c70
describe
'184301' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKA' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
10d57df06f82e116028c4bc67e6d4e6f
cc160e6e54adea75bcf7308c0b10a9f9dde0e302
describe
'38896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKB' 'sip-files00046.pro'
445d0f14629d013042995a09c2fb0d8f
bcc6ba2969e45494a4cfa43148a8b2f915c9f9d1
describe
'59840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKC' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
625a934822c15da48df85c7993cbd57f
9d54632d3d304e2558628ea743e55b5062b6e3f5
describe
'2881836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKD' 'sip-files00046.tif'
235c315016546c19c6286c79476dd573
10fed2aa9d78e21462985c65b55b6e79591a382a
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKE' 'sip-files00046.txt'
b449a840e032bed689bff04a3cf3db27
cb6b9431624b3bd4717961b8a2963991b2635369
describe
'20024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
b0cad0542fb1a015278311d50fea9f5a
3347d75726edc3599cb1dac424080d7257bb9888
describe
'347606' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKG' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
4c7e0de2c4b44670d4e2137a1f1d17dc
e45e24109b8135c6df401e8bef3ed7e36f64979a
describe
'215805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKH' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
c184dcea246d43d54d1cbcc393eaba48
f9e9f644dbc173ffc9e6ee28bae4547f9cbc3c4a
'2011-10-14T22:15:25-04:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKI' 'sip-files00047.pro'
a70424f71382a77dfbe7d0200f8191a9
5be5b1cdb42042bcc1fe40cd26b3953c6d5d8fe2
describe
'53265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKJ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
dfc5e5bbceb186d20615118b0ee8c19c
e52ba8e6119db67570b62cbf98d1a1551cf86ee5
describe
'2792904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKK' 'sip-files00047.tif'
08345c2e59879357299380c6a003d5bb
4a60f548d643b33b38f5fcafd255bea367b20677
describe
'174' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKL' 'sip-files00047.txt'
bd5eaf0158366461d3d15632e43285dc
f023f64d46686b72a9a133c47814761534eeb7b3
'2011-10-14T22:16:08-04:00'
describe
'18988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKM' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
5eb49cff9bd55eac9a15a57d1dd52a8d
5f95385acce54ed433ceaa28e7d61ff5ae2a4b30
describe
'361409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKN' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
d79372bc838f8c0ce113b72c434a9460
e65a791ffc677f908866bd9a45144192754932b6
describe
'60645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKO' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
803d4a8472b7241ed0f2668aae0292c2
a17e7a3685c68020f584d5eb5382a626a0ee88de
describe
'12656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
8c077508b580f28411a7721a3d2d8128
9d1bb68c312c38c12a4da920f1b8a0cafe928330
describe
'2899164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKQ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
dde2f2e0a203fe01ac0f60052d2f6a4b
c7dd04920cf48a938f7385c0fb8a01322df816e2
describe
'7877' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKR' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
efe177b56d35331190051142080f9ae4
c453ecf6a2f166688ae474088b7ede6cbc82a86d
describe
'344906' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKS' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
ec7a3a3a5bb668454e62b774025f2eb8
1c1b591326a2a4896eda235b43dbb00cc58ed9bb
describe
'193765' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKT' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
bec70004d0b1d1c3a8040fb10ac6e2fb
0947da0ec4fc2a718a611628078059d3f7d9cb94
describe
'39486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKU' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c8c5cbd954229304c227dea8ccc003f2
ba254bc1d2fa5d6c57a811c32c3450a45109a2f5
describe
'62217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKV' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
6f45c7a839a4efc07e62c37d1c1c44cb
2742dfc14fbbe9413a67dd1995c7460feb80a163
'2011-10-14T22:16:43-04:00'
describe
'2768840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKW' 'sip-files00049.tif'
0f68947c5fc81b63e6a8dcbbfcf88687
ae4ea03fafbf5427382314970ca7ea4f5112f620
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0f6498ad62d096b2939c1dc29623eb47
ca5d9e47d184dbd9f0a45b7d259808fb5505a1a2
describe
'20361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKY' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
45ac7446419ffb3caad0846b800cc594
b6acc9a00bbb5cfe4b389572680c68d7fe479c86
describe
'356408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXKZ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b604d9f56448243953b0c7dba52f20c3
d6105cd09b58feb623e6125b7cbdf028aedde7dd
describe
'190007' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLA' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
49b766e53c19455b8cdb963ff03e1650
6f27818822cc59c58b488424f1833968e325cf3c
'2011-10-14T22:16:19-04:00'
describe
'38142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLB' 'sip-files00050.pro'
edd716a28b5b1a3638e8135516a29472
edab9721c5c4a7e86bf19f5d1bbb516bba4d7984
describe
'59677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLC' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
1f32125a2a79eb2d4ccb06d2c8bc7edc
1a47cbf8b20f04c529fcd653598ee843f2c2bddc
describe
'2860832' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLD' 'sip-files00050.tif'
62b4d2cc43efbbeed3dedab8a3fa222b
51c5720dcce9a1f8e8c78c4965c94df131917856
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLE' 'sip-files00050.txt'
6885ff5a3149a8d85e8c279570b78363
a770fe23c1e8ae6a400d5e8452923b60e76e538f
describe
'19903' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLF' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
39703c65ee8c226161ed7729189c67fa
9ad6891a26cd51dc60a646e10e6429757a7e8571
'2011-10-14T22:12:53-04:00'
describe
'355304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
a79e65a38140c35e1294497c76f7dad1
ed9b8defe71d46e0af66622f25dcd214d07db263
'2011-10-14T22:12:16-04:00'
describe
'229022' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
8c20bdb68d60458d380b9fb7b7ae800b
37b91f529bdf8e7abf8e3d0aa3f016a9bc8a2c7f
describe
'841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLI' 'sip-files00051.pro'
fc600b42140d7c9d45f46d2d939fa0aa
5ac476d5e3180f7bb97c17c04dd6025778ca5db6
'2011-10-14T22:15:31-04:00'
describe
'55150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ca10022085eccb3dbaab77522718dd74
51bd3bd0f66316082b37def0a1563d6c5d6c0066
'2011-10-14T22:14:47-04:00'
describe
'2851508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLK' 'sip-files00051.tif'
ea905cf64a612e996f2eb6a1919632ef
d6d3a1b258ca2f601a869e0fc77e4dc35d3700de
describe
'176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLL' 'sip-files00051.txt'
76a03a5b45a5f7da9cad8491fb70c56b
5e870b2be00faf393733a1aa7e6c1dacddad04c6
describe
'19267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLM' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
f84c28924259688d2269686e99b0fe87
56eb8731b7de2033c5fc73e6ad2b7880689d1f01
describe
'347967' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLN' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
bcd141c5e4d16b55af2ceb9862dc76fe
61db792368f9a56daf80496a27208df701dc00bb
'2011-10-14T22:12:28-04:00'
describe
'62248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLO' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
bf3d1257b5d6f87785af6229ea9731d2
e2159731a1d725ce1c424546ebbcbac3411deb14
'2011-10-14T22:14:59-04:00'
describe
'12746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLP' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
bd921c60286c964e5c79bcb0e2aa86e9
324f5bfab323613556917427f51ca05109904c65
describe
'2793212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e9b23eb5358558735ed1173f54b92f74
070e9b505fba5c609d976a79c9bea4712934e319
describe
'7954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
b756ed27c873d5f3d6dbb3d4b056abb3
364ac4635c3b33b08eb5338363ab1783f0852376
describe
'330484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
5d515600f731a85f45240f41b6877402
d91ce1eb90254e6654d848cf655ea060408f91a2
describe
'190111' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
afa5781d3254c786fa9ce6f640207769
db216d97722b9d04080e1e79224502836e370590
'2011-10-14T22:16:46-04:00'
describe
'35880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
559d942c7df1086b072bcbf4bef50bd6
bbdf5788bd28cd4f2733e426b4b0bae511cc5109
describe
'59170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
46ebc4a216fe22d9d86c76c8204c6d2e
98d8d7d54be09a08a1b921ba414e35356dab544f
describe
'2653524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
7367a18016e170692089a9df832bac71
54475cfe463aa241a76695063405eb8dc13ac3e1
'2011-10-14T22:13:55-04:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
bb891f435eff49a34f76ea199077eb52
2327d7ec7677b6392b2b14c5efb655ac30254be6
'2011-10-14T22:15:52-04:00'
describe
'21474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c49b72a5049d28bfbc0cb288dee1ee9d
39878bbce52477200a39b8ee5065510b174801a5
describe
'337933' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXLZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
9a2596940d3a7ba687ff9f7f2fb4217d
4d325124c37204dddf3a7c8a7c36bf5c2e5a7045
'2011-10-14T22:15:43-04:00'
describe
'192676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
07272564eccb389cfb27929e96103fae
ae316e4875a5f9cf39584f801398fd5be9efbace
'2011-10-14T22:15:15-04:00'
describe
'38950' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
ebddbd763f594b4923236aecbbb0d55e
8a93658d4fc6035a840c2c7c486a7ebdf5f68e0b
describe
'60884' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
04ccfeb9598fdf962f84da8bc704a341
c3eee31e1f4f1d43123e0bdcd2b901e2aa542c03
describe
'2713692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
4b2a488a32315067f9eb5b38fb6005f2
e5aafb76d6948c7a72dc8647680ce64966633045
'2011-10-14T22:12:55-04:00'
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXME' 'sip-files00054.txt'
51687e058b4db560efd9518abb773b4a
6dc58b4fa30e9d7818814b1654b47d9220942b54
describe
'21168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
3f29de858a981f214dcb91b4e9614de1
3272cf96b107323b9dcf9c5fe39da9e0bbf07c6d
describe
'340551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
51c86cf7af325029269ae757786cabdc
6d83c10fbf0e24af6a2bda83557b5be924e3f5b4
describe
'168341' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
512271ce9e40c75da10285d4219f2791
0fa7be21f3374c97b7ac8b00a704af31af52e576
'2011-10-14T22:13:08-04:00'
describe
'16078' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMI' 'sip-files00055.pro'
41531d49321559979f7f8b3374019c4e
cad27a79f7c22185303922d4aa1b09bdcaf84e04
'2011-10-14T22:14:50-04:00'
describe
'48064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
3ea137afd86d2c53cd0d96db3d5e9ad6
98953e8d7b503db2e2f109b6b8e173ae87697231
describe
'2733652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
ca8ad55d792686ceb249fdee51fd1509
16d83ea7173ed81683c16cf0da796e55e8591349
describe
'664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXML' 'sip-files00055.txt'
0e8ea46d9171e073834092b6c17739f4
26dd09db24b3dc695538f4a3a4e87635606049b9
describe
'18247' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
017d8d85421601126324e71f8710e0ef
a2b739d015a3f2c6baf562c5ecf2d267f647809c
describe
'344618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
78368e1ba1877d1af2f676bda5abb0fd
041d96878f69d798714c0b6f7172649084caa694
describe
'178980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
e32b3c5bbc6a642827f6884ddb3f84bd
b5b6c00c6a73b04088aac0303420994a0d260116
describe
'23313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
85280a37c33cb6bcd9292391c3fd0a2e
f15ddde9362bdb9893b96e0c276db3e9947865bf
'2011-10-14T22:12:20-04:00'
describe
'54142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
9347ebe176fa8d369d0354e4c0cbf496
ad0f0ca6133294fc441e7f1ab23fc68119fb96ec
describe
'2766468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
9358b8c67eb2223edbc3a4d7760cbbbc
ebdd99a6a38710ab37d8f6a19a79ae63f4fbcf44
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
de39622ad899d95432ea7774ff7c7c8c
9773b9e8268414b00a54012fcb7a506a0207f47e
'2011-10-14T22:12:23-04:00'
describe
'19544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
b9ca0b67d323790746fbe2707972bdde
66d97d687234de4cb6fb0e58d1a12d418ff4aea0
describe
'349287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
088ca955c7034bdcc49f47e2239e2861
179585e691d3cc9b69f961248fe1029939d2ca56
describe
'187766' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
964813e4362d5e0ea9755efc64b643d6
ab6cacc1a725dfb53579dbb5f2772f8410bbb96a
describe
'37598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
5b027f6c9cee65619fdce6866328b635
bca67e641479a3dd7d785ac001e53dc62341a7f1
'2011-10-14T22:14:10-04:00'
describe
'58373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
b73b8fa0c29b1cd44a55b812aeeb044e
8883707ee47e34860867f8cf20ffadc0fd3126d6
describe
'2803400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
a7b8dd1357c21fd0455205c84d77e072
94a1cdef61e0e1c5b67a5ea57b7da87ca870de5a
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXMZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
36e1ebe888f13e6bd1fd297a494c2c42
fdecec4257be410f634c3860c6bbd0f1df397301
'2011-10-14T22:13:39-04:00'
describe
'20067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
99664e664f6c651f18f9c4716d18eeb0
f012c0bce133870bfdb3ffe4f9c1c940c6f0fe48
describe
'340869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
b810ee3f4a217fa433a9a213f0054f8e
5c6c04a012e20853d07d020ded135391d6917b25
'2011-10-14T22:14:33-04:00'
describe
'192001' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
36caa44af9029bc7d8856dc580eb7d51
52a0c7947b4d80ac692c8f06c20b24ca59ed2322
'2011-10-14T22:12:47-04:00'
describe
'39369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXND' 'sip-files00058.pro'
574e4fbbb479d28811d658bd29b268a2
3e0cb446b69751d55d790cb8827fc4e3cd33be7d
describe
'62140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
173b59fa0adb33ab9e1e1f259755d85b
b62820dfdb345b7339feb3150402219369624bdf
'2011-10-14T22:15:46-04:00'
describe
'2737260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
2a0ecd3e8818a319b5401550b6cfe179
ba3c82d49e799af722eda9134e9490c55e81d49d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
607e43ef5389f60e5ae0661eed2e95ad
c346f8786872a2542432e2dc7a2368b292c94eb6
describe
'20836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
7b054e258b6831ef4c6e5978c9afffb1
96b04a5a88c69956b851a122ba44c6fe5afb7b44
'2011-10-14T22:13:32-04:00'
describe
'346306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
c6bdbc94ec637394f9e7d444de05d317
e2bd3a044d069742eb3d7f9031dedf4640c53ef4
describe
'186283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
44ea9c41e229ad0b34cdfc03de3a748a
1f0e83751b30e0b60addf5c4a8893d90746c2a24
describe
'38854' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
0b789c735f1b22433c7435588b014f92
a4430dcdcec3bf2a09957e813c9cb5b45ea3f025
describe
'60798' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
ea6b679ab804e741f2bac2b922bb8127
7f0d4fd2fd81526be2489d9b2b604bed2613d6b0
describe
'2780336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a6abeec92c33f9f8eaec1fe2f29178c4
87fb82729e8d0d109b7917eef7d6474ae601acc5
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
aa7d121c794f66a735c7f26eec89c588
fb65add0dbe99e51da162dc93f9f4569b34040a4
describe
'20902' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
e86cba5e369895582595f1ed5a99de4e
cbe8b98709697bc604a971aa3b2c4494437572de
describe
'336092' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
b92f7ceb7880c024b439b43d3fe527c5
33e6395875c68a9c6308395258cf4f8fe373fbc6
describe
'204335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f0475d5b3e95adb4d531aa426a3c56d4
d988e0d4a65236f6409cc39e9271aa411fb84728
describe
'39134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNR' 'sip-files00060.pro'
155502ccae65fffbb13740845152b381
0ba8b4d255a39834e30d9fb3d4db7dde64ef3c6e
describe
'64483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
72cce3bd9ed689e2e086a11557cf5930
75eb6bec377e0a3c4da7ada46aef929c3c65237d
describe
'2698052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
317e49611fa1d241c0ce24314a66854c
d849a246a947e9016055990b28124b6de8249a1f
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNU' 'sip-files00060.txt'
a776a483083443ec88c914713fd54ecf
f4ae36277a0d3d837160269840f4aa5beb78083e
'2011-10-14T22:12:39-04:00'
describe
'21646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
4efa1f36a9c2abf45aed150a21e514d2
ecbe458cf08cfa0148057846a34009794f162394
describe
'352441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
0095dbf766fe122364fe6873c3f10b3a
d62305c53831d309a5faaaa1187364de9ea36f4c
describe
'199888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e259989045d6eab4dca399b1bdb880af
8acd1011a1b2b4b55beb57e17d27c4c593ae5d9c
describe
'38305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
0648cf8c0bb8207f5d5c78777d91b997
3bc3af388891842d749e736614fbe0fb7ad9babd
describe
'61092' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXNZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
4f56b8f0b99630b6b1e4545c09ad0ab3
bb942bfe9530fd95ae8349b4b680e88bc6879bcd
describe
'2830244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
1c637c58a974a4825af456b254541a9f
b9046a9c819f7eec618d4b1991403e233547fc46
'2011-10-14T22:14:26-04:00'
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
0c9c56b6e79dbd5abc35a49439d92d6f
21d01dc65a156f89295cb2a66b9f1adc68e65aa0
describe
'20452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
76f29de589ffd9ac6a7ec3debfa0d208
160c4a3a32e56cde636ca6ebf3f66f024534cc2c
describe
'354009' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
dba4ef270cb2e8af163410f17937c89e
e64dfff07b983f449d98cccf189df5301ae4064b
'2011-10-14T22:14:38-04:00'
describe
'191491' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
55073496e00321d48a06845668b9f8b0
83e479372d3624bc64d758bfb8423772ef4765ff
'2011-10-14T22:15:26-04:00'
describe
'39740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
4fc838fdce16f303f543cca13bedb3e6
4d25a93845be41c4efd7eb034fbacfd566d44f72
describe
'61767' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
68cf92a24167e5e3765935484b0e0ae9
692c39712a073504e65261d96b8f333e3a72ec16
describe
'2842688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
d0b80d89ffc33df082cf86ddfa158d15
bbd60ef35cdfdc14b33411d87104b61f8e315507
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f32aad43cd8b99cfd168fc3f215646f1
c3a99900454ec948ad7fce93c00b2e937a8b6376
describe
'20574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
5ff7ad6cbe2cf9d0fda744005c92600a
0ac99dbd1a74121af000808d5044fbc72df99c3a
'2011-10-14T22:16:20-04:00'
describe
'352824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
2ffc2a1549769da8f8df3dd2e955447e
5314732ccb2bc5710e4c516cc7d09e4f86db94c4
describe
'93217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
2bcd8d6b35ac34b7c98f0bf45298afdb
ca1088d88d74e5d45145a4bd1c8aa7f19df8d7ae
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
7d8fff69bd480c41c974c0c4dfa79829
116bac0a32aafcba2bb28190989b7574d999e86b
describe
'27991' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXON' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
64d0afb7c96c864a72d2a227fe6015e9
74976bdeee9491e2987633236488427be020d3e1
describe
'2833880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
5e252a132565ebeab4a752cdf13db5f7
4470fbe4524fddbd84799a5c3e2e54b6fd015d90
'2011-10-14T22:16:30-04:00'
describe
'120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
fe388bfa378082d93dbabf2a6cdcd1d6
f16460c9354fb3fcabaed5a6b6275f255a8dd762
describe
'13913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
b5adcefa8f54b22fc9795332190b209e
5e5ad6a8fb4af7ce90c7dc1a83810808c8b93205
describe
'337859' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
41cb5790c535eddc495aec087cbbf925
c3b6bc6aacbc509795f7ba1caabeca71e0b7bd45
describe
'60583' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
34d6a76ca48aaf2d39c334c8f06b32de
db196708d2d2b9e359a629188e27e1a6932e4638
describe
'12843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
7ebc685defd5b06aff9bf352ea9def10
4353d7f953682bcd795e7b02821eb98dc2fd3e44
describe
'2711456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOU' 'sip-files00064.tif'
43f47fb8176cd589a3863334ce894007
74647948fc74b5bb5ff5756eab2038d55ee5e448
describe
'8071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOV' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
837edb96b651d1120569c554f0eeb934
de74312791ddd72dd10f8e906fbf3e9f3a5bf512
'2011-10-14T22:15:07-04:00'
describe
'338115' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOW' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
7225161114e30ae5c1c1a67f49bec878
da5560d4c64ee75beb154e50bedeb5be98664025
describe
'195317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOX' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
cf5dadb1f75db65b727b286f891572a7
997c2349a57a5158358033f32579ff0820350c65
describe
'39328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOY' 'sip-files00065.pro'
1d58ec22c4312d5a47d29f56b1a24469
d72f05b42e7c38455f4d5498ee0677f6d5eaa5cd
describe
'63794' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXOZ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
36c9b2c76fae50d8eed3163d8d454d44
9abfe89a76d5ab3ab9cdb2bbfb1a13a7959cbc9e
describe
'2715528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPA' 'sip-files00065.tif'
b957c81590ea8d4b90bd93479d0120f9
e93587b81ce5b0f928c582225d86ed4666591ef5
'2011-10-14T22:15:58-04:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPB' 'sip-files00065.txt'
7a04e3319764511ba8fb7833ebdc7a55
a8578dd985fd37f6ae681f843b50411b2b83bb80
describe
'21441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPC' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
8d2bd04514f749142f943c09850cb00f
76bd6c82beb6953637ad617d0b0bd75c8bd9161b
describe
'358524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPD' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
5b54b3c53a5645700cc3923fda389a45
263433f42a64a5a03730583ed4df81bca7c51c39
describe
'189242' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPE' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
643366188e6b9886ab6bacce1288c49b
b74e2b1954b425d48ca66a22fdd563c5751492e9
describe
'36650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPF' 'sip-files00066.pro'
979fce41a32fb5af9e6d09b4aee8d303
ce465fa964840f07fd331ca1b73de0e0b1ac1ad8
'2011-10-14T22:14:01-04:00'
describe
'58224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPG' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
bb9f395828a8448dbc4806a9dbbcdd73
7193a20b6a5cbed715ce01a3214f1372409c3472
describe
'2877976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPH' 'sip-files00066.tif'
6c22754e90b5593cd329c7423a4a831e
53cd99fe77b6c452cede58ccd9b969b12a7b1648
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPI' 'sip-files00066.txt'
8e1e43470496cf729ba268d7455389a0
da0fc44a6d158ad47898eb52442e50f019462d5d
'2011-10-14T22:12:46-04:00'
describe
'20226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPJ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
2a0275f8317fdde788b353fc0e9654a1
c546dcb55127233598a9a73395fbfc474bd12d2e
describe
'348359' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPK' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
f0069b5bcd9e1c43d6dd9fd307edf434
07db26912d7286e50b578f14da6c4e80d52c351a
describe
'207439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPL' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
3e92950f42f18ea209aabb06456e0fc2
1801ca651bd08d3da8db1c81a2aeec8d2aafc960
'2011-10-14T22:16:16-04:00'
describe
'11039' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPM' 'sip-files00067.pro'
a3227db4018f6f4479b53f0b2529776d
84bc16a71c502085eda86811f4f4199d42207f5e
describe
'54225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d6f14e797b78337c0a345ba243c8dce1
00a6af330b48ca82fd533e6867b1f09e74e4fce6
describe
'2797892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPO' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f483cc740d5061df5f982185463258d6
9528387382065f1e150fcfdbbcdda100ca4169b7
describe
'494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPP' 'sip-files00067.txt'
7020f712629e7db8b7e0d6646fe0dc63
757f71f3be78ca894dffc78e19ee029329cec109
describe
Invalid character
'19915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPQ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e0d8e8887be6eaa76c82e877a7b3f87d
94e5ecd90db642ec9d85fb1afd4ed877cef71d66
describe
'334682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
25698686feb96ad1338da51519816cd9
d3d0da2a9bddd13c0469e9a74d447a38bc75fe76
describe
'195691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
d380d43faef80f10e231e498feb4330f
337715ff40853ae3d6a98555aa2782c142a5107f
describe
'36941' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
f24dbafeb443133fdaa8aa4f8dbc0a3d
4f41c3f2a86271ed4ea5bbce260f67f13166aadf
describe
'61688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPU' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
cacea45a3f0b4f384ec9a7f640f2349f
adfcd5debdd711f75be7c23c968997e7dd92561c
'2011-10-14T22:13:05-04:00'
describe
'2686952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
be7a36b3782c93896c89679ebda477c0
b73b0ef6da7a769f3bc7b39d09c4187af16f2a70
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPW' 'sip-files00068.txt'
3973c67851898bebc4b383fa3fb58108
103202094a0d7b8656dc406a05e69ed5549abadd
describe
'22044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
36421325a20b9abf1395007e10a61682
fcb0834905b8d8c1ac3c2ee72a863273849764f2
describe
'353845' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
7ef42b7abb2b65ddc3d9a02ee396e4c5
1ffac1120a77cfecb71496d3fd3640b44bb93378
describe
'206124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXPZ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a0ae31fb13ef352b6196fdf0ec28eaec
ac0802dea18a7cbd5ecab5cbe394d4f3152506c2
'2011-10-14T22:15:27-04:00'
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQA' 'sip-files00069.pro'
f9a46adc995add96dd962735a1b27049
152d7971ef976cbadf23d3bdc511ab3f1d6284d2
describe
'52321' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQB' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
68d3414ad954e72b0662d42751407eaf
3573fdab3bcb432f0fe0584c328de54c0b98f2e8
describe
'2840040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
580c2b11937554539463801f92404a0d
066bfb2619136340f85ba3b38f577868b4df7332
describe
'54' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQD' 'sip-files00069.txt'
346ac7eb9194100e237a3b347b130539
8895b7e82a25a6f3a9b8648ee21f4756d5dab4fd
describe
'19540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQE' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
8351eba60752e31b08215b92154a113c
6c44580de0611d1c31efe6e76778c69702a068d5
describe
'354190' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQF' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
a32f8595b96df3a62a04dc95d368b26b
4be2d4a252633a3f366dfcff41db5ebd2de582bf
describe
'69556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQG' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
6c5afbfd4594265cd62df93046e31151
3492aa16dddd4a94b5597b8df383521833a00fe5
describe
'14294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQH' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
7fa13b05b1e77140ccc832b621f227ff
a101522f2d66661cd0b8defde5fcb580f5dce805
describe
'2840764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQI' 'sip-files00070.tif'
7bfdda5e9cf5b8ac03e9d00b53072b2d
efde955e25ef0fb7d7054d996f11318135d89a1c
describe
'8315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQJ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
5d7e7bb3485b8a8719df36ea50584ea7
e2017df59148e4c59253a01b8dab97035ae44643
describe
'353311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQK' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
e751b1b289435e8bea21a0da5f7a5727
803cd394083f82f621ef721641f5747ce19c2d66
describe
'191652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQL' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
93f50553666f65f6a898346c533eaeba
2030167933e98814886b24ad32f3639770734e4e
describe
'36896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQM' 'sip-files00071.pro'
bb48556f8ef491c53996061de73b1466
440bca6fac373b9ae21413f69a2e1caaa08e813f
describe
'58743' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQN' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
54a2858ef251653c005737ac54e72e5a
def3bd57cb8952a46026450756c6373c8762ce95
describe
'2836352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQO' 'sip-files00071.tif'
7e59e9b2571c511797550b4cf73ca71c
e89b8a586c80bd7a115246b403f14b381bcfd71a
'2011-10-14T22:13:59-04:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQP' 'sip-files00071.txt'
2f872b5ca6569f84d261ac53c619a801
f22f880309d58404db3b385f978bd3f38db76814
describe
'20057' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQQ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
f7353223033cc0c70e7fbbcb0ad72b48
66277aab55f4a8a63722928095e367e607a3893f
describe
'346786' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQR' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
b98be5d6c391872aec4c2646c263a234
ae83abce08a6c0597cb405a61202b72eb5bbaa57
describe
'219202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQS' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
ca7ccdb6608040e36f16eda0237e525a
3c9797d8ba0064b594ff0002ac831e8967b8509f
describe
'13633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQT' 'sip-files00072.pro'
154470bf0d5abe22fd3425baa7a99dae
fcb40115d4e040c713a03e79108b817e7f849224
describe
'56182' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQU' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
6ae5041d5bc39ae7c12b824f7b75a15c
7d7d2bd3989ecde6ba619e040fac206c5d9e0806
describe
'2783484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQV' 'sip-files00072.tif'
30652214951fdc2c9950b5e47d0b2369
7324b84f4879f6c226796b37a05756bec0baec17
describe
'648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQW' 'sip-files00072.txt'
3a3bd2c1f851bfde16e042967bcf16c0
f01ccad6abfe266b73198827864f85ad2fc9c070
describe
'20178' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQX' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
7bc3b291df8bac2822242471626291e5
ab5a60d60056f05d634eb9c8e8c9359062ce6be8
describe
'345704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQY' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
3358a37cc872f37f2f54d6c91120a991
822b700ab7fcf67a2b417610efda37ec11ce3dcc
describe
'187215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXQZ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
ade1fe5c328cacd60865c3a9f0f92084
7ce5ad6930b8f7c91fe007b78ef937556a4d6dd0
describe
'39039' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRA' 'sip-files00073.pro'
935cbc300f5a7c0d4e7bcb3f892dc891
83673e59ab230c6c3757dd68ac54fb24fdf3f695
describe
'60655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRB' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
9a1c3a9e55d21394beab38f40568a790
c0e853873fc38ef08c129533c26aff183c26cd86
describe
'2774908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRC' 'sip-files00073.tif'
17c8b0c9267542fe8c8757f385e4dfa2
968cbad65ca1835e68274da7b60d6cfd5c59bf71
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRD' 'sip-files00073.txt'
c5192bfbba9568a54bfa6e6a3dbaf992
f9740d994df6a8fb52d35e8e6fe0f33d39cfd3e3
describe
'20956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRE' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
c5e95a6be4946cb2ae21925eac83021d
a1d8f2f12e61ab4f514c140f081740b4ad9e5970
'2011-10-14T22:12:40-04:00'
describe
'347799' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRF' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
1d9fd81f290c2b54833230ba1dfc289e
2401ce4f2052de32238d79a7f733b7bd1ef1aad2
describe
'188717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRG' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
8ebead7419e235ab4e552313990f4ebe
98d2bdf2ffe909f1cbd5dbc85f464befa8a6f40a
describe
'25170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRH' 'sip-files00074.pro'
fd0e31155cf73a74eb7fc5eab66b603c
cf0354c7b71f46e1fc2b4ff37c5e1356438fcfb0
describe
'54340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRI' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
a4c003eecebe0724a689b3ea2f58b4b6
a9cb1531f513f033b9c32fcca191c3bf769f5b3b
'2011-10-14T22:13:38-04:00'
describe
'2792936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRJ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
2b748fab99197195293bde0cfa51d48f
82cfa0a2b094e4a5e890ee624420c2ac01e048e8
'2011-10-14T22:15:23-04:00'
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRK' 'sip-files00074.txt'
cbd9bc27138f037c7b7d073b6b7656d0
26a09632caac10a1510e5487d08b8d58e2993b16
describe
'19045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRL' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
139203e0646a0ae5d8c8514b0bce5634
b337816e948d6d1945ce4fbfe0365de6f0963dca
describe
'355621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRM' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
c73119f4e4e05511eae41d6c832aac05
ddc1d90f5e88434424b0317caf7a8e392a4d158e
describe
'213588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRN' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
a7e48303ef0c19f874f54477120e8977
228dfd7f51cea3eb919c21896c70aff10d695f6a
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRO' 'sip-files00075.pro'
ea11d1853a66108f52c5280f3872c93d
7f19042fbd3aa6c341dda5bf272516810372072e
describe
'51409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRP' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
d679ee3f8eab1e4199f6071785da9ccb
689b1f74da7a5ecf1a4ee6d7f616e7cf95bcbc29
describe
'2855268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRQ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c3938ffa6d382787b6549f0db5cf6ded
6d929568467f554306ccc1facec5b5ecaa98c960
describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRR' 'sip-files00075.txt'
35914bbdbcfcb8c7fc52bb8bb6554b89
d8d90f4e5df2433b25af817d75101f50f42dfdc1
describe
'18216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRS' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
3188aa25ca6c0237b1258ebeb689fb71
5160089f8eb951b9807b3d7d1111124ee5fe6c71
describe
'346136' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRT' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
9bf492c4f778cdbe95ebf7f837276a67
b1e261d5bde90f4a7e400329d6a9d748794847ea
describe
'62236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRU' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
0ea19c2acea385035f47245e80362bd3
1c4a045778a302fca3a80c106db38a0ad2be88e9
'2011-10-14T22:16:27-04:00'
describe
'13323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRV' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
20038e472f9397d9e488499fde6af95c
551c84fb02866d86fe8ef02808636667868c6294
describe
'2775500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRW' 'sip-files00076.tif'
1d651dae8fbd6070e5a7571ce7eba0ea
d20cd1d14318a834ddb9c7efee6cc5f681107b9f
describe
'8069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRX' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
669ed640133c2a7f65c9c65a28af83c8
288377f207792e853be5489d755bcdf9bccbd645
describe
'349377' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRY' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
0f1a16e32278bca8fd8f89d1782b9d7c
63416d888ce2aab423353a66ca7d7e34c41f92be
describe
'186014' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXRZ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
28dec29ca25ee815c9e2f079707cbf8a
0586e608fbac6fc641b7e5be4f570cc6214f5dca
describe
'23600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSA' 'sip-files00077.pro'
d0be7a78683aa110960ced74df1ed64a
bb002e760abe6e34df41d0337c9cc4382aa1348d
describe
'55868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSB' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
a9a3475e3e176db74a1e9d18ae0af463
4083367f836a27927082fe0883d3cb2b43ea8198
describe
'2805708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSC' 'sip-files00077.tif'
8739cfa0f099e008dc6659e6ca2436c1
3003e440c0e6362285dffc14b465e4b537e8535d
'2011-10-14T22:13:46-04:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSD' 'sip-files00077.txt'
155cab8dc4d68f517f1484c9b2985afb
fbffbbd26b408244225b7d9178a7df680e7a7028
describe
'19437' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSE' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8f63ea625b9da4b5d6fc7b8ae9bb2ae3
522a73aa1fc73ca377d3d8b7fa64a2cc185554f0
'2011-10-14T22:12:44-04:00'
describe
'344722' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSF' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
2ffe256842bf58282997b4159207d64d
052f6388e73f190ee38a81f5e1cc6594ef5ed75f
'2011-10-14T22:14:22-04:00'
describe
'190198' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSG' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
097eec8b78f0ab8815d761d982d28350
efbbf52634704c9590f625afcd903c246c79d3e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSH' 'sip-files00078.pro'
e964e9e66a4d77b4776d566d1e11f431
0a740779428a979bda41413f3c8109177214bb11
describe
'60308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSI' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
d9442d3caf6778c6c8642fc0665d8fb4
3c8f9c8fabfab50008294e1faeb14e50c63e2636
describe
'2767908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSJ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
7f2a506688e5ddc9f9bcd1a01f063261
242b3fd147e8d00170a02b686bb94b6b32137804
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSK' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b470cd5ddcc20200ba75c77354ea5549
b0cdc74be555ebe1d3a6b5f2b7be2ea7bf0e8479
describe
'20324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSL' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
d6c907f81d8f00f2d2f45422d8fcc395
7890fffce3ba01a8c8daabae7c5a58ddb2d2f42d
describe
'350095' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSM' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
8cd139334b05b9a063fc1584bb42b4cf
c90395ed694f261492d3a8067c6875f26d008681
describe
'155945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSN' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
195adee8f6e7557a347cc8c9f216534c
1fcd4fae526e729cd3f17124984961de3dfd7add
describe
'11819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSO' 'sip-files00079.pro'
7decfeb013e93e38ea3f9b618968a272
e26f62497d65598c435b9d0eda3b2dbfbfd31c49
describe
'42548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSP' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cc441ca83230637ed0826ddd5104a609
8a9b93339da831e9390f18d85c5c5d95c318eb22
describe
'2809504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSQ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
ddf6a834b91e0b0b1181a4f78dd447fa
e4848b4313d82b92f3f5e203d2a4d43cfabb48db
describe
'584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSR' 'sip-files00079.txt'
c8b6817262535a322c18648ce4e1cc86
8dad108fe2ad7ac48e44ba0bb418eeef4d7bdfa1
describe
'16313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSS' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
61b0ab2ac7a316c4d23be88419ec4c75
d7e8f333d8cd3d9d9dc75272d8f327f394177df9
describe
'339575' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXST' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
89ad4ccaf0a92a12f6912a4b333e4d85
9e6bcd4f972b5b72153a0e5793b34a21c33d0ec3
describe
'186816' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSU' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
d40bb4d7fc3a1a2b88cb5b653751e0d5
345783358e7ab0b7f46a6a9466b3168c4b5b1b9c
describe
'36490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSV' 'sip-files00080.pro'
53c4bf61d26a7711e7465fd5cd37a9a3
a9725992a5a7e1d8690a440f094c96e332c1f081
describe
'60452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSW' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
32d236a9ff3c2331681c507ba22fa0cb
01105fc4b7c8494b96a927b07416845ee409b3f2
describe
'2726300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSX' 'sip-files00080.tif'
01b5de6c85a608fe839278aeae7d0586
43533d6f23cc8296bdf771422b4bf97bcb9a17ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSY' 'sip-files00080.txt'
60449635c993ad46d8749a3d4021ab6b
a62a4c6e5109c5a5e0e70697ae38a8a66319c897
describe
'21479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXSZ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
6d0b6b2f01ee6dd3b6adeabc38e27544
b62d4e4b56e093eb44cf9368b92b51fdc56bd3c6
describe
'329717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTA' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
f45a4004d655715cc28dc95081255d58
9a721ac5fd93bcaf412120eaa1ef4f55fb610594
'2011-10-14T22:16:09-04:00'
describe
'182476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTB' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
1e799d1fcb4d9a2ed6f56767ae7bef5c
25176109347a438adf43fdc806c2ef1813d7a260
describe
'36907' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTC' 'sip-files00081.pro'
5f21d31285e4fdebd55502b40477ab9b
e34d5b245a5d8fa33e74943868fa9dffbc98a30c
describe
'59513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTD' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
1f912b320ea4ae268259f5a96a90d715
918dd920864062e9cc64a4f1865b818bbb13cb35
describe
'2648584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTE' 'sip-files00081.tif'
42665ab5169eba5a99a8b78ae41e48cd
becc2a77512bf4d664e98219b4bf5668068eb9ea
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTF' 'sip-files00081.txt'
966faf9a5749095552499a5b1a980fdc
01fc6077fdddb176df38c6af6a847d3554f7edeb
describe
'21710' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTG' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
16aac4a4aca381d6c00b4f89df8cb88f
3fe08e345fca94909822c8d28a476868ffca3599
'2011-10-14T22:13:35-04:00'
describe
'342675' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTH' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
716f09b1150b72b080ebae1016347185
c5892efe7930b537cfc7c63d7569e5436b17089c
describe
'185619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTI' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
e4991641efed79f9fc87c059e9892ac0
cd5e3c2d283b1fba440378fa30b4027edb4d3623
describe
'34895' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTJ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
2816bf7a230ada24483db9e78dc6a41e
32bffb1addab7bb169f89209ecae04543c100d0f
describe
'58315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTK' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
b6a0a7551a652cae5d2d81af0907f858
0de45d96c3e571530465865560d7b3eec19a1e19
describe
'2750728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTL' 'sip-files00082.tif'
51f5a2f14d21833801b3f82e6e4f1a22
a8025abd7b2f6bb7f0c5be05f6ee09954b64d213
'2011-10-14T22:12:50-04:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTM' 'sip-files00082.txt'
abf31b786d11a240f8b90dcda25c45f0
6988f3b85abb7f4f6597984405454e2b0931e215
describe
'19794' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTN' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
6337365dbf0da5991b0b418c088a8574
ed54a98eff90549712ddebc300b2c50bab3b3ee0
'2011-10-14T22:13:03-04:00'
describe
'349015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
890d533b8219aebe22b54d5748150fbe
28ffbd7da6d9c274a539334931838016a0015933
describe
'182106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
67135b9413bf89c3de9ba8a351e00401
b39dfe26c20fa6ce43c5f274647ca8cd856b44b3
describe
'24674' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTQ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
f4910d9674ac397c400dd09ae2132a86
c33af326198718148f0a65e0555ba7ab6178c2c2
describe
'54534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTR' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
c479aeaac7f1713594b27efbf74c5354
09905046b081854065ec444e26284840b1a4cabe
describe
'2802548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTS' 'sip-files00083.tif'
ce10cb4d0a921e0afab872875fd69002
221ae098249ccf77650a119482a034bc1b2efe22
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTT' 'sip-files00083.txt'
d4393fe2da731901aa8382b60d850b2b
4ed486de498d93e06b82eaefd0d9c581840a7380
describe
'20571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTU' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
6db7e79acb16bdc7f48736a4d4f58495
31bbe46974f9aa24741b39367a99861d8be3fa32
describe
'342317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTV' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
49148a9a464fac9d435128290fa798be
55f017173efd319177bd32a096c065b50be3aef6
describe
'179617' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTW' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e613567de5a83c8a92c0a5b1fe883ce5
963373ee3015f9f956d067e4a22ced71c5506359
describe
'35789' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTX' 'sip-files00084.pro'
adf3413716af76d3d3eb1401a8ba0bcc
53ae7b698781f62513d62a97c67e78cb97cb4d21
describe
'59089' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTY' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
2298b74e7ee2aa9d7a12550ffa4ff13f
45d10b63e8dc088173eb099539b911967e4a0f57
describe
'2747744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXTZ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
ed53d8319610d829d06ad3b4620c5c42
d3bf1957e75bfda8c31253e72621a49f47e89baf
'2011-10-14T22:12:17-04:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUA' 'sip-files00084.txt'
165236cd1fe874d640d894cd7a1cb9b9
c77f5fc5a109cfbd8ce0ed845875a7a63cb54a96
'2011-10-14T22:12:56-04:00'
describe
'21377' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUB' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a415475596ed2ad4333d1a045291a52e
fbee105fe19ed57b25db0fcce1172f2227bb5d92
'2011-10-14T22:12:30-04:00'
describe
'336587' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUC' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
122ebe1f19dd99779f8e6dd1f5ce8036
080c4aa5f879ac67bf95eeb42eb614273f63d7ed
describe
'186881' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
a29ccb4920b75e6fad134c6f78afe093
0e0ac0ddce02ea922116805b870479395594a49d
describe
'32676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUE' 'sip-files00085.pro'
8867f3797d15d75949be612c5c4bcd5b
26e43543fb57ed7db82c59abf4642fade9eff5cc
describe
'57808' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUF' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
8b95a0f8bad5735bd35d46c728a1e666
907287c71421e1f58b41bc5b4c49bce892a32552
describe
'2701900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUG' 'sip-files00085.tif'
d877b792f1eab81ce99541e5410e9292
63cfc1c50fae169ce923c827d8e9b32ed8792f35
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUH' 'sip-files00085.txt'
f7770280a1c978ef8f3a1d8c667cb96d
0162b4640a4f218766327857c6abdf5282856269
describe
'20962' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUI' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
f3502fd335bbb661e130acca5b930590
f33030bca47e8a544e8c17eed52e3380489d39d9
describe
'334059' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUJ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
665724db3e0a55b8ecded880256759a9
eed621fa2daeb18777acdfb05709e53a57cbed68
describe
'179342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUK' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
38681a138aa548321d7995591cf90fdf
416417bae7b6a56ed336f086d6ec36b5767fb1aa
describe
'38337' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUL' 'sip-files00086.pro'
9b9aedebb6366edf49390f16b4c70c73
04af14ac051f01be17f2049f777c7cbd8c067715
describe
'57233' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUM' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
3155fdb3bb8f3dfb18495267aa771251
49013b7071cbee2b641a2c52e750349e4be32543
describe
'2681632' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUN' 'sip-files00086.tif'
f3ee72bd344bee2305a8d76e7012efcc
12258fb46edf4a6b6d0287466df6121f559a2944
'2011-10-14T22:16:51-04:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUO' 'sip-files00086.txt'
5de68c49a4ec3fa9a18e8e80da64fe01
1e2ade42a00ecb3a38dc79446dca39d194f4c724
describe
'21254' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUP' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
5d5a871e7b23c7ac94ebc65cb335861a
9831fd3c0f2baf54fe85f7d6a3c25417d8a87730
describe
'345300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUQ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
18a4844b62e516a636180a3a27cb3830
396b5a1ac1bfc3f3268acd24d9db1458c7957b93
describe
'178846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
c2fa740c411b34fc77091eb25a2b0994
8831d741141700120d4760066d101cc784c9551a
describe
'38196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUS' 'sip-files00087.pro'
4d96cd43b11daa6e0f508b5831f63283
a8525be11266bfd963679544f08cefd5b3f9a49f
describe
'58505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUT' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
bdb60cec1f9c94d465e4ecedb691363f
a471b1cfb4f120e9fcfd7b707a89dce9f9020ad5
describe
'2771668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
7edef4abcbab63ed862607d0b0d68ec9
79dfbbdc2e1fadf7ae40ec3beec49e4ebbc06dcb
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUV' 'sip-files00087.txt'
4cda6de9eabeed5c044bef6065c5722d
bd3efe21104d64139196b1b158b36910ee49f7ec
describe
'20710' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUW' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
c7dae99dd5641e96bc0dd212c9bf7484
b0b207f4ddcc7a3d1a479ea4791d91bd0c4462a6
describe
'346398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUX' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
0ddf4ad0350cb2f3de7cf4d51f19ffb4
c7bda2b696153eba19ae45907efa28e4cd543337
describe
'182421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUY' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
beaef3ef370fa72b718bc1838607bd9d
02cb6042afae62ac9875813cff8f834c85373739
describe
'37703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXUZ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
f05750901f28cd8c8a26ebd52c0f9df6
d154c4f09dd5e3b0d2ded92774a6e55778580edb
describe
'58190' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVA' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
4a244fa0d16cfdebc59ffea171801d2e
b5e2b45b53d12eaa8fb303f43a4e2489c39a23f6
describe
'2780396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVB' 'sip-files00088.tif'
3f9ffd3020b00699679e11188be323f5
5970548b1214a501465b06f49cf3721ee12a57af
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVC' 'sip-files00088.txt'
20c713f456b91362fccbdda54ad051e1
c6e6fcfa9cee1be40ade1070025e22b19f178abb
describe
'21041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVD' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
79a6e384c79b76a53e48b024a364f996
184a06f81622c45dfaaae8a3a43f00455abc5994
describe
'344995' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVE' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ed5a16131053e3cdfcc8e1d5d5f3624d
df60b565fad92bae8d325a775a22c4912f641274
describe
'195308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVF' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
16f94f80d50ce5f8a91492c2de042ed8
29e1462c993d21e68a2119c5e8d2f62122356f4c
describe
'34821' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVG' 'sip-files00089.pro'
a4981d8d87dc11c78767a8f5aace52e0
180b427cd7d837cb9f4be4b9473f59131d0dbdd9
describe
'61184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVH' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
6022eb745555af1dd0fdaed12820865a
83b3f4565d534e068c80c1c82318ec9d74be48c1
describe
'2769248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVI' 'sip-files00089.tif'
4f86eb29611b8e8af459840058a41c6d
50c0d4a9e8359eb0a92b52ee1bbedf16c6445702
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVJ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
e0bcf50c67928a936d10e3ac32ff68e3
5310bf45dfeedc2675959a659ae340e3dc10cf78
describe
'20759' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVK' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
379702dc4e883d6beb16f564a7c44cd4
ac8772e5be9a2b73a6fe2d0dd0e1a284ae3379eb
describe
'335672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVL' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
fe809d92700d6d5286d2b1af2904edd9
d798e3f199a6f017d46f3c815436cd9cf7903ff0
describe
'188110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVM' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
824381759d17f4c148513da60be34c33
ae9103918e5c71c19bfcb1cf8edb12cb09bad1ae
describe
'39855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVN' 'sip-files00090.pro'
03c74ef17d6231fb34b84daa145ef22a
6d34e8848dc6b5002c9b335b0a5fd3555deff0f1
describe
'61382' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVO' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
22ca6a2145332f1f4cc18c90daa500b4
a4954de331990f24633efe3a75edff4d4de5d803
describe
'2694716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVP' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f88e98e4baea7f3db18adf9e13610161
5a59ec2aff0491812d899fa87208149896b37dea
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVQ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
1673c1a3ce1e4787b5ec0a3b18f92d27
5c6852e223ddfef6f34decd304df3875fa7a4064
describe
'21700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVR' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
3f1e5b9c3d62e7a834674a40efd9895f
b1e9a65b637813cc73e411c0e4055f26bdcea884
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVS' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
07ce46de9bb8af7d6e9edbda5a776099
16c79bca9ece538506d2ac9e2227bc6b4640cb15
describe
'183490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVT' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
750451f380ca9700e444b34962ad175e
809465e24063ac38a66fec453736d55f881e0147
describe
'36956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVU' 'sip-files00091.pro'
0f7bf8241020410b5a68d414b36d8393
a44279e5e73ed1589e530cfbb9388df2742ee432
describe
'58105' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVV' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
ae7a7e7b05ac6ae0403e93e05d887d2f
92688b3ddab449b22b76930d701f44ab97753dfd
describe
'2747560' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVW' 'sip-files00091.tif'
44896cbe15ca03273beff3e5c169c127
558bd16f5e988fd91b30613aac5b445357fb497d
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVX' 'sip-files00091.txt'
4f583f3018de77f6b8eadc2cbb5278df
fb214116f535a9ea5082b986cfead704f5596646
describe
'20603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVY' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
a45fe7048bffb01346aded61873fd448
2bd24a115f95bd0ce35a933a0c152df146f23863
describe
'332189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXVZ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
80569d56c0130187efefd2b580f537e2
5b1e3bc99a52253c0c79de9167cb4719f977c5bf
describe
'192070' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWA' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
0e99ffb19ff45b0ad8d4082fbeed9f13
5e38311b273f5029e0a39a49ac69b6558f721e10
describe
'13264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWB' 'sip-files00092.pro'
34826e5ab4922a65fd6d66898d5712cf
6879177349acc1f6047ed11da2eba7c2b3e04ca1
describe
'51677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWC' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
08141392d01920c79bcc5b29f7a914c7
ec540a1301eb78dd758038c74262674166431fc5
describe
'2668300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWD' 'sip-files00092.tif'
e9d80a282f9ca18d9285587daad16b77
19b6fb1f08e44eb9fda24d282bc8da8507ae7f46
'2011-10-14T22:13:20-04:00'
describe
'537' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWE' 'sip-files00092.txt'
d27cb741ba6202f96b3c2f8d2ba328cb
9aae1cc7636ad3fd519cb9076e5d846c59070849
describe
'19657' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWF' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
96fcd984403f0dcdeaed0597a43d10e2
99cd66f20e7751746771fc315998f1f7925c049b
describe
'352940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWG' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
50b90b5668246d4c6e21813c202d5e95
6dc2ee3ee5d8f116bf4a3c43bbec7277069bf70b
describe
'164669' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWH' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
3c17ed48c8803597b7bd469bd4ab60e3
658123c9eee402cde8da42a3f622661a646f612e
'2011-10-14T22:14:11-04:00'
describe
'25309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWI' 'sip-files00093.pro'
1c7d1621e0550783f36e50988215b207
d85f3a00a3332c5acc8e66c9ea048e6770e3510b
describe
'50324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWJ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
aeb877159e99add4c24133bdba2e4025
46917167fdc100b02a41d978b00c12b8f955ca8a
describe
'2833136' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWK' 'sip-files00093.tif'
c123abefa06ce83e9198f122bd0ac791
6f7b62917026d251d8b06e68a76d759f2b09de3c
'2011-10-14T22:16:03-04:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWL' 'sip-files00093.txt'
bb25b9ec1fa946f249bd3f81ec70040d
a82939782e9d6fe1b77125fed755251210bfe0e8
describe
'18817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWM' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
05f1e65ce4bdbf30be73fcea79b9be08
da26af29a7b795d377896d7648106b694a516383
describe
'340015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWN' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
8baf68d38a68fe4ec66fc61f84461bf1
d3c29b5b71643d23d0664ab38feab52d5e0a7924
describe
'176206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWO' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
57d0e222ce4837ed1ea5061e420e1fa8
92a9950abc5c842375d83e285a50f1e95fd941ed
describe
'31186' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWP' 'sip-files00094.pro'
3cd2e58b57bc25987ad30b4b149bbdc4
7bdecb7f5607e1257b75f834ff9742a9cf77eae5
describe
'56047' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWQ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b047cdd4fb926e113b6686f33fc86b04
333dcb514df99be19dd0affac11b92cb8d77be17
describe
'2729512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWR' 'sip-files00094.tif'
a9c5c73d49d348e797b2bc9628a6b936
d5804fcc11c005127e4255bdb94a852eca788625
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWS' 'sip-files00094.txt'
8d0b0c6291a9ee719ffec10430ea6b3e
71e5278bfe2b2bfdfc118d6ea0b875a31c69c7cc
'2011-10-14T22:13:21-04:00'
describe
'20684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWT' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
07c5f0a1a229ea35cd23a25560b80039
27774a60117f505dc59089198ae76d8fe5c0e1c1
describe
'344871' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWU' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
90626f9c106a51e9aa4216cabc21d5fb
e6863fd96d189f155a7e78df959fb4ca38083f8d
describe
'176085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWV' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
701b1f0b8fe6518473a97069d374b381
0593d64d931ac3ccfa4ef1306e0a93f68cca7875
describe
'28177' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWW' 'sip-files00095.pro'
df6d110633c686b0da250037fdbb6c99
69cc16cbd4a3db1d79195a78434e90eb11fc05a9
describe
'56058' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWX' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
89fdc8b15a9008e286e61a4f5b4c0c1b
d33f242cfd126b9a94a1d95f698914372945688e
describe
'2768420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWY' 'sip-files00095.tif'
bfe947e57b8d3fb99ad702caf84cfe1d
d219ec9d1e589752b7f9bfaf3ffca0a106803d50
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXWZ' 'sip-files00095.txt'
10ae6cdceb3da4d1d2c071b35a040597
24ae660f567a99bf4d7b6177dd7e5ddba0cfed76
describe
'20501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXA' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
6ef4c5994b14d8ad18a0346e833b1835
7fc3877ad478b22b7132879608716b251f3b20bf
describe
'332746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXB' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
d0b3e1831ca8046b4a130b092b65e139
767aec76d57b76fa8059e044da645ec6b5d56e5c
describe
'196570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXC' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
497afa17757a30f013c337f254b331cf
276d8477d0fc5025645d5f18b9bcd1718b517fbb
describe
'38790' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXD' 'sip-files00096.pro'
4ddc1fa68bd4327488402115f12e598b
3a426dd807c17b1acec80464d61723793f2ac9cb
describe
'62169' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXE' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
0e0871889cf455c7a443bc220b160d3d
3c48e20dad8fe954ecadd5a1dde513b31a86dba2
describe
'2671272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXF' 'sip-files00096.tif'
0995dd272a700732af5a4f49ba70e6ba
d59ed81c2d6f5f6079f4704f3189c600f57c3366
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXG' 'sip-files00096.txt'
46e4aeb819550b2ca7b6d3123de73cf5
07fb04d1a822f51225d1a269fd5553cd979e54e5
describe
'21466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXH' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
002a0f51eb81cc356c3ccf3085c19189
236b9847411f40b51d4c40a670730b620854265e
describe
'333419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXI' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
0db65b4bc451d4de9a3d4b3ebbfd9fb2
06511b4bb25461b96b3d998271e7437ac50a58cd
describe
'186028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXJ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
182bad4d2430b7b39fc4a91a15b47afc
8d3d6be2a307c396461571688bc1ae6be6952979
describe
'36015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXK' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ec9c054e609c71113f17d1aee0dc1701
dd000397c5e65118b1091ee7d80ed4e1604f0ceb
describe
'58719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXL' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d7c9a26d2ec52d226d8c39454ce6ea0e
d5218e253f47968177f55a8fa48886f624565ea3
describe
'2676696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXM' 'sip-files00097.tif'
b4ff8475b7d8d36091af3a412919ae00
08b434415caa67bdb0e12d67eebe9683780eee3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXN' 'sip-files00097.txt'
e7be1626517c32e79acbd6e895d07e7c
d4fd5926b1d6ea8dfe8c1f10be9217c8bf64f8ab
describe
'21459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXO' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
fde9e1678147c648a2a30f53f9802b90
829b2625d61ff623bd46f0cddd79e29bdab07234
'2011-10-14T22:12:57-04:00'
describe
'322073' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXP' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
ac090172b524d4506a6b23e9ce7e2285
8dba7e0989d2254dd760c91a895118d09763cbef
'2011-10-14T22:16:33-04:00'
describe
'191983' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXQ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
0a98afbafa12866ce6ff24f7965795d4
02af58246062b0f83ca40cf2dbbcbb27d7379078
describe
'39367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXR' 'sip-files00098.pro'
abab2dba08b5fcba67855256514b5e2b
ffc629e8fd9be1004ed6ff8c49c033b1c8173694
describe
'63777' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXS' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
18e3e7812b09747216ddeab2bd3d1d6e
3522d8b2f883fd8c2903cb2615d8e0c03d80253c
describe
'2586600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXT' 'sip-files00098.tif'
dc2a51781155744200f20e94fdc0a328
d8760addca79b7637856bbdb4229626c9a4de22a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXU' 'sip-files00098.txt'
2ece6e8c7f6c5ff3a399e738cc53f9c3
f66fe5e078159a0433a8a860ae9ccd381641aa44
describe
'22480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXV' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a28d6f56055ef2b1734cdc9e635babdc
df6ffcd3259782eda1a253f8b18f89da90649e69
describe
'334350' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXW' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
48000e1db679be55390862b86edf8ac1
e839f2a73bc5f10543db15b91dc8d2e1ed2ee880
describe
'173332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXX' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
02383042a7a55c7d2e7d82639f872e78
aed027c2ba7fad51f763e55b73b3c38e8184fafe
describe
'575' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXY' 'sip-files00099.pro'
a25960d8c504b02795cf8b16b8fcea6d
cdbd4eebe635b065104135b207a1b9a039e1c5cc
describe
'42491' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXXZ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
f1cde72cd5d6242faa25df3ccf47cddd
f11148451f37ea97408437a3c1abc4501468876d
describe
'2683884' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYA' 'sip-files00099.tif'
14b8e52fa0814388ff3a36e50ab35dab
278a41619668b0fe174d5b546d48426257d69739
describe
'147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYB' 'sip-files00099.txt'
2bc37c3ef33ead342b7b1798ec562f00
73def7c22a6b2c09f47948c580722c3638634135
describe
'16723' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYC' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
46bc5a9e51911fa57042edf5397601fc
9207b7a6bd47b32f514022322951b115fe0a1d1f
describe
'331020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYD' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
0640e0374aeab758011b5e0ec1e77d67
f6d5d39574c11a0f9d5f5cdb15802e287c996353
describe
'51868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYE' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
971c852f88b96b692bda361597fb33ce
5eb353463c537ba05804b440dba83840ecbe6c77
describe
'11860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYF' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
b9d50ff347939681e204fa41f2508744
036bfa2fcac2f49cd0b1dbc7846345a69c90e692
describe
'2656100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYG' 'sip-files00100.tif'
d7c366c540f1a9f613e6cff9f522b5a8
a7b956d78ec7c362f9a7eec035849183ad63c2c9
describe
'7880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYH' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
2f5ef12ae8089d4d740ccfb2339498c7
0320989b616d20bd82ae159d78c40b21de2b892b
describe
'335491' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
d33cb138d487c0de4621a0f15305e317
86348cb4f0710bd4a2fcae0fc8ffa13db983c973
describe
'193309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYJ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a31c5918b1e496731f982cb2bc4a9c69
0496596cb4ca03c08fd77d2ae41dd7472db33b30
describe
'41137' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
4e663ea16f108afeba3d1415128455ab
8b8a982d338ba04a52d3fc77ab8c42f55cfca288
describe
'62648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
f90d3f929fbdd167fd8ca13036b5af36
2d5be64b426644af28faf4f4f7c4b58bdc323399
describe
'2693508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
42f38084658d1266c91a0bcf28c6395b
29c587b26bd812b8add292ad33d1cbd9cd8f64cd
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
209fb120973287a43013bfc73b2bac7a
5137fd0ac8b5e6c9e3d41dca18aab76a6b238fc1
describe
'21501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYO' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
4feb712efaaa1528e783f3fee4fdad0d
2578f636c8401702fc8acb08ae940e5e816573b7
describe
'327454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYP' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
07c1f5cb7e366f4088ba6621a6c9d35e
270691b633c34bb0854b711722852caadff6879f
describe
'182326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
61c5786e7bbbf4dd8b6c7c3cdc375449
ca2c960a3eeed7b71c6bea347f6db5d7d59aabd0
describe
'39601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYR' 'sip-files00102.pro'
e4e60080b2d88ab7792552f22fb13120
8d775f8b1bcccbf5300ffb46beed587c285c18bc
describe
'60110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
abe4714494af7172559dd41793992bc3
12b36a059e6fc72776b03699c2cda4fd60eb841b
describe
'2628856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
247621467fdaaa4effd813467b5b57c4
7e6213e6afacbb7ed4f3ea8f05b4844b58fc00e5
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
aa62ba616d042daf074719703c1ac896
711b2de1021d4bf8dd1a9e04b396282685e10bbf
describe
'21442' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYV' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
8cd9d437ed8aad8c053d5bd082dd6910
1e7ea1799c16724b4ac4b969279a23303818f717
'2011-10-14T22:15:21-04:00'
describe
'341264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
6346c2355cf1c6fe53967178283078e8
754530c75c2f6be6c464d8b81708c9d85e42b00c
describe
'181448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYX' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
dccf717cd056a59fce2d1b4a1994974c
ab4fbe2c500501bed811cd410b245b849f928ab1
describe
'19325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ab6df6c9ca1fbb56c2517ec983771c73
48a4c0e35180e69be3a024272ec9a489338b6fff
describe
'51518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXYZ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
6704ee63ea9247afed35abcb66174865
6fd4a11ac94a11b9e29d61e6d49b07af466c6274
describe
'2739072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
2a7150812cdcde4debfafa23970a67f0
19cd7df8c03cc45c7dbadaca516bcf587a520ed5
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZB' 'sip-files00103.txt'
13582bc4f0868f91d9392f4077788c4c
5f3ac8253b1f97e0f9bcbdf08057e73f7ff4ac2b
describe
'19367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZC' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
b565ab79c8cbbb908c9b7e3cc676222a
b31e95181d63ccd8b5e190c80a3c0c66e7db56d3
describe
'320924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZD' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
5bc5e10973b73299dd16b3813a7d470e
df2c830d605e276245a80d83772ef928b3feade3
describe
'181563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
0c3eb22aae1b5872bc8df0f37b33d38f
9386e87e1c36b6cdabdad81a0a6791dfdf76d1b9
describe
'37083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZF' 'sip-files00104.pro'
f94471e88b0d50e11d1bf52cec9f6ecd
7f9865c9a352c0515f1db9a074bdd76c82397d1a
describe
'58402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZG' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
1f7bcb79b7f92bed12c622f2af6b0a9e
409140cdca9cf15542d80904823e1ce4793c1ca5
describe
'2576836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZH' 'sip-files00104.tif'
046ccd48e34b909408035c783e72416a
cfc5c4126c9a5e036e227021e5fefd01a38ede79
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZI' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a019f8e41e6c81ea3264b62461eb3c91
28fac8916599ce302abafda48e0399a68e30a677
'2011-10-14T22:16:49-04:00'
describe
'22187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZJ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
705d97359ce263d83e208134b79836d9
0e2429fdd73187828357fc4522e414a09e19ff15
describe
'340611' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZK' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
6cc3361b0c791546b001da2c6e5ec11c
05d49df082557cea3abd8a24f9097613d358fad3
describe
'203684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZL' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
f0c25653b23d79751b91b681d2e9db6d
c6ea40ca99362a3174e55be5243baa585cf9e0fe
describe
'12724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZM' 'sip-files00105.pro'
4d9b3383792892b5ed49077f8d911982
1525ba03d78797d1f4c21121da80a44f9216b9eb
describe
'55475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
aca79bef91dfc765b00c771505914aad
107cb3701e1c603a1dc767b8a3d0c85e94731bf7
describe
'2735540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZO' 'sip-files00105.tif'
4f49505b56153638232b037c794f4e9f
888021da9bf87236009e13a69e95c1fc057acabf
describe
'652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZP' 'sip-files00105.txt'
c4aaacf26eab66698804eb7cbbbaf3fa
ef51bb3a41c4f66f0dc28587d08e4d3f0430d17d
'2011-10-14T22:16:28-04:00'
describe
'20101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZQ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
b55b149bfa19d302da6c6bd375cb710b
bf2298f80dcdff53e244f3ae6559eaf785a4582e
describe
'328972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZR' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
609da2fa2b6bc4faa0cfd33a81a263d5
43e7a1d783cd509541ae9df33d4c1296ce570941
describe
'175502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZS' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
081cc1c23cfe2a2c1856170827ea65de
14c8c72297b67b786aefbfab473dd12e0511b031
describe
'27865' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZT' 'sip-files00106.pro'
666ebeb14bb755e2eccaa99dc9fe987f
1f07f0f6adfb00f9d047d545662e00eb306357ab
describe
'55331' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
b68a7a0f67a3e59a92f164f36a0a96dc
470d367aa21fd20dec966d9349419b9e498862ad
'2011-10-14T22:15:22-04:00'
describe
'2640928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZV' 'sip-files00106.tif'
01e209125e3d3f2b9ab5ddf07d897888
4a2ac3d95144148cf87e8e08bd80902961b86fcb
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZW' 'sip-files00106.txt'
507b7a47ef456c13e59a0ed4f6e55dba
de577ad92ac42cb0861d8f7cb5aead7338dd5bdc
describe
'21102' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZX' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
9e265f5ed576c048b06dc85c00714efc
871175c8604e022059d97789034f8ab205498b76
describe
'331139' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
34487121ef8d11019273f7dee348be28
69fc377551b2452ddcdee682e06778d885d64c69
'2011-10-14T22:15:54-04:00'
describe
'181729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACXZZ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
ed77cccafa8842e9fb3d60e0b40c7bd4
7def8e47286bf4950cc705af91509610fe9a7407
'2011-10-14T22:15:59-04:00'
describe
'37375' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
e7c2d5053f98800e6321d5ba01ecf2cc
63db6ed4d523dd261f28a39e4aff8ea0b27ef647
describe
'59067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
298ffb0e7bc11c9496783b3069e178a8
c047630d595c2d15ed42b86d70cc2c3478a00e13
describe
'2658460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
f863d5293c535a678db991acebf6d843
308fb15e9d8600f29dcc0647ad123de0ea39cd1e
'2011-10-14T22:14:03-04:00'
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAD' 'sip-files00107.txt'
db3437e15b526adf93cfe45b3f62b28a
35a27b2264d79bac3610b29cbdc959efa0164a5c
describe
'21476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAE' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
4a90365dad6a372b8b711a091640652b
0648ebbace2aa406f6774134f271a534bcaf53e1
describe
'321963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAF' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
71e90f74832c9b17f39dab87b016127b
b3e7fbe3a20a3b51c893381f87be25ae4d15889f
describe
'192906' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAG' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
7cfc3f78b766678784ad60c972041505
7a098c6d94d7b505062b10bbb842248c6056a45e
'2011-10-14T22:16:02-04:00'
describe
'40594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAH' 'sip-files00108.pro'
f25e432a1570c4a99d40f3e2fb5eee9a
e4298b54c2cbb4db1a630ef4397c3fe932b707d1
describe
'62319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAI' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
3d6ccefedd50aa645db9c38ec725c93a
9a67781ba59f9d7bbf40d3ebc282bd023dfe86ff
describe
'2584804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAJ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
28cf1d1fd403889ace9e2f8be0e8b553
c5242a934597fbbc899870159489cc87e8cfa971
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
9fa0837d8817eae0e0bdccbfba42bab1
436bf31cd3dc53f325e156998ecbdc283419525c
describe
'22221' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAL' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
11745ea17c6c0c2f324b980bd2b53314
da11cd65f03d42509f045aedb40d9d6bfb24e66c
describe
'329263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAM' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
0765663105190880275de219c0f133dc
c39730ba4c2c8756fce3dec8894f1d42a8a0c846
describe
'194759' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
05143688aba06c3bb348b055185f0333
a0a0ac084ef28514833857a10b0e70fbe16a1bf0
'2011-10-14T22:15:03-04:00'
describe
'41003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAO' 'sip-files00109.pro'
f2344cbea070ee296e1ad14a7f7a3a55
eb2260aa68d5f84fddb61291ad33d6615fce96c1
describe
'62538' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAP' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
225b2d1a809c318eb321353b188c00c4
cd4fbf8d65fbc8a50e3b342ff2c7a9418fea69a0
describe
'2643472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAQ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
892eb7c086b747433f2558394ca92684
6242271963536610156c0bfe6fe74bf4e672a6d1
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAR' 'sip-files00109.txt'
6e16132dc8ff66870976e874844e2d82
ec0a382b3cef3d50327b3aff9b03697087a45949
describe
'21964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAS' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
e7926fa2327bf04328404d06012af96e
b5e84eef3f816dce193d35a5c3d0272c20f95fab
describe
'334432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAT' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
1fd6d7323b38d85ef945a96526e9025c
711b2a5e420308c2b2af5f431cac05967f775f56
describe
'211402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAU' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
fbbac6156075c97f3735b2578b561e6b
272f4a48121928bba4318b38e962144eb20f9213
'2011-10-14T22:13:43-04:00'
describe
'18542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAV' 'sip-files00110.pro'
6741a2de723a30124d69bf23f3f69a95
1efe7795c6c9e6d3d72967d0e276d9de2a74501e
describe
'61510' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAW' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
0810832279feecd734957b3fe77e50de
f54395b44ff7693870089006760daf2efe4aec7e
describe
'2685448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAX' 'sip-files00110.tif'
06019aefc43eedf20049487476d95f11
42e851be90bb5a462783630a051da2f8c8f21880
describe
'760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAY' 'sip-files00110.txt'
8a231bba308bd38dfcda8a4707cb3df5
38e884b11791f032a571d0c216ecb089c3576770
describe
'22096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYAZ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
1f9a65be443b9b78698d15e196b93338
eac359ec99dcdbc9d35a166769e642aa676d1d2a
describe
'347183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBA' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
b137c8c22d5a678f4a4e390bdb002cd4
2c7c27fc8be4fa5a4c25bc93e21aca781c142558
describe
'165758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBB' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
2974b235c94e3f3e053b47bc32938698
132abc2145b63bccef44f241f144116ea34bda7b
describe
'26037' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBC' 'sip-files00111.pro'
f5f6c9ef753b3a888c65ec6be47ae166
fbac5a65e04859457d814aeb342cdf52b4b592d1
describe
'53031' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBD' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
554c30a813d9365c7b5e07d85b14e6b6
4a644c3140b647fcfe2d5e6524c7fca8f9395b2c
describe
'2786664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBE' 'sip-files00111.tif'
92d461e82ce54f3c3312df40d86cba73
898c7e22cccd1ad3840f3004f7a71e11f68349ed
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBF' 'sip-files00111.txt'
3af7678d4451038c6c6fddddac19c63e
1c9ed4ae313925714bcb9c21f0691a0611f0f24e
describe
'19710' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBG' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
73ed887de42f6ec94c560c02af07f45f
7c4c21c25d0067f2925bc82bb92a56ab6500cdf8
describe
'332151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b83023e1231556a99acaa92e046cc6e7
bba115e8e4d79408c350e353af8651b14a9afe61
describe
'189488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBI' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
d2f025b662ecca7e135ce4454e7a040c
e25373ae9c32eb807dd95c316cb29b53efb242d7
describe
'41584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
05ed0342793f2cd2cc8d52db6a436d0b
d060dca0b19dcf63abe434776bbe03a71c0d6170
describe
'62666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
07ee48aa586b67805ef6548c31a2fb9c
c7649c79263a3235a303a6dcb9122e1541004ea6
describe
'2666612' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
73b97e7cb1119140642bf05f0ce19774
6acfb2cd649052a1edec042990c36f82b92d58f3
'2011-10-14T22:13:29-04:00'
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
d254d57fa1b4b055f1f014252cd89168
45c3d341404f2e5c589c7580224effbd53a269f0
describe
'21844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBN' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
ec77f4407ae14abe6a2c3865e972b905
f73fba44c268693fd8cee5ef8c4e23e393104419
describe
'334814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBO' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
691dbbcae8725092553cfd8b92427bdd
ee7fcc0c4c95c734b1606e71a6804a8bee4b1940
describe
'191488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBP' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
ff1e72d97bf68dc2121848001c9283ff
95a054c9d03e4b6b9e113a78a9d3ea3e67a06d43
describe
'42125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
dc3e75375fc5ee0880a1f557b8d74da0
b6e804bfd4e869dfa674fbcd1562cd5676a309ec
describe
'61846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBR' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
dbbe7bb2475f8fe97d9d6a25c00a70d8
d3daf18ed9b5a84eae1601539ae42bae7b9b1449
describe
'2688416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBS' 'sip-files00113.tif'
9c7323064ea88e3df474070830bd61a3
a37dcae207f46392492ea93501f41311c5d93fb9
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBT' 'sip-files00113.txt'
a514c7e918d489e32df19faea77c4338
f3f9f2375c53d54abe037028afbdf0b9b632cec4
describe
'21687' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
7fbcc0dbd9d96a42e749e912954117e0
5c3a9eeff9ae941117072c919c76a95860cce54b
describe
'330919' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBV' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
aa312fa55037290be3f361a3da3b5351
20e6577b396ea1f170147e99b860e1bbe8785d4e
describe
'194982' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBW' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
608f5f842eaf503ff25613596a60e4a6
f325edbbd574ef5d80a8b95eb7bf69e74cefa8ac
describe
'41543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBX' 'sip-files00114.pro'
fc5f82c635109a48b02e905b35091ec9
e92363b9557a5ce0cd670334b9ba6d31e1d32913
describe
'63922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBY' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
9c1070b918ab233271542fe8e25061da
fd488772e4ee781004986d46dc10de72b4cb48ae
describe
'2657000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYBZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
1d632dc44c22e3fc7152f89f4418c729
de4df34625c285e10065aecf15eb2139055f18ca
describe
'1672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCA' 'sip-files00114.txt'
15e2ecd0d5dde2e7f10e811f5bc894c3
57818ba8dd430d319c9724554c5e2c388c4870d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCB' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
747586ba35be0b773e3cd851e231f93e
60730cfe5408bae4b4257421bd6d3f33bf5aea07
'2011-10-14T22:12:15-04:00'
describe
'349147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCC' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
4d31690875599d3a86978efcad8941ce
7be80a6e8cf7de14ed3951394faf8fb2b327ce41
'2011-10-14T22:13:52-04:00'
describe
'187666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCD' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
e430c76978c0fbc1c04e3c448711bcf6
76f55f0d362c985b882e5d65f24153c02dcc6ab9
describe
'16412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCE' 'sip-files00115.pro'
9e9c1e29de5df36bf9441228ef1b0651
66dce0441d2f74f731cf0f9e32d56bb8a67e9c86
describe
'54618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCF' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
0e3977ffbe9dcf4545c9e5d59d55666e
397d526e843dd70cc8b39b3c1ff02351af9ed49f
describe
'2802624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCG' 'sip-files00115.tif'
fdd716898e11524fe2ef3af04e9927cb
c599c6eb372e0699715d23d2dde17081ca6c595e
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
69866dfc69b15816999661a2bd4a0781
60abeeac8311e9ef65cd6c746edbde44d56e7261
describe
'19992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCI' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
1825ce4c162d0b60e2a9dceefe7090ad
5d724e1128803275aa1c4e5439b01d7305e589ac
describe
'326878' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCJ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
f0e0ebc43d3419a607b7e6671a09c3c8
c1de1ca2be24f3378c752de26fa095270945d3b4
describe
'193551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCK' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
e580afeb2b403c6ffacfcbfcb7d92814
2d93e92e64a62778cd237c2e956473e1b440c514
describe
'39765' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCL' 'sip-files00116.pro'
f3db000944c4762af0e023b365b68f38
67433c76bd76b3fb5ef290748efa6a3d8ca8601c
describe
'62512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCM' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
a2f211bf64cbad9f47896caac32f736d
b71e5aff2debdd92c999cfaa713ce7b9db7fc61a
describe
'2624608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCN' 'sip-files00116.tif'
5a5a81b6ceb039a54042043f4652e533
8e1c12f9aba392449e79d855956d08843d20a402
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCO' 'sip-files00116.txt'
651041f4a0d6b8ac43d86aa3615bb6f7
986b5bbfb7a51e82e886ae1573a817bc6fe4cc3c
describe
'21954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCP' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
6fa6e2bfde64ba0a7ceeda87ec8559ef
abdede4bf1e2c541f796ff31edd9e95a028491c1
describe
'353172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCQ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
c8eb65585f85d8230c4889b0c01df243
92b78520785e26189ac151d83001985389443f19
describe
'177863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCR' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
5fff833c17e9e1ff764b26fb89dff4f0
e05b6a160ccd0b392731beba4b7ebce7c46fbfd6
describe
'25920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCS' 'sip-files00117.pro'
e92245a31e596f160ee6fb3218b19ecc
2ed61c12c2eb3139342698af1f4bb613732b9adf
describe
'55366' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCT' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
b53146abd08b277e45cfaa911292168f
195c31c17b0f0e5bdd401e47ba83ca995f48b035
describe
'2835272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCU' 'sip-files00117.tif'
a84e8d457d6527c6055c380ca6dafa8e
62c5dd1b6cfb8a17c0383bbb6dc9719a6773a7b0
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCV' 'sip-files00117.txt'
1906ad8996366bd7c950df08d914cd3c
4e36eee1254edfcc76acb07649ac189b2c9ae264
describe
'19997' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCW' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
60c477c1944b3b469a6c835678cbca1d
014da5404e42cd291ce079c4ff50776898c66491
describe
'324516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCX' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
ca4b0c9761b193a3c951df8a2ab4a590
0b50390b6d5c328f03c6f6861b0e8d2bc4ccfbb5
describe
'158997' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCY' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
0cecb4321b35a22afa0b10a9ea398194
c8fac8a5bef8ab09c158829c11239b00d56f83a8
describe
'15257' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYCZ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
8f0836df718f214d43688320f46be907
d765b6c70ef23b023b8135d1dc7b9cb6d15c7d98
describe
'46877' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDA' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
d8cc3813b03feea563ec06f0b5ad3ca2
14f642318b0ed1df1129867b7c3479f6fbe75d4a
describe
'2605416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDB' 'sip-files00118.tif'
2b329ee678a6c16b8d5c22b9dbeca049
cd3151a9571aa9e6239134fdd3c53ae12e41a110
describe
'640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDC' 'sip-files00118.txt'
2a3cfdf79b5d7d683cfe581134ecd39a
1a2eed7c9d86b64d183ba66124d52f5a7b92336e
describe
'19275' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDD' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e01404ceae35e4e9716363225536faae
0269902fab5f3ff9919335ed68f3ace872a3dc44
describe
'333559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDE' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
497723b28251e43d9b213c5329cbea99
361a0d9b1e164919e9b39e8d621e2231545d42e8
describe
'179487' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDF' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
5750ddb45dda7ef2e02927a443a1901d
fa644000980360e7b0276c80b31c69094ec20ece
describe
'38873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDG' 'sip-files00119.pro'
06fd94c3f893d68d8291e383931319c9
9d295a11dc8a81e5a45c5f3e8c1313bc0263338c
describe
'61072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDH' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
b937941d5154ea3309310b2dadbad24e
f96a3fac477ce5f062f047340d0ebfa1d7da6bf6
describe
'2678660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDI' 'sip-files00119.tif'
7041978137d21b0750bc0ef43c218d2c
314d17584a0b4d4084fa5a45cd73d81a8e0fee0a
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDJ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
67f8c598480ba759203ee7c046084bbd
cf4810e38f9d93f8a93999d473ea21fe2a4921a7
describe
'21386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDK' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
446afa6f7e6fa3c8c51034a7833d3ef3
8c22739877230352514a6e111eb3ea2d778a7b06
describe
'331386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDL' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
71a19d8fa36f0cb9f3be0bbd62a7a86c
9888c45d41b9cb1935bf8efec6bb25ba81fd238d
describe
'203695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDM' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
eea5699a9988bd030df44c423aaf7dd8
960d35b1450b06bfa839af0f246f4aa22304d85f
describe
'17149' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDN' 'sip-files00120.pro'
1dda26a725344522dd9d25e139a89266
df57f50f6f32cf684629e8c806f4be54b0fec9ba
describe
'59111' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDO' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
4329a7a3e96c272bd271e4de5b793fd7
4d5866ec89adaac7f9c816b1056eb215927e61dd
describe
'2661172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDP' 'sip-files00120.tif'
8094701113dcfffff4626cff308b3d15
5365fe3bd0daa24633bc846365240a32da0c922b
describe
'708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDQ' 'sip-files00120.txt'
5de152db0bef9f54b3ff0900af365a4d
ac5ffd996c812dd719f094dfba92d9607f51743d
describe
'21411' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDR' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
19050738ebdee74e5805200210d5f578
d31c50bca8b31d2d80cd30ed463ef286b60cd896
describe
'329699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDS' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
aea1a6514f84d489aede2090a98eb054
94272592801350b93bbe4792acf705ddbff00a2d
describe
'208669' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDT' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
97bff751c2d53322e0995a0500744931
b73af04976960a9dcd067388d4ab8652a1e3b0c8
describe
'14054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDU' 'sip-files00121.pro'
ab146f9f8ab867eac8ea2106175e1567
853d3356f4168caf03b15d61bdd8c24fa3cb607e
describe
'58903' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDV' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
fa139c71eafa3620103299728bcace6f
52ddf1b91386a268daf009afe384c6715cdd0afb
describe
'2646988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDW' 'sip-files00121.tif'
c50a6664181cf3d4e7e87da946cf80cb
efaae1491e548ff343f7b9218a6098a03ff749bb
describe
'583' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDX' 'sip-files00121.txt'
d0e2721e6a750cbb836643df11968ac4
9bca3e10e96462eada1e9561a2611d64410496a5
describe
'21394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDY' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
6b0396d80908953266442285548ab00b
882e49357a9684dcedb546980d7e56dab470a617
describe
'316724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYDZ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
3472aceed2a1c9913854ddb67f473abc
66bee2f11e10c5fdfb8a52153fd301af9833a453
describe
'181549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEA' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
d9822c06be27c6860d859201173a70fb
1f53ee2537fddfae994cd031f79886123a4c0379
describe
'29668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEB' 'sip-files00122.pro'
c745a64ee7e1993343980e7fb6275a41
5f61aea5e77c50b72ec39f5dd6af041e03c05569
describe
'61680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEC' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
f8646b108bd478f2a9ec548e688c4e71
54bfdb15839104dce4be17b61c620bbab708a3f6
describe
'2543372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYED' 'sip-files00122.tif'
b9eb8eda913a6c21a3304cc2081d6553
20b8c15d45e4066b2b6d01b55fc7a76bf340d950
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEE' 'sip-files00122.txt'
170f93fc8a3a89a87085b68d3df0b5e9
9976f9a3aca5524475c63b998168f72ca05fc2c9
describe
'22952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEF' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
a36379208eb1b0e59658720ae2bfe88d
d360f86b4244ec742987e059cb0278306608db5c
describe
'340647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEG' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
25c81e5667619471de9cca4ffd9cf359
a987adfda02a3c6b62fd905f1a03a8edf9885360
describe
'201862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEH' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
5ee33c09e52cb9423150308cb7942e8f
953905cdd012ad16752c2339e595315678bbe5e5
describe
'14279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEI' 'sip-files00123.pro'
b580315262c94e3501f0b8edc692a67d
247fdc42cf8fa48b3b86d4e6d8d1708d85845041
describe
'56806' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEJ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
9f303251670b85e24789634717a62592
c5cb363da67f9645468bb87825ecf215e9fd4f66
describe
'2734708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEK' 'sip-files00123.tif'
08ac90fae7842295d61818fa52868957
9a69a7be58ae521c76a13e9d971c077b14f4a503
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEL' 'sip-files00123.txt'
4809628d4145f432e3eebe8d54df0a5a
60d24cd3f7ab0df3170841e892b36ff772336f7a
describe
'20607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEM' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
06113972625dc320216553c53fe6af4f
a5f4cf71edc1d2839b58236cc8fc5de7a4dd4f85
describe
'320812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEN' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
4e8d86998fd02b6ebce58fe01b93f302
24dc0fdfe9a146fbf6ccd7bef845a75404e8be03
describe
'146601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEO' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
9eede65f35448c7b631e8e10591a0923
5f3b5fb6496173d65385ca3eb8f6bd66338f5dbe
describe
'24126' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEP' 'sip-files00124.pro'
4f5ada75a6030cb1d61304ffedd02b45
2752a9f286e580f4ef3a7b81bc7f3eb728434608
describe
'47287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEQ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
6c26a82858a983992aa585c809dd2067
0efe04bec68ebf29721795076dc8aca1ab8ae06b
describe
'2575252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYER' 'sip-files00124.tif'
d0a605de6f77525116b19ef02bee0535
0cec81729693fcb4ac50566c0367598e3e76bda3
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYES' 'sip-files00124.txt'
b78475a64cd9f23f686efc53517f9b40
256d977724196cc1e8478e4af5f8fa998a1a1279
describe
'19323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYET' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
c4a710754adaedea9a135e97a09df9be
5f83ba0f76c2067bf9344d73203fe386e7fbde5f
describe
'339142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEU' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
0c61f87a2803ccc2d9fa769491ea5733
1d058d47afd437bfdcfe9ac20b2d56b6233283f2
describe
'171535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEV' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
dbcb5505a9bf89f3df7a8e71ffba0098
8fc5dd64396ebeaf06b5fa34845742d0601ae9a6
describe
'36202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEW' 'sip-files00125.pro'
7aa3259cf900301d5fcb8a743ed7326a
9afc23309297180f3c8eae330c66a68790547458
describe
'58732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEX' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
c89ea91b1dfd692da13b0630411870e7
65a71398d921cb06548533493bcf328ce47fe066
describe
'2722548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEY' 'sip-files00125.tif'
9949c5df9b686488c985b674c8f75100
73263c5678e33ac6ce0aadd06b9da2d89badb437
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYEZ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
fa7c79926dd1554a994ea08476f7f489
f2197e5fdb3204366a1dcbcea2a069a78f92d7c5
describe
'20784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFA' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
52984f1f6329ae58f77f49434eea1bf9
e4e501070b6236d418e7d2784f0d8af4efa30f45
describe
'328349' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFB' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
a61b52812fbc1c58c2da914cc87e1cb5
5ed0b169ac1e82c32e3a88decb544d9d7b0388d8
describe
'177298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFC' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
df4031db5c2b7a095470115446b3f7c8
e0af7a74974e3e3eb55c7629cac773f0800d4a5e
describe
'32453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFD' 'sip-files00126.pro'
9f149d946cd470319c9bc7d7638b6cf7
c6d556b03b47620374718c7dae8a648b6d0254a6
describe
'57761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFE' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
d9413499ab5a54cac8a858a9e51cd434
258391d80550d77846bd1b3f0328b5e527c17c36
describe
'2636020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFF' 'sip-files00126.tif'
849cd3ff24e030a3696b017d09232665
b08bd40c65f4f0f92654734dcdc67698ff9042c3
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFG' 'sip-files00126.txt'
14a2cfdd98584ec625e7165119707cff
5a5ce89b269da995d2f99a47546dae9acf481a20
describe
'21433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFH' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
657d63bf3c6f956db7010c983fb62bd1
af24482170661de491dc3717b3239f719b68f87c
describe
'337196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFI' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
27db23bceeae90c8f58198b748f6e4d0
814bf447b64f81ca661b772608db36db6635a427
'2011-10-14T22:15:02-04:00'
describe
'181823' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFJ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
5bca80188d30e6cbd305b79feb2e8783
d35a4a29ebc4d2a559b1e8905ef825771373a645
describe
'39128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFK' 'sip-files00127.pro'
44fcf3858d787ded4844c131b3915b0b
96bfb830ebeaef663e320e40c8f1101ba13ec593
describe
'59699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFL' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
e7ac3969c807bc884edae03ab3114c27
01abba45312e379127bb1d82b727ce8f8ed08475
describe
'2706972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFM' 'sip-files00127.tif'
bd7be51e25acc65b30ffea5b1cf0c9b7
87c018523259f9beaec88eedd7001467d4bde162
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFN' 'sip-files00127.txt'
88aa8f4394382c539cb13c96e7632d0e
9faf232190c8e5c847068cec6d8a488ebd097e29
describe
'20946' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFO' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
418774b4943372843e5f8b140189b1f5
885bf6e46b67b3da2fead2af871a1e0a8a4be753
describe
'334689' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFP' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
9823915b69242dd352c303c9084b0ef9
6970ba5fb6efc0cfab19d853417712366d2dc98c
describe
'141110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFQ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
b854abb22d13a86b1321573af2ac8ac5
f3a20b74d4bd90441945885206e30bfc31ad50a9
describe
'17949' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFR' 'sip-files00128.pro'
28fca0b5537663d6d9101720cbf2b02b
cc3055210101ac7e8f084ee04152312d6b78ee80
describe
'47959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFS' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
9d078d7981eb4465ccd56ab1cebe6ae1
fdb41e783db72b9f8915e7708f1246b81dbfd41e
describe
'2686544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFT' 'sip-files00128.tif'
e5052f5b13c5fd397073c6196973c45a
dae6a68d214e7db049e9598bf770bd18c83bc9fc
'2011-10-14T22:13:06-04:00'
describe
'731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFU' 'sip-files00128.txt'
374cde02aa9865e382dc5526dc601b89
7bd6c4d2fc6e4b7f59464699ac631233e4da84bf
describe
'19165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFV' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
34241522a6d289134406f686c7cc3f5d
d3b9fc8c4e3ff0f1bc8735a0fa102aa23c0a3b50
describe
'348275' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFW' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
13d784a4a0566bdac8ee441c428c4455
7fbbb8070c73317da1c781bc25ebb393d7588d99
describe
'164265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFX' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
9c9a82d3ef676588a8875544757a060a
f9139976f812a8920e0294b76de73bbc468d7cb2
describe
'38223' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFY' 'sip-files00129.pro'
7d1d55b143953d8e91ac262f552c1d41
ccd33cb5eb02431c812f2c210e264d20edbf93bf
describe
'59797' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYFZ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
1375562ca10d7832e93dc3b9df99b3d1
93cddf01bf63528fbaa8ace877d5be8ba4566b78
describe
'2796280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGA' 'sip-files00129.tif'
7212f30aefc3a06cea488e07cc7be21d
8a67c58673c3253d6758159f9151e879b2894385
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGB' 'sip-files00129.txt'
63a8e910ceaee4e9080f4ef13a3588d1
2bc2204c945209b1e97d51791fdd74facdb13050
describe
'21406' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGC' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
d09fa9eee6bacd9f6e7081170a58e48f
f72287c968857a2dbe2294a352fa9c83eb167e4d
describe
'332394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGD' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
5091fa37c7f969ac2eb6e3ee7b3ecd98
65ac59efb76fcaea5283bea44506e795e09310e8
describe
'191767' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGE' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
ff3e0010d627d1649fabf8686e89263a
5596107182c2ed6a1711e8254fcef9829121be77
describe
'40663' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGF' 'sip-files00130.pro'
b433d07be2f8ebbbbbe910f2065238ad
7768ebd99d8762f57d449361c788ff0bc60f534b
describe
'61372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGG' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
49357d2798de80557ae571b02b3b5792
938fd2329944343cfb661effd82e5ea33d24e70f
describe
'2668564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGH' 'sip-files00130.tif'
5def94c3e49187ebd2cfea2f82a8fcfb
5e52fdf85544229b5bd4c0ee8f693b1b8ba6793a
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGI' 'sip-files00130.txt'
e71a2f12d76550061b35b74a6772ef72
fd5e28c97ec56729c8643276ef5e60ff20322f52
describe
'21270' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGJ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
b0c3809a0af1083b2cf4d2d0aaf4d4ea
df26bc8cf403299319af38c5f44f92f5b242a5f1
describe
'351914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGK' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
ad1a4c86da0106a20e4123e5b7de145f
168e95d7e3a23fcf8bf52adba0d992b4ca1f82f8
describe
'195486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGL' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
a40cc3b5f2e9a40d1293b84bebfff4ef
8313d54a2ab6d1781fd8bb28ae973bc4b0287ab7
describe
'42272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGM' 'sip-files00131.pro'
3b195db9e8034ab3e4cbbec7d43c2651
8bbb80fdabf1fcd9148a81d1443619a0a31b4737
describe
'61569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
fc3f7c53bd0159cb37b7c526c0fbe1ac
61dcc943670e2751c6e0a0e3ca086aba23f33a6e
describe
'2824748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGO' 'sip-files00131.tif'
ebd9fbcc7d36db24b78af212ed69d9cd
c0ef88d10401bbc2fe458f69062ec7bd094f31ff
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGP' 'sip-files00131.txt'
e7cae7e227e43b08bca1b87aa878fc51
c9bfe7f44c33df7370426f9df49a4bedc841d40c
describe
'20749' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGQ' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
399d7e06a48e034a35b16e9e1da57d80
e037924fc521d71e779cfb497194a95defbda1ce
describe
'328387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGR' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
5bbf3f9b79bb0e8b8b684adff751caac
2ab27b4960a5a7dbfa18d79a3cbebff37f98e3f1
describe
'199445' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGS' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
46189722a10b90b6ca9741e61195d14b
ca4890d5d319c9556ccbadf2b5b7eb60f100de0e
describe
'40305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGT' 'sip-files00132.pro'
3e88edd6769959b373eca30821eab449
6b8870dfee25a39bd46b34a8ce7ea7b40b539458
describe
'64362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
4bd4b415c327788303fabc55fdf25bbc
32f2d8c4b72c45b3512a9663a42ce9755837f370
describe
'2636452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGV' 'sip-files00132.tif'
55e20a13c4920747b69a4369262fba0f
c7b6817529f852225c556953f31c86806fd7acdc
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGW' 'sip-files00132.txt'
894adb37ef79342c709e69da9322dafe
77f6a2843a20deb588c5b91904f7fe9b3a463288
describe
'22318' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGX' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
28d7fab545ac96a7973db1cd52cf6866
4c94908458b1b5a3b757487dbf5431b72a5b7c23
describe
'343280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGY' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
7f0c8710a92684fd23d7b50058d89c1a
a15b4b394f02e66c07eb681c3817b0363145d203
describe
'82060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYGZ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
d4a6a01a941d2b843bbae951b0e8e46a
0f0014010d5b93544d7335922c3b68ca8d50420f
describe
'776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHA' 'sip-files00133.pro'
b19d5fe5a6b31e3e17f026ad23ab3772
14503d2c45a341b93eff7a1ff1748922698695fd
describe
'25500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHB' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
dc6d13d0748b54006316f22496686ea3
1629b72cba8d8a874b2805e232e418b3199af1a6
describe
'2755184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHC' 'sip-files00133.tif'
3f43cae3f0633b6651222752388fd5c7
8c5834a49812c190e95df3144a578d8a95fdea18
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHD' 'sip-files00133.txt'
27cd321bd00f280c06bd9a0ac61f2cb2
bbdb5c7a26e5571b88437986df94c7a088eb1c11
describe
'13331' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHE' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
a23ab8b19e8b5b37f2db205ec39af47c
765430659a6450c60c547b1857c7319d304d883c
describe
'326180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHF' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
d8c308707ccb3e892555f67251f17cb2
0624a7b0031c80510c992793ad09c9b7c2747448
describe
'54860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHG' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
e20808df2fea99de59e207caaa36748b
9f70bf2393045bca0b369c99c11f4782455e5970
describe
'12134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHH' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
74ca669a861d958e5b927ccd11408216
c567504b5ba167985242ad34711c811b45678a48
describe
'2618360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHI' 'sip-files00134.tif'
3a974015674b83ddb99f71720ced8075
830cb80536b77d42fd25fd206d7e9ce46b9bbdd9
describe
'7997' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHJ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
2da3f7dca0cd2daf9d328ba9fe9157ed
b4f6ded04ff3920d4efc663c75bbf25a6ceebda1
describe
'350373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHK' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
913d7ff491b10e7de2b423b10af32fda
157c63f48381397efaab97fe27ba52fa4ba8136a
describe
'192004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHL' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
dabf6524e24667debeaca1a4560ed09b
7fc15c64e54fb7c57bec5b1c5b5609dd4881b502
describe
'40662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHM' 'sip-files00135.pro'
5f2cca57d893d7c63fd77307fa09ded3
a56e4410722dfc570a21cf464f74f3afdded5a9b
describe
'60548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHN' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
f3e98c0b5ef07b40f0ea54f88849db6b
c5eaad92d806b67288508dcff3138e5d572e7715
describe
'2812988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHO' 'sip-files00135.tif'
53c5a03362b9598056538e431f0d00da
79c2b86d0b7e0655d0496e03f68434a92e9d287c
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHP' 'sip-files00135.txt'
73581496a5c85dc081ecd4f1555b1e46
aba648e38de928e257fa6e0fb96447588c426205
describe
'20547' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHQ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
47cf1eb71617927079e3b3662843f532
30a1e3731427f48c565a9be99fc8084b12dca882
describe
'343721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHR' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
1487ffd09dfe52e3d19073fe81e48f4f
20d5a86a658e581a8136cd6274252faf363a4ab8
describe
'195191' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHS' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
4dfbe92f3444ff9890bbb8ed112763c5
e2d36e3b300ef28957a9a8c53a508bde1f5c74e4
describe
'41175' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHT' 'sip-files00136.pro'
5a9d7d58514e22dab9059918ab212d93
2f75e014e411c6946895f098df1b2961e52f1173
'2011-10-14T22:12:18-04:00'
describe
'62952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHU' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
c1ced11104380bf1278155b302ac810d
bb5bbf213aea2f15ad17a95c4baf58f326c0d524
describe
'2759572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHV' 'sip-files00136.tif'
39893ef197cc6463f9de3d4b41ab94ec
c339d013939bbeb734bfb7689d4c1b8788e9e1f5
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHW' 'sip-files00136.txt'
a5fb789567adb5b6e785fef6d079d40f
cea5bd7cc0c655e01a692f728bbaf6a47f35a53e
describe
'20517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHX' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
5e978640e91da30a6c560b5c05a7f9c2
dfc9385aa3a26f15aaf7f4b7a34349c6faec209d
describe
'351628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHY' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
15b4e4ebd45cc34bdb62a9b38fa766be
fdff1c8a81d028d4dbfaefbc5a0829e9d2674380
describe
'199407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYHZ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
5ab6071573971a3a0b4790cd1f9dde00
a7788e316f129529615cf781a73e2b3cf92d2a31
describe
'16655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIA' 'sip-files00137.pro'
a46872d3a62e5bd3a89d2f56fdf3d13d
bef42847ca5c2dc63d560b4825491d92553c503a
describe
'56377' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIB' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
09c97f54e5332f9427300a2c5a5f8036
8ea572de5075606dabeac053b4cfd2d291b77f10
describe
'2822928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIC' 'sip-files00137.tif'
bbd490508c67efc81e0c136e547f4fa0
0aeb1152223b8e792089bc32cea5d87928d681e4
describe
'670' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYID' 'sip-files00137.txt'
ce22daeeb729fe0e20421e19e6fd3eb2
48825b0b0aeb5f62ad47579073c5d7e7efd8c683
describe
'20206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIE' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
17a4f684f4e0d94bec6f3ec399cbb9ba
b4af5c3e877e33b9fa180d5dec29026501bf6588
describe
'341700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIF' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
2e0dd2c557269738705ba7c736d0e44c
e8819c22babfb740210bef874cde89f3fb6262d7
describe
'195190' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIG' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
eaf16f94b4ca6410eca1a7a064ed882e
28a199bb6e1439245e4df7f715adb58d8a0eb4af
describe
'39885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIH' 'sip-files00138.pro'
dc2881ed7c282c3d60867e559a6a3614
1461a7316bc478044d154ebf8053f197d41ee17e
describe
'61811' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYII' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
c1c39130d33d95b01d29c36763b6c6ab
312ca843b23759f33c0fb4a0921a70312563d311
describe
'2742996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIJ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
8c2da99195002979ac01cb20c959b341
aba8a046c7ee348c1abdbf03c802fe885bbac6ec
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIK' 'sip-files00138.txt'
e083f3bf3091783943d28b9fecfbb5ef
54c0f09a459738c3e8c3c972cbc2fafac69c139d
describe
'20283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIL' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
274db39bf1f22a9eff19c245127ce87f
13a6c943d61db48fba9332d9655c3e7348b86754
describe
'347972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIM' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
550bc1e2ddf7e10f0095e56fb674ff1a
af60dbd5b5b7ad6657621e37d344af915c8a2ab5
describe
'194450' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIN' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
59730783e167f905deaf493c6af691e7
751f2e8c7302c212bdda4a190efdad89880812ec
describe
'40256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIO' 'sip-files00139.pro'
92e6f543266292b4b126c5bfc001a252
98b44bdd67a465fc7bc06d485b38faed5eee68aa
describe
'62506' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIP' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
3a6b56bd76569ba7d5f216a0025487a1
2be8f6b011dd70b157d72e2015bb0e560b4e9d6e
describe
'2793460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIQ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
d21e3d467503817c4564ecd1c94f7aac
fad69d87accda284221db56bed9e98507f711b99
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIR' 'sip-files00139.txt'
c55439c37231245692555637c12caf4e
365b15facc58ae551eaea9d08fef631993e61cc8
describe
'20760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIS' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
b27d241e3d3289acdf26bdf40e98a4a1
5f51bff9285c2781aa20224a263bedcec6aba439
describe
'339348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIT' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
94c0d0abc80c45ae4bcf417b4cc39cf4
811212895db33d0a9875b4b490834494c052823c
describe
'161394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIU' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
4a0862bda4f7c94286336f181b4c6238
618ec09af2d26e38f59bde3abcbd38557e6becf4
describe
'28582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIV' 'sip-files00140.pro'
03518cca6c09c13f55926a2dbe94d09c
369a8efc2fb8f6dc95399f24a96411a86efa0a27
describe
'50690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIW' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
1eb61e2cf348cb88a770de8aa9e54e77
eeafb3e79e290aa3852847d580b462b2af40d8fc
describe
'2724528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIX' 'sip-files00140.tif'
5322f126402b8d6781945a185c75117d
2500a6c427622a6c254afbd0f2101c2109505a91
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIY' 'sip-files00140.txt'
53d6211ef88f57891fde18064f3a9278
edacd01d51dfc4924b9c30d13c24fbe4e0e8c921
describe
'18426' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYIZ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
858d62396baf292d2f9c50d586464e1c
6195ee1cecc154dc5c78a9d78222713ccdcab241
describe
'357304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJA' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
4f695368247a953f2b9312835fcebe58
87dd51091e2b2823719c4bb7ee58645e19c5c633
describe
'176849' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJB' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
32c80edc46aac38e37a3bb0a5ecfd5c4
6919a80b785ee3dc1984f504c28b452b32b1a85b
describe
'26313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJC' 'sip-files00141.pro'
35bfc1aafe16bb4d71461496bca3a11e
9d8051a4c0f1e7d74b3367a877b2f90c2c42584c
describe
'56412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJD' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
4248d5ab98d4b510bb40efdcd08f05f0
07342364f9b8c54705929fd84db46349602880f7
describe
'2868376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJE' 'sip-files00141.tif'
5c17585732954d4a7c989d9e4571e0eb
df853ee27b2d8ea4d16ccacab0bac2eef6c52924
'2011-10-14T22:12:36-04:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJF' 'sip-files00141.txt'
fdf1b2e8d43c3080322716113d096730
0020df5fa4e56b70cc169cba0a391b155ebc25c4
describe
'20211' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJG' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
0d3f1253a774818e65e7aa394caf2057
a7786d7f0b533a9025d2490b657fc659ea5f55c6
describe
'337969' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJH' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
2ab0276d55a3aaed1f5b21b843b957e4
3a019113481a0f1863984ecf6c16d1687814b59f
describe
'190244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJI' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
b20aa22e0c5060e5b9eb03e0a1e177a1
956fac78a7ca6dc88a99924969dad4fa02bf77cc
describe
'37828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJJ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
92f1b7e6b54a8c664f9e5c144f183661
afbfe18ed30cc003adc362a63b84101bce94e198
describe
'60329' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJK' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c68548bf8ee703431547b21d2a190f9a
4795f424c8b1291d7508cef0f0fdad481b55e562
describe
'2713084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJL' 'sip-files00142.tif'
8f959b33ca5edce37debcdf80d2fd145
c7ef5eb199e4f37884bd06f360bd2daefcb3c968
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJM' 'sip-files00142.txt'
99b9de7b28f73d8929984ef8c0009c39
335f141514546784bbf16c50cbe81f99157adade
describe
'20551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJN' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
003ed013ebc1622af00bb5e295029de3
2e0779523ad4ca3bc186996c9dcfa99b17357949
describe
'339587' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJO' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
818532fe6c3b1e744a90b6d157cad07e
e8ec211f5a546cf405b0f4cd2d0df1f335468af7
describe
'195693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJP' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
1f5b4d85624d73cbfc83d476ea2734d7
aebc166d508e8f181897a5b3296df5def0945c3f
describe
'39691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJQ' 'sip-files00143.pro'
fc959b7e88ba5231caca1a5132eaa190
1cd0a288e5af871bc0d12048cc9682b437a9262a
describe
'62133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJR' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
4e82cdff391701b429fc5fe48b5bf6c1
553a011c6c5437dfb230a155efff55aa3aa27576
describe
'2725920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJS' 'sip-files00143.tif'
f494f5eef06b2a35fc6be34f40126b94
ec574922414ae5231aa27309e7b4755e166b3418
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJT' 'sip-files00143.txt'
553d145f4cd8756f4bd761c4b79f3f89
a091bb3b0ce7decc430e9df9d1c4526de420dd45
describe
'20349' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJU' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
163c86a83c7f7ee634b3a6a6532f95f2
6ffa52ac89ec9ab93e8e89a957b89b5274536ab2
describe
'340232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJV' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
c7754f087b2d934c5c5e5c073df545c8
3d9af771316602d0f7c34582d42d5f6798b28a1c
describe
'214827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJW' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
acf4c3d7959d9a606fb9c3a4ae59459c
1def411fc1ccdf82fc9a5606059c8b726aefed3f
describe
'17246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJX' 'sip-files00144.pro'
0ab05fab47f9bb9e31ecb492c5c681c8
83932e7a78d63b49869b33fb44b4536e664e8af0
describe
'57876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJY' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
56393360b6eb7a3ddc69952c67354add
1f14048fc1812b1c594cddcfe73d91e8bb4438b6
describe
'2731420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYJZ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
1c03874d959e98b2a5f1be25f6b1a078
bbe460a03879554e8bd7bb216b82ef8b67d19cb9
describe
'707' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKA' 'sip-files00144.txt'
bd342d600748158581f4ccd65e5c140f
67c138dadeb06b8d372cf54c337d5fbadab53fa0
describe
'20243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKB' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
eb5508966399b97a42d0833cd6d4e102
d9c70b40b18c62650142f5234691d57b986fd6cb
describe
'359093' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKC' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
2d50186d19db363beac46f26e6af08a5
d868444f058d09370e3b365c14589e5f60827720
describe
'226594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKD' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
3f82fbe1410668d5add9f0988704b247
b8a85dedc016874794ce7a0d99fe1256ebbabf3f
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKE' 'sip-files00145.pro'
f1a87ad1644a4a0a49b9488f7a8746ca
85da694d82c7ad50de4718a6c49d95964987e2e8
describe
'55226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKF' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
7e0caec12453593e7a037fd7cf66ddf9
028a67d73cbfe028fd6054c8598e454b21b22030
describe
'2883400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKG' 'sip-files00145.tif'
f7953ee2264ab417924cab1907560c24
6f4bfa9166c70e7d3e070d4fb159e39450969674
describe
'197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKH' 'sip-files00145.txt'
14f29444e14fb29cd3e7deb4ae9b90d9
a9116574203c35413869169d90287f39cc514fa0
describe
'19230' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKI' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
d24a295b7e2b1ae38cb95ae8d20ef8ad
af7bbcc80fd9c61a211fe76eb7c82d4a71522fd5
describe
'356581' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKJ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
2b6d95f8a24cb5a13525cc7d468ba4c0
95d045e48e0a43a3c0222d3c3c2f47a86b17e650
describe
'57446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKK' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
2d3bd09f641b12dd4330281004de2825
b778c013f32ad0267ab4029df9e89a11541bb37d
describe
'12519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKL' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
f9440232def4d747e2acae2b6604ca80
622b1011637eb3a2bf6b5166357ad7399a316c4e
describe
'2859376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKM' 'sip-files00146.tif'
7d98a36cc1cb7eb1b973f3c7041a73d4
07ff9674b5cd0faeada695ea9d809f112f7dae45
describe
'7924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKN' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
34491434a5aca98f03c84e434e77cb29
9ca89d4c2084fbbc5a4b5f8461d0092083883507
describe
'340102' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKO' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
2c9f9150bbc6aa50e5d0b5de0ed69769
839be3591a84c2a26917a3e90fcb23d019e58f14
describe
'194988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKP' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
1c2c5547bf35d9a5d749093412e807f8
bf0afa38047271c5f0a8daf3efaccaeaf5c333c9
describe
'38674' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKQ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
1053d06ed73acd5fbc719d9718d932c6
ff4eaef1df6d4b082c7fb4a75479f7d8ca539513
describe
'62055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKR' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
b3c6c2bb3dda3c6a756706a3c0fdeda2
dc7306329ab60aad638c34b960ddbc1ef025ba3d
describe
'2730180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKS' 'sip-files00147.tif'
ac51d854b5553c1046e8e4aa9496a858
c9b39d3d16db5459cedf64133864f44516a6d7b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKT' 'sip-files00147.txt'
bc108428a0478c3ba2de130752490812
5942b43f502ca83d6a873c8422fe7d322c19308b
describe
'20566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKU' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
392c500f2eb1567f8717b8b053ad1150
bf41fad8b033370a2aa75e018cf01602f78b82aa
describe
'346870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKV' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
16c4926bbe81ae9723f0ff8e7e3a9a30
283e054e793b49651c08b7d15ad67e012d9e0929
describe
'194285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKW' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
aec31c12319ebeb2dc7d3a13ffc4ed41
26428092a906282fdb6590585364438bc7085e59
describe
'39501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKX' 'sip-files00148.pro'
18d569cfa9dc82dac9ea7f27e732db24
6f3bc47a1aec0d42c673c00208124a7326a497fd
describe
'62696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKY' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
bb7a7483a2b35fb59295e5ec65a9ac44
cc900f10b9d4f45872f482e7b7ca4a1b62852356
describe
'2784860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYKZ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
684a1975a5f6d635043f1c846cb81253
07f2affaf6e702bed67f5ea294ec6838e58a029d
'2011-10-14T22:16:39-04:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLA' 'sip-files00148.txt'
588c1f61e517d3d3a7c9b22cd5fb4e3a
045362ee7d3a70e72e06017996a3f3812f341ab5
describe
'21165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLB' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
e680b280b4e97f1e2af4590ee32c76c9
c44c53b7c2241c482a5a5b42a724d464c68116fe
describe
'354851' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLC' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
071654761de1b7fc65b642b882a61dcb
8b22cdc0a235ee11b787069fe59e8b81c5456737
describe
'187678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLD' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
03019a675d0b14b43035c0ae34b10286
d5e2bcfce78df6e5ea986ef3a47e8a94ba65d199
describe
'42276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLE' 'sip-files00149.pro'
902a4eda81adc1bc00d2223c5bfd4116
99e9e7be3654a9c832477581b459bcec4117b3cc
describe
'61721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLF' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
c68797b9e86928e3598f7d075da9eeab
b5a24d3d98fb073b657d867587e79c4037d8b305
describe
'2848496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLG' 'sip-files00149.tif'
98afeea4957dab89e3a04ad874348fb6
3d98669ab9fee3aff9789c09d42b1a6f8185909e
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLH' 'sip-files00149.txt'
3c5e26d97e02afc6ce3489f1ab00303c
11c9b73c48a1a4b5e65caccc584a4580f64f1680
describe
'20238' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLI' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
0705bb83c28aeb83d53f6892ece1a40b
644712dcd0e7f1f95651cb0a8f95753e2739674c
describe
'350165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLJ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
0ff664c7e5bdd024293e574d100cbaf4
dbbe5a7ccae45b476a99862ccf750eed0c0feeac
describe
'215613' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLK' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
48b68b84c7ba349e89eed7e1904cfd13
f93f9e97c7d4f2d33a06ad837a13f2d59d551605
describe
'16318' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLL' 'sip-files00150.pro'
b7e8d24a2e384180730ac2cc746adc4e
f3610513f52d7a34984f2ddc5f6c002310576643
describe
'59187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLM' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
1514c93955d456e8cd17ee7c0dbd40cd
61d0c559e81ca84d17db3aa0393236b86bdbc274
describe
'2811632' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLN' 'sip-files00150.tif'
2d0c1764b531bbfbc93684e55e93fc71
9a602074a445a477515a0502048cc0e552fc8972
describe
'689' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLO' 'sip-files00150.txt'
629cacd65063cd8ae745121e32adc941
9f1d94d77045c98d221c8754eaef7222da78194d
describe
'20717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLP' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
b8cd57917fd16bd55495f54860e8de4c
8ebbeeba98c8f9efdd58b853eefc84ae50f3cd49
describe
'370150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLQ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
657cf525afa1771cf5fa8f2a0d325429
e309d68bd398c3f134a9bad85c6a2dde8de974f4
describe
'191502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLR' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
33666eaa307447833cf92c52dde7bcb1
491a8ff1fb4bc19ffeef15792b8fea4e31c4ac0d
describe
'39900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLS' 'sip-files00151.pro'
b3e58850fb748bceb5481add71093da4
f9eae69cae12b6ee952c3d63ce2898661cdef0bf
describe
'62335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLT' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
a5956636a17b111f385006d21df458c5
420db23dcf6ecabe08ff603cdf885924f90d9391
describe
'2974112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLU' 'sip-files00151.tif'
59b36592e50276c5fc7ee50a0da394f5
bee4714f9f9d6d79183c40f9a835f75b6cd37621
'2011-10-14T22:16:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLV' 'sip-files00151.txt'
6fb2759cd004741d15c1f2991fe7a2ab
7357f307ce2532a1e94d5c24b64d0c7ffc7b4335
describe
'23048' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLW' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
21cde71fb642a596f9d770decd13b505
d349f0051d28dd2c0964002cf7d43703689c46a2
describe
'351883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLX' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
78326c3925ffd4eb801f5813af0eeceb
7b78901cc9d75270f2fb6d0f6516186d8f20e08b
describe
'185066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLY' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
89a34e4a8b14a95844cc2364dafbf030
816af59b7e1f445637cc4a5305352b38ed7e9395
describe
'18091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYLZ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
209494390d354ca2ffe54a29ab613a13
1ae79aa06fcf39f3636eef39c0a5f5171253526a
describe
'51336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMA' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
bb6583e07eb7fddbcb533c5842bfd60f
5dde79a8ae097fa207b84ffb1c189ee7a6abe021
describe
'2824240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMB' 'sip-files00152.tif'
1815afe66485b58960e68d22b87ed16e
865b742aa098eb2c404a5af79b801335a0d33f09
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMC' 'sip-files00152.txt'
ba6a1bafdb7e691510369f3395797338
f30d333be8367790dfed811a40da320a8b21406d
describe
Invalid character
'18483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMD' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
111ff64c43c66c9146bae0dc8435c1ac
1eaeeb3c45b3f446bdca10cb6281fbd1d298f629
describe
'348706' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYME' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
197891811a3230635d1b5837eb1c832c
f992446f56ba8f5eaf4665b1dc4789cbbf53aa3b
describe
'195651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMF' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
3d96fdec5782e765fd21531f4ff34fd8
90c90bfbd346960765dd8e29ff04a4c09f913652
describe
'39549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMG' 'sip-files00153.pro'
95121cd54d325b9f88e7501e0ec17724
1af335387a6321ed3fff3e7a80cfc20fd26348b3
describe
'61561' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMH' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
1e9912821a26f8056ea4e229221e9b0a
2fb135489f45554a62130eb4430b8ebfc10e04d7
describe
'2799112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMI' 'sip-files00153.tif'
8b545e2ab0977be27cdff64dd41e2065
61387c89405bcf83ee194f57d3b7119bd3ec132f
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMJ' 'sip-files00153.txt'
92748125b961940c803fc9c63bed2133
e611b447c85e84815453fbb80242a0fe77b76aee
describe
'19988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMK' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
3db87b267140bd785cd4bd36802ce7d6
1387e495edbb5d5cb643e9c857712a4e19469351
describe
'351398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYML' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
2f08525081051964142a098a4f06ab76
de97b0b0d633e1aded1cbb01cdf4343181807fb2
describe
'195836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMM' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
efc5789fd07f7aa3fb68ffedfdbdeb78
7d44e36cc3b9f7f1ca9eaf84ea7e1700e75fc03c
describe
'40878' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMN' 'sip-files00154.pro'
ab05ff7590c5dbdf0765ffeb592b9bd0
b854c5cbd175f5832333461877a86b105eee8fe8
describe
'63391' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMO' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
63da648cccc3ddac7fea1eea8737bc3e
a718f76f6c0966cfce982721ab5c238a752cd545
describe
'2820820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMP' 'sip-files00154.tif'
cba1780aecc28a337d6341a5b49e9c2d
0b5cc76230a1040e0be6c2388d6285906b0e2d37
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMQ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
86546ef8f04c4166f20df146d1db360b
f1dd298ee21f829c7d13e0913c0972abc9c91ded
describe
'20694' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMR' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
ce3569d854abe5e7fd0902cd614c4541
232f812869a2052380f673beca50b23162fe7fe6
describe
'354362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMS' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
cb2e840008b6f1074eb28b37d339f55b
5573d3e0cc9eae2be79365f6c9edae2d4a1e1e6e
describe
'192139' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMT' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
7c064228abc145df545a449ecbb53634
8e826841c711ec7a250f824c8d22701d200c4e52
describe
'40145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMU' 'sip-files00155.pro'
ef7d5899d51ed2fd985c3452956807d5
d23da696d86333e4876b2e870e63fd56c6aadc26
describe
'62126' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMV' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
099b44fefda02bd73dcffd51eacc8b85
3fbf4ac606a8f9ecd40ea63dce1e3a5e10543c29
describe
'2844188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMW' 'sip-files00155.tif'
352983ce838460803bd8a3aae6fde0f0
431850607015c03990953cb79dffe348907da405
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMX' 'sip-files00155.txt'
a65238b6120846b1b3610122865c3f4e
7ca66925d69ede80908a0c29c7697fe617123f8a
describe
'20332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMY' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
5d274ec9adf14dcd61e9d5313e7b00d4
efef37f55ba7d974bf8e0aea42e95b628bd66683
describe
'349887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYMZ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
db3b141072c44f87286bd0d64b7d087f
e0a41cb8f55fc80360bfbe7b87e293175d4429aa
describe
'198028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNA' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
16b91bbdb58e2686a0e46b104b2a3d35
7e0775590d76eb19a3ca5e18b69c408d29e91dc7
describe
'41909' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNB' 'sip-files00156.pro'
f161cbcdc47e45af6d55756af46d3a40
3573a27c6921965de3a073100c0fd39917305b38
describe
'63243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNC' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
5612a687192cf63491f1f7b6fd05f95e
cf833c6845bc7734a3d4ea9c4a5ee5c48cc1f856
describe
'2808988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYND' 'sip-files00156.tif'
b3f46282c4a48c8d9b0825cc00a2304a
0c43831a2b34ca2bd4859a83768d36bec8a24a11
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNE' 'sip-files00156.txt'
be89eea038d64cf35d86f3277d69e40b
d447030564368ac34a469b342ab5cabcde2fe691
describe
'20655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNF' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
722e5be657a325725b8ce44778cd3be1
d7924b97f7218beef7f00ed02e902b6c08a71cc2
describe
'347193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNG' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
4fcfb1a6237e112e45f30a7b1f4481c6
edd3c4c947a4a798cd3ec69ab623cb4a14071a48
describe
'195600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNH' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
04a4cbee1cfa537583258d74b5315131
744b5950ef2aebdab93f24d2aa6bfce99277224b
describe
'42610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNI' 'sip-files00157.pro'
5032a5ad96b80dd10f59aacaa0e5d245
84952f259429a04220a4444486374a90184b074f
describe
'62686' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNJ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
d4874b736b930e9694cf60c9eb3534fd
c45abab14ec1a263ac70f288f221f052888dfe5d
describe
'2787724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNK' 'sip-files00157.tif'
2e14265bfd909cd3ac2514d77c7c9a65
d2d2d020a66f606ba4a63aa416de92f8a3ba307c
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNL' 'sip-files00157.txt'
91781b53c1fd7e2af5a083a7e5e70a1a
5979e5fd5cd42f372c22eb1444201b233155e001
describe
'20625' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNM' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
9525d96183111ab3308dd84dad35cb43
9bfd39a3d6fda1cb41dda7275356545ff0eac56c
describe
'344559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNN' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
e6c15c39e79b59679c47bf3d5636eb82
06b61380d3a56eae2e95a3cdf4e4bbbe442ee205
describe
'195005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNO' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
e78fc07534a6e43c6cd46461b85b2271
f3d5f93b2b07be8c8a20d006d5b2c1519f828119
describe
'39262' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNP' 'sip-files00158.pro'
0f2c7b721829f490e56c1977fc5065e7
13ca3afd2466908f052334b5a8faca0485a5c4d6
describe
'61392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNQ' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
0c7fc78e69d7612dae728baf0773f16c
d78af11ed47a7b811cfa7b46b75066eb1ac5fe5a
describe
'2765608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNR' 'sip-files00158.tif'
1420e7089d75fcfebeb495be9f8b7282
17a3635352dec11c40cc561494c3dda9b3b894b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNS' 'sip-files00158.txt'
668d4f54c60b3cd863be83e9a0024bf6
727a2dc2af1977e541a15879aa3d323e3550f0b8
describe
'20650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNT' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
305196714d2e2fffd2ce10d1db9ce31e
bea08e2b4298b549d6da666cf96d2a7d03fe15dd
describe
'349182' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNU' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
19cc74e65ec6da12aa8aeee35a655a0d
827023de7e0e0f1b9a9527c1a9a11f8323f07ef0
describe
'199454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNV' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
70b0e4d5df6cbc11ae0b8f38f3bb7ce6
d15c942404b07f7973e4a2ce852350363acb6d24
describe
'41064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNW' 'sip-files00159.pro'
d2fb4184417d796df56431026817d645
f6a5750c840aed2c35a18c5bf2d1edc3ca2103e9
describe
'63862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNX' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
17abf3377501617cc340c183af1c808f
fc2c93fa20ed599319094d4965a6473707075fa4
describe
'2803076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNY' 'sip-files00159.tif'
49627fca8ad802cb795f8088cb6f2686
32de35cc1fd55a8306704110b670da990edf7d56
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYNZ' 'sip-files00159.txt'
58cbda6808dc4eb307f6ac619874e98f
0035f6e6db02689ece8c60f98c7cc0fb1dfcb4d0
describe
'21011' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOA' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
abfa62086d248be7d0dbe1ecd80e678c
2457e0c85e91ba8a483c848ab3e3a4950526a52e
describe
'338818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOB' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
bd398b6bf430dc885a1e0d3493ba34f5
9d5f6a2ce70802648161d96fbb23fe4968f26d15
describe
'196920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOC' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
04a8e033102385e3bbd118509c970a20
6f963ab5a50c8b199bc628fd6521e1f2f9ca0c34
describe
'40550' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOD' 'sip-files00160.pro'
5192ed7f47c3d5ab589797e81e0320c4
efae2fa72b9bf1fb33ce3f86a58576830cc3741e
describe
'64032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOE' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
e2d334082567b930632b8983a8525ace
3e919ecddef6653c2f948774262ae2ce2b60c06a
describe
'2720820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOF' 'sip-files00160.tif'
e533296bb24c22ed6acd2b8b83e46d84
f585e62313db5cbba09552295fe5b8025221bc25
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOG' 'sip-files00160.txt'
9ae4d0989cede973001096c2af257b90
fd1373a86aad24b1d720ddd3cd6ae9ed8b91d578
describe
'21056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOH' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
4792c89774ce2bc8584edbed4f6442e5
cd2ba6ebea97ea0e5d18b17325d101dbcfaeae43
describe
'352742' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOI' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
0f210414138b218dccf1e6ba82316222
d44a137205c8056632a9c90a043f9643113a02e5
describe
'197140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOJ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
c3b2a07b2db285a6f189387065bbdd44
f11360d65f6401690d5ee2dabb52e234f046c66b
describe
'41998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOK' 'sip-files00161.pro'
6220a8463b225dcc23f9536231f43829
5e816fb9fa085344c9573a71097bf907c5b01c32
describe
'64229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOL' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
a927ba950d7abc149a266c147941ce43
7af3879f276e6c669b130ca3518f3b960da279af
describe
'2831404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOM' 'sip-files00161.tif'
fb868989efe565d43150427315b0c5ff
b33dde7c4cb4e8698892b8af1645194f5c31df6b
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYON' 'sip-files00161.txt'
65bd1a5e01f2f54f0a48be7312ada189
f2f9d2b0565a03d67b665c81b5a03e34689905ef
describe
'20886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOO' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
fa45c26e89030cc197580224b403b103
c4057a26e6dcf98f1dd584541f15a8761bbe3b63
describe
'354538' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOP' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
94d9e337327204abed0728409a212af3
8c52ac199b16b54480b9d056527754b30184bdf6
describe
'217579' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOQ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
5eb9547c340043b5ddf1fdcb4d76b543
dbd8375f415d8ac039d4fdf0d82a30da628fd35e
describe
'9651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOR' 'sip-files00162.pro'
dfc382f2595f71eb2f512d35c23afe94
2de8c4c67e643330097ce7fd61e61ca4b7238816
describe
'56600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOS' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
793e789b2b28b46a323f05ffe2ee45e5
f3e2751fdd7f9cd797f1ad4e6c73352ff733b879
describe
'2845904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOT' 'sip-files00162.tif'
26f1286a77a73786aef5a877c3106eb0
909080a5c74c1445ec5a76d9090377f697a3c0e9
describe
'404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOU' 'sip-files00162.txt'
15cf4d24421311337141df90be8855ba
53db681a8b3f0870cbb249a03cfe35f0f2d8daea
describe
'19749' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOV' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
4fa2c565c4286692647bedf3b44dbb4e
a10a4389daa2c1ad58cda8e6e6a48a5f04ba320a
describe
'352843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOW' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
086e61c55a179ee83b01314cf7825a16
401f6e15d614e1208bff18a71785c4fa72f7c1ac
describe
'191200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOX' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
417e1e171d81644599b4a614af3699ef
26633548927e0ee52397a06ced9f13518efeb8f7
describe
'24970' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOY' 'sip-files00163.pro'
f8c99a6aaa6b27c581b513d88729f40c
3b5116c05c0e6615b38be4651a4a080a7bff0bc4
describe
'59591' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYOZ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
8ba482eb176d7c6aaef3c118c933c359
4f82263b2259bb53861e1e1a5437fb8050753d82
describe
'2836068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPA' 'sip-files00163.tif'
8373ce9e1a517c4f53ecfc1c190830e9
9333778e2d88c14441f8ab78d53ec01f4e2df5ed
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPB' 'sip-files00163.txt'
c813401d68578aff314a07c492eb4678
dda89293f7a6cb87b0319def82cf61a10ed5ef07
describe
'23887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPC' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
74fbb2e5166b98a14897a04f0875ea90
bef1093bde3c48deee7a089b1ed9c0972ff000c9
describe
'346220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPD' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
c9b40d7155aab5a255c73a1312f43c7e
958dae49afd901b9991be4c75054b6fef079e5ac
describe
'167131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPE' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
37bef33608f175d7d334bd4d9f3551ae
f0c20caf5fc919e22b8bc930b32ef781a6a558a9
describe
'32078' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPF' 'sip-files00164.pro'
5f7e673d8268ee001ea1c80371bdc4fe
ffc307d6e23c63174ce47d34de3484b5d412846d
describe
'53831' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPG' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
5203a37e13366874ff9136c9a0d1ae80
f58f0d31bad69ce93ab3baf2798adbd5deccf94c
describe
'2781416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPH' 'sip-files00164.tif'
27f237bfd54974989642e1153b01842e
7eb3f7aa34240f277d3d9871be482e0d6e2b9309
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPI' 'sip-files00164.txt'
2311d0efa587694ef5da15cfa2343a4b
8ad16e34c2635727e1af0ca5404786707039f7cf
describe
'19552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPJ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
498fee8486f9e326a0f35e6f71cc9f8e
c6c399ccda489789c4d4e104f5cab5353e8862f7
describe
'351846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPK' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
8d6864685b2554a5e3c473e280058e2b
6be7bae1e851a893cb3e42f87e6c6571b6804b44
describe
'146351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPL' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
ec74bf040a8dd655b80b3df73eb0004f
f75222274a8e521bb02415e573e19d93ca115aef
describe
'5158' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPM' 'sip-files00165.pro'
beb21c402e19801797a6cb44fbef2294
01517623af7d610053f7e581faa08984fbbfb0b8
describe
'47610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPN' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
c10b7cda51f6a7c9c4a5e6eaad4a0d54
a03cced5353f1011d898178cd5d3f2bac12ac09a
describe
'2824372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPO' 'sip-files00165.tif'
f83023c53685abaabc864b0a1173c776
2b4972036e8391647d095ba3b4a6d7c89ea14596
describe
'251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPP' 'sip-files00165.txt'
1bf604454db8887efae4c63bd0f26846
478b3a5abe2346924755eb468d1447b830401a6e
describe
'20121' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPQ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
96376c4f095a6576c4cb8358699e9ce0
84491229f26741a63fc2c95b2616075214bb3c90
describe
'344737' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPR' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
6d740fdf27577f31ec39ac99a21ad75b
d187504f5338bdf50b30a6065e65fbdf8b7aed6d
describe
'226438' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPS' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
e1e84cb19a6cdfbf9a8c50284c785566
2b1b398cf0c29e5d885924e8fcfa036d89ca6ad4
describe
'68696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPT' 'sip-files00166.pro'
a191748f9652817bae1063a2f23aa9fe
0fe5665379e64573e8dc956ceff0586587bb5081
describe
'65536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPU' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
725f538bd0eb8cb75b42be256ecb4824
ea117d5fcce6710cc2507852b92d772373171b72
describe
'2767308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPV' 'sip-files00166.tif'
5f225c47ae78f40d747067e198a50007
7ff370c09ce302a6d99fa05decf0080a27e61014
describe
'2944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPW' 'sip-files00166.txt'
ea8fbfa8e4cac7030f2502ac296f48fc
3e0ec80e73bf3f0d9067e91608123f38e6d48f91
describe
'21958' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPX' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
c6ecb2a2bebd03bca1790c3b6810efdf
e362b831241592bbe2979f07576b80dec2fa254d
describe
'343118' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPY' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
750eb47b6bd4b4b87340447323be1ec0
98d5c07aafd31ad9b250ba3339517efce1107ad1
describe
'212331' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYPZ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
1949597e1add3140a45e50bfd124ec45
143226c2fe6fc931a74f1e02a579563b339094f9
describe
'43307' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQA' 'sip-files00167.pro'
b2656674eefa291798f1d75b655bf1e6
0fafce22cc8696e81b94c00e3ad0eec7e25aefb9
describe
'62186' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQB' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
7559f222de576ad523deccad4a242b67
baab8ab652529738aa607b2c9444c1d18c59fe61
describe
'2754584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQC' 'sip-files00167.tif'
8e982a9a98a6e7fd4e93bb18761aead2
94a287d14ece9ac83ec1e233733e6adb72fa0e92
describe
'2533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQD' 'sip-files00167.txt'
01e360eaae61c29cf55d123d1d9e072f
51eaaead64a09d64d6d59158f2208b25620f777c
describe
'22253' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQE' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
4c343f3e6270b7072ebc6fa6a7e00b3c
9bccc3bfda717585c92f4a4d529fcb40739af4fa
describe
'344815' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQF' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
fa50cd3ac343e2dfe8774428d17d4af6
561537928afdb7d5a4394e30e2e985c6c8805014
describe
'212594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQG' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
5e1527c0d6ce5958d7472752914c546e
dd6e9ee2659291e3436544389d55bc014acd72b1
describe
'36849' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQH' 'sip-files00168.pro'
9978be711a0b555963bf52566397d3e8
b4f4180daa73370dbf22ca60576bfd94ebc8e861
describe
'61759' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQI' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
b5a12561da5a57c8e0be2b8eb6b06026
d47ff2d17c1ffeaa686b32a586585d65ae65559e
describe
'2768300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQJ' 'sip-files00168.tif'
d499506259005f98b0c6fd1463aceb4a
613c8701ca15392a65b862065ecc8aea3cbead0b
describe
'1786' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQK' 'sip-files00168.txt'
f673b54dff71e416a2bb0eca3dca6d0a
195ea101ff0a22346917f1735bccf344d8d179c5
describe
'22066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQL' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
7fe0589f575f786284578936d610f571
5e29fb90945bf53df513c86bf9b3b87af21250a6
describe
'360466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQM' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
f39906feceb7858962bf0fd9063d864e
0e969408defcc2fcd7494654155592f698686468
describe
'206767' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQN' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
f40b707919057407f49b58baa361b446
5cbcfec6236a87397a1a0ac978d2cd11c25780d3
describe
'56226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQO' 'sip-files00169.pro'
156b1626629bbdbac8289201815391bc
81460c30b2dd4bf6b5e7acfdf6bd9ecee39cdaed
describe
'59605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQP' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
15b6ae4227ae5e476eaedb89147a4087
f590dd22b6a13dfd8e612e29b992f00e6465a81c
describe
'2893048' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQQ' 'sip-files00169.tif'
b9b11c8d14e84bceb578511aab913409
c09aff02e40025edc0f48d52c33cd18ab6e3e257
describe
'2873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQR' 'sip-files00169.txt'
bbdc44d2579bc59c2716c99299a9a0a3
19fc746bbea5836550337ff0218217150829d53c
describe
Invalid character
'20479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQS' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
45682c0041b90f82c6d5f90f5f7b8f7a
fad7c93aed46659ebc367bae482dd17fbcc85dbb
describe
'355237' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQT' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
5597490651a04fd51243a7832799b844
6e530b5e5f996ba8166c88a83ae94a730a4a8ae4
describe
'207402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQU' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
6794d8e136f85528202650494f464926
6804ada705d4bfb4675b431a337ca5285d83fca6
describe
'77694' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQV' 'sip-files00170.pro'
70306dca926cb44300f01a7d3b9e9936
81d02f76c37a8cab8d4fcad560009dff830c62b4
describe
'63571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQW' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
b12e90402465005b42986f3b24155ac0
5f2a2571cd025ad94c27504176a9e0a36a4d080c
describe
'2851556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQX' 'sip-files00170.tif'
4f3b8db5eb2b9ee8ed1211c49337a01f
2a83ab791af99e6e405bf3b3641b2da186ee06de
describe
'3360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQY' 'sip-files00170.txt'
eb64f67fd48a515d93f1797eef590f07
aa71aa25719c626cb27530da09e652718c7492b1
describe
'21517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYQZ' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
b2332c837f256bf7a78ed0dd461dc94f
baebadf5d27211a775769fd283d01e7545992d75
describe
'357305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRA' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
d3261e12ab02c40704971bd3843bcb02
b1aad6958bf6285d64be75bed8316dae468cf944
describe
'205910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRB' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
2e7d128af8ed5d72301c4d7644d96a5d
df4b1611058d4aa13274cd7b35d98a005278b048
describe
'44165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRC' 'sip-files00171.pro'
38e46c75da4382a89268fdaba12b3cc7
c6582fa3e4e55be6943ab3e888a1ba993c814ae1
describe
'62791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRD' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
a4287699477ca7cba4bca889ce18588e
4bbc2cc93e134c4cb8b3a1d757b3058c0f7d192e
describe
'2868060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRE' 'sip-files00171.tif'
445af46900e8d7c8cc62f93fc0f7f3e8
0bf708586aab71cdd30aa07ec526bfd25a573a59
describe
'1862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRF' 'sip-files00171.txt'
f2602fff20a552d9e2ad991a3f09e1ef
0791070d5aef4a44c9f07a56fa42070dd4ab1967
describe
'21643' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRG' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
8f9e38d682d9f66f2a05e2e0fba85c90
832916893e826069f11ba23d18385f9afe6c007c
describe
'354969' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRH' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
ec256a7c2c235346fc1e1216ab08dce8
b7957760e6845a30cb7f4201e1ba7f83460b5c38
describe
'192544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRI' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
d65197f1a93e5922d6003cbb270ff4ae
6d869e5653c88e29b2782897499ae56549c47191
describe
'64954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRJ' 'sip-files00172.pro'
6ef674d0d1cd5c822beda5abf0e905eb
17945e7a0aace27cf1f2170d05adccfff157a94d
describe
'58918' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRK' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
73cb60845d1142c996889041a90f3d5b
ce30aae3c1b6edf2164968a9278003c77c4d27be
describe
'2849168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRL' 'sip-files00172.tif'
588974a683b7f90d2e161c69714d5c54
46d7053680370907b5d73d183b1e911706429f96
describe
'2861' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRM' 'sip-files00172.txt'
caabf02f38506e65e52d640699e6893f
bcfa42b0af20d3f04c5ef88c06033c20cadb0b90
describe
'20799' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRN' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
361c458eebc42f36968b96dd0ef8bb49
accb8dde657609fa41efe1a37961dc184ba499e1
describe
'359540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRO' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
04cd33c6399de4733062035e9edc0bf4
e5999da4b145e2bd57376ce1d61e09681a30f423
describe
'174792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRP' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
ba7cdbe6f8d5025c12f9c3e2b8efecb8
9b29e519895a57d5a8beac45485a5296d5060382
describe
'49181' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRQ' 'sip-files00173.pro'
c5f365a7db6e5a89111328753c089ffb
1dd63b22b64dd3051cf5955bf7cf1e7bd5f04f86
describe
'55670' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRR' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
5644896b1b2b6ccd078326b374ff54b0
3cddf8a6b0a44f2f5500b76fe4785f438bc3b637
describe
'2885828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRS' 'sip-files00173.tif'
ca8de9a54b0dbacf3a136bdcff61ee40
0a9161360f37feea6d5bbf15791cb47d1fc1b8c6
describe
'2170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRT' 'sip-files00173.txt'
38e7ef31417af72e394027d2f96f8c98
ec9caac0367fed4b0be1796a93fa9895703c4759
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRU' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
bba3fe8521fcaff3eed5d013fba68936
f211941bf0bf0456e1c303c3fdb0e70e81b99fa2
describe
'348664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRV' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
9d6e90f87c8a38ef5a6172c13b296bd2
d2a2a64221f808f7fb03d4559bc1bf5649462cf1
describe
'190044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRW' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
4eb9455ad2b0ce896717d7300c3458f6
9d15d7524d44abc64de0ffa249523a68f76514c5
describe
'55123' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRX' 'sip-files00174.pro'
eb536e0814408ed74c9bdbc523cad617
df54c702c32a6951840e4affbaa9f92d5483d676
describe
'58302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRY' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
56810ecedf8063e3578bcb88bee8326a
47f8a9b6c9c1db7c7d204fa703f1e2d1602b6ce9
describe
'2798820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYRZ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
201d00e9a3215c10e0c1e297d5b23389
95522eb8b44a61d78e38320f355183fb5905bec2
describe
'2389' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSA' 'sip-files00174.txt'
62a3ad9d5fec5c74bc161e8b29c0533f
3560f10882c0f358e4dbf599b4066f86aae88b3b
describe
'21276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSB' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
f8e110279b8d7adf38e5b90bb58723ac
512d3182f1a004fdb44a450654839476e37827c2
describe
'360456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSC' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
5c78b409702045daae4907372488a96e
9e15f765c2da540f9d2a088efeb3c50678d3423e
describe
'179610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSD' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
208ea9c6904e78026499c4b7a8c5ca4b
bd33bee651c3018605eac5eed8d30f0975745be1
describe
'47762' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSE' 'sip-files00175.pro'
4c40c2d22dc2ada612db256e3e4f7d98
94e4a3cd0c4a092346d5db6d24cf9524e48770fa
describe
'55346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSF' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
36105bfdad8c5827a90e2627911f65e0
7aa23e5eb05a6db3fa80f039b4f73c2f6246fb5b
describe
'2892736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSG' 'sip-files00175.tif'
d0189d0cb6314c8346fa7c684275b56d
7eca6a12304ecdc9bd3de6b458b4731215f59f66
describe
'2104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSH' 'sip-files00175.txt'
befd0b5a85f583fb9924b0ad639067f3
e46e87bab958b2de3999973ffedad0d7f0bb51b1
describe
'20077' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSI' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
092bf476011cfd8ad6d9b50e5cd4f403
38af2e552383df2b2c56b8011e53963f8ada7d82
describe
'356993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSJ' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
3f252043c89cbb8ea8e8f365ded913a9
957768b39baf0d0a97bea95bc1a495a68afe7c1d
describe
'194185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSK' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
d6ae3098b9ffbfb88709b5edf9988c88
68e99c761166bb1246073c7923fd86382eb97a4b
describe
'56908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSL' 'sip-files00176.pro'
6bd52952a942d890e05a1de565cec0c8
4001c4a8ae913af7174600811bc1a2ee4fcbec0a
describe
'57718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSM' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
05d226a19a0cee69dcb9ed9eb802744a
bafe23441428203727a9409d5981ee124a66ddf9
describe
'2865104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSN' 'sip-files00176.tif'
57b21af158111004d321fc97d439a8a2
a531b425d17684afe2e92eca2870c8a570df75c0
describe
'2426' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSO' 'sip-files00176.txt'
37a00cdb7645f8c83c06a17f80f7ec9d
c5d46c8cc6428618dc7f666c6da942036dff4dc8
describe
'20182' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSP' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
6501cfdfe6d4f4928a8524231b47f5d4
ca919f2f89d177344e9cebc77af9b84964907d5c
describe
'359688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSQ' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
0695d1a330a08d77aa944a7d08d7af61
8d1ed1a11c4575304ee4c04125d4c9311a8e143b
describe
'196903' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSR' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
7dd93244d86efe05b19e50c12fb9da17
ee1131ec0088fa347fb503a604296676acfffc7a
describe
'35642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSS' 'sip-files00177.pro'
5fbfdb01a9cc815c24a4256e77d6dc38
cefdba028e1586dee2689ebbe6ddae400717ae7b
describe
'56578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYST' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
4631434e8fcd071be54fa18e4c41ebd1
57c0f0261ecb31b7a4791995b5ee70b2b51e688f
describe
'2886784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSU' 'sip-files00177.tif'
474303a0b9482b9efcd812735a153191
4a05be3466cab42f8a06c53e68a32a405f7be2f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSV' 'sip-files00177.txt'
fdb5d98b5ceab816b68d0ea24b9ee1a4
e84f2389f130b04347ca7f2a5aea6f145b025505
describe
'20739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSW' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
b9f6393d7d8108775050cf7b83ae87a8
3872576d58f5af78be63d103ceaf14df6ace4c20
describe
'358509' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSX' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
0793527a058bf93ae70dc0db7a46f170
6ecacf5111aa8d09ddafc4ae9754923ef689a90f
describe
'198635' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSY' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
29c9592c3f850a0421e3b1f97cf106fb
def8cabffdb3f28bbd5eee9d9b9ea135553122f5
describe
'43011' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYSZ' 'sip-files00178.pro'
e6ecb85e7cf52527fa3f017101e8a989
9ff11e15855863086bdf6cac4885247d52de5e08
describe
'61317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTA' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
7fce0a72f4a46ff4df40ce1871547a94
65888628ad9452f7e338c443eb97117744301921
'2011-10-14T22:16:04-04:00'
describe
'2877540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTB' 'sip-files00178.tif'
bf3e4c9bd8465d65284feb337c094460
7dabd3531bdc9bc6d7ee34c9ff1a6627e05415cc
describe
'1883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTC' 'sip-files00178.txt'
924353c82f27cc098b27ef60f56fda63
6a21433fc317791228962bbf31726e566c526e53
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTD' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
79209d608c79e838157bbfe12f70498b
c3eea8e89b45cc1aff554047d51584bb8a44216d
describe
'358897' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTE' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
090973b28700c7dd457fa74ced41dd3b
0c7f4df351d5e72b03eb8fe23b5391e1d309a3b9
describe
'189567' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTF' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
ce10e5fa79474e33e18d77739e4dd586
9175dd613c47b7833614aa4f5184c5f391f0c0c6
describe
'55579' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTG' 'sip-files00179.pro'
9cb2dc57443f912832555a3bf8d6bd10
3c4bf50c42a8114cf33eeacee04fe5ac0e640be8
describe
'56871' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTH' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
30785b7355243aaa6bdc6d2dd5ea4cc8
c6ef62e4a308d12ce7f1831d0d436140fb9ca34f
describe
'2880472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTI' 'sip-files00179.tif'
c29a10747fda4532fdea3c9c8a614c0a
0480219ae5415a5c2b0063d5c5f221117c5f9de4
describe
'2485' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTJ' 'sip-files00179.txt'
229a38ac4684dc398592b1246fc77525
857b5951c92b7384d8166d8deeb28405096707c7
describe
'20621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTK' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
659c2c7dded318756e741c16630b68c0
27df7944eccf659465cc9fea508c501362b2414b
'2011-10-14T22:16:11-04:00'
describe
'343892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTL' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
927707e576a57196e220a8dda0c28a0b
1f208e68b3db8c2550a48a8ddd60f732cacbe17b
describe
'205386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTM' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
26a01a6d9686e12c1cdbcad9716945ef
a3df0c51ef908a4ad17e1e0b5cee79441b9e7a13
describe
'27225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTN' 'sip-files00180.pro'
45719c879881064cd5007336fe24f01e
b7103111f94cf916e0a98153ae7e5e3d327daf59
describe
'59652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTO' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
b896e3432db8a7bfc18cc9a480bedb33
d542585f56ab31371d70d5f26a9c9858b0feb277
describe
'2760888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTP' 'sip-files00180.tif'
6ea714f5cf1c177d6530087f9959cfb5
14d60e4004a76549ae4ae128dc6dbb2cc4e049b6
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTQ' 'sip-files00180.txt'
ff27f6517fe33a45bbba22b01e348f4b
d0ed125f875825f56d97dab54f53c08e47b8aac1
describe
Invalid character
'21140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTR' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
9e8b0c5aeedd2fe6f4f3c8bc0fe24680
3cf13a87285a67d6f756856ba323ed5331339323
describe
'365124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTS' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
69a3e0ad8ec0b9efb156214105def9b3
1b3551ea5b7f20ee53f515686ef60cf5b3172cb2
describe
'327265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTT' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
e980e64eae15b34e4cd8423b8cdb0168
60097ac298a8e159e555c70840ec678aaa2eb6e4
describe
'85669' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTU' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
2bbc1b45eafb4404d8bfc399cdeb6499
08b503e44720d671a4b5db71bfe933f258230638
describe
'8775020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTV' 'sip-files00182.tif'
0493e16b6fdaf725824d31ecfa6e1b87
d19e94b8edd422b66fedb68401e10af97bbbceba
describe
'25493' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTW' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
2980b8c4aa422df3ec73310ea33f3843
a1a30f03535d2a125500743d5cf5d99e09abacdb
describe
'402111' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTX' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
cfa2c3309b6b7f2d2b1077825fc5aea3
e52416213e90a35958cdc2c63cbf9845481689ec
describe
'322662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTY' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
da3104e7a08d0f7579e1ee7c5589f1d3
1e37e11e288bee68415a60fe055c12556659f5d3
describe
'83373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYTZ' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
81e2b2c7f518d62a4d073bdef8444e41
bdb0ba8c5bcd45347e5cbac1cff82321dcc16dec
describe
'9660968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUA' 'sip-files00183.tif'
9524f4fb72ddc09b09da36f133f058a0
b742d62f06e8646a55547f28c62cbab51c28ed1c
describe
'25102' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUB' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
64f64b0a1c844a7981f8aaafa24fc765
a7728a9650e6bbd19dee8582036f639bca923262
describe
'390565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUC' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
6759855aaa600e53a4ed564ad1ce5459
e4f2de72b6e2863578d5955fc07fedff8ceb79e3
describe
'149178' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUD' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
69f969816ff4303242703ca9a528660f
03ec90c199d34cd6cbc3b2f4ddb3ddb5de58c9ff
describe
'26042' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUE' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
dc46a7f71edc5b337177d445c61e42de
ab87155707451027dafa4fd6396f70edc1be3dd4
describe
'9380012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUF' 'sip-files00184.tif'
1ef32530cb267d7bcfc6f09b3917a2ec
3efd2d50ea090482232f51aa8294eaef9a7a5f6d
describe
'10342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUG' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
62893b0181cc5fa6430276b19f224f0f
5b2e284f26cfc8e5e0218cbc8ef736d2e72a8e47
describe
'111969' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUH' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
75b32bad90b281cb307aa673f842126b
574b33ca6152ccc2eb3ccd56a4da62cd8901e02a
describe
'64171' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUI' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
edfb0b9005985d32012bd88ba3514247
eda87d9a2c81a01733735c67aa6e92ac272ba8b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUJ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
9f0861d7bd74fda4da00d894969fa12f
96c88a3d3a3cd1022413789a2241c59b0fc53ce4
describe
'18470' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUK' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
180773d161055b5d3248d91e465cf268
594088c1fa5e00ffbab6f9993b114cad9ba0f659
describe
'2695020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUL' 'sip-files00185.tif'
f0f67c49646d003c1cf583f4326b9435
9f765f397e5f7c8cb3cb5338fe12200680b86a06
describe
'11516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUM' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
b0da1f8a18aebf3de284005ee9470422
7a76d74e4933d1bdc4f82ac4357e7a313eff2dce
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUN' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
4bc24b8069329825f64cbd9bfb4e5caa
1fa6c85467f122768f35039e278706d5f4f4adce
describe
'298931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUO' 'sip-filesUF00080120_00001.mets'
aa31161d5b4485a08cd09b509e0d0f97
e5e187046de8b6b17a16a5ee1e18b21fee509f9e
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T00:39:59-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'388200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCGfileF20080401_AACYUR' 'sip-filesUF00080120_00001.xml'
b0684564a83ce7e5e7baa5c91b97b1bc
9d151a87e374c901f2dd9a7aebc6579e891aa3cb
describe
'2013-12-19T00:40:02-05:00'
xml resolution