Citation
The adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade)

Material Information

Title:
The adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade) scene: the Mississippi Valley, time: forty to fifty years ago
Uniform Title:
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Creator:
Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
Kemble, E. W ( Edward Windsor ), 1861-1933 ( Illustrator )
Charles L. Webster and Company ( Publisher )
Jenkins & McCowan ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Charles L. Webster & Co.
Manufacturer:
Jenkins & McCowan
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1884
Language:
English
Physical Description:
318, [16] p. : ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wit and humor, Juvenile ( lcsh )
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Finn, Huckleberry (Fictitious character) -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Runaway children -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Slaves -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Male friendship -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Fugitive slaves -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Race relations -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Slavery -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Fiction -- Missouri ( lcsh )
Fiction -- Mississippi River ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Adventure fiction -- 1891 ( gsafd )
Humorous fiction -- 1891 ( gsafd )
Bildungsromans -- 1891 ( gsafd )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Action and adventure fiction ( fast )
Humorous fiction ( gsafd )
Bildungsromans ( gsafd )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Summary:
A nineteenth-century boy, floating down the Mississippi on a raft with a runaway slave, becomes involved with a feuding family, two scoundrels pretending to be royalty, and Tom Sawyer's aunt, who mistakes him for Tom.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note:
Illustrations by Kemble.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mark Twain ; illustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002238988 ( ALEPH )
ALH9512 ( NOTIS )
183690101 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




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HUCKLEBERRY FINN.



ADVENTURES

OF

HUCKLEBERRY FINN

(TOM SAWYER’S COMRADE).

SCENE: The Mississippi Valley.
TIME: Forty to Fifty Years Ago.

BY

MARK TWAIN,

ILLUSTRATED,

NEW YORK:
CHARLES L. WEBSTER & CO.
1891.



CopyRIGHT, 1884,
By SAMUEL L, CLEMENS,
(All rights reserved.)

PRESS OF
Jenkins & McCowan,
NEW YORK,



NOTICE.

PERSONS attempting to find a motive in this narrative will
be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be
banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.

BY ORDER OF THE AUTHOR
Per G. G,, CHIEF OF ORDNANCE,



EXPLANATORY.

In this book a number of dialects are used, to wit: the Mis-
souri negro dialect; the extremest form of the backwoods
South-Western dialect; the ordinary ‘‘ Pike-County” dialect;
and four modified varieties of this last. The shadings have
not been done ina hap-hazard fashion, or by guess-work; but
pains-takingly, and with the trustworthy guidance and support
of personal familiarity with these several forms of speech.

I make this explanation for the reason that without it many
readers would suppose that all these characters were trying to

talk alike and not succeeding.
THE AUTHOR.



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I. PAGE.

Civilizing Huck.—Miss Watson.—Tom Sawyer Waits....... et

CHAPTER II.
The Boys Escape Jim.—Tom Sawyer’s Gang.—Deep-laid Plans.

CHAPTER III.

A Good Going-over.—Grace Triumphant.—'‘ One of Tom Saw-
yer's Lies”..........005 sin cesteleseceaact's teen c cece eee e eet eeee

CHAPTER IV.
Huck and the Judge.—Superstition

See e ee cee e er ne Serer cee ene

CHAPTER V.
Huck’s Father.—The Fond Parent.—Reform.......

ove ewan econ

CHAPTER VI.
He Went for Judge Thatcher.—Huck Decides to Leave.—Polit-
ical Economy.—Thrashing Around... ...scseecveesecsovene

CHAPTER VII.

Laying for Him.—Locked in the Cabin.—Sinking the Body.—
Resting :

CHAPTER VIII.
Sleeping in the Woods.—Raising the Dead.—Exploring the Isl-
and,—Finding Jim.—Jim’s Escape.—Signs.—Balum.

ix

22

28

32

36

41

48











x CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IX. PAGE

The Cave.—The Floating House....... cee cee cee sees veces 65

CHAPTER X.
The Find.—Old Hank Bunker.—In Disguise... Eon ete sterulaerace ater - 70

CHAPTER XI.
Huck and the Woman.—The Search.—Prevarication.—Going to
Goshen..... Biol shatioiaie vetetetunat rere e winks dealelacete tenes asetha eee iets 74
CHAPTER XII.
Slow Navigation.—Borrowing Things.—Boarding the Wreck.—
The Plotters.—Hunting for the Boat...... ccc cece een Soro’:
CHAPTER XIII.
Escaping from the Wreck.—The Watchman.—Sinking......2-.. 90

CHAPTER XIV.
A General Good Time.—The Harem.—French........ Wekeeroie as 96

CHAPTER XV.
Huck Loses the Raft.—In the Fog.—Huck Finds the Raft.—Trash ror

CHAPTER XVI.

Expectation.—A White Lie.—Floating Currency.—Running by
Cairo.—Swimming Ashore............ Bec rel hate teleretagete Bho rcar ion OFF,

CHAPTER XVII.
An Evening Call.—The Farm in Arkansaw.—Interior Decora-
tions.—Stephen Dowling Bots.—Poetical Effusions......... TI6
CHAPTER XVIII.

Col. Grangerford.—Aristocracy. —Feuds.—The Testament.—
Recovering the Raft.—The Wood-pile.-—Pork and Cabbage. 126



CONTENTS. xi

CHAPTER XIX. PAGE |

Tying Up Day-Times.—An Astronomical Theory.—Running a
Temperance Revival. —The Duke of Bridgewater. —The
Troubles of Royalty... . cee cee cee ee eee eee ets sievare eaeerebenas 138

CHAPTER XX.

Huck Explains.—Laying Out a Campaign.—Working the Camp-
meeting.—A Pirate at the Camp-meeting.—The Duke as a

PPITICEL Gavecres eo aaeerscas his tate tise ie tee Seca seeal eng evans ate renee we. 148
CHAPTER XXI.
Sword Exercise.—Hamlet’s Soliloquy.—They Loafed Around
Town.—A Lazy Town.—Old Boggs.—Dead............... 158
CHAPTER XXII.
Sherburn.—Attending the Circus.—Intoxication in the Ring.—
Mheshhrilling Craged yrs vorsccen essa sate ie scece oasis Pcie 169
CHAPTER XXIII.
Sold.—Royal Comparisons.—Jim Gets Home-sick............-. 173
CHAPTER XXIV.
Jim in Royal Robes.—They Take a Passenger. —Getting Informa-
tion.—Family Grief......... 0... cee eee Ss se oe Ea Ronse 179
CHAPTER XXV.
Is It Them ?—Singing the ‘* Doxologer.”—Awful Square.—Fu-
neral Orgies. —A Bad Investment. ..........c0e ese eee eee 186.
CHAPTER XXVI.
A Pious King.—The King’s Clergy.—She Asked His Pardon.—
Hiding in the Room.—Huck Takes the Money............. 193

CHAPTER XXVIII.

The Funeral.—Satisfying Curiosity.—Suspicious of Huck.—
Quick Sales and Small Profits... . 1... eee eee dshonosonddag 202



xii CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXVIII. PAGE

The Trip to England.—‘‘ The Brute !”—Mary Jane Decides to
Leave. —Huck Parting with Mary as Aas —The Op-
position Line... ....... 0.0 eae Shit betielaie lacs chu eieis\e: susie eperelere le 2OQ)

CHAPTER XXIX.
Contested Relationship.—The King Explains the Loss.—A Ques-
tion of Handwriting.—Digging up the Corpse.—Huck Escapes 219

CHAPTER XXX.
The King Went for Him.—A Royal Row.—Powerful Mellow.... 229

CHAPTER XXXI.
Ominous Plans.—News from Jim.—Old Recollections.—A Sheep
Story.—Valuable Information............e0e0005 Shales teen 233
CHAPTER XXXII.
Still and ee like. —Mistaken eee oe a ae —Ina
Dilemma wa iecsaousisecsacm ets ews erecens Meee caeray eee
CHAPTER XXXIII.
A Nigger Stealer.—Southern Hospitality.—A Pretty Long Bless-
ing.—Tar and Feathers............-... Sreuagenewile cnsinrotenetstoketetars 248
CHAPTER XXXIV.
The Hut by the Ash Hopper. foe ke ee the Light-
ning Rod.—Troubled with Witches.. Peet he pean 50
CHAPTER XXXV.
Escaping Properly.—Dark Schemes.—Discrimination in Stealing.
——AsDeep Holes etic snenoane aang cite sales eetece ents oleate ZOD
CHAPTER XXXVI.

The Lightning Rod.—His Level Best.—A Bequest to Posterity.—
A High Figure....... Meee e escent eect cess ceetssesccences 269



CONTENTS. Xili

CHAPTER XXXVII. PAGE
The Last Shirt.—Mooning Around.—Sailing Orders.—The Witch
PAG Bi teehee es cauie Ciece'e iapstare\eletarateraier eteseietara etal eosiaercjenelsveres avs caats 275
CHAPTER XXXVIIL.
The Coat of Arms.—A Skilled Superintendent.—Unpleasant
Glory.—A Tearful Subject... 00... ccc ccc cece ee cece ee eee eee 282

CHAPTER XXXIX.

Rats.—Lively Bed-fellows.—The Straw Dummy............... 290

CHAPTER XL.
Fishing.—The Vigilance Committee.—A Lively Run.—Jim Ad-
VASES? 4 Fl) CLOT eis Seis areata stg s hat eine a) Ane eeT acdc rode enca ee 295
CHAPTER XLI
The Doctor.—Uncle Silas.—Sister Hotchkiss.—Aunt Sally in
PV O UD Ler racerescsele tists seein oie sporsis carorine rere stiri rantia tee tre ne SUA neice 301
CHAPTER XLII. :
Tom Sawyer Wounded.—The Doctor’s Story.—Tom Confesses.
—Aunt Polly Arrives.—Hand Out Them Letters
CHAPTER THE LAST,»
Out of Bondage.—Paying the Captive.—Yours Truly, Huck Finn 317







ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
Huckleberry Fin. ...... cece cece cece ce cee ee ene Frontispiece,
TENE SWAG OWS ier eeie eis eis Sianeteieresa fet poke aie ity =ole Wieqep ere a eorehsoalse none pees 17
Learning about Moses and the ‘‘ Bulrushers”’...............0.. 18
Huck Stealing Away........ eta eaiale Moat ceetepie st reine ora eer Poa 2
Aisa ssc ea detector sy cue lo os siciae iala(ostoeiers/ c/w fa alent elo nielecaescelnte ciate crete eerie 23
WSN AB va estates ar ecaleelaver s asciesschersistereustaole eral crete epelep cites cise renter arr ae 33
Sosa piieiaer a ecaerterrecs piatcieivara se ralaescelatenelchars mesteiseastorsresstei ce areca tents 37
Jim and the Ghost...... cc cess eee e rece eee e teen cence te cenees 59
In the Cave..........6. ela Ja estan fad eles ote paneer Ted ne rcte rege TNFR ees Taree 66
Jim Sees a Dead Man......... ee eee eeeee Sie ce steieia sie arseer ismee rye 69
SOA aici tenets: assess see lagur seer sice str su vena apres ot eT Ears 72
SCEL UI paeViQUrsel lances a troricone settee msc ietar esa saaetaseods Geometers 80
He Sometimes Lifted a Chicken...... 0.0.0... 020. ce eee ee eee eereec|
Oh eordyselordiy le sense (cele cee Reet et see es 89
We Turned In and Sleptrre ine eccrine ¢ sees cides sar nOS
Solomon and His Million Wives. ......... 0... ccc ee eee ee eee 97
Elim bin saUipatheee anes cyalepesercts ects e/ hay rasraeeeieresnte sere city eee II5
“eltsMadertler= look: Spid etysweccc acne ence ale cee ee 120
EHS BETO USC astertoters si eyetncy crateue oasis errata cnemn eons wes ny oe ne arm a le 125
SCAnd DOs SrA-COmin gents cotemsge stone aes nomeeas se coaruen secre rete 140
“BysRights io Am: a-Dtike lai wegaecrn ois os sien folie eae TAG
‘le Amithe:ate Dauphine cry: ameqanays css. ncr secretes eet ees 145
Dhesksin giasw) Ulich. ees PN re eee in ISI
Another Little Sobscccs toe Cuvs ste alerts eee tees ounce erp anes 156
yaa BXervelel Skertolaan nenekn ee AG B5 oo docid None GER Ne bes I7r
“Alas. Our- PoorsBrother:. vauscce eee ho ae ee 183
Supper with the Hare-lip.......... avotefedstsheredese ev sjaistcrey Pe cyano 194
Huckemakes athes Money rin toners cia epee eel on Gee an eal 20T
a) Walt Greeeeenere e terarstap cpap ese Sts oeys ae sc eers Sa cy aracaeis eecetager at mee Cae are eee 207
Mh e PAU Ctl Ome etereener einer oucterevereiseeisiay cin ciet oes etl rei neaee ran aeeaaS 217



XVi ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
“ Gentlemen—Gentlemen! 7.0... cece ee eee ee ee ce cece eens 225
Phe Duke: Wenttor Himes 6. ps ie bee se eleeern coeeie Sere 250
Striking for the Back Country... ... cece cece ee cece ce cece eens 240
A Pretty Long Blessing. ..........+20.. Re etc Feet Sraetayictees 253
Travelling by Rail... .° tt... arolaigiorevalaeosiaieeatere lee sper scene 254
Tom Advises a Witch Pie...........6. Rc uae Su Ste RES mee cucrem eco aa 273
Unga PP earing Wea ysis carcass otek oc he eas Bees an aeeet onenRE27O)
Jim’s Coat of Arms........ Spuoeg at aserniig tates caeter alpen Mea eee emu reeraee 283
Tri SAL OM atlas vacate cists cic eine aieiois o's aterezs Stale eatsle rate (ate poreie toe eager 287
Aunt Sally Talks to Fae serene sc biapereletste sJoumavetenstesvelsielonspeceere +++ 306
Tom Sawyer Wounded 2 )e0 ils. o. wiv 5 css eleareierses occ cisco steric ‘see 309
Tom Rose Square in Bed.. a eruaecstne Es atscaeiciee 315

The End. Yours ry, Huck. ian oVareuanataye aerate sc batererein voters wee 318



ike aS

Kehoe ae i
apler 1.

Z OU don’t know about me, without
% you have read a book by the
name of “ The Adventures of
Tom Sawyer,’’ but that ain’t
no matter. That book was
made by Mr. Mark Twain,
and he told the truth, mainly.
There was things which he
stretched, but mainly he told
the truth. That is nothing. I
never seen anybody but lied,
one time or another, without
it was Aunt Polly, or the
widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt
Polly—Tom’s Aunt Polly, she

: is—and Mary, and the Widow
THE WIDOW’S. Douglas, is all told about in
that book—which is mostly a
true book; with some stretchers, as I said before.

Now the way that the book winds up, is this: Tom and me
found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it
made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece—all gold.
It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well,
Judge Thatcher, he took it and put it out at interest, and it
fetched us a dollar a day apiece, all the year round—more
than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Doug-
las, she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize
me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, consid-
ering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all
her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer, I lit out.

2







18 THE ADVENTURES OF

I got into my old rags, and my sugar-hogshead again, and
was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer, he hunted me up
and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might
join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So
I went back.

The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost
lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she



LEARNING ABOUT MOSES AND THE ‘‘ BULRUSHERS.”

never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes
again, and I couldn’t do nothing but sweat and sweat, and
feel all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced
again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to
come to time. When you got to the table you couldn’t go
right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 19

down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though
there warn’t really anything the matter with them. That is,
nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a barrel
of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and
the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.

After supper she got out. her book and learned me about
Moses and the Bulrushers; and I was in a sweat to find out
all about him; but by-and-by she let it out that Moses had
been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn’t care no
more about him; because I don’t take no stock in dead people.

Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let
me. But she wouldn’t. She said it was a mean practice and
wasn’t clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is
just the way with some people. They get down on a thing
when they don’t know nothing about it. Here she was a
bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use
to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault
with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And
she took snuff too; of course that was all right, because she
done it herself.

Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with
goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at
me now, with a spelling-book. She worked me middling hard
for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up. I
couldn’t stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was
deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say,
“Dont put your feet up there, Huckleberry;’’ and “dont
scrunch up like that, Huckleberry—set up straight;” and pret-
ty soon she would say, “ Don’t gap and stretch like that,
Huckleberry—why don’t you try to behave?” Then she
told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was
there. She got madthen, but I didn’t mean no harm. AllI
wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I
warn’t particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said;
said she wouldn’t say it for the whole world; she was going
to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn’t see no
advantage in going where she was going, so I made up my
mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it
would only make trouble, and wouldn’t do no good.

Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all
about the good place. She said all a body would have to do



20 THE ADVENTURES OF

there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing,
forever and ever. SoIdidn’t think much of it. But I never
said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go
there, and, she said, not by a considerable sight. I was glad
about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.

Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome
and lonesome. By-and-by they fetched the niggers in and
had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up
to my room with a piece of candle and put it on the table.
Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think
of something cheerful, but it warn’t no use. I felt so lone-
some I most wished I was dead. The stars were shining, and
the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard
an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead,
and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was
going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something
to me and I couldn’t make out what it was, and so it made
the cold shivers run over me. Then away out in the woods
Iheard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it
wants to tell about something that’s on its mind and can’t
make itself understood, and so can’t rest easy in its grave and
has to go about that way every night grieving. I got so
down-hearted and scared, I did wish I had some company.
Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I
flipped it off and it litin the candle; and before I could budge
it was all shriveled up. I didn’t need anybody to tell me that
that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad
luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me.
I got up and turned around in my tracks three times and
crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up a little lock
of my hair with a thread to keep witches away. But I hadn’t
no confidence. You do that when you've lost a horse-shoe
that you’ve found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but
I hadn't ever heard anybody say it was any way to keep off
bad luck when you'd killed a spider.

I set down again, a shaking all over, and got out my pipe
for a smoke; for the house was all as still as death, now, and
so the widow wouldn’t know. Well, afteralong time I heard
the clock away off in the town go boom—boom—boom—
twelve licks—and all still again—stiller than ever. Pretty
soon I heard a twig snap, down in the dark amongst the trees



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 21

—something was a stirring. Isetstill and listened. Directly
I could just barely hear a “‘ me-yow / me-yow !’’ down there.
That was good! Says I, “ me-yow / me-yow /” as soft as I
could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the
window onto the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground
and crawled in amongst the trees, and sure enough there was
Tom Sawyer waiting for me.



HUCK STEALING AWAY.



22 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER II. :

E went tip-toeing along a path amongst the trees back
towards the end of the widow’s garden, stooping down
so as the branches wouldn’t scrape our heads. When we was
passing by the kitchen I fell over a root and made a noise.
We scrouched down and laid still. Miss Watson’s big nig-
ger, named Jim, was setting in the kitchen door; we could
see him pretty clear, because there was a light behind him.
He got up and stretched his neck out about a minute, listen-
ing. Then he says,

“Who dah?”

He listened some more; then he come tip-toeing down and
stood ‘right between us; we could a touched him, nearly.
Well, likely it was minutes and minutes that there warn’t a
sound, and we all there so close together. There was a
place on my ankle that got to itching; but I dasn’t scratch
it; and then my ear begun to itch; and next my back, right
between my shoulders. Seemed like I’d die if I couldn’t
scratch. Well, I’ve noticed that thing plenty times since.
If you are with the quality, or at a funeral, or trying to go
to sleep when you ain’t sleepy—if you are anywheres where
it won’t do for you to scratch, why you will itch all over in
upwards of a thousand places. Pretty soon Jim says:

‘‘Say—who is you? Whar is you? Dog my cats ef I
didn’ hear sumf’n. Well, I knows what I’s gwyne to do. I’s
gwyne to set down here and listen tell I hears it agin.”

So he set down on the ground betwixt me and Tom. He
leaned his back up against a tree, and stretched his legs out
till one of them most touched one of mine. My nose begun
to itch. It itched till the tears comé into my eyes. But I
dasn’t scratch. Then it begun to itch on the inside. Next I
got toitching underneath. I didn’t know how I was going to
set still. This miserableness went on as much as six or seven
minutes; but it seemed a sight longer than that. I was itch-



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 23

ing in eleven different places now. I reckoned I couldn’t
stand it more’n a minute longer, but I set my teeth hard and
got ready to try. Just then Jim begun to breathe heavy;
next he begun to snore—and then I was pretty soon com-
fortable again.

Tom he made a sign to me—kind of a little noise with his
mouth—and we went creeping away on our hands and knees.
When we was ten foot off,
Tom whispered to me and
wanted to tie Jim to the
tree for fun; but I said no;
he might wake and make a
disturbance, and then
they'd find out I warn't
in. Then Tom said he
hadn’t got candles enough,
and he would slip in the
kitchen and get some more.
I didn’t want him to try.
I said Jim might wake up
and come. But Tom want-
ed to‘resk it; so we slid in
there and got three candles,
and Tom laid five cents on
the table for pay. Then we
got out, andI wasinasweat |
to get away; but nothing '
would do Tom but he must
crawl to where Jim was, on .-
his hands and knees, and
play something on him. I
waited, and it seemed a
good while, everything was
so still and lonesome.

As soon as Tom was back, we cut along the path, around
the garden fence, and by-and-by fetched up on the steep top
of the hill the other side of the house. Tom said he slipped
Jim’s hat off of his head and hung it on a limb right over him,
and Jim stirred a little, but he didn’t wake. Afterwards Jim
said the witches bewitched him and put him in a trance, and
rode him all over the State, and then set him under the trees





24. THE ADVENTURES OF

again and hung his hat on a limb to show who done it. And
next time Jim told it he said they rode him down to New
Orleans; and after that, every time he told it he spread it
more and more, till by-and-by he said they rode him all over
the world, and tired him most to death, and his back was all
over saddle-boils. Jim was monstrous proud about it, and
he got so he wouldn’t hardly notice the other niggers. Nig-
gers would come miles to hear Jim tell about it, and he was
more looked up to than any nigger in that country. Strange
niggers would stand with their mouths open and look him all
over, same as if he was a wonder. Niggers is always talking
about witches in the dark by the kitchen fire; but whenever
one was talking and letting on to know all about such things,
Jim would happen in and say, “Hm! What you know ’bout
witches?” and that nigger was corked up and had to take a
back seat. Jim always kept that five-center piece round his
neck with a string and said it was a charm the devil give to him
with his own hands and told him he could cure anybody with
it and fetch witches whenever he wanted to, just by saying
something to it; but he never told what it was he said to it.
Niggers would come from all around there and give Jim any-
thing they had, just for-a sight of that five-center piece; but
they wouldn’t touch it, because the devil had had his hands
on it. Jim was most ruined, for a servant, because he got so
stuck up on account of having seen the devil and been rode
by witches.

Well, when Tom and me got to the edge of the hill-top,
we looked away down into the village and could see three or
four lights twinkling, where there was sick folks, may be;
and the stars over us was sparkling ever so fine; and down
by the village was the river, a whole mile broad, and awful
still and grand. We went down the hill and found Jo Har-
per, and Ben Rogers, and two or three more of the boys, hid
in the old tanyard. So we unhitched askiff and pulled down
the river two mile and a half, to the big scar on the hillside,
and went ashore.

We went to a clump of bushes, and Tom made everybody
swear to keep the secret, and then showed them a hole in the
hill, right in the thickest part of the bushes. Then we lit
the candles and crawled in on our hands and knees. We
went about two hundred yards, and then the cave opened up,



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 25

Tom poked about amongst the passages and pretty soon
ducked under a wall where you wouldn't a noticed that there
was a hole. We went along a narrow place and got into a
kind of room, all damp and sweaty and cold,and there we
stopped. Tom says:

“Now we'll start this band of robbers and call it Tom
Sawyer’s Gang. Everybody that wants to join has got to
take an oath, and write his name in blood.”

Everybody was willing. So Tom got out a sheet of paper
that he had wrote the oath on, and read it. It swore every
boy to stick to the band, and never tell any of the secrets;
and if anybody done anything to any boy in the band, which-
ever boy was ordered to kill that person and his family must
do it, and he mustn’t eat and he mustn’t sleep till he had
killed them and hacked a cross in their breasts, which was
~ the sign of the band. And nobody that didn’t belong to the
band could use that mark, and if he did he must be sued; |
and if he done it again he must be killed. And if anybody
that belonged to the band told the secrets, he must have his
throat cut, and then have his carcass burnt up and the ashes
scattered all around, and his name blotted off of the list with
blood and never mentioned again by the gang, but havea
curse put on it and be forgot, forever.

Everybody said it was a real beautiful oath, and asked
Tom if he got it out of his own head. He said, some of it,
but the rest was out of pirate books, and robber books, and
every gang that was high-toned had it.

Some thought it would be good to kill the families of boys
that told the secrets. Tom said it was a good idea, so he
took a pencil and wrote it in. Then Ben Roger says:

“Here’s Huck Finn, he hain’t got no family—what you
going to do "bout him ?”’

‘Well, hain’t he got a father ?’’ says Tom Sawyer.

“Yes, he’s got a father, but you can’t never find him,
these days. He used to lay drunk with the hogs in the tan-
yard, but he hain’t been seen in these parts for a year or more.”’

They talked it over, and they was going to rule me out,
because they said every boy must havea family or somebody
to kill, or else it wouldn’t be fair and square for the others.
Well, nobody could think of anything to do—everybody was
stumped, and set still. I was most ready to cry; but all at



26 THE ADVENTURES OF

once I thought of a way, and so I offered them Miss Watson
—they could kill her. Everybody said:

‘¢Oh, she’ll do. That’s all right. Huck can come in.”

Then they all stuck a pin in their fingers to get blood to
sign with, and I made my mark on the paper.

“Now,” says Ben Rogers, ‘‘what’s the line of business of
this Gang ?”’

“ Nothing only robbery and murder,” Tom said.

“But who are we going to rob? houses—or cattle—
(je

“ Stuff! stealing cattle and such things ain’t robbery, it’s
burglary,” says Tom Sawyer. “ Weain’t burglars. That ain’t
no sort of style. Weare highwaymen. We stop stages and
carriages on the road, with masks on, and kill the people and
take their watches and money.”

“ Must we always kill the people ?”

“Oh, certainly. It’s best. Some authorities think dif-
ferent, but mostly it’s considered best to kill them. Except
some that you bring to the cave here and keep them till
they’re ransomed.”

“ Ransomed? What's that?”

“J don’t know. But that’s what they do. I’ve seen it in
books; and so of course that’s what we’ve got to do.”

“« But how can we do it if we don’t know what it is?”

«Why blame it all, we’ve got todo it. Don’t I tell you it’s
inthe books? Do you want to go to doing different from
what’s in the books, and get things all muddled up?”

“Oh, that’s all very fine to say, Tom Sawyer, but how in
the nation are these fellows going to be ransomed if we don’t
know how to do it to them? that’s the thing / want to get at.
Now what do you reckon it is?”

“Well I don’t know. But per'aps if we keep them till
they’re ransomed, it means that we keep them till they’re
dead.” ;

“Now, that’s something @&&e. That'll answer. Why
couldn’t you said that before? We'll keep them till they’re
ransomed to. death—and a bothersome Jot they’ll be, too,
eating up everything and always trying to get loose.”

“ How you talk, Ben Rogers. How can they get loose
when there’s a guard over them, ready to shoot them down
if they move a peg?”



i ce a a a i

HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 27

“A guard. Well, that zs good. So somebody’s got to set
up all night and never get any sleep, just so as to watch them.
I think that’s foolishness. Why can’t a body take a club and
ransom them as soon as they get here?”

“Because it ain’t in the books so—that’s why. Now Ben
Rogers, do you want to do things regular, or don’t you ?—
that’s the idea. Don’t you reckon that the people that made
the books knows what’s the correct thing todo? Do you
reckon you can learn’em anything ? Not by a good deal. No,
sir, we'll just go on and ransom them in the regular way.”

“All right. I don’t mind; but I say it’s a fool way, any-
how. Say—do we kill the women, too?”

“Well, Ben Rogers, if I was as ignorant as you I wouldn’t
let on. Kill the women? No—nobody ever saw anything
in the books like that. You fetch them-to the cave, and
you're always as polite as pie to them; and by-and-by they
fall in love with you and never want to go home any more.”

‘Well, if that’s the way, I’m agreed, but I don’t take no
stock in it. Mighty soon we'll have the cave so cluttered up
with women, and fellows waiting to be ransomed, that there
won’t be no place for the robbers. But go ahead, I ain’t got
nothing to say.”

Little Tommy Barnes was asleep, now, and when they wak-
ed him up he was scared, and cried, and said he wanted to
go home to his ma, and didn’t want to be a robber any more.

So they all made fun of him, and called him cry-baby, and
that made him mad, and he said he would go straight and
tell all the secrets. But Tom give him five cents to keep
quiet, and said we would all go home and meet next week
and rob somebody and kill some people.

Ben Rogers said he couldn’t get out much, only Sundays,
and so he wanted to begin next Sunday; but all the boys
said it would be wicked to do it on Sunday, and that settled
the thing. They agreed to get together and fixa day as
soon as they could, and then we elected Tom Sawyer first
captain and Jo Harper second captain of the Gang, and so
started home.

Iclumb up the shed and crept into my window just before
day was breaking. My new clothes was all greased up and
clayey, and I was dog-tired.



28 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER IIL

ELL, I gota good going-over in the morning, from old

Miss Watson, on account of my clothes; but the widow
she didn’t scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay and
looked so sorry that I thought I would behave a while if I
could. Then Miss Watson she took me in the closet and
prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every
day, and whatever I asked for I would get it. But it warn’t
so. I tried it. Once I got a fish-line, but no hooks. It warn’t
any good to me without hooks. JI tried for the hooks three
or four times, but somehow I couldn’t make it work. By-
and-by, one day, I asked Miss Watson to try for me, but she
said I was a fool. She never told me why, and I couldn’t
make it out no way.

I set down, one time, back in the woods, and had a long
think about it. I says to myself, if a body can get anything
they pray for, why don’t Deacon Winn get back the money
he lost on pork? Why can’t the widow get back her silver
snuff-box that was stole? Why can’t Miss Watson fat up?
No, says I ‘to myself, there ain’t nothing in it. I went and
told the widow about it, and she said the thing a body could
get by praying for it was “spiritual gifts.’ This was too
many for me, but she told me what she meant—I must help
other people, and do everything I could for other people, and
look out for them all the time, and never think about myself.
This was including Miss Watson, as I took it. I went out in
the woods and turned it over in my mind a long time, but I
couldn’t see no advantage about it—except for the other peo-
ple—so at last I reckoned I wouldn’t worry about it any more,
but just let it go. Sometimes the widow would take me one
side and talk about Providence in a way to make a body’s
mouth water; but maybe next day Miss Watson would take
hold and knock it all down again. I judged I could see that
there was two Providences, and a poor chap would stand con-



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 29

siderable show with the widow's Providence, but if Miss Wat-
son’s got him there warn’t no help for him any more. I
thought it all out, and reckoned I would belong to the widow’s,
if he wanted me, though I couldn’t make out how he was ago-
ing to be any better off then than what he was before, seeing
I was so ignorant and so kind of low-down and ornery.

Pap he hadn’t been seen for more than a year, and that
was comfortable for me; I didn’t want to see him no more.
He used to always whale me when he was sober and could
get his hands on me; though I used to take to the woods most
of the time when he was around. Well, about this time he
was found in the river drowned, about twelve mile above town,
so people said. They judged it was him, anyway; said this
drowned man was just his size, and was ragged, and had un-
common long hair—which was all like pap—but they couldn’t
make nothing out of the face, because it had been in the
water so long it warn’t much like a face at all. They said he
was floating on his back in the water. They took him and
buried him on the bank. But I warn’t comfortable long, be-
cause I happened to think of something. I knowed mighty
well that a drownded man don’t float on his back, but on his
face. So I knowed, then, that this warn’t pap, but a woman
dressed up in a man’s clothes. So I was uncomfortable again.
I judged the old man would turn up again by-and-by, though
I wished he wouldn’t.

We played robber now and then about a month, and then
I resigned. All the boys did. We hadn’t robbed nobody, we
hadn’t killed any people, but only just pretended. We used
to hop out of the woods and go charging down on hog-driv-
ers and women in carts taking garden stuff to market, but we
never hived any of them. Tom Sawyer called the hogs
“ingots,” and he called the turnips and stuff “julery” and
we would go to the cave and pow-wow over what we had done
and how many people we had killed and marked. But I
couldn’t see no profit in it. One time Tom sent a boy to run
about town with a blazing stick, which he called a ‘slogan
(which was the sign for the Gang to get together), and then
he said he had got secret news by his spies that next day a
whole parcel of Spanish merchants and rich A-rabs was going
to camp in Cave Hollow with two hundred elephants, and six
hundred camels, and over a thousand “sumter” mules, all



30 THE ADVENTURES OF

loaded down with di’monds, and they didn’t have only a guard
of four hundred soldiers, and so we would Jay in ambuscade,
as he called it, and kill the lot and scoop the things. He said
we must slick up our swords and guns, and get ready. He
never could go after even a turnip-cart but he must have the
swords and guns all scoured up for it; though they was only
lath and broom-sticks, and you might scour at them till you
rotted and then they warn’t worth a mouthful of ashes more
than what they was before. I didn’t believe we could lick
such a crowd of Spaniards and A-rabs, but I wanted to see
the camels and elephants, so I was on hand next day, Satur-
day, in the ambuscade; and when we got the word, we rushed
out of the woods and down the hill. But there warn’t no
Spaniards and A-rabs, and there warn’t no camels nor no ele.
phants. It warn’t anything but a Sunday-school picnic, and
only a primer-class at that. We busted it up, and chased the
children up the hollow; but we never got anything but some
doughnuts and jam, though Ben Rogers got a rag doll, and
Jo Harper got a hymn-book and a tract; and then the teacher
charged in and made us drop everything and cut. I didn’t
see no di’monds, and I told Tom Sawyer so. He said there
was loads of them there, anyway; and he said there was
A-rabs there, toe, and elephants and things. I said, why
couldn’t we see them, then? He said if I warn’t so ignorant,
but had read a book called “Don Quixote,’’ I would know
without asking. He said it was all done by enchantment.
He said there was hundreds of soldiers there, and elephants
and treasure, and so on, but we had enemies which he called
magicians, and they had turned the whole thing into an infant
Sunday school, just out of spite. I said, all right, then the
thing for us to do was to go for the magicians. Tom Sawyer
said I was a numskull.

“Why,” says he, “a magician could call up a lot of genies,
and they would hash you up like nothing before you could say
Jack Robinson. They are as tall as a tree and as big around
as a church.”

“Well,” I says, “‘s’pose we got some genies to help ws—
can’t we lick the other crowd then?”

‘“‘ How you going to get them?”

“‘T don’t know. How do ¢hey get them?”

“Why they rub an old tin lamp or an iron ring, and then





:
F
:

HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 31

the genies come tearing in, with the thunder and lightning
a-ripping around and the smoke a-rolling, and everything
they’re told to do they up and do it. They don’t think noth-
ing of pulling a shot tower up by the roots, and belting a
Sunday-school superintendent over the head with it—or any
other man.”

“Who makes them tear around so?”

“Why, whoever rubs the lamp or the ring. They belong
to whoever rubs the lamp or the ring, and they’ve got to do
whatever he says. If he tells them to build a palace forty
miles long, out of di’monds, and fill it full of chewing gum,
or whatever you want, and fetch an emperor’s daughter from
China for you to marry, they’ve got to do it—and they’ve got
to doit before sun-up next morning, too. And more—they’ve
got to waltz that palace around over the country wherever
you want it, you understand.”

“Well,” says I, “I think they are a pack of flatheads for
not keeping the palace themselves ‘stead of fooling them away
like that. And what’s more—if I was one of them I would
see a man in Jericho before I would drop my business and
come to him for the rubbing of an old tin lamp.”

“How you talk, Huck Finn. Why, you’d ave to come
when he rubbed it, whether you wanted to or not.”

“What, and I as high as a tree and as big as a church?
All right, then; I would come; but I lay I’d make that man
climb the highest tree there was in the country.”

“Shucks, it ain’t no use to talk to you, Huck Finn. You
don’t seem to know anything, somehow—perfect sap-head.”

I thought all this over for two or three days, and then. I
reckoned I would see if there was anything in it. I got an
old tin lamp and an iron ring and went out in the woods and
rubbed and rubbed till I sweat like an Injun, calculating to
build a palace and sell it; but it warn’t no use, none of the
genies come. So then I judged that all that stuff was only
just one of Tom Sawyer’s lies. I reckoned he believed in the
A-rabs and the elephants, but as for me I think different. It
had all the marks of a Sunday school.



32 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER IV.

ELL, three or four months run along, and it was well

into the winter, now. I had been to school most all

the time, and could spell, and read, and write just a little,

and could say the multiplication table up to six times seven

is thirty-five, and I don’t reckon I could ever get any

further than that if I was to live forever. I don’t take no
stock in mathematics, anyway.

At first I hated the school, but by-and-by I got so I could
stand it. Whenever I got uncommon tired I played hookey,
and the hiding I got next day done me good and cheered me
up. So the longer I went to school the easier it got to be.
I was getting sort of used to the widow’s ways, too, and they
warn’t so raspy on me. Living in a house, and sleeping in a
bed, pulled on me pretty tight, mostly, but before the cold
weather I used to slide out and sleep in the woods, some-
times, and so that was a rest tome. I liked the old ways
best, but I was getting so I liked the new ones, too, a little
bit. The widow said I was coming along slow but sure, and
doing very satisfactory. She said she warn’t ashamed of me.

One morning I happened to turn over the salt-cellar at
breakfast. I reached for some of it as quick as I could, to
throw over my left shoulder and keep off the bad luck, but
Miss Watson was in ahead of me, and crossed me off. She

says, ‘* Take your hands away, Huckleberry—what a mess
you are always making.” The widow put in a good word for
me, but that warn’t going to keep off the bad luck, I knowed
that well enough. J started out, after breakfast, feeling wor-
ried and shaky, and wondering where it was going to fall on
me, and what it was going to be. There is ways to keep off
some kinds of bad luck, but this wasn’t one of them kind; so
I never tried to do anything, but just poked along low-spirited
and on the watch-out.

IT went down the front garden and clumb over the stile,





HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 33

where you go through the high board fence. There was an
inch of new snow on the ground, and I seen somebody’s tracks.
They had come up from the quarry and stood around the stile
a while, and then went on around the garden fence. It was
funny they hadn’t come in, after standing around so. I
couldn’t make it out. It was very curious, somehow. I was
going to follow around, but I stooped down to look at the



tracks first. I didn’t notice anything at first, but next I did.
There was a cross in the left boot-heel made with big nails, to
keep off the devil.

I was up in a second and shinning down the hill. I looked
over my shoulder every now and then, but I didn’t see no-
body. Iwas at Judge Thatcher’s as quick as I could get
there. He said:

3



34. THE ADVENTURES OF

“Why, my boy, you are all out of breath. Did you come
for your interest ?”

‘*No sir,” I says; ‘¢is there some for me?”

“Oh, yes, a half-yearly is in, last night. Over a hundred
and fifty dollars. Quite a fortune for you. You better let
me invest it along with your six thousand, because if you take
it you'll spend it.”

“No sir,” I says, «I don’t want to spend it. I don’t want
it at all—nor the six thousand, nuther. I want you to take
it; I want to give it to you—the six thousand and all.”

He looked surprised. He couldn’t seem to make it out. He
says:

‘Why, what can you mean, my boy?”

I says, “Don’t you ask me no questions about it, please.
You'll take it—won’t you?”

He says:

“ Well I’m puzzled. Is something the matter?”

“ Please take it,” says I, “and don’t ask me nothing—then
I won’t have to tell no lies.”

He studied a while, and then he says:

“Oho-o. I think Isee. You want to se//all your property
to me—not give it. That’s the correct idea.”

Then he wrote something on a paper and read it over, and
says:

“ There—you see it says ‘for a consideration.’ That means
I have bought it of you and paid you for it. Here’s adollar
for you. Now, you sign it.”

So I signed it, and left.

Miss Watson’s nigger, Jim, had a hair-ball as big as your
fist, which had been took out of the fourth stomach of an ox,
and he used to do magic with it. He said there was a spirit
inside of it, and it knowed everything. So I went to him that
night and told him pap was here again, for I found his tracks
in the snow. What I wanted to know, was, what he was go-
ing to do, and was he going to stay? Jim got out his hair-
ball, and said something over it, and then he held it up and
dropped it on the floor. It fell pretty solid, and only rolled
about an inch. Jim tried it again, and then another time,
and it acted just the same. Jim got down on his knees and
put his ear against it and listened. But it warn’t no use; he
said it wouldn’t talk. He said sometimes it wouldn’t talk





HUCKLEBERRY FINN.. 35

without money. I told him I had an old ‘slick counterfeit
quarter that warn’t no good because the brass showed through
the silver a little, and it wouldn’t pass nohow, even if the
brass didn’t show, because it was so slick it felt greasy, and
so that would tell on it every time. (I reckoned I wouldn't
say nothing about the dollar I got from the judge.) I said it
was pretty bad money, but maybe the hair-ball would take it,
because maybe it wouldn’t know the difference. Jim smelt
it, and bit it, and rubbed it, and said he would manage so the
hair-ball would think it was good. He said he would split
open a raw Irish potato and stick the quarter in between and
keep it there all night, and next morning you couldn’t see no
brass, and it wouldn’t feel greasy no more, and so anybody
in town would take it in a minute, let alone a hair-ball. Well,
I knowed a potato would do that, before, but I had forgot it.

Jim put the quarter under the hair-ball and got down and
listened again. ‘This time he said the hair-ball was all right.
He said it would tell my whole fortune if I wanted it to. I
says, go on. So the hair-ball talked to Jim, and Jim told it
tome. He says:

‘‘ Yo’ ole father doan’ know, yit, what he’s a-gwyne to do.
Sometimes he spec he'll go ’way, en den agin he spec he’ll
stay. De bes’ way is to res’ easy en let de ole man take his
own way. Dey’s two angels hoverin’ roun’ *bout him. One
uv ’em is white en shiny, en ’tother one is black. De white
one gits him to go right, a little while, den de black one sail
in en bust it all up. A body can’t tell, yit, which one gwyne to
fetch him at de las’. But you is all right. You gwyne to
have considable trouble in yo’ life, en considable joy. Some-
times you gwyne to git hurt, en sometimes you gwyne to git
sick; but every time you’s gwyne to git well agin. Dey’s two
gals flyin’ *bout you in yo’ life. One uv ’em’s light en ’tother
_ one is dark. One is rich en ’tother is po’. You’s gwyne to
_ tarry de po’ one fust en de rich one by-en-by. You wants
to keep ’way fum de water as much as you kin, en don’t run
ag tesk, ’kase it’s down in de bills dat you’s gwyne to git

ung.”

When I lit my candle and went up to my room that night,
_ there set pap, his own self !





36 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER V.

HAD shut the door to. Then I turned around, and there

he was. J used to be scared of him all the time, he tanned

me so much.. I reckoned I was scared now, too; but in a

minute I see I was mistaken. That is, after the first jolt, as

you may say, when my breath sort of hitched—he being so

unexpected; but right away after, ] see I warn’t scared of
him worth bothering about.

He was most fifty, and he looked it. His hair was long
and tangled and greasy, and hung down, and you could see
his eyes shining through like he was behind vines. It was all
black, no gray; so was his long, mixed-up whiskers. There
warn’t no color in his face, where his face showed; it was
white; not like another man’s white, but a white to make a
body sick, a white to make a body’s flesh crawl—a tree-toad
white, a fish-belly white. As for his clothes—just rags, that
was all. He had one ankle resting on ’tother knee; the boot
on that foot was busted, and two of his toes stuck through,
and he worked them now and then. His hat was laying on
the floor; an old black slouch with the top caved in, like a
lid.

I stood a-looking at him; he set there a-looking at me,
with his chair tilted back a little. Iset the candle down. I
noticed the window was up; so he had clumb in by the shed.
He kept a-looking me all over. By-and-by he says:

“ Starchy clothes—very. You think you’re a good deal of
a big-bug, don’t you?”

“ Maybe I am, maybe I ain’t,” I says.

‘Don’t you give me none 0’ your lip,” says he. ‘“ You've
put on considerable many frills since I been away. I'll take
you down a peg before I get done with you. You're edu-
cated, too, they say; can read and write. You think you’re
better’n your father, now, don’t you, because he can’t? J’
take it out of you. Who told you you might meddle with



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 37

such hifalut’n foolishness, hey ?—who told you you could?”
“The widow. She told me.”
‘‘ The widow, hey ?—-and who told the widow she could put’
in her shovel about a thing that ain’t none of her business? ”
“ Nobody never told her.”
“ Well, Pll learn her how to meddle. And looky here—
you drop that school, you hear? I'll learn people to bring











66 pap,”

up a boy to put on airs over his own father and let on to be
better’n what Ae is. You lemme catch you fooling around
that school again, you hear? Your mother couldn’t read,
and she couldn’t write, nuther, before she died. None of the
family couldn’t, before ¢Aey died. J can’t; and here you’re
a-swelling yourself up like this. J ain’t the man to stand it
—you hear? Say—lemme hear you read.”’



38 THE ADVENTURES OF

I tcok up a book and begun something about General
Washington and the wars. When J’d read about ahalf a min-
ute, he fetched the book a whack with his hand and knocked
it across the house. He says:

“Tt’s so. You can do it. I had my doubts when you told
me. Now looky here; you stop that putting on frills. I
won’t have it. I'll lay for you, my smarty; and if I catch
you about that school [ll tan you good. First you know
you'll get religion, too. J never see such a son.”

He took up a little blue and yaller picture of some cows
and a boy, and says:

“ What’s this?”

“It’s something they give me for learning my lessons
good.”

He tore it up, and says—

“T’ll give you something better—I’ll give you a cowhide.”

He set there a-mumbling and a-growling a minute, and
then he says—

“ Ain't you a sweet-scented dandy, though? A bed; and
bedclothes; and a look’n-glass; and a piece of carpet on the
floor—and your own father got to sleep with the hogs in the
tanyard. Inever see such a son. I bet I'll take some o’
these frills out o’ you before I’m done with you. Why
there ain’t no end to your airs—they say you're rich. Hey?
—how’s that ?”

“They lie—that’s how.”

* Looky here—mind how you talk to me; I’m a-standing
about all I can stand, now—so don’t gimme no sass. I’ve
been in town two days, and I hain’t heard nothing but about
you bein’ rich. I heard about it away down the river, too.
That's why Icome. You git me that money to-morrow—I
want it.”’ .

‘‘T hain’t got no money.”

_ “Itsalie. Judge Thatcher’s got it. Yougit it. I want
iteae

“T hain’t got no money, I tell you. You ask Judge
Thatcher; he’ll tell you the same.”

“ Allright. Vl ask him; and I'll make him pungle, too,
or Pll know the reason why. Say—how much you got in /
your pocket ? I want it.” !

“J hain’t got only a dollar, and I want that to——”

f

vd

va



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 39

“Tt don’t make no difference what you want it for—you
just shell it out.”

He took it and bit it to see if it was good, and then he said he
was going down town to get some whisky; said he hadn't hada
drink all day. When he had got out on the shed, he put his
head in again, and cussed me for putting on frills and trying to
be better than him; and when J reckoned he was gone, he come
back and put his head in again, and told me to mind about
that school, because he was going to lay for me and lick me
if I didn’t drop that.

Next day he was drunk, and he went to Judge Thatcher’s
and bullyragged him and tried to make him give up the
money, but he couldn’t, and then he swore he’d make the
law force him.

The judge and the widow went to law to get the court to
take me away from him and let one of them be my guardian;
but it was a new judge that had just come, and he didn’t
know the old man; so he said courts mustn’t interfere and
separate families if they could.help it; said he’d druther not
take a child away from its father. So Judge Thatcher and
the widow had to quit on the business.

That pleased the old man till he couldn’t rest. He said
he’d cowhide me till I was black and blue if I didn’t raise
some money for him, I borrowed three dollars from Judge
Thatcher, and pap took it and got drunk and went a-blowing
around and cussing and whooping and carrying on; and he
kept it up all over town, with a tin pan, till most midnight;
then they jailed him, and next day they had him before
court, and jailed him again fora week. But he said Ae was
satisfied; said he was boss of his son, and he’d make it warm
for him.

When he got out the new judge said he was agoing to make
aman of him. So he took him to his own house, and dress-
ed him up clean and nice, and had him to breakfast and din-
ner and supper with the family, and was just old pie to him,
so to speak. And after supper he talked to him about tem-
perance and such things till the old man cried, and said he’d
been a fool, and fooled away his life; but now he was agoing
to turn over a new leaf and be a man nobody wouldn’t be
ashamed of, and he hoped the judge would help him and not
look down on him. The judge said he could hug him for



40 THE ADVENTURES OF

them words; so Ae cried, and his wife she cried again; pap
said he’d been a man that had always been misunderstood be-
fore, and the judge said he believed it. The old man said
that what a man wanted that was down, was sympathy; and
the judge said it was so; so they cried again. And when it
was bedtime, the old man rose up and held out his hand, and
says:

“Look at it gentlemen, and ladies all; take ahold of it;
shake it. There’s a hand that was the hand of a hog; but it
ain’t so no more; it’s the hand of a man that’s started in on
a new life, and ’ll die before he’ll go back. You mark them
words—don’t forget I said them. It’s a clean hand now;
shake it—don’t be afeard.”

So they shook it, one after the other, all around, and cried.
The judge’s wife she kissed it. Then the old man he signed
a pledge—made his mark. The judge said it was the holiest
time on record, or something like that. Then they tucked
the old man into a beautiful room, which was the spare room,
and in the night sometime he got powerful thirsty and clumb
out onto the porch-roof and slid down a stanchion and traded
his new coat for a jug of forty-rod, and clumb back again
and had a good old time; and towards daylight he crawled
out again, drunk as a fiddler, and rolled off the porch and
broke his left arm in two places and was most froze to death
when somebody found him after sun-up. And when they
come to look at that spare room, they had to take soundings
before they could navigate it.

The judge he felt kind of sore. He said he reckoned a
body could reform the ole man with a shot-gun, maybe, but
he didn’t know no other way.



HUCKLEBERRY FINN, 4l

CHAPTER VI.

ELL, pretty soon the old man was up and around again,
and then he went for Judge Thatcher in the courts to
make him give up that money, and he went for me, too, for not
stopping school. He catched me a couple of times and
thrashed me, but I went to school just the same, and dodged
him or out-run him most of the time. I didn’t want to go to
school much, before, but I reckoned I’d go now to spite pap.
That law trial was a slow business; appeared like they warn’t
ever going to get started on it; so every now and then I’d
borrow two or three dollars off of the judge for him, to keep
from getting a cowhiding. Every time he got money he got
drunk; and every time he got drunk he raised Cain around
town; and every time he raised Cain he got jailed. He was
just suited—this kind of thing was right in his line. .

He got to hanging around the widow’s too much, and so
she told him at last, that if he didn’t quit using around there
she would make trouble for him. Well, wasn’t he mad? He
said he would show who was Huck Finn’s boss. So he watched
out for me one day in the spring, and catched me, and took
me up the river about three mile, in a skiff, and crossed over
to the Illinois shore where it was woody and there warn’t no
houses but an old log hut in a place where the timber was so
thick you couldn’t find it if you didn’t know where it was.

He kept me with him all the time, and I never got a chance
to run off. We lived in that old cabin, and he always locked
the door and put the key under his head, nights. He hada
gun which he had stole, I reckon, and we fished and hunted,
and that was what we lived on. Every little while he locked
me in and went down to the store, three miles, to the ferry,
and traded fish and game for whisky and fetched it home and
got drunk and had a good time, and licked me. The widow
she found out where I was, by-and-by, and she sent a man
over to try to get hold of me, but pap drove him off with the



42 THE ADVENTURES OF

gun, and it warn’t long after that till I was used to being
- where I was, and liked it, all but the cowhide part.

It-was kind of lazy and jolly, laying off comfortable all
day, smoking and fishing, and no books nor study. Two
months or more run along, and my clothes got to be all
rags and dirt, and I didn’t see how I’d ever got to like it so
well at the widow’s, where you had to wash, and eat on
a plate, and comb up, and go to bed and get up regular,
and be forever bothering over a book and have old Miss
Watson pecking at you all the time. I didn’t want to go
back no more. I had stopped cussing, because the widow
didn’t like it; but now I took to it again because pap hadn’t
no objections. It was pretty good times up in the woods
there; take it all around.

But by-and-by pap got too handy with his hick’ry, and I
couldn’t stand it. ] was all over welts. He got to going away
so much, too, and locking me in. Once he locked me in and
was gone three days. It was dreadful lonesome. I judged

_he had got drowned and I wasn’t ever going to get out any

“. More. I was scared. I made up my mind I would fix up

some way to leave there. I had tried to get out of that cabin
many a time, but I couldn’t find no way. There warn’t a
window to it big enough for a dog to get through. I couldn’t
get up the chimbly, it was too narrow. The door was thick
solid oak slabs. Pap was pretty careful not to leave a knife
or anything in the cabin when he was away; I reckon I had
hunted the place over as much as a hundred times; well, I
was ’most all the time at it, because it was about the only way
to put in the time. But this time I found something at last;
I found an old rusty wood-saw without any handle; it was
laid in between a rafter and the clapboards of the roof. I
greased it up and went to work. There was an old horse-
blanket nailed against the logs at the far end of the cabin
behind the table, to keep the wind from blowing through the
chinks and putting the candle out. I got under the table and
raised the blanket and went to work to saw a section of the
big bottom log out, big enough to let me through. Well, it
was a good Jong job, but I was getting towards the end of it
when I heard pap’s gun in the woods. JI got rid of the signs
of my work, and dropped the blanket and hid my saw, and
pretty soon pap come in.



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 43

Pap warn’t in a good humor—so he was his natural self.
He said he was down to town, and everything was going wrong.
His lawyer said he reckoned he would win his lawsuit and get
the money, if they ever got started on the trial; but then
there was ways to put it off a long time, and Judge Thatcher
knowed how to do it. And he said people allowed there’d be
another trial to get me away from him and give me to the
widow for my guardian, and they guessed it would win, this
time. This shook me up considerable, because I didn’t want
to go back to the widow’s any more and be so cramped up
and sivilized, as they called it. Then the old man got to
cussing, and cussed everything and everybody he could think
of, and then cussed them all over again to make sure he hadn’t
skipped any, and after that he polished off with a kind of a
general cuss all round, including a considerable parcel of
people which he didn’t know the names of, and so called them
what’s-his-name, when he got to them, and went right along
with his cussing.

He said he would like to see the widow get me. He said
he would watch out, and if they tried to come any such game
on him he knowed of a place six or seven mile off, to stow me
in, where they might hunt till they dropped and they couldn’t
find me. That made me pretty uneasy again, but only fora
minute; I reckoned I wouldn’t stay on hand till he got that
chance.

The old man made me go to the skiff and fetch the things
he had got. There was a fifty-pound sack of corn meal, and
a side of bacon, ammunition, and a four-gallon jug of whisky,
and an old book and two newspapers for wadding, besides
some tow. I toted up a load, and went back and set down
on the bow of the skiff to rest. I thought it all over, and I
reckoned I would walk off with the gun and some lines, and
take to the woods when I run away. I guessed I wouldn’t
stay in one place, but just tramp right across the country,
mostly night times, and hunt and fish to keep alive, and so
get so far away that the old man nor the widow couldn’t ever
find me any more. I judged I would saw out and leave that
night if pap got drunk enough, and I reckoned he would. I
got so full of it I didn’t notice how long I was staying, till
the old man hollered and asked me whether I was asleep or
drownded.



44 THE ADVENTURES OF

I got the things all up to the cabin, and then it was about
dark. While I was cooking supper the old man took a swig
or two and got sort of warmed up, and went to ripping again.
He had been drunk over in town, and laid in the gutter all
night, and he was a sight to look at. A body would a thought
he was Adam, he was just all mud. Whenever his liquor be-
gun to work, he most always went for the govment. This
time he says:

“Call this a govment! why, just look at it and see what it’s
like. Here’s the law a-standing ready to take a man’s son
away from him—a man’s own son, which he has had all the
trouble and all the anxiety and all the expense of raising.
Yes, just as that man has got that son raised at last, and
ready to go to work and begin to do suthin’ for Az and give
him a rest, the law up and goes for him. And they call “ar
govment! That ain’t all, nuther. The law backs that old
Judge Thatcher up and helps him to keep me out o’ my prop-
erty. Here’s what the law does. The law takes a man
worth six thousand dollars and upards, and jams him into an
old trap of a cabin like this, and lets him go round in clothes
that ain’t fitten for a hog. They callthat govment! A man
can’t get his rights in a govment like this. Sometimes I’vea .
mighty notion to just leave the country for good and all.
Yes, and I zo/d ’em so; I told old Thatcher so to his face.
Lots of ’em heard me, and can tell what I said. Says I, for
two cents I’d leave the blamed country and never come anear
it agin. Them’s the very words. I says, look at my hat—if
you call it a hat—but the lid raises up and the rest of it goes
down till it’s below my chin, and then it ain’t rightly a hat at
all, but more like my head was shoved up through a jint o’
stove-pipe. Look at it, says I—such a hat for me to wear—
one of the wealthiest men in this town, if I could git my
rights. : ;

‘“‘Oh, yes, this is a wonderful govment, wonderful. Why,
looky here. There was a free nigger there, from Ohio; a
mulatter, most as white asa white man. He had the whitest
shirt on you ever see, too, and the shiniest hat; and there ain’t
a man in that town that’s got as fine clothes as what he had;
and he had a gold watch and chain, and a silver-headed cane
—the awfulest old gray-headed nabob in the State. And
what do you think? they said he was a p’fessor in a college,





HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 45

and could talk all kinds of languages, and knowed everything.
And that ain’t the wust. They said he could vo/e, when he
was at home. Well, that let me out. Thinks I, what is the
country a-coming to? It was ‘lection day, and I was just
about to go and vote, myself, if I warn’t too drunk to get
there; but when they told me there was a State in this coun-
try where they’d let that nigger vote, I drawed out. I says
I’ll never vote agin. Them’s the very words I said; they all
heard me; and the country may rot for all me—I’ll never
vote agin as Jong as I live. And to see the cool way of that
nigger—why, he wouldn’t a give me the road if I hadn’t shoved
him out o’ the way. I says to the people, why ain’t this nig-
ger put up at auction and sold ?—that’s what I want to know.
And what do you reckon they said? Why, they said he
couldn’t be sold till he’d been in the State six months, and
he hadn’t been there that long yet. There, now—that’s a
specimen. They call that a govment that can’t sell a free
nigger till he’s been in the State six months. Here’s a gov-
ment that calls itself a govment, and lets on to be a govment,
and thinks it is a govment, and yet’s got to set stock-still for
six whole months before it can take ahold of a prowling,
thieving, infernal, white-shirted free nigger, and 0
Pap was agoing on so, he never noticed where his old lim-
ber legs was taking him to, so he went head over heels over
the tub of salt pork, and barked both shins, and the rest of
his speech was all the hottest kind of language—mostly hove
at the nigger and the govment, though he give the tub some,
too, all along, here and there. He hopped around the cabin
considerable, first on one leg and then on the other, holding
first one shin and then the other one, and at last he let out
with his feft foot all of a sudden and fetched the tub a rat-
tling kick. But it warn’t good judgment, because that was
the boot that had a couple of his toes leaking out of the front
end of it; so now he raised a howl that fairly made a body’s
hair raise, and down he went in the dirt, and rolled there,
and held his toes; and the cussing he done then laid over
anything he had ever done previous. He said so his own
self, afterwards. He had heard old Sowberry Hagan in his
best days, and he said it laid over him, too; but I reckon that
was sort of piling it on, maybe.
After supper pap took the jug, and said he had enough





46 THE ADVENTURES OF

whisky there for two drunks and one delirium tremens. That
was always his word. I judged he would be blind drunk in
about an hour, and then I would steal the key, or saw myself
out, one or'tother. He drank, and drank, and tumbled down
on his blankets, by-and-by; but luck didn’t run my way. He
didn’t go sound asleep, but was uneasy. He groaned, and
moaned, and thrashed around this way and that, for a long
time. At last I got so sleepy I couldn’t keep my eyes open,
all I could do, and so before I knowed what I was about I
was sound asleep, and the candle burning.

I don’t know how long I was asleep, but all of a sudden
there was an awful scream and Iwas up. There was pap,
looking wild and skipping around every which way and yelil-
ing about snakes. He said they was crawling up his legs;
and then he would give a jump and scream, and say one had
bit him on the cheek—but I couldn’t see no snakes. He
started and run round and round the cabin, hollering ‘‘take
him off! take him off! he’s biting me onthe neck!” I never
see a man look so wild in the eyes. Pretty soon he was all
fagged out, and fell down panting; then he rolled over and
over, wonderful fast, kicking things every which way, and
striking and grabbing at the air with his hands, and scream-
ing, and saying there was devils ahold of him. He wore out,
by-and-by, and laid still a while, moaning. Then he laid
stiller, and didn’t make a sound. JI could hear the owls and
the wolves, away off in the woods, and it seemed terrible still.
He was laying over by the corner. By-and-by he raised up,
part way, and listened, with his head to one side. He says
very low:

“ Tramp—tramp—tramp; that’s the dead; tramp—tramp
tramp; they’re coming after me; but I won’t go— Oh, they’re
here! don’t touch me—don’t! hands off—they’re cold; let go
— Oh, let a poor devil alone!”

Then he went down on all fours and crawled off begging
them to let him alone, and he rolled himself up in his blan-
ket and wallowed in under the old pine table, still a-begging;
and then he went to crying. I could hear him through the
blanket.

By-and-by he rolled out and jumped up on his feet looking
wild, and he see me and went forme. He chased me round
and round the place,with a clasp-knife, calling me the Angel



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. Ay

of Death, and saying he would kill me and then I couldn’t
come for him no more. I begged, and told him I was only
Huck, but he laughed sch a screechy laugh, and roared and
cussed, and kept on chasing me up. Once when I turned
short and dodged under his arm he made a grab and got me
by the jacket between my shoulders, and J thought I was
gone; but I slid out of the jacket quick as lightning, and
saved myself. Pretty soon he was all tired out, and dropped
down with his back against the door, and said he would rest
a minute and then kill me. He put his knife under him, and
said he would sleep and get strong, and then he would see
who was who.

So he dozed off, pretty soon. By-and-by I got the old
split-bottom chair and clumb up, as easy as I could, not to
make any noise, and got down the gun. I slipped the ram-
rod down it to make sure it was loaded, and then I laid it
across the turnip barrel, pointing towards pap, and set down
behind it to wait for him to stir. And how slow and still the
time did drag along.



48 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER VIL.

x IT up! what you *bout!”

IT opened my eyes and looked around, trying to make
out where I was. It was after sun-up, and I had been sound
asleep. Pap was standing over me, looking sour—and sick,
too. He says—

“What you doin’ with this gun?”

I judged he didn’t know nothing about what he had been
doing, so I says:

“ Somebody tried to get in, so I was laying for him.”

“ Why didn’t you roust me out?”

“Well I tried to, but I couldn’t; I couldn't budge you.”

“Well, all right. Don’t stand there palavering all day,
but out with you and see if there’s a fish on the lines for
breakfast. Tl be along in a minute.”

He unlocked the door and I cleared out, up the river
bank. I noticed some pieces of limbs and such things
floating down, and a sprinkling of bark; so I knowed the
river had begun torise. Ireckoned I would have great times,
now, if I was over at the town. ‘The June rise used to be
always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins,
here comes cord-wood floating down, and pieces of log rafts
—sometimes a dozen logs together; so all you have to do
is to catch them and sell them to the wood yards and the
sawmill.

I went along up the bank with one eye out for pap and
‘tother one out for what the rise might fetch along. Well,
all at once, here comes a canoe; just a beauty, too, about
thirteen or fourteen foot long, riding high like a duck. I
shot head first off of the bank, like a frog, clothes and all
on, and struck out for the canoe, I just expected there’d
be somebody Jaying down in it, because people often done
that to fool folks, and when a chap had pulled a skiff out
most to it they’d raise up and laugh at him. But it
warn’t so this time, It was a drift-canoe, sure enough,





HUCKLEBERRY FINN. AQ

and I clumb in and paddled her ashore. Thinks I, the
old man will be glad when he sees this—she’s worth ten
dollars. But when I got to shore pap wasn’t in sight yet,
and as I was running her into a little creek like a gully, all
hung over with vines and willows, I struck another idea ; I
judged I’d hide her good, and then, stead of taking to the
woods when I run off, ’'d go down the river about fifty mile
and camp in one place for good, and not have such a rough
time tramping on foot.

It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard
the old man coming, all the time; but I got her hid; and
then I out and looked around a bunch of willows, and there
was the old man down the path apiece just drawing a bead
ona bird with hisgun. So he hadn’t seen anything.

When he got along, I was hard at it taking up a “trot”
line. He abused me a little for being so slow, but I told him
I fell in the river and that was what made me so long. I
knowed he would see I was wet, and then he would ‘be ask-
ing questions. We got five cat-fish off of the lines and went
home.

While we laid off, after breakfast, to sleep up, both of us
being about wore out, I got to thinking that if I could fix
up some way to keep pap and the widow from trying to fol-
low me, it would be a certainer thing than trusting to luck to
get far enough off before they missed me ; you see, all kinds
of things might happen. Well, I didn’t see no way for a
while, but by-and-by pap raised up a minute, to drink an-
other barrel of water, and he says:

“ Another time a man comes a-prowling round here, you
roust me out, you hear? That man warn’t here for no good.
T’da shot him. Next time, you roust me out, you hear?”’

Then he dropped down and went to sleep again—but what
he had been saying give me the very idea I wanted. I says
to myself, I can fix it now so nobody won’t think of foilow-
ing me.

About twelve o’clock we turned out and went along up
the bank. The river was coming up pretty fast, and lots of
drift-wood going by on the rise. By-and-by, along comes
part of a log raft—nine logs fast together. We went out with
the skiff and towed it ashore. Then we had dinner. Any-
body but pap would a waited and seen the day through, so

4



50 THE ADVENTURES OF

as to catch more stuff; but that warn’t pap’s style. Nine
logs was enough for one time; he must shove right over to
town and sell. So he locked mein and took the skiff and
started off towing the raft about half-past three. IJ judged
he wouldn’t come back that night. J waited till I reckoned
he had got a good start, then I out with my saw and went
to work on that log again. Before he was ’tother side of the
river I was out of the hole; him and his raft was just a speck
on the water away off yonder.

I took the sack of corn meal and took it to where the
canoe was hid, and shoved the vines and branches apart and
put it in; then I done the same with the side of bacon ; then
the whisky jug ; I took all the coffee and sugar there was,
and all the ammunition; I took the wadding; I took the
bucket and gourd, I took a dipper and a tin cup, and my old
saw and two blankets, and the skillet and the coffee-pot. I
took fish-lines and matches and other things—everything that
was worth a cent. I cleaned out the place. J wanted an
axe, but there wasn’t any, only the one out at the wood pile,
and I knowed why I was going to leave that. I fetched out
the gun, and now I was done.

I had wore the ground a good deal, crawling out of the
hole and dragging out so many things. SoTI fixed that as
good as I could from the outside by scattering dust on the
place, which covered up the smoothness and the sawdust.
Then I fixed the piece of log back into its place, and put two
rocks under it and one against it to hold it there,—for it was
bent up at that place, and didn’t quite touch ground. If you
stood four or five foot away and didn’t know it was sawed,
you wouldn’t ever notice it; and besides, this was the back
of the cabin and it warn’t likely anybody would go fooling
around there.

It was all grass clear to the canoe ; sol hadn’t left a track.
I followed around to see. I stood on the bank and looked
out over the river. All safe. So I took the gun and went
up a piece into the woods and was hunting around for some
birds, when I see a wild pig ; hogs soon went wild in them
bottoms after they had got away from the prairie farms. I
shot this fellow and took him into camp.

I took the axe and smashed in the door—I beat it and
hacked it considerable, a-doing it. I fetched the pig in and



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 51

took him back nearly to the table and hacked into his throat
with the ax, and laid him down on the ground to bleed—I
say ground, because it was ground—hard packed, and no
boards. Well, next I took an old sack and put a lot of big
rocks in it,—all I could drag—and I started it from the pig
and dragged it to the door and through the woods down to the
river and dumped it in, and down it sunk, out of sight. You
could easy see that something had been dragged over the
ground. I did wish Tom Sawyer was there, I knowed he
would take an interest in this kind of business, and throw in
the fancy touches. Nobody could spread himself like Tom
Sawyer in such a thing as that.

Well, last I pulled out some of my hair, and blooded the
ax good, and stuck it on the back side, and slung the ax in
the corner. Then I took-up the pig and held him to my
breast with my jacket (so he couldn’t drip) till I got a good
piece below the house and then dumped him into the river.
Now I thought of something else. So 1 went and got the bag
of meal and my old saw out of the canoe and fetched them
to the house. I took the bag to where it used to stand, and
ripped a hole inthe bottom of it with the saw, for there warn’t
no knives and forks on the place—pap done everything with
his clasp-knife, about the cooking. ThenI carried the sack
about a hundred yards across the grass and through the wil-
lows east of the house, to a shallow lake that was five mile
wide and full of rushes—and ducks too, you might say, in the
season. There was a slough or a creek leading out of it on
the other side, that went miles away, I don’t know where, but
it didn’t go tothe river. The meal sifted out and made a
little track all the way to the lake. I dropped pap’s whet-
stone there too, so as to look like it had been done by acci-
dent. ‘Then I tied up the rip in the meal sack with a string,
so it wouldn’t leak no more, and took it and my saw to the
canoe again.

It was about dark, now; so I dropped the canoe down the
river under some willows that hung over the bank, and waited
for the moon to rise. I made fast toa willow; then I tooka
bite to eat, and by-and-by laid down in the canoe to smoke a
pipe and lay out a plan. I says to myself, they'll follow the
track of that sackful of rocks to the shore and then drag the
river for me. And they'll follow that meal track to the lake





52 THE ADVENTURES OF

and go browsing down the creek that leads out of it to find
the robbers that killed me and took the things. They won’t
ever hunt the river for anything but my dead carcass. ‘They’ll
soon get tired of that, and won’t bother no more about me.
All right; I can stop anywhere I want to. Jackson’s Island
is good enough for me; I know that island pretty well, and
nobody ever comes there. And then I can paddie over to
town, nights, and slink around and pick up things I want.
Jackson’s Island’s the place.

I was pretty tired, and the first thing I knowed, I was
asleep. When Iwoke up I didn’t know where I was, for a
minute. I set up and looked around, a little scared. Then
I remembered. The river looked miles and miles across. The
moon was so bright I could a counted the drift logs that went
a slipping along, black and still, hundred of yards out from
shore. Everything was dead quiet, and it looked late, and
smelt late. You know what I mean—I don’t know the words
to put it in.

I took a good gap and a stretch, and was just going to un-
hitch and start, when I heard a sound away over the water.
I listened. Pretty soon I made it out. It was that dull kind
of a regular sound that comes from oars working in rowlocks
when it’s a still night. JI peeped out through the willow
branches, and there it was—a skiff, away across the water. I
couldn’t tell how many was in it. It kept a-coming, and
when it was abreast of me I see there warn’t but one man in
it. Think’s I, maybe it’s pap, though I warn’t expecting him.
He dropped below me, with the current, and by-and-by he
come a-swinging up shore in the easy water, and he went by
so close I could a reached out the gun and touched him.
Well, it gas pap, sure enough—and sober, too, by the way
he laid to his oars.

I didn’t lose no time. The next minute I was a-spinning
down stream soft but quick in the shade of the bank. I
made two mile and a half, and then struck out a quarter ofa
mile or more towards the middle of the river, because pretty
soon I would be passing the ferry landing and people might
see me and hail me. I got out amongst the drift-wood and
then laid down in the bottom of the canoe and let her float.
I laid there and had a good rest and a smoke out of my pipe,
looking away into the sky, not a cloud in it. Thesky looks



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 53

ever so deep when you lay down on your back in the moon-
shine ; I never knowed it before. And how far a body can
hear on the water such nights! I heard people talking at
the ferry landing. I heard what they said, too, every word
of it. One man said it was getting towards the long days and
the short nights, now. ’Tother one said ¢Azs warn’t one of
the short ones, he reckoned—and then they laughed, and he
said it over again and they laughed again ; then they waked
up another fellow and told him, and laughed, but he didn’t
laugh ; he ripped out something brisk and said let him alone.
The first fellow said he ‘lowed to tell it to his old woman—
she would think it was pretty good ; but he said that warn’t
nothing to some things he had said in his time. J heard one
man say it was nearly three o’clock, and he hoped daylight
wouldn’t wait more than about a week longer. After that,
the talk got further and further away, and I couldn’t make
out the words any more, but I could hear the mumble; and
now and then a laugh, too, but it seemed a long ways off.

I was away below the ferry now. I rose up and there was Jack-
son’s Island, about two mile anda half down stream, heavy-
timbered and standing up out of the middle of the river, big and
dark and solid, like a steamboat without any lights. ‘There
warn't any signs of the bar at the head—it was all under water,
now.

It didn’t take me long to get there. I shot past the head at
a ripping rate, the current was so swift, and then I got into the
dead water and landed on the side towards the Illinois shore.
I run the canoe into a deep dent in the bank that I knowed
about; I had to part the willow branches to get in; and when
I made fast nobody could a seen the canoe from the outside.

I went up and set down on a log at the head of the island
and looked out on the big river and the black driftwood, and
away over to the town, three mile away, where there was three
or four lights twinkling. A monstrous big lumber raft was
about a mile up stream, coming along down, with a lantern in
the middle of it. I watched it come creeping down, and
when it was most abreast of where I stood I heard aman say,
‘« Stern oars, there! heave her head to stabboard!” I heard
that just as plain as if the man was by my side.

There was a little gray in the sky, now; so I stepped into
the woods and laid down for a nap before breakfast.



54 = THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER VIII.

HE sun was up so high when I waked, that I judged it

was after eight o’clock. JI laid there in the grass and

the cool shade, thinking about things and feeling rested and

ruther comfortable and satisfied. I could see the sun out at

one or two holes, but mostly it was big trees all about, and

gloomy in there amongst them. There was freckled places

on the ground where the light sifted down through the leaves,

and the freckled places swapped about a little, showing there

was a little breeze up there. A couple of squirrels set ona
limb and jabbered at me very friendly.

I was powerful lazy and comfortable—didn’t want to get
up and cook breakfast. Well, I was dozing off again, when
I thinks I hears adeep sound of ‘‘ boom!” away up the river.
I rouses up and rests on my elbow and listens; pretty soon I
hears it again. I hopped up and went and looked out ata
hole in the leaves, and I see a bunch of smoke laying on the
‘water a long ways up—about abreast the ferry. And there
was the ferry-boat full of people, floating along down. I
knowed what was the matter, now. “Boom!” I see the
white smoke squirt out of the ferry-boat’s side. You see,
they was firing cannon over the water, trying to make my
carcass come to the top.

I was pretty hungry, but it warn’t going to do for me to
start a fire, because they might see the smoke. So I set
there and watched the cannon-smoke and listened to the
boom. The river was a mile wide, there, and it always looks
pretty on a summer morning—so I was having a good enough
time seeing them hunt for my remainders, if I only had a
bite to eat. Well, then I happened to think how they always
put quicksilver in loaves of bread and float them off because
they always go right to the drownded carcass and stop there.
So says I, I'll keep a lookout, and if any of them’s floating
around after me, I’ll give them a show. I changed to the



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 55

Illinois edge of the island to see what luck I could have, and
I warn’t disappointed. A big double loaf come along, and I
most got it, with a long stick, but my foot slipped and she
floated out further. Of course I was where the current set
in the closest to the shore—I knowed enough for that. But
by-and-by along comes another one, and this time I won. I
took out the plug and shook out the little dab of quicksilver,
and set my teeth in. It was “baker’s bread’”—what the
quality eat—none of your low-down corn-pone.

I got a good place amongst the leaves, and set there on a
log, munching the bread and watching the ferry-boat, and
very well satisfied. And then something struck me. I
says, now I reckon the widow or the parson or somebody
prayed that this bread would find me, and here it has gone
and done it. So there ain’t no doubt but there is something
in that thing. That is, there’s something in it when a body
like the widow or the parson prays, but it don’t work for me,
and I reckon it don’t work for only just the right kind.

I lit a pipe and had a good long smoke and went on watch-
ing. The ferry-boat was floating with the current, and I al-
lowed I’d have a chance to see who was aboard when she
come along, because she would come in close, where the
bread did. When she’d got pretty well along down towards
me, I put out my pipe and went to where I fished out the
bread, and laid down behind a log on the back in a little
open place. Where the log forked I could peep through.

By-and-by she come along, and she drifted in so close that
they could a run out a plank and walked ashore. Most
everybody was on the boat. Pap, and Judge Thatcher, and
Bessie Thatcher, and Jo Harper, and Tom Sawyer, and. his
old Aunt Polly, and Sid and Mary, and plenty more. Every-
body was talking about the murder, but the captain broke in
and says:

_ “Look sharp, now; the current sets in the closest here,
and maybe he’s washed ashore and got tangled amongst the
brush at the water’s edge. JI hope so, anyway.”

I didn’t hope so. They all crowded up and leaned over
the rails, nearly in my face, and kept still, watching with all
their might. I could see them first-rate, but they couldn’t
see me. Then the captain sung out:

“Stand away!’”’ and the cannon let off such a blast right



56 THE ADVENTURES OF

before me that it made me deef with the noise and pretty
near blind with the smoke, and I judged Iwas gone. If they’d
a had some bullets in, I reckon they’d a got the corpse they
was after. Well, I see I warn’t hurt, thanks to goodness. The
boat floated on and went out of sight around the shoulder of
the island. I could hear the booming, now and then, further
and further off, and by-and-by after an hour, I didn’t hear it
nomore. The island was three mile long. I judged they had
got to the foot, and was giving it up. But they didn’t yet a
while. They turned around the foot of the island and start-
ed up the channel on the Missouri side, under steam, and
booming once ina while as they went. I crossed over to
that side and watched them. When they got abreast the
head of the island they quit shooting and dropped over to the
Missouri shore and went home to the town.

I knowed I was all right now. Nobody else would come
a-hunting after me. I got my traps out of the canoe and
made me a nice camp in the thick woods. I made a kind of
a tent out of my blankets to put my things under so the rain
couldn’t get at them. I catched a cat-fish and haggled him
open with my saw, and towards sundown I started my camp
fireand had supper. Then I set out a line to catch some fish
for breakfast. J

When it was dark I set by my camp-fire smoking, and feel-
ing pretty satished; but by-and-by it got sort of lonesome,
and so I went and set on the bank and listened to the cur-
rents washing along, and counted the stars and drift-logs and
rafts that come down, and then went to bed; there ain’t no
better way to put in time when you are lonesome; you can’t
stay so, you soon get over it.

And so for three days and nights. No difference—just the
same thing. But the next day I went exploring around down
through the island. I was boss of it; it all belonged to me,
so to say, and I wanted to know all about it; but mainly I
wanted to put in the time. I found plenty strawberries, ripe
and prime; and green summer-grapes, and green razberries;
and the green blackberries was just beginning to show. They
would all come handy by-and-by, I judged.

Well, I went fooling along in the deep woods till I judged
I warn’t far from the foot of theisland. I had my gun along,
but I hadn’t shot nothing; it was for protection; thought I



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 57

would kill some game nigh home. About this time I mighty
near stepped on a good sized snake, and it went sliding off
through the grass and flowers, and I after it, trying to get a
shot at it. I clipped along, and all of a sudden I bounded
right on to the ashes of a camp fire that was still smoking.

My heart jumped up amongst my lungs. I never waited for
to look further, but uncocked my gunand went sneaking back
on my tip-toes as fast as ever I could. Every now and then
I stopped a second, amongst the thick leaves, and listened,
but my breath come so hard I couldn’t hear nothing else. I
slunk along another piece further, then listened again; and so
on, and so on; if I see a stump, I took it fora man; if I trod
on a stick and broke it, it made me feel like a person had cut
one of my breaths in two and I only got half, and the short
half, too.

When I got to camp I warn’t feeling very brash, there
warn’t much sand in my craw; but I says, this ain’t no time
to be fooling around. So I got all my traps into my canoe
again so as to have them out of sight, and I put out the fire
and scattered the ashes around to look like an old last year’s
camp, and then clumb a tree.

I reckon I was up in the tree two hours; but I didn’t see
nothing, I didn’t hear nothing—I only thought I heard and
seen as much asa thousand things. Well, I ‘couldn't stay up
there forever; so at last I got down, but I kept in the thick
woods and on the lookout all the time. All I could get to
eat was berries and what was left over from breakfast.

By the time it was night I was pretty hungry. So when it |
was good and dark, I slid out from shore before moonrise and
paddled over to the Illinois bank—about a quarter of a mile.
I went out in the woods and cooked a supper, and I had about
made up my mind I would stay there all night, when I heara
plunkety-plunk, plunkety-plunk, and says to myself, horses com-
ing; and next I hear people’s voices. I got everything into
the canoe as quick as I could, and then went creeping
through the woods to see what Icould findout. Ihadn’t got
far when J hear a man say:

“We better camp here, if we can find a good place; the
horses is about beat out. Let’s look around.”

I didn’t wait, but shoved out and paddled away easy. I tied
up in the old place, and reckoned I would sleep in the canoe.



58 THE ADVENTURES OF

I didn’t sleep much. I couldn’t, somehow, for thinking.
And every time I waked up I thought somebody had me by
the neck. So the sleep didn’t do me no good. By-and-by I
says to myself, I can’t live this way; I’m agoing to find out
who it is that’s here on the island with me; I’ll find it out or
bust. Well, I felt better, right off.

So I took my paddle and slid out from shore just a step or
two, and then let the canoe drop along down amongst the
shadows. The moon was shining, and outside of the shadows
it made it most as light as day. I poked along well onto an
hour, everything still as rocks and sound asleep. Well by
this time I was most down to the foot of the island. A little
tipply, cool breeze begun to blow, and that was as good as
saying the night was about done. I give her a turn with the
paddle and brung her nose to shore; then I got my gun and
slipped out and into the edge of the woods. I set down there
on a log and looked out though the leaves. I see the moon
go off watch and the darkness begin to blag’ct the river. But
in a little while I see a pale streak over the tree-tops, and
knowed the day was coming. So I took my gun and slipped
' off towards where I had run across that camp fire, stopping
every minute or two to listen. But I hadn’t no luck, some-
how; I couldn’t seem to find the place. But by-and-by, sure
enough, I catched a glimpse of fire, away through the trees.
I went for it, cautious and slow. By-and-by I was close
enough to have a look, and there laid a man on the ground.
It most give me the fan-tods. He had a blanket around his
head, and his head was nearly in the fire. J set there behind
a clump of bushes, in about six foot of him, and kept my eyes
on him steady. It was getting gray daylight, now. Pretty
soon he gapped, and stretched himself, and hove off the
blanket, and it was Miss Watson’s Jim! I bet I was glad to
see him. I says: ;

“ Hello, Jim!” and skipped out.

He bounced up and stared at me wild. Then he drops
down on his knees, and puts his hands together and says:

“ Doan’ hurt me—don’t! I hain’t ever done no harm to a-
ghos’. I awluz liked dead people, en done all I could for ’em.
You go en git in de river agin, whah you b’longs, en doan’ do
nuffn to Ole Jim, ’at ’uz awluz yo’ fren’.”

Well, I warn’t long making him understand I warn’t dead.



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 59

I was ever so glad to see Jim. I warn’t lonesome, now. I
told him I warn’t afraid of Azm telling the people where I was.
I talked along, but he only set there and looked at me; never
said nothing. Then I says:

“It’s good daylight. Le’s get breakfast. Make up your
camp fire good.”

« What’s de use er makin’ up de camp fire to cook straw-
bries en sich truck? But you got a gun, hain’t you? Den
we kin git sumfn better den strawbries.”



JIM AND THE GHOST.

“ Strawberries and such truck,” Isays. ‘‘ Is that what you
live on?”

“T couldn’ git nuffn else,” he says.

“Why, how long you been on the island, Jim?”

“‘T come heah de night arter you’s killed.”

“What, all that time?”

“ Yes-indeedy.”

“And ain’t you had nothing but that kind of rubbage to
eat?”



60 THE ADVENTURES OF

“No, sah—nuffn else.”

is Well, you must be most starved, ain’t you?”

“Treck’n I could eata hoss. I think Icould. How long
you ben on de islan’?”

‘Since the night I got killed.”’

“No! W’y, what has you lived on? But you got a gun.
Oh, yes, you gota gun. Dat’s good. Now you kill sumfn
en I'll make up de fire.”

So we went over to where the canoe was, and while he built
a fire in a grassy open place amongst the trees, I fetched meal
and bacon and coffee, and coffee-pot and frying-pan, and
sugar and tin cups, and the nigger was set back considerable,
because he reckoned it was all done with witchcraft. I
catched a good big cat-fish, too, and Jim cleaned him with
his knife, and fried him.

When breakfast was ready, we lolled on the grass and eat
it smoking hot, Jim laid, it in with all his might, for he was
most about starved. Vhen when we had got pretty well
stuffed, we laid off and lazied.

By- and- by Jim says:

“But looky here, Huck, who wuz it dat ’uz killed in dat
shanty, ef it warn’t-you?’

Then I told him the whole thing, and he said it was smart.
He said Tom Sawyer couldn’t get up no better plan than what
Thad. Then I says:

“ How do you come to be here, Jim, and how'd you get
here?”

He looked pretty uneasy, and didn’t say nothing for a
minute. Then he says:

‘Maybe I better not tell.”

“Why, Jim?”

“ Well, dey’sreasons. But you wouldn’ tell on me ef I ’uz
to tell you, would you, Huck ?”

“ Blamed if I would, Jim.”

‘¢ Well, I b’lieve you, Huck. I—I run off.”

ce Jim! oe

“But mind, you said you wouldn't tell—you know you
said you wouldn’t tell, Huck.”

“Well I did. I said I wouldn’t, and J’ll stick to it.
Honest ¢ajun I will. People would call me a low down
Ablitionist and despise me for keeping mum—but that don’t



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 61

make no difference. I ain’t agoing to tell, and I ain’t agoing
back there anyways. So now, le’s know all about it.’

“Well, you see, it’uz dis way. Ole Missus—dat’s Miss
Watson—she pecks on me all de time, en treats me pooty
rough, but she awluz said she wouldn’ sell me down to Or-
leans. But I noticed dey wuz a nigger trader roun’ de place
considable, lately, en I begin to git oneasy. Well, one night
I creeps to de do’, pooty late, en de do’ warn’t quite shet,
en I hear ole missus tell de widder she gwyne to sell me
down to Orleans, but she didn’ want to, but she could git
eight hund’d dollars for me, en it ’uz sich a big stack 0’
money she couldn’ resis’. De widder she try to git her to
say she wouldn’ do it, but I never waited to hear de res’, I
lit out mighty quick, I tell you.

“T tuck out en shin down de hill en ’spec to steal a skift
“long de sho’ som’ers ’bove de town, but dey wuz people
a-stirrin’ yit, so I hid in de ole tumble-down cooper shop on
de bank to wait for everybody to go ’way. Well, I wuz dah
all night. Dey wuz somebody roun’allde time. ’Long ’bout
six in de mawnin’, skifts begin to go by, en ’bout eight er
nine every skift dat went ‘long wuz talkin’ *bout how yo’ pap
come over to de town en say you’s killed. Dese las’ skifts
wuz full o’ ladies en genimen agoin’ over for to see de place.
Sometimes dey’d pull up at de sho’ en take a res’ b’fo’ dey
started acrost, so by de talk I got to know all ’bout de killin’.
I ’uz powerful sorry you’s kilied, Huck, but I ain’t no mo’,
now.

“T laid dah under de shavins all day. I’uz hungry, but I
warn’t afeared,; bekase I knowed ole missus en de widder
wuz goin’ to start to de camp-meetn’ right arter breakfas’ en
be gone all day, en dey knows I goes off wid de cattle *bout
daylight, so dey wouldn’ ’spec to see me roun’ de place, en
so dey wouldn’ miss me tell arter dark in de evenin’. De
yuther servants wouldn’ miss me, kase dey’d shin out en take
holiday, soon as de ole folks ’uz out’n de way.

“¢ Well, when it come dark I tuck out up de river road, en
went ’bout two mile er more to whah dey warn’t no houses.
I’d made up my mine ’bout what I’s agwyne to do. You see
ef I kep’ on tryin’ to git away afoot, de dogs ’ud track me;
ef I stole a skift to cross over, dey’d miss dat skift, you see,
en dey’d know ’bout whah I’d lan’ on de yuther side en whah



62 THE ADVENTURES OF

to pick up my track. So I says, a raff is what I’s arter; it
doan’ make no track.

““T see a light a-comin’ roun’ de p’int, bymeby, so I wade’
in en shove’ a log ahead 0’ me en swum more’n half-way acrost
de river, en got in’mongst de drift-wood, en kep’ my head
down low, en kinder swum agin de current tell de raff come
along. Den I swum to de stern uv it, en tuck aholt. It
clouded up en ’uz pooty dark for a little while. So I clumb
up en laid down on de planks. De men ’uz all ’way yonder
in de middle, whah de lantern wuz. De river wuz arisin en
dey wuz a good current; so I reck’n’d ’at by fo’ in de mawn-
in’ I’d be twenty-five mile down de river, en den I’d slip in,
jis b’fo’ daylight, en swim asho’ en take to de woods on de
Illinois side.

‘But I didn’ have no luck. When we ’uz mos’ down to
de head er de islan’, a man begin to come aft wid de lantern.
I see it warn’t no use fer to wait, so I slid overboard, en
struck out fer de islan’. Well, I had a notion I could lan’
mos’ anywhers, but I couldn’t—bank too bluff. J ’uz mos’
to de foot er de islan’ b’fo’ I foun’ a good place. I went
into de woods en jedged I wouldn’ fool wid raffs no mo’,
long as dey move de lantern roun’ so. I had my pipe ena
plug er dog-leg, en some matches in my cap, en dey warn’t
wet, so 1 ’uz all right.”

“And so you ain’t had no meat nor bread to eat all this
time? Why didn’t you get mud-turkles?”

“How you gwyne to git’m? You can’t slip up on um en
grab um; en how’s a body gwyne to hit um wid a rock?
How could a body do it in de night? en I warn’t gwyne to
show mysef on de bank in de daytime.”

“Well, that’s so. You’ve had to keep in the woods
all the time, of course. Did you hear ’em shooting the
cannon ?”

“Oh, yes. I knowed dey was arter you. I see um go
by heah; watched um thoo de bushes.”

Some young birds come along, flying a yard or two ata
time and lighting. Jim said it was a sign it was going to
rain. He said it was a sign when young chickens flew that
way, and so he reckoned it was the same way when young
birds done it. I was going to catch some of them, but Jim
wouldn’t let me. He said it was death. He said his father



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. _ 93
laid mighty sick once, and some of them catched a bird, and
his old granny said his father would die, and he did.

And Jim said you musn’t count the things you are going
to cook for dinner, because that would bring bad luck. The
same if you shook the table-cloth after sundown. And he
said if a man owned a bee-hive, and that man died, the bees
must be told about it before sun-up next morning, or else the
bees would all weaken down and quit work and die. Jim said
bees wouldn’t sting idiots; but I didn’t believe that, because
Thad tried them lots of times myself, and they wouldn't
sting me.

[Thad heard about some of these things before, but not all of
them. Jim knowed all kinds of signs. He said he knowed
most everything. I said it looked to me like all the signs
was about bad luck, and so I asked him if there warn’t any
good-luck signs. He says:

“Mighty few—an’ dey ain’t no use to a body. What you
want to know when good luck’s a-comin’ for? want to keep
it off?” And he said: “Ef you’s got hairy arms en a hairy
breas’, it’s a sign dat you’s agwyne to be rich. Well, dey’s
‘some use ina sign like dat, ’kase it’s so fur ahead. You
see, maybe you’s got to be po’ a long time fust, en so you
might git discourage’ en kill yo’sef ’f you didn’ know by de
sign dat you gwyne to be rich bymeby.”

“Have you got hairy arms and a hairy breast, Jim ?”’

“What's de use to ax dat question? don’ you see I has?”

“Well, are you rich?”

“No, but I ben rich wunst, and gwyne to be rich agin.
Wunst I had foteen dollars, but I tuck to specalat’n’, en got
busted out.”

«What did you speculate in, Jim?”

‘‘ Well, fust I tackled stock.”

“What kind of stock ?”

“Why, live stock. Cattle, you know. I put ten dollars
in acow. But I ain’ gwyne to resk no mo’ money in stock.
De cow up ’n’ died on my han’s.”

“So you lost the ten dollars.”

“No, I didn’t lose it all. I on’y los’ bout nine of it. 1
sole de hide en taller for a dollar en ten cents.”

‘¢You had five dollars and ten cents left. Did you spec-
ulate any more?” ;



64 THE ADVENTURES OF

“Yes. You know dat one-laigged nigger dat b’longs to old
Misto Bradish? well, he sot up a bank, en say anybody dat
put in a dollar would git fo’ dollars mo’ at de en’ er de year.
Well, all de niggers went in, but dey didn’t have much. I
wuz de on’y one dat had much. So I stuck out for mo’ dan
fo’ dollars, en I said ’f I didn’ git it ’d start a bank mysef.
Well o’ course dat nigger want’ to keep me out er de busi-
ness, bekase he say dey warn’t business ’nough for two banks,
so he say I could put in my five dollars en he pay me thirty-
five at de en’ er de year.

“So I done it. Den I reck’n'd I’d inves’ de thirty-five
dollars right off en keep things a-movin’. Dey wuz a nigger
name’ Bob, dat had ketched a wood-flat, en his marster didn’
know it; en I bought it off’n him en told him to take de
thirty-five dollars when de en’ er de year come; but some-
body stole de wood-flat dat night, en nex’ day de one-laigged
nigger say de bank ’s busted. So dey didn’ none uv us git
no money.”

“What did you do with the ten cents, Jim ?”

“Well, I’uz gwyne to spen’ it, but I had a dream, en de
dream tole me to give it to a nigger name’ Balum—Balum’s
Ass dey call him for short, he’s one er dem chuckle-heads,
you know. But he’s lucky, dey say, en I see I warn’t lucky.
De dream say let Balum inves’ de ten cents en he’d make a
raise for me. Well, Balum he tuck de money, en when he
wuz in church he hear de preacher say dat whoever give to
de po’ len’ to de Lord, en bound’ to git his money back a
hund’d times. So Balum he tuck en give de ten cents to de
po’, en Jaid low to see what wuz gwyne to come of it.”

“ Well, what did come of it, Jim?”

“ Nuffn’ never come of it. I couldn’ manage to k’leck dat
money no way; en Balum he couldn’. I ain’ gwyne to len’
no mo’ money ’dout I see de security. Boun’ to git yo’
money back a hund’d times, de preacher says! Ef I could
git de ten cents back, I’d call it squah, en be glad er de
chanst.”’ :

“ Well, it’s all right, anyway, Jim, long as you’re going to
be rich again some time or other.”

‘¢Ves—en I’s rich now, come to look at it. I owns my-
sef,en I’s wuth eight hund’d dollars. I wisht I had de

so

money, I wouldn’ want no mo’.



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 65

CHAPTER IX.

WANTED to go and look at a place right about the

middle of the island, that I’d found when I was explor-

ing; so we started and soon got to it, because the island was
only three miles long and a quarter of a mile wide.

This place was a tolerable long steep hill or ridge, about
forty foot high. We had a rough time getting to the top, the
sides was so steep and the bushes so thick. Wetramped and
clumb around all over it, and by-and-by found a good big
cavern in the rock, most up to the top on the side towards
Illinois. The cavern was as big as two or three rooms bunch-
ed together, and Jim could stand up straight init. It was
cool in there. Jim was for putting our traps in there, right
away, but I said we didn’t want to beclimbing up and down
there all the time.

Jim said if we had the canoe hid in a good place, and had
all the traps in the cavern, we could rush there if anybody
was to come to the island, and they would never find us with-
out dogs. And besides, he said them little birds had said it
was going to rain, and did I want the things to get wet?

So we went back and got the canoe and paddled up abreast
the cavern, and lugged all the traps up there. Then we
hunted up a place close by to hide the canoe in, amongst the
thick willows. We took some fish off of the lines and set
them again, and begun to get ready for dinner.

The door of the cavern was big enough to roll a hogshead
in, and on one side of the door the floor stuck out a little bit
and was flat and a good place to builda fire on. So we built
it there and cooked dinner. _

We spread the blankets inside for a-carpet, and eat our din-
ner in there. We put all the other things handy at the back
of the cavern. Pretty soon it darkened up and begun to
thunder and lighten; so the birds was right about it. Direct-
ly it begun to rain, and it rained like all fury, too, and I never

5



66 THE ADVENTURES OF

see the wind blow so. It was one of these regular summer
storms. It would get so dark that it looked all blue-black
outside, and lovely; and the rain would thrash along by so
thick that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider-
webby; and here would come a blast of wind that would bend
the trees down and turn up the pale underside of the leaves;
and then a perfect ripper of a gust would follow along and
set the branches to tossing their arms as if they was just wild;



IN THE CAVE,

and next, when it was just about the bluest and blackest—
fst / it was as bright as glory and you’d havea little glimpse
of tree-tops a-plunging about, away off yonder in the storm,
hundreds of yards further than you could see before; dark as
sin again in a second, and now you'd hear the thunder let go
with an awful crash and then go rumbling, grumbling, tum-
bling down the sky towards the under side of the world, like
rolling empty barrels down stairs, where it’s long stairs and
they bounce a good deal, you know.



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 67

“Jim, this is nice,” I says. “I wouldn't want to be no-
where else but here. Pass me along another hunk of fish and
some hot corn-bread.”

‘¢ Well, you wouldn’t a ben here ’f it hadn’t a ben for Jim.
You’da ben down dah in de woods widout any dinner, en gittn’
mos’ drowndea, too, dat you would, honey. Chickens knows
when it’s gwyne to rain, en so do de birds, chile.’

The river went on raising and raising for ten or twelve days,
till at last it was over the banks. The water was three or four
foot deep on the island in the low places and on the Illinois
bottom. On that side it wasa good many miles wide; but on
the Missouri side it was the same old distance across—a half
a mile—because the Missouri shore was just a wall of high
bluffs.

Daytimes we paddled all over the island in the canoe. It
was mighty cooland shady in the deep woods even if the sun was
blazing outside. We went winding in and out amongst the
trees; and sometimes the vines hung so thick we had to back
away and go some other way. Well, on every old broken-down
tree, you could see rabbits, and snakes, and such things; and
when the island had been overflowed a day or two, they got
so tame, on account of being hungry, that you could paddle
right up and put your hand on them if you wanted to; but
not the snakes and turtles—they would slide off in the
water. The ridge our cavern was in, was full of them. We
could a had pets enough if we’d wanted them.

One night we catched a little section of a lumber raft—
nice pine planks. It was twelve foot wide and about fifteen
or sixteen foot long, and the top stood above water six or
seven inches, a solid level floor. We could see saw-logs go
by inthe daylight, sometimes, but we let them go; we didn’t
show ourselves in daylight.

Another night, when we was up at the head of the island,
just before daylight, here comes a frame house down, on the
west side. She was a two-story, and tilted over, consider-
able. We paddled out and got aboard—clumb in at an up-
stairs window. But it was too dark to see yet, so we made
the canoe fast and set in her to wait for daylight.

The light begun to come before we got to the foot of the
island. Then we looked in at the window. We could make
out a bed, and a table, and two old chairs, and lots of things



68 THE ADVENTURES OF

around about on the floor; and there was clothes hanging
against the wall. There was something laying on the floor
in the far corner that looked like aman. So Jim says:

“Hello, you!’

But it didn’t budge. So TI hollered again, and then Jim
says:

De man ain’t asleep—he’s dead. You hold still—I’ll go
en see.”

He went and bent down and looked, and says:

“Tt’s a dead man. Yes, indeedy; naked, too. He’s ben
shot in de back. I reck’n he’s ben dead two er three days.
Come in, Huck, but doan’ look at his face—it’s too gashly.”’

I didn’t look at him at all. Jim throwed some old rags
over him, but he needn’t done it; I didn’t want to see him.
There was heaps of old greasy cards scattered around over
the floor, and old whisky bottles, and a couple of masks made
out of black cloth; and all over the walls was the ignorantest
kind of words and pictures, made with charcoal. There was
two old dirty calico dresses, and a sun-bonnet, and some
women’s underclothes, hanging against the wall, and some
men’s clothing, too. We put the lot into the canoe; it might
come good. ‘There was a boy’s old speckled straw hat on
the floor; I took that too. And there was a bottle that had
had milk in it; and it had a rag stopper for a baby to suck.
We would a took the bottle, but it was broke. There was a
seedy old chest, and an old hair trunk with the hinges broke.
They stood open, but there warn’t nothing left in them that
was any account. The way things was scattered about, we
reckoned the people left in a hurry and warn’t fixed so as to
carry off most of their stuff.

We got an old tin lantern, and a butcher knife without any .
handle, and a bran-new Barlow knife worth two bits in any
store, and a lot of tallow candles, and a tin candlestick, and
a gourd, and a tin cup, and a ratty old bed-quilt off the bed,
and a reticule with needles and pins and beeswax and buttons
and thread and all such truck in it, and a hatchet and some
nails, and a fish-line as thick as my little finger, with some
monstrous hooks on it, and a roll of buckskin, and a leather
dog-collar, and a horse-shoe, and some vials of medicine that
didn’t have no label on them; and just as we was leaving I
found a tolerable good curry-comb, and Jim he found a ratty



_ HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 69

old fiddle-bow, and a wooden leg. The straps was broke off
of it, but barring that, it was a good enough leg, though it
was too long for me and not long enough for Jim, and we
couldn’t find the other one, though we hunted all around.

And so, take it all around, we made a good haul. When
we was ready to shove off, we was a quarter of a mile below
the island, and it was pretty broad day; so I made Jim lay
down in the canoe and cover up with the quilt, because if he
set up, people could tell he was a nigger a good ways off. I
paddled over to the Illinois shore, and drifted down most a
half a mile doing it. Icrept up the dead water under the
bank, and hadn't no accidents and didn’t see nobody. We
got home all safe.















==

=i Niles aia

JIM SEES A DEAD MAN,





hl ; : it













7O THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER X.

FTER breakfast I wanted to talk about the dead man

and guess out how he come to be killed, but Jim

didn’t want to. He said it would fetch bad luck; and be-

sides, he said, he might come and ha’nt us; he said a man

that warn’t buried was more likely to go a-ha’nting around

than one that was planted and comfortable. That sounded

pretty reasonable, so I didn’t say no more; but I couldn't

keep from studying over it and wishing I knowed who shot
the man, and what they done it for.

We rummaged the clothes we’d got, and found eight dol-
lars in silver sewed up in the lining of an old blanket over-
coat. Jim said he reckoned the people in that house stole
the coat, because if they’d a knowed the money was there
they wouldn’t a left it. I said I reckoned they killed him,
too; but Jim didn’t want to talk about that. I says:

“ Now you think it’s bad luck; but what did you say when
I fetched in the snake-skin that I found on the top of the
ridge day before yesterday? You said it was the worst bad
luck in the world to touch a snake-skin with my hands.
Well, here’s your bad luck! We've raked in all this truck
and eight dollars besides. I wish we could have some bad
luck like this every day, Jim.”

“Never you mind, honey, never you mind. Don’t you git
too peart. It’s a-comin’. Mind I tell you, it’s a-comin’.”

It did come, too. It was a Tuesday that we had that talk.
Well, after dinner Friday, we was laying around in the grass
at the upper end of the ridge, and got out of tobacco. I
went to the cavern to get some, and found a rattlesnake in
there. I killed him, and curled him up on the foot of Jim’s
blanket, ever so natural, thinking there’d be some fun when
Jim found him there. Well, by night I forgot all about the
snake, and when Jim flung himself down on the blanket while
I struck a light, the snake’s mate was there, and bit him.



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. FA

He jumped up yelling, and the first thing the light showed
was the varmint curled up and ready for another spring. I
laid him out in a second with a stick, and Jim grabbed pap’s
whisky jug and begun to pour it down.

He was barefooted, and the snake bit him right on the heel.
That all comes of my being such a fool as to not remember
that wherever yousleave a dead snake its mate always comes
there and curls around it. Jim told me to chop off the
snake’s head and throw it away, and then skin the body and
roast a piece of it. I done it, and he eat it and said it would
help cure him. He made me take off the rattles and tie them
around his wrist, too. He said that that would help. Then
I slid out quiet and throwed the snakes clear away amongst
the bushes; for I warn’t going to let Jim find out it was all
my fault, not if I could help it.

‘Jim sucked and sucked at the jug, and now and then he
got out of his head and pitched around and yelled; but every
time he come to himself he went to sucking at the jug again.
His foot swelled up pretty big, and so did his leg; but by-
and-by the drunk begun to come, and so I judged he was all
right; but I’d druther been bit with a snake than pap’s
whisky. .

Jim was laid up for four days and nights. Then the swell-
ing was all gone and he was around again. I made.up my
mind I wouldn’t ever take aholt of a snake-skin again with
my hands, now that I see what had come of it. Jim said he
reckoned I would believe him next time. And he said that
handling a snake-skin was such awful bad luck that maybe
we hadn't got to the end of it yet. He said he druther see
the new moon over his left shoulder as much as a thousand
times than take up a snake-skin in his hand. Well, I was
getting to feel that way myself, though I’ve always reckoned
that looking at the new moon over your left shoulder is one
of the carelessest and foolishest things a body can do. Old
Hank Bunker done it once, and bragged about it; and in less
than two years he got drunk and fell off of the shot tower
and spread himself out so that he was just a kind of a layer,
as you may say; and they slid him edgeways between two
barn doors for a coffin, and buried him so, so they say, but I
didn’t see it. Pap told me. But anyway, it all come of look-
ing at the moon that way, like a fool.



72 THE ADVENTURES OF

Well, the days went along, and the river went down be-
tween its banks again; and about the first thing we done was
to bait one of the big hooks with a skinned rabbit and set it
and catch a cat-fish that was as big as a man, being six foot
two inches long, and weighed over two hundred pounds.
We couldn’t handle him, of course; he would a flung us into
Illinois. We just set there and watched him rip and tear



‘“*A FAIR FIT.”

around till he drownded. We found a brass button in his
stomach, and a round ball, and lots of rubbage. We split
the ball open with the hatchet, and there was a spool in it.
Jim said he’d had it there a long time, to coat it over so and
make a ball of it. It was as big a fish as was ever catched
in the Mississippi, I reckon. Jim said he hadn’t ever seen a
bigger one. He would a been worth a good deal over at the

,



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 73

village. They peddle out sucha fish as that by the pound in
the market house there; everybody buys some of him; his
meat’s as white as snow and makes a good fry.

Next morning I said it was getting slow and dull, and I
wanted to get a stirring up, some way. I said I reckoned I
would slip over the river and find out what was going on.
Jim liked that notion; but he said I must go in the dark
and look sharp. Then he studied it over and said, couldn't
I put on some of them old things and dress up like a girl?
That was a good notion, too. So we shortened up one of the
calico gowns and I turned up my trowser-legs to my knees
and got into it. Jim hitched it behind with the hooks, and it
was a fair fit. I put on the sun-bonnet and tied it under my
chin, and then for a body to look in and see my face was like
looking down a joint of stove-pipe. Jim said nobody would
know me, even in the daytime, hardly. I practiced around
all day to get the hang of the things, and by-and-by I could
do pretty well in them, only Jim said I didn’t walk likea girl;
and he said I must quit pulling up my gown to get at my
britches pocket. I took notice, and done better.

I started up the Illinois shore in the canoe just after dark.

I started across to the town from a little below the ferry
landing, and the drift of the current fetched me in at the bot-
tom of the town. I tied up and started along the bank.
There was a light burning in a little shanty that hadn’t been
lived in for a long time, and I wondered who had took up
quarters there. I slipped up and peeped in at the window.
There was a woman about forty year old in there, knitting by
a candle that was ona pine table. I didn’t know her face;
she was a stranger, for you couldn’t start a face in that town
that I didn’t know. Now this was lucky, because I was
weakening; I was getting afraid I had come; people might know
my voice and find me out. But if this woman had been in such
a little town two days she could tell me all I wanted to know;
so I knocked at the door, and made up my mind I wouldn’t
forget I was a girl.



74 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XI.
ue OME in,”’ says the woman, and I did. She says:
“Take a cheer.”
I done it. She looked me all over with her little shiny
eyes, and says:

‘What might your name be?”

«Sarah Williams.”

** Where "bouts do you live? In this neighborhood ?”

““No’m. In Hookerville, seven mile below. I’ve walked
all the way and I’m all tired out.”

“Hunery, too, I reckon. I'll find you something.”

“No’m, J ain’t hungry. Iwas so hungry I had to stop two
mile below here at a farm; so J ain’t hungry no more. It’s
what makes me so late. My mother’s down sick, and out of
money and everything, and I come to tell my uncle Abner
Moore. He lives at the upper end of the town, she says. I
hain’t ever been here before. Do you know him?”

“No; but I don’t know everybody yet. I haven’t lived
here quite two weeks. It’s a considerable ways to the upper
end of the town. You better stay here all night. Take off
your bonnet.”

“No,” I says, “I'll rest a while, I reckon, and go on. I
ain’t afeard of the dark.”
She said she wouldn’t let me go by myself, but her husband
would be in by-and-by, maybe in a hour and a half, and she’d
send him along with me. Then she got to talking about her
husband, and about her relations up the river, and her rela-
tions down the river, and about how much better off they used
to was, and how they didn’t know but they’d made a mistake
coming to our town, instead of letting well alone—and so on
and so on, till I was afeard 7 had made a mistake coming to
her to find out what was going on in the town; but by-and-by
she dropped onto pap and the murder, and then I was pretty
willing to let her clatter right along. She told about me and



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 78

‘Tom Sawyer finding the six thousand dollars (only she got it
ten) and all about pap and what a hard lot he was, and what
a hard lot I was, and at last she got down to where I was mur-
dered. I says: :

‘Who done it? We've heard considerable about these
goings on, down in Hookerville, but we don’t know who ’twas
that killed Huck Finn.”

“Well I reckon there’s aright smart chance of people here
that'd like to know who killed him. Some think old Finn
done it himself.”

“ No—is that so?”

“Most everybody thought it at first. He'll never know
how nigh he come to getting lynched. But before night they
changed around and judged it was done by a runaway nigger
named Jim.”

‘Why he %

I stopped. I reckoned I better keep still. Sherunon, and
never noticed I had put in at all.

“The nigger run off the very night Huck Finn was killed.
So there’s a reward out for him—three hundred dollars, And
there’s a reward out for old Finn too—two hundred dollars.
You see, he come to town the morning after the murder, and
told about it, and was out with ’em on the ferry-boat hunt,
and right away after he up and left. Before night they wanted
to lynch him, but he was gone, you see. Well, next day they
found out the nigger was gone; they found out he hadn’t ben
seen sence ten o’clock the night the murder was done. So
then they put it on him, you see, and while they was full of
it, next day back comes old Finn and went boo-hooing to
Judge Thatcher to get money to hunt for the nigger all over
Illinois with. The judge give him some, and that evening he
got drunk and was around till after midnight with a couple of
mighty hard looking strangers, and then went off with them.
Well, he hain’t come back sence, and they ain’t looking for
him back till this thing blows over a little, for people thinks
now that he killed his boy and fixed things so folks would
think robbers done it, and then he’d get Huck’s money with-
out having to bother a long time with a lawsuit. People do
say he warn’t any too good to do it. Oh, he’s sly, I reckon.
If he don’t come back for a year, he’ll be all right. You can’t
prove anything on him, you know; everything will be quieted





76 THE ADVENTURES OF

down then, and he’ll walk in Huck’s money as easy as noth-
ing.”

““Yes, I reckon so,’m. I don’t see nothing in the way of
it. Has everybody quit thinking the nigger done it?”

. Oh, no, not everybody. A good many thinks he done it.
But they’ll get the nigger pretty soon, now, and maybe they
can scare it out of him.”

“Why, are they after him yet ?”

“Well, you’re innocent, ain’t you! Does three hundred
dollars lay round every day for people to pick up? Some
folks thinks the nigger ain’t far,from here. I’m one of them
—but I hain’'t talked itaround. A few days ago I was talking
with an old couple that lives next door in the log shanty, and
they happened to say hardly anybody ever goes to that island
over yonder that they call Jackson’s Island. Don’t anybody
live there? says I. No, nobody, says they. I didn’t say
any more, but I done some thinking. I was pretty near cer-
tain I’d seen smoke over there, about the head of the island,
a day or two before that, so I says to myself, like as not that
nigger’s hiding over there; anyway, says I, it’s worth the
trouble to give the place a hunt. I hain’t seen any smoke
sence, so I reckon maybe he’s gone, if it was him; but hus-
band’s going over to see—him and another man. He was
gone up the river; but he got back to-day and I told him as
soon as he got here two hours ago.”

I had got so uneasy I couldn’t set still. I had to do some-
thing with my hands; so I took up a needle off of the table
and went to threading it. My hands shook, and I was mak-
ing a bad job of it. When the woman stopped talking, I
looked up, and she was looking at me pretty curious, and
smiling a little. I put down the needle and thread and let on
to be interested—and I was, too—and says:

“ Three hundred dollars is a power of money.. I wish my
mother could get it. Is your husband going over there to-
night ?”’ d

“Oh, yes. He went up town with the man I was telling
you of, to get a boat and see if they could borrow another
gun. They’ll go over after midnight.”

“ Couldn’t they see better if they was to wait till daytime ?”

“Yes. And couldn’t the nigger see better, too? After
midnight he’ll likely be asleep, and they can slip around



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. | 77

through the woods and hunt up his camp fire all the better for
the dark, if he’s got one.”

“T didn’t think of that.”

The woman kept looking at me pretty curious, and I didn’t
feela bit comfortable. Pretty soon she says:

‘‘What did you say your name was, honey ?”’

“ M—Mary Williams.”

Somehow it didn’t seem to me that I said it was Mary be-
fore, so I didn’t look up; seemed to me I said it was Sarah;
so I felt sort of cornered, and was afeared maybe I was look-
ing it,too. I wished the woman would say something more;
the longer she set still, the uneasier Iwas. But now she
says:

‘‘Honey, I thought you said it was Sarah when you first
come in?”

“Oh, yes’m, I did. Sarah Mary Williams. Sarah’s my
first name. Some calls me Sarah, some calls me Mary.”

“Qh, that’ s the way of it?”

“Yes’m.’ :

I was feeling better, then, but I wished I was out of there,
anyway. I couldn't look up yet.

Well, the woman fell to talking about how hard times was,
and how poor they had to live, and how the rats was as free
as if they owned the place, and so forth, and so on, and then
I got easy again. She was right about the rats. You'd see
one stick his nose out of a hole in the corner every little
while. She said she had to have things handy to throw at
them when she was alone, or they wouldn’t give her no peace.
She showed me a bar of lead, twisted up into a knot, and said
she was a good shot with it generly, but she’d wrenched her
arm a day or two ago, and didn’t know whether she could
throw true, now. But she watched for a chance, and directly
she banged away at a rat, but she missed him wide, and said
“Ouch!” it hurt her arm so. Then she told me to try for
the next one. I wanted to be getting away before the old
man got back, but of course I didn’t leton. I got the thing,
and the first rat that showed his nose I let drive, and if he’d
a stayed where he was he’d a beena tolerable sick rat. She said
that was first-rate, and she reckoned I would hive the next
one. She went and got the lump of lead and fetched it back
and brought along a hank of yarn, which she wanted me to



78 THE ADVENTURES OF

help her with. I held up my two hands and she put the hank
over them and went on talking about her and her husband’s
matters. But she broke off to say:

“Keep your eye on the rats. You better have the lead in
your lap, handy.”

So she dropped the lump into my lap, just at that moment,
and I clapped my legs together on it and she went on talking.
But only about a minute. Then she took off the hank and
looked me straight in the face, and very pleasant, and says:

“Come, now—what’s your real name ?”

“ Wh-what, mum ?”

“What’s your real name? Is it Bill, or Tom, or Bob ?—or
what is it?”

I reckon I shook like a leaf, and I didn’t know hardly what
to do. But I says:

“ Please to don’t poke fun at a poor girl like me, mum. If
I’m in the way, here, I'll se

“No, you won’t. Set down and stay where you are. I
ain’t going to hurt you, and I ain’t going to tell on you,
nuther. You just tell me your secret, and trust me. [’ll
keep it; and what’s more, I'll help you. So’ll my old man,
if you want him to. You see, you’re a runaway ’prentice—
that’s all. It ain’t anything. There ain’t any harm in it.
You've been treated bad, and you made up your mind to
cut. Bless you, child, I wouldn’t tell on you, Tell me all
about it, now—that’s a good boy.”

So I said it wouldn’t be no use to try to play it any longer,
and I would just make a clean breast and tell her everything,
but she mustn’t go back on her promise. Then I told her
my father and mother was dead, and the law had bound me
out to a mean old farmer in the country thirty mile back from
the river, and he treated meso bad I couldn’t stand it no
longer ; he went away to be gone a couple of days, and so I
took my chance and stole some of his daughter’s old clothes,
and cleared out, and I had been three nights coming the
thirty miles ; I traveled nights, and hid day-times and slept,
and the bag of bread and meat I carried from home lasted
me all the way and I hada plenty. I said I believed my
uncle Abner Moore would take care of me, and so that was
why I struck out for this town of Goshen.”

“ Goshen, child? This ain’t Goshen, This is St. Peters-





HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 79

burg. Goshen’s ten mile further up the river. Who told you
this was Goshen ?”

‘¢ Why, a man I met at day-break this morning, just as I
was going to turn into the woods for my regular sleep. He
told me when the roads forked I must take the right hand,
and five mile would fetch me to Goshen.”

“He was drunk I reckon. He told you just exactly
wrong.”

“Well, he did act like he was drunk, but it ain’t no
matter now. I got to be moving along. I'll fetch Goshen
before day-light.”

“Hold on a minute. Ill put you up a snack toeat. You
might want it.”

So she put me up a snack, and says:

«‘ Say—when a cow’s laying down, which end of her gets
up first? Answer up prompt, now—don’t stop to study over
it. Which end gets up first ?’’.

“The hind end, mum.”

“Well, then, a horse?”

“ The for’rard end, mum.”

‘¢ Which side of a tree does the most moss grow on?”

‘« North side.” ,

“Tf fifteen cows is browsing on a hillside, how many of
them eats with their heads pointed the same direction ?”

“The whole fifteen, mum.”

“ Well, I reckon you Aave lived in the country. I thought
maybe you was trying to hocus me again. What’s your real
name, now?”

‘¢ George Peters, mum.”

“Well, try to remember it, George. Don’t forget and tell
me it’s Elexander before you go, and then get out by saying
it’s George-Elexander when I catch you. And don’t go
about women in that old calico. You do a girl tolerable
poor, but you might fool men, maybe. Bless you, child,
when you set out to thread a needle, don’t hold the thread
still and fetch the needle up to it ; hold the needle still and
poke the thread at it—that’s the way a woman most always
does ; but a man always does ’tother way. And when you
throw at a rat or anything, hitch yourself up a tip-toe and
fetch your hand up over your head as awkward as you can,
and miss your rat about six or seven foot. Throw stiff-



80 THE ADVENTURES OF

armed from the shoulder, like there was a pivot there for it to
turn on—like a girl ; not from the wrist and elbow, with your
arm out to one side, like a boy. And mind you, when a girl
tries to catch anything inher lap, she throws her knees apart ;
she don’t clap them together, the way you did when you
catched the lump of lead. Why, I spotted you for a boy
when you was threading the needle ; and I contrived the
other things just to make certain. Now trot along to your
uncle, Sarah Mary Williams George Elexander Peters, and







‘““HUMP YOURSELF.”

if you get into trouble you send word to Mrs. Judith Loftus,
which is me, and I’ll do what I can to get you out of it. Keep
the river road, all the way, and next time you tramp, take
shoes and socks with you. The river road’s a rocky one,
and your feet ‘Il be in a condition when you get to Goshen,
I reckon.”

I went up the bank about fifty yards, and then I doubled
on my tracks and slipped back to where my canoe was, a



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 8I

good piece below the house. I jumped in and was off in a
hurry. I went up stream far enough to make the head of the
island, and then started across. I took off the sun-bonnet,
for I didn’t want no blinders on, then. When I was about
the middle, I hear the clock begin to strike ; so I stops and
listens ; the sound come faint over the water, but clear—
eleven. When I struck the head of the island I never waited
to blow, though I was most winded, but I shoved right into
the timber where my old camp used to be, and started a good
fire there on a high-and-dry spot.

Then I jumped in the canoe and dug out for our place a
mile and a half below, as hard as I could go. I landed, and
slopped through the timber and up the ridge and into the
cavern. There Jim laid, sound asleep on the ground. I
roused him out and says:

_ “Git up and hump yourself, Jim! There ain’t a minute
to lose. They’reafter us!”

Jim never asked no questions, he never said a word ; but
the way he worked for the next half an hour showed about how
he was scared. By that time everything we had in the world
was on our raft and she was ready to be shoved out from
the willow cove where she was hid. We put out the camp
fire at the cavern the first thing, and didn’t show a candle
outside after that.

I took the canoe out from shore a little piece and took a
look, but if there was a boat around I couldn’t see it, for
stars and shadows ain’t goodto seeby. ‘Then we got out the
raft and slipped along down in the shade, past the foot of the
island dead still, never saying a word.



82 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XII.

T must a been close onto one o’clock when we got below
the island at last, and the raft did seem to go mighty
slow. If a boat was to come along, we was going to take
to the canoe and break for the Illinois shore; and it was
well a boat didn't come, for we hadn’t ever thought to put
the gun into the canoe, ora fishing-line or anything to eat.
We was in ruther too much of a sweat to think of so many
things. It warn’t good judgment to put everything on the
raft.
If the men went to the island, I just expect they found
the camp fire I built, and watched it all night for Jim to
come. Anyways, they stayed away from us, and if my build-
ing the fire never fooled them it warn’t no fault of mine. I
played it as low-down on them as I could.

When the first streak of day begun to show, we tied up
to a tow-head in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked
off cotton-wood branches with the hatchet and covered up
the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-
in in the bank there. A tow-head is a sand-bar that has cot-
ton-woods on it as thick as harrow-teeth.

We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy tim-
ber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Mis-
souri shore at that place, so we warn’t afraid of anybody
running across us. We laid there all day and watched the
rafts and steamboats spin down the Missouri shore, and up-
bound steamboats fight the big river in the middle. I told
Jim ail about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and
Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after
us herself ske wouldn’t set down and watch a camp fire—no,
sir, she’d fetch a dog. Well, then, I said, why couldn’t she
tell her husband to fetch adog? Jim said he bet she did
think of it by the time the men was ready to start, and he
believed they must a gone up town to get a dog and so they



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 83

lost all that time, or else we wouldn’t be here ona tow-head
sixteen or seventeen mile below the village—no, indeedy,
we would be in that same old town again. So I said I
didn’t care what was the reason they didn’t get us, as long as
they didn’t.

When it was beginning to come on dark, we poked our
heads out of the cottonwood thicket and looked up, and
down, and across ; nothing in sight ; so Jim took up some
of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get
under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things
dry. Jim made a floor for the wigwam, and raised it a foot
or more above the level of. the raft, so now the blankets and
all the traps was out of the reach of steamboat waves. Right
in the middle of the wigwam we made a layer of dirt about
five or six inches deep with a frame around it for to hold it
to its place ; this was to build a fire on in sloppy weather or
chilly ; the wigwam would keep it from being seen. We
made an extra steering oar, too, because one of the others
might get broke, ona snag or something. We fixed up a
short forked stick to hang the old lantern on; because we
must always light the lantern whenever we see a steamboat
coming down stream, to keep from getting run over ; but we
wouldn’t have to light it for up-stream boats unless we see
we was in what they call a “crossing ;” for the river was
pretty high yet, very low banks being still a little under
water ; so up-bound boats didn’t always run the channel, but
hunted easy water.

This second night we run between seven and eight hours,
with a current that was making over four mile an hour. We
catched fish, and talked, and we took a swim now and then
to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down
the big still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars,
and we didn’t ever feel like talking loud, and it warn’t often
that we laughed, only a little kind of a low chuckle. We
had mighty good weather, as a general thing, and nothing
ever happened to us at all, that night, nor the next, nor the
next.

Every night we passed towns, some of them away up on
black hillsides, nothing but just a shiny bed of lights, not a
house could you see. The fifth night we passed St. Louis,
and it was like the whole world lit up. In St. Petersburg they



84 THE ADVENTURES OF

used to say there was twenty or thirty thousand people in St.
Louis, but I never believed it till I see that wonderful spread
of lights at two o’clock that still night. There warn’t a sound
there; everybody was asleep.

Every night, now, I used to slip ashore, towards ten o’clock,
at some little village, and buy ten or fifteen cents’ worth of



































=



ae aren
HE SOMETIMES LIFTED A CHICKEN.

meal or bacon or other stuff to eat; and sometimes I lifted a
chicken that warn’t roosting comfortable, and took him along.
Pap always said, take a chicken when you get a chance, be-
cause if you don’t want him yourself you can easy find some-
body that does, and a good deed ain’t ever forgot. I never
see pap when he didn’t want the chicken himself, but that is
what he used to say, anyway.



‘HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 85

Mornings, before daylight, I slipped into corn fields and
borrowed a watermelon, or a mushmelon, or a punkin, or
some new corn, or things of that kind. Pap always said it
warn’t no harm to borrow things, if you was meaning to pay
them back, sometime; but the widow said it warn’t anything
but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it.
Jim said he reckoned the widow was partiy right and pap was
partly right; so the best way would be for us to pick out two
or three things from the list and say we wouldn’t borrow them
any more—then he reckoned it wouldn’t be no harm to bor-
row the others. So we talked it over all one night, drifting
along down the river, trying to make up our minds whether to
drop the watermelons, or the cantelopes, or the mushmelons or
what. But towards daylight we got it all settled satisfactory,
and concluded to drop crabapples and p’simmons. We warn’t
feeling just right, before that, but it was all comfortable now.
I was glad the way it come out, too, because crabapples ain’t
ever good, and the p’simmons wouldn’t be ripe for two or
three months yet.

We shot a water-fowl, now and then, that got up too early
in the morning or didn’t go to bed early enough in the even-
ing. ‘Take it all around, we lived pretty high.

The fifth night below St. Louis we had a big storm after
midnight, with a power of thunder and lightning, and the rain
poured down in a solid sheet. We stayed in the wigwam and
let the raft take care of itself. When the lightning glared out
we could see a big straight river ahead, and high rocky bluffs
on both sides. By-and-by says I, “Hel-o, Jim, looky yon-
der!” It was a steamboat that had killed herself on a rock.
We was drifting straight down for her. The lightning showed
her very distinct. She was leaning over, with part of her up-
per deck above water, and you could see every little chimbly-
guy clean and clear, and a chair by the big bell, with an old
slouch hat hanging on the back of it when the flashes come.

Well, it being away in the night, and stormy, and all so
mysterious-like, I felt just the way any other boy would a felt
when I see that wreck laying there so mournful and lonesome
in the middle of the river. I wanted to get aboard of her and
slink around a little, and see what there was there. So I says:

“Le’s land on her, Jim.”

But Jim was dead against it, at first. He says:



86 THE ADVENTURES OF

“T doan’ want to go fool’n ‘long er no wrack. We’s doin’
blame’ well, en we better let blame’ well alone, as de good
book says. Like as not dey’s a watchman on dat wrack.”

“Watchman your grandmother,’ I says; ‘there ain’t
nothing to watch but the texas and the pilot-house; and do
you reckon anybody’s going to resk his life for a texas and a
pilot-house such a night as this, when it’s likely to break up
and wash off down the river any minute?” Jim couldn’t say
nothing ‘to that, so he didn’t try. ‘And besides,” I says,
‘we might borrow something worth having, out of the cap-
tain’s stateroom. Seegars, 7 bet-you—and cost five cents
apiece, solid cash. - Steamboat captains is always rich, and
get sixty dollars a month, and ¢/ey don’t care a cent what a
thing costs, you know, long as they want it. Stick a candle
in your pocket; I can’t rest, Jim, till we give her a rummag-
ing. Do you reckon Tom Sawyer would ever go by this
thing? Not for pie, he wouldn’t. He'd call it an adventure
—that’s what he’d call it; and he’d land on that wreck if it
was his last act. And wouldn’t he throw style into it >—
wouldn’t he spread himself, nor nothing? Why, you’d think
it was Christopher C’lumbus discovering Kindgom-Come. I
wish Tom Sawyer was here.”

Jim he grumbled a little, but give in. He said we mustn’t
talk any more than we could help, and then talk mighty low.
The lightning showed us the wreck again, just in time, and
we fetched the starboard derrick, and made fast there.

The deck was high out, here. We went sneaking down the
slope of it to labboard, in the dark, towards the texas, feel-
ing our way slow with our feet, and spreading our hands out
to fend off the guys, for it was so dark we couldn’t see no sign
of them. Pretty soon we struck the forward end of the sky-
light, and clumb onto it; and the next step fetched us in front
of the captain’s door, which was open, and by Jimminy, away
down through the texas-hall we see a light! and all in the
‘same second we seem to hear low voices in yonder!

Jim whispered and said he was feeling powerful sick, and
told me to come along. I says, all right; and was going to
start for the raft; but just then I heard a voice wail out and
say:

‘Qh, please don’t, boys; I swear I won’t ever tell!”’

Another voice said, pretty loud:



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. eric

“It’s a lie, Jim Turner. You've acted this way before.
You always want more’n your share of the truck, and you've
always got it, too, because you’ve swore 't if you didn’t you’d
tell. But this time you’ve said it jest one time too many.
You're the meanest, treacherousest hound in this country.”

By this time Jim was gone for the raft. I was just a-biling
with curiosity; and 1 says to myself, Tom Sawyer wouldn't
back out now, and so I won’t either; I’m agoing to see what’s
going on here. So I dropped on my hands and knees, in the
little passage, and crept aft in the dark, till there warn’t but
about one stateroom betwixt me and the cross-hall of the
texas. Then, in there I see a man stretched on the floor and
tied hand and foot, and two men standing over him, and one
of them had a dim lantern in his hand, and the other one had
a pistol, This one kept pointing the pistol at the man’s head
on the floor and saying—

“Td “ke to! And I orter, too, a mean skunk!”

The man on the floor would shrivel up, and say: “Oh,
please don’t, Bill—I hain’t ever goin’ to tell.”

And every time he said that, the man with the lantern would
laugh, and say:

‘’Deed you am’t/ You never said no truer thing ’n that,
you bet you.”’ And once he said: ‘* Hear him beg! and yit
if we hadn’t got the best of him and tied him, he’d a killed
us both. And what for? Jist for noth’n. Jist because we
stood on our rights—that’s what for. But I lay you ain’t
agoin’ to threaten nobody any mere, Jim Turner. Put
that pistol, Bill,’

Bill says:

‘«T don’t want to, Jake Packard. I’m for killin’ him—and
didn’t he kill old Hatfield jist the same way—and don’t he
deserve it?”

“ But I don’t want him killed, and I’ve got my reasons for it.”

“Bless yo’ heart for them words, Jake Packard! I’ll never
forgit you, long’s I live!” says the man on the floor, sort of
blubbering.

Packard didn’t take no notice of that, but hung up his lan-
tern on anail, and started towards where I was, there in the
dark, and motioned Bill to come. I crawfished as fast as I
could, about two yards, but the boat slanted so that I couldn’t
make very good time; so to keep from getting run over and



88 THE ADVENTURES OF

catched I crawled into a stateroom on the upper side. The
man came a-pawing along in the dark, and when Packard got
to my stateroom, he says:

“ Here—come in here.”’

And in he come, and Bill after him. But before they got
in, I was up in the upper berth, cornered, and sorry I come.
Then they stood there, with their hands on the ledge of the
berth, and talked. I couldn’t see them, but I could tell where
they was, by the whisky they’d been having. I was glad I
didn’t drink whisky; but it wouldn’t made much difference,
anyway, because most of the time they couldn’t a treed me
because I didn’t breathe. I was too scared. And besides,
a body couddn’t breathe, and hear such talk. They talked
low and earnest. Bill wanted to kill Turner. He says:

“ He’s said he’ll tell, and he will. If we was to give both
our shares to him zow, it wouldn’t make no difference after
the row, and the way we’ve served him. Shore’s you’re born,
he’ll turn State’s evidence; now you hear me. I’m for put-
ting him out out of his troubles.”

“
“Blame it, I'd sorter begun to think you wasn’t. Well,
then, that’s all right. Les’ go and do it.”

“Hold on a minute; I hain’t had my say yit. You listen
to me. Shooting’s good, but there’s quieter ways if the
thing’s got to be done. But what / say, is this; it ain’t good
sense to go court’n around after a halter, if you can git at
what you’re up to in some way that’s jist as good and at the
same time don’t bring you into no resks. Ain’t that so?”’

“Vou bet it is. But how you goin’ to manage it this time ?”

“ Well, my idea is this: we’ll rustle around and gether up
whatever pickins we’ve overlooked in the staterooms, and
shove for shore and hide the truck. Then we'll wait. NowI
say it ain’t agoin’ to be more ’n two hours befo’ this wrack
breaks up and washes off down the river. See? He'll be
drownded, and won’t have nobody to blame for it but his own
self. I reckon that’s a considerble sight better’n killin’ of him.
I’m unfavorable to killin’ a man as long as you can git
around it; it ain’t good sense, it ain’t good morals. Ain’t I
right ?”

“Yes—lI reck’n you are. But s’pose she don’t break up and
wash off?”



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 89

“ Well, we can wait the two hours, anyway, and see, can’t
we?”

« All right, then; come along.”

So they started, and I lit out, all inacold sweat, and scram-
bled forward. It was dark as pitch there; but I said in a kind
of acoarse whisper, “ Jim!’’ and he answered up, right at my
elbow, with a sort of a moan, and I says:

“Quick, Jim, it ain’t no time for fooling around and moan-
ing; there’s a gang of murderers in yonder, and if we don’t
hunt up their boat and set her drifting down the river so these
fellows can’t get away from the wreck, there’s one of ’em going
to be ina bad fix. But if we find their boat we can put al/ of
’em ina bad fix—for the Sheriff ll get ’em. Quick—hurry!
I'll hunt the labboard side, you hunt the stabboard. You start
at the raft, and 2

‘©Qh, my lordy, lordy! Raf ? Dey ain’ no raf’ no mo’, she
done broke loose en gone !—’en here we is!”





‘oH! LoRDY LoRDY !”



go THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XIII.

ELL, I catched my breath and most fainted. Shut
up ona wreck with sucha gang as that! But it
warn’t no time to be sentimentering. We'd gof to find that
boat, now—had to have it for ourselves. So we went.a-quak-
ing and shaking down the stabboard side, and slow work it
was, too—seemed a week before we got to the stern. No
sign of a boat. Jim said he didn’t believe he could go any
further—so scared he hadn’t hardly any strength left, he
said. But I said come on, if we get left on this wreck, we
are in a fix, sure. Soon we prowled, again. We struck for
the stern of the texas, and found it, and then scrabbled along
forwards on the skylight, hanging on from shutter to shutter,
for the edge of the skylight was in the water. When we got
pretty close to the cross-hall door, there was the skiff, sure
enough! I could just barely see her. I felt ever so thank-
ful. In another second I would a been aboard of her; but
just then the door opened. One of the men stuck his head
out, only about a couple of foot from me, and I thought I
was gone; but he jerked it in again, and says:

“ Heave that blame lantern out o’ sight, Bill!’

He flung a bag of something into the boat, and then got
in himself, and set down. It was Packard. Then Bill Ze
come out and got in. Packard says, in a low voice:

“ All ready—-shove off!” :

I couldn’t hardly hang onto the shutters, I was so weak.
But Bill says:

«¢ Hold on—’d you go through him?”

“No. Didn’t you?”

“No. 5o he’s got his share o’ the cash, yet.”

“ Well, then, come along—no use to take truck and leave
money.”

‘« Say—won’t he suspicion what we’re up to?”



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. gl

“Maybe he won’t. But we got to have it anyway. Come
along.”

So they got out and went in.

The door slammed to, because it was on the careened side;
and in a half second I was in the boat, and Jim come tum-
bling after me. JI out with my knife and cut the rope, and
away we went !

We didn’t touch an oar, and we didn’t speak nor whisper,
nor hardly even breathe. We went gliding swift along, dead
silent, past the tip of the paddle-box, and past the stern;
then in a second or two more we was a hundred yards below
the wreck, and the darkness soaked her up, every last sign of
her, and we was safe, and knowed it.

When we was three or four hundred yards down stream,
we see the lantern show like a little spark at the texas door,
for a second, and we knowed by that that the rascals had
‘missed their boat, and was beginning to understand that they
was in just as much trouble, now, as Jim Turner was.

Then Jim manned the oars, and we took out after our raft.
Now was the first time that I begun to worry about the men
—TI reckon I hadn’t had time to before. I begun to think
how dreadful it was, even for murderers, to be in such a fix.
I says to myself, there ain’t no telling but I might come to
be a murderer myself, yet, and then how would I like it?
So says I to Jim:

“ The first light we see, we'll land a hundred yards below
it or above it, in a place where it’s a good hiding-place for
you and the skiff, and then I'll go and fix up some kind of a
yarn, and get somebody to go for that gang and get them
out of their scrape, so they can be hung when their time
comes.”

But that ‘idea was a failure; for pretty soon it begun to-
storm again, and this time worse than ever. The rain pour-
ed down, and never a light showed; everybody in bed, I
reckon. We boomed along down the river, watching for
lights and watching for our raft. After a long time the rain
let up, but the clouds staid, and the lightning kept whimper-
ing, and by-and-by a flash showed us a black thing ahead,
floating, and we made for it.

It was the raft, and mighty glad was we to get aboard of
it again. We seen a light, now, away down to the right, on



92 THE ADVENTURES OF

shore. So I said I would go for it. The skiff was half full
of plunder which that gang had stole, there on the wreck.
We hustled it onto the raft in a pile, and I told Jim to float
along down, and show a light when he judged he had gone
about two mile, and keep it burning till I come; then I man-
ned my oars and shoved for the light. As I got down to-
wards -it, three or four more showed—up ona hillside. It
was a village. I closed in above the shore-light, and laid on
my oars and floated. As I went by, I see it was a lantern
hanging on the jackstaff of a double-hull ferry-boat. I skim-
med around for the watchman, a-wondering whereabouts he
slept; and by-and-by I found him roosting on the bitts, for-
ward, with his head down between his knees. I gave his
shoulder two or three little shoves, and begun to cry.

He stirred up, in a kind ofa startlish way; but when he see
it was only me, he took a good gap and stretch, and then he
says:

“Hello, what’s up? Don’tcry, bub. What's the trouble?”

I says:

“ Pap, and mam, and sis, and.

Then I broke down. He says:

“Oh, dang it, now, don’t take on so, we all has to have our
troubles and this’n ’1l come out all right. What’s the matter
with ’em?”

“ They’re—they’re—are you the watchman of the boat?”

“Yes,” he says, kind of pretty-well-satisfied like. ‘I’m
the captain and the owner, and the mate, and the pilot, and
watchman, and head deck-hand ; and sometimes I’m the
freight and passengers. I ain’t as rich as old Jim Hornback,
and I can’t be so blame’ generous and good to Tom, Dick
and Harry as what he is, and slam around money the way he
does; but I’ve told him a many a time ’*t I wouldn’t trade
places with him; for, says I, a sailor’s life’s the life for me,
and I’m derned if /’d live two mile out o’ town, where there
ain’t nothing ever goin’ on, not for all his spondulicks and as
much more on top of it. Says I Me

I broke in and says:

‘« They’re inan awful peck of trouble, and

“ Who is?”

“Why, pap, and mam, and sis, and Miss Hooker; and if
you’d take your ferry-boat and go up there #

”





39







HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 93

‘¢Up where? Where are they?”

“On the wreck.”

“What wreck ?”

“Why, there ain’t but one.”

“What, you don’t mean the Walter Scott ?”

“Yes.”

‘¢ Good land! what are they doin’ ¢here, for gracious sakes ?”

“ Well, they didn’t go there a-purpose.”

“TT bet they didn’t! Why, great goodness, there ain’t no
chance for ’em if they don’t git off mighty quick! Why, how
in the nation did they ever git into sucha scrape?”’

“Easy enough. Miss Hooker was a-visiting, up there to
the town Ht

“Yes, Booth’s Landing—go on,’

“She was a-visiting, there at Booth’s Landing, and just i
the edge of the evening she started over with her nigger woman
in the horse-ferry, to stay all night at her friend’s house, Miss
What-you-may-call-her, I disremember her name, and they
lost their steering-oar, and swung around and went a-floating
down, stern-first, about two mile, and saddle-baggsed on the
wreck, and the ferry man and the nigger woman and the
horses was all lost, but Miss Hooker she made a grab and
got aboard the wreck. Well, about an hour after dark, we
come along down in our trading-scow, and it was so dark we
didn’t notice the wreck till we was right on it; and so we
saddle-baggsed; but all of us was saved but Bill Whipple—
and oh, he was the best cretur!—I most wish’t it had been
me, I do.”

“My George! It’s the beatenest thing I ever struck. And
then what did you all do?”

‘* Well, we hollered and took on, but it’s so wide there, we
couldn’t make nobody hear. So pap said somebody got to
get ashore and get help somehow. I was the only one that
could swim, so I made a dash for it, and Miss Hooker she
said if I didn’t strike help sooner, come here and hunt up her
uncle, and he’d fix the thing. I made the land about a mile
below, and been fooling along ever since, trying to get people
to do something, but they said, ‘What, in such a night and
such a current? there ain’t no sense in ‘its go for the steam-
ferry.” Now if you'll go, and——

“ By Jackson, I'd ke to, and blame it I don’t know but I





04 THE ADVENTURES OF

will; but who in the dingnation’s agoin’ to gay for it? Do
you reckon your pap Se

“Why ¢hat’s all right. Miss Hooker she tole me, particular,
that her uncle Hornback i

“Great guns! is #e her uncle? Looky here, you break for
that light over yonder-way, and turn out west when you git
there, and about a quarter of a mile out you’ll come to the
tavern; tell ’em to dart you out to Jim Hornback’s and he’ll
foot the bill. And don’t you fool around any, because he’ll
want to know the news. ‘Tell him I'll have his niece all safe
before he can getto town. Hump yourself, now; I’m agoing
up around the corner here, to roust out my engineer.”

I struck for the light, but as soon as he turned the corner
I went back and got into my skiff and bailed her out and then
pulled up shore in the easy water about six hundred yards,
and tucked myself in among some woodboats; for I couldn’t
rest easy till I could see the ferry-boat start. But take it all
around, I was feeling ruther comfortable on accounts of tak-
all this trouble for that gang, for not many would a done it.
I wished the widow knowed about it. I judged she would be
proud of me for helping these rapscallions, because rapscal-
lions and dead beats is the kind the widow and good people
takes the most interest in.

Well, before long, here.comes the wreck, dim and dusky,
sliding along down! A kind of cold shiver went through me,
and then I struck out for her. She was very deep, and I see
in a minute there"warn’t much chance for anybody being alive
in her. I pulled all around her and hollered a little, but there
wasn’t any answer; all dead still. I felt a little bit heavy-
hearted about the gang, but not much, for I reckoned if they
could stand it, I could.

Then here comes the ferry-boat; so I shoved for the mid-
dle of the river on a long down-stream slant; and when I
judged I was out of eye-reach, I laid on my oars, and looked
back and see her go and smell around the wreck for Miss
Hooker’s remainders, because the captain would know her
uncle Hornback would want them; and then pretty soon the
ferry-boat give it up and went for shore, and I laid into my
work and went a-booming down the river.

It did seem a powerful long time before Jim’s light showed
up; and when it did show, it looked like it was a thousand







95

HUCKLEBERRY FINN.



mile off. By the time I got there the sky was beginning to
get alittle gray in the east; so we struck for an island, and
hid the raft, and sunk the skiff, and turned in and slept like

dead people.

WE TURNED IN AND SLEPT,



96 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XIV.

Y-AND-BY, when we got up, we turned over the truck
the gang had stole off of the wreck, and found boots,
and blankets, and clothes, and all sorts of other things, and
a lot of books, and a spyglass, and three boxes of seegars.
We hadn’t ever been this rich before, in neither of our lives.
The seegars was prime. We laid off all the afternoon in the
woods talking, and me reading the books, and having a gen-
eral good time. I told Jim all about what happened inside
the wreck, and at the ferry-boat; and I said these kinds of
things was adventures; but he said he didn’t want no more
adventures. He said that when I went in the texas and he crawl-
ediback to get on the raft and found her gone, he nearly died;
because he judged it was all up with 22m, anyway it could be
fixed; for if he didn’t get saved he would get drownded; and
if he did get saved, whoever saved him would send him back
home so as to get the reward, and then Miss Watson would
sell him South, sure. Well, he was right; he was most always
right; he had an uncommon level head; for a nigger.

I read considerable to Jim about kings, and dukes, and
earls, and such, and how gaudy they dressed, and how much
style they put on, and called each other your majesty, and
your grace, and your lordship, and so on, ’stead of mister;
and Jim’s eyes bugged out, and he wasinterested. He says:

‘‘T didn’ know dey was so many unum. I hain’t hearn
"bout none un um, skasely, but ole King Sollermun, onless
you counts dem kings dat’s ina pack er k’yards. How much
do a king git?”

“Get?” I says; “ why, they get a thousand dollars a month
if they want it; they can have just as much as they want;
everything belongs to them.”

“ Ain’ dat gay? En what dey got to do, Huck?”

“ They don’t do nothing! Why how you talk. They just
set around.”



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 97

“ No—is dat so?”

“Of course it is. They just set around. Except maybe
when there’s a war; then they go to the war. But other times
they just lazy around; or go hawking—just hawking and sp—
Sh!—d’ you hear a noise?”

We skipped out and looked; but it warn’t nothing but the
flutter of a steamboat’s wheel, away down coming around the
point; so we come back.

“Yes,” says I, “and other times, when things is dull, they



SOLOMON AND HIS MILLION WIVES.

fuss with the parlyment; and if everybody don’t go just so he
whacks their heads off. But mostly they hang round the
harem.”

“ Roun’ de which?”

“ Harem.”

‘¢What’s de harem?”

“The place where he keeps his wives. Don’t you know
7



98 THE ADVENTURES OF

about the harem? Solomon had one; he had about a mil-
lion wives.”

“Why, yes, dat’s so; I—I’d done forgot it. A harem’s
a bo’d’n-house, I reck’n. Mos’ likely dey has rackety times
in de nussery. En I reck’n de wives quarrels considable; en
dat ’crease de racket. Yit dey say Sollermun de wises’ man
dat ever live’. I doan’ take no stock in dat. Bekase why:
would a wise man want to live in de mids’ er sich a blim-
blammin’ all de time? No—’deed he wouldn’t. A wise
man ’ud take en buil’ a biler-factry; en den he could shet
down de biler-factry when he want to res’.”

“Well, but he was the wisest man, anyway; because the
widow she told me so, her own self.”

“JT doan k’yer what de widder say, he warn’¢ no wise man,
nuther. He had some er de dad-fetchedes’ ways I ever see.
Does you know ’bout dat chile dat he ’uz gwyne to chop in
two?”

“Yes, the widow told me all about it.”

“¢ Well, den! Warn’ dat de beatenes’ notion in de worl’ ?
You jes’ take en look at it a minute. Dah’s de stump, dah
—dat’s one er de women; heah’s you—dat’s de yuther one;
I’s Sollermun; en dish-yer dollar bill’s de chile. Bofe un
you claims it. What doesI do? Does Ishin aroun’ mongs’
de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill do b’long to,
en han’ it over to de right one, all safe en soun’, de way dat
anybody dat had any gumption would? No-—I take en
whack de bill in ¢wo, en give half un it to you, en de yuther
half to de yuther woman. Dat’s de way Sollermun was
gwyne to do wid de chile. NowJI want to ast you: what’s de
use er dat half a bill?—can’t buy noth’n wid it. En what
use is a half a chile? I wouldn’ give a dern for a miliion
un um.”

“But hang it, Jim, you’ve clean missed the point—blame
it, you’ve missed it a thousand mile.”

“Who? Me? Go ’long. Doan’ talk to me "bout yo’
pints. I reck’n I knows sense when I sees it; en dey ain’ no
sense in sich doin’s as dat. De ’spute warn’t ’bout a halfa
chile, de ’spute was *bout a whole chile; en de man dat think
he kin settle a ’spute ’bout a whole chile wid a half a chile,
doan’ know enough to come in out’n de rain. Doan’ talk to
me ’bout Sollermun, Huck, I knows him by de back.”



HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 99

“But I tell you you don’t get the point.”

“Blame de pint! I reck’n I knows what I knows. En
mine you, de veal pint is down furder—it’s down deeper. It
lays in de way Sollermun was raised. You take a man dat’s
got on’y one er two chillen; is dat man gwyne to be waseful
o’ chillen? No, he ain’t; he can’t ’ford it. He know how
to value’em. But you take a man dat’s got ’bout five million
chillen runnin’ roun’ de house, en it’s diffunt. He as soon
chop a chile in two asacat. Dey's plenty mo’. A chile er
two, mo’ er less, warn’t no consekens to Sollermun, dad
fetch him!”

I never see such a nigger. If he got a notion in his head
once, there warn’t no getting it out again. He was the most
down on Solomon of any nigger I ever see. So I went to
talking about other kings, and let Solomon slide. I told
about Louis Sixteenth that got his head cut off in France
long time ago; and about his little boy the dolphin, that
would a been a king, but they took and shut him up in jail,
and some say he died there.

“ Po’ little chap.”

“But some says he got out and got away, and come to
America.”

“Dat’s good! But he’ll be pooty lonesome—dey ain’ no
kings here, is dey, Huck?”

“No.”

“Den he cain’t git no situation. What he gwyneto do?”

“Well, I don't know. Some of them gets on the police,
and some of them learns people how to talk French.”

“Why, Huck, doan’ de French people talk de same way
we does?”

“No, Jim; you couldn’t understand a word they said—not
a single word.”

“Well, now, I be ding-busted! How do dat come?”

“don’t know; but it’s so. I got some of their jabber
out of a book. Spose aman was to come to you and say
Polly-voo-franzy—what would you think?”

“‘T wouldn’ think nuff’n; I’d take en bust him over de
head. Dat is, if he warn’t white. I wouldn’t ‘low no nigger
to call me dat.”

‘‘Shucks, it ain’t calling you anything. It’s only saying
do you know how to talk French.”



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f0ceb1867e457decf3638525db746b134d4ebf13
'2011-10-12T01:30:09-04:00'
describe
'405562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJG' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
500ee00f47d448954d0157b3527ae711
431a966ecbcfce20530bba3d871034325269032e
'2011-10-12T01:32:37-04:00'
describe
'82266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJH' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
f884db175ccfb0a3c5747fa673a3e39c
fd21f566196014f34591f0cce3c62591036c1201
'2011-10-12T01:29:20-04:00'
describe
'5308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJI' 'sip-files00007.pro'
c8a7c48e24cd72bd366a07b7cfb3afdc
fd7c79e29cb91d93a530ac87f891b0043ef1ff92
'2011-10-12T01:26:56-04:00'
describe
'33172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJJ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5e1fd332eb95260e765c0b41191a29ce
243948eb670df38b47305f6ef158962d157cff7b
'2011-10-12T01:25:28-04:00'
describe
'3264332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJK' 'sip-files00007.tif'
fc623dbb5de8608e9204e5bdb4667355
e630cfe2afaf06e5292aa990780f18d6c9ef07b8
'2011-10-12T01:29:28-04:00'
describe
'318' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJL' 'sip-files00007.txt'
4f0c4a2814f987d75b06e8d8ecdaeaaa
a6be1f792b8078d9e95631f8ba52de3201d6f8f9
'2011-10-12T01:35:09-04:00'
describe
'23311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJM' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
4075d51813adea8e000ee54b2d11d42e
91b97bee6095b027b3c54e95ab116d3d4b05fe01
'2011-10-12T01:31:48-04:00'
describe
'405454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJN' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
83241e44985fdd34b717a5a0adfc93ea
25e0e2de0643ded8ae771561e46796eb2046755c
'2011-10-12T01:26:45-04:00'
describe
'59834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJO' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
61629c9bb01612770e5b3971776b9b03
97ac24038ea6a7eb453c2a70c28a7bb0a7609362
'2011-10-12T01:34:38-04:00'
describe
'2851' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJP' 'sip-files00008.pro'
4f7d9f64492b4f0f627037dfc19f9d61
bc38be515d7195750baf2fe7ea8b4779391f4ffd
'2011-10-12T01:31:37-04:00'
describe
'24403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJQ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
f629a224cc9c45115aec956e07790490
6134b1a7861bbd4d2e6846f5a6bb69879ce5e69c
'2011-10-12T01:29:22-04:00'
describe
'3263036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJR' 'sip-files00008.tif'
9b576aef39ee90815283778e975ccb46
bddc4aeaf5926d3c8c6f0c996db7415cac82668d
'2011-10-12T01:36:25-04:00'
describe
'269' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJS' 'sip-files00008.txt'
c6d50c6ae0c87ec8d7dc8c9e5762b388
3ea77ae9d1091439a4f79e1e7224f0f9855556d8
'2011-10-12T01:33:29-04:00'
describe
'19722' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJT' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
d2f54f16e18bffd965ae8cc38e888f62
ce3ffd2926043d040b5739f87d2302988a491c3d
'2011-10-12T01:27:09-04:00'
describe
'405642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJU' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
27e6126e086aae70f8dcbf2585fb0a07
66e9ddc064a6e1e07d47bfd8f4ee3738eaec5b3f
describe
'77258' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJV' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
0010f8c57e1bb5fc1628025fd24b7409
c8dd096605342928207e1c5834e348af925d5314
'2011-10-12T01:29:33-04:00'
describe
'6504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJW' 'sip-files00009.pro'
f73cf3d967345b1c5c828aa830556dc3
a791847c1d0dd345697766ef5a2d0cf1cc0dfc12
'2011-10-12T01:29:01-04:00'
describe
'29998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJX' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
debccbd5ff9b3a3bd6d4552e64870f29
58947593d60473837ba158607b10e66cd633a472
'2011-10-12T01:26:06-04:00'
describe
'3263380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJY' 'sip-files00009.tif'
3d6bf5c3402339d99f40acc07e0ed682
d2cbc66a4f9abb1b77072ada07eaa6288b4c7de0
'2011-10-12T01:34:28-04:00'
describe
'365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBJZ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
ba8a33f9d644c75e4421ef16b3af07a9
34e8d1f87cc21c5e39c3d8ca4fc83887ba9652ad
'2011-10-12T01:31:40-04:00'
describe
'20945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKA' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
b57c848d31ff4504e58c292b93d83bed
df088c32716f230f5b7ce4193d4a8a2ab3d8cd3a
'2011-10-12T01:26:33-04:00'
describe
'405629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
9006938491b23efd23d552bda34cada6
36867f34e355864b0f3d5c39e553fef99ce88524
'2011-10-12T01:28:30-04:00'
describe
'100460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
da7dba503626920e67edf5d95922d4b9
22d4e93d4a32e96b4724e0b5210076371ac3e209
'2011-10-12T01:31:26-04:00'
describe
'15304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKD' 'sip-files00011.pro'
590fde2ec321d4cddd1e1129e324c1a1
3d2f3da4423e9904f2b2fb7b9f0db20dc6cde64b
'2011-10-12T01:34:36-04:00'
describe
'38534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
86078ae52f77d9ee1dae971adf37f5f4
5685cac6d8960a9000c86ad5e1c91479ff447940
'2011-10-12T01:34:32-04:00'
describe
'3264096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKF' 'sip-files00011.tif'
3614a77252b54703853c26ce76bbccb4
31b9d03ba21678ea2b4618d9ae79ed97b9b24daf
'2011-10-12T01:28:14-04:00'
describe
'720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKG' 'sip-files00011.txt'
2ff192b7fe5bc51cd96a237deb35fb5c
1f5dd87eefb8842e1d9885a75efac9f8d705344c
'2011-10-12T01:27:57-04:00'
describe
'23323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKH' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
29ca4395ba80ef20ab34ec8357510901
20bd4b4b7d8f39a5e05e9313ee3ebc078a9f1075
'2011-10-12T01:25:38-04:00'
describe
'405608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKI' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
51d6cedf42923f13a0bf8b1e66552d2a
f4f4d75bad212a7c69b6eae6c22ee64bfb50ce1f
'2011-10-12T01:25:35-04:00'
describe
'113367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKJ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8923b7217d762d539bf22b76057f1f2c
e692a7d26a11fe8c8b6da62667de99322c5d10c5
'2011-10-12T01:33:53-04:00'
describe
'21599' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
bee293e4eeede241bce23ae438f52423
673f26330dcfc2282674e86558674086eb2b4b98
'2011-10-12T01:29:12-04:00'
describe
'44789' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
115111c15056aa9494ae8883f40ff9c2
2f5567eec30111a3978056b11f91df80520aa56d
'2011-10-12T01:30:07-04:00'
describe
'3264908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKM' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7ee67586f08a8ecd057322c33b5b20d6
e3b7b2e12da368d2fa7e013f19932ab1557e0adf
'2011-10-12T01:36:13-04:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKN' 'sip-files00013.txt'
674125bf330f8ad9ac0a5a973a34292d
dcc5b506389d69c59b0cf85c75807b620c5e7667
'2011-10-12T01:25:14-04:00'
describe
'26062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
55633df829a4df9caddaff9b31263936
47d2c35589504bfd3c903ce1d05fbbdaa06f26cb
'2011-10-12T01:28:02-04:00'
describe
'405648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKP' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
353a1c98941c66e4cf5d82a0b2e2390a
66caa464d155a9286db4180484c47743ed515474
'2011-10-12T01:26:32-04:00'
describe
'121940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKQ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
4fe2666076e5e61923b41ae1eacc7b70
80fa40b47dd67e61a2c03a13dbb9fe22fce6a6a7
describe
'27085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
148b4c3e23e43e0a7907344cc82f25dc
7519b19ec79a5e019b04d7fa3c0df07598a98557
'2011-10-12T01:33:18-04:00'
describe
'48671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
7e360146260a39f12320cc5b3c805261
c8c4a1ec2cbbf9eb9c096ae1f63074da1ba900ed
'2011-10-12T01:29:05-04:00'
describe
'3265312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e3582bd8cbca9a1a619aa4cf1519f268
a7775a0b3367bd8f263a608611ca151254402906
'2011-10-12T01:27:23-04:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
3102d0097ffaf70c82a4d402a805ead6
af4f9883dc342e814a63d49f875776409fdacb33
'2011-10-12T01:26:03-04:00'
describe
'26950' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKV' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
ef0c2a323573178a44dc113c2ea08a9a
f1b23a6fcb2b260ae8494f3a8e30f69a5abbbeb0
'2011-10-12T01:27:33-04:00'
describe
'405581' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
db40cccb432f1f401ffc8f1e8755fe5a
5c567f3ea603a0d0e45e2658267435d4196dacfd
'2011-10-12T01:32:33-04:00'
describe
'137169' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
631e36151c0c61c1f148e91241c8ef1e
e41d76db84e1aad5c8f25a5a0b47ac40b49224cf
'2011-10-12T01:30:38-04:00'
describe
'31953' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
350f4fb876ccd43331f3c811fcaba5e2
f9fccff5dd61f88a2876f305edb9b57b048a3793
'2011-10-12T01:26:51-04:00'
describe
'49438' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBKZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
64db6fdf1b0c17f98998a5706ed39dc9
2e8bd162be6799c1e3ae8860cf5f34e5770a5c41
'2011-10-12T01:36:14-04:00'
describe
'3265692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLA' 'sip-files00015.tif'
9542b80163012c8b5abadbd3ed15d01f
98ccd5c552182d953cf18e78a94aae722c415b5c
'2011-10-12T01:27:16-04:00'
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLB' 'sip-files00015.txt'
56893d691c41a6701328452f15b7e6dc
b4632f7a0f2487e4201a4d0e711f65d53d800f8c
'2011-10-12T01:27:47-04:00'
describe
'27993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLC' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4e7503f76f6eaad532d79c505553e454
4c5d41b25624a2d85d576488120aa2f7a5b4abde
'2011-10-12T01:26:55-04:00'
describe
'405676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLD' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
6352d7b8acb6e93e75d63330a914d95b
a08c9bd786b2e7764b6f73f6defc76df09a065cb
'2011-10-12T01:34:37-04:00'
describe
'135489' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
ba589fc72b505c781ccc39ad5ba4084a
a1837b33e9c5bdaf50726c27cbfbf7dbc1acf5cc
'2011-10-12T01:30:42-04:00'
describe
'31308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLF' 'sip-files00016.pro'
b8de33c74da3ad34e60490669cbff6c1
4db6cf464de8eae06a1a1902595a3d3e5a7e4a1d
describe
'52303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
c1d789d0cb70d1d2794bec5e47ef9f5c
9a19bfb274d1b97d03199a7988c0b2bd2ab9f786
describe
'3265548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
6f4b78471edd92f660f686b3733a85e5
01d9c3721e170454e5d69cee504928d87c81ff6e
'2011-10-12T01:34:18-04:00'
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
cd50606088ab848d6bc7d69c84924428
6a7d0dc8c48a7c9040a5f590ab2dab27a694497d
'2011-10-12T01:27:32-04:00'
describe
'27818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLJ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4c6d45ef7b23b14286f86fe40ddd5c08
59f17f3e1c35546a18cc831f78a8028d71cea99e
'2011-10-12T01:31:04-04:00'
describe
'405533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
b925f8967c0be9deb8d939137c55cf48
eb31a6783835adac3ab29d08306569de5892579e
describe
'111254' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
910f43f393a1c297cd7d2266d2987833
9751950ee93756d6ec6d5861c9578363a4cf3daa
'2011-10-12T01:29:11-04:00'
describe
'21430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
f0bb86837b8cdbc3f7924673a6e86dd5
55a7fc2a8032a9ed87295bcb77d4913f720c6764
'2011-10-12T01:26:05-04:00'
describe
'41507' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
ff4b43a97e2866c9161c0bcfe6b56e47
1437077add5b211f4cbab241d19c429962724192
'2011-10-12T01:34:42-04:00'
describe
'3264600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
0a8bf4f72af6588aabbe80f2b4d7cef4
36f6d2aafbf25d2756761fbf19c943ae778fd9cf
'2011-10-12T01:27:34-04:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
1e9ee30febb5891b9ced388a0e0503fc
dea17b11a8a89213a83f87c4aafcd28dbcc77b91
'2011-10-12T01:26:04-04:00'
describe
'24989' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
4d862dc53d7947fa7a54d75a1474ae65
2943ccfb7cd8d6cc9da489ea34287a4718b2fe7f
describe
'405630' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
0a1cafdf8a8978336ee866aedb417399
3643419010b9ef79b6e0d5a0c356cbcbf01fc193
'2011-10-12T01:25:50-04:00'
describe
'49151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
aa64754d713a0c775798f20943b660d9
59005cf7069bbf0c2c65b9ec52035511d8101a7f
'2011-10-12T01:34:50-04:00'
describe
'14730' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLT' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
a82d27ca6f0d792f7ea8a4543d970885
76099672020dddf078d967e4f36e2716f76c77b7
'2011-10-12T01:29:17-04:00'
describe
'3255040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLU' 'sip-files00018.tif'
2d19e730d0696f3399e862399f994c50
6584ed8d3db4d4dc766e671b709f66dcb41a4cd9
'2011-10-12T01:25:30-04:00'
describe
'11119' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLV' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
0a55f5069f5040637758995d3cbfacaf
a9786cf60a51c69279da3f4d51ee7fabf42c57dd
'2011-10-12T01:31:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLW' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
2668c241e54866379f7d95d3a33ab22d
3a5fa56a7c695fb3aadeacc9e4ceedab845ceb2e
'2011-10-12T01:25:08-04:00'
describe
'144097' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLX' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f768b7354dbd0ae8a6251e416da3815d
f373d15af97cb70a01c3af18fd3743adf67c9456
describe
'48932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLY' 'sip-files00019.pro'
acb7e1c1ff72434136b7077405b15a7c
546c582a2087a766477459e4cf888c00315e0e6d
'2011-10-12T01:25:39-04:00'
describe
'54680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBLZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f87c4d869c09e4c6c174644a6839b12c
2b379eedd24fec0eff89e63edbb51662176e29bb
describe
'3264620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMA' 'sip-files00019.tif'
ff28a5adfd34c77a27806f443537aec8
a76128b5777bf97ea7530e2d3cecf6f5e41c228b
'2011-10-12T01:27:21-04:00'
describe
'2109' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMB' 'sip-files00019.txt'
410ea4c7861a9e05280db814b3271f35
8120fc2f0b6c9b68460c2b7efb6d7b5169181c8f
'2011-10-12T01:33:10-04:00'
describe
'26086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMC' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
37e973f52c97edbc0489910e9aed5832
ce4252a5a8ce675697227150a8252b4f0989872e
'2011-10-12T01:25:20-04:00'
describe
'405677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMD' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
76fe86aeb99ed31fc6ef5f516e515e6c
55a85bc287d14f9e764ff643919f9cda7c56a3bc
'2011-10-12T01:27:43-04:00'
describe
'105090' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBME' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1cd8ad7ae057ee0905c26b9f0544b22f
c4e133f2653b0d81db1e015c09e03d5e96ee5fa9
'2011-10-12T01:26:20-04:00'
describe
'22086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMF' 'sip-files00020.pro'
a3940ad38f2cf9927d7b7ac3699c4980
a1a634557e3f163e0f0a68ca09b7f28d8e864b45
'2011-10-12T01:25:09-04:00'
describe
'39619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMG' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
eee80dd8e55ebe6dfdc030367f79a73d
02a87cb090ca887fc1ebac388f6dfc3683ec47f5
'2011-10-12T01:28:13-04:00'
describe
'3263828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMH' 'sip-files00020.tif'
5de6cf0fbe42a9625904188c43e4cd8b
27492d0455a3e56701d742a7e40085337178315a
'2011-10-12T01:33:21-04:00'
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMI' 'sip-files00020.txt'
ccbc385c4eaceae72a7f6c362b4c38ef
ba3e9270b5c45fe02443598cbe7050cfe5de6fae
'2011-10-12T01:25:41-04:00'
describe
'23080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMJ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
f6cfccfd0e82385e490179d4e034843a
145fd032b629b6846456eb96924943e00a38ae5e
'2011-10-12T01:27:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMK' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
4a0cf87b814fc65e6c2eddb64304fb76
a421600199e3c16bb70a974eb7a8d1744e68e2b8
'2011-10-12T01:36:39-04:00'
describe
'193345' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBML' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0263d5a9e16d4b2f346c2669ea25f196
db088747f467b825e6611c59f6d865a7d1cd8bd3
'2011-10-12T01:28:22-04:00'
describe
'33962' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMM' 'sip-files00021.pro'
21417642a934c35f958f1642292cf726
4932d65e1ff29aabada461545d4e016ccc6ef2ce
describe
'65461' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
6b3f64f9df65e63117e79c03576f3650
eeed5b13cd75887769cc8553a4bfffa22ac728b1
'2011-10-12T01:26:21-04:00'
describe
'3266748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMO' 'sip-files00021.tif'
9604681296a3062e4b368dea7f090bef
14af1bcc7fbb4eaa3a7fac6669eb1123369401d9
'2011-10-12T01:26:29-04:00'
describe
'1868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMP' 'sip-files00021.txt'
5987bf25483fce18ec78966681856029
ceae3faac0f8b2bb1dcf5b9e2db1aa8e295ac47c
'2011-10-12T01:27:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMQ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
dacd8da5033b7875ffcf4879f04a9f37
330b3ececfaff0eb6a9f5ec9c0aed8417378ef3c
describe
'405664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMR' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
e3af9fc0a11632b2d199d7785c5acee8
55f505d4961c7590c224ec7a3f734333e88229b9
'2011-10-12T01:27:28-04:00'
describe
'189221' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMS' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e37b48d2d9bd5c571636bebe189b9750
22b9f92f9eb9edd8854008a95f9836f98dc44676
'2011-10-12T01:25:24-04:00'
describe
'19813' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMT' 'sip-files00022.pro'
25ab425f15bd2411aa046d788c13df3c
1404ffd501dca4b4a7026cd497ab77821e521247
'2011-10-12T01:37:05-04:00'
describe
'61052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMU' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
b5ac1fbe52ae973bf1f1b8a139f54981
0848768999c298423cf5665581249a1931fd866d
'2011-10-12T01:26:01-04:00'
describe
'3266320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMV' 'sip-files00022.tif'
54a99201e4c6b79befae3f691666d971
8e4b375eccf7534040f1a594a8e1d036d0ece0c9
'2011-10-12T01:36:49-04:00'
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMW' 'sip-files00022.txt'
43edd492816ab86c00fcf6fb5693ef8d
3f417c72d973625ee2e386677f26369e5ab40a24
'2011-10-12T01:28:51-04:00'
describe
'30335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMX' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
381b116259886a22de5662ab8fa2a213
cf9c547160860451a044cc1769842b48c636d690
'2011-10-12T01:34:09-04:00'
describe
'405625' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMY' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
5f114afdd46c76b770ebea48d4998e06
4131fc7f4c05cc4f7d11f18ca999782e7211f548
'2011-10-12T01:25:13-04:00'
describe
'222248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBMZ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
54d93294dd1217354f0365407b74defc
2a4d876f5951e6c6059080ac8c6c07e7e3fb9fe3
'2011-10-12T01:34:02-04:00'
describe
'59519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNA' 'sip-files00023.pro'
1d0460133d737dfd99c77c54d6fb3d9b
6ac0de8288742faf2563ed223b21fe81d1d1683f
'2011-10-12T01:32:29-04:00'
describe
'72761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNB' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
14d3a5de7447f089ceeb2bdc818a534d
830dfffc3358eeecf91e6b103c3cfd338c4b47a1
'2011-10-12T01:36:12-04:00'
describe
'3266976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
05ddc862c724b0eaac2fd9f3392327cf
3419454de8be3383d6d66d4e37e1ee469a11856a
describe
'2436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBND' 'sip-files00023.txt'
c675f3fcf5d9bc966cb2ed7312e3ac48
41040b3f333eba0575acdffe3f2ce7ade6c93f1c
'2011-10-12T01:27:49-04:00'
describe
'32699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNE' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
e46843f91662acf77836092172ade3bb
e2144fa0546961533ee7dfa26449e21bfdf4ed73
'2011-10-12T01:25:52-04:00'
describe
'405670' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
aae8c2e1678249080dd81df2b03e3368
0844da3ae87365ae41f060a7d4e882f692f31a02
'2011-10-12T01:30:18-04:00'
describe
'225362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNG' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
eb5a0c610161866d181da220d898b26a
7e0c8343eb3d41cac63061a70f7d475af60dab17
'2011-10-12T01:25:11-04:00'
describe
'61270' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNH' 'sip-files00024.pro'
57712adad3e8e41d892ed5ea1344663f
126cf808298c1dc57bc53dac7c4ec4e086e6ea17
'2011-10-12T01:36:19-04:00'
describe
'73742' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNI' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e290eb9c70c1bac46608ddb40c18d2ad
e9775d8dd0c46c03c2fdf67bbc5723e55694706c
'2011-10-12T01:26:26-04:00'
describe
'3266952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNJ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2472c6698522fa13702d4d88317eaac6
9f75f75bf37d048920d0ffeec882ab0bb7042f06
'2011-10-12T01:29:21-04:00'
describe
'2477' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNK' 'sip-files00024.txt'
5b4feef7742be43a1a4724baef72e60c
250e45cae3e2a0d0908b7c3445b7887481f62d7b
'2011-10-12T01:26:38-04:00'
describe
'32700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNL' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
ab2f0d47609afcba0fb2f472cf8008b1
5b5547dab4e42017dc6fbb5895ac9179b78c6355
'2011-10-12T01:29:38-04:00'
describe
'405658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNM' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
cc3aceab8272a505696973466b1528c9
bab538d33c0c5235c32b2a6f36738a29f3f0b3d4
'2011-10-12T01:29:26-04:00'
describe
'136871' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNN' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
eee8913561af52af43759205b1ff23da
8896f8e4f2dfb86211e6d5bb81976b8d10c9c8c8
'2011-10-12T01:28:08-04:00'
describe
'11133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNO' 'sip-files00025.pro'
2f9d267537222dc6538955511fc4cfa7
cc9be37ad902993e116677fce3bc5056c65569fa
describe
'47735' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNP' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d2f09fa90e689ae04eb84a351b92f8d8
511e938e73208e8750c41d637ea22d7f5d45ae02
'2011-10-12T01:36:30-04:00'
describe
'3265284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNQ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4cc9790fb7fb7c3c664e7786cecf5b28
52ae334f3eea01ee86dc684d5b7c4905ba37f389
'2011-10-12T01:31:53-04:00'
describe
'466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNR' 'sip-files00025.txt'
b690d46c3709db3aa6cec4dc2ab6d63a
851d1f7ea544455d7f189fb8136f54115aacf055
'2011-10-12T01:29:25-04:00'
describe
'26746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNS' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
c829e0ae4c74511b9a3dc7fac91f22c4
e06ecf423f4e4ae41cc82e226a5378e46c0ab831
describe
'405288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNT' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
0ad19257c2cbeea10a8357ef6e05d7b6
a5d151b466421571955781c2998f740f91192dcc
'2011-10-12T01:34:24-04:00'
describe
'188535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNU' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
ddc5436cf57a43698d1462bdc3a9bd17
e724530a449cbba225b0664669fc48a91ad4df88
'2011-10-12T01:33:22-04:00'
describe
'47230' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNV' 'sip-files00026.pro'
4018eab3853f6a06aa0a185f2cc1f99a
61dad9c513ccd894ebf7e2221950b98108ea1f70
'2011-10-12T01:28:01-04:00'
describe
'63303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNW' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
ec0133dced1630ae7a129be569573e0f
4b715254fafc5b081d7bf6b3847ce8cd3a8830d2
'2011-10-12T01:31:18-04:00'
describe
'3266176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNX' 'sip-files00026.tif'
ebfea0c94a74f52b5226036556bfa646
4e9b3a137c34e771cbc78bfd0c490d78efc9eb66
'2011-10-12T01:29:37-04:00'
describe
'1952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNY' 'sip-files00026.txt'
ceab80d6d650ed3b6a71cdd68610c53a
ce8e9f9c4db58648fcd2ee1868a6c27702999de0
'2011-10-12T01:27:41-04:00'
describe
'29933' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBNZ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
86dd33a5ec6c65d01e6df59b480daa08
defcc134ae82bd04fd1fe412ed7aaf6d2d3b17a8
'2011-10-12T01:28:44-04:00'
describe
'405618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOA' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d7b8d400acd81b6892882fe7384198a6
e1adc8bc4d69ae781e9843a58891f1bd80c32754
describe
'203516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOB' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
b3b9dfca9660a18733de21e5db63050c
142431ccaaad4a008efc141104a22ad8caa52b18
'2011-10-12T01:25:22-04:00'
describe
'40987' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOC' 'sip-files00027.pro'
93297cb8aecfc8105f6e5d1512295a4f
f38280fbceed09ea65380b2cd304bdfb6936a379
'2011-10-12T01:34:25-04:00'
describe
'68821' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOD' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
494d266c55649e4d58e739d63cfdafd2
36c0976f37abbe2b3e5d1f542e4202dc389e8227
'2011-10-12T01:27:35-04:00'
describe
'3267112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOE' 'sip-files00027.tif'
09af1a30fcc6583ae3b22673abbb5605
1240b6546540cca9c1f9d7665eebbafa809bd481
'2011-10-12T01:32:48-04:00'
describe
'1773' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOF' 'sip-files00027.txt'
6ccc7af14c61cdfbf60993677fd74914
7b7ad51a3b501ffe69e6b8cd5f1e7760598abbef
'2011-10-12T01:26:31-04:00'
describe
'32166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOG' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
166e69f7e0e8de3486b0bef7c3b52a89
bbc4dfb6ae88e3bc33bba986a7817a317349c2ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
1238bc70b8cd07ae0be453405d9d97ed
75d37643b8ae3f884bf61bd896f6227416dfb83e
'2011-10-12T01:26:47-04:00'
describe
'221473' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOI' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
5447bba9799b08559405e5820cc36c24
03f58dd0ed83c837aa254382436bf6f001daec55
'2011-10-12T01:34:01-04:00'
describe
'59930' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
e583caaa18462e8b6b0b12574890c445
763be638015c8b2e92abecf6e21a52b2233fdbe3
'2011-10-12T01:27:58-04:00'
describe
'72503' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOK' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
105022b1687325d33a74540d79d396b4
7e91b05533d04bc3d1429d5fab541e49751f6fa2
describe
'3266844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOL' 'sip-files00028.tif'
8e026133dab03824e89500ab5350fd45
8499b402fa7adba195aef1ce4ab735a30379e0ff
describe
'2428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOM' 'sip-files00028.txt'
68bb503d803b5505bbd3bf19afbe71e8
4a079892aaec9c1c44bc331f9cab98d254d2750d
'2011-10-12T01:25:43-04:00'
describe
'31948' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBON' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
47459e3524a0a7280e9165d78854864d
80cd2180859e68317000bf6663d04ad505dce2f3
describe
'398864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOO' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
9262989a15b8a6a5f17d7521052dc47a
3cdc8c6fd8372fff74f5928d1f9b60295f93eda5
'2011-10-12T01:28:38-04:00'
describe
'217595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOP' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
8378ef82af766c38d3c6800fe69fc402
128280fa0bac0f72a1eb709b464e2ba0645ad17b
'2011-10-12T01:27:10-04:00'
describe
'57003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOQ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0d898e6424fead20737e9286ab1ed096
83260c113f9f18647f06c9282a1ea9a706207f47
'2011-10-12T01:29:08-04:00'
describe
'72582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
81c542d94e755de6854db0e4940f9c08
becfd1d699aa4f6ad910803cdea72ff19a608cf0
'2011-10-12T01:25:29-04:00'
describe
'3212824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOS' 'sip-files00029.tif'
8f53eb0dfac04e39202924926af26fad
1210ed715f0319361b703501c3c4a3732135715b
'2011-10-12T01:26:00-04:00'
describe
'2350' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOT' 'sip-files00029.txt'
1c2a048c2873c8d786f36fe4531f2b7e
4749197bfffb5211a1b053ed65b2307c71cebead
'2011-10-12T01:29:39-04:00'
describe
'32945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOU' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
cf8b67798d805eb0d014aa5b3dbbfa87
fa3478be74c49088dd540ecc26d12a92d78ca2c9
describe
'405673' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOV' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
4bb7a79120506f3b41b9e37c43470c45
561efa301998ca1021dfc36b0d987e307acf27de
'2011-10-12T01:27:59-04:00'
describe
'199172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOW' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
cb919e557fe8fc8c0bac7d6e15c0def8
d12a5e8d3fce38fd61b47ca8ef0d699111af743c
'2011-10-12T01:37:07-04:00'
describe
'50683' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
1ad7a473a7a1ecf9e2fcd79497941424
147ad103be864b0b1c9ad6c37c52d7ae8e01494f
describe
'67976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
4543f7fb80cf5da63d35315f6ae76c4d
376e4a617f3d15d33080d36787a4169a39c04378
'2011-10-12T01:37:03-04:00'
describe
'3266684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBOZ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
08930590a8a3fd9e6a490ffdaa974a30
d1f308793b9d05e076c6c512eecb8df30d29e6de
'2011-10-12T01:29:18-04:00'
describe
'2084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPA' 'sip-files00030.txt'
3c76580e46f2554e500dd1947069f5bf
6cde7b70cc4297de881aabf392a90255ead207f6
'2011-10-12T01:30:32-04:00'
describe
'31691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPB' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
c38d1deb76c676debf5105a2078b7f62
93142b75e618edd461957543ddb7f09c1df7495e
'2011-10-12T01:36:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPC' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
7e5ca5933732430f91add5377498a961
1aba7848011a489b53d0cf3b42b2077abad1ef2e
'2011-10-12T01:25:51-04:00'
describe
'209038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPD' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
fe96700b9ad092c178926cfe9c9272fd
5d9d06bdf7e063d678580d4576abadefe0940185
'2011-10-12T01:26:07-04:00'
describe
'54407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPE' 'sip-files00031.pro'
244b5e05a243aa0095d93716fd644788
55b864e896ea2afd9616ea0e50a43dc8372e4255
'2011-10-12T01:26:37-04:00'
describe
'70223' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPF' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a256f9e0fd6da812a3caa50d46d4a274
5fc77cecdfd168f87c00ce8b0a06ebd4bf066140
'2011-10-12T01:26:24-04:00'
describe
'3266816' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPG' 'sip-files00031.tif'
f13d56148d6844b0c4db7ef44584bd9c
5bda797901c844fa85a4ae1a6f29c76b9ef4b780
'2011-10-12T01:28:37-04:00'
describe
'2246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPH' 'sip-files00031.txt'
d4b90704b38a93121a3926a8ef36aa13
6c91c12c9d281b03a7ea2a24fd9fa743b5e93e54
'2011-10-12T01:27:02-04:00'
describe
'31913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPI' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
245be8ac3d73ef1905d43e45f66153b5
11abcb566d39522ea14bd95ec36ecd3158a3f2d7
'2011-10-12T01:28:06-04:00'
describe
'405552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a8b9b0ee2e0d9f42b3547484a659df6f
fee74eb43ad879f68bdf5ba3bad0bb311072a0bd
describe
'196845' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e82cfef58795541ca6fc7f4dd7cdac4b
60afeffe8e3d9842c0df1fbcb920407f22585753
describe
'48939' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPL' 'sip-files00032.pro'
401bda54ae2884eaa7eab8d1a944a310
1e2283127073094a3893a67d3f6e3a52e211af8e
'2011-10-12T01:29:32-04:00'
describe
'64993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPM' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
b7f772f5c69120b4c588575c2de89c7b
978ec8c248bb8723e13f107734baa3f74c28b6ea
describe
'3266376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
a0499d7d47d1151f653922e6427e2bd3
7636b8f27658f6061bb798dc92ccd4ee2d547a63
describe
'2011' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPO' 'sip-files00032.txt'
3ecd5896ff45f7aa6ec8429fd038a7b8
dfdf325458d6752a4ff586a767e73e4fb12e0dec
'2011-10-12T01:33:44-04:00'
describe
'30692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPP' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
080b3771bddb8b0d8133d7257acc5bbe
4b068c1b1b9e68f8908830923e52c9833daa50e3
'2011-10-12T01:26:15-04:00'
describe
'405672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPQ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
be8395a8b5f838972192200752590df6
49921ffaac552a1c458b12b667431fddfaea44bf
'2011-10-12T01:27:04-04:00'
describe
'226353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPR' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
fb2559d59236689b533ff3afa338800c
a75382a25ea5c119b0c713e3c10abbfb857b1ae5
'2011-10-12T01:28:10-04:00'
describe
'59931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPS' 'sip-files00033.pro'
22c107b602a0c78787280dd407197077
6ac8b1514b40b00a39ceff85e63741ee2067e3cf
describe
'73997' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPT' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
a3a0fedf0dc5922493a7c82363ea804c
03c42100fcc9d36002677a3a26be3a3122e2708a
'2011-10-12T01:30:28-04:00'
describe
'3267076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPU' 'sip-files00033.tif'
92bec729250ff81fed355214d47ac3ae
0e1579906d78d9ab5a717c671a6115c9d88723a6
'2011-10-12T01:34:14-04:00'
describe
'2475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPV' 'sip-files00033.txt'
5748ad07ad701bd6787f284ae2d6b780
d0038eab7c6b54229ddd9cf48cf440ae78011ec5
describe
'32712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPW' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
15eb70b8c9efbce6a7fe574319c74ba1
0aef32e05c23c68d75f298b0a47672350a6f5e47
'2011-10-12T01:25:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b2f8fe07fff20fb501f13e90d325f8e1
4f672111cb145a4c16784edf1d8643c1ee34afc5
'2011-10-12T01:34:41-04:00'
describe
'218165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPY' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
9a32911206b26ce474b7d4e6376bf6f9
fdf70dfe03312da39441f0ca14a778f410dbf181
'2011-10-12T01:30:10-04:00'
describe
'58001' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBPZ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
1d864f286a0071de454f560c08fc6f32
4e53f1d1aaf9dbec50af214c69ba6073a1756ca9
'2011-10-12T01:28:03-04:00'
describe
'71311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
835ac12e55aaca63e0814bccf54097ef
f51c23e8b79d0c148c9a12c2738e05b384708f70
describe
'3266704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQB' 'sip-files00034.tif'
fd946ce00e564a871b85eea8acd8c3b1
90c000e9a65cf4d072b1601ac1fc4746486f8f9c
'2011-10-12T01:35:03-04:00'
describe
'2357' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQC' 'sip-files00034.txt'
ecef578a13b2832b88a7d8b36241caa6
7a8b2a25c13fbf5dfd797eeca6fa525eab523637
'2011-10-12T01:26:30-04:00'
describe
'31734' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQD' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
86a18f719008a4f583041ae41c2425b8
e30b08b38e3a4479de4373dcbed33bdb39dfdc29
describe
'405443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQE' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
a9239d70b514bc895fdee882ea03e66d
41bf86964c628f5771857dd0b5409495cd662406
describe
'200071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
65926b50871fb49305a11db8a0b9f5a4
066ef10ae64d90a4a21cd2bd1f30ed1a22fc42c2
'2011-10-12T01:25:17-04:00'
describe
'51244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
bcfa29010c9c364b36fa9d68a5c5957b
438a68e21beb33c15e4f96ad21d597e2281cfe91
describe
'66748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
7be5004db5ca7600cce5a82efc5c521d
74c695b3aae155a5bd8c1078cb5f05376729deb4
'2011-10-12T01:31:59-04:00'
describe
'3266584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQI' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1066c5dc545f93251a3e2402aee7d69b
5fed1cc619ef30ffce9b4ac8d09542ec13ebe8ad
'2011-10-12T01:29:02-04:00'
describe
'2111' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQJ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
dec76183ca2e62aba852153caf40af19
96f2afe5756debdab3c2fd1cd893649bf8ac7667
'2011-10-12T01:33:47-04:00'
describe
'30657' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a74ecdf0f44bfc5526420a8abdbd414e
15b4b1b4e0b774f3fba8ebba6a03f4793075914d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQL' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
8dfb964d8f72f1a94a563c11f73dc64f
c78b149a78f8fe4d4956b2615a411c9cb975dc18
'2011-10-12T01:30:00-04:00'
describe
'192868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQM' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
979adaa4c07afce0570dbb44d5eb99ad
463ecf769c5e4957b40b291cb54cc197c125ca0a
'2011-10-12T01:37:09-04:00'
describe
'48466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQN' 'sip-files00036.pro'
6bc051d36bd3d2660b0eeec7288c5718
c7d4a045bcf20970723da401ecd8c5d281fa22f3
describe
'63956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQO' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
1baf51fd218f87e862d9826f66ceef95
1483fe53225f884276e2fa6dff33dacb786055f6
describe
'3266284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
7f2d8d952920b292b01cecc1fe5a98e2
90b2586c42e1bc71fd89b574c7bcecb1c300dc38
'2011-10-12T01:33:05-04:00'
describe
'1993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQQ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
46dfb6d48ae27cb7a7a4ca89ab1e0c88
cc85dce0a31f3e6e6c1a94651370c9aa58bd347b
'2011-10-12T01:32:53-04:00'
describe
'30418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQR' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
55a4b84bf5adfb919dd462cb2d45608c
6e569f596bd1217006b1d4e08a47d905de5ca5e5
'2011-10-12T01:35:19-04:00'
describe
'399961' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
97b20b8eed29a5c2742b1507931cdd44
25ba2d83dad65743edcc7100a57fee6039d0d229
'2011-10-12T01:31:36-04:00'
describe
'181618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQT' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
4361b2c7c7e992bb24fdcc9fcd3058e5
5a23b25175707a24650769ef848516b7c576669e
'2011-10-12T01:32:49-04:00'
describe
'20274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQU' 'sip-files00037.pro'
28309de3d0d17e62617daa0ea2c87a1e
e802c8aef8ec64df6f4c96bc07a45b997ccf39be
describe
'60091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQV' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
f985663658ca75ff2a85b9ab9d336332
9469d7b6ed498d4c32fc9551faf320b742120fe6
describe
'3221252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQW' 'sip-files00037.tif'
be25e55ca98fd2d8dae09a1608a435d1
0f5c4bfe7d4a149e90edf3fb47d346120b516006
'2011-10-12T01:34:56-04:00'
describe
'854' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQX' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f1fe39b0d4c583621f48ece5e3cc0222
6d2852d48ee11ba3458a3c0392ef8b42cdf24ee8
'2011-10-12T01:32:12-04:00'
describe
'30521' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQY' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
652d6860b7e05c083066fa3dba1371ea
0346812683503aafc6b78a4e9c729d8b68bbe7ba
'2011-10-12T01:35:35-04:00'
describe
'397729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBQZ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
eb07f4ff533bd121274105c6a7efc71e
5d9673c50f485be395e85fe50b6a55345aadf1f9
'2011-10-12T01:37:10-04:00'
describe
'194890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
4e8acd0579f614a20375cc5e7a6a2664
42805e94f359505ac817814ebd517956526da827
describe
'51094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRB' 'sip-files00038.pro'
8d6e73a2e25a928fe89a317b8e1f503d
8c5811dbe3302a3d759a38bfed9415ea6484354d
describe
'67091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRC' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
8c51ecaad18c6fafca9578d100c0e658
16e33f510fa08a4bde0ae961eb2ded023fb44873
describe
'3203480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRD' 'sip-files00038.tif'
e3725b3efcb997d4a6f612b0fe768db8
c01d740e2f4fbf348111f61c8ea2e5fdad3ce650
'2011-10-12T01:33:08-04:00'
describe
'2100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRE' 'sip-files00038.txt'
3fa798f4016f94be3c39ea23f0d62c01
5d183d0535c3c82df6d989a8b163e43bafae848c
describe
'31957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRF' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
633824a3528aec06376d6c7010bda7c7
209f134f7a1b882d34deab6e8fd22d954a356fcc
'2011-10-12T01:34:05-04:00'
describe
'390950' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRG' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e762b9c767e2d4b4da8539613790cb51
420e4892817a32483f6849cfb7883398349fbe4b
'2011-10-12T01:26:46-04:00'
describe
'210060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
619fc803d87e4c7ac03eb799338a316b
7703bd9234e7aba999d2f2cd1c7d59e5be82b167
describe
'56003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRI' 'sip-files00039.pro'
e8cd00ba7094d1d0557f950a0d68f570
9afe84f4db7a2127586e0293539f44f198b72581
'2011-10-12T01:28:56-04:00'
describe
'70134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRJ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
a266ff4b3841712657c7f24695c00f71
bca58ca917b92e4774d9be219741633900f5eb05
describe
'3149128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRK' 'sip-files00039.tif'
9acf0f1b9fec0b0f2a9bd240c1af185e
380de0e43c16f6c514e1cfa339a7151478d6850d
'2011-10-12T01:33:46-04:00'
describe
'2304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRL' 'sip-files00039.txt'
826f9cf27b7ba48650aecd80c18405a1
719f86c01827af0971cdf08745ec8a01909187d2
'2011-10-12T01:34:22-04:00'
describe
'32391' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
5460b589d685333e96e5188e5c788a0d
b75a1291f2e7226e77d70768be1509dbc8a92aa9
'2011-10-12T01:26:48-04:00'
describe
'398398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRN' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d55ea10d5fccf9ff869382ef9115c620
6cc98a50918aa9515d9701ae8ebc9ce3e464c365
'2011-10-12T01:32:44-04:00'
describe
'181953' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRO' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
f6b37461f197d8b586daad03a331ab9b
bc7ab2039d5fe5f79e544a4971e64f7224cc14ba
'2011-10-12T01:33:02-04:00'
describe
'46010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRP' 'sip-files00040.pro'
defd074b93393e2226b5b79c9f0851ac
377b11ae92f1a136c92dd4b0a3bd0403135f1aca
describe
'62252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRQ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
19818822e4fe8bc7c19c4dd54ca25048
83ed7e8ef26117dffbbded0d305b15ccf4e28328
'2011-10-12T01:29:13-04:00'
describe
'3208908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRR' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1e5ea7e049b213b5b2492d0c2546bf7e
0e32b7b6b0428649203825b6a78e4cc1fbb85367
'2011-10-12T01:25:32-04:00'
describe
'1900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRS' 'sip-files00040.txt'
5737d1ef0f9a19878df8d774ee334621
6193a2f89d3f6d04de546e5d07afecc155646456
'2011-10-12T01:32:56-04:00'
describe
'30208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
93531f9fbcb4af80341a5ee73d115e89
6963b72c69eeed82f0783113fcffc7901c971979
'2011-10-12T01:30:52-04:00'
describe
'405674' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
72009cb2c89fde64ffd50cea75c8b35c
bbf8430616466301f2496bc90cdc75660f9d5b4e
describe
'159491' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRV' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
fd9f303a30dee2343ba5d5264dab6caa
3ec1fde87b0dfc90ad9ddc880b8198cc58d179cc
'2011-10-12T01:34:44-04:00'
describe
'19398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
6d14e669a2fd999f4d0acf453644f24c
f2ea104f17de547ff526659a76bcebf429caab05
'2011-10-12T01:26:50-04:00'
describe
'55304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRX' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c55e8356e9cd35b08904343e2ea17234
58bf266c4582b8a7d047d3e0f7939ac9711c47e9
'2011-10-12T01:28:04-04:00'
describe
'3266012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRY' 'sip-files00041.tif'
b922625fae26be3820a70ccd9bc26981
9b1b78dc68811c6cb9c405ee5f55becf6f253938
'2011-10-12T01:35:06-04:00'
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBRZ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
8e1c1a79dae10a90851221eb45b56188
9568a27ffc4a997cc13b7619b6b100b8ee4d7ac2
'2011-10-12T01:25:45-04:00'
describe
'29406' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
0e245cee4f73e1ea51a2a48556407cd2
0d68c3df7bb6700d9d60292a5b3faf48d1b5a6ba
'2011-10-12T01:35:04-04:00'
describe
'398422' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSB' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
3d5f63cd709537f0a9d2a94c083cd79a
0400ca65c48af53e1937376a34685f82353eff3b
describe
'184518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
3b9098c548952c5fa801668a587c4f7c
095caa3595b923bd7967ecffd5c9e1ec6497ba2a
'2011-10-12T01:37:06-04:00'
describe
'46885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
78a6d33c73b50602830bd652588e5d81
d4606b2784f6940d6ea13e8ee4ddbc20c1c9b083
'2011-10-12T01:28:12-04:00'
describe
'65330' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
9ddf0570ae2215b93253f1dc55be841f
ef1275014a56448f1eafc03e735c875cdf51e66b
'2011-10-12T01:30:04-04:00'
describe
'3209332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
198add01325c34d43da1bfc989e2ab1b
0c4b7a9390425fbcd3cba20f8fa768bad1510217
'2011-10-12T01:25:37-04:00'
describe
'1986' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
ebbb66dbde127c3f70e4b756539faac2
95a7dbb3606eef946ced68913a6c3236224500a4
describe
'31294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSH' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
4de9ced0548114f006e1d14e9eb13cb8
24806e29ec40e56377bbf41ad1996b94a2bb43e1
'2011-10-12T01:30:30-04:00'
describe
'405593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
55f9da5870f720db8f5357a05cebcc05
f8685db9ba2f1ec92a0cd300ad4892d6d590ee6f
'2011-10-12T01:28:05-04:00'
describe
'210243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
2b9bd0ed42cbd8882a27492f2c8a1640
f4984e44f44cc425e00c21b4c8b9df91ebc68abe
'2011-10-12T01:31:13-04:00'
describe
'56410' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSK' 'sip-files00043.pro'
3bae75dde60775470c974f106c9a2a21
7f4639db29c7c80ad61ccd3aebb8b7fa35622dc8
describe
'69951' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSL' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a3bb078de036fe84a687a31ca4441bc2
80ca6cda1a9351eb261279488d42640e39bb5c0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSM' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c2ae614df14146a39c617a134683cae4
680b8a190e66b309919fbc54b0228200bc5ef3f8
'2011-10-12T01:37:12-04:00'
describe
'2339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSN' 'sip-files00043.txt'
e73d4a5c6cbbba47e16f7acf3e9794a7
1499770b5b8bd6915504deb23a885d4fb528dbfb
describe
'31693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSO' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
2a60c388b344a40e9b1a34c01ea469c8
4f5b969f902a83b62b71b278cd661accc9ce959e
describe
'402782' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSP' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
a536e39d6f1d52479ebc5db79929b6b8
798e01661436f38993550eaf4cc3b382debed20d
describe
'170408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSQ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
6ca333d0ae453ae6bafa70acd4d08900
721db9f197095b53ec5eb7322a974f714203b6af
describe
'41502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSR' 'sip-files00044.pro'
3f4afeac9a79ef79ac56e90f14c32325
32f9fd2efc056fcc20d39d2758c6373929127287
describe
'58363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c3e7d35a11bd1298d8dd523188c3ae26
1c57482aae43e27e5bf333d82c6f5b669c0279e5
'2011-10-12T01:26:35-04:00'
describe
'3242784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBST' 'sip-files00044.tif'
eb5b67f2ddf569802212d2e8d60de00d
2ad0f0a3b11f6cfed754c0932b24eda7f1dd3912
'2011-10-12T01:26:57-04:00'
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSU' 'sip-files00044.txt'
03362f62e903d3e0cb6c9f6b5f2887ad
65395d0adf5cd06f55f9bd7c765dc0be75dd9394
'2011-10-12T01:26:59-04:00'
describe
'28745' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSV' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
0d5be9a60a5897bf04054d214ba3fd1e
e9adc7d1ffaa7d96c727084f29fd6569f43c5be3
'2011-10-12T01:33:36-04:00'
describe
'405480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSW' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8a32fdc6c1bb337c4dd4d3a46f5f38b4
5e41fd9c9588d3f759d5895b0e1331f9342eb6d7
'2011-10-12T01:25:42-04:00'
describe
'192357' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
62fb95576acbfbe139bccbeb14f8f994
d75b8277848afce659b2076dc28290dbbca16ab2
'2011-10-12T01:28:26-04:00'
describe
'49928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSY' 'sip-files00045.pro'
3dbf2b3b306ce31ed72dbebd2e3ee866
177083ca102206521394f5e61807bc2fb3be3eb6
describe
'64215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBSZ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
7cfdaa6138361df1b90d75e4092eb237
f7f495e1e44643a895595a414be5993a70c207b4
'2011-10-12T01:28:31-04:00'
describe
'3266312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTA' 'sip-files00045.tif'
d15c913e7a9ccef6abb4c14daa63c181
c7452f7f95a38a70d99809c7de6b4c3f9eedb4f9
'2011-10-12T01:25:40-04:00'
describe
'2061' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTB' 'sip-files00045.txt'
cf4a5c0a5d58c3d17baaa4491b65a52f
8cd5bfc7f1f5a162dbc531ce85afde8d5b07c661
'2011-10-12T01:32:17-04:00'
describe
'29938' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTC' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
e4d609f0fd732f73622737cf109d2b8c
c39d51004f5f8eb866fd816ef3e3605c10f530d3
'2011-10-12T01:31:32-04:00'
describe
'405603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTD' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
8f52e6d5e6a6574b115dac45b475922b
8b2a19d7d1eec7494b63eb4d4122d850c9e0b055
'2011-10-12T01:27:26-04:00'
describe
'214563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTE' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
50a9db8bfccbe1a4074ade0509b9f8f2
8c7ebe006d8df660ce59881ceb3e2380b567d79c
describe
'59340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTF' 'sip-files00046.pro'
17642887fa6cc7ba6c2b2ea670a86693
3601e6be386770fd92d82b58259cff0f6520ad4a
'2011-10-12T01:27:50-04:00'
describe
'70610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
7427fd606d9f96e3490b7ebea3b03507
43687686bfffe2e4527f34a676b8b52ba3c44495
describe
'3266716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTH' 'sip-files00046.tif'
cbd131972cac6972df60f68e3b4b73bb
6dfbde1c31f2e183d060132a626f652e171dc85e
'2011-10-12T01:32:38-04:00'
describe
'2406' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTI' 'sip-files00046.txt'
821a54fbee83a982a743354e9fa0ed9b
b3e7baf438f2acd9c56e5f0bc94bf2b980008990
'2011-10-12T01:29:29-04:00'
describe
'31569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTJ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
fc472b406acb1b2631096a0d07ded4e4
2ea598a413751d3e552a47d7e8e865af97022919
describe
'405650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTK' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
037b198d3d06c14a7b270e7ccf627c39
e126963f163c507d0f7fa715dcd56b3070ad80b1
'2011-10-12T01:27:44-04:00'
describe
'215231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTL' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
3a7ce504a485d144916f4ee7eefcde55
4cc15765179da28a3b7c9635173eeb33e2547488
'2011-10-12T01:27:53-04:00'
describe
'58245' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTM' 'sip-files00047.pro'
2be5e9227afd998aa1e5e53a7093d4b5
38148df5333db68585a0d9d085fe780a0f59aaab
'2011-10-12T01:36:24-04:00'
describe
'71783' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTN' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
d5669223785792331361f1a14c16e922
9dbe41b4aef4f6e8612e16d06464e3da71c7c170
describe
'3267016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTO' 'sip-files00047.tif'
8892479c3e8abf9e5d104a678e292e6a
1ea012366c5d0a74a5957ebbb94d1110b44257bb
'2011-10-12T01:25:46-04:00'
describe
'2370' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTP' 'sip-files00047.txt'
5995ec327350d0f1c6f752da03972494
97dbffe7772c38d14ba7001b0347d4d11b2b443c
describe
'32173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTQ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9cf8b83a0a7dcec81acec97b5d7fff29
d1dd39ebce3eae2244660ff8b2bd30aa72f77c0f
'2011-10-12T01:29:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTR' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
629b0ea394350545cdc6a271b0b9e229
ebd2da3d884550589614b120211309947f5a8606
describe
'217334' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTS' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
c9edf178049e43e78b77670ceafbc018
0d2315ed0c0be17849a1a420709478c312c7beee
describe
'59408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTT' 'sip-files00048.pro'
4b40436a2dadc41c4d7c5fda0ca76709
b68f0603c37995c1316440763d5864f16591fdce
describe
'72619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTU' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
510c252e90c320d7e07914740220a00f
95de3cecb2463b888a3e67dfc4f3b82da2bd9185
describe
'3267136' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTV' 'sip-files00048.tif'
0c7ecdf576fb1290a7435bc5d04ca693
14b567cf8acc335e770ae2f8385fa1758a5f0d65
'2011-10-12T01:28:19-04:00'
describe
'2418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTW' 'sip-files00048.txt'
a6fbfd98f710b54821580644d13af722
8ab91d355cde5dca7998a7e857b4be862e3d6365
'2011-10-12T01:28:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTX' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
03039a118c5b68265ce8358ea02a18fe
1ad18e71f2a7b00337cc40ec0468c8b0a8e280cc
'2011-10-12T01:33:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTY' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
6f7f315b0af85fa89f595368d3d0dc05
6242ad43c374149d6e4cdc22ff025779e489fd15
'2011-10-12T01:26:09-04:00'
describe
'220878' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBTZ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
460cd5a821ced5b0c969a5371682551f
3a386e4459577e958ef759eb6317c8393469d8f8
describe
'61413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUA' 'sip-files00049.pro'
329155ac1a983c41b62c304b1a960639
374b9542baada2b95e1ff29708ed90ebcc2e3bf0
'2011-10-12T01:25:44-04:00'
describe
'73256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUB' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
e0d31857cf8cc7e9486ef8e8fd9d14bb
4764532a829723b4f65edb82be16eb26450dd54e
describe
'3267264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUC' 'sip-files00049.tif'
1198fed8671310bebc12320abf912f12
bdd17c01346de4c6c50a0b7e4e2dbc9a4f44d70f
'2011-10-12T01:27:48-04:00'
describe
'2498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUD' 'sip-files00049.txt'
ca9a2f8af20766bc6d973f7f39afa104
7729c31ded2f055e1f9cb3fadf26a95c8caddd78
describe
'32658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUE' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
2939c3831a7a40bbab97a2ed18619d6d
9ffd830ca5613217287cea039c7488a56e3423a0
'2011-10-12T01:36:10-04:00'
describe
'405571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUF' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
ae5f943b59052d61e25d158d25a4197f
06964d311e5b622d480e15bcf70102b56396708b
'2011-10-12T01:33:06-04:00'
describe
'213433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUG' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
48cd2b21f687edda65bcaa08d5376296
538b9f9e6ec811cc075d7a1c8922b1fe9285b8ae
'2011-10-12T01:27:40-04:00'
describe
'57369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUH' 'sip-files00050.pro'
e0deb358fbdeeba6634dd2a1a0be6873
472ebeea16e935d822d2533c1aaa572ae34fbaa8
'2011-10-12T01:26:10-04:00'
describe
'71801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUI' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
811bdd4e4e080b04f81422493d480f4f
a0827e8c206e622e4fd33d600bedc0a267d4e2b7
'2011-10-12T01:34:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUJ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
5df6131f55497a55ae3ea83264277543
8a029707cd32f5705bdbf956a6ad1d550def2886
'2011-10-12T01:25:59-04:00'
describe
'2340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUK' 'sip-files00050.txt'
b29803f1af4dd253071110f90024462d
036af534c109681638ffebf63dd09a8bc8d3eccc
'2011-10-12T01:26:25-04:00'
describe
'32172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUL' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
bfd24c8a232905cbb13e49ecf77779fc
490e6444647fba26be5c582e7cc08ec6e65ba97e
describe
'405561' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUM' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9f853560afaddb31f2adc42b5dc2eca4
785bd63e91e3675d7a3a6bc54629722f739dd3da
'2011-10-12T01:30:31-04:00'
describe
'130513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUN' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
6306f8e4d0624ede05bf4a0fd1c495a8
7176d53e193aebaf8b03298794de94567dfc5462
'2011-10-12T01:31:31-04:00'
describe
'26605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUO' 'sip-files00051.pro'
df9f92c66660085072d13dad30b9c589
48f2dd9db7a41f5c512c4a1a2219b30d8e5a10b8
'2011-10-12T01:29:55-04:00'
describe
'45772' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
e773c1ab0ba2021d2db9eb9bc2552926
b39faebeedec4393b599c57b8625106a1c3a4099
'2011-10-12T01:26:42-04:00'
describe
'3264728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUQ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
c099b82731870bf93aed077cda1ff6d7
43a9f451ed82a0d6d80c21f90529a7e7d013ed78
'2011-10-12T01:31:25-04:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUR' 'sip-files00051.txt'
352957317938740d1ca119769995599f
55c1e73151aabe51e8f9cfc084314d758eba06b0
describe
'25140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUS' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
32be5b1362b42a7363ac7e3768966cde
0cd42c779745f2256255e95c9556d9e4b03ac4e2
'2011-10-12T01:35:16-04:00'
describe
'405662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUT' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
b7b84c0512fc2217cb69c41204ae0219
e928c42a02a62d6d5a0b8cbe236216fab1511ca2
'2011-10-12T01:36:28-04:00'
describe
'177905' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUU' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
6b783ec87ea7b4da992db19101e411d6
86050c1e50fae0cde7f273226c348871658b40b7
describe
'44413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUV' 'sip-files00052.pro'
976bed3bb0356ce818e5758654f0e68d
286c1b109ad31c22964fc89c3a2586e46a9ca770
describe
'62027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUW' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
d33fbb6532d62722da06192b197d2452
f02f035318470b2c4d9cbea8ad06430df9c25fcc
'2011-10-12T01:26:27-04:00'
describe
'3266200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUX' 'sip-files00052.tif'
85346d762c557c9a2131e46d523ce97a
9717402d345e34370a26ca06bedc175d9c15f6e6
'2011-10-12T01:32:36-04:00'
describe
'1839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUY' 'sip-files00052.txt'
964677e0ad17afa065880457b156cfe2
ccd4055a478fa35a68ea1e4261ce49198b3ea1e0
'2011-10-12T01:35:41-04:00'
describe
'29822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBUZ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f2820de478992d7729d271e74ff475eb
2f34a1973c840835de29eaa6554ceeae8cb12f24
'2011-10-12T01:32:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVA' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
9364b15bdc98290838d3ab948dc309f5
85236b0d3bc3f63084e1168cfb62235f99696c74
describe
'208411' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVB' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
450cc15568db026e07e879b327546dda
5350c5820af941fefd9bb9a99cf6d0f4fa1571dd
'2011-10-12T01:25:07-04:00'
describe
'56263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVC' 'sip-files00053.pro'
ee1eb19fd432c01c0f396d0f3bbe34fa
efaadce0e8ad528649a9b7a25efb8ff849a2356f
describe
'70197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVD' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
dbc66e4f07db7cecb0123fc72540898a
8c881c92e5dffd6979d7280fff77a929fbc10677
describe
'3266800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVE' 'sip-files00053.tif'
a32a0485ba7fd02b7be7135d987a5ba9
152113ae28fb6ed2f623d7f5a0f647a0540b9a49
'2011-10-12T01:29:53-04:00'
describe
'2309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVF' 'sip-files00053.txt'
2d458d125bb290e8388d296e2e5f80c7
3d56c57a589c3ea731520f648eb00fbfd9de6a8c
describe
'31779' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVG' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
9ec573c073ccb526ff895dacdef3ffb5
79761fe597073387b170d1c3dad1b60bafcd59cd
'2011-10-12T01:35:45-04:00'
describe
'405622' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVH' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
9f4a42a8e525a679e7658c260c10a993
bb277940c04df6874b4eda2708f8ca4454196ebe
describe
'212291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVI' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
ab0418116fd3b74d6cd805e3bfdf9109
67d6780e8484683fd87efd8812dfae5a11d98d8d
'2011-10-12T01:34:08-04:00'
describe
'58739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVJ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
f3c5d1d838354e7e525e41c83b4044b9
01a3d97492111822c422c307a480cfaf98c4d3e0
'2011-10-12T01:28:46-04:00'
describe
'70401' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVK' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
de2e67955855b05a8e6d75b41063dd4d
282a96faa8d229b64cacd4ad21763aa364590942
describe
'3266696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVL' 'sip-files00054.tif'
ee46183d89f372687f3dd71a859354fd
1f1437bc49d552ee95adf2faf340a75b47a7e6bd
'2011-10-12T01:31:17-04:00'
describe
'2380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVM' 'sip-files00054.txt'
7daf7e6c86e7550b994abcc0630116f6
d84e0de1982c9a4212a205d2a6f0c5bd194286ab
'2011-10-12T01:26:53-04:00'
describe
'31662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVN' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8b77dafb00ff4592d236b851617a6fbd
c843cb79281a1fb14d0de635ab13faba7e8810c8
describe
'405651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVO' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
5f8979aae167b2c1cf384225ef9d5c8b
b9fce0f2eb6b4cf4990cbb596f46db5dc4a34bca
'2011-10-12T01:27:12-04:00'
describe
'217812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
95c5663b541b5974fa9f87d267a3cd1f
c6c53d28d78f5bfc1b71623b5bf240021a567e9b
'2011-10-12T01:33:56-04:00'
describe
'59855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVQ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
7c54cf4e838a18c1d8b013acd5a5f836
1831468f516c06009318122161e4398249b257a4
'2011-10-12T01:34:47-04:00'
describe
'71624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVR' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
2d47cdc68acb8d06967e02102c0fa8cd
9cebda1d5533aa3df2865bdd1892d87fa8cd21eb
'2011-10-12T01:25:47-04:00'
describe
'3266760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
db802e715b2ba374fb788f0aceb83ded
00c09fa5ad950a49f8f472ccc7204ec48582dade
'2011-10-12T01:25:57-04:00'
describe
'2445' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVT' 'sip-files00055.txt'
7cd8ef3b7afa41b2ccaf89d859b5c103
0c4087ba2f930806c27fc5301abca945c08ca9fb
describe
'32124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVU' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
f14173aec359162386dd7bb8eec0a046
0321ef41c97363bc6442516318ce2d7f1883bea0
'2011-10-12T01:28:28-04:00'
describe
'405537' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVV' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ada777fe572095b0f88fdab8ca2c92e5
4f17022a0ef9121eb852f7fb53a2873f35508da1
describe
'213012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVW' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
7816e31aca5067c78db3cac741dcacfa
ba35d9855205c672859664e6eb96383b8a9b2c03
describe
'58778' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVX' 'sip-files00056.pro'
72403482a444885e4b3b32781fdc27d1
1ddbef0ffe66919ec4627a17fb06dc3a1a5ead9f
describe
'69774' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
04f42853cebc2d3852f7ef31bc046c7d
46b4bc665837157c1d4bcfbe2b7aaab73a61fc0c
'2011-10-12T01:25:21-04:00'
describe
'3266636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBVZ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
050b3c2d8f330c97b5ad3eea57397d2d
c8dc42bae51a49c6973eaaf0ff80581b7df86368
describe
'2381' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
b6c321bb1471d4a43ee5a1f32fd6bffc
fbf318842b5eb4f42ce826d06db78d114a30b8d5
'2011-10-12T01:34:03-04:00'
describe
'31677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
ad7195aa03c70eaceaccecbd5e56773b
56da780495a2994895a75eaaeb5baa019f3a751e
'2011-10-12T01:27:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
e09a02acb1b812bb1f50cae30f4a6e6c
c3f9109a391d6bb016dfadc4de20cef1cbac6069
describe
'220678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWD' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
c22daedbdf67832d832d46568a18d5b5
4bb99c0a2a6b644f271988892862f62574f2c459
'2011-10-12T01:27:17-04:00'
describe
'60421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
27c9e9e2dcd826619b6de54a262e3748
554edb148295d49d8de653f59895e54f2b058904
'2011-10-12T01:31:01-04:00'
describe
'71113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f85577f9695064dd2ced6cedf8bb2bb3
9ab3728c5d6730e96e11036974fc535a1d8fd013
'2011-10-12T01:34:06-04:00'
describe
'3266728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
342d5f1e5fc6a25d60668abb858f782f
23be79ba180a534748b69487c8fe664ba2b2edbf
describe
'2471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
3d5ffc78e1f6f7d2a09d496f7bedbfaf
03ea6af990e4898c8a89e1cce0e6c316159c6bc6
describe
'32016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWI' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
0cf2f976d2b07d7c7275d811f266549f
7e549548a8897bfb58a5ce3b6356191b5c6c6416
'2011-10-12T01:27:45-04:00'
describe
'405654' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
a53d34373d9c8de369bf4fb27e93e819
c9fc858d9df5a2a6f877d824240b5c813fd77a11
describe
'190492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
2a3888c4d10e155d82f9972e1e5280e3
578d7fa1d7b1f3f45184161aaaddeb35bf4e1021
'2011-10-12T01:32:40-04:00'
describe
'48498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWL' 'sip-files00058.pro'
89b8b4395afe0c08299908a3fc3922e2
8d1d501490735becbf400762909050ba7eb57c50
describe
'63602' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWM' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
88869a358e7de81cfdd7551b96b3278b
a68166d31b2e79c879c1a8a497ee9110fa2177af
'2011-10-12T01:28:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b7f00e166e1a1c326b8c028eccc4000d
ff442413b524aab4befb478efc06f9e05ddab610
describe
'2000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWO' 'sip-files00058.txt'
f46a584306b32f5be9b7cde2f11a522a
9eeae20f9ca6f171473b0e2f8a026b4f41c5cc08
describe
'29901' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWP' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
914f09ceb3f0d3d281146ddd1ba0407b
aca0f46d263808ef92e06ae67deb42146ea47101
'2011-10-12T01:31:58-04:00'
describe
'405598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWQ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
6b66eff77e8fcc8440de96b260b78638
a0e772cd50e977d04deaec5ef0ce2cb3588cf180
describe
'215411' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWR' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
9c190bd07afec6e10d98661046c6e8c3
8dfe7f3bb96af692f28127be789b98db41ce93a2
describe
'57951' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWS' 'sip-files00059.pro'
1acb464ba50dee513bd97f63335b3017
f9966c3df5689d6f071ae8a1e39007d62e1f0ca3
'2011-10-12T01:26:58-04:00'
describe
'71011' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWT' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
718ad3b207b10b12b143c8f7505c45f9
f9e0705ff8b45c366ec9fa2d2448ce2b129d584e
'2011-10-12T01:35:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWU' 'sip-files00059.tif'
044c5d594ecb9cb5b5a2ab0027068e4b
74694d09a0776954707d9ae952e28bb9a662bf49
'2011-10-12T01:36:07-04:00'
describe
'2369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWV' 'sip-files00059.txt'
1c9f5732dc7e908661862a63e54f12ed
2b132d6525cc8f686c512204408764e92c0c0638
describe
'31378' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWW' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
d73741cf3140d3c15a3a7b7c446ea04c
50d5c3e90afc38366ca41810d808aa08e1f9ef2d
'2011-10-12T01:32:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWX' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
f01c739c759b939fb045f9d882eddb7b
f7d930461a3d73832999634b44620538d9279ec2
describe
'215162' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWY' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
c89b627b48ff4f03273860b3d1a81c2b
8239ceb27f9d1b6e30042b45127854207035dcb3
'2011-10-12T01:33:07-04:00'
describe
'59331' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBWZ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
2b812ed75c1ac1772bcea585b16435bf
238f2bfb277e07e81ac31d1c63b53d0abff93730
describe
'70761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXA' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8abd34f95206c7a01e61ffa2f93b94fd
d250d4c61d908d06f71796ccbfe5d1a2d9f5e813
'2011-10-12T01:29:27-04:00'
describe
'3266620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXB' 'sip-files00060.tif'
4e8c9d84a47afb552802686e2cdf5a68
1dfc6b1670f58f7bfd2bb3c851690f52886cefe2
'2011-10-12T01:27:15-04:00'
describe
'2409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXC' 'sip-files00060.txt'
dcf67380068a98215f39e62f51095e94
e9fa89819e57927f29bad862e7e1f4c55d779168
describe
'31408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXD' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
ff3e2b1fed49eb51e8536912e8ae696b
81c91187538aebca92cb82177226ff9ccd4ab566
describe
'405528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXE' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
e5554f9210805a91e975ead7f4e3774e
8c39597505800ed3aa295db71cdd1829ecaecadf
describe
'214662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
66747cc870bdc059ef9cba3be28df8bb
042abacf49e4bd8265522972e2f84200aa7d5a84
describe
'59071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXG' 'sip-files00061.pro'
dff66db23955784f6ab605da1dd6a88c
70a41f43cb1cf5fd6dc571e8c5c380861b3ddd45
describe
'70822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
b20767c0ad8d888c92c3cc1808f91d40
ee59b0dfd9c1f2c0838fdb46436a169429f7dda4
describe
'3266872' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXI' 'sip-files00061.tif'
c1cc4c5d63ab54975edf5d5d9af171dd
ca45f65ae56f11907ba073eab29a45978de1d58c
'2011-10-12T01:30:03-04:00'
describe
'2412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXJ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
73d381df56052f78196d74d05466f5fc
0373611c066471386bf5411897363afb890e3f68
'2011-10-12T01:33:39-04:00'
describe
'32028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXK' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
8ad401d43e5c4dc79263548bf5c3461f
7a4fe7be8e9e2e3616493901a42bbb6ace82f60f
describe
'405639' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXL' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
b22232c5455a9c4f1dd2d0104ecd17e8
dbfe1869fb40c717681351970aa58ad84365707f
describe
'214783' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
228d02dca6cc17ee82314c37955b9daa
a1aee68ffd08331a31de62e922b92831ba071b33
'2011-10-12T01:27:30-04:00'
describe
'58891' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXN' 'sip-files00062.pro'
488c6392f471f684d4859d4113d2f810
c7e65e9820c84e1ace3ef1fe5616d3d07e89eec6
'2011-10-12T01:30:39-04:00'
describe
'71542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXO' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
d9a39ecf3d56f887a3854eccf44dbcf7
4c8d1cbd0f0f6f228fdd68227e8ec6ffdbbcbdf0
'2011-10-12T01:33:09-04:00'
describe
'3266756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
c6ec6422f9672a77b05cafa4c87d1820
18ae052398c6a212479e6622fa968e93a368cbe9
'2011-10-12T01:28:55-04:00'
describe
'2399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXQ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
9c4e697d17c2aab4fdad35fa5f327f21
0a69cd3c89922121c19bad8640dfe73912beb88f
describe
'31905' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXR' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
5eecb0e5c2787264f26639b20740d357
6d09c4970918a7ea7b7b65e49b2847f3358b8c15
describe
'405613' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
765f471b9044a4283eaf14104acb4b6d
c5d9c7ba4f56bc94e7fdb73d7b1b386aa9b078d7
describe
'181693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXT' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
a12cabe5b7a0d1ae169d4f8b79199396
00333673dc822701dbda24bf4fc9915a32c4cdac
describe
'20818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXU' 'sip-files00063.pro'
6870d212a46825a7e34bd94e3f33b029
6e23491f452f42ef4be9b225772b5f89b0a52e28
'2011-10-12T01:28:47-04:00'
describe
'61817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXV' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
14fb0958321944244d6ea04aca3ee4a6
49f02b3ce793742560fbef64805f305f2e00ddeb
describe
'3266732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
69057df2df260506f2ba64fc9d5eb895
9aa4f269192e6942a831f67ce5244a9ab553fe56
'2011-10-12T01:29:24-04:00'
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
a96382e386a9065e374af81ad1a1f549
e0621d94ca2f0975b5c53d0a5f5de7b626acb43f
'2011-10-12T01:29:48-04:00'
describe
'30931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXY' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
4d3754a0f5fa368255ca3d6fa3ba00e2
addfd2c89fd3428228b87d53d53937d07bffcf7f
describe
'405656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBXZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
5d4e9cd4dd80ef0784b5eb24a39557f2
f867a7a977c518d5f1b99726a8d96f0cf2dbb05c
'2011-10-12T01:27:52-04:00'
describe
'178754' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
ebb630497501816ddc4f07560194cd61
9172182a1e5c4c4cc6b241c9bd9f941a433446c6
'2011-10-12T01:32:25-04:00'
describe
'44934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
c98626b036aef05baf91231a30c86c32
c10478e29d770c6fea036fc4958338a7aa57bb5e
'2011-10-12T01:34:35-04:00'
describe
'62253' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
773cbbb2b0da5ea3365c89a528f98f71
2932551f75fa801648b6a451ef6b59641c0a7f28
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYD' 'sip-files00064.tif'
843a0f7cf80076f54dff8c76f494b8a6
8d69b18abf2ada22d3f45a2705ea69228422c5d0
'2011-10-12T01:34:26-04:00'
describe
'1864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
0ae35aa8c8f4a3b2de4350a7cc9201e7
c1a9929f3681aa6f296be2262cde53a1489ae0a2
describe
'30393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
8dc65ca91948c434d07381c631d872ff
e294169e71cf4bf08c31ae3dfed98d71a93ef507
'2011-10-12T01:33:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
3cd42715bdfa3c2b4277dba2df0f5eda
eeacfe74ba260c89c7511aa1935473eed11da7d6
'2011-10-12T01:27:31-04:00'
describe
'216534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
b74a6fdc05892dbe1737f0517c7ab66f
c0cd79bb55474fda38689634c52accff3d613bdd
'2011-10-12T01:36:23-04:00'
describe
'59515' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
5e157a70e71757c4d06bb24d59554c89
7c84aedce50c340f9d2f83e8d545911ea20a1e87
'2011-10-12T01:27:11-04:00'
describe
'71972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
66c9522c7fa8fde22c4634dffa319108
f99ebf950c45bea98c00624140f69d96a22e02fb
'2011-10-12T01:34:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
3ea308727d55ca714a0f60f9e2416a20
3ae1dd2c2a7e74e12ded703a6592288be4ba7015
'2011-10-12T01:31:09-04:00'
describe
'2431' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
fb25a2b54631c4e56277e920fcb27fb7
520bb9e67ce593a9686eec9532e6742fecb01b1f
'2011-10-12T01:31:43-04:00'
describe
'31771' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
148c5f2d99277af596fc0e9f141986da
613c96ed97077de09021425868b586d8298808b1
describe
'405568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
c5cfd6cf812aaee39ddc743a16d557c4
bf50c8db2714ce1893c0cb8b0c52a7e724e442f6
'2011-10-12T01:33:57-04:00'
describe
'205850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
94b4c690f22a9f1a572fddb6907ae888
a42237b373b90665b0e0c61be5dc2bd944cda182
describe
'54725' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
74cac4c22b4a403f38bfad3e8c6c349b
4cdcb06123a24b7ad0535ff95348744feb51d501
'2011-10-12T01:29:06-04:00'
describe
'69282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
e52a0b100f5d0dbe3f3aadfdf82f50d4
14ce878cc81cf3c618fb471051462dea9592e5d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
42634936a042d024691522396261a25c
5b31ebcab05a49dbe87af104dbd89023c20fedca
'2011-10-12T01:33:59-04:00'
describe
'2233' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
e0bf9ed07a98a45204a085754e5f2d71
757b71ff4d097f89a944f0651571502cde70714c
describe
'32019' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
dedc6e7f51009ad8d83fddcb31e61156
cbeb7e432b8d2b1dc3e1955ad26b78163f800f73
'2011-10-12T01:30:36-04:00'
describe
'405564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
7f663292aef08cdd98e6b821e38f3874
7952a0d8f9bae695afba09f9a63a94d0dab7dbc3
'2011-10-12T01:27:00-04:00'
describe
'196397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
17c5fa2516de5aa67054b158c9e183da
018253469836584bc8913b4df6d9cea7c787046a
describe
'51526' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
cb447a15af8fdd964256fc97840c9752
71c9108512f332cf2122ceddfc8aeeb26f7bf478
describe
'66782' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
e5f15d575c5f77785d3ffa2fae150336
03254abc06c8158f007659d237a72274b409b97e
'2011-10-12T01:35:08-04:00'
describe
'3266548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
299c230a9861440228c2a42a03dd30cc
353e1550be22480c799c0e1d7797438151b5d4af
'2011-10-12T01:28:35-04:00'
describe
'2126' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBYZ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
3419be16e367e865314b82576897e046
5fb16fcf331ac4fdb7001a9dcd6c317ec25815fc
describe
'30894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
254567f1398f624bda8c72f5d9870bf4
100f372bf844bd23d974b8a310e36b0b01fd8546
'2011-10-12T01:30:05-04:00'
describe
'405631' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
6af4e575601a6a6ed99fa4f4a5cb51e2
6860cca9663ef0edcc6e7345a5b2a407766502ff
'2011-10-12T01:28:45-04:00'
describe
'205199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
f87967f74673bdd4c20000fe09340190
f8ac86757cc6bc9b5e3ca5442770ae530b53836e
describe
'55603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
f4eddbc33515f5299c1af549af793739
57feb72d796afdba1140114cd5a51f9ce5a0e098
describe
'69222' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b81e5dd2e20ba518af27a46dd60b77dc
aa50cc70ffb1113a4649d88c892b02ed12c5386b
describe
'3266768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
20830a85e52a45a256def75528b6f3b7
320a430d5d0b2f3931f1639b313e8ef3af20ec69
'2011-10-12T01:28:57-04:00'
describe
'2272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d5fc86ce1b7aa6e5e43ad9413b0aef77
a192b43351ec93a2c17dac3f4e87bc2955e054b3
'2011-10-12T01:28:32-04:00'
describe
'31745' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
cfafa5b7e1577f9925ce729f48d70d98
ee64fe1019479252090c68af8f7bd621e570d44e
describe
'405621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
3b333e30142b9d3429d12f21aed959be
95e6acda87cc624144c0020353522e2944b5d54c
'2011-10-12T01:29:00-04:00'
describe
'190040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
efbf5ed8d57ebe3fc7a38980fb115534
0dcb3ec0e9a9098496d7913fed4ca51d6a6632f7
describe
'47921' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
4a20b4edfc08fd89a5da8c652f3f87d6
2efcd9df1fdd05b87f47571f6637d6563c54e87b
describe
'63086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
cee86c7abcf8183329d35a74aa65fffb
2024e41488462124450bf3935d0deb24e35e8c82
describe
'3266216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
99bc6698ff40ac28079c5f0d173424a4
d3215461b3e96e14ce4f8a40985f281a916081dd
'2011-10-12T01:33:51-04:00'
describe
'1988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
de139998fd2f8c2547089daba34c63e8
e61738c7b6957a4a603e93da04791b6eb83d407f
'2011-10-12T01:27:55-04:00'
describe
'30096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
d4fb7ffd11e278337a1c60e319c65ca7
edb4fc43048b97551d92ae3f4b99fa36234e76ed
describe
'405601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
8cf3b44761c37e0ed191fae7107954ed
d187709a41f38c30b5620115aaa9d9b891f02af6
'2011-10-12T01:34:39-04:00'
describe
'193798' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
292a2aaeb0b6261a4e4c48c31e5bc3fb
80028d521772c2ed0ceb4d9cca7c5fffb61b766f
describe
'26428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
fdef773812338e209c3ef20ad217bef4
f01e17810dd9905ba8cfdfe255a188be368b3ab3
'2011-10-12T01:34:52-04:00'
describe
'62748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
7f68cdfb6a3676f36aa1737107639f6b
17ffd2055d175f317dc346db156d794a9400b528
'2011-10-12T01:34:07-04:00'
describe
'3266608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b88e5a444f0389638d32ad907267b333
11ba98e263a5c5f821d1ebdb04d548f859350f89
'2011-10-12T01:36:52-04:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
899ac0ed3ed6c9c513a781155d4a9f9a
c3044071ba2cdad32fbe982eab05fff630a9183c
'2011-10-12T01:25:06-04:00'
describe
'31003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
68c47c6b373dd9c9f86ed39a581cd78c
c28a631c9b86bb375297c469133b9566f0dd487b
'2011-10-12T01:26:22-04:00'
describe
'405617' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
9fda464f6e9e095b8d13cffe6e1c4d87
5da5da5d6add4327d74b4729d70f193868c97cff
'2011-10-12T01:26:52-04:00'
describe
'217480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
455764fdc1758172f0046463eb0504bd
559d8114850dd7dd18226a94b4bcc0ec41f49452
describe
'57731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
c41cae2fb65bafdd4057b415e27729ed
c91e3c943eed28e058fbdf744086ed9b22ece12b
'2011-10-12T01:35:13-04:00'
describe
'71918' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABBZZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
4ae9d17a27e45cdb7761f9fc144320bb
8dd8672f6aa3ef4d7a1ae603bc9e56ed50715763
'2011-10-12T01:31:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
15ca6bd175023092305107653b45a9d6
3ae22e2b0c24d1caf06e59957db91b5c3108e934
describe
'2365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
4e800fd05b26934cb418690775cd12b4
9e7419d0f7270e3d420d51707ca2e76f26dfda27
'2011-10-12T01:32:43-04:00'
describe
'32363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
26cf0143f1c5a188fde0c681bde0563c
dedc7937f22759c27a0558c5ac9b7e88e648e035
describe
'405518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
14856d7e4efae564b5fa587ca53c9524
10c68f03f807bf2f6c51b69b305b61cd5cf7e508
describe
'212748' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
6d709195ee5ef8e27f747148c4a7f04f
6d46eea333d7fd8fc1a0fdb83ac2713b7eef13f8
describe
'57057' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
84aab30f1b624548ee4263d0cc514bb8
fc8be7294138d7bad0515170f12dc9ed4b175ec8
describe
'70813' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
9d583521f8b1dada5f6f3d7605a3c9a6
d8bfb7eeaf87baa5b860b1100e080eb3fbcfb202
describe
'3266672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
623f781b6f3bcf266e2c24091b1c65f3
7c013311592ab61f676d0a3488b303538a3725d8
describe
'2325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
089411e01c2c52cde66778a2bbf00e4b
5f0e205711935da8b375b321d97273a1d425e892
'2011-10-12T01:28:16-04:00'
describe
'31673' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
ceb44cedbaa15a9dbe6ea89b65e8c642
b1e00bb689ca62e10cf816c022bda460af7d594d
describe
'405616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
1c87a7e19d66e574d9b514ec65bb76bc
5a1d156fdfad0cf6e467457792705113bd2e33d2
'2011-10-12T01:26:14-04:00'
describe
'188444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
abbd7d5763f3c0f8e83d47472705248c
a378059213194d6a5e889f62c00de3a71d18d701
describe
'19915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
49a682cad753d946bc0bd9af32596056
8c45ddedaaee55e8c6d701a0b90048a76e8e803f
describe
'60836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
3dfbeef567683238d4f8115cd5e30d43
5264508e41c05f69939e00bc14485513d05b4edd
describe
'3266424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
af2e9f16aaa7aad8c35d12fdfa55e6ab
df48f2be54cf3b2c5641c6e2ce9678aa57c235b0
describe
'830' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
10276be2e495e3b4c721e48055534705
e86e154cb72c5f7cedd7e2e3debf0ab44efc8095
describe
'30147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
cfc4b485810ce50b3f93ac2b34ab85b9
187f5e31440face87517c56fdb9da9614d47d9d6
'2011-10-12T01:33:45-04:00'
describe
'405449' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
62d0ada65497ced279f0f2629a042012
df609e216ce04990825dfa4054ee946f29e07e4b
describe
'190297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
1305fe94308ea2ff97400a79f59fefe6
7452fd1b9bcf821a1be160c61c0ca9ba9d04a61d
describe
'47453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
92871163adbfcf988bd0d3b98f4aff7c
e51db092786e145a23d82c9a29931d938eb66b1b
describe
'64045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
b4fde32db3527e85f74b37773c2b7d07
3f46ff43680f9d90cab72286f40c18d8101349f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
3cbbde04814ca7b5ee7f9b87469ff263
2bff6dea52832550f9ab06dfb71cabb4bcbc160c
'2011-10-12T01:27:03-04:00'
describe
'1968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAW' 'sip-files00074.txt'
29d97a404cbc5311bc74b75219b4e6bd
25895678bc09c063f4ee859a3ca539d67286d1d4
'2011-10-12T01:26:28-04:00'
describe
'29940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAX' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
f55de0eb3d3448125afe6b35048aa6dd
a2d39600952ba60a64ec6d286e7c9d1048829109
describe
'405669' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAY' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e6c8b9f59f905bbad9c262d4da9eed47
a4c7901931aae94800e7e8b1a2af4ebc3bf8504e
describe
'219938' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCAZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7642db926a6baa7b1c9e44889b91d6a3
d9d9c1aa5d19188688b69ab5894bcd21633a16fc
'2011-10-12T01:35:18-04:00'
describe
'58600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
50f09c34c4daea5b706084294264f9d6
de93ec61ce37e9ed8a7d10c53ac2f67236055f98
'2011-10-12T01:27:19-04:00'
describe
'73231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
ca1ee6598e12d40b064e4ad062f080c2
fedd86f7f4e73e64c138f5c076842c21718c75e1
'2011-10-12T01:28:33-04:00'
describe
'3267228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
a0245a3dc36fd4502abe437b8b5740b5
86e188ccc6ec17537f5dd5463bd5e08b24518931
describe
'2388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBD' 'sip-files00075.txt'
fec7d9d3e89d7cbb18b9539f5b0ff735
2ab3c6b4c60324dc84d349cc71f599d0d5c91243
describe
'32706' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
a8ca6b34969f3a46b7efce3fde71e91d
c0fb7aaf284bea1203d8215cc820b5aac6d17cca
'2011-10-12T01:34:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
975917a77f9a54f845bf58e39acf13f3
08ad4bc7505465e2f05df4e5eb26b6913c82e531
'2011-10-12T01:26:19-04:00'
describe
'194823' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
99d9165e103ee6b5275f5a051f282391
082b89519c8655e2ddcdd8997181bd512ff2e929
describe
'22403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
03ac3705966f6a3bd9d3382d231c6fb1
4030317ac3911938f3cc28b341689c1e573ea483
'2011-10-12T01:31:44-04:00'
describe
'64773' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
50bb180aa868d8958ae379f2974fd5c2
1f7ebf04b2bb9f2c464c9089a2488fb08bd659de
'2011-10-12T01:32:08-04:00'
describe
'3266980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8b69317c2ddcff3a95b2be11bd10a9f6
9bb7d85433bae0fb1353ac42e071af630f517926
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
5d1945d6e4201eb6ba0acb6da32e08f6
81b4ed201ce8d95221bcc9b63291b8701b6abdd8
'2011-10-12T01:27:22-04:00'
describe
'31547' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBL' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
abe8c5c9ed0cb17e7e4fa2051441c3cc
17f4b95be83d941a18655cfe17fadc94c1c53e01
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
c04a0b40627979d3fd53e8b04dcb9c53
98cc381ffcc0732812a261be8759b3c3ea2d0d50
'2011-10-12T01:35:59-04:00'
describe
'203407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
dbd3be148374977f5fbf17e3428ad8d5
df2c23972fd7ab26ba44da59f2382d0562b922e7
describe
'52932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
87ab0705c6c844fc802b4352582ac11e
c7f5a02a0c14ea9d2fbc9ef406ccd11ee1dd4577
describe
'67301' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
21b2b4584b63bd3beda6c5a43581b754
4d1b238cd8a9922ec1bdbfd2cd38f68a905d6d4a
'2011-10-12T01:32:28-04:00'
describe
'3266656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
b728c77c32438408bdcf3109e53afbf0
4b7dcdac03d626dae8613c196a3f2437aff64371
describe
'2157' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
a0e3b14a99eeff12ccf56dd8cbfd878b
b88a0c93c74dd5140709758947b528339e7896db
describe
'30992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
cea22e042d14647bebc2a502bdfd320a
f97427d939913369b0f0557c4e1db39af7c9a19a
describe
'405655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBT' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
8d3b00d4ce963b020410e70356fcc1ca
843940677d063fa992f3924d857b4b398b0d4971
describe
'178888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
37f628d6084345b7debd33219ff632a4
8855c832dcc9d3eba391b46e2a3fb362395837ea
'2011-10-12T01:28:00-04:00'
describe
'42436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBV' 'sip-files00078.pro'
c315e60965312e48cdcf0f9220697cf2
23012158c3c97ea99e21a79890e11074b47a2ef3
describe
'61947' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBW' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
3c3111f9da514f7651634b79c1ccafef
e0721b0bba2634ff7f628381da84f2ae8e0db920
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
fb0b05055ef80125f4267b2a06b54315
ee586b957beddf372c39eb7088f948429310ace7
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b1db0f6e790a0a112982af832bbc1eba
b0cf0e783badfbbf5e7a6d90c171479e4cb43fcf
describe
'30067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCBZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
ce84864d814d4a622fcd1d8799b7f0ed
1d63407efaaa5f24bbc7ea6e6c5e046608ed88ab
'2011-10-12T01:33:04-04:00'
describe
'405544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
699c6616706092f3932dcc33a2c1f6ae
6b3ae54a862b37010a411ce54f9ef26c71069414
'2011-10-12T01:25:56-04:00'
describe
'208688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
36dec7c8cafd5c321c30841ea7feeed5
72346e35db215a785d8d47f107ef97bb0565c3af
describe
'54985' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
ebd57c9a7a0b575ec34d48c9ff6b36e6
7890d7e4c2fadcbc351f1028036290ba83b3f874
'2011-10-12T01:35:27-04:00'
describe
'70890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCD' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
05af773a6e27b28447ecde18f478fb02
da8876b4b7017237b66fd6a0e5f15c8208c96436
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
7a8efd8e4d42177ed61ba2159cc9ef63
0a5997ae9d1a52d4560a7ab73a2edd39fbb1e296
describe
'2259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCF' 'sip-files00079.txt'
6dd53fea086e98e1edadd2838264b367
c449ef37934f0a569713404585aa3841e8bfd2e6
'2011-10-12T01:26:13-04:00'
describe
'31585' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCG' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
7963a579b58f21b1133a94fe489b6e7b
a4c3c44d5c0ca04f2960cd8e172c896b45066631
describe
'405512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCH' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
0c08c9bcdfe7570c94ee457ae32bf453
6ad9cb7a58b43d2af824e63c5e97fc58c9fd1908
'2011-10-12T01:35:26-04:00'
describe
'210933' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
60e575c04185115314e05e1227e00062
cf137666a9e8d6d0f8ca5daa597e68e89fa4c044
describe
'55238' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
3b24fb8cdff0b91e236a0983f8f5bdc8
c490757c3c8321d43388d9f57642afbb01908026
describe
'70595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
a5ae222bb5317f0663f07c534e11abfa
75c404e9797c1533c37d6e2098b5d6e1c63efb0d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCL' 'sip-files00080.tif'
38a1496218c25d8682bc92b03bf2386b
a512ea69c40fdda89479e6919708f127cd714835
'2011-10-12T01:30:47-04:00'
describe
'2271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
e1afb98c4384167fd1664f4fbbebfeb7
ff80f0ba95f70d9e839e1667766b082b4999fdac
'2011-10-12T01:25:15-04:00'
describe
'32080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCN' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
f35fe76d56ef047cdb1048d2902e31e8
e782b1459edb4e980b069152b10a061519c12266
'2011-10-12T01:25:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCO' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
fcfcf3760d2ae897d27e18c5c06c9f6a
b8c9fd36a1c57ecd456f5d53242307e6efdabcb6
'2011-10-12T01:33:26-04:00'
describe
'203571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCP' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
485fb716fdfd1b4498a63bb207bf7077
b9eb1233cb4bdaed1009fe818bc01c5c87c96083
describe
'53225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
aff1a121bacdc07487c2d45483aabc6b
ecb5a70c0d53a78cfb4d84f1425f849ef76a7133
'2011-10-12T01:32:58-04:00'
describe
'68274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCR' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
c8102c11b9fd3ac483411ea01ceb162a
007cb59cfa3193ed93facb6b1fd0598aacfc4cd1
describe
'3266928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCS' 'sip-files00081.tif'
70bf4b5785be7a36bd80d581b7971ac9
79141597a44a1c444dc98578e68f8d061f1860f0
'2011-10-12T01:34:11-04:00'
describe
'2185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCT' 'sip-files00081.txt'
e939a675a0f695f068847cca5d736a48
c7f30f152d6bdbb57f8d32547fedf4765ff19204
'2011-10-12T01:36:34-04:00'
describe
'32144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCU' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
0581202c4183541491f6ab6301491380
2fd255e25823b4247a29ed0394876b7e1ac4a9da
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCV' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
6694f0e6b32301812cba76d1ec438b97
a9c446cf6867007d69a973ef55dded7f367458a9
describe
'205502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
5c20462090d4f68f87f0e1c227f2b1a8
a3f495a9ad8f3117eb99481ff15f62a57a746d21
'2011-10-12T01:27:42-04:00'
describe
'53841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCX' 'sip-files00082.pro'
505252f96461febae5edcfd037a10b9c
77bbd263d7612d216e10b48e81197793c46fd093
'2011-10-12T01:35:34-04:00'
describe
'69912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
9d59726f41a50c822d24a18012c0f469
e25dee3cf119e13c27d7f093ec0ef7393f601d6a
describe
'3266676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCCZ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
0aa9b68cff0e921f102a14561f92c674
0f4c7bef71598228f321b32afd73a31024f5dbf3
describe
'2211' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
aa5597a5ee0cdf45b931cb4688b3e673
4d66d0400648e7a50e8f5e7c9bdda50f54984c16
describe
'31589' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDB' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
6269317e502ef9be722f8e2d6afeb2a4
72c0bc7257f4c2dc7f24f2bd8473c5a92d51dd8a
describe
'405653' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDC' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
40e56f7297c8b458bafd8081773efc6b
db7d8a3b1db00dbde311bd91f129687e3055ef89
describe
'191220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDD' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
b423bd29538428298182c06f45c7c43c
c4b5bc5e04592d3c73e310631e936a987c969078
'2011-10-12T01:29:51-04:00'
describe
'47207' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDE' 'sip-files00083.pro'
6f1feb6e128604eb176a5e4198981930
db97a909bd5876ca3667c709da6bae8c9c30fd34
describe
'65967' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDF' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
09d91c5d141b8c5a30eab67f26fc2149
4ec2a58e6ad7c61af8f3fdfc85bb6389a114df26
'2011-10-12T01:27:06-04:00'
describe
'3266892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDG' 'sip-files00083.tif'
2f0893e584bd91a35770bb0cf076ae36
c3033b0043c500f368872462fefa2116645420ed
'2011-10-12T01:29:09-04:00'
describe
'1961' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDH' 'sip-files00083.txt'
31d878dcffaed99c52093ff9a666243a
59440ce7f5884ec0af614f753abddebef4d81172
describe
'31774' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDI' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
fe6769d17fb04284a4ae80ddcc792321
11d8aa5408d93c8cb111bfbdf3e0c1f39b0dbf05
'2011-10-12T01:29:35-04:00'
describe
'405652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDJ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
be2b1acedf6dd79bc904c5074e6aa1f1
2700ec03dfac2ea176285b0332b18c1aca9f47ae
describe
'203994' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDK' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
de5a07375330f36e53c6af22bc25f0eb
60fa8546f8c4fe0cab72b419c775f6bd20b1d769
describe
'25542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDL' 'sip-files00084.pro'
2812f3736a167f3f76d2de349c2fec18
93823da960eb91d8a4f49a323a851556eca6b87d
'2011-10-12T01:26:34-04:00'
describe
'66004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDM' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
0cd2fdf6b1b0b615fca677aed710816d
1a4bb43f97849860b161ca38cfe0fa4da6645405
'2011-10-12T01:33:12-04:00'
describe
'3266996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDN' 'sip-files00084.tif'
ce05a950732dbbbd7ec97aa78e13c13d
f669fe767ca1e7c1220cc40419eb340131d86bdc
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDO' 'sip-files00084.txt'
f14ddebfdcc724162949aa5a135825ad
c7623843b1a7074a595eb9d5a9e82478e5d57571
describe
'32071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDP' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
e2980163c247b6b1f1e067b25de1836d
150485babc698be5684bc2dbf19dd2eba9bb7312
describe
'405643' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDQ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f8ce3bec8f138de636f6fbc93546e917
b0b75b2187b23db0824de16de7062f6b4d7b552b
'2011-10-12T01:27:20-04:00'
describe
'166731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDR' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
47bd6882746418500ddbb6a53d6bda41
6de8889cdb5638f8f1460b98746e18109a71f7d1
describe
'39887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDS' 'sip-files00085.pro'
416cbbc8164636cc238510327b1f5dba
bc692f970898198475544be1417240f6bb9a2ece
'2011-10-12T01:34:51-04:00'
describe
'57838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDT' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
caeff32e186b7371c094df12d94b11c6
838b67ff479d67f9952274343f34b0dd5d5fcf13
'2011-10-12T01:25:34-04:00'
describe
'3265760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDU' 'sip-files00085.tif'
054cb04dfab9ff291b2cd2f3d0313ba0
f1cb0cc34e9f5274cae23465ca3124cde23dc8ac
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDV' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5bf04fe22fa01b513521fad9c679effd
a308da6d7a42b81e3986550ae85dfab88121bcac
'2011-10-12T01:32:04-04:00'
describe
'28690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDW' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
b7706770c57893ae9fb78a53d0fbc098
3b5c3348e25a8cc308b85ae86ae3a21aa32d4e48
describe
'405416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDX' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
8d8501978ef7e3badcfb63deac3cfed2
91d56007e7d51522198d295add3d858039b24678
describe
'191464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDY' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
bbf331aee5ab79ab6757e35cc6e80e83
c90085adc9db1fdef92a2850599d657bbbad2bd4
describe
'47299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCDZ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
6d350630d734b2df355a5fe0c0c4e9e3
f061ade68e402c1e3eab453c4d49a077c4bfb858
'2011-10-12T01:35:58-04:00'
describe
'64351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEA' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
22317416d5ad49cc9cb1acbdbc1103d7
e0050798d9248f1a7d78d00e2014053ab2c6819b
'2011-10-12T01:30:44-04:00'
describe
'3266260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEB' 'sip-files00086.tif'
73672f8aa65b2449b7d1a6b3b6a62993
89a43079381d22e1c7919368f2ada9daa3a37a43
'2011-10-12T01:33:43-04:00'
describe
'1960' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEC' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c5ce69f49093188164cf0dd5881e0c97
12cf0defa498342f931085aad84173410a729582
describe
'30174' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCED' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
953d5cc1b4fde7e059874db5fc092da1
8f985da72102b0d2fbfedc73942e62d009e35ece
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEE' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
47ee4033ac474249f84f852d24487bb5
bcc9e07e6dbd6306e2f7edbf5f6058ef5702a738
describe
'215013' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a9782bdc6479eef306db72d44eb1ead1
84eb05fe9bcb7b63fef5a19eecafab48b647e69d
describe
'58112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEG' 'sip-files00087.pro'
4b9c6055dc48997a759dc50c76a7a475
228ab17e5d0e401cdf3294b31c2e983997c0b5d3
describe
'71094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEH' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
8151d0bb409ce96e30000cbbb1e45ff1
df46b858a8021cc891db26f9c09eafbe64cadebd
'2011-10-12T01:30:06-04:00'
describe
'3267052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEI' 'sip-files00087.tif'
d9cc652993b68d2c44e7e31d2c6c52d1
9377ca3e4aa2be92239541a3af62ecd024fc11b4
describe
'2366' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEJ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
44efe47a6facdfc10acf7ee60e8e8d64
4d475e98fbd13dc0fd1a425101ff6f4b354e6902
describe
'32457' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEK' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
aed04c4384c9c7c3981b98e939ac5b15
e5c062b91e2ba1ba3ef117f8991f8d345227e4b0
'2011-10-12T01:34:59-04:00'
describe
'405596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEL' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
024e49311f226464b0d673432916b4db
c1ad8ec9355acc384202e4db1dc91ab3e40e4d39
describe
'178039' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEM' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
38aeb38156ecd394994163742b8c37d3
1cab91d01ca175f21847b8343afe6b09b0393ca6
describe
'17920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEN' 'sip-files00088.pro'
98ac5cfabc450a83c7614ee88920fafc
1d63eaf982de117651c476b61d7cf1d3ba4a9df6
describe
'58898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEO' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
7d01614eba2e4ff421cdf7380bf536d0
54a6cf1cca522334678d1c72b028bb8db6d7f9a5
'2011-10-12T01:25:58-04:00'
describe
'3266104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
b0b9ff535d292238faf1a9f15039b44f
9d30a51dedbe730adbf31868a2e6183b2a17311c
'2011-10-12T01:30:24-04:00'
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEQ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
b0de712cc4a03b3e3a235fb8b844f331
f5a5595b4320fcfd6fe91bb151a3e86fa3f82352
describe
'29413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCER' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
6eac7abb0448fc70ccc0a26d3a0d6904
8bd96e42ba379b7e9494d567ed98a3bce81694f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCES' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ab0c9db8468139d0c5df3ca508fbc1d0
57f4c0795fdd5c5324d1896a2a09e88cfc4e0623
describe
'220278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCET' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
27d54e0bb01e1763dc07324b822d0403
482b63b3aa7ce6cbb94ac56cd19ce352897486a4
describe
'60516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEU' 'sip-files00089.pro'
66c1ec683ecae809d1dfcd55d7387d19
0ab6dac5840b94f8a1cf29a10df0ba276eed3c65
describe
'72467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEV' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
86a5c40b697099669fb08e8cc12135ed
9132bd482a541c1d96db02d7ab8c80c5f3f7d96b
describe
'3267080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEW' 'sip-files00089.tif'
ebaa41694f3658cecf352170a9c201dd
35b776fa892320c380843c05b52776784e34e582
describe
'2464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEX' 'sip-files00089.txt'
1e7abddba756501250e89f058f02678e
4b50be7ecc237ae2ff92feec40c1ab314b8dc289
describe
'32402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEY' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
ee582a297f0cc4de080a09c07acfe76f
2c8064a01c73067ccd603b3202d844dee8f1aa22
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCEZ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
1a1d7788cb0d897b343cdd5e440c3445
4fe55d8e4e6a6307bd6c6e06fff7db466f930b82
'2011-10-12T01:36:32-04:00'
describe
'215956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFA' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
3f446b0d1aeabe51b0fbde7cff5691d2
9a80c185ab35aed3046a0352d13f8651af820c63
describe
'58178' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFB' 'sip-files00090.pro'
8f87c417c6bd5d94a709fe2d3f809fa2
da800fa9086fa545d5d31397500d6c970a3f8b75
'2011-10-12T01:30:45-04:00'
describe
'71523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
0c505f881a94ea459cbe3a9dcd301bb3
5ee6e59c77cbcbb67064d9787ccdc15f49a5a1d5
'2011-10-12T01:31:35-04:00'
describe
'3266988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFD' 'sip-files00090.tif'
68eab529d5aa1405a497fd3fc7106739
1bde15c8b25da8f0626e3611113ffe76947db765
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFE' 'sip-files00090.txt'
effb8334119cd6715e4dac03dae89b72
446be330bf8c5d2518afaf8ae4a9967306b2df10
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFF' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
7d682e3fa2c0b3f3657f41ccb75d1bb6
fe8b80effb77de1882e82dea7fe9bc569c08178e
'2011-10-12T01:32:59-04:00'
describe
'405647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFG' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
3b9a39473e276025dd2522ac0fe92e96
fb9850af129deff31ddeaa83cdd0d79214b752cf
'2011-10-12T01:29:03-04:00'
describe
'205960' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFH' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
4c50fdc9774ad0cf4d8f9064129d0242
96cd23a1986b5cea0f0d990fdb651e37a3551ff2
'2011-10-12T01:32:57-04:00'
describe
'55031' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFI' 'sip-files00091.pro'
e78452f5a23dc38444d66101953cc134
01f4e2b028619de988c3b79919d801d75b2e7506
'2011-10-12T01:35:10-04:00'
describe
'70098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFJ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
3a51c33643d7406a43829b0b40aa4d41
1365112f40ee7cec39404c73cc9e8057615d5f84
'2011-10-12T01:31:05-04:00'
describe
'3266956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
776974120e75b2b06fdf45fcce87aff6
08283e0b73f417e85fb77d1e7db8ca373886bacb
'2011-10-12T01:28:41-04:00'
describe
'2255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFL' 'sip-files00091.txt'
4aa41812db2effd912925f2eec6686d9
55c73b704a2dc9c04fb9b63130f6874943b34966
'2011-10-12T01:29:43-04:00'
describe
'32091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
8c6506c2fb5bcba6a0a7ac4df0ca42fb
ea27197c5ac9771d940460b2ecfa8fe2dc71ce02
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFN' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
0f1db8e1b9ab6bf2b3ce176ae95453f7
30b4dbbd591b1409e7a989d58d4e525addc863b0
describe
'209696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFO' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
4c6358bc7e9f2e690e29cfed4220c328
778a60ce8f1b37237a2308afe91a2d324e08e533
'2011-10-12T01:33:24-04:00'
describe
'55612' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFP' 'sip-files00092.pro'
322a1680f23048e66b0c90d19e2ff89e
c46130593a48f6ca4f4b4e9252ae4304aa3f0da5
'2011-10-12T01:35:32-04:00'
describe
'70819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFQ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
fb47c1581fc9e1ebe89add0c10a8f6bc
9e40e1f361edefdf457d83bcf0d83488a9f673d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFR' 'sip-files00092.tif'
903feca5fb8b6e73643d21a05f3fe4a7
510666011a606ef410f71c0636703c4e6f33800b
describe
'2281' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFS' 'sip-files00092.txt'
f1d1c156b058e3085b588b4fb46ad7df
bb07b9bb593aab405da131107e84620bae75c1ba
'2011-10-12T01:32:34-04:00'
describe
'32047' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFT' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
e455e70eb1b126636fd4bcfedf29ef55
0e03cd31afc8c97e0befa281b1859dbacbee7c9d
'2011-10-12T01:26:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFU' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
2ebe457f7dc6009a58caa124ad46c629
933fd0e10edd908cacc34cb88e2bb3c6ada46773
'2011-10-12T01:30:08-04:00'
describe
'151215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFV' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
f5017848ffd7a3d74af47f9b4ae40598
41b14171fd6fd547ee484e03072271a70e01fcea
describe
'23512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFW' 'sip-files00093.pro'
8e07c5f6f6bd898df9e77a9b8b916993
727b00c69bb9038e6d74a944a405639bf6848849
'2011-10-12T01:33:54-04:00'
describe
'52076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFX' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
6a4ab2f6108aad2adbe66486284d789b
40cb59a78b0a545342b23f471be44a73c9efa679
'2011-10-12T01:34:20-04:00'
describe
'3265388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFY' 'sip-files00093.tif'
c2249cb3787c2d44695329de11735db4
6014f21702af317baa6a945330f4422f1196cf8a
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCFZ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b265673ef5c46fa6eae04ffb41163273
19b5816394cd4e4b3ceeb1cecd2da964cc53c0e5
'2011-10-12T01:30:34-04:00'
describe
'27607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGA' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
d7bad5c6aed0fd64f3bac9a8b02f89f3
7a2affc1db73603aac14e9564c306fa869b05480
describe
'405577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGB' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c84f742ed6124fba79622d9c2a77a57b
a54c357aebe80e06674cf5c649d43a4a5a289ac1
describe
'174381' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGC' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
357fd61f60e190d54c16b81e7d7ce875
5594ba6388eedd2074f0a7aa532b7f54ec0d45a3
'2011-10-12T01:25:18-04:00'
describe
'41474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGD' 'sip-files00094.pro'
7e7204e19753f004966f55d9995a531c
0b09470757f02add8ffe87c2ea094aa63a1f9714
describe
'60341' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGE' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
2cdd9f536154eab1ab93f1bfcc34dc3d
ccc9fa1770c1977e6795b61a23a301ce5f7138f1
describe
'3266056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGF' 'sip-files00094.tif'
147e8fb164ff10f040b1d6b3f98be77c
6ef65f3a16eda172ed6b6b401c269647331d4008
'2011-10-12T01:36:04-04:00'
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGG' 'sip-files00094.txt'
aa5d98bb1828464ffb2b5ff548f0f39e
c84d6eba315b1130da18171c8cc553f47d670f9b
describe
'29445' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGH' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
65d3b8a8e9811e1f4d6402e843cb48c4
40fe821bba069850b95fe477a0eae228e26df561
'2011-10-12T01:27:25-04:00'
describe
'405675' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGI' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
da0bd45e944c5a0cb75ea97b0f28ee7b
ea557ef2575a6873baf941c1e5e84fc4e42eca56
describe
'205395' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGJ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
64fc38fa8acd223fba6939dd6f28120d
d2f316158cfbc6a246624c64d242a450b68cd9c5
describe
'54421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGK' 'sip-files00095.pro'
fe2a8f2dc7f400939c87c09159f3963f
f339f55e6314918b69902d302844a059e36b12e7
'2011-10-12T01:31:15-04:00'
describe
'69813' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGL' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
19511557e61054ed283cdc0eee44bc31
b54db328841532775aee6225d7a8bf8564f99af0
describe
'3266888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGM' 'sip-files00095.tif'
18b1bf5130146b893474617f7f38af5d
b9caba5587d8023869deeb71dc1da06c88f0fea6
'2011-10-12T01:35:55-04:00'
describe
'2224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
c1ae9d1dd43c0b42e4867c28c16484bd
fe7721f64d3008603472a1490a476db3beca7b7d
describe
'31912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGO' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
22fe7ceee223fb570eaa02e71ca3332f
d01d54c86a42e7e5b26a9a0978c466cb47d2df3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGP' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
c60b56eb46a0dd8320e34fc54b8aaeaa
43a068dadc30b72accc7a608202021ca3f146e7f
'2011-10-12T01:36:27-04:00'
describe
'201253' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGQ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
62b835eab6148ff2c06837783200dcbd
a6dd2668e696640644a379d791eebfdd506c7630
'2011-10-12T01:28:29-04:00'
describe
'52712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGR' 'sip-files00096.pro'
2bc1f54bc26b976590b6ea5e31497b67
88243d7657d3b77eb09910105d682723cc0c18f5
describe
'69104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGS' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
582dc0a8389bd203d4c1890406fdc55e
07692f9328d68329f445fdc3a3cc3d8bdcb4e8a1
describe
'3266856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGT' 'sip-files00096.tif'
3e4bbf324f375a4718cbe44f79bec174
4acb2ca3f742e52ed45eadf0b0fbf4a02201d67c
describe
'2169' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGU' 'sip-files00096.txt'
66b159e0c547ef3ac575d24a47d66a9a
17a71a4aff76950b44571d2c3ec639d80f97810b
describe
'31729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGV' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
73f87fe1f4719d0eb53197ea2f37c9e0
9348a42ccb7f155739fe985337a3593624aa75d2
'2011-10-12T01:35:20-04:00'
describe
'405632' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGW' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
43910a10da8cc9199e99b8e2c9f4a9ba
8a6a77b5e96bc14c36cc7187d40408ed886e98c2
'2011-10-12T01:35:57-04:00'
describe
'199670' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGX' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
ca58382c19d4532fc094a92a839a3550
412565d839747ce4007d1a8ed7de59415e95a35c
describe
'51295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGY' 'sip-files00097.pro'
fde0d781846cd7f46d784d07669dbc98
aec2fb50cb90c49846e9b16633f02daade7cfda0
describe
'67508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCGZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
888a882764f599b24b8c36095d51e0e6
1cc943769da5e5865a972a4e537356a52bf09038
describe
'3266724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
9242698a3afe13947d298586bd3d26b5
237eb7cde936ab14872e51c49d86204d351af620
'2011-10-12T01:34:49-04:00'
describe
'2108' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHB' 'sip-files00097.txt'
919841c89b3b4860445e5ed1dd259346
bcaef56452e70eb1e8a91407a25656cced555d2a
describe
'31573' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHC' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
2d6887ca581f1434363910adc3a3ff49
e1b42d7a3e9f5c049cfbcb3f9604047213b06d9d
describe
'405615' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHD' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
299ee1d40e0eb545d08e00c6d1ab07df
4846962357b6c90207c4f6025b6a68e375ffafbe
'2011-10-12T01:25:16-04:00'
describe
'216733' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
8479fe107ab58af36c714d4fc368e096
b19f146cd0be6bb2422927fcca71a0a20aa66843
'2011-10-12T01:34:16-04:00'
describe
'58122' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHF' 'sip-files00098.pro'
1715b008cda9a838d3b5b078b3ceb138
c5dd59c50b68992725bcc2e6e94d75815f6c2c85
describe
'71534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHG' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
38d2da0acca018bee8128074bb249e2a
f12ff88304adae5befbc9e7edfaeec711ae49ee0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHH' 'sip-files00098.tif'
c344936a3cf410beb7ab9d944e5b6a9e
631f4618ff4d822f468be382fbca072f933e3b2d
describe
'2378' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHI' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b1b7b23acadcfb3492396242930e1c99
1c1620b893175016743f3bcb9d5ab33a0913e5e0
describe
'31633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHJ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
3de90d7aa4c1ccc5ec239da7f7e9fa99
40c0e51852e2efd6496148f0c5a4d70cc17a4d95
'2011-10-12T01:25:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHK' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
406aac2f505054399615485a314cab6b
ca55b31abf4fefb2222a68e1373822ce3d336126
'2011-10-12T01:30:41-04:00'
describe
'139418' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHL' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
285b31d924f1e5e6a39c022dec4f7044
c32fb398caa71686da0099f1235ef87682542012
'2011-10-12T01:25:05-04:00'
describe
'12052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHM' 'sip-files00099.pro'
9c2c180616419db1c8233f7968a1bc00
f858eeedcf681969ea0cee311c0f89873f3d01c5
'2011-10-12T01:30:40-04:00'
describe
'48050' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHN' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
dfd9bc478b38416b892bf8aef0059737
758a0e7234c6b320d500ff7c51f9336d4f94bc3a
'2011-10-12T01:35:29-04:00'
describe
'3265348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHO' 'sip-files00099.tif'
0f301999c5770f690f5edb2aa09ea104
10b056b7424ec70b05711074647ac0d5cd2d4663
describe
'621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHP' 'sip-files00099.txt'
abac47346498e6aef553deb17948a94c
4d0db30a0dacbc440487db4f9dd6fb30516dad97
'2011-10-12T01:35:33-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'26777' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHQ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
4bef9e28c3c41dda5038a583038f7515
61e5004681023874e1fa245a5496cec09a308f85
describe
'405441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHR' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
66a8312beac19daf60a37bb8269db6f3
a4baab3a4a74e1be656bd01157834ca14ee8d236
describe
'188056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHS' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
30a590ee27bd2d748cd83586ffbffddf
042aa5996e8d5a5ad2c04bfc218f30f15f27f970
'2011-10-12T01:29:10-04:00'
describe
'46456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHT' 'sip-files00100.pro'
f1d57ee042c2b8f0f31402e2acc95e9a
a08f412d2d9cd55d34d05435d080326e1bd9394f
describe
'63650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHU' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
722a7b11600abbec595633371c3bfb64
a540d3ed8d1d96cd262d4a12bbb60f250247e64c
describe
'3266536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHV' 'sip-files00100.tif'
7990291d14f625ca303154f74427b219
bdace3507c4b30fb81942a21b5613d2c40960b90
'2011-10-12T01:27:37-04:00'
describe
'1924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHW' 'sip-files00100.txt'
746c04172994878a5eb6b3ced2198892
1da829835e12f367f65fba6f17c2495f49fd1fad
describe
'30563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHX' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
7b50ae1e5e7ddf2de021dd9961d7f308
3e99c1fcadf0bab7b40bbad99fcc59db0b4a16b1
describe
'405361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHY' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
5d20fecd2b671efae931fa04c54533ee
d0477c096d8b784ac6441e43d9e712525458013d
'2011-10-12T01:34:46-04:00'
describe
'180906' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCHZ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
6f3c37892a5ef18abc9d4256355c4750
8a2b146d7be9bdefa1172c2bf27bd6481b794ff4
describe
'18895' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIA' 'sip-files00101.pro'
2a5ae30b75a2e99900a1865bc1f27d4e
b2f7d60d38b634114c9a24b9036d7bfe9479f9e8
describe
'62291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIB' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
21d3ad404c6c15e257668ad052f7508d
f0feaf6261b08c77ff51deb519459a10536d4c29
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIC' 'sip-files00101.tif'
a6b058e8be01f65e937a7741ab2bb0e5
f3ab8cfbc5799af0452137310c9b6021b5139600
'2011-10-12T01:25:12-04:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCID' 'sip-files00101.txt'
0f4e809a2fa163cc53a717e01a860260
8f2edd4e59c30087cc0fb5ca5149ad964efac63b
describe
Invalid character
'31695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIE' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
5ba51095640582ef6b7f2739b4a0a74b
04959b437e3b345d535e89333e76e06f16dc6132
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIF' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
b4d071a1b53dd432ec0ae81edcb67f9b
aa388d90a834344422f0cffe8e63143e8202ef0e
describe
'206885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIG' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
35ca9fcd1c7ca17b33f4d591f66301ad
83832ee9780af76bb94dc1be1fb2768989e1a32e
'2011-10-12T01:35:44-04:00'
describe
'54747' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIH' 'sip-files00102.pro'
5bd9df3d811cec8a8e0e24dc12d52968
111ec4b2c9b8d1efaff5254e6b4b2c80b3f10922
describe
'70878' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCII' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
03a8c4aae41187d84ba623db957b8e2f
e2aecffb3c520fae4fb7c6852f252762523c01dc
describe
'3266876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIJ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
63338eac14e9bc6bbab9ef3bb703946f
450004d3487f92b2b45f0ea03e9b679187b1e664
describe
'2234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIK' 'sip-files00102.txt'
15dc2e82995bb5496954ed0d669457dc
62041c98fb2eb8a5335a4cd437f03ab6789a2257
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIL' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
fabd1ce4dad380b0ea50dfbaed2e42b6
a98943a90093126e06ed066aacdd66955c5cb1c6
describe
'405539' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIM' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
9608b6d74966b503b76d7893820ce134
388d694bbdd4de49b339aae57beff5db5f592fa8
'2011-10-12T01:36:43-04:00'
describe
'191449' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIN' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
b8f2c5e450d8e388b2e8907cf692893a
42dfcbcef13442bcabc7fc911b524d1edc649876
'2011-10-12T01:28:27-04:00'
describe
'50068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIO' 'sip-files00103.pro'
0cc366f00a63b23847b35ac3817d0a33
94d9a7801f577b45a185c02f8922145f01824058
describe
'67019' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIP' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
47ce320bd8bdabaaf1e08a375412f74f
e33f0558f65f79b4a1689cfee8d4b8e39941af45
describe
'3266780' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIQ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
5fae9102c567268b6a75e066a3d30bf7
390c0ebda7c6e7085d306acda5ea47c68b98ade2
'2011-10-12T01:29:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIR' 'sip-files00103.txt'
8c6366a288d792e94cc492ed406bdf37
27f0ce2169216e41666825377dfdac714d69636b
'2011-10-12T01:25:49-04:00'
describe
'31651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIS' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
77225f02c0936758a3aea63c842a44f2
d4ae77087ade59be7f7a19c98e207096d93cbb41
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIT' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
9e5d50f6f5449c56122b256e4b968d61
90dfcfce1f936e8cf211033d18a960ec29cd1c34
describe
'142285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIU' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
bbfdf398fbefc79ccdc811199dbeba54
5cb05d9ba9242c485076c6aed6835fad22dd0ca7
'2011-10-12T01:29:07-04:00'
describe
'29660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIV' 'sip-files00104.pro'
5b4c1ca74f258085403410691030ad96
be71800ab8fd3f5609d94d34f23b6b39ce588b25
describe
'51440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIW' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
557824e0b764fd0d0cc140d5205ea831
0dcfdeea4d208d951fe607da9432b363d822c7af
'2011-10-12T01:37:04-04:00'
describe
'3265572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIX' 'sip-files00104.tif'
42a1cdc5f3ea633c310cef3bf34868cd
917fa9b0d7cadc36d42500cee3a923ae8bbe9d98
'2011-10-12T01:36:02-04:00'
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIY' 'sip-files00104.txt'
d27ecbbe5d3b0c525763ed1fa52268d9
3347a553ecbd136fc3102addb16be03e62cf40ef
describe
'27776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCIZ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
95d81af62ade388180c0fc2ac9fa6979
7b4fa9a255edc78a5e39ed9276dc0d3856c5e00b
describe
'405607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJA' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
817df2bee8f395354bdc751e8abd9e00
76fea7e0719a62e17ad977c8718eccb778fa5f7f
'2011-10-12T01:26:43-04:00'
describe
'184082' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJB' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
53b3cadace4f9aa0d28035bdadf6f5f3
67076088ba2a8bbcaaf65a1456364d45943170b6
describe
'45849' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJC' 'sip-files00105.pro'
6d425989f10fc250f04ecf04941ec51e
7a66a21287c2dc7a7d747c03078f567ce4b86dbf
'2011-10-12T01:25:04-04:00'
describe
'62810' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJD' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
439ac04d56ec274ef87f5cc8f16cae5c
8a652d009eb383f2b65e1f22fe522478a296960e
describe
'3266256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJE' 'sip-files00105.tif'
06a8e208bf021cfc6dd4b85467cfad92
64174a6b63aab9eb4d49b4a13961dde661c14f40
describe
'1907' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJF' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ea5ad391961d3665ccbc8eabf50375ac
29026d71d2d05f18d909ea9ddd44d181d817da37
describe
'30078' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJG' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
5cb708733aa9f91e016fcc6c6e140601
671e466d42b12fef3b316f94df98ec99595c7c83
'2011-10-12T01:33:15-04:00'
describe
'405645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJH' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
e5c41cc92410fed6e22d6fd0a6ad884b
76e36035717b10c27643e62393bae83065f7c87c
describe
'216505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJI' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
e86203d65dd90c6e5ff2a247e8eff465
7b692a2824041d7110fa198ca4cacd64aa344348
describe
'59076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJJ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
b57ca172d750ffbc95ea293a3faa80e2
a97c7405662212f152571bafbee415d63b0eefc4
describe
'72629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJK' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
44d780a122119ab5c2eb395058064338
9de171a7278e9c193e4c977980b536cfcf266fca
describe
'3266948' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJL' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c92663eb937a59149238b90805d335ce
4d6614327c60364836da69093790fad22421f776
describe
'2400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJM' 'sip-files00106.txt'
5e35314585193011c73e89dea1e35d82
5dfce18a322f0a74a6309f955874fe218d91bede
describe
'32194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJN' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
6b035bf975588c85e8ab7bdfdfff41d3
2f7be886966993b0ccd1fbf4075575f68f467e53
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJO' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
b130ac31f74ab2cc0b25e3a5c5527d7e
91847fc254bdcd11c5395886c27cb0c7d7b71af9
describe
'208994' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJP' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
1e2b82747b4514a73f3ada5edd29fb01
73db1481494a2bec107f258930cbf6841ae1ae0e
'2011-10-12T01:31:46-04:00'
describe
'57016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJQ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
76180e28d63e7bd3c9c709e0e07781f1
d0b096c0dc7c3d525cb7357c11ba553b138c5c35
'2011-10-12T01:35:46-04:00'
describe
'70164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJR' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
5a323f09030f861a66f1008aded62afd
3d0cdbaebe6c51e5add5dd97c2c013fa49ed3b3c
describe
'3266852' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJS' 'sip-files00107.tif'
c31d4307f19ba12d095587bea513ebee
215247f00c6fbc2c5a0649e6a027dc6eb4fa5e9c
'2011-10-12T01:33:13-04:00'
describe
'2333' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJT' 'sip-files00107.txt'
c3d5bb85627ce05f01374c966eb3b8f7
80493b4979b5f90a14b1431574121dfb52d17aaa
describe
'31790' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJU' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
b56a5eb93d0269586378e3db203e4fa3
ca2c794e9c258cca002b322322b79378cf27f2b7
'2011-10-12T01:32:30-04:00'
describe
'405474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJV' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
27d6323a39bb93ac52bd0ed2d28c57d6
9340c58632a3dc79e2373fe18d817181952d8b1e
describe
'189868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJW' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
f1e411ae43cb4f568c7fb4cafdbf2317
281c13123eff1dbb851b3aa50119fa52d631c846
describe
'46664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJX' 'sip-files00108.pro'
69f192254006150208810861fa87cda5
3926cdf65a062cf630215ecddb8274bfa845aa02
'2011-10-12T01:36:47-04:00'
describe
'66266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJY' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
c4267aa86ee158f99e8c03c94d44ba0e
f51f1549c768fccf9cba45ad72177f4c284906ad
describe
'3266904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCJZ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
efb0579b30ea5459ca3f6d52b21e388d
94087443abe590333ad4f2671abe7f14e985e209
'2011-10-12T01:34:19-04:00'
describe
'1932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKA' 'sip-files00108.txt'
8c9c7fa8595e5e8ae8fe080262b709f9
7a6f41827e206bdd3a8c14186cb42141d53eb417
'2011-10-12T01:33:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKB' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
224dda354b3d8c88d147595b4f2bcfe0
965693fe0956c2e14b96e6d7d46a985c38b457e0
'2011-10-12T01:30:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKC' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
12e4e53f005db48656d0e32981d5d46a
09e99cf98fe34c1c2a8bb429c7a45f3c01ea0bba
'2011-10-12T01:31:45-04:00'
describe
'205241' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKD' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
113248a818a8f5a8374dafcfd1fee0cb
0eb5a7620dc4c16fd62070e8c33a70e65b55d8fa
'2011-10-12T01:32:39-04:00'
describe
'54904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKE' 'sip-files00109.pro'
07a54b288dff890e466c9a32dcd207b5
1d413ed9cc38f70274d2b79b780674697754053e
'2011-10-12T01:33:01-04:00'
describe
'68552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKF' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
60096ee6697f1fe1c337409a802c7567
0742a7bb51e99748ba517537afdf8a77eefd1ba4
'2011-10-12T01:35:40-04:00'
describe
'3266848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKG' 'sip-files00109.tif'
be994ec9973db64aef298a700c8db9c1
5d5c1c944efc01a8e0ca6fb25541fb0ed246e0a8
describe
'2263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKH' 'sip-files00109.txt'
dec9f37b66d34b146ce324f8f638a020
3810a2d497fa166bb17bfe90ace5a900ce81aabb
describe
'32058' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKI' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
4fa79e85c9fd87dcc50ce5b604df7426
5c213fa342450ec8bdf60d10f012569b4d8bffbb
describe
'405619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKJ' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
99e4d58a36abc39ad1d0db5379613512
fa94797f9a58f5b94b937274de3203b60b62f320
'2011-10-12T01:28:15-04:00'
describe
'181429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKK' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
2af3b7759d751a0827cb0d6d353a192a
7967e20120b011ed0ec4634ff4dc06e7a9eb242c
describe
'46092' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKL' 'sip-files00110.pro'
9c80b88b07228cc0a84212f8661c6fc4
44501c8601cbdafa922237cd4d7253ce37ba1b46
describe
'61894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKM' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
2c941d99f416ab4b7206dfc2daffa680
7abde19d9b13df9bbc8b46344f22b5220c2efd30
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKN' 'sip-files00110.tif'
2bdd517d08f5ad230170dcd4f0f0ce33
1d17c3254e3d74a40469ffb77a9d89d5aa9ca92a
'2011-10-12T01:28:54-04:00'
describe
'1881' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKO' 'sip-files00110.txt'
7af508ce3b9a63fcc14c9967266ff0e3
8e7104ede8abaa6827251e7e7d616cd30d3fa5a7
'2011-10-12T01:27:13-04:00'
describe
'29191' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKP' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
8aa4254bb4d1bf8fca2b7c4f5b7e8eba
a6801b3bc23ff8c6a1ce71b7c6ae272e10ad5b18
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKQ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
5cbe1b16c141535192796a70846c4eee
a55f9b6bd1eb14e0a3fa5491f844074a424a2fdd
describe
'188510' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKR' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
48fe551b34a6fdeb8fa3a0f9c2bec65b
5f47d5efe4c8c4adfdf49dd7ff6e847d714e3eed
describe
'47234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKS' 'sip-files00111.pro'
42ced2d4bb2ae6d78cdd8cc01485a0e2
e2b5687d88f5aa5ab635413341756423b7bb2c96
describe
'63436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKT' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
dc1bcaae5108dab03f76ead9e690e783
da1f0044fcc20aa4a249617046a31e003d0a718e
'2011-10-12T01:30:14-04:00'
describe
'3266524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKU' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1287e221fa077f3c6563cb1143b7c45f
2254fc14aa61936a414074633ead7c3922dcf8bb
'2011-10-12T01:26:36-04:00'
describe
'1963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKV' 'sip-files00111.txt'
02d45f50a5d8ab24a397b6bb712faea1
b1912425d54de2d9a64829ce8bad7578f9176229
'2011-10-12T01:34:40-04:00'
describe
'30644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKW' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e8603e002d783457e16ce8b1b7a453e3
e8fed6ce016031cbb3a45bc2cfef853f7f4316d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKX' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
81cde0d62f2f84b9bf4e96e82569b20c
10325bef736b87a04deaf71a800f00b90ad12569
'2011-10-12T01:34:29-04:00'
describe
'220695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKY' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
f84a406ed8711d2f9123925006c93520
fab13b5ff2683652eaac874b40e950726c34ab4a
describe
'59343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCKZ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
dd827cd6f3e914b28d36ab8e245a0c49
cb80526785ed8fa4a96d4d5cbb94f9c7e52b97ce
describe
'73470' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLA' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
d85752791a6662a7fcfb55a1e6500156
41dbb1f99e1cf10505f8b1415da01f92b95d32b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLB' 'sip-files00112.tif'
077eac3ca1f05a444b6d0ffba5dba312
3132af48bc539ad0bd7100a7c9001c82cd3e0f96
'2011-10-12T01:25:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLC' 'sip-files00112.txt'
b88aed950be653b1f73e3d4c16474b07
ef6dff572a089eb20b93f335faa007fe6bcc8381
'2011-10-12T01:31:00-04:00'
describe
'32330' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLD' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
1395b3cae32be1094d2160db18dae8c2
99fea2bb9c7f5633e9842820437fd1d8f342e82c
'2011-10-12T01:30:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLE' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
c1ab7ed19703e66677ff8f842035e0c0
6651d02b13048dfcb68df726e9a2086029119e73
'2011-10-12T01:28:50-04:00'
describe
'197215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLF' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
8fd85829800abbfbd8db09b6876aba71
4a206ebfc954f997ff61b6bdbb7c7ea8ddd6a7a6
'2011-10-12T01:25:26-04:00'
describe
'51882' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLG' 'sip-files00113.pro'
3112c089a8c5e6ebf3ddfc4afdf88969
94d441622c1d4a592c15a6d5331c4913adb3bc15
describe
'66908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLH' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
9086b020c634b895449ed4160777ea50
b7269e5eeb2f5faef880ea9fc4ff2d7085966e71
describe
'3266720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLI' 'sip-files00113.tif'
b6205850c56dd1b0b4f7f7b72cbafcb1
db124e8f265dad42039c60abc33208e8dae95662
describe
'2143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLJ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
b02127df5cf13dd1badffd4c91c1c748
2cbb29fb8f291b40fb3e2152095edd02e15b3c29
describe
'31570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLK' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
a0b38c4dcb0a1c750d0a88b61bfb0753
547fde4d73a32aed2a7e411d9d9ad5cb20bb9695
'2011-10-12T01:36:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLL' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
3f41ab4b1f389adadb394fedf3b54e9e
6706f693fb0ce11c0a8a60209e18ccec08f3c46a
describe
'196528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLM' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
a127c94faad9a43cb81435592b93df8b
0e3a6775c54c0794d894c2a915ae839eda20cb01
describe
'50603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLN' 'sip-files00114.pro'
fa47dbdfbb98dd47f32d6a798c03894a
76eddee29d685068af745d6ec46b5a5bc3a42f30
describe
'67894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLO' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
dd1df609465b3deed588a8961131b201
f19e3acedb08648da0d67fe978cb53064919380b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLP' 'sip-files00114.tif'
741ce80fa015f860f10290c0eb238596
70ea97b2885a00e9f43d868a0010c358eb6de1b0
describe
'2087' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLQ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
22de97dfe3653ce2b4e8ebbe82ead878
45be051fca18e3a9aa8460d9a4f03a6904ee643f
'2011-10-12T01:36:44-04:00'
describe
'31935' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLR' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
66106ddcbf3531b43d7342e8d6cab568
85f21984a8927136c6a952e97ffd1561eaf4336f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLS' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
b27eaefe0c40e9f613fcd932bd85f68d
843bc9cc12685b7eeeef2eae989e3e090b2d63ac
describe
'212754' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLT' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
78f38b25988d79ed3686d82b0796ceeb
922bfbc9c673aee14f9a04786b0d0ee26a284244
describe
'57528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLU' 'sip-files00115.pro'
c720ee0e02dbc91a88ade061d1ad927a
d8038655b43e8708fce2c7bf8b3252656be0c7b1
'2011-10-12T01:33:23-04:00'
describe
'71168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLV' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
907d46e2c69b1437eaececd036ff1c27
033851e25b39ae0511c7536595c658f96c018811
describe
'3266960' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLW' 'sip-files00115.tif'
0375d0ab020c6e8a90b1530f92936188
7eae1d872493e890af3976350975e9d64d52575e
describe
'2363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLX' 'sip-files00115.txt'
3d8593afceecf84fe4928ab7f9e54ce5
f9da103e511d64b74ddba8b64c9df4e174756510
describe
'32320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLY' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
d15e1c1b981a547f0cdcbfbee51081ff
65a63109e30d8250bbbef1ef3524084eccf3bc0d
'2011-10-12T01:30:57-04:00'
describe
'405575' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCLZ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
c7b328c1e2ab34aad72da8b2b8bb6e9d
4e5fbd136ee84c0eefbaf35ea0c18370f113e129
describe
'196868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMA' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
fcb846892c0527d6d660368b3a886f0e
2ed79b8e5bdefe8ae38fdccc36bd49f23b9fc816
describe
'50392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMB' 'sip-files00116.pro'
8b02503c4d7e57511e108693b385cf75
237683d17438b02c091d5531154fcba6d6c0f399
describe
'67837' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMC' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
a482d06b6202f598d4e8a43cc133d0ef
5cc3fddf1a239e19b1dc0fc74cd3da204890f345
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMD' 'sip-files00116.tif'
5bd8c4c4db1bb5805f5675a73b4baa50
dd957b05bbf31f3434139c6d0e96b95b9bdae3ad
'2011-10-12T01:31:12-04:00'
describe
'2071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCME' 'sip-files00116.txt'
5e0f40b4b96a485b4dc352dfb1f5c22a
614dced5fe03918024e84a6112e9aba6b1910b81
describe
'31684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMF' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
c62410fc7de30cef964682afac2871f4
211ba69d3a89c666907de20c3378e37a155d54be
'2011-10-12T01:35:15-04:00'
describe
'405636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMG' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
c104e25d960bb65e68e910b0a4fa3334
362cc77f1ecf7121ab511a1c9c3a09e2f1bf953d
'2011-10-12T01:28:34-04:00'
describe
'209067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMH' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8a4457898e7b30f22ce78ecf118be1c7
55bad402b8a53cf4f16f949c726c7aaeb2292169
describe
'55913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMI' 'sip-files00117.pro'
239f7fd95a7db5accb42b92e86e243ac
9759af7fc0c3f3569648374a77e913adeded6ff8
'2011-10-12T01:30:59-04:00'
describe
'71143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMJ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
46c4c90ef5dba740d6514ef25d73533f
a3d84ddf3cee830d1948ce38114917ab72efd57c
describe
'3266900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMK' 'sip-files00117.tif'
ce8573f1c20a4fb93a459fdd76d82f17
96e636bbad466648efc7a374a9b194670e7ac696
'2011-10-12T01:33:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCML' 'sip-files00117.txt'
ddc81ebaca116f563d594f252a8254bd
f1dd9d3998e761d29afbb6b5c744c72fdec2b5ac
'2011-10-12T01:33:17-04:00'
describe
'32490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMM' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
145aac73b1cdd1cc509f7860f260d539
e6894db571fde98cd9a80a23abf658287765405d
describe
'405569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMN' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
434a62f27fd3620bd4ed8f1e1151af5a
1e830811996c0ee26a1e012af53fee8154b94380
describe
'213846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMO' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
f659e3aed27af393624f45e9c48dcb47
3ca75fa27175821114d8539d6a69d144320f8b8b
describe
'57151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMP' 'sip-files00118.pro'
3ab2e08ceee7d88315bbfeb6ee6cc964
b5111fc1ed26171d087896b66f49c5ab93597077
describe
'71220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMQ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
4acdaca22daf126802cf20fc0ac286eb
74833227acac52fee47cce12bec3dc044a5969d6
describe
'3266828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMR' 'sip-files00118.tif'
7be9e95df7dc7498da32b3a501071e71
f9a7dbeb386f200f1f9646b9f197fe8770e83488
'2011-10-12T01:27:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMS' 'sip-files00118.txt'
4fbf8f0955be2784c64ff0a0cd67804b
d8a9a24a8e626de30d95738e2bd0e582a8e84781
'2011-10-12T01:36:37-04:00'
describe
'32259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMT' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
5270fa024f58ee311257123d65c22730
c956abb02ef76814cccc1470b5f1da90910ca2fd
describe
'405644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMU' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
7484072b1a2b94f0a8018d258723bde2
d229b23f969f95dddd1e7bd9bd6a289f618537a6
describe
'132758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMV' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
caa5dcebbe0f12cf081ea80bb7dbd5f3
d3268356a9da7b5e6ba4b79aa57bdccf09d6165e
describe
'8091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMW' 'sip-files00119.pro'
44339458b4ddbb1bc996254b687f2465
f0d9b8014211f6d5e6e24c79907057918991cd49
'2011-10-12T01:34:04-04:00'
describe
'44386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMX' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
1d0b2cb21ebf752522b4bed37a588e69
8ad11b276f6553a21405106ed21c3622cecd040f
'2011-10-12T01:25:19-04:00'
describe
'3264696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMY' 'sip-files00119.tif'
ba4be6b73e85ee69404b1e5666d5c993
443dbfc4a8a9b7a6403683b61ade8dda2c2aa6ce
'2011-10-12T01:29:16-04:00'
describe
'342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCMZ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
67d129eefa607f99bf26ae08176991e2
a834c1502ddc995fe932dc47eabe02fc8764d84b
describe
'25206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNA' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
9d7ec1e74397046bb0fcb438b351eeeb
4829febb41b979fd81bcaf1340ed8d38b3cf1798
describe
'405637' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNB' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
ca5bd9c121ef1174bb9be5a07a2f6290
5d4daf4cd06c94d44558632b625462e7f7be9779
describe
'154213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNC' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
7374b30afeb36650ddf64a4e94b67804
307c5f5dc9c466bb70ece2cb4b05da88f9599187
describe
'33409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCND' 'sip-files00120.pro'
8a40fb3e039d55da8bddf3508adf1305
7b9b25d5c3a6e324204a6fe2053b435f1dae69f3
'2011-10-12T01:30:51-04:00'
describe
'55999' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNE' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
2c5d9d52d3534a32cec6db032ca6f7bd
11f15e558677d07f0aaab4cfc6887142c6a6be3e
describe
'3265984' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNF' 'sip-files00120.tif'
e1d2296c524d87a69042bc9422a5bcbb
33338315946526a49eb06533eb060914ad5f526d
'2011-10-12T01:36:54-04:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNG' 'sip-files00120.txt'
cf06a3ad3cc8b86f32c209a02c54d83f
c7be2f689b46c75c8e59c0e92741c85cf7cb6c03
describe
'28787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNH' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
f78e8e08236058348185d86972519f6f
2f6f56ea0b336f124683093ec42b68ee5738dab8
describe
'405535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNI' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
c4afbf6684f8f21b7f4114e2dfc34e49
a04b30717b47556281b75ffa173cf9fd294953d5
describe
'212739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNJ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d4be29bc096ca7fa1758e414676bfc6a
7c2301c7678e43c91be6d141189401607c6e4cd0
describe
'56137' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNK' 'sip-files00121.pro'
3819a33d201e7fd516b242b736d01cc7
07e309ddb07ea94ae76104ff32cbedc9d9021c70
'2011-10-12T01:34:23-04:00'
describe
'71650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNL' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
304e58fcd691660d4ed41460b69c2051
def71f1e7179aa0b3f3a5fd0c97b47a018578f95
'2011-10-12T01:35:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNM' 'sip-files00121.tif'
6814ff2a9e209b684af68ed355ec4196
54d5d5d0ab6106fc32098d57591d539b6590393c
describe
'2302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNN' 'sip-files00121.txt'
15d38c725e65e039c637edcff38f0f60
fdf830ab98c072b5e6871fde64aa2a812236c172
describe
'32541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNO' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
385aec001f804efe7e337fd52d2044fb
078a5043f0c4e0283da8d2df40aae8e3aa87bafc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNP' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
31a9d62df0c00bd06220e8b8dcafa393
c005e5925095d424a72c2d139739b3e631edbec5
describe
'196022' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNQ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
02283923d38d7560d17421f1369ddb22
3869cc000b50ba5274ae1cbe9c9b94d05ee8720a
describe
'49024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNR' 'sip-files00122.pro'
a1da0c519ee0332f162eba7fdad4bfea
957617ead0baf812e32b40ff8ba1c88d38fee86c
describe
'67839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNS' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
bbedc0c19afc1dfc575f476c9543ee31
e66fd94f46a5c420eadc7cc8123510e5830ccacb
describe
'3266836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNT' 'sip-files00122.tif'
9776ff952fcc6da546c02d556a580b11
300a422dacc8e1e5299accee59742d4ab9c96d7e
describe
'2029' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNU' 'sip-files00122.txt'
e1f4a1015c63da3a6bd3cafe949e2a43
001e12a8acf369be44533e48b40e3cb6ac1ee655
describe
'31605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNV' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
40ef47d87d21a952601a330eaf6acdee
675742043af3d5c2894d986664b548832224f0a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNW' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
a6f854c4b37556f99e428c956e16d6fe
1b4b4512bb2f77767242cf8b1dbefba4490cf0b6
describe
'206233' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNX' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
41856882b81ed7b2358a68c2a29e0e73
cc9d4dff9708ebedac7f59f1af503f34f683ad38
describe
'53761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNY' 'sip-files00123.pro'
5ef6fb1c6b0765e78999484cd744139c
c879247555af6ba987680cb7afdd8a61d6c8cb07
describe
'68633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCNZ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
db54bae4781fab2ef13acb5592156325
00fb858da9bbf6ccff4e605c59f875be8cdfa5da
describe
'3266640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOA' 'sip-files00123.tif'
348609893f0cf47f3c4bc52c34b7281f
080209ba22e79560ab85327185963241fb607783
'2011-10-12T01:35:51-04:00'
describe
'2208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOB' 'sip-files00123.txt'
501bb8a7a530e3acad7ae041df29bc00
e3fb2f9aece373f0081037d84efff6b1924bc249
describe
'31080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOC' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
e1f56b2751fc59f99b8980277ac2145c
17040c5e2a345d3da448f22c80e4f7bcb57cb1c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOD' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
124a3c36ab111d116dd3a266c048f358
8c5135d38b6880a73eef20d31e8b972ea28eb988
'2011-10-12T01:26:11-04:00'
describe
'179021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOE' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
2d47a9aeec6dc08618939ce24ff7c302
5f042e50752dcb07455a387467c15105b3949c9c
'2011-10-12T01:26:54-04:00'
describe
'19953' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOF' 'sip-files00124.pro'
daf86c425147ce52f85b42bd70e93c60
e430f0391213124627c23c55d0b64000dc3d6027
'2011-10-12T01:33:32-04:00'
describe
'59493' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOG' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
1eca97831c47dc2a12575134207891e2
333517cdb3b3c48a20084bc066d56128bf237369
'2011-10-12T01:33:31-04:00'
describe
'3266228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOH' 'sip-files00124.tif'
cfef8646581b27de6762f515d130a217
aac0537d6a5768958c050f27f68ec220f3d5e376
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOI' 'sip-files00124.txt'
d8dfba738a0c8a526503ac6cb6ed2059
27b6d57c4e72cb31b65cd4c165a779de4528874f
describe
'29837' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOJ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
0eec2989da810e91c14640f9537cfd47
6f142a75414ffee9adccf91638c2781b5ec86ab9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOK' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
cdaa32ec3acd581346f64e9f538231b6
4a82989ea8dd4cee9d4e88249c71eb0d2b662bdc
describe
'224857' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOL' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
d51305f6704220b326e6382b3083a2cb
108ba4ec72669dcf4423ba4a83aa15bea746cd40
describe
'60614' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOM' 'sip-files00125.pro'
6c1ac2c9c9f598cb4f5d4f6b1f355762
cdc8c25b797e106e7bfdde8f05161cf220204e4c
describe
'72692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCON' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
14d88926fd261b75dd0f5c9a7a148c44
2cf192407fe8733f5bb22a8cc7e0d3417cc4f050
describe
'3266860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOO' 'sip-files00125.tif'
6f2d75cefafe627dd78e669a302e7479
cdd8f5eaa045a6d4fe77d2b5657d272d331c5ac0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOP' 'sip-files00125.txt'
43071b3a28d85dacac704df8b4707ec4
deb4494f1fa504c43b74b966e95b1d8ea18103e5
'2011-10-12T01:28:23-04:00'
describe
'32556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOQ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
1aba16d6b390d92b8bc1cf1c8f9d8c6e
7a42e45a56513af508ee84f77412ee9a24398271
describe
'405959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOR' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
dcfe7fd4de8e6ea0d76f337e05c738dd
dd34ed90848dc7469d5463517d3caf5f14f3a0f7
describe
'221214' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOS' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e1e46fac756edf41cdf81796c7e79a9c
fc5f38333c952ab17501ae42b83cae84ab6a488d
'2011-10-12T01:34:21-04:00'
describe
'62691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOT' 'sip-files00126.pro'
951156e51f4db7b9d3130d51dca734e7
f9e7752f52cf5679fff6c2e11d9d7944b917ffa7
describe
'71622' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOU' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
78181fe0a3155143226d0507db2f8132
26b63b9c359d0f115f26fe845f0b10e2cda78550
describe
'3268932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOV' 'sip-files00126.tif'
1d48b106753948a1e71a8404d7457633
059a3d59ea5bbb80ef5b267240552ffd18b40e0e
describe
'2534' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOW' 'sip-files00126.txt'
3890a78c5bb055a0437ad2adf9b0c721
b5d017188440cf527689060285413dd4a1d2f04a
describe
'31107' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOX' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
dc30671752ab247e24d5685761bc02d4
5ee1d15db83e3a8f4e1bcb709289b34fc20cc34d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOY' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
b55a13349db43a2dc5d53daa5b04fdaf
6b5866e647e21616f56723d9aa799a147e973107
describe
'159925' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCOZ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
0bd7cc41b6b62ae7bf7416db02583591
fd79dcdf0f6792f526ce94dd05a73767ea275222
describe
'40434' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPA' 'sip-files00127.pro'
f8a775da4004106be80faebacd266242
0a7fa526c2fb20bed8603efdff896287045611d8
describe
'55189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPB' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
989b4546d37763204036691f48fa7d55
a00b12a49bea9423e2f60ba26b4ede9c39d134b0
describe
'3265576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPC' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b109f7f9ef0ebeba1e0bd4a8fd003e32
e18fba1437f41b804ecc4f0e0c80a39fe829ffcc
'2011-10-12T01:31:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPD' 'sip-files00127.txt'
8a4db050e14581081466f2f98c320482
34d9c8ba0580e6e6a394c2ffffba71d0f3f30a3c
describe
'28299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPE' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
bda3f09b30d4b228b604407c6dd1cdb8
679dd6bf1baea21213e90f262a2b45f02056bf92
describe
'405663' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPF' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a0ff91ea51e0a287758baa7b0d8ce9d4
e3b8bfea551b593c60a7f22d7d49b80a500a5c1f
'2011-10-12T01:34:48-04:00'
describe
'217705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPG' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
9267d2dc33816ee6b2112f5b7fee45b7
9b84f572bfc7c0b30fbb569055c16854f70a3d4a
'2011-10-12T01:29:23-04:00'
describe
'60677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPH' 'sip-files00128.pro'
04fb6334456b65e0e857b2b1b855ff68
a5dfa3f7c1eb393491ff19d023f7a9528c4cf37e
'2011-10-12T01:25:53-04:00'
describe
'71200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPI' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
6e223306600b19d1469f630f0edbb6a3
2ea3cf877a46a2e97a170c97037751653f7b5c9b
describe
'3266740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPJ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
0f8dff761feac2d63ae4c6b1ef1f30e5
9599b2ab092e8df66c6d22b68ead4b160eb6049f
describe
'2454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPK' 'sip-files00128.txt'
7392e05125d34184c2e38e4ddc446bea
f8f1b84091186254b42fde6820aaa189369ed4ab
describe
'31590' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPL' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
46c4ae171ef88701abdea439c18e9bf6
40bda2a9e36c883e37343afd9a568c10c15dea61
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPM' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
2b944c1c38b98434d5d6e7c91508a6c4
5f2fb374ec83d13a88c0292e40ba30d4740a0d32
describe
'125530' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPN' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
17c46a8e735fe52c4ca1180e18da6f9e
722171c2ee6e855412791512ccd1842f3a9bd558
describe
'8295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPO' 'sip-files00129.pro'
9ec574fb0363dd5cbc6bc2854afb4b38
0b4d29fb4ea0c6f76deec1e471a684f99d26f24c
describe
'43685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPP' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
ce17ad2283115efe6c588b2fd8dc7887
005c29896e95784a5ff37f3eac9991af7c45fc3f
describe
'3264844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPQ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c3a003d2e5d49ca0c561528cf564e938
4891bd3ceff9645c09f557acca1f5ed11f7a6b51
describe
'377' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPR' 'sip-files00129.txt'
2ba90e34b728b9bb1e79648d643a05d2
6046e0f85108d5e639062bdab49a0947adad70c1
describe
'25420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPS' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
7ebad2a84f6680614a851c4f6c53b9d3
45b8fff04c5a5058521b6bba4a4a64ae2c9e6505
'2011-10-12T01:30:20-04:00'
describe
'405890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPT' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
2ea836e159dbe967bf1674443ac0987a
79ea67ebf0d2e49e4ba8b24d66ec4369b6b5064c
describe
'192740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPU' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
59ed5b5204cd1d6f23df59276db5da7a
b8a74b60aefc1973d686e9e0ccc63783401dbe4b
describe
'50332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPV' 'sip-files00130.pro'
e7be48d4ceeaceb1977531a286c22459
dc6691b3a8bcd5a0cb982968f77a6e7d7ec2972a
'2011-10-12T01:35:21-04:00'
describe
'64209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPW' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
975234fa29099d9512f22a2b2f8c5c43
aaad9c3d330720eb5fde26e24759a7d719dadd03
describe
'3268480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPX' 'sip-files00130.tif'
015eb0eb9ae91cd25e67863e475981ad
cda99517afbc262dc3252a3f313ec29d7bc33847
'2011-10-12T01:28:49-04:00'
describe
'2060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPY' 'sip-files00130.txt'
c1f21cb6b0dba77e9835ac4e7419f472
431f30e0373643079304bf5c7400b781a6e198a1
describe
'29886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCPZ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
8117a71780c9b45210e2e114eacf42ca
31fff050d0956b41234e7eb2f4e07d903aaea9e1
'2011-10-12T01:28:36-04:00'
describe
'405590' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQA' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
55720adb23e47888354d7bdd6f1a3296
7cb7a523126154e24ca0f0a280b5ccf94bff3e2c
describe
'212744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQB' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
a132792a9fc94fa3c9c17a5ebbd9d0ca
f998241e1a3d1ffa882ab4ada5850866c4665a06
describe
'58158' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQC' 'sip-files00131.pro'
51eb15d1038c2f5d4f28a7e5722105b5
d62d38ee597885fe053509e95e9baf2821417eea
describe
'71086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQD' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
7841ecc18bf8bc72d46e13d8a84d34e4
4e22e757fd56809e16f6ab05dd5ab086a378f50b
describe
'3266784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQE' 'sip-files00131.tif'
644e8ab2c95ca81db63cd11b53a98662
ca6acbe72529cbb4ae3445504c9624c9e316fe43
'2011-10-12T01:35:42-04:00'
describe
'2297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQF' 'sip-files00131.txt'
d555cd951fca1196716f2695e045c260
14a8594d7c6ae4bdcb604a45b397322d010ef841
describe
'31803' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQG' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
12ce11267d9fd93bd1ac0f8a6fb373f1
aff6e1b4d7a43f0f54c55b955014fe0fefa7a1a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQH' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
bbda2d8bfe6b11c53fed8893ea459d10
e7975f088976b8b638344924576e3d3fb1094bd8
'2011-10-12T01:31:51-04:00'
describe
'193647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQI' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
98402bf0e0f121432b704bc99c1b9697
d646163ba509c2b78761cfbca59b2c5cbd894bc9
describe
'50917' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQJ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
bd905ad50486ca77af6ebe489d5f1fc6
85307c224047fb6e032664aadd617d9817b4b738
describe
'66295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQK' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
1bda74b84d5e7cefde85a8c5927a2a00
d2ff0549f02c051c28cfc3065804d5c217d0a71c
'2011-10-12T01:34:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQL' 'sip-files00132.tif'
758b28cb6f92e58c92f5b1e20cde69f4
3cc7fdd05623db1a99c3e5f5d50e298e30e82600
'2011-10-12T01:29:58-04:00'
describe
'2082' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQM' 'sip-files00132.txt'
944c33f913cbd288ae529fa1e7b34e34
413054ee22f50a1a4c02eb0314aa9c10fa5a5a70
describe
'30928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQN' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
0fd8bd6388da8d712b4df875a19ffbfb
a0ee55362808ab71128b43842744e47734dd7929
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQO' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
c8e8e467446966919eb5362efa963223
8014f1c606f41a51c9136cb12014864aebf2589b
'2011-10-12T01:36:41-04:00'
describe
'199213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQP' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
fc8cfb5c3e3643c9adf6530b8cac4f7c
901690d51e6a6153716c261b3210a27502dea314
describe
'50033' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQQ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
53c96198e62384e67133df1881377202
325f569e9ffc4b0cfdc3d753100bd4449950f0a9
describe
'67005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
ca3e4580b9dd577b692d02481617f93d
90cd70ee994b7217bfbe2aeb4443ef91ba0c7666
describe
'3266708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQS' 'sip-files00133.tif'
cb184943fd8c70ebcf9038cae3e78e7b
2bb2b0541a7239a81759749dac4a33290490bece
describe
'2081' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQT' 'sip-files00133.txt'
214ec854040640cd9d14db2f899faca6
7145676684575ad47cffaaec0cdc90bfc0b1d8b0
describe
'31416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQU' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
d356d4552bcdfabab37cdaf6d15ac46a
e039bc3b25e7b009715960378070e8117d98b65d
describe
'405626' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQV' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
efdd415ff10b0f01066a0403c560a333
0819d976a33562a3103f4dbf2bfeace516bed57f
describe
'222178' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQW' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
16b254c734745e82506fb5748b601fe9
3b60c3c099fd977607976c926aebac1e0f399120
describe
'57228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQX' 'sip-files00134.pro'
4b7de5ba55f6791e4566a4edbca26af0
5813bc57d0063a5396255943c5c139681790171e
describe
'73044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQY' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
1ce184eea7b555e895971dea49be0d14
dbe823cb28d2b45e07f3d23e06ddb217bb9b2c0e
describe
'3267120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCQZ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
ad1f6c885db7ed970798f3332696cbca
cc0fa60d550354ca394695dd37e87f8590d2e072
describe
'2321' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRA' 'sip-files00134.txt'
b25308ac1ae59d258c01dadc98fbf842
fe84a4d797af6190f55e85ee781a6a6c7df604be
describe
'32782' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRB' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
0f7d37141e691730dd4714d417d44037
e7c8b370c48dadbea2c1484b266b70b25f836972
describe
'405638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRC' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
53096da0b89d99c251db269c98ef14a2
e4056a145531f4029858dc795949fc73e57847df
'2011-10-12T01:31:28-04:00'
describe
'222440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRD' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
c2ec5398ead9e30f082fab503071bdc3
3dc011b1ce9d949aaf771b5aba61785cf64e9a33
describe
'59688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRE' 'sip-files00135.pro'
2529cf5240754988d920be00a0d727b6
31202989c0e7141578b6bceafc776b821835cbd6
describe
'73376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRF' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
e275bded9372dd6620d7711facc103d8
1b3beb2252982025afa5a07a160260efc3058a32
'2011-10-12T01:35:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRG' 'sip-files00135.tif'
72a71af76fb26afc847de2663be705e7
046a7aff4c23a856c6a06aee5343c43fb7498517
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRH' 'sip-files00135.txt'
10f1fdc6f347ecb7cd09c5329d80064c
6ff0619a9fabe6b284ac57f3ef6953ac4cdb7ed1
describe
'32715' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRI' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
bbf0ebb628f476ba0c7178ab5db67d9c
9e80befbe7ad95110953d0846716fb2fee599b0a
describe
'405502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRJ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
8e73045da81b2f204cb9568d13a16b05
f3d169d09fc9c7c33023111eb2dc07d27fea08d6
describe
'198496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRK' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b6a95d3a01a5ce8235b18df503809111
1699b44bdd46f9edf4ed3a15c5362bd47103a725
describe
'51325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRL' 'sip-files00136.pro'
1359f884d433cfbeead670ff93956b7b
d4ee8895389ba401a57cfb4ab22fd8bcef0f3b25
describe
'67538' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRM' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
b65f05246c7a312e137bd3014b841480
5c3f204c8b668ba9d4e3cbc3515e5018be321d81
'2011-10-12T01:33:48-04:00'
describe
'3266664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRN' 'sip-files00136.tif'
99eeb593a3848fd6f87e2033f38519ba
227d31dad2da71355656aae5e2f12cca02b00943
'2011-10-12T01:29:44-04:00'
describe
'2103' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRO' 'sip-files00136.txt'
51b847aa8fa382478c89e3133df52a66
7653110066a4ae673f3118ea5df6c8137ff440d1
describe
'31474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRP' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
aabf7c4015380093d13ce3cc1afa7605
f19664ffb2aa06fb5ad8dfe51176d7d6cf3ac842
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRQ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
db5fd46c4fbf8fcb42c620ba400f3500
910dbcec87791ca410212d0a7fce5a9f531d923e
describe
'205952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRR' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
7c188866220ff15eee6dee12439f57ac
34c94e29df123147ab046de76a84a7ece96676ba
describe
'54054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRS' 'sip-files00137.pro'
59ea0874cc2d681dc2c0d9d341b638fa
b0ba7262599b72bcfbbb27f2172420a77d2771e9
describe
'69012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRT' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
6bb4d74f1b667fb3accae5085a32191b
124daca90bb6a69355c381dbcfbec0c5bee0b26d
'2011-10-12T01:34:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRU' 'sip-files00137.tif'
35a947fd44e18543bc3022564cbb98da
e15e206f5fc242706ecef4f1f6440610a6360cd6
'2011-10-12T01:36:06-04:00'
describe
'2225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRV' 'sip-files00137.txt'
889a33f4cf264e81d962eab73ccf4fdf
6271de462d57bc3c75f5ec76c79252ccff607ae8
'2011-10-12T01:32:35-04:00'
describe
'31655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRW' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
8d84ea321b8635bf3e19bf36d8c475a7
564d54e0866be5fca0b056ab5d9eabcd2c34c8e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRX' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
8335726859c0b326774013bc66839126
2ba2c917d3f51e5626dae94001d1543c2872975a
describe
'217024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRY' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
99a01dee74ee052e301e82888761ebec
5e7b800d1e9f7b1fb3a50bfe0cd539749b0c7d9b
'2011-10-12T01:26:16-04:00'
describe
'56794' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCRZ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
90336ec8a33e0598ca6e8c6f70066de7
3c8dafd39908f10f95b304da6a682a8680d1e7e9
describe
'72478' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSA' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
17c0a5afeeac103539a1fd23ba9527e7
7f239593f8dc3dcfbe81950ae62b8b64da6a0680
describe
'3267012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSB' 'sip-files00138.tif'
49b2205b518a85e582c6023271215151
8414f377efc7a17b868672c921f1289766847960
'2011-10-12T01:32:14-04:00'
describe
'2319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSC' 'sip-files00138.txt'
14dd64bcac12f9287ab8a92bd6da3f14
27667ef8a3081e81c157aab0828258fd206d0fda
describe
'32287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSD' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
edde69dafdfbe6c2098b6b891a1e153d
a4a0d540b142fbe0057e83c5824c3826cd9775f1
'2011-10-12T01:36:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSE' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
7069e41807f5472429d0bbdaaf4e7b9f
f9a977e5b0c44c647ec296e014dc239b0ed5f9eb
describe
'206620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSF' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
55d54e1c1520a4eae16bb23959f182ac
c6b1c2bda084db6d7b68491c695472efb05ba3b2
describe
'27258' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSG' 'sip-files00139.pro'
3e42ef16d7ddf7b56140c528c0b49d91
08395b8590aecdaa5523935f1b3a2b819e2cb755
'2011-10-12T01:35:00-04:00'
describe
'67356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSH' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
de038edf29950c8bb6afc0fce0fe41b2
6af7baa35ca537669365415574c7b1dbfcac04c3
'2011-10-12T01:33:38-04:00'
describe
'3267308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSI' 'sip-files00139.tif'
70b0ef4c301065027a4d458b39a56506
ad8e65ce37df9f91e80315e9cf810e41579ba872
'2011-10-12T01:29:47-04:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSJ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
73b65fea086b92697814438c93e35af8
bac8fb3f782bd65201cfd53567d4e8deb3b802c1
describe
'32657' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSK' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
b2a5ffc73f98700b53148abc1a0df40c
630e4505bd9d3aad614ceed0c28ee08ec524799d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSL' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
4f4b384c3c38c7ee51cfd1266ce406f7
ca4f62d1f315cc6416c5b6e341104ec1db1386ac
'2011-10-12T01:30:25-04:00'
describe
'216870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSM' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
bc89bfdcb2cced1d56d12e391c95c625
1398283c7f679325ea655f3687bd38dd392e5363
'2011-10-12T01:32:55-04:00'
describe
'57295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSN' 'sip-files00140.pro'
70323ce79c6c4dc1ed8c1e890ce6e91c
daee9fe00db6594cdeb735c7f72a794057883545
describe
'71681' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSO' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
6da817dbf9259fcdfbe915c54618be6e
c5f5d2cc69cc0db595e5bb06bfe4d651a290c8e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSP' 'sip-files00140.tif'
4cfee4649b6878db0df80f46f4d8045b
bc7340ab4d3eae2904eb7c01c19e9fee773757d3
'2011-10-12T01:36:20-04:00'
describe
'2329' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSQ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
b5df88b1a6aec41ba4a19a8b98c4ce13
b2972c765cfb265cc4050af8c0c91d6138ee039f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSR' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
670dc56419a709c0c8b77a54f3fe1d4b
812cd793f5c19ef160d81777c3e9198e91048ba5
describe
'405473' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSS' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
d6ef3bd8f758ec2fa6b184fd8de1a51e
3233448e8e9ad837820920153a8e46aa216339ec
'2011-10-12T01:29:49-04:00'
describe
'188756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCST' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
a251f2125a806bc40bd7dced214bc73c
dea0a5a64c0749e8453f70428a84d83b8058fc68
describe
'46746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSU' 'sip-files00141.pro'
7ed68549fe35ad2e60ecd0724e11e091
fce6cd1acc873fb5c583e0eb89b8a2b0d36ced9a
describe
'63204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSV' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
cf4d2e6992ac3ce8df34961141eec573
6df37bffcc50173e34e11974948848cdc46d6e13
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSW' 'sip-files00141.tif'
8413d20443a2cd4b3157acd6e84cf21b
a2e85bb760dddd89a3cb55c454b607ec176abfab
describe
'1920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSX' 'sip-files00141.txt'
03c1f92bf8e71346b8f1140418a86cb9
d0272942c0fd7b431c0bfafe12805f04e26546ff
describe
'30116' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSY' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
f3565c8550cc082fb78c14dc85934906
0066a5f768a85a44570458425cc7648a72525335
describe
'405558' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCSZ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
b368b24419a882170a5e70b1d35ce8e1
d47db63aff956160e40943bbb70f983bba0eb5b3
describe
'200746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
2b050cdea4bed86c33e4a1c77ffb8fcb
3d05f3c0f0c1b6b080d092522164e070334ed149
describe
'52503' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
6e63ea1398b72632f0e5ca740d0c45c1
680dfa53aedb720b04c7a524958ed80be9d8e2d6
'2011-10-12T01:36:15-04:00'
describe
'66413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTC' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
b87b33f1eece447d6fab35ea66b447e5
c461176a3dcb7928b3fc20b16f1afba7a4ccf20c
describe
'3266328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
ca635bce106dbf39d9f488373b77396e
fca7e2917ce5dbe477505915288fa4446ab3e35d
describe
'2077' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTE' 'sip-files00142.txt'
547bc134c3321063ea7c111624a3fb68
38589f19be48ea7a3202979391fdacf5029981a4
'2011-10-12T01:32:32-04:00'
describe
'30435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTF' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
749b7f4350201704e0ae08b90afb46e2
d7f63b802fe74c34e96412e0cbfd33d0d0e86667
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTG' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
9e000eb9464da0d5969fd77d60092154
973e887750917566482c836902ab73cb21802424
'2011-10-12T01:32:45-04:00'
describe
'223765' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTH' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
f13a68b78121e15ef686ca64fa1d7778
272210d64817dc94fcde1f2838d65a6d3706bcc4
describe
'59875' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTI' 'sip-files00143.pro'
d28f1adbeeef7bf5d78e9c79de934047
ca7e6adfc57770d608db075482ca73689ae9d0ed
'2011-10-12T01:27:51-04:00'
describe
'73197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTJ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
33b2c693db0cf5bd49a1974396392be1
dd16f1b0edf57bbddd8efd50d21d5ac68912c896
describe
'3267032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTK' 'sip-files00143.tif'
d889630f94c0c04f2698699cab1c978c
f96162fac7a7146c77bcf02246dfab924ef7ebd8
'2011-10-12T01:25:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTL' 'sip-files00143.txt'
4934f395848d6cadcb4f21bc7ed15706
44fe9daeb3914cada1171d684b3b849032773eb4
describe
'32723' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTM' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
06aeb59f493abbdc15dafca718bd23df
5c50635f13ed89db58d5358b68d36a04c4971841
describe
'405627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTN' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
6f7414bb65c1003e07ab5090449cf461
d62fce2cd6ab3a91d99f1cfb0efbe2411f89629c
'2011-10-12T01:33:16-04:00'
describe
'204647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTO' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
53602609dae7d8e2d8b68e604438cc0e
70044af6fb9e47e208fcc0cfdaa86bfe8cb7e3de
describe
'20401' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTP' 'sip-files00144.pro'
9f46a08e61063736bf97cf7abc2ccf10
348806e8305aee812f5c55cdfe6285d09344b8ad
'2011-10-12T01:34:54-04:00'
describe
'65062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTQ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
d6c5f8dace030b343bf63927c09092ea
f4e613af002214e161a3f39df982cd366019845c
describe
'3266864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTR' 'sip-files00144.tif'
ae4f8834927e2862f2b38357de82b1a3
3748936c6481978d0edf2390b56ae8e21acb8366
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTS' 'sip-files00144.txt'
1b9fa21331357b9ad7eccd10ae143d14
a1cb9c7fdb2d780c802140706aca6314a5929f59
'2011-10-12T01:26:49-04:00'
describe
'31528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTT' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
47a091af8c5efdebf95c5fd9aad96ed4
12c0f3fe620e8ab4ff412fe9a47a4a00ff132a16
'2011-10-12T01:29:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTU' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
90945065a68ab6edc6a1ff3c9fab1e27
eb7efe4c2845aca4ae8f31013efbf7fd91b2f5e9
describe
'227045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTV' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
7bfde9b5cdeab56b448324f4611f494d
bec4fdd8e18b74c16a72f626b8d4a7310906c364
'2011-10-12T01:32:16-04:00'
describe
'60509' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTW' 'sip-files00145.pro'
0beeb60e55b408d076cdeb1702583b50
6f0ea79f34c45d23d18c2f05490b4da51d4a0d9c
'2011-10-12T01:28:07-04:00'
describe
'73154' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTX' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
7726fdef4948b7adae2b4643b8f87c13
5eb67e4d135358ffd892d7c59a2548d64c5fbfb9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTY' 'sip-files00145.tif'
2c65bebeb475645b703fbd403929c2a5
f6b4a40f4dcf97a04d29c4e3c25c60596730fd2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCTZ' 'sip-files00145.txt'
bd0de6fe978bc3d307aa7090b82c6bfc
0436fef618216ce448324c2cc09f33e0dd527dec
describe
'32585' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUA' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
d1e41a2f94fe14e5e0d365917b9ba963
29995cf669c119ee695705c5b8305114e88a7eec
describe
'405660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUB' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
7f0474e1ae01d01cda2b605a9d3c08bf
3e8dde00afb952fe951a2fc112b396ccf7e9a976
describe
'208146' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUC' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
b7a330543c91307fbebdf65b254a70e0
038c00b14f26b0db4c61055406f3eb7e48b82980
describe
'56291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUD' 'sip-files00146.pro'
840edb7d0f2a45d218dc500f9af4e38c
0205fe50b038f3de93aa3b06cdc9a5265e19a139
describe
'70860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUE' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
d2f985fb2316501872daa27f2f1bac97
739c1fbe3e6416f52560ecd03cbffad43e444944
describe
'3266964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUF' 'sip-files00146.tif'
91c4612f776d90fc32da58dafbc6ee4b
c13926b751e5b1b41465fab06094caca3d9e2ade
'2011-10-12T01:35:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUG' 'sip-files00146.txt'
5233d148218060931953342078fb4c07
b7899573200c04d023b98367dd638af2aab630db
describe
'32198' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUH' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
971c02a78bea7f37518f97b6853fa19e
e30c83b6eb77d7d3befd4b8eb9325dd5249595b4
describe
'405612' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUI' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
392dd72e773f5c9e05d3cc8290595d91
e7a2d058e55b7122fd0aef608441d1315cfaeb93
describe
'145276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUJ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
592fd8f74b5720435f90777ed68d60fe
8cd879217f17404f6b7683f994a394f3b57e17c2
describe
'17293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUK' 'sip-files00147.pro'
579fc8ebc5450f3ccb8d9b8bba651920
d0495fca378a07b36dcb015a00af8e09cd3155fc
'2011-10-12T01:28:40-04:00'
describe
'53145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUL' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
eb4a0a299c5165dfb16014eae3e737d3
49deb15869f38b6bda7dc1e1001eda4ce0aa0d0e
describe
'3266128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUM' 'sip-files00147.tif'
ab9862fa19c447cabac929328a8f5542
44c00683bb6ceae5b0d6e2a3b2a6ceb4150a4930
describe
'722' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUN' 'sip-files00147.txt'
c65363979cb374e66c673d8e2d957c4c
a94e82d460acad90b8b4aec7856c00593c6e3006
describe
'28922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUO' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
9071f48b256274bb57ae897cc63b4f65
b3161a41175e714a3afecc6b3467e7e961089a4b
'2011-10-12T01:26:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUP' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
66a1f51f92c11a1264a42a6723f00d94
bcc11923172add842ef8f61ea69a37a00e75bdb6
describe
'204743' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUQ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
0b14497726ab87023174c9dbd136fe06
d1b786289a77ecc7c3ed0de882d71f515d6715fd
describe
'52193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUR' 'sip-files00148.pro'
b892efd73c3786e66926216c789f4c98
126a70dfb7ce34f8b12a040f6e10b617dfc748ce
describe
'70515' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUS' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
64b745464f022df57b7d2e6a96732520
5f18d0db31132efff8acf1468af333664f21d5b1
describe
'3266812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUT' 'sip-files00148.tif'
7c43daa59813228405ce1aa70273910f
494e4cf0f131f8c7a0d4519a6ddf05cf91a18c9d
describe
'2171' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUU' 'sip-files00148.txt'
b12b830d73a93b7ee3e9f51d3a2e3c9e
417395cbeac7dc36ad574e4e582d192c2415cc0c
describe
'31664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUV' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
4ef3b831e84b3eb0126779ddc8e22022
ffb69daeeb53e0ca5bf733215369df704c759ad3
'2011-10-12T01:27:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUW' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
0b5c45f503ef81e2c77e401c028f9d52
47c8f2d4c3fb9e4baf6c3a19cfc802e4ca1b1b23
describe
'168814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUX' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
2c94d1a8517cb0783bef85312878f093
d164c039e5084b4a01aabc20f80b38d27269d205
'2011-10-12T01:27:05-04:00'
describe
'21125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUY' 'sip-files00149.pro'
b5557ff18f798df0604b8d6714f73a73
e4a4c70a0a167743c0b81aa2b0c0db4049629ede
describe
'57494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCUZ' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
8afd355dd644f8e4293378aad5d67e2d
900e6a74b8507ed7f1d7bd89e43eb67b159b3b64
describe
'3266124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVA' 'sip-files00149.tif'
98fe5d1595f1fcbb791524bb1d202540
95687d5ab791b38498f96d92ad460b17653d81ce
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVB' 'sip-files00149.txt'
da7651ebd0da2cafc9f642158e76850c
b46ad62b24ff676e8784f4bf750b89aea9b42f5f
describe
'29520' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVC' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
ac7ac7a1bdc03010d987371e779e8fef
66e9ccb2af5d8a0be7654b450270ec0d49b89a8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVD' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
ff0f3ff616b0950b04dace41ff95a8ad
79f951ffb7ae54e45eacd14df20d2f91d1d0ceab
describe
'192974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVE' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b61cf5703e8d7276f1318dd759e99b04
3761907c59b9ebf3812dc83078a739892e457f5a
describe
'47656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVF' 'sip-files00150.pro'
d394294842b02f34854c2edebb50814f
0a1efbf14ec7a7ca79c7d9927add43996c7d28e7
describe
'66932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVG' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
979033007f00cdaa481c2a0f63e9a787
bb1534dcbbc5da92e246a467492c2f943ab9bb0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVH' 'sip-files00150.tif'
a55ab7250f252daf426cbb093af6de4c
cbba363d07ee02bae3adf3e125e7e6c3e31c1ed4
describe
'1973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVI' 'sip-files00150.txt'
6753af87a4c099da770a7a955aee50dc
ff174c7db5984760814e9fe8ca6c397eccaacbcd
describe
'31553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVJ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
67c350e95f63cb25f0776f4eec6d9ff5
6ec9c3e71559016c3020d36b0b26f59bec78f53d
describe
'405671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVK' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
0bb25eb7408ce57ff874fa3a3ef8acd5
95a68f2cc563011d6574f97b5615556c6c14c595
describe
'221431' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVL' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
fe2f176d381e98d2b7838bef88b2fea1
623b71e8a5367a8e83a2fdda85229c1aa4780b00
'2011-10-12T01:35:24-04:00'
describe
'60443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVM' 'sip-files00151.pro'
04d11e1c0e4552516b43d39ab5d6707d
1762ef0756a563d74d190fedb1741657a5ad4163
describe
'71654' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVN' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
d5abb7b17e9723a4db9ad4ab49d474ce
18a61a687c3bbfdabda6b07e0e14fc9ace084a92
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVO' 'sip-files00151.tif'
798f48228f190acfc63f79e3d125b8e5
f957005bfe84a06a90c2e9bb87576df79a10f6d5
describe
'2474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVP' 'sip-files00151.txt'
b41bbcbf1fe6e1d3c5a1cf8108101366
431163de6b7400a70217ff4f43efb95f0531ee8a
describe
'31920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVQ' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
cf7de1d3f6cb5689c5c3d400b2d4a986
8894f6df7dfc04c6ba1c04b522ba6d23f842410d
'2011-10-12T01:35:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVR' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
4f58436cf0c7851f5530f9e672b7421d
aad7b127ca71fdae63a7afe099bafaffd07eec6a
'2011-10-12T01:36:31-04:00'
describe
'182805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVS' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
808d1222ab8c05d647ae3f06f8a699bd
8f2b5e46ecd0b1a2bb59bfce0b8d0b1f888652f2
describe
'46213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVT' 'sip-files00152.pro'
d8446acf98644c1ae15fd8b22dc481be
22bf46832bdec858d78d82fb23401a661e8b8931
describe
'62944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVU' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
b875f7d5926b46edf813ea597bb4c036
aa9bbfdc9043fe12659d5313bd2e8911a052e493
'2011-10-12T01:28:20-04:00'
describe
'3266300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVV' 'sip-files00152.tif'
8183b4481c6264adce0366f819dd4a52
780b9ed3cc76e05660c0ecb15ab22d16e60c0928
describe
'1918' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVW' 'sip-files00152.txt'
3f51cb868033920ef00e044d6cddb75f
061b86b233975c95a6c1487222d67804df43b5dc
describe
'29983' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVX' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
9d2bb7b8356546ef1877d9750912a90b
b7e7d7f7468c8379e23703bdc32d3a8abc7951bf
'2011-10-12T01:30:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVY' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
7418f7b7b21b4bfd5a4c13a4a10e9c79
02a95c1e484ec9ecd389382d3d066ea446c91658
'2011-10-12T01:32:02-04:00'
describe
'218614' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCVZ' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
39ce2edef30153e78919e15e71ba65d6
bf1739b10c03b7bbe16a39d12b0c9fc13804514a
'2011-10-12T01:31:55-04:00'
describe
'60016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWA' 'sip-files00153.pro'
fac0ff9258d18d5f20cf46b83a4d977c
b2c485f182db3104d549b45e44d93a84ca3f4e3d
describe
'72495' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWB' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
28ebaac367d478272eeb82dea9411dcd
2d92a9e61f0802899449a1cc79e772e8017b4b45
'2011-10-12T01:33:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWC' 'sip-files00153.tif'
24bf66f7a0dbd79734817ee10d1c7947
9f75f8fef7cabdee129c0f13b9dff67ee6b1a0fe
'2011-10-12T01:32:06-04:00'
describe
'2446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWD' 'sip-files00153.txt'
a9ab9ad47bc7ca7ed8662e22deb9a1b0
797206a2941687835e1018f6b3c1ce42f45e36d0
describe
'32558' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWE' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
6a65b84fb9ed6e892c8fd810ab04a017
3b9bf7a266068c748783ee6612d13ac41923b31f
'2011-10-12T01:30:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWF' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
11a3bf8a8245425b0777debd95fcfc75
a327e170c85953a0a70c1a597f76ea795d58f707
describe
'219397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWG' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
b2bf3910f4c416d39a62acb74d914e15
35fe166caccb5e48fcc25efe5d07111caeebfc9a
describe
'58654' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWH' 'sip-files00154.pro'
63f7054816aa604920d84db9f70c7bf0
edecccbbb66238e759d344d00a109b092497fe55
describe
'71676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWI' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
5d5e7e629b78a3c4579d83ba3157b8f3
3a9c0d71d4979b7fec3e8a71da0ba126cc2649f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWJ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
1b0f6a5dbd98d686487dbac99403b58f
127817a94332426b108e86d62a58273cb822119b
'2011-10-12T01:33:35-04:00'
describe
'2397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWK' 'sip-files00154.txt'
0c2253fc82e24c91b790c9905650333b
f4f38157f6bee770f5b33382ceae544658ee6c04
describe
'32039' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWL' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
69197329fe86ac38e56c99225acc7880
45bbb9c708a4eb2afe3d4a4d21aacc562b466ef5
describe
'405547' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWM' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
a85fa7622514f42aea8c8e1eb194af5a
e32327a2d1060365ef6d71e579cab2679ebc7da3
describe
'165967' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWN' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
624b234e04e933953a3cc8c7445f26e5
77be35adf79f7788f9a8af17d280738ad2678fdd
describe
'14267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWO' 'sip-files00155.pro'
ebdd02aa25c132b39eb78c9c698b4fe4
210161ef1142620e9ac90615cd2410f26042c011
'2011-10-12T01:28:43-04:00'
describe
'56647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWP' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
a5f7bf68ee412dc28a2ee14ec9c4a057
9c0544defb46dff48f78fe09b9c61b913d88e7b0
describe
'3266244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWQ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
68bc20531687ed3f7a50609e20a4b386
e94d9e36b4b281b2e15f544bd78353a0c54cf185
describe
'618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWR' 'sip-files00155.txt'
462bd0fb9de3b0f346b6a447a898669f
08bc2bcbf33096cca7c07bb08b12ec556aa7ba3f
describe
'29565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWS' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
39368dbc6a51daafa1ecddcb9d452c7f
dbd125c164af9c53a4e966a31123779c46ad18ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWT' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
8183d3874dcba16c79b0367b8de5ae34
9fc57f4df4bd8e3f7524fce49e4d8aa2b8cf12a5
describe
'214525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWU' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
00f22ee2cda3768c5daa2e9d3d5fe4a0
550cf4f1c6624a8952a316e24357c1a3e4bb194c
'2011-10-12T01:33:34-04:00'
describe
'56037' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWV' 'sip-files00156.pro'
01d04a7bce5690233da1748ec1912501
6f4d9db218260f673de206dcd17e3fa233205474
'2011-10-12T01:33:37-04:00'
describe
'71193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWW' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
ade2f9509d25ffc55670cb6e52927a32
6b59ff473c00b623a8bca4c4f46aadaab94113b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWX' 'sip-files00156.tif'
fba6cd922774d5bdf3f816c47d2032d0
0247a6780cf283a8e4aea0d07b4f1245a40385c2
'2011-10-12T01:33:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWY' 'sip-files00156.txt'
24151fb1e843c37f83e74f4be69bbc54
f403df1669bab1c70bf834a412bba64812741094
describe
'31562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCWZ' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
efd394234011baab933ad808267ba8d5
c2f9d6c93ef8355b6bf9fcbb79aeff232195b103
describe
'405665' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXA' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
93d2e6d1d70e40d3bdc8379fc9e2fc44
02136d8c7b30303cd3074cf3dc80e1c45038c1f3
describe
'219636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXB' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
c2323880c0be1800f8eea928570234c3
3e75a91ec31633cb73b7d422424e26e5f1cfdea6
describe
'57032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXC' 'sip-files00157.pro'
a370d43fde1919357bcf183fb7bc181c
5b10abaeff25d88f30987654def4e98ce819223e
describe
'72266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXD' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
a81cd40aba3da584b327a8aad2f1a807
a8e7c2b3f0e1d720f702cac2161b86f84818512a
'2011-10-12T01:30:21-04:00'
describe
'3266824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXE' 'sip-files00157.tif'
bd10f90a76c70c702c9c5a5b10779c2d
3235be449cd0211dd099249bee2a0a688b4fd729
describe
'2327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXF' 'sip-files00157.txt'
fcc345e12ae5b3fe570d3f52c6014d84
431d2714ab36b1a30314b7267ea165d006d37404
'2011-10-12T01:25:10-04:00'
describe
'31718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXG' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
71a8e6390c304e15ae796dec39690360
01873e0dec625770db3f3141f20b3d4a8c45d8f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXH' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
6e090beaebe4f472f919151c52a4441b
8d282ac48d46e60374abad1a071ee4c44cb34de3
'2011-10-12T01:33:28-04:00'
describe
'221808' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXI' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
2bfcbf12b36a9a5109da3041ff3ad522
31db3d5859f2dfe9d9e6eb0c2d3289b5661fb638
describe
'58766' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXJ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
a8073e81561b0eb6c568b98b4e5d134b
15261310162c2f9b297eafcb2cdca434644dae26
describe
'73419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXK' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
929a426450416422363f6108245d8280
7af4b2d2a9c932b75137b1683781e90590b1a83e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXL' 'sip-files00158.tif'
51a1b6a180c7a976973f1c1bb12615b1
5604e9f1538160d1c9fe989a8a6410a0b452b9f3
'2011-10-12T01:36:42-04:00'
describe
'2423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXM' 'sip-files00158.txt'
abb36f0201832e0ed4deb93bd9d7dccf
44722252a381cd20548b525da0f6ddb8c736a24f
describe
'31805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXN' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
e287e6016f9f223a97b629750f1e1d21
91b8881790a11f422bf9c63f105c3487a35f19e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXO' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
e3cd30b2c400665867cad1839f498ddd
c83563857855556c24c0bc5f5c21de8388713363
'2011-10-12T01:28:24-04:00'
describe
'224839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXP' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
00bafe3d459dd721213113299c745c97
18fc0766c3e079b50d91c0d4843b3e25b54521a0
describe
'59699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXQ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
6f6b69fbee81699a76c1be380eb41834
2ec3f7ebac6fb6b70b9f9ab729664a80104b652e
describe
'73420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXR' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
bd88ecde775258ce263cf7def942ff21
b86d5110178fd03f2414da3e0d1fbc929b0bab17
'2011-10-12T01:28:52-04:00'
describe
'3267004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXS' 'sip-files00159.tif'
8bee29fdca1baa1c02cd439b7b6d0814
c82686700720d3d0f8412c832e0410fefb30f8cd
'2011-10-12T01:33:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXT' 'sip-files00159.txt'
3e03c46dbf1bed1b6e94879f3c2f02c5
09e61027d49e0c4b8de7d3df2add76ae85d27ebb
describe
'32369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXU' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
2260f491d99b4310698d57b86cd34961
84c193a3da41712ddbcde4e9d2e664f52db579c8
describe
'405413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXV' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
a4d8f2c11c2bbdacf46c4ac4373ee9e1
bef93bd0e5f7e8632739c1ee3a43e78535210864
describe
'168545' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXW' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
fb876978f6bc2d6fdf8533e3ed4892bd
fdbd161c4c51401da03317adc96bf73afc0fb165
describe
'19716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXX' 'sip-files00160.pro'
2bf9132cd10ebde96113bb58b710e11a
f93c8ea6a25c587618c379b77037eaaf22b8d9ff
describe
'58441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXY' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
2ef5988de8df735b809f685398079d41
e0eb2c9972d9b0a52241e380d6894ebb200b5949
describe
'3266248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCXZ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
82fd2561193063fb737643c4a077a80a
ee39f0c20f210d37db4f0f50fdb25acb2911ce65
'2011-10-12T01:36:36-04:00'
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYA' 'sip-files00160.txt'
3791ab1cc4a3ff2cea407094582df1d3
ca8649484631830e69665c36dd280d0494cbfc21
describe
'29795' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYB' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
23c250d81921e30025872594c27e8050
48ee873ab1054056f19a07289dd6bf6ba81f0449
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYC' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
5c02a59f37441a04d2800f1753137ef7
1c975e5aac989fadab585ab5ded53063038b3f63
'2011-10-12T01:31:47-04:00'
describe
'174527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYD' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
56ca19dd8e0553a4bf6a7cc1c8a976e8
05b60651ab5c80e02fae1dbc8e88bcdbbe35eb36
describe
'41159' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYE' 'sip-files00161.pro'
da037e8d6b8405422c9798b4afbeb6e8
4d7a25e5661b118372d5752e936b8ae2af2d8759
describe
'59564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYF' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
2ab1096be329a5cce6d7c02790a91503
3a407cd7f90b7d5164d78283307adace874caa56
describe
'3265924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYG' 'sip-files00161.tif'
cb1e30e6c2509e49e1d89526565b6675
4cba21c647c4880cc9dd3c93de76213ccf3eccbd
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYH' 'sip-files00161.txt'
ca05e130436496374adb731c431d3880
737c0af0187e49a45b6b198ae9cebb6d11427162
describe
'29259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYI' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
83d740f83754ff0b8f035cbb4dca38d4
3a24eb638340e483a485b73f878994648ee73219
describe
'405419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYJ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
49f4c68c366f02ad8ed7067ff78ba181
965cb355fa7f780bd0421dbf69f9e6d73be23e83
describe
'188358' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYK' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
95d9b97eb8d1883357cb6ade2d4f24a5
a3be94a97b78dbb3ad89cf95cab892625cdad529
describe
'45883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYL' 'sip-files00162.pro'
552b8e6f4143d55647001d4bcd02757b
6e87c2e5355eeeb8813d2dcb69bd9c20b9c9f06a
describe
'63033' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYM' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
d10e67daf7941f1f523f3f4bfae603ae
3daa3eac03f152e48e9bc23863c1860ad98fd611
describe
'3266364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYN' 'sip-files00162.tif'
73b0d6cce8df2bee3c3526dda3d8149c
5c0ad9da7d9e4711774be63f6be4475e1cefebfd
'2011-10-12T01:27:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYO' 'sip-files00162.txt'
a423dd3cd458926b3f426d3e3f359f81
21a75e8293705064a0ba62c240d3e6a370d6b079
'2011-10-12T01:35:36-04:00'
describe
'30193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYP' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
17992ea292ccf1341482f7a8a7578031
84d827fdfe5441c0560a50893e8c02ffa57d96e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYQ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
831d50e288babbfba79597f029fd0a75
5ed5ab826ed250110579ebe1e1f98943d36418b1
describe
'200385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYR' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
a59417448425384f6bb9bc66dd64dbe0
34a1a1c19655f530f8e5bc1595615d4448b930b2
'2011-10-12T01:32:47-04:00'
describe
'55229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYS' 'sip-files00163.pro'
e14d408749c7fc8d8ac48c37b5acdf09
b81a5bca341475a9f5b1533c3888cc31689ea0cd
describe
'65676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYT' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
04b4e309f964549fa619659e6fd8fa87
50597249bd39f294700729576d8168a0dbced46c
describe
'3266504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYU' 'sip-files00163.tif'
2cb779f96fe0215fe1f8fda912a187d2
68708ccef78321c1c36b7cbe33ade8b209b42d5a
describe
'2310' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYV' 'sip-files00163.txt'
6d0a68cff3bc77fdfc68e8fe51d3e906
04c098a476c7fd5c56f29964954a27a853f1b78f
describe
'30813' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYW' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
045d494fa5765942283965e2ffafff0e
f824cb0b4aada06e56a64a1b0c56eece71f90b3a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYX' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
8bc9ddf9fdc8ee72a3383e7a0e88f47e
f6f8b5551b15dbe3940852ed4eebef92e7d65a1a
describe
'189211' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYY' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
f9d83b145b22162f88e90b2abbe4faad
9026697876c393dc367f11602b787a2ed4984f95
describe
'49851' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCYZ' 'sip-files00164.pro'
8f485e812010fbf45011d4ae3f06c050
5b11fd9d29d83586d6421dd578f3be3b96b1ffec
describe
'65254' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZA' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
a777641bb7baced8e72b9461fef51e92
7953a88de31a856059326124123055df0a43c96f
describe
'3266516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZB' 'sip-files00164.tif'
9001cabc1d7ea0b43e0f4d7e25b94647
2b14c9846ab03f2f215cde4361e3fe81142fc939
describe
'2248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZC' 'sip-files00164.txt'
d04ed3e5e4d1b71d97e167023884ce54
c030e5c7ed39342930574a0c212b540cd529b299
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZD' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
49ce9991748dbdf7e4105aeda398b27a
11cde1133f88f58428b9f8d342e74130cb0689a0
'2011-10-12T01:27:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZE' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
169d0f5d37829f8d1c336e6259725294
921ece1e5887d430059dc8b124e48c2a315cf7c2
describe
'197795' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZF' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
2258dc71a9485b204dd9ccf5ba5fab58
9a0a5442e376820cf5be92cb4253529d986d6585
describe
'52843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZG' 'sip-files00165.pro'
d0caa03f22bed96f82543c100cd1d743
f3f44014144279dae01fd749cd45a387baca4e99
describe
'65140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZH' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
f7eb6026f55a00137e118125344f8045
2842f76235caf3a1738d4291aba7e82e0940858b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZI' 'sip-files00165.tif'
9f0fb0f083e4450ef3f9361ac0a4c2bc
b762ae6fe56c7079e5d91b6be0497ef98700abcb
describe
'2377' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZJ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
fcf5e98162eb2368262914b83a4b8ffc
86b443a8406331982d01b5607b2d9c1fff87fca8
describe
'30510' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZK' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
a262997c03a20be90f109177d6fb6416
5f1c8a3e16f9186f4b222638b76b15a5a2b4924a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZL' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
1e0c541fe1416957fa0df331ff040847
13e209000f04b839c1eee7e7b69af15818b91e2f
describe
'220628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZM' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
b201d6a9bbb06bf4eb3a599387438b17
1524de93bdd034eef79736961dfb59979e82f0e7
describe
'57939' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZN' 'sip-files00166.pro'
66312ff114a86124a4526a5119e46113
a1af1ec4c8b1ebdb72407a886f126aefed786733
describe
'72747' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZO' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
189cd1c5e9c7464699de15756844461a
47c767a47a54cadfd3f1dc6cccf2cde27d1eb9fe
describe
'3267164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZP' 'sip-files00166.tif'
9f4bfa3f28d3ef12a0f19b372a5b0550
812d065d39eb8a94e6cd394aa00abecdadee3fca
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZQ' 'sip-files00166.txt'
4c31c5f699b0bbf955b5b9c0dbfd81bd
733bd22c55bf77a3de7c094f3af104e533c52f72
describe
'32647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZR' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
3288493454e193f9b8a0071339b53556
4c02f251303f34f4b7e954a884bb333a20376dab
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZS' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
9353b4c5a328d51b3b8ea3c78af08be6
2fc438b8791525926d50e058726c19fb647285ec
describe
'221273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZT' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
4ba007967b3f005ae9ca832f5d6734e8
9570c9d309f32a7df536e669d83e268322edb4e2
'2011-10-12T01:35:53-04:00'
describe
'57646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZU' 'sip-files00167.pro'
b0b1014328130760889e258c01cc3b55
370863f891ffacd0a834d637d0c2f5b5a9233caa
describe
'72532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZV' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
ce867f4dc32b6627fb37f54ec1323a81
aebd9783fd03697782d116a3d8f426bb5c5fc78e
'2011-10-12T01:29:45-04:00'
describe
'3267048' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZW' 'sip-files00167.tif'
a35b2554c471733d1dd9529c37a93851
3cecd1b88259c22be868cb1f26364754a13ee8dd
describe
'2387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZX' 'sip-files00167.txt'
8b82d584012af3f06ba13cdbeeffc984
d5994a7cc5865f2552b6b193c90e5ac220a486a1
describe
'32654' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZY' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
a10e80385def8f3035b3e184c54f9264
3771dfda1a1ab1e397c085729ce3500109fe4cf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABCZZ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
a1c5516765d6eff2a4eec7309ff23bbe
edc96c19243162c184cbcc644f56a0e60bddeead
'2011-10-12T01:35:12-04:00'
describe
'217110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAA' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
6471a97f02e1e0d942c06a1a2212c21c
d7cbdfddca3a8bba97d6366b97a186d0b402c06f
describe
'55898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAB' 'sip-files00168.pro'
d4a20c97f98ae46717b9a2619a9e7ad3
4764ad2413d1481f82020a9a72d20741b756440c
describe
'71798' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAC' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
9f6e36972c02b8ab2510552369e1e45f
21bb08595d23065f8917e97a2dc5169984d136e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAD' 'sip-files00168.tif'
d2f60dfeab534992d52062ee168f252a
096ce50ff58344e51c1fb2ccf56b13e14a25a289
'2011-10-12T01:26:17-04:00'
describe
'2301' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAE' 'sip-files00168.txt'
fbbf7fc790d3b19f2ab6d6542ff34136
419dc11f5bd8250be23a7795ebbef5676f63268b
describe
'32167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAF' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
3a63f6eb97f0aa9e7e7d3f3e2a4bcd44
4403db12e85c35df6b10e58af000da9d98466bdf
describe
'405661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAG' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
c3c13368ab1ba17a963c88f94ddbdb3a
2fe59c98961cf004d4d6ca12e789289fe83ea5d9
describe
'215365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAH' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
787d0fada89f625e2cf8a7d81d83d710
0a0c7d65890a85b9963b2eb5b083cf0b97bc5915
describe
'55350' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAI' 'sip-files00169.pro'
ed3613d0258de8ec6c79728412b7a796
372096a126b8a518d0d139d85eab57e068901fdd
describe
'70479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAJ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
4b90a568311c3c5fc7d380be2c837658
eab1d001c77eefe9ae8dcebcfdda3bc58abdd927
describe
'3266972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAK' 'sip-files00169.tif'
41295eae869b9ddc684087d43ec5d36b
6ae5d28e15b57ff106b27277fc1b2ef65bdb0d81
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAL' 'sip-files00169.txt'
21458524dc047743841963a89edca1ce
5acc116a97749c0060b45d7aa11c9cd3b5081079
describe
'32334' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAM' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
85bcb70d140731e8f3daa6d58d5d3711
ae389f6e0b3b4ca9988fe610e95bd88e0bfc35f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAN' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
5a3bb140f928ead3dc0349dc52db2b59
30b0cfcbbd579b574383a327c4c28eb21a010c78
describe
'226663' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAO' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
74e65da5927197ca575f839d5ff8f14a
fe69180cb54ca549918eea56b844d39e740c0974
describe
'59913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAP' 'sip-files00170.pro'
5cbbce8cdd7f95a0c4c74c21c8f4d437
ae7db43bbcc7dd16f899380556c62a828e18b3e9
describe
'73488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAQ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
53bcf3173ca36590af7704d2bb56e1b1
9cb4179241ede05d5e552cc6edffa7e599538457
'2011-10-12T01:34:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAR' 'sip-files00170.tif'
37d6d6ffe2d5ee1a8fd152bbb405f6d2
935cddb2447516c1656e8281c9ebee883f336725
'2011-10-12T01:26:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAS' 'sip-files00170.txt'
a2d87c1e0211c86aa1fd5851ca614555
48205074a45fa8753f3c4a416285d132bedd14fa
describe
'32267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAT' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
d22bd7e11e24b93a047e1820fa6a73d9
7c7d8d631c920aaddd8613ea2e54e0054c105c44
'2011-10-12T01:27:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAU' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
baf9c437054fd9545e27dfbb2564018b
f49241cf4fdbb599ac7a4d1f2061af225bb649b3
describe
'189354' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAV' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
9eb44d69e0b43456b0e908800b2064ba
115825e46cfaedd1a6dae09f811ccd94e9156e35
describe
'45870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAW' 'sip-files00171.pro'
6eb5e01dde6654a8b5b78130fc3d3b9e
979e9bc8a551dc3e9480d35e5f7f2c13db6071f7
describe
'63641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAX' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
25287a415d3afd554df6cddc039fa0ab
a7b0f9a26f70b3c6ef90ce3270c97c72fc1fd969
describe
'3266368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAY' 'sip-files00171.tif'
c30a9f799b686561f59546b87018d04a
98d4b22316bfe35a605f226e1e351c355a36f1e3
describe
'1902' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDAZ' 'sip-files00171.txt'
9ea20d464d45afa08d330a4b9254bee1
e702e57260f832bf8a7ce5137b9ff32ada9158c0
describe
'30043' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBA' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
d6387a3b06c3e60a35ca692ca05113b9
8510ce576d5cce1914314725ff95304785ff2db3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBB' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
19a573ef8100f7a26cec791c822241bd
9cec3436d5c98442352fa871f58249c12027e985
describe
'222665' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBC' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
22a36d28c01a40ddfad8cfb768a64e63
f4d31561465574fe8bbc49df13ae1bbe9a8584f2
describe
'58844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBD' 'sip-files00172.pro'
d8999820eb06e6b512376b1480561b0e
c4ba19bc39221f6a2ee02f028b4266b18cfc1ce8
describe
'73038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBE' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
0e03631e73c8dfee88b6006c213f4b31
b48185d2ab6a15e8e0d05f18abdb1970cb7fea92
'2011-10-12T01:34:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBF' 'sip-files00172.tif'
12c82f4247fbb6f38b150ec7f924882e
b842b49fe7371b4588c9ecb3cf35d739f471fdb3
describe
'2396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBG' 'sip-files00172.txt'
fb5ebd5047280ee0bd20ce904aa8f369
6763b0c86887046246cf668b097a492c1a9f2642
'2011-10-12T01:31:02-04:00'
describe
'32256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBH' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
84c6a7543de24a350527afa06149b8e2
38472ef4d29c31619e28ed054e31dd96ccba5dce
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBI' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
7d87222ac516357b77eb1ac72918824a
e58c7922d0e342641ac38616149a69fe89e1809a
describe
'222907' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBJ' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
e94ec66775ec1c01db11c943191ced44
6f61be7e7a128a9ca2cb21b33233e74723c7c249
describe
'59802' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBK' 'sip-files00173.pro'
65418d3e3c77896f763b1a78943ee485
bb14ea39f9b5a85fc74ba4745a2f0c77ae0b065c
describe
'73058' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBL' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
f60742a5c2239d9d86cae9fccdac3673
ccb9d8e2dfd761597e463caea7455d59f7cffeaf
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBM' 'sip-files00173.tif'
79a40781e0fe6c02d5e7a7d8f74e6be6
bd7c4d0aa1c4d61445edaf0e36ca6c9fcb2f61ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBN' 'sip-files00173.txt'
51bbd77624de49bafd79aab8607613fd
2ee983ffe12490d7180ef41472cee71ceb397846
describe
'32435' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBO' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
de56d3ac995c9e558392084fc62f219d
f9ca176629f02933c09341fd8e75248dee60f0db
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBP' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
443141e72c997a8034edbc75b5883fe1
476f2be86bbe7ab2fa546d2566dee636fb2ba738
describe
'224057' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBQ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
15d6a193b0982ead7b3df1f9c8202854
c49d46023b1c38dd99f5cda8365c8d35346d87d1
'2011-10-12T01:33:25-04:00'
describe
'60203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBR' 'sip-files00174.pro'
fe1d02066b26a46e0332acd73a91c7b8
b3d1366b0546855222f3118bd71a35a1b0eac32d
describe
'73226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBS' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
87107d7a177ec8dc400b5bcbe4d990a5
0555347d9f2a7003b75bf99dcf0c2e25c19aa72b
'2011-10-12T01:32:27-04:00'
describe
'3266992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBT' 'sip-files00174.tif'
b1841bdff991baaad3cfe6c52e271560
e95257621f8ad47e122cc538ddc9269d8dbe4c36
describe
'2443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBU' 'sip-files00174.txt'
fa2a60dd3a2926b3e91611e0512a38eb
ccd45555b442dfa8ceeddcc901e07e415d358bb0
describe
'32367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBV' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
e820e278d7fda590ef57cb8be8e8dec7
634ee2ffac41311a86c58bf078e583b888b0e324
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBW' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
d556607d500653b83771c975f28029bd
1144f0e8283ba018ba6a5c66a7afe5c069d46476
describe
'181524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBX' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
c52b010ab5cb442d102a93544c8c5e6b
e2e958695155c0df8c2b278ed74fbdb30a0a02e8
describe
'31167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBY' 'sip-files00175.pro'
f7303547eef2ac951d8792a08333c1f1
ab30f4f7428e9630efe1120de664db231d8cb305
describe
'61523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDBZ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
c2ac7ccc0c44109e822d2a6533010c03
5e28edc9cc92fa97abc54d643d7e8e0d406bcf03
describe
'3266276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCA' 'sip-files00175.tif'
38a0a989d52e867a64d409cac23d5a19
3bdaa4bb41cea838e5bcc518afa0b2e022244c08
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCB' 'sip-files00175.txt'
ede751b937f861c603aa3713a3390d82
f73bfd2ba00cb24d361e094e50d00f7a96985420
describe
'30371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCC' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
033c8566f2ed6e98838961916f331c6d
0fd4892c79a998b6276662e92bf28339c78bfc05
describe
'405585' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCD' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
1dfdcc6d7490164e118f23d612b2d5b3
e28eeff1dcb63aacba3cb5342632cab0ff90c135
describe
'134702' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCE' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
8e0c840e06de82ef93c8b609d7e40e84
54658c82f7a6d172022e953c29f13fd104281d31
describe
'24031' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCF' 'sip-files00176.pro'
26be35a71119c899a64d670db9c6725b
2cadc67d934c543b7e0d7b831fc0d036579f298f
describe
'48821' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCG' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
c1f41e4f9b7ae51a0436ea5ee9d9c6ff
7ba5b65e1cf56a3da9116bac077b0e0333670b81
describe
'3264992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCH' 'sip-files00176.tif'
e404cb7932f934d0a6eb4facc824e907
94f9d234dc616ba24337555dcef4e82fd5782265
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCI' 'sip-files00176.txt'
894640dbcc635aac4f3190df7713b2ed
b15441d5d96dfbde54e438712b581f97b1b1f805
describe
'26357' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCJ' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
d72fb56bcdfdbe6a1a83af4de86734aa
d83cc9e2bbcdffce58a783f24ef9cefccf064e0a
describe
'405623' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCK' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
0956ad0191f364b1c4e58bf7d3f12b44
9c4d0f036c4be3fe976ebb646d8e8f969cbf0dc9
describe
'191482' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCL' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
32bd305f0144a0ed4adcdd194a76ba1a
967eb01a23a9b53b654721001e2bdec24449c9da
describe
'46739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCM' 'sip-files00177.pro'
de955994783c6f7d03040c5757cc8f9a
fc21e48dc34a94a34467c8c5c1c5eac7bc5f40da
describe
'63943' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCN' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
6e3fb09e65372475c2d27d65da129d14
91f6b1586540e786fad1c52a761c1e9b264fdc72
describe
'3266356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCO' 'sip-files00177.tif'
7e62d86677ab83d24aed17275a1a1895
da23af851a74153e00090e39f6aee65ceb3381f5
describe
'1938' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCP' 'sip-files00177.txt'
c55c3b0db6dc019d10f68e5ce81cba9e
26ca8887eb08e295b0f00cb6457ad4c110d20630
describe
'30075' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCQ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
d4a8f069d175e4e05814eb15e24cc073
4bcdd99205cfa831dc7878585b7bbe70bbcd9b88
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCR' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
fc1d542e4a909c1707324a53d30ff8ed
046a254495831b835c33e6339d3d5abe7bdad272
describe
'224510' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCS' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
603489dabc5ce207c4bb6898260522c1
2379e2530313ae1b2adfec808d7af1f2f2a8c8c4
describe
'58667' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCT' 'sip-files00178.pro'
64314f5c211948b6ee86ca35759585a9
a82e1841394c01e9cd4db8800e3f4e45fd8576a7
describe
'73727' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCU' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
0ed8e08e2e19849053b5b74baca6840c
b458d7b0763eeca8bc19027110afb116abc28720
'2011-10-12T01:29:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCV' 'sip-files00178.tif'
e7df3edc5b5bc4c837f585cfd6798fee
a13006589bc0ebbb56fb477b7205aecdd92bc24d
'2011-10-12T01:29:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCW' 'sip-files00178.txt'
4af339ee27ec072b5a14e0f875b5353d
f97660b1e981bd66ac79ad622bde0cbb57903d95
describe
'32196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCX' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
96549c0d541a66b7ca70ac9faae208db
6705e9414575a32141dfb4e897587a47e20ed7aa
describe
'405587' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCY' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
459bffefdf12fba333f55c81aa9ee406
b962521819b43718061e2b597a70795412caacde
describe
'205619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDCZ' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
bea26704e0f6b9b63e118a298cbf5db8
6adc69c0b3cf482eca062dec66f19d9f4bffffa6
describe
'52473' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDA' 'sip-files00179.pro'
df194c0f299432761df5fa5fae4fe18f
ebc0e173776fdbd149f97c8dd6b32ded49116195
describe
'69675' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDB' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
702da836e4eadb0c5834ae280fbe73db
8bfcddabdd633ffbd9001f9c6432b99b92706c81
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDC' 'sip-files00179.tif'
5a1e218e1dceeed1ef1323acc3c8f3e5
a07ff2bd0668f950a47c780105781859bb7d7f30
describe
'2160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDD' 'sip-files00179.txt'
6050cbe8f22a84d6162b7e5b1f0a9f23
8e42c5f1f50eae55a8f24c4256057ba36169d940
'2011-10-12T01:29:15-04:00'
describe
'31874' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDE' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
41f34b440e02f16f8b1d50d0b7fb6d1b
e253be73c1f756fb5e8874f4f30e321d49c13f99
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDF' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
e150c81e8cc59d0869c3e455fd40c96f
de209315b5e31b6aafc7d8a4328ec3a1e0a78cbf
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDG' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
fac0d164dce3f9686b8b393fe878e1e4
02a5fa797e2fd6acdfd9ef8ba24ddc1e2ec4ff55
describe
'57759' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDH' 'sip-files00180.pro'
59b12badef2619f5f03aed35f2c5e18b
579ab61e6df442e4e3e896bb55e59fc6fe7b180f
describe
'72259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDI' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
95cc96bec0a86c9e0890b64c0f4ccf07
6c888dc197837da33577a31329323210073647d2
'2011-10-12T01:36:50-04:00'
describe
'3266944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDJ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
86a35c3ff75021aa8318d48fc43e2320
b7c4aa1e57f88e498d1f985ca32bcd4d82d5c32d
'2011-10-12T01:35:49-04:00'
describe
'2361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDK' 'sip-files00180.txt'
68ee4368091d17cfeb1e17598df2c5ad
218b51d39599de1ab48f8bc153406ffbf2fbaa85
'2011-10-12T01:32:11-04:00'
describe
'32480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDL' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
f35d777f056333cd055a08f9a5dbf572
3da49c58f1869747769321c7b6d5248f71d04318
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDM' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
ff8613aa95bd2982c76bcff04f2beb10
78b843eabdefe388d22a1ee98fbbfc865b29c15b
describe
'209638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDN' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
61d080c012db536a42ed3ae6735c983d
95aaaa4dee1103b97386580742eec18654e1f74d
describe
'55005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDO' 'sip-files00181.pro'
e847107eca132e891a4a4cf31069dde8
31d9f9aadbd27d9202f62ae99997b0648f3a7b32
describe
'70029' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDP' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
6ffa95773794cfef7ee598330257794c
6759f42c8b374fdbbb9235d0311589e10e55aa3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDQ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
82f33c24013a88dace133324b63c58fe
a9c33bde8f17c4efe005f4bc27841c5289cf683c
describe
'2257' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDR' 'sip-files00181.txt'
3f25752edc9fc8122662f1a17e63c67f
14b2c28780b4d4bbc873dc2bbda008e7cfee4780
describe
'32403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDS' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
571db0faff6331c265cae1c5f9a7af86
f647ad7f65aa34f47c3b0dbafaf8783fce6c4170
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDT' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
5f976f877e48e9cdee8dc58f4dcb394b
04c83ad55ba56670b5c24ce6f660006e75647df8
'2011-10-12T01:30:35-04:00'
describe
'120332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDU' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
9ca7d5d16d4088a5ee37f2640c0acb9a
a62d84a16a1fe9d7bc6f198a2b4de532b73e8c1e
describe
'22738' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDV' 'sip-files00182.pro'
0fa98ca447048354ffbebc1bd0ed5046
cf88e6b9b18cb451d43e84cdf1570f71caaab142
'2011-10-12T01:35:52-04:00'
describe
'42957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDW' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
20fdcd64f1444565490746c92c078b8c
a502f7bff15989b18956da614ce13e9c56b79e56
'2011-10-12T01:36:48-04:00'
describe
'3264384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDX' 'sip-files00182.tif'
f87f4523072c08b71f99367387b602a0
31f54b0432c102f154fbef072f9cde0fbaadd309
'2011-10-12T01:36:38-04:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDY' 'sip-files00182.txt'
7d7203b5b7255bb1f63a82de0f1f743b
bd045e03579f5e723b3fdc6408608816cd762094
describe
'24148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDDZ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
0de86e149082f93179de05b594b544e9
cf267aba1f2e170272ecc50008eb0edac4d8fbb8
describe
'405611' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEA' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
1f628d77299ccf576b2718c9ca6f26ee
88cc5993a513e8485114dbd1ad56fdd91eaaf2f7
describe
'199300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEB' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
03d5deb9682164f137189f25553fca40
16ba6279a56ed2bc9020e7bf36dad4b2e00b2da2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEC' 'sip-files00183.pro'
cc39f3aebd2fb27ec075563c4b0dda50
5a11f91eb7fb3da09cc8821f3f1bdaf5cc0bb7cb
describe
'66443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDED' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
75f77fadaf0733d6625df05a5ba7b398
2bc22be8f9dcc4ee7138f43ee9d22187571b62d2
'2011-10-12T01:35:39-04:00'
describe
'3266540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEE' 'sip-files00183.tif'
96b3b7c1ec52e5bd1043a14f5f5c408d
60a8c5fba0a51461a1024f128ec7953fa90ba857
describe
'2066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEF' 'sip-files00183.txt'
eb52f19aa7e33710728657af0f624269
9e5ac3f1a73a0bb0420ed3f550585de545227016
describe
'30735' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEG' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
f15bed43bb9145e05f7bff64da5b5eeb
04c5da8c73338a4fbf3a82947640cc52684162fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEH' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
b5e549e4ee8382059862547ff60827f3
fcfe9b4200ddebeb79b3d65c226e497ad9eb6153
describe
'218200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEI' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
5e61d967745c04478207dc7b2eab32d5
fb4b3e78cce6b4deb808cc6b75ca223c649a09d5
describe
'57005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEJ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
2d72b9c2bf738c231400df5376e7d759
51f0ce04176b3fd9697713b855592721f46cf300
'2011-10-12T01:29:50-04:00'
describe
'72290' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEK' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
b95135081366be2b0b826170b3590132
399a38898aa7af514b51a234d4df0b3cfc8c916b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEL' 'sip-files00184.tif'
ed8c8973b68a6b1193f82f1d2965b28c
c1e03602d78d9917076470bae9bc2f60cdf09a06
describe
'2324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEM' 'sip-files00184.txt'
9f5374352c26d9cdfb41fa8309dd0149
8daa6a04ce62215c031e0e76b5ccf6226d53f5d7
'2011-10-12T01:33:42-04:00'
describe
'32335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEN' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
c82d28986c76953f4f617c64b16d17cd
f087db3221e7750a4ccb497a2d6fab7998770e19
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEO' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
6a8e1ab48fcd6364d9fbd551de7eef2c
d1f4c43137c8fa941ca3ec26260155a3d1637ea5
'2011-10-12T01:31:50-04:00'
describe
'222413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEP' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
937dc543adf5a2588dc0472a9aded60e
13815165e9973bd7bcf40ab5f3f299acbeaedb57
describe
'58574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEQ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
9842d9a3dc039d4ae36937f5411687ff
ee2eadcd02bffa0fa0cf4ac2fa41febcc7b5ba00
describe
'73026' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDER' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
6edbac2e1dd9da21a378cc3156ca61c7
2b39094198a27f5b555aeeffdad0f6dc335d7042
describe
'3267144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDES' 'sip-files00185.tif'
b4c2e29a75adb6384f561237eb3199bb
0b0a8e9574df47ed688b8ca3ad1835b83c34fe96
describe
'2389' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDET' 'sip-files00185.txt'
4a02589c15b271fec712e4081f858e6c
7d19c601bd56c589c1556cbc1bd4ee87e816f525
describe
'32756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEU' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
450f6bcf80da7906a797c7bb820bb754
a7b0fd6580f3ecb503a41a8cbd1996885ca8048e
'2011-10-12T01:35:54-04:00'
describe
'405659' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEV' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
c9fbb9b24f8e44de113803787fbc1c48
0f17fdca080d67317fd97ef754b0aabae990afd0
describe
'202069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEW' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
5e3de823059ce4e7162e869ce4256380
d6e0e477c3d3fd111124676bdd6e99fca584db7f
describe
'52489' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEX' 'sip-files00186.pro'
a5e0364405cb9e3a262f948bc2c9062c
09f818f4e0977683e2a15d65442a27ca37d5f1c0
describe
'69977' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEY' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
0514d7a2adb9d08041e178dbaea9fd75
f4a16a3196f370496e5f93f3fe82a246a5550ce9
describe
'3267028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDEZ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
bf97720d7fc55890608a5d9edb4bc3be
db5924f1c293013ac77cd763a32808b3b297e2fc
'2011-10-12T01:36:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFA' 'sip-files00186.txt'
af132cef83baed98177f00e128684c18
2652b2786156e2127686429e3aa57490da0e8c36
describe
'32244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFB' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
038724f0484459a33df121d8db38eeca
fe4bbbfaf8e59d35a216c13af648bc5e8618f3f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFC' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
0e919b7006d12e38e16c2389d759677c
674d718986017a65d51bfccbaf6972aef8c484a3
describe
'159752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFD' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
307fa7044f458b017f670f08cb8a6792
bdf81249bf27bedd9faf7600116d4d1c5857cbb3
describe
'14639' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFE' 'sip-files00187.pro'
48b61880a8e978bbf0f6f2bf0b18e0f7
7db04deff992a93dabacacf4fb6a38bfd13d2630
describe
'54104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFF' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
d373cb05475871e01f6bc920d0354a45
26ae2d01c35745f65ffe610206fcdca0b06569a7
describe
'3266000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFG' 'sip-files00187.tif'
437235e202735a21c850afe369d43e0d
83106e768c9e3408c0cb772b56ff97c937b24c11
describe
'619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFH' 'sip-files00187.txt'
b6935e6b8537efb6eeb0a98cf7cf9e3b
4993c64b38536cb7e4a209619c0b203bfea5feb0
describe
'28781' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFI' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
b215fbba1c2fc3efe7b10999475f64f9
61bc5ece70eb264e54d6121df32b793ef7d52e04
'2011-10-12T01:35:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFJ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
cf0b04fb080f6d7abd6c5f668b4fcf9e
48e64b5d3e89c8a97024532c37609f8e4b1ece73
describe
'211662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFK' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
b55d631915a02fc6769329fc566c3ba6
56eefc7a610dd6593f42c7abfbcb9b43ced38a75
describe
'55084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFL' 'sip-files00188.pro'
e66fec32106b9c583d6be08508cf5c6a
0e0956fc96b171c3fd61c2873cf1e9441dc536fc
describe
'70989' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFM' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
e0bf544e20860016d03027b09d919f1c
c93cf7cb4510b7393d85f6746407b5f2df7f09b7
'2011-10-12T01:30:13-04:00'
describe
'3267008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFN' 'sip-files00188.tif'
c15ebcdc18a4379097df0b72b0ed75c8
e26f04a2ba3b96daedc0577004529f3111dd5e44
describe
'2260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFO' 'sip-files00188.txt'
59049399a6a016e8c042d746aeda6b8c
8d3a95651b3fb4ef50ed35f9e308fb3f0e114bd6
describe
'32121' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFP' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
f6e3b13de8a8df0c97df0a59e0678e23
133919e33f6ebb1b78ee8a621b9d0308881bf331
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFQ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
19fb38c4b3b3df7dbafc900e70ae17b1
ea231515080245f9f5b6fdc2e17b27791f548be4
describe
'126903' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFR' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
65594e03f5d0479e15945dce1896155a
570d4793e26b8716c13624fb37017facf873dd77
describe
'24361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFS' 'sip-files00189.pro'
3d8a18be66f223e5f3b07060e7899e26
ef3889b8c21659630ea2c3f1e33a6d2237efc87d
describe
'44199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFT' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
22903349237e082bff9e45d47ee017b4
365a3e0bef72be71b7588b818caf99b82f5f110d
describe
'3264480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFU' 'sip-files00189.tif'
841c29a0964af4601d8acda00ae30a95
f8dc4e49cf1ab1f64f66a4c243100f3b8997a931
'2011-10-12T01:29:14-04:00'
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFV' 'sip-files00189.txt'
ab7ec48a5a589966a734a964f0f790ca
1205f8b023063e90d6378537f07f0d3eafa48da0
'2011-10-12T01:35:11-04:00'
describe
'24818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFW' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
3fa76961202ffee7b3f83b84e7969b71
9e8f168cc54d542a9662b7382bf06c31560b670b
'2011-10-12T01:35:38-04:00'
describe
'405353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFX' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
3f65b7c7ce748d998f6d3ea60fe33c7d
119f89fa3fdc77946bd68e9f9ef7a4f69748810b
describe
'186203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFY' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
506ba1300fc424412e843508c1b15c88
7b68a7dd2cb5a4cc4dcb484e09235a6c37975f1b
describe
'45251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDFZ' 'sip-files00190.pro'
13653ea7bfa85efb7dc862cdbf28ab2f
782e6ed578729944225c830c89a832cf6d70efc8
describe
'62971' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGA' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
ac21b8fb4c791fc75af15ee338c37cc2
09972e38d69ed4af639f1953d8cea6217c1afdde
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGB' 'sip-files00190.tif'
27756d7e20bb4eb067075a94b242750d
ef9627f842314ba873ec978b552ab1666ca5561a
describe
'1877' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGC' 'sip-files00190.txt'
8a41f1c7685b28d1775bdd1c7f4ba0dd
0b3fc4815023cd48c24e08acf77e0a07ebe24293
describe
'29972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGD' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
85b8d72718ec6037d91d8ce0d5615bf0
aaeb615adc9bf1cc72bdbc8e381cecad83936b2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGE' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
54dea40943fccf13d77b771a60f7efa5
63d83dd0167cedb190d691bd0b354cdfdd8dac72
'2011-10-12T01:32:54-04:00'
describe
'227621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGF' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
a0c37db69c61628265cd66950746064e
1db67ac6bb4f3afff02b372758cc5fd949eb088d
describe
'60900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGG' 'sip-files00191.pro'
4b73244da8d00b3ded2af77bc17c9430
b125f30ff94ecfcbf0814bfac1c09effaa013cd2
describe
'73829' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGH' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
58f447cb0a9ed6514dac2f3849d3e752
aa79be84e4ddf38152889d30086360c2a72c7086
describe
'3267108' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGI' 'sip-files00191.tif'
d9f13f27fda45a29e2ae88ac5318b7d7
17658b0abc818d6d1439d36d0d26a939617e1443
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGJ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
ea3f736cee165a4b1a36aa2edfdd318a
6fa719c59c6defb96b5ca7f5ef66a099cbcff434
describe
'32821' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGK' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
d84f08809b47b623600a8fa3bbc1cbf9
a9e80b0f954a07489242613931ae40c6195500c8
'2011-10-12T01:26:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGL' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
1afcd2359ba04a891d50aaf87909a01e
d2360c02ca683c5d579feb91e23509743d0ec2c7
describe
'221971' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGM' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
6cb6997291674b451fb492a702d34542
ec901198253078028c09cc1c2e331b47eb4c8ec1
describe
'57860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGN' 'sip-files00192.pro'
a85999980dcfd2d9801b3f6aa95864f0
2c6c61157f79ea7348f80b13ec98e3c738baadf6
describe
'73936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGO' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
7368f94092c6f5de0b8790fb17f9118a
c7c0e19ffbc97bbabb833346b945a99300893514
describe
'3267140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGP' 'sip-files00192.tif'
724449d84784efb05b6707b20944490a
fd3e8402e48788a9724c74761c54f93640a6bcea
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGQ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
e992745567287ace4ac8b22c032b646d
cb4290b046157c08f35e13452bb99c66371cf2db
describe
'32555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGR' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
ec81dadf2dd3434e31f310e189c2aab3
8531a7befb6994a732b4e7e49617d21981586f01
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGS' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
67e0ec51f658b1f3f123cb0e5fa5afdf
bda1604a86f47aabd1e8920f97a02315326f7bdb
describe
'204967' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGT' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
564118feddae0bfe69bcbd030aab40d1
551fdf6a6819f90c68824ba803df2bf1e458aa32
describe
'53843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGU' 'sip-files00193.pro'
6caefcaacf48a1aa12a86cab722e5517
4a72bd1156c50011ba060216627d010e48b0e7a3
describe
'69949' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGV' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
3d5d92c910637019c8e00ed23c60b020
d3c5b7c6dbde690a219a537fe3155cf7c49ea5df
describe
'3266764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGW' 'sip-files00193.tif'
d1feb1a3e930287d7119f40d6c9ace60
531b8fca3a84c2d7e3337c1f906c66e84084ed1c
describe
'2219' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGX' 'sip-files00193.txt'
85aa97b1d03df017a2be3a50178ba3b4
a38eff7e1d190e2d07be2dfe54d6afe995826561
describe
'32126' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGY' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
cb58a7c8ad0523fde5a8fa7186960674
5de2280a33b12d83d8cdf96b73fb3ff17571f174
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDGZ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
fd9112cd1bba023fc25638f8b34916b3
9062019f45a3b23f3df10e5d6ed934016a3bb887
'2011-10-12T01:32:24-04:00'
describe
'221848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHA' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
25e084a659385fb722e9c5254e0b9303
f70a12a1a21433ac3962087c9a647403a88c7df4
describe
'59195' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHB' 'sip-files00194.pro'
52dde3abd015c520bc3b33d75ca386f1
557fe961f0b3a1713706159c4a827f986f47a0d3
describe
'73623' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHC' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
6c7aa9f61b07ae62275d002a9eb6055d
b6eae11c19b4455a2c5a320fef15a0d85a91ad5a
'2011-10-12T01:28:59-04:00'
describe
'3267176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHD' 'sip-files00194.tif'
b47b181cb89ca084124133572e045fb4
42ad078e5db042f6b9ae1337a2c8a32d986e20b8
'2011-10-12T01:32:42-04:00'
describe
'2424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHE' 'sip-files00194.txt'
199ae7e68422e6537005219df7b41856
70186c1a666282782e9fbae6aa0bf4f48937db2f
'2011-10-12T01:33:14-04:00'
describe
'32563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHF' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
329d98a5010a402da160fcf673bd57fd
bfc61265f7e55e3f0eef7fe74e72f7caab454079
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHG' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
717a16b7c3ba55c13b6da193d4692a14
b4af9aa99f7965d85b70264280ee5129898004fd
describe
'195176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHH' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
98e66a567005b0eac02c4ff6a844204c
83a5eebca885ed1606f4dbdb94260f5e9918899c
'2011-10-12T01:31:54-04:00'
describe
'49555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHI' 'sip-files00195.pro'
b84140857cecb5513809b8652579d0cb
2fbcb1075ea064939112f7cf453174f97d706947
'2011-10-12T01:31:23-04:00'
describe
'67015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHJ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
f24e9ba7c330987d511858551ae2f407
c37323ee571c4ffe7ab8ecd12a8ee0c7bfc99851
describe
'3266776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHK' 'sip-files00195.tif'
f4b4bab43ff0a4e198cfbe86456fb93e
cf368639ea0950207ce18bad34083e56d1e55f31
describe
'2035' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHL' 'sip-files00195.txt'
ab213bfda78af0af48aaf60f3a8c1e37
7bdb514e3f718ccff1c71aa6234680da26ddbb65
describe
'31891' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHM' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
57e7bd20d4ff5774241db5f510eb273f
4fa5fbe0ce6061ee47acf4f0770aded53bb20269
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHN' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
4172691bf7039922467969280d7d1b55
f686dd0829000ed043d54caebc874d16d3450cae
describe
'215273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHO' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
7e1e9cf453896acd5ee085bfa6750cf7
6ec3bb29cb5883d540b1138f67f17116761f0486
describe
'55736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHP' 'sip-files00196.pro'
f3b3ca4c414f13f47c8a7ccc3093a3e2
1b1a7a99293097d870d7351f9f8a44040d5c0a4c
'2011-10-12T01:31:07-04:00'
describe
'71512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHQ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
43fa2a159fdb90c2fc2eda5c1ef04377
020bc2b3f3a82d090b4bb84ba85a447b05464ba1
'2011-10-12T01:32:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHR' 'sip-files00196.tif'
6f61f558dadb609d7ca43c7d1353062d
efd03e067b8dacf7a4a16cb288819356938687ae
describe
'2270' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHS' 'sip-files00196.txt'
68a8a23602ade1fe0db7c5b2ce367310
48e8ced6b81a48d441f2dad6822c041e6c09254b
describe
'31844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHT' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
8577cd42946cd93a1e82c54cf8302732
01ca1cbd9124329018a18ac646c001c807a35ba5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHU' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
738f18cb480c5bce007c4cf6e5a3241d
f3100269dd0a327881f428ca79900d13e2fea4fc
describe
'195475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHV' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
d9a75140fbab125858aa805d0086a7e4
3e9a5a16db63550e109325b57977f3f43ccebf06
describe
'47311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHW' 'sip-files00197.pro'
1d1570338287663c2816962106a8ae4c
d83371379f673a58a47726369300e8bfbda27189
describe
'64284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHX' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
cfe94bc867ce6d4db351d853f9f73933
8221ff7055aff99bfb3bdb93388bd3edb16cbf78
'2011-10-12T01:35:48-04:00'
describe
'3266392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHY' 'sip-files00197.tif'
525ef66c25e6836a50d23efe241ac0a7
03bc57b12b26be8bd425ea48b91a2a95c5b0b335
describe
'1964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDHZ' 'sip-files00197.txt'
d930640eeb2e24f48ecae2f92ef2f935
0127416ef72adf33b81f3f9b0c966c6355977c46
'2011-10-12T01:30:29-04:00'
describe
'30381' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIA' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
00f8fc729fe6cc8ecbecbab45fcef889
d2dc0108d7641e753ce5a8094352d4527512e386
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIB' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
30365ffbd004a02e53dff19f53eb1678
5b15410304b385346817079141bf31a2711b79b6
describe
'160964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIC' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
6fe9b817da7e9d1fa76cd73995df0235
cf3899e0e6472a0b1d302dffa12c2a76989e57e2
describe
'17133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDID' 'sip-files00198.pro'
c4df7b91b1959284e6a6e3557db7b0e2
a0ac23e5bec5df6c43177599bec5ba31ef5f9890
describe
'55627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIE' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
8412c6580ba181149adb5340798d2a3c
c1ccc1262e173a878506aca821baccf125d3f9e7
describe
'3266008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIF' 'sip-files00198.tif'
58411d37f8f91363d1f7d0a2759a9441
685ef536ee9d5e6037e1f14cd044caee400d8699
describe
'716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIG' 'sip-files00198.txt'
dd8a73914955dfffc90f51b4edd71ad3
bc3b39ab707abb1122f78f72a45201f281e79376
describe
'29011' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIH' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
e506be597cd0e1c18e5bd4b47cca919b
e1ff15fc334c3bb27556e1b3e9d6b2d3e98ca36b
'2011-10-12T01:31:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDII' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
490449e9bfbaad9c4dbb5a918db98de2
d2c1c5f805388cda4b4271a2ed0c74373da42aa6
describe
'163535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIJ' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
9ce51a1c2f42167e334cdc8516f09234
b42038072d44940c3ed2d90d1a6548d2594c896f
describe
'37868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIK' 'sip-files00199.pro'
3c0dbfffd90847762476e7809f143a69
30a86b14f13ed7cd9e56fc1b978400dd3894846b
describe
'58050' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIL' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
f45691ebc7af632bc879a2fdfa0a8072
b19549d959e64dddd00c3bb2020431a46c207096
describe
'3266036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIM' 'sip-files00199.tif'
ff9fe857e48776a490c3e02933093a32
3e299098e27f136fabd826f42628d5387704cb00
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIN' 'sip-files00199.txt'
d1fb419b87fd1f7b91febdc174ac5381
ee20777eb8bad705b5b18c39a52d72ba49dce1a8
describe
'29462' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIO' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
62246ad3edfbcb104bdec98ea551b400
a4e86c55fe1b6d90285bf5c3b48f197301de7562
'2011-10-12T01:36:46-04:00'
describe
'405503' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIP' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
6fb46bfdc537603f0c9fd7ad542fab99
f592ca0409a1d2cab674c870033fa4d38949f60a
describe
'187565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIQ' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
6408bf6117377e8a4771e6b1c446850c
91d62d61eedeafeb23ef2bd9cf14fde3a63ae6bb
describe
'45173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIR' 'sip-files00200.pro'
929d8e6cbc426ffa4550b1df8d30f087
bc2aed8320f4e4f40fc3e01d64c58b9e66c79880
describe
'66110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIS' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
b9b9f6b8e0a6a4c21f8649afc58c0b45
a4173fbedbfa3e6be98dad6de79cbac3e274ed20
describe
'3267060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIT' 'sip-files00200.tif'
67828cdbadabc3013206a2af23d1d2e5
eababda57c997752247ee9b57d491ff2ba3afb62
describe
'1885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIU' 'sip-files00200.txt'
48540a4869c921209c24038d5b0fc5d5
de54d10940c816b01703e2d83c79fdddc19486c9
describe
'32045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIV' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
e553318f7ccc589b023f3cc9ce04a166
ae01bafff03fd4aab1c7408cc7da9e1820041d2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIW' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
aafe3b7812437c6b5011f5eb4a09ee1e
ad5c90d9595c44e81b167490ca394246a459e168
'2011-10-12T01:32:19-04:00'
describe
'194283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIX' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
56913846f500f2ac3afb2c0bffe01fac
1df4e428fd4a73a1248aa7c7b3232002f0c61638
describe
'50668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIY' 'sip-files00201.pro'
f917a1989a26e3cd6f7bd2b4d6728062
63ca597bdf27fb7aae0d44f1d8233332ea0f84df
describe
'67151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDIZ' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
7c2b2b9a7f8f3502d0fded9e160d60b2
034341354c62cd1b4a3cba2bde916ebc2fa74f61
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJA' 'sip-files00201.tif'
0bb2489a25f4714eb44df4f1031a15e8
faf21757717bc79ed7bbee65250214c96d4cf072
describe
'2102' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJB' 'sip-files00201.txt'
9232a7bf30619b89eb10dcb6eecb86da
363aa1a5a593824d3665c57902b5bc58dcb3025e
describe
'31988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJC' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
857f9be08f11da26aebd7eab4ca8889c
7c37fb3612a08d176f9804b2d97c61c44c6997f0
describe
'405606' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJD' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
cdbfc57080aa9d07c8e853f04bfd3595
ca2ffe416843039953bf8a65e00c76ca98244029
describe
'216788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJE' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
7021e75b6bf46fd75ce4a42680f3563b
b49feed7e92de0f3ef6eeba42420388571a7d341
describe
'57374' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJF' 'sip-files00202.pro'
5ab92326f53bf0b3b55596d7fb52f61e
27227e3c7d4e7b5d3783b7b2cdbe5cd8333cb383
'2011-10-12T01:31:14-04:00'
describe
'72195' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJG' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
c6964354433b3ce0cbe25d93486e1712
7468e3753edc0c2a1b8636db927f0d704e4c3784
describe
'3267092' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJH' 'sip-files00202.tif'
a464ca5094235e97ee0321d825e219a7
e71a10aa45efe0bffedcc98f5b4677c9cf4778d4
describe
'2342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJI' 'sip-files00202.txt'
6fe2f1208995a12517687e5223e40f11
bae92a46b06f82dcef30aff954b23e9cf28928bd
'2011-10-12T01:29:30-04:00'
describe
'32522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJJ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
5c9f71eef2abd57d69fe2e0366ddc35d
fe0de7909212634009c4a7abc360358c0839b969
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJK' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
f6ca2c3ed73cf4f1986e3119ea8a3fa0
1348c49a3475841b34dc0c7ef68ffe955e79db7f
describe
'218932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJL' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
beab8bc4c9de20ca12083b18b9644ac4
8fa2facc1ce2fd23a74326890ac6eb1b44f12bc0
describe
'58230' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJM' 'sip-files00203.pro'
0135d252a10beb125f6d1eba7bd71d7a
38d05ccab01b1d1267b3bf92280ebe85f0c00e6d
describe
'72176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJN' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
3a9f0bb26613ee8ac89ea590ac490b7e
71beb0128c8751f0cb07059a6f1c427be2306978
'2011-10-12T01:35:37-04:00'
describe
'3267084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJO' 'sip-files00203.tif'
41f9638b792436d4ad2362798d8d9201
325bfee05e2b79f9bf7ce4f5317df4408289aaa3
describe
'2385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJP' 'sip-files00203.txt'
19cbf702cd23262dd534565955171c4d
1f2f02293f37112225f7a7f4061210541993ed65
describe
'32631' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJQ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
9103374df7a0db551d588451f3202386
21c03387f456b86de1e0f9f8defc950580fba1a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJR' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
3e80f1f0886205ac62f9061aca78b15e
4f0cc08874d411700c77eaba452b75c002aa6415
describe
'212776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJS' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
c2958c92917af88ba6289bc01e447821
19c9b6ffb0e6a8a799efe32e0d8729481fbdc818
describe
'55293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJT' 'sip-files00204.pro'
503a65b813f6f780fc09b66ce7f0ea8e
04072bd31787819862d2121a7efa5f19c48615c7
describe
'72071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJU' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
2bebd5d73c5d9b51cb366aaca2e61e15
3b04b62369529884cc5b397b8f30e91e1f92087c
'2011-10-12T01:32:52-04:00'
describe
'3267272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJV' 'sip-files00204.tif'
f8aa987d9f5f53d3301f449b1d3a0c0f
f1ae5bd1e68f3f17d070aa7699d1a349986a49cd
'2011-10-12T01:36:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJW' 'sip-files00204.txt'
ea5b5af561a50155363e8efed4a58734
796f53d698eca1f95ee10843e98bdd212bc9a4c4
describe
'32626' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJX' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
67f3b657b8b15414cd1cb0e77212f427
66e28f657a0062a565a5a7899c73b1cc7b3e95c8
describe
'405494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJY' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
9039fbf90e48d06cb9aa9bc1a9ce720f
3346b88d504bf69a220a6e438fc35f88021a4b39
'2011-10-12T01:30:17-04:00'
describe
'168531' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDJZ' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
b82eae53c80fa4b3c674b69365764401
6e6442bf4b638c2f737e1e47beb2783b4aad6f35
describe
'12775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKA' 'sip-files00205.pro'
a40c2a442759ce70f8d9cab10ce89202
b21d3e96d04c990287f1b49d8931a67a7945256d
describe
'54049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKB' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
77aedf171e9acf971fd0dc2e2592244e
c8eccdefe621f2f708e385f2e64faefd1e3c111a
describe
'3265700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKC' 'sip-files00205.tif'
6ae275edcdc57951958f410cbefd49cc
8417538b05b4d3562a7455cd7ea2bcf3533e86bb
describe
'585' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKD' 'sip-files00205.txt'
56a63696c3f44137ade9b11cca55201c
b8979c992b668bef182662ab1f044d39fd429e24
describe
Invalid character
'28350' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKE' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
7cb251a41509515c14a11293c332377a
fdd5630063b599a46a76c71fad83f8ed4cf7896f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKF' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
233719a992af46019c2022b5c9ab484a
4309b27f538d79f0823a3bbc7bfbc0920474a643
'2011-10-12T01:34:15-04:00'
describe
'196337' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKG' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
ad4db7f20889e9bc213fc55027e3f348
3a37ffa4d8a7a31bf43fe8284b00cfcd2a21f4df
describe
'49652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKH' 'sip-files00206.pro'
9b1594b25a8bb9e09ce7df7a3d08f24d
f432e9d637621445ed4a10a9dd8a90fbc994d7fa
describe
'65239' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKI' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
a343a246c7f59ed20516154690ba7062
62673f5f953d4d1c4d0a31b57b8e68dae494a3f3
describe
'3266408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKJ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
66649a147f8dfa3e713189e280ce3c93
66c7c0c3815087d48275dd84f4334f8a097035d8
describe
'2051' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKK' 'sip-files00206.txt'
9c4f7e8cf959af78e2402715991f1d8e
159939856a9ec521983ea7162257e12767373998
describe
'30365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKL' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
bae63650b9e87614ec22efbe534d1bce
8e9aee194ed33ee1002143a2f7259df7e635d72c
describe
'405666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKM' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
41beff8baddd2c722a39e9a38feb6253
d9607354516f168c21726636d3f1eb083c69a978
describe
'217268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKN' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
577ad0d5cba592f329d716fa81ba6a68
5ef00e817f143532a71499c12f932b0358134179
'2011-10-12T01:32:00-04:00'
describe
'57839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKO' 'sip-files00207.pro'
4ba5387a88f20818d51e9df36a41b40b
3dc865f3d553c3fb1170cada5f8bad00122c4acd
describe
'72189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKP' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
ede5d7c4f42b4ed70936928d0b030dc4
ea221f294f66598647377fee06e19d031f19db34
describe
'3266752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKQ' 'sip-files00207.tif'
677390bdf37d8e0cc1538b9c4775f1ad
67873d3640885502a241c222d4327beff81d1143
describe
'2364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKR' 'sip-files00207.txt'
e28ba5150827a43689a4949bb9284060
71f6161e849ca7a09a709184d602cfd4ac7c1c2a
describe
'31714' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKS' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
f6b4554c4c3ff729bed372a57c7cd4ae
71d7214c015bd5824678fb96cafa532bdb79c297
describe
'405747' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKT' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
37171ced623a0f3f2c16670551618af0
3687039c2a5e518efaaf40eb6cbb8992cb6b7ef6
describe
'220134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKU' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
df242fb31d88a1cf2a487c01d627aac1
1b3185f3416295e0dce534e6a516bbe53493fa79
describe
'60228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKV' 'sip-files00208.pro'
b97e4b6bcda221175f67fea8dd1a0885
23e3e11efe201fa83c6dc18670ced2d8d660cdf7
describe
'72228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKW' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
6f630416c2d2592d2612719bb1b38939
c8c210f61ae1ee2ce225185e6921ef8d5977a6b6
describe
'3267700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKX' 'sip-files00208.tif'
ae05b9785f4fb893dd345bcb0a95b769
5dd74c2653070e8b6858151b8ff1fdc1c9296f83
describe
'2451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKY' 'sip-files00208.txt'
4903ab143a682537f072a8a9ab0b2f10
7c68ba439a2ba4c106481ac944d1c03f62208bc3
describe
'31889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDKZ' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
f759705ed85a3d2662fba4084318bd53
dc612ed44fe1593dfe62da83b53c4a5bdce79c9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLA' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
e3a58dd3c71c4cf911a1feabe828efe1
71fcb7ec1badb03ddce289f1b6ea056f9bcdf4c7
describe
'221987' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLB' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
0bbb739af28a787ac7b12246d6d70353
56d9161c40539eabc19cc5e8cc0645ff2931912d
'2011-10-12T01:30:26-04:00'
describe
'60327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLC' 'sip-files00209.pro'
093f1051871a747c2089bec2625d807d
2c6c0e4b9e6aedb754ccb923a8b33cb7a55daf9b
describe
'73364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLD' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
61f1d63d32adb48a22c36acc1d5d5b73
a6ceefec1c28ed3864b2382288c4909a09fb5e3c
describe
'3267260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLE' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d4fbe04bed121e78a8e068f81ec85892
fc0697591455ebc2e7b79bcb2b6ea8b9a73913c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLF' 'sip-files00209.txt'
9581792f18ee2217d442df4e6545517e
e10bd2a3f81649ef9f93758b728758830a5b2185
describe
'33049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLG' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
cb05b8c2e4ae92773c8aa3a234e87a48
522041623e08d44e46bfe908ef0cfc1a6643588d
describe
'405657' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLH' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
c3f63177dee81a58afa52c9f0e506e5b
49c9e3afb2ff597b6fd25893b967a73ec61b9b6d
describe
'198997' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLI' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
5950c0437ce6c746c321492496b9cfc4
68aa57d9b23d444fca9abd130ecd0a89163ef219
'2011-10-12T01:35:05-04:00'
describe
'49294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLJ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
0df93551585ecc11faa9e68823ab1ccb
384923948be8fff2d915fdad2dcbbd4824c65d6f
describe
'66721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLK' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
35ccac2d2fdfaea48466abb0562ce2c0
ed7c8e642db455b127e5258d92c079e8308ba303
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLL' 'sip-files00210.tif'
dca18bce5ccc12c26bc11dbc7a667155
44e4f199a32b52e034f7117721889c4d747fc7b9
'2011-10-12T01:36:53-04:00'
describe
'2037' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLM' 'sip-files00210.txt'
7176e8884bbc8fc11d7d4d7e99644793
7f2bb27b94e8c1219ac94807149961fc1330c711
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLN' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
f42818f0f248da63f48ba6ac72889e37
b71c0e82a070705b399c92d6087ee7b8d549e81a
describe
'405624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLO' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
aca72d8357f462ef12d8d4346e07d2a3
20025023caa4320b936465e90a51230b3168bcce
describe
'175189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLP' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
1e54aea8749a64154a4589a538cb2df0
099ebf8bbe28ed8f60de2ecb0d0b2af5ab7581af
describe
'29685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLQ' 'sip-files00211.pro'
fe12b3dbebfb28a0db4d3b0b985f56bd
561a1f41b317bcc3ed854734c340ad44a711b00d
'2011-10-12T01:36:40-04:00'
describe
'59889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLR' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
768d11bb59296c472203d68383c3a67b
4f92cccb37a653d01d67ebc3a9adb37688fb8abe
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLS' 'sip-files00211.tif'
251b4906aa8f568f8f7b681720294f83
ae85466308ddaf6302fdbcaf773e1f5ef22c9f69
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLT' 'sip-files00211.txt'
aef673591003f00edf803617ec545d71
c1002bcca25162c6c14214134ea2a4fc3c9d411f
describe
Invalid character
'30195' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLU' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
f1f64837bd5bd5c6b2a424438c4d3973
8ace0d5c57982f7f7a21e5ca4500d5862ccf57b9
describe
'405640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLV' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
f319a60c3c322e7168adbe21c962161f
c881af4b1b564f83e7d4c1db11d1fedcce418047
'2011-10-12T01:31:27-04:00'
describe
'186248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLW' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
bd9a2e18e61b51ff74bc620ae7406a28
701c2bf4de67f5d4f7ae7471a8e47e6699d7e174
describe
'44764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLX' 'sip-files00212.pro'
22db0da4a4d23685bcf56f6a8dac5f95
500bba3935ee2b313dbb979bc18f8f52cbfd5c91
describe
'63219' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLY' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
fa178a3d9a47903dc4ea6b1016e7c0e3
01c0a1f5392064c02d0f4ddaf81bc85a3df069dc
describe
'3266484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDLZ' 'sip-files00212.tif'
78f286361252c24c9c730194f4a4e0d2
02d4a9a82997677ef0cf0489942146f3aaab276b
describe
'1854' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMA' 'sip-files00212.txt'
ba833cc8161add3b4895d8a82def6c86
6db1ba7a709dd12a12ba4ce7e6d021656a78169c
describe
'30472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMB' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
78bc64129e767a358a38928421b93da0
2ddf354e10b1b94a0cb42d9d344baf9c86e9c009
describe
'405440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMC' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
89de74172bca1e2fa447fc17030ddca0
c9b2245780acae83b8d95c2cbd6031d0d172302a
describe
'187883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMD' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
32f837c1940eb7176c099e45d0247753
8923853f3bfc1a2c8cb2effdccbdb9974744a016
'2011-10-12T01:32:50-04:00'
describe
'46455' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDME' 'sip-files00213.pro'
da85143cc16c468d6c4dd67774783138
79f0ad60632a712e43e25175c03848759a51aaef
'2011-10-12T01:36:08-04:00'
describe
'63068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMF' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
3d6438f3c832909365db22b427ed5d84
3fdd64153cca5420892336d137fa05686cbf9420
describe
'3266352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMG' 'sip-files00213.tif'
1bd87e19007d4f5007a0ce4184d50765
8e10a0dc436fadfd196fffb1a30862e6adb87a77
describe
'1926' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMH' 'sip-files00213.txt'
22a037c8216e9043ea95438410b69991
e31b8c2e38eb3817dcfe80f47c9b6a8a7f55d982
describe
'30267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMI' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
cdb9a30466d43476d92444cff35be6be
bf7793d30474a80e1339a5a406f982a43ca69088
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMJ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
5b40edd6888264603ec440faa062e59f
14b76efc60b9964120973977c3bb44c5050b9151
'2011-10-12T01:32:41-04:00'
describe
'206353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMK' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
10cd5015938c3c697905e9e04d03c67a
a5e228dff3a50acfd20dd11ea7755df2de7b2bce
describe
'53280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDML' 'sip-files00214.pro'
77f717ffa0c74b1d9364e854164e3c97
e820959ee82835efe7ec3775be0b97d2e9770e7c
describe
'69679' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMM' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
536c40e3ff97e5e59f715b79f6ced742
642f6c161ef1aeff42828f9f201aa4b3cc82f9f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMN' 'sip-files00214.tif'
86c8f25df334eba46a44fbed7bf459d4
08388125ef335882d632ecfd51fd8dff66e09927
describe
'2187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMO' 'sip-files00214.txt'
b8539fda4668e8a1bc02759f3bb39b88
995d12ad393f2e50f23c1737b62e6c9a69541d6e
describe
'32470' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMP' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
29b828c63b48b6beb6682045f89860c7
7ea4138cf2df9620a93c9f76746955be38ca7ba7
'2011-10-12T01:28:18-04:00'
describe
'405628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMQ' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
905f0d718339cf541a8ad75fd39ec35d
6e137d65e8f62a54cfd19193ee5098a8435b1f55
describe
'207298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMR' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
10ab90518f4e724867062b16adaea99b
42b0dc00ca778f469e5fd3d7a59b4a67835a6941
describe
'54541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMS' 'sip-files00215.pro'
094a88a0768a5dd6ca16fe9518ce6500
561a237bcb9dbb0d623da226ba4813a0e0f5323f
describe
'69890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMT' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
f2d6f8cfee52e989419591278f8080ec
deeeab4344115c80ecfa7f14f678cc91e1217242
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMU' 'sip-files00215.tif'
891a9b533e4270fe9e0f3a922167d626
dc245b0b5651ff05aa00924513ef561cb80e19bf
describe
'2239' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMV' 'sip-files00215.txt'
0dc64d6c8e5a235caf72562374cd97e6
1334c7d7d17622caadcc0735f5b111fa8270f750
describe
'32461' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMW' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
49d0883a49b8ea04b29ed716ad8558da
581fd303c7174aa851fa9fe228ca94b471ab23fe
describe
'405578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMX' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
b4de80310d2326c3af2ceb34a73c45ba
978b7e18a5af0978629d422d7c0e743edbfd7ca2
describe
'209867' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMY' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
e403852571b09086118f53c512fc0fdb
33e03b157785d423a4d49f4b333cba616f24b895
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDMZ' 'sip-files00216.pro'
1a5d4994dd51a0e32924fba8d5cd6030
9977487fac175ae546b654353c724eb733dae457
'2011-10-12T01:29:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNA' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
564c020ba032a1008ff3cde7ae7699cb
459cf879ccbc1492a8ea0423e908a944e015258b
describe
'3266968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNB' 'sip-files00216.tif'
aebdc35cbdd49b6ce08ab2ac63113711
64cd7b0a541998e1c7f2bcd819c26d8108995eac
describe
'2280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNC' 'sip-files00216.txt'
13311379a30ae7cced3b5e1f1e8d8392
5b16ce33f4701995c6028b0d00f6efaf2898987a
describe
'32229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDND' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
b8d6fa767e02209c0ce9b2342658b4f1
5ae2138c60ef4c973737ce557e55feadead9d7ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNE' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
6da91f05617920876d3d66c371dc30c1
3d7059a8cb077de12b705b5c942d1cd5328ff15e
describe
'206079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNF' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
b1b9f893e07ae2dfed29e0b11ba9630d
0d1b1e788d43ad3f04a0abdf51d1528470270af5
describe
'54329' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNG' 'sip-files00217.pro'
19a6f58909e4f62de5000fd400c9e127
c7186d03970d6abdc4acd4134ffcb50c814c0ee7
describe
'69273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNH' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
5cf61dcb2b3c97b32e10ffcefb749484
375d5d554e758fd776839155e0304e2c54dd7387
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNI' 'sip-files00217.tif'
4337170e98beed0ae44a601b165666ad
769e676f8785d310cefa4f34c21e380c58a8b15e
describe
'2250' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNJ' 'sip-files00217.txt'
63da885693da78f89a385c89b4ea9976
3c6607c4e7da79a51f595856f8dd058a9134a882
describe
'31778' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNK' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
44db4bec93ba520327a65978cc0f878b
1c7739eb08fa0f5b9f2cb3b3f2b89f988f14cce9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNL' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
399a3e0d27b97818626f9aa5a3b745e8
92cde4847af0dae6713167125d4650d446bb7df2
describe
'206034' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNM' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
48d32cadb27ccdc3e41c82e014e5a190
6d8e8f46d3f5481a5f4d741c4babc559c9d2a812
describe
'54801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNN' 'sip-files00218.pro'
58ee7b4a2fa8f0d3e1a6eb32a2cb0f54
c64d78b5b5de13965f20810073b9b65b1eeaecb3
describe
'69047' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNO' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
21a7e020aecbf5d601dfbf93c068f673
1a70705658f906c4f213bb04cc167ae439c4acf9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNP' 'sip-files00218.tif'
d7170363fbebe40a698b0a13b10f2813
202b168f8ecefb815e3d6e5dffeecf28638d9178
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNQ' 'sip-files00218.txt'
479e55932f23efc67020a53fbc710781
2cfa6706f5cdad6a54077d4534d3ff733a412e1f
describe
'32051' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNR' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
e773fc51dc4b1b771a9e92bda03250f4
ddbf51823c7bf4e7aac987c0e8414a814b1a494d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNS' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
56b0cf924a7cdbdfd7ebd192bbf7cc48
888d1a7ddd2a9f6989058986de86ddfa4e74d00e
describe
'193232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNT' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
5e8abeb7a1c40d23f20e7f898f4c6133
352a4d420e67ffaab7844868d9c76e91253b910d
describe
'48133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNU' 'sip-files00219.pro'
7222261a9bda532380301a8e724a1e43
5ad8bd3f082f5133dfd8f4999810ba24bd265893
describe
'66772' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNV' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
a0cd986d3bd10a23354695a51141863a
752b61bc92d35980cbc39c96f635d0065af87c17
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNW' 'sip-files00219.tif'
5fa8f80cfe57e5d3f0ad2a57035a6906
80519b06c3c53b0a234ba833de98b7673f502fe2
describe
'2004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNX' 'sip-files00219.txt'
14b460e10b4001e06faef4eccda46cfb
b9abfed7653e7ef7bf9fe0fda4549ecd3f97139b
describe
'31856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNY' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
9994417484cb6b408767f861f42f5da0
af399c5f73e1853f108a41c92c0fb4d74a62655f
describe
'405610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDNZ' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
0ff66eeb1d43fd5273a260c31ea2d263
81b545a791e971b870993c0ee01d2763d7ef6851
'2011-10-12T01:33:50-04:00'
describe
'214512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOA' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
236a66e4a62f1336d695a851abd2bbcf
dc8469be4d19be7db9f43cd1e66c8d5f932aaf02
describe
'55518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOB' 'sip-files00220.pro'
d032a2436103a775a5c02adf12291858
e5c9e2f6aa62d7b5001ea101d08cf04930b557e3
describe
'70889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOC' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
70497b926b6e1625bf872cd7a07159bc
23aa7f6d8822105b8367081b3e6f94d6e77ef070
describe
'3267224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOD' 'sip-files00220.tif'
d0cc890c2603370cafaf5589d55f480d
a87345c5de441758bcf24ce54f07a81e7cbcc78b
describe
'2294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOE' 'sip-files00220.txt'
9ce5dd1104a7ecab8c7e80508f44ee47
e19b1dee547f079e685ad14536abcaa0a22905a6
describe
'32753' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOF' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
4032834e4d92b3842594bb0229cbb205
b905f7d4e658d0d2f38ad021c17a110ce74ba28a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOG' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
0d40bf8fb26049aff84ba59615a84d99
b8718d4a570f9156c09ea009c83ac2863953a9d0
'2011-10-12T01:29:36-04:00'
describe
'174740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOH' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
10d6b3c3dd35e455a862104cd7a8f950
3eac46f204010d09e049ca945ce79670391d4fb8
describe
'14340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOI' 'sip-files00221.pro'
e337d60f30173d4d2933d815ce61b994
568fa521e4185fe60301d3a2bc3967ac4c2bf212
describe
'57594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOJ' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
dcee8921dfe14d571e4f250eaa4463dd
0a15fdc8f867a43236a441d697a3f2c11d74d93c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOK' 'sip-files00221.tif'
a213cfd070592fc299b92a809b176d12
2905d0eba1d20dc48b3374bff5bdc2c2b0da89bb
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOL' 'sip-files00221.txt'
08de6d866cc31f763defff19cd945131
8ad4faec9b7503e70903503b6ff34c00bc9d247b
describe
'30110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOM' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
8906130cc2ef082d21a6ced6cfccf24e
a6082ce632a50ed7ed12fed6c7bc24fe7de72210
describe
'405567' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDON' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
82df13ad182ab21d038440f1d36c976e
e1e5f65982f18f07e5605c90879c20619401d425
describe
'152990' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOO' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
21a13a666c76c8bc46f0c02950368d64
ad981e1db23632c39b43077d8c4febcfd91f0bd6
describe
'36022' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOP' 'sip-files00222.pro'
8c2c5c51b724359098bacd1a2f24474c
a29efdaab0f99b74700ab891097710ea054caae6
describe
'53840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOQ' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
2f70d90318dab4218f7c40f11a62fee9
0e9fe93438756b2b38706da98bf44a684aa21e58
'2011-10-12T01:30:37-04:00'
describe
'3265532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOR' 'sip-files00222.tif'
464f99197d5a22fd318abe03a388dbb7
e05aa04f723bd2513d0552de4bed6e3a5e4f6b2c
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOS' 'sip-files00222.txt'
1b6a3f05fdf35fd4e168fd83fc307cdf
8dca0fa02171ea6357000296b5ed6410cfa725d2
describe
'27717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOT' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
306daa74b52e250eeb71e9567e167e84
4c6f1ea831878842d7a8d8a7c4470ad34b1401a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOU' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
e03613a889ac35eb558e84688d90ff2a
21854c889802dd1b12a488cacbe5f72e1bb3e129
describe
'187685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOV' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
a553cd67cf818aee6141cf06bbb5408e
0560ab2d9fa987cc3e871e27bfff7b77704254ab
describe
'48897' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOW' 'sip-files00223.pro'
488471b829e3010aed1bb080c057f5b7
3850bd13020f151cb736f7b39461059c0c94a26a
describe
'64656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOX' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
251e9a4ba2a5c4722fa8dea28ab22386
1224833832146db5f0b72a2724285dc342ac9ea1
describe
'3266576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOY' 'sip-files00223.tif'
7d9d6aa34f95291485d41467373dd14e
18aafaacfafaa97e213ff4f7f14092175a6e2c11
'2011-10-12T01:31:34-04:00'
describe
'2049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDOZ' 'sip-files00223.txt'
8f2c5d666ee80b308fcbda142863b46c
c9a08ed7088833a5d4aa2204b4e79d9abd8efbb1
'2011-10-12T01:31:57-04:00'
describe
'30662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPA' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
7107c77d3b84854d1aa296a75fda7a2f
e4257ef8ff6bda374755a0fdf9e1e28af25de616
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPB' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
a37f8967ac54d9c6d206ad08937e574f
5c23a399e7ccdb508d935ff7cfb296a8c02860c5
describe
'201380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPC' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
f52b437c606a66016abb3b6742fed342
a710c823365395d5bdbacaf369e1488685ef6b52
'2011-10-12T01:33:00-04:00'
describe
'50846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPD' 'sip-files00224.pro'
eb084ac95fda803ca101bc0ad2e79335
57cb7ccc0811b18a8b494d708444691f20347d4f
describe
'68305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPE' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
4e55426e5ce2b697053c1b7406fd4861
56f61d58cd196229f57281569544019b3c833d2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPF' 'sip-files00224.tif'
f1d7fd5b6846c526f07149d945e4203e
d3af4c0c6dcac48816643cb69bf8b1a9334b110a
describe
'2098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPG' 'sip-files00224.txt'
04550b8113683f8c6fec9d9ccc1d724c
f7b4589338f69b10fc517d168404b6a560ffcaef
describe
'32134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPH' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
b09464307f0799fe0087c75171c8f376
3f4781070c06e27ddc7cbcfe45bad73f3920bcf8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPI' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
df789af9d5f36eabc8d36c9957c38852
a348c845e1f0787b784fdfacea4429cb12f41f68
describe
'211882' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPJ' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
c9bd2f3a51ad334719676ed5ef182a00
7c1bb2f4660d61d5b31d9be7d07c81a70efaab02
describe
'56323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPK' 'sip-files00225.pro'
6983bc88904a9054587884a385b81f75
1532f8c3bfe83a1c3c3ba900c3249ff8ef9da7c7
describe
'71081' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPL' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
b92f15ed0d29c0c7606c05606787c8c2
31fe2a3c81be51678aecc08cecde2ab03aa111d5
describe
'3266896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPM' 'sip-files00225.tif'
b2a3313170a2afe5ee5d5f9d109d3637
c86802058f42d2e278988bdd48cb0c2d0d427a47
'2011-10-12T01:36:17-04:00'
describe
'2308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPN' 'sip-files00225.txt'
4bd9f295c7945bd909c9db3c231f910c
bc5a7a0220a9b1c7ad3e1925a50643012a5181b9
describe
'32292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPO' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
d015049e65700e1fe9bd01aa5c83bc42
f99f0a0954b51ffda46e7caabfbeff239fe818c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPP' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
98018d4d59e8d87c2f641a0c4002cf8b
9273cf7952a5df81e77ac3be08eacfad172a7550
describe
'202577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPQ' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
1ca2792dc1eaf9ae84b9b6206805a615
b568932a65d46f4304c9ba80376f2fd8bb661378
describe
'50953' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPR' 'sip-files00226.pro'
1d776daea376ec9f4ab224adeff900f9
d62b458a44e857bc7939478ea915245c2fe6c382
describe
'69606' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPS' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
fb5f32faf0fce4051c56867653056ad5
e3e3ba62c2aa40bc702b9f7a83b3d04b5ea7221d
'2011-10-12T01:36:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPT' 'sip-files00226.tif'
05a2b1926615e83e46cfe9d8d6e64ad5
3af41a6e1b2b55362574c80029d5f50b06df0520
describe
'2101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPU' 'sip-files00226.txt'
f4c75470d14fec1e1a8d41a7efa229ac
f6278c7cb89fc1a1f34b1b4ed3674b7e1910c62a
describe
'31963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPV' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
405c9218465c330b21868c2d64eb5b0c
df700e7fc4e30175ad6d74349d5a8feff53f5c67
describe
'405586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPW' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
f340c68d3ba61eecc941d8d977b7b21f
5dc7f17827564ee243a0a0190312daee42f7a50d
describe
'212212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPX' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
43a07ec28c1ad6eb7da6115357786863
65bb0ff0801ad22a55f0a269431aa38cb2a97bd5
describe
'55105' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPY' 'sip-files00227.pro'
c10dd9aec2fa847e367d6345046c47e7
9557eee87578e1a56da159e46a5341ec39a27e2a
describe
'71582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDPZ' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
6bfbe59e917612acc92f4372043e1dde
fb1b77d7c6a5f7d0046e37cc5a62573b1aaaed50
describe
'3267064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQA' 'sip-files00227.tif'
799b3ae5a5b9eae0427b2a280c4637b0
05be103dafeee93abe95312e96d42df433132285
'2011-10-12T01:36:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQB' 'sip-files00227.txt'
1aeb74067adfeb6f47aea40bfedcc940
5e0cfa565833519b9ff869e3632f1cda0a04d98a
'2011-10-12T01:32:03-04:00'
describe
'32627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQC' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
c3eb22f6a9eb477c2b53bb249275eef6
461d777f180f8e67304437372361cdd5080a7174
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQD' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
b41bfc53ae3f98e9755a8c5d56db52b4
75e6fd6628f4fb7e9fa542ea59cd4bfb3ec13ef4
describe
'201260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQE' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
39a24e4c8cc7589af0d47de6201f81b4
a081f41312dea6168331e24a604d9c97d21747cc
describe
'50823' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQF' 'sip-files00228.pro'
a49bf18e9255c3a05621f30f1eb4955e
9a971f70cc6d2c1a8b155983cd65bff1d92e0e2f
describe
'68802' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQG' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
4f046b17328ea64d8c486460ba774189
f78ab67ffa0a15e2ca0fc1185ef5431a8e638558
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQH' 'sip-files00228.tif'
e4b9faede21abfbb7dc8c0fbc958a661
bbf1cf6ba95042279fb82d31610c6ce47641d3a8
describe
'2094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQI' 'sip-files00228.txt'
1b94e594e3acd16af84aef39a75b7cb2
3633a61e1812e592f13cf4bac48af52f29959cde
describe
'31623' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQJ' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
d45ffb086b9e44b840398986a62e0d32
ff82e009a6aaedd3bd24f0b4b90e870f068405ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQK' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
53027cfb4c46ac59ce46cf0c5d9f49e3
03cd33a5fa80162e49c80440e2ee97fad0ece963
describe
'150374' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQL' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
2b51633a2100cdf2aa3b4467e3eb5cea
fb783beb025a39015a5eaf755495120951ff0423
describe
'19450' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQM' 'sip-files00229.pro'
fb5ca54e39ae2d3b7d20ec3796288e34
cf2467c01a1533cd032e0108c8e2615da5cd8540
'2011-10-12T01:28:53-04:00'
describe
'51640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQN' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
ce46f68f7b8f19b33ffabf1dce852132
60a855e297b5ceb68c8be62a55d0e55ecca5cf4d
describe
'3265608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQO' 'sip-files00229.tif'
956021c9d5e31e38f1a8c048d57c0e56
ab16cf80f00611ac857d6ab55c742cb265e0aac6
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQP' 'sip-files00229.txt'
f664d67e138930eef03841f8222a03f6
515a8934d13f54425b38fb92ec3c954433b471bd
describe
'28094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQQ' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
4fe158fad3e9df3a72336d7d40b87e52
596ed5afea1756e5c923dda7593fdd21144ba912
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQR' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
6d1d7654bfbdc473feb16f75792fbe08
ea860767f8857d36159737b8964595f1a21b2bec
describe
'213986' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQS' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
7cf5f9963c6b0e6665dcee03a75af60d
b3f698711d81728514c1f920f2b99151d52e319f
describe
'55891' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQT' 'sip-files00230.pro'
03e3f36ee6f5120b7fa6f04c9444724c
be9dbeea795e1aba4f893061c2ca53ea65466f85
describe
'70526' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQU' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
e0b47056ec57ce42ccd18aa85e1faef9
ff07628c9a0930888954c1b530154e316212c7fb
describe
'3266808' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQV' 'sip-files00230.tif'
cc6db982c6792cb5c2d1d329ecc5ecf6
7bd20bbde01eb05b99ca84bdf99ce9167ed270b1
describe
'2293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQW' 'sip-files00230.txt'
d9143b870c1a5a6fa254b2dfe41b8770
5b06eaa06260ffa80fd75bcdf816ca2ef0a00802
describe
'31802' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQX' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
2f01dfb45ca3e1a3cda789974af74b0f
6acaf61032a65fc28d28ac40725c72af9aef9eaa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQY' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
50f2f307cb66fde670d8d12d1383bf8e
9ff2fac7d088192a85f66e87cceaf1b384d7a3f3
describe
'218909' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDQZ' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
df47286c7edb97babe9349aa00567efe
5ac312661cd15d4418c0c083e2d142be38bfdee8
'2011-10-12T01:33:41-04:00'
describe
'58625' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRA' 'sip-files00231.pro'
2bf0e0661c094bf74c25eeda93baa7ac
aaa665c5ba6e503716186311021184be6bfe7899
describe
'71076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRB' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
b1611d73386119c4f3bc6942c722ab19
020dec0631a54cf722b3cc496163baa7c9c906b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRC' 'sip-files00231.tif'
bb25647c61e2a99bf09705685d65d7c3
538500de9ea4a16e3cc1bc52482259616a336970
describe
'2392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRD' 'sip-files00231.txt'
1b780e81df84cc803afdb1b2140a8f56
bbc0d9bd5ec9508c0c19ce70dc5127c27d12f5f6
describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRE' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
29a66337706728599f9e6f5e0a07aaae
905b910e96e73311cdafd904b7760fe345af231a
'2011-10-12T01:26:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRF' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
385dd8c6ca119e9f930d2cd38e92e898
cb05b8bb7288c72e6fabda47a2d0a5066cc3dc5d
describe
'175198' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRG' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
dad31cfde73766fcf86ea0070c8ff966
0785ff662f0a1d115d67639c2eed09a9826745f0
describe
'40904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRH' 'sip-files00232.pro'
7d162ffb4b6f233711a70b01fcaf17e3
49972ff517e460972b8db6479e26b2a706b2b708
describe
'59429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRI' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
d09630417dedf231ecaa835164644013
6a695a5b228ac11f082cae9fb882fe46eb058450
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRJ' 'sip-files00232.tif'
aa1ead90e1ce3cab6378d6144d251147
43ccdbf2db99ca268dbb024eb01d18241537f3d3
describe
'1676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRK' 'sip-files00232.txt'
163540126838dfbfcb180ad2713e8226
571e27ff0158bd62eaa5264f8d1431eeb16056eb
describe
'29078' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRL' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
3d63f333a68c5c1c3e2454b4914a47e5
1793f97670837c117862191723b64ae0b15e066f
describe
'405299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRM' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
272b117def51631090eff92ad1bb8317
9fab6ace57d11ab2724ca0b2e886831e3a3ae36a
describe
'184409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRN' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
323715c44ec256c6b05c1f508a8b9f6c
524f1080f66fc094e7769086bc21bc7f74bf1e7e
'2011-10-12T01:37:11-04:00'
describe
'44803' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRO' 'sip-files00233.pro'
793d9efa7c9c8079bb7c47a0d728fb48
a46401aa7bfd7a7dc02b527f55fdfaaa1ed3e7ca
describe
'62346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRP' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
389eb4f2427e1f97c3b488f50cb3bd76
a8eea7f837ef662c582a0fb8abe237c9665f438c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRQ' 'sip-files00233.tif'
c83bf58ba7995596d165bf8314000610
a7a3c20eda01a9d103e677911477bdea0221f908
'2011-10-12T01:29:19-04:00'
describe
'1865' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRR' 'sip-files00233.txt'
9942b574e4a1a85adbcd7bdb580826ae
c12986777a86bac22f7b037d65eb49e57edd2e17
describe
'30334' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRS' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
e1da7ec18fba50bf4c8cc62c154bd568
5135b009c625c8bb0ec9de29acc3ec3978e4e3ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRT' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
4c18e678e92095d607825f344a903a40
ed4e9c235e4e974096a7c26d03a409240636f640
describe
'190152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRU' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
544409820673902f9ea0386627c4eaa8
f3f52e723c8f92180e9b158e96952c6ec06357b5
describe
'46133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRV' 'sip-files00234.pro'
8b1c91a1e7ef2e953bc2372368d58f08
02d1ce0e1305c5342ed404450c349ea1c83e11a2
describe
'65298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRW' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
97102ffeede83e6848cb71e7ee9b5bbf
0d3489e3dc632f5d90ab30d34fab6cf35c97d649
describe
'3266472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRX' 'sip-files00234.tif'
79fd74af9ebfdca7a1bcf2a3cda44d0c
b99e356311abce07b7728cbb65b1d39a3e0e2c1f
describe
'1929' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRY' 'sip-files00234.txt'
ae3434d97573e21d9c6f42bac8e33455
24469ddae12cfcf5350b870adc357c87f9d6abdb
describe
'30883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDRZ' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
45f1e1ff1b6969de09a7d48f600abd2f
67a11db228cefd67bc0cd4c073815ff5eac068b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSA' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
cfeabe158ec841beeeea18b0dc13c177
b0f29362a7e4c749d5e929eb585ba909459e79dd
describe
'182838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSB' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
cc05451653c672a9e9fa6b59f23f5f21
eb07eb507eee1711c472533493248fc30c344488
describe
'28326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSC' 'sip-files00235.pro'
4841a6f936442ff2ee96d3870e4edd40
e5d6c57b95e1703585e184cc2f634f907d704ec1
describe
'61456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSD' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
492bbd70ee672452645573f6ff901e43
bd70117bb3b29b6a2686fc2a852c0033685068b1
describe
'3266468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSE' 'sip-files00235.tif'
bf96d8a8a0c78a224c8956785a3cfd68
cda4b5a85c7b03166150edd429f94f14c6dd93cc
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSF' 'sip-files00235.txt'
adad1a1ff90468d369a773d6d87a8218
7a3afbcda7387a84e9498b3a30cc94167ee8cdc8
describe
'30460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSG' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
db4d5dfd3402b00ac803317bf8c0a5b5
bbc468ab83e08cbc0d022a5821e91fb01e7d5f52
'2011-10-12T01:36:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSH' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
28a4e0705f4ee2a867f9e786fc59562a
cdd8d66dc58c3dd7cd576e3c651ac1c7d00bfe88
describe
'170274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSI' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
d0caaf26a69b30f7c16ab30177007966
ce8bcdb921fd1298cac83d44f4f5714b9d9aaef4
describe
'39498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSJ' 'sip-files00236.pro'
ef0105bf99b6a1e6c3a89cab66fb13fc
4e058e0c778ed888395a1731cea04e478d59089f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSK' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
20396be89cd4b93152b1b921e4782513
8b486d2b25345e71f18a9a319aa3f820911d16bb
describe
'3265648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSL' 'sip-files00236.tif'
460e2724f55f40e78db2c8b70ac942fc
bd7afede4863408ed2c6678af25895fefd1d15e8
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSM' 'sip-files00236.txt'
9db4f45b23993206429b8597abad0b56
63f141476c7a41989d58d3909f75e814aaee8b73
'2011-10-12T01:30:22-04:00'
describe
'28300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSN' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
6687cee1f6b1e1a11d4bd8be0ad79665
e82b80eb67868bff307396f42836adb0e30e6e58
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSO' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
7fbd2d8256091ecd41ddb674f16230b8
19dbb641deb1fd009adf0bcf966c03cb1bebbb95
describe
'197286' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSP' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
de28004ac34c3a24ee8a05a23628ce8a
8effe769eb5d43be5b6715ba7125219d2028b41e
describe
'49323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSQ' 'sip-files00237.pro'
22f9066e86c51528a4bd46fbd391d02e
a72a425808a294e86aa24854ab939773b3cd5be3
describe
'65079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSR' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
dff518575d6a3ffcd06df8fc35d5f05e
f90064ab0e7f9836a1c30c5723303c8362be26e5
'2011-10-12T01:26:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSS' 'sip-files00237.tif'
9ea87f7e8fbf9b709a87fcd79060b8e8
b2c010cd11f99c18b312f8d6fb27177904223c1d
describe
'2032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDST' 'sip-files00237.txt'
15cab9bf8c981389e6e716e2863dd417
ec3177ed9d7f91c1f829bfa0c60480decce4c9bc
describe
'30441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSU' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
a10e7c206ab0540a5e0470ea5230e7d6
80b8ce2108f0453a7363f47c60d476185a42682e
describe
'405917' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSV' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
17bbeef07721b049ae0d285b589d8d4d
0eb94f4815ad6b422085d1a3f3ba0ece8e9e9bfd
describe
'208181' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSW' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
ddce2a4d5254d897bd9d2a20ea6e17fc
49be55467bd806f685d114972817ea61ef5a8d0b
describe
'58686' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSX' 'sip-files00238.pro'
3cfc8361b7c20e34b8f61e498571dd61
3082db192bcb368f0c068122561dd08ad9359a2d
describe
'67641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSY' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
9e195937fc0b805a2121785e43c1efc4
5074ee51621d234737e04f71b5bf11004318ea88
describe
'3268588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDSZ' 'sip-files00238.tif'
9908ffb478b2d73803b06a5f454be56b
defb4a502ee253b5244b6369c9d015b946d5139f
'2011-10-12T01:30:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTA' 'sip-files00238.txt'
e2b23545a4c226e0072ae20ad628e485
7e91fd6f37b695b741660a8ffa6abad393cd9b35
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTB' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
906b9baa3d7d76dd65d2e6525136d67b
f65a3b6c732f5f517ce48edab3e27706993ec415
describe
'405565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTC' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
405d3619676e4fd5ea76934eefdbfaa3
673443a5776ad9771e7639e8db2d2be7ab55d122
describe
'212762' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTD' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
f30b81f4cf098327911abda3693fa3d0
8eddbb880caf810a65036e8a849ef115edcbe723
describe
'57261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTE' 'sip-files00239.pro'
8be512be6e0f475bfcab5fc92eccf100
f3bb009a1365290cee66d62b2e6a04f0142700f0
describe
'70522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTF' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
642a142a1aff8f1d17deed8e14bec687
4cd0a4d03aa57df0d2fb4b77f66c386ec14d6ab8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTG' 'sip-files00239.tif'
4b03023c2554514627032f0815c8df0b
67eb3173a6734d999974d3f7a8514347fc74f699
describe
'2347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTH' 'sip-files00239.txt'
635b49b584660559375d66c51d40fa61
4cab045053b52e855a66be992d036a89fab88ee6
describe
'31610' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTI' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
920629e73d5275e8f910766007d3b19e
886ce8a42e1d20aee72def8a1b4592c9320ec298
describe
'405887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTJ' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
4ab1ce79a1a64a72d13b439cde7f0445
a3a1e0708e660627cc18760417154bc0f2eaece9
describe
'217103' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTK' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
344015ad2f62412a09ea1f8a6c6bbe03
1cab910918b6881646d0bacf10a693b9fd8208ee
describe
'60164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTL' 'sip-files00240.pro'
f24e766cb09a2b6900ce55ed84bc59a2
6c427c14d4d81f909e7a6572ab7a8f16acf19ecd
describe
'70919' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTM' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
4770d814a6072213d1ed7ec88fdf951b
2a70f00e9bf05bb064f21e3552dd189f273bbf96
describe
'3269104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTN' 'sip-files00240.tif'
96095fe5337a943a884485dfe7e71968
48b1ca02f608ad316735573433362b56a58cd75f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTO' 'sip-files00240.txt'
e9ac63f7d929f9b4dd95d62dfbba1a36
eacd1b9076cd83cb22be1d1fd6fe4ccb64c39085
describe
'31628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTP' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
1fb13fac4b46cfede14cbe79a754d0a7
840d09a9ff60f4d077dea8a1e35c706750ed9759
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTQ' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
e087d34b5f928ce63d83c7d71222ca28
6ca945c493ca8f2e54109203514311c6c1d54f7e
describe
'220217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTR' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
707e87cc2fe2efce7454aa95aea2f805
d2941a0e5ebb469ea23a75265ad3e497b0e93e2c
describe
'59412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTS' 'sip-files00241.pro'
25d0e8f33067424eb74afd8ba9224d85
dae92fb807d111bf5c42a157b12d854b24009402
describe
'71998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTT' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
a6ac06f0090c56353bd0b632c81d6fa0
82a9bdb0e3a74c2836601e8ff4f861363732f602
describe
'3266804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTU' 'sip-files00241.tif'
96a09f7ec06f3560a5e401a938d6b9a3
69c355fffe21edde00a49c2b492bc9d5d5e77203
describe
'2426' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTV' 'sip-files00241.txt'
e835756c41a29b2ff0de6560c70ec0dc
09aa146d9c92fc5c6541b0e8d3ec156485069baa
describe
'32061' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTW' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
337f5848433fcaf2709eed5c1e8c57bb
b5ffd521bdd0644b284447b4bfee4b25a5bf90b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTX' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
1997b6ae20a04ed7be68368c8478c27a
c6413eb647bf9c4262dd79a641cc97c18fe665fd
describe
'210685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTY' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
77b0175e2a59d286ea3f5c0304f506e6
3792a427685874b525756e254ca3bcae96da1873
describe
'54862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDTZ' 'sip-files00242.pro'
c1de8b0f381adef2c141c0e9b175a77e
e70c11244238e084b6bfc127fb78bb1a193cace9
'2011-10-12T01:32:20-04:00'
describe
'70100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUA' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
e5f06b48e00389ad707376be930869eb
9c1487d59316101c348e62c820e682179a4fc4bb
describe
'3267036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUB' 'sip-files00242.tif'
03e53a2ba1e6c4bfcfb40ffe5ad8dc5e
0a4147863cf80cfe3ebc0dffb6d8093bca79b7a8
'2011-10-12T01:33:03-04:00'
describe
'2249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUC' 'sip-files00242.txt'
6687ecf96109904fc7834ddea429aa77
7119e3e2ba256ae209d7489db70b0a34979c4aa5
describe
'32149' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUD' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
fc1ce0d022eca1dc32a98a716807bee7
08045c6db91562c46cf5516cba8b648ee127e419
describe
'405641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUE' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
45be0b093475693b0435d8de617a333c
a25f35de5daaa6d5c1848a8e07391e8baf716c14
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUF' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
eb02f522812cb71a8bec2f75783ce0ce
46fc8a0180b7cf0ceee96b58b876a047307bd1ef
describe
'57083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUG' 'sip-files00243.pro'
a004b0b706662ba5c2adcd5093f4e1ba
cd9d76a4c9244a245a4f5d75e63076c53371cb09
describe
'70837' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUH' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
adfff7c7ca8863062d68b0280b07aad3
74a011404ef12120b0fadca2d049c07a713a0201
describe
'3266820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUI' 'sip-files00243.tif'
2eb7274dfa9b00a49d2a764b536dad7c
422318745fb066e4836c24be60459209ad27d200
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUJ' 'sip-files00243.txt'
fef498b542327461c90bbd6f28b27ea2
d8190936855129ae0577ed28d557671e8327ac19
describe
'31897' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUK' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
ce24defbc98edb2d02678f0227c5f5d2
c71649315d2fcb14842834f5efa8da70af82e9f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUL' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
916a1bd0ad9bd122313e2580b6f3471e
1426cd919abbac089b6ccf918515eecf8823f68d
describe
'177583' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUM' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
4f4adba188405ae0109dd4f765343f11
5981ed063830b5af33fa984268c626c6f30a6b4b
describe
'29027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUN' 'sip-files00244.pro'
e74117a7b6a63d64f3bdcb3ec7b49d2d
d5f06003f220364e8d2fcb2991558b7686dfab20
describe
'60572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUO' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
df4cda710be1434c985d95c7cba84cd6
f65a3e676718717ff0c35273d98928e381772bb6
describe
'3266508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUP' 'sip-files00244.tif'
d9236e395ac52228d9648598422544ae
e4380d685ae24f00f65fd7b426378ec562aa214c
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUQ' 'sip-files00244.txt'
f4a19c1361bdaf03945304fa0a8765dd
a5065bc449c785a7adfe454fc77d6c283ca06f86
describe
'30555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUR' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
a50091ae1ea00d354670773e442349e1
d9677b7e38006009986f9002beae7ee4a812cda0
describe
'405536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUS' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
ff509589b78efd30b96d1c94495b3b3e
a65a800ae8a36626df5b312eab2d395e0534bd6a
describe
'199996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUT' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
cdc3d9a691c4b91f48ea44f777d6a189
6d9adbf6dfa17fc786bee75b8818a38bcc11f2b9
describe
'50680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUU' 'sip-files00245.pro'
16000822d5cec8d8461b62c9fe361f85
34f6783055744f902eb03f96dd839ebbe4cc5b3b
describe
'66692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUV' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
2a4b3aed4a4faf700639dc626e34536b
978fa378fb332858e1d9527110eae5fadcfa4697
describe
'3266416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUW' 'sip-files00245.tif'
f78993c6f31252a31eb75901aed7462c
3b053bff1bf424d543273c390b0c7f5f96a758e4
describe
'2069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUX' 'sip-files00245.txt'
8b1440bec2c4a6a6c7d633df955ce11c
ac18c4c303fa6dd6ae02975ddf044c6c1f117f7d
describe
'30487' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUY' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
da59ffd3e0f801c8a21462925a5705a7
b9c8b1e2c5f317b490a3f0123d3be6c465d253e4
describe
'405649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDUZ' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
0327032e81224366480f87fc0138e5f7
7e4956f98d6f358c233372c9e1333d5c7afb7804
describe
'197083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVA' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
0b95d9d17e0bcfa1a903831f1c8093ed
daca8f9b04bf548bcddff6c19319bed70ffb051a
describe
'50397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVB' 'sip-files00246.pro'
5f80ac4dacdf71de2afe741890b9e1ec
4b97b4c416d8f0bcda518883e9daf8716ea0aba6
describe
'65127' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVC' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
7e915b0e4c36ed55f757e7c61899a7d0
e0396348784f859078658c3758f0247d659f3906
describe
'3266444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVD' 'sip-files00246.tif'
3228e7d5841dd31dcdb74acfef08c8e6
95c3b0ded657259b35e33085dc81cde5297401f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVE' 'sip-files00246.txt'
a74bb85fd198e7dafb644973dbfec1b8
63dbba5034c7ed4eb97cb77c308f46202068cb24
describe
'30257' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVF' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
8a29fb6bc12d439536ad3131c9ccb5b2
785b439fdcd5f1a8458571bf495ad3b9e74dca27
describe
'405566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVG' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
ba391b2abf19b2201497b45d240cb001
63fe6b4fbb0691f2ae086ee897876b769d0df7e5
describe
'215535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVH' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
bde0743266251becd5a1e34781737675
11b197f677961e0ad4254ab6efef04ebe7d5721d
describe
'56268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVI' 'sip-files00247.pro'
54d7808e0b306b4a24d989c4e8afe71b
d06e237d00c45f380d91dba0182aca4192f1175e
describe
'71251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVJ' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
6757348eee2496bc508297267867889f
8a37c37bf7ce6d2589160e9d10dfcef96ca94068
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVK' 'sip-files00247.tif'
afb231f1d50e8f81fce25053b687919a
9ee2aec927c8ac6587a293ba41c08c58dd29d3f0
describe
'2296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVL' 'sip-files00247.txt'
1245691e1a95f71810a7f8b7fe7392c8
ef0c958aa40bce62b4331250bb2c71730ae7e139
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVM' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
7de2c43fa525778c6b47beb308da670f
bcb6acbb6f64c6a074fa68531bd5e943b944475e
describe
'405646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVN' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
d3661022e1501f5244b03e8f2a9dc63c
38975e24dd9a79337ab8da6d2c07d1d4aefa936f
describe
'207582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVO' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
1b69bb24a4f3ee2c9b095a045fa6d2b3
6388fddbff71e2ab9af2e846db2066fba00ed1d8
describe
'52647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVP' 'sip-files00248.pro'
6c7a9708abb31c1c689c9b744c0e0c4f
a8b9e4899b852827641ede9bc28916330c4eb79e
describe
'70527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVQ' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
c0a8b07c0f349bf1441cf379564dadde
3c1532f0d1e9bf66422b453a01c08f33022949c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVR' 'sip-files00248.tif'
ec36ed47bfc58a20aac619c943d020ce
d053d39092f9d52032155752d0a3ce1d9c63a2ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVS' 'sip-files00248.txt'
d94ccbf813e4407dda8fa8792321f07c
ef3b0cd9c758827ad47563d83767d12ff3faa82c
describe
'31880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVT' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
9016eabae29ee480588c6f15436f9f27
e5bbd6e6adb0d5e17e729dceffe722dfee2bafcf
'2011-10-12T01:31:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVU' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
241536da602b56cc6e8095868f6de6e7
3812b75d9686ec7605a5fc3c597e7b31c8cb6254
describe
'208839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVV' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
c33efdc8d381c5aa37f9cd7dbbbada22
d32ec14f48dd3d2155bf559352c0903b69cb8824
describe
'55777' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVW' 'sip-files00249.pro'
60daaf81ca36d8881ece8b490bc00c96
16fe089a311d30e13125acf598c295447cd5eb99
describe
'69800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVX' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
fb786829d2ef014114acb7b93f50c446
373c50bc157262e4c171e4958c984e1c2f6b60b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVY' 'sip-files00249.tif'
a51af09ed99fbfc1f09f6586afd7f229
2f526cab69dd54ecd28c8b24a6bf9d2d0c544910
describe
'2196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDVZ' 'sip-files00249.txt'
5c5671551c3806b10daa350d6b8b26c7
46e2d9b3bbd215cdac7325c2e2fadb89280f3f11
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWA' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
abca5623c3c75a315ce700c12413c61e
a1d5991b9b696138a8702844f91c2c308915b5b7
describe
'405600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWB' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
b20097c017bda6c47e1cb5d377ce2d6f
4f6a3adf6bdf7949b3f45181431eebdd7fc620d8
describe
'193343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWC' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
a42128adce39c549c9bcdfa696bcf459
53439ef63acd4ade075abadf9746f07b646fdb48
describe
'47293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWD' 'sip-files00250.pro'
2dfffdb94ad955fc20cfbdf88216df56
8dc35e9e028853c457739ef6f1a04abc0c7d9708
describe
'66200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWE' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
9e656f2ed87c4d4335e9af3547eb6a15
207b64ac9a10c42e885c5007112f15596bbef169
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWF' 'sip-files00250.tif'
4bfbd3d3144292b6d812bec804433a0f
6aa0f0d241f23c5e16cc85392d34fc0becc63832
describe
'1966' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWG' 'sip-files00250.txt'
114ff7e570a7edf91c08fd2aee7b2ffe
f621765d42f2c6cbb84c9dbda69eae4924a34046
describe
'31488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWH' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
1553f1c84ae3b78122bba5f290219ec6
b6760b7fcaaf62c807d13aea6f7a48c90199b5a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWI' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
1fb219ce18a4384c1eda882521a0bb39
4e10f7ecb60d253a2c6a50693fd9f506da8266f1
describe
'184542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWJ' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
7ba1f6a764997ed5a20dded1523c10ee
6cbeff562c530727b32f86adfc395ab0f6f43629
describe
'46071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWK' 'sip-files00251.pro'
ae33d8506473f4d17e0ead07bc03f0bb
04f638460bfb74bf595dd33d135b4a64822fbcc6
describe
'61005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWL' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
d3432eb5c80618a0c401bd5b7ef5bfc1
0aa4eac35bc07230af593887faadfedf85a0a150
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWM' 'sip-files00251.tif'
41ed25e3d694c12e9cc6ecb02a9234e5
5122aa4a80d60545c6ce3369bc7dedfd16993501
describe
'1807' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWN' 'sip-files00251.txt'
52431c996b19a33e4402135e5b3e2784
3419efc72cbfe50d854aeb49c50c0fe4ab514b7d
describe
'29532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWO' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
e6514506e2ba5bab141390f7dd82c5e4
9d594487538d776b156247b01edf9d5dd7c25af5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWP' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
5a0afe377f2c61cf5d9a34e6fc5361cf
378c104a56621f9b4a6aa7d7a363b2675768a46e
describe
'178624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWQ' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
c99b39ef22157b3e15d3f7709c1d654a
98f67039fae5319ed5097f7619bc14720a440103
describe
'42399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWR' 'sip-files00252.pro'
aee31097eef8a0c39476ecaf7ec0b1cb
6c1f7679b4f120dca2fbda9fec4aab15a232ec34
describe
'62135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWS' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
dc322656c4ef80101f3222fbdb2a402b
84d3d40cd4dedd1eb95954658caac6e5e51e5e30
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWT' 'sip-files00252.tif'
f2d94faca0552e3935b8a1c6917bf0c1
f79db26f89a7e640f1d05c47ec6ad6c60115cc80
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWU' 'sip-files00252.txt'
1a1a635d3a4ea2265254508002afd6c4
8eeba5eb0b7760afc9e7ca35435894dc70355430
describe
'29867' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWV' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
bd39a058ccb68b872f5e4ceb473e2ff1
ea87b02804347cd658b07ca8dbe74be8138380ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWW' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
1955351a55dc84908233373d26bdfe8f
ebe2de9d129ed93c40ed0aace4a5d0266f3c0543
describe
'200246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWX' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
1ede212fec73ac02afc5a4a68d7e5b9f
62b587faae367158dfd2ebf7e1b4a5b32e9ce28e
describe
'50723' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWY' 'sip-files00253.pro'
738a0da7e09d0da85de7d029bc906cd9
2fb96d8976be20849ed9409bd9d260b432728a31
describe
'67238' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDWZ' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
2c0b7dd1f20e8f50ab2a3ad7e3ff14ea
7bb3615d63612833dbee672825ce1b2529d69f6c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXA' 'sip-files00253.tif'
1de5473dfb88babf742f6565410124c4
80ccfc326c921dd8c5804121289716c6ff40b16b
describe
'2085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXB' 'sip-files00253.txt'
17c899611f55918366113c3abf0840dc
90c1fc315df7ca9e69e6a1f5aa14130bf624ae0e
describe
'31756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXC' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
d14d281459ffb5ef134793c59e68507a
66c28d0786ea4390c41e2235bb9f6e051e6d655e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXD' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
da33ef5a65b6b97f98c9927eb0b2fc0f
2698b706dcd4344ef440f7eb77332c5b790c3ee6
describe
'213514' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXE' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
ad6e2d1d008b6be58367721724604f28
e0a848109bc6120b42bc59bf1aa3c895cd09dc31
describe
'57612' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXF' 'sip-files00254.pro'
2e22aafa882725e3dc2e213ae163db28
8206f305803053c33e578daea930b6e78b0131e4
describe
'71225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXG' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
8be6aab65db4dc422181fc5c2a7a8dfc
19acf4e169385636c92b2996a4e5f2fbab4cdcb6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXH' 'sip-files00254.tif'
ae8d4ad9c24c7031f1520459a44dccc7
72af3aeb1417f60e0c00db311639ece70c4d5db8
describe
'2286' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXI' 'sip-files00254.txt'
09e3073c02d9365532e9200a1ca54027
f686a369175c14bd83f5475f8c5104706c87576d
describe
'32159' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXJ' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
19d8b970265db1ba42b3d13c4839beda
415146c14b7880fc461dfa639b723de2b2de9846
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXK' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
d7a2e403e8049005079a3b37ff84f801
f5de22566ff9ef6170aa4a61eaf2e607d4341e2d
describe
'196283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXL' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
7cc9bfb732645e6f5d11b5705d5fe608
44860c1b960228031aa6ec36fbd405d20361165c
describe
'48177' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXM' 'sip-files00255.pro'
68e7bb87e4dd82bb809e301f288f3441
4418e109fca784cbb1ef12bb091384e98fa781b8
describe
'66821' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXN' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
fdc2a286d58a0d1d0e65e52ccef4536f
04ec17f85aca524932bcb837eb3ad2afcea8714a
'2011-10-12T01:31:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXO' 'sip-files00255.tif'
9b69b2d2ecf4b42ea5bf2879e90a37fc
214c479fafa9bac4178f8b8559bff9d5b67eb584
'2011-10-12T01:35:14-04:00'
describe
'1991' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXP' 'sip-files00255.txt'
be628b3e9f31e1cf3b13d480b2814971
9100b4d667236c4ec2f92ffd685e20c5640a568b
describe
'31667' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXQ' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
b5f7b7b5e1c2dcd20c574e5636a5ae99
82c88372a422318cdbe63f9e0f019004ef94924f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXR' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
3670a67b093db08c8692c52286547d15
f1e40f2d67f5fec5d01cdc38e6674a0797232853
describe
'211471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXS' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
0337aa8218840eb6b0add8b1b9a2980a
2ecd61da1636e0339d7bc9f4c1839e3dc6df0ce9
describe
'54387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXT' 'sip-files00256.pro'
71c77f8bf61bf3b432d5e5aa6b1434a1
281378fbd80f23193c8a430b15a65f06db78c54b
describe
'71528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXU' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
d0c2cd493e812b4adce33a2d52b520c0
73947a5a5655b4c2b24d967aa3dd9c112128f09d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXV' 'sip-files00256.tif'
493fcdf15f1d000153208d944a3c0440
0f5d4218a50a9bd0f103c9d51c4926678a7a6ad4
describe
'2237' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXW' 'sip-files00256.txt'
5245dd5aabf18f3a3a53f7ca85f4262c
0a153eb88356169d12cee8970f0757fc0d6b2fc6
describe
'32404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXX' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
0a12424ad2576958541171a7d7e61470
96e3d7e5cca9f0ad615344fc390beaf46c4f2f9c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXY' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
430bf2f77d5bb7e9782eda9c69491a55
9360b84f12384178e87b62b152668a133c03ed59
describe
'193040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDXZ' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
7813a5e00ed2a6e22d5ee92fb2ea78f8
d0dd87a267cc8d4d095b2231d3a5864f99723d47
describe
'29449' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYA' 'sip-files00257.pro'
af4611c0f0bbd4b26bd7110f83efe14a
01f70b98acf8ef04fa5e506be73eb77e431582f0
describe
'64491' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYB' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
cf227657115a0fd7877f5cc6d85f9b97
62f89395302db49727992e2c7d62d1305ee2c723
describe
'3266668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYC' 'sip-files00257.tif'
7ca81b7f0b89c20d20532a4f1aa807a2
ceca2395097bb623081246b2c966e9f387b7e0fd
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYD' 'sip-files00257.txt'
baca6bbc29369fc7ee6e6f44daced689
c89551afb77b210f028484931c7186f2a622f6f5
'2011-10-12T01:30:43-04:00'
describe
'31230' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYE' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
d00546e76baaa0266acbde2e42aa2126
05152aa336eb4f115e2cb61d4e31b88ac97f11b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYF' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
25df1ebe22d1899fbf002b8c96709633
eaa8edb4fcedcceea6835845ae4755710470fa7c
describe
'213929' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYG' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
bad2424afe7df123839f88551eade313
7a57cc64d6ae4f73cbd771272debfe1c57d3a837
'2011-10-12T01:32:07-04:00'
describe
'33150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYH' 'sip-files00258.pro'
b157b4b7d1e519ce40a7cd5ff1a3aa49
49705bf6a0ca26343abc68f518f765a88f2c3fe7
describe
'68431' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYI' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
ad6881e18ec870d455b9cea79e66daa5
566281c139f2df79585cb8b69e80d6a69a7f46d4
'2011-10-12T01:32:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYJ' 'sip-files00258.tif'
cfcb0e17ecc051495aba4bb6864d8890
11db32165ce59ecc6ede94d8a1a4cb2bae41a38f
'2011-10-12T01:34:33-04:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYK' 'sip-files00258.txt'
0b831bfb36df0a505e4f1239cd2c0ece
acfdc6af1cf0e04a7f069e440d5db515cce796c0
describe
'31394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYL' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
15997f220511721b69ce28cfca200e8f
d1f8d278aedff387cd6358f6c93406ad90afcc16
'2011-10-12T01:30:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYM' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
c3969c1f7e17c1387c7ecab923585322
18274dc1629db6a21531b0818532b4e2fb123014
describe
'154553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYN' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
abdf099ba11740c3098d9665573e252f
c821732215cdbaa46825b7108b20fc1827946fc2
describe
'33536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYO' 'sip-files00259.pro'
04da0532701670b8116df626f59b3ae4
51e25f1d05704e4352b25e117d85962a47bbb38f
'2011-10-12T01:33:30-04:00'
describe
'51299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYP' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
78be2328bac43885a4b1361eeeb0201a
c6ea5746ef370d385b1a459fd935eacdec4d5e2f
describe
'3265224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYQ' 'sip-files00259.tif'
01701e9fced4fe362a40ddb3412dcc03
452bf49f13b30a8fb2cb18f1015075600b031073
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYR' 'sip-files00259.txt'
c8c75bff9dc75656340f7972c637a399
437179133bd52091a80d4f9dbb8c4d7fd2b15ed0
'2011-10-12T01:32:31-04:00'
describe
'26973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYS' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
827ddb0b9cd66f166d4a881e45b655d3
3ffd45e080e1748d84332cac8255d91f7bd6fed7
'2011-10-12T01:34:12-04:00'
describe
'405634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYT' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
738cce3ad7cfdb1b30735d1cb2d39404
cbb816661673ca91571f97b70060ab251f066e24
describe
'174611' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYU' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
70e4fb8e7bb22201782e4cc98e4104bc
e47674c1a96ced6d166747710287234633ea268f
describe
'40183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYV' 'sip-files00260.pro'
192cc60d88669559963e3d1be3f7d8c1
2b2095e98fa1c91ab8df5207150a69bf6cced4a0
describe
'60479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYW' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
e545bbf4fa9a12ca9d5a7ba0c3689b43
c05e5ab8d0380bab7917d941e97f6da69078f43e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYX' 'sip-files00260.tif'
d0e7f6a1b864a008b53e7565b189d438
de10bba61ff6be4ff98260ab23e60b8760a96927
describe
'1682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYY' 'sip-files00260.txt'
a3c070edd73e9c31a14d368e753e1e54
69ae7d29b506cc2fe6a647ca86bca1e7c46d69d3
describe
'29701' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDYZ' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
7f74551ee8e9c01a55d171adc1486428
24194f1c7777908e249f8c071b6e7980efab8839
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZA' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
9635537830f48b80b662bd6adf065980
62dc1cf87412dd472d712b692effa19e26c1520c
describe
'210051' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZB' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
d53dd3bcaa16d1b07e6f91a894623038
d208416b1040a837eb354b7cb55ff6532b47a4b7
describe
'55376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZC' 'sip-files00261.pro'
4d0793664ec20819292e768a80386902
2c09e8c79ea4af82e55b2f4825e9be8e189376bd
describe
'69153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZD' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
551181d9974ba8988f4eb7abc421f275
0e14adec6a55b45ff163a4c05bc57108e698dfd9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZE' 'sip-files00261.tif'
cd6beecaff0e2c6a9a485f3d8808a521
4f8c750304329187cfea07f7c453c7fca0d1b920
describe
'2261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZF' 'sip-files00261.txt'
acbda42588087c11b55d889203fefde0
399a354193a4658b8343509b3ea99ea1efc5bd89
describe
'31441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZG' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
14feb0b5218d7e0697cfafae5591469f
0c16ad4fe5cb5a44c0e4b94ce989071d8e4df15b
describe
'405526' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZH' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
e00b8ea15f8a664a7cb91d085b119833
541e01063d73ae5419db61b74dba77b372e75745
'2011-10-12T01:37:08-04:00'
describe
'198193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZI' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
8e8951c434ba0c32f8345b8376f35cc4
90e3ce5b033812798d7b335055a240e2c86a00a0
describe
'50007' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZJ' 'sip-files00262.pro'
10d4d26299cd848cf8f9ab434d16587b
709b4f2d8f2746f47f081909aeebcb325c196d0a
describe
'67386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZK' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
af90b31fa232f13bb8d7a5af035bbf52
1eeacd89f6eb20d0660ff9c8209dca8ea9188f66
describe
'3266692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZL' 'sip-files00262.tif'
e5585cfd73e2cf2a2c36ed06dbde8137
608d42b958e93b23f79f42996147fe667663c371
describe
'2065' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZM' 'sip-files00262.txt'
258acc15a7c68c0231b996e01ce5c926
e58667f35c3ec238915e7b8ba184419e85539547
describe
'31173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZN' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
56504f90e7f0bf5b22e5002c9719ceda
1ff0412acef0d2c50141d32e83a861157af7ac1c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZO' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
db5cc7fca774bc73bd3eece3f851bf41
51c4d0f649adc491c3e38262e1d14de69f7540de
describe
'213958' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZP' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
8c00a0129d0cdf3d4f5333b8afd092e6
77780090b11c8fa377ea1920c52c2c962cffca57
describe
'56066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZQ' 'sip-files00263.pro'
f2352bc2848727de7cab67438833bd49
cd12b48c18c56bbdaf9fb35344b29abe36dde37a
describe
'71170' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZR' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
bbe98de5ca27c16c60186fc7be459b6f
09f95a0e0df5448aee7896dcfdad57de0ca67304
describe
'3267020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZS' 'sip-files00263.tif'
64b927f2ff47a93b7048252431e43aa6
04fb896c6b4fe3615decaae8322e004bb99d9eb4
describe
'2291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZT' 'sip-files00263.txt'
ad60d1caa623adbc546200a91032d936
77733d1719a303f2f80dc9954215e5845fffeedd
describe
'32317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZU' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
a3d5b2025dd83732b06753cf5b600d41
c4209c8ec4e6273eb1006cbec9e5972315eb871a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZV' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
46ca1dc51cc1d35e8505bcb3d7465671
128dc53002f1726e51a272c7575e8ecac6c13822
describe
'178942' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZW' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
e4860f6bc2afc3157b5e67b4e6e7f8ca
ca14b23e2d44fe821b0dbc488a45cc2076b428cf
describe
'41939' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZX' 'sip-files00264.pro'
4a5921bbe51fda7289c6b89c79d3df8e
5ca4f003a28aa2725b3b0e1cf1759610c8bf6f35
describe
'62618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZY' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
c82ade4bc0cc0c112189436f3c1c850e
b5c2a9e0dcc5b86f432c59dfc5fdfd548e0a4ec2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABDZZ' 'sip-files00264.tif'
602c1e05881532e0514621315017040c
5125fb6ecee13394c5530eb8864e49e79e7f3d95
describe
'1760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAA' 'sip-files00264.txt'
bd5606bfc4adf5cc95a7fd2bfae176f0
aa53787b322bcf3da9d6c799e219f5ac88a76ac1
describe
'30939' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAB' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
06fef59f124ab366225a5a7c564f1d8f
d9dabfbffe6bf053b22185047ceb7d70873c3303
describe
'405614' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAC' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
88a8e0f83798186b6ae7e037ca1c11b8
9b7dfebcec4c6f2053a3d874a981e8b6f06c018f
describe
'166310' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAD' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
f0b716e90a560f91d21c4d7693110105
c4caa113a22385a74929a6d97ff543b1cf7bc99d
'2011-10-12T01:34:00-04:00'
describe
'38671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAE' 'sip-files00265.pro'
5bc66952adcd38831a48f2efa58fa1f7
1e926647453f7104ce8e54e0d3de2d2147aeaa04
describe
'56372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAF' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
0ee53dd4b612979048ef8d2f9b44d711
c2423f620f98125f8a1851ccf9ac32c66601644d
describe
'3265668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAG' 'sip-files00265.tif'
0a4b034b59e4b6f86c5c738495d43d01
45670bd4b08b5557d633a8fc3d970bedffb0991a
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAH' 'sip-files00265.txt'
203b053f58d7b4bf2fd51b299e203cb7
ab8cf2246d77775e1d0c757646ede4345edd881a
describe
'28192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAI' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
bdd55384ee35b59f92897972dcc3e96f
46a8b35c4ba7f7e47808cc9a04a09cb8a349fbc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAJ' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
c892eb174d08196ee7bcad079b60d301
090933d467ccf03be0643508174d50072b62c447
describe
'190949' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAK' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
7759cfc8654c9b9b2e8a09694dfa8fb0
a9b609d83a63eb22c32675bf83bd34ed6d965bab
describe
'46917' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAL' 'sip-files00266.pro'
2aff34987b2c87420918535e570a4d68
041ce951c2b48b001ce3ea3bfcc8b112968d1667
describe
'64163' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAM' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
a4cc6fd345d6172c12ef0b166f72d218
2554db1e421505d8e19bfa6b462a053f2811c324
describe
'3266332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAN' 'sip-files00266.tif'
5ac487cbb48c62d8bfd6b081daa73798
7b9f6642740bbf9b06c5b40fcedae663dc7120b0
describe
'1970' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAO' 'sip-files00266.txt'
0d1e441b1c3c6a66f193303f8d9bc4b6
58d13715762cae7b0eb77c707d703b85bdfeec55
describe
'30311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAP' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
29a90e85c211ded4bf0c2f4362da4813
7a8bc78436d3a2ce18299e15dbc0b20d0da88f88
describe
'405594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAQ' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
e03d056fe705a83b2d78088dce767b3b
02ecde963cb3cdcd3d49255cae28b7aaedcfb139
describe
'207690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAR' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
d33a55ddf1d8e91da72f990145a953d5
813149c3626dca7f3113427bfab4e333f751c001
'2011-10-12T01:35:07-04:00'
describe
'54022' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAS' 'sip-files00267.pro'
f460022d39b0535fb8a75f64aa89c173
38b14c808843546e2cd7a781c6ef1f67ad28a202
describe
'69678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAT' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
cd2e31d6848f035ba4617c99e5ad77b3
0c70b6905d43503725c1b7ad5724419aa1c007cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAU' 'sip-files00267.tif'
8b4a37b01f017d4c07f530dc795fba4f
184253cf50ef0194509bab7519891f107ba66ab4
describe
'2217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAV' 'sip-files00267.txt'
a2fa91ad573f58edc12f716df28cbb8d
4f6d4115f8f84cba1da2f12341bd9e5d4cd692de
describe
'32065' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAW' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
1e6c1328cc0e83cf139c109bb3c18854
0c8ca6ecedef104345cb7c611fafa0966be8e59b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAX' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
79566487e2a05dc962acb99ade989d43
0cc07a872399ba5a9883193121e0730e676b2010
describe
'207419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAY' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
0f24feceb5cf75a69c06deff5b5263ba
e5e15f20a419136dab529c307c37e30924c50efb
describe
'55420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEAZ' 'sip-files00268.pro'
955c479d77c10b4a81e237831227d624
ea0ea0d2939e9fa4a380f640b497b6b41030abe0
describe
'69152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBA' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
5c81c63142e0894aeecfe44034dabb74
70ca5de95e010900f5c1355d4d37733582b25f1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBB' 'sip-files00268.tif'
f7d03f7b25c61be0759a37c76f4130cd
4b2b4e24dc4edcd5eb29cfea57e2989acc05b874
describe
'2277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBC' 'sip-files00268.txt'
88acad430b6d1bdc4233c7f2b32ce0c7
33377d2f38d577d4dd19229b58167ceb36ba9034
describe
'31495' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBD' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
4d1229f9a4b254a3aad4c373a497c3ed
a52a8e469c997e5eb99d95513008b217274ea55a
'2011-10-12T01:28:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBE' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
ea36d9c171ca9d7e6343c7e92934bea3
dbd61107a7699acbe1f313ff1c6b461030bc116d
describe
'207954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBF' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
7ad9559526d825916167809eaaf39246
89f2e92f7fd9b5e6ecf4f12a7b05d528aa8c2d9a
describe
'55313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBG' 'sip-files00269.pro'
c8c69f9e7b505a4957e2773df4c782ed
63f67419968e31018cf5556ced755d8cf2f4a998
'2011-10-12T01:31:41-04:00'
describe
'69304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBH' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
1bb04b58bb9d3766f870730c34eea09e
a85c81d823881e4c7d0c6b9d1f6d123dd6e22732
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBI' 'sip-files00269.tif'
8b98e17db8f307f3251369d8ec575b25
82956c579e203ccf5cfddb152fe7a8bbdfe7477d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBJ' 'sip-files00269.txt'
a688e46c5895b8c4e8783f4acdd8fcb5
eba894743be8e8c57ad91bd5d7152245499868ca
describe
'31332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBK' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
06db74816dcd09ced4b0b80d9a2d5e19
39de87120352ff2dbf46e3dd897cb0e814cb3633
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBL' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
2a7df071daf889bcab58570b8f056084
76ca7e538e9625972973fa6300da4ceb687435d0
describe
'209041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBM' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
09099c943de50ccfd9048cccbe135e62
777482a28c63a60f2d04505fe61cb866dca503f4
describe
'54750' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBN' 'sip-files00270.pro'
03e7de43ea7a46234b7ec88031fafa39
95ad813b92d86310c77e0c869ac31d681e627289
describe
'68475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBO' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
bca3a87ec964f94d41f4295c03ab4450
de99062a5c34c80cd79ce4eee601a7b120ec4040
describe
'3266736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBP' 'sip-files00270.tif'
b1ddde85a3511c7c5c52589822c7a358
cf219016907931e437828e96c6310938e783696d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBQ' 'sip-files00270.txt'
f5dcbbe602d909af010cc78c10c69f59
848c03b52c8e7f942dd89e1260c1e0cfbbcf09fb
describe
'31611' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBR' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
a169036c6c4cae0615ecc0e5efc0660f
88483a73c123108d1c5b3999d92a971976fdbe5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBS' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
f6e51b501016e826db0e28ebd5535f1c
7fb1219aa57cc020bbe89e3b32e8f8ff352d421d
describe
'196668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBT' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
0eea231f28cd766a54cd049fa2a0a2fa
5e163a2d72b68dcfcd45ab51e04d5b5fca9c66ed
describe
'49421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBU' 'sip-files00271.pro'
0493dfe6c5ba5c0aefa8406e65989b2e
9a008b2c374f45903222b54648ac2264d29f5508
describe
'66160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBV' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
8e773055bd6bc29f881fbc36cd9d2544
f6caa8a9c59bb7a767901bee4388e99f82ee9dde
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBW' 'sip-files00271.tif'
f16c601ebf3b0003610232a3d37832e8
e81dcfbdfb135e838d3eb4487a3bbeffd8a80a27
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBX' 'sip-files00271.txt'
417b41063dafa012eab7b5b0dec95fae
550ab202aa870c5e9c8a74d21030aa27189ffc77
'2011-10-12T01:31:38-04:00'
describe
'31374' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBY' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
f2b0d854339cd3fa10b4b01872f5e117
8b034815019e332853b087024922c5ca53e855da
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEBZ' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
4d1c250ea5fc1bf02b4bd5c6b349e7ed
ab1a0761ea1cd232cfafef3d9a912e9dd38774cb
describe
'152704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECA' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
d41097a9893cc97bb98441bc27a796e5
9a03363ef7fb903d6e172cb62fc1cc74e9a6e870
'2011-10-12T01:34:31-04:00'
describe
'34105' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECB' 'sip-files00272.pro'
3a2db8be75d5493d8cd570905be0f5b0
35d675443476dcbcaac2169d62fbcc33459b04cc
describe
'52034' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECC' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
8d6180696c7f51af8dc39ff39d41e8f8
a8777c592070133f4643d32dec4c59f1a38fe775
describe
'3265216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECD' 'sip-files00272.tif'
bcebd478b3314eb10848204de0449aa5
a2e038907b6260197eeeba1ef566bda5abc5bd57
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECE' 'sip-files00272.txt'
1f7bef96d37e583be0770730d8daabf5
d37e8df059d4755e01a6f42dd3a137d0361b67b9
describe
'27075' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECF' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
140b8946b5445cdec8d7ff96fe1fc7d1
7d395591e8720fb38aff2413d56cc9f6e89802a9
describe
'405438' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECG' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
f2f9f952207b1e744295c1009c0c2203
5b5570f08b067747085c9fbb127563b934d1bbc9
describe
'189184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECH' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
6a4f07f8f11a9d686f0f09696c3d8d0c
dba676ec39225be203a3bbf2aca83c7e6e2490fe
describe
'46934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECI' 'sip-files00273.pro'
8e5ace24c827ec0406bf718142bcd808
0c537a8e80dcf8dd87a7c639ee609b01d54a4eb8
describe
'63572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECJ' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
777d0091775c54c575abecf8f6a31d03
f3fed0589d7a9a47f80a5b29c1f8eeee026b29ca
describe
'3266428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECK' 'sip-files00273.tif'
876408205efd4afe0de3a7465cf11187
949794b7c26e87009c10fda0fb3a25e8bb5bb9f5
describe
'1942' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECL' 'sip-files00273.txt'
af1943cb76f95ac535e3a731817878e9
b78392895718936b7459f37e5eda5865af60f7d9
describe
'30173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECM' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
3de7da1a900cf663af4ea85a1522cd84
bd4dacf710967cd01545358a3cef997af6017422
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECN' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
c381e8c073082db27547955b0ad76f27
9ccd00ad1923a223dd035ee6c0fda7ab8b428c02
describe
'213644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECO' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
6f36ba22cb416aa5538ee1efbc21e9af
90c1962caa2584097f5ac8493dcb53bb8aea240b
describe
'55881' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECP' 'sip-files00274.pro'
6a770fe493675722bd474ef7b7fb0c77
51a44ca81b2239671c40a03b2152a1634bf019fb
describe
'70984' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECQ' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
4469a3e8f0726b6c47f7aaff85d049cc
8bf63717d54e429be07bc275a9bce866e92093ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECR' 'sip-files00274.tif'
0bfffd20752435e99d5537d21c99294b
63c758fd83dd3b66832e1d772a78d6280bb28206
describe
'2288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECS' 'sip-files00274.txt'
2a25c075da7013fa5034ea2be9b3f533
5413edfc074b21f618ac15eafb851f2ffcfd267e
describe
'32137' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECT' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
7ee43286b4fc314579a75cce56d5d45c
9407b42e4e7700b337db1e2b0b4ced2b74268786
describe
'405549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECU' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
136e6f8f8566af6868eb3e8e8dcd3617
c930485bd80fed746d3d51ff12ab296a6ff16749
describe
'215546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECV' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
8ff87114c8a8c53460022f60031624ee
9d47e43321c9eb46ecb8bf37e9b309c9d4b7995a
describe
'56487' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECW' 'sip-files00275.pro'
cea4e4599eebe11cf5c3dd59072ef60a
149ac0e4ae612dbf47f45a0fcbb592288877eb3b
describe
'71203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECX' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
4b188af8d1e8c40b095e7b5969d21e2e
6db528b0f3fff7482458455734940f4096641885
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECY' 'sip-files00275.tif'
67d11c3ad408e64fccb78f4c738ececb
be3fea008422f019cd2c1e13b08a9571c75745a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABECZ' 'sip-files00275.txt'
408833860c98213dd392eeadb78a15c5
a843d9322aa50ab116707f581ce9331bcf2e29f3
describe
'32400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDA' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
1672fd6eedeb92b5e0496c8bdf3fc600
d368dc6a67390e31afa37fd45a334ba8479202e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDB' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
51c821e2900569a5dc3362ed57eb9095
7fbf4d8ffee87ea7d89b26cdca73f1d8283a4afe
describe
'219809' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDC' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
d35f5675d0b7ae72d58db10a4e5e8ab6
9893ff8588098ab1d1b878a0fa42970d5801b12c
describe
'58815' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDD' 'sip-files00276.pro'
b45417ac30dbc1ddade36bcdd033356e
d99c3fe8188536ae2fffa336dbf47facc99da348
describe
'73313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDE' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
48a4356c76ec185b2a6a740a6b188e86
426d9de9312fcfbbfde19e7b41eb4e4e89155ec7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDF' 'sip-files00276.tif'
84b62a4486d04e194a2e3722ccadf8b9
653088b159e6fbd89f7d39964da9401f80ff3a70
describe
'2394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDG' 'sip-files00276.txt'
75a868cb9e87613956f62605417911c3
ac191d91e429e57cfc0e850e3794b4760ab43b36
describe
'32634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDH' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
a7f7644e3e6c22173a030ee90fc88221
c55ac774fd21e9103d9b084d82b61eb23daea459
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDI' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
f2bcb4d899c575fcfb057d6131dfa768
6d18a36a5d7522cb7ea55a80bdae48eb074db4da
describe
'158611' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDJ' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
ee7cbdd7f755151aa9aa9c4503736a77
f5b1bb868cb3f974f96ecd5c50bccf821fcc0027
describe
'16371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDK' 'sip-files00277.pro'
1aad44bf5a40ff8282fd0068a1d9b3df
e3a615a9a8829deea16ff6ceb9bc0c4c7c624ee5
describe
'55314' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDL' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
89767d37ef7020b5740396001764373e
5f348c5ca4cd6d59f476e7ee87fc062f62377d4a
describe
'3266032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDM' 'sip-files00277.tif'
afe0f9acb40d35bfcbdc4a68f652d084
5e282250c47a28b762b2d0358097a614a26457d5
'2011-10-12T01:33:52-04:00'
describe
'676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDN' 'sip-files00277.txt'
37cfc68cd1cd79e257f5ab5cf955bd58
c09f710365f976121b42752f8e640aad1833bad2
describe
'28841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDO' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
8779ebd4e64cdf571caff0bc56f6aa01
4ca98ffb3b712b7d4c4967f38919c84ec3460c0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDP' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
29a9f6b60f23aea9aeff849a264ffacc
3f3adeb20851e5e17fa904fbaf50d79fbae8a233
describe
'175309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDQ' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
02e1eb0e50540e738bb75fa5295aee6d
e5301fc3915fbb40279f40bd1522166e3d6cc89d
describe
'42327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDR' 'sip-files00278.pro'
ea0bdd66bdd50d671bff782645343358
2db1dd593fa7d1e8c45c894087174718ea54e72d
describe
'59849' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDS' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
5b74d87a77a9d33dddd10c1ac8454ffb
8bd2bd81700e544c352b58e04f67e922342e9637
describe
'3266112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDT' 'sip-files00278.tif'
dd6f6c152b231932b12908ea630e3fb3
7cbb624fd027db6e2af46fa932dcb7213d43eff6
describe
'1734' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDU' 'sip-files00278.txt'
b55b8f60013d730ccd5cf2d4d67c31d2
f511101fd1461201407b9eb0d5671397ded2254c
describe
'29582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDV' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
47804d40121f2caafa0670f4cf229513
6264232e99a6fe6b4016c990ac9c33a12b8734f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDW' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
be5a90e49940f1712d6a3b18c938f460
7081692a741147ac9ea2685274477675ae788c82
describe
'196353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDX' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
0b69d15d3251d2728cbe3f5827068270
41c54eeb0d1865268f0671bf915480ab5b86686d
describe
'50020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDY' 'sip-files00279.pro'
51d5edd5b1c9aa1ad34de9d22aa89591
8b731db4ec100167388929de5d83f72388b9d8db
describe
'65183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEDZ' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
959179e52e4ef8cdbc4af9ae8d477af6
e626d3d7dd8c735e994414f77d4e39f9a3c0890c
describe
'3266480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEA' 'sip-files00279.tif'
7b8098cd0ba54beca6a210cbfc76991d
7624b1222d197ff02adbcff11bd671981c6009ec
describe
'2067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEB' 'sip-files00279.txt'
3070cc43f7526a234026374ab9c8e4fe
2f6db4ff698d0e2f605a6bb8d36b58db94a7b694
describe
'30344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEC' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
49ddf27390101536a128f7982b47b7a7
30f6348fef878c638617f6f84d52332ed60d2545
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEED' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
a3819c15ad7ba56a556f13f5c9f67760
cc35c4ec4417f6df097a974db77033509d0a5e80
describe
'207380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEE' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
21c772fb34624dff03eeef0d82b086e0
cef5572162800266098e9710af52fd6c2afe74f7
describe
'55480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEF' 'sip-files00280.pro'
439eac395fbd244d8d970fcfbfad685f
e1b54ea146a997f63e10a7b64363068a1ab2ed8e
describe
'71422' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEG' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
bb15fe869614f6040f0030b8360ad481
5bd952757734d96a7a49704da97543075e0d471e
describe
'3267148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEH' 'sip-files00280.tif'
49d5ec69227a6fe9adeb70e1595b5665
89b0d44c26145149f403a567a6bedeb7423a4b2f
describe
'2278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEI' 'sip-files00280.txt'
b3dd4e61045c8ebe5a99ba885fd8b615
dce7adba2fa72aefa82c24d5a51e21fad72c6644
describe
'32467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEJ' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
c93f7c8137747aed66ba266194cb86e0
e2d0c2a2dd8e8c8700dbf0d98929eb0980849cae
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEK' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
a9cc49d891f980ef5db2e9d17baed030
c1abdb1390ecc7bf68dc872032889ceccf1298b3
describe
'205545' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEL' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
a53e7e21ea28512b567a465842f5d14b
7e8be7cb2df9604e0f22c3b7f384a74ac4011efe
'2011-10-12T01:34:43-04:00'
describe
'54496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEM' 'sip-files00281.pro'
7dcf1dff7e424eafbdd36389df59d513
8d04ea88de8bdf5c81f6b26f094ac7183fca75af
'2011-10-12T01:31:19-04:00'
describe
'70949' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEN' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
40d6e9c1aad9a19759674cffb96c3e8e
f1e3dadac2d42c628727d166b5abd858dfb54234
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEO' 'sip-files00281.tif'
00ee08994d0f61f7a080b57ce308c873
ab09dfa2e3e44eb3fe79295e21928ca4a3dc1eb8
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEP' 'sip-files00281.txt'
467e942fcefe0e87cb8346aed7295168
87aeaf6abf84ca8db23e942f2600fe55f4283b02
describe
'32954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEQ' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
8ba2778909743e784209aefec1eb7a94
667133616c82832e170073bb7c40a574696d8337
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEER' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
660cccedf4a1b5b3afb2397342a1132f
94651b343c2a4e5ba43b08ab13bb46aca534a20d
describe
'196130' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEES' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
57ac6266f7f143511c1b57d2d63a5d99
c234fe62f3685fbc4244cf02bdd2a2f802923019
describe
'50406' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEET' 'sip-files00282.pro'
1eee33885e66eb779ea5389898f58ff8
11270bfa565d26f4584070cfdbd3087e9697d57b
describe
'67317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEU' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
8ca5b9d7743806827dbceb56a3384246
da879831b161bc7c3114fa0038353607bfedf19d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEV' 'sip-files00282.tif'
03944cbc0f0606167d728ca6ad887610
598a80a0008409bed49d012b7b1e6baf1216ccf2
describe
'2079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEW' 'sip-files00282.txt'
945a9e576e681509d1c2c8cce344de32
81ef0cf769f5ba54e80183ecae24f61160a80c3a
describe
'31191' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEX' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
18eaef943fc0bede8540f2a84d353fcc
8af841f7bb9b80c8ffdabda83fb685b99746d56b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEY' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
681b81c9154bd7f98fcdea4ef9c206f4
951ce10d9de04e156c2196d8861bfdaed30ef460
describe
'161383' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEEZ' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
9aa5d38751acce29e0d58e2686ff20ba
36591f6f744da4c45f0cadf25b6caddf5bc51631
describe
'20396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFA' 'sip-files00283.pro'
a73274b01ebe0af6178a3d94440d8179
ab4a3ddccb5f1c6a5ec0dca9e062d9dc0e00e326
describe
'55661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFB' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
74d1bd429cc9d2b7f171a399bae63ce1
5384782581bfeb73dd0f1eb99eb7649657d0f39c
describe
'3265844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFC' 'sip-files00283.tif'
78a1782b0408e790670668e34b5d14cb
6510da0ae55ca600faac112765812d511cb3add7
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFD' 'sip-files00283.txt'
01387fe91b6dabd1dbf2733dca2e0a9b
458cad7568c19539ae13ce076919c604a2b32de7
describe
'28560' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFE' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
fd8c72dd7040635fcd9bac285ee747ca
7e3188128dbc387e1079a4d8d306350164e0d7c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFF' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
a3b4e3b53d5a7ce26590c25f34d06b4a
82a1c8d13a5529432ab4386fd6d2531de4c0124a
describe
'223293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFG' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
d9658c6f456fa24cf10327d4508234c6
f5fa2e91c5634cf3545d63e05e9321f3d396ad50
describe
'60218' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFH' 'sip-files00284.pro'
bcfbfbcef030c2cc7e35ef9ad76f5ae4
c3dfd53cb762f5d1063e22169035a34610eb2f16
describe
'73638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFI' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
272a51ce4aaa74f1d7fa93f18de6db25
261de0095900deaa65a8e698772aab67251de8fd
describe
'3267320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFJ' 'sip-files00284.tif'
fdb9c244520af2c08187a2177de361f1
a05853d399e4df49bd962e1069894a9182246380
'2011-10-12T01:31:30-04:00'
describe
'2449' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFK' 'sip-files00284.txt'
195767702ca9a7da62feb8d399d403bd
2959c32c9f7dc7a7d16f3eeb1e6752ac1e7dcac2
describe
'33051' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFL' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
4967d78712f7fbfe7be857619e62d06d
361cf262647307520b5dcc43748eae0199436a74
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFM' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
31e3d35f8d7cc1286c0bf370ee460217
445f332ab325ec40a1e1100897a581653301b009
describe
'182691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFN' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
2c07a9cfa064de984068522c8dfb4748
9fa94fcbc64c23abc7ec1fc1a78fede2e93c8c66
describe
'43753' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFO' 'sip-files00285.pro'
13329fd399337d52b3ea5bea26cb3c88
ca33c441e0fedc6214ff23331e11c12cee4fddae
describe
'61646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFP' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
3871fe8069eae41b319f266117bb9137
ddafe9d2daf00651ced44e4072aeb0ae06e45155
describe
'3266116' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFQ' 'sip-files00285.tif'
d8c7e08e2ccbae114df3292970ec704e
a6691a5535cdb2726184f37e9e5f59672d4dcc62
describe
'1784' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFR' 'sip-files00285.txt'
ea0362a7d0a86c5c8febb1a9b4b137e9
f408b5d674deaca8ef45f25cedadc2b94ad344a3
describe
'29506' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFS' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
b0809d24f661cf85f0efd19cfa281fbc
3d51d04fa6fc608f973dc1be6cac2500e4b158bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFT' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
891d278b62684180305bbebb8a1fd053
e3c0fa8a0df4078250b34a3cf6443609dcc3ec71
describe
'180734' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFU' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
4e86b462e51a1859f864bd59c6b89a90
bd60138c7e4253c1fdb6657441406038a6bc693e
describe
'43225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFV' 'sip-files00286.pro'
60ea78c2ffdac1ebea56a915a22439e6
d9aaced18e826e9d00f4c3eb4dd70101e51fa476
describe
'61665' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFW' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
68ef501739d888d7933183de3a03ead9
53082fa86ff4b03e002a6b6530642f83549e7b72
describe
'3266492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFX' 'sip-files00286.tif'
f9dd7cd1d0fef7d1b1915e953ce81c2c
4c85a9d44c0b877161f2e02758ecf0dac55354ce
describe
'1797' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFY' 'sip-files00286.txt'
85cad5c139dcb3066993fa74306335ad
dd37ac71ac3d859abf9a66083dd985b085d2d200
describe
'30325' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEFZ' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
03c26bef74a199628ce9c6756f212ca0
1aa91ab79a55d7d1c7a8b48153f87e2806b2d5e1
describe
'405272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGA' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
6f3681872e9f4fc6f592ff143b63c95d
0f5d5a9dcf43134e2f6895e6094d9c4492b9b2d0
describe
'134587' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGB' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
4516c25d1be38fd935fe85f8b4819c3c
fba0cf35f78624f406e0af7da8abede00f731ef0
describe
'13644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGC' 'sip-files00287.pro'
3eea8c135b30a439756d5b4039ae9c95
cb55de5bc9796773eac2497beea8c87b40a3a129
describe
'50196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGD' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
b380d29835d33867bac9e00cdc81953f
fb12e0fe1f8750d2cf36066bf08a786105d042a6
describe
'3265736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGE' 'sip-files00287.tif'
228aa6f0d61a9eca0030912cdc7e7bb0
2a8fe77c2eeb3faee7f7ba13c5b0302494f71797
describe
'569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGF' 'sip-files00287.txt'
48469f23de844ed11cd11f1c8c49d9fa
7ae36579fcc5c0458cc7e2e42a3e4c2d86991e8c
describe
'28045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGG' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
24da6c42e8dea8d9c44ec076ee0248af
652e45e17c2b750675194edd00ec5b77ceb44838
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGH' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
cf582cff4f168a052fa51a5bf4a1d168
69140335955698f42686a6e815f937b8d62fbdfa
'2011-10-12T01:35:56-04:00'
describe
'197607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGI' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
732f12c2a64bf7a9cedc386699381353
adb687dfc8abd2420a2e54b8ed690814e8e85255
describe
'50995' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGJ' 'sip-files00288.pro'
3483941c9716de2cca27b242cbec489e
65ca63354a1824e1655b0ff022368d1d169ebdf6
describe
'68866' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGK' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
82b3c7b3f28ba00ce3e2908b49269fae
1b31e65ae0b758db6b873ccbf730dc30761517c3
describe
'3266788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGL' 'sip-files00288.tif'
5b7df86d5c122e7f0af0ca20e354cf22
2232f2fa39c109c3ff3a1d80620b9f7c87f21770
'2011-10-12T01:32:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGM' 'sip-files00288.txt'
71723436470c01c5a5b91fdb45d1ed5d
1501525f79e87401880943bd72b39c65c804ecf5
describe
'31877' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGN' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
7a538704e48bcbfd7adec51cde6f3209
001394dd75f5d57970a733cf14029803fac26395
describe
'405541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGO' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
0c4925a15d4ce54a78cae3f59c4d0d18
d6e68be232498b61e4a5905f8ec154f796740b0a
describe
'211946' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGP' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
3223bf65066aad3002a99e42036a0d03
826df4e5ff0e6016a3073b404dba557d40d288f4
describe
'55775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGQ' 'sip-files00289.pro'
703c85694fe283513db356c75fd2e1a8
4bcb3ffdbae5162f8c004683ce6451574f4bfd85
describe
'70471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGR' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
118f0c9f9336bca0ac780c40d066e90d
af84acf491b2711cdfc2e1819c46ae8c2bb05213
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGS' 'sip-files00289.tif'
478507e834b42cdec1484842628933ed
49a161d050de3d48e49e5dadf5779d6da873ad6b
describe
'2284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGT' 'sip-files00289.txt'
cd3b69571b6b17383edef339c80c5fe0
53c78700c2f5bcba26d15c3be68e4534c4acf530
'2011-10-12T01:32:10-04:00'
describe
'31902' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGU' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
5e78cac31ab5e9889265041656f03bbf
af4b5b161b4a87b5b7f7c84d093529fe3ee06404
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGV' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
6bc88db2c3d515cfae91c15ad086ffb4
cdadda31bc000ec6c30d5b28527c6ba8fc6f5a5c
describe
'197826' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGW' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
295a9e8ce05f813f71e65ab5ad9d762b
3e9fd5c9d12d2337f4ff6113b421fb9539fd6905
describe
'51464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGX' 'sip-files00290.pro'
c1bf7e307d87914ab1ad11cce29f02ff
aaa07829c34e56dbd03b4ce9feaad4b67075f563
describe
'68111' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGY' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
6384dca7842cc8c7103d7f51634f561e
558dfa1ad2751453cb9b22f0fd7f59150dcaf8f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEGZ' 'sip-files00290.tif'
e4cf9e509ec61f4dad6e1c0f2e2f7a19
114405ab827eb2642d871e4551be717c7e8e773e
describe
'2125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHA' 'sip-files00290.txt'
d067e8528e6a204e55f3cfff53159127
fe832aa71823fa10490af021a559580f15af0b05
describe
'31764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHB' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
3b43a0eac69e04dddc3f43936a31b855
6aa0834f41da6a7ca799ed1085cff22229e0be8c
describe
'405553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHC' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
70ed0c04e99c54a76d452bdadf6adb92
06621c3c7454ab12d77aadf855e675821de030ae
describe
'168529' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHD' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
a3f6f0ae74a53672e65b4901c2f30484
68b771acd22beb9f6c74788a0a54eecc185714b8
describe
'27893' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHE' 'sip-files00291.pro'
88d3484f1244279b5459fa09a541cac4
35d9c73c5cac34a365829b28b1ea6d383f7783b9
describe
'57707' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHF' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
5675626a73f0b53758fa06c9c3d91204
cb1e9e7206dcf3937da8a5950e02a4175c2c8e6c
describe
'3266108' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHG' 'sip-files00291.tif'
b5c29b8020cdd0ebe7c1b83a1af14b94
ed2e695d5cf5158f245b6f0bfad81d3c37ba97a0
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHH' 'sip-files00291.txt'
ad6250b8036dbfa632dd5a04d1059515
430cfed2644ca044108e733066236438ce62d09b
describe
'29255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHI' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
5de162106a63741db03b755b8a2719d8
f90b374d64a93c6344d72a5b87e305895a322eef
describe
'405556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHJ' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
6bcc42d727a3ac58de532c142daad596
639970bdcef77f2680e4e33e762069ec707513d2
describe
'203668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHK' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
99f8e2815c489797bafdfcfa884d7713
ac8ab1a2f87256ea77392212229287e0d2b04ac3
describe
'53704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHL' 'sip-files00292.pro'
dfd7b30d1072a4fd0e9246b5125e7de3
7dd548c16640d9c4943b11a1e4ad0574a230c4ac
describe
'70219' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHM' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
e5378ad5238b2850a5687e6c23c609d8
d93b6a35e6d7e8116f157a77a35b3e7ff7f61a8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHN' 'sip-files00292.tif'
29c2f2eba108377695e6e95274551719
350d07cecac8de83178f3d3ed9cda500157cecf6
'2011-10-12T01:34:55-04:00'
describe
'2203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHO' 'sip-files00292.txt'
15a0cecfc483bedb17a59073e064bfa2
8c128b9e1d30dc9bf65c697da7eb7696df656298
describe
'31937' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHP' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
ff29525577f56b6aa0edf8af791921a6
f2b9fd4165dcdfa92df20d473839bfd7934f9d4f
describe
'405584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHQ' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
7ceeee11d3711056992ba1aebfe92c74
5ad2e3e0593e804559c0fb7dd8b8042e49b49095
describe
'150424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHR' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
9c72d26a29c4b306708f82f9b9e40a5e
e7da2f5b95b748ac257cb66ced18fc0e6531c995
describe
'31743' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHS' 'sip-files00293.pro'
8868262f6922b88cbc478270dcf53a30
1772272ef0e8e4f28fd84ab74ee8e7dd7ad84b62
describe
'51176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHT' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
96edd39b82f10d936f3ac6f2ef193bb1
cd605d2bd29dfdaf3821c7cb5130b40ba2e5d2d2
describe
'3265016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHU' 'sip-files00293.tif'
c120ea610f2dafefef08f1dee2d60118
71a2d488df55f28e6e53dfb690cc100779bc32a5
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHV' 'sip-files00293.txt'
e8542a8ae41f77e94c556a1a68a3582b
0696531b4e1dcca3d24628bd8f3c6c7092204122
describe
'26272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHW' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
732d732b5ec9d22057a13aa91ad5be65
9bb12ec649cb020769b5ac05263ff1051c073a64
describe
'405572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHX' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
07b522ebd98cb6c8ad89041b0d401ac9
b8b122addae1c5d6a32a68fe21fc9b4413d0ce50
describe
'196425' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHY' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
0feca74ab3454404e8f1f18517d26440
ebad815efcc0661b378fd88a899a8b14507a6757
describe
'49360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEHZ' 'sip-files00294.pro'
985eabe93c12128ce457c1a1901adbf0
ed2dfaa0ce749e39fb5491a4cb1f504b89f3db17
describe
'66405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIA' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
99e6518ab4b262a61ba4e9aca4d366fd
2149f61843d825c5d62fa7339e24c3c872dca843
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIB' 'sip-files00294.tif'
05c36686db974c2f9c7ca57b2bfb6ba2
af01f7da1fcf5fff69e45a59ffbe2fd1f56c73e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIC' 'sip-files00294.txt'
534e63787ee782606b2cfa059f9ebbcf
2c305be553ba5b1a9c6d1b8d2398d135c751f63e
describe
'30386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEID' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
5f60bd88463c971b71c821d1c0b42a21
56571467ab7aa0156083793708e12b1c64110950
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIE' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
bd5e2e263382f7403637b770188443bc
52053e3b07cf600583ab51b2a182fd6e2f52bdce
describe
'226877' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIF' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
7af137bc462b26d4c36c9f204bd28182
71b4f348f9d36257b45d1b5b7572f698be4aeec4
describe
'61475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIG' 'sip-files00295.pro'
4395297549b5da3259790cde953f5af2
3e9844318186d5c46d67c4b4c5679840b854210b
describe
'73993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIH' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
68d688aa3756a711f39b2beebf2851a9
1a2834a0bc84f31ae74a1c7833342de15165654d
describe
'3267124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEII' 'sip-files00295.tif'
33f99291c4a15f9f45c1af5b277e491b
22bf26636484c83d537c5dcc217e60afafb667ba
describe
'2496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIJ' 'sip-files00295.txt'
a838e832bf0ac537e50c4faf02757f12
0c6365f82367fe974280c8eebb7495e460b58a15
describe
'32633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIK' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
84b3cf883d0c7a0ff8515cde881b32e6
180509435393572ce8c4cdefb36acd00015ac4b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIL' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
c6385f6c69b12d46e7a3c5f7da8ea5b4
1d41f468885345fc5f782bf882721e5acf413c95
describe
'219045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIM' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
c3da975a8acb3f6c719d0b8f801218be
2c354620a42656e56355b296063de3d83084edb0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIN' 'sip-files00296.pro'
bf190b6764f8872a5d9e44ae8ce4f42f
5daf620e1b38e62594698006bdc0b035523d6199
describe
'72340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIO' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
7792b99e6630caaf9ebe9e7521b30de0
49f6ca21473b8fea6cb845f1c47bfe15fb26fd49
describe
'3267100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIP' 'sip-files00296.tif'
85bf850a7c2e433ac900835b3dd1f308
3eba6a45bf8ba15de6f0dbce05eb06fd4727831b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIQ' 'sip-files00296.txt'
36886cdb305c154718b9a097cde3f2ee
10682caf8eb93c7d05ec9fedd9c252fd07d16425
describe
'32451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIR' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
0bcb879cbcaf29aad7ff561ada691f96
7c050781a541db57750dfd93c0c9eb8f20937049
describe
'405374' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIS' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
f5c99999d5594bb5c5ceb53f09cdf943
e8a9734aac7f1199cd5751ac0ba7e6a1826c0474
describe
'187767' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIT' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
c55bc4d79d1883218132e649a27f35d5
72f5d00ec8c4a7874ca59b46dcf80287193cddeb
describe
'48225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIU' 'sip-files00297.pro'
b57047897f4b167caae030a1b3863474
c2c036d4ce94970de954c31875dae1718b0e7b24
describe
'65951' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIV' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
423943021d0c92041f07604525844d90
f1735842c7535248de9402ad09bbea1d8d60af67
describe
'3266660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIW' 'sip-files00297.tif'
9d3f73a89e9500d53e455afe64d1d3f8
b4629ff907ea38b21d812a493805422ce754bfcf
describe
'2030' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIX' 'sip-files00297.txt'
f3797df183cb4f8515b806c7175a85b6
d21f0f93b5e7056ef371709ff86b7d17d9329255
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIY' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
4746ff982d1a7e6356a58cc88e291774
d403938b824f8b768f0741a17a596ca386ad77b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEIZ' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
3c3eeb2dcbac3c79d88c33d6330ddd1a
18a347e381d139fa294a2b1a3a63fd4bc23c9e71
describe
'205615' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJA' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
34c4602ac753136594696e968bc7e2db
a0b53863e369300b34478ce56749048c926e2a0a
describe
'60855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJB' 'sip-files00298.pro'
2889dd991344db4957b0e9580b7d2598
fd1d7b256ed50351e57c9cf53b25bc54bd1d0dcb
describe
'67010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJC' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
bada3619cd40bc5610a5d1748a0846fb
d8230a02c7376e96c6375e9a330cae747af44c71
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJD' 'sip-files00298.tif'
2d190672ff4993a27ae516446e6109b9
30a0bd47cc867628315d743b48a721d4d36249d8
describe
'2523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJE' 'sip-files00298.txt'
a2ac792535fdc344c452e911c879686b
13406df36d49e8937dfdd9cc94aa84431383d26e
describe
'30862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJF' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
f95f9808b0081d0aba9678eb70fabdcd
b0ff4cdb51080e4a8d730004b9a467f22dc3646b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJG' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
a903da8a9eaac860f6d67f6f675a1b6e
1e6202945a8cb4e0c7a2b655adf80ced336f889b
describe
'180562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJH' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
a9604f6bda05d43e98976ee250cfbd08
cf6d4c1535c33efa7b7166c61af21fe4b8bec8cc
describe
'44880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJI' 'sip-files00299.pro'
a4d7b2bdc5e7b9d755dd9e734b1e0060
61d96e84a8c1282def77e15b8bc034aa46c91307
describe
'61753' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJJ' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
aff34c395a8429405a32a634359bd600
5db9cd65e1e3fe416a432adbe2a321eb1a6df4fb
describe
'3266336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJK' 'sip-files00299.tif'
55047f48aa663c4506bfd81ae3fe0e82
6c8d8b5878200e9182b8cec6d2e6947107d220bb
describe
'1869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJL' 'sip-files00299.txt'
c669bcc7130f764fe3cb1e1cfab1229f
6165a5de8380d8dbedad9353123493de245a2418
'2011-10-12T01:34:58-04:00'
describe
'29747' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJM' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
26637a66591f8e8071d2ffd602645c54
650d32f1b16d16066780de93eee0c716d0a7d6e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJN' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
40089f238c670058aaac88395b343875
09b8d6c4b00e1192f97eb836561cf0ab5ecab58b
describe
'197049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJO' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
d4671335c6689e29541eaba60e80c71d
1dba34a8b52bda82c992346ab9e72703943eb1ad
describe
'50861' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJP' 'sip-files00300.pro'
9e0d5b484a4e8a4e698209180d26e9e2
0bb2ac2e3d8b7cc40ee163e44d7da37664501421
describe
'65684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJQ' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
ee718defd6023da4c216220f25bd6ac0
da4b27e66ee2157509fc1b6fd281b3b3dfe67c5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJR' 'sip-files00300.tif'
f0c2be8ccc09d18bfd42f32ba65b98fc
71490e1b2d5434441c0d359f519137987bce1f90
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJS' 'sip-files00300.txt'
cd14065892a141d66d972040e01f3008
a043e8416769c3988e5d52c0cdf90e1410a75a2d
describe
'31282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJT' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
8a36da450b27024e14faac5437aefc54
59401bd2bd746da08eb67feccd0397182b105e83
'2011-10-12T01:33:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJU' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
1fbb4734f65e36e4e3e49bd3cb0bac00
de675d876a3863f4c80c265f85e82b6e9bded149
describe
'203190' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJV' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
97782400d17f28ffee474008acac652c
47827291d93900ace5dcb9121532f7994b412b32
describe
'54194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJW' 'sip-files00301.pro'
1590ba8f3cac873c5782eced76542156
e741b26f2cd2c1a40ef3eb8ef422f4b8c2a95fac
describe
'69128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJX' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
a35dc08819ddc817dbd0f790bc3b41bc
66beb4d0fc1e9ae6791a5df22256cf02c1af00ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJY' 'sip-files00301.tif'
d875b4ffadd583bfbb436e920927522a
78563586e3299eedc7267d21b46a5557057ee92a
describe
'2228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEJZ' 'sip-files00301.txt'
45cb67adb214f9f80081c144f433005e
41f9e45773a6328c1c5393de135dcdf06a55e298
describe
'31642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKA' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
494cb678c62507486a58de39b2a4d5cd
1f2449c2fcd547727fafe576f95b469b14b542b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKB' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
e6e12ce8aacebb6f82b40f25e337ba5b
bd5c03a6a6010f33198b566dac030c446aebb485
describe
'211667' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKC' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
60d4445f249de461591e7cce4b11586b
5a31f925e692ac6eb944625ef5ee0e3e00f5f6eb
describe
'57256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKD' 'sip-files00302.pro'
c1e68543a22ca447727b288af7651133
eefa50a28c52748daa01bd03c3ccae772a6c7093
describe
'70472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKE' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
07a88e65ca051ed9df2babee3dd8f263
0117e314bea9cea918071764a00c16716c518774
describe
'3266628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKF' 'sip-files00302.tif'
1cef03216e792fdea1b23b53c1f69e4a
3ade469368a84c8f9f874120caa1db62be585980
describe
'2331' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKG' 'sip-files00302.txt'
e1d9dd151b9ae3b25d64438b4e8b05fe
8db15c557a00dd3e66d7613d7968f634418de0a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKH' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
3021fe2c9a80f95f12f4796d58f8d5d0
eadbf101207dbcb5238ae00c3268b431e7f5a233
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKI' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
46ed6b07f7321a8292880f52ad67feae
14b8caa75aa2c9b6f94d116f3de9c0e64a7bda5c
describe
'209342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKJ' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
0f581d10f49471624ef236b4fcd7a800
64929d095dca440ae4e71c15e64ff1c8ddbd770b
describe
'55276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKK' 'sip-files00303.pro'
44fbc3943167fc8d5f5534e7bbff5603
eee42b35d721daa3199355f42f47f8b01f8543c7
'2011-10-12T01:32:09-04:00'
describe
'69432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKL' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
5be7cd83649285f8f615628fdedfe61a
2295afb9d054e74ac71ea7d13696212c5448d945
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKM' 'sip-files00303.tif'
e19e622652b0f3ac13a82d140c5a1b05
c6a482ce3782f5bb7eda93543de9703b4d383072
describe
'2292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKN' 'sip-files00303.txt'
cf7a52402de795fd45d576d25797e361
127614a8a99f37224c0e89b0a87527c069560e6c
describe
'31084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKO' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
a2284444c98ecd07d88ea4825e08f961
e5f2b3519c36a2327f1fb3bf58c67825fbc8b725
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKP' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
d5b61bf6bec54d0a40effaaccc0c3962
e5d52eead7967acedabdfb42b3e2fac57d496094
describe
'152160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKQ' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
390e8ff405faf8606cd3f6d579416198
41fae91829ce8dba1d612216826ff6f8deecbccd
describe
'33546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKR' 'sip-files00304.pro'
f770a38fb3268f456054a9cc3eddf28f
6db97d26c39c2d0ee5490c3fa91f858f3fcdf012
describe
'52075' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKS' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
00dbeaf9a830e3d8e12f81a001facfbc
7d29d61b945f32ebd123134c219d667662a80c11
describe
'3265144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKT' 'sip-files00304.tif'
52c6692378fb972abf72c7a5e9016dcc
a22d57b289137f175c206ca749fe59944bad81bb
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKU' 'sip-files00304.txt'
53556b945e2d99dc0bf172b8fd9ac1cf
6cb0ae636dbc0e73033a26b7fd1a942f43dc4f14
describe
'26718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKV' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
f1ec9163b87f9700a864ca93cd098e06
2da5a21145ed783b22e18488e804123b24608f2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKW' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
4a32c03d088796cab4a7a88cc25d619b
9a17903b3a0b72f123624e10e71e7ed978971a7b
describe
'171522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKX' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
41bb8779037fd5e972a521c3e72c1576
e0227ccc674957fbcd3c16f8ac77bd24396ab0b8
describe
'40016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKY' 'sip-files00305.pro'
035b0fc8af6fbba750625fd4273c448e
9086fb84cddbfe51e0cd1fd10c570fb0971b7c1c
describe
'58410' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEKZ' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
5fe4874644231ef6fe4cdc6dbdec2083
2cc4ab92d9916950559172e7831370a2ba83b2f0
'2011-10-12T01:29:46-04:00'
describe
'3266020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELA' 'sip-files00305.tif'
683073de4b6c4407c24046a8015153ee
142301e32f6b20f4f2cabbbb2ce67a1a7d04e565
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELB' 'sip-files00305.txt'
a411f9649170cb63d9fba50a94a2f9e8
ff749c48cf082d9406e318b5e096175afce51e8d
describe
'29193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELC' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
8080c8584f9a1802f9e6bede14c06db5
ec7e7cc87bb9f49bec1926b1dd2dc3762a2c9b09
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELD' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
a52871c2b6267d904a95ca1e81bbe32e
c65b56f67a770eb0ddfbc4908d5d91b72da4f719
describe
'214467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELE' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
b4b0a649873651049995e6149ba0c1b4
ae0b73b376f6805fffebfbeb8b695f7926f1a390
describe
'57447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELF' 'sip-files00306.pro'
963f9c4be3ad29a5265dcb6da2851b0d
2ebf301097cc0f1a7ecefeb22c40af591c6030a7
describe
'70970' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELG' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
c1bebb13484db7763a6b7ae6a47da985
7164b01663de870c560e32639dfc63aa6b6b329a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELH' 'sip-files00306.tif'
6edad209c84da23fa69d0dd4abfd81d2
fb06e2de2ddc5a8cf8a951aa803b1f1515381964
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELI' 'sip-files00306.txt'
142845a3a0cfbfd1e3dfc216cce862f5
7f711d5062c4e726aed1c4ae54efe180cd24d55b
describe
'32245' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELJ' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
ba71a80d07a149708f2532e62e07d7ac
3f7da03370c534ca71847941eb14edd3011d0bec
describe
'405570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELK' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
8636b9a550f06a16748e1425b1aacee9
099455b83ee9832839b9e3cc1bd48215fccd2aa3
describe
'214120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELL' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
483857a7bc13001f58d89b024c6216b8
26d9c8ba798f79e2ac264e8869eea3d3e61fb82f
describe
'58367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELM' 'sip-files00307.pro'
7f5ea35e6f530213712a5dccda636c59
d3b667bbfc6e590bb7947c92f6674fa4ca3855b1
describe
'70704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELN' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
200c47a71d3d449f93dceb484c67b9ca
c5b39a847b89a546d42e9faa29d66a04aa943346
describe
'3266796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELO' 'sip-files00307.tif'
337f3006215cc219ee6f9fb47076e955
02f6a1bb24543f720d0c04cd0ce66bc2e9728255
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELP' 'sip-files00307.txt'
4ccb3c845d7292921ed7cf08fb0b7656
415fd790ce8cf5fb79aa31cc9bb8102fbc9cf37a
describe
'31934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELQ' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
7737973dcf3039a5f3f9bab15e33fd3d
d6acb6690e7ca4366a4e2fa19ac6db3131ac08c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELR' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
f34c8ccc7613789ef9c3874cd9773c35
ad7c2ac43978a8ab709fd6cd0fc38f73208ce9e3
describe
'216050' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELS' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
e19b1991f456f334f10b8ba1c1a928c5
e1f7216679a60311d02628613fc3bcab2464c43d
describe
'62503' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELT' 'sip-files00308.pro'
d3293bc45143161b22b1e0a9fa376eb8
e81dd48b63705d7ef1ee3d25c21fbc2b354ec66b
describe
'72819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELU' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
3c770542ddd5cec4647e39c14d2f1fbb
79d5ce19ae32d3337e9ce9a218871863e17a2b9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELV' 'sip-files00308.tif'
181afb92f648c1693205d5ac51a4ddf2
ef521fa2db40a720aad6eb3fce377667e969f429
describe
'2448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELW' 'sip-files00308.txt'
130ccb6648746a434f1b4e0be1aa4980
172447c6ea6e9ff415bb422f07f0d9bd04b6111a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELX' 'sip-files00308thm.jpg'
605313b7682a08060c57bdf3188d9dbf
37d740c5c147812fd664753991abce3238250c8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELY' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
63f6281b04ab61becce56efae84f6e91
3b1c326c6b932aa70e568e13ab9dff074ef61ca9
describe
'205277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABELZ' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
5f2f9f6c2cf6d97f3c4bcf48816e4128
b338731977d424842e64c92b8e3d5e20461ef600
describe
'55505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMA' 'sip-files00309.pro'
cf90f97c3584d5644e0deaea93e83750
8e50f2a048b402767b38ad141448eedc1e8fb1c5
describe
'70659' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMB' 'sip-files00309.QC.jpg'
ccf7db772f32a799cd3785ea0ff10608
a27822362458d3ed094dc35c0f3eac9c88192452
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMC' 'sip-files00309.tif'
a7c297e08eb28e8a7a990e4891e6674b
97ed5de969485213201289319a18886dff41a220
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMD' 'sip-files00309.txt'
770a0c7c324f62c98a922584a8cb4e9b
5f9b73725c389d5e2acfb288796fe40fda6cce14
describe
'32005' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEME' 'sip-files00309thm.jpg'
c98a99b0fefa06e878d288735722e032
f414df10db688e1f71ef467d69fb7f3a0afa6538
describe
'405461' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMF' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
56ff822ece029ab70a4d300f9594ca30
8a998ae7623d880ec3231f85a96ec2e7a86b95cb
describe
'164988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMG' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
468d553b624681928d2dcca922b193b6
c78e839c0b99940bbbd3e987daf8493025a709b4
describe
'22484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMH' 'sip-files00310.pro'
e641cb78d4ad366bc055632deb462e42
fdf94dd794bc034d55a0ad9268a8940da674ba67
describe
'57320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMI' 'sip-files00310.QC.jpg'
33d607915f2ccd0ff333ca5e6b03b636
ba79fd9d62944f500c6fe01d75ebcad91fb0495a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMJ' 'sip-files00310.tif'
cbd7cfcac66bd728ecc14ba377ceea1a
0b070f6bbf9b03f46f3faf39294818eaaa481497
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMK' 'sip-files00310.txt'
bd11058ccef31cf0e1523bcbab84e7a3
b989770b08b962ebaeb77473ee9979aba8d70631
describe
'29395' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEML' 'sip-files00310thm.jpg'
2dc8231738bb2cd247cef8e44478fba8
c235caf19fffa726dd9baa819016b52640ae8179
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMM' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
409b8cd1f19ee2773d0b64541245e837
1509578e5c5a8ba11217905ed6e8b59f41835996
describe
'198183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMN' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
c5bddbde815aeae9407c9995318c13b6
c9b1dfd349c60f78f233c42b22266ecaa2972a3e
'2011-10-12T01:33:27-04:00'
describe
'49850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMO' 'sip-files00311.pro'
d746a155e50240f3571ccd36f4d5f446
d4595ac2e078c57b95d9866dc4b8b1dadb127ae1
describe
'66967' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMP' 'sip-files00311.QC.jpg'
0c8bd1cc2898e637d00895a042317747
1f4c06a5f7c09bc5840f841af74a3eb346745616
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMQ' 'sip-files00311.tif'
a4fb31a69cec320bc0a6f2fa6284c8c6
dc3b2c1247ddcf7fc7e6570b6d2bc96abc9c11f7
describe
'2044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMR' 'sip-files00311.txt'
de4c82e36fdfb063a4e97d0147f21a86
0a6ceb455bb107995d68d901be5864c3b1019f73
describe
'31108' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMS' 'sip-files00311thm.jpg'
89d8e5d6f6643d9b1d12b6676e02c188
45f58634132b997b97dd9b3be67e5ed867d40381
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMT' 'sip-files00312.jp2'
15cc3ae7f884e8130b07065c22aa958c
ba78c79aca815c645478f349ad5da7a7f41cf52f
describe
'175479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMU' 'sip-files00312.jpg'
76445ddba7ad856544d40dfcc5f570cb
8897584432c734d2a892ee1618c9c7b81ad03abd
describe
'40859' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMV' 'sip-files00312.pro'
97719ba8e337924b7fdaed2176b43076
ff488ec77e6122da6cf9e91c8333b4391248a941
describe
'59664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMW' 'sip-files00312.QC.jpg'
a265148f07be835108759af508f922d0
f5d31ab51e898718b5aa31d90e4e94c8e4fbe5e4
describe
'3266120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMX' 'sip-files00312.tif'
ea1d01954089c3e04acf82a42d87510e
a2fd8ad15be8aa1c9cad5390be7a1b193574e403
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMY' 'sip-files00312.txt'
3db69ec79fc390e116bc1823cb3bcfbd
f62697ca9f4fb36eed5939e627e90dda172f884b
'2011-10-12T01:30:01-04:00'
describe
'29755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEMZ' 'sip-files00312thm.jpg'
029ed821d62fcffa123fa55de2d66168
6170346f23ff9745672028b18701110c941e57d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENA' 'sip-files00313.jp2'
9a7c291092d851ce90249309d3fe3767
f40b982d21588a978a67e605064b807353d8bb32
describe
'172472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENB' 'sip-files00313.jpg'
99fb329eb120ae604634266b6533f5e3
8d9d960016d5d77fddb23de15c58e74c7cfe3532
describe
'20742' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENC' 'sip-files00313.pro'
6f6ac489d4561154114b3c2967e951f5
ff150e86b1151eb55e35227a7f8d5b04bba3082b
describe
'56931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEND' 'sip-files00313.QC.jpg'
03fc8514f9e12f985b8717a20f1b8226
26852c0acefe3625407146992879ea8836b2749a
describe
'3265892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENE' 'sip-files00313.tif'
a829de91c6b7335ebac96d68c7894693
9bbb9daf92c0d92611460385731847856e62ba86
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENF' 'sip-files00313.txt'
52e60054c88dbebca4a24ff8cc6fd7b9
76dec6216b7aafae5c94b17cb2ac93ad5207546c
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENG' 'sip-files00313thm.jpg'
eff00f98dcdea803b5a3f6b58d36022b
823e20906ee545211eaef113e11644fb052561d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENH' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
64d704b3a808f5d0849d99d571489717
b0a94c43d0cdde6b46e3f344dad4877c1394f3f5
describe
'230323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENI' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
b5f2ab1448b844d4a2b4c477cd3d6b02
8f11c1365783ae584506bc8e33485b3de04772a4
describe
'63288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENJ' 'sip-files00314.pro'
e2d8c6225ba130e1175e42d5e1403e94
8edb6ac228418ab3c6e6423bfb4296ca469717a4
describe
'75047' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENK' 'sip-files00314.QC.jpg'
fa8e43389f7c02ff9d2b479babc253ae
50cf2e022fa11595452bc8bda8c91fa65d08e4aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENL' 'sip-files00314.tif'
6877939a58c15599d1684805357243ff
d50df79e90a879b7dbc814887fc5b63beeeb44e8
describe
'2562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENM' 'sip-files00314.txt'
b4eaac32bd77b3482c6ed694e8a35a2c
ea7e26a0b03335ce8f25704c8134e6d826634879
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENN' 'sip-files00314thm.jpg'
14aa0708dadc0183e4ec25d4d7b32acf
1c4427f8856914b77c3842cdea21780261bc34e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENO' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
3c197ee55db80e9e552acc451afb036c
88b496fccb54d2f3f13d689a4f035b5bd1832f03
describe
'223299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENP' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
4dccfd435420a9509724907c63647fde
079dc712d7a886e0725fa77a6e5f754c9f0e15e1
describe
'60159' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENQ' 'sip-files00315.pro'
b5500fa6c8d1eb77035d96e7ac3fc453
9d5cdee19e5d3011e81c3528e9e711cf932d4ca2
describe
'72719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENR' 'sip-files00315.QC.jpg'
c30002ff26eb7cc35544cdd6c9e35068
82379e5dc7e0740dadc3737f7b2c4ea2acd0e89e
describe
'3267184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENS' 'sip-files00315.tif'
010c90a9ec3889f17907843fdde2d81e
cc3725a8a999baab67fa469d4c1b0f06a1296c2c
describe
'2452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENT' 'sip-files00315.txt'
5f556c79e33e8d45224f9b74950f9721
2439e13adbb9bfb0a18922032c2db6bb7728161b
describe
'32691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENU' 'sip-files00315thm.jpg'
751df6a0e30726a89a195d29374aca6a
053ac1cb9a8ac528c12c2a1b9f15d84ed0e0f80b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENV' 'sip-files00316.jp2'
88a14fc2b88918257866783017f260e4
bfee1347aac494c60ca12f99705aebbac6b06db3
describe
'206242' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENW' 'sip-files00316.jpg'
10aa9d0d4164989a022cd1bd57c2754d
fad50019b021be00af2ab2dfcb29031a8e81619f
describe
'54149' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENX' 'sip-files00316.pro'
8a5edc2915a2485fcc983b9707afc20b
0f37d2c1e00d88f877c94599b0a0f8d56b219e5d
describe
'68952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENY' 'sip-files00316.QC.jpg'
39ab3547252fc8b819c2939d7de0c6fb
e854affb980d897bf1120c41ea33da94ff35a422
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABENZ' 'sip-files00316.tif'
0697dc60eab59d50b22f681b635a6902
36b160bdebe2f053650d4174b7e1ffdf01d1bda2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOA' 'sip-files00316.txt'
7ae6e7e2161470d09fec6615feeee41b
b2fabc98b4ebfd2aa7fe54eee1e3b09aad9c1def
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOB' 'sip-files00316thm.jpg'
cf23ec23f5f2a5a8d61172d1563b20aa
a66937b7c2aa510ecd93c309264686d29c07caf8
describe
'405602' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOC' 'sip-files00317.jp2'
b8f92063c75cc356c9b3c73178fa2998
f35f866817f7e2c0cdc11153bd3a4f766d1792e0
describe
'206714' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOD' 'sip-files00317.jpg'
6b00fd3edbaa28487ce7e60522865fc4
2d53de4a30a42d72f68ef34d3310599c76cee5e4
describe
'54470' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOE' 'sip-files00317.pro'
42f12808f52679680265701ccb753fe0
35dbe4e21cb0338d82e081492db0cadd0e24f49c
describe
'69111' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOF' 'sip-files00317.QC.jpg'
255a575f506cfc99ef7efabb0a412823
2d74ade76d68f7b235ea62d8f514fa2359283c25
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOG' 'sip-files00317.tif'
42da9d1bc879e2a48d77a499460d47fa
b2f22c3c6213901e8ef8f7e8ba37a1d3fb58c94b
describe
'2279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOH' 'sip-files00317.txt'
3efac1c063c352f9e809c47f4ad3b5d4
2bdf643a381734ac93248176307ec843268be1fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOI' 'sip-files00317thm.jpg'
98e8ff4c1cf7846668020f44b966df74
f104e2f547d2be09e9a8298072497f8d8d1e0151
describe
'405551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOJ' 'sip-files00318.jp2'
7a84fecf680f02bd1e58b0ba6bc1fec5
af3405d16a7879b7fe10e15ef6ad3bc8fd9e017a
describe
'206465' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOK' 'sip-files00318.jpg'
ce55843dc1779836e4a614275c4ff1ce
9332767e5cf97fb4749f385853ad9bd8845d18ea
describe
'53387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOL' 'sip-files00318.pro'
55a7868f664591e43591ba2d2b94a85f
5de2e8a5335772aa9c8b962367170baf9b318b18
describe
'69039' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOM' 'sip-files00318.QC.jpg'
e112a1984a1ef8347c455dbeeb0b8344
098cda83890bacf7a29ed9a03446789a619e1e0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEON' 'sip-files00318.tif'
a6245c47b0fa361d9a065f1fbe97fd34
a61faad85e3117d78e13f278ee4834feb8b8bd3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOO' 'sip-files00318.txt'
346d98467025b652dc8ea4da53cc6190
4cbb910de7ac3f9d217a609a61f91dd47b670d8a
describe
'32032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOP' 'sip-files00318thm.jpg'
4ce9e7d301b20c18c01809198feaf2b8
d7a35a09849754fb5d18e1aef6f7d6e374607146
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOQ' 'sip-files00319.jp2'
cb9d9fb23b89c5b5016aca02d92f09d0
fec1288f79d081229e19e14fc22458222674eb45
describe
'161354' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOR' 'sip-files00319.jpg'
56af0a511e80070c03b4aceedec7b63c
e79bacc53f61eca9c1f25ea67217186ba8970133
describe
'25760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOS' 'sip-files00319.pro'
3a4b90f70814d0098b83a38dcd6accf2
0c3392fdbefc3de9716c8bfe834b6140dbb4fae0
describe
'55671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOT' 'sip-files00319.QC.jpg'
64b777c34ecc26c2019dc6d213046935
9e56b2d0da4e474438713de2b0def43b0b898d51
describe
'3265996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOU' 'sip-files00319.tif'
901ce67baa466bbebd36e9a8e60c2f03
877fce38defc8a64e6a2ad6ad931305a16862f0c
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOV' 'sip-files00319.txt'
99e42bf14e90bd14b34598748df69efd
2e25d72ece68e5b8a5d59a3cc4fcdde3728f505b
describe
Invalid character
'28756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOW' 'sip-files00319thm.jpg'
78dfd18fcec08c546a99cdf2fce97c63
f0e63bbae5559d8580337e353bea4d08324d7a7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOX' 'sip-files00320.jp2'
c1fbcd31f08c74d29a086ca404d7b992
0b2ce4132d8e2fa5765cd27b1d542da15de4822e
describe
'156027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOY' 'sip-files00320.jpg'
67fd569a63532c22fded1eecaeceadf1
0fd39c7ec0c567a849e6ac0a957edc28bd78a7fe
describe
'34266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEOZ' 'sip-files00320.pro'
a82d7edceaeb3d3047fa006080a3e196
ffd18a45b2f9caf14451869b381b041b7402d8fe
describe
'54782' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPA' 'sip-files00320.QC.jpg'
6b8b808f80508e32f463e955e38a9817
cf2c74c1a41066d38fa6a9a01a4593c1aa3b1a5a
describe
'3265720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPB' 'sip-files00320.tif'
62db4a532289c115f93445bd8fe3731f
0be35555f1a834d8c7a2859caac7eb37301eaedc
'2011-10-12T01:36:29-04:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPC' 'sip-files00320.txt'
e8b8dacd6c18563dbdac332b3d17ed47
c0e287d368f01741655e1096d3ed7b753dff52f7
describe
'28500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPD' 'sip-files00320thm.jpg'
06a798301ad3f5bccb8ccca33c136638
368be60c8830a375d0405ab7a31c98b8edff7f5e
'2011-10-12T01:30:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPE' 'sip-files00321.jp2'
7f043df13d4244ca6b6bd556ea0fa92c
2f654eddad4d91007d706360db1fda921050ead1
describe
'213911' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPF' 'sip-files00321.jpg'
0ce95e4691679e84cbef54ae123f4ec8
a5fd9d67653d0868b72cb0a1be8c4048857ceb84
describe
'56074' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPG' 'sip-files00321.pro'
b9374d0163d5651875b0b7d3b9e77110
cde9579cf60aee51038702e6da6da5483d831c0e
describe
'71347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPH' 'sip-files00321.QC.jpg'
ad7860026a171bf27520c76c59ed077e
2b7c5f1e8c52c6b5a171aa7f020c81bc2d751f5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPI' 'sip-files00321.tif'
d2f151bb2da000a022b28b39f0a0af1d
433c1c4b807210f75b8324586a4ec1ae764a2c4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPJ' 'sip-files00321.txt'
9c07a1fb58eb655ce23b211af3369567
13ac5b87563a54880b114f11ceb51c5a7b1ab4ff
describe
'32293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPK' 'sip-files00321thm.jpg'
c7a1ec19a777781c8a990418bbf8c2be
920f404c8d8faa6deb2e11dfb9953dfb6d399107
describe
'405605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPL' 'sip-files00322.jp2'
71faac79aab95601bdbb0680b093c1e4
049c9fb1a2c18b9642a6e69cf80cc8a0db33bd1a
describe
'177709' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPM' 'sip-files00322.jpg'
fd49b9da818c3b8f810e187ce273e366
6106ddb835508e83de97b62241d4295ee45e2c10
describe
'26756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPN' 'sip-files00322.pro'
997d99b747b12290727044117a4ee842
93c5f100379a88b9d7d9344bc011bca61a83b64b
describe
'59820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPO' 'sip-files00322.QC.jpg'
7bdd8105a49a77ea13460b06d8dec904
1e78ee226009175a06e4e2d9d2f96fdf0ed278a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPP' 'sip-files00322.tif'
dd6b9a71b9e5ab8074e523af57464342
bd3a22e4b62cb02189bc99c3d870f448fe819a04
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPQ' 'sip-files00322.txt'
3dcfafb7562c0e6c2d81ba63f0e79a41
4e59c62429e0b108d5ea57bec137116221d06d45
describe
'29839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPR' 'sip-files00322thm.jpg'
d5d38f0ffca10d015189b12c3807498c
ec9668bf9f783c2c67d0f03a64f45f9215645b19
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPS' 'sip-files00323.jp2'
3832f560399569242b02ea84e68f492d
0b19bc8b4f90f5ec84af5cff346876d433612f1f
describe
'129322' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPT' 'sip-files00323.jpg'
daa74399746f42150587aaf4e911c827
ace384df1942de4ac1e04cf278cad39467d8e7ad
describe
'16773' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPU' 'sip-files00323.pro'
4225d9426a183fa2cfbdba219734ddf3
4a0d8f7290a3ac1bb12133e45ddfdb650fcdab32
describe
'49822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPV' 'sip-files00323.QC.jpg'
cc32783720e00253f255a7cbcec9871e
2ff45c010950b6948bd621ba5e02f613bb61a86f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPW' 'sip-files00323.tif'
f8ffbb1ed6c688d99e21dc644bbe252b
eb3eeae041b0485dc3bf0e00e38bc918243a8be4
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPX' 'sip-files00323.txt'
5ce4f94056e00051f0049fd661771a1d
5c4066d3758676c4c25a5d59001df58176378192
describe
Invalid character
'28144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPY' 'sip-files00323thm.jpg'
4917ef6a213c819bc79bc3640c2fc45f
8b824cb33658de20426d1ce28df0e3e473c3e266
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEPZ' 'sip-files00324.jp2'
8879c324a1d5699c8404afae3deb3ac6
f8ad11307a6987937db7babdb1a676bbfff66ab1
describe
'232744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQA' 'sip-files00324.jpg'
28887233243c8d634de72377b943457c
8ce05738c433095500709aa66628959289d4f4d3
describe
'10352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQB' 'sip-files00324.pro'
df4c386f39cda9bf97c4b30a3a1eaf23
ebb1b4494c24b30d2e1a7ec518e2816397061b72
describe
'74090' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQC' 'sip-files00324.QC.jpg'
f75141475f35b94814b06ffbaabec649
1c7a2a4ead7d290976cc7fed890023f349f56376
describe
'3268148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQD' 'sip-files00324.tif'
bb27919b7e177d30e1242d7577e983d7
cda697a0cd8d46beed4309d3cb06bdbb77a1bae6
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQE' 'sip-files00324.txt'
c4681ee132db6d909a667349b4ce2994
54dffaeaaa850546b165a44db255157099fee743
describe
'35033' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQF' 'sip-files00324thm.jpg'
94aa303a393f621a98477a30406ab9bc
564ea5adc43300056977f75d2d86d78a65d2e7cc
describe
'405595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQG' 'sip-files00325.jp2'
ddfb57442aa7c883d87f34727aa05ff8
fa29b3d0681fed4ed47ccae954eed89c219ac0a8
describe
'164275' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQH' 'sip-files00325.jpg'
0c104471a32dff2f9e5b9cce5a75c4ad
8d1047b2cf36379b649b663179c529bba3964dbc
describe
'37273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQI' 'sip-files00325.pro'
18fef3ba2b4aad18c2492f05013ae4ea
40949a884b6f5c968747179d74fac3b15c73f579
describe
'59295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQJ' 'sip-files00325.QC.jpg'
eea73ecb4dcca7d6110b4145d06206a1
f3c4fe6ab5299d8c2092fef27036b471dabbc347
describe
'3266464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQK' 'sip-files00325.tif'
478446aa95847ef407d198a8e035c850
8eaf7001ff1b2d928aed79c1c85937431afc3462
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQL' 'sip-files00325.txt'
bd52b8cf72f61f83d445c94d5d3481e3
9065acb53be5ddd99ed8a8f79c97846acfd2278a
describe
'30518' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQM' 'sip-files00325thm.jpg'
54ead93efa0045b5cf80fc7c044db6ea
57af897c1165baf92abc186f487fee45bbe2ec19
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQN' 'sip-files00326.jp2'
da737c9749c60ef905d444673a8b3fee
951c833492c21c72c7735c52f9e64a26ded7a7b7
describe
'212121' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQO' 'sip-files00326.jpg'
4d5805d7340ddb637631cb5baebee09b
028f5b929a808372261abd893be223bfd18497f3
describe
'69344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQP' 'sip-files00326.pro'
f7cf85910710bdc178d2ce110bbc0a1d
9cf95c5065ceed5b3265dfde0d6dde311e6de982
describe
'69142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQQ' 'sip-files00326.QC.jpg'
b5a2dda817f7006e59544c6b422ea067
b5c5584715bff8647077e664565769f848874fa7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQR' 'sip-files00326.tif'
2b1e1dfa5c559dcbfe899ba04a607cb9
434fbd3ee2d490573ebef348be6cf2eac644d995
describe
'2973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQS' 'sip-files00326.txt'
aca9885ddf0ae714d7f44a1c64b9023f
aea262b355252f7c7f9718f419e872a43eb101b4
describe
'32386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQT' 'sip-files00326thm.jpg'
b11b4959596cbfe62b4da8a9a99fe016
947d577fc2eaf9e148f9cd36ac83733cdb8311c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQU' 'sip-files00327.jp2'
41a6912f5b25737685d031c74a1cafd5
34cc043029639eb771eadef62ce45a782b2f153c
describe
'214458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQV' 'sip-files00327.jpg'
5b585f367e28b103d61c1240cd84622b
793ecf6e249b2392466af3f1f325149f4d4c5bd1
describe
'96900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQW' 'sip-files00327.pro'
b7fc204696b5e861ee521979d17baed4
8a4a817c59e22eb99f9f967830530238ceb55e28
describe
'69285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQX' 'sip-files00327.QC.jpg'
28422c41f1c595d210554792c21c5749
4f8d4c30be699415a639fd672087f3e776910f5d
describe
'3266832' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQY' 'sip-files00327.tif'
650038eb63bb3fcb01a359dda16299d7
37d58b4c5770a5dc938546d9ca94110a8a80b647
describe
'4781' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEQZ' 'sip-files00327.txt'
eb41a7267e7744e57294f1872b569252
2ed80368b0a5f020a24ac4ec9450bfb26394c1f1
describe
'32132' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERA' 'sip-files00327thm.jpg'
16ea6db0d3cc577852532228eb854f63
d4965aed0eca17168fbb5c070e13013e75199c94
describe
'405609' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERB' 'sip-files00328.jp2'
fdd04a53c41648b2449c7667dc83e347
3705fda9da48925d8233aa0fb0915b4e0d751915
describe
'189191' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERC' 'sip-files00328.jpg'
5b97c4d23f05d41225860b4d1920f00d
119217ec3e508698fef2344f2db46f6119f61dae
describe
'17044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERD' 'sip-files00328.pro'
9886c913ab33cd9c1ef127f7ebbabdd3
2744e17e93ef8d4b52f04d1a9a9966598b2c8d00
describe
'60906' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERE' 'sip-files00328.QC.jpg'
c16f62a4498c2c1b6ef06cc29ac5ace4
6218b1defefa20656db9eab04e559fdabebc0669
describe
'3266456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERF' 'sip-files00328.tif'
e84b1c05ad7e343eba23d2ebac084ffc
965e3782e6f7941f7b37cdb417d2ad9ebf82b587
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERG' 'sip-files00328.txt'
361e98482dac7b5515f8a86d568fea8c
3a7701097ce1385067242135ecb1149e1aa2025b
describe
'30670' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERH' 'sip-files00328thm.jpg'
2267bb05f913f2036d407d98589a0b6a
cd4136e0485e0acdcc8d49aef9049e2216cbb581
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERI' 'sip-files00329.jp2'
6e4e02db78102097c53ecd8f5a614024
2d9b1b094d7f5f6428fd7b359016390f7a687372
describe
'150946' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERJ' 'sip-files00329.jpg'
224d8a6858b0b129eb9393a7ea46cae8
8e85d9d4893288a626eed7b0fcae89e01d1fdd0a
describe
'28959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERK' 'sip-files00329.pro'
b55f95c4a1abe05fbe7c61f869b8561a
427412f09de4f73b4e8a41c1230750da207ff0f8
describe
'55181' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERL' 'sip-files00329.QC.jpg'
32d9f8879c0a4dbc1e89dac025b153a0
ec3e8db9416e9c6758061082d34e382416483cc4
describe
'3266072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERM' 'sip-files00329.tif'
aec09e826bd29f1b74270f9bb64608db
bf6d397119b44b067c32ac26226d49aebf2a94d0
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERN' 'sip-files00329.txt'
09a7a26175bed475515bac1880ec7a77
dc855332e850e2243c27bb0c8a551b5d503d5847
describe
'29861' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERO' 'sip-files00329thm.jpg'
1110f01e85e68d5af4b781bb78a1bbf4
6cf43296f8f5bd5d96702113c87f81032a881745
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERP' 'sip-files00330.jp2'
b9f758b4fc7db3d61e253a77bb1079b1
bc2afa8ab925339a850ab4d5f785305bd3b958e1
describe
'185097' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERQ' 'sip-files00330.jpg'
269d75834d1847881f1455ed4957683f
c74bd1e80f3b3cc9895ceaa81075b33b209729ab
describe
'16530' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERR' 'sip-files00330.pro'
586204b858c3e5e5489335d977c155b4
f923f62e25caadb2878ce0dfdb6d1cc9d935a0b0
describe
'62671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERS' 'sip-files00330.QC.jpg'
89db1496b3b7ecf75681bd345394bfc8
c267d861c346a0024743e30740dd0dc6c61fa2ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERT' 'sip-files00330.tif'
9a940d0598dba69b124335fc426bb609
ea487767e44dfb425079e35f81964d3b5ee72ad2
'2011-10-12T01:25:31-04:00'
describe
'723' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERU' 'sip-files00330.txt'
ab9e95a70e58a71178270b01c6c3cebf
d5e8f1f8c195a0a600b6d7c56fc5ec9c52fa8db4
describe
'31572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERV' 'sip-files00330thm.jpg'
acf83a6e09e650105234cde479cbeb38
fdbefbdd3d7169933471c9e0b5366e533ab56f33
describe
'405668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERW' 'sip-files00331.jp2'
157470eac9e527cc23eca017a3f64c10
09af4a1ba6e57f80e39c0ec9dbcbd420c2a6e97d
describe
'208305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERX' 'sip-files00331.jpg'
0384e042ed3b0a68ff9005da3ba43429
564402af35b1913d05de2d8c676bad83859b04f3
describe
'63079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERY' 'sip-files00331.pro'
63062c2e86f202a2b786fd46586c49b3
539d50f334182f43023d06ff38187a354a391c33
describe
'67925' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABERZ' 'sip-files00331.QC.jpg'
afb1b3414e7926caa1c8eb1f99b151e6
e0f34c417fc28a480cb22e90f01cbb67092b1b9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESA' 'sip-files00331.tif'
bdeb40c5882bd3a2cf9d6b9af306a0a3
2464b3e3edcdcc863bb3760bf3a642b54349b070
'2011-10-12T01:36:05-04:00'
describe
'2672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESB' 'sip-files00331.txt'
2d210f0d53feb9653a2bd2e0e1cd1bdb
3dd89d9903edf6a100e7427950018d4ba3762499
describe
'31311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESC' 'sip-files00331thm.jpg'
1ef8ae0efa974629c7715d7b99b15c8e
98f586e5ea6222f75817558b9895326b3ffab278
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESD' 'sip-files00332.jp2'
7ed87af3d4e0f3376ba13f9893cf3fbf
4af38d6964a93b7fa4f686fc28a3b64aa2784abe
describe
'141820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESE' 'sip-files00332.jpg'
12fc86f16408f9805c48d473577211cd
08db5bc8bbeecd35b92a546cdcf7df5fc982436f
describe
'19041' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESF' 'sip-files00332.pro'
da043e4bdaebdeed630e51e5d55c3870
2b2ed19af4e2de50a18237b41d76ed5b7834a821
describe
'51677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESG' 'sip-files00332.QC.jpg'
0e0edadfba2a0958b8d8522f4384c837
a5a4f8d82a3c4819e05adf8dbe393e9400287f83
describe
'3265564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESH' 'sip-files00332.tif'
97c1acfafd8592dd1c226fa9069a4463
3f27934159cee017b535dae78d3f8b166b60cfe0
describe
'794' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESI' 'sip-files00332.txt'
c0f38210ea47e745d80d82dbd95a06ea
7b13322416e83668ad286b0489054edadb5ead43
describe
'27690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESJ' 'sip-files00332thm.jpg'
099ed0c95ebf5cab0d286be6c7ee319e
0a3fdc9ee53203bed9f8ad3d3e7691346a4e4676
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESK' 'sip-files00333.jp2'
c48df98089de12c898e3795b88e1967c
87d804dbdf78acb0d1d260513a87e23a0a50a69b
describe
'195015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESL' 'sip-files00333.jpg'
cf37c03036567f03eaf3d2bcde9fda6b
81984424c3333e08bf1b1e4664d47af660f09734
describe
'53451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESM' 'sip-files00333.pro'
68bc20d227f5f56a4b69d27ca85bf89e
b2a0e86242ac8bc8b00adf494b162ff590b32b3d
describe
'65185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESN' 'sip-files00333.QC.jpg'
bb5a332786016128a0fc765a55ee54b8
8e5d46fad31054de1e9505d5dd9917ccd2116a1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESO' 'sip-files00333.tif'
440625f1ae2a9f8e4437bf4f4bb1ce21
bd2a72e250a1e1b8260b6b9143f8668868938851
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESP' 'sip-files00333.txt'
8de9e9b12ddabc5d667c8ca6f937eb90
26eb92c395a88a9ef7e7c9d30714243636074b17
describe
'32208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESQ' 'sip-files00333thm.jpg'
b6a010e752bafb3f7aada601a1d5cb9d
d718fb2073c22352575972d8ad84ce9644c49d01
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESR' 'sip-files00334.jp2'
1765b3712983313d919bffb7b94b85fc
43fa4e9902047045174ca4a513c75fb6c7d6f9e3
'2011-10-12T01:32:51-04:00'
describe
'231541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESS' 'sip-files00334.jpg'
0a6e5967cf88e133ef87941587a5a73d
053401d682d1ef06bc7a5df98340dd18c7075025
describe
'33658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABEST' 'sip-files00334.pro'
42481236d0777e7a445d71a126997a03
f74c0c5199ec7d045227e1c55a632f91b131e065
describe
'71608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESU' 'sip-files00334.QC.jpg'
0f5415007467bfb14601e074437d7b7a
f33b1f56939b72c5cfe34f957b3e262fecba01ca
describe
'3267508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESV' 'sip-files00334.tif'
60d4b500e22110bc65ab45c7524136b1
a818f0ac20e5b425d432729bd0380682e7c98924
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESW' 'sip-files00334.txt'
74a85834117f33aefecc26db8e9ca491
8583384479ff29e22ee1aa95321bcfee6d417821
describe
Invalid character
'33412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESX' 'sip-files00334thm.jpg'
9a539f865ec04f1caffb25498ad8311a
cabfe334dfd0d27861e23322d360d7c53799a66f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESY' 'sip-files00335.jp2'
d1724cf6931cda3523b2995b535fab8d
e2e9138d3cfb9fe628c89ee3d54ae85853e5c68a
describe
'210473' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABESZ' 'sip-files00335.jpg'
7ab717fc025929589c7c848143754593
b695995a246f3a91187893cd855de1b734b73b7f
describe
'71595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETA' 'sip-files00335.pro'
430d3ff3d23f2158642c5795564c9657
ea72be117e44830cbfda03aaae4aa36092b38b1f
describe
'68691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETB' 'sip-files00335.QC.jpg'
0d02f329df63418cf38e1d9b0dea34ef
1737b1f33926c1e9451a5065227d059e1f157608
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETC' 'sip-files00335.tif'
6d93585bbb7a5cf919e7c7d7ef3884cf
02ea6d43ccf088b57b238b35831c450a065f9008
'2011-10-12T01:34:10-04:00'
describe
'3030' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETD' 'sip-files00335.txt'
fca01a4f42e5b20dc7b31dde0c5ab916
841c1d55177a4ffb04829026b4bf2aa1467c97df
describe
'31846' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETE' 'sip-files00335thm.jpg'
634c7556d9ba2ffe646b26787ad66757
238bed6de116a4f7555b794114d587073a0c628e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETF' 'sip-files00336.jp2'
e39416f5e0df422907724fd794f8a879
167196ad49b1606110f520ed6109f7cc4754c306
describe
'203596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETG' 'sip-files00336.jpg'
70368cb60851d60c4e20ea98d7c36984
fe450de23db3ebd34c6722611ed23e09d7409475
describe
'71397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETH' 'sip-files00336.pro'
c6c76ac5a4ec59281f5a9a07001312e8
54b9b7b3c1432482c46cb98f8d4a687e42f6790c
describe
'67719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETI' 'sip-files00336.QC.jpg'
d33553fd8c90a25da638a2781f7b9da3
cc6bf8bd9311e265579ddbca7e9dfbe37cdda2af
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETJ' 'sip-files00336.tif'
8e3ad84ca531609c733df87fc3e05c0c
8e02e4e31d743a0db8c3d1e995acc68d78b5a4c2
describe
'3246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETK' 'sip-files00336.txt'
a6a2c55b6421d57de4bb9452aa92a317
7eab78acc6e9b024a5af805135b8abba8bd72467
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETL' 'sip-files00336thm.jpg'
0d9aaa6154d7baafc53a7da93ab8e2bb
b98e1b6e31fd9f0a33193f255f9171273c6b1c3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETM' 'sip-files00337.jp2'
9c1e1733f539734eb85107f232728566
a883b9d6712902b40fa544f833b2e6b1973a41b6
describe
'200348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETN' 'sip-files00337.jpg'
f1f1d47de4ac1d5c71e77e38e01c7f3a
22f104583f5b58d8c035fd32a3dd90b3442f8693
describe
'47372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETO' 'sip-files00337.pro'
12b5465f10eb39dbc1e3919026de85a8
3675b7b1c3d4c08ef5b305def2639445d80b8aa4
describe
'69688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETP' 'sip-files00337.QC.jpg'
e026fed0d540ee17ed3655a6f3d68d03
0ca8aff9de8922744947fd03fa8f5d290d00b296
describe
'3267156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETQ' 'sip-files00337.tif'
fe63113a94be7e5b82a7ac6ad0fbfadb
b40d0969640994a25030a4c02fd1449de7889f95
describe
'2012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETR' 'sip-files00337.txt'
b453d73dbc58e55689812d24773f3e09
529fb57137a160677801282695c2ece9b4543a27
describe
'32390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCUfileF20080402_AABETS' 'sip-files00337thm.jpg'
1cb0a6d52844a1c1c237bcbca3c47443
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Des pee f

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OP Iy g's &



ADVENTURES

OF

HUCKLEBERRY FINN.










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ue cit ted ARR

HUCKLEBERRY FINN.
ADVENTURES

OF

HUCKLEBERRY FINN

(TOM SAWYER’S COMRADE).

SCENE: The Mississippi Valley.
TIME: Forty to Fifty Years Ago.

BY

MARK TWAIN,

ILLUSTRATED,

NEW YORK:
CHARLES L. WEBSTER & CO.
1891.
CopyRIGHT, 1884,
By SAMUEL L, CLEMENS,
(All rights reserved.)

PRESS OF
Jenkins & McCowan,
NEW YORK,
NOTICE.

PERSONS attempting to find a motive in this narrative will
be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be
banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.

BY ORDER OF THE AUTHOR
Per G. G,, CHIEF OF ORDNANCE,
EXPLANATORY.

In this book a number of dialects are used, to wit: the Mis-
souri negro dialect; the extremest form of the backwoods
South-Western dialect; the ordinary ‘‘ Pike-County” dialect;
and four modified varieties of this last. The shadings have
not been done ina hap-hazard fashion, or by guess-work; but
pains-takingly, and with the trustworthy guidance and support
of personal familiarity with these several forms of speech.

I make this explanation for the reason that without it many
readers would suppose that all these characters were trying to

talk alike and not succeeding.
THE AUTHOR.
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I. PAGE.

Civilizing Huck.—Miss Watson.—Tom Sawyer Waits....... et

CHAPTER II.
The Boys Escape Jim.—Tom Sawyer’s Gang.—Deep-laid Plans.

CHAPTER III.

A Good Going-over.—Grace Triumphant.—'‘ One of Tom Saw-
yer's Lies”..........005 sin cesteleseceaact's teen c cece eee e eet eeee

CHAPTER IV.
Huck and the Judge.—Superstition

See e ee cee e er ne Serer cee ene

CHAPTER V.
Huck’s Father.—The Fond Parent.—Reform.......

ove ewan econ

CHAPTER VI.
He Went for Judge Thatcher.—Huck Decides to Leave.—Polit-
ical Economy.—Thrashing Around... ...scseecveesecsovene

CHAPTER VII.

Laying for Him.—Locked in the Cabin.—Sinking the Body.—
Resting :

CHAPTER VIII.
Sleeping in the Woods.—Raising the Dead.—Exploring the Isl-
and,—Finding Jim.—Jim’s Escape.—Signs.—Balum.

ix

22

28

32

36

41

48








x CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IX. PAGE

The Cave.—The Floating House....... cee cee cee sees veces 65

CHAPTER X.
The Find.—Old Hank Bunker.—In Disguise... Eon ete sterulaerace ater - 70

CHAPTER XI.
Huck and the Woman.—The Search.—Prevarication.—Going to
Goshen..... Biol shatioiaie vetetetunat rere e winks dealelacete tenes asetha eee iets 74
CHAPTER XII.
Slow Navigation.—Borrowing Things.—Boarding the Wreck.—
The Plotters.—Hunting for the Boat...... ccc cece een Soro’:
CHAPTER XIII.
Escaping from the Wreck.—The Watchman.—Sinking......2-.. 90

CHAPTER XIV.
A General Good Time.—The Harem.—French........ Wekeeroie as 96

CHAPTER XV.
Huck Loses the Raft.—In the Fog.—Huck Finds the Raft.—Trash ror

CHAPTER XVI.

Expectation.—A White Lie.—Floating Currency.—Running by
Cairo.—Swimming Ashore............ Bec rel hate teleretagete Bho rcar ion OFF,

CHAPTER XVII.
An Evening Call.—The Farm in Arkansaw.—Interior Decora-
tions.—Stephen Dowling Bots.—Poetical Effusions......... TI6
CHAPTER XVIII.

Col. Grangerford.—Aristocracy. —Feuds.—The Testament.—
Recovering the Raft.—The Wood-pile.-—Pork and Cabbage. 126
CONTENTS. xi

CHAPTER XIX. PAGE |

Tying Up Day-Times.—An Astronomical Theory.—Running a
Temperance Revival. —The Duke of Bridgewater. —The
Troubles of Royalty... . cee cee cee ee eee eee ets sievare eaeerebenas 138

CHAPTER XX.

Huck Explains.—Laying Out a Campaign.—Working the Camp-
meeting.—A Pirate at the Camp-meeting.—The Duke as a

PPITICEL Gavecres eo aaeerscas his tate tise ie tee Seca seeal eng evans ate renee we. 148
CHAPTER XXI.
Sword Exercise.—Hamlet’s Soliloquy.—They Loafed Around
Town.—A Lazy Town.—Old Boggs.—Dead............... 158
CHAPTER XXII.
Sherburn.—Attending the Circus.—Intoxication in the Ring.—
Mheshhrilling Craged yrs vorsccen essa sate ie scece oasis Pcie 169
CHAPTER XXIII.
Sold.—Royal Comparisons.—Jim Gets Home-sick............-. 173
CHAPTER XXIV.
Jim in Royal Robes.—They Take a Passenger. —Getting Informa-
tion.—Family Grief......... 0... cee eee Ss se oe Ea Ronse 179
CHAPTER XXV.
Is It Them ?—Singing the ‘* Doxologer.”—Awful Square.—Fu-
neral Orgies. —A Bad Investment. ..........c0e ese eee eee 186.
CHAPTER XXVI.
A Pious King.—The King’s Clergy.—She Asked His Pardon.—
Hiding in the Room.—Huck Takes the Money............. 193

CHAPTER XXVIII.

The Funeral.—Satisfying Curiosity.—Suspicious of Huck.—
Quick Sales and Small Profits... . 1... eee eee dshonosonddag 202
xii CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXVIII. PAGE

The Trip to England.—‘‘ The Brute !”—Mary Jane Decides to
Leave. —Huck Parting with Mary as Aas —The Op-
position Line... ....... 0.0 eae Shit betielaie lacs chu eieis\e: susie eperelere le 2OQ)

CHAPTER XXIX.
Contested Relationship.—The King Explains the Loss.—A Ques-
tion of Handwriting.—Digging up the Corpse.—Huck Escapes 219

CHAPTER XXX.
The King Went for Him.—A Royal Row.—Powerful Mellow.... 229

CHAPTER XXXI.
Ominous Plans.—News from Jim.—Old Recollections.—A Sheep
Story.—Valuable Information............e0e0005 Shales teen 233
CHAPTER XXXII.
Still and ee like. —Mistaken eee oe a ae —Ina
Dilemma wa iecsaousisecsacm ets ews erecens Meee caeray eee
CHAPTER XXXIII.
A Nigger Stealer.—Southern Hospitality.—A Pretty Long Bless-
ing.—Tar and Feathers............-... Sreuagenewile cnsinrotenetstoketetars 248
CHAPTER XXXIV.
The Hut by the Ash Hopper. foe ke ee the Light-
ning Rod.—Troubled with Witches.. Peet he pean 50
CHAPTER XXXV.
Escaping Properly.—Dark Schemes.—Discrimination in Stealing.
——AsDeep Holes etic snenoane aang cite sales eetece ents oleate ZOD
CHAPTER XXXVI.

The Lightning Rod.—His Level Best.—A Bequest to Posterity.—
A High Figure....... Meee e escent eect cess ceetssesccences 269
CONTENTS. Xili

CHAPTER XXXVII. PAGE
The Last Shirt.—Mooning Around.—Sailing Orders.—The Witch
PAG Bi teehee es cauie Ciece'e iapstare\eletarateraier eteseietara etal eosiaercjenelsveres avs caats 275
CHAPTER XXXVIIL.
The Coat of Arms.—A Skilled Superintendent.—Unpleasant
Glory.—A Tearful Subject... 00... ccc ccc cece ee cece ee eee eee 282

CHAPTER XXXIX.

Rats.—Lively Bed-fellows.—The Straw Dummy............... 290

CHAPTER XL.
Fishing.—The Vigilance Committee.—A Lively Run.—Jim Ad-
VASES? 4 Fl) CLOT eis Seis areata stg s hat eine a) Ane eeT acdc rode enca ee 295
CHAPTER XLI
The Doctor.—Uncle Silas.—Sister Hotchkiss.—Aunt Sally in
PV O UD Ler racerescsele tists seein oie sporsis carorine rere stiri rantia tee tre ne SUA neice 301
CHAPTER XLII. :
Tom Sawyer Wounded.—The Doctor’s Story.—Tom Confesses.
—Aunt Polly Arrives.—Hand Out Them Letters
CHAPTER THE LAST,»
Out of Bondage.—Paying the Captive.—Yours Truly, Huck Finn 317

ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
Huckleberry Fin. ...... cece cece cece ce cee ee ene Frontispiece,
TENE SWAG OWS ier eeie eis eis Sianeteieresa fet poke aie ity =ole Wieqep ere a eorehsoalse none pees 17
Learning about Moses and the ‘‘ Bulrushers”’...............0.. 18
Huck Stealing Away........ eta eaiale Moat ceetepie st reine ora eer Poa 2
Aisa ssc ea detector sy cue lo os siciae iala(ostoeiers/ c/w fa alent elo nielecaescelnte ciate crete eerie 23
WSN AB va estates ar ecaleelaver s asciesschersistereustaole eral crete epelep cites cise renter arr ae 33
Sosa piieiaer a ecaerterrecs piatcieivara se ralaescelatenelchars mesteiseastorsresstei ce areca tents 37
Jim and the Ghost...... cc cess eee e rece eee e teen cence te cenees 59
In the Cave..........6. ela Ja estan fad eles ote paneer Ted ne rcte rege TNFR ees Taree 66
Jim Sees a Dead Man......... ee eee eeeee Sie ce steieia sie arseer ismee rye 69
SOA aici tenets: assess see lagur seer sice str su vena apres ot eT Ears 72
SCEL UI paeViQUrsel lances a troricone settee msc ietar esa saaetaseods Geometers 80
He Sometimes Lifted a Chicken...... 0.0.0... 020. ce eee ee eee eereec|
Oh eordyselordiy le sense (cele cee Reet et see es 89
We Turned In and Sleptrre ine eccrine ¢ sees cides sar nOS
Solomon and His Million Wives. ......... 0... ccc ee eee ee eee 97
Elim bin saUipatheee anes cyalepesercts ects e/ hay rasraeeeieresnte sere city eee II5
“eltsMadertler= look: Spid etysweccc acne ence ale cee ee 120
EHS BETO USC astertoters si eyetncy crateue oasis errata cnemn eons wes ny oe ne arm a le 125
SCAnd DOs SrA-COmin gents cotemsge stone aes nomeeas se coaruen secre rete 140
“BysRights io Am: a-Dtike lai wegaecrn ois os sien folie eae TAG
‘le Amithe:ate Dauphine cry: ameqanays css. ncr secretes eet ees 145
Dhesksin giasw) Ulich. ees PN re eee in ISI
Another Little Sobscccs toe Cuvs ste alerts eee tees ounce erp anes 156
yaa BXervelel Skertolaan nenekn ee AG B5 oo docid None GER Ne bes I7r
“Alas. Our- PoorsBrother:. vauscce eee ho ae ee 183
Supper with the Hare-lip.......... avotefedstsheredese ev sjaistcrey Pe cyano 194
Huckemakes athes Money rin toners cia epee eel on Gee an eal 20T
a) Walt Greeeeenere e terarstap cpap ese Sts oeys ae sc eers Sa cy aracaeis eecetager at mee Cae are eee 207
Mh e PAU Ctl Ome etereener einer oucterevereiseeisiay cin ciet oes etl rei neaee ran aeeaaS 217
XVi ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
“ Gentlemen—Gentlemen! 7.0... cece ee eee ee ee ce cece eens 225
Phe Duke: Wenttor Himes 6. ps ie bee se eleeern coeeie Sere 250
Striking for the Back Country... ... cece cece ee cece ce cece eens 240
A Pretty Long Blessing. ..........+20.. Re etc Feet Sraetayictees 253
Travelling by Rail... .° tt... arolaigiorevalaeosiaieeatere lee sper scene 254
Tom Advises a Witch Pie...........6. Rc uae Su Ste RES mee cucrem eco aa 273
Unga PP earing Wea ysis carcass otek oc he eas Bees an aeeet onenRE27O)
Jim’s Coat of Arms........ Spuoeg at aserniig tates caeter alpen Mea eee emu reeraee 283
Tri SAL OM atlas vacate cists cic eine aieiois o's aterezs Stale eatsle rate (ate poreie toe eager 287
Aunt Sally Talks to Fae serene sc biapereletste sJoumavetenstesvelsielonspeceere +++ 306
Tom Sawyer Wounded 2 )e0 ils. o. wiv 5 css eleareierses occ cisco steric ‘see 309
Tom Rose Square in Bed.. a eruaecstne Es atscaeiciee 315

The End. Yours ry, Huck. ian oVareuanataye aerate sc batererein voters wee 318
ike aS

Kehoe ae i
apler 1.

Z OU don’t know about me, without
% you have read a book by the
name of “ The Adventures of
Tom Sawyer,’’ but that ain’t
no matter. That book was
made by Mr. Mark Twain,
and he told the truth, mainly.
There was things which he
stretched, but mainly he told
the truth. That is nothing. I
never seen anybody but lied,
one time or another, without
it was Aunt Polly, or the
widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt
Polly—Tom’s Aunt Polly, she

: is—and Mary, and the Widow
THE WIDOW’S. Douglas, is all told about in
that book—which is mostly a
true book; with some stretchers, as I said before.

Now the way that the book winds up, is this: Tom and me
found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it
made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece—all gold.
It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well,
Judge Thatcher, he took it and put it out at interest, and it
fetched us a dollar a day apiece, all the year round—more
than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Doug-
las, she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize
me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, consid-
ering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all
her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer, I lit out.

2




18 THE ADVENTURES OF

I got into my old rags, and my sugar-hogshead again, and
was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer, he hunted me up
and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might
join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So
I went back.

The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost
lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she



LEARNING ABOUT MOSES AND THE ‘‘ BULRUSHERS.”

never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes
again, and I couldn’t do nothing but sweat and sweat, and
feel all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced
again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to
come to time. When you got to the table you couldn’t go
right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 19

down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though
there warn’t really anything the matter with them. That is,
nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a barrel
of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and
the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.

After supper she got out. her book and learned me about
Moses and the Bulrushers; and I was in a sweat to find out
all about him; but by-and-by she let it out that Moses had
been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn’t care no
more about him; because I don’t take no stock in dead people.

Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let
me. But she wouldn’t. She said it was a mean practice and
wasn’t clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is
just the way with some people. They get down on a thing
when they don’t know nothing about it. Here she was a
bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use
to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault
with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And
she took snuff too; of course that was all right, because she
done it herself.

Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with
goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at
me now, with a spelling-book. She worked me middling hard
for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up. I
couldn’t stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was
deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say,
“Dont put your feet up there, Huckleberry;’’ and “dont
scrunch up like that, Huckleberry—set up straight;” and pret-
ty soon she would say, “ Don’t gap and stretch like that,
Huckleberry—why don’t you try to behave?” Then she
told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was
there. She got madthen, but I didn’t mean no harm. AllI
wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I
warn’t particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said;
said she wouldn’t say it for the whole world; she was going
to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn’t see no
advantage in going where she was going, so I made up my
mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it
would only make trouble, and wouldn’t do no good.

Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all
about the good place. She said all a body would have to do
20 THE ADVENTURES OF

there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing,
forever and ever. SoIdidn’t think much of it. But I never
said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go
there, and, she said, not by a considerable sight. I was glad
about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.

Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome
and lonesome. By-and-by they fetched the niggers in and
had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up
to my room with a piece of candle and put it on the table.
Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think
of something cheerful, but it warn’t no use. I felt so lone-
some I most wished I was dead. The stars were shining, and
the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard
an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead,
and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was
going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something
to me and I couldn’t make out what it was, and so it made
the cold shivers run over me. Then away out in the woods
Iheard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it
wants to tell about something that’s on its mind and can’t
make itself understood, and so can’t rest easy in its grave and
has to go about that way every night grieving. I got so
down-hearted and scared, I did wish I had some company.
Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I
flipped it off and it litin the candle; and before I could budge
it was all shriveled up. I didn’t need anybody to tell me that
that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad
luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me.
I got up and turned around in my tracks three times and
crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up a little lock
of my hair with a thread to keep witches away. But I hadn’t
no confidence. You do that when you've lost a horse-shoe
that you’ve found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but
I hadn't ever heard anybody say it was any way to keep off
bad luck when you'd killed a spider.

I set down again, a shaking all over, and got out my pipe
for a smoke; for the house was all as still as death, now, and
so the widow wouldn’t know. Well, afteralong time I heard
the clock away off in the town go boom—boom—boom—
twelve licks—and all still again—stiller than ever. Pretty
soon I heard a twig snap, down in the dark amongst the trees
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 21

—something was a stirring. Isetstill and listened. Directly
I could just barely hear a “‘ me-yow / me-yow !’’ down there.
That was good! Says I, “ me-yow / me-yow /” as soft as I
could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the
window onto the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground
and crawled in amongst the trees, and sure enough there was
Tom Sawyer waiting for me.



HUCK STEALING AWAY.
22 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER II. :

E went tip-toeing along a path amongst the trees back
towards the end of the widow’s garden, stooping down
so as the branches wouldn’t scrape our heads. When we was
passing by the kitchen I fell over a root and made a noise.
We scrouched down and laid still. Miss Watson’s big nig-
ger, named Jim, was setting in the kitchen door; we could
see him pretty clear, because there was a light behind him.
He got up and stretched his neck out about a minute, listen-
ing. Then he says,

“Who dah?”

He listened some more; then he come tip-toeing down and
stood ‘right between us; we could a touched him, nearly.
Well, likely it was minutes and minutes that there warn’t a
sound, and we all there so close together. There was a
place on my ankle that got to itching; but I dasn’t scratch
it; and then my ear begun to itch; and next my back, right
between my shoulders. Seemed like I’d die if I couldn’t
scratch. Well, I’ve noticed that thing plenty times since.
If you are with the quality, or at a funeral, or trying to go
to sleep when you ain’t sleepy—if you are anywheres where
it won’t do for you to scratch, why you will itch all over in
upwards of a thousand places. Pretty soon Jim says:

‘‘Say—who is you? Whar is you? Dog my cats ef I
didn’ hear sumf’n. Well, I knows what I’s gwyne to do. I’s
gwyne to set down here and listen tell I hears it agin.”

So he set down on the ground betwixt me and Tom. He
leaned his back up against a tree, and stretched his legs out
till one of them most touched one of mine. My nose begun
to itch. It itched till the tears comé into my eyes. But I
dasn’t scratch. Then it begun to itch on the inside. Next I
got toitching underneath. I didn’t know how I was going to
set still. This miserableness went on as much as six or seven
minutes; but it seemed a sight longer than that. I was itch-
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 23

ing in eleven different places now. I reckoned I couldn’t
stand it more’n a minute longer, but I set my teeth hard and
got ready to try. Just then Jim begun to breathe heavy;
next he begun to snore—and then I was pretty soon com-
fortable again.

Tom he made a sign to me—kind of a little noise with his
mouth—and we went creeping away on our hands and knees.
When we was ten foot off,
Tom whispered to me and
wanted to tie Jim to the
tree for fun; but I said no;
he might wake and make a
disturbance, and then
they'd find out I warn't
in. Then Tom said he
hadn’t got candles enough,
and he would slip in the
kitchen and get some more.
I didn’t want him to try.
I said Jim might wake up
and come. But Tom want-
ed to‘resk it; so we slid in
there and got three candles,
and Tom laid five cents on
the table for pay. Then we
got out, andI wasinasweat |
to get away; but nothing '
would do Tom but he must
crawl to where Jim was, on .-
his hands and knees, and
play something on him. I
waited, and it seemed a
good while, everything was
so still and lonesome.

As soon as Tom was back, we cut along the path, around
the garden fence, and by-and-by fetched up on the steep top
of the hill the other side of the house. Tom said he slipped
Jim’s hat off of his head and hung it on a limb right over him,
and Jim stirred a little, but he didn’t wake. Afterwards Jim
said the witches bewitched him and put him in a trance, and
rode him all over the State, and then set him under the trees


24. THE ADVENTURES OF

again and hung his hat on a limb to show who done it. And
next time Jim told it he said they rode him down to New
Orleans; and after that, every time he told it he spread it
more and more, till by-and-by he said they rode him all over
the world, and tired him most to death, and his back was all
over saddle-boils. Jim was monstrous proud about it, and
he got so he wouldn’t hardly notice the other niggers. Nig-
gers would come miles to hear Jim tell about it, and he was
more looked up to than any nigger in that country. Strange
niggers would stand with their mouths open and look him all
over, same as if he was a wonder. Niggers is always talking
about witches in the dark by the kitchen fire; but whenever
one was talking and letting on to know all about such things,
Jim would happen in and say, “Hm! What you know ’bout
witches?” and that nigger was corked up and had to take a
back seat. Jim always kept that five-center piece round his
neck with a string and said it was a charm the devil give to him
with his own hands and told him he could cure anybody with
it and fetch witches whenever he wanted to, just by saying
something to it; but he never told what it was he said to it.
Niggers would come from all around there and give Jim any-
thing they had, just for-a sight of that five-center piece; but
they wouldn’t touch it, because the devil had had his hands
on it. Jim was most ruined, for a servant, because he got so
stuck up on account of having seen the devil and been rode
by witches.

Well, when Tom and me got to the edge of the hill-top,
we looked away down into the village and could see three or
four lights twinkling, where there was sick folks, may be;
and the stars over us was sparkling ever so fine; and down
by the village was the river, a whole mile broad, and awful
still and grand. We went down the hill and found Jo Har-
per, and Ben Rogers, and two or three more of the boys, hid
in the old tanyard. So we unhitched askiff and pulled down
the river two mile and a half, to the big scar on the hillside,
and went ashore.

We went to a clump of bushes, and Tom made everybody
swear to keep the secret, and then showed them a hole in the
hill, right in the thickest part of the bushes. Then we lit
the candles and crawled in on our hands and knees. We
went about two hundred yards, and then the cave opened up,
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 25

Tom poked about amongst the passages and pretty soon
ducked under a wall where you wouldn't a noticed that there
was a hole. We went along a narrow place and got into a
kind of room, all damp and sweaty and cold,and there we
stopped. Tom says:

“Now we'll start this band of robbers and call it Tom
Sawyer’s Gang. Everybody that wants to join has got to
take an oath, and write his name in blood.”

Everybody was willing. So Tom got out a sheet of paper
that he had wrote the oath on, and read it. It swore every
boy to stick to the band, and never tell any of the secrets;
and if anybody done anything to any boy in the band, which-
ever boy was ordered to kill that person and his family must
do it, and he mustn’t eat and he mustn’t sleep till he had
killed them and hacked a cross in their breasts, which was
~ the sign of the band. And nobody that didn’t belong to the
band could use that mark, and if he did he must be sued; |
and if he done it again he must be killed. And if anybody
that belonged to the band told the secrets, he must have his
throat cut, and then have his carcass burnt up and the ashes
scattered all around, and his name blotted off of the list with
blood and never mentioned again by the gang, but havea
curse put on it and be forgot, forever.

Everybody said it was a real beautiful oath, and asked
Tom if he got it out of his own head. He said, some of it,
but the rest was out of pirate books, and robber books, and
every gang that was high-toned had it.

Some thought it would be good to kill the families of boys
that told the secrets. Tom said it was a good idea, so he
took a pencil and wrote it in. Then Ben Roger says:

“Here’s Huck Finn, he hain’t got no family—what you
going to do "bout him ?”’

‘Well, hain’t he got a father ?’’ says Tom Sawyer.

“Yes, he’s got a father, but you can’t never find him,
these days. He used to lay drunk with the hogs in the tan-
yard, but he hain’t been seen in these parts for a year or more.”’

They talked it over, and they was going to rule me out,
because they said every boy must havea family or somebody
to kill, or else it wouldn’t be fair and square for the others.
Well, nobody could think of anything to do—everybody was
stumped, and set still. I was most ready to cry; but all at
26 THE ADVENTURES OF

once I thought of a way, and so I offered them Miss Watson
—they could kill her. Everybody said:

‘¢Oh, she’ll do. That’s all right. Huck can come in.”

Then they all stuck a pin in their fingers to get blood to
sign with, and I made my mark on the paper.

“Now,” says Ben Rogers, ‘‘what’s the line of business of
this Gang ?”’

“ Nothing only robbery and murder,” Tom said.

“But who are we going to rob? houses—or cattle—
(je

“ Stuff! stealing cattle and such things ain’t robbery, it’s
burglary,” says Tom Sawyer. “ Weain’t burglars. That ain’t
no sort of style. Weare highwaymen. We stop stages and
carriages on the road, with masks on, and kill the people and
take their watches and money.”

“ Must we always kill the people ?”

“Oh, certainly. It’s best. Some authorities think dif-
ferent, but mostly it’s considered best to kill them. Except
some that you bring to the cave here and keep them till
they’re ransomed.”

“ Ransomed? What's that?”

“J don’t know. But that’s what they do. I’ve seen it in
books; and so of course that’s what we’ve got to do.”

“« But how can we do it if we don’t know what it is?”

«Why blame it all, we’ve got todo it. Don’t I tell you it’s
inthe books? Do you want to go to doing different from
what’s in the books, and get things all muddled up?”

“Oh, that’s all very fine to say, Tom Sawyer, but how in
the nation are these fellows going to be ransomed if we don’t
know how to do it to them? that’s the thing / want to get at.
Now what do you reckon it is?”

“Well I don’t know. But per'aps if we keep them till
they’re ransomed, it means that we keep them till they’re
dead.” ;

“Now, that’s something @&&e. That'll answer. Why
couldn’t you said that before? We'll keep them till they’re
ransomed to. death—and a bothersome Jot they’ll be, too,
eating up everything and always trying to get loose.”

“ How you talk, Ben Rogers. How can they get loose
when there’s a guard over them, ready to shoot them down
if they move a peg?”
i ce a a a i

HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 27

“A guard. Well, that zs good. So somebody’s got to set
up all night and never get any sleep, just so as to watch them.
I think that’s foolishness. Why can’t a body take a club and
ransom them as soon as they get here?”

“Because it ain’t in the books so—that’s why. Now Ben
Rogers, do you want to do things regular, or don’t you ?—
that’s the idea. Don’t you reckon that the people that made
the books knows what’s the correct thing todo? Do you
reckon you can learn’em anything ? Not by a good deal. No,
sir, we'll just go on and ransom them in the regular way.”

“All right. I don’t mind; but I say it’s a fool way, any-
how. Say—do we kill the women, too?”

“Well, Ben Rogers, if I was as ignorant as you I wouldn’t
let on. Kill the women? No—nobody ever saw anything
in the books like that. You fetch them-to the cave, and
you're always as polite as pie to them; and by-and-by they
fall in love with you and never want to go home any more.”

‘Well, if that’s the way, I’m agreed, but I don’t take no
stock in it. Mighty soon we'll have the cave so cluttered up
with women, and fellows waiting to be ransomed, that there
won’t be no place for the robbers. But go ahead, I ain’t got
nothing to say.”

Little Tommy Barnes was asleep, now, and when they wak-
ed him up he was scared, and cried, and said he wanted to
go home to his ma, and didn’t want to be a robber any more.

So they all made fun of him, and called him cry-baby, and
that made him mad, and he said he would go straight and
tell all the secrets. But Tom give him five cents to keep
quiet, and said we would all go home and meet next week
and rob somebody and kill some people.

Ben Rogers said he couldn’t get out much, only Sundays,
and so he wanted to begin next Sunday; but all the boys
said it would be wicked to do it on Sunday, and that settled
the thing. They agreed to get together and fixa day as
soon as they could, and then we elected Tom Sawyer first
captain and Jo Harper second captain of the Gang, and so
started home.

Iclumb up the shed and crept into my window just before
day was breaking. My new clothes was all greased up and
clayey, and I was dog-tired.
28 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER IIL

ELL, I gota good going-over in the morning, from old

Miss Watson, on account of my clothes; but the widow
she didn’t scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay and
looked so sorry that I thought I would behave a while if I
could. Then Miss Watson she took me in the closet and
prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every
day, and whatever I asked for I would get it. But it warn’t
so. I tried it. Once I got a fish-line, but no hooks. It warn’t
any good to me without hooks. JI tried for the hooks three
or four times, but somehow I couldn’t make it work. By-
and-by, one day, I asked Miss Watson to try for me, but she
said I was a fool. She never told me why, and I couldn’t
make it out no way.

I set down, one time, back in the woods, and had a long
think about it. I says to myself, if a body can get anything
they pray for, why don’t Deacon Winn get back the money
he lost on pork? Why can’t the widow get back her silver
snuff-box that was stole? Why can’t Miss Watson fat up?
No, says I ‘to myself, there ain’t nothing in it. I went and
told the widow about it, and she said the thing a body could
get by praying for it was “spiritual gifts.’ This was too
many for me, but she told me what she meant—I must help
other people, and do everything I could for other people, and
look out for them all the time, and never think about myself.
This was including Miss Watson, as I took it. I went out in
the woods and turned it over in my mind a long time, but I
couldn’t see no advantage about it—except for the other peo-
ple—so at last I reckoned I wouldn’t worry about it any more,
but just let it go. Sometimes the widow would take me one
side and talk about Providence in a way to make a body’s
mouth water; but maybe next day Miss Watson would take
hold and knock it all down again. I judged I could see that
there was two Providences, and a poor chap would stand con-
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 29

siderable show with the widow's Providence, but if Miss Wat-
son’s got him there warn’t no help for him any more. I
thought it all out, and reckoned I would belong to the widow’s,
if he wanted me, though I couldn’t make out how he was ago-
ing to be any better off then than what he was before, seeing
I was so ignorant and so kind of low-down and ornery.

Pap he hadn’t been seen for more than a year, and that
was comfortable for me; I didn’t want to see him no more.
He used to always whale me when he was sober and could
get his hands on me; though I used to take to the woods most
of the time when he was around. Well, about this time he
was found in the river drowned, about twelve mile above town,
so people said. They judged it was him, anyway; said this
drowned man was just his size, and was ragged, and had un-
common long hair—which was all like pap—but they couldn’t
make nothing out of the face, because it had been in the
water so long it warn’t much like a face at all. They said he
was floating on his back in the water. They took him and
buried him on the bank. But I warn’t comfortable long, be-
cause I happened to think of something. I knowed mighty
well that a drownded man don’t float on his back, but on his
face. So I knowed, then, that this warn’t pap, but a woman
dressed up in a man’s clothes. So I was uncomfortable again.
I judged the old man would turn up again by-and-by, though
I wished he wouldn’t.

We played robber now and then about a month, and then
I resigned. All the boys did. We hadn’t robbed nobody, we
hadn’t killed any people, but only just pretended. We used
to hop out of the woods and go charging down on hog-driv-
ers and women in carts taking garden stuff to market, but we
never hived any of them. Tom Sawyer called the hogs
“ingots,” and he called the turnips and stuff “julery” and
we would go to the cave and pow-wow over what we had done
and how many people we had killed and marked. But I
couldn’t see no profit in it. One time Tom sent a boy to run
about town with a blazing stick, which he called a ‘slogan
(which was the sign for the Gang to get together), and then
he said he had got secret news by his spies that next day a
whole parcel of Spanish merchants and rich A-rabs was going
to camp in Cave Hollow with two hundred elephants, and six
hundred camels, and over a thousand “sumter” mules, all
30 THE ADVENTURES OF

loaded down with di’monds, and they didn’t have only a guard
of four hundred soldiers, and so we would Jay in ambuscade,
as he called it, and kill the lot and scoop the things. He said
we must slick up our swords and guns, and get ready. He
never could go after even a turnip-cart but he must have the
swords and guns all scoured up for it; though they was only
lath and broom-sticks, and you might scour at them till you
rotted and then they warn’t worth a mouthful of ashes more
than what they was before. I didn’t believe we could lick
such a crowd of Spaniards and A-rabs, but I wanted to see
the camels and elephants, so I was on hand next day, Satur-
day, in the ambuscade; and when we got the word, we rushed
out of the woods and down the hill. But there warn’t no
Spaniards and A-rabs, and there warn’t no camels nor no ele.
phants. It warn’t anything but a Sunday-school picnic, and
only a primer-class at that. We busted it up, and chased the
children up the hollow; but we never got anything but some
doughnuts and jam, though Ben Rogers got a rag doll, and
Jo Harper got a hymn-book and a tract; and then the teacher
charged in and made us drop everything and cut. I didn’t
see no di’monds, and I told Tom Sawyer so. He said there
was loads of them there, anyway; and he said there was
A-rabs there, toe, and elephants and things. I said, why
couldn’t we see them, then? He said if I warn’t so ignorant,
but had read a book called “Don Quixote,’’ I would know
without asking. He said it was all done by enchantment.
He said there was hundreds of soldiers there, and elephants
and treasure, and so on, but we had enemies which he called
magicians, and they had turned the whole thing into an infant
Sunday school, just out of spite. I said, all right, then the
thing for us to do was to go for the magicians. Tom Sawyer
said I was a numskull.

“Why,” says he, “a magician could call up a lot of genies,
and they would hash you up like nothing before you could say
Jack Robinson. They are as tall as a tree and as big around
as a church.”

“Well,” I says, “‘s’pose we got some genies to help ws—
can’t we lick the other crowd then?”

‘“‘ How you going to get them?”

“‘T don’t know. How do ¢hey get them?”

“Why they rub an old tin lamp or an iron ring, and then


:
F
:

HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 31

the genies come tearing in, with the thunder and lightning
a-ripping around and the smoke a-rolling, and everything
they’re told to do they up and do it. They don’t think noth-
ing of pulling a shot tower up by the roots, and belting a
Sunday-school superintendent over the head with it—or any
other man.”

“Who makes them tear around so?”

“Why, whoever rubs the lamp or the ring. They belong
to whoever rubs the lamp or the ring, and they’ve got to do
whatever he says. If he tells them to build a palace forty
miles long, out of di’monds, and fill it full of chewing gum,
or whatever you want, and fetch an emperor’s daughter from
China for you to marry, they’ve got to do it—and they’ve got
to doit before sun-up next morning, too. And more—they’ve
got to waltz that palace around over the country wherever
you want it, you understand.”

“Well,” says I, “I think they are a pack of flatheads for
not keeping the palace themselves ‘stead of fooling them away
like that. And what’s more—if I was one of them I would
see a man in Jericho before I would drop my business and
come to him for the rubbing of an old tin lamp.”

“How you talk, Huck Finn. Why, you’d ave to come
when he rubbed it, whether you wanted to or not.”

“What, and I as high as a tree and as big as a church?
All right, then; I would come; but I lay I’d make that man
climb the highest tree there was in the country.”

“Shucks, it ain’t no use to talk to you, Huck Finn. You
don’t seem to know anything, somehow—perfect sap-head.”

I thought all this over for two or three days, and then. I
reckoned I would see if there was anything in it. I got an
old tin lamp and an iron ring and went out in the woods and
rubbed and rubbed till I sweat like an Injun, calculating to
build a palace and sell it; but it warn’t no use, none of the
genies come. So then I judged that all that stuff was only
just one of Tom Sawyer’s lies. I reckoned he believed in the
A-rabs and the elephants, but as for me I think different. It
had all the marks of a Sunday school.
32 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER IV.

ELL, three or four months run along, and it was well

into the winter, now. I had been to school most all

the time, and could spell, and read, and write just a little,

and could say the multiplication table up to six times seven

is thirty-five, and I don’t reckon I could ever get any

further than that if I was to live forever. I don’t take no
stock in mathematics, anyway.

At first I hated the school, but by-and-by I got so I could
stand it. Whenever I got uncommon tired I played hookey,
and the hiding I got next day done me good and cheered me
up. So the longer I went to school the easier it got to be.
I was getting sort of used to the widow’s ways, too, and they
warn’t so raspy on me. Living in a house, and sleeping in a
bed, pulled on me pretty tight, mostly, but before the cold
weather I used to slide out and sleep in the woods, some-
times, and so that was a rest tome. I liked the old ways
best, but I was getting so I liked the new ones, too, a little
bit. The widow said I was coming along slow but sure, and
doing very satisfactory. She said she warn’t ashamed of me.

One morning I happened to turn over the salt-cellar at
breakfast. I reached for some of it as quick as I could, to
throw over my left shoulder and keep off the bad luck, but
Miss Watson was in ahead of me, and crossed me off. She

says, ‘* Take your hands away, Huckleberry—what a mess
you are always making.” The widow put in a good word for
me, but that warn’t going to keep off the bad luck, I knowed
that well enough. J started out, after breakfast, feeling wor-
ried and shaky, and wondering where it was going to fall on
me, and what it was going to be. There is ways to keep off
some kinds of bad luck, but this wasn’t one of them kind; so
I never tried to do anything, but just poked along low-spirited
and on the watch-out.

IT went down the front garden and clumb over the stile,


HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 33

where you go through the high board fence. There was an
inch of new snow on the ground, and I seen somebody’s tracks.
They had come up from the quarry and stood around the stile
a while, and then went on around the garden fence. It was
funny they hadn’t come in, after standing around so. I
couldn’t make it out. It was very curious, somehow. I was
going to follow around, but I stooped down to look at the



tracks first. I didn’t notice anything at first, but next I did.
There was a cross in the left boot-heel made with big nails, to
keep off the devil.

I was up in a second and shinning down the hill. I looked
over my shoulder every now and then, but I didn’t see no-
body. Iwas at Judge Thatcher’s as quick as I could get
there. He said:

3
34. THE ADVENTURES OF

“Why, my boy, you are all out of breath. Did you come
for your interest ?”

‘*No sir,” I says; ‘¢is there some for me?”

“Oh, yes, a half-yearly is in, last night. Over a hundred
and fifty dollars. Quite a fortune for you. You better let
me invest it along with your six thousand, because if you take
it you'll spend it.”

“No sir,” I says, «I don’t want to spend it. I don’t want
it at all—nor the six thousand, nuther. I want you to take
it; I want to give it to you—the six thousand and all.”

He looked surprised. He couldn’t seem to make it out. He
says:

‘Why, what can you mean, my boy?”

I says, “Don’t you ask me no questions about it, please.
You'll take it—won’t you?”

He says:

“ Well I’m puzzled. Is something the matter?”

“ Please take it,” says I, “and don’t ask me nothing—then
I won’t have to tell no lies.”

He studied a while, and then he says:

“Oho-o. I think Isee. You want to se//all your property
to me—not give it. That’s the correct idea.”

Then he wrote something on a paper and read it over, and
says:

“ There—you see it says ‘for a consideration.’ That means
I have bought it of you and paid you for it. Here’s adollar
for you. Now, you sign it.”

So I signed it, and left.

Miss Watson’s nigger, Jim, had a hair-ball as big as your
fist, which had been took out of the fourth stomach of an ox,
and he used to do magic with it. He said there was a spirit
inside of it, and it knowed everything. So I went to him that
night and told him pap was here again, for I found his tracks
in the snow. What I wanted to know, was, what he was go-
ing to do, and was he going to stay? Jim got out his hair-
ball, and said something over it, and then he held it up and
dropped it on the floor. It fell pretty solid, and only rolled
about an inch. Jim tried it again, and then another time,
and it acted just the same. Jim got down on his knees and
put his ear against it and listened. But it warn’t no use; he
said it wouldn’t talk. He said sometimes it wouldn’t talk


HUCKLEBERRY FINN.. 35

without money. I told him I had an old ‘slick counterfeit
quarter that warn’t no good because the brass showed through
the silver a little, and it wouldn’t pass nohow, even if the
brass didn’t show, because it was so slick it felt greasy, and
so that would tell on it every time. (I reckoned I wouldn't
say nothing about the dollar I got from the judge.) I said it
was pretty bad money, but maybe the hair-ball would take it,
because maybe it wouldn’t know the difference. Jim smelt
it, and bit it, and rubbed it, and said he would manage so the
hair-ball would think it was good. He said he would split
open a raw Irish potato and stick the quarter in between and
keep it there all night, and next morning you couldn’t see no
brass, and it wouldn’t feel greasy no more, and so anybody
in town would take it in a minute, let alone a hair-ball. Well,
I knowed a potato would do that, before, but I had forgot it.

Jim put the quarter under the hair-ball and got down and
listened again. ‘This time he said the hair-ball was all right.
He said it would tell my whole fortune if I wanted it to. I
says, go on. So the hair-ball talked to Jim, and Jim told it
tome. He says:

‘‘ Yo’ ole father doan’ know, yit, what he’s a-gwyne to do.
Sometimes he spec he'll go ’way, en den agin he spec he’ll
stay. De bes’ way is to res’ easy en let de ole man take his
own way. Dey’s two angels hoverin’ roun’ *bout him. One
uv ’em is white en shiny, en ’tother one is black. De white
one gits him to go right, a little while, den de black one sail
in en bust it all up. A body can’t tell, yit, which one gwyne to
fetch him at de las’. But you is all right. You gwyne to
have considable trouble in yo’ life, en considable joy. Some-
times you gwyne to git hurt, en sometimes you gwyne to git
sick; but every time you’s gwyne to git well agin. Dey’s two
gals flyin’ *bout you in yo’ life. One uv ’em’s light en ’tother
_ one is dark. One is rich en ’tother is po’. You’s gwyne to
_ tarry de po’ one fust en de rich one by-en-by. You wants
to keep ’way fum de water as much as you kin, en don’t run
ag tesk, ’kase it’s down in de bills dat you’s gwyne to git

ung.”

When I lit my candle and went up to my room that night,
_ there set pap, his own self !


36 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER V.

HAD shut the door to. Then I turned around, and there

he was. J used to be scared of him all the time, he tanned

me so much.. I reckoned I was scared now, too; but in a

minute I see I was mistaken. That is, after the first jolt, as

you may say, when my breath sort of hitched—he being so

unexpected; but right away after, ] see I warn’t scared of
him worth bothering about.

He was most fifty, and he looked it. His hair was long
and tangled and greasy, and hung down, and you could see
his eyes shining through like he was behind vines. It was all
black, no gray; so was his long, mixed-up whiskers. There
warn’t no color in his face, where his face showed; it was
white; not like another man’s white, but a white to make a
body sick, a white to make a body’s flesh crawl—a tree-toad
white, a fish-belly white. As for his clothes—just rags, that
was all. He had one ankle resting on ’tother knee; the boot
on that foot was busted, and two of his toes stuck through,
and he worked them now and then. His hat was laying on
the floor; an old black slouch with the top caved in, like a
lid.

I stood a-looking at him; he set there a-looking at me,
with his chair tilted back a little. Iset the candle down. I
noticed the window was up; so he had clumb in by the shed.
He kept a-looking me all over. By-and-by he says:

“ Starchy clothes—very. You think you’re a good deal of
a big-bug, don’t you?”

“ Maybe I am, maybe I ain’t,” I says.

‘Don’t you give me none 0’ your lip,” says he. ‘“ You've
put on considerable many frills since I been away. I'll take
you down a peg before I get done with you. You're edu-
cated, too, they say; can read and write. You think you’re
better’n your father, now, don’t you, because he can’t? J’
take it out of you. Who told you you might meddle with
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 37

such hifalut’n foolishness, hey ?—who told you you could?”
“The widow. She told me.”
‘‘ The widow, hey ?—-and who told the widow she could put’
in her shovel about a thing that ain’t none of her business? ”
“ Nobody never told her.”
“ Well, Pll learn her how to meddle. And looky here—
you drop that school, you hear? I'll learn people to bring











66 pap,”

up a boy to put on airs over his own father and let on to be
better’n what Ae is. You lemme catch you fooling around
that school again, you hear? Your mother couldn’t read,
and she couldn’t write, nuther, before she died. None of the
family couldn’t, before ¢Aey died. J can’t; and here you’re
a-swelling yourself up like this. J ain’t the man to stand it
—you hear? Say—lemme hear you read.”’
38 THE ADVENTURES OF

I tcok up a book and begun something about General
Washington and the wars. When J’d read about ahalf a min-
ute, he fetched the book a whack with his hand and knocked
it across the house. He says:

“Tt’s so. You can do it. I had my doubts when you told
me. Now looky here; you stop that putting on frills. I
won’t have it. I'll lay for you, my smarty; and if I catch
you about that school [ll tan you good. First you know
you'll get religion, too. J never see such a son.”

He took up a little blue and yaller picture of some cows
and a boy, and says:

“ What’s this?”

“It’s something they give me for learning my lessons
good.”

He tore it up, and says—

“T’ll give you something better—I’ll give you a cowhide.”

He set there a-mumbling and a-growling a minute, and
then he says—

“ Ain't you a sweet-scented dandy, though? A bed; and
bedclothes; and a look’n-glass; and a piece of carpet on the
floor—and your own father got to sleep with the hogs in the
tanyard. Inever see such a son. I bet I'll take some o’
these frills out o’ you before I’m done with you. Why
there ain’t no end to your airs—they say you're rich. Hey?
—how’s that ?”

“They lie—that’s how.”

* Looky here—mind how you talk to me; I’m a-standing
about all I can stand, now—so don’t gimme no sass. I’ve
been in town two days, and I hain’t heard nothing but about
you bein’ rich. I heard about it away down the river, too.
That's why Icome. You git me that money to-morrow—I
want it.”’ .

‘‘T hain’t got no money.”

_ “Itsalie. Judge Thatcher’s got it. Yougit it. I want
iteae

“T hain’t got no money, I tell you. You ask Judge
Thatcher; he’ll tell you the same.”

“ Allright. Vl ask him; and I'll make him pungle, too,
or Pll know the reason why. Say—how much you got in /
your pocket ? I want it.” !

“J hain’t got only a dollar, and I want that to——”

f

vd

va
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 39

“Tt don’t make no difference what you want it for—you
just shell it out.”

He took it and bit it to see if it was good, and then he said he
was going down town to get some whisky; said he hadn't hada
drink all day. When he had got out on the shed, he put his
head in again, and cussed me for putting on frills and trying to
be better than him; and when J reckoned he was gone, he come
back and put his head in again, and told me to mind about
that school, because he was going to lay for me and lick me
if I didn’t drop that.

Next day he was drunk, and he went to Judge Thatcher’s
and bullyragged him and tried to make him give up the
money, but he couldn’t, and then he swore he’d make the
law force him.

The judge and the widow went to law to get the court to
take me away from him and let one of them be my guardian;
but it was a new judge that had just come, and he didn’t
know the old man; so he said courts mustn’t interfere and
separate families if they could.help it; said he’d druther not
take a child away from its father. So Judge Thatcher and
the widow had to quit on the business.

That pleased the old man till he couldn’t rest. He said
he’d cowhide me till I was black and blue if I didn’t raise
some money for him, I borrowed three dollars from Judge
Thatcher, and pap took it and got drunk and went a-blowing
around and cussing and whooping and carrying on; and he
kept it up all over town, with a tin pan, till most midnight;
then they jailed him, and next day they had him before
court, and jailed him again fora week. But he said Ae was
satisfied; said he was boss of his son, and he’d make it warm
for him.

When he got out the new judge said he was agoing to make
aman of him. So he took him to his own house, and dress-
ed him up clean and nice, and had him to breakfast and din-
ner and supper with the family, and was just old pie to him,
so to speak. And after supper he talked to him about tem-
perance and such things till the old man cried, and said he’d
been a fool, and fooled away his life; but now he was agoing
to turn over a new leaf and be a man nobody wouldn’t be
ashamed of, and he hoped the judge would help him and not
look down on him. The judge said he could hug him for
40 THE ADVENTURES OF

them words; so Ae cried, and his wife she cried again; pap
said he’d been a man that had always been misunderstood be-
fore, and the judge said he believed it. The old man said
that what a man wanted that was down, was sympathy; and
the judge said it was so; so they cried again. And when it
was bedtime, the old man rose up and held out his hand, and
says:

“Look at it gentlemen, and ladies all; take ahold of it;
shake it. There’s a hand that was the hand of a hog; but it
ain’t so no more; it’s the hand of a man that’s started in on
a new life, and ’ll die before he’ll go back. You mark them
words—don’t forget I said them. It’s a clean hand now;
shake it—don’t be afeard.”

So they shook it, one after the other, all around, and cried.
The judge’s wife she kissed it. Then the old man he signed
a pledge—made his mark. The judge said it was the holiest
time on record, or something like that. Then they tucked
the old man into a beautiful room, which was the spare room,
and in the night sometime he got powerful thirsty and clumb
out onto the porch-roof and slid down a stanchion and traded
his new coat for a jug of forty-rod, and clumb back again
and had a good old time; and towards daylight he crawled
out again, drunk as a fiddler, and rolled off the porch and
broke his left arm in two places and was most froze to death
when somebody found him after sun-up. And when they
come to look at that spare room, they had to take soundings
before they could navigate it.

The judge he felt kind of sore. He said he reckoned a
body could reform the ole man with a shot-gun, maybe, but
he didn’t know no other way.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN, 4l

CHAPTER VI.

ELL, pretty soon the old man was up and around again,
and then he went for Judge Thatcher in the courts to
make him give up that money, and he went for me, too, for not
stopping school. He catched me a couple of times and
thrashed me, but I went to school just the same, and dodged
him or out-run him most of the time. I didn’t want to go to
school much, before, but I reckoned I’d go now to spite pap.
That law trial was a slow business; appeared like they warn’t
ever going to get started on it; so every now and then I’d
borrow two or three dollars off of the judge for him, to keep
from getting a cowhiding. Every time he got money he got
drunk; and every time he got drunk he raised Cain around
town; and every time he raised Cain he got jailed. He was
just suited—this kind of thing was right in his line. .

He got to hanging around the widow’s too much, and so
she told him at last, that if he didn’t quit using around there
she would make trouble for him. Well, wasn’t he mad? He
said he would show who was Huck Finn’s boss. So he watched
out for me one day in the spring, and catched me, and took
me up the river about three mile, in a skiff, and crossed over
to the Illinois shore where it was woody and there warn’t no
houses but an old log hut in a place where the timber was so
thick you couldn’t find it if you didn’t know where it was.

He kept me with him all the time, and I never got a chance
to run off. We lived in that old cabin, and he always locked
the door and put the key under his head, nights. He hada
gun which he had stole, I reckon, and we fished and hunted,
and that was what we lived on. Every little while he locked
me in and went down to the store, three miles, to the ferry,
and traded fish and game for whisky and fetched it home and
got drunk and had a good time, and licked me. The widow
she found out where I was, by-and-by, and she sent a man
over to try to get hold of me, but pap drove him off with the
42 THE ADVENTURES OF

gun, and it warn’t long after that till I was used to being
- where I was, and liked it, all but the cowhide part.

It-was kind of lazy and jolly, laying off comfortable all
day, smoking and fishing, and no books nor study. Two
months or more run along, and my clothes got to be all
rags and dirt, and I didn’t see how I’d ever got to like it so
well at the widow’s, where you had to wash, and eat on
a plate, and comb up, and go to bed and get up regular,
and be forever bothering over a book and have old Miss
Watson pecking at you all the time. I didn’t want to go
back no more. I had stopped cussing, because the widow
didn’t like it; but now I took to it again because pap hadn’t
no objections. It was pretty good times up in the woods
there; take it all around.

But by-and-by pap got too handy with his hick’ry, and I
couldn’t stand it. ] was all over welts. He got to going away
so much, too, and locking me in. Once he locked me in and
was gone three days. It was dreadful lonesome. I judged

_he had got drowned and I wasn’t ever going to get out any

“. More. I was scared. I made up my mind I would fix up

some way to leave there. I had tried to get out of that cabin
many a time, but I couldn’t find no way. There warn’t a
window to it big enough for a dog to get through. I couldn’t
get up the chimbly, it was too narrow. The door was thick
solid oak slabs. Pap was pretty careful not to leave a knife
or anything in the cabin when he was away; I reckon I had
hunted the place over as much as a hundred times; well, I
was ’most all the time at it, because it was about the only way
to put in the time. But this time I found something at last;
I found an old rusty wood-saw without any handle; it was
laid in between a rafter and the clapboards of the roof. I
greased it up and went to work. There was an old horse-
blanket nailed against the logs at the far end of the cabin
behind the table, to keep the wind from blowing through the
chinks and putting the candle out. I got under the table and
raised the blanket and went to work to saw a section of the
big bottom log out, big enough to let me through. Well, it
was a good Jong job, but I was getting towards the end of it
when I heard pap’s gun in the woods. JI got rid of the signs
of my work, and dropped the blanket and hid my saw, and
pretty soon pap come in.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 43

Pap warn’t in a good humor—so he was his natural self.
He said he was down to town, and everything was going wrong.
His lawyer said he reckoned he would win his lawsuit and get
the money, if they ever got started on the trial; but then
there was ways to put it off a long time, and Judge Thatcher
knowed how to do it. And he said people allowed there’d be
another trial to get me away from him and give me to the
widow for my guardian, and they guessed it would win, this
time. This shook me up considerable, because I didn’t want
to go back to the widow’s any more and be so cramped up
and sivilized, as they called it. Then the old man got to
cussing, and cussed everything and everybody he could think
of, and then cussed them all over again to make sure he hadn’t
skipped any, and after that he polished off with a kind of a
general cuss all round, including a considerable parcel of
people which he didn’t know the names of, and so called them
what’s-his-name, when he got to them, and went right along
with his cussing.

He said he would like to see the widow get me. He said
he would watch out, and if they tried to come any such game
on him he knowed of a place six or seven mile off, to stow me
in, where they might hunt till they dropped and they couldn’t
find me. That made me pretty uneasy again, but only fora
minute; I reckoned I wouldn’t stay on hand till he got that
chance.

The old man made me go to the skiff and fetch the things
he had got. There was a fifty-pound sack of corn meal, and
a side of bacon, ammunition, and a four-gallon jug of whisky,
and an old book and two newspapers for wadding, besides
some tow. I toted up a load, and went back and set down
on the bow of the skiff to rest. I thought it all over, and I
reckoned I would walk off with the gun and some lines, and
take to the woods when I run away. I guessed I wouldn’t
stay in one place, but just tramp right across the country,
mostly night times, and hunt and fish to keep alive, and so
get so far away that the old man nor the widow couldn’t ever
find me any more. I judged I would saw out and leave that
night if pap got drunk enough, and I reckoned he would. I
got so full of it I didn’t notice how long I was staying, till
the old man hollered and asked me whether I was asleep or
drownded.
44 THE ADVENTURES OF

I got the things all up to the cabin, and then it was about
dark. While I was cooking supper the old man took a swig
or two and got sort of warmed up, and went to ripping again.
He had been drunk over in town, and laid in the gutter all
night, and he was a sight to look at. A body would a thought
he was Adam, he was just all mud. Whenever his liquor be-
gun to work, he most always went for the govment. This
time he says:

“Call this a govment! why, just look at it and see what it’s
like. Here’s the law a-standing ready to take a man’s son
away from him—a man’s own son, which he has had all the
trouble and all the anxiety and all the expense of raising.
Yes, just as that man has got that son raised at last, and
ready to go to work and begin to do suthin’ for Az and give
him a rest, the law up and goes for him. And they call “ar
govment! That ain’t all, nuther. The law backs that old
Judge Thatcher up and helps him to keep me out o’ my prop-
erty. Here’s what the law does. The law takes a man
worth six thousand dollars and upards, and jams him into an
old trap of a cabin like this, and lets him go round in clothes
that ain’t fitten for a hog. They callthat govment! A man
can’t get his rights in a govment like this. Sometimes I’vea .
mighty notion to just leave the country for good and all.
Yes, and I zo/d ’em so; I told old Thatcher so to his face.
Lots of ’em heard me, and can tell what I said. Says I, for
two cents I’d leave the blamed country and never come anear
it agin. Them’s the very words. I says, look at my hat—if
you call it a hat—but the lid raises up and the rest of it goes
down till it’s below my chin, and then it ain’t rightly a hat at
all, but more like my head was shoved up through a jint o’
stove-pipe. Look at it, says I—such a hat for me to wear—
one of the wealthiest men in this town, if I could git my
rights. : ;

‘“‘Oh, yes, this is a wonderful govment, wonderful. Why,
looky here. There was a free nigger there, from Ohio; a
mulatter, most as white asa white man. He had the whitest
shirt on you ever see, too, and the shiniest hat; and there ain’t
a man in that town that’s got as fine clothes as what he had;
and he had a gold watch and chain, and a silver-headed cane
—the awfulest old gray-headed nabob in the State. And
what do you think? they said he was a p’fessor in a college,


HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 45

and could talk all kinds of languages, and knowed everything.
And that ain’t the wust. They said he could vo/e, when he
was at home. Well, that let me out. Thinks I, what is the
country a-coming to? It was ‘lection day, and I was just
about to go and vote, myself, if I warn’t too drunk to get
there; but when they told me there was a State in this coun-
try where they’d let that nigger vote, I drawed out. I says
I’ll never vote agin. Them’s the very words I said; they all
heard me; and the country may rot for all me—I’ll never
vote agin as Jong as I live. And to see the cool way of that
nigger—why, he wouldn’t a give me the road if I hadn’t shoved
him out o’ the way. I says to the people, why ain’t this nig-
ger put up at auction and sold ?—that’s what I want to know.
And what do you reckon they said? Why, they said he
couldn’t be sold till he’d been in the State six months, and
he hadn’t been there that long yet. There, now—that’s a
specimen. They call that a govment that can’t sell a free
nigger till he’s been in the State six months. Here’s a gov-
ment that calls itself a govment, and lets on to be a govment,
and thinks it is a govment, and yet’s got to set stock-still for
six whole months before it can take ahold of a prowling,
thieving, infernal, white-shirted free nigger, and 0
Pap was agoing on so, he never noticed where his old lim-
ber legs was taking him to, so he went head over heels over
the tub of salt pork, and barked both shins, and the rest of
his speech was all the hottest kind of language—mostly hove
at the nigger and the govment, though he give the tub some,
too, all along, here and there. He hopped around the cabin
considerable, first on one leg and then on the other, holding
first one shin and then the other one, and at last he let out
with his feft foot all of a sudden and fetched the tub a rat-
tling kick. But it warn’t good judgment, because that was
the boot that had a couple of his toes leaking out of the front
end of it; so now he raised a howl that fairly made a body’s
hair raise, and down he went in the dirt, and rolled there,
and held his toes; and the cussing he done then laid over
anything he had ever done previous. He said so his own
self, afterwards. He had heard old Sowberry Hagan in his
best days, and he said it laid over him, too; but I reckon that
was sort of piling it on, maybe.
After supper pap took the jug, and said he had enough


46 THE ADVENTURES OF

whisky there for two drunks and one delirium tremens. That
was always his word. I judged he would be blind drunk in
about an hour, and then I would steal the key, or saw myself
out, one or'tother. He drank, and drank, and tumbled down
on his blankets, by-and-by; but luck didn’t run my way. He
didn’t go sound asleep, but was uneasy. He groaned, and
moaned, and thrashed around this way and that, for a long
time. At last I got so sleepy I couldn’t keep my eyes open,
all I could do, and so before I knowed what I was about I
was sound asleep, and the candle burning.

I don’t know how long I was asleep, but all of a sudden
there was an awful scream and Iwas up. There was pap,
looking wild and skipping around every which way and yelil-
ing about snakes. He said they was crawling up his legs;
and then he would give a jump and scream, and say one had
bit him on the cheek—but I couldn’t see no snakes. He
started and run round and round the cabin, hollering ‘‘take
him off! take him off! he’s biting me onthe neck!” I never
see a man look so wild in the eyes. Pretty soon he was all
fagged out, and fell down panting; then he rolled over and
over, wonderful fast, kicking things every which way, and
striking and grabbing at the air with his hands, and scream-
ing, and saying there was devils ahold of him. He wore out,
by-and-by, and laid still a while, moaning. Then he laid
stiller, and didn’t make a sound. JI could hear the owls and
the wolves, away off in the woods, and it seemed terrible still.
He was laying over by the corner. By-and-by he raised up,
part way, and listened, with his head to one side. He says
very low:

“ Tramp—tramp—tramp; that’s the dead; tramp—tramp
tramp; they’re coming after me; but I won’t go— Oh, they’re
here! don’t touch me—don’t! hands off—they’re cold; let go
— Oh, let a poor devil alone!”

Then he went down on all fours and crawled off begging
them to let him alone, and he rolled himself up in his blan-
ket and wallowed in under the old pine table, still a-begging;
and then he went to crying. I could hear him through the
blanket.

By-and-by he rolled out and jumped up on his feet looking
wild, and he see me and went forme. He chased me round
and round the place,with a clasp-knife, calling me the Angel
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. Ay

of Death, and saying he would kill me and then I couldn’t
come for him no more. I begged, and told him I was only
Huck, but he laughed sch a screechy laugh, and roared and
cussed, and kept on chasing me up. Once when I turned
short and dodged under his arm he made a grab and got me
by the jacket between my shoulders, and J thought I was
gone; but I slid out of the jacket quick as lightning, and
saved myself. Pretty soon he was all tired out, and dropped
down with his back against the door, and said he would rest
a minute and then kill me. He put his knife under him, and
said he would sleep and get strong, and then he would see
who was who.

So he dozed off, pretty soon. By-and-by I got the old
split-bottom chair and clumb up, as easy as I could, not to
make any noise, and got down the gun. I slipped the ram-
rod down it to make sure it was loaded, and then I laid it
across the turnip barrel, pointing towards pap, and set down
behind it to wait for him to stir. And how slow and still the
time did drag along.
48 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER VIL.

x IT up! what you *bout!”

IT opened my eyes and looked around, trying to make
out where I was. It was after sun-up, and I had been sound
asleep. Pap was standing over me, looking sour—and sick,
too. He says—

“What you doin’ with this gun?”

I judged he didn’t know nothing about what he had been
doing, so I says:

“ Somebody tried to get in, so I was laying for him.”

“ Why didn’t you roust me out?”

“Well I tried to, but I couldn’t; I couldn't budge you.”

“Well, all right. Don’t stand there palavering all day,
but out with you and see if there’s a fish on the lines for
breakfast. Tl be along in a minute.”

He unlocked the door and I cleared out, up the river
bank. I noticed some pieces of limbs and such things
floating down, and a sprinkling of bark; so I knowed the
river had begun torise. Ireckoned I would have great times,
now, if I was over at the town. ‘The June rise used to be
always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins,
here comes cord-wood floating down, and pieces of log rafts
—sometimes a dozen logs together; so all you have to do
is to catch them and sell them to the wood yards and the
sawmill.

I went along up the bank with one eye out for pap and
‘tother one out for what the rise might fetch along. Well,
all at once, here comes a canoe; just a beauty, too, about
thirteen or fourteen foot long, riding high like a duck. I
shot head first off of the bank, like a frog, clothes and all
on, and struck out for the canoe, I just expected there’d
be somebody Jaying down in it, because people often done
that to fool folks, and when a chap had pulled a skiff out
most to it they’d raise up and laugh at him. But it
warn’t so this time, It was a drift-canoe, sure enough,


HUCKLEBERRY FINN. AQ

and I clumb in and paddled her ashore. Thinks I, the
old man will be glad when he sees this—she’s worth ten
dollars. But when I got to shore pap wasn’t in sight yet,
and as I was running her into a little creek like a gully, all
hung over with vines and willows, I struck another idea ; I
judged I’d hide her good, and then, stead of taking to the
woods when I run off, ’'d go down the river about fifty mile
and camp in one place for good, and not have such a rough
time tramping on foot.

It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard
the old man coming, all the time; but I got her hid; and
then I out and looked around a bunch of willows, and there
was the old man down the path apiece just drawing a bead
ona bird with hisgun. So he hadn’t seen anything.

When he got along, I was hard at it taking up a “trot”
line. He abused me a little for being so slow, but I told him
I fell in the river and that was what made me so long. I
knowed he would see I was wet, and then he would ‘be ask-
ing questions. We got five cat-fish off of the lines and went
home.

While we laid off, after breakfast, to sleep up, both of us
being about wore out, I got to thinking that if I could fix
up some way to keep pap and the widow from trying to fol-
low me, it would be a certainer thing than trusting to luck to
get far enough off before they missed me ; you see, all kinds
of things might happen. Well, I didn’t see no way for a
while, but by-and-by pap raised up a minute, to drink an-
other barrel of water, and he says:

“ Another time a man comes a-prowling round here, you
roust me out, you hear? That man warn’t here for no good.
T’da shot him. Next time, you roust me out, you hear?”’

Then he dropped down and went to sleep again—but what
he had been saying give me the very idea I wanted. I says
to myself, I can fix it now so nobody won’t think of foilow-
ing me.

About twelve o’clock we turned out and went along up
the bank. The river was coming up pretty fast, and lots of
drift-wood going by on the rise. By-and-by, along comes
part of a log raft—nine logs fast together. We went out with
the skiff and towed it ashore. Then we had dinner. Any-
body but pap would a waited and seen the day through, so

4
50 THE ADVENTURES OF

as to catch more stuff; but that warn’t pap’s style. Nine
logs was enough for one time; he must shove right over to
town and sell. So he locked mein and took the skiff and
started off towing the raft about half-past three. IJ judged
he wouldn’t come back that night. J waited till I reckoned
he had got a good start, then I out with my saw and went
to work on that log again. Before he was ’tother side of the
river I was out of the hole; him and his raft was just a speck
on the water away off yonder.

I took the sack of corn meal and took it to where the
canoe was hid, and shoved the vines and branches apart and
put it in; then I done the same with the side of bacon ; then
the whisky jug ; I took all the coffee and sugar there was,
and all the ammunition; I took the wadding; I took the
bucket and gourd, I took a dipper and a tin cup, and my old
saw and two blankets, and the skillet and the coffee-pot. I
took fish-lines and matches and other things—everything that
was worth a cent. I cleaned out the place. J wanted an
axe, but there wasn’t any, only the one out at the wood pile,
and I knowed why I was going to leave that. I fetched out
the gun, and now I was done.

I had wore the ground a good deal, crawling out of the
hole and dragging out so many things. SoTI fixed that as
good as I could from the outside by scattering dust on the
place, which covered up the smoothness and the sawdust.
Then I fixed the piece of log back into its place, and put two
rocks under it and one against it to hold it there,—for it was
bent up at that place, and didn’t quite touch ground. If you
stood four or five foot away and didn’t know it was sawed,
you wouldn’t ever notice it; and besides, this was the back
of the cabin and it warn’t likely anybody would go fooling
around there.

It was all grass clear to the canoe ; sol hadn’t left a track.
I followed around to see. I stood on the bank and looked
out over the river. All safe. So I took the gun and went
up a piece into the woods and was hunting around for some
birds, when I see a wild pig ; hogs soon went wild in them
bottoms after they had got away from the prairie farms. I
shot this fellow and took him into camp.

I took the axe and smashed in the door—I beat it and
hacked it considerable, a-doing it. I fetched the pig in and
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 51

took him back nearly to the table and hacked into his throat
with the ax, and laid him down on the ground to bleed—I
say ground, because it was ground—hard packed, and no
boards. Well, next I took an old sack and put a lot of big
rocks in it,—all I could drag—and I started it from the pig
and dragged it to the door and through the woods down to the
river and dumped it in, and down it sunk, out of sight. You
could easy see that something had been dragged over the
ground. I did wish Tom Sawyer was there, I knowed he
would take an interest in this kind of business, and throw in
the fancy touches. Nobody could spread himself like Tom
Sawyer in such a thing as that.

Well, last I pulled out some of my hair, and blooded the
ax good, and stuck it on the back side, and slung the ax in
the corner. Then I took-up the pig and held him to my
breast with my jacket (so he couldn’t drip) till I got a good
piece below the house and then dumped him into the river.
Now I thought of something else. So 1 went and got the bag
of meal and my old saw out of the canoe and fetched them
to the house. I took the bag to where it used to stand, and
ripped a hole inthe bottom of it with the saw, for there warn’t
no knives and forks on the place—pap done everything with
his clasp-knife, about the cooking. ThenI carried the sack
about a hundred yards across the grass and through the wil-
lows east of the house, to a shallow lake that was five mile
wide and full of rushes—and ducks too, you might say, in the
season. There was a slough or a creek leading out of it on
the other side, that went miles away, I don’t know where, but
it didn’t go tothe river. The meal sifted out and made a
little track all the way to the lake. I dropped pap’s whet-
stone there too, so as to look like it had been done by acci-
dent. ‘Then I tied up the rip in the meal sack with a string,
so it wouldn’t leak no more, and took it and my saw to the
canoe again.

It was about dark, now; so I dropped the canoe down the
river under some willows that hung over the bank, and waited
for the moon to rise. I made fast toa willow; then I tooka
bite to eat, and by-and-by laid down in the canoe to smoke a
pipe and lay out a plan. I says to myself, they'll follow the
track of that sackful of rocks to the shore and then drag the
river for me. And they'll follow that meal track to the lake


52 THE ADVENTURES OF

and go browsing down the creek that leads out of it to find
the robbers that killed me and took the things. They won’t
ever hunt the river for anything but my dead carcass. ‘They’ll
soon get tired of that, and won’t bother no more about me.
All right; I can stop anywhere I want to. Jackson’s Island
is good enough for me; I know that island pretty well, and
nobody ever comes there. And then I can paddie over to
town, nights, and slink around and pick up things I want.
Jackson’s Island’s the place.

I was pretty tired, and the first thing I knowed, I was
asleep. When Iwoke up I didn’t know where I was, for a
minute. I set up and looked around, a little scared. Then
I remembered. The river looked miles and miles across. The
moon was so bright I could a counted the drift logs that went
a slipping along, black and still, hundred of yards out from
shore. Everything was dead quiet, and it looked late, and
smelt late. You know what I mean—I don’t know the words
to put it in.

I took a good gap and a stretch, and was just going to un-
hitch and start, when I heard a sound away over the water.
I listened. Pretty soon I made it out. It was that dull kind
of a regular sound that comes from oars working in rowlocks
when it’s a still night. JI peeped out through the willow
branches, and there it was—a skiff, away across the water. I
couldn’t tell how many was in it. It kept a-coming, and
when it was abreast of me I see there warn’t but one man in
it. Think’s I, maybe it’s pap, though I warn’t expecting him.
He dropped below me, with the current, and by-and-by he
come a-swinging up shore in the easy water, and he went by
so close I could a reached out the gun and touched him.
Well, it gas pap, sure enough—and sober, too, by the way
he laid to his oars.

I didn’t lose no time. The next minute I was a-spinning
down stream soft but quick in the shade of the bank. I
made two mile and a half, and then struck out a quarter ofa
mile or more towards the middle of the river, because pretty
soon I would be passing the ferry landing and people might
see me and hail me. I got out amongst the drift-wood and
then laid down in the bottom of the canoe and let her float.
I laid there and had a good rest and a smoke out of my pipe,
looking away into the sky, not a cloud in it. Thesky looks
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 53

ever so deep when you lay down on your back in the moon-
shine ; I never knowed it before. And how far a body can
hear on the water such nights! I heard people talking at
the ferry landing. I heard what they said, too, every word
of it. One man said it was getting towards the long days and
the short nights, now. ’Tother one said ¢Azs warn’t one of
the short ones, he reckoned—and then they laughed, and he
said it over again and they laughed again ; then they waked
up another fellow and told him, and laughed, but he didn’t
laugh ; he ripped out something brisk and said let him alone.
The first fellow said he ‘lowed to tell it to his old woman—
she would think it was pretty good ; but he said that warn’t
nothing to some things he had said in his time. J heard one
man say it was nearly three o’clock, and he hoped daylight
wouldn’t wait more than about a week longer. After that,
the talk got further and further away, and I couldn’t make
out the words any more, but I could hear the mumble; and
now and then a laugh, too, but it seemed a long ways off.

I was away below the ferry now. I rose up and there was Jack-
son’s Island, about two mile anda half down stream, heavy-
timbered and standing up out of the middle of the river, big and
dark and solid, like a steamboat without any lights. ‘There
warn't any signs of the bar at the head—it was all under water,
now.

It didn’t take me long to get there. I shot past the head at
a ripping rate, the current was so swift, and then I got into the
dead water and landed on the side towards the Illinois shore.
I run the canoe into a deep dent in the bank that I knowed
about; I had to part the willow branches to get in; and when
I made fast nobody could a seen the canoe from the outside.

I went up and set down on a log at the head of the island
and looked out on the big river and the black driftwood, and
away over to the town, three mile away, where there was three
or four lights twinkling. A monstrous big lumber raft was
about a mile up stream, coming along down, with a lantern in
the middle of it. I watched it come creeping down, and
when it was most abreast of where I stood I heard aman say,
‘« Stern oars, there! heave her head to stabboard!” I heard
that just as plain as if the man was by my side.

There was a little gray in the sky, now; so I stepped into
the woods and laid down for a nap before breakfast.
54 = THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER VIII.

HE sun was up so high when I waked, that I judged it

was after eight o’clock. JI laid there in the grass and

the cool shade, thinking about things and feeling rested and

ruther comfortable and satisfied. I could see the sun out at

one or two holes, but mostly it was big trees all about, and

gloomy in there amongst them. There was freckled places

on the ground where the light sifted down through the leaves,

and the freckled places swapped about a little, showing there

was a little breeze up there. A couple of squirrels set ona
limb and jabbered at me very friendly.

I was powerful lazy and comfortable—didn’t want to get
up and cook breakfast. Well, I was dozing off again, when
I thinks I hears adeep sound of ‘‘ boom!” away up the river.
I rouses up and rests on my elbow and listens; pretty soon I
hears it again. I hopped up and went and looked out ata
hole in the leaves, and I see a bunch of smoke laying on the
‘water a long ways up—about abreast the ferry. And there
was the ferry-boat full of people, floating along down. I
knowed what was the matter, now. “Boom!” I see the
white smoke squirt out of the ferry-boat’s side. You see,
they was firing cannon over the water, trying to make my
carcass come to the top.

I was pretty hungry, but it warn’t going to do for me to
start a fire, because they might see the smoke. So I set
there and watched the cannon-smoke and listened to the
boom. The river was a mile wide, there, and it always looks
pretty on a summer morning—so I was having a good enough
time seeing them hunt for my remainders, if I only had a
bite to eat. Well, then I happened to think how they always
put quicksilver in loaves of bread and float them off because
they always go right to the drownded carcass and stop there.
So says I, I'll keep a lookout, and if any of them’s floating
around after me, I’ll give them a show. I changed to the
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 55

Illinois edge of the island to see what luck I could have, and
I warn’t disappointed. A big double loaf come along, and I
most got it, with a long stick, but my foot slipped and she
floated out further. Of course I was where the current set
in the closest to the shore—I knowed enough for that. But
by-and-by along comes another one, and this time I won. I
took out the plug and shook out the little dab of quicksilver,
and set my teeth in. It was “baker’s bread’”—what the
quality eat—none of your low-down corn-pone.

I got a good place amongst the leaves, and set there on a
log, munching the bread and watching the ferry-boat, and
very well satisfied. And then something struck me. I
says, now I reckon the widow or the parson or somebody
prayed that this bread would find me, and here it has gone
and done it. So there ain’t no doubt but there is something
in that thing. That is, there’s something in it when a body
like the widow or the parson prays, but it don’t work for me,
and I reckon it don’t work for only just the right kind.

I lit a pipe and had a good long smoke and went on watch-
ing. The ferry-boat was floating with the current, and I al-
lowed I’d have a chance to see who was aboard when she
come along, because she would come in close, where the
bread did. When she’d got pretty well along down towards
me, I put out my pipe and went to where I fished out the
bread, and laid down behind a log on the back in a little
open place. Where the log forked I could peep through.

By-and-by she come along, and she drifted in so close that
they could a run out a plank and walked ashore. Most
everybody was on the boat. Pap, and Judge Thatcher, and
Bessie Thatcher, and Jo Harper, and Tom Sawyer, and. his
old Aunt Polly, and Sid and Mary, and plenty more. Every-
body was talking about the murder, but the captain broke in
and says:

_ “Look sharp, now; the current sets in the closest here,
and maybe he’s washed ashore and got tangled amongst the
brush at the water’s edge. JI hope so, anyway.”

I didn’t hope so. They all crowded up and leaned over
the rails, nearly in my face, and kept still, watching with all
their might. I could see them first-rate, but they couldn’t
see me. Then the captain sung out:

“Stand away!’”’ and the cannon let off such a blast right
56 THE ADVENTURES OF

before me that it made me deef with the noise and pretty
near blind with the smoke, and I judged Iwas gone. If they’d
a had some bullets in, I reckon they’d a got the corpse they
was after. Well, I see I warn’t hurt, thanks to goodness. The
boat floated on and went out of sight around the shoulder of
the island. I could hear the booming, now and then, further
and further off, and by-and-by after an hour, I didn’t hear it
nomore. The island was three mile long. I judged they had
got to the foot, and was giving it up. But they didn’t yet a
while. They turned around the foot of the island and start-
ed up the channel on the Missouri side, under steam, and
booming once ina while as they went. I crossed over to
that side and watched them. When they got abreast the
head of the island they quit shooting and dropped over to the
Missouri shore and went home to the town.

I knowed I was all right now. Nobody else would come
a-hunting after me. I got my traps out of the canoe and
made me a nice camp in the thick woods. I made a kind of
a tent out of my blankets to put my things under so the rain
couldn’t get at them. I catched a cat-fish and haggled him
open with my saw, and towards sundown I started my camp
fireand had supper. Then I set out a line to catch some fish
for breakfast. J

When it was dark I set by my camp-fire smoking, and feel-
ing pretty satished; but by-and-by it got sort of lonesome,
and so I went and set on the bank and listened to the cur-
rents washing along, and counted the stars and drift-logs and
rafts that come down, and then went to bed; there ain’t no
better way to put in time when you are lonesome; you can’t
stay so, you soon get over it.

And so for three days and nights. No difference—just the
same thing. But the next day I went exploring around down
through the island. I was boss of it; it all belonged to me,
so to say, and I wanted to know all about it; but mainly I
wanted to put in the time. I found plenty strawberries, ripe
and prime; and green summer-grapes, and green razberries;
and the green blackberries was just beginning to show. They
would all come handy by-and-by, I judged.

Well, I went fooling along in the deep woods till I judged
I warn’t far from the foot of theisland. I had my gun along,
but I hadn’t shot nothing; it was for protection; thought I
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 57

would kill some game nigh home. About this time I mighty
near stepped on a good sized snake, and it went sliding off
through the grass and flowers, and I after it, trying to get a
shot at it. I clipped along, and all of a sudden I bounded
right on to the ashes of a camp fire that was still smoking.

My heart jumped up amongst my lungs. I never waited for
to look further, but uncocked my gunand went sneaking back
on my tip-toes as fast as ever I could. Every now and then
I stopped a second, amongst the thick leaves, and listened,
but my breath come so hard I couldn’t hear nothing else. I
slunk along another piece further, then listened again; and so
on, and so on; if I see a stump, I took it fora man; if I trod
on a stick and broke it, it made me feel like a person had cut
one of my breaths in two and I only got half, and the short
half, too.

When I got to camp I warn’t feeling very brash, there
warn’t much sand in my craw; but I says, this ain’t no time
to be fooling around. So I got all my traps into my canoe
again so as to have them out of sight, and I put out the fire
and scattered the ashes around to look like an old last year’s
camp, and then clumb a tree.

I reckon I was up in the tree two hours; but I didn’t see
nothing, I didn’t hear nothing—I only thought I heard and
seen as much asa thousand things. Well, I ‘couldn't stay up
there forever; so at last I got down, but I kept in the thick
woods and on the lookout all the time. All I could get to
eat was berries and what was left over from breakfast.

By the time it was night I was pretty hungry. So when it |
was good and dark, I slid out from shore before moonrise and
paddled over to the Illinois bank—about a quarter of a mile.
I went out in the woods and cooked a supper, and I had about
made up my mind I would stay there all night, when I heara
plunkety-plunk, plunkety-plunk, and says to myself, horses com-
ing; and next I hear people’s voices. I got everything into
the canoe as quick as I could, and then went creeping
through the woods to see what Icould findout. Ihadn’t got
far when J hear a man say:

“We better camp here, if we can find a good place; the
horses is about beat out. Let’s look around.”

I didn’t wait, but shoved out and paddled away easy. I tied
up in the old place, and reckoned I would sleep in the canoe.
58 THE ADVENTURES OF

I didn’t sleep much. I couldn’t, somehow, for thinking.
And every time I waked up I thought somebody had me by
the neck. So the sleep didn’t do me no good. By-and-by I
says to myself, I can’t live this way; I’m agoing to find out
who it is that’s here on the island with me; I’ll find it out or
bust. Well, I felt better, right off.

So I took my paddle and slid out from shore just a step or
two, and then let the canoe drop along down amongst the
shadows. The moon was shining, and outside of the shadows
it made it most as light as day. I poked along well onto an
hour, everything still as rocks and sound asleep. Well by
this time I was most down to the foot of the island. A little
tipply, cool breeze begun to blow, and that was as good as
saying the night was about done. I give her a turn with the
paddle and brung her nose to shore; then I got my gun and
slipped out and into the edge of the woods. I set down there
on a log and looked out though the leaves. I see the moon
go off watch and the darkness begin to blag’ct the river. But
in a little while I see a pale streak over the tree-tops, and
knowed the day was coming. So I took my gun and slipped
' off towards where I had run across that camp fire, stopping
every minute or two to listen. But I hadn’t no luck, some-
how; I couldn’t seem to find the place. But by-and-by, sure
enough, I catched a glimpse of fire, away through the trees.
I went for it, cautious and slow. By-and-by I was close
enough to have a look, and there laid a man on the ground.
It most give me the fan-tods. He had a blanket around his
head, and his head was nearly in the fire. J set there behind
a clump of bushes, in about six foot of him, and kept my eyes
on him steady. It was getting gray daylight, now. Pretty
soon he gapped, and stretched himself, and hove off the
blanket, and it was Miss Watson’s Jim! I bet I was glad to
see him. I says: ;

“ Hello, Jim!” and skipped out.

He bounced up and stared at me wild. Then he drops
down on his knees, and puts his hands together and says:

“ Doan’ hurt me—don’t! I hain’t ever done no harm to a-
ghos’. I awluz liked dead people, en done all I could for ’em.
You go en git in de river agin, whah you b’longs, en doan’ do
nuffn to Ole Jim, ’at ’uz awluz yo’ fren’.”

Well, I warn’t long making him understand I warn’t dead.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 59

I was ever so glad to see Jim. I warn’t lonesome, now. I
told him I warn’t afraid of Azm telling the people where I was.
I talked along, but he only set there and looked at me; never
said nothing. Then I says:

“It’s good daylight. Le’s get breakfast. Make up your
camp fire good.”

« What’s de use er makin’ up de camp fire to cook straw-
bries en sich truck? But you got a gun, hain’t you? Den
we kin git sumfn better den strawbries.”



JIM AND THE GHOST.

“ Strawberries and such truck,” Isays. ‘‘ Is that what you
live on?”

“T couldn’ git nuffn else,” he says.

“Why, how long you been on the island, Jim?”

“‘T come heah de night arter you’s killed.”

“What, all that time?”

“ Yes-indeedy.”

“And ain’t you had nothing but that kind of rubbage to
eat?”
60 THE ADVENTURES OF

“No, sah—nuffn else.”

is Well, you must be most starved, ain’t you?”

“Treck’n I could eata hoss. I think Icould. How long
you ben on de islan’?”

‘Since the night I got killed.”’

“No! W’y, what has you lived on? But you got a gun.
Oh, yes, you gota gun. Dat’s good. Now you kill sumfn
en I'll make up de fire.”

So we went over to where the canoe was, and while he built
a fire in a grassy open place amongst the trees, I fetched meal
and bacon and coffee, and coffee-pot and frying-pan, and
sugar and tin cups, and the nigger was set back considerable,
because he reckoned it was all done with witchcraft. I
catched a good big cat-fish, too, and Jim cleaned him with
his knife, and fried him.

When breakfast was ready, we lolled on the grass and eat
it smoking hot, Jim laid, it in with all his might, for he was
most about starved. Vhen when we had got pretty well
stuffed, we laid off and lazied.

By- and- by Jim says:

“But looky here, Huck, who wuz it dat ’uz killed in dat
shanty, ef it warn’t-you?’

Then I told him the whole thing, and he said it was smart.
He said Tom Sawyer couldn’t get up no better plan than what
Thad. Then I says:

“ How do you come to be here, Jim, and how'd you get
here?”

He looked pretty uneasy, and didn’t say nothing for a
minute. Then he says:

‘Maybe I better not tell.”

“Why, Jim?”

“ Well, dey’sreasons. But you wouldn’ tell on me ef I ’uz
to tell you, would you, Huck ?”

“ Blamed if I would, Jim.”

‘¢ Well, I b’lieve you, Huck. I—I run off.”

ce Jim! oe

“But mind, you said you wouldn't tell—you know you
said you wouldn’t tell, Huck.”

“Well I did. I said I wouldn’t, and J’ll stick to it.
Honest ¢ajun I will. People would call me a low down
Ablitionist and despise me for keeping mum—but that don’t
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 61

make no difference. I ain’t agoing to tell, and I ain’t agoing
back there anyways. So now, le’s know all about it.’

“Well, you see, it’uz dis way. Ole Missus—dat’s Miss
Watson—she pecks on me all de time, en treats me pooty
rough, but she awluz said she wouldn’ sell me down to Or-
leans. But I noticed dey wuz a nigger trader roun’ de place
considable, lately, en I begin to git oneasy. Well, one night
I creeps to de do’, pooty late, en de do’ warn’t quite shet,
en I hear ole missus tell de widder she gwyne to sell me
down to Orleans, but she didn’ want to, but she could git
eight hund’d dollars for me, en it ’uz sich a big stack 0’
money she couldn’ resis’. De widder she try to git her to
say she wouldn’ do it, but I never waited to hear de res’, I
lit out mighty quick, I tell you.

“T tuck out en shin down de hill en ’spec to steal a skift
“long de sho’ som’ers ’bove de town, but dey wuz people
a-stirrin’ yit, so I hid in de ole tumble-down cooper shop on
de bank to wait for everybody to go ’way. Well, I wuz dah
all night. Dey wuz somebody roun’allde time. ’Long ’bout
six in de mawnin’, skifts begin to go by, en ’bout eight er
nine every skift dat went ‘long wuz talkin’ *bout how yo’ pap
come over to de town en say you’s killed. Dese las’ skifts
wuz full o’ ladies en genimen agoin’ over for to see de place.
Sometimes dey’d pull up at de sho’ en take a res’ b’fo’ dey
started acrost, so by de talk I got to know all ’bout de killin’.
I ’uz powerful sorry you’s kilied, Huck, but I ain’t no mo’,
now.

“T laid dah under de shavins all day. I’uz hungry, but I
warn’t afeared,; bekase I knowed ole missus en de widder
wuz goin’ to start to de camp-meetn’ right arter breakfas’ en
be gone all day, en dey knows I goes off wid de cattle *bout
daylight, so dey wouldn’ ’spec to see me roun’ de place, en
so dey wouldn’ miss me tell arter dark in de evenin’. De
yuther servants wouldn’ miss me, kase dey’d shin out en take
holiday, soon as de ole folks ’uz out’n de way.

“¢ Well, when it come dark I tuck out up de river road, en
went ’bout two mile er more to whah dey warn’t no houses.
I’d made up my mine ’bout what I’s agwyne to do. You see
ef I kep’ on tryin’ to git away afoot, de dogs ’ud track me;
ef I stole a skift to cross over, dey’d miss dat skift, you see,
en dey’d know ’bout whah I’d lan’ on de yuther side en whah
62 THE ADVENTURES OF

to pick up my track. So I says, a raff is what I’s arter; it
doan’ make no track.

““T see a light a-comin’ roun’ de p’int, bymeby, so I wade’
in en shove’ a log ahead 0’ me en swum more’n half-way acrost
de river, en got in’mongst de drift-wood, en kep’ my head
down low, en kinder swum agin de current tell de raff come
along. Den I swum to de stern uv it, en tuck aholt. It
clouded up en ’uz pooty dark for a little while. So I clumb
up en laid down on de planks. De men ’uz all ’way yonder
in de middle, whah de lantern wuz. De river wuz arisin en
dey wuz a good current; so I reck’n’d ’at by fo’ in de mawn-
in’ I’d be twenty-five mile down de river, en den I’d slip in,
jis b’fo’ daylight, en swim asho’ en take to de woods on de
Illinois side.

‘But I didn’ have no luck. When we ’uz mos’ down to
de head er de islan’, a man begin to come aft wid de lantern.
I see it warn’t no use fer to wait, so I slid overboard, en
struck out fer de islan’. Well, I had a notion I could lan’
mos’ anywhers, but I couldn’t—bank too bluff. J ’uz mos’
to de foot er de islan’ b’fo’ I foun’ a good place. I went
into de woods en jedged I wouldn’ fool wid raffs no mo’,
long as dey move de lantern roun’ so. I had my pipe ena
plug er dog-leg, en some matches in my cap, en dey warn’t
wet, so 1 ’uz all right.”

“And so you ain’t had no meat nor bread to eat all this
time? Why didn’t you get mud-turkles?”

“How you gwyne to git’m? You can’t slip up on um en
grab um; en how’s a body gwyne to hit um wid a rock?
How could a body do it in de night? en I warn’t gwyne to
show mysef on de bank in de daytime.”

“Well, that’s so. You’ve had to keep in the woods
all the time, of course. Did you hear ’em shooting the
cannon ?”

“Oh, yes. I knowed dey was arter you. I see um go
by heah; watched um thoo de bushes.”

Some young birds come along, flying a yard or two ata
time and lighting. Jim said it was a sign it was going to
rain. He said it was a sign when young chickens flew that
way, and so he reckoned it was the same way when young
birds done it. I was going to catch some of them, but Jim
wouldn’t let me. He said it was death. He said his father
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. _ 93
laid mighty sick once, and some of them catched a bird, and
his old granny said his father would die, and he did.

And Jim said you musn’t count the things you are going
to cook for dinner, because that would bring bad luck. The
same if you shook the table-cloth after sundown. And he
said if a man owned a bee-hive, and that man died, the bees
must be told about it before sun-up next morning, or else the
bees would all weaken down and quit work and die. Jim said
bees wouldn’t sting idiots; but I didn’t believe that, because
Thad tried them lots of times myself, and they wouldn't
sting me.

[Thad heard about some of these things before, but not all of
them. Jim knowed all kinds of signs. He said he knowed
most everything. I said it looked to me like all the signs
was about bad luck, and so I asked him if there warn’t any
good-luck signs. He says:

“Mighty few—an’ dey ain’t no use to a body. What you
want to know when good luck’s a-comin’ for? want to keep
it off?” And he said: “Ef you’s got hairy arms en a hairy
breas’, it’s a sign dat you’s agwyne to be rich. Well, dey’s
‘some use ina sign like dat, ’kase it’s so fur ahead. You
see, maybe you’s got to be po’ a long time fust, en so you
might git discourage’ en kill yo’sef ’f you didn’ know by de
sign dat you gwyne to be rich bymeby.”

“Have you got hairy arms and a hairy breast, Jim ?”’

“What's de use to ax dat question? don’ you see I has?”

“Well, are you rich?”

“No, but I ben rich wunst, and gwyne to be rich agin.
Wunst I had foteen dollars, but I tuck to specalat’n’, en got
busted out.”

«What did you speculate in, Jim?”

‘‘ Well, fust I tackled stock.”

“What kind of stock ?”

“Why, live stock. Cattle, you know. I put ten dollars
in acow. But I ain’ gwyne to resk no mo’ money in stock.
De cow up ’n’ died on my han’s.”

“So you lost the ten dollars.”

“No, I didn’t lose it all. I on’y los’ bout nine of it. 1
sole de hide en taller for a dollar en ten cents.”

‘¢You had five dollars and ten cents left. Did you spec-
ulate any more?” ;
64 THE ADVENTURES OF

“Yes. You know dat one-laigged nigger dat b’longs to old
Misto Bradish? well, he sot up a bank, en say anybody dat
put in a dollar would git fo’ dollars mo’ at de en’ er de year.
Well, all de niggers went in, but dey didn’t have much. I
wuz de on’y one dat had much. So I stuck out for mo’ dan
fo’ dollars, en I said ’f I didn’ git it ’d start a bank mysef.
Well o’ course dat nigger want’ to keep me out er de busi-
ness, bekase he say dey warn’t business ’nough for two banks,
so he say I could put in my five dollars en he pay me thirty-
five at de en’ er de year.

“So I done it. Den I reck’n'd I’d inves’ de thirty-five
dollars right off en keep things a-movin’. Dey wuz a nigger
name’ Bob, dat had ketched a wood-flat, en his marster didn’
know it; en I bought it off’n him en told him to take de
thirty-five dollars when de en’ er de year come; but some-
body stole de wood-flat dat night, en nex’ day de one-laigged
nigger say de bank ’s busted. So dey didn’ none uv us git
no money.”

“What did you do with the ten cents, Jim ?”

“Well, I’uz gwyne to spen’ it, but I had a dream, en de
dream tole me to give it to a nigger name’ Balum—Balum’s
Ass dey call him for short, he’s one er dem chuckle-heads,
you know. But he’s lucky, dey say, en I see I warn’t lucky.
De dream say let Balum inves’ de ten cents en he’d make a
raise for me. Well, Balum he tuck de money, en when he
wuz in church he hear de preacher say dat whoever give to
de po’ len’ to de Lord, en bound’ to git his money back a
hund’d times. So Balum he tuck en give de ten cents to de
po’, en Jaid low to see what wuz gwyne to come of it.”

“ Well, what did come of it, Jim?”

“ Nuffn’ never come of it. I couldn’ manage to k’leck dat
money no way; en Balum he couldn’. I ain’ gwyne to len’
no mo’ money ’dout I see de security. Boun’ to git yo’
money back a hund’d times, de preacher says! Ef I could
git de ten cents back, I’d call it squah, en be glad er de
chanst.”’ :

“ Well, it’s all right, anyway, Jim, long as you’re going to
be rich again some time or other.”

‘¢Ves—en I’s rich now, come to look at it. I owns my-
sef,en I’s wuth eight hund’d dollars. I wisht I had de

so

money, I wouldn’ want no mo’.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 65

CHAPTER IX.

WANTED to go and look at a place right about the

middle of the island, that I’d found when I was explor-

ing; so we started and soon got to it, because the island was
only three miles long and a quarter of a mile wide.

This place was a tolerable long steep hill or ridge, about
forty foot high. We had a rough time getting to the top, the
sides was so steep and the bushes so thick. Wetramped and
clumb around all over it, and by-and-by found a good big
cavern in the rock, most up to the top on the side towards
Illinois. The cavern was as big as two or three rooms bunch-
ed together, and Jim could stand up straight init. It was
cool in there. Jim was for putting our traps in there, right
away, but I said we didn’t want to beclimbing up and down
there all the time.

Jim said if we had the canoe hid in a good place, and had
all the traps in the cavern, we could rush there if anybody
was to come to the island, and they would never find us with-
out dogs. And besides, he said them little birds had said it
was going to rain, and did I want the things to get wet?

So we went back and got the canoe and paddled up abreast
the cavern, and lugged all the traps up there. Then we
hunted up a place close by to hide the canoe in, amongst the
thick willows. We took some fish off of the lines and set
them again, and begun to get ready for dinner.

The door of the cavern was big enough to roll a hogshead
in, and on one side of the door the floor stuck out a little bit
and was flat and a good place to builda fire on. So we built
it there and cooked dinner. _

We spread the blankets inside for a-carpet, and eat our din-
ner in there. We put all the other things handy at the back
of the cavern. Pretty soon it darkened up and begun to
thunder and lighten; so the birds was right about it. Direct-
ly it begun to rain, and it rained like all fury, too, and I never

5
66 THE ADVENTURES OF

see the wind blow so. It was one of these regular summer
storms. It would get so dark that it looked all blue-black
outside, and lovely; and the rain would thrash along by so
thick that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider-
webby; and here would come a blast of wind that would bend
the trees down and turn up the pale underside of the leaves;
and then a perfect ripper of a gust would follow along and
set the branches to tossing their arms as if they was just wild;



IN THE CAVE,

and next, when it was just about the bluest and blackest—
fst / it was as bright as glory and you’d havea little glimpse
of tree-tops a-plunging about, away off yonder in the storm,
hundreds of yards further than you could see before; dark as
sin again in a second, and now you'd hear the thunder let go
with an awful crash and then go rumbling, grumbling, tum-
bling down the sky towards the under side of the world, like
rolling empty barrels down stairs, where it’s long stairs and
they bounce a good deal, you know.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 67

“Jim, this is nice,” I says. “I wouldn't want to be no-
where else but here. Pass me along another hunk of fish and
some hot corn-bread.”

‘¢ Well, you wouldn’t a ben here ’f it hadn’t a ben for Jim.
You’da ben down dah in de woods widout any dinner, en gittn’
mos’ drowndea, too, dat you would, honey. Chickens knows
when it’s gwyne to rain, en so do de birds, chile.’

The river went on raising and raising for ten or twelve days,
till at last it was over the banks. The water was three or four
foot deep on the island in the low places and on the Illinois
bottom. On that side it wasa good many miles wide; but on
the Missouri side it was the same old distance across—a half
a mile—because the Missouri shore was just a wall of high
bluffs.

Daytimes we paddled all over the island in the canoe. It
was mighty cooland shady in the deep woods even if the sun was
blazing outside. We went winding in and out amongst the
trees; and sometimes the vines hung so thick we had to back
away and go some other way. Well, on every old broken-down
tree, you could see rabbits, and snakes, and such things; and
when the island had been overflowed a day or two, they got
so tame, on account of being hungry, that you could paddle
right up and put your hand on them if you wanted to; but
not the snakes and turtles—they would slide off in the
water. The ridge our cavern was in, was full of them. We
could a had pets enough if we’d wanted them.

One night we catched a little section of a lumber raft—
nice pine planks. It was twelve foot wide and about fifteen
or sixteen foot long, and the top stood above water six or
seven inches, a solid level floor. We could see saw-logs go
by inthe daylight, sometimes, but we let them go; we didn’t
show ourselves in daylight.

Another night, when we was up at the head of the island,
just before daylight, here comes a frame house down, on the
west side. She was a two-story, and tilted over, consider-
able. We paddled out and got aboard—clumb in at an up-
stairs window. But it was too dark to see yet, so we made
the canoe fast and set in her to wait for daylight.

The light begun to come before we got to the foot of the
island. Then we looked in at the window. We could make
out a bed, and a table, and two old chairs, and lots of things
68 THE ADVENTURES OF

around about on the floor; and there was clothes hanging
against the wall. There was something laying on the floor
in the far corner that looked like aman. So Jim says:

“Hello, you!’

But it didn’t budge. So TI hollered again, and then Jim
says:

De man ain’t asleep—he’s dead. You hold still—I’ll go
en see.”

He went and bent down and looked, and says:

“Tt’s a dead man. Yes, indeedy; naked, too. He’s ben
shot in de back. I reck’n he’s ben dead two er three days.
Come in, Huck, but doan’ look at his face—it’s too gashly.”’

I didn’t look at him at all. Jim throwed some old rags
over him, but he needn’t done it; I didn’t want to see him.
There was heaps of old greasy cards scattered around over
the floor, and old whisky bottles, and a couple of masks made
out of black cloth; and all over the walls was the ignorantest
kind of words and pictures, made with charcoal. There was
two old dirty calico dresses, and a sun-bonnet, and some
women’s underclothes, hanging against the wall, and some
men’s clothing, too. We put the lot into the canoe; it might
come good. ‘There was a boy’s old speckled straw hat on
the floor; I took that too. And there was a bottle that had
had milk in it; and it had a rag stopper for a baby to suck.
We would a took the bottle, but it was broke. There was a
seedy old chest, and an old hair trunk with the hinges broke.
They stood open, but there warn’t nothing left in them that
was any account. The way things was scattered about, we
reckoned the people left in a hurry and warn’t fixed so as to
carry off most of their stuff.

We got an old tin lantern, and a butcher knife without any .
handle, and a bran-new Barlow knife worth two bits in any
store, and a lot of tallow candles, and a tin candlestick, and
a gourd, and a tin cup, and a ratty old bed-quilt off the bed,
and a reticule with needles and pins and beeswax and buttons
and thread and all such truck in it, and a hatchet and some
nails, and a fish-line as thick as my little finger, with some
monstrous hooks on it, and a roll of buckskin, and a leather
dog-collar, and a horse-shoe, and some vials of medicine that
didn’t have no label on them; and just as we was leaving I
found a tolerable good curry-comb, and Jim he found a ratty
_ HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 69

old fiddle-bow, and a wooden leg. The straps was broke off
of it, but barring that, it was a good enough leg, though it
was too long for me and not long enough for Jim, and we
couldn’t find the other one, though we hunted all around.

And so, take it all around, we made a good haul. When
we was ready to shove off, we was a quarter of a mile below
the island, and it was pretty broad day; so I made Jim lay
down in the canoe and cover up with the quilt, because if he
set up, people could tell he was a nigger a good ways off. I
paddled over to the Illinois shore, and drifted down most a
half a mile doing it. Icrept up the dead water under the
bank, and hadn't no accidents and didn’t see nobody. We
got home all safe.















==

=i Niles aia

JIM SEES A DEAD MAN,





hl ; : it










7O THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER X.

FTER breakfast I wanted to talk about the dead man

and guess out how he come to be killed, but Jim

didn’t want to. He said it would fetch bad luck; and be-

sides, he said, he might come and ha’nt us; he said a man

that warn’t buried was more likely to go a-ha’nting around

than one that was planted and comfortable. That sounded

pretty reasonable, so I didn’t say no more; but I couldn't

keep from studying over it and wishing I knowed who shot
the man, and what they done it for.

We rummaged the clothes we’d got, and found eight dol-
lars in silver sewed up in the lining of an old blanket over-
coat. Jim said he reckoned the people in that house stole
the coat, because if they’d a knowed the money was there
they wouldn’t a left it. I said I reckoned they killed him,
too; but Jim didn’t want to talk about that. I says:

“ Now you think it’s bad luck; but what did you say when
I fetched in the snake-skin that I found on the top of the
ridge day before yesterday? You said it was the worst bad
luck in the world to touch a snake-skin with my hands.
Well, here’s your bad luck! We've raked in all this truck
and eight dollars besides. I wish we could have some bad
luck like this every day, Jim.”

“Never you mind, honey, never you mind. Don’t you git
too peart. It’s a-comin’. Mind I tell you, it’s a-comin’.”

It did come, too. It was a Tuesday that we had that talk.
Well, after dinner Friday, we was laying around in the grass
at the upper end of the ridge, and got out of tobacco. I
went to the cavern to get some, and found a rattlesnake in
there. I killed him, and curled him up on the foot of Jim’s
blanket, ever so natural, thinking there’d be some fun when
Jim found him there. Well, by night I forgot all about the
snake, and when Jim flung himself down on the blanket while
I struck a light, the snake’s mate was there, and bit him.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. FA

He jumped up yelling, and the first thing the light showed
was the varmint curled up and ready for another spring. I
laid him out in a second with a stick, and Jim grabbed pap’s
whisky jug and begun to pour it down.

He was barefooted, and the snake bit him right on the heel.
That all comes of my being such a fool as to not remember
that wherever yousleave a dead snake its mate always comes
there and curls around it. Jim told me to chop off the
snake’s head and throw it away, and then skin the body and
roast a piece of it. I done it, and he eat it and said it would
help cure him. He made me take off the rattles and tie them
around his wrist, too. He said that that would help. Then
I slid out quiet and throwed the snakes clear away amongst
the bushes; for I warn’t going to let Jim find out it was all
my fault, not if I could help it.

‘Jim sucked and sucked at the jug, and now and then he
got out of his head and pitched around and yelled; but every
time he come to himself he went to sucking at the jug again.
His foot swelled up pretty big, and so did his leg; but by-
and-by the drunk begun to come, and so I judged he was all
right; but I’d druther been bit with a snake than pap’s
whisky. .

Jim was laid up for four days and nights. Then the swell-
ing was all gone and he was around again. I made.up my
mind I wouldn’t ever take aholt of a snake-skin again with
my hands, now that I see what had come of it. Jim said he
reckoned I would believe him next time. And he said that
handling a snake-skin was such awful bad luck that maybe
we hadn't got to the end of it yet. He said he druther see
the new moon over his left shoulder as much as a thousand
times than take up a snake-skin in his hand. Well, I was
getting to feel that way myself, though I’ve always reckoned
that looking at the new moon over your left shoulder is one
of the carelessest and foolishest things a body can do. Old
Hank Bunker done it once, and bragged about it; and in less
than two years he got drunk and fell off of the shot tower
and spread himself out so that he was just a kind of a layer,
as you may say; and they slid him edgeways between two
barn doors for a coffin, and buried him so, so they say, but I
didn’t see it. Pap told me. But anyway, it all come of look-
ing at the moon that way, like a fool.
72 THE ADVENTURES OF

Well, the days went along, and the river went down be-
tween its banks again; and about the first thing we done was
to bait one of the big hooks with a skinned rabbit and set it
and catch a cat-fish that was as big as a man, being six foot
two inches long, and weighed over two hundred pounds.
We couldn’t handle him, of course; he would a flung us into
Illinois. We just set there and watched him rip and tear



‘“*A FAIR FIT.”

around till he drownded. We found a brass button in his
stomach, and a round ball, and lots of rubbage. We split
the ball open with the hatchet, and there was a spool in it.
Jim said he’d had it there a long time, to coat it over so and
make a ball of it. It was as big a fish as was ever catched
in the Mississippi, I reckon. Jim said he hadn’t ever seen a
bigger one. He would a been worth a good deal over at the

,
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 73

village. They peddle out sucha fish as that by the pound in
the market house there; everybody buys some of him; his
meat’s as white as snow and makes a good fry.

Next morning I said it was getting slow and dull, and I
wanted to get a stirring up, some way. I said I reckoned I
would slip over the river and find out what was going on.
Jim liked that notion; but he said I must go in the dark
and look sharp. Then he studied it over and said, couldn't
I put on some of them old things and dress up like a girl?
That was a good notion, too. So we shortened up one of the
calico gowns and I turned up my trowser-legs to my knees
and got into it. Jim hitched it behind with the hooks, and it
was a fair fit. I put on the sun-bonnet and tied it under my
chin, and then for a body to look in and see my face was like
looking down a joint of stove-pipe. Jim said nobody would
know me, even in the daytime, hardly. I practiced around
all day to get the hang of the things, and by-and-by I could
do pretty well in them, only Jim said I didn’t walk likea girl;
and he said I must quit pulling up my gown to get at my
britches pocket. I took notice, and done better.

I started up the Illinois shore in the canoe just after dark.

I started across to the town from a little below the ferry
landing, and the drift of the current fetched me in at the bot-
tom of the town. I tied up and started along the bank.
There was a light burning in a little shanty that hadn’t been
lived in for a long time, and I wondered who had took up
quarters there. I slipped up and peeped in at the window.
There was a woman about forty year old in there, knitting by
a candle that was ona pine table. I didn’t know her face;
she was a stranger, for you couldn’t start a face in that town
that I didn’t know. Now this was lucky, because I was
weakening; I was getting afraid I had come; people might know
my voice and find me out. But if this woman had been in such
a little town two days she could tell me all I wanted to know;
so I knocked at the door, and made up my mind I wouldn’t
forget I was a girl.
74 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XI.
ue OME in,”’ says the woman, and I did. She says:
“Take a cheer.”
I done it. She looked me all over with her little shiny
eyes, and says:

‘What might your name be?”

«Sarah Williams.”

** Where "bouts do you live? In this neighborhood ?”

““No’m. In Hookerville, seven mile below. I’ve walked
all the way and I’m all tired out.”

“Hunery, too, I reckon. I'll find you something.”

“No’m, J ain’t hungry. Iwas so hungry I had to stop two
mile below here at a farm; so J ain’t hungry no more. It’s
what makes me so late. My mother’s down sick, and out of
money and everything, and I come to tell my uncle Abner
Moore. He lives at the upper end of the town, she says. I
hain’t ever been here before. Do you know him?”

“No; but I don’t know everybody yet. I haven’t lived
here quite two weeks. It’s a considerable ways to the upper
end of the town. You better stay here all night. Take off
your bonnet.”

“No,” I says, “I'll rest a while, I reckon, and go on. I
ain’t afeard of the dark.”
She said she wouldn’t let me go by myself, but her husband
would be in by-and-by, maybe in a hour and a half, and she’d
send him along with me. Then she got to talking about her
husband, and about her relations up the river, and her rela-
tions down the river, and about how much better off they used
to was, and how they didn’t know but they’d made a mistake
coming to our town, instead of letting well alone—and so on
and so on, till I was afeard 7 had made a mistake coming to
her to find out what was going on in the town; but by-and-by
she dropped onto pap and the murder, and then I was pretty
willing to let her clatter right along. She told about me and
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 78

‘Tom Sawyer finding the six thousand dollars (only she got it
ten) and all about pap and what a hard lot he was, and what
a hard lot I was, and at last she got down to where I was mur-
dered. I says: :

‘Who done it? We've heard considerable about these
goings on, down in Hookerville, but we don’t know who ’twas
that killed Huck Finn.”

“Well I reckon there’s aright smart chance of people here
that'd like to know who killed him. Some think old Finn
done it himself.”

“ No—is that so?”

“Most everybody thought it at first. He'll never know
how nigh he come to getting lynched. But before night they
changed around and judged it was done by a runaway nigger
named Jim.”

‘Why he %

I stopped. I reckoned I better keep still. Sherunon, and
never noticed I had put in at all.

“The nigger run off the very night Huck Finn was killed.
So there’s a reward out for him—three hundred dollars, And
there’s a reward out for old Finn too—two hundred dollars.
You see, he come to town the morning after the murder, and
told about it, and was out with ’em on the ferry-boat hunt,
and right away after he up and left. Before night they wanted
to lynch him, but he was gone, you see. Well, next day they
found out the nigger was gone; they found out he hadn’t ben
seen sence ten o’clock the night the murder was done. So
then they put it on him, you see, and while they was full of
it, next day back comes old Finn and went boo-hooing to
Judge Thatcher to get money to hunt for the nigger all over
Illinois with. The judge give him some, and that evening he
got drunk and was around till after midnight with a couple of
mighty hard looking strangers, and then went off with them.
Well, he hain’t come back sence, and they ain’t looking for
him back till this thing blows over a little, for people thinks
now that he killed his boy and fixed things so folks would
think robbers done it, and then he’d get Huck’s money with-
out having to bother a long time with a lawsuit. People do
say he warn’t any too good to do it. Oh, he’s sly, I reckon.
If he don’t come back for a year, he’ll be all right. You can’t
prove anything on him, you know; everything will be quieted


76 THE ADVENTURES OF

down then, and he’ll walk in Huck’s money as easy as noth-
ing.”

““Yes, I reckon so,’m. I don’t see nothing in the way of
it. Has everybody quit thinking the nigger done it?”

. Oh, no, not everybody. A good many thinks he done it.
But they’ll get the nigger pretty soon, now, and maybe they
can scare it out of him.”

“Why, are they after him yet ?”

“Well, you’re innocent, ain’t you! Does three hundred
dollars lay round every day for people to pick up? Some
folks thinks the nigger ain’t far,from here. I’m one of them
—but I hain’'t talked itaround. A few days ago I was talking
with an old couple that lives next door in the log shanty, and
they happened to say hardly anybody ever goes to that island
over yonder that they call Jackson’s Island. Don’t anybody
live there? says I. No, nobody, says they. I didn’t say
any more, but I done some thinking. I was pretty near cer-
tain I’d seen smoke over there, about the head of the island,
a day or two before that, so I says to myself, like as not that
nigger’s hiding over there; anyway, says I, it’s worth the
trouble to give the place a hunt. I hain’t seen any smoke
sence, so I reckon maybe he’s gone, if it was him; but hus-
band’s going over to see—him and another man. He was
gone up the river; but he got back to-day and I told him as
soon as he got here two hours ago.”

I had got so uneasy I couldn’t set still. I had to do some-
thing with my hands; so I took up a needle off of the table
and went to threading it. My hands shook, and I was mak-
ing a bad job of it. When the woman stopped talking, I
looked up, and she was looking at me pretty curious, and
smiling a little. I put down the needle and thread and let on
to be interested—and I was, too—and says:

“ Three hundred dollars is a power of money.. I wish my
mother could get it. Is your husband going over there to-
night ?”’ d

“Oh, yes. He went up town with the man I was telling
you of, to get a boat and see if they could borrow another
gun. They’ll go over after midnight.”

“ Couldn’t they see better if they was to wait till daytime ?”

“Yes. And couldn’t the nigger see better, too? After
midnight he’ll likely be asleep, and they can slip around
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. | 77

through the woods and hunt up his camp fire all the better for
the dark, if he’s got one.”

“T didn’t think of that.”

The woman kept looking at me pretty curious, and I didn’t
feela bit comfortable. Pretty soon she says:

‘‘What did you say your name was, honey ?”’

“ M—Mary Williams.”

Somehow it didn’t seem to me that I said it was Mary be-
fore, so I didn’t look up; seemed to me I said it was Sarah;
so I felt sort of cornered, and was afeared maybe I was look-
ing it,too. I wished the woman would say something more;
the longer she set still, the uneasier Iwas. But now she
says:

‘‘Honey, I thought you said it was Sarah when you first
come in?”

“Oh, yes’m, I did. Sarah Mary Williams. Sarah’s my
first name. Some calls me Sarah, some calls me Mary.”

“Qh, that’ s the way of it?”

“Yes’m.’ :

I was feeling better, then, but I wished I was out of there,
anyway. I couldn't look up yet.

Well, the woman fell to talking about how hard times was,
and how poor they had to live, and how the rats was as free
as if they owned the place, and so forth, and so on, and then
I got easy again. She was right about the rats. You'd see
one stick his nose out of a hole in the corner every little
while. She said she had to have things handy to throw at
them when she was alone, or they wouldn’t give her no peace.
She showed me a bar of lead, twisted up into a knot, and said
she was a good shot with it generly, but she’d wrenched her
arm a day or two ago, and didn’t know whether she could
throw true, now. But she watched for a chance, and directly
she banged away at a rat, but she missed him wide, and said
“Ouch!” it hurt her arm so. Then she told me to try for
the next one. I wanted to be getting away before the old
man got back, but of course I didn’t leton. I got the thing,
and the first rat that showed his nose I let drive, and if he’d
a stayed where he was he’d a beena tolerable sick rat. She said
that was first-rate, and she reckoned I would hive the next
one. She went and got the lump of lead and fetched it back
and brought along a hank of yarn, which she wanted me to
78 THE ADVENTURES OF

help her with. I held up my two hands and she put the hank
over them and went on talking about her and her husband’s
matters. But she broke off to say:

“Keep your eye on the rats. You better have the lead in
your lap, handy.”

So she dropped the lump into my lap, just at that moment,
and I clapped my legs together on it and she went on talking.
But only about a minute. Then she took off the hank and
looked me straight in the face, and very pleasant, and says:

“Come, now—what’s your real name ?”

“ Wh-what, mum ?”

“What’s your real name? Is it Bill, or Tom, or Bob ?—or
what is it?”

I reckon I shook like a leaf, and I didn’t know hardly what
to do. But I says:

“ Please to don’t poke fun at a poor girl like me, mum. If
I’m in the way, here, I'll se

“No, you won’t. Set down and stay where you are. I
ain’t going to hurt you, and I ain’t going to tell on you,
nuther. You just tell me your secret, and trust me. [’ll
keep it; and what’s more, I'll help you. So’ll my old man,
if you want him to. You see, you’re a runaway ’prentice—
that’s all. It ain’t anything. There ain’t any harm in it.
You've been treated bad, and you made up your mind to
cut. Bless you, child, I wouldn’t tell on you, Tell me all
about it, now—that’s a good boy.”

So I said it wouldn’t be no use to try to play it any longer,
and I would just make a clean breast and tell her everything,
but she mustn’t go back on her promise. Then I told her
my father and mother was dead, and the law had bound me
out to a mean old farmer in the country thirty mile back from
the river, and he treated meso bad I couldn’t stand it no
longer ; he went away to be gone a couple of days, and so I
took my chance and stole some of his daughter’s old clothes,
and cleared out, and I had been three nights coming the
thirty miles ; I traveled nights, and hid day-times and slept,
and the bag of bread and meat I carried from home lasted
me all the way and I hada plenty. I said I believed my
uncle Abner Moore would take care of me, and so that was
why I struck out for this town of Goshen.”

“ Goshen, child? This ain’t Goshen, This is St. Peters-


HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 79

burg. Goshen’s ten mile further up the river. Who told you
this was Goshen ?”

‘¢ Why, a man I met at day-break this morning, just as I
was going to turn into the woods for my regular sleep. He
told me when the roads forked I must take the right hand,
and five mile would fetch me to Goshen.”

“He was drunk I reckon. He told you just exactly
wrong.”

“Well, he did act like he was drunk, but it ain’t no
matter now. I got to be moving along. I'll fetch Goshen
before day-light.”

“Hold on a minute. Ill put you up a snack toeat. You
might want it.”

So she put me up a snack, and says:

«‘ Say—when a cow’s laying down, which end of her gets
up first? Answer up prompt, now—don’t stop to study over
it. Which end gets up first ?’’.

“The hind end, mum.”

“Well, then, a horse?”

“ The for’rard end, mum.”

‘¢ Which side of a tree does the most moss grow on?”

‘« North side.” ,

“Tf fifteen cows is browsing on a hillside, how many of
them eats with their heads pointed the same direction ?”

“The whole fifteen, mum.”

“ Well, I reckon you Aave lived in the country. I thought
maybe you was trying to hocus me again. What’s your real
name, now?”

‘¢ George Peters, mum.”

“Well, try to remember it, George. Don’t forget and tell
me it’s Elexander before you go, and then get out by saying
it’s George-Elexander when I catch you. And don’t go
about women in that old calico. You do a girl tolerable
poor, but you might fool men, maybe. Bless you, child,
when you set out to thread a needle, don’t hold the thread
still and fetch the needle up to it ; hold the needle still and
poke the thread at it—that’s the way a woman most always
does ; but a man always does ’tother way. And when you
throw at a rat or anything, hitch yourself up a tip-toe and
fetch your hand up over your head as awkward as you can,
and miss your rat about six or seven foot. Throw stiff-
80 THE ADVENTURES OF

armed from the shoulder, like there was a pivot there for it to
turn on—like a girl ; not from the wrist and elbow, with your
arm out to one side, like a boy. And mind you, when a girl
tries to catch anything inher lap, she throws her knees apart ;
she don’t clap them together, the way you did when you
catched the lump of lead. Why, I spotted you for a boy
when you was threading the needle ; and I contrived the
other things just to make certain. Now trot along to your
uncle, Sarah Mary Williams George Elexander Peters, and







‘““HUMP YOURSELF.”

if you get into trouble you send word to Mrs. Judith Loftus,
which is me, and I’ll do what I can to get you out of it. Keep
the river road, all the way, and next time you tramp, take
shoes and socks with you. The river road’s a rocky one,
and your feet ‘Il be in a condition when you get to Goshen,
I reckon.”

I went up the bank about fifty yards, and then I doubled
on my tracks and slipped back to where my canoe was, a
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 8I

good piece below the house. I jumped in and was off in a
hurry. I went up stream far enough to make the head of the
island, and then started across. I took off the sun-bonnet,
for I didn’t want no blinders on, then. When I was about
the middle, I hear the clock begin to strike ; so I stops and
listens ; the sound come faint over the water, but clear—
eleven. When I struck the head of the island I never waited
to blow, though I was most winded, but I shoved right into
the timber where my old camp used to be, and started a good
fire there on a high-and-dry spot.

Then I jumped in the canoe and dug out for our place a
mile and a half below, as hard as I could go. I landed, and
slopped through the timber and up the ridge and into the
cavern. There Jim laid, sound asleep on the ground. I
roused him out and says:

_ “Git up and hump yourself, Jim! There ain’t a minute
to lose. They’reafter us!”

Jim never asked no questions, he never said a word ; but
the way he worked for the next half an hour showed about how
he was scared. By that time everything we had in the world
was on our raft and she was ready to be shoved out from
the willow cove where she was hid. We put out the camp
fire at the cavern the first thing, and didn’t show a candle
outside after that.

I took the canoe out from shore a little piece and took a
look, but if there was a boat around I couldn’t see it, for
stars and shadows ain’t goodto seeby. ‘Then we got out the
raft and slipped along down in the shade, past the foot of the
island dead still, never saying a word.
82 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XII.

T must a been close onto one o’clock when we got below
the island at last, and the raft did seem to go mighty
slow. If a boat was to come along, we was going to take
to the canoe and break for the Illinois shore; and it was
well a boat didn't come, for we hadn’t ever thought to put
the gun into the canoe, ora fishing-line or anything to eat.
We was in ruther too much of a sweat to think of so many
things. It warn’t good judgment to put everything on the
raft.
If the men went to the island, I just expect they found
the camp fire I built, and watched it all night for Jim to
come. Anyways, they stayed away from us, and if my build-
ing the fire never fooled them it warn’t no fault of mine. I
played it as low-down on them as I could.

When the first streak of day begun to show, we tied up
to a tow-head in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked
off cotton-wood branches with the hatchet and covered up
the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-
in in the bank there. A tow-head is a sand-bar that has cot-
ton-woods on it as thick as harrow-teeth.

We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy tim-
ber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Mis-
souri shore at that place, so we warn’t afraid of anybody
running across us. We laid there all day and watched the
rafts and steamboats spin down the Missouri shore, and up-
bound steamboats fight the big river in the middle. I told
Jim ail about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and
Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after
us herself ske wouldn’t set down and watch a camp fire—no,
sir, she’d fetch a dog. Well, then, I said, why couldn’t she
tell her husband to fetch adog? Jim said he bet she did
think of it by the time the men was ready to start, and he
believed they must a gone up town to get a dog and so they
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 83

lost all that time, or else we wouldn’t be here ona tow-head
sixteen or seventeen mile below the village—no, indeedy,
we would be in that same old town again. So I said I
didn’t care what was the reason they didn’t get us, as long as
they didn’t.

When it was beginning to come on dark, we poked our
heads out of the cottonwood thicket and looked up, and
down, and across ; nothing in sight ; so Jim took up some
of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get
under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things
dry. Jim made a floor for the wigwam, and raised it a foot
or more above the level of. the raft, so now the blankets and
all the traps was out of the reach of steamboat waves. Right
in the middle of the wigwam we made a layer of dirt about
five or six inches deep with a frame around it for to hold it
to its place ; this was to build a fire on in sloppy weather or
chilly ; the wigwam would keep it from being seen. We
made an extra steering oar, too, because one of the others
might get broke, ona snag or something. We fixed up a
short forked stick to hang the old lantern on; because we
must always light the lantern whenever we see a steamboat
coming down stream, to keep from getting run over ; but we
wouldn’t have to light it for up-stream boats unless we see
we was in what they call a “crossing ;” for the river was
pretty high yet, very low banks being still a little under
water ; so up-bound boats didn’t always run the channel, but
hunted easy water.

This second night we run between seven and eight hours,
with a current that was making over four mile an hour. We
catched fish, and talked, and we took a swim now and then
to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down
the big still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars,
and we didn’t ever feel like talking loud, and it warn’t often
that we laughed, only a little kind of a low chuckle. We
had mighty good weather, as a general thing, and nothing
ever happened to us at all, that night, nor the next, nor the
next.

Every night we passed towns, some of them away up on
black hillsides, nothing but just a shiny bed of lights, not a
house could you see. The fifth night we passed St. Louis,
and it was like the whole world lit up. In St. Petersburg they
84 THE ADVENTURES OF

used to say there was twenty or thirty thousand people in St.
Louis, but I never believed it till I see that wonderful spread
of lights at two o’clock that still night. There warn’t a sound
there; everybody was asleep.

Every night, now, I used to slip ashore, towards ten o’clock,
at some little village, and buy ten or fifteen cents’ worth of



































=



ae aren
HE SOMETIMES LIFTED A CHICKEN.

meal or bacon or other stuff to eat; and sometimes I lifted a
chicken that warn’t roosting comfortable, and took him along.
Pap always said, take a chicken when you get a chance, be-
cause if you don’t want him yourself you can easy find some-
body that does, and a good deed ain’t ever forgot. I never
see pap when he didn’t want the chicken himself, but that is
what he used to say, anyway.
‘HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 85

Mornings, before daylight, I slipped into corn fields and
borrowed a watermelon, or a mushmelon, or a punkin, or
some new corn, or things of that kind. Pap always said it
warn’t no harm to borrow things, if you was meaning to pay
them back, sometime; but the widow said it warn’t anything
but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it.
Jim said he reckoned the widow was partiy right and pap was
partly right; so the best way would be for us to pick out two
or three things from the list and say we wouldn’t borrow them
any more—then he reckoned it wouldn’t be no harm to bor-
row the others. So we talked it over all one night, drifting
along down the river, trying to make up our minds whether to
drop the watermelons, or the cantelopes, or the mushmelons or
what. But towards daylight we got it all settled satisfactory,
and concluded to drop crabapples and p’simmons. We warn’t
feeling just right, before that, but it was all comfortable now.
I was glad the way it come out, too, because crabapples ain’t
ever good, and the p’simmons wouldn’t be ripe for two or
three months yet.

We shot a water-fowl, now and then, that got up too early
in the morning or didn’t go to bed early enough in the even-
ing. ‘Take it all around, we lived pretty high.

The fifth night below St. Louis we had a big storm after
midnight, with a power of thunder and lightning, and the rain
poured down in a solid sheet. We stayed in the wigwam and
let the raft take care of itself. When the lightning glared out
we could see a big straight river ahead, and high rocky bluffs
on both sides. By-and-by says I, “Hel-o, Jim, looky yon-
der!” It was a steamboat that had killed herself on a rock.
We was drifting straight down for her. The lightning showed
her very distinct. She was leaning over, with part of her up-
per deck above water, and you could see every little chimbly-
guy clean and clear, and a chair by the big bell, with an old
slouch hat hanging on the back of it when the flashes come.

Well, it being away in the night, and stormy, and all so
mysterious-like, I felt just the way any other boy would a felt
when I see that wreck laying there so mournful and lonesome
in the middle of the river. I wanted to get aboard of her and
slink around a little, and see what there was there. So I says:

“Le’s land on her, Jim.”

But Jim was dead against it, at first. He says:
86 THE ADVENTURES OF

“T doan’ want to go fool’n ‘long er no wrack. We’s doin’
blame’ well, en we better let blame’ well alone, as de good
book says. Like as not dey’s a watchman on dat wrack.”

“Watchman your grandmother,’ I says; ‘there ain’t
nothing to watch but the texas and the pilot-house; and do
you reckon anybody’s going to resk his life for a texas and a
pilot-house such a night as this, when it’s likely to break up
and wash off down the river any minute?” Jim couldn’t say
nothing ‘to that, so he didn’t try. ‘And besides,” I says,
‘we might borrow something worth having, out of the cap-
tain’s stateroom. Seegars, 7 bet-you—and cost five cents
apiece, solid cash. - Steamboat captains is always rich, and
get sixty dollars a month, and ¢/ey don’t care a cent what a
thing costs, you know, long as they want it. Stick a candle
in your pocket; I can’t rest, Jim, till we give her a rummag-
ing. Do you reckon Tom Sawyer would ever go by this
thing? Not for pie, he wouldn’t. He'd call it an adventure
—that’s what he’d call it; and he’d land on that wreck if it
was his last act. And wouldn’t he throw style into it >—
wouldn’t he spread himself, nor nothing? Why, you’d think
it was Christopher C’lumbus discovering Kindgom-Come. I
wish Tom Sawyer was here.”

Jim he grumbled a little, but give in. He said we mustn’t
talk any more than we could help, and then talk mighty low.
The lightning showed us the wreck again, just in time, and
we fetched the starboard derrick, and made fast there.

The deck was high out, here. We went sneaking down the
slope of it to labboard, in the dark, towards the texas, feel-
ing our way slow with our feet, and spreading our hands out
to fend off the guys, for it was so dark we couldn’t see no sign
of them. Pretty soon we struck the forward end of the sky-
light, and clumb onto it; and the next step fetched us in front
of the captain’s door, which was open, and by Jimminy, away
down through the texas-hall we see a light! and all in the
‘same second we seem to hear low voices in yonder!

Jim whispered and said he was feeling powerful sick, and
told me to come along. I says, all right; and was going to
start for the raft; but just then I heard a voice wail out and
say:

‘Qh, please don’t, boys; I swear I won’t ever tell!”’

Another voice said, pretty loud:
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. eric

“It’s a lie, Jim Turner. You've acted this way before.
You always want more’n your share of the truck, and you've
always got it, too, because you’ve swore 't if you didn’t you’d
tell. But this time you’ve said it jest one time too many.
You're the meanest, treacherousest hound in this country.”

By this time Jim was gone for the raft. I was just a-biling
with curiosity; and 1 says to myself, Tom Sawyer wouldn't
back out now, and so I won’t either; I’m agoing to see what’s
going on here. So I dropped on my hands and knees, in the
little passage, and crept aft in the dark, till there warn’t but
about one stateroom betwixt me and the cross-hall of the
texas. Then, in there I see a man stretched on the floor and
tied hand and foot, and two men standing over him, and one
of them had a dim lantern in his hand, and the other one had
a pistol, This one kept pointing the pistol at the man’s head
on the floor and saying—

“Td “ke to! And I orter, too, a mean skunk!”

The man on the floor would shrivel up, and say: “Oh,
please don’t, Bill—I hain’t ever goin’ to tell.”

And every time he said that, the man with the lantern would
laugh, and say:

‘’Deed you am’t/ You never said no truer thing ’n that,
you bet you.”’ And once he said: ‘* Hear him beg! and yit
if we hadn’t got the best of him and tied him, he’d a killed
us both. And what for? Jist for noth’n. Jist because we
stood on our rights—that’s what for. But I lay you ain’t
agoin’ to threaten nobody any mere, Jim Turner. Put
that pistol, Bill,’

Bill says:

‘«T don’t want to, Jake Packard. I’m for killin’ him—and
didn’t he kill old Hatfield jist the same way—and don’t he
deserve it?”

“ But I don’t want him killed, and I’ve got my reasons for it.”

“Bless yo’ heart for them words, Jake Packard! I’ll never
forgit you, long’s I live!” says the man on the floor, sort of
blubbering.

Packard didn’t take no notice of that, but hung up his lan-
tern on anail, and started towards where I was, there in the
dark, and motioned Bill to come. I crawfished as fast as I
could, about two yards, but the boat slanted so that I couldn’t
make very good time; so to keep from getting run over and
88 THE ADVENTURES OF

catched I crawled into a stateroom on the upper side. The
man came a-pawing along in the dark, and when Packard got
to my stateroom, he says:

“ Here—come in here.”’

And in he come, and Bill after him. But before they got
in, I was up in the upper berth, cornered, and sorry I come.
Then they stood there, with their hands on the ledge of the
berth, and talked. I couldn’t see them, but I could tell where
they was, by the whisky they’d been having. I was glad I
didn’t drink whisky; but it wouldn’t made much difference,
anyway, because most of the time they couldn’t a treed me
because I didn’t breathe. I was too scared. And besides,
a body couddn’t breathe, and hear such talk. They talked
low and earnest. Bill wanted to kill Turner. He says:

“ He’s said he’ll tell, and he will. If we was to give both
our shares to him zow, it wouldn’t make no difference after
the row, and the way we’ve served him. Shore’s you’re born,
he’ll turn State’s evidence; now you hear me. I’m for put-
ting him out out of his troubles.”

“
“Blame it, I'd sorter begun to think you wasn’t. Well,
then, that’s all right. Les’ go and do it.”

“Hold on a minute; I hain’t had my say yit. You listen
to me. Shooting’s good, but there’s quieter ways if the
thing’s got to be done. But what / say, is this; it ain’t good
sense to go court’n around after a halter, if you can git at
what you’re up to in some way that’s jist as good and at the
same time don’t bring you into no resks. Ain’t that so?”’

“Vou bet it is. But how you goin’ to manage it this time ?”

“ Well, my idea is this: we’ll rustle around and gether up
whatever pickins we’ve overlooked in the staterooms, and
shove for shore and hide the truck. Then we'll wait. NowI
say it ain’t agoin’ to be more ’n two hours befo’ this wrack
breaks up and washes off down the river. See? He'll be
drownded, and won’t have nobody to blame for it but his own
self. I reckon that’s a considerble sight better’n killin’ of him.
I’m unfavorable to killin’ a man as long as you can git
around it; it ain’t good sense, it ain’t good morals. Ain’t I
right ?”

“Yes—lI reck’n you are. But s’pose she don’t break up and
wash off?”
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 89

“ Well, we can wait the two hours, anyway, and see, can’t
we?”

« All right, then; come along.”

So they started, and I lit out, all inacold sweat, and scram-
bled forward. It was dark as pitch there; but I said in a kind
of acoarse whisper, “ Jim!’’ and he answered up, right at my
elbow, with a sort of a moan, and I says:

“Quick, Jim, it ain’t no time for fooling around and moan-
ing; there’s a gang of murderers in yonder, and if we don’t
hunt up their boat and set her drifting down the river so these
fellows can’t get away from the wreck, there’s one of ’em going
to be ina bad fix. But if we find their boat we can put al/ of
’em ina bad fix—for the Sheriff ll get ’em. Quick—hurry!
I'll hunt the labboard side, you hunt the stabboard. You start
at the raft, and 2

‘©Qh, my lordy, lordy! Raf ? Dey ain’ no raf’ no mo’, she
done broke loose en gone !—’en here we is!”





‘oH! LoRDY LoRDY !”
go THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XIII.

ELL, I catched my breath and most fainted. Shut
up ona wreck with sucha gang as that! But it
warn’t no time to be sentimentering. We'd gof to find that
boat, now—had to have it for ourselves. So we went.a-quak-
ing and shaking down the stabboard side, and slow work it
was, too—seemed a week before we got to the stern. No
sign of a boat. Jim said he didn’t believe he could go any
further—so scared he hadn’t hardly any strength left, he
said. But I said come on, if we get left on this wreck, we
are in a fix, sure. Soon we prowled, again. We struck for
the stern of the texas, and found it, and then scrabbled along
forwards on the skylight, hanging on from shutter to shutter,
for the edge of the skylight was in the water. When we got
pretty close to the cross-hall door, there was the skiff, sure
enough! I could just barely see her. I felt ever so thank-
ful. In another second I would a been aboard of her; but
just then the door opened. One of the men stuck his head
out, only about a couple of foot from me, and I thought I
was gone; but he jerked it in again, and says:

“ Heave that blame lantern out o’ sight, Bill!’

He flung a bag of something into the boat, and then got
in himself, and set down. It was Packard. Then Bill Ze
come out and got in. Packard says, in a low voice:

“ All ready—-shove off!” :

I couldn’t hardly hang onto the shutters, I was so weak.
But Bill says:

«¢ Hold on—’d you go through him?”

“No. Didn’t you?”

“No. 5o he’s got his share o’ the cash, yet.”

“ Well, then, come along—no use to take truck and leave
money.”

‘« Say—won’t he suspicion what we’re up to?”
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. gl

“Maybe he won’t. But we got to have it anyway. Come
along.”

So they got out and went in.

The door slammed to, because it was on the careened side;
and in a half second I was in the boat, and Jim come tum-
bling after me. JI out with my knife and cut the rope, and
away we went !

We didn’t touch an oar, and we didn’t speak nor whisper,
nor hardly even breathe. We went gliding swift along, dead
silent, past the tip of the paddle-box, and past the stern;
then in a second or two more we was a hundred yards below
the wreck, and the darkness soaked her up, every last sign of
her, and we was safe, and knowed it.

When we was three or four hundred yards down stream,
we see the lantern show like a little spark at the texas door,
for a second, and we knowed by that that the rascals had
‘missed their boat, and was beginning to understand that they
was in just as much trouble, now, as Jim Turner was.

Then Jim manned the oars, and we took out after our raft.
Now was the first time that I begun to worry about the men
—TI reckon I hadn’t had time to before. I begun to think
how dreadful it was, even for murderers, to be in such a fix.
I says to myself, there ain’t no telling but I might come to
be a murderer myself, yet, and then how would I like it?
So says I to Jim:

“ The first light we see, we'll land a hundred yards below
it or above it, in a place where it’s a good hiding-place for
you and the skiff, and then I'll go and fix up some kind of a
yarn, and get somebody to go for that gang and get them
out of their scrape, so they can be hung when their time
comes.”

But that ‘idea was a failure; for pretty soon it begun to-
storm again, and this time worse than ever. The rain pour-
ed down, and never a light showed; everybody in bed, I
reckon. We boomed along down the river, watching for
lights and watching for our raft. After a long time the rain
let up, but the clouds staid, and the lightning kept whimper-
ing, and by-and-by a flash showed us a black thing ahead,
floating, and we made for it.

It was the raft, and mighty glad was we to get aboard of
it again. We seen a light, now, away down to the right, on
92 THE ADVENTURES OF

shore. So I said I would go for it. The skiff was half full
of plunder which that gang had stole, there on the wreck.
We hustled it onto the raft in a pile, and I told Jim to float
along down, and show a light when he judged he had gone
about two mile, and keep it burning till I come; then I man-
ned my oars and shoved for the light. As I got down to-
wards -it, three or four more showed—up ona hillside. It
was a village. I closed in above the shore-light, and laid on
my oars and floated. As I went by, I see it was a lantern
hanging on the jackstaff of a double-hull ferry-boat. I skim-
med around for the watchman, a-wondering whereabouts he
slept; and by-and-by I found him roosting on the bitts, for-
ward, with his head down between his knees. I gave his
shoulder two or three little shoves, and begun to cry.

He stirred up, in a kind ofa startlish way; but when he see
it was only me, he took a good gap and stretch, and then he
says:

“Hello, what’s up? Don’tcry, bub. What's the trouble?”

I says:

“ Pap, and mam, and sis, and.

Then I broke down. He says:

“Oh, dang it, now, don’t take on so, we all has to have our
troubles and this’n ’1l come out all right. What’s the matter
with ’em?”

“ They’re—they’re—are you the watchman of the boat?”

“Yes,” he says, kind of pretty-well-satisfied like. ‘I’m
the captain and the owner, and the mate, and the pilot, and
watchman, and head deck-hand ; and sometimes I’m the
freight and passengers. I ain’t as rich as old Jim Hornback,
and I can’t be so blame’ generous and good to Tom, Dick
and Harry as what he is, and slam around money the way he
does; but I’ve told him a many a time ’*t I wouldn’t trade
places with him; for, says I, a sailor’s life’s the life for me,
and I’m derned if /’d live two mile out o’ town, where there
ain’t nothing ever goin’ on, not for all his spondulicks and as
much more on top of it. Says I Me

I broke in and says:

‘« They’re inan awful peck of trouble, and

“ Who is?”

“Why, pap, and mam, and sis, and Miss Hooker; and if
you’d take your ferry-boat and go up there #

”





39




HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 93

‘¢Up where? Where are they?”

“On the wreck.”

“What wreck ?”

“Why, there ain’t but one.”

“What, you don’t mean the Walter Scott ?”

“Yes.”

‘¢ Good land! what are they doin’ ¢here, for gracious sakes ?”

“ Well, they didn’t go there a-purpose.”

“TT bet they didn’t! Why, great goodness, there ain’t no
chance for ’em if they don’t git off mighty quick! Why, how
in the nation did they ever git into sucha scrape?”’

“Easy enough. Miss Hooker was a-visiting, up there to
the town Ht

“Yes, Booth’s Landing—go on,’

“She was a-visiting, there at Booth’s Landing, and just i
the edge of the evening she started over with her nigger woman
in the horse-ferry, to stay all night at her friend’s house, Miss
What-you-may-call-her, I disremember her name, and they
lost their steering-oar, and swung around and went a-floating
down, stern-first, about two mile, and saddle-baggsed on the
wreck, and the ferry man and the nigger woman and the
horses was all lost, but Miss Hooker she made a grab and
got aboard the wreck. Well, about an hour after dark, we
come along down in our trading-scow, and it was so dark we
didn’t notice the wreck till we was right on it; and so we
saddle-baggsed; but all of us was saved but Bill Whipple—
and oh, he was the best cretur!—I most wish’t it had been
me, I do.”

“My George! It’s the beatenest thing I ever struck. And
then what did you all do?”

‘* Well, we hollered and took on, but it’s so wide there, we
couldn’t make nobody hear. So pap said somebody got to
get ashore and get help somehow. I was the only one that
could swim, so I made a dash for it, and Miss Hooker she
said if I didn’t strike help sooner, come here and hunt up her
uncle, and he’d fix the thing. I made the land about a mile
below, and been fooling along ever since, trying to get people
to do something, but they said, ‘What, in such a night and
such a current? there ain’t no sense in ‘its go for the steam-
ferry.” Now if you'll go, and——

“ By Jackson, I'd ke to, and blame it I don’t know but I


04 THE ADVENTURES OF

will; but who in the dingnation’s agoin’ to gay for it? Do
you reckon your pap Se

“Why ¢hat’s all right. Miss Hooker she tole me, particular,
that her uncle Hornback i

“Great guns! is #e her uncle? Looky here, you break for
that light over yonder-way, and turn out west when you git
there, and about a quarter of a mile out you’ll come to the
tavern; tell ’em to dart you out to Jim Hornback’s and he’ll
foot the bill. And don’t you fool around any, because he’ll
want to know the news. ‘Tell him I'll have his niece all safe
before he can getto town. Hump yourself, now; I’m agoing
up around the corner here, to roust out my engineer.”

I struck for the light, but as soon as he turned the corner
I went back and got into my skiff and bailed her out and then
pulled up shore in the easy water about six hundred yards,
and tucked myself in among some woodboats; for I couldn’t
rest easy till I could see the ferry-boat start. But take it all
around, I was feeling ruther comfortable on accounts of tak-
all this trouble for that gang, for not many would a done it.
I wished the widow knowed about it. I judged she would be
proud of me for helping these rapscallions, because rapscal-
lions and dead beats is the kind the widow and good people
takes the most interest in.

Well, before long, here.comes the wreck, dim and dusky,
sliding along down! A kind of cold shiver went through me,
and then I struck out for her. She was very deep, and I see
in a minute there"warn’t much chance for anybody being alive
in her. I pulled all around her and hollered a little, but there
wasn’t any answer; all dead still. I felt a little bit heavy-
hearted about the gang, but not much, for I reckoned if they
could stand it, I could.

Then here comes the ferry-boat; so I shoved for the mid-
dle of the river on a long down-stream slant; and when I
judged I was out of eye-reach, I laid on my oars, and looked
back and see her go and smell around the wreck for Miss
Hooker’s remainders, because the captain would know her
uncle Hornback would want them; and then pretty soon the
ferry-boat give it up and went for shore, and I laid into my
work and went a-booming down the river.

It did seem a powerful long time before Jim’s light showed
up; and when it did show, it looked like it was a thousand




95

HUCKLEBERRY FINN.



mile off. By the time I got there the sky was beginning to
get alittle gray in the east; so we struck for an island, and
hid the raft, and sunk the skiff, and turned in and slept like

dead people.

WE TURNED IN AND SLEPT,
96 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XIV.

Y-AND-BY, when we got up, we turned over the truck
the gang had stole off of the wreck, and found boots,
and blankets, and clothes, and all sorts of other things, and
a lot of books, and a spyglass, and three boxes of seegars.
We hadn’t ever been this rich before, in neither of our lives.
The seegars was prime. We laid off all the afternoon in the
woods talking, and me reading the books, and having a gen-
eral good time. I told Jim all about what happened inside
the wreck, and at the ferry-boat; and I said these kinds of
things was adventures; but he said he didn’t want no more
adventures. He said that when I went in the texas and he crawl-
ediback to get on the raft and found her gone, he nearly died;
because he judged it was all up with 22m, anyway it could be
fixed; for if he didn’t get saved he would get drownded; and
if he did get saved, whoever saved him would send him back
home so as to get the reward, and then Miss Watson would
sell him South, sure. Well, he was right; he was most always
right; he had an uncommon level head; for a nigger.

I read considerable to Jim about kings, and dukes, and
earls, and such, and how gaudy they dressed, and how much
style they put on, and called each other your majesty, and
your grace, and your lordship, and so on, ’stead of mister;
and Jim’s eyes bugged out, and he wasinterested. He says:

‘‘T didn’ know dey was so many unum. I hain’t hearn
"bout none un um, skasely, but ole King Sollermun, onless
you counts dem kings dat’s ina pack er k’yards. How much
do a king git?”

“Get?” I says; “ why, they get a thousand dollars a month
if they want it; they can have just as much as they want;
everything belongs to them.”

“ Ain’ dat gay? En what dey got to do, Huck?”

“ They don’t do nothing! Why how you talk. They just
set around.”
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 97

“ No—is dat so?”

“Of course it is. They just set around. Except maybe
when there’s a war; then they go to the war. But other times
they just lazy around; or go hawking—just hawking and sp—
Sh!—d’ you hear a noise?”

We skipped out and looked; but it warn’t nothing but the
flutter of a steamboat’s wheel, away down coming around the
point; so we come back.

“Yes,” says I, “and other times, when things is dull, they



SOLOMON AND HIS MILLION WIVES.

fuss with the parlyment; and if everybody don’t go just so he
whacks their heads off. But mostly they hang round the
harem.”

“ Roun’ de which?”

“ Harem.”

‘¢What’s de harem?”

“The place where he keeps his wives. Don’t you know
7
98 THE ADVENTURES OF

about the harem? Solomon had one; he had about a mil-
lion wives.”

“Why, yes, dat’s so; I—I’d done forgot it. A harem’s
a bo’d’n-house, I reck’n. Mos’ likely dey has rackety times
in de nussery. En I reck’n de wives quarrels considable; en
dat ’crease de racket. Yit dey say Sollermun de wises’ man
dat ever live’. I doan’ take no stock in dat. Bekase why:
would a wise man want to live in de mids’ er sich a blim-
blammin’ all de time? No—’deed he wouldn’t. A wise
man ’ud take en buil’ a biler-factry; en den he could shet
down de biler-factry when he want to res’.”

“Well, but he was the wisest man, anyway; because the
widow she told me so, her own self.”

“JT doan k’yer what de widder say, he warn’¢ no wise man,
nuther. He had some er de dad-fetchedes’ ways I ever see.
Does you know ’bout dat chile dat he ’uz gwyne to chop in
two?”

“Yes, the widow told me all about it.”

“¢ Well, den! Warn’ dat de beatenes’ notion in de worl’ ?
You jes’ take en look at it a minute. Dah’s de stump, dah
—dat’s one er de women; heah’s you—dat’s de yuther one;
I’s Sollermun; en dish-yer dollar bill’s de chile. Bofe un
you claims it. What doesI do? Does Ishin aroun’ mongs’
de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill do b’long to,
en han’ it over to de right one, all safe en soun’, de way dat
anybody dat had any gumption would? No-—I take en
whack de bill in ¢wo, en give half un it to you, en de yuther
half to de yuther woman. Dat’s de way Sollermun was
gwyne to do wid de chile. NowJI want to ast you: what’s de
use er dat half a bill?—can’t buy noth’n wid it. En what
use is a half a chile? I wouldn’ give a dern for a miliion
un um.”

“But hang it, Jim, you’ve clean missed the point—blame
it, you’ve missed it a thousand mile.”

“Who? Me? Go ’long. Doan’ talk to me "bout yo’
pints. I reck’n I knows sense when I sees it; en dey ain’ no
sense in sich doin’s as dat. De ’spute warn’t ’bout a halfa
chile, de ’spute was *bout a whole chile; en de man dat think
he kin settle a ’spute ’bout a whole chile wid a half a chile,
doan’ know enough to come in out’n de rain. Doan’ talk to
me ’bout Sollermun, Huck, I knows him by de back.”
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 99

“But I tell you you don’t get the point.”

“Blame de pint! I reck’n I knows what I knows. En
mine you, de veal pint is down furder—it’s down deeper. It
lays in de way Sollermun was raised. You take a man dat’s
got on’y one er two chillen; is dat man gwyne to be waseful
o’ chillen? No, he ain’t; he can’t ’ford it. He know how
to value’em. But you take a man dat’s got ’bout five million
chillen runnin’ roun’ de house, en it’s diffunt. He as soon
chop a chile in two asacat. Dey's plenty mo’. A chile er
two, mo’ er less, warn’t no consekens to Sollermun, dad
fetch him!”

I never see such a nigger. If he got a notion in his head
once, there warn’t no getting it out again. He was the most
down on Solomon of any nigger I ever see. So I went to
talking about other kings, and let Solomon slide. I told
about Louis Sixteenth that got his head cut off in France
long time ago; and about his little boy the dolphin, that
would a been a king, but they took and shut him up in jail,
and some say he died there.

“ Po’ little chap.”

“But some says he got out and got away, and come to
America.”

“Dat’s good! But he’ll be pooty lonesome—dey ain’ no
kings here, is dey, Huck?”

“No.”

“Den he cain’t git no situation. What he gwyneto do?”

“Well, I don't know. Some of them gets on the police,
and some of them learns people how to talk French.”

“Why, Huck, doan’ de French people talk de same way
we does?”

“No, Jim; you couldn’t understand a word they said—not
a single word.”

“Well, now, I be ding-busted! How do dat come?”

“don’t know; but it’s so. I got some of their jabber
out of a book. Spose aman was to come to you and say
Polly-voo-franzy—what would you think?”

“‘T wouldn’ think nuff’n; I’d take en bust him over de
head. Dat is, if he warn’t white. I wouldn’t ‘low no nigger
to call me dat.”

‘‘Shucks, it ain’t calling you anything. It’s only saying
do you know how to talk French.”
100 THE ADVENTURES OF

“‘ Well, den, why couldn’t he say it?”

“Why, he zs a-saying it. That’s a Frenchman’s way of
saying it.”

“Well, it’s a blame’ ridicklous way, en I doan’ want to
hear no mo’ ’bout it. Dey ain’ no sense in it.”

“Looky here, Jim; does a cat talk like we do?”

“No, a cat don’t.”

“Well, does a cow?”

‘¢No, a cow don’t, nuther.”

“ Does a cat talk like a cow, or a cow talk like a cat?”

‘¢No, dey don’t.’

“Tt’s natural and right for ’em to talk different from each
other, ain’t it?”

“ Course.”

« And ain’t it natural and right for a cat and a cow to talk
different from ws ?”

‘Why, mos’ sholy it is.”

“ Well, then, why ain’t it natural and right fora Prenchman
to talk different from us? Youanswer me that.”

“Ts a cat aman, Huck?”

“No.”

“Well, den, dey ain’t no sense in a cat talkin’ like a man.
Is a cow a man ?—er is a cow a cat?”

**No, she ain’t either of them.”

“Well, den, she ain’ got no business to talk like either one
er the yuther of ’em. Is a Frenchman a man?”

“Ves.”

“Well, den! Dad blame it, why doan’ he fad like aman?
You answer me dat!”

T see it warn’t no use wasting words—you can’t learn a
nigger to argue. So I quit.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. IOI

CHAPTER XV.

E judged that three nights more would fetch us to

Cairo, at the bottom of Illinois, where the Ohio

River comes in, and that was what we was after. We would

sell the raft and get on a steamboat and go way up the Ohio.
amongst the free States, and then be out of trouble.

Well, the second night a fog begun to come on, and we
made for a tow-head to tie to, for it wouldn’t do to try to run
in fog; but when I paddled ahead in the canoe, with the line,
to make fast, there warn’t anything but little saplings to tie
to. I passed the line around one of them right on the edge
of the cut bank, but there was a stiff current, and the raft
come booming down so lively she tore it out by the roots and
away she went. I see the fog closing down, and it made me
so sick and scared JI couldn’t budge for most a half a minute
it seemed to me—and then there warn’t no raft in sight; you
couldn’t see twenty yards. I jumped into the canoe and run
back to the stern and grabbed the paddle and set her back a
stroke.. But she didn’t come. I was in such a hurry I
hadn’t untied her. JI got up and tried to untie her, but I was
so excited my hands shook so I couldn’t hardly do anything
with them.

As soon as I got started I took out after the raft, hot and
heavy, right down the tow-head. That was all right as far as
it went, but the tow-head warn’t sixty yards long, and the
minute I flew by the foot of it I shot out into the solid white
fog, and hadn’t no more idea which way I was going than a
dead man.

Thinks I, it won’t do to paddle; first I know I'll run into
the bank or a tow-head or something; I got to set still and
float, and yet it’s mighty fidgety business to have to hold
your hands still at such a time. I whooped and listened.
Away down there, somewheres, I hears a- small whoop, and
102 THE ADVENTURES OF

up comes my spirits. I went tearing after it, listening sharp
to hearit again. The next time it come, I see J warn’t head-
ing for it but heading away to the right of it. And the next
time, I was heading away to the left of it—and not gaining
on it much, either, for I was flying around, this way and that
and ’tother, but it was going straight ahead all the time.

I did wish the fool would think to beat a tin pan, and beat
it all the time, but he never did, and it was the still places
between the whoops that was making the trouble for me.
Well, I fought along, and directly I hears the whoop behind
me. I was tangled good, now. That was somebody else’s
whoop, or else I was turned around.

I throwed the paddle down. I heard the whoop again; it
was behind me yet, but in a different place; it kept coming,
and kept changing its place, and I kept answering, till by-
and-by it was in front of me again and I knowed the current
had swung the canoe’s head down stream and I was all right,
if that was Jim and not some other raftsman hollering. I
couldn’t tell nothing about voices in a fog, for nothing don’t
look natural nor sound natural in a fog.

The whooping went on, and in about a minute I come a
booming down on a cut bank with smoky ghosts of big trees
on it, and the current throwed me off to the left and shot by,
amongst a lot of snags that fairly roared, the current was
tearing by them so swift.

In another second or two it was solid white and still again.
I set perfectly still, then, listening to my heart thump, and I
reckon J didn’t draw a breath while it thumped a hundred.

I just give up, then. I knowed what the matter was.
That cut bank was an island, and Jim had gone down ’tother
side of it. It warn’t no tow-head, that you could float by in
ten minutes. It had the big timber of a regular island; it
might be five or six mile long and more than a half a mile
wide.

I kept quiet, with my ears cocked, about fifteen minutes,
I reckon. I was floating along, of course, four or five miles
an hour; but you don’t ever think of that. No, you feel
like you are laying dead still on the water ; and if a little
glimpse of a snag slips by, you don’t think to yourself how
fast you're going, but you catch your breath and think, my !
how that snag’s tearing along. If you think it ain’t dismal
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 103

and lonesome out ina fog that way, by yourself, in the night,
you try it once—you’ll see.

Next, for about a half an hour, I whoops now and then ;
at last I hears the answer a Jong ways off, and tries to fol-
low it, but I couldn’t do it, and directly I judged I’d got into
a nest of tow-heads, for I had little dim glimpses of them on
both sides of me, sometimes just a narrow channel between ;
and some that I couldn’t see, I knowed was there, because
Vd hear the wash of the current against the old dead brush
and trash that hung over the banks. Well, I warn’t long
losing the whoops, down amongst the tow-heads ; and I only
tried to chase them a little while, anyway, because it was
worse than chasing a Jack-o’-lantern. You never knowed a
sound dodge around so, and swap places so quick and so
much.

I had to claw away from the bank pretty lively, four or-five.
times, to keep from knocking the islands out of the river;
and so I judged the raft must be butting into the bank every
now and then, or else it would get further ahead and clear
out of hearing—it was floating a little faster than what I was.

Well, I seemed to be in the open river again, by-and-by,
but I couldn’t hear no sign of a whoop nowheres. I reckoned
Jim had fetched up on a snag, maybe, and it was all up with

-him. I was good and tired, so I laid down in the canoe and
said I wouldn’t bother no more. I didn’t want to go to sleep,
of course; but I was so sleepy I couldn’t help it; so I
thought I would take jest one little cat-nap.

But I reckon it was more than a cat-nap, for when I waked
up the stars was shining bright, the fog was all gone, and I
was spinning down a big bend stern first. First I didn’t
know where I was; I thought I was dreaming; and when
things begun to come back to me, they seemed to come up
dim out of last week.

It was a monstrous big river here, with the tallest and the
thickest kind of timber on both banks ; just a solid wall, as
well as I could see, by the stars. I looked away down stream,
and seen a black speck on the water. I took out after it;
but when I got to it it warn’t nothing but a couple of saw-
logs made fast together. Then I see another speck, and
chased that ; then another, and this time I was right. It was
the raft.
104 THE ADVENTURES OF

When I got to it Jim was setting there with his head down
between his knees, asleep, with his right arm hanging over
the steering oar. The other oar was smashed off, and the
raft was littered up with leaves and branches and dirt. So
she’d had a rough time.

I made fast and laid down under Jim’s nose on the raft,
and began to gap, and stretch my fists out against Jim, and
says:

te Hello, Jim, have I been asleep? Why didn’t you stir
me up?”

“ Goodness gracious, is dat you, Huck? En youain’ dead
—you ain’ drownded—you’s back agin? It’s too good for
true, honey, it’s too good for true. Lemme look at you,
chile, lemme feel 0’ you. No, you ain’ dead! you’s back
agin’, live en soun’, jis de same ole Huck—de same ole Huck,
thanks to goodness !”’

“What's the matter with you, Jim? You been a drink-
ing?”

te Drinkin’? Has I ben a drinkin’? Has I had a chance
to be a drinkin’?”

“Well, then, what makes you talk so wild?”

‘*¢ How does I talk wild?”

“ How? why, hain’t you been talking about my coming
back, and all that stuff, as if ’'d been gone away?”

“ Huck—Huck Finn, you look me in de eye ; look me in
de eye. ain't you ben gone away?”

“Gone away? Why, what in the nation do youmean? /
hain’t been gone anywheres. Whete would I go to?”

‘Well, looky here, boss, dey’s sumf’n wrong, dey is. Is I
me, or who zs I? Is I heah, or whah zs I? Now dat’s what
I wants to know?”

“ Well, I think you’re here, plain enough, but I think you're
a tangle- headed old fool, Jim.’’

“Tis, is I? Well you answer me dis. Didn’t you tote
out de line in de canoe, fer to make fas’ to de tow-head ?”’

“No, I didn’t. What tow-head? I hain’t seen no tow-
head.”

“You hain’t seen no tow-head? Looky here—didn’t de
line pull loose en de raf’ go a hummin’ down de river. en
leave you en de canoe behine in de fog?”

“What fog?”
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 105

“Why de fog. De fog dat’s ben aroun’ all night. En
didn’t you whoop, en didn’t I whoop, tell we got mix’ up in
de islands en one un us got los’ en ’tother one was jis’ as good
as los’, ’kase he didn’ know whah he wuz? En didn’t I bust
up agin a lot er dem islands en have a turrible time en mos’

‘ git drownded? Now ain’ dat so, boss—ain’t it so? You an-
swer me dat.”

“ Well, this is too many for me, Jim. I hain’t seen no fog,
nor no islands, nor no troubles, nor nothing. I been setting
here talking with you all night till you went to sleep about
ten minutes ago, and I reckon I done the same. You
couldn’t a got drunk in that time, so of course you’ve been
dreaming.”

“ Dad fetch it, howis I gwyne to dream all dat in ten min-
utes?”

“Well, hang it all, you did dream it, because there didn’t
any of it happen.”

“ But Huck, it’s all jis’ as plain to me as

“Tt don’t make no difference how plain it is, there ain’t
nothing in it. I know, because I’ve been here all the time.’’

Jim didn’t say nothing for about five minutes, but set-there
studying over it. Then he says:

“Well, den, I reck’n I did dream it, Huck; but dog my
cats ef it ain’t de powerfullest dream I ever see. En I hain’t
evet had no dream b’fo’ dat’s tired me like dis one.”

“Oh, well, that’s all right, because a dream does tire a
body like everything, sometimes. But this one was a stav-
ing dream—tell me all about it, Jim.”

So Jim went to work and told me the whole thing right
through, just as it happened, only he painted it up consider-
able. Then he said he must start in and “’terpret’’ it, be-
cause it was sent fora warning. He said the first tow-head
stood for a man that would try to do us some good, but the
current was another man that would get'us away from him.
The whoops was warnings that would come to us every now
and then, and if we didn’t try hard to make out to under-
stand them they’d just take us into bad luck, ’stead of keep-
ing us out of it. The lot of tow-heads was troubles we was
going to get into with quarrelsome people and all kinds of
mean folks, but if we minded our business and didn’t talk
back and aggravate them, we would pull through and get out

a


106 THE ADVENTURES OF

of the fog and into the big clear river, which was the free
States, and wouldn’t have no more trouble.

It had clouded up pretty dark just after I got onto the raft,
but it was clearing up again, now.

‘Oh, well, that’s all interpreted well enough, as far as it
goes, Jim,” I says; ‘but what does ¢hese things stand for ?”

It was the leaves and rubbish on the raft, and the smashed
oar. You could see them first rate, now.

Jim looked at the trash, and then looked at me, and back
at the trash again. He had got the dream fixed so strong in
his head that he couldn’t séem to shake it loose and get the
facts back into its place again, right away. But when he
did get the thing straightened around, he looked at me steady,
without ever smiling, and says:

“What do dey stan’ for? Tse gwyne to tell you. When
I got all wore out wid work, en wid de callin’ for you, en
went to sleep, my heart wuz mos’ broke bekase you wuz los’,
“en I didn’ k’yer no mo’ what become er me en de raf’. En
when I wake up en fine you back agin’, all safe en soun’, de
tears come en I could a got down on my knees en kiss’ yo’
foot I’s so thankful. En all you wuz thinkin’ ’bout wuz how
you could make a fool uv ole Jim wida lie. Dat truck dah
is trash ; en trash is what people is dat puts dirt on de head
er dey fren’s en makes ’em ashamed.”

Then he got up slow, and walked to the wigwam, and went
in there, without saying anything but that. But that was
enough. It made me feel so mean I could almost kissed Ads
foot to get him to take it back.

It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go
and humble myself to a nigger—but I done it, and I warn’t
ever sorry for it afterwards, neither. I didn’t do him no
more mean tricks, and I wouldn’t done that one if I’'da
knowed it would make him feel that way.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 107

CHAPTER XVI.

E slept most all day, and started out at night, a little

ways behind a monstrous long raft that was as long

going by as a procession. She had four long sweeps at each

end, so we judged she carried as many as thirty men, likely.

She had five big wigwams aboard, wide apart, and an open

camp fire in the middle, and a tall flag-pole at each end.

There was a power of style about her. It amounted to some-
thing being a raftsman on such a craft as that.

We went drifting down into a big bend, and the night
clouded up and got hot. The river was very wide, and was
walled with solid timber on both sides; you couldn’t see a
break in it hardly ever, or a light. We talked about Cairo,
and wondered whether we would know it when we got to it.
I said likely we wouldn’t, because I had heard say there
warn’t but about a dozen houses there, and if they didn’t
happen to have them lit up, how was we going to know we
was passing a town? Jim said if the two big rivers joined
together there, that would show. But I said maybe we might
think we was passing the foot of an island and coming into
the same old river again. That disturbed Jim—and me too.
So the question was, what todo? I said, paddle ashore the
first time a light showed, and tell them pap was behind, com-
ing along with a trading-scow, and was a green hand at the
business, and wanted to know how far it was to Cairo. Jim
thought it was a good idea, so we took a smoke on it and
waited,

There warn’t nothing to do, now, but to look out sharp for
the town, and not pass it without seeing it. He said he’d be
mighty sure to see it, because he’d be a free man the minute
he seen it, but if he missed it he’d be in the slave country
again and no more show for freedom. Every little while he
jumps up and says:

“ Dah she is!”

But it warn’t. It was Jack-o’-lanterns, or lightning-bugs;
108 THE ADVENTURES OF

so he set down again, and went to watching, same as before.
Jim said it made him all over trembly and feverish to be so
close to freedom. Well, I can tell you it made me all over
trembly and feverish, too, to hear him, because I begun to
get it through my head that he was most free—and who was
to blame for it? Why, me. I couldn’t get that out of my
conscience, no how nor no way. It got to troubling me so I
couldn’t rest; I couldn’t stay still in one place. It hadn’t
ever come home to me before, what this thing was that I was
doing. But now it did; and it staid with me, and scorched
me more and more. [I tried to make out to myself that 7
watn’t to blame, because / didn’t run Jim off from his right-
ful owner; but it warn’t no use, conscience up and says, every
time, ‘* But you knowed he was running for his freedom, and
you could a paddled ashore and told somebody.” ‘That was
so—I couldn’t get around that, noway. That was where it
pinched. Conscience says to me, “What had poor Miss
Watson done to you, that you could see her nigger go off
right under your eyes and never say one single word? What
did that poor old woman do to you, that you could treat her
so mean? Why, she tried to learn you your book, she tried
to learn you your manners, she tried to be good to you every
way she knowed how. TZ at's what she done,”

I got to feeling so mean and so miserable I most wished I
was dead. I fidgeted up and down the raft, abusing myself
to myself, and Jim was fidgeting up and down past me. We
neither of us could keep still. Every time he danced around
and says, “‘ Dah’s Cairo!” it went through me like a shot,
and I thought if it was Cairo I reckoned I would die of mis-
erableness.

Jim talked out loud all the time while I was talking to my-
self. He was saying how the first thing he would do when
he got to a free State he would go to saving up money and
never spend a single cent, and when he got enough he would
buy his wife, which was owned on a farm close to where Miss
Watson lived; and then they would both work to buy the
two children, and if their master wouldn’t sell them, they’d
get an Ab’litionist to go and steal them.

It most froze me to hear such talk. He wouldn’t ever
dared to talk such talk in his life before. Just see what a
difference it made in him the minute he judged he was about
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 109

free. It was according to the old saying, “give a nigger an
inch and he’ll take an ell.” Thinks I, this is what comes of
my not thinking. Here was this nigger which I had as good
as helped to run away, coming right out flat-footed and saying
he would steal his children—children that belonged to a man
I didn’t even know; a man that hadn’t ever done me no harm.

I was sorry to hear Jim say that, it was such a lowering of
him. My conscience got to stirring me up hotter than ever,
until at last I says to it, “Let up on me—it ain’t too late, yet
—I’ll paddle ashore at the first light, and tell.’ I felt easy,
and happy, and light as a feather, right off. All my troubles
was gone. I went to looking out sharp for a light, and sort
of singing tomyself. By-and-by one showed. Jim sings out:

‘““We’s safe, Huck, we’s safe! Jump up and crack yo’
heels, dat’s de good ole Cairo at las’, I jis knows it!”

I says:

“T’ll take the canoe and go see, Jim. It mightn’t be, you
know.”

He jumped and got the canoe ready, and put his old coat~
in the bottom for me to set on, and give me the padd and
as I shoved off, he says:

“ Pooty soon I’ll be a-shout’n for joy, en I'll say, it’s all
on accounts o’ Huck; I’s a free man, en I couldn’t ever ben
free ef it hadn’ ben for Huck; Huck done it. Jim won't
ever forgit you, Huck; you’s de bes’ fren’ Jim’s ever had; en
you’s de only. fren’ ole Jim’s got now.’

I was paddling off, all in a sweat to tell on him; but when
he says this, it seemed to kind of take the tuck all out of me.
I went along slow then, and I warn’t right down certain
whether I was glad I started or whether I warn’t. When I
was fifty yards off, Jim says:

“ Dah you goes, de ole true Huck; de on’y white genlman
dat ever kep’ his promise to ole Jim.”

Well, I just felt sick. But I says, I got to do it—I can’t
get out ‘of it, Right then, along comes a skiff with two men
in it, with guns, and they stopped and I stopped. One of
them says:

“ What’s that yonder ?”

“ A piece of a raft,’’ I says.

“ Do you belong on it?”

(ONES MSI Tm
fIo THE ADVENTURES OF

“Any men on it?”

“ Only one, sir.”

‘Well, there’s five niggers run off to-night, up yonder
above the head of the bend. Is your man white or black?”

I didn’t answer up prompt. I tried to, but the words
wouldn’t come. I tried, for a second or two, to brace up and
out with it, but I warn’t man enough—hadn’t the spunk of a
rabbit. I see I was weakening; so I just give up trying, and
up and says—

“ He’s white.”

“T reckon we'll go and see for ourselves.”

“T wish you would,” says I, “ because it’s pap that’s there,
and maybe you’d help me tow the raft ashore where the light
is. He’s sick—and sois mam and Mary Ann.”

‘Oh, the devil! we’re in ahurry, boy. But I s’pose we’ve
got to. Come—buckle to your paddle, and let’s get along.”

I buckled to my. paddle and they laid totheir oars. When
we had made a stroke or two, I says:

“Pap'll be mighty much obleeged to you, I can tell you.
Everybody goes away when I want them to help me tow the
raft ashore, and I can’t do it by myself.”

‘¢ Weil, that’s infernal mean. Odd,too. Say, boy, what’s
the matter with your father ?”

‘« It’s the —a—the—well, it ain’t anything, much.”

They stopped pulling. It warn’t but a mighty little ways
to the raft, now. One says:

‘“‘ Boy, that’s a lie. What zs the matter with your pap?
Answer up square, now, and it’ll be the better for you.”

“T will, sir, I will, honest—but don’t leave us, please. It’s
the—the—gentlemen, if you'll only pull ahead, and let me
heave you the head-line, you won’t have to come a-near the
raft—please do.” ‘

“Set her back, John, set her back!” says one. -They
backed water. “Keep away, boy—keep to looard. Con-
found it, I just expect the wind has blowed it to us. Your
pap’s got the small-pox, and you know it precious well.
Why didn’t you come out and say so? Do you want to»
spread it all over?”

“Well,” says I, a-blubbering, “I’ve told everybody before,
and then they just went away and left us,”

“Poor devil, there’s something in that. We are right

y
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. IilI

down sorry for you, but we—well, hang it, we don’t want the
small-pox, you see. Look here, I'll tell you what to do.
Don’t you try to land by yourself, or you’ll smash everything
to pieces. You float along down about twenty miles and
you'll come to a town on the left-hand side of the river. It
will be long after sun-up, then, and when you ask for help,
you tell them your folks are all down with chills and fever.
Don’t be a fool again, and let people guess what is the mat-
ter. Now we're trying to do youa kindness; so you just put
twenty miles between us, that’s a good boy. It wouldn’t do
any good to land yonder where the light is—it’s only a wood-
yard. Say—I reckon your father’s poor, and I’m bound to
say he’s in pretty hard luck. Here—I’ll put a twenty dollar
gold piece on this board, and you get it when it floats by.
I feel mighty mean to leave you, but my kingdom! it won't
do to fool with small-pox, don’t you see?”

‘¢ Hold on, Parker,” says the other man, “ here’s a twenty
to put on the board for me. Good-bye, boy, you do as Mr.
Parker told you, and you'll be all right.”

‘¢That’s so, my boy—good-bye, good-bye. If you see any
runaway niggers, you get help and nab them, and you can
make some money by it.”

“¢Good-bye, sir,” says I, “I won’t let no runaway niggers
get by me if I can help it.”

They went off, and I got aboard the raft, feeling bad and
low, because I knowed very well I had done wrong, and I see
it warn’t no use for me to try to learn to do right; a body that
don’t get started right when he’s little, ain’t got no show—
when the pinch comes there ain’t nothing to back him up and
keep him to his work, and so he gets beat. Then I thought
a minute, and says to myself, hold on,—s’pose you’d a done
right and give Jim up; would you felt better than what you
do now? No, says I, I’d feel bad—I’d feel just the same
way I do now. Well, then, says I, what’s the use you learn-
ing to do right, when it’s troublesome to do right and ain’t no
trouble to do wrong, and the wages is just the same? I was
stuck. I couldn’t answer that. So I reckoned I wouldn’t
bother no more about it, but after this always do whichever
come handiest at the time.

I went into the wigwam; Jim warn’t there. I looked all
around; he warn’t anywhere. I says: i


I12 THE ADVENTURES OF

“ Jim!”

“Here I is, Huck. Is dey out o’ sight yit? Don’t talk
loud.”

He was in the river, under the stern oar, with just his nose
out. I told him they was out of sight, so he come aboard.
He says:

“« I was a-listenin’ to all de talk, en I slips into de river en
was gwyne to shove for sho’ if dey come aboard. Den I was
gwyne to swim to de raf’ agin when dey was gone. But lawsy,
how you did fool ’em, Huck! Dat waz de smartes’ dodge!
I tell you, chile, I ’speck it save’ ole Jim—old Jim ain’t
gwyne to forgit you for dat, honey.”

Then we talked about the money. It was a pretty good
raise, twenty dollars apiece. Jim said we could take deck
passage on a steamboat now, and the money would last us as
far as we wanted to go in the free States. He said twenty
mile more warn’t far for the raft to go, but he wished we was
already there.

Towards daybreak we tied up, and Jim was mighty partic-
ular about hiding the raft good. Then he worked all day fix-
ing things in bundles, and getting all ready to quit rafting.

That night about ten we hove in sight of the lights of a
town away down in a left-hand bend.

I went off in the canoe, to ask about it. Pretty soon I found
a man out in the river with a skiff, setting a trot-line. Iranged
up and says:

“Mister, is that town Cairo?”

“Cairo? no. You must be a blame’ fool.”

“What town is it, mister?”

“Tf you want to know, go and find out. If you stay here
botherin’ around me for about a half a minute longer, you'll
get something you won’t want.”’ :

I paddled to the raft. Jim was awful disappointed, but I
said never mind, Cairo would be the next place, I reckoned.

We passed another town before daylight, and I was going
out again; but it was high ground, so I didn’t go. No high
ground about Cairo, Jim said. JI had forgot it. We laid
up for the day, on a tow-head tolerable close to the left-hand
bank. I begun to suspicion something. So did Jim. I says:

“ Maybe we went by Cairo in the fog that night.”

He says:
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 113

“‘ Doan’ less’ talk about it, Huck. Po’ niggers can’t have
no luck. I awluz ’spected dat rattle-snake skin warn’t done
wid it’s work.”

“JT wish I’d never seen that snake-skin, Jim—lI do wish I'd
never laid eyes on it.”

“Tt ain’t yo’ fault, Huck; you didn’ know. Don’t you
blame yo’self ’bout it.”

When it was daylight, here was the clear Ohio water in
shore, sure enough, and outside was the old regular Muddy!
So it was all up with Cairo.

We talked it all over. It wouldn’t do to take to the shore;
we couldn’t take the raft up the stream, of course. There
warn’t no way but to wait for dark, and start back in the ca-
noe and take the chances. So we slept all day amongst the
cotton-wood thicket, so as to be fresh for the work, and when
we went back to the raft about dark the canoe was gone!

We didn’t say a word for a good while. There warn’t any-
thing to say. We both knowed well enough it was some more
work of the rattle-snake skin; so what was the use to talk
about it? It would only look like we was finding fault, and
that would be bound to fetch more bad luck—and keep on
fetching it, too, till we knowed enough to keep still.

By-and-by we talked about what we better do, and found
there warn’t no way but just to go along down with the raft
till we got a chance to buy a canoe to go back in. We warn’t
going to borrow it when there warn’t anybody around, the
way pap would do, for that might set people after us.

So we shoved out, after dark, on the raft.

Anybody that don’t believe yet, that it’s foolishness to han-
dle a snake-skin, after all that that snake-skin done for us,
wil believe it now, if they read on and see what more it done

or us. :

The place to buy canoes is off of rafts laying up at shore.
But we didn’t see no rafts laying up; so we went along during
three hours and more. Well, the night got gray, and ruther
thick, which is the next meanest thing to fog. Voucan’t tell
the shape of the river, and you can’t see no distance. It got
to be very late and still, and then along comes a steamboat
up the river. We lit the lantern, and judged she would see it.
Up-stream boats didn’t generly come close to us; they go
out and follow the bars and hunt for easy water under the

8
II4 THE ADVENTURES OF

reefs; but nights like this they bull right up the channel
against the whole river.

We could hear her pounding along, but we didn’t see her
good till she was close. She aimed right for us. Often they
do that and try to see how close they can come without touch-
ing; sometimes the wheel bites off a sweep, and then the pilot
sticks his head out and laughs, and thinks he’s mighty smart.
Well, here she comes, and we said she was going to try and
shave us; but she didn’t seem to be sheering off a bit. She
was a big one, and she was coming in a hurry, too, looking
like a black cloud with rows of glow-worms around it; but all
of a sudden she bulged out, big and scary, with a long row
of wide-open furnace doors shining like red-hot teeth, and her
monstrous bows and guards hanging right over us. There
was a yell at us, and a jingling of bells to stop the engines, a
pow-wow of cussing, and whistling of steam—and as Jim went
overboard on one side and I on the other, she come smashing
straight through the raft.

I dived—and I aimed to find the bottom, too, for a thirty-
foot wheel had got to go over me, and I wanted it to have
plenty of room. I could always stay under water a minute;
this time I reckon I staid under water a minute and a half.
Then I bounced for the top in a hurry, for I was nearly
busting. I popped out to my arm-pits and blowed the
water out of my nose, and puffed a bit. Of course there
was a booming current; and of course that boat started her
engines again ten seconds after she stopped them, for they
never cared much for raftsmen; so now she was churning
along up the river, out of sight in the thick weather, though
I could hear her.

I sung out for Jim about a dozen times, but I didn’t get
any answer, so I grabbed a plank that touched me while
I was “treading water,” and struck out for shore, shoving
it ahead of me. But I made out to see that the drift of
the current was towards the left-hand shore, which meant
that I was in a crossing; so I changed off and went that
way.

It was one of these long, slanting, two-mile crossings;
so I was a good long time in getting over. I made a safe
landing, and clum up the bank. I cou'dn’t see but a little
ways, but I went poking along over rough ground for a
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 15

quarter of a mile or more, and then I run across a big old-
fashioned double log house before I noticed it. I was go-
ing to rush by and get away, but a lot of dogs jumped out
and went to howling and barking at me, and I knowed
better than to move another peg.















CLIMBING UP THE BANK.
116 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XVII.

N about a minute somebody spoke out of a window, with-

out putting his head out, and says:

“ Be done, boys! Who’s there?”

I says:

“Tt’s me.”

“Who's me?”

“ George Jackson, sir.”

“What do you want?”

“J don’t want nothing, sir. I only want to go along by,
but the dogs won’t let me.”

“What are you prowling around here this time of night,
for—hey?”

“‘T warn’t prowling around, sir; I fell overboard off of the
steamboat.”

“Oh, you did, did you? Strike a light there, somebody.
What did you say your name was?”

“George Jackson, sir. I’m only a boy.”

“Look here; if you're telling the truth, you needn’t be
afraid—nobody “ll hurt you. But don’t try to budge; stand
right where you are. Rouse out Bob and Tom, some of
you, and fetch the guns. George Jackson, is there any-
body with you?”

“No, sir, nobody.

I heard the people stirring around in the house, now,
and see a light. The man sung out:

‘Snatch that light away, Betsy, you old fool—ain’t you
got any sense? Put it on the floor behind the front door.
Bob, if you and Tom are ready, take your places.”’

“ All ready.”

“ Now, George Jackson, do you know the Shepherdsons ?”

“No, sir—I never heard of them.”

“Well, that may be so, and it mayn’t. Now, all ready.
Step forward, George Jackson. And mind, don’t you hurry

oP


HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 117

—come mighty slow. If there’s anybody with you, let him
keep back—if he shows himself he’ll be shot. Come along,
now. Come slow; push the door open, yourself—just enough
to squeeze in, d’ you hear?”

I didn’t hurry, I couldn’t if I’d a wanted to. I took one
slow step at a time, and there warn’t a sound, only I thought
I could hear my heart. The dogs were as still as the humans,
but they followed a little behind me. When I got to the three
log door-steps, I heard them unlocking and unbarring and un-
bolting. I put my hand on the door and pushed it a little
and a little more, till somebody said, “ There, that’s enough
—put your head in.” I done it, but I judged they would
take it off.

The candle was on the floor, and there they all was, looking
at me, and me at them, for about a quarter of a minute. Three
big men with guns pointed at me, which made me wince, I tell
you; the oldest, gray and about sixty, the other two thirty or
more—all of them fine and handsome—and the sweetest old
gray-headed lady, and back of her two young women which I
couldn’t see right well. The old gentleman says:

“There—I reckon it’s all right. Come in.”

As soon as I was in, the old gentleman he locked the door
and barred it and bolted it, and told the young men to come
in with their guns, and they all went in a big parlor that had
a new rag carpet on the floor, and got together in a corner that
was out of range of the front windows—there warn’t none on
the side. They held the candle, and took a good look at me,
and all said, * Why #e ain’t a Shepherdson—no, there ain’t
any Shepherdson about him.” Then the old man said he
hoped I wouldn’t mind being searched for arms, because he
didn’t mean no harm by it—it was only to make sure. So he
didn’t pry into my pockets, but only felt outside with his
hands, and said it was all right. He told me to make myself
easy and at home, and tell all about myself; but the old lady
says:

“Why bless you, Saul, the poor thing’s as wet as he can be;
and don’t you reckon it may be he’s hungry ?”

“True for you, Rachel—I forgot.”

So the old lady says:

‘* Betsy” (this was a nigger woman), ‘‘ you fly around and
get him something to eat, as quick as you can, poor thing;
IIs ; THE ADVENTURES OF

and one of you girls go and wake up Buck and tell him—Oh,
here he is himself. Buck, take this little stranger and get the
wet clothes off from him and dress him up in some of yours
that’s dry.”

Buck looked about as old as me—thirteen or fourteen or
along there, though he was a little bigger than me. He hadn't
on anything but a shirt, and he was very frowsy-headed. He
come in gaping and digging one fist into his eyes, and he was
dragging a gun along with the other one. He says:

‘© Ain’t they no Shepherdsons around ?”

They said, no, ’twas a false alarm.

“Well,” he says, “if they'd a ben some, I reckon I'd a got
one.”

They all laughed, and Bob says:

“Why, Buck, they might have scalped us all, you’ve been
so slow in coming.”

“Well, nobody come after me, and it ain’t right. I’m al-
ways kep’ down; I don’t get no show.”’

“Never mind, Buck, my boy,” says the old man, “ you'll
have show enough, all in good time, don’t you fret about that.
Go ’long with you now, and do as your mother told you.”

When we got up stairs to his room, he got me a coarse shirt
and a round-about and pants of his, and I put them on.
While I was at it he asked me what my name was, but before
I could tell him, he started to telling me abouta blue jay and
a young rabbit he had catched in the woods day before yes-
terday, and he asked me where Moses was when the candle
went out. I said I didn’t know; I hadn’t heard about it be-
fore, no way.

“Well, guess,” he says.

“ How’m I going to guess,’
tell about it before?” 4

“But you can guess, can't you? It’s just as easy.”

“¢ Which candle ?”’ Isays.

‘* Why, any candle,” he says.

‘*T don’t know where he was,” says I; “where was he?”

“Why he was in the dark! That’s where he was!”

“ Well, if you knowed where he was, what did you ask me
LOE es

“Why, blame it, it’s a riddle, don’t you see? Say, how
long are you going to stay here? You got to stay always.

2

says I, “when I never heard |


HUCKLEBERRY FINN, 119

We can just have booming times—they don’t have no school
now. Do you ownadog? I’ve got a dog—and he'll go in
the river and bring out chips that you throw in. Do you like
to comb up, Sundays, and all that kind of foolishness? You
bet I don’t, but ma she makes me. Confound these ole
britches, I reckon I’d better put ’em on, but I’d ruther not,
it’s so warm. Are you all ready? All right—come along,
old hoss.”

Cold corn-pone, cold corn-beef, butter and butter-milk—
that is what they had for me down there, and there ain’t noth-
ing better that ever I’ve come across yet. Buck and his ma
and all of them smoked cob pipes, except the nigger woman,
which was gone, andthe two young women. They all smoked
and talked, and I eat and talked. The young women had
quilts around them, and their hair down their backs. They
all asked me questions, and I told them how pap and me and
all the family was living on a little farm down at the bottom
of Arkansaw, and my sister Mary Ann run off and got mar-
ried and never was heard of no more, and Bill went to hunt
them and he warn’t heard of no more, and Tom and Mort
died, and then there warn’t nobody but just me and pap left,
and he was just trimmed down to nothing, on account of his
troubles; so when he died I took what there was left, because
the farm didn’t belong to us, and started up the river, deck
passage, and fell overboard; and that was how I come to be
here. So they said J could have a home there as long as I
wanted it. Then it was most daylight, and everybody went
to bed, and I went to bed with Buck, and when I waked up
in the morning, drat it all, I had forgot what my name was.
So I laid there about an hour trying to think, and when Buck
waked up, I says: ;

“Can you spell, Buck ?”

“Yes,” he says.

“T bet you can’t spell my name,”’ says I.

“T bet you what you dare I can,” says he,

“ All right,” says I, “go ahead.”

“ G-o-r-g-e J-a-x-o-n—there now,” he says.

“Well,” says I, “ you done it, but I didn’t think you could.
It ain’t no slouch of aname to spell—right off without study-
ing.”

I set it down, private, because somebody might want me to
120 THE ADVENTURES OF

spell it, next,.and so I wanted to be handy with it and rattle
it off like I was used to it.

It was a mighty nice family, and a mighty nice house, too.
Thadn’t seen no house out inthe country before that was so nice
and had so much style. It didn’t have an iron latch on the front
door, nora wooden one with a buckskin string, but a brass knob

HERS
pk

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ti hs AM Hi
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“‘1T MADE HER LOOK SPIDERY.’

to turn, the same as housesina town. There warn’t no bed in
the parlor, not a sign of a bed; but heaps of parlors in towns
has beds in them. There was a big fireplace that was bricked
on the bottom, and the bricks was kept clean and red by pour-
ing water on them and scrubbing them with another brick;
sometimes they washed them over with red water-paint that
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. I2]

they call Spanish-brown, same asthey dointown. They had
big brass dog-irons that could hold upasaw-log. There was
a clock on the middle of the mantel-piece, with a picture ofa
town painted on the bottom half of the glass front, and a
round place in the middle of it for the sun, and you could see
the pendulum swing behind it. It was beautiful to hear that
clock tick; and sometimes when one of these peddlers had
been along and scoured her up and got her in good shape,
she would start in and strike a hundred and fifty before she
got tuckered out. They wouldn’t took any money for her.

Well, there was a big outlandish parrot on each side of the
clock, made out of something like chalk, and painted up gaudy.
By one of the parrots was a cat made of crockery, and a
crockery dog by the other; and when you pressed down on
them they squeaked, but didn’t open their mouths nor look
different nor interested. They squeaked through underneath.
There was a couple of big wild-turkey-wing fans spread out
behind those things. On the table in the middle of the room
was a kind of a lovely crockery basket that had apples and
oranges and peaches and grapes piled up in it which was much
redder and yellower and prettier than real ones is, but they
warn’t real because you could see where pieces had got chipped
off and showed the white chalk or whatever it was, underneath.

This table had a cover made out of beautiful oil-cloth, with
a red and blue spread-eagle painted on it, and a painted bor-
der all around. It come all the way from Philadelphia, they
said. There was some books too, piled up perfectly exact,
on each corner of the table. One was a big family Bible, full
of pictures. One was “ Pilgrim’s Progress,” about a man that
left his family it didn’t say why. I read considerable in it
now and then. The statements was interesting, but tough.
Another was ‘‘ Friendship’s Offering,” full of beautiful stuff
and poetry; but I didn’t read the poetry. Another was Henry
Clay’s Speeches, and another was Dr. Gunn’s Family Medicine,
which told you all about what to do if a body was sick or
dead. There was a Hymn Book, and a lot of other books.
And there was nice split-bottom chairs, and perfectly sound,
too—not bagged down in the middle and busted, like an old
basket.

They had pictures hung on the walls—mainly Washingtons
and Lafayettes, and battles, and Highland Marys, and one
122 THE ADVENTURES OF

called “Signing the Declaration.” There was some that they
called crayons, which one of the daughters which was dead
made her own self when she was only fifteen years old. They
was different from any pictures I ever see before; blacker,
mostly, than is common. One was a woman ina slim black
dress, belted small under the arm-pits, with bulges like a
cabbage in the middle of the sleeves, and a large black scoop-
shovel bonnet with a black veil, and white slim ankles crossed
about with black tape, and very wee black slippers, like a
chisel, and she was leaning pensive on a tombstone on her
right elbow, under a weeping willow, and her other hand hang-
ing down her side holding a white handkerchief and a reticule,
and underneath the picture it said “Shall I Never See Thee
More Alas.” Another one was a young lady with her hair
all combed up straight to the top of her head, and knotted
there in front of a comb like a chair-back, and she was crying
into a handkerchief and had a dead bird laying onits back in
her other hand with its heels up, and underneath the picture
it said “I Shall Never Hear Thy Sweet Chirrup More Alas.”
There was one where a young lady was at a window looking
up at the moon, and tears running down her cheeks; and she
had an open letter in one hand with black sealing-wax showing
on one edge of it, and she was mashing a locket with a chain
to it against her mouth, and underneath the picture it said
“ And Art Thou Gone Yes Thou Art Gone Alas.” These
was all nice pictures, I reckon, but I didn’t somehow seem to
take to them, because if ever I was down a little, they always
give me the fan-tods. Everybody was sorry she died, because
she had laid out a lot more of these pictures to do, and a body
could see by what she had done what they had lost. But I
reckoned, that with her disposition, she was having a better
time in the grave-yard. She was at work on what they said
was her greatest picture when she took sick, and every day
and every night it was her prayer to be allowed to live till
she got it done, but she never got the chance. It was a pic-
ture of a young woman in a Jong white gown, standing on the
rail of a bridge all ready to jump off, with her hair all down
her back, and looking up to the moon, with the tears running
down her face, and she had two arms folded across her breast,
and two arms stretched out in front, and two more reaching
up towards the moon—and the idea was, to see which pair
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 123

would look best and then scratch out all the other arms; but,
as I was saying, she died before she got her mind made up,
and now they kept this picture over the head of the bed in her
room, and every time her birthday come they hung flowers on
it. Other times it was hid with a little curtain. The young
woman in the picture had a kind of a nice sweet face, but
there was so many arms it made her look too spidery, seemed |
to me.

This young girl kept a scrap-book when she was alive, and
used to paste obituaries and accidents and cases of patient
suffering in it out of the Presbyterian Observer, and write
poetry after them out of her own head. It was very good
poetry. This is what she wrote about a boy by the name of
Stephen Dowling Bots that fell down a well and was drownded:

OpE TO STEPHEN DowLinc Bots, DEc’b.

And did young Stephen sicken,
And did young Stephen die ?

And did the sad hearts thicken,
And did the mourners cry?

No; such was not the fate of
Young Stephen Dowling Bots;
Though sad hearts round him thickened,
’Twas not from sickness’ shots.

No whooping-cough did rack his frame,
Nor measles drear, with spots;

Not these impaired the sacred name
Of Stephen Dowling Bots.

Despised love struck not with woe
That head of curly knots,

Nor stomach troubles laid him low,
Young Stephen Dowling Bots.

Ono. Then list with tearful eye,
Whilst I his fate do tell.

His soul did from this cold world fly,
By falling down a well.

They got him out and emptied him;
Alas it was too late;

His spirit was gone for to sport aloft
In the realms of the good and great.
124 THE ADVENTURES OF

If Emmeline Grangerford could make poetry like that be-
fore she was fourteen, there ain’t no telling what she could a
done by-and-by. Buck said she could rattle off poetry like
nothing. She didn’t ever have to stop to think. He said
she would slap down a line, and if she couldn’t find anything
to rhyme with it she would just scratch it out and slap down
another one, and go ahead. She warn’t particular, she could
write about anything you choose to give her to write about,
just so it was sadful. Every time a man died, or a woman
died, or a child died, she would be on hand with her * trib-
ute”? before he was cold. She called them tributes. The
neighbors said it was the doctor first, then Emmeline, then
the undertaker—the undertaker never got in ahead of Emme-
line but once, and then she hung fire on a rhyme for the dead
person’s name, which was Whistler. She warn’t ever the
same, after that; she never complained, but she kind of pined
away and did not live long. Poor thing, many’s the time I
made myself go up to the little room that used to be hers
and get out her poor old scrap-book and read in it when her
pictures had been aggravating me and I had soured on her a
little. I liked all that family, dead ones and all, and warn’t
going to let anything come between us. Poor Emmeline
made poetry about all the dead people when she was alive,
and it didn’t seem right that there warn’t nobody to make
some about her, now she was gone; so I tried to sweat out a
verse or two myself, but I couldn’t seem to make it go, some-
how. They kept Emmeline’s room trim and nice and ail the
things fixed in it just the way she liked to have them when
she was alive, and nobody ever slept there. The old lady
took care of the room herself, though there was plenty of
niggers, and she sewed there a good deal and read her Bible
there, mostly.

Well, as I was saying about the parlor, there was beautiful
curtains on the windows: white, with pictures painted on them,
of castles with vines all down the walls, and cattle coming
down to drink. There was a little old piano, too, that had
tin pans in it, I reckon, and nothing was ever so lovely as to
hear the young ladies sing, “The Last Link is Broken” and
play “The Battle of Prague” on it. The walls of all the
rooms was plastered, and most had carpets on the floors, and
the whole house was whitewashed on the outside.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 125

It was a double house, and the big open place betwixt them
was roofed and floored, and sometimes the table was set there
in the middle of the day, and it was a cool, comfortable place.
Nothing couldn’t be better. And warn’t the cooking good,
and just bushels of it too!

















































































































a = : =
Se =e, See SS eee = —— ee

set & ee ENG RS RS:
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THE HOUSE.
126 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XVIII.

OL. GRANGERFORD was a gentleman, you see. He
was a gentleman all over; and so was his family. He
was well born, as the saying is, and that’s worth as much ina
man as it is in a horse, so the Widow Douglass said, and no-
body ever denied that she was of the first aristocracy in our
town; and pap-he always said it, too, though he warn’t no
more quality than a mud-cat, himself. Col. Grangerford was
very tall and very slim, and had a darkish-paly complexion,
not a sign of red in it anywheres; he was clean-shaved every
morning, all over his thin face, and he had the thinnest kind
of lips, and the thinnest kind of nostrils, and a high nose,
and heavy eyebrows, and the blackest kind of eyes, sunk so
deep back that they seemed like they was looking out of cav-
erns at you, as you may say. His forehead was high, and
his hair was black and straight, and hung to his shoulders.
His hands was long and thin, and every day of his life he put
on a clean shirt and a full suit from head to foot made out
of linen so white it hurt your eyes to look at it; and on Sun-
days he wore a blue tail-coat with brass buttons on it. He
carried a mahogany cane with a silver head to it. There
warn’t no frivolishness about him, not a bit, and he warn’t
ever loud. He was as kind as he could be—you could feel
that, you know, and so you had confidence. Sometimes he
smiled, and it was good to see; but when he straightened
himself up like a liberty-pole, and the lightning begun to
flicker out from under his eyebrows you wanted to climb a
tree first, and find out what the matter was afterwards. He
didn’t ever have to tell anybody to mind their manners—
everybody was always good mannered where he was. Every-
body loved to have him around, too; he was sunshine most
always—I mean he made it seem like good weather. When
he turned into a cloud-bank it was awful dark for a half a
minute and that was enough; there wouldn’t nothing go wrong
again for a week.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 127

When him and the old lady come down in the morning, all
the family got up out of their chairs and give them good-day,
and didn’t set down again till they had set down. Then Tom
and Bob went to the sideboard where the decanters was, and
mixed a glass of bitters and handed it to him, and he held it
in his hand and waited till Tom’s and Bob’s was mixed, and
then they bowed and said “ Our duty to you, sir, and madam;”’
and ¢hey bowed the least bit in the world and said thank you,
and so they drank, all three, and Bob and Tom poured a
spoonful of water on the sugar and the mite of whisky or
apple brandy in the bottom of their tumblers, and give it to
me and Buck, and we drank to the old people too.

Bob was the oldest, and Tom next. Tall, beautiful men
with very broad shoulders and brown faces, and long black
hair and black eyes. They dressed in white linen from head
to foot, like the old gentleman, and wore broad Panama hats.

Then there was Miss Charlotte, she was twenty-five, and
tall and proud and erand, but as good as she could be, when
she warn’t stirred up; but when she was, she had a look that
would make you wilt in your tracks, like her father. She was
beautiful.

So was her sister, Miss Sophia, but it was a different kind.
She was gentle and sweet, like a dove, and she was only
twenty.

Each person had their own nigger to wait on them—Buck,
too. My nigger had a monstrous easy time, because I warn’t
used to having anybody do anything for me, but Buck's was
on the jump most of the time.

This was all there was of the family, now ; but there used
to be more—three sons; they got killed; and Emmeline
that died.

The old gentleman owned a lot of farms, and over a hun-
dred niggers. Sometimes a stack of people would come
there, horseback, from ten or fifteen mile around, and stay
five or six days, and have such junketings round about and
on the river, and dances and picnics in the woods, day-
times, and balls at the house, nights. These people was mostly
kin-folks of the family. The men brought their guns with
them. It was a handsome lot of quality, I tell you.

There was another clan of aristocracy around there—five
or six families—mostly of the name of Shepherdson. They
128 THE ADVENTURES OF

was as high-toned, and well born, and rich and grand, as the
tribe of Grangerfords. The Shepherdsons and Grangerfords
used the same steamboat landing, which was about two mile
above our house ; so sometimes when I went up there witha
lot of our folks I used to seea lot of the Shepherdsons there,
on their fine horses.

One day Buck and me was away out in the woods, hunting,
and heard a horse coming. We was crossing the road. Buck
says:

“ Quick! Jump for the woods !’’

We done it, and then peeped down the woods through the
leaves. Pretty soon a splendid young man come galloping
down the road,’setting his horse easy and looking like a
soldier. He had his gun across his pommel. I had seen
him before. It was young Harney Shepherdson. I heard
Buck’s gun go off at my ear, and Harney’s hat tumbled off
from his head. He grabbed his gun and rode straight to
the place where we was hid. But we didn’t wait. We start-
ed through the woods on a run. The woods warn’t thick,
so I looked over my shoulder, to dodge the bullet, and twice
I seen Harney cover Buck with his gun; and then he rode
away the way he come—to get his hat, I reckon, but I
couldn’t see. We never stopped running till we got home.
The old gentleman’s eyes blazed a minute—’twas pleasure,
mainly, I judged—then his face sort of smoothed down, and
he says, kind of gentle:

“‘T don’t like that shooting from behind a bush. Why
didn’t you step into the road, my boy?”

“The Shepherdsons don’t, father. They always take ad-
vantage.”

Miss Charlotte she held her head up like a queen while
Buck was telling his tale, and her nostrils spread and her
eyes snapped. The two young men looked dark, but never
said nothing. Miss Sophia she turned pale, but the color
come back when she found the man warn’t hurt.

Soon as I could get Buck down by the corn-cribs under
the trees by ourselves, I says:

“Did you want to kill him, Buck ?’”’

‘Well, I bet I did.”

“What did he do to you?”

“Him? He never done nothing to me.”
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 129

“Well, then, what did you want to kill him for?”

“‘ Why nothing—only it’s on account of the feud.”

“What's a feud?”

“Why, where was you raised? Don’t you know what a
feud is?”

“Never heard of it before—tell me about it.”

“‘Well,”’ says Buck, “a feud is this way. A man has a
quarrel with another man, and kills him; then that other
man’s brother kills Azm_; then the other brothers, on both
sides, goes for one another ; then the cousizs chip in—and by-
and-by everybody’s killed off, and there ain’t no more feud.
But it’s kind of slow, and takes a long time.”

‘Has this one been going on long, Buck?”

“Well I should reckon! it started thirty year ago, or
som’ers along there. There was trouble *bout something
and then a lawsuit to settle it; and the suit went agin one
of the men, and so he up and shot the man that won the suit—
which he would naturally do, of course. Anybody would.”

‘What was the trouble about, Buck ?—land?”

“T reckon maybe—I don’t know.”

“Well, who done the shooting ?—was ita Grangerford or a
Shepherdson?”’ A

“ Laws, how do / know? it was so long ago.”

“‘ Don’t anybody know?”

“Oh, yes, pa knows, I reckon, and some of the other old
people ; but they don’t know, now, what the row was about
in the first place.”

“ Has there been many killed, Buck?”

“Yes—right smart chance of funerals. But they don’t
always kill. Pa’s got a few buck-shot in him; but he don’t
mind it ’cuz he don’t weigh much, anyway. Bob’s been
carved up some with a bowie, and Tom’s been hurt once or
twice.””

_ «Has anybody been killed this year, Buck?”

“Ves, we got one and they got one. ’Bout three months
ago, my cousin Bud, fourteen year old, was riding through
the woods, on t’other side of the river, and didn’t have no
weapon with him, which was blame’ foolishness, and in a
lonesome place he hears a horse a-coming behind him, and
sees old Baldy Shepherdson a-linkin’ after him with his gun
in his hand and his white hair a-flying in the wind; and ’stead

9
130 THE ADVENTURES OF

of jumping off and taking to the brush, Bud ’lowed he could
outrun him; so they had it, nip and tuck, for five mile or
more, the old man a-gaining all the time ; so at last Bud seen
it warn’t any use, so he stopped and faced around so as to
have the bullet holes in front, you know, ‘and the old man he
rode up and shot him down. But he didn’t git much chance
to enjoy his luck, for inside of a week our folks laid him.
out.”

*T reckon that old man was a coward, Buck.”

“T reckon he warn’ta coward. Not by a blame’ sight.
There ain’t a coward amongst them Shepherdsons—not a
one. And there ain’t no cowards amongst the Grangerfords,
either. Why, that old man kep’ up his end in a fight one
day, for a half an hour, against three Grangerfords, and
come out winner. They was all a-horseback ; he lit off of
his horse and got behind a little wood-pile, and kep’ his horse
before him to stop the bullets; but the Grangerfords staid
on their horses and capered around the old man, and pep-
pered away at him, and he peppered away at them. Him
and his horse both went home pretty leaky and crippled, but
the Grangerfords had to be fetched home—and one of ’em
was dead, and another died the next day. No, sir, ifa body’s
out hunting for cowards, he don’t want to fool away any
time amongst them Shepherdsons, becuz they don’t breed
any of that Rind.”

Next Sunday we all went to church, about three mile,
everybody a-horseback. The men took their guns along, so
did Buck, and kept them between their knees or stood them
handy against the wall. The Shepherdsons done the same.
It was pretty ornery preaching—all about brotherly love, and
such-like tiresomeness ; but everybody said it was a good
sermon, and they all talked it over going home, and had such
a powerful lot to say about faith, and good works, and free
grace, and preforeordestination, and I don’t know what all,
that it did seem to me to be one of the roughest Sundays I
had run across yet.

Abont an hour after dinner everybody was dozing around,
some in their chairs and some in their rooms, and it got to
be pretty dull. Buck and a dog was stretched out on the
grass in the sun, sound asleep. I went up to our room, and
judged I would take a nap myself. I found that sweet Miss
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 131

Sophia standing in her door, which was next to ours, and she
took me in her room and shut the door very soft, and asked
me if I liked her, and I said I did; and she asked me if I
would do something for her and not tell anybody, and I said
I would. Then she said she’d forgot her Testament, and
left it in the seat at church, between two other books and
would I slip out quiet and go there and fetch it to her, and
not say nothing to nobody. I said I would. So I slid out
and slipped off up the road, and there warn’t anybody at the
church, except maybe a hog or two, for there warn’t any lock
on the door, and hogs likes a puncheon floor in summer-time
because it’s cool. If you notice, most folks don’t go to
church only when they’ve got to; but a hog is different.

Says I to myself something’s up—it ain’t natural for a girl
to be in such a sweat about a Testament; so I give it a shake,
and out drops a little piece of paper with ‘‘ Malf-past two”
wrote on it with a pencil. I ransacked it, but couldn’t find
anything else. I couldn’t make anything out of that, so I
put the paper in the book again, and when I got home and
up stairs, there was Miss Sophia in her door waiting for me.
She pulled me in and shut the door; then she looked in the
Testament till she found the paper, and as soon as she read
it she looked glad; and before a body could think, she grab-
bed me and give me a squeeze, and said I was the best boy
in the world, and not to tell anybody. She was mighty red
in the face, for a minute, and her eyes lighted upand it made
her powerful pretty. I wasa good deal astonished, but when
I got my breath I asked her what the paper was about, and
she asked me if I had read it, and I said no, and she asked
me if I could read writing, and I told her “no, only coarse-
hand,” and then she said the paper warn’t anything but a
book-mark to keep her place, and I might go and play now.

I went off down to the river, studying over this thing, and
pretty soon J noticed that my nigger was following along be-
hind. When we was out of sight of the house, he looked
back and around a second, and then comes a-running, and
says:

‘““Mars Jawge, if you’ll come down into de swamp, I'll
show you a whole stack o’ water-moccasins.”

Thinks I, that’s mighty curious; he said that yesterday.
Ho oughter know a body don’t love water-moccasins enough
132 THE ADVENTURES OF

to go around hunting for them. What is he up to anyway?
So I says—

“ A)l right, trot ahead.”

I followed a half a mile, then he struck out over the swamp
and waded ankle deep as much as another half mile. We
come to a little flat piece of land which was dry and very
thick with trees and bushes and vines, and he says—

“You shove right in dah, jist a few steps, Mars Jawge,
dah’s whah dey is. I’s seed ’m befo’, I don’t k’yer to see
‘em no mo’.”

Then he slopped right along and went away, and pretty
soon the trees hid him. I poked into the place a-ways and
come to a little open patch as big as a bedroom, all hung
around with vines, and found a man laying there asleep—
and by jings it was my old Jim!

I waked him up, and I reckoned it was going to bea grand
surprise to him to see me again, but it warn’t. He nearly
‘cried, he was so glad, but he warn’t surprised. Said he swum
along behind me, that night, and heard me yell every time,
but dasn’t answer, because he didn’t want nobody to pick Aim
up, and take him into slavery again. Says he—

“J got hurt a little, en couldn’t swim fas’, so I wuza con-
sidable ways behine you, towards de las’; when you landed
I reck’ned I could ketch up wid you on de lan’ ’dout havin’
to shout at you, but when I see dat house I begin to go slow.
I ’uz off too fur to hear what dey say to you—I wuz ’fraid
o’ de dogs—but when it ’uz all quiet agin, I knowed you/s in
de house, so I struck out for de woods to wait for day. Early
in de mawnin’ some er de niggers come along, gwyne to de
fields, en dey tuck me en showed me dis place, whah de
dogs can’t track me on accounts o’ de water, en dey brings
me truck to eat every night, en tells me how you's a gitt’n
along.”

“Why didn’t you tell my Jack to fetch me here sooner,
Jim?”

“Well, ’twarn’t no use to ’sturb you, Huck, tell we could
do sumfn—but we’s all right, now. I ben a-buyin’ pots en
pans en vittles, as I got a chanst, en a patchin’ up de raf’,
nights, when——”

“ What raft, Jim?”

“ Our ole raf’,”
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 133

“You mean to say our old raft warn’t smashed all to flin-
ders?”

‘No, she warn’t. She was tore up a good deal—one en’
of her was—but dey warn’t no great harm done, on’y our
traps was mos’ all los’. Ef we hadn’ dive’ so deep en swum
so fur under water, en de night hadn’ ben so dark, en we
warn’t so sk’yerd, en ben sich punkin-heads, as de sayin’ is,
we'd a seed de raf’. But it’s jis’ as well we didn’t, ’kase now
she’s all fixed up agin mos’ as good as new, en we’s gotanew
lot o’ stuff, too, in de place o’ what ’uz los’.”’

“Why, how did you get hold of the raft again, Jim—did
you catch her?”

“How I gwyne to ketch her, en I out in de woods? No,
some er de niggers foun’ her ketched on a snag, along heah
in de ben’, en dey hid her in a crick, ’mongst de willows, en
dey wuz so much jawin’ ’bout which un ’um she b’long to de
mos’, dat I come to heah "bout it pooty soon, so I ups en set-
tles de trouble by tellin’ *um she don’t b’long to none uv um,
but to you en me; en J ast’m if dey gwyne to grab a young
white genlman’s propaty, en git a hid’n for it? Den I gin
’m ten cents apiece, en dey ’uz mighty well satisfied, en wisht
some mo’ raf’s ’ud comé along en make ’mrich agin.. Dey’s
mighty good to me, dese niggers is, en whatever I wants ’m
to do. fur me, I doan’ have to ast’m twice, honey. Dat
Jack’s a good nigger, en pooty smart.”

«Yes, he is, He ain’t ever told me you was here; told
me to come, and he’d show me a lot of water-moccasins. If
anything happens, Ze ain’t mixed up in it. He can say he
never seen us together, and it'll be the truth.”

I don’t want to talk much about the next day. I reckon
Til cut it pretty short. I waked up about dawn, and was
agoing to turn over and goto sleep again, when I noticed
how still it was—didn’t seem to anybody stirring. That
warn’t usual. Next I noticed that Buck was up and gone.
Well, I gets up, a-wondering, and goes down stairs—nobody
around; everything as still as a mouse. Just the same out-
side; thinks I, what does it mean? Down by the wood-pile
I comes across my Jack, and says:

“What's it all about?”

Says he:

“ Don’t you know, Mars Jawge?”’
134. THE ADVENTURES OF

“No,” says I, “I don’t.”

ts Well, den, Miss Sophia’s run off! ’deed she has. She
run off in de night, sometime—nobody don’t know jis’ when
—run off to git married to dat young Harney Shepherdson,
you know—leastways, so dey ’spec. De fambly foun’ it out,
*bout half an hour ago—maybe a little mo’—en’ I ze you
dey warn’t no time los’. Sich another hurryin’ up guns en
hosses you never see! De women folks has gone for to stir
up de relations, en ole Mars Saul en de boys tuck dey guns
en rode up de river road for to try to ketch dat young man
en kill him ’fo’he kin git acrost de river wid Miss Sophia. I
reck’n dey’s gwyne to be mighty rough times.”

“ Buck went off ’thout waking me up.”

“Well I reck’n he did/ Dey warn’t gwyne to mix you up
in it. Mars Buck he loaded up his gun en ‘lowed he’s gwyne
to fetch home a Shepherdson or bust. Well, dey’ll be plenty
un ’m dah, I reck’n, en you bet you he’ll fetch one ef he gits
a chanst.”

I took up the river road as hard as I could put. By-and-
by I begin to hear guns a good ways off. When I come in
sight of the log store and the wood-pile where the steam-
boats lands, I worked along under the trees and brush till I
got to a good place, and then I clumb up into the forks of a
cotton-wood that was out of reach, and watched. There was
a wood-rank four foot high, a little ways in front of the tree,
and first I was going to hide behind that; but maybe it was
luckier I didn’t.

There was four or five men cavorting around on their
horses in the open place before the log store, cussing and yell-
ing, and trying to get atacouple of young chaps that was be-
hind the wood-rank alongside of the steamboat landing—but
they couldn’t come it. Every time one of them showed him-
self on the river side of the wood-pile he got shot at. The
two boys was squatting back to back behind the pile, so they
could watch both ways.

By-and-by the men stopped cavorting around and yelling.
They started riding towards the store; then up gets one of
the boys, draws a steady bead over the wood-rank, and drops
one of them out of his saddle. All the men jumped off of
their horses and grabbed the hurt one and started to carry
him tothe store; and that minute the two boys started on the
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 135

run. They got half-way to the tree I was in before the men
noticed. Then the men see them, and jumped on their
horses and took out after them. They gained on the boys,
but it didn’t do no good, the boys had too good a start; they
got to the wood-pile that was in front of my tree, and slipped
in behind it, and so they had the bulge on the men again.
One of the boys was Buck, and the other was a slim young
chap about nineteen years old.

The men ripped around awhile, and then rode away. As



‘*BEHIND THE WOOD PILE.”

soon as they was out of sight, I sung out to Buck and told
him. He didn’t know what to make of my voice coming out
of the tree, at first. He was awful surprised. He told me
to watch out sharp and let him know when the men come in
sight again; said they was up to some devilment or other—
wouldn’t be gone long. I wished I was out of that tree, but
I dasn’t come down. Buck begun to cry and rip, and ‘lowed
that him and his cousin Joe (that was the other young chap)
would make up for this day, yet. He said his father and his
136 THE ADVENTURES OF

two brothers was killed, and two or three of the enemy.

Said the Shepherdsons laid for them, in ambush. Buck said

his father and brothers ought to waited for their relations—

the Shepherdsons was too strong for them. I asked him

what was become of young Harney and Miss Sophia. He

said they’d got across the river and was safe. I was glad of
that; but the way Buck did take on because he didn’t manage
to kill Harney that day he shot at him—I hain’t ever heard
anything like it.

All of a sudden, bang! bang! bang! goes three or four
guns—the men had slipped around through the woods and
come in from behind without their horses! The boys jump-
ed for the river—both of them hurt—and as they swum down
the current the men run along the bank shooting at them and
singing out, ‘ Kill them, kill them!” It made me so sick I
most fell out of the tree. I ain’t agoing to tell ad/ that happen-
ed—it would make me sick again if I was to do that. I wished
I hadn’t ever come ashore that night, to see.such things. I
ain’t ever going to get shut of them—lots of times I dream
about them.

I staid in the tree till it begun to get dark, afraid to come
down. Sometimes I heard guns away off in the woods; and
twice I seen little gangs of men gallop past the log store with
guns; so I reckoned the trouble was still agoing on. I was
mighty down-hearted; so I made up my mind { wouldn't
ever go anear that house again, because I reckoned I was to
blame, somehow. I judged that that piece of paper meant
that Miss Sophia wasto meet Harney somewheres at half-past
two and run off; and I judged I ought to told her father about
that paper and the curious way she acted, and then maybe
he would a locked her up and this awful mess wouldn’t ever
happened.

When I got down out of the tree, I crept along down the
river bank a piece, and found the two bodies laying in the
edge of the water, and tugged at them till I got them ashore;
then I covered up their faces, and got away as quick as I
could. I cried a little when I was covering up Buck’s face,
for he was mighty good to me.

It was just dark, now. I never went near the house, but
struck through the woods and made fortheswamp. Jim warn’t
on his island, so I tramped off in a hurry for the crick, and
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 137

crowded through the willows, red-hot to jump aboard and
get out of that awful country—the raft was gone! My souls,
but I was scared! I couldn’t get my breath for mosta
minute. Then I raised a yell. from me, says—

« Good lan’! is dat you, honey? Doan’ make no noise.”

It was Jim’s voice—nothing ever sounded so good before.
Irun along the bank a piece and got aboard, and Jim he
grabbed me and hugged me, he was so glad to see me. He
says—

“ Laws bless you, chile, I ’uz right down sho’ you’s dead
agin. Jack’s been heah, he say ‘he reck’n you’s ben shot,
kase you didn’ come home no mo’; so I’s jes’ dis minute a
startin’ de raf’ down towards de mouf er de crick, so’s to be
all ready for to shove out en leave soon as Jack comes agin
en tells me for certain you zs dead. Lawsy, I’s mighty glad
to git you back agin, honey.” =

I says—

“« All right—that’ s mighty good; they won’t find me, and
they'll think TP’ve been killed, and_ floated down the river—
there’s something up there that’ll help them think so—so
don’t you lose no time, Jim, but just. shove off for the big
water as fast as ever you can.”

I never felt easy till the raft was two mile below there and
out in the middle of the Mississippi. Then we hung up our
signal lantern, and judged that we was free and safe once more.
I hadn’t had a bite to eat since yesterday; so Jim he got out
some corn-dodgers and butter milk, and pork and cabbage,
and greens—there ain’t nothing in the world so good, when
it’s cooked right—and whilst I eat my supper we talked, and
had a good time. I was powerful glad to get away from the
feuds, and so was Jim to get away from the swamp. We
said there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places
do seem so cramped up and smothery, but araft don’t. You
feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.


er

138 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XIX.

WO or three days and nights went by; I reckon I might

say they swum by, they slid along so quiet and smooth

and lovely. Here is the way we put in the time. It was a
monstrous big river down there—sometimes a mile and a half
wide; we run nights, and laid up and hid day-times; soon as
night was most gone, we stopped navigating and tied up—
nearly always in the dead water under a tow-head; and then
cut young cotton-woods and willows and hid the raft with
them. Then we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river
and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool off; then we set
down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee
deep, and watched the daylight come. Not a sound, anywheres
—perfectly still—just like the whole world was asleep, only
sometimes the bull-frogs a-cluttering, maybe. The first thing
to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line—
that was the woods on t’other side—you couldn’t make noth-
ing else out; then a pale place in the sky; then more paleness,
spreading around; then the river softened up, away off, and
warn’t black any more, but gray; you could see little
dark spots drifting along, ever so far away—trading scows,
and such things; and long black streaks—rafts; sometimes
you could hear a sweep screaking; or jumbled up voices, it
was so still, and sounds come so far; and by-and-by you could
see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the
streak that there’s a snag there in a swift current which breaks
on it and makes that streak look that way; and you see the
mist curl up off of the water, and the east reddens up, and the
river, and you make out a log cabin in the edge of the woods,
away on the bank on t’other side cf the river, being a wood-
yard, likely, and piled by them cheats so you can throw a dog
through it anywheres; then the nice breeze springs up, and
comes fanning you from over there, so cool and fresh, and
sweet to smell, on account of the woods and the flowers; but
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 139

sometimes not that way, because they’ve left dead fish laying
around, gars, and such, and they do get pretty rank; and next
you've got the full day, and everything smiling in the sun,
and the song-birds just going it!

A little smoke couldn’t be noticed, now, so we would take
some fish off of the lines, and cook up a hot breakfast. And
afterwards we would watch the lonesomeness of the river, and
kind of lazy along, and by-and-by lazy off to sleep. Wake
up, by-and-by, and look to see what done it, and maybe see
a steamboat, coughing along up stream, so far off towards the
other side you couldn’t tell nothing about her only whether
she was a stern-wheel or side-wheel; then for about an hour
there wouldn’t be nothing to hear nor nothing to see—just
solid lonesomeness. Next you’d see a raft sliding by, away
off yonder, and maybe a galoot on it chopping, because they’re
most always doing it on a raft; you’d see the ax flash, and
come down—you don’t hear nothing; you see that ax go up
again, and by the time it’s above the man’s head, then you
hear the £'chunk/—it had took all that time to come over the
water. So we would put in the day, lazying around, listening
to the stillness. Once there was a thick fog, and the rafts and
things that went by was beating tin pans so the steamboats
wouldn’t run over them. A scow ora raft went by so close
we could hear them talking and cussing and laughing—heard
them plain; but we couldn’t see no sign of them; it made you
feel crawly, it was like spirits carrying on that way in the air.
Jim said he believed it was spirits; but I says:

‘¢'No, spirits wouldn’t say, ‘dern the dern fog.’”

Soon as it was night, out we shoved; when we got her out
to about the middle, we let her alone, and let her float wher-
ever the current wanted her to; then we lit the pipes, and
dangled our legs in the water and talked about all kinds of
things—we was always naked, day and night, whenever the
mosquitoes would let us—the new clothes Buck’s folks made
for me was too good to be comfortable, and besides I didn’t
go much on clothes, nohow.

Sometimes we’d have that whole river all to ourselves for
the longest time. Yonder was the banks and the islands,
across the water; and maybe a spark—which was a candle in
a cabin winddw—and sometimes on the water you could see
a spark or two—on a raft or a scow, you know; and maybe
140 THE ADVENTURES OF

you could hear a fiddle or a song coming over from one of
them crafts. It’s lovely to liveona raft. We had the sky,
up there, all speckled with stars, and we used to lay on our
backs and look up at them, and discuss about whether they
was made, or only just happened—Jim he allowed they was
made, but I allowed they happened; I judged it would have



SAND DOGS A-COMING.”

took too long to make so many. Jim said the moon could a
laid them; well, that looked kind of reasonable, so I didn’t
say nothing against it, because I’ve seen a frog lay most as
many, so of course it could be done. We used to watch the
stars that fell, too, and see them streak down. Jim allowed
they’d got spoiled and was hove out of the nest.
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. I4t

Once or twice of a night we would see a steamboat slipping
along in the dark, and now and then she would belch a whole
world of sparks up out of her chimbleys, and they would rain
down in the river and look awful pretty; then she would turn
a corner and her lights would wink out and her pow-wow shut
off and leave the river still again; and by-and-by her waves
would get to us, a long time after she was gone, and joggle
the raft a bit, and after that you wouldn’t hear nothing for
you couldn’t tell how long, except maybe frogs or something.

After midnight the people on shore went to bed, and then
for two or three hours the shores was black—no more sparks
in the cabin windows. These sparks was our clock—the first
one that showed again meant morning was coming, so we
hunted a place to hide and tie up, right away.

One morning about day-break, I found a canoe and crossed
over a chute to the main shore—it was only two hundred
yards—and paddled about a mile up a crick amongst the
cypress woods, to see if I couldn’t get some berries. Just as
I was passing a place where a kind of a cow-path crossed the
crick, here comes a couple of men tearing up the path as tight
as they could foot it. I thought I was a goner, for whenever
anybody was after anybody I judged it was me—or maybe
Jim. Iwas about to dig out from there in a hurry, but they
was pretty close to me then, and sung out and begged me to
save their lives—said they hadn’t been doing nothing, and was
being chased for it—said there was men and dogs a-coming.
They wanted to jump right in, but I says— |

“Don’t you do it. I don’t hear the dogs and horses yet;
you’ve got time to crowd through the brush and get up the
crick a little ways; then you take to the water and wade down
to me and get in—that’ll throw the dogs off the scent.”

They done it, and soon as they was aboard I lit out for our
tow-head, and in about five or ten minutes we heard the dogs
and the men away off, shouting. We heard them come along
towards the crick, but couldn’t see them; they seemed to stop
and fool around a while; then, as we got further and further
away all the time, we couldn’ t hardly hear them at all; by the
time we had left a mile of woods behind us and struck the
river, everything was quiet, and we paddled over to the tow-
head and hid in the cotton-woods and was safe.

One of these fellows was about seventy, or upwards, and
142 THE ADVENTURES OF

had a bald head and very gray whiskers. He had an old bat-
tered-up slouch hat on, and a greasy blue woolen shirt, and
ragged old blue jeans britches stuffed into his boot tops, and
home-knit galluses—no, he only had one. He had an old
long-tailed blue jeans coat with slick brass buttons, flung over
his arm, and both of them had big fat ratty-looking carpet-
bags.

The other fellow was about thirty and dressed about as
ornery. After breakfast we all laid off and talked, and the
first thing that come out was that these chaps didn’t know
one another.

“What got you into trouble?” says the baldhead to t’other
chap.

“Well, I’d been selling an article to take the tartar off the
teeth—and it does take it off, too, and generly the enamel
along with it—but I staid about one night longer than I ought
to, and was just in the act of sliding out when I ran across
you on the trail this side of town, and you told me they were
coming, and begged me to help you to get off. So I told you
I was expecting trouble myself and would scatter out wth

ou. That’s the whole yarn—what's yourn?”

“Well, I’d ben a-runnin’ a little temperance revival thar,
*bout a week, and was the pet of the women-folks, big and
little, for I was makin’ it mighty warm for the rummies, I ¢e//
you, and takin’ as much as five or six dollars a night—ten
cents a head, children and niggers free—and business a growin’
all the time; when somehow or another a little report got
around, last night, that I had a way of puttin’ in my time
with a private jug, on the sly. A nigger rousted me out this
mornin’, and told me the people was getherin’ on the quiet,
with their dogs and horses, and they’d be along pretty soon
and give me ‘bout half an hour’s start, and then run me down,
if they could; and if they got me they’d tar and feather me
and ride me ona rail, sure. I didn’t wait for no breakfast—
I warn’t hungry.”

“ Old man,” says the young one, “ I reckon we might double-
. team it together; what do you think?”

“T ain’t undisposed.. What’s your line—mainly ?”

“Jour printer, by trade; do a little in patent medicines;
theatre-actor—tragedy, you know; take a turn to mesmerism
and phrenology when there’s a chance; teach singing-geog-
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 143

raphy school for a change; sling a lecture, sometimes—oh, I
do lots of things—most anything that comes handy, so it ain’t
work. What’s your lay?”

“T’ve done considerble in the doctoring way in my time.
Layin’ on o’ hands is my best holt—for cancer and paralysis,
and sich things; and I k’n tell a fortune pretty good, when
I’ve got somebody along to find out the facts for me. Preach-



“*BY RIGHTS I AM A DUKE!”

in’s my line, too; and workin’ camp-meetin’s ; and mission-
aryin’ around.”

Nobody never said anything for awhile; then the young
man hove a sigh and says—

“ Alas 1’?

“ What ’re you alassin’ about?’’ says the baldhead.
144 THE ADVENTURES OF

“‘To think I should have lived to be leading such a life,
and be degraded down into such company.” And he begun
to, wipe the corner of his eye with a rag.

“ Dern your skin, ain’t the company good enough for you ?”
says the baldhead, pretty pert and uppish.

“Ves, it z good enough for me ; it’s as good as I deserve;
for who fetched me so low, when I was so high? J did my-
self. I don’t blame you, gentlemen—far from it; I don’t
blame anybody. I deserveit all. Let the cold world do its
worst ; one thing I know—there’s a grave somewhere for me.
The world may go on just as its always done, and take
everything from me—loved ones, property, everything—but
it can’t take that. Some day J’ll lie down in it and forget it
all, and my poor broken heart will be at rest.” He went on
a-wiping.

“ Drot your pore broken heart,’’ says the baldhead ; “ what
are you heaving your pore broken heart at us f’r? We hain’t
done nothing.”

“No, I know you haven’t. Iain’t blaming you, gentle-
men. I brought myself down—yes, I did it myself. It’s
right I should suffer—perfectly right—I don’t make any
moan.”

“Brought you down from whar? Whar was you brought
down from?”

“ Ah, you would not believe me; the world never believes
—let it pass—’tis no matter. The secret of my birth-——”’

** The secret of your birth! Do you mean to say: a

“ Gentlemen,” says the young man, very solemn, “TI will
reveal it to you, for I feel I may have confidence in you.
By rights I am a duke!”

Jim’s eyes bugged out when he heard that; and I reckon
mine did, too. Then the baldhead says: “No! you can’t
mean it?” 4 ;

‘Yes. My great-grandfather, eldest son of the Duke of
Bridgewater, fled to this country about the end of the last
century, to breathe the pure air of freedom; married here,
and died, leaving a son, his own father dying about the same
time. The second son of the late duke seized the titles and
estates—the infant real duke was ignored. I am the lineal
descendant of that infant—I am the rightful Duke of Bridge-
water; and here am I, forlorn, torn from my high estate,


HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 145

hunted of men, despised by the cold world, ragged, worn,
heart-broken, and degraded to the companionship of felons
ona raft!”

Jim pitied him ever so much, and so did I. We tried to
comfort him, but he said it warn’t much use, he couldn’t be
much comforted; said if we was a mind to acknowledge him,



‘““y AM THE LATE DAUPHIN.”

that would do him more good than most anything else; so
we said. we would, if he would tell us how. He said we ought
to bow, when we spoke to him, and say ‘‘ Your Grace,” or
“¢My Lord,” or “ Your Lordship ”—and he wouldn’t mind it
if we called him plain “ Bridgewater,’’ which he said was a
title, anyway, and not aname; and one of us ought to wait on
him at dinner, and do any little thing for him he wanted done.

Well, that was all easy, so we done it. All through dinner

10
146 THE ADVENTURES OF

Jim stood around and waited on him, and says, “ Will yo’
Grace have some o’ dis, or some o’ dat?” and so on, and a
body could see it was mighty pleasing to him.

But the old man got pretty silent, by-and-by—didn’t have
much to say, and didn’t look pretty comfortable over all that
petting that was going on around that duke. He seemed to
have something on his mind. So, along in the afternoon,
he says:

“Looky here, Bilgewater,” he says, “I’m nation sorry for
you, but you ain’t the only person that’s had troubles like
that.”

“No?”

“No, you ain’t. You ain’t the only person that’s ben
snaked down wrongfully out’n a high place.”

“ Alas!”

“No, you ain’t the only person that’s had a secret of his
birth.”” And by jings, Ze begins to cry.

“ Hold! What do you mean?”

“ Bileewater, kin I trust you?” says the old man, still sort
of sobbing.

“To the bitter death!”’ He took the old man by the hand
and squeezed it, and says, “The secret of your being: speak!”

“ Bilgewater, I am the late Dauphin!”

You bet you Jim and me stared, this time. Then the
duke says:

“You are what?”

“Yes, my friend, it is too true—your eyes is lookin’ at this.
very moment on the pore disappeared Dauphin, Looy the
Seventeen, son of Looy the Sixteen and Marry Antonette.”’

“You! At your age! No! You mean you're the late
Charlemagne; you must be six or seven hundred years old,
at the very least.”

“Trouble has done it, Bilgewater, trouble has done it;
trouble has brung these gray hairs and this premature baldi-
tude. Yes, gentlemen, you see before you, in blue jeans and
misery, the wanderin’, exiled, trampled-on and sufferin’ right-
ful King of France.”

Well, he cried and took on so, that me and Jim didn’t
know hardly what to do, we was so sorry—and so glad and
proud we’d got him with us, too. So we set in, like we done
before with the duke, and tried to comfort 47m. But he said
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 147

it warn’t no use, nothing but to be dead and done with it all
could do him any good; though he said it often made him
feel easier and better for a while if people treated him accord-
ing to his rights, and got down on one knee to speak to him,
and always called him “‘ Your Majesty,” and waited on him
first at meals, and didn’t set down in his presence till he ask-
ed them. So Jim and me set to majestying him, and doing
this and that and t’other for him, and standing up till he told
us we might set down. This done him heaps of good, and
so he got cheerful and comfortable. But the duke kind of
soured on him, and didn’t look a bit satisfied with the way
things was going; still, the king acted real friendly towards
him, and said the duke’s great-grandfather and all the other
Dukes of Bilgewater was a good deal thought of by 27s father
and was allowed to come to the palace considerable; but the
duke staid huffy a good while, till by-and-by the king says:

‘Like as not we got to be together a blamed long time, on
this h-yer raft, Bilgewater, and so what’s the use o’ your be-
in’ sour? It'll only make things oncomfortable. It ain’t my
fault I warn’t born a duke, it ain’t your fault you warn’t born
a king—so what’s the use to worry? Make the best o’
things the way you find ’em, says I—that’s my motto. This
ain’t no bad thing that we’ve struck here—plenty grub and
an easy life—come, give us your hand, Duke, and less all be
friends.”

The duke done it, and Jim and me was pretty glad to see
it. It took away all the uncomfortableness and we felt
mighty good over it, because it would a been a miserable
business to have any unfriendliness on the raft; for what you
want, above all things, on a raft, is for everybody to be satis-
fied, and feel right and kind towards the others.

It didn’t take me long to make up my mind that these liars
warn’t no kings nor dukes, at all, but just low-down humbugs
and frauds. But I never said nothing, never let on; kept it
to myself; it’s the best way; then you don’t have no quarrels,
and don’t get into no trouble. If they wanted us to call them
kings and dukes, I hadn’t no objections, ’long as it would
keep peace in the family; and it warn’t no use to tell Jim, so
I didn’t tell him. If I never learnt nothing else out of pap,
‘I learnt that the best way to get along with his kind of people
is to let them have their own way.
148 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER XX.

HEY asked us considerable many questions; wanted to

know what we covered up the. raft that way for, and

laid by in the day-time instead of running—was Jim a run-
away nigger? Says I—

“ Goodness sakes, would a runaway nigger run south ?”

No, they allowed he wouldn’t. I had to account for things
some way, so I says:

“My folks was living in Pike County, in Missouri, where I
was born, and they all died off but me and pa and my brother
Ike. Pa, he lowed he’d break up and go down and live with
Uncle Ben, who’s got a little one-horse place on the river,
forty-four mile below Orleans. Pa was pretty poor, and had
some debts; so when he’d squared up there warn’t nothing left
but sixteen dollars and our nigger, Jim. That warn’t enough
to take us fourteen hundred mile, deck passage nor no other
- way. Well, when the river rose, pa had a streak of luck one
day; he ketched this piece of a raft; so we reckoned we'd go
down to Orleans on it. Pa’s luck didn’t hold out; a steam-
boat run over the forrard corner of the raft, one night, and
we all went overboard and dove under the wheel; Jim and me
come up, all right, but pa was drunk, and Ike was only four
years old, so they nevercomeupnomore. Well, forthe next
day or two we had considerable trouble, because people was
always coming out in skiffsand trying to take Jim away from
me, saying they believed he was arunaway nigger. Wedon’t
run day-times no more, now; nights they don’t bother us.”

The duke says—

“ Leave me alone to cipher out a way so we can run in the
day-time if we want to. [Il think the thing over—I’ll invent
a plan that'll fix it. We'll let it alone for to-day, because of
course we don’t want to go by that town yonder in daylight—
it mightn’t be healthy.”

Towards night it begun to darken up and look like rain;
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. 149

the heat lightning was squirting around, low down in the sky,
and the leaves was beginning to shiver—it was going to be
pretty ugly, it was easy tosee that. So the duke and the king
went to overhauling our wigwam, to see what the beds was
like. My bed was a straw tick—better than Jim’s, which was
a corn-shuck tick; there’s always cobs around about in a
shuck tick, and they poke into you and hurt; and when you
roll over, the dry shucks sound like you was rolling over ina
pile of dead leaves; it makes such a rustling that you wake —
up. Well, the duke allowed he would take my bed; but the
king allowed he wouldn’t. He says—

“T should a reckoned the difference in rank would asejested
to you that a corn-shuck bed warn’t just fitten for me to sleep
on. Your Grace’ll take the shuck bed yourself.”

Jim and me was ina sweat again, fora minute, being afraid
there was going to be some more trouble amongst them; so
we was pretty glad when the duke says—

“Tis my fate to be always ground into the mire under the
iron heel of oppression. Misfortune has broken my once
haughty spirit; I yield, I submit; ’tis my fate. I am alone
in the world—let me suffer; I can bear it.”

We got away as soon as it was good and dark. The king
told us to stand well out towards the middle of the river, and
not show a light till we got a long ways below the town. We
come in sight of the little bunch of lights by-and-by—that
was the town, you know—and slid by, about a halfa mile out,
all right. When we was three-quarters of a mile below, we
hoisted up our signal lantern; and about ten o’clock it come
on to rain and blow and thunder and lighten like everything;
so the king told us to both stay on watch till the weather got
better; then him and the duke crawled into the wigwam and
turned in for the night. It was my watch below, till twelve,
but I wouldn’t a turned in, anyway, if ’d had a bed; because
a body don’t see such a storm as that every day in the week,
not by along sight. My souls, how the wind did scream
along! And every second or two there’d come a glare that
lit up the white-caps for a half a mile around, and you'd see the
islands looking dusty through the rain, and the trees thrash-
ing around in the wind; then comes a h-wack /—bum! bum!
bumble-umble-um-bum-bum-bum-bum — and the thunder
would go rumbling and grumbling away, and quit—and then
150 THE ADVENTURES OF

rt comes another flash and another sockdolager. The waves
most washed me off the raft, sometimes, but I hadn’t any
clothes on, and didn’t mind. We didn’t have no trouble
about snags; the lightning was glaring and flittering around
so constant that we could see them plenty soon enough to
throw her head this way or that and miss them.

I had the middle watch, you know, but I was pretty sleepy
by that time, so Jim he said he would stand the first half of it
for me; he was always mighty good, that way, Jim was. I
crawled into the wigwam, but the king and the duke had their
legs sprawled around so there warn’t no show for me; so I
laid outside—I didn’t mind the rain, because it was warm, and
the waves warn’t running so high, now. About two they
come up again, though, and Jim was going to call me, but he
changed his mind because he reckoned they warn’t high
enough yet to do any harm; but he was mistaken about that,
for pretty soon all of a sudden along comes a regular ripper,
and washed me overboard. It most killed Jim a-laughing.
He was the easiest nigger to laugh that ever was, anyway.

I took the watch, and Jim he laid down and snored away;
and by-and-by the storm let up for good and all; and the first
cabin-light that showed, I rousted him out and we slid the
raft into hiding-quarters for the day.

The king got out anold ratty deck of cards, after breakfast,
and him and the duke played seven-up a while, five cents a
game. ‘Then they got tired of it, and allowed they would
“lay out a campaign,’’ as they called it. The duke went
down into his carpet-bag and fetched up a lot of little printed
bills, and read them outloud. One bill said ‘‘ The celebrated
Dr. Armand de Montalban of Paris,’’ would “ lecture on the
Science of Phrenology” at such and such a place, on the
blank day of blank, at ten cents admission, and “furnish
charts of character at twenty-five cents apiece.” The duke
said that was Aim, In another bill he was the ‘world re-
nowned Shaksperean tragedian, Garrick the Younger, of Drury
Lane, London.’’ In other bills he had a lot of other names
and done other wonderful things, like finding water and gold
with a ‘¢ divining rod,” ‘ dissipating witch-spells,’”’ and so on.
By-and-by he says—

‘** But the histrionic muse is the darling. Have you ever
trod the boards, Royalty?”
HUCKLEBERRY FINN. I51I

“No,” says the king.

‘‘You shall, then, before you’re three days older, Fallen
Grandeur,” says the duke. ‘“ The first good town we come
to, we'll hire a hall and do the sword-fight in Richard III.

and the balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet. How does that
strike you?”

a ett









THE KING AS JULIET.

“T’m in, up to the hub, for anything that will pay, Bilge-
water, but you see I don’t know nothing about play-actn’, and
hain’t ever seen much of it. I was too small when pap used
to have ’em at the palace. Do you reckon you can learn
me?”

“ Rasy!”
152 THE ADVENTURES OF

“ All right. I’m jist a freezn’ for something fresh, any-
way. Less commence, right away.”

So the duke he told him all about who Romeo was, and who
Juliet was, and said he was used to being Romeo, so the king
could be Juliet.

“ But if Juliet’s such a young gal, Duke, my peeled head
and my white whiskers is goin’ to look oncommon odd on
her, maybe.”

“No, don’t you worry—these country jakes won’t ever
think of that. Besides, you know, you'll be in costume, and
that makes all the difference in the world; Juliet’s in a bal-
cony, enjoying the