Citation
The story of the robins

Material Information

Title:
The story of the robins designed to teach children the proper treatment of animals
Series Title:
Home circle library
Creator:
Trimmer ( Sarah ), 1741-1810
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Printer )
Camden Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Fredeick Warne & Co.
Manufacturer:
Dalziel Bros. ; Camden Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vii, 213 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Robins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Duty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1891 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Trimmer ; with coloured illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026992400 ( ALEPH )
ALH9245 ( NOTIS )
183690141 ( OCLC )

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Full Text








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— Mawr







THE STORY OF THE ROBINS.







HALAS ily i ih i



ATA















































































































Tue Younc Visirors.—THE CRUEL

Boy.







STORY OF THE ROBINS.

DESIGNED TO TEACH CHILDREN
Che Drover Treatment og Animals,

BY

MRS. TRIMMER.





WITH COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS.

LONDON AND NEW YORK:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO,

—_9-———.



PREFACE.

Tuovucn the children of nearly a century ago first
delighted in the pretty ‘Srory or THE Robins,” it
still holds its place in juvenile literature, and is ever
welcome to the little lovers of birds and other
animals. “ Robin” was, and is, always the children’s
pet, and the sayings and doings of his nestlings can
never cease to interest them. The humane and wise
teaching of the story is not hurt, either, by a little
occasional quaintness, and in offering our young
friends a new edition of this nursery classic, we
think we are conferring on them a boon they will

appreciate.



CONTENTS.

— oe
CHAPTER I.
eaee
HARRIET AND FREDERICK FEEDING THE BIRDS 6 ° 1
CHAPTER II.
MRS. BENSON AND HER CHILDREN AT BREAKFAST.—THE
ROBINS VENTURE UPON THE TEA-TABLE, 5 ; .

CHAPTER III.

THE NESTLINGS FRIGHTENED BY THE GARDENER . . » 29

CHAPTER IV.
JOE THE GARDENER ERINGS NEWS OF THE BIRDS’ NEST TO
HARRIET AND FREDERICK =: . ig . . « 89
CHAPTER Y.

BARRIZT AND FREDERICK VIEWING THE ROBINS’ NEST , . 46

=



Contents.

CHAPTER VL.

PAGE

YHE YOUNG VISITORS,—THE CRUEL BOY 2 ° e 6&4
CHAPTER VII.

THE FIRST FLIGHT OF THE NESTLINGS . ° ° e s 68

CHAPTER VITI:

FREDERICK BisCOVERS THE YOUNG ROBINS IN THE CURRANT
BUSH . 3 Bante 4 ‘ 7 . 3 eee.

CHAPTER IX,

THE VISIT TO MRS, ADDIS'S . : . eee » «6 wd

CHAPTER X,

ADVENTURES OF THE LITRLE ROBINS . « + ¢« «© 210
CHAPTER XI.

THE FEATHERED NEIGHBOURS : e « « ° cok 24

CHAPTER XII.

“THR VISIT ™ THE FARM. z ; : : s - 184

CHAPTER XIll,

THE PIGS AND BEES . . si . ‘ : 2 « 148



Contents.

CHAPTER XIV.

FREDERICK VIEWING THE DUCKS AND GEESE °

CHAPTER XY.

fHe2 AVIARY ° *

CHAPTER XVI.

THE CLD ROBINS TAKE LEAVE OF THEIR YOUNG ONES

CONOLUSION ,



PAGE
163

172

183

207





THE

STORY OF THE ROBINS.

——t0———

CHAPTER I,
HARRIET AND FREDERICK FEEDING THE BIRDS.

In ahole which time had made in a wall covered
with ivy, a pair of redbreasts built their nest. No
place could have been better chosen for the purpose;
it was sheltered from the rain, screened from the
wind, and in an orchard belonging to a gentleman
who had strictly charged his domestics not to destroy
the labours of those little songsters who chose his
ground as an asylum.

Jn this happy retreat, which no idle schoolboy
daved to enter, the hen redbreast laid four eggs, and
then took her seat upon them, resolving that nothing



2 The Story of the Robins.

should tempt her to leave the nest for any length of
time till she had hatched her infant brood. Her
tender mate every morning took her place while she
picked up a hasty breakfast, and often, before he
tasted any food himself, cheered her with a song.

At length the day arrived when the happy mother
heard the chirping of her little ones; with unex-
pressible tenderness she spread her maternal wings to
cover them, threw out the egg-shells in which they
before lay confined, then pressed them to her bosom,
and presented them to her mate, who viewed them
with rapture, and seated himself by her side that he
might share her pleasure.

“We may promise ourselves much delight in
rearing our little family,” said he, “ but it will give us
a great deal of trouble. I would willingly bear the
whole myself, but it will be impossible for me, with
my utmost labour and industry, to supply all our
nestlings with what is sufficient for their daily
support; it will therefore be necessary for you to
leave the nest sometimes to seek provisions for them.”
She declared her readiness to do so, and said that
there would be no necessity for her to be long absent,
as she had discovered a place near the orchard where
food was scattered on purpose for such birds as would
take the pains of seeking it; and that she had been









Ahh
ANY
Se







HARRIET AND FREDERICK FEEDING THE BIRDs.







Feeding the Lrttie Ones. 3





informed by a chaffinch that there was no kind of
danger in picking it up.

“This isa lucky discovery indeed for us,” replied
her mate; “for this great increase of family renders
it prudent to make use of every means for supplying
our necessities. J myself must take a larger circuit,
for some insects that are proper for the nestlings
cannot be found in all places; however, I will bear
you company whenever it is in my power.”

The little ones now began to be hungry, and
opened their gaping mouths for food; on which their
kind father instantly flew forth to find it for them,
and in turns supplied them all, as well as his beloved
mate. This was a hard day’s work, and when even-
ing came on he was glad to take repose, and turning
his head under his wing, he soon fell asleep; his
mate soon followed his example. The four little
ones had before fallen into a gentle slumber, and
perfect quietness for some hours reigned in the nest.

The next morning they were awakened at the dawn
of day by the song of a skylark, which had a nest
near the orchard; and as the young redbreasts were
impatient for food, their father cheerfully prepared
himself to renew his toil, requesting hig mate to
accompany him to the place she had mentioned.
“That I will do,” replied she, “but it is too early yet; _



4 The Story of the Robins.

I must therefore beg that you will go by yourself and
procure a breakfast for us, as I am fearful of leaving
the nestlings before the air is warmer, lest they should
be chilled.” To this he readily consented, and fed all
his little darlings ; to whom, for the sake of distinc-
tion, I shall give the names of Robin, Dicky, Flapsy,
and Pecksy. When this kind office was performed
he perched on a tree, and while he rested, entertained
his family with his melody, till his mate, springing
from the nest, called him to attend her ; on which he
instantly took wing, and followed her to a courtyard
belonging to a family mansion,

No sooner had the happy pair appeared before the
parlour window, than it was hastily thrown up by
Harriet Benson, a little girl about eleven years old,
the daughter of the gentleman and lady to whom the
house belonged. Harriet with great delight called her
brother to see two robin redbreasts ; and she was soon
joined by Frederick, a fine chubby rosy-cheeked boy,
about six years of age, who, as soon as he had taken
apeep atthe feathered strangers, ran to his mamma,
and entreated her to give him something to feed them
with. “I must have a great piece of bread this
morning,” said he, “ for there are all the sparrows and
chaffinches that come every day, and two robin red-
breasts besides.” “Here is a piece for you, Frederick,”



Feeding the Little Ones. 5

replied Mrs. Benson, cutting a loaf that was on the
table; “but if your daily pensioners continue to
increase as they have done lately, we must provide
some other food for them, as it is not. right to cut
pieces from a loaf on purpose for birds, because there
are many children who want bread, to whom we
should give the preference. Would you deprive a
poor little hungry boy of his breakfast to give it to
birds?” No,” said Frederick, “I would sooner give
my own breakfast to a poor boy than he should go
without; but where shall I get food enough for my
birds ? I will beg the cook to save the crumbs in the
bread-pan, and desire John to preserve all he makes
when he cuts the loaf for dinner, and those which are
scattered onthe tablecloth.” “A very good scheme,”
said Mrs. Benson, “and I make no doubt it will
answer your purpose, if you can prevail on the
servants to indulge you. I cannot bear to see the
least fragment of food wasted which may contribute
\o the support of life in any creature.”

Harriet, being quite impatient to exercise her
benevolence, requested her brother to remember that
the poor birds, for whom he had been a successful
solicitor, would soon fly away if he did not make
haste to feed them; on which he ran to the window
with his treasure in his hand,



6 The Stor, of the Robins.



When Harriet first appeared, the winged suppliants
approached with eager expectation of the daily
handful which their kind benefactress made it a
custom to distribute, and were surprised at the delay
of her charity. They hopped around the window—
they chirped—they twittered, and employed all their
little arts to gain attention; and were on the point
of departing, when Frederick, breaking a bit from the
piece he held in his hand, attempted to scatter it
among them, calling out at the same time, “Dicky!
Dicky!” On hearing the well-known sound, the
little flock immediately drew near. Frederick begged
that his sister would let him feed all the birds him-
self; but finding that he could not fling the crumbs
far enough for the redbreasts, who, being strangers,
kept at a distance, he resigned the task, and Harriet,
with dexterous hand, threw some of them to the
very spot where the affectionate pair stood waiting
for her notice, who with grateful hearts picked up
the portion assigned them; and in the meanwhile
the other birds, being satisfied, flew away, and they
were left alone. Frederick exclaimed with rapture
that the two robin redbreasts were feeding; and
Harriet meditated a design of taming them by kind-
ness. “Be sure, my dear brother,” said she, “not to
forget to ask the cook and John for the crumbs, and



Frederick and Harriet. w







do not let the least morsel of anything you have to
eat fall to the ground, I will be careful in respect
of mine, and we will collect all that papa and mamma
crumble; and if we cannot by these means get
enough, I will spend some of my money in grain for
them.” “Oh,” said Frederick, “ I would give all the
money I have in the world to buy food for my dear
dear birds.” “ Hold, my love,” said Mrs. Benson
“though I commend your humanity, I must remind
you again that there are poor people as well as poor
birds.” “Well, mamma,” replied Frederick, “I will
only buy a little grain, then.” As he spoke these
last words, the redbreasts having finished their meal,
the mother bird expressed her impatience to return
to the nest; and having obtained her mate’s consent,
she repaired with all possible speed to her humble
habitation, whilst he tuned his melodious pipe, and —
delighted their young benefactors with his music; he
then spread his wings, and took his flight to an
adjoining garden, where he had a great chance of
finding worms for his family.

Frederick expressed great concern that the robins
were gone; but was comforted by his sister, who
reminded him that in all probability his new favour-
ites, having met with so kind a reception, would

return on the morrow, Mrs. Benson then bid them
2



8 The Story of the Robins.



shut the window; and taking Frederick in her lap,
and desiring Harriet to sit down by her, thus ad-
dressed them :—

“T am delighted, my dear children, with your
humane behaviour towards animals, and wish by all
means to encourage it; but let me recommend to
you not to suffer your tender feelings towards animals
to gain upon you to such a degree as to make you
unhappy or forgetful of those who have a higher
claim to your attention—I mean poor people ; always
keep in mind the distresses which they endure,
and on no account waste any kind of food, nor
give to inferior creatures what is designed for
mankind.”

Harriet promised to follow her mamma’s instruc-
tions ; but Frederick’s attention was entirely engaged
by watching a butterfly, which had just left the
chrysalis, and was fluttering in the window, longing ~
to try its wings in the air and sunshine; this
Frederick was very desirous to catch, but his mamma
would not permit him to attempt it, because, she
told him, he could not well lay hold of its wings
without doing it an injury, and it would be much
happier at liberty. “Should you like, I'rederick,”
said she, “when you are going out to play, to have
anybody lay hold of you violently, scratch you all



The Butterfly. 9





over, then offer you something to eat which is ver
disagreeable, and perhaps poisonous, and shut you
up in a little dark room? And yet this is the fate
to which many a harmless insect is condemned by
thoughtless children.” As soon as Frederick under-
stood that he could not catch the butterfly without
hurting it, he gave up the point, and assured his
mamma he did not want to keep it, but only to
carry it out of doors. “Well,” replied she, “that
end may be answered by opening the window;”
which, at her desire, was done by Harriet: the
happy insect was glad to fly away, and Frederick
had soon the pleasure of seeing it upon a rose.

Breakfast being ended, Mrs. Benson reminded the
children that it was almost time for their lessons to
begin ; but desired their maid to take them into the
garden before they applied to business. During his
walk, Frederick amused himself with watching the
butterfly as it flew from flower to flower, which gave
him more pleasure than he could possibly have
received from catching and confining the little
tender creature.

Let us now see what became of our redbreasts
after they left their young benefactors.

The hen bird, as I informed you, repaired im-
mediately to the nest; her heart fluttered with



10 The Story of the Robins.



apprehension as she entered it, and she eagerly
called out, “Are you all safe, my little dears?”
* All safe, my good mother,” replied Pecksy, “ but a
little hungry, and very cold.” “Well,” said she,
“your last complaint I can soon remove; but in
respect to satisfying your hunger, that must be your
father’s task ; however, he will soon be here, I make
no doubt.” Then spreading her wings over them all,
she soon gave warmth to them, and they were again
comfortable.

In a very short time her mate returned; for he
only stayed at Mr. Benson’s to finish his song and
sip some clear water, which his new friends always
kept where they fed the birds. He brought in his
mouth a worm, which was given to Robin ; and was
going to fetch one for Dicky, but his mate said, “My
young ones are now hatched, and you can keep them
warm as well as myself; take my place, therefore,
and the next excursion shall be mine,” “I consent,”
answered he, “because I think a little flying now
and then will do you good ; but, to save you trouble,
I can direct you to a spot where you may be certain
of finding worms for this morning’s supply.” He then
described the place; and on her quitting the nest he
entered it, and gathered his young ones under his
wings. “Come, my dears,” said he, “let us see what



Learning to Sing. It

kind of a nurse I can make; but an awkward one, I
fear; even every mother bird is not a good nurse, but
you are very fortunate in yours, for she is a most
tender one, and I hope you will be dutiful for hex
kindness.” They all promised him they would.
‘Well, then,” said he, “I will sing you a song.”
He did so, and it was a very merry one, and de-
lighted the nestlings extremely ; so that, though they
were not quite comfortable under his wings, they
did not regard it, nor think the time of their
mother’s absence long. She had not succeeded in the
place she first went to, as a boy was picking up worms
to angle with, of whom she was afraid, and therefore
flew further; but as soon as she had obtained what
she went for, she returned with all possible speed;
and though she had repeated invitations from
- several gay birds which she met to join their sportive
parties, she kept a steady course, preferring the plea-
sure of feeding little Dicky to all the diversions of
the fields and groves. As soon as the hen bird came
near the nest her mate started up to make room for
her, and take his turn of providing for his family.
“ Once more adieu!” said he, and was out of sight in
an instant,
“My dear nestlings,” said the mother, “how do
you do?” “Very well, thank you,” replied all at



12 The Story of the Robins.



once; “and we have been exceedingly merry,” said
Robin, “for my father has sung us a sweet song.”
“T think,” said Dicky, “I should like to learn it.”
“Well,” replied the mother, “he will teach it you, I
dare say ; here he comes, ask him.” “Iam ashamed,”
said Dicky. “Then you are a silly bird. Never be
ashamed but when you commit a fault; asking your
father to teach you to sing is not one; and good
parents delight to teach their young ones everything
that is proper and useful. Whatever so good a father
sets you an example of you may safely desire to imi-
tate.” Then addressing herself to her mate, who for
an instant stopped at the entrance of the nest, that
he might not interrupt her instructions, “Am I not
right,” said she, “in what I have just told them?”
“ Perfectly so,” replied he ; “I shall have pleasure in
teaching them all that is in my power; but we must
talk of that another time. Who is to feed poor
Pecksy ?” “Oh, I, I!” answered the mother, and
was gone in an instant.

“ And so you want to learn to sing, Dicky?” said
the father: “ well, then, pray listen very attentively;
you may learn the notes, though you will not be able
to sing till your voice is stronger.”

Robin now remarked that the song was very pretty
indeed, and expressed his desire to learn it also. “ By



Learning to Sing. 13



all means,” said his father; “I shall sing it very
often, so you may learn it if you please.” “For my
part,” said Flapsy, “I do not think I could have
patience to learn it, it will take so much time.”
“ Nothing, my dear Flapsy,” answered the father, “can
be acquired without patience, and I am sorry to find
yours begin to fail you already; but I hope, if you
have no taste for music, that you will give the greater
application to things that may be of more importance
to you.” “Well,” said Pecksy, “I would apply to
music with all my heart, but I do not believe it
possible for me to learn it.” “Perhaps not,” replied
her father, “but I do not doubt you will apply to
whatever your mother requires of you; and she is an
excellent judge both of your talents and of what is
suitable to your station in life. She is no songstress
herself, and yet she is very clever, I assure you: here
she comes.” Then rising to make room for her,
“Take your seat, my love,” said he, “ and I will perch
upon the ivy.” The hen again covered her brood,
whilst her mate amused her with his singing and
conversation till the evening, excepting that each
parent bird flew out in turn to get food for their
young ones.

In this manner several days passed with little
variation; the nestlings were very thriving, and



14 The Story of the Roozns.





daily gained strength and knowledge, through the
care of their indulgent parents, who every day
visited their friends, the little Bensons. JT rederick
had been successful with the cook and footman,
from whom. he obtained enough for his dear birds, as
he called them, without robbing the poor; and he
was still able to produce a penny whenever his papa
or mamma pointed out to him a proper object of
charity.







CHAPTER II.

MRS, BENSON AND HER CHILDREN AT BREAKFAST.—THE
ROBINS VENTURE UPON THE TEA-TABLE.

Ir happened one day that both the redbreasts, who
always went together to Mrs. Benson’s (because if
one had waited for the other’s return, it would have
missed the chance of being fed),—it happened, I say,
that they were both absent longer than usual, for
their little benefactors, having been fatigued with a
very long walk the evening before, lay late in bed
that morning; but as soon as Frederick was dressed,
his sister, who was waiting for him, took him by the
hand and led him down-stairs, where he hastily asked
the cook for the collection of crumbs. Assoon as he
entered the breakfast-parlour, he ran eagerly to the
window, and attempted to fling it up. “ What is the
cause of this mighty bustle?” said his mamma;





16 The Story of the Robvins,

—_—



‘do you not perceive that I am in the room,
Frederick ?” “Oh, my birds ! my birds!” cried he.
‘OT understand,” rejoined Mrs. Benson, “that you
have neglected to feed your little pensioners; how
came this about, Harriet ?” “We were so tired last
night,” answered Harriet, “that we overslept our-
selves, mamma.” “This excuse may satisfy you and
your brother,” answered the lady, “but I fear your
birds would bring heavy complaints against you,
were they able to talk. But make haste to feed them
now; and for the future, whenever you give any
living creature cause to depend on you for sustenance,
be careful on no account to disappoint it; and if you
are prevented from teas it yourself, eEapOY another
person to do it for you.”

“Tt is customary,’ continued Mrs. Benson, “for
little boys and girls to pay their respects to their
papas and mammas every morning, as soon’ as they
see them. This, Frederick, you ought to have done
to me on entering the parlour, instead of running
across it, crying out, ‘My birds! my birds!’ it would
have taken you but very little time to have done so.
However, I will excuse your neglect now, my dear,
as you did not intend to offend me; but remember,
that you depend as much on your papa and me for
everything you want as these little birds do on you;



















Mrs. BENSON AND HER CHILDREN AT BREAKFAST.—THE
ROBINS VENTURE UPON THE TEA-TABLE.







The Quarrel. 17

nay, more so, for they could find food in other places
but children can do nothing towards their own
. support; they should therefore be dutiful and
respectful to those whose tenderness and care they
constantly experience.”

Harriet promised her mamma that she would on
all occasions endeavour to behave as she wished her
to do; but I am sorry to say Frederick was more
intent on opening the window than imbibing the good
instructions that were given him. This he could
not do; therefore Harriet, with her mamma’s per-
mission, went to his assistance, and the store of
provisions was dispensed. As many of the birds
had nests, they ate their meal with all possible expe-
dition. Among this number were the robins, who
despatched the business as soon as they could, for
the hen was anxious to return to her little ones,
and the cock to procure them a breakfast; and
having given his young friends a song before
they left their bedchambers, he did not think it
necessary to stay to sing any more; they therefore
departed.

When the mother bird arrived at the ivy-wall, she
stopped at the entrance of the nest with a palpitating
heart; but seeing her brood all safe and well, she
hastened to take them under her wings. As soon as



18 The Story of the Robins.

—_— —————.



she was seated she observed thatthey were not so cheer-
ful asusual. ‘“ What is the matter 7” said she ; “ how
have you agreed during my absence?” To these
questions all were unwilling to reply; for the trath
was that they had been quarrelling almost the whole
time. “What! all silent?” said she. “I fear you
have not obeyed my commands, but have been con-
tending. I desire you will tell me the truth.” Robin,
knowing that he was the greatest offender, began to
justify himself before the others could have time to
accuse him,

“JT am sure, mother,” said-he, “I only gave
Dicky a little peck because he crowded me s0;
and all the others joined with him, and fell upon
me at once.”

“Since you have begun, Robin,” answered Dicky,
“TI must speak, for you gave me a very hard peck
indeed and I was afraid you had put out my eye. I
am sure I made all the room I could for you; but
you said you ought to have half the nest, and to be
master when your father and mother were cut, because
you are the eldest.”

“T do not love to tell tales,” said Flapsy, “but
what Dicky says is very true, Robin ; and you plucked
two or three little feathers out of me, only because I
begged you not to use us ill.”



Ine Naughty Robin. 19



* And you set your foot very hard upon me,” cried
Pecksy, “for telling you that you had forgotten your
dear mother’s command.

“ This is a sad story indeed,” said the mother, “I
am very sorry to find, Robin, that you already display
such a turbulent disposition. If you go on in this
manner we shall have no peace in the nest, nor can
T leave it with any degree of satisfaction. As for
your being the eldest, though it makes me show you
a preference on all proper occasions, it does not give
you a privilege to domineer over your brother and
sisters, You are all equally the objects of our
tender care, which we shall exercise impartially
among you, provided you do not forfeit it by bad
behaviour. To show you that you are not master of
the nest, I desire you to get from under my wing, and
sit on the outside, while I cherish those who are
dutiful and good.” Robin, greatly mortified, retired
from his mother; on which Dicky, with the utmost
kindness, began to intercede for him. “Pardon
Robin, my dear mother, I entreat you,” said he; “I
heartily forgive his treatment of me, and would not
have complained to you, had it not been necessary
for my own justification.

“You are a good bird, Dicky,” said his mother,
“but such an offence as this must be repented of



20 The Story of the Robins.

before it is pardoned.” At this instant her mate
returned with a fine worm, and looked as usual for
Tobin, who lay sulking by himself. “Give it,” said
the mother, “to Dicky ; Robin must be served last
this morning; nay, I do not know whether I shall
permit him to have any food all day.” Dicky was
very unwilling to mortify his brother; but on his
mother’s commanding him not to detain his father,
he opened his mouth and swallowed the delicious
mouthful. “What can be the matter?” said the
good father, when he had emptied his mouth; “surely
none of the little ones have been naughty? But I
cannot stop to inquire at present, for I left another
fine worm, which may be gone if I do not make
haste back.”

As soon as he departed, Dicky renewed his en.
treaties that Robin might be forgiven; but as he sat
swelling with anger and disdain, because he fancied
that the eldest should nct be shoved to the outside of
his mother's wing while the others were fed, she would
not hear a word in his behalf. The father soon came
and fed Flapsy, and then, thinking it best for his
mate to continue her admonitions, he flew off again.
During her father’s absence, Pecksy, whose little heart
was full of affectionate concern for the punishment
of her brother, thus attempted tocomfort him:





Robix's Pride, 21

ot oaeiae



“Dear Robin, do not grieve; I will give you my
breakfast, if my mother will let me.” “Oh,” said
Robin, “I do not want any breakfast; if I may not
be served first, I will have none.” “Shall I ask my
mother to forgive you?” said Pecksy. “Ido not want
any of your intercessions,” replied he; “if you had
not been a parcel of ill-natured things, I should not
have been pushed about as I am.”

“Come back, Pecksy,”’ said the mother, who over-
heard them; “I will not have you converse with so
naughty a bird. I forbid every one of you even to go
near him.” The father then arrived, and Pecksy was
fed. “You may rest yourself, my dear,’ said the
mother ; “your morning’s task is ended.” “Why,
what has Robin done?” asked he. “What I am
sorry to relate,” she replied —* quarrelled with his
brother and sisters!” “You surprise me; I could not
have suspected he would have been either so foolish
or sounkind.” “Oh, this is not all,” said the mother,
“for he presumes on being the eldest, and claims
half the nest to himself when we are absent, and now
is sullen because he is disgraced, and is not fed first
as usual,” “If this be the case,” replied the father,
“leave me to settle this business, my dear, and pray
go into the air a little, for you seem to be sadly vexed.”
“T am disturbed,” said she, “I confess; for, after all



22 The Story of the Robins.

my care and kindness, I did not expect such a sad
return as this. Iam sorry to expose this perverse
bird even to you, but he will not be corrected by me.
I will do as you desive, and go into the open air a
little.” So saying, she repaired to a neighbouring
tree, where she anxiously awaited the result of her
mate’s admonition.

As soon as the mother departed, the father thus
addressed the delinquent :—* And so, Robin, you want
to be master of the nest? would make, indeed, who do not know even how to
govern your own temper! I will not stand to talk
much to you now, but depend upon if, I will not
suffer you to use any of the family ill, particularly
your good mother ; and if you persist in obstinacy, I
will certainly turn you out of the nest before you
can fly.” These threatenings intimidated Robin, and
he also began to be very hungry as well as cold; he
therefore promised to behave better for the future,
and his brother and sisters pleaded earnestly
that he might be forgiven and restored to his usual
place.

“ T can say nothing in respect to the last particular,”
feplied the father; “that depends upon his mother;
but as it is his first offence, and he seems to be very
sorry, I will myself pardon it, and intercede for him

~







Robin Forgiven. 23
with his mother.” On this he left the nest to seek
for her. “Return, my dear,” said he, “to your beloved
family ; Robin seems sensible of his offence, and longs
to ask your forgiveness,” Pleased at this intelligence.
the mother raised her drooping head, and closed her
wings, which hung mournfully by her sides, expres-
sive of the dejection of her spirits. “I fly to give it
him,” said she, and hastened into the nest. In the
meanwhile Robin wished for, yet dreaded, her
return,

As goon as he saw her he lifted up a supplicating
eye, and in a weak tone (for hunger and sorrow had
made him faint) he cried, “ Forgive me, dear mother;
I will not again offend you.” “I accept your sub-
mission, Robin,’ said she, “and will once more
receive you to my wing; but indeed your behaviour
has made me very unhappy.” She then made room
for him, he nestled closely to her side, and soon found
the benefit of her fostering heat; but he was still
hungry, yet he had not confidence to ask his father to
fetch him any food; but this kind parent, seeing that
his mother had received him into favour, flew with
all speed to an adjacent field, where he soon met with
a worm, which with tender love *e presented to
Robin, who swallowed it with gratitude. Thus
was peace restored to the nest, and the happy

3

« NN



24 The Story of the Robins.



mother once more rejoiced that harmony reigned in
the family.

A few days after, a fresh disturbance took place.
All the little redbreasts, excepting Pecksy, in turn
committed some fault or other, for which they were
occasionally punished ; but she was of so amiable a
disposition, that it was her constant study to act with
propriety, and avoid giving offence ; on which account
she was justly caressed by her parents with dis-
tinguished kindness. This excited the envy of the
others, and they joined together to treat her ill, giving
her the title of the Favourite; saying that they made
no doubt that their father and mother would reserve
the nicest morsels for their darling.

Poor Pecksy bore all their reproaches with patience,
hoping that she should in time regain their good
opinion by her gentleness and affection. But it hap-
pened one day that, in the midst of their tauntings
their mother unexpectedly returned, who, hearing an
uncommon noise among her young ones, stopped on
the ivy to learn the cause, and as soon as she dis-
covered it, she made her appearance at the entrance
of the nest, with a countenance that showed she
knew what was going on.

“Are these the sentiments,” said she, “that subsist
in a family which ought to be bound together by love











Pecksy’s Kindness. 25



and kindness? Which of you has cause to reproach
either your father or me with partiality? Do we not
with the exactest equality distribute the fruits of our
labours among you? And in what respect has poor
Pecksy the preference, but in that praise which is
justly her due, and which you do not strive to da-
serve? Has she ever yet uttered a complaint against
you ? though, from the dejection of her countenance,
which she in vain attempted. to conceal, it is evident
that she has suffered your reproaches for some days
past. I positively command you to treat her other-
wise, for it is a mother’s duty to succour a persecuted
nestling; and I will certainly admit her next my
heart, and banish you all from that place you have
hitherto possessed in it, if you suffer envy and
jealousy to occupy your bosoms, instead of that
tender love which she, as the kindest of sisters, has
a right to expect from you.”

Robin, Dicky, and Flapsy were quite confounded
by their mother’s reproof; and Pecksy, sorry that
they had incurred the displeasure of so tender a
parent, kindly endeavoured to soften her anger.
“That Ihave been vexed, my dear mother,” said she,
“is true, but not so much as you suppose; and I am
ready to believe that my dear brothers and sister
were not in earnest in the severe things they said of



26 The Story of the Robins.



—_—

me—perhaps they only meant to try my affection.

I now entreat them to believe that I would willingly
resign the greatest pleasure in life, could I by that
means increase their happiness; and so far from
wishing for the nicest morsel, I would content myself
with the humblest fare, rather than any of them
should be disappointed.”

_ This tender speech had its desired effect; it recalled
those sentiments of love which envy and jealousy
had for a time banished; all the nestlings acknow-
edged their faults, their mother forgave them, and a
perfect reconciliation took place, to the great joy of
Pecksy, and indeed of all parties.

All the nestlings continued very good for several
days, and nothing happened worth relating. The
little family were soon covered with feathers, which
their mother taught them to dress, telling them that
neatness was a very essential thing, both for health,
and also to render them agreeable to the eye of the
world.

Robin was a very strong, robust bird, not remark-
able for his beauty, but there was a great briskness
in his manner, which covered many defects, and he
was very likely to attract notice. His father judged,
from the tone of his chirpings, that he would be a
very good songster.





A Lesson from the Birds. 27



Dicky had remarkably fine plumage; his breast
was of a beautiful red, his body and wings of an
elegant mottled brown, and his eyes sparkled like
diamonds.

Flapsy was also very pretty, but more distinguished
for the elegance of her shape than for the variety and
lustre of her feathers.

Pecksy had no outward charms to recommend her
to notice; but these defects were supplied by the
sweetness of her disposition. Her temper was con-
stantly serene, she was ever attentive to the happiness
of her parents, and would not have grieved them for
the world; and her affection for her brothers and
sister was so great, that she constantly preferred their
interest to her own, of which we have lately given
an instance,

The kind parents attended to them with unremitting
affection, and made their daily visit to Frederick and
Harriet Benson, who very punctually discharged the
benevolent office of feeding them. The robin red-
breasts, made familiar by repeated favours, approached
nearer and nearer to their little friends by degrees’
and at length ventured to enter the room and feed
upon the breakfast-table. Harriet was delighted at
this circumstance, and Frederick was quite trans-
ported; he longed to catch the birds, but his mamme



28 The Story of the Robins.

told him that would be the very means to drive them

away. Harriet entreated him not to frighten them on.

any account, and he was prevailed upon to forbear,
but could not help expressing a wish that he had
them in a cage, that he might feed them all day
long.

“And do you really think, Frederick,” said Mrs.
Benson, “that these little delicate creatures are such
gluttons as to desire to be fed all day long? Could
you tempt them to do it, they would soon die; but
they know better, and as soon as their appetites are
satisfied, always leave off eating. Many a little boy
may learn a lesson from them. Do you not recollect
one of your acquaintances, who, if an apple-pie or
anything that he calls nice is set before him, will eat
till he makes himself sick?” Frederick looked
ashamed, being conscious that he was too much
inclined to indulge his love of delicacies. ‘“ Well,”
said his mamma, “I see you understand who I mean,
Frederick, so we will say no more on that subject;
only when you meet with that little gentleman, give
my love to him, and tell him I beg he will be as
moderate as his redbreasts.”





CHAPTER III

THE NESTLINGS FRIGHTENED BY THE GARDENER.

THE cock bird, having finished his breakfast, flew out
at the window, followed by his mate; and as soon as
they were out of sight, Mrs. Benson continued her
discourse :—‘ And would you really confine these
sweet creatures in a cage, Frederick, merely to have
the pleasure of feeding them? Should you like to be
always shut up ina little room, and think it sufficient
if you were supplied with victuals and drink? Is
there no enjoyment in running about, jumping, and
going from place to place? Do you not like to keep’
company with little boys and girls? And is there
no pleasure in breathing the fresh air? Though these
little animals are inferior to you, there is no doubt but
they are capable of enjoyments similar to these ; and
it must he a dreadful life for a poor bird to be shut





30 The Story of the Robins.

up in a cage, where he cannot so much as make use
of his wings, where he is separated from his natural
companions, and where he cannot possibly receive that
refreshment which the air must afford to him when
at liberty to fly to such a height. But this is not all;
for many a poor bird is caught and taken from
its family, after it has been at the trouble of building
a nest, has perhaps laid its eggs, or even hatched its
young ones, which are by this means exposed to
certain destruction. It is likely that these very red-
breasts may have young ones, for this is the season
of the year for their hatching; and I rather think
they have from the circumstance of their always
coming together.”

“Tf that be the case,” said Harriet, “it would bea
pity indeed to confine them. But why,mamma, if it
is wrong to catch birds, did you at one time keep
canary-birds ?”

“The case is very different in respect to canary-
birds, my dear,” said Mrs. Benson ; “ by keeping them
in a cage I did them a kindness. I considered them
as little foreigners who claimed my hospitality. This
kind of bird came originally from a warm climate;
they are in their nature very susceptible of cold, and
would perish in the open air in our winters; neither
does the food which they feed on grow plentifully in



Canary-birds. 31





this country; and as here they are always bred in
cages, they do not know how to procure the materials
for their nest abroad. And there is another particular
which would greatly distress them were they to be
turned loose, which is the persecution they would be
exposed to from other birds. I remember once to
have geen a poor hen canary-bird, which had been
turned loose because it could not sing; and surely
no creature could be more miserable. It was starving
for want of food, famishing with thirst, shivering with
cold, and looked terrified to the greatest degree; while
a parcel of sparrows and chaffinches pursued it from
place to place, twittering and chirping with every
mark of insult. I could not help fancying the little
creature to be like a foreigner just landed from some
distant country, followed by a rude rabble of boys, who
were ridiculing him because his dress and language
were strange to them.”

“And what became of the poor little creature,
mamma?” said Harriet. “I was going to tell you,
my dear,” replied Mrs. Benson ; “I ordered the servant
to bring me a cage, with seed and water in their usual
places ; this I caused to be hung on a tree, next to
that in which the little sufferer in vain endeavoured
to hide herself among the leaves from her cruel
pursuers. No sooner did the servant retire than the



32 The Story of the Robins.

poor little wretch flew to it. I immediately had the
eage brought into the parlour, where I experienced
great pleasure in observing what happiness the poor
ereature enjoyed in her deliverance. I kept her some
years; but not choosing to confine her in a little
gage, I had a large one bought, and procured a
companion for her of her own species. I supplied
them with materials for building; and from them
proceeded a little colony, which grew so numerous
that you know I gave them to Mr. Bruce to put in
his aviary, where you have seen them enjoying
themselves. So now I hope I have fully accounted
for having kept canary-birds ina cage.”

“ You have indeed, mamma,” said Harriet.

“T have also,” said Mrs. Benson, “occasionally
kept larks. In severe winters vast numbers of them
come to this country froma colder climate, and many
perish. Quantities of them are killed and sold for
the spit; and the birdcatchers usually have a great
many to sell, and many an idle boy has some to
dispose of. I frequently buy them, as you know,
Harriet; but as soon as the fine weather returns, I
constantly set them at liberty. Bub come, my dears,
prepare for your morning walk, and afterwards let
me see you in my dressing-room,”

“TI wonder,” said Frederick, “whether our red-





eI DINE Ta EE SL AEE OFTEN ST NN e NET sTN e e

Taking Birds’ Nests. 33



breasts have got a nest? I will watch to-morrow
which way they fly, for I should like to see the little
ones.”
“And what will you do, should you find them
out?” said his mamma; “ not take the nest, I hope?”
“Why,” replied Frederick, “ I should like to bring
it home, mamma, and put it in a tree near the house;.
and then I would scatter crumbs for the old ones to
feed them with.”
“Your design is a kind one,” said Mrs. Benson,
“but you would greatly distress your little favourites.
Many birds, through fear, forsake their nests when
they are removed ; therefore I desire you to let them
alone if you should chance to find them.” Harriet
then remarked that she thought it very cruel to take
birds’ nests. “Ah, my dear,’ said Mrs. Benson,
“those who commit such barbarous actions are quite
insensible to the distresses they occasion. It is very
true that we ought not to indulge so great a degree
of pity and tenderness for animals as for those who
are more properly our fellow-creatures—I mean men,
women, and children; but as every living creature
can feel, we should have a constant regard to those
feelings, and strive to give happiness rather than
inflict misery. But go, my dear, and take your
walk.” Mrs. Benson then left them, to attend her



34 The Story of the Robins.

usual morning employments; and the children,
attended by their maid, passed an agreeable half-hour
in the garden.

In the meantime the hen redbreast returned to
the nest, while her mate took his flight in search of
food for his family. When the mother approached
the nest, she was surprised at not hearing as usual
the chirping of her young ones; and what was her
astonishment at seeing them all crowded together,
trembling with apprehension! “What is the matter,
my nestlings,” said she, “that I find you in this
terror?” “Oh, my dear mother,” cried Robin, who
first ventured to raise up his head, “is it you?”
Pecksy then revived, and entreated her mother to
come into the nest, which she did without delay ;
and the little tremblers crept under her wings,
endeavouring to conceal themselves in this happy
retreat.

“What has terrified you in this manner?” said
she. “Oh! I do not know,” replied Dicky; “ but we
have seen such a monster as I never beheld before,”
“ A monster, my dear? pray describe it.” “TI cannot,”
said Dicky ; “it was too frightful to be described.”
“Frightful indeed!” cried Robin; “but I had a full
_ view of it, and will give the best description I can.
We were all sitting peaceably in the nest, and very







The Monster. 35



happy together; Dicky and I were trying to sing,
when suddenly we heard a noise against the wall, and
presently a great round red face appeared before the
nest, with a pair of enormous staring eyes, a very
large beak, and below that a wide mouth with two
rows of bones, that looked as if they could grind us
all to pieces in an instant. About the top of this
round face, and round the sides, hung something
black, but not like feathers. When the two staring
eyes had looked at us for some time, the whole thing
disappeared.”

“T cannot at all conceive from your description,
Robin, what this thing could be,” said the mother ;
“but perhaps it may come again.” “Oh! I hope
not!” cried Flapsy; “I shall die with fear if it
does.” “Why so, my love?” said her mother; “has
it done you any harm?” “TI cannot say it has,”
replied Flapsy. ‘“ Well, then, you do very wrong, my
dear, in giving way to such apprehensions. You
must strive to get the better of this fearful disposition.
When you go abroad in the world you will see many
strange objects, and if you are terrified at every
appearance which you cannot account for, you will
live a most unhappy life. Endeavour to be good,
and then you need not fear anything, . But here
comes your father; perhaps he will be able to explain



36 The Story of the Robins.



the appearance which has so alarmed you to-
day.”

As soon as the father had given the worm to Robin,
he was preparing to depart for another, but, to his
surprise, all the rest of the nestlings begged him to
stay, declaring they had rather go without their
meal, on condition he would. but remain at home and
take care of them. “Stay at home and take care of
you!” said he; “why, is that more necessary now
than usual?” The mother then related the strange

occurrence which had occasioned this request. “Non-

sense!” said he; “a monster! great eyes! large
mouth! long beak! I don’t understand such stuff.
Besides, as it did them no harm, why are they to be
in such terror now it is gone?” “Don’t be angry, dear
father,” said Pecksy, “for it was very frightful
indeed.” “Well,” said he, “I will fly all around the
orchard, and perhaps I may meet this monster,”
“Oh, it will eat you up! it will eat you up!”
said Flapsy. “Never fear,” said he; and away
he flew. Sue

The mother then again attempted to calm them,
but all in vain; their fears were now redoubled
for their father’s safety; however, to their great
joy, he soon returned. “Well,” said he, “I have
seen this monster.” The little ones then clung to





The Monster. 27



their mother, fearing the dreadful creature was
just at hand. .
“What, afraid again?” cried he; “a parcel of
stout hearts I have in my nest, truly! Why, when
you fly about in the world, you will in all probability
see hundreds of such monsters, as you call them,
unless you choose to confine yourselves to a retired
life; nay, even in woods and groves you will be
liable to meet some of them, and those of the most
mischievous kind.” “T begin to comprehend,” said
the mother, “that these dear nestlings have seen the
faceofaman.” “Even so,” replied her mate ; “itisa
man, no other than our friend the gardener, who has
so alarmed them.”

“A man!” cried Dicky; “was that frightful
thing a man?” “Nothing more, I assure you,”
answered his father, “and a good man too, I have
reason to believe; for he is very careful not to
frighten your mother and me when we are picking up
worms, and has frequently thrown crumbs to us when
he was eating his breakfast.” “ And does he live in
this garden?” said Flapsy. “He works here very
often,” replied her father, “ but is frequently absent.”
“Oh, then,” cried she, “ pray take us abroad when he
is away, for indeed I cannot bear to seehim.” “You
are a little simpleton,” said the father, “and if you














38 The Story of the Robms.



do not endeavour to get more resolution, I will leave
you in the nest by yourself when I am teaching your
brothers and sister to fly and peck; and what will
_ you do then? for you must not expect we shall go
from them to bring you food.”

‘Flapsy, fearful that her father would be quite
angry, promised to follow his direction in every
respect ; and the rest, animated by his discourse,
began to recover their spirits.







CHAPTER IV.

JOE THE GARDENER BRINGS NEWS OF THE BIRDS’
NEST TO ITARRIET AND FREDERICK,

miLst the terrible commotions related in the last
chapter passed in the nest, the monster, who was no
‘ther than honest Joe the gardener, went to the

onse and inquired for his young master and mistress,
Having, as he justly supposed, some very pleasing
ews to tell them. Both the young gentleman and
lady very readily attended, thinking he had got some
ruit or flowers for them. “Well, Joe,” said Miss
enson, “what have you to say to us? Have you
got a peach or a nectarine, or have you brought me a
ot of sweet-william 2?”
“No, Miss Harriet,” said Joe; “but I have some-
ing to tell you that will please you as-much
though I had.” “ What’s that? what’s aul









go The Story of the Robins.



said Frederick. “Why, Master Frederick,” said Joe,
“a pair of robins have comed mortal often to one
place in the orchard lately; so thinks I, these birds
have got a nest. So I watches, and watches, and at
last I see’d the old hen fly into a hole in the ivy-wall.
T had a fancy to set my ladder and look in; but as .
master ordered me not to frighten the birds, I stayed
till the old one flew out again, and then I mounted,
and there I see’d the little creatures full fledged; and
if you and Miss Harriet may go with me, I will
show them to you, for the nest is but a little way
from the ground, and you may easily get up the step-
ladder.”

Frederick was in raptures, being confident that
these were the identical robins he was so attached
to; and, like a little thoughtless boy as he was, he
would have gone immediately with the gardener,
had not his sister reminded him that it was proper
to ask their mamma’s leave first; she therefore
told Joe she would let him know when she had
done so. :

When the redbreasts had quieted the fears of
their young family, and fed them as usual, they
retired to a tree, desiring their little nestlings not
to be terrified if the monster should look in upon
them again, as it was very probable he would do,



Robin's Past FHristory. 4l



They promised to bear the sight as well as they
could.

When the old ones were seated in the tree, “It is
time,” said the father, “to take our nestlings abroad.
You see, my love, how very timorous they are; and
— if we de not use them a little to the. world, they will
never be able to shift for themselves.” “Very true,”
replied the mother; “they are now well fledged, and
therefore, if you please, we will take them out to-
morrow ; but prepare them for it.” “One of the best
preparatives,’ answered her mate, “will be to leave
them by themselves a little; therefore we will now
take a flight together, and then go back.” The
mother complied, but she longed to be with her dear
family.

When they stopped a little to rest on a tree, “ Last
year,” said the hen redbreast, “it was my misfortune
to be deprived of my nestlings by some cruel boys,
_ before they were quite fledged, and it is that which
makes me so timid now, that I do not feel comfort-
able when I am away from them.”

“A calamity of the same kind befell me,” replied
the father; “I never shall forget it. I had been
taking a flight in the woods in order to procure some
nice morsels for one of my nestlings; when I re-
turned to the place in which I had imprudently built.



F

42 The Story of the Robins.





The first circumstance that alarmed me was a part of
my nest scattered on the ground just at the entrance
of my habitation ; I then perceived a large opening
in the wall, where before there was only room for
myself to pass. I stopped with a beating heart, in
hopes of hearing the chirpings of my beloved family,
but all was silent. I then resolved to enter: but
what was my consternation when I found that the
nest which my dear mate and I had with so much
labour built, and the dear little ones who were the
‘oy of our lives, were stolen away! nay, I did not
know but the tender mother also was taken. I rushed
out of the place distracted with apprehensions for
the miseries they might endure, and lamenting my
weakness, which rendered me incapable of rescuing
them. I was ready to tear off my own feathers with
vexation; but recollecting that my dear mate might
in all probability have escaped, I resolved to go in
search of her.

“As I was flying along I saw three boys, whose
appearance was far from disagreeable; one of them
held in his hand my nest of young ones, which he
eyed with cruel delight, while his companions seemed
to share hisjoy. The dear little creatures, insensible
of their fate (for they were newly hatched), opened
their mouths, expecting to be fed by me or their



The Death of the Hen. 43

mother, but all in vain; to have attempted feeding
them at this time would have been inevitable des-
truction to myself; but I resolved to follow the
barbarians, that I might. at least see to what place
my darlings were consigned.

“In a short time the party arrived at a house, and
he who before held the nest now committed it to the
care of another, but soon returned with a kind of
victuals I was totally unacquainted with, and with
this my young ones, when they gaped for food, were
fed; hunger induced them to swallow it, but soon
after, missing the warmth of their mother, they set
up a general cry, which pierced my very heart.
Immediately after this the nest was carried away,
and what became of my nestlings afterwards I never
could discover, though I frequently hovered about the
fatal spot of their imprisonment with the hope of
seeing them.”

“Pray,” said the hen redbreast, “what became of
your mate?” “Why, my dear,” said he, “when J
found there was no chance of assisting my little ones,
I pursued my course, and sought her in every place
of our usual resort, but to no purpose; at length I
returned to the bush, where I beheld an afflicting
sight indeed—my beloved companion lying on the
ground, just expiring! I flew to her instantly, and



4A. The Story of the Robins.



endeavoured to recall her to life. At the sound of
my voice she lifted up her languid eyelids, and said,
‘Are you then safe, my love ? what is become of our
little ones?’ In hopes of comforting her, I told her
they were alive and well; but she replied, ‘ Your
consolations come too late; the blow is struck, I feel
my death approaching. The horror which seized me
when I missed my nestlings, and supposed myself
robbed at once of my mate and infants, was too |
powerful for my weak frame to sustain. Oh! why
will the human race be so wantonly cruel? The
agonies of death now came on, and after a few con-
vulsive pangs she breathed her last, and left me an
unhappy widower. I passed the remainder of the
summer, and a dreary winter that succeeded it, in a
very uncomfortable manner, though the natural cheer-
fulness of my disposition did not leave me long a
prey to unavailing sorrow. I resolved the following
spring to seek another mate, and had the good fortune
to meet with you, whose amiable disposition has
renewed my happiness. And now, my dear,” said he,
“Jet me ask you what became of your former com-
panion ?”

“Why,” replied the hen redbreast, “soon after the
loss of our nest, as he was endeavouring to discover
what was become of it, a cruel hawk caught him up,



The Death of the Fen. 45

and devoured him in an instant. I need not say
that I felt the bitterest pangs for his loss; it is
sufficient to inform you that I led a solitary life
till I met with you, whose endearing behaviour har
made society again agreeable to me.”









CHAPTER V.

HARRIET AND FREDERICK VIEWING THE ROBINS’ NEST.

As soon as Mrs, Benson returned to her children,
Frederick ran wp to her, saying, “Good news! good
news, mamma! Joe has found the robins’ nest!”
“Tas he indeed?” said Mrs. Benson. “Yes,
mamma,” said Harriet, “and if agreeable to you, we
shall be glad to go along with Joe to see it.” “But
how are you to get at it?” said the lady, “for I
suppose it is some height from the ground.” “Oh
T can climb a ladder very well,” cried Frederick.
“You climb a ladder! You are a clever gentleman
at climbing, I know,” replied his mamma; “ but do
you propose to mount too, Harriet? I think this is
rather an indelicate scheme fora lady.” “Joe tells
me that the nest is but a very little way from the
ground, mamma,” answered Harriet; “but if I find



A Peep into the Nest. 49



it otherwise, you may depend on my not going up.”
“On this condition I will permit you to go,” said
Mrs. Benson; “but pray, Frederick, let me remind
you not to frighten your little favourites.” “Not
for all the world!” said Frederick, So away he
skipped, and ran to Joe before his sister. “We may
go! we may go, Joe!” cried he. “Stay for me,
Joe, I beg,” said Harriet, who presently joined him.
Frederick’s impatience was so great that he could
scarcely be restrained from running all the way,
but his sister entreated him not to make himself
too hot,

’ At length they arrived at the desired spot; Joe
placed the ladder, and his young master, with a little
assistance, mounted it very nimbly; but who can
describe his raptures when he beheld the nestlings!
“Oh the sweet creatures!” cried he, “there are

four of them, I declare! I never saw anything so
pretty in my life! I wish I might carry you all
home!” “That you must not do, Frederick,” said
his sister; “and I beg you will come away, for you
will either terrify the little creatures or alarm the
old birds, which perhaps are now waiting somewhere
near to feed them.” “Well, I will come away
directly,” said Frederick ; “and so good-bye, robins!
I hope you will come soon, along with your father





48 The Story of the Robins.



and mother, to be fed in the parlour.” He then,
under the conduct of his friend Joe, descended.

Joe next addressed Miss Harriet: “ Now, my young
mistress,” said he, “ will you goup?” As the steps
of the ladder were broad, and the nest was not high,
Miss Benson ventured to go up, and was equally
delighted with her brother, but so fearful of terrifying
the little birds and alarming the old ones, that she
would only indulge herself with a peep at the nest.
Frederick inquired how she liked the young robins.
«They are sweet creatures,” said she, “and I hope
they will soon join our party of birds, for they appear
to me ready to fly. But let us return to mamma,
for you know we promised her to stay but a little
while; besides, we hinder Joe from his work.”
“ Never mind that,” said the honest fellow ; “ master
won't be angry, I’m sartain; and if I thought he
would, I would work an hour later to fetch up lost
time.” “Thank you, Joe,” replied Harriet, “but I
am sure papa would not desire you to do so.”

At this instant Frederick perceived the two red-
breasts, who were returning from their proposed
excursion, and called to his sister to observe them.
He was very desirous to watch whether they would
go back to their nest, but she would on no account
consent to stay, lest her mamma should be displeased,



More Monsters. 49



and lest the birds should be frightened; Frederick,
therefore, with reluctance followed her, and Joe
_attended them to the house.

As soon as they were out of sight the hen bird
proposed to return to the nest; she had observed the
party, and though she did not see them looking into
her habitation, she supposed, from their being so
near, that they had been taking a view of it, and
told her suspicions to her mate. He agreed with
her, and said he now expected to hear a fine story
from the nestlings. “Let us return, however,” said
the mother, “for perhaps they have been terrified
again.” “Well,” said he, “I will attend you then:
but let me caution you, my dear, not to indulge their
fearful disposition, because such indulgence will
certainly prove injurious to them.” “I will do the
best I can,” replied she, and then flew to the nest,
followed by her mate.

She alighted upon the ivy, and peeping into the
nest, inquired how they all did. “ Very well, dear
mother,” said Robin. “What!” cried the father,
‘who now alighted, “all safe? not one eaten up by
the monster?” “No, father,” replied Dicky, “we
are not devoured ; and yet, I assure you, the monster
we saw before has been here again, and brought two
others with him.” “Two others! what, like him-



50 Zhe Story of the Robins.
self?” said the father: “I thought, Flapsy, you were
to die with apprehension if you saw him again ?”
“And ‘so I believe I should have done, had not -
you, my good father, taught me to conquer my fears,”
replied Flapsy. “When I saw the top of him, my
heart began to flutter to such a degree that I was
ready to die, and every feather of me shook; but
when I found he stayed but a very little while, I
recovered, and was in hopes he was quite gone. My
brothers and sisters, I believe, felt as I did; but we
comforted one another that the danger was over for
this day, and all agreed to make ourselves happy, and
not fear this monster, since you assured us he was very
harmless. However, before we were perfectly come
to ourselves we heard very uncommon noises, some-
times a hoarse sound, disagreeable to our ears as the
croaking of a raven, and sometimes a shriller noise,
quite unlike the note of any bird that we know of;
and immediately after something presented itself to
our view which bore a little resemblance to the
monster, but by no means so large and frightful.
Instead of being all over red, it had on each side
two spots of a more beautiful hue than Dicky’s
breast; the rest of it was of a more delicate white,
excepting two streaks of a deep red, like the cherry
you brought us the other day, and between these



More Monsters. 51





two streaks were rows of white bones, but by no
means dreadful to behold, like those of the great
monster. Its eyes were blue and white; and round
this agreeable face was something which I cannot
describe, very pretty, and as glossy as the feathers of
a goldfinch. There was so cheerful and pleasing a
look in this creature altogether, that, notwithstanding
I own I was rather afraid, yet I had pleasure in
looking at it; but it stayed a very little time, and
then disappeared. While we were puzzling ourselves
with conjectures concerning it, another creature,
larger than it, appeared before us, equally beautiful,
and with an aspect so mild and gentle that we were
all charmed with it; but, as if fearful of alarming
us by its stay, it immediately retired, and we have
been longing for you and my mother’s return, in
hopes you would be able to tell us what it is we
have seen.”

“J am happy, my dears,” said their mother, “to
find you more composed than I expected; for as
your father and I were flying together, in order to
come back to you, we observed the monster and the
two pretty creatures Flapsy has described; the
former is, as your father before informed you, our
friend the gardener, and the others are our young
benefactors, by whose bounty we are every day



52 The Story of the Robins.

ae

regaled, and who, I will venture to say, will do you”
no harm. You cannot think how kindly they treat

us; and though there are a number of other birds _
who share their goodness, your father and I are
favoured with their particular regard.”

“Oh!” said Pecksy, “are these sweet creatures
your friends? TI long to go abroad that I may see
them again.” “Well,” cried Flapsy, “I perceive
that if we judge from appearances we may often be
mistaken. Who would have thought that such an
ugly monster as that gardener could have had a
tender heart?” “Very true,” replied the mother;

you must make it a rule, Flapsy, to judge of
mankind by their actions, and not by their looks. I
have known some of them whose appearance was as
engaging as that of our young benefactors, who were,
notwithstanding, barbarous enough to take eggs out
of a nest and spoil them; nay, even to carry away
nest and all before the young ones were fledged,
without knowing how to feed them, or having any
regard to the sorrows of the tender parents.”

“Oh, what dangers there are in the world!”
cried Pecksy; “I shall be afraid to leave the nest.”
“Why so, my love?” said the mother; “every bird
does nut meet with hawks and cruel children. You
have already, as you sat on the nest, seen thousands



Antiipations. 53

of the feathered race, of one kind or other, making
their airy excursions, full of mirth and gaiety. This
orchard constantly resounds with the melody of
those who chant from their songs of joy; and I
believe there are no beings in the world happier
than birds, for we are naturally formed for cheerful-
ness; and I trust that a prudent precaution, and
following the rules we shall from our experience be
able to give you, will preserve you from the dangers
to which the feathered race are exposed.”

“Tustead of indulging your fears, Pecksy,” said
the father, “summon up all your courage, for to-
morrow you shall, with your brothers and sisters,
begin to see the world.”

Dicky expressed great delight at this declaration,
and Robin boasted that he had not the least remains
of fear. Flapsy, though still apprehensive of mon-
sters, yet longed to see the gaieties of life, and Pecksy
wished to comply with every: desire of her dear
parents. The approach of evening now reminded
them that it was time to take repose, and turning its
head under its wing, each bird soon resigned itself
to the gentle powers of sleep.











CHAPTER VI. -

THE YOUNG VISITORS.—THE CRUEL BOY.

Arter Harriet and Frederick had been gratified with
the sight of the robins’ nest, they were returning to
the house, conducted by their friend Joc, when they
were met in the garden by their mamma, accompanied
by Miss Lucy Jenkins and her brother Edward.
The former was a fine girl about ten years old, the
latter a robust, rude boy, more than eleven. “We
were coming to seek you, my dears,” said Mrs.
Benson to her children, “for I was fearful that the
business you went upon would make yon forgetful
of your young visitors.”

“T cannot answer for Frederick,” replied Harriet,
“but indeed, mamma, I would not on any account
have slighted my friends—How do you do, my dear
Lucey?” said she; “I am happy to see you. Will



Lucy and Edward. 55



you go with me into the play-room? T[ have got
some very pretty new books.—Frederick, have you
nothing to show Edward?” “Oh yes,” said Frede-
rick, “I have got a new ball, a new top, a new
organ, and twenty pretty things; but I had rather
go back and show him the robins.”

“The robins?” said Edward, “ what robins ?”

“Why, our robins, that have built in the ivy-wall.
You never saw anything so pretty in your life as the
little ones.”

“Ob, I can see birds enough at home,” said
Edward ; “but why did you not take the nest? it
would have been nice diversion to you to toss the
young birds about. I have had a great many nests
this year, and do believe I have a hundred eggs.”

“A hundred eggs! and how do you propose to
hatch them?” said Harriet, who turned back on
hearing him talk in this manner.

“Hatch them, Miss Benson?” said he; “who
ever thinks of hatching birds’ eggs ?”

“Oh, then, you eat them,” said Frederick, “or
perhaps let your cook make puddings of them ?”

“No, indeed,” replied Edward; “I blow out the
inside, and then run a thread through them, and
give them to Lucy to hang up among her curiosities «
and very pretty they look, I assure you.”



56 The Story of the Robins.

“ And so,” said Harriet, “you had rather see a
string of empty egg-shells than hear a sweet concert
of birds singing in the trees? I admire your taste,
truly !”

“Why, is there any harm in taking birds’ eggs?”
said Lucy; “I never before heard that there was.”

“My dear mamma,” replied Harriet, “has taught
me to think there is harm in every action which
gives causeless pain to any living creature; and I
own I have a very particular affection for birds.”

“Well,” said Lucy, “I have no notion of such
affections, for my part. Sometimes, indeed, I try to
rear those which Edward brings home, but they are
teasing, troublesome things, and I am not lucky.
To tell the truth, I do not concern myself much
about them: if they live, they live; and if they die
they die. He has brought me three nests this day
to plague me; I intended to have fed the birds. be-
fore I came out, but being in a hurry to come to see
you, I quite forgot it. Did you feed them, Edward 2’

“Not I,” said he, “I thought you would do it
tis enough for me to find the nests.”

“And have you actually left three nests of young
birds at home without food?” exclaimed Harriet.

“JY did not think of them, but will feed them
when I return,” said Lucy.





The Poor Nesthngs. 57



“Oh!” cried Harriet, “I cannot bear the thought
of what the poor little creatures must suffer.”

« Well,” said Edward, “since you feel so much for
them, I think, Harriet, you will make the best nurse.
What say you, Lucy, will you give the nests to
Harriet ?”

“With all my heart,” replied his sister ; “and pray
do not plague me with any more of them.”

“I do not know that my mamma will let me
accept them,” said Harriet; “but if she will, I shall
be glad to do so.”

Frederick inquired what birds they were, and
Edward informed him there was a nest of linnets, a
nest of sparrows, and another of blackbirds. Frede-
rick was all impatience to see them, and Harriet
longed to have the little creatures in her possession,
that she might rescue them from their deplorable
condition, and lessen the evils of captivity which
they now suffered.

Her mamnia had left her with her young com-
panions, that they might indulge themselves in inno-
cent amusements without restraint ; but the tender-
hearted Harriet could not engage in any play till she
had made intercession in behalf of the poor birds; she
therefore begged Lucy would accompany her to her
mainma, in order to ask permission to have the hixds’



\

58 The Story of the Robins.





nests. She accordingly went and made her request
known to Mrs. Benson, who readily consented ;
observing that though she had a very great objection
to her children having birds’ nests, yet she could not
deny her daughter on the present occasion. Harriet,
from an unwillingness to expose her friend, had said
but little on the subject; but Mrs. Benson, having
great discernment, concluded that she made the
request from a merciful motive; and knowing that
Lucy had no kind mamma to give her instruction,
she thus addressed her :—

“TI perceive, my young friend, that Harriet is
apprehensive that the birds will not meet with the
same kind treatment from you which she is disposed
to give them. I cannot think you have any cruelty
in your nature, but perhaps you have accustomed
yourself to consider birds only as playthings, without
sense or feeling; to me, who am a great admirer of
the beautiful little creatures, they appear in a very
different light; and I have been an attentive observer
of them, I assure you. Though they have not the
gift of speech, like us, all kinds of birds have
particular notes, which answer in some measure the
purpose of words among them, by means of which
they can call to their young ones, express their love
for them, their fears for their safety, their anger



The Poor Nestlngs. 59





towards those who would hurt them, &c.; from
which we may infer that it is cruel to rob birds of
their young, deprive them of their liberty, or exclude
them from the blessings suited to their natures, for
which it is impossible for us to give them an equiva-
lent. Besides, these creatures, insignificant as they
appear in your estimation, were made by God as
well as you. Have you not read in the New Testa-
ment, my dear, that our Saviour said, ‘ Blessed are
the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy’? How
then can you expect that God will send His blessing
upon you if, instead of endeavouring to imitate Him
in being merciful to the utmost of your power, you
are wantonly cruel to innocent creatures which He
designed for happiness ?”

This admonition from Mrs. Benson, which Lucy
did not expect, made her look very serious, and
brought tears into her eyes; on which the good lady
took her by the hand, and kindly said, “I wish not
to distress you, my dear, but merely to awaken the
natural sentiments of your heart: reflect at your
leisure on what I have taken the liberty of saying to
you, and I am sure you will think me your friend.
I knew your dear mamma, and can assure you she’
was remarkable for the tenderness of her disposition.
But let me not detain you from your amusements ;





60 The Story of the Robins.



go to your own apartment, Harriet, and use your
best endeavours to make your visitors happy. You
cannot this evening fetch the birds, because when
Lucy goes it will be too late for you to take so long
a walk, as you must come back afterwards; and I
make no doubt but that, to oblige you, she will feed
them to-night.”

Harriet and Lucy returned, and found Frederick
diverting himself with the hand-organ, which had
lately been presented to him by his godpapa; but
Edward had laid hold of Harriet’s dog, and was
searching his pocket for a piece of string, that he
might tie him and the cat together, to see, as he said,
how nicely they would fight; and so fully was he
bent on this cruel purpose, that it was with difficulty
he was prevailed on to relinquish it.

“Dear me!” said he, “if ever I came into such a
house in my life! there is no fun here, What would
you have said to Harry Pritchard and me the other
day when we made the eats fly?”

“Made the cats fly!” said Frederick; “how was
that?” ‘

“Why,” replied he, “ we tied bladders to each side
of their necks, and then flung them from the top of
the house. There was an end of their purring and
mewing for some time, I assure you, for they lay a



Cruel Edward. 61

RE, URI ant me

long while struggling and gasping for breath, and if
they had not had nine lives, I think they must have
died; but at last up they jumped, and away they
ran scampering. Then out came little Jemmy, crying
as if he had flown down himself, because we hurt
the poor cats. He had a dog running after him,
who, I suppose, meant to call us to task with his
bow-wow; but we soon stopped his tongue, for we
_ caught the gentleman, and drove him before us into
a narrow lane, and then ran hooting after him into
the village; a number of boys joined us, and cried
out as we did, ‘A mad dog! a mad dog!’ On this,
several people pursued him with cudgels and broom-
sticks, and at last he was shot by a man, but not
killed, so others came and knocked him about the
head till he expired.”

“For shame, Edward!” said Harriet; “how can
you talk in that rhodomontade manner? I cannot
believe any boy could bring his heart to such
barbarities.”

“ Barbarities, indeed! why, have we not a right to
do as we please to dogs and cats, or do you think
they feel as we do? Fiddle-faddle of your nonsense!
say I. Come, you must hear the end of my story:
when the dog was dead, we carried him home to
little Jemmy, who was ready to break his heart for



62 The Story of the Robins.



the loss of him ; so we did not like to stand hearing
his whining, therefore left him and got a eock, whose
legs we tied, and flung at him till he died. Then we
set two others fighting; and fine sport we had, for
one was pecked till his breast was laid open, and the
other was blinded, so we left them to make up their
quarrel. as they could.”

“Stop! stop!” exclaimed Harriet, “for pity’s sake,
stop! I can hear no more of your horrid stories;
nor would I commit even one of those barbarities
which you boast of for the world! Poor innocent
creatures! what had they done to you to deserve
such usage ?” '

“T beg, Edward,” said his sister, “that you will
find some other way to entertain us, or I shall really
cell Mrs. Benson of you.”

“What! are you growing tender-hearted all at
snce ?” cried he.

“T will tell you what I think when I go home,”
ceplied Lucy.

As for poor Frederick, he could not restrain his
tears, and Harriet’s flowed also at the -bare idea of
the sufferings of the poor animals; but Edward was
so accustomed to be guilty of those things without
reflection, that there was no making any impression.
of tenderness upon his mind; and he only laughed



Edward's Sport disturbed. 63



at their concern, and wanted to tell a long story
about an ox that had been driven by a cruel drover
till he went mad; but Harriet and his sister stopped
their ears.

At last little Frederick went crying to his mamma,
and the young ladies retired to another apartment;
so Edward amused himself with catching flies in the
window, pulling the legs off some, and the wings
off others, delighted with their contortions, which
were occasioned by the agonies they endured. Mrs.
Benson had some visitors, which prevented her
talking to this cruel boy as she otherwise would
have done on hearing Frederick’s account of him;
but she determined to tell his papa, which she
accordingly did some time after, when he returned
home.

Edward was now disturbed from his barbarous
sport by being called to tea ; and soon after that was
over, the servant came to fetch him and his sister,
Harriet earnestly entreated her friend Lucy to feed
- the birds properly till she should be allowed to fetch
them; Lucy promised to do so, for she was greatly
affected with Mrs. Benson’s discourse, and ther
entreated her brother to take leave, that she migh!
return home, With this he readily complied, as ther:
were no further opportunities for cruelty.



64 The Story of the Robins.

After her little visitors had departed, Harriet went
into the drawing-room, and sat herself down, that she
might improve her mind by the conversation of the
company. Her mamma perceived that she had been
in tears, of which Frederick had before explained
the cause. “I do not wonder, my love,” said she,
“that you should have been so affected with the
relation of such horrid barbarities as that thoughtless
boy has, by degrees, brought himself to practise by
way of amusement. However, do not suffer your
mind to dwell on them, as the creatures on which
he inflicted them are no longer objects of pity. It
is wrong to grieve for the death of animals as we do
for the loss of our friends, because they certainly are
not of so much consequence to our happiness, and
we are taught to think their sufferings end with
their lives, as they are not accountable beings; and
therefore the killing them, even in the most barbarous
manner, is not like murdering a human creature,
who is perhaps unprepared to give an account of
himself at the tribunal of heaven.”

“T have been,” said a lady who was present, “for
a long time accustomed to consider animals as mere
machines, actuated by the unerring hand of Provi-
dence to do those things which are necessary for the
preservation of themselves and their offspring ; but



The Learned Pig. 65





the sight of the Learned Pig, which has lately been
shown in London, has deranged these ideas, and I
know not what to think.”

This led to a conversation on the instinct of
animals, which young readers would not understand ;
it would therefore be useless to insert it.

As soon as the company was gone, “ Pray, mamma,”
said Harriet, “what did the Learned Pig do? I had
a great mind to ask Mrs, Franks, who said she saw
it; but I was fearful she would think me imper-
tinent.”

“T commend your modesty, my dear,” replied Mrs.
Benson, “ but would not have it lead you into such
a degree of restraint as to prevent you satisfying
that laudable curiosity, without which young persons
must remain ignorant of many things very proper
for them to be acquainted with. Mrs, Franks would, —
Tam sure, have been far from thinking you imper-
tinent. Those inquiries only are thought trouble-
some by which children interrupt conversation, and
endeavour to attract attention to their own insig-
uificant prattle; but all people of good sense and
good nature delight in giving them useful informa-
tion.

“In respect to the Learned Pig I have heard
things which are quite astonishing in a species of



66 Lhe Story of the Robins.



animals generally regarded as very stupid. The
creature was shown for a sight in a room provided
for the purpose, where a number of people assembled
to view his performances. Two alphabets of large
letters on card-paper were placed on the floor; one
of the company was then desired to propose a word
. whieh he wished the pig to spell; this the keeper
repeated to the pig, which picked out every letter
snecessively with his snout, and collected them
together till the word was complete. He was then
desired to tell the hour of the day, and one of the
company held a watch to him; this he seemed to
examine very attentively with his cunning little eye,
and having done so, he picked out figures for the
hour and minute of the day. He exhibited a
number of other tricks of the same nature, to the
great diversion of the spectators.

“For my own part, though I was in London at
the time he was shown, and heard continually of
this wonderful pig from persons of my acquaintance,
I never went to see him; for lam fully persuaded
that great erueliy must have been used im teaching
him things so foreien to his nature, and therefore
would not give encouragement to such a scheme.”

“And do you think, mamma,” said Harriet, “ that
the pig knew the letters, and could spell words ?”



Lhe Learned Pig. 67

“T think it possible, my dear, that the pig might
be taught to know the letters at sight one from the
other, and that his keeper had some private sign,
by which he directed him to each that was wanted ;
but that he had an idea of spelling I can never
believe, nor are animals capable of attaining human
sciences, because for these human faculties are
requisite ; and no art of man can change the nature
of anything, though he may be able to improve that
nature to a certain degree, or at least to call forth
to view powers which would otherwise be
hidden from us. As far as this can be done
consistently with our higher obligations, it may be
an agreeable amusement, but will never answer any
important purpose to mankind ; and I would advise
you, Harriet, never to give countenance to those
people who show what they call learned animals,
as you may assure yourself they practise great
barbarities upon them, of which starving them
almost to death is most likely among the number;
and you may, with the money such a sight would
cost you, procure for yourself a rational amusement,
or even relieve some wretched creature from extreme
distress. But, my dear, it is now time for you to
retire to rest; I will therefore bid you good-night,”











CHAPTER VII

THE FIRST FLIGHT OF THE NESTLINGS.

Harty in the morning the hen redbreast awakened
her young brood. “Come, my little ones,’ said
she, “shake off your drowsiness; remember, this
is the day fixed for your entrance into the world.
I desire that each of you will dress your feathers
before you go out, for a slovenly bird is my
aversion, and neatness is a great aavantage to the
appearance of every one.”

The father bird was upon the wing betimes, that
he might give each of his young ones a breakfast
before they attempted to leave the nest, When he
had fed them he desired his mate to accompany
him as usual to Mrs. Benson’s, where he found the
parlour window open, and his young friends sitting
with their mamma, Crumbs had been, according



the Fate of the Nesthugs. 69



to custom, strewed before the window, which the
other birds had nearly devoured; but the red-
breasts took their usual post on the tea-table, and
the father bird sang his morning lay; after which
they returned with all possible speed to the nest,
for, having so important an affair to manage, they
could not be long absent. Neither could their
young benefactors pay so much attention to them
as usual, for they were impatient to fetch the birds
from Miss Jenkins’s ; therefore, as soon as breakfast
was ended, they set out upon their expedition.
Harriet carried a basket large enough to hold two
nests, and Frederick a smaller one for the other:
thus equipped, with a servant attending them, they
set off,

Mr. Jenkins’s house was about a mile from Mr.
Benson’s ; it was delightfully situated; there was a
beautiful lawn and.canal before it, and a charming
garden behind; on one side were corn-fields, and on
the other a wood. In such a retreat as this it was
natural to expect to find a great many birds; but to
Harriet’s surprise, they saw only a few straggling
ones here and there, which flew away the moment
she and her brother appeared. On this Harriet
observed to Frederick that she supposed Edward
Jenkins’s practice of taking birds’ nests had made



70 The Story of the Robins.

them so shy. She said a great deal to him about
the cruelties which that naughty boy had boasted
of the evening before, which Frederick promised to
remember.

As soon as they arrived at the house, Lucy ran
out to receive them, but her brother had gone to
school. -

“We are come, my dear Lucy,” said Harriet,
‘to fetch the birds you promised us.”

“Oh, I know not what to say to you, my dear,”
said Lucy. “I have very bad news to tell you,
and I fear you will blame me exceedingly, though
not more than I blame myself. I heartily wish I
had returned home immediately after the kind
lecture your mamma favoured me with yesterday,
which showed me the cruelty of my behaviour,
though I was then ashamed to own it. I walked
as fast as I could all the way from your house,
and determined to give each of the little creatures
a good supper, for which purpose I had an egg
boiled and nicely chopped; I mixed up some bread
and water very smooth, and put a little seed with
the chopped egg amongst it, and then carried it to
the room where I left the nests. But what was
my concern when J found that my care was too
late for the greatest part of them! Every sparrow



The Fate of the Nestlings. 71

tay dead; they seemed to have killed eaeh other.
In the nest of linnets, which were very young, J
found one dead, two just expiring, and the other
almost exhausted, but still able to swallow; to him,
therefore, I immediately gave some of the food I
had prepared, which greatly revived him; and as I
thought he would suffer with cold in the nest by
himself, I covered him over with wool, and had
this morning the pleasure of finding him quite
recovered.”

“What, all the sparrows and three linnets
dead!” said Frederick, whose little eyes swam with
tears at the melancholy tale; “and pray, Miss
Jenkins, have you starved all the blackbirds too?”

“Not all, my little friend,” answered Lucy, “but
I must confess that some of them have fallen
victims to my neglect: however, there are two fine
ones alive, which I shall, with the surviving linnet, .
cheerfully resign to the care of my dear Harriet,
whose tenderness will, I hope, be rewarded by the
pleasure of hearing them sing when they are old
enough. But I beg you will stay and rest your
selves after your walk.”

“Let me see the birds first,” said Frederick.
“That you shall do,” answered Lucy; and taking

him by the hand, she conducted him to the room
6





72 The Story of the Robins.



in which she kept them, accompanied by Harriet,
Lucy then fed the birds, and gave particular in-
structions for making their food, and declared that she
would never be a receiver of birds’ nests any more;
but expressed her apprehensions that it would be
difficult to wean Edward from his propensity for
taking them.

Lucy then took her young friends into the
_parlour to her governess (for her mamma was dead),
who received them very kindly, and gave each of
them a piece of cake and_some fruit; after which
Lucy led them again info”the room where the birds
were, and very carefully put the nest with the poor
solitary linnet into one basket, and that with the
two blackbirds into the other. Frederick was very
urgent to carry the latter, which his sister consented
to; and then bidding adieu to their friend, they
set off on their way home, attended by the maid
as before.

Let us now return to the redbreasts, whom we
left on the wing flying back to the ivy wall, in order
to take their young ones abroad.

As the father entered the nest he cried out with
a cheerful voice, “Well, my nestlings, are you all
ready?” “Yes,” they replied. The mother then
advanced, and desired that each of them would get



Learning to Fly, 73



upon the edge of the nest. Robin and Pecksy
sprang up in an instant, but Dicky and Flapsy,
being timorous, were not so expeditious.

The hearts of the parents felt great delight at
the view they now had of their young family,
which appeared to be strong, vigorous, and lively,
and, in a word, endowed with every gift of nature
requisite to their success in the world.

“Now,” said the father, “stretch your wings,
Robin, and flutter them a little in this manner”
(showing him the way), “and be sure to observe
my directions exactly. Very well,” said he: “do
not attempt to fly yet, for here is neither air nor
space enough for that purpose. Walk gently after
me to the wall; then follow me to the tree that
stands close to it, and hop on from branch to
branch as you will see me do: then rest yourself;
and as soon as you see me fly away, spread your
wings, and exert all the strength you have to follow
me
Robin acquitted himself to admiration, and
alighted very safely on the ground.

“Now stand still,” said the father, “till the rest
join us.” Then going back, he called upon Dicky
to do the same as his brother had done; but Dicky
was very fearful of fluttering his wings, for he was

9



74 The Story of the Robins.

a little coward, and expressed many apprehensions
that he should not reach the ground without falling,
as they were such a great height from it. His
father, who was a very courageous bird, was quite
angry with him.

“Why, you foolish little thing!” said he, “do you
mean to stay in the nest by yourself and starve ?
I shall leave off bringing you food, I assure you,
Do you think your wings were given you to be
always folded by your sides, and that the whole
employment of your life is to dress your feathers and
make yourself look pretty? Without exercise you
cannot long enjoy health; besides, you will soon
have your livelihood to earn, and therefore idleness
would in you be the height of folly. Get up this
instant.”

Dicky, intimidated by his father’s displeasure,
got up, and advanced as far as the branch from
which he was to descend; but here his fears re-
turned, and instead of making an effort to fly, he
stood flapping his wings in a most irresolute manner,
and suffered his father to lead the way twice with-
out following him. This good parent, finding he
would not venture to fly, took a circuit unperceived
by Dicky, and watching the opportunity when his
wings were a little spread, came suddenly behind him

















THE First FLIGHT OF THE NESTLINGS.









Learnumg to Fly. 75



and pushed him off the branch. Dicky, finding
himself in actual danger of fallmg, now gladly
stretched his pinions, and upborne by the air, he
gently descended to the ground, so near the spot
where Robin stood, that the latter easily reached
him by hopping.

The mother now undertook to conduct Flapsy
and Pecksy, whilst the father stayed to take care
of the two already landed. Flapsy made a thousand
difficulties, but at length yielded to her mother's
persuasions, and flew safely down. Pecksy, without
the least hesitation, accompanied her, and by
exactly following the directions given, found the
task much easier than she expected.

As soon as they had a little recovered from the
fatigue and fright of their first essay at flying, they
began to look around them with astonishment.
Every object on which they turned their eyes
excited their curiosity and wonder. They were no
longer confined to a little nest built in a small hole,
but were now at full liberty in the open air. The
orchard itself appeared to them to be a world. For
some time each remained silent, gazing round, first
at one thing, then at another; atlength Flapsy eried
out, “What a charming place the world is! I had
no conception that it was half so big!”



76 The Story of the Robiis.

« And do you suppose then, my dear,” replied the
mother, “that you now behold the whole of the
world? I have seen but a small part of it myself,
and yet have flown over so large a space, that what
is ab present within our view appears to me a little
inconsiderable spot; and I have conversed with
several foreign birds, who informed me that the
countries they came from were so distant that they
were many days on their journey hither, though
they flew the nearest way, and scarcely allowed -
themselves any resting-time.”

“Come,” said the father, “let us proceed to
business; we did not leave the nest merely to look
about us.. You are now, my young ones, safely
landed on the ground; let me instruct you what you
are to do on it. Every living creature that comes
into the world has something allotted him to per-
form, therefore he should not stand an idle spectator
of what others are doing. We small birds havea
very easy task, in comparison of many animals I
have had an opportunity of observing, being only
required to seek food for ourselves, build nests, and
provide for our young ones till they are able to
procure their own livelihood. We have indeed
enemies to dread; hawks and other birds of prey
will catch us up if we are not upon our guard; but



Lhe Nestlings World. ay



the worst foes we have are those of the human race,
though even among them we redbreasts have a
better chance than many other birds, on account of
a charitable action which two of our species are said
to have performed towards a little boy and girl,*
who were lost in a wood, where they were starved
to death. The redbreasts saw the affectionate pair,
hand in hand, stretched on the cold ground, and
would have fed them had they been capable of
receiving nourishment; but finding the poor babies
quite dead, and being unable to bury them, they
resolved to cover them with leaves. This was an
arduous task, but many a redbreast has since shared
the reward of it; and I believe that those who do
good to others always meet with a recompence some
way or other. But I declare I am doing the very
thing I was reproving you for—chattering away
when I should be minding business. Come, hop
after me, and we shall soon find something worth
having. Fear nothing, for you are now in a place of
security ; there is no hawk near, and I have never
seen any of the human race enter this orchard but
the monsters who paid you visits in the nest, and
others equally inoffensive.”

The father then hopped away, followed by Robin

® Ailuding to the ballad of the Children in the Wood.



78 The Story of the Robins.

and Dicky, while his mate conducted the female
part of the family. The parents instructed their
young ones in what manner to seek for food, and
they proved very successful, for there were many
insects just at hand.







CHAPTER VIIi.

FREDERICK DISCOVERS THE YOUNG ROBINS IN THE
CURRANT BUSH.

Wuitsr ali the business related in the last chapter
was going on in the redbreast family, Harriet and
her brother were walking home with the poor birds
in the baskets, “Well, Frederick,” said she to him,
“what think you of bird-nesting now? Should you
like to occasion the deaths of a number of little
harmless creatures ?”

“ No, indeed,” said Frederick ; “and I think Miss
Jenkins a very naughty girl for starving them.”

“She was to blame, but is now sorry for her fault,
my dear, therefore you must not speak unkindly of
her; besides, you know she has no good mamma, as
we have, to teach her what is proper; and her papa
is obliged to be absent from home very often, and
leave her to the care of a governess, who perhaps



80 The Story of the Robins,

was never instructed herself to be tender tc
animals.”

With this kind of conversation they amused
themselves as they walked, every now-and then
peeping into their baskets to see the little birds,
which were very lively and well. They entreated
the maid to take them through the orchard, which
had a gate that opened into a meadow that lay in
their way, having no doubt of obtaining admittance,
as it was the usual hour for their friend Joe to work
there. They accordingly knocked at the gate, which
was immediately opened to them, and Frederick
requested Joe to show him the robins’ nest.

Just at this time the young robins were collected
together near the gate, when they were suddenly
alarmed with a repetition of the same noises which
had formerly terrified them in the nest; and Robin,
who was foremost, beheld, to his very great amaze-
ment, Frederick and Harriet, the maid who attended
them, with Joe the gardener, who, having opened
the gate, was, at the request of his young master
and mistress, conducting them to the ivy wall.

Robin, with all his courage (and, indeed, he was
not deficient in this quality), was seized with a great
tremor; for if the view he had of the faces of these
persons had appeared so dreadful to him when he



Leobin and his Friends, dL



sat in the nest, what must it now be to behold their
full size, and see them advancing with, as he
thought, gigantic strides towards him? He expected
nothing less than to be crushed to death with the foot
of one of them; and not having yet attamed his full
strength, and never having raised himself in the air,
he knew not how to escape, therefore chirped so
loudly as not only to surprise his brother and sisters,
and bring his father and mother to inquire the
meaning of his cry, but also to attract the attention
of the young Bensons.

‘What chirping is that?” cried Harriet.

“Tt was the cry of a young bird,” said the maid;
“ was it not one of those in the baskets ?”

“ No,” said Frederick, “the noise came that way,”
pointing to some currant bushes; “ my birds are very
well.”

“ And so is my linnet,” replied Harriet.

Frederick then set down his charge very carefully
and began looking about in the place from whence
he supposed the sound proceeded, when, to his great
joy, he soon discovered the redbreasts and their little
family, He called eagerly to his sister, who was
equally pleased with the sight. They then stooped
down to take a nearer view of them, by which means
he directly confronted Robin, who, as soon as ike



82 The Story of the Robins.

young gentleman’s face was on a level with his eyes,
recollected him, and calling to his brother and
sisters, told them they need not be afraid.

Harriet followed her brother’s example, and de-
lighted the little flock with the sight of her amiable
countenance. She heartily lamented having nothing
with which to regale her old favourites and their
family, when Frederick produced from his pocket a
piece of biscuit, which they crumbled and scattered.
Harriet, recollecting that her mamma would expect
her at home, and that the birds in the baskets would
be hungry, persuaded her brother to take up his
little load and return. They therefore left the red-
breasts enjoying the fruits of their bounty.

When the happy birds had shared amongst them
the kind present of their young benefactors, they
hopped about in search of some moister food. Dicky
had the good fortune to find four little worms toge-
ther, but instead of calling his brother and sisters to
partake of them, he devoured them all himself.

“Are you not ashamed, you little greedy crea- .
ture?” cried his father, who observed his selfish
disposition. “What would you think of your
brother and sisters were they toserve you so? Ina
family every individual ought to consult the welfare
of the whole, instead of his own private satisfaction ;



Robin and his Friends. 83





it is his own truest interest to do so. A day may
come when he who has now sufficient to supply tha
wants of his relations may stand in need of assistance
from them. But setting aside selfish considerations,
which are the last that ever find place in a generous
breast, how great is the pleasure of doing good, and
contributing to the happiness of others!”

Dicky was quite confounded, and immediately
hopped away to find, if possible, something for his
brother and sisters, that he might regain their good
opinion.

In the meanwhile Robin found a caterpillar, which
he intended to take for Pecksy; but just as he
was going to pick it up, a linnet, which had a nest
in the orchard, snatched it from him, and flew away
with if.

With the most furious rage Robin advanced to his
father, and entreated that he would fly after the
linnet and tear his heart out.

“That would be taking violent revenge indeed,”
said his father. “No, Robin, the linnet has as greata
right to the caterpillar as you or J, and in all proba-
bility he has as many little gaping mouths at home
ready to receive it. But however this may be, I had
for my own part rather sustain an injury than take
revenge. You must expect to have many a scramble



84 The Story of the Robins,



of this kind in your life; but if you give way to a
resentful temper, you will do yourself more harm
than all the enemies in the world can do you, for
you will be in perpetual agitation, from an idea that
every one who does not act in direct conformity with
your wishes has a design against you. Therefore
restrain your anger, that you may be happy ; for,
believe me, peace and tranquillity are the most
valuable things you can possess.”

At this instant Pecksy came up with a fine fat
spider in her mouth, which she laid down at her
mother’s feet, and thus addressed her :—

“ Accept, my dear parent, the first tribute of grati-
tude which I have ever been able to offer you. How
have I formerly longed to ease those toils which you
and my dear father have endured for our sakes! and
eladly would I now release you from further fatigue
on my account; but I am still a poor creature, and
must continue to take shelter under your wing. I
will hop, however, as long as I am able, to procure
food for the family.”

The eyes of the mother sparkled with delight, and
knowing that Pecksy’s love would be disappointed
by a refusal, she ate the spider which the dutiful
nestling had so affectionately brought her, and then
said, —



Dutiful Pecksy. 85



“How happy would families be if every one, like.
you, my dear Pecksy, consulted the welfare of the
rest, instead of turning their whole attention to their
own interest !”

Dicky was not present at this speech, which he
might have considered as a reflection on his own
conduct; but he arrived as it was ended, and
presented Pecksy with a worm, like those he had
himself so greedily eaten. She received it with
thanks, and declared it was doubly welcome from
his beak.

“Certainly,” said the mother, “fraternal love
stamps a value on the most trifling presents.”

Dicky felt himself happy in having regained the
good opinion of his mother and obliged his sister,
and resolved to be generous for the future.

The mother bird now reminded her mate that it
would be proper to think of returning to the nest.

“If the little ones fatisue themselves too much
with hopping about,” said she, “their strength will
be exhausted, and they will not be able to fly
back.”

“True, my love,” replied her mate ; “ gather them
under your wings a little, as there is no reason to
apprehend danger here, and then we will see what
they can do.”



86 The Story of the Robins.



She complied with his desire, and when they
were sufficiently rested she got up, on which the
whole brood instantly raised themselves on their
feet.

“Now, Robin,” cried the father, “let us see your
dexterity in flying upwards: come, I will show you
how to raise yourself.”

“Oh, you need not take that trouble,” said the
conceited bird; “as I flew down, I warrant I know
how to fly up.”

Then spreading his wings, he attempted to rise
but in so unskilful a manner that he only shuffled
along upon the ground.

“That will not do, however,” cricd the father;
“shall I show you now?”

Robin persisted in it that he stood in no need of
instruction, and tried again: he managed to raise
himself a little way, but soon tumbled headlong. His
mother then began reproving him for his obstinacy,
and advised him to accept his father’s kind offer of
teaching him.

“You may depend on it, Robin,” said she, “that
he is in every respect wiser than you, and as he has
had so much practice, he must of course be expert
in the art of flying; and if you persist in making
your own foolish experiments, you will only commit



The Upward Flight. 87



a number of errors, and make yourself ridiculous. I
should commend your courage, provided you would
add prudence to it; but blundering on in this igno-
rant manner is only rashness.”

“Let him alone, let him alone,” said the father ;
“if he is above being taught, he may find his own way
to the nest; I will teach his brother—~Come, Dicky,”
said he, “let us see what you can do at flying
upwards ; you cut a noble figure this morning when
you flew down.”

Dicky, with reluctance, advanced; he said he did
not see what occasion they had to go back to the
nest at all; he should suppose they might easily
find some snug corner to creep into till they were
strong enough to roost in trees, as other birds
did,

“Why,” said the father, “you are as ridiculous
with your timidity as Robin with his conceit.
Those who give way to groundless fears generally
expose themselves to real dangers. If you rest on
the earth all night, you will suffer a great deal from
cold and damp, and may very likely be devoured
whilst you sleep, by rats and other creatures that go
out in the night to seek for food; whereas, if you
determine to go back to the nest, you have but ons
effort to make, for which, I will venture to say, you

7



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describe
'2870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYO' 'sip-files00003.pro'
53458e822d51e5f90f21321e3a1c48d2
dffc15dcd3d4cd4ff29e4884bdb55d371aec239b
'2011-10-14T20:36:58-04:00'
describe
'46440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYP' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
2993525eea4f9191baa94506fac51730
24d380218b4f8ce908db943c056932155d51d46d
'2011-10-14T20:36:18-04:00'
describe
'2911568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYQ' 'sip-files00003.tif'
83eeef7fe534b375aebe1783374b9422
1d4046a8f1978a4f91245e9928cee9d487e6fe0f
'2011-10-14T20:37:10-04:00'
describe
'151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYR' 'sip-files00003.txt'
6589111d27d5c1f8156a14607b67a3b5
3ee8e8b2eef6e766578a9b44bff3693dc73a79c3
'2011-10-14T20:37:08-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'29820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYS' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
1ce13335a5c25f718294c92c0a6d7922
bd35514dcd7d3afc9b9e6362b4f2b2a90a2a2ee1
'2011-10-14T20:35:58-04:00'
describe
'329145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYT' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
bb2e7b3f54271aa80c2a34a4b8d02bf1
c1499e83a03a88dd07ef57f04fa5c446715e507c
'2011-10-14T20:33:03-04:00'
describe
'81144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYU' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
ab1d1d0a47cbf9e78a93c5653f20c490
9137cec813a3b4754463f4b9e727600f53621aed
'2011-10-14T20:35:51-04:00'
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYV' 'sip-files00007.pro'
6b34c888fa5cd3aca2d2e40b3c5153c8
098e0ebb519598696a1da5095dbcb7bdd14f9f0e
'2011-10-14T20:35:32-04:00'
describe
'28797' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYW' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
00e63a778fd93d1a5a4264484ae39e9a
0a78570e88a46cf690148f5ef9e0af19853fd98f
'2011-10-14T20:34:22-04:00'
describe
'2652780' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
00fed092eaf1dc1df361af1a32d06e5c
f51c5fc5999c320c4864d6efcf326af7c3340fe5
'2011-10-14T20:36:54-04:00'
describe
'61' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYY' 'sip-files00007.txt'
882270edb79380b6fd62d33b9f7f461d
a17dc4a1b578d1306bb64334781ec79bededf259
'2011-10-14T20:37:58-04:00'
describe
'21177' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGYZ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
d5e062a70283b5c24bee5fff099d2599
36ef17fa5f1df6365b1a898e20526356089c8380
'2011-10-14T20:37:18-04:00'
describe
'337767' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZA' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
f2d6f63085427ffd1d5dfa95fabe208d
afaa54e62aacbbe32f229fcfe69fc1e472980dda
'2011-10-14T20:32:59-04:00'
describe
'213001' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZB' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
aa0e03af5cd9bddc6dc7744ba5806940
b41925f395ea75f9feea0ea9528d3a7111acdafc
'2011-10-14T20:35:15-04:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZC' 'sip-files00010.pro'
8b19eda88e1cd6d9d46e8748a17ad63f
0cc1dd5291f41c61e351b1975620629570f1bfe3
describe
'58051' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZD' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
c1e2a24006ecd99c4d5b1f6b90eb4f3a
41f5663e24462b22a4f682a3bb7d624655c9d063
'2011-10-14T20:34:30-04:00'
describe
'8127248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZE' 'sip-files00010.tif'
9f1bca318624ae5f20f89c24507849c8
b6d8610d9635f5fff2d580b940aa8f1ab98f0285
'2011-10-14T20:33:25-04:00'
describe
'126' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZF' 'sip-files00010.txt'
80b99ace745926e928277f67af882899
fd203e4925024459b6d4714f0bc9cd69d50d0746
'2011-10-14T20:37:28-04:00'
describe
'29377' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZG' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
c827c15b9e80c074505bfa412ffc3c3a
55da60ac0c6f718509ac0db23be1003d2ae6a7bf
'2011-10-14T20:34:00-04:00'
describe
'318904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZH' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
b1beace9d740e86afb4e66c2ebbacaed
01bd6e58e6f73e8bb8b86d769625c3e54ba4d380
'2011-10-14T20:35:06-04:00'
describe
'103454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZI' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
7846c14789bb9b9e98c7d09cd3fc3605
00a12b6ff037a1ae5a70cc87ba6b08b179f49f94
'2011-10-14T20:33:56-04:00'
describe
'4223' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZJ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
a7e2d703445fae9c5f0e79f43f6f07ee
d7447e2ee655863b25634605848663da5aaebbfe
'2011-10-14T20:37:21-04:00'
describe
'39450' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZK' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
186d5b1fefcb6c3701e33b8e005d6765
a7d24ceb2e8e0fc69b0ed0786c38421df3e2c4c7
'2011-10-14T20:36:09-04:00'
describe
'2571768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZL' 'sip-files00011.tif'
13c5a4504020ee9ac2e7c2f945014448
0b1739a17c0c7379f2026ad53162a527c9c0f888
'2011-10-14T20:37:11-04:00'
describe
'249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZM' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f8c20eb9b325065bfc6181a8f837d9ec
e19d7e0be39bce5801d3733f8438a77ca51a861f
'2011-10-14T20:35:35-04:00'
describe
'25328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
d2d5b49209e436bb04805cc87dc8ca20
ee1944025e70009aa9c29413714f2b920a780a60
'2011-10-14T20:34:32-04:00'
describe
'329308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZO' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
5d291ae55575a8ee5656e9994d58b18b
5b7b22f86f1704cdf2ce137ffc970b77aa5c8a22
'2011-10-14T20:37:01-04:00'
describe
'123685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZP' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
37718de40491146ab4d3fe951b396bb1
1cdfd461fb55727ec6a9924f53ef2b6c2732abd2
'2011-10-14T20:37:40-04:00'
describe
'15551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZQ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
2f1a3125097a7e83b695d1dc923144b5
93ebc6965fefeb895778ad669edd0c3838d5b9d9
'2011-10-14T20:38:24-04:00'
describe
'47974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZR' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
14c1eb27c44e05bc8fab7272d0580953
576500e744445e52bbbf5d4857488ab31e36a229
'2011-10-14T20:37:43-04:00'
describe
'2654708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZS' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ff802dc953651765fd7d64eaa576bcdf
3305f1c3c11d7e7f4bb6c05439b75800c1200767
'2011-10-14T20:36:37-04:00'
describe
'650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZT' 'sip-files00013.txt'
6624c9fe8d4626bdc402a5d87138f844
921a838368dd4c65e2beed65b58825e6bd201b45
'2011-10-14T20:33:22-04:00'
describe
'27022' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZU' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
55684bd28098b28805d7b89762789ede
cefee0ee134100fea835da4f8aa86000efa0cc4c
'2011-10-14T20:33:21-04:00'
describe
'329079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZV' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
0d696d337cafe046375c0e01817cd0d2
c0ad76b4c24c9786c6cfdb72815ce1c56eb9ebe3
'2011-10-14T20:37:00-04:00'
describe
'93988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZW' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
6bc4595aa76c11e7232e666f8d10edaa
810a1961777777095c01b617837b2703b082189c
'2011-10-14T20:38:23-04:00'
describe
'10893' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZX' 'sip-files00015.pro'
2fdb2b79a85e34cbc7b839609a18927a
dfdb2eda41f14050ac6d1548101c92fefb930e63
'2011-10-14T20:35:30-04:00'
describe
'36918' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZY' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
a4a8cafc76129b27c63a11fcba604447
04e31219c0eb6d75eae1a19d3b4cf3391344795f
'2011-10-14T20:37:59-04:00'
describe
'2653972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAGZZ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
2f30608893d074d54bbcf2d5ec2d76f1
0d1b7ba2dd9a926500af5d029baed6291ea2fe06
'2011-10-14T20:37:19-04:00'
describe
'687' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAA' 'sip-files00015.txt'
49fe43722525a1860be1f75f3412d078
da64ca16d6bdcf6c046f52dbf87bd2928ad68e2a
'2011-10-14T20:35:12-04:00'
describe
'25095' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAB' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
e2219dffd22c7aa0059fcb8fdfdb91b5
9f2ecfea9f3237968017c20cfa024b77323cb704
'2011-10-14T20:37:38-04:00'
describe
'329297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAC' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
3f18e1121b105e6a1ae01f0826a04e51
30f5bea8d26035a188620e1b7328b1ead68369c8
'2011-10-14T20:34:15-04:00'
describe
'101957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAD' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
fed4a322438943b291f98d414920a53f
8ab97f0c2bf6060fe1576a3ec46378a85ea792df
'2011-10-14T20:36:48-04:00'
describe
'12091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAE' 'sip-files00016.pro'
26a94d949671c5308f2c52abe23a44f3
75eab83809d04d1fd1d7b89e1f949ad0f0325eea
describe
'40229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAF' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
a67472869f3e1dc1e9d8c2e00a57d84c
d83e5868f78b1230a64a294a67eef395fda84569
'2011-10-14T20:33:41-04:00'
describe
'2654472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAG' 'sip-files00016.tif'
424b6f055fe91849f2198e4b0f78165b
04906615555c79a261a288552c5c202a208f7188
'2011-10-14T20:33:31-04:00'
describe
'751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAH' 'sip-files00016.txt'
4a5782b06fc14558531a99f1df4ab852
8dceab121c20d7f011d8076ec75533565a7e19c8
'2011-10-14T20:38:07-04:00'
describe
'26478' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAI' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
5bb2aea1c3cba09083eadfde6b32d1a7
11f82332f44fb15f8cb1087c906f0bf4ca94d4f0
'2011-10-14T20:38:01-04:00'
describe
'329046' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAJ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
438b4fb812e80694f81a64c6815e0603
3b565bb882f43d9b8ca26a0d0f0b9b8e2049a7fb
'2011-10-14T20:34:43-04:00'
describe
'92757' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAK' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
798e770d515c07b3f760f1313c75c9df
c28f71b1365d5c77616560dc0c1af567a3923a5c
'2011-10-14T20:38:17-04:00'
describe
'8362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAL' 'sip-files00017.pro'
368de52bd906530b6c19c0af2ae09b25
6ea6bd3c36cd1dc6f426f9d28df76b22daa2c5e0
'2011-10-14T20:37:35-04:00'
describe
'34053' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAM' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b547a2974f44e22686656bfea21dc380
4e8f5fb5c210fb47803f0a2d9c71f2fdbd140f4a
'2011-10-14T20:38:36-04:00'
describe
'2653524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAN' 'sip-files00017.tif'
ab94a0247a13a3573ba8d6417a61abb0
4af520ccf29ae50a7e9db1d5e30c2453794f2264
'2011-10-14T20:37:47-04:00'
describe
'504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAO' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a72368c29ca183a0db270b4fd799c36e
ecd8e123bc1cef678c506988dedc28fb169f371d
'2011-10-14T20:35:10-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'23681' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAP' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
af0f6dcb3f8c14d36285a3c6fd0b8921
e79d9e272b05b1346dde731d6a5e7fc2258c7bc1
'2011-10-14T20:35:14-04:00'
describe
'329327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
9a2c8042457be102d893cb5be5d038cc
3fd37f9b8d1d29ee874d76a61459edc28bedd5f9
'2011-10-14T20:38:00-04:00'
describe
'155458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAR' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
16b3428c0e9769b1781fa2e7dd327992
de9e643d54dd913ffd899efd5088751e2a54b133
describe
'16133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAS' 'sip-files00019.pro'
e8c22e3ae667beb6a1fb709f8f2350bc
5cf6a63079df37ee437feae5023bd326e1fe702a
'2011-10-14T20:35:43-04:00'
describe
'58092' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAT' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
cc0480ae7618754c6135d48733f050e4
ec17046262e4e15a714ffec5bcaa46f85dc4b482
'2011-10-14T20:34:56-04:00'
describe
'2655800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAU' 'sip-files00019.tif'
663956e536a086394c89b6d57cd60468
e9f61b1b712cd338fdaf9b34ee030951a428026f
'2011-10-14T20:36:47-04:00'
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAV' 'sip-files00019.txt'
fc155ba46ffda3bd70d768e8fc155438
16db7b94570e6df22fefc4255e840976d630a65f
'2011-10-14T20:34:01-04:00'
describe
'30121' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
afc2ce474dcb79c23ad4d35484d1fe48
8ef167cc4b2a4b0469d2fd9c211aa8d111717125
'2011-10-14T20:34:12-04:00'
describe
'329279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAX' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
de318cd64796b31a483fab95038188fc
6b33115fa36d5cca45fbdac7910212aa51c8e274
'2011-10-14T20:38:12-04:00'
describe
'195628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
570dd61c6140a6c940c52804d702e5be
c7fa1b34b3235330cc840e90dad65b8e5f19473c
'2011-10-14T20:38:19-04:00'
describe
'35342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHAZ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
c335e6a7e07c41a19e9afee2ab6e6961
49a7c0c7a7435a12f603b1ffe294a9595b5c91d2
describe
'71780' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBA' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
dd30eac153a25b4d2f9ca483c610017c
2b446aacbae1ffbc3b633eac576435d614e5f4a5
'2011-10-14T20:32:39-04:00'
describe
'2656488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBB' 'sip-files00020.tif'
18a99aa656f8ae005cba389fa9698602
123522608e286a7dc693f6d2182f587c7ea0698f
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBC' 'sip-files00020.txt'
cd32938330dcbd0963fede063a65b250
f5263a4e9dcda68c6738d994ecc1f5f6fe3fbdf1
'2011-10-14T20:32:31-04:00'
describe
'33161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBD' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
9e2469c9042843ee94fef494c3e40d6d
bf9e01ed686834d7a786a69cbc43e0e2d2b8b050
'2011-10-14T20:36:01-04:00'
describe
'330578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBE' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
3ae75f95d40a04097c864aac06b0a182
e701ceacb067f121dd3ee8a5e680aaf921346494
'2011-10-14T20:34:40-04:00'
describe
'233300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBF' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0f574371f22977def1eaad9ff1b7963f
997c30473aecb4a04b5c7a6226be90e92d288a44
'2011-10-14T20:33:50-04:00'
describe
'3755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBG' 'sip-files00021.pro'
3cdd90ee19c91932d1b7ab142e613737
312e32af2943f69b7ab80cc7c9b827e2b6958731
'2011-10-14T20:34:26-04:00'
describe
'67928' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
95d0a174bf3d3cc486d4c7cdb289e9ae
d2c33069504f9fa4d41e8d0b8bbba188ca1f3dbd
describe
'7955760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
41f0303583e747c9c6369441440a575f
12a8f3380fd65e0136423cbecc848046aea5cedf
'2011-10-14T20:33:55-04:00'
describe
'260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBJ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
3dd6a0186fad297ce0c55620a470f40b
56f540f9bbd82a6c6f9b236aa37b47ceff392e46
'2011-10-14T20:38:27-04:00'
describe
'31593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
174c9e39b81b0936f2e6d47063d9fdcc
bec1c4778dfe551764c5c7caacb34e8d16a14557
'2011-10-14T20:34:54-04:00'
describe
'329354' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBL' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
90d6198a9fc345394bdecc918032669f
5de58c53da0a77aee947121cef1e847745146941
'2011-10-14T20:32:54-04:00'
describe
'192567' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBM' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b456c5ac81ed07993fd8bf0c4db92732
68628d9e7a2e376d30f07f09f8f5984c9e7acff7
'2011-10-14T20:35:00-04:00'
describe
'34689' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBN' 'sip-files00023.pro'
89bd33bf0af5c8361d2ac3871e3cc8f3
5d6a40c3217b39aaed508c18c7d97e8d718ace3e
'2011-10-14T20:33:27-04:00'
describe
'71672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBO' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
263f17fd5499e9f4c45e24e0c8ddb311
61fcdbe7666bf92e0add3205a9cda680832fd724
'2011-10-14T20:37:29-04:00'
describe
'2656584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBP' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7a8e7b2a29bcc50640d055065230b14b
3cdfef4a9d532b688282e8a5410ae1bab30d0caf
'2011-10-14T20:37:20-04:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBQ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
a4a5ef9175af83df88a19bcb0bf66772
cae5ffb8131b3185d2dac6a57fe4e58012fbd707
describe
'33098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBR' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
91259f8e339ff3458e3ea8b8773a8ff8
1e453da056fd1b363ec0da25c0d81e5372fb1974
describe
'329347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBS' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
b37c2faa23fb8b0518ff9952cd917547
5f2a956af0f5e1a13ac94debe89908c76a67727c
'2011-10-14T20:32:47-04:00'
describe
'197190' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBT' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d214a8aa8c9b518f5aabb0c592d377ad
54ddce17affa456edb9bd1d254bfcfd0439163ac
describe
'36405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBU' 'sip-files00024.pro'
f81b9a7882ffb77916890df9890a1810
5a81c00a33ea711b336954cbd2f14a4a8e8f6b45
'2011-10-14T20:34:07-04:00'
describe
'72915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBV' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
510a68d24f8ce598b5cfe49577814370
25e1658d1a3f4501822ca904932b766ad8f69da8
'2011-10-14T20:35:09-04:00'
describe
'2656676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBW' 'sip-files00024.tif'
85757e492b3659e377054337b57ff453
598a9f1b1faaa94efb81d133a415b214e65d3071
'2011-10-14T20:38:37-04:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBX' 'sip-files00024.txt'
d502f404c6b63a9d57cfd67c0e39c8cf
8ac1fbb34c3e7c7edc8d1f316f7ca02657f3d25f
'2011-10-14T20:34:20-04:00'
describe
'33664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBY' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
2178185e0ba3c0bf889799d0b707d0fa
ec372fe0922d406f3f910c827caaed093c5106a2
'2011-10-14T20:33:00-04:00'
describe
'329334' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHBZ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
61e1fefd883b61536ce7ab040fd726fd
6fba08987cd339de04f635f983cebbd353fb4cd0
'2011-10-14T20:35:17-04:00'
describe
'188888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCA' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
452f45b9b981e6253c44b88a12e4e789
a466f288d66e2e7768059f94af77564ec9606148
'2011-10-14T20:37:32-04:00'
describe
'34591' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCB' 'sip-files00025.pro'
56116d27c282e8183b6d83cf0f69de26
a4654f726f6df2c5967f342b1a8acabe39de4625
'2011-10-14T20:35:53-04:00'
describe
'71863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCC' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
34dbc1e16f31d073b2bf9711b161ee3a
9c8b37467544a3c60170327e1f198a48c33e3082
'2011-10-14T20:36:13-04:00'
describe
'2656708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCD' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4214eaa4d8b0d98e1e4697db2a6cdc52
c44aa7274e2dfd00e9b12e2ba03a8b359e901c66
'2011-10-14T20:34:05-04:00'
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
f424f8a4dc49ccaa87fba1909691d03c
d6e5459d2e0989d4d71c04c43cd31123edcc6f11
describe
'33788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCF' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
f48a5f5e4c1ac281a5d2cccd81693acb
a363c5bea0aa5bebe25e2c7aee4f679867bb4b60
'2011-10-14T20:36:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
8c5a454058eadd66d8ed4d8df437a190
dd74a205c4890d20e5d7c865c36d6aa58ab28cb1
describe
'198142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCH' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
fe1daffb11842026df5ac20ba6b30998
5c8df3634ed4ef352fcb5daab5a432ae8ecb4fdc
'2011-10-14T20:32:23-04:00'
describe
'35800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCI' 'sip-files00026.pro'
1b8a9682a014273d953b01078a91a3b9
b5d27077ba63ac00e3fdb28fb9c7e68e37eefbef
'2011-10-14T20:38:29-04:00'
describe
'72261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCJ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
fb2573a7507115ae8ad3a25f15f1184d
89dafbd400b331ef7c9ed6b6296f626d779b49e9
describe
'2656532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCK' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e830b5dc6b6747bc34b6528361e45651
f55882120fcf148e1aae643ee852b5b5ab38cf8b
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCL' 'sip-files00026.txt'
296fd44a4059847e18eaf50a4bc22921
8f18d9bdbbf9ba12aa87de8c65774ece3ef7cf49
describe
'33500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCM' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
8c261952e50d3457f889f44ae3981ebe
b935a2d22b6ea7b24291fcf7e58ec05b5176fe78
'2011-10-14T20:37:16-04:00'
describe
'329280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCN' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
05c4d7b0a9050c4551849dc26c7630ee
011633baa261bf0000c89b92b65ed15288a2ac91
'2011-10-14T20:32:58-04:00'
describe
'192453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCO' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
b6197ba28e58ae191bb45e7480d2d0fc
5f5a33fddca7aa291bb7fe37ba5c89745b5ad528
describe
'34695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCP' 'sip-files00027.pro'
7860bce60a09f7ecf5f25f997afba936
eaeb16d2fb8fae25a9c6b457b2a9388d657c0709
'2011-10-14T20:38:02-04:00'
describe
'71896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCQ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f50caff0b38b2cf4d85f23b69f4a141c
cdbf3db3d58fc8291ff951e77efd1ac46d9c8015
'2011-10-14T20:34:42-04:00'
describe
'2656460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCR' 'sip-files00027.tif'
962768f8eb169120a5ba1cc2bbb10b68
9c50da6d93cba1da146d2871fd997a0e2267c00f
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCS' 'sip-files00027.txt'
b2bb1c7f1f909b749544e2143fec4a4a
aa284505c717ba5f62e8c77501567eecdfa61fd3
'2011-10-14T20:32:42-04:00'
describe
'33105' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCT' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
72bdd33e638dcb2c7879f435dc0b855e
fe14766329b05825ecc213532b347cd2a8657cca
'2011-10-14T20:32:27-04:00'
describe
'329341' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCU' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
0a27474bd342fe3c3fa10b921e9ff612
cfbc192709a82f4764c844580d26aee642496be0
describe
'181582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCV' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b19c05cb82913e45ae33e9a050913393
257f8befe433af80cc821d152b50284e0555464a
'2011-10-14T20:33:20-04:00'
describe
'32995' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCW' 'sip-files00028.pro'
d53ccc72949f1932bce14c54e6f4666e
d3853c9aba6c3a847deb7859a5d773bcc3c1320d
'2011-10-14T20:37:12-04:00'
describe
'68690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCX' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
5974aa9c7a62212d8865ece3bb136bad
ec3d36e0158a42260271532b406eef4083547f66
'2011-10-14T20:34:19-04:00'
describe
'2656172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCY' 'sip-files00028.tif'
11369704776450a5be9725cbf62c6a42
25b1cb4c47d5c9c14d369cf72af5e5f0c336b628
'2011-10-14T20:34:45-04:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHCZ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
706bea3c92f7f05da8dff0931796957e
8676458575d1a4ae007e133e2b1360e1a93f3e64
'2011-10-14T20:33:29-04:00'
describe
'32436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDA' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6219178ee054c9fd5b18463a74977a4e
11cb4fb1a98331aea800c98f1c1795366526df98
'2011-10-14T20:34:55-04:00'
describe
'329240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDB' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
de42a72527c12a37948a9ed712dbac29
ff182d69dc806d230635b516e274641fa04e2894
'2011-10-14T20:33:23-04:00'
describe
'183132' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDC' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
dc84fbee681a98088eee500a50bbc11b
8913a18d33b7f24e12531a8f04f013d1a6e2cbb1
'2011-10-14T20:37:50-04:00'
describe
'33274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDD' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0914b09ed1534403b0f916c872f7f7e3
57dd6a87324da2408fe7128f9eda528a8d24db31
describe
'69272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDE' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
344380e5086b5e963dafdc124feae703
f3dc97ac968bb0a1b3607cc2fb19dd629026e0b9
'2011-10-14T20:37:42-04:00'
describe
'2656448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDF' 'sip-files00029.tif'
be89fbec6272921d01c206b3e642d200
48b596ac540b79da99ae27778cf151e31fc46b55
'2011-10-14T20:32:37-04:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDG' 'sip-files00029.txt'
c6ba815bfed43f9701b5fe92609a4c62
668c02189fda394ad60715c4e862fb284f00f163
describe
'32651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDH' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d0bd25de0f6179a1469efd8675b944c2
b47f0844c79d6e999c7207e23fe3e39d43f51108
'2011-10-14T20:32:33-04:00'
describe
'329326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDI' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0f8772ebd50d29e9dba1d39fcbbfc12a
de3ac3a7f93e11874a058dcf996d2e919f6faea5
'2011-10-14T20:34:17-04:00'
describe
'189795' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDJ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
8970ce425fc701dd9b326a1c8fda05c5
da374556da38bf3c0ba184833707aa355d7d7d89
'2011-10-14T20:38:04-04:00'
describe
'34624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDK' 'sip-files00030.pro'
6e823daf79d36abddbc4652349fd6cf2
682ac1ab48424d230296fc3fc14cb97fe61f2024
'2011-10-14T20:32:53-04:00'
describe
'71402' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDL' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
d628ea37cc25d128e9b6848d1f66736b
17c0aee2bd864368f87fc1fd2454be266c926293
describe
'2656504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDM' 'sip-files00030.tif'
d36604700e053b291aeacb03ee8c0edc
1409244f71500571dfe0fe6fa363e73b8d24d266
'2011-10-14T20:35:21-04:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDN' 'sip-files00030.txt'
a86cd88fcf3f911ff394541b96a1d2ac
dd872e8f84278043722c852a9192777370840f74
describe
'33118' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDO' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
ce08ea5da8beb8dedb9233e020b3bf84
98cd69cac0767eb6560cf27959bf6b5579d6ebeb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDP' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9dbe9a434ec52edf76b899d839c046e0
3de803fc1545fa0988f0a77485e73a98ac1a3b02
'2011-10-14T20:37:17-04:00'
describe
'187685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDQ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
d7603bc927c901015aeb79ee189f61c5
aab057273876dc60b546d5abb136abccaeba0ccf
'2011-10-14T20:35:28-04:00'
describe
'34516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDR' 'sip-files00031.pro'
e51cc229ae79834ba8db2698204678f3
f22a0013dd1f34f82a774f6524b9d86786326f3b
'2011-10-14T20:35:50-04:00'
describe
'68998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDS' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a835f166627d31ae2751c8b3f28b697b
ff93620013b78b79a7c8bf9f607175771f682bad
'2011-10-14T20:38:25-04:00'
describe
'2656376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDT' 'sip-files00031.tif'
08cc001b47b7bc1e9509992ecd0fedc1
6f825fd2d1b6d93be0eb65b961cf1c74c92ee296
'2011-10-14T20:34:44-04:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDU' 'sip-files00031.txt'
522e0a02dd1dec826e98c70d99a04071
ca6bab2ccc51742fb443f1d2f7cbc8a833302021
describe
'32871' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDV' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
3b6442bf1a5bb116b99ebac7e707cec0
6ff06879c041eeed101ef18faeb433cd7a997d2a
describe
'329307' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a82d812a0628569a23d99d2f6eaabe52
9dea34f086611cad6851455b56c69d63a156628d
'2011-10-14T20:37:56-04:00'
describe
'187791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDX' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
6b2e2244db558793f560019edf288db3
7cf4ca5a31035df6d24b24a4f9ca6654b8b23627
describe
'35014' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDY' 'sip-files00032.pro'
fffdc19a63c1345a60ace36e1ed7efad
15e35eb99227c54fc44e4c53e03a4ccb0e68181e
describe
'70059' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHDZ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1f668da5073dd4172c53006654c90524
e7027383734bff423aaa05a64aef82b9aec8678a
'2011-10-14T20:33:57-04:00'
describe
'2656560' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEA' 'sip-files00032.tif'
efef07f45feecac435fce4e7da210856
eaf169bd8e4061da4170c1e47ec2538345411118
'2011-10-14T20:36:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEB' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e2886428379e48a2ffc77080e16705c0
d5523c41e59d3f49b071c19b1b92a3c9cb1d3830
'2011-10-14T20:35:52-04:00'
describe
'33319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEC' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
562f62af570d1dbf5417fd3d7dcf238e
a0859fe2fa2d27d773d7f1c4f5455b5fd4e7370e
'2011-10-14T20:37:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHED' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
87e60eb98f9ba2d8230f64aac97f1717
bba37f44b938ba6fc0c27f94e5970221680725bb
'2011-10-14T20:38:16-04:00'
describe
'183348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEE' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
856ad053d2b1e37123cb30e43ab00c88
0ac194dd1d6165dba4bc1058acdff044b38eec82
'2011-10-14T20:34:02-04:00'
describe
'34537' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEF' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ddba92b3ae37cdfa60cfc6213b01fe77
5b647086e289df4a3544d0db3058de8dda66645f
describe
'69025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEG' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
22c13397e743c1f1b9a34c5386011363
7d945243749a6501a7124cca14290f61a96142db
'2011-10-14T20:36:24-04:00'
describe
'2656344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEH' 'sip-files00033.tif'
406bf6ca36d5ff60bbfd228fda7150cb
4daab41806fb33b36f2122b1fffc341bd499cc69
'2011-10-14T20:33:38-04:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEI' 'sip-files00033.txt'
ff2658883168cbaf74951de61bef6951
954facb12d377de2285d0e4fd9a4f25ab8076a68
'2011-10-14T20:34:52-04:00'
describe
'32369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEJ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
450bd676cc3c8ac43ef65549fb3bd0ef
2bd1611dc604b299beedd908b85f435b2b04f3d3
describe
'329271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
98ce14828ee996ed4a7ee972f3156d36
510a7373949ca7c3e0e3f1ced766069aee222ece
'2011-10-14T20:35:27-04:00'
describe
'118703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEL' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
a48a677eb836a821b109caea31de3b87
300688aefa106b9ebad67d4dcb922cfa721061c4
'2011-10-14T20:38:39-04:00'
describe
'11771' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEM' 'sip-files00034.pro'
d0b537718092f645a19a3770cf6d904c
848481812ddafc8b0aa63b13f8f29cf51acb9fe8
'2011-10-14T20:38:34-04:00'
describe
'43869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEN' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f22914340514c1ee9d247733dd1632e9
54078f8426ffbfa694120cc7714febd95388611d
'2011-10-14T20:34:16-04:00'
describe
'2654076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEO' 'sip-files00034.tif'
40340518f66b752ea2bcf16f44369143
5c954328af3b9522835ab3006673a06cf12a7529
describe
'471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEP' 'sip-files00034.txt'
c149bbebdb8c52457b55c8673b5b514d
0cd6ce099bca890f0d6c8463cbd9400e33a8e07b
'2011-10-14T20:34:23-04:00'
describe
'25293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEQ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
770ff6997a19d623e88c4f272b5ab388
16e9cae2a8951810ee0abd1381a8587e788b0210
'2011-10-14T20:36:05-04:00'
describe
'329321' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHER' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ff782fb79070069209679fb43a10cfc0
767c5bde0011cef6b6efdf311c2759952628a535
'2011-10-14T20:35:13-04:00'
describe
'174177' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHES' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
31a25b78eb8987c37fd3f83db422cfbf
fcee8bf9f4dfedf426f7f01ae8ffee6251918ff0
describe
'21356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHET' 'sip-files00035.pro'
ed061eac1aa05d12bb0429785dda9d80
296d95d0c561dd8d7cd03bc723c48caa59d2d944
describe
'61462' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEU' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
488a5cc6b0c827baed35b296dd2d521d
7a3d4d90f8040eadf96b42f2354f728d266c112c
'2011-10-14T20:33:39-04:00'
describe
'2655776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEV' 'sip-files00035.tif'
f7f53d5b80407aa63322a7192c01ab02
81648494a30008d3df47dd536e7af16c5f0375c0
'2011-10-14T20:33:01-04:00'
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEW' 'sip-files00035.txt'
e67605ffb1cd82d38eadd39bd0bf9b77
e48e3412fe54714bc1cf8d56012afe5abfeb0bb1
'2011-10-14T20:32:35-04:00'
describe
'30666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEX' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
269902ee658b67957d1fc558370bd6ea
22b126d760856a5d7ea3560eebfa5539d2f31726
describe
'329274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEY' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
b3aedd386015375380f9e593c03a3caf
ff59361c56d96bfe50ed52c0ff34286a5e0da02b
'2011-10-14T20:32:25-04:00'
describe
'189488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHEZ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
8747b7263467969f0697b21decec437c
2a4a6f2691f065d20a1d86116c00ac38f6b48270
describe
'34764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFA' 'sip-files00036.pro'
fbcae6cfaf0dafaeb931aa88b9d24b7b
dc64983407fc31b1d700967d37de107d58e83fef
'2011-10-14T20:34:53-04:00'
describe
'70476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFB' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
21f7e3344149015fb012d11c23709252
b5a4e3a3c53282a51a3eb52e4dda382d47448704
'2011-10-14T20:37:15-04:00'
describe
'2656464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFC' 'sip-files00036.tif'
37d5cadf19edd78f2124ab3bb4534b83
23111ab5ba8b325328b29134570150a82aabb8ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFD' 'sip-files00036.txt'
908b1ea623ed754ec21c5be9a756c000
93b8679b5eac2b16f31062d6f74b85685c969f01
describe
'32963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFE' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
250821305891d0bf71996b610cff9e8d
ac63131ecadfaa7b3621f11ffa4c5e065c2dfd64
describe
'333588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFF' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
05ee63cd2d0118a3e16139875a024511
91e74c6cc68e676b71921f7f38a839e99731f167
describe
'221283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFG' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c0e0a92729d04b0a7cbd233465040575
097725dad702bdda6127b36f7914029e00c6ed0d
'2011-10-14T20:34:50-04:00'
describe
'2303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFH' 'sip-files00037.pro'
34720bbbc4f46004e97fee77f1e7dd4e
a0f1ad5fef09a9638788d9e8e0f050ad48e45a17
'2011-10-14T20:37:51-04:00'
describe
'64307' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFI' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
54365f2d5516553b2f1f9c295dd343d1
4b75c48fe80ae7039b87fcefed55676399966e7f
describe
'8029452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFJ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
95e69f08c96049b74b835c65e9601436
b59885289ac6850a3b377b5bf3e94ae2386470fa
'2011-10-14T20:38:32-04:00'
describe
'192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFK' 'sip-files00037.txt'
7e8369c87d3bec446289cd7138727003
6bc09ee10eecb8cb942f303b0e7e0954f16496ad
'2011-10-14T20:32:56-04:00'
describe
'30956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFL' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
3a93dd36be7c39d531d812e8e1f6bca5
204c9f517f87fe96d7cbdd7c7f566e2de1c1c605
'2011-10-14T20:36:00-04:00'
describe
'325181' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
efe2f903fbb585b7ff2d9ef8aff23248
9637ce59f461e3d4aa32ac34666b6eb9d3bf9e62
'2011-10-14T20:37:06-04:00'
describe
'181237' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
edc18bbdb20f86f1d0b87ef1dfef52a9
c290f53b7ec3d92e28f66b36fa876d70cbb4436e
'2011-10-14T20:32:29-04:00'
describe
'32574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
cbcbe23c46a9e07eaf953ced1421189e
4d03f115c35bf9415728a96ed349d396786773bd
'2011-10-14T20:37:39-04:00'
describe
'67582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFP' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
cb9608200168c83f597533a12626b5c7
df488d8543741f5ae7911beb585154302a3b3e00
describe
'2623128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFQ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
fb5012ae6de30c5a83cd7624ed328272
178f6443d559cc2c524b7087ecf2dda688c3aa25
'2011-10-14T20:37:41-04:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFR' 'sip-files00039.txt'
37d64d70978bc6b87f259bca82b7c467
cdc4262392e3c4c5c7280640f947c3f2ea2b15da
'2011-10-14T20:35:41-04:00'
describe
'32448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFS' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
70b7eb54ccdf178151d54b947e226ed8
8b4c9cfd347da4022bae93dcea536a934c582415
'2011-10-14T20:38:41-04:00'
describe
'329296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFT' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
29592297db47f7de45a40dc6d409d6db
dd8031081b7217406e5727eb1b9833950269414d
describe
'180420' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFU' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
56e9bcbbcbc4432694b9b77d0d269f49
3a614dc36a05ec0f3890e9e95c6cb0875f4884dd
'2011-10-14T20:33:42-04:00'
describe
'32296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFV' 'sip-files00040.pro'
d1bc2e06f5dfb5e1f5e602bc0bb08110
fb8a14f53e645d4282ce2246c9c1c2f047cc5bc2
'2011-10-14T20:35:47-04:00'
describe
'66792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFW' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
9685c280b7a594bdbe19871ca0bd669c
0a8ce1765625810e8e3edf071b4707b49f35c4f4
'2011-10-14T20:36:41-04:00'
describe
'2656192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFX' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d15a481ebb2c725e30ccb91bba85e952
506e24b97916ea46b43c61cf4ab923063db757c4
'2011-10-14T20:36:20-04:00'
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFY' 'sip-files00040.txt'
a4eb92da4bd957f38822b482033116d2
794d455adfae1055833e9acbed4903b85763bd18
describe
'32277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHFZ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7f035869dd3643b533ec02c91b812a52
ad48e12fb7f58521a06c5e7d1217ca4716757544
'2011-10-14T20:33:28-04:00'
describe
'329284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGA' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
9d8122e60b492edc4353bc7e1e78996c
8cf08a54adab2fce78de5e731542a5211cd8a14e
'2011-10-14T20:34:09-04:00'
describe
'186233' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGB' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
68da0d8eeab89cdde1d303ac8865b714
b6e9c3c53922878f58c433d72850499a400e6545
'2011-10-14T20:38:10-04:00'
describe
'33924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGC' 'sip-files00041.pro'
00ae406a9bbf5a96b71399b4f8e54cfb
90bca90a85c31718e6f28932ff2da2ed69a0e998
describe
'69171' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGD' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c1da8a3c9d15a4fec766cbbdbcc8dd3a
6f2c5359fb3e95d19e835e63166e034ae6cc9f4e
describe
'2656324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGE' 'sip-files00041.tif'
671d025328d057eedbd08c2d18627989
8baa2d65eed4f4f5ef316268a94154ac84aec28e
'2011-10-14T20:33:35-04:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGF' 'sip-files00041.txt'
36477df1dda2816a215646d42ec525e0
513aa1a86ca40fd4748251a2c029abee00284785
describe
'32868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGG' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
5681865857d41b39a0959139573c14ab
84912ce0d798ce6c507fe39676dc26b41188cab9
describe
'329335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGH' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
88e3434c02fb600c40897a6e0493659f
8678d51f8abf86646e2daa4fff0a10fbc6a68ebc
'2011-10-14T20:35:55-04:00'
describe
'189013' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGI' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
51f9f57a14c47edc9f242fb46847b842
3a00d916e51d1dd2620c2f12bb359712a149936d
describe
'34608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGJ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
56587c69b49503e37ab01b6de74ad805
4ce1d988548170d239a170282a972b321500a3f5
'2011-10-14T20:32:57-04:00'
describe
'70068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGK' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
3a2f735bf8a28ec6793f6753d820acc8
8b93421dec538959c929f197b9e2097cb343e903
'2011-10-14T20:34:10-04:00'
describe
'2656284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGL' 'sip-files00042.tif'
1351b32c4fbe05b34d3a7077e65e0c9e
b4ef026e00d92d085bcf98fe2b7f9d12ace973d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGM' 'sip-files00042.txt'
3f6571ffa233387298a3d0aabd9e4ad6
c75d27a23c6269b2464d6ae3098faf37fc4bf3bb
'2011-10-14T20:34:37-04:00'
describe
'32441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGN' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
bda1a84585f5a39160da06b0c0d0a667
7a6932c67431a7a58d7c868f69fb2820fffdd6c4
'2011-10-14T20:32:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGO' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ece990debebea5eae4cdeeedeed00c61
f6203b8e9e0450748ea4630461c6623ea7184eed
describe
'186977' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGP' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
245a40928643370bd9ba38e629aaea69
883493605d4fb69231db67c7f4c7ce5fc4c6b5ff
'2011-10-14T20:37:30-04:00'
describe
'35502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGQ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
b3fe68b8f656a69641370a70024a3b94
44a2f50111d9feef9adbffa1e380a9a1ba01f11d
'2011-10-14T20:37:02-04:00'
describe
'69406' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGR' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a6a5b546c967fd25d29608b9e202e1c1
fd97839f39690969501dfb34de04ea8d956ecdef
describe
'2656212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGS' 'sip-files00043.tif'
bcd41285fb4ef64e38a389da37365ef9
cc2798e4fe8abde87778104fdc03e929596b218e
'2011-10-14T20:35:26-04:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGT' 'sip-files00043.txt'
d3d425add6ea87a96d10a1f541dd007f
6c63765f8a7c731e6ecad371f4ac197e19f5c592
'2011-10-14T20:35:46-04:00'
describe
'32698' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGU' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
28df3d1000a7763059c71ab533914aa9
f95d49f4b09c892293f8a598c4f7f182783b0b98
'2011-10-14T20:32:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGV' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
256185d2130ef9675ba5a57663603261
70852859e2b137a96c37d103afa35ca2eb3dc14c
'2011-10-14T20:35:24-04:00'
describe
'184801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGW' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
5bd2428bf79f0853ca1e35a68a47eae1
bfa67dd418769830605f1eaa353a07f3c14b5100
'2011-10-14T20:34:49-04:00'
describe
'33980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGX' 'sip-files00044.pro'
d953bedd7548b451e5f17c035d8747bf
fbc5777a4860e3d99e71eafc433129bd9d9a4cee
'2011-10-14T20:36:30-04:00'
describe
'68676' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGY' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
4d51835ffc3cf9ef96ad935ca1988a70
56d0c5b86cb81fdffd1cce6cea9812af3dcf0668
'2011-10-14T20:37:25-04:00'
describe
'2656296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHGZ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
585d65e21c1d6a515202037552b662c5
fecadf31fb42a81d32cbecdf3dc77490cfb9c288
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHA' 'sip-files00044.txt'
fd643b2adb716e0d9670a802b7d181c9
31b98e5e944a7d7038dc052aa212b2bb1ca77009
describe
'32586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHB' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
9e9394c5a7e4d01eb59b240b35bb55cc
0e6574c81d284d0cc27626c58209bf47edcecfd9
'2011-10-14T20:35:59-04:00'
describe
'320062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHC' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
7dd77c1752cdfd6226b28370dcae54ec
55ea8107d037b44f91813350a8ea4017fda98e1a
'2011-10-14T20:36:38-04:00'
describe
'184279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHD' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
21c8338407393ffcc002091e5eb3ad24
6e4f95430f11c7c8a4ddd61f845eab8073f3b8bf
'2011-10-14T20:38:30-04:00'
describe
'34685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHE' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f94f8aa994c65053d5345f198c60329d
f9efa710e6390a0e8c69d9bf6756b839b22a6856
describe
'68780' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHF' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
fa7fa6734e0c3f00b6f71c91ed82f8bd
670dbd276ef6f7455cd6ce979ab5d49f5cc699cd
'2011-10-14T20:36:45-04:00'
describe
'2582096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHG' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b3c90066d1368c0c2e0d27cdddd2aef7
1467ef474e916f775d42972f2249c2162238385e
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHH' 'sip-files00045.txt'
03b7cb6e748d96d99801e6afa61c4f35
10c915aebc75f1487b7cba36dc24bc2bb20180e7
'2011-10-14T20:36:59-04:00'
describe
'33150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHI' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9a3ec2a8fdaacac8291717cd8122841c
e2d098fa4708e029d7140ed0abb64ae2a84aa4dd
describe
'323160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHJ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5a0c0d27104976612fab2cbff1993b9c
3999d792ddf61ae27534f62785f0d93192ae87c7
'2011-10-14T20:37:24-04:00'
describe
'188176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHK' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
1b47caa9b95a4d6994649e2771e4baa1
0ae2c7492ddcb52333b5f9826b08e0c9bb13b50a
'2011-10-14T20:37:57-04:00'
describe
'34378' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHL' 'sip-files00046.pro'
eb3dc6aa28433331d97729f3686d614d
e5fbb2a38f55b5e900cb732b5e9a2b1159dd4d0c
'2011-10-14T20:32:28-04:00'
describe
'69373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHM' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
24e10024b990efa42048e4b7995846ba
9b7181f16e8a8703129db59edca8c2b941a58da0
'2011-10-14T20:34:35-04:00'
describe
'2606936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHN' 'sip-files00046.tif'
e36db080da2b76f55bc7a8d95f8f124f
f6bfc1d544acc60bc190093f8601f3837e5bd7a6
'2011-10-14T20:35:45-04:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHO' 'sip-files00046.txt'
f812e70cb9b837bd83269a7806e9152c
2adfa4fc45e333b29e93c4e6185416e3923237f3
'2011-10-14T20:34:06-04:00'
describe
'33347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHP' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
31c4b7c2e579dda017fc20b156e99142
2b18048a0bb6bf322b072179c5eec63e85e6f1bb
describe
'320068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHQ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
683c0c1f1b84ff5b815d54761326bcac
86e1b42029543e0344f5739630710d9c34aaaeec
describe
'193308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHR' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
783dbf16753c28c5649522c6c92c4854
a732aa4cc52839cbda74eb44ef285b2d6fbfa5db
describe
'34760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHS' 'sip-files00047.pro'
f870321edb0e320b27ad860a0fcadbf0
286b233d572f716dc5b0d1578cf82278113d3b38
describe
'70494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHT' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
b2c810d41a89e58266886394067c7412
77e3331065db4e2de7e6121075daa7e7d459b694
describe
'2582060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHU' 'sip-files00047.tif'
ba721c49e380277ad78c1e15c11b595f
763eaeb1d1e70145a9978d0a55fb4454e30edde4
'2011-10-14T20:34:25-04:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHV' 'sip-files00047.txt'
c3338846322a2116b4e4c74548a1d866
4afa9b0a87c11f7264b5bc3681aee9cb1c89dda1
describe
'33271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHW' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e374c29931f5239facc4c94f3bcac0af
1e59436d5f0daeab05ef76840d613bdb1bc80bd6
'2011-10-14T20:36:55-04:00'
describe
'316934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHX' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
47ab25a3ed1e87f5e4c750c5fc021337
b5a9032dc33c991cb3acbab74a92a7cc79566af5
'2011-10-14T20:35:19-04:00'
describe
'178218' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHY' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
c960ee6d029c9c24f484734f14076bdc
de1ececd0335d836721b36f7c2b703ccf6c3d4ed
'2011-10-14T20:37:34-04:00'
describe
'33014' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHHZ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
34bd5c40f68ec6c315fc045c72a190dd
05bb3a966e50baf1302eeaab67d2100a0b815d06
'2011-10-14T20:35:01-04:00'
describe
'67504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIA' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
defc4545961961bed25fa70b4f795456
5a7e2344acab1686a3232d16d422a1a17ba62d24
'2011-10-14T20:32:51-04:00'
describe
'2557336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIB' 'sip-files00048.tif'
a0321ee4744889c69a55d0a748e1d5d0
44a5d80254e6a6c0a17938d598f27c23fed780e9
'2011-10-14T20:33:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIC' 'sip-files00048.txt'
38018f9b5aafac29d4933abef6a4f9b3
52f532b37bef61f73c5f20dc33ff4081afba3019
'2011-10-14T20:33:06-04:00'
describe
'33454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHID' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
b7733343bed05c4fd836598370e852bb
5ab50caf86903e05b9c368266cadf22f9a21e4d5
'2011-10-14T20:34:39-04:00'
describe
'316838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIE' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
aae7acf3a3db2ca3ab81ed94ae5bbfbf
b10c2401036dee44c3702d0d7438f1a8f72ad103
'2011-10-14T20:36:46-04:00'
describe
'179166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIF' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b2ed23041cbfc25025c3bbfdf2742be1
ebaff5b820173c8208564ddd1ce5b06037a12f8a
describe
'33075' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIG' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c18e3a03dc1c4282799585b11f6d390b
49d2117566c83f2cd0b985413f68ca00eaca974c
describe
'66171' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIH' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
7155cd1c56ed2415755396c491a64b66
e05fef4c7e20d9ad51d81d0ac2864fb8270b99fe
describe
'2557172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHII' 'sip-files00049.tif'
eb387346c115418fce5bf8f2e40d6bab
9c3e71892f3e21c98dbabf72ba70e53a033dae41
'2011-10-14T20:33:40-04:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIJ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
77b9e680b65e96f21d21e41b6feb857b
674d213e9b190affb943e806e08b7dd3636af9ec
describe
'32899' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIK' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
897de9f6e09b14eeb1da3b6edb664888
5f94cd36a954d6479f98295e6d19d03e60e40ff9
'2011-10-14T20:37:26-04:00'
describe
'316724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIL' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
851f86c74cb3429813c3711753491414
5003ce9e10361c7fca98fb899bccb4c39f62a830
'2011-10-14T20:37:46-04:00'
describe
'168956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIM' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
9332461a240bec4f3bb1326338d59f00
ebd222a8f789bee0827dd6c6d6a08a5863753765
describe
'30104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIN' 'sip-files00050.pro'
2c47bc43cb225eb06e840374375e6051
c900920dabb0d7796e33b5162ed0ad03fefad51e
describe
'62711' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
18092f7eafe15453d303dd5b2ab86a10
d53dc7e49884ef8d8cd02e6fd842d73da3743672
'2011-10-14T20:35:05-04:00'
describe
'2556840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIP' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2e304dc4baec99ebd8b17e1571b41927
244feaf4bf877cdd11d71b02465271a3bac0bdf0
'2011-10-14T20:36:32-04:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIQ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
d54172bf16e616e13c6fd0daf0923b8a
1d67f77ff9affbe80ebaaf820ae42abaffb80d84
'2011-10-14T20:36:15-04:00'
describe
'31692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIR' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
df9c07e444dbf3f11bffaef82f2a36bd
6c19375de4f051fb501123c73e2aff05066f0b5a
'2011-10-14T20:38:38-04:00'
describe
'303475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIS' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
88060ec669588f13a50d2be624b9a7da
1e1262320ca55b5c708b36e4ade788934d03d0eb
describe
'166690' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIT' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
7afb435b05d2ae9a14155d694f774971
a1ac688943dcd997a3b8a0f988671c35b3d610fd
'2011-10-14T20:35:16-04:00'
describe
'22011' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIU' 'sip-files00051.pro'
fbb2962f48278b4b646f5404a8ca3075
b4503c5e4d10d10189b37c8d0aed8902f088b35a
'2011-10-14T20:37:04-04:00'
describe
'60371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ca9f5d640cbe1345ba4c4f8cf6694384
32faaf2ef5a51fc8ed219293ed491610c7169cb6
describe
'2449692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4e5de53c38fd179e08aa55904d827000
c5e4312448b5947d95761faff60e3752689219ae
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIX' 'sip-files00051.txt'
12d7d7dba6b5414b5619e72f0a88ca71
f5372aa5c3227c343548eca5f4c2894cae2df2c2
describe
'32249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIY' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
5f89bc08e520ec274f7a8c9852412d32
7efa40fbe81c9ede90274e1ebdff327651211f70
'2011-10-14T20:32:52-04:00'
describe
'308729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHIZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
22937812afe4068dd5666fc68564670a
e0ffaa6d9865ffcaad97a984bd96e2969cd0d481
'2011-10-14T20:37:48-04:00'
describe
'181541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
4e7695738a7c68bc36fad3cbcd1fe761
9958d1a791b8b3097256e4788cfe079f05223263
'2011-10-14T20:32:38-04:00'
describe
'34662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJB' 'sip-files00052.pro'
90c631077f942be83828a015e99f3ceb
eb7124704b6c2bd8aa7b5c9f6028f6aa605e4f0f
describe
'68795' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJC' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
d370e9e44a8f14993e031cebc4f19211
b004fca9c6ad92ce1fc5bf8c83b67a9386be5a23
'2011-10-14T20:34:46-04:00'
describe
'2491472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJD' 'sip-files00052.tif'
c99a492e707f37bdd9af31e3a85f6544
a078c93026a15b3b7847a923363d6820fea99f85
'2011-10-14T20:37:37-04:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJE' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e38276ff6b6bcf6effa633482f8e9bfa
8f9c23f1b4e46f1e5c5d6afce3629efdcb9ec156
'2011-10-14T20:35:39-04:00'
describe
'33973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJF' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f61d72fab57cddc28c3180c7f21b2be7
8ea91e1323787501f3e69ec2b3b0d9c8e8c620c8
'2011-10-14T20:33:07-04:00'
describe
'308630' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJG' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
082a6b8b2163478a3257946790ae4d3a
37b73bfaf55967e5b7c94a8236f9b9cf784ebc78
describe
'183335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJH' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
a62a3a64f8bd38124b07fde7a4e6b2de
a23a599208e5fd9997165dc8bb1b1857bee77d98
'2011-10-14T20:32:24-04:00'
describe
'35279' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJI' 'sip-files00053.pro'
3ccbb4eb33c638820af81e5fcfa3033f
722d4acadf107946dddee300f851646194c220d1
'2011-10-14T20:36:25-04:00'
describe
'69801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJJ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
9d5ec68fc23ba8809111128fd363c5d5
48731f3e0ea91cfdc0b7c58b5cfae2a0cd3f4234
'2011-10-14T20:35:54-04:00'
describe
'2491340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJK' 'sip-files00053.tif'
47a358abe8adc36350c10d94aa2fb9c0
abf8994234179eb024a0bcaea4e211fea4fa05e8
'2011-10-14T20:33:37-04:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJL' 'sip-files00053.txt'
82a25f3946732c5b369e1a428794728c
f882dea12ab4c655c5c94a45c76cdb2b8a8d1983
describe
'34166' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJM' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
2bc7c93d452c2c3ac97f2ce02c0174c0
6b88ad74b67d82e2d65287781428191bca862241
'2011-10-14T20:33:15-04:00'
describe
'308744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJN' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
c8d301fd081d2b955c51049ec6cc7c00
50d473839c713bac41251a7c5bdc93226212b78a
describe
'183659' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJO' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
87f5586eaaf5df79ace54dc32b240f1b
cd7970045572a4111fcd0b3a83477115a8fd59ab
'2011-10-14T20:34:57-04:00'
describe
'34188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJP' 'sip-files00054.pro'
9483f21296d04d6ceffc68cea90aced5
934fcb40ef99568abdb7250fb6c01179d4e5c504
'2011-10-14T20:35:31-04:00'
describe
'68497' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJQ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
cd1594981fa376bb4df15e4190719f4f
66ac5d34342c1c83beef541af3fa782ef8cb3676
describe
'2491352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJR' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b6520b2a8f28f3311bf1aa78425e7eec
6f80ef9ba7bcd8aa35bd3da971a482d6a10cf696
'2011-10-14T20:36:27-04:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJS' 'sip-files00054.txt'
0246c3c4933b47237d805b689fa4395f
c09d85f1e4cfc1a24105fd02397a260cb34d075c
describe
'33785' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJT' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
2e6b681ccaa936a8611e03196e4a5981
1e1a4949fe3120de5238ccab8c571a5ce125b20c
describe
'307617' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJU' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9d71533d2ebc3f02de89e0cc266a17ee
ca07034a599ce2bb3916f66fdcfba8da13a6b5a7
describe
'182188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJV' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
214f82461bc534061c79c9a82853e14a
bc596e25ba7d5f8d7adf00f0030a4c0a4f37b6bf
describe
'33498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJW' 'sip-files00055.pro'
3335768173336594e9551578c393d07c
e0dc405d92bcbb238157d3e30390bb0cdf1f2d6d
'2011-10-14T20:33:10-04:00'
describe
'66571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJX' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
4eb8220f5b1c81f5eaa1c6191eee6420
c3d9e0c391729e30f26837bcb62037f695186626
describe
'2483056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJY' 'sip-files00055.tif'
dd299712449ce566bd5a51f28dcdfa60
766ce59c9a7ae0e0a5cecbcf1ab37ac7b5ed6d58
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHJZ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
5f9fa34d66962b0d98665202df503a73
ccdc94f869f579eeb226d49619a49e683dc8da4c
describe
'33912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKA' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
c8be524c0191ebd0b3de05bd189725c9
fb1033c7cba256e6297b6ccf43e07d42a4774584
describe
'312822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKB' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
22e4be2b1385447a75e4f1219566c5f8
d6a3a88a77cf2f328384a62edb8e0cfea7dc9af9
describe
'179805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKC' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
34d6d3db43a768b0faf1584f498b856f
6c3820a3967c628b1ec4aee6ea48867465b094e4
'2011-10-14T20:33:24-04:00'
describe
'33404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKD' 'sip-files00056.pro'
1e335334c815d9102b406c9fda750865
24ba9e9a5b62b11da2397f349b7aa636fa1d109a
describe
'68134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKE' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
81233982ff28e109decf16ee16d088e2
e1dd8daa1635aae65b8eea382e740b5401b7c669
'2011-10-14T20:33:33-04:00'
describe
'2524548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKF' 'sip-files00056.tif'
9b1b4fa32d0402466d030f4f012a8d6c
385744012e434a6c9b343cd1a4ee69175d081b16
'2011-10-14T20:38:28-04:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKG' 'sip-files00056.txt'
06d6afcf1f6b6808ad67f4262bab1c25
fa15e09af94847bec06d8a0cc51e6d62b7a4abd4
'2011-10-14T20:33:34-04:00'
describe
'33840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKH' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
76d63fd48a027236f077c7aeda1bef99
f64887ceb5d83887e1c0642dffa6cc3a2ba3a977
describe
'310806' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKI' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
7060a15b6526b52ab825844d17834cdb
436dfe2cfcef726af0e73cb35cbb9df76aa6b0a2
describe
'182930' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKJ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
40d66270baa8effa3fb7ef019051ae50
b105d7f176c02fe314f438e0490760c2a324b841
describe
'33911' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKK' 'sip-files00057.pro'
a10ec6e413cedc4b6bc09f96b75f1eb4
08be460c8717dabbd8c2d5b36a2a5fd34801f565
'2011-10-14T20:35:38-04:00'
describe
'69566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKL' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
4467ef506dbae852253abcffec63f87c
4baf958d3fa8e6d86f4ee4515cd40200824f64a3
describe
'2507908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKM' 'sip-files00057.tif'
02313319cb0d22d7c42318b2590f008c
c5321ed46225dfd6ea2434c45fe9a1b88f5956fe
'2011-10-14T20:36:06-04:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKN' 'sip-files00057.txt'
c7d3ebe1e183535d8511717e01631043
f545438df29dfeb655c8bd244b45cf51885392c0
'2011-10-14T20:34:13-04:00'
describe
'33946' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKO' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
9e999ad6efceca3b554cc424d62dacb1
072cb09fd92434233f0ad053b37b8cbaa2d992b3
describe
'306683' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKP' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c60172e33b90570590e758d45a662d3e
70e6b178b14b76028e83632de21811c2c3bcf607
describe
'178926' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKQ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
0f43aa61f4ad47d13bdb878491302205
a0828ff2e9e082bb4ffab4004c0f3fa5d58c85bb
describe
'33065' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKR' 'sip-files00058.pro'
668685d0f0d5742210990d91793a7c20
fabd370b42e0310cffb1b259767f7afbab2d7d7d
describe
'67903' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKS' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
35a157dfcfbbfaa6e01bb4544863699b
6522e48776eef4abba8a00c42371970771924a7d
describe
'2475044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKT' 'sip-files00058.tif'
4ed5419b61a219fee35a3c5b458bcdd7
0c696bdfe4bf4aa0ab61b951cf32785728a3ba23
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKU' 'sip-files00058.txt'
b18da4471c38cf672420673f7252a6b1
5ed1bd2a06021043d4b587243c97788196f47251
describe
'34049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKV' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
89864ba98bc7981b30aa6914befcbf19
66940edb93cce90bfb62abe2b59b8b6e1f6b52a9
'2011-10-14T20:32:55-04:00'
describe
'310770' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKW' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
0880152122a35bc9400c1aaef29e7eec
c8b70e4ce7b60a03efb440ef1e625eb1363a3491
'2011-10-14T20:33:32-04:00'
describe
'184013' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKX' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
657ae6e44860c9023e2db72c45683733
2a01df209613e49a968ce033d7b85d99cfb97f00
describe
'33268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKY' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c148ae3dbbbc08b21c0689b0ffc6cfb3
2616f55a0240c40c7ed149a24461cf164e8f5083
describe
'68717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHKZ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
1ee4d531c8b5790d219a268d4b6691d6
f931b27bb807085d1e815c30cf70f8e403246c97
describe
'2507948' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLA' 'sip-files00059.tif'
8aad54ed663c2b1ecb77db6c63e3761e
ed802071df5de930a15c82980373b62788914cfd
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLB' 'sip-files00059.txt'
4f5fe8350d46bf93ad3eac228dfca1fa
d0516febad38e0459302e7f26c3a444a61304f6f
describe
'33976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLC' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
750fb91dc07a42e7591a60ae5790614f
6b83d7dcae9f340553751ef82edd5aa89e8306e1
describe
'309725' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLD' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
d7a673ca9c59b55013aea02862c9992a
068afced1161901def9a95084e740bcd664ab23d
'2011-10-14T20:32:30-04:00'
describe
'118490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLE' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
c5e4f71f73cab33c8e79329af30fda9d
c94c909fd81721b38b66ec9d1f25156eae1d94dc
describe
'11991' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLF' 'sip-files00060.pro'
81b339ad0c760c2305138f8b1f40641a
39b71f8abb726a277bd8d56fa7fa7eb072c5826f
describe
'45864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLG' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
6c67c83ffbf324d5bd5c7dd76dea9913
854ad1ddc41f7967281e07cda2a6f3b0a5c9de25
describe
'2497904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLH' 'sip-files00060.tif'
091865a0e1f9945a22d5a312bedd70ac
9feb7ac330ffa66015ac4e2338381fa26d935a99
describe
'479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLI' 'sip-files00060.txt'
51effb27aab3c7bee24d0241d09430fb
54f35be33e57a8dcddd19918d9e47d3da249fcc8
describe
'26969' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLJ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
be80cd61b2f64068abeb4287fa88fd8f
366b28fde977c199417bcb61c3b5b206476d6c87
'2011-10-14T20:36:12-04:00'
describe
'313686' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLK' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
dd2062589243607bf9df17a964518bc0
8f81ae031fc8329f908f19fc28c88e50a1b874fa
describe
'164524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLL' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
3e1e64532901cb50ec317da7533d0c8b
a874f88b5e36a9af9f448970cb45f68657dd856d
describe
'21035' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLM' 'sip-files00061.pro'
1771fdabcbfa9db3e34a448c33383d5f
304180dfa205555fd7c5bb000c01bd2e8cfe475c
describe
'58853' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLN' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
636eaab77a302808e35c328bb3bc3492
041eff096525ef02d869c4d4e271e052d7929b72
describe
'2531840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLO' 'sip-files00061.tif'
ae882327e26d9914c927ab646cbc796b
f60374d42928a1979c15020d72cfb5518401f3bd
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLP' 'sip-files00061.txt'
df211c69e6ab53d46dd534908e819156
12f6396e810e54d16ecb11fc50a7785ae79b44af
describe
'30479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLQ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
4944e0b9f2a67db3f56cb9fc2a76037a
9a18543a3a7a2263023cf95860a479a4e46c68cf
describe
'317912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLR' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
6322090a1e70c179e27aed0f00428bc8
95fb0529c02f0442ea998469dc651487287da7b8
'2011-10-14T20:36:43-04:00'
describe
'176360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLS' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
26f7e7219599a2964754529e4d74f940
59eb614e883e966ac4ad832e15bb25ad8cb868a3
describe
'33672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLT' 'sip-files00062.pro'
4991bc9e99aafd6d451e3613949500ac
ec5d55d0c4fc3b0f4321c534dc86c16cf04fbe5e
describe
'66998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLU' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
b9d2ae19d757e395f6bb51c217767e49
b07126fc4f3fb1048bddb5c5785328915fbe253a
'2011-10-14T20:38:21-04:00'
describe
'2565536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLV' 'sip-files00062.tif'
2a963e753030122f63d18813e0345e8d
fdde69b8b06c2577d69a49e4b2e22b3c331c0466
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLW' 'sip-files00062.txt'
591575f9e04b4ec935c14497965e2e46
d23017a6717334ead759871cfd9581d087b0ad25
describe
'33196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLX' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
16c1506abc93528fdeb31604b95c6c40
111338f8e2f66f7d7d8ccd323cec3b9cf12446d6
describe
'314924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLY' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
f33732c1192f192e5334de41e48c9044
d57e4aa779aad706b05eac82b1e411e4dcddbc95
'2011-10-14T20:34:18-04:00'
describe
'176945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHLZ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
011c65598b10f247c6ff9fa10d121ad9
bf433e3d80ee62595178de595444a828376e6d6e
describe
'32810' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMA' 'sip-files00063.pro'
224fc2ab5067f32c8987d40831b76a2f
202dbc5ab90e3109459c8f17dfeabf2b742362d0
describe
'67529' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMB' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
28d00dcbd23188cd7e4342f2478cec17
17df6257ddb0fb570ea969b876a97d7c926e5b7c
'2011-10-14T20:38:18-04:00'
describe
'2540884' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMC' 'sip-files00063.tif'
1a0c48f2e8eed6945f7f0808f9e68eeb
cbb6cfebb1922c794b51bfa5f91361cfb74f922e
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMD' 'sip-files00063.txt'
770bd1676e5dfe86a700b770776cdc75
7d418e00c7fcdc585856e95e32ac618e2305cad4
describe
'33615' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHME' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
ca284be10f4b7360cbff41c95551e64b
38fdef38ae52bddfbbde377d1c9f384d34cc2dc5
'2011-10-14T20:34:11-04:00'
describe
'329249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMF' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
2fc5aa1d4305989bf75887167d67a9c9
8d7b02f5f0e54df7c432c1e9ced125dbb3cfdc89
describe
'189527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMG' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
a721e43df593cd8aac206aa7484e8042
bf7d34d7e2b787270e4f674d3e55f94e2e3a01e6
describe
'34961' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMH' 'sip-files00064.pro'
9a348fee167e9e2965456a0f53c5527d
2102889d409c192ed3e034aa1fdd86220dd7e5b1
'2011-10-14T20:34:36-04:00'
describe
'70737' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMI' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
bacbd1edd5adc2b6a5e706fde413fe41
16f2257555df184a88b8f3810bcc8e4dd6b7bfe8
describe
'2656468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMJ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
0a75c38f64990277a1743ad6ec87d306
e070a91339d5ee7f1741c6b2fad5700d7bde4488
'2011-10-14T20:37:52-04:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMK' 'sip-files00064.txt'
2e050d6e89f87e6552fa89d3a43b5bfa
660fb9d239054ed51ae849b05a5e11c476ba308a
describe
'32884' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHML' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
492dde3bdfe394029eb437af98bba71e
b588bf130edb34050b73bb393cc703c2bbc307b3
'2011-10-14T20:33:16-04:00'
describe
'322116' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMM' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
ed49a426e93ccbe4a55f8fbfca8cb8ea
4c4fc3ca36ccf5b7d5210e9d316d66023277cc6a
describe
'183408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMN' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
682abb9a25ad68f6ea9d06928b2217db
8a2717962868a8f468e99176a89c700315e08e62
describe
'33699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMO' 'sip-files00065.pro'
bff1619ca05abb77a00e3dcaefd54a3c
e7eec65ae4442d4936df7e7936e266e1c6cf3cb5
'2011-10-14T20:33:46-04:00'
describe
'68667' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMP' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
f508b1323cc7ec9ead9a6c22e261b1ff
06bf970c3a12c807fbcd40a77f11972082a6e94b
describe
'2598476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMQ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
b823e85e5862b447bd3033cfb7a2116f
105c1dfbaec073b1a3cc3349ceab3cdd5e238d6a
'2011-10-14T20:36:33-04:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMR' 'sip-files00065.txt'
0419201e7b024cf105f98744ddbd2266
4ff4861ab8813c47b29000a296e4bbc8b62349eb
describe
'32643' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMS' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
57d6a42d30c2b4e7f3a75524bef89f7f
ec08d62e7f97241c81ba42b38ac4735b7fe16255
'2011-10-14T20:35:48-04:00'
describe
'329329' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMT' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
a5b442b92d882f89897103ebb8c5a693
53ff870c034350606895ec2e373682374e27e842
describe
'184287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMU' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
487df10f900399df974af6abc72275cc
756e2cc1f8069af4159ab22e27c38507a002a2aa
'2011-10-14T20:36:35-04:00'
describe
'34661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMV' 'sip-files00066.pro'
44eb904ea260fb8f1673bdc598505e9a
2338929425f544549a7a5b4e8dc88b9801e32c65
describe
'68848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMW' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
4ec2b8a3e9af9508a3ac4afc7d926e42
dd0445e960e7edbe1663b94bce9cf379d75a215d
describe
'2656388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMX' 'sip-files00066.tif'
a6205f062dcd2d615b482db342bb687b
2613937fd89e830bdd2ed2f8fe99178f6a2baf5c
'2011-10-14T20:38:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMY' 'sip-files00066.txt'
67340757c98e313a9d7b3087b1f7a8a9
c365e6669f1d228d47ef08292347957735218282
describe
'32944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHMZ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
50ac25a4fcfb714fc7b3ae372610523f
2549b09750294ba6bc9cbc16595369612563bd43
describe
'318922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNA' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
9d817a690bf352e04ef3a02f35604e26
5dcb9a758a6c62d3b86d4df1ced818ba7e15d96e
describe
'96226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNB' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
bbd62b7526dd4b421ad9dbdb93c51e9e
71bd0569e63a6a8e45f350f725daddf21c85e577
describe
'7349' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNC' 'sip-files00067.pro'
c6ae81d82721c6a20c97249f651e6257
95fdbe2033ca52fab741d7d12e9fb8ce80e1d251
describe
'36813' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHND' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
ec4e470c770b1845e53884ec79ade511
e4f516de36a70ef1e6a04c96295cc3f10642702a
describe
'2571136' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNE' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4c6e294df37dacaf5d0ee8eb53b75ff1
79cdfbef12dffb5274717d5fa044ff2b62b38725
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNF' 'sip-files00067.txt'
da9bf317bdaa19f2ccaf84cd80b4307a
d5b66335fa6e23c34b10b77fe9415411bc489aa9
describe
'23791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNG' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e0bff6dd789170c62d7340fd5b657378
f52d4bdd1dfeaf768494b926164106499197a630
'2011-10-14T20:36:50-04:00'
describe
'324114' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNH' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
2ad0f2430604a5abdef95ae8d40bee61
6ffa253621b966dc2918336d5cf33ef5727b329a
'2011-10-14T20:37:44-04:00'
describe
'160483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNI' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
919c2df3c12bff0d6f05904e57bac2eb
baa8c5de65fd39f601d6513c0b510a410bde867f
describe
'21507' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNJ' 'sip-files00068.pro'
e00aa5ed2c959f20d3669144e123bb88
e3853014a02ae1224fa414dfec390428d61a9edf
describe
'58673' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNK' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
2e6aefb15ba419599a20a4c9bc745722
90c9c8259dcf263ee1ddd6d9f3ac788099263969
describe
'2614404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNL' 'sip-files00068.tif'
63574ed1d525b9d3d49832c25f57181d
375c7ebd4b62a54cd1b2e8d2a0b38b18ca266175
'2011-10-14T20:35:44-04:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNM' 'sip-files00068.txt'
e37e06def968cd0f88296bd8bea8870b
e6631bdfe74de39617f5a771b6091977d3d1fde0
describe
'30367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNN' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
76d7c29121418120a246f6b7f7bbc5b5
c816bf15f678be8633a71c4a34585be042ed0e9a
describe
'315958' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNO' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c9e6c66d34427f5402df37febfffb279
9afa1fd69eab4d2ea0b001a8987f2bc6fb3678be
describe
'180125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNP' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
7263c5f3d95552ca719e50e5e1794057
1a1d3ba60d230622cfcc73c40470e861fc284fcc
'2011-10-14T20:37:13-04:00'
describe
'33691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNQ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
965f7bd0725661ed663fb7b9a12a547d
be6ec6d2b4684a7b4c81d63b425e8497185fdd07
'2011-10-14T20:38:40-04:00'
describe
'67841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNR' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
b6b88f8d1464f605b3783214d1724239
6797bb2556e9eb6fd9099b9fb3a4fadf1fab6405
describe
'2548940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNS' 'sip-files00069.tif'
2f43123a3fbace7c958edc69cab1340b
90f5703048b0592aedc19ada65439e94de0fa666
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNT' 'sip-files00069.txt'
2bcf8585f186482046f47b64bcaea987
035c754ec68d600a5b33a850c1d34e5036ab2cad
describe
'32905' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNU' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
68accc5415baa8887752f78be4306d9e
9573b205a4efd5176fae9dfba94793edae5e8653
'2011-10-14T20:38:35-04:00'
describe
'325999' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNV' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5db0594c321c760feeb38948138fcc8e
13a0a3b5ba37dd2e4b07967edf569c0d889f8fc6
describe
'191774' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNW' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
a953b73b15ecba655d8cc9e96516e6ed
b3896eea9eafc3810dc22b7254ea52125b869473
describe
'35580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNX' 'sip-files00070.pro'
72c70d174e6f659811242e647f946ad1
0bb08c9ef65ffc438f87ead32f5106459de85b27
'2011-10-14T20:37:33-04:00'
describe
'70500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNY' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
c2a335029f3f4b331fe2529b95774444
737c4eae16ed11d9adc9d8957f2c3a422b69910c
'2011-10-14T20:35:57-04:00'
describe
'2630848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHNZ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
1ad25b38084dcafe28b459bc439afe4a
60a339a4647887cb0c3cfd60689cf5ee5a0e88d5
'2011-10-14T20:32:41-04:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOA' 'sip-files00070.txt'
6bbe150095bf1eff125d88b36df50837
88bf12955dddb330d274b973ef1709036f5a27ba
describe
'32862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOB' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
44da1c519aefa87157c0c5240adfa2b0
f0a635ded4302fa1327beaaec6d57395fc9072e8
describe
'316954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOC' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
4d13a22185aa05c30c0c6d9b88b59933
ebdee598e2d72006f1d3679183fd5ce5db09db4f
describe
'180543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOD' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
8157c66dce03ea24f46cf917bfd7b645
7d2bded96ee30349102cf7da931849e525d21eda
describe
'33662' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOE' 'sip-files00071.pro'
58a4b39a9eb562c36e642dc99960b86f
aba0f2e676e3a3ab4b054dddf5c1f6e6b565d852
describe
'68475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOF' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
49d60c23a1927b80ff6c0f1aa4a653e3
85e6339e4376db49cb7b3ba619c452d7d77052ae
describe
'2557484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOG' 'sip-files00071.tif'
4fe1a62529bee496b5c2460400584802
708cdfdd811ded0f172025e9ca08c6c575b50823
'2011-10-14T20:38:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOH' 'sip-files00071.txt'
80520130a4e9839327c88bb5a2a4fd3e
e9b5efea1049feefa73939b98a6259518d8cb1d8
describe
'33453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOI' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
c94c16c51a68aa3904ede1b34183922f
a53c951c3dad58e4ea8be8e15d1e95709205a65f
'2011-10-14T20:38:08-04:00'
describe
'308199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOJ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
0cda7af285d332eda8d1f9db274fa2ca
ff2192354f9260b6455f25fb3959c556b913bfef
describe
'194634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOK' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
f992e275e23381ebc3d9aeb3349c0cbd
d3df3c692d5c805f5220c3f88b85ca99f1059e70
'2011-10-14T20:36:29-04:00'
describe
'35750' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOL' 'sip-files00072.pro'
87ad0bc32d0041adcad22828c91788b9
cef463be6e26fe07843362a3c2c6cfa886ce583f
describe
'72463' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOM' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
210ee7529c7419baabe89ca66dd84585
abb96d6e7515b6d7d903e631d7a2bf99cd22fff9
describe
'2487888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHON' 'sip-files00072.tif'
927e6938c4aa4c3c8c486855af5f07b4
bd4944df1fa1aeb1c81b9bcfa37902f796e17577
'2011-10-14T20:32:36-04:00'
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOO' 'sip-files00072.txt'
a617bdabf610de2f258fad6ea419c28d
9acc75d4894c359905033762ab6b7d42179fe9be
describe
'34408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOP' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
a97dd193b89467e6821982231ab80370
d41c448ef80a99d9d04ef45221fe77b3c3f5d9d0
describe
'313825' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOQ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
fb5a8ea7ef58dc5c11401e05a314db20
b8198b574cf7a06079d4467204dc165ad874ad1c
describe
'182302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOR' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
0290e76ea13d3012e8417a68361b4177
5792211d8736f093eb6c855bb5a5f9fbd0b484df
describe
'34024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOS' 'sip-files00073.pro'
c7719c2d5bace1173ed90fb447f4aaaa
a3482ba2ddf7364ed32f7fd38f56a4b5a85bb92f
describe
'67687' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOT' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
fc96117109c90ea83cf2ac51e1363bc0
49f3c27de8efe531275b6255dda2486d05de8a7b
describe
'2532552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOU' 'sip-files00073.tif'
1468e943fcc6fff46d1a04f64a0b06eb
92c43d209537cbd17e3c630431023dc24e801f1f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOV' 'sip-files00073.txt'
52ee47467eb7d8a426fdec1982c30517
a68728fe9b8fee9d62d091b0a7896da00711e9e8
describe
'33370' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOW' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
334d482531b87d8c585de85a136b9af9
cf0215270232a201da0ea0e6072e65a6c93bc64a
describe
'306888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOX' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
ae79a124e36b037ece2042032b0ed8db
f2428565eee0148880f21a97f595f411d71b735e
describe
'189681' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOY' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
b149fb02c7bd239ed8139104dbec1c15
bce4d0399aa5d4e8cb7e6483db615bca2df606f4
describe
'34156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHOZ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
9558364c7b16c484a9cb4032f739539c
bd50600a81b3f2c9fe94d55672693e815127eedf
describe
'71782' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPA' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
f5ee1122c752a179291e53e00f5a5a14
2afd4115b31c94557a703301c9042763601c8f0c
describe
'2477540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPB' 'sip-files00074.tif'
b9c673393017f01f854048a89674d8da
9a86abb67fe23caeb204c7bfe4bdfcae5b751ecd
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPC' 'sip-files00074.txt'
6d37366096a5afafba7e5663cc257e5f
a3f8aac40f1dbd58efa941643ef2e24743d586c5
'2011-10-14T20:37:45-04:00'
describe
'33566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPD' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
1d6882789de422843e61b60a192ce330
b74238205fcbf5e2008647e004674c015e104ccd
describe
'314839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPE' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b069a5bd6ca95ed004b538559664d617
7bbea9e9dca1c914062562900f5c7f1db3406d16
describe
'167248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPF' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
fe54953c022d6fd101c7e33779af0f90
b3cff2517f6091badc579397753b439e2d7f8896
'2011-10-14T20:38:31-04:00'
describe
'29878' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPG' 'sip-files00075.pro'
76bae12992109b55fccf0224a255c847
a2378f258398d2ebc3c8a4568329ad717e821442
describe
'62758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPH' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
0c124cb75c2132ac0b4cc4d5ae46a7c1
3a9d744a8473c0d18b00d547703949643386fa39
describe
'2540184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPI' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b9b0c042fe0de492d066433b126f5c28
53545c852c44c76d3236415b86bbb22fb6ead1e0
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPJ' 'sip-files00075.txt'
3ec42df9bd74f941211f1de131852824
8494d56e38734ddac2abd2d67e574f8f86859539
describe
'31309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPK' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
30754a05c5c1ff7a3eacb7865a202c82
2770bc3473f0a2707615d2db00741a87b987c200
describe
'324183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPL' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
06a26dc90b08544616d4864658f7e24a
878b26748b195d6c1e48b10e98714c067fa5cd76
describe
'155754' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPM' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c7e8fc7a8e39e649264790b1605190a1
8c2882f49006fc8cf3083daac4c2f4036770697e
describe
'20332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPN' 'sip-files00076.pro'
8b597a9e3e093e09c52f0960f5392bdd
936bb2ea671aa6682d6f7f4017c3ddc02c7f5d73
'2011-10-14T20:34:04-04:00'
describe
'57189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPO' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
ccc8ce4071e3b1c9764eed4347ff9789
0dea8f02bcf8376d76c9db6aabd89fd4ab841398
describe
'2614096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPP' 'sip-files00076.tif'
6aa7c81a8e4a3e5fa47859e3d6c988b1
13554b09454eef71cccdb4eb59a7c8ffdcc75841
'2011-10-14T20:33:17-04:00'
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPQ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
1aa0d8211d054b7c30e3a8071d05afe9
331cce37fed4c536a3078d6ea508db586b44a2b1
'2011-10-14T20:34:41-04:00'
describe
'29425' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPR' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
cf1bea1d5f0bac63d90401fb87008ff1
31d2c3fbb23a380a9bc8db7d1d470a6e4a542e47
describe
'329317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPS' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
8ddf35b90caad87e6d030fc0d1619de3
65936732f887fdf1474d9e88fb45b942e952197c
describe
'178785' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPT' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
efe4effb6afc3fc62484c1d75dc5c3d4
af91a82a8d67dfb20bc224f3d7417382b896b708
describe
'30950' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPU' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ceb9706909d7d89cb4d9c2e838970a6c
3284a2c885dd3e7fdcd72a6ca9d35101dcd3e5a7
describe
'68250' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPV' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
1fba335d08b04bcfee504aa4df0abe03
7d07a4c99b7f94c53bae22727a36eaf563b5ac0b
describe
'2656380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPW' 'sip-files00077.tif'
e32e9cf947ff9cb23b9624afda2764a3
f9858a02b9930918a512c578ae17a5d5be2fc56b
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPX' 'sip-files00077.txt'
3a0de376bf9d22f88bc7592d075dd927
a28ecb37fa87c0c51c5145892378bc8880752db7
describe
'32818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPY' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
3b46b65b36fe7ea31a51e521abab3d41
14abf7274fef00b56407c5e03fefdd2ab5d09605
describe
'329268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHPZ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
0e3ae628d2040641a196f3363b5ab510
f4fc17f14f65f019d3650c80ce56d3c55659ea92
describe
'182099' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQA' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
36291479d402f1e4a44df9b107201523
79d0b9c079dc52a31c8a09059169ff7137856e92
describe
'33017' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQB' 'sip-files00078.pro'
3ee6bd0b4a60a12aa1aa7c600d913204
3e5d780fa2c9f5b6003c75cec03ae86df4efc181
'2011-10-14T20:37:07-04:00'
describe
'69598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQC' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
29fb5ebea91a93c321857bd3b1e08269
65757543b17a9f3f048801f1d01452b49458ab65
describe
'2656392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQD' 'sip-files00078.tif'
2a048fe9075c891a69d619fbdc1fa258
c3dd24c460ae11a4e4e62ee311bdbb5baaed39c5
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQE' 'sip-files00078.txt'
628a46e954c4daa5eaf6dce14bd255f4
7c2a781b3afdce13a48ec1bfc31cbf38d2efb3da
describe
'32502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQF' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
1b0221670599ff92f5762e1e9dc80d81
c995e068a14e41718fe8ca7a7b89b1f4a24d1084
'2011-10-14T20:35:37-04:00'
describe
'323156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQG' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
f8e79663e04506d862eade96b696c49b
9a19747f5a776275112d66d43a0c7e8e453c321c
describe
'176355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQH' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
e13e9897435b8de71349276271237029
d762a5b24f09833ad6c5244871010267177b653f
'2011-10-14T20:38:11-04:00'
describe
'31814' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQI' 'sip-files00079.pro'
560bed795f65b873669f2613eb3acbcd
03e0de36a84ea25ede5e2f86f28e9827dd1c1c0d
describe
'66838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQJ' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d2954e3c81b2d9eefd0a080f52ac8ea5
3bb2a9389f1793b652f19c99b6b9466639372267
describe
'2606824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQK' 'sip-files00079.tif'
6b01c954eaee4f4684bc676452b5c54a
a7365cb679c041aa4e27d7ac11ca7d2b256dcbfd
'2011-10-14T20:32:44-04:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQL' 'sip-files00079.txt'
ce415fcbb2b4cccd0245b6d371ae59e0
302bbcb2aa6af9ca0a11185df30f5c242ba0db3e
'2011-10-14T20:37:53-04:00'
describe
'32754' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQM' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
e4145a8e4c790dc3bc1f7c0e127eef88
6af8c3048bed0d795053136b4e5d7d12157332be
describe
'320045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQN' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8263e8c3a587237f0f8fc8bccf93029a
79103552064ba9dc1d478d91ce0c6608e9b903a6
describe
'189644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQO' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
2ab8c07d3c1c5d71d27bf174dd2e0e7a
71925790476ad4e1f2bc6caa5d7dbae95d7c341f
describe
'35043' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQP' 'sip-files00080.pro'
918b3c1354404a68e3ced8b1fc015d8e
4b38e09275f92e97f969df4b3b1851983f05ee07
describe
'70496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQQ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
3915d2b6b5fb033703d09cc655c9b0ec
b68acb5acd2f98371991ffc9ebda0366b2c2c32b
describe
'2582208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQR' 'sip-files00080.tif'
2e1f6e9348dd9864b9087e1d70adcaac
7103a29ee571aec9fe02b25a1e5ce99809e0c3af
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQS' 'sip-files00080.txt'
dba2188c94845b4b8c26d3fc964cfe43
b4fc18dca72d15b5fe8bacee54909a4007b38673
describe
'33680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQT' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
8c709ce74d6ae8bd3c5cbe774118ab35
60f8c3fe2b064e9efe2cca37cc605a3497edc3dc
describe
'312867' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQU' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
1f55a2963a8fa02bfd25b8d2bb12f17b
9e895de48e23ab0abaf61bddfbbffb9e49067dfd
'2011-10-14T20:32:49-04:00'
describe
'185437' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQV' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
0a2b5331fe33563c2f5a8131716b1b71
198007aed4730449ef760e746eec96f03ce3049e
describe
'34426' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQW' 'sip-files00081.pro'
746e93e4532d432fa67adee63ed48e45
4390f82ae74ac61bbd938c7cbdd1c3bb4b952935
describe
'70091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQX' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
a05b6849501e3d0c89a6a92cc45b6403
65f3e07719e26080a5c523a31826f36ca941d3af
describe
'2524240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQY' 'sip-files00081.tif'
45d2be8cec50c5c4bbe70192d29aea51
c8b37d01c77c021166a31bafd4f88e9685b7d65a
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHQZ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
5ac781e9c07200dbbc618e225ace4569
48ef92fcaef94b95f1cb614ca062f74f7c97663b
describe
'33557' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRA' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
0e096ca50edc32bd8b1b32a5ec70455f
478ad0627cac2689ed4c392ef268dfb4015ba277
'2011-10-14T20:34:31-04:00'
describe
'329277' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRB' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
a30247291484ea0ad7abec34e2f7770a
f653ce28551d47f878cfd98d34b5e603f94fb44a
describe
'182883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRC' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
fe4d63a27da7628278a754b964f12ad2
f186ab72d75e34c4ee2189e4a87b78471be07f34
describe
'32719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRD' 'sip-files00082.pro'
0e32b82927b92390defc942278c94f49
6c1f5d55959a06bd342d4503e8aa3a3d02631eaa
'2011-10-14T20:36:56-04:00'
describe
'68032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRE' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
0fd9ddb7d969a1b73d0684a3b0ce04b1
07feab99eb8db66d5daf803bd73ad272973c0c61
describe
'2656544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRF' 'sip-files00082.tif'
c102fa9fb94cb59deb615068cf17c150
55579a1aa6e6b792b6e581e15fe27ca57e5873f5
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRG' 'sip-files00082.txt'
56c58ba6bbdb310438ce24284e856a84
e10e167091f420259bc4db0c06a0ad2d6964656a
describe
'32938' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRH' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
91dafa5045efa5b9b159abc420ddbba0
5a97b6f06c728cbdc97bc5a19b687b78a67fadb1
describe
'315954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRI' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
3987d5f787d38f83ec42ed0eec7cae83
08b8d23f11e56afcebe7604f2c91f0cc9cea5c5b
describe
'178618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRJ' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
d0206a823d05437195f0220cf04b71f2
45a95cacee14dcc4e326b8ce272c3396ae627799
'2011-10-14T20:35:20-04:00'
describe
'32404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRK' 'sip-files00083.pro'
f014f294bf8a6cc9d416f30661fb361b
3cffc54d45a0e5ff0c4828d1d0d4a06d9a889550
describe
'68149' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRL' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
783291643cdf63222cd4ad84de53acfe
233a888eaa5cfbe73eb46938fa13eb431e6b4a4d
'2011-10-14T20:33:05-04:00'
describe
'2548984' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRM' 'sip-files00083.tif'
77ce6263ba7ea5c26c2026b4053c1832
3cfc8669d56a20dbdf616da9e4bd01a39c2b29c8
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRN' 'sip-files00083.txt'
c97c45fd6ad15ead258e726eedc2cdf4
6684d6a10021fe8a51639183192d252910322a04
describe
'33045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRO' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
a398d57659253f076c00b2e5cd357f36
9a1ca3c6e008f1dd3fbba831fa0cebf97eca1d3f
describe
'319827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRP' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
dcfc59098f44d20632cacd1516a494e9
3608a1b8c2da598d39d0c9b8436b1f787be14b42
describe
'177713' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRQ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
f7a4018eb469cd06858d7ff3d9c6bd6c
4dd4dae5fda91e8e39c6808beec75dd29c7574d7
describe
'31687' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRR' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b0fe53145571cfa95a8313b3ca1869ba
3d9b6025b60b7e21de3f9061ad902feb909d2389
'2011-10-14T20:33:19-04:00'
describe
'67758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRS' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
4d5bf3b6af0bd11cc19a3aea25646930
ab658b9d97e4d59061ac496e9d4f00e8a391be2b
'2011-10-14T20:33:52-04:00'
describe
'2580460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRT' 'sip-files00084.tif'
eb9166fe33d916682874d3a23748465c
aca10d1b0e183608b63298b7ff9786bf8519f0ee
'2011-10-14T20:34:14-04:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRU' 'sip-files00084.txt'
2dc33a867674f179030e10b24c40fafa
afb007a5699dc1e6491e435e9385edf168b89351
'2011-10-14T20:36:40-04:00'
describe
'32588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRV' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
729b79014d0ff4ac6c03feb41d69f252
a038c4ea38a2701957b8502e8da217ebc50d3479
describe
'316975' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRW' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
930c24c16d60d0741a41c1785a103cba
ebcd82135cf497bd07f5c1d06383ee817ce48b87
describe
'181926' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRX' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
2d6b6deba8aacceddb5845ef157ef3d8
e81bb5c2683f4ee77e10be2141f91e7a6c21404d
describe
'33040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRY' 'sip-files00085.pro'
d67720d00729f09dd1016681cfa727ed
8dac119b2020c4ae36ecc99ba2e91b3c62a95239
describe
'66785' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHRZ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
2fdfb65fad7dd2556b0b730748fc26a4
acf68eead328ac405812e7fe4b53f80432d6e046
describe
'2557256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSA' 'sip-files00085.tif'
9784904ed2cdaa9a0e0afccf63ad16d8
275edebb422c6545a612ddc1518d33d08f641786
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSB' 'sip-files00085.txt'
939e6635b06304717abb53e51042b3db
27c727a2f587ede3a9d437f8cecf2f2a7783f47e
describe
'33043' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSC' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
2219884a335f3b4211d509faeb3897ff
2aea752c14b6b69cc26cbcaeaac5aca8e909afe8
'2011-10-14T20:35:34-04:00'
describe
'316513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSD' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
7700db7d85dff3901ff8bc54970e5525
a580b48db53aecbfbb004a52e4a203c72faa9c8a
'2011-10-14T20:37:31-04:00'
describe
'192513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSE' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ab654de14a81e8c6f5fdb983ab08d15c
302ee880d79cc74e0d46e2c9bf6d32560d324b12
'2011-10-14T20:36:17-04:00'
describe
'35367' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSF' 'sip-files00086.pro'
478664dd55ce4808c0b46bbc97da7678
7851b31bbd8f9c68b88df0644b35f9c798690c33
describe
'71771' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSG' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
4d077257b3360bf3ba8b985195e3cc3c
fdd9cc13f6ae21ac670b47772c8b7ccf13df50c5
describe
'2553656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSH' 'sip-files00086.tif'
07d08d663867258a0ad13a568972b648
44cf11c521f3d88bd78f54a19c7926b7aa64a64d
'2011-10-14T20:35:02-04:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSI' 'sip-files00086.txt'
5b6137d581b6b0178f6b8471a96d5a08
afc2ee712cb7b7e09567dad764c451f8ce2f2df9
describe
'33138' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSJ' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
586aa1a4074d4986ef59d6edb89c5c23
85ab6c8f0a5469f3967b5c9bbe78bf4f61932d3c
describe
'321106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSK' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
8234ce1accb7cdbce2096e07e5b6d4b5
8df067baa605b814b972f2d12d86b066bfa93167
describe
'175042' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSL' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
8a14883bd59163d111c87b333b991f0b
848fd03c1ddb022235ad854b0aab0e1340290cfa
describe
'31678' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSM' 'sip-files00087.pro'
a3b39e405a0f8f4f7ace35a27642c167
5e99eb804b770e4945ae0800af8f27b1a86f61c7
describe
'65269' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSN' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
327d011ffc39ee9bc1f2fc9714a0d57f
9f326ed969780401fbf081de75ccd04a39249db0
describe
'2590328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSO' 'sip-files00087.tif'
1f3763d1d543cb35ca82ead558f0c3e6
51215b0124efd468a93ade68a020b4da55ac351a
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSP' 'sip-files00087.txt'
a783116ed13a921717aa58d0215ebe34
670375bc0a62c8d95f64205746a4503131ec5746
describe
'32646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSQ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
e28373217ef2012b69e63ff1851dab89
cc4ce856461b12f772af3b3b2cc3db901cb3b0f4
'2011-10-14T20:32:43-04:00'
describe
'317931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSR' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
46fefd232d5ae7f5633ab5a824458efc
bf29e4a8203b562032147a6c4040b19e8d325dc9
describe
'180408' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSS' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
b08563be64eb7abf202cfc6d2230ab8a
7bab7accacef962c167acc3ef9f24b1ccd053fcb
describe
'35573' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHST' 'sip-files00088.pro'
78a3737c1d733526f478f0f1e600fc0b
95780d0f496cb26ae40eac16ba69431416251fb8
describe
'68183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSU' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
754700c1c4c104b9c28f5d2693bd75de
63b01dddebc4c48c3238234a8b4b661371f6a392
describe
'2565436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSV' 'sip-files00088.tif'
3a942376245daf081a4dbdfd09562485
5ff3dfa169138098f81ce46964f122241c836f3f
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSW' 'sip-files00088.txt'
ed2e08a5d6964ce7741f0b55bf9c38d8
ac754c68b291db17d8b15c344860098be3e5d930
describe
Invalid character
'33124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSX' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
7bfdb682839ed1d8769a9d329ebf9f0d
6aac06cb9e3a8bd0bda3cebbe64fb3a4fd617310
'2011-10-14T20:33:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSY' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
532b985d482d6344374e20c47ccb1705
a682e18defbcd5a99c4f07f7aa41955de0bc509e
describe
'183215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHSZ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
a69e9bc71c1d5172f9cd41016e45ce23
9e5c0612e40b8efad8fe2c612fac781176c582ff
describe
'33119' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTA' 'sip-files00089.pro'
c652a5a5aba71e573258efc15b060f15
1d5fe7a7aa7d25ef5e161f1218889c67b488722e
describe
'68563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTB' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
5227faa14608ad0df1ac94b58ab7a48c
a4d6cb3e2d88fc1b94ba05977671e3cb39668a05
'2011-10-14T20:37:23-04:00'
describe
'2656264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTC' 'sip-files00089.tif'
8c3b805050a86d517c3d0ac5308a9ec6
7bec9cfdf90a82ff23e8a250383cf162a8e179ae
'2011-10-14T20:32:45-04:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTD' 'sip-files00089.txt'
71d8c9fe0ef1f0c4af460f3c8dd33ca5
52d4b3cbe19a02ae87fc1dc7052ee2b27ff1681e
'2011-10-14T20:33:59-04:00'
describe
'32475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTE' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
af2874aa791c8ae136d581f286b9550b
be59c50eed3c5373d17e91180dd179dba87548dd
describe
'313693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTF' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
25c9b0352cb89c52e3ea91a1b6ee2a7b
2ed65a85c5ee530d3caa8e0c4b42a36f3fbd74ac
describe
'155383' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTG' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
f060acf8bce6f7129a72b1bcbda51e90
f8324e9bd2a1a44a2522b1e681d8d1476906e6ed
describe
'19980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTH' 'sip-files00090.pro'
72978118621bcd5db5813723309550e4
ad9688d6515688e3dfb6e86801847e7e8eacbffd
describe
'58134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTI' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
107052be0d2155f219295eca2b881180
f7862cb2737250a7b31e439f20d6722120ac9876
describe
'2531996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTJ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
9f8193c98b5506c2d784adc1ac5a0011
a15d1a7b93dbd94b27d738d1b88850bab30194c1
'2011-10-14T20:32:32-04:00'
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTK' 'sip-files00090.txt'
75299d0a581190a66bfdc296623232f3
2dc7b2662e10f3bfcf967d43e38aa8549b3bd2ef
describe
'31110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTL' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
b5c5d8746ad19055a4efcc14003edb9b
619a361bd113a900b864af0f3eeb1ed9e1de7775
describe
'319036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTM' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
5fcbd74a7db1a0c8c24d759e431fdee2
46ec879025481831424dcabc45aeaf8b95034c3e
describe
'181563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTN' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
bc637b41157825be7f5863e60d7f21b9
5709aa0450142fb2ac51b25584e940f0b57ae8ed
describe
'33585' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTO' 'sip-files00091.pro'
adcb4b2509b3f97dd7d38d2fbfe52135
d8bef6f946a7232faafa69018391438edfcb26ed
describe
'69619' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTP' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
071c9de4fca74fdce03e5de0a208cdc0
490e5718a57d4dcca6e1fb8189da1b50d9684318
'2011-10-14T20:32:34-04:00'
describe
'2573840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTQ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
9d58c5dfbbe4c783ebb0dd80891b9e92
c06f39db057c72ec20ed333980ca5ad6fd4a0733
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTR' 'sip-files00091.txt'
9d4a11b089b75a4f29c602873bc563a2
0e605b4361a4d19fd33924df1acbc71695fe37f6
'2011-10-14T20:35:23-04:00'
describe
'33173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTS' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
381a27c5a930a58a8423a5999ab51a1a
d67966bbe7a46f02b7964a917153a67500434394
describe
'320055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTT' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
0c219bcd9f82d39b395b9995e673d727
25a5bbc7472f643f1d8c508751fdaf224b64b01c
'2011-10-14T20:36:10-04:00'
describe
'178106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTU' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
086a3ce760ea27d66c1886a0c7b23909
3866fd8caa51b8ba9fe9aee10d99e545d6420425
'2011-10-14T20:34:34-04:00'
describe
'31368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTV' 'sip-files00092.pro'
a1479141d587b599acf962a9dee79e6a
4a7d4d95c03d9c9fb47be204364f46f0bbab9b25
'2011-10-14T20:36:16-04:00'
describe
'67787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTW' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
198856cbe24020d0a25cc49c2ca096fe
4a2c889cc197a0c38f23dcdaa164554d5885ee32
describe
'2581992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTX' 'sip-files00092.tif'
c7d9ec732a66a5c1717a5f4ec7e4bc30
c43727a77670d588907199f6c787c9a88e11b1ca
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTY' 'sip-files00092.txt'
5aa512fa28d1c2c38198837704809a9f
397641bad3c708379dbef44854e00cb09cfbb487
describe
'33257' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHTZ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
355527848e8ba029706f244ad34f9341
b546ca82d2e71dadbca77cd982f21f1c542d1562
describe
'322045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUA' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
ebc490a4b5b84c4b6cfa1dc0b5fcab74
78f8290d6a277871d311289382c95126d448435f
describe
'176755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUB' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
45d7434745b6e96576929b04bdf3fc11
4b3c0ca4062cbf0f14bbcc28e383878e002b42c1
'2011-10-14T20:33:45-04:00'
describe
'32608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUC' 'sip-files00093.pro'
faeeca71ad0b08951517fc388178428a
74540782074a581807f19f221870528045fa63d0
describe
'68128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUD' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
dd02b503ba7ebffe6afe06bdfda8507a
502e3969a6ced5ab02aa7d1514c1d2f8e8be9e2d
describe
'2598624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUE' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e7b117437aaff6ee494b73cd44363224
48bae6d8b21482a49119d0ffb6fc7975fcd653e4
'2011-10-14T20:35:07-04:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUF' 'sip-files00093.txt'
35970faf864229124729ce5fa729897e
8569cc307d8ba23473d5f33f67829609a4c27638
describe
'32813' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUG' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
6a78a39d54956f0eb2e00bebd8ef5369
ad12ee8ad5033135be6f4805aeb22d374631eb18
'2011-10-14T20:38:26-04:00'
describe
'313873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUH' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
62d3a4f607c6c04ec7be2984f2dd6577
ffa4b6827157422a528da639d0b1d5c9ecad9245
'2011-10-14T20:33:09-04:00'
describe
'181315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUI' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5deab46d0f39a71f1adf7c79a7bc3403
5d43fe9c3e75b478606317df5d0b21beb662c224
describe
'32735' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUJ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
db6c284f625d98e32fc3fea332f05a8b
2a04f229f4375356dbe21b2abfd71ab6c13c714f
'2011-10-14T20:36:14-04:00'
describe
'69391' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUK' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
13d87b14476e167600a11929f7128a46
63c4b86d38c8c039f5268e6f93442dd440f291ed
describe
'2532828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUL' 'sip-files00094.tif'
1971b90d994bfc90d234d237b31d1b99
3cbf1c20f1669eede48586af32c666be3d93c136
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUM' 'sip-files00094.txt'
55105dcea1f7da1d80ffb44391808abc
6da5002871824daea192c8af62c8811021ea9df7
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUN' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
de237e2d3d0ed2228bef26a2cddb8454
d9330b8c4a14e2d53441fa16d1fc6431e4ccc577
describe
'317920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUO' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
f19a11649ce310329629584d946c2c1b
625c1188c5b7c8b7ed962ed7213a5f1da68a3282
describe
'176206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUP' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
9172c2ca1123564dc9cef9869b0154ad
ffa94346f702b42fa03bd260befbd324fd4c4d0c
describe
'31915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUQ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
4e998fb896d048ef65ac01bf6dff86ea
dea3f93f92a6dd55079c1b154af16756ca344ffb
'2011-10-14T20:35:29-04:00'
describe
'67098' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUR' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
53251c35225a425174406e8fd66f189a
4adc528db9ea6bfd295f7364de1fccfc08b6378a
describe
'2565412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUS' 'sip-files00095.tif'
db7c755bd9162e57ed4dc8777abcbd05
bda3e18c6b9c6343088c59c4abce922e9b6b8f5f
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUT' 'sip-files00095.txt'
6bc7b0246bc0bd60af099e72d245fd49
47d445a0de73fbc54938a10cad9b6868fe781ee6
describe
'32898' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
62af4ed44d76462c7efa5ab51b638e9b
6eb2782884704e8138103de863ea3a3fc96fbef2
describe
'329316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUV' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
ac34f6cf8150667c609cc8a0fc321bea
0b6625d3fa236cc94f640e0a55cd9ed002dc3dc2
'2011-10-14T20:37:49-04:00'
describe
'184671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUW' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
ea2efa97de9ede13819a57984a91edf3
65c396108c226e9d9c101a23b74cb8e0e2a5720a
describe
'33399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUX' 'sip-files00096.pro'
146923e1b29b28f49e015c7bb89fdf14
a3a95e8347240626f0c6b271081bbabf315ff995
describe
'69447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUY' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
1aaa2d2fec72ab4ed866e87c443c9ec5
f6124d492c4168aa8a9682701e56c0a4a9afa10d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHUZ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
f70647bc66d1ad23fd187187b9b42870
10d0f2e02e0dda683e8e2d954d3ced24a2978d2d
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVA' 'sip-files00096.txt'
e8a842d139af253e4fbc623ee956a309
8fd559872e5353fa359a80806d474be0b0541451
describe
'33495' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVB' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
a1456fb4c90b73a85c669b6017fb570c
335aacf3474612b37c651b4061bc9a3477ab38e8
'2011-10-14T20:36:44-04:00'
describe
'327584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVC' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
afe687c14bcc2471db7114fb73f4f86c
4693a23bf34bb1adbe08251d55a4d4183e68870b
describe
'243444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVD' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
0b422d535617245a6022360cb9289dda
ae16c7ae00c96c050e7c8f0dfa11217583127e1f
'2011-10-14T20:38:09-04:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVE' 'sip-files00097.pro'
e5885c3224e4f9f98c629dfdbde291ea
76cf378b51880b24a55eb4bcfe11527d61b20dc3
describe
'69819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVF' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
5841bf120691d376058c57e8c44cf485
2528c6850bbb30924a3f958cb3280ca237e6868f
describe
'7882228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVG' 'sip-files00097.tif'
51898985797f8bad82a11ff3c1b84ff9
23be38e5e2a5917d79e5827390d0eaa01e507247
'2011-10-14T20:36:11-04:00'
describe
'131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVH' 'sip-files00097.txt'
ccfe694188d6b062ceba40cb11776482
a4b306ebb7841f31e236bb27dcc2beff866b4e3e
describe
'32659' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVI' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
8ad5684250e94f7e3d6770460fab7269
df16771eabfb899c343c5ab193132a5bd7ce5fe5
describe
'319047' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
b081d177e356ccd32183f0b6db498f72
62f96cebba97a403de1a1cd4abc5e9b596789714
describe
'179025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
e6c4acac4f0cdd47d772c9862ca3cc05
e2a39b1173fae4743c4da72dd50951a038c27ee2
describe
'33088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
882cde277a4e63b73345e93f70f3f2a1
f12d58cb981b3f763863c76341a30850e4a26a69
'2011-10-14T20:38:06-04:00'
describe
'69134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
5f5b50ba3c586acc5a5580304d106ab9
59ce9a6c045f1a45359598fd410a107663cddb26
'2011-10-14T20:32:48-04:00'
describe
'2573892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVN' 'sip-files00099.tif'
414fcba41ac3e1094ef995374dadcd84
24144a89c49e40bfd891f0fdc4705a9afe6f1630
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
26bf0638afaedd1440130c28367417e4
c3663ad3677e7f15895192a6693f9b470d709a33
describe
'33143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
a2bba22935366a0a5645fae6d62e1dd1
d83b5c56da7bb5844fc6d677711ade915068ac4d
describe
'321273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
2d44ee3377d450bc3dbf93969303df53
5cce51712885b858992082c39453150cc10172de
'2011-10-14T20:37:36-04:00'
describe
'183403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
66147af74fa6fcea4402072f458547cf
8f9d7bd1cf088bca2e66919013d4d17cab2b373a
'2011-10-14T20:33:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
e47137f9573644b4f76db11dff49410f
b408ad1b895a5dbf3b0e53ea11ed15968aa41501
describe
'67941' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVT' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
f20c0ca6edc2b398578796c520f70a09
972a136a8ce94c81ca96798d08c220d6bdf643e2
describe
'2592304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
35c3fba50bc044fd389a349b224e0e95
f40f61e263f2f57d7b49e4f679c511f2b3ec2ffa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
4607ca20d32d77ef27506c5f0c4bfd11
16a6e6fb035781371bbcf0dc2687958e2f342c7f
describe
'32855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVW' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
28cbaa654210bd0f03183b3ad1104aea
bffa273c4af444fd1a2621efa4d5116c4902f7b4
describe
'325202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
bcaad53ca21b8ce844ed722cd3dcb9bb
67e994385cbe79bc417248f9b2476d371f7fa4e2
describe
'184901' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVY' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a4736101083261edc5af860a752622ee
163a519f669a6ec57ad834abd72df0a22c09fca5
describe
'33861' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHVZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
cfb021467f1c94efc160255fd9909ebe
6c3f673f76fe2c1a2f8919ccc9ab358110837137
'2011-10-14T20:36:31-04:00'
describe
'68675' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWA' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
2a516f8810b9bfa9ebd0c91f9cbbde1e
cd817ed6213bc26f9221a3ea6ff05b9509d1fb1f
describe
'2623348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWB' 'sip-files00101.tif'
30b3c1e99cc61e34a142b83ed9c73c1f
f59e52d592dc1587274c7df2a78de090f3f33347
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
9b32ed9263c94c83b32c081b8d2d0289
5dd35aebc3b6e23db0559c0fd27f64932ca53313
describe
'32910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWD' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
63e97de93f9af9255c22eb4b57455f9a
3d2977b8e6714928cf9b37392a843cf0484ab662
'2011-10-14T20:33:12-04:00'
describe
'324977' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
210802a61941ca8584a08acabcc42d13
c8e5400273a1ec63a41fa1bd447bd958cf395315
describe
'96756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWF' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
5c29f2953b11a61bb07b1e0bdd504fb5
72561e53942f47a5372c229f502e328ddd0130fa
describe
'6732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWG' 'sip-files00102.pro'
4682796d39fb5706a6d522f1c8abedd7
d54837b699ea65f12047666fab120df74ce1db2e
describe
'37182' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
7d45c0de35d2d57f9f8ce6bbb6569c50
21572992df96c9dea597c291b8c7ddb28d0ac768
describe
'2620552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWI' 'sip-files00102.tif'
b16421cda2290bf3032d92a787e250e9
3cbb679b10a7a5cccfbefe7e958edde816a93694
describe
'273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
929f67853127e46c97836dc55349c449
62fef34d3c66f7a39e09ffb8c22c3a5a33d5bf0f
describe
'23697' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
ce90ae23901522c0c9a8ae4d8592e914
9ff5e96f75b9623f9d42f2dcff22563e96bb61cb
describe
'329352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWL' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
c0605996deaf2b23c1dc833088cfc372
0fa389cb6c77f8fbde31846db4509f5809c3047d
describe
'161862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWM' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
918cf9605b21142491d26727d9d1e9f7
91e70be3584b520e21fe9ee2b7f1609fb56829a7
describe
'20883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWN' 'sip-files00103.pro'
603e2d71aaa77b26516cf5e3bcdc4196
d3fc3d8c0f76a3c5b69f8dcd8773b97cd316bfcd
'2011-10-14T20:36:23-04:00'
describe
'59806' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
f392ffd6c39f90eecbfbf14f5c479742
52969f711098d931c36fbc7336af19fd0060d492
describe
'2655716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
5fb49e42a49ede048b43f7339c29a22a
7bb37a262514393338e9672a59244b84cd22b408
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWQ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
700def0e2127c63fc4186dc95686ac7d
40e7d94999c2c0825d530ea8c68ffc2e00203220
'2011-10-14T20:36:19-04:00'
describe
'30490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWR' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
2c508fdc2ace6bb499d0d84414db361f
f9173589e71c292490a2375ebb45c3e996d98b36
'2011-10-14T20:34:59-04:00'
describe
'329340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
47188919b554adb3f456c43a9728082b
405914f4f320f9cf5c3bd6444de6a5d370aef9ef
describe
'184409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWT' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
26ed2195435be37d6643c9eee06c1252
8227a9a5d15351b6d4a2f4fe36a3101cb9325712
describe
'33747' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
373ce96e85e064878c75dfda63e7b727
b238900bcd26228546d82996636d9679f4d921cd
'2011-10-14T20:34:21-04:00'
describe
'67889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWV' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
5c7608c8da04917a945e2627070d50bc
25c077935230573c4bf8ec9dee29621bf270acb4
describe
'2656168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWW' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7572319a43ad25665521ec095a99427d
8fbbcc4e3ac05387fadfe8a045bb43fa16648044
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWX' 'sip-files00104.txt'
3260781b8325e1a89af57ed6600deb81
309bebe64e2afb768caa9d20854bacfbe77445df
describe
'31844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWY' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
523a0a6520dd03a1efc075ce50098d23
98a50075504e3b4bdd8c61044af42d2c225afd84
'2011-10-14T20:36:21-04:00'
describe
'329269' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHWZ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
c118b4d39748f4c27014ea1f247a4741
bfabbc07f68004a27cde96489c2603f89e1c639e
describe
'183769' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
b4db31912b7c4f6f92284c9dfd48eb60
d45eeaa67d74bf1359f2fb8221d83c54145d1236
describe
'33238' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXB' 'sip-files00105.pro'
7c6eafeb8b9ac6ed6917cab111975aee
1ca11bc6ec218c3567c4cfeb94d7863b7d9cc371
describe
'67430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXC' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
04724a95e53bad89777d8b18ca4d5f90
a3192270328bbebc516b5028275ab9e3f1995907
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXD' 'sip-files00105.tif'
c158ef2e6c83f4bd27bab4b7b8758d6e
11d57f4d13b699c6ba952a4255f26e60de24967e
'2011-10-14T20:33:48-04:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXE' 'sip-files00105.txt'
f77bf1d4b06073d29a8e5b8de82ff214
16075e9f623d34aad8df166b59d11540be565161
describe
'32252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXF' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
6531dd2606ae6ede4f769a21a5e6f2d5
6d2d17101dee1205de5c9fb10eff2f9b0ae58bee
'2011-10-14T20:32:26-04:00'
describe
'329331' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXG' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
3756145dc8877eeabc5088e19abb3bc5
dc6bdac2ec775a00df3015b94ab57157d9791a3a
describe
'188596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
ff160eccfaa4ab8f721033406ebe254e
2bf29c1658b4a82ce3bfc50021505250506d11b4
describe
'35476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXI' 'sip-files00106.pro'
4a11aaf23105322b62cd47e2e680bdd9
daa3bb1b8a2e25737d821200fbe80448d565fcf1
describe
'70702' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXJ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
ddb5191eedd021dba76c9a33315cd9bd
3916edb813896e89ca97a5983347228f2bef0d0b
describe
'2656336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXK' 'sip-files00106.tif'
cf02eed3b9efeea825615e2b804dde23
f4cc7e841953bd360e832ed29ed2339c2974dbc8
'2011-10-14T20:33:36-04:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXL' 'sip-files00106.txt'
70a880f6398f2bbea60f2f109505d37e
ec61eb4e49dbd60ad882aa6f7af2a1f4ae497467
describe
'32624' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXM' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
715d1dcb76e4edd01ba0d8a9f8e56df4
83f780e60f9572f1999556a491529a00f1fab84a
'2011-10-14T20:35:25-04:00'
describe
'329294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
6a79304bb430ba8bbf2cddb8aafe737d
1eedfef41ca63245712e9e5a877a64ccf5d1f888
describe
'179998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXO' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
6516845177ded9c235b6acd9c4540e9d
b334c7a03aa0c60dc2591f3f4bb274d43d82b0b5
describe
'32801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
ed115fc106c1d8de3ab9384067c9e049
3db6e5ef5fff597aa51c0ef49f92b4542dd7197a
describe
'67355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
16731e918b19de8b124b6ba0bb80d364
a509a129946c3bff09aa933650ccb43b6e97bd0a
describe
'2656312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
5cd4ce59d4797efc387416bac7c0411d
bed2a2a92bd724765f5f9aa892a3ed8b031d29ec
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXS' 'sip-files00107.txt'
99648fe68342c2abb32003e53031d855
1238aeac94742a1478672396ee1e22353748b6ce
describe
'32595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXT' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
6f7ef8a6b2cb7fff3dec775cb20176a8
4c13e883ebcd0e6311b5e1a7392d8e760d6760f0
describe
'329291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXU' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
2a6a69dde3871927aaafd56776f9f2f2
2ecf093b1ddbfc9ea6912d5b96ba9c4fc6a4b913
'2011-10-14T20:36:49-04:00'
describe
'184107' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXV' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
2eb0f5f22b894e9b1a0eb14de4235086
f1cb73e243d11cee6beef88acb05c929b0252ff4
'2011-10-14T20:36:51-04:00'
describe
'33123' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXW' 'sip-files00108.pro'
d2313984f88e04e22c6ee8bc94aaaac2
eb58831f71a033d2c55f82501aedc8c4d52e80bc
'2011-10-14T20:37:22-04:00'
describe
'67559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXX' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
f855b96640ee7e80f298baa252887874
636007046a93ce05589d0e409e02449d7409b092
describe
'2656248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
729ff7e615092036db7cc64163f077a4
f204ee43b0c421b34f6af96450ad5d9ea3426860
'2011-10-14T20:36:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHXZ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
84c69b3c137e7d730a118b85233e01b6
628d66735ddb301e893bb56544f4775510f1ba10
describe
'32590' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYA' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
bb84e993446962a778793c6426f371eb
758eea352a5818f6d51a5c707e4d4829b0b61db3
describe
'329201' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
90f6dd7ced038184be21e9dc12b39ced
6a1b984648bf918c608b3a34b6081539e8bb9a4a
describe
'174613' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYC' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
34b7a441507daef2c5e4dcbc7e9fe948
b49f478157dd130531eec39c51eeebd77ddfeba9
describe
'30091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYD' 'sip-files00109.pro'
925c0a69805a047d66327a9f1d7e5e59
9fbfacea0eec2f321c30dbc662a68621921aea15
describe
'65930' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYE' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
2bf81eb0f3881df502705e9deefcfb9c
ad1d5a4df2eb980e15d1ad6c4db730c117abbf9e
describe
'2656328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
8feec772f18cf8b46231765b29f26a33
2ea2412741252643ad20e260dc75f4a282361d4d
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYG' 'sip-files00109.txt'
8e10f1648e500883f103c95079eff159
b9981b872ee8142d56d879458636785e705c60fe
describe
'32261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYH' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
58bf5e9c3c59289b88b784d117f494b2
7f3d4cf24804018dadb57b8febb7714524c41252
describe
'324184' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
72a368a32033af1f2431b44e26b227dd
a7860d1a2402c634de15d072bec04bec76edb6f8
describe
'168406' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
f4406f4889d3b18679ad5223745a07e5
eb49dcd97433091b831f55314645a12a03b0708c
describe
'30027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYK' 'sip-files00110.pro'
87c1612a8518d2ab8e4524f82dd03ead
689be332e59444a13e2dcf0c9e3cd2e289a30c50
describe
'66063' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYL' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
2325e12694825bf375f8f94362e44221
8e470f442e29dc98907638b032d41c53ce09829d
'2011-10-14T20:33:02-04:00'
describe
'2615120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYM' 'sip-files00110.tif'
312af6f76d630c10f1e163c1dc642345
2bb02cef8ed69c9ab5292edcbeb702e353f8aaf7
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYN' 'sip-files00110.txt'
44f976ac0b39d9e01165413e04123b77
7c7e09280b5af9a71a8790aaae6d91ebeac7dc6e
describe
'32549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYO' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
3d923bca78bd2359b456dc34b6bc1176
f7e51c320328aff0c8ec73e2b0e702ce5da43668
describe
'329355' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYP' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
75597d10614a37ecae9952d25993a6a2
b1d412daa8c1de318576cb2de83737a55f5f7e71
describe
'178747' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYQ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
ab4c1e52b3550308969f2e0c0bf3ae94
88652d0fd8bbe1fffb753211f65f951503e0f452
describe
'32329' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYR' 'sip-files00111.pro'
be4e46f613e3ccbacc65f104fd7967fd
f494061c7b7150f8bcae43a2fe73d5cb03a187dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYS' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
df232f3a5ad45a4137c226ef756ec210
d433facfcac65a296221b72ef281f0b90117005b
describe
'2656436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYT' 'sip-files00111.tif'
f99548e56367da5768e372e14392914f
91f023a6145ed4028c7ee6da3d2989bc9ad960c8
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYU' 'sip-files00111.txt'
e1990efa18e0f234657925f5c6ca2d3d
3dc4451487c2258acd76806ad66e991b99315b08
describe
'33035' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYV' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
b9fcd0df8bc03a0b5cc76fcf2cdf093a
58d5357a15eb78f0da48a3546c4b8e6ff69603fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYW' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b16741b7919144f8ec081585b39d2515
8f791912f6aa114183cb34536194890b93e6a57a
describe
'184021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYX' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
8c0cbb32ca53e22e92ab3d777a4ab81b
3ac1fe9abb4d9c121d3c97bd3577010c3b1df395
'2011-10-14T20:35:56-04:00'
describe
'33255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
285f808c7ec4a6ddbfbe4f74d66038a4
dd539681307b5bfbe96248aca492f8fde2ccfff5
describe
'69253' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHYZ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
6c3497800849d57bd60ff8e10858cd9e
de65ba4d41bce68c9e5dcfd22bc10741515b584b
describe
'2656428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZA' 'sip-files00112.tif'
fd00dbdc3f03b3c35ea52f20d267e297
4517d835aea5a9e2096a5bd8584a2c86ceefd0f1
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZB' 'sip-files00112.txt'
26a284516ce9d1414aeab5d221c0a481
5260498e1a33abe0e5bfdbf2ed80ee69fb3dbcb7
describe
'32787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZC' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
b860a7cbba230da82f49af9685ed0fcd
d6f3579eb947b6354abd2bccd6b7753afc4830bd
'2011-10-14T20:35:42-04:00'
describe
'329275' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZD' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
b96f1b3cd9c5944566f1c5f23903b99d
e31d7b0b93dba1e58c8eb77d458b923a0b9d552a
describe
'185349' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZE' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
eeb0f636b3a04050e57ef45b65072c73
8ebba72021f8f45c39e6b4d46bee4beb53c1c5f2
describe
'33306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZF' 'sip-files00113.pro'
0a542acfa30ee52e6be02e32a866f360
11b23f6b84436dff54a9a3900ba2abda0da76e32
'2011-10-14T20:34:51-04:00'
describe
'69555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZG' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
b18a5edd08e18ce50facc939947ae7eb
448cf19925bca4ed6cf37559c647e3f6349f0149
describe
'2656268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZH' 'sip-files00113.tif'
582cbce0578dbefb2ed8a22e976c2d1d
7ea495b398278f6332bb305d12928e7738395e19
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZI' 'sip-files00113.txt'
d4f5daadcd82ddff8a6f634322d1d2f4
16544288248036b995b221aff668786afe716d69
describe
'32874' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZJ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
cbbe136b162d17716a4cfac7ec337503
e648c9aeee98f6cc3c4f9523c592c36f1d809314
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZK' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
340d1409e994265e1e2db9634fd66c02
ad5bb33a3f323680aa95e037a350bd304b7d793f
describe
'175206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZL' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
b5fe1cc8ac387c4ed3f436979d9cd1eb
df9f542c92d204953865ac16ced1fd11be96ed88
'2011-10-14T20:34:29-04:00'
describe
'31811' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZM' 'sip-files00114.pro'
b9d96d92a6f9f13516c4710628399d3b
57018dd49ffcbb1d9b497538b7745b5a32ecd1a2
describe
'66990' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZN' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
a3de61ab68d073616b4141eca2ea1d7c
093b4d05fcedd5765ad11e6325164f19a71310e2
'2011-10-14T20:35:33-04:00'
describe
'2557384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZO' 'sip-files00114.tif'
d89a97721e237992310fed16a0722334
4a2695ec1e1a5ef995d10fda619bc4d3247def32
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZP' 'sip-files00114.txt'
9022d9852eca4a1684505c4a62118a16
d7a682bf2acbf4ea5f7e0084ed88fd567a89ed7c
'2011-10-14T20:33:13-04:00'
describe
'33101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZQ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
50c4db095b6cc56196d275f07ccad994
0d75ddb40b08cbabc07d993fa7206a8c68cf7f93
describe
'319958' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZR' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
703efe904c6b96c6932ef51da7d4ceaa
98e9d0c96d0b9a9502b85b834aa6cf4f3bab3f74
describe
'186027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZS' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
aa83b379597bfa0664c8dfeee6b3b28c
2185d1d450b5b71aa7fe0801f740da1ef6a0f4e2
describe
'35115' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZT' 'sip-files00115.pro'
340bc9cbee834e61ff9eefaabd1374c9
ed830f41e652dcfe8ca83a3d3802ff8b277db73f
describe
'70283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZU' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
418e205ebb3697638205a0eaca8e6dfb
8c2da00f3ddc5ca837a3f4e95a3fa93493a25043
describe
'2582192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZV' 'sip-files00115.tif'
1633d4755047b5966d3744c500422951
a796c12f34150b0c00c8be67b2dcded7f7598053
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZW' 'sip-files00115.txt'
0b4eea8f123da2ffdaf355a32a746f93
bda038fb22ec4b1ca949b6d791437c067b8ba781
describe
'33286' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZX' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
3e4e8e8bfc23193b0b13e364098a798f
cb9f393fc6e5c7fb738cdd1a0031c2e51539b228
describe
'322104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZY' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
80cecf70b3bdf74cdc8d3a59efae3139
cf041ebf09e3ca838b2b771405013d5b4fc835d1
'2011-10-14T20:35:08-04:00'
describe
'183305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAHZZ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
69ddfe8ce7e1184a4601cfefdf15321b
84459da2d23011e0da7ab67ca9cb8027efd31a8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAA' 'sip-files00116.pro'
c1e333f64f93003ee335c3ee04e35fad
d2e2d8c5e04e0d94f942c04efc96c06f13cd1d13
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAB' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
d38061fbe7bed43e1bd77fe9296e1e74
e10562dba56e92770531e073a1313a976f2c4e99
describe
'2598452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAC' 'sip-files00116.tif'
5aa6951811d33f01d029510b90a5cce4
0dc3c06c040cbc6794b1bf747a08ead864ae93a3
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAD' 'sip-files00116.txt'
759e57dab715c61e0361999c43527176
fe9f45c5a8d764a139a6aa4891d66bdc17c4e955
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAE' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
24eb13b5210a14add06b3071c099004f
c1928e7c373f2381d6109eb173f03d93d2768f69
describe
'326257' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAF' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
36ecc46f17e075812027750dd3ce6500
a1033ab857a54dbb3d82366aebd33c0f60d12e44
describe
'185471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAG' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
a74aa5e7cfa23bfa3dc76d7a76a75054
5ae0c510743cc76bf71cbdfd378d89e5a01c7209
describe
'33410' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAH' 'sip-files00117.pro'
8fe84803bbea26f41961c9f141a1a813
09ee7bde2a61060fc150d36ffe7e557cec6f4d74
describe
'68979' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAI' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
a2441f2ce2c0b5d9f08cef7f478d0893
ba67cf5c80e73a5c577647804ca1dd0162931c8a
describe
'2631548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAJ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
2b69a7a9d6117a9f488923947a26933f
1acfaa9dd72f90bd6ec98c9e14d0e9436588f864
'2011-10-14T20:33:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAK' 'sip-files00117.txt'
653e5dd0f5256808b694047e1d41b91f
fea9f9804b25cd8af36b0fb53721eb30a11a1123
describe
'32742' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAL' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
e850b564901fe6389d8ab19ed465783b
e277c59ba8375f43f0f1446f52a53fe255b0ef42
'2011-10-14T20:32:46-04:00'
describe
'319861' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAM' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
2fcf2b0693ae376a16d6160300d56fcd
cbded65cc65ce6ab7befb8c87b24fb5e365180ae
describe
'154283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAN' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
243d007a362001b45c3b0cbea27d4827
1cb2563c8349e85a1cc89986fc23f354e8f933c7
describe
'19940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAO' 'sip-files00118.pro'
cfab1984d0df690a5c77b8ebf0803e32
5177f5d8c92c71257af2124ad5e36d1ba7b90d5d
describe
'57656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAP' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
84634c6f9ee4c8d56528602c5bd69cf8
78403075f2a3818bed1ff923841e0ed9c1e7abe0
describe
'2581456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAQ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
7c88b73767549c47b44bc22804254b86
a61d668acf8b35919112ae0fb82c4c5d287c1df5
describe
'845' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAR' 'sip-files00118.txt'
2750328c18b9d783637abc12af81e883
b04c69762d7cea6781f15d083ea8de853858e715
describe
'30375' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAS' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
388879a508d77e27b56eba799f70f905
9738542eeef5174900eb7b07f0359c3c1bfaaadd
describe
'329252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAT' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
7dd29aeb968d3ff8e77f5d701a9b8a03
3c882969d0e85a994137a78041ed4c29a37ab3dc
describe
'183888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAU' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
68f3b88bcafaed56cc0016874fc877c4
8a54667b123c96c7f99ffed890a31430bf498357
describe
'33634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAV' 'sip-files00119.pro'
3600e1e687df4aa7572e3883eaddaf86
723f16830cd15b1da9553c44f550428ab9895f47
describe
'69991' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAW' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
77043ed1339a536f0e8fdd3ee1e009a4
a8d412091179ebfcdade03198f5bd79d4eda7343
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAX' 'sip-files00119.tif'
e4f7dc6fdfa9e752620e8481626fcf0d
5950eb7b7e11dcd041154904757293ab5c0cfb91
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAY' 'sip-files00119.txt'
416ba5598f58cda063b7e86dba59bcc8
6ed63b5c0d36bca0fd8ee1ffbe0b5b974580c0df
describe
'32937' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIAZ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
2e13d3f4cdfc1435e8b5fb0a125b8b37
5e2ccd7c0747473b29d4c9c733f2055976e45274
'2011-10-14T20:34:08-04:00'
describe
'319302' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBA' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
010793dec0520f5fef4e402a3bfa6c7a
0873aa785461cd9e1e4a2a41cc5de244a23e6e5c
describe
'187557' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBB' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
44aa6ea859955eda0b16f880d4884aad
490c294c6f3cc2f1afed380ae006c088a04034bc
describe
'34124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBC' 'sip-files00120.pro'
ff2c77ac9129a53c7aa8aae6fefd27ac
f62370360a7cefc712d0d5dc8868e0a16ab62e50
describe
'69749' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBD' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
18bcb66ba63f7f03d1bdd8e13edb5f9c
315f039f96c96a99e4c3ba2f0e3ae25a597b06bb
describe
'2575956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBE' 'sip-files00120.tif'
48036f790157b5e981ce60df556e038a
7ccd845c4c3d2c3bad473a215b2607f644da80c9
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBF' 'sip-files00120.txt'
c43a086f098b7f57d1ad56bc51722fde
36564ceb5209346410b03a516b10c89d0f253d91
describe
'33261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBG' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
bee564d3caed27ccf7d772ab1f1ea2db
bbc711a2da68220ac4f809179759ad86180ee195
describe
'329258' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBH' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
f717a4949df79188b00c80fdc8585e87
b86c2f978880245bf6528f15b3044dc6ddcecaa0
'2011-10-14T20:36:42-04:00'
describe
'181388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBI' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
c71b9dc6c058cd086450d4aed9d497b9
6dcc9b5fa6de836d0e9fd354d16e8760bcd7bedc
describe
'33031' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBJ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
4ded8588d8bbd643fb78b24baa2078de
b43982bc50ca2680c159c5910504fe46ede4a82d
describe
'66817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBK' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
2653162f524e76a35a7d65a1e1693509
05c2d08fa4a6ce5e20a9f7cb00b5f2847c107dba
'2011-10-14T20:34:24-04:00'
describe
'2656060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBL' 'sip-files00121.tif'
90044f939ce80db63557413b77f80b35
b58e8e4d0d8e19d83db9e33b55b5c3c2ae103492
'2011-10-14T20:35:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBM' 'sip-files00121.txt'
9511e504367f8c22fb86f0d07a113ce0
713ab85cb29513e0e597932b74f37c3f6dea8912
describe
'32015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBN' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
8eda871c5f50cb8f3e5cc9df03a98bde
5a5d4568ddcf9a35c5265449fac035f745210533
describe
'325482' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBO' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
6e80d38605819e912eeda4e84e2145a7
36807a51b6c432a74a36f99d6644d18916efe8ae
describe
'183674' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBP' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
81d6e2729401a31632c415d24919e499
390b580681a170d11bb75d9ee1438aa342d0469e
describe
'33755' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBQ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
edd7b1ddb47cabbb63ef37ac889e6b35
c2e3e6922a7ea2abb6d27b6cd098bc04835beaef
describe
'70026' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBR' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
a6c8f10c71adeefec0b74ff195cec9c8
30dad65a3cb67c343160ad45c00c269a5b222b15
describe
'2625600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBS' 'sip-files00122.tif'
7e73f5f340f2594777732d0df0305e1b
2eb781f9af4af295bb9c4143c8e6c6a24a09615d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBT' 'sip-files00122.txt'
337788380886c053fef39712747289e2
09832be94773bc80120b8d5ace509ac95bbf56ca
describe
'33401' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBU' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
487b13c25cc38ec7b4fe1bd0ebdc6706
d8a17e74128d9c2b8858466e7dbb81ab0a2286a3
describe
'328985' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBV' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
6b2e08c993c08ccd4a4487107f9e10a0
979f54d34b135b11c5e353465b8fbb8d687f45f5
describe
'180187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBW' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
0900af165da8d853d7a12e430db3225a
f15b73088211c27a6b007e643c3aba051288900f
describe
'32403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBX' 'sip-files00123.pro'
8d99b0fc3390c30cdf6a15fd6209b15e
fdbb6629bdbe70856690f704a3cacae3a78ebbfb
describe
'68766' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBY' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
68c77f878aeb7943c4f452f43e1fddca
537ef275ebee684bb10c9165bc0e0fcfadbd63dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIBZ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
cd096db43d6bd0178a03187944225511
1dc8a68e535dce5b4f5e587558d70fce8dcd8668
'2011-10-14T20:35:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICA' 'sip-files00123.txt'
989574d15caefee4065140116c6089dc
cf61efb13236db0b671b73da02d84b44ab7de444
describe
'33295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICB' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
51536e2fa939013bb8843a7b2502f2fc
55482d16ea35628e873c0d1bf307a99d2330a668
describe
'310993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICC' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
0b8d5d7e708cc4a88d947195e356b8be
9614375bb4e2e480d300311d7e7b3dfa0c7a727d
describe
'188712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICD' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
a4f0044bd4a5b03059e028caccbedab6
663ca695e2e7782e58537aa6af8e648a7e87de00
describe
'35508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICE' 'sip-files00124.pro'
924a1679aba2c9570146e6a9ce5bcbdb
ff5f036db1998463b8ede5dabe097dc555b5887b
describe
'69959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICF' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
f69a679ec3accb022a493ee15802c15e
a45b4960c06208175bdafa1dd0f956c4b3a20271
describe
'2509860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICG' 'sip-files00124.tif'
68b053e7a5fe3caf1cba1505672f21b4
e4d1e7ddc77d1abbce889b5cf9693b427d6d54ec
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICH' 'sip-files00124.txt'
aaf075afbc3503e31f9074c9cfc506bd
b545e8b64e798866d61ed9fa8cb6b7810ec160a6
describe
'33544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICI' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
aabae843b4ab483807f35587786245a6
e4b25ea300c49c99dc001a749d8d0b318bfc1c86
describe
'323964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICJ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
7e0a069ae7ebe07d016b67817fa5fb3a
b03f207fb81026786f388bfd595530a20f76c2eb
'2011-10-14T20:36:57-04:00'
describe
'184830' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICK' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
12b4cff3cb2cd517e57434cddc300825
6cf1363d2e3c27029428de22901753eb00b4abe4
describe
'33636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICL' 'sip-files00125.pro'
a141a6b7297a1d44da35ece819e69edf
b4bf90ea5fa44a29cd85541873320126d5d4dbad
describe
'67484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICM' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
24d7d4f4686813f405acb6e3e0017c94
9d5446b36912e5df7b07c599086f6eabc9482b25
describe
'2614932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICN' 'sip-files00125.tif'
4b120af9b7e87082de819b4d257076f6
71904bb07909747cb8d956ac81570377ad2be549
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICO' 'sip-files00125.txt'
a665f1063ca3f06b03c240d13043b0a1
fd9206c4a7d6b0a62b4f9e05755edd1ea0976303
describe
'32488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICP' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
b935c34e6acb6fa20b9ca95013d3c0c4
47e59e7e8d93f673346d724ac3f840ecd3a0fb6c
describe
'315857' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICQ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
e1c7cc9305e747c9889d8b99bde6b9b7
be9031b882b4b1200c375e76314db630a2754832
describe
'185547' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICR' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
2b31ce4b7f36fe0b37e0ba803ad219eb
dc5b5d986b14166258f4e704c8568e1216d3c145
describe
'34453' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICS' 'sip-files00126.pro'
3c3dfac7835daf08197afc0793312a93
c4a8ef7f4272ee174176697b046a85599977408e
describe
'71398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICT' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
82b6462d7ecbed8081a6b1c528637f13
c5c1b57e696c5a85547856255b4e3e0960925f28
describe
'2549388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICU' 'sip-files00126.tif'
358d93c294ce186ab4fa33f533ee5c52
95a2d1441d0a37daada24c8418372cfe89e4d0cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICV' 'sip-files00126.txt'
1bfc730679d47bcce5ab184ca66b345e
ddcb5a995ed9300381a4a44527f40fdb170b42ce
describe
'34088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICW' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
4e6d337a89a64fd355b1b964e863437b
5df4c4f2d12e0b144ecf4cab6519ba3acc2bf79a
describe
'323097' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICX' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
bf5256b97eb5a8fd957f023890aa3a58
ab61aa840c7da93d5e3f32dc6e20254acfb20fb5
describe
'187614' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICY' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
f7b113a30f2138e2b57412f4c9d7ab4c
5f3b5a68fc65aec2ec5c92fcf59f8c97f704cdd4
describe
'34434' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAICZ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
87527f383f212509fe6427a7d84904a6
4d1d9c621b0abb8504f55547612f1aff45521fe9
describe
'69517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDA' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
3a03026412d8db9f9830ed73554f5b80
9adc4e7be4488a615a7990db4165db00ab3050b7
describe
'2606912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDB' 'sip-files00127.tif'
92efd5ba2d18132c487fec1166f2b81e
325d09ca2c8e2eabfa0f4915a4e74f8b40624434
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDC' 'sip-files00127.txt'
901369fd34cc58b65333fa0f8ea4f565
dd83f66855d14326bb52f67e1d8869392cf35c2d
describe
'33348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDD' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
433e0cbd3b758a4704d8ee61c278344f
ad7d38573f81e2db4ae894c88fece88d98803318
describe
'329309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDE' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
462097d6a68363e729e5832af018f197
71df3b68d743e94fac67f11f69d300ff27fdceff
describe
'189101' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDF' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a4ae14badbade1b7b5d1987024c6d99e
876103fb00abfef898d93705016d29729da14961
describe
'35804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDG' 'sip-files00128.pro'
1ebade64fa9e8491a627d281e63233d1
4daaccce2b85cae3353b1f959762341d2b39ff72
describe
'71003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDH' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
5244d9779523d99d0882234c3fc63c45
39746d08f0b4480ac5fefc327467e54bdd93ac79
describe
'2656508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDI' 'sip-files00128.tif'
3edffa5536ad508d27ab2b559299c86f
045dea3f076e1060f9427704912d479837450e47
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDJ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
ac80aee278141d741f8aa1c5416ac044
be07529d6ab25aedf2947d9355626ff523f0c6b1
describe
'33288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDK' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
7037607531f93080816a1afa5a31cbe4
86b11e37773a959d06f3607b9502f25cdba1b4a0
describe
'325233' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDL' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
aee6dd923816122c95fadf73fea80da4
f1b53bd707ef1df24c71536135a5eed4cf32c24a
describe
'183498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDM' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
bba11893ea5ed74e049b39223f3bc7e6
af5705af7947ee706a24bf25c2b35a75870bc67e
describe
'33906' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDN' 'sip-files00129.pro'
736fad0a9f45b1a827c37009d6719f58
a0dc89d78c591d60615e81de751a2121254d4d3c
describe
'68954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDO' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
a796d7376833672e649d0e360c50e88f
60d122c4c1830b229f6256143a6df228956feb51
describe
'2623404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDP' 'sip-files00129.tif'
295f0bde590f9c7f4169372b6dc70384
5315dc3348a4dbceeb0ad1f91532edcea8f2e328
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDQ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
4dcab6045d9a693a598d178197557f57
d0f0f2741cbf8e0e62854844f73228ca88f68134
describe
'33158' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDR' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
48752e2511fc73b3c4dca675fc519873
b6f8f65784793c3678b3d645f5e0c9e74ff9ee51
describe
'322088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDS' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
1f33cfd24f11ef75deb202b5937acc60
deccb744ee23575b0bc2aeb98e7f27312172b6c9
describe
'191157' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDT' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
5d5a47f703c2549f66d396c6cf8ece13
f789b96b163a501a32b2216b062b44d067fe620b
describe
'36042' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDU' 'sip-files00130.pro'
85e3b9ac53cdaf042b6225f1f415ccac
aaa5e9eb43ca3fa903a507a92bd73c33fc5468f0
describe
'72131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDV' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
9160747ff70ab3631448994e0e0d540a
37b11370719de3558f471990338d6cd0510d4d8c
describe
'2598856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDW' 'sip-files00130.tif'
9a18b62af026f5d7eea1ad71fd816583
54a6ea3625fb97d41e5c20c3c4b85d23c8a98bdb
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDX' 'sip-files00130.txt'
5fa98b3708aec980ce40de339ae189d5
6e8fd3abad687882e15cf4248070d51644a5415a
describe
'33797' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDY' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
cbfa3265f4e718bbf0468994024efb78
b35f13cbdf006f26b12b57f5b176bc6fffb9afbb
describe
'329224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIDZ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
3eb89827005466a66ff32542c62e2ebc
f146ca9f25fbb6d18b04f5aec0866ee8fbd9f88d
describe
'186347' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEA' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
8cf7b9d71496af4f0d4dfd27d855dc20
218d1a6d50748e3bd08cf1d8628e708fcfaa7a2a
'2011-10-14T20:36:04-04:00'
describe
'34066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEB' 'sip-files00131.pro'
9df9ea4ad865456829dad196b4322ac7
d422b0af772ad147c0cafe835b73c8180c0306c0
describe
'69175' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEC' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
cacb2dbce40f33eae360ae9300decc14
56c69d01d57d6824f3dbf39f61bfa9642731e66a
'2011-10-14T20:34:47-04:00'
describe
'2656356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIED' 'sip-files00131.tif'
b32e1dd17ca755f76e319cc65d707c5f
eee8302eb42d79ab01e4a3c5a8925e54f027a579
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEE' 'sip-files00131.txt'
efa53e849d2c79bc0acdb81867818289
a847b6a40d6dff062bda69a68b9718b86319f63f
describe
'32791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEF' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
fffdc651579cf0feed059baebadc020f
093b94f3df541638ac61be16dfa0ec5e2265ab32
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEG' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
2395c258fe74c26df3dc00466839eb3b
88a3ea0134e3dfb9b1b1a5cd3cacd1f06efd9abb
'2011-10-14T20:33:44-04:00'
describe
'183608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEH' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
5817f329f3ad244e4521a22306b67d76
b234058de360742c0fa2e62dd95f0868c9f65be5
describe
'34761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEI' 'sip-files00132.pro'
161790db05df5eea413ff005746a7933
6d3d0221d2b074cbc01c1c6f8beaab11bf9d169c
'2011-10-14T20:38:33-04:00'
describe
'69844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEJ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
2ec2d12fdbe19911a49dc802c0f4d4da
5b5a307ccb1c0fbecc1cc74f3961401af86848c5
describe
'2656360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEK' 'sip-files00132.tif'
91cd98f61e7d768e9dd7fa27e6e1086c
bc8bc16b2421acd732341d90a0adf1804ab4f51b
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEL' 'sip-files00132.txt'
594b01874323b39be2f03c4d4f0b4250
3a3c8ad595b3624990c7383b08e3e8ce7bf818fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEM' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
0a90fb39c1ad826896acca9f0cfb4cfb
a5f41f5517a436701a21f3db42f006fe3dd3f9c3
'2011-10-14T20:33:43-04:00'
describe
'329339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEN' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
ae77ad05447a1d582988424a7bf4bfad
0058a92ba241bfc8055656aa731baa07ab917b10
describe
'122514' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEO' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
00795e7c809b95dca1fa37bfb792f62a
c2e8a11d7bc712d59fd123bde34db471750bbd50
describe
'14671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEP' 'sip-files00133.pro'
30d181cf4a938e43ae4fd8a6ab8755a5
4c66e3d6a76b1628410cf8106ede8b4ad83b28ba
describe
'46506' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEQ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
4605e29426560945a57b89b4eb5e46a0
16cc96fd26cf5f09d021bdedb1688018d27d82d0
describe
'2654524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIER' 'sip-files00133.tif'
f9be23b31faeb7698a85f3d38d29972b
f72ae418dd4832c20072d29b98c244a7f78be783
describe
'607' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIES' 'sip-files00133.txt'
b7e0e6ae34238b928892632a26155008
a5805ec056f59fe870044e6e3c87b788ffe1495f
describe
'26625' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIET' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
652293261b09588de2cba8a7a2b66d15
46d1e192a011d88cfd85ecef2168c63f17feb0d6
describe
'314863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEU' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
72d1894f3bd01ae4701e7167293e50d9
a1c406ee826f8380a85c5bf1954ef2e10a72206a
describe
'166351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEV' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
82e8dfceaf17126526595a0b97f3cadf
819e3f2f41e2fac820eddecd3b56b7f463fd6d6c
describe
'21474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEW' 'sip-files00134.pro'
0b6569539a1afd44c2cf994ae366b9a4
b6465f105b1d06c7be88b80b2303982ec4d9ac94
describe
'60841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEX' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
29248f6ac26326d6c75893dca39dcacb
d542bb28deab2a6334b66f0a0d64684f4bad473f
'2011-10-14T20:36:34-04:00'
describe
'2540316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEY' 'sip-files00134.tif'
7bcc56a82e5513e3d8a0164e63136199
b7e5064e952adbea924a70c8b89a009c1a6e9c73
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIEZ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
e88f6998afe816de557c935880e46a4a
e9904c6c81895aaa52177d19c2649bca4113fcbe
describe
'31189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFA' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
7cdac7b0ffafd9de3f1da1b91fa8c492
696ba8da2efbd0e6b59191c52b306bbf2d8bbd25
describe
'322591' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFB' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
d964712ee4d5eea111d8831ed86bd919
3802c61d7abf15c8d3da67df08c49bf15cfda6d6
describe
'207693' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFC' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
78ffa5e56283ed3b6111410cb5d00ae1
2488c58bd277a1f30c1c27043a92180040098303
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFD' 'sip-files00136.pro'
0dc5ec88e9849381271657365e619a09
42e9ed0cddba30d9f3d0804b0b8072e6924d453d
describe
'60208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFE' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
08fe788f235dca4302c490c5835d4d9b
2f802a823173a404cab8b9feab19234a4aa0eb4d
describe
'7764824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFF' 'sip-files00136.tif'
6bc3f76802256edbd3e010b2682f9386
9c23207edf47f6137c9091ab2e26a0663386b499
describe
'135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFG' 'sip-files00136.txt'
8432771d21d336ace9562e5edb24967a
7ab8b3d2b05f268150ce420a27055aa2e957729a
describe
'31054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFH' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
e47ad52557f7129238b022c3ff68329d
0a00e995c55e91c994ebcaa8668fc00e0e9fbca2
'2011-10-14T20:37:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFI' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
3a9bd2e9c97545bd2934c0a0d510a5a1
d336d9a05fab7eec8390f5a2971a7c8865dfe360
describe
'190856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFJ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
2fc63b58d7d94419781118d090d1f1e5
8606a4597effeb19f2609f518f463ce7246f4b99
describe
'34500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFK' 'sip-files00137.pro'
501a31d9540f6cd3cae7689d19fbdb3f
546fdcc74465c6e0dd92fa6e0ee6dab435ff09f9
describe
'71586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFL' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
4ba76d250e6d42f9aaa949d457865cd4
a5322496e63b66240de15da91bb52002ce0132ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFM' 'sip-files00137.tif'
2858fd8c7936c9fd95cd02d579e5dcb8
c6ae3511ad4a6a60cc8a832cbb9355efbe59ccb8
'2011-10-14T20:36:36-04:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFN' 'sip-files00137.txt'
d3bc62945ea2c8ce8d8afc72a5e54c33
fa1efcd31af029651529f4ee24eeef025992b43d
describe
'32885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFO' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
95613b10715655d6a7d82c00bcf8763c
b10c45ddbdab7f629d0e22e395bb18a78c073530
describe
'329600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFP' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
a439b299fe369e152b6d91c1a5a52249
52ab5f857750d88a4471b843691b281356a054b5
describe
'183786' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFQ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
fa4a8563769afe19702c6bfbc825e95e
d7fdeeb1b7e6da22e1c70bdab5d0a0e8d6145a24
describe
'33707' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFR' 'sip-files00138.pro'
e5cf2168e6d1c7938414a4da2bd7eba0
99b18ef1380a9d3ebbb911c66bd491d5943aedb9
describe
'69900' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFS' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
e86055baac5513b3e499ad34d15ca3c3
6245aa0566fa337993ac78f17dd159a44f57da63
describe
'2658388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFT' 'sip-files00138.tif'
9a68bf6c04e8dfbd26fb4dce29d4e280
d2b4c337e565b7648771f9bb1a7a663b5131e9d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFU' 'sip-files00138.txt'
008cc8a4f0aeaef6eb81bb9fe07d1f8c
cc6670c5af652d560458d3227523e29d0e8fbedc
describe
'32452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFV' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
2327c3e96c027851a1d400038dfa5770
9051ee44d23ba250614bc5c0946dee0b066f4c9c
describe
'329300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFW' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
e1b63bddfe40af946ecde00f5c36f9b6
53951c75edc9dc1c914a93018fdfe8d1e0107f6e
describe
'186597' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFX' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
922fc11e9bef46ca720a74367bce102a
9b668187f76ed51b68b50319d5afa56be730a396
describe
'34627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFY' 'sip-files00139.pro'
fe4957af9d0002e33b888da1dc5c7d75
a7f3e85ffb3aff220b3d181ff558d20e0262de58
'2011-10-14T20:37:03-04:00'
describe
'69721' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIFZ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
a3f8244c50c11b0d89df26e0882e4ff3
6d5d8860eb70392d62aa61bdadb65125848f9bbd
'2011-10-14T20:34:33-04:00'
describe
'2656412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGA' 'sip-files00139.tif'
fb7baec13d02ac22cbe8e2746254ed96
8850b62165b16e4019d6f59458d6070db8c728af
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGB' 'sip-files00139.txt'
7cdb77acb07ad0cc5040193207144b55
2ef409f306d3586e17f5d4d2ae468a6514f708e2
describe
'32532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGC' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
6b2ae68b423ce9f4d7e3f0dfd0f33523
8952194fc8e718de3fb029259b8329d3666beaf8
describe
'324197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGD' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
aba7bef149680e926511fa5b396e6f7f
6fb257d805201110d7cc8f4f96e3faadd1d7c3e1
describe
'182231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGE' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
256b897b7417151b8f6685b67e81395d
290f5ad417d8273d86799a5e0be1a2c8e96cf566
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGF' 'sip-files00140.pro'
fc633fa670a578d4585b2fcf084c61e4
7d4c42d92e560568d2c06cef9abceb6ad1208d29
describe
'68720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGG' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
e26854bc962536ee34bdbc0bea895d80
94b48f55648fc824e43f682acf5612d2a1cf42f2
describe
'2614988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGH' 'sip-files00140.tif'
e818c57ae8dc1fa722436e1a12b71238
215ede269e8867209faf58e2104cc2769e42ac4a
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGI' 'sip-files00140.txt'
28e7f18712f4703f5294ec8d4f97900b
6da1708f144f16ebaaa16dc61799ee176c0012fd
describe
'32761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGJ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
1b0fe0aaec3e7b86a366f6778f4deff8
3f03593257a207d2c1149f775e11ad74ccd48328
describe
'329305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGK' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
5446105cf465e79f709019921aa1245b
a66af59e59c7ab9f1323a75ced51d87d5198124b
describe
'180815' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGL' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
1822a756b5c374f407b393d924e035c2
ef29c2f6de1a7eebd4d74d8a14b882d9c43360f6
describe
'32666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGM' 'sip-files00141.pro'
155b6f284eb89209201e2c3fadd67186
166e05a1b97d4a3fa074355bbec88f6f5b053d64
describe
'67396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGN' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
2d0b6881f5d9a48af0abd9530fa3569a
751b7edbee5838dbbccd4c7ce43009eca2c43c7d
describe
'2656196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGO' 'sip-files00141.tif'
bdda81f6babd0f52b37b637dcdb275ce
2208340474062413e3f889a85226593affaa1757
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGP' 'sip-files00141.txt'
dff6a536f45559d18775f323ae26cdc9
d69f22d0bb0a0045456987448f1a6882c22c0eec
describe
'32312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGQ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
ae7dafb21d8cbc85e4b1cd8246e6f94e
c72142691878bfaa81c2d62ef7e4fab9729ff2a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGR' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
d4a94b2d59b5be5484502e1d198233e0
667fe554e5f747cb7cd8c169e0761f24aaad58d7
describe
'185298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGS' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
84de902449fe893c11a9c13bc1bd84ab
5c3a51c1f3f76262784eec9438014e800497f2fd
describe
'34245' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGT' 'sip-files00142.pro'
4ef6ee93148e7265f1512ce1c1029241
f8ddc649d6909bed20b8f19de9c3ab6549e9d683
describe
'69396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGU' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
620e70e05c04e7daec28020eb147224e
04f779c6bce58a72059b26548855c66edbcd7375
describe
'2656520' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGV' 'sip-files00142.tif'
0f9e67977671ce4b44ad6e9a69b6d87b
f370623437d267ef96a5c6a18f3d12b71a3a1b3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGW' 'sip-files00142.txt'
6f13ce3ec55caff289785a144729de3e
de4a7e23e3e5b6846ee5a4829d37bb9912ae75dd
describe
'33079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGX' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
732f82f94503626557e83be6edfe6de2
e8061c09480b889eeb7351fbe077f41344da6cba
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGY' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
3f933fc777ff85ff6fe768ea11a355d2
b306a3a53bc1bf6e1cd819629e3088d4bdf22ace
describe
'183055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIGZ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
a0472ca2d15e0e925ccec22b1152bca1
80564e483bc287f437aa82a741d35042206d8201
describe
'33178' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHA' 'sip-files00143.pro'
610850f2ed7fae55502c08cf941e5a1a
ca2992259e40a20347254597eb0b33f507a3ad1f
describe
'69868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHB' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
0a9bfef7292ac9997da91d2baffbb297
021a9acefefdaece14712209deb3b1a2aebf3e76
describe
'2656540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHC' 'sip-files00143.tif'
3834d1be9e86616acd46cfa8e641d0e2
b18738e708a9c4805d3b247d8ea5b18330ae9351
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHD' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e91942d1355c0665d89a195cec70bc8a
e2b28eec36a1fa2a8f308b0e52012d106c3db3d2
describe
'33039' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHE' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
f353e7c79f880f22198da43199abe5d0
adc52371f1a732ff0a1bf1186eb2136c3601f58d
describe
'329263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHF' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
b739847bb94c0d77d862969703cbbde6
2e66838d22147320c731c706148b83ed408b49fb
describe
'188843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHG' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
821300ccf1bd30c8a981e53b43244d26
e61c170f596f06331925b2fa86db85fd160326a4
describe
'34792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHH' 'sip-files00144.pro'
ae0b217a3c88221775553a169f4fa503
04b0c794e58ce53c8c8e09b0efe7738cfa0b2516
describe
'70762' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHI' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
22d23af772ad112728060321f28a786c
e3fe8a00902c9ff94811b34002732a2887ecdcb6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHJ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
2bd863fbae979105a3e933b59f75ed62
fc4f6a014be91c3464d198656a318727c89cff80
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHK' 'sip-files00144.txt'
c0ce73a4c62cf73e4beb12ed43fe916f
9349aec375dbea078a988287cb79913115b7a37e
describe
'33185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHL' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
5870ee6cbfb0f4e83c3905a6e6d13e5d
07f90a1dee197eedefe661b01ffafabd70930be7
describe
'329292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHM' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
e1e163e95048402d6a821344e911da62
826ba65cffa093cd05a05ad4cee370f1ef40bbc3
describe
'183527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHN' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
f53269d6508700e057200f4b3e6fdaac
c55ff341f932f6ce7dbc4f66f79f43e92c6f6166
describe
'33232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHO' 'sip-files00145.pro'
4b56641289924fca66c956a171745000
898d26c62d593e1fc1b631ec3e5242e30b33baa0
'2011-10-14T20:34:28-04:00'
describe
'68637' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHP' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
0c468f666b19d05cb8cf2f3ad8cf7ee4
9cd89deaacf9887bf376908492d80217d023596b
describe
'2656160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHQ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
c18f91a0c1540961bd635a2658a6efb0
9a80488096a354a391bc73bab572296165275565
'2011-10-14T20:34:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHR' 'sip-files00145.txt'
8b72dc31bd6aad1553f3e431189e7b12
8fba49b9ea2bb1856a2df7d72cb6a43ced19d1c0
describe
'31910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHS' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
31c611ff5f07bee5aad7d365fae38d25
5b99443676cecaeb14204bec55d46c8593190271
describe
'329343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHT' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
899cb6f35704f69d88f873b4d324495a
ca31714f4c9b2548740189102e4de316385590d9
describe
'185872' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHU' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
595a9707855e3e1dd8fa4ad77d76114d
33e19606af92fd3360306c7633e51ab8aa0fa481
describe
'35215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHV' 'sip-files00146.pro'
f73f9287273151b484e365afd21d0f70
3509ced7b542fb2224ee19fa2f8bf7e666ad4110
describe
'70269' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHW' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
96e9f9d20b66e0ca682cc90f24396aa3
02f29e6db5e77ff53dff50183d24166aa939bc56
describe
'2656240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHX' 'sip-files00146.tif'
26a846331a1c33721fbd56b435e94abe
02806e3457d2687a56d9a34dd3780b823bdbebc7
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHY' 'sip-files00146.txt'
0b98307facab453df21594a20c8fe1e5
2a97bd50651ce7ecf65ab330bd4d641764b56b18
describe
'32224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIHZ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
8fb5b6c5bcbb693b638ee82a2063e124
3a589d6142a9d3726959004e2d9d76855f9e97de
describe
'323054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIA' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
e4b3a41c17c3f7e0cfa9f1e32c98a46c
438d880730098e7751706710a2efc038a6634445
describe
'176668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIB' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
af0e258323083838ba00f4cdacdb1de7
fd5f94a66d20a246b34fdc9ffb29bf5c61bbc1aa
describe
'32458' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIC' 'sip-files00147.pro'
14c9471db4eee6cd84e33c7781b87b31
e2d14b46d67ced21ce4c1dab37e7fcd87d5c5ed6
describe
'67815' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIID' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
9a5f20a2d3f5e72093617e4ae256ca3b
3f0c8df3e23277de9bea8e79052121a91eb79852
describe
'2606764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIE' 'sip-files00147.tif'
dddf5e3718894b703ac0610af1ad3c89
19ddf07dc745bda2e1ca253c86c056753d77e9b8
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIF' 'sip-files00147.txt'
c549fb22a0e84f24f2e1567ca6e6b9a5
fc52576b6204217ca0e9c1d24d0001c89338dd1d
describe
'32537' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIG' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
a0629bc1c2274423ad2a2eed7cadffd0
00c76a832e56e1be406ed8055ff465d9bffc2d4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIH' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
74d4089fb99a982224accedfb378b2e0
d7f423376d3f0399a74908b7e53b535fbba14a1c
describe
'178247' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIII' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
06111884d31bd3571d949fbebc855b2a
a5130b34826de834b768cc11f6f716807f5be15b
describe
'32515' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIJ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
eb2cefd63996cbfc35edc9b371679b4d
1d71834815a1992803bc3c15ada1b81dd79ecfac
describe
'66717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIK' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
d9a067be03ae2eb97d8ac3bc12139315
35e4218871a3382468927f72ecb3a6a714ea5631
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIL' 'sip-files00148.tif'
3ac0a89be039fa1286049d4cd3d277b5
e75f5cdb4ecab45c75eb725761ab25a3826e72bc
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIM' 'sip-files00148.txt'
2f32ed9fca080b75340fbd774cab2bc3
9e1e801ef8932c89feafb04adf3ebe1d960f467b
'2011-10-14T20:37:09-04:00'
describe
'31892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIN' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
ada71f1007067e5822795f6576652614
88bbe3e78d73198aa21b4070781b1df530cd0528
describe
'329243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIO' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
c7a05ea26d5a75433852527d9be3cba7
9313a5e544639045f9c11f11299f35e1f20bcf79
describe
'162682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIP' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
a7d6b524a0499a79f9e0ceae035ad777
4134d35ffbb5c7a2fac7951871bab3f004231750
describe
'27341' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIQ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
1d0145fc752977dde0682430eabdfd60
df10d7049e013227b258f55eb332b31ff5367a58
describe
'60430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIR' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
5cc997ab5baab914ff8427a2ce0b8a89
4ff800995b78a7cdb79e9edb06ed900fdb1fa9b0
describe
'2655520' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIS' 'sip-files00149.tif'
2f5134d78dacc20be879879e04911469
ffbb23906fde77e379707cb3708271873d6d9448
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIT' 'sip-files00149.txt'
fdbff9bc06f9bf09c26bc8d45bc3e034
51f721e80a20d52be8dda9ededfcdcd724326997
describe
'30288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIU' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
2e4f767fe3e62369a420f503885ceb5d
04c3c38bae7bcc2213ce51d8e111556d00657bed
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIV' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
90662213754ebc21b6f69af382ea6018
40551be7d90e623d3c88d398f1fe13e0f0975494
describe
'159863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIW' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
9e56a2a3a859d4933196c6f2aab272d2
d7bc40c09e4fa0235d5c77cdadbac51370229250
describe
'21044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIX' 'sip-files00150.pro'
f27510c92a8d46e460413b92b706f8e3
59eb03696d6b3e9b478c01911d64d302314e0fcb
'2011-10-14T20:36:03-04:00'
describe
'59291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIY' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
46f4dec017e9d59108f2b35256c9918a
7825f93f6ba263ca0bcaf69c2bcaeaa5da9b1de8
describe
'2655628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIIZ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
8926a33d018289e4eb863eeec49c089e
850565b4d2120aaa5e39ae4834e11ea1d0fd86fd
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJA' 'sip-files00150.txt'
af8c6735b975c61b2bd0d0cf082d2707
f55180f04cca4adb87d2505a15535cadcc7b54ff
describe
'30038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJB' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
2803468c87e00786c13a96b153dadbaf
02e8a98244105c920bc1ded77188f6ed31044f46
describe
'329318' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJC' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
a7e3605b5882d7b7a91092c86eeb4bcc
261167c0120921596a64c250aebfbf0239b23e90
describe
'179311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJD' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
2ade0b8e9a78ed0449cc4ea098a32eb7
177eeefb098dc20bd3a5308488f906692c28d37d
describe
'32615' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJE' 'sip-files00151.pro'
7ed1882939979311ae3bd86d2ed942a2
cbc308aeed0609e040f4ffed31dfc7474583760f
describe
'67333' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJF' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
9fc970ce591fade3fd69e42d73166aa3
60ba259033acec972962642e11e9581503f4fb39
describe
'2656232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJG' 'sip-files00151.tif'
8c0a04f83daa86906472ad8f22a67e4c
487dfb2faa637f9fee35bd85bec496ed5e7446cb
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJH' 'sip-files00151.txt'
9c08c0acaeb98d2425cfa6de4eb8be42
012e6766f0a220dbe1aecced7929a8cd11c2cc85
describe
'32477' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJI' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
700c7b25ae927cdee40d225d4a49579a
3320273c1a98061d889a8453ee5e06b10ecfe829
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJJ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
afb7455285da40a9b26960d7160cba01
71a91e6e97f79e63e489faa877688e1a548b1ae3
'2011-10-14T20:35:22-04:00'
describe
'184100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJK' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
b07ee156518fde2bcaacf77704394f69
d22cefb86b62902980be82b8422dc0dfeee0577e
describe
'34331' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJL' 'sip-files00152.pro'
2132592d5c2193a690310c15261a4b25
3c0a87f785b0f422a1f98ca021b6123d522c339d
describe
'68809' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJM' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
71dbf9272bed3a62372f36e7416c7768
9a14cfec1cbc018ef7f76fe0bf776d8abea16b12
describe
'2656076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJN' 'sip-files00152.tif'
09a3966a8aafd7f7c33c94445cfca57c
6e0ad3064c343af2b21faab2f71ab2591fad8bd9
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJO' 'sip-files00152.txt'
b95185c84631e18fbdf98c4c96789778
a64902fc7fa34e1947a8a5b97b1fdbfb0f5fe4bd
'2011-10-14T20:33:30-04:00'
describe
'31813' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJP' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
11c09b6c98e6d394d8a130d7d9bfea11
88aae1cf148b71dff3aa8ff10a171bb225f00102
describe
'329349' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJQ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
b7acb730ba090f8b8ff4142463ce1465
dc72c38e11c25a5fb723c26739864de8735e6ded
describe
'187217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJR' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
ea540f2d44b5dc1c58552c8de346e4b4
317f121f27c16ee8385589dfad08cd632e18e82b
describe
'34181' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJS' 'sip-files00153.pro'
25658681252329bda3e1b9dafaa6925b
6c5a5b1c7819aaa9e6e1d36d536c18ca73169c36
describe
'69135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJT' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
67d7e90f425250a62457f1047c6bf3c2
4681f2745c9d41cc6c0c55d63b3e369276b277e7
describe
'2656332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJU' 'sip-files00153.tif'
114ce09a0ce82ea202da87c8be2d36c4
f6169be437b8a74cfd833a6a9ceb0d12ab6a0027
'2011-10-14T20:33:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJV' 'sip-files00153.txt'
72106182b8693ff16d3ccc85a17fe2e4
6ea15ab014b469bf7cbbbcff3f3607035b8ecc82
describe
'32960' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJW' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
f9f225f0bd188b053ccdf32072866b74
c22c7fb264b032436d7a262a79ed99e506321e27
describe
'329519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJX' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
7b2f217f2c336e5a2bddcd0f07b75ca8
835f6dffa64e239e7f32fb208d411aed855d7685
describe
'173899' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJY' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
b137fd443492892db49ba9f92374ac09
a9f7d65a6e677e630ac0f5d4156093db97f988de
describe
'31664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIJZ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
a9c8aef93edbdcaa603a6fb8b9a428a5
cbedb70727044fa136b3e0731a4851b1f97d0637
describe
'65339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKA' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
178f18d7cc2514442ae20f7970eb78a3
24207f6ec218233dd3f8ea2ab468778fb82939d4
describe
'2658360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKB' 'sip-files00154.tif'
51ff4a20f9a38430339ab264763f0fe4
b3253fe04c8db5e4469a3865aa54654c84cfaea5
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKC' 'sip-files00154.txt'
4a6f25c146659763652c1806ebe12ff4
4bc5d72a660f3beae70dfed179cf2edef7a832a3
describe
'32536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKD' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
325edabebead6c7fce4448d2ef626924
1d6c9e96276fdc246fbac971cb84168f11a7dbd7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKE' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
9ac8671b2b245ff80bc1543a9b560026
543b051a38889f5a64dcc0abd7ae276cd6dd1e8f
describe
'185803' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKF' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
377014c4dbfb58ee5d7912159fa9b23d
968d7c64ade267e9475f6316a09e688adaa6a9e3
describe
'34316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKG' 'sip-files00155.pro'
bcb28f519649fb3ad8e200d601078d73
e23bb89e980ba00438f704e91e3aeb45c8bdf093
describe
'70365' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKH' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
418a645ef8340d33942de031a8170d80
1f01a7021745273478ea5b3a7cfdbc787abaea36
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKI' 'sip-files00155.tif'
a04233a3f7d15a6e0582fb8dacc011fb
a0e3c8c4bb59c7d3639d95adb8bd03e6560aa6d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKJ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
591e34231f52217557ba6f838acbdf2d
18c40517fb26416800406ac1a6d101d932d5022e
describe
'32786' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKK' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
0bdbdda789ffa15daae055b3bf47dd3a
880eb89c6b71706e58bdc0a4f4515e37b8a20b3e
describe
'329272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKL' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
f5440b71f21733010201fb59717f4d00
837654204a7520ffba0d3282c11adaad3eac3d3b
describe
'182236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKM' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
817f3bbefeacdec9eb5d47563bbe789e
0c2e34eac82fe335f8837f2731f8dc7cefc4eeac
describe
'33673' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKN' 'sip-files00156.pro'
1ec99d7c808d93b3699e83fa030f205c
2b05c062e3e1a3df628140ebdac251832cad43c6
describe
'68155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKO' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
70fc19faf71b63977582bc07eed54102
787700bf45d3770623b8bbfaa6a8c98a9c298bcc
describe
'2656164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKP' 'sip-files00156.tif'
1b23a28cc4ffd2159ab9c2b51073e8ec
6030be03e555071f01176d62cb082a5107084f79
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKQ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
d1c74937a9446442efdb2bf8ddf75a25
55c247337c4a80e8f76dbe763c4210d0a631571c
'2011-10-14T20:37:14-04:00'
describe
'32385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKR' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
28c14fc4180a44ab847353c212ffb79e
e46a2cc630e509372200763ecf8c12c5abf10387
describe
'329281' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKS' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
7f7bd92259ad722ce229c126abd1b92b
405f9ac4e32a815df548e888cfac36f412329658
describe
'183863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKT' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
bf48c61937dc6e8ac95f9ac22e9dc07d
90c62b3c0bd655e2718b6cec87068cd88990ed2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKU' 'sip-files00157.pro'
2e097b73b76bd201296ec34a54019562
ba714367c6fe473c8f96f97846f5b55676100d20
describe
'68884' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKV' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
ba1189baa6452b036768864acefbfa25
fa7c2a258425486264dc21279f7abfc6eca6dce6
describe
'2656236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKW' 'sip-files00157.tif'
36f855cd076ece34699f8de5f68a66a3
e7c6cfa0608d568c5dd3e5c0250a25ded5914abc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKX' 'sip-files00157.txt'
6d0909da3aef0f362231f640da96f2f9
4c84fa6d77fd0cae1a328cea2748084ab5ea90da
describe
'32568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKY' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
d4eeb0a4c09ec9adb31d0c9a3ca71232
f81bb3d3c8e368c67181f76fd6c31c5c1bd35af9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIKZ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
3bc9865223915ff45ab37932712514a4
3a8671f1180712ce0ce825098adb40184ce30b38
describe
'184979' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILA' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
fbc1abe931d5be938de5bc844f5e85ca
ada134d6447f4f1d81cef3723b50781ef71997dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILB' 'sip-files00158.pro'
dfe2ab03deb353db919605acdaefc9ea
716fb1ff79e9a388dd45894c42016a208edaa317
describe
'69535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILC' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
d68fc6df57e471fe5671685c684a914b
c31f4b6d2c5a29d14b189903274519555daf8b82
describe
'2656288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILD' 'sip-files00158.tif'
e720fd0b2c002a1a5960c9497c75fcde
e74e43342de1f8f5b04a19516c7d15696900cfd0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILE' 'sip-files00158.txt'
2ead83fd02ec1c24132e965b3a3c2282
f6d29084dbff4d60e8af86d7c1010c2fd20eaa68
describe
'32760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILF' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
0d5c9c45edfb60fb00ba592d3ed26006
c92123ec52abc2037443d25c3180bcecf4cb195a
describe
'329276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILG' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
b24e8165dee2afa541c31bfc7df50255
474b8bf048d1a826b90fcf8871f987c35e5a81ff
describe
'131996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILH' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
19fb86144b9d74f2bf290fc466e380e7
21886a2bbe0d1328f3bb5872ac44cfe2b0858cdd
describe
'17595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILI' 'sip-files00159.pro'
ba3b0481d4ff8cbe5fcd29a3f71bac94
9ced41f00cd3ebe5ef8116834cf8019158d89a0e
describe
'49956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILJ' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
814bef0cf2230bc1300f5e2377d930e3
c845d2f7dbbc3c520b2ae75b4d84b45718166498
describe
'2654516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILK' 'sip-files00159.tif'
5d37c85f02e75e14413bdca213859995
b5dfa7f57987febac2923e74d7eb91b9a2142c67
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILL' 'sip-files00159.txt'
36b10c772f49c3a840a8ea71e31b6397
1cd5dd017d7f8b8ff80bc05bd7273b21af778357
'2011-10-14T20:35:11-04:00'
describe
'26972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILM' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
e47586157086f7fbbbdb91f8b66a2c3f
59c06501b310bb40413b057d379f3d3a9166bfa5
'2011-10-14T20:37:05-04:00'
describe
'329613' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILN' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
ab8ae938867067e67ca14fa5e88cc5fc
8cc8ee09edad84c6246d8bcb13172616593ff569
describe
'162020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILO' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
4cbe5454082d1fd917c561bec3a5f1f1
ee24c4d5492100027b8ff65582fd07f607687aea
describe
'20500' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILP' 'sip-files00160.pro'
ec9f4ba3813d6dd5064d14076ebe6aaa
415ba6af33c09d7908bbd489a75113541486a82f
describe
'57822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILQ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
7b00989481053351c7138fb20e043283
d9c5623293ce14b76e11089795bc24a0e69545bb
describe
'2657392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILR' 'sip-files00160.tif'
3c11d96ff26628f890cf2863b1357779
dadc4ff9ce69a1d31a354cc6495a1e03b1ddbfbc
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILS' 'sip-files00160.txt'
3547fb94e9fdd66660f6a1d979ed30db
e0e1a1a215de727816aa84fc8a8e87c3fc9aa4d0
describe
'29484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILT' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
b1cb007ab2718fde2f79a460a25d779b
e488860bd514063f65b602e3639d84760f31da6d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILU' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
adddb2b38a51d2ee3cad4041719d870c
cd4bdc36c354c7cacc988671c95aefa86342932c
describe
'188480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILV' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
b83d3689ec5d9ab6ffa26c2f80116958
869cbe668649cb810c3f1adbd265143dcc175ac7
describe
'33505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILW' 'sip-files00161.pro'
f3209636ac38c75cb7087b13c0979a8e
ec960bece8fce8f932bbdaa684225797d535ae24
describe
'69213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILX' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
4e3365e124194575d148568f4b9afa92
61a2c09895814834232ac244b151c738e00e222c
describe
'2656188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILY' 'sip-files00161.tif'
524dddc706c3a87394b5b7dc92de3434
35c386decb3a930f1131c38c5fe0766f543177ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAILZ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
d4b6e8c5ec5b603b55296410eb49cc7b
1193605c0756ff46e3c2a05c36e35b09b2d43c9e
describe
'32593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMA' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
1c9db42f854a3ab42b5acdf379eeff42
b915de52a7c2d9c625a7263237094704d388b00e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMB' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
344c15b8a4cb3110e54775a46f5a4a61
8c7e1cc01194f7b8460a76fe463b76c61011c055
describe
'180621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMC' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
fef9e36fbcefdebed4ebbb1662935179
be1c64993f4327896a689587c98152724b1c8e75
describe
'34601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMD' 'sip-files00162.pro'
83fa2397312b7da992da3a7333f1fde9
dff7e403dd6048b79ed296056c6dab8d0f9ade80
describe
'68049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIME' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
e0a42c5434ba1690e46acd3e464dba6a
19ca9b785d4094f8bedf64987b7cbeb22ba2d567
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMF' 'sip-files00162.tif'
00d3b9dba87b48d2ed36ce88121ae013
207310995c6f71b3e873965b46dfe87ee0a4a341
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMG' 'sip-files00162.txt'
f09d4f91b2117564c912ad4042cb9024
0703437887c3e9d3ae043ff078da89d0141afa9e
describe
'32259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMH' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
25064ec0088efebb0085bb5734c986df
aea4772daecbd66637a07d236ae5957e0435900a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMI' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
6485c16ad475e459d0ea373ba89bce6c
b955971fd5d50572f5031f0ea5ebde0fe7b16fb8
describe
'184483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMJ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
0a16b97b51cc11ad4461f2e00abd360a
0828a149e93af9ae9568154f3d23f4661ac00f15
describe
'34327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMK' 'sip-files00163.pro'
6f93ad1958cb5e29fb4ea50e0f4434dd
592af2444f75ceb4a4e42b9f0a695e8f53381079
describe
'68276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIML' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
00f550dc701f6fd9305b557ef4c1c840
48408bd99fead0aff4b1b9b342922e362abc722a
describe
'2656260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMM' 'sip-files00163.tif'
d3ffe45a2ff7715982a08f819c4b4e91
e50db2f0719ff2afcaaa2dd6c0801c55b2ea703f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMN' 'sip-files00163.txt'
6dc89022fe5243aa3b9c7245f677e5df
420c2acd45b19357bda1c586eb105097863072d9
describe
'32447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMO' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
40754716776ce9f72b8fa1d65154c069
49db65ff0754f604628763475dd8cbc3bf743e16
describe
'329322' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMP' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
19b9f6adef0182d9f769cddb67bc6743
2c4b855db5daf912b7ef451b27d2d9296048977f
describe
'192595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMQ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
003f2c50fef9f995f31f0664c7ba2739
56f8a53c13bc50946606211e643320aa2f4487d8
describe
'35533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMR' 'sip-files00164.pro'
933e52c85d9c81b2bea60ebb44786c05
61fcc774040ae84c2016ea9ddbde17c5c94bead3
describe
'70177' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMS' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
6e758cf494980ff6fa5278c7105e9f26
50dd3b7259f9c246f5b8626464a59aed6d445bb8
describe
'2656384' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMT' 'sip-files00164.tif'
1c3c053ade008f284842f679cb7cc3ef
79a0b71948ad8e415a0d80114512e04c9fdcd5dc
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMU' 'sip-files00164.txt'
1eccc4b5f66e0f8297b6217833253dcc
9afd2a0a499d667cea819f2c11844ee1edd46954
describe
'32601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMV' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
b284348f6547b7d3e0abfa2d5375173a
2fc2989a1bf9844bb3eeb8e1e989cca2d46f4ac2
describe
'329226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMW' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
115dc91e1c5e09f9fe9afd9d7ae2b687
15dd3a77724630856416b1dd4bfdc2593c733573
describe
'192758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMX' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
96b7c59f41168ad7503a17ebdd26e253
83b9b928b8681f26146df98eb5a4bb2315f6eadc
describe
'34998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMY' 'sip-files00165.pro'
e813820b3abcc935c4cacc6d192b2b4d
11c66020b5c3e56fc7930536a52ee94592c45497
describe
'70987' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIMZ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
c602e6794bfa0556fb88cdba38d29260
5af7d6f43e26879240aa7134bf1b2fbcfec5405b
describe
'2656292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINA' 'sip-files00165.tif'
dc8fd4b31c638610bf279e188af77f05
adc89b2f348f32f9a2d51212c6551104be7b0745
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINB' 'sip-files00165.txt'
b7187b591467b24f7e3ecf2cf30934b6
297c0ec6b70bdb643ead57d70adc94efce33f1fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINC' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
ceda66db24ee0b778d6fe7f55efd1a19
045dfd0c70621835a4c966b2d2f1b0375229c16c
describe
'329520' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIND' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
af3c6ae6b58cefe017f01f547f080965
5dbbc00aab64a0cd7c4e3c23f3cad6baef1d72be
describe
'180791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINE' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
22cf852d4db019eba06d73aa06d7a6d3
00082ba51aafbcd4e07e9a952b4e9cdcb6941929
describe
'33066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINF' 'sip-files00166.pro'
92b745af87c65528239a7cbcdd3ceaa0
5022dbcf47917b1fc7672c4c5a0cd6be5767ad73
describe
'66841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAING' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
08d720ffaee3678996c61a0766373222
6078ab39cbf364eebae58862ca434dbb859d30a1
describe
'2658168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINH' 'sip-files00166.tif'
30e8383f9232433ec14faac84832f4df
584ae42b3be59f0e8fdefe52ae57956813d1f10e
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINI' 'sip-files00166.txt'
90a092726d82d71f9ed8cfd12f1fcaa7
922426ce02abe2d181d798d06968df9b72a5f496
describe
'32248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINJ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
481cdf758968fd8560830d84ded9e665
e2a4bd869fb9ebcd7031a677018c83b7f3e1d4b1
describe
'329345' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINK' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
7bd52f49e4155fa3efa9327f042f4e93
aee3a633095819a3d85ce9d4f9207237fa6a8739
describe
'181571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINL' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
5d3c024cf0200076f2149faef613d6da
cde746b0e5e19df032edce31f1bfa67734c1851b
'2011-10-14T20:33:26-04:00'
describe
'33205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINM' 'sip-files00167.pro'
5dc21dfc97ac511328e1af84e43518dc
9b4e518a0d84b15b5dc1e4bc3a1c5568dbbc4f4f
describe
'68224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINN' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
7778dc73722a79985229babaf1e0c940
bf6dd5a38ca62b3a9df546aff935b0125f961ab2
describe
'2656024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINO' 'sip-files00167.tif'
1706b63a4acc9b16f089a0616a45009c
758bbe3164545e323f20ed207b3da38942bc77a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINP' 'sip-files00167.txt'
1558101c5e2f86807f64b1196dd67957
679c3f4e594a1a47cf1ce1ec64a11dd87e8c2495
describe
'32238' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINQ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
cd61ba59e1fdb43491a72d5a3a5afa0b
075ad5170092da0df6ae1e6d424ab27f47afe7d1
describe
'329605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINR' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
b14102f942c5e83a00a2c5b36c86f0ea
ae93306d4b0656aeb97b490b8080e80cb0c07dbe
describe
'163165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINS' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
1ed6aa4c3aa7c5bac506c5d221b9164f
342119378500569505ade5e5c39ef78317cf71cf
describe
'30035' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINT' 'sip-files00168.pro'
c3a110efcefc0886a4379da04da16c8c
29ae398615fab05230ce8fc0b5aee15d184fb088
describe
'62407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINU' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
13eb0a1d138097682e9c247fd968439b
74afd7047694806a422ac02ff410a065caa84a09
describe
'2657708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINV' 'sip-files00168.tif'
24365fcfb5ecf4c3654fc6e4d553fb1c
a5ecd93570cbe2eac7dabf44f9c200975d1b2565
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINW' 'sip-files00168.txt'
e44c4635c91af87d9f606c963c794f65
74a4d2da888ec69594a9ed6989843831c59fa3df
describe
'30744' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINX' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
6de3ef3667b273eb6642ba35848f5b72
8a7ee8d40ef43bcc9ee720f4b3bb1ba2b22abcff
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINY' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
d7876d2da2dc563b07e45ee95a2d89ce
eaa9e16db470cf5698eef82e4b22191301354379
describe
'159205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAINZ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
4e2193c6d2e8c917ca648c89e8a6d94b
230eef909a8f90be25eda723bfc709b5ca73e788
describe
'20553' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOA' 'sip-files00169.pro'
0ad3c28df83f763dea5c4fac6d956bb3
376083146ddfb0c949dfa881c3801f28cfa26c52
describe
'58819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOB' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
288f6d35876778d753260ce61c1ac762
ec9c86c78934a704eea96b06f3b6fde19cda23d6
describe
'2655508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOC' 'sip-files00169.tif'
f64b306c07df285c5ed38b2c17a4a3fd
ad11c33af2070717ee8e184e09770369ee03c97d
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOD' 'sip-files00169.txt'
47f21b72aa171da282c20248d5180292
84e61497d4ebb25afc03062bb6ab4bfbbe86b067
describe
'29947' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOE' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
7aa7e6f0a81d3df5235d7e52b6556e4b
920e45ba1edf40f93bf55cf0461378bf8c9c9881
describe
'329592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOF' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
926ae1da87ade78ceb42126c65848884
8b33b791646d7cf501197fbbae50152aaa1aa2bf
describe
'175891' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOG' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
73ad0e833c0d8d58ad379c02090d9a4b
7e29d8df628ed0832cdb20a62e51df3adcd0547f
describe
'33317' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOH' 'sip-files00170.pro'
ce8312027c5547861990b4848b78881f
45a69a4504f27af6f4dc42e174606a9f119fbaa1
describe
'66385' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOI' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
7a0edac8caef3a89c3df63799b13896c
62c1b37c69d0365c2b689cc5d28927ecbc589ba2
describe
'2658148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOJ' 'sip-files00170.tif'
1311e38527d19ff4810b6ade476d2478
bbb31028f3099b1146d3d4e525cf11ec9b51b25f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOK' 'sip-files00170.txt'
3c2070fdeb33660f32ad3a17e5725672
96f6d484ac1bf05ad838f6e3a078c90877df6832
describe
'31990' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOL' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
f9e9fe0caeb847e072d9abf3622b79a4
41ed2b336aa71d8c515501042fb361a8907a27af
describe
'329328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOM' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
9e7ffa7447f9002f0ad92106359e05c0
e6c7a0db8f9e7cf7cb799a4d5b36a3874631e4f0
describe
'172541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAION' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
3baa3c29df5e394a9be11a0a6c628031
9bb691ae70e66b20c30d09e4c511381eca840607
describe
'32489' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOO' 'sip-files00171.pro'
aa56c4d106bbf09e1559c4f7bffec0f8
c251921a257787cdf80bc6971c5f9ece1694dae9
describe
'66461' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOP' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
0470724ae209affcab3d36e229d3936b
11619c21498ee0ee3fdd0c06c17da186411232cb
describe
'2656056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOQ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
68623ee52bc7dd6482cf20eb085338b9
d5e5e907c90b3f8f8b1fb02398bec08bfe6c9711
'2011-10-14T20:34:58-04:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOR' 'sip-files00171.txt'
6eba16b85cb421e189a2cda588c35290
1daa6287fb2003b1371d1d97ec5a9ce461104f5c
describe
'31872' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOS' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
9b664baf7ebc3d659d8c6b861c6662a3
a386495bd047bf188395d700db2671236bf0c1fb
describe
'329558' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOT' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
8e6bd499c16b4d088a62fc6ecfaff341
470783d908edf59c244e51665305a6779777c86e
describe
'178847' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOU' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
8eefbe31c05fa79f0903bf6bd08a36ce
f98a60718296135808a667e1ba8d047720b98440
'2011-10-14T20:33:47-04:00'
describe
'33413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOV' 'sip-files00172.pro'
836f23730f7c9a2c6b0aa7eed4799a0e
47380d00ae75919d32a650c248fd95bc19b71e2a
describe
'66655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOW' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
b2337b22d8e37c056ffbcc41a77eb0bd
c4cc826246f7b4f9111c8d078927e26aea1b46de
describe
'2658132' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOX' 'sip-files00172.tif'
36625d89c6e63d86f812b258a845f77c
9275ae638ac1a980efc0fb5c90b6d27d6261ae9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOY' 'sip-files00172.txt'
0558a66e6d32d01d63918d601cc7a444
a7357711516d47b1412716d6ac0d651ddd502de0
describe
'31894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIOZ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
2e73c52b5ad9ffb62f5019ffd9e01954
dfac10deefb525ba69f157ceedae8ab456b60d1c
describe
'329336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPA' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
88de65344cd224f704037e5db23626f6
243c6299f94e1d74a4d2b9c06cf57303546afaf1
describe
'179455' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPB' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
767dfc5ff924f0b75e19419633435834
fb1dbfa153cf0896cefb6881f2d7f01fca37d702
describe
'33023' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPC' 'sip-files00173.pro'
fc704c27d30923967727d822aec170bf
63a5f2b18421a422e9ead9a05ce9ff87b623e23d
describe
'67125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPD' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
e73678fcd16347bfae7bdfff12523a3e
8b6ef9d07637331fd958297f16d7f4e26e68be59
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPE' 'sip-files00173.tif'
b3b4bd26dc640ad8e4947b260826f093
1aff279b6c2287ee9273f0129cc1df91096dd797
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPF' 'sip-files00173.txt'
d01c49600b8f8b303064f913319f09ae
606024b177f71d8a4a00d730053fbd867c888def
describe
'31866' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPG' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
594d60d9f9a9c5578d0a1161b33285f3
f87896814af5f171a6c9f1e4c93184b692b83000
describe
'329283' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPH' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
f012b6258ca10021c8b3e79eb29fa7e9
893a2161116805a30a213155c33cb88303bf0c29
'2011-10-14T20:36:22-04:00'
describe
'168905' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPI' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
a01fa21dedb965e0d5899517cb94e102
7492a8e9e3dd1dc716a8288ff3a0e82458ba187e
describe
'32258' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPJ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
660125838cf1e98ee780c65466b3904f
32f92de914a968eef355dc460a0d69ffd7a22371
describe
'65459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPK' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
f472668748b85b198ffda8b339a16817
ad5f6f96969990c2f7984db2a3efdc9636fce7b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPL' 'sip-files00174.tif'
70b5b8e3244d9aa9d1f07ce3ffa1ea98
0473436731beeceeb7eadedcc11273bcb646a182
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPM' 'sip-files00174.txt'
91ec9fd8c19e04afd4ef4fa30913ac59
75d55d6fa73dcef80bdcf548c6562fa91dd5f0a4
describe
'31491' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPN' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
376ff3f24916ca461f0a874290fff36b
729cdad2d36cd30e7c0cfd9dc8d64c28feff6fb9
describe
'329165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPO' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
9c47375a6d7fc49539c7bfeee52cdf73
685affff5e8f336337ffac43e5fcbf57673b4a46
describe
'172432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPP' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
8c2d85c9cad65806b60d14fc7ce3d6dc
c8a79b93cb6b4c250db81bd9b8560d398cc5d3c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPQ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
a4507fd23a4257bec60683748fb9340a
74aa8bde115e0d5d6912f22c7287ff8ce100d116
describe
'66872' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPR' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
d21f3019897fb653cebef4cf2255a5ad
ddc0f2c154f888172ed5f861e4d4cdc49e4c3af7
describe
'2655984' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPS' 'sip-files00175.tif'
b1b043c9003d878949fb86437ca88d0e
e727b7d14909b4945ffd7f0a7024567641a7b2a4
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPT' 'sip-files00175.txt'
ad25947d789d6b5563386fc8bd791fd1
e25391e97a3bfd69e63b5730f824ec84992722d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPU' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
318ad5a20c3ce1b58b3e4b90a9752972
4fec2cc6c7a64521880a98104d43d6b20d5e9bc0
describe
'329315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPV' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
40543fcee2f308efc1cac6960f536796
9759e4c8811134587e9d278c341d04e618a5b5dd
describe
'185231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPW' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
8b90ce6ed15913c931a45adf6657abf0
f7500439ecfb59e2505e5c07f5daa344a870c6c7
describe
'35249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPX' 'sip-files00176.pro'
e362bf7a36226973e9fd9ea57e561960
8d966be3fef9ae54134a38565e4af9b09e371e2f
describe
'68305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPY' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
b6164836c37256e1bd1e62cd91f147c3
2256dcb7cbb8df146ad8cf8e3f2c674550b74be1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIPZ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
df85244175275e48d838df72102f12b9
a4e28b1bd9d495a482e1747285ad12bdb5ab97da
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQA' 'sip-files00176.txt'
a807d462ff5919a662c14a3ca95c308b
3dda61f64348853f9303f507744c6dbd485647fc
describe
'32465' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQB' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
a4649cee6513f1dcbbf3ea280ef10529
9f9d761cab7c6c494a2b43ab7c181c9a5385b052
describe
'329273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQC' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
3a51632c17b900ae1323bcd69eaa62c8
c6038376ec60183b59c1e18dcab51b0226715739
describe
'186951' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQD' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
df59533ee6919e8e7083c8c1dfc8d934
b057db8d026907cc89d90b30388547158ad73ebe
describe
'35772' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQE' 'sip-files00177.pro'
5e169d4881c8a9f73833ef68b0335505
51e49ce72d371fd0b633aa1c1a28daf78616ee44
describe
'69508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQF' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
8f50b9b1dd16c7e1fad7621841870cf2
658e8c273263ece080e52ad789d04387e1f44216
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQG' 'sip-files00177.tif'
86f9b60fbc53aa86a4331ccf548c53e3
244bf6d863036308271e1d6f9e3b082696f46091
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQH' 'sip-files00177.txt'
de7e87120ec4348133dd699ec04ee2b7
bfac194fa821f20263962132f7eb9ae1a05e310a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQI' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
f1ed1df5bc397a99d1f79833913e65a2
a24b6c533bd348a50628e375db669d708ee7485c
describe
'329395' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQJ' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
f5fc3b90eb967c1ff97d5aa31346838f
bdc171fc05ce8daded831384facb5e31877106b5
describe
'126343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQK' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
3ff79fee9a1cd6c71c2957613539e6bc
5a302e3b1d55b434f157fd2795050e97b1a6fd35
describe
'16374' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQL' 'sip-files00178.pro'
faf203de37d5436a4a16e58f329d46b9
b145d72b78350f91b8267e3164853b62a130f410
describe
'49975' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQM' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
f8b5a907f2b6b16cf8d2c3e22f7ec23d
452e4e98ac9def78b302e6a8ed6799241df13ac7
describe
'2656692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQN' 'sip-files00178.tif'
826c28c6467008c091f93066b3273aab
5f8903f43e0ec2c188f22c7926c78ab18313801e
describe
'649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQO' 'sip-files00178.txt'
115263691897a4d52658de0f0182db27
722e154bbd69fb27620b057170880202c1688a65
describe
'27096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQP' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
379e7297187254d06bb4c7c1551897ea
140f67787747aa6d1dc5997dfed43c40f1b350ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQQ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
1d8d4e263bb8852dec0450af65502541
38d83a503c641ab5d448c55e95f730f0a191f4c9
describe
'152086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQR' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
da79c59aea2016ba0f0abc9de852df9f
da51fef675348ad27ff77d1d5daa4c174dc391fe
describe
'19404' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQS' 'sip-files00179.pro'
5e7d877d28a72a367ba684184f2b0316
15a6660fd4878e646baa499c5757ddc4f7549390
describe
'57172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQT' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
a3eb8137e8ec35edafbc2dd20d2203ca
9e32399a1cb357204cad27c7440d8022bd18c98d
describe
'2655600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQU' 'sip-files00179.tif'
114367188b92da4cca28bba1ec7fe357
fca3d705de7028eddc643075734f534c090990c5
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQV' 'sip-files00179.txt'
9f899846133c12bdc81d41839b8dfed0
bec4e3fbc9efc2918a04fb3befe5a26ed9739ffc
describe
'29669' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQW' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
c93b8ab2ead5ebed4c067be67543e350
c5fe28c6c929d0575e631ddaa26fdb21fe084b87
describe
'329344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQX' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
34942fb29bd38a14fba1dc96198fb1e0
6b330fc995f47abaf66fea590933d3af21c5a33c
describe
'184877' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQY' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
ef02bc3bffa5865774abcb5fe686cc0d
00d3451ced69109d38b89e07b68f021ab1e10099
describe
'35560' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIQZ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
8895703116ea342e77d61fc07de089da
4af16d1e97a63d7c0fe047777f277cace7a36615
describe
'71076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRA' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
ee5e1396cdbb929057ac327196804ee7
082218f7b87b976eedb26f164323f9f1f2a529cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRB' 'sip-files00180.tif'
4452c124662703087cacd94339c82ef4
a5be475cc2a798dab2a7763102696e258f58f655
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRC' 'sip-files00180.txt'
8ec33ad40b9f277f3ff6324e6bb82cd2
51fb5a72209260e08d1ef35adfdd7440db1f484b
describe
'33071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRD' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
fa4899d59bd12deb9e92e6073e1a4480
82065bd8be1d33bdc4969dd6bff5efa4907ada38
describe
'329293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRE' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
faff3a64b2a689bfcc913e7cd8521aaa
0df51b38e2ad07b911f62c71e6467b0c2caaf974
describe
'181544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRF' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
c17d1a42982e96c9fa569129f0ff3d43
50aeb26659ea0422fa1da65afa438ee6efae8a64
describe
'33927' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRG' 'sip-files00181.pro'
4b726b768ad75431faba32faf4628423
a3ad152556c62fe480ac6a9f3afb320c299c28dd
describe
'69505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRH' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
700785227d864e56a5cbeb6ffae2ba42
b1842ca97628ac4f35a82636a15d89e11a65cdc3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRI' 'sip-files00181.tif'
b5dd7ea1746dc7395cc4ff7e65cc8e1b
40d50b3ae3968fb0a8c2e2ef750dadac70fe5eec
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRJ' 'sip-files00181.txt'
02dee00f6d0c9fd85cba5732dca690c3
6d6bdf686dd061755f21652c0dea0bfbda466344
describe
'32379' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRK' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
93f512682cc8eadb756ceb4f668630cb
506bcd7cc6623a8f6eeea74a54f154c48738b8fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRL' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
bc1fd0cc3c6b600991aaf6c86d3420b9
69ee11aa12f6813aba82678f7b45698187147166
describe
'178826' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRM' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
dd0cc8bad11c5cc689d06d4aaedc3560
bffab00009d4c88a136fa45089eef6e1c1e47b1f
describe
'34546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRN' 'sip-files00182.pro'
373b599bef7494faf8793c3a157ae5dd
fe6e38cfcd2c0eb5898924255024083a36b2c744
describe
'68727' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRO' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
227b1349dcaba856efd5292dc8e2bf67
389cd6c97db46a26b74892b97988798bfd27ae25
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRP' 'sip-files00182.tif'
0a31b689c726075e275be1652b002f49
a7063f470b35128acdd2051162e24fb81823d9f1
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRQ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
4b67daf181840fdd51bf7efe5b3e7ea3
287ce1c10f424b2b005a1b2c5b61dbc01b8d1e44
describe
'32060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRR' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
68dfa2dce8cbf5813bab8da461cbe385
7a54fc357010cc76279e7c6937da86869b3264e1
describe
'329311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRS' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
16c9294886a396024911a3ce11b63abe
e3225bcf5cc74fb21f3b806c7acd34f0759e7882
describe
'178300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRT' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
0ce38bfcfe15e36190c02f0e91e849f1
74ea85d2c0fd8a85c1a11dc65f32bdd06d2a7b70
describe
'33871' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRU' 'sip-files00183.pro'
41cf43c213584e0c9f97612f8df8b661
ce0b1cd7e74dfb6bfa61ff45a87f462396d30cb2
describe
'67688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRV' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
8608745d06d60019657aeb640bfeda3a
7c0c6caeebb9aa8b740ed41654a915274207a4ba
describe
'2656176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRW' 'sip-files00183.tif'
78c2b965fb271da98f1f6f9a6e50ce59
7869c10adf2c56e8f2b8f20dc307544e9f18c369
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRX' 'sip-files00183.txt'
951974552ced6266035c26a65c7b2b43
d96690fbf488c54cdce41717e3d489c9b7ebf094
describe
'32217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRY' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
f68efcb317057dbe0183155145834990
5af5c51b47c69a0aa5aaa3894212ba17a65324a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIRZ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
fdf4073358ae676ab41fed820a0f1c44
67319d3a28600cba1a2d6b441caced7fb3293557
describe
'182342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISA' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
07e8f54f37d05236a05ff79048b817f8
c8534deda02fd234e517729958ac2dc24c0c1791
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISB' 'sip-files00184.pro'
ed9647463dff270237b014a5bb12e77f
5f21aaaf7348156c9701f501a75e6af622343245
describe
'68844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISC' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
7f2d0fc4638fe7e8f7f8f3fded5c602a
b4aab19cf6bb6ad06eb6da8df222dc73521110ef
describe
'2656200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISD' 'sip-files00184.tif'
4709d33865127b045a8ef6e08b1cf2e3
3a3294a78a44efad614c583f98b58239efebb15c
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISE' 'sip-files00184.txt'
84445edca1c0dbbf8c00efe55605b32b
66cc0261e42c85c6b0d3d3b1c31c31eeb1af247c
'2011-10-14T20:36:26-04:00'
describe
'32287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISF' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
5a8395df7bee61eefe8a3f87caed298d
6df8d11e2706ca4649871df96ec33cfc0bb20e7e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISG' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
c3bb1cea42278b57dd33277b77118123
38348876bd26a7a108e7a23ee3ecfc219f17fc7a
describe
'183029' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISH' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
69bd426c40515d138df82c5be4555fc9
7785148fbc0a625e1134b3e48bee7b29ef8582f1
describe
'34158' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISI' 'sip-files00185.pro'
7ed2b014d8eb6fcc4742a255a8c7bb70
f856cca79a7c0b835d33d26f62b476372c6938d4
describe
'68689' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISJ' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
4c66428d2365a9161489fe9d07c5353c
08f9d08897b5e68fdbf9e82c27c57cf831a9e61f
describe
'2656116' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISK' 'sip-files00185.tif'
66724387c0067229313bb86eb3e9b84d
308c283222990e253056390c84e565c4531be1ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISL' 'sip-files00185.txt'
039da93ee726919663c3664fed010ac7
b1448d19b16345a9e3b9fd39d8cb3d8f19d39a1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISM' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
c168ce62f3b76ac9b4fb7d8f851092f2
b21a688ed8e946576c29ef8d18981a1529743bdc
describe
'329074' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISN' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
03be3134127355877009511374f71ed5
3175deef649d144235425a000f82965c82c059d4
describe
'175649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISO' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
b69bb6b573988c1c647d372320d92568
e1be98da299ecd603ac1944d90fa295217289249
describe
'33855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISP' 'sip-files00186.pro'
6298ed8ece6fb0ff2aa7cf2c56972b96
d6eb710a9469a1d78396358d7655ab7514827cb6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISQ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
24235d07502175ce8c2c17036c20edd6
e9866763e15b6f0ad717d332015d0de005560976
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISR' 'sip-files00186.tif'
f5e6698e0d4b2b0dc37ad687648fcde1
9c13ae4563bed7b9dd03fb2cc18baa93726fdc6c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISS' 'sip-files00186.txt'
7e0584743db447d91dbb6cf0665b000d
c4ba8566dd6dc93627c399773967237149c139c1
describe
'32644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIST' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
2ab92342af70ab28a882ddc5ce83c153
7aebaa3fac7ac1e0912c5cd8cbcfc45fec2773af
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISU' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
8bcc3ff76c1fd1e8f9f80c070e00c7cf
8eab00067e59be36a494ffcc66c1c8ef35e48571
describe
'183556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISV' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
88d8e2b3e802c2d13d702269d7e69e5a
0e9f2bba862631b4446ee62f912bbf7b775d426b
describe
'34697' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISW' 'sip-files00187.pro'
38ba67ae0dda7d65ac042366ad1048cd
69afaba48bdd4754b5a00cf2b04f47b572e3b9eb
describe
'68980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISX' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
577c3a6f8bc557a091b99a7ab3b2be43
e877a84ab7cf99d748368e1350c2c5a667ae7ed1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISY' 'sip-files00187.tif'
ec085b18b4db09c7bcc884dbd9ba88c6
62fc7371fcd5f0189457d0be15e05c2139288908
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAISZ' 'sip-files00187.txt'
25c468ac02225a48316ec45e61b42212
80f4dca6d4e3095eedbfa1d15fe459dfda168c26
describe
'32494' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITA' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
f173625747ac7566faac87d9ed9e2713
6cb80320575229091dd772475cbf25d27b675e69
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITB' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
fb01bf02b37328f1290cd647f3df9044
65be797edb7df88f276a455f95e4890d2cc08620
describe
'184931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITC' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
68eedac8ae4b8748ed3bf5e87a70cc41
c3a12ed5551ed05a19fbd5de4605e9d327043336
describe
'35309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITD' 'sip-files00188.pro'
4fd30152322e54b24b5ee131086a95bd
25854097e02bb10925f7d84b17b927d49e292246
describe
'69981' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITE' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
595be12209310aed79d3b9d22ceb307f
83f075a7348334a0e1e487f30f98d159c6631cde
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITF' 'sip-files00188.tif'
1eb9db6528b878b584cd78fcfdd24763
f38a398653f9254f4b4ff1894eb24150acbfe3af
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITG' 'sip-files00188.txt'
1a7648e1f1001d5866f4923d6f751bad
72629615b386369468b11c365af9e548b7893e4a
'2011-10-14T20:36:08-04:00'
describe
'32961' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITH' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
1a385ebf0ac220126e580c03e040a5dd
436ecd54da41a0c4a30117bf9587dbbbd6963537
describe
'329236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITI' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
abbd9c249b83f999f13080ef68f9b526
51a88218784a2d7d87a760f452719c3946bcaefd
describe
'182538' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITJ' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
af44a8025461866a96006909972c0364
ce2665f963a80cb24513d0d4a854637343fa0221
describe
'34199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITK' 'sip-files00189.pro'
9df7a0efda3db7d8bfc56cb7e8f2cb01
d34246746d2d28df35148e3741db9507ec684808
describe
'68974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITL' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
b42f9f8cef4ce76f42d3f176058e252b
5673c3affecddafa8d3aad743f5c18fbce5f65d2
describe
'2656444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITM' 'sip-files00189.tif'
e400f17c96c210f1fb54762e40e3919e
e1f8c7cd18a91313f2e6b7e4e75c5449ab7e1503
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITN' 'sip-files00189.txt'
fff287051d9a0f66b3d00e02355f4af8
57935ee43c53cdbd47b8daefb27eb81a8b661f8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITO' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
4d38d1c39f3942ff1e8c2a59e59d6d39
9179c2797f6d42e607f9b5ae5af883336493f0ca
describe
'329248' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITP' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
61eae2dcc6a4e98097754e9e28794221
8d40a30354463786e0be4bb1105b0fb3d3a9f901
describe
'182460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITQ' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
57e56f8666650e4295dd1e5aaaa32f72
a53d80e263570c7144f1d873bb868d1ba9a9e1f8
describe
'34867' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITR' 'sip-files00190.pro'
02b8f3d09e0ec234c2c587a5020bcf80
5bad029c527d7defeb581f8e033215852b026dcc
describe
'70639' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITS' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
15226a4e474bb15047a75904836540c5
4297772c8a8e70b5aee0bb5e26f93eb6ab265c21
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITT' 'sip-files00190.tif'
31f8f025bff4067f3c77eeab4a3a5bfd
96e97f86e86d02a5bb9ae5751deb2db9765d4d07
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITU' 'sip-files00190.txt'
20c6ff9d53eee692e1a53b4e07002433
9315c0fb27ca4d5d6053077ae8e7f028144e7e01
describe
'32321' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITV' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
4895953a1ee71be095a9fe94175abc93
f19c9029199ec108bf83f35f30e2821b91dfb723
describe
'329351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITW' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
2e0c8c9f8adaf0b2c21835ca2febb5f8
b34c9ee0ab91c68b38950ffe89fbcbd681f215cf
describe
'177490' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITX' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
545793307b215fb7a398a4b7668fd3f6
4932fc0ad157d22dcff4dbcc9d3a52fff46230ca
describe
'33430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITY' 'sip-files00191.pro'
bb5352993710f04d5e975ad8fdf520d9
5eb8e69d13f8270cb84892ee626012009de15eb3
describe
'69173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAITZ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
652a210423bdcb97c4d1cd6eabe36621
eac14766dbc5aa84b3ef1887812cc52114b85379
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUA' 'sip-files00191.tif'
53f50c0420f3ad06cd1aff33891e2bb7
e762e6ec0222b887687c2c9b5bb93195b4b3644e
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUB' 'sip-files00191.txt'
22c1402943ed34c37da745d78df2cd90
f4bd29442571e5b394a1e9d5a5ad5324d960d482
describe
'32763' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUC' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
a08694a945a16a70bcba994b4d4255c3
52a64ef9e497a368d574dc38dffbe67ab748c593
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUD' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
00d5ca705b5c4b0725d40bf0bfe51b4f
1b1391f26470901c67f60bae92f4fa10251994b8
describe
'182183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUE' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
87591cf880d33cd9c4ff61f71571eec3
7273170dd1642ae2de1fa0231f0bcfc27ccf39c7
describe
'34965' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUF' 'sip-files00192.pro'
c68a9e8c70fbdc9b2549a8787912d68b
792802ba989ed3662d13f98c73552fb9b07bc596
describe
'71677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUG' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
679967f991c28a29ae9fb557c5352700
8ddd0a678c42326578c77764838ce64e9502279d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUH' 'sip-files00192.tif'
7609be6a7f22993ffb61a053e5fcfe84
4bfae045cefc3920cea154ed5cdda640b1813edc
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUI' 'sip-files00192.txt'
81fdadc7cd0eb7fbc756739872fde8f8
4f1d2fa07969c9038ea39dd46a83485db1d96804
describe
'33076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUJ' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
e6a3fde92662ccff8aa8e30bf30a65ca
a3a8e03d3e4ead2eea89991ca79ea4bcd57e5e75
describe
'329245' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUK' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
96e46a64e5f4d97aad7ed72127e7cc3a
c93a3ded2d1adeb8b8f99a4a45a18bad14b5ac40
describe
'181954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUL' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
3924904c2e652392253c3f55429e8f4f
1047145e969f791ed2e675f6498330f64569bb67
describe
'33608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUM' 'sip-files00193.pro'
52c6c014a905c1856c2393f4bc17e236
6fdd5a43f02983a4f85b4b6bc27b9e305d858bb9
describe
'69444' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUN' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
518b96f959c2215e1bf1499a3887ddc9
e6aa002a0d72ce7d5d5a7b6eb7b0d18e8d8e4f0a
describe
'2656300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUO' 'sip-files00193.tif'
93e3d02b5147e411ab6e669133b8424c
5b786a19e52c746f41d9b0870c0aaebab68566e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUP' 'sip-files00193.txt'
3cb6b266a5a15a5ea17b7c0dc0458490
baa7decbf322d0c8d7283f6196961b40612090a4
describe
'32426' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUQ' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
39faa566c151ce017d6570ae606dfa08
1d971b23722f5676ea9b8083105a4562891f5e7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUR' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
2b38de79ed28e14ef057461f2369b0dd
fb5c47f21abad7ddef57fecb9e3388c090f26404
describe
'176566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUS' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
e91b7b3e09730f6e3ad57b258dc0add1
402294b9ad2c407732827e6115d8b6b17be95c83
describe
'32864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUT' 'sip-files00194.pro'
c405727b8c51692b4d87341649939ddc
b2f644d0ea20fded5c0752a5bebced54b51a0d61
describe
'68285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUU' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
a20b78d280d2f61ae3b52c737b223b86
79c7a86b596c6a835c98834bc7ec47751f7b4ca7
describe
'2656208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUV' 'sip-files00194.tif'
f794fba37e6f606fc248c404aa7aeb18
e43f68503945e958ccedcd96049845f9c67f78a7
'2011-10-14T20:33:49-04:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUW' 'sip-files00194.txt'
1371eaa3e41308acbe62b21298043397
c7c229d8732dcc8931e8723653530d51d94e565f
describe
'32423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUX' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
82606482fa8eb769be16211037b7e1d8
b2a93b8b06b9536da563dbab3519d7cf2ccd44c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUY' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
a8cd7c66c1c523a2445f3bcb181c18b9
115888362189585748d507a6e1302f6e5b54ce76
describe
'185663' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIUZ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
e0ac79a6d62f4a6c000731011ded53cc
ff0078e0631e597d35371418cc78a2176d06b2ae
describe
'35120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVA' 'sip-files00195.pro'
8c342b3ec418620b3f5135f4d95152b4
991f40d0497d1dbcd004478b5e66e6c294a49436
describe
'70890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVB' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
61a448369ac044d8e994ea5b262e7aaa
9aa9abb3f12888155036333e7f11012dc7b59b75
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVC' 'sip-files00195.tif'
f8e90314275fd94d78d04bf963751306
2b41851e93faf7d7367958d30f015cc735a87423
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVD' 'sip-files00195.txt'
da0f9b0b44d37b169e754ee06ea0ef24
8ad3ff0c255ba89fd3397ccc736c71277d050a81
describe
'33025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVE' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
35f1a047e9e661ca7dbe36717f831cdb
776258d887752c056919e75ff295c8edcad35305
describe
'329313' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVF' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
e0c7c189f8817c9a831a4ee049a39e68
fae7047a2583428aa61351f0ab1838b9f73e9835
describe
'181143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVG' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
1d54f7fe5439d6aa87e60746b14dfe52
02a78199719be7bbd7dc517a7ab920c2a140e146
describe
'33463' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVH' 'sip-files00196.pro'
593e4af532602427ba484e8ba92d93c4
589993eb8fcc840f0cd333e59991d61020b0843e
describe
'68625' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVI' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
89015da8290c30515dfb0d5fafce09f6
02d189e40d02e4cdf00cbbf269da45a7dc641334
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVJ' 'sip-files00196.tif'
69ae8a710634759fec0aa48b0a9e37a4
a8bf3d573ddd6d7683abe0bb0504fe9f7c0df0a6
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVK' 'sip-files00196.txt'
99922b6e643db3762c80d52b8a611519
c5fd253bdb08f8c62ec2d1f19f439c70bd309edb
describe
'32843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVL' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
eb865cf902662d8c74533808de054e53
edb5059337ad954f0026562d068eb0f445b41e88
describe
'329220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVM' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
f7923ae9b780f8c38c5b15bd6a84e8d0
a96e736d06a88029c4c0777b93f48586cc8c2187
describe
'131943' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVN' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
36ed8763fde436ae51e8189a6ff8819a
0a849e7b881af01db48785fd510758afabc932db
describe
'17705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVO' 'sip-files00197.pro'
ddfbcac745bbdd8fde0e63cb8b23a6b7
79084f4db7a62d4e4bc885559e94abe03a3144b3
describe
'50930' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVP' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
b5be55e7c43cb01f61178ce0f4610b6f
afd029c3dde3a3e35ec8ffddc7006dc3bad1228f
describe
'2654760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVQ' 'sip-files00197.tif'
907cf7d9377ea38fe291134a665d27e7
ddb722aeb43b6a085d50fe7a519c6b89d02f43ef
describe
'765' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVR' 'sip-files00197.txt'
4f009d97e0b80711cbd7de18f448a6fc
c9c17b75d2ba4c3f14c9bfc3c462d23056cd4380
describe
'27389' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVS' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
fd8d549fcae156062142fbb21bdfb03c
ea758a44b3704c82bdce6fcbf2e069765766e3b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVT' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
351fac84bfc28f4eb7976db3a26e4847
31f0de9568b2200b1f4719dc4826f4f8c12dc2da
describe
'155146' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVU' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
22acbee68bb596647bcbf268630835d9
7ab4cbe351a6dd70401aeffe6e96be01052ee65c
describe
'20151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVV' 'sip-files00198.pro'
0b774973d397bdfb3434a5d752f5f9bb
f584b1351d577879d346bf7bcd975849d3cf3f08
describe
'57010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVW' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
f1e675f44c3b65f61ebfa8e0e7be8e07
0a11398f9ad0752188ae1c965a6ee0a531053d82
describe
'2655356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVX' 'sip-files00198.tif'
c50f6ffc21b340bfb8660ca10b2d4ced
fbb2a6b7c1271dc24c8ef3d64580da8dca36ae74
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVY' 'sip-files00198.txt'
f19b788e36dada84ada6b3ce810d5402
899b7ce5b4bb629fc846065aa0d14e2b671b9c47
describe
'29430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIVZ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
0e40facc4e528f6920d2293f363cade0
35bea890ae52df5da73c189adb558d3478c16fee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWA' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
a92b7a3f221d30ddff2490760ad2237a
3a32b274ef7f1d5d5bc93a2094a8ad72ce79d714
describe
'183178' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWB' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
b2441fe45e69c8dd3b8ad504206043c1
95f6a72706071a88c40e0c1ae827b86b5d09b22a
describe
'33883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWC' 'sip-files00199.pro'
be140829dae30934a83f70568014146f
e2573be3079398bbc8998737da5f6be227349384
describe
'69670' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWD' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
ec589cf8ed2e6530e09f80e71e3cdbff
36d07354d3ef03ab8697d5ffe2739e8e4fc86ef6
describe
'2656244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWE' 'sip-files00199.tif'
1b27e2624baf81021f8a913f6bd05809
91a7f759612099168b26a142d444c1506545cb4c
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWF' 'sip-files00199.txt'
24e4d4686290175764449da30b097158
68eab743e60ff0ebe56f11deaf6c077dc3aa4d47
describe
'32641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWG' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
f5410d032d35c04e98fc3100d3e12839
8373c730cfc18ca009c627abfc9eb549fe5e145a
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWH' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
16486974f6cf0fffa4ad7404e96d66ba
6a009ffe62094532ccc2e6baf0390d627d4c9b37
'2011-10-14T20:33:08-04:00'
describe
'184360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWI' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
ae90aaba4318843d57ea2d3633feb553
199b6d7446928769bbbf1e9d9a086491d4ffad18
describe
'34130' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWJ' 'sip-files00200.pro'
9196f871c827d0f3e5c08d836a024832
bccc966a607e6894736b6de875d44a3db15dee01
describe
'68474' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWK' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
bd8263c666dbd19a1bb83dd6d6bc8422
9ed5c572dc9b37b968c5d0de64f683f2ae4bd116
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWL' 'sip-files00200.tif'
b526a6029a1703474090ab4d8d9a056f
c25446abdd8134028ea8896fa63fe7de84bc5911
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWM' 'sip-files00200.txt'
4b89f6c1d84c18341e95c67ed383d62a
07b45574de6b3f6c939f56fd79242fe9aa6c1609
describe
'32346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWN' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
88757ff5c8f979598dd51bdbfa892765
4f0e20c736aa0bb6fce91500a67bf3dce3590a83
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWO' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
44cd827d693665ae18313ce9252309dc
d9744f07e73535f65d0f900c0c55ed4f806e1e9f
describe
'179114' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWP' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
3eb8e2c3858692dfc788bded3a87db56
5937fee1f8d41e438fc3de78fd7aa6107d319721
describe
'32854' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWQ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
0a093851780119de91226d59259335c2
42541543476fa206beabd1369d8b1e5cb80974ea
describe
'67759' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWR' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
86bc0cc97f2836d2fa935ee931fb101a
589dc846f5ffb8ba26ee5d577a2e4e4217a4d036
describe
'2656124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWS' 'sip-files00201.tif'
25fd8cf4a798256cb8d6a385e03e98e2
1baf214b441314e015387c1f5f730812cfa229c1
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWT' 'sip-files00201.txt'
65af0020f51e711726809e53568106cc
25d16f3b07fdecc74678c0eb947c802ff43c505a
describe
'32187' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWU' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
c95bd9685297d1852e698aa65eb8eb24
ce416a24b19b3a6e12418d56670209a23a48b3e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWV' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
57016600b8fcb557762c69b793ca75c8
6b215535f6e4e2fc7eab32c598de8801136d4995
describe
'182229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWW' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
7619b412b964e7317d943c7784f1211e
f092f696a6686dc090359154a065589bd3643812
describe
'35222' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWX' 'sip-files00202.pro'
d3b1f68eca6ae7d8ae1858a36dc5c160
404da1a064159531e92057d032e10a451f4b2960
describe
'70594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWY' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
6be68e48f492955fac5553f4839ede2d
c218fc23996a64fd6769fc4222696c2ab52c9119
describe
'2656320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIWZ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
d197d3243e1cc242f8d398cb8e464c9d
51818c188f6e034df5f61e00f9164f529d891091
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXA' 'sip-files00202.txt'
d45b774e0367839ec5c4d6a4f7111051
50ca047dd9121fd0d006df1a09231ec1881eb821
describe
'32640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXB' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
c824eab0dd38356920615c65f02745b2
8d2a7f5789fcc18f99763cab8cee9a116b286e3f
describe
'329338' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXC' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
9009ff72113f2badb6d89af9dadf7b7b
55c56bc0b0a5535cf28910f84e2ec8e313d03356
describe
'179379' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXD' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
7b0b361d1cccdc32aa45e96fca95f6eb
3bd37bd3fcba02689f6c377ba18c08b9528b6ccc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXE' 'sip-files00203.pro'
2cbc35157e66161bffb3fd46df70a314
723391bfd92eba5ef3efbdd6306296ce9b6ef7a6
describe
'68069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXF' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
8c53fda6c1c6079f405192477fbffefe
5add005110cf6a390c929d11256725901599e6f1
describe
'2656364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXG' 'sip-files00203.tif'
fada771ba8897360d9f42b347db44067
f110c525659899b44293e3f45d4c70dc3e5d51eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXH' 'sip-files00203.txt'
54bd4c63fefca23819b2d5e9b202d415
b3aa9fc6360508561bb90ac0d42eac77de3b7d2a
describe
'32294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXI' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
47dec5e045d6b62d42c6ac3b007a8b85
511eda2b1826a577c5c9756abc0206b108124770
describe
'329312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXJ' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
a5e08d6a657d0cfdf154c0518df747cd
daf8a8b81e843432f18fc0f91e6bd407e42838b1
describe
'183855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXK' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
8cbe5f52eacd9995c17dc2cc86daaf4c
efea074a64d72c61ada95b4c83f6fe0d6ed4bab1
describe
'34577' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXL' 'sip-files00204.pro'
a50436d3831bd913168fcdb3d8a75cc9
9e48936f32cad95ce7b7cdfc05d7638becdaeb82
describe
'68965' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXM' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
727400c52162ec953102453160a0b452
a617951d275206d39ee622e0e8b71112b9709300
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXN' 'sip-files00204.tif'
4782cd67d278ac04b21aba4e8b958ea5
760244a167fd7d87df2c7760a11d09f1bb097c1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXO' 'sip-files00204.txt'
74e1c42d4d2150541ff3745da047ad9c
b4d0a30e49aeccb0b02d40d7538b4709e256572e
describe
'32439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXP' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
6c9324b4e58c6c1914cbcb77ca8b1d4d
1402e36a55cbf31e0da8d740c5f540daf9ca7977
describe
'329071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXQ' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
fa02dc770c41acaf92d33e9e6d566e2d
5bcb34846cbae87f8eb184fabcded49132b18cd5
describe
'176147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXR' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
8120a73c46775a95d3dce7d355e0b1c7
12f9327474c3a455e2baa9d41a92667f2cacd274
describe
'31920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXS' 'sip-files00205.pro'
f7d7ae915479981ca2b816a0f33899fa
e23e275c606c3456df63fbc0af39d820bb99ab2a
describe
'67205' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXT' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
c065ef91308ffcaee7e55772d3fe73a0
96debb5906eb25bed311ae20e7b27a6ae9f4084b
describe
'2656040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXU' 'sip-files00205.tif'
5150ba643207be3ee8a96c13a6e14047
fe7ae65b6832b710996163b94c9c218d531abbbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXV' 'sip-files00205.txt'
837df910629c949af94c79bdc449a3a5
b4b787e45f6a3acc29eabc7cc37a3f08578ecf83
describe
'31644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXW' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
1c8e8c2207f4adc7bbd92dd7f774c0fa
b13c46ce847026e83dcb56ba0c10ce4322ac2514
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXX' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
0fc42698ed4a343abc695a66ce96441c
2eb25bfddaba8814cd31581dc7647968ebdb9cc7
describe
'179915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXY' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
438ff9daeac0904e9ece2a38e786ee7a
5f7dc73ec533ca7b8e4bf18e493b3629c411cc11
describe
'34433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIXZ' 'sip-files00206.pro'
fcf33d88e6d863f86c59e23f68e25839
6c58a2653154c56a00190bf21465bc268306ae39
describe
'68640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYA' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
a569c9c4156157a88eff30658c894478
a77c667de30def8917f66e011acf03422f198139
describe
'2656316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYB' 'sip-files00206.tif'
9bd26d695283ad3b39b4f5e5290ab25b
1d94487dca12510e9fdfd8c3f69ef7c7fe1cae13
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYC' 'sip-files00206.txt'
ee4d8aa988c34f363db86ce999185475
08bd27100601e90dc3eb7f7c6117f38d9ee46069
describe
'32255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYD' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
b84acb13dda19123b3918f9fc58919aa
45f1f032fa8ef1167aabc245a4bd1441cdf8808a
describe
'329066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYE' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
47f816fb8fe2d55647d3d43c32ea6a27
a16386c51b5ab997ba1a3571fe6c698316007b2c
describe
'173524' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYF' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
1e9c5d3fecf5ee607216247968c2abf8
bbcb31505ac6915d9abbd6c74fa643671122931f
describe
'33068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYG' 'sip-files00207.pro'
d145a4638259c890c22ac00c5c980e0f
74f455665e0aed6f7e1834cb47a4a30db66018bc
describe
'67246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYH' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
23c17dd858f11930c9e5f2615b580874
a9a5f278c1c389e57eb88d685335cbb765bdee27
'2011-10-14T20:38:15-04:00'
describe
'2656052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYI' 'sip-files00207.tif'
8a77657083ddbcaf805a29770e8628de
f77c40f28ac292d85e0f9bd5be8c0e3b0e06bc80
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYJ' 'sip-files00207.txt'
3e403ba45bc6c68bce42159f5fe660b0
59a577c403a526cc3190dad4cb8d879150fb2292
describe
'31875' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYK' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
b71966d66d58ce02ceb9b78bc6d16550
be1863196704bad336b49cc9bfd223ea4ee8972d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYL' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
c17d83b1a20bf0ed72c1f2882bfc0296
64d02cfcb7a4a946bbe22bdc275a67ae2cb5d3a5
describe
'182868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYM' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
fe191c001a45b58612dda223a4908580
388c983467df80642031a3c7f28857034ec77563
describe
'34219' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYN' 'sip-files00208.pro'
7f52c1bc065b3351be998fa3fd09419f
890eb1c836d9652f144b9edcbfaa8fb5107389b3
describe
'69295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYO' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
b6e66bc106450c514913d878477e34ac
5e32aa6130adf40a5f0373d6b005f6f57385dd7b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYP' 'sip-files00208.tif'
480cb4beab94a726bc13d87fd025695c
2b1cab4588a8b10e5b3c001b894740e50bebab06
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYQ' 'sip-files00208.txt'
560c25dc749b348f547f2134a75cf709
11297b498445dd7fe96631cbb78b78557baacfb0
describe
'32654' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYR' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
2631abb7c93a5b09a0415ae356b3c200
246bdae4c8a67cae28d025a2c04eaa24e8efedd5
describe
'329285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYS' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
fbed231fcd50a8bafef15eaf01504a99
1ae705c66b9b07ed2954290e2736ff0373d754a2
describe
'185212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYT' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
1fc95ce9a5c6589d002f8b38058a6627
3b501cab10661d1b0bfd43410dee5857f7402b59
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYU' 'sip-files00209.pro'
9e8a3129441e13275102266bec864e79
ab74d3ccdf05cf6304089bc711bac6c5ad86daf5
describe
'70981' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYV' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
4f1bdba1482e3d20442688ffb7c01d5b
6206e9e602c9d67b8da510eae893c5c4c546aebe
describe
'2656352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYW' 'sip-files00209.tif'
66af1f9dc1b0236d9de0d947bfa715d0
d8ccfb70f4c14221ef9bf512d1290e708a537f4c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYX' 'sip-files00209.txt'
f6e59108a53b49253dee7fc4edf21a9d
14ac665a4129980528a7b9a466cd5dd300994215
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYY' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
eab76ea490fafebb94ef78857aef9221
d1ed920f906de41d28b3ac69364fc317fb721bf5
describe
'329330' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIYZ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
a2a06fb321f4704a20fbceb4776d1a25
61808f05d0e91a493555d2da28889fe03a85b6c6
describe
'172514' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZA' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
a595ff5c8cecd721e04d6193f063a3c4
27e1bdec03fb6a48eb3cb468baec7c14110a8552
describe
'32303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZB' 'sip-files00210.pro'
c6b2a738890707df80f8a18201c33226
38e8bae086d2e4a3a7f5acf06f6e616e76a577c4
describe
'67848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZC' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
0dbc187bd4ac438751015358452237e6
603fe34691eedfb69a2b7a2edaf13f038070ee55
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZD' 'sip-files00210.tif'
8ae3e0fb6f5e3d7ebd03b2d4fb6c9084
7c0c95efe9ae56e122ab41b3711e1b68c982b2ca
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZE' 'sip-files00210.txt'
b45d6fda818cb371f8efa21c4ea745eb
db797e6e5e29c5117f83acdcbaaff704dcd20f43
describe
'32376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZF' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
cad6bb58ecb4f6b85576c0506227fa96
b5f937dfe59725889b3d88f2f5a9b9763014446a
describe
'329217' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZG' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
9ded0136788ab22d7c02286101e67ec4
a007311b80027ccc2640fbe8ba75b792c76340ac
describe
'184737' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZH' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
3508092f0a1bb9f2d332eedfcd5e734d
bf29fc759ab645b1955e88af3a46802d80ac1025
'2011-10-14T20:35:03-04:00'
describe
'35544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZI' 'sip-files00211.pro'
b0e9aa0c0fbcd3656b1268b4df8faade
708610a2ba61d6cb600bd272661e710b2b620015
describe
'70542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZJ' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
0485a061b756c0eebf5e77fe9a76b0ee
1c2567bd94b16c76e5adafe3d28d23049c3ff7ed
describe
'2656452' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZK' 'sip-files00211.tif'
16a58ee8c92c0a77dbc10d707df03571
238c90a1fbab5d8a26c2099ffd6ecdf342ebb97a
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZL' 'sip-files00211.txt'
2e240efea48c8260c902bacc663c27c7
c44c8be9d3331a3511e3999a820ecad53b8e9fa8
describe
'33189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZM' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
cacdbf398ee96b031975bbcbb1be0820
4fee405e9877156590b3bff0edcfd67918b95a3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZN' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
1c0bffcc7a3470eadcb5604185e7d660
7b7e5f700d7ec315a7c647007c15c481b66b0baf
describe
'166213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZO' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
6a290415bab5ec7e52c54149f8a5156a
83a74975035fbb0b814f3c3f7369ebeb7ca9f8ce
describe
'29473' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZP' 'sip-files00212.pro'
3ed4273531f9e06e591d7f21a200b566
2e6ffdfa6b1b0d2aa82129990beb7288b0f3c7d6
describe
'63890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZQ' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
13c7d845c8979dd740854beb208bf249
1405d85cfea9aa0e349e957b3a46f2c5b9fe0920
describe
'2656228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZR' 'sip-files00212.tif'
fd98a41a71ab3a685477a9a022fa88db
675ff3a9ecdfbe9ef098302db3be5d087c0112d7
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZS' 'sip-files00212.txt'
a7ca20af37e84ce14a7622486d7b8ab1
f16c160cb615f0b2804a8133b7de2c5bb6cffcb8
describe
'31703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZT' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
977b9b5d72562f90612291859b932624
6abd751457e9d661fdca193ea5ad35aa20882f18
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZU' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
c3cb03d3ec6cffd1f0d1d3351e0fcdb6
f05bb8024ac2942e98d630ca65d0b230e6d0aac5
describe
'183523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZV' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
5e00c865c5c6b9f142b5e55bd56945e2
e67f24272782ed59f344d4d1ec994efac560bf53
describe
'34479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZW' 'sip-files00213.pro'
796fa9c0b9b023f73c9521c5aaaabddd
a40f7c57402f72cce4f419b8c5c0f34006c5628b
describe
'69076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZX' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
65a4f22aa6c61653d13e75baa1cb01bd
f0cf5e707dbd7c55c233a752beb648e21bf2a70c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZY' 'sip-files00213.tif'
076eb6bc909910f47ec1e7c7ada4e921
78c912001cfb54c05706bf758b25f3e8e4e47eee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAIZZ' 'sip-files00213.txt'
d258a647e82e12283f0249b269e9db6b
518c9fb5db21216dbbb573888e10fbb65548d902
describe
'32498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAA' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
927f7afd1365160286cea4f1eed7bfc6
0e26c3c244cb79e5a90dd9fa93a20a9db60617b9
describe
'349180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAB' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
7495a748785fd57c7c3f8e1fd9e52b5e
21d59241be5d5ed60b3563ef9efb2296d75df60b
describe
'79782' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAC' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
3b15391077d07a3c0544f0b2f1a9f03f
ac61c29148967fe7c2493f64c2c99a3346e1e6f7
describe
'9353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAD' 'sip-files00214.pro'
cf669bd4243d51eeb1c5d5b8d667b4cb
99d062623cdaed227503795a8941127e5ee7c796
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAE' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
68667a34c9eea0582507fbc6d4fa1da5
3740091b933e25da1c7af03850a932c16f47c131
describe
'2805236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAF' 'sip-files00214.tif'
b2d6526564acc2ce495674c7dc252c14
73906a70a1c4e045142da10b2b02bfd4ccb2ee62
describe
'378' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAG' 'sip-files00214.txt'
cfe4b00c2a603ade998a55fec379ae1c
a227b4ad59606ab39ea0737c24f71e65aa601064
describe
'15132' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAH' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
acba17cb63ebc93d75b1eb3b0aa37eef
5f369f89a1e7aca8619bf6c91da52407068cc4db
describe
'329647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAI' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
0c76f5654b463deb7b4f32b3a2092748
12690e155a8a9d68de0bdc1f093639c3a17fbdb6
describe
'132403' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAJ' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
c1ed41f991603774363e6bf0fa9724ae
1b1c98e0ebc657dc8ab9bb9e5d20b1eb2788a6a4
describe
'21931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAK' 'sip-files00215.pro'
99a620652fb2e0cbc31fc3db2f73dd98
b6e47e6f181aa9c28402517cffa0b2c8a382cb71
describe
'48155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAL' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
948b8dab5c61322dd13c7224afe61997
feda7fbfc24c4588f4a98320d4f0d93eef98eb14
describe
'2648660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAM' 'sip-files00215.tif'
6526f68d3644ac98befb2fd536401ba1
2a598d6a140a8b59fda358e5453033c72130be23
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAN' 'sip-files00215.txt'
c176b5e0a21e6aada904e4072b3e2768
3ec4dc13d99385ee4d64661d4ee0786b1e72a215
describe
'21122' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAO' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
6644deec9dda913e2e7e78a6bdfddcca
656696b2cbe6057213ab6e4daf8c46f2efa61801
describe
'329306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAP' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
58c85d4d391ec575a7f9b46a4e46e35e
f754200dc3688e50a9b168d9b21379f7cea64426
describe
'180386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAQ' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
b77ddf1c227cd3afe9b51ca59738a117
e6a1e37529cb3f2d2ea30230e1abf68b757fcfdd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAR' 'sip-files00216.pro'
407cd5ea7bad81a3c8f2a3b8fc0912a5
df07b38377e0365e7e71cd6be55ad03fc74cee7f
describe
'69442' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAS' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
550ea4df46b5812e467a444bd1b90e52
4036826ff9ad6653df9f7cf911c94f67bb334d42
describe
'2656280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAT' 'sip-files00216.tif'
adec55e8afe5a1f5a696f996df3f2940
089d803bbd8c885242e41b99bd16970a7947f419
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAU' 'sip-files00216.txt'
e4ac63fef126b835d967d4f52b491696
986c2f24a7a937cfe4a88828cf5bc2024b9b9bc8
describe
'32117' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAV' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
84d1da62e3efa92a73ba30efb2bcb56a
fd738894b929fdaf137586d27f5b20707b9801d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAW' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
51ef2d4d4deb541194da1cfea0e68fa5
d8a7767c1f34ae70cb95312c7e6515c86d1a3ac8
describe
'184232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAX' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
dbc4bbc6c2176e8570db480f76d81084
652563cee5c935e16dc912d15605b82f01f2e9f1
describe
'34756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAY' 'sip-files00217.pro'
58f3832493855164be9634be50e3ba18
5019e6f42c967dc916dd246d9ea38069844c201d
describe
'69924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJAZ' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
d28fd445bebc7c33abe21b22cd937cae
62b188820958cb6431cd9559e086fe003a3c425e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBA' 'sip-files00217.tif'
5181239b6e28986e509ccc12002016d6
77576151847110acf85b916df22d70f6f01a4852
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBB' 'sip-files00217.txt'
e2722a848cf2e92276dab08dd951d392
1dfbc7adc4731d06de207c26c677bbc61951cae2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBC' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
ac2d2b3fd565c59db05492779dcf8b96
71d8dec6a527f59a6aa2ae412dd0cfd9a5690ab2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBD' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
0eb1ea262e8366b7a8048e4af8a4ecfe
3f8049aedceb604ef0aeec45d1e712c7949157d2
describe
'177817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBE' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
938e22b5dee384406a283b7de2a05037
da30d664abdac0b19e75913c41ea9df369eb3382
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBF' 'sip-files00218.pro'
20568a493aaac26c2faee0ba8083da14
856ea11be67ee45cbb255e4f7ed1b558a6508ab6
describe
'68559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBG' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
91cafbeff4ebd7c5777d916d7357d804
9b65e7266d707670fcf76b61fd93d140784893f8
describe
'2656252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBH' 'sip-files00218.tif'
7cb9513bff0bc28d5bd6be6468075a20
4c09f2784d2cf5fb4df9ccdeab5884b7c90dba32
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBI' 'sip-files00218.txt'
95ef75abe737ca51ad23e1153428c5bd
c52819b57e829063c0338808dcb82ae7be74bf33
describe
'32564' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBJ' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
51384c287fa186448f6fb27a58747b15
4037750fc821d0cd6d3f6421de5b17d607300043
describe
'329287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBK' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
fd3f20e0744994326e72e44808931ab1
47541b2b9a677ce1640cb2a117ec3aa47c5ad46c
describe
'182185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBL' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
483e3156b513b2fc8da169d272185e90
753d3be5a56aabd54f145390c988284371305489
describe
'34845' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBM' 'sip-files00219.pro'
1bd1e3eb7d9f6b69e4645d0fe3bd23d0
1906ca497026795ef845ced010c171ec199807d9
describe
'69137' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBN' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
45fa1646c80ab32818a1ab3a089cba07
4664727bc9fa5978da6b1ee6fddf295bcc377b5f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBO' 'sip-files00219.tif'
2a24bb61fea20e4f5741de4955e529d7
aaa68bfa85641f2e7a198c07ed1336f562022732
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBP' 'sip-files00219.txt'
7d895807141416e058c092d1fc7d6ed6
0d319d364089bd0dd4df8b66d40371d5bd6e2a9b
describe
'31945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBQ' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
8236de3c2d26adffa48357a0a627589a
92a99285f67c57acf115f108aeaac4704ec7c85d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBR' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
7172006dbd793ded05320bf5c0187946
760d60073193ba8cfedeff486f1b1c96f641b635
describe
'180308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBS' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
3fa74071454401bdc8a9f42a8281f2f9
040d7a38752e8f6a6ccaf14b93ee6c278718d8a5
describe
'34334' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBT' 'sip-files00220.pro'
5fe789172db246139ecf5a7154af666a
3e4626866b09b44806fdcf974a4711948b5e6c0f
describe
'68319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBU' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
e1ddb4eea8dd9181877adddb78c2d8bc
9b380ac7b9add430545b933bea838e76c0a78ad6
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBV' 'sip-files00220.tif'
5672e9889657a2accdeb55c03a78d550
add7c38edfa641247430b4e24ab6dacee83070d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBW' 'sip-files00220.txt'
9cb4431ffde9095464e3c02267f5d372
b5f2a43e78c569e5967d761e1c448efecaa2889c
describe
'31934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBX' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
6b298f934432d51b310ff9e595987ef3
b18f7ab487d4b3ce1c1bf150e879806ce3f5a7fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBY' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
ce42dde4e520f9428ded81decb796f09
f5f66963bbadf39577465dfd60ebbd2e6216fb3a
describe
'181968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJBZ' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
f9defba56a1098c312847cea195dc1d6
3ba6a7691fa407018e1616418ca8ce7196ed5630
describe
'33387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCA' 'sip-files00221.pro'
898620bce6011f21c9601cee84122a5c
8a0daeaec836aadf6a4938813c2acfe76c0a6102
describe
'67804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCB' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
e37e61a09d0b723284c242bd302aaf08
a4752b90b1f1459f41ba325e89d8813cb83c4d43
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCC' 'sip-files00221.tif'
610c67e4230bbb2241d3897f91f182ae
e5c182b27a93694a35c45b246a47e841fb206bdd
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCD' 'sip-files00221.txt'
e8d19eb1b7b4657ccfcda29aaefc2253
90846f276370424372d534a33d4b91103da15235
describe
'32336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCE' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
f1e76c77aca731554e8fb506c228eba4
32032b3e5a5156bfd35a4374bf98e35f89864a89
describe
'329153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCF' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
58c1047313dab981d2d5f5c70eea42f1
611f74aa2eb23e5aab56825dc1e2f884805532db
describe
'177108' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCG' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
4bf71dbad80ded6de15376f84d15d294
0eda23b1778810e7f6b61164441ed7f40b7e6e76
describe
'33887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCH' 'sip-files00222.pro'
40a03074ad59d4d86a3cf069621b9f9e
2d95727fcff8a8529215cd714e16369bbd1051c2
describe
'68952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCI' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
a10a592671e84bf3597e8b93b929cb04
f9eaae1bf22e294947d717d115bccaecaad74fd0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCJ' 'sip-files00222.tif'
0fb77477132297a0a91a2eea5842b9a8
d4952771a2587002b20ad5afea8313f352dde541
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCK' 'sip-files00222.txt'
3da4aa141aaec386c5423c0771907bab
8e1dd906990ebfed9239469ae95d953440ce9fbe
describe
'32391' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCL' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
d23a1778823a16e9ca53ce49a2a56b21
f762abf438d9c4a3c344df49bc4798865a755841
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCM' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
881e7f1c6f584b08b26277d93db1c99b
a017e385d74dfe4ed048277dc7da89f27dd51217
describe
'179741' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCN' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
7f973a919130e3a284d868e292132b43
ece45c0a1909b507b7a972652054454a9156f654
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCO' 'sip-files00223.pro'
1921e7940677fd96ae11d2e79b95d7b4
538b5ea36fb03890414ffae11c907be3811d820b
describe
'67783' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCP' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
5d0e152d8c1b24ba02a778716fb1e44e
c9df3d645469c16e67e1d3ae500518d163d79c47
describe
'2656148' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCQ' 'sip-files00223.tif'
bfb1902dc8b6b72f3b873903bd57e587
9d6c5a41dc50603a25d74574145adcfc1f952149
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCR' 'sip-files00223.txt'
7c21ff789954044826800e77f9aa7406
3cad4dfd15fdbfccd5ea9ad7141673783c8ee58b
describe
'31841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCS' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
b0e1bdcebe272ee48de644b2ea2e5bea
91dd0f54dc8e747276078849d9df9df8887ec9eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCT' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
7313746e1f039728eeb3be82e609d46a
bb8ad009ffe04ede0826be500922e822a8b1a200
describe
'181945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCU' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
627f66eb8a3a021b85c307b621f7e4c3
c1587d83fa475782ce87b551f1e43d140b4d1f05
describe
'34348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCV' 'sip-files00224.pro'
debe2027451ecea861441e95ae3eb0fe
654cc8584ba66f49bc55ed876bafa7caab7e78af
describe
'69027' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCW' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
72eca0ac6a61e4c8e082b253a1bc80cc
e754e963d20532e9a8df5200dcf3989476ee6382
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCX' 'sip-files00224.tif'
c5068a27709868ad16eab966fcf4dc47
ef4cb387f2084f1f214adfdaab1e37600c397b5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCY' 'sip-files00224.txt'
4e431f8b1afda2cae7905b9cc063a59d
2add0d24cd9e9016f06688e2ba3e457355234dba
describe
'32800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJCZ' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
a23e105837e4e85ce8246f636a4cecc5
3a7f3696b2cf4a63c31610604c2e2eab0a534ebb
describe
'329264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDA' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
ee66c03ddc570d5767d3598e50218a9a
c5e580cd587b631a69468df4cd3ed604cdc3e784
describe
'177476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDB' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
5dce5e06469294a0442190469d934a02
ee5b7332ee043cfe4182a0331692095ce0c518b3
describe
'33539' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDC' 'sip-files00225.pro'
0baab1ebb7539671d33a383034094cec
f45b2b4bf15e1bf262a67e7a79e83b39ecca1971
describe
'67368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDD' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
63cbfe71a5aa86e0cb4f2b6c50505620
a12bb55efaff7c8618278ebb980735be72cb38c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDE' 'sip-files00225.tif'
8dec3d026599ef53bb8ab5bac6232c10
5285f1d44b5d1f74ca76eace7ff1d7cf09e1dff3
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDF' 'sip-files00225.txt'
a60307a906598113a2a44d8d6ac3e63d
10614f718601741d83a66feb4463358015c6ad42
describe
'32215' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDG' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
d2f06a2b4b8fce1234e08a3607bfeede
bfd54286f59004d090024074cdeda60a3921bc9a
describe
'329299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDH' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
188688685e9b6f3c033c950e549bd66b
71e2bbadde7f54a81f6f1f859fd6b16b79f0f9bf
describe
'184084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDI' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
2ba3635ed4965b9bacfceaca8d36fcc4
488b71b0327ef8220e9383776fd38103a4610ee0
describe
'34535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDJ' 'sip-files00226.pro'
5067cf72273830915d3d63a95198a114
01cc36c7c15b25109af157e45d7b8fc457612695
describe
'69129' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDK' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
30174526430de059ff666bdbb3dea9d7
862cc68feb4a0457b0f252833a7f73e1469a8696
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDL' 'sip-files00226.tif'
c16d9022d1ce185da2127c99a31d66ff
52e4654e97a5b0a0e69edfdf58bba3429fc588e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDM' 'sip-files00226.txt'
d48aff1dd9447358253c9cb0b761cce4
2975117bac166ff7eb5282174dc610f6abcd0a2c
describe
'32723' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDN' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
9a58bf796788da14ed01edaa6df82396
fa34da7f226573ead5d08cb35a04fd6b988415a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDO' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
557db3c82e7bf08aa310a4a9e5972a7f
23cf45c569cbb5d8cbf5d0e95c2b4ab3874a2ac2
describe
'180221' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDP' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
936eb66234235c32ab379424a5c0c0d3
36cd6865dae2a237355fc6ab74c2598f9d035a4b
describe
'32724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDQ' 'sip-files00227.pro'
2703b1203799ca1a4539b841467774a6
51f09a28eda30951567148530bd9eface30f56a5
describe
'69327' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDR' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
9de4f929d4a508a6e217425f878eb01e
cbd2145f573928a5e2c72e688176cfb895adfcfc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDS' 'sip-files00227.tif'
3d5edabaa0c2257c29e7bf6f2626ac00
34815b35a4ba4f36e01eeb9fb0e18c92c0c8d50c
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDT' 'sip-files00227.txt'
b7c0f99087d1ac49704d4dec8b135fcf
bfcfc349c147f7dec124bb88a9d32e9e0fba8a65
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDU' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
af3773fb14125b59984fdcfe4b1e6156
eadf186b60bdddb85817ccb669bc17581f657c72
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDV' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
20ed636cfc3ab915b544ebde23274615
ca00cf6c1560db0a56d9f3605be511dd352366b0
describe
'180415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDW' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
4575a55e353406e72e1ae61ef8738a85
af31036de5c9245c1bac166577d4f4ce06797fe5
describe
'34052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDX' 'sip-files00228.pro'
52a484a6c3af44656547fc4051fcc336
b69b319e6a025a2f4af7c31bc905de2d8a00c47b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDY' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
75e6d089cc8c3f4e23de5e7be3ef9ce2
046b1880b4a08ddea1734c4fe15e1466b72d75f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJDZ' 'sip-files00228.tif'
58c81b4be7ed928c4ca8c56cc77a6838
8610ffeffae9cd1924d5c4a43fb821e16dbddfd3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEA' 'sip-files00228.txt'
a5ec0ccbc1cfe2f61f67fa1ee5cb0a8e
7ab10f20917edb3eb532cf0a0e87aa67ec298052
describe
'33062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEB' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
73c0b0d27cb371e575248bbddaaf1673
e265ae6b5163ac2750561596d275aafc5e7952f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEC' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
1b0ddc0394e96f962bf336b929ef24ad
5aa622df62159d85932db9d5c445736fa91f099d
describe
'179993' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJED' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
d2e5461719b751d7bdce4b6c943ebfed
62b6babf682347a51f0d09e7a2f268742d28d34d
describe
'33332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEE' 'sip-files00229.pro'
cfb60a589ba8fa45293f9087371ecff1
2af0e19db740c4b0c129f448a4dd89f90a012174
describe
'68508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEF' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
e1b18348547cd7433226097de205dab4
6da9152c1c3b0af46ea13a3f1592a02b917654ba
describe
'2656400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEG' 'sip-files00229.tif'
0acaecd51c100d63a14bb3cc4c1b8a54
5242f7f16e10d6604bded2f0d45fc6a346e1dd63
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEH' 'sip-files00229.txt'
43b44e041fd2127b00034f77d8342ed1
9b2d3feaea1f272ec53389469dcdc9113330a7c3
describe
'32851' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEI' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
77205da9d2b169aaeba9579f949f5545
a82ce118eaa52bcb3db07044f8bb9ac532cf4858
describe
'329337' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEJ' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
63112946799200d6a47bf404e6218d26
9975991178ff1ebf278b210d80e81554a1ec6c91
describe
'181692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEK' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
ce36713e75a6c8595a9159291b392003
b61540d6377f53abdfcc4af5c0351b93c945e99c
describe
'34085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEL' 'sip-files00230.pro'
ca548f8b6c33386be84a23671fba7960
1d8f1dd77fea75ce2c4640755e49a8979835ef45
describe
'70061' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEM' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
5ff2fe179d5723e76aca8959f3dade2a
591fa6b2a54a1bacbd09a28f1ddea393ab3374ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEN' 'sip-files00230.tif'
7c0a5611457bd2d4de83f9cb4166a6d7
cdbbd2aae0270227ea8f302a717e48046bb4120d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEO' 'sip-files00230.txt'
f0f1e6cbcbd80a15c8a6e036609b1de0
d6232c85630329644f75456805568c54cc9ad264
describe
'32752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEP' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
6ec78217632f6d7d5c0195b188c5107d
41cf079f99550c53f9966251ccd3114aa1f3ad0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEQ' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
ff1941b47127ff27f566e226b97a0c51
a441931acda3a30d223bccdee9815c49084e64ed
describe
'184427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJER' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
80b947fb486cd2648271b69c60717e1a
d275735fd2ed798a72993a66e4e3c4957deea993
describe
'34441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJES' 'sip-files00231.pro'
a492903dc789a9cd997ba0901f51f661
7c7e7312d6912173657bd82b6cf3b768200500c8
describe
'70683' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJET' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
48aca3aff6c80546ba7c766c0a554f37
7460ae4ac92625f6a84ea75808d4564a4f667b87
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEU' 'sip-files00231.tif'
60329dd543e38ca9f4296f44390be204
bb922a4f678a582bba3a8baae0d9e9c7c706f518
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEV' 'sip-files00231.txt'
f5643da5ef9f897bbe511237c9e61aad
5f07bc40505e434b384cedc484281b035096013c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEW' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
8763c9f61c0b200a71869897e7a4dde9
7e89c6451c26de2b0c5e1cccb3950bcb3f9b6185
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEX' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
c95983fffde67877970608bd43fc6a40
a81c830960e7ccaa55b73e42e4be2adf4fbc64a4
describe
'139644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEY' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
8f37c5d1a7a090cc206eea462a6a828c
fdfc16091057df7182535ba4b86b02034946de69
describe
'20489' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJEZ' 'sip-files00232.pro'
fac89c6e7013a2e99414ae3a9ea8eedb
d1b2ac6f634f0cd2c9ef0648b6a3f1fadfc24823
describe
'53600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFA' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
b155235b272f3199dc66080c083396f7
36c8049389f862d4c231c9f557072fc1f9e2ca39
describe
'2654864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFB' 'sip-files00232.tif'
9acc6bfc6cd07059d59dc3b24401b2f7
7b0ded478362f3ef6ffea56ca2b5626d3ed4f825
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFC' 'sip-files00232.txt'
7081b238c03674e7a0c363cae2a08591
dff302e075a32c1ab93ff19477bc0ee98bcdd8fe
describe
'27851' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFD' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
a3b29c09a8b146aa9fb19bc8b8058d8b
2c48da902de3e37b07c7caf034bf565bf1663983
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFE' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
0e0a5d4a0f53cde529b94e0e919a7d75
de38b8365108679afd7a857117c2565907bf06d8
describe
'155636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFF' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
9494b417415b6f254bb7a34e9d5718f2
56e8ad4baa1e5506df33887af8a6cea3a1b549a2
describe
'24356' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFG' 'sip-files00233.pro'
736e580c3c1fec8a44934411911b9f88
aedaa02a8133074b025fd8116d7bb9e12d012776
describe
'57719' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFH' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
841564b1747e27d41e14acf8321a5c6d
6ad2c2fa196ede3594e5a125b4d14e76235727f4
describe
'2655480' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFI' 'sip-files00233.tif'
42eef525ae776f11210560327870ff9f
da5d2837a837ac4f0114ffd96ecedf27824d8f55
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFJ' 'sip-files00233.txt'
e2af64d2dda32b71998d85444aa60690
301082833b4dce65e458cab413ee2829cfba860d
describe
Invalid character
'29601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFK' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
afe9f1d76f3a3c6febf8aef4998f4b63
1f81c9d843580c3966fd80736545d5f22be43db9
describe
'329332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFL' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
254013f5c04c13eba2924fde91a18d47
ac8042796e64e8d0cb772215fbc5b98f53ba524d
describe
'193103' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFM' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
1605a6e798d2f32f28ad1d3029648dcf
f15a68d4423fa95da4a77440c0abf62966506443
describe
'34826' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFN' 'sip-files00234.pro'
556041817d8156bc5dfd555422384a42
1577755bf614f6f0274f5daa42294d00fe196704
describe
'71406' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFO' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
e5370b1ebad37cd11bcaeec4d2ca7dc4
a107ed5b9a3812b9f35c29aa5fe7f97f5593ccc2
describe
'2656672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFP' 'sip-files00234.tif'
a39cd60bd970c79aa9ef194557bf63db
6a071d17af51216fb1f32be5950c8a03de279601
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFQ' 'sip-files00234.txt'
98c5779b2a4dc05e33254c8644a08406
3d3817f91cf4f0839a7ca4e7f1100012ecd4c1aa
describe
'33671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFR' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
918907ce743f398a0f87f3ef9cb19956
9c6be75c0489be41c4d06ddb841379c1b5985906
describe
'329286' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFS' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
0bfd3ee0ce0082e106f554ee5b7aa244
8205efb91e7373079dd1bef98546b0a54362b712
describe
'183054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFT' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
bdfda7aa3f2d71be6b585c8ba54611ee
a0b8f4fc3461c4530b58a0693b023e4df4a851cf
describe
'34235' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFU' 'sip-files00235.pro'
ee550c3cf7351302f0dd253840af9350
f8d8f63a2f32ad7801ae8aa23f0b77683db14e2c
describe
'68874' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFV' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
e3adce4d2acf165d54a980631cfdb974
6403e9e6122eac380846470d65d7ce7bd016257f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFW' 'sip-files00235.tif'
ad191cecf921ed6ef328fa444c46bab4
1533ce4500e725f0d2727b03085bfe47b3504f84
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFX' 'sip-files00235.txt'
85c3831452730bef1b528255ad956a97
e87e1e2f2f6799cb5454e3ae45da2f3aa5d90bc0
describe
'32484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFY' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
db72bf5f2dbf2d32a3354c33ae85611e
1bf2d872be15eade60330622631283e7979f1cbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJFZ' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
0b2bd490beeab51a271b8bfe343d875f
0a46b5d3734edcc8c20d51a3ed2706249b5a325a
describe
'179588' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGA' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
41b5b75adf03c2398822a03387896088
93ce0d402dcaf28039d31a339dbc2a1d4d5cf37e
describe
'34145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGB' 'sip-files00236.pro'
fafc962f8539eb8128457bd1a131b53e
556886f104f5e404d3415cbdf157d60709b6840c
describe
'67950' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGC' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
fd2f43d0aa5960ead88f7a744e4b81e0
9376edf185ef80dd3e80d479897880cd898b3bee
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGD' 'sip-files00236.tif'
e3ae04fe3c64768518471f1e2653fd0a
e0126683a404f87e976efb9ff98c9be0466d71a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGE' 'sip-files00236.txt'
11ceb841e70a5b53a9b79fd4e342c9f6
6414d4fdff3d2600b03ba875a3ad584c41285428
describe
'32206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGF' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
4a6840b9a5a93940c915f4ebb69f2744
84ce6db9ddd09257afe214288abae8ed0b7b18c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGG' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
68082b99d03d16c41a3f6a111e4763e3
90583375f1e19ffd39154d3b757b4a46dcb7975b
describe
'181416' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGH' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
610d14ba049d53e3b9d1f915ed9565b0
f538a4c6326bcde9456d674d24928eabddc10013
describe
'33850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGI' 'sip-files00237.pro'
11e53ca042bc51b994c506c584a53292
a5218dd4376f3aaa7d3e40feac02726bb3ef4d62
describe
'69203' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGJ' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
a435f12bd8c732d0b588ffda179def4d
b09741db3e61212bf9ecca1e0a590d1fac63bb4e
describe
'2656128' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCMfileF20080402_AAAJGK' 'sip-files00237.tif'
1e61966d78ea59ff89cfcd6258cbe84a
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describe
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ou eee





age pda lirarermen eer

| Congregational Sunday Jekools

ad oe fe Wha Lh



ee RD



i Sonnet fy ,
| Tp Lakg 1G
ee

— Mawr




THE STORY OF THE ROBINS.




HALAS ily i ih i



ATA















































































































Tue Younc Visirors.—THE CRUEL

Boy.




STORY OF THE ROBINS.

DESIGNED TO TEACH CHILDREN
Che Drover Treatment og Animals,

BY

MRS. TRIMMER.





WITH COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS.

LONDON AND NEW YORK:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO,

—_9-———.
PREFACE.

Tuovucn the children of nearly a century ago first
delighted in the pretty ‘Srory or THE Robins,” it
still holds its place in juvenile literature, and is ever
welcome to the little lovers of birds and other
animals. “ Robin” was, and is, always the children’s
pet, and the sayings and doings of his nestlings can
never cease to interest them. The humane and wise
teaching of the story is not hurt, either, by a little
occasional quaintness, and in offering our young
friends a new edition of this nursery classic, we
think we are conferring on them a boon they will

appreciate.
CONTENTS.

— oe
CHAPTER I.
eaee
HARRIET AND FREDERICK FEEDING THE BIRDS 6 ° 1
CHAPTER II.
MRS. BENSON AND HER CHILDREN AT BREAKFAST.—THE
ROBINS VENTURE UPON THE TEA-TABLE, 5 ; .

CHAPTER III.

THE NESTLINGS FRIGHTENED BY THE GARDENER . . » 29

CHAPTER IV.
JOE THE GARDENER ERINGS NEWS OF THE BIRDS’ NEST TO
HARRIET AND FREDERICK =: . ig . . « 89
CHAPTER Y.

BARRIZT AND FREDERICK VIEWING THE ROBINS’ NEST , . 46

=
Contents.

CHAPTER VL.

PAGE

YHE YOUNG VISITORS,—THE CRUEL BOY 2 ° e 6&4
CHAPTER VII.

THE FIRST FLIGHT OF THE NESTLINGS . ° ° e s 68

CHAPTER VITI:

FREDERICK BisCOVERS THE YOUNG ROBINS IN THE CURRANT
BUSH . 3 Bante 4 ‘ 7 . 3 eee.

CHAPTER IX,

THE VISIT TO MRS, ADDIS'S . : . eee » «6 wd

CHAPTER X,

ADVENTURES OF THE LITRLE ROBINS . « + ¢« «© 210
CHAPTER XI.

THE FEATHERED NEIGHBOURS : e « « ° cok 24

CHAPTER XII.

“THR VISIT ™ THE FARM. z ; : : s - 184

CHAPTER XIll,

THE PIGS AND BEES . . si . ‘ : 2 « 148
Contents.

CHAPTER XIV.

FREDERICK VIEWING THE DUCKS AND GEESE °

CHAPTER XY.

fHe2 AVIARY ° *

CHAPTER XVI.

THE CLD ROBINS TAKE LEAVE OF THEIR YOUNG ONES

CONOLUSION ,



PAGE
163

172

183

207


THE

STORY OF THE ROBINS.

——t0———

CHAPTER I,
HARRIET AND FREDERICK FEEDING THE BIRDS.

In ahole which time had made in a wall covered
with ivy, a pair of redbreasts built their nest. No
place could have been better chosen for the purpose;
it was sheltered from the rain, screened from the
wind, and in an orchard belonging to a gentleman
who had strictly charged his domestics not to destroy
the labours of those little songsters who chose his
ground as an asylum.

Jn this happy retreat, which no idle schoolboy
daved to enter, the hen redbreast laid four eggs, and
then took her seat upon them, resolving that nothing
2 The Story of the Robins.

should tempt her to leave the nest for any length of
time till she had hatched her infant brood. Her
tender mate every morning took her place while she
picked up a hasty breakfast, and often, before he
tasted any food himself, cheered her with a song.

At length the day arrived when the happy mother
heard the chirping of her little ones; with unex-
pressible tenderness she spread her maternal wings to
cover them, threw out the egg-shells in which they
before lay confined, then pressed them to her bosom,
and presented them to her mate, who viewed them
with rapture, and seated himself by her side that he
might share her pleasure.

“We may promise ourselves much delight in
rearing our little family,” said he, “ but it will give us
a great deal of trouble. I would willingly bear the
whole myself, but it will be impossible for me, with
my utmost labour and industry, to supply all our
nestlings with what is sufficient for their daily
support; it will therefore be necessary for you to
leave the nest sometimes to seek provisions for them.”
She declared her readiness to do so, and said that
there would be no necessity for her to be long absent,
as she had discovered a place near the orchard where
food was scattered on purpose for such birds as would
take the pains of seeking it; and that she had been






Ahh
ANY
Se







HARRIET AND FREDERICK FEEDING THE BIRDs.




Feeding the Lrttie Ones. 3





informed by a chaffinch that there was no kind of
danger in picking it up.

“This isa lucky discovery indeed for us,” replied
her mate; “for this great increase of family renders
it prudent to make use of every means for supplying
our necessities. J myself must take a larger circuit,
for some insects that are proper for the nestlings
cannot be found in all places; however, I will bear
you company whenever it is in my power.”

The little ones now began to be hungry, and
opened their gaping mouths for food; on which their
kind father instantly flew forth to find it for them,
and in turns supplied them all, as well as his beloved
mate. This was a hard day’s work, and when even-
ing came on he was glad to take repose, and turning
his head under his wing, he soon fell asleep; his
mate soon followed his example. The four little
ones had before fallen into a gentle slumber, and
perfect quietness for some hours reigned in the nest.

The next morning they were awakened at the dawn
of day by the song of a skylark, which had a nest
near the orchard; and as the young redbreasts were
impatient for food, their father cheerfully prepared
himself to renew his toil, requesting hig mate to
accompany him to the place she had mentioned.
“That I will do,” replied she, “but it is too early yet; _
4 The Story of the Robins.

I must therefore beg that you will go by yourself and
procure a breakfast for us, as I am fearful of leaving
the nestlings before the air is warmer, lest they should
be chilled.” To this he readily consented, and fed all
his little darlings ; to whom, for the sake of distinc-
tion, I shall give the names of Robin, Dicky, Flapsy,
and Pecksy. When this kind office was performed
he perched on a tree, and while he rested, entertained
his family with his melody, till his mate, springing
from the nest, called him to attend her ; on which he
instantly took wing, and followed her to a courtyard
belonging to a family mansion,

No sooner had the happy pair appeared before the
parlour window, than it was hastily thrown up by
Harriet Benson, a little girl about eleven years old,
the daughter of the gentleman and lady to whom the
house belonged. Harriet with great delight called her
brother to see two robin redbreasts ; and she was soon
joined by Frederick, a fine chubby rosy-cheeked boy,
about six years of age, who, as soon as he had taken
apeep atthe feathered strangers, ran to his mamma,
and entreated her to give him something to feed them
with. “I must have a great piece of bread this
morning,” said he, “ for there are all the sparrows and
chaffinches that come every day, and two robin red-
breasts besides.” “Here is a piece for you, Frederick,”
Feeding the Little Ones. 5

replied Mrs. Benson, cutting a loaf that was on the
table; “but if your daily pensioners continue to
increase as they have done lately, we must provide
some other food for them, as it is not. right to cut
pieces from a loaf on purpose for birds, because there
are many children who want bread, to whom we
should give the preference. Would you deprive a
poor little hungry boy of his breakfast to give it to
birds?” No,” said Frederick, “I would sooner give
my own breakfast to a poor boy than he should go
without; but where shall I get food enough for my
birds ? I will beg the cook to save the crumbs in the
bread-pan, and desire John to preserve all he makes
when he cuts the loaf for dinner, and those which are
scattered onthe tablecloth.” “A very good scheme,”
said Mrs. Benson, “and I make no doubt it will
answer your purpose, if you can prevail on the
servants to indulge you. I cannot bear to see the
least fragment of food wasted which may contribute
\o the support of life in any creature.”

Harriet, being quite impatient to exercise her
benevolence, requested her brother to remember that
the poor birds, for whom he had been a successful
solicitor, would soon fly away if he did not make
haste to feed them; on which he ran to the window
with his treasure in his hand,
6 The Stor, of the Robins.



When Harriet first appeared, the winged suppliants
approached with eager expectation of the daily
handful which their kind benefactress made it a
custom to distribute, and were surprised at the delay
of her charity. They hopped around the window—
they chirped—they twittered, and employed all their
little arts to gain attention; and were on the point
of departing, when Frederick, breaking a bit from the
piece he held in his hand, attempted to scatter it
among them, calling out at the same time, “Dicky!
Dicky!” On hearing the well-known sound, the
little flock immediately drew near. Frederick begged
that his sister would let him feed all the birds him-
self; but finding that he could not fling the crumbs
far enough for the redbreasts, who, being strangers,
kept at a distance, he resigned the task, and Harriet,
with dexterous hand, threw some of them to the
very spot where the affectionate pair stood waiting
for her notice, who with grateful hearts picked up
the portion assigned them; and in the meanwhile
the other birds, being satisfied, flew away, and they
were left alone. Frederick exclaimed with rapture
that the two robin redbreasts were feeding; and
Harriet meditated a design of taming them by kind-
ness. “Be sure, my dear brother,” said she, “not to
forget to ask the cook and John for the crumbs, and
Frederick and Harriet. w







do not let the least morsel of anything you have to
eat fall to the ground, I will be careful in respect
of mine, and we will collect all that papa and mamma
crumble; and if we cannot by these means get
enough, I will spend some of my money in grain for
them.” “Oh,” said Frederick, “ I would give all the
money I have in the world to buy food for my dear
dear birds.” “ Hold, my love,” said Mrs. Benson
“though I commend your humanity, I must remind
you again that there are poor people as well as poor
birds.” “Well, mamma,” replied Frederick, “I will
only buy a little grain, then.” As he spoke these
last words, the redbreasts having finished their meal,
the mother bird expressed her impatience to return
to the nest; and having obtained her mate’s consent,
she repaired with all possible speed to her humble
habitation, whilst he tuned his melodious pipe, and —
delighted their young benefactors with his music; he
then spread his wings, and took his flight to an
adjoining garden, where he had a great chance of
finding worms for his family.

Frederick expressed great concern that the robins
were gone; but was comforted by his sister, who
reminded him that in all probability his new favour-
ites, having met with so kind a reception, would

return on the morrow, Mrs. Benson then bid them
2
8 The Story of the Robins.



shut the window; and taking Frederick in her lap,
and desiring Harriet to sit down by her, thus ad-
dressed them :—

“T am delighted, my dear children, with your
humane behaviour towards animals, and wish by all
means to encourage it; but let me recommend to
you not to suffer your tender feelings towards animals
to gain upon you to such a degree as to make you
unhappy or forgetful of those who have a higher
claim to your attention—I mean poor people ; always
keep in mind the distresses which they endure,
and on no account waste any kind of food, nor
give to inferior creatures what is designed for
mankind.”

Harriet promised to follow her mamma’s instruc-
tions ; but Frederick’s attention was entirely engaged
by watching a butterfly, which had just left the
chrysalis, and was fluttering in the window, longing ~
to try its wings in the air and sunshine; this
Frederick was very desirous to catch, but his mamma
would not permit him to attempt it, because, she
told him, he could not well lay hold of its wings
without doing it an injury, and it would be much
happier at liberty. “Should you like, I'rederick,”
said she, “when you are going out to play, to have
anybody lay hold of you violently, scratch you all
The Butterfly. 9





over, then offer you something to eat which is ver
disagreeable, and perhaps poisonous, and shut you
up in a little dark room? And yet this is the fate
to which many a harmless insect is condemned by
thoughtless children.” As soon as Frederick under-
stood that he could not catch the butterfly without
hurting it, he gave up the point, and assured his
mamma he did not want to keep it, but only to
carry it out of doors. “Well,” replied she, “that
end may be answered by opening the window;”
which, at her desire, was done by Harriet: the
happy insect was glad to fly away, and Frederick
had soon the pleasure of seeing it upon a rose.

Breakfast being ended, Mrs. Benson reminded the
children that it was almost time for their lessons to
begin ; but desired their maid to take them into the
garden before they applied to business. During his
walk, Frederick amused himself with watching the
butterfly as it flew from flower to flower, which gave
him more pleasure than he could possibly have
received from catching and confining the little
tender creature.

Let us now see what became of our redbreasts
after they left their young benefactors.

The hen bird, as I informed you, repaired im-
mediately to the nest; her heart fluttered with
10 The Story of the Robins.



apprehension as she entered it, and she eagerly
called out, “Are you all safe, my little dears?”
* All safe, my good mother,” replied Pecksy, “ but a
little hungry, and very cold.” “Well,” said she,
“your last complaint I can soon remove; but in
respect to satisfying your hunger, that must be your
father’s task ; however, he will soon be here, I make
no doubt.” Then spreading her wings over them all,
she soon gave warmth to them, and they were again
comfortable.

In a very short time her mate returned; for he
only stayed at Mr. Benson’s to finish his song and
sip some clear water, which his new friends always
kept where they fed the birds. He brought in his
mouth a worm, which was given to Robin ; and was
going to fetch one for Dicky, but his mate said, “My
young ones are now hatched, and you can keep them
warm as well as myself; take my place, therefore,
and the next excursion shall be mine,” “I consent,”
answered he, “because I think a little flying now
and then will do you good ; but, to save you trouble,
I can direct you to a spot where you may be certain
of finding worms for this morning’s supply.” He then
described the place; and on her quitting the nest he
entered it, and gathered his young ones under his
wings. “Come, my dears,” said he, “let us see what
Learning to Sing. It

kind of a nurse I can make; but an awkward one, I
fear; even every mother bird is not a good nurse, but
you are very fortunate in yours, for she is a most
tender one, and I hope you will be dutiful for hex
kindness.” They all promised him they would.
‘Well, then,” said he, “I will sing you a song.”
He did so, and it was a very merry one, and de-
lighted the nestlings extremely ; so that, though they
were not quite comfortable under his wings, they
did not regard it, nor think the time of their
mother’s absence long. She had not succeeded in the
place she first went to, as a boy was picking up worms
to angle with, of whom she was afraid, and therefore
flew further; but as soon as she had obtained what
she went for, she returned with all possible speed;
and though she had repeated invitations from
- several gay birds which she met to join their sportive
parties, she kept a steady course, preferring the plea-
sure of feeding little Dicky to all the diversions of
the fields and groves. As soon as the hen bird came
near the nest her mate started up to make room for
her, and take his turn of providing for his family.
“ Once more adieu!” said he, and was out of sight in
an instant,
“My dear nestlings,” said the mother, “how do
you do?” “Very well, thank you,” replied all at
12 The Story of the Robins.



once; “and we have been exceedingly merry,” said
Robin, “for my father has sung us a sweet song.”
“T think,” said Dicky, “I should like to learn it.”
“Well,” replied the mother, “he will teach it you, I
dare say ; here he comes, ask him.” “Iam ashamed,”
said Dicky. “Then you are a silly bird. Never be
ashamed but when you commit a fault; asking your
father to teach you to sing is not one; and good
parents delight to teach their young ones everything
that is proper and useful. Whatever so good a father
sets you an example of you may safely desire to imi-
tate.” Then addressing herself to her mate, who for
an instant stopped at the entrance of the nest, that
he might not interrupt her instructions, “Am I not
right,” said she, “in what I have just told them?”
“ Perfectly so,” replied he ; “I shall have pleasure in
teaching them all that is in my power; but we must
talk of that another time. Who is to feed poor
Pecksy ?” “Oh, I, I!” answered the mother, and
was gone in an instant.

“ And so you want to learn to sing, Dicky?” said
the father: “ well, then, pray listen very attentively;
you may learn the notes, though you will not be able
to sing till your voice is stronger.”

Robin now remarked that the song was very pretty
indeed, and expressed his desire to learn it also. “ By
Learning to Sing. 13



all means,” said his father; “I shall sing it very
often, so you may learn it if you please.” “For my
part,” said Flapsy, “I do not think I could have
patience to learn it, it will take so much time.”
“ Nothing, my dear Flapsy,” answered the father, “can
be acquired without patience, and I am sorry to find
yours begin to fail you already; but I hope, if you
have no taste for music, that you will give the greater
application to things that may be of more importance
to you.” “Well,” said Pecksy, “I would apply to
music with all my heart, but I do not believe it
possible for me to learn it.” “Perhaps not,” replied
her father, “but I do not doubt you will apply to
whatever your mother requires of you; and she is an
excellent judge both of your talents and of what is
suitable to your station in life. She is no songstress
herself, and yet she is very clever, I assure you: here
she comes.” Then rising to make room for her,
“Take your seat, my love,” said he, “ and I will perch
upon the ivy.” The hen again covered her brood,
whilst her mate amused her with his singing and
conversation till the evening, excepting that each
parent bird flew out in turn to get food for their
young ones.

In this manner several days passed with little
variation; the nestlings were very thriving, and
14 The Story of the Roozns.





daily gained strength and knowledge, through the
care of their indulgent parents, who every day
visited their friends, the little Bensons. JT rederick
had been successful with the cook and footman,
from whom. he obtained enough for his dear birds, as
he called them, without robbing the poor; and he
was still able to produce a penny whenever his papa
or mamma pointed out to him a proper object of
charity.




CHAPTER II.

MRS, BENSON AND HER CHILDREN AT BREAKFAST.—THE
ROBINS VENTURE UPON THE TEA-TABLE.

Ir happened one day that both the redbreasts, who
always went together to Mrs. Benson’s (because if
one had waited for the other’s return, it would have
missed the chance of being fed),—it happened, I say,
that they were both absent longer than usual, for
their little benefactors, having been fatigued with a
very long walk the evening before, lay late in bed
that morning; but as soon as Frederick was dressed,
his sister, who was waiting for him, took him by the
hand and led him down-stairs, where he hastily asked
the cook for the collection of crumbs. Assoon as he
entered the breakfast-parlour, he ran eagerly to the
window, and attempted to fling it up. “ What is the
cause of this mighty bustle?” said his mamma;


16 The Story of the Robvins,

—_—



‘do you not perceive that I am in the room,
Frederick ?” “Oh, my birds ! my birds!” cried he.
‘OT understand,” rejoined Mrs. Benson, “that you
have neglected to feed your little pensioners; how
came this about, Harriet ?” “We were so tired last
night,” answered Harriet, “that we overslept our-
selves, mamma.” “This excuse may satisfy you and
your brother,” answered the lady, “but I fear your
birds would bring heavy complaints against you,
were they able to talk. But make haste to feed them
now; and for the future, whenever you give any
living creature cause to depend on you for sustenance,
be careful on no account to disappoint it; and if you
are prevented from teas it yourself, eEapOY another
person to do it for you.”

“Tt is customary,’ continued Mrs. Benson, “for
little boys and girls to pay their respects to their
papas and mammas every morning, as soon’ as they
see them. This, Frederick, you ought to have done
to me on entering the parlour, instead of running
across it, crying out, ‘My birds! my birds!’ it would
have taken you but very little time to have done so.
However, I will excuse your neglect now, my dear,
as you did not intend to offend me; but remember,
that you depend as much on your papa and me for
everything you want as these little birds do on you;
















Mrs. BENSON AND HER CHILDREN AT BREAKFAST.—THE
ROBINS VENTURE UPON THE TEA-TABLE.




The Quarrel. 17

nay, more so, for they could find food in other places
but children can do nothing towards their own
. support; they should therefore be dutiful and
respectful to those whose tenderness and care they
constantly experience.”

Harriet promised her mamma that she would on
all occasions endeavour to behave as she wished her
to do; but I am sorry to say Frederick was more
intent on opening the window than imbibing the good
instructions that were given him. This he could
not do; therefore Harriet, with her mamma’s per-
mission, went to his assistance, and the store of
provisions was dispensed. As many of the birds
had nests, they ate their meal with all possible expe-
dition. Among this number were the robins, who
despatched the business as soon as they could, for
the hen was anxious to return to her little ones,
and the cock to procure them a breakfast; and
having given his young friends a song before
they left their bedchambers, he did not think it
necessary to stay to sing any more; they therefore
departed.

When the mother bird arrived at the ivy-wall, she
stopped at the entrance of the nest with a palpitating
heart; but seeing her brood all safe and well, she
hastened to take them under her wings. As soon as
18 The Story of the Robins.

—_— —————.



she was seated she observed thatthey were not so cheer-
ful asusual. ‘“ What is the matter 7” said she ; “ how
have you agreed during my absence?” To these
questions all were unwilling to reply; for the trath
was that they had been quarrelling almost the whole
time. “What! all silent?” said she. “I fear you
have not obeyed my commands, but have been con-
tending. I desire you will tell me the truth.” Robin,
knowing that he was the greatest offender, began to
justify himself before the others could have time to
accuse him,

“JT am sure, mother,” said-he, “I only gave
Dicky a little peck because he crowded me s0;
and all the others joined with him, and fell upon
me at once.”

“Since you have begun, Robin,” answered Dicky,
“TI must speak, for you gave me a very hard peck
indeed and I was afraid you had put out my eye. I
am sure I made all the room I could for you; but
you said you ought to have half the nest, and to be
master when your father and mother were cut, because
you are the eldest.”

“T do not love to tell tales,” said Flapsy, “but
what Dicky says is very true, Robin ; and you plucked
two or three little feathers out of me, only because I
begged you not to use us ill.”
Ine Naughty Robin. 19



* And you set your foot very hard upon me,” cried
Pecksy, “for telling you that you had forgotten your
dear mother’s command.

“ This is a sad story indeed,” said the mother, “I
am very sorry to find, Robin, that you already display
such a turbulent disposition. If you go on in this
manner we shall have no peace in the nest, nor can
T leave it with any degree of satisfaction. As for
your being the eldest, though it makes me show you
a preference on all proper occasions, it does not give
you a privilege to domineer over your brother and
sisters, You are all equally the objects of our
tender care, which we shall exercise impartially
among you, provided you do not forfeit it by bad
behaviour. To show you that you are not master of
the nest, I desire you to get from under my wing, and
sit on the outside, while I cherish those who are
dutiful and good.” Robin, greatly mortified, retired
from his mother; on which Dicky, with the utmost
kindness, began to intercede for him. “Pardon
Robin, my dear mother, I entreat you,” said he; “I
heartily forgive his treatment of me, and would not
have complained to you, had it not been necessary
for my own justification.

“You are a good bird, Dicky,” said his mother,
“but such an offence as this must be repented of
20 The Story of the Robins.

before it is pardoned.” At this instant her mate
returned with a fine worm, and looked as usual for
Tobin, who lay sulking by himself. “Give it,” said
the mother, “to Dicky ; Robin must be served last
this morning; nay, I do not know whether I shall
permit him to have any food all day.” Dicky was
very unwilling to mortify his brother; but on his
mother’s commanding him not to detain his father,
he opened his mouth and swallowed the delicious
mouthful. “What can be the matter?” said the
good father, when he had emptied his mouth; “surely
none of the little ones have been naughty? But I
cannot stop to inquire at present, for I left another
fine worm, which may be gone if I do not make
haste back.”

As soon as he departed, Dicky renewed his en.
treaties that Robin might be forgiven; but as he sat
swelling with anger and disdain, because he fancied
that the eldest should nct be shoved to the outside of
his mother's wing while the others were fed, she would
not hear a word in his behalf. The father soon came
and fed Flapsy, and then, thinking it best for his
mate to continue her admonitions, he flew off again.
During her father’s absence, Pecksy, whose little heart
was full of affectionate concern for the punishment
of her brother, thus attempted tocomfort him:


Robix's Pride, 21

ot oaeiae



“Dear Robin, do not grieve; I will give you my
breakfast, if my mother will let me.” “Oh,” said
Robin, “I do not want any breakfast; if I may not
be served first, I will have none.” “Shall I ask my
mother to forgive you?” said Pecksy. “Ido not want
any of your intercessions,” replied he; “if you had
not been a parcel of ill-natured things, I should not
have been pushed about as I am.”

“Come back, Pecksy,”’ said the mother, who over-
heard them; “I will not have you converse with so
naughty a bird. I forbid every one of you even to go
near him.” The father then arrived, and Pecksy was
fed. “You may rest yourself, my dear,’ said the
mother ; “your morning’s task is ended.” “Why,
what has Robin done?” asked he. “What I am
sorry to relate,” she replied —* quarrelled with his
brother and sisters!” “You surprise me; I could not
have suspected he would have been either so foolish
or sounkind.” “Oh, this is not all,” said the mother,
“for he presumes on being the eldest, and claims
half the nest to himself when we are absent, and now
is sullen because he is disgraced, and is not fed first
as usual,” “If this be the case,” replied the father,
“leave me to settle this business, my dear, and pray
go into the air a little, for you seem to be sadly vexed.”
“T am disturbed,” said she, “I confess; for, after all
22 The Story of the Robins.

my care and kindness, I did not expect such a sad
return as this. Iam sorry to expose this perverse
bird even to you, but he will not be corrected by me.
I will do as you desive, and go into the open air a
little.” So saying, she repaired to a neighbouring
tree, where she anxiously awaited the result of her
mate’s admonition.

As soon as the mother departed, the father thus
addressed the delinquent :—* And so, Robin, you want
to be master of the nest? would make, indeed, who do not know even how to
govern your own temper! I will not stand to talk
much to you now, but depend upon if, I will not
suffer you to use any of the family ill, particularly
your good mother ; and if you persist in obstinacy, I
will certainly turn you out of the nest before you
can fly.” These threatenings intimidated Robin, and
he also began to be very hungry as well as cold; he
therefore promised to behave better for the future,
and his brother and sisters pleaded earnestly
that he might be forgiven and restored to his usual
place.

“ T can say nothing in respect to the last particular,”
feplied the father; “that depends upon his mother;
but as it is his first offence, and he seems to be very
sorry, I will myself pardon it, and intercede for him

~




Robin Forgiven. 23
with his mother.” On this he left the nest to seek
for her. “Return, my dear,” said he, “to your beloved
family ; Robin seems sensible of his offence, and longs
to ask your forgiveness,” Pleased at this intelligence.
the mother raised her drooping head, and closed her
wings, which hung mournfully by her sides, expres-
sive of the dejection of her spirits. “I fly to give it
him,” said she, and hastened into the nest. In the
meanwhile Robin wished for, yet dreaded, her
return,

As goon as he saw her he lifted up a supplicating
eye, and in a weak tone (for hunger and sorrow had
made him faint) he cried, “ Forgive me, dear mother;
I will not again offend you.” “I accept your sub-
mission, Robin,’ said she, “and will once more
receive you to my wing; but indeed your behaviour
has made me very unhappy.” She then made room
for him, he nestled closely to her side, and soon found
the benefit of her fostering heat; but he was still
hungry, yet he had not confidence to ask his father to
fetch him any food; but this kind parent, seeing that
his mother had received him into favour, flew with
all speed to an adjacent field, where he soon met with
a worm, which with tender love *e presented to
Robin, who swallowed it with gratitude. Thus
was peace restored to the nest, and the happy

3

« NN
24 The Story of the Robins.



mother once more rejoiced that harmony reigned in
the family.

A few days after, a fresh disturbance took place.
All the little redbreasts, excepting Pecksy, in turn
committed some fault or other, for which they were
occasionally punished ; but she was of so amiable a
disposition, that it was her constant study to act with
propriety, and avoid giving offence ; on which account
she was justly caressed by her parents with dis-
tinguished kindness. This excited the envy of the
others, and they joined together to treat her ill, giving
her the title of the Favourite; saying that they made
no doubt that their father and mother would reserve
the nicest morsels for their darling.

Poor Pecksy bore all their reproaches with patience,
hoping that she should in time regain their good
opinion by her gentleness and affection. But it hap-
pened one day that, in the midst of their tauntings
their mother unexpectedly returned, who, hearing an
uncommon noise among her young ones, stopped on
the ivy to learn the cause, and as soon as she dis-
covered it, she made her appearance at the entrance
of the nest, with a countenance that showed she
knew what was going on.

“Are these the sentiments,” said she, “that subsist
in a family which ought to be bound together by love








Pecksy’s Kindness. 25



and kindness? Which of you has cause to reproach
either your father or me with partiality? Do we not
with the exactest equality distribute the fruits of our
labours among you? And in what respect has poor
Pecksy the preference, but in that praise which is
justly her due, and which you do not strive to da-
serve? Has she ever yet uttered a complaint against
you ? though, from the dejection of her countenance,
which she in vain attempted. to conceal, it is evident
that she has suffered your reproaches for some days
past. I positively command you to treat her other-
wise, for it is a mother’s duty to succour a persecuted
nestling; and I will certainly admit her next my
heart, and banish you all from that place you have
hitherto possessed in it, if you suffer envy and
jealousy to occupy your bosoms, instead of that
tender love which she, as the kindest of sisters, has
a right to expect from you.”

Robin, Dicky, and Flapsy were quite confounded
by their mother’s reproof; and Pecksy, sorry that
they had incurred the displeasure of so tender a
parent, kindly endeavoured to soften her anger.
“That Ihave been vexed, my dear mother,” said she,
“is true, but not so much as you suppose; and I am
ready to believe that my dear brothers and sister
were not in earnest in the severe things they said of
26 The Story of the Robins.



—_—

me—perhaps they only meant to try my affection.

I now entreat them to believe that I would willingly
resign the greatest pleasure in life, could I by that
means increase their happiness; and so far from
wishing for the nicest morsel, I would content myself
with the humblest fare, rather than any of them
should be disappointed.”

_ This tender speech had its desired effect; it recalled
those sentiments of love which envy and jealousy
had for a time banished; all the nestlings acknow-
edged their faults, their mother forgave them, and a
perfect reconciliation took place, to the great joy of
Pecksy, and indeed of all parties.

All the nestlings continued very good for several
days, and nothing happened worth relating. The
little family were soon covered with feathers, which
their mother taught them to dress, telling them that
neatness was a very essential thing, both for health,
and also to render them agreeable to the eye of the
world.

Robin was a very strong, robust bird, not remark-
able for his beauty, but there was a great briskness
in his manner, which covered many defects, and he
was very likely to attract notice. His father judged,
from the tone of his chirpings, that he would be a
very good songster.


A Lesson from the Birds. 27



Dicky had remarkably fine plumage; his breast
was of a beautiful red, his body and wings of an
elegant mottled brown, and his eyes sparkled like
diamonds.

Flapsy was also very pretty, but more distinguished
for the elegance of her shape than for the variety and
lustre of her feathers.

Pecksy had no outward charms to recommend her
to notice; but these defects were supplied by the
sweetness of her disposition. Her temper was con-
stantly serene, she was ever attentive to the happiness
of her parents, and would not have grieved them for
the world; and her affection for her brothers and
sister was so great, that she constantly preferred their
interest to her own, of which we have lately given
an instance,

The kind parents attended to them with unremitting
affection, and made their daily visit to Frederick and
Harriet Benson, who very punctually discharged the
benevolent office of feeding them. The robin red-
breasts, made familiar by repeated favours, approached
nearer and nearer to their little friends by degrees’
and at length ventured to enter the room and feed
upon the breakfast-table. Harriet was delighted at
this circumstance, and Frederick was quite trans-
ported; he longed to catch the birds, but his mamme
28 The Story of the Robins.

told him that would be the very means to drive them

away. Harriet entreated him not to frighten them on.

any account, and he was prevailed upon to forbear,
but could not help expressing a wish that he had
them in a cage, that he might feed them all day
long.

“And do you really think, Frederick,” said Mrs.
Benson, “that these little delicate creatures are such
gluttons as to desire to be fed all day long? Could
you tempt them to do it, they would soon die; but
they know better, and as soon as their appetites are
satisfied, always leave off eating. Many a little boy
may learn a lesson from them. Do you not recollect
one of your acquaintances, who, if an apple-pie or
anything that he calls nice is set before him, will eat
till he makes himself sick?” Frederick looked
ashamed, being conscious that he was too much
inclined to indulge his love of delicacies. ‘“ Well,”
said his mamma, “I see you understand who I mean,
Frederick, so we will say no more on that subject;
only when you meet with that little gentleman, give
my love to him, and tell him I beg he will be as
moderate as his redbreasts.”


CHAPTER III

THE NESTLINGS FRIGHTENED BY THE GARDENER.

THE cock bird, having finished his breakfast, flew out
at the window, followed by his mate; and as soon as
they were out of sight, Mrs. Benson continued her
discourse :—‘ And would you really confine these
sweet creatures in a cage, Frederick, merely to have
the pleasure of feeding them? Should you like to be
always shut up ina little room, and think it sufficient
if you were supplied with victuals and drink? Is
there no enjoyment in running about, jumping, and
going from place to place? Do you not like to keep’
company with little boys and girls? And is there
no pleasure in breathing the fresh air? Though these
little animals are inferior to you, there is no doubt but
they are capable of enjoyments similar to these ; and
it must he a dreadful life for a poor bird to be shut


30 The Story of the Robins.

up in a cage, where he cannot so much as make use
of his wings, where he is separated from his natural
companions, and where he cannot possibly receive that
refreshment which the air must afford to him when
at liberty to fly to such a height. But this is not all;
for many a poor bird is caught and taken from
its family, after it has been at the trouble of building
a nest, has perhaps laid its eggs, or even hatched its
young ones, which are by this means exposed to
certain destruction. It is likely that these very red-
breasts may have young ones, for this is the season
of the year for their hatching; and I rather think
they have from the circumstance of their always
coming together.”

“Tf that be the case,” said Harriet, “it would bea
pity indeed to confine them. But why,mamma, if it
is wrong to catch birds, did you at one time keep
canary-birds ?”

“The case is very different in respect to canary-
birds, my dear,” said Mrs. Benson ; “ by keeping them
in a cage I did them a kindness. I considered them
as little foreigners who claimed my hospitality. This
kind of bird came originally from a warm climate;
they are in their nature very susceptible of cold, and
would perish in the open air in our winters; neither
does the food which they feed on grow plentifully in
Canary-birds. 31





this country; and as here they are always bred in
cages, they do not know how to procure the materials
for their nest abroad. And there is another particular
which would greatly distress them were they to be
turned loose, which is the persecution they would be
exposed to from other birds. I remember once to
have geen a poor hen canary-bird, which had been
turned loose because it could not sing; and surely
no creature could be more miserable. It was starving
for want of food, famishing with thirst, shivering with
cold, and looked terrified to the greatest degree; while
a parcel of sparrows and chaffinches pursued it from
place to place, twittering and chirping with every
mark of insult. I could not help fancying the little
creature to be like a foreigner just landed from some
distant country, followed by a rude rabble of boys, who
were ridiculing him because his dress and language
were strange to them.”

“And what became of the poor little creature,
mamma?” said Harriet. “I was going to tell you,
my dear,” replied Mrs. Benson ; “I ordered the servant
to bring me a cage, with seed and water in their usual
places ; this I caused to be hung on a tree, next to
that in which the little sufferer in vain endeavoured
to hide herself among the leaves from her cruel
pursuers. No sooner did the servant retire than the
32 The Story of the Robins.

poor little wretch flew to it. I immediately had the
eage brought into the parlour, where I experienced
great pleasure in observing what happiness the poor
ereature enjoyed in her deliverance. I kept her some
years; but not choosing to confine her in a little
gage, I had a large one bought, and procured a
companion for her of her own species. I supplied
them with materials for building; and from them
proceeded a little colony, which grew so numerous
that you know I gave them to Mr. Bruce to put in
his aviary, where you have seen them enjoying
themselves. So now I hope I have fully accounted
for having kept canary-birds ina cage.”

“ You have indeed, mamma,” said Harriet.

“T have also,” said Mrs. Benson, “occasionally
kept larks. In severe winters vast numbers of them
come to this country froma colder climate, and many
perish. Quantities of them are killed and sold for
the spit; and the birdcatchers usually have a great
many to sell, and many an idle boy has some to
dispose of. I frequently buy them, as you know,
Harriet; but as soon as the fine weather returns, I
constantly set them at liberty. Bub come, my dears,
prepare for your morning walk, and afterwards let
me see you in my dressing-room,”

“TI wonder,” said Frederick, “whether our red-


eI DINE Ta EE SL AEE OFTEN ST NN e NET sTN e e

Taking Birds’ Nests. 33



breasts have got a nest? I will watch to-morrow
which way they fly, for I should like to see the little
ones.”
“And what will you do, should you find them
out?” said his mamma; “ not take the nest, I hope?”
“Why,” replied Frederick, “ I should like to bring
it home, mamma, and put it in a tree near the house;.
and then I would scatter crumbs for the old ones to
feed them with.”
“Your design is a kind one,” said Mrs. Benson,
“but you would greatly distress your little favourites.
Many birds, through fear, forsake their nests when
they are removed ; therefore I desire you to let them
alone if you should chance to find them.” Harriet
then remarked that she thought it very cruel to take
birds’ nests. “Ah, my dear,’ said Mrs. Benson,
“those who commit such barbarous actions are quite
insensible to the distresses they occasion. It is very
true that we ought not to indulge so great a degree
of pity and tenderness for animals as for those who
are more properly our fellow-creatures—I mean men,
women, and children; but as every living creature
can feel, we should have a constant regard to those
feelings, and strive to give happiness rather than
inflict misery. But go, my dear, and take your
walk.” Mrs. Benson then left them, to attend her
34 The Story of the Robins.

usual morning employments; and the children,
attended by their maid, passed an agreeable half-hour
in the garden.

In the meantime the hen redbreast returned to
the nest, while her mate took his flight in search of
food for his family. When the mother approached
the nest, she was surprised at not hearing as usual
the chirping of her young ones; and what was her
astonishment at seeing them all crowded together,
trembling with apprehension! “What is the matter,
my nestlings,” said she, “that I find you in this
terror?” “Oh, my dear mother,” cried Robin, who
first ventured to raise up his head, “is it you?”
Pecksy then revived, and entreated her mother to
come into the nest, which she did without delay ;
and the little tremblers crept under her wings,
endeavouring to conceal themselves in this happy
retreat.

“What has terrified you in this manner?” said
she. “Oh! I do not know,” replied Dicky; “ but we
have seen such a monster as I never beheld before,”
“ A monster, my dear? pray describe it.” “TI cannot,”
said Dicky ; “it was too frightful to be described.”
“Frightful indeed!” cried Robin; “but I had a full
_ view of it, and will give the best description I can.
We were all sitting peaceably in the nest, and very




The Monster. 35



happy together; Dicky and I were trying to sing,
when suddenly we heard a noise against the wall, and
presently a great round red face appeared before the
nest, with a pair of enormous staring eyes, a very
large beak, and below that a wide mouth with two
rows of bones, that looked as if they could grind us
all to pieces in an instant. About the top of this
round face, and round the sides, hung something
black, but not like feathers. When the two staring
eyes had looked at us for some time, the whole thing
disappeared.”

“T cannot at all conceive from your description,
Robin, what this thing could be,” said the mother ;
“but perhaps it may come again.” “Oh! I hope
not!” cried Flapsy; “I shall die with fear if it
does.” “Why so, my love?” said her mother; “has
it done you any harm?” “TI cannot say it has,”
replied Flapsy. ‘“ Well, then, you do very wrong, my
dear, in giving way to such apprehensions. You
must strive to get the better of this fearful disposition.
When you go abroad in the world you will see many
strange objects, and if you are terrified at every
appearance which you cannot account for, you will
live a most unhappy life. Endeavour to be good,
and then you need not fear anything, . But here
comes your father; perhaps he will be able to explain
36 The Story of the Robins.



the appearance which has so alarmed you to-
day.”

As soon as the father had given the worm to Robin,
he was preparing to depart for another, but, to his
surprise, all the rest of the nestlings begged him to
stay, declaring they had rather go without their
meal, on condition he would. but remain at home and
take care of them. “Stay at home and take care of
you!” said he; “why, is that more necessary now
than usual?” The mother then related the strange

occurrence which had occasioned this request. “Non-

sense!” said he; “a monster! great eyes! large
mouth! long beak! I don’t understand such stuff.
Besides, as it did them no harm, why are they to be
in such terror now it is gone?” “Don’t be angry, dear
father,” said Pecksy, “for it was very frightful
indeed.” “Well,” said he, “I will fly all around the
orchard, and perhaps I may meet this monster,”
“Oh, it will eat you up! it will eat you up!”
said Flapsy. “Never fear,” said he; and away
he flew. Sue

The mother then again attempted to calm them,
but all in vain; their fears were now redoubled
for their father’s safety; however, to their great
joy, he soon returned. “Well,” said he, “I have
seen this monster.” The little ones then clung to


The Monster. 27



their mother, fearing the dreadful creature was
just at hand. .
“What, afraid again?” cried he; “a parcel of
stout hearts I have in my nest, truly! Why, when
you fly about in the world, you will in all probability
see hundreds of such monsters, as you call them,
unless you choose to confine yourselves to a retired
life; nay, even in woods and groves you will be
liable to meet some of them, and those of the most
mischievous kind.” “T begin to comprehend,” said
the mother, “that these dear nestlings have seen the
faceofaman.” “Even so,” replied her mate ; “itisa
man, no other than our friend the gardener, who has
so alarmed them.”

“A man!” cried Dicky; “was that frightful
thing a man?” “Nothing more, I assure you,”
answered his father, “and a good man too, I have
reason to believe; for he is very careful not to
frighten your mother and me when we are picking up
worms, and has frequently thrown crumbs to us when
he was eating his breakfast.” “ And does he live in
this garden?” said Flapsy. “He works here very
often,” replied her father, “ but is frequently absent.”
“Oh, then,” cried she, “ pray take us abroad when he
is away, for indeed I cannot bear to seehim.” “You
are a little simpleton,” said the father, “and if you











38 The Story of the Robms.



do not endeavour to get more resolution, I will leave
you in the nest by yourself when I am teaching your
brothers and sister to fly and peck; and what will
_ you do then? for you must not expect we shall go
from them to bring you food.”

‘Flapsy, fearful that her father would be quite
angry, promised to follow his direction in every
respect ; and the rest, animated by his discourse,
began to recover their spirits.




CHAPTER IV.

JOE THE GARDENER BRINGS NEWS OF THE BIRDS’
NEST TO ITARRIET AND FREDERICK,

miLst the terrible commotions related in the last
chapter passed in the nest, the monster, who was no
‘ther than honest Joe the gardener, went to the

onse and inquired for his young master and mistress,
Having, as he justly supposed, some very pleasing
ews to tell them. Both the young gentleman and
lady very readily attended, thinking he had got some
ruit or flowers for them. “Well, Joe,” said Miss
enson, “what have you to say to us? Have you
got a peach or a nectarine, or have you brought me a
ot of sweet-william 2?”
“No, Miss Harriet,” said Joe; “but I have some-
ing to tell you that will please you as-much
though I had.” “ What’s that? what’s aul






go The Story of the Robins.



said Frederick. “Why, Master Frederick,” said Joe,
“a pair of robins have comed mortal often to one
place in the orchard lately; so thinks I, these birds
have got a nest. So I watches, and watches, and at
last I see’d the old hen fly into a hole in the ivy-wall.
T had a fancy to set my ladder and look in; but as .
master ordered me not to frighten the birds, I stayed
till the old one flew out again, and then I mounted,
and there I see’d the little creatures full fledged; and
if you and Miss Harriet may go with me, I will
show them to you, for the nest is but a little way
from the ground, and you may easily get up the step-
ladder.”

Frederick was in raptures, being confident that
these were the identical robins he was so attached
to; and, like a little thoughtless boy as he was, he
would have gone immediately with the gardener,
had not his sister reminded him that it was proper
to ask their mamma’s leave first; she therefore
told Joe she would let him know when she had
done so. :

When the redbreasts had quieted the fears of
their young family, and fed them as usual, they
retired to a tree, desiring their little nestlings not
to be terrified if the monster should look in upon
them again, as it was very probable he would do,
Robin's Past FHristory. 4l



They promised to bear the sight as well as they
could.

When the old ones were seated in the tree, “It is
time,” said the father, “to take our nestlings abroad.
You see, my love, how very timorous they are; and
— if we de not use them a little to the. world, they will
never be able to shift for themselves.” “Very true,”
replied the mother; “they are now well fledged, and
therefore, if you please, we will take them out to-
morrow ; but prepare them for it.” “One of the best
preparatives,’ answered her mate, “will be to leave
them by themselves a little; therefore we will now
take a flight together, and then go back.” The
mother complied, but she longed to be with her dear
family.

When they stopped a little to rest on a tree, “ Last
year,” said the hen redbreast, “it was my misfortune
to be deprived of my nestlings by some cruel boys,
_ before they were quite fledged, and it is that which
makes me so timid now, that I do not feel comfort-
able when I am away from them.”

“A calamity of the same kind befell me,” replied
the father; “I never shall forget it. I had been
taking a flight in the woods in order to procure some
nice morsels for one of my nestlings; when I re-
turned to the place in which I had imprudently built.
F

42 The Story of the Robins.





The first circumstance that alarmed me was a part of
my nest scattered on the ground just at the entrance
of my habitation ; I then perceived a large opening
in the wall, where before there was only room for
myself to pass. I stopped with a beating heart, in
hopes of hearing the chirpings of my beloved family,
but all was silent. I then resolved to enter: but
what was my consternation when I found that the
nest which my dear mate and I had with so much
labour built, and the dear little ones who were the
‘oy of our lives, were stolen away! nay, I did not
know but the tender mother also was taken. I rushed
out of the place distracted with apprehensions for
the miseries they might endure, and lamenting my
weakness, which rendered me incapable of rescuing
them. I was ready to tear off my own feathers with
vexation; but recollecting that my dear mate might
in all probability have escaped, I resolved to go in
search of her.

“As I was flying along I saw three boys, whose
appearance was far from disagreeable; one of them
held in his hand my nest of young ones, which he
eyed with cruel delight, while his companions seemed
to share hisjoy. The dear little creatures, insensible
of their fate (for they were newly hatched), opened
their mouths, expecting to be fed by me or their
The Death of the Hen. 43

mother, but all in vain; to have attempted feeding
them at this time would have been inevitable des-
truction to myself; but I resolved to follow the
barbarians, that I might. at least see to what place
my darlings were consigned.

“In a short time the party arrived at a house, and
he who before held the nest now committed it to the
care of another, but soon returned with a kind of
victuals I was totally unacquainted with, and with
this my young ones, when they gaped for food, were
fed; hunger induced them to swallow it, but soon
after, missing the warmth of their mother, they set
up a general cry, which pierced my very heart.
Immediately after this the nest was carried away,
and what became of my nestlings afterwards I never
could discover, though I frequently hovered about the
fatal spot of their imprisonment with the hope of
seeing them.”

“Pray,” said the hen redbreast, “what became of
your mate?” “Why, my dear,” said he, “when J
found there was no chance of assisting my little ones,
I pursued my course, and sought her in every place
of our usual resort, but to no purpose; at length I
returned to the bush, where I beheld an afflicting
sight indeed—my beloved companion lying on the
ground, just expiring! I flew to her instantly, and
4A. The Story of the Robins.



endeavoured to recall her to life. At the sound of
my voice she lifted up her languid eyelids, and said,
‘Are you then safe, my love ? what is become of our
little ones?’ In hopes of comforting her, I told her
they were alive and well; but she replied, ‘ Your
consolations come too late; the blow is struck, I feel
my death approaching. The horror which seized me
when I missed my nestlings, and supposed myself
robbed at once of my mate and infants, was too |
powerful for my weak frame to sustain. Oh! why
will the human race be so wantonly cruel? The
agonies of death now came on, and after a few con-
vulsive pangs she breathed her last, and left me an
unhappy widower. I passed the remainder of the
summer, and a dreary winter that succeeded it, in a
very uncomfortable manner, though the natural cheer-
fulness of my disposition did not leave me long a
prey to unavailing sorrow. I resolved the following
spring to seek another mate, and had the good fortune
to meet with you, whose amiable disposition has
renewed my happiness. And now, my dear,” said he,
“Jet me ask you what became of your former com-
panion ?”

“Why,” replied the hen redbreast, “soon after the
loss of our nest, as he was endeavouring to discover
what was become of it, a cruel hawk caught him up,
The Death of the Fen. 45

and devoured him in an instant. I need not say
that I felt the bitterest pangs for his loss; it is
sufficient to inform you that I led a solitary life
till I met with you, whose endearing behaviour har
made society again agreeable to me.”






CHAPTER V.

HARRIET AND FREDERICK VIEWING THE ROBINS’ NEST.

As soon as Mrs, Benson returned to her children,
Frederick ran wp to her, saying, “Good news! good
news, mamma! Joe has found the robins’ nest!”
“Tas he indeed?” said Mrs. Benson. “Yes,
mamma,” said Harriet, “and if agreeable to you, we
shall be glad to go along with Joe to see it.” “But
how are you to get at it?” said the lady, “for I
suppose it is some height from the ground.” “Oh
T can climb a ladder very well,” cried Frederick.
“You climb a ladder! You are a clever gentleman
at climbing, I know,” replied his mamma; “ but do
you propose to mount too, Harriet? I think this is
rather an indelicate scheme fora lady.” “Joe tells
me that the nest is but a very little way from the
ground, mamma,” answered Harriet; “but if I find
A Peep into the Nest. 49



it otherwise, you may depend on my not going up.”
“On this condition I will permit you to go,” said
Mrs. Benson; “but pray, Frederick, let me remind
you not to frighten your little favourites.” “Not
for all the world!” said Frederick, So away he
skipped, and ran to Joe before his sister. “We may
go! we may go, Joe!” cried he. “Stay for me,
Joe, I beg,” said Harriet, who presently joined him.
Frederick’s impatience was so great that he could
scarcely be restrained from running all the way,
but his sister entreated him not to make himself
too hot,

’ At length they arrived at the desired spot; Joe
placed the ladder, and his young master, with a little
assistance, mounted it very nimbly; but who can
describe his raptures when he beheld the nestlings!
“Oh the sweet creatures!” cried he, “there are

four of them, I declare! I never saw anything so
pretty in my life! I wish I might carry you all
home!” “That you must not do, Frederick,” said
his sister; “and I beg you will come away, for you
will either terrify the little creatures or alarm the
old birds, which perhaps are now waiting somewhere
near to feed them.” “Well, I will come away
directly,” said Frederick ; “and so good-bye, robins!
I hope you will come soon, along with your father


48 The Story of the Robins.



and mother, to be fed in the parlour.” He then,
under the conduct of his friend Joe, descended.

Joe next addressed Miss Harriet: “ Now, my young
mistress,” said he, “ will you goup?” As the steps
of the ladder were broad, and the nest was not high,
Miss Benson ventured to go up, and was equally
delighted with her brother, but so fearful of terrifying
the little birds and alarming the old ones, that she
would only indulge herself with a peep at the nest.
Frederick inquired how she liked the young robins.
«They are sweet creatures,” said she, “and I hope
they will soon join our party of birds, for they appear
to me ready to fly. But let us return to mamma,
for you know we promised her to stay but a little
while; besides, we hinder Joe from his work.”
“ Never mind that,” said the honest fellow ; “ master
won't be angry, I’m sartain; and if I thought he
would, I would work an hour later to fetch up lost
time.” “Thank you, Joe,” replied Harriet, “but I
am sure papa would not desire you to do so.”

At this instant Frederick perceived the two red-
breasts, who were returning from their proposed
excursion, and called to his sister to observe them.
He was very desirous to watch whether they would
go back to their nest, but she would on no account
consent to stay, lest her mamma should be displeased,
More Monsters. 49



and lest the birds should be frightened; Frederick,
therefore, with reluctance followed her, and Joe
_attended them to the house.

As soon as they were out of sight the hen bird
proposed to return to the nest; she had observed the
party, and though she did not see them looking into
her habitation, she supposed, from their being so
near, that they had been taking a view of it, and
told her suspicions to her mate. He agreed with
her, and said he now expected to hear a fine story
from the nestlings. “Let us return, however,” said
the mother, “for perhaps they have been terrified
again.” “Well,” said he, “I will attend you then:
but let me caution you, my dear, not to indulge their
fearful disposition, because such indulgence will
certainly prove injurious to them.” “I will do the
best I can,” replied she, and then flew to the nest,
followed by her mate.

She alighted upon the ivy, and peeping into the
nest, inquired how they all did. “ Very well, dear
mother,” said Robin. “What!” cried the father,
‘who now alighted, “all safe? not one eaten up by
the monster?” “No, father,” replied Dicky, “we
are not devoured ; and yet, I assure you, the monster
we saw before has been here again, and brought two
others with him.” “Two others! what, like him-
50 Zhe Story of the Robins.
self?” said the father: “I thought, Flapsy, you were
to die with apprehension if you saw him again ?”
“And ‘so I believe I should have done, had not -
you, my good father, taught me to conquer my fears,”
replied Flapsy. “When I saw the top of him, my
heart began to flutter to such a degree that I was
ready to die, and every feather of me shook; but
when I found he stayed but a very little while, I
recovered, and was in hopes he was quite gone. My
brothers and sisters, I believe, felt as I did; but we
comforted one another that the danger was over for
this day, and all agreed to make ourselves happy, and
not fear this monster, since you assured us he was very
harmless. However, before we were perfectly come
to ourselves we heard very uncommon noises, some-
times a hoarse sound, disagreeable to our ears as the
croaking of a raven, and sometimes a shriller noise,
quite unlike the note of any bird that we know of;
and immediately after something presented itself to
our view which bore a little resemblance to the
monster, but by no means so large and frightful.
Instead of being all over red, it had on each side
two spots of a more beautiful hue than Dicky’s
breast; the rest of it was of a more delicate white,
excepting two streaks of a deep red, like the cherry
you brought us the other day, and between these
More Monsters. 51





two streaks were rows of white bones, but by no
means dreadful to behold, like those of the great
monster. Its eyes were blue and white; and round
this agreeable face was something which I cannot
describe, very pretty, and as glossy as the feathers of
a goldfinch. There was so cheerful and pleasing a
look in this creature altogether, that, notwithstanding
I own I was rather afraid, yet I had pleasure in
looking at it; but it stayed a very little time, and
then disappeared. While we were puzzling ourselves
with conjectures concerning it, another creature,
larger than it, appeared before us, equally beautiful,
and with an aspect so mild and gentle that we were
all charmed with it; but, as if fearful of alarming
us by its stay, it immediately retired, and we have
been longing for you and my mother’s return, in
hopes you would be able to tell us what it is we
have seen.”

“J am happy, my dears,” said their mother, “to
find you more composed than I expected; for as
your father and I were flying together, in order to
come back to you, we observed the monster and the
two pretty creatures Flapsy has described; the
former is, as your father before informed you, our
friend the gardener, and the others are our young
benefactors, by whose bounty we are every day
52 The Story of the Robins.

ae

regaled, and who, I will venture to say, will do you”
no harm. You cannot think how kindly they treat

us; and though there are a number of other birds _
who share their goodness, your father and I are
favoured with their particular regard.”

“Oh!” said Pecksy, “are these sweet creatures
your friends? TI long to go abroad that I may see
them again.” “Well,” cried Flapsy, “I perceive
that if we judge from appearances we may often be
mistaken. Who would have thought that such an
ugly monster as that gardener could have had a
tender heart?” “Very true,” replied the mother;

you must make it a rule, Flapsy, to judge of
mankind by their actions, and not by their looks. I
have known some of them whose appearance was as
engaging as that of our young benefactors, who were,
notwithstanding, barbarous enough to take eggs out
of a nest and spoil them; nay, even to carry away
nest and all before the young ones were fledged,
without knowing how to feed them, or having any
regard to the sorrows of the tender parents.”

“Oh, what dangers there are in the world!”
cried Pecksy; “I shall be afraid to leave the nest.”
“Why so, my love?” said the mother; “every bird
does nut meet with hawks and cruel children. You
have already, as you sat on the nest, seen thousands
Antiipations. 53

of the feathered race, of one kind or other, making
their airy excursions, full of mirth and gaiety. This
orchard constantly resounds with the melody of
those who chant from their songs of joy; and I
believe there are no beings in the world happier
than birds, for we are naturally formed for cheerful-
ness; and I trust that a prudent precaution, and
following the rules we shall from our experience be
able to give you, will preserve you from the dangers
to which the feathered race are exposed.”

“Tustead of indulging your fears, Pecksy,” said
the father, “summon up all your courage, for to-
morrow you shall, with your brothers and sisters,
begin to see the world.”

Dicky expressed great delight at this declaration,
and Robin boasted that he had not the least remains
of fear. Flapsy, though still apprehensive of mon-
sters, yet longed to see the gaieties of life, and Pecksy
wished to comply with every: desire of her dear
parents. The approach of evening now reminded
them that it was time to take repose, and turning its
head under its wing, each bird soon resigned itself
to the gentle powers of sleep.








CHAPTER VI. -

THE YOUNG VISITORS.—THE CRUEL BOY.

Arter Harriet and Frederick had been gratified with
the sight of the robins’ nest, they were returning to
the house, conducted by their friend Joc, when they
were met in the garden by their mamma, accompanied
by Miss Lucy Jenkins and her brother Edward.
The former was a fine girl about ten years old, the
latter a robust, rude boy, more than eleven. “We
were coming to seek you, my dears,” said Mrs.
Benson to her children, “for I was fearful that the
business you went upon would make yon forgetful
of your young visitors.”

“T cannot answer for Frederick,” replied Harriet,
“but indeed, mamma, I would not on any account
have slighted my friends—How do you do, my dear
Lucey?” said she; “I am happy to see you. Will
Lucy and Edward. 55



you go with me into the play-room? T[ have got
some very pretty new books.—Frederick, have you
nothing to show Edward?” “Oh yes,” said Frede-
rick, “I have got a new ball, a new top, a new
organ, and twenty pretty things; but I had rather
go back and show him the robins.”

“The robins?” said Edward, “ what robins ?”

“Why, our robins, that have built in the ivy-wall.
You never saw anything so pretty in your life as the
little ones.”

“Ob, I can see birds enough at home,” said
Edward ; “but why did you not take the nest? it
would have been nice diversion to you to toss the
young birds about. I have had a great many nests
this year, and do believe I have a hundred eggs.”

“A hundred eggs! and how do you propose to
hatch them?” said Harriet, who turned back on
hearing him talk in this manner.

“Hatch them, Miss Benson?” said he; “who
ever thinks of hatching birds’ eggs ?”

“Oh, then, you eat them,” said Frederick, “or
perhaps let your cook make puddings of them ?”

“No, indeed,” replied Edward; “I blow out the
inside, and then run a thread through them, and
give them to Lucy to hang up among her curiosities «
and very pretty they look, I assure you.”
56 The Story of the Robins.

“ And so,” said Harriet, “you had rather see a
string of empty egg-shells than hear a sweet concert
of birds singing in the trees? I admire your taste,
truly !”

“Why, is there any harm in taking birds’ eggs?”
said Lucy; “I never before heard that there was.”

“My dear mamma,” replied Harriet, “has taught
me to think there is harm in every action which
gives causeless pain to any living creature; and I
own I have a very particular affection for birds.”

“Well,” said Lucy, “I have no notion of such
affections, for my part. Sometimes, indeed, I try to
rear those which Edward brings home, but they are
teasing, troublesome things, and I am not lucky.
To tell the truth, I do not concern myself much
about them: if they live, they live; and if they die
they die. He has brought me three nests this day
to plague me; I intended to have fed the birds. be-
fore I came out, but being in a hurry to come to see
you, I quite forgot it. Did you feed them, Edward 2’

“Not I,” said he, “I thought you would do it
tis enough for me to find the nests.”

“And have you actually left three nests of young
birds at home without food?” exclaimed Harriet.

“JY did not think of them, but will feed them
when I return,” said Lucy.


The Poor Nesthngs. 57



“Oh!” cried Harriet, “I cannot bear the thought
of what the poor little creatures must suffer.”

« Well,” said Edward, “since you feel so much for
them, I think, Harriet, you will make the best nurse.
What say you, Lucy, will you give the nests to
Harriet ?”

“With all my heart,” replied his sister ; “and pray
do not plague me with any more of them.”

“I do not know that my mamma will let me
accept them,” said Harriet; “but if she will, I shall
be glad to do so.”

Frederick inquired what birds they were, and
Edward informed him there was a nest of linnets, a
nest of sparrows, and another of blackbirds. Frede-
rick was all impatience to see them, and Harriet
longed to have the little creatures in her possession,
that she might rescue them from their deplorable
condition, and lessen the evils of captivity which
they now suffered.

Her mamnia had left her with her young com-
panions, that they might indulge themselves in inno-
cent amusements without restraint ; but the tender-
hearted Harriet could not engage in any play till she
had made intercession in behalf of the poor birds; she
therefore begged Lucy would accompany her to her
mainma, in order to ask permission to have the hixds’
\

58 The Story of the Robins.





nests. She accordingly went and made her request
known to Mrs. Benson, who readily consented ;
observing that though she had a very great objection
to her children having birds’ nests, yet she could not
deny her daughter on the present occasion. Harriet,
from an unwillingness to expose her friend, had said
but little on the subject; but Mrs. Benson, having
great discernment, concluded that she made the
request from a merciful motive; and knowing that
Lucy had no kind mamma to give her instruction,
she thus addressed her :—

“TI perceive, my young friend, that Harriet is
apprehensive that the birds will not meet with the
same kind treatment from you which she is disposed
to give them. I cannot think you have any cruelty
in your nature, but perhaps you have accustomed
yourself to consider birds only as playthings, without
sense or feeling; to me, who am a great admirer of
the beautiful little creatures, they appear in a very
different light; and I have been an attentive observer
of them, I assure you. Though they have not the
gift of speech, like us, all kinds of birds have
particular notes, which answer in some measure the
purpose of words among them, by means of which
they can call to their young ones, express their love
for them, their fears for their safety, their anger
The Poor Nestlngs. 59





towards those who would hurt them, &c.; from
which we may infer that it is cruel to rob birds of
their young, deprive them of their liberty, or exclude
them from the blessings suited to their natures, for
which it is impossible for us to give them an equiva-
lent. Besides, these creatures, insignificant as they
appear in your estimation, were made by God as
well as you. Have you not read in the New Testa-
ment, my dear, that our Saviour said, ‘ Blessed are
the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy’? How
then can you expect that God will send His blessing
upon you if, instead of endeavouring to imitate Him
in being merciful to the utmost of your power, you
are wantonly cruel to innocent creatures which He
designed for happiness ?”

This admonition from Mrs. Benson, which Lucy
did not expect, made her look very serious, and
brought tears into her eyes; on which the good lady
took her by the hand, and kindly said, “I wish not
to distress you, my dear, but merely to awaken the
natural sentiments of your heart: reflect at your
leisure on what I have taken the liberty of saying to
you, and I am sure you will think me your friend.
I knew your dear mamma, and can assure you she’
was remarkable for the tenderness of her disposition.
But let me not detain you from your amusements ;


60 The Story of the Robins.



go to your own apartment, Harriet, and use your
best endeavours to make your visitors happy. You
cannot this evening fetch the birds, because when
Lucy goes it will be too late for you to take so long
a walk, as you must come back afterwards; and I
make no doubt but that, to oblige you, she will feed
them to-night.”

Harriet and Lucy returned, and found Frederick
diverting himself with the hand-organ, which had
lately been presented to him by his godpapa; but
Edward had laid hold of Harriet’s dog, and was
searching his pocket for a piece of string, that he
might tie him and the cat together, to see, as he said,
how nicely they would fight; and so fully was he
bent on this cruel purpose, that it was with difficulty
he was prevailed on to relinquish it.

“Dear me!” said he, “if ever I came into such a
house in my life! there is no fun here, What would
you have said to Harry Pritchard and me the other
day when we made the eats fly?”

“Made the cats fly!” said Frederick; “how was
that?” ‘

“Why,” replied he, “ we tied bladders to each side
of their necks, and then flung them from the top of
the house. There was an end of their purring and
mewing for some time, I assure you, for they lay a
Cruel Edward. 61

RE, URI ant me

long while struggling and gasping for breath, and if
they had not had nine lives, I think they must have
died; but at last up they jumped, and away they
ran scampering. Then out came little Jemmy, crying
as if he had flown down himself, because we hurt
the poor cats. He had a dog running after him,
who, I suppose, meant to call us to task with his
bow-wow; but we soon stopped his tongue, for we
_ caught the gentleman, and drove him before us into
a narrow lane, and then ran hooting after him into
the village; a number of boys joined us, and cried
out as we did, ‘A mad dog! a mad dog!’ On this,
several people pursued him with cudgels and broom-
sticks, and at last he was shot by a man, but not
killed, so others came and knocked him about the
head till he expired.”

“For shame, Edward!” said Harriet; “how can
you talk in that rhodomontade manner? I cannot
believe any boy could bring his heart to such
barbarities.”

“ Barbarities, indeed! why, have we not a right to
do as we please to dogs and cats, or do you think
they feel as we do? Fiddle-faddle of your nonsense!
say I. Come, you must hear the end of my story:
when the dog was dead, we carried him home to
little Jemmy, who was ready to break his heart for
62 The Story of the Robins.



the loss of him ; so we did not like to stand hearing
his whining, therefore left him and got a eock, whose
legs we tied, and flung at him till he died. Then we
set two others fighting; and fine sport we had, for
one was pecked till his breast was laid open, and the
other was blinded, so we left them to make up their
quarrel. as they could.”

“Stop! stop!” exclaimed Harriet, “for pity’s sake,
stop! I can hear no more of your horrid stories;
nor would I commit even one of those barbarities
which you boast of for the world! Poor innocent
creatures! what had they done to you to deserve
such usage ?” '

“T beg, Edward,” said his sister, “that you will
find some other way to entertain us, or I shall really
cell Mrs. Benson of you.”

“What! are you growing tender-hearted all at
snce ?” cried he.

“T will tell you what I think when I go home,”
ceplied Lucy.

As for poor Frederick, he could not restrain his
tears, and Harriet’s flowed also at the -bare idea of
the sufferings of the poor animals; but Edward was
so accustomed to be guilty of those things without
reflection, that there was no making any impression.
of tenderness upon his mind; and he only laughed
Edward's Sport disturbed. 63



at their concern, and wanted to tell a long story
about an ox that had been driven by a cruel drover
till he went mad; but Harriet and his sister stopped
their ears.

At last little Frederick went crying to his mamma,
and the young ladies retired to another apartment;
so Edward amused himself with catching flies in the
window, pulling the legs off some, and the wings
off others, delighted with their contortions, which
were occasioned by the agonies they endured. Mrs.
Benson had some visitors, which prevented her
talking to this cruel boy as she otherwise would
have done on hearing Frederick’s account of him;
but she determined to tell his papa, which she
accordingly did some time after, when he returned
home.

Edward was now disturbed from his barbarous
sport by being called to tea ; and soon after that was
over, the servant came to fetch him and his sister,
Harriet earnestly entreated her friend Lucy to feed
- the birds properly till she should be allowed to fetch
them; Lucy promised to do so, for she was greatly
affected with Mrs. Benson’s discourse, and ther
entreated her brother to take leave, that she migh!
return home, With this he readily complied, as ther:
were no further opportunities for cruelty.
64 The Story of the Robins.

After her little visitors had departed, Harriet went
into the drawing-room, and sat herself down, that she
might improve her mind by the conversation of the
company. Her mamma perceived that she had been
in tears, of which Frederick had before explained
the cause. “I do not wonder, my love,” said she,
“that you should have been so affected with the
relation of such horrid barbarities as that thoughtless
boy has, by degrees, brought himself to practise by
way of amusement. However, do not suffer your
mind to dwell on them, as the creatures on which
he inflicted them are no longer objects of pity. It
is wrong to grieve for the death of animals as we do
for the loss of our friends, because they certainly are
not of so much consequence to our happiness, and
we are taught to think their sufferings end with
their lives, as they are not accountable beings; and
therefore the killing them, even in the most barbarous
manner, is not like murdering a human creature,
who is perhaps unprepared to give an account of
himself at the tribunal of heaven.”

“T have been,” said a lady who was present, “for
a long time accustomed to consider animals as mere
machines, actuated by the unerring hand of Provi-
dence to do those things which are necessary for the
preservation of themselves and their offspring ; but
The Learned Pig. 65





the sight of the Learned Pig, which has lately been
shown in London, has deranged these ideas, and I
know not what to think.”

This led to a conversation on the instinct of
animals, which young readers would not understand ;
it would therefore be useless to insert it.

As soon as the company was gone, “ Pray, mamma,”
said Harriet, “what did the Learned Pig do? I had
a great mind to ask Mrs, Franks, who said she saw
it; but I was fearful she would think me imper-
tinent.”

“T commend your modesty, my dear,” replied Mrs.
Benson, “ but would not have it lead you into such
a degree of restraint as to prevent you satisfying
that laudable curiosity, without which young persons
must remain ignorant of many things very proper
for them to be acquainted with. Mrs, Franks would, —
Tam sure, have been far from thinking you imper-
tinent. Those inquiries only are thought trouble-
some by which children interrupt conversation, and
endeavour to attract attention to their own insig-
uificant prattle; but all people of good sense and
good nature delight in giving them useful informa-
tion.

“In respect to the Learned Pig I have heard
things which are quite astonishing in a species of
66 Lhe Story of the Robins.



animals generally regarded as very stupid. The
creature was shown for a sight in a room provided
for the purpose, where a number of people assembled
to view his performances. Two alphabets of large
letters on card-paper were placed on the floor; one
of the company was then desired to propose a word
. whieh he wished the pig to spell; this the keeper
repeated to the pig, which picked out every letter
snecessively with his snout, and collected them
together till the word was complete. He was then
desired to tell the hour of the day, and one of the
company held a watch to him; this he seemed to
examine very attentively with his cunning little eye,
and having done so, he picked out figures for the
hour and minute of the day. He exhibited a
number of other tricks of the same nature, to the
great diversion of the spectators.

“For my own part, though I was in London at
the time he was shown, and heard continually of
this wonderful pig from persons of my acquaintance,
I never went to see him; for lam fully persuaded
that great erueliy must have been used im teaching
him things so foreien to his nature, and therefore
would not give encouragement to such a scheme.”

“And do you think, mamma,” said Harriet, “ that
the pig knew the letters, and could spell words ?”
Lhe Learned Pig. 67

“T think it possible, my dear, that the pig might
be taught to know the letters at sight one from the
other, and that his keeper had some private sign,
by which he directed him to each that was wanted ;
but that he had an idea of spelling I can never
believe, nor are animals capable of attaining human
sciences, because for these human faculties are
requisite ; and no art of man can change the nature
of anything, though he may be able to improve that
nature to a certain degree, or at least to call forth
to view powers which would otherwise be
hidden from us. As far as this can be done
consistently with our higher obligations, it may be
an agreeable amusement, but will never answer any
important purpose to mankind ; and I would advise
you, Harriet, never to give countenance to those
people who show what they call learned animals,
as you may assure yourself they practise great
barbarities upon them, of which starving them
almost to death is most likely among the number;
and you may, with the money such a sight would
cost you, procure for yourself a rational amusement,
or even relieve some wretched creature from extreme
distress. But, my dear, it is now time for you to
retire to rest; I will therefore bid you good-night,”








CHAPTER VII

THE FIRST FLIGHT OF THE NESTLINGS.

Harty in the morning the hen redbreast awakened
her young brood. “Come, my little ones,’ said
she, “shake off your drowsiness; remember, this
is the day fixed for your entrance into the world.
I desire that each of you will dress your feathers
before you go out, for a slovenly bird is my
aversion, and neatness is a great aavantage to the
appearance of every one.”

The father bird was upon the wing betimes, that
he might give each of his young ones a breakfast
before they attempted to leave the nest, When he
had fed them he desired his mate to accompany
him as usual to Mrs. Benson’s, where he found the
parlour window open, and his young friends sitting
with their mamma, Crumbs had been, according
the Fate of the Nesthugs. 69



to custom, strewed before the window, which the
other birds had nearly devoured; but the red-
breasts took their usual post on the tea-table, and
the father bird sang his morning lay; after which
they returned with all possible speed to the nest,
for, having so important an affair to manage, they
could not be long absent. Neither could their
young benefactors pay so much attention to them
as usual, for they were impatient to fetch the birds
from Miss Jenkins’s ; therefore, as soon as breakfast
was ended, they set out upon their expedition.
Harriet carried a basket large enough to hold two
nests, and Frederick a smaller one for the other:
thus equipped, with a servant attending them, they
set off,

Mr. Jenkins’s house was about a mile from Mr.
Benson’s ; it was delightfully situated; there was a
beautiful lawn and.canal before it, and a charming
garden behind; on one side were corn-fields, and on
the other a wood. In such a retreat as this it was
natural to expect to find a great many birds; but to
Harriet’s surprise, they saw only a few straggling
ones here and there, which flew away the moment
she and her brother appeared. On this Harriet
observed to Frederick that she supposed Edward
Jenkins’s practice of taking birds’ nests had made
70 The Story of the Robins.

them so shy. She said a great deal to him about
the cruelties which that naughty boy had boasted
of the evening before, which Frederick promised to
remember.

As soon as they arrived at the house, Lucy ran
out to receive them, but her brother had gone to
school. -

“We are come, my dear Lucy,” said Harriet,
‘to fetch the birds you promised us.”

“Oh, I know not what to say to you, my dear,”
said Lucy. “I have very bad news to tell you,
and I fear you will blame me exceedingly, though
not more than I blame myself. I heartily wish I
had returned home immediately after the kind
lecture your mamma favoured me with yesterday,
which showed me the cruelty of my behaviour,
though I was then ashamed to own it. I walked
as fast as I could all the way from your house,
and determined to give each of the little creatures
a good supper, for which purpose I had an egg
boiled and nicely chopped; I mixed up some bread
and water very smooth, and put a little seed with
the chopped egg amongst it, and then carried it to
the room where I left the nests. But what was
my concern when J found that my care was too
late for the greatest part of them! Every sparrow
The Fate of the Nestlings. 71

tay dead; they seemed to have killed eaeh other.
In the nest of linnets, which were very young, J
found one dead, two just expiring, and the other
almost exhausted, but still able to swallow; to him,
therefore, I immediately gave some of the food I
had prepared, which greatly revived him; and as I
thought he would suffer with cold in the nest by
himself, I covered him over with wool, and had
this morning the pleasure of finding him quite
recovered.”

“What, all the sparrows and three linnets
dead!” said Frederick, whose little eyes swam with
tears at the melancholy tale; “and pray, Miss
Jenkins, have you starved all the blackbirds too?”

“Not all, my little friend,” answered Lucy, “but
I must confess that some of them have fallen
victims to my neglect: however, there are two fine
ones alive, which I shall, with the surviving linnet, .
cheerfully resign to the care of my dear Harriet,
whose tenderness will, I hope, be rewarded by the
pleasure of hearing them sing when they are old
enough. But I beg you will stay and rest your
selves after your walk.”

“Let me see the birds first,” said Frederick.
“That you shall do,” answered Lucy; and taking

him by the hand, she conducted him to the room
6


72 The Story of the Robins.



in which she kept them, accompanied by Harriet,
Lucy then fed the birds, and gave particular in-
structions for making their food, and declared that she
would never be a receiver of birds’ nests any more;
but expressed her apprehensions that it would be
difficult to wean Edward from his propensity for
taking them.

Lucy then took her young friends into the
_parlour to her governess (for her mamma was dead),
who received them very kindly, and gave each of
them a piece of cake and_some fruit; after which
Lucy led them again info”the room where the birds
were, and very carefully put the nest with the poor
solitary linnet into one basket, and that with the
two blackbirds into the other. Frederick was very
urgent to carry the latter, which his sister consented
to; and then bidding adieu to their friend, they
set off on their way home, attended by the maid
as before.

Let us now return to the redbreasts, whom we
left on the wing flying back to the ivy wall, in order
to take their young ones abroad.

As the father entered the nest he cried out with
a cheerful voice, “Well, my nestlings, are you all
ready?” “Yes,” they replied. The mother then
advanced, and desired that each of them would get
Learning to Fly, 73



upon the edge of the nest. Robin and Pecksy
sprang up in an instant, but Dicky and Flapsy,
being timorous, were not so expeditious.

The hearts of the parents felt great delight at
the view they now had of their young family,
which appeared to be strong, vigorous, and lively,
and, in a word, endowed with every gift of nature
requisite to their success in the world.

“Now,” said the father, “stretch your wings,
Robin, and flutter them a little in this manner”
(showing him the way), “and be sure to observe
my directions exactly. Very well,” said he: “do
not attempt to fly yet, for here is neither air nor
space enough for that purpose. Walk gently after
me to the wall; then follow me to the tree that
stands close to it, and hop on from branch to
branch as you will see me do: then rest yourself;
and as soon as you see me fly away, spread your
wings, and exert all the strength you have to follow
me
Robin acquitted himself to admiration, and
alighted very safely on the ground.

“Now stand still,” said the father, “till the rest
join us.” Then going back, he called upon Dicky
to do the same as his brother had done; but Dicky
was very fearful of fluttering his wings, for he was

9
74 The Story of the Robins.

a little coward, and expressed many apprehensions
that he should not reach the ground without falling,
as they were such a great height from it. His
father, who was a very courageous bird, was quite
angry with him.

“Why, you foolish little thing!” said he, “do you
mean to stay in the nest by yourself and starve ?
I shall leave off bringing you food, I assure you,
Do you think your wings were given you to be
always folded by your sides, and that the whole
employment of your life is to dress your feathers and
make yourself look pretty? Without exercise you
cannot long enjoy health; besides, you will soon
have your livelihood to earn, and therefore idleness
would in you be the height of folly. Get up this
instant.”

Dicky, intimidated by his father’s displeasure,
got up, and advanced as far as the branch from
which he was to descend; but here his fears re-
turned, and instead of making an effort to fly, he
stood flapping his wings in a most irresolute manner,
and suffered his father to lead the way twice with-
out following him. This good parent, finding he
would not venture to fly, took a circuit unperceived
by Dicky, and watching the opportunity when his
wings were a little spread, came suddenly behind him














THE First FLIGHT OF THE NESTLINGS.






Learnumg to Fly. 75



and pushed him off the branch. Dicky, finding
himself in actual danger of fallmg, now gladly
stretched his pinions, and upborne by the air, he
gently descended to the ground, so near the spot
where Robin stood, that the latter easily reached
him by hopping.

The mother now undertook to conduct Flapsy
and Pecksy, whilst the father stayed to take care
of the two already landed. Flapsy made a thousand
difficulties, but at length yielded to her mother's
persuasions, and flew safely down. Pecksy, without
the least hesitation, accompanied her, and by
exactly following the directions given, found the
task much easier than she expected.

As soon as they had a little recovered from the
fatigue and fright of their first essay at flying, they
began to look around them with astonishment.
Every object on which they turned their eyes
excited their curiosity and wonder. They were no
longer confined to a little nest built in a small hole,
but were now at full liberty in the open air. The
orchard itself appeared to them to be a world. For
some time each remained silent, gazing round, first
at one thing, then at another; atlength Flapsy eried
out, “What a charming place the world is! I had
no conception that it was half so big!”
76 The Story of the Robiis.

« And do you suppose then, my dear,” replied the
mother, “that you now behold the whole of the
world? I have seen but a small part of it myself,
and yet have flown over so large a space, that what
is ab present within our view appears to me a little
inconsiderable spot; and I have conversed with
several foreign birds, who informed me that the
countries they came from were so distant that they
were many days on their journey hither, though
they flew the nearest way, and scarcely allowed -
themselves any resting-time.”

“Come,” said the father, “let us proceed to
business; we did not leave the nest merely to look
about us.. You are now, my young ones, safely
landed on the ground; let me instruct you what you
are to do on it. Every living creature that comes
into the world has something allotted him to per-
form, therefore he should not stand an idle spectator
of what others are doing. We small birds havea
very easy task, in comparison of many animals I
have had an opportunity of observing, being only
required to seek food for ourselves, build nests, and
provide for our young ones till they are able to
procure their own livelihood. We have indeed
enemies to dread; hawks and other birds of prey
will catch us up if we are not upon our guard; but
Lhe Nestlings World. ay



the worst foes we have are those of the human race,
though even among them we redbreasts have a
better chance than many other birds, on account of
a charitable action which two of our species are said
to have performed towards a little boy and girl,*
who were lost in a wood, where they were starved
to death. The redbreasts saw the affectionate pair,
hand in hand, stretched on the cold ground, and
would have fed them had they been capable of
receiving nourishment; but finding the poor babies
quite dead, and being unable to bury them, they
resolved to cover them with leaves. This was an
arduous task, but many a redbreast has since shared
the reward of it; and I believe that those who do
good to others always meet with a recompence some
way or other. But I declare I am doing the very
thing I was reproving you for—chattering away
when I should be minding business. Come, hop
after me, and we shall soon find something worth
having. Fear nothing, for you are now in a place of
security ; there is no hawk near, and I have never
seen any of the human race enter this orchard but
the monsters who paid you visits in the nest, and
others equally inoffensive.”

The father then hopped away, followed by Robin

® Ailuding to the ballad of the Children in the Wood.
78 The Story of the Robins.

and Dicky, while his mate conducted the female
part of the family. The parents instructed their
young ones in what manner to seek for food, and
they proved very successful, for there were many
insects just at hand.




CHAPTER VIIi.

FREDERICK DISCOVERS THE YOUNG ROBINS IN THE
CURRANT BUSH.

Wuitsr ali the business related in the last chapter
was going on in the redbreast family, Harriet and
her brother were walking home with the poor birds
in the baskets, “Well, Frederick,” said she to him,
“what think you of bird-nesting now? Should you
like to occasion the deaths of a number of little
harmless creatures ?”

“ No, indeed,” said Frederick ; “and I think Miss
Jenkins a very naughty girl for starving them.”

“She was to blame, but is now sorry for her fault,
my dear, therefore you must not speak unkindly of
her; besides, you know she has no good mamma, as
we have, to teach her what is proper; and her papa
is obliged to be absent from home very often, and
leave her to the care of a governess, who perhaps
80 The Story of the Robins,

was never instructed herself to be tender tc
animals.”

With this kind of conversation they amused
themselves as they walked, every now-and then
peeping into their baskets to see the little birds,
which were very lively and well. They entreated
the maid to take them through the orchard, which
had a gate that opened into a meadow that lay in
their way, having no doubt of obtaining admittance,
as it was the usual hour for their friend Joe to work
there. They accordingly knocked at the gate, which
was immediately opened to them, and Frederick
requested Joe to show him the robins’ nest.

Just at this time the young robins were collected
together near the gate, when they were suddenly
alarmed with a repetition of the same noises which
had formerly terrified them in the nest; and Robin,
who was foremost, beheld, to his very great amaze-
ment, Frederick and Harriet, the maid who attended
them, with Joe the gardener, who, having opened
the gate, was, at the request of his young master
and mistress, conducting them to the ivy wall.

Robin, with all his courage (and, indeed, he was
not deficient in this quality), was seized with a great
tremor; for if the view he had of the faces of these
persons had appeared so dreadful to him when he
Leobin and his Friends, dL



sat in the nest, what must it now be to behold their
full size, and see them advancing with, as he
thought, gigantic strides towards him? He expected
nothing less than to be crushed to death with the foot
of one of them; and not having yet attamed his full
strength, and never having raised himself in the air,
he knew not how to escape, therefore chirped so
loudly as not only to surprise his brother and sisters,
and bring his father and mother to inquire the
meaning of his cry, but also to attract the attention
of the young Bensons.

‘What chirping is that?” cried Harriet.

“Tt was the cry of a young bird,” said the maid;
“ was it not one of those in the baskets ?”

“ No,” said Frederick, “the noise came that way,”
pointing to some currant bushes; “ my birds are very
well.”

“ And so is my linnet,” replied Harriet.

Frederick then set down his charge very carefully
and began looking about in the place from whence
he supposed the sound proceeded, when, to his great
joy, he soon discovered the redbreasts and their little
family, He called eagerly to his sister, who was
equally pleased with the sight. They then stooped
down to take a nearer view of them, by which means
he directly confronted Robin, who, as soon as ike
82 The Story of the Robins.

young gentleman’s face was on a level with his eyes,
recollected him, and calling to his brother and
sisters, told them they need not be afraid.

Harriet followed her brother’s example, and de-
lighted the little flock with the sight of her amiable
countenance. She heartily lamented having nothing
with which to regale her old favourites and their
family, when Frederick produced from his pocket a
piece of biscuit, which they crumbled and scattered.
Harriet, recollecting that her mamma would expect
her at home, and that the birds in the baskets would
be hungry, persuaded her brother to take up his
little load and return. They therefore left the red-
breasts enjoying the fruits of their bounty.

When the happy birds had shared amongst them
the kind present of their young benefactors, they
hopped about in search of some moister food. Dicky
had the good fortune to find four little worms toge-
ther, but instead of calling his brother and sisters to
partake of them, he devoured them all himself.

“Are you not ashamed, you little greedy crea- .
ture?” cried his father, who observed his selfish
disposition. “What would you think of your
brother and sisters were they toserve you so? Ina
family every individual ought to consult the welfare
of the whole, instead of his own private satisfaction ;
Robin and his Friends. 83





it is his own truest interest to do so. A day may
come when he who has now sufficient to supply tha
wants of his relations may stand in need of assistance
from them. But setting aside selfish considerations,
which are the last that ever find place in a generous
breast, how great is the pleasure of doing good, and
contributing to the happiness of others!”

Dicky was quite confounded, and immediately
hopped away to find, if possible, something for his
brother and sisters, that he might regain their good
opinion.

In the meanwhile Robin found a caterpillar, which
he intended to take for Pecksy; but just as he
was going to pick it up, a linnet, which had a nest
in the orchard, snatched it from him, and flew away
with if.

With the most furious rage Robin advanced to his
father, and entreated that he would fly after the
linnet and tear his heart out.

“That would be taking violent revenge indeed,”
said his father. “No, Robin, the linnet has as greata
right to the caterpillar as you or J, and in all proba-
bility he has as many little gaping mouths at home
ready to receive it. But however this may be, I had
for my own part rather sustain an injury than take
revenge. You must expect to have many a scramble
84 The Story of the Robins,



of this kind in your life; but if you give way to a
resentful temper, you will do yourself more harm
than all the enemies in the world can do you, for
you will be in perpetual agitation, from an idea that
every one who does not act in direct conformity with
your wishes has a design against you. Therefore
restrain your anger, that you may be happy ; for,
believe me, peace and tranquillity are the most
valuable things you can possess.”

At this instant Pecksy came up with a fine fat
spider in her mouth, which she laid down at her
mother’s feet, and thus addressed her :—

“ Accept, my dear parent, the first tribute of grati-
tude which I have ever been able to offer you. How
have I formerly longed to ease those toils which you
and my dear father have endured for our sakes! and
eladly would I now release you from further fatigue
on my account; but I am still a poor creature, and
must continue to take shelter under your wing. I
will hop, however, as long as I am able, to procure
food for the family.”

The eyes of the mother sparkled with delight, and
knowing that Pecksy’s love would be disappointed
by a refusal, she ate the spider which the dutiful
nestling had so affectionately brought her, and then
said, —
Dutiful Pecksy. 85



“How happy would families be if every one, like.
you, my dear Pecksy, consulted the welfare of the
rest, instead of turning their whole attention to their
own interest !”

Dicky was not present at this speech, which he
might have considered as a reflection on his own
conduct; but he arrived as it was ended, and
presented Pecksy with a worm, like those he had
himself so greedily eaten. She received it with
thanks, and declared it was doubly welcome from
his beak.

“Certainly,” said the mother, “fraternal love
stamps a value on the most trifling presents.”

Dicky felt himself happy in having regained the
good opinion of his mother and obliged his sister,
and resolved to be generous for the future.

The mother bird now reminded her mate that it
would be proper to think of returning to the nest.

“If the little ones fatisue themselves too much
with hopping about,” said she, “their strength will
be exhausted, and they will not be able to fly
back.”

“True, my love,” replied her mate ; “ gather them
under your wings a little, as there is no reason to
apprehend danger here, and then we will see what
they can do.”
86 The Story of the Robins.



She complied with his desire, and when they
were sufficiently rested she got up, on which the
whole brood instantly raised themselves on their
feet.

“Now, Robin,” cried the father, “let us see your
dexterity in flying upwards: come, I will show you
how to raise yourself.”

“Oh, you need not take that trouble,” said the
conceited bird; “as I flew down, I warrant I know
how to fly up.”

Then spreading his wings, he attempted to rise
but in so unskilful a manner that he only shuffled
along upon the ground.

“That will not do, however,” cricd the father;
“shall I show you now?”

Robin persisted in it that he stood in no need of
instruction, and tried again: he managed to raise
himself a little way, but soon tumbled headlong. His
mother then began reproving him for his obstinacy,
and advised him to accept his father’s kind offer of
teaching him.

“You may depend on it, Robin,” said she, “that
he is in every respect wiser than you, and as he has
had so much practice, he must of course be expert
in the art of flying; and if you persist in making
your own foolish experiments, you will only commit
The Upward Flight. 87



a number of errors, and make yourself ridiculous. I
should commend your courage, provided you would
add prudence to it; but blundering on in this igno-
rant manner is only rashness.”

“Let him alone, let him alone,” said the father ;
“if he is above being taught, he may find his own way
to the nest; I will teach his brother—~Come, Dicky,”
said he, “let us see what you can do at flying
upwards ; you cut a noble figure this morning when
you flew down.”

Dicky, with reluctance, advanced; he said he did
not see what occasion they had to go back to the
nest at all; he should suppose they might easily
find some snug corner to creep into till they were
strong enough to roost in trees, as other birds
did,

“Why,” said the father, “you are as ridiculous
with your timidity as Robin with his conceit.
Those who give way to groundless fears generally
expose themselves to real dangers. If you rest on
the earth all night, you will suffer a great deal from
cold and damp, and may very likely be devoured
whilst you sleep, by rats and other creatures that go
out in the night to seek for food; whereas, if you
determine to go back to the nest, you have but ons
effort to make, for which, I will venture to say, you

7
88 The Story of the Robins.

= ena

have sufficient strength, and then you will lie
warm, safe, and quiet: however, do as you will.”

Dicky began ‘to think that it was his interest
to obey his father, and said he would endeavour to
fly up, but was still fearful he should not be able
to do it. .

“Never despair,” replied his father, “of doing
what others have done before you. Turn your eyes
upwards, and behold what numbers of birds are at
this instant soaring in the air. They were once

all nestlings, like yourself. See there that new-
fledged wren, with what courage he skims along

Let it not be said that a redbreast lies grovelling on
the earth while a wren soars above him!”

Dicky was now ashamed of himself, and inspired
with emulation, therefore without delay he spread
his wings and his tail; his father with pleasure
placed himself in a proper attitude before him, then
rising from the ground, led the way ; and Dicky, by
carefully following his example, safely arrived at
the nest, which he found a most comfortable resting-
place after the fatigue of the morning, and rejoiced |
that he had a good father to teach him what was
most conducive to his welfare.

The father, baving seen him safe home, returned
to his mate, who, during his short absence, had
The Upward Flight. 89

been endeavouring to convince Robin of his fault,
but to no purpose; he did not like to be taught
what he still persuaded himself he could do by his
own exertions; she therefore applied herself to
Flapsy.

“Come, my dear,” said she, “get ready to follow
me when your father returns, for the sun casts a
great heat here, and the nest will be quite
comfortable to you.” Flapsy dreaded the experi-
ment; however, as she could not but blame both
Robin and Dicky’s conduct, she resolved to do her
best, but entreated her mother to inform her very
particularly how to proceed. “ Well, then,” said the
tender parent, “observe me. First bend your legs
then spring from the ground as quick as you can,
stretching your wings straight out on each side of
your body as you rise ; shake them with a quick
motion, as you will see me do, and the air will yield
to you, and at the same time support your weight ;
whichever way you want to turn, strike the air with
the wing on the contrary side, and that will bring
you about.” - She then rose from the ground, and
having practised two or three times repeatedly what
she had been teaching, Flapsy at length ventured to
follow her, but with a palpitating heart ; and was
soon happily seated in the nest by the side of
90 The Story of the Robins.



Dicky, who rejoiced that his favourite sister was
safely arrived,

The mother bird now went back to Pecksy, who
was waiting with her father till she returned; for
the good parent chose to leave the female part of
his family to the particular management of their
mother.

Pecksy was fully prepared for her flight, for she
-had attentively observed the instruction given to the
others, and also their errors; she therefore kept the
happy medium betwixt self-conceit and timidity,
indulging that moderated emulation which ought
fo possess every young heart; and resolving that
_ neither her inferiors nor equals should soar above
her, she sprang from the ground, and, with a steadi-
ness and agility wonderful for her first essay,
followed her mother to the nest, who, instead of
stopping to rest herself there, flew to a neighbouring
tree, that she might be at hand to assist Robin,
should he repent of his folly. But Robin disap-
pointed her hopes, for he sat sulky; thongh
convinced he had been in the wrong, he would not
humble himself to his father, who therefore resolved
to leave him a little while, and return to the
nest.

As soon as Robin found himself deserted, instead
Robin's Bad Temper. 9)

of being sorry, he gave way to anger and resentment.
“Why,” cried he, “am I to be treated in this
manner, who am the eldest in the family, while all
the little darlings are fondled and caressed? But I
don’t care; I can get to the nest yet, I make no
doubt.” He then attempted to fly, and after a great
many trials at length got up in the air; but not
knowing which way to direct his course, he some-
times turned to the right and sometimes to the left
now he advanced forwards a little, and now, fearing
he was wrong, came back again; at length, quite
spent with fatigue, he fell to the ground, and
bruised himself a good deal: stunned with the fall,
he lay for some minutes without sense or motion,
but soon revived; and finding himself alone in this
dismal condition, the horrors of his situation filled him
with dreadful apprehensions and the bitterest remorse.

“Oh,” cried he, “that I had but followed the
advice and example of my tender parents! then had
I been safe in the nest, blest with their kind caresses,
and enjoying the company of my dear brother and
sisters; but now I am of all birds the most
wretched! Never shall I be able to fly, for every
joint of me has received a shock which I doubt it
will not recover. Where shall I find shelter from
the scorching sun, whose piercing rays already
92 Lhe Story of the Robins.



render the ground I lie on intolerably hot? What
kind beak will supply me with food to assuage the
pangs of hunger which I shall soon feel? By what
means shall I procure even a drop of water to
quench that thirst which so frequently returns ?
Who will protect me from the various tribes of
barbarous animals which I have been told make a
prey of birds? Oh, my dear, my tender mother! if
the sound of my voice can reach your ears, pity my
condition, and fly to my succour!”

The kind parent waited not for further solicita-
tion, but parting from the branch on which she had
been a painful eye-witness of Robin’s fall, she
instantly stood before him.

“T have listened,” said she, “to your lamentations,
and since you seem convinced of your error, I will
not add to your sufferings by my reproaches; my
heart relents towards you, and gladly would I afford
you all the aid in my power; but, alas! I can do ©
but little for your relief. However, let me persuade
you to exert all the strength you have, and use
every effort for your own preservation; I will
endeavour to procure you some refreshment, and at
the same time contrive the means of fixing you ina
place of more security and comfort than that in
which you at present lie.” So saying she flew to
A Mother's Love, 93

a little stream which flowed in an adjacent meadow,
and fetched from the brink of it a worm, which
she had observed an angler to drop as she perched
on the tree; with this she immediately returned to
the penitent Robin, who received the welcome gift
with gratitude.

Refreshed with this delicious morsel, and com-
forted by his mother’s kindness, he was able to
stand up, and on shaking his wings, he found that
he was not so greatly hurt as he apprehended; his
head, indeed, was bruised, so that one eye was
almost closed, and he had injured the joint of one
wing, so that he could not possibly fly: however, he
could manage to hop, and the parent bird observing
that Joe the gardener was cutting a hawthorn hedge
which was near the spot, desired Robin to follow
her. This he did, though with great pain. “Now,”
said she, “look carefully about, and you will soon
find insects of one kind or another. for your suste-
nance during the remainder of the day, and before
evening I will return to you again. Summon all
your courage, for I make no doubt you will be safe
while our friend continues his work, as none of
those creatures which are enemies to birds will
venture to come near him.” Robin took a sorrowful
farewell, and the mother flew to the nest.


CHAPTER IX,

THE VISIT TO MRS, ADDIS’S.

“You have been absent a long time, my love,” said
her mate ; “but I perceived that you were indulging
your tenderness towards that disobedient nestling,
who has rendered himself unworthy of it. However,
I do not condemn you for giving him assistance, for
had not you undertaken the task, I would myself
have flown to him instead of returning home. How
is he ?—likely to live and reward your kindness ?”
“Yes,” said she, “he will, I flatter myself, soon
perfectly recover, for his hurt is not very con-
siderable; and I have the pleasure to tell you he is
extremely sensible of his late folly, and I dare say
will endeavour to repair his fault with future good
behaviour.”
“This is pleasing news indeed !” said he.
News of Robin. 95





The little nestlings, delighted to hear their dear
brother was safe and convinced of his error, ex-
pressed great joy and satisfaction, and entreated
their father to let them descend again and keep
him company. To this he would by no means
consent, because, as he told them, the fatigue would
be too great, and it was proper that Robin should
feel a little longer the consequences of his presump-
tion. “To-morrow,” said he, “you shall pay him a
visit, but to-day he shall be by himself.” On this
they dropped their request, knowing that their
parent was the best judge of what was proper to
be done, and not doubting but that his affection
would lead him to do everything that was con-
ducive to the real happiness of his family; but yet
they could not tell how to be happy without Robin,
and were continually perking up their little heads,
fancying they heard his cries. Both their father
and mother frequently took a peep at him, and had
the satisfaction of seeing him very safe by their
friend Joe the gardener, though the honest fellow
did not know of his own guardianship, and con-
tinued his work without perceiving the little cripple,
who hopped and shuffled about, pecking here and
there whatever he could meet.

When he had been for some time by himself, hig
96 The Story of the Robins,



—

mother made him another visit, and told him she
had interceded with his father, whose anger was
abated, and he would come to him before he went
to rest. Robin rejoiced to hear that there was a
chance of his being reconciled to his father, yet he
dreaded the first interview ; however, as it must be,
he wished to have it over as soon as possible, and
every wing he heard beat the air he fancied to be
that of his offended parent. ‘In this state of anxious
expectation he continued almost to the time of
sunset, when of a sudden he heard the well-known
voice to which he used to listen with joy, but
which now caused his whole frame to tremble; but
observing a beam of benignity in that eye in which
he looked for anger and reproach, he cast himself
in the most supplicating posture at the feet of his
father, who could no longer resist the desire he felt
to receive him into favour.

«Your present humility, Robin,” said he, “ disarms
my resentment; I gladly pronounce your pardon,
and am persuaded you will never again incur my
displeasure. We will therefore say no more on a
subject which gives so much pain to us.”

“Yes, my dear indulgent father,” cried Robin,
“permit me to make my grateful acknowledgments
for your kindness, and to assure you of my future
Robin's New Shelter. 97

obedience.” The delighted parent accepted his
submission, and the reconciliation was completed.

By this time Robin was greatly exhausted ; his
kind father therefore conducted him to a pump in
the garden, where he refreshed himself with a few
drops of water. He now felt himself greatly re-
lieved; but on his father’s asking him what he
intended to do with himself at night, his spirit sank
again, and he answered, he did not know.

“Well,” said the father, “I have thought of an
expedient to secure you from cold at least. Ina
part of the orchard, a very little way from here,
there is a place belonging to our friend the gardener,
where I have sheltered myself from several storms,
and am sure it will afford you a comfortable lodging ;
so follow me before it is too late.”

The old bird then led the way, and his son
followed him. When they arrived, they found the
door of the tool-house open, and as the threshold
was low, Robin managed to get over it. His
father looked carefully about, and at last found in
a corner a parcel of shreds, kept for the purpose of
nailing up trees, “Here, Robin,” said he, “is a
charming bed for you; let me see you in it and
call your mother to have a peep, and then I must
bid you “Good night.”
98 The Story of the Robins.



———.



So saying, away he flew, and brought his mate,
who was perfectly satisfied with the lodging pro-
vided for her late undutiful but now repentant son ;
but, reminded by her mate that if they stayed longer
they might be shut in, they took leave, telling
Robin they would visit him early in the morning.

Though this habitation was much better than
Robin expected, and he was ready enough to own
better than he deserved, yet he deeply regretted his
absence from the nest, and longed to see again his
brother and sisters. However, though part of the
night was spent in bitter reflections, fatigue at
length prevailed over anxiety, and he fell asleep.
The nestlings were greatly pleased to find that.
Robin was likely to escape the dangers of the night,
and even the anxious mother at length resigned
herself to repose.

Before the sun showed his glorious face in the
east, every individual of this affectionate family was
awake: tha father with impatience waited for the
gardener’s opening the tool-house; the mother pre-
pared her little ones for a new excursion.

“You will be able to descend with more ease, my
dears, to-day than you did yesterday, shall you not?”

“Oh yes, mother,” said Dicky, “I shall not be at
all afraid.” “Nor I,” said Flapsy.
The Lady's Pets. 99



“Say you so? then let us see which of you will
be down first,” said she. “Come, I will show you
the way.”

On this, with gradual flight the mother bent her
course to a spot near the place where Robin lay
concealed; they all instantly followed her, and
surprised their father, who having seen Joe, was
every instant expecting he would open the door.
At length, to the joy of the whole party, the gar-
dener appeared, and they soon saw him fetch his
shears and leave the tool-house open; on this the
mother proposed that they should all go together and
call Robin. There they found him in his snug little
bed: but who can describe the happy meeting? who
can find words to express the raptures which filled
each little bosom ?

When the first transports subsided, “I think,”
said the father, “it will be best to retire from hence.
If our friend returns, he may take us for a set of
thieves, and suppose that we came to eat his seeds,
and I should be sorry he should have an ill opinion
of us.” “ Well, I am ready,” said his mate. “And
we!” cried the whole brood.

They accordingly left the tool-house, and hopped
about among the currant bushes. “Ithink,” said the
father, “that you who have the full use of your
100 The Story of the Robsns.

limbs could manage to get up these low trees, but
Robin must content himself upon the ground a little
longer.” This was very mortifying, bub he had no
one to blame excepting himself; so be forbore to
complain, and assumed as much cheerfulness as he
could, His brothers and sisters begged they might stay
with him all day, as they could do very well without
going up to the nest; to this the parents consented.
It is now time to inquire after Harriet and her
brother. These happy children reached home soon
after they left the redbreasts, and related every
circumstance of their expedition to their kind
mamma, who, hearing the little prisoners in the
basket chirp very loudly, desired they would imme-
diately go and feed them, which they gladly did, and
then took a short lesson. Mrs. Benson told Harriet
that she was going to make a visit in the afternoon,
and should take her with her, therefore desired she
would keep herself quite still, that she might not be
fatigued after the walk she had had in the morning ;
for though she meant to go in the carriage it was
her intention to walk home, ag the weather was so
remarkably fine. The young lady took great care of
the birds, and Frederick engaged, with the assistance
of the maid, to feed them during her absence.
Harriet was then dressed to attend her mamma.
The Lady's Pets. — TOI

eee a pce ae ee eee

Mrs. Addis, to whose house they were going, wasa
widow lady; she had two children,—Charles, a boy of
twelve years old, at school, and Augusta, about seven,
at home. But these children were quite strangers
to the Bensons.

On entering the hall Harriet took notice of a very
disagreeable smell, and was surprised with the
appearance of a parrot, paroquet, and a macaw, all in
most superb cages. In the next room she came to
were a squirrel and a monkey, which had each a
little house neatly ornamented. On being introduced
into the drawing-room she observed in a corner a lap
dog lying on a splendid cushion; and in a beautiful
little cradle, which she supposed to contain a large wax
doll, lay in great state a cat with a litter of kittens,

After the usual compliments were over, Mrs.
Benson said, “I have taken the liberty of bringing my
daughter with me, in hopes of inducing you to favour
us, in return, with the company of Miss Addis.”

“You are very obliging,” replied the lady, “but
indeed I never take my children with me, they are
so rude; it will be time enough some years hence
for Augusta to go visiting.”

“T am sorry to hear you say this,” said Mrs,
Benson. “You are displeased, then, I fear, at my
having brought Harriet with me.” This in reality
102 The Story of the Robins.



was the case, as Mrs. Benson plainly perceived, for
the lady made no answer, and looked very cross.

Harriet was curious to examine the variety of
animals which Mrs. Addis had collected together;
but as her mamma never suffered her to run about
when she accompanied her to other people’s houses,
she sat down, only glancing her eye first to one part
of the room and then to the other, as her attention
was successively attracted.

As Mrs. Benson requested to see Miss Addis, hex
mamma could not refuse sending for her; she
therefore rang the bell, and ordered that Augusta
might come down to her. The footman, who had
never before received such a command (for Mrs.
Addis only saw the child in the nursery), stared
with astonishment, and thought he had misunder-
stood it. However, on his lady repeating her words,
he went up-stairs to tell the nursery-maid the child
was to be taken to the drawing-room. “ What new
fancy is this?” said she; “who would ever have
thought of her wanting the child in the drawing-
room ? I have no stockings clean for her, nor a frock
to put on but whatisragged. I wish she would spend
less money on her cats and dogs and monkeys, and
then her child would appear as she ought todo.” “I
won't go down-stairs, Nanny,” said the child. “But
A Neglected Child. 103



you must,” said Nanny; “besides, there’s a pretty
young lady come to see you, and if you go like a good
girl, you shall have a piece of sugared bread and butter
for your supper; and you shall carry the new doll
which your godmamma gave you, to show to your
little visitor.”

These bribes had the desired effect, and Miss
Addis went into the drawing-room ; but instead of
entering it like a young lady, she stopped at the
door, hung down her head, and looked like a little
simpleton. Harriet was so surprised at her awkward-
ness that she did not know what to do, and looked
at her mamma, who said, “ Harriet, my love, can’t
you take the little girl by the hand and lead her to
me? I believe she is afraid of strangers.” On this
Harriet rose to do so; but Augusta, apprehensive
that she would snatch her doll away, was going to
run out, only she could not open the door.

Mrs. Benson was quite shocked to see how sickly,
dirty, and ragged this poor child was, and how vulgar
also, for want of education; but Mrs. Addis was so
taken up at that instant with the old lap dog, which
had, as she thought, fallen into a fit, that she did not
notice her entrance ; and before she perceived it, the
child went up to the cradle in order to put her doll
into it, and seized one of the kittens by the ee the
104 The Story of the Robins,

squeaking of which provoked the old cat to scratch
her, and this made her ery and drop the kitten upon
the floor. Mrs. Addis, seeing this, flew to the little
animal, endeavoured to soothe it with caresses, and
was going to beat Augusta for touching it, but Mrs.
Benson interceded for her; she was, however, sent
away into the nursery. Happily for children, there
are not many such mammas as Mrs. Addis.

The tea-things being set, the footman came in
with the urn; and, both his hands being employed, he
left the door open. To the great terror of Harriet, and
even of her mamma too, he was followed by the monkey
they saw in the hall, which, having broken his chain,
came to make a visit to his lady. Mrs. Addis, far
from being disconcerted, seemed highly pleased with
his cleverness. “Oh, my sweet dear Pug!” said
she, “are you come to see us? Pray show how like
a gentleman you can behave.” Just as she had said
this he leaped upon the tea-table, and took cup after
cup and threw them on the ground till he broke half
the set; then jumped on the sofa and tore the cover
of it; in short, as soon as he had finished one piece
of mischief he began another, till Mrs, Addis, though
greatly diverted with his wit, was obliged to have
him caught and confined; after which she began
making tea, and quietness was for a short time
A Negleted Child. 108



restored. But Mrs. Benson, though capable of con-
versing on. most subjects, could not engage Mrs,
Addis in any discourse but upon the perfection of
her birds and beasts, and a variety of uninteresting
particulars were related concerning their wit or
misfortunes.

On hearing the clock strike seven, Mrs. Addis
begged Mrs. Benson to excuse her, as she made it a
constant rule to see all her dear darlings fed at that
hour, and entreated that she and the young lady
would take a turn in the garden in the meanwhile.
This was very ill-bred, but Mrs. Benson desired
she would use no ceremonies with her, and was
really glad of the respite it gave her from company
so irksome, and Harriet was happy to be alone with
her mamma; she, however, forbore making any re-
marks on Mrs. Addis, because she had been taught
that it did not become young persons to censure the
behaviour of those who were older than themselves.

The garden was spacious, but overrun with weeds;
the gravel walks were so rough for want of rolling
that it was quite painful to tread on them, and the
grass on the lawn so long that there w:¢ no walking
with any comfort, for the gardener was almost con-
tinually going on some errand or another for Mrs.
Addis’s darlings ; so Mrs. Benson and ber daughter
106 Lhe Story of the Robins.



sat down on a garden seat, with an intention of.
waiting there till Mrs. Addis should summon them.

Harriet could not refrain from expressing a wish
that it was time to go home; to which Mrs. Benson
replied that she did not wonder at her desire to
return; “ But,” said she, “my dear, as the world was
not made merely for us, we must endeavour to be
patient under every disagreeable circumstance we
meet with. I know what opinion you have formed
of Mrs. Addis, and should not have brought you
to be a spectator of her follies, had I not hoped
that an hour or two passed in her company would
afford you a lesson which might be useful to you
through life. I have before told you that our affec-
tions towards the inferior parts of the creation should
be properly regulated; you have, in your friend Lucy
Jenkins and her brother, seen instances of cruelty te
them which I am sure you will never be inclined tc
imitate; but I was apprehensive you might fall intc
thecontrary extreme, whichis equally blameable. Mrs,
Addis, you see, has absolutely transferred the affec-
tion which she ought to feel for her child to creatures
which would really be much happier without it.
As for Puss, who lies in the cradle in all her splendour,
I will engage to say she would pass her time pleasanter
in a basket of clean straw, placed in a situation where
The Visttors annoyed. 107

she could occasionally amuse herself with catching
mice. The lapdog is, I am sure, a miserable objects
full of diseases, the consequence of luxurious living,
How enviable is the lot of a spaniel that is at liberty
to be the companion of his master’s walks, when
compared with his! Pug, I am certain, would enjoy
himself much more in his native woods; and I am
greatly mistaken if the parrots, &., have not cause
to wish themselves in their respective countries, or at
least divided into separate families, where they would
be better attended ; for Mrs. Addis, by having such
a number of creatures, has put it out of her power to
see properly with her own eyes to all, But come, let
‘us go back into the house; the time for our going
home draws near, and I do not wish to prolong my
visit.” 3

Saying this, Mrs. Benson arose, and with her
daughter went into the drawing-room, which opened
into the garden; the other door, which led to the
adjoining apartments, was not shut; this gave them
an opportunity of hearing the following discourse,
which greatly distressed Mrs. Benson, and perfectly
terrified the gentle Harriet.

“Begone, wretch!” said Mrs. Addis, “begone this
instant! you shall not stay a moment longer in this
house!” “T hope, madam, you will have the good-
108 The Story of the Robins.

ness to give me a character; indeed and indeed, I fed
Poll, but I believe he got cold when you let him
stand out of doors the other day.” “I will give you
no character, I tell you,” said Mrs. Addis, “so depart
this instant. Oh, my poor dear, dear creature! I fear
you will never recover.—John !—Thomas! here, run
this instant to Perkins, the birdcatcher; perhaps he
can tell me what to give him.” Then bursting into
a flood of tears, she sat down and forgot her guests.

Mrs. Benson thought it necessary to remind her
that she was in the house, and stepped to the door
to ask what was the matter: Mrs. Addis recollected
herself sufficiently to beg pardon for neglecting to
pay attention to her, but declared that the dreadful
misfortune that had befallen her had made her in-
sensible to everything else.

«What can be the matter?” said Mrs. Benson,
“have you heard of the death of a dear friend? has
your child met with an accident?” “Oh no,” said
she, “but poor Poll is taken suddenly ill—my dear
Poll, which I have had these seven years,—and I fear
he will never recover.”

“Tf thisis all, madam,” said Mrs, Benson, “I really
cannot pity you, nor excuse your behaviour to me,
for it is an instance of disrespect which I believe no
other person but yourself would show me, and I shall
Poll’s Illness. 109

take my leave of your house for ever; but before I
go, permit me to say that you act in a very wrong
manner, and will certainly feel the il effects of your
injustice to your fellow-creatures, in thus robbing
them of the love you owe them, to lavish it away on
those animals, which are really sufferers by your
kindness.”

At this instant the footman entered to inform
Mrs. Benson that her servant was come; on which, ac-
companied by her daughter, she without further
ceremony left Mrs. Addis to compose herself as she
could.




CHAPTER X.

ADVENTURES OF THE LITTLE ROBINS,

As they walked along, both Mrs. Benson and her
daughter continued silent, for the former was greatly
agitated, and the latter quite in consternation at what
had lately passed. But their attention was soon
awakened by the supplication of a poor woman, who
entreated them to give her some relief, as she had a
sick husband and seven children in a starving con-
dition ; of which, she said, they might be eye-wit-
nesses if they would have the goodness to step into
a barn that was very near. Mrs. Benson, who was
always ready to relieve the distressed, taking her
daughter by the hand, and desiring the servant to
stop for her, followed the woman, who conducted her
to the abode of teal woe, where she beheld a father
surrounded by his helpless family, whom he could no








ADVENTURES OF THE LITTLE ROBINS.






False Tenderness. . Tit

ee



longer maintain, and who, though his disease was
nearly subdued, was himself almost ready to die for
want of good nourishing diet.

“ How came you all to be in this condition, good
woman ?” said Mrs. Benson to his wife; “surely you
might have obtained relief before your husband was
reduced to such extremity?” “Oh, my good lady,’
said the woman, “ we have not been used to begging,
but to earn an honest livelihood by our industry ;
and never till this sad day have I known what it was
to ask charity. This morning, for the first time, I
applied at the only great house in this village, where
I made no doubt there was abundance. -I told my
dismal tale to a servant, and begged she would make
it known to her mistress; but she assured me it was
in vain to come there, for her lady had such a family
of cats, dogs, monkeys, and all manner of creatures,
that she had nothing to spare for poor people; at the
same instant I saw the poulterer bring a rabbit and
a fowl, which I found were for the favourite cat and
dog. This discouraged me from begging; and I had
determined that I never would ask again, but the
sight of my dear husband and children in this con-
dition drove me to do it.”

“Well, comfort yourself,” said Mrs. Benson, “ we
will see what we can do; in the meantime here is
112 The Story of the Robins.

something for a present supply.” Mrs. Benson then
departed, as she was fearful of being late. Harriet
was greatly affected at this scene, and could no longer
help exclaiming against Mrs. Addis.

“She is deserving of great blame, indeed,” said
Mrs. Benson ; “but I have the pleasure to say, such
characters as hers are very uncommon—I mean in
the extreme, though there are numbers of people who
fall into the same fault in some degree, and make
themselves truly ridiculous with their unnatural
affections. I wish you, while you are young, to
guard your mind against such a blameable weak-
ness,”

Harriet assured her mamma that she should never
forget either Mrs. Addis or the lesson she had received
on the subject, and then expressed hersatisfaction that
they had met the poor woman. “I rejoice sincerely,”
said Mrs. Benson, “at having been fortunate enough
to come in time to assist this poor miserable family,
and hope, my love, you will, out of your own little
purse, contribute something towards their relief.”
“Most willingly,” said Harriet ; nabey, shall be wel-
come to my whole store.”

They kept talking on this subject till they arrived
at home. Little Frederick, who sab up an hour
beyond his time, came out to meet them, and assured
The Blackberds. 113



his sister that the birds were well, and fast asleep.
“T think,” said she, “it is time for you and me to
follow their example; for my part, with my morning
and evening walk together, I am really tired, so shall
beg leave to wish you a good night, my dear mamma.
Papa, I suppose, will not be at home this week?”
“No, my dear, nor the next,” said Mrs. Benson, “ for
he has many affairs to settle in the west. I am
rather fatigued also, and shall soon retire to rest.”

At the usual hour of visiting Mrs. Benson’s tea-
table the next day, the parent robins took their
morning’s flight, and found the children with their
mother. They had been up a long time, for Frede-
rick had made in his bedchamber a lodging for the
birds, which had awakened both him and his sister
at a very early hour, and they rese with great readi-
ness to perform the kind office they had imposed
upon themselves.

The two blackbirds were perfectly well, but the
linnet looked rather drooping, and they began to be
apprehensive they should not raise him, especially
when they found he was not inclined to eat. As for
the blackbirds, they were very hungry indeed ; and
their young benefactors, not considering that when
fed by their parents young birds wait some time
between every morsel, supplied them too fast, and
114 The Story of the Robins.

filled their crops so full that they looked as if they
had great wens on their necks; and Harriet per-
ceived one of them gasping for breath.

“Stop, Frederick!” said she, as he was carrying
the quill to its mouth; “the bird is so full he can
hold no more.” But she spoke too late; the little
creature gave his eyes a ghastly roll, and fell on one
side, suffocated with abundance.

“Oh, he is dead! he is dead!” cried Frederick.

“He is indeed,” said Harriet; “but I am sure we
did not mean to kill him, and it is some satisfaction
to think that we did not take the nest.”

This consideration was not enough to comfort
Frederick, who began to ery most bitterly; his
mamma hearing him, was apprehensive he had hurt
himself, for he seldom cried unless he was in great
pain; she therefore hastily entered the room to
inquire what was the matter, on which Harriet
related the disaster that had happened. Mrs. Benson
then sat down, and taking Frederick in her lap,
wiped his eyes, and giving him a kiss, said,—

“Tam sorry, my love, for your disappointment;
but do not afflict yourself; the poor little thing is
out of his pain now, and I fancy suffered but for
a short time. If you keep on crying so, you will

‘forget to feed your flock of birds, which I fancy, by
The Blackbirds. 115





the chirping I heard from my window, are beginning
to assemble. Come, let me take the object of your
distress out of your sight; it must be buried.”
Then, carrying the dead bird in one hand, and lead~
ing Frederick with the other, she went down-stairs.

While she was speaking, Harriet had been watch-
ing the other blackbird, which she had soon the
pleasure to see perfectly at his ease. She then
attempted to feed the linnet, but he would not eat.

“T fancy, Miss Benson,” said the maid, “he wants
air.”

“That may be the case, indeed,” replied Harriet,
“for you know, Betty, this room, which has been
shut up all night, must be much closer than the
places birds build in.” Saying this, she opened the
window, and placed the linnet near it, waiting to
see the effect of the experiment, which answered her
wishes; and she was delighted to behold how the
little creature gradually smoothed his feathers, and
his eyes resumed their native lustre; she once more
offered him food, which he took, and quite recovered.
Having done all in her power for her little orphans,
she went to share with her brother the task of
feeding the daily pensioners, which being ended,
she seated herself at the breakfast-table by her
mamma.
116 The Story of the Robins.

“T wonder,” said Frederick, who had dried up his
tears, “ that the robins are not come.”

“Consider,” said his sister, “that they have a
great deal of business to do now that their young
ones begin to leave their nest; they will be here by
and by, I make no doubt.” An instant after, they
entered the room. The sight of them perfectly
restored Frederick’s cheerfulness; and after they
were departed, he requested of his mamma that he
and Harriet might go again into the orchard, in
hopes of seeing the young robins.

“That you shall do, Frederick,” said she, “ upon
eondition that you continue a very good boy; but as
yesterday was rather an idle day with you, you must
apply a little closer to-day; and Harriet has a great
deal of business to do, therefore you must wait till
evening, and then perhaps I may go with you.”

Frederick was satisfied with this promise, and
took great paing to read and spell. He repeated by
heart one of Mrs. Barbauld’s hymns, and some other
little things which he had been taught; and Harriet
applied herself to a variety of different lessons with
great diligence, and performed her task of work
entirely to her mamma’s satisfaction.

As soon as the old redbreasts left their little
family in order to go to Mrs. Benson’s, Pecksy, with
Robin and Pecksy. 117





great kindness, began to ask Robin where he had
burt himself, and how he did it.

“Oh,” said he, “I am much better; but it is a
wonder I am now alive, for you cannot think what
a dreadful fall [ had. With turning about ag I did
in the air I became quite giddy, so could not make
the least exertion for saving myself as I was falling,
and came with great force to the ground; you see
how my eye is. still swelled, and it was much more
so at first. My wing is the worst, and still gives
me a great deal of pain; observe how it drags on the
ground; but as it is not broke, my father says it
will soon be well, and I hope it will be so, for I
long to be flying, and shall be glad to receive any
instructions for the future. I cannot think how I
could be so foolishly conceited as to suppose I
knew how to conduct myself without my father’s
guidance.”

“ Young creatures like us,” said Pecksy, “certainly
stand in need of instruction, and we ought to think
ourselves happy in having parents who are willing
to take the trouble of teaching us what is necessary
for us to know.. I dread the day when I must quit
the nest and take care of myself.” Flapsy said she
made no doubt they would know how to fly and
peck and do everything before that time; and for
118 The Story of the Robins.

her part she longed to see the world, and to know

how the higher ranks of birds behaved themselves,

and what pleasures they enjoyed; and Dicky de- .
clared he felt the same wish, though he must confess

he had great dread of birds of prey.

“Oh,” said Flapsy, “they will never seize such a
pretiy creature as you, Dicky, I am sure.”

“Why, if beauty can prevail against cruelty, you
will be secure, my sweet sister,’ replied he, “for
your delicate shape must plead in your behalf.”

Just as he had finished his speech a hawk
appeared in sight, on which the whole party was
seized with a most uncommon sensation, and threw
themselves on their backs, screaming with all their
might; and at the same instant the cries of numbers
of little birds echoed through the orchard. The red-
breasts soon recovered, and rising on their feet
looked about to see what was become of the cause ot
their consternation; when they beheld him high in
the air, bearing off some unhappy victim, a few of
whose feathers fell near the young family, who, on
examining them, found they belonged to a goldfinch ;
on which Pecksy observed that it was evident these
savages paid no attention to personal beauty.
Dicky was so terrified, he knew not what to do, and
had thoughts of flying back to the nest, but after
Getting Food. 119

Robin’s misfortune he was fearful of offending his
father; he therefore got up into a currant bush, and
hid himself in the thickest part of the leaves.
Flapsy followed him; but Robin being obliged to
keep on the ground, Pecksy kindly resolved to bear
him company.

In a few minutes their parents returned from
Mrs. Benson’s and found the two latter pretty near
where they had left them; but missing the others,
the mother with great anxiety inquired what was
become of them. Robin then related how they had
been frightened by a hawk; and while he was doing
80, they returned to him again.

“Tam surprised,” said the father, “that a hawk
should have ventured so near the spot where the
gardener was at.work.” Pecksy informed him that
they had not seen the gardener since he left them.
“Then I dare say he is gone to breakfast,” replied the
mother; and this was the case, for they at this
instant saw him return with his shears in his hand,
and soon pursue his work. ‘“ Now you will be safe,”
cried the father; “I shall therefore stay and teach
you to fly in different directions, and then your
mother and I will make some little excursions, and
leave you to practise by yourselves; but first of all

let me show you where to get water, for I am sure
9
120 The Story of the Robins,







you must be very thirsty.” “No,” said they, “we
have had several wet worms and juicy caterpillars
which have served us both for victuals and drink

Robin is very quick at finding them.” “There is
nothing like necessity to teach birds how to live,’
said the father; “I am glad Robin’s misfortunes have
been so beneficial to him.” “ What would have be-
come of you, Robin, if you had not exerted yoursel.
as I directed?” said his mother; “you would soon
have died had you continued to lie on the scorching
ground. Remember from this instance, as long as
you live, that it is better to use means for your own
relief than to spend time in fruitless lamentations.
But come along, Dicky, Flapsy, and Pecksy, there is
water near.” She then conducted them to the pump
from which Joe watered the garden, which was near
the tool-house where Robin slept.

Here they stayed some time, and were greatly
amused, still so near the gardener that they regarded
themselves as under his protection. The parents
flew up into a tree, and there the father entertained
his beloved mate and family with his cheerful music;
and sometimes they made various airy excursions
for examples to their little ones. In this manner the
day passed happily away, and early in the evening
Flapsy, Pecksy, and Dicky were conducted to the
Robin Lost. 121

nest; they mounted in the air with much more ease
than the preceding day, and the parents instructed
them how to fly to the branches of some trees which
stood near,

In the meantime they had left Robin by himself,
thinking he would be safe while the gardener was
mowing some grass; but what was the grief of both
father and mother, when they returned, and could
neither see nor hear him! The gardener, too, was
gone; they therefore apprehended that a cat or rat
had taken Robin away and killed him, yet none of
his feathers were to be seen. With the most anxious
search they explored every recess in which they
thought it possible for him to be, and strained their
little voices till they were hoarse with calling him,
but all in vain. The tool-house was locked, but had
he been there he would have answered: at length,
quite in despair of finding him, with heavy hearts
they returned to the nest; a general lamentation
ensued, and this lately happy abode was now
the region of sorrow. The father endeavoured to
comfort his mate and surviving nestlings, and so far
succeeded that they resolved to bear the loss with
patience. ,

After a mournful night the mother left the nest
carly in the morning, unwilling to relinguish the
I22 The Story of the Robins.

hope which still remained of finding Robin again ;
but having spent an hour in this manner, she
returned to her mate, who was comforting hig little
ones,

“Come,” said he, “let us take a flight if we sit
lamenting here for ever, it will be to no purpose:
the evils which befall us must be borne, and the
more quietly we submit to them, the lighter they will
be. If poor Robin is dead, he will suffer no more
and if he is not, so much as we fly about, it isa chance
but what we get tidings of him. Suppose these
little ones attempt to fly with us to our benefactors ?
If we set out early, and let them rest frequently by
the way, I think they may accomplish it.” This was
very pleasing to the little ones, and accordingly it
was determined that they should immediately set
out; they accomplished the journey by easy stages,
and arrived in the court yard just after the daily
pensioners were gone.

“ Now,” said the father, “stop a little, and let me
advise you, Dicky, Flapsy, and Pecksy, to behave
yourselves properly; hop only where you seexyout
mother and me hop, and do not meddle with any-
thing but what is scattered on purpose.”

“Stay, father,’ said Dicky, “my feathers are
sadly rumpled.”
Robin Lost. 123



* And so are mine,” said Flapsy.

“Well, smooth them then,” said he; “but don’t
stand finicking for an hour.”

Pecksy was ready in an instant, but the others
were very tedious, so their father and mother would
wait for them no longer, and flew in at the window;
the others directly followed them, and, to the inex-
pressible satisfaction of Frederick, alighted on the
tea-table, where they met with a very unexpected
pleasure; for who should they find there as a guest
but the poor lost Robin!

The meeting was, you may be sure, a happy one
for all parties, and the transports it occasioned may
be easier conceived than described. The father
poured forth a loud song of gratitude, the mother
chirped, she bowed her head, clapped her wings,
basked on the tea-table, joined her beak to Robin’s,
then touched the hand of Frederick. The young
ones twittered a thousand questions to Robin, but
as he was unwilling to interrupt his father’s song,
he desired them to suspend their curiosity to another
opportunity.












CHAPTER XT.

THE FEATHERED NEIGHBOURS.

You may remember, my young readers, that Frederick
obtained from his mamma a promise that when the
business of daily instruction was finished, he and
his sister should go into the orchard in search of
the robins. As soon, therefore, as the air was suffi-
ciently cool she took them with her, and arrived just
after the parent birds had taken their young ones
back to the nest. Robin was then left by himself,
and kept hopping about, and fearing no danger, got
into the middle of the walk. Frederick descried
him at a distance, and eagerly called out, “There’s
one of them, I declare!” and before his mamma
observed him he ran to the place, and clapped his
little hand over it, exulting that he had caught it.
The pressure of his hand hurt Robin’s wing, who
Lame Robin. 125

sent forth piteous cries, on which Frederick let him
go, saying, “I won’t hurt you, you little thing.”

Harriet, who saw him catch the bird, ran as fast
as possible to prevent his detaining it, and perceived,
as Robin hopped away, that he was lame, on which
she concluded that her brother had hurt him; but
on Frederick’s assuring her that his wing hung down
when he first saw him, Mrs. Benson said,—

“Tt is most likely he has been lamed by some
accident, which has prevented his going with the
others to the nest; and if that is the case, it will
be humane and charitable to take care of him.”

Frederick was delighted to hear her say so, and
asked whether he might carry him home.

“Yes,” said his mamma, “ provided you can take
him safely.”

“Shall I carry him, madam ?” said Joe; “he can
lie nicely in my hat.”

This was an excellent scheme, and all parties ap-
proved of it; so Frederick took some of the soft grass
that was mowed down to put at the bottom, and poor
Robin was safely deposited in this vebicle, which
served him for a litter; and perceiving into what
hands he -had fallen, he inwardly rejoiced, knowing
that he had an excellent chance of being provided
for, as well as of seeing his dear relations again. I
ee

need not say that great care was taken of him, and
you. will easily suppose he had a more comfortakls
night than that he had passed in the shed.

When Frederick and Harriet arose the next morn.

ing, one of their first cares was to feed the birds, and
they had the pleasure to see their nestlings in a very
thriving condition; both the linnet and the blackbird
now hopped out of their nests to be fed, to the great
amusement of Frederick; but this pleasure was soon
damped by an unlucky accident, for the blackbird
being placed in a window which was open, hopped
too near the edge, and fell to the ground, where he
was snapped up by a dog, and torn to pieces in
an instant. Frederick began to lament as before
but on his sister’s reminding him that the creature
was past the sense of pain, he restrained himself, and
turned his attention to the linnet, which he put into
a cage, that he might not meet the same fate. He
then went to feed the flock, and to inquire after
Robin, whom Mrs. Benson had taken into her own
room, lest Frederick should handle and hurt him.
To his great joy he found him much better, for he
could begin to use his injured wing; Frederick was
therefore trusted to carry him into the breakfast
parlour, where he placed him as has been already
described.
‘Dicky and Flapsy’s Rude Behaviour, 129

For some time the young redbreasts behaved very
well; but at length Dicky, familiarized by the kind
treatment he met with, forgot his father’s injunctions,
and began to hop about in a very rude manner; he
even jumped into the plate of bread and butter, and,
wishing to taste the tea, hopped on the edge of a
cup, but dipping his foot in the hot liquor, was glad
to make a hasty retreat, to the great amusement of
Frederick. Flapsy took the liberty of pecking at
the sugar, but found it too hard for her tender beak.
For these liberties their mother reproved them,
saying she would never bring them again, if they
were guilty of such rudeness as to take what was
not offered them.

As their longer stay would have broken in on a
plan which Mrs. Benson had concerted, she rang her
bell, and the footman came to remove the breakfast-
things ; on which the old birds, having taken leave
of Robin, and promised to come again the next day,
flew out at the window, followed by Dicky, Flapsy,
and Pecksy. Robin was safely deposited in a cage,
and passed a happy day, being often allowed to hop
out in order to be fed. ;

The parent birds alighted in the court, and con-
ducted their little ones to the water which was set
out for them, after which they all returned to the
528 The Story of the Robins.



nest ; here the young ones rested till the afternoon,
and then their parents took them out in order to
show them the orchard.

“You have not yet seen,” said the father, “the
whole extent of this place, and I wish to introduce
you to our neighbours.”

He then led the way to a pear-tree, in which
a linnet had built her nest. The old linnets
seemed much pleased to see their friends the red-
breasts, who with great pride introduced their little
family to them.

“My own nestlings are just ready to fly,” said the
hen linnet, “and I hope will make acquaintance
with them; for birds so well instructed, as I make
no doubt your offspring are, must be very desirable
companions.”

The little redbreasts were delighted with the hopes
of having some agreeable friends; and the old ones
replied that they had themselves received so much
pleasure from social friendship that they wished
their young ones to cultivate it.

They then flew on to a cherry tree, in which were
a pair of chaffinches in great agitation, endeavouring
to part one of their own brood and a young sparrow
which were engaged in a furious battle ; but in vain
neither of the combatants would desist till the
Lhe World in the Orchard. 129



chaftinch dropped dead to the ground. His parents
were greatly shocked at this accident ; on which the
cock redbreast attempted to comfort them with his
strains; but finding them deaf to his music, he
begged to know the cause of the quarrel.

“Oh,” answered the hen chaffinch, “ my nestling
is lost through his own folly. I cautioned him re-
peatedly not to make acquaintance with sparrows,
knowing they would lead him into mischief; but
no remonstrances would prevail. As soon as he
began to peck about, he formed a friendship with
one of that voracious breed, who undertook to teach
him to fly and provide for himself; so he left his
parents, and continually followed the sparrow, who
taught him to steal corn and other things, and to
quarrel with every bird he met: I expected to see
him killed continually. At length his companion
grew tired of him, and picked a quarrel, which .
ended as you have seen. However, this is better
than if he had been caught by men and hung up,
as I have seen many a bird, for a spectacle, to
deter others from stealing. Let me advise you, my
young friends,” said she, addressing herself to the
young redbreasts, “to follow your parents’ directions
in every respect, and avoid bad company.”

She then, accompanied by her mate, flew back to
130 The Story of the Robins.



her nest, in order to acquaint the rest of the family
with this dreadful catastrophe, and the redbreasts
took another flight.

They alighted on the ground, and began pecking
about, when all of a sudden they heard a strange
noise, which rather alarmed the young ones. Their
father desired them to have no fears, but to follow
him. He led them to the top of a high tree, in
which was a nest of magpies, who had the day
before made an excursion round the orchard, and
were conversing on what they had seen, but in such
a confused manner that there was no understanding
them; one chattered of one thing, and one of ano-
ther: in short, all were eager to speak, and none
inclined to hear.

“What a set of foolish, ill-bred little creatures are
these!” said the cock redbreast. “If they would
talk one at a time, what each says might afford
entertainment to the rest; but by chattering all
together in this manner they are quite disagreeable.
Take warning from them, my nestlings, and avoid
the fault which renders them so ridiculous.”

So saying, he flew on, and they soon saw a cuckoo
surrounded by a number of birds, who had been
pecking at her till she had scarce a feather left upon
her breast, while she kept repeating her own dull note,
The Cuckoo and the Owls. 131





“ Cuckoo! cuckoo!” incessantly. “Get back again
to your own country,” said a thrush ; “ what business
have you in ours, sucking the eggs and taking the
nests of any bird you meet with? Surely it might
be sufficient that you have the privilege of building

‘for yourself, as we do who are natives ; but you have
no right to seize upon our labours and devour our
offspring.”

“The cuckoo deserves her fate,” said the hen red-
breast: “though I am far from bearing enmity to
foreign birds in general, I detest such characters as
her. I wonder mankind do not drive cuckoos away;
but I suppose it is on account of their being the
harbingers of summer. How different is the cha-
racter of the swallow! he comes here to enjoy the
mildness of the climate, and confers a benefit on the
land by destroying many noxious insects. I rejoice
to see that race sporting in the air, and have had
high pleasure in conversing with them; for, as they
are great travellers, they have much to relate. But
come, let us go on.”

They soon came to a hollow tree. “Peep into this
hole,” said the cock bird to his young ones. They
did so, and beheld a nest of young owls. “ What a
set of ugly creatures!” said Dicky; “surely you do
not intend to show your frightful faces in the world !
132 The Story of the Robcus.



Did ever any one see such dull eyes, and such a
frightful muffle of feathers ?”

“Whoever you are that reproach us with the want
of beauty, you do not show your own good sense,”
replied one of the little owls; “ perhaps we may have
qualities which render us as amiable as yourselves.
You do not appear to know that we are night, and
not day birds ; the quantity of feathers in which we
are muffled up is very comfortable to us when we are
out in the cold; and I can-show you a pair of eyes
which, if you are little birds, will frighten you out of
your wits.” He then drew back the film which was
given him that the strong light of day might not
injure his sight, and stared full at Dicky, who was
struck with astonishment.

At that instant the parent owl returned, and
seeing a parcel of strangers looking into her nest,
she set up a screeching, which made the whole party
take wing. As soon as they stopped to rest, the
cock redbreast, who was really frightened, as well as
his mate and family, recollected himself, and said,
“Well, Dicky, how did you like the owl’s eyes? I
fancy they proved brighter than you expected; but
had they even been as ugly as you supposed, it was
very rude and silly in you to notice it You ought
never to censure any bird for natural deformities,
The Cuckoo and tne Owls. 133

since no one contracts them by choice; and what
appears disagreeable to you may be pleasing in the
eyes of another. Besides, you should be particularly
careful not to insult strangers, because you cannot
know their deserts, nor what power they may have of
revenging themselves. You may think yourself
happy if you never meet one of these owls by night,
for I assure you they often feed wpon little birds like
us, and you have no reason to think they will spare
you after the affront you have given them. But
come, let us fly on.” However, before we give any
further account of their adventures, let us return to
their benefactors.




CILAPTER XIE

THE VISIT TO THE FARM,

Just as Mrs. Benson and her children were preparing
to leave the room, after having witnessed the happy
meeting of the redbreast family at their tea-table,
the servant entered and informed them that a poor
woman was at the gate, who had been ordered to
attend in the morning. Mrs, Benson desired she
might come up. “ Well, my good woman,” said the
benevolent lady, “how does your husband do?”
“Thanks to your goodness, madam, and the blessing
of God, quite cheery,” said the woman.

“T am happy,” said the lady, “to find you in
better spirits than you were the other night, and do
not doubt you will do very well. I will order some
meat and bread to be sent you every day this week,
and will also assist you in clothing the children,”
flarriet’'s Benevolence. 135°



Harriet’s eyes glistened with benevolence at seeing
the woman, whose distress had so greatly affected
her, thus comforted; and slipping her purse, which
contained seven shillings, into her mamma’s hand,
she begged her to take it for the woman. “You
shall have the pleasure of relieving her yourself, my
dear,” said Mrs, Benson; “give this half-crown to
her.” Harriet, with a delight which none but the
compassionate can know, extended the hand of
charity. The woman received the benefaction with
grateful acknowledgments, and praying that the
Almighty might shower down his choicest blessings
on this worthy family, respectfully took leave and
returned to her husband, who, by means of the
nourishment Mrs. Benson supplied her with, gathere |
strength hourly.

As soon as she was gone, Mrs. Benson informed
her son and daughter that she intended to take them
with her to Farmer Wilson’s, where she made no
doubt they would pass a happy day; and desired
them to go and get ready for the journey while she
dressed herself. The young folks obeyed without
hesitation ; and having given their maid very strict
injunctions to feed Robin and the linnet, they
attended their mamma to the carriage. Leaving
this happy party to enjoy their pleasant a a us
136 The Story of the Robins.

go back to the robins, whom we left on the wing in
search of further adventures.

They soon alighted on a tree in which was a
Mocking-bird, who, instead of singing any note of
his own, kept successively imitating those of every
bird that inhabited the orchard, and this with a view
of making them ridiculous. If any one had any
natural imperfection in his singing, he was sure to
mimic it, or if any one was particularly attentive to
the duties of his station, he ridiculed him as grave
and formal. The young redbreasts were excessively
amused with this droll creature; but their father
desired them to consider whether they should like
to hear him mimic them. Every one agreed that
they should be very angry to be ridiculed in that
manner. “Then,” replied the father, “neither en-
courage nor imitate him.” The Mocking-bird,
hearing him, took up his notes—“ Neither encourage
nor imitate him,” said he. The cock redbreast on
this flew at him with fury, plucked some feathers
from his breast, and sent him screaming from the
place. “I have made you sing a natural song at
last,” said he, “and hope you will take care how
you practise mimicry again.” His mate was sorry

* The Mocking-bird is properly a native of America, but is intro-
duced here for the sake of the moral,
Lhe Chaffinch. 137



to see him disturb his temper and ruffle his feathers
for such an insignificant creature ; but he told her it
was particularly necessary as an example to his
nestlings, as mimicry was a fault to which young
birds were too apt to incline, and he wished to show
them the danger they exposed themselves to in the
practice of it.

The whole redbreast family rested themselves for
some time, and whilst they sat still they observed a
chaffinch flying from tree to tree, chattering to every
bird he had any knowledge of; and his discourse
seemed to affect his hearers greatly, for they per-
ceived some birds flying off in great haste, and others
meeting them; many battles and disputes ensued.
The ittle redbreasts wondered at these circum-
stances, at length Pecksy inquired the meaning of
the bustle. ‘“ This chaffinch,” replied the father, “is
a tell-tale ; it is inconceivable the mischief he makes.
Not that he has so much malice in his nature, but
he loves to hear himself chatter ; and therefore every
anecdote he can collect he tells to all he meets, by
which means he often raises quarrels and animosi-
ties; neither does he stop here, for he frequently
invents the tales he relates.”

As the redbreast was speaking, the chaffinch
alighted on the same tree. “Oh, my old friend,”
138 The Story of the Robins.
said he, “have you got abroad again? I heard the
linnet in the pear tree say you were caught stealing
corn, and hung up as a spectacle, but I thought this
could not be true; besides, the blackbird in the
cherry tree told me that the reason we did not see
you as usual was that you were rearing a family, to
whom, he said, you were so severe that the poor
little creatures had no comfort of their lives.”

“ Whatever you may have heard, or whatever you
may say, is a matter of indifference to me,” replied
the redbreast; but, as a neighbour, I cannot help
advising you to restrain your tongue~a little, and
consider, before you communicate your intelligence,
whether what you are going to say has a tendency to
disturb the peace of society.”

Whilst he was thus advising him, a flock of birds
assembled about the tree; it consisted of those to
whom the chaffinch had been chattering, who, having
come to an explanation with each other, had detected
his falsities, and determined to expel him from the
orchard, which they did with every mark of contempt
and ignominy. All the redbreasts joined in the pur-
‘suit, for even the little ones saw his character in a
detestable light, and formed a determination to avoid
his fault. When the tell-tale was gone, the party
which pursued him alighted altogether in the same
Viset to the Farm, 139

walk, and amongst them the redbreasts discovered
many of their old friends, with whom they now
renewed their acquaintance, knowing they should
soon be released from family cares; and the young
ones passed a happy day in this cheerful assembly.
But at length the hour of repose approached, when
each individual fled to his resting-place; and the
redbreasts, after so fatiguing a day, soon fell asleep.
While the redbreasts were exploring the orchard,
Mrs. Benson and her family, as we before showed,
set off on their visit to the farm, where they met
with a most welcome reception. Farmer Wilson was
a very worthy, benevolent man. He had, by his
industry, acquired sufficient to purchase the farm he
lived on, and had a fair prospect of providing for a
numerous family, whom he brought up with the
greatest care, as farmers’ sons and daughters used
formerly to be, and taught them all to be merciful to
the cattle which were employed in his business. His
wife, a most amiable woman, had received a good
education from her father, who was formerly school-
master of the parish. This good man had strongly
implanted in his daughter’s mind the Christian doc-
trine of universal charity, which she exercised, not.
only towards the human species, but also to poultry
and every living creature which it was her province
140 The Story of the Robins.





to manage. Mrs. Benson knew that her children
would here have an opportunity of seeing many
different animals treated with propriety; and ib was
on this account that she took them with her, though
she herself visited these good people from a motive
of sincere respect.

As soon as they were seated, Mrs. Wilson regaled
her young guests with a piece of nice cake, made by
her daughter Betsy, a little girl of twelve years old,
who sat by, enjoying with secret delight the honour
which the little lady and gentleman did to her per-
formance. It happened fortunately to be a cool day,
and Mrs. Benson expressed a desire to walk about
and see the farm.

In the first place, Mrs. Wilson showed her the
house, which was perfectly neat and in complete
order. She then took her guests into her dairy,
which was well stored with milk and cream, butter
and cheese. From thence they went to visit the
poultry-yard, where the little Bensons were exces-
sively delighted, for there were a number of cocks
and hens, and many broods of young chickens, besides
turkeys and guinea-fowls.

All the fowls expressed the greatest joy at the
sight of Mrs. Wilson and her daughter Betsy: the
cocks celebrated their arrival by loud and cheerful
The Poultry. 141

_——.



crowings; the hens gave notice of thelr approach by
cackling, and assembled their infant train to partake
of their bounty; the turkeys and guinea-fowls ran
to meet them; a number of pigeons also alighted
from a pigeon-house. Betsy scattered among them
the grain which she carried in her lap for that
purpose, and seemed to have great pleasure in
distributing it.

When their young visitors were satisfied with
seeing the poultry fed, Mrs. Wilson showed them
the henhouse ana other conveniences provided for
them, to make their lives comfortable; she then
opened a little door which led to a meadow, where
the fowls were often allowed to ramble and refresh
themselves. On seeing her approach this place, the
whole party collected, and ran into the meadow, like
a troop of schoolboys into their playground.

“You, Mrs. Wilson, and your daughter, must have
great amusement with these pretty creatures,” said
Mrs. Benson. “ We have indeed, madam,” said she,
and they furnish us with eggs and chickens, not only
for our own use, but for the market also.”

“And can you prevail on yourself to kill these
sweet creatures?” said Harriet. “Indeed, miss,
cannot,” said Mrs, Wilson,.“and never did kill a
chicken in my life; but itis an easy matter to find
142 Lhe Story of the Robins.



people capable uf doing it, and there is an absolute
necessity for some of them to die, for they breed so
fast that in a short time we should have more than
we could possibly feed. But I make it a rule to
render their lives as happy as possible ; I never shut
them up to fatten any longer than I can help, use ne
cruel methods of cramming them, nor do I confine
them in a situation where they can see other fowls
at liberty; neither do I take the chickens from the
hen till she herself deserts them, nor set hens upon
ducks’ eggs.”

“T often regret,” said Mrs. Benson, “ that so many
lives should be sacrificed to preserve ours; but we
must eat animals, or they would at length eat us—
at least, all that would otherwise support us.”

While this conversation passed, Frederick had
followed the fowls into the meadow, where the
turkey-cock, taking him for an enemy, had attacked
him, and frightened him so much that he at first
cried out for help, but soon recollected that this was
cowardly; so he pulled off his hat, and drove the
ereature away before Betsy Wilson arrived, whe was
running to his assistance.


CHAPTER XIII

THE PIGS AND BEES.

THE farmer’s wife next proposed (but with many
apologies for offering to take them to such a place)
to show them her pigsty. The name of a pigsty
generally conveys an idea of nastiness; but whoever
had seen those of Farmer Wilson would have had a
very different one. They were neatly paved, and
washed down every day; the troughs in which the
pigs fed were scoured, and the water they drank was
always sweet and wholesome. The pigs themselves
had an appearance of neatness which no one could
have expected in such kind of animals; and though
they had not the ingenuity of the Learned Pig, there
was really something intelligent in their gruntings,
and a very droll expression in the eyes of some of
them. They knew their benefactors, and found
144 The Story of the Robins.



means of testifying their joy at seeing them, which
was increased when a boy, whom Mrs. Wilson had
ordered to bring some bean-shells, emptied his basket
before them, Now a scramble took place, and each
pig began pushing the other aside and stuffing as
fast as he could, lest they should have more than
himself.

Harriet said she could not bear tosee such greediness
“Tt is indeed very disagreeable, even in such crea-
tures as these,” replied Mrs. Benson, “ but how much
more so in the human species! and yet how frequent
is this fault, among children in particular! Pray
look at these pigs, Frederick, and tell me if you ever
remember to have met with a little boy who ate
strawberries as these pigs do bean-shells?” Frede
rick’s cheeks, at this question, were covered with
conscious blushes; on which his mamma kindly
kissed him, and said she hoped he had seen enough
of greediness to-day to serve him for a lesson as long
as he lived.

In a separate sty was a sow with a litter of young
pigs. This was a very pleasing sight indeed to
Frederick, who longed to have one of them to play
with; but Mrs, Wilson told him it would make the
sow very angry, and her gruntings would terrify him
more than the turkey-cock had done; on which he
The Bees. 145

withdrew his request, but said he should like to keep
such a little creature.

“If it would always continue little, Frederick,”
said Mrs. Benson, “it would do very well; but it
will perhaps grow as large as its mother, and what
should we do then ?”

“T fear, ladies,” said Mrs. Wilson, “you will be
tired with staying here; will it be agreeable to you
to take a walk in the garden?” “With all my
heart,” said Mrs. Benson.

Mrs. Wilson then conducted her guests into a
garden, which abounded with all kinds of vegetables
for the table, quantities of fruit, and a variety of
flowers. Frederick longed to taste some of the
delicacies which presented themselves to his eye,
but he had been taught never to yather fruit or
flowers without leave, nor ask for any. However,
Mrs. Wilson, with his mamma’s permission, treated
him and his sister with some fine cherries, which
Betsy gathered and presented in cabbage-leaves, and
then took them to a shady arbour, where they sat
and enjoyed their feast; after which they went to
see the bees, which were at work in glass hives.
This was a great entertainment, not only to the
children, but to Mrs. Benson also, who was excess
sively pleased with the ingenuity and industry with
146 The Story of the Robins.



which these insects collect their honey and wax,
form their cells, and deposit their store. She had,
by books, acquired a knowledge of the natural history
of bees, which enabled her to examine their work
with much greater satisfaction than she would have
received from the sight of them had she been only
taught to consider them as little stinging creatures
which it was dangerous to approach.

“This is quite a treat to me indeed,” said she to
Mrs. Wilson, “for I never before had an opportunity
of seeing bees work in gless hives.”

“T find my account,” said Mrs. Wilson, “in keep-
ing bees thus, even upon a principle of economy;
for as I do not destroy them, I have great numbers
to work for me, and more honey every year than the
last, notwithstanding I feed my bees in the winter.
I have made acquaintance with the queen of every
hive, who will come to me whenever I call her, and
you shall see one of them if you please.”

On this she called in a manner which the inhabit-
ants of the hive they were looking at were accus-
tomed to, and a large bee soon settled on her hand;
in an instant after she was covered from head to foot
with bees. ;

Harriet was fearful lest they should sting, and
Frederick was running away; but Mrs, Wilson
Lhe Bees. 147

assured them the little creatures would not do any
mischief if no one attempted to catch them. “Bees
are, in their natural dispositions, very harmless crea-
tures, I assure you, Master Benson,” said she;
“though I own they will certainly sting little boys
who endeavour to catch them in order to suck their
bags of honey or take out their sting; but you see
that though I have hundreds about me, and even on
my face and arms, not one offers to do me an injury ;
and I believe wasps seldom sting but in their own
defence.” She then threw up her hand, on which
the queen bee flew away in great state, surrounded
by her guards, and followed by the rest of her
subjects, each ready to lose his own life in defence
of hers.

“There is something very wonderful,” said Mrs.
Benson, “in the strong attachment these little crea-
tures have to their sovereign, and very instructive
too. What say you, Frederick, would you fight for
“your Queen ?”

“Yes, mamma, if papa would,” replied Frederick.

“That I assure you, my dear, he certainly would
do if there were occasion, as loyally as the best bee
in the world: and I beg you will remember what I
now tell you as long as you live, that it is your duty
to love your Queen, for she is to be considered as the
148 The Story of the Robins.



mother of her people. But before we take our leava
of the bees, let me observe to you, my dears, that
several instructive lessons may be taken from their
example. If such little insects as these perform
their daily tasks with so much alacrity, surely it
must be a shame for children to be idle, and to fret
because they are put to learn things which will be
of the utmost consequence to them in the end, and
which would indeed conduce to their present happi
ness, would they but apply to them with a willing
mind, Remember the pretty hymn you have learnt,—

‘How doth the little busy bee
Improve each shining hour!’ &e.

But come, Mrs, Wilson,” continued the lady, “we
must, if you please, take leave of the bees, or we
shall have no time to enjoy the other pleasures you
have in reserve for us.”

As they walked along, Frederick so far forget
himself as to try to catch a moth, but his mamma
obliged him to let it go immediately. “Don’t you
think, Mrs. Wilson,” said she, “it is wrong to let
children catch butterflies and moths?” “Indeed I
do, madam,” replied the good woman. “ Poor little
creatures! what injury can they do us by flying
about? In that state, at least, they are harmless to
The Insects. I4y







ones

us. Caterpillars and snails, it is true, we are obliged
frequently to destroy, on account of their devouring
fruit and vegetables; but unless they abound so as
to be likely to do a real injury, I never suffer them
to be meddled with. I often think on my good
father’s maxims, which were—‘ Never take away the
life of any creature, unless it is necessary for the
benefit of mankind. While there is food and room
enough in the world for them and us, let them live
and enjoy the blessings they were formed for,’ he
would say.”

“When I was a little girl,” said Mrs. Benson, “ T
had a great propensity to catch flies and other
insects; but my father had an excellent microscope,
in which he showed me a number of different
objects; by this means I learnt that even the
minutest creatures might be as susceptible of pain as
myself. And so far from having a pleasure in killing
even the disagreeable insects which are troublesome
in houses, I assure you I cannot do it or see it done
without pain; and yet they certainly may be con-
sidered as enemies, and as such we have a right to
destroy them.”

“To be sure, madam,” said Mrs. Wilson, “for
without cleanliness we could not enjoy health. It
goes against me to demolish a fine spider’s web, and
150 The Story of the Rodins.



yet they make a house look very dirty; but I seldom
have any in mine, for I took care, when I first came
to live in it, to destroy the nests, and the old spiders
finding there was no security for their young ones
here, have forsaken the house; and J am inclined to
think the same vigilance in respect to other disagree-
able insects would have the same effect.”

“Doubtless,” said Mrs. Benson ; “ but pray tell me,
do you destroy the webs of garden spiders also?”
“ Not unless there are so many as to be disagreeable,”
replied Mrs. Wilson, “I should not myself like to
have the fruits of my industry demolished, nor my
little ones taken out of my arms, or from their warm
beds, and crushed to death.”

“JT am of opinion,” said Mrs. Benson, “that it
would be a good way to accustom one’s self, before
one kills anything, to change situations with it in
imagination, and to suppose how we should feel were
we bees, or ants, or birds, or kittens, and so on.”

“Indeed, madam,” said Mrs. Wilson, “I have often
wished that poor dumb creatures had somebody to
speak for them; many an innocent life would then
be saved, which is now destroyed to no end.”

“Well,” said Harriet, “I am sure I shall never kili
anything without first magnifying it in my mind, .
and thinking what it would say for itself if able to
The Spiders. 151

speak.” “Then, my dear, I will engage for you,”
replied her mamma, “that you will put but very few
creatures to death. But in order to have a proper
notion of their form, you must study natural history,
from whence you will learn how wonderful their con-
struction is, how carefully and tenderly the inferior
creatures provide for their young, how ingenious
their various employments are, how far they are from
yarbouring malice against the human species, and
how excellently they are informed and instructed by
their great Creator for the enjoyment of happiness
in their different classes of existence, which happiness
we have certainly no right wantonly to disturb.

“ Besides, it is really a meanness to destroy any
creature merely because it is little, and, in children,
particularly absurd to do so; for, upon this principle,
they must themselves expect to be constantly ill-
treated, though no animal stands more in need of
tenderness than they do for many years from the
time of their coming into the world: and even men
and women might expect to be annihilated by the
power of the great Creator, if everything that is
little were to be destroyed. Neither doI know how
we can precisely call anything great or little, since it
is only so by comparing it with others. An ant ora

fly may appear, to one of its own species, whose eyes
il
152 The Story of the Robins.



cet

are formed to see those parts which we cannot dis-
cover without glasses, as considerable as men and
women do to each other; and to creatures of the
dimensions of a mite, one of the size of an ant
doubtless looks formidable and gigantic. I there-
fore think it but justice to view insects with micro-
scopic eyes before we do anything to them that is
likely to give them pain, or to destroy their works
wanecessarily.”

During this conversation Frederick kept running
about, making choice of flowers, which Betsy Wilson
formed into nosegays for his mamma, his sister, and
himself.




CHAPTER XIV.

FREDERICK VIEWING THE DUCKS AND GEESE,

Tue next place Mrs, Wilson took her guests to was
a barnyard, in which was a large horse-pond. Here
her young visitors were delighted with the appear-
ance of a number of geese and ducks; some were
swimming in the water, some diving, others routing
in the mud to see what fish or worms they could
find.

“Tt appears very strange to me,” said Harriet,
“that any creatures can take delight in making
themselves so dirty.” “And yet,” replied Mrs.
Benson, “how many children do the same, without
having any excuse for it! The ducks and geese grub
about so in search of the necessaries of life; but I
have seen boys do it merely for diversion, and some-
times at the hazard of their lives.”
154 The Story of the Robins.



“Have you any fish here?” said Frederick. “1
believe none of any consequence,” replied Mrs.
Wilson; “the ducks and the geese would take care
that none should grow to any considerable size.
But there are plenty in a pond which you will see
in the next field, and I hope to have the pleasure of
seeing you, ab dinner, eat of some perch which were
caught there. Sometimes we catch fine carp and
tench, but only with nets; for neither my good man
nor I can bear the cruel diversion of angling, nor
do we allow our children to follow it, from a notion
that it hardens the heart and leads to idleness.

“Pray, mamma,” said Harriet, “is it right to catch
fish? J should think, as they live in water, and we
upon land, we have no business with them.” “You
would wish every one, then, my dear, to keep to their
own element? Your sentiment is a good one in

many respects, but it must not be extended go far as
to forbid the catching of fish, Man has dominion
over the fish, as well as over beasts and fowls, and
many of them are proper food for mankind, and the
astonishing increase of them shows that they are
designed to be so; for were all that are spawned to
grow to full size, there would soon be more than our
ponds, or even than the sea itself, could hold, and
they would be starved: therefore there are the same
Thoughtless Cruelty. 155

reasons for our feeding upon them as upon poultry,
but we should be very careful to despatch them as
quickly as possible.

“Some people are cruel enough to roast lobsters
alive, the cries of which, I have been told, are
dreadful to hear ; and others will flay eels alive, then
put them without their skins into a pail of cold
water, and afterwards cut them in pieces, and throw
them into a frying-pan of boiling fat, where some-
times every separate piece will writhe about in
agony: thus each poor fish suffers as many deaths
as it is divided into pieces. Now this, Harriet,
cannot be right, however authorized by custom;
therefore I hope you will never suffer such things to
be done in your kitchen when you keep house, but
always give orders that your lobsters be put into
boiling water, which kills them soon, and that your
eels be killed before they are skinned, which may
soon be done by laying hold of their heads and tails
and giving them a sudden pull, which separates the
vertebrees of the back. This is dreadful enough,
though little in comparison of what they suffer by
the other methods of killing them.”

“Oh, mamma!” said Harriet, “you make me even
shudder! I do not believe I shall ever desire to eat
eels ; I shall be ready to make speeches for every
156 The Story of the Robins,

— +

piece as it lies ina dish before me. But pray tell
me, is it cruel to kill frogs and toads?” “Ask Mrs,
Wilson, my dear; she has more to do with such
reptiles than I have,” said Mrs. Benson. “ Well,”
replied Mrs. Wilson, “I am very singular in
regard to such kind of creatures, and though I by
no means like to have them in my house, I do not
make.an outcry, and condemn every one to a violent
death which is accidentally found in my cellars or
other places: on the contrary, I generally see them
thrown into a ditch at some distance, to take their
chance. There are many birds and water-fowl that
feed on young frogs and toads, which will in general
keep them from multiplying so as to be nuisances to
us, and it is time enough for us to take arms against
them if there happen to be a very extraordinary
increase of them. My-good man is as particular in
respect to moles: if he finds them in his garden, or
any other part of his grounds where they can do
mischief, he has them killed, but never suffers them
to be molested when they are harmless. Neither
does he hunt after snakes, or permit any one
belonging to him to do so; for he says that if
they are not disturbed they will not come from their
haunts to annoy us; and to kill for the sake of killing
is cruel,”
Burd’s-nesting. 157

a ha a a er



“Pray, Mrs. Wilson,” said Frederick, “do your
sons ever go bird’s-nesting?” “No,” said she; “I
hope I have not a child amongst my family capable
of such barbarity. In the course of the summer
they generally have young birds to nurse, which fall
out of their nests or lose their parents, but are
seldom lucky enough to raise them, and we have only
one in a cage which they reared last summer. Yet
we have plenty of singing, for the sweet creatures,
finding they may enjoy themselves unmolested in
the trees, treat us with their harmony from morning
to night, of which you had a specimen in the garden.
Sparrows, indeed, my husband is under the neces-
sity of destroying, for they are such devourers, they
would leave him but little corn to carry to market if
he did not shoot them: but he never kills the crows,
because they are very serviceable in picking up
grubs and other things injurious to farmers. We
only set a little boy to watch our new-sown grain,
and he keeps making a noise, which effectually
frightens them.”

“Oh,” said Frederick, “I nurse young birds too.
I have got a linnet and a robin redbreast, and I feed
a hundred beside.” Mrs. Wilson smiled, and
addressing herself to Mrs. Benson, said, “ Now,
madam, we will, if you please, return to the house,
158 The Story of the Robins.

for I fancy by this time dinner is nearly ready, and
my husband and sons are about coming home.”

’ Mrs. Benson was a little tired with her ramble,
and was really impatient to see Farmer Wilson and
the rest of his amiable family. When she drew near
the house, she was met by the worthy man, who
gave her a most cordial welcome, and said he was
proud to see so much good company. Nancy, the
eldest daughter, to whom the mother had entrusted
the care of inspecting the additional cookery which
she had ordered, and who, for that reason, was not
to be seen in the morning, now made her appear-
ance, dressed with the most perfect neatness; health
bloomed in her cheeks, and cheerfulness and good
humour sparkled in her eyes. With this engaging
countenance she easily prevailed on Frederick to let
her place him by her at the table, round which the
two other visitors, the master and mistress of the
house, and the rest of their offspring, consisting of
Thomas, a fine youth of eighteen, four young boys,
and little Betsy, were soon seated.

The table was covered with plain food, but, by the
good management of Nancy, wuo had made an
excellent pudding, an apple pie, and some delicious
custards, it made a very good figure; and Mrs.
Benson afterwards declared that she had never
A Rural Feast. 159

—on

enjoyed an entertainment so much: and the pleasure
was considerably brightened by the happy counte-
nances of the whole family.

The farmer, who was a jocose man, said a number
of droll things, which diverted his little visitors very
much; and soon after dinner he begged leave to
depart, as he was sheep-shearing, but said he thought
the young gentlefolks might be diverted with the
sight, so invited them to pay a visit in the field, and
left Joe and Neddy to conduct Frederick to it, The
young farmers were rather shy at first, being afraid
that their guests would laugh at their country talk;
but when they observed how politely they behaved
to their sisters, they entered into conversation, and
told Frederick a hundred particulars about animals,
with which he was before unacquainted; and he in
return related all he knew about his redbreasts and
other pensioners. ‘They then showed him a pretty
cat with kittens, and also their favourite, Daphne,
with two young puppies: the latter were kept in a
kennel, and the cat in a stable, where they were well
supplied with food,

As Frederick knew that his sister was remarkably
fond of cats, he stepped back to call her to look at
them, which, with her mamma’s permission, she was
greatly pleased to do, and longed to have the kittens
160 The Story of the Robins.

to nurse, When she returned, she inquired whether
the dogs and cats were ever permitted to come into
the house.

“Not whilst they have young ones,” said Mrs.
Wilson, “for they make a great deal of dirt, and are
very troublesome at that time. But when Puss has
brought up her family, which is designed for the
stable, she shall be admitted amongst us again, for
she is a very useful creature, and deserves to be well
treated. But I do not suffer my children to handle
her; I think it looks very ugly for any one to be all
over scratches. Daphne is admitted to a greater
share of familiarity; she is very faithful and ex-
tremely good-natured ; but we never feed her in the
house, for there is no doing so without greasing the
floors.” .

“Tam opinion,” said Mrs. Benson, “ that a differ-
ence should be made between our treatment of cats
and of dogs. There is something very savage in the
nature of the former; and though they certainly are
deserving of our kindness on account of their useful-
ness, yet they cannot make themselves so agreeable
as dogs; and there is really something very formid-
able in their talons and teeth, and when enraged a
cat is no better than a little tigress. Besides, were
there not danger to one’s self in nursing cats, there
Cats and Dogs. 161



is no doing it without injury to-one’s linen, for when
Puss is best pleased she generally tramples with her
talons unsheathed, by which practice many a dress
has been torn. And even the cleanliness of cats is
injurious, for they usually have recourse to the
corners of chairs in order to rub the dirt from their
talons. Many people have a great dread of this
animal, and on that account it should not be used to
come into rooms in which a variety of company is
received. As for dogs, they are in general so very
social, grateful, and pleasing, that they seem formed
to be the humble companions of mankind, and if
kept in proper order, they may be familiarized with
safety ; but then they should be taught to know
their distance. And as there are different species of
dogs, we should make a prudent selection, and not
introduce into the house great mastiffs or tall grey-
hounds ; neither must we indulge those we domesti-
cate to too great a degree, for in that case they will
become as troublesome as cats.”

Mrs. Benson now: expressed her desire to see the
sheep-shearing, on which Mrs. Wilson and her daugh-
ter conducted her and Harriet to the field, where
they arrived at the conclusion of the operation
And a very pleasing sight it was to behold the
happy creatures, who lately waddled under a heavy,
162 The Story of the Robins.



heating load, relieved from their burden, leaping
and frisking with delight, whilst the accumulated
wool seemed, as it lay, to promise comfortable
clothing for many a naked person among the human
species, who, destitute of such a supply, would be in
danger of perishing in the ensuing winter.

Harriet observed the innocent countenances of the
sheep and lambs, and said she thought it was a
thousand pities to kill them. “It is co, my dear,”
said her mamma; but we must not indulge our
feelings too far in respect to animals which are given
us for food ; all we have to do is to avoid barbarity.
Tt is happy for them that, having no apprehension
of being killed, they enjoy life in peace and security
to the very last, and even when the knife is lifted to
their throats, they are ignorant of its destination,
and afew struggles put an end to their pain for ever.
But come, Mrs. Wilson, will you favour us with a
sight of your cows?” “ With pleasure, madam,” said
she ; “ they are by this time driven up to be milked.”

Mrs, Wilson then conducted her visitors towards
the farmyard. “Perhaps, madam,” said she, as they
walked along, “the young lady and gentleman may
be afraid of horned cattle?” “I believe,” replied
Mrs. Benson, “I may venture to say that Harriet
has no unreasonable fears of any living creature; i%
fear of Animals. 163

has been my endeavour to guard the minds of my
children against so distressing a weakness: but
whether Frederick’s heart has acquired fortitude
enough to enable him to venture near so many cows
I cannot tell. “Oh yes, mamma,” cried Frederick.
“I would sooner get up and ride into the yard on
the horns of one of them than run away.” “Well,
we shall soon put your courage to the proof,” said
Mrs. Benson; “so come along, sir.”

“As for my children,” said Mrs. Wilson, “they
are remarkably courageous in respect to animals.
All the creatures belonging to us are very harmless
and gentle, which is the natural consequence of kind
treatment, and no person need be afraid of walking
in any part of our grounds; but it is difficult to
persuade some people that there is no danger, for
they are apt to imagine that every loose horse they
see will gallop over them, and that every creature
with horns will gore and toss them.”

“Very true,” replied Mrs. Benson; “and I have
known many as much afraid of a toad, a frog, or a
spider, as if certain death would be the consequence
of meeting them; when, if these persons would but
make use of their reason, they would soon be con-
vinced that such fears are ill-erounded. Frogs and
toads are very harmless creatures, and so far from
164 The Story of the Robins:

s ek ms

offering an injury to any human being they may
chance to meet, they hop away with all possible
expedition, from a dread of being themselves des-
troyed; and spiders drop suddenly down with a view
to their own preservation only; and therefore it is
highly ridiculous to be afraid of them.

“Horses and oxen are much more formidable
creatures; they certainly could do us a great deal of
mischief if they were conscious of their superior
strength; but God has wisely ordained that they
should not be so, and having given mankind dominion
over them, He has implanted in their nature an awe
and dread of the human species, which occasion them
to yield subjection to the lords of the creation, when
they exert their authority in a proper manner. It is
really a very wonderful thing, Mrs. Wilson, to see a
fine lively horse submitting to the bit and harness,
or a drove of oxen quietly marching under the
direction of one man. But it is observable that.
those creatures which are the most useful to us are
the easiest tamed, and yield, not only singly, but in
flocks, to mankind—nay, even to boys. This shows
ab once the goodness and power of the Creator,
From what I have said, my dears,” added Mrs,
Benson, “ you must perceive that it is a great weak-
ness for a human being to be afraid of animals.”
fear of Animals. 165

a Nd



By this time the party were advanced pretty near
to the farmyard, and Frederick espied one of the
cows peeping over the gate; on which, with a
countenance expressive of fear, he ran hastily to his
mamma, and asked her whether cows could toss
people over gates and hedges. “What a silly ques-
tion, Frederick!” said she: “pray look again, and
you will perceive that it is impossible for such large
heavy creatures to do so; and these enclosures are
made on purpose to confine them within proper
bounds. But did you not boast just now that ‘you
could ride on the horns of one of them’? That I
shall not require you to do, for it would very likely
make the creature angry, because cows are not accus-
tomed to carry any load upon their heads; neither
would I allow you to run after them with a stick, or
to make any attempt to frighten them; but if you
approach as a friend, I maze no doubt you will be
received as such. So summon your courage, and
attend us; the cows will not hurt you, I can assure
you.”

Neddy Wilson then began laughing, from the idea
that a boy should be afraid of a cow, which made
Frederick ashamed of himself and quitting his
mamma’s gown, by which he had held fast while she
was speaking he laid fast hold of Neddy’s hand, and
166 The Story of the Robins.

declared his resolution to go as near the cow as he
would. I will not take upon me to say that his
little heart was perfectly free from palpitation, but
that lay in his own bosom, where none could discover
its feelings but himself; so let us give him as much
credit for courage as we can, and acknowledge him
to have been a noble little fellow in thus trusting
himself amongst a number of horned cattle.

The whole party now entered the farmyard, where
they saw eight fine cows, fat, sleek, and beautifully
clean, who yielded several pails of rich milk, the
steam of which, added to the breath of the cows,
cast a delightful fragrance around. Mrs, Wilson
then entreated her company to return to the house,
where tea was provided, and a delicious syllabub.

The farmer now came back, and refreshed himself
with a cup of ale, which was very comfortable after
the fatigues of the day.

“T have had,” said Mrs. Benson, “great pleasure
in viewing your farm, Mr. Wilson, which appears to me
to afford all the desirable comforts and conveniences of
life, and I most sincerely wish a continuance of your
prosperity. If it is not an impertinent question,
pray tell me, did you inherit the farm from your
father, or was it purchased with the fruits of your
own industry?” “Neither my wife nor I have led
The Good Farmer. ° 167

an idle life, I assure you, madam,” replied the farmer

“but, next to the blessing of Heaven, I think mysel
in a great degree indebted to my cattle for my good
success. My father left me master of a little farm
with a few acres of land well cropped, three horses
two cows, ten sheep, a sow and pigs, an ass, and e
few poultry: these have gradually multiplied to
what you now see me possess, besides numbers that
I have sold; and I have had fine crops of hay and
corn, so that every year I laid by a little money, till
I was able to purchase this farm, which has proved
a very good one to me.”

“There is something so uncommon in hearing a
farmer attribute apart of his success in life to his
cattle, that I should be obliged to you, Mr. Wilson,”
said the lady, “if you would account to me for this
circumstance.”

“ Most readily, madam,” said he. “When I was a
very young man, I heard a fine sermon from the
pulpit on the subject of showing mercy to brutes,
which made a great impression on my mind; and I
have ever since acted towards all dumb creatures as
I would to mankind, upon the principle of doing as
I would be done by. I always consider every beast
that works for me as my servant, and entitled te
wages ; but as beasts cannot use money, I pay them

19

a
168 The Story of the Robins.





in things of more value to them, and make it a rule,
unless in case of great necessity, to let them enjoy
rest on the Sabbath day.

“Tam very cautious of not letting my beasts work
beyond their strength, and always give them their
food in due season; nor do I ever suffer them to be
beat or cruelly used. Besides giving them what I
call their daily wages, I indulge them with all the
comforts I can afford them. In summer, when the
business of the day is over, my horses enjoy them-
selves in a good pasture, and in winter they are
sheltered from the inclemencies of the weather in a
warm stable. If they get old, I contrive some easy
task for them; and when they can work no longer, I
let them live on the common without it, till age and
infirmities make their lives burthensome to them-
selves, when I have them put to as easy a death as
possible.

“Though my cows and sheep do not work for me,
I think them entitled to a recompence for the profit
I receive from their milk and wool, and endeavour
to repay them with the kindest usage ; and even my
ass finds mercy from me, for I could not bear to see —
so useful a creature ill-treated; and as for my dogs,
I set great store by them on account of their
fidelity.”


T he Poundage of Cattle. 169

“These are very excellent rules indeed, Mr.
Wilson, and I wish they were generally followed,”
said Mrs. Benson; “for I believe many poor beasts
suffer greatly from the ill-treatment inflicted on
them, the horses particularly.” Yes, madam,” said
the farmer, “I have heard so, and could tell you such
stories of cruelties exercised on brutes in the country
as would quite shock you; and I have seen such in-
stances myself of the ill effects of neglecting them,
as have confirmed me in the notions I learnt from
the good sermon I told you of.”

“Tam much obliged to you for your information,
Mr. Wilson,” said Mrs. Benson, “and hope my child-
ren will never forget it, for it certainly is a duty to
extend our clemency to beasts and other animals.
Nay, we are strictly commanded in the Scriptures to
show compassion to the beasts of. others, even to
those of our enemies; surely, then, those which are
our own property, and work for us, have a peculiar
claim to it. There is one custom which shocks me
very much, and that is pounding of cattle; I fancy,
Mr. Wilson, you do not practise that much.”
“Madam,” replied he, “I should much rather pound
the owners of them, through whose neglect or dis-
honesty it generally happens that horses trespass on
other people’s land. If any beast accidentally geta
170 The Story of the Robins.

into my grounds, I send it home to its owner, for it
certainly is no wilful fault in the creature to seek
the best pasture it can find; but if I have reason to
suppose his owner turned him in, I then think
myself bound to do what the law directs in that
respect: but though it is a secret I am obliged to
keep from my neighbours, I may safely confess to
you, madam, that I have not the heart to let a poor
beast starve in a pound. As there are no courts of
justice in which beasts can seek redress, I set up one
for them in my own breast, where humanity pleads
their cause.”

“T wish they had such an advocate in every
breast, Mr. Wilson,” said the lady ; “but my watch
reminds me we must now take our leave, which I do
with many thanks to you and Mrs. Wilson for your
kind entertainment and good cheer, and shall be
happy to return your civilities at my own house,
and pray bring your whole family with you.”

Mrs. Benson then desired her son and daughter to
prepare for their departure. Fredrick was grown so
intimate with little Neddy that he could scarcely be
prevailed on to leave him, till he recollected Robin
and the linnet. ;

As they returned in the carriage, Mrs. Benson
remarked that Farmer Wilson’s story was enough to
The Return Home. 171



make every one who heard it careful of their live
stock, for their own sakes; “But, said she, “the
pleasure and advantage will be greatly increased if it
is done from a principle of humanity as well as
interest.” Harriet answered that she hoped she
should neither treat animals ill nor place her affec-
tions on them too strongly. “That, my dear,” replied
her good mamma, is the proper medium to be
observed.”

In a short time they arrived at home. The maid
to whose care the birds had been entrusted gave
a good account of her charge; and Harriet and
Frederick went to bed in peace, after a day spent
with much pleasure and improvement.














CHAPTER XV.

THE AVIARY,

THE next morning the redbreasts attended at Mrs.
Benson’s as usual, and Robin was still better, but
his father began to fear he would never perfectly
recover from his accident; however, he kept his
apprehensions to himself, and suffered the little ones
to entertain their lame brother with a relation of
what they had seen the day before in the orchard.
Frederick and Harriet were so diverted with the
chattering and chirping of the little things, that
they did not miss the parent’s song.

When the young ones had stayed as long as she
thought right, the hen redbreast summoned them
away, and all took leave of Robin, who longed to go
with them, but was not able. The father reminded
him that he had great reason to rejoice in his pre-
The Aviary. 173



sent situation, considering all things; on which he
resumed his cheerfulness, and giving a sprightly
twitter, hopped into Frederick’s hand, which was
sptead open to receive him. The rest then flew
away, and Harriet and her brother prepared for
their morning tasks.

The redbreasts alighted as usual to drink in the
courtyard, and were preparing to return to the
orchard, when Flapsy expressed a desire to look a
little about the world, for she said it would be very
mopish to be always confined to the orchard; and
Dicky seconded her request. Pecksy declared that,
however her curiosity might be excited, she had
known so much happiness in the nest, that she was
strongly attached to the paternal spot, and could
gladly pass her life there. The parents highly com-
mended her contented disposition; but her father
said that as there was nothing blameable in the in-
clination Dicky and Flapsy expressed for seeing the
world, provided it was kept within due bounds, he
would readily gratify it.. Then asking if they were
sufficiently refreshed, he took wing, and led the way
to a neighbouring grove, where he placed his little
tribe among the branches of a venerable oak. Here
their ears were charmed with a most enchanting
concert of music. On one tree a blackbird and a
174 The Story of the Robins.





thrush poured forth their strong melodious notes ;
on another a number of linnets joined their sweet
voices; exalted in the air a skylark modulated his
delightful pipe, whilst a brother of the wood, seated
on a cool refreshing turf, made the grove re-echo
with his melody ; to these the nightingale joined his
enchanting lay: in short, not a note was wanting to
complete the harmony.

The little redbreasts were so exceedingly charmed,
that for a while they continued listening with silent
rapture. At length Dicky exclaimed, * How happy
should I be to join the cheerful band, and live for
ever in this charming place!” “It is,” replied his
mother, “a very pleasant situation, to be sure; but
could you be sensible of the superior advantages —
which, as a redbreast, you may enjoy by taking up
your abode in the orchard, you would never wish to
change it. For my own part, I find myself so happy
in that calm retreat, that nothing but necessity shall
ever drive me from it.”

Pecksy declared that though she was much
delighted with the novelty of the scene, and
charmed with the music, she now felt an ardent
desire to return home; but Flapsy wished to see a
little more first. “Well,” said the father, “your
desire shall be gratified ; let us take a circuit in this
The Grove. 175
grove, for I wish you to see everything worth obser-
vation in every place you go to, and not fly about the
world, as many giddy birds do, without the least
improvement from their travels.” On this he spread
his wings as a signal of departure, which his family
obeyed.

Observing a parcel of boys creeping silently
along, “ Stop,” said he, “let us perch on this tree,
and see what these little monsters are about.”
Scarcely were they seated, when one of the boys
mounted an adjacent tree, and took a nest of half-
fledged linnets, which he brought in triumph to his
companions,

At this instant a family of thrushes unfortunately
- ehirped, which directed another boy to the place of
their habitation, to which he climbed, and eagerly
seized the unfortunate little creatures. Having met
with so much success, the boys left the grove, to exult
at their own homes over their wretched captives, for
ever separated from their tender parents, who soon
came back laden with the gain of their labour,
which they had kindly destined for the sustenance
of their infant broods.

The little redbreasts were now spectators of those
parental agonies which had been formerly described
to them, and Pecksy cried out, “ Who would desire


176 The Story of the Robins.

to live in this grove, after having experienced ths
comforts of the orchard?” Dicky and Flapsy were
desirous to depart, being alarmed for their own
safety. “No,” said the father, “let us stay a little ~
longer—now we will go on.”

They accordingly took another flight, and saw a
man scattering seed upon the ground. “See there,”
said Dicky, “ what fine food that man throws down!
I dare say he is some good creature who is a friend to
the feathered race. Shall we alight and partake of
his bounty?” “Do not form too hasty an opinion,
Dicky,” said the father; “watch here with me a
little while, and then do as you will.” All the little
ones stretched their necks, and kept a curious eye
fixed on the man. In a few minutes a number of
sparrows, chaffinches, and linnets descended, and
began to regale themselves; but, in the midst of
their feast, a net was suddenly cast over them, and
they were all taken captive. The man, who was a
birdeatcher by profession, called to his assistant,
who brought a cage divided into a number of small
partitions, in which the linnets and chaffinches were
separately deposited. In this dismal prison, where
they had searcely room to flutter, were those little
creatures confined who lately poured forth their’
songs of joy fearless of danger. As for the sparrows,
The Gun. 177





their necks were wrung, and they were put in a bag
together. The little redbreasts trembled for them-
selves, and were in great haste to take wing. “ Stay,”
said the father, “Dicky has not yet made acquaint-
ance with this friend of the feathered race.” “No,”
said Dicky, “nor do I desire it; defend me and all
who are dear to me from such friends as these!”
“Well,” said the father, “learn from this instance
never to form a hasty judgment, nor to put yourself
in the power of strangers, who offer you favours
you have no right to expect from their hands.”

“Jndeed, my love,” said the mother bird, “I am
very anxious to get home; I have not lately been
used to be long absent from it, and every excursion
I make endears it more to me.” “Oh, the day is
not half spent,” replied her mate, “and I hope that
for the gratification of the little ones you will
consent to complete the ramble. Come, let us visit
another part of the grove; Iam acquainted with
its inmost recesses.” His mate acquiesced, and
they proceeded on their journey.

At length the father hastily called out, “Turn
this way! turn this way!” The whole party
obeyed the word of command, and found the good
effects of their obedience, for in an instant they saw
a flash of fire, a thick smoke followed it, and imme-
178 The Story of the Robins.



diately they heard a dreadful sound, and saw a
young redstart fall bleeding to the ground, on which
he struggled just long enough to cry, “Oh, my dear
father! why did I not listen to your kind admo-
nitions, which I now find, too late, were the dictates
of tenderness!” and then expired.

The little redbreasts were struck with consterna-
tion at this dreadful accident, and Pecksy, who
recovered the soonest, begged her father would
inform her by what means the redstart was killed.
“ He was shot to death,” said he, “and had you not
followed my directions, it might have been the fate of
every one of you; therefore let it be a lesson to
you to follow every injunction of your parents with
the same readiness for the future You may
depend upon it our experience teaches us to foresee
many dangers which such young creatures as you
have no notion of, and when we desire you to do or
to forbear anything, it is for the sake of your safety
or advantage. Therefore, Dicky, never more stand,
as you sometimes have done, asking why we tell
you to do so and so; for had that been the case
now, you, who were in a direct line with the gunner,
would have been inevitably shot.”

They all said they would pay implicit obedience.
* Do so,” said he; “but in order to this you must
The Gun. 179

also remember to practise in our absence what we
enjoin you when present. or instance, some kinds
of food are very prejudicial to your health, which we
would not, on any account, let you taste when we
are by; these you must not indulge in when away
from us, whatever any other bird may say in
recommendation of them. Neither must you engage
in any dangerous enterprise, which others, who have
natural strength or acquired agility, go through
with safety; nor should you go to any places which
we have pointed out as dangerous, nor join any
companions which we have forbidden you to make
acquaintance with. This poor redstart might have
avoided his fate, for I heard his father, when I was
last in the grove, advise him not to fly about by
himself till he had shown him the dangers of the
world.”

Pecksy answered that she knew the value of
parental instruction so well, that she should
certainly treasure up in her heart every maxim of
it; and the others promised to do the same. “But,”
‘said Flapsy, “I cannot understand the nature of the
accident which occasioned the death of the red-
start.”

“Neither can I explain it to you, my dear,”
replied the father; “I only know fhat it is a very
180 The Story of the Robins.



common practice with some men to carry instru-
ments from which they discharge what proves fatal
to many a bird; but I have, by attentive observa-
tion, learnt how to evade the mischief. But come,
let us descend and rest ourselves a little, as we may
do it with safety, and then we will see if we cannot
find a place where you can find amusement, without
being exposed to such dangers as attend the inhabit-
ants of woods and groves. Are you sufficiently
rested to take a pretty long flight?” “Oh yes,”
eried Dicky, who was quite eager to leave the spot
in which, a short time before, he had longed to pass
his life: the rest joimed in the same wish, and every
wing was instantly expanded.

The father led the way, and in a very short
time he and his family arrived at the estate
of a gentleman who, having a plentiful fortune, en-
deavoured to collect all that was curious in art and
nature, for the amusement of his own mind and the
gratification of others. He had a house like a
palace, furnished with every expensive rarity; his
gardens, to which the redbreasts took their flight,
were laid out in such a manner as to afford the
most delightful variety to the eye.

Amongst other articles of taste was an aviary,
‘ which was built like a temple, enclosed with brasz
Lhe Aviary. 181

one pment

wire. The framework was painted green, and
ornamented with carving, gilt; in the middle a
fountain continually threw up fresh water, which
fell into a basin whose brink was enamelled witt
flowers; at one end were partitions for birds’ nests,
and troughs containing various kinds of seed
and materials for building nests: this part was
carefully sheltered from every inclemency of the
weather. Numbers of perches were placed in
different parts of the aviary, and it was surrounded
by a most beautiful shrubbery.

A habitation like this, in which all the conveni-
ences of life seemed to be collected, where abun-
dance was supplied without toil, where each gay
songster might sing himself to repose in the midst
of ease and plenty, safe from the dangers of the
woods, appeared to our young travellers desirable
beyond all situations in the world, and Dicky
expressed an earnest wish to be admitted into it.
“Well,” said the father, “let us not determine
hastily ; it will be advisable first to inquire whether
its inhabitants are really happy, before you make
interest to become one of the number. Place
yourselves by me on this shrub, and whilst we rest
ourselves we shall have an opportunity of seeing
what passes.”
182 the Story of the Robins.



The first bird that attracted their notice was a
dove, who sat cooing by himself in a corner, in
accents so gentle and sweet, that a stranger to his
language would have listened to them with delight;
but the redbreasts, who understood their import,
heard them with sympathetic concern, “Ob, my
dear, my beloved mate!” said he, “am I then
divided from you for ever? What avails it that I
am furnished here with all the elegances and
luxuries of life? Deprived of your company, I
have no enjoyment of them; the humblest morsel,
though gained with toil and danger, would be
infinitely preferable to me if shared with you.
Here am I shut up for the remainder of my days,
in society for which I have no relish, whilst she
who has hitherto been the beloved partner of all
my joys is for ever separated from me! In vain
will you, with painful wing, pursue your anxious
search in quest of me; never, never more shall I
bring you the welcome refreshmient ; never shall I
hear your soothing voice, and delight in the soft —
murmurs of the infant pair which you hatched with
such care and nursed with such tenderness! No,
my beloved nestlings, never will your wretched
father be at liberty to guide your flight and instruct
you in your duty.” Here his voice faltered, and
The Dove and the Lark. 183



overcome with bitter reflections, he resigned himself
a prey to silent sorrow.

“This dove is not happy, however,” said the hen
redbreast to her mate, “and no wonder; but let us
attend to the notes of that lark.” His eyes were
turned up towards the sky, he fluttered his wings, he
strained his throat, and would, to a human eye, hava
appeared in raptures of joy; but the redbreasts
perceived that he was inflamed with rage. “ And
am I to be constantly confined in this horrid place ?”
sang he. “Is my upward flight to be impeded by
bars and wires? Must I no longer soar towards that
bright luminary, and make the arch of heaven re-
sound with my singing? Shall I cease to be the
herald of the morn, or must [I be so in this con-
tracted sphere? No, ye partners of my captivity,
henceforth sleep on and take ignoble rest, and may
you lose in slumber the remembrance of past plea-
sures! Oh, cruel and unjust man! was it not
enough that I proclaimed the approach of day, that
I soothed your sultry hours, that I heightened the
delights of evening; but must I, to gratify your
unfeeling wantonness, be secluded from every joy
my heart holds dear, and condemned to a situation
I detest? Take your delicious dainties, reserve your

flowing stream, for those who can relish them, bu'
13
184 Lhe Story of the Robins.

give me liberty! But why do I address myself to
you, who are heedless of my misery?” Here, cast-
ing an indignant look around, he stopped his song. _

“What think you now, Dicky?” said the red-
breast; “have you as high an idea of the happiness
of this place as you conceived at the first view of
it?”

“I cannot help thinking still,” replied Dicky,
“that it is a charming retreat, and that it must be
very comfortable to have everything provided for
one’s use.”

“Well,” said the father, “let us move, and observe
those linnets who are building their nest.”

Accordingly, they flew to a tree, the branches of
which formed a part of the shelter of the aviary,
where they easily heard, without being themselves
observed, all that passed in it.

“Come,” said one of the linnets, “let us go on
with our work and finish the nest, though it will
rather be a melancholy task to hatch a set of little
prisoners. How different was the case when we
could anticipate the pleasure of rearing a family to
all the joys of liberty! Men, it is true, now with
officious care supply us with the necessary materials,
and we make a very good nest; but I protest I had
much rather be at the trouble of seeking them
The Blessings of Freedom. 185

What pleasure have we experienced in plucking a
bit of wool from a sheep’s back, in searching for
moss, in selecting the best feather where numbers
were left to our choice, in stoppiug to rest on the top
of a tree which commanded an extensive prospect,
in joining a choir of songsters whom we accidentally
met! But now our days pass with repeated same-
ness; variety, so necessary to give a relish to all
enjoyment, is wanting, Instead of the songs of joy
we formerly heard from every spray, our ears are
constantly annoyed with the sound of mournful
lamentations, transports of rage, or murmurs of dis-
content. Could we reconcile ourselves to the loss of
liberty, it is impossible to be happy here unless we
could harden our hearts to every sympathetic feeling.”

“True,” said his mate; “yet I am resolved to try
what patience, resignation, and employment will
effect, and hope, as our young ones will never know
what liberty is, they will not pine as we do for it.”
Saying this, she picked up a straw, her mate fol-
lowed the example, and they pursued their work.

At this instant a hen goldfinch brought forth her
. brood, who were full fledged. “Come, my nestlings,”
said she, “use your wings; I will teach you to fly
in all directions.” So saying, the little ones divided ;
one flew upwards, but emulous to outdo a little
186 Lhe Story of the Robins.



sparrow which was flying in the air above the aviary,
he hit himself against the wires of the dome, and
would have fallen to the bottom, but that he was
stopped by one of the perches. As soon as he
recovered,—

“Why cannot I soar as I see other birds do?”
sald he.

« Alas!” cried the mother, “we are in a place of
confinement, we are shut up, and can never get out;
but here is food in abundance, and every other
necessary.”

“Never get out!” exclaimed the whole brood ;
“then adieu to happiness!” She attempted to
soothe them, but in vain.

The little redbreasts rejoiced in their liberty, and
Dicky gave up the desire of living in the aviary, and
wished to be gone.

“Stop,” said the father, “let us first hear what
those canary birds are saying.”

The canary birds had almost completed their nest.

“ How fortunate is our lot,” said the hen bird, “in
being placed in this aviary! How preferable is if
to the small cage we built in last year!”

“Yes,” replied her mate; “yet how comfortable
was that in comparison Rath the still smaller ones
in which we were once separately confined! For
The Canary Birds. 187







my part, I have no wish to fly abroad, for I should
neither know what to do nor whither to go; and it
shall be my endeavour to inspire my young ones with
the same sentiments as I feel. Indeed, we owe the
highest gratitude to those who make such kind pro-
vision for a set of foreigners who have no resources
but their bounty, and my best lays shall be devoted
to them. Nothing is wanting to complete the hap-
piness of this place but to have other kinds of birds
excluded. Poor creatures! it must be very mortify-
ing to them to be shut up here, and see others of
their kind enjoying full freedom. No wonder they
are perpetually quarrelling ; for my part, I sincerely
pity them, and am ready to submit, from a principle
of compassion, to the occasional insults and affronts
I meet with.”

“You now perceive, Dicky,” said the cock red-
breast, “that this place is not, as you supposed, the
region of perfect happiness; you may also observe
that it is not the abode of universal wretchedness.
It is by no means desirable to be shut up for life, let
the place of confinement be ever so splendid; but
should it be our lot to be caught and imprisoned,
which may possibly be the case, adopt the senti-
ments of the linnet and canary birds; employment
will pass away many an hour that would be a heavy

t
188 The Story of the Robins,



load if spent in grief and anxicty, and reflections on
the blessings and comforts that are still in your
power will lessen your regret for those which are
lost. But come, pick up some of the seeds which
are scattered on the outside of the aviary, for that is
no robbery, and then I will show you another
scene,”




CHAPTER XVL.

THE OLD ROBINS TAKE LEAVE OF THEIR YOUNG ONES.

AS soon as the redbreasts had regaled themselves
with the superfluities of the feathered captives, they
took their flight to a different part of the garden, in
which was a collection of fowls and foreign birds,
It consisted of a number of pens built round a grass-
plot ; in each was a pan of water, a sort of box con-
taining a bed or nest, a trough for food, and a perch,
In every pen was confined a pair of birds, and every
pair was either of a different species, or distinguished
for some beautiful variety either of form or plumage.
The wooden bars which were put in the front were
painted partly green and partly white, which dazzled
the sight at the first glance, and so attracted the eyes
that there was no seeing what was behind without
going close up to the pens.
190 Lhe Story of the Robins.

ce

The little redbreasts knew not what sight to
expect, and begged their parent to gratify their
curiosity. “ Well, follow me,” said the father; “ but-
I believe you must alight on the cross-bars, or you
will not be able to examine the beauties of these
fowls.” They did so, and in the first pen was a pair
of partridges. The size of these birds, so greatly
exceeding their own, astonished them all; but not-
withstanding this, the amiable Pecksy was quite
interested by their modest, gentle appearance, and
said she thought no one could ever wish to injure
them.

“True, Pecksy,” replied tke father, “they have,
from the harmlessness of their disposition, a natural
claim to tenderness and compassion, and yet I believe
there are few birds who meet with less; for I have
observed that numbers share the same fate as the
redstart which yousaw die in the grove. I have myself
seen many put to death in that manner. For a long
time I was excessively puzzled to account for this
fatality, and resolved, if possible, to gratify my curi-
osity. At length I saw a man kill two partridges
and take them away. This very man had shown me
great kindness, in feeding me when I first left my
father’s nest; so I had no apprehension of his doing
me an injury, and resolved to follow him. When.

>
The Fate of the Partridges. 191



he arrived at his own house, I saw him deliver the
victims of his cruelty to another person, who hung
them up together by the legs, in a place which hadt
variety of other dead things in it, the sight of which
shocked me exceedingly, and J could stay no longer.
I therefore flew back to the field in which I had
seen the murder committed, and in searching about
found the nest belonging to the poor creatures, in
which were several young ones just hatched, who in
a-short time would be starved to death! How
dreadful is the fate of young animals that lose their
parents before they are able to shift for themselves !
and how grateful ought those to be to whom the
blessings of parental instruction and assistance are
continued !

“ When the next morning arrived, I went again to
see after the dead partridges, and found them hang-
ing as before, and this was the case the day after;
but the following morning I saw a boy stripping all
their feathers off. As soon as he had completed this
horrid operation, a woman took them, whom I ven-
tured to follow, as the window of the place she
entered stood open; where, to my astonishment, I
beheld her twist their wings about and fasten them
to their sides, then cross their legs upon their breasts,
and run something quite through their bodies.
192 The Story of the Robins.

After this she put them before a place which glowed
with a brightness something resembling the setting
sun, which, on the woman’s retiring, I approached,
znd found intolerably hot, I therefore made a hasty
retreat; but resolving to know the end of the part-
ridges, I kept hovering about the house; and at last,
looking in at a window, I saw them, smoking hot,
set before the man who murdered them, who was
accompanied by several others, all of whom eyed
them with as much delight as I have seen any of
you display at the sight of the finest worm or insect
that could be procured. In an instant after this the
poor partridges were divided limb from limb, and
each one of the party present had his share, till
every bone was picked. There were other things
devoured in the same manner ; from which I learnt
that men feed on birds and other animals, as we do
on those little creatures which are destined for our
sustenance, only they do not eat them alive.” |

“Pray, father,” said Dicky, “do they eat red-
breasts?” “I believe not,” said he, “but I have
reason to suppose they make many a meai of
sparrows, for I have seen vast numbers of them
killed.” 5

At this instant their attention was attracted by
oue of the partridges in the pen, which thus addressed
The Contented Partridges, 193



his mate :—‘ Well, my love, as there is no chance of
our being set at liberty, I think we may as well
prepare our nest, that you may deposit your eggs in
it. The employment of hatching and raising your
little ones will at least mitigate the wearisomeness
of confinement, and I promise myself many happy
days yet; for as we are so well fed and attended, I
think we may form hopes that our offspring will also
be provided for; and though they will not be at
liberty to range about as we formerly did, they will
avoid many of those terrors and anxieties tu which
our race are frequently exposed, at one season of the
year in particular.” “I am very ready to follow
your advice,” said the hen partridge, “and the busi-
ness will soon be completed, for the nest is in a
manner made for us, it only wants a little adjusting ;
I will therefore set about it immediately, and will no
longer waste my hours in fruitless lamentations,
since I am convinced that content will render every
situation easy in which we can enjoy the company
of our dearest friends, and obtain the necessaries of
life.” So saying, she retired into the place provided
for the purpose on which she was now intent, and
her mate followed, in order to lend her all the assist-
ence in his power.

“Tam very glad that my young ones have had
194 Lhe Story of the Robins.



the opportunity of seeing such an example as this,”
said the hen redbreast. “You now understand
what benefit it is to have a temper of resignation.
More than half the evils of life, I am well convinced,
arise from fretfulness and discontent; and would
every one, like these partridges, try to make the best
of their condition, we should seldom hear complaints,
for there are much fewer real than imaginary mis-
fortunes. But come, let us take a peep into the
next pen.”

They accordingly hopped to the next partition, in
which were confined a pair of pencilled pheasants.
Flapsy was quite delighted with the elecance of
their form and the beauty of their plumage, and
could have stayed the whole day looking at them ;
but as these birds were also tame and contented,
nothing more could be learnt here than a confirma-
tion of what the partridges had taught. Our
travellers therefore proceeded still further, and
found a pair of gold pheasants. Their splendid
appearance struck the young redbreasts with
astonishment, and raised such sentiments of respect,
that they were even fearful of approaching birds
which they esteemed as so much superior to them-
selves; but their father desiring they would never
form a judgment of birds from a glittering cutside,
The Proud Pheasants. 195



placed his family where they had an opportunity of
observing that this splendid pair had but little
intrinsic merit. They were proud of their fine
plumage, and their chief employment was walking
backwards and forwards to display it; and some-
times they endeavoured to push through the bars of
their prison, that they might get abroad to show
their rich plumage to the world, and exult over
those who were in this respect inferior to them.
“ How hard,” said one of them, “it is to be shut up
here, where there are no other birds to admire us,
and where we have no little ugly creatures to ridi-
cule!”

“Tf such are your desires,” said the hen redbreast
“T am sure you are happier here than at liberty ; for
you would by your proud, affected airs excite the
contempt of every bird which has right sentiments,
and consequently meet with continual mortification,
to which even the ugliest might contribute.”

Pecksy desired to know if all fine birds were
proud and affected. “By no means,” replied her
mother; “you observed the other pair of pheasants,
who were, in my opinion, nearly equal to these for
beauty and elegance. How easy and unassuming
were they! and how much were their charms
improved by the graces of humility! I often
196 Lhe Story of the Lobins.

eS

wonder that any bird should indulge itself in pride:
what have such little creatures as we to boast of ?
The largest species amongst us is very inferior to
many animals we see in the world, and man is lord
over the greatest and strongest even of these. Nay,
man himself has no cause to be proud, for he is
subject to death as well as the meanest of creatures,
as I have had opportunities of observing. But come,
the day wears away; let us view the other narts of
this enclosure.”

On this the father conducted his family to a
variety of pens, in which were different sorts of
foreign birds, of whom he could give but little
account, therefore would not suffer his young ones
to stand gazing at them long, lest they should imbibe
injurious notions of them; especially when he heard
Dicky ery, as he left the pen, “I dare say that bird
is a very cruel, voracious creature; I make no doubt
but that he would eat us all, one after the other, if
he could get at us.”

“Take care, Dicky,” said the father, “how you
form an ill opinion of any one on slight grounds
You cannot possibly tell what the character of this
stork is merely from his appearance; you are a
stranger to his language, and cannot see the dispo.
sition of his heart. Ifyou give way to a suspicious
The Lutiful Stork. 197





temper, your own little breast will be in a state of
constant perturbation ; you will absolutely exclude
yourself from the blessings of society, and -will be
shunned and despised by birds of every kind. The
stork which you thus censure is far from deserving
your ill opinion. He would do you no harm, and is
remarkable for his filial affection. I saw him taken
prisoner. He was carrying his aged father on his
back, whom he had for a long time fed and
comforted; the weight of this precious burden
impeded his flight, and being at length weary with
it, he descended to the ground to rest himself, when
a cruel man, who was out on the business of bird-
catching, threw a net over them, and then seized him
by the neck. The poor old stork, who was before worn
out with age and infirmities, unable to bear this
calamity, fell from his back and instantly expired.
The stork, after casting a look of anguish on his
dear parent which I shall never forget, turned with
fury on his persecutor, whom he beat with his
wings with all the strength he had; but it was in
vain to contend with a being so much more powerful
than himself, and in spite of all his exertions he
was conveyed to this place. But come, let us pick
up a little refreshment, and then return to the
orchard,”
198 The Story of the Robins.

Saying this, he alighted on the ground, as did
his mate and her family, where they met with a
plentiful repast, in the provisions which had
been accidentally scattered by the person whose
employment it was to bring food for the inhabitants
of the fowl-houses. When they had sufficiently
regaled themselves, all parties gladly returned to
the nest, and every heart rejoiced in the possession
of liberty and peace.

For three successive days nothing remarkable
happened either at Mr. Benson’s or at the redbreasts’
nest. The little family came to the breakfast-table,
and Robin recovered from his accident, though not
sufficiently to fly well; but Dicky, Flapsy, and
Pecksy continued so healthy, and improved so fast,
that they required no further care, and the third
morping after their tour to the grove they did not
commit the least error. When they retired from
the parlour into the courtyard, to which Robin
accompanied them, the father expressed great delight
that they were at length able to shift for themselves.

And now a wonderful change took place in his
own heart. That ardent affection for his young
which had hitherto made him, for their sakes, patient
of toil and fearless of danger, was on a sudden
quenched ; but, from the goodness of his disposition,
The Farewell. 199



he still felt a kind solicitude for their future welfare;
and calling thém around him, he thus addressed
them :—

“You must be sensible, my dear young ones, that
from the time you left the ege-shell to the present
instant, both your mother and I have nourished you
with the tenderest love. We have taught you all
the arts of life which are necessary to procure you
subsistence and preserve you from danger. We
have shown you a variety of characters in the
different classes of birds, and pointed out those
which are to be shunned. You must now shift for
yourselves ; but, before we part, let me repeat my
admonition, to use industry, avoid contention,
cultivate peace, and be contented with your condi-
tion. Let none of your own species excel you in
any amiable quality, for want of your endeavours to
equal the best; and do your duty in every relation
of life, as we have done ours by you. To the gay
scenes of levity and dissipation prefer a calm retire-
ment, for there is the greatest degree of happiness to
be found. You, Robin, I] would advise, on account
of your infirmity, to attach yourself to the family
where you have been so kindly cherished.”

While he thus spake his mate stood by; who,

finding the same change beginning to take place in
14
200 The Story of the Robias.



her own breast, viewed her young ones with tender
regret, and when he ceased cried out, “Adieu, ye
dear objects of my late cares and solicitude! may ye

never more stand in need of a mother’s assistance! —

Though nature now dismisses me from the arduous
task which I have long daily performed, I rejoice
not, but would gladly continue my toil for the sake
of its attendant pleasures. Oh, delightful senti-
ments of maternal love, how can I part with you?
Let me, my nestlings, give you a last embrace.”
Then spreading her wings, she folded them succes-
sively to her bosom, and instantly recovered her
tranquillity.

Each young one expressed his grateful thanks to
both father and mother, and with these acknow-
ledgments filial affection expired in their breasts,
instead of which a respectful friendship succeeded.
Thus. was that tender tie dissolved which had
hitherto bound this little family together; for the
parents had performed their duty, and the young
ones had no further need of their parental care.

The old redbreasts, having now only themselves to
provide for, resoived to be no longer burthensome to
their benefactors; and after pouring forth their
gratitude in the most lively strains, they took their
flight together, resolving never to separate. Every
The Goodness of God. 201





care now vanished, and their little hearts felt no
sentiments but cheerfulness and joy. They ranged
the fields and gardens, sipped at the coolest springs,
and indulged themselves in the pleasures of society,
joining their cheerful notes with those of other gay
choristers which animate and heighten the delight-
ful scenes of rural life,

The first morning that the old redbreasts were
missing from Mrs. Benson’s breakfast-table, Fre-
derick and his sister were greatly alarmed for their
safety ; but their mamma said she was of opinion
that they had left their nestlings, as it was the
nature of animals in general to dismiss their young
as soon as they were able to provide for themselves.
“That is very, strange,” cried Harriet; “I wonder
what would become of my brother and me, were you
and papa to serve us so!”

“ And is a boy of six, or a girl of eleven years old,
capable of taking care of his or herself?” said her
mamma. ‘No, my dear child, you have need of a
much longer continuance of your parents’ care than
birds and other animals; and therefore God has
ordained that parental affection, when once awak-
ened, should always remain in the human breast,
unless extinguished by the undutiful behaviour of a
child,”
202 The Story of the Robins.



“ And shall we see the old redbreasts no more ?”
cried Frederick? “I do not know that you will,”
replied Mrs. Benson, “though it is not unlikely
that they may visit us again in the winter; but let
not their absence grieve you, my love, for I dare say
they are safe and happy.’

At that instant the young ones arrived, and met
with a very joyful reception. The amusement they
afforded to Frederick soon reconciled him to the loss
of their parents; but Harriet declared she could not
help being sorry that they were gone. “I shall for
the future, mamma,” said she, “take notice of ani-
mals; for I have had much entertainment in observ-
ing the ways of these robins.” “TI highly approve of
your resolution, my dear,” said Mrs, Benson, “and
hope the occasional instruction I have at different
times given you has furnished you with general ideas
respecting the proper treatment of animals. I will
now inform you upon what principles the rules of
conduct I prescribe to myself on this subject are
~ founded.

“TI consider that the same almighty and good
Being who created mankind made all other living
creatures likewise, and appointed them their different
ranks in the creation, that they might form together
a community, receiving and conferring reciprocal
The Goodness of God. 203



benefits. There is no doubt that the Almighty
designed all beings for happiness, proportionable to
the faculties He has endowed them with; and who-
ever wantonly destroys that happiness acts contrary
to the will of his Maker.

“The world we live in seems to have been
principally designed for the use and comfort of
mankind, who, by the divine appointment, have
dominion over the inferior creatures ; in the exercise
of which it is certainly their duty to imitate the
Supreme Lord of the universe, by being merciful to
the utmost of their power. They are endowed with
reason, which enables them to discover the different
natures of brutes, the faculties they possess, and
how they may be made serviceable in the world;
and as beasts cannot apply these faculties to their
own use in so extensive a way, and numbers of
them, being unable to provide for their own suste-
nance, are indebted to men for many of the neces-
saries of life, men have an undoubted right to their
labour in return.

“Several other kinds of animals, which are sus-
tained at the expense of mankind, cannot labour for
them; irom such they have a natural claim to what-
ever they can’supply towards the food and raiment
of their benefactors; and therefore, when we take
204, The Story of the Robins.





the wool and milk of the flocks and herds, we take
no more than our due, and what they can very well
spare, as they seem to have an over-abundance given
them, that they may be able to return their obliga-
tions to us.

“Some creatures have nothing to give us but their
own bodies: these have been expressly destined by
the Supreme Governor as food for mankind, and he ©
has appointed an extraordinary increase of them for
that very purpose, such an increase as would be very
injurious to us if all were suffered to live. These
we have an undoubted right to kill, but should make
their short lives as comfortable as possible.

“ Other creatures seem to be of no particular use
to mankind, but as they serve to furnish our minds
with contemplations on the wisdom, power, and
goodness of God, and to exhilarate our spirits by
their cheerfulness, they should not be wantonly
killed, nor treated with the least degree of cruelty,
but should be at full liberty to enjoy the blessings
assigned them ; unless they abound to such a degree
as to become injurious, by devouring the food which
is designed for man, or for animals more beneficial
to him, whom it is his duty to protect. —

“Some animals, such as wild beasts, serperits,
&c., are in their nature ferocious, noxious, or
Constderatton to Animals. 205

venomous, and capable of injuring the health, or
even of destroying the lives of men and other
creatures of a higher rank than themselves; these,
if they leave the secret abodes which are allotted
them, and become offensive, certainly may with
justice be killed,

“Tn a word, my dear, we should endeavour to
regulate our regards according to the utility and
necessities of every living creature with which we
are anyways connected, and consequently should pre-
fer the happiness of mankind to that of any animal
whatever. Next to these (who, being partakers of
the same nature with ourselves, are more properly
our fellow-creatures) we should consider our cattle
and domestic animals, and take care to supply every
creature that is dependent on us with proper food,
and keep it in its proper place; after their wants are
supplied, we should extend our benevolence and
compassion as far as possible to the inferior ranks of
beings, and if nothing further is in our power, we
should at least refrain from exercising cruelties on
them. For my own part, I never willingly put to
death, or cause to be put to death, any creature, but
when there is a real necessity for it, and have my
food dressed in a plain manner, that no more lives
may be sacrificed for me than nature requires for my
206 The Story of the fobwns.



subsistence in that way which God has allotted me.
But I fear I have tired you with my long lecture, so
will now dismiss you.”

While Mrs. Benson was giving these instructions
to her daughter, Frederick diverted himself with
the young redbreasts, who, having no kind parents
now to admonish them, made a longer visit than
usual; so that Mrs. Benson would have been obliged
to drive them away, had not Pecksy, on seeing her
move from her seat, recollected that she and her
brother and sister had been guilty of an impropriety ;
she therefore reminded them that they should ne
longer intrude, and led the way out at the window;
the others followed her, and Mrs. Benson gave per-
mission to her children to take their morning’s walk
before they began their lessons.






















CONCLUSION.

As the old robins, who were the hero and heroine of
my tale, are made happy, it is time for me to put an
end to it: but my young readers will doubtless wish
to know the sequel of the history ; I shall therefore
inform them of it in as few words as possible.

Harriet followed her mamma’s precepts and ex-
amples, and grew up a general benefactress to all
people and all creatures with whom she was anyways
connected.

Frederick was educated upon the same plan, and
was never known to be cruel to animals, or to treat
them with an improper degree of fondness; he was
also remarkable for his benevolence, so as to deserve
and obtain the character of a good man.

Lucy Jenkins was quite reformed by Mrs. Benson’s
lecture and her friend’s example; but her brother
continued his practice of exercising barbarities on a














208 The Story of the Robins.

variety of unfortunate animals, till he went to school ,
where, having no opportunity of doing so, he grati-
fied his malignant disposition on his schoolfellows,
and made it his diversion to pull their hair, and pinch
and tease the younger boys; and, by the time he
became a man, had so hardened his heart that no
kind of distress affected him, nor did he care for any
person but himself; consequently he was despised
by all with whom he had any intercourse. In this
manner he lived for some years ; at length, as he was
inhumanly beating and spurring a fine horse merely
because it did not go a faster pace than it was able
to do, the poor creature, in its efforts to evade his
blows, threw his barbarous rider, who was killed on
the spot.

Farmer Wilson’s prosperity increased with every
succeeding year ; and he acquired a plentiful fortune,
with which he gave portions to each of his children
as opportunities offered for settling them in the
world; and he and his wife lived to a good old age,
beloved and respected by all who knew them.

Mrs. Addis lost her parrot by the disorder with
which it was attacked while Mrs. Benson was visit-
ing at the house; and before she had recovered the
shock of this misfortune, as she called it, her griet
was renewed by the death of the old lapdog. Not
Mrs, Addis’s Pets. 209



long afterwards her monkey escaped to the top of a
house, from whence he fell and broke his neck. The
favourite cat went mad, and was obliged to be killed.
In short, by a series of calamities all her dear darlings
were successively destroyed. She supplied their
places with new favourites, which gave her a great
deal of fatigue and trouble.

In the meanwhile her children grew up, and
having experienced no tenderness from her, they
scarcely knew they had a mamma, nor did those
who had the care of their education inculcate that
her want of affection did not cancel their duty; they
therefore treated her with the utmost neglect, and
she had no friend left, In her old age, when she
was no longer capable of amusing herself with cats,
dogs, parrots, and monkeys, she became sensible of
her errors, and wished for the comforts which other
parents enjoyed: but it was now too late, and she
ended her days in sorrow and regret.

This unfortunate lady had tenderness enough in
her disposition for all the purposes of humanity,
and had she placed it on proper objects, agreeably
to Mrs. Benson’s rule, she might have been, like her,
a good wife, mother, friend, and mistress, conse-
quently respectable and happy. But when a child
Mrs. Addis was, under an idea of making her
210 The Story of the Robins.





tender-hearted, permitted to lavish immoderate
fondness on animals, the care of which engrossed
her whole attention, and greatly interrupted her
education; so that, instead of studying natural
history and other useful things, her time was taken
up with pampering and attending upon animals
which she considered as the most important business
in life.

Her children fell into faults of a different nature.
Miss Addis being, as I observed in the former part of
this history, left to the care of servants, grew up
with very contracted notions, Amongst other pre-
judices, she imbibed that of being afraid of spiders,
frogs, and other harmless things; and having been
bitten by the monkey, and terrified by the cat when
it went mad, she extended her fears to every kind of
creature, and could not take a walk in the fields, or
even in the street, withou§ a thousand apprehensions,
And at last her constitution, which from bad nursing
had become very delicate, was still more weakened
by her continual apprehensions; and a rat hap-
pening to run across the path as she was walking,
she fell into fits, which afflicted her at intervals
during the remainder of her life.

Edward Addis, as soon as he became sensible -
his mother’s foible, conceived an inveterate hatred
fate of the Robins. 211

to animals in general, which he regarded as his
enemies, and thought he was avenging his own
cause when he treated any with barbarity. Cats
and dogs, in particular, he singled out as the objects
of his revenge, because he considered them as his
mother’s greatest favourites; and many a one fell an
innocent victim to his mistaken ideas.

The parent redbreasts visited their kind bene-
factors the next winter; but as they were flying
along one day, they saw some crumbs of bread
which had been scattered by Lucy Jenkins, who, as
IT observed before, had adopted the sentiments
of her friend in respect to compassion to animals,
and resolved to imitate her in every excellence.
The redbreasts gratefully picked up the crumbs, and
encouraged by the gentle invitation of her looks,
ietermined to repeat their visits; which they
accordingly did, and found such an ample supply
that they thought it more advisable to go to her
with their next brood than to be burthensome to
their old benefactors, who had a great number of
pensioners to support: but Frederick and Harviet
Benson had frequently the pleasure of seeing them,
and knew them from all their species by several
peculiarities which so long an acquaintance had
given them the opportunity of observing.
212, The Story of the Robins.





Robin, in pursuance of his father’s advice, and
agreeably to his own inclinations, attached himself
to Mr. Benson’s family, where he soon became a
great favourite. He had before, under the conduct
of his parents, made frequent excursions into the
garden, and was, by their direction, enabled to get
up into trees, but his wing never recovered suffi-
ciently to enable him to take long flights; however,
he found himself at liberty to do as he pleased, and
during the summer months he commonly passed
most of his time abroad, and roosted in trees, but
visited the tea-table every morning; and there he
usually met his sister Pecksy, who took up hea
abode in the orchard, where she enjoyed the friend-
ship of her father and mother. Dicky and Flapsy,
who thought their company too grave, flew giddily
about together. In a short time they were both
caught in a trap-cage, and put into the aviary which
Dicky once longed to inhabit. Here they were at
first very miserable; but after a while, recollecting
their good parents’ advice, and the example of the
linnets and pheasants, they at length reconciled
themselves to their lot, and each met with a mate,
with whom they lived tolerably happy.

Happy would it be for the animal creation if
every human being, like good Mrs. Benson,
The End of the Story of the Robins. 213





consulted the welfare of inferior creatures, and
neither spoiled them by indulgence nor injured
them by tyranny. Happy would mankind be if
every one, like her, acted in conformity to the will
of their Maker, by cultivating in their own minds,
and those of their children, the divine principle of
general benevolence.

From the foregoing examples I hope my young
readers will select the best for their own imitation,
and take warning by the rest; otherwise my
SToRY OF THE Rosins will have been written ia
‘Vail.



DALZIEL BROTHERS, CAMDEN PRESS, LONDON N.W-



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