Citation
Uncle Tom's cabin

Material Information

Title:
Uncle Tom's cabin
Series Title:
Old stories told anew
Creator:
Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896
Rae, Julia S. E ( Editor )
Maplestone, Florence ( Illustrator )
Trischler & Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Trischler & Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
97 p., [6] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 x 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Slavery -- Juvenile fiction -- United States ( lcsh )
Slaves -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Plantation life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fugitive slaves -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Slavery -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Germany -- Bavaria
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Some illustrations printed in colors; others and text printed in brown.
General Note:
Printed in Bavaria.
General Note:
"In the revision ... the incidents, plot and dialogue have throughout been carefully preserved as far as possible; ... adapt[ed] to the modern tastes of younger readers of the present generation ..."
Statement of Responsibility:
edited by Julia S.E. Rae ; with original illustrations by Florence Mapleston.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026974065 ( ALEPH )
ALH8551 ( NOTIS )
42673618 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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PREFACE

to

OLD STORIES EQLD ANEW

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In the revision of this short series of old stories, enjoying unrivalled popularity
in their original form, the incidents, plot and dialogue have throughout been carefully ~
preserved as far as possible; the object of the omissions made in the text being to
simplify and adapt it to the modern tastes of younger readers of the present generation,
to whom the new and interesting style of the illustrations will especially appeal.

EDITOR.



CHAPTERLI.

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UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

CONTENTS.
SER UR

George and Eliza .
An Evening in Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Crossing the Ohio .
Uncle Tom’s Farewell
The Escape .
Eva St. Clare
Tom’s New Home .
Quaker Friends .
Shadows
The Warning
The End .
Re-Union . ‘
The Slave Market .
Dark Places .

» XV. The Victory .

PAGE

I

8
17
25
33
39
46
53
58
65
71
75
80
83
gI

ILLUSTRATIONS
TO
“UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.”
See ES em
PAGE

Eliza escaping across the Ohio. . . Frontispiece
Uncle Tom’s new Master carries him off . 12
Eva distributing oranges and candy to Haley’s

gang of slaves: -- 0 es is 6 20
Uncle Lomesaves: va 2) on
“Uncle Tom I’m going therey . . . . . 29

} Topsy laying Flowers at Eva’s feet . . . 40

“Thee: is: not;wanted there, Vriendie 23.9
Tom refusing to whip Lucy . . . . . 59
Cassy ministering to Uncle Tom . . . . 69
The sale of Emmeline... Pee .O
George Shelby freeing all his SE pr eee O,

George Shelby covering Uncle Tom’s dead face 96

3 Se



\



Uncle Coms Cabin.

——>4<-—

CHAPTER I.
GEORGE AND ELIZA.

ATE in the afternoon of a chilly day in February, two men were Sitting over
their wine in a well-furnished dining-room in a town of Kentucky. One of
7 them, Mr. Shelby, looked like a gentleman. and seemed ill at ease while
talking earnestly with his companion, whose conversation was as coarse and
ungrammatical as his appearance was common, though he was smartly
dressed, and wore a large gold chain and rings, which he took care every-
i) body should see.
or Mr. Shelby poured him out another glass of wine as he said, “The fact
is, Haley, Tom is an uncommon fellow—he is certainly worth that sum anywhere—he’s
steady, honest, clever-———”
“You mean honest aS niggers go,” said Haley, coolly drinking off the wine.
“No; I mean really—Tom is a good steady, pious fellow. I’ve trusted him
with everything | have—money, horses, house—and let him come and go round the
country, and I’ve always found him true and square.”
“Some folks don’t believe in pious niggers, Shelby, but I do, replied Haley.
“I had a fellow in this yer last lot I took to Orleans who was always prayin’, and



2 UNG Eee ONES. © AR IaN:



quite gentle and quiet like. He fetched me a aes sum too. I think religion valeyable
in a nigger when it’s the real thing.”

“Well, Tom’s got the real thing, if ever a fellow had,” replied the other.

“J am sorry to part with him, I must say. You ought to let him cover the
whole debt, and you would, Haley, if you had any conscience.”

“Well, haven’t you a boy or a gal you could throw in with Tom?”

“No; to Say truth, I can’t bear selling any of my hands, and wouldn’t if! could
help myself.”

Here a beautiful little quadroon boy between four and five years old came
into the room. His soft, silky black hair hung in glossy curls about his round, dimpled
face, and a pair of large, bright dark eyes looked out from beneath their long lashes,
aS he peered into the room. He was gaily and neatly dressed, and was evidently a
pet of his master’s.

“Hallo, Jim Crow! pick up that? said Mr. Shelby, throwing him a bunch of
raisins from the table.

The child scampered as well as he could after the prize, and his master
laughed, and said, “Now, Jim, show this gentleman how you can dance and sing.”

The boy began one of the wild, grotesque Songs sung by the negroes, in a
rich, clear voice, with many comic movements of the feet, hands, and body, all in
perfect time to the music.

“Now, Jim, walk like old Uncle Cudjoe when he has the rheumatism,” said
Mr. Shelby.



Gai @ Re Ge AEN 2B Ee Zk 3

Instantly the child humped up his back, and hobbled about the room with.
his master’s stick in his hand, his childish face drawn up as if in pain.

“Bravo!” cried Haley, and clapping his hand on Mr. Shelby’s shoulder, he
added, “Fling in that chap, and the thing’s done! I call that a fair offer.”

At that moment the door was pushed gently open, and a young quadroon
woman entered the room. No one who saw her and the boy together could doubt that
she was his mother. She had the same full dark eye, with its long lashes, the same
Silky black hair; and her brown complexion flushed when she saw the strange man’s
looks fixed upon her, as he noticed with the quick eye of the trader what a pretty
figure, hand and foot she had. ;

“I was looking for Harry, sir —she said shyly as soon as she could speak.

“Well, Eliza, take him away then,” said Mr. Shelby, as the boy ran up to his
mother, who carried him away.

“What a beauty!” said Haley when she was gone, “What’ll you take for
herein

“Mr. Haley—my wife wouldn’t part with her for her weight in gold,” replied
Shelby, gravely. :

“Youll let me have the boy though?” said Haley.

“I would rather not sell him—the fact is, sir, I hate to take the boy from
his mother,” said Mr. Shelby.

“Oh—these critters ain't like hits folk,” said Haley, “but I don’t find it
pay to be cruel, 1 always use’em well. You see when J anyways can I take a little
care about the onpleasant parts, like selling young ‘uns and that, get the gals out



4 USNeG EE OMS CA BEN:



of the way, and when it’s clean dcne and can't be helped, they naturally gets used
to it. ‘Taint like white folks thats brought up ’specting to keep their wives and
children and all that. Niggers thats fetched up right hain’t no idees of that kind,
so these things comes easier.”

“Mine are not properly brought up then,” said Mr. Shelby.

“Spose not, you Kentucky folk spile your niggers. You mean well by ’em,
but ‘taint no real kindness arter all, for the rough and tumble when it comes is
harder on ’em. No, Mr. Shelby I think I treat niggers just as well as it’s ever worth
while to treat ‘em. Well, let me oy soon what you are going to do,” said Haley
aS he went away.

“Td like to have been able to kick the fellow down Stairs,” said Shelby to
himselt. “If anybody had ever told me I should sell Tom down south to one of those
rascally traders,I couldn't have believed it. So much for being in debt, and to a
fellow like that!”

Eliza had been kindly and carefully brought up by a kind mistress, and
happily married for some years to a bright handsome young man, named George Harris,
who was a Slave on a neighbouring estate.

Eliza was thinking over the strange words she had heard from Haley, with a
dread at her heart as to what they might mean, when a hand was laid on her shoulder.
She turned and with a bright smile exclaimed, “George! Who'd have thought of
' seeing you? Missis is out for the afternoon so we'll have the time all to ourselves.”
As she spoke she drew him into the little room opening to the verandah, where
She usually sat at her work, exclaiming, “How glad I am! Why don't you smile



CEORCE AND ELIZA 5



and look at Harry, isn’t he beautiful?’ said Eliza, lifting the boy’s long curls and
kissing him.

“| wish he'd never been born—I wish Id never been born myself,” said
George, bitterly.

Surprised and frightened, Eliza sat down, leaned her head on her husband's
shoulder, and burst into tears.

“There now, Eliza, it’s too bad for me to make you feel so, poor girl! I wish
you had never seen me, it would have been better for you.”

“What dreadful thing can have happened, George, to make you talk so?” said
Eliza, “I’m sure weve been very happy till now.”

“So we have, dear,” said George, drawing his child fondly on his knee, and
gazing at his glorious dark eyes.

“Just like you, Eliza, and you are ae handsomest woman I ever saw, and the
best I ever wish to see, but it’s all misery, misery!”

“Dear George, | know you have a hard master, but pray be patient- —

“Patient 2” said he interrupting her, “Did I say a word when he took me away
from the place where I was working hard. and everyone was kind to me, to put me
to work that any horse can do.”

‘It is dreadful,” said Eliza, “but after all he’s your master. you know.”

“Who made him my master? What right has he to me? I’m a better man
than he is, and know more about business, and he says he'll bring down my proud
Spirit, and puts me to the hardest and dirtiest work on purpose. Why only yesterday
as I was loading a cart with stones, that young Masr Tom stood slashing his whip



6 WNC 0 Ma SAL TIN:

so near the horse that the creature got frightened, and because I asked him not to
do it he turned on me, and his father told bim he might whip me till he was tired
if he liked. And he did it too—but Ill pay him out some day! Its all very well
for you, for you have been always kindly treated and well brought up, but I’ve been
kicked and cuffed and sworn at, and J won’t bear it, I won’t!’ Eliza trembled and
was Silent. “You know poor little Carlo you gave me?’ added George, “ihe creature
has been the greatest comfort I had, and kind of understood how [ felt, and as I was
feeding him the other day with a few scraps I picked up by the kitchen door, Mas’r
came along and said he couldn't afford to have every nigger keeping his dog, and
tied a stone to his neck and threw him into the pond. Poor thing, he looked so sad
at me as if he wondered why { didnt save him. I had to take a flogging because
I wouldnt drown him myself—I don’t care—Mas'r will find out I’m one that whipping
woni tame.”

“Oh, George, dont do anything wicked. if you only trust in God and try to
do right He will deliver you.”

“lain't a Christian like you, Eliza, but you don't know all. Mas'r says I
shan’t come to see you any more.”

“But we are married,” Said Eliza quietly

“Don't you know a Slave can’t be married by law? | can't hold you for my
wife, if Mas’r chooses to part us. That's why 1 wish I had never seen you—-that |
had never been born, or the boy either.”

“Mr Shelby is so kind to us!” said Eliza.



GEORGE AND ELIZA. 7

“Yes, but if he died the boy might be sold any day. The brighter and
handsomer he grows, the more likely he is to be taken from you.”

Eliza thought of the man she had seen, and turned pale and faint, but she
would not add to her husband’s trouble by telling him her fears.

Then he said, “Goodbye now, Eliza, for I’m going to Canada, and when I'm
there I'll buy you and the boy, God helping me, | will! You've a kind master who
won't refuse to sell you.”

“But what if you should be taken?”

“I won't be taken—lI1l die first! Hear my plan. Mas’r sent me down near
here thinking ’d come and tell you what he said, and I’m going home as if it was
all over. There are those that will help me, and in the course of a week or so |
shall be among the missing. Pray for me, Eliza, perhaps God will hear you.”

“Pray yourself, George, and trust in Him, then you won't do anything wicked.”

“Well, now good-bye,” Said George, looking earnestly upon her—then there were
last words, and sobs and bitter weeping, and the husband and wife were parted,
perhaps for ever.

ot Se “Ss
$13 Se



CHAPTER IL
AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

AXENCLE Tom’s cabin was a Small log building near his master’s house, witha
AE neat garden in front, where every Summer Strawberries, raspberries, and various
fruits and vegetables flourished. The cottage was covered by a large scarlet
begonia and a multiflora rose that, twining together, left scarce a sign of the
rough logs to be seen, with marigolds, petunias, and other brilliant annuais that
ss were the pride of Aunt Chloe’s heart. A round, black, shining face was hers,
oi and she looked proud of her position as the first cook in the neighbourhood,
~2°° which all allowed her to be. :

AS soon aS Aunt Chloe had retired from her duties as head cook at the house
for the day, she came home to her own fireside to “get her ole man’s Supper,” and then
a table was drawn up set out with cups and saucers of very gay pattern, and here
sat Uncle Tom awaiting his meal. He was a large, broad-chested, powerfully-made
man ofa full glossy black, with a face whose truly African features had an expression
of quiet good sense, kindness and benevolence. Young Mas’r George, a bright boy of
thirteen, was by Uncle Tom’s side, trying to teach him to write ona slate. “How easy
white folks allus does things,” said Aunt Chloe, looking at George with pride as she
carefully watched her cakes. “The way he can write and read too! It’s mighty interestin’.”

“But, Aunt Chloe, I’m getting very hungry”, said George, “isn’t that cake nearly done?”
“Most done, Mas'r George,” said Aunt Chloe, “brownin’ beautiful, a real lovely
brown. Let me ‘lone, for dat! Missis let Sally try to make some cake t’other day,






AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM’S CABIN. 9

jest to larn her she said. Oh go ’way Missis, says I, it really hurts my feelings to see
good vittles spoilt dat ar way! Cake ris’ all to one side, no shape at all, no more
than my shoe!”

With this Aunt Chloe took out a well baked pound cake, of which no city
confectioner need have been ashamed, and then began to bustle about in earnest.

“Here you, Mose and Pete, get out of de way you niggers! Get away, Polly,
mammy1l give her baby somefin by and bye. No, Masr George, you set down now
with my old man, and Pll take up de eS an have the hot cakes on your plates
in less dan no time.”

“They wanted me to come to Supper at the house,” said George, “but 1 knew
what was what too well for that.”

“So you did,” said Aunt Chloe, heaping the cakes on his plate, “You know’d
-your ole Aunty’d keep the best for you Let me ‘lone for dat!”

“Now for the cake,” said George, flourishing a large knife over it.

“La bless you, Masr George,” said Aunt Chloe earnestly, “you wouldn’t cut
it with dat ar great heavy knife?~ Smash all down, spile de pretty rise of it. I’ve
got a thin ole knife a purpose. Now eat away, you won't get anything to beat dat ar.”

When Mas’r George had arrived at that pass to which even a boy can come,
when he really could not eat another morsel, he had time to notice the woolly heads
and glistening eyes that were looking on hungrily from the opposite corner.

“Here, Aunt Chloe,” said he, “Mose and Pete want some too—bake them
some cakes.”

George and Tom moved to the chimney corner, and Aunt Chloe having placed



10 WEN Cth = Oe MSC ACBHENG



a heap of cakes on the table, took her baby on her lap and fed it, giving some to
Mose and Pete, who ate theirs rolling about under tie table.

“Oh, go long,” said the mother, with a kick here and there under the table,
«Can't ye be quiet when white folk come to see ye? Better mind what ye're about or
lll take ye down a button-hole lower, when Mas’r George is gone.”

It is hard to say what this terribie threat meant, but the boys didn’t seem
to mind it much, and coming out with hands and faces smeared with treacle, they
began to kiss the baby.

“Get ‘long wid ye, Said the mother, pushing away their woolly heads.
"Yell all stick together and never get clar. Go ‘long to the Spring and wash
yourselves. Did ye ever see such aggravating young ‘uns?’ added Aunt Chloe when
they were gone, and having washed the baby’s face, she laid her down in Tom’s lap.
He set her on his broad shoulder, and began capering and dancing with her, while
Mose and Pete, who had now come back, roared round him like young bears.

“Well now I hopes you're done,’ said Aunt Chloe, when she had cleared away
the Supper, “we’s going to have de meeting, but what we’s to do for chairs I declare
-I don’t know.’ ;

As the “meetings” had been held weekly for some time at Uncle Tom’s
without any more chairs, it seemed likely this difficulty would be got over.

“Old Uncle Peter sung both de legs out of dat oldest cheer, last week,”
said Mose. s

“You go ‘long, praps you pulled ‘em out some of your shines,” replied
Aunt Chloe.







AN EVEN ING IN NCP ONS CoN Bale Ne 11
“We'll get Uncle Peter into it,” said Mose, “and den he'll begin ‘Come saints
and sinners hear me tell, and den, down he’li go!” and Mose imitated the old man’s
voice, tumbling on the floor at the end to shew the supposed disaster.
“Come now, aint yer shamed?” said Aunt Chloe. “Mas’r George is such a
beautiful reader, I know hell stay to read for us.”

George readily agreed to this, and soon the room was filled with Cees)
of all ages who took part heartily in singing the spirited hymns about “Going to
glory, “New Jerusalem,’ “Canaan’s Fields; and “Jordan’s banks,” which negroes always
prefer to any others. Mas’r George read by request the last chapter of the Revelation,
with an occasional explanation of his own thrown in, and it was agreed on all sides
that it was really ‘mazing how he did it. Then the meeting ended with one of the
simpie earnest prayers that good Uncle Tom well knew how to offer up to God, and
that always went to the heart of those for whom he prayed.

While this was going on in Uncle Tom’s cabin, Mr. Shelby was signing ihe
papers that were to dispose of his faithful old servant, and as he handed them to
Haley with a heavy sigh, added,

“T hope youll remember, Haley, that you promised on your honour not to
sell Tom without knowing what sort of hands he’s going to.”

“Not unless ’m obliged to, said the trader, “however I'll do the very best
I can to eet Tom a eood berth,” and with that he took his departure.

When Mr. Shelby rejoined his wife that night, she asked him who the common
fellow was, who had come to dinner with them that day.



cole USN GE 0 Ms 6 AB LN.

“A man named Haley, with whom I had some business lately,” answered Mr.
Shelby moving rather uneasily in his chair.

‘Is he a negro-trader?” said Mrs. Shelby remarking her husband’s manner.

“Why, dear, what put that into your head?” said he, looking up.

“Why, Eliza came in here after dinner, crying and miserable, and said you
were talking to a trader and that she heard him make an offer for her boy, the
ridiculous little goose!”

“She did, eh?” said Mr. Shelby, at a loss what to say.

“IT told Eliza,” added Mrs. Shelby «that 1 was sure you never meant to sell any
of our people, least of all to a man like that.”

“Tve always felt and said so, Emily,” said her husband, “but I’m sorry to
say I can’t help it—I shall have to sell some of my hands.”

“Notto that creature? You cannot mean what you say.”

‘I do indeed. I’ve agreed to sell Tom!”

“What, our good faithful Tom? Your servant from a boy? Why we have
promised him his freedom a hundred times! I can believe anything now—even that
you could sell little Harry, poor Eliza’s only child,” said Mrs. Shelby in a tone of grief
and anger.

“If you must know the truth then, I have agreed to sell Tom and Harry both.
After all it’s no more than everybody does.”

“But why sell them, of all others on the place?”

“Because they are worth the most. The fellow would have paid a high price
for Eliza, only I wouldn't listen to it for a moment for your sake,” said Mr. Shelby.









AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM’S CABIN, 13

‘Do let me Say a good word for these poor creatures,” said his wife earnestly.
«Tom is a noble-hearted faithful fellow, if he is black. I believe he would lay down
his life for you. I have tried so hard to do my duty to these poor helpless people
and teach them what was right, and how can! bear to let them see that we care more
for a little money than for their precious souls?”

“J am sorry to pain you, Emily, and | know you are right in your feelings,

but I am in this Haley's power, and he will not settle my debt to him in any other
way. It would be worse if we had to sell all our people.”

“This is God’s curse on slavery” said Mrs. Shelby bitterly, “It is a sin to hold
a slave under laws like ours—I always felt it was!”

“(m very, very sorry, but the thing is done, and you must be thankful it is
no worse. In fact Haley wants to take them away to-morrow. I can’t bear to see Tom,
so [ shall go out early, and you had better take Eliza somewhere out of the way.”

“No, [ will have nothing to do with this cruel business. [ll go and see poor
old Tom in his trouble. As to Eliza | dare not-think of her.” .

There was one listener to these words that Mr. and Mrs. Shelby little suspected,
forina large closet opening out of their room, poor Eliza had hidden herself in the
restless state of her mind, and had heard all that was said.

When all was still, she crept away pale and shivering to her own pretty room.
where her boy lay asleep on the bed with a smile on his happy little face.

“Poor boy! they have sold you, but your mother will save you yet!” said Eliza.
She could not shed a tear, but taking a piece of paper and a pencil she wrote hastily —
“Dear Missis, don’t think me ungrateful—don’t think hard of me! I heard all you and



14 UNC TE Oise ABN

master said to-night. 1 am going to try and save my boy. God bless and reward you
for all your kindness!”

Then she made up a small bundle of clothing for her boy, which she tied
round her waist, not forgetting even at that terrible moment, to take one or two of his
favourite toys, and arousing the little sleeper, she dressed him and put on her own
ponnet and shawl, whispering as she did so, “Harry mustn’t speak loud or they'll
hear us. A Wicked man was coming to carry Harry away in the dark, but Mother
won't let him, so she’s going to run off with her little boy.”

It was a sparkling, frosty, starlight night, and the mother wrapped the
shawl close round her child, as he clung round her neck. A few minutes brought
them to the window of Uncle Tom’s cottage, and Eliza, stopping, tapped lightly on
the window.

The prayer meeting had lasted a long time, and Uncle Tom had sung some
hymns alone afterwards, so he and Chloe were not yet asleep, although it was between
twelve and one o'clock.

“What’s that?” said Aunt Chloe, starting up—“Why, if it ain’t “Liza! Get on
your clothes quick, ole man. I’m goin’ to open the door.”

The door flew open, and the light fell on Eliza’s worn face and dark
wild eyes.

‘I’m skeered to look at you, Lizy? Are ye tuck sick, or what’s come over ye?”

‘Tm running away, Uncle Tom and Aunt Chloe, carrying off my child. Master
sold him!”

‘Sold him?” exclaimed both, lifting up their hands in horror.



AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM’S CABIN. 15



“Yes, sold him!” said Eliza firmly. “I crept into the closet. by Missis’s door
to-night, and heard Master tell Missis that he had sold my Harry a you, Uncle
Tom, to a trader.”

Tom had stood during this speech like a man in a dream, and slowly, as
its meaning grew clear to him, he sank upon his old chair, and bowed his head
down over his knees.

“The good Lord have pity on us!” said Aunt Chloe, “It can’t be true! What
has he done that Mas’r should sell him?” .

“He hasn't done anything, it isn’t for that. Masr don’t want to sell, but he
told Missis this man had got power over him, and if he didn’t pay him a debt clear
off, he would have to sell the place and all the people. Master said he was sorry,
but if Missis ain’t a Christian and an angel there never was one. I’m a wicked girl
to leave her so, but | can’t help it. God forgive me if | am wrong.”

“Well, ole man, why dont you go too?” said Aunt Chloe. “Will you wait to
be taken down river, where they kill niggers with hard work? ld rather die than
go there any day! Be off with "Lizy, you've got a pass to come and go any time.”

Tom slowly raised his head,and looking round sadly said:

“No, no—I aint going. Let ‘Liza go, it’s her right. ‘Taint in natur for her
to stay. But you heard what she said. If I must be sold or all the people on the
place go to ruin, why let me be sold. I s’pose I can bear it as well as any on ’em.
Mas always found me on the spot, he always will. I have never broke trust nor
used my paSS noways contrary to my word, and | never will. Mas’r ain't to blame,
Chloe, and he’ll take care of you and the poor—” Here he turned to the rough trundle-bed



16 UNCUE 0 Mes CABIN

full of little woolly heads, and fairly broke down. He covered his face with
his large hands, sobs, heavy hoarse and loud, shook the chair, and great tears fell
through his fingers to the floor.

“And now,” Said Eliza as she was going away, “l saw my husband only to-day,
and he told me he was so hard pushed, he was going to run away. Do try to send
him word how | went and why, and tell him I'm going to try and find Canada. Tell
him—if I never see him again—to be as good as he can, and try and meet me in
heaven.” And with her child in her arms, Eliza glided away.



CHAPTER IIL
CROSSING SHE OF 10:






is impossible to imagine a more forlorn and desolate creature than Eliza,
when she left Uncle Tom’s cabin.

Her husband’s suffering and danger, and the dread of losing her child,
made. her forget the risk of leaving the only home she had ever known, and
- her motherly love blinded her to all she would have to go through to save
&s her boy. Although he was old enough to walk by her side, she could
~ not bear to put him out of her arms, and as she went rapidly forward,
~Z2 she hardly felt his weight in the excited state of her mind. She had
ae been to a little village near the Ohio river, and knew the way well, and
to go there and cross the river was her first idea; beyond that she could only
hope and pray for God’s help She walked on and on until sunset, only stopping
once or twice during the whole day to rest and take the most necessary food.
She was far beyond the places where she was known to anyone, and she and
the child being quite white enough not to call attention to themselves on account of
colour, she passed without notice to the river bank. It was early spring, and great
cakes of ice were wedged in by the bends in the water as it swept round the points
of land, until they formed a sort of floating raft,that filled up the river almost from
one shore to the other. Eliza at once saw that this state of things must have stopped
the ferry- boat from running, and finding this was so, Sat down at a little inn to



18 UN Ci Es OFM SiG AB INE



rest until she could find some way of crossing. She told the landlady she was
hastening to a Sick child on the other side, and laying the tired boy upon a bed. sat
by him until he was fast asleep. For her there was no rest.

Meanwhile her flight had caused a general sensation at home, and aS may
be supposed Haley was in a great rage at losing part of his bargain. He at once
prepared to ride after Eliza, but it was pretty well guessed on the place that Mrs.
Shelby would be very glad if she escaped, and many delays in catching and taming
the horses occurred before he could get fairly off.

“Sarve him right,” said Aunt Chloe, when news was brought her, in the kitchen
that “Mas Haley was mighty oneasy at havin’ to wait so long.” “He'll get wus nor
uneasy if he dont mend his ways. He’s broke a many, many hearts. Don’t he pull
off and sell de little children, and tear husband and wife apart, when it’s taking
the very life of em. Lor; if the devil don’t get sich as him, what’s he good for?” And
here Aunt Chloe began to cry and sob in good earnest.

“You oughter thank God you ain't like him, Chloe,” said Uncle Tom. ‘I'd
rather be sold ten thousand times over than have all that ar critter’s vot to answer
for.” The bell here rang for Tom.

“Tom, Said his master kindly, “I want to tell you that I snall have to pay
this gentleman a thousand dollars, if youre not here when he wants you. You can
have to-day to yourself. Go where you like, boy.”

“And mind,” added Haley, “don’t come it over your master, with any of your
nigger tricks—I wouldn't trust any on ye.”



CARS O*Sr5 IN Gee Hee One O: mules



“Mas’r,” Said Tom, “Have I ever broke word to you, since you was put into
my arms by ole Missis as a baby when I was eight years old till now?”

The tears came into Mr. Shelby’s eyes, as he replied.

‘It is quite true. If I could help it, no one should buy you.”

“AS sure aS | am a Christian woman,” said Mrs. Shelby to Haley, “I will buy
him back as soon as I can. Be sure you let me know to whom you sell him.”

From all the delays that had taken place,it was about an hour after Eliza
had reached the village, that her pursuers came riding into it. One of the blacks
who saw her at the window gave her a signal, and catching her child in her arms
she sprang out by a side door near the river. The trader saw her as she ran to
the bank, and in a moment was after her like a hound after a deer. Her feet seemed
to her scarce to touch the ground, and with the strength of despair giving one wild
cry and flying leap, she vaulted clear over the rough current near the shore, on tc
the raft of ice beyond!

The huge green fragment of ice on which she alighted creaked as her weight
came on it, but she Stayed there not a moment. With wild cries she leaped to another
and still another cake—her shoes were gone, her stockings cut from her feet, while
blood marked every step, but she saw and felt nothing, till dimly as in a dream, she
Saw the Ohio side, and a man helping her up the bank.

Haley had stood looking on amazed till Eliza had Seopa aeT when he turned
inquiringly to his assistants, Sam and Andy, saying:

“The gal’s got seven devils in her, I think!”

9



20 USN GEE I OeMcs) (CA BEN:

“Wall now,” said Sam, chuckling—‘“I hope Mas’r ’scuse us tryin’ dat ar road.
Don’t feel spry enough for dat, no way.”

“Laugh if you dare!” said the trader with a growl.

“Bless you, Mas’r, I can’t help it, “said Sam, “She looked so cur’ous a leapin
aw springin’, ice a crackin, to hear her plump! splash! how she goes it” And Sam
and Andy laughed till the tears rolled down their cheeks.

“[ll make you laugh tother side yer mouths; said Haley, laying about him
with his riding-whip.

Both ducked, and got on their horses, before he was up the bank.

“Good evenin’, Mas’r,” said Sam gravely “Mas’r Haley won't want us no more
to-night, Missis wouldn't hear of our ridin’ de critters over Lizzy’s bridge nohow,” and
he and Andy started off at full speed.

Eliza made her desperate way over the river in the dusk of twilight, and the
grey mist of evening rising from the water, the swollen current and masses of ice
placed a hopeless barrier between her and her pursuers; so Haley went discontentedly
back to the little inn to think what he could do. After a time he met there, by good
luck as he thought, two old acquaintances of his to whom he related his troubles, and
as their business was to catch runaway slaves, they soon agreed to recover the boy
for Haley, on condition of keeping Eliza to sell on their own account.

On the very night of poor Eliza’s mad flight, the wife and children of Senator
Bird of Ohio State were rejoicing over his unexpected return home after an absence
of some days. When he had rested and refreshed himself a little with the comforts
of his own fireside, his gentle loving little wife asked him if it was true that a law







CROSSING THE OHIO. 21

had just been passed forbidding people to help or shelter the poor slaves that come
over from Kentucky, and when he owned that this had been done, she exclaimed,

‘Its a shameful, wicked law, and I'll break it for one the first time I geta
chance! I put it to you, John, would you turn away a poor, shivering, hungry creature
from your door, because he was a runaway? Would you, now?”

To tell the truth Mr. Bird had a kind nature, and his wife knew it too, so he
was rather at a loss what to say.

“Of course it would be a very painful duty,” he began.

“Don't use that word, John”, interrupted his wife. “It can’t bea duty If people
want to keep their slaves from running away, let em treat ’em well. And when they
do run away they suffer enough from cold and hunger and fear, without everybody

turning against them, and law or no law, I never will! You wouldn't do it either any
sooner than 1.”

At this moment Mrs. Bird was called away, and fetching her husband directly
afterwards, they saw in the kitchen of their own house a young delicate woman, with
the fatal tinge of colour of the despised race on her sad sorrowful face, lying faint
and: he!pless on two chairs. The old black cook was explaining how the poor thing
had begged shelter from the cold, when the woman opened her a dark eyes, and
sprang up with a look of agony, saying,

“My Harry! have they got him?’ The boy ran to her as she spoke, and then
turning to Mrs. Bird she cried — “Do protect me, Ma’ am. Don’t let them get him!”

“You are safe here, no one shall hurt you’, said Mrs. Bird kindly.



bo
bo

UN CE Ose Ss CAB EN:
A bed was hastily made for the poor woman near the fire, and soon she fell
into a sound sleep, with her arm still around her boy When she awoke, calm and sad
once more, Mrs. Bird asked her where she came from and who she was.

“I came from Kentucky, and I crossed the ice!” said she.

“But the ice is all broken up, in great frozen masses’, said Mr. Bird.

“I know it, but I did it! I didn’t think I should get over, but I didn’t care. |
could but die if I didn’t. The Lord helped me—nobody knows how much the Lord
can help ‘em till they try.”

«Were you a Slave?’ Asked Mr. Bird.

“Yes, I had a kind master and mistress.”

“Then what made you run away from them?” said Mrs. Bird.

Eliza looked keenly at Mrs. Bird, who was in deep mourning, and said
suddenly,

“Have you ever lost a child, Ma’am?”

Mrs. Bird burst into tears, but as soon aS she could speak, replied,

‘T have just lost a little one, but why do you ask?”

“Then you will feel for me. I have lost two, and | had only this one
left, and Ma'am, they sold him, a baby that had never been away from his mother
in his life. So when I knew this I took him and came off in the night, an’ the man
that bought him and some of Mas’r’s folks chased me. Then I jumped right on to the
ice, and how I got across | don’t know.”

Eliza did not shed a tear, but all who heard her were deeply touched, even
the Senator. At last he turned suddenly round upon her and said,



GR OS Sa NGa dh eB 0 He: 23

“How came you to tell me you had a kind master?”

“Because he was kind, but he couldn't help himself. He owed money, and had
to give in to this trader and let him have my boy. But I couldn’t stand it.”

“Have you no husband?”

“Yes, but his master is real hard to him, and threatens to sell him down
south. [t's like P11 never see him again.”

“And where do you méan to go?” asked Mrs. Bird.

“Ta Canada. Is it very far off?” said Eliza, earnestly.

“Well see what we can do for you in the morning,” said Mrs. Bird, “mean-
while try to rest, poor woman. Put your trust in God, He will protect you.”

Mr. Bird and his wife returned to their room, and coming up to her he said:

“Shell have to get away this very night. That fellow will be here after her
early 10 morrow morning. A pretty thing for me if they were caught in my house!
They'll have to be got off tonight. [ve been thinking if I could get her to Van
Tromp’s, the man that came over from Kentucky, and set all his slaves free—he lives
up in the back woods, and there she'd be safe enough. The plague of the thing is,
nobody could drive there tonight but me, as the creek has to be crossed twice, and
no one who doesn’t know it as well as 1 do, can do it without danger. Cudjoe musi
put in the horses about 12, and I'll take her over, so mind she’s all ready to come.
And Mary, | don’t know how you feel, but there’s the drawer full—of poor little
Henrys things—some of them might do for the boy.”

Good little Mrs. Bird did not want telling twice to do a kindness, and put-
ting together a few of her lost darling’s treasured up clothes for the poor mother



24 UNCLE Eel OMS] Cae IN:

more suffering than herself, and dressing the fugitive in useful things of her own,
sent her on her way over the rough swampy road that led to the dwelling of honest
John Van Tromp. It was full late in the night when the carriage stopped, dripping
and splashed, at the door of a large farm-house, the owner of which at length
appeared.

“Are you the man to shelter a poor woman and child from slave-catchers ?”
asked Mr. Bird.

“I rather think I'am,” said honest John— “I’ve got seven sons each six foot
high, and we'll all be ready for em if they come here!”

Weary and worn out,Eliza dragged herself up to the door with her child
lying asleep on her arm. The rough man lighted her in, opened the door of a small
bed —room next the kitchen, and told her to yo in, adding,

“Now I say, gal, you needn’t be a bit afeard, let who will come here. lm up
to all that sort of thing, and those that know me won't try to get anybody out of my
house when I’m agin it. So you jest go to sleep as quiet as if your mother was
rocking you,’ Said he as he shut the door.

“She’s an uncommon handsome ‘un, added he to Mr. Bird, who told her story
in a few words.

“Ou! Ah! I tell ye what—these yer things make me comé the nighest to
Swearin’ of most anything,” said honest John.

When the Senator took leave of him, he put a ten-dollar note into his hand.

‘It’s for her,” was all he said.

“Ay—ay!” answered John, as they shook hands at parting.







Eva

Saves

Bncle Tom



CHAPTER IV.
UNCLE TOM’S FAREWELL.





he February morning looked grey and drizzling through the window of Uncle

ee Tom's cabin. It looked on sad faces there! The little table stood before the

2sifire, and on it was spread out a coarse clean shirt which Aunt Chloe was
bt ~=« ironing, every now and then raising her hand to her face, to wipe away the
‘ig tears that were running down her cheeks. Tom sat by with his Testament
_-jH\e open on his knee, but neither spoke. It was yet early, the children lay all
ci cot asleep together in their rude trundle-bed, and Tom got up and walked silently
Ss" +o look at them. 3

‘Its the last time!” he said.

“S‘pose we must bear it—but how can I?” said poor Aunt Chloe, as she sat
down aud began to cry. “Misses says shell try and get ye back in a year or two,
but nobody comes up ihat goes down thar. I’ve heard tell how dey works ’em on dem-
ar plantations”.

«There'll be the same God there, Chloe, as here.”

“Well,” said Aunt Chloe, “S’pose dere will, but de Lord lets drefful things
happen sometimes. I don’t seem to get no comfort dat way.”

“’m in the Lord’s hands,” said Tom, “and there's one thing | can thank him
for. Its me that’s sold, and not you nor the children. What comes will come only on
me, and the Lord will help me—I know he will.”

a



26 7 UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

“Any way, there’s wrong about it somewhar,” said Aunt Chloe, “Im clar of that”

“Ye ought to look up to the Lord above, there don’t a sparrow fall without Him.”

‘It don’t seem to comfort me, but I ‘spect it oughter,’ said Aunt Chloe, “but
der’s no use talkin, Tl jest bake the corn-cake, and get ye one good breakfast, cause
nobody knows when yell get another.”

Mrs. Shelby had excused Aunt Chloe’s attendance at the great house that morn-
ing, and the poor soul had spent all her care on this farewell feast, cooked her nic
est chicken, prepared her corn-cake just to her husband's taste, and brought out some
preserves kept for special occasions. .

“Oh, Pete,” said Mose joyfully, “aint we got a buster of a breakfast”!

Aunt Chloe gave him a sudden box on the ear.

“Thar now! Crowin’ over the last breakfast yer poor Daddy’s goin’ to have to home!”

“Oh, Chloe!’ said Tom gently.

‘IT can’t help it. Ts so tossed about, it makes me act ugly,” said Chloe hiding
her face in her apron, then taking up the baby and wiping her eyes she added.

“Now, I’s done | hope. Do eat somethin’. This yer’s my nicest chicken. Thar,
boys—ye shall have some—yer Mammy’s been cross to yer.”

The boys needed no second invitation tc eat all they could get, and bustling
about after breakfast Aunt Chloe said:

“Now [ must put up yer clothes. Jest like as not he'll take ’em all away.
These here’s your old shirts, and these yer is new ones—so be careful ‘cause there
wont nobody make yer no more! To think on’t, no critter to do for ye, sick or well!”
and Aunt Chloe laid her head on the box, and sobbed again.



UENCE OM Sie ACR EW EE. 2

The boys now began to cry too, and Tom taking the baby on his knee let
her enjoy herself in her own way, by scratching his face and pulling his hair.

“Ay, crow away, poor critter’ said Chloe, “Yell have to come to it too—yell
live to see yer husband sold or be sold yourself, jest as like as not—it’s no use
niggers havin’ nuthin.”

Here one of the boys called out— “Thar’s Missis a-comin’ in!”

“She cant do no good—what’s she comin’ for?” said Aunt Chloe, as she set
a chair for Mrs. Shelby, in a gruff crusty way. She seemed pale and unhappy, and
quietly looking at the silent group, sat down, and burst into tears. For a few
moments they all wept together, and in those tears melted away the bitter anger of
the oppressed. At last Mrs. Shelby said:

‘I can’t give you anything now to do you any good. But I promise you
faithfully that I will find out where you go, and bring you back as soon as | can
get the money. Till then, trust in God.”

Here the boys called out that Mas’r Haley was coming, and then a rough
kick pushed open the door. Haley stood there in a very bad humour, having ridden
hard the night before, and failed to capture his prey.

“Come, ye nigger, ain't ye ready?” said he, taking off his hat as he saw
Mrs. Shelby. Aunt Chloe shut and corded the box, and getting up looked gruffly on
the trader.

Tom rose up meekly to follow his new master carrying his heavy box on
his shoulder. His wife took the baby in her arms to go with him to the waggon,
and the children, still crying, followed them.



UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

to
DP



Mrs. Shelby, walking up to Haley, talked to him earnestly for a few minutes,
while the family party proceeded to a waggon that stood ready at the door. A crowd
of the hands on the place was there to bid farewell to their old Christian leader
and friend, and much grief was felt, especially by the women. |

“Get in!’ said Haley to Tom, as he strode through the crowd of servants,
who were frowning on him.

Tom got in, and Haley drawing from under the seat a pair of heavy fetters,
fastened them round each ankle. A groan of indignation was heard, and Mrs. Shelby
spoke from the verandah.

“Mr. Haley, those fetters are quite unnecessary.”

“Don't know, Ma’am, I’ve lost one five hundred dollars from this yer place,
and I can’t afford to run. no more risks.”

“What else could she ’spect on him?” said Chloe, angrily, while the two boys
now clung sobbing to her gown.” :

‘[m sorry,” said Tom, «that Mayr George happened to be away. Give my
love to Mast George.” Haley whipped up the horse, and with a steady sad look fixed
to the last on the old place, Tom was whirled away along the dusty road until
Haley suddenly drew un at a blacksmiths shop, to have some alteration made in a
pair of handcuffs.

“These yer’s a little too small for him,” said Haley pointing to Tom.

“What? Shelby’s Tom sold? Who'd have ets it? Ye needn't go to fetterin
him up like this. He’s the faithfullest best critter— —

“Yes--yeS, Said Haley, “your good fellers are just the ones to want to run off.”



DNC 1 OMS FAR EWE 0, 29


















‘



“Well,” said the i “hem. -
plantations down thar, stranger, ain’t ~
jest the place a Kentuck nigger wants.
to go to. A feller can’t help thinkin’ ~
it’s a pity to have a quiet likely feller like Tom gO
to be done for, on.une of them thar sugar plantations
_ “Wall—he’s got a fair chance. I promised to
do well by him. Ill get him house servant in some % .
good old family, and then he'll have as good a bert
Tom was sitting very sadly outside the shop while ‘this conversation was
going on. Suddenly he heard the click of a horse’s hoof behind him, and before
he could believe his eyes, George sprang into the waggon, threw his arms round his
neck, and sobbed and scolded aloud.
“IT declare it's a nasty, mean shame! I don't care what they say, any of ’em.
If I were a man they shouldn't do it, they shouldn't!’ said George with a kind of howl.

ee On Tee, a eee NS het ea ee ee



302 Se UN CE SO Mes) CA Ns



“Oh, Mas George, this does me good!” said Tom, “I couldn’t bear to go off
without seein’ you!’ Here Tom made a movement and as George’s eye fell on the
fetters he exclaimed.

«What a shame! Jl knock that old fellow down!”

“No you wont, Mas’ George. It wont help me to anger him.”

“T wont then for your sake, but isnt ii a Shame? They never sent for me,
nor told me, and if it hadnt been for Tom Lincoln, I shouldnt have heard it. I can
tell you | blew ’em all up at home!”

“That ar wasn’t right, Mas’ George.”

“Cant help it—its a shame! Look here, Uncle Tom,” said he, turning his back
to the shop and speaking in a low tone. “I’ve brought you my dollar!”

“T couldn't think of takin’ it, Masr George, no ways,” said Tom.

“But you shall take it,’ said George.

“Look here, I told Aunt Chloe I'd do it, and she ied me to make a hole
in it and put a String through, to hang it round your neck out of sight, or else this
mean scamp would take it away! I should like to blow him up, Tom, it would do me good.”

‘It wont do me no good, Masr George.”

“Then I won't for your sake,” said George tying his dollar round Tom’s neck.
“Now button your coat tight over it, and remember every time you see it that I'll come
down after you and bring you back. Aunt Chloe and I have been talking about it. Vl
see to it, [11 tease Father’s life out if he dont do it.”

“And now, Masr George, ye must be a good boy. Allus keep close to yer
mother. Don't be geitin’ into any .o them foolish ways boys has of gettin’ too big



UNCEE TOMS PARE WELT. 31

to mind their mothers. Tell ye what, Masr George, the Lord gives many good
things twice over, but He don’t give ye a mother but once. So now you hold on to
her, and grow up to be a comfort to her, thars my own good boy. You will now,
won't ye?”

“Yes, I will, Uncle Tom,” said George earnestly.

“Youll grow up to be a larned good man, and all the people on the place
and your Father and Mother’ll be so proud on ye. Be a good Masr like your Father,
and a good Christian like your Mother,” said Uncle Tom stroking the boy’s fine curly
head with his large strong hand.

‘lll be real good, Uncle Tom, I'm going to be a first-rater. And [11 have:
you back to the place yet, as I told Aunt Chloe this morning. Youll have good
times yet.”

Haley now came back with the handcuffs in his hand.

“Look here now, Mister, said George in a grand way, “I Shall let Father and
Mother know how you treat Uncle Tom.”

“Yowre welcome,” answered the trader. :

“| should think you'd be ashamed to spend your life buying and selling men
and women, and chaining them like cattle!” said George.

“So long as your grand folks want to buy ‘em Im as good as they is, ‘taint
any meaner sellin’ on ‘em than tis buyin.”

"ll never do either when Im a man,” replied George, “Im ashamed to be a
Kentuckian. I always was proud of it before. Well, goodbye, Uncle Tom, keep up
your spirits,“ said George, sitting very Straight on his horse as he rode away.



32 TEN Ca 0: Mas Ac ENG

“Goodbye, Masr George, God bless you, Kentucky haint got many like you” said
Tom looking fondly after the frank boyish face as it was lost to view. Over his heart
there seemed to be a warm spot where those young hands had placed that precious dollar.

“Now I tell ye what, Tom,’ said Haley as he came up to the waggon, and
threw in the handcuffs, “You treat me far and IJ1 treat you far. I[ aint never hard
on my niggers. Ye'd better jest settle down comfortable, and not try no tricks, ‘cause
niggers tricks of all sorts ['m up to, and it's no use. If niggers is quiet and don't
try to get off, they has good times with me, and if they don’t, why its thar fault
not mine.”





CHAPTER V.
THE ESCARE:

a “traveller arrived late one drizzly afternoon at a small country hotel in a
: village of Kentucky, and going up to the jolly crackling fire, was struck by
seeing a large hand-bill hung up against the wall, which was being eagerly
tead by a group of men standing near it. Mr. Wilson—that was the old
gentleman’s name-took out his spectacles and putting them on, carefully stu-
. died the contents of the paper: “Ran away my mulatto boy George, 6 feet
/ in height, almost white, brown curly hair: very intelligent, speaks well, can
5 read and write. Branded in right hand with the letter I. Four hundred
dollars for him dead or alive, the same for proof of his death.”

A tall stranger standing near Mr. Wilson remarked— “Such papers as these
are a shame to Kentucky. I’ve got a gang of boys, sir. I let ’em feel free to go whar
they like, and they know I’ve got free papers ready for ‘em all when I die, and I tell
ye, Stranger, there ain't a man in our parts gets more out of his niggers than | do.”

“| think you are right, friend,” said Mr. Wilson,’ and this boy named here is
a fine fellow—no mistake about that—he worked once for me, and was my best hand,
sir. He invented a clever machine too for cleaning hemp, used in many factories—his
master has a patent for it.”

‘He holds it, I spose and makes money of it, and then brands the boy in
his right hand; he’s a nice ‘un!”





34 e TON Cal SEO Me Sec AlBaGN:

Here a small one-horse chaise drove up to the inn, and a well-dressed, tall,
handsome-looking man entered the room. He had a dark Spanish complexion, fine
black eyes and hair, and walking quietly up to the bar gave in his name as Henry
Butler, Oaklands, Shelby County, asked for a private room, and sat down to wait
while it was got ready for him.

Mr. Wilson had not been able to take his eyes from the stranger from the
moment of his appearance, and at last the latter seemed to recognise him, and walking
up gave his hand as he said—‘“Mr. Wiison, I think? I see you remember me?”

“Yes—sir—” answered Wilson, half reluctantly. “I should like to see you, sir,
in my room for a few minutes on business!” said the stranyer.

“When they were alone, the young man locked the door, put the key inte his
pocket, and faced Mr. Wilson.

“George?” said Mr. Wilson.

“Yes, George—I’m well disguised you see, don't answer to the description at
all. A little walnut-bark made my yellow skin a Spanish brown, and I've dyed my
hair black.”

“I know, George, your master isn’t all he ought to be, but you shouldn’t run
away—it’s against the law—you're running an awful risk. If youre taken youll be
worse off than ever—they’ll half kill you and sell you down river.”

“Mr. Wilson, I know I run a risk’--said George, “but I’ve got pistols aot
me—and down South I never will go! If it comes to that I can earn six feet of free
soil in Kentucky for myself!”



THE ESCAPE > 35



‘Why George, this state of mind is awful! You surely wouldn't break the
laws of your country?” said Mr. Wilson, nervously.

“I have no country,’ said the young man bitterly. My mother was a slave,
and | saw her put up to sale with her seven children, all sold to different masters!
L lay awake whole nights when | was a little fellow, and cried for my mother and
sisters; never had a kind word said to me till | came to work in your factory, Sir.
You were good to me, and God knows I am grateful for it. Then I found my good
beautiful wife, and last of all my master comes between her and me, and says 1 must
give her up. Sir, these things the law of Kentucky allows, but | have no country!
I only want to be allowed to leave yours in peace—when I get to Canada, that shall
be my country, where I am free!

“Go ahead, George, go ahead—but be careful, my boy—don't shoot anybody —at
least | wouldn't you know” said good Mr. Wilson, walking up and down the room.
“Where's your wife, George>”

“Gone, Sir—with her chil” in her arms—no one knows where.”

“Is it possible? From such a kind family.”

“Kind families sometimes get into debt, and have to sell children away from
their mothers to pay with,’ said George bitterly.

“Well, well,” said the kind old man, taking a rollof notes from his pocket-book,
which he offered to George—“You must take this to help you, my boy—money goes
a long way everywhere—you can’t have too much if you get it honestly.”

“IT think | have money enough, Sir,” said George, “but I will take it if I may
repay you again when I car. I have a faithful black friend who will go with me



36 UCN CHAE 1 OsM Sat CeneB iN,

as far as Ohio, and put me with some friends there, and to-morrow night I hope to
get so far safely. I shall travel boldly by daylight, though I feel I am running a
terrible risk—So good-bye, sir. If you hear I’m taken, you may know I’m dead!”

“Take heart, George, and trust in the Lord. Youre a brave fellow. Everything
will be set right—if not in this world in another.”

“Thank you for saying that, sir. Ill think of that,’ said George, as Mr. Wilson
left the room. ;

A quiet Scene now rises before us. A large roomy, neatly painted kitchen,
its yellow floor smooth, without an atom of dust upon it: rows of shining tins for
cooking all sorts of good things to eat; glossy green wood chairs, old and firm, a
small rocking-chair with patchwork cushions, and a large comfortable one with tempting
feather cushions, in which sat our old friend Eliza at work. She looked paler and
thinner than in her old Kentucky home, and as her dark eye followed the gambols
of her little Harry, who was playing on the floor beside her, it had an earnest depth
of resolve that never was there in earlier and happier days. Near her sat a woman
about sixty, whose snowy cap, plain white muslin handkerchief smoothly folded over
her bosom, and grey dress, shewed her to be a Quaker. She had a face that time
Seemed to touch only to make it sweeter and more loveable; her silvery hair was
neatly parted over a placid forehead, beneath which shone a pair of clear, honest,
loving brown eyes.

“And so thee thinks still of going to Canada, Eliza?’ she said.

“Yes, Mvam—I must go onward. I dare not stop,” said Eliza firmly.



det be Pes CAE: 37



“Thee knows thee can stay here as long as thee pleases,” continued Rachel
Halliday.
“Thank you? said Eliza warmly, “but I can’t rest. Last night I dreamt that
man was here!”

“Poor child!” said Rachel kindly. “The Lord hath ordered it so that never
has a fugitive been stolen from our village. | trust thou will not be the first,”

At this moment the door opened, and Mary, an honest rosy looking girl with
large brown eyes like her mother’s, came in.

“Mary, thee’d better fill the kettle,” said her mother gently. And while it
was boiling Rachel quietly proceeded to make some biscuits. Simeon Halliday, a tall
strong man in drab coat and trousers and broad-brimmed hat, now entered.

“Any news, Father?” said Rachel, putting her biscuits into the oven.

“Peter Stebbins told me they should be along to-night with friends,” said
Simeon, as he was washing his hands in a little back porch.

“Indeed?” Said Rachel looking anxiously at Eliza.

“Did thee say thy name was Harris?” asked Simeon of Eliza as he came
in again.

Eliza slowly answered “Yes,” half afraid that some one had found her out.

Then Simeon called Rachel away, and said to her:

“This child’s husband will be here to-night. He has come to the settlement
with Peter—he is a bright likely fellow too. Shall we tell her now?”

“We must, I couldn't bear to keep it from her.”

Rachel came out into the kitchen, and said gently to Eliza,



38 UNCLE 10M Se CABIN

“Come with me, my daughter—I have news for thee, nay it is good news” she
added as she led her into the next room.

Mary had taken up little Harry in her arms, and kissed him as she whispered,

“Thy father is coming, little one.”

Meanwhile Rachel drew Eliza tenderly to her, and Said;

“The Lord hath had mercy on thee, my child. Thy husband is among friends,
who will bring him here to-night.”

Eliza gazed upon her as in a happy dream, and soon overcome by the feeling
of perfect rest and peace after her long suffering, slept as she had not slept since
the fearful midnight hour when she had fled with her boy. She dreamt of a beautiful
home in a free land, where her boy played in freedom and joy; she heard her hus-
band’s footsteps coming nearer; his arms were around her, his tears on her face, and
she awoke! It was no dream. The daylight had long faded; her child lay asleep by
her side, and her husband was sobbing by her pillow!



CHAPTER VL
BVAss 1, CLARE

I hundred years ago the Mississippi was a river of mighty unbroken solitude,

HE rolling amid unknown wonders of vegetable and animal life. Now what

F other river of the world bears to the ocean, riches like those of a country

bringing forth all that grows between the tropics and the poles? The

Slanting light of the setting sun quivers on the sea-like breadth of the

river; the slender canes, and the tall dark cypress glow in the golden ray,
_ as the heavily laden steamboat marches onward.

“ye Piled with cotton-bales from many a plantation, we must look well
among her crowded decks before we shall find again our friend Uncle Tom, sitting
in a little nook among the cotton bales. He had gradually won the confidence even
of a man like Haley, and for some time had been allowed to come and go freely
where he pleased on the boat. He was ever ready to lend a helping hand to any
work that was going on, and when he had nothing to do, he climbed to a nook among
the cotton on the upper deck, and spelt over his Bible to himself.

For a hundred or more miles above New Orleans the river is higher than the
country around, and the traveller from the deck of the steamer overlooks the plantations
on all sides. As poor Tom looked back in thought upon the old home ever moving
farther and farther away from him, as he passed on to a new and untried life, he
felt that his Bible was all left to him now of the. happy past.





40 UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

Among the passengers
on the boat was a young man
of fortune and good family named
St. Clare, with his little daughter
of five or Six, and.a lady relative,
who had. the little one especially
under her care.

Tom had often caught
glimpses of the little girl, for
she was one of the busy tripping
creatures that flit like a sunbeam
from place to place, and once
Seen she was not easily forgotten
her form was perfect in its
childish beauty and grace, and
her face remarked less for its

loveliness of feature, than for a dreamy seriousness of expression



See Page 73




and the long-golden-brown hair that floated like a cloud around it, and the soft
depths of her violet blue eyes shaded by heavy fringes of golden-brown, were so

unlike those of other children,
thither upon the boat.

that all eyes followed her as she glided hither and



B Vea eos Cole AL Ka. 4]

She was always in motion, with a half smile upon her rosy mouth, Singing to herself
as she moved lightly about, as in a happy dream.

: No word of reproof ever fell upon her ear for what she chose to do, and
she went all over the boat as she pleased, always dressed in Spotless white; and
there was not a nook or corner above or below, that those fairy footsteps and that
golden head had not visited.

The fireman, as he Jooked up from fis fiery furnace, Sometimes found her
deep blue eyes looking fearfully and pityingly at him, as if she thought him in some
dreadful danger. A thousand times a day rough voices blessed her, and smiles of
unusual softness stole over hard faces as she passed; and when she tripped fearlessly
over dangerous places, hands were stretched out to save her and smooth her path.
Tom watched the little creature with more and more interest every day. To him
she seemed something almost divine, and he half believed he saw one of the angels
stepped out of his New Testament. Often and often she walked sadly round. the place
where Haley’s gang of men and women Sat in their chains. She would glide in among
them and look at them with an air of wondering sorrow, and sometimes lift their
chains in her little hands as she flitted away with a woful sigh.

Several times she appeared suddenly among them with her hands full of
candy, oranges and nuts, which she would divide joyfully among them, and then be
gone again.

Tom watched the little lady a great deal before he tried to make her
acquaintance. He could cut pretty little baskets out of cherry-stones, make funny
faces on hickory-nuts, or odd jumping figures out of elder-pith, and whistles of all



42 ON CEE SE OMS CAB EN
sorts and Sizes. The little one was shy and it was not easy to tame her. She would
perch like a bird on some box or package near Tom, and take from him: without a
word the little toys he offered her one by one, but at last they became friends.

“What’s little missy’s name?” said Tom when he thought he might venture to ask.

“Evangeline St. Clare—though Papa and everybody else call me Eva. Now
what’s your name?”

‘My name’s Tom—the little children used to call me Uncle Tom way back
thar in Kentuck.”

“Then I mean to call you Uncle Tom; because you see | like you”, said Eva,
“so Uncle Tom, where are you going?”

“I don’t know, Miss Eva.”

‘Don’t know?” said Eva.

“No, ’m going to be sold to somebody.”

“My Papa can buy you, said Eva quickly; “and if he buys you, you will have
good times. [11 ask him to this very day.”

“Thank you, my litile lady;”’ said Tom.

The boat here stopped at a landing to take in wood, and Eva hearing her
father’s voice, bounded gaily away. Jom offered his help in wooding, and was soon
busy among the hands.

Eva and her father were standing together by the railings to see the boat
start from the landing-place, when by a sudden movement the child lost her balance,
and fell over the side of the boat into the water. Her father was about to plunge
in after her, but was held back by some who saw that more effectual aid had followed



Bev Ae al esl ACRE. 43

the little one. Tom was standing just under her on the lower deck when she fell;
he saw her strike the water and Sink, and was after her in a moment. A broad-
chested strong-armed fellow, it was easy for him to keep afloat in the water till the
child rose to the surface, and he caught her in his arms, and Swimming with her to the
side of the boat handed her up, all dripping, to the hands eagerly stretched out to
receive hier.

The next day as the steamer drew near New Orleans, a general bustle of
preparation for landing prevailed on board. On the lower deck sat Tom, anxiously
watching from time to time a group on the other side of the boat. There stood the
fair Eva, none the worse for the accident that had befallen her, and a graceful young
man stood by her, carelessly leaning one elbow on a bale of cotton, while a large
pocket-book lay open before him. It was evident that he was Eva’s father; he had
the same noble cast of head, the same blue eyes, and golden-brown hair, yet the
expression was quite different. The beautifully cut mouth was proud and rather
sarcastic, and an airoffree-and-easy importance sat lightly upon every turn and movement
of his handsome face and form.

He was listening with good-humoured careless indifference to Haley’s remarks
aS to the value of the article for which they were bargaining, and when the trader
had finished speaking said half contemptuously—“Well, my good fellow, what’s the
damage? as they say in Kentucky—How much are you going to cheat me out of?”

“Well? said Haley, “if | should say thirteen hundred dollars for that ar fellow,
I shouldn't but just save myself, raily!”

“Poor fellow! but I suppose youd let me have him for that, out of a



44 UNG EBY TO MES CABIN,

particular regard for me?’ said St. Clare fixing his keen mocking blue eye upon
the trader. : oo

“Papa, do buy him—it’s no matter what you pay--[ want him,” whispered Eva
softly, putting her arms round her father’s neck.

“What for, pussy? Are you going to make a rocking horse of him, or what?”

Here the trader gave in a certificate signed by Mr. Shelby, which the young
man took up with the tips of his long fingers, and glanced over carelessly.

“A gentlemanly hand—” he said “but I'm not sure after all about this religion—
How many hundred dollars now do you put on for that?”

“You like to be a-joking now,” said Haley —“but you see in this letter what
Ton’s old master says about him.” .

“There, count your money, old boy—” said St. Clare as he handed a roll of
notes to the trader,-who with a face beaming with joy, filled up the bill of sale.

“Tt wonder how much I might feich if | were for sale myself*—said St. Clare
as he took Eva by the hand, and walked up to Tom saying, “Look up, Tom, and see
how you like your new master.”

Tom looke@ up. It was not in nature to look at that young gay, handsome
face, without pleasure, and Tom felt the tears start into his eyes as he said heartily,
“God bless you, Mas’r.”

“T hope he will. Can you drive horses, Tom?”

“Pye been allus used to horses—Mas’r Shelby raised heaps of em,” said Tom.

“| think I shall make you coachy, on condition you won't get drunk more than
once a: week, as a rule. Tom.’



BAA SS CLARE. 45



Tom look surprised and hurt as he said—‘“I never drink, Mas’r.”

“lve heard that story before, Tom, but well see. It will be particularly
convenient to all concerned if you don’t. Never mind, my boy, Im sure you mean
to do well”

“T sartin do mas’r’—said Tom.

“And you shall have good times,” said Eva. “Papa is good to everybody, only
he -will laugh at them.”

“Papa is much obliged to you,’ said St. Clare, laughing as he walked away.



CHAPTER VIL
TOM’S NEW HOME.



\s

va’s father, Augustine St. Clare, was the son of a rich planter in Louisiana.
His mother was a French Huguenot lady, and he had only one twin brother
named Alfred. His first love had been given to a good and beautiful girl
whom he hoped to marry, but this chanceof happiness he lost, and the handsome
heiress who soon afterwards became his wife, was selfish and heartless as
only a spoilt beauty can be. Still St.Clare was always kind and indulgent to
her, and when Marie had a lovely little girl, her husband felt for a time
x real affection for her. He gave this child the name of his mother, to whom
He nad been devoted, and as Eva was very delicate, and Marie too much taken up
with her own fancied ill health to bestow care upon her child or household, St. Clare
had just returned from-a tour in the Northern State of Vermont, having invited his
cousin Ophelia St. Clare to return with him on a visit to his home in the South, where
her skill and experience as a good housekeeper and nurse were sadly needed. Miss
Ophelia was no longer young, her figure was tall and ungraceful, her movements quick
and decided; and although she did not talk much, her words were to the purpose when
she did speak. She loved her cousin Augustine dearly, and so he was able to persuade
her that the path of duty she was always trying honestly to follow, lay in the direction
of New Orleans, and that she must go with him to take care of Eva, and keep everything
from going to rack and ruin during the frequent illnesses of his wife.



TOM’S NEW HOME 47

The carriage met the St. Clare family when the boat arrived, Miss Ophelia’s
numerous packages having been safely placed in it.

“Where's Tom?” said Eva to her father as they drove him.

“He’s outside, pussy. I’m going to give Tom to mother to make up for that
drunken fellow that upset the carriage.”

The house was built in the Moorish style, it was a square building enclosing
a courtyard, entered through an arched gateway. In the middle of the court a fountain
threw high its silvery waters falling in never-ceasing spray into a marble basin, fringed
with a deep border of sweet violets. Two large orange trees, now full of blossom,
threw a delicious shade around; huge pomegranate-trees with their glossy leaves and
flame-coloured flowers; dark leaved Arabian jessamines with their silvery stars, geraniums,
rose-trees loaded with blossoms, golden jasmines and lemon scented verbenum, all gave
fragrance and beauty to the scene.

Eva was ina State of frantic delight. “Isn't it beautiful —lovely-my own
dear, darling home?’ said she to Miss Ophelia.

“It's a pretty place, though it looks rather old and heathen-ish to me,” replied
Miss Ophelia.

St. Clare smiled as he heard this remark, and turning to Tom, whose beaming
black face was radiant with admiration, he said, “Tom my boy, this seems to suit you.”

“Yes, mas’, it looks about the right thing” said Tom.

Eva had flown like a bird through the porch into a little boudoir opening on
the verandah, where a tall pale dark-eyed woman half rose from a couch on which
She was reclining.



48 UN CEE TOMES CAB LN

“Mamma”! Said Eva, embracing her again and again—

“Thatll do, child, don’t make my head ache;’ said her mother. languidly
' kissing her. oe

A crowd of servants now pressed forward, among them a mulatto woman of
very respectable appearance.

“Oh, there’s mammy”—said Eva as she flew across the room, and throwing
herself into her nurse’s arms, kissed her repeatedly.

“Well,” said Miss Ophelia to St. Clare, “Southern children can do something
I couldn't.”

“What's that?” said St. Clare.

“I wish to be kind to everybody, and ] wouldn't have anything hurt, but as to
kissing niggers!” ae

“That you’re not up to, eh?” said St. Clare with a laugh, as he went into the
passage. “Here you all, Mammy, Jemmy, Polly, Sakey, glad to see Masr?’ he said as
he went about shaking hands with one and another, and added as he stumbled over
a sooty little urchin crawling upon all fours—“Look out for the babies! If 1 step upon
anybody, let ‘em cry out!”

There was plenty of laughing and blessing Mas’r, as St..Clare distributed
small pieces of money among. them, saying,

“Come now, take yourselves off. like good boys and girls—And the whole party
disappeared through a door into a large verandah, followed by Eva, who carried a
great bag she had been filling with apples, nuts, candy, ribbons, laces, and toys of
every kind during her homeward journey.



1M Se NE We HO ME. 49










“Come here, Tom,” said
his master, and as Tom entered
the splendidly furnished boudoir,
st. Clare Said to his wife: “Here
,. Marie, I've brought you a coach-
San to order, at last. .Now
say I never think of you
en I’m away.”

Marie opened her eyes
and looked at Tom _ without
Tising, and said, “I know he'll get drunk!”

- “No, he’s warranted pious and sober.”
Fe Oe “I hope hell turn out well, but it’s
- more than | expect,” said Marie, adding when Tom was
- gone—“he'’s a perfect hippopotamus.”

“Come now Marie,” said St. Clare seating himself
by her sofa, “Say Something pretty to a fellow! here's a
present I got for yeu in New York. ” It was a photograph



“What made you sit in such an awkward way?”
¥ said Marie. “I wish you wouldn't insist on my talking and
R looking at things, I've hada bad headache all day.”



50 UN GLE 16 MES. CABIN:

“Our good useful New England cousin is come to. take some of your worries
off your hands, said St. Clare, trying to find something kind to say.

“I'm sure she’s welcome,” said Marie languidly, “I think she'll soon find out
that we mistresses are the slaves down here.” ;

“Come, Marie, that’s too bad,” said St. Clare—‘“there’s Mammy now, the best
creature, what could you do without her?”

“Mamimy’s the best I ever knew,” Said Marie, “yet she’s selfish, dreadfully
selfish, its the fault of the race.” ie

“Selfishness is a dreadful fault,” said St. Clare gravely.

“She's good in some ways, continued Marie, “but she’s always worrying about
that husband of hers—You see,” she said turning to Miss Ophelia, “when I married and
came here to live, of course | had to bring her with me, and her husband my father
could not spare. He was a blacksmith and very useful. and I thought.and said at the
time Mammy and he had beiter give each other up, as it wasn't likely to be convenient
for them to live together again.” eae

“Has she children?” asked Miss Ophelia.

"Yes; Ske ‘has wos

“T suppose she feels being away from them?”

“I couldn't have then here. They were dirty little things, and besides they
took up too much of her time, but I believe Mammy is rather sulky about this. |
feel sure, though she knows how much [ want her, and how wretched my health is,
She would go back to her husband to-morrow if she could I do indeed!”

“Its very sad,” said St. Clare, with a sarcastic cur! of his lip.



TOM’S NEW HOME. 51







“Now Mammy has always been a pet of mine” said Marie, quite unconscious
of the pain she was giving to her kind-hearted husband, «I've given her no end of
dresses, and worked sometimes whole afternoons trimming her caps when she was
going to a party. She never was whipped more than once or twice in her life, and
has her strong coffee or tea every day, with white sugar init. The fact is our servants
are spoilt. I’m always talking to St. Clare about it.”

Here St. Clare said he had to go and give some orders on the cade and
Eva soon tripped away after her father.

When she was gone ner mother added—

“Eva wants looking after in some things. She was always disposed to be
with servants, and that doesn’t matter with some children. I played with my father’s
negroes, and it never did me any harm. But Eva seems somehow to put herself on
an equality with every creature that comes near her. It’s a strange thing about the
child—She isn’t a bit like me.”

Miss Ophelia thought, “I hope she isn’t,’ on took care not to say So.

Marie was still complaining of the way in which the servants were indulged
by St. Clare, when a merry laugh rang out from the Verandah, and Miss Ophelia stepping
out saw Eva sitting perched like a bird upon Uncle Tom’s knee, hanging a wreath
of roses round his neck, after having stuck cape jessamines into all his buttonholes,
gaily laughing as she cried out, “oh Tom, you look so funny!” Her father stood near,
laughing too.

This was a happy time to Tom in many ways. Little Eva’s fancy for him,
the gratitude of a noble nature, had led her to ask her father to let Tom attend her



52 UNC IE ft OMS. € ABN.
in her walks and rides whenever she wanted him. He was well-dressed, and not hard
worked, and then too he was in a beautiful place, and did enjoy the birds, the flowers,
the fountains, the light and beauty of the court, and what seemed to him a palace
within the house.

If he could have forgotten all he had left behind him in old Kentucky, he
would have had nothing left to wish for in this world.







CHAPTER VIIL
QUAKER FRIENDS.

s=iilere was a gentle bustle at the Quaker house on the day after George's
NV meeting with his wife,as Rachael Haltiday moved quietly to and fro, putting
a together from her household stores, useful things for the wanderers who were
“to go forth that night. The afternoon was drawing to a close when George
and Eliza sat together, in the little room where they had taken shelter. He
had his boy on his knee, and held her hand in his. as he said.
‘Tl try to feel like a Christian as you say, to forget the past, and put
So" away hard and bitter feelings; read my Bible and learn to be a good man.”
“When we get to Canada I can help you,’ replied Eliza—‘“I can make dresses
very well, and wash and iron fine things; between us we can earn enough to live upon.*
“Yes, Eliza, so long aS we are together and have our boy. What a blessing
it is for a man to feel that his wife and child are his own! If they will only let me
alone now I will be happy- and thankful, though I have not a cent of money, nor a
roof to cover me, nor a spot of land to call mine!”
“But we are not in Canada yet,” said Eliza.
-At this moment voices were heard in the outer room, and soon a rap came at
the door. Eliza started and opened. it.
Simeon Halliday was there, and with him a Quaker brother, named Phineas Fletcher,
who had not the peaceful air of Simeon, but looked particularly shrewd and wide-awake.





54 UN CAE SiO ave SreC AaB Ne

“Our friend Phineas hath heard something it is important for thee to know,
_ George,’ said Simeon quietly. a

“That I have,” said Phineas, “for | stopped last ‘night at a little lone tavern
on the road, and while I was lying down on a buffalo rug till my bed was ready,
half asleep, for I was tired with hard driving, I heard some fellows drinking and
talking about the Quaker settlement’. So I listened, and found out all their little plans. ©
This young man was to be sent back to Kentucky to his master,.and his wife two of
them were going to sell in New Orleans on their own account. The child was to go
to a trader who had bought him, and the boy Jim to his master in Kentucky. They
know the road we are going to-night, and theyll be down after us, six or eight strong,
so what's to be done?”

“What shall we do, George?” said Eliza faintly.

“| know what I shall do,“ said George, examining his pistols. “I dont want to
drag anyone else into it. If you will lend me a conveyance and tell me the way, I
- will drive alone to the next stand. Jim is a strong brave fellow, and so am 1.”

“Well, friend, but theell need a driver for all that,’ answered Phineas with
a keen look—“Thee’s welcome to do all the fighting, but | oe a thing or two about
the road thee doesn’t.”

“Phineas is a wise and skilful man,” said Simeon, “Let him help thee, George.”

“All I ask is to be allowed to go out of the country in peace,’ said George,
“but Vil fight to the last breath before they shall take my wife and son. Can you
blame me?”

‘I pray I be not tried,” said Simeon. “The flesh is weak.”



OoU CA KH Ree RleE NBS. oo



“| think my flesh would be pretty strong in such a case, “said Phineas,
Stretching out a pair cof arms like the sails of a windmill. “I ain't sure, friend George,
I shouldn't hold a fellow for thee, if thee had an account to settle with him.”

“Let us pray the Lord we be not tempted,” said Simeon.

“And so I do,” es Phineas, “but if we are tempted, why—let them look
out, that’s all.”

‘It's plain thee wasn’t born a Friend? said Simeon smiling. In fact Phineas
had been a jolly backwoodsman, a famous hunter and dead shot at a buck, but having
wooed a pretty Quakeress, had for her sake joined the society in these parts.

‘It isn’t safe to start till dark,” added Phineas, “but we ought to keep ahead
of ’em then. So take courage, friend George, this isn’t the first ugly scrape I’ve been
in with thy friends.” |

And now Rachel took Eliza’s hand kindly, and led the way to the supper
table. Soon after supper a large covered waggon drew up before the door, and George
walked out of the door with his child on one arm and his wife on the other. Phineas
placed Eliza and the boy comfortably in the back of the waggon, George and Jim on
a Seat before them, mounting in front himself. The waggon rumbled on over wide
dreary plains, up hills and down valieys, hour after hour, but about three o’clock
George’s ear caught the first sound of pursuing horsemen, who fast gained on the
party. Phineas raced his horses to a sudden turn in the road, where a steep projecting
rock seemed to promise Some shelter and concealment; then suddenly checking them,
and Springing out of the waggon he cried out.



56 UPN Ca el OME Se. CAB EN.

“Out with you everyone in a twinkling, and up into the rocks with me. This
is one of our old hunting-dens.”

Phineas went first with the boy in his arms, then Jim, George and Eliza last.
A few moments’ scrambling brought them to the top of the ledge, the path was then
but a narrow pass, where only one could walk at a time, till it came to a chasm
more than a yard wide, beyond which stood a pile of steep rocks full thirty feet
high. They all leaped this chasm, and found themselves hidden by the fragments of
loose stones lying about the edge of the rock.

“Well now, here we all are, and let ‘em get us if they can. No one
can come here without walking in Single file between the rocks in fair range of your
pistols, boys, d’ye see?” said Phineas. :

The party below, now to be seen in the light of the dawning day, consisted
of Haley's friends, Tom Loker and Marks, with several rowdies hired at a low inn
to help in catching a set of niggers.

‘Now, Jim, look to your pistols and watch that pass with me | fire at the
first man, you at the second,and so on,” Said George.

“But. what if you don’t hit?”

“Tshall hit’lsaid George coolly.

After a Short pause, Tom Loker said boldly,

‘Tia going right up, for one. I never was afraid of niggers, and I ain’t going
to be now!”

One of the most courageous of the party followed Tom, and they all came
pushing up the rock. In a moment Tom’s burly form was seen, almost at the verge



QUAKER FRIENDS. 57
of the chasm. George fired—the shot entered his side, but he would not retreat,
and with a yell like that of a mad bull, he was leaping right across the chasm.

“Friend, thee isnt wanted here!” said Phineas, suddenly stepping forward,
and meeting Loker with a push from his long arms. Down he fell into the chasm,
crackling among trees, bushes, logs, loose stones, till he lay, bruised and groaning,
thirty feet below. Marks headed the retreat down the rocks with much more will
than he had shewn in going up, while all the party came tumbling hastily after him.

“I say, fellers—you jist go round and pick up Tom there, while I go back for
help,” said Marks, as he galloped away.

With much trouble the others raised Tom, and dragged him as far as the
horses. George looked over the rocks, and saw them trying to lift Tom into the saddle,
but he reeled and fell heavily to the ground. Upon this the whole party got on their
horses and rode away. When they were quite out of sight, Phineas began to bestir
himself, and soon saw friends coming up to the help of his party.

_ “Do stop and do something for that poor man before we go,” said Eliza to
Phineas, who went to the wretched man, and bound up his wounds.

“You pushed me down there,” said Tom faintly.

‘If | hadn't thee’d have pushed us down,” returned Phineas quietly, “but we bear no
malice. I'll take thee to a house where they'll nurse thee as well as thy own mother could.”

The seats were now taken out of the waggon, the buffalo skins spread on one
side, and four men lifted Tom into it. Eliza, George and Jim got in also and after
about an hour’s drive the whole party reached a neat farm-house, where the weary
travellers were welcomed to a good breakfast. Here for the present we leave them.





CHAPTER IX
SHADOWS.



ne morning when Miss Ophelia was busy in some of her domestic cares,
St. Clare called her to see a little negro girl about eight or nine years of age,
# whom he had taken a fancy to buy. She was one of the blackest of her race,
and her round glassy eyes moved with quick glances over everything in the
room. Her woolly hair, braided in little tails, stuck out in every direction,
4 = and the expression of her face was shrewd and cunning, though she put on
“4ae4” a Solemn look that was almost absurd in its gravity. She was dressed in a

“wo — dirty, ragged garment, and stood with her hands demurely folded before her.

Miss Ophelia was struck with amazement aS her cousin mischievously said.

“Topsy, this is your new mistress. I’m going to give you up to her, see now
that you behave yourself.”

“Yes mas,” said Topsy gravely, with a wicked twinkle in her eye.

“| don’t want her I’m sure,” said Miss Ophelia. “I have more of them now
than I know what to do with”

‘Ivs too bad of me, I believe,” said St. Clare, “to add to your bothers, but the
truth is this poor thing belonged to some horrid people at a shop I have to pass every
day, and I was tired of hearing her scream when they were beating and ill-using her.
She looked bright and funny too, so I bought her, and Ill give her to you to see what
you can do with her.”



SHADOWS. 59

“The first thing to
be done is to wash and
dress her decently,” re-
plied Miss Ophelia, as she

~ led her new charge away.

When at last arrayed in a

fresh suit, with her hair
cut short, Miss Ophelia sat down
and began to question her.

“How old are you, Topsy?”
‘Duno, missis, said Topsy
with a grin.

“Didn't anybody ever tell
you? Who was your mother?”
lever. had none!” said the child with another grin.—
answer in that way, child. Tell me where you
rere cnr ‘and who your father and mother were.’
ad no father, nor mother, nor nothin! Old Aunt, she used to take






Car’ 00" i
Have you ever heard of God, Topsy? Do you know who made you?”
“Nobody never made.me—I spect I growd,” said Topsy.
“You have your work in hand there, cousin, said St. Clare who had come in
during this catechism.



60 UNC Tee Om SCA BN:



Topsy Was soon a noted character in the house. Her taste for every kind of
drollery, grimace, and mimicry; for dancing, tumbling, climbing, singing, whistling,
imitating every sound that hit her fancy, seemed extraordinary; and it was soon found
out that whoever insulted Topsy was sure to meet with some disagreeable accident
soon afterwards; to lose a pair of ear-rings or other favourite trinket; stumble into
a pail of hot water. or be splashed with dirty slops when dressed to go out for a
holiday, and no one could ever be found to have caused the mischief, though everybody
felt sure it was Topsy. She soon learnt to do many things well when she chose, but
she very seldom did choose. Her greatest delight was to dress herself in Miss
Ophelia’s best clothes, and caper about before the glass.

‘I don’t know what I shall do with you, Topsy,” said that Lady one day in
despair at some of her tricks.

“Law, Missis, you must whip me—I ain't used to workin’ unless | gets
whipped.”

“Why, Topsy, I don't want to whip you. You can do very well if you like.
Why won't you?”

“Ts used to whippin’, I s’pect its good for me.”

Then Miss Ophelia tried whipping, and Topsy made a great fuss about it,

Screaming, groaning with all her might, while half an hour afterwards she would say
to some of her companions,

“Law, Miss Feely’s whippims wouldn't kill a mosquiter. Oughter see how ole
Masr did it—he know'd how!”



SHADOWS. 61

She quite prided herself on her ndughtiness, and would say,

“Law, you niggers, dees you know you's all sinners? Miss Feely says so. but
ye aint any on yeup tome. I’s so awful wicked, there can’t nobody do nuthin’ with me!”

Eva and Uncle Tom were greater friends than ever as time went on, and she
had helped him to write a letter home to his wife, telling her where he was and how
he hoped some day to see her and his children again. In due time Tom received an
answer to it from Master George saying that Aunt Chloe had been hired out to a con-
fectioner in Louisville, where she was earning large sums of money, all of which was
to be saved to buy Uncle Tom back. Mose and Pete were flourishing, and the baby
trotting all over the house. Tom was never tired of looking at this precious letter,
and talking to Eva about it.

Two years had slipped away since he had met the lovely child who had
become to him an angel upon earth, and he was now with the rest of the family
passing the hot summer at Mr. St. Clare’s beautiful villa on Lake Pontchartrain.

On one of the golden sunsets that reflect themselves on the bright waters of
the lake, Tom and Eva were seated on a little mossy seat in an arbour at the end
of the garden. It was Sunday evening, and Eva's Bible lay open on her knee. She
read in her sweet musical voice,

“And | saw a sea of glass, mingled with fire.”

“Tom—there it is! said Eva suddenly stopping and pointing to the Lake,
which reflected the golden glow of the sky.

“True enough, Miss Eva,” said Tom, singing—



62 UN CIE 2 OsveSe2C A Bolen.

“Oh, had I the wings of the morning,
Id fly away to Canaan’s shore;
Bright angels should convey me home,

To the new Jerusalem !”

“Where do you suppose New Jerusalem is, Uncle Tom?”

“Up in the clouds, Miss Eva.”

“Then I think I see it. Those clouds look like great gates of pearl, and you
can see beyond them, far, far off—it’s all gold. Tom, sing about Spirits bright.”

Tom sang the well known hymn:

“T see a band of spirits bright,
That taste the glories there;
They all are robed in spotless white,
And conquering palms they bear.”

“Uncle Tom—l’ve seen them—they come to me sometimes in my sleep—those spirits,”
said Eva.

Tom had no doubt of it at all: it would not have surprised him to hear that
Eva had been to heaven. :

“Uncle Tom-—I’m going there!”

“Where, Miss Eva?”

The child rose, and pointed her little hand to the sky. The glow of evening
lit her golden hair and flushed cheek with unearthly brightness, and her eyes were
bent earnestly on the skies.



SH AVDO Wes: . 63

‘Tm going there —to the spirits bright, Tom— I’m going before long,” she said.

The faithful cld heart felt a sudden pang; and Tom thought how often he had
noticed the last six months that Eva’s little hands had grown thinner, and how when
she ran or played in the garden, as she once could for hours, she became soon tired
and languid. Miss Ophelia had often spoken of a cough, she could not cure, and even
now that bright cheek and little hand were burning with fever, and vet the thought
that Eva’s words suggested had never come to him until now! Could it be indeed so?
The conversation between Eva and Tom was disturbed by a hasty call from Miss
Ophelia to come in quickly, as the dew was falling. She had noted the slight dry
cough, flushed cheek and glittering eye, and had tried to call St. Clare’s attention to
them, but he would not listen to her fears, or rather watched Eva secretly with jealous
affection, with sudden thrills of dread at his heart, lest his darling should indeed be
growing too good for this world; and then he felt a wild determination to keep her—
never to let her go.

One day when Eva was alone with her mother, she opened a drawer, and
taking from it a jewel-case, shewed the child its contents saying—

“These are the diamonds Im going to give you when you come out. | wore
them at my first ball.”

Eva took out a diamond necklace, and as her large thoughtful eyes rested on
it she said,

“Are these worth much money, Mamma?’

“Of course they are; Father sent to France for them They are worth a
small fortune.”



64 UNG EB ONES GAB IN:

“IT wish I had them to do what I pleased with!”

“What would you do with them?”

“ld sell them, and buy a place in the free states, to take all our people to,
and hire teachers to teach them to read and write.”

“Much good that would do them,’ said Marie laughing.

“I think they ought to be able to read the Bible and learn God’s will,” said
Eva steadily, “and to write their own letters, and read letters that are written to them.
I know, Mamma, it doeS come very hard on them that they can’t do these things. Tom
feels it, Mammy does, many do. I think its wrong.”

“Come, come, Eva—you are only a child—you know nothing of these things,”
said her mother—‘“besides you make my head ache.”

Eva stole quietly away, but she gave Mammy reading lessons whenever she could.

oo



CHAPTER X.
Hee WAR NOUN. G.

bout this time St. Clare’s brother Alfred, with his son Henrique,a boy of twelve,
spent two or three days with the family at the lake. The twin brothers
were most unlike in all respects, and yet had uncommon love for each other.
Henrique was a fine dark-eyed boy, full of spirit, and of admiration for
his cousin Eva. Her little pet white pony was brought up to the verandah
by Tom, while a mulatto boy led Henrique’s small black Arab horse. As he
came forward to take the reins from his little groom, he cried out angrily,
“Why, Dodo, you lazy dog, you haven't rubbed my horse down this morning.”
“Yes, Mas’'r, he got that dust on his own self,” said Dodo, meekly.
“You rascal, how dare you speak?” said Henrique violently, raising his riding-
whip. The boy was a handsome fellow of just Henrique’s size, and his cheek flushed
and his eye sparkled as he tried to speak a word or two. Henrique struck him across
the face with his whip, and forcing him on his knees, beat him till he was out of breath.

“Take that for vour impudence, and take the horse back, and clean him
properly,” said Henrique, walking away to meet Eva, who stood in her riding-dress near.

“Dear Eva, I am sorry this stupid fellow has kept you waiting. Let us sit
down on this seat till he comes back. What’s the matter, Cousin?”

“How could you be so cruel and wicked to poor Dodo?” asked Eva.





66 ENCE OM: Ss. CA Ba N:

“Dear Eva—you dont know Dodo—he’s full of lies and excuses. The only
way is to put him down at once. That’s how Papa manages.”

“But you beat him, and he didnt deserve it,” said Eva sadly.

‘It may do for some time when he does, and doesn’t get it—but | won’t beat
him again before you, Eva, if it vexes you.” Eva did not feel satisfied yet.

Dodo soon appeared with the horses.

“Well, Dodo—this seems better,” said Henrique more graciously, come and
hold Miss Eva’s horse while I put her on it.”

As Dou was giving up the reins, Eva bent down towards him, and said,

“That's a good boy, Dodo, thank you.”

Dodo looked up surprised into the sweet young face, and as the children
cantered away, he watched them with teirs in his eyes, for Eva’s kind words had
touched his heart with a new pleasure.

As the cousins returned from their ride the St. Clare brothers met them, and
Alfred was struck with the brilliant complexion and golden hair of his little niece.

“What a perfect beauty she is—she will make many hearts ache some day,”
he said to Augustine.

“Indeed I fear so,” said her father bitterly, and he hurried io take her off
her horse, saying as he clasped her in his arms,

“How could you ride so fast, dear? you know it’s bad for you.”

“I felt so well, papa, and liked it so much, | forgot.” St. Clare carried her
into the house, and laid her on a Sofa.



THE WARNING 67



“Til take her under my care,” said Henrique, seating himself by the sofa and
taking her hand. As soon as the children were alone he said:

“Do you know, Eva, I'm so sorry we're going away in two days, and then |
shan’t See you again for ever so long! If I stayed. with you I'd try to be good, and
not cross to Dodo and so on. You see I've got such a quick temper, but ['m not really
bad to him. J think on the whole Dodo’s pretty well off!

“Would you think you were well off, if there were no one in the world to
love you?’ i

‘I? of course not. But I can’t help it. I can’t love him myself, can |?”

“Why can’t you?” said Eva.

“Why, Eva—you don’t love your servants, do you?”

‘I do, indeed. Doesn’t the Bible say we should love everybody?”

‘TI suppose the Bible does say such things, but then nobody ever thinks of
doing them, Eva, nobody does!’

Eva did not speak at once, but when she did, she said earnestly,

“Do love poor Dodo, and be kind to him for my sake, dear Cousin!”

“I could love anything for your sake, dear Eva,” replied Henrique warmly, and
then the dinner bell put an end to the conversation.

Two days after this the brothers parted, and Eva, who had exerted herself
beyond her strength during her cousin’s visit, began to fail rapidly, and at last a doctor
was sent for. In a week or two she was again better, and her father declared thai
she would soon be as well as ever. Miss Ophelia and the doctor alone were not
deceived, and Eva herself felt a strange certainty that her earthly time was short.



68 U NEC EEE OMS CuBr:

One day her father called her to him to show her a statuette he had bought
for her, and as she came forward in her white dress, with golden hair and glowing
cheeks, he could hardly bear to look upon her fragile beauty, and taking her suddenly
in her arms, exclaimed,

“Eva, darling, you are better now, are you not?”

«Papa, Said Eva firmly, “] have something 1 want to say to you now.” St. Clare
trembled aS she seated herself on his lap. She laid her head on his bosom, and said:

“IT cannot keep it to myself any longer—I am going to leave you soon, Papa,
never to come back.” And Eva sobbed.

“What can have put such sad thoughts into your little head, dear child?” said
her father trying to speak cheerfully.

“IT am not sad about going away, Papa, only because I don’t want to leave you
and all my friends—it almost breaks my heart. There are things here that seem
dreadful to me.”

“What things, Eva?”

“I feel sad for our poor people—they all love me and I wish, Papa, they were
all free!”

“Why, Eva, dont you think they are well off now?”

“But, Papa, if anything should happen to you, what would become of them?
Everybody isn’t like you, Papa. Uncle Alfred isn’t, and Mamma isn't. Papa, isn’t there
any way to have all slaves made free?”

‘Its a difficult question, darling. I heartily wish there were not a slave in
the land, but I don't know what can be done.”



THE WARNING. 69

“You are such a good man
Papa, so noble and kind, you might find
some way. When I am dead you will
think of me, and do it for my sake. I
would do it if I could.”

“When you are dead, Eva? Don’t
talk to me like that! You are all I have
on earth.”

«But think, Papa—these poor people
love their children as much as you do me—
poor Mammy—and Tom—and all of them.”
“There, darling, only don’t talk of dying,
and I will do anything you wish.”
e, dear, dear Papa—that Tom shall have his freedom as soon





as—I am gone!”

“Yes—dear—! will do anything in the world you ask me to do.”

“Dear Papa,’ said the child, laying her burning cheek against his. “I wish
we could go together to our home with God. Don’t you want to go, Papa?”

St. Clare drew her closer to him, but was silent.

“You will come to me?’ said Eva again.

‘| shall come after you—I shall not forget you,” said her father.

The shadows of evening closed round them as St. Clare. sat silently rocking
the little frail form in his arms until she fell asleep.



10: UNG LE TOMS CABAEN.



A day. or two afterwards, Topsy was in disgrace with Miss Ophelia, and Eva
followed her into a little glass room near the verandah, where St. Clare heard and
saw the children without being himself seen.

They were both sitting on the floor and Eva began

‘Why won't you try and be good, Topsy? Don't you love anybody?”

“Dunno nothin’ "bout love—-I loves candy, and sich, that's all. Never had
nothin nor nobody,” said Topsy.

“But Topsy if youd try to be good, you might,”—

“There can't nobody love niggers, niggers can’t do nothin! I don’t care!” said
Topsy, beginning to whistle.

“Oh, Topsy, I love you--because you haven't any father or mother or friends—
and I want you to try and be good. I’m very ill, Topsy, and very likely I mayn’'t live
much longer.”

The sharp bright eyes of the black child filled with tears, as a ray of
heavenly love for the first time pierced the darkness of her heathen soul. She wept
and sobbed. while the beautiful child bending over her looked like a bright angel.

“Poor Topsy!” said Eva. “God loves you, and can help you to be good and go
to heaven, just aS much as if you were white.”

“Oh, dear Miss Eva—I will try! I will try! I never cared nothin’ about
it before.”

And Topsy kept her word.

%



CHAPTER XL
etek EaNe



Everything in Eva’s room was tasteful and beautiful, for her father’s loving
care had chosen the prettiest ornaments and fittings for the use of his darling.
% The bamboo furniture, with rose-coloured curtains and hangings, was of
» . light and fanciful design, and exquisite white figures; statuettes and pictures
ii were placed on every side, images of childhood, beauty and peace.
HO The deceitful strength that had buoyed Eva up for a little while
“G4S was fast passing away; seldom and more seldom her light step was heard
' in the verandah, and oftener she was found lying un a little lounge by the
open window, her large deep eyes fixed on the waters of the lake. It was Tom’s
greatest delight to carry her slight form now up and down her room, now out into
the verandah, and sometimes he would walk with her under the orange-trees in the
garden, or sitting down in one of their old seats, sing to her the favourite old hymns.

One afternoon Eva had been unusually bright and cheerful, had sat up in her
bed, looked over all her little trinkets and precious things, and named those to whom
she would have them given. Her father had been with her in the evening, and said
that Eva was more like her old self than she had been since her illness, and when
he kissed her for the night, he said to Miss Ophelia,

“We may keep her with us after all,” and retired with a ae heart than
he had had for weeks before.







(ee WN Go 0 MES eC ASBSION:

But at midnight the mysterious message came.

Miss Ophelia saw a sudden change in her loved patient, and in a moment
St. Clare was bending over his child, who was still asleep. What was it he saw in her
face that made his heart stand still? It was the dawning of immortal life-in that
childish soul! St. Clare heard and said nothing—he saw only that look on the face of
the little sleeper.

“If she would but wake and Speak once more!” he said, and stooping over her,
spoke in her ear, “Eva darling!’ The large blue eyes opened, a smile passed over her
face. She tried to raise her head and to speak.

“Do you know me, Eva?’

“Dear Papa!” said the child with a last effort, throwing her arms about his
neck. In a moment they dropped again, she struggled for breath, and threw up her
little hands.

Tom had taken his master’s hands between his own, and with tears streaming
down his dark cheeks, looked up for help—where he had always been used to look.

“Oh—bless the Lord! Its over, dear mas’r—look at her? said Tom, as Eva
opened her eyes once more.

“Eva!” said St. Clare gently. ‘Tell us what you see!”

A bright, a glorious smile passed over her face, she said brokenly—

“Love—joy—peace!” gave one sigh, and passed from death into life!

There lay the little sleeping form, robed in a simple white dress; the rose-
coloured light througi the curtains cast a warm glow over the icy coldness of death;



THE END. 8

but upon the bright happy face rested the blessed expression of the long holy sleep
which “He giveth to His beloved.”

St. Clare stood long gazing there, and Saw aS in a dream how flowers were
lovingly placed around his lost child. The door opened again, and Topsy SDE ee
her eyes swollen with crying, holding something under her apron.

“You must not come in,” Said the maid who was arranging the flowers.

“Do let me put just one, there—such a pretty one,” said Topsy, holding up a
half -blown tea-rosebud.

“Let her stay—she shall come,” said St. Clare suddenly. Topsy came forward
and laid her flower at Evas feet, and then with a wild and bitter cry threw herself
down by the bed, and wept and moaned aloud.

“O, Miss Eva! I wish I’s dead too, I do!”

At this cry the blood flushed into St. Clare’s white marble-like face, and the
first tears he had shed since Eva died, stood in his eyes.

“She said she loved me, she did!” said Topsy, “Oh dear! there ain’t nobody
left now—there ain't!”

Miss Ophelia raised her gently, and took her from the room, but as she did
So some tears fell from her eyes, and as she led her away she said,

“Topsy, you poor child, don’t give up. I can love you though I’m not like
that dear child. I can love you--I do; and I'll try to help you to grow up a good
Christian girl.”

Miss Ophelia’s voice and honest tears said even more than her words, and
from that hour she gained an influence over poor Topsy that she never lost.



74 UNCEE COM: Ss CAB EN



“Oh, my Eva, whose little hour on earth did so much good, what account have
I to give for my long years?” thought St. Clare.

There, by the mossy seat where Eva and Tom had talked and sung and read
so often, was the little grave. Tom hada feeling that drew him to his master, wherever
he went, wistful, sad, and as in a dream, or when he sat pale and quiet in Eva’s
room, holding before his eves her little open Bible, though seeing no letter nor word
that was in it.

In a few days the St. Clare family were back again in New Orleans, restlessly
longing for change of scene in their grief.



CHAPTER A&I.

RE-UNION.

eek after week glided away in the St. Clare home, and the waves of life
settied back to their usual flow where that little bark had gone down.
All the interests and hopes of St. Clare’s life had unconsciously wound
themselves around his child, and now that she was gone there seemed
nothing to be thought of, and nothing to be done. Still St. Clare was in
some ways a better man than he had been. He honestly read his little
Eva’s Bible, and thought more of his duties to his servants; and soon after
his return to New Orleans took steps to free Tom by law. Meanwhile he became
more attached to the honest faithful fellow every day, and in the wide world there
was nothing that seemed to remind him so much of Eva. The day after he had begun
to free Tom St. Clare said to him,

‘’m going to make a free man of you, so have your trunk packed to set out
for Kentucky.” He was rather annoyed when Tom’s face became suddenly lighted
up with joy, and he fervently exclaimed,

“Bless the Lord!”

“You needn't be quite so delighted to leave me, Tom. Ive not been a bad
master to you.”





76 UNG E Et OMS 70 AEB UN,

Masr’s been too good, | know” said Tom, “but it’s bein’ a free man —That’s
what I’m joyin’ for!”

“| suppose, Tom, youll be leaving me then in a month or two,” said St. Clare, sadly,

“Not while Mas’r’s in trouble,” said Tom.

«And when will my trouble be over?” said St. Clare, with another sigh, “No,
Tom, | can’t keep you till then.”

At this moment Miss Ophelia called her cousin away, and sitting down by
him said seriously,

“| want you to give me Topsy for my own, aS you said you would, that
[ may have a right to free her when I like. Why not give me the deed of gift at once?”

“Why—do you think I'm going to die?” said St. Clare gaily, as he sat down
and wrote the paper.

“We know not what shall be on the morrow,” said Miss Ophelia gravely, as
she took the paper, Saying, “Now I can protect her whatever happens.”

In the evening St. Clare began to play and sing the touching “Dies Irce” from
Mozart's Requiem, telling his cousin it brought back to him his mother’s vcice, and
the time- when he had first learnt it from her. Then walking restlessly up and down
he said half to himself, ;

“Dear little Eva! she had set her heart on a good work for me!”

Presently he said to Miss Ophelia,

“I don’t know what makes me think of my mother so much to night. I feel
as if she were near me, and keep thinking of things she used to say. I’m going to
the Club for half an hour to hear the news.”



RE-UNION. 17

That night he was brought home fatally stabbed in the side by a man whom
he had tried to disarm in a sudden quarrel between two gentlemen that had taken
place in the Club. The doctor who examined him said that there was no hope of
saving his life, and he recovered consciousness for the last time only to.see the terror
and misery of the poor dependents around him, about to lose their only friend.

He laid his hand on Tom’s as he knelt beside him, saying,

“Tom—poor fellow—pray for me!’

And Tom did pray with all his heart and mind for the soul that was passing,
that looked so steadily and sadly from those large, mournful blue eyes. St. Clare
murmured softly to himself the words of the requiem hymn he had sung that evening.

“His mind is wandering,’ said the doctor.

“No—it is coming home at last!” said St. Clare.

The paleness of death fell on him, and with it a happy expression of peace,
like that of a wearied child who sleeps. Just before the spirit departed he opened
his eyes with a sudden light, as of joy—said “Mother!” and then he was gone!

He had been struck down in a moment, in the flower and strength of his
youth, and the house re—echoed with sobs and shrieks of despair, from those who

well knew the unfeeling character of the mistress in whose hands they were left.
Tom hardly thought of himself as he felt hope and peace on his master’s account,
but before many days had passed he heard that Marie had decided to sell the place,
and all the servants upon it except her own, and return with them to her father’s
plantation. The hope of liberty, the thought of wife and children, rose up before his



78 UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

soul; he choked back the bitter tears, and tried to pray, but the more he said “Thy
will be done,” the worse he felt.

He went to Miss Ophelia, who ever since Eva's death had treated him with
marked kindness, and said:

“Miss Feely—Mas’r St. Clare promised me my freedom. He told me he had
begun to take it out for me, and perhaps if Miss Feely would be good enough to
speak to Missis, she would go on with it, as it was Mas’r’s wish.”

‘Tl speak for you, Tom, and do my best,” said Miss Ophelia, who was preparing
to return north—‘“but if it depends upon Mrs. St. Clare I can’t hope much for you.”

She found Marie lying. upon a sofa, busy in choosing some thin black stuffs
for dresses, and turning to Miss Ophelia she said,

“[haven't a dress to wear, and as I’m going away next week, I must choose something.”

“Are you going So soon?’

“Yes, St. Clare’s brother has written, and he thinks the’ servants and furniture
had better be sold at once.”

“There’s one thing I wanted to speak to you about. Augustine promised Tom
his liberty, and began to have the papers drawn up. I hope you'll do all you can to
carry it out.”

“Indeed I shall do no such thing,” said Marie sharply, “Tom is one of the
most valuable servants on the place—it couldn’t be afforded in any way. Besides
he’s a great deal better off as he is!”

“He wants it so much, and it was a promise,” said Miss Ophelia.

“T dare say he does want it—they’re all a discontented set always wanting





See Page 81

Sale of Emmeline



RE-UNION. 79
What they haven't got. Keep a negro under and he does well enough, but set them
free, and they get lazy and turn out mean worthless fellows. It’s no favour to free them.”

“But Tom is so steady and good.”

“You needn't tell me! Ive seen hundreds like him. He'll do very well as
long. as ‘he’s taken care of.”

“But consider the chance of his getting a bad master,” said Miss Ophelia again

“Oh, most masters are good, for all the talk that’s made. I’ve lived and
- grown up in the south, and I never yet knew a master that didn’t treat his servants
quite as well as is worth while. I don’t feel afraid of that!” replied Marie.

“Well,” said Miss Ophelia desperately, “I know it was one of your husband’s
last wishes that Tom should have his freedom; it was one of the promises he made
to dear little Eva on her death-bed, and I shouldn’t think you would set it aside.”

Marie covered her face with her handkerchief, and sobbing violently, exclaimed,

“Everybody is so inconsiderate! I should n’t have expected you would remind
me of all my troubles! It was hard when I had only one daughter she should have
been taken! And when I had a husband that exactly suited me, he should be taken!
I suppose you mean well, but it’s inconsiderate—very!”

And Marie sobbed and gasped for breath, and called for Mammy to open the
window and bathe her head, and in the confusion Miss Ophelia made her escape.

She did the next best thing she could for Tom, by writing a letter for him
to Mrs. Shelby, telling her his troubles, and begging her to help him.

The next day Tom and some half dozen other servants were marched down to
the slave warehouse to be sold by auction.





CHAPTER Xill.
THE SLAVE MARKET.




Emong the number of men, women and children, awaiting their fate with Tom
and the other servants of the St. Clare family, he could not help noticing
4 one quiet, gentle looking mulatto woman, about fifty, neatly and carefully
dressed with a high red turban on her head. By her side was her young
daughter, of fifteen, with soft dark eyes, and curling light brown hair. Both
were crying, but each quietly, that the other might not hear.

“Mother, do try if you can’t sleep a little,” said the girl.

“I can’t sleep, Em, it’s the last night we may be together.”
“Perhaps we shall get sold together, Mother—who knows?”
“May be—but I'm so afeard of losin’ you, I see nothin’ but the danger,” said
the poor mother.

“The man said we should both sell well,” said poor Emmeline, simply, and
after a moment's pause her mother replied,

“Emmeline, if we shouldn't ever see each other again after to morrow, always
remember how you've been brought up, and all Missis told you. Take your Bible and
hymn book with you, and if youre faithful to the Lord, He'll be faithful to you”

In the morning, Mr. Skeggs, the auctioneer, called his goods together, and
marched them off to the public saleroom, where under a splendid dome were men of
all nations moving about the marble pavement, buyers and sellers of human souls!



Te 3S 7A VE MeAG RoR el: 81

Tom had been wistfully looking in the faces of those about him for one he
would wish to call master, but he saw no St. Clare there. Just before the sale began
a short, broad, strong man, shabbily dressed, elbowed his way through the crowd, like
one who means business. From the moment Tom saw him come near the group where
he was, he felt a strange horror of him. He had a round bullet head, large green-grey
eyeS, with shaggy sandy eyebrows, and stiff wiry hair; a large coarse mouth, and
enormous dirty hands and nails. He seized Tom by the jaw, and opened his mouth to
look at his teeth, made him put up his sleeve to show his muscle, and made him spring
and jump to see his paces. Again Legree stopped before Emmeline, took hold of her
with his heavy dirty hand, examined her roughly, and then pushed her back against
her mother. And then the sale began. Tom was one of the first to be put up and
sold, befure he knew where he was. Emmeline’s mother was next bought by a respectable,
kind looking old gentleman, whom she asked to take her daughter too.

‘ld like to, but I'm afraid I can't afford it,’ said her new master, watching
with painful interest as the young girl mounted the block, and looked around her with
a frightened and timid glance. Her flushed cheeks and the feverish fire of her eyes
made her even more beautiful than before, her price rose beyond the means of more
friendly bidders, and she fell to the lot of the hideous bullet-headed stranger, Simon
Legree, owner of a cotton plantation on the Red River, who had already secured Tom.
She is carried away in the same lot with him and two other other men, and goes off,
weeping aS she goes. .

On the lower part of a small mean boat on the Red River, Tom sat with
chains on his wrists and feet. and a weight heavier than chains on his heart. AJl had



82 DING LE EOS CAB EN:

‘faded away from him to return no more— Kentucky home with wife and children, and
kind friends; St. Clare home with its beauty and refinement—the angelic golden-headed
Eva, and the proud, gay, careless yet ever-kind St. Clare—all gone! Legree walked up
to Tom, and taking away his trunk with all its contents, disposed of them to men on
board the boat, and saumntering up again said roughly,

“Now, Tom, we've got rid of your extra baggage, so itll be long enough before
you get more clothes—I go in for making niggers careful—one suit has to do for one
year on my place. “Now,” added Legree, doubling his great heavy fist, “d’ye see this
fist? [ never see the nigger yet I couldn't bring down with one crack, so now, mind
yourselves, for | don’t shew no mercy.”

The boat moved on, up the red muddy current through the windings of the
Red River, and sad eyes gazed wearily on the steep red clay banks, as they glided by
in dreary Sameness. At last the boat stopped at a small town, and Legree with his
party, disembarked.

Pe



CHAPTER AIV.
DeATR KE ACG ES:



,oiling wearily behind a rude waggon, over a ruder road, Tom and his
companions marched onward. In the waggon sat Simon Legree, and Emmeline
and another woman, chained together, were stowed away in the back part
of it. Legree’s plantation at length came in view. It had once belonged
to a rich man of taste. who had laid out the grounds well, but tke place
now had a ragged forlorn appearance, and what had formerly been a large

© fruitful garden, was now all overgrown with weeds. The waggon rolled
“<2 up a neglected gravel path, under a fine avenue of China-trees to the house,
built in the southern style with a wide verandah of two storeys running round it.
Three or four fierce-looking dogs came tearing out, trying to lay hold of Tom and
his companions.

“Ye see what ye’d get if ye tried to run off,” said Legree, patting the dogs
with grim pleasure. “These yer dogs has been raised to track niggers, and they'd
jest aS soon chaw one of ye up as eat their supper! so mind. Well, Sambo, how is
things going on?”

‘First-rate, Mas’r,” said Sambo, a fanea fellow.

“Quimbo, yer minded what I tell’d yer?” said Legree to another of his crew.

“Guess I did,” said Quimbo, shewing his large white teeth.



84 UN CEE al OMS ct AS BAN:

These two coloured men were the chief hands on the plantation, and Legree
had trained them to help him in all his cruel deeds.

Tom soon followed Sambo to “the quarters,” a sort of street of rude huts in
a row, far off from the house. Tom’s heart sank when he saw them, for he hoped
for the comfort of a little place to himself where he might be quiet and alone out
of working hours. They were mere shells of cottages, without any kind of furniture,
only a heap of dirty straw on the bare ground!

“Dunno whar to put ye,” said Sambo, “there’s a pretty smart heap of niggers
to each just now—it’s a busy time!”

It was late in the evening when the weary toilers came flocking home. and
then there was a scramble at the hand-mills, where their handful of hard corn was
yet to be ground to fit it for the cake that was their only supper. To a late hour
of the night the grinding went on, for the mills were few, and the tired and feeble
ones were driven back by the strong. Tom waited patiently te get a place at the
mills, and moved by the utter weakness of two women, who were trying to grind
their corn, he ground for them, put together the fire where many had baked cakes
before him, and then set to work to get his own Supper. It was but a small work
of charity, yet it touched their hearts, and a look of womanly kindness came over
their hard faces. They mixed his cake for him and baked it; and Tom sat down
by the light of the fire and took out his Bible, for he had need of CUO

“What's that?” said one of the women.

“A Bible,” replied Tom.

“Hain't seen one Since I was in Rentuen?



DARKE LAGE s. 85

“Was you raised in Kentuck?” said Tom with interest. ;

“Yes, well raised too—never ‘spected to come to dis yer. Read a piece
anyways,” Said the woman, curiously.

Tom read: “Come unto Me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden—and I will
give you rest.”

When the women had gone to their wretched cabins to seek forgetfulness of
their misery in Sleep, Tom rose, disconsolate, and stumbled into the hut allotted to
him, where laying himself down on the crowded floor, he fell asleep, and in his
dreams was visited by the Sweet ministering angel who had loved and comforted
him when on earth. se

Legree soon found out Tom’s value, as a good and honest worker in all that
he did, still he hated him for the goodness that made him stand by the weak and
helpless. A few weeks after Tom’s arrival on the place he noticed among the workers
one morning a handsome woman whom he had never seen before. She was evidently
a lady in manner and appearance, and aS she walked by Tom’s side, proud and
erect, he wondered why she came to work like this,and marked that she picked her
cotton very fast and clean. There was a poor mulatto woman named Lucy, who was very
weak and ill that day, and as Tom passed near her, he silently put a few handfuls
of his own cotton into her sack.

“Oh don’t! itll get you into trouble,” said Lucy, surprised. “I canb’ar it better’n
you,” returned Tom, going away. ;

Suddenly the strange woman came near enough to hear Tom’s words, took a
quantity of cotton from her own basket, and put it into his, saying as she did so.



86 UNCUE Tews c CRIN.

“You know nothing about this place, or you wouldn't have done that.” She
then went on with her work, and before the day was over, her basket was filled to
overflowing, and she had several times put largely into Tom’s. When Legree was going -
to weigh the baskets that evening Sambo said to his master spitefully,

“Dat ar Lucy’s short weight again, Tom and Missie Cassy filled up her
basket though.”

“Wall then—Tom shall have the pleasure of flogging her—Itll be good practice
for him, eh?’ said Legree, savagely.

“When Lucy gave in her basket, Legree, pees to find it short weight
said angrily,

“What, short again, you lazy-bones. Stand aside, yell catch it pretty soon.”
The woman gave a groan and sat down on a board. “Now come here, you, Tom,” said
Legree. “You see I didn’t buy ye jest for the common work. I mean to make a driver
of ye, and yer may aS well begin to get yer hand in You jest take this yer gal and
flog her-—-ye’ve seen enough of it to know how.”

‘I beg masr’s pardon,’ said Tom, ‘Its what I ain't used to—never did—and
cant do--no way possible.”

“Yell learn things ye never did know before I’ve done with you,” said Legree,
striking Tom a heavy blow across the cheek.

“There, now cant ye do it?’ said he furiously.

“No, Mas’r,” said Tom wiping away the blood from his face. “I’m willin’ to
work night and day, but this yer thing I cant feel it right to do, and [ never will,
MasT, never.”



Dea RK Pe ANC ES: 87



Legree saw a quiet
determination in Tom’s
words that roused his wicked
spirit to fury, and kicking
him violently yelled out,
“You dare to tell
me what's right or wrong?
Ain't | your Masr? Didn't
I pay down twelve hundred
dollars for your old black shell?
“Ain't yer mine now, body and soul?”
In all his pain this question
roused Tom’s better spirit, and he
called out,
“No, no—my soul ain't your's masr—Ye haven't bought it, ye can’t buy it! It’s
been bought and paid for by One that’s able to keep it!”
“We'll see,” said Legree. “Here, Sambo, Quimbo, give this dog a breakin’ in he
wont get over this month.”

It was late at night when Tom lay groaning and bleeding alone, in an old
room of the cotton mill, among broken machinery, and other rubbish heaped up there.
The thick air swarmed with mosquitos, which added to the torture of his wounds, while
he suffered agony from *hirst.





88 UNCLE TOMS -€ ABE N.

“Good Lord—Do look down—give me the victory! prayed poor Tom in
his anguish.

Some one entered the room, and he saw the flash of a lantern.

“Who's there? Please give me some water,’ said Tom faintly. The woman
Cassy, for it was she, set down her lantern, and pouring water from a bottle, raised
his head and gave him some.

“Drink all you want, I knew how it would be. It isn't the first time I’ve been
out in the night, carryin’ water to such as you,” said Cassy.

“Thank you, Missis,” said Tom when he had done drinking.

“Don't call me Missis—I’m a miserable slave like yourself,’ she said bitterly,
and then dragging in a small mattress, on which she had spread wet linen clothes
she added—‘“Try to roll yourself on tho this.”

Stiff with wounds and bruises Tom was sume time in doing this, but it
seemed to relieve him a little.

“Now thats the best I can do for you,” said Cassy, when she had raised his
head on a roll of damaged cotton for a pillow. There was silence for awhile, and
then Tom said feebly, .

“IT saw ‘em throw my coat in that ‘ar corner, my Bible is in the pocket—if
Missis would please get it for me.’ Cassy went and fetched it, and Tom opening it
at once at a deeply marked passage of the last scene in our Saviour’s life, said

“If Missis would only be so good as to read that ‘ar—it’s better than water.”

Cassy took the book and read aloud in a soft voice that touching story of



DAR Ker UAC ES: 89

suffering and glory. When she came to the words, “Father, forgive them, for they
know not what they do”’she threw down the book and burying her face in the heavy
- masses of her hair, sobbed passionately. In a few moments she rose and said,

“Can I do aye more for you, my poor fellow? Shall I give you some
more water?”

Tom drank the water and looked. earnestly and pitifully into her face, but
before he could speak she said kindly,

“Non’t talk—try to sleep if you can,’ and placing water within his reach,
Cassy left the shed.

In the morning, Legree, who began half te regret the loss of one of his best
hands for some days in the press of the cotton-picking season, came early to see if
his victim was inclined to give in yet.

“How d’ye feel, my boy, eh?” said he sneeringly, “have you had enough yet,
or would ye be glad to do what | tell you now?”

“Mas’r Legree, | can’t do it—I never will do a cruei thing, come what may,’
said Tom boldly. :

- “Yes—but ye dont Know what may come. What ye’ve got ain't nothing—
nothing ’tall!”

“Mas, | know ye can do drefful fines ue after you've killed the body,
there ain't no more ye can do!” said Tom, adding with more spirit as he went on,
‘Tl give ye, as iy Mas’r, all the work of my hands, all my time, all my strength,



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'2011-10-15T21:36:26-04:00'
describe
'14282028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLQ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
2d214448d352245dc8268ab7ea92e9b6
b235de158608753427fb6cd0b8f4826753615b36
'2011-10-15T21:35:35-04:00'
describe
'237' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLR' 'sip-files00009.txt'
81b8c875053dd3a4fa9d46ef8e0d5fac
b19b34d473c7882075a6e3a4d601d72a26fcab3b
'2011-10-15T21:36:24-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'27035' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLS' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
0885248d28c754a5a54e489b0f78b4e5
b34c0d3add3d709de9d6665d2d23d4563c33d086
'2011-10-15T21:36:25-04:00'
describe
'616791' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLT' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
8a246ed5ed5caf3fd08e27e1949dfd99
f0b213cec4f35a8788a37f3744ee1abad7b1fc14
'2011-10-15T21:37:06-04:00'
describe
'62200' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLU' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
e5ddbd169112e3b21d918267adda2edb
68e9cbbe92579279b34bbc58c0ed96709c98bb4e
'2011-10-15T21:35:00-04:00'
describe
'13235' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLV' 'sip-files00011.pro'
59838aff9616685ed9a45fbd611d9d54
64807f271eb82bbac3669e2a74e47c722b962872
'2011-10-15T21:36:36-04:00'
describe
'31400' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLW' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
2b834b9d6e639612e8f0d13a18e71f12
0434f01e84999340cb550aec0aa06d16eb613c5b
'2011-10-15T21:36:19-04:00'
describe
'4955632' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLX' 'sip-files00011.tif'
133fc1540f2ad9b442027710c4e686f5
c112587dbfc8397a899787f7b791c2e53668a207
'2011-10-15T21:35:56-04:00'
describe
'709' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLY' 'sip-files00011.txt'
2e4f77185f2a965dde11d308c8f51a37
ef448e56fe81088e195dc05b1c4dec17625f3f80
'2011-10-15T21:37:33-04:00'
describe
'22751' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHLZ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
06e31ebc6e1c3115d81a8c4d7158b1e1
8aae741dc876d655588fe929b845fe80ed40040e
'2011-10-15T21:36:10-04:00'
describe
'616980' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMA' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ec33950fc1bb3a8262437a979b8f2ae8
88471753c27877c3d9df0f04fcf11a747e9c45a3
'2011-10-15T21:35:44-04:00'
describe
'79901' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMB' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
4cbd8706529e32ff314dd7d98a3af0c2
44f07397d91a5f38625951f015df239d7ef6abda
'2011-10-15T21:36:37-04:00'
describe
'32493' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMC' 'sip-files00012.pro'
7b28b01bafc70f5f414cdc7b1b14aea8
7af7b43f20e9a1f6e2c47669d2c4f4dc29f23a06
'2011-10-15T21:35:26-04:00'
describe
'36382' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMD' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
609f1f6248bb5b015df505fa46f9cca2
98c70f9554056706c8312ff1335e36be7a0fad23
'2011-10-15T21:37:20-04:00'
describe
'4956736' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHME' 'sip-files00012.tif'
693b7a99f8fab94af85f2995846ea60f
d1cfb7debbd7da1e370c5616c22aa8d2ce2aad84
'2011-10-15T21:35:59-04:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMF' 'sip-files00012.txt'
c18ba3afce4a5c92a01c1fa78f7691f9
fa94e6ae800cc00127e8c30235aa5f1d3e96ce37
describe
'24851' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMG' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
d8e04946ccd3d4439a8e499739caf5b8
0e440b9ec620df40cad7633d61e74480bb5c00fd
'2011-10-15T21:36:33-04:00'
describe
'617008' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMH' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
df7fee1add4d2b12b258c1e614aee793
6d218173df845ffdcb4ae91bcd21e9ae6f64f42f
'2011-10-15T21:37:04-04:00'
describe
'98188' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMI' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
f35641674d67625c5d6ba2596725d8b2
4e0f4033ac4b2408578384a46904bf3af17d7b91
'2011-10-15T21:35:15-04:00'
describe
'30274' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMJ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
621d42f18e699d746abaf9c866c67f8a
ebde84ed9771e086489c18f2535a34edcaaf32c2
'2011-10-15T21:37:11-04:00'
describe
'43347' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMK' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
cead65999f01ad625df2e93bcd508379
a98894fd498b6232aa5ee09a7404ec9b4d5b3e6b
'2011-10-15T21:35:47-04:00'
describe
'4957996' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHML' 'sip-files00013.tif'
fc79b7123cb804e926586bcc59bb0fae
8c1117ab0ed88e2ab025b733eb092b7cecc69182
'2011-10-15T21:36:48-04:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMM' 'sip-files00013.txt'
b20e00a80193dbbad5bfa74e9a8c73b2
01feab01fd48fbdcae3e429df867a374bdfa5097
describe
'27008' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMN' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
24d41217dc33b7f21a98af18bbc9fe9b
881617c1a45886cc18239d0ff15a735348322281
describe
'616998' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMO' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
2cd4a0bd308f37df3e9b084d0aeb515a
7fb17d82ea44bf70952544c0acce8fad6a699533
'2011-10-15T21:36:58-04:00'
describe
'108394' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMP' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f4b145ca5dbe2eaa35db70a5f083290d
0db756da9877a3a9a19bd5ab2b24f1ec8350822d
describe
'36651' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMQ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
5743c56127f22c3cc53ec219fc551cb0
26e1b5ebf86241ed9fc18e56796d8071c5ff1525
describe
'44918' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMR' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
22777189147e4d6e4f7a79a28523f0b3
8b0a3115a315a9d91384d261c258e3d852a3d391
'2011-10-15T21:35:37-04:00'
describe
'4958776' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMS' 'sip-files00014.tif'
4a40f6127e04ad6f1be042a67c41b665
7baeb0b90f865879c9fd6da8899a3ab795be33c8
'2011-10-15T21:36:12-04:00'
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMT' 'sip-files00014.txt'
f23f8dcf5ef771db7705ed9536aac4a3
5bf7b990051e69aeea1a0c13bf394a7df27b7e85
'2011-10-15T21:36:22-04:00'
describe
'28444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMU' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
7be1ee3c096e667fff9f4973b06600f0
2ea16a4dd6502ef82daea030f910090c1136c612
'2011-10-15T21:37:21-04:00'
describe
'617014' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMV' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
bde5772cc1b5d72035b583bd6f099dab
29146bc0d3c33deab8a237fb64e5464eb80e6d01
describe
'113070' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMW' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ec83fe9c94593251801fa66c14dac8de
963a7cc6a17be9b49eb88c7fb09ade759d3d657e
'2011-10-15T21:37:36-04:00'
describe
'39783' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMX' 'sip-files00015.pro'
a688919f77c654ca37338450e5b4cfb2
2821bb65dea74c2fc69a95bcc9a52ffed568ac75
'2011-10-15T21:35:16-04:00'
describe
'48078' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMY' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
6f356becaf3466a6673246cda68471c2
738c69a10b773bc919980d502bee30b3d83dbe41
'2011-10-15T21:36:42-04:00'
describe
'4958728' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHMZ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
08cb7d883b52a2a0c000bb0e247a1596
089ef8934c47fe741efe71d1f30c960dd36e0c9e
describe
'1672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNA' 'sip-files00015.txt'
1d5521051c215720f6c2ee4fff010f02
c407dd8671c9388b593bb7683a3d2c2db533362d
'2011-10-15T21:35:40-04:00'
describe
'28314' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNB' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
6ba04235a9102519d17d49a0161ab882
416573ba6b0b3a788670ceeb95ec3b5dd589a30a
'2011-10-15T21:36:49-04:00'
describe
'616708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNC' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
f096405f28037f2637345c029e022e63
01a3573488a60f46a2806c5ace14fadc0ef82562
'2011-10-15T21:36:57-04:00'
describe
'118601' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHND' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
0faa6e1b5983f4d20ff8a9dcf89c6b96
a227d13253f72c9a05de3fa8bf278360460c1f49
describe
'43264' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNE' 'sip-files00016.pro'
3973975b0752a6c6ddb2e66100633db7
444570958279ee7d0974a1b48ae0417b68ead4e3
'2011-10-15T21:35:31-04:00'
describe
'48758' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNF' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
deae72ca415a9eaaa176c64b274e9153
ec4f369618067a7824d57b128d7e782f2486577d
describe
'4958932' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNG' 'sip-files00016.tif'
ca06b46ef5e5ac6e6fe4ccba8ecda020
56b2e57ebb0216636a69610dc58148a2339d35c9
'2011-10-15T21:35:57-04:00'
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNH' 'sip-files00016.txt'
03a17ed7f49f6ab67b0a5c41c439d211
5b0d91b88d21f0f7684c5d7f1061045c40afe9e5
'2011-10-15T21:36:51-04:00'
describe
'28790' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNI' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
65e69f31d0eba6e863dd212c1def8b74
2e577ea2d7d9018610ab200b511e87a220e199dd
'2011-10-15T21:36:28-04:00'
describe
'616879' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNJ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
c5b717fffbfc18d79e7703e156759466
81ffbf8f4e3c82ca3285ea63d721e0c0824723bc
describe
'108162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNK' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
ffd9937fc41a5d3cc59992fea700ec73
96fecf98e93aaf5856fc2d620076167205e1e7f0
'2011-10-15T21:36:07-04:00'
describe
'38874' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNL' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d5fcf07258fd3cc46961fa24d7b05ca7
1ee0a1869f94d8e9cd9f3c75b910fc47b78ad596
'2011-10-15T21:35:19-04:00'
describe
'47392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNM' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
687e129c76239811c371b4b393c3c4ea
6bd41a7320cba6ca8aee1803ddba837f914ab59c
describe
'4958732' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNN' 'sip-files00017.tif'
b25a80747ae2ace065b90a89629b23a2
97398cff6b11cdabdcb10b2fa8ef2e0a706486fb
'2011-10-15T21:37:12-04:00'
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNO' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a4137e055a6db09790479ce1e09e210c
16962f2e9ade56eb917a723ff43ddab4e3ab723a
'2011-10-15T21:35:22-04:00'
describe
'28282' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNP' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d18c1d68e3e0e947d184b0ee6615b7bd
7510f4df0dfe94f2d62bf11fd196167534efc4f1
'2011-10-15T21:34:59-04:00'
describe
'617011' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNQ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
9bd9caaa2b3950f7838beac195ff0d7b
3e0bac7fac19d4961d24ed4a81e580edd909f61b
describe
'104230' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNR' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
b60126e87ae08245b725bc9ff93ba9e9
c9645747f0d32a84c422eba071047d5316ad2dad
'2011-10-15T21:36:15-04:00'
describe
'40027' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNS' 'sip-files00018.pro'
0888484dfd219bad0e22d42a09aedfd5
12f112ef703ca605bbbf20017e62906c2761fa4b
describe
'43444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNT' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
205f336cf7fceecd9a83b3c1148d17aa
754132d0e392fbf4c9da6901e51c957b0b199746
'2011-10-15T21:35:51-04:00'
describe
'4957968' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNU' 'sip-files00018.tif'
13a4e68f2a0559b716f7aee6e2ce869e
330bab4b2e9ff09871dfb61719b1e44697b7cfea
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNV' 'sip-files00018.txt'
247a72abddf824ab951ddcba483dc76f
ad22d3937eb62c8d769656db8568aaf141dfe0eb
'2011-10-15T21:37:23-04:00'
describe
'27128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNW' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
910c2c9e5ecda42f819b9e2cc00ac3c1
b06b9c9ffd011f6bbe34a66d7036f80d6adf3c14
'2011-10-15T21:37:05-04:00'
describe
'613101' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNX' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
8a5f43b9ae15b5831426cc2c8348f3d5
83eb332b251237788b3bb82861aa49c88bd40baa
'2011-10-15T21:35:27-04:00'
describe
'91553' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNY' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
7a1db701605ef17c3d6022e242881219
1d1719fc053cf085f820ce45792556f194975704
describe
'28811' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHNZ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
5dfc35b14dad6d200b1de09a141b5c1e
5395e38f1b0f5aa7d460a6eeddf56dfbcae737c9
describe
'37864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOA' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
92d6f67a5f6722ece4220d87c649c596
f3d18181af58d9cd97ea6842dd1bc452be3c5970
'2011-10-15T21:36:45-04:00'
describe
'4926020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOB' 'sip-files00019.tif'
a2b6f15641afaa7f088134b981f590a7
c007ca147fb41408ee5e93ab9528144010286301
'2011-10-15T21:36:14-04:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOC' 'sip-files00019.txt'
e1ab4624bed01237b6a4a32593aa4366
4e86a846b1ce7c373bb9a1c3e169f57a3ae12046
'2011-10-15T21:37:01-04:00'
describe
'25737' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOD' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
2d9ce512a64425e27a6622d4f9ab878c
18a8457283fd3949c2e0bb8b49c1e80f1a6abeb3
describe
'616780' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOE' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
c08602ff07ce7cc6d44d15c70cbd365f
79758dff7f8f4f775d4aef679d8b2d5a496e6f67
describe
'112400' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOF' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
b479e82cc5f6eba100deea61b2339d67
e6b0da7a91d4761950bbe52c8a1edff3e0dccd3a
'2011-10-15T21:36:52-04:00'
describe
'43191' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOG' 'sip-files00020.pro'
8cf88d48fa261ed42f811dc2fb13a7b9
04699f99bcd77a13604309065be7afdf242ce818
'2011-10-15T21:36:39-04:00'
describe
'45012' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOH' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
0dab68cdbb66fd6893707fe1bd15e340
b71703681a204cb90ce22a65a3d052fbeab80a55
describe
'4958044' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOI' 'sip-files00020.tif'
8f330d93c09c9915c0b964aab452657f
da30792657fd08906a16268daf861fec835a9ac7
'2011-10-15T21:37:10-04:00'
describe
'1786' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOJ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
47bb0e76bb6b1c9dab871c8a7a1600b8
d87fccf5c79bb2dd85f0d6f9938542c429e32143
describe
Invalid character
'27103' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOK' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
7725fe76f48e037b72313238951dceec
0e33956c1561e9fa58ef506f868ad565b002318b
'2011-10-15T21:36:11-04:00'
describe
'617007' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOL' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
9f2ae9fb8de91fc2b2f13f88b188d4ec
0f72404f20c2dde3c1ad0dca625195d27ba3f487
describe
'111755' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOM' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
4d9040f06c9f334f58c2c7be7e266504
2ea0eaaf682d33337c772b8b37e2c555928b88e1
describe
'41856' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHON' 'sip-files00021.pro'
12a6068f37f4c56169fe3e047f10e4f4
273aa9ca00daa3df3db05b97b414f594719de86b
'2011-10-15T21:35:06-04:00'
describe
'46985' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOO' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
8c75650727cb66c80229298a3a21c334
df015fd99b863b8b3576b3dba3e73157d1f63fd0
describe
'4958528' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOP' 'sip-files00021.tif'
a73518d21b74a84f8fca0bde7f8dcf19
351e6f8ab132af9930fa488c2cc9fc3065f78b8b
'2011-10-15T21:37:13-04:00'
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOQ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
1aee8157b6883980bb780aca781a4509
3c2687fa8d81eb2f81d117ebf329fbf2c1dd8eb5
describe
'28017' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOR' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
1a656aeaaad796e24c11686fdc455667
83756451892b0e27f738dc3a7ee14a70e21fb010
describe
'617012' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOS' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
2cca569c8a55c1cabc40a907af594ca1
fe9801e6f0ab324d5567aee86b245c042cd54dca
describe
'108715' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOT' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
24ec6da3cfe324206a89a353a319d6b9
9e187e9db65d848b8e898fca4123c98a52561d47
'2011-10-15T21:35:02-04:00'
describe
'40509' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOU' 'sip-files00022.pro'
58ba8d6e29896191fdf00e64d38577c0
0014af6575a1f293319161b7a3389b6c15189f3a
describe
'44717' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOV' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
bb080f0c556493a94d981276a319409d
03463d31bc1b53452108d309f6c9c3ce58508d42
describe
'4958272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOW' 'sip-files00022.tif'
fabdd042cf468fc76a3bab73287894d8
4b385a896006cbb90c3e46cf7fa57634a12e26e8
'2011-10-15T21:35:11-04:00'
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOX' 'sip-files00022.txt'
de13e1a50177663e60fb927e32cdeffb
ce9b019e9127b00a0d8a87bf0dfb907364bf67be
describe
'27408' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOY' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
81cbd8a605e94829a35c46300a70cf9b
8713163484a4b2ec6790136d8911110e0edad7e5
'2011-10-15T21:35:01-04:00'
describe
'607249' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHOZ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7ed752e1553ee1150a157406ea82f40e
6daf47d5218bd82f145746b3a9f16ea44da70625
describe
'114876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPA' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
98fe00c88ba46dc3523274c38746de92
a20a44a3b9bcda37956f8c3b4c0462e49e58325d
'2011-10-15T21:36:29-04:00'
describe
'42769' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPB' 'sip-files00023.pro'
2623b3721f4b72b8a694059e2218a5ca
4c30a09f575a28dee0985c58223f2839c0120001
'2011-10-15T21:36:00-04:00'
describe
'45530' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPC' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
24df54fbdf1c2ee359b9ac32255e219e
8d1107d28ac48b345c2123b8d6bb41b10416e70a
'2011-10-15T21:35:23-04:00'
describe
'4880280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPD' 'sip-files00023.tif'
742fd1db3886b0df442c2b54775ca165
2bb5bdc791de81dcfd8b00bb9498f3c51d15ed14
'2011-10-15T21:35:07-04:00'
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPE' 'sip-files00023.txt'
3213ff71281c710f86bf7de1126e5695
4cf063b1a712192d9a65a3959134bca88afd9c72
describe
'27907' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPF' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
474ec5aabc21ffedf28ed7e811d6ad25
6ead5164c40a297edcb2d5511302cc919c257d4c
describe
'616849' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPG' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
04ce54e8334d74fcb97ef8685edb7608
16cf9e43310d76debee72c6fb9a3d01091608dc2
'2011-10-15T21:35:17-04:00'
describe
'105336' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPH' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
bf6fb429ab426ebdc26777859ffaa979
ed36be7db7f66f55daca41da600f08aaf3a3c730
'2011-10-15T21:36:17-04:00'
describe
'38416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPI' 'sip-files00024.pro'
92d207cbae524159623c953045c92645
b5a8b382024b77c82b06e4a8d6f4cade156a72a0
'2011-10-15T21:35:12-04:00'
describe
'44667' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPJ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
30b69765c0403ca3ae6365bf5fc898bd
f7575312121742a421741d021e2cfb1bad77c893
describe
'4957940' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPK' 'sip-files00024.tif'
eecc8ceceb8ca19306ad8cd9400caa09
1cd79e081103b77bdfe00a0c2bf9db4b806981d9
'2011-10-15T21:37:03-04:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPL' 'sip-files00024.txt'
0e8c27bfc7313161fd406539e9bf7cf0
738f3cc2dddf947f8be011ebea94e820c194d018
describe
'27252' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPM' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
db12698c5e28e69f4c536e3c18b4b880
30e5ab865906d6d244cac87fa5244a146cb0009b
describe
'600096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPN' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
b1fbaaca1af52ef25db88404de57a4b4
00867b7dddfb13368c952f1ae721690874670f5e
'2011-10-15T21:37:09-04:00'
describe
'106568' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPO' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
2bef5d676459a1bdbbab617cf3371fd7
45833d25656d9b3204f21dba877ce2286f8731b1
'2011-10-15T21:35:08-04:00'
describe
'3902' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPP' 'sip-files00027.pro'
df33f0d971bade4862a050c724188cf6
e79b1635775b2a63a32d64149e993711dd8d1653
describe
'43644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPQ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
10cdedaea7c3ca9a141b324d56f4ed50
9f1a799bc085c04675b95f5aad78f3e6d3542172
'2011-10-15T21:37:34-04:00'
describe
'14423564' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPR' 'sip-files00027.tif'
ee3abcc48dad103d36842359d9ba835d
ee6a021780e18a46ce8ce05a3ac35a09bf852f9d
'2011-10-15T21:35:28-04:00'
describe
'202' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPS' 'sip-files00027.txt'
baef0049874f28fb81fd995994e359a9
14785242212da106790b4dc560da01514d639e3c
'2011-10-15T21:36:01-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPT' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
b4534b73ff9c8c6d40ece38cbb072ed9
ae1b64c4d68e3185562a1067f7b30e0103f4f60c
'2011-10-15T21:35:03-04:00'
describe
'610091' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
12f68b4df228d7d86f3e8eb1cfbce11f
564adad2d278c933458e09f7ce6d44432c6bac6f
'2011-10-15T21:37:28-04:00'
describe
'117096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
a7aca8d96454ee7697e4c734ca7124e5
2da39c34e025a33047eecdc8cd7cba22235b3ce1
describe
'47224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
b19c477bba3e90532194a989676edc5e
58e231114ba5ecfc653845149ab3c977b3d4a946
'2011-10-15T21:36:56-04:00'
describe
'45191' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
f6a331aadb3e57319533eb5f24196a9b
16fbff124f8d220e9c185e2134f038b94583d0f8
'2011-10-15T21:35:54-04:00'
describe
'4903552' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
6e4aacce35fc531791d22251a22638b2
9008dd0a57b26c909b1fe5f4f9196d5e320f1ce0
'2011-10-15T21:35:18-04:00'
describe
'1945' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHPZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
1e62e2194323c8e5e48f244af1c03666
b4a0f08710e9b8d5713b1ec0160e0037a1937836
'2011-10-15T21:35:20-04:00'
describe
'27646' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
26d4e8814bcee2ed74e12a72e537e0ef
a6470671b26a9cba2d3a13a1f69ef479868280e0
describe
'616994' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
bcf7852f52c89321f96f0799c6462725
1c9d4eae307f648561068a4acb239ce4f3f01f4b
'2011-10-15T21:35:32-04:00'
describe
'107881' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
ed40bf95b716abf409c87c727841f57d
230cb2bd34dbc1cd4f2707c2927d1f09d8099506
'2011-10-15T21:35:21-04:00'
describe
'38781' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
13b547b679a3f5ef0c75044d86b6c94f
3cb2b6df4bef4c0a696dbd069ece80291779d0f9
describe
'45794' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQE' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
b3bfe1b6ab92272bfc4cfa7f38dc8001
76abfddcb2baae1de7847bd67b6a16e8ad629eb8
describe
'4958176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
504ee11b15056ce07d86f30d6ad520c8
97ca5b08403f41d0d9e35ecc62c64955be2b0f99
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQG' 'sip-files00030.txt'
79f3eef83b56f640e3b777c52b9ce13f
73cf953a323ee0359a9131a33d8cbf5f43dc0d10
'2011-10-15T21:37:08-04:00'
describe
'27410' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
da55ba66f7778fa134017f910cabd440
bf80d0634c5430f6577a20cff479b0384e1d7ffe
'2011-10-15T21:37:22-04:00'
describe
'617013' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
dd4d8c33fd8cfb7dd9e8a6dd5ebe6d9e
1136211a6575027c5564978b9a60925f6f0c8fd8
describe
'111593' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
5018bfe84822ccb3fd43ee508deeed7b
a8fa05ba661bbc710e43ec93904f02dc6d44a777
'2011-10-15T21:36:47-04:00'
describe
'44506' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQK' 'sip-files00031.pro'
f488f996ae7a7339db3316d9dd3bf57b
532f1b6f5220b66fbd94670f7e6f80a222e3ba50
describe
'46479' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQL' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
aa828d9347600a7afe312ebffc2600a0
cbfffd7ee28822ce133cd0002aca6f3631ff1375
describe
'4958472' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
75a295e8e136f37762282935faa12572
215f30b7cbbddb347ee0ad90428a7b456c06f50d
describe
'1822' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQN' 'sip-files00031.txt'
5bbe4006712f61042a35d164989768e4
5a5cb74df5e76fa74dd2149192e1544b3e1fea24
'2011-10-15T21:36:41-04:00'
describe
'27886' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQO' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
e4cbe7f87b9060efafc360f8ecef0ec7
51c4ef5ccd1de358b90f166a1a22409ae4d44dca
describe
'616878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3744868d926cedd24c515111aec148d4
7e09911aa6234e6b1a05d78f770fd7f56c50cf57
describe
'62885' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
b3b5196a5c7824fff302ce1d3b9313dc
3cd6d215b4c6a6ac78ce43054c5d86a4b3ef216b
describe
'15915' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQR' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c233bb71edec1e706545f64ef0f0eaa0
5bc6e04f8884f04e5cdb6d0924d3623458730246
'2011-10-15T21:37:32-04:00'
describe
'30759' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQS' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1266163f37274d7b87ab20951809fafc
cf24ba5fd6592a5e3bdb62827cd851e335c36f53
describe
'4955492' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQT' 'sip-files00032.tif'
0ad19332ddc1bbed11b912ce754dfe54
d7dbd436f7a5fd74cd03bb19cd0546399b38ca7f
describe
'641' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
ed120dbb1e4525d1b8ec60630ec331b5
3c35ae88c582a6352e18b53ca62d1952d8240667
describe
'22421' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQV' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
2b7bffdcabbe32bde1c902cec8bee785
108d0c010b9dd699ec91c0b19cf69347769129e8
describe
'616986' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a71c95abbc29cb5a79ecd671663abc7e
7f35b2b610138a6b0190052cf7534f76834579e1
'2011-10-15T21:36:20-04:00'
describe
'106155' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQX' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
9fe534794310a5bb7fea6f537a3e6cb3
98d454b41ac453f5ca0b4a73117c882f215b0076
describe
'38784' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQY' 'sip-files00033.pro'
495fd952a37893efd2314c705f2eaa1e
b89071be5acacc5cef75abeb2129f336545a1415
'2011-10-15T21:36:30-04:00'
describe
'42706' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHQZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
9b6abf31acff2aa72c2965b89ec0cd61
eb2e34a0bee52f37d783c87f20af86ab0b286e22
'2011-10-15T21:36:08-04:00'
describe
'4957668' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
521136b5c044aaae8608b1bfc5d9e2cd
6090e742061c396bc01e7a2e7abc044ca95c839e
'2011-10-15T21:37:35-04:00'
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRB' 'sip-files00033.txt'
401e4766a954950ad20374eacaf801dc
38a662983aaf8cf5c5263dea27e592d08e3333a5
'2011-10-15T21:37:17-04:00'
describe
'26352' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRC' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
27d21225ae18324c93f8e81479c29864
e2ad696fb2abfc315fbde3d0e520abddb6460b75
describe
'617005' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0583248e0935615e983291eb0335e721
cf7cbc0f217ef006bfb61c13706db29553963a3c
'2011-10-15T21:35:46-04:00'
describe
'109543' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRE' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
fb4ce55fdeef498e08eee089e35f0f6c
9e8ae2d6918b7c6061cf42468ff3ebf1dbd370f9
describe
'42333' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
005d34f357dab64153e1ae1123d0a964
23e855e4c7313434526ec644bd3a811c5186ec18
describe
'45143' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
9cc553b47e388512603553b4cd93c4f1
b280f5961d4474d2de324fa3e296334513090aa4
describe
'4958164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
993f09eddc5e4b4ab803b3c7780b459b
682721a2928cb74db8fdff6b24c4c2beed808d52
describe
'1697' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRI' 'sip-files00034.txt'
4f6db6c2e89053f5605bf7937ffa0979
78f08862da9c3b3ca285288e9ecf57771ff8c142
describe
'27675' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
7207718fae0d6232b210fe0b90b11611
c364928729fd19bcb9984f587e92441b45b33c5b
describe
'616989' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
7c6639aa8748f1852ea628bc5121ed6a
1d1e08b4205e5effd632a932c8f06b6637ddcfdb
describe
'113077' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
bd3e08d7ab342b1d7a872dc5d783e1e5
c0b8cd855e0f89181e639d3f0509d0241e632ef0
'2011-10-15T21:36:53-04:00'
describe
'42061' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
a23096852d23de1cdebd0700f800285d
01274b22370ab4f98a956a708b010968ebeb4518
describe
'44411' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
90afb3b83349f7d93411d69d6ba0f6bb
629aadd4dffdadfeea61f1c489e98c7817ca208e
describe
'4958284' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
8e47e222470883bddf4d0f063a8fe233
bdb37a5b21df5a3c41eca57be0de874e494e0d0c
'2011-10-15T21:36:03-04:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
5d7f649586fb3236628aa1d5468d41c4
7f451ba0242e810fd07c0076c12351b79057b017
describe
'27367' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
8314c43364618dfc51e62ed4c444e0d1
c7965ca76757cda6e84f7ca292f56f017923ebc5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a27388e9bcfb58be38085d23c1e10a04
a15ee116d7a8c0e22c15f0f7790856f5fb6f0ee5
'2011-10-15T21:36:21-04:00'
describe
'113247' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
48080508f7fc3b441c96e0df6a2e621c
fe10337b4a971e4c2a49947706e099fc2061cba3
'2011-10-15T21:37:15-04:00'
describe
'44560' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRT' 'sip-files00036.pro'
445614f8a5eb9b1829200dec321daca0
13a80a7b7bc4da7c568d123efcfa2d8d059ab5a3
'2011-10-15T21:35:30-04:00'
describe
'45255' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRU' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
9373e88157142b9d0c14ffde94d967e6
3838f80bd853acbcf90b01f4f08f4c3ea630d0ba
describe
'4958128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
3556a1f9e0323f87beaed4fa2a2f6a6b
8c8c5d22e86e943c195a73fd9b98485b880dc562
describe
'1814' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRW' 'sip-files00036.txt'
fba87b31407b6ca25c4e465f4bce9339
c33a1062ad9d8c5abb508245b9b524bd6c7c7a7e
'2011-10-15T21:36:50-04:00'
describe
'27310' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRX' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
ac273ad73dc67e4e9f5f1d94b30aa5c1
ff286232cbfbb08f3c8fe9b459e3dbee37dc2f25
describe
'600099' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
422653bb7b40334f3771d70ff6aa954b
6d78f28623ef04d2a9ce84ea0c6c7b2d5e6b4b0b
describe
'101235' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHRZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
3ec5973e6d214071079caf753ba32d0c
1645a015c9ccb684fa7532cdd931d379ef084063
describe
'3126' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
708f7f90cacf1d08dedd0e0b4dc3a242
f3b6e70b4e87c78df63decc46843131a9ca03ea3
describe
'42679' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSB' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ffbf6ed2fc359f11339f989d3789b1f1
4090d367d3dcf995db9d44e6fa526e2382f01426
describe
'14423252' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
7c15368ed06ab5aca8976407609dfc55
6633c4ea96a9f2e56501155c38e9c9a5a82c0723
'2011-10-15T21:36:23-04:00'
describe
'418' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSD' 'sip-files00039.txt'
2133b88a6947cad2ce64275a16ac788d
63220e0f7234add1312cf896fc59a1e5d1015a0c
describe
Invalid character
'28602' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSE' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
972f9011a07fa4718611ae97b0784d8d
c714cbb9ffec0cafd85941e4d09a932dc371a5ae
describe
'616929' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSF' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
9993b5f218117c1a11a6b2aa31820817
317f99121bf34461446c0cb8f42a15897e0625a9
describe
'114765' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSG' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
1a75fb68f97c47f8a6f68eb478a01f2e
97bdcd1abf235feedd88f09b35aba71857ca6512
'2011-10-15T21:37:02-04:00'
describe
'42392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSH' 'sip-files00041.pro'
670a5493148c8b00f3d8f8da64f18e50
979600e0a91fc641c9fcf3b0e148be0f089464ce
describe
'45271' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSI' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
893412e835588ca42eef14c110bc8c1b
d6f2fe89f87b52f05ca30c6fab95fe072e412546
describe
'4958372' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSJ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d522381dde19036e0a37a91d80c2d75a
81369c1a4030181e5d464a12088673b4648c6406
describe
'1751' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSK' 'sip-files00041.txt'
2e1d257ad423b513553dcf67c2191ddf
4a51a47e9a19b61ec3d2c246bc54464478708956
describe
'27840' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSL' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
7e5b975a1ecd3328a7c60d532d1b8e9d
91b1a61b0fd7c130b59491a6ac1412042292b8d7
'2011-10-15T21:35:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSM' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
6c6515dfbd317db0afbfb79ecbed9d63
725d266c5d3d1f349ddf67c835e6fa81b4159504
describe
'102308' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSN' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
bfdb8aa122e75e470f629cfed916ae46
681f091c49975e40b97f89f87776e1ebc1a2987e
describe
'38107' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSO' 'sip-files00042.pro'
d33666c0ef212363a9221c533ee3efe9
1335bcfadbef41ec3063c54caa3e4fa0a00aeb97
describe
'42017' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSP' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
49e4b59b175ff3fbf9f6b2ce7638e273
e84d721b26ba6dc31bd6aeb2f1c6fd3d95c06af8
describe
'4958120' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSQ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
439f9b766770d9a75c430fcc05787b25
c8960ee0a3f25de3832e278e9df989fdc7bf9bbc
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSR' 'sip-files00042.txt'
2780d1779613c34dc07665d3be33a34c
1c4a81f82878b1fe8f8f4c43f9785a1fed0715f9
describe
'27158' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSS' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
2a6ccfa93e0eaf7ce7dea0b63895901d
3383297b4b2d69ec2d74125540ef4a0a2d6e61c8
describe
'616995' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHST' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
c1266f31c531fa8f332e654b5a3b58ce
0b31ab42ef3c6f99aaa598bd8db459202dce6dec
'2011-10-15T21:35:38-04:00'
describe
'116460' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSU' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
8229ab1d0fe9885d28a212b4cf319b4f
7d8266eb93ce622b816d36440295559d9f79e3fb
describe
'43717' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSV' 'sip-files00043.pro'
2b9ea8211eac735f18e9e7dfaa640415
28c731c4c9992d940ea779e55a6c14ff715cfc46
'2011-10-15T21:35:33-04:00'
describe
'44483' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSW' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c9c014c3ef9c58e10b6d990db6ff91fa
348a66f15a2c9c7022112904572a1285201d0d5a
'2011-10-15T21:35:36-04:00'
describe
'4958236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSX' 'sip-files00043.tif'
347d6441e6138a8af2d47de61d14a38e
aec46204fb7b4bfb70dc43ea4fef137f4db26825
describe
'1838' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSY' 'sip-files00043.txt'
7c82c60d8851e29df297c914b032689f
ded618d8e71ccdb88d4812161eb03ba37d04da90
describe
'27762' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHSZ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
7e605d4e55fa5f5e277d87f9a9a61788
7b5ec0679c4799086cdf369de1bfaad224db06de
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTA' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
98bef9abe729ea5ea59bec3e793b2952
9e25107186cb7e02af4dc3dfa1123047ca41f13c
describe
'103904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTB' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
941378d6eb8d64ba2a3474e38c265226
d55e2e5c05d1b9b656f714174c5b37e8c36d240c
describe
'38516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTC' 'sip-files00044.pro'
35321add6c1936f35f3e295c45a5ed8e
45a21d382b3dd1c7a9305cc1da88ec005fc11002
'2011-10-15T21:37:00-04:00'
describe
'44906' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTD' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
6c1454f6e8b590ee1addd1998c825d59
1dd9231bb991de6f3081a6174b86e84634d2c961
describe
'4958280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTE' 'sip-files00044.tif'
2cdd967e601339a18b0115601c807df7
658aa06cfdb3f92599319fb477559b9ddd573675
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTF' 'sip-files00044.txt'
15e5ab4ddbd2e8ffabfa66591a05b11b
4f5a837ecbda3ae4977da2a8a054ec624407bd12
describe
'27745' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTG' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
a8decfbd029121389f52544d7e6c7ad7
2bbb87bf2ed63b8e09ed403fa216c963a5458941
describe
'599977' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
9513afd39bbb606ead5cc2aa5f33bda4
03b1b682d18c83fa06e815d03540fcd49007ef97
'2011-10-15T21:36:43-04:00'
describe
'98455' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
fa15dc10f1dda33e5b2f8d87dc25e591
c7f5c5aa2425e1e9970c1b2d5894a52d3bb9e053
describe
'4980' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTJ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
6943c352edeab0e8e46ba43f24881ab3
a0df3257a1dfc8750efd6cfffbb4cc2aa3a1d12d
describe
'40661' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTK' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
45bcb510fcb07014341b3ec9d2975a65
f37be4beb792ac33e63d1d71077a7c1a8cee5222
describe
'14422768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
3e3abb4c026c66dcbf6f61e6b61c0791
e6df323c4ec550b429279d387381a73ff6986921
'2011-10-15T21:35:29-04:00'
describe
'319' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTM' 'sip-files00047.txt'
4e648c46f1b024a123a6b51f884f0c23
5c27eeb31b2f37378fbb7293c80cca1c25865fff
'2011-10-15T21:35:14-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'27552' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTN' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
65a17b75715c0ad9641a7e34cd003043
f398eecd75d44d51f7c348b441f799bf98a01215
describe
'616992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTO' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
6c1a133ce4b5787a77f6e9863069d4d5
8d564399dfd6198b02ec2067c35064d2f110eec0
describe
'100389' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
06ff9ec41156f573cf7f430533fc957e
e737a9cb33cd9b5761fd03bee135832b3105a7af
describe
'33503' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTQ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
cb96dec7d1691747ff0179827dfc6a8d
848cfe035c485b2aa043c179b36f8cc9849442be
describe
'41126' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTR' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
ee06d29f56be45f5ba0135eec70b4876
e8abfeb49c3d315467e769de2f3b5a5842faf807
describe
'4957888' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
3e6d6996f2d1d6ab237deaecaf654b60
c96c152c2cc48523b6cb809cf8254d2aa63d8b57
'2011-10-15T21:37:26-04:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTT' 'sip-files00055.txt'
0030a37944cbec1d7e541de2ec1be6fd
5978f6eec6416d5cc339e2775cef609a54ef19f4
'2011-10-15T21:37:29-04:00'
describe
'26865' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTU' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
9c02b9a866bfde0785ec8ff264274536
6094dec44b3b0f6484dd721401f87016d40a8e9a
describe
'616949' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTV' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
6a15c54e5f5979e9be2a83c5600debda
65903248ecef24ffda3556168f73fc272980f4a2
describe
'111903' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTW' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
be1e239b9309727472f94512709cac1b
2d78ff7aa73a009618a688333be12d21b402980d
'2011-10-15T21:37:07-04:00'
describe
'42832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTX' 'sip-files00056.pro'
2c03ece251d7840fb0dc8cd4174fa43c
c6943c4250443c5c6735ba26fa81dd27d4960e14
'2011-10-15T21:36:04-04:00'
describe
'46308' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
100d835c4fb15b25a1117577df5ab6a8
bed5a7813e9accb4692c2523f9965e2aa669abe6
describe
'4958352' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHTZ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
286e5fdbbaa6ddb093061ddd17affc71
3cb520b0b5e437811d02ad2b4aed14f34b03681b
describe
'1780' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
13cf212a5e42f6509b87a10abe48978c
9fd0456c8fad64b29fc71e02640370b06d856976
describe
'27754' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
aeba0fe4af1f7988f5da6fdc52e2965f
8b35fb79d15f10e6ecfd3495ce9c7d3cd14e4f55
describe
'616673' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
00eb38d6c530f0e69b19fb46a10116e4
6c77130b1945b749ddf1b57f7b97675d57648fd9
describe
'112006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUD' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
fa7abada500bf24813e0c3332ed77c25
82537191bd7d395afa62a795733513064f71332b
describe
'41065' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
07e7e32901aec72df6e6b498934dae7a
db229d09c72104ca8044e06987fd9e746ed5ce87
describe
'45516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
befb7d1ef3599487d7a052f7780b1483
95e1ed8ea533596cca4aae03ebbbaaab22c2f2a2
describe
'4958796' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
89a5c9e12eb106e8b609a1cafc094ab1
d861e6fd99750bb03c22544006c7a2a14ae0f54a
'2011-10-15T21:37:38-04:00'
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ac3d988f5360fa774b9d0d7fc96d9107
906ae1c3e97fc9a930bbf307ec4652331529b277
describe
'28570' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUI' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
8740ff633e8848d71d77606bb96c0730
d057040fd6614d851e58285ded954e2089fb8b9c
describe
'616977' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
16254f8240bc56df88daf06b51f383c0
dcd2d9b970b0c9628d19098a7cb121607e442f25
describe
'108434' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
16647b0ee632fccaa5900b36eaed0274
fd6187a8498d591ab632b250ebce2197cc987c72
describe
'39986' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUL' 'sip-files00058.pro'
b45ba5e95e1283a79910ef7a3c8316a8
8ab57c17ea3931c785be1d95986ac032cac42060
describe
'43775' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUM' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
6209a72281969ba96c8b2cad52e82235
1523da43dedf62310c466c48642f4f232affb629
'2011-10-15T21:37:16-04:00'
describe
'4958548' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
3cc0e3a8bc94dc14d9be17c8d962cc40
3ab9677207b9722368fd63b2c32eb7df16006508
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUO' 'sip-files00058.txt'
aec711690bab0c21552d27f0b62dcfa8
7d486fc13f983ae8930cc2ed92edef5d94300f0f
describe
'28047' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUP' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
21ecf04a41b95dd2503e9f866fc20212
c4ab8d69f5570400f3851cd8023d96c1c8c30b25
'2011-10-15T21:35:52-04:00'
describe
'600089' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUQ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
6d890f25966b365909d324b6a280850e
b3447ed2ce77d7cc8fb10601d843cdf8704be1b8
describe
'115541' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUR' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
caf4b3578150ac800281b0a230ab3fb5
83452e9b51f246d356d7d3576ac41c9d9b65e5c7
describe
'28451' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUS' 'sip-files00059.pro'
986f5e7474bcf4e70aac71b4c64ee14f
7ae562c375118158c102b82caba111a55599636a
describe
'45059' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUT' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
3cc8f8057044ea4aa08f212efd7a0a6b
a32846ed876ff6607ec6f8b8bc7c19f57c738400
describe
'14423164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUU' 'sip-files00059.tif'
e0ee726b646cc99dff5cd4d5246fffc3
46fdfff6fea484d9440651d194bc125a9547b483
'2011-10-15T21:35:41-04:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUV' 'sip-files00059.txt'
4a7d2ba63a41917758e52a9133044b00
5c8195f2b03095095cf345016b4d4066f3488265
describe
Invalid character
'28227' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUW' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
6fd7e0b927672c02943aa0789a908721
ece91b0311dbcf32bcac5e28f105b6a800e1f665
describe
'616984' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUX' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
349a281174e8c324aa5c23624b6f300a
ef3bea144a99d69023841c89bbc60fb99e84d4c7
describe
'107013' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUY' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
9461f2940c9eeddb1e62f7f49e99efc3
da9c098a887b83fdad4f8d2c75e9f54b9e7803a6
describe
'41009' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHUZ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
04c007b799f37a35a450de2b1de159fc
87c31cfd603f2cca352b6932350f62cc1bf77f47
describe
'44140' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVA' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
042803c935f6eaf7a0829f679c02a48c
f02ee61ba93bc77fe5737237a3d5e7ba5e33b555
describe
'4957880' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVB' 'sip-files00060.tif'
59999bab091c3dbfa21260aaaa3f141a
e9b4e49375675ab35b286bbf42d263af50c64758
describe
'1693' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVC' 'sip-files00060.txt'
91adcc926fa77606e294d28be1377cfb
4c7228c01214739dcf96c5449700ffa17053459c
describe
'27098' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVD' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
4f7d476631b7813b007cad49b3f652ba
8e3b2dfe3182544ab21286e5807fb285554947e8
describe
'617006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVE' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
cc8f2289dcf309900c9b27691894c787
db5e42433b861d4ec16f43b491e4946fdda8fff6
'2011-10-15T21:35:48-04:00'
describe
'99212' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
8c5dca3583c0df20c68ab0a19fb62d0c
fa84f037721d2b5bca89e48641f7ab02ce5f8843
describe
'38729' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVG' 'sip-files00061.pro'
cf48c7adcc67dc28ca6bbe9e590b4df9
06f228d0144029e89e4ef798407af0994b7fe72a
describe
'41704' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
2d3259fc1b23773e6dee5b85e7e6fb40
290d4a96dd1bf50e6bbe400affc90fcd50e2c056
describe
'4958040' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVI' 'sip-files00061.tif'
c8db46fdb9f8aafbfed838b769689841
bf35ca407558f8f728831bfe6bf70fcb35c6958a
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVJ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
58ab986d099b2141634719f565d7286b
f33049b1b7913962b523a28ab499e096370c789c
describe
'26946' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVK' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
490ff947fc7eeaa62f08d9ae9e945175
e5adbc7abb5108f67bc3a9e4c8a0ddfe5f5b92ee
describe
'616978' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVL' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
da027a03d47db11839cfb784629096c7
2163ed7a4970f16813866e095b98b2659794ea5d
'2011-10-15T21:35:24-04:00'
describe
'64891' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
7293a826341084652916cf24bafe23f9
d723835ec6d7aff64997d669871e9407fc192905
describe
'18954' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVN' 'sip-files00062.pro'
4969569bf5e83f01ff1331521904e3a4
bd5cddbb860e7b1829864995f9c5c3086a59d762
describe
'30828' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVO' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
08f1cf3db2ad5b75d287463a1fe2a629
99e642c0ecd610e977f91a5e3b280c1ed443c68f
describe
'4955588' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
d3740446556fba0c779f2e4fbfc6548f
686bc520b3810e3c207cc58c936b119233c32881
describe
'771' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVQ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
53f9dc82f8864ff60323ba80377f8585
c35a9888e36cf4342995fac36f40e3036367e0aa
describe
'22493' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVR' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
7bad166c4759fee12928c11f604b13c7
776ef99e3c496208eb5973caaecdd0d76aa6e409
describe
'616988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
ee896845a8471e794be0461926e42d51
cc08570bcd81122f501d24a7326433f1162ffb7d
describe
'104181' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVT' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
eb7ba25e4c5ab6635f491c0223943d40
8d51a4751acac475ba51ac64548885e34513dad5
describe
'37241' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVU' 'sip-files00063.pro'
809cdfd74c4166aebb55f54b91c8d558
f852cb814652b8e275709772051dc7bafa8f6276
describe
'41069' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVV' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
c37cf4494fb4afcadb65d0cea0c39b30
881b0cd9b2d094da4416a801b407f29544f226d3
describe
'4957660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
04adf7a69284caf82ffdaa1736cf1f87
695dc8c1824a9682bb8a0f36b9f09b0ac4c75506
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
b1786b60d17270aaf0c6ef383f7089b2
427ca299a2746423a636713e6714e547695e968f
describe
'26395' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVY' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
51dc40baf1ed76b51ebe405fdf7d6be5
525cdecd99965089f16842b301eebe6dcd6f4cf4
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHVZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
a20d15aa312a9245603a1858b23de1fc
ac046adeec7d605f98abda9f0aaa95bb17873247
describe
'104059' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
041d45632abfaf3d3b6aa575a7dfee8b
741b716b317a131accd0d223adf678d5d320744b
describe
'38723' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
9f5594fa677c68241d2bceef993cb5ad
5e213b415814c615780c3ab969416eaad967f938
describe
'42755' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
a5163215013625d5813a82a600a75dd2
1edd6c85fcd650a62c0649c11249ed1a11889bbe
describe
'4957840' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWD' 'sip-files00064.tif'
18e5d8232c2cca13b4195455113c6247
0cb2c4be68c272c0692c3e6a38fe14d9fc1efdf8
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
4769d0b99ca4ede5603a822d588e7464
32d1a615a1df69705197a69e22173f68a4fe0888
describe
'26843' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
4e4320dcd094f89ac5b0b52f210027f7
4aa610dab4d1da7d919a330062b719a6ae20992d
'2011-10-15T21:35:49-04:00'
describe
'616939' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
20469b6c1b4bcda9ec873714d9cea94c
89f57081ae1c1997da4d292f35818e0e5573a503
describe
'112253' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
02bdeba79fd7127a76f854f39538a6b1
197aff8843eb2b2f39c41671cfe18852a418affe
describe
'42630' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
9493b0a5cc0e4d2e1459ba85dce389e1
3dd64e5eba109c1a364005d561a52c2f8f00d152
describe
'43418' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
23dd2ee389e6f1765f5356e2da77e517
a6cf8d3a8ed4a9c6fa70e8d71d7c76d33554534b
describe
'4958000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
18173983c15742eafbc26c3fb6cdce58
8eb47a4338638b5c5be02e1ad536a6581ccfe3df
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8dc1d5dd2d39a6079e230ad658aa29e7
51f7608e740316221bb5d2ec10dfe56d249aab41
describe
'27212' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
e752e8232249225cf51a6f0ff7fd8fd8
4b39210a61a5772fa268aaf3c97db78d0407fb25
describe
'616934' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
21dcb44e5dfd3ed4ef1b212b7b230f43
ca8c1dd13f17f9bd47afd36ade117444a26afdcd
describe
'112768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1585026ea539180a2c50e65e42f1d89e
faf85351f32f5dd2afad7c5243e55177e31e5a09
describe
'42724' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
e6154f42840d5656ce1596ae0693b58d
565b22443be3c5b2accfa5217eb850b1d1e9d56b
describe
'45880' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a429cef03e3ff93c112e3d792bd7891b
1e2d7531184e2428051617191bcb910bb174f722
'2011-10-15T21:36:59-04:00'
describe
'4958204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
dd8d6b5292df6914cd1fc32126f1202b
6455db05a12d885f415b16040b20511e0ce8b98a
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
602ce1fc340b99a4433d22bc80f1db96
afd08f578f31f5993324bca8f82ab281caba1968
describe
'27292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
3ae92d1d32240f8b699a96948e0608ab
a9f10c08857f522db3d87281d46814fcb70ca64d
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
738d5b75544149a08fab3ae832893351
ac34e2d7c608c13b493a439f1df532d25458fe2f
describe
'106037' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
6dfa21a650f7c3593d4264ce810124fc
bc5b36444ab6c62b5efdfc14c2e73991040fc33b
describe
'37553' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
17b0fa125ed3fd477fcf95d484a6edeb
98cfbd5c9f8d00c595edec022e7d1a57411bae09
'2011-10-15T21:37:18-04:00'
describe
'43130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
05dc8d653dfc5cdd2ec6fc68af9b73dd
aee17ea76ac7d668dc05a392b551badd788a3806
describe
'4958440' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
25a74760636ebd0c70039f92984bbe13
c4c3d9497991513c71b394b8d3a25244783a7629
'2011-10-15T21:36:44-04:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHWZ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
2a7f00ea75ced23a90852e614cbf6024
fd81441bd5a0486e3d81a8ec37b409dff3b414e6
describe
'27855' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
3810b06dfa10320a5f39d1b65c34e0e1
7b6575bdb929c25d734fa284aa1f0e9a7a6a109c
describe
'616955' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b052dc8ee49ba0d842e404e25a32558d
318fe0cb0ae4556bf139c08b708bb6241afd6ef1
describe
'81844' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
72867e77930174b606cd96deba30de53
3fc44fff44c846e952f32e782d596002050d89cc
describe
'25325' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
3725f57f783fff32177d26b6cfaf559c
f8d571f687c50abe4c3fac4e484f77e028d45666
describe
'35046' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b0fa1b92d1346694a90a9184177d410b
0b48aa5240a5bd06a0dce45b6785f9d6bde22363
describe
'4956428' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
c957736ddba01895f9f351e7f96c1990
cb27b7f0bb13b788a7808c14df21db9e0b366594
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
387a34a3c24f0c69d91d30725dbcf0ff
6067c1c2df455650d01d05b379dc270b2b591e4a
describe
'24162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
78b6076d19352736a82618db308628eb
f76ee6637f39d9e50b1e63f7ca99c07380a2d080
describe
'616954' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
b21ed23ba580466beddee8283c41a935
9c955dcda7e029baaed3a549d8d3f46923e43cb1
describe
'104661' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
8b51d0869dd27e006446f5bdaf3733b1
b9e4f80e6ff54c73df20f9171899eb4b241b8edf
describe
'38207' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e4eb4de99ac8f5d36cd2032bc23def00
0633d2d2007b971278866fc3cfa3b6fe216b1610
describe
'43056' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
334890789bcc973615b857bf6aaf8b92
0c2e48a3a11e6bf4be690df2b41de8d3b6be6142
describe
'4958016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
15410d1250bb0a6aa51adfe6c7de3042
11794e7818155f555fb33854dd48081909f9abad
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
98030212cc7273966820ae05c02aac58
6b7071e8bf8bd7722ae5df1edc046d9dc8e6ae6e
describe
'27052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
afb6503587b6ff1450ec9a77d5a658c4
0b5de1ef78aa63c29c2e413e898bad59803cba5d
describe
'600018' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e111b63b602af96b1685c46bbb5dd84e
c899556d7fed2ba5be94583ddfb8cf08f31a3374
describe
'107094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
26627ba8273105e45a9d3d68a0fba5a6
72a4765e07bbdb6c0e67aeeff7bd84c10d628d68
describe
'24797' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
79112914b47c6f1d18c28fcc58713784
8a6cbf091fef7ff5e3b12dbc2928888d35e74834
describe
'43148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
72cd36dc648bc765afa65679d6c42d51
fa399c4a1aa82e7db4e98159812fe8b84a035dfb
describe
'14422808' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
aa3725ca6029ad4ab1f297b39a3b4dfc
b90042709b03bde1174224027fecd10fa1feb462
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
82120c4286b676dc58c5af9d27e6f762
625c37d57140fe9cb16d565e0df181600f09b706
describe
Invalid character
'27559' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
5e2204821296669bcb3b47e194fff330
63d3ff8ea2e7524707dc530507a10f6cc8e75b5b
describe
'616953' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
29a282369e2a7ae57bc6d344220903e3
ce86998b11fd147bf4e5267b418d2734b17eaf22
describe
'115595' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
05e57b6d3fc141c72d805e3687a55ec3
29a4be7e6570ef0b4d302119e0fc2e5290a91adf
describe
'44909' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
eb01bb61b84f061a93e2664c30e6e12c
6101139a94f7b1b40674906bca1b313466a19262
describe
'46084' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHXZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
05301ab9885d7c520e44f50d7b1c0892
77c985284f5acbec49105be3d1dabd0157da089c
describe
'4958740' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
575638d04dd3ed6a939b04574a701f33
c58fe079e6c90dc9d1a6f5cc8e3add796d0ff40e
describe
'1830' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
d1c27e6a8e7d5f31b2dc788eb8e30a8c
3812a5d4bad3abbf905352ea3de8638f5ee29f88
describe
'28245' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
b2204a3063e7fe2daaa3e0f1ba62c1c3
0034937f2c23247bbe26f4e2e0ae1944dc8d9ca5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
d35cb61f80443094a2e3da2bfc573d3d
baed26f1b63f0dda44493afceb339cc3eb56f690
describe
'101405' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
71c9f4e4888d9f3c1d50fc7236097312
fac5a9e73414caf66200c2541dd800e9532ea633
describe
'36859' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
405c95b3e4466626abebce7ff058efbf
e3cab098b56c39751125c4c0f7d42733fb9021b7
describe
'42906' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
cc4a719fdd0ad6d0c3f1f0ba1ee508c8
96af07c4462d45dc032824eb1aec959bd9b77887
describe
'4957564' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
a2749b8913fa335a97f30b3054c9f4a8
d0abbfda906f46aebff62425d038883b117a22fa
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
50d21d555b540e0857977e935ec95d4e
2813eab654fe4710525ac57ad38ed9d205fbe6cb
describe
'26565' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
24d62799e95c716d3e5e852f9f3b4039
d0b6356676169a380959eb78e118f03994d5bc37
describe
'616938' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
3baf2112969d7eb0f10ca83a4f213d5a
bbe186da9f1855ed2b76cc384197957917bd8a78
describe
'114274' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
14d48ed0d215a8b0d2a72afe7b967b92
79b6a01589139a0c399d76e0e97570f2a9104f7b
'2011-10-15T21:36:02-04:00'
describe
'45660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
d235b552603bcd866fbe63c4d922b4b3
694d4019139430ab2a667ecec9b2c17cd610ff55
describe
'46081' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
9d2ecb143ea14139bcd5ccc54cd0f0c4
8c5c950549674f98df8168840fae7d76c75114dd
'2011-10-15T21:36:34-04:00'
describe
'4958292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
46393b6a2571140b23904e33f7bd794b
edd05a6b7230edf3f8a19f351cb63fa771ef880a
describe
'1858' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
9e56cb1569abc8992a0bd07fbeefb0ed
04f827aab51b540b5c1c03f713277b75fb493e2a
describe
'27443' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
5608fd5dabdf8ade55e600d6de9e2a15
06ff3ec35bdb7d4402a659791eea2617585bf9d5
describe
'616974' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
7a6938b7e59129e53e88705f69c62e16
06f753b850e1849fc9e8cb036a10e29612d1d3e2
describe
'100309' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
56fd5c382766cffd49d2ccf577d053f6
9fcdfdc7965b7bf21760071a8f872c37b93d5901
describe
'38551' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
126c8e4bcc54cc709b3250ea6a4260cc
e647801709fca7530dfe4e99f02d16a925c5e467
describe
'43082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
8273a6b1ba0d11bdc343245b4a4494f1
ab8f1a4ca9ee622045ea031f5c4c67c15f69a19f
describe
'4957816' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
3b67eff09837b8814a3876c8b5d5263f
42ff3df1caaabcb0f56af0541e86b3c0ef084a87
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYW' 'sip-files00074.txt'
02d75c1ba2951c7e2527f3eadf655042
18a961aa27bb34f7251c41e041579d2d86b05076
describe
'27039' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYX' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
8c825ed6508f4db697acc916bf986d76
a4dbbf389fa57779cbcedd717001e826fada0356
describe
'616811' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYY' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
144acbc4c145f4676d72f2280b79429a
1e2c94a3302b0694da0560c0614953dbe0356913
describe
'55699' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHYZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
8c2ce99e9948211e974e29ae1e9bfd24
4f2a5a551b88ae719546254d5c6bf775914ed638
describe
'12594' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
c790d9bc742c7972c9f51e54c93399f4
7f6393f56e66e44b38e49203e41e5cd4e1cab0e5
describe
'29453' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
34037fcfad5d0a248a1f34f43cdef675
801adaf2b935c60b4a6f372eaed6d818307d3abc
describe
'4955236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
7e77df12c4e9cf935849f8b85101214b
741b60c19d92fbc956216546ff2f7edd7af05ffa
describe
'578' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZD' 'sip-files00075.txt'
530e34d581e7981689c0ea04bd96abd8
8277cf1b991e554f8902c58d11e4d79e17287978
describe
'21947' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
02b2ec847b9904b221b4c8b52fb63892
9343c00e8f6252dfc88395ae2efbd7bddef9832a
describe
'616775' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
bf8fd27302abcc0e2f21356306bff708
71d42e85be4fc0db3ed14983643799c47a17a70b
describe
'110265' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
63826d5055981d4ff15bfce6e4e875b2
94df93ca2126b10611e148ef9a53014a62fb2b3a
describe
'41090' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
86598d2fa9dc3b3ab64796115a9557b9
17aa5a025ec141143c1c21cac62dce1179a27ec6
describe
'42798' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
1022967cf248bacfb341a5d105a60418
19f121b06228c523412d4cbde3dec35b10d0af41
'2011-10-15T21:35:43-04:00'
describe
'4957688' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
b42d163ad1b33f4b7e3bc13dec4d5857
91fabbb70cee536a0bccb09eef27104f3fef180f
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0947a14a7957b9d93bbcb5dda3c9b71f
917772ac5c049c6c3a8e0265ff2489d0a55b4b71
describe
'26443' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZL' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
ad7570ac1eb996d70ee2d4e751bc5ae4
d73fdd56f2cb23707c746c7fe1aa973baa53614b
describe
'616899' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b99e6ce8c85fe7e51a4835ceb426e8b9
21dbfff80c287dbbc854d7f3b6afe7f17564445b
describe
'109935' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
399811665c0551617b98a7534659b868
2ba67fb33bd3f2f70a64fa02ac7490909c333fa8
describe
'41560' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6f1ce4d2cc88e47f571577a0260f8fe8
9af15c35925c96997a832c06b9763264ed1b5c5e
describe
'44315' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
4e47a7c398b410b997359a18004496b5
7d623d07f5be5e692c1c41b0cef8c3ba6d7e08e2
describe
'4958316' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
b2f3669f4c7cc0ca9fb25f2758735225
c48a30cd488fc9c639800267daeb64ec5b43d0cd
'2011-10-15T21:36:13-04:00'
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
cb1200698ab6dd7be039e0c33a9dd8cc
75ded36d4617333f9783d2dc55bbfc4c9fad7608
describe
'27600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2040ce50c25fed69ff4b171d090bcbc6
a97540fa8c6925fec915665c17026646373668f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZT' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1947ebc3a5af76587c3a848acb48032f
a29b6f28278d7c51e7bfab55064bc800e499d7bc
describe
'98826' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
29346131317f95c6c26eb36546e15f50
1288e764a2f4fad3df039709acc1aab0769500ed
describe
'36135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZV' 'sip-files00078.pro'
ea445e7645495e4e627764b33ff31e93
cb7c24ed0f6d899a438ed01ea1341a6f7479959c
describe
'41655' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZW' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
85893919e6db86b30e9e0a6399574669
50241bd58321253d0be4be3723013081680db879
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
7a704759f8247b2e311e1788a642390b
67aa28bb030d3b6844701f9c1af6192d3991b99e
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
14dc3fe7e8b7b24cfa618e65dc8949b7
9af932245d04e672bc60dd17cf39138003fa928b
describe
'27204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAHZZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
3424df1f9363785f6c788cedfed38001
c7dce8a27de76457954d7a83bd2583b58a1114f3
describe
'600090' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
a1cedb89a6bcbbbe2fc8b50c039f9499
7ddf2f898e1ab4bde49c7c9672b5bc0f39ced08c
describe
'108290' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
a460ec16c67d9f9e0a40951fc1b8371b
bf839f5d0bf59d878c415599b76410e0b06b5265
describe
'25198' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
bd81c0eb2156c66bd9ee2270e2fcdb23
bcc79f89ab4329d9476ce0b532df3c803389702f
describe
'44004' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAD' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cfb1372603a186307bf1dabc5602039a
228e7bdee663cc2075017e117a35b0d051b5f4b9
describe
'14423020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
9eabf433bc22219784981fbaef3750b3
973d68818edce122a18fa361c0fb031879ef6005
'2011-10-15T21:36:05-04:00'
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAF' 'sip-files00079.txt'
21c58509409fa19348d58b5ebf226220
e6b2ba5286e36e7f991a95c25f6a057fc6b5ba2e
describe
'28070' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAG' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
adc5234669b4197d0ec2e5ab1b472e20
4efb7c773e41a3ef7df0b1ba109b2c3228f92dab
'2011-10-15T21:37:25-04:00'
describe
'617001' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAH' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
475ed3a641cec404c349ac0c5462e129
3bf77e5c23a0bfd5f40e38aa8d3b5756aaeb4467
describe
'105372' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
e1baf25da974830f2b705957aa6818d2
e36ea75b640af8197c99fafc5d6e8f2f6b71aa65
describe
'40160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9c86c8ffb9ddb4f4f09b0d7da868ebf9
06b25bd975a49dd6cf281edb8c51f55b22832f50
describe
'42653' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
a36128c455480c611f20e96e4ca0642a
91cd41e4ee8dd0c433851b79384ff6c5c06e6394
describe
'4957340' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAL' 'sip-files00080.tif'
805ddabcd78b6fae08bd91cd65acec0a
28362ec921f4e546f13c1b803abf0fea23e83484
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
b4c19ddd3918e1dfdcdb4ff9c6cb43ef
bbd79e050a0547a3d8587aed2c904f41f623824d
describe
'26107' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAN' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
234b0d363957891fe2ef0a8f1813a97e
442077e7bf57d7145a841f7ba1f8e57f3ffb51a3
describe
'616787' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAO' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
12e8f2a4cf499d8772796f4a09c9e884
a10976520aa1920b066d7c7c61fbc4bf09006057
describe
'121922' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAP' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
d41455c6ce8c53d9f41df72f71d4a6fd
d7a8460912d6a6518feb7e5c0e61821c12040ced
describe
'42821' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
45db27a999a68780e4c8c12b5b56a16c
dfa395af0da03d45a5b41933c155f3406990d38e
describe
'48068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAR' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
d42d270404c24c99f9016573be6cd298
ef45c3203f86d3a242b349edc9a71a558c5bf1ea
describe
'4958724' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAS' 'sip-files00081.tif'
0afe9ed386887d005abb94054e4ae83b
f298f790d6778933fe929abea972fa2cdbd3a820
describe
'1727' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAT' 'sip-files00081.txt'
db0b141b3396b6cbba5bc5f40c0dc0f2
53d763e74fcb3342949de4043e261ae52c11e2f2
describe
'28322' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAU' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
d4a1ca711db14b661f4c4fab6374e3f3
717381b66fe425f43ba0b0a188feb4e96274591d
describe
'616956' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAV' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
4091b974079989c6a929f5fb907ed1f6
b3833b58b51cbe3835aad0809fff1c7e14e502b3
describe
'56606' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ee988e554866283d64ba70f79e22c047
5f89fb76ee9a41b3db36a7d0e7b362c3d0c72046
describe
'11524' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAX' 'sip-files00082.pro'
bb5d73f4c0f5c47a267cbe2784b55569
32dbd826446834e0985978714965e9906cfea586
describe
'28548' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
9095e3da374bbf1a745fd5715a38cf14
7638ede14153925a9558280665b7613bba5fdeb0
'2011-10-15T21:35:04-04:00'
describe
'4955192' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIAZ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
6160561e14b87afdbc6d8115880dbe13
9785de73e2290095cf4f0310a49a79655ac10f2b
describe
'471' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
e17b2b488741224bff28dbde5946769e
71d1f90c1abf9a704fdd837df302ea2e15be3302
describe
'21836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBB' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
4b4cf58063e7d65949f0d8228dc358c2
d95bee7732b063525112134f70e4aebad89c5a57
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBC' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
35a708f99094a00db19e8bae5ff1ceb5
095cf0ecb19bfe7aeb22e4092840304824a7627d
'2011-10-15T21:36:35-04:00'
describe
'99665' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBD' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
db91e6b57a65799eae64ffa5e6d98f27
0a6decfc14b2cde9ec1ab58b3b5fa641faecc9cc
describe
'37638' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBE' 'sip-files00083.pro'
5e74c2c24ea8b6d9a1b661658ba91953
1a287d25d85c703ab460988a8a8146a20477c29f
describe
'41843' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBF' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
78280379109b104e475e789723324066
2aa1b24dbddb69b5552ab070b3e6b13d0a5eedaf
describe
'4957704' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBG' 'sip-files00083.tif'
2bfe8337d611bcb9fdb57163198011bd
d899af43ab263e10a75cf20cd575894f772287ad
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBH' 'sip-files00083.txt'
66b910c7eacac56dcee492d463aa2bdb
0a7b74ae533088c7fdbb23f31221adc9b10856a9
describe
'26667' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBI' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
419f203eae928644a4f5648527f84d94
341323997b4e8cbcc8ffebb61e232d36c7f7bd92
describe
'616778' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBJ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
6ef64b4ca11b8b1992f0dc378b50997f
9e85c90a77778d55676fb53e63a3c5ff6cb341fc
describe
'110845' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBK' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
57565a604bc1464bedea50be69349745
99dc9988046452e14142587cbac5d19a406ec589
describe
'42454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBL' 'sip-files00084.pro'
105475ba83cf7018562ce687c1e3e578
47d8fdf396053bc0cf35cb089a80f4857f982277
describe
'45081' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBM' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
feaf6b6de369a2ed20083e4692f9a623
4534b62eb098185fa61fd072141355867689f49b
describe
'4958652' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBN' 'sip-files00084.tif'
d94633e30d8e64e43b56169fcc2f512f
dd667fd29a062d788e853a55f0ae00378264ef7e
describe
'1735' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBO' 'sip-files00084.txt'
6b5644488d8cdb2d6cec9526d8ed5e71
42e7bd2876ac1bdef4f12e8ea2f1e0ea70c6f736
describe
'28333' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBP' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
d8b50450ba43514dbf64334502a2a566
f5226d78095e33540ec85ce27a83f984a0c4732e
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBQ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
742dd7592fb332791a619d975dde8d22
4705612ca07a7f5e4de0c3232e9865025a955129
describe
'117350' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBR' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
358f12e79574ef966c134c40a342f438
7330f470d3e5b521fe6f61456736220c5243831c
describe
'42903' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBS' 'sip-files00085.pro'
9609059241cb43a4336adddfffbbc8b6
b0cc8c1042d5fe806b1351caedac592f6e720701
describe
'45923' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBT' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
aa54c8ead987a665626cff32f11e3253
a109b0f7a4cdd827857ed85855a2e6aac37ab4b4
describe
'4958680' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBU' 'sip-files00085.tif'
fac1cdb66f5030e20b2360f78a593cf5
872daa76f1506f8c3679b6121af353baec58e4f7
describe
'1769' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBV' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5df0fa9a771af3331e91f44005c59b50
b0b463f7e96d640514c850c59b453e371273e836
describe
'28180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBW' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
847d157e0f2f39b97c42ecd201059f1c
6fa2a2a4e0e1888fad2989a191c54e24da129ab9
describe
'617000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBX' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
4e4052e3bfc302fa14e9e41489523b57
0f6a6dbfe7c73086dd466152df09af3425a7ced7
describe
'107169' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBY' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
967dc1bd97e7c4e76edf1d2e496b2e78
4156e321ef850205f5dc20b1dd29dffcb9d98376
describe
'38550' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIBZ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
a40df913fa0346fe171e6007aef1902a
cc052f3aa952384ddb5788f3e4f955a8a93ca509
describe
'41943' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICA' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
8c6a6520d451951776f2bd3e43e89040
aa90431a34a40e49b2450bc5da9de4b701806fb9
describe
'4958084' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICB' 'sip-files00086.tif'
3d4198b27bf8aa477db77ed2953c1a42
0ae4842568cba23cfac79d910a3118090c774278
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICC' 'sip-files00086.txt'
2a85628d3a0d9d82926fec73f95ef7da
fbe3de0dc2eefe732de6ea44285a02aebef54d4f
describe
'27353' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICD' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
b72409df9a33d18f8a4b8d25d0ce3980
772b20a566c8804a096732a156528d7e4c72c620
describe
'616951' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICE' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
28048cca5bc0ab9917b72c2c6baef260
b7a1081c47f6e1480bec97d70dc08496caefe396
describe
'125719' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
b326aaebc8b643869ba114785add3e86
9e9ba2635c65030325b580870c6496f97ccb0356
describe
'47034' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICG' 'sip-files00087.pro'
6eedaa3c9a80644e8e310c3ed5096a28
4adb9fffaba104663a655c76ab898e99947b9e69
describe
'46760' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICH' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
0abb8ed136e665b35ea931dba4fff7b2
13f89bbbee1a1d9f9f92955faebfd22acde572bc
describe
'4958708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICI' 'sip-files00087.tif'
320c6e3d6c924c5b581a0a1a7358d17f
3412d842285747acb029eb393ed0419073a65470
describe
'1938' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICJ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
9a587ba4f813c55435377cf30231fc3e
a6a4806b64e8029f6d926cc950f9264af73804d1
describe
'28413' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICK' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
236bbbddbb0b857e7a35c5fe65eabcf1
fa43eb3db9c002254cb8678010153b7c0a12e1aa
describe
'616975' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICL' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d5c007149f2812e16b7a6336e8927070
7116923c1aac447c8f212d5afad657e64d63a442
describe
'99500' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICM' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
786424c64775a09d8e836c88f5531182
29d213a231fe59a69e61e68823dfbc482f2659f2
describe
'35389' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICN' 'sip-files00088.pro'
6178ff1441be4ada2b57637feb93618d
99efd103f0c4aa40d5d30b00acbc51543d05836c
describe
'42153' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICO' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
3b8ddeb484cb6772b5b87f7f4107c0d3
2c24ad9d629101aa2fc2bbb416319f04d6aa8fc1
describe
'4957812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
1b2bf78a428c70025ac9ead18583a75b
5aa3d6457bc4db43b154df9a45bde5169da9e82a
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICQ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
6b6c224880b97ffb178185a5fdebc486
98802c891e3bcad57a058f2fc686f4fbe9ac3d4f
describe
'26679' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICR' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
33f1c6e9bf785a549e591a3f5241a198
9fbfb59b01fda2ab014b063b8c64279b443ad1d2
describe
'600073' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICS' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
de14517402eeb2faddf857b7b659c7fa
0855ef556b03dcad623b3c673b61a50f41e46e80
describe
'101070' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICT' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
1848c7c3baad3f9edeac194a770416ad
d575fe865abe249aac95b36a09b49a0dc15e6160
describe
'26293' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICU' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7b7b740e925dfdfd22c6acac6ef14e67
7bdf259bfaa44c2de00417593a74c11dec13d8a0
describe
'41637' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICV' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f509c4d3f8aa60ffbeadb20b6370bdc9
a0ab9ebde5dbb997cd4ae8aead927055b49eb8d0
describe
'14422448' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICW' 'sip-files00089.tif'
dbd864ba2d10694db71953656a5bd758
a260b348a5c79860adf81aa863ab641e5d1a58a7
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICX' 'sip-files00089.txt'
908c4588fda81c9dfec1520accb1cb6e
3c6c37e614ececbc0eb6861b956a7c395c172edb
describe
Invalid character
'26963' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICY' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
3a71c0ce404e51c4ae61321b365916bd
f40a325dafe1eaa8199bf660043c8f8ee8e71043
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAICZ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
fa94b850b60020e4ea9c66b9cc68f6de
79cd0fc65907d07b4f9bb389fb744e5e460787c2
'2011-10-15T21:37:37-04:00'
describe
'100583' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDA' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
9955ed61b92d614f68e58b6b3f724af9
cc53206f1a353317e9cfe8c4bea512351aa9e4ca
describe
'37802' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDB' 'sip-files00090.pro'
1486d547807a2b7791c7ad00d8f53a6e
0b1f211bf990bc9c6251ddedb1c7546ce3b0308e
describe
'43217' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
98335fc94f8f06e32bf947987aa2a809
2022cbfa039a88d6a16d883655dc11c5aca06f31
describe
'4958096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDD' 'sip-files00090.tif'
0f1b73dd75c8b5c2f832a22fad7fb449
5994102b033ac410d7512c6e18389df0ab8f5d63
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDE' 'sip-files00090.txt'
5eb1b9a312c863a939bf81a0b29adf77
332d164abbb1e406502a4e424d9df1bd2cea1b54
describe
'27307' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDF' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
644486c74c0540806a119daca5ac69f2
20619b91659f255279fc889bc8690ea082bd4624
describe
'616796' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDG' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
4b09a61891549598f640c5d24bc5ee46
d39f9dc6bfa5b72e50e152e0522df76cc6b6d37a
describe
'114396' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDH' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
ec3a0a9af9948ad4500cc776b9247b2f
dcc946b4c69b876d5ff35137d22e5012c5c4bff9
describe
'41139' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDI' 'sip-files00091.pro'
ba08cc820fbb6f47b771cc9c9f3888b6
8f31342fda23a0838e557b1b7658ac166b4668c2
describe
'45707' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDJ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
51da64ca18d0a008cce63ffb9c6f4a79
bc4a74c1501ce6b6b2bc2c5641198a60a93d1ea8
describe
'4958536' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
9831f037d7e467320de10f9b78ce9fc1
f40fe4261eedbc18d3a23b1664f1e041f968ea73
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDL' 'sip-files00091.txt'
8af413abc4b65b0f2ccd6cd51acaf295
20d3fad0dae35080c30d50793c861c97382a9b24
describe
'28010' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
a91afc455da2eca87d797ed6937ef6a1
dd874912eb229a78f5b25717ecf97d12d5b1c899
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDN' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
57454f2b9227a6812e162ef03a8dc4d6
457bab1392b4a5d566b8b07c76d76f04ca44cd3c
describe
'82714' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDO' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
1df4c5871087cbc479497213f680948f
2610191b30ffdc6921395bbbcfd4a1b7235166d4
describe
'26054' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDP' 'sip-files00092.pro'
dc5c6d39b1e3e60e7ddefb930e3cd0cd
f2c0b3e6d6473dcf654bd75e591038a0985ade10
describe
'36407' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDQ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a86669194a383650f1c304194324d66e
65018fde5d8722d65f52ab58f035ccd85bf5caf3
describe
'4956884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDR' 'sip-files00092.tif'
0a5fa421231d4d7fa41a15e229306784
4cf13ec9cd9ab0cf431e0491023e4417477713fa
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDS' 'sip-files00092.txt'
9b07a46abf15782aece7ebae65c52c64
ecf99c2f8239146402af0ead28cf49948828ccbf
describe
'24948' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDT' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
ed44e387e318900f38c45feebb3bdcc5
739e55f4cc172b33c3e6587be605b11217b1010c
describe
'616963' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDU' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
e28a0e03d0ab3880ebd0aea75a8511a8
e1725359eb82583e35a6d5c25327b308ef2f18cd
describe
'103827' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDV' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
39d12c8781c700b082c323c85004573e
8b97b894cfd183caa3ac86634169df1b0285ad5f
describe
'41080' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDW' 'sip-files00093.pro'
a55fdecdec5c463fe5efa4e685296f78
21776558f6e731a41f5e761bd84d94522f34c245
describe
'44384' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDX' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
acbf6cdbfd731980fa817f7500323f98
2be7e4cb2c8804192e271ece7aa104c544cf0fa5
describe
'4958068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDY' 'sip-files00093.tif'
72e2da0e4bbffc08319b3db80599942f
2920a99e1601716296a9337ca426eb7f5105c3b6
describe
'1668' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIDZ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
6e2e68d97857985ca06520053e70760c
1ebc6a1b05efe609aaebfb0129e90077e199f2cd
describe
'27262' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEA' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
7c8be4f493129a67d53c226df6f9cff3
51a03b426eda6f97992903c6aaf0b5ff07de967e
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEB' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
ac8e3f9f8500c85c0243c7503bf031d0
3197950b4464dd7c68efaac2baa63bee84db8760
describe
'72166' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEC' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
a989273590fe51d9c7ffeb54fabee6b7
6ef2ec36ea9716938f417f94e1b86d3fecb33995
describe
'21139' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIED' 'sip-files00094.pro'
3cc396d6e78efb94e761b3df696d0a1b
159efb9d666965003d152d593f48e5da42851192
describe
'34162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEE' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
8e6c779c3e4cba47799a568b6da941e0
9e373ab2b2f61e8a1ce74997003ab22f84faba96
describe
'4956392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEF' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ae024888ad5090516e0e2aba0297de30
6f678ef3eb0a44416f94d2fe35fcc7d161fa39ac
describe
'893' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEG' 'sip-files00094.txt'
7e30083f27e9f8be546fb845bd75a2b7
256e8be96263fb8a8117b0d0a96f409fa1242dbf
describe
'24060' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEH' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
d67da34613298abdd553c5b8153e747b
e64c22ef7fb9875de803c2c1512da58c359a3561
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEI' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d3a29661b8cba9fdbea1b90a4038c71c
ee4323e8486b5c18c81abc7ac6cb869636f7c538
describe
'107780' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEJ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
1a3d4a846ebb0bd82f2325ae88983f2e
39318830d92a1cfe4939b8c9d3a15621ca733f6a
'2011-10-15T21:36:38-04:00'
describe
'37140' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEK' 'sip-files00095.pro'
afd240ee82b5fc970a249ef43b6b0be5
137d2bb0b2dbd9d3d3f731510895f25019791c3f
describe
'42824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEL' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
eab0cee2b8df11f67e1c59d2a2d28c0c
3678ee5ff2083aa2c3699c558c0c583875ab089b
describe
'4957992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEM' 'sip-files00095.tif'
3fcd75add403e75499f0aea6266612db
36326a798a653fc1acd3298c5d012d90803d3165
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
40596eb8d3c3004b5c6725919d66c7a3
ab5cade6297610101a19132ccb281b76095b7a96
describe
'27065' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEO' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
b6962d1c80592ae32ba8f50af66a8146
d13c4e12d80360ae7db9266a00b9b323997c49b9
describe
'616970' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEP' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
c9ecc858ad7be30d48f412308371f333
c6ef2434e6df88ae8d8a269f761d6181eb57201d
describe
'102417' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEQ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
5d0acd9777a4a4ef8c2d0e3b909e192f
0c8eed3a75cb9841f59143e267d4dc3219deae16
describe
'36499' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIER' 'sip-files00096.pro'
5d4ddf9f5c79a424de762a3e3fb180dc
224d6fdd7a4050584d57ffa730e3e79231979a01
describe
'42276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIES' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
9d766d81b784bc3eeb0c794dd4ee4553
b984520966c09e24385aa6cbff28da2c00b1485e
describe
'4957864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIET' 'sip-files00096.tif'
211816f2ff78f37d107b88271f448fe0
d599b4032bb081bac3eb49ce1602bb7d1ebed63e
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEU' 'sip-files00096.txt'
a36efa81af8e34417982c15929b5ec3d
37728912c9e917b32a5b5fb1a03934ad6b0d1cae
describe
'27111' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEV' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
cee6d874814c5c96310e44dd13bfe277
d50ca38f7f383f6062d360039df25068085b7eec
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEW' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
b659f2585ae35f822337b4a4fc3b47ad
eb67d45c883c05bb176d417507104a4a05541907
describe
'108059' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEX' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
5cb758bbd29da035409ebac303d995d2
4abb6d390ab9d513ad248679413e245c3b72ed0f
describe
'40336' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEY' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ffc60fed75843dd7dd5c3d4bc0b79a09
19a809c0bc125c2d25193fb88e55a603cbfb5052
describe
'45272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIEZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d80bddf11281389f7d8cb52fa41a0207
e67b55a19bc62d048eb118795d779110ee788492
describe
'4958244' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
bbad2a4f223e8a44b8e397a1befeb22b
2f405b39b8388546e462450fe17a8e2c55ddba74
describe
'1674' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFB' 'sip-files00097.txt'
91fb4b493de88e65e87e15e0dceda039
9490e0d58d07d5cdbe9062a2b3a6701a1753d384
describe
'27469' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFC' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
70e28c45801a3fd38197c514ca81a19e
a20fd85c26cca91e75c762bac820e384e5fb44a7
describe
'617010' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFD' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
56ad0eb0e65a4cc7ee282cae9a8c6109
41295d4ee1ff9d5e550567565ff9acc480a7bd1d
describe
'106988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
14ac643ea3e9e347ca8ef4a7ef4d7e48
1395bf61e3c8e6a167b62949105b37151ca36638
describe
'36862' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFF' 'sip-files00098.pro'
6542f9b8b430d2d6176a0cb08d3006ca
309bb5e0c9cdeeaff0f3f984768c22c2f3dbcdc3
describe
'45628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFG' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
33bbf4516a26b678e44f5718ae91fd9b
fe9c80ba992c907235e9883200cda67cadd50da0
describe
'4958444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFH' 'sip-files00098.tif'
443deeb312d5b957f1118adb018286a5
e5af41ea3d69aec08aca18c2d5a52261e243ee35
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFI' 'sip-files00098.txt'
7e1e64ade58b6ff5ab38ba05d7f69e85
d586a93acb5add9870b78c83227d0bf374f7a42d
describe
'28005' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFJ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
37895003539078483e14c6bfa53d5b70
505c95d56764b9c42104ea775895a2874c487641
describe
'600007' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFK' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
bb1e8c022453161f17253759db740502
64773d18c6e506ca2b1f3bb35fbeb5229b14012d
describe
'100143' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFL' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
888d8fac04f43cf9913c77da5c749f65
8061e517c977544c945cb87d2314f40fbe438445
describe
'30001' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFM' 'sip-files00099.pro'
aa8aa10035c8eb8189a6f6ae27cec3ee
fda3fa2b053359f0bffca2119c2689ac06f55169
describe
'39878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFN' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
2043cc6ba24e727147ff961ed8f4b10c
647b0db700a5ce5191e09adddc92177c84a47a6e
describe
'14422148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFO' 'sip-files00099.tif'
d748be5affb93da7b8270fdd141244cf
07c762b5aaf6242b1db99a8d856814cce2b9d71a
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFP' 'sip-files00099.txt'
12938d995eb4373af6be24f740fda45f
97b7f99a94f07e3feef349a0b55fbbb5f3f741c3
describe
'26334' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFQ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
c56afe6299bc2a41b01a81d7fc07d7b0
153b61439fc4b0e5475f4a49ab3a7c99c069a8a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFR' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
6ed7cdecffffc8c3804a3d103882de49
594d8b398b85253cfbacffc326b9686fdfdd799a
describe
'95826' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFS' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b2e00d850d78c34902a58696a0c3d707
71c56e1e5bb2c52c1c22faaa54270ee2eabf1c81
describe
'34075' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFT' 'sip-files00100.pro'
1e58487c0b8ae24571d77ba1429ababd
d3d32e065dc15e2da8328cfb66978ef5571a68aa
describe
'42477' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFU' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
e11da8527581f210629b3a6c9b5c1024
a249d60aa70241d934d01c53b820faed56fc9368
describe
'4957664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFV' 'sip-files00100.tif'
ffe8900abf5c2cd726a1784aaeb04b04
58ee4a79f0592b6e6712913d44ce30362665a986
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFW' 'sip-files00100.txt'
1ecb9a18917e6c3f7775776bd175f555
97d297320cb6d4865d76bc37bea6f73c06b9ee3c
describe
Invalid character
'26721' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFX' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
3c778135f60294b4e068ab1b4056f5a9
f85bf3f92d786a01871b05a9f18d76bd909c3428
describe
'616944' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFY' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
143697cdb8846d297ee154b88c882fd4
30ac00cfb35280d05a16065cf13c62dbda977ffe
describe
'109116' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIFZ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
9608bd1c0b9e647764bfebfbfa704edd
9bbf5d9647a6e5f618bedcac1f990bb8cafba022
describe
'37589' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGA' 'sip-files00101.pro'
bb4f8f19b6a06eadf2db3754a6591133
d65346b49dcc30bfbcc88c7b95cfa0c355dbf121
describe
'42623' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGB' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
a80be61cc421344baec56190f3200ac6
ea2ed3cb34355833c0670720c9bae086d7ca8b86
describe
'4957896' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGC' 'sip-files00101.tif'
7a36bfbf731504843999b48a18395811
53dfbf06847ac2a3a0c572a1ea8b5512e1eeca6f
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGD' 'sip-files00101.txt'
7a47b6452f9fe5f5b80fc7c72a752fb1
5e8d6af03b850489052cea5021346236251b4d00
describe
'26899' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGE' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
07aca05d50e3761091d19b0588a6e340
f47900e6cb2634b59d5bf9e17f4280f8b34d826c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGF' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
3f5ecdf9edfc97195db04a22829788a4
ebac0bedd159ebd286fb36879f8c9d464f2c059e
describe
'105256' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGG' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f4180f177669adeac07770e7ce1a2587
64e3fcef88a3448e2c1a941dd113842e167eb591
describe
'37516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGH' 'sip-files00102.pro'
0ce08def45036ce019f0cbd442ec00d4
516fdade89964159f357b6d41a746b2700e62cbc
describe
'43240' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGI' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
918c536cb6ead81d8135703db90d2bcc
ab10634bc80b95f7952067d40131493c319c6149
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGJ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
ba268935c8a77d9858ba8331bf6d1121
957822518088c0b9f945dad15c88549eccef1e3b
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGK' 'sip-files00102.txt'
63f843548e3cb780e63aa42d5c92c989
cad2a4b8a8d8a512aa2ff9aa27be490dcbeeca7e
describe
'27458' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGL' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
5d41b3fae3464e49f542b0b25fa84ea3
aefa48c463c59fc4168cd85fbf04dfc8eab61dcd
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGM' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
ab160292f64ab9b232f2e25262b00b62
08526aee4309e7615190863cd5ca0e291f7d76b0
describe
'108519' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGN' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
8d86a32e259e35b27807438dbc0d6033
7723c9a826a5cd89665b48370b40cdf2b908bf8c
describe
'38616' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGO' 'sip-files00103.pro'
79c9e691a0bf956d67a080c5b6be3e44
218f28204c099f0e538d31e468d04391b08755dd
describe
'45897' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGP' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
28f3476a30ab8854ecf6a15f5419d708
8ef4953ddebbc21033e82b5a8e729aaf5f959c1b
describe
'4958296' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGQ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
9a4fdcfb28a936ffa2e8bebba94c5a11
7e544c43fbd8f13011239f5df9b6e3ebd82ef595
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGR' 'sip-files00103.txt'
7ad6b6acf72f4ffabd2a6d58cc8d5a1b
250b47246f7c731c8cf0f8c642b5cadb9641d0a7
describe
'27755' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGS' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
66a29402c3525af2a60d2f37c614f62a
229e3d729c16c9959422b192cb6b5a12a017807c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGT' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
9f05ad1f9978019e514b67b79f13f9ea
0b0bb885d5d1201b4ad642fe9c6ed6a19aea20d5
describe
'67876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGU' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e73f0bc81940171c94f736003a86eb03
c4e79f06a22b8e8b7cda7d5f50236d65b9b5b5ff
describe
'17550' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGV' 'sip-files00104.pro'
16150db132ac21637153576b371922f2
140187d4fa903f9135def2faf2d55d4f72ca38b5
describe
'32862' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGW' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
c1c9da87eba1b8f0bbc5dd242232297d
13ae295ccf116348e5730df85f4ea255c5f951d6
describe
'4955896' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGX' 'sip-files00104.tif'
03a103c9a4a664b16c75aa23e2ee8770
f5d13fafe47e02ae10aabf74c2eca498ec48de12
describe
'732' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGY' 'sip-files00104.txt'
5d446a76e73210cd82d0c002b0e9a2c0
d7345923e629b32a8a42770b1cc5ca65e8cc2409
describe
Invalid character
'23151' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIGZ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
c9d631e6b38c003075b793c022607fd0
ac3a316a7f18fc11667240e2c1541e0093992e7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHA' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
da14d0042f15f18712bca1a08b229506
0f5d5a8ec86ccc0a11de7a7d37779e41738c8ef6
describe
'88071' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHB' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
863ae5eda8bd72c9268ae03c462479a3
7eadf7740aa89a6ec508387a07ef58d4aa46cce9
describe
'29358' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHC' 'sip-files00105.pro'
9813df13f21e9a7ec4faaa17991d8eb7
c5747925de25eb7c47aed9bd555f2dc2c01acef0
describe
'39967' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHD' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
565ae867a75b8cb98104e8c8b4eda538
4839487da644ca2520de47e783da5b87ec99a325
describe
'4957468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHE' 'sip-files00105.tif'
787a2efd424cb727d6d619b6586dfcd1
e17d24474a04b8fedda68d3d0543b00b57644549
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHF' 'sip-files00105.txt'
b83e6206a76460b0a39cf383a1c48375
e1f0b5863574adf119faa3ee9e0f835933144e26
describe
'26063' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHG' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
58dd74f7569d0c6802c93349dc77f3e2
69b44a8bd7cc3ecd57927a9bdc4f4c6e16347b33
describe
'616999' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHH' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
359efc144a13fedde24ac50e80fbc173
b022b7f128e1287a65d73e93ca6e39f57c339f2d
describe
'105344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHI' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
10d2db58c6e7ddee273b333251e44b65
f967cabdb9886fc635c38db1e8cab2a325db30d2
describe
'37546' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHJ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
4de38aa58d4166360e63f9b1df800044
9a834a694f4c48c8860cdfae3a4163d7fa251261
describe
'45043' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHK' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
05882fbfd1d405e87046e5fac9fdcd63
62683418c99f08fdf898aad69e5e6a12fcb63f52
describe
'4957960' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHL' 'sip-files00106.tif'
107becb2f3a9742112339ee27ebead7f
2bd95b9997cdbc687069f09e4a57ba2deaa52e83
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHM' 'sip-files00106.txt'
c169a5e1211e175c908ea059f93b0d26
cb342e4cf53141d2a7736e0a609ef826fcc3b75e
describe
'27118' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHN' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
ec8a218775b87f685a2d46996b21bc75
68c779aefe3dd7250233e38659f1a5f745deeb59
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHO' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
aa6ea17c9125d3219dba8fcea6826391
7e3207fd5eccfbe9e05362549658965f6074227e
describe
'110660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHP' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
1b56c9ef4747c8b0a76ff4f915cb10f5
1ab4dd79f604a972aa169196e5b3f69247701f89
describe
'42933' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHQ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
c3cd1b51b6821feb9d17777f79b2c752
93212e01ed44ecd44fd42869fab042a0f9071f97
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHR' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
e1ffc52fe79c26fe67bb3e016082aebb
c850c58714e8657ac1ae2a73b4eb1a8d50d02f9e
describe
'4958256' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHS' 'sip-files00107.tif'
c1e337cef18406221e26513580cf314c
e6624481c222414f04ef5bbd461990b7a6050725
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHT' 'sip-files00107.txt'
228deee07db8064cc320625e7d7034c7
73329d05940bfc2944e0ff8ec89ccc334dab8daf
describe
'27726' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHU' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
7f3927b2c996756df38777460a09b0d7
63e87bcbf00f01172d7db738cd18230006286cf2
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHV' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
df1e278d8283c96b08b9f3421c896338
937d25e04b19c404c989a291abfc22ef80268a81
describe
'102272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHW' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
8fdcad19d3744e2b739fc220a2a6c6e1
a7f252149e6d0cb7a85313ecc6e397855b866d19
describe
'39189' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHX' 'sip-files00108.pro'
747b3648a5aead5d4c700de7bd43daa1
e09445348d92986db0a0657f5efc63af99d4fe32
describe
'44700' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHY' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
f9f1dcb583b75f850a1ce4e927fe8d4f
2e26237fc9009c4f8c01ae22880545eaf87a7d2f
describe
'4958364' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIHZ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
45db8b205a2cca7767f7fc18336ce46e
ab57129f6d2a08ca97bb1e27c0fd3914ce8bf07b
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIA' 'sip-files00108.txt'
826f15d8b79dc44689deca2a116a288c
2b5322305eb3c51e123c46b2bdf3a0d644bce221
describe
'27805' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIB' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
131823a45360f11d00896f824d48f0bf
3b611eb88982c1ef33969b197a87ce6f599321b1
describe
'588988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIC' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
1053e6226a2b7883b6d8bb428ce60b4a
5c103dece0a75f0dc15c1b6428b9efa599242ac8
describe
'100344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIID' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
8340260f173bf09b65e8b8f63b341f40
f4944b11343e7b93882c5ea2fe0539a12154bd64
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIE' 'sip-files00111.pro'
9c73817205210357e7415cb28ede2791
95a6368a4ea3099c630ebde9f913ed3e3a1bdb30
describe
'42152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIF' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
b2c2b44fe33e406f5fdd1e9c8c897693
d2be4724e0cd2a24cf3fbd4c2bf15e9b2b3cc6d6
describe
'14157544' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIG' 'sip-files00111.tif'
353af1496d5fef9b4ba3e205690325d7
ec9080f3d7df5f9fb1045600f3493a84c0346a3b
'2011-10-15T21:37:30-04:00'
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIH' 'sip-files00111.txt'
d6a102bcd5d254880012937b77a55687
0c6fca802174233bb0088bfb54af017c7b62fe4f
describe
Invalid character
'28271' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIII' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
b3312737f574612ebc77a477f3d8aabf
515a0d7a51449724555a91023f58e6cf9cc56310
describe
'616869' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
2f0c10891faec76e614e2da8bddb4956
2fa38601f8c9866625581b5d4e5710fcac9ff750
describe
'114005' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
1d163b698c1b33fcb86e96dec4d6a988
3f8be34c3ba4c1a7181a0aab20722047d59ff94c
describe
'44091' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIL' 'sip-files00113.pro'
6631dbcce3eafde79ea8bc8ba2ab0917
a26de55c8fc49531b33544761d02866855938ee8
describe
'46565' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
d03e1d69e2ff3317f37a2d8d903ceaa8
2dddb3f54e89b7c5b3f6cdc72f25621a4d095fa9
describe
'4958644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
ef2a678c8232650940264eb7cd94aebd
a96e27e1122ecc9edfd2591fcdf6411d52001e51
describe
'1860' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
165fb0ebb5c96e09fb9bcacadcc2856a
7d1549cd97c176b37a0b921ad4e97cf62e885eaf
describe
Invalid character
'28032' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIP' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
e3ea29c6c2680c3caf880f8909b17de9
190ace36709d3b4b19b6f0a58aad620bb638db27
describe
'616968' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
e55d7c8b3536c4c76b39ec585678891f
a01405be5aa541740f393e7696337d9fccb7bc20
describe
'106337' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIR' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
33f3fea2d10b4ca4bc171ce98eeac43f
33aa3a6ae7164b7e38027d3209c27eb570c401e2
describe
'35892' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIS' 'sip-files00114.pro'
68a24241c5abc24e85c8f24bd8bad29b
bb3a742d398b77e5e794b11d1b92b57eb4093522
describe
'41547' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIT' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
fb076e0d4f0d082fb8435c65818c43da
71dc187efb9e57bc9dee8dc77b9b113d53aaaa7b
describe
'4957904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIU' 'sip-files00114.tif'
0681a8c667d62e6f43d39fec8a20f4a1
21460d045ece2733ecfd2955e40f89239e087fa1
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIV' 'sip-files00114.txt'
63930ffe2896bfd69807a18ce076d964
ca14507e8bb42d6806716276f44832540be424df
describe
'26917' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
c59904c743332670abeed4e7d6b51e95
0f7b11bfda20e0e58f047db5099b311aa33082c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIX' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
c15a2bb38ba5b2c25e31f10ddef253ed
53d3547dfb0eedb88f448f8684934a29ef4e5588
describe
'122076' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIY' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ec879fcc9916ad577d9a5f5275e41e77
660edd89bf23102be8b18e300d678ae90d9ddc39
describe
'48744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIIZ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
978cca95ef2bf372153d60637ad1595f
2391f9061896bd4440358c0cfed29016c193ae84
describe
'48480' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJA' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
24aa78d36bf4b58810ca4946e69ef570
a7a869fee2fa0feed094db8d8150ddfa9cb7e5f5
describe
'4958860' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
50f1a1c01b8a6a151f1f22e6a0b8eed4
360ed19455df4de1b8dbdf8b1ca5205654fe747b
describe
'1966' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJC' 'sip-files00115.txt'
dd13660c246906d7e95e6f4d27d36560
3399233a1026c3f6c83de0f13167916ee5c4aad7
describe
'28414' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJD' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
1506c523eed43911df826c86973ba575
111fee293d6a8c961c22692e516ef077a5287c17
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJE' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
f6578495be0445bbac7941c02978994b
3edd0152177173a033724bfc046d8bd8f5b32c96
describe
'82345' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJF' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
c65abbe8e17403b9897ee5924f67c32a
3d3915334e2d99bf60ac3ba55d45ff5f6e7a83ca
describe
'27817' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJG' 'sip-files00116.pro'
4f36f70ef77d3b546aa6c175746852e5
51a57fc5929eb2412f9b098b00dc9344542e0d2f
describe
'36625' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJH' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
10793edc8728708de8e5e35ae0b1d3fd
fc391fd5c2d7f84c9b680795fa41723cf7ea9ac1
describe
'4956584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJI' 'sip-files00116.tif'
ec6d917560594a1c0d1b20d0091f887e
aedd48ec6f4d07d97c8307183565aadbd7a58722
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJJ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
db715e6d7345812b8a4b2cc14bdef633
fd6bd0ea37303a59e9651ced35fe543331323381
describe
'24573' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
bf3d208d69bc7e5e63f1759ef118e322
89ba56be68f7d3d468818e1d2b182422ae8a9c99
describe
'616991' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJL' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
0a95754e76b9526b88a525f2e7c33d27
d5acafa974b63b0ba6dc168637046c0e4f27c455
describe
'94122' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJM' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
65c71e302231486c633db5f4d7a82b98
3845ed339db3b3664c70a15f1d2ecc5a8731ad45
describe
'32753' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJN' 'sip-files00117.pro'
15d0d7e45ae6b6b261ec4498519680f9
03bc42599964d35787065b9c70502522959daa1c
describe
'41448' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJO' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
1d7a880f72a286b99500c1351ce8ac55
23eb35c7b23d8d4c71b4c3c14b7619ab359b9abe
describe
'4957912' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJP' 'sip-files00117.tif'
bb5ad2da4ccc428be3ac2179960493d9
3d827c3d5d4dada015003d45d290bba841fa4e00
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJQ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
41523633c03450035eb6ee5e9475db9c
3fd541da4ae1ae1138ac51d97f95fe77ae254523
describe
'26671' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJR' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
9544ff09258c0b181fc6135600a90f69
f635ab66d7b622e72c85fe0b1d9e340759ca092e
describe
'617009' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJS' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
54a0fdd565dcfcca3e966f704feee3de
fd7b5c1a268859070327be1471317e6964317108
describe
'115482' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
66ba853b350cb19ccf2bc14ec65bff90
cc167085bae3db0a1c81f5f9c3d87756c8423962
describe
'42795' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJU' 'sip-files00118.pro'
914aebb1bacf3d24610792c1106b71d2
618b472b5531d992a70781fbf8f7c1a7dc273170
describe
'43298' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJV' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
1730627e9144d7d519e310fa11e172fc
44fb777a6b35a3a022b65c89a3ef89974cd5cb4d
describe
'4958092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJW' 'sip-files00118.tif'
086045fe911a922c305e2a607ccb4812
e10426ae70a0a3e0b39120229bed0599eac66d48
describe
'1734' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJX' 'sip-files00118.txt'
dba549d20145c9711dc4167349ab28b6
ff49241f515cbea8df134470fcfd03248dc8b51b
describe
'27172' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJY' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
63901d79118a7113504be9a3e0206058
f2855b5230a29d0c2f64fc7bf8e5209dbea3f5e8
describe
'616940' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIJZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
b7412c0ccff07188f9bfc05db5109b88
6f6244c2b5b751cac17112991fa91138ff1c2ef2
describe
'107950' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKA' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
291a066a3be847d58e55cb77023907d4
c87d459be900ba034ef78d243a186d6c0fee4795
describe
'40738' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKB' 'sip-files00119.pro'
9fa0e0ae5a3b2988cdca03b1b0b751e5
b95529ccd1d851154491bcc550f79fb620a79258
describe
'46624' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKC' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
a4b7a245b3e121a2c20cd6a35a84230f
cd836feacae95edeffa28abfd8c360e2e2caa741
describe
'4958556' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKD' 'sip-files00119.tif'
94b4c6bc7f85a6aa5aeafb37a878a2fb
5f2562f79bc575a8e59b22bfbd51e13b452b89b7
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKE' 'sip-files00119.txt'
6ebbc61126d5b0032158182faa94428e
6146f48ce15f442a80bad3a48afb836d07590892
describe
'28133' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKF' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
8750dc855d97f12d0b630b7daa74fe62
eb602561065fb9d0e2b0692ba18d945c831cd3b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKG' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
be226c39be86f5ec8a2f0ed6d2b338e7
f4c762f9de6d184472966eb9c79ccc94d89d52f6
describe
'102749' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKH' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
22f691146950c76f74533ec91982db48
efaa00bc53f5771f7b7b2fc687665e4f9013eecd
describe
'38445' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKI' 'sip-files00120.pro'
95b63918bbeb0054d4d636a4a70e5a0d
284360337f9142178c38eac36a0694887d45f06c
describe
'45065' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKJ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
d49b1498aacad6d929c6c1cd084b482f
2f0c21531589f95fcc0e743b946a30d76779d49d
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKK' 'sip-files00120.tif'
9f22fb3e45ebbb8009402902aa538d77
8b5d6a32c9b59bd39e1df296e73117070848ae64
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKL' 'sip-files00120.txt'
aa0cd145a07fd6b998c15de75bddfc29
f519d6e5d67a866697efd8e30cf3e4635db3151a
describe
'27501' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKM' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
f4e38a6cbcb57651ec089b2734d79706
9c2e45857e4a47311ac589d3bcbac64fb387917c
describe
'616919' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
3a1708e28613476d69977ec1a70d7539
fc7ed84210c56363f3735435146aabf2c11c0401
describe
'101289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKO' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
2f63e1d89f377f3f475941172399e6a8
eb829f86876747829bb03d83c5a69cc9549a834f
describe
'24276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKP' 'sip-files00121.pro'
5be5b22f3bb0ad5de8f624f6f4dfa527
bff537a04ec06eaadf597f279cf2183b665b7a78
describe
'43319' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKQ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
b70cdaca0f00559fc47e261669c45384
29a743967585fc071ace5dea538a0931111db7c1
describe
'4958600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKR' 'sip-files00121.tif'
edbbb9f52bae323f8d161cf62ffa8cc2
c1fc23105802fbbc64e258e26c50df985539589f
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKS' 'sip-files00121.txt'
30abdf9fcbc89ba72273b38aaa7f6537
9f7f446b5fce16816ace03dececa68591bd4dd04
describe
'27905' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKT' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
d67199db0bba78c4e2f97b88af71df6b
ea14295cd4fc7cc7623c91ea3fc010aea8e29943
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
39eb86bdc94f2cc03179dd7a6994bb75
2070db4c38ab7f7c7cc347ac1415fe4396d6a949
describe
'105628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKV' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
76d892db7cb89ea0dbdbb216cee76552
d527e558385afa30ae5a93c6f5650d63b951f182
describe
'37753' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKW' 'sip-files00122.pro'
c3063876b1c60b52a9ef24eb0b8a983b
9871b0df4de380012620a4af0a2f86fcf6920c2d
describe
'44170' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKX' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
b178ec24e129f970d60716bb5c086b53
2ffd09912a5550f3a845e3e3395c20d93e08c725
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKY' 'sip-files00122.tif'
59d6fb0b3856ca8f2bfb5fdb7b329eb6
62761257e71fef224fcdeaa87edb29148f199557
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIKZ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
11e2cff5d8f77f5bba1c1f7b22d28b00
5b63f150569a0323161f239ec85e8a842d48ae9c
describe
'27584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
e0ff99f3549aae62d75e59e6152e9b52
9118cb93e018bdc6c088c30dd8fbf6bdc41c2f29
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILB' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
ca1115c24492c2576daf45d6fd4d1535
fb26941d665f33266d7e8cd78ac6b532783a5e3c
describe
'95797' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILC' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
7ae07e1f31103354c476c0d49e3b958d
ea6af198bba45c84f8f45502bf8824a38ca27d02
describe
'34457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILD' 'sip-files00123.pro'
9c8f41d485a91cf636ec7731412b16b5
5ded528160752c9ebd15f46baac1e6139cbed29e
describe
'41854' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILE' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
7427c41eb3bd3bef0b75c1da99d3f15b
e79f9ebba0ed2d222494a64003b25df475d2939c
describe
'4957856' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILF' 'sip-files00123.tif'
7351f30085e7f22fddb5c38a2fec4bfb
dca42d11e42ae560fe5fba6129a7629e76a1f08e
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILG' 'sip-files00123.txt'
4cf5a22706943ccb679c7b873637f370
2074dd82a31bdc5555a59b50a658be30300d37cb
describe
'26768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILH' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
1f85bee2f757a31cb91a97e1ba2e18e0
21c12509d2738f045c50b7d77838e27c609a7fdf
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILI' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
0a176d90b5367f2924b2f228dee37b99
ec56582b3636b86447e682b325d5f550e16e0492
describe
'56826' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILJ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
c1571f27d549fcf8f919240fc3f57e0d
72766fb6f8f7d73beee4742f41ff530589f77bbb
describe
'11721' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILK' 'sip-files00124.pro'
6286871ddb29159160d6ebd6686c9576
1bc9b8e1469aeba1ca77846187bdebcf077fbf05
describe
'28019' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILL' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b7ebec47abff83d2542c1edce6348a26
c5bf9004340f28343f8e2b04e58dbcbfe63470f7
describe
'4954868' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILM' 'sip-files00124.tif'
28b77f76f770c818524fccfdffc093fb
8cac944848f9cd092e44e48eb0b74ee402cc6f3c
describe
'477' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILN' 'sip-files00124.txt'
90cc1ae98a0583c13f6230cef7b0a1aa
35f6d826e4de7d573cc40a4b98ea03d190556c29
describe
'21316' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILO' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
18f2225e2d74c4cdf7895fc00d8e201a
ac19993ad366404bae1716038da83772f482abb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
8d8fc0dce8b3e848eca4cd57a10ab2f8
54fc29c21a271c490e410098aff16421d9f080ce
describe
'107183' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILQ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
42ed2df5453caf3ea187a1e42fcbd94d
8bb3959f3741d8c62e2a37626e98494d7fc7ad26
describe
'38842' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILR' 'sip-files00125.pro'
34dc2640b8036914d54ef01fe611202a
6e67fed4080bb9cc8ea7a5e6c7f4a7c0770e444d
describe
'43848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILS' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
4b77eb1ef66008dad299bf7359d8bccf
aaf0a04a573fb08eb3b57c75d1335c09bb887c9e
describe
'4957984' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILT' 'sip-files00125.tif'
a8bb4510c629dec8ed0da3954fef3d6f
0749ae9f10df3954300ae662751619f2b9c2171e
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILU' 'sip-files00125.txt'
e8859fba23e048829112f5f564ce8729
2fa8cf4d24673082f2ea45a248903f2f905a4c34
describe
'26943' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILV' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
50fabbae7a018e02fafb38da00c31aca
329dc6735c6d5bd189794a67f98214d80c62862d
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILW' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
217570fa0c88ea38b24b68df76541966
0d60f830e87246998e2e60948afd76fefed23888
describe
'107927' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILX' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
1e7a9b02d57d49b7850308ea39e83172
75649d2170cef4148e603a6ae1d2c7f583f9a627
describe
'40243' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILY' 'sip-files00126.pro'
f134dae013fc3032e7a958df472ec6da
0a0055c93d514816e7571d5f4109555f4f65ea4b
describe
'43765' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAILZ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
d0a8f09d740f5135206a762e8f4c8638
ec3cc89948687316da62c02042830d907887c15a
describe
'4957948' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMA' 'sip-files00126.tif'
f41ce5a1426ad2e1a18209ebd12f2146
efd557736989ed923ddba850d3220a358feda174
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMB' 'sip-files00126.txt'
4dcdc92c2dcaf5dea4714dd91bd27c91
d5a232296660f7b9630e540fa389737d2d1945a5
describe
'27049' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMC' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
f926cb529e2d3b22d416491dea460aca
4b5015ecdb385d381c25a2cd303ca371b0e35567
describe
'616997' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMD' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
f4530e198beb03fa91b4b0e4780f1de5
ed871eea25edfe37f5932f77ecf86b5683a30134
describe
'97689' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIME' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
c90dde2e078a489d47a50c5a440d5e7c
ead07e4a1a29787662353fe5fcf18b5d9022c788
describe
'35931' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMF' 'sip-files00127.pro'
129770fb3ad8a2fd611905ed8385d1de
b626a24f37ba61b50a791f9bde554c6fc5ef6cb7
describe
'43394' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMG' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
f146723ca97c1a54e09a6dea903081c0
9044df5d92a20edb11cb35b7a96dfd768565d1bf
describe
'4957988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMH' 'sip-files00127.tif'
c9c48bea8f1cc0cb7546c9e4b8ed5122
c6f7aa20f91c9d194a304bfb559e73f7bc7e7d3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMI' 'sip-files00127.txt'
2ecc1824086eda957caf65370ddbc575
a5cd0c4fd8bf8eac99e6cec056cbc20ade319704
describe
'27127' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMJ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
e6ab56843fbaf9a2dbc8d53e14130c07
c587860eefc6cd42a8ecb61e7d869211902734ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMK' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
db9daa21129a496ac963c7c6c7773c26
a04d9021da9776b6968ca5a12a73d88323b5b22c
describe
'107744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIML' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
9e08e958998cd0a3530de3170390772d
2bdf434c1cf66578f7ce3e4f71307e1d84645509
describe
'38438' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMM' 'sip-files00128.pro'
35480c86496918082b23bc4984fe4971
9bb6e883ca40f745f9efb7a2f54d1da89eadd508
describe
'43080' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMN' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
dae3bc72826cc06d61145044eb6be926
3cba81d20aa2524124cb860e5c90439a3abc907c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMO' 'sip-files00128.tif'
9159f9ffe9da613b9ad17732a51c8b96
14dac6167e883bc922daf19d5650790a3e628f62
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMP' 'sip-files00128.txt'
330c1c614557acf6e95ec29169c580d3
61ba2e21ff25cb557d2acef514a683b1a4ba8d6f
describe
'27265' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFNfileF20080329_AAAIMQ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
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AON

oO

ee

iat


# ae ae ‘es Class,

ee MARTIN’S STREET.

RRA

FIRST CLASS

PRIZE

ae DED TO

Zp
2

aes nk] igi AL.

No. LOGE

BERNA AR McA A OA Mc AA De HA
Presioent: REV. JOSHUA HAIGH. jit
VICE-PRESIDENTS :

Mr. J. BARNSLEY, Mr. J. Barnes,
Me. H. BisseKer.




od
sect

oo

Nowe


Oup STORIES TOLD ANEW







Ediled ley

ejuna S.E.Rae |

je pee Illustration § ne -
5 Ke

er
ONDON Ne
‘TRISCHLER. & Compa
18, Dew Briclge Olreel Ee
1891

Peri { ed mn [Bavaria
PREFACE

to

OLD STORIES EQLD ANEW

+> 5
In the revision of this short series of old stories, enjoying unrivalled popularity
in their original form, the incidents, plot and dialogue have throughout been carefully ~
preserved as far as possible; the object of the omissions made in the text being to
simplify and adapt it to the modern tastes of younger readers of the present generation,
to whom the new and interesting style of the illustrations will especially appeal.

EDITOR.
CHAPTERLI.

see
oy dN
Soe,
EVE

a

ow
» VIL
RNS,
ea

ak

» AID
» XII.
pee

UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

CONTENTS.
SER UR

George and Eliza .
An Evening in Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Crossing the Ohio .
Uncle Tom’s Farewell
The Escape .
Eva St. Clare
Tom’s New Home .
Quaker Friends .
Shadows
The Warning
The End .
Re-Union . ‘
The Slave Market .
Dark Places .

» XV. The Victory .

PAGE

I

8
17
25
33
39
46
53
58
65
71
75
80
83
gI

ILLUSTRATIONS
TO
“UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.”
See ES em
PAGE

Eliza escaping across the Ohio. . . Frontispiece
Uncle Tom’s new Master carries him off . 12
Eva distributing oranges and candy to Haley’s

gang of slaves: -- 0 es is 6 20
Uncle Lomesaves: va 2) on
“Uncle Tom I’m going therey . . . . . 29

} Topsy laying Flowers at Eva’s feet . . . 40

“Thee: is: not;wanted there, Vriendie 23.9
Tom refusing to whip Lucy . . . . . 59
Cassy ministering to Uncle Tom . . . . 69
The sale of Emmeline... Pee .O
George Shelby freeing all his SE pr eee O,

George Shelby covering Uncle Tom’s dead face 96

3 Se
\



Uncle Coms Cabin.

——>4<-—

CHAPTER I.
GEORGE AND ELIZA.

ATE in the afternoon of a chilly day in February, two men were Sitting over
their wine in a well-furnished dining-room in a town of Kentucky. One of
7 them, Mr. Shelby, looked like a gentleman. and seemed ill at ease while
talking earnestly with his companion, whose conversation was as coarse and
ungrammatical as his appearance was common, though he was smartly
dressed, and wore a large gold chain and rings, which he took care every-
i) body should see.
or Mr. Shelby poured him out another glass of wine as he said, “The fact
is, Haley, Tom is an uncommon fellow—he is certainly worth that sum anywhere—he’s
steady, honest, clever-———”
“You mean honest aS niggers go,” said Haley, coolly drinking off the wine.
“No; I mean really—Tom is a good steady, pious fellow. I’ve trusted him
with everything | have—money, horses, house—and let him come and go round the
country, and I’ve always found him true and square.”
“Some folks don’t believe in pious niggers, Shelby, but I do, replied Haley.
“I had a fellow in this yer last lot I took to Orleans who was always prayin’, and
2 UNG Eee ONES. © AR IaN:



quite gentle and quiet like. He fetched me a aes sum too. I think religion valeyable
in a nigger when it’s the real thing.”

“Well, Tom’s got the real thing, if ever a fellow had,” replied the other.

“J am sorry to part with him, I must say. You ought to let him cover the
whole debt, and you would, Haley, if you had any conscience.”

“Well, haven’t you a boy or a gal you could throw in with Tom?”

“No; to Say truth, I can’t bear selling any of my hands, and wouldn’t if! could
help myself.”

Here a beautiful little quadroon boy between four and five years old came
into the room. His soft, silky black hair hung in glossy curls about his round, dimpled
face, and a pair of large, bright dark eyes looked out from beneath their long lashes,
aS he peered into the room. He was gaily and neatly dressed, and was evidently a
pet of his master’s.

“Hallo, Jim Crow! pick up that? said Mr. Shelby, throwing him a bunch of
raisins from the table.

The child scampered as well as he could after the prize, and his master
laughed, and said, “Now, Jim, show this gentleman how you can dance and sing.”

The boy began one of the wild, grotesque Songs sung by the negroes, in a
rich, clear voice, with many comic movements of the feet, hands, and body, all in
perfect time to the music.

“Now, Jim, walk like old Uncle Cudjoe when he has the rheumatism,” said
Mr. Shelby.
Gai @ Re Ge AEN 2B Ee Zk 3

Instantly the child humped up his back, and hobbled about the room with.
his master’s stick in his hand, his childish face drawn up as if in pain.

“Bravo!” cried Haley, and clapping his hand on Mr. Shelby’s shoulder, he
added, “Fling in that chap, and the thing’s done! I call that a fair offer.”

At that moment the door was pushed gently open, and a young quadroon
woman entered the room. No one who saw her and the boy together could doubt that
she was his mother. She had the same full dark eye, with its long lashes, the same
Silky black hair; and her brown complexion flushed when she saw the strange man’s
looks fixed upon her, as he noticed with the quick eye of the trader what a pretty
figure, hand and foot she had. ;

“I was looking for Harry, sir —she said shyly as soon as she could speak.

“Well, Eliza, take him away then,” said Mr. Shelby, as the boy ran up to his
mother, who carried him away.

“What a beauty!” said Haley when she was gone, “What’ll you take for
herein

“Mr. Haley—my wife wouldn’t part with her for her weight in gold,” replied
Shelby, gravely. :

“Youll let me have the boy though?” said Haley.

“I would rather not sell him—the fact is, sir, I hate to take the boy from
his mother,” said Mr. Shelby.

“Oh—these critters ain't like hits folk,” said Haley, “but I don’t find it
pay to be cruel, 1 always use’em well. You see when J anyways can I take a little
care about the onpleasant parts, like selling young ‘uns and that, get the gals out
4 USNeG EE OMS CA BEN:



of the way, and when it’s clean dcne and can't be helped, they naturally gets used
to it. ‘Taint like white folks thats brought up ’specting to keep their wives and
children and all that. Niggers thats fetched up right hain’t no idees of that kind,
so these things comes easier.”

“Mine are not properly brought up then,” said Mr. Shelby.

“Spose not, you Kentucky folk spile your niggers. You mean well by ’em,
but ‘taint no real kindness arter all, for the rough and tumble when it comes is
harder on ’em. No, Mr. Shelby I think I treat niggers just as well as it’s ever worth
while to treat ‘em. Well, let me oy soon what you are going to do,” said Haley
aS he went away.

“Td like to have been able to kick the fellow down Stairs,” said Shelby to
himselt. “If anybody had ever told me I should sell Tom down south to one of those
rascally traders,I couldn't have believed it. So much for being in debt, and to a
fellow like that!”

Eliza had been kindly and carefully brought up by a kind mistress, and
happily married for some years to a bright handsome young man, named George Harris,
who was a Slave on a neighbouring estate.

Eliza was thinking over the strange words she had heard from Haley, with a
dread at her heart as to what they might mean, when a hand was laid on her shoulder.
She turned and with a bright smile exclaimed, “George! Who'd have thought of
' seeing you? Missis is out for the afternoon so we'll have the time all to ourselves.”
As she spoke she drew him into the little room opening to the verandah, where
She usually sat at her work, exclaiming, “How glad I am! Why don't you smile
CEORCE AND ELIZA 5



and look at Harry, isn’t he beautiful?’ said Eliza, lifting the boy’s long curls and
kissing him.

“| wish he'd never been born—I wish Id never been born myself,” said
George, bitterly.

Surprised and frightened, Eliza sat down, leaned her head on her husband's
shoulder, and burst into tears.

“There now, Eliza, it’s too bad for me to make you feel so, poor girl! I wish
you had never seen me, it would have been better for you.”

“What dreadful thing can have happened, George, to make you talk so?” said
Eliza, “I’m sure weve been very happy till now.”

“So we have, dear,” said George, drawing his child fondly on his knee, and
gazing at his glorious dark eyes.

“Just like you, Eliza, and you are ae handsomest woman I ever saw, and the
best I ever wish to see, but it’s all misery, misery!”

“Dear George, | know you have a hard master, but pray be patient- —

“Patient 2” said he interrupting her, “Did I say a word when he took me away
from the place where I was working hard. and everyone was kind to me, to put me
to work that any horse can do.”

‘It is dreadful,” said Eliza, “but after all he’s your master. you know.”

“Who made him my master? What right has he to me? I’m a better man
than he is, and know more about business, and he says he'll bring down my proud
Spirit, and puts me to the hardest and dirtiest work on purpose. Why only yesterday
as I was loading a cart with stones, that young Masr Tom stood slashing his whip
6 WNC 0 Ma SAL TIN:

so near the horse that the creature got frightened, and because I asked him not to
do it he turned on me, and his father told bim he might whip me till he was tired
if he liked. And he did it too—but Ill pay him out some day! Its all very well
for you, for you have been always kindly treated and well brought up, but I’ve been
kicked and cuffed and sworn at, and J won’t bear it, I won’t!’ Eliza trembled and
was Silent. “You know poor little Carlo you gave me?’ added George, “ihe creature
has been the greatest comfort I had, and kind of understood how [ felt, and as I was
feeding him the other day with a few scraps I picked up by the kitchen door, Mas’r
came along and said he couldn't afford to have every nigger keeping his dog, and
tied a stone to his neck and threw him into the pond. Poor thing, he looked so sad
at me as if he wondered why { didnt save him. I had to take a flogging because
I wouldnt drown him myself—I don’t care—Mas'r will find out I’m one that whipping
woni tame.”

“Oh, George, dont do anything wicked. if you only trust in God and try to
do right He will deliver you.”

“lain't a Christian like you, Eliza, but you don't know all. Mas'r says I
shan’t come to see you any more.”

“But we are married,” Said Eliza quietly

“Don't you know a Slave can’t be married by law? | can't hold you for my
wife, if Mas’r chooses to part us. That's why 1 wish I had never seen you—-that |
had never been born, or the boy either.”

“Mr Shelby is so kind to us!” said Eliza.
GEORGE AND ELIZA. 7

“Yes, but if he died the boy might be sold any day. The brighter and
handsomer he grows, the more likely he is to be taken from you.”

Eliza thought of the man she had seen, and turned pale and faint, but she
would not add to her husband’s trouble by telling him her fears.

Then he said, “Goodbye now, Eliza, for I’m going to Canada, and when I'm
there I'll buy you and the boy, God helping me, | will! You've a kind master who
won't refuse to sell you.”

“But what if you should be taken?”

“I won't be taken—lI1l die first! Hear my plan. Mas’r sent me down near
here thinking ’d come and tell you what he said, and I’m going home as if it was
all over. There are those that will help me, and in the course of a week or so |
shall be among the missing. Pray for me, Eliza, perhaps God will hear you.”

“Pray yourself, George, and trust in Him, then you won't do anything wicked.”

“Well, now good-bye,” Said George, looking earnestly upon her—then there were
last words, and sobs and bitter weeping, and the husband and wife were parted,
perhaps for ever.

ot Se “Ss
$13 Se
CHAPTER IL
AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

AXENCLE Tom’s cabin was a Small log building near his master’s house, witha
AE neat garden in front, where every Summer Strawberries, raspberries, and various
fruits and vegetables flourished. The cottage was covered by a large scarlet
begonia and a multiflora rose that, twining together, left scarce a sign of the
rough logs to be seen, with marigolds, petunias, and other brilliant annuais that
ss were the pride of Aunt Chloe’s heart. A round, black, shining face was hers,
oi and she looked proud of her position as the first cook in the neighbourhood,
~2°° which all allowed her to be. :

AS soon aS Aunt Chloe had retired from her duties as head cook at the house
for the day, she came home to her own fireside to “get her ole man’s Supper,” and then
a table was drawn up set out with cups and saucers of very gay pattern, and here
sat Uncle Tom awaiting his meal. He was a large, broad-chested, powerfully-made
man ofa full glossy black, with a face whose truly African features had an expression
of quiet good sense, kindness and benevolence. Young Mas’r George, a bright boy of
thirteen, was by Uncle Tom’s side, trying to teach him to write ona slate. “How easy
white folks allus does things,” said Aunt Chloe, looking at George with pride as she
carefully watched her cakes. “The way he can write and read too! It’s mighty interestin’.”

“But, Aunt Chloe, I’m getting very hungry”, said George, “isn’t that cake nearly done?”
“Most done, Mas'r George,” said Aunt Chloe, “brownin’ beautiful, a real lovely
brown. Let me ‘lone, for dat! Missis let Sally try to make some cake t’other day,



AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM’S CABIN. 9

jest to larn her she said. Oh go ’way Missis, says I, it really hurts my feelings to see
good vittles spoilt dat ar way! Cake ris’ all to one side, no shape at all, no more
than my shoe!”

With this Aunt Chloe took out a well baked pound cake, of which no city
confectioner need have been ashamed, and then began to bustle about in earnest.

“Here you, Mose and Pete, get out of de way you niggers! Get away, Polly,
mammy1l give her baby somefin by and bye. No, Masr George, you set down now
with my old man, and Pll take up de eS an have the hot cakes on your plates
in less dan no time.”

“They wanted me to come to Supper at the house,” said George, “but 1 knew
what was what too well for that.”

“So you did,” said Aunt Chloe, heaping the cakes on his plate, “You know’d
-your ole Aunty’d keep the best for you Let me ‘lone for dat!”

“Now for the cake,” said George, flourishing a large knife over it.

“La bless you, Masr George,” said Aunt Chloe earnestly, “you wouldn’t cut
it with dat ar great heavy knife?~ Smash all down, spile de pretty rise of it. I’ve
got a thin ole knife a purpose. Now eat away, you won't get anything to beat dat ar.”

When Mas’r George had arrived at that pass to which even a boy can come,
when he really could not eat another morsel, he had time to notice the woolly heads
and glistening eyes that were looking on hungrily from the opposite corner.

“Here, Aunt Chloe,” said he, “Mose and Pete want some too—bake them
some cakes.”

George and Tom moved to the chimney corner, and Aunt Chloe having placed
10 WEN Cth = Oe MSC ACBHENG



a heap of cakes on the table, took her baby on her lap and fed it, giving some to
Mose and Pete, who ate theirs rolling about under tie table.

“Oh, go long,” said the mother, with a kick here and there under the table,
«Can't ye be quiet when white folk come to see ye? Better mind what ye're about or
lll take ye down a button-hole lower, when Mas’r George is gone.”

It is hard to say what this terribie threat meant, but the boys didn’t seem
to mind it much, and coming out with hands and faces smeared with treacle, they
began to kiss the baby.

“Get ‘long wid ye, Said the mother, pushing away their woolly heads.
"Yell all stick together and never get clar. Go ‘long to the Spring and wash
yourselves. Did ye ever see such aggravating young ‘uns?’ added Aunt Chloe when
they were gone, and having washed the baby’s face, she laid her down in Tom’s lap.
He set her on his broad shoulder, and began capering and dancing with her, while
Mose and Pete, who had now come back, roared round him like young bears.

“Well now I hopes you're done,’ said Aunt Chloe, when she had cleared away
the Supper, “we’s going to have de meeting, but what we’s to do for chairs I declare
-I don’t know.’ ;

As the “meetings” had been held weekly for some time at Uncle Tom’s
without any more chairs, it seemed likely this difficulty would be got over.

“Old Uncle Peter sung both de legs out of dat oldest cheer, last week,”
said Mose. s

“You go ‘long, praps you pulled ‘em out some of your shines,” replied
Aunt Chloe.




AN EVEN ING IN NCP ONS CoN Bale Ne 11
“We'll get Uncle Peter into it,” said Mose, “and den he'll begin ‘Come saints
and sinners hear me tell, and den, down he’li go!” and Mose imitated the old man’s
voice, tumbling on the floor at the end to shew the supposed disaster.
“Come now, aint yer shamed?” said Aunt Chloe. “Mas’r George is such a
beautiful reader, I know hell stay to read for us.”

George readily agreed to this, and soon the room was filled with Cees)
of all ages who took part heartily in singing the spirited hymns about “Going to
glory, “New Jerusalem,’ “Canaan’s Fields; and “Jordan’s banks,” which negroes always
prefer to any others. Mas’r George read by request the last chapter of the Revelation,
with an occasional explanation of his own thrown in, and it was agreed on all sides
that it was really ‘mazing how he did it. Then the meeting ended with one of the
simpie earnest prayers that good Uncle Tom well knew how to offer up to God, and
that always went to the heart of those for whom he prayed.

While this was going on in Uncle Tom’s cabin, Mr. Shelby was signing ihe
papers that were to dispose of his faithful old servant, and as he handed them to
Haley with a heavy sigh, added,

“T hope youll remember, Haley, that you promised on your honour not to
sell Tom without knowing what sort of hands he’s going to.”

“Not unless ’m obliged to, said the trader, “however I'll do the very best
I can to eet Tom a eood berth,” and with that he took his departure.

When Mr. Shelby rejoined his wife that night, she asked him who the common
fellow was, who had come to dinner with them that day.
cole USN GE 0 Ms 6 AB LN.

“A man named Haley, with whom I had some business lately,” answered Mr.
Shelby moving rather uneasily in his chair.

‘Is he a negro-trader?” said Mrs. Shelby remarking her husband’s manner.

“Why, dear, what put that into your head?” said he, looking up.

“Why, Eliza came in here after dinner, crying and miserable, and said you
were talking to a trader and that she heard him make an offer for her boy, the
ridiculous little goose!”

“She did, eh?” said Mr. Shelby, at a loss what to say.

“IT told Eliza,” added Mrs. Shelby «that 1 was sure you never meant to sell any
of our people, least of all to a man like that.”

“Tve always felt and said so, Emily,” said her husband, “but I’m sorry to
say I can’t help it—I shall have to sell some of my hands.”

“Notto that creature? You cannot mean what you say.”

‘I do indeed. I’ve agreed to sell Tom!”

“What, our good faithful Tom? Your servant from a boy? Why we have
promised him his freedom a hundred times! I can believe anything now—even that
you could sell little Harry, poor Eliza’s only child,” said Mrs. Shelby in a tone of grief
and anger.

“If you must know the truth then, I have agreed to sell Tom and Harry both.
After all it’s no more than everybody does.”

“But why sell them, of all others on the place?”

“Because they are worth the most. The fellow would have paid a high price
for Eliza, only I wouldn't listen to it for a moment for your sake,” said Mr. Shelby.



AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM’S CABIN, 13

‘Do let me Say a good word for these poor creatures,” said his wife earnestly.
«Tom is a noble-hearted faithful fellow, if he is black. I believe he would lay down
his life for you. I have tried so hard to do my duty to these poor helpless people
and teach them what was right, and how can! bear to let them see that we care more
for a little money than for their precious souls?”

“J am sorry to pain you, Emily, and | know you are right in your feelings,

but I am in this Haley's power, and he will not settle my debt to him in any other
way. It would be worse if we had to sell all our people.”

“This is God’s curse on slavery” said Mrs. Shelby bitterly, “It is a sin to hold
a slave under laws like ours—I always felt it was!”

“(m very, very sorry, but the thing is done, and you must be thankful it is
no worse. In fact Haley wants to take them away to-morrow. I can’t bear to see Tom,
so [ shall go out early, and you had better take Eliza somewhere out of the way.”

“No, [ will have nothing to do with this cruel business. [ll go and see poor
old Tom in his trouble. As to Eliza | dare not-think of her.” .

There was one listener to these words that Mr. and Mrs. Shelby little suspected,
forina large closet opening out of their room, poor Eliza had hidden herself in the
restless state of her mind, and had heard all that was said.

When all was still, she crept away pale and shivering to her own pretty room.
where her boy lay asleep on the bed with a smile on his happy little face.

“Poor boy! they have sold you, but your mother will save you yet!” said Eliza.
She could not shed a tear, but taking a piece of paper and a pencil she wrote hastily —
“Dear Missis, don’t think me ungrateful—don’t think hard of me! I heard all you and
14 UNC TE Oise ABN

master said to-night. 1 am going to try and save my boy. God bless and reward you
for all your kindness!”

Then she made up a small bundle of clothing for her boy, which she tied
round her waist, not forgetting even at that terrible moment, to take one or two of his
favourite toys, and arousing the little sleeper, she dressed him and put on her own
ponnet and shawl, whispering as she did so, “Harry mustn’t speak loud or they'll
hear us. A Wicked man was coming to carry Harry away in the dark, but Mother
won't let him, so she’s going to run off with her little boy.”

It was a sparkling, frosty, starlight night, and the mother wrapped the
shawl close round her child, as he clung round her neck. A few minutes brought
them to the window of Uncle Tom’s cottage, and Eliza, stopping, tapped lightly on
the window.

The prayer meeting had lasted a long time, and Uncle Tom had sung some
hymns alone afterwards, so he and Chloe were not yet asleep, although it was between
twelve and one o'clock.

“What’s that?” said Aunt Chloe, starting up—“Why, if it ain’t “Liza! Get on
your clothes quick, ole man. I’m goin’ to open the door.”

The door flew open, and the light fell on Eliza’s worn face and dark
wild eyes.

‘I’m skeered to look at you, Lizy? Are ye tuck sick, or what’s come over ye?”

‘Tm running away, Uncle Tom and Aunt Chloe, carrying off my child. Master
sold him!”

‘Sold him?” exclaimed both, lifting up their hands in horror.
AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM’S CABIN. 15



“Yes, sold him!” said Eliza firmly. “I crept into the closet. by Missis’s door
to-night, and heard Master tell Missis that he had sold my Harry a you, Uncle
Tom, to a trader.”

Tom had stood during this speech like a man in a dream, and slowly, as
its meaning grew clear to him, he sank upon his old chair, and bowed his head
down over his knees.

“The good Lord have pity on us!” said Aunt Chloe, “It can’t be true! What
has he done that Mas’r should sell him?” .

“He hasn't done anything, it isn’t for that. Masr don’t want to sell, but he
told Missis this man had got power over him, and if he didn’t pay him a debt clear
off, he would have to sell the place and all the people. Master said he was sorry,
but if Missis ain’t a Christian and an angel there never was one. I’m a wicked girl
to leave her so, but | can’t help it. God forgive me if | am wrong.”

“Well, ole man, why dont you go too?” said Aunt Chloe. “Will you wait to
be taken down river, where they kill niggers with hard work? ld rather die than
go there any day! Be off with "Lizy, you've got a pass to come and go any time.”

Tom slowly raised his head,and looking round sadly said:

“No, no—I aint going. Let ‘Liza go, it’s her right. ‘Taint in natur for her
to stay. But you heard what she said. If I must be sold or all the people on the
place go to ruin, why let me be sold. I s’pose I can bear it as well as any on ’em.
Mas always found me on the spot, he always will. I have never broke trust nor
used my paSS noways contrary to my word, and | never will. Mas’r ain't to blame,
Chloe, and he’ll take care of you and the poor—” Here he turned to the rough trundle-bed
16 UNCUE 0 Mes CABIN

full of little woolly heads, and fairly broke down. He covered his face with
his large hands, sobs, heavy hoarse and loud, shook the chair, and great tears fell
through his fingers to the floor.

“And now,” Said Eliza as she was going away, “l saw my husband only to-day,
and he told me he was so hard pushed, he was going to run away. Do try to send
him word how | went and why, and tell him I'm going to try and find Canada. Tell
him—if I never see him again—to be as good as he can, and try and meet me in
heaven.” And with her child in her arms, Eliza glided away.
CHAPTER IIL
CROSSING SHE OF 10:






is impossible to imagine a more forlorn and desolate creature than Eliza,
when she left Uncle Tom’s cabin.

Her husband’s suffering and danger, and the dread of losing her child,
made. her forget the risk of leaving the only home she had ever known, and
- her motherly love blinded her to all she would have to go through to save
&s her boy. Although he was old enough to walk by her side, she could
~ not bear to put him out of her arms, and as she went rapidly forward,
~Z2 she hardly felt his weight in the excited state of her mind. She had
ae been to a little village near the Ohio river, and knew the way well, and
to go there and cross the river was her first idea; beyond that she could only
hope and pray for God’s help She walked on and on until sunset, only stopping
once or twice during the whole day to rest and take the most necessary food.
She was far beyond the places where she was known to anyone, and she and
the child being quite white enough not to call attention to themselves on account of
colour, she passed without notice to the river bank. It was early spring, and great
cakes of ice were wedged in by the bends in the water as it swept round the points
of land, until they formed a sort of floating raft,that filled up the river almost from
one shore to the other. Eliza at once saw that this state of things must have stopped
the ferry- boat from running, and finding this was so, Sat down at a little inn to
18 UN Ci Es OFM SiG AB INE



rest until she could find some way of crossing. She told the landlady she was
hastening to a Sick child on the other side, and laying the tired boy upon a bed. sat
by him until he was fast asleep. For her there was no rest.

Meanwhile her flight had caused a general sensation at home, and aS may
be supposed Haley was in a great rage at losing part of his bargain. He at once
prepared to ride after Eliza, but it was pretty well guessed on the place that Mrs.
Shelby would be very glad if she escaped, and many delays in catching and taming
the horses occurred before he could get fairly off.

“Sarve him right,” said Aunt Chloe, when news was brought her, in the kitchen
that “Mas Haley was mighty oneasy at havin’ to wait so long.” “He'll get wus nor
uneasy if he dont mend his ways. He’s broke a many, many hearts. Don’t he pull
off and sell de little children, and tear husband and wife apart, when it’s taking
the very life of em. Lor; if the devil don’t get sich as him, what’s he good for?” And
here Aunt Chloe began to cry and sob in good earnest.

“You oughter thank God you ain't like him, Chloe,” said Uncle Tom. ‘I'd
rather be sold ten thousand times over than have all that ar critter’s vot to answer
for.” The bell here rang for Tom.

“Tom, Said his master kindly, “I want to tell you that I snall have to pay
this gentleman a thousand dollars, if youre not here when he wants you. You can
have to-day to yourself. Go where you like, boy.”

“And mind,” added Haley, “don’t come it over your master, with any of your
nigger tricks—I wouldn't trust any on ye.”
CARS O*Sr5 IN Gee Hee One O: mules



“Mas’r,” Said Tom, “Have I ever broke word to you, since you was put into
my arms by ole Missis as a baby when I was eight years old till now?”

The tears came into Mr. Shelby’s eyes, as he replied.

‘It is quite true. If I could help it, no one should buy you.”

“AS sure aS | am a Christian woman,” said Mrs. Shelby to Haley, “I will buy
him back as soon as I can. Be sure you let me know to whom you sell him.”

From all the delays that had taken place,it was about an hour after Eliza
had reached the village, that her pursuers came riding into it. One of the blacks
who saw her at the window gave her a signal, and catching her child in her arms
she sprang out by a side door near the river. The trader saw her as she ran to
the bank, and in a moment was after her like a hound after a deer. Her feet seemed
to her scarce to touch the ground, and with the strength of despair giving one wild
cry and flying leap, she vaulted clear over the rough current near the shore, on tc
the raft of ice beyond!

The huge green fragment of ice on which she alighted creaked as her weight
came on it, but she Stayed there not a moment. With wild cries she leaped to another
and still another cake—her shoes were gone, her stockings cut from her feet, while
blood marked every step, but she saw and felt nothing, till dimly as in a dream, she
Saw the Ohio side, and a man helping her up the bank.

Haley had stood looking on amazed till Eliza had Seopa aeT when he turned
inquiringly to his assistants, Sam and Andy, saying:

“The gal’s got seven devils in her, I think!”

9
20 USN GEE I OeMcs) (CA BEN:

“Wall now,” said Sam, chuckling—‘“I hope Mas’r ’scuse us tryin’ dat ar road.
Don’t feel spry enough for dat, no way.”

“Laugh if you dare!” said the trader with a growl.

“Bless you, Mas’r, I can’t help it, “said Sam, “She looked so cur’ous a leapin
aw springin’, ice a crackin, to hear her plump! splash! how she goes it” And Sam
and Andy laughed till the tears rolled down their cheeks.

“[ll make you laugh tother side yer mouths; said Haley, laying about him
with his riding-whip.

Both ducked, and got on their horses, before he was up the bank.

“Good evenin’, Mas’r,” said Sam gravely “Mas’r Haley won't want us no more
to-night, Missis wouldn't hear of our ridin’ de critters over Lizzy’s bridge nohow,” and
he and Andy started off at full speed.

Eliza made her desperate way over the river in the dusk of twilight, and the
grey mist of evening rising from the water, the swollen current and masses of ice
placed a hopeless barrier between her and her pursuers; so Haley went discontentedly
back to the little inn to think what he could do. After a time he met there, by good
luck as he thought, two old acquaintances of his to whom he related his troubles, and
as their business was to catch runaway slaves, they soon agreed to recover the boy
for Haley, on condition of keeping Eliza to sell on their own account.

On the very night of poor Eliza’s mad flight, the wife and children of Senator
Bird of Ohio State were rejoicing over his unexpected return home after an absence
of some days. When he had rested and refreshed himself a little with the comforts
of his own fireside, his gentle loving little wife asked him if it was true that a law

CROSSING THE OHIO. 21

had just been passed forbidding people to help or shelter the poor slaves that come
over from Kentucky, and when he owned that this had been done, she exclaimed,

‘Its a shameful, wicked law, and I'll break it for one the first time I geta
chance! I put it to you, John, would you turn away a poor, shivering, hungry creature
from your door, because he was a runaway? Would you, now?”

To tell the truth Mr. Bird had a kind nature, and his wife knew it too, so he
was rather at a loss what to say.

“Of course it would be a very painful duty,” he began.

“Don't use that word, John”, interrupted his wife. “It can’t bea duty If people
want to keep their slaves from running away, let em treat ’em well. And when they
do run away they suffer enough from cold and hunger and fear, without everybody

turning against them, and law or no law, I never will! You wouldn't do it either any
sooner than 1.”

At this moment Mrs. Bird was called away, and fetching her husband directly
afterwards, they saw in the kitchen of their own house a young delicate woman, with
the fatal tinge of colour of the despised race on her sad sorrowful face, lying faint
and: he!pless on two chairs. The old black cook was explaining how the poor thing
had begged shelter from the cold, when the woman opened her a dark eyes, and
sprang up with a look of agony, saying,

“My Harry! have they got him?’ The boy ran to her as she spoke, and then
turning to Mrs. Bird she cried — “Do protect me, Ma’ am. Don’t let them get him!”

“You are safe here, no one shall hurt you’, said Mrs. Bird kindly.
bo
bo

UN CE Ose Ss CAB EN:
A bed was hastily made for the poor woman near the fire, and soon she fell
into a sound sleep, with her arm still around her boy When she awoke, calm and sad
once more, Mrs. Bird asked her where she came from and who she was.

“I came from Kentucky, and I crossed the ice!” said she.

“But the ice is all broken up, in great frozen masses’, said Mr. Bird.

“I know it, but I did it! I didn’t think I should get over, but I didn’t care. |
could but die if I didn’t. The Lord helped me—nobody knows how much the Lord
can help ‘em till they try.”

«Were you a Slave?’ Asked Mr. Bird.

“Yes, I had a kind master and mistress.”

“Then what made you run away from them?” said Mrs. Bird.

Eliza looked keenly at Mrs. Bird, who was in deep mourning, and said
suddenly,

“Have you ever lost a child, Ma’am?”

Mrs. Bird burst into tears, but as soon aS she could speak, replied,

‘T have just lost a little one, but why do you ask?”

“Then you will feel for me. I have lost two, and | had only this one
left, and Ma'am, they sold him, a baby that had never been away from his mother
in his life. So when I knew this I took him and came off in the night, an’ the man
that bought him and some of Mas’r’s folks chased me. Then I jumped right on to the
ice, and how I got across | don’t know.”

Eliza did not shed a tear, but all who heard her were deeply touched, even
the Senator. At last he turned suddenly round upon her and said,
GR OS Sa NGa dh eB 0 He: 23

“How came you to tell me you had a kind master?”

“Because he was kind, but he couldn't help himself. He owed money, and had
to give in to this trader and let him have my boy. But I couldn’t stand it.”

“Have you no husband?”

“Yes, but his master is real hard to him, and threatens to sell him down
south. [t's like P11 never see him again.”

“And where do you méan to go?” asked Mrs. Bird.

“Ta Canada. Is it very far off?” said Eliza, earnestly.

“Well see what we can do for you in the morning,” said Mrs. Bird, “mean-
while try to rest, poor woman. Put your trust in God, He will protect you.”

Mr. Bird and his wife returned to their room, and coming up to her he said:

“Shell have to get away this very night. That fellow will be here after her
early 10 morrow morning. A pretty thing for me if they were caught in my house!
They'll have to be got off tonight. [ve been thinking if I could get her to Van
Tromp’s, the man that came over from Kentucky, and set all his slaves free—he lives
up in the back woods, and there she'd be safe enough. The plague of the thing is,
nobody could drive there tonight but me, as the creek has to be crossed twice, and
no one who doesn’t know it as well as 1 do, can do it without danger. Cudjoe musi
put in the horses about 12, and I'll take her over, so mind she’s all ready to come.
And Mary, | don’t know how you feel, but there’s the drawer full—of poor little
Henrys things—some of them might do for the boy.”

Good little Mrs. Bird did not want telling twice to do a kindness, and put-
ting together a few of her lost darling’s treasured up clothes for the poor mother
24 UNCLE Eel OMS] Cae IN:

more suffering than herself, and dressing the fugitive in useful things of her own,
sent her on her way over the rough swampy road that led to the dwelling of honest
John Van Tromp. It was full late in the night when the carriage stopped, dripping
and splashed, at the door of a large farm-house, the owner of which at length
appeared.

“Are you the man to shelter a poor woman and child from slave-catchers ?”
asked Mr. Bird.

“I rather think I'am,” said honest John— “I’ve got seven sons each six foot
high, and we'll all be ready for em if they come here!”

Weary and worn out,Eliza dragged herself up to the door with her child
lying asleep on her arm. The rough man lighted her in, opened the door of a small
bed —room next the kitchen, and told her to yo in, adding,

“Now I say, gal, you needn’t be a bit afeard, let who will come here. lm up
to all that sort of thing, and those that know me won't try to get anybody out of my
house when I’m agin it. So you jest go to sleep as quiet as if your mother was
rocking you,’ Said he as he shut the door.

“She’s an uncommon handsome ‘un, added he to Mr. Bird, who told her story
in a few words.

“Ou! Ah! I tell ye what—these yer things make me comé the nighest to
Swearin’ of most anything,” said honest John.

When the Senator took leave of him, he put a ten-dollar note into his hand.

‘It’s for her,” was all he said.

“Ay—ay!” answered John, as they shook hands at parting.




Eva

Saves

Bncle Tom
CHAPTER IV.
UNCLE TOM’S FAREWELL.





he February morning looked grey and drizzling through the window of Uncle

ee Tom's cabin. It looked on sad faces there! The little table stood before the

2sifire, and on it was spread out a coarse clean shirt which Aunt Chloe was
bt ~=« ironing, every now and then raising her hand to her face, to wipe away the
‘ig tears that were running down her cheeks. Tom sat by with his Testament
_-jH\e open on his knee, but neither spoke. It was yet early, the children lay all
ci cot asleep together in their rude trundle-bed, and Tom got up and walked silently
Ss" +o look at them. 3

‘Its the last time!” he said.

“S‘pose we must bear it—but how can I?” said poor Aunt Chloe, as she sat
down aud began to cry. “Misses says shell try and get ye back in a year or two,
but nobody comes up ihat goes down thar. I’ve heard tell how dey works ’em on dem-
ar plantations”.

«There'll be the same God there, Chloe, as here.”

“Well,” said Aunt Chloe, “S’pose dere will, but de Lord lets drefful things
happen sometimes. I don’t seem to get no comfort dat way.”

“’m in the Lord’s hands,” said Tom, “and there's one thing | can thank him
for. Its me that’s sold, and not you nor the children. What comes will come only on
me, and the Lord will help me—I know he will.”

a
26 7 UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

“Any way, there’s wrong about it somewhar,” said Aunt Chloe, “Im clar of that”

“Ye ought to look up to the Lord above, there don’t a sparrow fall without Him.”

‘It don’t seem to comfort me, but I ‘spect it oughter,’ said Aunt Chloe, “but
der’s no use talkin, Tl jest bake the corn-cake, and get ye one good breakfast, cause
nobody knows when yell get another.”

Mrs. Shelby had excused Aunt Chloe’s attendance at the great house that morn-
ing, and the poor soul had spent all her care on this farewell feast, cooked her nic
est chicken, prepared her corn-cake just to her husband's taste, and brought out some
preserves kept for special occasions. .

“Oh, Pete,” said Mose joyfully, “aint we got a buster of a breakfast”!

Aunt Chloe gave him a sudden box on the ear.

“Thar now! Crowin’ over the last breakfast yer poor Daddy’s goin’ to have to home!”

“Oh, Chloe!’ said Tom gently.

‘IT can’t help it. Ts so tossed about, it makes me act ugly,” said Chloe hiding
her face in her apron, then taking up the baby and wiping her eyes she added.

“Now, I’s done | hope. Do eat somethin’. This yer’s my nicest chicken. Thar,
boys—ye shall have some—yer Mammy’s been cross to yer.”

The boys needed no second invitation tc eat all they could get, and bustling
about after breakfast Aunt Chloe said:

“Now [ must put up yer clothes. Jest like as not he'll take ’em all away.
These here’s your old shirts, and these yer is new ones—so be careful ‘cause there
wont nobody make yer no more! To think on’t, no critter to do for ye, sick or well!”
and Aunt Chloe laid her head on the box, and sobbed again.
UENCE OM Sie ACR EW EE. 2

The boys now began to cry too, and Tom taking the baby on his knee let
her enjoy herself in her own way, by scratching his face and pulling his hair.

“Ay, crow away, poor critter’ said Chloe, “Yell have to come to it too—yell
live to see yer husband sold or be sold yourself, jest as like as not—it’s no use
niggers havin’ nuthin.”

Here one of the boys called out— “Thar’s Missis a-comin’ in!”

“She cant do no good—what’s she comin’ for?” said Aunt Chloe, as she set
a chair for Mrs. Shelby, in a gruff crusty way. She seemed pale and unhappy, and
quietly looking at the silent group, sat down, and burst into tears. For a few
moments they all wept together, and in those tears melted away the bitter anger of
the oppressed. At last Mrs. Shelby said:

‘I can’t give you anything now to do you any good. But I promise you
faithfully that I will find out where you go, and bring you back as soon as | can
get the money. Till then, trust in God.”

Here the boys called out that Mas’r Haley was coming, and then a rough
kick pushed open the door. Haley stood there in a very bad humour, having ridden
hard the night before, and failed to capture his prey.

“Come, ye nigger, ain't ye ready?” said he, taking off his hat as he saw
Mrs. Shelby. Aunt Chloe shut and corded the box, and getting up looked gruffly on
the trader.

Tom rose up meekly to follow his new master carrying his heavy box on
his shoulder. His wife took the baby in her arms to go with him to the waggon,
and the children, still crying, followed them.
UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

to
DP



Mrs. Shelby, walking up to Haley, talked to him earnestly for a few minutes,
while the family party proceeded to a waggon that stood ready at the door. A crowd
of the hands on the place was there to bid farewell to their old Christian leader
and friend, and much grief was felt, especially by the women. |

“Get in!’ said Haley to Tom, as he strode through the crowd of servants,
who were frowning on him.

Tom got in, and Haley drawing from under the seat a pair of heavy fetters,
fastened them round each ankle. A groan of indignation was heard, and Mrs. Shelby
spoke from the verandah.

“Mr. Haley, those fetters are quite unnecessary.”

“Don't know, Ma’am, I’ve lost one five hundred dollars from this yer place,
and I can’t afford to run. no more risks.”

“What else could she ’spect on him?” said Chloe, angrily, while the two boys
now clung sobbing to her gown.” :

‘[m sorry,” said Tom, «that Mayr George happened to be away. Give my
love to Mast George.” Haley whipped up the horse, and with a steady sad look fixed
to the last on the old place, Tom was whirled away along the dusty road until
Haley suddenly drew un at a blacksmiths shop, to have some alteration made in a
pair of handcuffs.

“These yer’s a little too small for him,” said Haley pointing to Tom.

“What? Shelby’s Tom sold? Who'd have ets it? Ye needn't go to fetterin
him up like this. He’s the faithfullest best critter— —

“Yes--yeS, Said Haley, “your good fellers are just the ones to want to run off.”
DNC 1 OMS FAR EWE 0, 29


















‘



“Well,” said the i “hem. -
plantations down thar, stranger, ain’t ~
jest the place a Kentuck nigger wants.
to go to. A feller can’t help thinkin’ ~
it’s a pity to have a quiet likely feller like Tom gO
to be done for, on.une of them thar sugar plantations
_ “Wall—he’s got a fair chance. I promised to
do well by him. Ill get him house servant in some % .
good old family, and then he'll have as good a bert
Tom was sitting very sadly outside the shop while ‘this conversation was
going on. Suddenly he heard the click of a horse’s hoof behind him, and before
he could believe his eyes, George sprang into the waggon, threw his arms round his
neck, and sobbed and scolded aloud.
“IT declare it's a nasty, mean shame! I don't care what they say, any of ’em.
If I were a man they shouldn't do it, they shouldn't!’ said George with a kind of howl.

ee On Tee, a eee NS het ea ee ee
302 Se UN CE SO Mes) CA Ns



“Oh, Mas George, this does me good!” said Tom, “I couldn’t bear to go off
without seein’ you!’ Here Tom made a movement and as George’s eye fell on the
fetters he exclaimed.

«What a shame! Jl knock that old fellow down!”

“No you wont, Mas’ George. It wont help me to anger him.”

“T wont then for your sake, but isnt ii a Shame? They never sent for me,
nor told me, and if it hadnt been for Tom Lincoln, I shouldnt have heard it. I can
tell you | blew ’em all up at home!”

“That ar wasn’t right, Mas’ George.”

“Cant help it—its a shame! Look here, Uncle Tom,” said he, turning his back
to the shop and speaking in a low tone. “I’ve brought you my dollar!”

“T couldn't think of takin’ it, Masr George, no ways,” said Tom.

“But you shall take it,’ said George.

“Look here, I told Aunt Chloe I'd do it, and she ied me to make a hole
in it and put a String through, to hang it round your neck out of sight, or else this
mean scamp would take it away! I should like to blow him up, Tom, it would do me good.”

‘It wont do me no good, Masr George.”

“Then I won't for your sake,” said George tying his dollar round Tom’s neck.
“Now button your coat tight over it, and remember every time you see it that I'll come
down after you and bring you back. Aunt Chloe and I have been talking about it. Vl
see to it, [11 tease Father’s life out if he dont do it.”

“And now, Masr George, ye must be a good boy. Allus keep close to yer
mother. Don't be geitin’ into any .o them foolish ways boys has of gettin’ too big
UNCEE TOMS PARE WELT. 31

to mind their mothers. Tell ye what, Masr George, the Lord gives many good
things twice over, but He don’t give ye a mother but once. So now you hold on to
her, and grow up to be a comfort to her, thars my own good boy. You will now,
won't ye?”

“Yes, I will, Uncle Tom,” said George earnestly.

“Youll grow up to be a larned good man, and all the people on the place
and your Father and Mother’ll be so proud on ye. Be a good Masr like your Father,
and a good Christian like your Mother,” said Uncle Tom stroking the boy’s fine curly
head with his large strong hand.

‘lll be real good, Uncle Tom, I'm going to be a first-rater. And [11 have:
you back to the place yet, as I told Aunt Chloe this morning. Youll have good
times yet.”

Haley now came back with the handcuffs in his hand.

“Look here now, Mister, said George in a grand way, “I Shall let Father and
Mother know how you treat Uncle Tom.”

“Yowre welcome,” answered the trader. :

“| should think you'd be ashamed to spend your life buying and selling men
and women, and chaining them like cattle!” said George.

“So long as your grand folks want to buy ‘em Im as good as they is, ‘taint
any meaner sellin’ on ‘em than tis buyin.”

"ll never do either when Im a man,” replied George, “Im ashamed to be a
Kentuckian. I always was proud of it before. Well, goodbye, Uncle Tom, keep up
your spirits,“ said George, sitting very Straight on his horse as he rode away.
32 TEN Ca 0: Mas Ac ENG

“Goodbye, Masr George, God bless you, Kentucky haint got many like you” said
Tom looking fondly after the frank boyish face as it was lost to view. Over his heart
there seemed to be a warm spot where those young hands had placed that precious dollar.

“Now I tell ye what, Tom,’ said Haley as he came up to the waggon, and
threw in the handcuffs, “You treat me far and IJ1 treat you far. I[ aint never hard
on my niggers. Ye'd better jest settle down comfortable, and not try no tricks, ‘cause
niggers tricks of all sorts ['m up to, and it's no use. If niggers is quiet and don't
try to get off, they has good times with me, and if they don’t, why its thar fault
not mine.”


CHAPTER V.
THE ESCARE:

a “traveller arrived late one drizzly afternoon at a small country hotel in a
: village of Kentucky, and going up to the jolly crackling fire, was struck by
seeing a large hand-bill hung up against the wall, which was being eagerly
tead by a group of men standing near it. Mr. Wilson—that was the old
gentleman’s name-took out his spectacles and putting them on, carefully stu-
. died the contents of the paper: “Ran away my mulatto boy George, 6 feet
/ in height, almost white, brown curly hair: very intelligent, speaks well, can
5 read and write. Branded in right hand with the letter I. Four hundred
dollars for him dead or alive, the same for proof of his death.”

A tall stranger standing near Mr. Wilson remarked— “Such papers as these
are a shame to Kentucky. I’ve got a gang of boys, sir. I let ’em feel free to go whar
they like, and they know I’ve got free papers ready for ‘em all when I die, and I tell
ye, Stranger, there ain't a man in our parts gets more out of his niggers than | do.”

“| think you are right, friend,” said Mr. Wilson,’ and this boy named here is
a fine fellow—no mistake about that—he worked once for me, and was my best hand,
sir. He invented a clever machine too for cleaning hemp, used in many factories—his
master has a patent for it.”

‘He holds it, I spose and makes money of it, and then brands the boy in
his right hand; he’s a nice ‘un!”


34 e TON Cal SEO Me Sec AlBaGN:

Here a small one-horse chaise drove up to the inn, and a well-dressed, tall,
handsome-looking man entered the room. He had a dark Spanish complexion, fine
black eyes and hair, and walking quietly up to the bar gave in his name as Henry
Butler, Oaklands, Shelby County, asked for a private room, and sat down to wait
while it was got ready for him.

Mr. Wilson had not been able to take his eyes from the stranger from the
moment of his appearance, and at last the latter seemed to recognise him, and walking
up gave his hand as he said—‘“Mr. Wiison, I think? I see you remember me?”

“Yes—sir—” answered Wilson, half reluctantly. “I should like to see you, sir,
in my room for a few minutes on business!” said the stranyer.

“When they were alone, the young man locked the door, put the key inte his
pocket, and faced Mr. Wilson.

“George?” said Mr. Wilson.

“Yes, George—I’m well disguised you see, don't answer to the description at
all. A little walnut-bark made my yellow skin a Spanish brown, and I've dyed my
hair black.”

“I know, George, your master isn’t all he ought to be, but you shouldn’t run
away—it’s against the law—you're running an awful risk. If youre taken youll be
worse off than ever—they’ll half kill you and sell you down river.”

“Mr. Wilson, I know I run a risk’--said George, “but I’ve got pistols aot
me—and down South I never will go! If it comes to that I can earn six feet of free
soil in Kentucky for myself!”
THE ESCAPE > 35



‘Why George, this state of mind is awful! You surely wouldn't break the
laws of your country?” said Mr. Wilson, nervously.

“I have no country,’ said the young man bitterly. My mother was a slave,
and | saw her put up to sale with her seven children, all sold to different masters!
L lay awake whole nights when | was a little fellow, and cried for my mother and
sisters; never had a kind word said to me till | came to work in your factory, Sir.
You were good to me, and God knows I am grateful for it. Then I found my good
beautiful wife, and last of all my master comes between her and me, and says 1 must
give her up. Sir, these things the law of Kentucky allows, but | have no country!
I only want to be allowed to leave yours in peace—when I get to Canada, that shall
be my country, where I am free!

“Go ahead, George, go ahead—but be careful, my boy—don't shoot anybody —at
least | wouldn't you know” said good Mr. Wilson, walking up and down the room.
“Where's your wife, George>”

“Gone, Sir—with her chil” in her arms—no one knows where.”

“Is it possible? From such a kind family.”

“Kind families sometimes get into debt, and have to sell children away from
their mothers to pay with,’ said George bitterly.

“Well, well,” said the kind old man, taking a rollof notes from his pocket-book,
which he offered to George—“You must take this to help you, my boy—money goes
a long way everywhere—you can’t have too much if you get it honestly.”

“IT think | have money enough, Sir,” said George, “but I will take it if I may
repay you again when I car. I have a faithful black friend who will go with me
36 UCN CHAE 1 OsM Sat CeneB iN,

as far as Ohio, and put me with some friends there, and to-morrow night I hope to
get so far safely. I shall travel boldly by daylight, though I feel I am running a
terrible risk—So good-bye, sir. If you hear I’m taken, you may know I’m dead!”

“Take heart, George, and trust in the Lord. Youre a brave fellow. Everything
will be set right—if not in this world in another.”

“Thank you for saying that, sir. Ill think of that,’ said George, as Mr. Wilson
left the room. ;

A quiet Scene now rises before us. A large roomy, neatly painted kitchen,
its yellow floor smooth, without an atom of dust upon it: rows of shining tins for
cooking all sorts of good things to eat; glossy green wood chairs, old and firm, a
small rocking-chair with patchwork cushions, and a large comfortable one with tempting
feather cushions, in which sat our old friend Eliza at work. She looked paler and
thinner than in her old Kentucky home, and as her dark eye followed the gambols
of her little Harry, who was playing on the floor beside her, it had an earnest depth
of resolve that never was there in earlier and happier days. Near her sat a woman
about sixty, whose snowy cap, plain white muslin handkerchief smoothly folded over
her bosom, and grey dress, shewed her to be a Quaker. She had a face that time
Seemed to touch only to make it sweeter and more loveable; her silvery hair was
neatly parted over a placid forehead, beneath which shone a pair of clear, honest,
loving brown eyes.

“And so thee thinks still of going to Canada, Eliza?’ she said.

“Yes, Mvam—I must go onward. I dare not stop,” said Eliza firmly.
det be Pes CAE: 37



“Thee knows thee can stay here as long as thee pleases,” continued Rachel
Halliday.
“Thank you? said Eliza warmly, “but I can’t rest. Last night I dreamt that
man was here!”

“Poor child!” said Rachel kindly. “The Lord hath ordered it so that never
has a fugitive been stolen from our village. | trust thou will not be the first,”

At this moment the door opened, and Mary, an honest rosy looking girl with
large brown eyes like her mother’s, came in.

“Mary, thee’d better fill the kettle,” said her mother gently. And while it
was boiling Rachel quietly proceeded to make some biscuits. Simeon Halliday, a tall
strong man in drab coat and trousers and broad-brimmed hat, now entered.

“Any news, Father?” said Rachel, putting her biscuits into the oven.

“Peter Stebbins told me they should be along to-night with friends,” said
Simeon, as he was washing his hands in a little back porch.

“Indeed?” Said Rachel looking anxiously at Eliza.

“Did thee say thy name was Harris?” asked Simeon of Eliza as he came
in again.

Eliza slowly answered “Yes,” half afraid that some one had found her out.

Then Simeon called Rachel away, and said to her:

“This child’s husband will be here to-night. He has come to the settlement
with Peter—he is a bright likely fellow too. Shall we tell her now?”

“We must, I couldn't bear to keep it from her.”

Rachel came out into the kitchen, and said gently to Eliza,
38 UNCLE 10M Se CABIN

“Come with me, my daughter—I have news for thee, nay it is good news” she
added as she led her into the next room.

Mary had taken up little Harry in her arms, and kissed him as she whispered,

“Thy father is coming, little one.”

Meanwhile Rachel drew Eliza tenderly to her, and Said;

“The Lord hath had mercy on thee, my child. Thy husband is among friends,
who will bring him here to-night.”

Eliza gazed upon her as in a happy dream, and soon overcome by the feeling
of perfect rest and peace after her long suffering, slept as she had not slept since
the fearful midnight hour when she had fled with her boy. She dreamt of a beautiful
home in a free land, where her boy played in freedom and joy; she heard her hus-
band’s footsteps coming nearer; his arms were around her, his tears on her face, and
she awoke! It was no dream. The daylight had long faded; her child lay asleep by
her side, and her husband was sobbing by her pillow!
CHAPTER VL
BVAss 1, CLARE

I hundred years ago the Mississippi was a river of mighty unbroken solitude,

HE rolling amid unknown wonders of vegetable and animal life. Now what

F other river of the world bears to the ocean, riches like those of a country

bringing forth all that grows between the tropics and the poles? The

Slanting light of the setting sun quivers on the sea-like breadth of the

river; the slender canes, and the tall dark cypress glow in the golden ray,
_ as the heavily laden steamboat marches onward.

“ye Piled with cotton-bales from many a plantation, we must look well
among her crowded decks before we shall find again our friend Uncle Tom, sitting
in a little nook among the cotton bales. He had gradually won the confidence even
of a man like Haley, and for some time had been allowed to come and go freely
where he pleased on the boat. He was ever ready to lend a helping hand to any
work that was going on, and when he had nothing to do, he climbed to a nook among
the cotton on the upper deck, and spelt over his Bible to himself.

For a hundred or more miles above New Orleans the river is higher than the
country around, and the traveller from the deck of the steamer overlooks the plantations
on all sides. As poor Tom looked back in thought upon the old home ever moving
farther and farther away from him, as he passed on to a new and untried life, he
felt that his Bible was all left to him now of the. happy past.


40 UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

Among the passengers
on the boat was a young man
of fortune and good family named
St. Clare, with his little daughter
of five or Six, and.a lady relative,
who had. the little one especially
under her care.

Tom had often caught
glimpses of the little girl, for
she was one of the busy tripping
creatures that flit like a sunbeam
from place to place, and once
Seen she was not easily forgotten
her form was perfect in its
childish beauty and grace, and
her face remarked less for its

loveliness of feature, than for a dreamy seriousness of expression



See Page 73




and the long-golden-brown hair that floated like a cloud around it, and the soft
depths of her violet blue eyes shaded by heavy fringes of golden-brown, were so

unlike those of other children,
thither upon the boat.

that all eyes followed her as she glided hither and
B Vea eos Cole AL Ka. 4]

She was always in motion, with a half smile upon her rosy mouth, Singing to herself
as she moved lightly about, as in a happy dream.

: No word of reproof ever fell upon her ear for what she chose to do, and
she went all over the boat as she pleased, always dressed in Spotless white; and
there was not a nook or corner above or below, that those fairy footsteps and that
golden head had not visited.

The fireman, as he Jooked up from fis fiery furnace, Sometimes found her
deep blue eyes looking fearfully and pityingly at him, as if she thought him in some
dreadful danger. A thousand times a day rough voices blessed her, and smiles of
unusual softness stole over hard faces as she passed; and when she tripped fearlessly
over dangerous places, hands were stretched out to save her and smooth her path.
Tom watched the little creature with more and more interest every day. To him
she seemed something almost divine, and he half believed he saw one of the angels
stepped out of his New Testament. Often and often she walked sadly round. the place
where Haley’s gang of men and women Sat in their chains. She would glide in among
them and look at them with an air of wondering sorrow, and sometimes lift their
chains in her little hands as she flitted away with a woful sigh.

Several times she appeared suddenly among them with her hands full of
candy, oranges and nuts, which she would divide joyfully among them, and then be
gone again.

Tom watched the little lady a great deal before he tried to make her
acquaintance. He could cut pretty little baskets out of cherry-stones, make funny
faces on hickory-nuts, or odd jumping figures out of elder-pith, and whistles of all
42 ON CEE SE OMS CAB EN
sorts and Sizes. The little one was shy and it was not easy to tame her. She would
perch like a bird on some box or package near Tom, and take from him: without a
word the little toys he offered her one by one, but at last they became friends.

“What’s little missy’s name?” said Tom when he thought he might venture to ask.

“Evangeline St. Clare—though Papa and everybody else call me Eva. Now
what’s your name?”

‘My name’s Tom—the little children used to call me Uncle Tom way back
thar in Kentuck.”

“Then I mean to call you Uncle Tom; because you see | like you”, said Eva,
“so Uncle Tom, where are you going?”

“I don’t know, Miss Eva.”

‘Don’t know?” said Eva.

“No, ’m going to be sold to somebody.”

“My Papa can buy you, said Eva quickly; “and if he buys you, you will have
good times. [11 ask him to this very day.”

“Thank you, my litile lady;”’ said Tom.

The boat here stopped at a landing to take in wood, and Eva hearing her
father’s voice, bounded gaily away. Jom offered his help in wooding, and was soon
busy among the hands.

Eva and her father were standing together by the railings to see the boat
start from the landing-place, when by a sudden movement the child lost her balance,
and fell over the side of the boat into the water. Her father was about to plunge
in after her, but was held back by some who saw that more effectual aid had followed
Bev Ae al esl ACRE. 43

the little one. Tom was standing just under her on the lower deck when she fell;
he saw her strike the water and Sink, and was after her in a moment. A broad-
chested strong-armed fellow, it was easy for him to keep afloat in the water till the
child rose to the surface, and he caught her in his arms, and Swimming with her to the
side of the boat handed her up, all dripping, to the hands eagerly stretched out to
receive hier.

The next day as the steamer drew near New Orleans, a general bustle of
preparation for landing prevailed on board. On the lower deck sat Tom, anxiously
watching from time to time a group on the other side of the boat. There stood the
fair Eva, none the worse for the accident that had befallen her, and a graceful young
man stood by her, carelessly leaning one elbow on a bale of cotton, while a large
pocket-book lay open before him. It was evident that he was Eva’s father; he had
the same noble cast of head, the same blue eyes, and golden-brown hair, yet the
expression was quite different. The beautifully cut mouth was proud and rather
sarcastic, and an airoffree-and-easy importance sat lightly upon every turn and movement
of his handsome face and form.

He was listening with good-humoured careless indifference to Haley’s remarks
aS to the value of the article for which they were bargaining, and when the trader
had finished speaking said half contemptuously—“Well, my good fellow, what’s the
damage? as they say in Kentucky—How much are you going to cheat me out of?”

“Well? said Haley, “if | should say thirteen hundred dollars for that ar fellow,
I shouldn't but just save myself, raily!”

“Poor fellow! but I suppose youd let me have him for that, out of a
44 UNG EBY TO MES CABIN,

particular regard for me?’ said St. Clare fixing his keen mocking blue eye upon
the trader. : oo

“Papa, do buy him—it’s no matter what you pay--[ want him,” whispered Eva
softly, putting her arms round her father’s neck.

“What for, pussy? Are you going to make a rocking horse of him, or what?”

Here the trader gave in a certificate signed by Mr. Shelby, which the young
man took up with the tips of his long fingers, and glanced over carelessly.

“A gentlemanly hand—” he said “but I'm not sure after all about this religion—
How many hundred dollars now do you put on for that?”

“You like to be a-joking now,” said Haley —“but you see in this letter what
Ton’s old master says about him.” .

“There, count your money, old boy—” said St. Clare as he handed a roll of
notes to the trader,-who with a face beaming with joy, filled up the bill of sale.

“Tt wonder how much I might feich if | were for sale myself*—said St. Clare
as he took Eva by the hand, and walked up to Tom saying, “Look up, Tom, and see
how you like your new master.”

Tom looke@ up. It was not in nature to look at that young gay, handsome
face, without pleasure, and Tom felt the tears start into his eyes as he said heartily,
“God bless you, Mas’r.”

“T hope he will. Can you drive horses, Tom?”

“Pye been allus used to horses—Mas’r Shelby raised heaps of em,” said Tom.

“| think I shall make you coachy, on condition you won't get drunk more than
once a: week, as a rule. Tom.’
BAA SS CLARE. 45



Tom look surprised and hurt as he said—‘“I never drink, Mas’r.”

“lve heard that story before, Tom, but well see. It will be particularly
convenient to all concerned if you don’t. Never mind, my boy, Im sure you mean
to do well”

“T sartin do mas’r’—said Tom.

“And you shall have good times,” said Eva. “Papa is good to everybody, only
he -will laugh at them.”

“Papa is much obliged to you,’ said St. Clare, laughing as he walked away.
CHAPTER VIL
TOM’S NEW HOME.



\s

va’s father, Augustine St. Clare, was the son of a rich planter in Louisiana.
His mother was a French Huguenot lady, and he had only one twin brother
named Alfred. His first love had been given to a good and beautiful girl
whom he hoped to marry, but this chanceof happiness he lost, and the handsome
heiress who soon afterwards became his wife, was selfish and heartless as
only a spoilt beauty can be. Still St.Clare was always kind and indulgent to
her, and when Marie had a lovely little girl, her husband felt for a time
x real affection for her. He gave this child the name of his mother, to whom
He nad been devoted, and as Eva was very delicate, and Marie too much taken up
with her own fancied ill health to bestow care upon her child or household, St. Clare
had just returned from-a tour in the Northern State of Vermont, having invited his
cousin Ophelia St. Clare to return with him on a visit to his home in the South, where
her skill and experience as a good housekeeper and nurse were sadly needed. Miss
Ophelia was no longer young, her figure was tall and ungraceful, her movements quick
and decided; and although she did not talk much, her words were to the purpose when
she did speak. She loved her cousin Augustine dearly, and so he was able to persuade
her that the path of duty she was always trying honestly to follow, lay in the direction
of New Orleans, and that she must go with him to take care of Eva, and keep everything
from going to rack and ruin during the frequent illnesses of his wife.
TOM’S NEW HOME 47

The carriage met the St. Clare family when the boat arrived, Miss Ophelia’s
numerous packages having been safely placed in it.

“Where's Tom?” said Eva to her father as they drove him.

“He’s outside, pussy. I’m going to give Tom to mother to make up for that
drunken fellow that upset the carriage.”

The house was built in the Moorish style, it was a square building enclosing
a courtyard, entered through an arched gateway. In the middle of the court a fountain
threw high its silvery waters falling in never-ceasing spray into a marble basin, fringed
with a deep border of sweet violets. Two large orange trees, now full of blossom,
threw a delicious shade around; huge pomegranate-trees with their glossy leaves and
flame-coloured flowers; dark leaved Arabian jessamines with their silvery stars, geraniums,
rose-trees loaded with blossoms, golden jasmines and lemon scented verbenum, all gave
fragrance and beauty to the scene.

Eva was ina State of frantic delight. “Isn't it beautiful —lovely-my own
dear, darling home?’ said she to Miss Ophelia.

“It's a pretty place, though it looks rather old and heathen-ish to me,” replied
Miss Ophelia.

St. Clare smiled as he heard this remark, and turning to Tom, whose beaming
black face was radiant with admiration, he said, “Tom my boy, this seems to suit you.”

“Yes, mas’, it looks about the right thing” said Tom.

Eva had flown like a bird through the porch into a little boudoir opening on
the verandah, where a tall pale dark-eyed woman half rose from a couch on which
She was reclining.
48 UN CEE TOMES CAB LN

“Mamma”! Said Eva, embracing her again and again—

“Thatll do, child, don’t make my head ache;’ said her mother. languidly
' kissing her. oe

A crowd of servants now pressed forward, among them a mulatto woman of
very respectable appearance.

“Oh, there’s mammy”—said Eva as she flew across the room, and throwing
herself into her nurse’s arms, kissed her repeatedly.

“Well,” said Miss Ophelia to St. Clare, “Southern children can do something
I couldn't.”

“What's that?” said St. Clare.

“I wish to be kind to everybody, and ] wouldn't have anything hurt, but as to
kissing niggers!” ae

“That you’re not up to, eh?” said St. Clare with a laugh, as he went into the
passage. “Here you all, Mammy, Jemmy, Polly, Sakey, glad to see Masr?’ he said as
he went about shaking hands with one and another, and added as he stumbled over
a sooty little urchin crawling upon all fours—“Look out for the babies! If 1 step upon
anybody, let ‘em cry out!”

There was plenty of laughing and blessing Mas’r, as St..Clare distributed
small pieces of money among. them, saying,

“Come now, take yourselves off. like good boys and girls—And the whole party
disappeared through a door into a large verandah, followed by Eva, who carried a
great bag she had been filling with apples, nuts, candy, ribbons, laces, and toys of
every kind during her homeward journey.
1M Se NE We HO ME. 49










“Come here, Tom,” said
his master, and as Tom entered
the splendidly furnished boudoir,
st. Clare Said to his wife: “Here
,. Marie, I've brought you a coach-
San to order, at last. .Now
say I never think of you
en I’m away.”

Marie opened her eyes
and looked at Tom _ without
Tising, and said, “I know he'll get drunk!”

- “No, he’s warranted pious and sober.”
Fe Oe “I hope hell turn out well, but it’s
- more than | expect,” said Marie, adding when Tom was
- gone—“he'’s a perfect hippopotamus.”

“Come now Marie,” said St. Clare seating himself
by her sofa, “Say Something pretty to a fellow! here's a
present I got for yeu in New York. ” It was a photograph



“What made you sit in such an awkward way?”
¥ said Marie. “I wish you wouldn't insist on my talking and
R looking at things, I've hada bad headache all day.”
50 UN GLE 16 MES. CABIN:

“Our good useful New England cousin is come to. take some of your worries
off your hands, said St. Clare, trying to find something kind to say.

“I'm sure she’s welcome,” said Marie languidly, “I think she'll soon find out
that we mistresses are the slaves down here.” ;

“Come, Marie, that’s too bad,” said St. Clare—‘“there’s Mammy now, the best
creature, what could you do without her?”

“Mamimy’s the best I ever knew,” Said Marie, “yet she’s selfish, dreadfully
selfish, its the fault of the race.” ie

“Selfishness is a dreadful fault,” said St. Clare gravely.

“She's good in some ways, continued Marie, “but she’s always worrying about
that husband of hers—You see,” she said turning to Miss Ophelia, “when I married and
came here to live, of course | had to bring her with me, and her husband my father
could not spare. He was a blacksmith and very useful. and I thought.and said at the
time Mammy and he had beiter give each other up, as it wasn't likely to be convenient
for them to live together again.” eae

“Has she children?” asked Miss Ophelia.

"Yes; Ske ‘has wos

“T suppose she feels being away from them?”

“I couldn't have then here. They were dirty little things, and besides they
took up too much of her time, but I believe Mammy is rather sulky about this. |
feel sure, though she knows how much [ want her, and how wretched my health is,
She would go back to her husband to-morrow if she could I do indeed!”

“Its very sad,” said St. Clare, with a sarcastic cur! of his lip.
TOM’S NEW HOME. 51







“Now Mammy has always been a pet of mine” said Marie, quite unconscious
of the pain she was giving to her kind-hearted husband, «I've given her no end of
dresses, and worked sometimes whole afternoons trimming her caps when she was
going to a party. She never was whipped more than once or twice in her life, and
has her strong coffee or tea every day, with white sugar init. The fact is our servants
are spoilt. I’m always talking to St. Clare about it.”

Here St. Clare said he had to go and give some orders on the cade and
Eva soon tripped away after her father.

When she was gone ner mother added—

“Eva wants looking after in some things. She was always disposed to be
with servants, and that doesn’t matter with some children. I played with my father’s
negroes, and it never did me any harm. But Eva seems somehow to put herself on
an equality with every creature that comes near her. It’s a strange thing about the
child—She isn’t a bit like me.”

Miss Ophelia thought, “I hope she isn’t,’ on took care not to say So.

Marie was still complaining of the way in which the servants were indulged
by St. Clare, when a merry laugh rang out from the Verandah, and Miss Ophelia stepping
out saw Eva sitting perched like a bird upon Uncle Tom’s knee, hanging a wreath
of roses round his neck, after having stuck cape jessamines into all his buttonholes,
gaily laughing as she cried out, “oh Tom, you look so funny!” Her father stood near,
laughing too.

This was a happy time to Tom in many ways. Little Eva’s fancy for him,
the gratitude of a noble nature, had led her to ask her father to let Tom attend her
52 UNC IE ft OMS. € ABN.
in her walks and rides whenever she wanted him. He was well-dressed, and not hard
worked, and then too he was in a beautiful place, and did enjoy the birds, the flowers,
the fountains, the light and beauty of the court, and what seemed to him a palace
within the house.

If he could have forgotten all he had left behind him in old Kentucky, he
would have had nothing left to wish for in this world.




CHAPTER VIIL
QUAKER FRIENDS.

s=iilere was a gentle bustle at the Quaker house on the day after George's
NV meeting with his wife,as Rachael Haltiday moved quietly to and fro, putting
a together from her household stores, useful things for the wanderers who were
“to go forth that night. The afternoon was drawing to a close when George
and Eliza sat together, in the little room where they had taken shelter. He
had his boy on his knee, and held her hand in his. as he said.
‘Tl try to feel like a Christian as you say, to forget the past, and put
So" away hard and bitter feelings; read my Bible and learn to be a good man.”
“When we get to Canada I can help you,’ replied Eliza—‘“I can make dresses
very well, and wash and iron fine things; between us we can earn enough to live upon.*
“Yes, Eliza, so long aS we are together and have our boy. What a blessing
it is for a man to feel that his wife and child are his own! If they will only let me
alone now I will be happy- and thankful, though I have not a cent of money, nor a
roof to cover me, nor a spot of land to call mine!”
“But we are not in Canada yet,” said Eliza.
-At this moment voices were heard in the outer room, and soon a rap came at
the door. Eliza started and opened. it.
Simeon Halliday was there, and with him a Quaker brother, named Phineas Fletcher,
who had not the peaceful air of Simeon, but looked particularly shrewd and wide-awake.


54 UN CAE SiO ave SreC AaB Ne

“Our friend Phineas hath heard something it is important for thee to know,
_ George,’ said Simeon quietly. a

“That I have,” said Phineas, “for | stopped last ‘night at a little lone tavern
on the road, and while I was lying down on a buffalo rug till my bed was ready,
half asleep, for I was tired with hard driving, I heard some fellows drinking and
talking about the Quaker settlement’. So I listened, and found out all their little plans. ©
This young man was to be sent back to Kentucky to his master,.and his wife two of
them were going to sell in New Orleans on their own account. The child was to go
to a trader who had bought him, and the boy Jim to his master in Kentucky. They
know the road we are going to-night, and theyll be down after us, six or eight strong,
so what's to be done?”

“What shall we do, George?” said Eliza faintly.

“| know what I shall do,“ said George, examining his pistols. “I dont want to
drag anyone else into it. If you will lend me a conveyance and tell me the way, I
- will drive alone to the next stand. Jim is a strong brave fellow, and so am 1.”

“Well, friend, but theell need a driver for all that,’ answered Phineas with
a keen look—“Thee’s welcome to do all the fighting, but | oe a thing or two about
the road thee doesn’t.”

“Phineas is a wise and skilful man,” said Simeon, “Let him help thee, George.”

“All I ask is to be allowed to go out of the country in peace,’ said George,
“but Vil fight to the last breath before they shall take my wife and son. Can you
blame me?”

‘I pray I be not tried,” said Simeon. “The flesh is weak.”
OoU CA KH Ree RleE NBS. oo



“| think my flesh would be pretty strong in such a case, “said Phineas,
Stretching out a pair cof arms like the sails of a windmill. “I ain't sure, friend George,
I shouldn't hold a fellow for thee, if thee had an account to settle with him.”

“Let us pray the Lord we be not tempted,” said Simeon.

“And so I do,” es Phineas, “but if we are tempted, why—let them look
out, that’s all.”

‘It's plain thee wasn’t born a Friend? said Simeon smiling. In fact Phineas
had been a jolly backwoodsman, a famous hunter and dead shot at a buck, but having
wooed a pretty Quakeress, had for her sake joined the society in these parts.

‘It isn’t safe to start till dark,” added Phineas, “but we ought to keep ahead
of ’em then. So take courage, friend George, this isn’t the first ugly scrape I’ve been
in with thy friends.” |

And now Rachel took Eliza’s hand kindly, and led the way to the supper
table. Soon after supper a large covered waggon drew up before the door, and George
walked out of the door with his child on one arm and his wife on the other. Phineas
placed Eliza and the boy comfortably in the back of the waggon, George and Jim on
a Seat before them, mounting in front himself. The waggon rumbled on over wide
dreary plains, up hills and down valieys, hour after hour, but about three o’clock
George’s ear caught the first sound of pursuing horsemen, who fast gained on the
party. Phineas raced his horses to a sudden turn in the road, where a steep projecting
rock seemed to promise Some shelter and concealment; then suddenly checking them,
and Springing out of the waggon he cried out.
56 UPN Ca el OME Se. CAB EN.

“Out with you everyone in a twinkling, and up into the rocks with me. This
is one of our old hunting-dens.”

Phineas went first with the boy in his arms, then Jim, George and Eliza last.
A few moments’ scrambling brought them to the top of the ledge, the path was then
but a narrow pass, where only one could walk at a time, till it came to a chasm
more than a yard wide, beyond which stood a pile of steep rocks full thirty feet
high. They all leaped this chasm, and found themselves hidden by the fragments of
loose stones lying about the edge of the rock.

“Well now, here we all are, and let ‘em get us if they can. No one
can come here without walking in Single file between the rocks in fair range of your
pistols, boys, d’ye see?” said Phineas. :

The party below, now to be seen in the light of the dawning day, consisted
of Haley's friends, Tom Loker and Marks, with several rowdies hired at a low inn
to help in catching a set of niggers.

‘Now, Jim, look to your pistols and watch that pass with me | fire at the
first man, you at the second,and so on,” Said George.

“But. what if you don’t hit?”

“Tshall hit’lsaid George coolly.

After a Short pause, Tom Loker said boldly,

‘Tia going right up, for one. I never was afraid of niggers, and I ain’t going
to be now!”

One of the most courageous of the party followed Tom, and they all came
pushing up the rock. In a moment Tom’s burly form was seen, almost at the verge
QUAKER FRIENDS. 57
of the chasm. George fired—the shot entered his side, but he would not retreat,
and with a yell like that of a mad bull, he was leaping right across the chasm.

“Friend, thee isnt wanted here!” said Phineas, suddenly stepping forward,
and meeting Loker with a push from his long arms. Down he fell into the chasm,
crackling among trees, bushes, logs, loose stones, till he lay, bruised and groaning,
thirty feet below. Marks headed the retreat down the rocks with much more will
than he had shewn in going up, while all the party came tumbling hastily after him.

“I say, fellers—you jist go round and pick up Tom there, while I go back for
help,” said Marks, as he galloped away.

With much trouble the others raised Tom, and dragged him as far as the
horses. George looked over the rocks, and saw them trying to lift Tom into the saddle,
but he reeled and fell heavily to the ground. Upon this the whole party got on their
horses and rode away. When they were quite out of sight, Phineas began to bestir
himself, and soon saw friends coming up to the help of his party.

_ “Do stop and do something for that poor man before we go,” said Eliza to
Phineas, who went to the wretched man, and bound up his wounds.

“You pushed me down there,” said Tom faintly.

‘If | hadn't thee’d have pushed us down,” returned Phineas quietly, “but we bear no
malice. I'll take thee to a house where they'll nurse thee as well as thy own mother could.”

The seats were now taken out of the waggon, the buffalo skins spread on one
side, and four men lifted Tom into it. Eliza, George and Jim got in also and after
about an hour’s drive the whole party reached a neat farm-house, where the weary
travellers were welcomed to a good breakfast. Here for the present we leave them.


CHAPTER IX
SHADOWS.



ne morning when Miss Ophelia was busy in some of her domestic cares,
St. Clare called her to see a little negro girl about eight or nine years of age,
# whom he had taken a fancy to buy. She was one of the blackest of her race,
and her round glassy eyes moved with quick glances over everything in the
room. Her woolly hair, braided in little tails, stuck out in every direction,
4 = and the expression of her face was shrewd and cunning, though she put on
“4ae4” a Solemn look that was almost absurd in its gravity. She was dressed in a

“wo — dirty, ragged garment, and stood with her hands demurely folded before her.

Miss Ophelia was struck with amazement aS her cousin mischievously said.

“Topsy, this is your new mistress. I’m going to give you up to her, see now
that you behave yourself.”

“Yes mas,” said Topsy gravely, with a wicked twinkle in her eye.

“| don’t want her I’m sure,” said Miss Ophelia. “I have more of them now
than I know what to do with”

‘Ivs too bad of me, I believe,” said St. Clare, “to add to your bothers, but the
truth is this poor thing belonged to some horrid people at a shop I have to pass every
day, and I was tired of hearing her scream when they were beating and ill-using her.
She looked bright and funny too, so I bought her, and Ill give her to you to see what
you can do with her.”
SHADOWS. 59

“The first thing to
be done is to wash and
dress her decently,” re-
plied Miss Ophelia, as she

~ led her new charge away.

When at last arrayed in a

fresh suit, with her hair
cut short, Miss Ophelia sat down
and began to question her.

“How old are you, Topsy?”
‘Duno, missis, said Topsy
with a grin.

“Didn't anybody ever tell
you? Who was your mother?”
lever. had none!” said the child with another grin.—
answer in that way, child. Tell me where you
rere cnr ‘and who your father and mother were.’
ad no father, nor mother, nor nothin! Old Aunt, she used to take






Car’ 00" i
Have you ever heard of God, Topsy? Do you know who made you?”
“Nobody never made.me—I spect I growd,” said Topsy.
“You have your work in hand there, cousin, said St. Clare who had come in
during this catechism.
60 UNC Tee Om SCA BN:



Topsy Was soon a noted character in the house. Her taste for every kind of
drollery, grimace, and mimicry; for dancing, tumbling, climbing, singing, whistling,
imitating every sound that hit her fancy, seemed extraordinary; and it was soon found
out that whoever insulted Topsy was sure to meet with some disagreeable accident
soon afterwards; to lose a pair of ear-rings or other favourite trinket; stumble into
a pail of hot water. or be splashed with dirty slops when dressed to go out for a
holiday, and no one could ever be found to have caused the mischief, though everybody
felt sure it was Topsy. She soon learnt to do many things well when she chose, but
she very seldom did choose. Her greatest delight was to dress herself in Miss
Ophelia’s best clothes, and caper about before the glass.

‘I don’t know what I shall do with you, Topsy,” said that Lady one day in
despair at some of her tricks.

“Law, Missis, you must whip me—I ain't used to workin’ unless | gets
whipped.”

“Why, Topsy, I don't want to whip you. You can do very well if you like.
Why won't you?”

“Ts used to whippin’, I s’pect its good for me.”

Then Miss Ophelia tried whipping, and Topsy made a great fuss about it,

Screaming, groaning with all her might, while half an hour afterwards she would say
to some of her companions,

“Law, Miss Feely’s whippims wouldn't kill a mosquiter. Oughter see how ole
Masr did it—he know'd how!”
SHADOWS. 61

She quite prided herself on her ndughtiness, and would say,

“Law, you niggers, dees you know you's all sinners? Miss Feely says so. but
ye aint any on yeup tome. I’s so awful wicked, there can’t nobody do nuthin’ with me!”

Eva and Uncle Tom were greater friends than ever as time went on, and she
had helped him to write a letter home to his wife, telling her where he was and how
he hoped some day to see her and his children again. In due time Tom received an
answer to it from Master George saying that Aunt Chloe had been hired out to a con-
fectioner in Louisville, where she was earning large sums of money, all of which was
to be saved to buy Uncle Tom back. Mose and Pete were flourishing, and the baby
trotting all over the house. Tom was never tired of looking at this precious letter,
and talking to Eva about it.

Two years had slipped away since he had met the lovely child who had
become to him an angel upon earth, and he was now with the rest of the family
passing the hot summer at Mr. St. Clare’s beautiful villa on Lake Pontchartrain.

On one of the golden sunsets that reflect themselves on the bright waters of
the lake, Tom and Eva were seated on a little mossy seat in an arbour at the end
of the garden. It was Sunday evening, and Eva's Bible lay open on her knee. She
read in her sweet musical voice,

“And | saw a sea of glass, mingled with fire.”

“Tom—there it is! said Eva suddenly stopping and pointing to the Lake,
which reflected the golden glow of the sky.

“True enough, Miss Eva,” said Tom, singing—
62 UN CIE 2 OsveSe2C A Bolen.

“Oh, had I the wings of the morning,
Id fly away to Canaan’s shore;
Bright angels should convey me home,

To the new Jerusalem !”

“Where do you suppose New Jerusalem is, Uncle Tom?”

“Up in the clouds, Miss Eva.”

“Then I think I see it. Those clouds look like great gates of pearl, and you
can see beyond them, far, far off—it’s all gold. Tom, sing about Spirits bright.”

Tom sang the well known hymn:

“T see a band of spirits bright,
That taste the glories there;
They all are robed in spotless white,
And conquering palms they bear.”

“Uncle Tom—l’ve seen them—they come to me sometimes in my sleep—those spirits,”
said Eva.

Tom had no doubt of it at all: it would not have surprised him to hear that
Eva had been to heaven. :

“Uncle Tom-—I’m going there!”

“Where, Miss Eva?”

The child rose, and pointed her little hand to the sky. The glow of evening
lit her golden hair and flushed cheek with unearthly brightness, and her eyes were
bent earnestly on the skies.
SH AVDO Wes: . 63

‘Tm going there —to the spirits bright, Tom— I’m going before long,” she said.

The faithful cld heart felt a sudden pang; and Tom thought how often he had
noticed the last six months that Eva’s little hands had grown thinner, and how when
she ran or played in the garden, as she once could for hours, she became soon tired
and languid. Miss Ophelia had often spoken of a cough, she could not cure, and even
now that bright cheek and little hand were burning with fever, and vet the thought
that Eva’s words suggested had never come to him until now! Could it be indeed so?
The conversation between Eva and Tom was disturbed by a hasty call from Miss
Ophelia to come in quickly, as the dew was falling. She had noted the slight dry
cough, flushed cheek and glittering eye, and had tried to call St. Clare’s attention to
them, but he would not listen to her fears, or rather watched Eva secretly with jealous
affection, with sudden thrills of dread at his heart, lest his darling should indeed be
growing too good for this world; and then he felt a wild determination to keep her—
never to let her go.

One day when Eva was alone with her mother, she opened a drawer, and
taking from it a jewel-case, shewed the child its contents saying—

“These are the diamonds Im going to give you when you come out. | wore
them at my first ball.”

Eva took out a diamond necklace, and as her large thoughtful eyes rested on
it she said,

“Are these worth much money, Mamma?’

“Of course they are; Father sent to France for them They are worth a
small fortune.”
64 UNG EB ONES GAB IN:

“IT wish I had them to do what I pleased with!”

“What would you do with them?”

“ld sell them, and buy a place in the free states, to take all our people to,
and hire teachers to teach them to read and write.”

“Much good that would do them,’ said Marie laughing.

“I think they ought to be able to read the Bible and learn God’s will,” said
Eva steadily, “and to write their own letters, and read letters that are written to them.
I know, Mamma, it doeS come very hard on them that they can’t do these things. Tom
feels it, Mammy does, many do. I think its wrong.”

“Come, come, Eva—you are only a child—you know nothing of these things,”
said her mother—‘“besides you make my head ache.”

Eva stole quietly away, but she gave Mammy reading lessons whenever she could.

oo
CHAPTER X.
Hee WAR NOUN. G.

bout this time St. Clare’s brother Alfred, with his son Henrique,a boy of twelve,
spent two or three days with the family at the lake. The twin brothers
were most unlike in all respects, and yet had uncommon love for each other.
Henrique was a fine dark-eyed boy, full of spirit, and of admiration for
his cousin Eva. Her little pet white pony was brought up to the verandah
by Tom, while a mulatto boy led Henrique’s small black Arab horse. As he
came forward to take the reins from his little groom, he cried out angrily,
“Why, Dodo, you lazy dog, you haven't rubbed my horse down this morning.”
“Yes, Mas’'r, he got that dust on his own self,” said Dodo, meekly.
“You rascal, how dare you speak?” said Henrique violently, raising his riding-
whip. The boy was a handsome fellow of just Henrique’s size, and his cheek flushed
and his eye sparkled as he tried to speak a word or two. Henrique struck him across
the face with his whip, and forcing him on his knees, beat him till he was out of breath.

“Take that for vour impudence, and take the horse back, and clean him
properly,” said Henrique, walking away to meet Eva, who stood in her riding-dress near.

“Dear Eva, I am sorry this stupid fellow has kept you waiting. Let us sit
down on this seat till he comes back. What’s the matter, Cousin?”

“How could you be so cruel and wicked to poor Dodo?” asked Eva.


66 ENCE OM: Ss. CA Ba N:

“Dear Eva—you dont know Dodo—he’s full of lies and excuses. The only
way is to put him down at once. That’s how Papa manages.”

“But you beat him, and he didnt deserve it,” said Eva sadly.

‘It may do for some time when he does, and doesn’t get it—but | won’t beat
him again before you, Eva, if it vexes you.” Eva did not feel satisfied yet.

Dodo soon appeared with the horses.

“Well, Dodo—this seems better,” said Henrique more graciously, come and
hold Miss Eva’s horse while I put her on it.”

As Dou was giving up the reins, Eva bent down towards him, and said,

“That's a good boy, Dodo, thank you.”

Dodo looked up surprised into the sweet young face, and as the children
cantered away, he watched them with teirs in his eyes, for Eva’s kind words had
touched his heart with a new pleasure.

As the cousins returned from their ride the St. Clare brothers met them, and
Alfred was struck with the brilliant complexion and golden hair of his little niece.

“What a perfect beauty she is—she will make many hearts ache some day,”
he said to Augustine.

“Indeed I fear so,” said her father bitterly, and he hurried io take her off
her horse, saying as he clasped her in his arms,

“How could you ride so fast, dear? you know it’s bad for you.”

“I felt so well, papa, and liked it so much, | forgot.” St. Clare carried her
into the house, and laid her on a Sofa.
THE WARNING 67



“Til take her under my care,” said Henrique, seating himself by the sofa and
taking her hand. As soon as the children were alone he said:

“Do you know, Eva, I'm so sorry we're going away in two days, and then |
shan’t See you again for ever so long! If I stayed. with you I'd try to be good, and
not cross to Dodo and so on. You see I've got such a quick temper, but ['m not really
bad to him. J think on the whole Dodo’s pretty well off!

“Would you think you were well off, if there were no one in the world to
love you?’ i

‘I? of course not. But I can’t help it. I can’t love him myself, can |?”

“Why can’t you?” said Eva.

“Why, Eva—you don’t love your servants, do you?”

‘I do, indeed. Doesn’t the Bible say we should love everybody?”

‘TI suppose the Bible does say such things, but then nobody ever thinks of
doing them, Eva, nobody does!’

Eva did not speak at once, but when she did, she said earnestly,

“Do love poor Dodo, and be kind to him for my sake, dear Cousin!”

“I could love anything for your sake, dear Eva,” replied Henrique warmly, and
then the dinner bell put an end to the conversation.

Two days after this the brothers parted, and Eva, who had exerted herself
beyond her strength during her cousin’s visit, began to fail rapidly, and at last a doctor
was sent for. In a week or two she was again better, and her father declared thai
she would soon be as well as ever. Miss Ophelia and the doctor alone were not
deceived, and Eva herself felt a strange certainty that her earthly time was short.
68 U NEC EEE OMS CuBr:

One day her father called her to him to show her a statuette he had bought
for her, and as she came forward in her white dress, with golden hair and glowing
cheeks, he could hardly bear to look upon her fragile beauty, and taking her suddenly
in her arms, exclaimed,

“Eva, darling, you are better now, are you not?”

«Papa, Said Eva firmly, “] have something 1 want to say to you now.” St. Clare
trembled aS she seated herself on his lap. She laid her head on his bosom, and said:

“IT cannot keep it to myself any longer—I am going to leave you soon, Papa,
never to come back.” And Eva sobbed.

“What can have put such sad thoughts into your little head, dear child?” said
her father trying to speak cheerfully.

“IT am not sad about going away, Papa, only because I don’t want to leave you
and all my friends—it almost breaks my heart. There are things here that seem
dreadful to me.”

“What things, Eva?”

“I feel sad for our poor people—they all love me and I wish, Papa, they were
all free!”

“Why, Eva, dont you think they are well off now?”

“But, Papa, if anything should happen to you, what would become of them?
Everybody isn’t like you, Papa. Uncle Alfred isn’t, and Mamma isn't. Papa, isn’t there
any way to have all slaves made free?”

‘Its a difficult question, darling. I heartily wish there were not a slave in
the land, but I don't know what can be done.”
THE WARNING. 69

“You are such a good man
Papa, so noble and kind, you might find
some way. When I am dead you will
think of me, and do it for my sake. I
would do it if I could.”

“When you are dead, Eva? Don’t
talk to me like that! You are all I have
on earth.”

«But think, Papa—these poor people
love their children as much as you do me—
poor Mammy—and Tom—and all of them.”
“There, darling, only don’t talk of dying,
and I will do anything you wish.”
e, dear, dear Papa—that Tom shall have his freedom as soon





as—I am gone!”

“Yes—dear—! will do anything in the world you ask me to do.”

“Dear Papa,’ said the child, laying her burning cheek against his. “I wish
we could go together to our home with God. Don’t you want to go, Papa?”

St. Clare drew her closer to him, but was silent.

“You will come to me?’ said Eva again.

‘| shall come after you—I shall not forget you,” said her father.

The shadows of evening closed round them as St. Clare. sat silently rocking
the little frail form in his arms until she fell asleep.
10: UNG LE TOMS CABAEN.



A day. or two afterwards, Topsy was in disgrace with Miss Ophelia, and Eva
followed her into a little glass room near the verandah, where St. Clare heard and
saw the children without being himself seen.

They were both sitting on the floor and Eva began

‘Why won't you try and be good, Topsy? Don't you love anybody?”

“Dunno nothin’ "bout love—-I loves candy, and sich, that's all. Never had
nothin nor nobody,” said Topsy.

“But Topsy if youd try to be good, you might,”—

“There can't nobody love niggers, niggers can’t do nothin! I don’t care!” said
Topsy, beginning to whistle.

“Oh, Topsy, I love you--because you haven't any father or mother or friends—
and I want you to try and be good. I’m very ill, Topsy, and very likely I mayn’'t live
much longer.”

The sharp bright eyes of the black child filled with tears, as a ray of
heavenly love for the first time pierced the darkness of her heathen soul. She wept
and sobbed. while the beautiful child bending over her looked like a bright angel.

“Poor Topsy!” said Eva. “God loves you, and can help you to be good and go
to heaven, just aS much as if you were white.”

“Oh, dear Miss Eva—I will try! I will try! I never cared nothin’ about
it before.”

And Topsy kept her word.

%
CHAPTER XL
etek EaNe



Everything in Eva’s room was tasteful and beautiful, for her father’s loving
care had chosen the prettiest ornaments and fittings for the use of his darling.
% The bamboo furniture, with rose-coloured curtains and hangings, was of
» . light and fanciful design, and exquisite white figures; statuettes and pictures
ii were placed on every side, images of childhood, beauty and peace.
HO The deceitful strength that had buoyed Eva up for a little while
“G4S was fast passing away; seldom and more seldom her light step was heard
' in the verandah, and oftener she was found lying un a little lounge by the
open window, her large deep eyes fixed on the waters of the lake. It was Tom’s
greatest delight to carry her slight form now up and down her room, now out into
the verandah, and sometimes he would walk with her under the orange-trees in the
garden, or sitting down in one of their old seats, sing to her the favourite old hymns.

One afternoon Eva had been unusually bright and cheerful, had sat up in her
bed, looked over all her little trinkets and precious things, and named those to whom
she would have them given. Her father had been with her in the evening, and said
that Eva was more like her old self than she had been since her illness, and when
he kissed her for the night, he said to Miss Ophelia,

“We may keep her with us after all,” and retired with a ae heart than
he had had for weeks before.




(ee WN Go 0 MES eC ASBSION:

But at midnight the mysterious message came.

Miss Ophelia saw a sudden change in her loved patient, and in a moment
St. Clare was bending over his child, who was still asleep. What was it he saw in her
face that made his heart stand still? It was the dawning of immortal life-in that
childish soul! St. Clare heard and said nothing—he saw only that look on the face of
the little sleeper.

“If she would but wake and Speak once more!” he said, and stooping over her,
spoke in her ear, “Eva darling!’ The large blue eyes opened, a smile passed over her
face. She tried to raise her head and to speak.

“Do you know me, Eva?’

“Dear Papa!” said the child with a last effort, throwing her arms about his
neck. In a moment they dropped again, she struggled for breath, and threw up her
little hands.

Tom had taken his master’s hands between his own, and with tears streaming
down his dark cheeks, looked up for help—where he had always been used to look.

“Oh—bless the Lord! Its over, dear mas’r—look at her? said Tom, as Eva
opened her eyes once more.

“Eva!” said St. Clare gently. ‘Tell us what you see!”

A bright, a glorious smile passed over her face, she said brokenly—

“Love—joy—peace!” gave one sigh, and passed from death into life!

There lay the little sleeping form, robed in a simple white dress; the rose-
coloured light througi the curtains cast a warm glow over the icy coldness of death;
THE END. 8

but upon the bright happy face rested the blessed expression of the long holy sleep
which “He giveth to His beloved.”

St. Clare stood long gazing there, and Saw aS in a dream how flowers were
lovingly placed around his lost child. The door opened again, and Topsy SDE ee
her eyes swollen with crying, holding something under her apron.

“You must not come in,” Said the maid who was arranging the flowers.

“Do let me put just one, there—such a pretty one,” said Topsy, holding up a
half -blown tea-rosebud.

“Let her stay—she shall come,” said St. Clare suddenly. Topsy came forward
and laid her flower at Evas feet, and then with a wild and bitter cry threw herself
down by the bed, and wept and moaned aloud.

“O, Miss Eva! I wish I’s dead too, I do!”

At this cry the blood flushed into St. Clare’s white marble-like face, and the
first tears he had shed since Eva died, stood in his eyes.

“She said she loved me, she did!” said Topsy, “Oh dear! there ain’t nobody
left now—there ain't!”

Miss Ophelia raised her gently, and took her from the room, but as she did
So some tears fell from her eyes, and as she led her away she said,

“Topsy, you poor child, don’t give up. I can love you though I’m not like
that dear child. I can love you--I do; and I'll try to help you to grow up a good
Christian girl.”

Miss Ophelia’s voice and honest tears said even more than her words, and
from that hour she gained an influence over poor Topsy that she never lost.
74 UNCEE COM: Ss CAB EN



“Oh, my Eva, whose little hour on earth did so much good, what account have
I to give for my long years?” thought St. Clare.

There, by the mossy seat where Eva and Tom had talked and sung and read
so often, was the little grave. Tom hada feeling that drew him to his master, wherever
he went, wistful, sad, and as in a dream, or when he sat pale and quiet in Eva’s
room, holding before his eves her little open Bible, though seeing no letter nor word
that was in it.

In a few days the St. Clare family were back again in New Orleans, restlessly
longing for change of scene in their grief.
CHAPTER A&I.

RE-UNION.

eek after week glided away in the St. Clare home, and the waves of life
settied back to their usual flow where that little bark had gone down.
All the interests and hopes of St. Clare’s life had unconsciously wound
themselves around his child, and now that she was gone there seemed
nothing to be thought of, and nothing to be done. Still St. Clare was in
some ways a better man than he had been. He honestly read his little
Eva’s Bible, and thought more of his duties to his servants; and soon after
his return to New Orleans took steps to free Tom by law. Meanwhile he became
more attached to the honest faithful fellow every day, and in the wide world there
was nothing that seemed to remind him so much of Eva. The day after he had begun
to free Tom St. Clare said to him,

‘’m going to make a free man of you, so have your trunk packed to set out
for Kentucky.” He was rather annoyed when Tom’s face became suddenly lighted
up with joy, and he fervently exclaimed,

“Bless the Lord!”

“You needn't be quite so delighted to leave me, Tom. Ive not been a bad
master to you.”


76 UNG E Et OMS 70 AEB UN,

Masr’s been too good, | know” said Tom, “but it’s bein’ a free man —That’s
what I’m joyin’ for!”

“| suppose, Tom, youll be leaving me then in a month or two,” said St. Clare, sadly,

“Not while Mas’r’s in trouble,” said Tom.

«And when will my trouble be over?” said St. Clare, with another sigh, “No,
Tom, | can’t keep you till then.”

At this moment Miss Ophelia called her cousin away, and sitting down by
him said seriously,

“| want you to give me Topsy for my own, aS you said you would, that
[ may have a right to free her when I like. Why not give me the deed of gift at once?”

“Why—do you think I'm going to die?” said St. Clare gaily, as he sat down
and wrote the paper.

“We know not what shall be on the morrow,” said Miss Ophelia gravely, as
she took the paper, Saying, “Now I can protect her whatever happens.”

In the evening St. Clare began to play and sing the touching “Dies Irce” from
Mozart's Requiem, telling his cousin it brought back to him his mother’s vcice, and
the time- when he had first learnt it from her. Then walking restlessly up and down
he said half to himself, ;

“Dear little Eva! she had set her heart on a good work for me!”

Presently he said to Miss Ophelia,

“I don’t know what makes me think of my mother so much to night. I feel
as if she were near me, and keep thinking of things she used to say. I’m going to
the Club for half an hour to hear the news.”
RE-UNION. 17

That night he was brought home fatally stabbed in the side by a man whom
he had tried to disarm in a sudden quarrel between two gentlemen that had taken
place in the Club. The doctor who examined him said that there was no hope of
saving his life, and he recovered consciousness for the last time only to.see the terror
and misery of the poor dependents around him, about to lose their only friend.

He laid his hand on Tom’s as he knelt beside him, saying,

“Tom—poor fellow—pray for me!’

And Tom did pray with all his heart and mind for the soul that was passing,
that looked so steadily and sadly from those large, mournful blue eyes. St. Clare
murmured softly to himself the words of the requiem hymn he had sung that evening.

“His mind is wandering,’ said the doctor.

“No—it is coming home at last!” said St. Clare.

The paleness of death fell on him, and with it a happy expression of peace,
like that of a wearied child who sleeps. Just before the spirit departed he opened
his eyes with a sudden light, as of joy—said “Mother!” and then he was gone!

He had been struck down in a moment, in the flower and strength of his
youth, and the house re—echoed with sobs and shrieks of despair, from those who

well knew the unfeeling character of the mistress in whose hands they were left.
Tom hardly thought of himself as he felt hope and peace on his master’s account,
but before many days had passed he heard that Marie had decided to sell the place,
and all the servants upon it except her own, and return with them to her father’s
plantation. The hope of liberty, the thought of wife and children, rose up before his
78 UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.

soul; he choked back the bitter tears, and tried to pray, but the more he said “Thy
will be done,” the worse he felt.

He went to Miss Ophelia, who ever since Eva's death had treated him with
marked kindness, and said:

“Miss Feely—Mas’r St. Clare promised me my freedom. He told me he had
begun to take it out for me, and perhaps if Miss Feely would be good enough to
speak to Missis, she would go on with it, as it was Mas’r’s wish.”

‘Tl speak for you, Tom, and do my best,” said Miss Ophelia, who was preparing
to return north—‘“but if it depends upon Mrs. St. Clare I can’t hope much for you.”

She found Marie lying. upon a sofa, busy in choosing some thin black stuffs
for dresses, and turning to Miss Ophelia she said,

“[haven't a dress to wear, and as I’m going away next week, I must choose something.”

“Are you going So soon?’

“Yes, St. Clare’s brother has written, and he thinks the’ servants and furniture
had better be sold at once.”

“There’s one thing I wanted to speak to you about. Augustine promised Tom
his liberty, and began to have the papers drawn up. I hope you'll do all you can to
carry it out.”

“Indeed I shall do no such thing,” said Marie sharply, “Tom is one of the
most valuable servants on the place—it couldn’t be afforded in any way. Besides
he’s a great deal better off as he is!”

“He wants it so much, and it was a promise,” said Miss Ophelia.

“T dare say he does want it—they’re all a discontented set always wanting


See Page 81

Sale of Emmeline
RE-UNION. 79
What they haven't got. Keep a negro under and he does well enough, but set them
free, and they get lazy and turn out mean worthless fellows. It’s no favour to free them.”

“But Tom is so steady and good.”

“You needn't tell me! Ive seen hundreds like him. He'll do very well as
long. as ‘he’s taken care of.”

“But consider the chance of his getting a bad master,” said Miss Ophelia again

“Oh, most masters are good, for all the talk that’s made. I’ve lived and
- grown up in the south, and I never yet knew a master that didn’t treat his servants
quite as well as is worth while. I don’t feel afraid of that!” replied Marie.

“Well,” said Miss Ophelia desperately, “I know it was one of your husband’s
last wishes that Tom should have his freedom; it was one of the promises he made
to dear little Eva on her death-bed, and I shouldn’t think you would set it aside.”

Marie covered her face with her handkerchief, and sobbing violently, exclaimed,

“Everybody is so inconsiderate! I should n’t have expected you would remind
me of all my troubles! It was hard when I had only one daughter she should have
been taken! And when I had a husband that exactly suited me, he should be taken!
I suppose you mean well, but it’s inconsiderate—very!”

And Marie sobbed and gasped for breath, and called for Mammy to open the
window and bathe her head, and in the confusion Miss Ophelia made her escape.

She did the next best thing she could for Tom, by writing a letter for him
to Mrs. Shelby, telling her his troubles, and begging her to help him.

The next day Tom and some half dozen other servants were marched down to
the slave warehouse to be sold by auction.


CHAPTER Xill.
THE SLAVE MARKET.




Emong the number of men, women and children, awaiting their fate with Tom
and the other servants of the St. Clare family, he could not help noticing
4 one quiet, gentle looking mulatto woman, about fifty, neatly and carefully
dressed with a high red turban on her head. By her side was her young
daughter, of fifteen, with soft dark eyes, and curling light brown hair. Both
were crying, but each quietly, that the other might not hear.

“Mother, do try if you can’t sleep a little,” said the girl.

“I can’t sleep, Em, it’s the last night we may be together.”
“Perhaps we shall get sold together, Mother—who knows?”
“May be—but I'm so afeard of losin’ you, I see nothin’ but the danger,” said
the poor mother.

“The man said we should both sell well,” said poor Emmeline, simply, and
after a moment's pause her mother replied,

“Emmeline, if we shouldn't ever see each other again after to morrow, always
remember how you've been brought up, and all Missis told you. Take your Bible and
hymn book with you, and if youre faithful to the Lord, He'll be faithful to you”

In the morning, Mr. Skeggs, the auctioneer, called his goods together, and
marched them off to the public saleroom, where under a splendid dome were men of
all nations moving about the marble pavement, buyers and sellers of human souls!
Te 3S 7A VE MeAG RoR el: 81

Tom had been wistfully looking in the faces of those about him for one he
would wish to call master, but he saw no St. Clare there. Just before the sale began
a short, broad, strong man, shabbily dressed, elbowed his way through the crowd, like
one who means business. From the moment Tom saw him come near the group where
he was, he felt a strange horror of him. He had a round bullet head, large green-grey
eyeS, with shaggy sandy eyebrows, and stiff wiry hair; a large coarse mouth, and
enormous dirty hands and nails. He seized Tom by the jaw, and opened his mouth to
look at his teeth, made him put up his sleeve to show his muscle, and made him spring
and jump to see his paces. Again Legree stopped before Emmeline, took hold of her
with his heavy dirty hand, examined her roughly, and then pushed her back against
her mother. And then the sale began. Tom was one of the first to be put up and
sold, befure he knew where he was. Emmeline’s mother was next bought by a respectable,
kind looking old gentleman, whom she asked to take her daughter too.

‘ld like to, but I'm afraid I can't afford it,’ said her new master, watching
with painful interest as the young girl mounted the block, and looked around her with
a frightened and timid glance. Her flushed cheeks and the feverish fire of her eyes
made her even more beautiful than before, her price rose beyond the means of more
friendly bidders, and she fell to the lot of the hideous bullet-headed stranger, Simon
Legree, owner of a cotton plantation on the Red River, who had already secured Tom.
She is carried away in the same lot with him and two other other men, and goes off,
weeping aS she goes. .

On the lower part of a small mean boat on the Red River, Tom sat with
chains on his wrists and feet. and a weight heavier than chains on his heart. AJl had
82 DING LE EOS CAB EN:

‘faded away from him to return no more— Kentucky home with wife and children, and
kind friends; St. Clare home with its beauty and refinement—the angelic golden-headed
Eva, and the proud, gay, careless yet ever-kind St. Clare—all gone! Legree walked up
to Tom, and taking away his trunk with all its contents, disposed of them to men on
board the boat, and saumntering up again said roughly,

“Now, Tom, we've got rid of your extra baggage, so itll be long enough before
you get more clothes—I go in for making niggers careful—one suit has to do for one
year on my place. “Now,” added Legree, doubling his great heavy fist, “d’ye see this
fist? [ never see the nigger yet I couldn't bring down with one crack, so now, mind
yourselves, for | don’t shew no mercy.”

The boat moved on, up the red muddy current through the windings of the
Red River, and sad eyes gazed wearily on the steep red clay banks, as they glided by
in dreary Sameness. At last the boat stopped at a small town, and Legree with his
party, disembarked.

Pe
CHAPTER AIV.
DeATR KE ACG ES:



,oiling wearily behind a rude waggon, over a ruder road, Tom and his
companions marched onward. In the waggon sat Simon Legree, and Emmeline
and another woman, chained together, were stowed away in the back part
of it. Legree’s plantation at length came in view. It had once belonged
to a rich man of taste. who had laid out the grounds well, but tke place
now had a ragged forlorn appearance, and what had formerly been a large

© fruitful garden, was now all overgrown with weeds. The waggon rolled
“<2 up a neglected gravel path, under a fine avenue of China-trees to the house,
built in the southern style with a wide verandah of two storeys running round it.
Three or four fierce-looking dogs came tearing out, trying to lay hold of Tom and
his companions.

“Ye see what ye’d get if ye tried to run off,” said Legree, patting the dogs
with grim pleasure. “These yer dogs has been raised to track niggers, and they'd
jest aS soon chaw one of ye up as eat their supper! so mind. Well, Sambo, how is
things going on?”

‘First-rate, Mas’r,” said Sambo, a fanea fellow.

“Quimbo, yer minded what I tell’d yer?” said Legree to another of his crew.

“Guess I did,” said Quimbo, shewing his large white teeth.
84 UN CEE al OMS ct AS BAN:

These two coloured men were the chief hands on the plantation, and Legree
had trained them to help him in all his cruel deeds.

Tom soon followed Sambo to “the quarters,” a sort of street of rude huts in
a row, far off from the house. Tom’s heart sank when he saw them, for he hoped
for the comfort of a little place to himself where he might be quiet and alone out
of working hours. They were mere shells of cottages, without any kind of furniture,
only a heap of dirty straw on the bare ground!

“Dunno whar to put ye,” said Sambo, “there’s a pretty smart heap of niggers
to each just now—it’s a busy time!”

It was late in the evening when the weary toilers came flocking home. and
then there was a scramble at the hand-mills, where their handful of hard corn was
yet to be ground to fit it for the cake that was their only supper. To a late hour
of the night the grinding went on, for the mills were few, and the tired and feeble
ones were driven back by the strong. Tom waited patiently te get a place at the
mills, and moved by the utter weakness of two women, who were trying to grind
their corn, he ground for them, put together the fire where many had baked cakes
before him, and then set to work to get his own Supper. It was but a small work
of charity, yet it touched their hearts, and a look of womanly kindness came over
their hard faces. They mixed his cake for him and baked it; and Tom sat down
by the light of the fire and took out his Bible, for he had need of CUO

“What's that?” said one of the women.

“A Bible,” replied Tom.

“Hain't seen one Since I was in Rentuen?
DARKE LAGE s. 85

“Was you raised in Kentuck?” said Tom with interest. ;

“Yes, well raised too—never ‘spected to come to dis yer. Read a piece
anyways,” Said the woman, curiously.

Tom read: “Come unto Me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden—and I will
give you rest.”

When the women had gone to their wretched cabins to seek forgetfulness of
their misery in Sleep, Tom rose, disconsolate, and stumbled into the hut allotted to
him, where laying himself down on the crowded floor, he fell asleep, and in his
dreams was visited by the Sweet ministering angel who had loved and comforted
him when on earth. se

Legree soon found out Tom’s value, as a good and honest worker in all that
he did, still he hated him for the goodness that made him stand by the weak and
helpless. A few weeks after Tom’s arrival on the place he noticed among the workers
one morning a handsome woman whom he had never seen before. She was evidently
a lady in manner and appearance, and aS she walked by Tom’s side, proud and
erect, he wondered why she came to work like this,and marked that she picked her
cotton very fast and clean. There was a poor mulatto woman named Lucy, who was very
weak and ill that day, and as Tom passed near her, he silently put a few handfuls
of his own cotton into her sack.

“Oh don’t! itll get you into trouble,” said Lucy, surprised. “I canb’ar it better’n
you,” returned Tom, going away. ;

Suddenly the strange woman came near enough to hear Tom’s words, took a
quantity of cotton from her own basket, and put it into his, saying as she did so.
86 UNCUE Tews c CRIN.

“You know nothing about this place, or you wouldn't have done that.” She
then went on with her work, and before the day was over, her basket was filled to
overflowing, and she had several times put largely into Tom’s. When Legree was going -
to weigh the baskets that evening Sambo said to his master spitefully,

“Dat ar Lucy’s short weight again, Tom and Missie Cassy filled up her
basket though.”

“Wall then—Tom shall have the pleasure of flogging her—Itll be good practice
for him, eh?’ said Legree, savagely.

“When Lucy gave in her basket, Legree, pees to find it short weight
said angrily,

“What, short again, you lazy-bones. Stand aside, yell catch it pretty soon.”
The woman gave a groan and sat down on a board. “Now come here, you, Tom,” said
Legree. “You see I didn’t buy ye jest for the common work. I mean to make a driver
of ye, and yer may aS well begin to get yer hand in You jest take this yer gal and
flog her-—-ye’ve seen enough of it to know how.”

‘I beg masr’s pardon,’ said Tom, ‘Its what I ain't used to—never did—and
cant do--no way possible.”

“Yell learn things ye never did know before I’ve done with you,” said Legree,
striking Tom a heavy blow across the cheek.

“There, now cant ye do it?’ said he furiously.

“No, Mas’r,” said Tom wiping away the blood from his face. “I’m willin’ to
work night and day, but this yer thing I cant feel it right to do, and [ never will,
MasT, never.”
Dea RK Pe ANC ES: 87



Legree saw a quiet
determination in Tom’s
words that roused his wicked
spirit to fury, and kicking
him violently yelled out,
“You dare to tell
me what's right or wrong?
Ain't | your Masr? Didn't
I pay down twelve hundred
dollars for your old black shell?
“Ain't yer mine now, body and soul?”
In all his pain this question
roused Tom’s better spirit, and he
called out,
“No, no—my soul ain't your's masr—Ye haven't bought it, ye can’t buy it! It’s
been bought and paid for by One that’s able to keep it!”
“We'll see,” said Legree. “Here, Sambo, Quimbo, give this dog a breakin’ in he
wont get over this month.”

It was late at night when Tom lay groaning and bleeding alone, in an old
room of the cotton mill, among broken machinery, and other rubbish heaped up there.
The thick air swarmed with mosquitos, which added to the torture of his wounds, while
he suffered agony from *hirst.


88 UNCLE TOMS -€ ABE N.

“Good Lord—Do look down—give me the victory! prayed poor Tom in
his anguish.

Some one entered the room, and he saw the flash of a lantern.

“Who's there? Please give me some water,’ said Tom faintly. The woman
Cassy, for it was she, set down her lantern, and pouring water from a bottle, raised
his head and gave him some.

“Drink all you want, I knew how it would be. It isn't the first time I’ve been
out in the night, carryin’ water to such as you,” said Cassy.

“Thank you, Missis,” said Tom when he had done drinking.

“Don't call me Missis—I’m a miserable slave like yourself,’ she said bitterly,
and then dragging in a small mattress, on which she had spread wet linen clothes
she added—‘“Try to roll yourself on tho this.”

Stiff with wounds and bruises Tom was sume time in doing this, but it
seemed to relieve him a little.

“Now thats the best I can do for you,” said Cassy, when she had raised his
head on a roll of damaged cotton for a pillow. There was silence for awhile, and
then Tom said feebly, .

“IT saw ‘em throw my coat in that ‘ar corner, my Bible is in the pocket—if
Missis would please get it for me.’ Cassy went and fetched it, and Tom opening it
at once at a deeply marked passage of the last scene in our Saviour’s life, said

“If Missis would only be so good as to read that ‘ar—it’s better than water.”

Cassy took the book and read aloud in a soft voice that touching story of
DAR Ker UAC ES: 89

suffering and glory. When she came to the words, “Father, forgive them, for they
know not what they do”’she threw down the book and burying her face in the heavy
- masses of her hair, sobbed passionately. In a few moments she rose and said,

“Can I do aye more for you, my poor fellow? Shall I give you some
more water?”

Tom drank the water and looked. earnestly and pitifully into her face, but
before he could speak she said kindly,

“Non’t talk—try to sleep if you can,’ and placing water within his reach,
Cassy left the shed.

In the morning, Legree, who began half te regret the loss of one of his best
hands for some days in the press of the cotton-picking season, came early to see if
his victim was inclined to give in yet.

“How d’ye feel, my boy, eh?” said he sneeringly, “have you had enough yet,
or would ye be glad to do what | tell you now?”

“Mas’r Legree, | can’t do it—I never will do a cruei thing, come what may,’
said Tom boldly. :

- “Yes—but ye dont Know what may come. What ye’ve got ain't nothing—
nothing ’tall!”

“Mas, | know ye can do drefful fines ue after you've killed the body,
there ain't no more ye can do!” said Tom, adding with more spirit as he went on,
‘Tl give ye, as iy Mas’r, all the work of my hands, all my time, all my strength,
90 UNCEE TOMS CAB EN:

but my soul, I won't give up to mortal man. Mas Legree, I[ ain't afeard to die—ye
may whip me, starve me, burn me, it'll only send me sooner where I want to go!”
‘lll make ye give out before I've done,” said Legree savagely—“hark ye—I
won't deal with ye now, because [m busy and want all my hands, but I never forget.
I'll pay yer out some day—see if I don't,” anil with that he went out of the shed.
CHAPTER XV.
THE VICTORY.



a is easier to die in a moment of excitement for what we know to be right,
ae than to drag on a weary life of pain and suffering, which Seems io have
HS no end, and so poor Tom found it for some time after he had been so
cruelly hurt by Legree. Long before his wounds were healed he had been
forced to work beyond his strength, until day after day, he came to his
wretched shelter exhausted and worn out in body and mind.

Sometimes he felt inclined to believe that God had indeed forgotten

LD and forsaken him, so dark appeared all around him; and then some blessed
vision of the brighter world to come would give him fresh courage to bear the sad
troubles that surrounded him on every side.

A few months passed slowly and drearily away, and then it was known one
day that Cassy and Emmeline were both missing. They had in fact hidden themselves
in a garret of the house that Legree was afraid to enter, on account of horrid noises
that he said he had heard there, for like all wicked people he often fancied evil spirits
were trying to get hold of him. The supposed escape of Cassy and Emmeline roused
the surly temper of Legree to fury, and his rage fell upon the defenceless head of
Tom. When Legree first told the news to his hands he noticed a sudden light in
Tom's eye, and that he took no part in the pursuit; and when he came back without finding
the fugitives,his bitter hatred of his slave arose once more stronger than ever in his mind.
92 WN eel OMS i CrAr BIEN,

“Now Quimbo,’ said he to that worthy, «you just go and walk that Tom up here

right away. He shall say what he knows about these yer gals, or [11 know the reason why.”

Tom heard the message with a foreboding heart, for he knew all the plan of

the fugitives’ escape, and where they were hidden. As he passed along the plantation,
the scene of his labours and sorrows, he felt as if the end was indeed near.

Legree walked up to him and seized him roughly by the collar of the coat
as he hissed out between his teeth,

“Well, Tom, do you know I've made up my mind to &:ll you, unless ye say
what ye know of these yer gals!”

‘T ain't got nothin’ to tell, Mas’r,” said Tom firmly.

“Do ye dare to tell me, yeold black Christian, ye don't know?” said Legree fiercely.

“T know, Mas, but I can't tell anything. I ean die.”

Legree Said in a terrible voice, taking Tom by the arm with a grip of iron—

“Ye think ‘cause | let ye off before, I don’t mean what! say, but I do. Youve
always stood out agin me—now J’Ul conquer you or kill you, one or tother!”

Tom looked up to Legree and answered—

“Mas'r, if you was sick, or in trouble, or dyin’, and I could save you, I'd give
you my hearts blood—as the Lord gave his for me, but oh, Mas’r—don’t bring this sin
on your soul—it will hurt you more than it will me! Do the worst you can, my troubles
~ will soon be over— but if you don’t repent yours won't never end!”

There was but a moment’s pause, and then Legree foaming with rage, smote
his victim to the ground.

* Ht &
PoE Vee PO RLY: 93

Was he alone that long night, whose brave loving spirit was bearing up, in
that old shed, against blows and brutal stripes? Nay—there stood by him One, seen
by him alone, “like unto the Son of God.”

“He’s most gone, Mas'r,” said Sambo, touched, hard as he was, by the paniente
of his victim.

“Pay him out—Give it him—ITll take every drop of blood he has if he dont
confess,” shouted Legree.

Tom opened his eyes and looked upon his master,

“Ye poor miserable critter! I forgive ye with all my soul,’ and he fainted away.

“‘t believe he’s done for—Yes—he is—well, his mouth’s shut at last—that’s one
comfort, said Legree.

Yet Tom was not quite gone. The wretched blacks who had been the tools
of a brutai master, tried to bring him back to life, when Legree had gone away. They
washed his wounds, and made a rude bed of old cotton for him to lie on, and one of
them begged a drink of brandy from Legree as if for himself, which they poured down
Tom's throat.

“Oh, Tom—we’s been awful wicked to ye,” said Quimbo.

“I forgive ye with all my heart,” said Tom faintly.

“Do tell us who Jesus is, anyhow—Jesus—that’s been standin’ by you so all
this night; said Sambo.

The word roused the failing spirit—he spoke of Him-—-His life—death—and
power to save. They wept—those savage men!

Two days afterwards a young man drove a light waggon up to the house,
94 ) UNCLE TOM’S CARIN.

and asked to see the owner of the place. It was George Shelby who had now succeeded
to his father’s property, and upon receiving Miss Ophelia’s letter, some time after it
was written, had come in search of his dear old friend. He had traced him with much
difficulty to the Red River plantation.

When he saw Legree he said at once—

“I hear you bought in New Orleans, a boy named Tom. He used to be on my
father’s place, and I came to see if I could not buy him back.”

Legree’s brow grew dark, and he broke out passionately—

“I did buy such a fellow—the most saucy impudent dog! Set up my niggers
to run away —got off twe gals worth a thousand dollars each. He owned to that, and
when | asked where they was, he up and said he knew but wouldn’t tell—and stood
to it thoughe! gave him the most cussed flogging I ever gave nigger yet. I believe
he’s trying to die, but I don’t know as he'll make it out.”

“Where is he? let me see him,” said George eagerly with crimson cheeks,
and flashing eyes.

"In dat ar shed,” said a boy who was holding George’s horse.

Tom had been lying insensible since that fatal night, and the tears and
blessings of the poor sufferers he had tried to comfort, had not reached his senses.

When George entered the hut he felt sick and giddy, and kneeling down by
his old friend he said,

‘Is it possible, poor—poor Uncle Tom!’

Something in the voice touched the ear of the dying man, and smiling he said—
THEE Velce Te02RY: 95

‘Jesus can make a dying bed
Feel soft as downy pillows are—”

Tears fell from the young man’s eyes as he bent over his poor friend.

‘Dear Uncle Tom, do look up. Here's Mast George! Don’t you know me?”

Mast George?’ said Tom opening his eyes feebly. Slowly the idea seemed
to fill his soul—the eye brightened, the face lighted up, the hard hands clasped, and
tears ran down his cheeks. “Bless the Lord! It is! . They haven't forgot me. Now I
shall die content. Bless the Lord, oh my soul!”

“You shant die—I’ve come to buy you, and take you home,” Said George eagerly.

“Mast George—ye're too late. The Lord’s bought me, and is goin’ to take me
home—and I long to go. Heaven is better than Kentuck!”

“Oh-—don't die—Itll break my heart to think what you've suffered—Poor—

poor fellow!”
“Dont call me poor fellow—thats all past and gone now. I’m right in the
door going into glory! [ve got the victory. The Lord Jesus has given it me! Ye
mustn't tell Chloe how ye found me—twould be so drefful to her. Only tell her ye
found me goin’ into glory, and that I couldnt stay for no one—Oh, Mas’r George—what
a thing ’tis 10 be a Christian!”

At this moment Legree came up to the door of the shed, looked in and turned
away. The flush of strength that the joy of seeing George had given to the dying man
passed away, and with a smile, and one or two deep drawn Sighs, he fell asleep.

George sat awed by the solemn scene, and as he turned, Legree stood sullenly
96 TNO Ea Ose S256 ABE N.

behind him. George could not give way to his passions in the holy presence of the
dead, and only said: : .

“What shall I pay you for all that is left here?”

“I dont sell dead niggers—you can bury him when and where you like,” said
Legree, sulkily. «After all what a fuss for a dead nigger!”

At that George turned upon the ruffian, and with one indignant blow, knocked
Legree flat upon his face.

Beyond the plantation, George had seen a dry, sandy knoll, shaded by a few
trees—there they made the grave, and kneeling over it George said solemnly—

“T pray thee, Eternal God, to witness, that from this hour | will do what one
man can to drive out this curse of slavery from my land!’

About a month after George Shelbys return home, all the servants on the
estate were called together to hear a few words from their young master.

To the Surprise of all he appeared among them with papers in his hand,
giving freedom to every one on the place, which he read and presented amidst sobs and
tears and shouts,

Many begged him earnestly not to Send them away, declaring they were quite
happy as they were. |

When he could be heard, George said in reply:

“You need none of you leave me unless you like, only you are now free men
and women,and I shall pay you for your work. If I die, or get into debt, you cannot
now be Sold 1 mean to carry on the place and teach you what it may take you
some time tc iearn, how to use the blessings of your freedom well. Now, my friends


See Page 91

George Shelby covering Uncle Tom’s dead face
A HEE Vol CO ROY: 97



look up and thank God for it!” All knelt by one consent to.offer their praises to God,
and then George said:

“You all remember our good old Uncle Tom? It was on his grave, my friends,
that I resolved before God that I would never own another slave while it was possible
to free him: that nobody through me should ever run the risk of being parted from
home and friends, and dying on a lonely plantation as he died. So when you rejoice
in your freedom, think you owe it to that good man, and pay it back in kindness to his ©
wife and children. Think of your freedom every time you see Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and
let it remind you all to follow in his steps, and be as honest, faithful and Christian
as he was.”

We have only to add that George and Eliza Harris reached Canada safely,
thanks to the kind Quaker friends who helped them on their way; and that Cassy and
Emmeline too made their escape, after many adventures, to that happy land of freedom.

Legree never recovered from the raving madness which his wicked life brought
upon him at last, and. terrible stories were told of his sufferings in those dark days
when he was left alone to repent of his many deeds of cruelty.
Sonera