Citation
Little Emmie, the mountain prisoner, or, a father's care

Material Information

Title:
Little Emmie, the mountain prisoner, or, a father's care
Added title page title:
Father's care
Creator:
E. W. ( Author, Primary )
Morrish, G ( Printer )
London Gospel Tract Depot ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
London Gospel Tract Depot
Manufacturer:
G. Morrish
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
120 p. : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Marriage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sick -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Youth -- Death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Missionaries -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Asylums -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1891 ( local )
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by Dalziel.
Statement of Responsibility:
by E.W.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027006561 ( ALEPH )
ALH9804 ( NOTIS )
183690070 ( OCLC )

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Full Text








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CONTENTS.

PAGE

: CHAPTER I.
CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH = a 9

CHAPTER II.

ELIZABETH’S MARRIAGE - - - 21
CHAPTER III.

GOING ABROAD - - - - 26
CHAPTER IV.

THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN - 6
CHAPTER: V.

EDWARD’S ILLNESS AND DEATH — - 46
CHAPTER VI.

ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM - - 54
CHAPTER VII.

EMMIE AT BETsy’s HOME - - 65

CHAPTER VIIL
MEETING OF MOTIIEK AND CHILD - 71

CHAPTER | IX.
THE EARTHQUAKE AND JOURNEY TO
SEAFIELD- - - - - - 78



viii CONTENTS.

CHAPTER X.
HOMEWARD BOUND - :

CHAPTER XI.

STEERAGE PASSAGE AND ITS’ Ex-

PERIENCES 2 7

CHAPTER XIL.
SALOON COMFORTS) - -

CHAPTER XIII.
ARRIVAL IN LoNDON DOCKS

CHAPTER XIV.
GRANDMOTHER’S WELCOME

CHAPTER XV.
REST AT LAST - - -

em 0 = 0

PAGE
85
88

98
106

113

116





Kittle Etmmie, the

Prisoner ;



OR, A FATHER’S CARE.

2
=



CHAPTER I,

CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH.

jee |LIZABETH was the only
daughter of Christian Myers,
a Hebrew of the tribe of
Benjamin. The records of
his genealogy were carefully
preserved by his father,
Hyam, as well as at the chief
Synagogue. Christian was given this name
at a baptismal font in the Church of
England, in commemoration of his being
the first child born after his parents’ con-
version to Christianity.

For six months they had read in secret
the New Testament, unknown. to each
B











Io LITTLE EMMIE,

other; but the mighty truths revealed in
that precious volume, the Spirit af God
used in convicting them of sin, and thus
shewing them that the endless rites of the
Mosaic ritual could never atone for their
guilt, and at last He revealed the Naza-
rene as their long-expected Messiah, as
their Jehovah, their Saviour-God.

It was no light thing for these two to
confess Jesus, for it entailed being cut off
by their family, and mourned for as dead.
In after years, when Christian was a
youth, he met his father’s brother, who
wept over the boy, and with his hand
on the lad’s head, looking in pity down
upon him, said, ‘Is this my poor brother
Hyam's child?” The writer, through
whose veins the blood of Abraham flows,
has often heard Christian repeat this story.
Well does she remember the raven locks
of this son of Abraham, and the expression
of his face when repeating stories of his
people.

Hyam by his confession sacrificed wealth
and family, but possessing a good educa-
tion, he was able to maintain his wife and
children in comfort by his labours in the
mercantile world. Christian, too, followed
his father’s footsteps, and at the commence-
ment of our story, Elizabeth was a child of



CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH. 11

ten, living in her parental home, a pretty
villa in a suburb of one of our commercial
cities.

Christian married a Gentile maiden.
Both, at the time of their marriage, were
only Christians in name ; but ere the birth
of Elizabeth her mother found out a
Saviour’s love, and she thus became more
interested in her husband’s people, and she
delighted to search the scriptures until the
time came that few women knew more of
them than she. Thus Elizabeth was early
blessed in having a christian mother.

Early did she lisp the precious name of
Jesus ; early was she taught a Saviour's
love. Her father, too, became a follower
of the “ Nazarene,” no doubt in answer to
his wife’s oft-repeated prayers; and for
many years after (when he fully believed
that Christ our Passover had been sacri-
ficed) would his aged grandsire, who died
in the faith of his fathers, go to Christian’s
house and burn the bone of the paschal
lamb.

No word was ever uttered; but it was
believed that this aged patriarch thought
by so doing that Christian and his family
partook of the blessing, and when this
aged Hebrew was passing from the con-
fines of this transitory scene—the day



I2 LITTLE EMMIE.

on which he died was the Day of Atone-
ment—not a morsel would he allow to
pass his lips, not a drop of wine to moisten
them. His constant prayer was that he
might pass into Abraham’s Bosom (the
place of the departed) on the Day of
Atonement, with all his sins forgiven
him, as on that day he believed the sins
of the past year were forgiven. He did
die on that day, just as the sun was sinking
in the western horizon. Would that he
had known the Sun of Righteousness in
all His healing power. The reader will
wonder why this Hebrew had intercourse
with his christian relatives. The Jew
says that the children cannot help what
their parents do, so therefore are not
responsible. Whatever were his faults,
he was a godly Jew, ‘‘he walked in the
law blameless,” a pattern to many in
acting up to his belief. Alas! that the
outward life of so many denies what the
lips utter.

Elizabeth’s countenance, although a
child, shewed clearly from what race she
sprang. Her dark eyes and hair, and sad,
far-off look, indeed her whole appearance
shewed to an observer that she was one of
Judah’s daughters. While still young she
disliked to be thought a Jewess, and one































































































































































































HER FATHER INTRODUCED HER TO A JEW,



















CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH. T5

day when her father introduced her to a
Jew, the latter said very warmly, “I thought
-she belonged to our nation,” his quick
eagle eye soon detected the look of annoy-
ance on Elizabeth's face, and he said,
‘Are you ashamed to belong to our nation ?
Do not one half the world worship a Jew,
and the other a Jewess, the Nazarene and
Mary ?”

In after years, however, when Eliza.
beth’s heart was touched with the love
of her Redeemer, when she knew the
scriptures not only in the letter but in
the spirit thereof, she felt glad that she
belonged to that ancient people. We
are glad to know that soul-stirring truth:
“Dead and risen with Christ ;’ but still
‘the heart glows with fervour when thinking
that there are kindred ties with God’s
favoured people, and there is an inward
feeling of satisfaction in knowing that
down-trodden Jerusalem will once again
be queen of nations.

The Redeemer wept over that city.
Within its gates some of His mightiest
works were done; ‘and without its gates
He offered up Himself to God, and soon
will come the time when He, the true
King Solomon, will sit on David’s throne,
and that throne will stand for ever, when



£6 ‘LITTLE EMMIE,

they will look upon Him whom they have
pierced. But He will comfort His people,
like Joseph of old his brethren. The
mighty temple will rear its head once
more. What a scene of magnificence did
that Roman soldier cause to crumble when
he threw the firebrand into its midst! An
ancient writer says, as a traveller on horse-
back towards sunset mounted the hill, when
the sun in all his bold majestic beauty shed
its rays on its gold-covered walls and
pillars, such a sea of glory was revealed
that no traveller could easily forget. But,
blessed be His name, many a son and
daughter of Judah have found out another
temple, another building of God, eternal in
the heavens, where the Sun of Right-
eousness will shed His golden beams.

Through disappointments in business,
together with physical causes, the once
stalwart frame of Christian Myers soon
succumbed, and in a few months Elizabeth
was left fatherless. Well does she re-
member that lovely spring day when the
remains of her dear father were committed
to their last resting-place,

“ Till Christ his precious dust will take,
And treshly mould.”

What a crowd was around that grave!



CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH. 17

some out of sympathy for the mourners,
others from morbid curiosity to see the
interment of the converted Jew.

At the grave Christian’s favourite hymn
was sung, a hymn in which his rich bass
voice had often joined, with the accompani-
ment of his father’s flute often the family
would unite in singing it, standing in the
well-staircase of Christian’s home, and as
the notes ascended higher and higher, they
would think of the time,

“When, in a nobler, sweeter song,”

they would sing His power to save.
Hebrew voices will swell that chorus, and
among them will Christian’s blend :—

*Not all the blood of beasts,
On Jewish altars slain,
Could give the guilty conscience peace,
Or wash away its stain.

“ But Christ, the heavenly Lamb,
Took all our guilt away ;
A sacrifice of nobler name,
And richer blood than they.
Believing, I rejoice
To see the curse removed,
And bless the Lamb with cheerful voice,
And sing redeeming love.”

Elizabeth, as she stood at the grave, had
the comfort of knowing that she would



18 LITTLE EMMIE,

meet her loved parent again, where partings
are unknown.
“ Yes, we part, but not for ever ;
Joyful hopes our bosoms fill ;
They who love the Lord, no never
Know a long, a last farewell.”

Just before his departure to that ‘‘ Better
Land,” his prayer had been that it might
be well with all his loved ones ; but in the
midst he broke off saying, “I will not pray
that it might be well, for I know that it
will be. All was well, all is well, and
all will be well.” On the tomb-stone that
marked his last resting-place were the
words :—

“GEIRTSITERAN: MY IES,

WO FELL ASLEEP IN JESUS.
“Tt ts well.”
How true that hymn:

“ Asleep in Jesus, blessed sleep,
From which none ever wakes to weep, .
A calm and undisturbed repose,
Unbroken by the last of foes.”

All, indeed, was well with the fatherless
girl, and in after years, when she trod on
foreign shores, her father’s God was with
her still, and how often there did her voice
pour forth the strains :—



CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH. Ig

“Guide me, oh ! Thou great Jehovah,
Pilgrim through this barren land.
Iam weak, but Thou art mighty.
Guide me with Thy powerful hand,
Bread of heaven,
Feed me till I want no more.”

He did guide, and will guide her still,
even unto the end.

She and her mother could not now com-
mand the comforts they had been accus-
tomed to, still they had enough; so they
removed to a pretty cottage in a village
in Devonshire. Here did mother and
daughter spend many happy days. Eliza-
beth loved to listen to her mother’s recitals
of her father’s people. Her eye would
kindle, and her heart burn within her,
thankful that she was sheltered beneath
the blood-stained lintel. She knew that
her Saviour had reared the crystal walls of
salvation for her, and dryshod she had
passed within their confines safe unto the
other shore. How she wished that her
people could say so too.

Her mother told her that her grandfather
would recite his daily prayers, and while
doing so, owing to their length, his tired
body would have to lean against some
article of furniture for support.

He thought the number of his prayers
would gain him favour with God. How



20 LITTLE EMMIE.

that Elizabeth’s aunt, Christian’s eldest
sister, who had been brought up in the
Jewish faith, had found out the love of her
Saviour, and that now both brother and
sister were roaming the courts of the
heavenly Jerusalem.

The days passed smoothly and pleasantly
on, till Elizabeth left her mother’s home
for that of her husband, and her mother
went to live with her only son, who was
residing in the north of England. He was
several years Elizabeth’s senior, had been
married while she was a girl at school: so
for this reason, Elizabeth and her mother
for many years were alone.







CHAPTER II.

ELIZABETH'S MARRIAGE.

LIZABETH and her mother
attended a meeting of Chris-
tians, where the latter, when
she was bereaved, was led.
On first entering this unpre-
tentious building she heard
that hymn:











“From every stormy wind that blows,
From every swelling tide of woes,
There is a calm, a sweet retreat,
*Tis found before the mercy-seat.”

A christian man spoke on the text, “He
is not here but risen.” She had been
looking at the grave of her dear departed
one; but now these comforting words sent
peace into her soul.

One Sunday, a tall, fair stranger, with
his Bible under his arm, entered. He
wore a heaven-born expression, so calm
and peaceful. After the meeting was over,



22 LITTLE EMMIE.

his eye fell upon Elizabeth, He made
_ inquiries about her, as her appearance
interested him, more especially her sad
expression. It was so different from his
own restful face. He early learned to
trust a Fathers care; but Elizabeth had
to wade through deep waters ere she could
so trust. Edward N., the stranger in
question, was a tutor in a gentleman’s
school. He was the son of christian
parents, who were Baptists. He himself
was a Christian, but a worldly one.

On first leaving home, he went as a
master in a school, where the principal, a
dissenting minister, so stumbled Edward
by his life during the week, being so
different from that he preached in the
pulpit on Sundays, that he gave notice to
leave, and sought an appointment else-
where. He was successful in obtaining a
situation where the principal was not only
a Christian in name, but in life also. He
met with others on the Lord’s day to break
bread as the apostles did of old.

Edward was expected to attend with the
boys. He in wonder looked on, and wrote
that same day to his father, telling him
that he did not know with what sort of
people he was living now. He thought
they must be quakers. However, he soon



ELIZABETH’S MARRIAGE, 23

afterwards was led to see that they were
doing the right thing in meeting thus, and
he cast in his lot with them.

When the summer vacation arrived he
went to his boyhood’s home, and as there
were none in the village who met as he
had been accustomed, he walked four miles
to a neighbouring towa, the place where
Elizabeth resided, and thus they met. He
was invited to dine at the house of a friend
of Elizabeth, and there, in the afternoon,
she and her mother saw him. The follow-
ing week he called on them, and that first
evening she joined him at the plano in
singing : —

“How good is the God we adore,
Our faithful, unchangeable Friend,

Whose love is as great as His power,
And knows neither measure nor end.

“Tis Jesus, the First and the Last,
Whose Spirit shall guide me safe home,
We'll praise Him for all that is past,
And trust Him for all that’s to come.”

In after years these two called this hymn
“Our hymn,” but little did they then know
what they would be called to pass through
to prove His love and power.

This friendship ripened into love. “No
wealth or power had he,” but he had a
willing mind to work. He trusted his



24 LITTLE EMMIE.

heavenly Friend. One day Elizabeth
received a letter from Edward asking her
to be his companion along the pilgrim way.
She accepted, and married him, but against
the wish of her mother, as Edward was
poor. The mother liked him much;
but she dreaded hardships for her daughter.
She has since learned, however, that trust-
ing Jehovah instead of riches may bring
trials of faith ; but a rich harvest is reaped
thereby in having opportunities of seeing
Jehovah’s hand extended for his people’s
good.

Edward furnished a small but pretty
cottage, and although these two had little
of this world’s goods, they had the upholder
of the universe as theirs, and they knew
that when this passing world was done,
there was an inheritance that was undefiled
reserved in heaven for them. What a halo
of grandeur around that word, inheritance!
In having Christ we inherit all things.

Edward was thankful on leaving the
train, to see his loved home from the
bridge beyond. And in the month of
May it looked especially pretty, with its
overhanging bushes of pink and white
hawthorn. No need for hand to be lifted
to the knocker, for eager eyes were watch-
ing for that well-known form.



ELIZABETH'S MARRIAGE. 25

On the evening of the arrival of these
two in their new home, they sang to-
gether :—

“ Jerusalem, my happy home,
Name ever dear to me,

When shall my labours have an end,
And I, thy glories see.”

Neither thought how soon one of them
might be called to roam those courts ; but
we are anticipating. Three years passed
away in happiness; but at last Edward
began to wear a look of pallor; a slight
cough, too, made his wife very anxious.
The thought was very distressing, but she,
willing that he should try anything for his
benefit, persuaded him to take a doctor’s
advice and go abroad. So they contem-
plated going to an island in the southern
seas. They had a little girl, a sweet child
of two summers, and the father was often
heard to say, “To depart and to be with
the Lord would be far better; but for the
sake of my wife and child, I feel I ought
to take my doctor’s advice.” So ina short
time parents and child sailed for the
southern seas.







CHAPTER EIT.

GOING ABROAD,

{DWARD, his wife, and Emmie,
4} went together for the last
time to the home of Edward’s
‘boyhood, and after a few
days set out for the great
Metropolis. It was requisite
to find a lodging for the night
before going on board, so about ten minutes
before the train steamed into the terminus,
Edward, his faith being always so simple,
and such a bright example to Elizabeth,
said, ‘ Let us ask the Lord to direct us to
a lodging.” And on passing down a street
they bent their footsteps in the direction of
a lodging-house, and aclean, homely person
received them, and on being informed of
their so quickly leaving England, she
shewed the lonely emigrants no little kind-
ness ; but what was better still, the woman
was a Christian. She was a member of

the Church of England, but worship where


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































i

i







A





= :







GOING ABROAD. 29

she may, she was a member of the Church
of Christ, that invisible one, that none can
sever. After a comfortable meal in a
pleasant parlour, Elizabeth was shewn to
her room, and there over the mantel-shelf
was that beautiful text in large type, ‘ Rest
in the Lord.” Turn which way she would,
her eyes fell back on those precious words.
In the dim hours of night, by the lowered
gas light would she behold those words,
and when on the stormy deep, that soul-
refreshing text would cheer her saddened
spirit.

On the morning of September 26th,
188-, the parents and child left the
London Docks in the ship R—. Many
prayers ascended far and near for the
safety of that vessel, for a large number of
her living freight were not only bound for
the southern seas, but were also bound for
the evergreen shore, and were in that
vessel, with Jesus at the helm, who
was guiding them towards that blissful
haven;

“We are out on the ocean sailing,
To a land that hath no storms.”

This was not the case with that mighty
ship R., for when off the coast of Africa, one
morning about five o'clock, a tornado arose,



3jO LITTLE EMMIE,

and the noise of falling timber, &c., awoke
Elizabeth. To her oft repeated question,
to her husband, could she get no direct
reply. He was ever anxious to save
Elizabeth trouble; but she heard the
steward inform a passenger that a tornado
had arisen. All hearts quailed ; but “ Rest
in the Lord” again came to Elizabeth.
She thought it was about the time when
many at home would be offering prayer
for her safety, and those dear to her, she
fell into a sound slumber, calmed by this
assurance.

The little one, too, slept far beyond her
usual hour, while Edward sat in his chair
and calmly rested on his God. No break-
fast was taken that morning by any of the
passengers, and Elizabeth did not awake
till the storm was over. The sun was
shedding his glittering rays on the calm
waters beneath. Often did Elizabeth
repeat that beautiful hymn of Charles’
Wesley, in the dark hours of the night, as
she lay in her berth listening to the mighty
waves dashing up against the side of the
ship :—

“Jesus, lover of my soul,
Let me to thy bosom fly,
While the billows near me roll
While the tempest still is high.”



GOING ABROAD. 31

The evenings were spent by Christians
of every class, meeting in the evening in
the steerage for prayer, and the reading of
God’s word, a Church of England clergy-
man, Wesleyans, Presbyterians, &c., all
meeting on one common ground. A
christian steward was heard to say, such a
sight he had never seen before ; not in that
vessel, at any rate. There is One above
who knows the good received and done at
those meetings, and all of that little Chris-
tian band are scattered now, but—

“Though sundered far, by faith they meet
Before one common Mercy Seat.”

On this vessel sped in her hourly course,
till again a storm appeared. The heavens
were black and ominous. The cold south
wind penetrated everywhere; but again
the mighty Creator heard the cries of His
people, and spoke peace to the troubled
ocean, and soon the lovely island of Tas-
mania was sighted, where the vessel
touched for some hours.

Such an Eden did the port seem to all:
the lovely terraces, villas, and beautiful
gardens.

The blue vault of heaven above, looking
down on the calm waters of the harbour.
With such a sight from the deck, one



32 LITTLE EMMIE.

would have scarcely realised that the vessel
had so recently battled with gigantic waves.
After the storm, how sweet the peace, and
if earth can afford such experiences, what
must our feelings be when our vessel
is anchored safely in the fair Eden
above.

Again the vessel struck out for the ocean
wave, and in a few days our emigrants
were landed safely in a harbour of a
lovely island. The harbour itself was en-
closed by steep rugged hills, with here and
there a group of houses of a very primitive
appearance,

Edward and his little family landed and
started for the chief town of the island
with only a few coins, and not an earthly
friend. He had, however, his heavenly
Friend, and what needed he more. The
emigrants arrived at the town, and put up
for the night at a second-rate boarding
house.

The following day Edward sought for a
cottage where he might live and store his
boxes, till he could find employment. He
was successful, and the landlady who lived
in the next house, invited him and his little
family to go at once to her house till his
own could be made somewhat comfortable:
Elizabeth on hearing of the kind invitation,



GOING ABROAD. 33

soon got herself and little one ready to go
to this good woman. She gave them a
hearty welcome, and when Elizabeth was
taken to her room, she saw hanging on a
wall ina homely frame, “True religicn is
to visit the fatherless and widow in their
affliction, and to keep ourselves unspotted
from the world.”

The lonely emigrants soon found out
that they were in the house of christian
people, and although refinement and Eng-
lish comfort were wanting there, yet true
and noble hearts were in that little home,
as after events proved.

Four days later the little family entered
the cottage that they were to call home.
They thought that their boxes would have
to serve as chairs for many a day ; but when
they entered, a blazing fire was in the
grate and a small table in the centre of
the little parlour, two chairs and snowy
curtains hanging from the windows, all
put there by this kind-hearted christian
woman.

Edward sallied forth to get some eatables
—not quite so much at home in this occu-
pation as in teaching the rising genera-
tion. He soon returned, however, when
the trio partook of their first meal in their
colonial home. Such feelings of thankful-



34 LITTLE EMMIE,

ness arose from the hearts of the parents,
that no words could ever express. Now
in truth did they sing :—

‘Flow good is the God we adore,
Our faithful, unchangeable Friend,
Whose love is as great as His power,
And knows neither measure nor end.”

He had shewed his power by bringing
the emigrants across the stormy deep, and
although He is the upholder of the vast
universe, His love could come down to
touch the heart of this poor woman to
shew His children kindness. May a rich
reward be in store for all she did for
Edward and those dear to him.

He applied to the Colonial Board of
Education for a school. Many candidates
were already in the field, but Edward
believed that his Father and God could
give him an appointment if it were good
for him. And so he calmly rested in
child-like faith.

A few weeks passed away, and one day
on returning from a visit to a neighbouring
town, when the travellers unlocked the
door of their lowly abode, Edward saw
lying on the floor a letter, and on opening
it, to his wondering gaze, he read that he
was appointed master of a small school



GOING ABROAD. a5

near the bush, on the mountains, with a
salary of £100 a year, and a house to live
in. Such was his Father’s care over him.
What thanksgiving arose that night from
hearts glowing with gratitude to Him
“whose love is as great as His power, and
knows neither measure nor end.”











CHAPTER IV.

THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN.

Y\|DWARD went on first, to
eae prepare the house for Eliza-
beth. It was situated on the
side of a mountain, about
sixty miles from the town in
which they were now living.
Edward arranged to return
part of the way to meet his wife and child.

The morning he arrived at his mountain
home was very cold, with rain and sleet
falling, and thus hiding magnificent scenery.
The house was a wooden shanty, and one,
built many years ago; it was so different
from the modern ones. The garden, in
front, was overgrown with weeds. Edward,
nothing daunted, soon made a pathway up
to the front door. He made a table out of
one of the packing cases, a bookshelf too,
and arranged all the books he loved so
well.













THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN. ° 37

All Elizabeth’s nicknacks, gifts from
friends that she thought she would never
see on earth again, were put in their
several places. So that when Elizabeth
arrived she found all in order. When she
came to the place of meeting, her husband
was waiting tor her with a hired convey-
ance to take heron her way. Such scenery
she had never betore beheld ; so grand and
bold. Lofty mountains covered with per-
petual snow towering up in splendour
beneath the blue heavens, and the luxuri-
ant bush at the side covering many square
acres of ground. As she neared the lofty
piles, their beauty seemed to increase, and
at last the travellers descended a steep
incline, and could hear in the distance the
roar of a mighty river sweeping down
magnificent gorges.

On they went, till they were in the bed
of a river of immense width, only passable
in the summer at all times. In winter,
often impassable for many weeks. When
the travellers were in the bed of this river,
they were surrounded by lofty embank-
ments, cut so evenly, that they looked as if
_done by the hand of man, if it had not been
for their immense height. But this was
not so; it had been formed by a glacier of
past ages. This river of ice, with its



38 LITTLE EMMIE.

mighty millions of tons, had slowly, but
‘surely done its work.

The travellers seemed locked in on all
sides, and Elizabeth wondered where the
outlet was. ‘The sides of some of the em-
bankments were covered with overhanging
shrubs of every description. It has been
said that in this spot is some of the grand-
est scenery of the world. At last they
ascended a steep incline, and then they
were at the top of a rugged precipice, and
at last on a plain.

On they went this lovely morning till
the everlasting hills again appear in sight,
and the luxuriant bush, with birds of every
hue, warbling sweet songs. Such a spot
seemed like an earthly Eden; one could
fancy that sorrow could never enter here.

On these mountains, there were a few
settlers ; they were far away from all good
influence. Although beholding all this
grandeur of nature, many of them avowed
that there was no God. On Sundays the,
weekly avocations would still be pursued,
such as building, reaping and sowing.

There was no companionship for Edward
and his wife. They did not want the com-
panionship of the ungodly; they only
wanted to do them good. Edward had
once sought to do good to those in the



































} }
j |

}

\ |

, | TROPICAL SCENERY.

1

i

]
it











THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN. 4I

busy‘scenes of one of England’s northern
cities by preaching forth the words of life,
and now God had brought him across the
ocean to speak to those people in their
mountain strongholds. He felt it to be a
noble work to sow the seeds among the
young, and while he was enabling them to
fill their places on the platform of life, he
was training them for something beyond it.

On the Sunday after their arrival (Eliza-
beth never forgot that scene) Edward called
the children together to speak to them of
Jesus and His love. Many voices were
raised in singing that well-known school
hymn :—

een is a better world, they say,
Oh! so bright,
Where sin and woe are done away,
Oh! so bright.
No clouds e’er pass along its sky,
No tear-drops glisten in the eye,
Happy land.”

If the Christian could not look beyond
this scene, to his mansions in the skies,
how could he bear the sorrows and the
partings. But for the glad re-unions when
earth’s storms are overpast, his heart would
fail him. The God of Israel is a God of
love; nay, not only a God of love, but is
D



42 LITTLE EMMIE.

love itself, and when earth’s weary travel-
lers arrive in their eternal home, they will _
have a Father's greeting, a Father’s wel-
come, and they will bid farewell to every
fear; faith will give place to sight in those
mansions above, and if earth apart from sin
is ofttimes so beautiful, what must it be in
the fair Eden above.

Edward laboured among the people here,
and as the word of the Lord can never
return to Him void, let us hope that
Edward will have had souls for his hire.
The husband and wife felt alone with
God; far away from kindred and friends.
They took walks together, and each day
fresh. beauties would open to their view.
The lofty mountains, the luxuriant bush, the
mountain gorges, with their overhanging
foliage of every hue, and the mighty waters
rushing down their incline, would all speak
to them, telling them that the mighty
Creator was here, and, in the midst of all,
this mighty Creator was caring for His
children.

The pleasant evenings were whiled
away in the midst of these mountain
passes, shielded only by wooden parti-
tions these two passed their days.

The winds so prevalent, and no Eng-
lishman could imagine what they were



THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN. 43

like, swept down the gorges, often rocking
the house. Indeed, before they were the
inmates one day, the chimney fell and
smashed the roof, still they feared not.
They would sit in the evenings around the
blazing hearth, great trunks of trees three
feet long blazing up the chimney, all so
different to what they had been accustomed
to; still Elizabeth often looked back on
those days of native grandeur, as far sur-
passing those of other years.

They were many miles from any meeting
of Christians, and being so often prevented
from going to any, as they had no vehicle
of their own, and once or twice were much
disappointed in a neighbour taking them,
they thought they would remember the
Lord’s death there in those mountain
strongholds :—

“Do this, he cried, till time shall end,
In memory of your dying Friend ;
Meet at my table, and record
The love of your departed Lord.”

As the emblems of the Saviour’s death
were laid in that lowly cottage that
glorious Sunday morning, Elizabeth little
thought that it was not only the first time
but would be the last also, that she and



44 LITTLE EMMIE,

Edward would partake of those emblems
together.

She has never forgotten, nor will she do
so, that memorable Sunday morning. As
ahe took the bread, the Saviour at the
moment seemed to speak to her, as He
had never done before, in all His living
power, ‘‘ This is my body, which is broken
for you.’ The husband and wife sang
together :—

“ We'll sing of the Shepherd that died,

That died for the sake of the flock,
His love to the utmost was tried,
But firmly endured as a rock.”

Elizabeth seemed to be prepared in some
measure for a coming trial; such an one
that the writer cannot fully depict it.
Enough to know that Jehovah was with
her all the way. She received a letter
from a friend, and in it a leaflet with the
words :—

“While she leans on me
The burden shall be mine, not hers.”

He did, indeed, bear all the weight, or it
would have crushed her.

The following week, Edward became
much worse, and thought it right to get
médical aid, at the nearest town, which



THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN. 45

was sixty miles distant. This meant a far
different journey than an Englishman
might suppose. Several hours were spent
in travelling. Edward started one autumn
evening for the nearest railway station, and
as she watched his receding form, she little
dreamed that this loved husband had seen
those hills for the last time--that he was
so soon to bid farewell to earth, to ascend
the heights of glory.









CHAPTER V.

EDWARD'S ILLNESS AND DEATH.





JATE at night, Edward arrived
} at his destination, took a
lodging for the night, and
the next morning went to the
hospital to get advice. The
doctors said they could do
nothing for him unless he
became an inmate of the building for a
time, and he, for the sake of his wife and
child, became one.

Elizabeth was long afterwards told, that
they knew he was near his end, and
thought that he was better in the hospital
than in lodgings. She eagerly waited for
tidings of her husband’s return; so imagine
her feelings when she received a letter,
informing her that her husband was an
inmate of a hospital, with stranger hands
ministering to his wants.

The next day she decided to go to him,













EDWARD'S ILLNESS AND DEATH. 47

and know full particulars. She and her
child arrived at the town, sought a lodging .
for the night, and the next morning went
to see her husband.

Noble institutions are these hospitals,
and noble hearts had the founders of them,
but no one can portray fully the wife’s
feelings when, at the far end of a long
ward, she saw her husband looking pale
and wan, and looking, too, at least ten
years older than when she last saw him.
Anxiety had made havoc of his feeble
frame.

The doctor had written over his bed the
Latin word for consumption, not thinking
that his patient would know its meaning.
The word itself, together with being told
to keep his bed, made all hope cease. He
knew his weakness; that he could work no
longer for his wife and child.

Edward was very unhappy in this place;
his wife saw that he was, and offered to get
a lodging. Oh! how gladly did he fall in
with this idea. Elizabeth now seemed to
lose all hope ; but she felt that she would
like to minister to his wants herself, instead
of strangers doing so. Intuition seemed to
tell her, that those pleasant evenings in the
home on the mountains were over for ever.
But even there, she had at times her mis-



48 LITTLE EMMIE.

givings. One evening he asked her to
read a hymn he had composed :—-

“Jesus, Lord Jesus, how oft would I fly

Thy face, to see.

Gazing on Thee, now exalted on high,
Comforteth me.

Boundless the love that surrounds me, I know;

Living the streams that continually flow,

Down to the poor wearied pilgrim below,
Saviour from Thee.

“ Here oft I tremble a sigh of regret,

Waiting for Thee.

Star of the morning, that never can set,
Coming for me.

Lord, when Thou comest, from sorrow I rest,

Deep drink of joy, and lean on Thy breast,

Satisfied fully! in Thy presence blest,
Saviour with Thee.

“Saints now united, in glory ne’er part,

Saviour from Thee.

One is the object and hope of the heart—~
Jesus ’tis Thee.

The rivers of crystal and city of God,

Portals of pearls, such a glory unfold ;

But, what are these, when Thy face I behold?
Nothing to me?

“List what the Bride and the Spirit doth say!
Come, come away.
Let him that heareth the word, Come, say
Come, come away.



EDWARD'S ILLNESS AND DEATH. 4g

Jesus now testifies, I quickly come,

To take my beloved ones up to my home;

Oh! may our hearts echo back to His own,
Come, Jesus, come.”

Elizabeth, with a great effort, read this
hymn.

Edward wrote a letter to his father (the
last letter he ever wrote to that loved
parent) asking him to sing, with the rest
of the family, this poem, when all were
gathered around the old harmonium.

After Edward was on foreign shores, he
valued the christian home of his childhood
as he had never done before. When he
saw the ungodly homes around him, the
infidelity and its consequences, he loved to
think of his boyhood’s home and of his
christian parents.

A time came when Elizabeth formed
one of the circle in that home, and around
the old harmonium she joined in singing
the hymn of her loved one, not with break-
ing heart, but with a heart full of thankful-
ness that her husband was free from all
pain, safe in his home in glory, and she had
proved Jehovah-Jesus that He could
far more than make amends for earthly
loss. It was through deep and sore
sorrows, however, ere she could speak of
His love, even in this measure.



50 LITTLE EMMIE.

Elizabeth found a clean, comfortable
lodging, and went with a vehicle the next
day to the hospital for her husband.
When he came to the lodging and saw it
replete with comfort, she saw his look of
satisfaction. Elizabeth had brought him
here that her hands might minister to him ;
but her God and Father would not have it
so, His way was the best way as after
events proved.

Edward was to have no earthly prop to
lean on as he passed through the valley of
the shadow of death. Jesus was His only
stay. Truly Edward, the passage was a
rough one that preceded thy entry into
that blissful harbour, but it only made
thy rest more sweet and Christ more
dear. They partook of tea together on
their arrival at this lodging. Edward, with
an unnatural energy to cheer his wife, had
moved to the table. This was the last
meal they were to partake of together on
earth. God knew it; they did not, and
well was it that the veil was drawn. How
our fainting hearts would sink if we knew
all that we had to go through. He who
knows our feeble frame, has mercifully
hidden the future. He has also said, “As
thy day so shall thy strength be,” and
‘My grace is sufficient for thee.”



EDWARD'S ILLNESS AND DEATH. 51

That night Elizabeth awoke suddenly
from a sound slumber and became delirious.
Her husband was removed into another
apartment, and she was left by him to be
taken care of by the woman of the house.
We will leave her now, only to say, that
Edward came to her bedside once, and
earnestly with his now enfeebled voice
prayed for her recovery; that she might
be restored to her child. This prayer was
answered ; but in God’s own way and time.
His way was the best way, and His own
time the right time.

Edward’s faith,.as he approached the
end, shone brighter and brighter. The
woman of the house, who attended to him,
and the doctor pressed him to write on
paper what he wished done with regard to
his wife and child; and one day, the
woman having got a certificate from the
doctor that his disease was approaching a
fatal termination, put it into the dying
man’s hands. He, however, did not waver.
He would do nothing but trust them to
Jehovah, the Father of the Fatherless,
and the Husband of the widow. :

It was a test to his faith to know that his
wife and child were on foreign shores and
with no means of support. He knew that
he was powerless to help; but he knew



52 LITTLE EMMIE.

that the God who had led him hitherto
was a faithful Promiser, so with calmness,
he awaited his exit into glory. He was
sitting in his chair the day before he
departed. On the morning of his passing
into the eternal world, he was too weak to
get up. :

Towards the evening, the landlady came
into the room, she did not notice any
_ change. In the morning he had asked her
to read to him Psalm cxvi, and also a
hymn :—

“ Rest of the saints above,
Jerusalem of God.”

and he feebly marked the following verse:

* And by the Spirit’s power
He’s ope’d the heavenly door,
And brought me to this favoured hour,
When toil shall all be o’er.”

Edward must have felt that his end was
near, for as the woman was about to leave
the room he, with an unnatural energy,
called her. She returned to his bedside,
and in ten minutes afterwards he peacefully
slept away, to awake on that glad morn to
meet the Lord he loved so well. His happy
spirit is however with him now, he has



EDWARDS ILLNESS AND DEATH. 53

passed the portals and is resting now on
his Saviour’s breast :—

“ Safe in the arms of Jesus,
Safe on His gentle breast ;
Free from the world’s temptations,
Sweetly his soul shall rest.”

A few Christians took him to his last
resting place one Sunday afternoon. The
rain was pouring in torrents; but what of
that to the sleeping saint. His soul was in
the paradise above,

“ Where he will know, without a cloud, -
His full unbounded love.”

Edward had often wished to be a
missionary. God gave him his wish for a
short time. That Pacific isle gave hima
home till he set out again on another
voyage; but this time he was ‘‘bound for
the evergreen shore.”







CHAPTER VI

ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM.



EY |DWARD being in a dying

|] state when Elizabeth was
taken delirious, and having
no means at his disposal was
powerless to act. The land-
lady of the lodging, together
with the doctor, soon were ap-
prised of the fact that Edward was poor, so
they sought to get Elizabeth into a lunatic
asylum. She was quite unconscious when
she was taken. They took her from her
bed, and hastily put her into a cab, and
drove her to this building. No place for
her, as many afterwards said; still God in
His goodness hid her from the coming
trial; from the coming solemn events.
Her medical attendant said that her body
was in such a weak state, that she must
have died had she passed through all the
after events connected with her husband’s
death. Every detail from the commence-

SheSieiean



ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 55

ment of her illness till the time she left the
institution came vividly to her recollection.

On arriving at the building her Bible, a
gift from her mother, was taken from her.
She was then led to a small cell with a
lattice window, not a particle of furniture,
and put on a bed of straw on the floor
Here she remained for three weeks ; per-
fectly dead to the outer world.

The wild shrieks of the insane sounded
through the corridors, and were mixed up
with the wild fancies of her fevered brain.
Stull in her wild delirium, thoughts of
heaven and heavenly things soothed that
fevered brain. She was often heard to
sing in the dark hours of the night,

“How good is the God I adore,
My faithful, unchangeable Friend,
Whose love is as great as His power,
And knows neither measure nor end.”

And oftener still :—

“There is a Name I love to hear,
I love to sing its worth,
It sounds like music in my ear,
The sweetest Name on earth.”

During these weeks she had occasional
visits from young attendants, and once or
twice during the night, the tiny window in



56 LITTLE EMMIE,

the door was quickly opened, and a dark-
eyed, matronly looking woman threw the
light of the lantern on the suffering one
and then quickly passed on. Once or twice
she came to Elizabeth and gave her some.
thing to drink.

The day before she got up, Edward
was taken to the mansions above. The
authorities heard of his death, and likely
thinking that friends would be looking
after Elizabeth, had her dressed and taken
to the ward of the worst patients, where
she was so weak that she had to be
supported by an attendant, and she was so
frightened that she feared to move. The
frantic shrieks of some of the patients,
mixed with the oaths of one or two atten-
dants, and the waking up as it were from a
dream, without then the faintest recollec-
tion of how she came there or where she
was, that in her weakness, she fancied she
was in a place of satanic influence.

Edward wanted to write a letter to her,
that she might have it, when she came to
herself, that she might be told where she
was. The woman who nursed him said
she would never get it, so Edward did not
write. Well would it have been for
Elizabeth, when she did come to con-
sciousness, to have had some loving heart



ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 57

to break the awful news; but the naked
truth of her position dawned on_ her,
on seeing “ Lunatic Asylum” on a printed
form. The doctor, who was the means of
her being placed in this institution, was
heard to say that some place between an
asylum and a hospital was needed for her.

On the following Sunday, Edward’s
remains were put in their last resting place,
and the succeeding Sunday was one also
never to be forgotten by Elizabeth. When
returning to her dark cell, she could throw
herself on her knees, and cry to her God
to deliver her from this cell. How this was
to be done, she did not know; but she had
faith to believe that He could do it.

On this Sunday morning in question she
asked for a Bible. The attendant said,
“What Bible.” Elizabeth felt deeply hurt
and answered, “ There is but one Bible.”

Within ten minutes the doctor, a truly
kindhearted man, came his rounds with the
matron, and on coming to Elizabeth, who
was trying to support her weak frame on
the bench, said to the matron, ‘ This is no
place for her.”

Half-an-hour afterwards the woman took
her up-stairs. Elizabeth wondered where
she was going, when a door was thrown
open and she was led into the convalescent

E



58 LITTLE EMMIE.

ward—a long cheerful room, with flowers
and pictures, and a piano at the far end.
A number were seated around the table,
with their prayer-books and hymn-books.
And soon after the chaplain walked in,
and a truly godly man he was. The first
hymn he called sent such comfort to
Elizabeth that words cannot express :—

“ Art thou weary, art thou languid,
Art thou sore distrest,
Come to me, saith One, and coming,
Be at rest.” 3

Only a person in like circumstances can
fully understand the calm that these words
brought to Elizabeth’s troubled breast. She
was informed that she was to stay in this
ward. Never had any patient in that
building passed so quickly to it. It was
the custom to bring them gradually through
each ward.

At night she feared she was to be taken
to her lonely cell; instead of which she was
taken to a bright cheerful ward of 36 beds,
and her resting place was shielded, and
in one of the best positions. Now again,
how truly could she say, “ How good is
the God J adore.”

All here shewed her kindness. Firmer
and rougher hands were needed for patients



ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 59

below, but here she had every care. Once,
when in the cell below, two attendants
came to her with something, and because
she did not want to take it, they boxed her
ear so, that it gave her pain for some time
after. She never spoke of it ; as whatever
sense she had then restored to her, told her
to make a fuss would only be worse for
herself.

The Superintendent or the Inspectors
would never have allowed such an action
had they known it; but how, my reader,
are the authorities to guard always against
unprincipled servants? It should be the
last extremity for friends to put those dear
to them in sucha place. It is only those
who have suffered within its walls can tell
the secrets. One of Elizabeth’s attendants
would often come to her and ask her to
sing that well-known hymn :—

“Sweetest note in seraph song,
Sweetest carol ever sung,
Jesus, blessed Jesus,”

The poor afflicted ones delighted to hear
Elizabeth sing and play. None, to their
ears, played like Mrs. R.; none sang like
her. She could only account for it, that
what came from the heart, spoke to the
heart. She had proved the One, whose



60 LITTLE EMMIE.

name was the sweetest name on earth, and
would therefore with wondrous feeling
sing of

“His mighty power to save.”

All this time Elizabeth could not imagine
why her husband never came to her, and
intuition kept her from asking the reason ;
for she was afraid of the answer, for in her
wild delirium she fancied he was safe on
the other shore.

One afternoon, about five weeks after
she was an inmate of this institution, she
was told that a lady wished to see her.
She went to the waiting-room, a cold-
looking place, and met this lady. She was
a Christian and an elderly one, and in
her strong Scotch brogue in answer to
Elizabeth’s question, ‘Where is my hus-
band ?” she said, ‘“‘ He has gone to be with
the Lord.” The tone, the accent, and
greater still the words, all sank down into
Elizabeth’s bleeding heart. Oh! what a
moment that was, God alone witnessed her
feelings ; but in the midst, such a calmness
stole over her that she was never able to
express, She felt an unseen presence
around her. The visitor was heard to say,
“She took it far better than I expected.”



ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 61

Words often used ; still, if prayer is made,
what is there that we cannot expect
Jehovah to do! He can calm the troubled
breast :-—

“Flow sweet the name of Jesus sounds
In a believer’s ear,
It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds,
And drives away his fear.”

She left her visitor to ascend that stair-
case, with no friendly arm to lean on, no
mother’s breast to sob her sorrow out on;
but that unseen presence was with her, as
she ascended to the ward. It was a living
reality. No outward emotion did she shew.
She thought of her child, and pleaded for
strength to bear. The doctor came twice
that night to the ward to see Elizabeth.
Her intuition told her that he feared a
relapse; but instead of which he saw
something -he could not understand. She
knew where to fly for refuge. Oh! with
what fervour did she whisper :—

Jesus, Lover of my soul,
Let me to Thy bosom fly.”

When all the lights were out she stifled
her sobs beneath the bedclothes. This
relieved her. Sleep came at last, and in the



62 LITTLE EMMIE.

morning she opened her Bible that had
been returned to her, and her eye fell on
Psalm cxlvi. Every word seemed written
for her. ‘While I live will I praise the
Lord. Put not your trust in the son of
man, in whom there is no help. Happy is
he who hath the God of Jacob for his help,
who made heaven and earth. Which
executeth judgment for the oppressed.
The Lord looseth the prisoners. The
Lord preserveth the strangers. He re-
lieveth the fatherless and widow.” In days
of old what care He always took of the
stranger. Once when speaking to Israel
He said, “Ye know the heart of the
stranger.” Under the head of that word
‘and widow” also did Elizabeth come. The
faithful Promiser was hers, He was a hus-
band to the widow and a Father to her
fatherless child. Truly did she feel a
stranger in a foreign land. Sometimes she
felt she could only utter

““Guide me, Oh! Thou great Jehovah,
Pilgrim through this barren land;
I am weak, but Thou art mighty,
Guide me with Thy powerful hand.
Bread of Heaven :
Feed me till I want no more.”

He did guide her, He did lead her, in a



ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 63

most remarkable way. The doctor one
day asked her if she had any friends.
She thought of the good woman who had
befriended her and Edward on first coming
to the island. She sent a message to her,
and in a few hours she and her husband
came to her. Oh! how they sympathised.
The wife saw Elizabeth’s coloured dress,
and the next morning before breakfast
Elizabeth received a new black dress, that
hands must have plied the needle over late
on into the preceding night. The robe was
a sombre one indeed, but the Lord
will bless the giver of that sombre
parcel.

These two good people offered her a
home at once. Certain forms had to be
gone through, but in a few days the good
people fetched her and brought her to their
humble dwelling. It was a lovely spring
morning when the prison doors were
opened to let the lonely widow through.
A hearty welcome and an ample repast
were awaiting her; and as she entered
that lowly dwelling, her heart again she
lifted to her

“... Faithful, unchangeable Friend,
Whose love is as great as His power,
And knows neither measure nor end.



64 LITTLE EMMIE,.

Tis Jesus, the First and the Last,

Whose Spirit will guide me safe home ;
T’ll praise Him, for all that is past,

And trust Him for all that’s to come.”

The darkest hour is just before the dawn.
Elizabeth's darkest hour was past, and
dawn came at last.







CHAPTER VII.

EMMIE AT BETSY'S HOME.



JET up, you lazy girl; it is
| after five o’clock, and you
lying; “flere. I» “tell sou
what it is; if you are going
to eat my bread, you will
have to earn it first. Tve
worked hard in my day,
and you will have to do it, too, or my
name is not Betsy Cranstone.”

Emmie had been taken hastily to this
woman, a distant relative of her father, and
such were the words she heard on the
morning after her arrival at Joe Cranstone’s
farm. The woman very reluctantly took
her—the kid, as she called her. No person
explained in any way the cause of the
change, and the little clinging, loving
heart was well-nigh broken. Let us not’
suppose that childhood has not its feelings.

This homestead was situated away up







66 LITTLE EMMIE.

on the hills—-a wooden shanty surrounded
by hundreds of acres of barren-looking
land. The rugged mountains, whose tops
reared far away into the heavens, with not
an acre of bush to relieve the eye, and
scattered on them here and there were
extinct craters, which shewed to a passer-
by, if ever there were such a being in this
outlandish spot, that though far away
from the busy scenes of life, the foot-
prints of the Creator were here; and His
watchful eye at this moment was watching
over that beautiful and lonely girl, who
Was in consternation listening to the words
and harsh tones of Betsy Cranstone. The
child was of very delicate organisation ;
she wore such a look of refinement, and
her expression was so sweet. Her well
formed head was covered with a mass of
auburn curls.

Poor Emmie awoke from a troubled
sleep, wondering where she was; but
though a child in years, she was not in
mind, and the absence of her father and
mother and the whole change of circum-
stances flitted through her little active
mind, and the harsh tones of Betsy
frightened away or rather prevented the
outburst of her pent up feelings, which
otherwise would have broken out.



EMMIE AT BETSY'S HOME, 67

Emmie, in her childish glee, had often
frolicked on the green in front of the native
school, where her father had scattered the
seeds of truth. She had rambled in the
woods gathering ferns and wild flowers.
Her little voice had warbled sweet notes
of praise in the Sunday class. She had
been petted and loved by the children.
Her refined and sensitive nature had never
to succumb to harsh treatment. Her day
had been one continual flow of happiness.
And now in one short week all was
changed, and Emmie was alone, yet not
alone, for her father’s God was with her.

* Saviour, like a shepherd lead us,
Much we need Thy tender care.”

The poor child was taken ill, and Eliza-
beth was afterwards told that she had
almost lost her. Most unsuitable medicine
was administered to the little one; so that
God must have fully been the Author of
-her recovery. He who knows the end
from the beginning was going to rejoice
the mother’s heart in giving her back her
child. Hecan over-rule all things. When
Elizabeth was told where her darling was,
the child she had so loved and shielded, she
received a great shock, and oh! the bitter
pain of knowing she could not get to her.



68 LITTLE EMMIE,

It was the law that no inmate of an
asylum could leave that institution till he
or she had a home to be taken to.

The mother tried to forget the instru-
ment used in caring for her child, and con-
stantly prayed to the Shepherd of Israel,
who never slumbers or sleeps, to shield
her darling child. His ear was attentive
to that mother’s cries. His eye was on
her child, ‘“‘Shall not he who formed the
ear hear, and shall not he who made the
eye see?” That wondrous formation of
ear and eye speaks of a wondrous Creator.
Betsy in her rough way fed and ‘“‘ housed”
the child; but she did not want her there.

There are many hearts with rough ex-
teriors in the colonies, that when on Eng-
land’s shores possessed softened natures ;
but from colonial hardships in days gone
by, and from having to battle with the
stern realities of life, and without any fear
of God before their eyes and ignorant of
the One who is the great burden-bearer of
His people, they have become selfish and
hardened. Would that they knew the One,
whose love can melt the heart of stone.

When Joe Cranstone was on English
shores he had professed to belong to
the Saviour; but the love of drink, and
the temptations of ungodly companions,



EMMIE AT BETSYS HOME. 69

together with the love of gold, had made
him a fearful backslider. Could such a
one have ever tasted the Saviour’s love?
Still the great God above so loved man-
kind as to send His Son to die that all
might be saved, and ere his soul is called
hence, may he know and feel a Saviour’s
love. He, too, as well as Emmie, had
christian parents. He had at times his
moments of contrition, but turned to drink
to drown remorse.

The child trembled to hear his drunken
oaths at the table, and oh! how she longed
for her mother. That mother she was
soon to see, much sooner than she ex-
pected.

Elizabeth wrote a letter to Betsy, asking
her to send Emmie to the station, and she
would be there to meet her. One morn-
ing the child dressed herself as usual, and
appeared in the doorway tremblingly.
Betsy told her to come quickly to her
breakfast, and then get herself ready to go
in the buggy. Emmie dared not ask a
question. The woman volunteered to
remark ‘‘that her father was in a big hole.”
This was all the comfort that the fatherless
child had bestowed on her.

Now that Betsy knew that she was to be
rid of her, she was a little more kind in her



70 LITTLE EMMIE,

articulations. Over rough roads was
Emmie driven for many miles. Horses
dashing fearlessly on, accustomed to rough
roads and river passes. A vehicle swaying
into the middle of the river was thought
nothing of by colonials of earlier days ; but
to one of later date such experiences do
not tend to soothe the nerves, if he has
any.

However people soon get used to these
things as to everything else. The dryness
of the climate is very exhilarating, and the
starlight nights, owing to this dryness, are’
magnificent. When Elizabeth’s eyes first
rested on the “Southern Cross” in the
midst of the spangled heavens, she thought
she had never seen aught so lovely.

On Emmie was driven on this eventful
morning, and at last stopped at a primitive
little railway station.















CHAPTER VIII.

MEETING OF MOTHER AND CIIILD.



LIZABETH was _ thankful
indeed for the welcome she
had received at the humble
cottage of her kind-hearted
friends. Their home seemed
like a palace to her, now that
she was no longer a prisoner.

The day she wended her steps towards
that home was a memorable one to her.
The same unseen presence seemed to
follow her, and send a calmness into her
soul. Awful as the thought was, that she
was a widow, penniless almost, and a
stranger in a foreign land, sweet, heavenly
peace filled her soul, that the God of Israel
was caring for her.

After her arrival at this resting-place
afforded her, one wish filled her breast—
that she might fly to her child. This was
quite impossible, as Emmie was many





72 LITTLE EMMIE,

miles away, and Elizabeth only possessed
a few pence.

A few days after she was brought to
this friendly shelter she received a letter,
and on opening it she found a cheque for
about £5, payable to herself. The money
had been sent to her by the officer whose
duty it was to pay the teachers’ salaries,
and this amount was sent to her as that
due to her late husband. Elizabeth knew
he had not been able to fulfil his duties for
some time previous to his death; still the
authorities paid the salary up to the date of
his death. She was enabled at once to
write to Betsy Cranstone asking her for
her. child.

On a spring morning Elizabeth started
by a stage coach drawn by eight horses,
dashing along over rough roads they
were well trained to traverse. Up hill
and down, now near the edge of awful
precipices, then for two or three miles
through an amphitheatre of hills and rugged
precipices. One false step, or an inex-
perienced driver, and all might have been
hurled into the abyss below.

But all this was nothing to Elizabeth,
for was she not going to meet her long-lost
child! At the breakfast hour the coach
stopped at a wayside inn, and Elizabeth









CH.

E COA

THE STAG









MEETING OF MOTHER AND CHILD. 75

ordered breakfast, and when she asked the -
amount of payment, the landlord, who was
a perfect stranger to her, would not take
anything. Her widow’s garb might have
won his sympathy. However, whatever
was the cause, she had another manifesta-
tion of a Father's care.

Again the coach sped on its way, till
Elizabeth had to change for the train.
This was soon done, and in a short time,
Emmie saw a train slowly steam into the
primitive little railway station, on the plat-
form of which she was standing with
‘Betsy. And oh! joy burst into her little
heart, for at the window of one of the
carriages was the face of her long-lost
mother, who soon took her to her breast,
and then with a bursting heart of thank-
fulness to the Father of all mercies, parent
and little one sped on their way.

They soon arrived at the temporary
shelter that had been afforded to Elizabeth
by the good people who had so befriended
her. She, however, longed to be able to
earn something for herself, as she knew
that three months must elapse ere she
could hear from friends at home. In a
day or two she applied for a small school.
Friends doubted the good of this applica-
tion, as there were so many other appli-



76 LITTLE EMMIE,

cants; but Elizabeth could trust in a little
measure her heavenly Father now, whose
care had been so manifested to Edward in
providing for him; so she felt assured that
she would have that which was good for
her. She calmly waited the issue of
events.

Three days after her application, while
sitting at tea, a messenger came with a
note. On opening it she was informed
that a temporary teacher was wanted at
Seafield ; average attendance sixteen;
salary after the rate of £81; expenses
paid, and she was asked to go. She was
given the money for a first-class ticket and
expense of vehicle. Imagine her joy, dear
reader, once more to be able to shield her
little one, and to have a sphere of labour.
God can use whom He will for His people’s
ood, and He does the very best for
those who leave the choice to Him. “Om-
nipotence hath servants everywhere.’
Once again could she sing:

“Flow good is the God I adore.”

He restored her to health, gave her back
her child, and now was bestowing on her
an earthly home, and although He had
taken her husband to the paradise above,



MEETING OF MOTHER AND CHILD. 7?

He was not going to leave her alone ; for
He Himself was to be her guard and guide,
and give her the privilege of scattering
seeds of truth among the children of parents
who could not point them the way to the
tender Shepherd.

What an honour to serve Him in the
smallest measure; but the vessels He uses
are made meet for the Master’s use. He
wounds to heal, He breaks the earthen
vessel that His light may shine out to
poor benighted travellers. He uses the
weak things of the earth that He Himself
and not another may have all the glory.

“Close to His feet on the pathway,
Empty, and frail, and small,
An earthen vessel was lying,
Which seemed of no good at all.

“But the Master saw and raised it
From the dust in which it lay,
And smiled as He gently whispered,
This shall do My work to-day.”

SS UAS







CHAPTER IX.

THE EARTHQUAKE, AND JOURNEY TO

SEAFIELD. .

|N the following Saturday Eliza-
|| beth was to start for Seafield.
The evening previous was
spent in busy preparations
for the journey, and with a
light heart she retired for
the night. Once again she
was not only to have a manifestation of
His love, but of His power also.
In the dark hours of the night a rum-
bling noise was heard under the sward
outside the house, and it increased by
degrees, until it sounded like mighty peals
of thunder vibrating through the air. Then
the lowly cottage of which Elizabeth was
an inmate was shaken to the foundation,
as if the Creator had taken it within His
rasp.
Elizabeth awoke, and in the darkness of





THE EARTHQUAKE, 79

the night she did not need to be told
of the awfulness of her position.. Forty
feet of the spire of the neighbouring
church had fallen to the ground. Some
of the masonry of the adjoining house
was shivered to atoms. Elizabeth did
not tremble; but a faint feeling stole
over her, which was succeeded by a calm-
ness, for she thought, ‘My God would .
not have given me this school, if He
were going to destroy me in this earth-
quake.” She felt so sure that the school
was of God that the simple faith took
all fear, and the Author of it used these
thoughts to comfort her.

The next morning all was calm in nature.
The inhabitants, as she passed along the
street to the railway station, looked awe-
stricken, as if something unearthly had
happened, as indeed it had. Many, how-
ever, who avowed openly that there was
no God, betrayed their fear. They knew
Him not as a God of love—yea, even
love itself—and fear of the Unseen dwelt
in their breast, try how they would to
hide it.

Elizabeth, her little one, and a daughter
of the good people who had so succoured
her, started for A., a small town seventy
miles off, and twelve miles from her future



80 LITTLE EMMIE,

home. They arrived at the terminus at
mid-day. News soon flies in a small place,
so one of the Seafield school committee, a
well-to-do farmer, who was in the town
of A. that day, soon was apprised of the
fact that the new schoolmistress had ar-
rived. He met her and made himself
known to her, and offered to take her
in his own conveyance. The trio were
soon on their way this lovely spring day.
The terrible earthquake of the preceding
night had cast no shadow on that day.
The sun was shining brilliantly. On went
the travellers, till the lovely ocean ap-
peared, whose mighty waves could be
heard dashing against the gigantic rocks
of the coast.

Elizabeth was eagerly looking out for
the schoolhouse, when, to her surprise, the
good man drove her to his own grounds,
and at last they stopped outside a pretty
wood villa with a verandah and lovely
flowers underneath. The good man’s wife,
a bright-looking person, soon appeared,
and the travellers were given a hearty
welcome, and a repast such as a farm-
house can provide was soon spread, to
which they did ample justice.

They were kept there for the night, and
the next morning Elizabeth was taken to



TUE EARTHQUAKE. 81

her home. She expected to sce a small
shanty, such as she and Edward had
possessed on the mountains, but to her
surprise it was a well-built house, standing,
together with the school, on seven acres of
land covered with verdant grass, except
where the garden lay, and these grounds
were surrounded by a plantation of gum
trees, through which the snow-fed crystal
stream was winding.

No words can fully depict Elizabeth’s
feelings when she entered this home, given
as it were direct to her from heaven. It
was the God of Israel who had touched
the hearts of her benefactors to send her
here. She had no home, and He gave
her one through them. Thus shewing
how God can come in for His people's
good.

The following Monday morning Eliza-
beth met her pupils. She soon got to
love them and they her; and at the end of
one month she was asked to accept the
school permanently. Here she lived for
a year and a half, spending some of her
happiest days. The pure air and sea-
breezes soon strengthened her, and she
felt that her God had done so much for
her she must do something for Him, so
she formed a Sunday-class in the school-



82 LITTLE EMMIE.

room on Sunday afternoons, and at her
own house in the evening for those older,
and who had left the dayschool. Many
had to walk several miles ; but gladly did
they travel rough roads to hear God’s
word. Only about once in five weeks did
a church minister hold service in the
place.

One young girl confessed that she had
found the Saviour through Elizabeth. She
said no interest did she ever take in her
Bible before she came. Once this young
“woman was driving, and her younger
sister fell out of the vehicle, through the
horse taking fright. The poor girl was
several miles from home, and alone by
the roadside with her sister’s head bleeding
profusely. She thought of Elizabeth tell-
ing her to pray when in difficulty ; so the

irl poured out her first real prayer to
God, that she might be guided to some
house to get relief for her sister. She
directly saw in the distance a cottage,
to which she hastily drove, and found
the woman of the house to be a Christian
—a Wesleyan--and she quickly relieved
the suffering girl.

Elizabeth’s health at last gave way, and
she sought medical aid, and was advised
to return quickly to her native land, as she



THE EARTHQUAKE. 83

was suffering from consumption. She soon
prepared to leave this loved spot, and this
young girl who had confessed her Saviour
was asked by others to carry on the
Sunday class that Elizabeth had been
compelled to give up. May God’s rich
blessing be upon this young worker at
the far ends of the earth. Before Eliza-
beth left she composed the following lines,
which were accepted very heartily by the
parents of her pupils:

“ Fair Seafield ! I love to gaze
Upon the panorama of thy lovely landscape ;
Thy distant snow-capped hills towering up in splen-
dour
Beneath the canopy of blue.

Thy wide-spread meadows, and flocks of bleating
lambs ;

And the eastern shores of thy fairy isle,

Fringed with yon azure ocean.

I oft behold thy homesteads, dotted here and there,
And filled with many a kindly heart.

Thy village school, where smiling children, too, I
meet,

And where on Sunday afternoons,

Their voices mingle, with those of riper years,

In hymns of praise to the great Artist,

Whose pencil, as it were, has sketched so fair a
scene,

Where once the sceptre of the savage ruled its
sway.



84 LITTLE EMMIE.

Thy sunsets, too, wee the sun

In all his bold majestic beauty, bathed in sollen
light,

Is seen to smile behind the western hills.

The moon, too, with her silver sheen

I love to gaze on,

Rising in all her loveliness into the spangled vault
of heaven.

Fairer and grander scenes I might have seen,
Where other snow-capped hills tower ’neath heaven’s
canopy.

And lovely gorges, made by the glaciers of other
years,

And foliage of every hue is there ;

Where the crystal stream winds on, a

Increasing ever and anon until I hear its distant
roar.

But Seafield, where I, a homeless stranger found a
home,

And kindly hearts to cheer, I'll ne’er forget thee ;

And in the distant ages may thy voices join with
mine

In Hallelujahs

To the great Creator, the Saviour of mankind,

Whose mighty voice is heard

In the distant roar of thy mighty waves.”







CHAPTER X.

HOMEWARD BOUND.
| 9 NT was with mingled feelings
that Elizabeth looked upon

: the scene of her short labours,
@=)} sorry to bid farewell to the

| scholars she had loved so
-| well, yet glad for the sake of

her child to return to her
native land. The parents of the pupils
presented her with ten pounds. Here
was another manifestation of a Father’s
care, for she needed the money to help to
defray the expenses of the voyage.

One day towards the end of summer,
she and her child left that loved spot. A
hurricane arose as she was on her way to
the railway station. The same evening to-
wards dusk, amid torrents of rain, she
arrived at the terminus of the town, near
the port from where she had to embark for
her native shores. Here, according to
previous arrangements, after a pressing
invitation, was Elizabeth met by her old









86 LITTLE EMMIE.

friends—those who had always befriended
her. In the same lowly cottage, where
she had experienced such love and care,
did she fizd another welcome, and here
she remained for a few days ere she set
sail. Near this spot she bade farewell
to scenes that she would never visit on
earth again, where some of her greatest
trials had been, but where, too, her Father’s
care had been so manifest. One spot, the
dearest on earth to her, had to be left,
never more to be looked on, the spot
where her dear husband lay; still, while
weeping over that grave, she could lift her
eye heavenward to that serener clime
where sorrow can never enter, and where
she will see her beloved husband again.
Her friends accompanied her to the sea-
port where she was to embark. Elizabeth
much dreaded seeing this place. Those
hills reminded her of the time when she
and Edward landed, as lonely emigrants ;
and now she was going to embark from
the same place a widow, yet not alone; for
the God of Israel, who was going to guide
her across the deep, supported her now.
For the moment the feeling was agonising,
but the same calm assurance stole over
her that she was not alone, and with a firm
step she ascended the gangway, nerving



HOMEWARD BOUND. 87

herself to face the stern realities of life
for the sake of her darling child.

Elizabeth possessed some of the charac-
teristics of her race: she hada vast amount
of the power of endurance, together with
indomitable perseverance, that during the
last few months had been called into action.
These are nought without the blessing of
the Lord ; still He works in us not only to
will but to do according to His good
pleasure, and He nerves the feeble hand
for fight.

She at last bade farewell to her faithful
friends. How they had befriended her,
God only knows. There are some noble
ones on earth, and among them do these
friends of the friendless stand. God used
them as instruments, so thanksgiving must
ascend to the Fountain Head for all our
mercies ; still may God abundantly bless the
instrument: “I will bless them that bless
you” is not effaced from the written word.

As Elizabeth saw the receding forms of
her true friends, a feeling of loneliness
crept over her; but in gentle whisper
she heard the words of that mighty
Comforter saying, “’Tis I, be not afraid.”

In a short time the good ship A. was
out on the ocean wave and “ Home-
ward Bound.”









CHAPTER XL

STEERAGE PASSAGE AND ITS EXPERIENCES.





oft LER Elizabeth’s friends had
1} left her, she descended to the
steerage: she had no means
to take a saloon passage.
The deck of the ship and
all the surroundings reminded
her of her outward voyage,
when she had her loved husband to protect
her. The vessel was expected to be
heavily loaded at the next port, so that
very little room was left for steerage
passengers. She found at the foot of
steps almost perpendicular, a small square
compartment, with two narrow deal tables
and forms to match, and the only medium
of light and air was through the hatchway.
The food was served very indifferently.
Rusty tins held the eatables, and to one in
delicate health the whole appearance did
not have a very appetising effect. No

Pee









>
3 oN
OSS]











STEERAGE PASSAGE.













STEERAGE PASSAGE. QI

doubt the whole arrangements were ample
for what remuneration the company re-
ceived ; still to one in her state of health
it was far from desirable. There were
nine squalid children constantly making
a din, still Elizabeth pitied them, and on
the first Sunday she called them together
and told them of Jesus and His love.

After twelve hours’ passage the vessel
arrived at the chief port of the island,
where she remained one week. Elizabeth
prayed earnestly for grace to bear all the
difficulties connected with the steerage.
For six days, from early morn till dusk,
the stores for England were being hauled
down to a place close by her, there being
only a thin partition between her and the
hold, and the door leading to the spot
constantly open, so that watching her child
to keep her from danger was Elizabeth’s
constant occupation. There are warm
hearts everywhere, and the fellow passen-
gers though poor, possessed kindly feelings.
Some of the women were ever ready to
minister to the invalid. A cup of tea was
often brought to her cabin door.

A kind-hearted Irishman would go on
shore now and then to buy sweets, &c.,
and then distribute them among the
little ones. How often it -is that when



g2 LITTLE EMMIE,

trouble oppresses us, there are other
wounded hearts around us. woman, who had lost her husband a few
weeks before, was returning to her native
shores with five children, two of them
infants. When Elizabeth knew of this,
she thought, I am not alone in trouble.
Oh, what a time will that be when He
will wipe the tear from every eye, and
we shall rest eternally where sorrow can
never enter.

While Elizabeth was staying with her
friends before she embarked, she went toa
boarding-house to wish the friend farewell
who had first told her that she was a widow.
This lady invited her to luncheon, and
while the two were seated at a dining-
table, a gentleman and his wife walked
in, and took seats near them. Elizabeth
was introduced to them by her friend.
The gentleman had that day heard from
England, and in a letter was one enclosed
for Elizabeth, which he intended sending
to her that day.

It was from an old mutual friend whom
she had known from girlhood, and he
thought to gain her friends by thus bring-
ing her before their notice. And now ina
most remarkable way was she brought be-
fore these people in a public restaurant,



STEERAGE PASSAGE. 93

and nearly one hundred miles from her
former place of abode. Her friend
said, “ This meeting is of the Lord ;”
but Elizabeth wondered for what pur-
pose.

On the gentleman hearing that she was
to start for England so soon, and was to
remain in the next port a week, he said
there was a friend there whom he knew
intimately, and he would write to him at
once. Perhaps he might be able in some
way to shew her kindness. Two days
after, Elizabeth and her child arrived at
this port about six p.m., and the former
was completely prostrated with the effects
of the voyage, not well enough to look
after her little one, much more to battle
with the surroundings.

- However, her mind rose above diff-
culties, and, as has been said, she prayed
for grace to bear, and this was not denied
her. At eleven a.m. she was told that
a lady on deck wished to see her, and
when Elizabeth went up she found a friend
that she had known in other years, in her
native land, and she was also the wife
of the gentleman that her new-found friend
had written to on her behalf. Sorry indeed
was she to see her so situated. She said,
‘IT am sure it would not be the wish of



94 LITTLE EMMIE. ©

your friends at home that you should be in
thesteerage.”:
- Elizabeth said, “They do not know of
my coming, neither will they till I am far
on the voyage.”

This lady invited her to her house, but
Elizabeth was too ill to accept.

On the following Saturday her husband
came to see Elizabeth, and shewed great
sympathy on seeingher so situated, and said,
‘IT will do all I can for you, Mrs. N.”
Elizabeth did not know what the words
were meant to convey, and little did she
think of the benefit his noble heart was
going to confer upon her.

The next morning being Sunday, and
feeling better, she strolled with her child
into the town, and never before or since
did she experience such a sense of loneli-
ness. She was three hundred miles from
her true and tried friends, and twelve
thousand miles from her native land. She
endeavoured to find a meeting of Chris-
tians, and was successful after much walk-
ing and trouble. A salvation army officer
directed her (these people are found in all
parts of the globe). How thankful was
Elizabeth to rest at last. Oh, how she
valued that hour with God’s own people!
And once again she took the emblems



STEERAGE PASSAGE. 95

of the Saviour’s death, and thanksgiving
true and heartfelt ascended that morning
to the Father of all mercies.

After the meeting was over, friendly
faces were around her, and she was taken
to one good woman’s house, who for the
greater part of the day took care of Emmie
and nursed her mother. That evening she
returned to the vessel, and as she again
descended the steps and saw the dim light
of the lanterns sending a sombre shade on
all around, she determined to accept no
more invitations, but to nerve herself to
bear, and not to again visit comfortable
homes that would only be the means of
making her more discontented with her
lot by comparison.

She always remembered the words of
her friend: “1 will do all I can for you;”
and was ever eager to look at any stranger
descending the steps. Her faith, however,
had to be tested once more. The day
before the vessel started for England she
was put out to sea, as there was a regatta
and the chief officers were fearful of the
sailors getting intoxicated, so the vessel
was anchored far out in the harbour. All
hope seemed gone for anything to be done
for the weary travellers.

The last day came for the vessel to he



96 LITTLE EMMIE.

in the harbour, and then the last hour.
She was, however, soon to be on her
way to an earthly haven, and the God
of all comfort was guiding her, and He
who has the hearts of all in His hands
was going to take the fatherless and
widow across earth’s stormy waters in
His arms of love. The poor fragile thing
was to taste some of earth’s comforts in
a remarkable way, till the vessel she had
embarked on steered into a harbour of her
native land.

A gentleman appeared on the steps,
Elizabeth eagerly scanned him; but he
was not her long-expectea friend. How-
ever, as he descended, he seemed to have
his eye fixed on Elizabeth, and after speak-
ing to the steward he advanced straight
towards her. ‘I am sent,” he said, ‘‘ by
Mr. B. to tell you that he has settled
everything for you, and transfers you to
the saloon, where you will get every
comfort. It was impossible for him to
come to you himself, as business calls
him away. I am to bid you farewell
for him.”

He then turned to the steward and
called upon him to take Elizabeth’s lug-
gage to the saloon.

Elizabeth wondered if she heard aright,



STEERAGE PASSAGE. 97

she seemed ina dream. Here ina strange
land, so many miles from those dear to
her, seated on a rough wooden bench,
with nine squalid children around her, the
foul air enough to take what little appetite
she had from her, and now to be asked to
quit this place where she had spent seven
of the most iniserable days of her life and
go to the saloon, no words can fully por-
tray her feelings. Enough to say, that
with an alacrity she had not possessed for
many a day she ascended the steps,
breathed once more the lovely sea breeze,
and then followed her guide to the saloon.











CHAPTER XII.

SALOON COMFORTS.

RLIZABETH, when shewn to
her cabin, could not help
exclaiming aloud, “This is
beautiful.” She had known
what comforts and refinement
mean, still in comparison to
what she had left only a
few moments before, all seemed truly de-
lightful. She was given one of the largest
cabins, with more berths than she required.
She had been given an easy chair before
starting, but this article had been of no
use to her whatever, having no room in
the steerage to put it. The steward soon
fixed this article at the end of the saloon,
and when Elizabeth reclined in it she
thought she had indeed found a haven
of rest. She soon gained strength.
Each meal was served so nicely, and so
many things to tempt the invalid, that her
pale, wan look soon passed away. All







SALOON COMFORTS. 99

were kind and considerate. The little
fatherless girl soon gained friends. At
each port passengers would go ashore,
and return heavily laden with the produce
of the place, and Emmie was never for-
gotten—bananas, oranges, grapes, sweets,
&c., were amply supplied her. The
mother and child could not go ashore.
No funds, and want of strength kept
Elizabeth in the vessel.

One day, in the tropics, with the sun
immediately overhead, and all the port-
holes closed while the vessel was coaling,
all the passengers went on shore, but
Elizabeth and her child had to remain ;
but never did she value a sea breeze as
she did that night, when the ship was out
again on the ocean wave. The evenings
were whiled away by the passengers,
either by card-playing or singing. Eliza-
beth noticed that the card-players were
often the most earnest in joining in the
singing of the hymn, “For those in peril
on the sea.” Their card-playing, however
much they tried, could never make them
forget that they were on the mighty deep.

The first Sunday in the saloon, Elizabeth
was asked to join in the singing, and she
played the organ, too. ‘And as she sat at
the instrument she could not help contrast-



IOO LITTLE EMMIE.

ing that evening with the previous one,
when, instead of being seated at the organ
with an air of refinement surrounding her,
she was seated on a wooden bench with no
support, and the dim lantern making the
apartment more sombre still. Such is life,
full of changes, one day up, another the
reverse. She was truly thankful for the
change; but the ludicrous contrast of the
situation gave her a feeling of amusement.

She was brought other comforts besides
the ship’s allowance, and was told that a
friend of her husband, unknown to her,
had come on board before she arrived, and
given a carte blanche for all she needed for
her comfort. Who this friend was Eliza-
beth had no idea; but it seemed that
whichever way she turned her Father’s
care was manifested.

Those comforts had not been given her
the first week, as she was only allowed as
a favour to go on board a week before the
ship started from the island, because she
should be saved the trouble of changing
from a coasting steamer in order to meet
the vessel, so the regular order was not
established at first. Such a change from
that which was so hard to bear to luxury in
comparison enchanted the little fatherless’
one. They had asplendid passage, such an
one as the vessel had never experienced.



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'2011-10-16T12:46:31-04:00'
describe
'2100932' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRH' 'sip-files00009.tif'
259d1f3f4ae0ba88d9f16a59d43ea271
e5bd04f96dcb268583ece42f8e2e3ebc3853f3e2
'2011-10-16T12:48:13-04:00'
describe
'774' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRI' 'sip-files00009.txt'
1f863c907ded8a4ad5520375b92ac145
8cd1f8a1d4835a4ee2a58672980fc5d8556aea31
'2011-10-16T12:47:21-04:00'
describe
'20315' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
3b1b6338e2279fdc2cdf86b45a76bb4f
fa97292a30d4c5a0c1e5dbfe87814c0b81da2564
'2011-10-16T12:49:42-04:00'
describe
'261471' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRK' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
1966d9631719d6263e2d4b57e5b31842
855179d8c51d23f7c45f1f3a326762fdd141c0c5
'2011-10-16T12:49:37-04:00'
describe
'190183' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRL' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
f351c8d1429da7dab32f7cd594f5a4f3
2f32a69dcb1af7a660f53b8f714ffc3a562ec6a8
describe
'31841' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRM' 'sip-files00010.pro'
1ff6397888348a13bd3f5d94cb8bcaf8
977041b723e6a3502f1de9e724d935e03273e246
describe
'64955' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRN' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
8265428737c5cab21d5426f717fe867d
fd680cf806e058a97c3bf15c7bb67efbd0bae9d2
describe
'2101108' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRO' 'sip-files00010.tif'
d70726e392bb6f115d700dc354513f19
cbce978e2e9786db916d519a31de00ce6bae2d1e
'2011-10-16T12:48:28-04:00'
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRP' 'sip-files00010.txt'
11a1126cb2bd3a2871421ae6aa90fef9
244342d360a624e605ed82d55832a42381325c28
'2011-10-16T12:47:25-04:00'
describe
'22611' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRQ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
b86e69be97bdb440a2495e91d1a5b7aa
da422db6851e842ac3eb19580ec4260ac435591f
'2011-10-16T12:48:05-04:00'
describe
'261449' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
c533eeef26ad07aedf824ef0b5758fe8
12404a025444eaa90e47e37466fd8aeff7c12c14
'2011-10-16T12:46:28-04:00'
describe
'186078' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRS' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
9e35fc7921b7d8f5012d4cf1e44f59c3
04d670bcb21cb80860a5e943ec54b57e5464a3c8
'2011-10-16T12:49:55-04:00'
describe
'30861' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRT' 'sip-files00011.pro'
45254763111eea18362da64419a91ee9
6fb0756ede0708c65260c74f8e7002b80af54ab1
'2011-10-16T12:47:17-04:00'
describe
'63783' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRU' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
350b7da6ecd588ab6c2ed8c5e48669f8
0ad373da57d254ddd104f02941bf4839a76f3174
'2011-10-16T12:47:01-04:00'
describe
'2101172' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
bc5023ca65e985aae574ce3b32ad3643
9332c2ca83863495ba7fb1c9c23565fc61794705
'2011-10-16T12:47:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRW' 'sip-files00011.txt'
da392d4ca72f07cee59192850e18d54f
e88f57cb59438c1dc80e5729f9d502d92974f7c9
'2011-10-16T12:48:45-04:00'
describe
'22993' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRX' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
b5f5af477d0f329c426ccd7755b9683f
4eb797a2fb4bb401179192aeb7c80b2c6c341b49
'2011-10-16T12:49:16-04:00'
describe
'261479' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRY' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d7701fe34ab898465df6523e39c911ed
e9ea2ab228e5471a8e474157735588e94d0f2785
describe
'187254' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIRZ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
b55996d6f3f0d91baa82afc153331577
0e8d38cc05017fc641066060a475be67ed349000
'2011-10-16T12:47:27-04:00'
describe
'30751' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISA' 'sip-files00012.pro'
63a97cf06079c58b2ecd581ad0ba4ba6
a969017ef033d5c98452b20af388fd1e64e32e44
'2011-10-16T12:46:30-04:00'
describe
'64241' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISB' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
0e703df98cb03c877d1b15b6b2836d7d
999c9d10b45db1a25a8446a7b0e3c049c698b2f8
describe
'2101216' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
3da490bd6b7716ff645aae2d354da3da
244a55fd8e592c5a210b2c9eb2944ed7474a917c
'2011-10-16T12:49:23-04:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISD' 'sip-files00012.txt'
1821fa2b9c348fd8fccca25ab0fd474a
e6fb4d6175f79f70714f2b8c06f71a3947e5f4d7
'2011-10-16T12:48:38-04:00'
describe
'23062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISE' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
1c3ceb7fb3e7f2614548c5bea4e34510
178959847fe63a12a20c16413e1c8764031d5a66
describe
'261453' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISF' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
b16ce152ff51c98f11c1ace0b3e7a883
75cf1e2170ce8504d92e78952aca81c2e9e483db
describe
'254418' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISG' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
3fe8cd4ee03295ef9e024cc9d9a38e91
a64c991048b09cdf139d72f21bbdfe1353c2a036
'2011-10-16T12:46:22-04:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISH' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b7809dedd2b2cece792cbac7fa4a2ac4
8c8e5f0cd8b832afd7c313c5e77ffe82049bd780
'2011-10-16T12:49:10-04:00'
describe
'64237' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
229c3d2ff975adebfd07a2c6afade2bf
a24e44d8bc51239c7d44db16c0ffc9a9c75e3b99
describe
'2101276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISJ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
c7a2c1036f149d7255b0352fbf4e8549
07acc035459246fb53a3d01c2464e0c5e1ce02a6
'2011-10-16T12:49:21-04:00'
describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISK' 'sip-files00013.txt'
a815124551cd8ad21a02b03e32afc995
50843ac139027783e765f3afa5f53753aae71bc9
describe
'21621' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISL' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
b2e8e95b672b3590434755aaee655083
d50edc8ebda0e5e36c801accc1da7e70c4f97ffb
describe
'261455' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISM' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
10e36a572d56d8597fb1038fff23a3cd
3fb40f045dd20775b04d72a2c51630b713e3b96b
describe
'22523' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISN' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
624896584df44fa9d9bea299da073ca6
f2649c37f95b27cf01277a5ae7b544c8d5a770fb
'2011-10-16T12:46:26-04:00'
describe
'9406' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISO' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
57554d2bd5c04e633e180a496bead5a6
d7ff6c179852cf35323e99a876e02fb00fd50d9d
'2011-10-16T12:47:53-04:00'
describe
'2098136' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISP' 'sip-files00014.tif'
81ec6d9212c13ade706f38cf3d0379c1
5f2de453746bd03aa48cfba44012dc3bd8afad0b
describe
'7407' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISQ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
ee7597461ab67b28da572e79a1bc9fee
919e9146a0e9c24a5fa3c4c6f1fd1743b0b232e1
describe
'261482' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
c04b8da13a0cf3bbfdc3a13f69614457
1f50ba02628d38e0e5259aadd122273168323042
'2011-10-16T12:46:48-04:00'
describe
'173354' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISS' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
bd5516bfd16371f47733ea6967b43e45
4392dac8846cb159a7444adbb41bad000e3adc1f
describe
'30678' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIST' 'sip-files00015.pro'
23fa6ac04c0e1103bac1d961e2e562b3
c02cc795c2c10b81a6406d63d6c85b51b5711b72
describe
'63154' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
78857e3611b3ef8047e4de096efa709f
e5cb35f6d6b1ec226d59afd6cad7fa2db328bb81
describe
'2101068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISV' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0acb9dca042596507b395d127631f4f3
8dc0ee13a1d1f621ef94b4104b8a87d0ebafdbb1
'2011-10-16T12:48:48-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISW' 'sip-files00015.txt'
5e24fe749a4e91c799d317127ddfb069
ad664ed6dd9a6c5407783c87bec5023244602b17
'2011-10-16T12:49:58-04:00'
describe
'22861' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISX' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
319f469810166f96ec4eb9c1d46a5a2c
247187f53ccb2a140b85d078e0a2ef03717caf86
'2011-10-16T12:49:13-04:00'
describe
'261411' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISY' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
9802c7e611e10303972594fcb522bf6c
e12f9795ba0c570b1c5af5e29a60bf3dd07ac066
describe
'187353' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAISZ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
b5e55f793eaddf6cd472f311aae987dd
ff321c6714233282cb3fb8a914a2dc9728df7823
'2011-10-16T12:50:10-04:00'
describe
'30182' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITA' 'sip-files00016.pro'
176bbd8cd45ef1067f948977aecabf14
87288145650c78ea54d5baa9da373f0b7308e129
'2011-10-16T12:50:03-04:00'
describe
'63204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITB' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
84af0b815c309b003cc5f626f0af0a14
f5bdd6737956a2c914539377100efacf463e1756
describe
'2101176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITC' 'sip-files00016.tif'
761ef373787394b3a07a17b0141eb228
f0c96d8b73dfd269a8cfa0198c8902c6f6a828c7
'2011-10-16T12:47:23-04:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITD' 'sip-files00016.txt'
76c707effd7fb88f30525a7577221b35
29f0b180d9cc6808cb146b9bfd839ac7236a01bf
'2011-10-16T12:49:12-04:00'
describe
'22490' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITE' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
629d19acc0afeb994f86859eae114f28
e59b92904293e4c9e5e371459fcbe0cf6cec23e5
'2011-10-16T12:49:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
53dc5b838532b952344bb194bd4e9fd8
0842b843900687a3f6a001a0ab20ed62aa650cfa
'2011-10-16T12:48:08-04:00'
describe
'161703' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITG' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
1066ec6dadbf3a1b4114cff3397b99e7
1e5d81bd8b212416d9f9a887af661ab5ba40f8d9
describe
'26969' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
496a5fe93270050b409631168e4fa128
b1039d7aa3a84028e23ea7efcc2ad9ef974430fb
'2011-10-16T12:49:44-04:00'
describe
'52890' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
967168fcd51023f0a1fff71475ac35d5
e4c06c8a37af4ec0a7d8da5c2dcf5649edc0367e
describe
'2100632' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITJ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
67785fd034934fd19478443902f85d2d
34ad2371f5328e87c0502be8cc3a91bba41b3c91
'2011-10-16T12:48:18-04:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITK' 'sip-files00017.txt'
ee3e79839ae2f66ed35f69b7973cc289
5874eee0d77227b39ec78fba8e04115a2d31bc6e
describe
'20009' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITL' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d9b8dc2202c8609a7cc68f00d42e1baf
0a87a89482865c8edd823a0031990de602ff4431
'2011-10-16T12:47:07-04:00'
describe
'261702' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITM' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
92354e448f22943ad4f7d54e5a589900
8d8586d9aaafa804cc272433decac69e8375c46c
describe
'157422' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
592a6a69886198dfe551bb9ac25f54cf
e4588ff90826cd2d1aaf24ff5469c761fee7af68
'2011-10-16T12:46:23-04:00'
describe
'24905' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITO' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c7aa3a012aa1a3f72af25336af1135fd
624f448f5b81816cbd8350c981ab28b73194e6fa
describe
'51133' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
54ff3b4e96540c043bc596df302cb810
fa91182ae95e09f6aa9e070b7bb58e47fdeaff88
describe
'2102500' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITQ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
8e79a0143cb8febf83f650aba088adbd
b7d8d9a90cc9d119c6cc1441601e3b038cfd04d7
'2011-10-16T12:47:52-04:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITR' 'sip-files00018.txt'
d03ce2a0168a7d1af050dc7be017e6d4
9cc5cf45a24b04f400f47f32ae38e26b6cf2c061
describe
'19476' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITS' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
e7a11849435258496ff1ad0eed7bdb16
77f7d89835c823aea4bacdcd4ce1842afdc0015e
describe
'261472' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITT' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
3a9ab20d275b3bae0fcdb50099dc7017
0221947525dea807474dd41840980658f207eb73
describe
'186082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
01337c52b8cee4a1d260b15941b66f17
fb6b921d7df6f049fe1e2cacd138bcd21b19d05b
'2011-10-16T12:47:05-04:00'
describe
'30246' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITV' 'sip-files00019.pro'
fd4c141871ff95ea933d11bd5fe88d77
a674213a25ebe3176427aab49a73a3f37bfa4f40
describe
'62361' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
bdc72ad5c2bf9d9e6d8b7499e7ca0837
75c78b862a46d76a6c5b527051173c52ac576bfc
'2011-10-16T12:47:14-04:00'
describe
'2101140' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
2dd3f82913f918f4c1df78585768986a
8587219abe432c5ce73aaddabfc17d269430c552
'2011-10-16T12:48:40-04:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
f2727d5f49a74f677510171ad13591ad
e9e81b5b800cbae45e035445733bf372fa6cf6f0
'2011-10-16T12:47:54-04:00'
describe
'22321' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAITZ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
b16c0cb3cd6fe1a595e4cbc674062b5c
20d3cd03c05e21fe05c71505f84f9013b8baa4b7
'2011-10-16T12:47:20-04:00'
describe
'261224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
df6af4c7cea0a653a3ee88c5acbdfbc2
7862dff44bc44a3b5fbc041f578b1142ef34a7a1
'2011-10-16T12:50:02-04:00'
describe
'125602' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
49ec9b9b29b65b6d4eb081c89f3fcae4
e2ad7fcaeb47d3cfd8023b4676b914fd8bbb4b96
describe
'15976' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUC' 'sip-files00020.pro'
3482db054b9aeaf41e8f45903e33dca8
71a19a40e8beacfd05f3c44ce95b559f5174cbb1
'2011-10-16T12:49:48-04:00'
describe
'40812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
81d5a36e7e0f5813e57ee2bce6af897f
7686d9e379657f6fde540a3ae8c2fc51c5e80605
'2011-10-16T12:47:40-04:00'
describe
'2099924' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUE' 'sip-files00020.tif'
7ccd28df18c97b92de72eb34f942a98d
f3ba2107fe5cb4863f50a7faf03659be3291621a
describe
'668' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUF' 'sip-files00020.txt'
a00aa722078e4500e5ab4821c42aba29
faa00d9befb4ac4c8712ec3248a2166097f41a71
'2011-10-16T12:50:04-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'16331' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUG' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c3496a8ebffd0bff8eb3dcff214e7bef
74813aff02f7c8acfa93cc5184a522b116897927
describe
'261483' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUH' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
62be381a5d4c8fa8142f750aa49cfd87
c2d73929ae27dfca1ba4471f14ff70a2ebd29a22
'2011-10-16T12:47:26-04:00'
describe
'172870' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUI' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
5ad22fc1aaff4bf6615b92b443c49392
37bbb84f0c2b132f19aee46f13acb220145eb5de
'2011-10-16T12:50:00-04:00'
describe
'18457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUJ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
0b46b29fc22ad1b16954671941163086
c6007750f58de85ed2ff259515ebf12b02958d78
'2011-10-16T12:47:06-04:00'
describe
'53852' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUK' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
954ed08b940de1f3cb96195597fabb39
3d08f992e9432e1e6ce75151448ca2df58674306
'2011-10-16T12:47:10-04:00'
describe
'2100828' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7199ebbda736a41057103a4e1338a2b3
3438fa35dfe9704b2f425d349373accdc0fc2fd5
'2011-10-16T12:49:22-04:00'
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
439422169962d1e6af23bfbfc84801b9
8b53ef6da8083fb60dc17cace7c9bd602cebf256
describe
'20523' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
3aec6144b0ca2076f34ab4807efffafb
2cd0103767892eba77c81f277b4fa5b6bf2a7eaa
'2011-10-16T12:46:35-04:00'
describe
'261382' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
a4920f0f129e736e893d4baf68906c45
db216893bdc0eb0d3a43fda7589f34660f86dd3e
'2011-10-16T12:48:59-04:00'
describe
'183867' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c8ffcf8594ae5bd19933a3f039ab870e
7f6f0e1639a2390411a516f4bef4e491afa3dacc
'2011-10-16T12:49:04-04:00'
describe
'31265' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
ded69a3e3ecdee27e66b73f84ab5e093
1448bae3af154390c4f419643ee6cb83d0d1f837
describe
'63941' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
feb4686d0a4790034dddb968fdc997eb
6c95b9104fc388213ec45097435f24ae95c6f8e9
'2011-10-16T12:47:35-04:00'
describe
'2101088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUS' 'sip-files00022.tif'
42e38e219aafe90f038deb9437a29d7e
35adf639685928d3af7fe0d0c6ef863f1cbebc85
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUT' 'sip-files00022.txt'
edb85c73cd2e10eb45ae8ed1b1e009c3
9ba26abd8d31c4c673b5e07041e3c86731fc9695
'2011-10-16T12:47:47-04:00'
describe
'22806' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUU' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
cfe55b9e853ac1ce2134d2347fe94762
077b1b6ff89942667164e18e89b9a196493c7e61
describe
'261378' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
82b830ba8331339c5036f88a00ce2207
d0931ec4fc966cada7a1d6f0ad63fa41f2b5b709
'2011-10-16T12:47:08-04:00'
describe
'172469' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
70b91dac0ab375168849c9567cb5d29e
aa2159dc9639fe065bf1e7b6a0fa518369f38b93
describe
'30087' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUX' 'sip-files00023.pro'
bd00013d19a087ccf33b653d098f0fa3
ab8c890e706064727deae7266a78012269942d2b
describe
'58876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUY' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
0e48febfeb2911f5f8b6f7beeea67fec
6e7d935bfae9e42ba9bac9fec9907b3d0e1087d7
describe
'2100880' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIUZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5bf78f822af8758f091b47ec4f9dfe72
6debf1cc318a163353e633e34efda9cfc5649172
'2011-10-16T12:46:33-04:00'
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
fb50d15c23ed4a36771b354f0d58628e
fddbfe30233f915f29dff1af66c52216f3cc4e5a
'2011-10-16T12:47:33-04:00'
describe
'21391' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
a7f29d1b10dd195d1d15f48505fff7f0
15974ce0fb1fb9ce2a4142598e6aed6b5fa84c6a
'2011-10-16T12:46:53-04:00'
describe
'261419' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2cb7b0119cbbd26415c58c182b66b73b
a189fd64906ab6e7c5a99d3cd74b596af9e11f24
describe
'187579' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
1db629186187612814a0d995198c585f
e792dc5402b9d982a6181e159f4a41eb06e1e6bb
describe
'31155' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVE' 'sip-files00024.pro'
0c8dc76862047b2dc2b12feee07b8ace
5d6424359ee492d8edaaccb0016104e37c25a8d3
describe
'63827' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
48f2f4028d5b81addbcd994458b6d2c0
1d27dc47e103001469a24b4be54dd7217a4f6597
describe
'2101036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c78bd83a60eee7ae000bfe322c4d36c5
115f96213acb116520ab8d195099ce4dd118c705
'2011-10-16T12:47:56-04:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVH' 'sip-files00024.txt'
33d2e84e143c1d4ccbbd4cc27987f173
45b39247edda68366e079b8c01e459b6ba73eca1
'2011-10-16T12:46:37-04:00'
describe
'22549' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
3d97682f9677c3de267b75ce42bcc847
0de28162bb6c4aef855789bfc23f695983fc8e51
describe
'261446' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a1151eebf85c9f69dea782d97826cf0b
cfc05274743a2d49c3e0202ceece2920abea4623
'2011-10-16T12:48:23-04:00'
describe
'162220' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
ceb392a476207d2e1d93ae472e33d854
7a30912f0c89a7ea240184b9990a76d75b81d284
describe
'25656' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVL' 'sip-files00025.pro'
6ecbd857c283acd7fc7b1c88a199daf1
3aed09163f64685c604798bb099f8b75ac2cca52
'2011-10-16T12:47:28-04:00'
describe
'54710' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVM' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
179e259b92f23f897c16e8da0fb138d9
520c983fe04bda3ba35f43b8ce42963482d4e205
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
27c982b9727c91b58c7204421b91a54a
9cfb7b82c0d25f66d39742eba251f21c31e35b7b
'2011-10-16T12:48:24-04:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVO' 'sip-files00025.txt'
05d27e33bae4086d7f7c6582ae1aed1b
da34ad9f8c007bd6bd66c06a4e3dc5b4a0597d1e
'2011-10-16T12:48:51-04:00'
describe
'20631' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
9418ebfb2daaf57374f8b1fb9c3f2f50
d45d1d282fef5513c25788065d476a65c90b00c2
describe
'261416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVQ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
24898e1a160d9a411eccecdcc9cc1e2f
e9bcca35a3bd980f916b3b7baff3b03c09756a8e
'2011-10-16T12:48:19-04:00'
describe
'171320' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVR' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8132b6f2140c84da36cfddfae5166959
d25d50b39dae79c22fc9393d1b7398bf01f3a958
describe
'22341' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVS' 'sip-files00026.pro'
a0500edb35e32413c7386fbaf31d71de
7460d2882b45125be986b727f1d10516aea509bd
describe
'57953' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
cc02627f1472ba56398c12505d96d0ef
b9d1751634112826f618142bc521c2b489e42148
'2011-10-16T12:47:43-04:00'
describe
'2101064' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
4ec7e530e4bed02ed89a8d0955d75095
a169ab20bd042c003f94309e05ecc80aec7dc47c
'2011-10-16T12:47:36-04:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
038c5bb10c20842c64a10fc1e0f2bd71
52a386f4ab6236a074c61cd3fa3a305db0f4c08d
describe
'20981' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
5906c94cbeeabac62b3ba8bf96c1e0cd
4ab5232f2f5b2ed0ce95d6e9d456526b2cfaf235
'2011-10-16T12:48:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
6590b8ebd54e84b663668fc6804eca91
7e2713bb074066a6c6ecfae78ea40c067833e515
'2011-10-16T12:48:47-04:00'
describe
'219075' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
440d5ca55ac87fdd336f329b7d0052d6
8fcf7c348dcb6ea4e1283ce20c2a1a0daea92434
describe
'626' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIVZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
04f8016f92de32e474db97fa67debfdc
e5d140aaa60875a9dc16d18d6852ea4a5448fce0
'2011-10-16T12:46:43-04:00'
describe
'53813' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
03e03f52eb226cf410bdac849d30b688
64140357c801fa77ad15669b89c8ac7d3775537c
'2011-10-16T12:46:32-04:00'
describe
'2100692' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
e0a86f95f76d8b0b5b791cd950fa35cc
c1060f0844f33214e2f2abfd410123f2caa283cc
'2011-10-16T12:47:38-04:00'
describe
'131' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d077010db9e7640fdb978cbe2fab9ee6
cb7abb44ca3b74318cd4ea9dcc9661a2a8ca0505
'2011-10-16T12:49:06-04:00'
describe
'19173' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWD' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
b76c4d91a66ecb14c393e1aa30409b68
527cadb20a33d12ee8ce08d47743d584c7fbe4a1
'2011-10-16T12:48:36-04:00'
describe
'261109' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
b684794adf1f1af3c13b86066f21838c
e6372b5a7ebfed3f6fa06085198bfc693a05509f
describe
'40546' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
1237fb05dfd91f5eeade30bb30c51944
bece885cce9b5ba19775c3e7786191ff60d5caba
describe
'10858' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWG' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
48c08aae003fc1c4fcd9e0e497339276
8e7a8d491742ad69bc8e44a3245a9e0ddff3bc5e
'2011-10-16T12:46:29-04:00'
describe
'2098152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
f025ce69935e089a193adafaa2db031c
dfeb88867e1ab51485f09d3dde7c65e60fa42376
describe
'7599' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWI' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
a7924ae85c22fb9831f8e9ff7059f68c
3f8e99cd4a9f2834abcd354ac2f4ec4206021d15
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWJ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
52402baca026f23927d75ec37792c550
10c0d4ccd738fb6735c3994eb05df206a15b2649
'2011-10-16T12:49:14-04:00'
describe
'174016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWK' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
24b341fb8ca4a187f17551a36a48712c
99d777552aa1422abc15eeb4acb12f3e97d6bf3a
describe
'29041' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWL' 'sip-files00029.pro'
cc894bf2dde30caa4831778e8cff697b
b92c8995209b50a098a766f06847e78da8fce6fb
describe
'61211' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWM' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
3ebb22f5deeb58cac1cb28dadcf86ff2
6ac17d1444646bd3bc9bd844afb0859dced12ee3
describe
'2101272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWN' 'sip-files00029.tif'
8b51722e424e3c602d2ab064f5d58b7a
565d1978bf6b8e4a428e3baf4ee7d1761ec7b3e5
'2011-10-16T12:47:48-04:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWO' 'sip-files00029.txt'
cf05cd12de1c9e8fc42688abe378e43a
b1e76df3ba96c53d1e6cd65dff4e84a13e702401
'2011-10-16T12:48:29-04:00'
describe
'22309' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWP' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
55cb449c15cf866b7ff059a5664cf888
9fac0e5165df27c8f0d76f1e7d6ae5e6ac422b6e
describe
'261647' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWQ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
19805b4779bb54707f8314a1c5543a71
3c28b8e05deabfe8e85c245ae519f4db2cf58072
describe
'183298' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWR' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
d8e4d89fc690ada0c333b44b9f429864
ef5d0f2f4eb301f79614dd72c422c8a6255c702c
describe
'29280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWS' 'sip-files00030.pro'
0df8d312dd8481e107b49bd4c30018ac
8c3f8a31362c6de8cb0df2e8fbf92a8177ff715a
describe
'61492' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
facd95ec47c128db9f79be5e8c1ed313
13b96ecb0dcc8f9e76344a7274c398e49f5e28ec
'2011-10-16T12:46:54-04:00'
describe
'2102936' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
f82d7bcdef8d0e257a085a74993918e4
82c627efa5b6f867afc1a23433f5dad6fe8d3fe3
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWV' 'sip-files00030.txt'
4bac07273e2529d46757f83934889776
aba181315e5e12c65efe6668fd9e25e63efe4dd7
'2011-10-16T12:49:47-04:00'
describe
'21753' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWW' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
b079295fca9858f6e3b8793ddfdd932c
9201a99fe794d939c626f6aa183892390ecf61da
'2011-10-16T12:48:37-04:00'
describe
'261432' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWX' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
cc7fc3b348059b65bf8125e98bf5c75d
5b92995da7fb82b4b4ae5c9abd71fd98af0d3aaf
'2011-10-16T12:47:51-04:00'
describe
'187804' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWY' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
c4087296f61dbc03d3c0bece9238e575
4f21e247e526bfc811de4cbdf797f9c5003e68cb
describe
'29435' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIWZ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
36c2d94bcad98abd2cec756cb3c28e5a
b5bbf05a388048956e1bd29329526928402f2f32
describe
'63967' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
f20788e9a15ec1ff3a786997e293b63a
73d763809b7bc8d6f327805db1a04650e57bdac9
describe
'2101312' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXB' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7b9201354230ec4a99b808a93ef68678
45465fe558cead3a6cd3aca51d4e7d82bd4e5950
'2011-10-16T12:49:01-04:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXC' 'sip-files00031.txt'
bdfcb678ea01ec1fb96c6ffae0ce6a76
8014eee8a12802c591f36cd0bcfb67c8e7db8c94
describe
'22750' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXD' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
c5db2202d16cef63d9cf0c8b504f0391
b1565f3231c80fc3c860bed47b9f15a82cea00d9
describe
'261438' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXE' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3c76096ad1d0e1d88ce5fe1d73e61450
e0994adff3918b99b8cce29624651fad8259261c
describe
'172985' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXF' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
c33dfb8f3973a3566f3598dda6aee7ea
47981c291d33a48c2205fa0d804b3686559bdbeb
describe
'30186' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXG' 'sip-files00032.pro'
d8474cdd57654f364721906b621f9bbe
f08c0c4d4854830a68092944a498e327f6183d73
describe
'61433' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXH' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
759704e9a860318d66002dc63396ba01
604226101785d29dc4b6932625b40910000c9095
describe
'2100964' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXI' 'sip-files00032.tif'
47e56af297494214f3f092baaf52244a
fed3814725c4c31a07eb3e1264b7aec57d03bf02
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXJ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a5dffb12fe917f162b3f56a278003b95
06b991f697d81f8ce4b103629e9d1319a4061885
'2011-10-16T12:48:02-04:00'
describe
'21848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXK' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
1e81d3b6f1f3f052f8dfccaaca6d2807
3b3b1bf28bfd5f70be62e2866945cf438eba3e06
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXL' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a02695d2b224d8c656a5f937c0256dd2
65b46538c953a39bc9d5b6d9e8c2a876a2b1fad8
describe
'176766' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
1baa1df87239a96ae8cde3deda1bbe79
4965e90523993d51412d2d16f670908796a7aa3a
describe
'30648' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXN' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ff40393235335f50fd0d5e95c15db94d
8f0200690115e55b6eb8b20cb3a1adb67b046409
'2011-10-16T12:48:32-04:00'
describe
'63221' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXO' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
5bcea51b9aa2e773cce120175f9511ed
a4bab43c1457ccdd8267c80f485a09763982f73e
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
a50f5afc5fa93a5de73240d574a062b8
8f804ba485d760bd73c37aa8237c16897b4f6a36
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXQ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
fa034537a87c0c2c771b7c4d6d301d0d
4858695ec0990d88279a972323bc1ab917453ac6
'2011-10-16T12:47:58-04:00'
describe
'22616' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXR' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
5aee474fe6500db8d74646b8fd52ca51
0ae3841e49234393c1fc09f78e11f5208f7b9d4b
'2011-10-16T12:48:00-04:00'
describe
'261710' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXS' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
d3b1cb0f6b891389d00bade4baf8617c
0c4a31baf01eb3cd4edab39fe9c6a1da10e7fc61
describe
'178865' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXT' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f044fbf8173bc64d2d19be6d1c9ed2ee
395a01f0ca683e23879841b0047e6cd965f59c3c
describe
'28447' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXU' 'sip-files00034.pro'
657e30ab95cfaf59216dabdeeed866c7
e3a199f8a10bd525676e8f471659091758f8aac0
'2011-10-16T12:47:09-04:00'
describe
'60858' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXV' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
e92a33a3f3e87d7ed040bcc5ca2b6040
53f039342b16fc72814647761a62ec3693b61fc0
describe
'2102948' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXW' 'sip-files00034.tif'
571e4a524327ef35d43a7652e05f43ee
21c0cfc4bed1edbaa470172bb20e2581fccc01a1
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXX' 'sip-files00034.txt'
c060f2d09a434b61931606af34c24634
db0a78c2d2a5e1d46c334ee86ed5f955a333d7f1
'2011-10-16T12:49:19-04:00'
describe
'22303' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXY' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
229352fce216ad306d400d39e7ad4a9b
58906e276cb1ec9cfbbf0049ee5a1b9fdf398a97
'2011-10-16T12:46:49-04:00'
describe
'261452' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIXZ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
60e4d301e3cce19f5c1ca4353415e6b3
0a068cb1ee12714045c024842e062452536c2902
describe
'91575' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYA' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
83fac8d1460acfee461da186c999a8b5
72f824caadd9d9aef5b2b83601e10bb129cc4d21
'2011-10-16T12:47:00-04:00'
describe
'9357' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYB' 'sip-files00035.pro'
5082b96d27d4a034cf4070967cb68e8a
db094f6fd62c722952e66177333ae5da7d8a62ef
describe
'28584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYC' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
8eee0e946c209117a4abb282121f9d5c
21c681250a1fee7faf853932efa3488e27519440
describe
'2099264' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYD' 'sip-files00035.tif'
3f1ebfd60c322e020d3cf64e4f5d34f5
1c66f2ea043192f9a71e62315eae8e8b01e1ae70
describe
'442' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYE' 'sip-files00035.txt'
592380358bf9b886e2d0d9dcf59c8c6c
c6726152ba31d78aa3541f6de4f3acd52ff65c09
describe
Invalid character
'12786' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYF' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a3089fa878ad62a0a72df28f0993e13b
e3d2b657c7bf83ba5fdf8ad6798711e44a20f9b0
describe
'261481' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYG' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
2938e0d86a8593e874771098d0ab9233
34708b0fc03de2c3f80c874672cc9e6f1787eaac
'2011-10-16T12:48:35-04:00'
describe
'169392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYH' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
ad51a0343f8fc4009d037da4b0de4eed
466d18bfa516108b22461b2e8ab79ecbb4d2428f
describe
'21350' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYI' 'sip-files00036.pro'
dec82b0d983734b10d9b8b5a233bf52a
21f004d84870c6421ae1dc28ee33b79f3272f4f3
describe
'56300' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
aa2a24e2af55ab4a3b938e48ff760a58
4a63a4adac69bc9ac45657d12b4f00e6dfca6d46
'2011-10-16T12:47:57-04:00'
describe
'2100948' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYK' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ca9e93116c4755188af836758859748b
3ef0f21e1d4335b60a7165332181154b55717533
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYL' 'sip-files00036.txt'
d1144f668ee62f1f0b28546e6350a0fa
baffa66d7daa7d93c37f6edf0e755fddf7d6e11a
describe
'21032' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYM' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b413d5a46408a210f6eca09de3b4d830
b7a4d920349109922cb4ebd42182af78fdfeba94
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
279699f6cdf7e294bbfb7433baf05733
b337564d4e2f80247ccafc394cd730f5fcf50fcf
'2011-10-16T12:48:10-04:00'
describe
'182618' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYO' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
2899e3795f4bf44846e8a59ee7e19748
ac26b70c99eeb837f0ffcc7bbe5742a73b2cf4a2
'2011-10-16T12:48:53-04:00'
describe
'32263' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
b5ecbf915d201b7e053973b4019afe9c
e3f02f824e80a2b5d77f66da1959ca7cad0fae5b
'2011-10-16T12:49:27-04:00'
describe
'66140' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYQ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
7664f7db7b672d59e335a4d4e6a4d99b
d7bd0d6fba7bccc8697527d9e07b16b752745209
'2011-10-16T12:48:56-04:00'
describe
'2101324' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
7f2a6a3668141754346c5cd1cb6028dc
659c306266573ff447ad2217d058027d3ed46d58
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
9f999b5adf3db04080e85747ee83c94d
38fb679ce816806f54c23db0f72e8dfb7ea0c88c
describe
'23553' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYT' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
5492c68454f4c969b9f76e67774404e2
3385b8d7883b8cdc98d85f1cbfd2964afbbe3484
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYU' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
15f55904b4be547caa1002ae7f9af493
d7e2ad14da4a0e94a50a833fc6bdb50507ecc39c
describe
'185498' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYV' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
5dac8cb2827e28f63af64fc2e2496a12
e6fffc80a4006c445e31b829c51aa1b5f86e8697
describe
'30997' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYW' 'sip-files00038.pro'
d2b23d37b3e9c3e5567c0581970d78df
d45851564c61bfd00db4c7563e43fbff7e25f982
'2011-10-16T12:46:46-04:00'
describe
'63716' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYX' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
4c5b048f87e1ff81d6e27500a1de8181
dbb705469d61b6a38ecba88e1c30bdfe7eec7910
'2011-10-16T12:49:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYY' 'sip-files00038.tif'
f6fe7c6da0d76c503919a68bfcbe636e
586769bce258a0e69a90185fadd755f515ba9c45
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIYZ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
6ed3214fe7b9061629c34f8968b74c6a
d9b45420237b7b0288fbede24c1d72bee586eca0
'2011-10-16T12:48:11-04:00'
describe
'22352' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZA' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
f22fc5fc50f29e3653ee0484f6a0d87f
6f20bef881320d7281b8327fb7b0643aa674df15
'2011-10-16T12:48:14-04:00'
describe
'273531' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZB' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
4ed94bce78217897fecc5903c6243575
ac7d8cd986e1ac29a8f3a54d1afeb6a60fef18e4
'2011-10-16T12:47:30-04:00'
describe
'274327' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZC' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
0de0bb5244c6fea50ff069b94d0806da
48f10558010fb3eaf15d8dea982a2cd1723690d8
describe
'5883' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZD' 'sip-files00039.pro'
525e8125745a00ce9ffd2dbf21ec0606
b77495f70e2d837eadf0b0eb11110d8c09b40e8b
describe
'69382' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZE' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
d76df2f2770af1a410d2b01d79821064
885e9ad12a849f6ba63a9747b8ddc6c373c70bb1
describe
'2198092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZF' 'sip-files00039.tif'
2d858506deb8e7c0e5f83e1611d758a7
fa40b4f0a882a97f2b454ae471698a43ffa71eb2
describe
'328' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZG' 'sip-files00039.txt'
7f54e20a297aabfbd08b361e9377f17d
81f7b67113b21f8465b94665df7098bcf2954380
'2011-10-16T12:46:57-04:00'
describe
'22094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZH' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
81780c3877fa58faa6be446b6827daae
63f476a91c667e67ec2a4a1173e8ed921ffadb25
describe
'261466' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZI' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
0d80b0ba926ff8035bcecd2de18d380b
9598847512530aaa48720d8d608d7061f5728673
describe
'52921' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
76cd352c07ae2d36780507dd096f5f92
640568aa3d32b17abc5c83d88beeae55ac311197
'2011-10-16T12:48:33-04:00'
describe
'12397' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
6286ae650c266b7452b06949f92d2c13
9419018a2ee6ae69094ff71260e418817e54a312
describe
'2098168' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
59e62791dbab4c16c4a47df83431a107
f545c4806bd30233a54359f1ff2636e695c56f49
describe
'7848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZM' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
af9a826c04e6ed26563bea41eca8355c
c2ca286ad711071798cd2390256a3fe6a00adfad
describe
'261456' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZN' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
6bd77f74a2a76d6bd47e660e02df923c
cd095548140615a1d5c58a7f1e11958aa0e37360
'2011-10-16T12:49:02-04:00'
describe
'178881' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZO' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
07edfc35a44b7572d909055fe2dde33e
e2f94145ed95ed74584114a7330bcbf487517655
describe
'28135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZP' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9be88e73552465436477170ae03a5556
c5b197459dfdd36c05f78f91bb9413665547eafa
'2011-10-16T12:46:45-04:00'
describe
'59836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZQ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
ad107de2243e0ca4aa3826a73db66e71
2ba7b797766a993a8a2fb7f34e84d03780d4a160
describe
'2101212' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZR' 'sip-files00041.tif'
284745fdd51bde3cecfbae78e5732988
53be17a111b794606031a49cb0daed5634eee3aa
'2011-10-16T12:48:31-04:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZS' 'sip-files00041.txt'
2f19e7d45f75b0f21fa1b5a809a01255
a26c8473cb95a58759939c7f9846f174c8c45e11
describe
'21798' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZT' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
fc98bdb46e48958e93127b2361a8870b
82756b032949ce214d671f8edcc204474529a95c
describe
'261475' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZU' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
d6e31784b483cfa703657361c526565c
8e4d61d417edb5c745297e1afcd5602567d53e2f
'2011-10-16T12:47:22-04:00'
describe
'182887' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZV' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
66337015e71e12b7d2ace6d4e40c974e
86c9020d601c59f123c9b3c5668fd7c538689a21
describe
'30892' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZW' 'sip-files00042.pro'
c5e6fc216fbc84111c043c2b45061047
99062ae66b48dd31c1e6f5ce48448bc0267d41ac
describe
'64677' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZX' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
ca04b1129824b76ee92620d34e955eed
f9f5e916f3846344ff6503d36f8d5c4db778b054
'2011-10-16T12:47:55-04:00'
describe
'2101512' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZY' 'sip-files00042.tif'
2f299fdb42dfe642aa4d22d698cf53df
7cf53df99f9d4ccc422a89632fca263b20ad518f
'2011-10-16T12:46:59-04:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAIZZ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
21b5cfb735e36a64849559bf8bfaf041
4a3e012bc3924795ff7aa6a8b242f24bebf312e3
describe
'23401' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAA' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
74ea88c3cf089b6bddaafa2dacf6fd4e
97e111177dbae5f4a9e25c6180a201e9c6e08b1c
describe
'261391' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAB' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
c46a588a58177691c4fea007a6c7e5a0
6aceb95099ef19b877b295550ad0c47f6afdd003
describe
'173170' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAC' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
8ef72fad7c9b14fe2ebe8e7493eb41d4
25bb2e33ec7ffd751e00fcabc110f2ca8f77795f
describe
'29061' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAD' 'sip-files00043.pro'
1d7f27f87dc87b2b1f8590d975b8f1c4
3043f42f5228ac37aed48c19ab9ab5e111ee7c2b
'2011-10-16T12:48:20-04:00'
describe
'60722' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAE' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
0c4ba3eb2f3bb716f6735eee99203e64
0891197c81ea9b9fa6d63f481e04447879dd5ca6
describe
'2101044' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAF' 'sip-files00043.tif'
dd652122c5a530a4b5e69b8de26a848b
7b0d11e0d77ed86bae4ccae575b0a75d748a8d51
'2011-10-16T12:46:27-04:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAG' 'sip-files00043.txt'
ca91ce1af17527163b2333016a61d59d
d0f731c36d3042cca842a5206a7182163a932098
describe
'22362' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAH' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
602daf9d37a11ea46aa5c6f4b3de88bc
96fc3d12ff5fcf0636d5e5073b5ce215778ca751
describe
'261474' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAI' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
ae5bd32e554763ac6680c20dfdbd46a2
b362c4f1a73d830fc9cce95614c0bdaf8c0eda55
'2011-10-16T12:48:25-04:00'
describe
'162247' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAJ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
1b3d96d6720f8eddcc35063cb1cb06d7
9ae9d5e4b6a55c393175172bec818e41cee24f78
'2011-10-16T12:49:15-04:00'
describe
'25555' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAK' 'sip-files00044.pro'
fdf88a731c31d5042248d8039f2ea45e
52a80126b558327b95afd704a7d9df768ad7567c
'2011-10-16T12:47:03-04:00'
describe
'54060' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAL' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
ec286da01b71cade0f7e01ab96aafe4a
3566168a057554c541126e23ea16232111774ec6
'2011-10-16T12:46:44-04:00'
describe
'2100768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAM' 'sip-files00044.tif'
06bfd9bfc512cfd2ec628a7199cadcff
0a7ec29180f4f1377081b77fbd82dd5d5768407a
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAN' 'sip-files00044.txt'
c7462519a2515d8d2bb9bdab2a7f83c1
68a6000a7aa8e2b9f903ec9ca2528fc0d7f40c8f
'2011-10-16T12:48:04-04:00'
describe
'20443' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAO' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
aabeb9fe2639a6e8740dd5a36180a19a
63fea1a5be18a54508930ca60a935b0a3f2f748e
describe
'261447' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAP' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
2a2674bee2e632038898f3ba9370afda
42121a611bc3dd364c6e2bad7f0999d8d32df138
describe
'118092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAQ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
e3aede33c75f48c18422c772886ba653
ca3d6e846a3cbeee0770caba89ea573712827c75
describe
'11333' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAR' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e205c53fc61b6650fc1335836aaf52db
443c311c5ff3d85687c3a099dfa2a4658af5a6bf
describe
'36735' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAS' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
616fd9b27d2a4d3815e2244fca2b8317
3152cab91abfed11dc08b5536b32e1ff2d8d729b
describe
'2099812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAT' 'sip-files00045.tif'
2a5250d55fbd37388a76fa66a1048f16
51ca9ba564f815613dd59da017b0529740222c23
describe
'457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAU' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d0244e5bb535765588d990e14a8e04af
92b7c4a80b3c4730082d553d037b7c7547da0acf
describe
'15344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAV' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
54e7399b7b6e0a7fe7a50fe593479d18
17260e86a99e597213a9a96ca509a371973ebbef
describe
'261457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
77f1e561bccf7e3b13f71c0e111e5b7f
2866137ad8fff9d8c195da5cae11609288a3319e
describe
'162944' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAX' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
747fea4a36e121f7f3dce2e896a47aa2
7b65b1c609ba0061a7f3f52257cde841a3677f68
'2011-10-16T12:46:24-04:00'
describe
'19548' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAY' 'sip-files00046.pro'
4aedb8c53425d21dd98a6c058a08b9d5
bec9745fd0012d0cf7b33c30ddaa27009813e302
describe
'55797' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJAZ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
340c22728473f729d8e1c1860e11703f
42eb8f737c3c05d8ad7a6ed5a7d4c08482bdd808
describe
'2101104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBA' 'sip-files00046.tif'
b87b05f0cfb936340c771e6e86e8efe8
12900b78ad3ee998ec843ae10ca39fc32687f25d
describe
'873' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBB' 'sip-files00046.txt'
e7447e23f12038b511fc58aaff405fa6
cade0e6d55eca753425622c21df8a8ff9840e369
describe
'21320' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBC' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
d03e4103e04ffec62ef440072329f02d
a7dd59f7b16c3f665e537626dbb7f365db9e664d
describe
'261450' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBD' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
385c05764e0bdc7f6be9b3625ae0511c
c40465172c01a21a5908b3ea02ad8a6b7c77d1be
'2011-10-16T12:48:43-04:00'
describe
'183431' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBE' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
711e9f5eef21637b9617d034d9d3a699
a0b780f4f6a17b82ea084ab12726e372cdd02e87
'2011-10-16T12:47:18-04:00'
describe
'31595' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBF' 'sip-files00047.pro'
45a637789fe394c0a717fff80118c160
85190672a6e0a70e2bde091d6094a18cef86890e
'2011-10-16T12:47:34-04:00'
describe
'63278' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBG' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
ec5269e553c34bee9a8ec0667202e112
bcfe168bb76e80a0c33c28a1dfc5633f09879d45
describe
'2101040' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBH' 'sip-files00047.tif'
9b0da7b93308cb8672569dc1e793c577
b13751a186ee212007c23e8622fa8346cd4d0222
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBI' 'sip-files00047.txt'
6ba4e16c8a23f329d7aea097b21a2ea6
dbcbb05a7040184d98bca3031cc328f803f6c1fa
describe
'22669' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBJ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
2197d9c8a947465d9d7cac382b6143c6
6ee03f738235ea920186503983d83721b49b46fd
'2011-10-16T12:49:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBK' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
3f8a16180629e1699866af869fbc7cfa
32e2af977ffe7d05513d97be4a62193f459350bd
describe
'143644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBL' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
84e9c7d4676e010c872d5b5eaf9bb5b7
b190b76ec861cfdaa21eaddd9bfa214f6864a8fd
describe
'25186' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBM' 'sip-files00048.pro'
0b08f9efa9b5c708221b8e285b2cd327
6fc5d001da475ee34d4a295e5a25c4c8e402e326
describe
'44885' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBN' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
d4077aa91e169695ca444606ff898d63
80cdadfc93cfe2f972f1df8631557f9edd3d31c7
describe
'2100516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBO' 'sip-files00048.tif'
9ea590c147eb9c97bba83946ac78edfa
9c02ded3b47dd5d58cf4fac8851f464bb54b7982
'2011-10-16T12:49:52-04:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBP' 'sip-files00048.txt'
87588bca5c2d9dceb52f533e136a9e8b
bf95635e4ec1ea7774562a94d5886a66684859c3
'2011-10-16T12:47:13-04:00'
describe
'18151' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBQ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
52b1ead4d45b394e8d5a573517c30b63
bf45fec0df128a4a8ac4179f977e97a336ab0f8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBR' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
21e2645d749f32567b7ff40215aac46f
1ccefe649cdc3375233b36ab2567ad10d152a21f
describe
'182548' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBS' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8b67a3f78697bfceacb42e7f4a99a947
61a0d2701e074fbafc09976837653d285e656195
'2011-10-16T12:48:57-04:00'
describe
'29907' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBT' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f68709603eda52fb915495cdee34480b
cf9e6a5f89e171cad6defb424cec1e631fabb596
'2011-10-16T12:48:30-04:00'
describe
'62623' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBU' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ea248c7bca59c0ebbe9d74156bf2e518
a575d2345763abbcc0b31379bf265b92fff22350
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBV' 'sip-files00049.tif'
d21535b0c16f3621c04d9557ab6ab7a7
b8ac1c7ee1e1700933aac9b1d172a03361fae2f8
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBW' 'sip-files00049.txt'
8ee3ec57f57339413e5cc3195a1f7d1c
5fe59ccc55cd8d11ca7f037e2475592d8ef6fa7b
describe
'22492' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBX' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e4e56e292738577e3b0bab289215044c
72a82003a4415b0634e6495277df6d5f912cdb21
describe
'261459' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBY' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
cc74d1ecc7f2d248d39d51eae788b1f5
c8c7478479101547261c64451697c0bf8e063c0a
'2011-10-16T12:46:41-04:00'
describe
'179680' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJBZ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
0b4c768da75dccc2fbc63f77c06e8b83
76e0760b533d096d96b71785fbb56b52917a9295
'2011-10-16T12:47:44-04:00'
describe
'30987' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCA' 'sip-files00050.pro'
8f9f0eaad4a712e17e07a224491bdafe
d27d9fd064142ac271f9693be0b260b19b846b15
describe
'63314' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCB' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
53156e035494447cd9110296d5679896
ef9e98472dba39de7ff8314b585ab6c6015ae77f
describe
'2100960' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCC' 'sip-files00050.tif'
1e59ad7889495a8ddceb397a26c0614b
03d9ef840da7b5b5d818e28f6091654c721f9783
'2011-10-16T12:49:50-04:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCD' 'sip-files00050.txt'
6cf04c880e55131a7f1a5681d26ebfe6
b87c94ee95ea0207a5f854627bee367667f1f499
describe
'22090' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCE' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
ed3f7581bbeb9a11c20288296a5cc074
9188669fbf6a19a1ccf8191c7c7477daaf7905f0
describe
'261444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCF' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
d19322ceb8ea36539937ae5a1950de40
871e1908a6d7f01c37ec5bdf076f169d9f32c5a3
describe
'187364' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCG' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
b7bf88d3ff90b16ea0adf6d7de970def
bc8566ebdecd2443cad19ae56f13c8fd9435208a
describe
'31260' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCH' 'sip-files00051.pro'
25cd5bf0bbab11c1ebcb786c91a5f461
cdc46245ee5b9941d91935b6ff7fe7261298e904
describe
'67063' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCI' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
2d91b068a8d63fd50eba259f4d460893
9cc2abbb968aa47969fe3946ce186e9b6fbd5f52
'2011-10-16T12:49:38-04:00'
describe
'2101340' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCJ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
04e99c552e2cb669efe5ca31a65e2852
1fe1414893662a4ddf293d843fca8508ec0ea594
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCK' 'sip-files00051.txt'
83faf83b9a8f5ee609266d963702022b
99fbe673930bf84fbecfaa92f9427b38c964df5d
describe
'23558' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCL' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
2feed55cf1dc8d5a35936cb78a0fa974
4762af5eceed18b5fd2cf9e3928b3aa4613a5e78
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCM' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ebec2f9c1ec02d31f0c66fbcbfa4d79b
4c8f93c9944fe1e0e77ddb4f3d5c7b7f8e03f9ec
'2011-10-16T12:48:55-04:00'
describe
'161606' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCN' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
cac22b81ab9cbb942fcf57d8dc200194
08007c399f8b70189381d027fc861cdf33abde23
describe
'25345' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCO' 'sip-files00052.pro'
11897da31fb9d66741ca57e50879c0da
d0b3d72af9635481d049e5b7be1ff643a3f4c4bc
'2011-10-16T12:48:17-04:00'
describe
'53033' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCP' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
a4a02188524921120cc3144b2512094d
5c5300d9177cf6bf6897bcba06223d50cdd9d1d7
describe
'2100740' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0147edc6acd896122914543b21950d8f
8525c733fa3f6ffacb21b9feb6a81386b3059938
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCR' 'sip-files00052.txt'
990dbfd8f0d54d2e089670be87724bdd
c026eb4f37fc8d009f513be348ebd7e60a2a43c1
'2011-10-16T12:50:11-04:00'
describe
'20901' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCS' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
71883b38b9584b5bc99e14defe2ae362
40e3ec431b389be3205ffd51a3c95098224d9c8e
describe
'261406' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCT' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
de1b8da405dea828a4e8d52195b64d43
84abe7c0aa933ee9c693cb52da159b145479e6a4
describe
'131666' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCU' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
a437c16e365b8f0542de352fae649e91
98fd4508ff2fad1eaa05647118a8ce5837e6972f
describe
'17802' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCV' 'sip-files00053.pro'
40791cc46d9b2156b7a9445d24f1746a
b35398035ee8959c98f3cecd3aa848222586198a
describe
'42932' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCW' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
45cee853400ae917cc7f782b0667efb5
a8390555ed7e388f74b5eb96f9ec64f1f891f47e
describe
'2100348' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCX' 'sip-files00053.tif'
1ea7ab25ef692a10494939572f330ba2
91d98c2ad6213d232bf26bc04d9ce3275a4ddb3a
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCY' 'sip-files00053.txt'
33c56ac1de3bf1fa41437013517b45aa
c5c97d5d43386b7c306208130c05ea1add1603c9
describe
'17457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJCZ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
6ce4dd7d3c10e1bac825f59e1ef38c4b
8843e0edcf28d89d1e51438dc464a24b47209ba9
describe
'261443' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDA' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
0b44112267b4a302128a0b127441cbc1
287337aadd73016045a7d3f459c9736f4f67a5a7
describe
'177488' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDB' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
b26aac80784bf2130017d61e69a2d44c
c79ad6e0136727fe42e797015d35c3d837025a75
describe
'22186' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDC' 'sip-files00054.pro'
499bd238bccbc75b75121417c1c97e73
118ace0b864ebb4b8a789840b728c7b2807d1f20
describe
'59853' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDD' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
20acf3cf7fd10b6945364655ed0ceb1d
3582378511aa71ebdf3b3914444c54ed6281e422
'2011-10-16T12:50:05-04:00'
describe
'2101112' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDE' 'sip-files00054.tif'
d28369865af77b6e0e05491f8aef2e28
e9caa53ecaf036283d3482480724efefc6bdadf7
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDF' 'sip-files00054.txt'
4a95f3a27dea0cba2e91259dc0e1d13f
aa3383617c5612c2f2a8d758963be10e692cd694
describe
'21799' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDG' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
4b2b16de8976066da6a4bd9aa557a702
a9b0310cfe30290291f8c40ced13bc2c506dfe15
'2011-10-16T12:49:30-04:00'
describe
'261462' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDH' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
88ad678fef845eb9787f4a9d036dec3e
239520fd58232cf9c972d34c933dbf3c267e0a4d
'2011-10-16T12:48:09-04:00'
describe
'163315' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDI' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
ac4330251ca6fd7b96a83c26575c6ece
af764ff2115ead6e65010768ebae626fa7189830
'2011-10-16T12:48:39-04:00'
describe
'28000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDJ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
8bfe79dec41e2e1cce6e07f6084e0597
c7c585d32716e66ec54e60796076ee13bc4690dd
describe
'56076' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDK' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
9211d8b763c8b8c60ea9b44eca4003d6
a25a6da373699cdb606bd85f4419d258571d3493
describe
'2100916' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDL' 'sip-files00055.tif'
27adae297ddd324ecce56ff47b365f77
c12a98d1f0157c7bed0bdbe25746d00e157367c1
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDM' 'sip-files00055.txt'
fdd26ddb0493efc13c1aad61ae896d0c
ecec9311a781b2e98a5a2cfcaf54b0d64f8c40b1
describe
'21015' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDN' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
71855380adfa666bf782a41d5a565459
b9553d4f511b1ad7735cf776b61bff409ac07797
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDO' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
70f6ce1c5ec181ad1e3d9f3e2681e8e5
32dc66d69b5796947398d6c751b761ba15e44d95
describe
'182175' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDP' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
f4e2b62473213c58d0649538dd63ba88
fa2eac5211cab63f97a400b7ab7abdae087d3962
describe
'31336' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDQ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
5240fc81c498c9bc1183137d74ef0551
72b3176c32a04f3c5c626def5c7e477e10ab509c
describe
'64652' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDR' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
167b2e283c1cd278db37832420d1e316
63a1fcd5c301068b23aa08c6ec28c55455a781a8
describe
'2101252' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDS' 'sip-files00056.tif'
af19fb47406b0d5c4b18809f9900384e
de26e4c8f1c82209b5f414afe5c607d4145b7ca8
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDT' 'sip-files00056.txt'
7df9add9959499b6de62d335cc005f5b
be805a7f45688d0ef88c45408293bfc2e56e4e3a
describe
'22828' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDU' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
75d912ae363498e20f10af2bf2321b32
93894beb6cb55dbaa7761425afe1986400239d60
describe
'261451' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDV' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b3e8fda0c2690fdc04766d29f200b169
2c41b8e0894a478c5125c78069e768ef3df86954
'2011-10-16T12:49:03-04:00'
describe
'189607' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDW' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d34234a6e8186688cf3ba6eec7f30e6b
a8004baf81976c96539df0b38f5a15baa317c4c7
describe
'31829' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDX' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d0557f2bfc42ef8482288a706de90d3c
b991a2daaf1d7a536fca1260c4d18c3b72187c91
describe
'67534' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDY' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
0d3aa7969a72ee9f9d2300a60cc911d6
105284e646699e09b33c741345efb4bb36c45ad9
'2011-10-16T12:48:22-04:00'
describe
'2101556' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJDZ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
d3663e16455e08002f8b9a8dae235e4a
7f37304e891bd8f8107040b793a2fc773f59a0c3
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEA' 'sip-files00057.txt'
41f58a32c16e53da4e447ca8cb3a023b
d13a607af1e8164027d1bf64d4dc5707ec728983
describe
'24187' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEB' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
52cd2760f3e32c757b2a13cd7080d5ed
3137612e77468c2e6bfa03850badc77b5e2a445c
describe
'261458' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEC' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1657ff1e55a02638b552042620718096
738309b738ec9c349bb85b13d936344489fec773
'2011-10-16T12:46:51-04:00'
describe
'163882' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJED' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
986cbf9ca0fd360b3fbcc878c4d98344
fc3d46e8ad9bd8621eb6060d83e9809dcb0c4d84
describe
'28464' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEE' 'sip-files00058.pro'
b6054fb7965874714053f449bd060ea3
60305cf5b976d762bbe3b84b4591cb1ec30ffadc
describe
'59323' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEF' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
fd3f57d5db15ebae548670646f41716c
2bad3eb0f73f37bce40a87da90aa3e7a56a6a025
describe
'2101128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEG' 'sip-files00058.tif'
c0625e4ec68d41c658acc1199aaa9b54
98996c67519e0dcff21e0b4fa86578b36cd1a46f
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEH' 'sip-files00058.txt'
16f84d48882d2af06238c9b7f0b4622b
6d81a47c635cefc6ea35da60e194e60dd6a3e9f8
describe
'21831' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEI' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
5ce1f5def5ae8c4a39e6b8007626f3ba
97c5fbc39f3b07204be3beb2a5078bbcba6367a3
describe
'261429' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEJ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
fcd59253d3d1efd2aa2d5a7688005407
08199932b4c380101350ef0ae949716f9afc7e05
describe
'168677' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEK' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
c6e892b746d28c23e0beaf75b30b3d68
4137374f60a3690dd1d4946aaa0bd1217addd6fa
describe
'29675' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEL' 'sip-files00059.pro'
d25a94fcfb881d81e10fae4c31e9417b
33bc6a728294416f71830e9071e1b62d7170d0be
'2011-10-16T12:48:21-04:00'
describe
'60427' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEM' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
5767b8e400aed7776b004b743500b9cd
eb787065336395e4dfa526b0fc29610589ee615e
describe
'2101016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEN' 'sip-files00059.tif'
434f58d1b3526a7754c39640ddc9a439
bb910cfad72b4981de3e69939965b98e29708ad0
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEO' 'sip-files00059.txt'
a67832f2e0f8755fff1a0d750ed76f16
0dc1f105731440147fab5651cac1d4fca4f6db69
'2011-10-16T12:49:41-04:00'
describe
'22130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEP' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
412d738435147e4a4331fb7374d51177
cf78a259266a69f23b1bd41cfb12bcdadf414618
describe
'261412' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEQ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
632375d8eb6bd28be4411e8920a4643c
4a4342f8e3ccf9924ce8b1ce3f2ad296b69dbd3a
'2011-10-16T12:49:45-04:00'
describe
'162044' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJER' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
0addc58594b15f2d81841377ab337faf
62b44a6175a6ab8e35ea835790eae9b8dc84ca94
describe
'28604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJES' 'sip-files00060.pro'
4e1dcf02d556abfe9e46562d122665ce
c3050da00b6674ac58174c208754462b8b2234c7
describe
'59459' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJET' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
f492dc700328a5b35ce060ecde45f174
0a64730b57d15a4b2431b05f93873c838591bbd7
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEU' 'sip-files00060.tif'
5a641e5e59f6ec64cc2fd762994276b5
ce29299b24f17ca387cb396b3308841472bac627
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEV' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d39b83edc3f274b4e09c992ffeb317ec
65fa0862969612f3eed956e43cbae4ef59ad40e4
describe
'22008' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEW' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
1f4ed5b8410afd79ab30014c800b20d0
6bd12b1cef0e8262ab0baf4345417d49c441a664
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEX' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
b7a428f26f36f640c7e5b0293ef1a1d2
d823fdfbdb05266da488fa62f9e6623fd60e6f31
describe
'149024' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEY' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
45c5e1b2cd8842b807943c242cf4a9ce
5c149f034c3c6de49f2e5043f5dd04f70b5b109e
describe
'26720' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJEZ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
60d435fac4394cdfd910cb3be780a688
54bea52b6de2762d45ff1235310617ed37d38889
describe
'55173' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFA' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
9df1750e86a21cda29733b69ac9baa0c
8b583d16ea8386fa59992f7a84d37083a0697e00
describe
'2100992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFB' 'sip-files00061.tif'
c32fcdd79407baaf33af050dccfcdfa0
ddb980524d7b762ff2b68003a7b5e411b499660b
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFC' 'sip-files00061.txt'
9d04ea40cf01274f6769a57df5ef0ac3
5c1f2e808b0cedb3d4b0d83622fc04aa172decac
describe
'21229' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFD' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
fcb6e7a743316248329a66e1e6da718c
7e22bf32d57e5a9927c912432e203d97fdc4dcbd
'2011-10-16T12:47:04-04:00'
describe
'261428' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFE' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
361cbe09cdb44028c072795df685ce3b
409c5957ca66ef78795df42ac9ff6eb65397fcb0
'2011-10-16T12:48:49-04:00'
describe
'165121' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFF' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
f9404eaaa736ba9badd6131621243937
4ced44535739ffda3a3b83b99142a2bf462977fc
describe
'28603' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFG' 'sip-files00062.pro'
4eca39653c6f928d8ee8a30c9e731883
f85f99308f3872aa63d5a162cb2ce8d7ea76c08c
describe
'58367' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFH' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
720bf88ee1395e4625aeadee44aa7611
28e579b4914c63bb165ebd3e896d7f6aaa52e18f
describe
'2100796' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFI' 'sip-files00062.tif'
5066ac15b10713f920ca2db1034a907e
23fa51ce98e6ff0d65a59246074dffa13d0b6589
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFJ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
444e8c21839a26734c861ab2424fdd9d
e8f46b1a547791f268926623b8d3fa2be1761f67
describe
'21282' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFK' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
43ba7cd3962b52573367b1d7835b0fdc
cda013576423da261802d2a383b1edf928fe371b
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFL' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
74da13acc168af1eede9224e6241f146
f568f5f2d752d3aa2f52190d04e748137b1afe0c
describe
'168768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFM' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
7a15457a6d7ac109a83c8092dcf80007
54b7f9c7750ba45223026c4a3f9642e8ab281368
describe
'28670' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFN' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1bc9d48f71019bd421d8ff704c6ffc14
725e67f21a2d402f94dfb71427881da84f70edfe
describe
'60359' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFO' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
43da9e31720e075f9d0433a75ae51b84
4a3176d798fffe7bf0bd02ed5719c236618f758b
describe
'2101032' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFP' 'sip-files00063.tif'
c5d27458a4259adb512f43cb306d7f70
5d4460211bf63adc49ff67fdc7c750c6cc6840cf
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFQ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
35e4f309a82c1b88ad0824298f77e359
cef198ee61b24398c4f9b6e58abed7f4047d3b85
describe
'21550' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFR' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
4892359631881e69d713ec6aafaae709
edde042b684daa35ad0e3b5c439d2cc3b961dc89
describe
'261454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFS' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f4df4172596c092b953ff5b24c921a4e
2f4cf09c16f830d22538ba73e8e2172ec50e2000
'2011-10-16T12:48:15-04:00'
describe
'78057' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFT' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
06a5e3f2c4382dfada94293138430c72
edcb58289c3f3cdb2f97dc16eed2d757b9f32842
describe
'7493' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFU' 'sip-files00064.pro'
11b8feec3cc038acf9608fae691cf296
c142c4f1d863a9366b6620adcb6ad4edb7c1bdfd
'2011-10-16T12:46:52-04:00'
describe
'25100' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFV' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
77b9191fedf45df33fc0a0fb3c16f770
6a2feea01db69a27521be3bc212676c25686b088
describe
'2099184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFW' 'sip-files00064.tif'
be6a67d1f5edb61fc6c024badcaee3b4
69fb3131cdeeeedf0b80df02483bdd14b373903a
describe
'409' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFX' 'sip-files00064.txt'
e8a46c674bcd37cbf5cff66dc2a44df2
44bba90f0d1982c31d3701ab89b6ac4965af547e
describe
'12242' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFY' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
3f4ff5f477524afbf4ab15c30be52d70
34954e1233b725baeb3ddebfb0529ede37d0be6a
describe
'261467' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJFZ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
d6d2a3d0300af3a7b3bda5d8d4245699
2c1b82d6c02c93ab17d5b07fc105fae506a83e26
describe
'159039' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGA' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
c696e057e76e6a102c670587e6e1be62
e8d669ada7c62de6a842fbe4b1a0fbb22c2bb762
describe
'20006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGB' 'sip-files00065.pro'
723413f7e0317b24e565035536513ec7
7995ac45d5f112da7b40b32d5cfd44cb1fc81d4a
describe
'53628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGC' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
c17b7e313ec54df1f017c17ac26bd2d6
aa4f778483fe386c12fd0536fb5692217e665d5c
describe
'2100808' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGD' 'sip-files00065.tif'
7f2f3a71e3a05090a139228e0b936e2d
4e94f2b2a0fde4095cc818a92af7aa546c5c8321
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGE' 'sip-files00065.txt'
2f48b837f256db6cfbba139bc3e82e3f
76b5711083b822183ff5dad0abd7c29c3f9b686c
'2011-10-16T12:47:59-04:00'
describe
'20175' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGF' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
6a2ebbe953ca910fba75c8a355b81656
6515d9db0144e9cb3ab96705ef358d4aad1c9d7f
describe
'261469' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGG' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
adea207eb64e8976deb0bc840a0035d7
17fcd525119de96372c630b57f5ce056f04be4b6
describe
'189506' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGH' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
2f8bf7e60aa926d941bc04d55e3141ff
c65853fa3ed7893bbd6986a3d627ba1b5bf31255
describe
'30824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGI' 'sip-files00066.pro'
a04a2bc0f43b43bd1acc2947a800e5bb
431806d0446d3b8be217ea839b55963f2cbe1d90
describe
'64135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGJ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
865afd82679072554569f2a58eb6d77d
7d61660a1dd1073a91a053665ddf797878f409be
describe
'2101048' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGK' 'sip-files00066.tif'
33365001ab334f50c0f266bce78b059e
8946fda1888cb0241bad4c8bd598fd0ccf48de4e
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGL' 'sip-files00066.txt'
183eb1b65613daea26b06f9b40b8f01a
f562605f5f16511b33bca1dd1c50dfd81a79860f
'2011-10-16T12:48:34-04:00'
describe
'22698' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGM' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
f33ba7fbac4506054b739eba9ee8599c
e8b24c728123bed3e5e9f4b0788bbad90354f027
describe
'261473' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGN' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
eeac1ca377a23b8e2c46692a9dc7a6ff
6b7f91b4485b356e028d6f88b84e4aed24ce6a27
describe
'192674' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGO' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
f81fda6dba03be5c2878ce5c8d99616a
8cda4eece27fb82cde2be36d6546107e73eaab94
describe
'31135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGP' 'sip-files00067.pro'
29bb2653eedb799f04fd52730ba96a67
5f89e45ee0eff372a8b13484a78a9494c6c188c4
'2011-10-16T12:49:56-04:00'
describe
'65546' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGQ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
c936e586aa874d67f811f3823b097ba7
c1b5d1d755eb0c8ec02d899ce2970a6cbb162f98
describe
'2101288' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGR' 'sip-files00067.tif'
b172e9146c82d43eae2a3d4df6384cc7
ea5d5ee53c412d81df100e221842db0bdc87fe11
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGS' 'sip-files00067.txt'
37e0650b0c70654ff828fb21a23138e9
c4a789ede6ade119d6f742413599a7891f5956fb
describe
'23071' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGT' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
274461c40b239b8d0393111c1e92f115
18c953044695eb1e89977891dfb0136cd6edb35d
describe
'261441' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGU' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
748da87df7749cadc0c643750d754fac
eaa6ccd0ec46b35c30a6d472424cb4ea8f244929
'2011-10-16T12:50:08-04:00'
describe
'177715' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGV' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
b1fd08a58cb0c0a0e46864d1a1ab8482
5c61cbd4f00d3c0067f80d3f11825a760f344cd9
describe
'31900' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGW' 'sip-files00068.pro'
9d8d2a1accfbf6edafce0043585b580f
1e748dd0022694e8f5ec84f804d7e918874d34ef
describe
'64728' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGX' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
cac3b7c53529d91e3f64202ec03fb5ce
dca7c31f7740662e7f560632f939fcf70d3ae876
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGY' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a6ef59e5a6001e570d2a4fb63d3fbd35
03f7a144910721b7a6a24fc383a515a4d9643feb
'2011-10-16T12:50:01-04:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJGZ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
1202139a5f08ceaf8459a9db35090d52
0273d900d954de52e2d95d4c29a4da3f1eac0f9a
describe
'22962' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHA' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
547caddde463696332b3677eeb376c65
04cdc09df5fd39688f82eca5c3f3324742fbafdb
describe
'261427' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHB' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
3ecd0b6351074878708f92a26d6fa49b
39915c7997a5fa083049104dd7cd80242e5e0044
describe
'168654' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHC' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
01726d87ad93b217603ac79dcfaa6cb8
e8babedcb2017b956f479221bba22806e0de27b6
describe
'30584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHD' 'sip-files00069.pro'
71d2631c10a390f9eaa93340fe077525
85d9c06263ec36c0175c9ed0d0bc7d1216c591a3
describe
'62672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHE' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
11c906a74667c920107b8d4492901fdd
59f55b00a216956e1cac93c0690ea31080781883
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHF' 'sip-files00069.tif'
487de45148af028a939f8ddba28e4425
a0b372013007f296a3933fbb860cbb9addd8e2b6
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHG' 'sip-files00069.txt'
d180589db3e3ccb574acb3ccdc4f5af5
42fd664aee6bf37081522481998ee502c4a61641
describe
'22212' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHH' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
eec1fdfc04487924953c2707936d9fb2
1d53bf04c887de7a591021165a022aa848a07702
describe
'261692' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHI' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
b77c307597e4a18c07d4d5d758b64b3e
fc7676419daec04ba046e28939784c4b75d40dac
describe
'146451' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHJ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
6470d7e85e7c8297abceb5a4b02709bc
04503e2debac5f16fb64938ded0c69616dad58ac
describe
'20849' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHK' 'sip-files00070.pro'
58c996a746e538aca62f47bf8f03bf42
5e13f9c958d53103682bc14d359c69d1436f7921
describe
'48258' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHL' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
057b7ee03bff477a8327b3ddd32a1b36
b1ac10e8783444b618b5fb72da7eb379c5dd040b
describe
'2102060' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHM' 'sip-files00070.tif'
9076ec817cd4ce24b47a3fd524619882
962734918be93ac8423337e5d4093b95a335b600
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHN' 'sip-files00070.txt'
fafe6a6e84726e4845dfa823164a405b
f44b695e431341705d3f6544b3f36edbe799e6e2
describe
Invalid character
'18121' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHO' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
90f3dcc22288e4df61def34ed9d6d373
bc9380f46bce80b23218a3abc43bfc7e18699b56
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHP' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
a38e4a500e3dac71c554bb7ba2ce8ad6
191653e1deaa1f8b6068aa6a04fa9b71ca80f713
describe
'163808' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHQ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
985de65b3ac3ca50315b9d8860245855
6763c4b0110e7b7625585cc7aa84e1459239955d
describe
'19956' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHR' 'sip-files00071.pro'
6e187c0e0ffe008302557a98755b4bdb
cdf945f54c3446c08674a210c798eeb86a1d41a4
describe
'53144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHS' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
20886704b60fcd3319237a1dbe0f1502
c06fbce93b3046427bb7434ef4bf6cd46f6df229
describe
'2100696' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHT' 'sip-files00071.tif'
6bb3040407fa456ce9949d5fbffd4f8d
d7fdb8b4c1c56112e9f3ac2c8942741239fde6e6
'2011-10-16T12:49:46-04:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHU' 'sip-files00071.txt'
57fea0ae0e5e848c929de26ec1842139
87f3575cfd45971777b80cbb8c5ef3f865a64f1d
describe
'20229' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHV' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
6e7fa5779b40e3cb9809e90b435667ad
30c82aad40eaa7914dfdb8e5ef91db810d3229e8
'2011-10-16T12:46:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHW' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
c628693da10d46c82f34f0ac69ad7d8e
b24c132c65c920d8caf79cc9ca9535c44cea9ef4
describe
'183369' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHX' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
bedd255a6e0d373338ca25d62a65ac16
9332ef8789c313bf0ea939a34f9d3b5d6d9fd218
describe
'30664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHY' 'sip-files00072.pro'
f5488ab86c2c5d51a3649ab572a6a987
c1d61f5f4d774765133a0d7716bb5371238f9859
describe
'64752' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJHZ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
c69b3ac848f21b2c1179b7b89ff22d9d
ce0716f2cbd5b10bee5fcb2b2089c64c9059d306
describe
'2101444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIA' 'sip-files00072.tif'
8d10e3d4f6341dd236385407a852d424
8fae8c66a639c259a96a0774764b16a16f3f1f47
'2011-10-16T12:48:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIB' 'sip-files00072.txt'
2d3cc85ff33e8eb44ec891ee193b07ff
8bfdd234bd12c83ea5691e2d3b61fbcc5de8bbad
describe
'23457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIC' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
a8f4c4b8d8d9e5a8970102e8e422911f
be58dedbc07854bce22fcb955b320d4657e0a84f
describe
'269614' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJID' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
3d429761e7af20947238b26b88530e23
ab644487e72d0b7431098c1a0c36f26641b27425
describe
'272608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIE' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
561baf5ca68c5f088b0e5a700fe31f53
a3c015189c8176c51ebd9a4d0fda5a4a781687b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIF' 'sip-files00073.pro'
c76c4a1eb789c2b5ff24d65f963bf095
23f6c91703dd75c915841047d542f73054eadebe
describe
'69500' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIG' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
8aaf45524e2eb6cdf20361a51edd5ebb
a8dd1fb175f7d8ad7fa5c9e21f2c8521c355b3a7
describe
'2168612' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIH' 'sip-files00073.tif'
f3d3baa8d592a292d00cf13e9e300b27
d18e11da756a933b1ec5e9ad9ed9977f60de4aa8
'2011-10-16T12:49:49-04:00'
describe
'35' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJII' 'sip-files00073.txt'
a68c1d23ed7942d5a09547dd5c437884
f0c6776af0f6beeb8157a1926245f2711d1ba5d6
describe
'23248' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIJ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
1d20fb08c2f3cdca7d5cde034447bdd3
8a3c52a7590aa11598a55853beeff4c9a20b6707
describe
'261260' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIK' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
1ec3a8797c9ca895bf4464afe1dbbc01
859450d1e29f59a2044f0a3aa08f9032d81c974b
describe
'52201' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIL' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
a14552f6196868ccec61c45aa6134dfc
05de34dab427a1d3859cf57ac81798c520e607b7
describe
'12461' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
36e945e70d1f5fa6197d720d43304ada
fb1f76b0548e794088d9f39dd0644b06f2db57fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIN' 'sip-files00074.tif'
06bd14217c1e0867e3995586103c6450
1eb5231794239a8a258c5600dad8e15b51a87f33
describe
'7818' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIO' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
c37d2de5798c3acb546ddd06b7d194e3
6282b0ad852bdb121a2aa98641a506ac7ca1f43b
describe
'261460' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIP' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e3ea3ecfb126d29f2ebcbaacf7b3cefe
7d5c036044cfbf19b0c7d536253d4065e9bdc259
describe
'195292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIQ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
01d36a3e6243d50473b3383db5df3f32
0e8c4aaf69bf9f1cbb51a8ff34397a334b46ba83
describe
'31911' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIR' 'sip-files00075.pro'
4f230aba46630a13575d3741b99dfd1a
3536bfcd3a742ab2bb6b374a7d933476747e1519
describe
'68359' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIS' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
c667f76b3dd5d612d21bfb49ca42fa5a
f6ac0b993effa69a3bbc0fed1c3d8ec055781074
describe
'2101416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIT' 'sip-files00075.tif'
a6622e7550fabe6057e7c7855e8e1c1f
ba95a267bbd69a426b2e8a3d42b468cd64341c4f
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIU' 'sip-files00075.txt'
a70394d39facd34dbf862cc428fc16ac
527279420be4c226d69437353d95600fa1df3cf0
describe
'23976' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIV' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
ca4c8b696b4b66250c20e3f8aea0dbc4
82248072bb7e303a84602d6b96436448c5b520a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIW' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
71ad7ffc908892c9751f0899c3fafb8f
cde069e501a871bbb8ca4507babe3deca24140c8
describe
'177810' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIX' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
45e03a50c4aaf820770cbee1d6f7f873
218dd2c936e850a3b25dee89277713aa3c593900
describe
'28619' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIY' 'sip-files00076.pro'
eb1eee99780c8b729c7c1637e20efc1a
c19990fcd7966f986303e02ffd06ca5045326c71
describe
'60906' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJIZ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
26f86b4dfe717988c9d4e826ea3b4720
13eb1b6ec8502432489e41505a7b6568804110c3
describe
'2101164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJA' 'sip-files00076.tif'
e74d93ba64bad84d850074be918358fc
99687adc7393c3788f88ca1f55ea1c0595553a75
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJB' 'sip-files00076.txt'
8481f8d6bf76ad3e9fe711cee0f4d2ba
3a6b40ff0d1bee36a6289806ebaf8b7a4953f56f
describe
Invalid character
'21970' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJC' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
48bed3231ec3447f9b427f8f57c92596
e528f7240e1f49540b2f982f780532c676f65492
describe
'261439' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJD' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
6a39c7cc8a03c067794b5a27421cd905
9c8b4a8c821f19059cf940c0e9d44ff2e5b9f7d8
describe
'147041' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJE' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
4d499a49690db74932ff58cb8827bbdb
eb9f0773d7933ce98aa3fbf607758248260f7290
describe
'21986' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJF' 'sip-files00077.pro'
3f3e50f1eb974787007cb2998080de40
6ddb211d2e47e3e304151ff1f89306fbca8e9008
describe
'48271' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJG' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
2bc6ea0d8c7a057849cd4f577294e5ae
414524581564a4d7ed255f827e4161f4f0e98164
describe
'2100444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJH' 'sip-files00077.tif'
c37aaf2473197cc0e630a07484e6c36b
27213aee2c89991686de1d92e4443829986544df
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJI' 'sip-files00077.txt'
4fcff88355b0d48a61fd55badbc1253d
7c160d2bc1f5eabca9e6bd14a2079b48e857e683
'2011-10-16T12:49:36-04:00'
describe
'18737' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJJ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
055f81363e551ca06f340e4902993ab5
1c14bf75d31938db649becf03312bd002dbcb0df
'2011-10-16T12:48:58-04:00'
describe
'261371' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJK' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
e0f41d011e0033d56e4f6793817f38d3
8efa83557471e08f4cd67a7b1370fb5ff41cfb86
describe
'189292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJL' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
2573714d7479e2512a3b7c5937017585
9ee10d72ff8e427d6c4c8971da7d73ee343150dd
describe
'18980' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJM' 'sip-files00078.pro'
b6fff4cc4850fb80d59cbae511e763ab
0bc50565e46c9ae532ab7be3839b95cc7953d512
describe
'58613' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJN' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
b636ad7886858fb7a5cb46f8a386df5c
b70fd12714b3c87234cdcd0141dca0b0e52bb75c
describe
'2101260' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJO' 'sip-files00078.tif'
dcb6108871cb8d3f63bcaae0a6e84b93
2adbc12b7d8dba7c2088c0f6be0b8ebb4a2cd091
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJP' 'sip-files00078.txt'
5bd29ccf4f70ab7e2d84632d12219a35
044f987014ebebc1e7ea323188c2af3910798566
describe
Invalid character
'22142' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJQ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
705eb34f8db5ddf5cb9c296a2c973ab0
02e779ca6c997a7073dd9d8455be851d0b5b223e
describe
'261379' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJR' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
997bb9751c99c94d01d5e80108932b04
ef4980fce1d427884753698b2584ea6b8b952c17
describe
'190904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJS' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
2ca5ad28fdf791f563186a92bb2e10e7
bda3ec4597f8af9e011d6abd774c138f53d0fa34
describe
'30389' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJT' 'sip-files00079.pro'
382dff23b36978d0db1bd1b1c6cf166b
b75ded11086e28c6666f2368d9c52fc833df385c
describe
'66733' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJU' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
9fcb8383841868eb5b09b91164d35281
d34d7fb36c1718d5eb108e2bc3a96ec080b4ff71
describe
'2101424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJV' 'sip-files00079.tif'
6878ea9e0b596e60bc4aac046cb51c9e
1781f9ba0ea9a1e57734d0418843b799d1b53dac
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJW' 'sip-files00079.txt'
4d97ccbab5c2ce1c600e7e3aaf28750f
f71fb0ab546121734e3e44d82b4c2ce0a0b3133b
describe
'23542' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJX' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
8ee8b9d55d0d94631117c3acd30f3b5d
3fb63b920af6618deed91f5436fc7d92512bc63b
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d12956dabe01c973a43183b16f36d9e5
d5a835ef6525283cb1473109d00a3390c763a3d3
describe
'193189' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJJZ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
fbeb07a0efa3fd53e49aabc87790daa6
167cdbdf865285a3bcf653ec6cd56e1c973e6b46
describe
'30715' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKA' 'sip-files00080.pro'
058c7aed115dd863fe4b929029d03d66
a1833d6d13baf6ccf794bd243d34a746c6a74f9e
describe
'70876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKB' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
ef9a5043ebedb36e0c912d7ce80819b8
61f8995b2959d3952899531d1ed88e5ae74effe2
describe
'2105112' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKC' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c95e39b705075496e96562322441e3c5
5d504369689b06945685df41995f913596ae26aa
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKD' 'sip-files00080.txt'
90ac9cf21fc517f1b2e1a995299572ee
e27b49ea1521a580d91d8efeb2268807a520439a
describe
'27154' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKE' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
91950c10d8e97d1b38f185baaee84f7f
aa24b0de33fc9dc85eff320fff54c55046a7184c
describe
'261417' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKF' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
11ba518b34580a7388d871c1f6118790
2d9d1525f18a12d110f41fd5a785f52bc96c5cb3
describe
'183436' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKG' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
02ac38602d7378433837b329b6dba6be
df086e206053f401dbd485f57d5364ba2ea838a8
'2011-10-16T12:48:26-04:00'
describe
'30001' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKH' 'sip-files00081.pro'
c2d8218b642cd1e9aa38344eb5618ad8
59142cc3e90dfdcaa73a41c0b56f5cf68710e4dc
describe
'63681' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKI' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
7e5a2377237efc2cb5cdd481c0bb20c5
8a5a6e4246607c1753cfb7332e5e200d8434c279
describe
'2101084' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKJ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
5395adfcc52709e8438e8ba4f268ec95
7c87cf12585680840ef6c910e51fbb086ddb1bb9
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKK' 'sip-files00081.txt'
11790fc97ab3baf2b2ea0c64879f09fb
96392ca0bc1742b06bc1541398e0149b68063990
describe
'22697' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKL' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
d3955a4cda8bc1be7f2f19d0b5485d7a
7113f540594b7151f1a74d50d3a94b259ab3a16f
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKM' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
1fbdc8474702d0d7d7df2c2f7b74df39
cba7dcc90128a47f297c6a111939b1a3f4461049
describe
'191878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKN' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
1374a188f16bfadc28124ff83cd88266
be5786b4817710aa7d3fef53e4d524550b76900f
describe
'30560' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKO' 'sip-files00082.pro'
b4d832cb90c7bcd6f145c543ea96b3a8
1f47f7b4706216585b3f98d329123e50bb9d9f75
describe
'65545' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKP' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
70273132342a49a09e271db97ac7c0a5
0a42b06c3ac0be27a46a25bf14a3d5c3893a913f
describe
'2101544' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKQ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3f0e491aeee33c4181137517adee8efd
d29c5a33a24c0423646e9413c6455bbbc3f8c35c
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKR' 'sip-files00082.txt'
736ba729fdaa942a19134c4e5b4a4480
166adea58c412244b21a62ed156071e5fc040df5
describe
'23604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKS' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
48ba1e2485d57ca6b05daf649a977b81
4453803e85fd65b30f616acb0c72ab5e5df275ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKT' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
2f2c1f8428cce6759d7d860f6a001b9d
244c6d67c5062a0502a25a1ef63e82aeef74518a
describe
'163941' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKU' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
0316b81391b24ac5ea0077c73ae86ccd
a6ab809a41f44c0369e6a059067a3695d4c0c40c
describe
'28623' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKV' 'sip-files00083.pro'
9bc8613bcb2dfe07732c57e00dbec4ad
5d87d317322ebb0140e8db243c3cc28a7eb73f97
describe
'55492' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKW' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
d368ab55e5f4cbe6b33c66073cacd3be
f3ac7d08ce58aedeae90aa10fc85d00da9f29cbe
describe
'2101028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKX' 'sip-files00083.tif'
b8e83f467aee4e154712f79ca7705c20
33877c6d17191925f661a3e3430b2812ca2d74dd
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKY' 'sip-files00083.txt'
b1e83be3f328bb1e8087520c5846b072
5d62b11f4e5564d55d7414dc46ea99e7fa71439d
describe
'21268' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJKZ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
4ea281ab6e3d6672980e2423839e1145
b0737e74eb1c0efe538d118bf19b907697b1db62
describe
'261276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLA' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
53fdc1d7d672626ed6dac0f72302869c
90ebe72648a9a7abb280b348dd12db4d8917a428
describe
'135605' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLB' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
310329fb438b51fd277372ebb4f04578
7874e24ab556170c7dae9fbb3e52c27a243696b5
'2011-10-16T12:47:29-04:00'
describe
'21757' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLC' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b000a5e651897b4dbd1c9c8a386c1b88
6d46cb5eb4547c985cb7692e3ccda3f44d3d9797
describe
'43046' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLD' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
a60f6996e36f151b06f5796a3ddc408c
22c91024bf7fcb5fe0c085ecdabe25836781a899
describe
'2100280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLE' 'sip-files00084.tif'
5c81e39626d8d977603594b0d09d1ed7
26abd94712ea82527410b9048ae4c0e3ad91cdb1
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLF' 'sip-files00084.txt'
62209b0f7f9a8f4298644a6edc0f9e4c
2276975e0b73cf5b33509bf8d907fb69b09a5523
describe
'17707' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLG' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
d0dbf6dcf045ccb12d5004a73f23fb37
16ab52572c2c4d82e211d4e944f62f500b9c10fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLH' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
346d5fbeb371284af9e85f19829cd990
b730a5831c33a766519bf12c2286fca90048b59d
describe
'181431' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLI' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
8c6acf2fec25b6162f9c733850891886
a8b6ed2bb5858053c8d9bbe26919938d13ef93a6
describe
'23223' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLJ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
2e43ff069f31ac70ff25ae3b59eeb969
ac51b84526688cb0f2d1d76097f26515504bc23c
describe
'59935' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLK' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
5636345e58850e1bd6133aaecd686f9c
29949b6029bb4c680f004c32f75a83bcd0e545f6
describe
'2101208' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLL' 'sip-files00085.tif'
ec469528d303d0129127fae4e26399ed
b576f6a7c0165d357ae4fd811fbef089f9a5a0d4
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLM' 'sip-files00085.txt'
46947442eeebfe2b2eb81f87fdc335d5
64e252cefeb33b337b7478440521d24e9c69b93f
describe
'22157' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLN' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
724230c52b231ef19dd2b98bc2663788
9fde15044b1bdc2dfd9c9b38106a6042fe5aa5af
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLO' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
35d175d98a334c12161606a22d94db93
6482c189ceb424c4ee1e4f208119d1d0604e0c45
describe
'197424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLP' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ef796f6715a68bfab95d94e45b3d034e
f62284056ded2ef8041b4545b1b5f97330a41022
describe
'31997' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLQ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
7155f5186ddbdea6db1b60cb8c8f98a3
d0c13c21da109c93624697f53280079cc84d5f99
describe
'69206' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLR' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
20ed0abf5167c72b0859ba271a37f441
9ba8fcf1a14906ed73033e2892f2b5ae1470a442
describe
'2101388' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLS' 'sip-files00086.tif'
6d28a8519ed529bcc4b1b39b4159fbe8
eb40b30ccd03d7c2e04fa9f8afe874780c2a610d
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLT' 'sip-files00086.txt'
a266353f28d3483631a3a5c56bff66fc
f1280b2b83cf5958c3477c2d62a19dc90a43d983
'2011-10-16T12:49:54-04:00'
describe
'23895' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLU' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
719cc68059a2cfba515171423df7c745
5c163d4bbbe0f2863cac36cb36b7321e8f87c3bc
describe
'261445' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLV' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
6ea5cc78da2abd17ab158a8a9741aa94
58c500aa10a4df824cf921cbc76c2d2ddb57bc72
describe
'190280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLW' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
fb43055f1dd17cd658b4bd4d2ed1b1ff
bd235cfae53deefcc9b1279a0a84979e55d031c8
describe
'30712' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLX' 'sip-files00087.pro'
d0d55b259423d5a0d4f4a367407e17da
2c650c639dbfaa71f7a32b1b388572a863447ad2
describe
'64848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLY' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
eb319bd3c728ae1028a79fd0be4d1cc7
14099151dc672664990733458b18d89fbffd94c6
describe
'2101240' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJLZ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
33c40539ac22cbe2cb0820178d6f37f7
ec692e87f9beaaed82d0db89d68f5763675f7282
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMA' 'sip-files00087.txt'
163d60c4b7f5022ec91d803dd7c50fe9
a0a31e2a43399013847cad3ce8a14239031573f7
describe
'23226' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMB' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
18e3e98ec90ddf0e40c55daa20e69dd8
2c5a6f19faead8b01729c51c4f609d2ca5d868be
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMC' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
3814ce36aa7bf4af42b9c75c7a899af1
7a3189d9005d7e473a6fc90259995779b5b0fe4f
describe
'184859' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMD' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
8ec29a84482aac6a50ac532fa862cdd0
a87c9272d27e19a2e249f4ee3ed00a7094e7fdae
describe
'20598' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJME' 'sip-files00088.pro'
83b315946060e25a4531e659cb7d2aa3
66f2885e4ad22362c944d586bd37687ccd93d662
describe
'59243' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMF' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
5f25f6621a4ae1aa3715a0685b463fab
af4c4eb7a08be71614c222360147e795ab88b0ea
describe
'2101092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMG' 'sip-files00088.tif'
3436d41289c703d85d527b43542e4933
390ef41fc10b547ab6022079b368aa085af03bc5
'2011-10-16T12:49:09-04:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMH' 'sip-files00088.txt'
df0ab06dcbab0322c98acd744a0cf0d5
9cf2632d543bb73df33b83cb8e23f2a02b09a79d
describe
'21706' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
b5e79e7216671ced8f49070aaa692131
44dee4767ba8eb93682073c0f1787327bbe2c7a1
describe
'266110' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMJ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
d9755fe8bcb1603ba152aea2e288b27b
08776b9a43bd40d413b170e5c84ff5c49e50db65
describe
'244079' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMK' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
fd92fd20ff88db422c16d4c01144fcd2
8c3018b69cc941a6c7b9e0c464f4fecb8e09e31c
describe
'700' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJML' 'sip-files00089.pro'
ddf9d9eaf226c4eed09bf156c0bb68ae
fdb1add7fe4a8c6193de75e3420a25871db201cb
describe
'66702' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
132ac00f66eade7c934d097467fa53b0
6ffdd0cc7ece1608cce04b2c40946227b5030045
describe
'2138956' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
6f7b0bc5a5b35eb589a99eb5b94cab06
2b3700c60d2ac5457784256eef7759ce5a609f29
describe
'130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMO' 'sip-files00089.txt'
bcf191db0032b82e7bc0b9227ff199dc
3b04332b1c0e7e16f3e04959b7c97efc70ac2a2a
describe
'23547' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMP' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
e6882e04ae074c45e0ed71febd29cafb
3a8b6a8a63311fb4be8aeb2d4a2d08da4ad43e4b
'2011-10-16T12:47:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
fa23777dddc2e4aa2bdef2d01121c585
5b03772f2cfef63b883206c3bc724a54d133de39
describe
'24419' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
88370d1141a68c242f3876787fda4501
49d805b0218d7b41fa7840fb5a9e30f9c88049fd
describe
'9382' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMS' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
002fcc152b01eea32470e96efd3150f3
0a9440bddfeb38575ef2a87c32b1f2e78eb99f92
describe
'2098128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMT' 'sip-files00090.tif'
d389fd7c4294d1d5e6ae29cb4ac92618
eae09a65e86048ce60cfbb11d38296b48e245ffa
describe
'7361' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMU' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
c364c798b58e78a8b818035c21ed83e4
ac7e984c87723d3e68d91055aa6f8452595938f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMV' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
9f54da7b7f9212178b447e699f7aa8e3
94dc94df7daa1bf0f0bf246ced91256014b26d01
describe
'181131' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMW' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c4a4a9da95ebc5fe67535e848723824b
200d01870cb5e0ee097815644f8f34b0e9bc3685
describe
'31907' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMX' 'sip-files00091.pro'
9384e4b3513f531f4adc511872cab611
51449260d1b2e197d9e574f85b7aa69d1b244564
describe
'64831' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMY' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e06f6caebf770613889adfe8f229b0c9
c722220d03cbf64bf4803ea14b43aa91e14c28f9
describe
'2101096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJMZ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
2b5627d43046d19335ce293e49684027
70e53273fc13dcbbfb4df1f2dda853dbcf805677
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
85f85e0bb50be8dff6fc8bf72da5fe06
d5bd4f8a2dbd5f0117265e2d8fb772005c577e52
describe
'22595' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNB' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
bcb2f99991aad58ed990bdb75d6ccc24
bf2fd4ff4a7bcf933f4c401d9e42e22f4ddeecaf
describe
'261468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNC' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
f8552bc406daa48d47a93d05d07888dd
1eaf741611ff667842e27cab006e626af17f2b94
describe
'185937' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJND' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
e822c08701e12f1f338af3e3266f11f5
cbd3272e4abeccd5c52d26e31e1da87904f56338
'2011-10-16T12:49:34-04:00'
describe
'30328' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNE' 'sip-files00092.pro'
5df91f4a15556e898e63c3e8f448caec
a053711ce097ac669cdfe4c5cd0a6a00e15a55cb
describe
'67912' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNF' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2d40552d9f90554c9e29f6d18e2f419c
9cced649698f1120e00224af81d206097d5df6fb
describe
'2104920' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNG' 'sip-files00092.tif'
3ecfbb00237ccf6c6faa2c59be50603b
6c53c1f60fb4bf7b60ded1030096da58051ab2b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNH' 'sip-files00092.txt'
dd7b9e2723ef705f612b8a059ea82468
8b3eaf65cdeea0f7d230326df9efe458a5ac1d38
describe
'27039' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNI' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
d4c8a4b2f4630d0cd1707f34a797a09a
eb0ba6e1f5620d47fffefafefbfcdccbd5791571
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNJ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
68654260660a45bad9a2c81750708aa1
e2b86ab608c1c28d7514899fc4dafc88485913f6
describe
'183081' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNK' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
da3a7ea9f6201bc0602876445575db33
5b8e1f2a0b44e99d2f03345de47d4ed83c66c001
describe
'30456' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNL' 'sip-files00093.pro'
4042cca1f86c1fb81f67a1b0add0fdee
a9aa9e6a1e3d7f6bceb1f95c8c80471f6f8dc9ea
describe
'65381' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNM' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
5875736218352f6882ad5426aa3bc14b
8f066d3870392010f6fd67e1cd966692501d2f3d
describe
'2101304' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNN' 'sip-files00093.tif'
68881cb849b1aa473e86b376b643665a
963b1943e128a5b222464988efb1e3816dfba830
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNO' 'sip-files00093.txt'
22c8846720c0aa15d8ee65d1d1398ab6
47f9237590cf2574344d6c8f65b8b55ba43d4359
describe
'23632' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNP' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
0ccbf05a5fab06f043845d199b6a2de2
f14094300dec46535fb3875afb691aaff06564e7
describe
'261346' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNQ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
9248de6d483ac7c60573b83702b3be5b
bb0c8c59cee123fff30b16e79b213e40535e0e67
describe
'174085' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNR' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5ab52e36329edb5ec678e66437e4e908
d2a79b48da776f29e566611f1a50291dd9b7d6f4
describe
'30265' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNS' 'sip-files00094.pro'
7417404c048546ce58e634189e7049fd
77e1d9da33b36f8fef95ce3f64d7b9961e8292ec
describe
'62512' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNT' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b71d1c0b8e502ebf73a20d2d22bde63b
ab19f94383a1a3fc3bd9915048a493c2d5b2bd6a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNU' 'sip-files00094.tif'
a93739a9b06e158cfb226ede465f6614
ad2017b6b6a345f3ac6436498e373f97e8d3edf0
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNV' 'sip-files00094.txt'
20da8ce1185498b10a86f0adacd97e03
cb5d2356a78db5de34acec9906e3bf6ea2e6b27a
describe
'22485' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNW' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
95156bc0ff6df20bda453db97da6f4f7
6d10acc2dcce4418590f92738d320682418e1c0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a3bf1fccfa7e2a0b31ba6b18a15259c6
978c88c6b4022148a1fdd73b2041fc855f970b30
describe
'183288' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
75e398fada3cef6914e3ed9c2d802641
270637c090262072f897e6e8445056c9fd5d8b84
describe
'31142' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJNZ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
698520d06f9e98e94e45d5f394729bcd
4ef759a49be1620192e89ce1103a5281248134cc
describe
'66522' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOA' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
33ef380e845feee45b7d004c725aefed
7f32ce7b963ba182d833c6b91588877a182414f5
describe
'2101532' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOB' 'sip-files00095.tif'
06c04cabba22bd8f943fde465c27f579
f226e04dceaf3361c57bc1d98c2554ca8d7a3b1f
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
36827b1219ce161aaa438febe1fb5ba2
1b1a7eae138b87032fb1a8eb189d6b395bad9b7a
describe
'23993' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOD' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
7f00f4de9fe75dd07de00b1b0b732a6d
126a4932dc2e7fc50cb6ce46731a975be083f1c7
describe
'261418' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOE' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
f38d15c3ddbc799beb9d5319ee5ed00c
ffe9d4f23c6873148b4b5e69eb8653d32121543c
describe
'177907' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOF' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
9f72d6c800d41e69d343a7b0349621e7
8a59d4a4b1e40697a2179234849a98bb2d5f9a26
describe
'29215' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOG' 'sip-files00096.pro'
385d50a327d08ccb228a1dd59721993c
e1cc0ad2946d586e489198b22cf7324acb5d4a9d
describe
'63325' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
0412d0a5a1f8d30ddd46ab15d01d03bb
4d328253716d65d15cb06eeec73bcdbdc529b48e
describe
'2101440' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
09da1902bc9a4ee77eccb035bc85820e
e26d5aef18c6f39eb16d30f7ff6007eb4b0bf904
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOJ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
0a23eae199faac343f6f2388692f757e
b17009746b89dc56804da0d2966a9fac5b18de6b
describe
'23148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOK' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
e03dfc2281d2e3b184437b8d6c5fb494
38df3b7938dc0690bc65303b4d9fb7216f86ddf2
describe
'261369' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOL' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
2034c86c447c2c0cb5e4ae85271975f0
bcb5318bfd2ded87b857b50f42f13fac16f5c577
describe
'124377' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOM' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
69da9a99518a4692427b15e41025c132
4251e0855a91b36599dcbd6b259f5f7fb5127275
describe
'15696' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJON' 'sip-files00097.pro'
a7ac68800da1e560246cfdd794320523
5e0ebb504ad3d400d48749c11e6cadb4d060cba0
describe
'41147' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOO' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8fd5b2225b60c1ffa7604231e1b910b0
04f8407723deb1d3b338a75aab6d05aa0391e10d
describe
'2099904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOP' 'sip-files00097.tif'
fdc2e36b860dea709a7717465e0130d5
6a4cc134d4a0524be6a81e6cf6d56c06e66b38d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOQ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
0f4f625e466bda48a50dff43033cfee7
28b0779ddaca95d0e4934a928bc0b760ba5072f6
describe
'16247' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOR' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
3569272bbc7ad3cfff450b1c61e7367a
9be69dbbfcfe222e921ad1e6265cd62068650466
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOS' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
1f4340b744245476d5db8e4616a65a9e
c7efcf21bd31e7044b872cd8406d126cd47830bd
describe
'172280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOT' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
d0779db20048d617ac21fd53bea3d173
d8f45dd2c0fc7d6874af541def867376158b6ee3
describe
'21488' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOU' 'sip-files00098.pro'
e191d1596cfee3eaae6435789db1f30b
059c262505e2cbe4277e81b69cb00ac83842c493
describe
'57447' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOV' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
78d41285b50809ab96207c845a21e8cf
c438cb195b699801224f7dab41969ce3085ac059
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
9afc8de38dccf0f2bee0e46f45470f05
4caa4f74a8970bd67ce9f9b3fd11a98a1d4eb791
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOX' 'sip-files00098.txt'
972b2d377027626a5d0a00d5bd551db4
9254f10d7dc96f7f116f22fe8c7eed30a5ea70e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOY' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
b878f50def7e84e03b74cd6f9eea6de3
b19bb8f081456a8af45ea6b58a32c6c0203174e7
describe
'261480' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJOZ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
98d2c175e3b4fe2ff7e0b342183cce51
2046311beca7772674d8295cb79ad8bb45bf36bb
describe
'189348' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPA' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
9498e50d2691b3334122aec5e23c1966
3656a692acd870855294172dca689f2cea1e7c6d
describe
'31441' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPB' 'sip-files00099.pro'
78548813204ff9feb121aa621dd15095
04a32e7b1ffcf19ef584e6d715acd42ffd1b0fde
describe
'66063' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPC' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
1e10ddc266b1c8bd6a0cb6d987065779
4f608522f6b520dc5a5b9e97f0f54336bc71262b
'2011-10-16T12:48:54-04:00'
describe
'2101184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPD' 'sip-files00099.tif'
fe9aeb2e6b3d5e57641c10c6ba469f02
d5f27b1d7b23d2273958b3d6030ef42d650fef7b
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPE' 'sip-files00099.txt'
a6ba5b07999f62e950ae94e9eeeba385
efad69f1c74c1cf58f64bf67456c11051362e41f
describe
'23087' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPF' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
f40932b07a9216ad1d4b567c070c013e
15a1cd269c592dcd6578984932970319e8cff6d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPG' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
99388b47faf6ca5694f00335238046a4
2bcce191c226bcfde2835b10d100706f6f441c4a
describe
'195862' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPH' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
016bfe1134b2dd8f0ff1a56d5725df56
dfe8cfb8fa95569c281631c3fa9b75d6ffa424a9
describe
'33543' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPI' 'sip-files00100.pro'
d39af9a6a62cc5e37c98edf007cda360
dd4ef7ce1743a01ca70019ca0be75e005f7d786c
describe
'70832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPJ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
51e9e1966f177c5e24f06bee24248341
227dd14299d3ba8022b6b4f4a883942547ff7696
describe
'2105108' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPK' 'sip-files00100.tif'
f2a29e5c8ccc591fab6b7ba9e60a6bd6
0a06a63d8c55b524b5debd62d2dbf838259b041b
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPL' 'sip-files00100.txt'
a2376f6b9aa6c4203e72ca5a99ee3059
aad5da6d246ce3be8511a4e56add0993936115f2
describe
'27403' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPM' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
98b06d5e09f114f46dc77cde5bade451
d2974b16a577fcb642466fb2072c0afb8e5833b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPN' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
0414a416b766d5fd75a29833c6b69c82
17cf45a48ae8660124728b3658378be5966fbfdf
describe
'182345' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPO' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
28ca2bb07c0a60f4545ee48326277426
5a3fc7e363b911933fedbf39bec2dce3cd0fa67e
describe
'30139' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
55c1b07593dbd7e9e3edd5ad46b98d95
bea6ea4dcd4c1a181e4f25c86fde92d72b94cd22
describe
'64579' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPQ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
477241d9d1da3e5253edb520ebbb4e11
d4ed1da71958b303a6b6d9281f0982e19988fd5e
describe
'2101256' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPR' 'sip-files00101.tif'
5c142fae4c835cd67dab8ab9c6ee1bf0
45963f9e9359ebefcfa8beb708e9664a4a69676d
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPS' 'sip-files00101.txt'
b98c69d86d8b88ba386ccc14e865bad8
a4dda4f4554cd6b2d38a054effd448a81c8afb3d
describe
'22796' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPT' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
5c2553a6646e925aba8f242b08803c7d
db3007661158042078c5a0b5831b9e95cf68aef0
describe
'261477' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPU' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
6dd9912c9618bd3ad5769d8cf67a23ef
521c333affe7995b33e34462b62e3e5722f7f737
describe
'195890' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPV' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
5d2e26d36f9bf6e39e9fd0615e3abaaa
d5cf78ad226a8323feae6054b1273fcdce42bbbe
describe
'32869' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPW' 'sip-files00102.pro'
d9a943a7ca782c6b0b6e24c567a7227f
3d393019ccb56ea73fc2d184a308bbe67adccc2a
describe
'67469' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPX' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
387962c296448bd7a3d175ccfef41dd5
3eaa689702fa6615139dfa90183e94fdb974635d
'2011-10-16T12:49:28-04:00'
describe
'2101516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPY' 'sip-files00102.tif'
f843207ecdb62adaa10b47365285ff41
d0e4592c50021c3cff1868d4363a389b533a3cd5
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJPZ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
224fb1ba64b171c6c547fc47858a8ed5
6d7ad58552ff7322ab6a0b28cffcf905d7eb0d6e
describe
'23412' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQA' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
fd2ecd1a13e936924e2d40307da58c30
b241a3f0ce881a8d85f70da24a6f64368d3e2e5f
describe
'261434' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
25903d0e459385e0216c48ebbf3e499d
461abb7a2daf6b76522240bc3a1ac8a06c6feabf
describe
'196175' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQC' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
6918bebaf814e8f129f83a8817ecc99f
77b085feabc574fd5a57106fd2414150aea12851
describe
'31712' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQD' 'sip-files00103.pro'
c6a51887a864d620f912f8735eca6b29
05de51b9c009a585f1a9fe744f57a12d4da2441c
describe
'67478' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQE' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
2b4d1a8dbceb7712554ddbb54727f7a4
c573a902a8d446ee47fb5bf864b414f8e49e0593
'2011-10-16T12:47:39-04:00'
describe
'2101296' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQF' 'sip-files00103.tif'
d69fda0602185f295614d532ba7953eb
39bbfd7e34805dc184dc84a8ab443eb40661c316
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQG' 'sip-files00103.txt'
6e9040ef8a158915148f93f09b0b7c8d
f5682fd80d370f1b952cab17acbad7a0328c527b
describe
'23116' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQH' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
af63d34a260b4274e17136b738a5312d
cb568c2d04c987d32e56ccbf0bc1f5140267de97
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQI' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
c2c04161b269380bb593b5d72d8967c3
8c9c1d43c8b408a620ea70f5aad20b4630711384
describe
'195916' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQJ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
49e4f8ad506216cd9540ed91b81ee142
972e037100b755f639bac4f11550ba64ff12aa25
describe
'31487' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQK' 'sip-files00104.pro'
e11d7693de57ab5f9e49a6b2ecc58bc4
9f6e7f2fad203e634736b2bdd40aac0f0de28ffe
describe
'68204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
93c99334e3aedbca15efcacf2c74e59a
ab0e34b8d264fc4b9f840196b14f25d166a7e55e
describe
'2101648' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQM' 'sip-files00104.tif'
2eb37c431aed296b61767b9f915b79ec
193e4efd5e186e4fb97224cfc9506c3bc1478175
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
463ca7460b6ef5e7410a28ee637bbef3
2a41f18e3ef47e6bb12936d90cc6804f0971a61d
describe
'23963' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQO' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
8e41d7fac1f08c482ff79ea19cda79a7
cff71d94238a4c05e972af55ac1e548817c00fe2
describe
'261394' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQP' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
c4113ee6f8838e9f0321dbacfb11a5f8
6d79b702eeda664bc2c4335fdd244c2d5d95a116
describe
'182890' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQQ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
03d5b8baaf2cf03599303b58628b4e39
e9e1012bfba028a6a6c54b1d9a54dc3302d0920f
describe
'28822' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
31b9c8584a423586d8c44c2be56c0694
7def94d7e065dfe6a1cb3721123b23a9d40eb116
describe
'61721' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
13fa1a8dccb1bc21bb33fb68cb7d9f56
3024756bf25b3d6db6e405b08a51d5d3e1f4747d
describe
'2101192' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQT' 'sip-files00105.tif'
59d1145c0b825c25a05d046c0642314b
bc979eef90bb79302af1ac0c36a1e41d8d5aa568
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQU' 'sip-files00105.txt'
37436d6aca0e8ca71e8d0f03c148b00a
212dbcb489cd435f28d6905234aa01457f11e118
describe
'22368' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQV' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
37c63c8bf304569bdb0a5633c5b4451c
3e7d6669b25b4290b3741bf4d0317079aea69534
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQW' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
bf07e565b7922e113ab227c3c7d77408
722b7da072c3a783495b9223364e5436bb354bf6
describe
'164547' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQX' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
f0d9ebffa0fa6d1ddfd25b8c12bfe35e
027d795ea636094b25b86d867e6848f974afd4fb
describe
'20269' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
88b50d6ee9fa920f24c8ea6b34ddeda3
976a24345492d6768428fb94f2ed09098914f823
describe
'57234' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJQZ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
ccbb6585937ae08a650dfe66854dd606
ad7c780cf0f3d25d27a0eef49f8e045d69a9d262
describe
'2101300' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRA' 'sip-files00106.tif'
852d6ea20066122c1eeed89b0741c4b4
5f3469dba81c1e4bd10950a59a9e16add3f3e8c6
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRB' 'sip-files00106.txt'
889e7213294ee4ddab31841465cd46a3
37f07a3d484b70ade701647e4e687371b64bb53c
describe
'21897' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRC' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
c9b4d32023f6d8ecfd7e0c83506fe02b
80ed0f02a56823d584f73bea58b0744b1ccff961
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRD' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
ea3fb5b0faa41aa6b81cfb2dcba3b005
c0d1e70bc00ee56b065a26ad9d2ed3aafc6bbe4e
describe
'180665' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRE' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
6cc04a4b095671d99cb51ead3c00ddbc
d6040b9845a35d6c3b1ceed1fca26df20d3350fe
describe
'30832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRF' 'sip-files00107.pro'
fdfcb0baadf6459b80f51315f334849d
27e2c5351f12dd6119c1bd43b66858d1b2830c4e
'2011-10-16T12:49:40-04:00'
describe
'66676' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRG' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
b1da0019bafbb2b680077f7b4eea674a
0220955a5de8c21bbb134c655180e7bab5ebeceb
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRH' 'sip-files00107.tif'
2e811cb88028cccfebd80929acbd2187
dde01637c80b98b33d9ce3f15315daed73b3c667
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
3e5f8d244cd625a2d119d12ef23fa1fd
782892ba15a92dc5bdac012b4a1bd700c11920fd
describe
'23327' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRJ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
f14e2cc1bf9ff1ba5a47989d506459e8
435a19ffa0c706cb6611008c8b35c02933a2be09
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRK' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
11fbecf774346b9b8a299cfa108b4b7e
bc75e548c22db0f26b77f0365f00b67151087a54
describe
'176036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRL' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
c9c0135b2ccad1ddcd81fedce561871d
a6a31054d16eb68ee2b12485b7d81d9302f95d39
describe
'29405' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRM' 'sip-files00108.pro'
b255c06d9d1e22183785af3f0c92909b
54d0131821574aeee99b8c7a495844bb294525ab
describe
'61612' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRN' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
84fa621dcfb3d065684680d98e73e001
30f123f7efb89cc2f82fa9e828114290195d3f24
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRO' 'sip-files00108.tif'
256607a580974b571e25fd1465a205e9
6804f1c4bbaa8d626aaa0644f283db95da15bbed
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRP' 'sip-files00108.txt'
85affaf8113aa181a3d3816fb2a9e555
cf7df8dffa65f1659d39c9d21842da3dbf54b451
describe
'22064' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRQ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
5d5b38a39a9f5da6dccb49eb19d16523
9809fe345ef5118c435347843e889ca1466ba54e
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRR' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
f1171d4985d95b53c550e33cd8f91537
9178b02c830cb311cee04a6f34baa298fed73dad
describe
'167693' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRS' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
b00b92a6c16a5a7f06c0ecd6ab80e955
2c08e3d5e58fc0a569241aefbea49c9cb1b57bf4
describe
'27958' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRT' 'sip-files00109.pro'
dd06c8b0aa56d10f29a64da61c01ab6d
244b71431a24fbd0c33c18ddd3cc599113311046
describe
'57459' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRU' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
9f8c182e1067ce3ac9370ea950b9017e
e30c7f619e2ab0797dda6d4cd925e6e2a4a516ef
describe
'2100952' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRV' 'sip-files00109.tif'
87020377cbbc3d97ca0f769a98dc5467
63c49f33b2aa332a2144b61d92330ab73bd2033f
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRW' 'sip-files00109.txt'
c5a6854c720d3c0b35cf8e8abefbbb9f
bfc9d6dfcddbed7a4c7cdbbe889310cb2453c4b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRX' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
f849640fa87e218b138012915e167483
7581de40072beee2f89732b12cf4a9d85e24cd2c
describe
'261478' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRY' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
e30c1eb0073329bf2c1eab8817e0a24d
900eadb27bcd9453773c74fdeb08e09783ff3322
describe
'189604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJRZ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
28875eee7c4239b96e921b0a2513df8d
cc3162cc52820ea82d72eaf675d12d89c0b87103
describe
'32192' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSA' 'sip-files00110.pro'
a8f5d7cdb08e955ade1c34e4f25a2a64
4756da69aed1676ab851c23f3350b969baf2b3de
describe
'66456' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSB' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
756c1d694c9706b880c268b3e762d59a
cda083fc570544fedd768301de0b77964c077b8c
describe
'2101500' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSC' 'sip-files00110.tif'
9eeb4917bbc7bdbdaa86ff12b5b1f3cc
1be4c4acb47da8e9f783e8e7ece0340b10f5006b
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSD' 'sip-files00110.txt'
cf1445572ea9be19e67c968de43cb1d0
aca3191d2ebb1f58d0e04cb9366206ef58e5f87e
describe
'23585' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSE' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
032dffd4dce541fc215b670ba97e7180
d4fd39df6d38cf067915fa7cf18a02f85253ca75
describe
'261470' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSF' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
8d2ad737a8fad798992ee698c838eba3
d54f0471edb11c42d6c7dd449aa20dda43162cbd
describe
'191311' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSG' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
878a25850901457b69bfeb0af957c038
056812f0a127e0e8348a6e46c3eb6afc0fbbc952
describe
'32225' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSH' 'sip-files00111.pro'
b4f23fc14747a8bb334bb479a173c573
0869d59d27d1c4db842b50b5e201da398b12fd51
describe
'67739' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSI' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
45ccfbe1e23ad30ba345d543cce5fdef
47fd99d7c8f3e38622b30c395beefa9f3f5a516d
describe
'2101356' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSJ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
0e43155e17abd5ee3c94adcf69b00f48
e4f0f1ba780108dfa03cc93d1853e9bb0d4ba2f6
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSK' 'sip-files00111.txt'
8a5d79d20db2ef280d0605454b3c9b31
e545a09ee5f15b759f0a420e79e0c0896887dd4d
describe
'23789' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSL' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
7a08cf2fd14bb7174b6d015282917dc4
894dd9ba859d0d727b2035c8d953551ab236389a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSM' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
7b25b06fefeb424494a43a3eb8ce4d0a
ccf88d7f0927c4688156295ffee6971f87fae50e
describe
'134054' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSN' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
705ac09731abd4094daccae5b97a2112
9b0863d0ba0b92e2a2a5f66fb0887c5c5c9281f6
describe
'19052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSO' 'sip-files00112.pro'
72d0ca4bc23cb092dc2cabb24df5287a
c6f79bd2e64c98fa4cdcb8a3e492057150fd32b2
describe
'45198' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSP' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
841e58466bece85f2cfbd7acdb4a4da5
ed1875f0c8adcc3427f666dd6210a63940dcefae
describe
'2100312' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSQ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
d1a9b854d1cd636d96ba72c6bebc9267
a9e96ca0e6627f01accb5fba75c642037a4762b3
describe
'783' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSR' 'sip-files00112.txt'
24dd4e89ada5f95dc49f30b0e615698e
26c5b202b48008971cf6762c4e403de2ca11feba
describe
'17763' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSS' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
6702ba84d28334bbe5cabeae53efc5c7
48d9f42f5e39cea414bd46d17b222eb052e760c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJST' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
1e6c78d79bfcf0a2819938392dae5b37
f08040f1e39388c816c0feaf4c51c75cf02e883e
describe
'168388' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSU' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
668371b253766c4fc306e9d4914054c0
e093152ba07d63a2bbdf7a5aba83fe000549977c
describe
'19929' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSV' 'sip-files00113.pro'
5841fbb0e658884401523be935987b79
af4fa9bea40f4dbd430ad82af05f6dbaf4aff1e8
describe
'56184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSW' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
07e5f71f3103edb72bf2c0e0405c1aee
dfd15bda824e82ecc0b9e30a0e7e39fcf2ed399c
describe
'2100972' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSX' 'sip-files00113.tif'
361c5ecfb024f5ebb9390ab8569fdf4a
1595e57ddb9f657231ff90ddf2368a6ed7fbbfd0
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSY' 'sip-files00113.txt'
0de4cae91865744a0d4da253d847de5e
8e61afcc98510dee3bf152b8060578200f0d0d98
describe
'21044' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJSZ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
2642e9490ceaaa807700b8a41c2ab0a2
24b7e271f707ce2c77ab063640468a74f13d9570
describe
'261399' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTA' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
f71076c23cfd334627c4d92efb2646b4
188573ca759e18a0f0c663f3441855d2c3888ebd
describe
'183189' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTB' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
456c6ddbaf5e5dd927a1a52e15b48874
9b584454c8923db9cdd01ae621e4860ac70c94cf
describe
'29964' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTC' 'sip-files00114.pro'
f0281ae34e31984b0fd81011a728de41
5e56878f037c0e103257ef4c3746105c0bd35e2d
describe
'63388' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTD' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
bf1e7060390af7ab71ef625e4253587f
7ffcccc7d819044da44329fe04fb744bb68833a8
describe
'2101344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTE' 'sip-files00114.tif'
eea1ddaa921c54897dee25f295300b80
0f28ac0991aca51c8576af34bff9e263e40d726d
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTF' 'sip-files00114.txt'
135f5c03f34a9c969db27a519b0edf14
7620b64163bab2060753e0b0d159838257fb43b2
describe
'22801' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTG' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
144a519a3c2797af67e22df6e40bdae3
8c183cbdcd12be6ec85fdb41e1b5982ae5eabd12
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTH' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
9690faaa5c7280a00fbe1ee973248aa9
26a9957b591d2089a0e44374ce0485db15453111
describe
'140387' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTI' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
7ea94caa446a187d141e663aaa846d03
e0775af95e198db6de2b9fb33cc27ef68de6cc8c
describe
'20935' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTJ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
5829066551d5558f11c0ef013a399c77
6e4a1a3a7141d5e6b39094561b6fad3933799f60
describe
'47270' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTK' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
d7e4eb84dd464147d310423acf91be54
7fedb5b3413e6b8a1fe396ec25b02de58a83e082
describe
'2100668' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTL' 'sip-files00115.tif'
0f5a7ed9d7e6de0334d7ae468457c109
5bcfd18223562f0565bca3228dd68da6f7aaf7ea
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTM' 'sip-files00115.txt'
cc3a95a0c26344534e18894e57cfa376
dc4e5f1f23a5fa903cb4b7e7ac43ca72575cc91c
describe
Invalid character
'18679' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTN' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
85c788f3dc6156bb903b41eee5b45b05
16d17830fc9e46f5983d163b7bd11a808da831a2
describe
'261604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
8e5cdb8543461d710d4018648adcac53
2d2230a2fad22514d95747bab643b8d162b3a198
describe
'159937' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
bef28e83f2d63f60804aa574f17f776e
75beb6b971e12af42f7812a0be85d7c741d24f94
describe
'18331' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTQ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
c8dc9e338ac76805948e423d2fe785e7
68e7d564d2fbe09fb6d62b396de608082464cd65
describe
'53549' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTR' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
17a4fedfa9b703b4216a0f4f9d2e7e5a
2cb4a0f13db545536e31c41c025a1379327ad3d9
describe
'2102720' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTS' 'sip-files00116.tif'
8ff3123da5c18f6214633fdd19c50da8
01fc4ac16d030cbe531518054e0dbb4c594aaf89
describe
'829' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTT' 'sip-files00116.txt'
158d6498fa6eef95b6c0e63a98c8a38f
3739365618f6920e489edfea7e0f4a5f9616a848
describe
'20449' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTU' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
e49a5457d6b889483fc2e050cf9465ff
8ee5210ca99a27374f1e92f87d1839a14c20709f
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTV' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
bc5a9f4af4ecb3adcd8c95b88ac1d150
92be15e31bc39d326904a476093a1bcda77831ff
describe
'187240' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTW' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
57b5a90ee033d964a82d759839f69b41
307b0842243ddaecad652af7d1f8c472f0f8e834
describe
'30299' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTX' 'sip-files00117.pro'
97e9e684cef60fc9136517b836b39ea3
e22eb6ef6c517ce7c341c45edcb8bbf927feacfb
describe
'64006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTY' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
92d9d8abd00809ffb3363f8d5695f528
fb6b50278297681f4d7d15b6f763d32d1877d7fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJTZ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
2c48f02fc9d71022e975d38f9b5d0440
8c1a7bbce32e7a86cebbb554956b7d514fabfa22
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUA' 'sip-files00117.txt'
8765ee29cace9b1a7590a3f24f5739f7
26632db152477405e35deb606fe16e927927864f
describe
'22869' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUB' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
ee1722b01e6d11136db54575dd2a217a
d4392050013d83c51a06ccadcd89c6effac11b57
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUC' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
5d9b3fd214dbf01000c11455af838aaf
6b96b519b4a644f35f8968c630850fecf69044d2
describe
'181959' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUD' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
a7878a8b110ea7ef09cd0ed3d6d79db4
aa5a40b48cb2a03aa18b71651d5a98f7a9091d4f
describe
'30716' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUE' 'sip-files00118.pro'
856b8a25d103d4bc7aa781dbe17fff97
c848fcaeebfdc731bb90ca81c0137aed0866c01c
describe
'64873' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUF' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
2031cf1db7256896fa916506b1480ace
b0ae4d33b753752edb3ce2de276b1c6c805619df
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUG' 'sip-files00118.tif'
b4b2656908f45877114d604bc5bad0ff
4d9ed3648722ce9b455bbf40da5611acbe6de167
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUH' 'sip-files00118.txt'
d6e7444fcc4fbfff6ff6aec42b1f8f85
da029dec1e54ff3556cbd8cdbae7c56e7b6fd12d
describe
'22753' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUI' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
c122419e221a77f50112ff659509d086
e6b0471fb302f19c0de30d6fb3ae3d583c9a0aca
describe
'261370' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUJ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
1529f6a8aeb870e8d6bf359abb3db92d
8bedc4088a8a1cd879500225b216f63a1f9d0b07
describe
'153088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUK' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
dd17ae6a768d88bc890b002992424517
765231c5dbfccca915201a682cd3bd998bf49039
describe
'26288' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUL' 'sip-files00119.pro'
b5e6564410e0d5c267a532f617a16209
4a8d2c75c6451f8c37293d10f923b9e2de4762b7
describe
'53723' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUM' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
c7ef72c2007bb855eaef84dff6f5a0f0
28043917f11645a7d7a1aa4e36a6b22426093b8f
describe
'2100884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUN' 'sip-files00119.tif'
310307849bc06be765ed412227e28090
45ea87d7c2a309a5fd392420272859f8c6d59ad7
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUO' 'sip-files00119.txt'
c720dd96fa452f11d1d32d061ad6b8cd
6365b1131ede64f0f531447cae8e54035d726111
describe
'20488' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUP' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
5d797e836fed1468687c9f03ced450f0
3abcb9ef6d47e2f80d81df6d030822b32c261516
describe
'261831' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUQ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
ff327e9b91b341e77f20e18c40f3df6a
4f87615dba01daa73b3b42c100b171b49a9d1495
describe
'107643' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUR' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
22ab039c0d413732be5b89335b4778f9
a674313a1af27b63d5f5c83a585ce6dfd04077f8
describe
'14675' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUS' 'sip-files00120.pro'
fb3789b1f350fc80ebf1c6a7ca699954
9a8b4374512eedd296275d2c8eed0b4a590b0346
describe
'36753' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUT' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
eae11f8ef827612d91cd7dbd8459a92d
b285034e761221826f933fd0269393da3d3fb079
describe
'2102684' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUU' 'sip-files00120.tif'
fd1c4442e380eb72b17337559f508dcd
c1bc5990c8e590eb84f8e3406379f0ebabbc08d5
describe
'680' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUV' 'sip-files00120.txt'
42b1ebee032e43ed71a05bc3ceb77429
aa7c00c21e80bc345466f6549ea5b0a84590227b
describe
Invalid character
'15328' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUW' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
9db80119ebb20a4741df86fba79883ff
bda3452c86fac84175d4f7a9be7dcf98897bf2ce
describe
'304247' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUX' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
91768105f69c687875bca7ef5aa10738
dde61593fbe6b390908d19cb405b245de103edc1
describe
'102438' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
87ebfa6b173427347e4f942bda9b8429
551a7f0502d7e3065f335fa91cddbe46ba3a2268
describe
'26203' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJUZ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
89fd94071cac71950acc99f01cf7dff1
ca4503a45ce44448575bc94ba0d1a9bee4af1cc3
describe
'7311224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVA' 'sip-files00121.tif'
09d8f7cda012e3e5cd2093a15ca34c9a
5481418b4256611632211c192d8c8316c32a7e16
describe
'12218' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVB' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
a9c8fc2f868db9e9a2b7b91ad2366b4f
37907570248debc3ec4f91f443e11d078a134c31
describe
'300708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVC' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
7e6660ae9c0b4eacc53ae903915dd483
f004bccdf37659e5a4a3708533df21adaceb4dcf
describe
'166755' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVD' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
4d593a628f87bb3a0e04c3ebe142486c
97d87f7af2fbf9ce9028ace1e2349416f8290327
describe
'23413' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVE' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
b95cda42a1640ca66f7a0ef9074f8498
23632ab7d6fda6329e28b15645502c5bcc7ecdbd
describe
'7222952' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVF' 'sip-files00122.tif'
95623e00af07fafaa3de365da3474d66
8866316c7b4b0a5132e6bff818c18c711a92f8d2
describe
'9890' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
6b9aa736c336c324474a0c3571e60911
9a9f2f0f1832804fa0564ab6835c19c90c4fe63a
describe
'70467' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVH' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
491e08e3a8393e8540ac711b86cf7c20
6f513f0216c45193f0f19a42b0d34f275e76cf13
describe
'22652' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVI' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
cd6ab42d499b4481d3205e619a11c899
3a88dcbf3754a0329fe5b92a51501f7d2a093a9a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
8a3a8c5f86afae3a54a5409eff25e31b
d45c4d4ac0feb96cf2ef4835b1696416fe69ef0e
describe
'11060' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
6b81dc6d9943488baec668ee2dfbfe0a
2e242f8fccc005019c63796d721f7c068555cd98
describe
'1697892' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVL' 'sip-files00123.tif'
a4bff8fbc7dc595414c2436f4a054182
599562e76c25020545ea6fe46c72018ce5193b10
describe
'8475' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFOfileF20080329_AAAJVM' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
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LITTLE EMMIE, THE MOUNTAIN
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CONTENTS.

PAGE

: CHAPTER I.
CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH = a 9

CHAPTER II.

ELIZABETH’S MARRIAGE - - - 21
CHAPTER III.

GOING ABROAD - - - - 26
CHAPTER IV.

THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN - 6
CHAPTER: V.

EDWARD’S ILLNESS AND DEATH — - 46
CHAPTER VI.

ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM - - 54
CHAPTER VII.

EMMIE AT BETsy’s HOME - - 65

CHAPTER VIIL
MEETING OF MOTIIEK AND CHILD - 71

CHAPTER | IX.
THE EARTHQUAKE AND JOURNEY TO
SEAFIELD- - - - - - 78
viii CONTENTS.

CHAPTER X.
HOMEWARD BOUND - :

CHAPTER XI.

STEERAGE PASSAGE AND ITS’ Ex-

PERIENCES 2 7

CHAPTER XIL.
SALOON COMFORTS) - -

CHAPTER XIII.
ARRIVAL IN LoNDON DOCKS

CHAPTER XIV.
GRANDMOTHER’S WELCOME

CHAPTER XV.
REST AT LAST - - -

em 0 = 0

PAGE
85
88

98
106

113

116


Kittle Etmmie, the

Prisoner ;



OR, A FATHER’S CARE.

2
=



CHAPTER I,

CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH.

jee |LIZABETH was the only
daughter of Christian Myers,
a Hebrew of the tribe of
Benjamin. The records of
his genealogy were carefully
preserved by his father,
Hyam, as well as at the chief
Synagogue. Christian was given this name
at a baptismal font in the Church of
England, in commemoration of his being
the first child born after his parents’ con-
version to Christianity.

For six months they had read in secret
the New Testament, unknown. to each
B








Io LITTLE EMMIE,

other; but the mighty truths revealed in
that precious volume, the Spirit af God
used in convicting them of sin, and thus
shewing them that the endless rites of the
Mosaic ritual could never atone for their
guilt, and at last He revealed the Naza-
rene as their long-expected Messiah, as
their Jehovah, their Saviour-God.

It was no light thing for these two to
confess Jesus, for it entailed being cut off
by their family, and mourned for as dead.
In after years, when Christian was a
youth, he met his father’s brother, who
wept over the boy, and with his hand
on the lad’s head, looking in pity down
upon him, said, ‘Is this my poor brother
Hyam's child?” The writer, through
whose veins the blood of Abraham flows,
has often heard Christian repeat this story.
Well does she remember the raven locks
of this son of Abraham, and the expression
of his face when repeating stories of his
people.

Hyam by his confession sacrificed wealth
and family, but possessing a good educa-
tion, he was able to maintain his wife and
children in comfort by his labours in the
mercantile world. Christian, too, followed
his father’s footsteps, and at the commence-
ment of our story, Elizabeth was a child of
CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH. 11

ten, living in her parental home, a pretty
villa in a suburb of one of our commercial
cities.

Christian married a Gentile maiden.
Both, at the time of their marriage, were
only Christians in name ; but ere the birth
of Elizabeth her mother found out a
Saviour’s love, and she thus became more
interested in her husband’s people, and she
delighted to search the scriptures until the
time came that few women knew more of
them than she. Thus Elizabeth was early
blessed in having a christian mother.

Early did she lisp the precious name of
Jesus ; early was she taught a Saviour's
love. Her father, too, became a follower
of the “ Nazarene,” no doubt in answer to
his wife’s oft-repeated prayers; and for
many years after (when he fully believed
that Christ our Passover had been sacri-
ficed) would his aged grandsire, who died
in the faith of his fathers, go to Christian’s
house and burn the bone of the paschal
lamb.

No word was ever uttered; but it was
believed that this aged patriarch thought
by so doing that Christian and his family
partook of the blessing, and when this
aged Hebrew was passing from the con-
fines of this transitory scene—the day
I2 LITTLE EMMIE.

on which he died was the Day of Atone-
ment—not a morsel would he allow to
pass his lips, not a drop of wine to moisten
them. His constant prayer was that he
might pass into Abraham’s Bosom (the
place of the departed) on the Day of
Atonement, with all his sins forgiven
him, as on that day he believed the sins
of the past year were forgiven. He did
die on that day, just as the sun was sinking
in the western horizon. Would that he
had known the Sun of Righteousness in
all His healing power. The reader will
wonder why this Hebrew had intercourse
with his christian relatives. The Jew
says that the children cannot help what
their parents do, so therefore are not
responsible. Whatever were his faults,
he was a godly Jew, ‘‘he walked in the
law blameless,” a pattern to many in
acting up to his belief. Alas! that the
outward life of so many denies what the
lips utter.

Elizabeth’s countenance, although a
child, shewed clearly from what race she
sprang. Her dark eyes and hair, and sad,
far-off look, indeed her whole appearance
shewed to an observer that she was one of
Judah’s daughters. While still young she
disliked to be thought a Jewess, and one




























































































































































































HER FATHER INTRODUCED HER TO A JEW,













CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH. T5

day when her father introduced her to a
Jew, the latter said very warmly, “I thought
-she belonged to our nation,” his quick
eagle eye soon detected the look of annoy-
ance on Elizabeth's face, and he said,
‘Are you ashamed to belong to our nation ?
Do not one half the world worship a Jew,
and the other a Jewess, the Nazarene and
Mary ?”

In after years, however, when Eliza.
beth’s heart was touched with the love
of her Redeemer, when she knew the
scriptures not only in the letter but in
the spirit thereof, she felt glad that she
belonged to that ancient people. We
are glad to know that soul-stirring truth:
“Dead and risen with Christ ;’ but still
‘the heart glows with fervour when thinking
that there are kindred ties with God’s
favoured people, and there is an inward
feeling of satisfaction in knowing that
down-trodden Jerusalem will once again
be queen of nations.

The Redeemer wept over that city.
Within its gates some of His mightiest
works were done; ‘and without its gates
He offered up Himself to God, and soon
will come the time when He, the true
King Solomon, will sit on David’s throne,
and that throne will stand for ever, when
£6 ‘LITTLE EMMIE,

they will look upon Him whom they have
pierced. But He will comfort His people,
like Joseph of old his brethren. The
mighty temple will rear its head once
more. What a scene of magnificence did
that Roman soldier cause to crumble when
he threw the firebrand into its midst! An
ancient writer says, as a traveller on horse-
back towards sunset mounted the hill, when
the sun in all his bold majestic beauty shed
its rays on its gold-covered walls and
pillars, such a sea of glory was revealed
that no traveller could easily forget. But,
blessed be His name, many a son and
daughter of Judah have found out another
temple, another building of God, eternal in
the heavens, where the Sun of Right-
eousness will shed His golden beams.

Through disappointments in business,
together with physical causes, the once
stalwart frame of Christian Myers soon
succumbed, and in a few months Elizabeth
was left fatherless. Well does she re-
member that lovely spring day when the
remains of her dear father were committed
to their last resting-place,

“ Till Christ his precious dust will take,
And treshly mould.”

What a crowd was around that grave!
CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH. 17

some out of sympathy for the mourners,
others from morbid curiosity to see the
interment of the converted Jew.

At the grave Christian’s favourite hymn
was sung, a hymn in which his rich bass
voice had often joined, with the accompani-
ment of his father’s flute often the family
would unite in singing it, standing in the
well-staircase of Christian’s home, and as
the notes ascended higher and higher, they
would think of the time,

“When, in a nobler, sweeter song,”

they would sing His power to save.
Hebrew voices will swell that chorus, and
among them will Christian’s blend :—

*Not all the blood of beasts,
On Jewish altars slain,
Could give the guilty conscience peace,
Or wash away its stain.

“ But Christ, the heavenly Lamb,
Took all our guilt away ;
A sacrifice of nobler name,
And richer blood than they.
Believing, I rejoice
To see the curse removed,
And bless the Lamb with cheerful voice,
And sing redeeming love.”

Elizabeth, as she stood at the grave, had
the comfort of knowing that she would
18 LITTLE EMMIE,

meet her loved parent again, where partings
are unknown.
“ Yes, we part, but not for ever ;
Joyful hopes our bosoms fill ;
They who love the Lord, no never
Know a long, a last farewell.”

Just before his departure to that ‘‘ Better
Land,” his prayer had been that it might
be well with all his loved ones ; but in the
midst he broke off saying, “I will not pray
that it might be well, for I know that it
will be. All was well, all is well, and
all will be well.” On the tomb-stone that
marked his last resting-place were the
words :—

“GEIRTSITERAN: MY IES,

WO FELL ASLEEP IN JESUS.
“Tt ts well.”
How true that hymn:

“ Asleep in Jesus, blessed sleep,
From which none ever wakes to weep, .
A calm and undisturbed repose,
Unbroken by the last of foes.”

All, indeed, was well with the fatherless
girl, and in after years, when she trod on
foreign shores, her father’s God was with
her still, and how often there did her voice
pour forth the strains :—
CHILDHOOD OF ELIZABETH. Ig

“Guide me, oh ! Thou great Jehovah,
Pilgrim through this barren land.
Iam weak, but Thou art mighty.
Guide me with Thy powerful hand,
Bread of heaven,
Feed me till I want no more.”

He did guide, and will guide her still,
even unto the end.

She and her mother could not now com-
mand the comforts they had been accus-
tomed to, still they had enough; so they
removed to a pretty cottage in a village
in Devonshire. Here did mother and
daughter spend many happy days. Eliza-
beth loved to listen to her mother’s recitals
of her father’s people. Her eye would
kindle, and her heart burn within her,
thankful that she was sheltered beneath
the blood-stained lintel. She knew that
her Saviour had reared the crystal walls of
salvation for her, and dryshod she had
passed within their confines safe unto the
other shore. How she wished that her
people could say so too.

Her mother told her that her grandfather
would recite his daily prayers, and while
doing so, owing to their length, his tired
body would have to lean against some
article of furniture for support.

He thought the number of his prayers
would gain him favour with God. How
20 LITTLE EMMIE.

that Elizabeth’s aunt, Christian’s eldest
sister, who had been brought up in the
Jewish faith, had found out the love of her
Saviour, and that now both brother and
sister were roaming the courts of the
heavenly Jerusalem.

The days passed smoothly and pleasantly
on, till Elizabeth left her mother’s home
for that of her husband, and her mother
went to live with her only son, who was
residing in the north of England. He was
several years Elizabeth’s senior, had been
married while she was a girl at school: so
for this reason, Elizabeth and her mother
for many years were alone.




CHAPTER II.

ELIZABETH'S MARRIAGE.

LIZABETH and her mother
attended a meeting of Chris-
tians, where the latter, when
she was bereaved, was led.
On first entering this unpre-
tentious building she heard
that hymn:











“From every stormy wind that blows,
From every swelling tide of woes,
There is a calm, a sweet retreat,
*Tis found before the mercy-seat.”

A christian man spoke on the text, “He
is not here but risen.” She had been
looking at the grave of her dear departed
one; but now these comforting words sent
peace into her soul.

One Sunday, a tall, fair stranger, with
his Bible under his arm, entered. He
wore a heaven-born expression, so calm
and peaceful. After the meeting was over,
22 LITTLE EMMIE.

his eye fell upon Elizabeth, He made
_ inquiries about her, as her appearance
interested him, more especially her sad
expression. It was so different from his
own restful face. He early learned to
trust a Fathers care; but Elizabeth had
to wade through deep waters ere she could
so trust. Edward N., the stranger in
question, was a tutor in a gentleman’s
school. He was the son of christian
parents, who were Baptists. He himself
was a Christian, but a worldly one.

On first leaving home, he went as a
master in a school, where the principal, a
dissenting minister, so stumbled Edward
by his life during the week, being so
different from that he preached in the
pulpit on Sundays, that he gave notice to
leave, and sought an appointment else-
where. He was successful in obtaining a
situation where the principal was not only
a Christian in name, but in life also. He
met with others on the Lord’s day to break
bread as the apostles did of old.

Edward was expected to attend with the
boys. He in wonder looked on, and wrote
that same day to his father, telling him
that he did not know with what sort of
people he was living now. He thought
they must be quakers. However, he soon
ELIZABETH’S MARRIAGE, 23

afterwards was led to see that they were
doing the right thing in meeting thus, and
he cast in his lot with them.

When the summer vacation arrived he
went to his boyhood’s home, and as there
were none in the village who met as he
had been accustomed, he walked four miles
to a neighbouring towa, the place where
Elizabeth resided, and thus they met. He
was invited to dine at the house of a friend
of Elizabeth, and there, in the afternoon,
she and her mother saw him. The follow-
ing week he called on them, and that first
evening she joined him at the plano in
singing : —

“How good is the God we adore,
Our faithful, unchangeable Friend,

Whose love is as great as His power,
And knows neither measure nor end.

“Tis Jesus, the First and the Last,
Whose Spirit shall guide me safe home,
We'll praise Him for all that is past,
And trust Him for all that’s to come.”

In after years these two called this hymn
“Our hymn,” but little did they then know
what they would be called to pass through
to prove His love and power.

This friendship ripened into love. “No
wealth or power had he,” but he had a
willing mind to work. He trusted his
24 LITTLE EMMIE.

heavenly Friend. One day Elizabeth
received a letter from Edward asking her
to be his companion along the pilgrim way.
She accepted, and married him, but against
the wish of her mother, as Edward was
poor. The mother liked him much;
but she dreaded hardships for her daughter.
She has since learned, however, that trust-
ing Jehovah instead of riches may bring
trials of faith ; but a rich harvest is reaped
thereby in having opportunities of seeing
Jehovah’s hand extended for his people’s
good.

Edward furnished a small but pretty
cottage, and although these two had little
of this world’s goods, they had the upholder
of the universe as theirs, and they knew
that when this passing world was done,
there was an inheritance that was undefiled
reserved in heaven for them. What a halo
of grandeur around that word, inheritance!
In having Christ we inherit all things.

Edward was thankful on leaving the
train, to see his loved home from the
bridge beyond. And in the month of
May it looked especially pretty, with its
overhanging bushes of pink and white
hawthorn. No need for hand to be lifted
to the knocker, for eager eyes were watch-
ing for that well-known form.
ELIZABETH'S MARRIAGE. 25

On the evening of the arrival of these
two in their new home, they sang to-
gether :—

“ Jerusalem, my happy home,
Name ever dear to me,

When shall my labours have an end,
And I, thy glories see.”

Neither thought how soon one of them
might be called to roam those courts ; but
we are anticipating. Three years passed
away in happiness; but at last Edward
began to wear a look of pallor; a slight
cough, too, made his wife very anxious.
The thought was very distressing, but she,
willing that he should try anything for his
benefit, persuaded him to take a doctor’s
advice and go abroad. So they contem-
plated going to an island in the southern
seas. They had a little girl, a sweet child
of two summers, and the father was often
heard to say, “To depart and to be with
the Lord would be far better; but for the
sake of my wife and child, I feel I ought
to take my doctor’s advice.” So ina short
time parents and child sailed for the
southern seas.




CHAPTER EIT.

GOING ABROAD,

{DWARD, his wife, and Emmie,
4} went together for the last
time to the home of Edward’s
‘boyhood, and after a few
days set out for the great
Metropolis. It was requisite
to find a lodging for the night
before going on board, so about ten minutes
before the train steamed into the terminus,
Edward, his faith being always so simple,
and such a bright example to Elizabeth,
said, ‘ Let us ask the Lord to direct us to
a lodging.” And on passing down a street
they bent their footsteps in the direction of
a lodging-house, and aclean, homely person
received them, and on being informed of
their so quickly leaving England, she
shewed the lonely emigrants no little kind-
ness ; but what was better still, the woman
was a Christian. She was a member of

the Church of England, but worship where















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































i

i







A


= :




GOING ABROAD. 29

she may, she was a member of the Church
of Christ, that invisible one, that none can
sever. After a comfortable meal in a
pleasant parlour, Elizabeth was shewn to
her room, and there over the mantel-shelf
was that beautiful text in large type, ‘ Rest
in the Lord.” Turn which way she would,
her eyes fell back on those precious words.
In the dim hours of night, by the lowered
gas light would she behold those words,
and when on the stormy deep, that soul-
refreshing text would cheer her saddened
spirit.

On the morning of September 26th,
188-, the parents and child left the
London Docks in the ship R—. Many
prayers ascended far and near for the
safety of that vessel, for a large number of
her living freight were not only bound for
the southern seas, but were also bound for
the evergreen shore, and were in that
vessel, with Jesus at the helm, who
was guiding them towards that blissful
haven;

“We are out on the ocean sailing,
To a land that hath no storms.”

This was not the case with that mighty
ship R., for when off the coast of Africa, one
morning about five o'clock, a tornado arose,
3jO LITTLE EMMIE,

and the noise of falling timber, &c., awoke
Elizabeth. To her oft repeated question,
to her husband, could she get no direct
reply. He was ever anxious to save
Elizabeth trouble; but she heard the
steward inform a passenger that a tornado
had arisen. All hearts quailed ; but “ Rest
in the Lord” again came to Elizabeth.
She thought it was about the time when
many at home would be offering prayer
for her safety, and those dear to her, she
fell into a sound slumber, calmed by this
assurance.

The little one, too, slept far beyond her
usual hour, while Edward sat in his chair
and calmly rested on his God. No break-
fast was taken that morning by any of the
passengers, and Elizabeth did not awake
till the storm was over. The sun was
shedding his glittering rays on the calm
waters beneath. Often did Elizabeth
repeat that beautiful hymn of Charles’
Wesley, in the dark hours of the night, as
she lay in her berth listening to the mighty
waves dashing up against the side of the
ship :—

“Jesus, lover of my soul,
Let me to thy bosom fly,
While the billows near me roll
While the tempest still is high.”
GOING ABROAD. 31

The evenings were spent by Christians
of every class, meeting in the evening in
the steerage for prayer, and the reading of
God’s word, a Church of England clergy-
man, Wesleyans, Presbyterians, &c., all
meeting on one common ground. A
christian steward was heard to say, such a
sight he had never seen before ; not in that
vessel, at any rate. There is One above
who knows the good received and done at
those meetings, and all of that little Chris-
tian band are scattered now, but—

“Though sundered far, by faith they meet
Before one common Mercy Seat.”

On this vessel sped in her hourly course,
till again a storm appeared. The heavens
were black and ominous. The cold south
wind penetrated everywhere; but again
the mighty Creator heard the cries of His
people, and spoke peace to the troubled
ocean, and soon the lovely island of Tas-
mania was sighted, where the vessel
touched for some hours.

Such an Eden did the port seem to all:
the lovely terraces, villas, and beautiful
gardens.

The blue vault of heaven above, looking
down on the calm waters of the harbour.
With such a sight from the deck, one
32 LITTLE EMMIE.

would have scarcely realised that the vessel
had so recently battled with gigantic waves.
After the storm, how sweet the peace, and
if earth can afford such experiences, what
must our feelings be when our vessel
is anchored safely in the fair Eden
above.

Again the vessel struck out for the ocean
wave, and in a few days our emigrants
were landed safely in a harbour of a
lovely island. The harbour itself was en-
closed by steep rugged hills, with here and
there a group of houses of a very primitive
appearance,

Edward and his little family landed and
started for the chief town of the island
with only a few coins, and not an earthly
friend. He had, however, his heavenly
Friend, and what needed he more. The
emigrants arrived at the town, and put up
for the night at a second-rate boarding
house.

The following day Edward sought for a
cottage where he might live and store his
boxes, till he could find employment. He
was successful, and the landlady who lived
in the next house, invited him and his little
family to go at once to her house till his
own could be made somewhat comfortable:
Elizabeth on hearing of the kind invitation,
GOING ABROAD. 33

soon got herself and little one ready to go
to this good woman. She gave them a
hearty welcome, and when Elizabeth was
taken to her room, she saw hanging on a
wall ina homely frame, “True religicn is
to visit the fatherless and widow in their
affliction, and to keep ourselves unspotted
from the world.”

The lonely emigrants soon found out
that they were in the house of christian
people, and although refinement and Eng-
lish comfort were wanting there, yet true
and noble hearts were in that little home,
as after events proved.

Four days later the little family entered
the cottage that they were to call home.
They thought that their boxes would have
to serve as chairs for many a day ; but when
they entered, a blazing fire was in the
grate and a small table in the centre of
the little parlour, two chairs and snowy
curtains hanging from the windows, all
put there by this kind-hearted christian
woman.

Edward sallied forth to get some eatables
—not quite so much at home in this occu-
pation as in teaching the rising genera-
tion. He soon returned, however, when
the trio partook of their first meal in their
colonial home. Such feelings of thankful-
34 LITTLE EMMIE,

ness arose from the hearts of the parents,
that no words could ever express. Now
in truth did they sing :—

‘Flow good is the God we adore,
Our faithful, unchangeable Friend,
Whose love is as great as His power,
And knows neither measure nor end.”

He had shewed his power by bringing
the emigrants across the stormy deep, and
although He is the upholder of the vast
universe, His love could come down to
touch the heart of this poor woman to
shew His children kindness. May a rich
reward be in store for all she did for
Edward and those dear to him.

He applied to the Colonial Board of
Education for a school. Many candidates
were already in the field, but Edward
believed that his Father and God could
give him an appointment if it were good
for him. And so he calmly rested in
child-like faith.

A few weeks passed away, and one day
on returning from a visit to a neighbouring
town, when the travellers unlocked the
door of their lowly abode, Edward saw
lying on the floor a letter, and on opening
it, to his wondering gaze, he read that he
was appointed master of a small school
GOING ABROAD. a5

near the bush, on the mountains, with a
salary of £100 a year, and a house to live
in. Such was his Father’s care over him.
What thanksgiving arose that night from
hearts glowing with gratitude to Him
“whose love is as great as His power, and
knows neither measure nor end.”








CHAPTER IV.

THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN.

Y\|DWARD went on first, to
eae prepare the house for Eliza-
beth. It was situated on the
side of a mountain, about
sixty miles from the town in
which they were now living.
Edward arranged to return
part of the way to meet his wife and child.

The morning he arrived at his mountain
home was very cold, with rain and sleet
falling, and thus hiding magnificent scenery.
The house was a wooden shanty, and one,
built many years ago; it was so different
from the modern ones. The garden, in
front, was overgrown with weeds. Edward,
nothing daunted, soon made a pathway up
to the front door. He made a table out of
one of the packing cases, a bookshelf too,
and arranged all the books he loved so
well.










THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN. ° 37

All Elizabeth’s nicknacks, gifts from
friends that she thought she would never
see on earth again, were put in their
several places. So that when Elizabeth
arrived she found all in order. When she
came to the place of meeting, her husband
was waiting tor her with a hired convey-
ance to take heron her way. Such scenery
she had never betore beheld ; so grand and
bold. Lofty mountains covered with per-
petual snow towering up in splendour
beneath the blue heavens, and the luxuri-
ant bush at the side covering many square
acres of ground. As she neared the lofty
piles, their beauty seemed to increase, and
at last the travellers descended a steep
incline, and could hear in the distance the
roar of a mighty river sweeping down
magnificent gorges.

On they went, till they were in the bed
of a river of immense width, only passable
in the summer at all times. In winter,
often impassable for many weeks. When
the travellers were in the bed of this river,
they were surrounded by lofty embank-
ments, cut so evenly, that they looked as if
_done by the hand of man, if it had not been
for their immense height. But this was
not so; it had been formed by a glacier of
past ages. This river of ice, with its
38 LITTLE EMMIE.

mighty millions of tons, had slowly, but
‘surely done its work.

The travellers seemed locked in on all
sides, and Elizabeth wondered where the
outlet was. ‘The sides of some of the em-
bankments were covered with overhanging
shrubs of every description. It has been
said that in this spot is some of the grand-
est scenery of the world. At last they
ascended a steep incline, and then they
were at the top of a rugged precipice, and
at last on a plain.

On they went this lovely morning till
the everlasting hills again appear in sight,
and the luxuriant bush, with birds of every
hue, warbling sweet songs. Such a spot
seemed like an earthly Eden; one could
fancy that sorrow could never enter here.

On these mountains, there were a few
settlers ; they were far away from all good
influence. Although beholding all this
grandeur of nature, many of them avowed
that there was no God. On Sundays the,
weekly avocations would still be pursued,
such as building, reaping and sowing.

There was no companionship for Edward
and his wife. They did not want the com-
panionship of the ungodly; they only
wanted to do them good. Edward had
once sought to do good to those in the
































} }
j |

}

\ |

, | TROPICAL SCENERY.

1

i

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it





THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN. 4I

busy‘scenes of one of England’s northern
cities by preaching forth the words of life,
and now God had brought him across the
ocean to speak to those people in their
mountain strongholds. He felt it to be a
noble work to sow the seeds among the
young, and while he was enabling them to
fill their places on the platform of life, he
was training them for something beyond it.

On the Sunday after their arrival (Eliza-
beth never forgot that scene) Edward called
the children together to speak to them of
Jesus and His love. Many voices were
raised in singing that well-known school
hymn :—

een is a better world, they say,
Oh! so bright,
Where sin and woe are done away,
Oh! so bright.
No clouds e’er pass along its sky,
No tear-drops glisten in the eye,
Happy land.”

If the Christian could not look beyond
this scene, to his mansions in the skies,
how could he bear the sorrows and the
partings. But for the glad re-unions when
earth’s storms are overpast, his heart would
fail him. The God of Israel is a God of
love; nay, not only a God of love, but is
D
42 LITTLE EMMIE.

love itself, and when earth’s weary travel-
lers arrive in their eternal home, they will _
have a Father's greeting, a Father’s wel-
come, and they will bid farewell to every
fear; faith will give place to sight in those
mansions above, and if earth apart from sin
is ofttimes so beautiful, what must it be in
the fair Eden above.

Edward laboured among the people here,
and as the word of the Lord can never
return to Him void, let us hope that
Edward will have had souls for his hire.
The husband and wife felt alone with
God; far away from kindred and friends.
They took walks together, and each day
fresh. beauties would open to their view.
The lofty mountains, the luxuriant bush, the
mountain gorges, with their overhanging
foliage of every hue, and the mighty waters
rushing down their incline, would all speak
to them, telling them that the mighty
Creator was here, and, in the midst of all,
this mighty Creator was caring for His
children.

The pleasant evenings were whiled
away in the midst of these mountain
passes, shielded only by wooden parti-
tions these two passed their days.

The winds so prevalent, and no Eng-
lishman could imagine what they were
THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN. 43

like, swept down the gorges, often rocking
the house. Indeed, before they were the
inmates one day, the chimney fell and
smashed the roof, still they feared not.
They would sit in the evenings around the
blazing hearth, great trunks of trees three
feet long blazing up the chimney, all so
different to what they had been accustomed
to; still Elizabeth often looked back on
those days of native grandeur, as far sur-
passing those of other years.

They were many miles from any meeting
of Christians, and being so often prevented
from going to any, as they had no vehicle
of their own, and once or twice were much
disappointed in a neighbour taking them,
they thought they would remember the
Lord’s death there in those mountain
strongholds :—

“Do this, he cried, till time shall end,
In memory of your dying Friend ;
Meet at my table, and record
The love of your departed Lord.”

As the emblems of the Saviour’s death
were laid in that lowly cottage that
glorious Sunday morning, Elizabeth little
thought that it was not only the first time
but would be the last also, that she and
44 LITTLE EMMIE,

Edward would partake of those emblems
together.

She has never forgotten, nor will she do
so, that memorable Sunday morning. As
ahe took the bread, the Saviour at the
moment seemed to speak to her, as He
had never done before, in all His living
power, ‘‘ This is my body, which is broken
for you.’ The husband and wife sang
together :—

“ We'll sing of the Shepherd that died,

That died for the sake of the flock,
His love to the utmost was tried,
But firmly endured as a rock.”

Elizabeth seemed to be prepared in some
measure for a coming trial; such an one
that the writer cannot fully depict it.
Enough to know that Jehovah was with
her all the way. She received a letter
from a friend, and in it a leaflet with the
words :—

“While she leans on me
The burden shall be mine, not hers.”

He did, indeed, bear all the weight, or it
would have crushed her.

The following week, Edward became
much worse, and thought it right to get
médical aid, at the nearest town, which
THE COTTAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN. 45

was sixty miles distant. This meant a far
different journey than an Englishman
might suppose. Several hours were spent
in travelling. Edward started one autumn
evening for the nearest railway station, and
as she watched his receding form, she little
dreamed that this loved husband had seen
those hills for the last time--that he was
so soon to bid farewell to earth, to ascend
the heights of glory.






CHAPTER V.

EDWARD'S ILLNESS AND DEATH.





JATE at night, Edward arrived
} at his destination, took a
lodging for the night, and
the next morning went to the
hospital to get advice. The
doctors said they could do
nothing for him unless he
became an inmate of the building for a
time, and he, for the sake of his wife and
child, became one.

Elizabeth was long afterwards told, that
they knew he was near his end, and
thought that he was better in the hospital
than in lodgings. She eagerly waited for
tidings of her husband’s return; so imagine
her feelings when she received a letter,
informing her that her husband was an
inmate of a hospital, with stranger hands
ministering to his wants.

The next day she decided to go to him,










EDWARD'S ILLNESS AND DEATH. 47

and know full particulars. She and her
child arrived at the town, sought a lodging .
for the night, and the next morning went
to see her husband.

Noble institutions are these hospitals,
and noble hearts had the founders of them,
but no one can portray fully the wife’s
feelings when, at the far end of a long
ward, she saw her husband looking pale
and wan, and looking, too, at least ten
years older than when she last saw him.
Anxiety had made havoc of his feeble
frame.

The doctor had written over his bed the
Latin word for consumption, not thinking
that his patient would know its meaning.
The word itself, together with being told
to keep his bed, made all hope cease. He
knew his weakness; that he could work no
longer for his wife and child.

Edward was very unhappy in this place;
his wife saw that he was, and offered to get
a lodging. Oh! how gladly did he fall in
with this idea. Elizabeth now seemed to
lose all hope ; but she felt that she would
like to minister to his wants herself, instead
of strangers doing so. Intuition seemed to
tell her, that those pleasant evenings in the
home on the mountains were over for ever.
But even there, she had at times her mis-
48 LITTLE EMMIE.

givings. One evening he asked her to
read a hymn he had composed :—-

“Jesus, Lord Jesus, how oft would I fly

Thy face, to see.

Gazing on Thee, now exalted on high,
Comforteth me.

Boundless the love that surrounds me, I know;

Living the streams that continually flow,

Down to the poor wearied pilgrim below,
Saviour from Thee.

“ Here oft I tremble a sigh of regret,

Waiting for Thee.

Star of the morning, that never can set,
Coming for me.

Lord, when Thou comest, from sorrow I rest,

Deep drink of joy, and lean on Thy breast,

Satisfied fully! in Thy presence blest,
Saviour with Thee.

“Saints now united, in glory ne’er part,

Saviour from Thee.

One is the object and hope of the heart—~
Jesus ’tis Thee.

The rivers of crystal and city of God,

Portals of pearls, such a glory unfold ;

But, what are these, when Thy face I behold?
Nothing to me?

“List what the Bride and the Spirit doth say!
Come, come away.
Let him that heareth the word, Come, say
Come, come away.
EDWARD'S ILLNESS AND DEATH. 4g

Jesus now testifies, I quickly come,

To take my beloved ones up to my home;

Oh! may our hearts echo back to His own,
Come, Jesus, come.”

Elizabeth, with a great effort, read this
hymn.

Edward wrote a letter to his father (the
last letter he ever wrote to that loved
parent) asking him to sing, with the rest
of the family, this poem, when all were
gathered around the old harmonium.

After Edward was on foreign shores, he
valued the christian home of his childhood
as he had never done before. When he
saw the ungodly homes around him, the
infidelity and its consequences, he loved to
think of his boyhood’s home and of his
christian parents.

A time came when Elizabeth formed
one of the circle in that home, and around
the old harmonium she joined in singing
the hymn of her loved one, not with break-
ing heart, but with a heart full of thankful-
ness that her husband was free from all
pain, safe in his home in glory, and she had
proved Jehovah-Jesus that He could
far more than make amends for earthly
loss. It was through deep and sore
sorrows, however, ere she could speak of
His love, even in this measure.
50 LITTLE EMMIE.

Elizabeth found a clean, comfortable
lodging, and went with a vehicle the next
day to the hospital for her husband.
When he came to the lodging and saw it
replete with comfort, she saw his look of
satisfaction. Elizabeth had brought him
here that her hands might minister to him ;
but her God and Father would not have it
so, His way was the best way as after
events proved.

Edward was to have no earthly prop to
lean on as he passed through the valley of
the shadow of death. Jesus was His only
stay. Truly Edward, the passage was a
rough one that preceded thy entry into
that blissful harbour, but it only made
thy rest more sweet and Christ more
dear. They partook of tea together on
their arrival at this lodging. Edward, with
an unnatural energy to cheer his wife, had
moved to the table. This was the last
meal they were to partake of together on
earth. God knew it; they did not, and
well was it that the veil was drawn. How
our fainting hearts would sink if we knew
all that we had to go through. He who
knows our feeble frame, has mercifully
hidden the future. He has also said, “As
thy day so shall thy strength be,” and
‘My grace is sufficient for thee.”
EDWARD'S ILLNESS AND DEATH. 51

That night Elizabeth awoke suddenly
from a sound slumber and became delirious.
Her husband was removed into another
apartment, and she was left by him to be
taken care of by the woman of the house.
We will leave her now, only to say, that
Edward came to her bedside once, and
earnestly with his now enfeebled voice
prayed for her recovery; that she might
be restored to her child. This prayer was
answered ; but in God’s own way and time.
His way was the best way, and His own
time the right time.

Edward’s faith,.as he approached the
end, shone brighter and brighter. The
woman of the house, who attended to him,
and the doctor pressed him to write on
paper what he wished done with regard to
his wife and child; and one day, the
woman having got a certificate from the
doctor that his disease was approaching a
fatal termination, put it into the dying
man’s hands. He, however, did not waver.
He would do nothing but trust them to
Jehovah, the Father of the Fatherless,
and the Husband of the widow. :

It was a test to his faith to know that his
wife and child were on foreign shores and
with no means of support. He knew that
he was powerless to help; but he knew
52 LITTLE EMMIE.

that the God who had led him hitherto
was a faithful Promiser, so with calmness,
he awaited his exit into glory. He was
sitting in his chair the day before he
departed. On the morning of his passing
into the eternal world, he was too weak to
get up. :

Towards the evening, the landlady came
into the room, she did not notice any
_ change. In the morning he had asked her
to read to him Psalm cxvi, and also a
hymn :—

“ Rest of the saints above,
Jerusalem of God.”

and he feebly marked the following verse:

* And by the Spirit’s power
He’s ope’d the heavenly door,
And brought me to this favoured hour,
When toil shall all be o’er.”

Edward must have felt that his end was
near, for as the woman was about to leave
the room he, with an unnatural energy,
called her. She returned to his bedside,
and in ten minutes afterwards he peacefully
slept away, to awake on that glad morn to
meet the Lord he loved so well. His happy
spirit is however with him now, he has
EDWARDS ILLNESS AND DEATH. 53

passed the portals and is resting now on
his Saviour’s breast :—

“ Safe in the arms of Jesus,
Safe on His gentle breast ;
Free from the world’s temptations,
Sweetly his soul shall rest.”

A few Christians took him to his last
resting place one Sunday afternoon. The
rain was pouring in torrents; but what of
that to the sleeping saint. His soul was in
the paradise above,

“ Where he will know, without a cloud, -
His full unbounded love.”

Edward had often wished to be a
missionary. God gave him his wish for a
short time. That Pacific isle gave hima
home till he set out again on another
voyage; but this time he was ‘‘bound for
the evergreen shore.”




CHAPTER VI

ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM.



EY |DWARD being in a dying

|] state when Elizabeth was
taken delirious, and having
no means at his disposal was
powerless to act. The land-
lady of the lodging, together
with the doctor, soon were ap-
prised of the fact that Edward was poor, so
they sought to get Elizabeth into a lunatic
asylum. She was quite unconscious when
she was taken. They took her from her
bed, and hastily put her into a cab, and
drove her to this building. No place for
her, as many afterwards said; still God in
His goodness hid her from the coming
trial; from the coming solemn events.
Her medical attendant said that her body
was in such a weak state, that she must
have died had she passed through all the
after events connected with her husband’s
death. Every detail from the commence-

SheSieiean
ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 55

ment of her illness till the time she left the
institution came vividly to her recollection.

On arriving at the building her Bible, a
gift from her mother, was taken from her.
She was then led to a small cell with a
lattice window, not a particle of furniture,
and put on a bed of straw on the floor
Here she remained for three weeks ; per-
fectly dead to the outer world.

The wild shrieks of the insane sounded
through the corridors, and were mixed up
with the wild fancies of her fevered brain.
Stull in her wild delirium, thoughts of
heaven and heavenly things soothed that
fevered brain. She was often heard to
sing in the dark hours of the night,

“How good is the God I adore,
My faithful, unchangeable Friend,
Whose love is as great as His power,
And knows neither measure nor end.”

And oftener still :—

“There is a Name I love to hear,
I love to sing its worth,
It sounds like music in my ear,
The sweetest Name on earth.”

During these weeks she had occasional
visits from young attendants, and once or
twice during the night, the tiny window in
56 LITTLE EMMIE,

the door was quickly opened, and a dark-
eyed, matronly looking woman threw the
light of the lantern on the suffering one
and then quickly passed on. Once or twice
she came to Elizabeth and gave her some.
thing to drink.

The day before she got up, Edward
was taken to the mansions above. The
authorities heard of his death, and likely
thinking that friends would be looking
after Elizabeth, had her dressed and taken
to the ward of the worst patients, where
she was so weak that she had to be
supported by an attendant, and she was so
frightened that she feared to move. The
frantic shrieks of some of the patients,
mixed with the oaths of one or two atten-
dants, and the waking up as it were from a
dream, without then the faintest recollec-
tion of how she came there or where she
was, that in her weakness, she fancied she
was in a place of satanic influence.

Edward wanted to write a letter to her,
that she might have it, when she came to
herself, that she might be told where she
was. The woman who nursed him said
she would never get it, so Edward did not
write. Well would it have been for
Elizabeth, when she did come to con-
sciousness, to have had some loving heart
ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 57

to break the awful news; but the naked
truth of her position dawned on_ her,
on seeing “ Lunatic Asylum” on a printed
form. The doctor, who was the means of
her being placed in this institution, was
heard to say that some place between an
asylum and a hospital was needed for her.

On the following Sunday, Edward’s
remains were put in their last resting place,
and the succeeding Sunday was one also
never to be forgotten by Elizabeth. When
returning to her dark cell, she could throw
herself on her knees, and cry to her God
to deliver her from this cell. How this was
to be done, she did not know; but she had
faith to believe that He could do it.

On this Sunday morning in question she
asked for a Bible. The attendant said,
“What Bible.” Elizabeth felt deeply hurt
and answered, “ There is but one Bible.”

Within ten minutes the doctor, a truly
kindhearted man, came his rounds with the
matron, and on coming to Elizabeth, who
was trying to support her weak frame on
the bench, said to the matron, ‘ This is no
place for her.”

Half-an-hour afterwards the woman took
her up-stairs. Elizabeth wondered where
she was going, when a door was thrown
open and she was led into the convalescent

E
58 LITTLE EMMIE.

ward—a long cheerful room, with flowers
and pictures, and a piano at the far end.
A number were seated around the table,
with their prayer-books and hymn-books.
And soon after the chaplain walked in,
and a truly godly man he was. The first
hymn he called sent such comfort to
Elizabeth that words cannot express :—

“ Art thou weary, art thou languid,
Art thou sore distrest,
Come to me, saith One, and coming,
Be at rest.” 3

Only a person in like circumstances can
fully understand the calm that these words
brought to Elizabeth’s troubled breast. She
was informed that she was to stay in this
ward. Never had any patient in that
building passed so quickly to it. It was
the custom to bring them gradually through
each ward.

At night she feared she was to be taken
to her lonely cell; instead of which she was
taken to a bright cheerful ward of 36 beds,
and her resting place was shielded, and
in one of the best positions. Now again,
how truly could she say, “ How good is
the God J adore.”

All here shewed her kindness. Firmer
and rougher hands were needed for patients
ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 59

below, but here she had every care. Once,
when in the cell below, two attendants
came to her with something, and because
she did not want to take it, they boxed her
ear so, that it gave her pain for some time
after. She never spoke of it ; as whatever
sense she had then restored to her, told her
to make a fuss would only be worse for
herself.

The Superintendent or the Inspectors
would never have allowed such an action
had they known it; but how, my reader,
are the authorities to guard always against
unprincipled servants? It should be the
last extremity for friends to put those dear
to them in sucha place. It is only those
who have suffered within its walls can tell
the secrets. One of Elizabeth’s attendants
would often come to her and ask her to
sing that well-known hymn :—

“Sweetest note in seraph song,
Sweetest carol ever sung,
Jesus, blessed Jesus,”

The poor afflicted ones delighted to hear
Elizabeth sing and play. None, to their
ears, played like Mrs. R.; none sang like
her. She could only account for it, that
what came from the heart, spoke to the
heart. She had proved the One, whose
60 LITTLE EMMIE.

name was the sweetest name on earth, and
would therefore with wondrous feeling
sing of

“His mighty power to save.”

All this time Elizabeth could not imagine
why her husband never came to her, and
intuition kept her from asking the reason ;
for she was afraid of the answer, for in her
wild delirium she fancied he was safe on
the other shore.

One afternoon, about five weeks after
she was an inmate of this institution, she
was told that a lady wished to see her.
She went to the waiting-room, a cold-
looking place, and met this lady. She was
a Christian and an elderly one, and in
her strong Scotch brogue in answer to
Elizabeth’s question, ‘Where is my hus-
band ?” she said, ‘“‘ He has gone to be with
the Lord.” The tone, the accent, and
greater still the words, all sank down into
Elizabeth’s bleeding heart. Oh! what a
moment that was, God alone witnessed her
feelings ; but in the midst, such a calmness
stole over her that she was never able to
express, She felt an unseen presence
around her. The visitor was heard to say,
“She took it far better than I expected.”
ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 61

Words often used ; still, if prayer is made,
what is there that we cannot expect
Jehovah to do! He can calm the troubled
breast :-—

“Flow sweet the name of Jesus sounds
In a believer’s ear,
It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds,
And drives away his fear.”

She left her visitor to ascend that stair-
case, with no friendly arm to lean on, no
mother’s breast to sob her sorrow out on;
but that unseen presence was with her, as
she ascended to the ward. It was a living
reality. No outward emotion did she shew.
She thought of her child, and pleaded for
strength to bear. The doctor came twice
that night to the ward to see Elizabeth.
Her intuition told her that he feared a
relapse; but instead of which he saw
something -he could not understand. She
knew where to fly for refuge. Oh! with
what fervour did she whisper :—

Jesus, Lover of my soul,
Let me to Thy bosom fly.”

When all the lights were out she stifled
her sobs beneath the bedclothes. This
relieved her. Sleep came at last, and in the
62 LITTLE EMMIE.

morning she opened her Bible that had
been returned to her, and her eye fell on
Psalm cxlvi. Every word seemed written
for her. ‘While I live will I praise the
Lord. Put not your trust in the son of
man, in whom there is no help. Happy is
he who hath the God of Jacob for his help,
who made heaven and earth. Which
executeth judgment for the oppressed.
The Lord looseth the prisoners. The
Lord preserveth the strangers. He re-
lieveth the fatherless and widow.” In days
of old what care He always took of the
stranger. Once when speaking to Israel
He said, “Ye know the heart of the
stranger.” Under the head of that word
‘and widow” also did Elizabeth come. The
faithful Promiser was hers, He was a hus-
band to the widow and a Father to her
fatherless child. Truly did she feel a
stranger in a foreign land. Sometimes she
felt she could only utter

““Guide me, Oh! Thou great Jehovah,
Pilgrim through this barren land;
I am weak, but Thou art mighty,
Guide me with Thy powerful hand.
Bread of Heaven :
Feed me till I want no more.”

He did guide her, He did lead her, in a
ELIZABETH IN THE ASYLUM. 63

most remarkable way. The doctor one
day asked her if she had any friends.
She thought of the good woman who had
befriended her and Edward on first coming
to the island. She sent a message to her,
and in a few hours she and her husband
came to her. Oh! how they sympathised.
The wife saw Elizabeth’s coloured dress,
and the next morning before breakfast
Elizabeth received a new black dress, that
hands must have plied the needle over late
on into the preceding night. The robe was
a sombre one indeed, but the Lord
will bless the giver of that sombre
parcel.

These two good people offered her a
home at once. Certain forms had to be
gone through, but in a few days the good
people fetched her and brought her to their
humble dwelling. It was a lovely spring
morning when the prison doors were
opened to let the lonely widow through.
A hearty welcome and an ample repast
were awaiting her; and as she entered
that lowly dwelling, her heart again she
lifted to her

“... Faithful, unchangeable Friend,
Whose love is as great as His power,
And knows neither measure nor end.
64 LITTLE EMMIE,.

Tis Jesus, the First and the Last,

Whose Spirit will guide me safe home ;
T’ll praise Him, for all that is past,

And trust Him for all that’s to come.”

The darkest hour is just before the dawn.
Elizabeth's darkest hour was past, and
dawn came at last.




CHAPTER VII.

EMMIE AT BETSY'S HOME.



JET up, you lazy girl; it is
| after five o’clock, and you
lying; “flere. I» “tell sou
what it is; if you are going
to eat my bread, you will
have to earn it first. Tve
worked hard in my day,
and you will have to do it, too, or my
name is not Betsy Cranstone.”

Emmie had been taken hastily to this
woman, a distant relative of her father, and
such were the words she heard on the
morning after her arrival at Joe Cranstone’s
farm. The woman very reluctantly took
her—the kid, as she called her. No person
explained in any way the cause of the
change, and the little clinging, loving
heart was well-nigh broken. Let us not’
suppose that childhood has not its feelings.

This homestead was situated away up




66 LITTLE EMMIE.

on the hills—-a wooden shanty surrounded
by hundreds of acres of barren-looking
land. The rugged mountains, whose tops
reared far away into the heavens, with not
an acre of bush to relieve the eye, and
scattered on them here and there were
extinct craters, which shewed to a passer-
by, if ever there were such a being in this
outlandish spot, that though far away
from the busy scenes of life, the foot-
prints of the Creator were here; and His
watchful eye at this moment was watching
over that beautiful and lonely girl, who
Was in consternation listening to the words
and harsh tones of Betsy Cranstone. The
child was of very delicate organisation ;
she wore such a look of refinement, and
her expression was so sweet. Her well
formed head was covered with a mass of
auburn curls.

Poor Emmie awoke from a troubled
sleep, wondering where she was; but
though a child in years, she was not in
mind, and the absence of her father and
mother and the whole change of circum-
stances flitted through her little active
mind, and the harsh tones of Betsy
frightened away or rather prevented the
outburst of her pent up feelings, which
otherwise would have broken out.
EMMIE AT BETSY'S HOME, 67

Emmie, in her childish glee, had often
frolicked on the green in front of the native
school, where her father had scattered the
seeds of truth. She had rambled in the
woods gathering ferns and wild flowers.
Her little voice had warbled sweet notes
of praise in the Sunday class. She had
been petted and loved by the children.
Her refined and sensitive nature had never
to succumb to harsh treatment. Her day
had been one continual flow of happiness.
And now in one short week all was
changed, and Emmie was alone, yet not
alone, for her father’s God was with her.

* Saviour, like a shepherd lead us,
Much we need Thy tender care.”

The poor child was taken ill, and Eliza-
beth was afterwards told that she had
almost lost her. Most unsuitable medicine
was administered to the little one; so that
God must have fully been the Author of
-her recovery. He who knows the end
from the beginning was going to rejoice
the mother’s heart in giving her back her
child. Hecan over-rule all things. When
Elizabeth was told where her darling was,
the child she had so loved and shielded, she
received a great shock, and oh! the bitter
pain of knowing she could not get to her.
68 LITTLE EMMIE,

It was the law that no inmate of an
asylum could leave that institution till he
or she had a home to be taken to.

The mother tried to forget the instru-
ment used in caring for her child, and con-
stantly prayed to the Shepherd of Israel,
who never slumbers or sleeps, to shield
her darling child. His ear was attentive
to that mother’s cries. His eye was on
her child, ‘“‘Shall not he who formed the
ear hear, and shall not he who made the
eye see?” That wondrous formation of
ear and eye speaks of a wondrous Creator.
Betsy in her rough way fed and ‘“‘ housed”
the child; but she did not want her there.

There are many hearts with rough ex-
teriors in the colonies, that when on Eng-
land’s shores possessed softened natures ;
but from colonial hardships in days gone
by, and from having to battle with the
stern realities of life, and without any fear
of God before their eyes and ignorant of
the One who is the great burden-bearer of
His people, they have become selfish and
hardened. Would that they knew the One,
whose love can melt the heart of stone.

When Joe Cranstone was on English
shores he had professed to belong to
the Saviour; but the love of drink, and
the temptations of ungodly companions,
EMMIE AT BETSYS HOME. 69

together with the love of gold, had made
him a fearful backslider. Could such a
one have ever tasted the Saviour’s love?
Still the great God above so loved man-
kind as to send His Son to die that all
might be saved, and ere his soul is called
hence, may he know and feel a Saviour’s
love. He, too, as well as Emmie, had
christian parents. He had at times his
moments of contrition, but turned to drink
to drown remorse.

The child trembled to hear his drunken
oaths at the table, and oh! how she longed
for her mother. That mother she was
soon to see, much sooner than she ex-
pected.

Elizabeth wrote a letter to Betsy, asking
her to send Emmie to the station, and she
would be there to meet her. One morn-
ing the child dressed herself as usual, and
appeared in the doorway tremblingly.
Betsy told her to come quickly to her
breakfast, and then get herself ready to go
in the buggy. Emmie dared not ask a
question. The woman volunteered to
remark ‘‘that her father was in a big hole.”
This was all the comfort that the fatherless
child had bestowed on her.

Now that Betsy knew that she was to be
rid of her, she was a little more kind in her
70 LITTLE EMMIE,

articulations. Over rough roads was
Emmie driven for many miles. Horses
dashing fearlessly on, accustomed to rough
roads and river passes. A vehicle swaying
into the middle of the river was thought
nothing of by colonials of earlier days ; but
to one of later date such experiences do
not tend to soothe the nerves, if he has
any.

However people soon get used to these
things as to everything else. The dryness
of the climate is very exhilarating, and the
starlight nights, owing to this dryness, are’
magnificent. When Elizabeth’s eyes first
rested on the “Southern Cross” in the
midst of the spangled heavens, she thought
she had never seen aught so lovely.

On Emmie was driven on this eventful
morning, and at last stopped at a primitive
little railway station.












CHAPTER VIII.

MEETING OF MOTHER AND CIIILD.



LIZABETH was _ thankful
indeed for the welcome she
had received at the humble
cottage of her kind-hearted
friends. Their home seemed
like a palace to her, now that
she was no longer a prisoner.

The day she wended her steps towards
that home was a memorable one to her.
The same unseen presence seemed to
follow her, and send a calmness into her
soul. Awful as the thought was, that she
was a widow, penniless almost, and a
stranger in a foreign land, sweet, heavenly
peace filled her soul, that the God of Israel
was caring for her.

After her arrival at this resting-place
afforded her, one wish filled her breast—
that she might fly to her child. This was
quite impossible, as Emmie was many


72 LITTLE EMMIE,

miles away, and Elizabeth only possessed
a few pence.

A few days after she was brought to
this friendly shelter she received a letter,
and on opening it she found a cheque for
about £5, payable to herself. The money
had been sent to her by the officer whose
duty it was to pay the teachers’ salaries,
and this amount was sent to her as that
due to her late husband. Elizabeth knew
he had not been able to fulfil his duties for
some time previous to his death; still the
authorities paid the salary up to the date of
his death. She was enabled at once to
write to Betsy Cranstone asking her for
her. child.

On a spring morning Elizabeth started
by a stage coach drawn by eight horses,
dashing along over rough roads they
were well trained to traverse. Up hill
and down, now near the edge of awful
precipices, then for two or three miles
through an amphitheatre of hills and rugged
precipices. One false step, or an inex-
perienced driver, and all might have been
hurled into the abyss below.

But all this was nothing to Elizabeth,
for was she not going to meet her long-lost
child! At the breakfast hour the coach
stopped at a wayside inn, and Elizabeth






CH.

E COA

THE STAG



MEETING OF MOTHER AND CHILD. 75

ordered breakfast, and when she asked the -
amount of payment, the landlord, who was
a perfect stranger to her, would not take
anything. Her widow’s garb might have
won his sympathy. However, whatever
was the cause, she had another manifesta-
tion of a Father's care.

Again the coach sped on its way, till
Elizabeth had to change for the train.
This was soon done, and in a short time,
Emmie saw a train slowly steam into the
primitive little railway station, on the plat-
form of which she was standing with
‘Betsy. And oh! joy burst into her little
heart, for at the window of one of the
carriages was the face of her long-lost
mother, who soon took her to her breast,
and then with a bursting heart of thank-
fulness to the Father of all mercies, parent
and little one sped on their way.

They soon arrived at the temporary
shelter that had been afforded to Elizabeth
by the good people who had so befriended
her. She, however, longed to be able to
earn something for herself, as she knew
that three months must elapse ere she
could hear from friends at home. In a
day or two she applied for a small school.
Friends doubted the good of this applica-
tion, as there were so many other appli-
76 LITTLE EMMIE,

cants; but Elizabeth could trust in a little
measure her heavenly Father now, whose
care had been so manifested to Edward in
providing for him; so she felt assured that
she would have that which was good for
her. She calmly waited the issue of
events.

Three days after her application, while
sitting at tea, a messenger came with a
note. On opening it she was informed
that a temporary teacher was wanted at
Seafield ; average attendance sixteen;
salary after the rate of £81; expenses
paid, and she was asked to go. She was
given the money for a first-class ticket and
expense of vehicle. Imagine her joy, dear
reader, once more to be able to shield her
little one, and to have a sphere of labour.
God can use whom He will for His people’s
ood, and He does the very best for
those who leave the choice to Him. “Om-
nipotence hath servants everywhere.’
Once again could she sing:

“Flow good is the God I adore.”

He restored her to health, gave her back
her child, and now was bestowing on her
an earthly home, and although He had
taken her husband to the paradise above,
MEETING OF MOTHER AND CHILD. 7?

He was not going to leave her alone ; for
He Himself was to be her guard and guide,
and give her the privilege of scattering
seeds of truth among the children of parents
who could not point them the way to the
tender Shepherd.

What an honour to serve Him in the
smallest measure; but the vessels He uses
are made meet for the Master’s use. He
wounds to heal, He breaks the earthen
vessel that His light may shine out to
poor benighted travellers. He uses the
weak things of the earth that He Himself
and not another may have all the glory.

“Close to His feet on the pathway,
Empty, and frail, and small,
An earthen vessel was lying,
Which seemed of no good at all.

“But the Master saw and raised it
From the dust in which it lay,
And smiled as He gently whispered,
This shall do My work to-day.”

SS UAS




CHAPTER IX.

THE EARTHQUAKE, AND JOURNEY TO

SEAFIELD. .

|N the following Saturday Eliza-
|| beth was to start for Seafield.
The evening previous was
spent in busy preparations
for the journey, and with a
light heart she retired for
the night. Once again she
was not only to have a manifestation of
His love, but of His power also.
In the dark hours of the night a rum-
bling noise was heard under the sward
outside the house, and it increased by
degrees, until it sounded like mighty peals
of thunder vibrating through the air. Then
the lowly cottage of which Elizabeth was
an inmate was shaken to the foundation,
as if the Creator had taken it within His
rasp.
Elizabeth awoke, and in the darkness of


THE EARTHQUAKE, 79

the night she did not need to be told
of the awfulness of her position.. Forty
feet of the spire of the neighbouring
church had fallen to the ground. Some
of the masonry of the adjoining house
was shivered to atoms. Elizabeth did
not tremble; but a faint feeling stole
over her, which was succeeded by a calm-
ness, for she thought, ‘My God would .
not have given me this school, if He
were going to destroy me in this earth-
quake.” She felt so sure that the school
was of God that the simple faith took
all fear, and the Author of it used these
thoughts to comfort her.

The next morning all was calm in nature.
The inhabitants, as she passed along the
street to the railway station, looked awe-
stricken, as if something unearthly had
happened, as indeed it had. Many, how-
ever, who avowed openly that there was
no God, betrayed their fear. They knew
Him not as a God of love—yea, even
love itself—and fear of the Unseen dwelt
in their breast, try how they would to
hide it.

Elizabeth, her little one, and a daughter
of the good people who had so succoured
her, started for A., a small town seventy
miles off, and twelve miles from her future
80 LITTLE EMMIE,

home. They arrived at the terminus at
mid-day. News soon flies in a small place,
so one of the Seafield school committee, a
well-to-do farmer, who was in the town
of A. that day, soon was apprised of the
fact that the new schoolmistress had ar-
rived. He met her and made himself
known to her, and offered to take her
in his own conveyance. The trio were
soon on their way this lovely spring day.
The terrible earthquake of the preceding
night had cast no shadow on that day.
The sun was shining brilliantly. On went
the travellers, till the lovely ocean ap-
peared, whose mighty waves could be
heard dashing against the gigantic rocks
of the coast.

Elizabeth was eagerly looking out for
the schoolhouse, when, to her surprise, the
good man drove her to his own grounds,
and at last they stopped outside a pretty
wood villa with a verandah and lovely
flowers underneath. The good man’s wife,
a bright-looking person, soon appeared,
and the travellers were given a hearty
welcome, and a repast such as a farm-
house can provide was soon spread, to
which they did ample justice.

They were kept there for the night, and
the next morning Elizabeth was taken to
TUE EARTHQUAKE. 81

her home. She expected to sce a small
shanty, such as she and Edward had
possessed on the mountains, but to her
surprise it was a well-built house, standing,
together with the school, on seven acres of
land covered with verdant grass, except
where the garden lay, and these grounds
were surrounded by a plantation of gum
trees, through which the snow-fed crystal
stream was winding.

No words can fully depict Elizabeth’s
feelings when she entered this home, given
as it were direct to her from heaven. It
was the God of Israel who had touched
the hearts of her benefactors to send her
here. She had no home, and He gave
her one through them. Thus shewing
how God can come in for His people's
good.

The following Monday morning Eliza-
beth met her pupils. She soon got to
love them and they her; and at the end of
one month she was asked to accept the
school permanently. Here she lived for
a year and a half, spending some of her
happiest days. The pure air and sea-
breezes soon strengthened her, and she
felt that her God had done so much for
her she must do something for Him, so
she formed a Sunday-class in the school-
82 LITTLE EMMIE.

room on Sunday afternoons, and at her
own house in the evening for those older,
and who had left the dayschool. Many
had to walk several miles ; but gladly did
they travel rough roads to hear God’s
word. Only about once in five weeks did
a church minister hold service in the
place.

One young girl confessed that she had
found the Saviour through Elizabeth. She
said no interest did she ever take in her
Bible before she came. Once this young
“woman was driving, and her younger
sister fell out of the vehicle, through the
horse taking fright. The poor girl was
several miles from home, and alone by
the roadside with her sister’s head bleeding
profusely. She thought of Elizabeth tell-
ing her to pray when in difficulty ; so the

irl poured out her first real prayer to
God, that she might be guided to some
house to get relief for her sister. She
directly saw in the distance a cottage,
to which she hastily drove, and found
the woman of the house to be a Christian
—a Wesleyan--and she quickly relieved
the suffering girl.

Elizabeth’s health at last gave way, and
she sought medical aid, and was advised
to return quickly to her native land, as she
THE EARTHQUAKE. 83

was suffering from consumption. She soon
prepared to leave this loved spot, and this
young girl who had confessed her Saviour
was asked by others to carry on the
Sunday class that Elizabeth had been
compelled to give up. May God’s rich
blessing be upon this young worker at
the far ends of the earth. Before Eliza-
beth left she composed the following lines,
which were accepted very heartily by the
parents of her pupils:

“ Fair Seafield ! I love to gaze
Upon the panorama of thy lovely landscape ;
Thy distant snow-capped hills towering up in splen-
dour
Beneath the canopy of blue.

Thy wide-spread meadows, and flocks of bleating
lambs ;

And the eastern shores of thy fairy isle,

Fringed with yon azure ocean.

I oft behold thy homesteads, dotted here and there,
And filled with many a kindly heart.

Thy village school, where smiling children, too, I
meet,

And where on Sunday afternoons,

Their voices mingle, with those of riper years,

In hymns of praise to the great Artist,

Whose pencil, as it were, has sketched so fair a
scene,

Where once the sceptre of the savage ruled its
sway.
84 LITTLE EMMIE.

Thy sunsets, too, wee the sun

In all his bold majestic beauty, bathed in sollen
light,

Is seen to smile behind the western hills.

The moon, too, with her silver sheen

I love to gaze on,

Rising in all her loveliness into the spangled vault
of heaven.

Fairer and grander scenes I might have seen,
Where other snow-capped hills tower ’neath heaven’s
canopy.

And lovely gorges, made by the glaciers of other
years,

And foliage of every hue is there ;

Where the crystal stream winds on, a

Increasing ever and anon until I hear its distant
roar.

But Seafield, where I, a homeless stranger found a
home,

And kindly hearts to cheer, I'll ne’er forget thee ;

And in the distant ages may thy voices join with
mine

In Hallelujahs

To the great Creator, the Saviour of mankind,

Whose mighty voice is heard

In the distant roar of thy mighty waves.”




CHAPTER X.

HOMEWARD BOUND.
| 9 NT was with mingled feelings
that Elizabeth looked upon

: the scene of her short labours,
@=)} sorry to bid farewell to the

| scholars she had loved so
-| well, yet glad for the sake of

her child to return to her
native land. The parents of the pupils
presented her with ten pounds. Here
was another manifestation of a Father’s
care, for she needed the money to help to
defray the expenses of the voyage.

One day towards the end of summer,
she and her child left that loved spot. A
hurricane arose as she was on her way to
the railway station. The same evening to-
wards dusk, amid torrents of rain, she
arrived at the terminus of the town, near
the port from where she had to embark for
her native shores. Here, according to
previous arrangements, after a pressing
invitation, was Elizabeth met by her old






86 LITTLE EMMIE.

friends—those who had always befriended
her. In the same lowly cottage, where
she had experienced such love and care,
did she fizd another welcome, and here
she remained for a few days ere she set
sail. Near this spot she bade farewell
to scenes that she would never visit on
earth again, where some of her greatest
trials had been, but where, too, her Father’s
care had been so manifest. One spot, the
dearest on earth to her, had to be left,
never more to be looked on, the spot
where her dear husband lay; still, while
weeping over that grave, she could lift her
eye heavenward to that serener clime
where sorrow can never enter, and where
she will see her beloved husband again.
Her friends accompanied her to the sea-
port where she was to embark. Elizabeth
much dreaded seeing this place. Those
hills reminded her of the time when she
and Edward landed, as lonely emigrants ;
and now she was going to embark from
the same place a widow, yet not alone; for
the God of Israel, who was going to guide
her across the deep, supported her now.
For the moment the feeling was agonising,
but the same calm assurance stole over
her that she was not alone, and with a firm
step she ascended the gangway, nerving
HOMEWARD BOUND. 87

herself to face the stern realities of life
for the sake of her darling child.

Elizabeth possessed some of the charac-
teristics of her race: she hada vast amount
of the power of endurance, together with
indomitable perseverance, that during the
last few months had been called into action.
These are nought without the blessing of
the Lord ; still He works in us not only to
will but to do according to His good
pleasure, and He nerves the feeble hand
for fight.

She at last bade farewell to her faithful
friends. How they had befriended her,
God only knows. There are some noble
ones on earth, and among them do these
friends of the friendless stand. God used
them as instruments, so thanksgiving must
ascend to the Fountain Head for all our
mercies ; still may God abundantly bless the
instrument: “I will bless them that bless
you” is not effaced from the written word.

As Elizabeth saw the receding forms of
her true friends, a feeling of loneliness
crept over her; but in gentle whisper
she heard the words of that mighty
Comforter saying, “’Tis I, be not afraid.”

In a short time the good ship A. was
out on the ocean wave and “ Home-
ward Bound.”






CHAPTER XL

STEERAGE PASSAGE AND ITS EXPERIENCES.





oft LER Elizabeth’s friends had
1} left her, she descended to the
steerage: she had no means
to take a saloon passage.
The deck of the ship and
all the surroundings reminded
her of her outward voyage,
when she had her loved husband to protect
her. The vessel was expected to be
heavily loaded at the next port, so that
very little room was left for steerage
passengers. She found at the foot of
steps almost perpendicular, a small square
compartment, with two narrow deal tables
and forms to match, and the only medium
of light and air was through the hatchway.
The food was served very indifferently.
Rusty tins held the eatables, and to one in
delicate health the whole appearance did
not have a very appetising effect. No

Pee









>
3 oN
OSS]








STEERAGE PASSAGE.







STEERAGE PASSAGE. QI

doubt the whole arrangements were ample
for what remuneration the company re-
ceived ; still to one in her state of health
it was far from desirable. There were
nine squalid children constantly making
a din, still Elizabeth pitied them, and on
the first Sunday she called them together
and told them of Jesus and His love.

After twelve hours’ passage the vessel
arrived at the chief port of the island,
where she remained one week. Elizabeth
prayed earnestly for grace to bear all the
difficulties connected with the steerage.
For six days, from early morn till dusk,
the stores for England were being hauled
down to a place close by her, there being
only a thin partition between her and the
hold, and the door leading to the spot
constantly open, so that watching her child
to keep her from danger was Elizabeth’s
constant occupation. There are warm
hearts everywhere, and the fellow passen-
gers though poor, possessed kindly feelings.
Some of the women were ever ready to
minister to the invalid. A cup of tea was
often brought to her cabin door.

A kind-hearted Irishman would go on
shore now and then to buy sweets, &c.,
and then distribute them among the
little ones. How often it -is that when
g2 LITTLE EMMIE,

trouble oppresses us, there are other
wounded hearts around us. woman, who had lost her husband a few
weeks before, was returning to her native
shores with five children, two of them
infants. When Elizabeth knew of this,
she thought, I am not alone in trouble.
Oh, what a time will that be when He
will wipe the tear from every eye, and
we shall rest eternally where sorrow can
never enter.

While Elizabeth was staying with her
friends before she embarked, she went toa
boarding-house to wish the friend farewell
who had first told her that she was a widow.
This lady invited her to luncheon, and
while the two were seated at a dining-
table, a gentleman and his wife walked
in, and took seats near them. Elizabeth
was introduced to them by her friend.
The gentleman had that day heard from
England, and in a letter was one enclosed
for Elizabeth, which he intended sending
to her that day.

It was from an old mutual friend whom
she had known from girlhood, and he
thought to gain her friends by thus bring-
ing her before their notice. And now ina
most remarkable way was she brought be-
fore these people in a public restaurant,
STEERAGE PASSAGE. 93

and nearly one hundred miles from her
former place of abode. Her friend
said, “ This meeting is of the Lord ;”
but Elizabeth wondered for what pur-
pose.

On the gentleman hearing that she was
to start for England so soon, and was to
remain in the next port a week, he said
there was a friend there whom he knew
intimately, and he would write to him at
once. Perhaps he might be able in some
way to shew her kindness. Two days
after, Elizabeth and her child arrived at
this port about six p.m., and the former
was completely prostrated with the effects
of the voyage, not well enough to look
after her little one, much more to battle
with the surroundings.

- However, her mind rose above diff-
culties, and, as has been said, she prayed
for grace to bear, and this was not denied
her. At eleven a.m. she was told that
a lady on deck wished to see her, and
when Elizabeth went up she found a friend
that she had known in other years, in her
native land, and she was also the wife
of the gentleman that her new-found friend
had written to on her behalf. Sorry indeed
was she to see her so situated. She said,
‘IT am sure it would not be the wish of
94 LITTLE EMMIE. ©

your friends at home that you should be in
thesteerage.”:
- Elizabeth said, “They do not know of
my coming, neither will they till I am far
on the voyage.”

This lady invited her to her house, but
Elizabeth was too ill to accept.

On the following Saturday her husband
came to see Elizabeth, and shewed great
sympathy on seeingher so situated, and said,
‘IT will do all I can for you, Mrs. N.”
Elizabeth did not know what the words
were meant to convey, and little did she
think of the benefit his noble heart was
going to confer upon her.

The next morning being Sunday, and
feeling better, she strolled with her child
into the town, and never before or since
did she experience such a sense of loneli-
ness. She was three hundred miles from
her true and tried friends, and twelve
thousand miles from her native land. She
endeavoured to find a meeting of Chris-
tians, and was successful after much walk-
ing and trouble. A salvation army officer
directed her (these people are found in all
parts of the globe). How thankful was
Elizabeth to rest at last. Oh, how she
valued that hour with God’s own people!
And once again she took the emblems
STEERAGE PASSAGE. 95

of the Saviour’s death, and thanksgiving
true and heartfelt ascended that morning
to the Father of all mercies.

After the meeting was over, friendly
faces were around her, and she was taken
to one good woman’s house, who for the
greater part of the day took care of Emmie
and nursed her mother. That evening she
returned to the vessel, and as she again
descended the steps and saw the dim light
of the lanterns sending a sombre shade on
all around, she determined to accept no
more invitations, but to nerve herself to
bear, and not to again visit comfortable
homes that would only be the means of
making her more discontented with her
lot by comparison.

She always remembered the words of
her friend: “1 will do all I can for you;”
and was ever eager to look at any stranger
descending the steps. Her faith, however,
had to be tested once more. The day
before the vessel started for England she
was put out to sea, as there was a regatta
and the chief officers were fearful of the
sailors getting intoxicated, so the vessel
was anchored far out in the harbour. All
hope seemed gone for anything to be done
for the weary travellers.

The last day came for the vessel to he
96 LITTLE EMMIE.

in the harbour, and then the last hour.
She was, however, soon to be on her
way to an earthly haven, and the God
of all comfort was guiding her, and He
who has the hearts of all in His hands
was going to take the fatherless and
widow across earth’s stormy waters in
His arms of love. The poor fragile thing
was to taste some of earth’s comforts in
a remarkable way, till the vessel she had
embarked on steered into a harbour of her
native land.

A gentleman appeared on the steps,
Elizabeth eagerly scanned him; but he
was not her long-expectea friend. How-
ever, as he descended, he seemed to have
his eye fixed on Elizabeth, and after speak-
ing to the steward he advanced straight
towards her. ‘I am sent,” he said, ‘‘ by
Mr. B. to tell you that he has settled
everything for you, and transfers you to
the saloon, where you will get every
comfort. It was impossible for him to
come to you himself, as business calls
him away. I am to bid you farewell
for him.”

He then turned to the steward and
called upon him to take Elizabeth’s lug-
gage to the saloon.

Elizabeth wondered if she heard aright,
STEERAGE PASSAGE. 97

she seemed ina dream. Here ina strange
land, so many miles from those dear to
her, seated on a rough wooden bench,
with nine squalid children around her, the
foul air enough to take what little appetite
she had from her, and now to be asked to
quit this place where she had spent seven
of the most iniserable days of her life and
go to the saloon, no words can fully por-
tray her feelings. Enough to say, that
with an alacrity she had not possessed for
many a day she ascended the steps,
breathed once more the lovely sea breeze,
and then followed her guide to the saloon.








CHAPTER XII.

SALOON COMFORTS.

RLIZABETH, when shewn to
her cabin, could not help
exclaiming aloud, “This is
beautiful.” She had known
what comforts and refinement
mean, still in comparison to
what she had left only a
few moments before, all seemed truly de-
lightful. She was given one of the largest
cabins, with more berths than she required.
She had been given an easy chair before
starting, but this article had been of no
use to her whatever, having no room in
the steerage to put it. The steward soon
fixed this article at the end of the saloon,
and when Elizabeth reclined in it she
thought she had indeed found a haven
of rest. She soon gained strength.
Each meal was served so nicely, and so
many things to tempt the invalid, that her
pale, wan look soon passed away. All




SALOON COMFORTS. 99

were kind and considerate. The little
fatherless girl soon gained friends. At
each port passengers would go ashore,
and return heavily laden with the produce
of the place, and Emmie was never for-
gotten—bananas, oranges, grapes, sweets,
&c., were amply supplied her. The
mother and child could not go ashore.
No funds, and want of strength kept
Elizabeth in the vessel.

One day, in the tropics, with the sun
immediately overhead, and all the port-
holes closed while the vessel was coaling,
all the passengers went on shore, but
Elizabeth and her child had to remain ;
but never did she value a sea breeze as
she did that night, when the ship was out
again on the ocean wave. The evenings
were whiled away by the passengers,
either by card-playing or singing. Eliza-
beth noticed that the card-players were
often the most earnest in joining in the
singing of the hymn, “For those in peril
on the sea.” Their card-playing, however
much they tried, could never make them
forget that they were on the mighty deep.

The first Sunday in the saloon, Elizabeth
was asked to join in the singing, and she
played the organ, too. ‘And as she sat at
the instrument she could not help contrast-
IOO LITTLE EMMIE.

ing that evening with the previous one,
when, instead of being seated at the organ
with an air of refinement surrounding her,
she was seated on a wooden bench with no
support, and the dim lantern making the
apartment more sombre still. Such is life,
full of changes, one day up, another the
reverse. She was truly thankful for the
change; but the ludicrous contrast of the
situation gave her a feeling of amusement.

She was brought other comforts besides
the ship’s allowance, and was told that a
friend of her husband, unknown to her,
had come on board before she arrived, and
given a carte blanche for all she needed for
her comfort. Who this friend was Eliza-
beth had no idea; but it seemed that
whichever way she turned her Father’s
care was manifested.

Those comforts had not been given her
the first week, as she was only allowed as
a favour to go on board a week before the
ship started from the island, because she
should be saved the trouble of changing
from a coasting steamer in order to meet
the vessel, so the regular order was not
established at first. Such a change from
that which was so hard to bear to luxury in
comparison enchanted the little fatherless’
one. They had asplendid passage, such an
one as the vessel had never experienced.
SALOON COMFORTS. Iol

Elizabeth often watched the rippling
waves by moonlight, so calm was the
water; and when her darling child was
sleeping the sweet sleep of childhood, the
mother’s thoughts would often fly back to
the land of her adoption, of its being the
land where her dear husband lay ; but then
again would come those comforting words,
‘He is not here, but risen ;’ and then her
thoughts would fly upwards to that serener
clime, where sorrow can never enter,
where again we shall meet our loved ones ;
and then her thoughts would fly back to
her little one, with heartfelt gratitude to
our Father and God for prolonging her
life to train the precious legacy for Him.

May He give her grace to do so, till her
course has run, and she is welcomed by
her Saviour God far up the heights of
glory, which will make amends for all the
sorrow of many a weary pilgrim.

Tn the Christian’s home in glory
There remains a land of rest.”

After toil how sweet the rest that none
but His loved ones know.

Every person was dreading the passage
round Cape Horn; the previous one was
terrific. However, one morning about 11
a.m. the vessel steered her course round
102 LITTLE EMMIE.

this dangerous point, but all was so calm, a
waveless sea, the waters as blue and as
peaceful as the sky above. Before this
point was reached, the ship steered through
the icebergs; but the glorious moon shed
her silver sheen on to these magnificent
piles that afforded such a sight difficult to
describe. One immense iceberg was like
the ruins of a Grecian temple, such a sight
with the spangled heavens above, looking
down on the calm waves beneath, bearing
up chis temple of ice, lit up by the moon in
all her glorious beauty.

To an observer all told of the mighty
wonders of the deep, and lifted the heart in
adoration to that mighty Creator, who once
walked on the dark sea waves of Galilee,
and in accents sweet said, “It is I, be not
afraid.” On the vessel sped, till after
passing the barren coast of some parts of
Western Africa, she sighted the grand
peak of Teneriffe one lovely morning,
when the clouds, just for one short five
minutes exposed this mighty pile to the
eager passengers. Soon after she steered
into the lovely harbour of Santa Cruz. It
was a glorious afternoon when that lovely
spot was first seen by the passengers.
Such an earthly Eden it seemed, perhaps
more so than it really was (beautiful as it is)
SALOON COMFORTS. 103

to the weary voyagers, who had been tossed
on the mighty deep for five long weeks.

The vessel anchored in this harbour for
some hours. All looked eagerly out to see
if there were any fresh passengers. As
little Emmie stood on the deck, a general
of the army walked the whole length of the
deck to give her fruit. His hoary head,
and the hard lines of his face, told that he
had fought many a battle, but underneath
was a kindly heart that could come down
to the little fatherless one to make her
happy. This good man had not only
fought this world’s battles, but he was a
soldier evidently in that army of which
Jesus is the Captain. One Sunday even-
ing, when passengers were crowded round
the organ, he walked boldly forward and
asked for that hymn to be sung, “As the
hart panteth,” &c. His whole expression
shewed how he felt the words. This
hymn was often afterwards sung, and called
General S.’s hymn.

In a few hours the vessel again was out
on the ocean wave, and as Elizabeth was
reclining in her chair she saw a gentleman
and a lady enter the saloon. Their whole
bearing and appearance shewed them to be
so. All were eagerly trying to gain their
patronage, which our Jewish passenger
104, : LITTLE EMMIE.

shunned. Jewish blood, try how she
would to stifle her feelings, would mount
up unforbidden, so she sat quietly in her
chair and looked on. At last the lady
went to the piano and played and sang
with a sweet treble voice that simple
melody, “I’ve sighted the golden gate.”
Elizabeth felt by the feeling with which
she poured forth the strains of the simple
melody that the golden city of God was
the goal unto which she was hastening.
Then she sang that beautiful hymn, “ For
ever with the Lord.”

Elizabeth could no longer forbear join-
ing with her, and her alto accompaniment
was very much valued by this stranger.
But she was not such long. She thanked
Elizabeth heartily for the part she had
taken, and thus a friendship sprang up
that very much sweetened the few last
hours of the voyage. She shewed great
kindness to Emmie, played with her, and
amused her in many ways. Her own little
girl of six she was eagerly looking forward
to meet, and the little fatherless one
reminded her so of her. In course of con-
versation Elizabeth was led to tell her of
her kind-hearted friend of the Pacific Isle,
who had been the means of the comforts
she was then enjoying, when to her sur-
SALOON COMFORTS ~ I05

prise, this lady said, “‘ His sister is married
to my brother,” and thus Elizabeth was
shewn kindness by two members of the
same family when 11,000 miles apart from
each other. Surely this was of God.
Elizabeth gave her some of her writings
to read, and when she bade farewell she
said, ‘“‘ Will you write to me, I feel J know
you so well by what you have written,
which I have read with much interest.”

At last the Bay of Biscay came in sight,
and on the vessel sped over its waves, so
unexpectedly calm, and soon the dear old
Cornish hills came in view. All the
passengers were on deck, and gave a
unanimous verdict, that go where one will,
no land looked like England. The heart
of the Englishman beats true to his country,
and often is he heard to say:

“ England, with all thy faults,
I love thee still.”

Emmie looked up innocently into her
mother’s face, and said, “Is this Grandma’s
land?” Elizabeth stayed her answer, for
she did not know if ever she should see
that loved parent on earth again. She
did not know whether or not her feet were
roaming the plains of Immanuel’s land.

H


CHAPTER XIII.

ARRIVAL IN LONDON DOCKS,

cANY of the passengers landed
)} at Plymouth, fearing to risk
another hour more than could
be helped on the ocean wave.
The papers brought on deck
heen from Plymouth told of terrific
weather in the Channel
during the previous few days. (To see
the deck of the ship boarded by news-boys
was a pleasant sight to all: for it told
of land not being far off) However, by
the time the returned emigrants of our
story arrived in the Channel, the storm
was over, and, as usual, the vessel was
steering her course over calm waters, with
the new moon sending a lovely mellow
light into the cabin where the widow and
her child were resting.
As breakfast was being served, Graves-
end was sighted. All rushed eagerly on






ARRIVAL IN LONDON DOCKS. 107

deck, and were told that many hours would
elapse ere the London Docks would be
arrived at, as the tide would not serve.
However, before the meal was over the
vessel seemed to be on the move once
more, and passengers were told that, with
* more steam power than usual, the captain
thought he might proceed, and, to the joy
of all, again she moved and at last steamed
into the London Docks. Some of the
friends of passengers looked as if they
could jump to the vessel, ere she touched
the quay, so eager were they to meet
their loved ones.

Elizabeth had informed her relatives of
her return, and had sent a telegram from
Plymouth of her safe arrival. And as
the vessel sped over the mighty deep,
thoughts of her beloved mother would
come to her mind, and wondering if she
were still alive, and how the well-worn
travellers would be received. She had
committed all into the hands of her Guard
and Guide, and she felt assured that,
come what may, all would be well. And
all was well, for a glad welcome awaited
the widow and the fatherless.

Though she was penniless and helpless,
she knew that all power was in the hands
of the One who had promised to be a
108 LITTLE EMMIE.

Husband to the widow and a Father to
the fatherless. All hearts are in His
hands, and still how afraid we are to trust
that mighty Deliverer, who, in times past,
so cared. How He bears with us, as He
did with the Israel of old. Sonow He
bears us, as it were, on eagle’s wings, until
He will land us safely, not in an earthly
Jerusalem, but far up the heights of glory,
“Above the strife of earthly din,” safe
within the courts of the heavenly Jerusalem,
no more to go out.

“Jerusalem, my happy home,
Name ever dear to me,
When shall my labours have an end,
And I thy glories see >”

She knew whom she had trusted. She
could say, He loved me and gave Himself
for me. And she believed that He loved
her still, and would do so till the end.

As the vessel steamed into the docks,
where not long before she had set out for
the Southern Seas with her beloved hus-
band, the One who said, “As thy days, so
shall thy strength be,” supported her now;
and she knew that each day was bringing
her nearer another haven, another rest ;
and that Jesus, the Captain of her salva-
tion, was steering her course towards that
ARRIVAL IN LONDON DOCKS. IOg

haven; and that not all the rocks, shoals,
and storms of this poor world could alter
His course. All would only be the means
of making that rest more sweet at the
close, Christ more dear, and heaven more
near.

** Jesus, lover of my soul,
Let me to Thy bosom fly,
While the billows near me roll,
While the tempest still is high.
Hide me, oh! my Saviour hide
Till the storm of life is past.
Safe into the haven guide,
Oh! receive my soul at last.”

But blessed be His name, she had the
assurance that He would shield, that He
would guide till he had anchored her safely
on the other shore, safe into that blissful
haven.

It was with much emotion that Eliza-
beth gazed on the shores of her native
land, wondering what changes might have
taken place; but oh! the unspeakable
comfort to know that she had with her that
faithful, unchangeable Friend, and He was
not going to leave her now.

Worn and weary, she dressed herself
and her little one, and went on deck, to see
the passengers go ashore, and with the
hope that she might see some friendly face ;
110 LITTLE EMMIE,

but no, her faith was to be tested now.
Could she trust still that mighty Deliverer
who had brought her safely across those
stormy waters. And there as she stood on
the deck, penniless, that lonely one lifted
her heart to her heavenly Protector. As
she gazed on those countless myriads of
houses, and watched the busy crowd, with
no pitying eye for her, she felt what it was
to be “alone in London.” And after all
the blessings that had been bestowed upon
her, after two hours of weary waiting,
descended below to weep there, and she
had the knowledge that she and her child
must shortly rest elsewhere.

The kind-hearted steward pressed her
to eat, and as she was trying to take a
morsel, a hand was laid on her shoulder,
and on turning her head, she beheld the
kind, cheerful face of Edward’s mother,
who had come many miles to meet the
vessel, but not being accustomed to travel
much in London had failed at first to find
the vessel, and had sought some hours.

Elizabeth felt her faith had been tested,
and that her Friend who faileth never had
sent her now an earthly comforter, and
after tears of joy and some refreshment,
she recovered, and with a thankful heart
was ready to go on her way. But on
ARRIVAL IN LONDON DOCKS. Iv!

turning to leave the saloon another friend
appeared, a cousin, who had that morning
received a letter from Elizabeth’s brother
asking her to meet the vessel as business
prevented him from doing so, and she also
put a registered letter into Elizabeth’s
hands received from the same source, ‘and
she found in it some gold coins to enable her
to proceed on her way, and a few kind
words telling her that warm hearts and a
warm welcome were awaiting her. But her
heart had to be made more glad still, after
she had learned the lesson, for a little
further on the way she met this only
brother. He received her with a glad
welcome, thankful that his only sister was
returned to comfort her widowed mother.
Elizabeth, her child, and brother sped
on their way. Everything was wonderful
to little Emmie’s eyes. She could not
remember the wonders of England. A
colonial mountain home, then the time
spent with Betsy, succeeded by a sea
voyage, was all Emmie’s world. After
now seeing so much she was wondering
where she was going to be taken. She
did not, however, fear anything like Joe
Cranstone’s farm, and even so, her darling
mother was with her now, and what wanted
she more; and then, when she looked into
I1l2. : LITTLE EMMIE.

her dear mother’s face, she was looking so
bright, and seemed so happy, talking to
the kind face opposite to her, and that kind
face often cast a sunny glance at little
Emmie, and at last when the train stopped
he got such nice things for her to eat.

Now that the train journey was over,
and the travellers got into a cab, and were
driven on and on, through crowds of
people and houses, Emmie wondered
where all the people could be going, till at
last the cab went out from the crowded
streets into the green lanes, and Emmie
had never seen such beautiful houses. As
she was thinking how she would like to
live in one, the cab stopped, and she was
led by her uncle up to the hall door of his
house,




CHAPTER? XV.

GRANDMOTHER'S WELCOME.

|S the travellers walked up to

| the house, eager eyes were
watching, and the moment
they caught sight of the
expected visitors, there was
an immediate rush to the
door, so that there was no
need for hand to be raised to the knocker.
True it was, indeed, that a warm welcome
awaited the returned emigrants.

Emmie’s aunt received her with a loving
embrace, and there in the background, not
being quite so nimble as in years gone by,
was Elizabeth's aged mother coming to
meet her. What a meeting that was for
all, but for the mother and the long-lost
daughter, none can depict it. If these are
some of the meetings on earth, what must
they be above? Brethren and kindred
from every shore will meet in yonder












II4 LITTLE EMMIE,

haven. There will be the meetings with
no bitter partings :

“In heaven above, where all is love,
There’ll be no parting there.”

After the meeting of mother and daughter,
the little one was freed from her aunt’s
embrace, only to be hugged more closely
by her aged grandparent. Emmie could
not understand it all. Everything was
delightful. After having been so recently
with rough Betsy Cranstone, she could
never picture anything half so sunny as
her grandmother's face, with its snowy
curls, and beaming eyes looking down on
her so kindly and lovingly. For a moment
the child thought of the pe where
her mother had so recently taken her,
where the nine poor squalid children had
made such a din that almost deafened her,
and at the moment of this vision, her aunt
took her to a nursery, a room specially
prepared for her, as her aunt had no little
ones of her own. Such beautiful little
dresses, &c., were exposed to her view.
There was every comfort, such as Emmie
had not known before. And when her
kind aunt took her to the dining room,
little Emmie thought she was in fairyland.
Such wonderful things, and such lovely
GRANDMOTHER'S WELCOME. TI5

flowers. Once the little one was lost, and
her grandmother found her lying in one of
the sideboard shelves, saying, “ This is
like being aboard ship.”

How much all had to tell of when the
evening meal. was over. How thankful
were they to sit around that hearth once
more, and not only from one heart that
night, but from mother, son and daughters
did that favourite hymn of Elizabeth’s
come to remembrance :

“We'll praise Him for all that is past,
And trust Him for all that’s to come.”

Surely all had enough to praise Him
for, and abundant proof, too, that He is
worthy of all our praise and worthy of all
our trust.

“Worthy of homage and of praise,
Worthy by all to be adored ;
Exhaustless strains of heavenly lays,
Thou, Thou art worthy, Jesus Lord !”




CHAPTER XV.

REST AT LAST.

iOME happy weeks were spent
| here, and then Emmie’s
uncle, by her grandmother’s
wish, went into a_ pretty
country village, and took a
house.

Elizabeth had seen a
doctor, who gave her the glad news that
the voyage had arrested the disease, so
this country home, and pure air around,
were likely to restore the invalid to health.

She was ever anxious not to lead an
idle life, so begged to be allowed to pre-
pare the home for the little family. This
was granted, thinking to give her pleasure.

One lovely day, Emmie with her grand-
mother and aunt were seen travelling
towards this rural retreat, far away from
smoke and dirt. And once again at a










REST AT LAST I1l7

railway station does little Emmie espy her
mother, and what a welcome does she give
the little one. The last time they met at
a railway station poor Elizabeth had no
home to take her child to; now all is
changed. And how good was God to the
widow and fatherless. So Emmie and her
darling mother, with her grandmother,
were driven along through green lanes,
till they stopped outside a pretty cottage,
with roses entwined around the door,
a beautiful field of golden grain on the
other side, and the Derbyshire hills in the
background,

The travellers alighted, and to Emmie’s '
wondering gaze the inside of this pretty
abode was exposed. The parlour, the
play-room, the garden, all seemed wonder-
ful to her, especially. when the child was
told this was to be her home with her
mother and grandmother.

Elizabeth had been told to trouble about |
nothing, that all would be provided for her,
as she had every comfort she needed and
‘a comfortable income; still she had to
study economy, and she delighted to move
about the house in domestic enjoyment,
thankful to the God of all comfort for
being so good to her.

With her own hands, the tric ere made
118 LITTLE EMMIE.

happy. The home-made bread, the clotted
cream, and new-laid eggs are often added
to the usual plain fare, and on certain
occasions (red letter days to the little one)
Emmie is seen running with out-stretched
arms to welcome her uncle and aunt, who
always are so loving and kind, and what
joy is seen in her grandmother’s counte-
nance at such glad reunions.

The little one’s prattle and her loving
ways are helping to brighten the aged
pilgrim’s days as she descends the hill
of life to ascend the heights of glory;
and Elizabeth can thank the God of Israel
for giving her such a mother, for through
her she first learned to know the One who
had been her Guard and Guide when she
had breasted oft the crested wave of this

world’s troubled sea, and had at last given
her rest.

This world has many attractions for the
young and inexperienced, and that mother
is blestindeed who has attracted her children
around her own fireside, who has sought
to make home the happiest place on earth,
and early taught them a Saviour’s love
and to love the name of Jesus, until those
children have learnt to say,

“ There is no Friend like Jesus,
There is no place like home.”
REST AT LAST. IIg

That home unto which all His are hasten-
ing—
“That home which is better far
Than any earthly home can be.”

Poor Elizabeth, after all she had gone
through, was truly thankful for this haven
of rest, where she could train and educate
her child, if spared to her. She dwells
not on the past in sorrow, but only to
remember all the way the Lord hath led
heer.
And thus the days passed smoothly and
happily on, God had dealt very tenderly
with the widow and fatherless. After the
storm came the sunshine, and oft could be
heard coming from that widowed heart :

“ How good is the God I adore,
My faithful, unchangeable Friend,
Whose love is as great as His power,
And knows neither measure nor end.

“Tis Jesus, the First and the Last,
Whose Spirit will guide me safe home;
Tl praise Him for all that is past,
And trust Him for all that’s to come.”

Elizabeth does not expect to be exempt
from all trouble; but she knows that He
who has brought her hitherto, and who
has said, “As thy days, so shall thy
I20 LITTLE EMMIE.

strength be,” will be with her all the way,
even unto the end, until she bids adieu to
earth and rests for ever in the fair Eden
above.

Farewell, Elizabeth! It is a rugged
road that leads to God—

“ But there with all the blood-bought throng,
From sin and sorrow free,
Thouw'lt sing the new eternal song,
Of Jesus’ love to thee.

“ Now in a song of grateful praise,
To our dear Lord the song we'll raise:
For above the rest this note shall swell—.
Our Jesus hath done all things well.



London: G. Morrisn, 20, Paternoster Square, H.C.



ti mY SE PEL AMC NIE AM ILE