Citation
A Little hero

Material Information

Title:
A Little hero
Creator:
Musgrave, H. ( Author, Primary )
Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Glasgow
Edinburgh
Publisher:
Blackie & Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
95, 8 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Mothers and sons -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Nannies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sick -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1887 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1887 ( rbprov )
Baldwin -- 1887 ( local )
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Ireland -- Dublin
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Summary:
Eight-year-old Jeff is sent from India to live with his mother's estranged family in Scotland, where he tries to be brave for his mother's sake.
General Note:
British Library copyright receipt stamp dated 1887.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in sepia.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Musgrave

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026885999 ( ALEPH )
ALH5160 ( NOTIS )
182860911 ( OCLC )

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A LITTLE HERO.

BY

MRS. MUSGRAVE,

Author of “ Riverside Sketches;” &.







LONDON

BLACKIE & SON, 49 & 50 OLD. BAILEY, E.C,
GLASGOW, EDINBURGH, AND DUBLIN.









A LITTLE HERO.

CHAPTER I.

earA was eight years old, and his name
3 was Geoffry. But everyone called
etme! him Jeff. The gentle lady who
was his mother had no other children, and
she loved him more than words can say; not
because he was a good or pretty child—for
he was neither—but because he was her one
little child.

Jeff had big wide-awake, brown eyes,
that seemed as if they never could look
sleepy. His hair was yellow, but cut so short
that it could not curl at all.






6 A LITTLE HERO,

This was very sensible, for he lived in the
hottest part of India. But his mother cer-
tainly thought more about keeping him cool
and comfortable than about his good looks.
His hair would have made soft and pretty
curls all over his head if allowed to grow
longer. Jeff had no black nurse, like most
little boys have in India. An old Scotch-
woman called Maggie, who had left her
northern home with Jeff’s mother when she
was martied, did everything for the little boy
that was required. She certainly had a great
deal of mending to do, for Jeff was active and
restless, and tore his clothes and wore holes
in his stockings very often. And Maggie was
not always very good-tempered, and used to
scold the little master for very trifling matters.

But she loved her lady’s child dearly for
all that, and Jeff very well knew that she
loved him and that her cross words did not
mean much. .

I think everyone in his home loved the



A LITTLE HERO. ve

little lad. He was so merry and bright, so
fearless of danger, so honest and bold in
speech, that he won all hearts,

His life had been a very happy one till
now. But one day all the brightness and
happiness came suddenly to an end, and
Jeff thought that he could never feel quite so
light-hearted again. He could never be sure
that anything would last.

“Mother dear, do tell me, why are you
getting me so many new clothes?” he said
one morning, resting his elbow on his
mother’s knee, and playing with the soft
blue ribbons that trimmed her white dress.

Upon the table there was quite a big heap
of new shirts and dozens of stockings all
waiting to be marked.

“T am sure I cannot wear all these things
here, because they are quite thick and warm,
and I know we are not going to the hills this
summer, for I heard father say he could not
afford it.”



8 A LITTLE HERO,

Maggie came in at this moment with
another tray piled up with collars and
handkerchiefs. Then the mother put down
her book and drew her little boy’s head
closer to her breast. He could hear her
watch ticking now. Jeff heard, and felt too,
that her heart was beating quickly. He
smiled upwards at the loving grave eyes.

“But you know you haven't been running,
mother.” And he laid his little brown hand
against her breast. Poor heart! aching with
a grief it dared not express, bursting with an
anguish it had long concealed.

“My little lad, how can I let you go from
me?” she said very softly, still holding him
near to her. He raised himself out of her
arms quickly and looked with wondering
eyes at Maggie and the heap of clothes.

“Where to? Where am I going?” he
said, with all a child’s eager curiosity shin-
ing in his eyes. “But not without you,
mother?”



A LITTLE HERO. 9

Then the poor mother turned away with a
sob, saying,

“Maggie, you tell him. I can’t—I
can’t.”

And when Jeff recovered his astonishment
he saw that his mother had gone out of the
room.

“My bairn, we're going over the water
together—you and me—to Hngland—to
your grandmother’s.”

Old Maggie’s nose was rather red, and it
seemed to Jeff, not used to associate her
with sentiment, that her voice sounded queer
and choky. What could it all mean? ;

“Who is going?” he demanded impera-
tively. ‘Father and mother, and you and
me, I s’pose?”

“No,” said Maggie, beginning to sniff,
“your father isn’t going.”

“Then mother is going, and you too,
Maggie, will be there to mend my clothes,”
he said in a satisfied way.



10 A LITTLE HERO.

“Yes, yes, I'll gang wi’ ye, my bairn, my
bonnie laddie—Ill no leave ye in a strange
land by yersel’—but not your mother.”

Jeff threw a look of extreme disdain
towards the guardian of his wardrobe, and
cried out angrily:

“Not mother! JI don’t believe you,
Maggie. You can’t know anything about
it. Mother must be going. You know she
has never left me since I was born.”

Then he flew to the door and shouted
down the passage in a boisterous way, his
pale face growing quite red and angry with
excitement.

“Mother, you are going to England. Say
you are going, and that Maggie doesn’t
know.”

No answer came. Perhaps in that short
silence a dim presentiment of the terrible
truth was felt by this little boy, so soon to
be separated from ‘all he so fondly loved.

Jeff was soon rattling the door-handle of



A LITTLE HERO, 11

his mother’s room in his usual impetuous
way.

“ Mother, mother, open quickly

There never was a repulse to that appeal.
But the door was opened without even a
gentle word of expostulation, and Jeff was
drawn into a darkened room. The mother
had got up from her sofa, for there was a
mark on the cushion where her head had
been. She stood in the middle of the room,
now quite still, with her arms thrown about
her boy. He did not see at once how very
pale she looked, nor did he notice how her
lips trembled.

“You will not send me away from you,
‘mother. Oh, I will be good. I will never
be naughty or troublesome any more if you
will come to England with me. Mother, I
promise. I cannot go without you; oh no, I
cannot!”

Jeff was sobbing loudly now. The
silence oppressed him. He felt instinctively

1?



12 A LITTLE HERO.

that a solemn time had come in his
life.

“Do not break my heart, my boy. Come
on the sofa and sit beside me, and I will try

and tell you what you must know.”

_. Then as he sat very close to her, clasping
her thin hands in his own feverish little
fingers, she told him why it must be. Jeff
knew quite well that a great many children
were sent to England from this station in
the plains and that they never came back.
He had lost many little companions in this
way, not when they were quite babies, but
just after they began to run about and to
grow amusing. There were none as old as
he was left here.

When his gentle mother began to remind
him of the last summer’s heat, and recalled
how he sickened and drooped in the sultry
breathless days, he remembered all he had
suffered and how very tired and languid he
felt. Now the summer would soon be here



A LITTLE HERO, 13

again, for it was the end of March already,
and the doctor had said that if Jeff was not
sent away to a cooler climate he would cer-
tainly die.

“We are not rich, my darling, your
father and I, and he must stay here this year
through the summer. I could not take you
up to the hills as I did last year when you
were so ill. You are everything to me—
you are all I have got, my darling—” her
voice broke a little. ‘‘ You would certainly
get ill again, and you might even leave me
altogether—you might die—if I kept you
here. Your grandmama knows my trouble,
and she has written to ask me to send you
to her. You will live with them all at Loch
Lossie till some day we can come home.”
The pretty lady sighed and pushed her soft
brown hair away from her forehead.

“Two or three years, Jeff, my darling, will
pass soon—to youand me. [ shall hope to
hear that you are growing strong and well,



14 A LITTLE HERO,

and that you are mother’s own brave lad, wait-
ing patiently till she is able to meet you again. '
Be a man—do not grieve me now, my own
little lad, by any tears. There are many
things I want to say to you before you go,
and if you cry—well—I cannot say them.”

The little boy’s face was quite hidden on
his mother’s knee. She felt him sob once
or twice, and then all was quite still in this
great shady room. So still that at last the
poor mother thought her noisy active Jeff
must have fallen asleep. Her hand was
resting on his head, while her beautiful sad
eyes gazed through the open window and
across the parched bit of garden towards the
high hills far away. Oh! if only she could
take her child up there to the mountains and
rest peacefully with him near the melting
snows, and see the colour come back to his
pale cheeks in the beautiful green gardens.
She did not weep, though her heart was very
sore. For it seemed very cruel to send the



A LITTLE HERO. 15

child so far away to kinswomen who were
strange to him—who she knew were not
gifted with any loving tenderness towards
childhood, any compassion or sympathy for
waywardness. They would not understand
Jeff. Might not the cold discipline warp all
the noble generous instincts of her child’s
nature?

Then her hand began softly to stroke the
quiet head. She could not see his face, but
his little body quivered more than once at
her touch, and she knew then that he could
not be asleep. She did not speak to him
any more—she had no words ready—her
heart was so full.

Presently Jeff lifted himself slowly from
her knee. His glance followed the direction
of her eyes. He did not look her in the face
at once.

“ Mother, dear, indeed I will remember.
I have been saying it over and over to my-
self, not to forget. I will be brave; it is a



16 A LITTLE HERO.

great thing to be a brave man father has al
ways said. When you come to fetch me you
shall see that I have not forgotten what you
say, but—but do not let it be too long. It
is so hard to be a man—for a boy to bea
man—to be really brave—oh, so very hard!
I wish I might ery, you know, but now you
have asked me not to—I cannot—I will
not.”

~ The mother rose up quickly and paced the
room backwards and forwards, with hands
clasped and eyes bent on the floor. The
little boy remained quite still where she had
left him.

“Jeff, not to-morrow, but the day after is
when you are to go. Your father will take
you down to Bombay and see the steamer.
We have so short a time together, you and I,
and, dearest, I can never say all the things
that are in my heart. You could not re-
member them if I did, and even if you cvuld
they would only sadden you. It would be

(396)



A LITTLE HERO. 17

a cruel burden to lay upon you, to tell you
of my sorrow.”

Jeff did not sob or cry when at last he
lifted his brown eyes to his mother’s face.
Yet his voice was weak and trembling as he
said slowly:

“JT will go away from you bravely, mother,
as you wish it. I have never been dis-
obedient, have I? I will try and not forget
till you come that you wish me to be brave—
that it is a noble thing to be brave.” Then,
with a heart-rending sob, “Mother, oh mother,
do not be very long before you come!”

CHAPTER II.

N the voyage home Jeff found many things
to amuse him, and made friends in
every part of the big steamer. The stewards,

and the crew, and the stokers would all
(396 ) B



18 A LITTLE HERO.

smile, or have some joke ready, when his
bright little face appeared round some un-
likely corner. For Jeff soon knew his way
about the ship, and was here, there, and every-
where all day long. Of course he was not
always thinking of his home in India, or of
the dear faces he had left behind. Even
grown-up people easily forget their sorrows
in new scenes. Still, Jeff would grow grave
when he remembered he had seen the tears
in his father’s eyes for the first time, when
he had said, “ Good-bye, my little son.”

Further back still, and yet more sacred,
so sacred indeed that he only liked to think
of it after his prayers, he cherished in his
memory the picture of his sad mother, stand-
ing in the verandah of their bungalow, wav-
ing her hand to them as he and Maggie were
driven away. The tight feeling at his heart
came again at the bare recollection of the
tall slim figure in white, the tearless pale
face, the sad sweet smile.





A LITTLE HERO. 19

When he lay in his berth at night time—
above thecreaking and groaning of machinery,
above the din inevitable on a steamer—he
heard a gentle voice bless him as on that last
evening at home:

“God be with you, my own little lad.
Be brave till I see you again. I shall be so
proud to feel that my boy is a real hero.”

On the way to Bombay Jeff had asked his
father what a real hero was. Then he had
been told that a hero was “one full of cour-
age and great patience, and dauntless before
difficulties; one who allowed no fear to over-
come him, who fulfilled his duty, and some-
thing over it under hard and trying circum-
stances,”

Jeff was unusually quiet and thoughtful
for some little time after this explanation,
and the father could not help wondering
why he looked so grave and sad.

“Tt will be difficult to be a hero—very .
difficult,” he said at length with a heavy sigh.



20 A LITTLE HERO.

Then the gallant soldier, who was his
father, sighed too.

It was not heroic—it was only a simple
duty to send his little son so far from him,
and yet how hard a thing it was.

There was nothing that Jeff liked better
on the big steamer than going “forrard” to
the men’s quarters. He would sit huddled up
on a sea-chest, with his elbows resting on
his knees, or would climb into an empty
hammock and remain for hours, listening to
the wonderful tales told him by the crew.

“Captain Clark, I really don’t think it
possibly can all be true—those stories the
men tell, [mean. They must be quite heroes.”

The little boy’s brown eyes were round and
stretched in amazement. The captain did
not take long to draw from him some of the
marvellous narratives and chapters of acci-
dents that had been told to him.

“No, my little fellow, I don’t think much of
it is true either. We allow sailors to spin



ee



A LITTLE HERO, 21

yarns and only believe as much as we like.”
Jeff was much better satisfied to feel that a
hero was not an impossible being, and that
these rough and ready, hard swearing, rollick-
ing men were not in reality the stuff out of
which was moulded true heroism, endurance,
and nobility. He took comfort now in
laughing at their “make believe” tales of
miracles and chivalry.

At last the voyage, which had been all
pleasantness to Jeff, came to an end, and he
felt very sorry to think of parting with so
many kind friends.

On a fine April morning, with a deep blue
sky and an easterly wind, the great steamer
went up the Thames and was berthed in her
dock. Naturally there was a great deal of
stir and much excitement amongst the pas-
sengers, many of whom had not been home
to their native country for long years. Most
of the travellers had friends to meet them
and were anxiously on the look-out. Those



22 A LITTLE HERO.

who had not were attending to their luggage.
Very few were passive spectators of the busy _
scene. Jeff was greatly amused by all the
bustle and agitation. He might have been
even more so had he not felt socold. The
April winds blew very keenly on his sensi-
tive little frame, unseasoned to such a pierc-
ing air. Still he tried to see all he could; it
was novel and amusing, and he would write
a long letter to mother to-night and should
like to tell her all aboutit. She must know
all these things of course, but then she might
have forgotten.

“Well, my little man, and what do you
think of London town?” said Captain Clark
approaching Jeff and waving his hand to-
wards a distant cloud of smoke.

“Ts that London?” said Jeff with an air of
deep disappointment. “Oh, how dirty it
looks! it’s nothing half as grand as Bombay.”

A tall thin gentleman with whiskers be-
ginning to turn gray had walked past Jeff



A LITTLE HERO. 23

twice, casting a scrutinizing glance towards
him. The little boy had noticed the stranger
because he was so oddly stiff and very stern
looking. At this moment Maggie came up
the companion steps and started towards this
gentleman with a cry of recognition.

“Mr. Colquhoun, here we are, sir!”

The angular gentleman, who stepped so
carefully over coils of rope and the obstacles
of luggage, looked precisely as if he had come
out of a bandbox. He was so very much
starched, indeed, that Jeff could not help
wondering if a summer in the plains would
make him less stiff. As he came nearer and
put out a hand to the little boy, who was his
wife’s nephew, it seemed like a piece of wood
with mechanical joints.

“So this is Mary’s son,” he said in a formal
way. “How do you do, little fellow. You're
not much of a specimen to send home. I
suppose they have spoilt you pretty well in
India. What is your name? Ah, yes, ©



24 A LITTLE HERO.

Geoffry, to be sure; after your father’s family,
I suppose.”

Jeff did not like the way in which Mr.
Colquhoun spoke his father’s name. He was
quickly sensitive to a tone or look. In
after days he wondered much why an atti-
tude of hostility was always tacitly assumed
towards his father.

“My father’s people have always been
brave soldiers. Two of his brothers were
killed in the mutiny; they were heroes, .I
think. They were called Geoffry and Roger.”

The little boy made up his mind that he
should never like the new uncle. The dis-
paraging accent on his father’s name was an
insult.

Mr. Colquhoun had married Jeff’s aunt, his
mother’s eldest sister, and lived at Loch Lossie
with grandmama, under whose roof Jeff was
to be.

But Jeff did not know yet that grand-
mama was only the nominal ruler there.



A LITTLE HERO. 25

The little boy began to wonder at once if
his young cousins would speak in the same
dry methodical way as their father. It was
just like measuring off words by the yard.
How very tiresome it would be to listen to
all day.

And would all people in England be so
clean and precise as this new uncle?

During the short railway journey up to
London from the docks, Jeff watched Mr.
Colquhoun with an uneasy stare that would
have been embarrassing had the object of
this attentive scrutiny become aware of it.
Old Maggie’s nudges and whispered re-
monstrance produced no effect.

By and by the travellers were taken to a
big hotel near a railway station, and dinner
was ordered for them in a great gilt coffee
room. They were informed they would
have to wait at the hotel till the night express
started for Scotland. Jeff was much happier
in his mind when Mr. Colquhoun drove away



26 A LITTLE HERO,

in a hansom to transact his business. Left
alone with Maggie, he proposed a walk
through those wonderful busy streets outside,
and when he came back he sat down to
write his Indian letter.

This was finished and posted before his
uncle returned, and Jeff felt very much re-
lieved that it was safe beyond recall, Those
cold critical eyes might have glanced over
the contents: and the little boy was aware
that his candour regarding his newly found
relative was not flattering. Maggie and Jeff
slept in a Pullman car that night and arrived
at Lossie Bridge early in the morning.

Tired and cold as was this delicate boy his
mind was open to receive an impression of
wild beauty in the surrounding country.
He thought he had never seen or even
dreamt of anything so beautiful and grand.
His animated enthusiasm and undisguised
pleasure seemed to warm something in his
uncle’s breast. He even smiled.



A LITTLE HERO. 27

The tears rose to Jeff’s eyes. Ah! yes, he
could understand now why that dear mother,
so faraway, pined for her native hillsand lakes.

The mists lifting from the rugged moun-
tain sides, with the morning sun shining
bravely on a glittering lake, was a sight most
glorious. The sound of running brooks, the
swish of cascades—sounds most strange to
Jeff’s ears—made music everywhere.

He was silent with wonder and enjoyment
during the long drive from the station.
Grandmother’s house on Loch Lossie was a
fine stone-built residence, facing the lake on
the south. : re

It was backed up by the stern heather-clad
hills, which sheltered it from rude north
winds. side of the lake for nearly a mile, and Jeff
was amazed at the orderly aspect of the shrub-
beries adjoining it. Everything was clipped
and pruned. The wild luxuriant tangle of
Indian jungles, the richly sweet smell of



28 A LITTLE HERO.

tropical growths, and the brilliant colouring
of foreign flowers were all so different to this.

Maggie recognized the familiar features of
the landscape with repeated cries of surprise
or pleasure. Her hard and wrinkled face
beamed with the joy of a returned exile.

“Why, Maggie, you never talked about
Scotland to me at all,” said Jeff in some
astonishment as he saw actual tears glisten-
ing in her eyes.

“It isn’t them as does the most talking as
feels the most,’ she said sharply, dashing
away the unusual moisture.

As they got nearer to the big house, which
looked so cold and bare, Jeff saw that a boy
and a little girl stood under the portico
awaiting their arrival.

It was now past seven o’clock and the sun
had dispersed the last thin veil of mist over
the mountains, and was shining with might
on the glittering windows of the big house
which was to be Jeff’s new home. .



A LITTLE HERO. 29

CHAPTER III.

HIS is your cousin from India, children,”

said Mr. Colquhoun, as he lifted Jeff

down from the back of the sess where
he sat with Maggie.

Then the little traveller saw that the other
boy wore a kilt, and was not at all like his
father. The girl had on a sun-bonnet, and
Jeff only got a glimpse of a pair of rosy
cheeks.

“You are Brian and Jessie. I have heard
about you often. Mother has your photo-
eraphs. I cannot seeif Jessie is as pretty as
her picture; but how thin your legs are Brian,
like my dhobees. Uncle Hugh, do tell me
why do dhobees always have thin legs?
Father doesn’t know.”

Uncle Hugh was one of those very discreet
people who never attempt a reply to chil-
_ dren’s questions.



30 A LITTLE HERO.

“Go into the house, Brian, and take your
cousin to have some breakfast in the nursery.
Is your mother up yet? Mind you both
come down tidy in time for prayers.”

“But please, Uncle Hugh, I never have
breakfast in the nursery. Father and mother
think I am old enough to eat with them.
Maggie, do tell him it is true. Must I really
go with them? Can’t I see grandmama or
Aunt Annie, first? They are mother’s own,
her very own relations, you see. And she
did send so many messages. I have said
them over and over again to myself, not to
forget. It is very important is it not, Uncle
Hugh, to deliver your despatches?”

Alas for poor Jeff! His pleading was
not heard. He had yet to learn the firm
and obdurate nature of the starched gentle-
man with whiskers.

“Brian, obey me at once. Show your
cousin the way upstairs.”

And then Jeff, further constrained by old



A LITTLE HERO. ol

Maggie’s hand, was marched away up
two flight of stairs, through a long cor-
ridor and double baize doors, then down
another narrower passage into a large square
room. It seemed to Jeff that there was a
great deal of heavy furniture everywhere,
and thick carpets, and an excess of light
flooding the rooms. In India the sunshine
was always excluded.

Breakfast was laid on the table in the
nursery. There were steaming bowls of por-
ridge and a large glass dish of marmalade set
out. An odour of bacon also was perceptible.

“Tsn’t my governor a stiff one?” said
Brian in a jeering way, as his cousin drew
near the great coal fire and drew off his little
worsted gloves—the gloves which mother
had knitted.

“Is your governor a tyrant too?”

Jeff shook his head in a fierce negative.

“My governor never bullies his men, if
you mean that, Brian. Don’t you care about



32 A LITTLE HERO.

your father? I don’t call him a very nice
sort of a father, but then of course I needn’t
like him particularly, because he is only my
uncle—only a sort of an uncle too—not a
real one.” :

Brian was a very pretty-looking boy,
with auburn hair and large innocent blue
eyes. People said he had a heavenly ex-
_ pression, and interpreted a mind to match.

Jessie had pulled off her sun-bonnet,and the
nurse, Nan, a big bony woman, was tying a
pinafore about her. She could hardly hear
the conversation of the two boys on the other
side of the room, as Maggie and Nan were
carrying on a lively exchange of question and
answer.

“Cousin Jeff, ’'m quite sure you wouldn’t
like to have breakfast down-stairs. I did
once when Nan was ill, and it was quite
drefful,” called out Jessie, nodding her head
gravely at the recollection. ‘“ Papa won't let
you drink if you have the least bit in your



A LITTLE HERO. 33

mouth, and he says everything that is nice
isn’t good for children. Kidneys and saus-
ages, and herrings and bacon youre only
allowed to smell down-stairs. Isn’t our break-
_ fast ready now, Nan? I am so hungry.”
Then the children were bidden to sit down
to the table, and Jeff tasted porridge for the
first time. He did not care much about it,
and watched Maggie devour it with no little
astonishment.

“Did mother always eat it, Maggie?”

“Yes, my bairn; and it’s fine stuff to
make growing lads.”

“Well, V’ll try and like it,” said Jeff rather
doubtfully, as he made a second valiant
attempt to swallow two or three spoonfuls.

In the course of a very few days Jeff
found out that his cousin Brian was not nearly
so angelic as he looked. He bullied Jessie,
who was a good-tempered little girl, and de-
ceived his father and mother with a wonder-

ful amount of success.
(396) c



34 A LITTLE HERO,

With grandmama, who was really a keen-
sighted old lady, his plausible excuses and
affectionate embraces did not meet with the
same acceptance. Not that he really cared,
for he was impatient of her slow ways, and
did not feel sorry for her failing sight or
feeble limbs; only, he liked the five shillings
and half-sovereigns she occasionally bestowed,
and thought that he might receive more if he _
pretended a dutiful behaviour.

Jeff really, however, fell in love with the
old lady at first sight. There are very few
old people to be seen in India, and the dig-
nity and pathos of her appearance touched a
tender chord. He admired her fine white
hair and handsome features, all furrowed
with the countless little lines of time. And
she wore such stiff brocades and silks, such
beautiful old lace, and the funniest brooches,
with pictures in them. Her soft white hands
touched him in a loving way, and she had a
gentle voice something like the dear mother’s.



A LITTLE HERO. 35

Poor Jeff yearned for the tenderness and
affection that seemed so far off. How long
it would be before the hunger in his heart
would be satisfied he dared not think. But
grandmama was old and feeble, and he might
not stay long in her sitting-room.

It seemed rather hard to Jeff that she was
never allowed to have her own way—that
her life was ruled for her. Aunt Annie
would always come and fetch away the little
boy after ten minutes, even when grand-
mama had sent for him.

But after some weeks, when it was found
that the little boy could sit still and not
tease with too many questions or too much
talking, he was allowed to stay longer; some-
times to play draughts with or read to the
old lady.

About Aunt Annie Jeff did not at once
make up his mind. She was a tall woman,
with a strong voice and handsome features,
who always seemed busy and in a hurry.



36 A LITTLE HERO.

Brian said she knew Latin and Greek, so
Jeff decided she must be clever. She did
not wear pretty clothes or soft laces like his .
mother. Her dresses were very plain, of
some harsh coarse stuff and dull ugly colours;
her manner was always a little abrupt, and
she seemed to have no patience to listen to
anything that children said. Jeff supposed
that she was so wise that she could not profit
by anything they might say.

Perhaps nothing in Scotland surprised
Jeff more than to find how busy everyone
was, and how much one could do here. Even
ladies and rich people did things for them-
selves, and theiramusements generally seemed
to be like hard work. Young men walked
or rode, or played tennis and cricket inces-
santly. There was no mid-day sleep; no
lying in hammocks smoking and reading
novels. It was never too hot to go out and
do something, though to Jeff it often seemed
too cold. By degrees, however, he became



A LITTLE HERO. 37

accustomed to the climate, and before the
summer had fully arrived his fair delicate
face took a new bloom that would have glad-
dened the heart of his mother. He had been
more than a month at Loch Lossie when
the following letter was posted to India.

Loon ‘Losstx, May 10th.

Dear darling Mother,—I am not nearly
a hero yet. I haye not got even really brave,
but I mean to. I don’t like lots of things
here at all, and I get angry and quarrel with
Brian, because he tells lies—or sort of lies—
and is very unkind to Jessie. He pinches
her where it won’t show when she won’t do
what he wants. Nobody ever believes that
Brian does not tell truth. He seems so obe-
dient, and he never asks questions or
bothers people, and he is so clever with his
lessons. He always seems to know them
with hardly looking. The Rev. Mr. M‘Gregor,
who is our tutor, you know, says Brian is



38 A LITTLE HERO.

very intelligent; a most promising pupil he
calls him to Aunt Annie. I think Mr.
M‘Gregor flatters Aunt Annie, because he
wants to stay our tutor. But I don’t think
Brian knows deep down about the things what
helearns. He never is tiresome wanting to see
behind things, or to know why. You re-
member those questions always did come to
me when I did lessons with you and father.
Cousin Jessie is very pretty, and I know she
has a very kind heart. She gave two shil-
lings out of her money-box—all what she
had saved in pennies—to a little beggar girl
without any shoes that came to the door.
Aunt Annie was angry about it, because she
said, “No one need to beg or be poor.”
Grandmama is a very nice person, but why
does she never listen when I speak of father?
I go and read to her sometimes when she is
feeling well, and she says she likes my read-
ing better than Brian’s; he gabbles on so
quick and never stops, because he wants to



A LITTLE HERO. 389

get it over. Sometimes I stop altogether in
the middle of a chapter and talk instead.
We have very nice talks—we talk about you.
Then grandmama always sighs and says how
hard it is you are a soldier’s wife, and are
poor and are obliged to live in India. They
seem to think a great deal about being rich
here; but I think honour and glory is more,
and I mean to be a soldier.

Aunt Annie does not seem to love her
children much. She just kisses them in the
morning and at night once on the cheek,
without any arms, and she never goes to
tuck them up.

It is funny, I ae but Jess and Brian
don’t seem to know it is queer. I call Uncle
Hugh the bandbox man—to myself only,
of course. He is never untidy, or hot, or cold.
He seems to get up out of bed tidy; because
I saw him in his night-shirt one morning,
and his hair was all straight and smooth.

Mine isn’t now when I get up, because



40 A LITTLE HERO.

they don’t cut it so short here, and it has got
all curly. I will ask Maggie to cut off a bit
for you to see.

Maggie has got such a nice brother. He
says he remembers you when you were a
little girl, and my eyes are like yours. He
is the head-keeper now, and lets me go out
fishing with him. He has got straight red
hair, and oh, such a red beard! and he talks
in such a queer way—they all do here; but
IT am beginning to understand. Maggie is
going to live at Sandy’s cottage soon. He
had a wife, but she is dead, and there is no
one to work and cook for him. But I shall
see Maggie nearly every day, and Nan—that
is Jessie’s nurse—will mend my clothes.

The primroses have been quite lovely. It
will be all withered when it has been through
the Red Sea, and will have no smell, but T
send you one all the same. Mother, you
forgot to tell me what English flowers were
like—they are beautiful.



A LITTLE HERO. : 41

I hope the major is quite well, and I do
hope he doesn’t get any fatter, because of his
poor little horse. I wish he could see how
thin Uncle Hugh is—sometimes I wonder I
can’t see through him. He walks up the
steepest hills and over the heather without
ever stopping.

Tell father I can ride quite as well as
Brian, and Uncle Hugh says I have a
good seat. It must be true, because he never
praises anybody.

Oh, dear darling mother, my hand is quite
tired, and I have taken two afternoons to
write this letter. I wish I could see you
and feel you, though I don’t in the least for-
get what you are like. I can’t bear to look
at your picture often, because it makes the
tears come in my eyes, and you might not
like me to cry. At night when I go to bed
I shut my eyes very quick and very tight,
and try not to remember anything in India.
I generally go to sleep very quick. The



42 A LITTLE HERO.

next time I write perhaps I shall be nearly
a hero. I am a long way off it yet. It
would be dreadful if I was not one before
you come. A thousand kisses to you and
father from your own loving little boy,
JEFF,

The letter did not stand so irreproachably
spelt, but that is what it said and meant.

CHAPTER IV.

Y poor little boy sadly missed many
things that were joys or daily events
at home in India. Yet he did not magnify
their importance unduly, and remembered that
he must not grieve the loving heart which
probably ached with just as keen a longing
as his own. ‘This was heroism of a negative
kind, I fancy.



A LITTLE HERO, 43

At Loch Lossie they were not at all
demonstrative people. They never kissed
each other in the day-time, or walked arm
in arm, or sat very near together.

ToJeff these things had become natural, and
his spontaneous, affectionate nature seemed
suddenly frozen up by circumstances. The
dull ache of longing for kindly, smiling eyes,
for little playful speeches, at times seemed
more than he could bear.

And to him who had lived in the con-
stant presence of his mother the many
restrictions laid upon the children at Loch
Lossie seemed cruelly hard; and it was a
discipline that seemed to have no meaning,
that seemed to presuppose disobedience,

He might not go in the drawing-room or
conservatory without leave, or look at the
books in the library, or pick the commonest
flowers in the garden, or walk near the
loch. No promise was ever regarded as
sacred by his seniors.



44 A LITTLE HERO.

“But if I give you my word, Uncle
Hugh,” he had pleaded in early days, “ not
to go near the water, or touch the boats,
surely I may go down the drive.”

Uncle Hugh only looked down on him
with cold denial.

“Tittle boys are not to be trusted; their
promises are not worth much,” he answered.

Then Jeff got very red, and burst out
passionately:

“You must have known only boys who
were liars. Did you not speak the truth
yourself when you were young?”

Brian pulled at his jacket to modify his
speech. Jeff wrenched it away.

“Don’t touch me, Brian; I shall say
what I like; and I know you don’t always
speak the truth. Uncle Hugh, don’t you
know it is only cowards who make false
promises? Can’t you trust me? No one
who is brave—really brave—or who tries to
be brave—would tell a lie.”



A LITTLE HERO. 45

But the appeal seemed to fall on deaf ears.

Not long after this little scene the Rev.
Mr. M‘Gregor had reason to complain of
Jeff's negligence. He was very inattentive
to instruction and his lessons were never
properly prepared.

“The boy, moreover, Mr. Cuaron has
a tiresome habit of reasoning with regard to
actions, even my actions. This approaches
disrespect. Logic, you are aware, cannot be
conveniently applied to every circumstance
of life.”

“Tt ought to be,” said rigid Mr. ease
with a certain degree of sternness.

“T respect the boy for his fearless ques-
tionings and outspoken sentiments, though I
admit they are embarrassing at times.” |

“T am not sure, Mr. M‘Gregor, if Geoffry
does not teach us a lesson sometimes.”

Uncle Hugh called him Geoffry, much to
Jeff’s amusement.

Secretly Uncle Hugh did not highly esteem



46 A LITTLE HERO.

the boy’s tutor, though necessity compelled
him to employ his services.

The Rev. Mr. M‘Gregor was, no doubt,
a clever man in his way, but he was not
aman of high principle. He hated trouble
of any sort, and expediency was usually his
guide. Still he had had much experience in
teaching, and Aunt Annie was quite equal to
the task of sounding his knowledge of
classics and mathematics.

These were beyond reproach, and she
esteemed it a very fortunate accident which
had thrown him in her way.

One of the most strict laws laid down at
Loch Lossie was that the boys were never to
make use of the boats moored at the little
landing-stage.

It came to Jeff’s knowledge that Brian
repeatedly disobeyed this order. He knew
that at dusk his cousin frequently went out
alone in a little skiff that was easily managed.
Finally, after many anxious days, he re-



A LITTLE HERO. AZ

solved to tell Brian that he was aware of his
disobedience.

Brian turned on him fiercely, calling him
“Spy,” “Sneak,” and “ Molly.”

Jeff did not lack in daring or intrepidity,
and it was hard to be reproached with
timidity by one he knew his inferior in the
respect of courage. Then he remembered that
to be patient was not the least part of a
hero’s task, and checked the angry words that
were about to rise.

One morning Uncle Hugh came into the
school-room, where the boys were always to
be found at this hour. His face was graver
than usual, and his voice sounded cold and
cruel in Jeff’s ears.

“One of you boys has disobeyed me. You
have been out in the skiff. I suppose it was
last evening while we were at dinner.”

He looked steadily at the two lads, who
were gathering their books together to
take down to Mr. M‘Gregor’s house. Jeff



48 A LITTLE HERO.

coloured up to the roots of his curly hair,
and looked down, unwilling to confront
the guilty one’s confusion. But Brian, with
the angelic face and imnocent aspect he
habitually wore, was self-~possessed enough
to ask:

“Did somebody say they saw one of us,
papa?”

Mr. Colquhoun looked at his own son, and
never doubted his innocence.

“No, my boy, but I found a pocket-knife
in the skiff and a coil of gut, with two fish.
I know you have both knives exactly alike,
and probably only one of you can tell me to
which it belongs. Geoffry, have you your
knife in your pocket?”

Silence, and no movement on Jeff’s part.
In a moment Jeff looked up, and in his
steady brown eyes there was something which
Uncle Hugh could not read.

It was a bold glance, but not a defiant
one; a resolute gleam, but yet a sad one.



=F

A LITTLE HERO. 49.

For days afterwards Mr. Colquhoun remem-
bered that dauntless look. .

“No, Uncle Hugh,” he said firmly.

“Brian, where is yours?”

Obedient to his father’s command Brian
brought one from his pocket. That very
morning, not an hour ago, he had asked Jeff
to lend him his knife, and had not returned
it to its rightful owner. Jeff’s lips closed
tightly and his eyes fell.

“Then I must believe, Geoftry, that it is
you who have disobeyed me. Have you
anything to say for yourself?”

“TI did not go in the boat,” he said dog-
gedly, picking up some books and strapping _
them together, with despair at his heart.
Surely this was being a hero.

“Do not add a lie to your offence and
make it worse.”

“T have not told you a lie, Uncle Hugh.
I—did—not— go,” he almost shouted,
shouldering his books.

(396 ) D



50 A LITTLE HERO,

Mr, Colquhoun did not argue or seek to
prolong the interview, but in a few words
spoke the sentence of punishment.

“T will give orders that you are not to
use your pony for a month, and that Sandy
is not to take you rabbiting or fishing for the
same length of time. You are not to be seen
anywhere in the gardens or grounds except
on your way to Mr. M‘Gregor’s. I have
never restricted you boys in any reasonable
pleasures, but I am fully determined to make
you understand that I intend to be implicitly
obeyed when I think it necessary to lay down
a rule.”

Then Mr. Colquhoun went away, and
Jeff threw down his books with a bang.

“Tl fight you, Brian, you coward, you
false witness! You're worse than Ananias,”
he said, squaring himself for the combat and
reddening all over his face.

“All right. Come on. I’m twice as strong
as you, and Sandy has taught me how to box.”



A LITTLE HERO. 51

With this invitation Jeff began the battle
in a very unscientific way. Of course he
came out of the fray with a bleeding face and
torn clothes. There was no one near to pity
him, and he could only wash his face and
hope that the rents would escape Aunt
Annie’s notice till Nan had mended them.

For a fortnight this poor little boy moped
about the upstairs rooms and passages in a
very miserable way. Jessie was his best
consolation, bringing him news from the
garden and stable which interested him.
She also paid a daily visit to Sandy in order
to’ glean little details of sport, and came
back usually with her small face puckered
up in anxiety to forget nothing.

It was really very sad for poor Jeff that
the otter hounds should visit the neighbour-
_ hood at this juncture. He had to watch
Uncle Hugh and Brian starting at daybreak
three times a week to participate in the sport.
His poor heart was very sore all the time, for



52 A LITTLE HERO.

Uncle Hugh had not believed him, and
there was no one in whom he could confide.
It was a terrible anguish to bear all alone,
and the injustice of his punishment was the
sorest part of his trouble.

Maggie had gone away to live at her
brother Sandy’s cottage soon after her return,
and he might not even go down and see her
now. .

Meanwhile, Brian kept the knife that really
belonged to Jeff, for Uncle Hugh had not
given back the delinquent’s implement. It
seemed to Jeff that his cousin took delight
in parading his possession and assuming
innocence. He went out of his way to assert
his virtue.

One evening, watching the waning light
from an upstairs window, Jeff saw a little
skiff shoot out into the open space of water,
not shadowed by the hills. There was a
little figure in it. Here was a glorious
opportunity to go down and tell Uncle Hugh



A LITTLE HERO. 53

‘and establish his own truth. For a few
seconds a conflict went on in his breast, and
then with a heavy sigh he laid his head on
the window sill and burst into passionate
sobbing. When it was almost dark the fit
of weeping had passed off. But he remained
at the open window, breathing the balmy air.
Suddenly he was startled by a cry from the
water. In vain his eyes sought to pierce
the gathering gloom. Again the ery. For-
getting all restrictions, with a sudden uncon-
trollable impulse, he rushed down the stairs
and out into the garden to the lake side.

CHAPTER V.

APA, papa! oh, come quickly! There’s
some one drowning in the lake. And

oh! I was standing in the hall when Jeff
rushed down-stairs and out of the front door,



54 A LITTLE HERO.

with his face all white and his eyes staring.
He must have seen from upstairs—he was
standing at the window, you know. Oh papa,
perhaps it is Brian; he never came in to tea.”

Little Jessie, with eyes distended and
panting breath, astonished Mr. Colquhoun
and her mother by the unusual impropriety
of bursting open the dining-room door at
dinner-time. In a moment her father was
on his feet and out of the door, followed by
the butler and footman. A presentiment of
how it had all happened flashed upon him
as he hurried down to the edge of the water.
There were cries, muffled cries, “growing
gradually fainter, and splashes as though of
some one struggling; ascream, and then what
seemed an ominous silence,

It did not take a minute to launch a boat,
and row out afew yards from theshore. An
upturned skiff told its tale of a repeated dis-
obedience. Clinging to it by one hand was
Jeff, with the other he gripped Brian’s hair;



A LITTLE HERO. 55

but his little hand had just relaxed its hold
as Mr. Colquhoun approached. The effort
to hold up his cousin had taxed his strength
to the utmost, and unconsciousness stole over
him at the moment of rescue,

They were both saved. In five minutes,
time the butler and footman had carried in
the two insensible forms and laid them safely
on, the rug in the library.

It was not long before Brian gave signs of
life. A gasp, a sigh, a fluttering breath, and
his eyes opened to see his mother hanging
over him. They wandered round the room
and saw his father watching beside Jeff for
some sign of returning consciousness.

There was an ugly contraction of Brian’s
brow at this moment. To Mr. Colquhoun
the moments of doubt were full of anguish.
Perchance Jeff had given his life for his son’s,
for life seemed long in returning to the little
face that lay so still and white, with the
pretty yellow curls dripping wet. At last



56 A LITTLE HERO.

Jeff opened his eyes, but it was with no
rational gaze,

‘““Mother—I did try—they will tell you
that I did try,” he said faintly. Then his
eyelids closed again, and he muttered, “I
will say it now—‘as we forgive them that
trespass against us.’”

Mr. Colquhoun understood at last. Here
was verily a little hero who had suffered the
guilt and punishment of another—a weak
and sensitive child who had borne a wrong
silently, and had finally all but lost his life
to save the life of one he knew had sacrificed
him.

By and by the doctor came, and Jeff was
undressed and taken upstairs without any
other revival. Maggie had been sent for at
once, to her brother’s cottage, and was in-
stalled in Jeff’s little room as his nurse. The
doctor had lifted the wet curls above Jeff’s
temple, and had revealed a dark bruise there.
evidently the boy had come in contact with



A LITTLE HERO. 57

some obstacle in his wild plunge from the
shore to the skiff, only a few yards off. Jeff
and Brian had both been learning to swim
with Sandy this summer; but Brian had
made no progress, whereas Jeff could manage
a few strokes.

That was a very anxious night for the
household at Loch Lossie. ven little Jessie
was suffered to wander about the passages
till after ten o'clock; and there was no
assembly for prayers in the dining-room as
usual. A great shadow and fear seemed to
hang over the house. Brian was taken away
by his mother to his own room and put to
bed.

“Take him out of my sight. He is the
cause of all this,” Mr. Colquhoun had said
sternly, seeing he was fully recovered and
inclined to make explanations.

Mr. Colquhoun and Maggie sat up together
by Jeff’s bedside. He lay most of the night
still and white. Towards daybreak a pink



58 A LITTLE HERO.

spot came into each cheek, and he breathed
more quickly and grew restless. At last he
began to speak:

“Oh, mother, I cannot bear it—indeed I
cannot bear it! No one loves me here, it is
lonely—and they won’t even believe me or
trust me—they think I am a liar. Brian
looks so good, and he is never found out—
they think he must be true. When will you
come, mother?—oh, I want you, I want you.”

All the pent-up sorrow of weeks and
months went out in the last bitter cry. Then,
as if awakened by his own intensity of feel-
ing, Jeff opened his eyes and was suddenly
conscious of his surroundings.

“Uncle Hugh, where am [? Why are you
sitting here? Have I been ill? Oh, yes, I
remember all now. I heard Brian scream,
and I ran down to the lake. He was not
drowned, was he? Oh, if I had saved him!
mother would be so glad; because he is my
enemy, you know. Why does my head ache



A LITTLE HERO. . 59

-so much; it all seems confused too. I wish
you would believe me, Uncle Hugh; indeed
I told the truth.”

The man of starch bent down till his face
was very near to Jeff. His voice was a little
husky:

“T believe you now, my little lad. I could
never doubt you again; you have behaved
like a hero!”

Then Jeff half raised himself on his pillows,
and the dim morning light revealed an
elastic smile on his pale face.

“Oh, say that again. I do want to be a
hero before mother comes.”

He fell back once more, murmuring,

“T am so tired and sleepy, and so happy
now. Uncle Hugh, will you hear me say my
prayers? After I had been unhappy mother
always heard me say my prayers. And I
think,—perhaps I have cheated God. lately
—since you punished me, for I would not
say ‘forgive us our trespasses as we forgive



60 A LITTLE HERO.

them that trespass against us.’ I did not
forgive you or Brian, and I could not say it.
Now I can, and it will be all right. God
will understand.”

Soon after Jeff fell into a deep and
dreamless sleep. He slept far into a bright
morning, and when the doctor came he pro-
nounced his little patient as convalescent.

“You may get up to-morrow, and we shall
have. you out with the otter hounds on Satur-
day, my little man,” he said with a kind
smile.

- Jeff's eyes sought Mr. Colquhoun’s face
with an eager look of inquiry.

“We will see, Jeff’—he called him Jeff
for the first time—“but you must make
haste and get well.”

And Jeff did get well and rode right
bravely. Better sport was never seen,





A LITTLE HERO, 61

CHAPTER VL

EFF was now ten years old, for nearly
two years have gone by since he came
to England. He has grown very much, and
is a tall muscular boy, with a bright smiling
face; only when he is alone or unconscious
of observation he is sometimes subdued, and
there is a yearning wistful look in his big
brown eyes that seems to declare he is not
quite happy.

“You have news from India to-day, Geof
fry,” said Uncle Hugh one morning rather
stiffly as he met the boy coming down the
stairs with a letter in his hand. “Your
Aunt Annie has also had a letter from your
mother.”

Jeff looked rather as if he had been ery-
ing, and his voice trembled a little when he
answered Mr. Colquhoun:

“Yes, there is news. She is coming—at
last. But oh, she is ill!”



G2 A LITTLE HERO.

Jeff nearly broke down here. “Uncle
Hugh, I may go to London and meet her
next week.”

The passionate pleading of the boy’s voice
in the last words was indescribable.

He had grown used to negatives presented
to his requests during his stay at Loch Lossie,
but this was a widely different and an ur-
gent matter.

“T think, my boy, it will be better not.
Your aunt has fully discussed the matter
with me, and she does not wish it. She
thinks that her meeting with her sister will
be a painful one; she did not part on very-
friendly terms with your mother. A recon-
ciliation will be more pleasant at Loch Lossie.”

Jeff coloured deeply. He knew what all
this meant. Uncle Hugh’s carefully-worded
speech was clear to him.

“Yes, I know—Sandy told me. You and
Aunt Annie did not want her to marry
father, because he was poor and only a



A LITTLE HERO. 63

soldier in a marching regiment. You were
all unkind to her about it and made her very
unhappy; but she did not care for money
and a grand house—and—and she loved
father. She is very. happy with him—we
were all happy together till I had to be sent
home. Think of it only, Uncle Hugh, two
whole years without seeing her. Didn’t you
love your mother too? And now to lose a
single day or hour, after so long! Oh, do
let me go, Maggie will take me if you
can’t.”

Mr. Colquhoun stood a moment in silence
looking out of the window. His heart went
with the boy, for Jeff had grown dear to
him, with his frank impulsive ways and aeep
strong affections.

“Well, well, perhaps something may be
done. You had better go and have a little
talk about it to your aunt before you go to
Mr. M‘Gregor’s.”

Jeff looked very blank and despairing as



64 A LITTLE HERO.

he turned round and went slowly up the
stairs again. Aunt Annie was one of those
superior people who never change their mind.
She took a vast amount of pride in her own
prompt judgment, and not for worlds would
have admitted herself in the wrong. Jeff
was sure that the most urgent pleading would
not prevail to alter her decision.

No sympathetic throb for the child and
mother once more to be united would alter
her resolution.

“No, Jeff, I have told your uncle that I
have fully made up my mind that the recon-
ciliation to take place between your mother
~ and her family shall be under this roof. It
is impossible for a child of your age to un-
derstand this matter, and I beg that you
will cease to argue. Your mother and I
parted in great bitterness, but that is past
and forgiven.”

Jeff made a little gesture of anger.

“ My lips will be closed with regard to



A LITTLE HERO. 65

bygones, and when Mary is once here I shall
never recur to painful matters.”

This was all very grand and magnanimous
in words, but the effect it had upon Aunt
Annie’s auditor was anything but soothing.

“But surely mother, when she comes by
herself and is ill, would think it kinder of
you to meet her at once,” he said in hot in-
dignation.

But no words availed, and Mrs. Colquhoun
kept to her determination. She probably
did not observe the set and dogged look upon
the boy’s face as he turned to leave the
room. He was of the same blood as her-
self, and something of her own resolute
nature formed part of his character.

But Aunt Annie turned back complacently
to the translation of her German novel, with-
out giving another thought to the deep strong .
child-nature with which she came daily in
contact.. The persistence of her small ad-

versary had, indeed, ruffled her serenity for
(396 ) E



66 A LITTLE HERO.

a few minutes, but her emphatic denial of
his request must certainly have convinced
him of her strength of purpose. What was
the bitter disappointment to the little aching
heart in comparison with the maintenance
of her own dignity and authority!

But Jeff went brooding down the avenue
with his books slung over his back, and

on his face there was a set look of despair,
which boded no good to Mr. Colquhoun’s
authority.

‘The week passed quietly, and without any
further pleading on Jeff’s part; only, he was
unusually quiet and thoughtful.

On the morning before the expected arrival
of the steamer from India, Jeff was missing
from Loch Lossie. Brian came in hot haste

to his father, eager to.inform him of the un-

warranted disappearance. Brian was fond

of establishing his own virtue by declaring

the faults of others.
“Mr. M‘Gregor must not be kept waiting,



A LITTLE HERO. 67

Brian. You go down to him at once. Never
mind your cousin.” This was not what
Brian had anticipated, and he departed in
_ great disgust.

“TI do believe -he’s gone up on the moor,”
said this youngster vindictively as a parting
shot, sincerely hoping that Jeff might be
called to account for some serious delin-
quency. He had never forgiven him for
having been found out himself in a serious
fault last year. The recollection of Jeff’s en-
durance under a false accusation was a con-
tinual mortification to his small soul. He
knew that his father had never forgotten
that episode, and from time to time regarded
him with suspicion of a new deception.

All that day till nightfall, though keepers
' and scouts were sent about in all directions,
no word came of the missing lad. Inquiry
was made in the nearest township and at
Lossie Bridge station in vain. No little
traveller had been seen to arrive or depart.



68 A LITTLE HERO.

Late at night a porter from the next station
down the line came up to the house and in-
formed Mr. Colquhoun that a little boy answer-
ing to the description of Jeff had taken that
mornine’s mail to London from Drumrig.

It was too late for Mr. Colquhoun to set
off in pursuit of the culprit that night, but
all preparations were made for his departure
the next morning.

‘Meanwhile Jeff had arrived in the great
city, to which he was a stranger, towards
evening. A little waif and stray in London,
with only five shillings in his pocket! But
no fears assailed him. He was encouraged
by the great hope of the meeting on the
morrow. His heart began beating at the
very thought of the loving arms into which
he would nestle.

Naturally he was puzzled to know what
to do with himself. It was more than pro-
bable that the great hotel at the railway
station would swallow up his five shillings



A LITTLE HERO. 69

and leave him without the means of getting
to the steamer. He addressed himself to a
friendly-looking porter who was staring at
him with a certain amount of curiosity, see- _
ing he had no luggage:

“What does it cost to get a bed in there
for the night?” he said.

The porter grinned satirically.

“More nor such as you can pay. Yer
wouldn’t get much change out of a sovereign,
. Tl be sworn.”

He walked down the platform, and Jeff
saw that he was making merry with one of
his friends over his inquiry. In terror lest
some detaining hand might even yet be
stretched forth, he hurried out of the station
and was soon lost in the small streets about
King’s Cross.

He at length found a male ieee
lodging, attracted thereto by a card in the
window, to the effect that “Lodgings for
single men” were to be had.



70 A LITTLE HERO.

The woman who opened the door to him
looked doubtfully at this youthful customer,
but the production of a couple of shillings
and an offer from Jeff to pay in advance
settled all difficulty.

“T am going down to the docks to-morrow
to meet my mother, who is coming from
India,” he said, giving a frank explanation
of his plans. “I shall have to leave quite
early and I will pay you to-night.”

The woman smiled at the dignified atti- .
tude of her would-be lodger, and bade him
come in and she would find him a bed to
suit.
She saw very well that this was no roughly-
nurtured child, and possibly guessed partly
at the truth.

There were two or three labouring men
taking supper in a back kitchen, and a
strong smell of onions and frying fat per-
vaced the atmosphere.

Jeff felt it would not do to appear.



A LITTLE HERO, 71

squeamish in such company, and drew near
to the fire, making a pretence of warming
his hands.

“Here's a new lodger, Timothy; you
make room for him,” said the woman with
a broad grin,

“Runned away from school, young
marster, I'll be bound,” said one rough giant,
catching hold of Jeff by the arm. The
boy turned his brown eyes steadily on his

_ captor.
“No, I have never been at any school,” he
said with composure. “But they would

not let me meet my mother, who is coming
home from India, so I took all the money
out of my savings-box and came by the
train without telling anyone.”

The nayvy released him.

“From Ingy! That’s a long way to come.
And they wouldn’t let you meet her! It was
a darned shame. You're a well plucked one
for your size. Can ye stand treat, young



72 A LITTLE HERO.

maister? We'll drink to the health of the
lady from Ingy.”

Jeff took his few coins out of his pocket
with a dubious frown.

“There's my bed to pay for here, and
some supper, and I’ve got to get to the docks
to-morrow by ten o'clock. This is all I’ve
got; perhaps I can spare you a shilling.”

- They were honest labourers, though rough,
and took his shilling, and no more, and went
off to the public-house.

Jeff asked for an egg and some tea and

bread and butter, and then said he would go
to bed.
“Tl put you along of my boy ’Arry. He
sleeps wonderful quiet, and some of them
is roughish customers to lie alongside of when
they comes in from the ‘Lion,’” said the
woman as she lighted a candle.

Jeff sighed when he was ushered into the
dingy attic where he was to pass the night,
thinking of his own little white bed at Loch



A LITTLE HERO. 73

Lossie and all the dainty arrangements of
bath and dressing paraphernalia.

The next morning he was astir at day-
break, and without casting a glance at his
sleeping companion he went softly down the
stairs and laid his payment on the kitchen
table. He had some difficulty in unbarring
the door, but succeeded after many endea-
vours,

Though it was an April morning the air
was very raw and bleak at this early hour,
and the boy shivered repeatedly.

At a coffee-stall in an adjoining street he
bought a thick slice of bread and butter and
a steaming cup of what was called tea, sweet
and strong, if not particularly fragrant. For-
tified by such nourishment against the biting
air, he inquired of the first policeman he met
the nearest way to the station, and reached it
soon after seven o’clock. There was an hour
and a half to wait before his train started,
but he sat down on a sheltered bench and



74 A LITTLE HERO,

remained an unnoticed little figure till the
train drew up. At about the same hour Mr.
Colquhoun was crossing the border in a
southern express in pursuit of the runaway.

.

CHAPTER VII

“"T was the same steamer that Jeff had come

home in two years ago. Much the same

sort of scene was going on on the deck as on
a former occasion.

The burly form of Captain Clark might
be descried from afar pacing up and down.
It seemed all like a dream to the boy, vividly
recalling his own arrival. He rubbed his
eyes hard, scarcely feeling sure of his own
identity.

The great steamer had been in dock over
half an hour, and those passengers who had
not disembarked at Gravesend were busy
with their luggage.



A LITTLE HERO. 75

“Captain Clark, don’t you remember me?
It is Jeff Scott.”

The boy had taken off his cap in a salute
to his old friend. The beauty of his yellow
curls was fully revealed. All the sickly
paleness resulting from tropical heats had
disappeared from Jeff’s face, and he stood |
now on the deck a fair specimen of a healthy
English lad.

Captain Clark instantly recognized the
steady brown eyes. They recalled another
pair of eyes, infinitely sadder, but oh, how
like! The golden-haired lady down-stairs
had been put under his especial charge, with
many injunctions to see to her welfare.
But the voyage had not brought back the
expected health to her cheek or light to her
eyes. It was with a heart full of pity that
this good man turned to the boy.

“Th, my boy, and is it really you? I am
glad to see you. Have you come to take a
passage back with me?”



76 A LITTLE HERO.

But Jefi was not in the mood for any
joking this morning.

“T have come to see mother,” he said
with infinite gravity. “I know she is one
of your passengers. Let me go to her at
once. Who will tell me which is her cabin?”

The good old sailor’s weather-beaten face
changed a little.

- “You will perhaps take her by surprise,
my lad. She is ill—very weak—she cannot
stand any shock. Which of her friends or
relatives has come to meet her?” _

“T have come—only,” said Jeff, “I ran
away to do it. She would expect me, of
course.”

Captain Clark looked at the boy, whose
fair face flashed at some painful recollection.

“Well done, Jeff.” The old captain’s voice
was husky. “Come with me at once. We
will find your mother’s maid or the stew-
ardess, but you must promise to be very
gentle and not to agitate her.”



A LITTLE HERO. 77

Jeff smiled with superior wisdom. How
could his presence agitate his beloved
mother?

At one of the state-room doors off the
saloon Captain Clark knocked gently.

An elderly woman answered the summons
at once, and held up her finger with a warn-
ing “Hush! she is asleep, poor lady! do
not wake her.”

Then Jeff came a little forward, trembling
with eagerness, his eyes full of yearning.

“This is her boy, Mrs. Parsons, who has
come alone from Scotland to meet her.”

Jeffs steadfast eyes met the woman’s,
but he did not understand the look of pity
in them. Why should anyone be sorry for
him, now that the sad years of separation had
come to an end?

“Come in then, laddie, very softly. She’s
been talking day and night of her bairn;
but you must, mind, let her have her sleep
out. She lay awake the long night through.”



78 A LITTLE HERO.

Then Jeff was cautiously admitted.

Child as he was, he staggered a little at
the aspect of the white still form extended
on a berth. He drew his breath quickly for
a few seconds as his eyes rested on the dear
familiar face—familiar, and yet how altered!

The fine oval face had indeed fallen away
sadly, and the soft golden hair waved away
from a brow like marble. Deep dark lines
beneath the closed eyes hollowed the cheeks
and seemed to speak of pain and sleepless
nights. Slow tears welled up to Jeff’s eyes
and fell silently one by one.

He turned to the woman and spoke in a
whisper:

“She has been very ill? She never told
me.”

“Very ill,” said the elderly matron curtly.
It was difficult to restrain her own tears.

Then Jeff sat down quietly and remained
half-hidden by the curtain that sheltered the
sleeper. Presently the noise of trampling



A LITTLE HERO. 79

overhead seemed to rouse the invalid. She
stirred and sighed without opening her
eyes.

“Mrs. Parsons, will you ask if any letters
or telegrams have come for me. I shall
never get ashore EERO my friends.
Surely someone will come.” Again a long-
drawn sigh.

Jeff’s little brown hand stole round the
curtain and very softly clasped the thin white
fingers.

“Mother, J am here—your own little lad.
Mother, oh, mother! Mother dear—”

The soft brown eyes opened with a startled
look. Then suddenly the intensity of yearn-
ing mother-love met Jeff’s gaze. In a mo-
ment he was on his knees beside ne with ue
arms about her neck.

“Never, never to leave you any more,
mother—to feel your hands—to kiss your
cheek every night—to nurse you—to make
you well—to cover you with love. Oh,



80 A LITTLE HERO.

how could I ever bear it all! There is none
like you—none—none.” _

The sweet pale face flushed in an ecstasy
of gratitude and passionate feeling beneath
the endearing epithets and the loving touches.

“My lad—my little lad,” she kept repeat-
ing to herself in a low murmur, “he has come
to meet me, to make me well.”

“In the few moments that succeeded, Jeff
poured forth the tale of his adventurous flight
from Loch Lossie. He made haste to soften
the neglect of his mothez’s relatives.

“They did not know you were very ill,
mother. They only thought you were a
little bit ill before you left India. Aunt Annie
said your maid would bring you down to
Scotland quite well; but oh, I had the ache
inmy heart. It was a real pain,and I felt I
could not wait, and I knew you would not
be angry.”

“Anory, my darling!” the mother said
with a wondering smile, touching his hair



A LITTLE HERO. 81

with her weak fingers. “How pretty your
hair has grown, Jeff, and you are so tall and
look so well! Your father would be pleased
to see you so big and strong. He will come
home soon now. We are not so poor as we
were. His uncle has left us some money, you
know; that is why I was able to come to
England.”

It flashed across Jefi’s mind that Mrs.
Colquhoun must have been aware of his
parents’ improved circumstances when she
invited her sister to Loch Lossie. He put.
away the thought from him.

“And your grandmama, tell me all about.
her, Jeff, and your little cousins. I have
longed to hear from your own lips about
everyone.”

There was a lovely pink flush on the
mother’s face now, and her beautiful eyes were
as bright as stars. Mrs. Parsons came for-
ward, and, looking at her anxiously, said

gently:
(396 ) F



82 A LITTLE HERO. ©

“Indeed, ma’am, but I think you had
better talk no more just now. I will fetch
your beef-tea, and just let the laddie sit
quietly beside you, where you can see him.”

Mrs. Scott smiled gently, clasping Jeff's
brown fingers more closely.

“He will not leave me, Mrs. Parsons—
promise—even if I go to sleep.”
~ And so Jeff sat through the morning hours
hardly speaking or stirring.

At about twelve o'clock Captain Clark
came to the door and was bidden to enter.
He had come to say that he had made every
arrangement to get Mrs. Scott comfortably
conveyed to London, and that Mrs. Parsons
must get her mistress ready early in the
afternoon.

“And here is a telegram, Mrs. Scott, just
come for you,” he said, holding out the brown
envelope. Languid fingers went out to
receive the missive. Was not all her world
beside her?



A LITTLE HERO. 83

From Mr. Colquhoun, York Station, to Mrs. Scott, 8.8.
Jellalabad, Albert Docks.

“Will be at St. Pancras Hotel this even-
ing. Send reply there. Say where you are
staying. Is Geoffry with you?”

The answer was soon written, and the kind
captain took it away to despatch. Prepara-
tions for Mrs. Scott’s removal were carried on
as quickly as possible, and Jeff made himself
useful by running backwards and forwards
with messages.

In the evening the sick lady and the boy,
under Captain Clark’s care, reached the apart-
ments in Brook Street that had been secured
for them. About seven o’clock Uncle Hugh
made his appearance. He forbore to speak
one word of anger or reproach to Jeff; even
greeting him with a certain degree of kind-
ness. The poor boy wasalone in the sitting-
room turning over the pages of an old



84 A LITTLE HERO.

Graphic. His eyes bore traces of recent
tears.

“And how is your mother getting on, Jeff?
I hope we shall be able to take her back to
Scotland to-morrow.”

“To-morrow, Uncle Hugh? oh, no! She is
very ill—much worse than we thought.
Perhaps she will be ill a long time. The
doctor is here now. The railway tried her
so much. She has fainted thrice since we
got here.”

All Jeff’s stoical fortitude broke down
when he began to speak—the tears could
not be kept back, and he sobbed bitterly.

“Uncle Hugh, what shall I do? She does
not look like the mother she used to be! She
cannot walk across the room or even sit up.”
' Mr, Colquhoun had not realized anything
seriously the matter with his sister-in-law,
and this was the first intimation he had re-
ceived of her critical condition.

By and by, when he had seen the doctor,



A LITTLE HERO. 85

he was made to recognize the gravity of the
case. There was very little hope of the
gentle mother’s recovery. All the anticipa-
tions of convalescence in Scotland, and a
reconciliation at Loch Lossie, were at an end.
He remembered his wife’s last injunction,
“Be sure you bring Mary down here at once,
and don’t have any excuses.”

Alas! poor Mary would never travel any
more to her old home. Her days of rest
were at hand, ;

Uncle Hugh was very gentle and con-
siderate towards Jeff that night and during
the ensuing days that dragged so slowly.
The boy could hardly be persuaded to leave
the house for half an hour, and always hurried
back with feverish impatience after the short-
est absence. He came in mostly laden with
primroses and violets—her favourite flowers;
often going into two or three shops to get
_them, never sufficiently satisfied with their
freshness.



86 A LITTLE HERO.

One night Jeff had gone to bed earlier
than usual, for he mostly lingered about
the passages or wandered restlessly from
room to room till it was late. This evening
he had been greatly comforted by some fancied
‘improvement in the poor invalid’s appear-
ance.

“Mother darling, you are better—say you
are better to-night, and that you will soon be
well enough to go back to Loch Lossie,” he
said as he hung over her at saying “good-
night.”

She smiled fondly upon him.

“You wish me to get better so very much,
Jeff, I almost feel as if I must.”

“You must, you must,” he repeated vehe-
mently.

It hardly seemed any time since he had
gone to bed when Jeff was roused by Uncle
Hugh touching him on the shoulder.

“Get up, my boy, quickly, your mother
wishes you to come to her.”



A LITTLE HERO. 87

Mr. Colquhoun’s face was very grave, and
his habitually cold voice had a thrill of
sympathy in its tones. The boy was up ina
moment. Nothing was surprising now.
When he had put on his clothes he went
down-stairs to his mother’s room. The door
was ajar and he pushed it open. There was a
solemn hush here, though there were plenty
of lights about, and a kettle steaming on the
hearth. Jeff noticed at once an overpower-
ing smell of drugs. There was a strange
man in the room. The boy with a cold
chill at his heart recognized him as a
doctor. How still the figure on the bed was!
How marble-white the face propped up by
many pillows! The mother heard the gentle
footfall of her beloved child, and the soft
brown eyes unclosed at his approach—un-
closed with the ever-loving glance. A fleet-
ing smile passed over her face.

“My little lad,” said a voice, oh, so faintly,
but with such infinite tenderness, “you



88 A LITTLE HERO.

have been quick in coming. I have sent for
you to say another good-night. Jeff, darling,
try and understand—I am going—where it
is always morning—I am going to leave you
—after such a little stay—”

The boy had thrown himself beside her on
the big bed. He had never seen the ap-
proach of death. He could not understand it.

- “Mother, why should you go? why should
they take you away from meagain? Oh, no,
no! Please, sir, do not be so cruel; I’m so
lonely without her.”

He turned with anguished eyes to the
grave gentleman who had placed a hand on
the dear mother’s pulse.

Again she spoke:

“My boy, you must understand, God has
called me—I am dying. In the morning [
shall not see your dear eyes; | shall never
touch your head again. Oh, dear, dear head—
oh, soft curls!” She paused a minute and a
little sob broke from her.



A LITTLE HERO. 89

“Jeff, Uncle Hugh has been telling me
about you the past few days. It has been
a great happiness—a great comfort to know
that you are so brave and truthful. There
are faults, my darling, still; but I think, my
own, that you will be a hero some day.”
She smiled upon him with indescribable con-
tent. “TI have no fears for you. You will bear
what is given you to bear patiently. You
will not grieve your father—you will re-
member that—” Her voice failed.

“Oh, mother, stay with me. I can never
be great or good without you—things are
so hard. Only stay with me a little while.
No one has ever loved me as you love me.”

A glow of light passed over the sweet face.

“Darling, no one will ever love you like I
have loved you. Jeff, you have been a great
happiness to me. By and by, when you
come to me, I shall know, perhaps, that you
have remembered all that I have said to you.
Oh, doctor, the pain—again.”



_ 90 A LITTLE HERO.

She gasped for breath, and Mrs. Parsons
lifted her up and put some cordial to her
lips. When she spoke again she wandered
a little:

“T was so happy in India—we were all so
happy together. Dear husband—our little
son—is growing up all that we could wish
him—by and by—he will comfort you. I
shall know—perhaps that you speak of me
—sometimes.”

“Mother, you shall know,” burst from Jeff.
He spoke in a hoarse way. Only by a
supreme effort could he choke back his sobs.
Now he had raised himself and was gazing
into the beloved eyes, which seemed to see
some far-off vision.

“ And, mother, I promise, when you are
gone—I will be—all you wish. I will never, -
never forget—all my life through—and when
—TI see you again—I shall see you again, you
know—you will know how much I have
gone on loving you—and remembering. Oh,



A LITTLE HERO. 91

mother, can’t I go with you?-—must I wait
here alone? You will never kiss me, never
touch me—and when—I am a real hero—
- your voice will not praise me. Take me
with you, mother, mother!” Then Jeff fell
back unconscious, and was carried out of the
room by Uncle Hugh, who was sobbing like a
child. The angel of death did not tarry.
In the morning Jeff ‘knew that his sweet
mother had said her last “ good-night.”

Years have gone by, and Jeff Scott is a
man now. He is reckoned a real hero in
these days, one whose name has been a
household word. He is a soldier like all
the men of his race—a right gallant soldier,
who wears a V.C. upon his broad breast. He
has seen much service, and done brave deeds
by flood and field, under the roar of cannon,
and in instant fear of death.

His fiery impetuous spirit is in a measure
subdued, but still his rash acts of bravery



92 A LITTLE HERO.

have been reproved with a smile by his
superior officers.

In one campaign he had swam a river
under hot fire of the enemy, carrying de-
spatches between his teeth—he had rallied
hig regiment by picking up the colours
dropped by two wounded comrades, though
his own right arm was shattered by a shot—
he had defended the sick and wounded in a
quickly thrown up fort with desperate bravery
against a host of attacking enemies.

He seemed to hold his life only to spend
it for others. No privations were hard to
him. He bore with a smiling face heat or
cold, and encouraged with a cheerful word
dispirited soldiers.

“Sir.” said a gallant general, “you have
won a Victoria Cross three times over. I
honour you for your heroic bravery. Your
mother may be proud to hear of such a son.”

Ah! what a tender chord was touched by
those words. In the darkness of the African



A LITTLE HERO. 938

night Jeff went out with a heavy heart from
his tent, and, looking up at the silent stars,
wondered if. she knew, if she approved.

And when he went home, and was sent
for to Osborne to receive his decorations from
the Queen’s hand, the honour heaped upon
him seemed more than he could bear. When
the greatest lady in the land spoke a few
kind words of praise the tears started to his
brave brown eyes. Perchance the aspect of
such a stripling moved her womanly heart
to a special throb of sympathy, he looked
so young to have achieved such deeds of
valour.

But the applause of the world in general
will never sound attractively in Jeff’s ears;
society will never claim him as one of her
pet lions.

At Loch Lossie they speak of him with
respectful admiration, and Aunt Annie no
longer holds out any opinions against such a
distinguished young man. She loses no op-



94 A LITTLE HERO.

portunity of proclaiming her kinship to
young Captain Scott. But Jeff only spends
a short time occasionally in Scotland; most
of his leave is generally passed with his father.

The deep strong affection between father
and son seems to become a closer bond as
the years rolls on. They speak sometimes
of the dead mother, and even now Jeff’s
voice hushes and his steady eyes are misty
at the mention of her name or the recalling
of her words. He loves her with a love that
time has no power to weaken; he has kept
all her sayings faithfully in his heart; her
letters to him are his most cherished posses-
sions.

The passionate intensity of his nature has
deepened and strengthened with his man-
hood. He never forgets. Oh, brave, true
heart! oh, loyal breast! oh, faithful hero!
guarding well the noble standard of courage
and truth that was given you to guard in
boyhood’s days.



A LITTLE HERO. : 95

“ Her little lad” that she loved so well is
indeed “one full of courage and great
patience, and dauntless before difficulties;
one who allows no fear to assail him, who
fulfils his duty and something over tt under
hard and difficult circumstances.”

THE END.



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man,

White Lilae: Or, The Queen of the May. By Amy Watton.
“From first to last absorbing almost to the point of fascination.”—Daily Mail.
Little Lady Clare. By Evzuxyn Evererr Green.

“Certainly one of the prettiest, reminding us in its quaintness and tender
pathos of Mrs, Ewing’s delightful tales.” "Literary World.

The Saucy May. By Henry Frirs.
“‘A book both interesting and exciting.”—Spectator.
The Brig ‘‘Audacious.” By Aran Cox.
“Fresh and wholesome as a breath of sea-air in tone.”—Court Journal.
Jasper’s Conquest. By Exizapera J. Lysacat.
: “One of the best boys’ books of the season.” —Schoolmaster.
Sturdy and Strong: Or, How George Andrews made his Way.
By G. A, Henry.

“The history of a hero of everyday life, whose love of truth and innate pluck
carry him, naturally, from poverty to affluence.”—The Empire.
Gutta-Perecha Willie: The Working Genius. By Gzoren Mao

Dowatp, LL.D.

“ Get it for your boys and girls to read for themselves, and if they can’t do that
read it to them.”—Practical Teacher.

The War of the Axe: Or Adventures in South Africa, By
J. Prroy-GRovzs.
“The story is well and brillidntly told.”"—Literary World.

The Eversley Seerets. By Evstyn Evrrnrr GReey.
“Ts one of the best children’s stories of the year.” Academy.



2 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.

The Lads of Little Clayton. By R. Srzap.

“A a canttat book for boys, and may be read to a class with great profi "School
master.

Ten Boys who lived on the.Road from Long Agoto Now. By Jang
Anprews. With 20 Illustrations,
“Really attractive and brightly written.”—Saturday Review.

Winnie’ 's Seeret: A Story of Faith and Patience. By Katz Woon.

“Written preplasly in the style that is surest to win the hearts of young folks.”
—Pictorial World.

A Waif of the Sea: Or the Lost Found. By Kats Woop.
‘A very touching and pretty tale, full of interest.”—Hdinburgh Courant.
The Joyous Story of Toto. By Lavra E. Ricnarps. With 30
humorous and fanciful Illustrations by E. H. Garrett.
“Should take its place beside Lewis Carroll’s unique works.”—Birmingham Gaz.
Miss Willowburn’s Offer. By Saran Dovupyey.
“Jtis acareful, well executed, and cheery study of English still life."—Academy.
A Garland for Girls. By Lovisa M. Axcort.
“These little tales are the beau ideal of girls’ stories.”—Christian World.
Hetty Gray: Or Nobody’s Bairn. By Rosa MunHonuanp.
“a charming story for young folks. Hetty is a delightful creature.”— World.

Brothers in Arms: A Story of the Crusades. By F. B. Harrison.
“One of the best accounts of the Crusades we have read.'"—Schoolmistress,

The Ball of Fortune. By Cuarzes Pzaros.

‘‘A capital story for boys. There is plenty of incident.”—Journal of Education.
Miss Fenwiek’s Failures. By Esui Sroarr.

“‘A girl true to real life, who will put no nonsense into young heads.”—Graphie.

Gytha’s Message: A Tale of Saxon England, By Emma Lusi.

“The sort of book that all girls and some boys like,”Journal of Education.
My Mistress the Queen: A Tale of the 17th Century, By M. A.

PavL.
“The style is pure and graceful, and the story is full of interest.”—Scotsman.

Jack o’ Lanthorn: A Tale of Adventure. By Hunry Fairs.
“The narrative is crushed full of stirring incident.”—Christian Leader. |

The Family Failing. By Daruny Daun.

“Tt is a capital lesson on the value of contentedness.”—Aberdeen Journal.



BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 3



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.

The Stories of Wasa and Menzikoff: The Deliverer of Sweden,
and the Favourite of Czar Peter.

Stories of the Sea in Former Days.
Tales of Captivity and Exile. -

Famous Discoveries by Sea and Land.
Stirring Events of History.

Adventures in Field, Flood, and Forest.

BLACKIiE’S TWO SHILLING SERIES.
In crown 8vo, with Illustrations, cloth elegant, 2s.

Sam Silvan’s Sacrifice: The Story of two Fatherless Boys. By
Jesse CoLMAN.

“‘There is real pathos in the tale, and shows the beauty of endurance and un-
selfishness.”—Scottish Leader.

A Warrior King: A Boy’s Adventures in South Africa, By J.
Evz.yn.
“ Just the book for boys—not a ‘dry’ page in it.” eee News,

Susan. By Amy Watton.

“A clever little story, in which the authoress shows a great deal of insight into
children’s feelings and motives.”—Pall Mali Gazette.

Linda and the Boys. By Czormss Szupy Lownpzs.
«Js full of the kind of humour that children love.”. —Liverpool Mercury.
Swiss Stories for Children and those who Love Children.
From the German of Mapam Spyri. By Lucy WHEEtocg.
“Lifelike descriptions of Swiss homesteads and country.”—Practical Teacher.

Aboard the ‘‘Atalanta.” By Henry Fairs.

“We doubt if any boy after reading it would be tempted to the great iilstalee
of running away from school under any pretext whatever.”—Practical Teacher.

The Penang Pirate. By Jonn C. Huronson.
“It is rattling, adventurous, and -romantic,”—Aberdeen Journal.

Teddy: The Story of a “Little Pickle.” By Joun C. HuroHeson.
“There is real humour in the tale.”—The Times.



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'2011-10-11T17:23:13-04:00'
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFFS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
4a57aeb9298dfe4b3b968568cbad1fce
aa1273baad593c9abb11dbcdbb3d74dde59f4e5c
describe
'32564' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFFT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
e9de9fe74172805d845689a06432cac1
5dc0147178cf0b94352d08a361ac1813781d5c6c
'2011-10-11T17:24:35-04:00'
describe
'280310' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFFU' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
717323bd5193fa1b1218072c4c6f8008
dadcefc499565c3364d1fbe6486d3e9829c2bdaa
describe
'162978' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFFV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
8e448a545184092fcb1901b0ce016be0
1cd6d363afaced261ce0b47705deb6cb2e5b4de2
'2011-10-11T17:23:36-04:00'
describe
'23351' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFFW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
e6c01b0aba369b65da151dfde96ae041
90b8b2805ad41ea34d1a040bb24870ce8e3d8bda
'2011-10-11T17:22:37-04:00'
describe
'64785' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFFX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
b2768b36b00cc78d23af644ebc9cc993
b7f2cb37cc6352556226cf4651728eb591bce947
'2011-10-11T17:23:46-04:00'
describe
'2264288' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFFY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
14e5a3d504c6c0da10e67ecada577e38
184e67094517f20c24f69d2ce427804c6b622fac
'2011-10-11T17:23:25-04:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFFZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
65aea1ba9f3cb3465e740616cdb414d0
3f9280fdc6e394452a5b8e16b14247cf30c42840
'2011-10-11T17:24:21-04:00'
describe
'33335' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGA' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
4be445a4f3913f841b64d63df6923782
d8f713c9be765a74bc8c87cbfcbfda5d2456c3f1
'2011-10-11T17:23:21-04:00'
describe
'280192' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGB' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
b581807b0998d0e0e575831cd4a89080
fd58f848d3b337ef774d04c5c5abac8124d7bb97
'2011-10-11T17:22:44-04:00'
describe
'145942' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGC' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
01db404fc074a0149e920c102f08e614
7ee24d8902a4bd08ab00d1addad6468512e2f654
'2011-10-11T17:22:29-04:00'
describe
'19126' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGD' 'sip-files00013.pro'
912412e995098bdb3f5ae007f78f8189
a568cd3bfc81ad5edef9f073e488b6244149b6d1
describe
'59904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGE' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
cdce89afe22878805724e5424b3ad9dd
bfbe70e4936af4d9040e5623e8d938237198c4dc
describe
'2263920' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
c8f73e6b5cf4f98141ef3d96e5d87b39
73f4967f0b95ea1ccdde0b58cdb018ee9f6945c4
'2011-10-11T17:23:06-04:00'
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
7496cd68fad86db0804bf33d6d816fab
9787c460ca2ffd06bf8525513b1131f36468a9ca
describe
'31366' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGH' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
751d61c3224d697902ef414c2cf5cc60
936fbe56cc39bb08e38f305531b3d355e9c5624d
'2011-10-11T17:23:54-04:00'
describe
'280332' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGI' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
384aebdd4bb2530b4bd9123c72849dd5
b068733e55031ddd9af909aabcd0e57f6beb297c
describe
'156624' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
7ac9f4e009b50e18bc31a520278570c4
2977e2f45b8aa1b5dac2ab7de4bda0dc6d4091f1
'2011-10-11T17:24:16-04:00'
describe
'21734' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGK' 'sip-files00014.pro'
29e430efd9a94d87c15105e00b121950
77c7a2ac1ac56400eaa7ce4195f33aef90866f25
'2011-10-11T17:23:19-04:00'
describe
'64517' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGL' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
92c77703e32c2609c82f72441f917e0f
ddb686923ec6f0a84789d6b9afbcd8b1a35fa8dc
describe
'2264424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGM' 'sip-files00014.tif'
5e904145152bcf33f75a51ec08397d0e
3ef267e1cbb3be8833c3ad0964bada091a6db706
'2011-10-11T17:23:02-04:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGN' 'sip-files00014.txt'
1a682a4ce3d29464ef781eb601a5ec53
7ac800ccd375ce025557be9106bdea9de00c90b3
describe
'32691' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGO' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
29ced07014b89b81dac69bd371912cc5
4c399b8826fc7360d20bc6ff47f577ddfb446945
'2011-10-11T17:22:43-04:00'
describe
'280322' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGP' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
b5bae2d8d3af572ccddc99902fec4f30
4c375e2e3b91fe0c9e5313e15d5bd5f60fe27b8c
'2011-10-11T17:24:11-04:00'
describe
'156217' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ff0dbe4b325385f26b601838622bc42f
41157647fdf6c4f7da3ee8ae56df031a0f2c2153
'2011-10-11T17:23:37-04:00'
describe
'21566' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f5efc532ee17c39fc00af537ae1b281e
cf6d90d9d68a27398105626c2db4140c186358a3
describe
'63427' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGS' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d135f35ee37e17fefcac3f8bcebce7ec
c59af517cb6fc6937e876e8c1e03ad3a9d94800b
'2011-10-11T17:24:42-04:00'
describe
'2264148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGT' 'sip-files00015.tif'
2e4903fc00fd94931584d6901c46ed76
8c83a6a465357b1413d826a621b10784d23eca7e
'2011-10-11T17:23:30-04:00'
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGU' 'sip-files00015.txt'
3cb85897c18b8ebce64d7e3b372b38d3
c7f2fe5ffb2b29d0d5f853e227b1395748588d2d
'2011-10-11T17:24:22-04:00'
describe
'32731' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c6d07745a8c43d514c91961a76166c36
c16cdb5a39b94045cfcce28060651959d892a15d
describe
'280329' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGW' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
765a1fc78dd4a3d3e9801828fbcbc80b
314884d57ce4e36e545750e391705ff927ed0954
describe
'160010' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGX' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
e00fe1eda347af70e13021864491f849
f27702f4795af8f93b90ae671467021a8eb3a323
'2011-10-11T17:23:45-04:00'
describe
'22921' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGY' 'sip-files00016.pro'
f8168cf2bce2971d16765153ee11d9f2
56d121c03d134c76ad0127140fddb78671ff157b
describe
'65658' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFGZ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
6b9fdf7a735334b2d938a09adfe7c0a5
8811837a272da72471195a744e9dbbe3df18b7fc
describe
'2264120' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHA' 'sip-files00016.tif'
42f9097d18909251b7f062f6de9ddd39
e0d6661b6e5b297534de0070c52e8ed05ccd233d
'2011-10-11T17:24:33-04:00'
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHB' 'sip-files00016.txt'
6191318bc1f919d98296d52f859ad8d1
97a749fe8c84ccf97c9f21c35b79661b1d16e903
describe
'32895' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHC' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
e1cb26a788d63a9dbd6b61c98be80fd2
eefc4c3b5ac77cb1808f56ea6795089b42c2cdca
'2011-10-11T17:23:22-04:00'
describe
'280283' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHD' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
6c3ae33af76cfc5d00a9d6926d23e425
0f8199223ef3023fd25ef52516545d404ab3afb5
'2011-10-11T17:23:56-04:00'
describe
'163330' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHE' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
e37771b53644a3cd9f33972ec46cb3ad
1d01aedf426a17971d0c19693dd5b5e9472e0720
describe
'23751' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHF' 'sip-files00017.pro'
38726a96f36ddec662782f5a5f6cabae
d70ed937ec146e99b22d91719152a647819860b1
describe
'66746' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHG' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
8c3f82307d2d6fecdc1df4057c8eb716
b2d38c74ecadc5af0131f6c0baa397e1697ca21f
'2011-10-11T17:23:34-04:00'
describe
'2264224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
7dfb71ac51b48ad63e611c8c62a58600
e25f437d79e35ca2943567619c74edbe5916a9ad
'2011-10-11T17:22:33-04:00'
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
c806cf0633c2f0ecc4e8d949a1b1b978
9d6c914f0d48fb528c1acf7bf9f6a5c2472f1793
describe
'33445' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHJ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
112778d1d115280348d30f98c52213be
3e048bdce38aae173f0c3ec078dbf07b3cea9f6d
'2011-10-11T17:23:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHK' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
94d209cdd7f77a9ef5d75b33d8dfc387
ba43fa2c5cbd9f7d9830475ae59ce00a287ab0c1
'2011-10-11T17:23:35-04:00'
describe
'171127' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHL' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
11dbcba3d130dfd90f8080ee661a28af
0b9d1de5bf6cca48660ba5c8d189cef4ab45bde6
describe
'25372' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHM' 'sip-files00018.pro'
684d944275215118afce98f9cf8bd948
4398b5df58311596db21985da3ca750b8cdf5eb4
describe
'67444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHN' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
95537a053a782f2fdd12d7909d8b20bd
ab4cbe25507ff4380d3880e0a4d5577e47946b63
'2011-10-11T17:24:19-04:00'
describe
'2264500' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHO' 'sip-files00018.tif'
6b0bd64cd7d612ee7a0b74318af2dd58
477f174652d0d087bdd7d2a9df967f132050b967
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHP' 'sip-files00018.txt'
18f55f0f4c15da17ee2838aa0ac6d72c
15744b2777bb00bd4a59d9dafa5ca0e0055ba603
'2011-10-11T17:22:52-04:00'
describe
'33874' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHQ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
acd2957ba87a3f8985902059d06389ae
97b35210994a328b4af431ef57a4e45d87190117
describe
'280342' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHR' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
881861768f70980503f0653681617d83
7e04b01f9a86159e7f1e8c1e346262da9128415c
'2011-10-11T17:22:59-04:00'
describe
'160095' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHS' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
b784a447f9649577bf6527a28f565936
f82f547d48a7a40b526ac2479562b7e51bb30080
describe
'22250' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHT' 'sip-files00019.pro'
428a342e7d74c9a4a1df2706438a0c11
9ce0a0ae027f3c40a0902892ac9688342cda222c
'2011-10-11T17:23:01-04:00'
describe
'64911' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHU' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
cdd191b9754fa97674de9c4f7adcd6e7
4046d884592ee642827fa1b46c534b4c8cba8068
'2011-10-11T17:24:18-04:00'
describe
'2264380' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHV' 'sip-files00019.tif'
709dbb7fd7aafd624649ab10eb40f732
49043e91d3f35d533e4cc9e6e23bc82c7700d736
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHW' 'sip-files00019.txt'
ae0adce73bfc95c45ffe786e5252ea5f
a520c93704048d3d39d9471efc2868c01427d0ed
'2011-10-11T17:23:43-04:00'
describe
'32701' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHX' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
ce993b9a20594801247ec76c7e467244
1429aedea3cce9d89ebeae8838b149bd46058f97
describe
'280579' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHY' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
3b962d0ddd0e20fb43ae3e03bd485971
23bec59ee1c235d1a705e2557f8259978aaf0d4c
describe
'159594' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFHZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
93453e9f1e8e65820f428cdc1f2ab8a5
64e9afd05b51f6de6388166f2d603bd58dbaa010
'2011-10-11T17:23:28-04:00'
describe
'23286' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIA' 'sip-files00020.pro'
68e69cf930cfa8af9f6671a9a4af283a
ada6de57acc0b103be2ab7036351666a76edb199
'2011-10-11T17:23:00-04:00'
describe
'66128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
aaaf7e599ace85f17a2836e3f1c967bc
da9dcf0118cfa003ee7b81ebd0f3b6ce39c32116
describe
'2266116' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIC' 'sip-files00020.tif'
aedcdc3b98399030a99f972c5ad34fc4
07a79815722916cd2069ae51365f51894d79e75a
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFID' 'sip-files00020.txt'
7b4561bf638cf8b0b12445f7c5470504
637ca1dab50db31d2cc7a31fb7a2fab5a5580900
describe
'33157' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIE' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
0ce745dc22e9a68f6e3731bab334bb5a
6ee4574cce8c3a7aef3707390e05bd264d9fb23f
describe
'280325' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIF' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
44adb9a4624054f6799bcf092a2bb3cb
8430c33e65bd6762a8e19da4dfde9b13315a0df7
describe
'141360' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIG' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
93689deb0cf2b9e14ea8f8963c57f9c6
a1576e33e4b5511e133d05d0e49e56fcb9e6dee0
describe
'18610' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIH' 'sip-files00021.pro'
c89330993285532cfec30086a4c6b5ec
47f73e2e7fb2e9602a10badfa72f4f36efdc9105
'2011-10-11T17:23:42-04:00'
describe
'57923' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFII' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
f86b339442d6e655556c552798d8036b
fbddf00dff71181aee5b9d928cd26b4c8e14a4e6
describe
'2263728' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIJ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
0f435436cc1b535f33b87a8e1fdd56fc
802aa2d5d6e87b75ed6dbaea538f12821129d91d
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIK' 'sip-files00021.txt'
799894a0548de34bcccb4252fdf47586
d8a86559174bf46482afa86311b4a4057970e769
'2011-10-11T17:22:50-04:00'
describe
'31092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIL' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
148e63608ef092195b2c759e419a5d4c
b403e422e8497ce0c0cbe11f911df6494e287ce3
describe
'280321' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIM' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
25dbd9fd54b858f01a85b033c87f2de8
d72fa8b5e3f1829d8830d99dc8f19419cb692133
'2011-10-11T17:22:47-04:00'
describe
'169514' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIN' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
fb5d9b781dd69b8195a57a970ddc11db
1143af8b9f5a413a67691fc5bfa8bf2045cfbb0d
describe
'25172' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIO' 'sip-files00022.pro'
07b187c2fb4e1941a00b3e01c60a046f
a3ba6282dc84224777de46e2a2a41194a5e2f8c3
describe
'66372' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIP' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7b34f8b376f0537c940746fcfa716976
14258707a037fd019e141d8dfd4fe27fccb3438a
describe
'2264132' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIQ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
d0b4261e5e57d991e520d62390a9b27c
50cc126f05786bb2e45d95a59d47ffd775a4e6a0
'2011-10-11T17:22:42-04:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIR' 'sip-files00022.txt'
3ceb01db282672c376921d443fe644f2
a733d1bc90c807b003df70d0e499d73abf1f31a1
describe
'33160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIS' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
88a0ad0c2397117a1863b14aa7223e95
39bce76dd74172b13ae3d16eab07bf509b6287f1
describe
'280340' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIT' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
07660610759af2d174ce76f15f82e885
1c5e232bbbdd3d3bf9e1732c55c4b7cbea1428fb
describe
'166538' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIU' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
affa4217294152d1f9285ce1690ae0ef
a59e1cb035675703aab4057d688f927979feda1b
describe
'23595' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIV' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3bed1b832009f603eb29a2734b2ed327
95613400a4a59d58aca2791cb580f3deb2fd020e
'2011-10-11T17:22:39-04:00'
describe
'65506' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
720eaf6a381cdde029173d6aebc40bfe
8bbaeb016ce12c5c195da03716e89cfffabbbc4c
describe
'2264316' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIX' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e8cc206ecafeda047760c6fa6ea76ab7
7a2f02dc0b02f64dbb72877e5aaac9ce8eb45bae
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
2b1ae69b0e060471dab431a1a718445d
c32f53a71e67f94cf91746f9ae2916880ccb5cf2
describe
'33147' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFIZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
e32714da0807d34b0e78060f43e13d36
265bfe7cbb29d838a980088ae2596d76000199aa
describe
'280292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
1cbf0d253147c72297dcfa08ff69f78f
66ec2ae5515da4a5d2455646e97e80cc6fa22d86
describe
'163378' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
673080e3057307735f335905f86ca19f
fa3b4240e3edd4d3dbc13a565b334d88decb7c61
describe
'24085' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJC' 'sip-files00024.pro'
93f1b50bfef3ea819adb77c26f04950e
ce1e48af7469200f385c08820bdd3b6392ce0141
describe
'66308' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJD' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
c39a733c251c88627cf6c32a210604f8
a6347a3f7a8ee589ccebc9315e1bb8e4344ade55
describe
'2264012' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJE' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e7439fb182256426614a7a234c0cb8c8
edbbef638fbdc5673f2266a7b5614083ab197feb
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
7d27d30fa3474e9848cd8243cb12cae9
20a368f64edbc4be22ab4dfc4f69aebfd01c24ee
describe
'32947' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJG' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
f373b2ee59b4fec81201ba3adbdc40bf
5b17c32998f7a67f414136b5c9dc2e504f902acd
describe
'280257' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJH' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
f22184ac55eae5b7827bdd672f3e4c61
9a9c60515b0c7bc969418fa7986590b69ecb5a67
describe
'167921' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJI' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
9ff96f07a6e1063056199c7e659721c3
eb85294ccad55d38ed4bf22914890ebba9b91640
'2011-10-11T17:23:41-04:00'
describe
'24087' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJJ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
bb52a13e75f416274673d172cdda51a5
a4762184f9dc70c4fe4f41092a15c0ce8c128c66
describe
'66293' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJK' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
a7eba4f61a10978c612e0de56f80518e
aaa359b0fcf5333dd3b056e7429cc2e5cbf2e6ef
'2011-10-11T17:23:31-04:00'
describe
'2264312' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJL' 'sip-files00025.tif'
a3c4edd210214cba4af9fbbbe62db3a1
1d1648d58e0d6cfc1bf7338aaa0ae32f9d40e2a6
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJM' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d402ae5e6f04faf917e70b3f67af2b63
c3eedb5f278154faa51bcd6ee05f59992233e67b
'2011-10-11T17:22:51-04:00'
describe
'33354' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJN' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ff304969485fa5c220723882fc7118ea
edea11520226cf8120790348e168b919f7fa9574
describe
'280343' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJO' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
eb08aa864f41023d1b77ff7938f3d907
afd63d245e0636a2458f7c1b2c2311a47d718134
describe
'162515' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJP' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
5026c55b01924ebb32f7a0d92be9fee8
841d7386e0df1ebad3767b73ef1003e2e3879ad7
describe
'24574' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJQ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
9761cc5c7132ff75ee23ab8bad1c9049
822d92012fe4d8caeb6bd36b9ca959e8c362d10d
describe
'66431' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJR' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
10997964a959ce8d0794e1e927c9fdba
f2328f9925e76c45db2003d14431bed704beaa44
describe
'2264412' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJS' 'sip-files00026.tif'
7dde314c51ee597741266e178bae96f3
c4697461ece32d961e4eec770ddea3d1a5f17684
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJT' 'sip-files00026.txt'
959b827c3eea690d65b59e5ea0a06aa4
92d7b8f49f14a616bbd2886d0472e575a0b5488b
describe
'33712' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJU' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
10e217bf65e197c5ed72f9d5da54cc5c
fa25d2614b706062da151cdc3e61151785305ac4
describe
'280284' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJV' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
35d49e1f376a89c89c2679f375d0e6ab
ca507ab467c19be56e4f3046dfbf2e38f69f390a
describe
'160782' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJW' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
39f0851b714e28ea89a42bdd46f13058
d5387150a7e9261bd307a99f69bbf8a94f0c2937
describe
'24466' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJX' 'sip-files00027.pro'
755b9db4f7eb8d38b5704079306f3fc0
4263b0123f35d7e13be0942893f059e2ff2ed702
'2011-10-11T17:22:36-04:00'
describe
'65398' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJY' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
040d491d5315bdd43cb609353dac24fb
5b41b5d1e16ce3368f8f5271b08bcaebb6e936bb
'2011-10-11T17:24:02-04:00'
describe
'2264344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFJZ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
243b998ece5b9032a7e8c9cb453518d6
6645fee7678313f0002c068c8c7933059f3ee629
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKA' 'sip-files00027.txt'
9a2abdf0ae08e66b1d0ebe8ebd2e104c
eeedb32abe625e0834e86a5d65ca206c9e48a788
describe
'33180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKB' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
96e59ef5d6bea6bf531a1ed8c3df418c
34dff08761b9a215e56c15f5dc1b029a16055da1
describe
'280493' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKC' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a73e44a2095220f75e81333afd3e5a3a
b8abbf421cda5bf96aa4dc445767b18c541694a4
describe
'157090' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKD' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
9bcc6dd6ea3d87228052eb20c8d64ca6
cfccb4f462fb93595ab5db768b70ac6098869039
describe
'21773' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKE' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ea460be7ce83ae278cbfb4a94aa07da9
416bb02f01f86e473c8450c4a15b91616a93ae98
describe
'63904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKF' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
2cab76769a0795f981f5a4afe45ed704
b4ceefc868e531819358c1a5e071f357c74a5bef
describe
'2266292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKG' 'sip-files00028.tif'
51eb2f2521bdddbf7830a983a6ee25b8
a8c2141cbbbe556eb91a02aad9b1c5a30b850850
'2011-10-11T17:24:17-04:00'
describe
'873' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKH' 'sip-files00028.txt'
1cb94f6199ce057ad6bf7ac8009dffe4
cb99eb19c099ae01d85642c3805ac295db4b6880
describe
'32727' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKI' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
ed30f395701be1d757ca39b6bdb5c96f
7465c93245ec16b713bffc647f65ad649d64c7f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKJ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
5d2bd3a787453a4dbc47c11454806fbc
a3af5331b5339e5f6bdd1bc035743441f323cd5c
describe
'164308' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKK' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e8c88db6c0efa5cb7c3983b3ff141fa7
3724aec77f15d275fbeadba3314530616b8c0a94
describe
'23513' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKL' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a22ea7d3d568b6af4604b2dbc5f55977
e777455c188becf5c25320b0e0f3ecd4ca6dabc3
'2011-10-11T17:23:47-04:00'
describe
'64674' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKM' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
bef124a968293a0f2a0ff62d6e58fa3a
a1471b8c18999beeecfe5b4c9859e318d17de1a6
describe
'2264112' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKN' 'sip-files00029.tif'
1b6d746f27d3615c9507c86aae798956
ef221016dd51241679bb19924ae42cf40fc83746
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKO' 'sip-files00029.txt'
fdf09d5db1e008bd52f4f9929915ed9b
806feee633c08d397e26b3e674b3fed96a5632d9
describe
'33350' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKP' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
b6e478c1ce6c3508f9ff2d3c07cdf1b4
34e6e4f589b4ed504ea95fa35943c5a1863d94d9
'2011-10-11T17:23:40-04:00'
describe
'280303' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKQ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0f0804caf3ae16c24380e5539fa28a9a
414acd32442abe4b02beb3560d25a478b9484976
describe
'162810' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKR' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
abdf0acc210d177d9cf306fb0e043308
a41d99df7f18a2ca84bafe423580dbf3509e525c
describe
'24006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKS' 'sip-files00030.pro'
77382558ceb4788f90756ce1a2377d1b
672bed0f88741c0d06a8748b34e24a15bbbbc721
describe
'67128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
787368813f1a1b543051ca45775da00b
fc4768ac27b06a7840da507db5d5c0f12e68d468
describe
'2264216' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
9166c95f668b3e94d82c45b558a2f193
5b8d0fddd2b68ae4a680d0a67e56d759da3710b5
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKV' 'sip-files00030.txt'
4b2ae6c411bba5abc5a8b244695e1ab6
62f9a3060186e5ee4afc32f48198f3d45a9996f8
describe
'33402' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKW' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
06be5def5e30632692731f63a685b668
0dc10f99a67535afc66d3f8b30479778c31a6341
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKX' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
a4dfe210ef69c65906b0421ee1072cb1
8807d8ff116cfe5601e8012ea5f051fd61e8b512
'2011-10-11T17:24:08-04:00'
describe
'161601' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKY' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
116202dbe3d3d93cfd6306d3a261e260
519820604e352e2a546b34eef2b528e78b5a4baa
describe
'24350' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFKZ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
0b6b9a3fc335e37216c6f0ecb5c9e7c8
7c97c4690c43572f257a51041640e974e3e6ffd9
'2011-10-11T17:24:04-04:00'
describe
'64887' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
cffac50fb6489033c071cfd65b1c5fe0
87820fb9d271f994fa041340a1f8d2932e5a1820
'2011-10-11T17:24:15-04:00'
describe
'2264332' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLB' 'sip-files00031.tif'
dc026cf878cabec1b392ab0a6e0e33c9
1568ed7a652e1e8ae92ca812851088096ff65361
'2011-10-11T17:24:03-04:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLC' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f60a671e08326da502c748f9d28f4b69
c77c4abbc626bc6c656e34f30fad77d12e432217
'2011-10-11T17:23:32-04:00'
describe
'33555' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLD' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
2fe63370dc3b17daf21e41a12889bee0
abeaa9c711ac88ded95863c8bbf06a5dfcf26ac0
describe
'280309' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLE' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
d68ede41d51571ac585b2dedcac7d245
31b21bda3f437315a72a8ecef94c74c169fe73ce
'2011-10-11T17:24:00-04:00'
describe
'165990' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLF' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
c158a9c824e2c2448823ff0390173da0
ed7550c8d8d4c201619a6e021f2be83928ed5f8b
describe
'23629' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLG' 'sip-files00032.pro'
256f35d81c05cefc284d253af77c7e55
98714dc6d6c1b05734e3a4250aa0d786102cfd1d
describe
'66000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLH' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
988dd88138e607d7ad8788d67a15ba17
490d509f94cf1765597a0dd9a97140f6e86734d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLI' 'sip-files00032.tif'
d52cf3d5094b6e7765405e0b422c9893
f5474e4e65ab62081d58700ec313a88a24ba2920
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLJ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
354a7f8263cee88e02a52de2e248433a
eea2e8ea346fd056f8008f27970eea703b7f9d3c
describe
'33167' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLK' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
e1a26ce70c56234765fcb6c3c803973d
a72bfa7d9f1318aa96c4abca9b26f780eadaa9c1
'2011-10-11T17:24:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLL' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
225d8a7c690bee04bd72ee39d2f4214f
a2c61e016cdfa17d1ab19c5238765d8c296f0ad5
'2011-10-11T17:23:23-04:00'
describe
'147289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
03b474a6a5feb3cb7b848a181ade7682
8289e14e7fd2f6501d2b1cfaa1c2c0d3cb899fdb
'2011-10-11T17:22:28-04:00'
describe
'19349' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLN' 'sip-files00033.pro'
7c03e631364c369bc813870092472ad9
626f74eed1aa830207098c616c58c4bbf697b286
describe
'58876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLO' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
ad71dbe015715aa7e94ce037adc6fcfd
237f02fa65dabfc12bf3a0deeefb3a4bcb8996b5
describe
'2263608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
57c3bb4b34eff9ea2c615f07c24a1dc4
8d77a9ff2995503ca62b24d1a6dae41ce4213bee
describe
'795' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLQ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
fcd0c22bd927855a6fee895a57f0479d
66f642e7791d4c8007258d5a97a37bd8b1b42263
describe
'31065' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLR' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
67a0d9f8b75674e7dc116824f92a24e2
55744234081cbec0de43353b06974df0926aa5c0
describe
'280290' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLS' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
ff97cab781b60784b945915ed922efc2
eafb01dafe73a107561ee7440441038e3a793edf
describe
'162464' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLT' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f3496437443de6ab364c4e222e42ba72
1e1464e41a5c95aed4f9235d4b783c2ea6b100af
describe
'23255' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLU' 'sip-files00034.pro'
5aaf7b8eabd5ba1ceb5070436b5da5e2
c566bd9613f8498f37928c8061e293d4c3e54b10
describe
'64390' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLV' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
c7420dee291fbed5fc46a943f52b21b4
9ef5fa08dcd50c3b4d566ef990d5e6199e5a63e1
describe
'2264040' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLW' 'sip-files00034.tif'
30ff6c74b0e75003cb23d305476b5ecb
a5d4ad8175204b43a7c3c35c788566707e7ed5f4
'2011-10-11T17:23:03-04:00'
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLX' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6aceede08c0a8d5a502f7345d4be0fac
66029d7db6e8af9b86f8f7c51b72feba8bd5b362
describe
'32482' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLY' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
92c009e618b6f487d53ba9df96bb5f0e
3e42035b2a587f97e97f12071c208335bc08b824
describe
'280330' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFLZ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
02d59b3b351cfd97d45d8abcec5f94eb
153dca46390d54c045583cfefc5514b0bf209187
describe
'160096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMA' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
9c5bb111cd69445f0f546a99379e509b
2a130cdcdca54a788f3bc6dca244de18edf62cb1
'2011-10-11T17:24:29-04:00'
describe
'23310' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMB' 'sip-files00035.pro'
fb9cfec0670a41ff8a7a2a45b262c110
e9f09b5925f1ca625b1c3b21d3d8221a29fd69e1
describe
'65457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMC' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
50f34a88e81bddd84627fce1f32caefa
be2490895d0418a226ee233ccdc36ab66e46721b
describe
'2264124' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMD' 'sip-files00035.tif'
388836da7bcca015a5c47eaa430c698c
697d44104350e04ff97711ce122052b3e728c5d3
'2011-10-11T17:22:40-04:00'
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFME' 'sip-files00035.txt'
29e8cb1831b02911f493c10cf9df1f28
a95e53ebd22ec738d3cd58a47cd5242bc359e66e
describe
'32941' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMF' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
61c9b0dcb6218cce5da683c349cc4fb5
2d9a7e8c619cf84516b58e35ef4b70583113f546
describe
'280334' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMG' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1c47514eef0d22e55093e66e3519749e
6461f458fe8809f546999a74a06b5cfc642a8d2c
describe
'161608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMH' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
09dfc63cdfddb6688d9e5f3d413d172d
d0cca45ec44991babcbb99083bd9b0d39dcd83b4
describe
'23575' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMI' 'sip-files00036.pro'
b0f8878381c1183af003eb794537a6b4
cf680f9327969a1709509c591d2aa8013aaa6226
describe
'63554' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
dce142f13d4063269418d329450b4cde
0a4b6df03c5928887c620ff966436fb508acf187
describe
'2264108' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMK' 'sip-files00036.tif'
d8b89d544ab4cc588b1f529f3b13e9b4
f17c8925435ae2ac33946b3ee7b3d6bc89fbefe5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFML' 'sip-files00036.txt'
27ed30930f0f1aa8bd844049b64f42a6
8b72277d8994675dce8e7f1bd675d7d2a527ae67
describe
'32544' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMM' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
9b7bb3ec60c495888cc84f2636deea5f
2280d236b96765ef2b94a78cddbe88390ba9b3b1
describe
'280152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
7e49cc09cc0fc668223e51505568a129
d8ad0ac02323078b2ae66447f3737c5f807cc542
describe
'163038' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMO' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
ab85f1bf72ebb7d2a032fc58b2a28bb1
8a5e6755e32d7e071ecb94f51e4475b85812d880
describe
'24082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
567d1bf132038cf07cb74eadb5cc6d33
2cc3e47641165a5f53a12694e1c05ba2414a77a7
describe
'65952' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMQ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
42382ea7289dcd9344ea1099fed9601e
fc62a0af3f895591ceaf37572780d2980b36b04f
describe
'2264168' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a7f8e2cc64d5e3137b2ebd7b38003864
5b48c7f2e0a269542a6541a3d8bbe16c91e7e418
'2011-10-11T17:22:32-04:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f7510c575405deec1ba226fb87dcfbb2
8481b5fcb845e39cbb29cdfc63cda882e80252e7
describe
'33048' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMT' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
8330c43e083cac674cf615f1b2e36163
eab8f0b25cc6286fa22fc1cc5cc7450a83c3155f
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMU' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
53478ad17a8b47395e4afaf3592b7e5a
dc3d32e0568d1dc02e4ea6b2fb9a737cd270e313
describe
'164422' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMV' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
8a52f4c5de2ac58a0b36b6900810012e
54924192518ed31ea8522ce83d552456d4d4c3d8
describe
'25646' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMW' 'sip-files00038.pro'
e8e83f7c9005163884e738b3577b029f
af6953bc911a19ece60db0aa033455b695618962
describe
'67804' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMX' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2ed23b5cf3042ae04990fef0fc0ecad4
f58860dd24f905dc2a34504c63b1a5eb8afadd6d
describe
'2264580' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMY' 'sip-files00038.tif'
a8ca9b6b89de58a3510a3e5400d6a2fa
a15361de15c0594a065d5d4ffff1fbca090db43f
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFMZ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
0b0b7786e167680cc5bc8e9971682bfe
14599caa9ebae69e66a2b90699e812d07653647d
describe
'33882' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNA' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
c353a7375f3281b3ca96162c7388d876
42b6d886d59c9020e0c6cd5349839b469ca486c9
'2011-10-11T17:22:23-04:00'
describe
'280308' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNB' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
1270fd728289e8b599ddb9c62742fd7d
6fc8fba72b3c447490dbc7297db34b19975a5e12
'2011-10-11T17:24:38-04:00'
describe
'155975' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNC' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
835361ca68aedc44a639bb2a9c979d0c
f8a0f46415a3fb6f416e4c096883bdfcdbdabdf9
describe
'23133' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFND' 'sip-files00039.pro'
d9696c8a30aa04802fc2c33dcc4a94d9
3f50a21bf235e6dd512798e51e495525b8e99a8b
describe
'64969' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNE' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
65d5bf956ea5dd30b55632f25d49637b
531323ffc87296abe658bed6f621ff4cff22607c
describe
'2264212' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNF' 'sip-files00039.tif'
1f67cf89155b02ef5758c58cc2d89082
4445a1369017ea08563bf442bc24ad572b885f60
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNG' 'sip-files00039.txt'
362a4376449be011cdf5afa9a3048ca2
c2a10ac2b2e9fa6f87d5afd7b0655ae8752143c7
describe
'33208' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNH' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
9f7c81adbc3f7c1bc7abbe4b80c76924
de374d29c6e916b7d577920bfc6e7022a1089635
'2011-10-11T17:24:26-04:00'
describe
'280252' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNI' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
3ec5223a86d7fceda8c458b67118e29d
6c7eabc1407f0cc561983b1f5f674dceca4fb8ae
describe
'157547' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3891fd7a537ae122abe141d8f496d1dd
d4ccbed0312adbdeb723558283165bc17d116e1b
describe
'24687' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNK' 'sip-files00040.pro'
95721928d613a94c35d734cf03095cef
19ec5a3093412aafc3c7fdb7ebff88ffb866c911
describe
'68159' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNL' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
0d937784f285f543e7c7c761a5dbe963
15978ebcf0e76d84e559d4aeed18e34ea6aecbc9
describe
'2264308' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNM' 'sip-files00040.tif'
7a6268d6ba8e117d0a54be2db10d5706
945f502823d41d5dcd0d2e45cb91fed38e052767
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNN' 'sip-files00040.txt'
8d03923aeb5a5841f5477842050cbdcf
a5335ef63e631d0669041532a1ef5de42dcee96a
'2011-10-11T17:22:38-04:00'
describe
'33568' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
f558051e5b6a88adcfa9502a87a8c680
6b329580356f58bff43b65b91d896024714060b9
describe
'280299' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNP' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
d1bc8e8fa61a74662ade1406bc8e53e0
22e9c0ac49239e0e0ef5fd656d5e30b42cf24b38
describe
'150229' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNQ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
d390df410ebb89ef5527eac5a6fb8c54
2bb8e9e80598097b8fc7a5a530df6c49c2f9042d
describe
'23375' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNR' 'sip-files00041.pro'
a4edd38286ec270c89e379f9125e1d0b
dcca501126270837f295eac1a3aaea6beb56610f
describe
'63326' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNS' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
01c7bdba002f215b1afb2261212e1bf1
8803ec42865398593cafa1cc28a3f0af585efa37
'2011-10-11T17:24:12-04:00'
describe
'2264176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNT' 'sip-files00041.tif'
22e8432d55c9bc49c7b0897239ce2482
8bfcd03b2c89d8267300a4016d048e9f288535d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNU' 'sip-files00041.txt'
fc5ace6298de9041a91cb5e6690362d0
c4b299f3f91329b6bff4507d2d4d2dd4eea3a854
describe
'33191' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
d8834ab280a622d7560e573da095a270
c20af1cb41278b76d413202fb6478fef617b9e01
describe
'280327' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNW' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
ec66a4ea548e0af0034efe946bfb8ccb
ace8c75769d440260cceb2e5da5cb0ca5b7ee936
describe
'167116' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNX' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
ffaf493a1ff63a181de71ad421d9a0cd
e32cef3f0192aa36cb9d2bbca4d03295872c6d5b
describe
'25295' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNY' 'sip-files00042.pro'
f35d6285b9ccdb519d77f8603d21fbeb
0dffd3fef8df42938d3bce1f99b21e893f7234f5
'2011-10-11T17:23:16-04:00'
describe
'67577' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFNZ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
b1b25dc86540bf417b142a84ffea0346
e200c22c28e797f85aec70e8456b1a2c2c5a2624
describe
'2264636' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOA' 'sip-files00042.tif'
7b3b42fcef7586b63dbf9104c8e25307
e6f452748436dce56acc0897ff5c8f05f49fd491
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOB' 'sip-files00042.txt'
73c9365e0827ed42c3544b59110d5701
23e6406a2a9ad3bfd1d1366a20cebaf549c52087
describe
'34352' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOC' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
d7ad9ceb43001671ffed58a559c852f9
02383282ecaf8baf265e82bb5ff2fd758d5b2d01
describe
'280287' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOD' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
677844d69c206f507b88b6d1da112a8b
71184d636414048ed6cd4e342daf6606d5db5bc4
describe
'160625' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
f9fef48927023683c942dbe383198258
f02b1f2e61b514b412d3afcea739673f2ef8d60f
describe
'23723' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOF' 'sip-files00043.pro'
a087fe37fb944a9c0223fa90aeb6805b
297080abf87810c592c4682f9e2b46a0aa640c9e
'2011-10-11T17:22:57-04:00'
describe
'66574' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c57129b3d3b0653047bbecf4487781ed
b9b0d81c46d72915ca19902ebb2a2bcb4938f18f
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
829476e4e29ab66e2325459971008f5c
d63a6bdfbae56d382b5e7c145012c5a0d93e078c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOI' 'sip-files00043.txt'
d88ff76696be54b9decece8d9e0ee836
a32aedd769741f2ee8427b1bbd34206291ccad7b
describe
'33535' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOJ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
e9d5e0ac68fde5d7d351e28c1cf4a40f
fc32d11f7d6503ef7348817e68bf64fe33c8d966
describe
'280259' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOK' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
ea9d76699aded7f06cacd2e1fa2554d9
88dd56c86a6dccca0012cf473264e4db03ce1daf
describe
'166837' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOL' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
1b73864022ef2cf73f47b59cefb85e1d
179bf41d398b2432b8a8ec2f23bf9f2984c0a664
describe
'23904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOM' 'sip-files00044.pro'
9f685e45ced5f81a8c47fd585fc29dab
f57643803c90cce4090a2508505679e3bb65a802
describe
'65796' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFON' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
1417a6e13a4d362f5771723fd86c51b1
cd6462ffc8473056bae289c8b0ea22fd6c4c618a
describe
'2264164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOO' 'sip-files00044.tif'
0215e08c9930c52e34bd423267890555
3f901577139d121e1ecad1d80a20b9a0494815e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOP' 'sip-files00044.txt'
5d28657cb097608c93aa1b71e15b0432
f72ac16f5edf0185cc64d4c8c30ad90dce6747dd
'2011-10-11T17:24:14-04:00'
describe
'33232' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOQ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f4944dda3591a70f2e432ef3555fe2e2
3912956c87f8c5f1da22e6aa9633226b514503ba
describe
'280307' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOR' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
e8e8bd4e0f453bd24737f8e07b894723
0835716e60ac5b1fa3b2fee7c099b7aa9476dd69
describe
'165356' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOS' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
8d0dc59e72c76e2159bc22d2c57de2f0
08b0497f431329758e0611ce69de0ba721afc94d
'2011-10-11T17:24:39-04:00'
describe
'23482' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOT' 'sip-files00045.pro'
765d08efc129d87514241cb51ca0d6e8
10876696390395582b0b673adfcdbb6b6fc3e4f2
describe
'65651' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOU' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
1bb83833e0287ee34dfec51e815ea0ef
3464ee41da7c127f92c8427c21f816a2f7ed86d0
describe
'2264360' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOV' 'sip-files00045.tif'
16bfa41673192ed2b9b3745dcf19c245
889f42b1e897784a0825b177086e6f668cc8a4e9
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOW' 'sip-files00045.txt'
cac6ebbf02efd227c35b2f40e38a8dca
d249bcdb43e5b9ec74ad2f16072a4d6685d172f5
describe
'33679' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOX' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
e41bf1488e04ebe5156124b9be1ed11c
72e097b8e6e95d5814359f17185658d1062d88e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOY' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
80a7eb2b7886e6caea7b393961d3e8ba
afed01bddc4aec3767ba65676f0d21d7b4e953b5
describe
'135446' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFOZ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
346e0c313174492684c279b6a03d6e50
f33e592ed6bcc1ce52c51fc485a8099b783f3345
describe
'16765' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPA' 'sip-files00046.pro'
b9932cf20492b84feb820b0780ac81d2
52839acce14e61e3739b6fe1d2527b80531b37c2
'2011-10-11T17:24:10-04:00'
describe
'53172' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPB' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
47e6907807bcbb143ccdb63528cccc29
2f90cf537f3b9f94da7815f93a2d0ea9dfe0476d
describe
'2263416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPC' 'sip-files00046.tif'
e35d6153b80c8760efafa580ea7ac2a8
9ba75f9955221e05be89ba91a5020516cfc7980e
describe
'730' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPD' 'sip-files00046.txt'
ccf4e62b55939d79b1390f05040abb3a
0f43d5cec9bafd67e8b3689af0a32fb6b281e057
describe
'30130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPE' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
437fa7347fc2e15ff856670736e84846
a5317e5bfdb804da03aeb5f2449cabae62730720
describe
'280285' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPF' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
6a2d54a4989f1002fe8ac7d713674521
736a3e1b7397b97ee3e62a4f14eac290696ae6dd
describe
'164664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPG' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
f84cbb620ab3d671ea8bed59e969f7e1
7cd9147569ad6ab89da1cae42687a797d16b5d30
'2011-10-11T17:24:30-04:00'
describe
'23416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPH' 'sip-files00047.pro'
dd07723d6f41c26f4a94698af272df09
947270777000dcd15ce5a2a8e0084129f21d1f54
describe
'66506' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
99aec0b51d84c76d6110eb0652cd66c0
7f080e4e698a04f45fa858f3f5fe075301e8b184
'2011-10-11T17:23:27-04:00'
describe
'2263996' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
29b6bc1532e1e462550f37a5b7238900
ea398387e75b6672d26489dfcca7b80721d096c9
'2011-10-11T17:24:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPK' 'sip-files00047.txt'
a76c599f8ff1576f84881ecfcdb5ef7a
9dd36f49707ca7647cbdacd0f60f9ffd1449c3b3
describe
'32950' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPL' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
480b46faaf9d7d22787c62f9a962ca10
0f90817538ef280ab6aa4b048963a9757c8f90e4
describe
'280267' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPM' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
2a53317d176556a5c35fdb2776e8ed8b
e510793a8d76890f44878bd0c4e0de8b0fb7d91d
describe
'156572' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f4f64e1054bc2fed7983bff618c34698
9d4ee6203d85923be52a11f7b8c0bca2ae13a56a
describe
'21175' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPO' 'sip-files00048.pro'
1d7af60bec8eeb321f140a49375574a7
76bec2fb7efcf7fc2ccaa410da08df995a22089a
describe
'63038' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
7a144bdd6668b98fec7947658a63da92
224fb92a7d256f2cabbedd3a4ad98f1d3209e746
describe
'2264060' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPQ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
f8d25d4919abcb47819aa9f7aba5e0b2
a96409058010b091e36b46bf9d303177d684dec6
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPR' 'sip-files00048.txt'
4c6c82b5f2c71dcd7569ba4b0508fb16
987cd695a08a28f134ded2f68f8ad3547acf94af
describe
'32463' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPS' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
64c02cd5970027a779888dc36f6b5fdf
c42c39fd80c58b992fa75f387145009845079858
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPT' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
432d01a7f5b1b8096c2ad8592cb4bc0b
6dcf1cd15a898868c9ccd6d03094375089026e10
describe
'160104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPU' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
9d258827f4b2a02b608715b0af3d37fb
bc7dbcf98010770b399e4164c17646347c0daadf
describe
'22682' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPV' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e2e3d5aa5b0f50d10b87e01ed4be66fd
3a5f152835e54d0059929a9efea65cde70ae1d57
describe
'65237' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPW' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
03ab8f087af6442fc374d0f6c332994b
07be3e4e474585f0ba55f43f688daf9a4aff7c59
describe
'2264156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPX' 'sip-files00049.tif'
ffeb822fe7ee9efcd195051f05b24d41
76d6bc8b298045b405d9bbd8f413ac8b27e177e7
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPY' 'sip-files00049.txt'
6a3a699c6fa48b0a5e036abb3df2bbd6
b7db340387cb11ed6f7d1a3673982100a9d81935
describe
'32955' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFPZ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
76aa2e392b49723b55894563c0582c18
db23be4e936f7b35cc60e03c055c7b560ec3654c
describe
'280326' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
4ae7b73adc24a9a7329dbc5db0987689
7e9ce294cad8042b840abd1e8aba1495011e3031
describe
'164991' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQB' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b6e854b04c2c4dfc6e0d9806ca449725
256a2a88bfed412b16c2d208df584cd3b7023fc4
'2011-10-11T17:22:55-04:00'
describe
'22808' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQC' 'sip-files00050.pro'
e87b2f7b2a1c9cfc76274a666b619024
cc98fbbe1570cf997f2edabb0ed8a71b1c9d236a
'2011-10-11T17:24:07-04:00'
describe
'64888' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQD' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
14ddceeddde0e733674e9b87b07a0f65
5c93620b1739cc20bbf4fd51a7d5c7581bbe3a8d
'2011-10-11T17:23:33-04:00'
describe
'2264184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
8f3f4a5fea3c2f88394380563f52c4cb
477fd473d8863bf42e1011c637246e96e3400240
'2011-10-11T17:24:28-04:00'
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
a59b067fc07f7db1e387dd4fe2b89ce5
4366f4827f2093f92ad779611639053cd5e2f28c
describe
'33097' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQG' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
96cd8f64841afaab91192f2ec917e35d
a0407e76b41559284e785494ff5349b308d16943
describe
'280338' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQH' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
bfb5e4d0a2c1e69157d3146534bc2227
7721056e6615b2c69e6dc29d1974ed08cd560705
'2011-10-11T17:23:52-04:00'
describe
'161617' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQI' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ff1018ef19f30a84d4923bc072293542
6697301ce086d4f604f023f15edfb28d33a8c4f8
describe
'22571' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQJ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f00d321f1d8fb8e1d7823eb23943892b
03b5ac620d0a053b604bd81b6a0a6a517a0eb446
describe
'64829' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQK' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ab4918aea9784a1d6e9afcf597dc619e
9b9e32ccc838c94afe7530fa8673832b10994b58
describe
'2264244' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQL' 'sip-files00051.tif'
47a7ce7ace30b6573ba1fdcf9279b70d
e083ed6cd1a5d14edb14f20deddb356c41ef979d
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQM' 'sip-files00051.txt'
5ff3e40d35c41fa880a09f8967539ec9
abc6e3bee3d026e37e504cb11e95c4730129ad83
describe
'33139' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQN' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
8d92cd025823f85b9b9ef4d7f804f1da
7cd75f1cf756321ea672c8e7d5b63bde994eea68
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQO' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
2e1eb67fa8af141f8aa1939be2e687fa
1063af7b88986f9c7296f9c25059454776280cff
describe
'159628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQP' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
c1b7e1f72b0db3c256343f66a3b2d5b5
60eeb3482cb46cbdc06d084cfa37574e0e178a0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
a11f48689763425276efc08b97d6cc71
4a72fddd263238b8cdd632b45faa439ffb5037d6
describe
'62850' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
5b37d54b5a0445a21fecedf5e1f4c4d7
8146838c58d03f25a4b33e95b25f2f699d41ba30
describe
'2264204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQS' 'sip-files00052.tif'
accde8a3dce6952d44498239d3a7cd46
2cea06dae68632072261cbbfd9c4fe743da9540e
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQT' 'sip-files00052.txt'
0868c25b877550ddd9957ff3d3f1d270
94055a7939650bb5078538ad0fae59292a79ef63
describe
'33014' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQU' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
9c159b63a007c9523f2f9c83fb3e79b1
38c404fe96173959b591a89d4e95cf707f8a36c5
describe
'280337' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQV' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
8d7ec1ed78fdad32b51eb96716e6bf6b
abd87bad0e098a1e8ed1c308d8b9480f1673c741
describe
'154454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
26202107fbace17e4a50da09622a9835
9f4015745de3e2d7a19ad6aeec7b298d5b71c661
describe
'21800' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQX' 'sip-files00053.pro'
db2306ce2c33b502fa99b4096c7faa27
4cdbe76f27256b1d19def03cd6b62ca4e2fc6cd4
describe
'62837' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQY' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
852b69c849da4903409df160bf312fa9
a0a3073780435025528f2bb5c5e00fb83f379f05
describe
'2264116' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFQZ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
9583c6bd58e6bd4c228ad745692e245b
c1f0c54ae529939fa5818f85d8b6524bb4963966
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRA' 'sip-files00053.txt'
7bc81c4fc4e943547b154bd9281b26cb
7d83862b3f9f2cd42fa5c77e518dcd1ab3313dec
describe
'32086' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRB' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
0e75ead2add16c95e7ce8ada0712832a
e9dbc5cad9d0c2dd6a5bba8cd773843685cf4496
describe
'280569' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRC' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
0bf807a74d4e0b8335165e5ec4f26542
2bfa2b959d8dc82ee5881dc4fbf088dd8d9b1bee
describe
'165835' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRD' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
0478bd02dbdd30fc4f657b18de299bb2
166c39a9e9ca2e6800f42a278f427096eb4edab8
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRE' 'sip-files00054.pro'
7b1d4bf3bf86e09dd5562d86c48b134f
b2222410f5ee6f3bf929e37c300f93bfc3330e33
describe
'66216' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRF' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
5d3c834d12495b021fc9805ba30fd8e0
5cb3afeadc8f2eac30a90d9fd4b963542b12c1ac
describe
'2266344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
6ebbf2884e8a2421c693719353fcdafe
b1d64dce21757e22449192117261b18a8b0f22f9
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
7cbfeea763ce6c3d4decbcb61f71e48f
b944690301757173efd0fe983b761bcf16cc4403
describe
'33526' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRI' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
23b19fc0ce134057bba385d8f099387a
a0118ab9290b5a462e9a33c287156275e07f8a28
describe
'280324' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
6ee2870bc6fb5ae53dee762a538a0c1e
5472b1251b4049bb8744977d8a073bae775e4fae
describe
'169409' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRK' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
683b6d33f92bbdc2bd119c1250834ca9
bcb6322de37fa05336e5398f17e2beef124add3f
describe
'24894' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRL' 'sip-files00055.pro'
07932bd53adf5bc1a43f4604e2cb47c0
e48e013c1d30fdfc46bac34b96cfe7da537f7077
describe
'68749' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRM' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
89589ae1d26cfcd564485e691d43be1a
5775d0c90456366936d46cf4b2ea507bdd9cd987
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRN' 'sip-files00055.tif'
a853ac9d342f0f1c2de14302f72a1e9e
b2e543a98f8a6ce1444b9125fc7a20f52632c0cb
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRO' 'sip-files00055.txt'
0a827fcd165f8d1074f3608067bea525
84a05f4a6e655cc7b0d3639a246b0db8ec5b7a40
describe
'33853' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRP' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
03189658df095b2e3baad77419b11747
c198aa74cb1651d112b3980882480915acd238a1
describe
'280315' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRQ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
4b26028d64eb11b26080c0b5efb62e79
7f3916bae9f5bacde6a0b7507fbd7cfdb8553bc5
describe
'161490' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRR' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
f94b2962fafae9184f70a8663122b08f
69cefccf2cda8bf2ad58504e23e5d8f892e9f2e1
describe
'22770' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRS' 'sip-files00056.pro'
081b98a0f2a34d9bf6151cd2b3732372
82398df82d24a08112327f430eb9b1bcfa03f8db
describe
'63679' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRT' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
d7e46d805870b46fee43292f7ec6b20b
70c61ecfe4b4558edc7c189ae1b02d301b176631
describe
'2264320' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
6ebbc09a83ee9fe8d40d294c85351ae7
2e8d539228a6b278520af1714e3911c49f184ba6
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRV' 'sip-files00056.txt'
8eab2dc933a3195799e95377223fb721
34a20f6204b6262f4363d35f5f2f642920d9653e
describe
'33062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRW' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
017b17790195ad22914f8369a67764eb
8b6b5c01d3eb449a7037743d12caa88f385cf061
describe
'280139' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRX' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
f2fa44e478a66482fce43c60ab5bbc1e
c9d4b145464f5e86940cda284d8abc65a0759706
describe
'146369' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRY' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
cba1a6a4b97814142bbff6e67eaaa851
0e689bb6501522b4b229d53903d408d5164da55f
describe
'19653' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFRZ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
e70364bc98e7653c6643c820a0d698f3
4aa9c3d792dec160db174f86314f18ea40dfdbac
describe
'58623' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
be9dd61bd938eb6e576c0f90e608a957
5d555f533dccedee96b747ae01d5cf400be36c40
describe
'2263764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSB' 'sip-files00057.tif'
6d90aeeb26dd1ea67e3cb19b8def1fc3
be40c2a8d4b01b62f42b1573c4cbb65db1e88665
'2011-10-11T17:23:18-04:00'
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSC' 'sip-files00057.txt'
0d8c9fd7650057b13cf8b9dfbfbe90a5
dbd1396c2d0e858ee22ad57d3a0400e528e62d12
describe
'31448' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSD' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
cb0fa56373b37ce30c5f29edf033959c
b4cba3bb4596d573b53411b949deb8e208a0623b
describe
'280272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSE' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1b674ce2f1ceeea0e3eb614b64ea11d9
52d5d4d164a1f2aa0177a5578ff87fd7f41d6791
describe
'174374' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSF' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
3d5600caaed3191d835eff792a9b827e
bf01ab899a73c21a83b6f6f97fe0e805695d4fc7
describe
'25083' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSG' 'sip-files00058.pro'
22ef0d9f362fdc72648d2c3ddaf48de5
0ec6b0e6073346f6714ae8172f7ddf46a6d93fdc
describe
'68743' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSH' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
148a442bd52b5bb9a140ac607f5714b2
9ffaec6c3dedce23a538ceeb594d0bd0596da428
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSI' 'sip-files00058.tif'
35284cc3faa147857dc7abf83e6e40f1
905cda70d2bff6c20990383f1a11628123afa594
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSJ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
f9ea6c45963755c67c0ab2f072fe97bb
a222505467725ae89cab5167964f3ee47ec3a237
describe
'34038' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSK' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
65e4b56fc843167bd3dafdcf02b1b4af
3826d66baaf31713781fe7f07574460e5d1e43f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSL' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
884c7257adcdea35402c15e6c7f14387
764affac0558b3cc8c8bb4658ee8a09e475f9a95
describe
'169260' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
01b9f688d3948673d9d3ddbd679a25b2
6088e0377ad8f2df0aa171567e58a0c67b9978da
describe
'24669' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
3257bf91473efe951b9450cc57cac7f8
977d4998d08347a7b242efca725bcf6255d17d2f
describe
'67038' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSO' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c04edf846d945366bdd94aaf42444b00
7450955376e1b6b9e7dd6593029e3b0dd52f20d6
describe
'2264260' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSP' 'sip-files00059.tif'
39535429f511617cae23b9b56bbc351e
ecd1191bc6b6fe9f3331096460cdad3bd07f35b5
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
c0fac617304dd0f806cbabd790cfc673
a12084c50d7545ea6c4424406e62b9ea1f38058c
describe
'33619' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSR' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
75cd76d45ddd5b5a42b9446c00d4c8de
853482212bb82b7405654064b7cc03596732e0ab
'2011-10-11T17:24:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSS' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
1622e1496a0caaa5f40839c514fa38b1
6ef0ef9bce4140a89e85f889f3a6853a204577a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFST' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
07207de7436439b4230c877e1065d9ad
1e77ec035f62f20207f98e6f74cec5dda8c5b3ea
describe
'23277' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSU' 'sip-files00060.pro'
69b748b06714c301ffc5ed4d69e99202
681ffd74835ab5e89de47af33156bcff65b4978c
describe
'64200' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSV' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
c48f72e72a00c895d286c32cba4e52da
a869fd60789cc7d4a8f91e6d30bcf4b4adb72324
describe
'2264284' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSW' 'sip-files00060.tif'
12988ce562db626e9a7e6cd8ce85f7fb
aa7ce910029ca017728268c9284aefbc533d7a6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSX' 'sip-files00060.txt'
bf240066e06d609a31f3d72ea8225222
413905aec4a5aa757d0bedd4359d3eb13632d10d
describe
'32830' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSY' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
d76dc437a2497ce10a599b3124104599
a9996f8b8ca4aff0c7a1a4ebd6a4a9c0db933a11
describe
'280241' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFSZ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
36b6ea00626dfda36ed480eeeb0a9f63
427a72da29849e94f85b1dd9ebd75fc517bd6ecb
describe
'161583' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTA' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
ea8fae8458d801465bcefcc76df927b8
5ea3012be64c82b7ed834245f9019c6053a17e08
'2011-10-11T17:22:45-04:00'
describe
'22665' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTB' 'sip-files00061.pro'
ab7604e61924579c2f0b45e209571715
44a655ff24288197ef301c1db24e81b5b9136d99
describe
'64814' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
6b0b06af714de8edea0a572aff76180c
d1a0c8956de10099a06f1d6e570c607263e61e04
'2011-10-11T17:23:04-04:00'
describe
'2264096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTD' 'sip-files00061.tif'
843f125ddc12aded8153a2c31b1ceb92
b71a1d450228a59bc9fb5dca50c46849f88e2cdd
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
e9b0feb03457f1ab55f0fa18082fdb0b
b4cb10f8f8da7ec1f61a51b3c8afca44a35ef663
describe
'32795' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTF' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
d8ae837cdb2384a4427a2a8e0fa0ddab
f475228b7b3319f06ccb7b6c49283ffbcbd863af
'2011-10-11T17:22:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
e65b0a239f446d4fe3ddd6681841295f
d858723b12b6277f6b9c28f1dbd0fc2396f77afe
describe
'164390' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTH' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
86e7f9ff7683790f0b9c4d359091fe35
242aca7ac9551c78c3b22733750f522774205771
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTI' 'sip-files00062.pro'
83aa46e8594b94b464faeceb643e67c4
df43e4f57b119f8ab6288d601662c27a23382efe
describe
'65296' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
db506d48b1d18fb95d07585a5856645a
706be02f4c34c35d596a25a708d8c1d863da987f
describe
'2264328' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTK' 'sip-files00062.tif'
b12106ccca9bc4b08bc752b765da528c
7a166c3b0fc181d877dc68d760d8548897c225a4
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTL' 'sip-files00062.txt'
e4bbd1337391134c6182f9343e6115a2
f208fa27845b8946fc98248bbe385265824058f2
describe
'33267' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTM' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
ff05ce167d52255db4276a934d07eda2
2804875869b5bf028a6b95fff154108bfd909250
'2011-10-11T17:24:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
ecfac6b7b5fbb8265f5c0f396c7ee28c
527b798f66294f2c5efc9e027c08a3dee8fbb517
describe
'156693' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
dfdfb25aad5f08190945bc3b9a7b47ea
4890d208a428113dca3bd6612f6a37af8318493a
describe
'21460' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTP' 'sip-files00063.pro'
62685927e7b3d055b21df6c88a1cb770
5529f35195f7eb0788e24210e266e7b57319df23
describe
'62629' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTQ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
1204f48dfe88b2a9394d2e7631568e2e
9d54a2d392096afff547ae19d37c58056139ad0c
describe
'2264100' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
64e402773e942946afbfe41e73c4ee67
fd93c059c158ec1039bf764eccd7269ff228253d
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
dd1e4355093fcd14d5bef56be6fc3125
595754017d6e37d38f72570a46064b0c66382dea
describe
'32618' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTT' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
ce086a3bfc1a251bafe935a38e2210ab
482c3a01611f85cc9d578d67797ff90894d86e74
describe
'280219' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTU' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
9cce1ea416c24cca41d97b9125105e28
a28bfec634bf01e848bdbeb82cc507254f241d85
describe
'142578' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTV' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
48c15f91d7edbd62ff59d04572fd57f3
e6bf0bbcd57661b207555cefd2112c64ae3fd921
describe
'18724' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTW' 'sip-files00064.pro'
c32c07e1fc36864f9a0b433c4caff00b
052c132a82a913a86d55506f242471e6e714df01
describe
'57103' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTX' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
4b8718e9e607abdbb4f6c090d3d39528
1a2439c62a8f5186cb53fe0167faf4064b582e85
describe
'2263528' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTY' 'sip-files00064.tif'
b82c1be7a408aefa83b44c3360e84c84
39043a64ef864aad05c54ba383fca207f6344cdd
'2011-10-11T17:24:41-04:00'
describe
'754' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFTZ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
7b572065a81228ed8648a348f34bcef9
856775b88c3d8ffdbcc1b4e1287a1f0306704793
describe
'30996' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUA' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
fc2f9412f7255ea7f553968e499f9d7e
0c8545eda88db998d6aea4b99a6720fef8f21f1a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUB' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c7a57cd61b4aa01ec5d91982d88a5c8c
a8990f20870995678774ce7a7661dc5a54e10ce3
describe
'152839' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUC' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
b64814312b48ae8785dd54f723294a10
5ea3f40534d9cdd7cb966d2af0955e0a01ceaf2c
describe
'20261' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUD' 'sip-files00065.pro'
263e2b2b1f819ab7400785e48b4ca65d
c1790bda3113c765b4165fe2374c8b648b2496d4
describe
'62081' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUE' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
94340e8071da0fd1fba9861949dd610d
acc290f1af186254b0814d70ab8f22c195c88079
'2011-10-11T17:23:24-04:00'
describe
'2263960' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUF' 'sip-files00065.tif'
9ec1ce0953a1867671a6eeacf1035556
d1eee9641d38d7dfc567fa6a573478fce96f69b0
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUG' 'sip-files00065.txt'
ddac9bd8a938160f037c447d7c2fe0c5
b482cb5412c749ee09699e792cdcd7881b68b0a6
describe
'31736' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUH' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
fa5c49041c7856f3d6e678e00c89de4e
3479a98761472713f989256bd07fa4e1b959cd38
describe
'280301' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUI' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
c630decf8b18d85def6daa0a9ce96b1b
124ad8d2d8ea72338cb10809b76e13348d0ade81
describe
'162521' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUJ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
dbd81c8b0955d7ac5d23cbac4862e1f4
6d9c05c2572cf094d175c69db7493fcb8b57736a
describe
'22476' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUK' 'sip-files00066.pro'
b287aa72acf5679e5fdd362edfac4bce
da48086d7a54b06497fe45b47c1add3f6154aaea
describe
'64665' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUL' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
9a0bab3635482172213ec0cb4ec6220f
237ce11f9a02d25b31a2a0d0a39bd5c8873366a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUM' 'sip-files00066.tif'
c61878f742249ef1895ed05a4c87322c
c8b18eb4fde3f2dbd7c4ede71622434a2e714307
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUN' 'sip-files00066.txt'
88f152764d8345b5153a366bc6720aca
aa2114a0557b40460688ad42c77c2e9abc9f029a
describe
'33403' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUO' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
e1a627c94ab40eeb8d550751049a048d
1077af0d09d51aece1a14db79ade3335710e113d
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUP' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
3dae63fe4ae773a206d01b2e3b2d124a
4347d4f0a9ff9f0d9d39335277c45444589f9133
describe
'159876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
6a67612621271be30d18464cc29d9d0b
173a50a92e0758ba727fe0570adafe929e041d16
describe
'22112' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUR' 'sip-files00067.pro'
79f3116a19f38425d42af95c4fba1277
39edb2e50b1af24bc0766dbd08949efb943bf948
describe
'65812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUS' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
57fae57745522bded3305c6c82101f12
14098c67caf92fefbf3ded6800f48b30d556bc2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
264cb990ad6ccfbe423c772c326f0a7d
7d710cebba9571e183b69305a1217c1ece26b15d
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
9498b01966c0d5d014aeb5efbf7b86fb
9e29388335386477d4f18a0864c47549344dd528
describe
'32801' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
08078ccae88aba35501d107f46637a20
fa80943ceb3a36ae5c22cebab9877945b98d11d8
describe
'280339' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
5fb49fbf28ff9b2a41b4fd0a72ddcfeb
ec9d6e102bedbf43a0cfd0a23f8be4a212a51582
describe
'165219' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ea4f6b9f282c2868c7be8e84deb96258
bea0186b6f0f04db6f7142e682af0a1774ccd3a9
describe
'23301' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUY' 'sip-files00068.pro'
fa5e01c62fe7af1acc3ff4c8de2b7d2a
87fdbceeb75540fa5ad17a02dd43c86846978181
describe
'65911' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFUZ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
0db5b6706106f484853528f4b7135ee8
a3c1225f0e511855e1e828ecca0b7b0ce0fc10e6
describe
'2264152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
0d422eba7e13c596f028f5bdf2370a96
f5a8386985c8d64f1f2c730b0e33e95564274312
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
0b8778c671dc88842dfb10215431f996
e158990f315ce1c8c9e9eab8c7897bdad61eb9fc
describe
'32902' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
2b97ef78245bd55b6264df8cf78f826c
8ebcd25d45d8ae8dd358de99fa3337276c8c41fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVD' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ee26a21d528d6e2a8773a8d149d580b8
2799abfe54e41f4911759a19fe6936d1b61dd700
describe
'167270' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVE' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
ff457d66b7eac122c268c68b10525b37
ffdc3a92f0dbf8f37da66aa0378cc8dcfab2df0f
describe
'24339' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
ce61e07ebe45b6321f7ed943272b96a2
92dfdb7e783e090b3dbb025df5a75f68c72e95da
describe
'66585' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
7a8cd7cefdc4434ae39e77c27d53245c
98732e1e8cfd55fcbe7ffbca31e4e382f53243cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
133d34362a895819fbff1609dd98b53e
6c171aaa8fbdb066b9da77f2c4b60a982d8fcbc4
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
67e49341462d473d3a322694ed55b8af
644edde89f869d409d5f74ce88eb7aea13442f5f
describe
'33131' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVJ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
5216331ec169b7a51ffd51b532000b33
70f22694754cd2ec88a8a2a48876c20bfaaede5e
'2011-10-11T17:24:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVK' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7fe4cd82177310a13e8416ac0f11b5b2
a549f1b765219ff1b31f61e16dc507f7b2251d06
describe
'166999' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVL' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
9e79296fa8cd3e87daf4de7c85f93991
80dbd2168644289b6e8efff2274b49fc9a0572de
describe
'23280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
5c6dc5cca0db876bd507f80ee16a9801
6e4510a934fe7891ed49b73f6ff84880a6d73b84
describe
'65663' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVN' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
62c09b2db26d073598424139662e5405
5ac1ae0ec3e9544e3203a788fd2e7d1a385d6692
describe
'2264188' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVO' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b58e336e00e4491d64f0496a100853e9
50d4962186b75ade8ac9400d33db621097ce28a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
ac339d5d45106718c65c5b1bcb8fae03
e3bde5be9a3134e41ac45392f5c99a8ee5513761
'2011-10-11T17:23:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVQ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
ad69f4b0ed47a23eaaecb4133c948057
67031687aaca4af8799cfd852d6d2c4bdd0f0522
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVR' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
b5c085dfd4b9621cbce978e5668badd4
2130b71b182d076e36ad076f0ed28679dc391053
describe
'165464' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVS' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
cdcfdd2cb2f96d1f3015af2f1cf71d8e
82216173d30b81eeb104d787aea1fd47883defc1
describe
'24295' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVT' 'sip-files00071.pro'
34d357e15327464a54bef68421558983
73714618f6231700515ef19293493168533b1a5f
describe
'66582' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
bc17a92c5993056680e9dfe65cd76872
1defadff17e5b4b3db9c59ff288efe7bc88add6a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
daf255204a2d62cd5412ce67f7df533f
eb9cbac703d8fb9a7f2d16601adf00f42cc6df17
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
9ae8b38b5c5b14902a6d7590112974e9
12ee1a6ee0ce9c5c144c6d5e4ea45dde6b752b36
describe
'33178' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVX' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
dd1aba05466e4cde156b72c12c10dd0e
465932203346233476e555fb7c97a43d39d0e6cd
'2011-10-11T17:24:05-04:00'
describe
'280298' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVY' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a9d9ea9e38aec120533e5695f6e6a72a
17291a94b400caf0c1143caa5a85285d3b0691db
describe
'165010' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFVZ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
53f33b40e6a175a4ce6e5262c6778e2b
c80cc9acfe77e233aa7166eac0d6179a7f4f4ecd
describe
'23913' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWA' 'sip-files00072.pro'
5db7fd3ae10bcc0e44876e50f88f598a
abeb83b31c88bc73f49d19a4e486b4e9bab4dbfc
describe
'66130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWB' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
97c14bb0dc307c32442e40242d071f2d
0ecd751ca2efd22771d8a9c91c206973154c21af
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWC' 'sip-files00072.tif'
589fea803ecd955bca53dbc484435ef0
3c447b80a7bb1beda13af04f73927a3f103d3794
'2011-10-11T17:23:15-04:00'
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWD' 'sip-files00072.txt'
10a5b25cbd23d9ec5d204c951754cbe5
6ae03cddc8958f1b47232c94071870be162764cb
describe
'33205' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWE' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
cc615941eb44fc2ce0ca6670dab89942
26cf3b2bdf0d127351211a17883d5492164e810d
describe
'280320' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWF' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
0a6ca9f8643a32fcd4ad2ef8ed176fcb
81c3877ccf69f0151f3def2b9977a800dfed83f1
describe
'156246' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWG' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
e82dbfbb8ff54197e4607310295545f8
6263e55085e2ac7edc501483b098caa4e87b39c4
describe
'21719' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWH' 'sip-files00073.pro'
7566a4affd6443935d0bf0f28da6b82c
dcf56113a15ca082f5b530507d847416123d60f0
describe
'63094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWI' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
5eb61c41ece3d4cb1d365ec5336f1bdf
00d6c4b4c5abacf8afc23db776c8ae100c176ca5
describe
'2263916' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
c80dc402dd17c84c660c6bd11f3a8c3c
2191be98e2aacb3de40250262ec0f28ee1420af8
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
7d3b8f236662d0ab8ee7a8d9d6f56654
dfaf8dc61df55cdd2f6817287519f6961d8a5e0d
describe
'32033' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6dce78369da4202c1ea9592233a7c1d9
e0a157e19d32c806a12b349b7730bf8af4d7eebc
describe
'280289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
8b3810fc9feeea0af8b13030da512838
e655a44f5489233d01d1c08e5f853bb043a32801
describe
'158772' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
6f64fd2f0773893a89098f4cbbe027d9
6481d2d68b10dea700fe9775e315cb837a1b5e8d
describe
'21689' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWO' 'sip-files00074.pro'
2a4a46267ad6a64dd47930feaee5955d
e71830d04ba6e9c1a90449bf1fdcc4a0e6f184f6
describe
'62982' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWP' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
e8dd5bcab42ac7998e705be93e3cb5bc
64189c66873c533ed73f9e9b10c6f59847fe58dc
describe
'2264016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWQ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
3ae72d46991adeb0dddc42d02b913768
c6cbf045530bee9072d4579de49a087bddd41e50
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWR' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f9af695bc06eb19e6a0958a69ce97351
4ed2f84032f50b4b8886468f2e0dbbf4d822aad4
describe
'32574' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWS' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
c0fca5cbb731677384931d1f7abb6188
b5a6227736db60f3c3a07602dfa7474b5c7e718e
describe
'280225' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWT' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
06c230b767fdf63f55efca098436351b
4ab9b33825df19579470135208c3631b37509385
describe
'154915' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
970352c4d64f9e1275ab59ea62e52b37
4390809d3ca320ee47d0f7e426917f2674b511f5
describe
'20922' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
dc82a5062b2c2db4982dc6cecb6282fc
247bb91b6b039c03dbf73c5c6e27f350022929b0
describe
'62239' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
c6d0d4095e5e908fa034581edf8b3b1a
e985faabd60dc8b403c6846490a64851ef97f3f4
describe
'2263992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
cf526ac0916e7b5334fd64e3c09e5c92
eedc0528b3ce089cf7d4c9531fa8108ec568a5e7
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
fe5185b00a5df2444e0c0f7b6a22bdad
481e1db6017adfa4f1b3f0332b6a7961903fffd2
describe
'32816' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFWZ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
e56c61e1ce36ff672dafc5eb68503270
1fd720a9b9aa4bf266b57d8dc248d64fc2d24af5
describe
'280279' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
961690f75a5c993b98d59cc791b209f0
6427ace205480a0c65cc65cbaf695b26383ba81b
describe
'157676' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXB' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b24bf6b7ff8162c32c8411f68c334419
3d8d0bb88190f85d1fd832c5a58f6fac78f259ac
describe
'22255' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXC' 'sip-files00076.pro'
4f0eb587520b1623a481c49793612060
148c9a214b059d7645f6f8109e9868959cde823e
describe
'64311' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXD' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
ad6831ce5d3411e15def46fa07b71dc2
78d1b7300ae185ed8ff734221ef9181f45648f4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXE' 'sip-files00076.tif'
ab4a051cb30c77ec6217c9031730c1a4
66d91a69a690a67eebefe8eb42a0c3174214fa60
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXF' 'sip-files00076.txt'
56f3c7910ec5f1fe7076434aef12398a
2fcbb4a775a5ebbe1eb061f5d2d9c6d624156501
describe
'33586' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXG' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
f2165696f6b0082140e8a6715d07362c
51ce78ec2cfca58cfe259b0d7b98a315acfc1d0b
describe
'280304' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXH' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
530f70f1ef6b5595813cb955d7f2fbaa
c9c6300512d2b682f99d9afc26ad02dcd0dcd0d9
describe
'165107' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXI' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
ab9ab65b56f2e69083102aeb581c5256
41fa7d9a06a6a5ec6da5a16c175609841281d898
describe
'24102' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXJ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
dea0a4388aba65250639bc4db8a9fb05
fe347a78c0920e072728ef92cb1e350f84cfe299
describe
'65077' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXK' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
2df83240e388b0a35e513b974fe90431
10903f893fb4cbec9cdfdb61b56d1ec36d9b9690
describe
'2264064' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXL' 'sip-files00077.tif'
74b3ece9487017a75e5f8c21bc3666e7
86c48893fd7795303a04248f44ed22a698a6b85c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXM' 'sip-files00077.txt'
17936dbbb20eb1e18d4c6acca2f31183
538c94d33d5061f8f9c8748696a22bfa19d8f755
describe
'33405' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXN' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
a5768b420e622a4af79003a412d083ed
85432ea327a3218530b8b8926593212399cf270d
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXO' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
f8e540e49cd60c57f4e949882c5b20cb
fbe3ec7eeeb7ca00750bbe73c0a884f73f580a5c
describe
'146803' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXP' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
2d2e14f78baef58798ced519bf40468a
c2a3f39be2423c60c52063c3e619269c191f6bca
describe
'18767' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1dd34e626d9ce2432836f2909753c6f4
8131330aafca1b8b04228d5845a1c36c560f78b0
describe
'58091' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
f2cb75f17dd0a464d9cd791b04ffa446
ffe627ac1701a740a16706355a3649f4df2408c4
describe
'2263756' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXS' 'sip-files00078.tif'
d34192e74f72a7d97c2648aed72fa9f4
0eda2f87ecc86f80c0d506b517b18846ab3087d7
describe
'770' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
13d13a07727b91c460d7630128095e5c
91b0dc122cf546d5c75c54f87940e4a580ee061a
describe
'31553' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXU' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
22e3b8d55c98208eccb61e03ea3e1673
4db096b9e4bbfd7421a38931278673ef4e585326
describe
'280278' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXV' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
33ab7fcb327b49a5c63dccfce8d51327
9112a7f4dde14a6e23c9005c253d21c91d018c53
describe
'161202' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
174ed49d2fa9517569a257a8ba9dd935
6bb337ed155fb6de02bd03ac2056a2cf7fc9b465
describe
'22858' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXX' 'sip-files00079.pro'
b22b40629f9bcbbc4599ef37c2451550
fd81a8815546a11e54553fc7cb66f5a271d5b547
describe
'64848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXY' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
afe33b2972f59a5755f55eb625087cf6
634e6d053fc533011f3aa38dd23a3869b90a3f9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFXZ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
cb2371a1ba09a4331e20469f1b4c1f98
e14cafadd50f7059b5f91c2ecd0fe57c71f375d0
'2011-10-11T17:22:58-04:00'
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYA' 'sip-files00079.txt'
e227dd31195fdbccaa1f73dbd96368ad
5304442e752cef868516565695817de935f2a5f5
describe
'33247' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYB' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
f34f9834b395c3c0ed2039cefd3ed885
865c57b9bed768f3e49a107ef26876567fffa548
describe
'280344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYC' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d18324adf9e3e2176aa562277a83a2cd
6e81693206025a81eeee3183b883b9ffc4ebe3b9
describe
'156759' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYD' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
14fef5ebc0068c6f66be23c0f0010899
f568392a5ca29e7fb8f0942ef71b278b2f99fb7d
describe
'21769' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYE' 'sip-files00080.pro'
89df2ecb84dab320024358b2a56326bf
a0c53f08dea57f268ef64aeb2632269f8790ea1b
describe
'62576' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYF' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
c9b1f3399c01a9325f0de066dee55778
990c4690f126c69098a8080408843e1cf8df2873
describe
'2264200' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYG' 'sip-files00080.tif'
0eb6f58fb404b9226d3ed8c73df63d65
5107ecf93429508139a5fad09c8b90385a500c4d
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
ac90f5f5d49c945223e3e1d112efb161
238e9bbe191ca48439b2f5a225429f516622df28
describe
'33074' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYI' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
24e3dd0f137357c1d28483fe5d5fa11a
2af2a1e232165201807e1bf64fc73c50b3215b95
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
e31cb5a85b9b125ac211275700d28f0c
83d107213dff4fd49343d3f58273b107295261a6
describe
'158038' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
8e62c2c9b8bbd01169c03d434713d886
7fe400f76e744fa796707d8c7cd15656f6efd56f
describe
'22002' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYL' 'sip-files00081.pro'
dc30aa8f041f84966f33de0b37873453
3804ac073c4860d8c1270867603e40037a781fcc
describe
'63792' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYM' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
48815a90606969782f4f415fcfb84019
109c9632592acc44941a5a69af449075329ff82b
describe
'2264256' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
19a9795b6b1f50e61cbc9794265ed745
f64e7e2d334c6ce3e0de74333420ed394758d24c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
6db0fb56ebeaa2fb1b378f6d85f86804
25aacca1a0570423e8d9849fbd13e956cc33ec81
describe
'32520' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYP' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
f74eaf9e7cda00c9ffdf96846c49b622
4ea7ff9a86dd5e6249a4b7dd77c5d33dcbe75c7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYQ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b041c0e166fe643ebb39f477edea2dd0
a777c399bf68f53ab295737084514cf7e49959af
describe
'161921' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYR' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ca9106555b326a292db48e4292da208c
a652298a1fdfdb900218eab8e748311845528b29
describe
'22879' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYS' 'sip-files00082.pro'
4d77ed160f788dfaa718cfab5b0f8eb1
ba7bc5ee8766cf1896ffde702ddcc7dc86389bab
describe
'65521' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f3a1efccedd30ba887b2fb615c2ea286
90f83f9499726b1548fa85bb6be697204c1d8b4d
describe
'2264464' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
5501bf05f903727a8b97814a62946c4d
e5a093b52bf66e3b89dba1358b5a1007adc014a5
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
dd7189eb46d0ab71c61ffc7b3a65bf32
129f1530f985444e94d5a51d16a246814f012ee8
describe
'33142' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYW' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
f4f6905dedb7bbcf8b388fa354e82904
5cef6b239b45d3aa94825d782c143e7fd82f45fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
755aa39e4ec162f3ec4d4b55dbc4a97a
17c3cfc444f47dcb40a7a43d39234d9fc0f040fb
describe
'153826' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYY' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
8025c4e7e501db29a31339935cc5536b
51ac86959d09b923361c57cde68ffa0bfadfcb04
describe
'21152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFYZ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
ddfb3c0c15edeeb998eae574109186df
6073e98494398cac38379f3ca5331d6521e669bd
describe
'62691' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZA' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
3431364a974ffc3078f51d045f1f0edf
5c25c74698d8df8a5d4f5db6cf54ba8729bef537
describe
'2264180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZB' 'sip-files00083.tif'
51dacfe84a0d82aaae670785094eb108
ed35885e82b691432cd4507e2dcafbefb2a8f0e5
describe
'858' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZC' 'sip-files00083.txt'
e73daab3f383de62f568273fef713790
0987465247bf07ad3d35064b210717f9c6ccfdf9
describe
'32207' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZD' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
7b14543ee39e20183259026679443bba
9f30e69a75dc72222d7bbd2f00044344039e20a6
describe
'280333' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZE' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
f6c12d85cbe3e18b2b23294dde492ef4
50798583bff2072adf76f91c640b299bebf4b371
describe
'163464' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZF' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
a67d6e4301252b57b53f9c79e71c7a59
273d56bf0aac05e49dc69c94515a9f8f9899e967
describe
'23426' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a878a8497819727f035c7cb962f95f6b
be25528332bab3c7a3600c47126ea114e4b556d7
describe
'66066' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZH' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
fd530f30d2d1db714810792627883f67
d78ec92d641f78f6f7d6955e2fc9893be51a1280
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZI' 'sip-files00084.tif'
00c6cd23043ef7863511e0e6a12d14d6
fe01be9f0593b842cf42ae35f4956336c845c86a
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZJ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
d87e01b36bec7c4f4128264cebe2c4fd
552b287903e2037634c6f41c1eda61280d66a0d4
describe
'33034' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZK' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
5f6aa72db3ab20c9c55fa796417d84e0
25952e2c66075c03fa993f1c38367db0aa8b0c49
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZL' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
4bc207b79fd167991bdbb3ebabda3f15
24f4e1b4b8bb0b1e2cf050832a18f196e28e4832
describe
'157343' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
7d96214a756d25e2bf4218c0898fd972
5ee55ae1647817ff9cfabd8417029746713d767c
describe
'22085' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZN' 'sip-files00085.pro'
682d5d64cc9671108e36ee790f9cdcab
a2fe58c5712c5eab35b05c437fb8071ec6d9ee50
describe
'62401' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZO' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
c2d44d4b0bb88406f526ff56953dc09e
c609d085327a1b87389f7ad770431cb5bf6ea0b2
describe
'2264068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZP' 'sip-files00085.tif'
45c3b4f1592414dc86533e20431b7610
8bc318d6d2dd1a90089d9be3a1d814f64a225d5e
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZQ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
8eb9a84752436eddb31c0f11e57619b0
b11da1c965d131a346b72a9f889788cdd14b4f9b
describe
'32431' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZR' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
82cb0e02a6d51f658b81ce9ab7d28190
cb60d80a59aefb9c4a6c3824d29639b08c1e29a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZS' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
29b29eceae45bb29236edba7395cd20e
7642d848a637e5863b922beab3139b9890437c0e
describe
'153169' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZT' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
66413cfc5205f00e491017cf9d8c0e93
5fbab6cb524afe4d8202c23112a0f3b4381dfe9c
describe
'22153' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZU' 'sip-files00086.pro'
5f0a1bc9f5c4de9da9ba867c6184a650
a86aa70e019551439a36d8a723944dc36424ecb7
describe
'62180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZV' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
c7be0c0f1fe916a1cf4a990b53e4ed3c
245f779f6b35a7a54356df4948f5e28763da4fbe
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZW' 'sip-files00086.tif'
5118c53255450a0c2d070804458f521d
351a5485dd1f116149897b8843012506b8b1c31f
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZX' 'sip-files00086.txt'
ab315e2934c61b8da8a10a1ee0a8870a
3ff43bda6a92bdf71423e00deae28f432f4b04a3
describe
'31996' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZY' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
66306e43730f749df427ea5028e284d9
90bca83f8817c53ea8053a42dac90a1192ff20ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAFZZ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
fd91a843414188f2057f96a45bd6865b
3a77f52b5c96b353e2c24e0673d37ade4bc40b75
describe
'152459' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAA' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
3be304f24407f3d7614598fa30670fa4
c8f7997f5dcca440a56afb78db15250b1b2e26d0
describe
'21824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAB' 'sip-files00087.pro'
042d3d3bbbae389a5330f8f703576b6b
3f90bb0f23fecbb71b8699fd518f3f2c9f058d7f
describe
'61454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b0363ec35f8ea7646fb5274bd7246648
e5800019925c07b41b3aea4f3c9389a51c151ec7
describe
'2264236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAD' 'sip-files00087.tif'
6c16057e473c84bc9b3ad6dc029d72af
19b4d984458cd6f0fc82c3d152d7a64e52f7f47c
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAE' 'sip-files00087.txt'
ca92bccebe94bae561089bbb7f7edc66
3eea4ff9799b8be3939cc9f6579535eb28f06009
describe
'32136' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAF' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
b57970bf17fad3df873a8eca990cfd38
f2a6d5c399705a0b8b2bac970113237d107f416f
describe
'280323' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
ab532a705a553ef583c45a3c22d8679d
98f51afbf47835102e8ee5d5f5b2f8f15a122852
describe
'151171' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAH' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
aa1cf5a2ae15de768b0337e96af552a9
6cea51cb576eb34e0473cc0d4b458bb12f598dd2
describe
'22163' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAI' 'sip-files00088.pro'
26cc2ac0faa9432fbe9f2651d59eb26b
025f85e87a0f7ffc190ebe71e8e9602651dc91eb
describe
'62313' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAJ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
a659bdb633516810784726b2c774d89e
6200316bf3785a25ed0e32f2e018e8ef90b8417d
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAK' 'sip-files00088.tif'
d9a0e1b574eb5f388fc0170861842bde
96996953c962101652a5455c233b847c9a100e09
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAL' 'sip-files00088.txt'
948fff703c28d15173c3086fddab22ac
5c62abecfe811feba8f1198ec6e0bbe6f55f8c64
describe
'32554' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAM' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
ebc27440a8e9efcbd28b77d688489328
eac1cb0c5e3683f5ef707b3ce3026d6aa7935843
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
432126fa3cb965c7a1e0564016eeb3fd
f779dcbf131eb297d149ef0af9be3040eceb22f7
describe
'155925' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAO' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
9d20a0de341a0f18251a8d7373229f9c
0e6788b8362816e654d1b2d03109a1f06dd307a7
describe
'23180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAP' 'sip-files00089.pro'
c48ea08bda982e756d3055dfa754a73b
f3b6da00c2f99ddc64420b1e9e6bec602a30b076
describe
'62815' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAQ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
d5b0a9dedf345e52e20e4ff1c238b0d1
12c6ac3a7949627c8517b939fadfaa30e7ada7b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
b86ccb67641e65e369c3a21c376285a4
4abdcbceb15b285e7dcaf44f40ca9f0ef71fd65b
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAS' 'sip-files00089.txt'
4c2da41aa6966966dd63c9a7f1e60600
8754f815ce7db938175e59a75b26c8d6172bfbaa
describe
'32304' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAT' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
df07e8ab6b2b02ed4331acf4b5bcac67
671f2b7d184004ca0f1ab55a0c5d692ab3e97d05
'2011-10-11T17:23:17-04:00'
describe
'280328' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAU' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
e2bd310849afe9eaa61ba1cd30543600
ed70fb2f09776b3659354f556cb60363fad20997
describe
'154141' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAV' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
f28a769c47ed423a5c71818abd8a55f3
d62320084450ef904468e4ec481404a9300b3edd
describe
'20996' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAW' 'sip-files00090.pro'
dd1094b3a536613555f4e642798b5041
7aebc1d7bd3f1c8befcc6a6e339efcfd0cc7d533
describe
'58913' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAX' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
f7bcd78c9fb1548a48840f2ab1ce5c79
3ae58055737788e062684660787e34361a0a39ed
describe
'2263824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAY' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f691268957cd3ef2faef584f0c1fe9f8
c88533450864813b965d41282bd44c90cb7be80e
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGAZ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
db0c4a99cf6ebc45d6bb758717d800ba
c06cc6f5aa1314ece46da26e0b439be35b18b77c
describe
'31414' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBA' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
9389fabc5dc2fec47eeddb2ffa10a4e5
cb05589321ffde676fec8ada204dcdfcb56dd206
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBB' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
5fe139273ca5e1de704b731ee7d44f8c
74caf9def425bcee635e5358948118bb0e5275f1
describe
'168130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBC' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
aa8f44bde8b05fe37b694b195981b637
44a7e7d6f490e2a71617f9c5fd9ef4bd753d7c6c
describe
'24617' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBD' 'sip-files00091.pro'
aaeedc074d5b77709439553015689804
821a0eb33d73c02b1f534995395f1e7a0c26cd9f
describe
'66536' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBE' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
8536e29f8137761e1a87a2a30e1bae9a
b52285f5fc5d76d5bff07fb5a68c01dbc6cfdef0
describe
'2264340' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBF' 'sip-files00091.tif'
9cc6bf5c0f8bf0bfc754491bad9ae5e9
5e37fd80542a275d9f39b2705f3b31b779f2e0a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBG' 'sip-files00091.txt'
ac33139fc4ef92935bcc959ec953fdf7
22404d09ba9e8a70b8c807c11ba55cf1e3ec8b99
describe
'33341' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBH' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
8b34bf6687c122658f1743049645ca27
87eb2491295b98cb5fc4eab1cce0771144aca1f7
describe
'280277' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBI' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
5bbdabca17ae522fe8a8dcf0b9d3ea2e
9578ef35017eb91f7ec12ca7c341cb5c0af45187
describe
'150923' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBJ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
6e695d9824980f559a83b6db53a41b6a
83a29bf666f26db67e8219cba6e7d09649ab1d09
describe
'22321' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBK' 'sip-files00092.pro'
1ea16ec0efbaa5d256711100cab98f37
114d64214f7b36d578bfa724874156ca84e8a086
describe
'62174' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBL' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
1724b5b3fe2ab0bf9b97ca44d7b7f9c0
196cc7631cc6b80659b81a5671fd08841b5300b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBM' 'sip-files00092.tif'
c660a067a7f6f2af01ac5aab634eb7f7
5f75829682d45529f2f238bc54f92f635cbcba97
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBN' 'sip-files00092.txt'
63393588e3674e34b9a0d39a5a7db7db
5753497cd5d73d8f5bf9e627cc684a4f9968dd9f
describe
'32823' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBO' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
e9f0ea25fa8b1a9a9fd33311715002c4
04579d08c1faf09f9675ccc95a582535e4ad4295
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBP' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
6c364abb20eb31629492325a2745cee6
2413d118bb0fc2788058ef5b490b6879dc047bba
describe
'156752' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBQ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
b956cd630387c6c97c683a6715ff04ad
5029e2a926359488bd255b1e740a8552c5c8f1ee
describe
'24280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBR' 'sip-files00093.pro'
7afb200545f3c5dd216cfc14aa57ade1
6c7e9a60e49697d1798ff7b22d5bf3e290077658
describe
'66162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBS' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
dbce51a559c4ff0b1688866598195e95
2e5bbbb2093905650c568cc9c060dd437262517b
describe
'2264268' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBT' 'sip-files00093.tif'
eafa53e077294d2cd7d071d24cc5af63
a52de633e6df48727388e4bb630c6f129a459290
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBU' 'sip-files00093.txt'
4fd0084084ebd081f8456a754851926e
50cf0d0d0dbf954c3f002e8e80dc4e90d9c6e1c4
describe
'33525' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBV' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
6f7753e7751013cb61eb74b2327c1003
a94feb6fe180325a5f1068525f56a670973778c5
describe
'280306' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBW' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
3d13f3685c1e0add87e79225468938ba
43bbec7f8c266551546d161ccaa6c924c8f5c985
describe
'160607' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBX' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
763042e3a402294b2029731bb647b28e
a86b5e72f2e0512863e08a914661d2e3cb4104eb
describe
'22012' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBY' 'sip-files00094.pro'
97ec839558514627d60a5536a1bd4c67
5291afc8c9f13c00983b055ed383970b3510f6b5
describe
'65610' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGBZ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
0da633e1cc10e61dcc9a5d8e25d3c4e7
8a39453bd2b6fa586b749d3c0b4da689c2296d58
describe
'2264336' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCA' 'sip-files00094.tif'
afaaab019951ef88bbf234632385cb6a
eb5910d77286a7829516f5db8fa7e6320b29336f
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCB' 'sip-files00094.txt'
d4516fe6c3abd2a009db15978aab0f0b
bd9b4ecfbca0997aff7f35b50985949955ca95e2
describe
'33682' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCC' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
d59476a4d66e19fcde53f6a79c25a74a
da76997d0113b48b586da4cd263725a47bb56954
describe
'280276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCD' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
0eec60ccde2307d918148249be7403c1
e4d29b20632b8d70dbb7ee65e176b3d3d24ee382
describe
'161995' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCE' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
0035e98ca57e833726edf1feeef14295
af6aa5bca71fe20876d831b165c26fabde061039
describe
'23163' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCF' 'sip-files00095.pro'
c38f2a6583ad14e5c0f225f7835ce8b4
7c40bcb6861a7bcaae5736a1f9d7a4261f49fe31
describe
'62404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCG' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
ecaf7d0247ecc8985ed0f3ce6f3865f0
2c999f857f47ace47e0a77c3ec2c0b8817ba9166
describe
'2264240' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
57da6e378384afc9f50bc634976593d9
5eefd1d31808e6f183129c973a7c026ab42496ad
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCI' 'sip-files00095.txt'
9f4c0f2b54cc0c5313fe52b303719d0a
6a50729f314fc8a8420f78fd43aeec6e2ddc5880
describe
'33328' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCJ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
627b7ed6e5b3657f95589fdefbdb72a4
6cffc70a4d8f9874d998bc5c9a1466fa2a781443
describe
'280300' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
fd970527182d21b5ffb5ef3da4336d40
fcfa84c9ff321e9e6a2b52d5267da51b1f5e4b21
describe
'162036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCL' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
1b0157322701e1d34c613d630d4ab230
07022ac46a65133641a1d2be8d124fddc05ce108
describe
'23281' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCM' 'sip-files00096.pro'
16fa55f7f6b889edc2f7a7ed329611ce
b683ce563f4694dc297f9559a6372e688c186870
describe
'64326' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCN' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
a14e3aea3303938272462d5726da2f9f
45abb178db5cb8bf70a106fe41adb8490a2c8758
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCO' 'sip-files00096.tif'
cf32136f07fe2e5513269308e30e7fd6
8cd210d1f2540d42a6c25607766230b81aa8f1dc
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCP' 'sip-files00096.txt'
8bd30a0ac76d3cb732e139b20bf0d994
1a5e8a1d83d99125232134130683792968593e0b
describe
'33352' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCQ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
f979989d36a8baf079fb0f0055d6029a
b15e568e58ede750c96b73be236420d223b3fee1
describe
'280341' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCR' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
fb2931e17dc137cc177625fab3f5f646
90809c55a18151f6e6d9123fa04d22b34ad3abff
describe
'160721' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCS' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
cf7a78b49228c32f5c7f868c2ac8f378
904eee56a6fe6bd94c9ea4257e5f65c3fbe1c09e
describe
'23138' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCT' 'sip-files00097.pro'
6137ab62d1a93f69f90ab3e877b373ba
cbfbe6a8db1635d35da251501e4724d0757bd79c
describe
'64515' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCU' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
616a77fd7f7ba65eb3f4934005852606
e02288846f403fd51fbd2056a0bcbbd77ff8e7c7
describe
'2264088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCV' 'sip-files00097.tif'
dc2b0825d3555508f3faedf35c901b20
bea07f44a9d2770834bbc6fccde11e3914ffdc65
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCW' 'sip-files00097.txt'
d86682a2d93ca79877871ee65cfc5825
208509e338df2e8496a05eef3607d33387ccf525
describe
'32829' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCX' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
d5792871cc72cfb3f31f7c495bb91777
47a368adf2119ee54c9c2168737c94a3a9d6e755
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCY' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
6e52faa30e757b6377d33141ac79605d
1f89f7090143fe6bd70d8fd497663b9c49448876
describe
'155932' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGCZ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
649b47cc161182d022a31a7b5596981e
fc182efe1d66b42a56b5b7b28c8d3a9f79faeb09
describe
'23635' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDA' 'sip-files00098.pro'
f6476a5e91715b7055c11ab94a13db98
c7d5b9da9fa1d06580392c599ec6f2cc47c1856b
describe
'64028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDB' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
f247b91082b230f498246c34ba6c1ff2
c6bec858f5b865660806b898ea87f9cfaf072cfa
describe
'2264144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDC' 'sip-files00098.tif'
f36570144782fdea1b6fd0604b3de29f
19b10b41a9617dd3cf240d7b592dad3d76189b48
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDD' 'sip-files00098.txt'
c3909db174dbcc51378065abb948d33d
e79f7dceb610d53919c3a8d8bdf7344aa645451d
describe
'32539' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDE' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
773dbd89479fca03c14930fe42fe7c68
95c66a30c9bbe29b5c37805a2ee445463a42843f
describe
'280220' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDF' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
49f4ab393531255a12072247763413f3
109581a0253b307643c6ede2db22193eff75aa48
describe
'77351' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDG' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b013a88d7133044a81e9001bee706a2c
0e0438594d06313dbf6764c698023e3b67df60b1
describe
'7545' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDH' 'sip-files00099.pro'
91006646fabba49cc104e6cdb8300599
0cef5363793d7b0329393226ef6ac04586860222
describe
'34984' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
1a50cc92ec7febcb96e453e707aaecb4
8639135edcdb68597ce5f57f1fdc7e583a00c09a
describe
'2261172' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDJ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
e9711bc51876bca7904eae6516aad839
6397c6b44f9eabb7cdf27717b4d8d8f4bbc29b0d
describe
'354' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDK' 'sip-files00099.txt'
365fa3b5fdd09c6e7a9d6284b4bc0a37
35838993999f5d279968d2f3f5e0ea3599f4b5b6
describe
'23081' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
c376fddfceb2c427be4dcf9398d16eab
fbd691d3ddb3a27f29f2514a09bb6a4fe4497be2
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDM' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
5574ab2838a6aed5d62a4743fc5dcfe2
6d1ff319cfcffee4e3ac1c3fa244d07f59cc27f9
describe
'182282' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDN' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
8d3469a860e3b9a0cb2dec39935ef676
2aa82761b9b59ff8301b6c11621772d5118377d1
describe
'42478' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDO' 'sip-files00101.pro'
9ffadf43d909702cc0a58595d517c0e8
a4b99c2889da2d2060e57ed59ad0adf4261cb25b
describe
'71257' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDP' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
1e13d8cf467cfd127b0d827dfdf47858
75fff0534b1b06126e416509f743b60b3aed76e9
describe
'2265332' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDQ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
ccb0d4c058a4aaa404fee4753eebea4f
8bad34e4c4911f254d01e9f9cd9c3f6eb3fb8a12
describe
'1917' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDR' 'sip-files00101.txt'
8debe0dda7cd835cdf45e144fc0cd6b4
cf66099713460b742341bc29f5aaac51aac2d5c1
describe
'35914' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDS' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
89b1f5d9b9739e443fb03de0fc582b2a
e7c3f184aa9aa9b3cb8c57da7c27b0ac9cbc00c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDT' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
aa6884a0edaf1e59b87244f49d4bfefc
d1b693a9c88d6b6232a8fb94f2d9fdef58373489
describe
'209392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDU' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
0f1761909371927770dab3ad6a4ec4bb
cac144c60bc4658f69f5173b12249a2bb13d49ef
describe
'52519' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDV' 'sip-files00102.pro'
75f832801b2cda51a99cd0c79430d7e1
b1001593d766141a391ea1996211a93205f94a92
describe
'77519' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDW' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
06c05e3ee2d3d4f2dd28009117355870
305167487bf84b3841f835c17b6e9171c6180973
describe
'2265664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDX' 'sip-files00102.tif'
b86d521e7c146f69959b06c1ab07d2b6
0f7a5ba2a12613a20f39340a3dd361bfab119143
describe
'2217' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDY' 'sip-files00102.txt'
850f5323eb09afaa1f7247e6f700c646
a6451d9cc81b8bde7a1730cbb9b9c61e65ca1c91
describe
'37435' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGDZ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
76c50c222ec77d02d48708d37a33db37
61c60a39ef7e2dc4eeea66c7156692dd621ec43f
describe
'280275' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEA' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
4b90ef0244fe35b29f9a34915298d9b3
6b8fde1c7462dabc7012ee0d6ae828676167edfe
describe
'183214' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEB' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
066dcfd8fef732d7fb4dbe7deef28e18
858463df9a6e7e57f4b936750e7b38313200acce
describe
'39980' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEC' 'sip-files00103.pro'
615cbcffbf58eaf976a8796515b1f6cc
8bda5aecdf90f6446de21afcb2c0ffe626edc842
describe
'70554' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGED' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
07572f98cf0cfdeedbbc9cde1c9c9ed7
8d6feccdbe693037318d3f7f0227230f287a5dae
describe
'2265196' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEE' 'sip-files00103.tif'
6b039c6f3016b8e2f0bb9c92963b41a3
6bc38f8527b6cd1ec8be60284039f8f8e485dbdf
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEF' 'sip-files00103.txt'
069a833fea4ba6891fb1d9bf04f8bb0d
00a044d2300c7c310ced6a17960c3456a96e0804
describe
'35486' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEG' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
d2c014ead935a36dd673a1947adcd88b
65050a080facce5c43e1542cb48d1d7bda5df692
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEH' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
1ab4fda00383de3fccf86783635e6dc5
dc2c985a63c2718a5c280f55566048d683fb2db9
describe
'209881' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEI' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
27e9097e32b591c82d5b5f9ecd82b19e
2b4e193e5b8a663521209e993b5cc449e079a412
describe
'52058' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEJ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
8a0431ffa0f0126c2bff74028d627589
aa68bc7f872b8de5cf49f17eb932b2de1a22f88a
describe
'77417' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEK' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
ee5a4e8cb4f0bc90feac283d66b2e6b0
a087a248a9b97c7c28a9b8110936c962b4a20e02
describe
'2265340' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEL' 'sip-files00104.tif'
5b4491469278befe021bf83376858648
29af0b8752eae110fabdc279cbe76081473e69f4
describe
'2254' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEM' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a3955729f7e78059115f6d385ea1077c
ea2016a68b755d3f27b9473bacf8db9bc0a48df3
describe
'36654' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEN' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
1f506f6865edd79221ab7dd1d2124e1a
3471feaf78c765408406fccb9d6d3c762b6036bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEO' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
abb8f5139db366e2af660c70e12437b9
3954387c66ce7e585cfe1a23a1fcdfe4bf3bced0
describe
'197152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEP' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
99ac9ec805d20858df3cc5182f671953
3fd9033f965d02aa21902e62582dfbe589c29768
describe
'48446' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEQ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
90e4d7a3a04f166518f2df1ec6866ee8
ca94b751938b12d5dec52ad75214989185adf6e9
describe
'74563' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGER' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
a12e10740da5ca78d93cd70c4fda16ce
00a771097bc895b766e64f3c2e6ba585c182032a
describe
'2265716' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGES' 'sip-files00105.tif'
4239d81fb30f4d19bd9742d047517323
5392b21662970032851682225221bb8d24d5f726
describe
'2135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGET' 'sip-files00105.txt'
7ee2e3a96dcd0c1ebc5936d472f007f9
1260a1024581ef3a8a787ea50d4ce5b628d0143e
describe
'36850' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEU' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
cfe9ac0158a75d59574718096e9ac126
d3544edd1c2969a50bc8f3b19cd358b964b72f90
describe
'280567' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEV' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
2590303574b377737b387172a65b7ff6
3f2fced3524399e2ec602e0a7bf0b36d3c9634e8
describe
'198382' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEW' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c1d972fbf95eed2af6e09eaebaa72c67
982bc8c07fc816009bcc0ea1460d709a3a3a094d
describe
'48181' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEX' 'sip-files00106.pro'
17e0f8ae9a045e5ef2f81704a522fffe
464df4a4610fa44b57812f2f8169e22987f276e3
describe
'75878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEY' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
3d061285eef660dc2686e7fa1c66bcf7
bb1bc9a1d3d198fde879172059377aa1e2a8d377
describe
'2267532' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGEZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
e3ac846cd56571cf1f85296e38b405ca
7c9cd9518342a15863e2b99d991b966081902fc2
describe
'2119' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFA' 'sip-files00106.txt'
7e3ea31c599de7d8f7c8917d22f34c3c
3c38f9c854d75d3f97f6be1294214cbd14ca4c9b
describe
'36806' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFB' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
958e180a58d730f9ddb46363eb3ca923
1c57bfdb91f13b5c9cfaa52b88aab83acb5672b6
describe
'280318' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFC' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
16a24a1f5ac32fe93f76376aeb3f74cd
3f33b69273ef8cb6ad0a473ec0f3a143937a42cb
describe
'196400' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFD' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
df5150890067cc94a88a0b486065e5ea
6c9a57852d2fbb73d864bd06e254c61b1849f024
describe
'47654' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFE' 'sip-files00107.pro'
d28456afd654c50e8a895cb31344110b
fc020ad6d5f542ea3acbea978a2506d8753c58fc
describe
'75295' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFF' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
c57c4c027c1a163f6b0609d1e0c7f87e
7cfbd520f3154e4cf0dbc399d81545144832622e
describe
'2265708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFG' 'sip-files00107.tif'
e1f3fdd42568d13f404193278047559e
b4af530e264a5f670db03c50c88f0cbab8fef3d0
describe
'2137' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFH' 'sip-files00107.txt'
312c29d520b9f4693a091cfef0b5535a
c1b6e4637c56e070ac0335a4154b1d2cd9d49b37
describe
'36585' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFI' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
a82bb0b7f604b489f1bb37e0f6e5ed22
a951dca723753818a7c450feadbddb59e598e87d
describe
'280501' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFJ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
09f96e71afc20b665bddf00ecce64fb0
3452d88048f91930ba90075bddf7de16b22999f8
describe
'221666' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFK' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
b496da70c4d67a76ea3cc75ae2c983a7
819050a0be05dde450573d8223a50148736cdda9
describe
'59644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFL' 'sip-files00108.pro'
805c3b973e959e78705058e554583aa9
14a50ba9d1377b023ad6dbd9c15406e6264c1bec
describe
'81173' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFM' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
55a95adf8072ec93c9fe825bec0928af
7a8e7169a788416a17599b2f3227f1754c53a831
describe
'2267608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFN' 'sip-files00108.tif'
619c6558e1a617e5c6e739103b3e7a75
7c7107f11c27e3b90bc955fa0df83666d9eb77b5
describe
'2525' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFO' 'sip-files00108.txt'
20a96a8bfa04ae8c9ec9bb856cb902f3
14411cfbbe117253d982259098c0930f8b265d2f
describe
'37384' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFP' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
1726f242c414d9cecc65b0352c039ba5
d82b2701897d2764b28907f056d070d557b08781
describe
'320647' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFQ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9aad63f6f54a2f411a375699579b0bef
669c2282c685267549786d8815fd2bb2710257a0
describe
'110586' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFR' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
f998f5d6ff68fab8eee9f1d9ad4eae95
0b448c68c1c1e17120b9bc9a9e9faf34803de09a
describe
'37040' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFS' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
50171236b44ed475c0ff1d03d026b3a6
2ba1af78a7e3159ecafb4482d9237f23f5f07460
describe
'7712476' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFT' 'sip-files00111.tif'
ef5d1fe86b9a9b30fd6a49e582e0e660
3444b8d1de9449621eb4ad870975cba4f58bbefe
describe
'23098' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFU' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
492acfea4b38ae368921945f0da37417
278a8feacc9fbd5fad03b1f3dbb0b0ef1eb91f28
describe
'297288' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFV' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
8c0f33e3fd30ac032d224bbbd7c02576
836f8989cbb447a52550cf22e35c00170110926a
describe
'155751' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
cc5120ecccc386df18b85100581ced57
0bb934d72a1167166a541fe3c8af82b10df0c55d
describe
'38505' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFX' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
5eb337161c81ddd6a76aa726eb8d7528
e868c5e944e13104fa4610db83cd59cb8e54999a
describe
'7157796' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFY' 'sip-files00112.tif'
b1d415bbced02002f2d504341668e773
49f21153344ea29045f782a1f74e673485b5c219
describe
'21082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGFZ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
6eb096e1b5134f470cddd612dd908184
129f922b5939eb927e2cf97984ae5fa3860accef
describe
'38108' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGA' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
2a5d6e69dcafb06bc60bae6d540c9f15
432a3f0ccbdb6307bbce86afa2bea778092d5803
describe
'27705' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGB' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
969f61e8dc900174c4b45ff1d84ab5a1
259bb6d1ef839347894730244f065c65f8e6db62
describe
'222' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGC' 'sip-files00113.pro'
354f2034d5947e9710913dc0dae177de
71ef37a902c947509b2d13f02c2a397e68a48ab4
describe
'20317' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGD' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
98e1c5d71cc42d1cac9b70baa0580337
f636be9f3e2fe6ac48d59dd1662f23ba747a89ab
describe
'932184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGE' 'sip-files00113.tif'
88a72e1f2a961464b395c051bffad040
b36eb9c6499aa5ed80b431d14ea3599c44271418
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'18855' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGG' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
6a0f032062f90d387e72db283115f542
5fb6bf78236bea4c921a1e050284d02a9765aad5
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGH' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
2ec71c2c21860b5c98c9d4d771a037c8
9ca69e98b331a1e973904d9696233029e39a6b27
describe
'179047' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGI' 'sip-filesUF00080031_00001.mets'
b7729400b3aa122ee7198c9cc274e653
44d986ed2fb7f49232d3d48bfa0355d34dc098b7
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T07:11:04-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'231125' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAFLfileF20080329_AAAGGL' 'sip-filesUF00080031_00001.xml'
527b3c0ce3cfb758ef0c239a830106f4
5a94e699440a9f196f9cd8a7b586f3e309f439ee
describe
'2013-12-19T07:11:05-05:00'
xml resolution







=





Longton School poard.

~ Presented to

Aorah bottanc

As a Reward fer Regular
and Runctual Altendanee.

To. of ‘itenbances ACA b.

—S, —— => =< os <=
— =" = SS — — —
=" — om = = =
—! = = =< = —
=! a! = i — =




A LITTLE HERO.
=o
:
aA

a J. ¢
2. pi

‘,
y



396

JgFF savus Brian rrom Drownine.


A LITTLE HERO.

BY

MRS. MUSGRAVE,

Author of “ Riverside Sketches;” &.







LONDON

BLACKIE & SON, 49 & 50 OLD. BAILEY, E.C,
GLASGOW, EDINBURGH, AND DUBLIN.



A LITTLE HERO.

CHAPTER I.

earA was eight years old, and his name
3 was Geoffry. But everyone called
etme! him Jeff. The gentle lady who
was his mother had no other children, and
she loved him more than words can say; not
because he was a good or pretty child—for
he was neither—but because he was her one
little child.

Jeff had big wide-awake, brown eyes,
that seemed as if they never could look
sleepy. His hair was yellow, but cut so short
that it could not curl at all.



6 A LITTLE HERO,

This was very sensible, for he lived in the
hottest part of India. But his mother cer-
tainly thought more about keeping him cool
and comfortable than about his good looks.
His hair would have made soft and pretty
curls all over his head if allowed to grow
longer. Jeff had no black nurse, like most
little boys have in India. An old Scotch-
woman called Maggie, who had left her
northern home with Jeff’s mother when she
was martied, did everything for the little boy
that was required. She certainly had a great
deal of mending to do, for Jeff was active and
restless, and tore his clothes and wore holes
in his stockings very often. And Maggie was
not always very good-tempered, and used to
scold the little master for very trifling matters.

But she loved her lady’s child dearly for
all that, and Jeff very well knew that she
loved him and that her cross words did not
mean much. .

I think everyone in his home loved the
A LITTLE HERO. ve

little lad. He was so merry and bright, so
fearless of danger, so honest and bold in
speech, that he won all hearts,

His life had been a very happy one till
now. But one day all the brightness and
happiness came suddenly to an end, and
Jeff thought that he could never feel quite so
light-hearted again. He could never be sure
that anything would last.

“Mother dear, do tell me, why are you
getting me so many new clothes?” he said
one morning, resting his elbow on his
mother’s knee, and playing with the soft
blue ribbons that trimmed her white dress.

Upon the table there was quite a big heap
of new shirts and dozens of stockings all
waiting to be marked.

“T am sure I cannot wear all these things
here, because they are quite thick and warm,
and I know we are not going to the hills this
summer, for I heard father say he could not
afford it.”
8 A LITTLE HERO,

Maggie came in at this moment with
another tray piled up with collars and
handkerchiefs. Then the mother put down
her book and drew her little boy’s head
closer to her breast. He could hear her
watch ticking now. Jeff heard, and felt too,
that her heart was beating quickly. He
smiled upwards at the loving grave eyes.

“But you know you haven't been running,
mother.” And he laid his little brown hand
against her breast. Poor heart! aching with
a grief it dared not express, bursting with an
anguish it had long concealed.

“My little lad, how can I let you go from
me?” she said very softly, still holding him
near to her. He raised himself out of her
arms quickly and looked with wondering
eyes at Maggie and the heap of clothes.

“Where to? Where am I going?” he
said, with all a child’s eager curiosity shin-
ing in his eyes. “But not without you,
mother?”
A LITTLE HERO. 9

Then the poor mother turned away with a
sob, saying,

“Maggie, you tell him. I can’t—I
can’t.”

And when Jeff recovered his astonishment
he saw that his mother had gone out of the
room.

“My bairn, we're going over the water
together—you and me—to Hngland—to
your grandmother’s.”

Old Maggie’s nose was rather red, and it
seemed to Jeff, not used to associate her
with sentiment, that her voice sounded queer
and choky. What could it all mean? ;

“Who is going?” he demanded impera-
tively. ‘Father and mother, and you and
me, I s’pose?”

“No,” said Maggie, beginning to sniff,
“your father isn’t going.”

“Then mother is going, and you too,
Maggie, will be there to mend my clothes,”
he said in a satisfied way.
10 A LITTLE HERO.

“Yes, yes, I'll gang wi’ ye, my bairn, my
bonnie laddie—Ill no leave ye in a strange
land by yersel’—but not your mother.”

Jeff threw a look of extreme disdain
towards the guardian of his wardrobe, and
cried out angrily:

“Not mother! JI don’t believe you,
Maggie. You can’t know anything about
it. Mother must be going. You know she
has never left me since I was born.”

Then he flew to the door and shouted
down the passage in a boisterous way, his
pale face growing quite red and angry with
excitement.

“Mother, you are going to England. Say
you are going, and that Maggie doesn’t
know.”

No answer came. Perhaps in that short
silence a dim presentiment of the terrible
truth was felt by this little boy, so soon to
be separated from ‘all he so fondly loved.

Jeff was soon rattling the door-handle of
A LITTLE HERO, 11

his mother’s room in his usual impetuous
way.

“ Mother, mother, open quickly

There never was a repulse to that appeal.
But the door was opened without even a
gentle word of expostulation, and Jeff was
drawn into a darkened room. The mother
had got up from her sofa, for there was a
mark on the cushion where her head had
been. She stood in the middle of the room,
now quite still, with her arms thrown about
her boy. He did not see at once how very
pale she looked, nor did he notice how her
lips trembled.

“You will not send me away from you,
‘mother. Oh, I will be good. I will never
be naughty or troublesome any more if you
will come to England with me. Mother, I
promise. I cannot go without you; oh no, I
cannot!”

Jeff was sobbing loudly now. The
silence oppressed him. He felt instinctively

1?
12 A LITTLE HERO.

that a solemn time had come in his
life.

“Do not break my heart, my boy. Come
on the sofa and sit beside me, and I will try

and tell you what you must know.”

_. Then as he sat very close to her, clasping
her thin hands in his own feverish little
fingers, she told him why it must be. Jeff
knew quite well that a great many children
were sent to England from this station in
the plains and that they never came back.
He had lost many little companions in this
way, not when they were quite babies, but
just after they began to run about and to
grow amusing. There were none as old as
he was left here.

When his gentle mother began to remind
him of the last summer’s heat, and recalled
how he sickened and drooped in the sultry
breathless days, he remembered all he had
suffered and how very tired and languid he
felt. Now the summer would soon be here
A LITTLE HERO, 13

again, for it was the end of March already,
and the doctor had said that if Jeff was not
sent away to a cooler climate he would cer-
tainly die.

“We are not rich, my darling, your
father and I, and he must stay here this year
through the summer. I could not take you
up to the hills as I did last year when you
were so ill. You are everything to me—
you are all I have got, my darling—” her
voice broke a little. ‘‘ You would certainly
get ill again, and you might even leave me
altogether—you might die—if I kept you
here. Your grandmama knows my trouble,
and she has written to ask me to send you
to her. You will live with them all at Loch
Lossie till some day we can come home.”
The pretty lady sighed and pushed her soft
brown hair away from her forehead.

“Two or three years, Jeff, my darling, will
pass soon—to youand me. [ shall hope to
hear that you are growing strong and well,
14 A LITTLE HERO,

and that you are mother’s own brave lad, wait-
ing patiently till she is able to meet you again. '
Be a man—do not grieve me now, my own
little lad, by any tears. There are many
things I want to say to you before you go,
and if you cry—well—I cannot say them.”

The little boy’s face was quite hidden on
his mother’s knee. She felt him sob once
or twice, and then all was quite still in this
great shady room. So still that at last the
poor mother thought her noisy active Jeff
must have fallen asleep. Her hand was
resting on his head, while her beautiful sad
eyes gazed through the open window and
across the parched bit of garden towards the
high hills far away. Oh! if only she could
take her child up there to the mountains and
rest peacefully with him near the melting
snows, and see the colour come back to his
pale cheeks in the beautiful green gardens.
She did not weep, though her heart was very
sore. For it seemed very cruel to send the
A LITTLE HERO. 15

child so far away to kinswomen who were
strange to him—who she knew were not
gifted with any loving tenderness towards
childhood, any compassion or sympathy for
waywardness. They would not understand
Jeff. Might not the cold discipline warp all
the noble generous instincts of her child’s
nature?

Then her hand began softly to stroke the
quiet head. She could not see his face, but
his little body quivered more than once at
her touch, and she knew then that he could
not be asleep. She did not speak to him
any more—she had no words ready—her
heart was so full.

Presently Jeff lifted himself slowly from
her knee. His glance followed the direction
of her eyes. He did not look her in the face
at once.

“ Mother, dear, indeed I will remember.
I have been saying it over and over to my-
self, not to forget. I will be brave; it is a
16 A LITTLE HERO.

great thing to be a brave man father has al
ways said. When you come to fetch me you
shall see that I have not forgotten what you
say, but—but do not let it be too long. It
is so hard to be a man—for a boy to bea
man—to be really brave—oh, so very hard!
I wish I might ery, you know, but now you
have asked me not to—I cannot—I will
not.”

~ The mother rose up quickly and paced the
room backwards and forwards, with hands
clasped and eyes bent on the floor. The
little boy remained quite still where she had
left him.

“Jeff, not to-morrow, but the day after is
when you are to go. Your father will take
you down to Bombay and see the steamer.
We have so short a time together, you and I,
and, dearest, I can never say all the things
that are in my heart. You could not re-
member them if I did, and even if you cvuld
they would only sadden you. It would be

(396)
A LITTLE HERO. 17

a cruel burden to lay upon you, to tell you
of my sorrow.”

Jeff did not sob or cry when at last he
lifted his brown eyes to his mother’s face.
Yet his voice was weak and trembling as he
said slowly:

“JT will go away from you bravely, mother,
as you wish it. I have never been dis-
obedient, have I? I will try and not forget
till you come that you wish me to be brave—
that it is a noble thing to be brave.” Then,
with a heart-rending sob, “Mother, oh mother,
do not be very long before you come!”

CHAPTER II.

N the voyage home Jeff found many things
to amuse him, and made friends in
every part of the big steamer. The stewards,

and the crew, and the stokers would all
(396 ) B
18 A LITTLE HERO.

smile, or have some joke ready, when his
bright little face appeared round some un-
likely corner. For Jeff soon knew his way
about the ship, and was here, there, and every-
where all day long. Of course he was not
always thinking of his home in India, or of
the dear faces he had left behind. Even
grown-up people easily forget their sorrows
in new scenes. Still, Jeff would grow grave
when he remembered he had seen the tears
in his father’s eyes for the first time, when
he had said, “ Good-bye, my little son.”

Further back still, and yet more sacred,
so sacred indeed that he only liked to think
of it after his prayers, he cherished in his
memory the picture of his sad mother, stand-
ing in the verandah of their bungalow, wav-
ing her hand to them as he and Maggie were
driven away. The tight feeling at his heart
came again at the bare recollection of the
tall slim figure in white, the tearless pale
face, the sad sweet smile.


A LITTLE HERO. 19

When he lay in his berth at night time—
above thecreaking and groaning of machinery,
above the din inevitable on a steamer—he
heard a gentle voice bless him as on that last
evening at home:

“God be with you, my own little lad.
Be brave till I see you again. I shall be so
proud to feel that my boy is a real hero.”

On the way to Bombay Jeff had asked his
father what a real hero was. Then he had
been told that a hero was “one full of cour-
age and great patience, and dauntless before
difficulties; one who allowed no fear to over-
come him, who fulfilled his duty, and some-
thing over it under hard and trying circum-
stances,”

Jeff was unusually quiet and thoughtful
for some little time after this explanation,
and the father could not help wondering
why he looked so grave and sad.

“Tt will be difficult to be a hero—very .
difficult,” he said at length with a heavy sigh.
20 A LITTLE HERO.

Then the gallant soldier, who was his
father, sighed too.

It was not heroic—it was only a simple
duty to send his little son so far from him,
and yet how hard a thing it was.

There was nothing that Jeff liked better
on the big steamer than going “forrard” to
the men’s quarters. He would sit huddled up
on a sea-chest, with his elbows resting on
his knees, or would climb into an empty
hammock and remain for hours, listening to
the wonderful tales told him by the crew.

“Captain Clark, I really don’t think it
possibly can all be true—those stories the
men tell, [mean. They must be quite heroes.”

The little boy’s brown eyes were round and
stretched in amazement. The captain did
not take long to draw from him some of the
marvellous narratives and chapters of acci-
dents that had been told to him.

“No, my little fellow, I don’t think much of
it is true either. We allow sailors to spin
ee



A LITTLE HERO, 21

yarns and only believe as much as we like.”
Jeff was much better satisfied to feel that a
hero was not an impossible being, and that
these rough and ready, hard swearing, rollick-
ing men were not in reality the stuff out of
which was moulded true heroism, endurance,
and nobility. He took comfort now in
laughing at their “make believe” tales of
miracles and chivalry.

At last the voyage, which had been all
pleasantness to Jeff, came to an end, and he
felt very sorry to think of parting with so
many kind friends.

On a fine April morning, with a deep blue
sky and an easterly wind, the great steamer
went up the Thames and was berthed in her
dock. Naturally there was a great deal of
stir and much excitement amongst the pas-
sengers, many of whom had not been home
to their native country for long years. Most
of the travellers had friends to meet them
and were anxiously on the look-out. Those
22 A LITTLE HERO.

who had not were attending to their luggage.
Very few were passive spectators of the busy _
scene. Jeff was greatly amused by all the
bustle and agitation. He might have been
even more so had he not felt socold. The
April winds blew very keenly on his sensi-
tive little frame, unseasoned to such a pierc-
ing air. Still he tried to see all he could; it
was novel and amusing, and he would write
a long letter to mother to-night and should
like to tell her all aboutit. She must know
all these things of course, but then she might
have forgotten.

“Well, my little man, and what do you
think of London town?” said Captain Clark
approaching Jeff and waving his hand to-
wards a distant cloud of smoke.

“Ts that London?” said Jeff with an air of
deep disappointment. “Oh, how dirty it
looks! it’s nothing half as grand as Bombay.”

A tall thin gentleman with whiskers be-
ginning to turn gray had walked past Jeff
A LITTLE HERO. 23

twice, casting a scrutinizing glance towards
him. The little boy had noticed the stranger
because he was so oddly stiff and very stern
looking. At this moment Maggie came up
the companion steps and started towards this
gentleman with a cry of recognition.

“Mr. Colquhoun, here we are, sir!”

The angular gentleman, who stepped so
carefully over coils of rope and the obstacles
of luggage, looked precisely as if he had come
out of a bandbox. He was so very much
starched, indeed, that Jeff could not help
wondering if a summer in the plains would
make him less stiff. As he came nearer and
put out a hand to the little boy, who was his
wife’s nephew, it seemed like a piece of wood
with mechanical joints.

“So this is Mary’s son,” he said in a formal
way. “How do you do, little fellow. You're
not much of a specimen to send home. I
suppose they have spoilt you pretty well in
India. What is your name? Ah, yes, ©
24 A LITTLE HERO.

Geoffry, to be sure; after your father’s family,
I suppose.”

Jeff did not like the way in which Mr.
Colquhoun spoke his father’s name. He was
quickly sensitive to a tone or look. In
after days he wondered much why an atti-
tude of hostility was always tacitly assumed
towards his father.

“My father’s people have always been
brave soldiers. Two of his brothers were
killed in the mutiny; they were heroes, .I
think. They were called Geoffry and Roger.”

The little boy made up his mind that he
should never like the new uncle. The dis-
paraging accent on his father’s name was an
insult.

Mr. Colquhoun had married Jeff’s aunt, his
mother’s eldest sister, and lived at Loch Lossie
with grandmama, under whose roof Jeff was
to be.

But Jeff did not know yet that grand-
mama was only the nominal ruler there.
A LITTLE HERO. 25

The little boy began to wonder at once if
his young cousins would speak in the same
dry methodical way as their father. It was
just like measuring off words by the yard.
How very tiresome it would be to listen to
all day.

And would all people in England be so
clean and precise as this new uncle?

During the short railway journey up to
London from the docks, Jeff watched Mr.
Colquhoun with an uneasy stare that would
have been embarrassing had the object of
this attentive scrutiny become aware of it.
Old Maggie’s nudges and whispered re-
monstrance produced no effect.

By and by the travellers were taken to a
big hotel near a railway station, and dinner
was ordered for them in a great gilt coffee
room. They were informed they would
have to wait at the hotel till the night express
started for Scotland. Jeff was much happier
in his mind when Mr. Colquhoun drove away
26 A LITTLE HERO,

in a hansom to transact his business. Left
alone with Maggie, he proposed a walk
through those wonderful busy streets outside,
and when he came back he sat down to
write his Indian letter.

This was finished and posted before his
uncle returned, and Jeff felt very much re-
lieved that it was safe beyond recall, Those
cold critical eyes might have glanced over
the contents: and the little boy was aware
that his candour regarding his newly found
relative was not flattering. Maggie and Jeff
slept in a Pullman car that night and arrived
at Lossie Bridge early in the morning.

Tired and cold as was this delicate boy his
mind was open to receive an impression of
wild beauty in the surrounding country.
He thought he had never seen or even
dreamt of anything so beautiful and grand.
His animated enthusiasm and undisguised
pleasure seemed to warm something in his
uncle’s breast. He even smiled.
A LITTLE HERO. 27

The tears rose to Jeff’s eyes. Ah! yes, he
could understand now why that dear mother,
so faraway, pined for her native hillsand lakes.

The mists lifting from the rugged moun-
tain sides, with the morning sun shining
bravely on a glittering lake, was a sight most
glorious. The sound of running brooks, the
swish of cascades—sounds most strange to
Jeff’s ears—made music everywhere.

He was silent with wonder and enjoyment
during the long drive from the station.
Grandmother’s house on Loch Lossie was a
fine stone-built residence, facing the lake on
the south. : re

It was backed up by the stern heather-clad
hills, which sheltered it from rude north
winds. side of the lake for nearly a mile, and Jeff
was amazed at the orderly aspect of the shrub-
beries adjoining it. Everything was clipped
and pruned. The wild luxuriant tangle of
Indian jungles, the richly sweet smell of
28 A LITTLE HERO.

tropical growths, and the brilliant colouring
of foreign flowers were all so different to this.

Maggie recognized the familiar features of
the landscape with repeated cries of surprise
or pleasure. Her hard and wrinkled face
beamed with the joy of a returned exile.

“Why, Maggie, you never talked about
Scotland to me at all,” said Jeff in some
astonishment as he saw actual tears glisten-
ing in her eyes.

“It isn’t them as does the most talking as
feels the most,’ she said sharply, dashing
away the unusual moisture.

As they got nearer to the big house, which
looked so cold and bare, Jeff saw that a boy
and a little girl stood under the portico
awaiting their arrival.

It was now past seven o’clock and the sun
had dispersed the last thin veil of mist over
the mountains, and was shining with might
on the glittering windows of the big house
which was to be Jeff’s new home. .
A LITTLE HERO. 29

CHAPTER III.

HIS is your cousin from India, children,”

said Mr. Colquhoun, as he lifted Jeff

down from the back of the sess where
he sat with Maggie.

Then the little traveller saw that the other
boy wore a kilt, and was not at all like his
father. The girl had on a sun-bonnet, and
Jeff only got a glimpse of a pair of rosy
cheeks.

“You are Brian and Jessie. I have heard
about you often. Mother has your photo-
eraphs. I cannot seeif Jessie is as pretty as
her picture; but how thin your legs are Brian,
like my dhobees. Uncle Hugh, do tell me
why do dhobees always have thin legs?
Father doesn’t know.”

Uncle Hugh was one of those very discreet
people who never attempt a reply to chil-
_ dren’s questions.
30 A LITTLE HERO.

“Go into the house, Brian, and take your
cousin to have some breakfast in the nursery.
Is your mother up yet? Mind you both
come down tidy in time for prayers.”

“But please, Uncle Hugh, I never have
breakfast in the nursery. Father and mother
think I am old enough to eat with them.
Maggie, do tell him it is true. Must I really
go with them? Can’t I see grandmama or
Aunt Annie, first? They are mother’s own,
her very own relations, you see. And she
did send so many messages. I have said
them over and over again to myself, not to
forget. It is very important is it not, Uncle
Hugh, to deliver your despatches?”

Alas for poor Jeff! His pleading was
not heard. He had yet to learn the firm
and obdurate nature of the starched gentle-
man with whiskers.

“Brian, obey me at once. Show your
cousin the way upstairs.”

And then Jeff, further constrained by old
A LITTLE HERO. ol

Maggie’s hand, was marched away up
two flight of stairs, through a long cor-
ridor and double baize doors, then down
another narrower passage into a large square
room. It seemed to Jeff that there was a
great deal of heavy furniture everywhere,
and thick carpets, and an excess of light
flooding the rooms. In India the sunshine
was always excluded.

Breakfast was laid on the table in the
nursery. There were steaming bowls of por-
ridge and a large glass dish of marmalade set
out. An odour of bacon also was perceptible.

“Tsn’t my governor a stiff one?” said
Brian in a jeering way, as his cousin drew
near the great coal fire and drew off his little
worsted gloves—the gloves which mother
had knitted.

“Is your governor a tyrant too?”

Jeff shook his head in a fierce negative.

“My governor never bullies his men, if
you mean that, Brian. Don’t you care about
32 A LITTLE HERO.

your father? I don’t call him a very nice
sort of a father, but then of course I needn’t
like him particularly, because he is only my
uncle—only a sort of an uncle too—not a
real one.” :

Brian was a very pretty-looking boy,
with auburn hair and large innocent blue
eyes. People said he had a heavenly ex-
_ pression, and interpreted a mind to match.

Jessie had pulled off her sun-bonnet,and the
nurse, Nan, a big bony woman, was tying a
pinafore about her. She could hardly hear
the conversation of the two boys on the other
side of the room, as Maggie and Nan were
carrying on a lively exchange of question and
answer.

“Cousin Jeff, ’'m quite sure you wouldn’t
like to have breakfast down-stairs. I did
once when Nan was ill, and it was quite
drefful,” called out Jessie, nodding her head
gravely at the recollection. ‘“ Papa won't let
you drink if you have the least bit in your
A LITTLE HERO. 33

mouth, and he says everything that is nice
isn’t good for children. Kidneys and saus-
ages, and herrings and bacon youre only
allowed to smell down-stairs. Isn’t our break-
_ fast ready now, Nan? I am so hungry.”
Then the children were bidden to sit down
to the table, and Jeff tasted porridge for the
first time. He did not care much about it,
and watched Maggie devour it with no little
astonishment.

“Did mother always eat it, Maggie?”

“Yes, my bairn; and it’s fine stuff to
make growing lads.”

“Well, V’ll try and like it,” said Jeff rather
doubtfully, as he made a second valiant
attempt to swallow two or three spoonfuls.

In the course of a very few days Jeff
found out that his cousin Brian was not nearly
so angelic as he looked. He bullied Jessie,
who was a good-tempered little girl, and de-
ceived his father and mother with a wonder-

ful amount of success.
(396) c
34 A LITTLE HERO,

With grandmama, who was really a keen-
sighted old lady, his plausible excuses and
affectionate embraces did not meet with the
same acceptance. Not that he really cared,
for he was impatient of her slow ways, and
did not feel sorry for her failing sight or
feeble limbs; only, he liked the five shillings
and half-sovereigns she occasionally bestowed,
and thought that he might receive more if he _
pretended a dutiful behaviour.

Jeff really, however, fell in love with the
old lady at first sight. There are very few
old people to be seen in India, and the dig-
nity and pathos of her appearance touched a
tender chord. He admired her fine white
hair and handsome features, all furrowed
with the countless little lines of time. And
she wore such stiff brocades and silks, such
beautiful old lace, and the funniest brooches,
with pictures in them. Her soft white hands
touched him in a loving way, and she had a
gentle voice something like the dear mother’s.
A LITTLE HERO. 35

Poor Jeff yearned for the tenderness and
affection that seemed so far off. How long
it would be before the hunger in his heart
would be satisfied he dared not think. But
grandmama was old and feeble, and he might
not stay long in her sitting-room.

It seemed rather hard to Jeff that she was
never allowed to have her own way—that
her life was ruled for her. Aunt Annie
would always come and fetch away the little
boy after ten minutes, even when grand-
mama had sent for him.

But after some weeks, when it was found
that the little boy could sit still and not
tease with too many questions or too much
talking, he was allowed to stay longer; some-
times to play draughts with or read to the
old lady.

About Aunt Annie Jeff did not at once
make up his mind. She was a tall woman,
with a strong voice and handsome features,
who always seemed busy and in a hurry.
36 A LITTLE HERO.

Brian said she knew Latin and Greek, so
Jeff decided she must be clever. She did
not wear pretty clothes or soft laces like his .
mother. Her dresses were very plain, of
some harsh coarse stuff and dull ugly colours;
her manner was always a little abrupt, and
she seemed to have no patience to listen to
anything that children said. Jeff supposed
that she was so wise that she could not profit
by anything they might say.

Perhaps nothing in Scotland surprised
Jeff more than to find how busy everyone
was, and how much one could do here. Even
ladies and rich people did things for them-
selves, and theiramusements generally seemed
to be like hard work. Young men walked
or rode, or played tennis and cricket inces-
santly. There was no mid-day sleep; no
lying in hammocks smoking and reading
novels. It was never too hot to go out and
do something, though to Jeff it often seemed
too cold. By degrees, however, he became
A LITTLE HERO. 37

accustomed to the climate, and before the
summer had fully arrived his fair delicate
face took a new bloom that would have glad-
dened the heart of his mother. He had been
more than a month at Loch Lossie when
the following letter was posted to India.

Loon ‘Losstx, May 10th.

Dear darling Mother,—I am not nearly
a hero yet. I haye not got even really brave,
but I mean to. I don’t like lots of things
here at all, and I get angry and quarrel with
Brian, because he tells lies—or sort of lies—
and is very unkind to Jessie. He pinches
her where it won’t show when she won’t do
what he wants. Nobody ever believes that
Brian does not tell truth. He seems so obe-
dient, and he never asks questions or
bothers people, and he is so clever with his
lessons. He always seems to know them
with hardly looking. The Rev. Mr. M‘Gregor,
who is our tutor, you know, says Brian is
38 A LITTLE HERO.

very intelligent; a most promising pupil he
calls him to Aunt Annie. I think Mr.
M‘Gregor flatters Aunt Annie, because he
wants to stay our tutor. But I don’t think
Brian knows deep down about the things what
helearns. He never is tiresome wanting to see
behind things, or to know why. You re-
member those questions always did come to
me when I did lessons with you and father.
Cousin Jessie is very pretty, and I know she
has a very kind heart. She gave two shil-
lings out of her money-box—all what she
had saved in pennies—to a little beggar girl
without any shoes that came to the door.
Aunt Annie was angry about it, because she
said, “No one need to beg or be poor.”
Grandmama is a very nice person, but why
does she never listen when I speak of father?
I go and read to her sometimes when she is
feeling well, and she says she likes my read-
ing better than Brian’s; he gabbles on so
quick and never stops, because he wants to
A LITTLE HERO. 389

get it over. Sometimes I stop altogether in
the middle of a chapter and talk instead.
We have very nice talks—we talk about you.
Then grandmama always sighs and says how
hard it is you are a soldier’s wife, and are
poor and are obliged to live in India. They
seem to think a great deal about being rich
here; but I think honour and glory is more,
and I mean to be a soldier.

Aunt Annie does not seem to love her
children much. She just kisses them in the
morning and at night once on the cheek,
without any arms, and she never goes to
tuck them up.

It is funny, I ae but Jess and Brian
don’t seem to know it is queer. I call Uncle
Hugh the bandbox man—to myself only,
of course. He is never untidy, or hot, or cold.
He seems to get up out of bed tidy; because
I saw him in his night-shirt one morning,
and his hair was all straight and smooth.

Mine isn’t now when I get up, because
40 A LITTLE HERO.

they don’t cut it so short here, and it has got
all curly. I will ask Maggie to cut off a bit
for you to see.

Maggie has got such a nice brother. He
says he remembers you when you were a
little girl, and my eyes are like yours. He
is the head-keeper now, and lets me go out
fishing with him. He has got straight red
hair, and oh, such a red beard! and he talks
in such a queer way—they all do here; but
IT am beginning to understand. Maggie is
going to live at Sandy’s cottage soon. He
had a wife, but she is dead, and there is no
one to work and cook for him. But I shall
see Maggie nearly every day, and Nan—that
is Jessie’s nurse—will mend my clothes.

The primroses have been quite lovely. It
will be all withered when it has been through
the Red Sea, and will have no smell, but T
send you one all the same. Mother, you
forgot to tell me what English flowers were
like—they are beautiful.
A LITTLE HERO. : 41

I hope the major is quite well, and I do
hope he doesn’t get any fatter, because of his
poor little horse. I wish he could see how
thin Uncle Hugh is—sometimes I wonder I
can’t see through him. He walks up the
steepest hills and over the heather without
ever stopping.

Tell father I can ride quite as well as
Brian, and Uncle Hugh says I have a
good seat. It must be true, because he never
praises anybody.

Oh, dear darling mother, my hand is quite
tired, and I have taken two afternoons to
write this letter. I wish I could see you
and feel you, though I don’t in the least for-
get what you are like. I can’t bear to look
at your picture often, because it makes the
tears come in my eyes, and you might not
like me to cry. At night when I go to bed
I shut my eyes very quick and very tight,
and try not to remember anything in India.
I generally go to sleep very quick. The
42 A LITTLE HERO.

next time I write perhaps I shall be nearly
a hero. I am a long way off it yet. It
would be dreadful if I was not one before
you come. A thousand kisses to you and
father from your own loving little boy,
JEFF,

The letter did not stand so irreproachably
spelt, but that is what it said and meant.

CHAPTER IV.

Y poor little boy sadly missed many
things that were joys or daily events
at home in India. Yet he did not magnify
their importance unduly, and remembered that
he must not grieve the loving heart which
probably ached with just as keen a longing
as his own. ‘This was heroism of a negative
kind, I fancy.
A LITTLE HERO, 43

At Loch Lossie they were not at all
demonstrative people. They never kissed
each other in the day-time, or walked arm
in arm, or sat very near together.

ToJeff these things had become natural, and
his spontaneous, affectionate nature seemed
suddenly frozen up by circumstances. The
dull ache of longing for kindly, smiling eyes,
for little playful speeches, at times seemed
more than he could bear.

And to him who had lived in the con-
stant presence of his mother the many
restrictions laid upon the children at Loch
Lossie seemed cruelly hard; and it was a
discipline that seemed to have no meaning,
that seemed to presuppose disobedience,

He might not go in the drawing-room or
conservatory without leave, or look at the
books in the library, or pick the commonest
flowers in the garden, or walk near the
loch. No promise was ever regarded as
sacred by his seniors.
44 A LITTLE HERO.

“But if I give you my word, Uncle
Hugh,” he had pleaded in early days, “ not
to go near the water, or touch the boats,
surely I may go down the drive.”

Uncle Hugh only looked down on him
with cold denial.

“Tittle boys are not to be trusted; their
promises are not worth much,” he answered.

Then Jeff got very red, and burst out
passionately:

“You must have known only boys who
were liars. Did you not speak the truth
yourself when you were young?”

Brian pulled at his jacket to modify his
speech. Jeff wrenched it away.

“Don’t touch me, Brian; I shall say
what I like; and I know you don’t always
speak the truth. Uncle Hugh, don’t you
know it is only cowards who make false
promises? Can’t you trust me? No one
who is brave—really brave—or who tries to
be brave—would tell a lie.”
A LITTLE HERO. 45

But the appeal seemed to fall on deaf ears.

Not long after this little scene the Rev.
Mr. M‘Gregor had reason to complain of
Jeff's negligence. He was very inattentive
to instruction and his lessons were never
properly prepared.

“The boy, moreover, Mr. Cuaron has
a tiresome habit of reasoning with regard to
actions, even my actions. This approaches
disrespect. Logic, you are aware, cannot be
conveniently applied to every circumstance
of life.”

“Tt ought to be,” said rigid Mr. ease
with a certain degree of sternness.

“T respect the boy for his fearless ques-
tionings and outspoken sentiments, though I
admit they are embarrassing at times.” |

“T am not sure, Mr. M‘Gregor, if Geoffry
does not teach us a lesson sometimes.”

Uncle Hugh called him Geoffry, much to
Jeff’s amusement.

Secretly Uncle Hugh did not highly esteem
46 A LITTLE HERO.

the boy’s tutor, though necessity compelled
him to employ his services.

The Rev. Mr. M‘Gregor was, no doubt,
a clever man in his way, but he was not
aman of high principle. He hated trouble
of any sort, and expediency was usually his
guide. Still he had had much experience in
teaching, and Aunt Annie was quite equal to
the task of sounding his knowledge of
classics and mathematics.

These were beyond reproach, and she
esteemed it a very fortunate accident which
had thrown him in her way.

One of the most strict laws laid down at
Loch Lossie was that the boys were never to
make use of the boats moored at the little
landing-stage.

It came to Jeff’s knowledge that Brian
repeatedly disobeyed this order. He knew
that at dusk his cousin frequently went out
alone in a little skiff that was easily managed.
Finally, after many anxious days, he re-
A LITTLE HERO. AZ

solved to tell Brian that he was aware of his
disobedience.

Brian turned on him fiercely, calling him
“Spy,” “Sneak,” and “ Molly.”

Jeff did not lack in daring or intrepidity,
and it was hard to be reproached with
timidity by one he knew his inferior in the
respect of courage. Then he remembered that
to be patient was not the least part of a
hero’s task, and checked the angry words that
were about to rise.

One morning Uncle Hugh came into the
school-room, where the boys were always to
be found at this hour. His face was graver
than usual, and his voice sounded cold and
cruel in Jeff’s ears.

“One of you boys has disobeyed me. You
have been out in the skiff. I suppose it was
last evening while we were at dinner.”

He looked steadily at the two lads, who
were gathering their books together to
take down to Mr. M‘Gregor’s house. Jeff
48 A LITTLE HERO.

coloured up to the roots of his curly hair,
and looked down, unwilling to confront
the guilty one’s confusion. But Brian, with
the angelic face and imnocent aspect he
habitually wore, was self-~possessed enough
to ask:

“Did somebody say they saw one of us,
papa?”

Mr. Colquhoun looked at his own son, and
never doubted his innocence.

“No, my boy, but I found a pocket-knife
in the skiff and a coil of gut, with two fish.
I know you have both knives exactly alike,
and probably only one of you can tell me to
which it belongs. Geoffry, have you your
knife in your pocket?”

Silence, and no movement on Jeff’s part.
In a moment Jeff looked up, and in his
steady brown eyes there was something which
Uncle Hugh could not read.

It was a bold glance, but not a defiant
one; a resolute gleam, but yet a sad one.
=F

A LITTLE HERO. 49.

For days afterwards Mr. Colquhoun remem-
bered that dauntless look. .

“No, Uncle Hugh,” he said firmly.

“Brian, where is yours?”

Obedient to his father’s command Brian
brought one from his pocket. That very
morning, not an hour ago, he had asked Jeff
to lend him his knife, and had not returned
it to its rightful owner. Jeff’s lips closed
tightly and his eyes fell.

“Then I must believe, Geoftry, that it is
you who have disobeyed me. Have you
anything to say for yourself?”

“TI did not go in the boat,” he said dog-
gedly, picking up some books and strapping _
them together, with despair at his heart.
Surely this was being a hero.

“Do not add a lie to your offence and
make it worse.”

“T have not told you a lie, Uncle Hugh.
I—did—not— go,” he almost shouted,
shouldering his books.

(396 ) D
50 A LITTLE HERO,

Mr, Colquhoun did not argue or seek to
prolong the interview, but in a few words
spoke the sentence of punishment.

“T will give orders that you are not to
use your pony for a month, and that Sandy
is not to take you rabbiting or fishing for the
same length of time. You are not to be seen
anywhere in the gardens or grounds except
on your way to Mr. M‘Gregor’s. I have
never restricted you boys in any reasonable
pleasures, but I am fully determined to make
you understand that I intend to be implicitly
obeyed when I think it necessary to lay down
a rule.”

Then Mr. Colquhoun went away, and
Jeff threw down his books with a bang.

“Tl fight you, Brian, you coward, you
false witness! You're worse than Ananias,”
he said, squaring himself for the combat and
reddening all over his face.

“All right. Come on. I’m twice as strong
as you, and Sandy has taught me how to box.”
A LITTLE HERO. 51

With this invitation Jeff began the battle
in a very unscientific way. Of course he
came out of the fray with a bleeding face and
torn clothes. There was no one near to pity
him, and he could only wash his face and
hope that the rents would escape Aunt
Annie’s notice till Nan had mended them.

For a fortnight this poor little boy moped
about the upstairs rooms and passages in a
very miserable way. Jessie was his best
consolation, bringing him news from the
garden and stable which interested him.
She also paid a daily visit to Sandy in order
to’ glean little details of sport, and came
back usually with her small face puckered
up in anxiety to forget nothing.

It was really very sad for poor Jeff that
the otter hounds should visit the neighbour-
_ hood at this juncture. He had to watch
Uncle Hugh and Brian starting at daybreak
three times a week to participate in the sport.
His poor heart was very sore all the time, for
52 A LITTLE HERO.

Uncle Hugh had not believed him, and
there was no one in whom he could confide.
It was a terrible anguish to bear all alone,
and the injustice of his punishment was the
sorest part of his trouble.

Maggie had gone away to live at her
brother Sandy’s cottage soon after her return,
and he might not even go down and see her
now. .

Meanwhile, Brian kept the knife that really
belonged to Jeff, for Uncle Hugh had not
given back the delinquent’s implement. It
seemed to Jeff that his cousin took delight
in parading his possession and assuming
innocence. He went out of his way to assert
his virtue.

One evening, watching the waning light
from an upstairs window, Jeff saw a little
skiff shoot out into the open space of water,
not shadowed by the hills. There was a
little figure in it. Here was a glorious
opportunity to go down and tell Uncle Hugh
A LITTLE HERO. 53

‘and establish his own truth. For a few
seconds a conflict went on in his breast, and
then with a heavy sigh he laid his head on
the window sill and burst into passionate
sobbing. When it was almost dark the fit
of weeping had passed off. But he remained
at the open window, breathing the balmy air.
Suddenly he was startled by a cry from the
water. In vain his eyes sought to pierce
the gathering gloom. Again the ery. For-
getting all restrictions, with a sudden uncon-
trollable impulse, he rushed down the stairs
and out into the garden to the lake side.

CHAPTER V.

APA, papa! oh, come quickly! There’s
some one drowning in the lake. And

oh! I was standing in the hall when Jeff
rushed down-stairs and out of the front door,
54 A LITTLE HERO.

with his face all white and his eyes staring.
He must have seen from upstairs—he was
standing at the window, you know. Oh papa,
perhaps it is Brian; he never came in to tea.”

Little Jessie, with eyes distended and
panting breath, astonished Mr. Colquhoun
and her mother by the unusual impropriety
of bursting open the dining-room door at
dinner-time. In a moment her father was
on his feet and out of the door, followed by
the butler and footman. A presentiment of
how it had all happened flashed upon him
as he hurried down to the edge of the water.
There were cries, muffled cries, “growing
gradually fainter, and splashes as though of
some one struggling; ascream, and then what
seemed an ominous silence,

It did not take a minute to launch a boat,
and row out afew yards from theshore. An
upturned skiff told its tale of a repeated dis-
obedience. Clinging to it by one hand was
Jeff, with the other he gripped Brian’s hair;
A LITTLE HERO. 55

but his little hand had just relaxed its hold
as Mr. Colquhoun approached. The effort
to hold up his cousin had taxed his strength
to the utmost, and unconsciousness stole over
him at the moment of rescue,

They were both saved. In five minutes,
time the butler and footman had carried in
the two insensible forms and laid them safely
on, the rug in the library.

It was not long before Brian gave signs of
life. A gasp, a sigh, a fluttering breath, and
his eyes opened to see his mother hanging
over him. They wandered round the room
and saw his father watching beside Jeff for
some sign of returning consciousness.

There was an ugly contraction of Brian’s
brow at this moment. To Mr. Colquhoun
the moments of doubt were full of anguish.
Perchance Jeff had given his life for his son’s,
for life seemed long in returning to the little
face that lay so still and white, with the
pretty yellow curls dripping wet. At last
56 A LITTLE HERO.

Jeff opened his eyes, but it was with no
rational gaze,

‘““Mother—I did try—they will tell you
that I did try,” he said faintly. Then his
eyelids closed again, and he muttered, “I
will say it now—‘as we forgive them that
trespass against us.’”

Mr. Colquhoun understood at last. Here
was verily a little hero who had suffered the
guilt and punishment of another—a weak
and sensitive child who had borne a wrong
silently, and had finally all but lost his life
to save the life of one he knew had sacrificed
him.

By and by the doctor came, and Jeff was
undressed and taken upstairs without any
other revival. Maggie had been sent for at
once, to her brother’s cottage, and was in-
stalled in Jeff’s little room as his nurse. The
doctor had lifted the wet curls above Jeff’s
temple, and had revealed a dark bruise there.
evidently the boy had come in contact with
A LITTLE HERO. 57

some obstacle in his wild plunge from the
shore to the skiff, only a few yards off. Jeff
and Brian had both been learning to swim
with Sandy this summer; but Brian had
made no progress, whereas Jeff could manage
a few strokes.

That was a very anxious night for the
household at Loch Lossie. ven little Jessie
was suffered to wander about the passages
till after ten o'clock; and there was no
assembly for prayers in the dining-room as
usual. A great shadow and fear seemed to
hang over the house. Brian was taken away
by his mother to his own room and put to
bed.

“Take him out of my sight. He is the
cause of all this,” Mr. Colquhoun had said
sternly, seeing he was fully recovered and
inclined to make explanations.

Mr. Colquhoun and Maggie sat up together
by Jeff’s bedside. He lay most of the night
still and white. Towards daybreak a pink
58 A LITTLE HERO.

spot came into each cheek, and he breathed
more quickly and grew restless. At last he
began to speak:

“Oh, mother, I cannot bear it—indeed I
cannot bear it! No one loves me here, it is
lonely—and they won’t even believe me or
trust me—they think I am a liar. Brian
looks so good, and he is never found out—
they think he must be true. When will you
come, mother?—oh, I want you, I want you.”

All the pent-up sorrow of weeks and
months went out in the last bitter cry. Then,
as if awakened by his own intensity of feel-
ing, Jeff opened his eyes and was suddenly
conscious of his surroundings.

“Uncle Hugh, where am [? Why are you
sitting here? Have I been ill? Oh, yes, I
remember all now. I heard Brian scream,
and I ran down to the lake. He was not
drowned, was he? Oh, if I had saved him!
mother would be so glad; because he is my
enemy, you know. Why does my head ache
A LITTLE HERO. . 59

-so much; it all seems confused too. I wish
you would believe me, Uncle Hugh; indeed
I told the truth.”

The man of starch bent down till his face
was very near to Jeff. His voice was a little
husky:

“T believe you now, my little lad. I could
never doubt you again; you have behaved
like a hero!”

Then Jeff half raised himself on his pillows,
and the dim morning light revealed an
elastic smile on his pale face.

“Oh, say that again. I do want to be a
hero before mother comes.”

He fell back once more, murmuring,

“T am so tired and sleepy, and so happy
now. Uncle Hugh, will you hear me say my
prayers? After I had been unhappy mother
always heard me say my prayers. And I
think,—perhaps I have cheated God. lately
—since you punished me, for I would not
say ‘forgive us our trespasses as we forgive
60 A LITTLE HERO.

them that trespass against us.’ I did not
forgive you or Brian, and I could not say it.
Now I can, and it will be all right. God
will understand.”

Soon after Jeff fell into a deep and
dreamless sleep. He slept far into a bright
morning, and when the doctor came he pro-
nounced his little patient as convalescent.

“You may get up to-morrow, and we shall
have. you out with the otter hounds on Satur-
day, my little man,” he said with a kind
smile.

- Jeff's eyes sought Mr. Colquhoun’s face
with an eager look of inquiry.

“We will see, Jeff’—he called him Jeff
for the first time—“but you must make
haste and get well.”

And Jeff did get well and rode right
bravely. Better sport was never seen,


A LITTLE HERO, 61

CHAPTER VL

EFF was now ten years old, for nearly
two years have gone by since he came
to England. He has grown very much, and
is a tall muscular boy, with a bright smiling
face; only when he is alone or unconscious
of observation he is sometimes subdued, and
there is a yearning wistful look in his big
brown eyes that seems to declare he is not
quite happy.

“You have news from India to-day, Geof
fry,” said Uncle Hugh one morning rather
stiffly as he met the boy coming down the
stairs with a letter in his hand. “Your
Aunt Annie has also had a letter from your
mother.”

Jeff looked rather as if he had been ery-
ing, and his voice trembled a little when he
answered Mr. Colquhoun:

“Yes, there is news. She is coming—at
last. But oh, she is ill!”
G2 A LITTLE HERO.

Jeff nearly broke down here. “Uncle
Hugh, I may go to London and meet her
next week.”

The passionate pleading of the boy’s voice
in the last words was indescribable.

He had grown used to negatives presented
to his requests during his stay at Loch Lossie,
but this was a widely different and an ur-
gent matter.

“T think, my boy, it will be better not.
Your aunt has fully discussed the matter
with me, and she does not wish it. She
thinks that her meeting with her sister will
be a painful one; she did not part on very-
friendly terms with your mother. A recon-
ciliation will be more pleasant at Loch Lossie.”

Jeff coloured deeply. He knew what all
this meant. Uncle Hugh’s carefully-worded
speech was clear to him.

“Yes, I know—Sandy told me. You and
Aunt Annie did not want her to marry
father, because he was poor and only a
A LITTLE HERO. 63

soldier in a marching regiment. You were
all unkind to her about it and made her very
unhappy; but she did not care for money
and a grand house—and—and she loved
father. She is very. happy with him—we
were all happy together till I had to be sent
home. Think of it only, Uncle Hugh, two
whole years without seeing her. Didn’t you
love your mother too? And now to lose a
single day or hour, after so long! Oh, do
let me go, Maggie will take me if you
can’t.”

Mr. Colquhoun stood a moment in silence
looking out of the window. His heart went
with the boy, for Jeff had grown dear to
him, with his frank impulsive ways and aeep
strong affections.

“Well, well, perhaps something may be
done. You had better go and have a little
talk about it to your aunt before you go to
Mr. M‘Gregor’s.”

Jeff looked very blank and despairing as
64 A LITTLE HERO.

he turned round and went slowly up the
stairs again. Aunt Annie was one of those
superior people who never change their mind.
She took a vast amount of pride in her own
prompt judgment, and not for worlds would
have admitted herself in the wrong. Jeff
was sure that the most urgent pleading would
not prevail to alter her decision.

No sympathetic throb for the child and
mother once more to be united would alter
her resolution.

“No, Jeff, I have told your uncle that I
have fully made up my mind that the recon-
ciliation to take place between your mother
~ and her family shall be under this roof. It
is impossible for a child of your age to un-
derstand this matter, and I beg that you
will cease to argue. Your mother and I
parted in great bitterness, but that is past
and forgiven.”

Jeff made a little gesture of anger.

“ My lips will be closed with regard to
A LITTLE HERO. 65

bygones, and when Mary is once here I shall
never recur to painful matters.”

This was all very grand and magnanimous
in words, but the effect it had upon Aunt
Annie’s auditor was anything but soothing.

“But surely mother, when she comes by
herself and is ill, would think it kinder of
you to meet her at once,” he said in hot in-
dignation.

But no words availed, and Mrs. Colquhoun
kept to her determination. She probably
did not observe the set and dogged look upon
the boy’s face as he turned to leave the
room. He was of the same blood as her-
self, and something of her own resolute
nature formed part of his character.

But Aunt Annie turned back complacently
to the translation of her German novel, with-
out giving another thought to the deep strong .
child-nature with which she came daily in
contact.. The persistence of her small ad-

versary had, indeed, ruffled her serenity for
(396 ) E
66 A LITTLE HERO.

a few minutes, but her emphatic denial of
his request must certainly have convinced
him of her strength of purpose. What was
the bitter disappointment to the little aching
heart in comparison with the maintenance
of her own dignity and authority!

But Jeff went brooding down the avenue
with his books slung over his back, and

on his face there was a set look of despair,
which boded no good to Mr. Colquhoun’s
authority.

‘The week passed quietly, and without any
further pleading on Jeff’s part; only, he was
unusually quiet and thoughtful.

On the morning before the expected arrival
of the steamer from India, Jeff was missing
from Loch Lossie. Brian came in hot haste

to his father, eager to.inform him of the un-

warranted disappearance. Brian was fond

of establishing his own virtue by declaring

the faults of others.
“Mr. M‘Gregor must not be kept waiting,
A LITTLE HERO. 67

Brian. You go down to him at once. Never
mind your cousin.” This was not what
Brian had anticipated, and he departed in
_ great disgust.

“TI do believe -he’s gone up on the moor,”
said this youngster vindictively as a parting
shot, sincerely hoping that Jeff might be
called to account for some serious delin-
quency. He had never forgiven him for
having been found out himself in a serious
fault last year. The recollection of Jeff’s en-
durance under a false accusation was a con-
tinual mortification to his small soul. He
knew that his father had never forgotten
that episode, and from time to time regarded
him with suspicion of a new deception.

All that day till nightfall, though keepers
' and scouts were sent about in all directions,
no word came of the missing lad. Inquiry
was made in the nearest township and at
Lossie Bridge station in vain. No little
traveller had been seen to arrive or depart.
68 A LITTLE HERO.

Late at night a porter from the next station
down the line came up to the house and in-
formed Mr. Colquhoun that a little boy answer-
ing to the description of Jeff had taken that
mornine’s mail to London from Drumrig.

It was too late for Mr. Colquhoun to set
off in pursuit of the culprit that night, but
all preparations were made for his departure
the next morning.

‘Meanwhile Jeff had arrived in the great
city, to which he was a stranger, towards
evening. A little waif and stray in London,
with only five shillings in his pocket! But
no fears assailed him. He was encouraged
by the great hope of the meeting on the
morrow. His heart began beating at the
very thought of the loving arms into which
he would nestle.

Naturally he was puzzled to know what
to do with himself. It was more than pro-
bable that the great hotel at the railway
station would swallow up his five shillings
A LITTLE HERO. 69

and leave him without the means of getting
to the steamer. He addressed himself to a
friendly-looking porter who was staring at
him with a certain amount of curiosity, see- _
ing he had no luggage:

“What does it cost to get a bed in there
for the night?” he said.

The porter grinned satirically.

“More nor such as you can pay. Yer
wouldn’t get much change out of a sovereign,
. Tl be sworn.”

He walked down the platform, and Jeff
saw that he was making merry with one of
his friends over his inquiry. In terror lest
some detaining hand might even yet be
stretched forth, he hurried out of the station
and was soon lost in the small streets about
King’s Cross.

He at length found a male ieee
lodging, attracted thereto by a card in the
window, to the effect that “Lodgings for
single men” were to be had.
70 A LITTLE HERO.

The woman who opened the door to him
looked doubtfully at this youthful customer,
but the production of a couple of shillings
and an offer from Jeff to pay in advance
settled all difficulty.

“T am going down to the docks to-morrow
to meet my mother, who is coming from
India,” he said, giving a frank explanation
of his plans. “I shall have to leave quite
early and I will pay you to-night.”

The woman smiled at the dignified atti- .
tude of her would-be lodger, and bade him
come in and she would find him a bed to
suit.
She saw very well that this was no roughly-
nurtured child, and possibly guessed partly
at the truth.

There were two or three labouring men
taking supper in a back kitchen, and a
strong smell of onions and frying fat per-
vaced the atmosphere.

Jeff felt it would not do to appear.
A LITTLE HERO, 71

squeamish in such company, and drew near
to the fire, making a pretence of warming
his hands.

“Here's a new lodger, Timothy; you
make room for him,” said the woman with
a broad grin,

“Runned away from school, young
marster, I'll be bound,” said one rough giant,
catching hold of Jeff by the arm. The
boy turned his brown eyes steadily on his

_ captor.
“No, I have never been at any school,” he
said with composure. “But they would

not let me meet my mother, who is coming
home from India, so I took all the money
out of my savings-box and came by the
train without telling anyone.”

The nayvy released him.

“From Ingy! That’s a long way to come.
And they wouldn’t let you meet her! It was
a darned shame. You're a well plucked one
for your size. Can ye stand treat, young
72 A LITTLE HERO.

maister? We'll drink to the health of the
lady from Ingy.”

Jeff took his few coins out of his pocket
with a dubious frown.

“There's my bed to pay for here, and
some supper, and I’ve got to get to the docks
to-morrow by ten o'clock. This is all I’ve
got; perhaps I can spare you a shilling.”

- They were honest labourers, though rough,
and took his shilling, and no more, and went
off to the public-house.

Jeff asked for an egg and some tea and

bread and butter, and then said he would go
to bed.
“Tl put you along of my boy ’Arry. He
sleeps wonderful quiet, and some of them
is roughish customers to lie alongside of when
they comes in from the ‘Lion,’” said the
woman as she lighted a candle.

Jeff sighed when he was ushered into the
dingy attic where he was to pass the night,
thinking of his own little white bed at Loch
A LITTLE HERO. 73

Lossie and all the dainty arrangements of
bath and dressing paraphernalia.

The next morning he was astir at day-
break, and without casting a glance at his
sleeping companion he went softly down the
stairs and laid his payment on the kitchen
table. He had some difficulty in unbarring
the door, but succeeded after many endea-
vours,

Though it was an April morning the air
was very raw and bleak at this early hour,
and the boy shivered repeatedly.

At a coffee-stall in an adjoining street he
bought a thick slice of bread and butter and
a steaming cup of what was called tea, sweet
and strong, if not particularly fragrant. For-
tified by such nourishment against the biting
air, he inquired of the first policeman he met
the nearest way to the station, and reached it
soon after seven o’clock. There was an hour
and a half to wait before his train started,
but he sat down on a sheltered bench and
74 A LITTLE HERO,

remained an unnoticed little figure till the
train drew up. At about the same hour Mr.
Colquhoun was crossing the border in a
southern express in pursuit of the runaway.

.

CHAPTER VII

“"T was the same steamer that Jeff had come

home in two years ago. Much the same

sort of scene was going on on the deck as on
a former occasion.

The burly form of Captain Clark might
be descried from afar pacing up and down.
It seemed all like a dream to the boy, vividly
recalling his own arrival. He rubbed his
eyes hard, scarcely feeling sure of his own
identity.

The great steamer had been in dock over
half an hour, and those passengers who had
not disembarked at Gravesend were busy
with their luggage.
A LITTLE HERO. 75

“Captain Clark, don’t you remember me?
It is Jeff Scott.”

The boy had taken off his cap in a salute
to his old friend. The beauty of his yellow
curls was fully revealed. All the sickly
paleness resulting from tropical heats had
disappeared from Jeff’s face, and he stood |
now on the deck a fair specimen of a healthy
English lad.

Captain Clark instantly recognized the
steady brown eyes. They recalled another
pair of eyes, infinitely sadder, but oh, how
like! The golden-haired lady down-stairs
had been put under his especial charge, with
many injunctions to see to her welfare.
But the voyage had not brought back the
expected health to her cheek or light to her
eyes. It was with a heart full of pity that
this good man turned to the boy.

“Th, my boy, and is it really you? I am
glad to see you. Have you come to take a
passage back with me?”
76 A LITTLE HERO.

But Jefi was not in the mood for any
joking this morning.

“T have come to see mother,” he said
with infinite gravity. “I know she is one
of your passengers. Let me go to her at
once. Who will tell me which is her cabin?”

The good old sailor’s weather-beaten face
changed a little.

- “You will perhaps take her by surprise,
my lad. She is ill—very weak—she cannot
stand any shock. Which of her friends or
relatives has come to meet her?” _

“T have come—only,” said Jeff, “I ran
away to do it. She would expect me, of
course.”

Captain Clark looked at the boy, whose
fair face flashed at some painful recollection.

“Well done, Jeff.” The old captain’s voice
was husky. “Come with me at once. We
will find your mother’s maid or the stew-
ardess, but you must promise to be very
gentle and not to agitate her.”
A LITTLE HERO. 77

Jeff smiled with superior wisdom. How
could his presence agitate his beloved
mother?

At one of the state-room doors off the
saloon Captain Clark knocked gently.

An elderly woman answered the summons
at once, and held up her finger with a warn-
ing “Hush! she is asleep, poor lady! do
not wake her.”

Then Jeff came a little forward, trembling
with eagerness, his eyes full of yearning.

“This is her boy, Mrs. Parsons, who has
come alone from Scotland to meet her.”

Jeffs steadfast eyes met the woman’s,
but he did not understand the look of pity
in them. Why should anyone be sorry for
him, now that the sad years of separation had
come to an end?

“Come in then, laddie, very softly. She’s
been talking day and night of her bairn;
but you must, mind, let her have her sleep
out. She lay awake the long night through.”
78 A LITTLE HERO.

Then Jeff was cautiously admitted.

Child as he was, he staggered a little at
the aspect of the white still form extended
on a berth. He drew his breath quickly for
a few seconds as his eyes rested on the dear
familiar face—familiar, and yet how altered!

The fine oval face had indeed fallen away
sadly, and the soft golden hair waved away
from a brow like marble. Deep dark lines
beneath the closed eyes hollowed the cheeks
and seemed to speak of pain and sleepless
nights. Slow tears welled up to Jeff’s eyes
and fell silently one by one.

He turned to the woman and spoke in a
whisper:

“She has been very ill? She never told
me.”

“Very ill,” said the elderly matron curtly.
It was difficult to restrain her own tears.

Then Jeff sat down quietly and remained
half-hidden by the curtain that sheltered the
sleeper. Presently the noise of trampling
A LITTLE HERO. 79

overhead seemed to rouse the invalid. She
stirred and sighed without opening her
eyes.

“Mrs. Parsons, will you ask if any letters
or telegrams have come for me. I shall
never get ashore EERO my friends.
Surely someone will come.” Again a long-
drawn sigh.

Jeff’s little brown hand stole round the
curtain and very softly clasped the thin white
fingers.

“Mother, J am here—your own little lad.
Mother, oh, mother! Mother dear—”

The soft brown eyes opened with a startled
look. Then suddenly the intensity of yearn-
ing mother-love met Jeff’s gaze. In a mo-
ment he was on his knees beside ne with ue
arms about her neck.

“Never, never to leave you any more,
mother—to feel your hands—to kiss your
cheek every night—to nurse you—to make
you well—to cover you with love. Oh,
80 A LITTLE HERO.

how could I ever bear it all! There is none
like you—none—none.” _

The sweet pale face flushed in an ecstasy
of gratitude and passionate feeling beneath
the endearing epithets and the loving touches.

“My lad—my little lad,” she kept repeat-
ing to herself in a low murmur, “he has come
to meet me, to make me well.”

“In the few moments that succeeded, Jeff
poured forth the tale of his adventurous flight
from Loch Lossie. He made haste to soften
the neglect of his mothez’s relatives.

“They did not know you were very ill,
mother. They only thought you were a
little bit ill before you left India. Aunt Annie
said your maid would bring you down to
Scotland quite well; but oh, I had the ache
inmy heart. It was a real pain,and I felt I
could not wait, and I knew you would not
be angry.”

“Anory, my darling!” the mother said
with a wondering smile, touching his hair
A LITTLE HERO. 81

with her weak fingers. “How pretty your
hair has grown, Jeff, and you are so tall and
look so well! Your father would be pleased
to see you so big and strong. He will come
home soon now. We are not so poor as we
were. His uncle has left us some money, you
know; that is why I was able to come to
England.”

It flashed across Jefi’s mind that Mrs.
Colquhoun must have been aware of his
parents’ improved circumstances when she
invited her sister to Loch Lossie. He put.
away the thought from him.

“And your grandmama, tell me all about.
her, Jeff, and your little cousins. I have
longed to hear from your own lips about
everyone.”

There was a lovely pink flush on the
mother’s face now, and her beautiful eyes were
as bright as stars. Mrs. Parsons came for-
ward, and, looking at her anxiously, said

gently:
(396 ) F
82 A LITTLE HERO. ©

“Indeed, ma’am, but I think you had
better talk no more just now. I will fetch
your beef-tea, and just let the laddie sit
quietly beside you, where you can see him.”

Mrs. Scott smiled gently, clasping Jeff's
brown fingers more closely.

“He will not leave me, Mrs. Parsons—
promise—even if I go to sleep.”
~ And so Jeff sat through the morning hours
hardly speaking or stirring.

At about twelve o'clock Captain Clark
came to the door and was bidden to enter.
He had come to say that he had made every
arrangement to get Mrs. Scott comfortably
conveyed to London, and that Mrs. Parsons
must get her mistress ready early in the
afternoon.

“And here is a telegram, Mrs. Scott, just
come for you,” he said, holding out the brown
envelope. Languid fingers went out to
receive the missive. Was not all her world
beside her?
A LITTLE HERO. 83

From Mr. Colquhoun, York Station, to Mrs. Scott, 8.8.
Jellalabad, Albert Docks.

“Will be at St. Pancras Hotel this even-
ing. Send reply there. Say where you are
staying. Is Geoffry with you?”

The answer was soon written, and the kind
captain took it away to despatch. Prepara-
tions for Mrs. Scott’s removal were carried on
as quickly as possible, and Jeff made himself
useful by running backwards and forwards
with messages.

In the evening the sick lady and the boy,
under Captain Clark’s care, reached the apart-
ments in Brook Street that had been secured
for them. About seven o’clock Uncle Hugh
made his appearance. He forbore to speak
one word of anger or reproach to Jeff; even
greeting him with a certain degree of kind-
ness. The poor boy wasalone in the sitting-
room turning over the pages of an old
84 A LITTLE HERO.

Graphic. His eyes bore traces of recent
tears.

“And how is your mother getting on, Jeff?
I hope we shall be able to take her back to
Scotland to-morrow.”

“To-morrow, Uncle Hugh? oh, no! She is
very ill—much worse than we thought.
Perhaps she will be ill a long time. The
doctor is here now. The railway tried her
so much. She has fainted thrice since we
got here.”

All Jeff’s stoical fortitude broke down
when he began to speak—the tears could
not be kept back, and he sobbed bitterly.

“Uncle Hugh, what shall I do? She does
not look like the mother she used to be! She
cannot walk across the room or even sit up.”
' Mr, Colquhoun had not realized anything
seriously the matter with his sister-in-law,
and this was the first intimation he had re-
ceived of her critical condition.

By and by, when he had seen the doctor,
A LITTLE HERO. 85

he was made to recognize the gravity of the
case. There was very little hope of the
gentle mother’s recovery. All the anticipa-
tions of convalescence in Scotland, and a
reconciliation at Loch Lossie, were at an end.
He remembered his wife’s last injunction,
“Be sure you bring Mary down here at once,
and don’t have any excuses.”

Alas! poor Mary would never travel any
more to her old home. Her days of rest
were at hand, ;

Uncle Hugh was very gentle and con-
siderate towards Jeff that night and during
the ensuing days that dragged so slowly.
The boy could hardly be persuaded to leave
the house for half an hour, and always hurried
back with feverish impatience after the short-
est absence. He came in mostly laden with
primroses and violets—her favourite flowers;
often going into two or three shops to get
_them, never sufficiently satisfied with their
freshness.
86 A LITTLE HERO.

One night Jeff had gone to bed earlier
than usual, for he mostly lingered about
the passages or wandered restlessly from
room to room till it was late. This evening
he had been greatly comforted by some fancied
‘improvement in the poor invalid’s appear-
ance.

“Mother darling, you are better—say you
are better to-night, and that you will soon be
well enough to go back to Loch Lossie,” he
said as he hung over her at saying “good-
night.”

She smiled fondly upon him.

“You wish me to get better so very much,
Jeff, I almost feel as if I must.”

“You must, you must,” he repeated vehe-
mently.

It hardly seemed any time since he had
gone to bed when Jeff was roused by Uncle
Hugh touching him on the shoulder.

“Get up, my boy, quickly, your mother
wishes you to come to her.”
A LITTLE HERO. 87

Mr. Colquhoun’s face was very grave, and
his habitually cold voice had a thrill of
sympathy in its tones. The boy was up ina
moment. Nothing was surprising now.
When he had put on his clothes he went
down-stairs to his mother’s room. The door
was ajar and he pushed it open. There was a
solemn hush here, though there were plenty
of lights about, and a kettle steaming on the
hearth. Jeff noticed at once an overpower-
ing smell of drugs. There was a strange
man in the room. The boy with a cold
chill at his heart recognized him as a
doctor. How still the figure on the bed was!
How marble-white the face propped up by
many pillows! The mother heard the gentle
footfall of her beloved child, and the soft
brown eyes unclosed at his approach—un-
closed with the ever-loving glance. A fleet-
ing smile passed over her face.

“My little lad,” said a voice, oh, so faintly,
but with such infinite tenderness, “you
88 A LITTLE HERO.

have been quick in coming. I have sent for
you to say another good-night. Jeff, darling,
try and understand—I am going—where it
is always morning—I am going to leave you
—after such a little stay—”

The boy had thrown himself beside her on
the big bed. He had never seen the ap-
proach of death. He could not understand it.

- “Mother, why should you go? why should
they take you away from meagain? Oh, no,
no! Please, sir, do not be so cruel; I’m so
lonely without her.”

He turned with anguished eyes to the
grave gentleman who had placed a hand on
the dear mother’s pulse.

Again she spoke:

“My boy, you must understand, God has
called me—I am dying. In the morning [
shall not see your dear eyes; | shall never
touch your head again. Oh, dear, dear head—
oh, soft curls!” She paused a minute and a
little sob broke from her.
A LITTLE HERO. 89

“Jeff, Uncle Hugh has been telling me
about you the past few days. It has been
a great happiness—a great comfort to know
that you are so brave and truthful. There
are faults, my darling, still; but I think, my
own, that you will be a hero some day.”
She smiled upon him with indescribable con-
tent. “TI have no fears for you. You will bear
what is given you to bear patiently. You
will not grieve your father—you will re-
member that—” Her voice failed.

“Oh, mother, stay with me. I can never
be great or good without you—things are
so hard. Only stay with me a little while.
No one has ever loved me as you love me.”

A glow of light passed over the sweet face.

“Darling, no one will ever love you like I
have loved you. Jeff, you have been a great
happiness to me. By and by, when you
come to me, I shall know, perhaps, that you
have remembered all that I have said to you.
Oh, doctor, the pain—again.”
_ 90 A LITTLE HERO.

She gasped for breath, and Mrs. Parsons
lifted her up and put some cordial to her
lips. When she spoke again she wandered
a little:

“T was so happy in India—we were all so
happy together. Dear husband—our little
son—is growing up all that we could wish
him—by and by—he will comfort you. I
shall know—perhaps that you speak of me
—sometimes.”

“Mother, you shall know,” burst from Jeff.
He spoke in a hoarse way. Only by a
supreme effort could he choke back his sobs.
Now he had raised himself and was gazing
into the beloved eyes, which seemed to see
some far-off vision.

“ And, mother, I promise, when you are
gone—I will be—all you wish. I will never, -
never forget—all my life through—and when
—TI see you again—I shall see you again, you
know—you will know how much I have
gone on loving you—and remembering. Oh,
A LITTLE HERO. 91

mother, can’t I go with you?-—must I wait
here alone? You will never kiss me, never
touch me—and when—I am a real hero—
- your voice will not praise me. Take me
with you, mother, mother!” Then Jeff fell
back unconscious, and was carried out of the
room by Uncle Hugh, who was sobbing like a
child. The angel of death did not tarry.
In the morning Jeff ‘knew that his sweet
mother had said her last “ good-night.”

Years have gone by, and Jeff Scott is a
man now. He is reckoned a real hero in
these days, one whose name has been a
household word. He is a soldier like all
the men of his race—a right gallant soldier,
who wears a V.C. upon his broad breast. He
has seen much service, and done brave deeds
by flood and field, under the roar of cannon,
and in instant fear of death.

His fiery impetuous spirit is in a measure
subdued, but still his rash acts of bravery
92 A LITTLE HERO.

have been reproved with a smile by his
superior officers.

In one campaign he had swam a river
under hot fire of the enemy, carrying de-
spatches between his teeth—he had rallied
hig regiment by picking up the colours
dropped by two wounded comrades, though
his own right arm was shattered by a shot—
he had defended the sick and wounded in a
quickly thrown up fort with desperate bravery
against a host of attacking enemies.

He seemed to hold his life only to spend
it for others. No privations were hard to
him. He bore with a smiling face heat or
cold, and encouraged with a cheerful word
dispirited soldiers.

“Sir.” said a gallant general, “you have
won a Victoria Cross three times over. I
honour you for your heroic bravery. Your
mother may be proud to hear of such a son.”

Ah! what a tender chord was touched by
those words. In the darkness of the African
A LITTLE HERO. 938

night Jeff went out with a heavy heart from
his tent, and, looking up at the silent stars,
wondered if. she knew, if she approved.

And when he went home, and was sent
for to Osborne to receive his decorations from
the Queen’s hand, the honour heaped upon
him seemed more than he could bear. When
the greatest lady in the land spoke a few
kind words of praise the tears started to his
brave brown eyes. Perchance the aspect of
such a stripling moved her womanly heart
to a special throb of sympathy, he looked
so young to have achieved such deeds of
valour.

But the applause of the world in general
will never sound attractively in Jeff’s ears;
society will never claim him as one of her
pet lions.

At Loch Lossie they speak of him with
respectful admiration, and Aunt Annie no
longer holds out any opinions against such a
distinguished young man. She loses no op-
94 A LITTLE HERO.

portunity of proclaiming her kinship to
young Captain Scott. But Jeff only spends
a short time occasionally in Scotland; most
of his leave is generally passed with his father.

The deep strong affection between father
and son seems to become a closer bond as
the years rolls on. They speak sometimes
of the dead mother, and even now Jeff’s
voice hushes and his steady eyes are misty
at the mention of her name or the recalling
of her words. He loves her with a love that
time has no power to weaken; he has kept
all her sayings faithfully in his heart; her
letters to him are his most cherished posses-
sions.

The passionate intensity of his nature has
deepened and strengthened with his man-
hood. He never forgets. Oh, brave, true
heart! oh, loyal breast! oh, faithful hero!
guarding well the noble standard of courage
and truth that was given you to guard in
boyhood’s days.
A LITTLE HERO. : 95

“ Her little lad” that she loved so well is
indeed “one full of courage and great
patience, and dauntless before difficulties;
one who allows no fear to assail him, who
fulfils his duty and something over tt under
hard and difficult circumstances.”

THE END.
A SELECTION OF
BLACKIE & SON'S

BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

SUITABLE FOR GIFTS. FOR SCHOOL LIBRARIES,
FOR PRIZES.

BLACKIE’S HALF-CROWN SERIES.
Tustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

The Hermit Hunter of the Wilds. By Dz. Gorpon Srastes.
“*A thorough boy’s book.”—Schoolmaster.
aa s Ambition: A Story. for Children, By Evetyn Everett
REEN,

“Greatly will it delight the children who are happy enough to get it.”—Free-
man,

White Lilae: Or, The Queen of the May. By Amy Watton.
“From first to last absorbing almost to the point of fascination.”—Daily Mail.
Little Lady Clare. By Evzuxyn Evererr Green.

“Certainly one of the prettiest, reminding us in its quaintness and tender
pathos of Mrs, Ewing’s delightful tales.” "Literary World.

The Saucy May. By Henry Frirs.
“‘A book both interesting and exciting.”—Spectator.
The Brig ‘‘Audacious.” By Aran Cox.
“Fresh and wholesome as a breath of sea-air in tone.”—Court Journal.
Jasper’s Conquest. By Exizapera J. Lysacat.
: “One of the best boys’ books of the season.” —Schoolmaster.
Sturdy and Strong: Or, How George Andrews made his Way.
By G. A, Henry.

“The history of a hero of everyday life, whose love of truth and innate pluck
carry him, naturally, from poverty to affluence.”—The Empire.
Gutta-Perecha Willie: The Working Genius. By Gzoren Mao

Dowatp, LL.D.

“ Get it for your boys and girls to read for themselves, and if they can’t do that
read it to them.”—Practical Teacher.

The War of the Axe: Or Adventures in South Africa, By
J. Prroy-GRovzs.
“The story is well and brillidntly told.”"—Literary World.

The Eversley Seerets. By Evstyn Evrrnrr GReey.
“Ts one of the best children’s stories of the year.” Academy.
2 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.

The Lads of Little Clayton. By R. Srzap.

“A a canttat book for boys, and may be read to a class with great profi "School
master.

Ten Boys who lived on the.Road from Long Agoto Now. By Jang
Anprews. With 20 Illustrations,
“Really attractive and brightly written.”—Saturday Review.

Winnie’ 's Seeret: A Story of Faith and Patience. By Katz Woon.

“Written preplasly in the style that is surest to win the hearts of young folks.”
—Pictorial World.

A Waif of the Sea: Or the Lost Found. By Kats Woop.
‘A very touching and pretty tale, full of interest.”—Hdinburgh Courant.
The Joyous Story of Toto. By Lavra E. Ricnarps. With 30
humorous and fanciful Illustrations by E. H. Garrett.
“Should take its place beside Lewis Carroll’s unique works.”—Birmingham Gaz.
Miss Willowburn’s Offer. By Saran Dovupyey.
“Jtis acareful, well executed, and cheery study of English still life."—Academy.
A Garland for Girls. By Lovisa M. Axcort.
“These little tales are the beau ideal of girls’ stories.”—Christian World.
Hetty Gray: Or Nobody’s Bairn. By Rosa MunHonuanp.
“a charming story for young folks. Hetty is a delightful creature.”— World.

Brothers in Arms: A Story of the Crusades. By F. B. Harrison.
“One of the best accounts of the Crusades we have read.'"—Schoolmistress,

The Ball of Fortune. By Cuarzes Pzaros.

‘‘A capital story for boys. There is plenty of incident.”—Journal of Education.
Miss Fenwiek’s Failures. By Esui Sroarr.

“‘A girl true to real life, who will put no nonsense into young heads.”—Graphie.

Gytha’s Message: A Tale of Saxon England, By Emma Lusi.

“The sort of book that all girls and some boys like,”Journal of Education.
My Mistress the Queen: A Tale of the 17th Century, By M. A.

PavL.
“The style is pure and graceful, and the story is full of interest.”—Scotsman.

Jack o’ Lanthorn: A Tale of Adventure. By Hunry Fairs.
“The narrative is crushed full of stirring incident.”—Christian Leader. |

The Family Failing. By Daruny Daun.

“Tt is a capital lesson on the value of contentedness.”—Aberdeen Journal.
BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 3



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.

The Stories of Wasa and Menzikoff: The Deliverer of Sweden,
and the Favourite of Czar Peter.

Stories of the Sea in Former Days.
Tales of Captivity and Exile. -

Famous Discoveries by Sea and Land.
Stirring Events of History.

Adventures in Field, Flood, and Forest.

BLACKIiE’S TWO SHILLING SERIES.
In crown 8vo, with Illustrations, cloth elegant, 2s.

Sam Silvan’s Sacrifice: The Story of two Fatherless Boys. By
Jesse CoLMAN.

“‘There is real pathos in the tale, and shows the beauty of endurance and un-
selfishness.”—Scottish Leader.

A Warrior King: A Boy’s Adventures in South Africa, By J.
Evz.yn.
“ Just the book for boys—not a ‘dry’ page in it.” eee News,

Susan. By Amy Watton.

“A clever little story, in which the authoress shows a great deal of insight into
children’s feelings and motives.”—Pall Mali Gazette.

Linda and the Boys. By Czormss Szupy Lownpzs.
«Js full of the kind of humour that children love.”. —Liverpool Mercury.
Swiss Stories for Children and those who Love Children.
From the German of Mapam Spyri. By Lucy WHEEtocg.
“Lifelike descriptions of Swiss homesteads and country.”—Practical Teacher.

Aboard the ‘‘Atalanta.” By Henry Fairs.

“We doubt if any boy after reading it would be tempted to the great iilstalee
of running away from school under any pretext whatever.”—Practical Teacher.

The Penang Pirate. By Jonn C. Huronson.
“It is rattling, adventurous, and -romantic,”—Aberdeen Journal.

Teddy: The Story of a “Little Pickle.” By Joun C. HuroHeson.
“There is real humour in the tale.”—The Times.
4 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



TWO SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

Warner’s Chase: Or the Gentle Heart. By Anniz 8. Swan.

“There is nothing sentimental and no sickly goodyism in it, but a tone of quiet
and true religion that keeps its own place.” Perthshire Advertiser.

New Light through Old Windows. A Series of Stories illus-
trating Fables of Alsop. By Grecson Gow.
*«Most delightfully-written little stories.”—Glasgow Herald.
S°A Pair of Clogs:” And other Stories. By Amy Watron.
«
The Hawthorns. By Amy Watron.

**A remarkably vivid and clever study of chil(-life.”—Christian Leader.
Dorothy’s Dilemma: A Tale of the Time of Charles I. By Cano-

LINE AUSTIN.

“Will be warmly welcomed by children.”"—Court Journal.
Marie’s Home: Or, A Glimpse of the Past. By Carotine Austin.
“An exquisitely told story. The heroine is as fine a type of girlhood as one

could set before our little British damsels of to-day.”—Christian Leader.

The Squire’s Grandson: A Devonshire Story. By J. M. Catm-
WELL.
“Cannot fail to favourably impress all young readers, *__Schoolmaster.
Insect Ways on Summer Days in Garden, Forest, Field, and
Stream. By Jennurt Homenreys. With 70 Illustrations.
“A charming book for young people.”—Schoolmaster.
Magna Charta Stories: Or Struggles for Freedom in the Olden
Time, Edited by ARTHUR GILMAN, A.M.
“A book which ought to be in the hands of all boys.” Educational News.

The Wings of Courage; Anp Tum Croup-Srinner. Translated

from the French of Gzorcz Sanp, by Mrs. Corxran,

“Mrs, Corkran has earned our gratitude by translating into readable English
these two charming little stories.”-Atheneum.

FOR THE YOUNGER CHILDREN.
Adventures of Mrs. Wishing-to-be. By Attce Corzpay.
“Simply a charming book for little girls.”—Saturday Review.
Our Dolly: Her Words and Ways. By Mrs. R. H. Reap.
«“Prettily told and prettily illustrated.”—Guardian.

Fairy Fancy: What she Heard and Saw.. By. Mrs. R. H. Reap.
«The authoress has very great insight into child nature."—Glasgow Herald.
BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE, 5

TWO SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

Four Little Misehiefs.

By Rosa MuLHoLianp.

“A charming bright story about real children.” Watchman.

Little Tottie, and Two Other Stories,

By THomas AROBER,

“The book is a most alluring prize for the younger ones.”—Schoolmaster.

Naughty Miss Bunny.

By Crara Munnonpanp.
“This naughty child is positively delightful.”-

—Land and Water.

‘Chirp and Chatter; Or, Lassons rrom Firnp anp Tres. By

ALicE Bangs.

With 54 Illustrations by Gorpon Browne.

“A nicer present for a child one could not selecu. '—Glasgow Herald.

BLACKIE’S EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES.
‘In Crown 8vo, cloth extra, each with Tinted or Coloured Dlustrations,

rae ee Daring and Danger. By

HENTY.

The Seven Golden Keys. By Jars
E, ARNOLD.

The Story of a Queen. By Mary
C. ROWSELL.

Joan’s Adventures at the North
Pole and Elsewhere. By ALicE
CORKERAN,.

Filled with Gold. By JENNIE PER-
RETT.

Edwy: Or, Was he a Coward? By
ANNETTE LYSTER.

The Battlefield Treasure. By F.
BAYFORD HARRISON.
Yarns on the Beach. By G. A.

HENTY.
ATerrible Coward. By G. M. Fenn.

The Late Miss Hollingford. By
Rosa MULHOLLAND.

Our rane apd other Stories: By
Amy W.

The es te his Dog. "By Mary
C. ROWSELL.

Into the Haven. By ANNIE S. Swan.

Tom _Fineh’s Monkey. By J. ©.
HUTCHESON.

Our General: A Story for Girls, By
ELIZABETH J. LySA@Ht.

Aunt Hesba’s Charge. By Euiza-
BETH J. LYSAGHT.

By Order of Susen Maude. By
LovIsA CRoW.

Miss Grantley’s Girls, and the Stories
she told them. By THOS. ARCHER.

The Troubles of Little Tim. By
GREGSON Gow.

Down and Up Again. By GREGsoN
Gow.

The Happy Lad. By B. BJORNson.

The Patriot Martyr, and other Nar-
ratives of Female Heroism.

Madge’s Mistake. By ANNIE E.
ARMSTRONG.

Box of Stories, By Horace Happy-
MAN.

When I was a Boy in China, By

YAN PHoU LEE,

‘*We are able to recommend one and all of these; their excellence is remark-

rble.”—School Guardian.
‘i : f :
6 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BLACKIE’S SHILLING SERIES.

Square 16mo, 128 pp., elegantly bound in cloth, with Frontigf eces in
Colours. nw

Mr. Lipscombe’s Apples. By Juzra
GoDDARD.
A Gypsy aeainee Her Will. By

An zmlgrant, Boy’s Story. By
Ascott R, Hors.

The Castle on the Shore. By Isa-
BEL HORNIBROOE.

John a’ Dale. By Mary C. RowsELL.
Jock and his Friend. By Cora
LANGTON.

Gladys St or The Sister's Charge. By
In i eee le Holidays. By JEN-

NETT HUMPHREYS.
How the Strike Began. By EMMA
LEsuin,

Tales from the Russian of Madame
Kubalensky.

Cinderelia’s Cousin. By PENELOPE.
Their New Home. By A. 8. FENN.
Janie’s Holiday. By C. REDFoRD.
The Children of Hayecombe. By
ANNIE §. FENN. |

The Cruise of the ‘‘Petrel.” By
_ FF. M Homes,

The Wise Princess. By M. HARRIET

M. CAPES.

A Boy Musician: Or, the Young Days
of Mozart.

Hatto’s Tower. By Many C. Row-
SELL.

Fairy Lovebairn’s Favourites. By
J. DICKINSON.

ote

Alf Jetsam, By Mrs. Gxo. CUPPLEs,
The Redfords, By Mrs. G. CupPLus.
Missy. By F. BayrorD HARRISON.
Hidden Seed. By EMMA Lesire.
Jack’s Two Sovereigns. By ANNIE
8S. FENN. ,

Ursula’s Aunt. By ANRIE'S. FENN.
A Little Adventurer. By GREGsoN
OW. : ws

Olive Mount. By ANNIE 8. Fenn.
Three Little Ones. By C. LANGTON.
Tom aa cicine Mistake, By Emma

ie lite Brothers.
RIET M. CAPES.

The New Boy at Merriton.
The Blind Boy of Dresden.
Jon of Iceland: A True Story.
Stories from Shakespeare.
Every Man in his Place.

Fireside Fairies and Flower
Fancies,

To the Sea in Ships.

Little Daniel: a Story of the Rhine.

Jack’s Victory: Stories about Dogs.

Story of a King: By one of his Sol-
ers.

By M. Har-

Prince Alexis, or Old Russia.
Sane the Serf: Stories of Russian
8.

True Stories of Foreign History.

“The stories are without exception highly interesting, and all enforce some
desirable truth, Teachers should make a note of this excellent series.” Teacher?

Aid.
BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN, 7.



THE NINEPENNY SERIES OF BOOKS FOR
CHILDREN.

Neatly bound in cloth extra.

Each contains 96 pages and a Coloured

Illustration.

Things will Take a Turn, By
BEATRICN HARRADEN.

Max or Baby. By Ismay THorn.

The Lost Thimble: and other Stories.
.By Mrs. MusGRAVE.

Si Bek aevandys or the Heir of Castle

Fergus. y E. J. LYSaGHr.
A Day of Adyontures By CHAR-
LOTTE WYATT.

The Golden Plums: and other Stories.
By FRANCIS CLARE.

The Queen of Squats. By ISABEL
HORNIBROOK.

Shueks: A Story for Boys. By Emma
LESLIB.

Sylvia Brooke. By M. Harriet M.
CAPES.

The Little Cousin. By A. 8. FENN.
In Cloudland. By Mrs. MusgRAVE.
pales ead the Gypsies. By Kate

Hans the Painter. By Mary C.
ROWSELL,

Little Troublesome,
HORNIBROOK.

My pay, May. By Harrint BouLt-

By ISABEL

A bitte Hero. By Mrs. Mus-

ears ae Pilgrimage. By
JESS FLEMING.

Harold’s Ambition, . By JENNIE
PERRET?,
Sepperl th ee Devmey Boy. By

Aboard aoe Meena
GEORGE CUPPLES.

A Blind Pupil. By ANNIE S. FENN.
Lost and Found. By Mrs. Carb
ROTHER.

By Mrs.

Eishenman Grim. By Mary C.
WSELL.

ue ate admirably adapted for the young. The lessons deduced are such

as to mould children’s minds in a

‘ood groove.

We cannot too highly commend

them for their excellence.”—Schoo rretrese.



SOMETHING FOR THE VERY LITTLE ONES.
Fully Illustrated. 64 pp., 82mo, cloth. Sixpence each.
* Tales Easy and Small for the Youngest of AN. Inno word will you see more

letters than three.

By JENNETT HUMPHREYS.

Old Dick Grey and Aunt Kate’s Way. Stories in little words of not more than

four letters.
Maud’s Doll and Her Walk.

By JENNET? HUMPHREYS.
In Picture and Talk. In little words of not

more than four letters. By JENNETT HUMPHREYS.

In Holiday Time, And other Stories.
~ letters, .By JENNETT HUMPHREYS.

By Mrs, A. H. GARLICK.

Whisk and Buzz.

In little words of not more than five
8 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.

THE SIXPENNY SERIES FOR CHILDREN.
Neatly bound in cloth extra, Each contains 64 pages and a Coloured Cut.

A Cte Man of War.
TIDDEMAN.

Lady Daisy. By CAROLINE STEWART
Dew. By H. Mary WILSON.
Chris’s Old Violin. By J. LockHart.
Mischievous Jack, By A. CORKRAN.
The Twins. By L. E. TWDEMAN.
Pet’s Project. By Cora LANGTON.
The Chosen Treat. By C. Wyatt.
Little Neighbours, By A S. Fenn.
Jim. By CHRISTIAN BURKE.

Little Curiosity: Or, A German Christ-
mas. By J. M. CALLWELL.

Sara the Wool-gatherer.
Fairy Stories: told by PENELOPE.
A New Year’s Tale. ByM.A.CURRIE.
Little Mop. By Mrs. Bray.

‘The Tree Cake. By W. L. Rooper.
Nurse Peggy, and Little Dog Trip.
Fanny’s King. By DARLEY DALE.

By L. BE.

Wild Marsh Marigolds. By D. Daz.
Kitty’s Cousin. By Hannan B.
MACKENZIE. .
Cleared at Last.

DARD.

A Year with Nellie. By A.8. FEnn.

Little Dolly Forbes. By Do.

The Little Brown Bird. A Story of
Industry.

The Maid of Domremy.

Little Erie: a Story of Honesty.

Unele Ben the Whaler.

The Palace of Luxury.

The Charcoal Burner.

Willy Black: a Story of Doing Right.

The Horse and His Ways.

The Shoemaker’s Present.

Lights to Walk by.

The Little Merchant.

Nicholina: a Story about an Iceberg.

By JULIA GopD-

A SERIES OF FOURPENNY REWARD BOOKS,
Each 64 pages, 18mo, Illustrated, in Picture Boards.

A Start in Life. By J. LockHART.

Happy Childhood, By AIMEE DH
ENOIX DAWSON.

Dorothy’s Clock. By Do.
Toddy. By L. E. TMDEMAN.

Stories about my Dolls, By FELICIA
MELANCTHON.

Stories about my Cat Timothy.
Delia’s Boots. By W. L. Roopzr. ’
Lost on the Rocks. By R. ScorTsEr.

A Kitten’s Adventures. By Caro-
LINE STEWART.

Holidays at Sunnycroft. By ANNI
S. SWAN. i

Clifnbing the Hill. By Do.
A Year at Coverley. By Do.

Phil Foster. By J. LockHARt.

Papa’s Birthday. By W. L. Roopmr.

The Charm Fairy. By PENELOPE.

eee Tales for Little Children.
By M. A. CURRIE.

Worthy of Trust. By H. B. Mac

KENZIE,
Brave and True. By GREGSON Gow.

The Children and the Water-Lily.
By JuL1a GODDARD.

Poor Tom Olliver. By Do.
Maudie and Bertie. GREGSON Gow.
Johnnie Tupper’s Temptation. Do.

Fritz’s Experiment. By LEriria
M‘LINTOCE.

Luey’s Christmas-Box.

** A Complete List of Books for the Young, prices from 4d. to 7d. 6d.,
with Synopsis of their Contents, will be supplied on Application.

BLACKIE & SON, Lim1rep: Lonpon, Guascow, & EDINBURGH.
Wh |26\5

HUGHES & HARBER,