Citation
Casket of gems

Material Information

Title:
Casket of gems for boys & girls ; with beautifully coloured plates
Place of Publication:
[S.l
Publisher:
s.n.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[2], 224 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1895 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1895 ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1895 ( rbbin )
Onlays (Binding) -- 1895 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Onlays ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage:
England
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes index.
General Note:
Published in England?: price on cover is three shillings & sixpence.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026523796 ( ALEPH )
50734217 ( OCLC )
ALF9540 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text














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THE EDITOR.



















MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES,

CHAPTER I,

ACK WILTON was enjoying his holidays at the sea

J side town of Rosaport. Everything was new to him

and the delights of the sea never ceased to charm
him. He liked nothing better than to be out on the
dancing waves, either rowing along with his papa, or
catching the lively little fish that were to be found in the
bay. Sometimes, too, he got a sail in a yacht, and then his
happiness was supreme, insomuch that when he went to
bed at night, he could speak of nothing else—talked about
sleeping with his head to the bow and his feet to the stern,
and in the morning was often found by his nurse, putting
up his sheet for a mainsail, or fishing with a string having
a crooked pin at the end, for the slippers that lay on the
bedroom floor. Now, it happened that in Rosaport the
people got up a very large aquarium,—that is, a kind of
show in which you see great tanks, partly made of glass,
and filled with salt or fresh water, as may be required. In
these are placed all kinds of fish and other creatures that
live in the water. When you look through the glass, you
can see them dash about, or walk or creep, just as they
would do if they were in the sea itself. “Jack’s papa
procured him a ticket, which admitted him at any time;
and as he was greatly pleased with all he saw there, he
went to the aquarium very often. One day he found him-
self almost alone in the place, and was looking at the funny
movements of a large crab, when the odd creature climbed
up the little artificial rockery in the tank, and stood on
the top, which was above the surface of the water. Jack

B



4 Mk. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

noticed that its back looked blue and red like the face of a
boy suffering from extreme cold, and that its nippers were
large and strong. It first darted its little horny eyes right
and left, as if to see if Jack was quite alone; then it
trimmed its feelers, as a gentleman trims his moustache,
and at last, in a sharp, piping voice, cried, “ Hulloa, little
fellow, I’m Mr. Crab!” Jack was surprised, and not a
little afraid; but recovering himself, he felt inclined to be
angry, for he did not like to be called “little” Did he
not wear a regular hat upon Sundays, and was he not
looking forward to having a man’s coat in a year? Never-
theless, it was not everybody who could boast of a chat
with a crab, and so he resolved to be civil.

“Good morning, Mr. Crab, my name is Jack Wilton.”

“Come nearer then, Jack; for I am old, and my voice is
weak.”

“Here I am,” said Jack, going quite close to the tank,
and bending over it; “but no nipping, mind!” for his nose
was dangerously near.

“Nipping! Ha-ha!” laughed Mr. C. “Oh dear, no;
besides, your nose would not be good to eat, though I were
to take a bit. No, no, I wish to have a talk with you; for,
you see, although this tank is full of different kinds of crea-
tures, I am rather lonely, being the only crab in it. Then,
the people who come crowding to see us, only wait a minute
or two and pass on. Sometimes, indeed, some wise-looking
folks, with spectacles on, stand and watch me for a long
time; but then they keep calling me long names, and’ I
hate that. One man, the other day, called me a crustacean,
and I felt as if I could have clawed him.” And here Mr.
C. got up, and stamped with rage, four feet at a time.

“But you should not be angry with people: for calling
you a crustacean,” said Jack, “for that is just what you
are.

“No, I’m not: I’m not half so crusty as some of my
neighbours.”

“Oh, but that’s not what Imean. A crustacean is just a





MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 5

shell-fish,” said Jack, who had heard about such things at
~ school.

“ Well, well, never mind! Crab is the name that I like
best, all the same.”

“ You seem to have a nice set of neighbours,” suggested
Jack, changing the subject. :

«Oh, pretty fair. There’s Lazy Lobster now, as we call
him here. You can see him fumbling away at something
in that dark corner down below there. He is always in the
way, and I am constantly tripping over his feelers.”

“The proper word is ¢endacula,” said Jack with some
pride of learinng.

«Ten what ?” asked Mr. C.

“ Ten-tac-u-la— feelers, as you called them just now.”

“But he has only ¢wo,” persisted Mr. C.

“J know that well enough,” quoth Jack somewhat snap-
pishly, “but the two feelers are called tentacula for all that.”

«That seems odd : but you should know best. Well, Lazy
this very morning got hold of one of my hind legs, think-
ing it was something to eat, and didn’t he give it a squeeze !
I declare I feel it sore yet. He is not a bad fellow though,
and we often have a little chat about our frolics in the dear
old sea. I have many other neighbours. There are the
little black whelks that slide about on the rocks like snails,
with their houses on their backs, and sometimes, when I
am smart enough, I snap up a prime juicy one. Did you
ever taste a whelk, Jack ?”

“Oh, often and often,” cried Jack with delight, “but they
were boiled though.”

“ Eh ? * Boiled, ‘boiled’—what’s ‘boiled’ ?”

“Don’t you know? Why, it means being put in a pot
with water, and then placed on a fire, and the heat goes all
through the water, till it bubbles and steams long enough to
prepare the whelks for eating.”

“Oh—ah—yes—I see. Are c—crabs ever boiled, Jack?”
asked Mr. C. in a sickly manner.

“Yes, often. They are not good till they are boiled.”



6 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

“Indecd!” said Mr. C., getting red in the face. “Then
since I am not boiled I must be bad, it seems. I prefer to
be bad; so you had better go home and get yourself boiled
to make you a good boy, and you can choose a more worthy
companion for the future,” and so saying, he scrambled
down from his perch, and almost hid himself among the
weeds beneath.

Jack at first felt inclined to laugh, but he was sorry Mr.
Crab had misunderstood him; and having heard that mis-
understandings always grow worse the longer they are left
unexplained, he determined to coax his friend up, so as to
put matters right at once. He therefore tapped on the
glass of the tank, wagged his finger, and cried, “ Do come
up, Mr. Crab; I did not mean to vex you. Please, come
up, and Ill explain all about it.” For along time Mr. C.
only shook his back, as if to say, “I wont,” and tried to
hide himself altogether out of sight. But kindly looks and
kindly words have been known to reach the hearts of even
the lower animals, and so Jack continued to entreat Mr.
C. to come up. At last he was rewarded, for though he
looked very sullen, the huffy old thing came slowly up
to his place to hear Jack’s explanation.

« All I meant was,” he said, “that crabs were not good
for food to man till they are boiled. I did not wish you
to think that crabs were bad. God made crabs for some
useful purpose, and so they must be good creatures in their
own way.”

“T see, I see,” said Mr. Crab; “but before I forgive you
quite, tell me this, Jack: Have you ever eaten a crab ?”

“No, never. I am quite sure.”

“Then it is all right. Let us shake claws over it.”

Jack fearlessly put out his hand, and although Mr. C.
gave him a squeeze that brought the tears to his eyes,
he bore it like a man, and Mr. C. and he were good
friends ever after.

“And now,” said Jack, “please tell me something more
about your neighbours.”





MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.” 7

“J will to-morrow, but not to-day, for here comes a

crowd of people, so you had better be off.”

“Very well; but I shall come earlier to-morrow. Good
bye!” and Jack went home to tell his little brothers and
sisters of all that he had seen and heard.



Cuapter II.

Next day, early in the forenoon, Jack went to the aqua-
rium, and found Mr. Crab in an excellent humour, for he
had just had a toothsome breakfast off a nice bit of raw
herring, his tastes being like those of the Germans, who
prefer the raw herring to the boiled.

“Good morning, Mr. Crab.”

“Good morning, Jack,” said he, getting up to his place.
“Tt is very good of you to spare me so much of your time,
when you might be outside at your games.”

“Qh, I come because I like to hear you, and you promised
to tell me more about your neighbours, you know.”

“Quite right. Well, where shall I begin? I have so
many neighbours, as I told you—mussels, oysters, limpets,
sea-urchins, starfish, besides several kinds of fish. I think
I shall tell you something about those flower-like creatures,
of various colours, which you see sticking on the rocks.”

“T know them,” cried Jack, “they are called sea-
anemones.”

“Indeed! “we call them slyyedlzes, because, although they
look so pretty and innocent, their leaves are nothing but
feelers for catching unwary small animals that get within
their reach. I remember, when I was a little fellow, not
much bigger than the locket on your chain, sidling across
the top of one of them, fancying it was nothing but a
beautiful sea-weed, when I felt the soft leaf-feelers closing
rcun. me, and I was being gradually sucked down into its

B 2



8 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

stomach, when, luckily for me, my sharp shell cut the
creature in two, and I managed to escape from between the
halves. A day or so afterwards, I saw the two bits quite
happy, and fishing away—two sly-jellies instead of one!”

“Oh, Mr. Crab, what a story!” cried Jack laughing.

“Quite true, I assure you,” said Mr. C., with much
gravity. “And what is more, such things happen in the
sea every day.” * ae

Jack did not feel certain about it, but he was afterwards
informed by his papa that Mr. Crab was right.

“Now, Jack, look down at the gravel. Do you seea
huge whelk-shell moving about very quickly—far more
quickly than any real whelk could move ?”

“Yes, yes, I see it. Ha-ha! how it is hobbling about to
be sure!” and Jack burst into a fit of laughing, and indeed
for a time he almost forgot Mr. Crab, in watching the funny
tilts and tumbles of the clumsy yet fidgety old shell.

“That’s the comic fellow of the tank,” said Mr. C.
“Wait a minute, and you will see him for yourself.”

“Hooray! there he is! and I know him,” shouted Jack,
as he saw the tiny head and two little claws of a crab peep
out from under the big shell. “I know him! it’s the
Hermit crab. He is always half-dressed, and he has to
stick his hind quarters into whatever shell comes handiest.”

“Quite right, Jack; and now I will tell you a queer thing
that happened just the other morning. One of the sly-
jellies or an—an—what did you call them ?”

“ Anemones.”

“Yes, one of the anemones, quite a youngster, could get
no rest on account of his being tickled by Lazy Lobster’s
twotacula, and ”>—_

“ Zen-tacula,” interrupted Jack.

“And so,” continued Mr. C., taking no notice, “he slipped
down from his place, and got on to the Hermit’s old whelk-
shell, while crabbie was sound asleep inside. In the
morning, the Hermit woke up, and feeling something heavy
on the top of him, set off at a great rate round the gravel-







Mk. CRAL AND HIS ADVENTURES. 9

space, trying to shake it off. The anemone enjoyed the
ride immensely, spreading out its feelers to balance itself.”

“Just like the riders in the circus,” said Jack.

“And while it went round on its jovial ride, the limpets
canted up their shells to get a view, the whelks put out their
telescope eyes, the mussels gaped with astonishment, old
Lazy almost cracked his sides with mirth, and the merry
little fish above nearly drowned themselves with laughing,”
and here Mr. Crab’s feelers wiggle-waggled, and his nippers
snap-snapped like fingers and thumbs, as if he heartily
enjoyed the very remembrance of the fun.

“Soon after,’ continued he, “the poor Hermit, panting
after so hard a run, came clean out of the shell, regardless
of what beholders might think, and begged Master Anemone
to stop his fun, and get off the shell. After much slipping
and sliding Master A. did get off, and amid the greatest
laughter, poor crabbie got into his old shell, back foremost.”

“That was jolly good fun,” remarked Jack. “But, Mr.
Crab, you said a little ago, that the fish were nearly drowned.
How could a fish be drowned when water is its own proper
element ?”

“Easily. You know that a fish breathes by means of
gills. The water enters by the mouth. The air it contains
is kept by these gills, and then the water passes out behind.
If the water were to rush into the gills first, the fish would
not be able to breathe, and so it would be drowned. When
it is taken out of the water, the gills stick together like
bits of wet paper, and can not breathe then, so that the
fish dies.”

“ How are you able to live out of the water, then ?”

“ Oh, my gills are kept in a kind of box, which holds enough
water to keep them in good condition for breathing while
I take a ramble on the shore, or while I have a chat with
you, Jack. I have only to take a dip, and then I am all
right for a while,” and suiting the action to the word, Mr.
Crab let himself down to the bottom of the tank, and after
some time came up smiling to the surface.



10 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

“T could not do that,” sighed Jack, “but I know a big
fellow at our school who can dive, and keep under the
water for a good while.”

« Ah, but he cannot breathe while he is down, as I can,”
said Mr. C.

“Why?”

“Tam not sure, but I think your gills are not the same
as mine.”

“Oh, [have no gills; my breathing things are called lungs,
and I think yours are also called by the same name; and
now that I remember, my lungs can only breathe in air,
and when water gets in they can’t. I know that, every-
time I try to swim.”

“And so, you see, if you had water to breathe, you
would speedily drown.”

“Yes, thank you, I understand it all now.”

“ By the way, Jack, when you are going to have a new
suit, do you need to hide till it is ready.”

“Qh no,” replied Jack laughing, “I wear my old things
till the new ones come home from the tailor’s.”

“Happy boy!” cried Mr. C. “It is quite different with .
me. When my body gets too big for my shell, I drop out
of it, and have to hide beneath a rock, for, you see, | am
then so soft that even my own brothers would bite me if
they could.”

“Horrid!” cried Jack, “but do you know, one of my
brothers once bit my arm through my clothes!”

“O Jack, surely that is not true.”

“No, Mr. Crab, it is quite true.”

“Well, well, I never heard anything so dreadful. We
poor stupid things might easily make a mistake about a soft |
brother, and even eat him; but for boys to bite those they
know to be their brothers, and to bite what they cannot
eat, seems to me both wicked and wasteful.”

“And so it is; but please to tell me, Mr. Crab, do you
manage to get out of your shell quickly ?”

“Oh yes, just in a twinkling.”





MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. It

“ Do you break the old shell in pieces first ?”

“No, no. We come out clean, leaving the shell whole.”

“Every bit of you?”

“ Every bit.”

“Then do please tell me how to do it,” said Jack in his
most coaxing manner, “for mamma says I am very slow at
getting out of my clothes when it is bedtime, and it would
be so jolly to say ‘here goes!’ and be into my night-shirt
before she could say ‘Jack Robinson.’”

“JT would be very glad to tell you all about it,” replied
Mr. C., “if you had a shell the same as mine; but with
your buttons and strings, and so on—no, I don’t see how it
could be done.”

Jack felt disappointed, but said nothing, and as people
just then began to crowd into the aquarium, he had to say
“good bye” for that day.

Cuapter III.

As Jack was required at home next day, he did not go as
_usual to see his friend; but early on the day following he
was at the tank, and as Mr. Crab was waiting, the con-
versation was speedily renewed.
“T’ve been wearying for you,” said Mr. C. “Yesterday,
I waited till my lungs were almost dry in the hope of your
coming. But perhaps you are tired of my long stories ?”
“Not a bit,” said Jack, “I hope you are not nearly done
yet. Go on, please.”
“Well, since you are so kind, I shall tell you to-day of
a little adventure I had when I was quite small in size—
after my tail had been tucked up, you know.”
“Your tail!” exclaimed Jack. “Who ever heard of a
crab’s tail ?”
On this, Mr. C. begged Jack to take hold of him, and
to turn him on his back. This done,—for he was not



12 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

frightened—Mr. C. opened the part of his shell which I
have heard boys and girls call his “ purse.”

“Do you see that, Jack?” said Mr. C. from beneath.

SNES

“That was my tail when I was a baby-crab, in fact I
was at that time very like a common shrimp, and used my
tail as he does. By-and-bye, as I grew larger, it grew
bigger and broader, and at last was tucked up beneath me,
as you see. And now, please, turn me back to my old
position, for I don’t like lying with my legs in the air like
this.”

Mr. Crab’s request was complied with, and when he was
all right again, Jack thanked him for the information given,
and begged him to go on with his story.

“To begin then :—One fine summer day, some friends
and I agreed to have a little excursion to a certain stone-
quay ina Highland Loch. Our old folks had told us that
boats often came to this place, knocking off mussels and
other shell-fish with their sharp bows, while the people
that sailed in them pitched crumbs and other dainties into
the water. So, feeling sure of plenty to eat, we walked a
long way by a winding path of sand, and at length arrived
at the quay. Truly there was a feast of good things, and
we lost no time in beginning to eat. We were just in the
midst of it, when plump down into our midst came a great
big juicy mussel, its shell off, and all ready for eating.
There was a great rush for it, but the biggest fellow got
hold of it and, wonderful to tell! he had no sooner begun
to enjoy it, than he rose higher and higher through the ©
water, until he was clean out of sight! We had scarcely
recovered from our surprise, when down came another
mussel, if possible safpzer than the first. Again it was
seized, and up, up, rose friend number two. The same thing
was repeated again and again till five of us were away, and
I only remained; but it was only for a little, for I too got a
mussel, clutched it, began to eat it, and was hoisted clean
out of the water to find myself soon after, with my five





MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 13

friends, in what I was told was an old jelly-can. Oh dear!
Such a fearful row as there was in that can! Just fancy,
Jack, if six boys, with their four-and-twenty limbs, were
thrown higgledy-piggledy into a barrel without a chance
of getting out, what a scrimmage there would be! Well,
here were we six, with twelve nippers and forty-eight legs
amongst us, topsy-turvy, wiggledy-waggledy, clawing, scrap-
ing, pinching, and pushing each other with might and main;
and our woes made worse bythe wicked boy who had
caught us, standing above us, clapping his hands, and
shouting with laughter at the fine sport we made for him.”
Jack’s eyes twinkled, and he stuffed his handkerchief into
his mouth in case Mr. C. should see him laughing, and be
offended.

“ Shortly after,” continued Mr. Crab, “he carried us up
to a dusty road, and, having got a long switch, he tumbled
us all out, and tried to drive us before him like a flock of
sheep. But none of us cared to walk straight forward, so
we bolted here and there—some tried to get over the sea
wall, some tried to plunge into the ditch, in fact we scam-
pered in all directions, eager to escape, for we were almost
choked with dust, and nearly dead with fright. When our
poor weak legs refused to carry us further, we were switched
along the road ever so many yards at a time. Luckily for
me, I managed .to get out of the way, and, lame and
wearied, I limped down to the sea-side, and alone of all
the six, arrived at home, where I need not tell you, there
was great grief over the loss of so many interesting crab-
lings. But that boy was punished, Jack, punished by
myself without my knowing it till afterwards. Fora while I
never went near the stone quay without fear and trembling;
but, as nothing happened to me, I grew bolder, and went
quite close to it. Once I was busy over a bit of string, and
trying to see if it would eat, when I found the string being
pulled up. I tried hard to let go, but one of my nippers
had got entangled in a loose strand of the cord, and I could
not: I was therefore hauled ashore. This time there were



14 MR. CRAB AND FAIS ADVENTURES.

two boys; my captor and another, who was busy fishing.
My captor seemed to have some ill will to the other boy,
for no sooner did he get me free from the string, than
he walked on tip-toe to the place where the other was
looking earnestly into the water, expecting a nibble, and
dropped me down his back, between his shirt and his skin.
The place was hot and uncomfortable, so I scrambled and
scratched my hardest, while the poor fisher yelled with
the pain, and danced about as if he were mad. The
more he danced the deeper I went down, and the more
fiercely did I struggle to escape—pinching and clawing
at his smooth bare back in order to help myself out.
The boy’s yells brought many people rushing to the quay
—most of them thinking that he must have swallowed a
hook, or that a hook had gone into his eye. At last a big
hand came down his back, and I—the innocent cause of
all the disturbance—was dragged forth to view. Before
being pitched into the water, I had time to see that the
boy I had been hurting was none other than my old
enemy of the jelly-can and the crab-race! I did not
mean to cause him pain; I only wished to get out of an
unpleasant place; and yet, I should not wonder if his back,
that night, had much writing in red ink about the powers
of a crab. Never be cruel to the lower animals, Jack,
for if you be, you are sure to be punished in the long
run. But I am getting dry now, and you have waited
long enough for to-day. If you come to-morrow, I have a
story to tell you of a fight I once had.” .

“Qh, thank you, thank you, Mr. Crab, I shall be delighted
to come, if I be quite well, and mamma has nothing for.me
to do. Good-bye!” and Jack went home, taking hearty fits
of laughing by the way, as he remembered the comic story
of the crab race.





MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 15

CuaptTer IV.

“Goop morning, Jack,” said Mr. Crab, as his young friend
came up next morning, radiant with expectation.

“Good morning, Mr. Crab, and now for ‘the fight.’”

“Dear me, you are in a great hurry; but I'll tell you all
about it directly;” and settling himself on a nice bit of
- sea-weed, which he had trailed up for the purpose, he went
on thus :—

“After a long and dreary winter one year, when food
was scarce and work was hard, I resolved to visit a distant
part of the sea-bottom, where, as I was told, there was
plenty of food. I shall not weary you with an account of
my journey; it is enough to tell you that at length I
reached a beautiful region, where there were tracts of fine
-sand, splendid clumps of sea-weed, and here and there the
great brown rocks, with quite a choice of holes in which to
stay. I picked out one of the best, and was just settling
down after a dainty meal of sweet sea-slugs, when into my
place came one of the prettiest young lady-crabs I had ever
seen. Her shell was lovely, her eyes jet black, and her
claws the perfection of elegance and grace. When first
she saw me, she moved shyly backwards, as if anxious to
escape my notice; but I begged her to come in and make
herself at home—which she could do all the more readily
since it was her own house of which I had coolly taken
possession. I suppose, too, that she felt satisfied with my
appearance, for, after a little, she became quite chatty, and
told me all I wished to learn about this part of the sea.
One thing alone, she said, was wanting to make her own
happiness and that of her neighbours complete—and that
was the death or expulsion of the great Velvet-Fiddler.
About a mile off, in a thickly weeded part of the water,
the monster lived. He was gigantic in size, and was the
terror of the sea-bottom for miles around. His chief



+

16 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

delight was to fight every crab he met, and never to leave
off till he had either crippled or killed his opponent.
Besides that, he was the horror of a small colony of Green-
back Crabs, whole families of whom he had slain and
afterwards eaten. In the caves about this dreadful abode,
she said, the skeletons and claws of the multitudes he had
killed, were to be found lying an inch deep. He had but
recently dared to attack the beautiful Shelline, as my
handsome young crab was called; and she shewed me one
of her toes which he had rudely broken. As she told me
these things, my heart leapt at the thought that I might
be the means of punishing the cruel monster, for it is ever
the pride of the male to defend the female of his race

“¢Shelline” said I, ‘I shall not rest till this place is rid |
of this wicked monster. This instant I shall sally forth
in quest of him. Kindly examine my armour. My nip-
pers, I know, are in fine pinching order, and ready for the
fray |’

“* Bravest!’ she replied, after a careful inspection, ‘your
shell-armour is tight and without a flaw. Go, then,’ she
continued, with tears in her eyes—at least I think there
were, for I could not see aright for the water in my own,
‘Go, then, and may you be successful in your enterprise.
Wear this for my sake, and “when this you see, remember
me.”’ With that, she presented me with a pretty blade of
dulse, pulled fresh and glossy from the side of the rock.

“JT placed it in my bosom, and went forth on my venture.
The day was lovely. The water above me was green as
emerald, the sands below me yellow as gold. ‘Oh that I
had the fins of a fish,’ thought I, ‘that with lightning speed
I might dart to the den of the crab-slayer!’ But it was
no use wishing, so I strode onwards, striking terror by my
warlike mien to the heart of flounder and sole, and skate
and halibut, as they sped from before me. Long eels
wriggled quickly from my path; pink star-fish lay flat at
my approach, and spiky urchins rolled aside to let me pass.
When I was more than half-way, my progress was delayed





MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 17

by a thick grove of long string-like weeds through which
'] had to travel; and the trouble I had among them, caused
-me to feel somewhat tired before I reached the other side.
Here, however, I found the settlement of the Greenbacks—
creatures very small in size compared with myself—but bold
-and enterprising. I fancy they took me to be the crab-
slayer at first, for they fled at my approach, and as they
were nearly all lame, their efforts at running were not very
successful. Speedily I managed to assure them that my
intentions were peaceful, and that I had come for the
purpose of ridding them of their bloodthirsty neighbour.
No sooner had I said this, than they danced around me,
_lame legs and all. They brought me all kinds of nice
things to eat, so that after a short time I felt quite
refreshed, and continued my journey. Two of the oldest
colonists undertook to shew me the way, and as we went
along, they told me many stories of the monster’s cruelty.
They oped I would be prosperous, but they were afraid
lest I should have the same fate as many others who had tried
before. The monster, it seemed, had a way of dragging
the opponent, whom he could neither maim nor kill, to the
edge of a tremendous precipice that was behind his#den,
and throwing him over it. At last we came to the entrance
of a gloomy weed-forest, and my companions wishing me
every success, left me to pursue my way alone. I had not
gone many paces, when a terrible figure rose up before me.
It had great glowering eyes, a thick rugged-looking body,
and legs and claws so long and fierce, that my courage
began to give way. He was at least thrice my own size,
and as he came stalking out from among the slimy weeds,
and into the sickly twilight, I was so frightened, that I had
half a mind to turn and run. A look, however, at the
love-token which Shelline had given me, restored me to
myself, and I made bold to stay.
“«Wretched crab,’ said he, addressing me in the crustiest
of tones, ‘what business have you here ?’
“Wretched, thyself, cried I, ‘thou heartless creature, thou



18 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

slayer of the innocent, thou villainous crab-maimer, I am
here to slay the slayer, and to give thy claws to the Green-
backs !’

“Ha, ha, he scornfully replied, ‘come on then, and I
shall scrunch thee as I would the veriest periwinkle !’

“With that we came to close quarters, and, grappling
together, we wrestled furiously. For some time neither of
us gained any advantage; but I felt myself being gradually
dragged among the slippery weeds that warped about us, or
broke as'we dashed wildly hither and thither. Nearer and
nearer were we coming to the awful precipice about which
I had been warned. I put forth all my strength, and every
joint seemed to crack with the strain; but all seemed of no
use. In vain I plied my nippers on my enemy’s stubborn
shell; I could not break it, nor even crack it. I turned, as a
last chance, upon his long legs, and, lo, they bent, they broke
with the squeeze I gave them. Snap, snap went one after
another, and I thought myself safe, when suddenly I lost
foothold, and over the precipice we went together, the
wretch’s claws grasping my left nipper as if in a vice. With
my right I tried to catch at the weeds that grew on the
face.of the rock, as we reeled and whirled down, down,
down to certain death on the stones below. For a few
moments every effort was useless, but at last 1 grasped a
strong weed, and held on hard. I could do nothing for my
own safety, however, so long as the creature held my left
nipper, and so I hung there scarcely knowing what to do.
By-and-bye, to my great joy, the monster relaxed his grip,
and seemed about to slip off altogether, when he let go
my nipper, and caught one of my legs. To fling off that
leg was the work of a moment, and then, though wounded,
I was free. I managed to drag myself slowly and painfully,
by means of weeds, to the top of the precipice, where I lay
down to rest, and after this, all that happened to me is like
a dream.» I became unconscious, and when I awoke I was
in Shelline’s abode, being carefully tended by her loving
claws. I heard afterwards that a large company of Green-



MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 19

backs, curious to know the result of the fight, had crept
nearer and nearer, till at length they found me out, and
with much labour dragged me home. As the reward of
my bravery I was permitted to marry Shelline, and we
lived very happily together till the sad event which tore
her from me, and brought me to this place.”

“That is a capital story,” said Jack, drawing a long
breath; “but is that quite true about throwing off your leg,
Mr. Crab? I have just been counting the number of your
legs, and I don’t find one wanting. Have you a wooden
one ?”

“There, there You have just asked two questions.
Well, I answer ‘yes’ to the first, and ‘no’ to the second.
Crabs can throw off their legs if they choose, and others
grow on in their place.”

“ That zs queer,” said Jack. “I wish very much it were
the same with us. But I must go home now, Mr. Crab;
and so, thanking you very much for your story, and trying
to remember that it is the pride of the boys to defend the
girls, I must say good-bye,” and off he went in great spirits.

CHAPTER V.

“On Mr. Crab,” cried Jack, as, next morning, he ran up to
the tank. “Oh Mr. Crab, Iam so sorry, but a letter has
come to-day from Uncle John, asking mamma to allow me
to go to him on a visit. Mamma is writing just now, say-
ing I may go, and I shall be off by the first steamer in the
morning. Oh dear, and I shall not hear any more of your
nice stories for a long while, because before my visit to
Uncle is at an end, my holidays will be over, and I shall not
get back to Rosaport any more this year.”

“JT am quite vexed to hear it,” said Mr. C., ‘for I have
really enjoyed having a nice boy to talk to; and, indeed,

it was a great pleasure to me to tell you all about my past
(OD



20 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

_ history. I had many other adventures to tell you, but
these I must keep for you till another year, if we should
both live so long.”

“Won't you tell me one to-day, Mr. Crab.”

“ Oh certainly, if you wish it.”

“] wish it very much, Mr. Crab.”

“Then what shall it be about? Let me see!” and
Mr. C. turned up his horny little eyes, as if thinking what
to say.

“T know what I would like to hear about,” said Jack ; “I
should like you to tell me all about the sad event that
caused you to be imprisoned in the aquarium.”

“T will,” said Mr. C., and proceeded as follows :—*“ At
the request of a large family of youngsters, Shelline and I
agreed to give a grand party, and this was the more easy to
do on account of a storm, which had been the means of
killing many kinds of small fish by dashing them against
the rocky shore. All who were asked to the party had
said they would come, so that a good deal had to be done
to prepare for the occasion. The spot we chose for it was
floored with snow-white lime, being just cockle and other
shells ground small by the waves.”

“Lime!” exclaimed Jack, “where did they get the lime?”

“Out of the water, to be sure; for, though you cannot
_ see it, there is enough of it to give all the creatures of our
kind the shells they wear. When they die, the lime used
in making these shells is just given back to the sea, and it
is prepared by the waves for the animals that need it.”

‘Oh yes, I understand,” said Jack: “please go on about
the party.”

“Tn the midst, then, of this pretty white floor,” continued
Mr. C., “we hada large flat stone fringed all round with
green sea-weed. This was to be our table; and it had to
be a big one, for you know, Jack, we cannot sit down on a
chair as you can, and so we had to get up on the table at
supper-time. Surrounding the place, were a vast number
of tall brown tangles, which just looked like pillars; and,



MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. ai

overhead was a roof of beautiful purple leaves, with spaces
between to let through the soft moonlight we expected to
shine upon us on the party night. Our boy-crabs were
busy hunting for days before, while the girl-crabs stayed at
home to help their mother. Before sun-down on the great
day, our table was spread with all sorts of good things.”

“T should like to hear what things you had,” said
Jack, who thought himself well able to judge of a good
supper.

«* At the one end,” said Mr..C., “we had a fine eel curled
round and round with his head sticking up in the middle ;
at the other, a fat sole, his white side uppermost; along the
sides were different kinds of little fish, each one in an
oyster shell; and in the centre, a fan-shaped shell full of
shrimps, and a monster mussel, the pride of the feast.
This huge creature had defied every effort to get at him for
days; but luckily, my eldest boy-crab, a brave little fellow,
by dint of earnest watching, succeeded at last in catching
him while he was yawning, and dragged him home in
triumph by the beard. Of course many of the creatures on
our table had been dead for several days, but I suppose
you know that some kinds of animal food are all the better
for being kept. At length the night came; everything
was ready, and the guests were beginning to arrive; but,
to our great disappointment, the sky was cloudy, and the
moon not likely to make her appearance. This would have
spoilt all our little arrangements, and our supper would have
become a regular scramble, but for the efforts of Shelline
and myself to keep order. Suddenly, to our amazement
and delight, the fringe round our table began to sparkle
and glitter, and shortly hung like beads of gold on threads
of emerald; the tall tangle-pillars were next lit up with
countless little jets of flame; and, finally, the purple dome
of weeds above us was crusted over with dazzling diamonds.
Our party-hall thus became more lovely than the fairest of
fairy palaces.”

“Splendid! splendid!” shouted Jack ; but suddenly sober-



22 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

ing he added, “but look here, Mr. Crab, is this all true, or
is it only a ‘make up’ ?”

Mr. Crab frowned and seemed offended.

“Perhaps,” said he, “you do not know that sometimes
the sea is full of very little creatures that glisten in the dark
like sparks of fire 2?”

“Oh yes, Mr. Crab, I have heard of them; and I beg
your pardon for appearing not to believe you. I have seen
what you mean, when we have been sailing in our boat, and
the oar made great flashes of light at every dip. They
are said to be phos—phos—tuts! What do you call that
stuff on the end of a match that makes it kindle ?”

“J am sure I don’t know,” said Mr. C.

“Oh, I have it! They are said to be phosphorescent—
yes, that’s the word,” and Jack looked up with conscious
pride. ‘

“And a very long: word it is; I wonder that a little
fellow like you can remember such a big one.”

“Pray, go on with the party. I am sorry I interrupted
you.”

“Tt did not take long to get supper over, and then the
youngsters had great fun with cracker-weeds, games at
hunt the cockle, &c., wrestling matches, walking round the
edge of the table on their hindmost legs, their nippers in
the air, or trying who could get up quickest when tumbled
on their backs. When they were tired, a walk was pro-
posed, so Shelline and I led the way, and the rest followed
in pairs. We went outside to see the illuminations, which
were everywhere as bright and beautiful as in our party-
hall. On we went, forgetting time and distance in the
pleasures of our walk. All at once, there burst upon our
view something we had never seen before. It was, as we
then thought, a palace, about the length of this tank, with
~ beautiful arches lighted up with the strange fires, and with
open spaces between. It had a circular entrance at both
ends, and, curious to see it from the inside, Shelline and I
walked in, and, to our alarm, found ourselves drop suddenly



MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 23

down, the moment we crossed the threshold. The rest
followed, and all were amused at the sudden down-come at
the door-step. We then walked about admiring the place,
and met two or three good-looking lobsters doing the same.
At length, thinking we had been away from home long
enough, we made for the entrance, but found, to our surprise
and horror, that it was high above our reach. We rushed
to the other entrance. It wasthesame. Then there was a
panic! Our joy was turned to woe, as, with frantic gestures,
we sped hither and thither, now dashing ourselves against
the sides, now trying in vain to squeeze ourselves through
the open spaces; and when we found all our efforts useless,
we lay huddled in a corner awaiting the awful fate that
somehow we all expected. The lobsters did not give in
so soon, for they kept feeling here and pushing there for a
long time. Some of their acquaintances outside, seeing
their position, tried to haul them through by their feelers,
but they did not succeed in doing more than hurting the
poor prisoners. Morning dawned, and what we had taken
for a palace, was nothing but a big cage made of wooden
hoops and cordage. Shortly, our prison was violently
shaken, and we felt ourselves being dragged out of the
water. We came ashore in the bay of Rosaport, and found
some rough-looking men standing about us. They seemed
pleased with what they had caught. We were taken out
one by one, and put into acreel or basket. While this was
going on, a gentleman came up, and spying me, he said, ‘ That
is a splendid fellow. How much will you let me have him
for?’ and they struck a bargain, the upshot of which was,
that the gentleman carried me off in a net bag and put me
in this tank. In the hurry, I-did not see Shelline, nor have
I heard of her since. Can you think what has become of
her, Jack 2?”

“Well, Mr. Crab, I am rather afraid that—but I don’t
like to tell you;” and Jack spoke feelingly.

“You don’t think they have b— boiled her, Jack ?”

“] think they have.”



24 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

“Oh dear, dear! poor Shelline!” and Mr. C., forgetting
Jack in his sorrow, plunged down to the bottom of the
tank, and hid himself in its gloomiest corner.

Jack was very sorry for him, and came away bearing
on his mind the evils of such prying curiosity as led to the
disasters here recorded.

THE RIVER.

fc H, tell me, pretty river!
Whence do thy waters flow ? -
And whither art thou roaming,
So pensive and so slow ?”

“My birthplace was the mountain,
My nurse the April showers ;

My cradle was a fountain,
O’er-curtained by wild flowers.

“One morn I ran away,
A madcap, hoyden rill—
And many a prank that day
I played adown the hill!

“And then, ’mid meadowy banks,
I flirted with the flowers,

That stooped, with glowing lips,
To woo me to their bowers.

“But these bright scenes are o'er,
And darkly flows my wave,
I hear the ocean roar,
And there must be my grave!”
Goodrich,





THE CHILDREN’S HOUR. 25

THE CHILDREN’S HOUR.

ETWEEN the dark and the daylight,
When the night is beginning to lower,

Comes a pause in the day’s occupations
That is known as the Children’s Hour.

I hear in the chamber above me
The patter of little feet,

The sound of a door that is opened,
And voices soft and sweet.

From my study I see in the lamplight
Descending the broad hall stair,

Grave Alice and laughing Allegra,
And Edith with golden hair.

A whisper and then a silence ;
Yet I know by their merry eyes
They are plotting and planning together
To take me by surprise.

A sudden rush from the stairway,
A sudden raid from the hall !

By three doors left unguarded
They enter my castle wall!

They climb up into my turret
O’er the arms and back of my chair;
If I try to escape they surround me;
They seem to be everywhere.



26

THE CHILDREN’S HOUR.

They almost devour me with kisses,
Their arms about me entwine,

Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen
In his Mouse Tower on the Rhine!

Do you think, O blue-eyed banditti,
Because you have scaled the wall,
Such an old moustache as I am
Is not a match for you all ?

I have you fast in my fortress,
And will not let you depart,

But put you down into the dungeon
In the round-tower of my heart.

And there will I keep you for ever,
Yes, for ever and a day,

Till the walls shall crumble to ruin,
And moulder in dust away !





AVE HOLD
JO Hows OF THE

os.



— FNS
_ FOR THEY Sow Norgy\
<< saneither do they reap nor



of Gather into barns;
yet your PEAvENLY FATHER





: fe feedeth them +
- ae “ai. ARE









UNCLE BEN’S STORY. 29



















UNCLE BEN’S STORY.

Uncle Ben is a retired sailor, lyin in a village; and he tells this story to two
little girls, Flora Lee and Nellie Green.

ie HEN I was a young man, I went on a whaling
voyage. I will tell you how whales are caught.
“A whale is the largest sea animal; some are a
good deal longer than my barn there. Ships that go out
to catch whales are often three or four years away from
home, and go off thousands of miles.

“The ship has a great many boats, which are hoisted up
at the sides. The men go out in the boats, and, when they
catch a whale, tow it to the ship.

“Almost at the top of the mast, and nearly a hundred
feet from the water, there are two sticks, which are called
the ‘cross-trees.’ When the ship reaches any part of the
ocean where whales are found, men are sent up to the cross-
trees to look out.

“When a whale is seen, one of the men calls out, ‘There
D



30 UNCLE BENS STORY,

she blows!’ This great fish draws water into his mouth,
and then blows it up in the air; and this is what they mean
by ‘blowing.’

“When the men on deck hear this cry, they find out
where the whale is, and then get out the boats and go after
him. They row up to the huge monster of the deep with
very little noise, and then throw one or two harpoons into
him.

“A harpoon isa kind of iron spear, with a wooden handle,
to which a long rope is fastened. When the whale feels the
iron, he dives down into the deep, or swims away as fast as
he can. Sometimes he drags the boat after him, at a fright-
ful speed, for many miles; and it often happens that the
men in the boat have to cut the line, in order to save their
lives.

“When the whale is weak from loss of blood, and tired
out, the boat again steals upon him, and a long lance is
_ thrust into his body. ‘This kills him, if it is well done.

“Very often, when the men ‘attack the whale, he turns
upon the boat, and breaks it all to pieces with a single
slap of his tail, or crushes it all to bits in his great mouth.
The sailors always have a hard time, and are offen killed
in their efforts to conquer the whale.

“When they get the whale alongside the ship, they cut
out the fat, or ‘blubber,’ in long strips, and hoist it on
board the vessel. It is then chopped up in small pieces,
and tried out in great kettles. The oil is put into barrels,
and stowed in the hold.

“T have told you how to catch a whale, so that you may
understand the story which I am now going to tell you.

“T sailed in the ship Fame, for the South Pacific Ocean,
long before either one of you was born. We went round
Cape Horn, which is a very stormy place, and came near
being cast away in a heavy gale.

“But when. we had got into the Pacific Ocean we had
fine weather, and at last reached the ‘feeding ground.’
Though the whale is a monstrous creature, he feeds upon



UNCLE BEN’S STORY. 31

very small animals called ‘squid.’ Of course he must live
where he can find his food.

“One day I was up on the cross-trees, looking out on
the ocean for whales. I had with me a boy of about twelve
years of age. He was as pretty a boy as ever I saw. He
had fair, brown hair, which curled in ringlets on his cheeks
and neck.

“We all loved that boy, for he was a brave and noble
little fellow. He was gentle and kind to the men, and
always obeyed the orders of the officers at once. He was
our pet, and we all treated him just like a younger brother.

“ He could read well, and wrote a handsome hand; and
when he first came on board the ship, I knew he couldn't
be the son of very poor parents, for he did not speak like
boys brought up in the street, and his hand was as white
and soft as that of a fine lady.

“One day I was up on the cross-trees, and George was
with me, as I said before. We were on the lookout for
whales, and he was just as anxious to discover one as
though he had been the captain of the ship.

“While we were sitting there, we fell into a conversation ;
and I asked George how it happened that he came to sea.
He was reluctant to tell me at first, but after a while he
confessed that he had run away from home, and that his
mother did not know where he was. I asked him if he had
ever written to her; and he said he had not, adding, that it
would make her very unhappy if she knew he was on board
a whale ship. But I told him she would be a great deal more
unhappy at not hearing from him at all; and so, after much
persuasion, he promised me that he would write to her.

“ Pretty soon after we had this talk, I saw a whale far off
on the sea. Ina few minutes the men had a boat out, and
George and I were with them pulling away towards the
great fish. :

“We rowed close up to the whale, and sent one iron into
him. Before we could strike him again, he turned upon us,
and with one blow smashed our frail boat all to DIececu:



32 UNCLE BEN’S STORY.

“Dear me!” exclaimed little Flora, with a shudder.

“ Another boat from the ship picked us up. George was
a good swimmer; but I saw that he was sinking this time,
and I bore him up in my arms till he was taken into the
boat. I found that he was badly hurt, for his face was
deadly pale, and he was so faint he could hardly speak.
We had lost the whale ; so we went back to the ship.

“T carried George in my arms to the deck, and then bore
him to his bunk in the forecastle.”

“That was a room to sleep in—wasn’t it?” asked Nellie.

“Yes, child; but it wasn’t any such place as your cham-
ber. It was cold, dark, and damp. I laid the poor boy in
his bunk, and tried to find out where he was hurt; but he
was so weak he could tell me nothing.

“Tf he had been my own son, I could not have felt any
worse. I could not help thinking of his poor mother, as I
sat by the side of his bunk, watching over him. What
would she have said if she could see her darling child, sick
in that dirty, dark place? How she would have wept !

“T did not think poor George was very badly hurt; I did
not want to think so, and I suppose this is the reason why
I did not. The captain went down to see him, and then
got some medicine for him.

“In the evening he seemed to be a little better, and I
hoped he would be well in a day or two. He talked a
little with me, and told me where his pains were. He
spoke of his mother and his home, and seemed to feel
very sad to be so far away from them.

“T sat by his side till eight bells—that is, till twelve -
o'clock. He slept much of the time, and as I bent over
him and listened to his quiet breathing, I thought he was
better, and that he would be able to go on deck the next day.

“You don’t know much about the life of a whaler, I sup-
pose; so you can’t tell how tired and worn out he gets
sometimes. The boats are often out all night, and the men
have to row, when they are so sleepy and tired that they
can hardly hold their heads up.



UNCLE BEN’S STORY. 38

“Well, I had been out in the boat all the night before,
and I was just as tired asa man could be. I could hardly
keep my eyes open, as I sat at the side of the poor sick
boy; but I did not once lose myself while I was on this
duty.

Oat twelve o'clock, finding that George slept easily, I
called one of my shipmates to take my place. He was
very willing to do so; but before I left him, I charged him,
over and over again, to keep awake and mind the boy. He
promised me he would, and I went to my bunk.

“T was so tired that I slept very soundly till near
four o’clock in the morning. My first thought was of poor
George, and jumping out of my berth, I hastened to his
side. My shipmate whom I had left to watch him was
fast asleep.

“T felt very angry with him; but such was my desire to
learn how the sick boy was, that I could think of nothing
else. I looked into the bunk, and all was as still as when I
had left, and I thought he was asleep.

“All was still and calm in the berth—so still and calm
that I trembled with fear. I listened to hear his breathing,
but no sound reached my ear. I then placed my hand
upon his brow. It was as cold as marble.

“ Poor George was dead !

“ Oh, children, I can’t tell you how I felt then. It seemed
just as though our angel had been taken out of the ship. I
wept for him as if he had been my son or my brother.

“From that sleep in which I had left him he had never
awakened, for he lay just as he was at midnight. There
was not a dry eye in the ship when it was told that poor
George, whom we all loved, was dead.

“We dressed him in his clean clothes, and bore his body
upon deck, where we covered it with the American flag.
At noon the sad cry of ‘All hands to bury the dead’ sounded
gloomily through the ship.

“The body of poor George, sewed up in a piece of sail-
cloth, was placed on a plank, still covered with the Ameri-

D2



34 UNCLE BEN’S STORY.

can flag. It was raised upon the rail, ready to be cast into
the sea.

“The captain, with his eyes brimful of tears, and hardly
able to speak from grief, read prayers; and all was ready to
- lower the body into the deep. The canvas had been left
open at the head, and the wind blew the fair brown locks
upon the cold brow of poor George, just as when he had
stood by my side on the cross-trees.

“One by one the sailors kissed his marble cheeks,—
kissed him for his mother,—and wiped the tears from their
brown faces. The canvas was sewed up, the word was
given, and the body slid off the plank into the great ocean,
there to sleep till the graves give up their dead.

“ The ship sailed away upon her course, and it was many
and many a day before we ceased to think of the poor boy
in his ocean grave.” .

LITTLE BY LITTLE.

NE step, and then another,
And the longest walk is ended;

One stitch, and then another,
And the largest rent is mended;
One brick upon another,
And the highest wall is made;
One flake upon another,
And the deepest snow is laid.

So the little coral workers,

By their slow but constant motion,
Have built those pretty islands

In the distant, dark blue ocean;
And the noblest undertakings

Man’s wisdom hath conceived,
By oft-repeated efforts

Have been patiently achieved.





















BUNNY. 37

BUNNY.

c

NE evening last spring,” writes a lady, “my dog
barked at something behind a flower-pot that stood
in the door-porch. I thought a toad was there,

but it proved to be a very young rabbit, a wild one. The

poor thing was in a state of great exhaustion, as if it had been
chased, and had been a long time without food. It was quiet
in the hand, and allowed a little warm milk to be put into its

mouth. Upon being wrapped in flannel and placed in a

basket by the fire, it soon went to sleep. When it awoke,

more milk was offered in a small spoon, which this time
was sucked with right good will; and the little creature
continued to take the milk in this way for several days,
until strong enough to help itself out of acup. It appeared
to become tame immediately, soon learned its name, and I
never saw a happier or merrier little pet. Its gambols on
the carpet were full of fun. When tired with play, it would
feed on the green food and nice bits placed there for it, and
when satisfied, it used to climb up the skirt of the dress,
nestle in the lap or under the arm, and go to sleep. If
this indulgence could not be permitted, then Bunny (as we
called it) would spring into my work-basket, and take a nap
there. At midday it liked to sit in the sun on the window
seat, then it would clean its fur and long ears, each being
separately drawn down, and held by one foot while brushed
by the other. This duty performed, it would stretch at full
length, and basking in the sunbeams, fall asleep. Strange
to tell, all this was going on with the dog in the room, who
had been made to understand that the rabbit was not to be
touched; stranger still, the rabbit ceased to shew any fear
of the dog, but, on the contrary, delighted in jumping on
the dog’s back, and running after his tail. These liberties,
however, were not pleasing to Jewel; they were evidently
only endured in obedience to the commands of his mistress.



38 BUNNY.

Not approving of one favourite being made happy at the
other’s expense, I was obliged to interfere on these occasions,
and call Bunny to order.

“ Being frequently told that a wild rabbit could not be so
thoroughly domesticated, but that it would return to the
woods if it regained its liberty, I feared that if mine got
loose it would certainly run away. Yet I wished it should
be sometimes in the garden to feed upon such green food
as it liked best; for this purpose I fastened it with a collar
and small chain, and, thus secured, led it about. One
evening the chain unfortunately broke, and Bunny was
free! At first we saw it running from place to place with
wild delight, but after a little while we could not see it, and
we hunted in vain under the shrubs, calling it by name
until it became dark; we then ceased to search any longer,
and I concluded my pretty pet was gone.

“ Before retiring for the night, I gave a last look out of
the window, in the hope I might chance to see it once
more. “The moon was then shining brightly, and I dis-
tinctly saw my little rabbit sitting at the door with head
and ears erect, as if listening for its friends within, anxious,
perhaps, for its accustomed nice supper and soft warm bed.
I hastened down stairs to let it in, calling it by name, when,
the moment I opened the door, a strange cat darted for-
ward, seized it by the neck, and bore it screaming away!
Of course, every effort of mine was useless to overtake
the cat.

“T feel convinced that this fond little creature would not
have left us to return to the woods. That it did not come
when called was the effect of excessive joy for its newly-
found freedom, which must have been doubly delightful
while we were near, as no doubt it saw us when we could
not see it, and was only quietly feeding when we thought it
was gone away.

“Four months must have been the extent of poor
Bunny’s short life.”



CASABIANCA. a 30

CASABIANCA.

HE boy stood on the burning deck,
Whence all but he had fled ;
The flame, that lit the battle’s wreck,
Shone round him—o’er the dead.
Yet beautiful and bright he stood,
As born to rule the storm ;
A creature of heroic blood,

A proud though child-like form |

The flames rolled on—he would not go,
Without his father’s word ;—

That father, faint in death below,
His voice no longer heard.

He called aloud: “Say, father! say
If yet my task be done ?”—

He knew not that the chieftain lay
Unconscious of his son.

* Speak, father!” once again he cried,
“Tf I may yet be gone!”

But now the booming shots replied,
And fast the flames rolled on.

Upon his brow he felt their breath,
And in his waving hair,

And looked from that lone post of death,
In still, yet brave despair ;

And shouted but once more aloud,
“My father! must I stay ?”

While o’er him fast, through sail and shroud
The wreathing fires made way :



40

CASABIANCA.

They wrapped the ship in splendour wild,
‘They caught the flag on high,

And streamed above the gallant child,
Like banners in the sky.

There came a burst of thunder sound,—
The boy !—oh, where was he?
Ask of the winds, that far around
With fragments strewed the sea,—
With mast, and helm, and pennon fair,
That well had borne their part !
But the noblest thing that perished there,
Was that young faithful heart!
Mrs. Hemans.













ANECDOTES OF ELEPHANTS, 41

ANECDOTES OF ELEPHANTS: |

LEPHANTS are very grateful for kindness, and often
become strongly attached to their keepers. They
remember persons for a long time, and will some-

times manifest great pleasure at seeing an old acquaintance.
Many years ago, a little girl came from Calcutta to Boston
in a ship which brought an elephant. She used to play
with him, and give him things to eat, and he became very
fond of her.

About a year after, she went to see a menagerie, in which
there was an elephant. She looked at him without remem-
bering that he was the same one which had come from India
with her, and screamed with terror when the huge beast
put his trunk around her, and drew her towards him, as he
had been accustomed to do. But she soon recognised her
old friend.

An English officer says, that he once saw a woman in
India give a young baby in charge of an elephant. So
huge and clumsy a creature seems a strange nurse for an
infant; but he took care of it tenderly and skilfully. The
child would crawl about and get under his legs, but he
would never set his foot upon it.

The elephant was tied by a chain, and whenever the
baby was disposed to creep off too far, and out of his reach,
he would lift it with his trunk as gently as a mother, and.
move it back again to the place from which it started. It
must have been a funny sight to see an elephant tending a
baby.

But the elephant remembers injuries and insults as well
as kindnesses, and will sometimes take vengeance upon the
offender, even after the latter has forgotten the wrong. An
elephant driver once had a cocoa-nut given him, which, out



42 ANECDOTES OF ELEPHANTS.

of wantonness, he endeavoured to break by striking it twice
against his elephant’s head.

The next day the animal saw some cocoa-nuts exposed
in the street for sale, and, taking one of them up with his
trunk, he beat it about the driver’s head till the man was
completely dead. This comes, said the author who related
the circumstance, of jesting with elephants.

In the city of Delhi, in India, a tailor was in the habit of
giving some fruit, or other delicacy, to an elephant that
daily passed by his shop; and so accustomed had the ani-
mal become to this usage, that he regularly put his trunk in
at the window to receive the expected treat.

One day the tailor, being out of humour, thrust his needle
into the beast’s proboscis, telling him to be gone, as he had
nothing to give him. The creature passed on, apparently
unmoved, but, on coming to the next dirty pool of water,
filled his trunk, and returned to the shop window, into
which he discharged the whole contents, thoroughly
drenching the tailor and all his goods.

An elephant, kept near Paris, once gave a curious in-
stance of sagacity. A painter was desirous of drawing him
in an uncommon attitude, which was that of holding his
trunk raised in the air, with his mouth open. The painter's
boy, in order to keep the animal in this posture, threw fruit
into his mouth.

But the boy frequently deceived him by making offers
only of throwing the fruit. At length he grew angry at the
mockery ; and, as if he knew that the painter’s intention of
drawing him was the cause of it, instead of revenging him-
self upon the lad, he turned his resentment on the master,
and, taking up a quantity of water in his trunk, threw it
upon the painter’s paper and spoiled it,



PULL IT UP BY THE ROOT. 43

RULE IT UP BY THE -ROOT;

“ ATHER, here is a dock,” said Frank, as he was at
work with his father in the garden: “shall I cut it
off close to the root ?”

“No,” said his father; “that will not do. I have cut it
up several times; but the weed grows again, stronger than
ever. Pull rt up by the root; for in no other way can you
kill it.”

Frank pulled again and again at the dock; but the root
was so deep in the ground, that he could not start it up.
So he asked his father to come and help him; and the
weed was soon destroyed.

“This dock-root, Frank,” said his father, “which is an
evil and fast growing weed in a garden, puts me in mind of
the evil things that grow so fast in the hearts of children.
A bad passion, even when found out, is hard to be removed.
It is of no use to trifle with it. There is no way to master
and destroy it but to pull zt up by the root! You have
often seen in our garden, Frank, that when the weeds are
allowed to grow, they spoil all the plants and flowers near
them. So it is with evil passions in the heart of a child.
If a little boy has a bad temper, we must not expect to find
him kind and cheerful, or at all anxious to make others
happy. And a little girl who is idle, we need not expect to
find neat, gentle, or pleasant. As weeds injure the flowers
and useful plants, so bad passions will injure agreeable traits
and good habits. Ifa child is disobedient to his parents
or teacher, we might as well look for a rose or a tulip ina
bed of nettles, as to hope to find in his heart those graces
and good desires that we love to see growing there. So
let all bad passions and wrong desires be pulled up by the

yoot {”



LT LAMB,
44 LHE P.

THE PET. LAMB

HE dew was falling fast, the stars began to blink ;
I heard a voice: it said, “Drink, pretty creature,
drink!”
And, looking o’er the hedge, before me I espied
A snow-white mountain lamb, with a maiden at its side.

No other sheep were near; the lamb was all alone,
And by a slender cord was tethered to a stone ;

With one knee on the grass did the little maiden kneel,
While to that mountain lamb she gave its evening meal.

“ Rest, little one,” she said; “hast thou forgot the day

When my father found thee first, in places far away ?

Many flocks were on the hills, but thou wert owned by
none,

And thy mother from thy side for evermore was gone.

“Thy limbs will shortly be twice as stout as they are now;
Then I’ll yoke thee to my cart, like a pony to the plough; .
My playmate thou shalt be; and when the wind is cold,
Our hearth shall be thy bed, our house shall be thy fold.

“See, here thou need’st not fear the raven in the sky ;
Both night and day thou’rt safe—our cottage is hard by.
Why bleat so after me? Why pull so at thy chain? —
Sleep, and at break of day I’ll come to thee again.”
Wordsworth.















THE LITTLE SUNBEAM, A7

THE LITTLE SUNBEAM

LITTLE sunbeam in the sky
Said to itself one day,
“T’m very small; but why should I
Do nothing else but play?
I’ll go down to the earth, and see
If there is any room for me.”

And so it travelled to and fro,
And glanced and danced about;

And not a door was shut, I know,
To keep the sunbeam out;

But, ever as it touched the earth,

It woke up happiness and mirth.

I may not tell the history
Of all that it could do;
But I tell this, that you may try
To be a sunbeam too.
“A sunbeam, too!” perhaps you say ;
Yes, I am very sure you may.

For loving words, like sunbeams, will
Dry up a falling tear;

And loving deeds will often help
A broken heart to cheer.

So loving and so living, you

Will be a little sunbeam too.



48 THE BROWN THRUSH.

THE BROWN THRUSH.

HERE’s a merry brown thrush sitting up in a tree,
“ He’s singing to me! He’s singing to me!”
And what does he say, little girl, little boy ?

“Oh, the world’s running over with joy!
Don’t you hear? Don’t you see ?
Hush! Look! In my tree,

I’m as happy as happy can be!”

And the brown thrush keeps singing, “A nest, do you see,
And four eggs laid by me in the juniper tree ?
Don’t meddle! don’t touch! little girl, little boy,
Or the world will lose some of its joy!
Now I’m glad! now I’m free!
And I always shall be,
If you never bring sorrow to me.”

So the merry brown thrush sings away in the tree
To you and to me, to you and to me:
And he sings all the day, little girl, little boy,
“Oh, the world’s running over with joy:
But long it won’t be,
Don’t you know? Don’t you see?
Unless we are as good as can be!”















7

eas
ae
nis







JAMES WATT AND THE TEA-KETTLE. 51

JAMES WATT AND THE TEA-KETTLE.

BOUT the middle of last century, a little boy sat in
a comfortably furnished room in Greenock, watching
his mother making the tea. He was a boy of a some-

' what delicate constitution, and fond of retirement, seldom

joining in the more boisterous sports of his companions. As

he sat by the fire, when the kettle was boiling, he observed
the lid dancing up and down, and making such a clatter as the
lids of tea-kettles are apt to do, when they wish to give intima-
tion that the water is ready to be poured into the tea-pot.

Many and many a time had this peculiarity of the tea-kettle

lid been observed before, but no one had thought of inquir-

ing into the nature of that force which produced this dancing

motion. But the little boy, of whom I am speaking,
was a thoughtful boy, and always liked to know the causes
of things. You will observe, in our picture he has lifted off
the lid, and is puzzling his young brains to know how the
lid kept dancing up and down so briskly. It occurs to him
that it must be the power of the steam which he observes
issuing from the kettle, that is the cause; and it further
occurs to him that, if the steam in the kettle can make the
heavy lid move up-and down so rapidly, there is no reason
why steam should not be made to move other things as
well. And so he set himself to try, and, after much
patient labour and experiment, he devised the steam
engine, which performs so much work now-a-days, that
somebody has said that by and by we may all go to sleep
for a hundred years, and allow the steam to manage the
world. Perhaps you would like to read the Song of Steam.
Well, I shall give it you :—
E 2



52

THE SONG OF STEAM.

THE SONG OF STEAM.

Harness me down with your iron bands,
Be sure of your curb and rein,

For I scorn the power of your puny hands,
As the tempest scorns a chain.

How I laughed, as I lay concealed from sight
For many a countless hour,

At the childish boast of human might,
And the pride of human power!

When I saw an army upon the land,
A navy upon the seas,
Creeping along, a snail-like band,

Or waiting the wayward breeze ;
When I marked the peasant faintly reel
With the toil which he daily bore,
As he feebly turned atthe tardy wheel,

Or tugged at the weary oar.

Ha! ha! ha! they found me at last;
They invited me forth at length,
And I rushed to my throne with thunder blast,
And laughed in my iron strength.
Oh, then ye saw a wondrous change
On the earth and ocean wide,
Where now my fiery armies range,
Nor wait for wind or tide.

Hurrah! hurrah! the waters o’er
The mountains steep decline;
Time—space—have yielded to my power—
The world! the world is mine!
The rivers the sun hath earliest blest,
Or those where his beams decline,
The giant streams of the queenly West,
Or the orient floods divine,



THE SONG OF STEAM. 53

I blow the bellows, I forge the steel,
In all the shops of trade;
I hammer the ore, and turn the wheel,
Where my arms of strength are made;
I manage the furnace, the mill, the mint;
I carry, I spin, 1 weave;
And all my doings I put into print
On every Saturday eve.

I’ve no muscle to weary, no breast to decay,
No bones to be “laid on the shelf;

And soon I intend you “may go and play,”
While I manage the world by myself.

But harness me down with your iron bands,
Be sure of your curb and rein,

For I scorn the strength of your puny hands,
As the tempest scorns a chain.

Anon.




ss |

|
|
wy wi is



54 THE TWO TRAVELLERS AND THE BEAR.

THE TWO TRAVELLERS - AND THE BEAR.

WO men were journeying through a forest, when
they saw a huge bear approaching them. One
of the travellers immediately climbed a tree that

was at hand, and sat on one of the branches to observe
what he thought must be the immediate death of his
companion. The other, seeing that he must be attacked,
fell flat on the ground, and lay quite still and motion-
less, holding his breath, and feigned the appearance
of death as well as he could. The bear came up, smelt
him all over, turned him round with his paw, and, satisfied
that he was dead, went slowly away without doing him any
injury, for it is well known that bears will not taste a dead
body. As soon as he was gone, the other traveller came
down from the tree, and, addressing his friend, said with a
laugh, “ What was it the bear was whispering in your ear
as you lay upon the ground?” “He advised me,” said he,
“never to travel with a companion who deserts me at the
moment of danger.”





THE VULTURE OF THE ALPS. a

PEs VET URE OF THE ALPS,

N the mountainous parts of Switzerland there are
found birds of prey, of the vulture species, which
grow to great size, and are very strong and fierce.

They are able to take up in their claws and carry off a well-
grown lamb or kid.

A peasant boy, only eight years of age, was once engaged
in looking after some cattle in a pasture among the moun-
tains. He lived in a solitary hut, and was the only person
in it, as the Swiss train their children very early to this
occupation. He perceived two young vultures, at no great
distance, on the ledge of a low rock. Tempted by the
prize, he drew silently close behind the rock, and suddenly
grasping them in his arms, took possession of both birds, in
spite of the most terrible resistance. He was yet strug-
gling with his prey, when, hearing a great noise, he saw, to
his no little terror, the two old birds flying rapidly towards
him. He ran with all his speed to the hut, and closed the
door, just in time to shut out his pursuers. The boy after-
wards spoke of the terror he suffered during the whole day,
in his lonely dwelling, lest the old vultures should force an
entrance; as, being powerful birds, they would in their fury
have ended his life.

They kept up the most frightful cries, and strove with all
their might to break down the barriers of the frail hut,
which was loosely built of single logs, and find some way to
rescue their offspring. But the young peasant kept his
prey, being well aware of its value; the government paying
about four dollars for every vulture killed. As night ap-
proached, he saw his pursuers, tired with their useless
efforts, leave the hut, and watched their flight. to the lofty
though not distant precipice. As soon as the darkness had



56 THE VULTURE OF THE ALPS.

set in, he again grasped the two young birds in his arms,
and ran as fast as his legs could carry him down the moun-
tain to the nearest village, often looking back lest the
parent birds should have seen him, and fancying he heard
their cries at every interval. He arrived in safety, how-
ever, at the hamlet, not a little proud of his prize.

THE STAR.

WINKLE, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

Then the traveller in the dark,
Thanks you for your tiny spark ;
He could not see which way to go,
If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,

And often through my curtains peep ;
For you never shut your eye,

Till the sun is in the sky.

As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark ;
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,



BALLAD OF THE TEMPEST. 57

BALLAD OF THE TEMPEST.

E were crowded in the cabin;
Not a soul would dare to sleep:
It was midnight on the waters,
And a storm was on the deep.

’Tis a fearful thing in winter
To be shattered by the blast,
And to hear the rattling trumpet
Thunder, “ Cut away the mast!”

So we shuddered there in silence,
For the stoutest held his breath;
While the hungry sea was roaring,
And the breakers threatened death.

And as thus we sat in darkness,
Each one busy in his prayers ;

“We are lost!” the captain shouted,
As he staggered down the stairs.

But his little daughter whispered,
As she took his icy hand:

“Tsn’t God upon the ocean,

Just the same as on the land ?”

Then we kissed the little maiden,
And we spoke in better cheer ;
And we anchored safe in harbour
When the moon was shining clear.



58 POOR SAMMY.

POOR SAMMY.

AMMY was a poor, half-witted man, twenty-three
years old, who lived close to our little church with
his mother and sister, who worked hard to keep him.

Sammy always looked clean and respectable. Poor fellow!
he could do nothing to earn even a sixpence, but still he
was always busy in the little garden in the front of the
house, and every Saturday night his mother gave him his
wages. Sometimes it was a penny, sometimes a_half-
penny, and sometimes only a peppermint lozenge; still he
was contented and happy; and you shall hear what he did
with his wages when he had them.

Whenever the church was opened—Sunday or week-
day—for service, for a Bible-class, or to be cleaned for
Sunday, sure enough there was poor Sammy; he would
walk into his usual place, and after having knelt down most
reverently for a few minutes, would watch all that was
going on until he found the doors were going to be closed,
when he would kneel down again, and then quietly walk
home. If in his walks he met any of the congregation he
would bow very low to them: he evidently thought they
belonged to him in some way, for he never would take the
slightest notice of any but those who were seen in the
church; but it was on those Sundays when a collection was
made that Sammy was most excited; all his wages went
there, even his peppermint lozenge.

What a lesson does “Poor Sammy” teach us! He
never neglected an opportunity of serving God. Perhaps
he did not say any words, but he worshipped for all that,
and with far more sincerity than many in that church who
had all their senses about them, and many more comforts
and enjoyments than he could ever know.



THE MONKEYS AND THE RED CAPS. 59



THE MONKEYS AND2THE RED CAPS,

SPANISH mule-driver, becoming weary of his
monotonous life, resolved on seeing the world.
Having invested all his little savings in the pur-

chase of red caps, he crossed over to Africa, expecting to

find a ready sale for his caps among the natives of

that part of the world. In the course of his journey, he

came to the edge of a large forest, and being weary,

he opened his pack, drew out one of the red caps,

and, putting it on his head to protect him from the
F



,

60 THE MONKEVS AND THE RED CAPS.

heat, he fell sound asleep. He had not slept long, when
he was awakened by a great chattering in the trees over-
head, and looking up he observed the trees covered with
monkeys, each with a red cap on its head. The creatures
had seen the Spaniard draw the cap from the pack and put
it on his head, and, as soon as he had fallen asleep, each of
them imitated his action.

The traveller was in great distress, when he saw all the
savings of many years hopelessly lost, as he imagined, and,
in his vexation, he pulled the cap off his head and dashed
it on the ground. What were his surprise and joy to see
every monkey do exactly the same thing! The Spaniard
was not long in gathering up all his caps, and proceeding
on his journey.





BRUCE AND THE SPIDER. 61

BRU GE AN) aie SPIDER:

ING BRUCE of Scotland flung himself down,
In a lonely mood to think ;
True, he was a monarch, and wore a crown,
But his heart was beginning to sink.

For he had been trying to do a great deed,
To make his people glad ;

He had tried and tried, but could not succeed,
And so he became quite sad.

He flung himself down in low despair,
As grieved as man could be;

And after a while he pondered there,— |
“T’ll give it up,” cried he.

Now just at the moment a spider dropped,
With its silken cobweb clew ;

And the king in the midst of his thinking stopped
To see what the spider would do.

"Twas a long way up to the ceiling dome,
And it hung by a rope so fine,

That how it would get to its cobweb home
King Bruce could not divine.

It soon began to cling and crawl
Straight up with strong endeavour ;
But down it came with a slipping sprawl,

As near to the ground as ever.



62

BRUCE AND THE SPIDER.

Up, up it ran, nor a second did stay
To make the least complaint,

Till it fell still lower; and there it lay
A little dizzy and faint.

Its head grew steady—again it went,
And travelled a half yard higher ;

*Twas a delicate thread it had to tread,
And a road where its feet would tire.

Again it fell, and swung below ;
But up it quickly mounted,

Till up and down, now fast, now slow,
Six brave attempts were counted.

“Sure,” said the king, “that foolish thing
Will strive no more to climb,

When it toils so hard to reach and cling, »
And tumbles every time.”

But up the insect went once more ;
Ah me! ’tis an anxious minute:

He’s only a foot from his cobweb door ;
Oh, say, will he lose or win it?

Steadily, steadily, inch by inch,
Higher and higher he got,

And a bold little run at the very last pinch
Put him into the wished-for spot.

“ Bravo! bravo!” the king cried out ;
“ All honour to those who try :
The spider up there defied despair ;—
He conquered, and why should not | ?”



BRUCE AND THE SPIDER.

And Bruce of Scotland braced his mind,
And gossips tell the tale,

That he tried once more as he tried before,
And that time he did not fail,

Pay goodly heed, all ye who read,

_ And beware of saying, “I can’t;”

*Tis a cowardly word, and apt to lead
To idleness, folly, and want.

Eliza Cook.





64 STORY OF A CAT AND A SPANIEL.

STORY OF A CAT AND A SPANIEL.

LITTLE black spaniel had five puppies, which were
thought too many for her to bring up. As the
mistress of the house was unwilling that any of them

should be drowned, she asked the cook if she thought it
would be possible to bring up some of them by the hand,
before the kitchen fire. In reply, the cook said that
perhaps the puppies might be given to the cat instead of
her kittens.

The cat made no objection, took them kindly, and
gradually all the kittens were taken away, and the cat
nursed the two puppies only. She gave them her tail
to play with, and they were always in motion. They soon
ate meat, grew rapidly, and were fit to be removed long
before the others that were left with their own mother.

When they were taken away, the cat became quite
inconsolable. She prowled about the house, and on the
second day fell in with the little spaniel, who was nursing
the other three puppies. “Oh,” says puss, putting up
her back, “it is you who have stolen my children.” “No,”
replied the spaniel, with a snarl; “they are my own flesh
and blood.” “That won't do,” said the cat. “I am quite
certain that you have my two puppies.”

Thereupon there was a desperate combat, which ended in
- the defeat of the spaniel, and in the cat walking off proudly
with one of the puppies, which she took to her own bed.
Having left this one, she returned, gained another victory,
and carried off another puppy. Now, it is very strange
that she should have taken only two, the exact number
she had been deprived of.



THE BRAVE PEASANT. 65

THE BRAVE PEASANT.

N the hard winter of 1783 and 1784, there were many
sudden and heavy storms of rain. The streams
and rivers overflowed their banks, and swept along

large pieces of broken ice in their course. In the city
of Verona, in Italy, there was a large bridge over the
River Adige. This river rises in the snowy mountains of
Tyrol, and runs with a rapid current. Upon the bridge
there was a house in which the toll-gatherer lived with
his family.

By a sudden increase of the river, this house became en-
tirely surrounded by water ; and many of the arches of the.
bridge were carried away by the huge blocks of ice which
floated down the current. The part of the bridge on which
the house was built stood the longest, because it was the
most strongly made. But it looked as if it must soon go—
with the rest.

The poor man, and his wife and children, uttered loud
cries for help, which were heard by a great number of per-
sons who stood on the banks. Everybody pitied them,
but no one could do anything for them, because it seemed
impossible that a boat could live in a river running with
such force, and so filled with blocks of ice.

A nobleman on horseback rode down to the banks of the
river; and when he saw the dangerous position of the
family, he held up a purse containing two hundred ducats
of gold, and said he would give it to any one who would
save them.

But the fear of death kept everybody—even some
sailors who were present—from making the attempt. In
the mean time the water rose higher around the house
every moment.



66 THE BRAVE PEASANT.

At last an Austrian peasant felt his heart filled with pity
for the poor people, and resolved to save them if he could.
He sprang into a boat, pushed off from the shore, and, by
his strength and skill, reached the house at last. But the
family was numerous, and the boat was small; so that he
could not bring them all at once.

He first took three persons, and conducted them safely
to land, and then went back for the rest, and brought them
away also. Hardly was this done, when the house, and the
part of the bridge on which it stood, were carried away.

The brave peasant was hailed with shouts of joy and
admiration. The nobleman offered him the purse of gold,
and said that he well deserved it. But the peasant declined
to take it, saying, “I did not do this for money; I am not
rich, but I have enough for my wants: give it to the poor
toll-gatherer, who has lost his all.” And then he went
away without telling the people his name, or where he
lived.







THE RAM AND THE MTRROR. 67

THE RAM AND THE MIRROR.

ANY years ago there lived in Scotland a nobleman
whose name was Lord Melville.

Lord Melville was a man high in station, and
assisted in the government of the country. In the summer
season he lived in a large, fine house, a few miles from
Edinburgh, called Melville Castle, where a great many
ladies and gentlemen used to come and see him. He was
a very good-natured man; and one of the ways he had of
shewing his good nature was by his fondness for animals.

At one time he made a pet of a ram, which was called
Will, which grew very tame, and used to follow his master
all over the house and about the grounds. One day, in
the early part of September, he had invited a large party
of ladies and gentlemen to dine with him. When the
hour drew near at which his guests were expected, he went
into the drawing-room to see that all things were in order ;
after which he passed by the front door, which he thought-
lessly left open.

Will was sauntering about the outside of the house,
panting with the heat; but seeing the front door open, he |
stepped in, and as the drawing-room door was also open,
he at once went forward into it. At the farther end of the
room there was an uncommonly large and beautiful mirror,
which cost nearly a thousand dollars. It had been bought
at the sale of the furniture of a Spanish ambassador who
was leaving London, and was such a mirror as money
could hardly replace.

Will was a black-faced ram, with large, curled horns.
No sooner did he see his own image in the glass, than
he took it to be a rival challenging him to fight. He
stamped with his foot, snorted with his nose, throwing up



68 _ THE RAM AND THE MIRROR.

his head with an air of haughty defiance. The likeness
in the glass, of course, did the same. Will accepted the
challenge, and stepping back as far as he could, ran
forward with all his force, and struck the mirror a most
tremendous blow, shivering it into a thousand pieces.

Lord Melville was standing at the front door when he
heard the dreadful crash of the glass. He came running
in, saw the havoc that was made, and easily judged how
it had been done. Will was standing on the floor, shaking
his head, and looking much surprised at the sudden dis-
appearance of his foe.

His master was very angry for a moment, but remem-
bering that the poor beast had only obeyed a natural
instinct, and that he himself had been to blame in leaving
the outer door open, he soon got over it, and contented
himself with saying, “Ah, Will, you little know what
mischief you have done!” After dinner, he told the story
to his guests, and they all had a good laugh over the
accident.

In due time, Will went the way appointed to all animals
of his kind, and fell under the butcher’s knife. One of his
horns was made into a spoon, and the other into a snuff-
box. This snuff-box was mounted with silver, and had a
Scotch pebble, or crystal, set in the lid. These articles
were given to Mr. Pitt, who was at that time prime
minister of England, and an intimate friend of Lord
Melville. The snuff-box was often produced after dinner,
and the story told of Will’s encounter with the mirror.

But we have not come to the end of the story yet.
The Spanish ambassador, at whose sale the mirror had
been bought, had gone home to his own country, and was
there one of the king’s ministers. Mr. Pitt once had
occasion to write him a despatch on public business, and
he sent, at the same time, a private letter, in which he told
him how the mirror which once belonged to him had been
smashed by Lord Melville’s ram.

The ambassador read the letter to the king, who was



THE RAM AND THE MIRROR. 69

much diverted by the story, and said that Lord Melville
should have another Spanish mirror as good as that which
had been destroyed. So he sent him a very fine one from
one of his own palaces. After it had arrived, Mr. Pitt
gave the king the snuff-box which had been made from
Wills horn, And so ends the story of Lord Melville’s
ram.

SPEAK. Abies BRU TH:

H, ‘tis a lovely thing for youth
To walk betimes in wisdom’s way ;
To fear a lie, to speak the truth,
That we may trust to all they say.

But liars we can never trust,
Although they speak the thing that’s true;
And he that does one fault at first,

And lies to hide it, makes it two.

OPO

Pride costs more than hunger, thirst,

or cold. -

Letter face a danger, than be always
wn fear.



70

THE SHIP OF FAME.

THEA SEIP OR? ANE:

HAT ship is this you’re sailing in,
This wondrous ship of fame?

Our ship is called the Church of God,

And Christ's our Captain’s name.

Then join our happy crew,

We’re bound for Canaan’s shore;

The Captain says there’s room for you,
And room for millions more!

And what’s the crew that sails with you
On board this ship so grand?
The saints of God, all wash’d in blood,
And under Christ’s command.

Do you not fear the stormy seas,
Your barque may overwhelm?

You need not fear, the Lord is near,
And Christ is at the helm.

What wages do you get on board

This ship that you commend ?

We ’ve love, and peace, and joy, and grace,
And glory in the end.

Heave out your boat, I’ll come on board,
You say there’s plenty room;

The Captain says you’re welcome now,
Make no delay but come.

Then hoist the sail, we’ll catch the breeze,
And soon our dangers o’er;

The ship will land us safe at last,

On Canaan’s happy shore. |

























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SAMUEL, 73

SAMUEL,

N the time of Eli the high-priest, the children of Israel
had become very forgetful of God and of His law.
El’s own sons were very wicked, and set a bad

example to the people. But God did not cast them off
nor forget them, though they had sadly forsaken Him.
He purposed to raise up a teacher, who would bring them
back to the right way, and instruct them in His law. For
this purpose he raised up Samuel, who, when a mere child,
was sent by his mother to the tabernacle at Shiloh, to wait
upon Eli, who was a very old man. Every year, when his
mother came to Shiloh to attend the feast of the passover,
' she brought Samuel a new coat, and other little presents,
such as children like to receive. Samuel was very fond of
his work, and was very much attached to Eli, who taught
him the law of his God, and trained him in the fear of the
Lord.

The sons of Eli grew more and more wicked, and their
father was too -indulgent to restrain them. God was dis-
pleased with Eli for this, and determined to punish them.
But, before doing so, He wished to give them time for
repentance, and to warn them that, if they continued in
their evil ways, they would perish.

One evening, after Samuel had done all the work
assigned him, and had just lain down in bed, he heard
some one calling his name twice. Thinking it was Eli
who called him, the child at once rose from his bed, ran to
the old man, and asked him what he wanted. Eli assured
him that he had not called him, and told him to lie down
again. Samuel did so, but again the voice came, and again
the child went at once to Eli. The same thing happened
a third time, and then Eli knew that it was God who had
called, and so he told Samuel, if the voice should come
again, to say, “Speak, Core for thy servant heareth.”



74 SAMUEL.

The voice came again, and then Samuel answered as Eli
had told him. Thereupon, the Lord told Samuel what He
was going to do to Eli's sons as a punishment for their
wickedness.

Samuel did not, as many children would have done, run
and tell Eli what the Lord had revealed to him. He loved
Eli, and he would fain have concealed the bad news from
him. He did not rejoice in evil. So he went to bed, and
slept until the morning. When he rose, he went about his
work as usual, and it was only when Eli pressed him to
tell, that he made known to him what God had said to him,
God appeared to him many times after this, and the people
soon came to know that Samuel was a true prophet of God.
After the death of Eli, Samuel became judge over Israel,
and he went constantly about among them, instructing both
old and young, and calling upon them to put away their
idols and turn to the God of their fathers. After many
years’ patient work, the people listened to Samuel’s voice,
and then the Lord blessed and prospered them, Bas

THE-GHILD’S PRAYER:

ORD, look upon a little child,
By nature sinful, rude, and wild;
Oh put Thy gracious hands on me,
And make me all I ought to be.

Make me Thy child, a child of God,
Washed in my Saviour’s precious blood,
And my whole heart from sin set free,—
A little vessel full of Thee.

O Jesus, take me to Thy breast,
And bless me, then I shall be blest:
Both when I wake and when I sleep,
Thy little lamb in safety keep.



THE BETTER LAND. 7 e

THE BE IPER LAND,
a HEAR thee speak of the Better Land,

Thou call’st its children a happy band;
Mother, oh! where is that radiant shore ?

Shall we not seek it, and weep no more?

Is it where the flower of the orange blows,

And the fireflies glance through the myrtle boughs?”
“Not there, not there, my child!”

“Ts it where the feathery palm-trees rise,

And the date grows ripe under sunny skies ?

Or ’midst the green islands on glittering seas,

Where fragrant forests perfume the breeze,

And strange bright birds, on their starry wings,

Bear the rich hues of all glorious things ?”
“Not there, not there, my child!”

“Ts it far away in some region old,

Where the rivers wander o'er sands of gold;

Where the burning rays of the ruby shine,

And the diamond lights up the secret mine,

And the pearl gleams forth from the coral strand;

Is it there, sweet mother, that Better Land?”
“Not there, not there, my child !—

“Eye hath not seen it, my gentle boy;

Far hath not heard its deep songs of joy;

Dreams cannot picture a world so fair:

Sorrow and death may not enter there;

Time doth not breathe on its fadeless bloom;

For beyond the clouds and beyond the tomb—
It is there, it is there, my child!”

Mrs. [emans.



THE SNOW SHOWER.

THE SNOW SHOWER.

EE, mamma, the cramds are flying
Fast and thickly through the air,

On the branches they are lying,
On the walks and everywhere ;

Oh, how glad the birds will be,
When so many crumbs they see!

MAMMA’S ANSWER.

No, my little girl, ’tis snowing,

Nothing for the birds is here:
Very cold the air is growing,

"Tis the winter of the year :—
Frost will nip the robin’s food,

"Twill no more be sweet and good.

See the clouds the skies that cover,
‘Tis from them the snow-flakes fall,

Whit’ning hills and fields all over,
Hanging from the fir-trees tall.

Were it warm ’twould rain, but lo!
Frost has changed the rain to snow.

CHILD.

If the robins food are needing,
Oh, I hope to me they’ll come,

I should like to see them feeding
On the window of my room;

I'll divide with them my store,
Much I wish I could do more.

Mrs. Lundie Duncan.



THE FROST. 77

MALE EROS T,

HE frost looked forth one still, clear night,
And whispered, “Now I shall be out of sight:
So through the valley and over the height
In silence I'll take my way.
I will not go on like that blustering train,
The wind and the snow, the hail and the rain,
Who make so much bustle and noise in vain,
But T’ll be as busy as they.”

Then he flew to the mountain and powdered its crest;
He lit on the trees, and their boughs he dress’d
In diamond beads; and over the breast
Of the quivering lake he spread
A coat of mail, that need not fear
The downward point of many a spear
That he hung on its margin, far and near,
Where a rock could rear its head.

He went to the window of those who slept,

And over each pane, like a fairy crept;

Wherever he breathed, wherever he stepp’d,
By the light of the morn were seen

Most beautiful things: there were flowers and trees;

There were bevies of birds and swarms of bees ;

There were cities with temples and towers; and these
All pictures in silver sheen!

But he did one thing that was hardly fair ;
He peep’d in the cupboard, and finding there
That all had forgotten for him to prepare,

“ Now just to set them a thinking,
I'll bite this basket of fruit,” said: he,
“This costly pitcher I’ll burst in three;
And the glass of water they’ve left for me

Shall ‘tchick!’ to tell them I’m drinking!”

8 LL TiaGoUlas



78 THE LILY AND THE DEWDROP.

THE LILY AND THE DEWDROP.

« OME hither, dear Dewdrop,” a Lily once said,
“ And rest on my bosom thy bright little head :
*Tis white and as soft as a pillow can be,

And just about.large enough, Dewdrop, for thee.

I’ll cover thee up; and I’ll rock thee to sleep;

And from thee the chilling night breezes I’ll keep.

“And, when on the morrow the sunlight again
Shall rest on the mountain-top, hill-side, and plain,
I'll open the door of thy dear little home,

And tell thee the beautiful sunbeams have come

To take thee again to the bright sunny sky ;

And then I will kiss thee and bid thee good-bye.”

The radiant Dewdrop stood listening awhile,
And then to the flower replied with a smile :
“Thy kindness, dear Lily, I freely accept ;”

And into her beautiful bosom he crept,
_ And all the night long, in the snowy white bell
Of the bright little beauty, slept soundly and well.

Next morning, aroused by the song of the lark,
The Lily’s young sister to her did remark,

“How pure and how bright thou art, sister, to-day !
What makes thee so lovely? do tell me, I pray:
What beautiful spirit has given to thee

The radiant robe that around thee I see?”

The Lily replied, “To my bosom, last night,
I folded a Dewdrop all lovely and bright;
And ever since that happy hour, I have felt
As if in my bosom an angel had dwelt.”



THE SHEEP AND THE BIRDS. 79

THE SHEEP AND THE BIRDS.

FATHER and his son were once sitting under a
tree upon a hill. It was near sunset, and a flock
of sheep were feeding not far off. A strange man

came by, who had a dog with him. As soon as the sheep
saw the dog they became alarmed, and ran into some
thorny bushes, which grew near by. Some of their wool
caught upon the thorns and was torn off. When the boy
saw this he was troubled, and said, “See, father, how the
thorns tear the wool from the poor sheep. These bushes
ought to be cut down, so that hereafter they may not harm
the sheep.” His father was silent a while, and then said,
“So you think the bushes ought to be cut down?” “ Yes,”
answered his son, “and I wish I had a hatchet to do it
with.” The father made no reply, and they went home.

The next day they came to the same place with a hatchet.
The boy was full of joy, and very eager to have his father
begin to cut down the bushes. They sat down upon the
hill, and the father said, “Do you hear how sweetly the
birds sing ? Are they not beautiful creatures ?” “Oh, yes,”
replied the boy; “the birds are the most beautiful of all
creatures.”

As they were speaking, a bird flew down among the
bushes, and picked off a tuft of wool, and carried it away to —
a high tree. “See,” said the father, “with this wool the
bird makes a soft bed for its young in the nest. How
comfortable the little things will be! and the sheep could
well spare a little of their fleece. Do you now think it well
to cut down the bushes?” “No,” said the boy; “we will
let them stand.”

“My dear son,” said the father, “the ways of God are



80 THE SHEEP AND THE BIRDS.

not always easy to understand. It seemed to you very
hard yesterday, that.the poor sheep should lose their wool ;
, but to-day you see that without this wool the little bird

could not have made its warm nest. So, many things
- happen to us which seem hard; but God ordains them for
our good, and they are meant in kindness and love.”

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THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE. 8

oe

THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

HE golden eagle is a bird of prey, and it is found in
the British Islands, and in the lofty and barren cliffs
of the Orkney Islands, which lie on the north of

Scotland.

One of these birds was once the cause of great distress
and terror to the inhabitants of a village there. The vil-
lagers had gone out, one summer day, to the hay fields.
About one o'clock they left their labour to rest, and to eat
the food they had brought with them. While they were
enjoying themselves in this quiet way, the peaceful, happy
scene was suddenly interrupted by a great golden eagle, the
pride, but also the pest, of the village.

The savage bird stooped down over the party of villagers
for a moment in its flight, and then soared away with some-
thing in its talons. :

One piercing shriek from a woman’s voice was heard,
and then the cries of the villagers, exclaiming, “ Hannah
- Lamond’s child! Hannah Lamond’s child! The eagle has
carried it off!”

In an instant, many hundred feet were hurrying towards
_ the mountain, whither the eagle had flown. ‘Two miles of
hill and dale, copse and shingle, lay between ; but in a short
time the foot of the mountain was covered with people.

The eyry (which is the name for an eagle’s nest) was well
known, and both of the old birds were visible on the ledge
of a high rock. But who could scale that dizzy cliff, which
even Jack Stewart, the sailor, had attempted in vain ?

All the villagers stood gazing, and weeping, and wringing
their hands, yet not daring to venture up a cliff which seemed
to afford them no footing.

Hannah Lamond, meanwhile, was sitting on a rock



84 THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

beneath the mountain, as pale as death, with her eyes fixed
on the eyry. Noone had hitherto noticed her, for every
eye was, like hers, fixed on the eyry.

Presently she started up, crying out, “Only last Sunday
was my sweet child baptized!” and dashed through the
brakes, over the huge stones, and up the precipice, faster

than the hunter in pursuit of game. No one doubted that

she would be dashed to pieces. But the thought of her
infant in the talons of the eagle seemed to give the wretched
mother strength. On she went, in spite of the dangers to
which she was exposed on the fearful precipice up which
she was climbing.

As she drew near the eyry, the eagles dashed by, so close
to her head that she could see the yellow light of their
wrathful eyes. They did not hurt her, but flew to the
stump of an ash tree, which jutted out of a corner in the
cliff near her. The poor mother passed on, and, having at
length reached the dreaded spot, fell across the eyry, in the
midst of the bones with which it was strewed, and clasped
her child alive in her arms.

There it lay unhurt and at rest; wrapped up just as she
had laid it down to sleep in the harvest field. The little
creature gave a feeble cry, and she screamed out, “It lives!
it lives!”

Binding her darling to her waist with her handkerchief,
and scarcely daring to open her eyes, she slid down the

shelving rocks to a small piece of root-bound earth. Her

fingers seemed to have gained new strength, as she swung
herself down by broom, and heather, and dwarf birch, strik-
ing her feet from time to time against the sharp-edged
rocks. But she felt no pain.

The side of the precipice now became steep as the wall
of a house; but it was matted with ivy, whose thick, tough
stems clung to the rock, and formed a ladder, down which
she swung herself; while her neighbours, far below on their

knees, were watching her, thinking each moment she would
be killed.



THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE. 85

Again she touched earth and stones. She heard a low
bleating beside her, and, looking round, saw a goat, with
two little kids: she followed their track down the rest of
the precipice. Her rugged path became easier as she went
on, and brought her at length to the foot of the mountain
again, among her neighbours and friends, who, a few mo-
ments before, had scarcely dared to hope they should ever
see her again.

On first reaching the ground, her strength failed, and she
fell fainting to the earth, The crowd that had gathered
round to welcome her, now stood back to give her air.
She was soon well again, and joined them in giving thanks
to God, who had saved her child and herself in the hour of
danger.

HEN all Thy mercies, O my God,
My rising soul surveys,

Transported with the view I’m lost,
In wonder, love, and praise.

O how shall words with equal warmth
The gratitude declare,

That grows within my ravished heart!
But Thou canst read it there.





IRUST AND TRY.

TRUST AND TRY.

ts ANNOT,” Edward, did you say ?
Chase the lazy thought away ;
Never let that idle word

From your lips again be heard.

Take your book from off the shelf—

God helps him who helps himself:

O’er your lesson do not sigh :—

Trust and try,—trust and try.

“Cannot,” Edward? Say not so;
All are weak, full well I know;
But if you will seek the Lord,
He will needful strength afford:
Teach you how to conquer sin,
Purify your heart within ;

On your Father’s help rely :—
Trust and try,—trust and try.

“Cannot,” Edward? Scorn the thought ;
You can do whate’er you ought;

Ever duty’s call obey,

Strive to walk in wisdom’s way ;

Let the sluggard, if he will,

Use the lazy “cannot” still;

On yourself and God rely,—

Trust and try,—trust and try.











THE sat Ol
AN D HEALTH :

ei ,

OM FO) ed)










THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN, - 89

PE VOUTH OF FRANK EIN.

ENJAMIN FRANKLIN was born in Boston, in
the State of Massachusetts, January 17, 1706. His .
father was a tallow-chandler and soap-boiler, and
he was the youngest son, and the youngest child but two,
of a very large family.

Boston, at the time of Franklin’s birth, was a much
smaller place than it is now; but it was a considerable town,
containing about eighteen thousand inhabitants, and it had
public schools, as it has now. He shewed an early taste
for reading, and his father desired to educate him for the
ministry. With that view he was sent to a grammar
school when he was eight years old, and rose rapidly in his
class.

But in less than a year he was removed to another
school, where he might learn writing and arithmetic, as his
father, who had a large family to support, was not rich
enough to give him the expensive education which would
have been necessary to fit him to be a clergyman. Here
he learned to write a very good hand, but did not get on
very well in arithmetic. When he was ten years old, he
was taken away from school to assist his father in his
business ; and he never went to school any more.

Little Franklin disliked his father’s trade, and wanted
very much to go to sea; but his father would not give
his consent. He was very fond of the water, and learned
to swim well, and to manage boats—very much as Boston
boys do now.

He continued with his father about two years; but his
distaste for the business rather increased than diminished.
He also shewed a growing fondness for reading, spendinge
in books all the money he could get; and it was finally

H



90 THE VOUTH OF FRANKLIN.

concluded that he should be bound apprentice to his
brother James, who was a printer.

This employment was more to his taste than his father’s
trade. He had to work hard, but he was a healthy, strong,
and cheerful boy, and work did not tire him very much;
and he had a chance of indulging his strong love of
reading. “Often,” says he, “I sat up in my chamber
reading the greatest part of the night, when the book was
borrowed in the evening, and to be returned in the
morning, lest it should be found missing.”

This practice, in spite of Franklin’s example, we do
not advise our young friends to imitate. Few boys could
be deprived of their sleep in this way, without injuring
their health; but Franklin had a very strong constitution,
and could bear it.

From reading, Franklin naturally went to writing, and
his first attempts at composition were in the form of verse.
He wrote two ballads,—one about a shipwreck, and one
about a pirate,—printed them himself, and went about the
streets to sell them. _ They sold in great numbers: and the
boy naturally enough felt quite vain of his success ; but his
father, who was a sensible man, told him that his verses
were poor stuff, and that he had better stick to his business,

Not long after, he shewed his father a piece which he
had written in prose. The same affectionate critic and
true friend told his son that his style was deficient in ease,
grace, and clearness; and the boy resolved to correct it.

He got hold of an odd volume of the Spectator, which
had been published in London not long before, and was
much delighted with it. He took some of the papers,
made short hints of their contents, laid them by for a few
days, and then, without looking at the book, re-wrote
them. When this was done, he carefully compared his
own production with the original, and corrected the errors
in the former.

Some of the papers in the Spectator contained tales or
stories. Franklin translated these into verse, and after a



THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN. QI

while, when he had forgotten the original, turned his own
poetry back into prose. His main object in doing this was
to increase his command of language; because in writing
poetry one is obliged, for the sake of the metre and the
rhyme, to pick out exactly the right word, and reject
many that first come into the head,.and are suitable for
rose.

This was a most excellent way to learn how to write a
good English style; and Franklin’s success was worthy of
the pains he took. This poor boy, without a teacher, with
few books, working hard for his living all day, learned to
write in a way that everybody admires, because his style is
so simple, easy, and graceful. You see his thoughts through
it as clearly as you can see the objects in the streets through
a pane of glass.

What Franklin thus did is what boys and girls call
“writing composition.” Many of them do not like to do
it, and think it very hard work; and when it is demanded
of them, they will do no more than is necessary to save
them from censure. But they make a great mistake, for
there is no exercise required in schools that will be of more
service to them; and no one can learn to write well with-
out taking pains.

While he was a lad, Franklin learned the value and im-
portance of temperance in eating and drinking. He found
a book which advised men to leave off eating meat, and to
live entirely on vegetable food; and he resolved to try the
plan. He learned to prepare some of the dishes described
in this book, and proposed to his brother that if he would
allow him weekly half the money which was paid for his
board, he would board himself.

This offer was accepted, and Franklin found that he
could live upon half of his allowance, and save the other
half for books. While the others went to dinner, he staid
at the printing office, and after he had eaten his slight meal
(perhaps a biscuit or a slice of bread, with a bunch of raisins
or an apple), he had the rest of the time for study.



92 THE VOUTH OF FRANKLIN.

After some years, he gave up his system of living
entirely upon vegetable food; and we do not advise any
young person to imitate him in this plan of not eating
meat. It would not suit the health of all persons, or yield
them strength enough to do hard work, and it would some-
times give trouble.

It is best to eat in moderation whatever is set before us,
without thinking about it. But in our country many people
eat too much meat, and their health would be better if their
food were composed more of vegetable and farinaceous
substances.

Franklin continued through life to be very temperate in
eating and drinking. He said of himself that a few hours
after dinner he could never tell of what dishes it had con-
sisted. In this respect, his example is worthy of all imita-
tion.

It is a misfortune to have a dainty and delicate appetite ;
and a man who is not particular about his food is much
better off than one who is. It costs him less to live; and
he is a much more welcome guest at the tables of his friends.
When a man invites you to dine with him, and you finda
simple dinner on the table, he really pays you a compliment ;
because he thinks you do not care about pampering your
appetite with delicacies, and are content with plain food.

While Franklin was an apprentice, his brother started a
newspaper, which was called the Mew Eugland Courant ;
and Franklin thought he would write an article for it.
Being still a boy, and supposing his brother would reject
any communication which was known to be his, he wrote
his piece in a disguised hand, put no name to it, and slipped
it, in the evening, under the door of the printing office.

_It is probable that he did not sleep very soundly that
night, and went to the office next morning with a beating
heart. But what was his delight to hear his brother and
some of his friends commending the article, wondering who
could have written it, and ascribing it to this or that gentle-
man, who was known to be a good scholar and writer. It



THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN. 93

was printed in the paper; and this success led Franklin to
write others in the same way, and at last to confess that he
was the author.

When Franklin was about seventeen years old, he left
his brother's employment, in consequence of a difference
between them ; and not being able to get work in any other
office in Boston, he went to New York in a sloop. It took
him three days to go; and that was a very quick passage;
now one can go from Boston to New York in about eight
hours.

No one in New York wanted a printer’s boy; and so
he determined to push on to Philadelphia. He went to
Amboy in New Jersey in a vessel, from Amboy to Burling-
ton on foot, and from Burlington to Philadelphia in a boat.
When he reached this city, it was on Sunday morning; and
being hungry, he went into a baker's shop to get some bread.
He bought three rolls; and putting one under each arm,
and taking the third in his hand, he went on his way through
the streets, eating as he walked.

As he was going along in this manner, a young girl,
named Deborah Reed, happened to be standing in the door
of her father’s house ; and when she saw the droll figure he
presented, she laughed at him, as well she might. But it is
curious enough that this young girl afterwards became his
wife. She little thought, when she saw him that Sunday
morning, that such would be the end.

Franklin found employment in Philadelphia at his trade.
After he had been there a few months, his industry and
intelligence attracted the attention of Sir William Keith,
who was at that time governor of Pennsylvania. Pennsyl-
vania was a colony then, dependent upon Great Britain, -
and the governor was not chosen by the people, but was
appointed in England, and sent out there.

Sir William Keith promised to set him up in business,
and persuaded him to go to London to buy presses and
types ; telling him he would lend him money, and give him
letters of introduction and recommendation. A letter of

H 2



94 THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN.

introduction is a letter in which the writer asks the person
to whom it is addressed to be kind to the one who bears it,
and to serve him in any way he can.

Franklin went to London relying upon the governor's
promises; but when he arrived there, he found that Sir
William had played him a pitiful trick, and done nothing
for him. So here he was, in the midst of the great city of
London, without money and without friends. But he had
a good trade; and being an excellent workman, he readily
found employment in a printing office. He earned money
enough to support himself, and save something besides.

The workmen in this office were in the habit of drinking
a great deal of strong beer, which was not good for their
- health, and cost them more money than they could afford.
Franklin drank nothing but water, and they called him the’
water American. He endeavoured to persuade them to
leave off beer drinking, and save their money; but they
told him it made them strong, and that they could not do
their work without it. He convinced them that this was
not true, because he could lift and carry a greater weight
than any of them. Some of them at last gave it up, and
drank as he did.

Franklin passed eighteen months in London, working
at his business, and diligently improving his mind by study
and observation. He was liked and respected by every
body; for, besides being industrious, temperate, and studious,
he was very good-natured and obliging, and always ready
to do a good turn to others. He was also a very pleasant
and entertaining companion, and always full of life, and
spirit, and cheerfulness.

He returned to Philadelphia when he was twenty years
old; and soon afterwards he began the printing business
on his own account, in partnership with a man named
Meredith, who had some money. The business prospered
in their hands, and his career afterwards was one of uniform
success, usefulness, and distinction.

But our account of Franklin stops with the end of his



THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN: 95

youth. Our young readers, when they grow older, will
read his Zz/e, and learn how he became a great statesman
and a great philosopher, and what valuable discoveries he
made, and how much good he did to his country and to
mankind.

Our object is to shew that his success and distinction as
a man were owing in great part to his diligence and industry
as a boy. He never wasted his time in idle sports or
frivolous amusements, but stored his mind with useful
knowledge in his leisure hours. Boys at this time have
more advantages of education than Franklin had. They
have better schools to go to, and far more books to read.
They have only to improve their chances as he did his,
and they cannot fail to be good scholars and respectable
men..

“ Seest thou a man diligent in business,
he shall stand before kings.”

PROVERBS xxii. 20.



96 JUPITER AND THE SHEEP.

JUPITER AND, TEE “SHEEP.

HARMLESS sheep was greatly iil-used by the wild
beasts of the forest. This being so, she went to
Jupiter, and begged him to give her something by

means of which she might protect herself.

“T see well, my gentle creature,” said Jupiter, “that you
are very defenceless; say, then, in what way you would like
me to serve you. Shall I give you long sharp teeth to bite
with ?”

“Oh no,” replied the sheep, “I do not wish to be fierce
like the wolf.”

“Or,” continued Jupiter, “shall I give you poison to kill
the creatures that hurt you?”

“ Nay, nay, that would make me like the serpents, which
are hated by both men and beasts.”

“What then shall Ido? Would you prefer that I should
make horns to grow on your forehead, and make your neck
stronger ?”

“ Alas, no, kind father, for then I should be always
butting like the rude he-goat.”

“And yet,” said Jupiter, “if you wish others to keep
from hurting you, you must have something with which to
hurt them.”

“Must 1?” sighed the sheep. “Then, good father, please
let me remain as I am. For if I had the power to hurt,
I fear I should have also the wish to hurt; and it is better
to suffer, than to be the cause of suffering.”

Jupiter blessed the gentle sheep, and, from that hour, she
forgot to complain.



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cbf421cc2246b804e79bd4b6d50d91b7e7554201
'2011-10-14T06:51:00-04:00'
describe
'241952' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHL' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
7fbfa4da0f9e944a07172c7bef42ee3a
00e80a680e6356fe5599be67cb5d1fc7b0594297
'2011-10-14T06:50:19-04:00'
describe
'64235' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHM' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
b5973b41c45822206b323cf270f39803
e9d75e9ed53c6f0a01885ef42bc852cfbfe03b53
'2011-10-14T06:49:42-04:00'
describe
'3733608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHN' 'sip-files00008.tif'
a167a407fb8fdfd3d80aaecfd579df46
53530976d83f2c3dfa198f947d9eddf82ecba5a4
'2011-10-14T06:47:06-04:00'
describe
'23660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHO' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
5d6bf84ca23baaeb597c76ee3be4d342
0d9287f72d60ca18af9dcc28e9064559a66a4aef
'2011-10-14T06:50:36-04:00'
describe
'455726' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHP' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
1ee2239ee7c994f92e7bc4675a1c422e
b824fac3688e12c81c4718c57a00e08eff31ca1f
'2011-10-14T06:50:22-04:00'
describe
'176842' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHQ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
d6f68fc419152b9a50381c449cef13a3
234370a87efd1f80602cd7cde8358d1dccec91a8
'2011-10-14T06:47:10-04:00'
describe
'42213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHR' 'sip-files00009.pro'
5de9bbaaabac2606765df586cd224815
696b9dbee9a23a425a8e04deb5438b2b2c684bec
'2011-10-14T06:49:38-04:00'
describe
'55311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHS' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
7724073384626de41956a584d13b1e4a
685bd916eeba780173904e96718b8a7bd845314c
'2011-10-14T06:49:37-04:00'
describe
'3655100' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHT' 'sip-files00009.tif'
653fe48d840a2dcaea9fe45a440c2fc8
2c388b993a74a09762444d58784f00967429a886
'2011-10-14T06:47:51-04:00'
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHU' 'sip-files00009.txt'
cb02e5da5b2887a5fdba4d7c5757c0d3
8363ab05b4e30f9385125bd3726961c0867b8ea1
'2011-10-14T06:51:02-04:00'
describe
'19255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHV' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
2a8453b654b518e609955dbd2200465d
7a101777b040840e987a2b3b777072cac817ec7a
'2011-10-14T06:50:20-04:00'
describe
'465304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHW' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
9a66dc7435e911654194c9974f2750c4
6307a249aa386f40953b8f8f34592689a140be7e
'2011-10-14T06:49:51-04:00'
describe
'188186' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHX' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
60e3719693b4eb94ff52895b9bcb41ce
f8e5cc4faee22fa6796b3a99aa35f9a553c3e7e0
'2011-10-14T06:49:15-04:00'
describe
'51345' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHY' 'sip-files00010.pro'
e3d4208c219c446f7e4b42c43c3b6953
53a0434c7246fb06f4dcf5a476e8d74e4e4dc20e
'2011-10-14T06:47:39-04:00'
describe
'59379' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACHZ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
6eb67251bb822a827b7440bf8d895a5c
5c6409e4f834c3ba767fade0c1062e76d3dcde58
'2011-10-14T06:46:58-04:00'
describe
'3732264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
84f942fc69e7fc818597130fadc3ce91
81edfae95a6247b64f57152e90fa0ca01791cd65
'2011-10-14T06:48:38-04:00'
describe
'2014' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIB' 'sip-files00010.txt'
c14510394abf3bc6454bdb67e378086e
8d06cfb90ae580840290dc292bf0dcb25cadc8c8
'2011-10-14T06:50:13-04:00'
describe
'20543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIC' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
773e0e6c4f5149b8fbb739a0409c037d
adeb9d4e49f79478af46f9a3d217261b9b023ac1
'2011-10-14T06:46:56-04:00'
describe
'457018' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACID' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d5199cb862f7159d4756b4590a7b40ed
98262d460a9e9f4c817cd44145f4511877d65d45
'2011-10-14T06:50:39-04:00'
describe
'183875' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIE' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
bf83aa6ac43c85dc3678f68c2743daa9
5c8e2da7d23860d406264a782b3a5cd30a76ee61
describe
'47647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIF' 'sip-files00011.pro'
66950b9ed33576edb635f443664171a2
6a934b8930d49b1ed56c19de06c9f64308d5d0b9
'2011-10-14T06:47:44-04:00'
describe
'58428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIG' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
ea084af0ba248c6bb7feb20de5bc8956
b60548b07e27c67fd5a9e98b6c3c9726d6c1e8c0
describe
'3665824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
0b38c2bd500d787ee002610334f27873
f3ba2ca7b7c97a6650d88ff38de25bb5d3ddb883
'2011-10-14T06:50:54-04:00'
describe
'1968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACII' 'sip-files00011.txt'
ccdcb4168d4c95a989d0be8ffebb55b8
8983a25cfc7154dfd22931dfd8e48287d299a91a
describe
'20471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIJ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
721ef2053b8fc48fb72a21cb20978e62
daf842abc6ed30b11d83cba2191599a45778b3a8
describe
'458422' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIK' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ea2e21d126c2cba43db032734c91f131
fa2edb969064fd2d138449adf8f90c7fce5357be
'2011-10-14T06:49:06-04:00'
describe
'191910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIL' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
d867cd50f7bea2a25a02ae85837a571e
7a7f6bc7ef1ea3348834371e009db4e147e99cc2
'2011-10-14T06:48:09-04:00'
describe
'50505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIM' 'sip-files00012.pro'
87df4bbc5d431aa47ac4f6ef4ae583e0
ed5c6fe3a4a36438069c4361b361afd19156c85d
'2011-10-14T06:50:35-04:00'
describe
'60725' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIN' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
11bd1893564ecaeba819214e8ebccf44
8e8eff38df811f72f79fbbf7de9d900f928b24a2
'2011-10-14T06:47:20-04:00'
describe
'3677460' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIO' 'sip-files00012.tif'
6427bfc714b481afed7d4d44f6becfd1
aba62d24626908e93c572726112153a2d29283ab
describe
'1999' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIP' 'sip-files00012.txt'
74619e33ae28078cba0196ab2ea13bab
441512abb14dfc025b3f8ba771d9578c02934807
describe
'20889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIQ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
70a0ca3c419c9d2ad8c83de26d9b9a15
fdfc3527b3a62a16d727d3d064a327254c5cd30f
'2011-10-14T06:51:24-04:00'
describe
'458352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIR' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e2aab0ab108dd18b7e3478ee5588cb73
cfe9107e6835b63a9d4e55f31edfa87867dc3b5b
'2011-10-14T06:50:38-04:00'
describe
'173430' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIS' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
3c051172efdbcf422caf2d7fa95b6958
d6d13b1b89b3436676f15d16279be93bbdf8bd68
'2011-10-14T06:50:48-04:00'
describe
'43683' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIT' 'sip-files00013.pro'
d4ec290aaa19b86b87ca970221713b1d
3f580e7cfa65dcdcb889de57ccd6eccbbc59405e
'2011-10-14T06:47:04-04:00'
describe
'55160' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIU' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
92091d0a4a6a98414a2c266195d4a91f
de3880d043d2298bb7db91dca0dcf51f0286070c
'2011-10-14T06:48:19-04:00'
describe
'3676140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIV' 'sip-files00013.tif'
b4e8d92e77854697ea2f09703a783a7c
f267eeab2f18ace4fe1f7ecb2a044a7137ea1688
'2011-10-14T06:50:32-04:00'
describe
'1888' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIW' 'sip-files00013.txt'
0727a95ccbf34983b5c9a0bd696f5776
de5b5e5f15145d68f138a8ba5a259cb462ea57f4
'2011-10-14T06:48:01-04:00'
describe
'19038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIX' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
5f5f5c22882fea8e92767900b4cca641
3135a7883e316f253ea5689b06fdbafc25c8330f
'2011-10-14T06:48:07-04:00'
describe
'465312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIY' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
94680d67baa4fdccbc69135898abdfc3
cadcc0982fd695df353c0684146fb4bf69c265bb
'2011-10-14T06:50:04-04:00'
describe
'184718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACIZ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
cb329e6bcc0a1a6bb0a741d0375deee2
e0fe938caccce785bab71344b62dc7d3b19214bc
'2011-10-14T06:48:20-04:00'
describe
'50598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJA' 'sip-files00014.pro'
63a8c2fb242a2c496948d99c2c78389d
d11337d77b1d3c408e296d64571fb958f4e65425
'2011-10-14T06:51:30-04:00'
describe
'57668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJB' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
4fa54f1e5fe0f6d43a064287f7d1211a
ed0b16d94445f705923fab5b57b779233deb92d2
'2011-10-14T06:49:53-04:00'
describe
'3732236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJC' 'sip-files00014.tif'
56b2b4eb8b2de957adaf81b7c48724fe
3a441c303002e6951d26439d958dab7761517180
'2011-10-14T06:47:40-04:00'
describe
'2032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJD' 'sip-files00014.txt'
6a6b23adb901e3d3a7313728ce430c75
43c504f88e51f935436ba7041b33ca26fc5d010d
'2011-10-14T06:48:23-04:00'
describe
'20274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJE' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
70350c4d62d84673149e0b29753c21b0
ddb708790a245c2b19d4c2ce9bf9e8b204fd5fc3
'2011-10-14T06:50:10-04:00'
describe
'458699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJF' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
ebe9f74b230764be22092b4f7a313821
7960596f17b71833195d88a4ebfc45142b25f851
'2011-10-14T06:47:50-04:00'
describe
'198103' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJG' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
31f3404e2126f78dedcb9d2c63da7a3c
bdbe6047e8897aac4ed8d50c5488c4f8dce902f3
'2011-10-14T06:47:00-04:00'
describe
'53788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJH' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f48ee6e3d6363d395f37f6dc6311fd17
a279cb4bfc033227e0f1ccb753aac7b8c19bcfbb
describe
'61094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJI' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
9f2616d284c4c5a672190123da845a34
a49b970dd53e56af085133c2494d1d151bb24b49
'2011-10-14T06:50:46-04:00'
describe
'3679560' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJJ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
62619f233b966c17bb990d203848f3a7
6b95c493ba07d3adae9cdc2e400726edcea40b45
describe
'2228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJK' 'sip-files00015.txt'
7a7cc86a1a042d52c8691757cbc81c0c
6fc9ccc61c7bb8e23a0749cee42191d9eab9f646
'2011-10-14T06:50:25-04:00'
describe
'20315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJL' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
dd6889c65a416f620f0e4f2362922678
3d1260a4d6639418ffbde7ee638841d54afa613e
'2011-10-14T06:46:48-04:00'
describe
'458448' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJM' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
989fd659bab1bdae38d8e080827aa66e
fc202f3a6b85a5308c56474d0c31412c2e14516c
'2011-10-14T06:47:58-04:00'
describe
'166077' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJN' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
a6d4236757ce6773c7af09737507fe0a
07c06579028f8905ea5223c68d0c50047aca028f
'2011-10-14T06:49:27-04:00'
describe
'44552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJO' 'sip-files00016.pro'
82e836482439c8ea03e13396b751df91
a74b0f4bc03f9dc17e4d00610268c8f065d965e7
'2011-10-14T06:50:49-04:00'
describe
'53608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJP' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
08546531119c3ddf0d1f8d7291183732
b3cd46436363d2fcbe585c3be7193130e39a7977
'2011-10-14T06:48:53-04:00'
describe
'3676984' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJQ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
afaee70d15c13415f8f14b528395cef0
2dacdf320468d96838dab54e0b4bfcea0227d065
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJR' 'sip-files00016.txt'
a5ebc2642b5e440e97cbb8f439a9a805
2c540fdc0e0cdbd8fe5f40627f37ce6ae12fd8f5
'2011-10-14T06:47:55-04:00'
describe
'19312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJS' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4f203c6f826fef04f7e17f790c1cc3ad
13c4cb1a3d3acd933f9969d3ebb7d86f31011b0c
'2011-10-14T06:49:09-04:00'
describe
'457025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJT' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e3b9fd63d7b6f5c3055fcd6a7db1500c
465a4bf8663e2c6e479681940396bb62e5e222e6
'2011-10-14T06:47:45-04:00'
describe
'162827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJU' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
ee0689537ecb7b94f9107252156636eb
0882261923a4cf2fa3c1d55666671d3acbe8d46c
'2011-10-14T06:46:51-04:00'
describe
'40923' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJV' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e6f92f8b08213715d58ec51ad0f423f7
3330ae6dbee60699a67313d70abd1ebd273fd460
describe
'53726' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJW' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
29fb24a24ad76900390a1853e814b2e3
b66b9e314e901c9a5e29c513198e2c0e21d18338
'2011-10-14T06:47:54-04:00'
describe
'3665592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJX' 'sip-files00017.tif'
fa022ccadacc5e42857c230947e5c391
1eda509e9061782bbb6e9d1f3e0864970d5614eb
'2011-10-14T06:49:13-04:00'
describe
'1668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJY' 'sip-files00017.txt'
1b38b82faa3a44ce8429abb2793e121a
9e532f15fd40993ea9f5929ece4df3e26724a926
describe
'19257' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACJZ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
45003cd7a03ba2aeae3a487de144eca7
35ea69c3cec3bda40a20f8d7af7a2f2d9d4e31f0
'2011-10-14T06:47:21-04:00'
describe
'458406' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKA' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
1aed24dd4082e28706de830db30a190f
279d007927339c9c702507301a930ed85a2dc8c7
'2011-10-14T06:50:59-04:00'
describe
'196339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKB' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
6bb9b52eec4f14d03d08efefdaabe072
9597e452a65a1d21920cfdd856c39b352c9daabe
describe
'52865' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKC' 'sip-files00018.pro'
9e5115d26b4a4eacc5705c1d8e1984b4
9833aefe4d26505ffb74508f901bf79bb584574f
describe
'61377' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKD' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
be198ff4a422fe8b485ad3b9313f53cb
b400421bf7aa35cfcb27058085603abb2611306c
'2011-10-14T06:46:50-04:00'
describe
'3677456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKE' 'sip-files00018.tif'
5dbe72cc76effa305d47f7618a01168b
935cfdd54f80f46c5750bd8248934aac4f626846
'2011-10-14T06:48:00-04:00'
describe
'2069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKF' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1833491ea09b1c29646cc590428a6359
d9c6979cadecc680f390eeaedc23bcd103e4ff08
describe
'21050' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKG' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
5dc47e71be92240af6e2653e37c9cb37
b6500d345672ebb9f9cba38a464a8eb465028c2b
'2011-10-14T06:49:35-04:00'
describe
'456936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKH' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
8ebd952084b3112af38239efd92449d3
d323fb024dd26c9375fb299e1f463ef5b4461be5
'2011-10-14T06:48:10-04:00'
describe
'207240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKI' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
15c7105c5d8b971b5390549ecb350186
60541e0d64334f198675a6a132d0c0c43b2b9e8f
'2011-10-14T06:51:08-04:00'
describe
'55213' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKJ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
861af100e035721f1f8b8a8d5b98a3fc
eba0deb849c230edc4f9e136ccdadb52d33b4b1a
describe
'64546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKK' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
3dafb71316560838eb18eee73f30cf2b
d332b48b193ead730083456373ef1a948c7b3a3b
describe
'3666012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKL' 'sip-files00019.tif'
dbefd01fcf5e3d0de98cea996b45904a
f56b33689ca821e29b3329485d66a416609c1753
'2011-10-14T06:46:47-04:00'
describe
'2192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKM' 'sip-files00019.txt'
689bdf5eb7f38113c0e9bb48ad4f70f4
055cc5b69395efc9323355586a56057e081ee77f
'2011-10-14T06:51:23-04:00'
describe
'20989' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKN' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
7c0ec313ec602d5198bfcbfbc41e614d
69489efabb367a26c67f9507f5d14f491ff96317
describe
'461867' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKO' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
bc1d1df692cb90f4853bdfc7b64c96e4
692f7247d9d43d221bb5ad41a639a13e164b8897
'2011-10-14T06:47:30-04:00'
describe
'182055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKP' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
55c5020f48a08af9b8ba3096993e3372
075b2acedc978c1b672cd9cb80ce560b7ddf6b2e
describe
'47599' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKQ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
8ea3f0f1b9e4511f1489625b8232f403
e389294e45fe8686f558ad4900cea13140c0c167
'2011-10-14T06:47:41-04:00'
describe
'58199' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKR' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
efd72e6634a6b9e51f610d97d13a38ba
58b6e333ddf620752c3e9ddce7008f122e81979c
'2011-10-14T06:48:43-04:00'
describe
'3704580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKS' 'sip-files00020.tif'
8ee1dabe04afb7c7a16646aa3b6186dd
c6d278bfb83ea935da99d0e06249fb6d538c62a0
'2011-10-14T06:48:17-04:00'
describe
'1853' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKT' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b556eafb8ba685573ed3a9d1274749f6
4f8f33dc382295026f007b8f6a3fada7975203e6
describe
'19795' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKU' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
36e3f7172a49bbee71a7d786ecb0f145
5fd1ae794b32f5cf982bdea323daec173dbd0d10
'2011-10-14T06:51:04-04:00'
describe
'456870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKV' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
b1fa78812d8e730b51bbd98c87427c39
1359aac4bb711e7716b1ec30850a04875a54312c
'2011-10-14T06:49:22-04:00'
describe
'185316' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKW' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
9b6efa3f7b8507bd1d0ef5dca3e00714
ce7377577c14ea0a8be44e73b62753e6a64cd351
'2011-10-14T06:49:54-04:00'
describe
'48917' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKX' 'sip-files00021.pro'
ca978b9d0b924365ec8ac93c24138ced
97ae896a0cb4ab3b7bbd1d35c3ef373c566c2c12
'2011-10-14T06:48:33-04:00'
describe
'57927' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKY' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
afddce842454f963090a1a74043780fd
fca679bf68bb062913d28d1312cd53fa6b9a05c3
'2011-10-14T06:48:31-04:00'
describe
'3665664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACKZ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7b8e654b43e4afe91ba194d24750208a
9c5e61ebcc55f1aacc6e1be873d58f7a003abd11
'2011-10-14T06:46:52-04:00'
describe
'2039' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLA' 'sip-files00021.txt'
cfc444afbd231e1ca2b45ab9ff830055
b70adf40c7dd95b6cf8b0abaceccad4831f1d1fe
'2011-10-14T06:48:40-04:00'
describe
'19921' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLB' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d6f50752066d2bbc1746ad1f22ec74a4
a82385b6f6be1017dacfadefa767867603d3812b
describe
'458383' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLC' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
5b9963a2cca9f1bf7951c9007f15adaf
41e9ab159a2833340f098ea52ed872105ee56027
'2011-10-14T06:50:31-04:00'
describe
'200457' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLD' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
2486c89ea38419d8340cceec4f3bed8b
f86464d0bdc95468e88f68c3934c09f18c62da5d
describe
'55080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLE' 'sip-files00022.pro'
f47a474514a973cd5f4068cf4d688637
ecb87727d21c85cd6bcbd570f642e42ec2a2884b
'2011-10-14T06:49:43-04:00'
describe
'63566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLF' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7c502237c806aeb11308def533d033b8
96f371178e174defed5d243d0485496d1d6ebfbe
describe
'3677224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLG' 'sip-files00022.tif'
d795a91dcbb0e03860557baa1b206bb8
f79e8ee34047cb9564a81fb0535b6900599815b1
'2011-10-14T06:49:36-04:00'
describe
'2153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLH' 'sip-files00022.txt'
b22d413bea9493676d641b81b2461ced
a96fbef6a459442a375a494de75596e1de966442
'2011-10-14T06:50:30-04:00'
describe
'20464' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLI' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
7dbf9846c9944c538f0d7c02cd054584
5695ea48237534e691a3d941b3ed6ebb16137d2e
'2011-10-14T06:51:35-04:00'
describe
'456576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLJ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
589a0a613e71f087d251fd2c2c1251dc
72cb4308f679830e6bd62188119c1ec2d481c983
'2011-10-14T06:50:01-04:00'
describe
'207822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLK' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
c836afd99179c5f857d7a7576643873a
141c872d17efc8cf00e131625c96e3a5584ae0df
describe
'54841' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLL' 'sip-files00023.pro'
287b6163df6b6f01df74ada85d47a411
fbe356330c669fe7ed8922c40db5cc344bd3322d
'2011-10-14T06:47:13-04:00'
describe
'63931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLM' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
920bd7b6dca15572f7dc8377a447b987
28d1dafb444abc9ca8f13a103fc3942e9e1c3aad
'2011-10-14T06:48:41-04:00'
describe
'3662512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
c0f0399a7e07349b8f85d88ae518418c
857f2eb64888e976f95086936c9132c4ec54c4c7
'2011-10-14T06:50:23-04:00'
describe
'2165' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLO' 'sip-files00023.txt'
6983d24b78ebe6bde1725d9a6c55e300
72cd1b960ec503b46a0ecac63ed5359d684c8f1b
'2011-10-14T06:46:37-04:00'
describe
'20732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLP' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
64d2caf63fd04081311a941fb6bc8b03
fd66ebb8d0b83a2e3484577406ec109c46a53f2c
'2011-10-14T06:49:29-04:00'
describe
'445107' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLQ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
905582b582ce91ace9bd1f9131f0dfc3
8b52b88f6865987d41e2bd05a91e91f9840e2846
'2011-10-14T06:47:43-04:00'
describe
'204932' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLR' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
8578861e62ddb8da3da553b7d4e0fe20
15ebc44c55b16b0fc65c7d00c42a98a12a854182
'2011-10-14T06:49:46-04:00'
describe
'55451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLS' 'sip-files00024.pro'
fdbfd3cd621b9fbd406adfdf30dd22e7
dfcd2b4e1663dffcbb0c9b9688b4ee9812470156
describe
'64214' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLT' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
0a9f6c540ee6ba93c59753fddb5ec97b
7ddef3625a08c716db5b0bf5ef732d2dc9fa9f03
describe
'3571036' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLU' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c9e3662808ce3fa199a8cf3ae21cb522
3cacff6d524cc250c09b64868cadc97578b1e765
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLV' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f98d998bce74b7752a7cad79513bc44b
c32ac90c5e61f96e1e5783def974fc842ffe7937
'2011-10-14T06:50:03-04:00'
describe
'21089' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLW' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
8ba507f6b41032ecb755b4bdf5ac760f
87a165526644ec0244c6b9363b8e8c6d2cf7723e
describe
'453574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLX' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a4de6966ff8e8b26efcad06d21c79fef
330e71134123001b9832829e0a08b28412eb1d82
describe
'179723' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLY' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
6072a5ee2123f04da689ab81e5bfc161
9426ca2c2df5624d7c5699077fb7e50e3c46a459
'2011-10-14T06:47:42-04:00'
describe
'46104' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACLZ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
6d282585b46ef990ac38fb236ec11126
89305a57b1774977a1edbd88bac171601e1e7009
'2011-10-14T06:48:27-04:00'
describe
'58312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMA' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e7ff19bbf7257b4829e8734cd6d7a59c
d49b6db90db27c770a20b4afd10bf557520b1827
describe
'3638236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMB' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4f7999eb2052a2cc85539d3f3b921f82
44df5af744c81c71778e527506920ca0f3643749
'2011-10-14T06:47:59-04:00'
describe
'1876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMC' 'sip-files00025.txt'
538e9c24b0d8fa7e377e93861de33ba0
a700f31bfc3e9f3b8daac442efe69d6223f1061b
describe
'20251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMD' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
293777abc63761d399973faff6b054ef
4ffa12917ad7a98a7e73a25569db46d78c31bf96
describe
'467026' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACME' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
031b7385412ab15d21a42563da293589
27f0f1867651827dc4c6790a52cf24019791ace9
'2011-10-14T06:50:43-04:00'
describe
'183156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMF' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
4bf693a53b3b5a863eddf778716a4751
8d6e9782ca260ca62899db4a1f6d9bcc8eb6f911
'2011-10-14T06:46:35-04:00'
describe
'50479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMG' 'sip-files00026.pro'
3d3954b9da3c03ece24699cfa47d6d5d
23bab2d9e238c9ce0bfb2c74ce81d1e82428eec3
'2011-10-14T06:49:04-04:00'
describe
'57763' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMH' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
37a7a34dbced23f9fd099fed7974be3f
b40053b5b8fbc03295a34ddcf1cce2eb1e3ef987
describe
'3746008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMI' 'sip-files00026.tif'
8edfb9d3ae1f3a9b420233e38cd155cd
82d90a74246ddfbc05abe855c76cc1ff6abdc778
describe
'1992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMJ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
2087087dbb4c3b063da8698a4a3d4af6
e78a6b6b99911725f72b7643a49c5c8dfd9c078c
describe
'20261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMK' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
1f566fa530d21cf7e99b528cb9b35ce9
0fc4ef3e95b141a91e3ad168429ec3322b9eba57
'2011-10-14T06:48:55-04:00'
describe
'456949' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACML' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
3fa38116db7b5114b91074e13d7b385a
04544219f397c70323953c71823b73b30052e184
describe
'199781' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMM' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
31406798bc6ba8b133860508c062385d
ddf306576db5af35e3d16f0377f10de34e75aecc
describe
'54070' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMN' 'sip-files00027.pro'
f3e7f8ff7eb5e7ea32ff4dbe0964ac97
8ba52d175e1563e01fc073c03a8ba59269cfec1d
'2011-10-14T06:48:14-04:00'
describe
'61617' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMO' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
667d3414ff4621e0da37add236dd8c59
7d1a0c0470539309b66c59665fbead17dea58bd0
describe
'3665620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMP' 'sip-files00027.tif'
437343435b0dec21d806109d0fb1f0b2
3b0ad65150288274834eea2bdfd1888f03f8ee68
'2011-10-14T06:50:51-04:00'
describe
'2123' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMQ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
176eb52a71ce0344c22bbe7924230091
267819a3d751cfa39be2dda661aa61168197f5d2
'2011-10-14T06:49:18-04:00'
describe
'20345' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMR' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
66ae7b65b546e842df942e017e7e3e0d
f6fe3dc30e8d31cdf1f340d33151538b114c9f5f
describe
'449879' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMS' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
2d15e3bf780cc7dc183a39e2b23b235a
2324b6785e21f100e12511defa2b8642f468d24e
'2011-10-14T06:47:19-04:00'
describe
'192573' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMT' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
fd52d6f5d3b35c34bc0c17249b379d02
6bb6a5dac97b4036f61abd29c5499994bda3aaf0
describe
'50373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMU' 'sip-files00028.pro'
aacf235f95bd98210ac393f9faf4b48f
4f525379830c66032208965365309215b9ec1ffa
'2011-10-14T06:51:10-04:00'
describe
'61591' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMV' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
76bb3a8832b6d19cad4a3c033cb87687
3f85358cbb269a5de8bafdc7f3841f4ecbf5772f
'2011-10-14T06:47:56-04:00'
describe
'3608760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMW' 'sip-files00028.tif'
e99dc4aedee087abf5284adf084c7151
34f015125855bfb6d9169299e16fc30f06051025
'2011-10-14T06:48:39-04:00'
describe
'1988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMX' 'sip-files00028.txt'
62586a37ab1a341ee99f7e9b4402e484
ebb16c21b5119662c31c164c438fa8eb75f398c2
'2011-10-14T06:49:02-04:00'
describe
'21220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMY' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
336af62a38bceb654a684d4d1ba802ce
c97b5f983537587b1095f633e97965e689b0e177
describe
'458400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACMZ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
ab5938608f1a08c773e05be7a67a2021
101893cc64f521b72b173d573f36c0bbb37ae5b8
'2011-10-14T06:49:56-04:00'
describe
'197372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNA' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
b51e42361de12fdeefff61710e3b0c27
46a4a878a8e66cf5c0d84506bc643c2618798992
'2011-10-14T06:46:59-04:00'
describe
'53145' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNB' 'sip-files00029.pro'
6778c8d471d599005941bd24c23876ed
8b03eb32c43536fff1b868e1288e8502d7e51bcf
'2011-10-14T06:49:59-04:00'
describe
'61835' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNC' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
33e9ffadc542c82f986af0300ef51015
97800fc0445cd878ea5f2559bce951e41830c6cf
'2011-10-14T06:51:19-04:00'
describe
'3677236' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACND' 'sip-files00029.tif'
77f5dd49188138e4860f76426fd0a403
5a59bc733d3f9a4e8bad4c58504252f572334348
'2011-10-14T06:50:33-04:00'
describe
'2091' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNE' 'sip-files00029.txt'
fbee391266d5a38a0a5277dc58165736
3371d90ae3399f496cca31626b2b80142bc3bb86
'2011-10-14T06:49:25-04:00'
describe
'20746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNF' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
9f7ed57e8b8506f50cc3931f4899ad80
20096efc20811ec6fa2d9bdbb8d8ed41dba399fa
describe
'436162' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNG' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
53dbbe1eb1201bdd1037a158bc76c35f
857b50081ed0b6ea26e36ce300236b247c5b9746
'2011-10-14T06:47:14-04:00'
describe
'129574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNH' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
bcf3d7a00e4d921bc0bd0598516d707f
063495e2e336f09127d512a16b98d84039f5a894
describe
'24276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNI' 'sip-files00030.pro'
bcc52a4535f2bdda13a3289a46c965fa
9beb455447325b759a68a8c245eddccda6dcb195
describe
'41525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNJ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
771642fd135c78f4b60eca8e9919e22e
351e8c26de7b97125fc744735432c458efd8b064
describe
'3497720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNK' 'sip-files00030.tif'
e1eeaca95fad612f27d26f20367ad92f
bb9e0bb7008f98a9233dfe5728dbf33df198732d
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNL' 'sip-files00030.txt'
2cf8fa5d66e4505a432fdaadd416e30e
f3bc002f7b19d3a03fa1802be14ee767b801a372
'2011-10-14T06:48:54-04:00'
describe
'16393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNM' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
aa0826da3f6bd0ee45654e7bf158b857
b9c24ef9252632af0ee6d0bd983d2da4dd1fc826
describe
'448423' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNN' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
b483353d9d49ff40dcd84a24651fedf0
b0f7ea0a07fc2eb10aa7c269c3630d75e10d9d7e
describe
'115457' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNO' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
056218c4982ac3f0e7f7818f817cf130
2e42848d89dc8366aeaf25084c8080751f20b4fc
describe
'21964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNP' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a0bd13d827eef961a4ccb4f4c2e846ac
543a0f64525054b8521c0efc17d1c8acbe34eed9
'2011-10-14T06:47:52-04:00'
describe
'36063' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNQ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
79c087d0613d0d52467392d5659cf0ed
081a77947d310bbc98019030f4351bca1bcf31b7
'2011-10-14T06:49:24-04:00'
describe
'3595860' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNR' 'sip-files00031.tif'
68a47b0be8c5a8c92c8526ef905a49aa
6e2a2cde87078a5cc44ec7c79765177b0ee0e004
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNS' 'sip-files00031.txt'
43f6f8da5033d3be324fa9c37235f344
05adc187e49a4e01ef3b433b08441b67e3921403
'2011-10-14T06:50:26-04:00'
describe
'15310' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNT' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
4d8fe7f2ce4d5fb14f77cf8718ba1635
4618060e728b691a41288de41f82c16e6605682e
describe
'434372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNU' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
8e4af0d16010953765a92e087aefdeaa
10b4c15b156525d08fdc3324d7990c37a745fdf4
'2011-10-14T06:46:43-04:00'
describe
'123142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNV' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
eafe3a7dd11dadb3f76ec41bbccea6c1
a4126de8b7b3690d0485bc8eaaf99e47006d0868
'2011-10-14T06:50:56-04:00'
describe
'14475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNW' 'sip-files00032.pro'
fe28c818593de9018b974385a0e15225
0a51e31dc790c2bb107f833a5d015e3145d24f3a
describe
'38440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
c51d0e67b2db874c7e9f8d39847f0701
e36f4177fa1c6e5e51597d43b7a5bef4c7f86365
describe
'3483840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNY' 'sip-files00032.tif'
4737a2a9db9a555f0707af66a3d74db6
389f9d41dde16c08907aeca60a93e8f59155340b
'2011-10-14T06:51:34-04:00'
describe
'590' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACNZ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
6cf3a39bd89374624a723ab21ed6cc06
657cd996f9678635babbbe2f98cd063a270c004b
'2011-10-14T06:51:11-04:00'
describe
'15547' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOA' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
5ec3b32a8c6ed00f19192a4e45201d7e
908a2bd5da8c887191f5e954ba4277f9ec3787ad
describe
'482094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOB' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
96e5a781406871cd3670775e2602bdf1
fbb8d77bc0901564d44934d4d1b8506d16455c00
describe
'198809' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOC' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
521c1a20cf57faa842f02293fe033954
43be03bad6ef4b713b0eeccb8a693c98868ee722
'2011-10-14T06:47:08-04:00'
describe
'6156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOD' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8b96df6b5d3922fd1461887a47014593
cfcc0e781f23a6c39f02603936a52868544fcf64
describe
'59204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
450e7b9e0fe16566740f54ae818bc859
e2c73b9f276d4fb022e34975b4596bf14ad0ff1f
describe
'3867572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOF' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b7cef78ac1ab2b3eed2d30107cb35f23
c5792ca9689e1681eb29d2225530540202ed301d
'2011-10-14T06:47:16-04:00'
describe
'339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOG' 'sip-files00033.txt'
224404d48905635b5d8d8726c8bcd307
480c2724f5dec8dfa9de78ca8a03859b45553d8e
describe
'22340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOH' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
4621bfb98e26afe3938c06441510ca72
48aca26dbcd2cc1b123e66cf62a1928854bbddf3
'2011-10-14T06:46:46-04:00'
describe
'465208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOI' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
20b604a96ee89a863acdb6a770029bbf
e23b600fc0a542c9b4c350384158849fddb9022a
'2011-10-14T06:48:03-04:00'
describe
'178902' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOJ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
5b45dfd657decbb2517049391900d956
e2d7cff8017666c0d588944bc214eac553b8bf97
'2011-10-14T06:46:34-04:00'
describe
'47973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOK' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
228aec3726db2b5d07760acb869e32ad
ee39130ad6fabee5d3aa2f13969916b59a4978eb
'2011-10-14T06:51:16-04:00'
describe
'3732172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOL' 'sip-files00034.tif'
ef7b1be2fe286d0777eba264c6078ca1
bc8d4fb37eb272eebaf33c209b1fc7183920c086
'2011-10-14T06:47:25-04:00'
describe
'19138' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
ce6e3f566f776ebdf5c775e489e108ef
3ebe9d84d4556b931f5cde3de8fef067b73597f6
'2011-10-14T06:48:47-04:00'
describe
'457010' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACON' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
d97f833ae4c87a28d51844ac619c71c8
e0cfb8aed343554691bbcbcc3fc8740259f49b0d
describe
'139326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
2dcccfbd2061d44ff88bb079caead3c7
ab449f2586c17c8d12f11828d0fa08553b18f1f4
'2011-10-14T06:51:05-04:00'
describe
'24125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
833253730fd1c9ee4bb8b4baea95b782
afe1853b5b343ffb9d8b88901ea02dcab6dd0b77
'2011-10-14T06:50:58-04:00'
describe
'43311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
6464a9b73a05e8016d9595992930d16a
5b82af6bb2f450da8c6cdf035344837049282714
'2011-10-14T06:46:36-04:00'
describe
'3665048' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
5d7b665c9ff59bb1c15c3304ff09d49b
6e3ada3dca1edc1bbba98c94e8f1ab4fb12d7168
'2011-10-14T06:46:54-04:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOS' 'sip-files00035.txt'
98fd4bb58f3a9e33896c85c87fd4cf5c
7e73944b7edc6ed35cd5a3fc5bdccdd6e3309474
'2011-10-14T06:47:15-04:00'
describe
'17096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOT' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
4afe43c8da2cf4d2c2a9b863e67d8ade
292b35abc12d7f807e3c5fa045061e920031b075
describe
'442920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
40b71d5f18e4b8890a783c13aa95cd89
13b67ff0b010f062c5bc569ffdb1f1d6eb7fdcf5
describe
'194742' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
c62cb37ee6a3b829ddc6d9dc489e62a6
68856f631b6427d7fde291af99908ab18d61f5b9
describe
'50179' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1c61fafa76485c02457123fefa75cf55
b50749d07b25c2d19fe4df981f7513376033999d
describe
'61156' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
e41d9552075d87192342908f498ef020
57411638061386449907fcc039ecd95582d07763
'2011-10-14T06:46:57-04:00'
describe
'3553172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
8f81bc29c2ed5a9054682b25ad828c81
fcc3928c73b6f638b420270eb2441ea5a6604d80
'2011-10-14T06:50:05-04:00'
describe
'1979' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACOZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
fa3f72c374a595e362c5774aa78fa4bf
6e5ae9e9c837d644268f1e729fb5c38757b50e99
'2011-10-14T06:50:29-04:00'
describe
'20981' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
461b20f5c4c43619bbf8c50611e02e22
11a2ae79e6ce144dac74c2c139de9db8647d7303
describe
'458718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
76bc9e7f0217e3b17811e2b02bf03c74
9442c79a94df85cc3ae73cc2bc2a8e11329a4062
'2011-10-14T06:47:35-04:00'
describe
'190878' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPC' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
5cf9d225cf97f7b940e252a3c9568ab7
e7fe901f831f78f94c6c62cb130ebdc7213419dc
describe
'51380' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPD' 'sip-files00037.pro'
eb99e9a9f15ac6a40da476cc0e07d7a3
fc6e43d4a5f09a40b00353ae49136d927eef74bc
'2011-10-14T06:49:30-04:00'
describe
'59496' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a03b7c8ed0a2cafee904b8b074ada351
bf4bdabb31e39c89e48d8e72d9adfb0df4fe3a5e
'2011-10-14T06:46:45-04:00'
describe
'3679412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPF' 'sip-files00037.tif'
aecf6abe7662017ccd811cf34daa2608
a2791d263741c16f4b52360c1f37111eaab32d25
'2011-10-14T06:51:15-04:00'
describe
'2034' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
32045afa250e58a9c8db91efc1730320
662d31874df489389f92ad08ed94e11f7ef01858
'2011-10-14T06:49:05-04:00'
describe
'20346' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
2ca7578b0af451309382f34f90f653e7
f9dbc0c8997bb3a8f8b7eff97080ddd3e123d199
'2011-10-14T06:51:03-04:00'
describe
'465232' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPI' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
d55122c465ab264edd44505eff5a53c6
63c9bcc165652854ba10ce9a15b950b6e9656a5e
'2011-10-14T06:48:13-04:00'
describe
'185966' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
e7a38ede933db9428aaf1b845e50d6a1
006b5a755d9f899b60b58f78a0617dfd85800fa6
describe
'52200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
7a478c3ce1cd94ec44b219adf8e6bb62
9371e3404181f5652a897584524950bec9482661
describe
'58705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
fe5bd8531cc73b6ba8cf89cebd5821fe
f3303b7ab21da958128ec316003e390ed3912d95
describe
'3732204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPM' 'sip-files00038.tif'
9861e2750c187c21dedab932a9275207
63c52d62b1125b262868a588d297a3cd9361a082
'2011-10-14T06:51:25-04:00'
describe
'2054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
8aae30584c4620717d7d113a13326056
ca75776bd73a60e809713f3348d353b7a3e2f002
describe
'20306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPO' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
4c2fd55189d595bcbf8b4e8d9de0b05a
b5b15b6fb50de807dfd1361c8e419152f357df64
'2011-10-14T06:48:48-04:00'
describe
'465591' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
45f7840dbeed76cace31f45f7af4167b
9a2e0fdbdf38ad5454a2a7c51622550a6f09bdd2
'2011-10-14T06:51:09-04:00'
describe
'181967' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPQ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
796df0a4cea49a6aa709696da4db76a4
7f81df437154a8297f3f9c62180842fba9d1e330
describe
'49443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPR' 'sip-files00039.pro'
92597be77bf191e53cc342c300cfd930
104260e035769706c43bab6999aab9f7a7a6341f
describe
'58718' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
f61f080b28d01714fcd0fa978ed9eddd
550b5dfe659393c350f02dd4062d7667a205182f
'2011-10-14T06:51:17-04:00'
describe
'3734432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
2df331249d74a31883041399c0e62b58
20da7b3daa28ec720d69c09df1ef884692edc3d4
describe
'1973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
0d948c6ccb33fd28fbe442a44aa9d3ce
16ba188c06e8ffd60d04e24efbfdc366e0193b12
describe
'20572' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
941dd1c2e4c9de7817c6260c4f88452a
0344150e5941c104507e86791e5db294784d1275
'2011-10-14T06:48:56-04:00'
describe
'448439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPW' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
00499495dd77932153b04408b04d6ace
f67b3b1556b6661dfc3c3ec983796eb38c3df128
'2011-10-14T06:46:44-04:00'
describe
'139692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPX' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
428791de880ad250e049607d05a668d5
e712d533af0eae741815182fde4461c5d337d122
describe
'34579' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
c692f18956ad63c9c26f386e70d1f7e1
6afa3fb0d08fb5077ab587c8a3e3739b08c3619a
'2011-10-14T06:47:18-04:00'
describe
'43275' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACPZ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
2ec28c8dff483126078cafb65326eed6
b7b3e2a6702b7fcce13bca851acad3eab9fb711e
'2011-10-14T06:51:33-04:00'
describe
'3596896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
95a8ff9499a865f849041683603bcae9
edd36c03fa906d4d339ea62b536b63d875088924
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d554b6a827bcb0ab05fd2d89d9c5651a
6d73817c9611a9303a4dace416305761ee7a74c6
'2011-10-14T06:48:50-04:00'
describe
'16255' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
353e6ac94c317fe695bd08745aed4737
bb6ba91ed2ab90e80ddcd606e06bb0628eba4049
describe
'465471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQD' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
9bcdf03de809f430e42d9bfaa4b0808a
1fa0e1bf298f354624663fa7199a10012651ffc5
'2011-10-14T06:48:58-04:00'
describe
'134476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
821a7ffd08eb843699a95bd8179c1384
7ee56f67fb35bf70d802402f06ce9dc5b36b44db
'2011-10-14T06:49:41-04:00'
describe
'38388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQF' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
33564397d6e5d97a41931b212d7aab44
89bea63b88b797d9343dad19cf57c1e42d730304
'2011-10-14T06:48:08-04:00'
describe
'3733612' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQG' 'sip-files00041.tif'
382e82a140b3f3b591acead1fe278ec1
eecd49d7ca70f738bd19853f26192667a9e9af0e
describe
'16350' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQH' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
8d570e06767296c38521ab74ce4e571c
c6e6eb06b79e3685141442233fc8f7a2e37142f6
'2011-10-14T06:50:09-04:00'
describe
'465284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQI' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
fd570b6d53a03f02150769fbbd1ad817
f8a9dcb2e279b3a73221ecd4441b6eeb07ee0018
describe
'179207' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQJ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
c86fc250890d50119924fd0bab424771
d329e929ef15610029bfeaa619a3e96ee6e871c6
describe
'46306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQK' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
60028745931b5e31e6c290e3fc650862
ad0effd1d23dbb8e5ccd3e915811d2baa9218969
describe
'3731728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQL' 'sip-files00042.tif'
06fb83fb3d829e1efa4982f21b18c31f
9727eab6dd02d6cac00878623040b5c551e5eb77
'2011-10-14T06:49:44-04:00'
describe
'17918' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQM' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
a0ae3649465fc4971ce45bb4d0f59ff0
943bd8c27c30489e150c0631fabc85cf246adda7
describe
'457011' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQN' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
c7695b1b5fbdd466d1446af5b2adca67
afacc3b6938311febe19e063c352debda8d385f0
'2011-10-14T06:48:28-04:00'
describe
'183780' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQO' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
043a59d3fb0cfc3c7c9436c7d755449a
ad667d3ef194e74997f64cecc8ab602a4d935977
describe
'50627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQP' 'sip-files00043.pro'
7d8b2095dbfdc83d1f7b2320fa24abf3
813ecfacf3ad0d6c384b83d3a4271797044b9475
describe
'55323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQQ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
b5795dfe658107f20e9f0ae3e563d4a9
a2ee7573ed34849e3455f2e6252b7cac0552457d
describe
'3665176' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQR' 'sip-files00043.tif'
bf764f8f794d6a894ff2850904c70ec1
4fcc64d04953b25db10bc0e724565dce3a5da4da
describe
'2023' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQS' 'sip-files00043.txt'
e11058b67fe98cdc7443f0ec912f5dc4
f433992033272a6e7df603b86f2df267c57dce4a
'2011-10-14T06:49:32-04:00'
describe
'18429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQT' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
c1a4cb6cf37607e35faccece9770d7ee
3acdb7ea8a19952b7c265c8af9c5a58f615c3cd9
'2011-10-14T06:48:52-04:00'
describe
'465566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
b5f9d3b6a4ada3acf7707c61ad4bef4d
2286830b5c454b0202ee5a2531c2fb061acf6793
describe
'178068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQV' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
bc14f6b6d06b6b1a524117af9b7fe6ac
592d2df344296cc589404b1f5dfffe2b9271bc29
'2011-10-14T06:49:26-04:00'
describe
'50407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQW' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b1ce9360554e3b60b87dde0c2dd33546
3c461b4821b4309d632616dea45eb53516b3e7df
describe
'56012' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQX' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
705eed014f6e0dee3762fd52595d2165
47b4aa870e97d666eab4f054ba0f8b8973bf5f52
describe
'3734272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQY' 'sip-files00044.tif'
43cbe30948016fbd9addca23197d253f
7b6380e9d0fe54576a70453405cb33b52be1244f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACQZ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
cef53ee5d96540fb8fdbab8299e5860c
c4c994310ba9557df61d3bd995c187b400eecbc9
describe
'19396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRA' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
dd1de485a223b0ba796297547fb62fcb
15fc5e6e93f8cca9d587d8e2897536bfa458edea
'2011-10-14T06:47:29-04:00'
describe
'457008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRB' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8289dbf4e1f7fe694c063b72bbc31f57
8ebcd84bb14e8edd91cabbd78139015f8dcc9048
'2011-10-14T06:46:39-04:00'
describe
'112981' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRC' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
373ac1564fe661d0fcc8848e7452e3d6
62039007124cd21264b12594830a457e8eb9eb7d
describe
'24929' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRD' 'sip-files00045.pro'
a583cb613cb9b6bc4c6e60083a0e58ab
97cfa5199372bbf3868cb6d14e6eeb13f8acd096
'2011-10-14T06:51:22-04:00'
describe
'36179' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRE' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
068ccfab9b3fa70dd2b48aeef1b3b289
56467da33d697b4bf07db0e612302a935ac6047d
describe
'3664320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRF' 'sip-files00045.tif'
972629bf89d1f94eaa25059c0142296b
ab079ff6482ba8853ca790c3f4399a7af4e47b50
'2011-10-14T06:49:33-04:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRG' 'sip-files00045.txt'
bd54fd8ff92d78ede74bef2a431a953b
da590d42963d187b44e2c82dff950a46b2d7b9ee
'2011-10-14T06:49:10-04:00'
describe
'14765' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRH' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b8d6dccadfc435bed717cad62274bccb
160b3e0e5ece8be5e242d711890c37f2ef9ec831
'2011-10-14T06:46:33-04:00'
describe
'465570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRI' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
a5cbc2c681b5cdac852cee0d986b0b7d
726308ceb56b23851f01998b097e2835be3b9eb2
describe
'103360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRJ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
fc9e86967706c37a2ed7f78e1b0296cf
04eda4d98b8ed14178ddb7d2787e1cd2f38a536d
describe
'12197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
27ca61a4018db7e3fcb227c886b5797e
b23b82ec9b74a442c519b1cbbb276a5abb9e8758
'2011-10-14T06:48:51-04:00'
describe
'30371' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRL' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e26fd6e3bf025d6856b0b0640c208d1c
29de8a96874cdff5b3a3b05962d5d27e6eb39a56
describe
'3732568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRM' 'sip-files00046.tif'
d7f55b0511a148d869b76b49d43eeffc
35112328f72b24642f691008b862ef8f0e5dd147
'2011-10-14T06:51:37-04:00'
describe
'532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRN' 'sip-files00046.txt'
5e2f15325433d3e5d3a58bf7b1715689
553f1ceee737eea78b5de65a91908fb450b0f89c
describe
Invalid character
'13278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRO' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
003a2843ac2d340af4dd68bc7e6c1daa
2e1d6df146d499f7c311d44e853d657f660e1041
describe
'456995' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRP' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e8fdfea11d171b84a85ae4665cd4648a
7f5747687721409e09f986d9711785e963834c2e
'2011-10-14T06:48:49-04:00'
describe
'167003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
872e7cacb19368e369785d79d47b295c
6fd7fe0b7311435c424444c7999a737c4be8616b
describe
'42864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRR' 'sip-files00047.pro'
4516c6bf528468d3881c6014a119ea4b
0156766ed2b02c0529e0785178511d609ac278c7
describe
'52545' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRS' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
56d8d33feec7ea0e21406d3f974ea841
b877dd9e9b4e05565e731271e018a4f1497aee61
describe
'3665284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRT' 'sip-files00047.tif'
3c623966c80724a7725a258c48c05e4a
432d3629aa38d7f879a5edfeab1506890106928d
describe
'1713' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRU' 'sip-files00047.txt'
61b2b777439f819c9c9ea94ec5a4ef1b
fb900c9c794e7007bb249347bde5b9ff74f7670c
'2011-10-14T06:49:17-04:00'
describe
'18694' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRV' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
54173d90c0183c4178c4f9c7bb22cd96
57e4043eb91df4e6e121e4a3bc44175f6417267a
describe
'465556' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRW' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9dfaf23f31513ad8be065f89edff6a89
d1bcd4a9ec065b4aba213a24c20b7c851d170832
'2011-10-14T06:47:17-04:00'
describe
'168109' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRX' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
20a1c9d70063f8f9b1aefc89e5bff1df
17801ae16be0864ea0854df1f1ea31a9424b4738
describe
'45998' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRY' 'sip-files00048.pro'
0aafc304c08d3c7507fd5888557caa23
d0bad147b89fc8706c53a11f6ae1f02ac1f7aec2
describe
'52996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACRZ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
e1bc363ac49c5bb92704c53f74ad4472
75bb048eb8d1a3f5b6531d511c7f62fc267b5ccf
describe
'3733980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSA' 'sip-files00048.tif'
461f40e444466231f27acb4bd707e2f5
8f744689cb771b877e8984bc7eb6dd8e983f8de1
describe
'1811' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
936d007cbb1a7c3ba8b48f8b46168f10
8db458379886f54aa3f1119b8d673f310e798689
describe
'18734' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSC' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
6fbdc345904adc16d59f74f9c2d17b03
e101df51efe5d79c59c028294481cb195d52574d
'2011-10-14T06:48:37-04:00'
describe
'465596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSD' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
12662fe6dfed7cb3e81973d6fad94168
fd219d57838933f431f656fdce36e6a1367f8c4c
describe
'162982' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
4bdb8d181e4a82b15d6f507b2c83ea44
f5ab355a01ec44d0a21aec20c0a1c32ceb5ebe74
describe
'44307' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSF' 'sip-files00049.pro'
709ca8fbc38c7410645de149a9a08319
92baba02992bbe89ff4bc22512be6fd5927d3a67
'2011-10-14T06:47:02-04:00'
describe
'52147' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
bb013598cd435a0da1bf9be93430fe7d
195f1469e427dfccae3a8d21642885bc3b48a8e7
describe
'3734032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSH' 'sip-files00049.tif'
20b5072cd491b0e812e084258d3b1c18
5b52598d18baf893bda39334fbabd0aa8e51869d
'2011-10-14T06:49:00-04:00'
describe
'1768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSI' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0f2cc85eeeab617f3c626735923d8ec6
6a7fec910d7efa58086d5f5bf4d843246218cc0d
'2011-10-14T06:50:28-04:00'
describe
'18602' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSJ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
940821c79b52ad3e93bc7ca77c0f0083
9b3bb603a256664027108e3bc76d45621aad3329
describe
'465593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSK' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
e43bb4964dca8957e321f0425a51c14e
2c9f844635486c309734617b954f67ee13886f79
describe
'133155' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSL' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
93fb902b6f8cff16b315bf14fb163ef4
0688f073ea0ea5ab5a7a5406018af09ea36d73c6
describe
'29994' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSM' 'sip-files00050.pro'
c8e85d85903a220fd1bfc1b321679fc0
246765493133f2edcc52d513c459d22412c9cc16
'2011-10-14T06:46:42-04:00'
describe
'42151' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSN' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
afa896991024d9a8c127bb485f09a2d1
f9719726a72ecb4f9ce3f8702bb27e24d7eab300
describe
'3733644' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2d6f774fbd13b4783e64af9a56de2be8
ce16dc91dc69be667963491d125c6a1dfbf80626
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSP' 'sip-files00050.txt'
5dffa10541108670fcff8d4c346a7013
a5bcda264186b3ae8479aca3abd62376a9b29ce2
'2011-10-14T06:50:17-04:00'
describe
'16658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
0e1cb689ea4011bd456962313c49e18d
041178bc56e2c0357520f5385fb31cb4f9c824cb
describe
'466824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSR' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
482ac6ade56923913b3955876dffb4a1
5326353b41f97222f9b5ddae24b4fb6c2e29358f
'2011-10-14T06:49:50-04:00'
describe
'101183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSS' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
1b7bb53a4a7c15f3da95ca8338915e2b
1080deb7ed44eac640899ebc656942f90a010c3e
'2011-10-14T06:49:40-04:00'
describe
'27561' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACST' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
14503c83dca7e3fe2adb8fc62c6a2b97
fb18b6fd3b2e4950c259884b37a5f1b4afc96ca0
'2011-10-14T06:48:59-04:00'
describe
'11210708' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSU' 'sip-files00051.tif'
753a2c52803c8e673638639f27119e6a
fc2d3701a38904f4bb5dd136e5bacc7fc7aab8e1
describe
'13443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSV' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
92069602ab1b2ef332cbd44849ce0f48
68252163f6a472ee69674bd5185f110cd30b511f
describe
'465481' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSW' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
abe7e15deb683ead6852dcfbf3c96f48
226302737f65f41d19fe45ab37a8b8743e8d3abd
describe
'17967' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSX' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
55212cb59afa8b91bef70151e27aaf86
596a96b6287bb34a368f6fe6d673e15ab2950678
describe
'8889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
2e04ca4b9c71666f2b7f3657ea030664
4111a4e73e466705a4ce9b3a06ab2a383e5f2cd0
'2011-10-14T06:49:47-04:00'
describe
'3731112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACSZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
10413bed11e92ab6a65d458980b610a5
6f3dbcfa26da6b624a19abf90f342e496d6b98ab
'2011-10-14T06:46:40-04:00'
describe
'7459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTA' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
96d1577a7ddcf6046b02add054aa0a2a
079c13ff739133ad0bbd4e7d0eb1736e356fa1b1
describe
'465552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d20b4a1230778ebc878933844f53b9e5
1a5b99a32f67113e2b77fc8212f0b25b3dd7668d
'2011-10-14T06:50:53-04:00'
describe
'98991' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTC' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
1a5064b8adc839b650d28f67d6144379
6ce3a91063835a9efd16d14cd70111f7883e2bb9
'2011-10-14T06:47:03-04:00'
describe
'20466' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTD' 'sip-files00053.pro'
abee80420e246239ed94787f5b30244b
5b13faf97a8b8692889cd31ad2c83d55af849f18
describe
'33002' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTE' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
0438e97d0b8ae8f3fb0a32d086dde0d5
3a6dc8a083b9c010602aa4429120ab7598e80fe9
describe
'3733008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
57a14a04a0ea4d204ce9b814c875a7f2
661c0432e39440741ca69f51e03741d0c00a3c09
'2011-10-14T06:49:20-04:00'
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
5614c58ac5cf877516ed9fdab3916975
05d5d093bb42815248e12b134f4761e20e97c65c
'2011-10-14T06:50:24-04:00'
describe
'14462' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTH' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
69d55163c976cf12ba053c353260fdc0
827b7ced50ed555fd74a17741a539df6d11fc656
describe
'484459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTI' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
ba857fe58320c6e3f6b1137790977f05
2aab41a8138cd63cb7e06a9a418f523ac78aff0c
describe
'118980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTJ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
69601e0108763654ddb51c766e9c39de
f4e695b484868b029a9e59760d5555f1f31ad524
'2011-10-14T06:50:07-04:00'
describe
'23936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTK' 'sip-files00054.pro'
eeb77c84ad48554e20a1e439774b0fa0
d079d94c8d946574092cb2b87911900fd520a38a
'2011-10-14T06:47:49-04:00'
describe
'37158' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTL' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
40c64775330a4c7c4737bcfcf1816a58
d8a6f97f5b866aa5eac2a4c2e9e5534e6aa7527e
'2011-10-14T06:49:03-04:00'
describe
'3884692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTM' 'sip-files00054.tif'
f9e3f846034ae6a8cb84073581c3e168
9d8d6974d26ff110c636ec8388d53ee656b3ea2e
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTN' 'sip-files00054.txt'
6e14e742640dca50fd554ccc6d4f92dd
0dce3dbd61644aaf405a3dd9c4ffc14dfcc1c4bd
describe
'15529' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTO' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
2567b45c410f0d9d816c4d958adb4671
6a79dd9b6c6a60ac644007889c742a9e431cfa03
'2011-10-14T06:47:11-04:00'
describe
'463710' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTP' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
1cd844f3c322d0688514e7c91596cf57
52a948106f4945a7d513931c74ea9175fecbd62e
'2011-10-14T06:50:37-04:00'
describe
'183783' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTQ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c93a96bea55862332a99264605272d63
181bc0f19b6e846fba17c1c4e044156996f5347a
'2011-10-14T06:51:31-04:00'
describe
'50751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTR' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d1ae50c180c15047fb69145e054d2404
c8d337f26517261da7ebba9a10879c951181f5e3
describe
'3719940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
7d62435c0ce1ba66898b7ad547b9bf99
6aaf31c1c2354208d5201e24e61264fce55d09fd
describe
'19503' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTT' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
da59f6f8ec172a665c70318ba30cceac
4b161482fa497b0cf336a0e1a59e07384a1fe4fb
describe
'484419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTU' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
45ecc622af19e7f97054a764c74bcb52
45e57616bc91e9aba7c504550b9a2e2b8b1b891b
describe
'199649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTV' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
1a5a0a7f5be269071a1dd47bccb996e3
384392bc751ffec3b4e4b333adedfdb809c69c4f
describe
'57076' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTW' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
fe4f6e48726092f47804b3dd6c327ce0
40942e2a9e536c1d4ce3ff6070be52dc53c83e91
'2011-10-14T06:47:57-04:00'
describe
'3886988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTX' 'sip-files00056.tif'
9acff45d8e62be09b0f55d0f6ab6db1d
e703d15e318ee3e403051080f049c0db0f0b5665
describe
'22043' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
61c45e1465d464ceab905d59f55d1080
db6d5e9e5de33c290a6123a90db14c9206ab1031
describe
'465486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACTZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
88d8affea4775b9b310e5cb6ea220ba9
224540a085f17533bc3ddc40b2c842119e706d55
'2011-10-14T06:47:48-04:00'
describe
'168407' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
30a5abe687b0dae0f27a9e7009191e3b
9c171ac719c78e2f5c244f89b07677b2afb4d23b
describe
'44479' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
81a215a39a79fe9dd78f624ec8f34db8
0589416de51c0a783794d4d1a7abf3bd6f6a6605
'2011-10-14T06:48:29-04:00'
describe
'52929' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
3b40582c8ef246575954054ec6c4475b
a6dcae3a6c113edc70fec78c766d491956abe8d6
'2011-10-14T06:50:02-04:00'
describe
'3733940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
de24d688b5c572694fee61906517582e
12bcb780a6ff4e4304064228938d45d4a90e20ce
'2011-10-14T06:50:08-04:00'
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
05bd1fef7b4104b5c5a2f4942f32e64e
1b49ba4a906ae0d806d2a252124d089854fb2cf1
describe
'18707' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
316422d7198eb1b78a3f91479eac4ae4
94b77c26a9809bff7c28eecce3d99cf857f6e985
'2011-10-14T06:51:20-04:00'
describe
'472123' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
619e933b2e9ff4ac982eb620a31ca478
371d6a36b27a6482dc743118d7010fa3f4ce7d62
describe
'126455' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
378a10d995ab76253d2e9419d8093bdb
ec77376c7c866c61266755f0897c6fbff932dbfe
'2011-10-14T06:50:16-04:00'
describe
'30054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUI' 'sip-files00058.pro'
22d665caa3cd2ab1ebb9c98837eb52d7
473520e928bdc419335ffb0d6ee69f8758e8f2ab
'2011-10-14T06:50:55-04:00'
describe
'39745' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUJ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
514cb0e4f684377dfcf22f9cb6ab0322
68050fbabac3f1f1d24fa3ca040ba7f12091ec01
describe
'3785772' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUK' 'sip-files00058.tif'
6b6b00cb0ee7e4aaabac487e121beb6f
27f38a8b163fce1e5d121c5702328e759159e5a8
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
f9a42efab123518687095f7c54cda524
7777240df5f0970aa3d2f942da8d1ae258de766d
'2011-10-14T06:48:05-04:00'
describe
'16069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUM' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c084af72846b2b7d12c4207a843837eb
8affc3ed1120c64a821bb70b41b8141413ad9bcd
'2011-10-14T06:47:53-04:00'
describe
'458692' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUN' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
450888fa5e37ae34235cb6591178f043
3d29fd2a307fc6e6a4c22497aea6ad80155f4621
'2011-10-14T06:48:25-04:00'
describe
'128428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUO' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
c75c1d9c88b31a9297fc25c8311dcbb9
ecf22bbb2f5dd9a08cb84447294e738c37f02c4e
describe
'16079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUP' 'sip-files00059.pro'
972959e65bd7c3d697d503d5544f51a0
087e94e25196cfd0bf2e21e60e5843052a670ddd
'2011-10-14T06:49:01-04:00'
describe
'39427' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUQ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c66688091cdd6780f3e92e2e4858389e
f7a5d7ca13fd8f9ae7f52d161435e1c3df9f3ea2
describe
'3678428' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUR' 'sip-files00059.tif'
994a41a1966bc250fdc855fcaa16cc7f
2a7645a8738f8dab695672d7617e0ad2a6394f40
describe
'685' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUS' 'sip-files00059.txt'
f304469feb1031355a9488e034c915c3
c98fbb5759af3e2045e8bc6404a5cf98b175689d
describe
'15796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUT' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
ff034f0d0d5eebfa90e63eb1c79aff8d
22c9cc44e3e360413f8784fbdd9e598a48778b9b
describe
'465015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
26ef8488e91e93177227fac832ecbc25
def205eebb4d4e0062064fe97b1a86ad73149fb2
'2011-10-14T06:48:11-04:00'
describe
'137839' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f2683bff68481a6bf51ec9ae969e8ac5
f660547e9bab9c8e00ccd4894f693e1d1ee5f56b
describe
'27934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUW' 'sip-files00060.pro'
8d4f4f0a159fa6d80da46c0588b38a60
0e4b663f4987fc262365b3bf81d721e998416280
'2011-10-14T06:50:14-04:00'
describe
'44554' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
bcb944030f1fdbec57422246e1ead7f0
75ed9c7d8136b432b5003a1afce5711614b78ee7
describe
'3729360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
46ef2add388f853362f7fdaa072f9452
a89b0194427b32991c3a180ca6c0ab65bc72eefa
'2011-10-14T06:50:18-04:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACUZ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
1b39f349d5938443b111b1b97c861ebd
5b8956e2cf50a32ce731038a1d7bf4c2a7b532ef
describe
Invalid character
'17533' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVA' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
a07ca273d8fa97bb898ed945080afd35
6850e346c73d3274ff28aafda011f5e823d839fd
describe
'451867' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVB' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
f7da459c09216bda7f5bd9c3c0743434
d06df4a67cc6d576548e9ce92d9d9a4af7f50b02
'2011-10-14T06:49:28-04:00'
describe
'176823' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
01a24783cd932fd5f212ff72da2647e2
c75844643c8e9b263483cc72727196980fe7577c
describe
'46484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVD' 'sip-files00061.pro'
4e14b25996c1b2e5d170a6d7093be34c
964b17850d4d7c4c035742e6f9ef54f8886277a7
describe
'56037' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVE' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
6a709080e1b93a6a6d5494356a7b109d
c695be4477d72b22bf38c6868eb2340dfecd5228
describe
'3624456' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVF' 'sip-files00061.tif'
d09012e229af0a52cdd20dd76db62554
45b4a0532763171f99a99e7e13b7bcb193bc9ad1
describe
'1849' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
4f12bb8f276ee694832ed9d77ecdfaf6
faf4e34c57359e371fb72511846191b2437e2a63
describe
'19522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVH' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
675d45b508b480acff9f0a31388d7437
03a9167d434d181789d095840e9f7c5007c0c074
'2011-10-14T06:51:26-04:00'
describe
'456758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVI' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
f621c12b7929c1a98c2ce594a6465466
dc13b2f6331bfe3a47bdcf5f59e34f44364b04d1
describe
'118163' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVJ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
645cc3bcc7a13d27f9c8736f8ffa586c
720203b7983a9c520ba6a76613b2ef3d7d99d701
describe
'26344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVK' 'sip-files00062.pro'
f4e05890e968c8f4ae0ed061bce36bff
2fc3f4b64ed8173a99b0a764ad9c3ef8ea597734
describe
'37778' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVL' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
14a5fdd92a666f92ab7645b3596af0e2
5cca3651e7858c02ce91f09d4f9d92eb0ecb27cd
describe
'3662600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVM' 'sip-files00062.tif'
34889c82d1b3c09e79bd8d1bf99148c6
46c6595700f56baa02a6c12320d7057880659fb9
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVN' 'sip-files00062.txt'
e2c431efc5c774989dade8b22393824f
578456155a10803e8d55f133a80061fa787cbce0
describe
'15393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVO' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
a9118ddabbce193d94ba95d257ddd465
95e7964f7ef10d83737eb32f8dccb6d892f7676b
describe
'455305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVP' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
062d47983a1c1f2287399af4dc64d2f9
95fa5eccdc145e829b354ff4ed2cac7f50d1a967
'2011-10-14T06:49:11-04:00'
describe
'109108' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
36387f760d2e92c79e61dc1c28ef2a3e
b4779c7a04ee3ae665a09b1f0de0e97b4bdbfb77
describe
'21682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVR' 'sip-files00063.pro'
cc11dd04808ca952e2519a25f290014e
299a93af2328c9f108635517588019b5bedd48cc
describe
'35515' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVS' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
7411a9d1c71d3a95ec43805a705efb8c
3c8e5a526cb4ded15bad12d50067b74bdb99854b
'2011-10-14T06:50:11-04:00'
describe
'3650632' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVT' 'sip-files00063.tif'
ce1b506c9870392cfe62a8bbac999146
1981411f902f0989b84e12a9ddfdb92ea4b316d5
'2011-10-14T06:50:40-04:00'
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVU' 'sip-files00063.txt'
5c9eee5f39d509f6cbea6e0b347ac9fc
0b492db449896d6ef98e4a2efa6886942ed4a087
describe
'14981' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVV' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
2231a33143313b895e95b105f2c80c54
0b2907484b4cbac64d86c0d8c410dcd1a6bea5d8
describe
'465243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVW' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
71722d4dbe8308cd07819080f7d32269
bf2c68e39bcbaf1a8d8d77646b025eaac69f16ad
'2011-10-14T06:48:45-04:00'
describe
'169107' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVX' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
4042020646f4be41f008ff06b088e5cf
fca3457153c6cd31ef30323c832097348cb38836
describe
'44234' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVY' 'sip-files00064.pro'
128701728f4feda0d817bc9612c397ab
edfa173dc670ac3d5ca47aa6a1eccf871933904f
describe
'52913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACVZ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
2b0753e8fb91ccdd8ae73872175ff411
2afeba272d859a7e1a9f0edb1ab838bfb8cdb046
describe
'3731756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWA' 'sip-files00064.tif'
0b354e5d1b44aa8ad23fca41111691d9
8058ec36ff67864997ac18f1463e88e4ce966f7e
'2011-10-14T06:49:16-04:00'
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWB' 'sip-files00064.txt'
11dc467b8c5cc6633ec8f113b8fd76f4
a0953de67eee1b769839509b77f1aa38cacc5fce
describe
'18785' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWC' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
094e5656358fa2960e2d6c15a7ebc9a7
9a32c25a5e2cd6faa94fa6b882f56fbd2db0fe60
describe
'439871' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWD' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
8b66d2bb13fee7dcd0bf3c36d93d0713
f0bce4f94282f975d162fd8da6c6ac5ad29432d9
describe
'146415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWE' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
5f93d0e1feb85b4b85e9b1c5620e71a7
c336d0542fe389ba248a2a76c368214c10530a9b
describe
'14080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWF' 'sip-files00065.pro'
dae07ef02285f1e0e6a97c7b6f843187
f97570c81f3066827050894ef74efc36087a86c5
'2011-10-14T06:51:21-04:00'
describe
'44501' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWG' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
3168f11d065f5109855975412c04fba8
a0f0bffd7a1f44b69728994aa3cb878f3474c1ae
describe
'3527992' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWH' 'sip-files00065.tif'
f2cbf08f88da5480d8bfd871554de188
d39c24192307dc3c20dd38b139e32927de26ec37
describe
'574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWI' 'sip-files00065.txt'
6d8f7196401a6bd5f8abafaf7c693098
fff966348e3da6d7ccb6ff925d334b9023531396
'2011-10-14T06:48:18-04:00'
describe
'17454' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWJ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
6f192d72947d1f94298b6f6c453788e5
01d90fa75cae8479e92a5203eb683f52563cb5b1
describe
'449878' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWK' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
72dd696bc21312747c374829915d9ac7
0782b7bae3cdf687084ef73f8f73dd217f604aec
'2011-10-14T06:51:06-04:00'
describe
'139115' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWL' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
db7c3dca7396644c3fed962d621a2381
03d93e675c8316b07fa4cc7ad06a0216d2f83d05
describe
'20161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWM' 'sip-files00066.pro'
5d9c609d89beb8b75f328547cb0d6c89
1c7386efc326bf411b1cd927820f0afdf48aae29
describe
'41521' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWN' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
b08fe82cb386fb2867e5acb983d6adbb
8149ec6589a368914079b630422a8d9238e7d369
describe
'3607668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWO' 'sip-files00066.tif'
b7e351a35d4684e17915dbac3973fc27
267a7be262862cd3a4a34059052b10a22241be51
describe
'794' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWP' 'sip-files00066.txt'
c44b9237a81074b5a1c9a8002eff53bb
30fabf94f16b56527ee3692dd59935f5a14864e4
describe
'16527' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWQ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
41dd4e0e614fe0d1a648c260ca5d6a9c
39b534cb5f4b1b08d43a15512a3aa136360f871a
describe
'448373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWR' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
0bcae02368119fc0cb682955f5535b11
43870c36adca26ad4ee723a70a56d23cca6c9e2f
describe
'115677' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWS' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
9a495e4785c58618f5784f04b156fa4e
adfd4f2a3cc47c985b5c86f14c17545c481da0b8
describe
'24150' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWT' 'sip-files00067.pro'
738809304e213521d7d29df42333085e
59b454f799ad16bc5610a2c7c07bac09fbd7c889
describe
'38982' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWU' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
11608aab67b041fd580c176bbad3c8a6
38137883bb351134d55932e74dc32878e2865f57
describe
'3595964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWV' 'sip-files00067.tif'
dfaf780f763c7fbfda1c27183ab195f0
4e020bc9dd3e3f4f1a4a5a3aa012e95c195d786b
'2011-10-14T06:48:36-04:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWW' 'sip-files00067.txt'
7de0c78f71d771949a9bdc003364fb80
fac0a033e259de6b0192f71f7bb225a23c52fc3e
describe
'15566' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWX' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
5f61a3c3e42f862e00680d218c6925d7
f1d0aaa9c6b483ab7d9f0085ceac0d80bbb840c0
describe
'453594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWY' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b6ab74e2f24436537db8f566fd9a428c
664aa244613693651e9e403ce38a7df006fe00f2
describe
'116936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACWZ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ac7748ee6b68fc69966729da7952687c
dcdcd63d1be171e6977ec409f10e00c0defc65c6
describe
'26633' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXA' 'sip-files00068.pro'
685d5f7b7502be1cd9ffae27df2b0017
87f91b2476048ade42375312987fb9b15ee33384
describe
'36731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXB' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
dde09be6786395211f59f29490245edb
037aa5bb1f7ae4c033889304b2ac49d24e5632a2
describe
'3636972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXC' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a4aace36840dc0cd9fa04ea229fa12db
f948b251cc1a1546965542ac86a75ad653cb7bac
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXD' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a6e0bbe511aa6454c5080dd48ff72855
b8e8e661ce19ce659c7eeaec3cfc6b68fd580eb4
describe
'15311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXE' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
5755830182df2b512196fb2d039645d3
a9d7d699fd07ed85802105fd7aa18fcc971253dc
describe
'456894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXF' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e907e4ff75de2545701d6903d42f9183
16af5d87672ad1483cdd21add241bd96d75a465b
describe
'89241' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXG' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
4262ea846f945785eb273b9f09c74b3d
09c5c432830261cac01a06d5a084da2936cd1115
describe
'8620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXH' 'sip-files00069.pro'
9ac213d50c4f0341a5f90fd0cb262273
0c3ce015ad8cab9a6e8d389ef6ecf1858d1f8372
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXI' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
24278b8db1e62a5b4ea183a46d5d117d
f2c3377cdfde1f4e78d9bd12c4cabb119c5756dd
describe
'3663916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXJ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
ac594f9852a62bd5e0fc0322f385d438
ce425a0843bdced04dc9e006eb91361f3ab17d4c
describe
'386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXK' 'sip-files00069.txt'
1af8e5c635530e82a78c92cdfa322291
df398d219c7b39acb83a2307c77deaa52a9b8b34
describe
'12921' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXL' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
fc7ebf78920698286adfb13e52d0000d
fa9cb314bb99236a54e5ef4d51e8ba7fd381a663
describe
'465450' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXM' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5337fef4f222461ef47cd84a18b8a24d
e30496a980b95e94ca96062283cd3a666dba1d94
describe
'162333' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXN' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
00ef67b6cfad68016efdedf01502b117
49f4f0c3ecd54958024d894d10f6933b9d38ec32
describe
'41374' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXO' 'sip-files00070.pro'
06ad3566f52f4fef746a97a0d2fc2254
ccd6577165871af8e9e7f514d285a09721efb5ae
'2011-10-14T06:51:14-04:00'
describe
'51212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXP' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
8ad1db461c41e42e06ba35d7f80bb69b
f460a240d6df7076a7cca1410fbfa8e29fb275d3
'2011-10-14T06:50:00-04:00'
describe
'3734044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXQ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
776accbc667545dfd3aee061bf1ac2f9
a2d89a2d3c644d34d7b161f962e877d3c08c8a67
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXR' 'sip-files00070.txt'
fb5741fa35d102da197442eddaf3652f
832a73f3d4d21ba4bd8dd58b43ec688f645103b9
describe
'18504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXS' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
09f381576cd91547d5646a60a1b8cb05
2514962b8f4e2c40739cbce47fa7dd07fd0a344d
describe
'458739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXT' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
079b357c29bc6c52a609ce72f0f97259
e301d391c74c81887c6416e9685925cfa91453e8
describe
'164801' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXU' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
136e0d435b39b4bc84d2a71a31ee11eb
e9a6731f32dfe22dc1107d8144a889fd6307c10e
describe
'41079' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXV' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3cd984e7e15a5181bf0cb51f9174cd4e
686d3e5cb04103e74a547b72d13e53de2006b260
describe
'52628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXW' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a756f79de664a08537e9abf6b65fceb1
84c43ba378259f5ba481f682e404f14a77749472
describe
'3679040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXX' 'sip-files00071.tif'
f95ce55868797d5f61a8a427bf2314a2
a0104eb4ebfc5a98977e6fa81c018fda3e560637
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXY' 'sip-files00071.txt'
3011f22882ee9435de0c3f8d847bad8b
293a23cdb5143c72fc1848b4cbb6b7142bb7957a
describe
'19020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACXZ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
aabd01ddf97d843af5f3f83b9f0928ef
bed40766f15485c47901a25782261a3b09c3f50e
describe
'465295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYA' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
c6183abf6ad92d97b6994fc42078c7ac
c4fd5b6905c70bb38ed394155a0b195d8cdfa4bc
describe
'147547' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYB' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
3566c9e7089cc70951fdf3153543a856
b81e1e2cccabe2cdc11a6208a2a999b7715bc937
describe
'25818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYC' 'sip-files00072.pro'
8048ed07bf786aaec7724cb1db5ac1c8
931728370cb798a2404e599b326c58fe22ae4201
describe
'45335' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYD' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
5aa59d4f828e13aff6be43eb3c3bd97b
83ddd10e73ac647cdd6275a3c5f8af39012f4aac
describe
'3731348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYE' 'sip-files00072.tif'
fdf29723b6bc51b340546cb3b03ce357
7309c10d7cded4ebc49f689777a0ac7300d879c2
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYF' 'sip-files00072.txt'
5135f576f60785e062743a6af80d1cc9
11f26fb6cda020d8a5827f65bd688af6d563245c
describe
'17171' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYG' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
e87f1e9c6c45f4d4e5ea47e7e3f6d712
568e320270ea56244b28d6eeba5586333fed799e
describe
'457004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYH' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
2b17e1d40b8324684bf8cb5862153230
13c71129adfa0f731683f12b14f8e6b10199ba9a
'2011-10-14T06:47:46-04:00'
describe
'171124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYI' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
3b568307a73594cd5d623eb7a72136b4
46e0ec4d804575672ee8eb30065ef28e3a8f023a
'2011-10-14T06:50:45-04:00'
describe
'43720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYJ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
96cb0e7d5cfcf839751bac72e9cc78ec
23cce4aeed41d878538900f6be3c5cffaa4a69c7
describe
'55338' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYK' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
6dd4a7ec289fe6de82ecc84c051ed284
ddefacd48e4e363fc8bc7dce3676ddf7a4d7679d
describe
'3665488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYL' 'sip-files00073.tif'
a64323f92dcce72529c24f5e8b8cd0c6
77284a8fcd07b878a4025ab9706bab387d9f5c98
describe
'1751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYM' 'sip-files00073.txt'
50117b48d13a19d3a6b81b28833a65c1
8f767343efa6d9b558bab2159a36b90b7eaa6ddc
'2011-10-14T06:47:32-04:00'
describe
'19362' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYN' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
d2c0b8860843fcdd8d502abfba88dc1f
917281ad4d5777eacd1b3e7ce00dbab841371fbb
describe
'458451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYO' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
601a36e35e1fc3bdd51ad194c0a7df13
b84a69ec31449e0da63adbbb6531c3548edb48f6
describe
'185916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYP' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
c3f81ffb58807066ca54f757bb06db4d
a64f1b2e01494cd05e5b8c413916eea8dbfc1675
describe
'51673' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYQ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
ed39fc1e4b7bd527dc675ef79c1b3fcd
6c018a101efc67cd82819c1cb4d19ffc03c3dcba
describe
'59118' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYR' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
e79a5f4e310205c127dba7fe6f2ae5f5
a51664cc0b54d58e683d65cb4838f231f6f801b1
describe
'3677088' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYS' 'sip-files00074.tif'
b8c85c6e50559f76f4038111bb2e8059
af4cf29c6a4fc769cdf7965086e9e9d6ff72afbd
describe
'2025' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYT' 'sip-files00074.txt'
289d3b9bdb9fca5259305109cdd2343c
47ecef177fd0889aa8e57d050791595ca8a4d4fa
describe
'19650' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYU' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
e46cc9e82a634d0d5d0913c7a9167da1
cca9ca0f4972ac790f18badd576bfa2e29c3da60
describe
'465542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYV' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
0ff7c7e103194f810242779c0b871a66
4aeb60e1ba8615899709589f629c491d6c0c95b6
describe
'101343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYW' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
3d20c335a4c8a5999894248cd48a3ff7
baaae4f05f99abcf5bf489660e6549391bbad05a
describe
'20094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYX' 'sip-files00075.pro'
f488456f6f92689297cd5b9ff3d0af08
fdbfdc3d387fd0fc68423eb56f5242b361cb53fe
'2011-10-14T06:49:12-04:00'
describe
'33457' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYY' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
79a5daa0d43c8f13d3b1ac7166ce1b93
fbc421f7794947e7a1a9fae8fce2a2fe56ee17b8
describe
'3732988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACYZ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
f592aee97febfcb15fe3d59b43155706
ea87246856465b40a293b93fba00a070908eec84
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZA' 'sip-files00075.txt'
8bdeb470ad351db819fb28c2502ca730
6ebf355ac8dbde46e0c8bf232c9759d5ac93bc1e
'2011-10-14T06:50:06-04:00'
describe
'14769' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZB' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
1c1f4009e171006804452a4637da8134
5606d725b71bb0ce2881e02e223d79f47fc72fb4
describe
'465523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZC' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
627cc7da6b5d7efb62ae6a3fbb0962b0
b17fb612d4ec277b0db4c94742c80f6e71f8b5a2
describe
'115935' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZD' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
4d7d6bf3cc1da5402b91637453198465
b2026d62617c863678ab22feca86789bc9a0e527
'2011-10-14T06:46:55-04:00'
describe
'25343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZE' 'sip-files00076.pro'
39bed4541166a781f35aa919d763bb56
dc9d53a11a7e630c00bb00f3a898940bfb37152d
describe
'38761' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZF' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
81a99db550e7c9405ae2d19b4016dcec
cfda240dc891a4bee19d924db329b9bd94fa7ede
'2011-10-14T06:47:31-04:00'
describe
'3733348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZG' 'sip-files00076.tif'
38c4643362af0ffc5d0bfbae3ab237dc
73efe34073d28936dacb51cf86ad8c93ecad3055
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZH' 'sip-files00076.txt'
ffcf7efe53d075c53f3a007b1d2aa546
ac8f046d348977206302c949b24a7f3d3ec5ba32
describe
'15856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZI' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b296fa2255ae46cda126d216ba48dbcf
b246f4d808410af098aa12ebb84d65999c84db25
describe
'468208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZJ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
344a088bda2c48acc78e85dd3da7db9d
e5679defdb86629bd33a28e536a5739adfc60c5c
describe
'119003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZK' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
b4eed740bcdee6f9bf14bd2d743d9a91
bb865752b84daeffa1e7ebe121d4c5d152791620
describe
'33593' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZL' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
1b1b08501d51cbaea04833e9773d06e1
2b62f01cfda336dbcee717d1d3b2a6acb855f80e
describe
'3754028' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZM' 'sip-files00077.tif'
1ea8debbc13e9d1bd18d5881624710ff
987cf6e9794df5a00d4b7ee4c4a517af6ef372ba
describe
'14397' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZN' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2b1dd0ad28ec269a52ccc8375cb18fdd
1b74bd9318b5aa621a0072387b64a9be06086700
describe
'463811' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZO' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1b154b669e134c892368b67ea78cea46
c0298b129c199f55367ff4f72a9a803d53c70c3c
describe
'162910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZP' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
9ed8ef16b619ad62c126a1cd9cf13e90
a6b88fbc590afcea4fbcafb48895f1c31f249b68
describe
'9917' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1cf97b5fd3c23f2020440367bda53bcb
a5aefba2a004271545df7de11454e75c75a086b4
describe
'53067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
af17e4e196a836486510c6e5199e9c30
8d5b3a4734f797f5fc5d14d1118bf131e9483fd4
'2011-10-14T06:48:22-04:00'
describe
'3721040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZS' 'sip-files00078.tif'
540c05023144aa0da0ba870af9a54d01
333275e2d27d9e46f810ef88a06ca407d3776878
describe
'484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
a8f6699335179a2fde30cd4b429a4a9e
d00a94a8c716efed0b596bf779d2b05e1ea6fe06
'2011-10-14T06:48:34-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'21627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZU' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
283c42dacda50cf197b636991a472f03
2cfacd9edb024dc853abaf2a81b3ec2628f10c8b
describe
'465578' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZV' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
c68a541533abb377a51b06a96cea9dbd
5a4f7042c0b01386b303ed3602dfc413f6023722
'2011-10-14T06:48:24-04:00'
describe
'172830' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
45511076bb8bd9fbdf2a2fad62b5c062
b4e5f4e512f539a0b0a3946fe54cc40c65951645
'2011-10-14T06:48:04-04:00'
describe
'47049' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZX' 'sip-files00079.pro'
7ff74e9ddf966c5633c325f56690ee1e
327ba2585d3708989179b930abc38abdbb84d7b1
describe
'54664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZY' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
3bc45c81d34e225ba0bdec3c2f1aa010
71eda4917907213600e62fa9e05f7133948d0fd8
'2011-10-14T06:48:46-04:00'
describe
'3733988' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAACZZ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
61f7305cda291084079580551bc1cdb7
af983b8daf38e8a2dacab38e4450117b7fda5427
describe
'1965' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAA' 'sip-files00079.txt'
84bf5fa9bc59c3a5d180086f49743ac8
8819ff2a6eb8ae3b9a01fd5b1ef97da7d36cce06
describe
'18807' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAB' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
778c972832a20b0bc932af8e4f639701
0e4f7de77374a27e8e2f2e3bcf65c59ac985a21e
describe
'465124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAC' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
3c6f6ce2656bc6a2559906872b921290
6eb74a9f96d4b40b6ba295b7c099a48695ee99f7
describe
'154629' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAD' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
5feeaefa1fea4b3a9da9282403616bf6
99b05f86636122f38902919fe7a039a4095b68f0
'2011-10-14T06:48:42-04:00'
describe
'38483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAE' 'sip-files00080.pro'
3662952d1fadbd1fea0b9e0097804481
9b10e21763688c24fbae323b9cfb6d28a355d5c5
describe
'48752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAF' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f4b0089dd7cd33e64ba1aaf254b4e2a8
11accbd829535f79c8b9791dabfe94515e3c0d4b
describe
'3731528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAG' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c1a464773a1a19dc924bd194f32f8f90
d84f503b75fc2b4f32e938572db5a2f5c2b8b96d
'2011-10-14T06:51:01-04:00'
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
97858f0347dca8527adef632eb3c35d9
a4412f7dea06a47443b0a3eb849abdd5cf54c626
describe
'17767' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAI' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
407dbb5a971cd4afc849dd7d24bf3278
66e9a742611f86ab030a416391cf7212946c72fb
describe
'465291' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
6b6eac236bae0a7ad539762a77347807
06b36e12199272be4aaf6e24d58c9fc0809ee879
describe
'133822' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
258a12d533d46943719e9009fe55e2bd
1b4391f80664db6d51fdcf039a86b9e387d9316b
describe
'32548' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAL' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f6394e102cc3b1d12fffc7045a6da634
dc0b3ca8c9132d330f5a94b1f30b560e7fd46c30
describe
'42007' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAM' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4d94ce0320ef9dbce09e5cf0626d81fa
d843cb7df00592fc5a4e890b7e7041e6ece7edd1
describe
'3731124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
4e7c2b88323ff8588cf2472d37005eb6
74ac8ad07f455326373ebb75b3666377d7f7a879
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
a18644273efa975295c04d91c762c88d
cde8f5214b512f044302746ff0376110e533675c
describe
'16396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAP' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
5986e3ef2bb4de0707bd90d5dae8ad9d
d33454808e7da9c2429a0024d5473d14ddcc3d35
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAQ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
0a98ef216eab7adaf0bec46fe298a283
3315853d5a4a1d92624cd5ef1fe6fdb79c9ac202
describe
'104164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAR' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
f700855d19432737bf18e78512dd3836
55c6d83e849b6b4929fff6ca05a3095223345b66
describe
'23113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAS' 'sip-files00082.pro'
1ad63547ce647b70021b504cbc8d2b4d
b3314d1b647b9664058f9786bc29bbe29ad0388c
describe
'34582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f7dc25badb12aaf2cc92ecd7dd87d642
a050094b12fe11cb15fd4de59e37227f80b525c2
'2011-10-14T06:47:24-04:00'
describe
'3730672' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
9eac4341ac9da9c5aae4dca3d1a0a343
d6d56249dcaa5a3a06d0b510d65d5fded0fdc4cc
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
4b9240325ad80758ea6f73557224ffb8
e9986b81f3c8cba0c590e6e3134318109cb16b40
describe
'14381' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAW' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
bf08042cc31e665306361d0cec83c1d8
015342ea90ccc9e088492530fcb8e6de3237285c
describe
'465541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
0796264b316b370f0d0f8fc011b61c92
08f07500c37f12c5aa7eb05c691abcb35afd270f
'2011-10-14T06:46:41-04:00'
describe
'140399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAY' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
29313171f155694e26e8ab3ff7d75ad4
9b84735488682f0f87b75e5fab1c4c3971f0e7ed
describe
'36113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADAZ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
6d855a3817a0e1d343e5c3d54c22d664
cae6209adf7cb83b8be6b709af12af75bbda2cc4
describe
'45740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBA' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
6a8ef9850c229f6489dd65b09597e4bc
afb09c00500d885eb6c31b85562652cf1ae8dbad
'2011-10-14T06:49:19-04:00'
describe
'3733652' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBB' 'sip-files00083.tif'
a308bc29b836cd4247101b41a10fce6a
1fdd0129aa59529110665ab1bfc00abe47ea6e0b
'2011-10-14T06:49:08-04:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBC' 'sip-files00083.txt'
80f0adaee6dbd3b7c1b8ecf9df23b83c
1566f771934fa401c878d7933a6f548ed5b1d2ed
describe
'17273' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBD' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
6eb185ab33828305a63e6209df08c67c
4eadf2f05f16e67de8a330694f7b8eb2f4e0c28c
describe
'465311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBE' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
4f69f1c0ed3dec39e8addaf8e6e5b420
d185bfa686a086257c236d76d46787257bebce1a
describe
'140861' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBF' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
0ef8cbeda002d670c0cb5969b7bba776
345b7d9671128663cfb9b20ffd30ba85712a6aa6
describe
'35508' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
4dc617e7a700e1b82469d038acd389f4
761b2d13a2640c9127fd528c0193761ece3a7cad
describe
'44904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBH' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
4cbe3ed95bc533e8766e25d3d5464686
5054d8b46ba6050a9c73e75ee8fa2ce62efa8efc
describe
'3731364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBI' 'sip-files00084.tif'
127c164956d3bb9b0765576a6d7ec4e5
709a72737d03e6f6974c1d62768eff9f4dd8dd63
'2011-10-14T06:49:49-04:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBJ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
b541d0d6c27136f8439ec7796271b0ed
eac615fcabcafba098f1d1ea76c3b61e578af986
describe
'17339' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBK' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a6ead348b5606376c1f2c3a3428b03c4
32d017296b0889eb92cbc8e64942dc10c8f7f27e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBL' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
5770e6f701fd16e94b173396190e959f
0ba6ec0a5e846836e9764f26dcefd3851f2d045b
describe
'161204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
4d8eac467e8ebf3cd6dd5d8b3a9e403f
8e319787ec576ee35cca55bf056ad56503c24419
describe
'42999' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBN' 'sip-files00085.pro'
4a2bc21655a18b969983cb94532558c2
f891752cc5e17af626bab474e37a3ec1afb3375a
describe
'51390' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBO' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
dae9c2c6194323e7359a6b133fbee102
d0a5edb6fd5ced63730648c524005f29cd1e32ec
describe
'3733892' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBP' 'sip-files00085.tif'
4b1e789122b82efe04142145c4ccf2eb
0074478bc184912e798f5196c7b913aea2e2ab92
describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBQ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ff5a7c9c6190f0b44440cffa77f468b9
4a04451892cf0ad8b2a3e3fbf235dcb20808ddb3
describe
'18743' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBR' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
1ede9ed2e049bad6cc2e0342aa244634
64ea5f5090483ec8693f4a698660ad6e0fa7db35
describe
'465149' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBS' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
9ef98e32455be54b6a358c6d09e6c5b5
1888114024753d70cd0b3ed71079207eb64d3589
describe
'122740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBT' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
b88757992784f5707fa112d940526dcd
7b6cf3b100aff91a4a58c1bc41eda361792c9011
describe
'12938' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBU' 'sip-files00086.pro'
4ae9673633f88b86bcb6d8be5e58e0ec
de4d1d009b8d8b89b69e150a10c280a1888dc168
describe
'38433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBV' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
31684d2d78fad850165685c22137c9c7
458663bf56ba51e91e44e60c2144cd2157346aed
describe
'3730920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBW' 'sip-files00086.tif'
014bb9e02efb0585293d64b0832c01d9
9d27127163881cede148abdff730c254a75f7771
describe
'618' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBX' 'sip-files00086.txt'
478470e032f6484270d110e87a1718c4
16b0b151cd7c3a9d1ac02e8b0c85bd5cd3e4f6e5
'2011-10-14T06:48:44-04:00'
describe
'15819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBY' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
952ad1d723e114b7df24d3743cd044dd
d33e61fa340c6a9eb64f9ea2d5d2cda649275953
describe
'452375' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADBZ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
871dc03a66c62e8a88da157a6f0c8ca2
c67b0fad9a92cd3a00ed99bbb629fa666c24abb6
describe
'108767' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCA' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
31f55923cc70fe282c8dda0cfec5323b
bd019f9af83cc806837148f863c6c13e41a8efc4
'2011-10-14T06:48:16-04:00'
describe
'29284' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCB' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
4781bb82af504f8e731e401fbbf6f210
0f2354d5a2f32f32e33d6fe721818c91b95a8c0c
describe
'10864516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCC' 'sip-files00087.tif'
fbe201303d77448f492a15ddb74396cb
13ab6cefb4f10954663b59420715319151c19f0d
'2011-10-14T06:51:07-04:00'
describe
'13724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCD' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
13a34a6b108398ec60869193345faa04
441b8088aee4360c7269ac93c2b1a438b153a321
describe
'465261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCE' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
98cd839680e55f0e5841b89609767467
517d4d9c86d87ec3f5cd9b6ab08269e78f576070
describe
'18078' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCF' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
f01a61f9298cfc202e4e321bd11f920d
36d03119d1b2c5bdba840d4ea4e2ad07c9025504
describe
'8985' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
196ae5e4f53579d32dd0f316d0978d7b
73531ca140e46b3f0bacd1cdd40fc67d257c609a
describe
'3728820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
3c716ae12c955d024f34fc147d6fef9d
8979d0074fb000acd9747993e8e081099d5fb893
describe
'7471' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
7276acf3d8f9f1981a5060f511f10eea
b4d86fb5b52d1a00429421fd8425fad5f75127db
describe
'455295' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCJ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
a23a27c268bbbd20db6ffe6f260ac799
b9a44b8e8375145cea4b30bff5ff1c989f01773c
describe
'169616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCK' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
8b91551d05056e00c4b25e98033ba8bc
62bfb565080cd49b078caef5659829df07f12387
describe
'43326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCL' 'sip-files00089.pro'
6b9c5aed7400a63118f818b3f9f76359
88c0417970bc8c7a20754ecb764267f206aed937
describe
'54641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
a87a95b2b151ad95ac486433b457ea66
3747f350664125e9801f18beefd30c6f65af5e2f
describe
'3651600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
2787bb6cb16d41288d1c6fc17ff9a5a6
c68f3075860357ace6999e5a95131df0ff90fcb4
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCO' 'sip-files00089.txt'
0853d6fa38db11c3348ac2b53b0bc22c
5214404f0e9e4b5f7f68f3c3451960bae092fc93
describe
'19214' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCP' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
cbdda680c7a91a58da768ecf9d2c06f8
69d2c0d96b4315bc926bf2eba398f2d5ea542a09
describe
'465297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
942a6667d4248e3b3303b0f5f98a377f
3acbd22fb4e5c5a3c838721f1df0898fc8ffaa66
describe
'184778' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
59ff06fa0c6a7d19b549c9e6fb36a403
0a7a8821682284a3a5dede5216b503c69f143075
describe
'51209' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCS' 'sip-files00090.pro'
826556fa649e413701958ada57db69ad
362589eb356b41f3dbeae26f43927a43e946c5a0
describe
'58351' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCT' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
602909dbfb9857cafe0c0b0eaa2b6746
54e937973d8be1c9b6c1a3263b7b2a5e8f4d287f
'2011-10-14T06:47:38-04:00'
describe
'3732168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCU' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f5063ddfaa43ac96f4535a59539b1309
c795c1e1820922c57f93fff8a113ea25ad713de8
describe
'2009' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCV' 'sip-files00090.txt'
43d57ff20947017edc1db1cc9e1b70b0
a630df5610c9371fe52875760276add54c11fe64
describe
'19934' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCW' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
bf15d4c2a364998b663305764aff12d9
b7d6c4dfe64b5999227ac3c3c5a309c1860c2c6d
describe
'453461' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCX' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
5fb63165f02dcb86c1886037163f33d3
c9b65248d2228684ed63b2653acb52c52fb3334d
describe
'122019' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCY' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
d091530a05fa3ccbde3bf3409bda7af6
fcb42cfd0effc5f5caee1efe6e54f54e809eacb1
'2011-10-14T06:48:21-04:00'
describe
'25951' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADCZ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
7b4a24a2b744bffc4fd35118da7d25a0
d63a7286e2a8dca5708f982db98b96f6400719ab
'2011-10-14T06:49:57-04:00'
describe
'39251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDA' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
fea6724ec5c9a89b69d9ed292383641b
3e8973d4b6fbf9d8e83f558b47c2f2e46adc1df5
describe
'3637200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDB' 'sip-files00091.tif'
f980c046f20fac5828d1b40b58eb742b
9df0b13d3174f5d5f13d9e5960c75740c87279ef
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDC' 'sip-files00091.txt'
6fa8a49a6de63adfa606546ed21e6d71
1e247bf5311d1e14a190a8100e76c4d985fe1cf2
describe
'15513' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDD' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
eb49e4d2b26bf06c814fd7589f5b380f
53a7b68155236fe71cbf28c4ee403e0a81a8cb12
describe
'465303' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDE' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
5e0ac0f1eec39940935d4d8c558c9e9d
3ad2be4c093b2051a31f83ffd240ae18f12b8a12
describe
'101368' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDF' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
da01fb2f32ac86b85e5a3c878ce4d001
d8acfb8be4510aa744885a1843dbc94bdabaa0ba
describe
'20413' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDG' 'sip-files00092.pro'
95b55bcc7e88e4c21342fe13d2c3db08
40311cdc23532f403a4ce26bdd8491ec5ff4d56d
describe
'32805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDH' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7330c40e16f186a0dee44b7cc47e7d3c
eaf9c118a2e29cc010b7a33bc718f22bdd581810
describe
'3730396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDI' 'sip-files00092.tif'
41c1342d8807d8cbfc9d1cd394f63abd
3171383fdb5529fbf54a253d513bf5c38675261f
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDJ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
105c1ae1c9af53aca5efcb3257e919be
eb383c0886ae3a89dbed72b451a640916b5f1268
describe
'14124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDK' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
f1e9b3b95e61f72daae35807a084c982
b0c48b17e3d522a0e14f862db9398bfcdeb711cd
describe
'465581' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
8ece4fc50279327caf1c6defa299ac2a
d2759c1a43ea8875b2097059b1dc0cd4beac770d
describe
'166004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
e976e58bc47f59381a68bbc49616cbf0
dfa7ba2ef1275207d3b88a63c550fdb840478bb6
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
1f6e685106158f9f28f614e66aaae739
e3d5b30a82344596a4efe97378a3ac4534d39ca2
describe
'56226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
e0a4264c62308a6cd2a2ebc0c8bfbc1b
66b4fea499f118c493bad06f6d2f497d5d3087f6
describe
'3735812' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e758cd4a1b46464e6af214fba6ad1979
28032078840307f05d3e55cbdabb67a08999bc66
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
f26ac76eb10fb6b710df6ccd512d949c
86cc566c67fea202cf614cb6d6829cf6c622e407
describe
'23484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDR' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
7f1ca614d4540323bc7dc15b129542ff
ee957ff4fe50988924f0ecd2b83f446e243d582a
describe
'453308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c71f30fda2842f775755f59cc004810b
d60b3744eac296db7ba5a6498d2381569c09810a
describe
'101707' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDT' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
0846320b2794575ed56852bb6731f1e2
ae6e53393819cce89fac4583550caaa2bba1f41a
describe
'31208' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDU' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f94a470c8e0b7e20fa3284ec88709f3b
56c9528bda1340413be9f25ace8ec3270b4c4566
describe
'3634616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
50bf28be659d38d63d4f631a62e43d7e
335b5526185e6d2cc9113adfbca91a5584f9dfde
describe
'14224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDW' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
5761b8c1300e6d21e32b71ddf9008ec4
2218197bbe1a8828d1e8c1b2b5a7d08faecde0ed
describe
'453584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
478a4b80372015522278d87812b4d34f
129fabe8b80bc1eae3b530cf7a2576ca82ce93e3
describe
'172486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
bfcde0600627d480b1ca762925c288ec
a990d25201c19f00a4ea979daecec2124095ede7
describe
'42698' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADDZ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
53637e07fbb3d2ac5eb9f0881e860d52
95cb78c263965961e0d599155d099ca17b596912
describe
'55705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEA' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
8d1003c28567a5a6293f423c9a5d0119
a7581d420ab8aec363fce8ce2476102fafa26748
describe
'3638240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEB' 'sip-files00095.tif'
bdf936bd27f99700389f0308017afdf2
f029b06cc824b3d29e7fd571dae8d42b4539bba3
'2011-10-14T06:47:07-04:00'
describe
'1739' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
aa153c348d627cd04d9730d572418e7d
30c08720a4a81f7a3fa59ca11f662e934ab723ad
describe
'19510' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADED' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
3cbdbc5f4e7fac93dac01a711beda08e
d82543b0afcce4d02b2c000ddf15ee023ebbd49d
describe
'465590' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEE' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
35d46592d5c6019c93b342341ec45f7c
2bd38b56eb95d93bc066f3784b7a26196f85648d
'2011-10-14T06:50:42-04:00'
describe
'191937' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEF' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
1d7f8a9d77b4228995b6c7287079a083
7109fa2734f98d5443d20567c9b339ff7f0acfb5
describe
'52525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEG' 'sip-files00096.pro'
dc3b05f55ef9345b938e0a0b92db04e8
91973ae71bbbb55b7ed555795c37e35bcd29839a
describe
'60154' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
20247202cff37195283a652662bf9fa5
4e672537fbd361f02af177621dcdd06b989cbf2e
describe
'3734440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
ffec6f56fcf70846612ce989bd9db8a7
f14b804cd95c099c6c1b6efc887a45b9295cc68c
describe
'2138' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEJ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
c8140a1040eb180291096879826529ad
83af75520b2d70c2817d21a42032be361c441a66
describe
'20506' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEK' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
115423ef483af99fa0070395e19b5177
8c7e79136c07d68259fd7feec74e500d17518da6
describe
'456969' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEL' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
d730e23d5cec37e08c5c546beeed6b9b
5cec7eca50afd985f14adbc53439e216fcda7153
describe
'194297' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEM' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
af3f2b28dbf950d749d48034bccd7f9e
96116ce9d9890d2a27f45a33d2f9db74fca1e804
describe
'52134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEN' 'sip-files00097.pro'
9e42890cd817907e3928b4f7f9c3111f
3310aa26c32d92d60f1d52ddf884bacc0c0687a7
describe
'60668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEO' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
14dd897913af52e7cfd42a28704a9d44
c2b6c494af07bd7762abb14702a7e4d1188c6211
describe
'3665848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEP' 'sip-files00097.tif'
61104a83cbfaee48e79207bc42a470ff
d6d4e6d4764e7780845ca01b749e64597e467868
describe
'2105' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEQ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
525dbbcd58aebcd1036905ab24f6beab
20523ed0c8e2601f4935bde3d0dc421306b60ab5
describe
'20299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADER' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
bbc844ecd4afbb66829b6d36ec38ad10
b6ff9e74486a55b5e842664ab93e79d48bb3af8b
describe
'465256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADES' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
cf49b3bf7df3fd7429ef00fef4abb8ba
e94da5fbe3a6d05ea6406628aac6f4e0eddae45a
describe
'192826' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADET' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
211dd56e596478b38a85489d3fd340bf
1dd869a029d088256ce60b6aef9dc7ea5e01c6a9
describe
'53080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEU' 'sip-files00098.pro'
0592cbf0f4f574fd0d3806b54b0f4ac2
4829475376af82fccbd3c7e52b170426450b98f6
describe
'60157' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEV' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
5d55784fa12080ffb0327010e81818f3
4669f810688392c4e344335a038233c5b1782124
describe
'3732096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d0b6e78064a4e25aea446c719045bd6f
b22914d105d20bfd9f40ee2c5c7f0951421f8c47
describe
'2082' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEX' 'sip-files00098.txt'
41f77442cde0b4f3007097918c5e373b
00b56691c4493ddb92fa919ef15084e4bcf1c982
describe
'20326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEY' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
8b30c97613ee54ed66cf21c427174f4c
cd70362689a580d0ad3c457d74ff70f23e9edd05
describe
'457484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADEZ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
2cd8c2748e1ee064a575413e57f652a4
42b479819fc6d9de558154f1f63e8d858bd807c0
describe
'195015' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFA' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
a6c560c05b8c376d0a98fea44519fe68
6ae089e9ec101bfbc02500e182ea0c6743bd4540
describe
'51522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFB' 'sip-files00099.pro'
0d4c5f926e534e62ff3928fdaac3bc24
fcc39dcb5feaba728e4cef51a6a5ee67424104d8
describe
'62127' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFC' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
2212143838640e3189f30dcfe2db3955
4bb0a2f19c7905c77d281484976a81139c2ba89a
'2011-10-14T06:49:14-04:00'
describe
'3670172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFD' 'sip-files00099.tif'
4babd92d89175f42619d19b14dc1f604
a09342e8fd5695bcac090b5e2fa0b799597608b8
describe
'2057' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFE' 'sip-files00099.txt'
08554a8e9db0138ae4eac2c267a98f44
ccf214df5294155653770f48a4f6fdf0deb0375a
describe
'20869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFF' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
1114b12a3b3bffd6e7f3488f029d03e2
565827b5d9ecd340ea090eee5040370860ad3fea
describe
'465308' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFG' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
4ec39e0a5e2c9644f37cfc126078c11b
1efbd87ca608cb030857a2b4052c0f5d1e33d834
describe
'196373' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFH' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
67b19983ac90831d4f029abb8724fe3a
770a3f2431fa135f0da3b8a86c7c8b2232f57e4e
describe
'52605' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFI' 'sip-files00100.pro'
3ed1a78b48279f430a776d1caba33156
3eddc05c6d7386471f78ccf8660d5f54267241d0
describe
'61212' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFJ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
19a8d505573c107adb69d2369dc8bc27
ac85c8c80d9dd256f681bf944d7e6b8a520513ab
'2011-10-14T06:51:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFK' 'sip-files00100.tif'
514648def1167b57fad84980369f5b0b
6f54b8739d430ce0464da1ee385da4a80f3941f3
describe
'2056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFL' 'sip-files00100.txt'
187068a19aadcd300418eeb6796f9038
90bbaf6bc8d99c7d6e5a243902366e29bb5d9a08
describe
'20800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFM' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
fcf60245ecd66e0a4461b62a6e3062e7
476865f08d56002506e232b25d64aa1e3fa2b357
describe
'456956' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFN' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
c060de8693317a97f739089585c9955e
3a73a32c1b3329cf620d90918e3d740cce51ebb7
describe
'113388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFO' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
f1bf102a22e28bd27c0b29111baeb7c9
37b5cab80ccaf79c8a67c590e6bb21f5819df840
describe
'22571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
4ab52beb3631b1e12e7f7e4a6ffab214
aeb5b5ae6bd871f1594e5e0c405220e4d7625ecb
describe
'36472' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFQ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
bdc34c13764e53de158a0991d46d8eb8
188fbaa9d63697ff0bbf8d95e0f097d792d99915
describe
'3664360' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFR' 'sip-files00101.tif'
d820ceeeda0b3658050c1d653222420f
cc5de997fbc729977ccec455705cf384cbcd39ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFS' 'sip-files00101.txt'
762c473e6db067e523e7422ca632441e
3e4fdef31ad726eef899abd8449ea073d032912f
'2011-10-14T06:51:29-04:00'
describe
'14827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFT' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
fb51027bc9bc7e7b3a605e4a41fa3695
b51c8fa6099c26cf27e1e15a3939afe3c8defbf4
describe
'465289' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFU' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
29e11f0f7fd28f8806347f98472abf23
f47da08f9725e17c058244bb7fcc02c16a9ba1dd
describe
'140225' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFV' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
24e4a01242f9d44fb7b285c12850c2fd
06582aad516cc9975e23a4d2ec61bf12375cd288
'2011-10-14T06:49:21-04:00'
describe
'34573' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFW' 'sip-files00102.pro'
fab5ae01628822383997652d136a9f7a
a7d7fe06fa85b7af7218b02806f176a7c864315b
describe
'45598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFX' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
963fbcbb5f18f6e3aecf7bef5cce7e45
59da4b9732f91e510fe09560cd0927c6f4a76aae
describe
'3731512' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFY' 'sip-files00102.tif'
61ebf19928bdd7ef81e591c25257a0c9
09db9570217e645982449d899f848bf4858eb3ec
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADFZ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
49b6530966aba18d8a2109252c0a97e9
351ba7ae2fb736be2123d6fdbc3b4214d6c2f360
describe
'18042' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGA' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
fb1ed95e9d6f55a69f0fa4cb64feebe7
b900559b710703c5797c26ee581d4d3fc6539c01
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
544c973f1fd9d37a9e4c163ac8b177a4
4e3d4ebf61bc3702f147606a85db02ed228cf58b
'2011-10-14T06:46:38-04:00'
describe
'131964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGC' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
44622a82a44034b1d9e3ee8b9d170dda
0514f490b39700d9e9940aa5e7ad1605e24308cb
describe
'29414' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGD' 'sip-files00103.pro'
915460eacf61e6eb3a9aa31bf01800f6
0c261c097072b4930bcb89b494a70084ca3af26b
describe
'43417' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGE' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
f5fe0b1d1bee5b7248b7d7ff42afca3c
7fc90c1118dfc81140b5798ca93f5beb2944c386
describe
'3665280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGF' 'sip-files00103.tif'
1fdb732e65ee8748cc1b5cf290e90243
1863c8f3e4020e9496dc5dd3f9ba5366b8111420
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGG' 'sip-files00103.txt'
a6ef88b8701ffa96be59c784a7c1a03c
12da45743bff507500e2d265ba3fa84895441ca0
describe
'17621' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGH' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
e0f2393e30dc3f6618d459531202fb75
709da0d2607276c15def42f9e11639f417806120
describe
'453562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGI' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
c8943436336a5cfeba6ab2994dc5721b
f186428f540b2591b55b32bdf2b1476c06b1579b
describe
'116092' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGJ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
5c04c5d4d8690c5c8f0bd239db9b2c22
bd203614155975129235395d2bd4c3c072ce9f36
describe
'24193' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGK' 'sip-files00104.pro'
12c899078a0e750ebec321140e167fac
e509652ad86e69cf4c56e0c8462c08902ca8f9a0
describe
'37067' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
37bd96e94b3b303b52c41ce6e105def0
49578a938fe93919a7d073e46a174ee7c52ef66b
describe
'3637532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGM' 'sip-files00104.tif'
44d96716309e6dfb6e52fed5ac8589f3
164fd1c3ceb514adfd80ab51ac8dd7c7d68b9582
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
148e81ceb0bccdb7c3d0a0414ccf4c30
4fc0dee420df55d9180166fd71d25229182cccf9
describe
'15300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGO' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
24361540ca1c4b4ff1a2cec4ce6a1b0c
033c5c9fad5cc309cdcb3a1a57814d3ce01c4527
describe
'465064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGP' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
960bf3db36ec533172b7f54beaf23072
28f81968ebc9379b03d648e4de4b341d9bd333a7
describe
'170778' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGQ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
533579aee0684cf56e46d55794554f19
445a16c38b407f75551edebdc6f8620c75b2351a
describe
'48003' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGR' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
4dce1ebaa60d5ff8ceefcf0ab39d5f3c
7b7075d14fa122f0380cd71016a5ca751c0beaee
describe
'3732304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGS' 'sip-files00105.tif'
4c138322e721493d4312505978f56ad9
747dca9da0ed96b9b52c01d37d8ebedba8a1ba54
describe
'19334' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGT' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
a68133dd86320140930f2093eb5a9ca5
675604ecb2df952dafca154eabf9f8e9993b7e81
describe
'472137' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGU' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
6206974866db94cfa18f02743968585d
0d2617c3519f798d09267b53497d7dffad398519
describe
'152628' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGV' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0bc7c8bb10d370154ea3c36c655278ec
ed81bcadba26b1e55d3aa9312c4bda7746ef7bd1
describe
'41584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGW' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
e74c458dd51d0b3840da3f300f03af6c
2c412a5782bb3a00f59e5cdef9c7105eeba0a82d
'2011-10-14T06:47:27-04:00'
describe
'3786376' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGX' 'sip-files00106.tif'
898167601dbdaf9c17c558d0063996ad
5e85c29623083b38cc8bda7755cd3905d800f9c9
describe
'16681' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGY' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
5d2404d977b15fe235ead844bc31346a
4cdd0d339bf8d971dd4566f409d8c81ebeee31a4
describe
'458709' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADGZ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
01b765a0e74fa5d3de5bc1894bc9530b
4b12535e653cb48b5e7d48e1cc9a0451fa4588f6
describe
'180488' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHA' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
3a7413f2be0760399ba2c4944fb5427c
39b0a9b979a7dc3589f863a2a4add8069d4c736f
describe
'45666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHB' 'sip-files00107.pro'
8b7a0e628023daec2c453d5cc2121712
af41105b5e77690e0416552b74daa0d7bc37dd12
describe
'55469' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHC' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
9ebd4614b69c8f5fc664835c9cce6646
70e85f399a26822214e22ebeae9ba011b46fb495
describe
'3679264' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHD' 'sip-files00107.tif'
be5d58dcb601798efbc998d7e42730bc
7139a10e11e78bc289dbd023f7f65e59b4865dc0
describe
'1818' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHE' 'sip-files00107.txt'
643cead62fe6f37b82b72f8a9c2ae2b5
1715fedb8cadf2d782f93fa02b2117a68e4c74b8
describe
'18947' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHF' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
00e26d205ff3f6fe301f869d13a83859
de29e5caa807b00ad97d6234780d83b8a183774d
describe
'465292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHG' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
635d0bba0aee9be7baedc5ed1acb0130
189d94f04a3e6306131d6593bdf275aa651bc957
describe
'142253' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHH' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
f1e4080d04d108aed7ffd8d3f0ad6d1c
4a5c3375c42302597584d0cafa00d95ce987a168
describe
'33349' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHI' 'sip-files00108.pro'
2c5ba6e3c30f7840a2355ed4d755a339
5d6120c6400f4efcd2c9080f1fadd64eb554fb53
describe
'45935' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHJ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
c660193461a24bce1593300d55749ef4
7e36358773ba5d0013b83b5a8664df34a05f13c0
describe
'3731328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHK' 'sip-files00108.tif'
0f5eeb159a1b8c2292dcf4fbefc2f184
bbf8d8504024020b9fc8d3e5fddd35ee2740aa7c
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHL' 'sip-files00108.txt'
bc2706b9c58c22c02a0e292209ba5dd6
f95172da7e2d50f00675bd1cb6691289e3be74d7
describe
'17172' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHM' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
740f0966bdb24ee73e8ace79ef581d5e
7487f8b68a7faf3a5f8919f36555e307623a0644
describe
'465446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHN' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
37877ca4e5f53aef6b9d870ed08e8800
963c2819b008b080033a013716a5fe0136b88a47
describe
'196161' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHO' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
8d9824346c2f14768f2e32c51d3fb532
47731ca0ca324eb138eadb3c2b208852f7c3fab7
describe
'54144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHP' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
b4e247e2ec7e14c8c7aa9e7ec46c8a0e
f3d5870aec7c4514e568bf32c2a6090508bc5b91
describe
'3734940' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHQ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
afe2c6397e1107869740d663d92e471c
51e2d88c47abd62fa7d2645a8064926bf3b4207e
describe
'20491' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHR' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
e8e30ce44dc6c3ade3a17617814281f1
b6f434d464a99c3960dc181e83e26573b7326e22
describe
'465305' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHS' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
b9e334124fdabe8fe790434c7e8bd54b
598bc4cbe79a4b6d455e064173935a3ab9d286a0
describe
'159646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHT' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
a71f423cc419afd02c5b446b5dbe6e67
5dec81138325db2af73706e56dff28789e7905de
describe
'4711' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHU' 'sip-files00110.pro'
6d813187a95df630ea2960a61116dd4b
cd6fdbf89017ce32b8c47cb4e7f0054b5f5926bf
describe
'50549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHV' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
2d358010245442db67562c6f07ba28ba
2084991f2e9187a006e656d8372afc2fee59170f
describe
'3732668' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
438bf76fb2b3103ad47924460517005f
09035d04f8457bd09ff9bad1f604843144e4900c
describe
'269' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHX' 'sip-files00110.txt'
0d02740b02fbc2c06e127831f5923bad
06c2c21945f86075eba43e826f57b54775fe86f8
describe
Invalid character
'21064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHY' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
e4e76bab9c306da866ce7f3b5eef6e90
39fa6015b56dbd19dec68d9411dc8679537b516f
describe
'460707' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADHZ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
54f48782d73c455e35fd08c1a64c52d9
ed8941a735c8e3c01e8e86f4fa0659d9dd6db146
describe
'177272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIA' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
4c30654c0021f7961fdacafbe4cc9e53
10a2031bf668a3524ac0e5e8e0a697b6b40f17a6
'2011-10-14T06:49:45-04:00'
describe
'46799' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIB' 'sip-files00111.pro'
62102433de7a5c0ebfb97b2b840bdf33
a957100d1d6972124a787171a8b677cc95a6bfda
describe
'56107' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIC' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
f293dffc82c9adc08901fe20ce09bedc
9a84cdc456546f4037e7468fcd2228d7188f9178
describe
'3695204' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADID' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1248f83fb0ef63b32681595bf0f23d3d
676244758615081de3b4ee1dba1e2e9ee1884142
describe
'1907' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIE' 'sip-files00111.txt'
fd5fa0766fd25a65d73d4d968de5267e
d80a41944e87e517f7ba05f123d4caab946665ab
describe
'19702' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIF' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
31beedb3ff55227e7e9530c9ee3670d0
003647121ee1f7aeffc2353856fe35c7da27f4f9
describe
'503736' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIG' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
11e297a0d4a6e8e126736a0efb7409b8
ea06337d5639e7a37bc8ea8823eb36f42bbc2e9a
describe
'176962' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIH' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
4a6cb15b565460ae491530119ffced9e
d35c00bfd8f40ccbe68c6e2486acb9444419c203
describe
'53222' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADII' 'sip-files00112.pro'
3eed9fb461d5dbbf9f3d349a62515246
c10dfcc94310aa6131da94b2722923b4df6b8328
describe
'57769' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIJ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
818530e32fb112e57405326a892f7cbe
40797f7f33f19621f6af23da5cee7047f3a5e9af
describe
'4043060' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIK' 'sip-files00112.tif'
c88d1b919709586c0d084d7c5d644d6b
017155bcc191c7a19b406500ab4b0cd608e9cc68
describe
'2074' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIL' 'sip-files00112.txt'
6d439f5316eaf37095a7edfe0c290751
a0f65dc8704926da956dcc79519b31fe1a6554d6
describe
'22216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIM' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
bb01568f05f46f529dec6cfbe9841b32
fe942704aa61a1dd4a15be43dc785a3dae2b6f67
describe
'465555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIN' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
ce37eaaf0cebe246c5a9c1d5b8df03a5
5c424f72945d3d6d1feb59d4806ceac9822e6012
describe
'185666' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
89f26ec3534f3db47b7f08bb62ff1cec
710b2146e4d725ab47c330ea856d9e71d9ff53a1
describe
'51575' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIP' 'sip-files00113.pro'
0b37b4d24f7cd2cc5530ee8ea747f357
f5edc0cf3882e048a9565fe2bf57c0a047532231
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIQ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
4d8e4ab1d9d56c92e7b76d3b39c34527
39b684ad27eb2a99933e04b207c08b7bb6710d83
describe
'3734188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIR' 'sip-files00113.tif'
d5d83de27b4d3ca685afa335aac0ce67
37c003ad40113a4ec81b85d673233246b9c8c6e6
describe
'2046' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIS' 'sip-files00113.txt'
b02c1abee2190b5cc46ffe0c9775d4f0
585b6378a96b83f98676b0d22328d031d4a9b5f1
describe
'19495' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIT' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
f388689e8a3f4438117900db7708f0f9
9e7894e2f73aca3d003aa1a80b411b3953de92bd
describe
'453243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIU' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
beb677b8a679217c2932104352a18d5b
602dc79f0306d4e1a5f592a49308c9f01596d967
describe
'145811' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIV' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
46dd98538622269ed0ef2fd20e60eaef
f611d5c7f7a8e3582ea073c7a64d6da6150816b1
describe
'32353' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIW' 'sip-files00114.pro'
642b4e72c6ecea583feda4179f96035a
86d27960c596a00413a4b888a90c2fae5ac36183
describe
'46059' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIX' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
1794ff07523484b30c7d264d45f53abc
ccd768dcf71d7749d7fd87d67b865d9579926d97
describe
'3635476' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIY' 'sip-files00114.tif'
60528eed348e60b80261b6a780936202
b4147a4ab88fbad7d79a1aea129d9a2f4d38678b
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADIZ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
c60a30356e236c9457a67c261a197519
10a0dbbf3b257761f7f046d3a50ecd14ae6b86e5
describe
'17576' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJA' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
9ad62f0d2213d5075ef1855d7e26e6bf
613c66e1b3c67c3a84a4dbcdd30d75546a9909b1
describe
'465583' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJB' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
4402be98926aa2089d6148219d317b8f
615fd97b51d6fd6b7fc802ead0c0d8bd7742bc6c
describe
'173530' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJC' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
9ee44ff5ba1c161be084869fcad84dc7
7bc04a065d347b0a7bf98c64c08bdb376def31cf
describe
'47169' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJD' 'sip-files00115.pro'
3c733a5750e019ea724e2ecaf272b96c
f4c1148a8333d74405bfa0ac9fad0fd1a283d62f
describe
'53994' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJE' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
ea513ca2aa431b6350803a93d9dbefcd
8b1a697ace0d9336beaccc88040753dce34e5baa
describe
'3734024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJF' 'sip-files00115.tif'
36351ad7421d685310ae61091863ec77
1e8f853ce83eca654d07365cce09e4b28738be56
describe
'1914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJG' 'sip-files00115.txt'
7f972e0e3ac66b63c397f67232767986
a17bdf4ec40bfc0bb415d2ee2d1c91073d6133d3
describe
'18873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
1cc86dd030a9cf7191c330343d4954a0
9b9f51e4a3247dd48400fda6165b4e1bbbdb2f70
describe
'447844' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJI' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
6c6d358c5f824787f9314ede96fd2106
5bd34b99b3c4e8459ab543a079b10603137041db
describe
'130542' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJJ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
4800c708d53639b3780a8e5661989c49
dd926e370543c80b4ca63a0f8c21bc992aca90af
'2011-10-14T06:50:21-04:00'
describe
'24486' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJK' 'sip-files00116.pro'
7e80ca2dfa75d8fd1832f83917818811
9471b90cf3ee5d33af1bc1d40205cfc72bdec233
describe
'40909' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJL' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
285a9f2b156562d7e84ea98d54f4b3d1
429defaa5eef636a0d6053189e558df4b7cf9f7d
describe
'3591440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJM' 'sip-files00116.tif'
ca2b0b191970f5cc6b3b75fa3d152033
1acb122ac933ff8901b3f69332804579434af1eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJN' 'sip-files00116.txt'
37dead139cd8d7e81e2a2d19d8c5a128
244c8d622c4bdb105fedd7d89c9a8d8b64d85b87
describe
'16575' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJO' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
4b70faca96a473404d733e8280439907
e14f00469148649323473ac8eab1750f8b2753e0
describe
'462293' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
a3a6d391a0bddf411ccdf5f542d38e49
b80529e1e32bd6c315b848fa8a9c0a6e56b28bc1
describe
'154229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJQ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8b1fa5f6db6667d15f3f3321936a0be0
d075bc378debbe78f3dc23282f7834a2f0f22167
describe
'42709' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJR' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
b91396e91f28f8bf887562f46eba1a48
268f5be07be90c49e27685cdec37c302bc674e58
describe
'11109640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJS' 'sip-files00117.tif'
ee44a8aa38af2b4b7ab8e5e63dc161a9
02bb4c6e5d19dedd9478b27ecd86d9a03818d415
describe
'18446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJT' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
a783f79551112747d29bed4d0654718d
4c2ee822f2456941afcecd60a578afd7e676b8cf
describe
'464974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJU' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
f356b0e5bb1c15542e6aa80af1c25235
abc818f7e16003be0bcdbe9df27a692b2700ace9
describe
'19357' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJV' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
132da53a8a5ab1b47f770915d323aec0
c8d842ab90ef50f68926602f7d8e74a57c8c7cab
describe
'9399' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJW' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
90f398f5ac967ab1997a4d90ea6771c4
942b8042576ddf6cfdb6166bf1052e0b5bf0ce08
describe
'3728856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJX' 'sip-files00118.tif'
62c53184f1b19c51705ded7a633f7c63
29d8a7867a8f2bd79395759160fd61718b884b7b
describe
'7646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJY' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
79fe636c79441b9222a1fb4c80e10035
ccf45fbbe775b8079cade5db580114b1957aab89
describe
'465586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADJZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
f95afc137efd1cc58728182d21df603a
3543953596e3281425867c4e170d15fe65221979
describe
'158794' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKA' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
debc4976a477d29084ecdad7a3edecb7
cea6115a4b8b5829a16d4bc2172507e1e3383b69
describe
'41756' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKB' 'sip-files00119.pro'
6f7905cddc4037663f21098ff8800220
273ba2ba86e89c217a7a28d27f958dd324dbcf50
describe
'50901' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKC' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
1949773233df5d153bc9bc55d87bed37
ff31811a3f68ed317b66f2fa092bffdaa86f3657
describe
'3733948' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKD' 'sip-files00119.tif'
ef6d7c4e238a46d18a9573c97802e6da
cdf4d24881134e5a1ea47ade8bdce02d5cafa953
'2011-10-14T06:50:41-04:00'
describe
'1716' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKE' 'sip-files00119.txt'
71359b927db825459f005394d8f73435
9df19220388c42c732557b774ca80e66c0a4dffc
describe
'18597' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKF' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
eecb018290a6513bdda7423df11f9ac8
f9f93ca89f9e3be1ab171333b6764b3ad529226c
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKG' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
95daa72d057f18831f395604741856e4
389ea67fd4b66dc39f9505f4808454152561be34
describe
'159642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKH' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
828d1d0e10f9efdc7c92b1f2c49f82be
738c16b84ebab8b7791b470e8e3074244c7b5af4
describe
'41029' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKI' 'sip-files00120.pro'
a415c88908fbdff303fa78dfe85bb99a
8776c695ef578f3bb58248d3e38b37ec42032113
describe
'51840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKJ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
aa5568f8ae0c0774c56db02c26d73ab2
92b89df5e8585d67927150d35f2b300316e7a777
describe
'3734152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKK' 'sip-files00120.tif'
36baaaee125189376797446b2119d82a
b0d43debd79e6270680583cf3b36392456538da9
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKL' 'sip-files00120.txt'
a6b1791075f3d880b53cd3d050556e59
40e19d260a45ca1d7022ed57830266aaff6b6f04
describe
'19143' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKM' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
79dada47cb2b46b269041e4839d4e6b2
8c6b7424d1daac3e0dae9497325e3ab3679cd645
describe
'458246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
c6c4d4be55bc1f5769cf63e1ee964eac
cc45c059fc58231731172c318af0dde28ec03e11
describe
'171332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKO' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
86c3305753fb70fabc0f9fd0fc631190
063a3097414d1d38d5e48e927c4425b2e344be93
describe
'44973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKP' 'sip-files00121.pro'
222aff5c1e97e4584468eef028bd323c
62e75935bb46eb64d3134456792c6ee23667ade2
describe
'54590' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKQ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
1262231c63bc3b6c87cca1eacee5edaf
280452d93057b1da878b084cfb65a4ad6736ea8d
describe
'3675848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKR' 'sip-files00121.tif'
a893229af4966d04dff3e5d351882ab3
354c78c81c9948165cce4fd0b50f666583cbf003
describe
'1837' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKS' 'sip-files00121.txt'
0c84675d3021856d58414967c7c087e6
9ed8b3d0edf12396dc655ba697782ec49437f5d4
describe
'19638' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKT' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
c591560997dd698be43d2df47da360d7
3bf91b763fa5704027e561ef9765a1b80c13d69e
describe
'503627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
08d7d23a2d33f2ceb7b237279d029380
6550a8dac2662082c13cf68c966bff00914478e1
describe
'162853' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKV' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
7e849b479e507bdf88ba428da03abc90
0abfa5ef604d31dc752f7568bc3d98e98a55bc93
describe
'46772' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKW' 'sip-files00122.pro'
8046301e769a9e5024ba89995f024c84
ded2ef1702e8aec8d99590f4cf394f25da2d1e8c
describe
'54038' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKX' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
6843d1c98dd2d167da8dd0b836f34019
7cc3a59aefaf454c39da9b663ca43cd884d354d2
describe
'4043004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKY' 'sip-files00122.tif'
7b8789fc632224e66aa7100804ccd68f
98eece71901a638cc4aaeec9c3039f8f0b6780e5
describe
'1858' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADKZ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
510793f5add90a4641ab5eec579d9f53
da64990e65eeb786255ac636e577efdf51e6ef37
describe
'22218' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
e734977889fdfa0c8f72473d783b7919
6a9c9c5c22964cd7c28adb22a6fb6f67ddd87b97
describe
'460158' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLB' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
58c65c015300c425f1d1ffdf26f42f06
dbfc4f92ba494e2fcc767bd2f4d9ee969fe89191
describe
'192945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLC' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
54998ade1b382b850a88f980243e0001
aefca1652afe4b624cacaab6f90991fb6d92f007
describe
'54096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLD' 'sip-files00123.pro'
431dbd28f34b3e7facabd997bdd35a81
ef63ed4f058982952cceddb2b0b8b22be9a3df7b
describe
'59281' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLE' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
4e5834be07222b3c08a07359f6400f79
240d533ebe7c732272cf19a0413c5424136182a4
'2011-10-14T06:51:13-04:00'
describe
'3691336' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLF' 'sip-files00123.tif'
44bcfc49c627a546982aa3222d59a57a
c6944c5b99085365315c44b4dd8b224f15c9fdb2
describe
'2134' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLG' 'sip-files00123.txt'
ac400bc4112962fa85b3513a2ff0dac4
b75479b778b3c4fde5f53079da658c7f45880c0b
describe
'20051' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLH' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
74fcfef2b3dd886515f6b82c87761326
5ad347cd91eda062ff1078603da07977f90627a4
describe
'465251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLI' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
4551d8702580a7322cc832ae34cb36c6
92c20b90d34b82618853a4fc7ebe88a166964782
describe
'197231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLJ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
9aa4c5bca067af5cb2211854f953e921
067863dce362b260c5157aa906fe0e494063eaeb
describe
'53531' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLK' 'sip-files00124.pro'
a2965bfe2929b332c5566d389b35f941
1320c15b45a5a47f3609acdef4f962ba78712891
describe
'61321' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLL' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
07cbf6598698a3c4ec978cd027565186
b874b0d4bf95b3d2348d913e593e31bb18a68d40
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLM' 'sip-files00124.tif'
8f0bca63cce712c2a7e506f645a11320
fb178741a5d9fc674f0da37a7f2f87c6e0bf8ba1
describe
'2086' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLN' 'sip-files00124.txt'
dc717f957dd711c5d8993fa46053bfff
01355a4cf90975896fa800aceee17203bf83c801
describe
'20886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLO' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b6be16494b0d978bc2bd84befa0cbfcc
e834c38f9e39a1b3e1828643a9683d3121192a5d
describe
'466252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
91050227959b4f045727906ecb33a027
529af7628842edeaca55fe9f70ccdae4b03e7372
describe
'155976' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLQ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
d681ab581e926a676a97b29e1464e4e0
a277a7afa552ec2215f5bd7bb14bf8deeb18a953
describe
'4272' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLR' 'sip-files00125.pro'
e4e7e71ce58e1b7e25bdfab6721dcae4
34d51b1e3d3ce368969dbfe11b57f16f37daddf3
describe
'48805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLS' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
9722f850779c79f39b9457f39c83bf2d
ff2ed8176c62c74912f57ed625f4abcf015a0b56
describe
'3740268' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLT' 'sip-files00125.tif'
6ff67a7317079696dab1f440aa7721ad
ba4775d3af7d71009364f448994eaf5be7945a1f
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLU' 'sip-files00125.txt'
fc02607e52c83a520a16724a6736ddd6
89ef43466b8348837c49d171f833c0c2c9ea4da7
describe
'20643' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLV' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
0d554d59c0f6a1be4040b5d42f6d1690
d85de90f0d5044afa1f1f9e9c92be78971c5bca9
describe
'457000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLW' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
552878cf84a5e780687ded6e91ac1efc
5fe993934294769261f8a8243c8522a729cc246e
describe
'176110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLX' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
87c8c90441ef8a0fb472557109724019
7f6e4a30c4d88d8e7678c4299901354565336bdb
describe
'48304' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLY' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
7307b4fb5512ed151def59567271e97f
722610cff4c4ae0e918dc9286020aedb017e6014
describe
'3665936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADLZ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
d8f12aa66c7afa6da44036cb914c728a
175b484a9e79c57c6736d275f4f08165a82f1583
describe
'18909' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMA' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
b4384fc7c051261fc8a956485ea050de
da07542707f85de37dde39cafc9f7db16ff57100
'2011-10-14T06:47:34-04:00'
describe
'452442' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMB' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
3e7572424b2bcecb3c81bdd6bc46bccc
38b2f61e0640cdffc031bbce665813b42d224733
describe
'124070' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMC' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
4ec377acb07afe9936f3644450319504
f7ca3d483211185cbd2f56a647dd3ba9cb863009
describe
'28349' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMD' 'sip-files00127.pro'
7fe1693ef198e500d5c52f1617ceefe8
9bd85ec5c85a6ff142f664237ac5399d2718d700
describe
'40569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADME' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
05dbf1ec0915d71643b34ce9d6240194
952ed3814846c66c07e45cf8eb7d86eb0ab748bc
describe
'3628300' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMF' 'sip-files00127.tif'
6e3f1a862a3ff8e4ad6157bd4e884303
654b158f9db47dc210e5cd12931e3ab39092eb29
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMG' 'sip-files00127.txt'
a6bcc666e735679b90bfee6fdec1ee3e
837e05a83277a8a120db4454ff3b7a08edc94e2d
describe
'15641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMH' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
ec059e5eec1ef0464ff020ef375dd955
3e02f7ab527e01b4b7651df745e4d4c8d9105e02
describe
'459405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMI' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
b5a218b5bae012e4728467a8cf098117
09c89fe7b38fc4d18e1c153e327605b30d2e3848
describe
'97220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMJ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
8649d03c8a1d8dc324e06084e9bd0c09
6ae0b9d5e618bb703db03eedd11896fae58e6284
describe
'30442' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMK' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
3dbddee99f33fb15bdcd641c33ee24cf
8acde30835b8fea5e7093e947ed8d469cd7d3537
describe
'3685424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADML' 'sip-files00128.tif'
1b6bc66e441f3300fc4f6d8209906517
02ed363c4802cae333e5cb049deebfb779eec74f
describe
'14819' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMM' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
300feb37cd60b62bddee3e70276d0fcd
0d2d3690288e02a86761fcb69fd4b22bf2667124
describe
'465585' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMN' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
59edf374054d72d2803ea37c123a906c
d97a664f3c09ea5a552edb8796f9ee61a77edcb8
describe
'174280' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMO' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
19ef6e9cd0eb05834b2895abcb8bd5e6
ed47383bdb7fb0807e2771c99b84e6267e3f7c43
describe
'46559' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMP' 'sip-files00129.pro'
ac96206ad387dff29b309d8d0824b66b
3f13d4acbce5ccfa141544767efe8ec3bf34f048
describe
'54788' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMQ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
3baecea4e8deb9a37a384bb9bacc3331
65bf19c9cbef4cb99a514446e771ba41502ac557
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMR' 'sip-files00129.tif'
1f0915010357021376ad47c3d74f5f8f
e26934d6bcf5c3b6aec3d86f270e00204381ea0d
describe
'1856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMS' 'sip-files00129.txt'
10e56b3a4a7c6d75dc92e16ebf1cef37
ce3721e5adc455539210b6105b5fa5f4dbe1edba
describe
'18995' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMT' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
b13ef08b10c1e06e47106a360113b1c8
578bc6c380253744cc4cf9b675eaa1f5d3811a12
'2011-10-14T06:49:39-04:00'
describe
'458698' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMU' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
e7390e94b189f8f47fb064dbeb3c8167
c58ea81d8b881bbfaa5462a1e3736c2ddce79072
describe
'192779' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMV' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
6b1c0881cd63cc258aecf06f653a0e55
d62ac0b1f42955773284b73ccf104764955484b1
describe
'54131' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMW' 'sip-files00130.pro'
f357fb3667b535deb2816871cd961413
64d11dbf8f3cf1b68a6bc8bf604d54a2b8503d73
describe
'60090' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMX' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
a698f68fa17e09283ddaaad67e68034d
f15e6aa5e786d497fc080986e38342e32a324e48
describe
'3679432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMY' 'sip-files00130.tif'
40e5a58ab945eb7a8e63a61c5f253995
ecbfcdfc9cee78a873526a5f9851f608b6eb6f22
describe
'2109' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADMZ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
6cf70fa8ebc678612f6496ca628e9baa
f4e208bced1b60a5fa209712d0c4d468684e3134
describe
'20054' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNA' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
c0515f7eb876728064b1a09f97f9bf73
59132b82e22d01ad67ed22bda494e90073412362
describe
'458589' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNB' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
62244e2ca7c487c51de580e7051aa2be
8e98483304bd5f7a6b12ed37f8fa088e55b06d21
describe
'96882' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNC' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
a54d3f82983a10879f635ba209f7ca77
504d95d48719b9d55c3f9cdf9a8f97c2a81a983f
describe
'18267' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADND' 'sip-files00131.pro'
691ea5af2325892b3cd1c2402dd2dbb2
665c02f6426481ff9099c63482e2c8b49268424a
describe
'32093' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNE' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
816676b44447bd311a58b15ff09bbbff
6ba229663987b6eed3a2cfb17cb69e745b157a47
describe
'3677964' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNF' 'sip-files00131.tif'
c4d510687241f6ee7d35bdba0500817a
8dfc2f4298261502653a04cbbf2ee655615d8fc2
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNG' 'sip-files00131.txt'
9473806d10b27235214dae6443dfcafe
b749e3043edf9ffefdaf7e95ea69de678d2d40a9
describe
'13966' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNH' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
d13967b19b40b6130aea0603ccc48c1f
16a8cf60962f3973535553623c56fae6093948de
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNI' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
2eaf3f335ae895fefe8546ca41b5e662
f0cad46a13a7c1f94b53570298389e09e3af421c
describe
'172974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNJ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
b30abc12cdd92d39fa66dd976d4b1224
b91d72175bf527a6198a46072db5a72043e62771
describe
'45570' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNK' 'sip-files00132.pro'
4b7f24de67b6e2b8b20ee49887d11e45
5c806f91d362ee0c546554abd3e8e39e148f2c64
describe
'55167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNL' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
3f9f391e4c090b33a895f1950869e22d
4c4d1f74bc00e73bf0a3131d567031b5ef3ab238
describe
'3731868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNM' 'sip-files00132.tif'
d65654ded8ee926482e91db4c26eec88
fd11c14b6f56d25f2cb314aca3a141d7be6bcb47
describe
'1805' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNN' 'sip-files00132.txt'
e1d9aa165a7e219277c6fc2982229c3b
058213659a31ec94fd221839007ed996b8653a79
describe
'19310' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNO' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
54d5cc41d5583447bfafbcec54e4b603
dafb95fc633f0a1d13e5e172a0127cafe380a22f
describe
'465569' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNP' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
f065b4974fc72614a4b47c2fc51b8a83
8e4b37c3efc72a2203fd4eeb1baf5a13241e3b2b
describe
'185775' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNQ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
93e0cbb9bc8a948662db52fa5bf6f421
d001868623d32c0c74ba8339fc23ebcc0272cd98
describe
'52634' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNR' 'sip-files00133.pro'
7bfe5d92e3dab2049807a20bf65b5062
00d21d64bd9a758b24ee64024e56354f05910b7c
describe
'58064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNS' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
e666071f65dd66078f9ee3540c905f16
c716ac370c66809bd81023a8c8f18264f932da4f
describe
'3734124' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNT' 'sip-files00133.tif'
990eb541dbd2e8d9a1f385eaacf10441
8191e14dd4d03aa6c3b5282101bdfef349e82607
describe
'2064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNU' 'sip-files00133.txt'
deeb6a6dee8be1d71c7c420cb38fa2c1
75df2d11e3e69b39e5fae7368cd0b6567fdd226a
describe
'19810' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNV' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
f25754838b4c0e5f8dc6af7f9b217f34
aa4faadff1323d10a1f650b43b0366b35287d2d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNW' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
633af8c66b25c8d65581252ee84aa25c
1ed3e4abf1756732c657760b09f92d49263aff02
describe
'118868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNX' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
8267f396d2f98410fc901878b95c6cb7
a854be8470bc9be394c6ce9927c6b14800d79712
describe
'25796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNY' 'sip-files00134.pro'
c5c9412bb7f1200a58b9837a4109d581
018e56a74b6e4404799fe433e2fcea6d82210a14
describe
'37594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADNZ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
eca3b26b7116681ebc6ce6df44d007bf
2f873c5b75f97e490a42288c0e871a21f9bcf61b
describe
'3730876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOA' 'sip-files00134.tif'
c4a38a7905a12d496b98e219de464a7e
392209404f6b2ce9ac325d97517929baec2ab7f8
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOB' 'sip-files00134.txt'
45cd88a9dd3fd4d9632cf43f41116ed1
03e19f43e8b894e853ef0c8bcbcad24b4a0e7b23
describe
'15433' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOC' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
e3b243ba77d0534d24f6b84b65eb35cd
9d023e35fe8b23bc112a78e5ce765ff1d99a4305
describe
'465482' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOD' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
8d6f1a45097aa466057cd72b0c6c435b
78b77e7988fe0d07d161ab955eef65751d609f96
describe
'136943' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOE' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
0ff42381a9bacfef36788fe112c60a8d
6c78a5ad681e4159e849b6c4fa20fc66f1063a1c
describe
'40411' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOF' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
1e0de1cda35a3ec6fff26e939b89e3d1
2832fa36126125c40e022a0b9f3e008d8b939313
describe
'3733924' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOG' 'sip-files00135.tif'
0f61420e255f6e0ad34e997bc4ee2cba
8da8f442559d8864a53a3061c40b9d3a1f895c5f
'2011-10-14T06:48:35-04:00'
describe
'17269' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOH' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
c8ec16c1fbb0bf38b803ccda825038a8
d8782da503e462618e1788c8e1ae586b9f5731b8
describe
'465265' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOI' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
7242293da4d46a17577eaef03f05229f
f0ae68610224ae0ab25429bf8c28313fea4449e5
describe
'160274' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOJ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
2c7b3d266db8d39f020a7c74e6748cb2
ac10636b913694dfe2a3804e7921705864aa53e9
'2011-10-14T06:47:26-04:00'
describe
'4703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOK' 'sip-files00136.pro'
69538ac25e46d78825ebc9b9e91a627e
a9c1f726df76cf82a0d8fb033ba49cab0bf57212
describe
'52606' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOL' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
6e97ce7f5b84c0739ade23cd68e57645
a22a2c5b3d02711158b6f196e49f1e1acd877484
describe
'3732848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOM' 'sip-files00136.tif'
be5d96b6fb8cafa13f24c24d056e97dc
00f4d253bc973aa1d6b6cad3e2f84300b1bc9daf
describe
'179' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADON' 'sip-files00136.txt'
10b92199edb56e73022154356a53386a
ee659088a60c3eefebd93d52b809dc1e6a5737f0
'2011-10-14T06:49:23-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'21710' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOO' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
c30e8b5d73e255420535f1b867f8ac05
5d0c447a80a80f8fbc2fbbd9b2b816dc37121056
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOP' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
9685d441c31fa17296e45ceb92447123
2385bdbf9f36a50ec961726ddea41978cc967470
describe
'113016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOQ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
63ddb9fca6c027bb3ad5d47b68b41b3b
42b588698b4ec4f6785a4fc8898b58e6f0b5a4d7
describe
'23065' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOR' 'sip-files00137.pro'
975c38aae1673200b974eb3ee03236f4
ae2edf96fafc9a1d0a967c546093666f8c005928
describe
'37522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOS' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
697f2ac0924236ce3b349d6d6df2d169
4ea6c344cac93ded15ccab61ea749b3e78d00037
describe
'3664504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOT' 'sip-files00137.tif'
a93ccc62d55cd5b3af91952df08f142a
571dd6dce6e91c58d0ed71b0673bcb983f6b2f5c
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOU' 'sip-files00137.txt'
3cd9dfbeedcb1c6d773b355b19c42f2c
91ce6dc2dd8d7e6a19bb6ba875cadd3d53071475
describe
'15382' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOV' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
bfbeb1abfe7e5d1d0930d05eed831c8a
5eef5647d7f912c11cdd08d6ac5a76c9ab9a4ace
describe
'465153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOW' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
f02c695e7e98032cf3c0dd843ac57f91
c205739849692c1ee30f057492d44c070135a953
describe
'119498' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOX' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
9512d716cd5d3de5ac30bfe5c07945ee
070073d34ee13f6c663111e731fd07febaef4e75
describe
'26535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOY' 'sip-files00138.pro'
7807b1feabfb37574a1db7fb1f995abd
3f1f2ca16eaeab2378aa897a17d6fcadcc498e0a
describe
'39188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADOZ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
0652b17f5b724c8bc2ca73bf307f811f
092a508403750b35030249e32ae2778cbd02b472
describe
'3730984' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPA' 'sip-files00138.tif'
dbffeb4337776bd207ef722aa2266239
0ae366cb34398149029fef05b3c6ee60efb4fcea
'2011-10-14T06:47:36-04:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPB' 'sip-files00138.txt'
7b0ba2d72847a7b4d569218f3bf6e5b9
b8927706634fe822e1b2894ce466126900c07e91
describe
'16040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPC' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
3f58f5897d6bdb414a3f2d7f7645c2f7
6ac870426dadcbf7b82646fcdfe750914aeeca35
describe
'465584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPD' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
4185bd9de5b98fc2498b83e071229c6e
db12ae406d654e4bf0fe662d853a7b4aeb519e35
describe
'106817' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPE' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
3790ecdf96a9d31f1d4682995d99b2db
a26f85d265a5bec28f0fbaf5d17f2a0cca31335a
describe
'21344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPF' 'sip-files00139.pro'
8b740c352c63249ca1478ddb46b98f51
0346a9c51c08930e1f5f1946967813c255eef342
describe
'35864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPG' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
356829e7b02897e7d7e1b480b7b06765
397c94c925ad41ddb824ce293178a5e461e8d1af
describe
'3733216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPH' 'sip-files00139.tif'
82abad5453fa78bd2a0423ccd971e964
71ffaafa02a516b93ae961ddecc8e56a01e1b893
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPI' 'sip-files00139.txt'
ea9f28b153bced1fc0e7c179bffc883c
d64b94850142d9f152b34a451fd65775d66234d6
describe
'15261' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPJ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
04d390715de68b408572f523d0dfa381
db25fc06da416615c943eb3eeae14e1e6b924165
describe
'465298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPK' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
5ae276d6c60999f4a0a1d20bfac9236a
f29b79af9975cdd24bc16a2f758c82d2b28ef31e
describe
'167251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPL' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
d09b5fc374864d91a244d22f14918a11
38ec6d91cc60950f37fe13d7dade0b1a27d4464a
describe
'43957' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPM' 'sip-files00140.pro'
b683e7907cad62d431ff826281ed365b
9b09de5a0d66d1aaf5faab25448e1f807ded1ca1
describe
'52260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPN' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
eaf305b9abf4a1d9590b6bcffea2be9b
e7c23b79da070d6137ab14fd3907e8e658fec045
describe
'3731852' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPO' 'sip-files00140.tif'
4c9221f2d85cdfde28c02c8907ced5bb
9e2dccea14bfe8338dc5858f3f9f0776a3a85af3
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPP' 'sip-files00140.txt'
66bbb7125c32dfd425996c96a4439c8a
07c019795279834a84368232462bf6118a8272cd
describe
'19122' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPQ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
420cd476de924bac867acf6bfae9fab4
a89be41a8cacf74dd351d67654eb31a83447f3e7
describe
'465539' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPR' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
5bf520c596dab96959e6bf95fa1ecbd3
da3080cb1791f89cb365329132c486e38caab095
describe
'188730' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPS' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
23f78262c271fc48a3a939359987283b
6676c1dd992aa90cbb6b472b755e7cefbfa82cf8
describe
'52713' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPT' 'sip-files00141.pro'
c111ab7097c757fcd729a86e4172c839
ce9d88589a1c131d6e554e44a1d5e90ce8f216ee
describe
'58162' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPU' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
cd065e9ed367627a77404e641df2375b
e35ff2af713b8d9638edf529e0536df4545e3db1
describe
'3734192' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPV' 'sip-files00141.tif'
d2d0451c52467ca285c206df9b0599f3
5beb5b17862616025dce4b53c4543d541c87918b
describe
'2096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPW' 'sip-files00141.txt'
8622c1b3b8979f33ac0ccff54ac08e61
fd633c51cf6d0170264093d5baf429d7df809adc
describe
'19740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPX' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
5f55abd51ac39842b126161678651da3
ec52a71bef81d962eba97c748d5eedd2ec7a605d
describe
'465254' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPY' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
7610ab5158deb109811890aab993adb6
41356c541ec53d85195091cfd9cd6cee93ad8afa
describe
'179994' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADPZ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
f456a2770ce2118a21f79e5ded5167f4
37a91728236e3989320e09016ad3a2468ced5908
describe
'50315' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQA' 'sip-files00142.pro'
61b55a30af6c1cef69f217b9dc7bdb82
d0f5bb7c6e62d23c225dfeb6390f3c4b4e9916d2
describe
'56600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQB' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
e8305b10483b9bc8898b4b4aa45a70b3
2368d8e2e7d50570518cea6ede0fcb7b380fbe2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQC' 'sip-files00142.tif'
f96a6a5d44ee8a46a7565e15de69a7e9
7ca1c181c3e51bb8f14f99584efdbdea4cfdcffe
describe
'1974' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQD' 'sip-files00142.txt'
f48453b951485456f1ae72b35e7e6de3
b781822087bef79fa1ea942beac29a25994f0282
describe
'19546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQE' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
0572fd688586114c0ebc8c39142201b6
d5d8d83851ada9c1a17efe2c4602b12cd44a6017
describe
'465364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQF' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
a1646b8b7160aadc90d4f991590fa98f
eef62ca34e0c2482f13754d24ce049f38e2e2f82
describe
'158551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQG' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
24ad17c25d22edb3dc5d0d81266e0cc2
320bc6f466fc685b4c4ac247b1e4f9f9548f15d0
describe
'41021' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQH' 'sip-files00143.pro'
73b75287f8acf781276c7461197eb476
219124b383bff230c107005bd98b5d0ebdf6cbe7
describe
'51206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQI' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
d3ecbb7d32888895aa870411aea09847
25997c52f086cef5a0245d9e60c31d34f3513161
describe
'3733760' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQJ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
a4b5cb2b7063478a15a800de443d2b69
3037c011963b2a9c8c01a887b7628a5313815b8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQK' 'sip-files00143.txt'
7f45eb182d4473c976f5505a67aa4be3
bab6104ef9e2445470ac5b4294a0a2fac762552e
describe
'18310' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQL' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
033755e22a582f3766c788695141554e
e1f918326c7c093af4413cdcb4ca5046f19cd2c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQM' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
3707f560cf8a62b35c734dc508ddbe66
4e8aee0e21a84e154cfbe389c6e288d1779561f9
describe
'144244' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQN' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
5bb25803a13e20a9a858f16e36edd115
ae0a9752b76f4e85f4390ef04b66df4449b27cb7
describe
'27525' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQO' 'sip-files00144.pro'
44726991a2f74a93e55a1de68d8d24b7
3f1b36b695d478e292a37347648d64ec310bf158
describe
'43087' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQP' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
2d969d381b107409fbaef1b6153a44e0
8db6e2a01357ca63acd51cba044fa16636abe5d8
describe
'3731108' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQQ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
e089cfb864dc2ee8b749aee9c8d5b9b7
a4d802d1cf1c680e2dfbd697280f570e8707a337
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQR' 'sip-files00144.txt'
cfba7ba89d0c3700098feee65fff89fd
c1e7937e6b5e3fffa050c17a40c933684cb328d1
describe
Invalid character
'16481' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQS' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
46e7c9a8f1e82017624e585f2498f14f
d19d1e43b2ecd1c7651861c6935737e210c59006
describe
'457246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQT' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
dfdfd78601c9c0835400f578834f782e
4db90ea543c479cef7e40a76962bd8c2b81f6f58
describe
'175882' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQU' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
93d20f38c836ea004e1772d65e1d0426
3c61613c8409a6a8b6134f5554088f98c54d7441
describe
'47171' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQV' 'sip-files00145.pro'
84a3207371063aad515ddcce4a50b126
24023c385468520a96f6fa9472fad2b0cc2be6e5
describe
'54425' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQW' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
d416bbceda1b4c0f0dbfc94a4326eb75
7e221b6d723fbaf0aa2e75d8557766409e4a17a8
describe
'3667912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQX' 'sip-files00145.tif'
e9285eb7be6b50546985da55c5d49838
b8de55b2410e9449ceb46b4b4fc33a6df60f3d3e
describe
'1896' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQY' 'sip-files00145.txt'
1138560b6e460ba0d9d198f141b2a089
80da90257dbb86bba711ab969156b5b961fc7ed3
describe
'19332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADQZ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
c533a6589fb13f4621692d8c32619c97
59b426b6a1c275fd10d394957b579c60f7083b96
describe
'465186' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRA' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
929343c5a0faf36ce3ca2b163aab7fff
b2d646118c46e0a1a6aaaa292a1279672e80b3a6
describe
'123541' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRB' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
f3ce7990010ebce532467873282110e3
69f4b6cb9ba6a755dee5ae30ff9842730a7a7cbf
describe
'23655' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRC' 'sip-files00146.pro'
bbd2bcaae26528b2b7ad509c6ab32109
6cbf536dd6ddcaae6c893c3fa16dc09e99cdb2dd
describe
'38505' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRD' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
341c7220c4ff42cb896763f0e84687b7
c5e7f4b91bd41fc8487b98ef1658fbdc5a96dbec
describe
'3730792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRE' 'sip-files00146.tif'
2c88ff9f2e867a10bcf9a31e27e3d099
efae2254b82fda1d5e8919f84e6ab2dd12620473
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRF' 'sip-files00146.txt'
69cbd0d46b7430057d6fc1a8b6d74222
7eec0e4becc8e96ca062df997cf932ad72f8ed61
describe
'15032' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRG' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
7c067132f1e8ac4d0dec7269b679e66e
a301b4bbf718175c1f3ee8c72cb4e225949c527e
describe
'459110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRH' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
7cd747abb033e5ac717d1757dfffe74c
f345d19b26ef939f76063487aadde4217facbc9d
describe
'179438' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRI' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
695858f72ab1c5323fc69983570b99fd
04b3224d1edfee295b01933badd1e04ce9876f37
describe
'49179' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRJ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
e46b5aeaacc4addda8be7486f886f0a2
1b0e59e0429cc8ae8482af3eb979fcf93451f1b2
describe
'3683424' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRK' 'sip-files00147.tif'
b5ac94daf89123f2ba13d2e76fd46879
11e95a85a29fbbc272a35f54ea57e7f2f36fcd00
describe
'19096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRL' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
8b783fe7c1b4cdd49fc63035a63c2d99
228c6d007d2be5f32e581f502bd9fcbe584a1965
describe
'467037' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRM' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
2e2a298d8116807874cb2c969681676a
aef0fc3eb6a39baff7cdc1e9b0879f9743c84cb5
describe
'192450' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRN' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
019d1faaaadc3ddf8e5098c1827a1ee2
97a307d1f893a4e1eac6dcea56bf7dbc1477820c
describe
'4387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRO' 'sip-files00148.pro'
6eb2870ff5b41861d06257e9fc1e29cb
d84abeb244724a8d0f1f69f4be923dc30a8ef186
describe
'57651' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRP' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
bdd700732f2e1a78427e225c5ff2cc6a
b6804bed1ac73d2e6fdac96419d4048b5dd5304a
describe
'3748348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRQ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
367f71f21d0e2e968a513c875bb621a7
e3a47f31555e11c36272cd4a8b11f4904860e563
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRR' 'sip-files00148.txt'
bccca8a73e86dd66bb79b64026300904
146180c8bac37aafed12be56a458480e125d40a6
describe
Invalid character
'22298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRS' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
bdeee1ee3cad7d61a0067ea2fe1747ea
74a26b6358b78540edd846aee858c1201dc44df1
describe
'456968' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRT' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
d3988c93cc1a7318df503c05d30963de
5f415b8f769cae0839a8d2cb6d01291620c43407
describe
'119180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRU' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
733449976636607909c3f698f86b689b
f85c3e344ec1ca57082b0a7012ffbc529aaa99d9
describe
'25594' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRV' 'sip-files00149.pro'
08a4c1fd511447e8264ef3190755c37b
4e4085a6f1250bb7945119a6d464f16f1b80fc3d
describe
'39791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRW' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
78955616b4adacd13395e4686af2fcd2
3d1af211bd857dfcf0cea8e11920ea3dd0c7ab4a
describe
'3664720' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRX' 'sip-files00149.tif'
4ba3e2d31d9cc86e8881c7de3a982241
f5d677711bf4361ad2b301942491605854f6f591
'2011-10-14T06:46:53-04:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRY' 'sip-files00149.txt'
aec11aa0dbe174f34411ff6165afe083
1296c4edb562235d5473c57fe0260b451fa1526d
describe
'16388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADRZ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
55e67602895679c01a7a6d283221854c
5ce04aab6563114566be5810692e7a50f558d8c8
describe
'465592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSA' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
87a941cf210213b160536f9257a72209
66ce8b85f9a731d17fd8fbeb80124af9040ac270
describe
'159912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSB' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
9b90517618c3368306b4a25304438eb1
be95cb3f458bdbad883a0ec45cbbcd600b17acc1
describe
'42936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSC' 'sip-files00150.pro'
370aa69e89da9bb0d96d3d59e89f482f
cc7890af2a96ac7cc9c7c0a8d676644fcdd890bd
describe
'50917' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSD' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
5645e7ccb179b32dc7b6d2207da678b8
6569840bf533b7e25dceb2ad6a8510167c164e07
describe
'3733856' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSE' 'sip-files00150.tif'
a1dc88dccd077d34dc0832ea152ac6bd
5c92f14f18f5f5db251c0dcf6f972adedf56d08d
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSF' 'sip-files00150.txt'
768c999acab400b1fb0683449edcc865
62d9ac3cc0f870952f9dd04e08788b9657009371
describe
'17872' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSG' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
dd73ae75fbf2a0867bf043cb112f5555
46b0b70f57732bf2244b3a8295ee239f03713b84
describe
'465558' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSH' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
433cda751b7318317493967d3896b012
324fcf518047034fef3aac117dde4a5ed05b6c26
describe
'185113' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSI' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
a11046ede33e5e92dc16999903283863
8a1ebdfc163a3fd4ea5b02fd61f59ee83d534cf1
describe
'51409' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSJ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f0d1e74e752547db8be0269ffd3bca2d
05b49b4a385a36e258347f7657db01b8157b4e78
describe
'56616' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSK' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
737738f240e0018d211b72f5735a1dfa
9813cbabb1575664c95b95b4596a8a8493675341
describe
'3734020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSL' 'sip-files00151.tif'
7961f18edb47f2f07f6912f869cb52a3
70d4594ad528254eb842d916f9d99f37634d0e47
describe
'2017' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSM' 'sip-files00151.txt'
cd1d9cfb514bf4c62651df3e25b3c154
9c0d8192373be8520c7db1852ae86c1c5da573b9
describe
'18971' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSN' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
a409c97995bcb55576383185cf6397ce
52a0cd879fd76ba47d4ee9a2baa591f274bae879
describe
'465276' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSO' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
894316e0c8681d917df1f25cc7f92570
0b7ae5df0ededce063ddef81bfafdb12ea7c6e6a
describe
'118228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSP' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
59c4ffd33693448fb3123a03f338cbaf
024d16b048b54d6cec9601bca64c38e6a6f542f6
describe
'26324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSQ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
c851fe8f5de0f34e86e2248df5996032
ced7cf518f3d25757dd9d79f0b6fd3f9111bfb7b
describe
'39478' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSR' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
4900b04c9365e0a6df3cf29f86d9c71f
fd628ece69e304bda723cec6cc432f8b111a85e0
describe
'3731008' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSS' 'sip-files00152.tif'
9a0385bb67d68157c24cbb145988406a
925f7e34b1af4e90230ce201727838dd965e093e
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADST' 'sip-files00152.txt'
1dcae6b18cd30146d99339eeb6b9b0ad
dce9180205705819be92e3439d483bc42df12ccb
describe
'15731' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSU' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
b81766b12802d5bc93892ad5c8518744
3ff20ded5ca53b0b3ade24a79d968fe173963b8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSV' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
56bad6ea24b13a0c15e0ac82e11ee1d5
0d41c954b05754fb2ce553f502106f8f2bd33d4d
describe
'155584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSW' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
8f569753ca0af62e2f93bd6f30ee0e73
e4e85a5c553ba4b7bb0f454788dd48047f77c6b1
describe
'39064' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSX' 'sip-files00153.pro'
5054165e0aab9e6be8b3b23a7beda3ca
2bc995d44aaa2a033079670eb29d1ede2521ffef
describe
'50830' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSY' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
9c6f9ae31c8d1a58aef4a2a6ef629dda
ce8d6ce40f7d456446d78d1064fe8e29ded353ac
describe
'3665224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADSZ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
0c1497674a1bca7b7a30cdb00fd9f9f3
0d27cba1fb497c59a9e14bdd185c2055d99a7c5e
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTA' 'sip-files00153.txt'
6e418cf72189646a7bd9691517ee7e5d
941a0f99efbecbefa4c6e5067e9388d0c07b353b
describe
Invalid character
'18540' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTB' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
ccbd894d0f917641d4f547820f008eec
860619b81fe376056949c0b83216b4ed77732fa1
describe
'465579' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTC' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
c6ae7a6ab958b061dde21e5f2e93bf5a
3117c201cf100353391c9af0b9c9bb2e0110e02b
describe
'167983' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTD' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
852602a5422a4a6288d05d8b2a567826
534bdae7aeb2e8281531a620529cf51825022f4a
describe
'45252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTE' 'sip-files00154.pro'
d8581c8e824947e0a856822b076983a0
05f7aab879b590f1d02d2b9722b25b02d668f647
describe
'54532' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTF' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
9b4c445258b1e4916d7e6b5f9b100513
338ae13f9ac33a79cb1e9c4edc1da41679a1c48c
describe
'3734220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTG' 'sip-files00154.tif'
93792deaed13181a7d76fae1d7bebe75
fa5098c82f628246ffa325146cfdae488e6c901f
describe
'1795' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTH' 'sip-files00154.txt'
4f42cccdcab91aed7b3bda0756cdc00a
e82cb20db7eda7b2630f818c82eca03b35ea8948
describe
'19636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTI' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
3589bfcd30d84c185482ad3b8c4f8639
871bbc9158e4c8dcc9cd24f406e0234839f48623
describe
'450146' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTJ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
054b783f18f90bd456eb6a041e9d9461
9736f977b85a08f9ffd3576378af525cda1ffecd
describe
'139109' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTK' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
c8d3744b91a63fd852957bc11e76b515
ba53b31fb8b39beb0e158b8eb377b9766d5bcf23
'2011-10-14T06:47:23-04:00'
describe
'31375' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTL' 'sip-files00155.pro'
8299a44789ed9e41135d1e913d92864d
81d00dabc9e25d336c25da9f50cf2decdfb2e301
describe
'43645' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTM' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
c7c0fe6b2d3ea964b6953a9ee921c7e7
66efc05ebc7a000eb1e9977b605978179f47e6dd
describe
'3609800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTN' 'sip-files00155.tif'
140df67e69002b33ecf06c39c270a343
84cc004f5c8809355c15081c67edd28e3f8f9731
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTO' 'sip-files00155.txt'
433e0af2e12f875b16e6e8cd95c98969
40896b5628efc9c042df9ac25817be350f2aa629
describe
Invalid character
'16526' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTP' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
3984c4a894c235a493d645dd986b4d18
fc3d4384cd1530182ad80bb23fd209cf3ca6663c
describe
'453271' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTQ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
78fa1b9474031e81d2889f1fc743a08e
bd20d08ac00be90649d1ad092e5b807c50dc6097
describe
'180253' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTR' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
229c81e4e0abb39dfb4c8d314ccaab90
248b569b9ba7f76a4aab56661179908d164a2cdc
describe
'46565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTS' 'sip-files00156.pro'
6f2634251792667bf0936d03d00ba9f0
79bedd7b4476c4d116f48b9af01fc5811718d70b
describe
'57358' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTT' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
75183cd058d051d56226d92d61b9b260
3dd392a03ef6f640783b94ad6cc731380accb0fd
describe
'3635832' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTU' 'sip-files00156.tif'
ed0232e5650b893567ff341d9b576904
cc5df2c287ef856dca27ec3c07bcceba88bab63c
describe
'1863' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTV' 'sip-files00156.txt'
cca622ce06423d73159a0de0baff70d4
8bd09bb6050fa2e2055b38223089f1df07212bdd
describe
'19328' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTW' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
336bbac10b2bf0d48eb917a264733961
3f6b53b235fcff19ae45aaa09f8c0918eb5ad86d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTX' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
96bd814975aa7f09236dbce41648b8cb
80db3c71158c8ffa05b391bb3230175c2c5dbc30
describe
'139024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTY' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
a5c50476dddc850d50e43c4a205d8a46
5465b5f1179ac03fe2c059fe7114f58feb34cf4a
describe
'10037' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADTZ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
3b14dedebc56ff15e2ee3bc3bf2d6668
87d245d0f5eef260f59c450ca813ae5e15d9133e
describe
'39862' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUA' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
a4f228fdd138ccf3a5865e592f8ae8b5
e6c756b4fb77f64b082ec839c5f47d3282da381a
describe
'3733696' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUB' 'sip-files00157.tif'
d51e4be1d333a64971162ce2e2263db0
13916a55b1e392828f16e3988557839518c1dbbf
describe
'419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUC' 'sip-files00157.txt'
910f04d30859ed7899a68f4471982117
30956045ec061d95aac6a0d27b5be06e2256840e
describe
'16598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUD' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
7a641d7f8591d4cedd2a29264184cddf
39a7e2e5aae8cb5321e160bdc05312f362af6f90
describe
'465287' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUE' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
cd20a22b04329bf60fd9aba38c920680
9a01417bd59d411b6fd1ff98a8180937995045f9
describe
'102914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUF' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
a9876cbfb5530f1a5724a3e184accbb6
e99db0eecae8e9d36aeb07c7e774b105d3a91958
describe
'16140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUG' 'sip-files00158.pro'
427daea26ba6eab7eb00f110ae84b1ce
79db250136fb972f80ca72000a6c1662249bd89d
describe
'33246' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUH' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
6cd715d6ba6efbdcb36b5bf89c217083
33864570cf90247e1a15a23286e5e5c0ac24a2c9
describe
'3730636' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUI' 'sip-files00158.tif'
d37b0c363b40e1b9674fc61ece5d9057
1f1d3c2f194f5267d7859c84cc94e0006ec6d2f0
describe
'795' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUJ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
ef4d77c33d4b87fc3b8bbffbf5179df9
77f4614c1d0a91e99e0312eaac0b126a2038a965
describe
'14855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUK' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
f72f3d9719647051a39eb8cf3d20f7d0
fc69d8a999687298bf8491a7df03b434ad6902e2
describe
'462106' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUL' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
a04111cb25194d5ef7cdf81b2ea7f9ee
e99b249d5aa57069c0a8e6207cd45ce25601235a
describe
'145068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUM' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
877f697c61848d4539567c7483033b74
921176d4d7c0d8d08088962cb4bd5497400509c9
describe
'38544' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUN' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
579d3f78919b5b0ce957b50a112b2145
6ad5e8763d23ffea210f166b6e9d554b63028354
describe
'11101040' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUO' 'sip-files00159.tif'
b5cf5dd9d91318b7d4991bde67928024
a0bc9ae416137451c7230ab3fcda21a5d2e2b18d
describe
'17558' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUP' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
4036aead7ecefe0cc5c9b3215036e397
de9373d41730cdd82495680dfc8ded1808f2c89c
describe
'465549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUQ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
eefaf1daa9926041cec854ae2a0d92f2
d99c7ebf7856cc906228613c829e21e90b0ee888
describe
'20843' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUR' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
1b79b094bf3b602b0fc8ccd4eea24b7f
ed8a8bc3e36b908984fa889cf38b63a35caba5b4
describe
'9712' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUS' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
4d76e7cee47ddb16a97036de70a9740f
eb1372470d8c59058abb21ba34cc6c3f0244d2a3
describe
'3731144' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUT' 'sip-files00160.tif'
71dc650f65cd835a633d924feb6dc28a
e884fac4738595b51c27693490c381393e459b6f
describe
'7709' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUU' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
944a8eb9a975cd6eef7a8ff05b193562
a78788de26e9cc50c49543af814520d9d9d9be26
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUV' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
20ed0fc46f5121103213f627a110a063
4f3789df9ad72b29c9074d5e2c91b8454d462b81
describe
'137598' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUW' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
561536dddbf43f1190814f1f6c9a73cf
fa64f3bb69c0adddfed90210961e0ef9da2e872a
describe
'32691' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUX' 'sip-files00161.pro'
a3d7c58980b97674fb39bde18c964e8b
1970e91a29dc95896db8daff94f4fc8a3b5a79d0
describe
'45180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUY' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
7e567b3f7af29052e7bafcb14be8ae84
4291c1f370c3bc381531920e432f8736b3599171
describe
'3733620' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADUZ' 'sip-files00161.tif'
4f9b2614ea49008ccff8e123e36218ed
35df585deb5379584229da46157b4649e1db8afc
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVA' 'sip-files00161.txt'
4d200cbabda635b36575d287c227d2f6
6740ea5096f570606691cc1356c7c8a9e2731e54
describe
'16933' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVB' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
6e1cbdf0260b2eecb88430e68f17a896
52d04030c775929d0c3eea79ceb0782b0b4dfb4f
describe
'465202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVC' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
939a19cc4c1581ccecfa19b3833d8a59
f6529e95e6fa337016500d6971a952d9998bbe52
describe
'153800' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVD' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
a61798ec8efbb56b948835619024e521
001dadc3cd4a56d4a910967eab7351f004390ed2
describe
'39056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVE' 'sip-files00162.pro'
82a922e86327e84d849632967f6f78df
1157e355a27cbf1b1628998f1fd0d0508f55976b
describe
'49377' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVF' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
094da1fca229ab98d69c80f21f153149
ac1a994f9427c19d1ab67a34693b7f9f0ef25bc6
describe
'3731596' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVG' 'sip-files00162.tif'
5dc2b6ed0b7e0fd5f07cf7a017fa10f8
7b5860be34f02c295950250b34651324c0cc5eb4
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVH' 'sip-files00162.txt'
109e4d483d763c498c5d8d8687465c1e
b08bda82e86b56d8246cf146f0ba77e7d5f5d5c9
describe
'18141' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVI' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
3e1ef45cc39f3102071a8b458518bde3
780f3efade05a0842661698fbfa69d584b50df35
describe
'465294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVJ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
f8916bce77821613738187d4eaf9e5e6
715ff6eec07b2c4651e2a43ab07d44aa6f6c1fef
describe
'145467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVK' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
11ad6557397ac1f308801e7c421684cf
94480dd2e0941b100282d7623d53caddb2ebe197
describe
'37202' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVL' 'sip-files00163.pro'
15d74487a71d4f15fb8cfeaf6e493445
86d0fdc36e9acd70dffe633f990b596bdb87b1f8
describe
'47090' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVM' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
59d02490d3c0c82495d0d30a2bed8996
86004fa944a67646ee9b2938948f42f622a63df5
describe
'3731392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVN' 'sip-files00163.tif'
32212c8ec451f8af99528511fe462397
684ca7b97f8c2b1182703278a90f436261a9aa3f
'2011-10-14T06:48:12-04:00'
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVO' 'sip-files00163.txt'
47dc99908045d8adf4cb89896a8d94f5
0e82b348d59af31965663bd91d242e052837756c
describe
'17876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVP' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
2e1496939b939799649db33f9df6bf15
522a123f0bbc7fc7d536ca773f753abe7398b478
describe
'458398' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVQ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
e61dd0978cdb397de355ed46bcea2f0f
6d9caf60b73009e46cc21662d6308486bd260dc0
describe
'121502' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVR' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
20bfaf28cccd6925d7296ffae00dfce8
0a9bfe20d2bbd86155cfe1863606cf0ffa1e63e0
describe
'23836' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVS' 'sip-files00164.pro'
8b1b20064ea0ddc1d0b2b3690ec7d458
6e1d65e8eaf828912cc2f433d95e2adc3c2c7d1c
describe
'39340' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVT' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
8cdb827744d003d0e7baf4c14fb25345
a82f4fd0efe633c68fb700abc9e70e39ebec82a0
describe
'3676056' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVU' 'sip-files00164.tif'
5176001786b091b998c4f246c8192d68
61cbc13c3690c0e1b02ce47fde3bc868798d6b18
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVV' 'sip-files00164.txt'
7d71eb2757a9abb95863374d5b456548
179f2ad142dcd58077c328f748b609e006ad547e
describe
'15639' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVW' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
048b7ee7432135b102b6beb5531c61e4
5746d934fb090571e570d5fe01311c0e577d236e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVX' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
0dd8fdd28d5175c18378912f8cf6c732
503c8a7a79229a143f70aab695ecdd694cb0f66a
describe
'178507' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVY' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
b9068df7e08789dc7c87a45f7a1252b6
44d8e6c9d8327d39b796729d2f4ea51216ced7fb
describe
'519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADVZ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
a1ad1592784bd8709c001a82f689b56e
31202f027cc6ce04842115b853153c94bd86b250
describe
'57661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWA' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
dde408db8437d913d937fe083870f453
73ce5ac6b96e2c3941aa0923132c438062f8f48d
describe
'3733600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWB' 'sip-files00165.tif'
c7ef697283ee8478c53072cdaab3afa6
d91d7ed13782b83579930c8946dac4e769846552
describe
'57' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWC' 'sip-files00165.txt'
6f2cfec72502f466eb69e935ea69632d
4acca9d260b7fd0a741e22b91a4aaf393037a5ee
describe
Invalid character
'23571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWD' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
870976c2b2a71162fa0705ba787f0b65
8db3cffa6424113892413c7ac80cfa67f516ada8
describe
'471216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWE' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
04735ac7c27d5bba8a84062aa66a7e37
b7df750847378f00db2980d6bf0205c13d981c0b
describe
'171388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWF' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
0fb9926ed005460bbe945ab05d4def13
7578b972cafdd5b8df73f3fd4cf8146c0c4e5e79
describe
'47044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWG' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
fa5b519f24b6a972e95341beebf241b0
eb18917dbf6cd5698471f1fa98c2947bf4e9acb5
describe
'3779320' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWH' 'sip-files00166.tif'
9a195118f01461190f4997c34c841fff
e70c2a08775018bb6c40d71bfd1aca4b3fcc4f98
describe
'18568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWI' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
00d0dab9c6d12a65818d21dccb6e7ed4
dfec9e7f7d17c2c2cfa68550ea7df6819c8a4d08
describe
'465515' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWJ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
6147fbb6fe29df903401007039185a0e
ae138c08c415b8dc74529be2378b5671a01567c3
describe
'162590' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWK' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
9281e9d38f92171c99df9cd0db1cf584
bbd306c4b7fefe061f1f296ea6a93facb6f436a1
describe
'42671' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWL' 'sip-files00167.pro'
abdc0c526a765056cfdd61600830cfd8
a54f4393006cd58638885d74e92353c096113a05
describe
'49894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWM' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
4295d4b2a4c0ae75c1e8b033090d13a3
cfc4e4381db988569929fd90a01f3a56e1fdd754
describe
'3733664' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWN' 'sip-files00167.tif'
330ab85cee9c8a5dacb63b0abc655c7a
d3f62f170d721809d353976044a81fc169b8b688
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWO' 'sip-files00167.txt'
44114b8d8907f7ffce3108af7b4b17a6
0c169a80e3586b4dfcc4cb5c4dbfd03b67811b8b
describe
'17682' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWP' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
1422e19c397239b24466f9f97b099f44
d998f91448dcf148b344226c60788e3e875f8b10
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWQ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
d21f40fd30bbebf556cac9e44c2e64b8
52e28cae1480f9b439334df8dd16bad23d29c8d0
describe
'115922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWR' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
e4f403c45cde00428e99c00f3d5bb712
2308547a46ffe7bfc73717b42a97d30bd7bac377
describe
'26154' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWS' 'sip-files00168.pro'
41d0be51be908ed4045dbb797153eec0
ebffdd68015261d6b70e99adfe8e6f735b69d965
describe
'38189' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWT' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
57a2586e90ca8e8f38f06a1701c16016
86da9c618438814b723cc0a6b16e77044800e7f1
describe
'3730916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWU' 'sip-files00168.tif'
6b21de861bb23a751a974ce80cef7643
8e289b131bca6236d192afc0fc66fcc247f9d39c
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWV' 'sip-files00168.txt'
f29481879645c71c9764edd1cde02fad
fe26fe9f6bd6773de89ee392e10c2c1c98b55bb4
describe
'15364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWW' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
3579ad0fdd708643b6502223f2fe09c3
2bc9d800da9afdcf3bff140000d4aee1315c936c
describe
'452680' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWX' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
fb9e1a700572aebffb2a4bdd54fc93e3
cd636311c3135dba5fb96b52ddcf4bfd2285a891
describe
'176029' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWY' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
8827a392bff93b93489d5c7aa1d0a4e0
9a7801fdf5406783fd2dc002c4a2fd4aaa2a74da
describe
'45927' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADWZ' 'sip-files00169.pro'
a537619febf3a7057acff9bb481b196f
0deaf6385f3e32df2210c5a5b831185137884d5d
describe
'55792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXA' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
739744aa8c508c93ded2ef1973987dd8
1796dd057f327f8dc8ea5bc3954af3d07eb4fb4e
describe
'3631224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXB' 'sip-files00169.tif'
370d850585eb7e17c8e79338a6266ab1
ceb2b5d1348eb93753c449de350a12ac4bb11bb9
describe
'1821' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXC' 'sip-files00169.txt'
170e39ff5b15ab2c2b9aeb946b6707f7
d8fc5c06340e35c3e3b1debb06f9f94b1ff711bf
describe
'19679' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXD' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
984204e6eda6036eb895d19e7a25ad4d
0611ddc43505fb32249efce7123ec70780de7f4d
describe
'456715' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXE' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
9d63aafc7cb6ac7f81ea773892cf2988
b5fb784944150649b47a675ff4a3ba3740ff1434
describe
'199459' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXF' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
9c69b1ca4bf2603d48a1a145e70eccbd
51b9c51d8c90a7b094d9c4bc63c366713389ee6d
describe
'55196' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXG' 'sip-files00170.pro'
34b5f5de426afa75ef894bd77eef66c1
625e2fbdc48c752b3c7b784de327084a68edac0b
describe
'62251' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXH' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
41288efe04c20578c5d6a16d271879c2
e10553177fab8baac38b5e59712ff6f14aeb0350
describe
'3663584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXI' 'sip-files00170.tif'
bad0b35623e9d8689c76311f84ed17db
5d98141e20cea25032212a5bb1c9bbd17ae94fd9
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXJ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
6e01e0ec4e2488ee306cb14b05f65cbd
38cbc5d445d468c79aa1de7bf545ae0d1dd9c97c
describe
'20661' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXK' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
ed7258e7782e4211710d36c63605ef69
57d0c5fcf0a3bdbfc6839809fa8b0a6d718c1f6f
describe
'452656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXL' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
bb8add8e96fbf45dcdc7408e4a03803c
62415c085d9e4bd9a80876084fd7b87233521ed1
describe
'126889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXM' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
403dafac63e943eb3e8430800f79b51d
6aad577f6345580afc758fb924b5f0ebd36689c2
describe
'29642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXN' 'sip-files00171.pro'
6740e76d54f5eacd0ada187549d9560a
124dfc2dfcba7dc1de84b8e21c2717dd4b7fcda0
describe
'41889' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXO' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
213eb3ab4846176276bcaf5d65f520c7
91a113b4f4b07b51016d974e2f552025856c599c
describe
'3630536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXP' 'sip-files00171.tif'
28725f5c50fdc29d4e1130e01bbffe2b
6ba685392053841dfafedbacdc2e8a312182d55f
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXQ' 'sip-files00171.txt'
1a511218b2e1eb7336da70930e2b0841
5115b46da860948a0d07ea38ac5206fb33c2c341
describe
'16627' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXR' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
2085a0c9102633c78ae8f90ed3dad6f9
9cf9bf46f5928601b3103e65423d8d5addbc1208
describe
'465281' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXS' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
b5a9bae9c770169d658be28565c70f5b
8af6b6d603a8eea5220c379ced14ec0a8e10c596
describe
'88647' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXT' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
d89d01359e6259bc75fb75127ea511f1
35df47a33e0c2c3dbdc70a5ab40b6a7063b276e5
describe
'13954' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXU' 'sip-files00172.pro'
33a3efbc4484f2a11529b522287856b3
22ac315965e0783acc38d550d491633a8e52052e
describe
'28483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXV' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
6c594e19579dc600d9a61a3e0d993e35
6c889366139af99d31f55ba7976ee94d576f0433
describe
'3730228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXW' 'sip-files00172.tif'
8b8a0f9fdbcf71ebc0725a0a0a17590f
2a51d63a729da9158f1b67b95d6ab81311daac9f
describe
'586' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXX' 'sip-files00172.txt'
3f13876291c4035af7c825c3eedb1e47
5fcbcdb6faddafaaf33a5b4d0311b1867035d606
describe
'13163' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXY' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
4a36fe169bf3601fa461d108652f8d77
9ab362d4b08a0e29deb30829eb40ad63935dd588
describe
'471792' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADXZ' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
7bec5add1485c8ef9cc76b7113e29472
9911b243a6ec8270f2892d1243f9381ef57d36d1
describe
'70446' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYA' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
246836de7b113627cc5c12a6c3d9724c
ef6ba44cfb88624bac24cff7cda1225427055a60
describe
'23188' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYB' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
0b11f8755484fbe316f8957ac785747a
df61367b8f5e4c4443bd12a6fd205d2d137082a0
describe
'3783020' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYC' 'sip-files00173.tif'
1a79a225090d12fec68d649cc0b62964
a0a17c7c846c55407ff3a34e3f75f8e3d615b3d8
describe
'12482' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYD' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
31adda5e872aa87515c4591beaeed018
6ab6de8f3f6d4b3cdeb7df845b94a05725b1dee6
describe
'465216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYE' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
b287f8396a419ccf88ebf076eebd020e
b573e37c50c35f3dfb6eea64797fb9372f9052b2
describe
'142324' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYF' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
68d0f31f205a04dc39f71232a9b0a223
46a486acd487e8ae42b31a34d2df13378c67a949
describe
'43592' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYG' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
7b266e79678f9ed3680a8a15d3116fae
4069e299d15d435dfd86df31da89a5a34925706a
describe
'3732024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYH' 'sip-files00174.tif'
13cd721f14a012dba2046c5c1da2d7af
bf4c3db8aa349a2d7926d065af1dc53a13613f1c
describe
'18387' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYI' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
28fffdba9505e58ba9c52902ebd8f734
d5ef94bc69b76bf3272d98a298e7929ff56d167d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYJ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
eff96e4aeecc0a7cbcf3d0554e4c6f6c
0c3259e988bbacae192db3c39f490f70e9ba5e5d
describe
'88854' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYK' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
d4ad45be8a943342f82b98672ca0cb68
8f1017114355fa3b4af649d7d9947aaf78477b1e
describe
'16216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYL' 'sip-files00175.pro'
7acea023a9b0c6cc4b91d760068301ea
728aed2d36fef33cb0a74cc97d3a7827f85a10e2
describe
'29405' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYM' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
1b0e37e6c15b5450e043dc571da26028
83b599e9af191ca44b49a4bbbb5341b6872c94dd
describe
'3730484' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYN' 'sip-files00175.tif'
61914d3fa4875496748cae354b852c09
769702f8a19b7da09d984908c9d35e0ad608dc86
describe
'752' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYO' 'sip-files00175.txt'
cb3661255db5d444b434d72810581e94
8b57a271885adc00cee3f8b689c8fc83165d98c4
describe
'13695' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYP' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
529a8561cf2f426dbf5d335b687dd064
516ce313435e418eebdd6fe40c69e9a546c925c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYQ' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
72daa22808cffa774cb7ccf9a1fc6f9f
80e31fa62c580467752475a2f127bc51490f4445
describe
'164549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYR' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
c3d2edac8c86528382371d19a615513c
45d6c058028b32b5fa1eb1d64c979a7b5549af6f
describe
'45220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYS' 'sip-files00176.pro'
ab01cd7ee8ffe26e5fe608f8134d68d2
fa24dcdae6f248486f6a9d609a3ce9bbfee65c1b
describe
'51571' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYT' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
72abef0c55eab5b1cb893ffa0b322342
bbfc2cc3e6f507f17c64b9d7419ec550eecd0296
describe
'3731820' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYU' 'sip-files00176.tif'
7b505e627159cf751fe5d8d21057b3d3
63a3a29052c8863fa14ce96aef2fd06533b8b090
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYV' 'sip-files00176.txt'
8a675b10721e4228db33674d97f77650
49fc6a35b8a8f6c99e1b89f7e09a30d40000541a
describe
'18886' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYW' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
d3f6502dd6fd788d7c9b56ff4fdb1a51
3f9209e596049df704810ac14de10cfe5900a3a3
describe
'465282' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYX' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
df2bd47e38ab5846be735187558f3ec2
0f13db3f13c43395900d70f4c0ef02422b668cf6
describe
'180228' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYY' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
0330738d0dd2f423c535e1ccd66bcbb2
30ff063ee84504316bb2e34e81d194ced57a886c
describe
'50589' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADYZ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
e51ac49bf1e1798d6c741bfa768ba106
6e6dcec068b57e1f8e2db22ccf4b1d9d7c0db573
describe
'57069' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZA' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
f9130c287f7393e636ba2ee3dd157a07
16bcd1b965c20d34bb41ef280cefb2c1eb46807e
describe
'3731944' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZB' 'sip-files00177.tif'
57f9ceb3a8cd11905c95d0474ded012c
157c75de19c0250f0667f022bb60733e1d4bbd07
'2011-10-14T06:47:47-04:00'
describe
'2044' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZC' 'sip-files00177.txt'
38e227720ffcacc5120a3507135666f4
08fc42e30b955e87155a1be5542be59bccda26f5
describe
'19945' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZD' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
2c213b7bd3674426daa02df2d62b828b
67d7eaff08f1d0483eb27525cf4a82185f6a7eae
describe
'465270' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZE' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
844f2860a99b68f6755500ec637cb0fb
06193ca6ab6e5a319df1c77dae1b1145cc4b06d9
describe
'183894' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZF' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
e028d315115b6b60546646176885f274
21e2a4a8d24e20b35dd3c9121ffc3e4e24298ef4
describe
'53059' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZG' 'sip-files00178.pro'
c3b856e78fd830d0c16dd38816e41069
9d6b0501cb918910402ee113f9ce62d1bfbcd828
describe
'58197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZH' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
acd1d03e3d05b52d71a8e58a5c297a65
9abadb6e553e65d64e7f78b4bf00105cf6fecefa
describe
'3732164' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZI' 'sip-files00178.tif'
3277700016d30e968e75fedfacc36784
ea270b494c875d1c85fd54c6420ee5b63c67a85f
describe
'2110' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZJ' 'sip-files00178.txt'
5aa33eb8b10ead5e6b6ca9e3817d01de
7ab8999fdb4c66c3e18e0b002cba29184e52c08b
describe
'20135' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZK' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
19b849f9f59e48e7c4243563ee3be6b9
1370f229c451540775db36746b6bbe5bbcc9d9ff
describe
'465252' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZL' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
5ec141640c5d34758c0be327899fb4c6
3f490df829cb861e28d84863ccf71e8a84e78b6b
describe
'159683' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZM' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
cbcde6502e344410ad0b9ce4ef748aa7
0ce2261507d152ee3ff4431c3acbb1fe6c4859c7
describe
'18062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZN' 'sip-files00179.pro'
c79ea318fd89405dbc4b437269707996
64ac7c1f4d77dfc521a4eb54ab1224b22c264599
'2011-10-14T06:50:15-04:00'
describe
'46535' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZO' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
c3c7adf905d7b5962927a16335a225d5
1e0d5b85bc91585c4d32ad7ae8837fc8abaee26c
describe
'3731600' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZP' 'sip-files00179.tif'
8c86aff73b317b86aeb4ed81af957124
b083ce951736dc260b915bd58eca0ca88aeabdf2
describe
'737' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZQ' 'sip-files00179.txt'
ebf4157f2289eac0414ceea680dd93e5
b09f09927cd63e7f2efa34c5185ba4c25db24189
describe
'17703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZR' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
84e7b26687c66bd0ed20281f5dd5708e
8894d6c38f6790fb0da138d2a8d741831962d389
describe
'465299' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZS' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
a47fedbfb5c6d99db75c91919f2ba3e5
a7932a880c84c255687b22ad2182330062afac79
describe
'161240' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZT' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
0e32741c2b53d975869560ab27711b98
e1d5f7cfec0184d31a3be46a4f3709454327b053
describe
'42563' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZU' 'sip-files00180.pro'
ce1ca0e5c036868695b88e0a09fb911e
69ed21914887e79fe1c07768d68afc3c7564763e
describe
'51167' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZV' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
040c5f9a3a033b5363a513d815b82553
2c89a9b483d0b7ccb93a2c5adc551c058f874aa8
describe
'3731724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZW' 'sip-files00180.tif'
9f33d277a87694d9491996a55cd2e76d
f742aadd5f9238e7f24050355ccd786247be836b
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZX' 'sip-files00180.txt'
86fe828d557d45959903835b5d9d377b
ab1c1edf6d6a6f34372878737281a3f4f9d058db
describe
'18717' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZY' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
0fb288cd4d6e6059628cb24945d753be
c797a92f146e6464d75a0c0064c5bc7667323273
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAADZZ' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
1469afbef26ffc41c1584b0fcc30f980
07c78fb5fe1926be3c6116466cd07270ed4f9131
describe
'134789' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAA' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
107a2cb5f390217bda5647e4a154e229
57171c276dc3a078a9098ed3a220e735b01c53b5
describe
'36392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAB' 'sip-files00181.pro'
c7343f8a899369d584de0cd599098e96
ece940d9ebb557b338e71c3a0b31b8f63353fc6e
describe
'42699' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAC' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
58ae62e2ff8542ccdd053210f394c8b1
f5827a5573890cddab368b5280bcd76ab59641ef
describe
'3664808' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAD' 'sip-files00181.tif'
fdfee070b1c5b937f6b918eafb41d8cf
0ffd1c26b7e7db7d9e15165ecae5c17dbd4bae39
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAE' 'sip-files00181.txt'
8736952e720820162e700e22008c8b46
ac02705e97922abd5ae4d0595e1e3376d0ca958e
describe
'16549' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAF' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
13deff9fa5dc6f0421ff1c2a97bf6887
d3b4daae2d49a467dc124be3d5e77f9f9f65add5
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAG' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
24c1597e017e649876b43128fc514398
12c3d82d12e619e90d9220d9aa3ebfff8ff02c09
describe
'156142' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAH' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
f016221fcbb65a1d8d114e7a3ef6081b
10d890116cef2d546038f4ec2f739d72fd966a1d
describe
'41827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAI' 'sip-files00182.pro'
53bb57d76c1e465c4fdcc8bd7d853fff
e61dcf3d7bb121cfed486f9cad41367b8ffdd707
describe
'48959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAJ' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
3176bfbbb58ad8078ca0d7e9a26c0558
fac55425c87dab9cbf74d0b6fb0baf851109e545
describe
'3731400' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAK' 'sip-files00182.tif'
f2e8c291ac89cfaefafd061d29cf2b44
6e81c3da5bd2fae1e18b830d04908b02e2bc8c33
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAL' 'sip-files00182.txt'
1bc69270be5e59e0bc6938689b75e16b
a1a1adb4db398c1c77cfd53d8f9f84e7af6fed6f
describe
'17648' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAM' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
bd87c2325736b0b364bdc6582737a266
d6c3b738220ddb12f4ffb5b33be62faf5180d64e
describe
'465296' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAN' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
927c3e5a265269b891560a7956bfaf23
515d5cbbcc448db21e6c465ef483ef38ebe14e29
describe
'170497' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAO' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
873f6d105190ed550b12ab9540c882c5
dd8fd50a6f9a4f9219aebad0f6c4f876094b677a
describe
'48006' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAP' 'sip-files00183.pro'
bffd61e8bbcc61c6437fcb53aec25595
6f4267abedd3a5784fc80c9034301eba450b1728
describe
'53869' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAQ' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
0a19feec9167ce4dea1116d3c223a86c
3ce9dddcd355af6c73a8cce33aa8500c30caa952
describe
'3731704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAR' 'sip-files00183.tif'
4ffee508a7b4dbc9bf313333ab9b6a98
18254e08de5202d337f663a5684359e180067892
describe
'1913' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAS' 'sip-files00183.txt'
21669fc489d984cab0b5bc17ba2b0cd2
e8ad074c02987db4f3da820373064c65a61845a2
describe
'18551' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAT' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
c8a2be1b4f678a88f34e96adae820873
a4a942d20e41bd4fb7002660b3033157529fbc4f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAU' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
8e4be2223207fbc9b492db6fb5cc1b0e
a2da4d5fd578e1cff3f62cefd4a95acc6721b027
describe
'102824' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAV' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
8de7bd35e066f6e248bdce5ce2987a63
78d10f51c308eb2451e1557fa5703e86fb951f90
describe
'21922' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAW' 'sip-files00184.pro'
67e14fc057035c829d3799216eddd8c2
038606ffe5dbc5ecf50891f4a41968693341d46b
describe
'33858' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAX' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
5c9f395cd8b6330b6785752590013e51
6e72091dfcfcc560c6113bfc8eab96da3414d54a
describe
'3730640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAY' 'sip-files00184.tif'
f434ca284c296f3f805a346b129b98ad
5cf51393e5b07eb5f66e22561e3f2f53996672ec
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEAZ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
ab9b7187d6405712a234f2f9571b218c
4e064d72c63647986200eef3c3f8e94855de3908
describe
'14392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBA' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
8b6a49c1218fc1257a44dcdb92e72f9f
db1997969e2512cfa15aeb826023b9b4d55f4cdb
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBB' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
413670339deb5b6958f555965903e0aa
2f9e6717cf4a5ec49da6bb28efa04fd40ce2446d
describe
'140243' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBC' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
2c3e8f94289892df5764768d550140b4
52515a80335382ad3957f8b82883e6b0fd37a486
describe
'35703' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBD' 'sip-files00185.pro'
7c1b8dcc56af84857810ca7dd7b197aa
726e2895b61afbb5f8d205f3d59c4af103ee6d51
describe
'46543' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBE' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
6f677e0ec67da4cadd872190444b2739
ad6dfc929fc93dca7e279b82dfa94d4f828b588b
describe
'3731396' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBF' 'sip-files00185.tif'
84b8df6a5d4142f87538f4d2b34f417c
329c9eaae8de3063fbf28b1cf2b9b1359480f38a
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBG' 'sip-files00185.txt'
aecdcac094e4a0aca992a5c437d0f4a4
30b42010a94be8af67f7b76c91ea620e19e49312
describe
'17555' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBH' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
b3e99d15ad20de8e4b46ed6b59563bb0
ac289bf3efe813b0a8b3e171b1a00ce37c699f55
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBI' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
6979403cf33983da86f91719bb3d82bc
0fc8bff199f067dfc102e2fea55177341cf5a320
describe
'169615' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBJ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
01f00c50d9474b49b913d4544fb6aa74
c26c01de2a2171547a04ccfaaba6be8ff3688d84
describe
'46751' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBK' 'sip-files00186.pro'
1daaed62d07ef7887d595808f751a159
bcedf2b312e1c5885bbddf6b2e3540efdc9fe5fd
describe
'51963' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBL' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
f9bc5a7fb83488dbcdaa8099ab8324ad
620feae023fc824ef9a313f0846aef02f760bc31
'2011-10-14T06:47:09-04:00'
describe
'3731536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBM' 'sip-files00186.tif'
abe3f5862a091ce6f79289ecace44dd0
ff80b56f99bec5d9d26b26978a801439ac986353
describe
'1855' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBN' 'sip-files00186.txt'
9800e339c3b38a99c61db3e88bb8e45f
2bf99468d9225088ade16812f0f354689c5d6421
describe
'18226' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBO' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
9f29084dda6855fa56af884edc26b3b4
5dcb94145f460822d1f3a286be78aa87fec69960
describe
'457946' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBP' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
248e21e1d3f781fa76ce27d069edc5d6
01ab902f1bb3a725a835f32545e0c25107f562e5
describe
'126441' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBQ' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
36a85cbc44fd100da496eb2e34651f89
7db7a8a18c6094b17240dbe71bc284e6d10f832b
describe
'30972' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBR' 'sip-files00187.pro'
c497aa6737808fc593118167e52345de
a3831f28fb1bebaee80b6f0bc718627b75470843
describe
'40711' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBS' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
4e5d15bec726e8b62d3f043445990695
cce58553b13dfa7dad099bb99a73d953bafbf6f1
describe
'3672492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBT' 'sip-files00187.tif'
a3837edf3f7686bcea218762be2d26f4
cc1187bf8f452f9148ebb4b9f50bfa715a939723
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBU' 'sip-files00187.txt'
e06ee5271993bca7723d55f690b0dd5a
db0cee232bf049cda11941ecd92459a95bc266fd
describe
'16083' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBV' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
c111f35569020199c6a0e8af5f01836e
3626e45e359b18506754c060e7c956282e0f5df4
describe
'465123' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBW' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
a0bb8f8e4d487eb6aff209baaf8a59d5
adb73dc65f47af0c18e2584d3d0d325b99144ec1
describe
'122807' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBX' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
d6ccebfb35b64f69e6e5fea86b06385d
428623f4d9e679ebeff0d39055bb3bbb5a4a4247
describe
'30364' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBY' 'sip-files00188.pro'
032bac5808a875e64d22c8e556455d6a
c1eaa402d13eecad569bbd15b0be1a18c6e6e323
describe
'40673' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEBZ' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
918d49f519f3c55fd52bfe8a5894e48d
b8a39e462d4c08098ffd0d3213d3b14504e6ea06
describe
'3730996' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECA' 'sip-files00188.tif'
114c244802cd7ca8d0ad5e4a14c3f740
9027b14fda7017a3391fa5653d5f8461fbb74f3c
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECB' 'sip-files00188.txt'
a68f8bac3c7ea767ae53ae501549dfbe
5bcd4d46d66540b696447eeb46b32178373efca6
describe
'16065' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECC' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
58cee0fc44bae82b1c582065cb8fc588
20857e3d45a948e2406485e2aad6955e377bf005
describe
'465565' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECD' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
92772d9c14841cfe438189e8c5246da7
a8957a74eb93db7c0bc48004ae3faec49359a5ec
describe
'103388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECE' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
c75006fba9a01969c2d7db96f2fe6575
af4d85bf08692ba69110dee36d512a2dfcac22f5
describe
'18729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECF' 'sip-files00189.pro'
5966f3a7339176f46793f9aea1d8a75e
1755a8dca6f2a52d0303187d20b08a83f3a0f7a8
describe
'35735' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECG' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
40a36ffc158b6883e98eeb1987571c06
749fc19316e7bd55f63c2e5b217f3f813a3ef593
describe
'3733220' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECH' 'sip-files00189.tif'
8f994cacc217620e52e79fdceb4ebb5b
810f895c75a81b1819bc8f703fea30a6435f5ce6
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECI' 'sip-files00189.txt'
69a93b32a53dfbd0ef56bab33238ea5b
032c9723bd271d43cb15d0217b36dbef12d22d89
describe
'15068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECJ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
21b4397144c8b4b6144a8a32fab0f3ed
5650e5dc4ade1767c661e8a6e1f05dc3c9326d9e
describe
'465595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECK' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
84af444156198720eaeb1e7b784166b1
c3380bfd0543b9e6eacad594c4d5bb217c54185a
describe
'158084' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECL' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
d67dd2cd8c519e2e4fff3a9deb75be08
ec2c974208114d88d31345db89cdfcaab437de0f
describe
'41249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECM' 'sip-files00190.pro'
5b01978b703dd6c9c23a13bb2bbf83da
e76d3ffc120451023f3a07be999667cc21babbad
describe
'50714' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECN' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
c17ef029537aee3f21b898d40bffc04b
e482b9d49372adb39c209b43bb1e2c8eba019477
describe
'3733908' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECO' 'sip-files00190.tif'
1889a3df671bb6010331f28d258b9aee
bfc688af2f3c9a9eb315f6ddf5145ecd98a9529e
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECP' 'sip-files00190.txt'
e07cb8561f96c0186f151dd76cda7c89
b1f3f303828084e4bd7061d61d80462edbf7bfe4
describe
Invalid character
'18386' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECQ' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
0a384293d084e709fd399408b31f6649
d80a227202d5af01c34bae22507228ee4fb587d2
describe
'465348' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECR' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
0122068e8fe665fd0606abeecde92c81
4f0293d48f55d5932f68724349bc888b7a3b74a5
describe
'158162' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECS' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
73d3212b932d82693d9be254086492bf
4ee58c988210f0314ce5163970855d1768acc04f
describe
'41175' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECT' 'sip-files00191.pro'
c50917f628283455996dfa6cca66a89c
dbf2d775b6f7b8d9d37bc827ec9b858d9ca1774d
describe
'49388' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECU' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
6d40fafd6e25451b991fb0de839f26cd
95c52632cb8a30b6119fdc1a50a94d38de8292aa
describe
'3733656' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECV' 'sip-files00191.tif'
9b35f2d667a58967f0485ebedde2eb30
84d293b9acf45c78008e5788f2d4c83c7bd87103
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECW' 'sip-files00191.txt'
44092f0c3a90a15c248d606aa614ba33
f2281968e97b84dec98a65d7e26eba770e611827
describe
'17857' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECX' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
e5e67106d1e507e1e2f4f511f175dda5
47fedbaaf62ec4bdabcbe19f28babb1b47e8649f
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECY' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
8380c3c9b293d1bec39dfc721b314b77
3fe1f74bc8f72eaa04797c7df555d9383ef3c78c
describe
'168738' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAECZ' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
250454aaeaa3012e9808f27cee5ca06b
908eccd1201ceb20f1de7957f8843dc1f070612c
describe
'45631' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDA' 'sip-files00192.pro'
76be68ebf7ab93fc0206802046c56c40
659f7dda23484f837d74b905102dadb8b6f5d5e4
describe
'53850' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDB' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
fc620fc0e2059126442e7ce7099bc47d
0294f8fe86fab245b23eee132753828a1974d247
describe
'3734200' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDC' 'sip-files00192.tif'
e1a83c488d6adf37198f8cc39ee41d16
bf672f33c284f465d311808a72b8ee43e44f1506
describe
'1834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDD' 'sip-files00192.txt'
310717b9993a51a4edf4ae90cc964d29
b033e2bab7f346bf1f1aa138f721b4cb78e87885
describe
'18880' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDE' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
9eb2673d8b55fe17edbb8b6e0a314f5b
4fb5e2ac6b375c827fcdd2e97f78bd6b10e279e4
describe
'452183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDF' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
d69b0ae7ae8213c09606648acddf0c75
67b0e2130a7b74f67d69c02a30c587a1023007b1
describe
'106770' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDG' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
addbf9d8da0c4c65783d13d9e189b2b0
036aeb187c2aea00f29099fc1d6f2d1f2c1fefaf
describe
'29311' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDH' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
26ae06fd9e93b0365f0d9fd45f24f121
7b883ee2045f0257be696cd4e335bb21dcde180d
describe
'10860640' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDI' 'sip-files00193.tif'
a76560efedc721f9fe9f912b29301dd5
790c0d647fa65a5b107781f60102bc65263c9ba4
describe
'13912' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDJ' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
81935f3e2af16b73c249e17d58e9892a
58f3dbee87781a09df190729e05284282200ad8a
describe
'465429' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDK' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
92a79faca22e479854eb48f29a4b2b5f
7d1d888c0e7868a4d9ed7fbf4efac2a3ce7f1cba
describe
'24732' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDL' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
c0782bda75e7cbd157cadbc08e383a79
87357a0c323106db624309b0da0aa12d92575f27
describe
'10222' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDM' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
60862693281abaa7eca21bcc1710d6d9
70a99c631379ad56e1f8b10bf7c3d3de961205bc
describe
'3731224' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDN' 'sip-files00194.tif'
6aabc0953ef1899b06abcfbd84bba8e4
cd616f54a0c6eec71c47fe1b87778d1e639ed428
describe
'7918' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDO' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
5aef6f7a8c975effa02b7ad6c8480dd0
f5c65b9274965764f2e4e0bce6bed18b8c4a177d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDP' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
305374ad78d65577a9786f854dcb70c4
de144942e9c4cb3e355ecaea0ea906ff9d68ee3c
describe
'156609' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDQ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
e7537202c64c98b9969890a4273e8583
0e738854f09f87fe7936bb50baf0b132d94d39b7
describe
'42343' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDR' 'sip-files00195.pro'
1e1fdc107d469c264714504ce5159748
f406f39a2a065f8dcbffe1c41a239bb549105fbe
describe
'49290' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDS' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
90427e22651423c33bff3cc0cb7082dd
dc19b6183b7cfd4e3dd2103cd955d25e684bea42
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDT' 'sip-files00195.tif'
64daf360c4ea00cb0b5838f384acfe83
53a72be3f324c2ae070fe143ffd2fbf10fc32c5b
describe
'1706' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDU' 'sip-files00195.txt'
461eaa7f8c74a3a353f576f7c7c01181
c65794f81577d3aa80c5a7e625aadf315d317932
describe
'17828' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDV' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
8954552b088a57ca62c5ab7c672b5e24
57aefb22e70e475b821e3f6d112350f7c6d29082
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDW' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
fcc67f7f6dfa9bd4097ecce7ad33e212
2835193cf4d8857284bf01555099e5b4f4b22e40
describe
'159115' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDX' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
af0d5c91210bcaaa0d20efeb59ca377a
d6766439ab64813dc3e15a7aadc8bafd08b6d360
describe
'43915' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDY' 'sip-files00196.pro'
a625463db646ccef60a49dc21b4d5908
bc56a753f57ce434d9be9ab6ced6e8e74330c87e
describe
'49864' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEDZ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
959a772be314f8477717dbaeb16feb0a
500445c278b5a04692d7131e985c4e46f534ee14
describe
'3733688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEA' 'sip-files00196.tif'
c4daa3c1c6e021b0db6e6ea8205c03ff
dfa9fc5eb2c1c96a2d91df468273747478fc4f1c
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEB' 'sip-files00196.txt'
83af627e93c8c44bcfc67ef6f66d8e9d
354f3f1b0b8e26c82e7f881e2361358e34b8ceac
describe
'17834' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEC' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
a8ff5922cfea6868b37c4a1119f7672e
3c51cd72860cee3e5322115c5639e7c8c2fcbf26
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEED' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
2496e992541f5782abb9bf95b52fc013
0bcf9a7fd3e21b33e04a4fe888abc8a03a9f46e4
describe
'148528' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEE' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
5ff83bd949e649a26fdb36834076ab18
1e118efb2837fa8a52d59bed8dd7f619f019d9aa
describe
'39249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEF' 'sip-files00197.pro'
17f4bdb8bbd0b62d1a9df1ecec044c44
599d4a296e7667b674532b21bb2e5f7595fed25e
describe
'47791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEG' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
09e93f9556cea2a0450cbefaf81e4f96
a90516d196b28f78c542ab7cd4574170f3d3f714
describe
'3731372' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEH' 'sip-files00197.tif'
86f3d71da9b8facf4a135254cf4f4391
e2a87cbf5a13663f102d8597a3ed10b31d0b1259
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEI' 'sip-files00197.txt'
b1a7ae3369fc6ff4b7a31626a00362c1
c347c6b48c755e5128cf8c54e67d50d3d96f2db6
describe
'17173' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEJ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
f325a0776da733b1d0ae71139b70c18c
3d41d4d3e82391c64ce2312145c019d4e1dd738f
describe
'465310' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEK' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
6baff5c110cd01b39841ac9047392f7e
39e60d56fb4e2c4b4a032979b5f5117071a9a672
describe
'175393' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEL' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
c390c10f7cc53c8c64c96b0a44e10989
511475782d42e8413ec3d78f15298e438c3e236c
describe
'46868' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEM' 'sip-files00198.pro'
5765919a7633d2d437caf61ab53c4e8b
e42bae3be96de8b4c6e7f44daef12e691752cca3
describe
'54278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEN' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
bf213c0d2fe6b02b841b5d13f6ffbd7a
b4184570116db1be2b9bbe195e40ae8895bc3822
describe
'3731688' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEO' 'sip-files00198.tif'
f789676b0c190b0e15a60d75e86045ba
04d9605b094d79202a423d25748ac3bc3de66f62
describe
'1887' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEP' 'sip-files00198.txt'
5c878a01a8ed545c6d93f0d71ee98d6c
44534cbb2d50aa0ea610bd32bad6d1adb7d51776
describe
'18546' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEQ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
a13d05e17afc020e7ecccda71e19610b
5a666ed25e45b587412676c77526c446a33cfd0a
describe
'479024' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEER' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
601490c894b143704652698d2d587cad
a68b7baf3a2a1f48c1d05044f1ce0ca185348d5f
describe
'199375' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEES' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
e8d305f8a57cf800320b85520cc95560
67b098f275cf4a238f302723789c8b0f04883f3d
describe
'52917' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEET' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
77c43b782aea9e39be23c973f04c57dd
44b9fd2dec0d6c1303261a067a4db69dd3b73900
describe
'3842436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEU' 'sip-files00199.tif'
c4cf74147ec0c6d64e656251335cc151
dc6f5fe0860712daaa1bbbf2bf5e53ff57e571e2
describe
'20133' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEV' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
27306cba105c3b1a7ff61d3a745d711b
5e8a5cbd852da6495c37f54128879e6ffff7fba4
describe
'457475' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEW' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
d0d6b5e1442f438e67aab42f29dc3618
5d949521b3102133c251eb8858d8f50e47f47218
describe
'166270' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEX' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
f6775382c140b900e8681e69a327b97e
6101d5e4bcfc1134b189692a5e60d8b9e1c1ed63
describe
'697' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEY' 'sip-files00200.pro'
c1ccc74483419a0edb3d2f3a352fc92c
f1ad00003c0e64f3cc6d9ef7f02fbee62670e9b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEEZ' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
f9bf9f3ef932e5cb83df51a341f9f737
d15de493b4799a1aa1071c7fe58ff5806b0f62fc
describe
'3670504' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFA' 'sip-files00200.tif'
e8a415dabadaf4a18745b8f3734b38a0
0557d43635b2695aed920168daad6b0f8a4c7fa8
describe
'97' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFB' 'sip-files00200.txt'
faff6b68b046420160e30aa77fee8e1d
c395ba25bbf4f3f0768423f18826c05da1115474
describe
Invalid character
'21107' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFC' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
1cd2fb21437993c69f874dcbce91403b
aa2c9cafd1762daf512df39c782cb6ebff48c2c0
describe
'465260' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFD' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
eb4133f9359f03cce9a7cdfd59695769
042e1d4f865c6c7fe3b84097fdb35c871d5b9043
describe
'137312' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFE' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
2f3875e3b2cd0afff005431596fae36e
31f67d071c4a04ee5a08980e32e19e95ff808323
describe
'31467' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFF' 'sip-files00201.pro'
98f2598904230ca7ef9a634b85e51167
7a59e2c2f62c568bf9d5c7ea0581c06f2be7d29e
describe
'44093' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFG' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
fb93b4fbc0cb2d24bcdf2f203308a8b4
e7f5957268d72e0c957fa5d8be2f789bbcc87465
describe
'3731016' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFH' 'sip-files00201.tif'
af0ece1944a3d57f4ff4318055e77ab6
756ab92ac34bf765e12b4386dd22bafeab77e835
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFI' 'sip-files00201.txt'
550a31eb731fa9134923bf488101d144
8212c5a72dd5ac83622f10c2229f69a97efd1444
describe
'16697' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFJ' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
ec8d2b6a9614cbf5824a8593a4f138e7
7bd25c8ae01b6bd4c9f402d53b3ea2643397de58
describe
'456999' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFK' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
9d7fd23752e65a081d7a31ab5ca7df46
49fdf05085b94f69aa36fe2e6a02198ee0f031ab
describe
'190207' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFL' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
e39e4076f44ce5629fed827be328befa
275385aaf853b86bd05ec6ea0547b18f38972cba
describe
'52099' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFM' 'sip-files00202.pro'
3c82cdeb36ea6e88e205513b06268cdf
f6b851aede7a15fe2d4fd1a6b0ed85e0717a5137
describe
'58973' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFN' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
c816f0a290a08175dc5543ff90cbd04f
547dc27b8e0e646617bc3540be03aef618fbcae4
describe
'3665684' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFO' 'sip-files00202.tif'
f25eb6a082bb0ec1daaa0b2e6a3443d5
5f530575b73181f85889fa30c2ae2ea808e7b5d0
describe
'2080' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFP' 'sip-files00202.txt'
504d1062837eceb282549622a3942fce
d42a06837e7c48702e3c0acfdf56119206e36067
describe
'19943' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFQ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
07749d77c7fd83a6c72489c58b652f2f
290d991d59c2cdba417c751f1ff2135ea0e9d758
describe
'465250' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFR' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
6bef56ae33b3df4a580ecc0bdde99fe7
30fe8cc9b016f7d01008fef0e41fbfc809666552
describe
'186931' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFS' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
96c454e724b8dee81df4ff08dd1c1976
38e6f22ad156c7b9cddfb16f2d186319cffa3253
describe
'53901' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFT' 'sip-files00203.pro'
baf45155fea0f751427658b33f27f6dc
b3e2bcc2ae99d84bda6cbf523079efe632642ade
describe
'57827' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFU' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
fae6904ece8443de0d9c5c2dce58b20d
61f4facb6c701864f25a738d492a708dd9a37c39
describe
'3731764' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFV' 'sip-files00203.tif'
7f4d5979ae4cb3138287e9491ff939a2
219d9ebad49332da6c52ea357783cdb6caf350aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFW' 'sip-files00203.txt'
94ac6dba9f0a303863fed39118e072df
b66b2854b99e465a0381fd44727a9dccdcab686d
describe
'19319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFX' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
25f0c5707e0733462ea7f108d9ac256e
40823012fafe3ee26fd0402a7aaa020125b98c3e
describe
'465597' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFY' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
2f130722aac0cb81ada18e39b5e28dbb
eae8e6e5a0f6e5faafb8f0fefcc0bb3a1c330c4d
describe
'165000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEFZ' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
4a16b5930d11d165b921e5fac760f138
68609322ad006403c4a532ba57f2f55af70ed252
describe
'42949' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGA' 'sip-files00204.pro'
446755e1c8ada9c25a96afe56a0dd4dc
418299a02c6cd18dfa98a16fc639031e7da79651
describe
'52073' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGB' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
eb9b162e3ffe61fa153798b7f64d7491
ec0e2b2f913cb3ea8409e76e18ff70a731c69a2d
describe
'3733852' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGC' 'sip-files00204.tif'
83be7e972408a4a050b02fd9fbbe92fb
2c038e6e5e19aa93bb8ccbaf3b03a3238cc2127c
describe
'1724' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGD' 'sip-files00204.txt'
0840575a449d12aab008704d2190a219
74a0ac5556db4d17d325d894e95cdf1b1a5b2af4
describe
'18503' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGE' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
8bb469ced662367a34110da716f58cb2
68f0b63ed60d598c2966d65b114dd15b9b92a309
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGF' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
790d4c57200033dc2353320a8f319982
131f618f8c6118c1ef86167602ef3e176d9b6ff7
describe
'171837' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGG' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
0613f484fb926fa40d4fef22c0760356
aaba09cf43939fd7758ec1e32c0dd244f5275d3d
describe
'3298' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGH' 'sip-files00205.pro'
a628cfe3a40afd2962bd5e39359f6007
83d7ecc7d0be190c8904de8898d77d483a5abab2
describe
'53757' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGI' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
1023508b09e02a28d1efcfdeaa8e2479
efd6628f6fffef5b7634f224e5767e026648fc21
describe
'3733052' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGJ' 'sip-files00205.tif'
571c7fc1b98f241bb11cf17a6155e068
5f1d48f384b6e041745ad0c75e39690c7bd8f0b6
describe
'183' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGK' 'sip-files00205.txt'
8ad384f5783469c4f4c6756bb1175e31
26ba42bb43379450b3fa243e160971f381616f92
describe
'21977' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGL' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
19de0ab2841c62b94b94af42ee5cdc7d
c58967644dfbb3e8de2131776f00d7e71633efbc
describe
'459259' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGM' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
bb777d9e0e22b150fd5edc6c7155e016
e4def4fda30f9cca5ab3e3e358ba036341385c08
describe
'185072' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGN' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
11c330226637ee399e37098e85a3ffc5
14b2e2139c3b77b3044b91eea8ce94f3f6ad5576
describe
'48798' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGO' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
6aa43a43d2b94a303b5bfb21fa2ac71e
5b5e1fb8108a91db41d9257a356a22df1d80ee10
describe
'3685440' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGP' 'sip-files00206.tif'
aeae4713d26268f646146b61ac87c7c1
cba32b2f6e69e972648e87e5dda7f7c9dc60b478
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGQ' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
641414b6a39c447401737103a28dc12f
b8df87d6f68271812f586670211842e0b70e114b
describe
'453595' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGR' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
0668855496752ca9b03bea707fde2445
006db65cef819bbd9ddc2f87ed13f282cfd3a6cc
describe
'185516' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGS' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
1dea6d1501ed79d24fbacaea60a181e1
4616c30cc44e448d1a1aff18fde92525bf31aa4a
describe
'48492' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGT' 'sip-files00207.pro'
1b3b4c8ca3c6867a18c402104b8f7744
ddb3df1da9af0b1d1e50de1a5eed97594ab3f938
describe
'57517' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGU' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
2895905c0cf97a15a34b2e9ca49e2a6e
940dcc41bc6a3710db7f9bc4268e177a18fa3736
describe
'3638000' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGV' 'sip-files00207.tif'
e994421769b1a781e1236cedcbc8b9aa
e3c3726faca207876518c2066e4442f66309164f
describe
'1899' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGW' 'sip-files00207.txt'
1da1e5e30df182e2967c4e88da79a8c9
f57783ffe57bed8c74367832ceee7b6718ee6f32
describe
'19468' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGX' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
911ebf17801da94ab26c10cb90ae2451
2653deaa13e975fa19d96e09a63125748de4a0b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGY' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
d9d104f738754f7124b140350eaa3b62
2132b76edfe6dc720952ccfc33cc6b94ab062dbb
describe
'168673' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEGZ' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
df732267956f19ff5960f0318dcaf940
7343fce854fb0a7826ee06f5155e30f3221df45d
describe
'45014' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHA' 'sip-files00208.pro'
2afa08f3a16508e9e9e4237c30157965
dc47bcf2578c96f147669defa923389d90e46375
describe
'52262' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHB' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
89401a8436cec5fea78d6a1be1190953
0b08587c46a1f13930b5035955be01a7ca775211
describe
'3731904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHC' 'sip-files00208.tif'
6818aa112092633a2117789c6413165e
cfcf7f6835dba2f50773ff1558244b0878e89a6e
describe
'1794' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHD' 'sip-files00208.txt'
25b442ef15c82c7a50e41bf532dfcd73
b0ac943851f2e401b88ae4cc46dd7d4b03e4548e
describe
'19071' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHE' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
c1a035b54a62fc18fb0fd7479349468a
590b80efa202e7c2c9fdd9a66a43e05ffc45ffa8
describe
'465206' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHF' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
85160880bbc1753294bde9ea431c54ad
c37132d40cea2e813c1c3f5f70d3849786cdab9a
describe
'132658' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHG' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
e73a1be9e6741eedbde753067d8e097b
c0dec380868ddbe8b9d535ce887aede28716fa39
describe
'32341' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHH' 'sip-files00209.pro'
dd7dbd1fcc729bd7b59069eb83790da4
b8edb69aa78f39bac529eb4c3b4266df5ce4ff39
describe
'41642' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHI' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
dc37ef6ec00b8ba70ffab3260d3c982d
fe651804baa64ac717311a19b52c301b9fe46144
describe
'3731004' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHJ' 'sip-files00209.tif'
58a63c1e9e1a45fc38d2b3bb7b02b9dc
3df95151f06b6b2701e144ba85e2524d41198d4f
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHK' 'sip-files00209.txt'
a89580b4fe84ff5601d8201684792924
eec00a4d3111b0d6747c3f88eca48bc7fad41f44
describe
'16061' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHL' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
5d0125cbb22071507e13eec564bae3a7
2c7aa0e9ad156628bf5452db034b9fecbbd84653
describe
'465241' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHM' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
ca78d2b591c4543fb78b80d3c4951568
2869b6bea115fc5109ffd6964bdfb9bf7495b0d3
describe
'179649' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHN' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
38b4f4c7baf2160768194a2c1ea9bd54
fef3de87f9533c097e0123babc0ed5ee01bb0001
describe
'48526' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHO' 'sip-files00210.pro'
c5acddd7d8b75e83e25989e284b152ea
c77cec7f70acc0f028d591690d02fddecc820359
describe
'55986' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHP' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
5501ed90913be65e806275a547c8a991
8b6a46c6bfbd1aa7f22802f672880e61c9615790
describe
'3731936' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHQ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
a8d68de39e697f10092a994c455d1088
3989d271e48f4c0faee40005c1b16c02c8d640bb
describe
'1916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHR' 'sip-files00210.txt'
dba38fa19af1f65ee12ee213ea311732
9e2d1445bc73861260101171fe4fbd7b35cd2e9f
describe
'19483' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHS' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
5b3044e2bfbb51aa0726975bf862f090
c98e604ddcd738593777c3d9317ec67ae74a3ee2
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHT' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
d072ee3e636f90f0235a8b5490386dd4
3423f72281f7e622ab7c07ec3efeb002f2a64c40
describe
'171045' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHU' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
c57475e53038fe2a51cf65046167b23d
3cdca84f6a9a89a5d7a51f6f4cc3818e68b8dbe9
describe
'47153' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHV' 'sip-files00211.pro'
f421b5529ba5b30a73f85577fd770d38
dd5a17a70cdd9dd3514cef30406ae657e1f3fb56
describe
'53055' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHW' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
9db10bdcd6b4fc1f2bab7e68f75de2a0
16a858e9deff67f96fb39fa63ff1cc2e4177bdf6
describe
'3731568' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHX' 'sip-files00211.tif'
e04b1bf61ca90187397d2f747f20cdbc
139296f0d6ae6e29049ed4c57af731d8cc3f44bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHY' 'sip-files00211.txt'
3bed8806504103e38e4a83d81068bd5c
447d5e6885629a53561354622fa77699ccfdc482
describe
'18451' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEHZ' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
8638c2636ad2aa239700e6b6fdde0468
4881dfc93670d647551041bd4244246b103d3fe7
describe
'465262' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIA' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
3532f1647b47f78bf4aeb1f76da18695
845c9ada7b9673f3fcf3f47fece615fce4bb2669
describe
'116229' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIB' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
67aba3fb919f68cd749f58a2726391b0
4c959fb67696ee3d7091b80cc584b19dcc94b3a3
describe
'23910' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIC' 'sip-files00212.pro'
3ee20433f27ac60a0439efc5a2c6b592
5c826fbcdc3c8157a9089a9af3b55d6ba0d2dcaf
describe
'37705' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEID' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
01f6c162da822c277db6d348d6cfc843
93b526160b6f0413a35c60f14d458f9f5ae26e69
describe
'3730700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIE' 'sip-files00212.tif'
8601107342ed2a60c2e5c7d4480144e0
036af3afd95b2a431caca40128687de5821e6fe0
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIF' 'sip-files00212.txt'
696980cf4d0d9ca08b55c4bf6d3229e4
b96ee288a5863e30671ad0b525d7c2607a1868de
describe
'15294' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIG' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
6f55097f669596102b83cf679906a99d
552748120170cc03fb94583459a5c1cf6fa13f43
describe
'465242' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIH' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
d7fa4ed61d98f9504cdd70cf3bddf879
f690c6f2defba90dfd0d430f06d1ee63e7053f63
describe
'210125' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEII' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
e8c59a2c24e2efcef2429c11760fb84c
42e0e3377709218ad3051d6bdc219492fbc52ba5
describe
'2777' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIJ' 'sip-files00213.pro'
18125fac5a2b6b6e67dbdc5fd5ef0b7c
4de2bae9e84c0ab0c4f6fb977d0d5c53e8910f2e
describe
'64319' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIK' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
7d4cdd213f9dde82c05af5bffd669446
1aa697743566570526d97ceb4377f140bbaae386
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIL' 'sip-files00213.tif'
6294b50b9253ec550ee43c4cd9b727f5
3ba70bcb53e104ae7dafe937b55dd1aac275b81d
describe
'120' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIM' 'sip-files00213.txt'
720009dbd9cb62d4df12c5a270321f92
b4b2945481ca9173ff23c76fd92bbd760587b8f8
describe
'24447' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIN' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
f2d112768eb0064d63901d49401050cc
cf3af906b25278da4d2945fb12a1b02ad3b48cbe
describe
'465582' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIO' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
1debed1dc1706c9038c83c8d99e26439
7a75bb587454bb8c05ca81c273e41722e39a13b3
describe
'178249' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIP' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
1984120198fd67d7fc8c4d50195a6aee
f2f1a25391c20775bb43491bbd8d64dd1e142320
describe
'49768' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIQ' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
969d440067d40cb9b9155098eafe94f4
84ebbc8d30321cdcbf80d1c78000f9e56575dd03
describe
'3734704' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIR' 'sip-files00214.tif'
39f2ea94d5413b3064a709a1c23d5954
19abdd27442aeaf97bce89d0a72b653de777625e
describe
'19523' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIS' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
40f80c678dfc241f7fa52924c7515bd3
f2dd31e230d1caca093b5fe478e8d99cd1375f5c
describe
'456439' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIT' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
4bfa2dc0367cbae9e52689446437d14a
fe316f2bd963ec7a47cf19a5486302d97734946e
describe
'121959' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIU' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
3a39707d4b51867b5c820b422017c178
4ea4c6dfff102a45a649a2b48ae68589c08f2f76
describe
'25769' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIV' 'sip-files00215.pro'
b581d8b220d666a304d0293a354763f0
4124ad41c09187fbf77fbf9f484e816cd628c0d7
describe
'38180' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIW' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
18a5a656c49a773491336ea765454e61
1e223e9d43b00736fabfd8553700817579716ba4
describe
'3662152' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIX' 'sip-files00215.tif'
034437bba338d5a059c6f7a72f497f80
b9764d84b14b8c6b32ed102ba08a26e15420e377
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIY' 'sip-files00215.txt'
b989e13f443199bb266ce0a3adbbc034
7d6f3f201f8e6c3bdec05b3d3efe02a786db6b69
describe
'15326' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEIZ' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
78981953c5ff31fef26069887a38352f
e8105bde4c76060e05e37cfecc5007dab6594ad8
describe
'463323' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJA' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
1b14d8a3fef00465ae295473a5757524
57006952ed2b37c74f4f5735b26034c8f819841a
'2011-10-14T06:47:01-04:00'
describe
'158949' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJB' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
17d536c724967b28cd725dc096f85465
8b9989b619e17b27d36e5e7fdeb36defecb3296c
describe
'39810' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJC' 'sip-files00216.pro'
d11a93184e52e8186036c950e7be6609
c4428bfe4fb436c19857a1773ef18db97e120254
describe
'50849' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJD' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
19f718c865f490622c4d958c57436724
e1457c283eee16c62a84b44265be070e3de4f0a7
describe
'3718112' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJE' 'sip-files00216.tif'
caf124592e9ca42b75b67f4c71a1d112
a1165b7d33d76507e97e0c53bd45e203ea2cb340
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJF' 'sip-files00216.txt'
329f65a5a0d62bc1227cfc948b50d7c9
dcece22f686b4a0cc26949ed681398ca29c11ce5
describe
'18791' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJG' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
16b47f90051c826ba9c35e52a093c4fd
68e80912b54a63e9023f5e1c32b58e596d03fea9
describe
'456729' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJH' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
610cdd4602d6855fe36e8aa831fa9415
2d8807b2fb3a3ea0cc1bcc901ed2067c8a3a8400
describe
'136419' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJI' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
032ec43da9714333e32eb59c8a9c7ae7
d93b9486eaee06286305e00e3091688ea4a28fab
describe
'29354' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJJ' 'sip-files00217.pro'
5c642733ab068bc1be21056a6fd0714f
348d084672dacc1535f6d0ed5b9adf4c8ec33d3f
describe
'44646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJK' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
078a63693afde8e416005de9aabc698b
f733d266621616b7e684b036e4c1ecb5bc6bf11a
describe
'3662840' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJL' 'sip-files00217.tif'
896a000144b8bdb6db6274e2cfc9c3d6
d46c129ec752016fea9eb3088a28247a162b3a98
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJM' 'sip-files00217.txt'
7376a41e869838dbba718973f81c8ed8
94d7fc84dcd940da6dbe8653078fc75ed9882234
describe
'17603' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJN' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
943156a5a6b285766b5ebc18b5fa7a63
2c5fc86b304b431438ee7a5d7e860626521ffc07
describe
'455286' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJO' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
5394b0d21e4c6fb809506f7c1e8c7867
705b52feb9addc7bdb0a218d757866296b74919a
describe
'175436' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJP' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
11dc220edbb40c714125c37298dd6bad
02dbb95ab49a4456fd493e10a40fde1423f02346
describe
'44870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJQ' 'sip-files00218.pro'
5026d064d665e277cdc6c9bd0050a9d8
445f8ff4592a976fe916ed0ce6f051283dfc642d
describe
'54051' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJR' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
adc7a67aea311ef8e5415576472172af
3d09d751d5c25b7287982af714fd80830d8fdede
describe
'3651700' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJS' 'sip-files00218.tif'
fe05b07a34bf1053668c361f790b66dc
16135382dda07ee9916f9f5aaf380c9c15e91400
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJT' 'sip-files00218.txt'
bd36e854b1009088b4af9a3caedd93be
8c427d6afaef91c154d2631097bc6b5acca41a9b
describe
'18859' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJU' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
19e7bbdb6aa8551965543c8bcfa6e6df
22e91996330b0ba8db5d5570d075d1b6b75e6a53
describe
'465562' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJV' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
db22a0c3d7498ef55cea0410294f63a8
84f5424f4df356a3ca6b996eac17242e9b06063b
describe
'193216' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJW' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
606a61a46c983fc6cb671c789a3a7ec0
8f78477d53388f006686305d7ba5ba1f3719978e
describe
'53062' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJX' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
7f06818b54466cca02ae1091be0770b6
74b3c400b7aa55ab2e1f362bedc4912b83046e98
describe
'3734848' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJY' 'sip-files00219.tif'
473f73bfc425999f3ff32e45e80a57d4
4efc123cdcb209a20070bfe2778d1d84acac8619
describe
'20141' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEJZ' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
c2dbeec010ff4d0ec4ae3739c6f0beec
8bf68c6eb1a532d63007a2baddc975c883d3786c
describe
'459256' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKA' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
aa76e3904d58ea98cd06cbc14e03bd95
7ecc7ba38edde840dae884d088b84395173e7634
describe
'82552' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKB' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
5b11d73ae0450016f3a7db8f3f2280f6
4abefdbd4991971155fba822045c5d6e28bbaced
describe
'26519' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKC' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
140bf7ff0153ee93bca6917335e5db08
d012d73b0caf5c05969bd79341d98cd8c8fdce58
describe
'3683536' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKD' 'sip-files00220.tif'
2205e4f80212119ee8a2280bdb98170e
fd1bfee3c507a073185bb3e9bf32eb1a16a45e5d
describe
'13873' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKE' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
38f66570fa9f03b1a6242cc2cf060180
928981e1dc03ea2d518a579ed66b915b8e30a9be
describe
'458443' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKF' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
f126ed4c897d8a97ebbb63a966480883
826b8fec092b2872287c9676795e0431238e497e
describe
'183344' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKG' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
aba88881cd88cba29529e675dac68325
d3a7b0565b6fa4efea7734ec3a0ce74ffeaf928d
describe
'47890' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKH' 'sip-files00221.pro'
d36241358e349f78bd9435a15f6d0c58
236cc6433553ea767c8fb7077719bed0a1f1a18e
describe
'56185' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKI' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
e66b82a951147d9a89aa5144ecede187
224310bb04ccace288cca8a28925c8b14b9a314e
describe
'3676904' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKJ' 'sip-files00221.tif'
b9e2e830d1795a73facc3697dfbe7fa4
7215ff8399b46439df4d8ad9e6862e9dab5c3fb6
describe
'1919' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKK' 'sip-files00221.txt'
cb5ad704d932bfae61b2457b015360f1
656654457ef905198ab1e9cd4ab743befb24611b
describe
'19292' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKL' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
bc0c2dd0ea7ae996d9c49a82c2e75309
c6d1a13b877c8e1896da147f5fb703d5924fe31d
describe
'465197' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKM' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
a0f2736c8eabf14be1782c7a51adccda
085bb24c73a1243f9338c649e04d00ed23fc7309
describe
'166980' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKN' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
1663f8d543776c3fcab0d6b7676e4851
ac48390ee4bcf7afb1e0d1c5c229f777f664bd94
describe
'43415' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKO' 'sip-files00222.pro'
16661f80f623c3fdad4990da04e29507
79aeae7d57e0d9e3cf4b7b563949da580e9d96d0
describe
'52920' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKP' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
2477947670933fd691a67c1881a82a6f
70ca78a0483d7760898a40af18855f9ff2254a9d
describe
'3731916' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKQ' 'sip-files00222.tif'
c8fe617a6c255586d57ea841be0b0e41
bea71f7c69cd30f150b3964e9c9136f6896b5ffe
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKR' 'sip-files00222.txt'
6edab05897c651bb104ad7bd0111daa5
ff42a2027f1b414b8c23b6168e2e1c1b9abc19f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKS' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
9e69ea7a3b41444e63b70ea07a4f9dbc
962ecb4994b371b79215ceb04798cfdd070727d2
describe
'465301' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKT' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
7f1e1a78397b38e116173d73ef911686
4a1d76f907a314401c85c35f0a4ee1adfe92558c
describe
'153914' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKU' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
9c36878b8d4f342573797c0bf8bc0bd8
335811de9ec450708d7d5e5ea28abbc073210f50
describe
'38903' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKV' 'sip-files00223.pro'
cd7537833c49c27264f830212b373f50
42f398074894d7a57a9e3abde450a349f1d8c054
describe
'49053' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKW' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
25f3e7ac18a46ceda49c8c4e3152ffa4
002fe8ee3c425b67218cf6c9629052172e4fb11e
describe
'3731660' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKX' 'sip-files00223.tif'
4169677e64c2d97283c86d155587aca5
e3c3a707f204c9403971036c64ae4c51648545d3
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKY' 'sip-files00223.txt'
1c761ef10f7a4c220cda71e1d7257ea5
664ad68973d2a897abb1ed301ac72060ea88640a
describe
'18497' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEKZ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
e71f71baea575e6003370a7219649d32
14744e9144048a4c9d2ebbcef0427d061d980d2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELA' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
52f201710a0ac8178b998bd112e2c608
545d3cd8bf04215b514eeb44e46bc7043683def4
describe
'175094' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELB' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
49e9c0e6b413587c2377778e7e2fe938
32fdceb48238db71ae670123a820416658ad50f2
describe
'46870' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELC' 'sip-files00224.pro'
94ea5dce948ae9ba41c66c19175faabd
eb4204946652746fedc89ec0120633439800a6fc
describe
'53574' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELD' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
603e215a1e94fcd9601ecdeaf90522ed
0e0108c9a1f662dc3f19a47eead9e4b2dc34bb35
describe
'3731608' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELE' 'sip-files00224.tif'
a5f07b5f30f274e1d531a51720d75027
4d4820b12a67b2919ea1ff0ffc5eecc8d8982749
describe
'1838' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELF' 'sip-files00224.txt'
22024345c28c9b137ce666788ff0b890
6a75f9619e9d77221dd3375c183cb0f95852322e
describe
'18601' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELG' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
a0b44cb0aad414592ddeab4e6e924faa
9b13fda859133e387d7e25a576a52b85233fe465
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELH' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
42ca1c1c46bdb14aec99546a87a570ad
bbcd2295b731abddb9bc5da3521a24ac964baca8
describe
'166096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELI' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
edc8b9de8fa798ecac4fcbd5be3ef9bf
cf8a964b313ca9d6959f5c939ed6239e02be624b
describe
'44743' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELJ' 'sip-files00225.pro'
d51f6330806e29631b80926224719784
f7889f9add8cb1889bd180389814939718ed843b
describe
'51392' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELK' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
c591b224c1fc19cfa44ebfec239bad0a
61910a05ceacdc058e756092ba927654d33fc3fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELL' 'sip-files00225.tif'
f420028ddd4f26a3b0c2a2dfe0e4ee46
0516dce2943f925d6aefdb63ffe39c49daf66668
describe
'1783' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELM' 'sip-files00225.txt'
b566969172bffe2358dffc9764fbac39
8adf5f759c37f68f6449132557f38adf1a0d6070
describe
'18096' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELN' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
a6161a28de5617250d189d73425fd7fc
ba72fa77d68d98482eea33e9827d58b9a36f9d1d
describe
'465219' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELO' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
4c14a8109c1410b5abd2363e2d11c07e
4a4f03a6fa5e0891a5a526416b724f431b16524b
describe
'106646' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELP' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
cab6f0d1cce4e834e88f260eced5f8d8
eb20b1c7f3af13179eaa5e730eb929320df9cca2
describe
'20883' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELQ' 'sip-files00226.pro'
cd1ee42d3a3d299342f2326ea85d9252
baeccde577d1f74238bf735b234ce54e8bd413d9
describe
'35352' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELR' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
8420bb0e63c17b30140ec5c8d1a0bdef
e959a3198a9ee25acaaea8880050a5b7fdc037d8
describe
'3730796' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELS' 'sip-files00226.tif'
ffeba8964aad270aeefe09257051cf14
5decb4dcac1fbe70697b69da831a9441e35ef125
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELT' 'sip-files00226.txt'
efbfd818297ac7b167b3d7e0a87aa5ed
46b9a22cef7e10bcee27b3e1cff77ee28b164463
describe
'15097' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELU' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
b5680f91b6081a7f9d2f1316527bafa3
68b0cbf0c21c6ed88dec3214220bcb758e62784a
describe
'465269' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELV' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
0b745d01fcbe32c4ead732a9d32767bb
2c0a33872a1a6b973048e1bd38bc3127d344a27d
describe
'114432' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELW' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
e082b7f7a739cba776dccd6f96f6a699
b926b18283943e16e31ec1aa78c2333e1be6bd65
describe
'25584' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELX' 'sip-files00227.pro'
4eba81e1acc239d94af26f32f1f45dec
7857172e37e8dfdb2882693a0a5d7ca20b75b6f9
describe
'37802' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELY' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
4bdb30a0c83e25580adf7c77a9a0b0ea
20e9cc97961d8ca91f4d610e59bdbbc288b8dd43
describe
'3731140' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAELZ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
1b2f09526263fa162f9328dc48ece1bd
004b48db3879c2a54aafca90000ceb0bb2e1c9b7
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEMA' 'sip-files00227.txt'
08b2546a6365f610a7159761b0e45c99
a12f1fd606e168fe8c02619f7631784eb840eae7
describe
'16042' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEMB' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
36ff03c423608fae9d204e53ad78cb2b
48f20507db6b500ca39d4c0ef292a934957a372d
describe
'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEMC' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
ef85043b450e10d7f6d356bf8b14eb2d
f62a3493d2b654a170ecaaf330058faade4ef924
describe
'89758' 'info:fdaE20080331_AAABCKfileF20080402_AAAEMD' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
be49546c934e878f39116174da380b90
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describe
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THE EDITOR.













MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES,

CHAPTER I,

ACK WILTON was enjoying his holidays at the sea

J side town of Rosaport. Everything was new to him

and the delights of the sea never ceased to charm
him. He liked nothing better than to be out on the
dancing waves, either rowing along with his papa, or
catching the lively little fish that were to be found in the
bay. Sometimes, too, he got a sail in a yacht, and then his
happiness was supreme, insomuch that when he went to
bed at night, he could speak of nothing else—talked about
sleeping with his head to the bow and his feet to the stern,
and in the morning was often found by his nurse, putting
up his sheet for a mainsail, or fishing with a string having
a crooked pin at the end, for the slippers that lay on the
bedroom floor. Now, it happened that in Rosaport the
people got up a very large aquarium,—that is, a kind of
show in which you see great tanks, partly made of glass,
and filled with salt or fresh water, as may be required. In
these are placed all kinds of fish and other creatures that
live in the water. When you look through the glass, you
can see them dash about, or walk or creep, just as they
would do if they were in the sea itself. “Jack’s papa
procured him a ticket, which admitted him at any time;
and as he was greatly pleased with all he saw there, he
went to the aquarium very often. One day he found him-
self almost alone in the place, and was looking at the funny
movements of a large crab, when the odd creature climbed
up the little artificial rockery in the tank, and stood on
the top, which was above the surface of the water. Jack

B
4 Mk. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

noticed that its back looked blue and red like the face of a
boy suffering from extreme cold, and that its nippers were
large and strong. It first darted its little horny eyes right
and left, as if to see if Jack was quite alone; then it
trimmed its feelers, as a gentleman trims his moustache,
and at last, in a sharp, piping voice, cried, “ Hulloa, little
fellow, I’m Mr. Crab!” Jack was surprised, and not a
little afraid; but recovering himself, he felt inclined to be
angry, for he did not like to be called “little” Did he
not wear a regular hat upon Sundays, and was he not
looking forward to having a man’s coat in a year? Never-
theless, it was not everybody who could boast of a chat
with a crab, and so he resolved to be civil.

“Good morning, Mr. Crab, my name is Jack Wilton.”

“Come nearer then, Jack; for I am old, and my voice is
weak.”

“Here I am,” said Jack, going quite close to the tank,
and bending over it; “but no nipping, mind!” for his nose
was dangerously near.

“Nipping! Ha-ha!” laughed Mr. C. “Oh dear, no;
besides, your nose would not be good to eat, though I were
to take a bit. No, no, I wish to have a talk with you; for,
you see, although this tank is full of different kinds of crea-
tures, I am rather lonely, being the only crab in it. Then,
the people who come crowding to see us, only wait a minute
or two and pass on. Sometimes, indeed, some wise-looking
folks, with spectacles on, stand and watch me for a long
time; but then they keep calling me long names, and’ I
hate that. One man, the other day, called me a crustacean,
and I felt as if I could have clawed him.” And here Mr.
C. got up, and stamped with rage, four feet at a time.

“But you should not be angry with people: for calling
you a crustacean,” said Jack, “for that is just what you
are.

“No, I’m not: I’m not half so crusty as some of my
neighbours.”

“Oh, but that’s not what Imean. A crustacean is just a


MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 5

shell-fish,” said Jack, who had heard about such things at
~ school.

“ Well, well, never mind! Crab is the name that I like
best, all the same.”

“ You seem to have a nice set of neighbours,” suggested
Jack, changing the subject. :

«Oh, pretty fair. There’s Lazy Lobster now, as we call
him here. You can see him fumbling away at something
in that dark corner down below there. He is always in the
way, and I am constantly tripping over his feelers.”

“The proper word is ¢endacula,” said Jack with some
pride of learinng.

«Ten what ?” asked Mr. C.

“ Ten-tac-u-la— feelers, as you called them just now.”

“But he has only ¢wo,” persisted Mr. C.

“J know that well enough,” quoth Jack somewhat snap-
pishly, “but the two feelers are called tentacula for all that.”

«That seems odd : but you should know best. Well, Lazy
this very morning got hold of one of my hind legs, think-
ing it was something to eat, and didn’t he give it a squeeze !
I declare I feel it sore yet. He is not a bad fellow though,
and we often have a little chat about our frolics in the dear
old sea. I have many other neighbours. There are the
little black whelks that slide about on the rocks like snails,
with their houses on their backs, and sometimes, when I
am smart enough, I snap up a prime juicy one. Did you
ever taste a whelk, Jack ?”

“Oh, often and often,” cried Jack with delight, “but they
were boiled though.”

“ Eh ? * Boiled, ‘boiled’—what’s ‘boiled’ ?”

“Don’t you know? Why, it means being put in a pot
with water, and then placed on a fire, and the heat goes all
through the water, till it bubbles and steams long enough to
prepare the whelks for eating.”

“Oh—ah—yes—I see. Are c—crabs ever boiled, Jack?”
asked Mr. C. in a sickly manner.

“Yes, often. They are not good till they are boiled.”
6 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

“Indecd!” said Mr. C., getting red in the face. “Then
since I am not boiled I must be bad, it seems. I prefer to
be bad; so you had better go home and get yourself boiled
to make you a good boy, and you can choose a more worthy
companion for the future,” and so saying, he scrambled
down from his perch, and almost hid himself among the
weeds beneath.

Jack at first felt inclined to laugh, but he was sorry Mr.
Crab had misunderstood him; and having heard that mis-
understandings always grow worse the longer they are left
unexplained, he determined to coax his friend up, so as to
put matters right at once. He therefore tapped on the
glass of the tank, wagged his finger, and cried, “ Do come
up, Mr. Crab; I did not mean to vex you. Please, come
up, and Ill explain all about it.” For along time Mr. C.
only shook his back, as if to say, “I wont,” and tried to
hide himself altogether out of sight. But kindly looks and
kindly words have been known to reach the hearts of even
the lower animals, and so Jack continued to entreat Mr.
C. to come up. At last he was rewarded, for though he
looked very sullen, the huffy old thing came slowly up
to his place to hear Jack’s explanation.

« All I meant was,” he said, “that crabs were not good
for food to man till they are boiled. I did not wish you
to think that crabs were bad. God made crabs for some
useful purpose, and so they must be good creatures in their
own way.”

“T see, I see,” said Mr. Crab; “but before I forgive you
quite, tell me this, Jack: Have you ever eaten a crab ?”

“No, never. I am quite sure.”

“Then it is all right. Let us shake claws over it.”

Jack fearlessly put out his hand, and although Mr. C.
gave him a squeeze that brought the tears to his eyes,
he bore it like a man, and Mr. C. and he were good
friends ever after.

“And now,” said Jack, “please tell me something more
about your neighbours.”


MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.” 7

“J will to-morrow, but not to-day, for here comes a

crowd of people, so you had better be off.”

“Very well; but I shall come earlier to-morrow. Good
bye!” and Jack went home to tell his little brothers and
sisters of all that he had seen and heard.



Cuapter II.

Next day, early in the forenoon, Jack went to the aqua-
rium, and found Mr. Crab in an excellent humour, for he
had just had a toothsome breakfast off a nice bit of raw
herring, his tastes being like those of the Germans, who
prefer the raw herring to the boiled.

“Good morning, Mr. Crab.”

“Good morning, Jack,” said he, getting up to his place.
“Tt is very good of you to spare me so much of your time,
when you might be outside at your games.”

“Qh, I come because I like to hear you, and you promised
to tell me more about your neighbours, you know.”

“Quite right. Well, where shall I begin? I have so
many neighbours, as I told you—mussels, oysters, limpets,
sea-urchins, starfish, besides several kinds of fish. I think
I shall tell you something about those flower-like creatures,
of various colours, which you see sticking on the rocks.”

“T know them,” cried Jack, “they are called sea-
anemones.”

“Indeed! “we call them slyyedlzes, because, although they
look so pretty and innocent, their leaves are nothing but
feelers for catching unwary small animals that get within
their reach. I remember, when I was a little fellow, not
much bigger than the locket on your chain, sidling across
the top of one of them, fancying it was nothing but a
beautiful sea-weed, when I felt the soft leaf-feelers closing
rcun. me, and I was being gradually sucked down into its

B 2
8 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

stomach, when, luckily for me, my sharp shell cut the
creature in two, and I managed to escape from between the
halves. A day or so afterwards, I saw the two bits quite
happy, and fishing away—two sly-jellies instead of one!”

“Oh, Mr. Crab, what a story!” cried Jack laughing.

“Quite true, I assure you,” said Mr. C., with much
gravity. “And what is more, such things happen in the
sea every day.” * ae

Jack did not feel certain about it, but he was afterwards
informed by his papa that Mr. Crab was right.

“Now, Jack, look down at the gravel. Do you seea
huge whelk-shell moving about very quickly—far more
quickly than any real whelk could move ?”

“Yes, yes, I see it. Ha-ha! how it is hobbling about to
be sure!” and Jack burst into a fit of laughing, and indeed
for a time he almost forgot Mr. Crab, in watching the funny
tilts and tumbles of the clumsy yet fidgety old shell.

“That’s the comic fellow of the tank,” said Mr. C.
“Wait a minute, and you will see him for yourself.”

“Hooray! there he is! and I know him,” shouted Jack,
as he saw the tiny head and two little claws of a crab peep
out from under the big shell. “I know him! it’s the
Hermit crab. He is always half-dressed, and he has to
stick his hind quarters into whatever shell comes handiest.”

“Quite right, Jack; and now I will tell you a queer thing
that happened just the other morning. One of the sly-
jellies or an—an—what did you call them ?”

“ Anemones.”

“Yes, one of the anemones, quite a youngster, could get
no rest on account of his being tickled by Lazy Lobster’s
twotacula, and ”>—_

“ Zen-tacula,” interrupted Jack.

“And so,” continued Mr. C., taking no notice, “he slipped
down from his place, and got on to the Hermit’s old whelk-
shell, while crabbie was sound asleep inside. In the
morning, the Hermit woke up, and feeling something heavy
on the top of him, set off at a great rate round the gravel-




Mk. CRAL AND HIS ADVENTURES. 9

space, trying to shake it off. The anemone enjoyed the
ride immensely, spreading out its feelers to balance itself.”

“Just like the riders in the circus,” said Jack.

“And while it went round on its jovial ride, the limpets
canted up their shells to get a view, the whelks put out their
telescope eyes, the mussels gaped with astonishment, old
Lazy almost cracked his sides with mirth, and the merry
little fish above nearly drowned themselves with laughing,”
and here Mr. Crab’s feelers wiggle-waggled, and his nippers
snap-snapped like fingers and thumbs, as if he heartily
enjoyed the very remembrance of the fun.

“Soon after,’ continued he, “the poor Hermit, panting
after so hard a run, came clean out of the shell, regardless
of what beholders might think, and begged Master Anemone
to stop his fun, and get off the shell. After much slipping
and sliding Master A. did get off, and amid the greatest
laughter, poor crabbie got into his old shell, back foremost.”

“That was jolly good fun,” remarked Jack. “But, Mr.
Crab, you said a little ago, that the fish were nearly drowned.
How could a fish be drowned when water is its own proper
element ?”

“Easily. You know that a fish breathes by means of
gills. The water enters by the mouth. The air it contains
is kept by these gills, and then the water passes out behind.
If the water were to rush into the gills first, the fish would
not be able to breathe, and so it would be drowned. When
it is taken out of the water, the gills stick together like
bits of wet paper, and can not breathe then, so that the
fish dies.”

“ How are you able to live out of the water, then ?”

“ Oh, my gills are kept in a kind of box, which holds enough
water to keep them in good condition for breathing while
I take a ramble on the shore, or while I have a chat with
you, Jack. I have only to take a dip, and then I am all
right for a while,” and suiting the action to the word, Mr.
Crab let himself down to the bottom of the tank, and after
some time came up smiling to the surface.
10 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

“T could not do that,” sighed Jack, “but I know a big
fellow at our school who can dive, and keep under the
water for a good while.”

« Ah, but he cannot breathe while he is down, as I can,”
said Mr. C.

“Why?”

“Tam not sure, but I think your gills are not the same
as mine.”

“Oh, [have no gills; my breathing things are called lungs,
and I think yours are also called by the same name; and
now that I remember, my lungs can only breathe in air,
and when water gets in they can’t. I know that, every-
time I try to swim.”

“And so, you see, if you had water to breathe, you
would speedily drown.”

“Yes, thank you, I understand it all now.”

“ By the way, Jack, when you are going to have a new
suit, do you need to hide till it is ready.”

“Qh no,” replied Jack laughing, “I wear my old things
till the new ones come home from the tailor’s.”

“Happy boy!” cried Mr. C. “It is quite different with .
me. When my body gets too big for my shell, I drop out
of it, and have to hide beneath a rock, for, you see, | am
then so soft that even my own brothers would bite me if
they could.”

“Horrid!” cried Jack, “but do you know, one of my
brothers once bit my arm through my clothes!”

“O Jack, surely that is not true.”

“No, Mr. Crab, it is quite true.”

“Well, well, I never heard anything so dreadful. We
poor stupid things might easily make a mistake about a soft |
brother, and even eat him; but for boys to bite those they
know to be their brothers, and to bite what they cannot
eat, seems to me both wicked and wasteful.”

“And so it is; but please to tell me, Mr. Crab, do you
manage to get out of your shell quickly ?”

“Oh yes, just in a twinkling.”


MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. It

“ Do you break the old shell in pieces first ?”

“No, no. We come out clean, leaving the shell whole.”

“Every bit of you?”

“ Every bit.”

“Then do please tell me how to do it,” said Jack in his
most coaxing manner, “for mamma says I am very slow at
getting out of my clothes when it is bedtime, and it would
be so jolly to say ‘here goes!’ and be into my night-shirt
before she could say ‘Jack Robinson.’”

“JT would be very glad to tell you all about it,” replied
Mr. C., “if you had a shell the same as mine; but with
your buttons and strings, and so on—no, I don’t see how it
could be done.”

Jack felt disappointed, but said nothing, and as people
just then began to crowd into the aquarium, he had to say
“good bye” for that day.

Cuapter III.

As Jack was required at home next day, he did not go as
_usual to see his friend; but early on the day following he
was at the tank, and as Mr. Crab was waiting, the con-
versation was speedily renewed.
“T’ve been wearying for you,” said Mr. C. “Yesterday,
I waited till my lungs were almost dry in the hope of your
coming. But perhaps you are tired of my long stories ?”
“Not a bit,” said Jack, “I hope you are not nearly done
yet. Go on, please.”
“Well, since you are so kind, I shall tell you to-day of
a little adventure I had when I was quite small in size—
after my tail had been tucked up, you know.”
“Your tail!” exclaimed Jack. “Who ever heard of a
crab’s tail ?”
On this, Mr. C. begged Jack to take hold of him, and
to turn him on his back. This done,—for he was not
12 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

frightened—Mr. C. opened the part of his shell which I
have heard boys and girls call his “ purse.”

“Do you see that, Jack?” said Mr. C. from beneath.

SNES

“That was my tail when I was a baby-crab, in fact I
was at that time very like a common shrimp, and used my
tail as he does. By-and-bye, as I grew larger, it grew
bigger and broader, and at last was tucked up beneath me,
as you see. And now, please, turn me back to my old
position, for I don’t like lying with my legs in the air like
this.”

Mr. Crab’s request was complied with, and when he was
all right again, Jack thanked him for the information given,
and begged him to go on with his story.

“To begin then :—One fine summer day, some friends
and I agreed to have a little excursion to a certain stone-
quay ina Highland Loch. Our old folks had told us that
boats often came to this place, knocking off mussels and
other shell-fish with their sharp bows, while the people
that sailed in them pitched crumbs and other dainties into
the water. So, feeling sure of plenty to eat, we walked a
long way by a winding path of sand, and at length arrived
at the quay. Truly there was a feast of good things, and
we lost no time in beginning to eat. We were just in the
midst of it, when plump down into our midst came a great
big juicy mussel, its shell off, and all ready for eating.
There was a great rush for it, but the biggest fellow got
hold of it and, wonderful to tell! he had no sooner begun
to enjoy it, than he rose higher and higher through the ©
water, until he was clean out of sight! We had scarcely
recovered from our surprise, when down came another
mussel, if possible safpzer than the first. Again it was
seized, and up, up, rose friend number two. The same thing
was repeated again and again till five of us were away, and
I only remained; but it was only for a little, for I too got a
mussel, clutched it, began to eat it, and was hoisted clean
out of the water to find myself soon after, with my five


MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 13

friends, in what I was told was an old jelly-can. Oh dear!
Such a fearful row as there was in that can! Just fancy,
Jack, if six boys, with their four-and-twenty limbs, were
thrown higgledy-piggledy into a barrel without a chance
of getting out, what a scrimmage there would be! Well,
here were we six, with twelve nippers and forty-eight legs
amongst us, topsy-turvy, wiggledy-waggledy, clawing, scrap-
ing, pinching, and pushing each other with might and main;
and our woes made worse bythe wicked boy who had
caught us, standing above us, clapping his hands, and
shouting with laughter at the fine sport we made for him.”
Jack’s eyes twinkled, and he stuffed his handkerchief into
his mouth in case Mr. C. should see him laughing, and be
offended.

“ Shortly after,” continued Mr. Crab, “he carried us up
to a dusty road, and, having got a long switch, he tumbled
us all out, and tried to drive us before him like a flock of
sheep. But none of us cared to walk straight forward, so
we bolted here and there—some tried to get over the sea
wall, some tried to plunge into the ditch, in fact we scam-
pered in all directions, eager to escape, for we were almost
choked with dust, and nearly dead with fright. When our
poor weak legs refused to carry us further, we were switched
along the road ever so many yards at a time. Luckily for
me, I managed .to get out of the way, and, lame and
wearied, I limped down to the sea-side, and alone of all
the six, arrived at home, where I need not tell you, there
was great grief over the loss of so many interesting crab-
lings. But that boy was punished, Jack, punished by
myself without my knowing it till afterwards. Fora while I
never went near the stone quay without fear and trembling;
but, as nothing happened to me, I grew bolder, and went
quite close to it. Once I was busy over a bit of string, and
trying to see if it would eat, when I found the string being
pulled up. I tried hard to let go, but one of my nippers
had got entangled in a loose strand of the cord, and I could
not: I was therefore hauled ashore. This time there were
14 MR. CRAB AND FAIS ADVENTURES.

two boys; my captor and another, who was busy fishing.
My captor seemed to have some ill will to the other boy,
for no sooner did he get me free from the string, than
he walked on tip-toe to the place where the other was
looking earnestly into the water, expecting a nibble, and
dropped me down his back, between his shirt and his skin.
The place was hot and uncomfortable, so I scrambled and
scratched my hardest, while the poor fisher yelled with
the pain, and danced about as if he were mad. The
more he danced the deeper I went down, and the more
fiercely did I struggle to escape—pinching and clawing
at his smooth bare back in order to help myself out.
The boy’s yells brought many people rushing to the quay
—most of them thinking that he must have swallowed a
hook, or that a hook had gone into his eye. At last a big
hand came down his back, and I—the innocent cause of
all the disturbance—was dragged forth to view. Before
being pitched into the water, I had time to see that the
boy I had been hurting was none other than my old
enemy of the jelly-can and the crab-race! I did not
mean to cause him pain; I only wished to get out of an
unpleasant place; and yet, I should not wonder if his back,
that night, had much writing in red ink about the powers
of a crab. Never be cruel to the lower animals, Jack,
for if you be, you are sure to be punished in the long
run. But I am getting dry now, and you have waited
long enough for to-day. If you come to-morrow, I have a
story to tell you of a fight I once had.” .

“Qh, thank you, thank you, Mr. Crab, I shall be delighted
to come, if I be quite well, and mamma has nothing for.me
to do. Good-bye!” and Jack went home, taking hearty fits
of laughing by the way, as he remembered the comic story
of the crab race.


MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 15

CuaptTer IV.

“Goop morning, Jack,” said Mr. Crab, as his young friend
came up next morning, radiant with expectation.

“Good morning, Mr. Crab, and now for ‘the fight.’”

“Dear me, you are in a great hurry; but I'll tell you all
about it directly;” and settling himself on a nice bit of
- sea-weed, which he had trailed up for the purpose, he went
on thus :—

“After a long and dreary winter one year, when food
was scarce and work was hard, I resolved to visit a distant
part of the sea-bottom, where, as I was told, there was
plenty of food. I shall not weary you with an account of
my journey; it is enough to tell you that at length I
reached a beautiful region, where there were tracts of fine
-sand, splendid clumps of sea-weed, and here and there the
great brown rocks, with quite a choice of holes in which to
stay. I picked out one of the best, and was just settling
down after a dainty meal of sweet sea-slugs, when into my
place came one of the prettiest young lady-crabs I had ever
seen. Her shell was lovely, her eyes jet black, and her
claws the perfection of elegance and grace. When first
she saw me, she moved shyly backwards, as if anxious to
escape my notice; but I begged her to come in and make
herself at home—which she could do all the more readily
since it was her own house of which I had coolly taken
possession. I suppose, too, that she felt satisfied with my
appearance, for, after a little, she became quite chatty, and
told me all I wished to learn about this part of the sea.
One thing alone, she said, was wanting to make her own
happiness and that of her neighbours complete—and that
was the death or expulsion of the great Velvet-Fiddler.
About a mile off, in a thickly weeded part of the water,
the monster lived. He was gigantic in size, and was the
terror of the sea-bottom for miles around. His chief
+

16 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

delight was to fight every crab he met, and never to leave
off till he had either crippled or killed his opponent.
Besides that, he was the horror of a small colony of Green-
back Crabs, whole families of whom he had slain and
afterwards eaten. In the caves about this dreadful abode,
she said, the skeletons and claws of the multitudes he had
killed, were to be found lying an inch deep. He had but
recently dared to attack the beautiful Shelline, as my
handsome young crab was called; and she shewed me one
of her toes which he had rudely broken. As she told me
these things, my heart leapt at the thought that I might
be the means of punishing the cruel monster, for it is ever
the pride of the male to defend the female of his race

“¢Shelline” said I, ‘I shall not rest till this place is rid |
of this wicked monster. This instant I shall sally forth
in quest of him. Kindly examine my armour. My nip-
pers, I know, are in fine pinching order, and ready for the
fray |’

“* Bravest!’ she replied, after a careful inspection, ‘your
shell-armour is tight and without a flaw. Go, then,’ she
continued, with tears in her eyes—at least I think there
were, for I could not see aright for the water in my own,
‘Go, then, and may you be successful in your enterprise.
Wear this for my sake, and “when this you see, remember
me.”’ With that, she presented me with a pretty blade of
dulse, pulled fresh and glossy from the side of the rock.

“JT placed it in my bosom, and went forth on my venture.
The day was lovely. The water above me was green as
emerald, the sands below me yellow as gold. ‘Oh that I
had the fins of a fish,’ thought I, ‘that with lightning speed
I might dart to the den of the crab-slayer!’ But it was
no use wishing, so I strode onwards, striking terror by my
warlike mien to the heart of flounder and sole, and skate
and halibut, as they sped from before me. Long eels
wriggled quickly from my path; pink star-fish lay flat at
my approach, and spiky urchins rolled aside to let me pass.
When I was more than half-way, my progress was delayed


MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 17

by a thick grove of long string-like weeds through which
'] had to travel; and the trouble I had among them, caused
-me to feel somewhat tired before I reached the other side.
Here, however, I found the settlement of the Greenbacks—
creatures very small in size compared with myself—but bold
-and enterprising. I fancy they took me to be the crab-
slayer at first, for they fled at my approach, and as they
were nearly all lame, their efforts at running were not very
successful. Speedily I managed to assure them that my
intentions were peaceful, and that I had come for the
purpose of ridding them of their bloodthirsty neighbour.
No sooner had I said this, than they danced around me,
_lame legs and all. They brought me all kinds of nice
things to eat, so that after a short time I felt quite
refreshed, and continued my journey. Two of the oldest
colonists undertook to shew me the way, and as we went
along, they told me many stories of the monster’s cruelty.
They oped I would be prosperous, but they were afraid
lest I should have the same fate as many others who had tried
before. The monster, it seemed, had a way of dragging
the opponent, whom he could neither maim nor kill, to the
edge of a tremendous precipice that was behind his#den,
and throwing him over it. At last we came to the entrance
of a gloomy weed-forest, and my companions wishing me
every success, left me to pursue my way alone. I had not
gone many paces, when a terrible figure rose up before me.
It had great glowering eyes, a thick rugged-looking body,
and legs and claws so long and fierce, that my courage
began to give way. He was at least thrice my own size,
and as he came stalking out from among the slimy weeds,
and into the sickly twilight, I was so frightened, that I had
half a mind to turn and run. A look, however, at the
love-token which Shelline had given me, restored me to
myself, and I made bold to stay.
“«Wretched crab,’ said he, addressing me in the crustiest
of tones, ‘what business have you here ?’
“Wretched, thyself, cried I, ‘thou heartless creature, thou
18 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

slayer of the innocent, thou villainous crab-maimer, I am
here to slay the slayer, and to give thy claws to the Green-
backs !’

“Ha, ha, he scornfully replied, ‘come on then, and I
shall scrunch thee as I would the veriest periwinkle !’

“With that we came to close quarters, and, grappling
together, we wrestled furiously. For some time neither of
us gained any advantage; but I felt myself being gradually
dragged among the slippery weeds that warped about us, or
broke as'we dashed wildly hither and thither. Nearer and
nearer were we coming to the awful precipice about which
I had been warned. I put forth all my strength, and every
joint seemed to crack with the strain; but all seemed of no
use. In vain I plied my nippers on my enemy’s stubborn
shell; I could not break it, nor even crack it. I turned, as a
last chance, upon his long legs, and, lo, they bent, they broke
with the squeeze I gave them. Snap, snap went one after
another, and I thought myself safe, when suddenly I lost
foothold, and over the precipice we went together, the
wretch’s claws grasping my left nipper as if in a vice. With
my right I tried to catch at the weeds that grew on the
face.of the rock, as we reeled and whirled down, down,
down to certain death on the stones below. For a few
moments every effort was useless, but at last 1 grasped a
strong weed, and held on hard. I could do nothing for my
own safety, however, so long as the creature held my left
nipper, and so I hung there scarcely knowing what to do.
By-and-bye, to my great joy, the monster relaxed his grip,
and seemed about to slip off altogether, when he let go
my nipper, and caught one of my legs. To fling off that
leg was the work of a moment, and then, though wounded,
I was free. I managed to drag myself slowly and painfully,
by means of weeds, to the top of the precipice, where I lay
down to rest, and after this, all that happened to me is like
a dream.» I became unconscious, and when I awoke I was
in Shelline’s abode, being carefully tended by her loving
claws. I heard afterwards that a large company of Green-
MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 19

backs, curious to know the result of the fight, had crept
nearer and nearer, till at length they found me out, and
with much labour dragged me home. As the reward of
my bravery I was permitted to marry Shelline, and we
lived very happily together till the sad event which tore
her from me, and brought me to this place.”

“That is a capital story,” said Jack, drawing a long
breath; “but is that quite true about throwing off your leg,
Mr. Crab? I have just been counting the number of your
legs, and I don’t find one wanting. Have you a wooden
one ?”

“There, there You have just asked two questions.
Well, I answer ‘yes’ to the first, and ‘no’ to the second.
Crabs can throw off their legs if they choose, and others
grow on in their place.”

“ That zs queer,” said Jack. “I wish very much it were
the same with us. But I must go home now, Mr. Crab;
and so, thanking you very much for your story, and trying
to remember that it is the pride of the boys to defend the
girls, I must say good-bye,” and off he went in great spirits.

CHAPTER V.

“On Mr. Crab,” cried Jack, as, next morning, he ran up to
the tank. “Oh Mr. Crab, Iam so sorry, but a letter has
come to-day from Uncle John, asking mamma to allow me
to go to him on a visit. Mamma is writing just now, say-
ing I may go, and I shall be off by the first steamer in the
morning. Oh dear, and I shall not hear any more of your
nice stories for a long while, because before my visit to
Uncle is at an end, my holidays will be over, and I shall not
get back to Rosaport any more this year.”

“JT am quite vexed to hear it,” said Mr. C., ‘for I have
really enjoyed having a nice boy to talk to; and, indeed,

it was a great pleasure to me to tell you all about my past
(OD
20 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

_ history. I had many other adventures to tell you, but
these I must keep for you till another year, if we should
both live so long.”

“Won't you tell me one to-day, Mr. Crab.”

“ Oh certainly, if you wish it.”

“] wish it very much, Mr. Crab.”

“Then what shall it be about? Let me see!” and
Mr. C. turned up his horny little eyes, as if thinking what
to say.

“T know what I would like to hear about,” said Jack ; “I
should like you to tell me all about the sad event that
caused you to be imprisoned in the aquarium.”

“T will,” said Mr. C., and proceeded as follows :—*“ At
the request of a large family of youngsters, Shelline and I
agreed to give a grand party, and this was the more easy to
do on account of a storm, which had been the means of
killing many kinds of small fish by dashing them against
the rocky shore. All who were asked to the party had
said they would come, so that a good deal had to be done
to prepare for the occasion. The spot we chose for it was
floored with snow-white lime, being just cockle and other
shells ground small by the waves.”

“Lime!” exclaimed Jack, “where did they get the lime?”

“Out of the water, to be sure; for, though you cannot
_ see it, there is enough of it to give all the creatures of our
kind the shells they wear. When they die, the lime used
in making these shells is just given back to the sea, and it
is prepared by the waves for the animals that need it.”

‘Oh yes, I understand,” said Jack: “please go on about
the party.”

“Tn the midst, then, of this pretty white floor,” continued
Mr. C., “we hada large flat stone fringed all round with
green sea-weed. This was to be our table; and it had to
be a big one, for you know, Jack, we cannot sit down on a
chair as you can, and so we had to get up on the table at
supper-time. Surrounding the place, were a vast number
of tall brown tangles, which just looked like pillars; and,
MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. ai

overhead was a roof of beautiful purple leaves, with spaces
between to let through the soft moonlight we expected to
shine upon us on the party night. Our boy-crabs were
busy hunting for days before, while the girl-crabs stayed at
home to help their mother. Before sun-down on the great
day, our table was spread with all sorts of good things.”

“T should like to hear what things you had,” said
Jack, who thought himself well able to judge of a good
supper.

«* At the one end,” said Mr..C., “we had a fine eel curled
round and round with his head sticking up in the middle ;
at the other, a fat sole, his white side uppermost; along the
sides were different kinds of little fish, each one in an
oyster shell; and in the centre, a fan-shaped shell full of
shrimps, and a monster mussel, the pride of the feast.
This huge creature had defied every effort to get at him for
days; but luckily, my eldest boy-crab, a brave little fellow,
by dint of earnest watching, succeeded at last in catching
him while he was yawning, and dragged him home in
triumph by the beard. Of course many of the creatures on
our table had been dead for several days, but I suppose
you know that some kinds of animal food are all the better
for being kept. At length the night came; everything
was ready, and the guests were beginning to arrive; but,
to our great disappointment, the sky was cloudy, and the
moon not likely to make her appearance. This would have
spoilt all our little arrangements, and our supper would have
become a regular scramble, but for the efforts of Shelline
and myself to keep order. Suddenly, to our amazement
and delight, the fringe round our table began to sparkle
and glitter, and shortly hung like beads of gold on threads
of emerald; the tall tangle-pillars were next lit up with
countless little jets of flame; and, finally, the purple dome
of weeds above us was crusted over with dazzling diamonds.
Our party-hall thus became more lovely than the fairest of
fairy palaces.”

“Splendid! splendid!” shouted Jack ; but suddenly sober-
22 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

ing he added, “but look here, Mr. Crab, is this all true, or
is it only a ‘make up’ ?”

Mr. Crab frowned and seemed offended.

“Perhaps,” said he, “you do not know that sometimes
the sea is full of very little creatures that glisten in the dark
like sparks of fire 2?”

“Oh yes, Mr. Crab, I have heard of them; and I beg
your pardon for appearing not to believe you. I have seen
what you mean, when we have been sailing in our boat, and
the oar made great flashes of light at every dip. They
are said to be phos—phos—tuts! What do you call that
stuff on the end of a match that makes it kindle ?”

“J am sure I don’t know,” said Mr. C.

“Oh, I have it! They are said to be phosphorescent—
yes, that’s the word,” and Jack looked up with conscious
pride. ‘

“And a very long: word it is; I wonder that a little
fellow like you can remember such a big one.”

“Pray, go on with the party. I am sorry I interrupted
you.”

“Tt did not take long to get supper over, and then the
youngsters had great fun with cracker-weeds, games at
hunt the cockle, &c., wrestling matches, walking round the
edge of the table on their hindmost legs, their nippers in
the air, or trying who could get up quickest when tumbled
on their backs. When they were tired, a walk was pro-
posed, so Shelline and I led the way, and the rest followed
in pairs. We went outside to see the illuminations, which
were everywhere as bright and beautiful as in our party-
hall. On we went, forgetting time and distance in the
pleasures of our walk. All at once, there burst upon our
view something we had never seen before. It was, as we
then thought, a palace, about the length of this tank, with
~ beautiful arches lighted up with the strange fires, and with
open spaces between. It had a circular entrance at both
ends, and, curious to see it from the inside, Shelline and I
walked in, and, to our alarm, found ourselves drop suddenly
MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES. 23

down, the moment we crossed the threshold. The rest
followed, and all were amused at the sudden down-come at
the door-step. We then walked about admiring the place,
and met two or three good-looking lobsters doing the same.
At length, thinking we had been away from home long
enough, we made for the entrance, but found, to our surprise
and horror, that it was high above our reach. We rushed
to the other entrance. It wasthesame. Then there was a
panic! Our joy was turned to woe, as, with frantic gestures,
we sped hither and thither, now dashing ourselves against
the sides, now trying in vain to squeeze ourselves through
the open spaces; and when we found all our efforts useless,
we lay huddled in a corner awaiting the awful fate that
somehow we all expected. The lobsters did not give in
so soon, for they kept feeling here and pushing there for a
long time. Some of their acquaintances outside, seeing
their position, tried to haul them through by their feelers,
but they did not succeed in doing more than hurting the
poor prisoners. Morning dawned, and what we had taken
for a palace, was nothing but a big cage made of wooden
hoops and cordage. Shortly, our prison was violently
shaken, and we felt ourselves being dragged out of the
water. We came ashore in the bay of Rosaport, and found
some rough-looking men standing about us. They seemed
pleased with what they had caught. We were taken out
one by one, and put into acreel or basket. While this was
going on, a gentleman came up, and spying me, he said, ‘ That
is a splendid fellow. How much will you let me have him
for?’ and they struck a bargain, the upshot of which was,
that the gentleman carried me off in a net bag and put me
in this tank. In the hurry, I-did not see Shelline, nor have
I heard of her since. Can you think what has become of
her, Jack 2?”

“Well, Mr. Crab, I am rather afraid that—but I don’t
like to tell you;” and Jack spoke feelingly.

“You don’t think they have b— boiled her, Jack ?”

“] think they have.”
24 MR. CRAB AND HIS ADVENTURES.

“Oh dear, dear! poor Shelline!” and Mr. C., forgetting
Jack in his sorrow, plunged down to the bottom of the
tank, and hid himself in its gloomiest corner.

Jack was very sorry for him, and came away bearing
on his mind the evils of such prying curiosity as led to the
disasters here recorded.

THE RIVER.

fc H, tell me, pretty river!
Whence do thy waters flow ? -
And whither art thou roaming,
So pensive and so slow ?”

“My birthplace was the mountain,
My nurse the April showers ;

My cradle was a fountain,
O’er-curtained by wild flowers.

“One morn I ran away,
A madcap, hoyden rill—
And many a prank that day
I played adown the hill!

“And then, ’mid meadowy banks,
I flirted with the flowers,

That stooped, with glowing lips,
To woo me to their bowers.

“But these bright scenes are o'er,
And darkly flows my wave,
I hear the ocean roar,
And there must be my grave!”
Goodrich,


THE CHILDREN’S HOUR. 25

THE CHILDREN’S HOUR.

ETWEEN the dark and the daylight,
When the night is beginning to lower,

Comes a pause in the day’s occupations
That is known as the Children’s Hour.

I hear in the chamber above me
The patter of little feet,

The sound of a door that is opened,
And voices soft and sweet.

From my study I see in the lamplight
Descending the broad hall stair,

Grave Alice and laughing Allegra,
And Edith with golden hair.

A whisper and then a silence ;
Yet I know by their merry eyes
They are plotting and planning together
To take me by surprise.

A sudden rush from the stairway,
A sudden raid from the hall !

By three doors left unguarded
They enter my castle wall!

They climb up into my turret
O’er the arms and back of my chair;
If I try to escape they surround me;
They seem to be everywhere.
26

THE CHILDREN’S HOUR.

They almost devour me with kisses,
Their arms about me entwine,

Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen
In his Mouse Tower on the Rhine!

Do you think, O blue-eyed banditti,
Because you have scaled the wall,
Such an old moustache as I am
Is not a match for you all ?

I have you fast in my fortress,
And will not let you depart,

But put you down into the dungeon
In the round-tower of my heart.

And there will I keep you for ever,
Yes, for ever and a day,

Till the walls shall crumble to ruin,
And moulder in dust away !


AVE HOLD
JO Hows OF THE

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_ FOR THEY Sow Norgy\
<< saneither do they reap nor



of Gather into barns;
yet your PEAvENLY FATHER





: fe feedeth them +
- ae “ai. ARE



UNCLE BEN’S STORY. 29



















UNCLE BEN’S STORY.

Uncle Ben is a retired sailor, lyin in a village; and he tells this story to two
little girls, Flora Lee and Nellie Green.

ie HEN I was a young man, I went on a whaling
voyage. I will tell you how whales are caught.
“A whale is the largest sea animal; some are a
good deal longer than my barn there. Ships that go out
to catch whales are often three or four years away from
home, and go off thousands of miles.

“The ship has a great many boats, which are hoisted up
at the sides. The men go out in the boats, and, when they
catch a whale, tow it to the ship.

“Almost at the top of the mast, and nearly a hundred
feet from the water, there are two sticks, which are called
the ‘cross-trees.’ When the ship reaches any part of the
ocean where whales are found, men are sent up to the cross-
trees to look out.

“When a whale is seen, one of the men calls out, ‘There
D
30 UNCLE BENS STORY,

she blows!’ This great fish draws water into his mouth,
and then blows it up in the air; and this is what they mean
by ‘blowing.’

“When the men on deck hear this cry, they find out
where the whale is, and then get out the boats and go after
him. They row up to the huge monster of the deep with
very little noise, and then throw one or two harpoons into
him.

“A harpoon isa kind of iron spear, with a wooden handle,
to which a long rope is fastened. When the whale feels the
iron, he dives down into the deep, or swims away as fast as
he can. Sometimes he drags the boat after him, at a fright-
ful speed, for many miles; and it often happens that the
men in the boat have to cut the line, in order to save their
lives.

“When the whale is weak from loss of blood, and tired
out, the boat again steals upon him, and a long lance is
_ thrust into his body. ‘This kills him, if it is well done.

“Very often, when the men ‘attack the whale, he turns
upon the boat, and breaks it all to pieces with a single
slap of his tail, or crushes it all to bits in his great mouth.
The sailors always have a hard time, and are offen killed
in their efforts to conquer the whale.

“When they get the whale alongside the ship, they cut
out the fat, or ‘blubber,’ in long strips, and hoist it on
board the vessel. It is then chopped up in small pieces,
and tried out in great kettles. The oil is put into barrels,
and stowed in the hold.

“T have told you how to catch a whale, so that you may
understand the story which I am now going to tell you.

“T sailed in the ship Fame, for the South Pacific Ocean,
long before either one of you was born. We went round
Cape Horn, which is a very stormy place, and came near
being cast away in a heavy gale.

“But when. we had got into the Pacific Ocean we had
fine weather, and at last reached the ‘feeding ground.’
Though the whale is a monstrous creature, he feeds upon
UNCLE BEN’S STORY. 31

very small animals called ‘squid.’ Of course he must live
where he can find his food.

“One day I was up on the cross-trees, looking out on
the ocean for whales. I had with me a boy of about twelve
years of age. He was as pretty a boy as ever I saw. He
had fair, brown hair, which curled in ringlets on his cheeks
and neck.

“We all loved that boy, for he was a brave and noble
little fellow. He was gentle and kind to the men, and
always obeyed the orders of the officers at once. He was
our pet, and we all treated him just like a younger brother.

“ He could read well, and wrote a handsome hand; and
when he first came on board the ship, I knew he couldn't
be the son of very poor parents, for he did not speak like
boys brought up in the street, and his hand was as white
and soft as that of a fine lady.

“One day I was up on the cross-trees, and George was
with me, as I said before. We were on the lookout for
whales, and he was just as anxious to discover one as
though he had been the captain of the ship.

“While we were sitting there, we fell into a conversation ;
and I asked George how it happened that he came to sea.
He was reluctant to tell me at first, but after a while he
confessed that he had run away from home, and that his
mother did not know where he was. I asked him if he had
ever written to her; and he said he had not, adding, that it
would make her very unhappy if she knew he was on board
a whale ship. But I told him she would be a great deal more
unhappy at not hearing from him at all; and so, after much
persuasion, he promised me that he would write to her.

“ Pretty soon after we had this talk, I saw a whale far off
on the sea. Ina few minutes the men had a boat out, and
George and I were with them pulling away towards the
great fish. :

“We rowed close up to the whale, and sent one iron into
him. Before we could strike him again, he turned upon us,
and with one blow smashed our frail boat all to DIececu:
32 UNCLE BEN’S STORY.

“Dear me!” exclaimed little Flora, with a shudder.

“ Another boat from the ship picked us up. George was
a good swimmer; but I saw that he was sinking this time,
and I bore him up in my arms till he was taken into the
boat. I found that he was badly hurt, for his face was
deadly pale, and he was so faint he could hardly speak.
We had lost the whale ; so we went back to the ship.

“T carried George in my arms to the deck, and then bore
him to his bunk in the forecastle.”

“That was a room to sleep in—wasn’t it?” asked Nellie.

“Yes, child; but it wasn’t any such place as your cham-
ber. It was cold, dark, and damp. I laid the poor boy in
his bunk, and tried to find out where he was hurt; but he
was so weak he could tell me nothing.

“Tf he had been my own son, I could not have felt any
worse. I could not help thinking of his poor mother, as I
sat by the side of his bunk, watching over him. What
would she have said if she could see her darling child, sick
in that dirty, dark place? How she would have wept !

“T did not think poor George was very badly hurt; I did
not want to think so, and I suppose this is the reason why
I did not. The captain went down to see him, and then
got some medicine for him.

“In the evening he seemed to be a little better, and I
hoped he would be well in a day or two. He talked a
little with me, and told me where his pains were. He
spoke of his mother and his home, and seemed to feel
very sad to be so far away from them.

“T sat by his side till eight bells—that is, till twelve -
o'clock. He slept much of the time, and as I bent over
him and listened to his quiet breathing, I thought he was
better, and that he would be able to go on deck the next day.

“You don’t know much about the life of a whaler, I sup-
pose; so you can’t tell how tired and worn out he gets
sometimes. The boats are often out all night, and the men
have to row, when they are so sleepy and tired that they
can hardly hold their heads up.
UNCLE BEN’S STORY. 38

“Well, I had been out in the boat all the night before,
and I was just as tired asa man could be. I could hardly
keep my eyes open, as I sat at the side of the poor sick
boy; but I did not once lose myself while I was on this
duty.

Oat twelve o'clock, finding that George slept easily, I
called one of my shipmates to take my place. He was
very willing to do so; but before I left him, I charged him,
over and over again, to keep awake and mind the boy. He
promised me he would, and I went to my bunk.

“T was so tired that I slept very soundly till near
four o’clock in the morning. My first thought was of poor
George, and jumping out of my berth, I hastened to his
side. My shipmate whom I had left to watch him was
fast asleep.

“T felt very angry with him; but such was my desire to
learn how the sick boy was, that I could think of nothing
else. I looked into the bunk, and all was as still as when I
had left, and I thought he was asleep.

“All was still and calm in the berth—so still and calm
that I trembled with fear. I listened to hear his breathing,
but no sound reached my ear. I then placed my hand
upon his brow. It was as cold as marble.

“ Poor George was dead !

“ Oh, children, I can’t tell you how I felt then. It seemed
just as though our angel had been taken out of the ship. I
wept for him as if he had been my son or my brother.

“From that sleep in which I had left him he had never
awakened, for he lay just as he was at midnight. There
was not a dry eye in the ship when it was told that poor
George, whom we all loved, was dead.

“We dressed him in his clean clothes, and bore his body
upon deck, where we covered it with the American flag.
At noon the sad cry of ‘All hands to bury the dead’ sounded
gloomily through the ship.

“The body of poor George, sewed up in a piece of sail-
cloth, was placed on a plank, still covered with the Ameri-

D2
34 UNCLE BEN’S STORY.

can flag. It was raised upon the rail, ready to be cast into
the sea.

“The captain, with his eyes brimful of tears, and hardly
able to speak from grief, read prayers; and all was ready to
- lower the body into the deep. The canvas had been left
open at the head, and the wind blew the fair brown locks
upon the cold brow of poor George, just as when he had
stood by my side on the cross-trees.

“One by one the sailors kissed his marble cheeks,—
kissed him for his mother,—and wiped the tears from their
brown faces. The canvas was sewed up, the word was
given, and the body slid off the plank into the great ocean,
there to sleep till the graves give up their dead.

“ The ship sailed away upon her course, and it was many
and many a day before we ceased to think of the poor boy
in his ocean grave.” .

LITTLE BY LITTLE.

NE step, and then another,
And the longest walk is ended;

One stitch, and then another,
And the largest rent is mended;
One brick upon another,
And the highest wall is made;
One flake upon another,
And the deepest snow is laid.

So the little coral workers,

By their slow but constant motion,
Have built those pretty islands

In the distant, dark blue ocean;
And the noblest undertakings

Man’s wisdom hath conceived,
By oft-repeated efforts

Have been patiently achieved.












BUNNY. 37

BUNNY.

c

NE evening last spring,” writes a lady, “my dog
barked at something behind a flower-pot that stood
in the door-porch. I thought a toad was there,

but it proved to be a very young rabbit, a wild one. The

poor thing was in a state of great exhaustion, as if it had been
chased, and had been a long time without food. It was quiet
in the hand, and allowed a little warm milk to be put into its

mouth. Upon being wrapped in flannel and placed in a

basket by the fire, it soon went to sleep. When it awoke,

more milk was offered in a small spoon, which this time
was sucked with right good will; and the little creature
continued to take the milk in this way for several days,
until strong enough to help itself out of acup. It appeared
to become tame immediately, soon learned its name, and I
never saw a happier or merrier little pet. Its gambols on
the carpet were full of fun. When tired with play, it would
feed on the green food and nice bits placed there for it, and
when satisfied, it used to climb up the skirt of the dress,
nestle in the lap or under the arm, and go to sleep. If
this indulgence could not be permitted, then Bunny (as we
called it) would spring into my work-basket, and take a nap
there. At midday it liked to sit in the sun on the window
seat, then it would clean its fur and long ears, each being
separately drawn down, and held by one foot while brushed
by the other. This duty performed, it would stretch at full
length, and basking in the sunbeams, fall asleep. Strange
to tell, all this was going on with the dog in the room, who
had been made to understand that the rabbit was not to be
touched; stranger still, the rabbit ceased to shew any fear
of the dog, but, on the contrary, delighted in jumping on
the dog’s back, and running after his tail. These liberties,
however, were not pleasing to Jewel; they were evidently
only endured in obedience to the commands of his mistress.
38 BUNNY.

Not approving of one favourite being made happy at the
other’s expense, I was obliged to interfere on these occasions,
and call Bunny to order.

“ Being frequently told that a wild rabbit could not be so
thoroughly domesticated, but that it would return to the
woods if it regained its liberty, I feared that if mine got
loose it would certainly run away. Yet I wished it should
be sometimes in the garden to feed upon such green food
as it liked best; for this purpose I fastened it with a collar
and small chain, and, thus secured, led it about. One
evening the chain unfortunately broke, and Bunny was
free! At first we saw it running from place to place with
wild delight, but after a little while we could not see it, and
we hunted in vain under the shrubs, calling it by name
until it became dark; we then ceased to search any longer,
and I concluded my pretty pet was gone.

“ Before retiring for the night, I gave a last look out of
the window, in the hope I might chance to see it once
more. “The moon was then shining brightly, and I dis-
tinctly saw my little rabbit sitting at the door with head
and ears erect, as if listening for its friends within, anxious,
perhaps, for its accustomed nice supper and soft warm bed.
I hastened down stairs to let it in, calling it by name, when,
the moment I opened the door, a strange cat darted for-
ward, seized it by the neck, and bore it screaming away!
Of course, every effort of mine was useless to overtake
the cat.

“T feel convinced that this fond little creature would not
have left us to return to the woods. That it did not come
when called was the effect of excessive joy for its newly-
found freedom, which must have been doubly delightful
while we were near, as no doubt it saw us when we could
not see it, and was only quietly feeding when we thought it
was gone away.

“Four months must have been the extent of poor
Bunny’s short life.”
CASABIANCA. a 30

CASABIANCA.

HE boy stood on the burning deck,
Whence all but he had fled ;
The flame, that lit the battle’s wreck,
Shone round him—o’er the dead.
Yet beautiful and bright he stood,
As born to rule the storm ;
A creature of heroic blood,

A proud though child-like form |

The flames rolled on—he would not go,
Without his father’s word ;—

That father, faint in death below,
His voice no longer heard.

He called aloud: “Say, father! say
If yet my task be done ?”—

He knew not that the chieftain lay
Unconscious of his son.

* Speak, father!” once again he cried,
“Tf I may yet be gone!”

But now the booming shots replied,
And fast the flames rolled on.

Upon his brow he felt their breath,
And in his waving hair,

And looked from that lone post of death,
In still, yet brave despair ;

And shouted but once more aloud,
“My father! must I stay ?”

While o’er him fast, through sail and shroud
The wreathing fires made way :
40

CASABIANCA.

They wrapped the ship in splendour wild,
‘They caught the flag on high,

And streamed above the gallant child,
Like banners in the sky.

There came a burst of thunder sound,—
The boy !—oh, where was he?
Ask of the winds, that far around
With fragments strewed the sea,—
With mast, and helm, and pennon fair,
That well had borne their part !
But the noblest thing that perished there,
Was that young faithful heart!
Mrs. Hemans.










ANECDOTES OF ELEPHANTS, 41

ANECDOTES OF ELEPHANTS: |

LEPHANTS are very grateful for kindness, and often
become strongly attached to their keepers. They
remember persons for a long time, and will some-

times manifest great pleasure at seeing an old acquaintance.
Many years ago, a little girl came from Calcutta to Boston
in a ship which brought an elephant. She used to play
with him, and give him things to eat, and he became very
fond of her.

About a year after, she went to see a menagerie, in which
there was an elephant. She looked at him without remem-
bering that he was the same one which had come from India
with her, and screamed with terror when the huge beast
put his trunk around her, and drew her towards him, as he
had been accustomed to do. But she soon recognised her
old friend.

An English officer says, that he once saw a woman in
India give a young baby in charge of an elephant. So
huge and clumsy a creature seems a strange nurse for an
infant; but he took care of it tenderly and skilfully. The
child would crawl about and get under his legs, but he
would never set his foot upon it.

The elephant was tied by a chain, and whenever the
baby was disposed to creep off too far, and out of his reach,
he would lift it with his trunk as gently as a mother, and.
move it back again to the place from which it started. It
must have been a funny sight to see an elephant tending a
baby.

But the elephant remembers injuries and insults as well
as kindnesses, and will sometimes take vengeance upon the
offender, even after the latter has forgotten the wrong. An
elephant driver once had a cocoa-nut given him, which, out
42 ANECDOTES OF ELEPHANTS.

of wantonness, he endeavoured to break by striking it twice
against his elephant’s head.

The next day the animal saw some cocoa-nuts exposed
in the street for sale, and, taking one of them up with his
trunk, he beat it about the driver’s head till the man was
completely dead. This comes, said the author who related
the circumstance, of jesting with elephants.

In the city of Delhi, in India, a tailor was in the habit of
giving some fruit, or other delicacy, to an elephant that
daily passed by his shop; and so accustomed had the ani-
mal become to this usage, that he regularly put his trunk in
at the window to receive the expected treat.

One day the tailor, being out of humour, thrust his needle
into the beast’s proboscis, telling him to be gone, as he had
nothing to give him. The creature passed on, apparently
unmoved, but, on coming to the next dirty pool of water,
filled his trunk, and returned to the shop window, into
which he discharged the whole contents, thoroughly
drenching the tailor and all his goods.

An elephant, kept near Paris, once gave a curious in-
stance of sagacity. A painter was desirous of drawing him
in an uncommon attitude, which was that of holding his
trunk raised in the air, with his mouth open. The painter's
boy, in order to keep the animal in this posture, threw fruit
into his mouth.

But the boy frequently deceived him by making offers
only of throwing the fruit. At length he grew angry at the
mockery ; and, as if he knew that the painter’s intention of
drawing him was the cause of it, instead of revenging him-
self upon the lad, he turned his resentment on the master,
and, taking up a quantity of water in his trunk, threw it
upon the painter’s paper and spoiled it,
PULL IT UP BY THE ROOT. 43

RULE IT UP BY THE -ROOT;

“ ATHER, here is a dock,” said Frank, as he was at
work with his father in the garden: “shall I cut it
off close to the root ?”

“No,” said his father; “that will not do. I have cut it
up several times; but the weed grows again, stronger than
ever. Pull rt up by the root; for in no other way can you
kill it.”

Frank pulled again and again at the dock; but the root
was so deep in the ground, that he could not start it up.
So he asked his father to come and help him; and the
weed was soon destroyed.

“This dock-root, Frank,” said his father, “which is an
evil and fast growing weed in a garden, puts me in mind of
the evil things that grow so fast in the hearts of children.
A bad passion, even when found out, is hard to be removed.
It is of no use to trifle with it. There is no way to master
and destroy it but to pull zt up by the root! You have
often seen in our garden, Frank, that when the weeds are
allowed to grow, they spoil all the plants and flowers near
them. So it is with evil passions in the heart of a child.
If a little boy has a bad temper, we must not expect to find
him kind and cheerful, or at all anxious to make others
happy. And a little girl who is idle, we need not expect to
find neat, gentle, or pleasant. As weeds injure the flowers
and useful plants, so bad passions will injure agreeable traits
and good habits. Ifa child is disobedient to his parents
or teacher, we might as well look for a rose or a tulip ina
bed of nettles, as to hope to find in his heart those graces
and good desires that we love to see growing there. So
let all bad passions and wrong desires be pulled up by the

yoot {”
LT LAMB,
44 LHE P.

THE PET. LAMB

HE dew was falling fast, the stars began to blink ;
I heard a voice: it said, “Drink, pretty creature,
drink!”
And, looking o’er the hedge, before me I espied
A snow-white mountain lamb, with a maiden at its side.

No other sheep were near; the lamb was all alone,
And by a slender cord was tethered to a stone ;

With one knee on the grass did the little maiden kneel,
While to that mountain lamb she gave its evening meal.

“ Rest, little one,” she said; “hast thou forgot the day

When my father found thee first, in places far away ?

Many flocks were on the hills, but thou wert owned by
none,

And thy mother from thy side for evermore was gone.

“Thy limbs will shortly be twice as stout as they are now;
Then I’ll yoke thee to my cart, like a pony to the plough; .
My playmate thou shalt be; and when the wind is cold,
Our hearth shall be thy bed, our house shall be thy fold.

“See, here thou need’st not fear the raven in the sky ;
Both night and day thou’rt safe—our cottage is hard by.
Why bleat so after me? Why pull so at thy chain? —
Sleep, and at break of day I’ll come to thee again.”
Wordsworth.






THE LITTLE SUNBEAM, A7

THE LITTLE SUNBEAM

LITTLE sunbeam in the sky
Said to itself one day,
“T’m very small; but why should I
Do nothing else but play?
I’ll go down to the earth, and see
If there is any room for me.”

And so it travelled to and fro,
And glanced and danced about;

And not a door was shut, I know,
To keep the sunbeam out;

But, ever as it touched the earth,

It woke up happiness and mirth.

I may not tell the history
Of all that it could do;
But I tell this, that you may try
To be a sunbeam too.
“A sunbeam, too!” perhaps you say ;
Yes, I am very sure you may.

For loving words, like sunbeams, will
Dry up a falling tear;

And loving deeds will often help
A broken heart to cheer.

So loving and so living, you

Will be a little sunbeam too.
48 THE BROWN THRUSH.

THE BROWN THRUSH.

HERE’s a merry brown thrush sitting up in a tree,
“ He’s singing to me! He’s singing to me!”
And what does he say, little girl, little boy ?

“Oh, the world’s running over with joy!
Don’t you hear? Don’t you see ?
Hush! Look! In my tree,

I’m as happy as happy can be!”

And the brown thrush keeps singing, “A nest, do you see,
And four eggs laid by me in the juniper tree ?
Don’t meddle! don’t touch! little girl, little boy,
Or the world will lose some of its joy!
Now I’m glad! now I’m free!
And I always shall be,
If you never bring sorrow to me.”

So the merry brown thrush sings away in the tree
To you and to me, to you and to me:
And he sings all the day, little girl, little boy,
“Oh, the world’s running over with joy:
But long it won’t be,
Don’t you know? Don’t you see?
Unless we are as good as can be!”









7

eas
ae
nis




JAMES WATT AND THE TEA-KETTLE. 51

JAMES WATT AND THE TEA-KETTLE.

BOUT the middle of last century, a little boy sat in
a comfortably furnished room in Greenock, watching
his mother making the tea. He was a boy of a some-

' what delicate constitution, and fond of retirement, seldom

joining in the more boisterous sports of his companions. As

he sat by the fire, when the kettle was boiling, he observed
the lid dancing up and down, and making such a clatter as the
lids of tea-kettles are apt to do, when they wish to give intima-
tion that the water is ready to be poured into the tea-pot.

Many and many a time had this peculiarity of the tea-kettle

lid been observed before, but no one had thought of inquir-

ing into the nature of that force which produced this dancing

motion. But the little boy, of whom I am speaking,
was a thoughtful boy, and always liked to know the causes
of things. You will observe, in our picture he has lifted off
the lid, and is puzzling his young brains to know how the
lid kept dancing up and down so briskly. It occurs to him
that it must be the power of the steam which he observes
issuing from the kettle, that is the cause; and it further
occurs to him that, if the steam in the kettle can make the
heavy lid move up-and down so rapidly, there is no reason
why steam should not be made to move other things as
well. And so he set himself to try, and, after much
patient labour and experiment, he devised the steam
engine, which performs so much work now-a-days, that
somebody has said that by and by we may all go to sleep
for a hundred years, and allow the steam to manage the
world. Perhaps you would like to read the Song of Steam.
Well, I shall give it you :—
E 2
52

THE SONG OF STEAM.

THE SONG OF STEAM.

Harness me down with your iron bands,
Be sure of your curb and rein,

For I scorn the power of your puny hands,
As the tempest scorns a chain.

How I laughed, as I lay concealed from sight
For many a countless hour,

At the childish boast of human might,
And the pride of human power!

When I saw an army upon the land,
A navy upon the seas,
Creeping along, a snail-like band,

Or waiting the wayward breeze ;
When I marked the peasant faintly reel
With the toil which he daily bore,
As he feebly turned atthe tardy wheel,

Or tugged at the weary oar.

Ha! ha! ha! they found me at last;
They invited me forth at length,
And I rushed to my throne with thunder blast,
And laughed in my iron strength.
Oh, then ye saw a wondrous change
On the earth and ocean wide,
Where now my fiery armies range,
Nor wait for wind or tide.

Hurrah! hurrah! the waters o’er
The mountains steep decline;
Time—space—have yielded to my power—
The world! the world is mine!
The rivers the sun hath earliest blest,
Or those where his beams decline,
The giant streams of the queenly West,
Or the orient floods divine,
THE SONG OF STEAM. 53

I blow the bellows, I forge the steel,
In all the shops of trade;
I hammer the ore, and turn the wheel,
Where my arms of strength are made;
I manage the furnace, the mill, the mint;
I carry, I spin, 1 weave;
And all my doings I put into print
On every Saturday eve.

I’ve no muscle to weary, no breast to decay,
No bones to be “laid on the shelf;

And soon I intend you “may go and play,”
While I manage the world by myself.

But harness me down with your iron bands,
Be sure of your curb and rein,

For I scorn the strength of your puny hands,
As the tempest scorns a chain.

Anon.




ss |

|
|
wy wi is
54 THE TWO TRAVELLERS AND THE BEAR.

THE TWO TRAVELLERS - AND THE BEAR.

WO men were journeying through a forest, when
they saw a huge bear approaching them. One
of the travellers immediately climbed a tree that

was at hand, and sat on one of the branches to observe
what he thought must be the immediate death of his
companion. The other, seeing that he must be attacked,
fell flat on the ground, and lay quite still and motion-
less, holding his breath, and feigned the appearance
of death as well as he could. The bear came up, smelt
him all over, turned him round with his paw, and, satisfied
that he was dead, went slowly away without doing him any
injury, for it is well known that bears will not taste a dead
body. As soon as he was gone, the other traveller came
down from the tree, and, addressing his friend, said with a
laugh, “ What was it the bear was whispering in your ear
as you lay upon the ground?” “He advised me,” said he,
“never to travel with a companion who deserts me at the
moment of danger.”


THE VULTURE OF THE ALPS. a

PEs VET URE OF THE ALPS,

N the mountainous parts of Switzerland there are
found birds of prey, of the vulture species, which
grow to great size, and are very strong and fierce.

They are able to take up in their claws and carry off a well-
grown lamb or kid.

A peasant boy, only eight years of age, was once engaged
in looking after some cattle in a pasture among the moun-
tains. He lived in a solitary hut, and was the only person
in it, as the Swiss train their children very early to this
occupation. He perceived two young vultures, at no great
distance, on the ledge of a low rock. Tempted by the
prize, he drew silently close behind the rock, and suddenly
grasping them in his arms, took possession of both birds, in
spite of the most terrible resistance. He was yet strug-
gling with his prey, when, hearing a great noise, he saw, to
his no little terror, the two old birds flying rapidly towards
him. He ran with all his speed to the hut, and closed the
door, just in time to shut out his pursuers. The boy after-
wards spoke of the terror he suffered during the whole day,
in his lonely dwelling, lest the old vultures should force an
entrance; as, being powerful birds, they would in their fury
have ended his life.

They kept up the most frightful cries, and strove with all
their might to break down the barriers of the frail hut,
which was loosely built of single logs, and find some way to
rescue their offspring. But the young peasant kept his
prey, being well aware of its value; the government paying
about four dollars for every vulture killed. As night ap-
proached, he saw his pursuers, tired with their useless
efforts, leave the hut, and watched their flight. to the lofty
though not distant precipice. As soon as the darkness had
56 THE VULTURE OF THE ALPS.

set in, he again grasped the two young birds in his arms,
and ran as fast as his legs could carry him down the moun-
tain to the nearest village, often looking back lest the
parent birds should have seen him, and fancying he heard
their cries at every interval. He arrived in safety, how-
ever, at the hamlet, not a little proud of his prize.

THE STAR.

WINKLE, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

Then the traveller in the dark,
Thanks you for your tiny spark ;
He could not see which way to go,
If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,

And often through my curtains peep ;
For you never shut your eye,

Till the sun is in the sky.

As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark ;
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
BALLAD OF THE TEMPEST. 57

BALLAD OF THE TEMPEST.

E were crowded in the cabin;
Not a soul would dare to sleep:
It was midnight on the waters,
And a storm was on the deep.

’Tis a fearful thing in winter
To be shattered by the blast,
And to hear the rattling trumpet
Thunder, “ Cut away the mast!”

So we shuddered there in silence,
For the stoutest held his breath;
While the hungry sea was roaring,
And the breakers threatened death.

And as thus we sat in darkness,
Each one busy in his prayers ;

“We are lost!” the captain shouted,
As he staggered down the stairs.

But his little daughter whispered,
As she took his icy hand:

“Tsn’t God upon the ocean,

Just the same as on the land ?”

Then we kissed the little maiden,
And we spoke in better cheer ;
And we anchored safe in harbour
When the moon was shining clear.
58 POOR SAMMY.

POOR SAMMY.

AMMY was a poor, half-witted man, twenty-three
years old, who lived close to our little church with
his mother and sister, who worked hard to keep him.

Sammy always looked clean and respectable. Poor fellow!
he could do nothing to earn even a sixpence, but still he
was always busy in the little garden in the front of the
house, and every Saturday night his mother gave him his
wages. Sometimes it was a penny, sometimes a_half-
penny, and sometimes only a peppermint lozenge; still he
was contented and happy; and you shall hear what he did
with his wages when he had them.

Whenever the church was opened—Sunday or week-
day—for service, for a Bible-class, or to be cleaned for
Sunday, sure enough there was poor Sammy; he would
walk into his usual place, and after having knelt down most
reverently for a few minutes, would watch all that was
going on until he found the doors were going to be closed,
when he would kneel down again, and then quietly walk
home. If in his walks he met any of the congregation he
would bow very low to them: he evidently thought they
belonged to him in some way, for he never would take the
slightest notice of any but those who were seen in the
church; but it was on those Sundays when a collection was
made that Sammy was most excited; all his wages went
there, even his peppermint lozenge.

What a lesson does “Poor Sammy” teach us! He
never neglected an opportunity of serving God. Perhaps
he did not say any words, but he worshipped for all that,
and with far more sincerity than many in that church who
had all their senses about them, and many more comforts
and enjoyments than he could ever know.
THE MONKEYS AND THE RED CAPS. 59



THE MONKEYS AND2THE RED CAPS,

SPANISH mule-driver, becoming weary of his
monotonous life, resolved on seeing the world.
Having invested all his little savings in the pur-

chase of red caps, he crossed over to Africa, expecting to

find a ready sale for his caps among the natives of

that part of the world. In the course of his journey, he

came to the edge of a large forest, and being weary,

he opened his pack, drew out one of the red caps,

and, putting it on his head to protect him from the
F
,

60 THE MONKEVS AND THE RED CAPS.

heat, he fell sound asleep. He had not slept long, when
he was awakened by a great chattering in the trees over-
head, and looking up he observed the trees covered with
monkeys, each with a red cap on its head. The creatures
had seen the Spaniard draw the cap from the pack and put
it on his head, and, as soon as he had fallen asleep, each of
them imitated his action.

The traveller was in great distress, when he saw all the
savings of many years hopelessly lost, as he imagined, and,
in his vexation, he pulled the cap off his head and dashed
it on the ground. What were his surprise and joy to see
every monkey do exactly the same thing! The Spaniard
was not long in gathering up all his caps, and proceeding
on his journey.


BRUCE AND THE SPIDER. 61

BRU GE AN) aie SPIDER:

ING BRUCE of Scotland flung himself down,
In a lonely mood to think ;
True, he was a monarch, and wore a crown,
But his heart was beginning to sink.

For he had been trying to do a great deed,
To make his people glad ;

He had tried and tried, but could not succeed,
And so he became quite sad.

He flung himself down in low despair,
As grieved as man could be;

And after a while he pondered there,— |
“T’ll give it up,” cried he.

Now just at the moment a spider dropped,
With its silken cobweb clew ;

And the king in the midst of his thinking stopped
To see what the spider would do.

"Twas a long way up to the ceiling dome,
And it hung by a rope so fine,

That how it would get to its cobweb home
King Bruce could not divine.

It soon began to cling and crawl
Straight up with strong endeavour ;
But down it came with a slipping sprawl,

As near to the ground as ever.
62

BRUCE AND THE SPIDER.

Up, up it ran, nor a second did stay
To make the least complaint,

Till it fell still lower; and there it lay
A little dizzy and faint.

Its head grew steady—again it went,
And travelled a half yard higher ;

*Twas a delicate thread it had to tread,
And a road where its feet would tire.

Again it fell, and swung below ;
But up it quickly mounted,

Till up and down, now fast, now slow,
Six brave attempts were counted.

“Sure,” said the king, “that foolish thing
Will strive no more to climb,

When it toils so hard to reach and cling, »
And tumbles every time.”

But up the insect went once more ;
Ah me! ’tis an anxious minute:

He’s only a foot from his cobweb door ;
Oh, say, will he lose or win it?

Steadily, steadily, inch by inch,
Higher and higher he got,

And a bold little run at the very last pinch
Put him into the wished-for spot.

“ Bravo! bravo!” the king cried out ;
“ All honour to those who try :
The spider up there defied despair ;—
He conquered, and why should not | ?”
BRUCE AND THE SPIDER.

And Bruce of Scotland braced his mind,
And gossips tell the tale,

That he tried once more as he tried before,
And that time he did not fail,

Pay goodly heed, all ye who read,

_ And beware of saying, “I can’t;”

*Tis a cowardly word, and apt to lead
To idleness, folly, and want.

Eliza Cook.


64 STORY OF A CAT AND A SPANIEL.

STORY OF A CAT AND A SPANIEL.

LITTLE black spaniel had five puppies, which were
thought too many for her to bring up. As the
mistress of the house was unwilling that any of them

should be drowned, she asked the cook if she thought it
would be possible to bring up some of them by the hand,
before the kitchen fire. In reply, the cook said that
perhaps the puppies might be given to the cat instead of
her kittens.

The cat made no objection, took them kindly, and
gradually all the kittens were taken away, and the cat
nursed the two puppies only. She gave them her tail
to play with, and they were always in motion. They soon
ate meat, grew rapidly, and were fit to be removed long
before the others that were left with their own mother.

When they were taken away, the cat became quite
inconsolable. She prowled about the house, and on the
second day fell in with the little spaniel, who was nursing
the other three puppies. “Oh,” says puss, putting up
her back, “it is you who have stolen my children.” “No,”
replied the spaniel, with a snarl; “they are my own flesh
and blood.” “That won't do,” said the cat. “I am quite
certain that you have my two puppies.”

Thereupon there was a desperate combat, which ended in
- the defeat of the spaniel, and in the cat walking off proudly
with one of the puppies, which she took to her own bed.
Having left this one, she returned, gained another victory,
and carried off another puppy. Now, it is very strange
that she should have taken only two, the exact number
she had been deprived of.
THE BRAVE PEASANT. 65

THE BRAVE PEASANT.

N the hard winter of 1783 and 1784, there were many
sudden and heavy storms of rain. The streams
and rivers overflowed their banks, and swept along

large pieces of broken ice in their course. In the city
of Verona, in Italy, there was a large bridge over the
River Adige. This river rises in the snowy mountains of
Tyrol, and runs with a rapid current. Upon the bridge
there was a house in which the toll-gatherer lived with
his family.

By a sudden increase of the river, this house became en-
tirely surrounded by water ; and many of the arches of the.
bridge were carried away by the huge blocks of ice which
floated down the current. The part of the bridge on which
the house was built stood the longest, because it was the
most strongly made. But it looked as if it must soon go—
with the rest.

The poor man, and his wife and children, uttered loud
cries for help, which were heard by a great number of per-
sons who stood on the banks. Everybody pitied them,
but no one could do anything for them, because it seemed
impossible that a boat could live in a river running with
such force, and so filled with blocks of ice.

A nobleman on horseback rode down to the banks of the
river; and when he saw the dangerous position of the
family, he held up a purse containing two hundred ducats
of gold, and said he would give it to any one who would
save them.

But the fear of death kept everybody—even some
sailors who were present—from making the attempt. In
the mean time the water rose higher around the house
every moment.
66 THE BRAVE PEASANT.

At last an Austrian peasant felt his heart filled with pity
for the poor people, and resolved to save them if he could.
He sprang into a boat, pushed off from the shore, and, by
his strength and skill, reached the house at last. But the
family was numerous, and the boat was small; so that he
could not bring them all at once.

He first took three persons, and conducted them safely
to land, and then went back for the rest, and brought them
away also. Hardly was this done, when the house, and the
part of the bridge on which it stood, were carried away.

The brave peasant was hailed with shouts of joy and
admiration. The nobleman offered him the purse of gold,
and said that he well deserved it. But the peasant declined
to take it, saying, “I did not do this for money; I am not
rich, but I have enough for my wants: give it to the poor
toll-gatherer, who has lost his all.” And then he went
away without telling the people his name, or where he
lived.




THE RAM AND THE MTRROR. 67

THE RAM AND THE MIRROR.

ANY years ago there lived in Scotland a nobleman
whose name was Lord Melville.

Lord Melville was a man high in station, and
assisted in the government of the country. In the summer
season he lived in a large, fine house, a few miles from
Edinburgh, called Melville Castle, where a great many
ladies and gentlemen used to come and see him. He was
a very good-natured man; and one of the ways he had of
shewing his good nature was by his fondness for animals.

At one time he made a pet of a ram, which was called
Will, which grew very tame, and used to follow his master
all over the house and about the grounds. One day, in
the early part of September, he had invited a large party
of ladies and gentlemen to dine with him. When the
hour drew near at which his guests were expected, he went
into the drawing-room to see that all things were in order ;
after which he passed by the front door, which he thought-
lessly left open.

Will was sauntering about the outside of the house,
panting with the heat; but seeing the front door open, he |
stepped in, and as the drawing-room door was also open,
he at once went forward into it. At the farther end of the
room there was an uncommonly large and beautiful mirror,
which cost nearly a thousand dollars. It had been bought
at the sale of the furniture of a Spanish ambassador who
was leaving London, and was such a mirror as money
could hardly replace.

Will was a black-faced ram, with large, curled horns.
No sooner did he see his own image in the glass, than
he took it to be a rival challenging him to fight. He
stamped with his foot, snorted with his nose, throwing up
68 _ THE RAM AND THE MIRROR.

his head with an air of haughty defiance. The likeness
in the glass, of course, did the same. Will accepted the
challenge, and stepping back as far as he could, ran
forward with all his force, and struck the mirror a most
tremendous blow, shivering it into a thousand pieces.

Lord Melville was standing at the front door when he
heard the dreadful crash of the glass. He came running
in, saw the havoc that was made, and easily judged how
it had been done. Will was standing on the floor, shaking
his head, and looking much surprised at the sudden dis-
appearance of his foe.

His master was very angry for a moment, but remem-
bering that the poor beast had only obeyed a natural
instinct, and that he himself had been to blame in leaving
the outer door open, he soon got over it, and contented
himself with saying, “Ah, Will, you little know what
mischief you have done!” After dinner, he told the story
to his guests, and they all had a good laugh over the
accident.

In due time, Will went the way appointed to all animals
of his kind, and fell under the butcher’s knife. One of his
horns was made into a spoon, and the other into a snuff-
box. This snuff-box was mounted with silver, and had a
Scotch pebble, or crystal, set in the lid. These articles
were given to Mr. Pitt, who was at that time prime
minister of England, and an intimate friend of Lord
Melville. The snuff-box was often produced after dinner,
and the story told of Will’s encounter with the mirror.

But we have not come to the end of the story yet.
The Spanish ambassador, at whose sale the mirror had
been bought, had gone home to his own country, and was
there one of the king’s ministers. Mr. Pitt once had
occasion to write him a despatch on public business, and
he sent, at the same time, a private letter, in which he told
him how the mirror which once belonged to him had been
smashed by Lord Melville’s ram.

The ambassador read the letter to the king, who was
THE RAM AND THE MIRROR. 69

much diverted by the story, and said that Lord Melville
should have another Spanish mirror as good as that which
had been destroyed. So he sent him a very fine one from
one of his own palaces. After it had arrived, Mr. Pitt
gave the king the snuff-box which had been made from
Wills horn, And so ends the story of Lord Melville’s
ram.

SPEAK. Abies BRU TH:

H, ‘tis a lovely thing for youth
To walk betimes in wisdom’s way ;
To fear a lie, to speak the truth,
That we may trust to all they say.

But liars we can never trust,
Although they speak the thing that’s true;
And he that does one fault at first,

And lies to hide it, makes it two.

OPO

Pride costs more than hunger, thirst,

or cold. -

Letter face a danger, than be always
wn fear.
70

THE SHIP OF FAME.

THEA SEIP OR? ANE:

HAT ship is this you’re sailing in,
This wondrous ship of fame?

Our ship is called the Church of God,

And Christ's our Captain’s name.

Then join our happy crew,

We’re bound for Canaan’s shore;

The Captain says there’s room for you,
And room for millions more!

And what’s the crew that sails with you
On board this ship so grand?
The saints of God, all wash’d in blood,
And under Christ’s command.

Do you not fear the stormy seas,
Your barque may overwhelm?

You need not fear, the Lord is near,
And Christ is at the helm.

What wages do you get on board

This ship that you commend ?

We ’ve love, and peace, and joy, and grace,
And glory in the end.

Heave out your boat, I’ll come on board,
You say there’s plenty room;

The Captain says you’re welcome now,
Make no delay but come.

Then hoist the sail, we’ll catch the breeze,
And soon our dangers o’er;

The ship will land us safe at last,

On Canaan’s happy shore. |



















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SAMUEL, 73

SAMUEL,

N the time of Eli the high-priest, the children of Israel
had become very forgetful of God and of His law.
El’s own sons were very wicked, and set a bad

example to the people. But God did not cast them off
nor forget them, though they had sadly forsaken Him.
He purposed to raise up a teacher, who would bring them
back to the right way, and instruct them in His law. For
this purpose he raised up Samuel, who, when a mere child,
was sent by his mother to the tabernacle at Shiloh, to wait
upon Eli, who was a very old man. Every year, when his
mother came to Shiloh to attend the feast of the passover,
' she brought Samuel a new coat, and other little presents,
such as children like to receive. Samuel was very fond of
his work, and was very much attached to Eli, who taught
him the law of his God, and trained him in the fear of the
Lord.

The sons of Eli grew more and more wicked, and their
father was too -indulgent to restrain them. God was dis-
pleased with Eli for this, and determined to punish them.
But, before doing so, He wished to give them time for
repentance, and to warn them that, if they continued in
their evil ways, they would perish.

One evening, after Samuel had done all the work
assigned him, and had just lain down in bed, he heard
some one calling his name twice. Thinking it was Eli
who called him, the child at once rose from his bed, ran to
the old man, and asked him what he wanted. Eli assured
him that he had not called him, and told him to lie down
again. Samuel did so, but again the voice came, and again
the child went at once to Eli. The same thing happened
a third time, and then Eli knew that it was God who had
called, and so he told Samuel, if the voice should come
again, to say, “Speak, Core for thy servant heareth.”
74 SAMUEL.

The voice came again, and then Samuel answered as Eli
had told him. Thereupon, the Lord told Samuel what He
was going to do to Eli's sons as a punishment for their
wickedness.

Samuel did not, as many children would have done, run
and tell Eli what the Lord had revealed to him. He loved
Eli, and he would fain have concealed the bad news from
him. He did not rejoice in evil. So he went to bed, and
slept until the morning. When he rose, he went about his
work as usual, and it was only when Eli pressed him to
tell, that he made known to him what God had said to him,
God appeared to him many times after this, and the people
soon came to know that Samuel was a true prophet of God.
After the death of Eli, Samuel became judge over Israel,
and he went constantly about among them, instructing both
old and young, and calling upon them to put away their
idols and turn to the God of their fathers. After many
years’ patient work, the people listened to Samuel’s voice,
and then the Lord blessed and prospered them, Bas

THE-GHILD’S PRAYER:

ORD, look upon a little child,
By nature sinful, rude, and wild;
Oh put Thy gracious hands on me,
And make me all I ought to be.

Make me Thy child, a child of God,
Washed in my Saviour’s precious blood,
And my whole heart from sin set free,—
A little vessel full of Thee.

O Jesus, take me to Thy breast,
And bless me, then I shall be blest:
Both when I wake and when I sleep,
Thy little lamb in safety keep.
THE BETTER LAND. 7 e

THE BE IPER LAND,
a HEAR thee speak of the Better Land,

Thou call’st its children a happy band;
Mother, oh! where is that radiant shore ?

Shall we not seek it, and weep no more?

Is it where the flower of the orange blows,

And the fireflies glance through the myrtle boughs?”
“Not there, not there, my child!”

“Ts it where the feathery palm-trees rise,

And the date grows ripe under sunny skies ?

Or ’midst the green islands on glittering seas,

Where fragrant forests perfume the breeze,

And strange bright birds, on their starry wings,

Bear the rich hues of all glorious things ?”
“Not there, not there, my child!”

“Ts it far away in some region old,

Where the rivers wander o'er sands of gold;

Where the burning rays of the ruby shine,

And the diamond lights up the secret mine,

And the pearl gleams forth from the coral strand;

Is it there, sweet mother, that Better Land?”
“Not there, not there, my child !—

“Eye hath not seen it, my gentle boy;

Far hath not heard its deep songs of joy;

Dreams cannot picture a world so fair:

Sorrow and death may not enter there;

Time doth not breathe on its fadeless bloom;

For beyond the clouds and beyond the tomb—
It is there, it is there, my child!”

Mrs. [emans.
THE SNOW SHOWER.

THE SNOW SHOWER.

EE, mamma, the cramds are flying
Fast and thickly through the air,

On the branches they are lying,
On the walks and everywhere ;

Oh, how glad the birds will be,
When so many crumbs they see!

MAMMA’S ANSWER.

No, my little girl, ’tis snowing,

Nothing for the birds is here:
Very cold the air is growing,

"Tis the winter of the year :—
Frost will nip the robin’s food,

"Twill no more be sweet and good.

See the clouds the skies that cover,
‘Tis from them the snow-flakes fall,

Whit’ning hills and fields all over,
Hanging from the fir-trees tall.

Were it warm ’twould rain, but lo!
Frost has changed the rain to snow.

CHILD.

If the robins food are needing,
Oh, I hope to me they’ll come,

I should like to see them feeding
On the window of my room;

I'll divide with them my store,
Much I wish I could do more.

Mrs. Lundie Duncan.
THE FROST. 77

MALE EROS T,

HE frost looked forth one still, clear night,
And whispered, “Now I shall be out of sight:
So through the valley and over the height
In silence I'll take my way.
I will not go on like that blustering train,
The wind and the snow, the hail and the rain,
Who make so much bustle and noise in vain,
But T’ll be as busy as they.”

Then he flew to the mountain and powdered its crest;
He lit on the trees, and their boughs he dress’d
In diamond beads; and over the breast
Of the quivering lake he spread
A coat of mail, that need not fear
The downward point of many a spear
That he hung on its margin, far and near,
Where a rock could rear its head.

He went to the window of those who slept,

And over each pane, like a fairy crept;

Wherever he breathed, wherever he stepp’d,
By the light of the morn were seen

Most beautiful things: there were flowers and trees;

There were bevies of birds and swarms of bees ;

There were cities with temples and towers; and these
All pictures in silver sheen!

But he did one thing that was hardly fair ;
He peep’d in the cupboard, and finding there
That all had forgotten for him to prepare,

“ Now just to set them a thinking,
I'll bite this basket of fruit,” said: he,
“This costly pitcher I’ll burst in three;
And the glass of water they’ve left for me

Shall ‘tchick!’ to tell them I’m drinking!”

8 LL TiaGoUlas
78 THE LILY AND THE DEWDROP.

THE LILY AND THE DEWDROP.

« OME hither, dear Dewdrop,” a Lily once said,
“ And rest on my bosom thy bright little head :
*Tis white and as soft as a pillow can be,

And just about.large enough, Dewdrop, for thee.

I’ll cover thee up; and I’ll rock thee to sleep;

And from thee the chilling night breezes I’ll keep.

“And, when on the morrow the sunlight again
Shall rest on the mountain-top, hill-side, and plain,
I'll open the door of thy dear little home,

And tell thee the beautiful sunbeams have come

To take thee again to the bright sunny sky ;

And then I will kiss thee and bid thee good-bye.”

The radiant Dewdrop stood listening awhile,
And then to the flower replied with a smile :
“Thy kindness, dear Lily, I freely accept ;”

And into her beautiful bosom he crept,
_ And all the night long, in the snowy white bell
Of the bright little beauty, slept soundly and well.

Next morning, aroused by the song of the lark,
The Lily’s young sister to her did remark,

“How pure and how bright thou art, sister, to-day !
What makes thee so lovely? do tell me, I pray:
What beautiful spirit has given to thee

The radiant robe that around thee I see?”

The Lily replied, “To my bosom, last night,
I folded a Dewdrop all lovely and bright;
And ever since that happy hour, I have felt
As if in my bosom an angel had dwelt.”
THE SHEEP AND THE BIRDS. 79

THE SHEEP AND THE BIRDS.

FATHER and his son were once sitting under a
tree upon a hill. It was near sunset, and a flock
of sheep were feeding not far off. A strange man

came by, who had a dog with him. As soon as the sheep
saw the dog they became alarmed, and ran into some
thorny bushes, which grew near by. Some of their wool
caught upon the thorns and was torn off. When the boy
saw this he was troubled, and said, “See, father, how the
thorns tear the wool from the poor sheep. These bushes
ought to be cut down, so that hereafter they may not harm
the sheep.” His father was silent a while, and then said,
“So you think the bushes ought to be cut down?” “ Yes,”
answered his son, “and I wish I had a hatchet to do it
with.” The father made no reply, and they went home.

The next day they came to the same place with a hatchet.
The boy was full of joy, and very eager to have his father
begin to cut down the bushes. They sat down upon the
hill, and the father said, “Do you hear how sweetly the
birds sing ? Are they not beautiful creatures ?” “Oh, yes,”
replied the boy; “the birds are the most beautiful of all
creatures.”

As they were speaking, a bird flew down among the
bushes, and picked off a tuft of wool, and carried it away to —
a high tree. “See,” said the father, “with this wool the
bird makes a soft bed for its young in the nest. How
comfortable the little things will be! and the sheep could
well spare a little of their fleece. Do you now think it well
to cut down the bushes?” “No,” said the boy; “we will
let them stand.”

“My dear son,” said the father, “the ways of God are
80 THE SHEEP AND THE BIRDS.

not always easy to understand. It seemed to you very
hard yesterday, that.the poor sheep should lose their wool ;
, but to-day you see that without this wool the little bird

could not have made its warm nest. So, many things
- happen to us which seem hard; but God ordains them for
our good, and they are meant in kindness and love.”

ESE ORAL IR RE ECS aaa
rae evs
& Better to do well than to &
| say well
ee

EOxee

- :
a Tt 7s never too late to learn. mt
a ae
sCaens Sass oO ES WESSON UNO RONEDS NUR NU NONE NS

pres






THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE. 8

oe

THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

HE golden eagle is a bird of prey, and it is found in
the British Islands, and in the lofty and barren cliffs
of the Orkney Islands, which lie on the north of

Scotland.

One of these birds was once the cause of great distress
and terror to the inhabitants of a village there. The vil-
lagers had gone out, one summer day, to the hay fields.
About one o'clock they left their labour to rest, and to eat
the food they had brought with them. While they were
enjoying themselves in this quiet way, the peaceful, happy
scene was suddenly interrupted by a great golden eagle, the
pride, but also the pest, of the village.

The savage bird stooped down over the party of villagers
for a moment in its flight, and then soared away with some-
thing in its talons. :

One piercing shriek from a woman’s voice was heard,
and then the cries of the villagers, exclaiming, “ Hannah
- Lamond’s child! Hannah Lamond’s child! The eagle has
carried it off!”

In an instant, many hundred feet were hurrying towards
_ the mountain, whither the eagle had flown. ‘Two miles of
hill and dale, copse and shingle, lay between ; but in a short
time the foot of the mountain was covered with people.

The eyry (which is the name for an eagle’s nest) was well
known, and both of the old birds were visible on the ledge
of a high rock. But who could scale that dizzy cliff, which
even Jack Stewart, the sailor, had attempted in vain ?

All the villagers stood gazing, and weeping, and wringing
their hands, yet not daring to venture up a cliff which seemed
to afford them no footing.

Hannah Lamond, meanwhile, was sitting on a rock
84 THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

beneath the mountain, as pale as death, with her eyes fixed
on the eyry. Noone had hitherto noticed her, for every
eye was, like hers, fixed on the eyry.

Presently she started up, crying out, “Only last Sunday
was my sweet child baptized!” and dashed through the
brakes, over the huge stones, and up the precipice, faster

than the hunter in pursuit of game. No one doubted that

she would be dashed to pieces. But the thought of her
infant in the talons of the eagle seemed to give the wretched
mother strength. On she went, in spite of the dangers to
which she was exposed on the fearful precipice up which
she was climbing.

As she drew near the eyry, the eagles dashed by, so close
to her head that she could see the yellow light of their
wrathful eyes. They did not hurt her, but flew to the
stump of an ash tree, which jutted out of a corner in the
cliff near her. The poor mother passed on, and, having at
length reached the dreaded spot, fell across the eyry, in the
midst of the bones with which it was strewed, and clasped
her child alive in her arms.

There it lay unhurt and at rest; wrapped up just as she
had laid it down to sleep in the harvest field. The little
creature gave a feeble cry, and she screamed out, “It lives!
it lives!”

Binding her darling to her waist with her handkerchief,
and scarcely daring to open her eyes, she slid down the

shelving rocks to a small piece of root-bound earth. Her

fingers seemed to have gained new strength, as she swung
herself down by broom, and heather, and dwarf birch, strik-
ing her feet from time to time against the sharp-edged
rocks. But she felt no pain.

The side of the precipice now became steep as the wall
of a house; but it was matted with ivy, whose thick, tough
stems clung to the rock, and formed a ladder, down which
she swung herself; while her neighbours, far below on their

knees, were watching her, thinking each moment she would
be killed.
THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE. 85

Again she touched earth and stones. She heard a low
bleating beside her, and, looking round, saw a goat, with
two little kids: she followed their track down the rest of
the precipice. Her rugged path became easier as she went
on, and brought her at length to the foot of the mountain
again, among her neighbours and friends, who, a few mo-
ments before, had scarcely dared to hope they should ever
see her again.

On first reaching the ground, her strength failed, and she
fell fainting to the earth, The crowd that had gathered
round to welcome her, now stood back to give her air.
She was soon well again, and joined them in giving thanks
to God, who had saved her child and herself in the hour of
danger.

HEN all Thy mercies, O my God,
My rising soul surveys,

Transported with the view I’m lost,
In wonder, love, and praise.

O how shall words with equal warmth
The gratitude declare,

That grows within my ravished heart!
But Thou canst read it there.


IRUST AND TRY.

TRUST AND TRY.

ts ANNOT,” Edward, did you say ?
Chase the lazy thought away ;
Never let that idle word

From your lips again be heard.

Take your book from off the shelf—

God helps him who helps himself:

O’er your lesson do not sigh :—

Trust and try,—trust and try.

“Cannot,” Edward? Say not so;
All are weak, full well I know;
But if you will seek the Lord,
He will needful strength afford:
Teach you how to conquer sin,
Purify your heart within ;

On your Father’s help rely :—
Trust and try,—trust and try.

“Cannot,” Edward? Scorn the thought ;
You can do whate’er you ought;

Ever duty’s call obey,

Strive to walk in wisdom’s way ;

Let the sluggard, if he will,

Use the lazy “cannot” still;

On yourself and God rely,—

Trust and try,—trust and try.








THE sat Ol
AN D HEALTH :

ei ,

OM FO) ed)




THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN, - 89

PE VOUTH OF FRANK EIN.

ENJAMIN FRANKLIN was born in Boston, in
the State of Massachusetts, January 17, 1706. His .
father was a tallow-chandler and soap-boiler, and
he was the youngest son, and the youngest child but two,
of a very large family.

Boston, at the time of Franklin’s birth, was a much
smaller place than it is now; but it was a considerable town,
containing about eighteen thousand inhabitants, and it had
public schools, as it has now. He shewed an early taste
for reading, and his father desired to educate him for the
ministry. With that view he was sent to a grammar
school when he was eight years old, and rose rapidly in his
class.

But in less than a year he was removed to another
school, where he might learn writing and arithmetic, as his
father, who had a large family to support, was not rich
enough to give him the expensive education which would
have been necessary to fit him to be a clergyman. Here
he learned to write a very good hand, but did not get on
very well in arithmetic. When he was ten years old, he
was taken away from school to assist his father in his
business ; and he never went to school any more.

Little Franklin disliked his father’s trade, and wanted
very much to go to sea; but his father would not give
his consent. He was very fond of the water, and learned
to swim well, and to manage boats—very much as Boston
boys do now.

He continued with his father about two years; but his
distaste for the business rather increased than diminished.
He also shewed a growing fondness for reading, spendinge
in books all the money he could get; and it was finally

H
90 THE VOUTH OF FRANKLIN.

concluded that he should be bound apprentice to his
brother James, who was a printer.

This employment was more to his taste than his father’s
trade. He had to work hard, but he was a healthy, strong,
and cheerful boy, and work did not tire him very much;
and he had a chance of indulging his strong love of
reading. “Often,” says he, “I sat up in my chamber
reading the greatest part of the night, when the book was
borrowed in the evening, and to be returned in the
morning, lest it should be found missing.”

This practice, in spite of Franklin’s example, we do
not advise our young friends to imitate. Few boys could
be deprived of their sleep in this way, without injuring
their health; but Franklin had a very strong constitution,
and could bear it.

From reading, Franklin naturally went to writing, and
his first attempts at composition were in the form of verse.
He wrote two ballads,—one about a shipwreck, and one
about a pirate,—printed them himself, and went about the
streets to sell them. _ They sold in great numbers: and the
boy naturally enough felt quite vain of his success ; but his
father, who was a sensible man, told him that his verses
were poor stuff, and that he had better stick to his business,

Not long after, he shewed his father a piece which he
had written in prose. The same affectionate critic and
true friend told his son that his style was deficient in ease,
grace, and clearness; and the boy resolved to correct it.

He got hold of an odd volume of the Spectator, which
had been published in London not long before, and was
much delighted with it. He took some of the papers,
made short hints of their contents, laid them by for a few
days, and then, without looking at the book, re-wrote
them. When this was done, he carefully compared his
own production with the original, and corrected the errors
in the former.

Some of the papers in the Spectator contained tales or
stories. Franklin translated these into verse, and after a
THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN. QI

while, when he had forgotten the original, turned his own
poetry back into prose. His main object in doing this was
to increase his command of language; because in writing
poetry one is obliged, for the sake of the metre and the
rhyme, to pick out exactly the right word, and reject
many that first come into the head,.and are suitable for
rose.

This was a most excellent way to learn how to write a
good English style; and Franklin’s success was worthy of
the pains he took. This poor boy, without a teacher, with
few books, working hard for his living all day, learned to
write in a way that everybody admires, because his style is
so simple, easy, and graceful. You see his thoughts through
it as clearly as you can see the objects in the streets through
a pane of glass.

What Franklin thus did is what boys and girls call
“writing composition.” Many of them do not like to do
it, and think it very hard work; and when it is demanded
of them, they will do no more than is necessary to save
them from censure. But they make a great mistake, for
there is no exercise required in schools that will be of more
service to them; and no one can learn to write well with-
out taking pains.

While he was a lad, Franklin learned the value and im-
portance of temperance in eating and drinking. He found
a book which advised men to leave off eating meat, and to
live entirely on vegetable food; and he resolved to try the
plan. He learned to prepare some of the dishes described
in this book, and proposed to his brother that if he would
allow him weekly half the money which was paid for his
board, he would board himself.

This offer was accepted, and Franklin found that he
could live upon half of his allowance, and save the other
half for books. While the others went to dinner, he staid
at the printing office, and after he had eaten his slight meal
(perhaps a biscuit or a slice of bread, with a bunch of raisins
or an apple), he had the rest of the time for study.
92 THE VOUTH OF FRANKLIN.

After some years, he gave up his system of living
entirely upon vegetable food; and we do not advise any
young person to imitate him in this plan of not eating
meat. It would not suit the health of all persons, or yield
them strength enough to do hard work, and it would some-
times give trouble.

It is best to eat in moderation whatever is set before us,
without thinking about it. But in our country many people
eat too much meat, and their health would be better if their
food were composed more of vegetable and farinaceous
substances.

Franklin continued through life to be very temperate in
eating and drinking. He said of himself that a few hours
after dinner he could never tell of what dishes it had con-
sisted. In this respect, his example is worthy of all imita-
tion.

It is a misfortune to have a dainty and delicate appetite ;
and a man who is not particular about his food is much
better off than one who is. It costs him less to live; and
he is a much more welcome guest at the tables of his friends.
When a man invites you to dine with him, and you finda
simple dinner on the table, he really pays you a compliment ;
because he thinks you do not care about pampering your
appetite with delicacies, and are content with plain food.

While Franklin was an apprentice, his brother started a
newspaper, which was called the Mew Eugland Courant ;
and Franklin thought he would write an article for it.
Being still a boy, and supposing his brother would reject
any communication which was known to be his, he wrote
his piece in a disguised hand, put no name to it, and slipped
it, in the evening, under the door of the printing office.

_It is probable that he did not sleep very soundly that
night, and went to the office next morning with a beating
heart. But what was his delight to hear his brother and
some of his friends commending the article, wondering who
could have written it, and ascribing it to this or that gentle-
man, who was known to be a good scholar and writer. It
THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN. 93

was printed in the paper; and this success led Franklin to
write others in the same way, and at last to confess that he
was the author.

When Franklin was about seventeen years old, he left
his brother's employment, in consequence of a difference
between them ; and not being able to get work in any other
office in Boston, he went to New York in a sloop. It took
him three days to go; and that was a very quick passage;
now one can go from Boston to New York in about eight
hours.

No one in New York wanted a printer’s boy; and so
he determined to push on to Philadelphia. He went to
Amboy in New Jersey in a vessel, from Amboy to Burling-
ton on foot, and from Burlington to Philadelphia in a boat.
When he reached this city, it was on Sunday morning; and
being hungry, he went into a baker's shop to get some bread.
He bought three rolls; and putting one under each arm,
and taking the third in his hand, he went on his way through
the streets, eating as he walked.

As he was going along in this manner, a young girl,
named Deborah Reed, happened to be standing in the door
of her father’s house ; and when she saw the droll figure he
presented, she laughed at him, as well she might. But it is
curious enough that this young girl afterwards became his
wife. She little thought, when she saw him that Sunday
morning, that such would be the end.

Franklin found employment in Philadelphia at his trade.
After he had been there a few months, his industry and
intelligence attracted the attention of Sir William Keith,
who was at that time governor of Pennsylvania. Pennsyl-
vania was a colony then, dependent upon Great Britain, -
and the governor was not chosen by the people, but was
appointed in England, and sent out there.

Sir William Keith promised to set him up in business,
and persuaded him to go to London to buy presses and
types ; telling him he would lend him money, and give him
letters of introduction and recommendation. A letter of

H 2
94 THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN.

introduction is a letter in which the writer asks the person
to whom it is addressed to be kind to the one who bears it,
and to serve him in any way he can.

Franklin went to London relying upon the governor's
promises; but when he arrived there, he found that Sir
William had played him a pitiful trick, and done nothing
for him. So here he was, in the midst of the great city of
London, without money and without friends. But he had
a good trade; and being an excellent workman, he readily
found employment in a printing office. He earned money
enough to support himself, and save something besides.

The workmen in this office were in the habit of drinking
a great deal of strong beer, which was not good for their
- health, and cost them more money than they could afford.
Franklin drank nothing but water, and they called him the’
water American. He endeavoured to persuade them to
leave off beer drinking, and save their money; but they
told him it made them strong, and that they could not do
their work without it. He convinced them that this was
not true, because he could lift and carry a greater weight
than any of them. Some of them at last gave it up, and
drank as he did.

Franklin passed eighteen months in London, working
at his business, and diligently improving his mind by study
and observation. He was liked and respected by every
body; for, besides being industrious, temperate, and studious,
he was very good-natured and obliging, and always ready
to do a good turn to others. He was also a very pleasant
and entertaining companion, and always full of life, and
spirit, and cheerfulness.

He returned to Philadelphia when he was twenty years
old; and soon afterwards he began the printing business
on his own account, in partnership with a man named
Meredith, who had some money. The business prospered
in their hands, and his career afterwards was one of uniform
success, usefulness, and distinction.

But our account of Franklin stops with the end of his
THE YOUTH OF FRANKLIN: 95

youth. Our young readers, when they grow older, will
read his Zz/e, and learn how he became a great statesman
and a great philosopher, and what valuable discoveries he
made, and how much good he did to his country and to
mankind.

Our object is to shew that his success and distinction as
a man were owing in great part to his diligence and industry
as a boy. He never wasted his time in idle sports or
frivolous amusements, but stored his mind with useful
knowledge in his leisure hours. Boys at this time have
more advantages of education than Franklin had. They
have better schools to go to, and far more books to read.
They have only to improve their chances as he did his,
and they cannot fail to be good scholars and respectable
men..

“ Seest thou a man diligent in business,
he shall stand before kings.”

PROVERBS xxii. 20.
96 JUPITER AND THE SHEEP.

JUPITER AND, TEE “SHEEP.

HARMLESS sheep was greatly iil-used by the wild
beasts of the forest. This being so, she went to
Jupiter, and begged him to give her something by

means of which she might protect herself.

“T see well, my gentle creature,” said Jupiter, “that you
are very defenceless; say, then, in what way you would like
me to serve you. Shall I give you long sharp teeth to bite
with ?”

“Oh no,” replied the sheep, “I do not wish to be fierce
like the wolf.”

“Or,” continued Jupiter, “shall I give you poison to kill
the creatures that hurt you?”

“ Nay, nay, that would make me like the serpents, which
are hated by both men and beasts.”

“What then shall Ido? Would you prefer that I should
make horns to grow on your forehead, and make your neck
stronger ?”

“ Alas, no, kind father, for then I should be always
butting like the rude he-goat.”

“And yet,” said Jupiter, “if you wish others to keep
from hurting you, you must have something with which to
hurt them.”

“Must 1?” sighed the sheep. “Then, good father, please
let me remain as I am. For if I had the power to hurt,
I fear I should have also the wish to hurt; and it is better
to suffer, than to be the cause of suffering.”

Jupiter blessed the gentle sheep, and, from that hour, she
forgot to complain.
BIRDS. 97

BIRDS.

IRDS! birds! ye are beautiful things,
With your earth treading-feet and your cloud-
cleaving wings ;
Where shall man wander, and where shall he dwell,
Beautiful birds, that ye come not as well?

Ye have nests on the mountain all rugged and stark,
Ye have nests in the forest all tangled and dark;

Ye build and ye brood ’neath the cottager’s eaves,
And ye sleep on the sod ’mid the bonnie green leaves.

Ye hide in the heather, ye lurk in the brake,

Ye dive in the sweet flags that shadow the lake,

Ye skim where the stream parts the orchard-decked land,
Ye dance where the foam sweeps the desolate strand.

Beautiful birds! ye come thickly around,

When the bud’s on the branch and the snow’s on the
ground ;

Ye come when the richest of roses flush out, |

And ye come when the yellow leaf eddies about.

Beautiful birds! how the schoolboy remembers

The warblers that chorused his holiday tune ;

The robin that chirped in the frosty December,

The blackbird that whistled through flower-crowned June.

The schoolboy remembers his holiday ramble,
When he pulled every blossom of palm he could see,
9 g : BIRDS.

When his finger was raised as he stopped in the bramble,
With “Hark! there’s the cuckoo; how near he must be!”

Beautiful creatures of freedom and light!

Oh! where: is the eye that groweth not bright

As it watcheth you trimming your soft, glossy coats,
Swelling your bosoms, and ruffling your throats?

Oh! I would not ask, as the old ditties sing,

To be “happy as sand-boy,” or “happy as king ;”
For the joy is more blissful that bids me declare,
“JT’m as happy as all the wild birds of the air!”

I will tell them to find me a grave when I die,

Where no marble will shut out the glorious sky ;

Let them give me a tomb where the daisy will bloom,
Where the moon will shine down, and the leveret pass by.

But be sure there’s a tree stretching out far and wide,
Where the linnet, the thrush, and the woodlark may hide ;
For the trillest and purest of requiems heard,

Is the eloquent hymn of the beautiful bird.


















































THE ETIRICK SHEPHERD'S DOG. IOI

THE ETTRICK SHEPHERD'S DOG:

Ettrick Shepherd, gives the following interesting
account of a remarkable dog belonging to him:

“J thought I discovered a sort of sullen intelligence in
his countenance; notwithstanding his dejected and forlorn
appearance, I gave a drover a guinea for him. He was
scarcely a year old, and knew so little of herding that he
had never turned a sheep in his life; but as soon as he
discovered that it was his duty to do so, and that it obliged
me, I can never forget with what eagerness and anxiety
he learned his evolutions. He would try every way deli-
berately till he found out what I wanted him to do; and
when I once made him to understand a direction, he never
forgot or mistook it again. Well as I knew him, he often
astonished me, for when pressed hard in accomplishing
the task that he was put to, he had expedients of the
moment that bespoke a great share of the reasoning
faculty.

“On one occasion about 700 lambs, which were under
his care at feeding time, broke up at midnight and scam-
pered off in three divisions across the neighbouring hills,
in spite of all that he and an assistant could do to keep
them together. The night was so dark, that we could not
see Sirrah; but the faithful animal heard his master lament
their absence in words which, of all others, were sure to set
him most on the alert, and without more ado he silently set
off in quest of the recreant flock. Meanwhile, the shep-
herd and his companions did not fail to do all in their
power to recover their lost charge. They spent the whole
night in scouring the hills for miles around ; but of neither
the lambs or Sirrah could they obtain the slightest trace.

lie HOGG, better known by his title of Zhe
102 THE ETTRICK SHEPHERD'S DOG.

~ They had nothing for it, day having dawned, but to return
to their master, and inform him that they had lost the
whole flock of lambs, and knew not what had become of
one of them. On our way home, however, we discovered
a lot of lambs at the bottom of a deep ravine, and the in-
defatigable Sirrah standing in front of them looking round
for some relief, but still true to his charge. The sun was
then up, and when we first came in view, we concluded
it was one of the divisions, which Sirrah had been unable
to manage till he arrived at that commanding situation.
But what was our astonishment when we discovered that
not one lamb of the whole flock was wanting. How he
had got all the divisions collected in the dark is beyond
my comprehension. The charge was left to himself from
midnight until the rising sun, and if all the shepherds in
the Forest had been there to assist him, they could not have
effected it with greater promptitude.”

N the early days of spring, when the birds begin to
sing,
And the primrose ’gins to grow, and the daisies
burst and blow,
Gather flowers!

May their beauty joy impart, and their fragrance fill
our heart ;
Oh, then kind thoughts will grow, and in due time burst

and blow
Like the flowers.











EHOMDING
he EVIL and

> THE *










A LION HUNT. 105

A LION HUNT.

N the 4th of August, 1844, I received an invitation
from the inhabitants of Mahouna, the lions’ para-
dise, which I immediately accepted. On my arrival,

about sunset, I found the village surrounded by immense
piles of light wood, arranged for the reception of the lion,
that paid them nightly calls. I forbade them being kindled,
and immediately selected the place I intended to occupy,
in order to waylay him that very night, in case he should
come as usual to prey on the herds. Having, by careful
searching, found the route by which the animal usually
came, I took my seat directly in his path, in spite of the
remonstrances of the Arabs.

Finding me fixed in my purpose, they brought me mats
and cushions; and a smoking repast was soon placed by
the side of the couch that was to serve me for the night.
My hosts. remained with me till a late hour, telling many
tragic stories of the strength and ferocity of the lion. As
midnight approached, the party broke up, with many
prayers for my success. I+ remained on the watch, with a
native corporal in the French service, named Saadi, whose
brother was chief of this country. He was armed with a
carbine, and I with a double barrelled rifle.

About one o’clock in the morning, my Arab friend, little
accustomed to these night watches, pleaded guilty to being
very sleepy, and stretched himself out behind me, where, .
to do him justice, he slept most soundly. I know many
brave men who would not have done as much while lying
in wait for a lion. I had taken the precaution to have all
the dogs tied up under the tents, so as to quiet their
customary clamour; and now, in the dead silence around
me, I could detect the faintest noise or motion. Up to
this time the heavens had been serene, and the moon

I
106 A LION HUNT.

clear; but soon clouds gathered in the west, and came
scudding past before a warm sultry wind; and a little
later, the sky was all overcast, the moon disappeared, and
the thunder rolled round us in heavy peals, announcing
a coming tempest. Then the rain fell in torrents, and
drenching my companion he awoke, and we consulted for
a moment about returning. But while we were talking,
an Arab called out from the tents, “ Beware, the lion will
come with the storm!”

This decided me to remain at my post, and I covered
the locks of my gun with the skirts of my coat. ‘Soon the
rain ceased; flashes of lightning played round the distant
horizon; and the moon, brighter than ever, came-in and
out from the fleecy clouds over our heads. I took advan-
tage of every one of these brief moments of clear sky to
survey the country about me, and to examine every clump
of trees or fallen log; and it was in one of these short
luminous intervals that, all of a sudden, I thought I saw
the lion. I waited breathless till the moon came out
again. Yes; it was he! standing motionless only a few
paces from the camp. Accustomed to see fires lighted at
every tent, to hear a hundred dogs barking in terror, and
to see the men hurling lighted brands at him, he, without
doubt, was at a loss to explain the rather suspicious silence
that reigned around him.

While I was turning slowly round, in order to take
better aim, without being seen by the animal, a cloud shut
out the moon. I was seated with my left elbow on my
knee, my rifle at my shoulder, watching, by turns, the
lion, that I only recognised as a confused mass, and the
passing cloud, the extent of which I anxiously contem- .
plated. At length it passed by; and the moonlight,
dearer to me than the most beautiful sunshine, illuminated
the scene, and again shewed me the lion still standing in
the same place. I saw him the better, because he was so
much raised above me; and he loomed up proudly magni-
ficent, standing, as he was, in majestic repose, with his
A LION HUNT. 107

head high in air, and his flowing mane undulating in the
wind, and falling to his knees. It was a black lion, of
noble form and the largest size. As he presented his
side to me, I aimed just behind his shoulder, and fired.
I heard a fierce roar of mingled pain and rage, echoing
up the hills, with the report. of my gun, and then from
under the smoke I saw the lion bounding upon me,

Saadi, roused the second time that night from his
slumbers, sprang to his’ gun, and was about to fire over
my shoulder. With a motion of my arm, I pushed aside
the barrel of his gun; and when the beast, still roaring
furiously, was within three steps of me, I fired my second
directly into his breast. Before | could seize my com-

anion’s gun, the lion rolled at my feet, bathing them in
the blood that gushed in torrents from his throat. He
had fallen so near me that I could have touched him from

- where I stood.

It was a long time before the Arabs could believe that
the lion was really dead, or venture into the presence of
the fallen monarch of the forest. But when assured that
their dread enemy, from whom they had suffered so much,
could no longer harm them, they overwhelmed me with
thanks and congratulations. The men, with stately grace,
kissed the hem of my garment, or my rifle that lay at my
side, saying, “May God strengthen your arm, and bless
you.” The women kissed my hand, saying, “God bless
the mother that bore you.” The mothers lifted up their
children in their arms, that they might touch me and kiss
me, saying, “Don’t be afraid, he only harms the lion; he
is our friend and brother.”

I can truly say, with all sincerity, that there were no
voices so sweet as those which named my mother’s name,
that-asked me her age, and when I had left her, if I ever
heard from her now when far away, if I wanted to see
her, and if she were ever coming to their country ; and that
ended their questions by invoking a thousand blessings on
her honoured head.
108 THE ACORN AND THE PUMPKIN.

THE ACORN AND THE PUMPKIN.

COUNTRY lad, as he lay one day stretched out
A upon his back beneath a large oak, observed the
runner of a pumpkin, with heavy fruit on it, climbing
upon a hedge near at hand. He shook his head at this,
and said, “It is very odd to see such immense fruit on so
slender a stem, and these tiny acorns up there on the great
oak. I really think it would have been better if these big,
yellow pumpkins, the size of a man’s head, had been made
to grow upon the stout tree, and those small acorns, not so
large as.my thumb, upon the creeping plant.”

He had scarcely done speaking, when a good-sized acorn
fell right upon his nose, and gave him rather a sharp rap.
As he jumped up, rubbing the sore place, he could not help
saying, “ But if that had been a pumpkin. that fell just now,
it would have been all over with my poor nose.” And this
was not quite so stupid as what he said before.

OW sweet to sit among the flow’rs,
To dream away the sunny hours,
To breathe the scent of fragrant blooms,
Or drink the air the rose perfumes.

But sweeter far to be the rose,
Whose odours such delights disclose ;
For ’tis, the Book bids us believe,
More bless’d to give than to receive.
THE BOY ARTIST. 109

THE BOY ARTIST.

HE early years of Benjamin West, an eminent histo-
rical painter, who flourished in the beginning of the
present century, were passed at Springfield, a re-

mote settlement of Pennsylvania, in America. It was in
his seventh year that he gave the first indications of his
propensity for the pencil. One of his sisters, who was
married, came with her infant daughter to spend a few
days at her father’s. When the child was asleep in the
cradle, Mrs.-West and her daughter went out to gather
flowers in the garden. They left little Benjamin‘to watch
the infant during their absence, giving him a fan to drive
away the flies from his little charge. After some time the
child happened to smile in its sleep, and its beauty attracted
the attention of its youthful guardian. He looked at it
with a pleasure which he had never before experienced,
and noticing some paper on the table, together with pens
and red and black ink, he set himself to draw a likeness
of the sleeping infant, although he had up to this time
scarcely ever seen a picture or an engraving of any kind.
While thus occupied, he heard his mother and sister ap-
proaching, and on their entrance endeavoured to conceal
what he had been doing. But the old lady observing his
confusion, asked what he had been about, and requested
him to shew her the paper. He obeyed, entreating her
not to be angry with him. Mrs. West, after looking at
the drawing with evident pleasure, said to her daughter—
“] declare he has made a likeness of little Sally.” He then
offered to make pictures of the flowers which she held in
her hand, if it would give her any pleasure. This he did
so well that she kissed him with much fondness and satis-

faction. In after-life, when referring to this incident of
Teo
110 THE BOY ARTIST.

his boyhood, West used to say that that kiss of his mother's
made him a painter. For some time he pursued his
favourite employment, with red and yellow colours obtained
from the Indians, and indigo given to him by his mother.
Having learned that, in Europe, pencils were made from
camel’s hair, he determined to procure a substitute. Seiz-
ing a black cat, kept in the family, he extracted the requisite
quantity of hairs from her tail for his first brush, and after-
wards pillaged her back for others. Thus following out
the bent of his genius, West, in the course of time, raised
himself to a position of the highest distinction as a painter,
and was chosen to succeed Sir Joshua Reynolds as President
of the Royal Academy in 1792.

Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our carth an Eden,
Like the Heaven above.

Idleness ts the root of all evil.

n~

flope and strive ts the way to thrive.


Ee Ge

eT

a

PRIDE OF DRESS. 113

PRIDE OF DRESS.
A FABLE. |

A LITTLE boy and girl were once seated on a flowery

NX bank, and talking proudly about their dress.—

“See,” said the boy, “what a beautiful new hat I

have got; what a fine blue jacket and trousers: and what

a nice pair of shoes! It is not every one who is dressed
so finely as I am!”

“ Indeed, sir,” said the little girl, “I think I dm dressed
finer than you; for I have on a silk. hat and pelisse, and
a fine feather in my hat—I know that my dress cost a great
deal of money.”

“ Not so much as mine,” said the boy, “I know.”

“Hold your peace,” said a caterpillar, crawling near in
the hedge; “you have neither of you any reason to be
so proud of your clothes, for they are only second-hand,

‘and have all been worn by some creature or other, of

which you think but meanly, before they were put upon
vou. Why, that silk hat first wrapped up such a worm as
Iam!”

“ There, miss, what do you say to that?” said the boy.

“ And the feather,” exclaimed a bird perched upon a tree,
“was stolen from or cast off by one of my race.”

“What do you say to that, miss?” repeated the boy,
“Well, my clothes were neither worn by birds nor worms.”

“ True,” said a sheep grazing close by, “but they were
worn on the back of some of my family before they were
yours; and, as for your hat, I know that the beavers have
supplied the fur for that article; and my friends the calves
and oxen in that field were killed, not merely to get their
flesh to eat, but also to get their skins to make your shoes.”

See the folly of being proud of our clothes, since we are
114 STORY OF AN ELEPHANT.

indebted to the meanest creatures for them. And even
then we could not use them, if God did not give us the
wisdom to contrive the best way of making them fit to
wear, and the means of procuring them for our comfort.

Cobbii.

STORY OF AN ELEPHANT.

VERY affecting story is told of an elephant that

broke loose one dark night from a camp in the

East. He ran wild among the tents, roaring and

trumpeting with his trunk, and driving men and _ beasts
before him.

He was followed in his flight by swordsmen and spear-
men, who shouted and called after him. Regardless of
the noise, he still ran on, throwing down the tents, and
everything that came in his way, wounding and injuring
many, and, at last, killing his keeper with a blow of his
great trunk. The moment the poor man fell, and the
elephant saw that he did not rise, he suddenly stopped,
seemed concerned, looked at him with an eye of pity, and
stood fixed to the spot. He paused for a few seconds,
then ran toward the place from whence he had broken
loose, and went quietly to his station. In front of this lay
the daughter of the keeper, a little girl about two years
old. In a moment, he took the child gently round the
waist, lifted it from the ground, caressed and fondled it
for some time.

Every beholder trembled for its safety, and expected
that it would share the fate of its poor father. But no;
the tired creature having turned the child round several
times, gently laid it down, and drew over it some clothing
which had fallen off. After this he stood over the child.
STORY OF AN ELEPHANT. 11s

with his eyes fixed upon it. “And if,’ said the narrator,
“JT did not see the sorrowful tear steal from his eye, I have
never seen it in my life.” He then submitted to be chained
by some other keepers, and stood motionless and downcast,
as if aware that he had done a wrong he could not repair.
His sorrow became more and more evident as he stood
and gazed on the fatherless child, who, without any fear,
played with his trunk.

From this time the animal was quiet; and he always
seemed delighted when the little orphan was in sight.
Many persons went to see the noble creature fondle the
child; but there was a visible alteration in his health. He
pined away, and died six months afterward.

DILIGENCE REWARDED.

ONG ago, a little boy was entered at Harrow School.
He was put into a class beyond his years, and
where all the scholars had the advantage of previous
instruction, denied to him. His master chid him for his dul-
ness, and all his own efforts could not raise him from the
lowest place on the form. But, nothing daunted, he procured
the grammars and other elementary books which his class-
fellows had gone through in previous terms. He devoted —
the hours of play, and not a few of the hours of sleep, to
the mastering of these; till, in a few weeks, he gradually
began to rise, and it was not long till he shot far ahead
of all his companions, and became not only dux of that
division, but the pride of Harrow. That boy, whose career
began with this fit of energetic application, you may see
his statue in St. Paul's Cathedral to-morrow; for he lived
to be the greatest Oriental scholar of modern Europe, and
most of you have heard the name of Sir William Jones.
Life in Earnest.
116 BETTER THAN DIAMONDS.

BETTER THAN DIAMONDS.

WAS standing in the broad crowded street of a large
city. It was acold winter’s day. There had been
rain; and although the sun had been shining brightly,

yet the long icicles hung from the eaves of the houses, and
the wheels rumbled loudly as they passed over the ground.
There was a clear bright look, and a cold bracing feeling in
the air, and a keen north-west wind, which quickened every
step.

Just then a little child came running along—a poor, ill-clad
child. Her clothes were scant and threadbare; she had
no cloak and no shawl, and her little bare feet looked red
and suffering. She could not have been more than eight
years old. She carried a bundle in her hand. Poor little
shivering child! I pitied her. As she passed me her foot
slipped, and she fell with a cry of pain; but she held the
bundle tightly in her hand, and jumping up, although she
limped sadly, endeavoured to run as before.

“Stop, little girl, stop!” said a sweet voice; and a
beautiful woman wrapped in a huge shawl, and with furs
around her, came out of a jeweller’s shop close by.

“ Poor little child,” she said, “are you hurt? sit down on
this step and tell me.”

“Oh, I cannot,” said the little child; “I cannot wait, I
am in such ahurry. I have been to the shoemaker’s, and
mother must finish this work to-night, or else she will never
get any more shoes to bind.”

“ To-night ?” said the beautifil woman ; “to-night ?”

“ Yes,” said the child, for the stranger's manner had made
her bold—“ yes, for the great bail to-night; and these satin
slippers must be spangled, and”

The beautiful woman took the bundle from the child’s
hand and unrolled it. You do not know why her face
flushed, and then turned pale; but I looked into the bundle,


BETTER THAN DIAMONDS. EL?

and on the inside of a slipper I saw a name (a lady’s name)
written, but I shall not tell it.

« And where does your mother live, little girl?”

So the child told her where, and then she told her that
her father was dead, and that her little brother was sick,
and that her mother bound shoes that they might have
bread; but that sometimes they were very cold, and that
her mother sometimes cried because she had no money to
buy milk for her little brother. And then I saw that the
lady’s eyes were full of tears; and she rolled up the bundle
quickly, and gave it back to the little girl, and turning away,
went back into the shop from which she had just come out.
As she went away I saw the glitter of a diamond pin.
Presently she came back, and stepping into a handsome
carriage rolled off.

The little girl looked after her a moment, and then, with her
little bare feet, colder than they were before, ran quickly away.

I followed the little girl to a narrow damp street, and
into a small dark room; I there saw her mother—her sad
faded mother, but with a face so sweet, so patient, hushing
and soothing a sick baby. And the baby slept, and the
mother laid it on her lap; and the bundle was unrolled,
and a dim candle helped her with her work; for though it
was not night, yet her room was very dark. Then, after a
while, she kissed her little girl, and bade her warm her
poor frozen feet over the scanty fire in the grate, and gave
her a little piece of bread, for she had no more, and then
she heard her say her evening prayer, and folded her
tenderly to her bosom, blessed her, and told her that the
angels would take care of her.

And the little child dreamed. Oh! such pleasant dreams
of warm stockings and new shoes; but the mother sewed
alone, and asthe bright spangles glittered on the satin
slippers, came there no repining into her head? When she
thought of her child’s bare, cold feet, and of the scant morsel
of dry bread that had not satisfied her hunger, came there
visions of a bright room and gorgeous clothing, and a table
118 BETTER THAN DIAMONDS.

loaded with all that was good, a little portion of which spared
to her would give warmth and comfort to her humble dwell-
ing. If such thoughts came, and others of a pleasant
cottage, and of one who had dearly loved her, and whose
strong arm had kept want and trouble from her and her
babes, but who could never come back—if these thoughts
did come repiningly, there also came another; and the
widow’s hands were clasped and her head bowed low in
deep contrition, as I heard her say, “ Father, forgive me,
for thou doest all things well, and I will trust in thee.”

Just then the door opened softly, and some one entered.
Was it an angel? Her dress was spotless white, and she
moved with a noiseless step. She went to the bed where
the sleeping child lay, and covered it with soft, warm
blankets. ‘Then presently a fire sparkled and blazed in
the grate, such as it had never known before. Then a
huge loaf was placed on the table, and fresh milk for the
sick babe. Then she passed gently before the mother,
and drawing the unfinished slipper from her hand, placed
there a purse of gold, and said, in a voice like. music,
“ Bless thy God, who is the God of the fatherless and the
widow,” and she was gone; only as she went out I heard
her say, “ Better than diamonds, better than diamonds!”
Whom could she mean? I looked at the mother. With
clasped hands and streaming eyes, she blessed her God
who had sent an angel to comfort her.

So I went too; and I went to a bright room where
were music and dancing, and sweet flowers; and I saw the
young happy faces of those who were there, and beautiful
dresses sparkling with jewels; but none that I knew until
one passed me whose dress was of simple white, with only
a rosebud on her bosom, and whose voice was like the
sweet sound of a silver lute. No spangled, slipper was
on her foot, but she moved as one that treadeth upon the
air, and the divine beauty of holiness had so glorified her
face, that I felt as I gazed upon her that she was almost
an angel of God.














time of oy.
























ile” ae




SUNNY DAYS WILL COME AGAIN. on

SUNNY DAYS WILL COME AGAIN.
HOUGH to-day be dark and dreary,

And black clouds around us rise,
Let us halt not, nor be weary,
Light is looming in the skies!
Aid and cheer each fellow-creature
’Gainst the storms that round us lour,
Soon they'll wear a brighter feature,
And the sunshine come with power.
Never, boys, give way to sorrow,
But be up, and act like men;
Look with hope for joy to-morrow,
Sunny days will come again.

Let us throw aside all sadness,
Better times are on the wing;
Who can tell what joy and gladness
Providence to us may bring ?
Nerve, then, every manly feeling,
And with courage meet the stcrm;
Let us wounded hearts be healing,
And our duty still perform.
Never, boys, give way to sorrow, &c.

We should not be always sighing,
Nor indulge in wild dismay ;
Bear in mind “Old Time” is flying,
Therefore wisdom more display.
If our prospects be not shining,
And our hearts be bowed with care;
Where’s the good of our repining,
Still look up, and ne'er despair!
Never, boys, give way to sorrow, &c.
Rainford.
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PHARAOH'S DREAMS. 123

PHARAOH’S DREAMS.

ET us have a talk about Joseph and the king. You
know how Joseph was sold by his wicked brethren,
how he was bought by an Egyptian merchant, and

how he was falsely accused, and, although guiltless,
taken to prison. While there he shewed himself to
be so good and kind, that the jailor just let him go
about as he would, yet Joseph never thought of running
away. He had a Friend—“one that sticketh closer than a
brother.” No prison walls or prison bars could keep Him
out; his Friend was God. No wonder then that he should
be cheery in so dull a place. Even the prisoners found out
that God was with him, for did He not tell Joseph how to
read the dreams of the butler and the baker. They knew
quite well that Joseph could not tell of himself, but the
Friend, who is the “Searcher of hearts” could and did tell
Joseph what to say. The reading of the dreams came true.
The baker was hanged, but the butler was restored to his
place in the palace of Pharaoh the king, and had promised
to remember Joseph. Like many people who receive
favours and make promises of rewards, he forgot all about
it for a very long time. On one occasion, two years
afterwards, however, he was reminded of the promise
he had made to the poor prisoner. Pharaoh was un-
comfortable about two dreams he had had, and which
kept on coming night after night. He called his wise
men together. They looked solemn, consulted their
books, and made up, I daresay, ever so many ridiculous
stories, by way of telling what was meant by the dreams of
the king. But Pharaoh was not pleased nor satisfied.
Could no other person explain? “Yes, sire,” I think I hear
the butler say: “When I was in prison a young man told
the baker and me the meaning of our dreams, and it came
124 PHARAOH’S DREAMS.

true.” Then the king sent hastily and brought Joseph out
of prison, told him his dreams, and asked if he could tell
what they meant. Joseph, then, knowing he had no wisdom
in himself, told Pharaoh that God would give him an answer.
The dreams were these—as you see them pictured on the
wall behind the king’s couch :—He thought he stood by a
river, and saw seven fat kine come up out of it, and feed in
a meadow. Soon after, he saw seven other kine come up,
very thin and poor, and they ate up the seven fat kine; and
still they were lean, the same as before. Then he slept and
dreamed again, and he saw seven good ears of corn come
up upon one stem, and soon after, seven ears more, very
thin and blasted by the east wind, and the seven bad ears
devoured the seven good ears. Then Joseph explained to
Pharaoh, as the Spirit of God taught him, and said that the
seven fat kine and the seven good ears meant that in the
land of Egypt there would be seven years of great plenty ;
and that the seven poor kine and seven thin ears of corn
meant that there would come seven years of famine to
consume the land. Joseph went on to explain, that God
had sent the dreams to warn Pharaoh to lay up good store
during the plentiful years, so as to be ready for the years of
famine that were to follow. The king was pleased with all
that Joseph had spoken, and said to his servants, “Can we
find another man like this—a man in whom is the Spirit of
God?” And he also said to Joseph, “Because God hath
made known to thee all these things, there is no one so wise
as thou art. Thou shalt be over my house; and my people
shall be ruled by thee; only in the throne shall I be greater
than thou. See, therefore, I have set thee over all the land
of Egypt.”

From this I wish you to remember two things—1st, That
“the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom ;” and,
2nd, That if you have this wisdom, the Lord will do with
you as he did with Joseph, and as he did with David, who
said, “ Thou shalt increase my greatness, and comfort me on
every side.”
WHAT A CHILD CAN DO. 125

WHAT A CHILD CAN DO.

H, what can little hands do,
To please the King of Heaven ?
Little hands some work may try,
To help the poor in misery :—
Such grace to mine be given!

Oh, what can little lips do,

To please the King of Heaven?

Little lips can praise and pray,

And gentle words of kindness say:—
Such grace to mine be given!

Oh, what can little eyes do,

To please the King of Heaven?

Little eyes can upward look,

Can learn to read God’s holy book:—
Such grace to mine be given !

Oh, what can little hearts do,

To please the King of Heaven?

The hearts, if God his Spirit send,

Can love and trust the children’s Friend:—
Such grace to mine be given!

K 2
126 THE CAPTIVE MAID.

~

THE CAPTIVE MAID.

S in the olden time there were constant wars on the
borders between England and Scotland, so was it
in Bible times between Israel and Syria. These

two kingdoms lay alongside each other, and there was no
natural boundary between them. Hence arose frequent.
quarrels about the marches. At one time, the Israelites
would invade Syria; at another time, the Syrians would
invade Israel. Bands of armed men would lurk on the
border, and, whenever an opportunity offered, they would
rush across, plunder and carry away whatever they could
lay their hands upon—cattle, household goods, and even
men and women, and little children. These last they made
much money of by selling them as slaves.

In one of these raids into Israel, the Syrians carried
captive a little Israelitish girl, whom they gave as a present
to Naaman, a famous soldier, who was commander-in-chief
of the Syrian armies. The little girl became maid. to
Naaman’s wife. Naaman was a brave soldier and a great
man, but he was afflicted with the terrible and loathsome
disease of leprosy. The little captive maid had known
many in her old land, who had had this disease, but who -
had been completely cured by the prophet Elisha. Her
mistress and her master too, I think, must have been kind
to the young girl far from home and all her friends. Now
kindness always begets kindness, and the captive maid
began to consider how she might requite the kindness
shewn to her. I am sure she would try to be a faithful
servant, and to do her work well and honestly. But she
wished above all things to see her master cured. She was
grieved to see so gallant a man and so brave a soldier,
and one, too, so kind and gentle, suffering from leprosy,
THE CAPTIVE MAID, 127

and she thought she would tell her mistress of the cures
she had seen performed in her country. ;

Accordingly, one day when waiting on her mistress, she
said quietly and gently: “I wish much master would go
and see the prophet who is in Samaria.” “Why do you
wish that ?” replied her mistress. “Oh! do you know he
has cured ever so many lepers, and I am sure he would:
cure master too.” A selfish little maid would have kept
this knowledge to herself. She would have said—*I know
how master could be cured, but I won't tell, because they
had no business to take me from my home in this way, and
make mea slave.” But this little girl was not selfish. She
was anxious to do good to any one that needed it, and so
she acted in the way I have told you.

Her master heard what she had said, and, believing her
story, he determined to go to Samaria. He went in great
state, accompanied by many servants, and carrying with
him large presents to be given to the man who could cure
him. He went first to the king of Israel, but he was a
wicked man, and did not know anything of Elisha. He
did not wish to know anything of him, for bad men dislike
good men, just because they are good. The poor king
was afraid when Naaman came to him, and thought he
wished to pick a quarrel with him. But Elisha, hearing of
Naaman’s arrival and of his errand, sent word to the king
to send him to him, and he would then learn that there was
a God in Israel.

Naaman, accordingly, came to Elisha’s door. The pro-
phet, without even coming out to see him, told him to go
and dip seven times in Jordan, and he would be cured.
Naaman did not like this. It seemed too simple a cure,
and he was on the point of turning away home, when one
of his servants, wiser than his master, advised him to try
the cure. Naaman consented, and, after dipping seven
times in Jordan, he was perfectly restored, and his flesh
came again like the flesh of a little child. The great
soldier was full of gratitude, and, which was better, he
128 DEEDS OF KINDNESS.



resolved henceforth to worship the true God. It was not
much a little captive maid could do, but SHE DID WHAT SHE
~ couLp, and she converted her master. I hope every boy
and girl who reads this story will remember this lesson—
Do WHAT YOU CAN. .

DEEDS OF KINDNESS.
UPPOSE the little cowslip

Should hang its golden cup,

And say, “I’m such a tiny flower,
I’d better not grow up!”
How many a weary traveller
Would miss its fragrant smell !
How many a little child would grieve
To lose it from the dell!

Suppose the glistening dewdrop
Upon the grass should say,
“What can a little dewdrop do,
I’d better roll away!”

The blade on which it rested,
Before the day was done,
Without a drop to moisten it,
Would wither in the sun.

How many a deed of kindness

A little child can do,

Although it has but little strength,
And little wisdom too!

It wants a loving spirit,

Much more than strength, to prove
How many things a child may do
For others, by its love.
x
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shall not want.

an SSE)
«maketh me to lie.


























4 em as


LLEWELYN AND HIS DOG. 131

LLEWELYN AND HIS “DOG,

HE spearman heard the bugle sound,
And cheerily smiled the morn,

And many a brach and many a hound
Attend Llewelyn’s horn;

And still he blew a louder blast,
And gave a louder cheer,—
“Come, Gelert! why art thou the last
Llewelyn’s horn to hear ?

“Oh, where does faithful Gelert roam ?
The flower of all his race!

So true, so brave!—a lamb at home,
A lion in the chase!”

That day Llewelyn little loved
The chase of hart or hare,

And scant and small the booty proved,—
For Gelert was not there.

Unpleased, Llewelyn homeward hied ;
When near the portal seat,

His truant Gelert he espied,
Bounding his lord to greet.

But when he gained the castle door,
Aghast the chieftain stood :

The hound was smeared with drops of gore,—
His lips and fangs ran blood!

Llewelyn gazed with wild surprise ;—
Unused such looks to meet,
Go

Ny

LLEWELYN AND HIS DOG.

His favourite checked his joyful guise,
And crouched and licked his feet.

Onward in haste Llewelyn passed,
(And on went Gelert too,)

And still, where’er his eyes were cast,
Fresh blood-drops shocked his view.

O’erturned his infant’s bed he found!
The blood-stained cover rent,

And all around the walls and ground
With recent blood besprent !

He called his child—no voice replied!
He searched with terror wild;

Blood! blood he found on every side!
But nowhere found the child!

“Monster! by thee my child’s devoured |”
The frantic father cried;

And to the hilt his vengeful sword
He plunged in Gelert’s side!

His suppliant, as to earth he fell,
No pity could impart ;

But still his Gelert’s dying yell
Passed heavy o'er his heart.

Aroused by Gelert’s dying yell,
Some slumberer wakened nigh ;—

What words the parent's joy can tell
To hear his infant cry!

Concealed beneath a mangled heap
His hurried search had missed,

All glowing from his rosy sleep,
His cherub boy he kissed!
LLEWELYN AND HIS DOG. 133

Nor scratch had he, nor harm, nor dread;
But the same couch beneath

Lay a great wolf, all torn and dead,—
Tremendous still in death!

Ah, what was then Llewelyn’s pain!

- For now the truth was clear:

‘The gallant hound the wolf had slain,
To save Llewelyn’s heir.

Vain, vain was all Llewelyn’s woe :—
* Best of thy kind, adieu!

The frantic deed which laid thee low
This heart shall ever rue.” —

And now a gallant tomb they raise,
With costly sculpture decked ;

And marbles, storied with his praise,
Poor Gelert’s bones protect.

Here never could the spearman pass,
Or forester, unmoved ;

Here oft the tear-besprinkled grass
Llewelyn’s sorrow proved.

And here he hung his horn and spear ;
And oft, as evening fell,
In fancy’s piercing sounds would hear

Poor Gelert's dying yell.
Spencer.
134 THE THREE SCHOOL-FELLOWS.

THE SEFEREE. SCHOOL-FELEOWS:

RANDPAPA was sitting in his study one morning
before breakfast, and Alfred was standing between
his knees, looking up into his face, while little

Emma, seated on the carpet, was trying to spell out some
of the words from a large volume that was spread upon her
lap. It was a bright summer morning, and the sunshine
came in through the low casement, and made the very
books look cheerful as they stood ranged upon the shelves ;
and the long sprays of honeysuckle outside danced in the
light breeze, and threw-moving shadows on the floor.

“T should like to be a great man,” said Alfred; “when I
am grown up as old as papa, I should like people to talk
about me, and to have my name printed in the newspapers,
and dukes and princes coming to see me.’

“In short, you would like to be a second Alfred the
Great,” said grandpapa, with a smile.

“No, grandpapa; I do not want to be a king, but a great
man—such as those gentlemen were talking of who were
here last night. Oh, if I live to grow up, I will try to
become a great man.”

“Listen to a story,” said grandpapa, “which, to please
you, shall be about three great men, whom people at one
time talked about very much, and whose names were often
printed in newspapers, and two of whom, at least, dukes
and princes went to visit.

“Three boys were at school together, many years ago.
They were close friends, keeping company out of school-
hours, helping each other out of trouble, and having their
pleasures and sports in common. They were nearly of an
age, but there was a difference in their appearance, and still
more in the dispositions and pursuits of each.
THE THREE SCHOOL-FELLOWS. 135

«The first was a heavy-looking boy, not quick to learn,
but always plodding at his books, and sure to be master of
his lesson, though making no great show of what he knew.
He meant to be a lawyer; and his companions used to say
that he was grave enough for a judge.

“The second was a lively lad, full of dash and spirit,
with ability to learn whatever he chose. He was not idle,
but he did not give himself up to study like the first, yet he
meant to be a great man. He was an orphan, and his
friends were poor; but his family had once been rich, and
he was determined, by some means or other, to obtain great
wealth, and buy again the estates which they had lost.

“ The third was a shy and timid boy, pale and thoughtful,
not strong in health, and fonder of reading than of study.
He was gentle in disposition, and so kind-hearted that he
would not needlessly set his foot upon a worm. He, too,
was meant for a lawyer; but the choice of his heart was a
country life, with a garden and plenty of books.”

“T like the second best of any, grandpapa,” said Alfred,
with a look of great interest.

Grandpapa fondly patted the head of his little boy, and
then continued: “After the first boy left school, he still
went on with his studies, and became a very learned man.
He was a great lawyer, the greatest in the kingdom, and
was made not only a judge, but Lord High Chancellor of
England, which is the highest office that any lawyer can
obtain.”

“Well done, lawyer!” cried Alfred, clapping his hands.

“The second school-boy went to India, and there gained
great power and riches, so that in a few years he came
back, and bought again his family estates. His greatness
and his splendour were talked of from one end of the
kingdom to the other; his gold and his jewels were of
more value than could be told. But the blessing of God
was not with him in his greatness. Troubles came heavily
upon him; and having no higher comfort than this world
~ could give, he was a careworn and unhappy man.

1B
136 THE THREE SCHOOL-FELLOWS.

“ The third boy, after he left school, continued the study
of the law for some time, but ill health compelled him to
give it up at last. He went to live in a small house ina
country village, where no one knew him but a few chosen
friends—chosen because they were God’s people, and of one
heart and mind as followers of Christ. There he lived
from year to year, reading and writing, far from the busy
world, with its vanities and sins, and almost forgotten by his
former school-fellows, whom he never met again.”

“Dear grandpapa,” exclaimed Alfred, in a tone of dis-
appointment, “I do not call this last a great man at all!
But what was his name ?”

“William Cowper; I consider him by far the greatest
man of the three,” said grandpapa, in reply.

“From this quiet dwelling he sent out to the world books
that he had written, which will instruct and comfort the
Christian, when the names of his two companions are for-
gotten. His hymns have been uttered as words of prayer
by many an humble, repentant sinner, seeking for a Saviour's
mercy; his poems have expressed the language of many a
pilgrim on his way towards heaven. The others were great
for this world, and they had their reward in such honour
and happiness as this world can bestow. He lived for
eternity, and his highest ambition was to do guod to the
souls of others, and that his own name might be written in
the Book of Life. And now that the grave is over them
all, and they have done with the world for ever, whose
object seems to have been the best worth living for?
Whose recompense is the most valuable and the most
lasting ?

“You have my consent to be a great man, if you please,”
said grandpapa in conclusion ; “ but the only true greatness
to my mind, and as we are taught in the Bible, consists in
‘loving God with our heart, and soul, and strength, and in
doing all the good we can to others.’— The Church.
THE WONDERFUL PUDDING. 137

THE WONDERFUL PUDDING.

NCLE ROBERT invited his nephews to dinner.
He promised to give them a pudding which had
employed more than a thousand men in the

_making of it.

“A pudding that has taken a thousand men to make!
Then it must be as large as a church!”

“Well, my boys,” said Uncle Robert, “to-morrow, at
dinner-time, you shall see it.”

Scarcely was breakfast over next day, when the boys
got ready to go to their Uncle’s house. When they
arrived there, they were surprised to see everything as
calm and as quiet as usual. At last, however, they sat
down to table. The first course was removed; their eyes
were eagerly fixed on the door, and—in came the pudding!
It was a plum-pudding of the usual kind,—not a bit larger.

« This is not the pudding you promised us,” said one.

“Tt is indeed,” said Uncle.

“© Uncle! you do not mean to say that more than a
thousand men have helped to make that little pudding ?”

“Eat some of it first, my boy, and then take your slate
and pencil, and help me to count the workmen,” said Uncle
Robert.

“ Now,” he continued, “to make this pudding we must
first have flour; and how many people must have laboured
to procure it! The ground must have been ploughed, and
sowed, and harrowed, and reaped. To make the plough,
miners, smelters, smiths, wood-cutters, sawyers, and car-
penters must have laboured. Then we have the builders
of the mill; then the men who quarried the mill-stones,
and made the machine-work of the mill. Think, too, of
the plums, the lemon-peel, the spices, the sugar; all these
138 THE WONDERFUL PUDDING.

come from distant countries, and to bring them hither,
ships, shipbuilders, sailmakers, growers, merchants, and
grocers, have been employed. Then we require eggs,
milk, and suet.”

“Oh stop, stop, Uncle!” cried one of the boys; “I am
sure we have more than a thousand already !” z

“T have not yet reckoned all, my boy. We must cook
the pudding, and then we must reckon the colliers who
bring us coal, miners who dig for tin and iron for the
sauce-pan; and, lastly, there is the linen of the cloth in
which the pudding was wrapped. To make this we must
count in those who raise the flax, gather it, card it, spin it,
and weave it, and all the workmen to make the looms and
machines.”

“Yes, yes, Uncle Robert, we see now that you have kept
your promise, and that this- little pudding, simple though
it appears, is really the work of a multitude of busy people.”


































THE BEAR AND THE WATER-BUTT. 139

THE BEAR AND THE WATER-BUTT.

ANY animals have a kind of wisdom which we call
sagacity. You have heard stories, I am sure, of
the cleverness of elephants, and horses, and dogs ;

now I mean to tell you of a bear, to shew you how sensible
this kind of creature can be.

In acertain Polish forest, a young bear had been caught
and tamed. By-and-bye he was taught to go to a well and
draw water, which he carried to a large butt or tub in the
laundry. Every day he filled his buckets at the well, and
fastening them at each end of a stick, carried them on his
shoulders to the laundry; for, you know, a bear can walk
upright just like a man. One day, the bear had drawn the :
usual quantity of water, and emptied it into the butt, but
he discovered that, notwithstanding, it would not fill. He
became uneasy and suspicious. Once more he went back
to the well, filled his buckets and emptied them as before,
and yet the butt seemed to have no more in it than it had
at first. A third and a fourth time he went for more water,
with the same result as before. At last he was sure there
was something wrong; and so he went and hid himself,
intending to watch that stupid water-butt. Two boys
belonging to the place, thinking bruin was away, came into
the laundry, and began laughing heartily at the trick they
had played him, for they had opened the tap at the bottom
of the butt, so that the water might run out. In a moment
the bear saw what they had been doing, and uttering a cry
of rage, burst from his hiding-place, and seizing a heavy
bit of wood, ran at the young rascals, who rushed out of the
place as fast as they could. Soon the deep growls of the
angry beast were heard all over the place. The people
were terrified, and locked every door in case he might try

L 2
140 THE BEAR AND THE WATER-BUTT.

to come in. Some of the boldest tried to coax him into a
good humour, but he refused to be pacified. At last he
retired slowly to the wood-yard, and took up a strong
position on a pile of timber. Here, during the day, he
remained sullen and terrible. Towards evening he gra-
dually became uneasy, and began to shew signs of giving
in; at length, at the hour of supper, he came slowly down
and allowed himself to be chained and captured. Now,
you will see that in finding out the trick that had been
played upon him, this bear was sensible, but to remain
sulky and angry for so long a time was senseless and
stupid. The bear, however, may be excused, for he was
only a beast; but if he had been a boy, he would have
been inexcusable.

When you’re teased by naughty boys,
Do not sulk and angry be;

Try good humour; try a smile,
Naughty boys will set you free.









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CHILDREN BROUGHT TO JESUS. 143

CHILDREN BROUGHT TO JESUS.

HEN mothers of Salem their children brought to
_ Jesus,
The stern disciples drove them back, and bade
them depart,
But Jesus saw them ere they fled,
And sweetly smiled and kindly said,
“Suffer little children to come unto Me.”

“For I will receive them and fold them in my bosom:
I’ll be a Shepherd to these lambs, oh! drive them not
_away :
For if their hearts to me they give,
They shall with Me in glory live;
Suffer little children to come unto Me.”

How kind was our Saviour to bid those children welcome ;
But there are many thousands who have never heard His
name ;
The Bible they have never read,
They know not that the Saviour said,
“ Suffer little children to come unto Me.”

Oh! soon may the heathen of every tribe and nation,
Fulfil Thy blessed Word, and cast their idols all away!
Oh! shine upon them from above,
And shew Thyself a God of love,
Teach the little children to come unto Thee!
144. EARLY PIETY.

EAREY PIETY.
Tue INFANT SAVIOUR FOUND IN THE TEMPLE.

E know but little of the boyhood and early man-
hood of Jesus. After His parents returned from
Egypt, whither they had gone through fear of
Herod, they settled in the small upland village of Nazareth,
which lies delightfully embosomed among the hills of
Galilee, like a rose amidst its petals. Hence, in early
Christian writers, Nazareth was called the Rose. Joseph,
the reputed father of Jesus, was a carpenter, and occupied
himself in making ploughs, carts, and other farm imple-
ments for his rustic neighbours. Jesus was mostly in the
company of Mary His mother, and we may be sure that,
remembering the wonderful things that had happened at
His birth, she would teach Him very early out of the Bible,
and instruct Him out of the law. He grew like other boys
—He increased in stature, we are told, and in wisdom,
and was a great favourite with all who knew Him, and,
what was much better, He increased day by day in favour
with God.

It was customary for all the Jews to go to Jerusalem, at
least once a year, at the feast of the Passover, and they
brought with them such of their children as were fit for
the journey. It was a strange and solemn sight to see
the people from every little village and hamlet in the most
remote corners of the land, leaving their homes in the
early spring, when the country was all fresh and green,
and journeying, first in small companies, then in larger
crowds, towards Jerusalem. And as they journeyed along
on foot, they would beguile the weariness of the journey

by singing hymns and songs. You will find the hymns
LARLY PIETY. 145

they were accustomed to sing on these occasions in Psalms
CXX.-CXXXIV.

When Jesus was twelve years old, His parents took Him
with them to Jerusalem. It was a long journey for so
young a child; but the weather was generally beautiful,
and they walked slowly, and so He was able to undertake
it. When the feast was over, His parents set out on their
return. There were crowds travelling in the same direc-
tion, all returning from the same feast. Mary and Joseph
thought that Jesus was somewhere in the crowd, and were
in no way anxious about Him, although they had not seen
Him at any time during the first day’s homeward journey.
But when evening came on, He was nowhere to be found.
They sought Him in vain among their kinsfolk and acquaint-
ance. Becoming alarmed, they returned to Jerusalem in
search of Him, and, on the third day, they found Him in
the Temple, sitting in the midst of the learned men who
lived in Jerusalem, hearing them expound the Scriptures,
and asking them questions. His knowledge and wisdom
were remarkable for one so young, and crowds gathered
round, struck with His understanding and answers.

Mary must have been surprised when she saw her son
so occupied. She called Him to her, and gently rebuked
Him for having caused them so much anxiety. Then
came from Jesus the wonderful words, and they are the
first recorded words of His—“Wist ye not that I must be
about my Father’s business?” He was only a child twelve
years of age, but even at that early age He was thinking
of His heavenly Father, and of the work He could do
for Him. Herein He has left an example to all children,
that they too ought to remember that they have some work
to do for God. I doubt not but Jesus liked His play like
any other boy; but, whether at play or at work in Joseph’s
workshop, He always acted as under the eye of His Father
in heaven. So should every boy and every girl act, always
remembering the solemn words, “THovu, Gob, SEEST ME.”
146 I MUST NOT TEASE MY MOTHER.

I MUST ONOD “EEASE: MY VO EER.

MUST not tease my mother,
For she is very kind;
And everything she says to me
I must directly mind.
For when I was a baby,
And could not speak or walk,
She let me in her bosom sleep,
And taught me how to talk.

I must not tease my mother,
And when she likes to read,
Or has the headache, I will step
Most silently indeed.

I will not choose a noisy play,
Nor trifling troubles tell;

But sit down quietly by her side
And try to make her well.

I must not tease my mother;
I’ve heard dear father say,
When I was in my cradle sick
She nursed me night and day.
She lays me in my little bed,
She gives me clothes and food ;
And asks for nothing in return,
But that I should be good.

I must not tease my mother,
She loves me all the day;
And she has patience with my faults,
And teaches me to pray.
How much I'll strive to please her—
She every hour shall see;
For should she go away or die,
What would become of me?
Mrs. Sigourney.
4A WONDERFUL MACHINE. 147

A WONDERFUL MACHINE.

most useful machine in the world.
Fames. Can you, Joseph? Then I should like to
hear of it. What is it used for ?

Foseph. Very many things. The woodman uses it in
felling his trees, and the sawyer in sawing timber into
boards; farmers could not get along without it in plough-
ing, sowing, reaping, and mowing; and they tell me that
thousands of these machines are used abroad in cultivating
the tea-plant and the sugar-cane.

Fames. How large are they ?

Foseph. They are seldom more than eight or ten inches
long; but, for all that, some of them can reach down to
the bottom of a deep well, or up to the top of the church-
spire.

Fomes. | never heard of such a thing; that must be a
strange machine. Is it made of wood or of iron ?

Foseph. Of neither. It is formed of different materials,
some hard and some soft; and it has a great many secret
springs that require oiling.

Fumes. How I should like to see one of them. What
does it look like ?

Foseph. 1 will shew you one some day; but let me
describe it. It is made of twenty-seven hard pieces, most
of them with springs or hinges tied together with strings
in a most curious manner. It often requires cleaning, and
when carried in the open air, especially in winter, is
commonly kept in a leather or a woollen bag. Most people
set a high value on this machine, and a good one is worth
more than £250 to its owner.

Fames. £250?

[oes James, I can tell you what strikes me as the
148 A WONDERFUL MACHINE,

Foseph. Yes, T once knew a man who had a capital one,
and he said that he would not take £2,500 for: it, money
down.

fames. Why, what a machine! It must be a fortune to
have one. —

Foseph. Indeed it is, when put to a good use. There
are more people who get their living by this machine than
by any other means. If any great work is going on, it is
sure to be employed. Without it they never could have
‘made the Crystal Palace, nor any of the beautiful things it
contains. Even the mysterious magnetic telegraph could
not operate without its aid. And then it is quite as useful
in making little things. Without it you cannot make
either a good knife, a corkscrew, a peg, or even a pin.
In short, it is, as I said, the most useful machine in the
world.

Fames. The sooner you shew it to me the better. Why,
the carpenter's tools are nothing to it. He must bea rich
man who can get one. i

Foseph. That does not follow; for I once knew a man
in the poor-house who had one.

Fames, Then it was a great shame; for he had no °
business in the poor-house with such a machine as that.
I wish I had money enough to buy one.

Foseph. You have one, and so has almost every man,
woman, and child in the town. If you were to be searched
this very minute, I venture to say that one would be found
in your pocket.

Fames. In my pocket? You may search me, and turn
my pocket inside out. I have nothing but my hand in my
pocket, except my knife, an apple, my pocket-handkerchief,
and a piece of whipcord.

Foseph, Nothing but your hand? Why, the human
hand is the very machine I have been speaking of.

Fame. The human hand? You said it was worth
£250.

Joseph. Yes, 1 did; and I hardly think you would part
A WONDERFUL MACHINE. 149

with a hand for twice that sum, and I am certain that, if
you were to lose it, you could not replace it for £2,500.

Fames. You said it would reach to the top of the church-
spire.

Foseph. Yes, 1 did; and had it not done so, they would
have found it difficult to put the weathercock on the top of
the steeple.

Fames. But what did you mean by saying it was made
of twenty-seven hard pieces, most of them with springs or
hinges tied together in a most curious manner ?

Foseph. The hand has twenty-seven bones; the joints
are the hinges; the sinews keep the bones together; and
the flesh is a soft substance that covers the whole. The
leathern bag is a glove, which is worn commonly enough,
especially in winter. ~

Fames. I never could have believed it.

yoseph. Ves; surely the human hand is the most useful
machine in the world, and we cannot be too thankful to
God for His gift. It ought always to be used for His
glory and the good of our fellow-creatures.

games. Then let us not forget the Almighty hand that
made this human hand. David did not forget Him when
he said, “ Thy hands have made me and fashioned me; give
me understanding that J may learn thy commandments.”
150 BOBBY AND HIS RABBITS.

BOBBY AND HIS RABBITS.

OBBY had a pair of fine white rabbits, and he was
B never tired of looking at their pretty pink eyes,
their long silken ears, and their soft woolly fur.

Two or three times a day, during summer, he went to their
hutch and fed them, and they were so very tame that they
took the green blades from his hand. Sometimes he took
them out to the lawn to feed on the sweet white clover-tops,
but he had to be very watchful, for there were some cats in
the neighbourhood that wished to eat Bobby's pets, and
they would sit on the walls all the time the rabbits were
feeding, waiting a chance to pounce down on the little
creatures. But Bobby was careful, and the rabbits seemed
to have faith in his power to protect them, for they nibbled
away, unheeding the sly fellows on the walls. After a month
or two, to Bobby’s intense delight he found a little family
of white rabbits among the hay in the hutch. What funny,
dainty little things they were to be sure,—so tiny, so soft,
so neat. Every morning Bobby saved some of his milk
from his breakfast, and his eyes sparkled with delight as he
saw the little woolly balls put out their mites of tongues, and
lap the milk from the saucer. They grew bigger every day,
and who so proud as Bobby, when he was able to present
one pair to a bright-eyed young lady who lived next door,
and when she gave him a kiss for them, he felt inclined to
give her another pair on the spot. So, to this one and to
that, Bobby parted with the young family, leaving only the
pink-eyed papa and mamma. I wish I had not to tell
any more; but I must tell the truth. In the winter follow-
ing, Bobby found it troublesome to get food for his pets,
and became less anxious about them, until, one day, he


BOBBY AND HIS RABBITS. 151

found them lying dead—starved to death. Poor things!
The sight of their thin bodies, the wet untidy hutch, and
the spars half-eaten through, made him cry as if his heart
would break; and he gave them a very fine funeral indeed,
and buried them with much ceremony in a hole dug in the
garden; but he was never allowed to have living pets
again.


152 CONSIDER THE LILIES OF THE FIELD,

CONSIDER THE LILIES OF THE FIELD.

O! the lilies of the field
How their leaves instruction yield !
Hark to Nature’s lesson given
By the blessed birds of heaven.

Every bush and tufted tree

Warbles truth and piety;

Children banish doubt and sorrow -——
God provideth for the morrow.

One there lives whose guardian eye
Guides our earthly destiny ;

One there lives, who, lord of all,
Keeps His children lest they fall.

Pass we, then, in love and praise,
Trusting Him through all our days,
Free from doubt and faithless sorrow :—
God provideth for the morrow,
Leber.






TIRED OF PLAY. 156

TIRED OF PLAY.

IRED of play! tired of play!
What hast thou done this live-long day?
The birds are hushed, and so is ‘the bee;
The sun is creeping up steeple and tree.

The doves have flown to the sheltering eaves,
And the nests are dark with the drooping leaves ;
Twilight gathers, and day is done :—

How hast thou spent it, my beautiful one?

Playing! But what hast thou done beside,
To tell thy mother at eventide?

What promise of morn is left unbroken?
What kind word to thy playmates spoken ?

Whom hast thou pitied, and whom forgiven?
How with thy faults has duty striven?
What hast thou learned by field and hill,
By greenwood path, and by singing rill?

There will come an eve to a longer day,
That will find thee tired, but not of play!
When thou wilt lean, as thou leanest now,
‘With drooping limbs and an aching brow,
And ‘wish the shadows would faster creep,
And long to go to thy quiet sleep.

Well will it be if thine aching brow

Is as free from sin and shame as now;
Well for thee if. thy lip can tell

A tale like this of a day spent well.

If thine open hand hath relieved distress;
If thy pity hath sprung to wretchedness;
If thou hast forgiven the sad offence,
And humbled thy heart with penitence; |
M 2 '
156 TIRED OF PLAY.

If every creature hath won thy love,

From the creeping worm to the brooding dove;
And never a sad, low-spoken word

Hath pleaded with thine heart unheard,—

Then, when the night steals on as now,
It will bring relief to thine aching brow ;
And, with joy and peace at the thought of rest,
Thou wilt sink to sleep on thy mother’s breast.

LORD MACAULAY’S MOTHER.

HILDREN, look in those eyes, listen to that dear
C voice, notice the feeling of even a single touch that
is bestowed upon you by that gentle hand! Make
much of it while you have that most precious of all good
gifts—a loving mother. Read the unfathomable love of
those eyes, the deep anxiety of that tone and look, however
slight your pain. In after-life you may have friends—fond,
dear, kind friends; but never will you have again the inex-
pressible love and gentleness lavished upon you which none
but a mother can bestow. Often do I sigh in my struggles
with the hard, uncaring world for the sweet, deep security
I felt, when, of an evening nestling in her bosom, I listened
to some quiet tale suitable to my age, read in her tender
and untiring voice. Never can I forget her sweet glances
cast upon me when I appeared asleep—never her kiss of
peace at night. Years have passed away since we laid her
beside my father in the old churchyard; yet still her voice
whispers from the grave, and her eye watches over me, as
I visit spots long since hallowed to the memory of my
mother. Macaulay.
A GOOD RECOMMENDATION. 157

A GOOD RECOMMENDATION.

i LEASE, sir, do you want a cabin boy?”
“JT do want a cabin boy, my lad; but what is
that to you? A little chap like you is not fit for
the place.”

“Oh sir, I am real strong. I can do a great deal of
work, though I am not so very old!”

“ But what are you here for? You do not look like a city
boy. Have you run away from home ?”

“Oh! no, indeed, sir! my father died, and my mother
is very poor, and ] want to do something to help her. She
let me come.”

“Well, my son, where are your letters of recommenda-
tion? we cannot take a boy without knowing something
about him.” =

Here wasa damper. Willie had never thought of the
necessity of bringing letters from his teacher or minister,
or some other proper person to prove to strangers that he
was an honest and good boy. Now, what was he to do?

He stood in deep thought, the captain all the time
closely watching the motions of his expressive face. At
length he put his hand in his bosom, and drew out a little
Bible, and without one word placed it in the captain’s hand.

The captain opened the blank page and read :—

“To WILLIE GRAHAM.

“ Presented as a reward for regular and punctual attendance at Sabbath
School, and for his blameless conduct there and elsewhere.

“ By his Sunday-School Teacher.”

The captain was not a pious man; but his heart could
not view this case unmoved. The little fatherless child
158 A GOOD RECOMMENDATION.

standing humbly before him, and referring him to the
testimony of his Sunday-School Teacher, given in his little
Bible, touched a tender spot in the breast of the noble
seaman. Clapping Willie heartily on the shoulder, the
captain said, “You are the boy for me. You shall sail
with me; and, if you are as good a lad as I think you are,
your pocket shall not be empty when you go back to your
good mother.”

HOLY BIBLE, BOOK DIVINE.
OLY Bible, book divine,

Precious treasure, thou art mine;
Mine to teach me whence I came,
Mine to tell me what I am.
Holy Bible, book divine,
Precious treasure, thou art mine.

Mine thou art to guide my feet;

Mine to judge, condemn, acquit ;

Mine to shew a Saviour’s love;

Mine to chide me when I rove.
Holy, &c.

Mine to tell of joys to come,
And the rebel sinner’s doom;
Mine to shew, by living faith,
Man can triumph over death.

Holy, &c.
NYG)

mT CREATOR :


Dk. EDWARD JENNER. I61

DR. EDWARD JENNER.

R. EDWARD JENNER was born in the town of
Berkeley. He was the discoverer of a means of
preventing the terrible disease once so common in

England, called the small-pox. He suffered very much
from it in early life, and was the more anxious, if possible,
to find out some means to render the disorder less severe,
if unable altogether to prevent it. There was a complaint
common among the cows in Gloucestershire, called cow-
pox; and it was found that the persons who caught this
disease from the animals whilst milking them, were never
afterwards afflicted with the small-pox. Dr. Jenner, there-
fore, determined to try whether it were possible to give
the cow-pox to some young persons, which he did by
taking the matter from the cows, and introducing it into
their arms.

You may, perhaps, have seen this very thing done to
the arm of a brother or sister when very young. ‘This
operation is called vaccination ; and the disease thus given
to the child is so slight, that in most cases it is scarcely
an illness at all, and it generally prevents the frightful
complaint, which, if not fatal, is sadly disfiguring to the
face, and, in many instances, has caused blindness and
other affections; so we should all feel very grateful to
Dr. Jenner.

He may truly be called one of the great men of our
land; and it is pleasant to know that although after this
discovery kings and rulers of almost every country sought
his acquaintance, he never lost his simplicity, or became
affected by pride. Not long before his death he said, “I
wonder not that people are ungrateful to me for the dis-
We DR. EDWARD JENNER.

covery, but I do wonder that they are ungrateful to God
for the benefits of which I am but one of the humble
means.” The benefits arising from vaccination cannot be
too highly valued. Although small-pox does sometimes
assume the form of an epidemic—that is, attacking large
numbers in particular districts—yet, were vaccination strictly
enforced, that disease would be less frequent, less extended,
and certainly less severe and fatal.

JESUS: LOVES ME.

For the Bible tells me so;
Little ones to Him belong,

They are weak, but He is strong.
Yes, Jesus loves me,

The Bible tells me so.

eer loves me, this I know,

Jesus loves me! He who died
Heaven’s gate to open wide;
He will wash away my sin,
Let His little child come in.

Jesus loves me! loves me still,
Though I’m very weak and ill;
From His shining throne on high
Comes to watch me where I lie.

Jesus loves me! He will stay
Close beside me all the way:
If I love Him, when I die

He will take me home on high.
THE DOGS OF ST. BERNARD, 163

THE DOGS OF ST. BERNARD.

HESE wonderful dogs have been usually called
mastiffs, probably on account of their great strength;
but they strictly belong to the species of spaniels—

amongst which are found the shepherd’s dog, the Esqui-
maux dog, and the other varieties most distinguished for
intelligence and fidelity.

The Convent of the Great St. Bernard is situated near
the top of the mountain known by that name, near one of
the most dangerous passes of the Alps, between Switzer-
land and Savoy. In these regions the traveller is often
overtaken by the most severe weather, even after days of
cloudless beauty, when the glaciers glitter in the sunshine
and the pink flowers of the rhododendron appear as if they
never were to be sullied by the tempest. But a storm
suddenly comes on;. the roads are rendered impassable
by drifts of snow; the avalanches (which are huge loosened
masses of snow or ice), are swept into the valleys, carrying
trees and crags of rock before them. The hospitable
monks, though their means are scanty, open their doors
to every stranger that presents himself. To be cold, to
be weary, to be benighted, constitute the title to their com-
fortable shelter, their cheering meal, and their agreeable
conversation. But their attention to the distressed does
not end here. They devote themselves to the dangerous
task of searching for those unhappy persons, who may
have been overtaken by the sudden storm, and would
perish but for their charitable succour. Most remarkably
are they assisted in these truly Christian offices. They
have a breed of noble dogs in their establishment, whose
extraordinary sagacity often enables them to rescue the
traveller from destruction. Benumbed with cold, weary
164 ‘THE DOGS OF ST. BERNARD.

in the search for a lost track, his senses yielding to the
stupefying influence of frost, which betrays the exhausted
sufferer into a deep sleep, the unhappy man sinks upon the
ground, and the snow-drift covers him from human sight.
Tt is then that the keen scent and the exquisite docility of
these admirable dogs are called into action. Though the
perishing man lie ten or even twenty feet beneath the
snow, the delicacy of smell, with which they can trace him,
offers a chance of escape. They scratch away the snow with
their feet; they set up a continued hoarse and solemn bark,
which brings the monks and labourers. of the convent to
their assistance. To provide for the chance that the dogs,
without human help, may succeed in discovering the un-
fortunate traveller, one of them has a flask of spirits round
his neck, to which the fainting man may apply for support ;
and another has a cloak to cover him. ‘These wonderful
exertions are often successful; and even when they fail
to restore him who has perished, the dogs discover the
body, so that it may be secured for the recognition of
friends; and such is the effect of the temperature, that the
dead features generally preserve their firmness for the
space of two years.

One of these noble creatures was decorated with a medal,
in commemoration of his having saved the lives of forty-
two persons, who, but for his sagacity, must have perished.

Many travellers who have crossed the passage of St.
‘Bernard have seen this dog, and have heard, around the
blazing fire of the monks, the story of his extraordinary
career. He died about the year 1816, in an attempt to
convey a poor traveller to his anxious family. The Pied-
montese courier arrived at St. Bernard in a very stormy
season, labouring to make his way to the little village of
St. Pierre, in the valley beneath the mountain, where his
wife and children dwelt. It was in vain that the monks
‘attempted to check his resolution to reach his family.
They at last gave him two guides, each of whom was
accompanied by a dog, of which one was the remarkable
THE DOGS OF ST. BERNARD. 165

creature whose services had been so valuable to mankind.
Descending from the convent, they were in an instant
buried by two avalanches; and the same common destruc-
tion awaited the family of the poor courier, who were
toiling up the mountain in the hope to obtain some news
of their expected friend. They all perished.

A story is told of one of these dogs, who, having found
a child unhurt, whose mother had been destroyed by an
avalanche, induced the poor boy to mount upon his back,
and thus carried him to the gate of the convent,

JOSEPH LIKE JESUS.

Genesis xxxvii.
Beloved of his father.

J oseph Hated of his brethren. like Jesus.
- Sold for twenty pieces of silver.



Genesis xxxix.

The perfect servant. l
Joseph Tempted in the wilderness. f like Jesus.

Suffering for sin, but not his own.



Genesis xl., xli. 1-37.
In prison. f
Joseph Released. like Jesus.
Exalted.

I LE NE
Genesis xli. 37-57.
Head over all things.

Joseph Wearing a new name. hike Jesus.

Doing a new work.



Genesis xlii.
Giving repentance,

Joseph And forgiveness of sins. | ke Jesus.
Sharing his glory.
166

I SAW A SHIP A-SAILING.

I SAW A SHIP A-SAILING,

SAW a ship a-sailing,
A-sailing on the sea:
And, oh! it was all laden
With. pretty things for thee!

There were comfits in the cabin,
And apples in the hold;

The sails were made of silk,

And the masts were made of gold.

The four-and-twenty sailors

That stood between the decks,
Were four-and-twenty white mice,
With chains about their necks.

The captain was a duck,

With a packet on his back ;

And when the ship began to move,
The captain said, “ Quack, quack !”














































SET THE BIRDS FREE. 169

SEI (HE: BIRDS
H, set them free!
Kind-hearted man, have pity
On the poor cage-birds, snatched from hedge
or tree,
Or open field, to pine in smoky city.

Set the birds free!
Their joy is in the meadows,
At will to wander with the murmuring bee,
Or sit and sing amid the happy shadows.

Set the birds free!
To smooth the ruffled feather,
To flit at liberty o'er wood and lea,
Bathe in blue skies and drink the sunny weather.

Oh, set them free!
See them once more upspringing
Into the open with a cry of glee—
With rapture pure their Maker's praises singing.

Richard Wilton.


170 THE DAISY AND THE LARK.

DEE DATSY AWN Di beh esse

UT in the country, close by the road, stands a hand-
some house. Before it there is a garden with
flowers, and a painted railing; and just outside the

railing, among beautiful green grass, grew a little daisy.
The sun shone upon it as warmly and kindly as upon the
large, splendid flowers in the garden; and so it grew from
hour to hour, till one morning it stood fully unfolded, with
its small, pure white petals in a ring round the little yellow
sun in the middle.

The daisy thought that no one saw it there among the
grass, and that it was a poor, despised flower; but it was.
very contented, turned its face to the warm sun, looked up
to it, and listened to the lark singing high in the air.

Inside the railing stood a great many stiff, genteel

flowers: the less fragrance they had, the prouder they were
of their fine dress. The peonies blew themselves up, in
order to be bigger than the rose; but size is nothing! The
tulips had the most beautiful colours, as they very well
knew; and, therefore, they held themselves up very straight,
that people might have a good sight of them.
__ They never looked at the little daisy outside; but the
daisy looked all the more at them, and thought within
itself, “ How rich and beautiful they are! Certainly the
lark will come down and pay them a visit. How glad I
am that Iam so near them! for I shall be near that fine
musician too.”

Just at that moment, tee-wheet! down flew the lark, but
not to the peonies and tulips; Oh, no! down into the grass
beside the poor daisy, which was so astonished and so
delighted that it did not know what to think. The bird
danced round about it, and sang, “ How soft the grass is!
THE DAISY AND THE LARK. 171

and see, what a lovely little flower, with a golden heart, and
a silvery white dress !”

Nobody can imagine how happy the little daisy was.
The lark kissed it with its bill, sang to it, and then flew up
to the blue sky again. It was a full quarter of an hour
before the daisy could compose itself; then it turned round
to see what the garden flowers were doing: “surely,” it
thought, “they must have been delighted to see a little
flower so happy.” But the tulips stood as stiff as before,
and their lips were drawn together in a pout, and they
were red in the face, for, the fact was, they had been
angry.

‘The peonies hung their heavy heads in a very sulky
manner, and it was as well they could not speak; other-
wise the daisy would have got a severe scolding. Just
then a little girl came into the garden with a bright, sharp
pair of scissors, and went straight to the tulips, which she
snipped off one after the other.

“O dear,” sighed the daisy, “it is all over with them
now.” The girl went away with the tulips, but the daisy
was glad that zés head had not been snipped off, and very
thankfully folded up its petals as the sun was setting, and
fell asleep, and dreamed the whole night about the sun and
the lark.

Next morning, as the flower was stretching out all its
white petals, like so many little arms, to the air and light,
it recognized the bird’s voice; but the voice was very
mournful now. The poor lark had, indeed, good reason
for singing a sad song; for it had been taken prisoner, and
put into a cage, which hung beside an open window of the
house.

The little daisy wished very much to help its friend the
lark; but how was it to manage that? Yes, it was a
difficult affair. The flower quite forgot how beautiful every
thing was all around it, and how warmly the sun shone, and
could think of nothing but the captive bird.

Two little boys now came out of the garden, one of them

N 2
172 THE DAISY AND THE LARK.
with a knife in his hand, and they came directly towards the
daisy, which could not conceive what they meant.

“Here we can cut out a beautiful piece of turf for the
lark,” said the boy with the knife, and immediately began
to cut out a square turf, with the daisy exactly in the middle
of it.

“Tear the flower off,” said the other boy; and then the
daisy began to tremble with fear. To be torn off was to
lose its life; and it was so anxious to live, that it might
come with the turf into the cage of the captive lark!

“No, let it stay,” said the first boy, “it makes the turf so
pretty.” The daisy was accordingly spared, and arrived
with the turf in the cage of the prisoner. ;

But the poor bird lamented loudly over its lost freedom,
and flapped with its wings against the wires of the cage;
and the little daisy could not speak, could not say a word of
comfort, willing as it was to do so. Thus passed the whole
forenoon.

“There is no water here,” said the imprisoned lark ;
“they have all gone, and have forgotten to give me a drop
of water to drink. My throat is dry and burning—ah ! I
must die.” Then it bored its bill into the cool turf to
refresh itself a little, and its eyes fell upon the daisy. The
bird nodded to the flower, kissed it with its bill, and said,
“Poor little flower, you will grow dry and wither away
here too. They have given me only you, and your little
spot of green grass, instead of the whole world that I had
outside! Ah! you only remind me how much I have lost.”

“Oh, if I could only comfort him!” thought the daisy.
Evening came, but still no one brought the poor bird a
drop of water. It stretched out its pretty wings, and shook
them in a quivering way that was painful to the daisy to
see; its song was now a mournful chirp, its little head bent
over the flower, and the bird’s heart broke for want and
longing. The flower could not now, as on the evening
before, fold its petals together and sleep; it hung - sickly
and sad towards the ground.
THE DAISY AND THE LARK. 173

The boys did not come till next morning, and when they
saw the bird dead they cried, and shed many tears; and
they dug it a neat little grave, which they decked with
flowers. They had put the dead bird into a pretty red box,
for they were resolved to give it a fine burial. Poor lark!
while he lived and sang they forgot him, let him sit in his
cage and suffer thirst, and now, when he was dead, they
gave him tears and ornaments.

The turf, with the daisy in the middle of it, was thrown
out into the dusty road ; and nobody thought of the one that
had felt most pity for the poor bird, and had been most
anxious to comfort it.


174 WHAT'S O'CLOCK.

WHAT IS: OICLOCKe2

HEN I was a boy, my father one day called me to
him, that he might teach me how to know what
c’clock it was. He told me the use of the

minute finger and the hour hand, and described to me the

figures on the dial-plate, until I was pretty perfect in my
art.

: No sooner had I gained this additional knowledge, than
I set off scampering to join my companions, but my father

called me back again: “Stop, Humphrey,” said he, “I have

something else to say to you.”

Back again I went, wondering what else I had yet to
learn, for it seemed to me that I knew all about the clock,
quite as well as my father did.

“ Humphrey,” said he, “I have taught you to know the
time of the day, I must now teach you to find out the time
of your life.”

All this was Dutch to me; so I waited rather impatiently
to hear how my father would explain it, for I wanted sadly
to go to my marbles.

“The Bible,” said he, “describes the years of man to be
threescore and ten, or fourscore years. If we divide the
fourscore years of an old man’s life into twelve parts, like
the dial of the clock, it will allow almost seven years for
every figure. When a boy is seven years old; then it is
one o'clock of his life, and this is the case with you; when
you arrive at fourteen years, it will be two o’clock with you;
and then at twenty-one years, it will be three o’clock, should
it please God thus to spare you. In this manner, you
may always know the time of your life; and your looking
at the clock may perhaps remind you of it. My great-
grandfather, according to this calculation, died at twelve
WHAT'S O'CLOCK. 178

o'clock; my grandfather at eleven, and’ my father at ten.
At what hour you and I shall die, Humphrey, i is only known
to Him to whom all things are known.”

Never since then have I heard the inquiry, “What
o'clock is it?” without being reminded of the words of my
father.

I know not, my friends, what o’clock it may be with you,
but I know very well what time it is with myself; and that
if I mean to do anything in this world which hitherto I
have neglected, it is high time to set about it. The words
of my father have given a solemnity to the dial-plate of a
clock which perhaps it never would have possessed in my
esteem, if these words had not been spoken. Look about '
you, I earnestly entreat you, and now and then ask your-
selves the question, “ What o’clock is it with me ?”

Child's Companion.

GOD CARES FOR ALL.

O you know how many stars
_ There are shining in the sky?
Do you know how many clouds

Every day go floating by?
God the Lord has counted all:
He would miss one should it fall.

Do you know how many flies
Play about in the warm sun?
How many fishes in the water ?—
God has counted every one.
Every one he called by name
When into the world it came.

Do you know how many children

Go to little beds at night,
Sleeping there so warm and cosey,

Till they wake with morning light ?—
God in heaven each name can tell,
Knows them all and loves them well,
176 DR. LIVINGSTONE.

DR. LIVINGSTONE.

AVID LIVINGSTONE was born in the village of
D Blantyre, in the neighbourhood of Glasgow. His
father was employed in the extensive linen factories
in that village, and in these factories the future missionary
and traveller wrought when he was a boy. He was em-
ployed as a piecer-boy, and afterwards as a spinner; and
gained the respect and good-will of his employers by his
steadiness and sobriety, and the love of his fellow work-
men and acquaintances by his kindly and affectionate
demeanour.

He was a thoughtful, resolute boy, smitten with a
great love of learning, and yearning, like many other
Scotchmen of the humbler classes, to raise himself to a
higher position than that to which he was born. There
was no readier road to the accomplishment of this, than by
attending the classes of some university. Glasgow was in
the neighbourhood of Blantyre, and Glasgow had a famous
university, always willing to welcome within its portals any
youth who may desire to reap the benefits of a university
education. By patient plodding and dogged perseverance,
Livingstone qualified himself for admission, and he attended
classes during the winter months, and wrought steadily at
the factory while the summer lasted. He thus early
learned the habit of endependence.

He was no enthusiast. He was a plain, practical youth.
He studied early and late when it was the time for study,
and worked as a man should work, when the season for
bodily labour came. He lived frugally at all times, avoided
excesses of every kind; in short, did thoroughly whatever
DR. LIVINGSTONE. 177

he undertook to do, and thus, in some degree, prepared him-
self, all unconscieusly, for that great work which he was
afterwards to accomplish. “The child is father of the
man:” never was there a more striking illustration of this
saying than in the case of David Livingstone. He was
not a genius, as that word is generally understood; he was
not endowed with unwonted intellectual powers; but he
had qualities which were of more importance than these.
He was resolute, determined, with an unconquerable power
of will, recognised no such word as “ zmpossible,” but held
firmly to the belief that “whatever men dare they can do.”
And when to these qualities was added one higher still—
implicit faith in God—we need not wonder at the marvel-
lous success which attended him, and the triumphs he was
enabled to effect.

All our readers know the outline of his adventurous
career; we do not intend to sketch it. His labours as a
missionary, his discoveries as a traveller, the impulse his
example has given to efforts to Christianize Africa, are
familiar to all. In all his work he had no thought of
himself; and yet, by doing the work assigned him in a
loving, Christian spirit, he has won for himself a name that
will never die. “The righteous shall be had in everlasting
remembrance.”

The great lesson we should wish our young readers
to learn from David Livingstone is that old, old one
spoken of in the Bible, where it is said, “WHATEVER THY
HANDS FIND TO DO, DO IT WITH THY MIGHT.” David
Livingstone began life as a factory boy, and he now rests
amid England’s mighty dead. His body was borne home
from Africa as a sacred treasure, and committed to the
grave amid the tears not merely of his own people, but
of the whole civilized world. ‘“Seest thou a man
diligent in his business, he shall stand before kings.”
178

LIELDS FOR LABOUR.

FIELDS FOR LABOUR,

ie you are too weak to journey

Up the mountain steep and high,
You can stand within the valley
While the multitude go by;

You can chant in happy measure
As they slowly pass along:

Though they may forget the singer,
They will not forget the song.

If you have not gold or silver
Ever ready to command,

If you cannot to the needy
Reach an ever-open hand,

You can visit the afflicted,
O’er the erring you can weep;
You can be a true disciple
Sitting at the Master’s feet.

If you cannot in the conflict
Prove yourself a soldier true,

If, where fire and smoke are thickest,
There’s no work for you to do;

When the battle-field is silent
You can go with careful tread,

You can bear away the wounded,
You can cover up the dead.

Do not then stand idly waiting
For some greater work to do;
THE BARNYARD. 179
Fortune is a lazy goddess,
She will never come to you.

Go and toil in azy vineyard,
Do not fear to do or dare,

If you want a field of labour,
You can find it anywhere,

THE BARNYARD.
| LEARNED a good lesson, says a lady, when I was

a little girl. One frosty morning I was looking out
of the window into my father’s barnyard.

It was a very cold morning. The water was frozen in
the trough at the pump. The yard was filled with cows,
oxen, and horses, wanting to drink, and waiting for the ice
to-be broken.

The cattle all stood very quiet and meek till one of the
cows tried to turn round. In making the attempt she
happened to hit her next neighbour, whereupon the neigh-
bour kicked and hit another.

In five minutes the whole herd were kicking each other
with fury. Heels, horns, and teeth were busy on all sides.
The cow gored the pony; the pony kicked the ox; the ox
struck right and left with his horns; the horses bit and
reared, and stamped, and plunged.
~ My mother laughed and said, “ See what comes of kick-
ing when you are hit. Just so, I have seen one little cross
word set a whole family by the ears.”

Thereafter, when any of us were cross she would say,
“Take care, my children; remember how the fight in the
barnyard began.

«Never give back a kick for a hit, and you will save
yourselves and others a great deal of trouble.”

Oo
180 BAD COMPANY,

BAD COMPANY.

NE Spring, a farmer, after working busily for several
weeks, succeeded in sowing one of his largest fields
with corn. The neighbouring crows soon found

their way into the field, and never left it without having
their crops well filled with corn. The farmer being un-
willing to have the germs of his future crop destroyed,
determined to drive the bold marauders off to their nests.
Accordingly, he loaded his old rusty gun, intending, on
their next visit, to give them a warm reception.

It so happened that the farmer had a parrot, as talkative
and mischievous as those birds usually are, and being very
tame, it was allowed its freedom, to come and go at plea-
sure. When strolling about, some time after the farmer’s
declaration of war against the crows, it saw some of these
black robbers busy at their old trade. Being a lover of
- company, “ Pretty Poll” hopped over among the crows, and
was soon quite friendly with them. The farmer hearing
the cawing of the crows, took down his gun and sallied
forth. Reaching his corn-field, he saw at a glance (though
he overlooked the parrot) how matters stood. Levelling
his gun, he fired, and with the report were heard the death-
scream of three crows, and an agonising shriek from poor
Poll. As the farmer advanced to see what execution he
had done, the unwounded crows flew away. On looking
‘more closely, great was his surprise to see his mischievous
parrot stretched upon the ground, with its feathers sadly
ruffled, and a broken leg. “You foolish bird,” said the
farmer; “this comes of keeping bad company.” The parrot
made no reply, but looked very solemn. On carrying it to
the house, the children, seeing its wounded leg, exclaimed :

“What did it, papa? What hurt our Pretty Poll?” “Bad
BAD COMPANY. 181

company, bad company,” answered the parrot in a solemn
voice. “Ay, that it was,” said the farmer. “ Poll was with
those wicked crows when I fired, and received a shot
intended for them. Remember the parrot’s fate, children,
and beware of bad company.” With these words the
farmer turned round, and with his wife’s help bandaged
the broken leg; and in a few weeks the parrot was as
lively as ever, but never forgot its misfortune in the corn-
field. If it ever saw the farmer's children playing with
quarrelsome companions, it invariably dispersed them with
the cry: “Bad company, bad company.”



[ESUS OUR SHEPHERD.

Folded in His bosom, what have we to fear?
Only let us follow whither He doth lead,—
To the thirsty desert, or the dewy meed.

[rs is our Shepherd, wiping every tear ;

Jesus is our Shepherd, may we know His voice;
How His gentle whisper makes our hearts’ rejoice !
Even when He chideth, tender is His tone:

None but He shall guide us; we are His alone.

Jesus is our Shepherd—guarded by His arm,

‘Though the wolves may raven, none can do us harm;
When we tread death’s valley, dark with fearful gloom,
We will fear no evil, victors o’er the tomb.
182 RIDDLES.

RIDDLES:

HE famous Wrse Men of Greece did not disdain to
send puzzles to each other. They are also fond of
riddles in the East, or Oriental countries.

The following very pretty one is found in one of their
stories : “ What tree is that which has twelve branches, and
each branch thirty leaves, which are black on one side and
white on the other ?”

The tree is the year; the branches, the months; and the
leaves, black on one side and white on the other, signify”
day and night.

The following beautiful riddle, in verse, contains much
excellent instruction, not only in regard to the value, but
also the proper use of worps, and the propriety of carefully
considering them before they are uttered :—

“From rosy bowers we issue forth,
From east to west, from south to north:
Unseen, unfelt, by night, by day,
Abroad we take our airy way.

“We foster love, and kindle strife,—
The bitter and the sweet of life:
Piercing and sharp, we wound like steel ;
Now, smooth as oil, those wounds we heal.

“Not strings of pearl are valued more,
Nor gems, encased in golden ore;
Yet thousands of us every day,
Worthless and vile, are thrown away.
RIDDLES. 183
“Ve wise, secure with bars of brass *

‘The double doors through which we pass ;

For, once escaped, back to our cell |

No human art can us compel.”

Here is still another; and you can find it out for your-
self:—“I came in the morning,—it was spring; and I
smiled. I walked out at noon,—it was summer; and I was
glad. _I sat down at evening,—it was autumn; and I was
sad. I lay down at night,—it was winter; and I slept.”

Mrs. Barbauld. .

Le slow to promtse, but quick to perform.

RARARRAR REED

Letter to slip with the foot than with
the tongue.

“oer



Command your temper lest tt command you.

ARR

A good servant makes a good master.

~

Debt ts the worst kind of poverty.

ae



Tel



Better to be alone than m bad company.

O 2
184 JESUS THE GOOD SHEPHERD.

JESUS THE GOOD. SHEPHERD:

HEEP are very plentiful in Palestine, and form a very
considerable portion of the wealth of the people.
Sheep are very silly, defenceless creatures, are

very apt to wander; and, if attacked by dogs or wild
animals, they do not attempt to defend themselves, but
run away in all directions. Hence the shepherd has to
keep a very strict watch over them, lest they go astray ;
and he has also to protect them from danger, especially
during the night, because it is then that wild beasts roam
about seeking their prey.

In hot countries like Palestine, the shepherd had alsc
to look out proper pasture for his sheep. In the scorching
summer weather, the grass on the hillsides got withered
and parched, and was then unfit for food. Accordingly
the shepherd had to remove his flock to the low-lying
valleys, where streams of water ran, on whose banks fresh
green grass would be found.

It was customary to fold the sheep at night, that is, put
them into an enclosure surrounded by a wall, where they
might be so far protected from their enemies. But even
then they were not entirely safe. The wolf, or other beast
of prey, creeping out under the cover of darkness, would
stealthily approach the fold, and, if he discovered the
smallest opening, would find his way in, and kill and
destroy.

In the Bible we are compared to sheep, and the Lord
Jesus tells us that He is the Good Shepherd. From what
I have said regarding the earthly shepherd, you will easily
see what Jesus means when He calls Himself the Good
Shepherd,
JESUS THE GOOD SHEPHERD. 185

- We had all gone astray, had wandered from God, and
would never have returned of our own accord. The Lord
Jesus went in search of us, and found us when far from
home, and then gently led us home. But, even when
brought home, we have many enemies. We read _ that
the devil goeth about like a roaring lion, seeking whom
he may devour. But the Lord Jesus can defend us from
this and all other enemies, for He has all power in His
hands, and nothing can harm us without His permission.
The very hairs of our heads are all numbered. Moreover
our Good Shepherd provides pasture for His sheep. He
gives us the Bible, the Sabbath, the preaching of the
Gospel, and many other precious things, whereby our souls
are nourished and strengthened. Well may He call Him-
self the Good Shepherd.

But there is one thing which I have not yet told you,
but which is very wonderful, and ought to lead us to love
Jesus our Shepherd. In order to bring His sheep home,
and to be their Shepherd, He had to lay down His own
life. So great was His love for His poor, wandering, lost
sheep that, when nothing but His life could recover them,
He did not hesitate to offer it up. And then you should
think what His death was. He was nailed to the bitter
cross, and died a death of shame and agony. The Good
Shepherd gave His life for the sheep. If He did so, what
else is there which He will not do for us? Well may
every child sing ——

Jesus, tender Shepherd, hear me,

Bless Thy little lamb to-night ;

Through the darkness be Thou near me,
Watch my sleep till morning light.
186 THE DROP OF IWATER.

iE DROP OR WAGER

S alittle brook was running merrily along on its way
to the sea, one of its water-drops suddenly stood
still and stopped behind, being caught by the root

of a forget-me-not, which grew by the side of the brook.
A little boy, who saw this water-drop stop, was curious to
know all about it. So he went down to the spot where it
lay, and asked it whence it came.

“A long while ago,” said the water-drop, “I lived with
my countless sisters in the great sea. We had all sorts of
games. Sometimes, we mounted up high in the air, and
peeped at the stars; and then we sunk plump down deep
below, and saw how the great whales sported about, and
the little fishes chased one another. But I wished to get
higher; and so, one day, when the sun rose out of the sea,
I clung fast to one of his hot beams, and thought that now
I should reach the stars, and become one of them. But
I had not got up very far when the sunbeam shook me off,
and let me fall into a black cloud.

“Then I sailed about in the cloud—now high up in the
sky, and now low down near the earth—till the cloud came
near the top of a mountain, when a flash of fire suddenly
_ darted through it, and a loud and frightful sound rung all
around. I thought I must surely die. But the cloud laid
itself down softly on the top of the mountain, and I escaped
by trickling into a little hole in the ground.

“J now wished to rest a while; but the little hole into
which I fell was much deeper than I thought; so I slipped
down and down, till I reached a place which was pitch
dark, and where I could neither see nor hear anything.
Then I began to fear that I was to be a prisoner for life.

“Happily, my fears were groundless; for, after a long




THE DROP OF WATER. 189

and tiresome journey in the dark, and over all sorts of soils
and rocks, I was at length permitted to come up once more
into the free, cheerful air. And now I will run back to my
sisters, and there wait patiently till 1am called to some-
thing better.”

All this the Giee drop told the little boy. But hardly
had she ceased speaking, when the root of the forget-me-
not caught her by the hair and drew her in, that she might
become a floweret, and twinkle brightly a as a blue star on
the green firmament of earth.

PIEPER. LAORNS;

HE thorns on a rose or blackberry bush are very
little things; but they will tear your flesh, and
make you feel very uncomfortable. Thistles are

smaller still; but if you get their sharp points in your hands,
the pain will be great until they are removed. The stings
of nettles are so small that you can hardly see them with
the naked eye; but if you touch them, they will torment
you. No matter how happy you may be, a thorn or nettle
in your finger is enough to spoil your pleasure.

So the sweetest, the most clinging affection, is often
shaken by the slightest breath of unkindness. An unkind
word from a beloved one is a thorn to a sensitive mind
that sends a pang to the heart. A cross look, or a cold
expression from a friend, is a nettle in the finger. These
little things quench love and spoil friendship.

If childhood and youth would be happy, they must pluck
out the thorns of ill temper, the thistles of envy, and the
nettles of jealousy; for if these are indulged, they cannot
be happy in themselves, nor hope to make others happy
around them.
190 THE FOUR SEASONS.

THE FOUR SEASONS.

a WISH it were always winter!” cried Ernest, who had
returned from skating, and was making a man out of
snow. His father desired him to write down this

wish in a memorandum book he took out of his pocket;

and Ernest did so.

The winter passed away, and the spring came. Ernest
stood with his father by the side of a bed of flowers, and
gazed with delight upon the hyacinths, the violets, and the
lilies of the valley.. “These are the gifts of spring,” said
his father ; “ but they will soon fade and disappear.” “Ah!”
said Ernest, “I wish it were always spring!” “Write this
down in my book,” said his father; and Ernest did so.

The spring passed away, and summer came. Ernest
went with his parents, and some of his playmates, into
the country, and spent the day there. Everywhere the
meadows were green and decked with flowers, and in the
pastures the young lambs were sporting around their
mothers. Ernest and his playmates passed a very happy
day. As they were going home, the father said, “Has not
ihe summer its pleasures too, my son?” “Oh, yes,” said
Ernest ; “I wish it were always summer!” And this wish
Ernest wrote down in his father’s book.

At last autumn came. Ernest again went with his
‘ parents into the country. It was not so warm as in the
summer, but the air was, mild and the heavens were clear.
The grape-vines were heavy with purple clusters; melons
lay upon the ground in the gardens; and in the orchards
the boughs were loaded with ripe fruit. “This fine season
will soon be over,” said the father, “and winter will be upon

us.” “Ah!” said Ernest, “I wish it would stay, and always
be autumn.”
THE FOUR SEASONS. Il

“Do you really wish so?” said his father. “I do,
indeed,” replied Ernest. “ But,” continued his father, taking
at the same time his memorandum book out of his pocket,
“see what is written here.” Ernest looked and saw it
written down, “I wish it were always winter.” ‘“ Now turn
over another leaf,” said his father; “and what do you find
written there?” “I wish it were always spring.” “And
farther on, what is written?” “I wish it were always
summer.” .

« And in whose handwriting are these words?” “ They
are in mine,” said Ernest. “And what is now your wish ?”
“That it should always be autumn.” “That is strange,”
said his father. “In winter, you wished it might always
be winter; in spring, you wished it might always be spring ;
and so of summer and of autumn. Now, what conclusion
do you draw from all this ?”

Ernest, after thinking a moment, replied, “I suppose
that all seasons are good.” “That is true, my son; they
are all rich in blessings, and God, who sends thera to us,
knows far better than we what is good for us.

“ Had the wish you expressed last winter been granted,
we should have had no spring, no summer, no autumn.
You would have had the earth always covered with snow, so
that you might have had skating and made snow men.
How many pleasures would you have lost in that event!
It is well for us that we cannot have all things as we wish,
but that God sends us what seems good to Him.”

Lf you wish to have the frurt, you must
learn to climb the tree.
192 A PRICELESS DOG,

Ae PRICELESS: DOG

GENTLEMAN returning from New Orleans in

a steamer, was especially interested by a lady who

was one of the passengers. She was the wife ofa
wealthy planter, returning to her father’s house with her
only child, to whom she was most devoted. While pass-
ing through the canal of Louisville, the steamer stopped
for a few moments at the quay. The nurse, wishing to see
the city, was stepping ashore, when the child sprang from
her arms into the terrible current that swept towards the
falls, and immediately disappeared. The confusion that
ensued attracted the attention of a gentleman who was
sitting in the fore-part of the boat quietly reading. Rising
hastily, he asked for some article of clothing which the
child had worn. The nurse handed him a tiny apron she
had torn off in her efforts to saye the child as it fell. Turn-
ing to a fine Newfoundland dog that stood eagerly looking
up into his face, the gentleman pointed first to the apron,
and then to the spot where the child had sunk. In an
instant the noble dog leaped into the stream and dis-
appeared. By this time the excitement was intense; and
some persons on shore, thinking that both child and dog
were lost, procured a boat, and started to search for the
body. Just then the dog was seen far away with some-
thing in his mouth, Bravely he struggled with the waves,
but it was clear that his strength was failing fast, and more
than one breast gave a sigh of relief as the boat reached
him, and it was announced that he was still alive. The
dog and the child were both brought on board. Giving
a single glance to satisfy herself that the child was really
living, the young mother rushed forward, and, sinking
beside the dog, threw her arms round his neck and burst














A PRICELESS DOG. 195
into tears. "Few could bear the sight unmoved, and as
she caressed and kissed his shaggy head, she looked up to
the owner of the dog and said: “Oh sir, I must have this
dog; take everything I have, but give me the preserver
of my child’s life” The gentleman smiled, and patting
his dog’s head, said, “I am very glad, madam, he has -
been of service to you, but nothing in the world could
induce me to part with him.” The dog looked as if he
quite understood what they were talking about, and giving
his sides a shake, laid himself down at his master’s feet,
with an expression in his large eyes that said plainer than
words, “ No; nothing shall part us.”

THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.

S a dog was crossing a brook with a bone in his
mouth, he saw his own image in the clear water,
and mistook it for another dog carrying another bone.

Not content with what he himself possessed, the greedy
creature snatched at the prize which he saw below. In
doing so, he of course dropped the real bone, which fell
into the brook and was lost !

The greedy, grasping at more than they have, often lose
even that which they might in peace have enjoyed. °

fle who grasps too much holds lrttle,
196 THE FIRST PRINTER,

THE FIRST PRINTER,

N the town of Strasburg, during the earlier part of the
fifteenth century, there lived a man called John
Gutenberg. Somehow, he had come to think that

books might be made in some easier way than by writing
them with a pen from beginning to end. He procured
bits of wood, and with a knife carved out the form of a
letter on each little block separately, so that when he had
made enough, he could move and arrange them as he
pleased. He knew very well that it was a wonderful plan
he had found out, and so he kept his secret to himself for
fear others might get at it, and make money by it. You
see it was only fair that, since Gutenberg had discovered it,
he, and nobody else, should get the reward. Just outside
of Strasburg, there was an old monastery—that is, a place
something between a house and achurch. Its rooms had
stone floors and high arched roofs, and here the bald-
crowned monks used to live. The rooms were called cells,
Now, in the cells nearest the public road, John Gutenberg
set up a jeweller’s shop; but in the cell that was behind, he
had all his little blocks with the letters upon them, and his
tools for carving, fixing them together, and so on. During
every spare moment, he left his front shop, went into this
back cell, and, locking the door behind him, wrought hard
at his new discovery. After he had got his types all right,
he set himself to make ink of various colours, and by-and-
bye, he was delighted to be able to have page after page
all of his own printing. He could scarcely sleep for think-
ing about it, and when he did fall into a slumber, his
dreams were all about types, and ink, and printing-presses.
One of his dreams, however, shocked him so much, that
when the morning came he felt as if he could break all the
types to pieces. He had dreamt that he heard two voices,
one telling him to go on with his work, for that thousands
upon thousands of people, who might live long after he was
THE FIRST PRINTER. 197

dead, would thank him with all their hearts for his discovery.
Men would be wiser, and the world would be better in every
way, for having more books than they had ever had before.
The other voice told him that his discovery would do ever
so much mischief. Bad men, it said, would be better able
to spread their wicked thoughts, and so the world would be
worse than it had ever been. Poor John did not know
which to believe, but he was sad when he thought that his
new work might hurt people; and so, as I have said, he
had a good mind to destroy what it had cost him so much
time and labour to invent. Luckily, he stayed his hand
and went on with his work. But I am sorry to tell you,
that he was watched by prying eyes. They did not find
out what he was doing in that back cell, but they fancied
he must be at some mischief, when he went there and
locked himself in. The result was that he had to leave
Strasburg, and flee to his native city of Mentz. Here he
took a partner called John Fust, told him his secret, and
set up a printing office. One of the first books he printed
was the Bible, and so, many people who had never read
it before were now able to get a copy of it. Now, the
men whose business it had been to write copies of the
Bible, were ill-pleased to learn that prizted ones could be
obtained; and so, filled with spite and jealousy, they rose
up against poor Gutenberg, who was thus obliged to flee
once more. For some time he wandered about, poor and
neglected, till a kind prince, called Adolphus of Nassau,
took pity on him, and helped him to set up a new printing-
press, from which a number of books were issued. He
died, not rich, but in comfortable circumstances. His old
partner, Fust, was mean enough to say that /e was the
inventor of printing, and in this way tried to rob poor
Gutenberg of his fame. The world knows better about
it now than it did at that time. And so you will try to
remember that John Gutenberg was the first printer, and
that Strasburg was the first place at which a book was
printed.
198 ROOM FOR ALL,

ROOM, FOR: ALE,

GENTLEMAN with whom I am acquainted, had in
his wood-shed a half-barrel nearly full of hay, in
which a speckled hen of his took a fancy one day

to deposit an egg. The egg pleased her so much that she
determined to lay another, and so she went on until she
had seven nice white eggs there. Then she sat down
upon them, and made up her mind that if eggs were nice,
chickens were better, and she would have some. Before.
this, however, the old tabby cat spied the comfortable
barrel filled with nice hay, and not objecting in the least
to the seven white eggs, she slipped into the barrel, and
the first thing the hen knew, there sat Mrs. Puss with
three snips of kittens by her side.

The hen peeped over her nest, clucked, fluttered her
wings, and undoubtedly said: “Get out!” Possibly, she
may have remarked: “That’s my barrel! There isn’t
room for you!” !

The cat in return arched her back, distended her tail,
hissed, and coolly demanded: “What are you going to do
about it?” After a minute’s parley, the hen walked con-
tentedly away, leaving the cat sole possessor. Tab spread
herself over the eggs and kittens, and when she became
tired, or wanted her food, in hopped the hen, and covered
the kittens and the eggs. When night came, and it was
time for respectable people to be in bed, the cat and the
hen cuddled down together, and were as happy as possible.
There was plenty of room, you see, in that house for two
families !

Presently one little downy chick burst its shell, then
another, and lo! there were soon seven chickens peeping .
and cheeping, and looking about to see what a strange


















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ROOM FOR ALL. 201

world it was, to be sure. And there was a great animal
with green eyes, and a purr that sounded like the biggest
kind of hand-organ, to say nothing of the three blind kittens,
with pink noses and very feeble voices. The kittens
weren't blind always, and when their eyes opened, what a
wonderment there must have been! The greatest mystery
of all to solve was whether they were chickens or kittens,
and who was the mother, the cat or the hen. And they
haven't really found out yet; for when the young fry were
old enough to hop out of the barrel it was quite impossible
to divide the family, so they all sallied out together to seek
their fortunes and to see the world. The kittens were
inclined to be very playful, and took all sorts of liberties
with the grave old hen, playing with her tail, pouncing
upon her back, and running after the chickens, who, in
turn, trotted about in perfect bewilderment, peeping and
flapping their tender wings, and following first the cat, and
then the hen. The only way to avoid having three lunatic
cats and seven imbecile chickens, was to keep them together
in their old home; there they are still—a cat, a hen, seven
chickens, and three kittens. The house must be crowded,
but still there is room for all.

As this is a positive fact, I think it will be well for the
children who are inclined to be fretful with their younger
brothers and sisters, to bear this story in mind; and if
animals can dwell lovingly together, even under such very
uncomfortable circumstances, what ought little children to
do who have so many things to make them happy?
Wouldn't it be well to try and see if there isn’t room for
the baby brothers and the troublesome. sisters ? And the
way to begin is to make room for them first in your hearts
—that’s the better way; the rest will all come easily
enough, you will find.

P 2
202 THE ROBIN REDBREAST.

THE ROBIN REDBREAST.

HE Robin is a great favourite with all young people.

He is a very sociable bird, and delights to dwell

near human beings, and seems to take pleasure in

their presence. In the cold weather of winter, the Robin

will come to the windows of houses, and you may often see

the children throwing them crumbs of bread to eat. It is

pleasant to see them hopping about, picking up the crumbs,

and by their movements seeming to shew their gratitude
for the kindness shewn them.

The Robin often builds its nest in curious places. One
of them began to build a nest in the library of a gentle-
man’s house, but, being disturbed there, went into the
dining-room, which was not entered by the family from
breakfast-time until the middle of the day. The window
was left open, and the little bird could fly in and out at
pleasure. She built her nest in the folds of a window
curtain,—a nice warm place for a bird’s nest, if it were never
moved or shaken.

A still more singular place was once chosen by another
Robin. She took possession of a hole in a book-shelf in a
school, in which there were seventy children. The hole
chosen was at the furthest end of the room, directly above
the heads of a class of little girls from four to five years
old, who, much to *their credit, never disturbed the bird.
There she laid and hatched five eggs. One of the young
ones died in a few days, and the body was carried off by
the parent birds. The remaining four were fed regulafly in
the presence of the children, and in due time reared. And,
oddly enough, twelve years afterwards, another Robin built
her nest in the very same spot.

A stranger place yet was once selected by a pair of

\
THE ROBIN REDBREAST. 203

Robins, who took up their abode in a church, and affixed
their nest to the Bible as it lay on the reading desk. The
clergyman would not allow the birds to be disturbed, and
supplied himself with another Bible.

These stories of birds building their nests in churches
remind us of a verse in the Bible, which says, “ The sparrow
hath found a house, and the swallow a nest for herself,
where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O Lord of
Hosts, my King and my God.”

THE REDBREAST.

| OW simply unassuming is that strain,

It is the redbreast’s song, the friend of man.
High is his perch, but humble is his home,
And well concealed. Sometimes within the sound
Of heartsome mill-clack, where the spacious door,
White-dusted, tells him plenty reigns around—
Close at the roct of brier-bush, that o’erhangs
The narrow stream, with shealings bedded white,
He fixes his abode, and lives at will;
Oft near some single cottage he prefers
To rear his little home; there, pert and spruce,
He shares the refuse of the goodwife’s churn,
Which kindly on the wall for him she leaves:
Below her lintel oft he lights, then in
He boldly flits, and fluttering loads his bill,
And to his young the yellow treasure bears.
204 DICK AND THE GIANT.

DICK AND THE GIANT.
ITTLE DICK was as blithe, cheerful a fellow as you

ever saw. He used to go singing and whistling

about nearly all day. He was always merry;
scarcely anything could make him sad. One day he
thought he would have a ramble in a large forest at
some distance from his home. He had often before been
along its edges; but it looked so dark he was afraid to enter.
But Dick on this day was more merry than usual, for the
sun shone bright, and the flowers looked lovely ; and so he
sang and whistled till he made the woods ring again. He
amused himself for some time among the trees and flowers,
and at last he entered deep into the forest, and was delighted
at the scene. A clear brook ran through the wood, and the
waters looked so pure that Dicky, being very thirsty, stooped
down to drink. But just at that moment he was suddenly
seized from behind, and found himself in the hands ofa
great, tall, fierce, ugly-looking giant, a hundred times as big
as himself; for Dick was not much larger than the giant’s
thumb. The giant looked at him with savage delight,
opened wide his mouth, and made a noise that seemed to
Dick quite terrible. Dick thought the giant would have
eaten him alive at one mouthful. The giant did not, how-
ever, do this; but put him into a large bag and carried him
off, The poor little captive tried all he could to get out
of the bag, but to no purpose ;—he was held fast. He
screamed, he struggled, he tried to tear a passage; but the
giant laughed, and carried him far away. At last the giant
came to his house, a gloomy-looking place, with a high wall
around it, and no trees nor flowers. When he had entered
he shut the door, and took Dick out of the bag. Dick now
thought his time was come, When he looked around he
saw a large fire; and before it hung four victims like him-
DICK AND THE GIANT. 205

self, roasting for the giant’s supper. The giant, however,
did not kill Dick; but he took him by the body, and gave
him such a squeeze as to put him in great pain; he then
threw him into a prison which had beem prepared for him.
It was quite dark, and iron bars were all around it, to pre-
vent his getting out. Dick dashed backward and forward
in his dungeon, and beat his head against the iron bars, for
he was almost mad with fright. The giant gave him a piece
of dry bread and a drop of water, and left him.

The next day the giant came and looked, and found that
Dick had eaten no bread; so he took him by the head, and
crammed some of it down his throat, and seemed quite
vexed to think he would not eat. Poor Dick was too much
frightened to eat or drink. He was left all alone in the
dark another day; and a sad day it was. At the thought
of his own home, his companions, the sunlight, the trees,
and the many nice things he used to eat, the poor creature
screamed, and tried to get through the iron bars; and he
beat his poor head and limbs sorely in trying to get out.

The giant came again, and wanted Dick to sing as he
sung when at home, and to be happy and merry. “Sing,
sing, sing!” said he. But poor Dick was much too sad to
sing. A prison is no place to sing songs in. The giant
now seemed in quite a rage, and took Dick out to make
him sing. Dick gave a loud scream, a plunge, a struggle,
and sank dead in the giant’s hand!

Perhaps the young reader thinks this a strange story ;
and yet it is true, for poor Dick was a little bird, and the
giant was a cruel boy. Nothing is more cowardly, as
nothing is more cruel, than to inflict wanton suffering on
creatures so unable to defend themselves. To a noble
mind helplessness is a claim to friendship and protection.
206

THE BOY WHO COULD NOT LIE.

THE BOY WHO COULD NOT LIE.

HERE was once a young Virginian,
And a noble boy was he,
Yet he sprang not from a princely line,
Nor was of high degree ;
But the clear blood mantled in his cheek,
The light flashed from his eye,
And his presence was right noble,
For he never told a lie.

Now his home was near a forest,
Filled with lofty branching trees,

And his wont had been to “try his oe
Boy-fashion, upon these:

We may think that he not seldom too,
Had snapped the brittle toy,

Ere his. father found a hatchet stout,
And bought it for the boy.

Who so proud as our young woodman now ?
His soul is full of glee;

He will try. his keen-edged tool at once
Upon the nearest tree.

So he hies him round his father’s house,
And waves it in the air;

When in an evil hour he spies
A pear tree planted there.

Oh! the mischief in that bold bright eye!
The mischief in that hand!












to the LORD « 6
But t they that deal :
%» rut eee are His®































THE. BOY WHO COULD NOT LIE. 209

For the favourite tree is ruined,
Though the finest in the land.

Yet no eye hath seen the ruin wrought,
And he will go his way :—

Why not shroud his fault in silence,
Light the blame on whom it may?

But the boy was better than his thought!
His father saw the tree:
“Who hath done this wanton mischief here?”
Impatiently cried he.
’Twas the struggle of a moment,
Though ’twas easy to deny:
Then he summoned up his courage,—
“Srp, I cANNOT TELL A LIE!”

I wish you could have seen
His father’s features now;

He forgot his petty sorrow
As he read that open brow;

Then clasp’d him in his arms and said,—
Fit words for son and sire,—

“J had rather lose a thousand trees,
Than have my son a liar!”

So the fearless boy grew up
To be a fearless noble man:
Match his virtues in long centuries,
If match them so you can.
That shall be a glorious century
Which of patriots yields us one
Of glory fit to mate with that
Of General Washington.
210 LHE DUKE AND THE HERD-BOY.

THE DUKE AND THE HERD-BOY.

SCOTCH nobleman, who was very fond of farming,
had bought a cow from a gentleman who lived
near him. The cow was to be sent home next

morning. Early in the morning, as the duke was taking
a walk, he saw a boy trying in vain to drive the cow to his
house. The cow was very unruly, and the poor boy could
not manage her at all.

The boy, not knowing the duke, bawled out to him,
“Hallo, man! come here and help’ me with this beast.”
The duke walked slowly on, not seeming to notice the boy,
who still kept calling for his help. “At Tast, finding that he
could not get on with the cow, he cried out in ” distress,
“Come here, man, and help me, and I'll give you half of
whatever I get.”

The duke went, and lent a helping hand.

“And now,” said the duke, as they trudged along after
the cow, “how much do you think you will get for the
job?”

: “J don’t know,” said the boy; “but I am sure of some-
thing, for the folk up at the big house are good to every-
body.”

On coming toa lane near the house, the duke slipped
away from the boy, and reached home by a different road.
Calling a servant, he put a'sovereign into his hand, saying,
“ Give that to the boy who brought the cow.’

He-then returned to the end of the lane, where he had
parted from the boy, so as to meet him on his way back.

“Well, how much did you get ?” asked the duke.

“A shilling,” said the boy; “and there’s half of it to you.”

“But surely you got more than a shilling?” said the
duke.
THE DUKE AND THE HERD-BOY. 211

“No,” said the boy; “that is all I got; and I think it
quite enough.”

“TI do not,” said the duke; “there must be something
-wrong; and as I ama friend of the duke, if you return I
think [ll see that you get more.”

They went back to the house. The duke rang the bell,
and ordered all the servants to be assembled.

“ Now,” said the duke to the boy, “point out the person
who gave you the shilling.”

“It was that man there,” said he, pointing to the butler,
who immediately fell on his knees, confessed his fault, and
begged to be forgiven; but the duke ordered him to give
the boy the sovereign, and leave his service at once. “You
have lost,” said the duke, “both your situation and your
character by your deceit. Learn for the future that honesty
is the best policy.”

The boy now found out who it was that had helped
him to drive the cow; and the duke was so pleased with
the manliness and honesty of the boy that he sent him to
school, and paid for him out of his own pocket.

LTLonesty ts the best policy.

Cee

Lit-gotten wealth never prospers.



Poor indeed is he who thinks he never
has enough.
Q
A ee THE RAVEN,

THE CRAVEN:

HE raven is a busy, inquisitive, impudent bird. He
goes everywhere; he affronts and drives off the
dogs; he plays his pranks on the poultry, but takes

care to keep on the best of terms with the cook. The
grave way in which a raven sets about a piece of mischief,
as if it were a solemn duty, is most ludicrous.

A raven, belonging to one of my friends, used to watch
the gardener at work among the plants. Whenever the
man had taken especial pains to prop up and secure some
valuable plant, the. raven, with a sideling step and a
most unconcerned air, as if he were thinking of anything
but the plant, would slowly saunter by. Seizing his
opportunity when the gardener’s attention was averted,
one wrench of his iron bill laid the unlucky plant on the
earth, and the raven moved off, looking as innocent as an
infant.

A tame raven was once kept near a guard-house. At
the guard-house a party of soldiers was always stationed
ready for service. The soldiers were daily drilled by their
officers, and from time to time were ordered out on various
kinds of duty. The raven never tired of watching their
proceedings, and from frequently hearing the words of
command used by the officers, became very expert in
repeating them.

One day the captain was absent, and the soldiers were in
the guard-house as usual, some taking a nap, others engaged
in conversation or amusement. A loud voice of command
was suddenly heard outside the door. “Guards! attention !
Turn out! turn out! Quick!” Supposing it-to be their
captain’s voice giving an alarm in a case of great emer-
gency, they instantly seized their guns, took their places
in the ranks, and marched out of the guard-house.
















GRATITUDE. 218

Here they stopped for further orders. “ Forward, march !
quick step!” immediately followed, in the captain's voice.
The men looked around for the captain, but no captain was
to be seen. The commands came from the raven, who was
gravely watching the fun from the top of an adjoining wall.
The soldiers took the thing in good humour. They madea
great pet of the bird, always thereafter calling him Captain.

GRATITUDE.

f *\ RATITUDE is that sweet duty which we owe to
every one who does us a kindness, and above all to
God and to our parents. There is nothing more
hateful in a man, nor can we say anything worse of him,
than that he is “ungrateful.”
' There was a law in China that every official who was
found guilty of cheating should have his hands cut off. A
mandarin, ‘one of the highest officials of the kingdom, being
found guilty, was sentenced to this punishment; which
was just about to be carried into execution, when his
daughter, in all the beauty of youth and innocence, under-
took his defence, pleading herself her father’s cause before
the Emperor Quen-ti. Hler speech wasashort one. “It
is most true, great Emperor,” said she, when she appeared
before the monarch; “my father has deserved the fate
which awaits him, his hands must be cut off. Here they
are,” she added, as she stretched out her own from under
her wide sleeves. “Yes, great Emperor, these hands
which you see here belong to my unfortunate father.
These are useless to the support of his family, and I deliver
them up to the severity of the law, to preserve those hands
of his which work for us—my old grandfather, my brothers
and sisters, and myself!”
At this generous action the emperor could scarcely restrain
his tears. The father was pardoned, and the praises of his
noble-minded daughter were sounded through the whole court.
216 A RESOLUTE BOY.

A RESOLUTE BOY.

OLLAND is a very low and flat country. Much
of it is below the level of the sea. Were it not
for the extensive embankments which have been

built by the people to keep out the sea, the whole country
would be only a vast salt marsh.

Instead of roads they have canals. These are very
easily built, and are supplied with water from the sea, which
is let in through great wooden gates built in the embank-
ments. In spite of all their care, inundations sometimes
happen, which do immense damage.

When the tide is high the water dashes against the
embankments, which are composed of sand; and although
at first only a little breach is made, yet the loose sand gives
way by degrees, until sometimes it works a passage, and
pours in with resistless fury, washing everything before it
—houses, cattle, people, and all. Such deplorable accidents
can be prevented only by great care in watching for the
first appearance of a break, and immediately stopping it.

One night a little Hollander, about six years old, was
coming home very late. He had been away for the doctor
for his sick mother. As he was passing along near one of
the embankments, he heard the trickling of water.

It was so dark that he had to hunt around for some time
before he found it; but at last he discovered that between
the side of one of the gates and the bank there was a little
hole worn, through which the water was trickling in quite a
stream.

He was a little fellow, but he was wise enough to know
that if the water was left to run long, it would soon wear a
larger hole, and very likely burst through in a regular
inundation before morning.
He tried to stop the hole with sand and little sticks, but
the water still trickled through. In the dark he could find
nothing which would stop it; so what did he do? He
thrust in his little fist, which effectually stopped the water.

But after a while he began to grow sleepy and chilly.
He wanted to take his hand out, for his arm ached, and he
thought of home and his warm bed. But, like a hero as he
was, he stood to his post.

His head nodded, and he almost fell asleep; but the
thought that he was preventing so much danger and trouble
to his family, to the whole village, perhaps to the whole
country, gave him strength, and he stood to his post!

Very early in the morning his friends and neighbours,
who had started out to look for him, found him nodding
and shivering at the gate, but still at his post. You may
well believe that they were delighted with the prudence and

‘bravery of the little fellow.

And it was not long before the whole country heard of
it, even the king himself, who ordered a monument to be
erected to his honour, and, on the top of it, a marble statue
of the little hero.

Loot.

A FAREWELL.

Y gentle child, I have no song to give you;
No lark could pipe to skies so dull and gray;

Yet, ere we part, one lesson I can leave you
For every day.
Be good, sweet child, and let who will be clever;
Do noble things, not dream them, all day long;
And so make life, death, and that vast for ever
One grand, sweet song.
Charles Kingsley.

Q2
218 DAVID—THE SHEPHERD OF BETHLEHEM,

. DAVID—THE SHEPHERD OF BETHLEHEM.

N the time of Saul, the first king of Israel, there lived
in Bethlehem, a small village lying eight miles south
of Jerusalem, a well-to-do farmer named Jesse. He

had eight sons, and we learn from the Bible that they were
all tall, gallant-looking men. The youngest of these sons
was called David, and while his elder brothers were
occupied either in tilling the fields, or in fighting in Saul’s
army against the Philistines, David was engaged in watch-
ing his father’s sheep. In this way he spent most of his
time in the open air, and had the ruddy, healthy complexion
which you generally find in boys brought up in the country.
His occupation left him much time for meditation and
study ; and, while the sheep were grazing on the hillside,
or, in the hot season, under the shadow of the trees which
grow by the river courses, David used to amuse himself
by playing on the harp. He was passionately fond of
music, and many a traveller through the uplands of Beth-
lehem would stop and listen to the sweet strains of the
boy shepherd.

He was also very fond of poetry, and at a very early age
began to write short songs or hymns, which he would sing
to the music of his harp. Many of the songs were sug-
gested to him by what he saw around him. On the clear
winter evening, when he was coming home to his father’s
house, after seeing the sheep safely in the fold, he would
watch the stars, as they came out one by one until the
whole heaven was aglow. When he saw their number
and their beauty, he thought of the glory of that God who
made all these stars, and he could not keep from writing a
hymn—a very beautiful one, which you will find in the
19th Psalm, in which he tells how the heavens shew forth
DAVID—THE SHEPHERD OF BETHLEHEM. 219

the glory of God, and the firmament, that is, the starry sky,
His handiwork. When he thought of the care and anxiety
which he bestowed upon his sheep, how he had to defend
them from their enemies, and to lead them where they
might find suitable pasture, he was reminded of the care
which God had over him, and he wrote that most beautiful
hymn, which you have in the 23rd Psalm, and which, I
doubt not, you have repeated and sung many a time—
The Lord is my Shepherd.

But, though fond of music and poetry, David was not
a soft boy. He was brave as a lion. On one occasion,
a lion came rushing out of a thicket, and, seizing one of
the flock, was carrying it away, when David at once gave
chase, and smote the lion, delivering the lamb out of its
mouth. Many a boy would have run away on seeing a
great lion coming from the wood, but David had trust in
God, and knew that He could deliver him.

This shepherd lad lived to become a king, and was a
brave, good king. He had been brave and good when he
was a youth, and he continued so when he became a man,
and God gave him great power and a great name, and he
was the most famous king that ever ruled over Israel.
Like all great and good men, he was very fond of his
native place, and, when he came to the kingdom, he
selected as his capital the hill-fortress of Jerusalem. Many
a time when a boy had he walked round it, and looked up
to the hills, on which it was built, with wonder and awe,
little dreaming then that it would one day be his own,
and that he would bea king there. But so it was. God
chose him for king, because he was a man after His own
heart, and if you honour God as David did He also will
honour you.
DOG THE FLOOD.

THE CONQUERING SAVIOUR.

AIL to the Lord’s Anointed,
Great David's greater Son!
Hail, in the time appointed,
His reign on earth begun!

He comes to break oppression ;
To set the captive free;

To take away transgression,
And reign in equity.

Arabia’s ‘desert ranger

To Him shall bow the knee;
The Ethiopian stranger

His glory come and see.

THE CHILD'S PRAYER.

ORD, look upon a little child,
By nature sinful, rude, and wild;
Oh put Thy gracious hands on me,
And make me all I ought to be.

Make me Thy child, a child of God,
Washed in my Saviour’s precious blood,
And my whole heart from sin set free—
A little vessel full of Thee.

O Jesus, take me to Thy breast, :
And bless me, then I shall be blest;
Both when I wake and when I sleep,
Thy little lamb in safety keep.
OLD SANTA CLAUS,

to
{2
i

OLD: SANTA: CLAUS,

LD Santa Claus sat all alone in his den,
With his leg crossed over his knee,

While a comical look peeped out at his eyes,
For a funny old fellow is he.

His queer little cap was tumbled and torn,
And his wig it was all awry;

But he sat and mused the whole day long,
While the hours went flying by.

He had been as busy as busy could be,
In filling his pack with toys; :
He had gathered his nuts, and baked his pies,
To give to the girls and boys.

There were dolls for the girls, and whips for the boys,
With wheel-barrows, horses, and drays,

And bureaus and trunks for Dolly’s new clothes:
All these in his pack he displays.

Of candy, too, both twisted and striped,
He had furnished a plentiful store ;

While raisins and figs, and prunes and grapes,
Hung up on a peg by the door.

“T am almost ready,” quoth he, quoth he,
“And Christmas is almost here;

But one thing more,—I must write them a book,
And give to each one this year.”
505 OLD SANTA CLAUS.

So he clapped his specs on his little round nose,
And, seizing the stump of a pen,

He wrote more lines in one little hour
Than you ever could read in ten.

He told them stories all pretty and new,
And wrote them all out in rhyme;

Then packed them away with his box of toys,
To distribute one at a time.

And Christmas Eve, when all were in bed,
Right down,the chimney he flew;
And, stretching the stocking-leg out at the top,

He clapped in a book for you.


LINDE,

aU Reem
PAGE ms
'3 | Jupiter and the Sheep, .

Mr. Crab and his See
The River, . ; .

The Children’s Hour, , :
Uncle Ben’s Story, . >

Little by Little, . : vi

Bunny, . ‘ : . 1
Casabianca, . . . .
Anecdotes of Elephants, >
Pull it up by the Root, . °
The Pet Lamb, . rs ‘

The Little Sunbeam, .

The Brown Thrush, ;

James Watt and the Tea-Kettle,

The Song of Steam,

The Two Travellers and the
Bear,

The Vulture of the Alps

The Star, : :

Ballad of the Tones . .

Poor Sammy, 3

The Monkeys and the Red
Caps, A

Bruce and the Gants

Story of a Cat and a Spaniel, .

The Brave Peasant, : 7
The Ram and the Mirror, ,
Speak the Truth, . : >
The Ship of Fame, : .
Samuel, : , .
The Child’s Prayer, : .
The Better Land, : ®
The Snow chews. : .
The Frost,

The Lily and the Dewdrop, :
The Sheep and the Birds,

The Theft of the Golden Eagle,
Trust and Try, . ,
‘The Youth of Franklin,

24
25
29
34
37
_ 39
41
43
44
47
48
51
52
54
55
56

57
58

59
61
64
65
67
69
70
73
74
75
76
EL
78
- 79
83
86
89



Birds, . :

The Ettrick Shepherd’s Dene
A Lion Hunt, :
The Acorn and the Peete
The Boy Artist,

Pride of Dress,

Story of an Elephant,
Diligence Rewarded, .
Better than Diamonds, .
Sunny Days will come Again,
Pharaoh’s Dreams,

What a Child can do,

The Captive Maid, ,
Deeds of Kindness, O
Llewelyn and his Dog,

The Three School-fellows,
The Wonderful Pudding,

The Bear and the Water-Butt,
Children brought to Jesus,
Early Piety, .

I Must not Tease my Mother,
A Wonderful Machine, .
Bobby and his Rabbits, .

Consider the Lilies of the Field,

Tired of Play,

Lord Macaulay’s Wotner
A Good Recommendation,
Holy Bible, Book Divine,
Dr. Edward Jenner,
Jesus loves me,

The Dogs of St. Benard
Joseph like Jesus, .

I saw a Ship a-sailing,
Set the Birds free, .

The Daisy and the Lark,
What’s o’Clock? .

God Cares for All, ;

Pace
96
97

IOL
105
108
109
I13
II4
II5

- E16

121
123
125
126
128
131
134
137
139
143
144
146
147
150
152”
155
156
157
158
161
162
163
165
166
169
170
174
175
INDEX.

224

PAGE
Dr. Livingstone, 176
Fields for Labour, . 178
The Barn-yard, 179
Bad Company, 180
Jesus our Shepherd, 181
Riddles, 182
Jesus the Good Shepherd, 184
The Drop of Water, 186
Little Thorns, 189
The Four Seasons, Igo
A Priceless Dog, . : 192
The Dog and the Shadow, 195
The First Printer, . 196
Room for All, 198

INDEX TO COLOURED AND

Pace

2.
27.
28.
35:
36.
45-
49.
50.
41.
72.
81.
87.
88.
99:

100,

103.

104.
III.
IIQ.

Frontispiece—CuRoMo PLATE.

Crab Villa.

Text—“ Behold,” &c. .

George on the Lookout.

Off to the Whaling.

The Pet Rabbits.

CHROMO PLATE.

The Brown Thrush.

James Watt.

Outward Bound.

Text—“ Consider,” &c.

CHROMO PLATE.

Text—“ Pleasant,”

The Doves.

Birds.

Asleep and Awake.

Children gathering Prim-
roses.

Text—“ The Eyes,” &c.

CHROMO PLATE,

Text—“ Blessed,” &c.

&c.



Pace
The Robin Redbreast, 202
The Redbreast, 203
Dick and the Giant, - 204
The Boy who could not Lie,. 206
The Duke and the Herd- ae 210
The Raven, 212
Gratitude, 215
A Resolute Boy, 216
A Farewell, 217
David~The Sheplerd of Beth-
lehem, . 218
The Conquering SAyour, 220
The Child’s Prayer, 220
Old Santa Claus, 221

FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
I20.

122.
129.
I4I.
142.
154.

160.

200.

Bile’
214.



130.

159.

167.
168.
187.
193.
194.
199.

207.
208,

Going Aloft.

Joseph interpreting Pharaoh’s
Dream.

“God is Love.”

Text—“ The Lord,” &c.

The Fisher-Boys.

Text—“ Jesus Called,” &c.

CHROMO PLATE.

Text—“ Remember,” &c.

Charlie’s Pet.

The Mute Swan.

The Birds’ Nest.

CeRoMo PLATE.

On Guard.

Text—“ Honour,” &c.

Text—“ Good Name,” &c.

The Skipping Rope.

Text—“ Lying Lips,” &c.

Grace Darling.

Ride a Cock Horse.

Early Lessons.









—I