Citation
Nil desperandum

Material Information

Title:
Nil desperandum and, The shabby stranger
Added title page title:
Shabby stranger
Added title page title:
Nil Desperandum
Creator:
Sunday School Union (England) ( Publisher )
William Rider and Son ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Sunday School Union
Manufacturer:
William Rider and Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
60, [6] p. : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Trust in God -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1891 ( rbprov )
Genre:
Children's stories
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026891946 ( ALEPH )
ALH5412 ( NOTIS )
182860914 ( OCLC )

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SEATED UNDER THE PORCH.



|

i
:
:





UNL SRSPERANDUM,

THE SHABBY STRANGER,

va

LONDON:
SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION,
56, OLD Bairzy, E.C.



AO





NIL DESPERANDUM:
NEVER DESPAIR.

38+; NE cold, rainy night in November, 184—
{a poor boy, thinly clad, and whose pale
pinched features plainly told of in-
sufficiency of food and premature care, was
seated under the porch of a large public build-
ing, the doors of which stood invitingly open,
and whence issued a stream of light and warmth.
As the boy crouched behind the pillar and

3

ERS
S

watched the people enter, he thought ~ how

much he shovld like to go in and see what
they were doing. “But it is not for tho likes of

me,” he said, half aloud. However, by-and-by
he saw men in their working dress going in, so”

i



6 NIL DESPERANDUM :

he took courage, and followed them through
the vestibule into a large brilliantly lighted
room, and seated himself on a bench close by
the door. At first, his eyes were dazzled by
the unaccustomed glare, but in a short time he
could look round; he then saw that the large
room was nearly full of people, who all ap-
peared to be intently listening to a gentleman
who stood on a platform at the further end of
the room. He wondered what he could be saying
that so interested everybody, and wished he
knew, for he could only hear the voice, not
make out the words. Seeing a vacant seat
nearer the platform, he -quietly- crept thither.
The first sentence he heard distinctly was “ Nil
. Desperandum.” “What can it mean?” was
his mental thought, but hark! the speaker is
. giving an explanation, “ Never despair; you
may be poor, badly clothed, and half fed; you
may live in a mean dwelling, with scarcely the
necessaries of life, yet you have within you
the power of making your lives beautiful—-



_ NEVER DESPAIR. 7.
a power which can enable you to look beyond :

the trials, disappointments, and afflictions: of
carth to that home where every noble aspira- .

tion shall find fulfilment, every longing desire _ |

for happiness be satisfied with a plenitude of
joy such as man cannot conceive. Butif you
would attain to this state of ineffable bliss you
must do your part in life’s battle worthily ;
sink not into the sloth of indifference because
you are poor, but strive manfully to vanquish
the difficulties that may bar your path to re-
spectability and competence—strive, depending
upon Him who gives you life, health, and
energy. His arm is omnipotent, and the
strength of omnipotence will be yours if you
ask for it—God will not fail you, He loves you
too well, you are His own work, He looks upon
you in infinite compassion, notes all your feeble
efforts to do well, listens to your imperfect
prayers and waits to bestow upon you all the
-riches of His grace. Be, then, strong in Him,
trust not alone in your own strength but in



8 NIL DESPERANDUM :

tle might of God, do your part well and faith-
fully and God wiildo His. He has said and He
will perform, The way of the Lord is strength
to the upright, walk then in this more excel-
lent way, seek first the Kingdom of Heaven,
then shall all things be added unto it.”

As the boy listened wonderingly he wished he
could find this way of peace and security ; then
came the thought, “But I am so poor and
miserable; but, the gentleman said, Never
‘despair.—No, I like ‘ Nil Desperandum’ better,
and when I am going to give in, or feel it is no
use trying, I will say it to myself, then I shall
remember what the gentleman said about God
helping those who help themselves; but how
can I get ‘God to help me,?’ why, I must ask
Him.”

Absorbed in the new train of ideas that had
been aroused within him by the energy of the
speaker, the boy heard little more, for he soon
left the room, as he knew that his mother _
would be expecting him ; and one of tke first



NEVER DESPAIR. “9

results of that night’s resolves, was, not to make
her angry. On leaving the building, he found
that the rain had ceased, and that the moon
was shining; he looked up with a strange thrill
of new-born joy, which he could neither ana-
lyse nor define, but it seemed to -arise from the
conviction that possessed his mind, “He who
made that beautiful moon to give light in the
' darkness, sees me, knows my wants, and is
ready to help me.”

The way to his poor home did not seem long,
although he had more than a mile to go ere he
reached the narrow alley in which it was
situated, and where his mother had lived ever
since he could remember. Robert Carter was
at this time about sixteen years of age, but he
was so thin and small that he might have
passed for a child of twelve; his father had
died when he was quite a baby, so that he had
no recollection of him; his. mother took in
-washing,—her customers being chiefly the actors
at alow theatre close by the alley where she



STO: . NIL DESPERANDUM.

lived—and as she generally had to wash, dry,
iron, and mend in one day, for the things to
be in readiness for the evening’s performance,
she always seemed in a bustle, and never to
have time to clean or tidy her own dwelling—
dirt and discomfort might be said to reign
there with absolute sway. Robert had known
no other ever since he could remember, yet,
strange as it may seem, the quiet silent boy,
who never found fault, hated the discomfort of
his home; he liked cleanliness and order, was
always careful to wash himself when he went
home at night before he got his supper. Al-
though his mother would say, “What makes
the lad so particular?—he does not take after me;.
I can live without so much fuss about clean-
liness, if I could not, what would become of
me, I wonder; who would earn the bread ?”
Robert was apprenticed to a shoemaker; he
did not like the trade, but his mother desired
him to go, because he would earn a small wage,
and if he went to learn the trade he wished,



NEVER DESPAIR, 11

he would have no wage for the first three years 5
so, to please her, Robert gave up his own will.
His master was a kind-hearted man, and
often gave the poor boy a dinner, and would
have done more, could he have afforded to do
so without injury to his own family. The boy
appreciated his master’s kindness, and did
his best to show his gratitude by never wast-
ing his time, and by giving heed to his
master’s instructions, so that in less time than
might be deemed possible he became really
useful, and could be trusted to do the coarser
work. Robert desired to be a good hand at
his trade, but he feared. he should never
learn the more difficult parts, for, as he often
sorrowfully said to himself, he was not clever ;
he was careful and industrious, but not really
quick to learn; but by paying great attention —
he had acquired the knowledge he possessed,
and as stated was a help to his master; but he
wanted to be more than a cobbler, he would
like to earn money to help his mother, so that



12. NIL DESPERANDUM:

she might not have to work so hard. ‘And the

words he had heard in the public rooms en-
couraged him to persevere. “Nil Desperandum”
he repeated to himself on his way home. “No,
I will not give in; I will try, and then if I fail
it will be no fault of mine.” Just as he had
come to this resolution he reached his home,
and quietly opening the door, saw his mother
seated on a low chair by the fire smoking a

pipe to refresh herself after her day’s work. —

How the lad hated the very smell of tobacco
only he knew, for not a word did he say to
grieve his mother. ©

“ How late you are to-night, Bob! the pota-

toes for your supper are burnt to a cinder, and .

there is not a crust in the cupboard.”

“Never mind, mother; I can do without, I

will go to bed and sleep instead of eating.” ©
“As you will; if you can work without food
it is more than I can. But stay, before you go

wash some potatoes that I may cook them for
your breakfast ; they will be all you will get, |

ihn,



NEVER DESPAIR, 18

for I have nothing else, and no money, me I
did not get paid to-night,”

Robert washed the potatoes and then went
to his room, if such it could be called ; in reality
. it was little better than a closet: his bed was a
bundle of straw and the covering did not keep
him from shaking with cold ; but to-night cold,
hunger, and discomfort were all forgotten ; one
thought occupied his mind to the exclusion of
all others, “ How shall I get God to help me?”
He had not been taught to ask God in prayer
to give him his daily bread; he had not been

‘taught the great and holy truths of the “ word

of God.” He knew that there was such a book
‘as the Bible, because there was one ona shelf
downstairs ; but of its contents he was entirely
ignorant. “T must read it,” he ejaculated; “the
gentleman said, ‘Search the Scriptures, and
search means seek. Why, I seek for things when
Thave lost them ; what am I to seek in the Bible
for? Let me see, what was it? let me think.
: Yes, he said, we were so lost in sin and wicked-



14 NIL DESPERANDUM:

ness, we were so far from God and holiness,
that we must perish everlastingly unless we
found our way to God through Jesus Christ
HisSon. He called it the way of salvation from
death, or reconcilement to God through the
sacrifice of His Son, and that way he said we
should find plainly written in the Bible. So if
I would find it I must read the Bible. I can’t
begin to-night, for I have no candle, but I will
‘get up an hour sooner, and see if I can find
anything about ‘the way.’”

Robert lay down on his hard pallet, but he
could not sleep, thoughts new and exciting
chased each other through his mind; the past
seemed to have been a strange stagnation, and
he wondered how he could have lived so long
without feeling that he had a soul to be saved;
wondering how he could have been so in-
different to the future, when every day was

bringing it nearer; but the one point to which
"his thoughts ever returned was: “I must find
the way of salvation.” This was his resolve



NEVER DESPAIR. - 15.

when at last sleep closed his weary eyes; this
his first awaking thought ; and true to his reso-
lution of the previous night, he got up an hour
before his usual time. It was still dark, and he
had no candle; he usually lit the fire for his
mother, he did so this morning, and when it
burnt up so that he could see to read by its
light, he took down the Bible, wiped the thick
coat of dust off its cover, and opened it. He saw
‘Old and New Testament. “Which must I read
first, I don’t know either; I will read a bit of
both.” So he read the first chapter of Genesis,
then he turned the leaves until he found the
New Testament, when he read the first chapter
of St. Matthew’s Gospel. The history of the
Creation excited in him a-feeling of awe.
“What a Being that could say, Let there be
light, and light came! and that powerful Being
to care for such a poor ignorant boy as me!
yet the gentleman said He does.” He spoke .
aloud, forgetting that his mother might hear,_
and quite started when she called out,—



160 NIL DESPERANDUM:

“What are you saying, Bob?”

“T was talking to myself, mother.”

“Then I wish you would not, for you roused
me out of a sweet sleep.”

“T am sorry, mother, but it is just time to
' get up. Iam going now, good morning.”

And placing the Bible on the shelf, he put
on his tattered hat and ran off. He had been
so intent upon his reading that he had forgotten
to take his potatoes, and would have had no
- dinner if. his master had not kindly sent him
a plate of pudding. .

“T wonder if God, the great God that made
all things, told my master to send this to me?
Perhaps He did, for the gentleman said the very
hairs of our head are all numbered.” Thus
cogitated Robert as he ate the pudding, and
perchance for the first time in his short life
he said,—

“Thank God for my dinner.” He was not an
idle boy, but this afternoon he worked with
double energy. Once his master said, “I hope



NEVER DESPAIR. 17

you are taking pains, Robert, you seem to be
working very fast.’’ Robert showed what he



was doing to his master, who was perfectly’

satisfied, and in a pleased tone commended the



18 NIL DESPERANDUM:

boy’s diligence, and thinking to himself the -
while, “the bit of pudding is well paid for.”

. Every morning Robert got up early that he
might have time for reading, much to the as-
tonishment of his mother, who could not
imagine what strange fancy possessed the lad.
On the Saturday he said to her,—

“Mother, will you have time to mend my
Jacket ”

“No, that I shan’t; it must do as it is, it is
quite good enough to run in the streets night
and morning, and you are never oub at any
other time.”

“Then, mother, will you lend me a needle
and I will try to sew up the holes, I think I
can, it won't be very difficult ?”

“ What do you want it done to-day for ?”

“T want to go out to-morrow, mother.”

“Go out! why your clothes are not fit to
be seen on Sunday, where can you want to”
got”

The boy was shy of telling his mother and



NEVER DESPAIR. 19

hesitated, then said in a low voice, “ Mother, I
want to go to church.”

“ What to do there, pray ? this is a new freak,
you have been strange enough all the week,
getting up at unearthly hours to read that old
book which had not been opened’ since your
father last used it.” This was news to the boy.
Then his father, the father he had so often
longed to know, had read “the Book ” and
may-be, he had found the way of Salvation—
the way he wanted to find; but his mother’s”
voice interrupted his silent thoughts.

“What do you want to go to church for ?—
tell me.”

Robert had always been obedient to her will,
fear might have made him in the first instance,
now it had become habit, so he replied.

“Mother, I want to hear about the way of
Salvation.”

“ And pray what do you know of that way ?”
- she asked, slightingly.

“Nothing yet; but I heard, that it isa way”
B

~



20 NIL DESPERANDUM :

of happiness, and a way of safety, and I should
like to know it; for you know, mother, I am not
very strong, and I might die.” :

“Nonsense, I am much older than you, and
I am not dead, or likely to die.”

“But, mother, you are much stronger than I
am.”

And as his mother glanced at his pale thin
face, she, too, thought it quite possible that he
might not have many years of life; for a
moment a pang shot through her heart at the
thought—that if she had bought bread with
the money she had spent in her favourite in-
dulyence, her boy would have been stronger ;
but to put away the unwelcome suggestion she
said, hastily,—

“Here! give me your jacket, I will soon
stitch up the rags.”

“There, it is mended, but it is not fit for a

-decent lad to wear on Sunday; take my advice - ~
and stay at home until you can get better =

things to wear.”



_ NEVER DESPATR, 21

“No, mother ! I will not stay at home because
my clothes. are shabby, I will sit in a corner
out of sight, then I shall offend no one.”

“As you wip but I cannot think what has
come to you.”

Truly the jacket was old and worn, but so
were his other garments; and Robert, who
liked neatness, would have been very glad of a
~ new suit, but he could not wait; no, he must
go and hear what was said about the way in
which he wanted to travel. Could he find that
way, he should work more heartily, for he

would have peace within and happiness before —

him; and then—there he checked himself, for
imagination brought before him so many good
things, that the realisation of them seemed im-
possible, so he softly whispered “Nil Despe-
randum.” The next morning he got up even
earlier than usual that he might have more
time to read. He had read the account of the ©
nativity and the temptation, with even greater
wonder than that of the creation; but while:



22 NIL DESPERANDUM:

the latter excited his admiration, the former

elicited love and trust. He murmured to him-

self, “For how much God must have loved us
to give His Son, to become a little child and
the child of poor people, so that He had to
work,” bere he paused for a long time—* Yes,
work—so He knows what work means; and
very likely he was often tired; I dare say when
Tread more I shall see that He was, Then
He knows what hunger is, ‘for He was an
hungered, and he knows what temptation is.
Why He knows everything about me—for I
am‘poor, have to work hard, am very often
tired and hungry—and how often should I like
to be saucy when mother is angry! The good
gentleman said, that He knew all about us, but
I thought that was impossible; as He lives in
Heaven, and is so great and powerful, but now
I see how He knows. And as He knows, will

He help me, will He hear me when I ask Him 2°

the gentleman said He would, and he repeated
something which I wish I could find,—it was



NEVER DESPAIR. “23

about asking. Was it ‘Ask, and ye shall
receive?’ Yes,those were the words. May-be
I shall hear this morning how I am to ask, for
I must ask in His way, or I may not get what
IT want.”

The plan of the church favoured Robert's
idea of sitting in a corner; it had large
square pews with high sides, so that when
their occupants sat down, only their heads
could be seen; a large gallery went quite
round the church, which darkened the lower
part; at the east end were placed a few
benches for the poor, some of them at the side
of the pulpit, and some behind; at the ex:
tremity of one of these, Robert took -a seat,
and was partly hidden by a pillar. 5

He had no prayer-book, but he listened
attentively, and thought he had never heard
anything so beautiful as the short prayers,
that seemed to forget nothing, but pray for
everything and everybody. Then the com-
mandments: how strange it seemed that God



24 NIL DESPERANDUM!$

should have given such stringent laws! yet he
had never heard of them before, and how he
had broken the Sabbath’! not once had he kept
it as a holy day, so far as he could remember.
Then the good old clergyman went into the
pulpit, and after an appropriate prayer gave
out his text, the eighth verse of the sixty-third
Psalm,—

“My soul followeth hard after Thee: Thy
right hand upholdeth me.”

Had the clergyman known Robert, and pre-
pared a discourse especially for his instruction
and encouragement, it could not have been
more appropriate. Plainly and clearly he
pointed out the way to attain the love of God
in the heart, its influence on the motives and:
actions of the possessor, with the sure promise
of divine aid to all who earnestly desired to

have it, This sermon was to Robert as seed ,

cast into ground prepared to receive it, which °
springs up healthy and luxuriant, and in due

' time bears fruit. He was waiting, longing for ~



NEVER DESPAIR. 25

light to guide him out of the darkness in
which he was; and the words he heard were
as light to him. He might not have heen able
to repeat the sentences as he heard them, but
the substance remained with him throughout
his after life. Often in times of trial, diffi-
culty, or temptation, he would recall that dis-
course, and ask, “How would one who loves
God act?” And the answer would be accord-
ing to the law and to the testimony as revealed
in God’s word. But one sentence was so deeply
engraven on his mind, that even the words
were not forgotten : “The children of God ought
not to be slothful or careless in their earthly
callings, but to honour God in them, by dili-
‘gence, punctuality, and well-doing; following
the apostle’s exhortation to be diligent in busi-
ness, fervent in spirit.”

Robert went to church again in the afternoon,
and from this time was regular in his attend-
ance on public worship. He was quick to
receive, and apply to his own wants, the great



26 NIL DESPERANDUM:

truths he heard, but he was very shy about
speaking of them; he was afraid to say how
much he wished to be one of God’s child-
ren, lest he should do something directly
opposed to His expressed desire. But he could
not hide the change that was gradually trans-
forming his character and conduct.

As before intimated, he had given his mother
little trouble, but now he gave her real help.

When he began to ask God to give him a
new heart, put a right spirit within him, and
make his life pure, he also began to make his
own little room more tidy: the dirt and dis-
order had often annoyed him, but he had made
no effort for more comfort; but now it seemed
as if he could not be pure within so long as
. there was no order without, so he put the few
things there were in his room as tidy as his first
awkward essay at neatness suggested. But he
was not satisfied, the room would be all the
better for being swept. Still he was not quite
‘pleased with the general effect, the boards



NEVER DESPAIR. 27

looked dark; so one morning he got up very
early and gave them a scrubbing. The result
pleased him, his room was clean, and clean he
would keep it. Only his mother knew that he
did girls’ work, and she would not laugh at
him. Yes, truly his mother noted all he did;
since the time he told her he wanted to go to
church, that he might learn the way of salva-
tion, she had closely watched him. She saw
how first one old habit, and then another, was
given up ;—saw how he employed every spare
moment either in doing useful work, or im-
proving his reading and writing. And daily
seeing him make the best of life, she began to
be more neat and clean. So when the youth
returned home from his work, he did not, as
too often he had formerly done, find the chairs
and table littered with rubbish, and the floor
covered with pools of muddy water; ashes up
to the grate, and a hearth the reverse of white,
but was greeted by a bright fire, clean hearth,
and shining red bricks.





28 NIL DESPERANDUM:

When this pleasant sight first greeted him
he thought he had made a mistake and opened
the wrong door, and was about to shut it again,
when his mother called out,—

“What is the matter, Bob? where are you
going ?”

Ashamed to say that he could not think it
was his home, he stammered and looked-round
in confusion.

“What! you don’t know the room to-night,
is not that it, Bob?”

“ Are you going to have company, mother ? ”

“Yes, I hope so.”

“ Who is coming ?”

“My company has come,” replied his mother,
with a short laugh. Then, as he looked round
in some bewilderment, she said, “ You are my
company. As you have grown so mightily
particular upstairs, why, I thought you would
- like your sitting-room to be nice as well.”

“Oh, mother, how good you are!” he
breathed.



NEVER DESPAIR, 29

“Not much of that, Bob, but I think the
place looks better for a little cleaning, and so
‘I mean to try to keep it tidy.”

But this was not the only result of the in-
fluence exercised so unconsciously by the quiet,
patient, industrious, painstaking youth. For
some time past his mother had denied herself
ber favourite indulgence, that she might buy
bread with the money thus saved ; for she had
not forgotten the pang that shot through her
heart that night when he so simply talked of
dying: until then she had not realized what
life would be without her boy. She had been
careless, slatternly, irreligious, but she was a
mother, and was capable of feeling a mother’s
tenderness. Hard work and dire poverty had
_ crusted over the softer feelings of her heart,
but not destroyed them, and her boy’s example
roused them once more into life. “He was
doing his best, she would do hers ;” so she
reasoned; but as yet she only understood the
word best in its limited earthly sense, she had



30 NIL DESPERANDUM!

not penctrated to the higher and holier motives
that swayed her boy; that would be a work of
time.

One Sunday morning in the beginning of
February, when Robert went upstairs to get
ready for church, he saw spread out on his
bed a suit of clothes, not new, but good and
warm. Scarcely waiting to think ‘“ where
_ they came from?” he fell on his knees by the
bedside and covered his face with his hands,
A deep sob broke from him, In a few moments,
he arose and ran down, almost knocking down
Mrs. Carter, who was on the last step.

“Mother, where did you get the clothes?”

“T bought them.”

“ But, mother, they must have oda a great
-deal of money, and we are so poor.”

Never you mind the cost, they are bought
‘and paid for, and we are none the poorer that
*'Isee; so wear them, and look decent for the
first time for years.”

Robert. was very undemonstrative, but he



NEVER DESPAIR. 81

went to his mother's side, and putting his arm
round her neck, kissed her cheek.
There, there, that will do, you have little



enough to thank me for; but now tell me why
you knelt by the bed before you came down,”

—



32 NIL DESPERANDUM :

For Mrs. Carter, curious to see Robert’s sur-
prise, had followed him upstairs, and was
standing at the door when he saw them.

“Because I wanted to thank God first,” re-
plied Robert, in a low reverent voice. Mrs.
Carter said no more, but all that Sabbath she
pondered over her boy’s answer. And she de-
cided in her own mind that there must be ©
more in his strange fancies than she had
imagined.

It would be tedious to follow in detail all
lis struggles to attain a respectable livelihood
for himself and his mother; how he did jobs
at home, thus increasing by a trifle their
income; nor can we describe his pleasure
when he had saved sufficient to buy his
mother a new gown and shawl: his gift to her
was as unexpected as hers had been to him;
and if she did not receive hers as he had dona
his, as direct from God, she at least determined
to put it to a good use and announced to
her delighted son that she should go with him



NEVER DESPAIR, 33

to church. She did not add, I would have
gone long since had I had a decent dress.

She had been slowly but surely awakening
to a sense of her need of something higher and
more enduring than her daily food. She had
begun to read the word of God, and no longer
wondered that her boy loved it; for in it she
found such sweet words of comfort that she
longed to make them her own. She, too, was
seeking feebly, doubtingly, but still seeking
" for that more excellent way—“the way of Sal-
vation.” She had read, “ They that wait upon
the Lord shall renew their strength ;” and she
thought, If I wait upon Him in His house, and
join my prayers to those of His people, perhaps
then He will have mercy on me, and give me
the will to believe. For she had also read
the reply to the Philippian gaoler, “Believe
on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be-
saved.” But how was she to believe? what
was she to believe? she asked in perplexity.
She did not see in Christ the God-given Medi-



3%. NIL DESPERANDUM,

ator—the one yet all sufficient sacrifice, whereby
Cod could reconcile to Himself a guilty world.
She did not know that Christ was knocking at
the door of her heart, waiting to make Him-
self known to her as her Saviour. She only
felt that she wanted something which as yet
she did not possess. So to have this want
* satisfied she went to the house of God, and
was disappointed to find that the uneasiness
of her mind, instead of being allayed by the
truths she heard, was increased, and she
thought it hard that now when she was trying
to live respectably, and do her duty by her
boy, she should not have peace. No, she was
not to find peace until she had learnt in
the valley of humiliation and deep self-abase-
ment that she could do nothing to purchase it,
that it is the free gift of God, given without
money and without price to all who are willing
to receive it.

As her convictions increased so did her efforls-
to do well; she worked harder, read her Ville



NEVER DESPAIR. 85

frequently,and spent a longer timein prayer ; was
regular in her attendance on public worship,—
her son never went to church alone now, she
was always with him. He was happy, she
could see that ; he enjoyed the services heartily,
they were to him meat and drink; but she had
no part in his joy : she had gone hoping to find -
the way of salvation, and it seemed to her that
all she heard confirmed and increased her con-
demnation, until in the very bitterness of her
soul she cried aloud,—

“O wretched woman that Iam! who shall
deliver me from the body of this death?”

Like a flash of light came the thought,—

“ Jesus Christ my Lord!” and with the know-
ledge the longed-for peace. She had found the
Physician, and He had applied the healing balm
and given health and cure. Rest had come, she
had at last taken the cup of salvation, and now
her desire was that Christ might dwell in her
heart, that she might know His love, and be
filled with all the ae of God. Robert

-



36 NIL DESPERANDUM,

noticed the change in his mother even before
she put her hand on his shoulder, and feelingly
said,—

“My boy, I understand your religion now.”

Yes, they were united in the faith, they were
fellow-travellers to that country which hath
foundations, whose Builder and Maker is God, -
And that night, when Robert had thanked his
heavenly Father for all His mercies, especially
on behalf of his mother, he softly repeated,
Nil desperandum. No, I will never despair,
God helping me; He has given me and my
mother the greatest of all blessings, a desire to
serve Him, and He will not withhold the less;
if I am true to myself He will help me.

When Robert’s term of apprenticeship had
expired, he began business on his own account,
in a very small way at first; but as he was
punctual in performing his promises, used the
best materials, and did his work well, he soon
became known, and orders increased so that he
had to take an apprentice to help him. But



NEVER DESPAIR, 37

before that he had taken a small cottage on
the outskirts of the town and furnished it com-
fortably, and induced his mother to give up
washing for hire, and devote her time to her
own domestic duties. She had not done this
willingly, she wanted to do her part in earning
her daily bread ; but he told her, and truly, that
he would rather work for her, even if she did
nothing, than see her toiling from morning to
night.

Some eight or nine years after commencing
business, when his position was thoroughly
assured, and he could well afford to keep a wife,
he married an amiable and affectionate young
woman, the daughter of his former master. She
was truly pious, and in all respects a suitable
helpmeet. And Mrs. Carter found that she
had not lost her son, but gained a daughter, and
it would have been hard to find a more united
family, or a household enjoying a greater de-
pree of quiet happiness.

Work was no weary task, but a privilege;



88 NIL DESPERANDUM,

God’s blessing rested on them, and made even
labour rest. The trials, cares, and anxieties
which came to them were so many bonds of love
drawing them nearer to the fountain whence
their blessings flowed. And for seventeen years
the three probably enjoyed as much real happi-
ness as is possible in this state of probation.
Then inexorable Death entered their peaceful
dwelling and carried off the first sheaf.

Mrs. Carter, whose old age had been vigorous
and healthy, was seized with mortal sickness.
From the first symptoms of disease she believed
that she should not recover; but she did not
murmur, she committed herself into God’s hand
with the humble submission of a child, remark-
ing to her daughter in reference thereto, “He
has dealt. well with me all these years, and He
will not fail me now.” Another time she said
to her son,—

“ Robert, it seems as if eternity itself would
be too short to utter all my praises for the
mercy and goodness that have followed me all



NEVER DESPAIR, 39

my days. And you, Robert, were His instru-
ment to make me seek His love; had you not
found the way of truth, what would have
become of me? what would have been my con-
dition when lying as now. May God’s richest
blessing rest upon you; may your days be
fraught with His love, and death be swallowed
up in victory.”

The death of his mother, the only parent he
had known, was a great trial to Robert Carter.
Ile missed her smile, her gentle loving words,
more than he cared to say; he would look at
her vacant chair, and feel that he had lost a
priceless treasure. Only now did he seem to
realize the value of a mother’s love; and he
almost accused himself of indifference during
the past long years because he had not learned -
to.esteem it as now that it was lost for ever.
Then his own health was failing. Although he
tried to hide the sad truth from his dear wife
as long as possible, yet she noted the increased
pallor of his complexion, his loss of appetite,



40 NIL DESPERANDUM,

and difficult breathing; in alarm she begged
him to cease working.

“Soon, my dear, but not just yet; I must
finish the orders I have in.”

And although his strength declined very
rapidly when the warm summer weather came,
he did complete them. Yes, and the last
order was finished well and carefully as ever,
although the hands were weak and the eyes
"weary: it was the spirit within that sustained
the feeble frame.

The work was for one who had been his
customer for ten years, and who in all that time
had never had one fault to find; but when it
was quite done, and folded in clean white paper,
and sealed up, as of yore, by his own hand, he
looked round his little workroom with a strange
‘wistful, loving glance; then went down to his
wife, said very cheerfully,—

“Now, my dear, I am going to rest as you
wish; all the work is done, and the man will
make the shop tidy before he leaves. Poor



NEVER DESPAIR. 41

fellow, he does not like the idea of not coming
again; but you will be kind to him.”

“What do you mean? Can’t you be kind
yourself, and not tell me?”

“My dear, I can whilst I am here, but that
will be a very short time.”

“Nonsense, Robert! you will gain strength
now that you can take rest.”

“Not in this world; and were it not for you

' I should be so glad to go where I shall see Him ~
who hath led me and guided me all these years,
and who hath not failed in the performance
of one promise.”

“Robert, don’t talk so; God will not take
you from me.”

“That will be as He sees best for you and for
me; but whatever happens, He will never leave
you—never forsake you; you are His loving
child; trust Him as your loving Father, and
when you repeat ‘Our Father, realize the great
truth. Then all will be well with you—well
for time, well for eternity.”



42 NIL DESPERANDUM,

“Robert, I cannot bear it; I shall never be
able to get on without you.”

“ Yes, dear, if you abide in Christ, His strength
will be perfected in your weakness; and next
to God’s own word bear in mind my favourite
motto, ‘Nil desperandum. Yes, I still like it
better than ‘Never despair ;’ for I do not think
if I had not heard it I should have persevered
in honestly doing my duty,—life was so hard.”

Yes, honestly, patiently, and perseveringly
doing his duty in that state of life in which it
had pleased God to place him; that was all.
_ He was not talented, he was not a fashionable
shoemaker, but he had done his duty to the
best of his ability and had lived respected, and
could leave his wife above the fear of want.

Robert Carter’s premonition was correct; in
less than three weeks after the last order was.
finished he fell asleep in Jesus.

On visiting his widow a few months after, I
found her calm, but very sosrowful. She re-
marked,—



NEVER DESPAIR, 43

’ “JT mourn for myself, not for him; I do not
know how to bear life without him, he was so
good and kind. While he lived I had nota
care beyond my small domestic concerns; he
attended to everything that could save me
trouble. Ah! why did God take him when he
was so fit to live?” ;

“ And ready to die.”

“Yes, that must have been it; he was wait-
ing for God. His last days were spent in
prayer and praise; and I—well, I must learn
submission.”

Yes, God will comfort the poor bereaved
widow. He has smitten, that He may the more
effectually heal; and she will yet praise Hin,
not only for joys, but for afflictions, when slie
has Jearnt by experience that they also are
evidences of infinite love.





“A LITTLE WHILE.”



“What is this that He saith, A little while?” JouN xvi. 18



Ou, for the peace which floweth as a river,
Making life’s desert places bloom and smile!

Oh, for the faith to grasp heaven’s bright ‘‘for ever,”
Amid the shadows of earth’s “‘little while” !

** A little while ” for patient vigil keeping,
To face the stern, to wrestle with the strong;

“ A little while” to sow the seed with weeping ;
Then bind the sheaves, and sing the harvest song.

“ A little while” to wear the robe of sadness ;
To toil, with weary step, through miry ways,
Then to pour forth the fragrant oil of gladness,
And clasp the girdle round the robe of praise.

“A little while,” ’midst shadow and illusion,
To strive, by faith, love's mysteries to spell;
Then read each dark enigma's bright solution,
Then hail sight’s verdict, ‘‘ He doeth all things well.”

* A little while,” the earthen pitcher taking
To wayside brooks, from far-off fountains fed 3

Then the cool lip its thirst for ever slaking

Beside the fulness of the fountain-head.

“A little while” to keep the oil from failing ;
“CA little while ” faith’s flickering lamp to trim ;
And then the Bridegroom’s coming footsteps hailing,
To haste to meet Him with the bridal hymn.

And He who is Himself the gift and giver,
The future glory and the present smile,

With the bright promise of the glad ‘‘ for ever,”
Will light the shadows of the ‘‘little while.”















‘*T want another made like this,” she said. —See Page 49.



THE SHABBY STRANGER.



Such was the mental exclamation
of Mrs. Lynn, the dressmaker in the
village of Ringsadam. She lived just
off the quiet High Street, and her gay parlour
window, with its cuts of “Paris fashions,” and
tissue-paper “patterns,” was well known to all the



feminine population of Ringsadam. Mrs. Lynn

herself was a neat, spruce little woman, with cork-
screw curls and elaborate flounces. She was a
native of the village, and had never left it except to
“serve her time” in a London workroom. She
was an industrious, striving woman, tasteful and
punctual in her business, and strictly honest in
every action, And yet there was in her something

-

a



48 THE SHABBY STRANGER.

which repelled esteem. The littie dressmaker lived
wholly for herself, She was civil because it was
her interest—she was just because she had her
character to maintain. Not one good deed of hers
was Gone simply because it was right.

“Yes,” she said, talking to herself as she snipped
at a dress she had in hand, “ there are ladies in the
family ; and though I s’pose they wouldn’t give me
their evening dresses, still there’s morning ones, and
_ all the maids’ as well. Ah, they would be good
customers. Well, Miss Curtis, the upholsteress,
has promised to do her best in speaking a good
word forme. We'll see, we'll see. Why, here is
Miss Curtis herself.”

“Yes, Mrs, Lynn,” said a rosy young woman,
standing in the doorway. “TI can’t stop, for I’m in
a great hurry, but I’ve just looked in to say that
the lady at the House has promised to give youa
call. They were thinking of hiring a needlewoman
to live there ; but she says if you'll suit, she won't;
so I expect it will be a good thing for you. And
now good-bye!”

‘Good-bye, and thank you very much!” said
Mrs. Lynn, speaking with great energy. And then
she ran up-stairs and slipped on her best gown, and
returned to put the workroom in “ apple-pie order,”
and resume her cutting out.



THE SHABBY STRANGER. 49

She had scarcely taken up the scissors when the
door opened slowly, and an elderly individuat
entered. The new comer was dressed in plain and
sombre garments, and her spare, bowed figure
seemed that of one who had borne a heavy weight
of care and sorrow. Her thin, pale face was half
hidden beneath the poke bonnet which supported a
huge and almost rusty veil.

“Bother the woman!” thought Mrs. Lynn;
“some shabby genteel widow or cld maid, who will
want something made in some queer old fashion for
next to nothing.”

“You are Mrs, Lynn?” said the stranger.

“Yes, ma’am,” returned the dressmaker ; ‘ what
can I do for you?”

The stranger deposited a large worked bag on the
table, and leisurely took from it a worn and shabby
bodice, which she spread out before her.

““T want another one made like this,” she said.

“ Indeed,” remarked Mrs. Lynn ; “ well, it’s sadly
out of fashion.”

“Tt’s- my fashion, I never change it,” said the
customer; “I'd leave you this for a pattern, and
here is the material,” she added, diving into her
bag, and producing some stuff which, though neat
and good, was plain and inexpensive to the last
degree.



50 THE SHABBY STRANGER.

“This is not enough for the skirt, ma’am,” said
the dressmaker.

“No,” returned the other, “I make my skirts
myself. I have very few dresses, and plenty of
time.”

Mrs. Lynn took a leisurely survey of her new
patroness, and came to the conclusion she was a
needy gentlewoman living on a pension: why
trouble herself to conform to the whims and
economies of such a person when she had the
prospect of a new and good customer ?

“You see these sort of things do us no credit
when they are made,” she remarked, “but quite
the contrary, and we make most profit out of the
skirts, too.”

“Well, if you do not like to do it, I will take it
away; no matter,” said the stranger, folding up the
obnoxious pattern.

“You see I’ve nearly ag much business as I can
ondertake,” said Mrs. Lynn, pompously, “and I
fear you wouldn't like the price I should set on it
to make it worth while doing. Doubtless you can
find some young person in the village who will
gladly do it at your own house for a mere trifle.”

“Oh, I shall easily get it done,” said the old lady,
fastening up her bag, “and so good morning, Mrs.
Lynn ;” and away she went,



THE SHABBY STRANGER. 51

All that day and the next the dressmaker wasted.
a great deal of time in adorning her own appearance,
and peeping from her window to watch for tne
coming customer; but no one came, and on the
evening of the second day Miss Curtis herself called,
to consult Mrs. Lynn about some silk for a sofa
cushion.

“T’ve seen no one from the great house yet,”
remarked the dressmaker, rather snappishly.

“T’m so sorry,” exclaimed the other, “but I
feared not, for when I was there this morning, I
found they were hiring a sempstress, as they'd
thought of doing at first. And yet they promised
so faithfully to give you a call! It’s very strange.”

“T should think it is,” said Mrs. Lynn. “ What
sort of family is it?”

“Qh, very nice indeed,” returned the other.
“The mistress is one of the sweetest ladies I ever
saw, and her daughters are very pleasant girls ; but
the mistress herself is such an invalid, that the
whole house is really under the management of her
husband’s mother, and she isa character! I hear
she has a younger son, who has been very wild, and
fallen into great trouble, and so she stints herself of
.every penny of her private income, that she may
help him, and give his little children a fitting

education. He’s been a terrible curse to her, and
ie D



52 THE SHABBY STRANGER,

she won't let his brother help him, because she says
no one has a right to have patience with him except
the mother that bore him.”

“Ts she a pale thin lady, and does she really
dress shabbily ?” asked Mrs. Lynn, breathlessly.

“ Ah, that she does,” rejoined Miss Curtis; “and
she makes the greater part of her own dress, and
always carries a great worked bag.”

““Then she was here yesterday morning!”
-exclaimed Mrs. Lynn, almost crying, “and I told
her it was not worth my while to do the work she
brought. Ok dear, dear!”

And the poor woman fidgeted about her little
workroom, condoling with herself, and remarking
that ladies should look like ladies, or not expect to
be treated as such.

“ But she does look like a lady,” said Miss Curtis.

“Yes, some poor governess or pensioned widow,”
returned Mrs. Lynn. “ Oh dear, dear, if I could but
have known!” ;

“ Ah!” thought Miss Curtis, as she walked home
to her humble lodging, “all would have been well
if Mrs. Lynn had simply been ‘ courteous’ because
it was right, without any respect of persons.”








JAMIE DEE,



THE SAYINGS AND DOINGS

oF

JAMIE DEE,






ay AMIE DEE was one of the “ cha.
YA? racters” of Scutterstown. He was a
cobbler, and his stall was situate
beneath the high, old-fashioned win-
dow of the village “general shop.”
Jamie was a little man, with a handful of fuzzy hair
on the top of his head, and a pair of goggles astride
his nose. He was a bachelor, and as he was an
industrious, sober man, we knew he could not be
poor, though he never droamed of choosing better

. lodgings than the little loft over the blacksmith’s

forge, or buying gayer clothing than the quaint

~ brown suit which had been his “Sunday best” from
‘times unknown.

-



56 THE SAYINGS AND DOINGS

Jamie’s one luxury was books. He knew every
cheap stall in the county, and no pedlar ever left
Scutterstown without paying a visib to him. In
fact, he was not only a well-read man, acquainted
with many of the standard English authors, but he
had wandered into sundry studious by-ways, in which
he had picked up stores of odd stories, wise adages,
and quaint wit. Yet he was no mere book-worm.
His studies did not lie on the top of his mind, like
seeds on stony ground ; they fell into it, and ripened
to quick perception and originality.

The doctor and the parson liked a talk with the
worthy cobbler, and when anything happened in

‘ Scutterstown, every one’s first thought was, “ What
will Jamie Dee say ?” i

I remember once standing in front of his stall with
a schoolfellow, who was priding himself overmuch
on the talents and goodness of his deceased grand-
father. In the fulness of his vanity he raised his
voice, but was brought to a sudden pause by the otd
cobbler exclaiming, in a warning tone, “ Take care,
young gentleman, take care; don’t grow like.a
potato, whose best part is in the ground !”

One of my uncles died rather suddenly, and my
aunt, who was quite a young woman, gave way to
her grief, and, shunning even her duties, shut herself
up with her sorrow. Month after month passed by,



OF JAMIE DEE. 57

and when any one had a glimpse of her, they saw
but a wasted face, shrouded in the gloomiest weeds.
‘inding their commonplace consolations unavailing,
her friends “respected her feelings,” as they said,
and kept out of her way. But as she was taking a
twilight walk in her garden, Jamie Dee went by,
and, instead of passing the gate as others did, he
paused and saluted her as usual before her bereave-
ment. She was not morose, even in her desire for
solitude, so she answered him kindly, and Jamie
remarked in his odd way, ‘“‘ Madam, I am sorry you
find it so hard to forgive God, but He’lt have
patience with you so long as you do your best.”
My aunt was deeply touched by a sympathy which
did not depreciate her sorrow, even while it pointed
out the sin of its excess, and before many days were
over, the good cobbler had the satisfaction of seeing
her resume her daily walks and ordinary pursuits. .
Jamie was never angry. Safe from the perils of
riches and the pangs of poverty, neither wanting
work nor overwhelmed by it, he was spared most
irritating vexations. But he spoke angrily once,
and those who heard him never forgot it. One very
snowy winter day he took a poor widow some coals
and wood. In the course of the evening, on her
- way to the baker’s, she passed his room above the
smithy, and noticed there was no firelight flickering



58 THE SAYINGS AND DOINGS

up the wall. While she was in the baker's, Jamie
entered, and in the warmth of her gratitude the old
woman began expressing fears lest he ‘“ had robbed
himself.” The cobbler turned sharply round, said
fiercely, “Well, dame, am I not free to do as I like?”
and stalked from the shop.

Jamie Dee was a Scotchman, and dearly loved his
native land. A young man once said to him, “James,
if we could see their footprints on the earth, we
should find all Scotchmen’s feet turned southwards.”
“J dare say, sir,” was the prompt rejoinder; “ye
see by the time they go home, they are mostly riding
in their carriages.”

Yet there was one question which no one could
answer, — What became of Jamie’s earnings?’ They
were certainly small, yet much wider than his frugal
life. Would so wise e man hoard much, when he
seemed to have neither kith nor kin? One doughty
villager ventured to mention the matter to him, and
after vainly trying many hints, candidly asked the
question, “ Jamie, what d’ye do with your money?”

“T invest it,” said James, gravely.

“Ts it a good investment, sir? you're a knowing
man, but we may all be deceived in these things.”

“ Oh, its all right,” returned James.

“Safe as the Bank of England, eh ?”

“A precious deal safer !” said the cobbler.



OF JAMIE DEE. 59

“'D’ye draw the interest, James 9”

“No, it’s accumulating,” James replied ; and a
reverent look passed over his face ashe said tlie words.

“Tsay, James, youre a knowing man, and from
what you say, this must be a good thing. I should
Like to put a little in the affair myself.”

“ But you can’t, my friend, it’s quite private.”

_ “Can't anybody but you?’

“T believe so—I hope so—but a great many who
might so invest don’t choose,” said James, rather
comically ; and at that moment a customer stopped
before the stall, and the neighbour walked off.

Not many weeks after this, Jamie’s stall was not
opened as usual. Presently we noticed that the
curtain of the loft window was not drawn. In the
course of the day the truth came out,—Jamie’s work

.was done. The night before, he had read his evening
chapter—the old Bible was opened at the fourteenth
ot St. John—and gone to rest. When he awoke, it

, was not in the rude and lonely chamber, but among
the “many mansions” which his Saviour had
prepared for him.

Before his funeral, a strange gentleman was seen
inquiring after him, and was directed to our kind-
hearted doctor, who had undertaken the management
of the old man’s little affairs. The stranger expressed
his surprise-at the story he was told, stating that,

ns,



GO Tile SAYINGS AND DOINGS OF JAMIE DEE.

though he had never seen him, James had been in
correspendence with himself and his father, who
were solicitors in Dunse, for more than forty years.
James’ father had been a tradesman in that town,
and, owing to sickness and sundry misfortunes, had
died while his son was still a child, leaving consider-
able debts. Quite forty years before, the stranger’s
father had received a letter from James, enclosing a
small remittance to be used towards the payment of
these, and ever since, at certain intervals, larger or
smaller sums had been received for the same purpose,
and very little now remained unpaid. The solicitors,
never having seen their client, had imagined from
his short, odd letters, that he was a man in good
circumstances, who, though he desired to do strict
justice to his father’s memory, desired also to do it
at his ease and leisure; and the stranger was
evidently touched as he stood beside the poor coffin
in the bare, rough chamber.

“One of the creditors is a wealthy man, and
would not have received the money if he had known
how matters stood,” said he.

“That is just why James took care he should not
know,” remarked the doctor.

“But he has gotten his interest now,” said the
old villager, who stood near them; “he has gotten
his interest now.”



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SIXPENNY SERIES OF STORY
BOOKS.

SMALL FootscaP 8vo.

Alice Middleton.
Alice Wilmot.
All Lost inthe Snow. By

Mrs, OLDING.
Bob, the Shoeblack.
Broken Fees: but Sound

Hearts. By Benjamin CLARKE,

By a Way they Knew Not.

AITH CHILTERN,
Carrie’s Enemy.
Ellen Strong’s Victory.

Elsie; or, Like a Little
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Esther's Regret.
Esther’s Task. By E.A.W.
Factory Girl.

Foundling of Fivecote.
Fred and His Relations.
Gerty’s Girlhood.

How it Came About.

In the Corn Fields:
Story of Ruth.

Jeannie Barker.

Johnny’s Search. By Mrs.
C. M. Crarkg,

Little Nell and Me.
Little Sunnyheart. By

ANNIE E, CourTEnay,
Marion Grey.
Marion Morley.

The

CLOTH.
Marjory’s Dark Month.

By Annie E, CouRTENAY,
Miss Stepney’s Fortune.
Myra’s Pink Dress.

Nil Desperandum.
Orphan Bessie.
Plague of the Village.
Richd. Qwen’s Choice.

Saved through the Chil-
dren: Story of Jonah.

Shorn Lambs (The).
Story of Jas. Brewster.
The Broken Cactus.

The Farmer’s Foundling.
By T. B. H.
Geraldine’s Quest. By

Lucretia Maysury.

The Two Friends. By
C. Hityer.

The Young’ Crossing

Sweepers. By Mrs. OLvina.

Tim, the News’-Boy. By
the Author of “‘Buy an Orange,
Sir?’’ “ Bible Pictures — Old
and New Testament,” &c.

Tom Lambert.

Truth Speaking.

Under Suspicion.

Will Carves the Way. By
A.E.G.

Zita, the Gipsy Girl. By

Mary ONLEY,



‘London; SuNDAy ScHOooL Union, 56, Old Bailey, E.C.



BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG,

PETER BIDDULPH; the Story of a
Settler’s Life in Australia. By W. H. G. KINGSTON.
Crown 8vo, cloth gilt, hoards, well Illustrated. Price 2s.

_ ‘A stirring tale. Just the book for a high-spirited boy. It will initiate
him into some of the hardships of life, while showing him at least one road
to its material success.”"— Western Times.

THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT.
By Ascott R. Horg. Crown 8vo, cloth boards, gilt, well
Illustrated. Price 2s.

“* A stirring tale of adventure in an American settlement in perilous con-

tact with the Indians. Humorous character, as well as dangerous experi-
ence, are found in its pages.” — Western Times.

BLINKEY AND ONIONS. A Ragged
School Reminiscence. By Mrs. JAMES MARTIN. Crown
8vo, cloth boards, gilt edges, well Illustrated. Price 2s. 6d.

“ This story is above the average of such works, and is a grand defence
of work among the neglected and outcast."—LEdinburgh Daily Review,

SQUIRE LYNNE’S WILL. A Story ofa
Lost Will. By Emma Lestiz. Crown 8vo, cloth boards,
: gilt edges, well Illustrated. Price 2s. 6d.

ere are some ingenious complications in this Sony and the moral

although not obtrusively enforced, is an excellent one.”—Scotsant.

WAVE UPON WAVE. An Autobiography.
By SARAH DoupNEy. Crown 8vo, cloth boards, well
Illustrated. Price 2s. 6d.

«A pleasing and telling story, written in autobiographic form, character-
ised by great variety of incidents, skilful narratives, and excellent
engravings. ’—City Press.

THE LAND OF THE PIGTAIL. China
from a Boy’s point of View. By BENJAMIN CLARKE.
Crown 8vo, cloth boards, profusely Illustrated. Price 2s. 6d.

‘This is one of the best books on China for youthful readers that we have
met with for some time.” —The Rock.

THE FIVE-BARRED GATE. A Story of

the Senses. By JAMES CROWTHER. Crown 8vo, cloth

- boards, well Illustrated. Price 1s. 6d.
“A happy and successful effort to popularise and emphasise religious
teachings with the aid of science."—Zdinburgh Daily Review,

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION. 68, OLD BAILEY, LONDON, E.0,





BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG,

CHARLEY LAUREL. A Story of the Sea,

, W.H. G. Kincston. Crown 8vo, cloth boards, gilt
edges, well Illustrated. Price 3s. 6d.

~ “One of Kingston's very best stories; its brilliant binding and get-up

make it a very choice present book, and it is not a bit too good for the

story.”—Literary Churchman.

THE BOY WHO SAILED WITH BLAKE.
An Historic Story of Naval Life and Adventure. By W.
H. G. Kineston. Crown 8vo, cloth boards, gilt edges,
with Ten Engravings. Price 3s. 6d.
“The stirring times of Blake and his adventures ashore and afloat are
graphically reproduced. That boys will read it goes without saying.”—
Literary World,

A TRUE HERO. A Story of the Days of
William Penn. By W. H. G. Kincsron. Crown 8vo,
: cloth boards, gilt edges. Price 2s. 6d.
‘* Written with Mr. Kingston’s well-known power, and embellished with
some good engravings.”—Graphic.

CAUGHT IN THE TOILS. The Story of

a French Convent School. By EMMA LEsLiz. Crown

8vo, cloth boards, gilt edges, well Illustrated. Price 2s. 6d.

‘* We heartily commend this story to the attention of parents. ‘The evils

of convent schools are admirably illustrated in this story which we hope will
be widely read.”— The Rock

FRIENDLY CHATS WITH YOUNG
MEN AND MAIDENS. By Rev. H. O. MACKEY.
Foolscap 8vo. cloth boards. Price Is.

Dwells on the promise of youth, success in life, character, books,

religious instruction, &c. It is a small book of solid instruction.”"— Western
Times.

WOMEN WORTH EMULATING. A
Book for Girls. By CLARA Lucas BALFour. Crownâ„¢
8vo, cloth boards, gilt, well Illustrated. Price 2s.

€ An excellent little volume which should at once be added to all Sunday

School and village libraries.”—Court Circular.

MEN WORTH IMITATING; or Brief
Sketches of Noble Lives. By W. Hi. Groser, B.Sc.
Crown 8vo, cloth boards, gilt, well Illustrated. Price 2s.

“The author draws lessons of endurance, perseverance and moral excel-

lence, in a way that will recommend his work asa suitable present for the
young.” —Bookseller.

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION, 58, OLD BAILEY, LONDON, E.G.





SERIALS FOR THE YOUNG.
YOUNG ENGLAND:

FOR

BOYS AND GIRLS.

MONTHLY, FOURPENCE.

YOUNG ENGLAND provides a monthly supply of Inter-
esting, Instructive, and Entertaining Literature for Boys and
Girls. Its Tales and Articles are spiritedly. written, and well
Illustrated. It is full of Tales and Papers on every subject in
which Boys and Girls delight. The help of all interested in the
diffusion of pure literature is solicited in the circulation of this
work.

SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS. -

THE

CHILD'S OWN MAGAZINE:

A Bundle of Pictures and Stories for the Little Ones.
PUBLISHED MONTHLY.

PRICE ONE-HALFPENNY.

THE CHILD'S OWN MAGAZINE is ¢he Paper for the
Little Ones ; It is brimful of the Pictures and Stories in which
Children dehght. No volume could be a more acceptable gift
for the Nursery. Fathers and Mothers, Brothers and Sisters, do
not forget the Little Ones. You have your own Magazines ;
remember the Younger Ones, and give them a Monthly treat
that costs so little.

Yearly Volume, paper boards, 1s.; cloth gilt, 2s.
SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION, 36, OLD BAILBY, LONDON, E.C. ~



SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION

BOOK SALOONS

CONTAIN THE

LARGEST STOCK of JUNIOR LITERATURE in
the WORLD, with UNUSUAL FACILITIES for
selection.

This includes EVERY VARIETY in SUBJECT
MATTER, produced in the best style that MODERN
IMPROVEMENTS ix PRINTING and BINDING
afford. Books of TRAVEL. Books of ADVENTURE.
Books of HEALTHY FICTION. Books of BIOGRAPHY.
Books of PICTURES. Books for PRIZES, PRESENTS,
GIFTS, or REWARDS, and Books for STUDY as well as
RECREATION.

POCKET BIBLES, from 6d. to £2 25,5 TEACHERS’
BIBLES, from 3s. to 60s. PRESENTATION,
FAMILY, and PULPIT BIBLES, from 12s. 6d. to £6 6s.
COMMENTARIES, CONCORDANCES, and other
WORKS ILLUSTRATIVE of SCRIPTURE. Books
for TEACHERS, for the Study, and the Class. Books for
SCHOOLS, Admission Books, Roll Books, Records, Journals,
gc., §&c. ILLUMINATIONS for School Adornment. MAPS
for School Walls. MUSIC for School Psalmody, and
SPECIALLY BOUND BOOKS for SCHOOL
LIBRARIES. AMERICAN ORGANS for Cash, or on the
Three Years’ System.

COMPLETE CATALOGUES ON APPLICATION,

56, OLD BAILEY, LONDON, E.C.











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'2011-10-12T12:47:13-04:00'
describe
'1933384' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00011.tif'
4b75a63202aa351f6eb3d2e47160916f
0f1959a80db1fc3a98b29ab9dc0a50e1f4c75708
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00011.txt'
bd0413231241b65f6b055e76e1764f8f
9145ab88718e493701aea31eefd66b0820134773
'2011-10-12T12:46:53-04:00'
describe
'35650' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
c76ee0e1b43d3828e06e1777b6e89640
e3d91a12b682f29fcf13068f11a1defb938e9de7
'2011-10-12T12:44:52-04:00'
describe
'238837' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
4045681792454ce7e395e47f74e7a040
5f0f761d331f00211c5df7bf4ca66cc7b0111090
'2011-10-12T12:45:15-04:00'
describe
'173408' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
5b40b9668918ac5fc8aa8dd4fac50d9e
de0a5ee0b2ea649c476b5122136ecf1cc88663cb
describe
'25472' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00012.pro'
02bc86af4d376e682781b768114b5bd9
5373601fdb04ae3cb9ebbd049d8311ade2fa17e3
'2011-10-12T12:46:43-04:00'
describe
'71798' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
ba9afe0c54592092b7a6dd1b48fc0cc4
abe69878efd9b9a4203f8056668c297e1f714d90
describe
'1933220' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
e3294d103e1850876b0909e00150e682
a9abf5b33a198424e5207992b8df90482eb69edd
'2011-10-12T12:45:04-04:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00012.txt'
c701e1ef91ca79fbae77c620d9a9ff01
4a4a42fc21222827fed7bb344f428e130cfaeb02
'2011-10-12T12:45:59-04:00'
describe
'35440' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
a92fb4a39785b8209f31660744b646be
be0779c706002f2226e6f406a46764fd0589fcc5
'2011-10-12T12:45:34-04:00'
describe
'238843' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
80ac9bb2f9b6e2ed10aa6cced7d77522
4d48dd112ef19958340dd2b32a8c5f1eda9ed3aa
'2011-10-12T12:45:27-04:00'
describe
'173831' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5897351cfcf8e41225d7cfd8f526be28
9309da40c6add4a5b6888b84ffc7b53edef58c40
'2011-10-12T12:46:35-04:00'
describe
'25978' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
cda885472fd441e4f463ef7beb59c545
0094d4081bc153ccecc8a0344b883e374135ac05
'2011-10-12T12:45:32-04:00'
describe
'71610' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
7229c113639969810db639d0d4fde250
84876898b60248cf172f5cdeb808d26530717239
'2011-10-12T12:45:02-04:00'
describe
'1933580' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
a953840ffd8fa34daa98a8ad046577fa
5bcd59945104ea95bd2054d0e229b9a339324fdd
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
04c95821760b9993df3bf4397c86b2f7
d88a223ed5d26ff5ca5dea3c5357c6432c3be4fd
describe
'35793' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
186248492c5a2b68d0e6f82b103f6345
f64db90781a218b60ab67765aa9fcc916a69acd9
'2011-10-12T12:46:20-04:00'
describe
'238878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
6d5cc4a436d6a099a537cc850772e904
dcffe4f91dab57af60f42d9f2ff9930781b0aa19
'2011-10-12T12:45:47-04:00'
describe
'183458' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
55619c1fe5f96429f01b63e9bf73a20d
6b73186f3a828a439bd487065dd9c4b08e44ffac
'2011-10-12T12:46:45-04:00'
describe
'26418' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00014.pro'
c8785c8acca02a5a706ccc73c539b9a5
e9755471bc952ed5e6157440b908df020b797aee
'2011-10-12T12:44:48-04:00'
describe
'74012' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
81dd96e33585db8821484a809392e4e6
412cf4ea4e253df262ae6bc69b0a8646a226ef14
'2011-10-12T12:47:17-04:00'
describe
'1933332' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00014.tif'
f92043c9f429c7d0e20fb017130c8fdc
3d2c371a2d83542e0c63d3a270b88d4a039ef556
'2011-10-12T12:45:37-04:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00014.txt'
4a3a786e3dc3ad5aea9f11968f99215a
7f8ec23b2f484b58b753c4bcb4d89f8f4a5afdb6
describe
'35629' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
c80cd16b50efff4178a7504abd4c061b
178ba10375a61a7296bab7c14264716bda63087d
'2011-10-12T12:46:11-04:00'
describe
'238870' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
a1925afc5c4599ccf94c48b46b9a1893
8e777baa20386a50fec5db29e8f2bf3856483c15
'2011-10-12T12:46:15-04:00'
describe
'186153' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
b1fabfffc7e2cb3e82d477eb22acae18
ef642b42f2720db007c3d60460e48269b719598a
describe
'26424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
c6e07509b6da8377b3aed310fd4c6219
6c8fc832ee4c3c2a01ef70ed31fb70f1a1e643c0
'2011-10-12T12:47:12-04:00'
describe
'73402' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
ac979d06123392c8216eb3222c0396bf
5cd3c622ca86124ebb07ecd46f718b810371fb6d
describe
'1933236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00015.tif'
a9056e7fe0589cfa38ffdcf700de44b5
4cc15ffd599911fd64c71ea41c4ab0790ee1ff12
'2011-10-12T12:47:14-04:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00015.txt'
1980afebd89384f810ed407c3a8062f0
d0301a4dbe645c7795c726c5a04f96288b771c46
'2011-10-12T12:45:05-04:00'
describe
'35519' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
3b066e47ac2a5ba91504cfe5a60afec3
a7ad86375413fb08794cc287465f3dfa7b284b98
'2011-10-12T12:45:00-04:00'
describe
'238891' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
9957906d0227cb8983e3171a250b60e1
736a7b4c55a4ff9f3de45a9d03bde1f9c935be41
'2011-10-12T12:46:00-04:00'
describe
'163574' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
9842297acd2813a28bd4134ce072f4c6
3fd65310c3cd6e0dbd945a6b0c6e9751c18a9d00
describe
'25637' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00016.pro'
6639f1f35603fc960811d5f88409de0e
18403bff57ed1b9122fc9d59fcf3716ea2c91cd8
describe
'72802' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
e4b5660b73d629ff4cc78f674eb4aa8a
55c20d48032bca8b40a055d97bc7227af7179ed2
describe
'1933736' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00016.tif'
aa7fe6ccff32815964df4893a95fd0ff
d80200078984b6f6f1a124ad446ffbabd142af8f
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00016.txt'
725bc0c5bdfecda416d79c82c48fea00
fdd1ad0f72392c86b78c7723590e05d53d0a9fdc
describe
'36535' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4062ca7382ad5884114ba4857834cc8f
3fa6e09871d3834079e08d71449c16e22522de51
'2011-10-12T12:44:59-04:00'
describe
'238892' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
2396b9ceb56aceff844ddc355c44c7b3
d392529e6b36a088d742fc5995991360afcc1e80
'2011-10-12T12:45:26-04:00'
describe
'172281' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
1d1ac2094646b20961798866d4e6b5e5
9b9b0f860e72b956c2e1dd98071c7e1760783341
'2011-10-12T12:46:40-04:00'
describe
'26842' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00017.pro'
451f7620db8caac83083bff76240c449
c14739a6040070812294963bade5f943f940ba4a
describe
'75216' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
cacdc1c221705202d1d2a362815e42db
c66cb46a420a93ebcac5a6036043cafbe1993cc3
'2011-10-12T12:46:28-04:00'
describe
'1933820' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00017.tif'
88b063bfebeb6591f7350087cc4bd1ed
24730c5e2429a84488d4d6d0c91fda2b09f43a30
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00017.txt'
b32997cd4d819c56e421fc710705cf9d
c1e451c43edb2e4b153536a01d312bbc60711315
'2011-10-12T12:45:06-04:00'
describe
'36661' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
1ddc03e195cf6a8002a3bc9cf8b0bc13
3c42bbb125b6d05b52fa235a3b2fa1559f2dc3f4
'2011-10-12T12:47:10-04:00'
describe
'238829' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
bb16d2178ae4ebc8c2260187945d8f60
926f19e264c12459d7e8b5795a1a9faf3fd84dce
describe
'180513' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c5c8118b006b29dfac2d5bdf09ae759b
a6e1caa48935b86ed96d7ba9b24910fd93523333
'2011-10-12T12:44:44-04:00'
describe
'26019' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
7c4f888c57efc151acc8a7bbeb546633
128673b4dc590a08eb565b9871bce5478edc906d
'2011-10-12T12:47:01-04:00'
describe
'71507' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
eed606b18896a0eac3b93f0dbf284de0
be82705921e8c74a95f688f970d80afb458d6270
'2011-10-12T12:44:50-04:00'
describe
'1933020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
5e51b3db8c80901af8df674d34629bab
0779b2b86d411b695799fed895b4abc3a304190f
'2011-10-12T12:46:04-04:00'
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
e9727f992bbee5ddc25ee34d207c29fa
debc1e39bd8937960b4081ed6bceeadaa29bf42c
'2011-10-12T12:45:14-04:00'
describe
'34646' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
1530552cf908a076bad6e1a78a40255f
409d7faca9156068747772608febb56fea250a0c
'2011-10-12T12:44:39-04:00'
describe
'238799' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
b0faab2a5acb44bf00e65695071c5d30
b0e6ae4d2791c7a8b3ca87a2d883015c82bc7787
describe
'186834' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSL' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
63149119f4fa5f053d7cde102d845012
731dbb7b96ae46c83a1eb181185231087e1ab429
describe
'26979' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSM' 'sip-files00019.pro'
97cb909dc0d1d0c274e2906846aad9cd
3ca1f958d3f53b4dfed16552592c549daf1c3c30
'2011-10-12T12:46:55-04:00'
describe
'73041' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSN' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
fa904e65fad2159cfa361969ac7a136d
65ee4acc4cbb3900f151eb0a8c9415ee9c5f231f
describe
'1932944' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
30a2020cfe2648f682af7a1b83a52420
db22ce4bfcfe79b222d8e4d9a7334534447284ae
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSP' 'sip-files00019.txt'
54fe3b125a9a05a6b928131fbbe8ee25
4d8423ff50b252cfb0ff2474a05978345dbadd15
'2011-10-12T12:46:05-04:00'
describe
'34917' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
7dfd61a678e1c84e6a5844485afb6e6d
9f7b89a9189d214fbcfa4185108ca61cf27bf4f9
describe
'238746' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
1b7d9d2fb187f9020f2c8c4767b02cc5
17ad3898e2c96afbb96da1ddc299226c4a52f8ab
describe
'169355' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSS' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
11e9de8a9154311c3f57d7f8f6c3d27e
a2afdd7ada47fbe4ae456ae7ea6033b7a23e8a52
'2011-10-12T12:44:56-04:00'
describe
'23734' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQST' 'sip-files00020.pro'
88f55a6e2fc28ef6a79df021d6241195
ebef32211180f6e1ec14b9533cc8802df514c394
describe
'69570' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSU' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
2be299618fd1d526ffbf2a37012a2ee7
ff75fe75d1a9ee1e42f29f622ac9b4496126042b
describe
'1933008' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSV' 'sip-files00020.tif'
a73e79224e9273815021a1d3b6359d5f
6cd1ed4a05d4e24dbc49d4ac94cda3aea1e46e00
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSW' 'sip-files00020.txt'
70846a013f18181981eede028821d39a
6079c23029fa65fc116d8adff6cc1efae884840d
'2011-10-12T12:45:13-04:00'
describe
'35101' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSX' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
a53503df0edf3493ed37a643fe88b6b7
9086f3f53d534646fd5f8ed8a455cd5f292fdcca
'2011-10-12T12:47:16-04:00'
describe
'238980' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSY' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
5705f503f9b57416ccfc461a7f6b75be
f54ab72064c5c1a6d65a10f0c33f3b03d24241e4
'2011-10-12T12:46:19-04:00'
describe
'219870' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
053329da59b585e4d58ff1db2332173a
337eb3687d1c12c044f1cdab1bfa8c93afd96c52
'2011-10-12T12:47:06-04:00'
describe
'5813' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTA' 'sip-files00021.pro'
1146f9b6a1e95c658a7147e98cd09035
438e19a2d2e80d425418c1507645624fd0f51c3e
'2011-10-12T12:46:39-04:00'
describe
'71326' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
2f6b18973e2f4275dcb0e57d7b6d7b3c
19c29e44012208184815ed4bd193e63ddf2c5f2b
'2011-10-12T12:44:42-04:00'
describe
'1935148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTC' 'sip-files00021.tif'
3fb1fdf2592679e343c812d8651d6689
4ed44a6a1d83311a462a08fe88e2b542ccfaa5ae
describe
'317' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTD' 'sip-files00021.txt'
c16ef2428c37efa7872c201cd8456611
5d78159caece25bd00cc8039aa65b45258f52dce
describe
'35044' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTE' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
8a3aff4cde18d98c877d7fa7443706b6
50e25057c04f6fb699f7ab130a32016e3f3a9bf5
describe
'238771' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTF' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
36f8d56914918d25334160ebdf10aeb0
a4701fa47428cba351e0e9c2e419ef2a15edbdef
describe
'168302' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTG' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
880c699fde65982cc9de962698321b16
6ba6b72aa7c7b475a47ec7ddec1fda4cd0ac8b16
describe
'22270' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTH' 'sip-files00022.pro'
cb0f705b296ecba69524b430f706b399
45817364ca0cb74bb64a8b1bfce31a0172aa2fb0
describe
'66249' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTI' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7da819c95d371bd2253c3da8114533d2
1827fd84991f8bfb7db7b4ccc8de04cac9999a8a
'2011-10-12T12:45:22-04:00'
describe
'1932720' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTJ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
af0fbe942bbca01b35256c8aa1a32513
6909eed458c3e331b00497564f7bb9c9fe9bcc61
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTK' 'sip-files00022.txt'
41eb672f1da522dd1bf2aff617f9296a
3672a20a0ce8a09487d84bf974758301e1d0c09f
'2011-10-12T12:45:48-04:00'
describe
'33693' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTL' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
6df91352edaac035838932186c2dae17
5db46f736e2cce817fc8e35fa37e85bf43fe6359
'2011-10-12T12:46:12-04:00'
describe
'238731' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTM' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
f5122bf4eda9c1e2e11e572f6b664697
4b483b904ea8338674e5f2c3cd6f9b3b096c7cd9
'2011-10-12T12:44:54-04:00'
describe
'170151' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
f7c16373c263273d78391b427786ef75
7dd57914ab5d8147776f458b2a89d25d12422e66
'2011-10-12T12:47:22-04:00'
describe
'23078' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTO' 'sip-files00023.pro'
ad9f1b8fc25c3149b30954d00bccb11e
e7feb179964aea036d04c81ab656b40a302ea5d1
describe
'66129' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
ced92c59ab295ea438ee31cad535f567
f6fb12a5867cc9e26a5623db64dcd92a678c752e
'2011-10-12T12:45:33-04:00'
describe
'1932736' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTQ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
d66be277052805b2916b27291d1c60b4
ce08aa5ae0ac4f98527cad81cf6cdcdadc14b773
'2011-10-12T12:44:38-04:00'
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTR' 'sip-files00023.txt'
1257b85cb13989bd1e64ec8c2912a659
b90eba99bcce714a8b2f8af4304bc67c5d45f60d
'2011-10-12T12:46:54-04:00'
describe
'33996' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTS' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
d6fd3ace7a1a37ca278d269f4cfd4593
c5a90959fd488c3a36de123b8861e7e55bbb7c60
'2011-10-12T12:45:28-04:00'
describe
'238849' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTT' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a2af79e0165e1417e99001c9a14adf2d
43f058aa732286893db175ac8f80306817805863
describe
'164790' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTU' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
3e02400088e91f7896afc32aac08ab07
79d758128209229756a7dc9f5bd50f16ce3d8af8
'2011-10-12T12:45:49-04:00'
describe
'22296' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
8ae9b644450a610ed553d4f8bca2e566
53af68ca6bb1d94b55ab0c4f862f762ec1be0116
describe
'66660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
928bdc517bb8911f24d949f5f7ba74e4
e5aca25e407cc344422077e6688c197526b4fd9a
'2011-10-12T12:47:08-04:00'
describe
'1933052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
9a21c085051603e09d4f68911630f1ca
c519e89651f6ea329c5b5048305e0bc8afbd5c53
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTY' 'sip-files00024.txt'
4053c2f7e018e34c1dd2e8e9bc9d982c
81133e8d317afd3d17c913382b5da63d66476fc6
describe
'34152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQTZ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
8e8425711c303b284aac56be4d5a400b
c80779d533a1d1041dc96c9b0d0592a4ba9e3708
'2011-10-12T12:45:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUA' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
e803eca445d1db310603be58e5ace914
975c9009bc1d45d71f42136ede705a71aca41fee
'2011-10-12T12:47:07-04:00'
describe
'177694' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b18116e47d559fdb95f70af8fe485697
e00fe73e94727c84bb96c1acb6a2e8dbb494a130
describe
'25150' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUC' 'sip-files00025.pro'
1cffb1272914793e316da9b2c747aad1
99b1f9ff3363fe532ec59091f6f29e915c4d0a41
describe
'72252' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
0e8a964c4ff9bf7d92b3d629f833555e
49edbff8474f1516e19ce9b6e5a0371d2a1f554b
'2011-10-12T12:46:46-04:00'
describe
'1933160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
33e4b2e82ef039e14d2e81a3c632875b
e57dc7877e9afc6aa26ccb261ab66e781d9bdfda
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUF' 'sip-files00025.txt'
fc42d0bbb1aadfe87ce85853a39201f8
d4427f90d049acd60d5812adc5e9afe162769735
describe
'35087' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUG' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
1e7e3d853d455f6e5a077e01f043dd37
bff55a41146f9cd5306005373b1dfc51fea673c8
describe
'238824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
21b54910f48f0600d04c09ef7a0fbbd6
a63f4253769fd49cb188042f697bbe9d0cbe6340
describe
'183609' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
d27bf47b5a80ae29a0ca4a224773308a
4db0709e37000f22feb2c299db3d1db6f339ea57
'2011-10-12T12:47:21-04:00'
describe
'25889' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
968baaaece74bd203d0abb099ab6e364
aa18b891c5c39a0d95647f4229ddcde2c5aecb80
describe
'72453' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c21e691ea19260a3a1351bb7f78f7de9
682b86479bdb311d7cc2afad4cde3f25b4c75f0f
describe
'1932912' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00026.tif'
1d9138776fdee922373918b5ff432238
85b25dcef364e055455253dd0777647bf6b2551e
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00026.txt'
04634611f94a901efc25b1763423bc3b
e834006c9c1e1f00b52ad5cc64b749aacfc007c0
describe
'35068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
c90ba64a015bc3e0b6e770c64e9f57fa
e8ec6bd128465ad30a55475eea584e404a2e11f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e908a990654d5308310d048c7981dd66
7acdd7a5cf047310b2a876994b5d23fb021fe254
'2011-10-12T12:45:40-04:00'
describe
'179280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
f3d2e1dae10dd315092cfb4359ceb8ea
15b7e5429fa711f5153391b463d4fe496c995bce
'2011-10-12T12:46:49-04:00'
describe
'24162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
55d12571006da3c05afe0ea278a4de04
2725e16e54113aa9efd3231a9a9e8c8e8619ebd1
'2011-10-12T12:47:09-04:00'
describe
'70113' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
b9422fda818817551e1095faf09a38ce
eacae7b63c44b851314945022763709ae43e3c45
describe
'1933176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00027.tif'
92395ef7819b26de43b3918f6a05e18e
31963b6221e194ea08fb7e10457455aacda867b5
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d4fec03203db8bb0a56ed1fe4b231b2f
ec1af4587e51cd14d5c6697b5dde87a51109a7bb
'2011-10-12T12:46:52-04:00'
describe
'35082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
b5e0d74f7bb421c80efae1d0dec49278
49b71eee30c4b0c625f89b582cb741e913479bb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
6824e1bcb6b5b9eea089e5b828720389
cb21883a7c053113c1d48f1f669abc3eab41e559
describe
'181858' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
3b4b6b6cb112d9515798db099f34938f
684bfa350d4c2a4b58bfa89000c1f99aa6698699
describe
'25081' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00028.pro'
4e4cf5dbdf6fc6113b65e5fea8b3e9d4
a88de402ce194979e27451c095ed46ec7dfe8485
describe
'73094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
53ad3937ff94b805d3516c1bd65b8691
1059258484e23228e61bf1fc98708c745ea4d54e
'2011-10-12T12:46:18-04:00'
describe
'1933496' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
110531266f182d156fa12ffab5c28ecb
b4d961b71a28080d893be66dd71f8c6f09eb4a65
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00028.txt'
1b4cbf319a1eb7cfed804431b05d1e08
3c860ee751b78d4bd10e21c578014c9bd279d30a
'2011-10-12T12:45:24-04:00'
describe
'35802' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
0b82b28b5920dd180800de1cae13b4a2
7f5b90a59ffc2d05396a662727a2b713232b7067
describe
'238821' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
765b7ac117fe10088ff92da4f579a951
b29edcf0c56762b9fe971e34f0f05f53107be460
describe
'185674' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
f6a03d3a6a940c8832fd01dcd9cae79e
ad01c670b586eaf9bfce34189b90bc7ee9571ad9
describe
'26088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ad90704fab2e35550e6e47191e0b0e9a
df5515086a4b0bd760415273d3be7e68cf0ff0d8
'2011-10-12T12:44:41-04:00'
describe
'73311' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
55b050bb9ccd95ece0fab452d9de5990
e92c8e815e5d50fd6f04e4db08c0ee1e845226a5
describe
'1933328' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00029.tif'
b83c7bf0c6d4f3e308a672ee7711ebb4
19d63b2cda0d2880e9f41fdd0dc8315f07662e00
'2011-10-12T12:46:56-04:00'
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00029.txt'
63e8217bc481b4b27d97eeb8d56fca36
c6f6d8f73020b56359c53779a567cfa9089673c7
describe
'35926' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
23de8f13d71a141f84a3bbdfed037e91
e4c46980cccebd06715f6fb7e751a4fd61c280d7
'2011-10-12T12:46:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
15f92dfbc30a81db5c5ec9d99e82fec3
bf565a3d8ffad96a537a664bccb5680d0e3dc7f3
describe
'181451' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
e045fc5fbdee8e08b6424da9512e8cc2
3826d370686f12cc58c46fed8dddc202869f0917
describe
'26101' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00030.pro'
edec35004ec247c262b1e17705c7dafd
8ff39e4d9b7d0d05666aee66e31a1f8e98c1375c
'2011-10-12T12:45:45-04:00'
describe
'71131' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
a4a98b8fc6898c58d720944e3014e408
e83f28577b6418a1a46e81f6d49b78ef1adcf442
describe
'1932824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
a0f6bfdf2e289c434049d69f617cd461
5e4e81c7303277ab26d44687d222ab8920b1ce80
'2011-10-12T12:46:13-04:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f304604a011e1ef2e5bd4832f347241e
88c895ec89ae36b2b20ed71e2bcac499767f17a7
'2011-10-12T12:46:09-04:00'
describe
'34732' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
858d8d1086ab49b5bee0ba56e22f547c
3a306be645d13e3dff27b67e117c4d9af160b192
'2011-10-12T12:46:37-04:00'
describe
'238848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
1618aab4b6875de03077a228e833fd5a
9aaedd4e2255af658b0b8d054f44ab8e739a65d4
'2011-10-12T12:45:35-04:00'
describe
'183532' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
c456f8f1b33d7cbd8e44c75a87f04b53
8ce6ee12d8a49b2afd81ae2c2eabb345eb87b94f
describe
'26014' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
8ad0352726600e718db8c18fa0c449de
cc68090a1f173f5d606af406a82adad4b2ea9809
'2011-10-12T12:44:53-04:00'
describe
'73449' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
203fa054c23d80cc88b0c5c995af87a2
d4646846fe895f27f9ffa690de7af5e3c2569690
describe
'1933296' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
5ce292a286c5880ac4d129e33b545a75
5a88db053328c3fe9c031c5d31f811f82d881c61
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
c0019489abce4d15e711c28d298c96f6
6c341f42893931bc8a948541005bd347fde98e24
'2011-10-12T12:45:21-04:00'
describe
'35620' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
fb581cdaace012aafdcd89cb738efa2a
7a0cf7af93bbc48cf6ebf943bcb79c027befcc7d
'2011-10-12T12:44:51-04:00'
describe
'238863' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
464bc28e66d367b50918a6906eb77ed6
ece64a6bf394ceaba9253678b708b4af05904a60
'2011-10-12T12:46:06-04:00'
describe
'164834' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
efbda20a6e001290eb6f9d7717218b3e
9e246242d0bf57fa71591f2704de1ce00043d6cf
'2011-10-12T12:44:32-04:00'
describe
'20774' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
dee588a3201b23612149c0b4dba881e9
eede8fd27df35ae93286f59de649cfda347add80
describe
'65602' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
f30603c989555eac473798b86a94f8f5
16130732f99227f0537c6a645975ba476115b311
describe
'1932544' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00032.tif'
40cd30774fda58393ee72cc34431b677
52e0caf59875ce91fab221e2c628f5dbcb0e1faa
'2011-10-12T12:45:51-04:00'
describe
'887' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00032.txt'
663300d57007eb58356f9e5d8063a816
114e1315dadb495f9f84042fb3d6aaab533a0e87
describe
'33308' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
228be856b3a22c5864fcaa32b399ef50
ac61515ae21348244b717ce8776f2c3cbb0e287c
describe
'238814' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
769f409458013336c48b1e6861eddafd
0e53118eb24b819df7275d5c6041f6331f714cf8
'2011-10-12T12:46:23-04:00'
describe
'186475' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
a9222e5a26dfc1050bc521a921226a6a
8c3cec3467ba5f76fbdc1af5be3044e3071f3075
describe
'26173' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8816f1374e5f12864dd76e125b1f60f7
5e94054be0e243f58b0f61022b932ec6219be75b
describe
'74127' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
5aa3cf6e4cc461e25fd6a90b3ba4e635
5abbb16e8ae5788e5054be63ffb40eab583a43c6
'2011-10-12T12:44:57-04:00'
describe
'1933392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00033.tif'
34a1dbae2d4480051faf3b42353b54b6
b0889c70ac5cad0ee9236507d969456dde572027
'2011-10-12T12:44:33-04:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
53d69cb789d5716c4c88ce0057cdf9f1
e3cc7bd66bebcb48606bee274ba8e3b873a72666
describe
'35968' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
96254a714c75dcbb8fad46fe58a4861f
17c198afa9dcf88a06396273211d605ba52aaf14
describe
'238880' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
9caa1dd1d41fd2f06e7189b0380766cc
cc1667e27b9e9780dc765112674a86c66e2e9bf6
describe
'166538' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
7f4a3e84bac1aacf19a6d9d820ac6985
414715789ad6a124a8a76ea3aed2ebbaddff2503
'2011-10-12T12:45:42-04:00'
describe
'23173' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00034.pro'
fdda6945eddb9403f162b75093bbff34
1d759e59ba6c7c9a4a437f81514c792c9aae24e5
describe
'66902' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a1d1f32c72f5d8e70af64e7405051b2d
19e9b9ad18d182d03a84b094922a0ba567c81632
describe
'1932756' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00034.tif'
22d2e1475419538b1758fdeb2f23cbca
3c8ae0aaa9dfb1a489802a45ec5a4148d1cb61ea
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2797c90246cca7df0389bbe993093780
a72ca239504ba45decaacf3e923d4abbf49ac278
'2011-10-12T12:45:54-04:00'
describe
'34303' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
5b57afb4719ae124b46269f2121c19a9
0c035c254c5e4b8b006a9e00fe15ee3adac8057e
describe
'238828' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
f7601e7a7ca095429958c57325328850
a725fdcfeec8ac719add6c0186260e263ff42b3b
describe
'218826' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
4923538a4a04ac7224ff71265f981fda
e68efc49c10141cd47a8a5916344b762a867a490
describe
'6259' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00035.pro'
7d5d9cb93cebbe154273f19703cb0c42
628820a8da427a9b392ccd9ac06fbc1721ab98dd
describe
'71305' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
a13b944050df87cc5ca7d84bc05b5183
cd78835e640736cdb87b2ee90aaf6cf593a57d1c
describe
'1932752' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00035.tif'
130b22abf9dad09e5c0589d662d674d3
75f729adf18b90cce322f0a411efc481eb690c1f
'2011-10-12T12:46:48-04:00'
describe
'257' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00035.txt'
8060c3be17c9f7d3b5ad9fcede56f295
ad205e1f005d1d0739ae5d3230b487c2d99be9b6
describe
'33707' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
1e1108b4cad731482e46a3d16db8e8b2
bcfbd13af9089a263f5f42ec2c99a628a8a2311d
'2011-10-12T12:44:35-04:00'
describe
'238631' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
2c744bf06de87f68b2c2a54097404336
f1a66a9ac2a6bc57f7f4ab59b77fe7c182c09b99
'2011-10-12T12:44:36-04:00'
describe
'175988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
ba3f73aad99f1feb43760992a7279ffd
0865ff5da7d44f5314d41daf03c3bed6f00bde50
'2011-10-12T12:47:03-04:00'
describe
'24796' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00036.pro'
7564aa623696e76e0cb6d59c76ad3e79
4a88f7a313a7c729522eb863671767ffa356c864
describe
'70162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
eb3a19e7c010e35c3c01239f8a85a38e
8c6470d93cd62bccdd1b13f41773a37edb18b683
describe
'1932772' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00036.tif'
383406e82595762aff283f5fb458d15f
4aefc1b99c6e32112f7d60311abe473c98adc029
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00036.txt'
4834aa28270434cdd4a86a940bb5fb80
7018052aad1d42a892fda639864c9e3bea145288
describe
'34529' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
6f07e7b13a6b834919b65727857c64df
40eaa4e0fe542db929602f2f6febecc02d19fafb
describe
'238897' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
787990718c4421bf8e47ab58719945a3
aa4e1d4b6d0e3ec922113ddbdc2e564fe530b8ba
describe
'185187' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
3c9a398752372d7139773dd27419b151
16da129241ae17b87311bcc399a6399858574fa4
describe
'26073' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
ed787d798d6078a0e0f72a81d2f6b4bb
16dcd6c838ca03b13df330634be0bb9f4bf6362e
describe
'72628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
7906501e20dba05beae2595c0189c3f4
f201706d22bdce9c8c510e6bc1eaf14a8ccd8a37
describe
'1933320' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c0d028cb897fcbacdfdc7c92257443f0
49d456807e67dbf29e9623c12474be1ffe804884
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00037.txt'
dc10c4414efca0a9c8833fa546c56e09
13a4fb7eda9c3ba73d3128e188ee203dd7939e94
describe
'35743' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
5864ec99eae35969dfb8fa05c46c9b77
011c72d143c00fa6a7cb4553278b77167445726b
describe
'238875' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
ba6e8076b1eb50cb1bf473af60574f06
d43fe4b97ee7fc4ebfb982d846285b52a72bba6a
describe
'179354' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
74483a091804b2f37a654809e168c273
701ab4a3b5f000af051f3d2f29bc92a234292db3
describe
'25706' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00038.pro'
0dfa386d0c2081d6c1d35bb73a64ffc0
5b466694438dbe76deac4ea7dca37779a3b04157
describe
'70091' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
224a5f21f685555524de7778b6744e20
2baf7601b966c317d292dbb5e9bd6adf4f821c2f
describe
'1932980' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
54ec89d302dfeb9d45619db5d2811b1e
eec6ee81e769c69f112f0aab77112820855fddca
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ea52473097012c46a1476cb38a859bfa
c04a7fbe4287b04505e085098c76cbb095160eaa
describe
'34629' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
1bf3be4c1310428579708da5ed8b4727
2e3b2729380ee9d2c8db18457158770892bece43
describe
'238879' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
01d28b8082e503672f8baae9ffc2b426
e6318b6b123650b563f9f561192e5d4fec617328
describe
'185339' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
d8a20d1b436297ef228a4c2795be541e
2044af32c95fcd43ce3185254e9fdba642f48069
describe
'25984' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00039.pro'
36b0d4857136f17ee550288322b04525
b0f5274ff17324e649725962c864b85026c97346
describe
'71957' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
283340eff3ddcd79ec68f2bf2480c871
1e6ccdde37b177fa2113446fbbfc4c37b035c4c6
describe
'1933088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00039.tif'
e7aab1b9b2f9f3d4aea1514d43f57c1f
834a07cb5d4387038cb59633d3b700d426a7b706
'2011-10-12T12:45:43-04:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
4137da164265ae983cd08d7fadffde67
5f6e20aa12162097b53514a0119ee387cd4d3b0d
describe
'34745' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
6e0041cc2e8fdb554456c5e79493773d
1a9fbafb667632192952533b51e6d68ebfabab90
describe
'238772' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
dc7f3e692da3687635a1d486d9b1fd50
99aafef3afd8eb4cb66ff5db904d7fe48980fc55
describe
'179727' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
8b6f87edf436501e112a349ca19d9897
a73cda975ac4a33d168e75bcf173db7c86352aeb
describe
'25390' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00040.pro'
8e216c486a96b35b1d2c7741e48c9504
7db8ea38d01e9921e383bda0947b0af7f718940d
describe
'69868' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
56a39a58bbf5a4577d8a99b106aef508
7f484a90079408283f144b0dce32f71d9e9b0485
describe
'1932956' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00040.tif'
3889c52402dcdf595eda35699c8db293
885851f068532d2c6e03a1653c613cc9dd1bbdf9
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00040.txt'
dd77ec74ee3f374c08418fb4d9f8ba6c
b27e5681d3f56922203bb51d9536dd49ec729371
describe
'34322' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
d50f6716675d99451206fbd71205c438
feb541f2b55a62068951d8682b9d888d5387f2ac
'2011-10-12T12:46:31-04:00'
describe
'238856' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
90c71753edf41925d989a66e47f36d63
7b5a1d7655c4197dd8a38c44e4da6ecece1378a8
describe
'180288' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
963856f235a2a6bf8b962ca76e8a908a
b32ec8ed2de49f2d0db004bb1848387f8e6993d3
describe
'25220' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
112dfe30363dbbb440175e13ab20a151
87cb37306e06f9b8d5266c8bffc4e572b1f1bf19
describe
'70025' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
8975bb60f762ee2a6d3abd4307e15d70
d28eba1fc392fab1e7424cfac26e3852e38f95d6
describe
'1932964' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
0d9a58eba4f517289610cadfdf7afcb5
61231c5a9f579607b171a77705846c91eed850a1
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
e9cd8555c1f3a472946834b9dd888d45
60f18cbcb3300fac278b7737a3511ebc0da7823b
describe
'34443' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
77dcbf1aa6ac36495ff83c42337f3bbb
6cb7f181301a61316d7bd807178b949b0a11a19e
describe
'239089' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
3c6f85529f95443db6db575fd6e5484e
8f4397ae37818886c7c09a3b932b65a801cd81df
describe
'180480' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
87d69bd48e81ae1efaf0e8e373d42ac1
4cd7c3ca68044f5d1288925814abac8538c50e3f
describe
'26052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
2e957a9a3fbcb7f462afb5b86cb651b8
102760d33e31d7102b547e854df09c16ff36e78a
describe
'72235' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
898e38c721578272e435190c308787aa
198d29aa14adfe41e96365112c2d07e2e9bdc268
'2011-10-12T12:44:30-04:00'
describe
'1934976' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
76e9877a9ab90eff2b313934e2bea115
db2d604005518d2f8eeec26d10a743eff9b9b360
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
aa63e9ac0e474e3713496f652f097d87
42c63b58efa43792e534903bee739ac0425b227b
describe
'35253' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
de1adcc4ca60789313c4c39af544e10f
60d8346de60485227a1d305b771935534ef375ad
describe
'238877' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
55fdc6a29792df2abb3f7fb507f6845d
d331b93f0653d8b200579011d25b7bd789d50d15
'2011-10-12T12:45:39-04:00'
describe
'182228' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
c8bd87b24f68cbe6654ca9aeadb16edd
5ec98bc195abd356212ea3063724662fac99f097
describe
'25699' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
3ebfed32c72c5610b1dddbf79d02e9aa
866fd53f30abb6580fc104c1d875a6ba9e257d5b
describe
'72180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
33c13d14df28795dc0ad936ee411bb33
9e0a8bb309dd332ec3b800acb49be56281b94f45
describe
'1933292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
7935e93e1aed7eb6478673114a9568b3
be820b1094c8e22a47b37d22163b7f12c1a09928
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
172ce39a2771af67e9c2826c47291a70
772255467fbd9793fe9b95cfe14e7f4a21cd0130
describe
'35473' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
44188e63562d4f71ce39a14fbeadb41a
9ce1bc5f6fe88e2ad3faabc225eae66936ebb60b
describe
'238989' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
317bc77d37939224fcbaa7e89bdb2a7c
2b395eb9ed28111b50013f7e7e5153bf08803593
describe
'173084' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
e2cc94306649e4f60d7dbf4395eb6fc0
716f303f27c7ca68a24ed15ebcd335975b13c69a
describe
'23981' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
835c96fa3a8d36f632360215aaadc0e7
e358159376f45cc89e90821527f1c344d7a71e19
describe
'69118' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
a2a8dd2d4c2f59819baef65943877c3a
915fc2326ebde4d04ef192e046da4f2dd36c7e5f
describe
'1934708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
a2ae533008604d6324a82fa388add494
6ab6c05969b22412e313521d8eccc43ed778b461
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
bae3d8504dd210e4e23beaec2cb73347
938f2d70e9c6373ffd5f94acc89ed42fd001739f
describe
'34071' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
7245f3e7b020b8968d4261b8f19525a6
e97c1f0fd4d877ff30ec611dc3006f0472cc1917
describe
'238659' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
1b7e10f9c97bbc847ab48f7bfc49485a
a64a3143972113a2c5fe5603236b56e999d8e738
describe
'169082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
e8440a0dc7e86c8f879ab0fac54b7969
6a8dc7e28cf4342a3b237446e6bf6a9a56e07cf9
describe
'22785' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00045.pro'
71e476b1904570398a035cef7fb0f389
c9dc89b15e7c18a1fc90da5909f1bda0a32cb880
describe
'66585' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
2e8580e40118124383272021030b2c44
3780aaa8ed4e6e85adf4c5d9217ddf32edc0266a
describe
'1932872' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00045.tif'
c5dcd33e0f57611d63287a4435fed9b6
012dc8ab016b6eff8f75098b42aaedb2b4c7919d
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
dabb01cd3440b8923141466be418e050
f9899ee5fc76fbe18147a2b23efdfe7acf282417
describe
'34290' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
66d27037afc5bac86674bbe58d645c62
6ab1eccf96f26796af26d53d4a35fbc38a38e83f
describe
'238898' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
7d3d98b6228ef2552c7b22b62084fb7f
b7ba05f81bd268ad25d9da54024bbcae87d38e75
describe
'165996' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ca6eccb9b37bad82409055cf47b2af97
83133993f80fbac1d7bd90b36568fff10c24a7e5
describe
'25222' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00046.pro'
5a4848df93c2d9dcd1c2552d803674aa
3bad9ec414d9b75ee6f41dea8730fdc35ec9dd57
describe
'69058' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e4e9b1721fc0cfd4d4b134a3deb7d7db
4cb385481d03828e802b930a64158767d0a7dff9
describe
'1932992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00046.tif'
64342b62c808516553898f4373af4de2
cd32255cd2dab0b1b5f734149ccf59f6ee15c1f1
'2011-10-12T12:46:01-04:00'
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00046.txt'
c177b9344f6671c72a9121c8274e5043
fad97d96499ab93a2326f173caf91f36ea692802
describe
'34825' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
3f955f42fa208b2900c711a84ef54876
116ca874d22e2b8fd0126b048791459ae38b4504
describe
'238782' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
a7399b6963c1fa8a8ed78c6e6b0235e5
1d108955948d8696e70c942557150568e8d74c2b
describe
'146024' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
c0b9418917b2a877a79a0d9fdcaa80ee
e14646c30836d0c7de7b3645c92760ad63a2b429
describe
'19057' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAA' 'sip-files00047.pro'
8f8a3a457a9f48f8ef35c0a6c239d101
79e3ad9a4b467732e55548f6e65ee61fab356d2f
describe
'60161' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
61c53aa8354f306e0cd30cb159560d0d
9d6e8f1b01f366bd458306fdaeaf5069f6b6de30
'2011-10-12T12:45:03-04:00'
describe
'1932448' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAC' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c3fc3941e2d9c6f3faad45d6f65e5221
65d7c6a1e0a99366d0228b83b21dd8cdc0aed746
describe
'775' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAD' 'sip-files00047.txt'
b4a0d7c6b5a66baf33cd7a1b4f4eb398
5ea1be6ae5e435700836ffbce8af7e49b7e1801e
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'32277' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAE' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
42a0148ed315a9ef77f40ad4ec25f294
c5c7e5348a5e73575bfefebe6be1fdd53dae0c5a
describe
'239000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAF' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
c7f7c4f46d8d34619d6d60d7e08cad58
5c0435102d72e1d8e4f281728be0c904e21bce17
describe
'145776' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAG' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
5cf08cf76b715b4781f3bd0795ac2e28
42b1b97c1e3efe892f46addd0ef0c9f6eb641318
describe
'35106' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAH' 'sip-files00048.pro'
850aef85ca24d297fe6c870f64420c1f
c327bb4205d7790547f162fcecbb4097fae55fd7
describe
'53525' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAI' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
6b6c79365ea7a3c5354255a68a92f142
77b427a330b1444ce0c39650a53d1c66a5825069
describe
'1933312' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ac6b16ba120050afaff907b54ace8e8e
063492846c067b2d3b2ff4a4f657d52eba30142a
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAK' 'sip-files00048.txt'
e6a6c52b1e215c8977fdfe485f423a15
b007bbf4d21f315788352d9d7484e138820fe482
describe
'29253' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
49a976624bd902f1f31fecbe5f1a6d6f
2bbe22fcbd34e3a432bd757f1aa04015de671218
describe
'238713' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAM' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
8d770e27a9657a2c36d4e00b2bb9d6ba
335a866b9d663723d84a52aa6d383098ae1d90c8
describe
'65972' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAN' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
f63f4145722785b1d65e443475238ac8
f1448c95429debd0875263a95e71c4a33b869ed6
'2011-10-12T12:46:27-04:00'
describe
'25060' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAO' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
7030511275e4daff7489360d77ccabde
0f8dcbdf82ed1625a1df17aa7c15de74b51c5a43
describe
'1928468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAP' 'sip-files00049.tif'
8f86e8893ec92f278acec363a7d6aac8
517e07780d36ca15f28dbdabbc6cce9c2e46f4cc
describe
'19432' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
d87fd09e440c7890b57f196044ea5f38
a43233dd75043d79473026f07266af7fe733939d
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAR' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
ce31dac7316c9ed335c60bfbb126b27f
bc42b3f6e53c3677b051a9b8052ed93c4035d55f
describe
'216456' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
dcba94199717209fe9cc5b292dd23e15
0dab8472900940ec4b74e16b7dde6ec235c5549c
'2011-10-12T12:47:20-04:00'
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
d6d6cd53814ef6eca5357099fb29c1d5
68f26d9c60183ce5bcb28bd5f0b31afad586af7c
'2011-10-12T12:44:47-04:00'
describe
'69156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
4c26b972314b6abada591cae4b0ff242
ce72966351c919ee159d6228b9a504fa5ac8d454
describe
'1932768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
303bba8867b0e5e52cad9234feba673d
42e5717a6f7dd9fb70f7b17dcc04478c5638db46
describe
'139' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
2174d9b03fdea3bde2710449488e19d3
ff3153267940b1c63466ee93439e52e63c9cdb30
describe
'33379' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
83c7023926a5e5df78e9ffb39b139016
611e53b746c067eab93400c33feaba77477606a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
04264f586872aae70cbf04f9663dac86
62e64bca4559e1c4edfdf30df70d2323167deab3
describe
'158374' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARAZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
dced84eace0ea0e40088fc9e7b9c42ab
610691f0dba66397ba130eca023417e3d7bd45f7
describe
'19289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBA' 'sip-files00051.pro'
4b27fe6a19cfd0b21922b419826e4cfd
5d59b32a426869a96194150768d50c0c8f313a6e
describe
'60178' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBB' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
8ed10283fba39ea2a90456338412b929
dea5103501939cc68b025b9c732a9689ebf67ebe
describe
'1932064' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
2b9cf73a3b76d7dd48490b06199ce6b1
077d4911b6a5d72a674cb74ca9840b3649503d09
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBD' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c9ff4af8070d44119b8ae0a027b2c5aa
cfdfb0a3dc85b83936ff2dd1d2ac2fa01a7baa6f
describe
'31754' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBE' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
88543dc32292e853945e0fecf9036f31
2f81bac351c15b07a031c650119f113557a06acd
describe
'238867' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
443e53d11c9f4d1a3668d9fe74e00c7e
29f04fad6d5001aa80b0b3158241850d3cfaae57
'2011-10-12T12:46:24-04:00'
describe
'191002' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBG' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
ecdd0d4b6659214e92ae6ebfd2c64b1d
da7666c2450200300b26b9f330e7d32c7767f0b7
describe
'33109' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
fe322264e7bcfc0dfc83de7c97b5871a
c7df30424f7379c2c6f5030e1dfa9ef79c3ab9fd
describe
'77187' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
fb19a77168b28a84167e6e60725cda08
b723cfd7ee4f7292f2315accbd9168bd3c96a769
describe
'1933700' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
82db44b3e51cfbca733bd32f7249b48d
1a33ac7b818060ded25d0c47dacd4127d387db9e
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
88ee69382275728f51566ef231559364
91814c3389705794b4bfadbb5db9e419b80e2782
describe
'36245' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBL' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
dd8ac1653cffc14514d6531fc73d568c
63984e54cf884ca831f3ab0fa657f25cd3ee8991
describe
'238899' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
84a9cbc1c87f08b725e0cd51f99aff9d
3442353932a0562dcc5a401045735403d3788549
describe
'183346' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
b42151ce28406e1c4a238f25a4a95b20
a300c7ee2ae5b702a2565de3c741ecb1103fbe55
describe
'29154' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
b8dbd1c67cca5820ab31cbda0bd3ade0
a462bb1425b223628d284bd2e1d0078dc39cdb83
describe
'73396' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBP' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
de25ca461e943cb299e1d1ba07fbd54b
b45ccfe7ad6b147a8049ac0b595014913fedd97a
describe
'1933488' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
581aed8b26e84d6a3e6d7df8dcddbbe5
b61336cbfb00c6f61a8e4ce53fc0e4d21aa6cda5
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBR' 'sip-files00053.txt'
711cf273e6844108f6f84118796c29aa
ab46aff6d5ba2bf83f03162a0fe3c518c0fdf0b2
describe
'35534' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
09cace053e4af0c355f0509b52b12407
0ed6eeb11e6d9fdac05e05a9d43bee45b60f632d
describe
'239083' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
689901b46131901be6e306302cb7d2af
fc0afe05cc2b45ab7bcfed8ca8b8061dcb2c2854
describe
'186721' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
e61c4422abd19843084c0955823d6c74
0f448bcf4f3a7e037e0bf366628af07f53357fc3
describe
'28928' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
213ca258e5ef15ffe4edfc65eef600d6
dbc131123f604f3cebf436648f00a7270f71a2ef
describe
'73495' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
6887255707cb137dacc67993c8a10866
ac48f2d041297827acc2509025ef8a5dff137492
describe
'1935336' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
964d186ef5e421ea8c485d1bd8a9c49d
0ade3d0103f0425c39f18df2c02013418d72c16b
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
77b6bc67bf5ed0aca1b63c7f9e342d8d
56f2ff9e602bbb33f83f28ad06f84cc79bb6b506
describe
'36075' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARBZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e53649b9e1fac7dd145dfa0f30d4b995
47f92d5f42604461ab675d85fbb160335f9deeca
describe
'238873' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
aadfe86880bb14aedbd1476263ee7d59
0c3c8160f21c67d70878b768aac3deb48e038bd7
describe
'197091' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
0126a4ff76ade58f2781edf675d4d659
edc011aa2d5a297700af2c8cc8d95977017cf7c7
describe
'32347' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
bef987b798780c8204ca641e6e025e44
4b568bfdac9e70f3e21d777c0652fc090456ef43
describe
'76827' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
4f488f3bf2179adbce6d77529023b8ef
8cdd7c38138fbc354acdcf505a68adff0777acbd
describe
'1933636' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
4e0ea7ab124f258fb0b51f909b608e62
cb92767f41b6a4039e07f784f846b17590197a03
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
a34fe26f481572d4c4759eeb4f809439
d42895aabc69d4759beb520a0d69254c62554579
describe
'36845' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCG' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
75d606741f30dd7a995dddcf23630ebd
7abbba998d58c8a0b4b584fa1fdc953a2dc4b40f
describe
'238847' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
74013a49fe085f4404d677520c30a96c
4e600d512f95e271d85aec5efafb82b069802947
describe
'162901' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
7108f71f1269cb5fce31e606d1c3342f
16fe0b7aed67d1dcee60948d9d29001b1b2bd4ec
describe
'27070' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCJ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
58d39aba565708e39372e107f1ccd6db
134dfe058cba5aabae17f35e697e2b301535e892
describe
'68088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
3764a48e8e8190910b9771db544aca9f
eb74d7da281a81db22ffad8e2403041b4756f1ae
describe
'1932916' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
ea22116d592eabb99b45548fea183ba0
6c3e645fab7b8fa092e2a1c80a8695529a9a8733
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
a99d00298aa04e219f6b4d2999a45419
19d845bea28cf49f50103ec1cc699f5dd491336b
'2011-10-12T12:45:53-04:00'
describe
'33943' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
1967c60db8677e86099631ca9f3be38a
d7745b559419a7ab5efe8a9a16bcf8facd43e5a6
describe
'238800' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
1f346580723b19a21bbad219c1fbb343
19443491160b8bf544a31bd9a7f60b29fac0785f
describe
'46875' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
125ab3483a4804e04d911e36cfabd8ff
6ec68a0b865c995a44d64fcfa1c5551e64ee3807
describe
'21809' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCQ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
be15312093238d77b6b90dc1c76793ae
748ebdac0ec648ca9e85c36b0b41beab0b78c0a5
describe
'1928404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCR' 'sip-files00057.tif'
5d8bd026483316d1ee8ec0fc7d111ac4
52471c3cd2203116babba7a8866695dad14d9724
describe
'18792' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCS' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
bb5dc95936deaeff6fbf689a23719561
fd3b700f4dc730003a0dfe00c26183bcff5f01f2
describe
'239107' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCT' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
a89bd9656c53f1b9da4ae42f72044bc5
1e56a9aac057039dbf7d356d293e356907f8fc44
describe
'189058' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCU' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
b892e718333f9e0f5ddddf0033f61847
6e06be3061ca264681454948f2670740812fb012
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCV' 'sip-files00058.pro'
460e08eb3c5545ab01844ae4b181149c
3e2a38761a01bb19d30885384dc329023782cb40
describe
'63627' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCW' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
1527429e7027f278ee73d2d4b7900181
d10787e579df795b465ae5aec32f447bdf330863
describe
'1934288' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCX' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b25e79decc5958be20ebd6af8c40d52b
2a4219e5d868b3873f0ca6d518943cda1d733a54
describe
'159' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCY' 'sip-files00058.txt'
432a54d3ebda6dfed0c2ea1f6f862378
a12b1a3c760d859e51ffc99fdb5e2c3ca1441b97
describe
'32086' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARCZ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
0c72bffc07cd76e3ba6d9ade8f6ea276
0832686c582891d1d0e55beecf9be21360bb5cf6
describe
'238696' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDA' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
80ed8c4057c8233cdd923b6bbd64002c
5d13ab040b6f7ba28e3a6a85e492026f42daf3b0
describe
'150533' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDB' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
bf7c6622c6889f6f6e56e72b98290b17
e0dfb8bf3ca3ae0ca61227c5a166760454e39adb
describe
'16221' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDC' 'sip-files00059.pro'
283c4e307c9abd7024129f5619ec0376
47a48ae56addec9458c23a8591dd746971186e12
'2011-10-12T12:47:23-04:00'
describe
'60607' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDD' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
8373b2db4ff1cd7830cb3c4dc27e2eec
2719de71f04513ac381f9c4472b09d0d12411b55
describe
'1932468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDE' 'sip-files00059.tif'
34d65d37c7befa0359832f7d42019c82
c3ecdf0772aa54e240011b55a0f8bd7d061dab75
describe
'786' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDF' 'sip-files00059.txt'
67c88b695d54af993fab96bf7df16556
0b17d8ae815d6f0bef35a5a13cb91eec2aeae5cd
describe
'32239' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDG' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
f0c8bde0b62581177c2f948bcf02ab64
c955038cb82b50e37a83d7e4a00c932a118047e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDH' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
d8944e9dba9f059b8697b2659d7db756
ab6b71299b3acf5f995e55d2ff9daf0965942e1a
'2011-10-12T12:46:03-04:00'
describe
'191123' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDI' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
a2fd113b90475e8430cc9ba97cdc5544
de5886b008b54037ca959edb219160facf554c47
describe
'33383' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDJ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
a1afe3437ea2f1c81ccfee970de676d7
45948948656324aa17e130530c4fb892857cd0bc
describe
'77992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDK' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
cbcce76debd4dce9be6798360dc94625
a2737b580d6189aa5fe392102cd9ecb6a67b2ec2
describe
'1933540' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDL' 'sip-files00060.tif'
40b363144507cf5a6ce2848050c6fc30
fcfbfc2a1802cc191395b9dd3494937610680871
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDM' 'sip-files00060.txt'
827d1476d5e79bd65fcceba4191fcbe5
34fbffd3d226f715761340f9036ce688c15a9154
describe
'36464' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDN' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
224998d8a7969dd75ba4d12a3777ef66
9e65bbc7d175519b50b836af98fd4a4ef0c9fa8e
describe
'238874' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDO' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
5788cce1d1b40855aa0db2c1bab3b817
2d3817e6149796b5884eb847d8e666806039f61e
describe
'197905' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDP' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
f7ac23ee01dc418107b01597abd5794e
5b8f4d95adac565782a8af00d28a23dc8e9fa23b
describe
'35653' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDQ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
1b510486a8bb0eaaa76820189e4660f9
36e6d5b5bbcfdd56549eef70b78b1b9e202c96fd
describe
'79443' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDR' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
29e570b09b7b3acf8f553fb47d383199
ab7958600369fe6d80359415078c118ea563cc7f
describe
'1933760' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDS' 'sip-files00061.tif'
23a382fc4126a02e0e5213b20e6931ec
d8a056986f853e3cfa4943840c7b35e955fa808a
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDT' 'sip-files00061.txt'
848f521937cee603a486bf6877b5849b
5456fe1437c22cbef560497898b67c8b25f2f728
describe
'37104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDU' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
1ee9c631df6072f9f4fcc4b93ba51fe9
f4acb490d3ff786d69eb8e2f11d49ace85420174
describe
'238858' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDV' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
19a0ca751903f5b6bd8ab89beda8e020
8d988a0cabe811ff644aee55f375884617464c8e
describe
'196242' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDW' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
68657e2432ec06eee460d78a7db2f4f9
576eeb164d8c989d7fb8c3f5698d196517290db3
'2011-10-12T12:45:36-04:00'
describe
'32320' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDX' 'sip-files00062.pro'
7d4c911d51c586c10401e0ec6252aef0
8fd3ea2ad51e4ff68193c93fb6937b4e9880c572
describe
'77036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDY' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
3505b43342abfc55631a5ee0d66dd54e
59762f57208d14317b7b5b2d699f4aefa02d2a99
describe
'1933632' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARDZ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
46effda539fe6e629312158cc4bc3602
c2c4bf128819cfc841bdb9035a2e23203492353f
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREA' 'sip-files00062.txt'
3ec4da35967592d1d832842d29350c71
ea6687e26c291027e4917ed720b3eb7dfa8204b8
describe
'36655' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREB' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
1c81339b21d231a231b5f424f4b57b3c
ec2ed761df05b6a3e3116b3f81f5f4e6d0964dde
describe
'238842' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREC' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1d3cc6f5d3008f2c82e0a469747efe96
70d54011b69944c7e32f2437b17149f3852cce02
describe
'196988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARED' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
ca149b16e6e4dc84c811b52b0459f9a5
75c7a40b1f220996ff0529bee356ac243c2b04b7
describe
'32384' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREE' 'sip-files00063.pro'
a522d1e2df27381542a15b9b595126df
2f709678c5d51a4c8d4d82c5e6788e88c40b452d
describe
'77464' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREF' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
872147e21bfffcc22ca6e23d51e1b1cf
1d76b167458038a2cec827be79ea7697d831e9b5
describe
'1933680' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREG' 'sip-files00063.tif'
abc47823865bb1676a2c7d0101b58c85
27c41015f2b023ebc9392034ef64eecbffec0b0b
'2011-10-12T12:47:02-04:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREH' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4b911e74f82bf1037d316c72063bf49f
76134016da259faa4d90dc25bde69d20f0166295
describe
'36474' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREI' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
05da021e5e2d7640b2a2b3898f69f131
26e022bca5b1a0250bc57d8f2b79f3a7095786d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREJ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
fd74a40633ffcd4fe31d56360180642a
285d312a74fd420f292152f12fd4aadc1f47250d
describe
'195754' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREK' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
25544e1283188c2b7164dbaa8c6dedb5
8c3d076d07224d192ecefc60504dd0ada8dc6346
describe
'33889' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREL' 'sip-files00064.pro'
95e64d08aef2cf6a694ad8277418cc2f
a93e6aa752d4c5fcbb9d9a36780451ac495dfc61
describe
'77738' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREM' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c13548f62418e4c5a797c17dfc3108a2
8a09b9375bbe35357daa6eee737640c0c5a6e136
describe
'1933692' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREN' 'sip-files00064.tif'
1141b7f354a7d8da1230e0c5d1ca0b23
866a099e7636ce4871f4e3d657c37a30de495335
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREO' 'sip-files00064.txt'
7771ff060e52aba64d8c1211c1c71575
52076b510e800388437cab24a448f1878601049c
'2011-10-12T12:45:08-04:00'
describe
'36792' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREP' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
d6ffdd38620a8e9ef807ee4fb3e4b987
c1bf84e627873c9eb67d2ab492a1197d436e13c5
describe
'238836' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREQ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
6c52ca9a2d13cae059876b06931eaa11
39e676fe8f9cb603b6d787424bb77bb4b3d5154a
describe
'176254' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARER' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
bbf59ad3ceda36b2c7d0338eb61e959c
faaba236cf2c70ad2aec8929c7ab989a4cab42ea
describe
'24157' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARES' 'sip-files00065.pro'
c18b88df920459030ad6e3cd03079247
c690a21a11698b88c2316224071395cbe525b144
describe
'71065' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARET' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
f6a6a4196d1fdf359ef272fa23ff095f
8623860ca43b84915f30dbe58a4c0d8f3f6454cc
describe
'1933696' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREU' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6ac6ed1e22719164682b9041b19f6522
f0ca12ca5c75fa44d6ef61f4c8810ffaa0c5dd42
'2011-10-12T12:45:41-04:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREV' 'sip-files00065.txt'
01c95211c2f573292cc3e81c174676f4
3f8573af29a52f561a10b38ef08bdb3f4ef75b47
describe
'35970' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREW' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
4c694f2ec7f0a5a8c2b4cbc9f1337e2c
4b1f5a1c242a54b0229761b63d1e6a61d0835640
describe
'238818' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREX' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
bba85df0ce94a82d217cae7bc41000d7
6dcd73c55bcd1f1e32b28f7f68ec146cc0c4e77d
describe
'191518' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREY' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
65fe635e8c9886791642f1c7d43352c9
ebaa3cb6ce2c43ec3088745c74a01763e879caac
describe
'34367' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAAREZ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
deb286ab896bd13bf7ae93fb12007b8a
13087b586ba2f8195c438624a722ac169c03cf2f
describe
'77267' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a57d5622913e86eb7c16c5b93486876f
0f5463091f5ceab8805ae8b5bde5cee6419e510c
describe
'1934344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFB' 'sip-files00066.tif'
854a751d1f35507daff83ac63fadda3b
b1cd29371be1299bebe863d0f60bc876455bf4eb
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFC' 'sip-files00066.txt'
744e788f6f514febb64399fa7d46f44b
912c5ad52e5a8cde3aa565639baf2a902a444d4c
describe
'37494' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFD' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
4c5f0df077828944022db4677e6735dc
f8cafcf6b9458903c938c68fe8be2949fc13c46a
describe
'238757' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFE' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
73fbb65a5218f51b1cdda16a5ffb6118
ce1f7b416e17c60bde21cc61d7f6a22ccc630d4f
'2011-10-12T12:45:16-04:00'
describe
'225832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFF' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
23c061603a9f68737030dc5ae308c84f
163971ea756e07ee1acb81798142906b4196e2f5
'2011-10-12T12:45:23-04:00'
describe
'51125' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFG' 'sip-files00067.pro'
d8a92d304dd943976e759102b87cb7ec
7eb7d9172fdf3b8174a5b6d8a6ab7c23de969ab1
describe
'84277' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFH' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
b430c0c5d154990f60861c9f79cc62b1
21fcc1cb94f956a1f9e02f11287d90752970d649
describe
'1934928' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFI' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4f790662ce24e4e20cc3ac44dabd1f6d
2397b9defc2df3280377f03485b47a62af3185d4
describe
'2166' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFJ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
64b0b2b254cac0e6fda4e7264b0744e0
696bc4570e1dfb7beb1a367ee89ce4ab180e0763
describe
'39875' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFK' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
72e35a6c582ea159c8d0282df077004d
98c8158601c3bb3a6472fe94e1d541a38082978e
describe
'238871' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFL' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
c912b619e2f180b576bd76c7c2134bde
e74d6d542ed17e94deabc211b3438e77d86b6ccd
describe
'216143' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFM' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ceaac9fcfc184e5ffc0ed8de95acd852
14b19748f24c794a1bbd719c6d4424c83d221a56
describe
'51633' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFN' 'sip-files00068.pro'
423d2b2d182a1fa4e5d01c4c35469a5f
17c10a747ae374c70cc1fb60706a4ca348afffc0
describe
'82489' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFO' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
689a4a4c1ac6de705564faa7e0e589f5
0a2a31526e5fbe12a91df829dedf7894dc828557
describe
'1934584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFP' 'sip-files00068.tif'
aec501b89d00fd5ba6f7e79c94ed97dd
e0644c2471ff6c9c97a070d8726c9f0c5048deef
describe
'2218' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFQ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
22e9855406f07a01e0168e53053aa86e
a9f55366b22d85bcd0436781f468b1fc74b8cd07
describe
'38790' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFR' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
ff473c0c8896d404b4c7a8d4b75add1c
b98e3ff9013970c0896dcfbf562793085a1d0ce0
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFS' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e5be222ad5413eccc93232c24eddb832
2e578883de0df9872098982f62d2ffd768945333
describe
'169815' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFT' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
2fc8cbe0cbda00168f08a140ce71e73b
65fd43da87855483d217bb78a6fa26d63bd269cf
'2011-10-12T12:45:19-04:00'
describe
'28089' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFU' 'sip-files00069.pro'
434ee84c522304bc4efdfeec2959a0b1
f74cae8e6d1dfae521bd50551950142188214654
describe
'67062' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFV' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
d406ae0df236172082b03226a6a4864b
b2e8e6bb40c9c619282d8713f0e7e217572ea5b6
'2011-10-12T12:44:34-04:00'
describe
'1933408' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFW' 'sip-files00069.tif'
e0bd4f6f4d65d0b22167b244ecdb717a
e3b1d2e9c4552909d3d8d37b1746e68eed4abaa1
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFX' 'sip-files00069.txt'
8200f8b09c3fc3971fb9b5c6f9d3d2d3
b6d9b75ff85969a8250430a4eeb13cf842684ce9
describe
'34642' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFY' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
3dc7663f6a9dff2e19c5e5f8dd2ea7ee
6a6d11697c76d7cd8bbc5623d29aa4baa53338a0
'2011-10-12T12:46:42-04:00'
describe
'239099' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARFZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
cdfa8a60976485ddf38ac602d6d65c9a
42f63152d50477bacd26d835a860d1380a464ad7
describe
'187263' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
e09a88e0f44633d4868d1ea87c60e7fd
50f4b11e2d5ca4817b3d44e2f96d096f24e6e08e
describe
'27616' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGB' 'sip-files00070.pro'
54f4b28b7ff3de4e16a5c5abba9d36a2
65aa8033dcdd75d903b607e81e4225c0fa97f369
describe
'76249' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
c26bdd60facc54318a79452267f8b698
c7b27c7cb59b6ee5a25c80c3871679cc21f56404
describe
'1935964' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
7a011d18cffce0d86e567f9b1e811198
9753f39f1d6e3d2fd891056fa7168ed1970ca55a
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGE' 'sip-files00070.txt'
2f8285746603a78152ed99d59e15b13e
56dfcce3c71f3e8beab6a19135c72c50fbce24ba
describe
Invalid character
'37219' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGF' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
00dbfb4b18b352e8a2fd8bf8d773c793
5a3c2f064dadfb569ac3ce028729312d359e6299
describe
'268952' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGG' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
a77ab1cd120a5494ef67f602af3d757e
0f64a3300b7fdced97dd770f77f2f47db6652c20
describe
'121151' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGH' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
b240bc34961695a2243f63b99e56c9e1
fd56f61fb6b123e0c8c540346188018e10d34ae6
describe
'42827' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGI' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
24ab396de708c1915d9591e698d59a6f
f5662fcb0d5beb524ccce043b2ba4dcb9de29c4e
describe
'6473892' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
ff71dee4cd2781a2f9c352982904764a
74e1e1fbe1483955035da8888d64737f47b29ab8
'2011-10-12T12:46:34-04:00'
describe
'25759' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGK' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
2b3b20cafa5fa30a28f0ba261352b802
8d3ad55249867a4aac7caab06bd68facd799447f
describe
'260913' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGL' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
fb3e1d979fdd0dc7eff162e302789bb3
5842f490c3abb02b54697aeccf0820dd7e9cb515
describe
'142491' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGM' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
f1d3a072163c4441452bc6f9410786e9
2b7281b4d2f5b56fcf0426cbee5273daa97abd77
describe
'40169' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGN' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
34158d17317ce69a9c904aa1f7b9343d
bb8bdab211121e2e461a15287ec3425bd02af9a7
describe
'6279744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGO' 'sip-files00074.tif'
1b6404948afe92aefcafe7972a82687b
44a3a4d44bdf77b7dd687e8f0ad6ef274d95f507
describe
'23663' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGP' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
75d681e891b46701c9ea5a6fad159997
08cd6154b95f45eb4a8519538021a8763db3b5cb
describe
'64' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGQ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
5420a89ee5965c1ccc81c39c06728686
ed0306f0f0f432e177f6696c64300e0dc2a97b30
describe
'114160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGR' 'sip-filesUF00080020_00001.mets'
9dfbf34f22a9c6b13e5fc4f2554ec988
1cf65361c701b41039dd93e894f636569ae9aa0b
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T07:02:15-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'147390' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAEXfileF20080328_AAARGU' 'sip-filesUF00080020_00001.xml'
f87516ae287abe7d4a0e2eea4dd917f7
feea30a85d7b0042e2fab3a838fa181a9698c18d
describe
'2013-12-19T07:02:13-05:00'
xml resolution







SEATED UNDER THE PORCH.
|

i
:
:





UNL SRSPERANDUM,

THE SHABBY STRANGER,

va

LONDON:
SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION,
56, OLD Bairzy, E.C.
AO


NIL DESPERANDUM:
NEVER DESPAIR.

38+; NE cold, rainy night in November, 184—
{a poor boy, thinly clad, and whose pale
pinched features plainly told of in-
sufficiency of food and premature care, was
seated under the porch of a large public build-
ing, the doors of which stood invitingly open,
and whence issued a stream of light and warmth.
As the boy crouched behind the pillar and

3

ERS
S

watched the people enter, he thought ~ how

much he shovld like to go in and see what
they were doing. “But it is not for tho likes of

me,” he said, half aloud. However, by-and-by
he saw men in their working dress going in, so”

i
6 NIL DESPERANDUM :

he took courage, and followed them through
the vestibule into a large brilliantly lighted
room, and seated himself on a bench close by
the door. At first, his eyes were dazzled by
the unaccustomed glare, but in a short time he
could look round; he then saw that the large
room was nearly full of people, who all ap-
peared to be intently listening to a gentleman
who stood on a platform at the further end of
the room. He wondered what he could be saying
that so interested everybody, and wished he
knew, for he could only hear the voice, not
make out the words. Seeing a vacant seat
nearer the platform, he -quietly- crept thither.
The first sentence he heard distinctly was “ Nil
. Desperandum.” “What can it mean?” was
his mental thought, but hark! the speaker is
. giving an explanation, “ Never despair; you
may be poor, badly clothed, and half fed; you
may live in a mean dwelling, with scarcely the
necessaries of life, yet you have within you
the power of making your lives beautiful—-
_ NEVER DESPAIR. 7.
a power which can enable you to look beyond :

the trials, disappointments, and afflictions: of
carth to that home where every noble aspira- .

tion shall find fulfilment, every longing desire _ |

for happiness be satisfied with a plenitude of
joy such as man cannot conceive. Butif you
would attain to this state of ineffable bliss you
must do your part in life’s battle worthily ;
sink not into the sloth of indifference because
you are poor, but strive manfully to vanquish
the difficulties that may bar your path to re-
spectability and competence—strive, depending
upon Him who gives you life, health, and
energy. His arm is omnipotent, and the
strength of omnipotence will be yours if you
ask for it—God will not fail you, He loves you
too well, you are His own work, He looks upon
you in infinite compassion, notes all your feeble
efforts to do well, listens to your imperfect
prayers and waits to bestow upon you all the
-riches of His grace. Be, then, strong in Him,
trust not alone in your own strength but in
8 NIL DESPERANDUM :

tle might of God, do your part well and faith-
fully and God wiildo His. He has said and He
will perform, The way of the Lord is strength
to the upright, walk then in this more excel-
lent way, seek first the Kingdom of Heaven,
then shall all things be added unto it.”

As the boy listened wonderingly he wished he
could find this way of peace and security ; then
came the thought, “But I am so poor and
miserable; but, the gentleman said, Never
‘despair.—No, I like ‘ Nil Desperandum’ better,
and when I am going to give in, or feel it is no
use trying, I will say it to myself, then I shall
remember what the gentleman said about God
helping those who help themselves; but how
can I get ‘God to help me,?’ why, I must ask
Him.”

Absorbed in the new train of ideas that had
been aroused within him by the energy of the
speaker, the boy heard little more, for he soon
left the room, as he knew that his mother _
would be expecting him ; and one of tke first
NEVER DESPAIR. “9

results of that night’s resolves, was, not to make
her angry. On leaving the building, he found
that the rain had ceased, and that the moon
was shining; he looked up with a strange thrill
of new-born joy, which he could neither ana-
lyse nor define, but it seemed to -arise from the
conviction that possessed his mind, “He who
made that beautiful moon to give light in the
' darkness, sees me, knows my wants, and is
ready to help me.”

The way to his poor home did not seem long,
although he had more than a mile to go ere he
reached the narrow alley in which it was
situated, and where his mother had lived ever
since he could remember. Robert Carter was
at this time about sixteen years of age, but he
was so thin and small that he might have
passed for a child of twelve; his father had
died when he was quite a baby, so that he had
no recollection of him; his. mother took in
-washing,—her customers being chiefly the actors
at alow theatre close by the alley where she
STO: . NIL DESPERANDUM.

lived—and as she generally had to wash, dry,
iron, and mend in one day, for the things to
be in readiness for the evening’s performance,
she always seemed in a bustle, and never to
have time to clean or tidy her own dwelling—
dirt and discomfort might be said to reign
there with absolute sway. Robert had known
no other ever since he could remember, yet,
strange as it may seem, the quiet silent boy,
who never found fault, hated the discomfort of
his home; he liked cleanliness and order, was
always careful to wash himself when he went
home at night before he got his supper. Al-
though his mother would say, “What makes
the lad so particular?—he does not take after me;.
I can live without so much fuss about clean-
liness, if I could not, what would become of
me, I wonder; who would earn the bread ?”
Robert was apprenticed to a shoemaker; he
did not like the trade, but his mother desired
him to go, because he would earn a small wage,
and if he went to learn the trade he wished,
NEVER DESPAIR, 11

he would have no wage for the first three years 5
so, to please her, Robert gave up his own will.
His master was a kind-hearted man, and
often gave the poor boy a dinner, and would
have done more, could he have afforded to do
so without injury to his own family. The boy
appreciated his master’s kindness, and did
his best to show his gratitude by never wast-
ing his time, and by giving heed to his
master’s instructions, so that in less time than
might be deemed possible he became really
useful, and could be trusted to do the coarser
work. Robert desired to be a good hand at
his trade, but he feared. he should never
learn the more difficult parts, for, as he often
sorrowfully said to himself, he was not clever ;
he was careful and industrious, but not really
quick to learn; but by paying great attention —
he had acquired the knowledge he possessed,
and as stated was a help to his master; but he
wanted to be more than a cobbler, he would
like to earn money to help his mother, so that
12. NIL DESPERANDUM:

she might not have to work so hard. ‘And the

words he had heard in the public rooms en-
couraged him to persevere. “Nil Desperandum”
he repeated to himself on his way home. “No,
I will not give in; I will try, and then if I fail
it will be no fault of mine.” Just as he had
come to this resolution he reached his home,
and quietly opening the door, saw his mother
seated on a low chair by the fire smoking a

pipe to refresh herself after her day’s work. —

How the lad hated the very smell of tobacco
only he knew, for not a word did he say to
grieve his mother. ©

“ How late you are to-night, Bob! the pota-

toes for your supper are burnt to a cinder, and .

there is not a crust in the cupboard.”

“Never mind, mother; I can do without, I

will go to bed and sleep instead of eating.” ©
“As you will; if you can work without food
it is more than I can. But stay, before you go

wash some potatoes that I may cook them for
your breakfast ; they will be all you will get, |

ihn,
NEVER DESPAIR, 18

for I have nothing else, and no money, me I
did not get paid to-night,”

Robert washed the potatoes and then went
to his room, if such it could be called ; in reality
. it was little better than a closet: his bed was a
bundle of straw and the covering did not keep
him from shaking with cold ; but to-night cold,
hunger, and discomfort were all forgotten ; one
thought occupied his mind to the exclusion of
all others, “ How shall I get God to help me?”
He had not been taught to ask God in prayer
to give him his daily bread; he had not been

‘taught the great and holy truths of the “ word

of God.” He knew that there was such a book
‘as the Bible, because there was one ona shelf
downstairs ; but of its contents he was entirely
ignorant. “T must read it,” he ejaculated; “the
gentleman said, ‘Search the Scriptures, and
search means seek. Why, I seek for things when
Thave lost them ; what am I to seek in the Bible
for? Let me see, what was it? let me think.
: Yes, he said, we were so lost in sin and wicked-
14 NIL DESPERANDUM:

ness, we were so far from God and holiness,
that we must perish everlastingly unless we
found our way to God through Jesus Christ
HisSon. He called it the way of salvation from
death, or reconcilement to God through the
sacrifice of His Son, and that way he said we
should find plainly written in the Bible. So if
I would find it I must read the Bible. I can’t
begin to-night, for I have no candle, but I will
‘get up an hour sooner, and see if I can find
anything about ‘the way.’”

Robert lay down on his hard pallet, but he
could not sleep, thoughts new and exciting
chased each other through his mind; the past
seemed to have been a strange stagnation, and
he wondered how he could have lived so long
without feeling that he had a soul to be saved;
wondering how he could have been so in-
different to the future, when every day was

bringing it nearer; but the one point to which
"his thoughts ever returned was: “I must find
the way of salvation.” This was his resolve
NEVER DESPAIR. - 15.

when at last sleep closed his weary eyes; this
his first awaking thought ; and true to his reso-
lution of the previous night, he got up an hour
before his usual time. It was still dark, and he
had no candle; he usually lit the fire for his
mother, he did so this morning, and when it
burnt up so that he could see to read by its
light, he took down the Bible, wiped the thick
coat of dust off its cover, and opened it. He saw
‘Old and New Testament. “Which must I read
first, I don’t know either; I will read a bit of
both.” So he read the first chapter of Genesis,
then he turned the leaves until he found the
New Testament, when he read the first chapter
of St. Matthew’s Gospel. The history of the
Creation excited in him a-feeling of awe.
“What a Being that could say, Let there be
light, and light came! and that powerful Being
to care for such a poor ignorant boy as me!
yet the gentleman said He does.” He spoke .
aloud, forgetting that his mother might hear,_
and quite started when she called out,—
160 NIL DESPERANDUM:

“What are you saying, Bob?”

“T was talking to myself, mother.”

“Then I wish you would not, for you roused
me out of a sweet sleep.”

“T am sorry, mother, but it is just time to
' get up. Iam going now, good morning.”

And placing the Bible on the shelf, he put
on his tattered hat and ran off. He had been
so intent upon his reading that he had forgotten
to take his potatoes, and would have had no
- dinner if. his master had not kindly sent him
a plate of pudding. .

“T wonder if God, the great God that made
all things, told my master to send this to me?
Perhaps He did, for the gentleman said the very
hairs of our head are all numbered.” Thus
cogitated Robert as he ate the pudding, and
perchance for the first time in his short life
he said,—

“Thank God for my dinner.” He was not an
idle boy, but this afternoon he worked with
double energy. Once his master said, “I hope
NEVER DESPAIR. 17

you are taking pains, Robert, you seem to be
working very fast.’’ Robert showed what he



was doing to his master, who was perfectly’

satisfied, and in a pleased tone commended the
18 NIL DESPERANDUM:

boy’s diligence, and thinking to himself the -
while, “the bit of pudding is well paid for.”

. Every morning Robert got up early that he
might have time for reading, much to the as-
tonishment of his mother, who could not
imagine what strange fancy possessed the lad.
On the Saturday he said to her,—

“Mother, will you have time to mend my
Jacket ”

“No, that I shan’t; it must do as it is, it is
quite good enough to run in the streets night
and morning, and you are never oub at any
other time.”

“Then, mother, will you lend me a needle
and I will try to sew up the holes, I think I
can, it won't be very difficult ?”

“ What do you want it done to-day for ?”

“T want to go out to-morrow, mother.”

“Go out! why your clothes are not fit to
be seen on Sunday, where can you want to”
got”

The boy was shy of telling his mother and
NEVER DESPAIR. 19

hesitated, then said in a low voice, “ Mother, I
want to go to church.”

“ What to do there, pray ? this is a new freak,
you have been strange enough all the week,
getting up at unearthly hours to read that old
book which had not been opened’ since your
father last used it.” This was news to the boy.
Then his father, the father he had so often
longed to know, had read “the Book ” and
may-be, he had found the way of Salvation—
the way he wanted to find; but his mother’s”
voice interrupted his silent thoughts.

“What do you want to go to church for ?—
tell me.”

Robert had always been obedient to her will,
fear might have made him in the first instance,
now it had become habit, so he replied.

“Mother, I want to hear about the way of
Salvation.”

“ And pray what do you know of that way ?”
- she asked, slightingly.

“Nothing yet; but I heard, that it isa way”
B

~
20 NIL DESPERANDUM :

of happiness, and a way of safety, and I should
like to know it; for you know, mother, I am not
very strong, and I might die.” :

“Nonsense, I am much older than you, and
I am not dead, or likely to die.”

“But, mother, you are much stronger than I
am.”

And as his mother glanced at his pale thin
face, she, too, thought it quite possible that he
might not have many years of life; for a
moment a pang shot through her heart at the
thought—that if she had bought bread with
the money she had spent in her favourite in-
dulyence, her boy would have been stronger ;
but to put away the unwelcome suggestion she
said, hastily,—

“Here! give me your jacket, I will soon
stitch up the rags.”

“There, it is mended, but it is not fit for a

-decent lad to wear on Sunday; take my advice - ~
and stay at home until you can get better =

things to wear.”
_ NEVER DESPATR, 21

“No, mother ! I will not stay at home because
my clothes. are shabby, I will sit in a corner
out of sight, then I shall offend no one.”

“As you wip but I cannot think what has
come to you.”

Truly the jacket was old and worn, but so
were his other garments; and Robert, who
liked neatness, would have been very glad of a
~ new suit, but he could not wait; no, he must
go and hear what was said about the way in
which he wanted to travel. Could he find that
way, he should work more heartily, for he

would have peace within and happiness before —

him; and then—there he checked himself, for
imagination brought before him so many good
things, that the realisation of them seemed im-
possible, so he softly whispered “Nil Despe-
randum.” The next morning he got up even
earlier than usual that he might have more
time to read. He had read the account of the ©
nativity and the temptation, with even greater
wonder than that of the creation; but while:
22 NIL DESPERANDUM:

the latter excited his admiration, the former

elicited love and trust. He murmured to him-

self, “For how much God must have loved us
to give His Son, to become a little child and
the child of poor people, so that He had to
work,” bere he paused for a long time—* Yes,
work—so He knows what work means; and
very likely he was often tired; I dare say when
Tread more I shall see that He was, Then
He knows what hunger is, ‘for He was an
hungered, and he knows what temptation is.
Why He knows everything about me—for I
am‘poor, have to work hard, am very often
tired and hungry—and how often should I like
to be saucy when mother is angry! The good
gentleman said, that He knew all about us, but
I thought that was impossible; as He lives in
Heaven, and is so great and powerful, but now
I see how He knows. And as He knows, will

He help me, will He hear me when I ask Him 2°

the gentleman said He would, and he repeated
something which I wish I could find,—it was
NEVER DESPAIR. “23

about asking. Was it ‘Ask, and ye shall
receive?’ Yes,those were the words. May-be
I shall hear this morning how I am to ask, for
I must ask in His way, or I may not get what
IT want.”

The plan of the church favoured Robert's
idea of sitting in a corner; it had large
square pews with high sides, so that when
their occupants sat down, only their heads
could be seen; a large gallery went quite
round the church, which darkened the lower
part; at the east end were placed a few
benches for the poor, some of them at the side
of the pulpit, and some behind; at the ex:
tremity of one of these, Robert took -a seat,
and was partly hidden by a pillar. 5

He had no prayer-book, but he listened
attentively, and thought he had never heard
anything so beautiful as the short prayers,
that seemed to forget nothing, but pray for
everything and everybody. Then the com-
mandments: how strange it seemed that God
24 NIL DESPERANDUM!$

should have given such stringent laws! yet he
had never heard of them before, and how he
had broken the Sabbath’! not once had he kept
it as a holy day, so far as he could remember.
Then the good old clergyman went into the
pulpit, and after an appropriate prayer gave
out his text, the eighth verse of the sixty-third
Psalm,—

“My soul followeth hard after Thee: Thy
right hand upholdeth me.”

Had the clergyman known Robert, and pre-
pared a discourse especially for his instruction
and encouragement, it could not have been
more appropriate. Plainly and clearly he
pointed out the way to attain the love of God
in the heart, its influence on the motives and:
actions of the possessor, with the sure promise
of divine aid to all who earnestly desired to

have it, This sermon was to Robert as seed ,

cast into ground prepared to receive it, which °
springs up healthy and luxuriant, and in due

' time bears fruit. He was waiting, longing for ~
NEVER DESPAIR. 25

light to guide him out of the darkness in
which he was; and the words he heard were
as light to him. He might not have heen able
to repeat the sentences as he heard them, but
the substance remained with him throughout
his after life. Often in times of trial, diffi-
culty, or temptation, he would recall that dis-
course, and ask, “How would one who loves
God act?” And the answer would be accord-
ing to the law and to the testimony as revealed
in God’s word. But one sentence was so deeply
engraven on his mind, that even the words
were not forgotten : “The children of God ought
not to be slothful or careless in their earthly
callings, but to honour God in them, by dili-
‘gence, punctuality, and well-doing; following
the apostle’s exhortation to be diligent in busi-
ness, fervent in spirit.”

Robert went to church again in the afternoon,
and from this time was regular in his attend-
ance on public worship. He was quick to
receive, and apply to his own wants, the great
26 NIL DESPERANDUM:

truths he heard, but he was very shy about
speaking of them; he was afraid to say how
much he wished to be one of God’s child-
ren, lest he should do something directly
opposed to His expressed desire. But he could
not hide the change that was gradually trans-
forming his character and conduct.

As before intimated, he had given his mother
little trouble, but now he gave her real help.

When he began to ask God to give him a
new heart, put a right spirit within him, and
make his life pure, he also began to make his
own little room more tidy: the dirt and dis-
order had often annoyed him, but he had made
no effort for more comfort; but now it seemed
as if he could not be pure within so long as
. there was no order without, so he put the few
things there were in his room as tidy as his first
awkward essay at neatness suggested. But he
was not satisfied, the room would be all the
better for being swept. Still he was not quite
‘pleased with the general effect, the boards
NEVER DESPAIR. 27

looked dark; so one morning he got up very
early and gave them a scrubbing. The result
pleased him, his room was clean, and clean he
would keep it. Only his mother knew that he
did girls’ work, and she would not laugh at
him. Yes, truly his mother noted all he did;
since the time he told her he wanted to go to
church, that he might learn the way of salva-
tion, she had closely watched him. She saw
how first one old habit, and then another, was
given up ;—saw how he employed every spare
moment either in doing useful work, or im-
proving his reading and writing. And daily
seeing him make the best of life, she began to
be more neat and clean. So when the youth
returned home from his work, he did not, as
too often he had formerly done, find the chairs
and table littered with rubbish, and the floor
covered with pools of muddy water; ashes up
to the grate, and a hearth the reverse of white,
but was greeted by a bright fire, clean hearth,
and shining red bricks.


28 NIL DESPERANDUM:

When this pleasant sight first greeted him
he thought he had made a mistake and opened
the wrong door, and was about to shut it again,
when his mother called out,—

“What is the matter, Bob? where are you
going ?”

Ashamed to say that he could not think it
was his home, he stammered and looked-round
in confusion.

“What! you don’t know the room to-night,
is not that it, Bob?”

“ Are you going to have company, mother ? ”

“Yes, I hope so.”

“ Who is coming ?”

“My company has come,” replied his mother,
with a short laugh. Then, as he looked round
in some bewilderment, she said, “ You are my
company. As you have grown so mightily
particular upstairs, why, I thought you would
- like your sitting-room to be nice as well.”

“Oh, mother, how good you are!” he
breathed.
NEVER DESPAIR, 29

“Not much of that, Bob, but I think the
place looks better for a little cleaning, and so
‘I mean to try to keep it tidy.”

But this was not the only result of the in-
fluence exercised so unconsciously by the quiet,
patient, industrious, painstaking youth. For
some time past his mother had denied herself
ber favourite indulgence, that she might buy
bread with the money thus saved ; for she had
not forgotten the pang that shot through her
heart that night when he so simply talked of
dying: until then she had not realized what
life would be without her boy. She had been
careless, slatternly, irreligious, but she was a
mother, and was capable of feeling a mother’s
tenderness. Hard work and dire poverty had
_ crusted over the softer feelings of her heart,
but not destroyed them, and her boy’s example
roused them once more into life. “He was
doing his best, she would do hers ;” so she
reasoned; but as yet she only understood the
word best in its limited earthly sense, she had
30 NIL DESPERANDUM!

not penctrated to the higher and holier motives
that swayed her boy; that would be a work of
time.

One Sunday morning in the beginning of
February, when Robert went upstairs to get
ready for church, he saw spread out on his
bed a suit of clothes, not new, but good and
warm. Scarcely waiting to think ‘“ where
_ they came from?” he fell on his knees by the
bedside and covered his face with his hands,
A deep sob broke from him, In a few moments,
he arose and ran down, almost knocking down
Mrs. Carter, who was on the last step.

“Mother, where did you get the clothes?”

“T bought them.”

“ But, mother, they must have oda a great
-deal of money, and we are so poor.”

Never you mind the cost, they are bought
‘and paid for, and we are none the poorer that
*'Isee; so wear them, and look decent for the
first time for years.”

Robert. was very undemonstrative, but he
NEVER DESPAIR. 81

went to his mother's side, and putting his arm
round her neck, kissed her cheek.
There, there, that will do, you have little



enough to thank me for; but now tell me why
you knelt by the bed before you came down,”

—
32 NIL DESPERANDUM :

For Mrs. Carter, curious to see Robert’s sur-
prise, had followed him upstairs, and was
standing at the door when he saw them.

“Because I wanted to thank God first,” re-
plied Robert, in a low reverent voice. Mrs.
Carter said no more, but all that Sabbath she
pondered over her boy’s answer. And she de-
cided in her own mind that there must be ©
more in his strange fancies than she had
imagined.

It would be tedious to follow in detail all
lis struggles to attain a respectable livelihood
for himself and his mother; how he did jobs
at home, thus increasing by a trifle their
income; nor can we describe his pleasure
when he had saved sufficient to buy his
mother a new gown and shawl: his gift to her
was as unexpected as hers had been to him;
and if she did not receive hers as he had dona
his, as direct from God, she at least determined
to put it to a good use and announced to
her delighted son that she should go with him
NEVER DESPAIR, 33

to church. She did not add, I would have
gone long since had I had a decent dress.

She had been slowly but surely awakening
to a sense of her need of something higher and
more enduring than her daily food. She had
begun to read the word of God, and no longer
wondered that her boy loved it; for in it she
found such sweet words of comfort that she
longed to make them her own. She, too, was
seeking feebly, doubtingly, but still seeking
" for that more excellent way—“the way of Sal-
vation.” She had read, “ They that wait upon
the Lord shall renew their strength ;” and she
thought, If I wait upon Him in His house, and
join my prayers to those of His people, perhaps
then He will have mercy on me, and give me
the will to believe. For she had also read
the reply to the Philippian gaoler, “Believe
on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be-
saved.” But how was she to believe? what
was she to believe? she asked in perplexity.
She did not see in Christ the God-given Medi-
3%. NIL DESPERANDUM,

ator—the one yet all sufficient sacrifice, whereby
Cod could reconcile to Himself a guilty world.
She did not know that Christ was knocking at
the door of her heart, waiting to make Him-
self known to her as her Saviour. She only
felt that she wanted something which as yet
she did not possess. So to have this want
* satisfied she went to the house of God, and
was disappointed to find that the uneasiness
of her mind, instead of being allayed by the
truths she heard, was increased, and she
thought it hard that now when she was trying
to live respectably, and do her duty by her
boy, she should not have peace. No, she was
not to find peace until she had learnt in
the valley of humiliation and deep self-abase-
ment that she could do nothing to purchase it,
that it is the free gift of God, given without
money and without price to all who are willing
to receive it.

As her convictions increased so did her efforls-
to do well; she worked harder, read her Ville
NEVER DESPAIR. 85

frequently,and spent a longer timein prayer ; was
regular in her attendance on public worship,—
her son never went to church alone now, she
was always with him. He was happy, she
could see that ; he enjoyed the services heartily,
they were to him meat and drink; but she had
no part in his joy : she had gone hoping to find -
the way of salvation, and it seemed to her that
all she heard confirmed and increased her con-
demnation, until in the very bitterness of her
soul she cried aloud,—

“O wretched woman that Iam! who shall
deliver me from the body of this death?”

Like a flash of light came the thought,—

“ Jesus Christ my Lord!” and with the know-
ledge the longed-for peace. She had found the
Physician, and He had applied the healing balm
and given health and cure. Rest had come, she
had at last taken the cup of salvation, and now
her desire was that Christ might dwell in her
heart, that she might know His love, and be
filled with all the ae of God. Robert

-
36 NIL DESPERANDUM,

noticed the change in his mother even before
she put her hand on his shoulder, and feelingly
said,—

“My boy, I understand your religion now.”

Yes, they were united in the faith, they were
fellow-travellers to that country which hath
foundations, whose Builder and Maker is God, -
And that night, when Robert had thanked his
heavenly Father for all His mercies, especially
on behalf of his mother, he softly repeated,
Nil desperandum. No, I will never despair,
God helping me; He has given me and my
mother the greatest of all blessings, a desire to
serve Him, and He will not withhold the less;
if I am true to myself He will help me.

When Robert’s term of apprenticeship had
expired, he began business on his own account,
in a very small way at first; but as he was
punctual in performing his promises, used the
best materials, and did his work well, he soon
became known, and orders increased so that he
had to take an apprentice to help him. But
NEVER DESPAIR, 37

before that he had taken a small cottage on
the outskirts of the town and furnished it com-
fortably, and induced his mother to give up
washing for hire, and devote her time to her
own domestic duties. She had not done this
willingly, she wanted to do her part in earning
her daily bread ; but he told her, and truly, that
he would rather work for her, even if she did
nothing, than see her toiling from morning to
night.

Some eight or nine years after commencing
business, when his position was thoroughly
assured, and he could well afford to keep a wife,
he married an amiable and affectionate young
woman, the daughter of his former master. She
was truly pious, and in all respects a suitable
helpmeet. And Mrs. Carter found that she
had not lost her son, but gained a daughter, and
it would have been hard to find a more united
family, or a household enjoying a greater de-
pree of quiet happiness.

Work was no weary task, but a privilege;
88 NIL DESPERANDUM,

God’s blessing rested on them, and made even
labour rest. The trials, cares, and anxieties
which came to them were so many bonds of love
drawing them nearer to the fountain whence
their blessings flowed. And for seventeen years
the three probably enjoyed as much real happi-
ness as is possible in this state of probation.
Then inexorable Death entered their peaceful
dwelling and carried off the first sheaf.

Mrs. Carter, whose old age had been vigorous
and healthy, was seized with mortal sickness.
From the first symptoms of disease she believed
that she should not recover; but she did not
murmur, she committed herself into God’s hand
with the humble submission of a child, remark-
ing to her daughter in reference thereto, “He
has dealt. well with me all these years, and He
will not fail me now.” Another time she said
to her son,—

“ Robert, it seems as if eternity itself would
be too short to utter all my praises for the
mercy and goodness that have followed me all
NEVER DESPAIR, 39

my days. And you, Robert, were His instru-
ment to make me seek His love; had you not
found the way of truth, what would have
become of me? what would have been my con-
dition when lying as now. May God’s richest
blessing rest upon you; may your days be
fraught with His love, and death be swallowed
up in victory.”

The death of his mother, the only parent he
had known, was a great trial to Robert Carter.
Ile missed her smile, her gentle loving words,
more than he cared to say; he would look at
her vacant chair, and feel that he had lost a
priceless treasure. Only now did he seem to
realize the value of a mother’s love; and he
almost accused himself of indifference during
the past long years because he had not learned -
to.esteem it as now that it was lost for ever.
Then his own health was failing. Although he
tried to hide the sad truth from his dear wife
as long as possible, yet she noted the increased
pallor of his complexion, his loss of appetite,
40 NIL DESPERANDUM,

and difficult breathing; in alarm she begged
him to cease working.

“Soon, my dear, but not just yet; I must
finish the orders I have in.”

And although his strength declined very
rapidly when the warm summer weather came,
he did complete them. Yes, and the last
order was finished well and carefully as ever,
although the hands were weak and the eyes
"weary: it was the spirit within that sustained
the feeble frame.

The work was for one who had been his
customer for ten years, and who in all that time
had never had one fault to find; but when it
was quite done, and folded in clean white paper,
and sealed up, as of yore, by his own hand, he
looked round his little workroom with a strange
‘wistful, loving glance; then went down to his
wife, said very cheerfully,—

“Now, my dear, I am going to rest as you
wish; all the work is done, and the man will
make the shop tidy before he leaves. Poor
NEVER DESPAIR. 41

fellow, he does not like the idea of not coming
again; but you will be kind to him.”

“What do you mean? Can’t you be kind
yourself, and not tell me?”

“My dear, I can whilst I am here, but that
will be a very short time.”

“Nonsense, Robert! you will gain strength
now that you can take rest.”

“Not in this world; and were it not for you

' I should be so glad to go where I shall see Him ~
who hath led me and guided me all these years,
and who hath not failed in the performance
of one promise.”

“Robert, don’t talk so; God will not take
you from me.”

“That will be as He sees best for you and for
me; but whatever happens, He will never leave
you—never forsake you; you are His loving
child; trust Him as your loving Father, and
when you repeat ‘Our Father, realize the great
truth. Then all will be well with you—well
for time, well for eternity.”
42 NIL DESPERANDUM,

“Robert, I cannot bear it; I shall never be
able to get on without you.”

“ Yes, dear, if you abide in Christ, His strength
will be perfected in your weakness; and next
to God’s own word bear in mind my favourite
motto, ‘Nil desperandum. Yes, I still like it
better than ‘Never despair ;’ for I do not think
if I had not heard it I should have persevered
in honestly doing my duty,—life was so hard.”

Yes, honestly, patiently, and perseveringly
doing his duty in that state of life in which it
had pleased God to place him; that was all.
_ He was not talented, he was not a fashionable
shoemaker, but he had done his duty to the
best of his ability and had lived respected, and
could leave his wife above the fear of want.

Robert Carter’s premonition was correct; in
less than three weeks after the last order was.
finished he fell asleep in Jesus.

On visiting his widow a few months after, I
found her calm, but very sosrowful. She re-
marked,—
NEVER DESPAIR, 43

’ “JT mourn for myself, not for him; I do not
know how to bear life without him, he was so
good and kind. While he lived I had nota
care beyond my small domestic concerns; he
attended to everything that could save me
trouble. Ah! why did God take him when he
was so fit to live?” ;

“ And ready to die.”

“Yes, that must have been it; he was wait-
ing for God. His last days were spent in
prayer and praise; and I—well, I must learn
submission.”

Yes, God will comfort the poor bereaved
widow. He has smitten, that He may the more
effectually heal; and she will yet praise Hin,
not only for joys, but for afflictions, when slie
has Jearnt by experience that they also are
evidences of infinite love.


“A LITTLE WHILE.”



“What is this that He saith, A little while?” JouN xvi. 18



Ou, for the peace which floweth as a river,
Making life’s desert places bloom and smile!

Oh, for the faith to grasp heaven’s bright ‘‘for ever,”
Amid the shadows of earth’s “‘little while” !

** A little while ” for patient vigil keeping,
To face the stern, to wrestle with the strong;

“ A little while” to sow the seed with weeping ;
Then bind the sheaves, and sing the harvest song.

“ A little while” to wear the robe of sadness ;
To toil, with weary step, through miry ways,
Then to pour forth the fragrant oil of gladness,
And clasp the girdle round the robe of praise.

“A little while,” ’midst shadow and illusion,
To strive, by faith, love's mysteries to spell;
Then read each dark enigma's bright solution,
Then hail sight’s verdict, ‘‘ He doeth all things well.”

* A little while,” the earthen pitcher taking
To wayside brooks, from far-off fountains fed 3

Then the cool lip its thirst for ever slaking

Beside the fulness of the fountain-head.

“A little while” to keep the oil from failing ;
“CA little while ” faith’s flickering lamp to trim ;
And then the Bridegroom’s coming footsteps hailing,
To haste to meet Him with the bridal hymn.

And He who is Himself the gift and giver,
The future glory and the present smile,

With the bright promise of the glad ‘‘ for ever,”
Will light the shadows of the ‘‘little while.”









‘*T want another made like this,” she said. —See Page 49.
THE SHABBY STRANGER.



Such was the mental exclamation
of Mrs. Lynn, the dressmaker in the
village of Ringsadam. She lived just
off the quiet High Street, and her gay parlour
window, with its cuts of “Paris fashions,” and
tissue-paper “patterns,” was well known to all the



feminine population of Ringsadam. Mrs. Lynn

herself was a neat, spruce little woman, with cork-
screw curls and elaborate flounces. She was a
native of the village, and had never left it except to
“serve her time” in a London workroom. She
was an industrious, striving woman, tasteful and
punctual in her business, and strictly honest in
every action, And yet there was in her something

-

a
48 THE SHABBY STRANGER.

which repelled esteem. The littie dressmaker lived
wholly for herself, She was civil because it was
her interest—she was just because she had her
character to maintain. Not one good deed of hers
was Gone simply because it was right.

“Yes,” she said, talking to herself as she snipped
at a dress she had in hand, “ there are ladies in the
family ; and though I s’pose they wouldn’t give me
their evening dresses, still there’s morning ones, and
_ all the maids’ as well. Ah, they would be good
customers. Well, Miss Curtis, the upholsteress,
has promised to do her best in speaking a good
word forme. We'll see, we'll see. Why, here is
Miss Curtis herself.”

“Yes, Mrs, Lynn,” said a rosy young woman,
standing in the doorway. “TI can’t stop, for I’m in
a great hurry, but I’ve just looked in to say that
the lady at the House has promised to give youa
call. They were thinking of hiring a needlewoman
to live there ; but she says if you'll suit, she won't;
so I expect it will be a good thing for you. And
now good-bye!”

‘Good-bye, and thank you very much!” said
Mrs. Lynn, speaking with great energy. And then
she ran up-stairs and slipped on her best gown, and
returned to put the workroom in “ apple-pie order,”
and resume her cutting out.
THE SHABBY STRANGER. 49

She had scarcely taken up the scissors when the
door opened slowly, and an elderly individuat
entered. The new comer was dressed in plain and
sombre garments, and her spare, bowed figure
seemed that of one who had borne a heavy weight
of care and sorrow. Her thin, pale face was half
hidden beneath the poke bonnet which supported a
huge and almost rusty veil.

“Bother the woman!” thought Mrs. Lynn;
“some shabby genteel widow or cld maid, who will
want something made in some queer old fashion for
next to nothing.”

“You are Mrs, Lynn?” said the stranger.

“Yes, ma’am,” returned the dressmaker ; ‘ what
can I do for you?”

The stranger deposited a large worked bag on the
table, and leisurely took from it a worn and shabby
bodice, which she spread out before her.

““T want another one made like this,” she said.

“ Indeed,” remarked Mrs. Lynn ; “ well, it’s sadly
out of fashion.”

“Tt’s- my fashion, I never change it,” said the
customer; “I'd leave you this for a pattern, and
here is the material,” she added, diving into her
bag, and producing some stuff which, though neat
and good, was plain and inexpensive to the last
degree.
50 THE SHABBY STRANGER.

“This is not enough for the skirt, ma’am,” said
the dressmaker.

“No,” returned the other, “I make my skirts
myself. I have very few dresses, and plenty of
time.”

Mrs. Lynn took a leisurely survey of her new
patroness, and came to the conclusion she was a
needy gentlewoman living on a pension: why
trouble herself to conform to the whims and
economies of such a person when she had the
prospect of a new and good customer ?

“You see these sort of things do us no credit
when they are made,” she remarked, “but quite
the contrary, and we make most profit out of the
skirts, too.”

“Well, if you do not like to do it, I will take it
away; no matter,” said the stranger, folding up the
obnoxious pattern.

“You see I’ve nearly ag much business as I can
ondertake,” said Mrs. Lynn, pompously, “and I
fear you wouldn't like the price I should set on it
to make it worth while doing. Doubtless you can
find some young person in the village who will
gladly do it at your own house for a mere trifle.”

“Oh, I shall easily get it done,” said the old lady,
fastening up her bag, “and so good morning, Mrs.
Lynn ;” and away she went,
THE SHABBY STRANGER. 51

All that day and the next the dressmaker wasted.
a great deal of time in adorning her own appearance,
and peeping from her window to watch for tne
coming customer; but no one came, and on the
evening of the second day Miss Curtis herself called,
to consult Mrs. Lynn about some silk for a sofa
cushion.

“T’ve seen no one from the great house yet,”
remarked the dressmaker, rather snappishly.

“T’m so sorry,” exclaimed the other, “but I
feared not, for when I was there this morning, I
found they were hiring a sempstress, as they'd
thought of doing at first. And yet they promised
so faithfully to give you a call! It’s very strange.”

“T should think it is,” said Mrs. Lynn. “ What
sort of family is it?”

“Qh, very nice indeed,” returned the other.
“The mistress is one of the sweetest ladies I ever
saw, and her daughters are very pleasant girls ; but
the mistress herself is such an invalid, that the
whole house is really under the management of her
husband’s mother, and she isa character! I hear
she has a younger son, who has been very wild, and
fallen into great trouble, and so she stints herself of
.every penny of her private income, that she may
help him, and give his little children a fitting

education. He’s been a terrible curse to her, and
ie D
52 THE SHABBY STRANGER,

she won't let his brother help him, because she says
no one has a right to have patience with him except
the mother that bore him.”

“Ts she a pale thin lady, and does she really
dress shabbily ?” asked Mrs. Lynn, breathlessly.

“ Ah, that she does,” rejoined Miss Curtis; “and
she makes the greater part of her own dress, and
always carries a great worked bag.”

““Then she was here yesterday morning!”
-exclaimed Mrs. Lynn, almost crying, “and I told
her it was not worth my while to do the work she
brought. Ok dear, dear!”

And the poor woman fidgeted about her little
workroom, condoling with herself, and remarking
that ladies should look like ladies, or not expect to
be treated as such.

“ But she does look like a lady,” said Miss Curtis.

“Yes, some poor governess or pensioned widow,”
returned Mrs. Lynn. “ Oh dear, dear, if I could but
have known!” ;

“ Ah!” thought Miss Curtis, as she walked home
to her humble lodging, “all would have been well
if Mrs. Lynn had simply been ‘ courteous’ because
it was right, without any respect of persons.”


JAMIE DEE,
THE SAYINGS AND DOINGS

oF

JAMIE DEE,






ay AMIE DEE was one of the “ cha.
YA? racters” of Scutterstown. He was a
cobbler, and his stall was situate
beneath the high, old-fashioned win-
dow of the village “general shop.”
Jamie was a little man, with a handful of fuzzy hair
on the top of his head, and a pair of goggles astride
his nose. He was a bachelor, and as he was an
industrious, sober man, we knew he could not be
poor, though he never droamed of choosing better

. lodgings than the little loft over the blacksmith’s

forge, or buying gayer clothing than the quaint

~ brown suit which had been his “Sunday best” from
‘times unknown.

-
56 THE SAYINGS AND DOINGS

Jamie’s one luxury was books. He knew every
cheap stall in the county, and no pedlar ever left
Scutterstown without paying a visib to him. In
fact, he was not only a well-read man, acquainted
with many of the standard English authors, but he
had wandered into sundry studious by-ways, in which
he had picked up stores of odd stories, wise adages,
and quaint wit. Yet he was no mere book-worm.
His studies did not lie on the top of his mind, like
seeds on stony ground ; they fell into it, and ripened
to quick perception and originality.

The doctor and the parson liked a talk with the
worthy cobbler, and when anything happened in

‘ Scutterstown, every one’s first thought was, “ What
will Jamie Dee say ?” i

I remember once standing in front of his stall with
a schoolfellow, who was priding himself overmuch
on the talents and goodness of his deceased grand-
father. In the fulness of his vanity he raised his
voice, but was brought to a sudden pause by the otd
cobbler exclaiming, in a warning tone, “ Take care,
young gentleman, take care; don’t grow like.a
potato, whose best part is in the ground !”

One of my uncles died rather suddenly, and my
aunt, who was quite a young woman, gave way to
her grief, and, shunning even her duties, shut herself
up with her sorrow. Month after month passed by,
OF JAMIE DEE. 57

and when any one had a glimpse of her, they saw
but a wasted face, shrouded in the gloomiest weeds.
‘inding their commonplace consolations unavailing,
her friends “respected her feelings,” as they said,
and kept out of her way. But as she was taking a
twilight walk in her garden, Jamie Dee went by,
and, instead of passing the gate as others did, he
paused and saluted her as usual before her bereave-
ment. She was not morose, even in her desire for
solitude, so she answered him kindly, and Jamie
remarked in his odd way, ‘“‘ Madam, I am sorry you
find it so hard to forgive God, but He’lt have
patience with you so long as you do your best.”
My aunt was deeply touched by a sympathy which
did not depreciate her sorrow, even while it pointed
out the sin of its excess, and before many days were
over, the good cobbler had the satisfaction of seeing
her resume her daily walks and ordinary pursuits. .
Jamie was never angry. Safe from the perils of
riches and the pangs of poverty, neither wanting
work nor overwhelmed by it, he was spared most
irritating vexations. But he spoke angrily once,
and those who heard him never forgot it. One very
snowy winter day he took a poor widow some coals
and wood. In the course of the evening, on her
- way to the baker’s, she passed his room above the
smithy, and noticed there was no firelight flickering
58 THE SAYINGS AND DOINGS

up the wall. While she was in the baker's, Jamie
entered, and in the warmth of her gratitude the old
woman began expressing fears lest he ‘“ had robbed
himself.” The cobbler turned sharply round, said
fiercely, “Well, dame, am I not free to do as I like?”
and stalked from the shop.

Jamie Dee was a Scotchman, and dearly loved his
native land. A young man once said to him, “James,
if we could see their footprints on the earth, we
should find all Scotchmen’s feet turned southwards.”
“J dare say, sir,” was the prompt rejoinder; “ye
see by the time they go home, they are mostly riding
in their carriages.”

Yet there was one question which no one could
answer, — What became of Jamie’s earnings?’ They
were certainly small, yet much wider than his frugal
life. Would so wise e man hoard much, when he
seemed to have neither kith nor kin? One doughty
villager ventured to mention the matter to him, and
after vainly trying many hints, candidly asked the
question, “ Jamie, what d’ye do with your money?”

“T invest it,” said James, gravely.

“Ts it a good investment, sir? you're a knowing
man, but we may all be deceived in these things.”

“ Oh, its all right,” returned James.

“Safe as the Bank of England, eh ?”

“A precious deal safer !” said the cobbler.
OF JAMIE DEE. 59

“'D’ye draw the interest, James 9”

“No, it’s accumulating,” James replied ; and a
reverent look passed over his face ashe said tlie words.

“Tsay, James, youre a knowing man, and from
what you say, this must be a good thing. I should
Like to put a little in the affair myself.”

“ But you can’t, my friend, it’s quite private.”

_ “Can't anybody but you?’

“T believe so—I hope so—but a great many who
might so invest don’t choose,” said James, rather
comically ; and at that moment a customer stopped
before the stall, and the neighbour walked off.

Not many weeks after this, Jamie’s stall was not
opened as usual. Presently we noticed that the
curtain of the loft window was not drawn. In the
course of the day the truth came out,—Jamie’s work

.was done. The night before, he had read his evening
chapter—the old Bible was opened at the fourteenth
ot St. John—and gone to rest. When he awoke, it

, was not in the rude and lonely chamber, but among
the “many mansions” which his Saviour had
prepared for him.

Before his funeral, a strange gentleman was seen
inquiring after him, and was directed to our kind-
hearted doctor, who had undertaken the management
of the old man’s little affairs. The stranger expressed
his surprise-at the story he was told, stating that,

ns,
GO Tile SAYINGS AND DOINGS OF JAMIE DEE.

though he had never seen him, James had been in
correspendence with himself and his father, who
were solicitors in Dunse, for more than forty years.
James’ father had been a tradesman in that town,
and, owing to sickness and sundry misfortunes, had
died while his son was still a child, leaving consider-
able debts. Quite forty years before, the stranger’s
father had received a letter from James, enclosing a
small remittance to be used towards the payment of
these, and ever since, at certain intervals, larger or
smaller sums had been received for the same purpose,
and very little now remained unpaid. The solicitors,
never having seen their client, had imagined from
his short, odd letters, that he was a man in good
circumstances, who, though he desired to do strict
justice to his father’s memory, desired also to do it
at his ease and leisure; and the stranger was
evidently touched as he stood beside the poor coffin
in the bare, rough chamber.

“One of the creditors is a wealthy man, and
would not have received the money if he had known
how matters stood,” said he.

“That is just why James took care he should not
know,” remarked the doctor.

“But he has gotten his interest now,” said the
old villager, who stood near them; “he has gotten
his interest now.”



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edges, well Illustrated. Price 3s. 6d.

~ “One of Kingston's very best stories; its brilliant binding and get-up

make it a very choice present book, and it is not a bit too good for the

story.”—Literary Churchman.

THE BOY WHO SAILED WITH BLAKE.
An Historic Story of Naval Life and Adventure. By W.
H. G. Kineston. Crown 8vo, cloth boards, gilt edges,
with Ten Engravings. Price 3s. 6d.
“The stirring times of Blake and his adventures ashore and afloat are
graphically reproduced. That boys will read it goes without saying.”—
Literary World,

A TRUE HERO. A Story of the Days of
William Penn. By W. H. G. Kincsron. Crown 8vo,
: cloth boards, gilt edges. Price 2s. 6d.
‘* Written with Mr. Kingston’s well-known power, and embellished with
some good engravings.”—Graphic.

CAUGHT IN THE TOILS. The Story of

a French Convent School. By EMMA LEsLiz. Crown

8vo, cloth boards, gilt edges, well Illustrated. Price 2s. 6d.

‘* We heartily commend this story to the attention of parents. ‘The evils

of convent schools are admirably illustrated in this story which we hope will
be widely read.”— The Rock

FRIENDLY CHATS WITH YOUNG
MEN AND MAIDENS. By Rev. H. O. MACKEY.
Foolscap 8vo. cloth boards. Price Is.

Dwells on the promise of youth, success in life, character, books,

religious instruction, &c. It is a small book of solid instruction.”"— Western
Times.

WOMEN WORTH EMULATING. A
Book for Girls. By CLARA Lucas BALFour. Crownâ„¢
8vo, cloth boards, gilt, well Illustrated. Price 2s.

€ An excellent little volume which should at once be added to all Sunday

School and village libraries.”—Court Circular.

MEN WORTH IMITATING; or Brief
Sketches of Noble Lives. By W. Hi. Groser, B.Sc.
Crown 8vo, cloth boards, gilt, well Illustrated. Price 2s.

“The author draws lessons of endurance, perseverance and moral excel-

lence, in a way that will recommend his work asa suitable present for the
young.” —Bookseller.

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION, 58, OLD BAILEY, LONDON, E.G.


SERIALS FOR THE YOUNG.
YOUNG ENGLAND:

FOR

BOYS AND GIRLS.

MONTHLY, FOURPENCE.

YOUNG ENGLAND provides a monthly supply of Inter-
esting, Instructive, and Entertaining Literature for Boys and
Girls. Its Tales and Articles are spiritedly. written, and well
Illustrated. It is full of Tales and Papers on every subject in
which Boys and Girls delight. The help of all interested in the
diffusion of pure literature is solicited in the circulation of this
work.

SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS. -

THE

CHILD'S OWN MAGAZINE:

A Bundle of Pictures and Stories for the Little Ones.
PUBLISHED MONTHLY.

PRICE ONE-HALFPENNY.

THE CHILD'S OWN MAGAZINE is ¢he Paper for the
Little Ones ; It is brimful of the Pictures and Stories in which
Children dehght. No volume could be a more acceptable gift
for the Nursery. Fathers and Mothers, Brothers and Sisters, do
not forget the Little Ones. You have your own Magazines ;
remember the Younger Ones, and give them a Monthly treat
that costs so little.

Yearly Volume, paper boards, 1s.; cloth gilt, 2s.
SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION, 36, OLD BAILBY, LONDON, E.C. ~
SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION

BOOK SALOONS

CONTAIN THE

LARGEST STOCK of JUNIOR LITERATURE in
the WORLD, with UNUSUAL FACILITIES for
selection.

This includes EVERY VARIETY in SUBJECT
MATTER, produced in the best style that MODERN
IMPROVEMENTS ix PRINTING and BINDING
afford. Books of TRAVEL. Books of ADVENTURE.
Books of HEALTHY FICTION. Books of BIOGRAPHY.
Books of PICTURES. Books for PRIZES, PRESENTS,
GIFTS, or REWARDS, and Books for STUDY as well as
RECREATION.

POCKET BIBLES, from 6d. to £2 25,5 TEACHERS’
BIBLES, from 3s. to 60s. PRESENTATION,
FAMILY, and PULPIT BIBLES, from 12s. 6d. to £6 6s.
COMMENTARIES, CONCORDANCES, and other
WORKS ILLUSTRATIVE of SCRIPTURE. Books
for TEACHERS, for the Study, and the Class. Books for
SCHOOLS, Admission Books, Roll Books, Records, Journals,
gc., §&c. ILLUMINATIONS for School Adornment. MAPS
for School Walls. MUSIC for School Psalmody, and
SPECIALLY BOUND BOOKS for SCHOOL
LIBRARIES. AMERICAN ORGANS for Cash, or on the
Three Years’ System.

COMPLETE CATALOGUES ON APPLICATION,

56, OLD BAILEY, LONDON, E.C.