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Heroes of history

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Title:
Heroes of history in words of one syllable
Series Title:
Burt's one syllable histories
Creator:
Sadlier, Agnes
Burt, A. L ( Albert Levi ), 1843-1913 ( Publisher )
Méaulle, F ( Fortuné ), b. 1844 ( Engraver )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
A.L. Burt
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Language:
English
Physical Description:
viii, 234, [1] p. : ill., ports ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Queens -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Battles -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Romans -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Christians -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
World history -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Huns -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Arabs -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Muslims -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Biographies -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Biographies ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by Meaulle and Dalziel.
General Note:
Includes index.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Agnes Sadlier ; with illustrations.

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University of Florida
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CAP-TURE OF FRAN-CIS I, OF FRANCE BY CHARLES Y; BPAIN,



HEROES OF HISTORY

IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE



By AGNES SADLIER a

AUTHOR OF ‘‘ A HISTORY OF IRELAND IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE”

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS



NEW YORK ;
A. L. BURT COMPANY, PUBLISHERS ae



Burt’s One Syllable Histories

Bound in handsome cloth binding. Covers in

Colors. Each Volume Profesely Illustrated.

HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. By Mrs.
HELEN W. PIERSON.

HISTORY OF ENGLAND. By Mrs. HELEN W. Pier-
SON.

HISTORY OF FRANCE. By Mrs. HELEN W. PIERSON.
HISTORY OF GERMANY. By Mrs. HELEN W. PIER-
HISTORY OF RUSSIA. By HELEN AINSLIE SMITH.
HISTORY OF IRELAND. By AGNEs SADLIER.
HISTORY OF JAPAN. By HELEN AINSLIE SMITH.
HISTORY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT. By Jose-

PHINE POLLARD.
HISTORY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT. By Josz-

PHINE POLLARD.
HEROES OF HISTORY. By AGNES SADLIER.
BATTLES OF AMERICA. By JosEPHINE POLLARD.
LIVES OF THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED
STATES. By Mrs. HELEN W. PIERSON.

A. L. BURT COMPANY, New York.



Copyright, 1891,
By JOSEPH L. BLAMIRE.



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

HEROES OF THE BIBLE, . . 5 5 < : ° e . ° ‘
CHAPTER II.

HEROES OF PERSIA AND OF GREECE, A 5 f 5 s . . *

CHAPTER III.

HEROES OF Rome, . eee 5 fs : 3 . . . °
CHAPTER IV.

HEROES OF THE MIDDLE AGES. From A.D. 70oo TO A.D. 1500, . 4 e
CHAPTER V.

HEROES OF THE CRUSADES, . 5 a - 5 - Fs é ° 5
CHAPTER VI.

HEROES OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. From A.D. 1500 To A.D. 1600, .

CHAPTER VII.

HEROES OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. From A.D. 1600 To A.D. 1700, -

CHAPTER VIIL.

HEROES OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. From A.D. 1700 TO A.D. 1800, .

CHAPTER IX.
HEROES OF THE NINETEENTH CentURY. From A.D. 1800 TO THE PRESENT TIME,

PAGE

x3)

29

51

94

. 140

181

196

2

-_
&











LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE

Cyrus, King of Persia, . . . . 13
A Persian Palace, . ‘ eee - 15

A Rock Grave in Persia, F ‘ Seay
Miltiades, . g 3 fs . . elO
Themistocles, . 7 sti ie : 21
Types and Costumes of Early Grea
Life. : 6 3 ‘ $2123)

Pericles, . 7 . . ° : sie
Alexander the Great, “ i 5 27

Roman Eagle, . . 4 : : 2420
Horatius Cocles, : . S : SRST
Coriolanus, i ‘ : . : Lo 32
The Gauls in Rome, . : : - 33
The Roman Forum, . . fj 35
Interior of the Pantheon, : ; PhS 7,
Hannibal, . 5 : ‘ : - 39
The Appian Way, near Rome, F 32 AT
Julius Cesar, . : : s : 45)
Tomb of Augustus Czesar, . . - 46

Augustus Cesar, ‘ : é .
Constantine the Great, . 3 : . 48
Arch of Constantine in Rome, . - 49
The Huns, : . ° . é - 53
Arabs and Tartars, . : A . se b7
Charlemagne, . . . . - 58
Charlemagne at the School of the Palace, 59
Charlemagne Before Narbonne, . - 60
Death of Roland, . é ; : - 63

A Knight Made by the Dead Hand of

PAGE

Roland, 65
A Viking (Sédndina nen Pigs), - 69
Landing of the Danes in England, . a Hl
Raid of the Northmen, . 5 : 3573
Alfred the Great, Z ‘ 2 - 74
Canute, ‘ 3 E 2 3 32 70
Canute and the Sea, : : 3 7;
Ancient Round Tower, . . 4 279)
Brian Boru on the Plains of Clontarf, . 81
The Four Courts, Dublin, 5 , . 83
Landing of William the Conqueror, 87
Harold, the Last of the Saxon Kings, gI
The Burial of William, A 93
In the Time of the Crusades, . 3 94
Jerusalem, Showing the Mosque of Omar, 103
At the Time of the Crusades, . - 105
Triumphal Entry of Richard I. and

Philip Augustus into Acre, . é . III
Richard’s Farewell to the Holy Land, . 113
Edward L., . . 11g
Robert Bruce, . 3 e : ‘ . 125
Edward III,, : Fs 2 fs A - 126
Death of Edward III., . 4 : 27,
Henry the Fifth, : . i : - 135
“Welcome, Welcome, Harry of France

and: Englands cease en on eee E37,
Columbus, ; é é fs e - 141
Queen Isabella, ; 5 . 41



Vill

List of Llustrations.

PAGE PAGE
Hernando Cortes, . . 16145] “Death.of Turenne, ace 555 ee 192
Pizarro, . CNS A é - 151 | The Duke of Marlborough, . . . 195
Charles V., és sos ‘ . 156 | Peter the Great, 2 Beal te , - 199
Francis I., See eRe +. 159 | Charles XII. Seine the Conditions of
William the Silent). sone rO5 bo BOGE ts Sy ise) “ae aor
The Dykes in Holland, erg Frederick the Gar oN et hae ee 6203
Henry IV., : ; .17I General Wolfe, . . . . e + 205
Gustavus Vasa,. . . . 175 | Montcalm, Fish eee. oe pn ecereas
Ivan the Terrible, 179 George Washington, . . . - 207
The Count de Tilly Gloating Ore the Napoleon, Emperor, PRK ST eee
Massacre, ; f . . 183 | Battle of Trafalgar, . . . . . 211
Gustavus and His Queen Entering Mu- Death of Nelson at Trafalgar, ; i212
nich, ‘ 3 : . 184 | Wellington, i 2 - eo217,
Death of Gustavus Nicioiis: - 185 | Oliver Hazard Perry, . . ° - 219
Louis XIV., - 185 | Robert E. Lee, . 7 oF, . e225
Louis XIV. and His Coie . 188 | William T. Sherman, e a © . 224
The Great Condé, . 189 | Philip Henry Sheridan, . eis . 224
William III. Receiving the Aicopa - 190 | General Grant, . ° . . . » 225
William III. of Orange and Queen Mary, 191 | William L., . ooo ae eet at fone ed



PREFATORY.



When it is seen that a book of the size of “ Heroes
of History” treats of the most famous of those who
have gained their laurels “on the tented field,” from
Joshua down to General Gordon, it will readily be
recognized that the sketch of each one must neces-
sarily be slight. It is nevertheless hoped that the book
may be of real service in establishing correctly in the
minds of its youthful readers the main points of his-
tory—the causes which led these men to wage war
and where, when, with whom and against whom they
fought—and thus impart that general knowledge
which is sure to quicken the taste for wider reading

on the same subjects.
AGNES SADLIER.

New York, August, 1891.





\





Heroes ot History.

CHAPTER - I.
HE-ROES OF THE BI-BLE*

A he-ro, as no doubt you know, is one who has
done great deeds for his land or for our race. Peace
has her he-roes as well as war; men who in times
which tried men’s souls stood firm in the cause of right,
or by their great thoughts brought calm out of storm.
It is not of these though that this book will tell, but
of those who won their fame on the fields of war.

Josh-u-a. The first he-ro of whom we know much
more than his name was Josh-u-a. He was a He-
brew, but born in E-gypt, while his race dwelt there
as slaves. When Mo-ses brought them out of that
tand, and they were in the des-ert, Josh-u-a’s wise,
good words’ made him dear to Mo-ses, so that when —
the time came for that great man to die, he put his
hands on Josh-u-a, and made him chief in his place.

* Full particulars of the lives and deeds of the Bible Heroes will be found in Rout-
LEDGE’S ONE-SYLLABLE HisToRY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT.



8 Fleroes of [History.

Then Josh-u-a led the He-brews, as God told him,
to the Land of Prom-ise. It was to be theirs, but
they had to fight for it, and wrest it from the strong
bad na-tions that held it. They went past the stream
of the Jor-dan and came to the strong town of Jer-1-
cho. Then their souls grew weak, and they said it
was too strong to take. But Josh-u-a, whose trust in
the Lord naught could shake, made them all march
round the walls once a day for six days, and make no
sound as they went. Then, on the next day, all the
priests went with the men, and bore the Ark. ‘They
went round six times and. made no sound. ‘Then they
went round once more, but this time they gave a great,
long shout, while the trump-ets were blown. And at
once the walls fell down, and Josh-u-a took the town.
He had to fight a great deal though ere he won the
Land of Prom-ise. One time he had to meet five
kings with a great force. It was late in the day ere the
tide of strife was seen to turn for the He-brews, and
Josh-u-a was in fear lest the foe should get more men
ere the next day. So he plead with God to make the
day last till his men had beat the foe so that they would
not dare to face them more. And God heard him; »
the day did not fade to night till few of the foe were
left. So he kept on, a true he-ro, in his course, till at
last the rich, fair Land of Prom-ise was won, and dealt
out mid the tribes of Is-ra-el. And Josh-u-a kept the



Gideon. 9

rule till his death, and gave proof that he was as great _
in the arts of peace as in the arts of war. :
Gid-e-on. For a long time the He-brews dwelt
in the place which he had won, till they set up false
gods in the place of the true God, who then let new

foes spring up and smite them with a strong hand. In

their fear they plead with God to save them, so at last
He sent an an-gel to a poor youth whose name was
Gid-e-on, to tell him to come forth and save Is-ra-el.
Gid-e-on, who was of mean birth, was loath to take

the words for truth, and sought as a sign from God

that the fleece of wool which he should spread on the
eround might be wet with dew while all the ground
was dry. ‘And it was so. Then he sought one more
sign; that the fleece might keep dry while all the ground

was wet. And God gave him this sign too. So he

went to the camp. ‘Then God told him to let all the
men go home who had a wish to do so; and a great
throng went. ‘Then God told him to bring his band to
drink at a stream, and to send home all those who bent
down their mouths to the stream to drink, but to keep
those who brought up the wa-ter to their mouths in

_ their hands. This test left him but 300 men, for most





knelt down to drink at their ease.. Then Gid-e-on
made three small bands of these, and gave to each
man a trump-et and a pitch-er with a light in it. At
mid-night he led them to the camp of the foe, and all



10 fleroes of History.

blew a great blast oftheir trump-ets, and made a wild
clang with their pitch-ers, while they cried out with a
loud voice, “The sword of the Lord and of Gid-e-on!”’
When the foe heard the shout and the noise, and saw
the bright light, and could not tell whence it came,
they were struck with fear and fled. But all the tribes
of Is-ra-el went out and cut them off, and put most of
them to death. And then Is-ra-el had peace for a long
time, and Gid-e-on kept the rule till his death.
Sam-son. Then a fierce foe, the Phil-is-tines,
smote the Is-ra-el-ites, and beat them so that they had
lost all hope, when God. made a strong man of the
name of Sam-son fight them and save Is-ra-el. Sam-
son was not so good as Josh-u-a, or Gid-e-on. He
fell in love with a fair Phil-is-tine wo-man whose name
was De-li-lah, and she got him to tell her that the cause
of his great strength was in his long hair, which God
had said should not be cut. But while he slept, De-
li-lah cut it, and the Phil-is-tines took him with ease.
They put his eyes out, and kept him in jail, but on a
great feast-day they brought him out that all might
mock at him. But the blind Sam-son, whose hair had
grown and with it his strength, told the boy who led
him to place him by the two strong posts that held up
the hall. The boy did so, and Sam-son broke down
the posts, and slew all who were in the hall, and thus

died with his foes.



David. II

Da-vid. This was the next great he-ro of the He-
brews. He was but a poor boy who kept his sheep
on the hill-sides, till Sam-u-el was sent by God to make
him king in-stead of the bad king Saul. As he was

~~ not to reign till Saul died though, he kept on at his old

life. Is-ra-el was once more at war with the Phil-is-
tines, at this time, and Da-vid was sent to the camp
with food for his broth-ers. And while there he saw
a huge man come down from the hill on which stood
the foe’s camp, and mock the Is-ra-el-ites, and heard
that all stood in too much fear of him to go down in
the vale and fight him. But Da-vid felt no fear, and
got leave to fight him. So he took his staff, and chose
five smooth stones from the brook, and put them in his
scrip. Then he ‘took a sling in his hand, and went
down to where huge Go-li-ath stood in his strong,
bright coat of mail. He was in a great rage when he
saw how small a thing the youth brought to fight him
with; but Da-vid paid no heed to his treats, but as
he ran to meet him, took a stone from his scrip and
put it in his sling, and with it dealt Go-li-ath so strong
a blow in the face, that he fell to the ground. Then
Da-vid took his sword and cut off his head. Great -
was the joy of the Is-ra-el-ites when Da-vid came back
with Go-li-ath’s head! But the foe, full of fear, ran
off and left their camp to them. Da-vid’s fame grew



12 fleroes of fTistory.

so great that the king, Saul, could not bear him, and
tried to kill him, so that Da-vid had to flee and hide |
in caves and holes till Saul died. ‘Then he was made
king, and put down all Is-ra-el’s foes, and made her a
strong rich na-tion.

Ju-das Mac-ca-be-us. It was long ere the He-
brews saw his like—not till near the time of Christ,
when they were great no more, but bent neath the
rule of strange kings. One of the worst of these was
An-ti-o-chus, who did his best to make them bow
down to the false gods whom he held in place of the
One and True God. So a brave priest, Mat-a-thi-
as, told all who had zeal for the true faith to flee with
him to the great hills. A great throng did so, and he
soon had a strong force. At his death, his son Ju-das,
who was so brave and strong that he got the name of
Mac-ca-be-us, or the Ham-mer, was made head in his
place, and fought so well that he got back a good part
of theland. At length An-ti-o-chus sent his best men
of war, at the head of a great force, to put them down.
The strife was fierce, but Ju-das won the field, and so
kept on till at last he was slain in a great fight, when
he had but few men to help him. But his life had
been so grand in its aim, that, though short, it was not
in vain; for his broth-ers, whom he had made to feel
as he did, fought on till they made their land for quite
a time great and free.



ee

C. YTUS. 13

a

_ CHAPTER IL
_ HE-ROES GF PER-SIL-A AND OF GREECE.

Cy-rus. If you
were asked to tell of
Per-si-a, no doubt you
would say that it is a
land in the south-east
of A-si-a, whose head
man bears the name of
the Shah, and that
there is not much else
to tell of it. And this
would be true of it
now. But once it was
not so; ere Christ
came on earth, Per-
Si-a was a great land,
\ | and had her he-roes
CY-RUS, KING OF PER-SI-A. like the rest of the Ta
| : tions. The first of

these was Cy-rus. A strange tale is told of his youth.
At the time of his birth, Per-si-a was neath the rule
of the Medes. The king’s name was As-ty-a-ges,
and Cy-rus was his grand-son, In a dream he saw





14 fleroes of Llistory.

that Cy-rus would one day take his throne from him,
so he told Har-pa-gus, one of the chief men of his
court, to put him to death. So Har-pa-gus gave the
child to a herds-man of the king, and told him to put
it on a bleak hill till it died. The man took it to his
own home, where he found that his own child had just
died. And when his wife saw the fair, strong babe,
she would not let him take it from her. So the man
put out his own dead child on the hill, and kept the
young prince. ‘Time went on; he grew to bea strong
boy, and was so bright that all the rest of the boys let
him lead in the games. One day they had a sham
fight, and when one of the boys did not do as Cy-rus
told him, he beat him well with a stick. ‘The boy ran
home and told his father, who was a man of high rank,
and he told the king, who had the boy brought to him.
At sight of him, the king knew from his age, and his
proud mien, that he must be his grand-son. So he
sent for Har-pa-gus and the herds-man, and got the
truth from both. As he thought that his dream had
been borne out by the fact that the boys had made Cy-
rus king at play, he let him live, but he got the son
of Har-pa-gus, and had him cut up, and the parts put
on a dish on the board, when he had Har-pa-gus to
sup with him. When he grew up, Cy-rus, whose fa-
ther was a Per-si-an, and whose heart was thus full of
love for that race, got them to rise and throw off the



Cyrus. . 15

yoke of the Medes, and make him king in his grand-
fa-ther’s place. He made Per-si-a great, for he brought
all the lands in A-si-a neath -her sway. There was a
king in Lyd-i-a, a land far to the north-west, whose
name was Croe-sus, and who was so rich that to “be





A PER-SIAN PAL-ACE.

as rich as Croe-sus” got to bea prov-erb. He sought
to check Cy-rus in his course, and came to fight him
with a great host. But Cy-rus beat him, and kept him
for the rest of his life. The next feat of this great king
was to take Bab-y-lon. This great town was so large
as to take in 12 square miles on each side of the Eu-



16 Heroes of ffistory.

hra-tes, a great, broad, swift stream—it was girt
round by thick, high walls, with great gates of bronze,
and was rich and grand with the fine houses of its
kings, and its great men, and its fair gar-dens, built
row on row, high in the ar. To look at it, one would
have thought no one could take it; but Cy-rus, when
he had laid siege to it for two years, found a way to
do it, and made a plan which has made him rank mid
the great men in war of all time. There was a lake
near by, to which a ca-nal led from the Eu-phra-tes.
- Both of these were dry, for the stream was kept from
them by a great brick dam. But one long, dark night,.
when a great feast was held in the town, he set his men
to workto tear down this dam. Thus the great stream
was made to turn its course, and leave in the midst of
the town through which it ran a dry bed. All the
streets that came to an end at the stream had strong
gates to keep out all the foe who might have tried to
get in the town by boat; but when the men of Cy-rus
came down the dry bed of the stream, they found one
of them at which they could get in, and thus get to the
heart of the town. Mean-while, in the great hall of
his pal-ace, lit by soft lights and full of rich scents, the
king sat ata great feast with his chief men round him.
All at once the cry that the foe was on them rang out,
but too late. From hall to hall, from feast to feast,
street to street, the men of Cy-rus had sped, and slew



Cyrus. 17.

each and all, till at last they burst in-to where the king
was and slew him on the steps of his throne (s.c. 538).
Cy-rus was now so great that he took the name of the
“king of the world.” This great man met his death



A ROCK GRAVE IN PER-SI-A,

where he spent most of ‘his life, on the field of war.
He went to put down a fierce tribe to the north, but
was slain, it is said, by a wo-man, who flung his head
in a bowl of blood, that he might drink his fill. °His

son, Cam-by-ses, who now came to the throne, is



18 Heroes of History.

thought to have been mad, yet he brought more lands
neath the sway of Per-si-a. When he died, he left no
son, but a man whose name was Smerd-is said he was
the son of Cy-rus, and got the throne. Not a few
thought that he was a man of low birth who had had
his ears cut off for a crime. He kept them wrapt up
in the day, but they got his wife to feel at night, and
she found that he had none; so he was put to death.
Da-ri-us. Of those who now thought they had a
right to the throne was Da-ri-us, one of the late king’s
kin. He said to the rest who laid claim, that they
should all ride forth in the morn ere the dawn broke,
and that he whose horse should be the first to neigh
when the sun rose, should be king. This was done,
and the horse of Da-ri-us gave a loud neigh as the sun
rose, and the rest got down and made a bow to him as
their king. Da-ri-us was born to rulemen. He made
fine roads through the land, built great towns, and kept
a strict, but not harsh rule. But he had a great wish
to add still more lands to his vast realm, and most of
all, to take Greece, for some of the men who dwelt
there had lent help to some foes of Da-ri-us in A-si-a.
Now Greece, small as it looks on the map, was a great
land ere Christ came on earth. The Greeks had
thought out their own civ-il-i-za-tion, and taught it to
the rest of the world. They had great men who gave
to the world the best thoughts that it knows; while



Miltiades. 19

more gave it tne best things in art. Greece was made
up of a lot of small states, bound, not as our states
are, by a bond which makes all stand up for each, and
each for all, but by a sort of loose league which left
each free to help the rest or
not, as she chose. “The two
chief states were Ath-ens and
Spar-ta, but one of these was
sure to choose black if one
chose white, so they could
not be said to be friends. It
was Ath-ens which had
made Da-ri-us swear to
break her might, and, true to
his word, a vast fleet was
soon seen on the sea, led by
his chief men of war. Now
Ath-ens was but a small
place, not half the size of
Rhode Isl-and—that is, not
as big as a large farm in the
~West—but her men had
great pluck. So they clad
them-selves in brass and steel, and set off to meet the
foe.
Mil-ti-a-des. At length they came to the Plain
of Mar-a-thon, 22 miles out from Ath-ens. Huge



MIL-TI-A-DES,



20 Fleroes of History.

mounts and bare hills guard it on all sides, save one
where the bright blue sea breaks on the beach. The
great fleet of the foe rode in sight. It was the rule in
Ath-ens for a fresh man to lead each day, and by
good luck, on this day it was Mil-ti-a-des, He made
a long line of the men, and ere the foe had all got on
shore, with a great burst of song, they came down on
them with a run, and bore a great mass of them to the
ground with their spears. A long, fierce fight then
took place, but when at length the foe strove to get
back to their boats, the Greeks set scores of them on
fire. But at last they got off, and made straight for
Ath-ens. But Mil-ti-a-des led his men back to the
town in time to keep the foe from it. So they set
sail for A-si-a (490 3c). Mil-ti-a-des did not live
long; he died of a wound he got in war; but his name
will live till the end of time. Da-ri-us tried no more
to bring Greece neath his sway, but gave his time
to the arts of peace till his death. But his son Xer-
xes (Zerks-sez) set out to take it at the head of a great
host.

Le-on-i-das, the Spar-tan, and The-mis-to-cles,
the A-the-ni-an. Not a few of the states said they
would not band with the rest to meet him; that he
was too strong. But Ath-ens and Spar-ta stood firm,
and a few small ones cast in their lot with them.
Now Spar-ta was a state where the first and last end



Themestocles. 21

was war; they paid no heed to trade, but taught their
boys in all ways to bear pain and give no sign that
they were hurt. Their fare was but black beans and
broth. So you may judge
that though her men were
few, they were worth a
great deal in time of war.
Led by Le-on-i-das, then
king, they now took the
held. Up to this time,
Ath-ens had fought but
land fights; but The-mis-
to-cles, a great and shrewd
man, had got her to build
a fleet. So the A-the-ni-
ans were to fight the foe
at sea, and the Spar-tans
on land, but for peace
sake, they let the men of
Spar-ta lead. In due time
Xer-xes came, set a grand
land force on the shores of
Greece and made straight ©
for Ath-ens. But on the
way he had to lead them through a small pass twixt
the cliffs and the sea, which bore the name of Ther-
mop-y-lz, or Hot-Gates, from the fact that hot

Z (ak
FF tA
me Oe

i
Vf

WON
\\
NS

\ “SS

v'\ S

i

Ko Uy)

y
Nyy’
7

= 1,

gy,
)),

Py

Wy)

ss





22 Fleroes of History.

springs were near by. Here Le-on-i-das, the Spar-
tan, took his stand with but a small force. In vain
the foe tried to break through; for two days he kept
them back, but then a false Greek led them by a
small lone path round the mount, and brought them
on the brave Spar-tan’s rear. Some fled at sight of
the foe, but three hun-dred stayed with Le-on-i-das
and fought till they were slain (nc. 480).

Xer-xes now swept on to Ath-ens. All fled as he
drew near to the fleet, andfrom it saw their homes burn.
These ships — now the sole hope of Greece — lay in
a small bay made by the coast of Ath-ens and two
isles, one of which, Sal-a-mis, gave its name to the
great sea-fight which now took place. When the
vast fleet of Xer-xes bore down on the Greek fleet,
some were in sore fear and sought to get off, but The-
mis-to-cles sent word of this plan to Xer-xes, and ‘he
put a guard at the mouth of the bay to keep his prey
safe till the morn. When the Greeks found that they
were in a trap they knew they must do or die, so
in the morn a Greek ship made a dash at one of the
foe’s. The rest went to her help, and soon the bright
_ bay was a scene of fierce strife and blood, while from
his gold throne, on the base of a hill on the shore,
Xer-xes kept the scene in view. But the size and
bulk of the foe’s ships made them no match for the
small, light boats of the Greeks in so small a plac’:































































































































































































































































































































































TUMES OF EAR-LY GRE-CIAN LIFE,

TYPES AND COS



24 Heroes of Flistory. —

and at last they had to flee, and thus, thanks to The-
mis-to-cles, the Greeks won the great sea-fight of Sal-
a-mis (Bc. 480). 7

On this blow Xer-xes set off for home, but left a
large force, led by one of his best men, Mar-do-ni-us,
to keep up, tte war.

Pau-sa-ni-as, the Spar-tan, and A-ris-ti-des,
the A-the-ni-an. The two foes met once more on
the plain of Pla-te-a. The Spar-tans were led by
Pau-sa-ni-as, one of the kin of the great Le-on-1-das,
and the A-the-ni-ans by A-ris-ti-des, the Just. | Fierce
and long was the fray, but at last Mar-do-ni-us fell,
and then the Per-si-ans fled and left all their tents, full
of rich things, to the Greeks.

Greece was now safe from the Per-si-ans, but Ath- -
ens was a heap of burnt houses, so The-mis-to-cles
set to work to build it up. He was a man full of
craft and guile, but put these to the use of his land
and strove hard to make her great and strong. Pau-
sa-ni-as, of Spar-ta, who was sent to fight the Per-si-
ans, got to like their soft ways of life, and to loath
the hard life of Spar-ta, and at last told Xer-xes he
would help him to take Greece. His plot was found
out; he was brought back to Spar-ta and tried, but
set free for want of proof. But he was soon at
his old tricks, and this time there was so much proof
that he fled to a tem-ple to be safe, and there died for



_ Pelopidas and Epaminondas. j 25

want of food. I grieve to say that it was soon found
at Ath-ens that the great The-mis-to-cles had had

Z part in the schemes of Pau-sa-ni-
as, and he fled to Per-sia, where
he died.

The course of P4ga-ni-as, and
still more that of The-mis-to-cles,
is a sad proof of how great a mind
and how vile a soul a man can
have !

Ath-ens now grew great neath
the rule of a great and wise man
of the name of Per-i-cles, while in
war her men were led by Cimon.
But when Per-i-cles died, Al-ci-bi-
a-des came to the front and got the
men of Ath-ens to do things which
made the state weak. Spar-ta rose
and got to be the chief state of
Greece, and kept a harsh rule o’er
all the rest. By a trick she got her
men in a strong fortress of Thebes
and kept that town by force for
three years. |

Pe-lop-i-das and .E-pam-i-non-das of
Thebes. These were two brave youths of Thebes,
who made up their minds to free their town, So



PER-I-CLES,



20 aa Fleroes of History.

Pe-lop-i-das and a band of youths dressed up like
girls, and put wreaths of. pine and fir on their heads,
and went round from. houseto house where the Spar-
tans dwelt and put them to death. Then they took
a it-ress by storm, and put the rest of the Spar-
Jout, and“Ipeed Thebes. But Spar-ta would not
“hebes go, and went“to war. So E-pam-i-non-
das led the men of ‘Fhebes to meet them. A great





fight took place at Leuc-tra, where E-pam-i-non-das

vave proof how finé-a mind he had for war. This
fieht broke the might of Spar-ta, and Thebes got to
he the thief town of Greece for a time. Through all

their lives Pe-lop-i-das and E-pam-i-non-das strove to

o make Thebes great, and both these dear friends died

ons ‘the field of war.

Phil-ip of Mac-e-don. Wher Thebes was
thus left with no head, there dwelt in Mac-e-don,
a land to the north of Greece, a king of the name of
Phil-ip. The folks of Mac-e- Jon were not keen like
the Greeks, but were rough and plain, and knew
naught of books or art.” But Phil-ip had spent three
years of his youth at Thebes and learned how to
make war from E-pam-i-non-das. | So he set to work
now to gain all Greece, and bit by bit he built up his
strength. He gave aid ta Ath-ens in her wars, but
all the while drew the chains round her. In vain De-
mos-the-nes made great speech on speech to rouse



Alexander the Great. Poa oe 24

them to a sense of what was to come; Phil-ip kept
on, and soon had all Greece at his feet. But at the



AL-EX-AN-DER THE GREAT,

height of his fame he was slain at a great feast held
when his daugh-ter was wed,



28 i fTeroes of History.

Al-ex-an-der the Great. Phil-ip’s crown was
set on the head of his son Al-ex-an-der, but 20 years
‘of age. This king stands at the head of the war
he-roes of the world. His first feat was to start to
take Per-si-a. He set sail for A-si-a, and met the Per-
si-ans at the stream of the Gran-i-cus, and beat them
(334 nc). Then he kept on and met the foe led by
their king, Da-ri-us, at a place named Is-sus, and
beat them so that the king took to flight (333 Bc).
‘ On swept Al-ex-an-der in his wake, while each great
town threw wide its gates to him, and at last came up
with the king when he was near death from a wound
made by one of his own men. A-lex-an-der was now
head of the great realm of Per-si-a, but his wish was
to rule the world. So he set his face to the south,
to the great, strange land of In-di-a. Over great
mounts, past great streams, by huge hosts of men
who sought to stay his course, he swept, and was
close to its bounds when his men, worn out with all
they had done, said they would not go one step more.
So he had to turn back, and went to Bab-y-lon to
rest for a time. But as his great joy was to spend
the whole night with his chief men, and drink a great
deal of wine as they spoke of the fields they had
won, it is not strange that, with his great toils, his
strength gave out. He grew weak and ill, and died
at the age of 32 years, and left his vast realm with no
head,



Floratius Cocles. 29

CHAPTER IIL.
HE-ROES OF ROME.
While these things

took place in Greece
and A-si-a, anew na-
tion, the Ro- mans,
grew great in It-a-ly.
At first they were
neath the rule ot
kings, but at last they
got such a bad king
that they drove him
out, and made up
their minds to trust
the rule to two men
Wa }whom they would call
~con-suls, and who

i
a should hold it for one
RO-MAN EA-GLE,
year.

Ho-ra-ti-us Co-cles. Tar-quin, the king, would
not yield to his fate, but tried hard to get back to
his throne. At last he got the aid of Lars Por-se-na,
a great king, who came down on Rome with a great
force. Now there was but one bridge by which he







30 Fleroes of History.

=. could cross the
= fee stream of the Ti-
——=———-- ber to Rome, and
so a brave man,
Tlotrti-us Go-
bets cles, said he
ould 20 to ‘ne fas end of the bridge
EE from Rone and hold it: while the
= rest cut it down. And there he stood
with his great axe, and kept the foe
back till he heard the great crash, and
saw the bridge float down the Ti-ber;
then, all -clad- in stiff, strong mail as
he was, he sprang in the stream ind
3 swam back to Rome. The state had
a stat-ue of him set up, and gave
him as much land as he could plow
, ina day.
Cor-i-o-la-nus. The true name of
is man was Mar-cus, and, while still a mere boy, he
got the crown of oak for sav-ing the life of a man in
a great fight, and was known for the rest of his life
as Cor-i-o-la-nus. But though he fought war on
war for Rome, and made her foes shake at the sound
of his name, he had the fault of pride. He was of
high birth, and his mien to those of low birth was
harsh and proud. So they grew to hate him, and





Cortolanus. 31



HO-RA-TI-US CO-CLES.

when he sought to be con-sul they would not let
him have the post. So, ina rage, he went off, but



32 fleroes of fTistory.

was soon back at the gates of Rome at the head
of her worst foe—the Vol-sci-ans. In their fear,
the Ro-mans sent forth his moth-er and his wife
with his chil-dren to beg him to spare them. He
had been deaf to all else, but when they plead he
gave way, and, with
a burst of tears, cried
out, ‘“Moth-er, thou
hast saved Rome,
but lost thy son.”
He then led the foe
to their home, where,
it is said, they put
him to death. (488
B.C. )
Cin-cin-na-tus.

The next he-ro of
Rome was Lu-ci-us
Quin-ti-us, who got
the name of Cin-cin-
na-tus from the fact
that he wore his hair
in long curls. Ata time when a strong foe of Rome,
‘the At-qui-ans, had got round the troops of Rome,
and held them fast, the chief men of Rome sent for
him to come and keep the rule till he had made
Rome safe. He was found at work at the plow on



COR-I-0-LA-NUS,



Cincinnatus. 33

his smca!l farm, but he set off for Rome at once, as
soon as he heard the bad news. Then he made all



THE GAULS IN ROME.

the men give up all else, and go with him to seek-
the foe. He set off at their head, and went so fast



34_ fleroes of [Tistory.

that ere the foe knew where they were, they were
shut in by his troops. They had to yield, and as
a sign that they did so, Cin-cin-na-tus set up two
spears in the ground, and on the top laid one to
meet both. ‘Then he made the foe pass neath this
yoke. In the short space of 24 hours this was all
done! For this great act, Cin-cin-na-tus got a tri-
umph; that is, he rode through the gates of Rome
and all through its streets in a grand char-i-ot, with
a wreath of lau-rel on his head, while all the chiefs:
of the foe were led first in chains, and all their flags
and the rich spoils which were won from them were
borne by the troops, so that all might see them.
When this grand scene was past, Cin-cin-na-tus went
to his home to taste once more the sweets of the peace
he had won. (458 Bc)

Ca-mil-lus. This is one of the best men we meet
with in the tale of Rome. He won war on war for
her, and brought rich, strong towns neath her sway.
He was great of soul, too, for even when he laid siege
to a town, a man who kept a school there sought to
please him by a base act, and brought all the boys to
his camp. But Ca-mil-lus had his hands tied, and
. told the boys to flog him home, and so great was the
Joy of the foe to see their boys safe that they flung
wide the gates of their town to Ca-mil-lus, and made
friends with the Romans. But though Rome gave











fleroes of [History

him tri-umphs, and rang with his praise, he had foes,
and some of these said that in a late war he had kept
some of the spoils. So he left Rome, with a wish
that they might soon need him. It was not long ere
the Gauls, a fierce tribe from the north, swept in great
hordes to Rome, led by their chief, Bren-nus. Rome
sent a force to beat them back; but in vain. And
now the loss of Ca-mil-lus was felt; and in sore dread
all fled, save a band of young Sen-a-tors, and a few
more young men, who went in the Cap-i-tol and made
it fast. But the old Sen-a-tors who could not fight
went to the Fo-rum and took their seats in their chairs,
with their i-vo-ry scep-tres in their hands, there to wait
for the foe. When the Gauls got to Rome, they
found no one in streets or homes, and went on till they
came to the hall where they found this band of old men
straight and still in their chairs. At first they stood
in awe at the strange sight, but at last one grew so
bold as to go up and take hold of one of the old men’s
white beards. At once the Sen-a-tor struck the Gaul
with his scep-tre, and then they were all slain! Then
the Gauls set fire to Rome, to all but the Cap-i-tol,
which stood on a steep hill which they durst not climb,
for fear of the bold, small band of Romans on top who
could hurl them down. One night they tried to get
up by stealth, and would have done so, for the man
on watch was in a deep sleep, but that some geese





-ON,

THE

N-

PA

THE

-RI-OR OF

E





-T

IN



38 Heroes of [istory.

made a loud noise, and woke one of the Sen-a-tors,
who woke the rest and made all rush out in time to
hurl the first Gaul down, who, as he fell, bore the rest
with him down the cliff. Mean-time those who had
left Rome, had sought out Ca-mil-lus and made him
take the chief rule once more. So he was soon at the
gates of Rome, with a strong force, drove out the foe,
and made all set to work to build up Rome once more.
His death did not take place for 25 years more, and
all that time he was chief man in Rome, and gave
proof that he was as great in the arts of peace as in
war. He died of a plague (365 zc.)

As time went on, Rome grew great and strong, and
brought more lands neath her sway. But one great
town came near her in strength or might—this was
Carth-age, on the coast of Af-ri-ca. Her wealth had
been made in trade, so she had great fleets of ships,
which Rome had not. It was not long ere the two
found cause for strife. To fight Carth-age at sea was
now the dream of the men of Rome; but as they
had no ships, and knew not how to build them, it
would seem to most minds a mad one. But just at
this time the sea threw on their coast a ship of Carth-
age. At once they set to work. Trees were cut
down and 120 ships built like it, while bands of men
were put on a long bench with oars and taught how
to row on dry land. Att last these bold Ro-mans



keg ihe ee 39

set out in these rude boats to meet the best men
on the sea, then in the world. They were led by Du- ©
il-i-us and they beat the men of Carth-age, who had
EOimes toe meet them -— ?
with scorn.
Reg-u-lus. Kome
now sent out a great
fleet, led by Reg-u-
lus, one of her con-
suls. Carth-age sent
as great a fleet to meet
it, led by Ham-il-car,
and a great sea-fght
took place, and the
Romans won. They
then went on land to
fake Carth-age._- In
the first fights they
won, but then Reg-u-
lus lost,.and the men
of Carth-age took him.
They then sent him to
Rome to say on what terms they would make peace.
But when Reg-u-lus got there, he told the Sen-ate
not to yield to Carth-age, and went back and told
them that Rome said no to her terms. In their rage
they put the brave man in a cask stuck full of sharp












ne

ia

HAN-NI-BAL



40 fTLeroes of LListory.

nails, and made it roll down hill, and thus put to
death a true he-ro (250 8). But the war went on
for nine years, and then peace was made.

Han-ni-bal, of Carth-age. When a few years
went by, the war broke out once more. The men of
Carth-age were led this time by Han-ni-bal, who
stands mid the first war-men of all time. He came
at the head of a great land force, whom he led o'er
the Alps to Rome.

Fa-bi-us. One of the best men whom Rome
sent out to keep him back from Rome was Fa-bi-us.
His plan was to use up all the food near the foe, and
to keep him in dread by quick moves on him here
and there, but not to fight on a field face to face.

Still, Han-ni-bal did not lose ground. He won
fight on fight, but did not go to Rome for though his
men tried to urge him, he knew how hard it would be
to take it. So the war went on till at last a young
man of the name of Scip-i-o came to the front. Save
one more, whom I will tell of in time, Scip-i-o was the
best man Rome had in all her days. His plan was
to take the war to Af-ri-ca, and thus make Han-ni-bal
go home to save Carth-age. So he set out and fought
the men of Carth-age, so that in great fear they sent
for Han-ni-bal to come home and save them from the
Ro-mans. He did so, and met Scip-i-o on the field
of Zam-a. Long and fierce was the fight, but Rome







THE AP-PI-AN WAY, NEAR ROME.



1 fleroes of Listory.

won, and Carth-age at last was at her feet (203 Bc).
Scip-i-o, when he came back to Rome, had a grand
tri-umph, and got the name of Af-ri-can-us put to his
own.

Ju-gurth-a, of Africa. The next strong foe whom
Rome found in Af-ri-ca was this prince. He took the
throne of Nu-mid-i-a from the right heir, and though
Rome gave him her aid and tried hard to put Ju-
gurth-a down, ‘he beat all her troops by his skill in
war, or by bribes.

Mar-i-us. At length Rome sent out a man of
low birth and rude in his ways, but of great skill in
war, to take Ju-gurth-a. This was Mar-i-us.
Though low-born, he had great aims and sought to
be made con-sul. Then he wed with one of high
birth, and thus made his way. But his hate for men
of high birth, who had made a mock of his birth and
his aims, was great, as you will see. He made an end
of the war, and brought Ju-gurth-a to Rome to grace
his tri-umph. Then this poor king was cast in a
dark jail, to die of lack of food.

Sul-la was a young man of high birth who had
been in the war neath Mar-i-us, and his friends said,
was the one who took King Ju-gurth-a. So a feud
sprang up twixt Sul-la and Mar-i-us. Sul-la was
not nice to look at; there were great sores on his red

fee, and his keen blue eyes had a fierce glare; but



Sulla. 43

the troops had a deep love for him, for his ways with
them were kind. But just at this time huge hordes
of the fierce Celts and Ger-mans bore down on Rome,
and both Mar-i-us and Sul-la were sent out to fight
them, and for atime, to beat them was their sole
thought. But when this was done the feud sprang
up once more. Rome's prime need was now for a
man who was great in the arts of peace, to fix things
which had gone wrong. But Mar-i-us, though he
was made con-sul, did not do much to put things
right. When a fresh war broke out twixt Rome and
Pon-tus, a land of A-si-a, those of high birth thought
Sul-la should lead the troops, and those of low birth
thought Mar-i-us should do so. The troops stood
by Sul-la; Mar-i-us in vain made up a force of slaves;
he had to flee for his life. When Sul-la was gone to
the East, Mar-i-us came back, and with his friend
Cin-na, put him-self at the head of a great throng of
the low class, and put scores on scores of the high
class to death. It was not long ere Mar-i-us died
(z.c. 83), but the war went on till Sul-la came back.
Fierce and full of blood were the scenes that then
took place. The corpse of Mar-i-us was torn from
its tomb and cast in a stream. Throngs of the low
class were put to death, and bands of the rich as well
—all whom he thought were not with him. Then
Sul-la made new laws, and all the chief men of Rome



44 fTeroes of [listory.

said these were good, for they stood in too much fear
of him to say no. At last he went off to his fine
home, out of Rome, where he spent the rest of his
life and died (s.c. 78).

Pom-pey. A host of great men now came to the
front in Rome, and it got to be hard work with each
to hold his place. One of the best of these was Pom-
pey, who put down the last of the men with Mar-
1-us, in Spain, and when he came back to Rome got
a triumph and the name of The Great. He then got
him-self and his rich friend Cras-sus made con-suls.

Ju-li-cus Cz-sar. “This was the great-est Ro-
man of them all.” He was of the kin of the proud
wife of Mar-i-us, and a man born to rule men. His
fame was not made so soon as Pom-pey’s, and at this
time he paid court to that great man whom all Rome
had a deep love for. At length Pom-pey was sent
off to A-si-a to put down the foes of Rome, and
Cze-sar was sent to rule Spain. The two got back
to Rome near the same time, and with Cras-sus,
made a league to help each other. Cze-sar was made
con-sul, and at the end of his term was sent to bring
Gaul (France) neath the yoke of Rome. For the
next nine years he was at war, in which his skill was
so great that he ranks with Han-ni-bal and Al-ex-
an-der. Hewrote books, too, in which he has told in
a plain, pure style all that he did. When he had got

~»



Julius Cesar. eS
Gaul neath his rule, f
he took Switz-er-land,
beat the Ger-mans and
went to Brit-ain, where
he got the tribes of the
Brit-ains to bend to
him, though not for
long. His fame was
now far more than that of
Pom. pey, who, with men in
Rome, sought to bring to
pass his fall. Cze-sar knew
this, and so when word was
sent to him to dis-band his
troops and come to Rome,
he said he would if Pom-
pey, who was near Rome
with quite a large force,
would do so with his. No fo
heed was paid to this, but {
he was told once more _.
by the con-suls, who \
were friends of Pom-
pey, to dis-band his,
troops, or Rome would
look on him as her ||
foe. So he saw that)
his death was meant, = 8 S
and at the head of his JU-LI-US een















46 fleroes of TT estory.

troops came to Rome, while all the chief men fled,
and put him-self at the head of things. The troops
af Pom-pey left him and came to Cz-sar, and Pom-

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































TOMB OF AU-GUS-TUS C#-SAR.

pey fled. When he had been made con-sul and
made things right at Rome, Cze-sar went in search
of Pom-pey, and found him in Thrace, a land north
of Greece. They had a great fight, but Cze-sar



a a aT a ee

:

—_ ee ee

Augustus Cesar. 47

beat and Pom- 2
pey fled tog
E-gypt, where
he was slain in.
a war in which
he took part
twixt the young
queen Cle-o-pa-tra and
her broth-er (sc. 48).
Cze-sar went there and
brought back peace,
and gave the crown to
Cle-o-pa-tra neath the
sway of Rome. Then
he came back to Rome
and was made con-sul
once more. The men
who had been with
Pom-pey broke out in
war in Af-ri-ca, but he
went there and put them
down, and at last was
head of Rome, the queen
of the world, and at}
peace. No man had}
such honor paid him as |
Cze-sar. But he was
mild in his time of rule, |
and set to work to make





AU-GUS-TUS C-SAR,



48 fTeroes of fistory.

Rome great and strong. But he had no lack of foes.
In vain he said hehad no wish to be king; they said he
had set his heart on a crown and a throne, and so
they made a plot to kill
him, and slew him as
-he stood 3 in the sen-ate
hall. One of those in
the plot was his great
friend Bru-tus, and it is
said that as he fell he
cried out, “And thou
too, Bru-tus.” (Bc. 44.)

Au-gus-tus. His
death brought on fresh
war twixt the men of
». Cze-sar, led by Marc
s@@ An-to-ny, and his foes,
led by Bru-tus. The
end of it all was that
Oc-ta-vi-us, of the kin
of Cze-sar, put down
all the rest and made
him-self the first Em-
pe-ror of Rome. He
did much to make Rome fine and great, and gave

great help to all the arts. At length Rome gave him

ie 5
the name of Au-gus-tus, which means sa-cred. It



CON-STAN-TINE THE GREAT,































ROME.

CON-STAN-TINE IN

ARCH OF





2 Heroes of History.

was in his reign that Christ was born. At his death,
he left Rome strong and at peace (14 a.v.),

_Con-stan-tine the Great. Of the rest of those
who sat on the throne of Rome Ti-tus, Tra-jan, Au-
re-li-an and Al-ex-an-der Se-ve-rus made the most:
fame in war till the time of Con-stan-tine. He was
the first to grant peace to the Christ-i-ans, whom the
rest had put to death in fierce ways. It is said that
when he was in a fierce fight with Max-en-ti-as, who
sought to keep the crown from him, a cross of fire
was seen in the sky, which bore on it these words in
Greek: “In this con-quer.” When he got to the
throne he made his home at Con-stan-ti-no-ple, in
place of Rome, and did much to spread the true faith.
A sad blot on this great man’s life is that he lent his
ear to false tales of his son Cris-pas, and had him
put to death. He died in the year 336 a.v., while in the
field at war with the king of Per-si-a, and left the
realm to his three sons. 3



The Goths. 51

Crea Lye
HE-ROES OF THE MID-DLE A.GES.

FROM A.D. 700 TO A.D. 1500.

As the years went by, Rome, once so great and
strong that she had most of the known world neath
her sway, grew weak. Long ere Con-stan-tine came
to the throne, a strong wild tribe of the name of the
Goths came down from their home in Nor-way and
Swe-den, and spread o’er the rest of Eu-rope. Some
made their home on the vast steppes which stretch
from the Black Sea to the Bal-tic Sea, and were
known as the East Goths, and more found a place to
dwell near the Alps and the stream of the Dan-ube,
and were known as the West Goths. But to gain
these homes, the strong Goths had to drive out of the
lands they took the Ger-man tribes who had dwelt
there, and these had to go south to seek new homes.
Thus they came like a great wave on the north
bounds of the realm of Rome. At first she was yet
too strong to give way, and time on time beat them
back, but at last they took from herland on the Dan-
ube, and dwelt there.

As time went on, the Goths grew less wild and
rough, and not a few took the faith of Christ; and no



oe Lleroes of Fistory.

‘doubt all would have gone well in time, had it not
been for a strange new foe who now swept down on
Eu-rope. This was the Huns, a tribe whose home
was in the north of A-si-a, on the vast plains which
stretch from’ Rus-si-a to. Chi-na; but who. one day
took it in their heads to see the world. The Huns
were not wild in their ways or in their looks. When
at home they dwelt in tents in which they kept their
steeds as well; but when on the move, the men ate,
and drank, and slept on horse-back: and thus kept
their legs in this shape so much, that they got bent
out like a bow. They were short, strong men, with
coarse thick lips, straight black -hair like wire, small
round eyes black as sloes, and skins the hue of gold.
They ate nuts and raw meat, and did not seem to
know what lack of food, or thirst, or cold meant.
Their wives and chil-dren, who were just as foul to
sight and smell in all ways, rode back of them in huge
vans. Near-ly four hundred years from the time that
Christ had been on earth, this vast, fierce horde of
Huns came to Eu-rope, swept o’er Ger-man-y, and
then made their home in Da-ci-a, a land whose great
plains of grass no doubt put them in mind of the
home they had left, and which has since been known
as Hun-ga-ry. Just as the Goths had made the Ger-
man tribes give up their lands and move south, so the
Goths now had to make room for the Huns. They









NS,

THE HU





54 fleroes of flistory.

fled to the bounds of Rome, and plead for leave to
dwell in her realm. They got it, and 200,000 Goth-
men came oer the Dan-ube. But those who had
charge of them did not treat them or their kin right,
and they got to look on Rome as a foe, and not a
friend. ‘They made war on her, went east to the cap-
i-tal, met the Em-pe-ror Val-ers at the head of a great
force, and slew him in the fierce fight which took place
(378 A.D.),

The-o-do-si-as the Great then came to the
throne. He made peace with the Goths, got great
bands of them to serve as his troops, and gave them
lands to dwell on. But when he was dead, they broke
out once more, and, led by their chief A-lar-ic, swept
her realm, came to the gates of Rome, took it and
gave it to his men to sack for six days. (410 ap.)
No doubt at this time much was lost that no gold
could give back to the world, but no church was hurt,
nor those who had gone in them to be safe.

Up to this time, the Huns, who were the cause of
all this strife, had staid in their new home. But now
a man got to be their chief whose name was At-ti-la,
but whose joy and pride it was to be known as the
Scourge of God. So, at the head of his wild horde,
he swept to the south, and left fire and blood as the
marks of his track. He came to Gaul, and there was
met by a great force of Ro-mans and tribes they had



Clovis. = § 55

got to help them. A fierce fight took place, but the

Eluns lost. At-ti-la went off from Gaul, and made:
his way to Rome. As he drew near its walls, he

was met by the Pope Leo I., who got him to draw off

his men and go back. From this time, the Huns are’

lost sight of. |

Clo-vis. On Christ-mas night (406) a horde of
Ger-man tribes made their way o’er the Rhine, and
made their home in Gaul. One of these tribes was
the Franks, and as years went on, one of their chiefs,
whose name was Clo-vis, put down the rest of the
tribes, threw off the last trace of the yoke of Rome,
and built up a great realm which got the name of
France from the Franks. Clo-vis had wed a good
maid, Clo-tilde, who held the faith of Christ, and
once, when in sore straits in a great fight, he cried out
to the God of his wife to help him. Then the tide of
strife was seen to turn for him, and he won the field.
So, one day, with great pomp and state, Clo-vis and

3000 of those neath his rule, went through the streets .

of the old town of Rheims (rem) to the spot where
the priests gave bap-tism, and took the faith of Christ.
This brave chief brought more and more lands neath
his sway, till at his death France and a large part of
Ger-man-y made up his realm. Butnone of Clo-vis’
sons, nor of their kin, had his good traits. All his
line were weak, poor things, who could not cope with



66 Fleroes of History.

the needs of the realm, but left all their work to men
whom we should call Prime Min-is-ters, but who
were known in that day as May-ors of the Pal-ace.
The kings were seen but once a year, when they rode
on a car drawn by ox-en, with their crowns on, o’er
their long, fair hair, which fell to their waists. As
they did naught the rest of the year, save eat, and
drink, and sleep, and have a good time, they got the
name of the slug-gard kings. |

Charles Mar-tel (or the Ham-mer) was May-or
of the Pal-ace, when a great host of the Ar-abs made
their way to Eu-rope, took Spain and the south of
France, and would have got all the realm, had not he
gone to meet them with a great force, and beat them
at Tours (a.p. 732). For the rest of his life, this brave
man was king in all save name. He gave life or
death, made war or peace, just as if he were on the
throne. But he did not seek to bear the name; no
doubt he thought that it had grown so mean a thing in
the eyes of the Franks, that it would not add much
to him. So the poor heirs of Clo-vis were left in
peace on the throne till he died. __ :

Pep-in the Short, his son, was not of the same
mind, though. He had hard work to keep the realm
safe from the wild tribes near by, and as he flew from
point to point, no doubt he thought he had’ to work
too hard to keep his goose of a king safe on his throne.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































AR-ABS AND TAR-TARS,



58 fleroes of L[istory.



Scr ee
{UNS









CHAR-LE-MAGNE.

So at last he sent to
the Pope to ask,
“Who is king, he
who rules, or ie Sho
wears fe crown?”
“He who rules, of
COU SiC) -salde the
Ropers litataicah
cried the small man
with a great will, and
lost no time, but sent
the last of the slug-
gard kings to dwell
in a house of monks.
‘Then Pep-in got the
crown put on_ his
head and the name
of king.
Char-le-magne,
or Charles the Great
was the son of Pep-
in, and stands one of
the first of the great
men of all times.
Great in war, he was

still more great in peace, for in that rude, rough age, he
sought to have wise laws made, and to have the young



»



















if A
ol











CHAR-LE-MAGNE AT THE SCHOOL OF THE PAL-ACE,



60 fTeroes of [istory.

of all ranks taught by wise men. He had, all his life,
a deep love for wise men, and for books.. The first
great feat of Charles was to march on the Sax-ons,
They were a strong, wild tribe who dwelt in the north
of Ger-man-y, mid the great hills, whence they would
bear down on those who dwelt in the low lands, and



CHAR-LE-MAGNE BE-FORE NAR-BONNE,

burn the towns and the crops. So, at the head of his
troops, Charles went to a point in the great mounts
where a huge hill of red sand-stone rose on each
side like the post of a door. This was known as the
West-pha-li-an gate, for a path led up from here to
the heart of the Sax-ons’ land. On one of these red

<



Roland. 61

hills was the strong home of their chief, Wit-te-kind.
Charles did not take long to make this good for
naught, and then went on to Pad-er-born. He tore
down their great fane which stood at this place, and:
had the great false god put down deep in the ground.
But, ere he had time to do more, he had to go off to
It-a-ly, to fight the Lom-bards, who dwelt there and —
had tried to throw off his yoke. The next year he
went back to Sax-on-y, built a home there, and told
all the Sax-on chiefs to come and hail him as their
king. All did so, save Wit-te-kind, but he went off,
out of the land, to bide his time to strike. He had
not long to wait, for Charles had soon to go off to
Spain, to help the E-mir of Ar-a-gon, who had sought
his aid. Ere he set out for home he had brought a
great part of Spain neath his rule. 3
Ro-land. As Charles led his troops home through
the great range of hills, the Pyr-e-nees, which shut
out France from Spain, he put his rear guard in
charge of Ro-land, one of his kin. The line of the
troops had to stretch out to great length, for great
walls of rock rose up on each side of a small path,
and so Ro-land and his men were left far to the rear.
The foe knew this would be so, and they hid in the
holes in the rocks at a spot they thought would be
the best for their bad work; and when Ro-land and
his men got there, sprang out on them. The brave



62 fleroes of History.

Franks, thus caught in a trap, fought well, but to no
use; they were all slain. But the brave Ro-land
thought of those who had gone on, and in his death
throes he brought his great horn Du-ran-dal to his
lips, and blew a great blast which was heard a great
way off, to warn them that the foe was on their track.
Then the brave youth died, but his fame dwelt in the
hearts of the Franks. The tale of how he died was
told in hall and hut, and was made the theme of a
song, the “Song of Ro-land,” which was sung as the
troops went to fight. When Charles got home, he
heard that the Sax-ons had been at their old work
once more. Wit-te-kind had come to his own, as
soon as Charles had gone, and led them like a scourge
through the land up to the walls of Co-logne. The
great king was soon in the midst of them, and built
ten great forts, and bore off some of their chief men as
a pledge on their part to keep the peace. Then he
told a great band of them to go with his own men to
fight a fresh foe, the Slavs, The Sax-ons went off
with joy and speed with the Franks, but one day, in
a pass mid the hills, fell on the Franks and slew them.
Great was King Charles’ wrath when he heard this,
and he made up his mind to teach the Sax-ons once
for all that they had met one to whose yoke they
must bend, if not by fair means, then by stern ones.
He came o’er the Rhine, laid waste their land with



c
Faas
a MS

-LAND

°
4
ke
°
x
ao
io2]
Q





64° fleroes of EHistory.

fire and sword, and put to death 4000 who would not
take the faith of Christ. Their chief Wit-te-kind
made a last stand, but Charles beat him, and then at
last the fierce chief gave up and came to the camp of
Charles, and said he would be of the faith of Christ.
It is said that it was in a small church near his home
which Charles had torn down that Wit-te-kind bent
his neck to the yoke of Christ. And so at last the
Sax-ons, so long the scourge and pest of the north,
were brought to feel that war was not the sole end of
lite. As time went on they grew to set some store by
the things of peace; new towns sprang up, and homes
for the monks, each with its church and school, where
their boys and girls learnt the things they should know.

Now I will go back and tell why Charles had to
go to It-a-ly. The king-of the Lom-bards, in It-a-ly,
Des-i-de-ri-us, had schemes to put down Charles.
With this end in view he had sought to get Pope
A-dri-an to crown the two sons of Charles’ broth-er in
his stead. When the Pope said he would not, Des-
i-de-ri-us lost no time, but bore down on Rome at
the head of a great force. The Pope sent off to beg |
Charles to come to his aid, but as he knew some time
must go by ere Charles could get to him, he had new
strong gates put up, and laid in a great store of food.
When Charles got word of the Pope’s sore strait, he
sent word to Des-i-de-ri-us not to dare to raid Rome,



Charlemagne. 65

or he would march with a great force to make him
give up such a plan. But the Lom-bard king did
naught but jeer at his threat, and kept on. At once
Charles led his force o’er the Alps, and was on Des-
i-de-ri-us ere he knew it. He fled to Pa-vi-a, at
which town Charles left one of his men with a large



A KNIGHT MADE BY THE DEAD HAND OF RO-LAND.

force to keep him shut up, and went on to Rome,
where he was met with great joy. It must have been
a grand sight to see Charles, who was a tall man, near
sev-en feet high, with a grave, grand look, ride through
the streets on his fine steed, while songs and shouts rent
the air, at the head of his long train, in his rich robes



66 Heroes of fHistory.

of pur-ple and gold, with a crown bright with gems on
his head. At the Church of St. Pe-ter, he got off his
horse and bent his lips to each step as he went up to
where, at the great door, the Pope stood to bless and
thank him for his prompt aid.

In a short time Charles got hold of Des-i-de-ri-us,
and made him leave the world, and dwell in a house
of monks. Then at Mil-an, the Pope set on the
great king’s brow the i-ron crown of the Lom-bards,
which is said to have been made out of one of the
nails which held Christ to the cross. Charles had
not been at home long, when one of the kin of Des-i-
de-ri-us sought to stir up the Av-ars who dwelt in
Hun-ga-ry, to make raids on Charles’ realm. He
was soon in the field, drove them back, and brought
the land now known as Aus-tri-a neath his rule.
With all this vast realm to watch and guard, this wise
king still found time to think of things that would
make those in it grow in the arts of peace. He got
as wise a man as the world had in that age, the monk
Al-cu-in, to leave Eng-landand teach the Frank youths.
He brought men from It-a-ly to teach them how to
sing. But though the song-schools were set up, I
grieve to say they were the cause of no great pride
or joy to the good king, for he says the sound the
youths made when they tried to sing was like the
howls of wild beasts. He found more cause to be



Charlemagne. 64

glad when he went to the schools and heard them at
their tasks. But one day when the mas-ter told him
that the sons of the men of rank did not get up their
tasks as well as did those of low birth, his face grew
red and his eyes shone with wrath, and in stern tones
he told them that if they thought that their rank and
wealth made them not need to learn from books, they
should find how far they were from the truth, for
they should gain naught from him, if he found that
they did not do their tasks well!

Charles did his best to make the poor through his
vast realm_get their rights. With this end in view,
he made wise laws and rules, and saw that they were
kept. He did all that he could, too, to make trade
grow. He dwelt at Aix-la-Cha-pelle, where he built
a great church, still to be seen, much the same as it
was in his day, and at In-gel-heim, where he built a
bridge o’er the Rhine.

I will now tell of the last great act of this great
king’s life. In the year 800 the Pope, Leo IIL.
was hurt by a band of men who had made a league
to put him down. Charles’ wrath was great when
he heard that these had gone so far as to lay hands
on the Pope, and he set off at once for Rome, where
he soon put things right. Then came the last grand
scene of this great king’s life. He went to High
Mass on Christ-mas day, and when it had been sung,



68 : fleroes of fistory.

the Pope came to where he sat in state with all his
chief men round him, and set a crown on his head,
and gave him the name of Em-pe-ror of the West.
(A.D. 800.)

Charles had the grief to see all his sons die save
one, Lou-is, and when he grew old he sent for all
the chief men of his great realm, and got them to say
that they would be true to this youth as their king,
Then he told Lou-is to take the crown as a gift from
God, from him, and from the na-tion, and try to reign
well. In a few years from this time this wise and
brave king died. (Jan. 28, 814.)

The North-men. While the faith of Christ had
been taught through most parts of Eu-rope by this
time, there was a race in the far north who still held
to their old false gods. They dwelt in Scan-di-na-
vi-a (Nor-way and Swe-den), but the worst and most
fierce of them had their homes in Den-mark, and on
the south coast of the North Sea, in what we know
as Hol-land and Ger-man-y ; bleak lands, full of mists
and fogs, where wild storms make the sea lash the
flat coasts, from which it is so hard to keep it out.
They were huge strong men, with white skins, fair
hair, and bright blue eyes, who drank deep at their
rude feasts, while their bards sang of their feats in
war. It was the boast of some of these sea-kings
that “they slept neath no roof and drank ale by no



Northmen, 69

hearth.” War was their chief joy and they made it
their trade, and thought that bliss in the life to come
would be to be at war all the time. As their land
was poor and did not Da ETS So
yield much, their way a
was to sail off in their

small ships to some
rich land, sail up the
streams to the towns
on the banks, take all
they could bear off,
ANG SOUT tne. est:
You may well think
that they were held in
dread by all the folks
of Eu-rope, who gave
them the name of |
Northmen or Vi-kings
(veek-ings). ~°This
means creek-men, for
they kept their boats
in creeks. Ere
Charles died, he had
wept to see their a
dark ships off his coasts, and, no doubt, it was at
the thought that when his strong hand should be
still in death, there would be none to hold them in







































































































70 Heroes of History.

check. And his thought was true, as we shall see.
But they did not plague France till they had
brought much woe on Eng-land and Ire-land. So
far as their raids on Eng-land went they were no
new thing, for, 449 years ere this time (449 AD.) great
war-bands of them, led by Hen-gist and Hor-sa, their
great chiefs, had come down on it, took it from the
Brit-ons, and made their homes there. Ass time went
on they took on the faith of Christ, and had but
just learnt to prize the things of peace when their
fierce kin swept down on their coasts for prey and
spoil. But the Eng-lish rose to fight the Danes—
this was the name they gave the North-men—and
thus men of one blood and one speech were at war.
For years, with gain and loss on each side in turn,
they went on, but at last the Danes got a great part
of Eng-land neath their rule, and it did not seem as
if aught could now keep the whole from them. But
this dark hour had its great man in Al-fred, king of
-Wes-sex, one of the realms in which Eng-land was
split. From a boy he had been on the field of war,
so that when he came to the throne he could now put
to use what he had learnt in that hard school. At
first things did not go well, and he had to buy peace
for three years, which gave him time to breathe; but,
just as he thought, at the end of that time Guth-rum,
then chief of the Danes, was back in the land with



Northmen. ui

the whole strength of the North-men. They swept
through the land, and were soon in Wes-sex, and
took the town of Ex-e-ter. At break of spring Al-





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































LAND-ING OF THE DANES IN ENG-LAND.

fred fixed his force close round the town, while he
got a fleet of ships to keep all help by sea from them.
So at last the Danes had to give up the town, and



72 Fleroes of Listory.

swore to leave Wes-sex. They went off, and Al-fred
let his troops go to their homes, and all was well,
when, all at once, the Danes burst on the land once
more with fire and sword. Al-fred had to flee and
hide in the woods with his small band, and live as
best he might. Thus, one day, he had to rest in the
hut of a poor herds-man, whose wife had put some
cakes on the fire to bake, while she went off to. do
some tasks. No doubt the good dame thought that
as the king was close to the fire he would not let
them burn. But the king’s mind was on his bow
and shafts, to see if they were fit to fight with, and he
paid no heed to the food. Soon the smell of burnt
cakes rose in the hut, and as the dame ran to the fire
to see how much harm had been done, she cried out
in great wrath that it was but just he should watch
the cakes when he was so glad to eat them.

In this dark time, too, he is said to have put on the
dress of a bard, and gone with his harp to the camp
of the foe, to see how strong they were. All this
time he got more and more men in his force, and at
last, with the first burst of spring, he set out to march
on the Danes. As he went, fresh bands of his men
came to him. When he came to where the great
host of Danes were, he went at once to fight, and
made them yield to him. Their chief, Guth-rum,
took the faith of Christ, and the Danes swore to make





RAID OF THE NORTHMEN,



74 fleroes of Flistory.

war no more on Wes-sex. This peace, which was
kept, was known as the peace of Wed-more, where
it was sworn to (A.D. 878).

For the rest of his life this great king made the
good of those neath
his rule the sole
| end of his life. He

did> -his> =best- to
guard his realm, for
he made a fleet, the
first Eng-land had,
and thus may be
said to have been
the one to found
her might at sea.
He also made wise
laws, “so-- that the
rich and the strong
should not crush
the poor and the
weak. He set up
schools for those of
low as well as for
those of high birth. He had a deep love for books,
and he knew not a few sweet songs by heart. He
found time mid the cares of state, too, to write books,
some out of his own head, and some in Eng-lish from



HSS
ey
mA

NY ih



AL-FRED THE GREAT.



Sweyn, of Denmark. 75

the Lat-in tongue. In 886 the Danes made one
more great raid, but Al-fred, in a short time, drove
them back, and took a large part of their realm from
them. ‘This blow broke their might for some years,
and when they came back once more, led by their
chief, Hast-ing, he beat them, and drove them from
the land. A few years from this time, this brave
and wise king, one of the best, if not the best, Eng-
land has had, died (a.v. gor).

Sweyn, of Den-mark. But the land had by no
means seen the last of the Danes. Though king on
king of the line of Al-fred fought them, naught could
break the might of this fierce foe. At last, when Al-
fred had been dead near 100 years, a great fleet bore
a host of Danes to Eng-land’s coasts, led by their
king, Sweyn. Eth-el-red then sat on the throne of
FEng-land, and in his dread lest the Danes who dwelt
in his realm should rise and join with their kin, he
had them all put to death on one day. When the
news of this rash act got to Sweyn’s ears, he swore to
wrest the realm from king Eth-el-red. He swept
through its length and breadth with fire and sword,
and then went off to his own land, but was soon back
with a great fleet. The beaks of his ships were of
brass, the sterns bore beasts of gold. On the head
of each mast was the shape of a bird, or a man, or of
a bull, or a great fish. As he led his troops through



76 - - Heroes of History.

the land, town on town bent to his yoke, and at last
Eth-el-red had to flee o’er the sea to France, and
leave his realm to Sweyn.

Ca-nute, the Dane. Sweyn was now king of
Eng-land in all

save the name; but
as he died when
Eth-el-red had
been but a_ few
months gone, he
did not get the
crown put on his
head. He left a
son, Ca-nute; but
a large part of the
realm rose to keep
the crown from this
young prince of the
foe. They sent for
Eth-el-red to come
back to his own.
Eth-el-red was so
slow that he was
known as the Un-read-y; but for once in his life he
went with speed, and was on Ca-nute’s track ere he
knew it. Fierce strife went on for some time. The
son of Eth-el-red, a brave, wise prince, Ed-mund,

bY GO

i] WY,



CA-NUTE.



Canute. 17





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































who was so strong that he got the name of I-ron-
sides, gave that king great aid, and when Eth-el-red
died, had the crown put on his head at Lon-don.
Ca-nute did the same at South-amp-ton, and thus



78 fleroes of [istory.

Eng-land had two kings. They kept up the war;
but at last, in a great fight at As-ling-don, the
Danes won. Then the two kings met on a small
isle in the stream of the Sev-ern, and made two parts
of the land. Ed-mund was to rule the South, and
Ca-nute the North. But the brave Ed-mund, who
had fought so well for his own, soon died, and Ca-
nute got to be king of the whole land. He had the
crown put on his head at Lon-don, and swore that he
would be just to all in his rule. Then he said that
Danes and Eng-lish must held no’ grudge, but give
up strife and dwell in peace. As time went on, Ca-
nute rose from a mere wild fierce chief with a-thirst for
blood, to be a wise and mild king. He took on the
yoke of Christ, and then made a law that all the rites
of the old faith of the Danes, with its false gods, must
be seen no more in the land. He saw that the laws
were kept; that the poor had their rights. His first
aim was to win the love of those neath his rule. He
brought the poor land, rent so long with strife, peace,
and, as he said, “strove to lead a right life in all
things.” And so it came to pass that when he died,
the Eng-lish felt deep grief for this good king, whom
they once held in such dread. (a.v. 1035.)
Bri-an Bo-ru, of Ire-land. Of course, when the
Danes gave Eng-land such fierce, hard times, they did
not leave a land so close to her as Ire-land in peace,



Brian-Boru. 79

you may besure. It was in 790, just a few years from
the time that they swept down on Eng-land, that their
dark ships were first seen on the low, gray waves of
the I-rish Chan-nel as they swept the shore, then up
the streams to the broad lakes which stud the
heart of Ire-land; while the wail of
pain, the red glare of fire, and the
sight of blood, told where their path
had lain. This was but the first of
a long tale of strife and woe. It was
of small use to beat them back ; more
and more they came, till at last they
had all the spoil of the land fast in
towns which they built at points on
the coast. Thus Cork, Lim-er-ick,
. Wex-ford and Dub-lin were all first
the strong-holds of the
Danes. At last great
_ piles of stone, which got












ers, were built through
the land; and when the
prows of the foe’s ships
were seen on the sea, the
s strong men made haste to



8o : Fleroes of Listory.

who were too ill or weak or old to fight, in these
strong keeps, while they went off to meet the foe.
As years went on, and the might of the Danes grew,
the I-rish did not learn to view them in the same way
as the Eng-lish. As has been said, the North-men
found in Eng-land their own kin, who spoke the same
tongue, and thus it was not hard for a strong king
like Ca-nute to make one nation of both. But from
first to last, the I-rish had naught but hate for them.
At last a time came when the Danes found their
match. In those days Ire-land was made up of five
small realms, each with its own king; while at Ta-ra
dwelt the kings of Ul-ster, the O'Neills, who were
Ard-reaghs, or head kings, and kept rule oer all
the land. Now the man who was to give the
death-blow to the Danes’ might was Bri-an Bo-ru,
king of Mun-ster. When he came to the throne, |
men found that some one who knew how to rule
was at the helm of state. But what they had yet
to find was, that he had made up his mind to be
chief king; not the shade of a chief king, as most
of them had been, but a true king, who would make
him-self felt in the land. To bring this to pass, he
had to wrest the crown from the chief king, Mal-
a-chy, the head of the strong clan of the O’Neills,
and break the might of the Danes — no slight tasks.
But Bri-an lost no time; he set to work at once to





Se ERAS Sea ees

BRI-AN BO-RU, ON THE PLAINS OF CLON-TARF,



ap

So flerocs of History.

break the might of some foes near him, and _ then,
step by step, fought his way till at last he sat as Ard-
reagh in the hall of Ta-ra, while Mal-a-chy, who,
though brave —for he wore a col-lar of gold which he
had won from the Danes — seems to have been a mild
man, went off to his small realm of Meath. Then
Bri-an went through the land, made the kings pay
him trib-ute, so that he got to be known as “ Bri-an of
the Trib-ute,’” and set to work to make the arts of
peace grow.. He beat back the Danes, and for 12
years the land had a taste of the joys of peace. The
burnt homes of the monks were built up; men set to
till the soil; roads were built, each with a bridge
where there was need; and forts rose here and there.
But as the king grew old, the Danes grew bold once
more. Att last they made up their minds to strike one
grand blow, and, with this end in view, sent off for
bands of their fierce kin in all the lands near by to aid
them. Bri-an, on his side, gave all his mind to a
like task, and soon had a strong force neath his flag.
One of the first of his chiefs was Mal-a-chy, king of
Meath, who, like a true man, did not let his own
wrongs keep his hand still when his land had need of
it. So Bri-an led his men down to the strand of
Clon-tarf, which lies north of Dub-lin, and here, at
dawn on Good Fri-day (4.p. 1014), the Danes and
they met. All day the fight went on till the sun went





Brian Boru. $3

down the crest and was soon to sink. Then at last the

Danes broke and-fled; some to their ships, some
to the great woods not far off. As one ran, he came
to the tent where the old king, too old to fight, had
staid to pray. The beams of the low sun fell on his
bent white head and long white beard. As he stood -
to gaze, a Dane who had caught up with him said,
“That is the king.” At this news, Bir-dar, the first
Dane, caught up his axe and made a rush on Bri-an.
The old king, who in his day knew no peer in strength
in the land, half rose
from his knees and
smote the Dane on the
legs with his sword.
But Bro-dar dealt him

==> —_—_—_——SSS===S
SSS















THE FOUR COURTS, DUB-LIN,



S4 Heroes of Histery.

such a blow on the head that he laid him dead.
He then fled to the woods, but was caught next day
and put to death. So fell the great king Bri-an in
the hour when the foe fell, and deep was the grief
of those neath his rule as they bore him to Ar-magh,
where he was laid to rest (4.D. 1014).

Will-iam the Con-quer-or. I have told you
that Charles the Great wept when he saw the dark
ships of the Danes near his coasts. He would have
wept more could he have seen what was to come to
pass, for the fate of Eng-land and Ire-land was in
store for France, as the kings of his line found to
their cost. At last, in the year g11, Charles the Sim-
ple, then king of France, made up his mind to give
the Danes a part of France, and thus save the rest
from their raids. So he gave them a great tract in
the north, and gave his own daugh-ter to their chief,
Rol-lo, as his wife, when he took the faith of Christ.
The part of France where the North-men dwelt got
to be known in time as “ North-men’s Land,” or
Nor-man-dy. As the years went by they grew less
fierce and wild; the old Norse tongue died out and the
French tongue was heard in its stead. They grew
strong in the faith of Christ; grand homes for monks
rose in the glades of the woods, and on the roads
crowds were seen as they made their way each year
to pray at some shrine of fame. Neath the rule of



William the Conqueror. 85

its dukes, as those who held the rule were known,
Nor-man-dy got to be rich and strong, and though a
part of the realm of France, and neath the rule of its
king, was in truth just as free as if it were bound by
no such tie. But the time had now come when it
was to play a part in the tale of Eng-land, and form
a bond which was to last for a long time, and cause
great woe and pain to more men and their kin than
we can count, ere there should rise one with mind
and strength to break it.

Will-iam of Nor-man-dy, whose chief work it was
to bring Eng-land and Nor-man-dy neath one crown,
stands in the first rank of the great men of all time.
His youth was hard, for he was but a child when he
got to be duke, and the fierce, proud lords were wont
to chafe neath the yoke of a child, the more so as he
was of low birth on the side of his moth-er. She was
but the child of a tan-ner, and won the love of Duke
Rob-ert, Will-iam’s sire, as she stood to wash clothes
in a small brook near the road. But Will-iam’s
strong will was more than a match for his lords, and
made him gain all his ends. He was so strong that
no man could bend his bow. At times he was hard,
as to the men of A-len-con, a town with whose men
he was at war. In scorn of his low blood they hung
raw hides on their walls, with loud cries of “ Work
for the Tan-ner.” To pay them for this scorn, Will-



86 FLeroes of L[fistory.

iam tore out the eyes and cut off the hands and feet
of some men of theirs whom he had in his camp, and
flung these in the town. The way that Will-iam
came to set his thoughts on the throne of Eng-land
was this: when Ca-nute the Dane died he left two
sons, who both wore the crown of Eng-land in turn, but
left no heirs, so that the crown then went to their half
broth-er, Ed-ward, who was of the line of Al-fred the
Great. He had dwelt for a long time with Will-iam
and grown fond of him, and it was from there that he
came to Eng-land. But though mild and so good
that he is known as a saint, Ed-ward found it hard to
rule the Eng-lish. He had been so long in Nor-man-
dy that all his tastes, ay, the tongue he spoke, were
strange to those of his own land, and he had to lean on
his chief man, Earl God-win, whose daugh-ter he had
wed, for help. When God-win died his son Har-
old took his post, and did much to make the land
rich and strong. But while things stood thus, Har-
old went for a sail one time, but was swept on the
shores of Nor-man-dy. The chief on whose lands
he was cast gave him to Duke Will-iam, who told
him that while King Ed-ward had dwelt at his court
they had been as if of the same blood, and that when
he went to take his place on the throne of Eng-land
he gave his word that he would leave the crown at
his death to Will-iam. The duke then went on to



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































LAND-ING OF WILL-IAM THE CON-QUER-OR,, }



88 Heroes of [Hustory.

tell Har-old that ere he would set him free he must
swear an oath on part of the bones of a saint to help
him to make Eng-land his. So Har-old swore; but
when he got back home he paid no heed to his oath,
and when the king died got all the chief men in the
realm to make him king. When news of this got
to Nor-man-dy the duke’s rage was great, and he
built a great fleet and set sail for Eng-land. The
duke’s ship was the Mo-ra, and was the gift of his
wife. The fleet had to lie still for quite a time for
want of a wird, but at last the breeze blew from the
right point, and the fleet made for the shores of Eng-
land. They got to land in Sus-sex. As soon as the
great news came to the ears of King Har-old he set
off with his troops, who were all in oreat glee, for they
had just won in a great fight with the Danes, so that
they felt sure they could beat this new foe. In the
dim dawn of a morn in the fall, Duke Will-iam
led his men to meet the king, who took his stand on
a hill near Has-tings—the hill on which Bat-tle now
stands. A fine, strong force were the men of Eng-
land that day as they stood in deep ranks with their
king and his rich flag in their midst, each with his
great gray, sharp axe and his strong shield. Still as
death kept the dense throng, while the Nor-man force
‘came on: first those who shot shafts from their great
bows, next those who fought with the lance, and then,



William the Conqueror. 89

last of all, the men on horse-back. In front of all
rode a bard, who threw his sword in the air and
caught it as he sang the song of Ro-land. As they
drew near they rent the air with their great war-cry,
“God is our help!” Then from the Eng-lish came
back theirs; ‘“‘ Christ's Rood!” which means cross.
Then they met, but the Eng-lish stood firm as a rock
neath the sweep of the wave. And so the hours wore
on in fierce strife, and it was hard to tell which side
would win. But the duke did not lose head nor
heart; he kept his troops up to their work, and once,
when a cry went up that he was slain, he tore his hel-
met from his head and cried out, “I live, and by God’s
help will yet win.” His chief aim was to get the flag
of the king in his hands, but each time he got near it
he was thrust back. At last he made a feint of flight,
and when he had drawn off a great band in his track,
made a great dash back, and for the first time broke
through ‘the dense mass which rose like a wall round
it. Near and more near he drew, hard though the
Eng-lish fought to keep him back. Att last, as the
sun went down the sky, a shaft struck King Har-old
in the eye, and he sank dead neath his flag, for which
a fierce fight went on oer his corpse. But the Eng-
lish had lost heart, and in a short time fled and left
the field to the foe (4.p. 1066).

When he had won this first great step he lost no



go Fleroes-of History.

time, but made his way to Lon-don, and had the
crown put on his head mid shouts of “ Yea, yea,’ from
the Eng-lish. Then he let them see that he had not
come to change aught, but to keep the rule they had
‘known. So that he could be just to all he tried hard
to learn the Eng-lish tongue, but in vain; he had to
give up the task. But when the new king went. off
for a while to Nor-man-dy, the men of Eng-land rose
here and there to throw off his yoke. Will-iam was
soon back and put them down, but found that the
end was not yet. Sweyn, king of Den-mark, made
up his mind to wrest Eng-land from the Nor- mans,
and swept up one of her streams with a great fleet.
All Eng-land rose as one man to greet and j join with
him. Great was Will-iam’s wrath, but he did not
lose his head. He went to the Danes, gave them a
huge bribe to give no help to the Eng-lish, and then
swept down on the north, and swept it so with fire
and sword that it had no roof nor food for man nor
beast. The last to hold out was Her-e-ward, a brave |
Eng-lish lord, who took his stand with a small force
in the fen or marsh lands near E-ly, and did such
brave deeds that they seem like things that have been
made up to read of in books. At last Will-iam sent
word to him that he would give him his life and leave
to dwell a free man where he chose if he would lay
down his arms, So Her-e-ward, who saw that all



William the Conqueror. gI

hope was past, and that it was best for Eng-land for
him to give in, took an oath to be true to Will-iam,
and broke up his camp.

The land was now Will-iam’s, who: had had such
hard work to win it that »
he may in truth bear the \ §
name by which he is
known —the Con-quer-
or. His first great work.
was to set to work aL
find out just how much §
land was in his realm, |
and to count all the}
towns and those whos
dwelt in them. When}
this was done it was all}
set down in a_ book®*
which was known as 2g
Dooms - day Book, a =
judg-ment day book, for Ne
it was from it that the a oe
king wes to judge how HAR-OLD, a A OF THE SAX-ON KINGS.
large a tax each man”
should pay. He got great sums by the tax which
he put on things which had had none till he came.
He made new ” laws, too, one of which was that the
fires and lights had to be put out at the sound of









g2 Lfleroes of History.

a bell which rung each night at the hour of eight.
Fis love for the great deer was great, and he laid
waste a great tract of ground to make a vast woods
for them to roam in, and where he might hunt.
In spite of all his harsh acts, his reign brought
great good to Eng-land. The men there were gross
in their ways, the lords fierce, with no thought save
of field sports and food and strong drink. The Nor-
man lads were, on the whole, mild in their ways,
though just as brave, and knew more of books and
the fine joys of life. Their monks and priests were
wise, good men, of meek ways and good lives. One
of them was Lan-franc, a monk whose great mind
and saint-like ways made him dear to Will-iam, who
made him Arch-bish-op of Can-ter-bur-y. In. this
great post he did much good, for when all fell back
and dare not face the fierce king, Lan-frane would
plead with him to spare those who had drawn down
his wrath. And the king would at all times speak to
Lan-franc and smile on him as he did to no one
else. The last part of this great king’s life was sad.
His son Rob-ert was the cause of much woe to him.
This youth went so far as to lead a force to fight him
with, and gave him a wound in the fray. At last he
went to fight the King of France, and as he rode
through a town which he had set on fire, his horse
shied and threw him, This hurt him so much as to



William the C ongueror. 93

cause his death.
As he lay on his
bed, the thought of
all the harm he had
done rose in_ his
mind. No home
nor church had he
been wont to spare,
and as he thought
of this in his death
hour he gave great *
sums to build some
of these up once
more, and large
alms to the poor.
At last one morn;
as the great bell of
a church near by
rang the hour of
prime, he said that
he gave his soul to the Bless-ed Vir-gin, that she
might make his peace with Christ, and then he died.
(A.D. 1087.)



THE BUR-I-AL OF WILL-IAM.



94 fleroes of fiistory.

CHAPTER V.
HE-ROES OF THE CRU-SADES.
~The Cru-sades. We have now come to the time

when the he-roes won their great fame in wars fought

in the Ho-ly Land for the tomb of Christ. And I











pe ee
7 .UNTRN7

IN THE TIME OF THE CRU-SADES.

will tell you how these came to be fought. As you
know, the Ho-ly Land was that where Christ was
born, dwelt and died. Now, it was quite in vogue in
the Mid-dle A-ges for folks to go there to press the soil
which the feet of Christ once pressed, and pray at Je-



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70c730c751619328ebd450d977a08185a08b2d2c
'2011-10-28T03:12:15-04:00'
describe
'11296' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGFZ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
03596d5045d95d653df8967e4dff155a
e364cd37a4af0bb599d6460d147e3d2bddf08f0b
'2011-10-28T03:14:29-04:00'
describe
'547149' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGA' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
1ae4fa4eca02aecfa909d5dc8b54ee9e
e9ed2fa3405831a045bb01bb2834658b63f4dae8
'2011-10-28T03:13:30-04:00'
describe
'220352' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGB' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
51edfe20d88a492cf7aceec471ea6ecb
52c494b56f9eac0cabcea5a5ac81016a47eefc77
'2011-10-28T03:11:40-04:00'
describe
'59461' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGC' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
862299aaf7c6ff612cb94d5505476531
93ff773f6a5631ae51a7958d9559902e60659195
'2011-10-28T03:10:40-04:00'
describe
'4388544' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGD' 'sip-files00004.tif'
59e8c45fa6bede5c2da9616ff78d9a44
afe1fb9c153d90d47af7936ab27194206ea936ef
'2011-10-28T03:13:29-04:00'
describe
'22270' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGE' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
1033f4c68043ca591604cc6bfd0cd4fb
ec85b99045de00b51cc888ab1f90d35d9990ff21
'2011-10-28T03:14:18-04:00'
describe
'547173' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGF' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
f553c4cc8ee6af1a71daf61c9203dda5
2cd13fc2498acbc646e808258cd816e8e4c9ddf9
'2011-10-28T03:14:24-04:00'
describe
'111561' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGG' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
69b67bc38c25b2f61a36088ddf2c3071
568bf0d1974793cffd6e723494f72d8175f912a1
'2011-10-28T03:14:06-04:00'
describe
'35132' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGH' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
6e059b497ddb84d11187b6478ace7d92
b9e41641f0168534ad61a1f1291dd144adb9ae4f
'2011-10-28T03:12:30-04:00'
describe
'4386520' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGI' 'sip-files00005.tif'
e825c2949f72b783ffe82453a567b031
88b78554a9b73364cee78adb45463313cd4c0c31
'2011-10-28T03:11:35-04:00'
describe
'16129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGJ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
9a8bd55a79d1d085e3bc29c2ab5ee88d
4a653a1889a34abd760856763261649dc6e16cec
'2011-10-28T03:10:18-04:00'
describe
'547169' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGK' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
0e68d9a5910c8814e1d718af9efebe5e
10608869448b0041b85496472df210be410e418b
'2011-10-28T03:10:57-04:00'
describe
'87607' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGL' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
b6a4ff9246618b1951dc43c4779b5487
6ea50e01012609fe0dc2654f105f23911c6ec816
'2011-10-28T03:10:20-04:00'
describe
'28642' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGM' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
dfb7a7f9b5ffae4b7265b40bff882ef4
597d3edee99eb18a1214a8cde0abfb718256a59b
'2011-10-28T03:10:16-04:00'
describe
'4385312' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGN' 'sip-files00006.tif'
2023eed1361b2ed2cd025e992f6dfbc3
8dfe18250c13034dc6272daa3efd71096adbb6c7
'2011-10-28T03:11:15-04:00'
describe
'12973' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGO' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
9c0abccd9479c1fd2fa600ff5c7c54af
0f8c9e756710412fe69421ca5a8cd3ab17be8f53
'2011-10-28T03:12:56-04:00'
describe
'547145' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGP' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
7b1079b0cc4a2994d69b0064e5220501
dbda7e2348708ad04e959d969005fcb2c4baf858
'2011-10-28T03:12:01-04:00'
describe
'86051' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGQ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
2a8100adaa110571dea80ebee2a553d2
10e48a7b31b08b6fecc1d712c39ead7b779108c1
'2011-10-28T03:10:05-04:00'
describe
'30330' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGR' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
c31e755f19eb78eb5f8f924f48dc09ea
76fae5a357e37e7d906cabc1f366ee0bbb637c01
'2011-10-28T03:11:08-04:00'
describe
'4385940' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGS' 'sip-files00007.tif'
7bf0ebb675ad68357970b2934553f36a
54038ca2b619c25ce72f7f1cb27e1679c90df609
'2011-10-28T03:11:14-04:00'
describe
'14529' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGT' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
4e1a28b7228f18388843b8c9eac08d64
cde11765e80201d3b8800715d2d810b554ec4b0b
'2011-10-28T03:12:19-04:00'
describe
'547140' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGU' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
36e87d784512481cc52173c0d165d564
14861374921f3a65c25233bcd2837feb6a1595da
'2011-10-28T03:10:10-04:00'
describe
'125005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGV' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
7c21aeb4dfb12c4b9130dd125c9fb949
c35fd6f852f6f998dd9e66cac70e865f371652a4
'2011-10-28T03:09:59-04:00'
describe
'36415' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGW' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
eb4dc9134aeec49d56742062419f13bf
0a4967588579003897b783ea1331f5e08fc117fc
'2011-10-28T03:09:43-04:00'
describe
'4386368' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGX' 'sip-files00008.tif'
3ccfd37dce6005cd4a1ce23d96a51a57
9d9ef83149b4afccb02e4d494dc096d394a2bd93
describe
'15726' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGY' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
614463385deb1217943b1474d2806c3a
1d21e7eaf299fc7f91a04622016eeb3dfab64461
'2011-10-28T03:14:25-04:00'
describe
'547161' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGGZ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
b82bb7c19c0412ddf552839587de1757
718a8fb2e7aa9c43c8fe18749ac66468a93e6e1e
'2011-10-28T03:11:16-04:00'
describe
'131588' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
fe4ca217a1e94216febbfc9ec54f77fe
114fe154b0b05e7cd0508adbd9f00338b2783910
'2011-10-28T03:12:44-04:00'
describe
'43778' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHB' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
973dbc29dd5787b7d2230a668641ca12
48282b2dbd45c7928b6c569b594445c4d1680a06
'2011-10-28T03:12:50-04:00'
describe
'4386608' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHC' 'sip-files00009.tif'
060adc2d985bc3fd100960dbc5a88b1a
1c769f622610d9d44c05b9cd5d8e7494213a6cac
'2011-10-28T03:10:48-04:00'
describe
'16841' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHD' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
0f961986e95264ee20d4907e6bc46871
fa297037221570257ea31f3fea2a323d69caa330
'2011-10-28T03:14:09-04:00'
describe
'547171' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHE' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
2977b4e5bc761f79dcf867b4a68dbe68
f60c2c26c1e469d2e9a50f870ea52442c3db1aae
'2011-10-28T03:11:31-04:00'
describe
'99314' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHF' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
dabeda2df3c3398e73eb255879ebdd6a
8334987494067945ef0cdd3a76fdbe1f20f95cf1
'2011-10-28T03:12:08-04:00'
describe
'33594' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHG' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
d19ac64ac2f903d80d6450e927f44e41
778fc90389ead5cbad908d727d272e0f1f0fa9a9
'2011-10-28T03:09:41-04:00'
describe
'4385592' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHH' 'sip-files00010.tif'
b46aede1b7e51ce299dab679d1b9e2ba
ede321320f19d2bf4e769aa771b960f3e85e6d8c
'2011-10-28T03:10:44-04:00'
describe
'14004' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHI' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
660230b7ad4cb3f31595ad278cd30375
c86ee2491a3893bea9c609b79e5cf99c02e536e4
'2011-10-28T03:10:45-04:00'
describe
'547176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
1a187029455dd0218319691046f152ea
933436463dbd1a595e2474e5e294301d681424fe
'2011-10-28T03:12:52-04:00'
describe
'120860' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHK' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
faf2e6a098b58c7cfac4bcee706454f3
c1ff9220ea0d67a03b5e70d769632aaca1ad5b45
'2011-10-28T03:10:47-04:00'
describe
'44001' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHL' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
03051bc8fab2bc284febeede3e5dbd1e
3215e27d788591e4ed59b13cf0b0aee07c153067
describe
'4386736' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHM' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b7a655015f56237277aa719f3b5d2d8e
94da56aba007d579d60fe7e10482df1e75fc55ed
'2011-10-28T03:13:40-04:00'
describe
'17442' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
b86569ebc46bfdda0ef277bf38608654
411195efce4ec0d01219b005ebcb54a51134e81e
'2011-10-28T03:12:23-04:00'
describe
'547181' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ecda1896a627ef8f69e009bcd8a72e82
cb09c2cd486bffbd0d2d58d76c0d648c35428c5f
describe
'131898' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHP' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
d2f0de05951da61d1196a9ac531ba174
0fabcc0e261705d7854b70ebe08811d0af35623b
'2011-10-28T03:09:35-04:00'
describe
'38165' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
683dabf775de3b448209cd3293019d64
c1008d0df9a5c7b367a7e5f16e6775469436dbcb
describe
'4386428' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
29cd0fbd925609ccab2202e33f22796f
74a523e5484ce5c43c3f15ca7d8057451c6da712
'2011-10-28T03:11:02-04:00'
describe
'15851' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHS' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
e9f2236629ab34ae6fbfa0c6fe3634ca
6817b8dc456e928115c491841cb6d13b7b6c0711
'2011-10-28T03:11:33-04:00'
describe
'547066' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHT' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
fc91c6b8fc54b8730cb71501d9158ac9
177ded408403f6d00b6953308dca32684c5bd0d8
'2011-10-28T03:14:34-04:00'
describe
'138789' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHU' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
85c39bb2e87a56d0a390795ab45306ab
b57b56ef8e26739290b55c2d5339176c0b020046
'2011-10-28T03:11:46-04:00'
describe
'46024' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHV' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0b3cf92ca32e35c436c99a7d5babcc26
0cce0a85b708b7d5b6e2e74d779f93abd0fbc9f2
'2011-10-28T03:10:39-04:00'
describe
'4386840' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHW' 'sip-files00013.tif'
6ba22887471d423a25dba88d736a95fc
3089f6489e55b34c04ec32ff1507af17c6f4e72f
'2011-10-28T03:11:17-04:00'
describe
'17615' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHX' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
b7c60c775aa7b8cc7cb4d29ef858a269
1fb0921601b38b459534ebaef235d7ff929fa2fe
describe
'547138' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHY' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
cc57a021b82945593329fd60ac7503ff
6b6d21b1480334dc4e4f7bbddaf6f2560b088df5
'2011-10-28T03:10:23-04:00'
describe
'177129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGHZ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
4bb6da143d979c91c00fe4d00a8471c2
258d640b19d7ded1cce51e7c8eaf2b2b6a08a1a7
'2011-10-28T03:10:14-04:00'
describe
'60951' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIA' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
ce041f0c6c45a0f2a536033de1a9c3c0
541b2f3794393613aab87e14d617bdd79c914b68
'2011-10-28T03:11:39-04:00'
describe
'4387816' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIB' 'sip-files00014.tif'
77cccbfae55e7353d33bad45ce48276c
cedc37a9bc7fdf7603c139a844f00d5ee7815d36
'2011-10-28T03:11:52-04:00'
describe
'21240' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIC' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
148796aac29fe35cc93eebfc4233bb86
d2988af1db79e6847f1641694a1a2297f40a7806
'2011-10-28T03:11:23-04:00'
describe
'547180' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGID' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
8f017ff3d5dbe74b9ad21e9ab1056387
347a4cd19d5a1b74f3401c687dea14b7b4b94b1a
'2011-10-28T03:09:42-04:00'
describe
'180701' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
9ffc1efe752c5117ab2f0fb282f55cd2
2c8f12d9235ed0adb65c65269157ac8f1031b90d
'2011-10-28T03:10:59-04:00'
describe
'60884' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIF' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
3561763277fca378e72968f474a57cae
3488e71b027ba8a7af0215af2ec9bb7c142cd6c9
describe
'4387840' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIG' 'sip-files00015.tif'
5a58641428b02b6bdad8ddbe167a128f
d4067dc475210a133d21d79f48da42d8a1382993
describe
'21416' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIH' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
a0605b3a3bc3834d81bbcff97563699e
db572dbe5436d8c32ed4c6fb7c52955c1bd4a7c7
'2011-10-28T03:12:40-04:00'
describe
'547120' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGII' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
65c73b25ec6d5d6b63e9f8d6cc660e53
a69806b904c43c802af03541094c377a02534633
'2011-10-28T03:10:00-04:00'
describe
'174231' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIJ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
5169008c66142fc880b7178cb980fb8c
378574bc245ea33bfd74445026c1a2f8cc6a9067
describe
'58486' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIK' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
2491909d1dff439ce1f65507a4bade4a
c0e170ff488ac0a03a6b96f3a1a6accaf2e27933
'2011-10-28T03:09:29-04:00'
describe
'4387616' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIL' 'sip-files00016.tif'
fbe97c6de26c95ffe03f2ea96b80200f
47180f974b5d2e15e658fe18c1a7a76166678938
describe
'20497' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIM' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7bf83d8575f297adb79ee30753401584
86c8e57e36d8a358b4e61977775afc51c8c3a1f0
describe
'547152' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIN' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
07a30805d2835e36f77e8ba05115516a
ed76726849a9bf516684a0edbc2e2f2561e872dc
describe
'175491' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIO' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
d0e2abed9053638ce30bac65d4240573
7f12e59e750b5de0de3d956c461a91234e1a3f1d
'2011-10-28T03:12:36-04:00'
describe
'58725' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
41fd8c4c0c74d54d3ec00f1f3fb4346c
68c9f69415793e27f6f9fea4e4e7da3419b7b62f
describe
'4387712' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIQ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
44e612f104eb41388eb502a714861e17
e28dfcb08b4b95f4967bc63f4945e57f30fe6777
'2011-10-28T03:13:59-04:00'
describe
'20585' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIR' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
5da3b7502357659557584e2b4798e388
b2171953cd7f1726f42f507a6449157043744e1f
describe
'547146' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIS' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
b62679ec7ca8d4b779e31e720c8c83ef
719b9fb4d0dc2100feadc4f2f6d6cb17c73ab2e9
'2011-10-28T03:14:45-04:00'
describe
'175614' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIT' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
e39a13a3873f050edb0829162422290f
d619434d536c44a0ad9506f24be8457d61268605
'2011-10-28T03:10:29-04:00'
describe
'61067' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
b753d8d127331a54b00f81593b91a42e
b6aea80b886b9d7fed05927afe722a1c025fc659
describe
'4388120' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9b79336fdf746b00e42e5dea97459aaf
f3475f033f88a831c767a200c946169a4a26d99d
'2011-10-28T03:10:17-04:00'
describe
'21889' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIW' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
b9fb7110f6d77f91ffc39175755b8746
8b2e7d34942f012b48d3baa75e0efdca531bcf8a
'2011-10-28T03:10:11-04:00'
describe
'536304' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIX' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
2193defc7eae967ca809b77bdcb6d6e9
9e3030be33fb7a31c8e13b409a93b0fba0975eae
'2011-10-28T03:10:53-04:00'
describe
'170014' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIY' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
3607826ccac77b2ead8e7e8ee1fca549
4a76c604260ec86cc67f46babb2e035d0ce21d64
describe
'53613' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGIZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
4d0f2ac7b71c3dd3493499ff460db6b6
a81176021d43303620e1904182b0dd9c68e01cd6
'2011-10-28T03:10:35-04:00'
describe
'4302096' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJA' 'sip-files00019.tif'
9e03c314678dc3401d764ee50079863b
69b2a0ed4ffd900af3ce86b5378c7415069c3410
'2011-10-28T03:10:30-04:00'
describe
'20054' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8a44cfbd901bb1173a3a4dc767a44166
723b06a90dd02c85f9bbefbc4545beac13b25079
'2011-10-28T03:14:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
1e75a93a1e146a4711461e861d9ad55d
523f351ee33ee7e02e24e1bd58e115cfce498416
'2011-10-28T03:11:22-04:00'
describe
'177422' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
fc8ddc0c21bf971cbfc4f7acd2769dfe
a6d3e398c9829db19b5315e535c7f64826db39fd
describe
'60439' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
a66e800016dd03d01ada0f33fd63cebe
c0f2db08b012f13a4b738d46e15308fd5fc242ac
'2011-10-28T03:14:13-04:00'
describe
'4387720' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJF' 'sip-files00020.tif'
1de485413a679ee74aa4dddcd6aead17
0517bcb7f7b707e18ca2da8de4b899dceabb68c9
describe
'21008' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJG' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c19e622675e28dc8951a36c131949c25
e250aa4f16a9da1392f46a921321110416b8369e
describe
'536474' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJH' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
bb221bca6d7a2ea93e82a5ed3b72b23c
89eced6300f6ffeef42bf6e9ac42dbc6526ce80f
describe
'185791' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJI' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
cbb92899d692e99903daf9a27ceb3209
e9522bc6ff3279994c9f1310c8fc0a86813da724
describe
'54559' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJJ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
3ac74939d5eb7e30309496332af3a024
8d054c4f4c3dc333e71f1e32ab27f6e32fa1a24d
'2011-10-28T03:09:57-04:00'
describe
'4302004' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
637237bbc1dec650bf308b6f33e07737
921f1ffb331e1580f5791846e84b8feeb2132564
describe
'19781' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJL' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
6dbe89b73422eccc61db7eb8b2604dd0
d9779e28dc202d3207b8dd59238654ffc78fae84
'2011-10-28T03:12:20-04:00'
describe
'536490' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJM' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
9db7d439bb03c42950b2491770d6075c
e6a98cd739a742558a547bba28ac75bb4fa26465
'2011-10-28T03:09:31-04:00'
describe
'179521' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJN' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
bc93916cc7ad7b7876d9a49e761c80ef
0a52ba5d1c8cdcafa0049d87cc17b711b55e0280
'2011-10-28T03:13:15-04:00'
describe
'61387' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
8b612434d0366e43bd616782946945cf
d807b4e1cc76ded06e734acbcd01e827e84bff53
'2011-10-28T03:13:17-04:00'
describe
'4302192' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
0d279bfd5bc7eb537f5daa69665456c8
4a535df9ab7831770740214dd4a69163c9648473
'2011-10-28T03:11:05-04:00'
describe
'20921' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJQ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
26d48a76cd143fb43f6dd237df79ea31
163d14f9914a8d977140db4ff10a50387d028f4e
'2011-10-28T03:09:37-04:00'
describe
'534503' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJR' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
38fb16b20f0104a9bc406b2403d8f56a
ab7a30022612c6fe33dd061e5ef1d999b20c56ea
'2011-10-28T03:09:48-04:00'
describe
'171712' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJS' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
18dac33d1133d8bcc7b67405863e0b08
2623ca9c6ad4840245bf2fea7fb104c890164ab7
'2011-10-28T03:13:47-04:00'
describe
'50797' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJT' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
c420eb4c664e173301f688854b6cded9
96307b04cbeb4cdc5405554bf646e72494faf271
describe
'4287536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJU' 'sip-files00023.tif'
51277d8ff20eab9a8f973d0342a4a2e1
faccaa1ad3a8db39fc5d3c183f38f205350f6137
describe
'18935' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJV' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
851ca4ba38b995ddc8a771b31ce42a79
a7e6e89299ad85308b14b7c3afddf7bc6f7a5084
describe
'543584' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJW' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
c811671da73e38e77381dc5557da2c8d
dea9feb9d206af21003526520318a03417b7687a
'2011-10-28T03:13:38-04:00'
describe
'179661' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJX' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
8481b3cc2f020f1f16d8fc6fba3cbbde
224635a286c0c1edddc0a2b2e22a605f271ce3d0
describe
'63170' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJY' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
0c3aaf95a7caa639b64cab6af8437a0a
fec92c5533a7224da18dd91e3047dae9fb4d605a
'2011-10-28T03:09:44-04:00'
describe
'4359576' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGJZ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
235be097758a567abe9697e45d08a549
34d2a66adddb480405f84d8917bdb239f38fd481
describe
'21723' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKA' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
8807d3f08604af1feaadeb1451ae22ed
b39526417bf163e5ebcffbf3579a8238f566df05
describe
'538274' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
4a2fa4c29e8855c795d53d7585a65016
34f89aaf1094e06b6d31826cee4cd4ba2e6038e4
'2011-10-28T03:11:36-04:00'
describe
'164519' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKC' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
cead64e34d3a9d85ff7f928b5e0a2384
0a3f1360150ab03f02808e87b1c1cc554cd5f95d
describe
'55392' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
26a613880de7b5b11e1b7920e3788ffc
96260ad9c5d38007ef6f01c1e9bb079b1de263ac
describe
'4316880' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4a25bd50954a81d2c89f52bd5e602a55
26da4b6922df638057fcb4f45d5adb186a88356a
'2011-10-28T03:11:11-04:00'
describe
'21313' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKF' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
07bc82afcd6c10f83e8566ffcba15f71
90a0309764b8fae90c4e09d6d5a94bb138acf29c
'2011-10-28T03:10:36-04:00'
describe
'547175' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
72a548983fef72399a53eae3e5d07332
7b2a7ea211e4953f1c702d9bea50fd24516ef2fb
describe
'175786' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKH' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
40988611235131dd7d1ed698d479ecb2
b0ada0815bf7434890d5c07039704e6782e340d8
'2011-10-28T03:10:51-04:00'
describe
'61146' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKI' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
3f2ea7b358a3201bc20d7928f2499ae8
80eba161483696d546c70c4c026d328c89630952
'2011-10-28T03:10:31-04:00'
describe
'4388052' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKJ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
7e0f9cf2cb65c3732bea7e2a036d4b78
1911c5f0deb864d640537e478e637d182853caf5
describe
'21680' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKK' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
19a961f282312f89627ce3d2a301fe44
7f3c5c7628c22ccebf3d5522644415d9a815590f
describe
'547164' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
7ab943291682519dad9393205866e585
f0ce3a7491fe855b0f5760577c69c44f2518376b
describe
'167259' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKM' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
f499baffdca0a3e55095045df8bf9094
8ed78d7e10ae83b8b55e364094611b9eebe72eea
'2011-10-28T03:09:32-04:00'
describe
'55429' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
b021c7c95fd6f37dcd3991456f5ea1e1
8e46745bb96b3320613cf6af35d83a2991e09e02
describe
'4388164' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
27802621fec95c88cbacd87294575efd
3aa5eebb86356fa617db415e49ebdc7a48323dc6
'2011-10-28T03:10:54-04:00'
describe
'21064' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKP' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
a853771edd7fcdbfb968260c47f4bea2
8ea11deb764ceed01484e82d8fe92ae5b510a9d3
describe
'547099' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
431c89fda36d1da875fa9bcc60e88a37
175a2149773bf37400beee0146fabea49cbb5db4
'2011-10-28T03:14:20-04:00'
describe
'173888' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
6689d6a79e4b01eaf0a080b70b5b9581
39879e2909c9f4ba2115922ed20ce8a1dc9bf055
describe
'59465' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKS' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
355f8a07ce3c644d82ca9f1b356758d5
dd1d8505485267f577ad998e5513c0d4651f54b7
'2011-10-28T03:12:55-04:00'
describe
'4387736' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKT' 'sip-files00028.tif'
119fa2f5ee46471ff4fd64bcb21a6dc4
e3383dae2c368cc8b3c218dcade1f3a638442012
describe
'20903' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKU' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
057be7b1d6fee24d5769b5cfa26ec19a
bad598d7a34ff864299015e3340865dcc556f1b4
'2011-10-28T03:11:43-04:00'
describe
'555436' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKV' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
155b802c0417aa5a8d1879ee8e23f42e
3d074846d9e4457ecbb8d2942ec230253ab03018
'2011-10-28T03:09:30-04:00'
describe
'174118' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKW' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
f3de1ee2f88c838c83adb608abb9d923
f4b1d33b0d7cea80d2638a6c1fda7152bf1227ca
'2011-10-28T03:12:59-04:00'
describe
'52380' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
ec2a9689d2e2917de3c9a057cda4624d
946e63378fcd1ddef0464f12e17feb7dc3474b6b
describe
'4454932' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
becb0c730c6c412618d22464507dce8c
7c94d53ff1cee7ae4b9d76a5f2d384c3a55e52dc
'2011-10-28T03:11:42-04:00'
describe
'21894' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGKZ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
441294d3bb19ee7bc01921e3d08d5d66
b8737dc8011ef1c2a8f2d3174d319bc733b2cfd8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLA' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
e5546164f126b2003841f42288e0cd48
8f4e7b8008a28be8c3cdbc8019dc40d9fd313b6a
'2011-10-28T03:14:08-04:00'
describe
'170736' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLB' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
8d38dbe8dc013eb3cbf20057a99c3d29
0011504e0a99592d966f8a8fda7ba59447d8963a
'2011-10-28T03:10:08-04:00'
describe
'59855' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
167c4c4112afda602084c1e6d925a2bc
e47fc3b2b7583b001b6e4cda07dda2b676e87f94
'2011-10-28T03:12:24-04:00'
describe
'4387964' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLD' 'sip-files00030.tif'
7c3176df3acda0370926746845cea11b
b34f8f7f62a1e579a3d4c5b756a4ac7ad9d61a6a
'2011-10-28T03:11:10-04:00'
describe
'21467' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLE' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
6b315fdb1d875d54cf531a5ef1c3f621
0111ffd2b1d94ea9f6927d44bbe41f17684241c9
'2011-10-28T03:11:12-04:00'
describe
'547167' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLF' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
068f5e501d8d8971f72b9ec9b34e3044
25336e43e7d4af1fa2c615bb1b83d5590b8489cf
describe
'172263' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLG' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
97401e767ef05355fbdb2752fd9ef736
b98f69e3479d7f62fec91184680a710fdc703618
'2011-10-28T03:14:31-04:00'
describe
'57723' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLH' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
2947ff775c61d554caa01d78acc179a5
db06efe6b4a4e090a2477e004d1bd23de7ba9408
'2011-10-28T03:11:20-04:00'
describe
'4388160' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
749b375fd5c94dedc9f87db970593459
8908515f95204f2dd7096bd2e722cbbade12bb75
'2011-10-28T03:12:32-04:00'
describe
'21374' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLJ' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
00fa4333d599f296c452096e44fbf6cc
9cb0eee5867376fcc4e1672eef355e45b6a201bf
describe
'550718' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLK' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
9b8261bc88d4c0015bbb2aac845f57ee
d12531ac33ded2f2d77a5a93c9576244b1fb8878
describe
'180476' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLL' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
7a73707e19e7988e9b9a35925b009662
998028da6f5f94551ead263b07dd065a3015485a
'2011-10-28T03:13:11-04:00'
describe
'60679' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLM' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a577e39e4e6e8fc5f7447f49dd8c98d9
d2f41a5c9e725aa8b3dfded2138fa8febe0c5b18
'2011-10-28T03:12:31-04:00'
describe
'4416496' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
84286f970ae3c470afa56211ab70cbd0
c695f61ef9244fb51973fa5f7376808ddddc8917
describe
'21536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLO' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
423757c1bb42b894444c8090e0f70d05
9c768a88091146d3c974a0d195cc28b2e376bb0a
'2011-10-28T03:11:53-04:00'
describe
'541815' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
e71c408a488c1852e1b637de27f15e43
e332bd6360841a73abec0ab99c4f4089e2d3a007
'2011-10-28T03:10:19-04:00'
describe
'166469' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
9bfadaf8d96094e5b052738aea18707b
da954e3e3157ea014d7ba7a228c6c66c98e0f46d
describe
'46243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLR' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
cf18a90bea712f7a0d53a6bb53c96c30
84c9a6bc1e994eb2bbb6add84c0c0fcea91f946f
'2011-10-28T03:11:54-04:00'
describe
'4344600' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLS' 'sip-files00033.tif'
433c02160ec5514f061a6289e2d13390
7b72ea379aff91e6831e37cd09ef40829c8c41a5
'2011-10-28T03:13:26-04:00'
describe
'18720' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
5b2660305354f979f0ede1eba0ddcad7
73725e67cc5df8c219d7ebeb121dade54863d0b8
'2011-10-28T03:09:36-04:00'
describe
'547133' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLU' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
3259a4263eb63412a9476a50cf7871a2
f7fb757f1c1e533cb91d65e6898cdad691c87bdd
'2011-10-28T03:13:35-04:00'
describe
'176958' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLV' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
39056bb0c6e4c8aec2245f5a3c10e061
3a16e230513be0f84fe86f1759c3ba5f816ad3bf
describe
'61807' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLW' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
efb792beabc9239d47753447d338b4ab
792874e1e7263f4a57fab5664ce03d4b8c05add7
'2011-10-28T03:11:57-04:00'
describe
'4388096' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
35116ac2c8745b319988efcc34233753
bbba09bae138428c0d3f082adbc07dafa86387e7
describe
'21858' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLY' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
92c38d7b161a00150eb05f3bc01418e7
f84dcdf0bb702f85fa24635d96f1b2c8cff0e23d
'2011-10-28T03:11:24-04:00'
describe
'547174' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGLZ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
6829f0497a4e525b71067dd3459d867e
fa29e184194b0fc160e5f7aa59c322639c508e6a
'2011-10-28T03:09:28-04:00'
describe
'147304' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMA' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
7b47d9c54f776b1497e4b1fe74d086c0
c2de7fa12ee09d3e8a34d45054d71503d3156204
'2011-10-28T03:09:49-04:00'
describe
'48652' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
674feb06354b8af32dd666a9e8167a9b
2e9bed401290bac8c5dd93cca20c8ce08cc51c58
'2011-10-28T03:14:44-04:00'
describe
'4387512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
4d9b7f60cb22868f63a9bf792599c22d
b1efb7f8cb6f6dee22b868f28746e18792ae46de
'2011-10-28T03:13:48-04:00'
describe
'19106' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMD' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
ee24a6a0dd7495a65c5ec35b9c4a4043
ab64abfab0e85a7559bcb55700d4a8dfdce3938d
'2011-10-28T03:12:21-04:00'
describe
'547144' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGME' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
824f47289adbd644b7ee0e516502c655
1be2e7fb1b8b806c20f107f5c43fd55b94a81188
describe
'170614' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMF' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
b18302db826d536d7739f4e71607f4e5
f8b82814c53a69ef6f07772dc280ec1b94a8cc6d
describe
'55219' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMG' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
5c104f8868e12507022e4121f0660fdd
e5c06975e60826c03a6967a36b1b9c6240574772
'2011-10-28T03:14:14-04:00'
describe
'4387644' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f22f6153bf2fec57ac823acfd93e2d7d
41eee2233c7bb37306bb2c3cee24399c316d1379
'2011-10-28T03:13:07-04:00'
describe
'20210' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMI' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
86cbfbd7be964ff11a7d20a77ef418db
47be996a31ab60930a843816fc851c0e58514afd
describe
'547143' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMJ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
0c630b7d278d4ceff83512dd065323fc
6b87ed9b923d73857798003da2a9e57cbec1d317
'2011-10-28T03:13:25-04:00'
describe
'162492' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMK' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
d74884a0cf2f67e5a88e47cd2cb8ec51
5486f395444749c7d9f6e3348f0bb3126d16a05f
'2011-10-28T03:13:16-04:00'
describe
'47085' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGML' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
5c1026c8a8390f5935588d95d5f5d819
20d8841ed935b7bc2c8787f5fca56c41f004ec9d
describe
'4387544' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMM' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c9b6c96e06929a69833256563f99df2a
24c4302557af8f7fd12648bd3fd8bcfa19d460a6
'2011-10-28T03:12:34-04:00'
describe
'19096' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
127b0e11bfc89fe06c6c6586892b8606
12cf4845246f4314a38dc8b99ccbb6a7d268d52c
'2011-10-28T03:11:41-04:00'
describe
'547168' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
9582a632df31845c3563262d35793218
d390a199335a38687bd3a9484b3dfcdbce4627e8
describe
'159400' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMP' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
03ce0b480f8ea5e4cc30ed8cc5f8921f
1752b445d2a00fa3776836829c27c4b97889ee7d
'2011-10-28T03:11:56-04:00'
describe
'51576' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMQ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
c4c007d7554dc1afe857584380559220
1480665e7d8e874edb911e57e4669199b5335b2f
'2011-10-28T03:11:01-04:00'
describe
'4387436' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
2bbab151c1d98a0d47da13ef69863b3b
87d15c2af72db5e37ccea2e179e26a1d1fad2c6f
'2011-10-28T03:12:33-04:00'
describe
'19671' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMS' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ce046394095825a90c5725470e37e9c5
1a1dc537478865ef6eb6756aa9549e0618bb32ba
describe
'531463' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMT' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
f524d51f59844fa15bc88cdbae4b693f
2a96aa5009222a2060d5d2eedb04633d91bedffe
describe
'157610' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMU' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
2d0587079e3dfeb7959be9829152ec3c
ccb612ec859a8d235e69d00666b11247d402e4e9
'2011-10-28T03:10:27-04:00'
describe
'44853' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMV' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
13ef43e9bd9ada4036f3de347622e363
29d64751208cf882b67083240515823cea78c59c
describe
'4261408' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMW' 'sip-files00039.tif'
bf9f031a4d7fa208ecbc1475b8279d83
24de92af62a0a5b6d09c19c0c839470403f5b32f
describe
'17853' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMX' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f216cee020f7b3adc676ac26abd81bbc
49a56f9927e58c2dfd637f1c704b31d4e4cce626
'2011-10-28T03:10:28-04:00'
describe
'547178' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMY' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
52d6e534c085e9a01286328d50ab74c5
44dab039f04a1db0f591e06981771d406ec858cf
'2011-10-28T03:10:21-04:00'
describe
'171834' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGMZ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
7310791fc61eb764608f915c348bfc88
59881b649019df7d47d16a3b265f522e9c18a60e
'2011-10-28T03:12:18-04:00'
describe
'58615' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNA' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
bb46d46dd2e0c6705aae5835b95a68d2
e4afa653db3b99214eb6c706b27effae44f45d67
'2011-10-28T03:12:49-04:00'
describe
'4387724' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNB' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ef608f4e9ff26558eb6357486df91d6c
aa60e6488b33292659d06fdfc42764767fe2df04
'2011-10-28T03:10:13-04:00'
describe
'20573' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7ced8537fa624f11969e503d4affe9f5
9a353d89489b27c4282182ce44206a76e2069dfa
'2011-10-28T03:10:46-04:00'
describe
'531703' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGND' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
c06701d741b924d8a06aae62d9e2a040
29c166df68df8f4acc2eca9231fb106b9628c8e7
'2011-10-28T03:10:37-04:00'
describe
'126457' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
eaaf442a62f7110973f89c03fcc7cd0a
ec461dc485a2931bf73c890782dc646528883918
'2011-10-28T03:11:47-04:00'
describe
'36913' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNF' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c94df469dea3499c1816b1edfb5d4767
86e2706582a111b1060db1bf143bcae8ed72eaa0
describe
'4265196' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNG' 'sip-files00041.tif'
e14a45d63bdba95d2fb2ddf275b2d071
b2400745c28991200e10b40b71d5186b50758581
describe
'16965' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNH' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
9bae596455682da768912090e235132c
d4b9212cebe5ec927a54de85a086d93d4d79688b
describe
'548704' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNI' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
adc3aa9f51d8c650ad1a0e8046c24820
a06843f48e3dbe720be92f9e0438c286fd43ff41
describe
'170611' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNJ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
87f0e7f287c3cc9c31ef2b2a7a4b442a
74454f707fea0a693e0ac0c69f33fefa70ef476f
describe
'57066' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNK' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
6df4c0106adcbf3a352975adae7d69a0
fe7d868c756ba1cba8ec2c11104994a732df0fca
describe
'4399956' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNL' 'sip-files00042.tif'
0974648528b28075f41a8b5876105b63
1fa0b8e09809f6db3168c9e70e5f13d3a41f3195
'2011-10-28T03:13:49-04:00'
describe
'20002' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNM' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
548d565d0244a221dd4ddb35827d6548
f64544fcd2e64c02a68be7fba161c258f079c8d9
'2011-10-28T03:10:22-04:00'
describe
'534622' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNN' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
35f526e00d61f126ed630cfb31dc9599
1456373a66b12bbdf6c0425679a1a9547c377e29
'2011-10-28T03:10:55-04:00'
describe
'195588' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNO' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
20ee437dc5c489bf5a9391034178d0ba
c241aa6535cd7782229537505a0191aa1249c0dd
'2011-10-28T03:14:30-04:00'
describe
'51510' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNP' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
0b481fefddc8e9663a18c3a3ff5c914f
b69fe70121810da418ebe509cb94a51853cefd10
describe
'4287632' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNQ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ba5ebc8f538db44aec2384bd2e605288
b816fecf32f55959d2a39848f1534ad381b3a0df
'2011-10-28T03:14:32-04:00'
describe
'19387' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNR' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
de43194a4749258923ba91ad1aa12506
f222cdcacb731fee9244bd891e118a037f947627
describe
'538251' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNS' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
661e02fb2f08f4dd3fb757ab49e518a7
e72f80d55a6446ed042fed9d6a3eaf70e194c03a
'2011-10-28T03:13:33-04:00'
describe
'172088' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNT' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
884b0423256749f1f1602e3193d2a9b2
cd8c17cdeaa916c17e323e63f7e00afb32e12f65
describe
'58083' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c55650528e9bee35205bf90145aa61c6
6f6775e1638f6b0b8821a84629ce655e74601da1
'2011-10-28T03:14:19-04:00'
describe
'4316128' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
e628ceb67ed45bbb6aaed7adcd4e0bc3
e228831cc612437014c987e3f18b69c07828cf9b
'2011-10-28T03:11:38-04:00'
describe
'20155' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNW' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
b9fa83f6b6ff42098b1be8a887a20a71
db7697dad5765d1ff5620e8b76fd0c789e753c19
'2011-10-28T03:10:06-04:00'
describe
'540055' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNX' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
b2df4929eaec021a77f0c56fdad382a0
af55fd23a274337034498c88cc688f819ac34802
describe
'161135' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNY' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
6633905a01df7f8b1b09b07a37e48219
140fcd72b42bc85281b9845cbb77a9709f6b44bc
describe
'52384' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGNZ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
a5a84c5291180eae93acf3091d8a68ca
be3193304ad1edf99f4e0bbf302a11f622a15874
describe
'4330492' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOA' 'sip-files00045.tif'
6e0f4f729f585d23e5015141c505b34f
9cf1cbe29df2973325a449b000c2703728cad40c
'2011-10-28T03:10:04-04:00'
describe
'19760' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
1fb5be4a8771d5aeb8cee1e2bd02f2d6
965226e89abd21131b68a65fdb82df80b6d8cfca
'2011-10-28T03:11:51-04:00'
describe
'547076' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
8c6534096352240e9130459b821b3d14
ceffdee95b422a817ecb877d3117b79fbff698e5
describe
'163238' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
2db2482a62d917c032b28dab04ae5bec
9d90d0deaa0afd6c2ce745ae87f58826c5e466dc
describe
'55835' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOE' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
d651f3fbe7f9b84f8d38b88e84e50bb7
7c18f49c7b7fb3e95478a326163ca5d723b197df
describe
'4387336' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOF' 'sip-files00046.tif'
5ba62c0cba4d59ece0016442f607c48c
36efc75e69ede4379f8e167d1e0b75429d763372
describe
'19840' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOG' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c2e6b00e0d4e06a4a5dda01e40747e7b
782280ebe375586f98b61f0fe35968fe58718a47
describe
'545358' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
1d69f157ec064a2c9e86eff08b1d63fe
c15c03e4221f7ef8bab90dbf679ba226c65ab214
describe
'114462' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
0ba5b61dd76d7bae7c8ea3ab516138eb
7f9023324326ccb9bde41ad0b34043389b9f936a
'2011-10-28T03:09:52-04:00'
describe
'33042' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOJ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
61435e0e41057f3649c9cccb7f45bbd2
946e9ba558d128bf30b8c2010a770777ed162dc2
'2011-10-28T03:14:01-04:00'
describe
'4373176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOK' 'sip-files00047.tif'
32fb487d1afdf61f9f57b54f3b150ebe
b65ce63d07f1792bad5e10f5dbff2d1531c684f7
'2011-10-28T03:14:21-04:00'
describe
'15780' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOL' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
bf115a3da3b13ba6639135e049a700fa
8d9b4db0e0a7ced9651b234f33f77e1ad6e9eced
'2011-10-28T03:10:25-04:00'
describe
'547100' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOM' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
f43ca3cc0fc52a76fee21bc3b7a343ef
878466ad570ff8f0b441c33894d9ae24118bf7fb
'2011-10-28T03:13:10-04:00'
describe
'161129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGON' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
d4b9f1209c7d4cef3531e3d067344a12
0a49035e28e32c68cc8c6d308680f703add58c81
describe
'55517' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOO' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
2ed23656bbceb03d9162b0769e44f834
0028f97ccfa0dacefdc74130bb937a2a681decb7
'2011-10-28T03:11:37-04:00'
describe
'4387320' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOP' 'sip-files00048.tif'
a22c41aae023f4605ccd5948d6188956
99a8685a945ca466a3042c9d17bd1379e5f07707
'2011-10-28T03:09:40-04:00'
describe
'19799' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOQ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
2e2cc4306f2c3093998da6f888ba19f4
f1363ec12b474524e19715b7d0fd815cd5a3e119
describe
'534681' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOR' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
093efadb0f5b096f12e34d284a1fa5b1
6b6a0aea4065e0afe0485fc41a5084a962c7dadb
describe
'178279' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOS' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
9687633d59340a7955449417620f6c18
26dd4cd2e04c5c2813e508b50f8d7f5e566b46e1
describe
'59891' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOT' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
52b7a79ce270cbcf9217ccb79d0bf63a
7304fe809822514cd6f4dc3a73a2fce5c1b0eba6
describe
'4287788' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c151ddf835f5137119608b9511d8581b
b4713837eb683ec6d96e23718368ef0e45786296
'2011-10-28T03:12:09-04:00'
describe
'20565' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOV' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
6e035adb6bae0a6b0781910c55be9b6e
1a28ff8c1d3af4cffd13b12776d3ecda0d580525
'2011-10-28T03:11:09-04:00'
describe
'547182' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOW' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
8d14d0f8068a5084b84e52b8a3f3a5d8
ee23ce6a4a38e3512fe6ba73df7882e7ba518675
describe
'162324' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOX' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
636822b3a5b889f10f042e573e43533e
cff0e3c67c7b916eebb6ab58b1aed0aef0ae58bd
'2011-10-28T03:12:12-04:00'
describe
'55087' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOY' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
134fe2c40199e08d3c424efa9b9aa841
72c177cd69533ab9c3dd851e157170d223492c43
'2011-10-28T03:12:05-04:00'
describe
'4387264' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGOZ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
f6167e42ca70be8b05f201198e6fdacf
03cb8ce02ff9bf4b66f81325d6a592fccdb70312
'2011-10-28T03:10:43-04:00'
describe
'19721' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPA' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
9df5109f27e89ef1ecb3e778083c00e1
906ebe95b9f123687b187125de0d0bf5d6785df1
describe
'540053' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
cb8e5931338d47bbb86b91280fb8f4f6
6fb921992e97a94b84b4deda918b39bc49f9856a
describe
'187435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPC' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
48c12ac5bc1d467d41e9588dce2d0f99
3ca6063abf4e8de99cdce555d53943f80c015c07
'2011-10-28T03:12:06-04:00'
describe
'58231' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPD' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
4afa82e145d25999d5130c36e7c82ff8
b55859e5c46f886444325bd0ee59be3179a22475
describe
'4331244' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPE' 'sip-files00051.tif'
507ae794defbab1e5144995537719c2b
a71430d9115d79b8ee679345e21df8840fff2bfa
describe
'21837' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPF' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
4691d4821d9f97c01c5b133050f6b61f
0aa7e8d73f25858c1fb781744c58e4fa02bfa3de
'2011-10-28T03:10:02-04:00'
describe
'547166' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPG' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
b53461a445892c60a538cd26a40a6292
35652d53d52043f7561d2cf3d6e870260c7ce10e
'2011-10-28T03:13:03-04:00'
describe
'155635' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPH' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
3aa3050c752eca200d1b7a8534d185d7
5071cda553f6001e8e0df71cd7d6c9ff01064d01
describe
'46125' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
abc92084a57bce552de217eb3f7a8399
9ae2c17a383772bbf5035be51994a11f0d27f392
describe
'4387180' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
588d0b75ea07a435fecbacd866d01695
622a113e4245eccfdadebfe9a6380b5d04a7b80b
describe
'18218' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPK' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
b5ba7cdc05264a1d2bfbf79ca7339cbe
fd2ca75180d213bb95b318e2f682197bd11e8a18
'2011-10-28T03:13:43-04:00'
describe
'547117' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPL' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
39204719b31a45fa27c0d10976db0665
c6bcff01ee8b48dd26f51fca6df7c47336491683
'2011-10-28T03:11:34-04:00'
describe
'176535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPM' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
8cda97f9bb703c3ab050b27a8e3cb8b4
3e6c352b077543598cdd8e2ce19525ae15e7092d
'2011-10-28T03:14:03-04:00'
describe
'55985' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPN' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
be862ec19ba17128398d935aa903de98
dfd2d21c48394b7c19fbda516af1e52f2619dc5c
'2011-10-28T03:14:02-04:00'
describe
'4388340' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPO' 'sip-files00053.tif'
5218fe3144d5fb26275d23d0800c0790
0cf0767f8b9d068a78b98a77f6bc9e03d1497629
'2011-10-28T03:11:25-04:00'
describe
'21664' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPP' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c0f6f63b44901bc11f621849f6f6c66e
15fbf6a8156c454f3e0d9577a758f9a967f44139
'2011-10-28T03:09:39-04:00'
describe
'550737' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPQ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
92ca605322d41d05a79e6a214c4cad00
c48f085249eae50547faee6dd3be42caaf85b051
describe
'156972' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPR' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
3168cce7271ff3822b116d9616f02f16
7262def38045e45d71c93376e6a697035bc4c68b
describe
'51902' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPS' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
fd338b13c42874f80bbc14509f04ac40
6d9b2c940488bf6bd053583f978c6bedf472e2ef
describe
'4416328' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPT' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c2a1daa98d8c2b05282364adae314d77
5389e3062b2f7660b4d58b27326da06bc6a8b09f
'2011-10-28T03:10:09-04:00'
describe
'19912' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPU' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
5a6d2af97cc2a818469951a0481b9b92
4021c0a8f431964dec7a0a5a2172eaf176ad43b4
'2011-10-28T03:09:33-04:00'
describe
'558007' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPV' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
720557926109c8f886e36e370421829f
95fd00bf657b86b1e7207ec6daf35d1b8acfad05
'2011-10-28T03:09:54-04:00'
describe
'118725' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPW' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1fd560db4ca545adb52774253f58bb86
deb45f36f5ce059dbc0766c8b3fdd5ae228f427f
describe
'34784' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPX' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c70c3e257884a11d6d8a341b3790b4cc
da97503c4fc2007178e5dde114518729bcac2a49
'2011-10-28T03:11:21-04:00'
describe
'4474056' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPY' 'sip-files00055.tif'
7ad7250b3e04e757e4422ccac5de883c
e217f08d53e6f4fa9eb03307b106906bcfb2f7c0
describe
'15913' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGPZ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
c6d59d53772355b0a3426e0938bf9c2d
c9a2b0bc31cddb4c9f1269e4dfab8151894a3b9b
'2011-10-28T03:12:57-04:00'
describe
'547185' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQA' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
8911bca4da25e25cbcf6b91104c91f62
cf4e46a88d1bb05d9575951c467e6142046041bf
'2011-10-28T03:12:38-04:00'
describe
'139202' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQB' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
60ef56b40a0927f8ad263d574601f6eb
d0fca678e3c71a32f040b7a6e96fde58e1eb6fd8
describe
'47145' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQC' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
eb8a3ba49469c162648c1b2cd6b3d6c8
3c9ed11233a6680c4261e0f6a5d1a1a63fdfefdc
describe
'4386940' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQD' 'sip-files00056.tif'
2eedcac6cf31faf5c91d02ce855d6edd
bbb583e4839e2dfcc52e7901c462fc6372b95f9a
describe
'17826' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQE' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
209d2284af5a25968622a06de8d92750
84abb22cca04b51c512d9fe63852083ecacc224f
'2011-10-28T03:10:52-04:00'
describe
'547184' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQF' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
d2c60346f4b384404d3c7784a289dd8e
fc8d4b55bbd327e0d389c7ad6b447a8d173d7fb5
describe
'146891' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQG' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
8d98053d3f2a3a64413a355571a26e44
a38c204df5a59fee48b2a7e3cfdc114ad8114d0d
describe
'50838' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
ee1b0f82616cf8b21ffdc69a9057764f
88670e21f21d511674e1ca51d2be413285ea7c36
describe
'4387152' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
a0aad558b5b3042ea8386fb6f8a9b01a
5626232a1e491c0d72c4e8c97870b3af3c65a9ad
'2011-10-28T03:14:36-04:00'
describe
'18629' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQJ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
a593f34bb62f5d9258982b9e5b07adb0
2c54d880b427999a60d1994461f72dd034c35c35
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQK' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c6d92304410cb1c8be18b90ded0b7d51
e4aa46554f527bcd77ef78dbf23778fa4bfdbffe
describe
'169138' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQL' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
7a29034442eed93cfcda3cb4d26d048b
d989965c264b9e9d1a31f5e2eee056dca0992eec
'2011-10-28T03:11:06-04:00'
describe
'56678' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQM' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
4211e74e7ffccbb77395e72f64f4c924
77625359c54580f8d081740dfc9ce23c94f37ae6
describe
'4387220' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
ebe5ae7f701d275b88679c5dfd26b63b
7fb9af2e10057e523e53ee1f4dbd5cb4ab9aab61
describe
'19707' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b31383528dd68165445ae0681671a738
954e96e2ee6c613a095885a4d5bfb3d29b55d527
describe
'546958' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
48490e73ef723bee2497bc3b4fedf229
c50541b4c8e4388a7eaf347a51df8e29c0be098a
describe
'237028' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
253715f48f48bf169e93ddeda5144f12
d793f9e4a981202f1114abb162654beee0c47f8b
'2011-10-28T03:12:29-04:00'
describe
'61711' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQR' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
d80c22fb700c569f4ed42ffd80a9de62
250cc7d8b4caffc42398193c2ba92455efd66ede
describe
'4388660' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQS' 'sip-files00059.tif'
1b80b8d7f3a4d2401eec1da3970b81f7
4c390339123929ce2b035b408dc768217abb1b9e
describe
'22649' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQT' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
619e2e47212a7ceda601050e62140df9
b4dc14ad040fa961e34a999f7ec9f03c80c5095b
'2011-10-28T03:12:22-04:00'
describe
'557868' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
9162d2fbbaa4124e707d00f8636c94f4
374a9d94f7702cef7912d109b0a90fb4b465e406
'2011-10-28T03:10:32-04:00'
describe
'163715' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
366d768e60b31fb17cadfab7f72008f2
d70151836ec93ed6b79b6623ec9941aaca304a55
'2011-10-28T03:10:12-04:00'
describe
'55755' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQW' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
5fc030cedc897d6c6eb78e691faf3fa0
2d58ddb9475c17fe46c60178be89f975a4f565ef
'2011-10-28T03:11:13-04:00'
describe
'4472976' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQX' 'sip-files00060.tif'
6e8f392aeee4b47dfc3697b68df7b572
c4b034f01c1b8351f8e69aa9cdc6a66f72d0fdd8
'2011-10-28T03:10:07-04:00'
describe
'19881' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQY' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
46dd8b9d4dc9d51b25c4bbd54d9b634b
9d41fe9e1c0d94f5d6a2aeb9616c492db608bed2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGQZ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
72c4c2107fb0bf985bed5408c4629611
569f0010843ab83182d7594bdfdbe3e4eb53da39
'2011-10-28T03:13:31-04:00'
describe
'177044' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRA' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e990a1b1e1a9b87b0c920788852ec9a6
73f51a4df77afe961f2a26a6bd8ba5c6a876c63f
describe
'59071' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRB' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
9fc4739011a67f4b58f12c9f2fdca8ed
cac1ab29cd57ed3511a017dafc2a3a45aafdf83e
'2011-10-28T03:10:50-04:00'
describe
'4387800' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRC' 'sip-files00061.tif'
2d4bec89fd367d9686fc8975307bd117
c816eb397fc7237d9b3e6619e5182653bdfb2e8d
'2011-10-28T03:10:38-04:00'
describe
'20814' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRD' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
fa05d97667b4c41bf4d56462910f30eb
c2765ca5338fd8f678ed0cc1e655020e51b478ec
describe
'554243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRE' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
bb1e69eda26906ed6ec95c5e2fdddeea
7b996d725a5f784206407bb4ef590e590219b30d
describe
'165176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRF' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
ecbf4c8241c3270923b4b446f18bc982
91d81cd436ebec15af695f168d11f9292f6a123b
'2011-10-28T03:09:58-04:00'
describe
'55666' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
28205a073a64bed9aaac9941a9763215
9d6a26cc9a0764acd6211a2a9d2cca97d7b0a125
describe
'4444448' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
058e19734b50d90d501261b542db48a8
b14326ad1d53e72372be3a8ea120370bc5f60915
describe
'19732' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRI' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
bab63206101ec65b31f3a607feac03c4
978f10d517516777e098c24ccb5c20f98373cc3f
describe
'549699' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
cdc95d6704e776bdf758bd4dbf43183b
255f63fa9942356e278412d9922f896952de4e50
describe
'214670' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRK' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
874ef07e818ab129a74e4e341c3215df
4448634b65cb3021f26974b24eed8d9e547c9381
describe
'56648' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRL' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
8db0c0f0dd5d54d45879e72933b5ff7e
7ff7a61c354765c64ec6bcf849581cfa12de2eeb
describe
'4410420' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRM' 'sip-files00063.tif'
cb30864ba6447268fc95e408c3d05eb5
a4be0606e39aff9299649a7f02e78ce5ebdcdf71
'2011-10-28T03:13:06-04:00'
describe
'21321' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRN' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
ce5f8cbbcb2e406c78758a08be7d2dc3
a995393f9cf3104b00400dd6006f6a5b32e0ec7f
'2011-10-28T03:11:27-04:00'
describe
'556029' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRO' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
e47715ba5728fe9238b406c3b9697aa9
ad8dab481e2915202018a52ed04bc6d5fbf8c74c
describe
'187730' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRP' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
f30f604beea7da6e316cc1aabca282fc
75819b0f07501800950511162399ec648885e9cd
describe
'57296' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRQ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
b771c960541203c1796ba3396f59d4b1
48548549f16d8fe2ec7768911250d9589fc0357b
describe
'4459512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRR' 'sip-files00064.tif'
2a0920f5baf89033ffaef6e1fa9f19c5
932b780f8e5b22532ade89c91f0f69376d322096
describe
'21342' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRS' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
2fc758490680b32706782c4cc7783c68
248ef7600d0dc0ecf82bf661c860d23570f4d6e2
describe
'547153' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRT' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
0ccadf4037ae9db75be480e63754c8fb
7167b71e702c0c826419d71f03c28d67ff662714
describe
'232475' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRU' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
3105da883780f9e9af64164e4e5d819c
819f3e82ea2f4f43ee3ec88301582bb9fa19e9dc
describe
'59926' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
d19494af0fa7ecbfda86e7d111863fda
ddea3fe0396a42da97ad3dee93532b2a3e163561
describe
'4388440' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
1ef5d6737b168b00620392af0039e2d4
b915ce8c75f7be656199b01d7884af9e08dee2f1
describe
'21987' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRX' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
5d5b32223d93bc11f3c0486e5e395992
fa9f46b070ff2aa25f4b3d4ec193b2748bc86523
describe
'547020' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRY' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
04cf46ad85459da191d19397c001b19d
5608ca25fa661828236e46833d0c97c8c98abcff
'2011-10-28T03:09:55-04:00'
describe
'165058' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGRZ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
14df27183fd02e0952237075179c25f7
3a81d87877298cf19a48167d0c16a97304c70533
describe
'52128' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
5e05107917eed3a04875c83a8d7b5ce9
82590e505a012d8e2a033ffba4bc414b6dd0c10b
describe
'4387700' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSB' 'sip-files00066.tif'
69552f095dcde7efc2f730be73a08857
929042e8c8c6b813514d10342acc091216792287
describe
'20107' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSC' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
c59dc5ec355c135f778935f7b5007221
dc8aadacfd09e855f080a26bc6ab04ba718561e3
describe
'547177' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSD' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
6e650ebbc58745ec9cb6c5fc35af930d
9e421e5c3410647eeae9c2ecfac79aa2e139219d
describe
'181711' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSE' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b350686201d40abc53cf4a56abd72e96
baef07635fe99ef3787c8478e7cc725d97696e24
'2011-10-28T03:12:10-04:00'
describe
'63074' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSF' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1c71bca1e465ecf53c99e0d664c3ffbb
313bf2fc0558eaf4c782c19e02bdc55d730bb77e
'2011-10-28T03:12:26-04:00'
describe
'4388424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSG' 'sip-files00067.tif'
029d46eaa478e9e90e1ca2df4738ce12
73901f93463e650ac3f85da73d4737a2bc3ec04e
describe
'22198' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSH' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
34e4e335479c759213e6b578f6817336
7279f2f186ef4bca3cfc90f9dca5eb0fc72b63a1
describe
'547156' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSI' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
06f7e48a34fff1cdbcaa94453cf96946
16b03e29ba556fe6719109b2a79a660e45324a97
describe
'172028' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSJ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
9ce0f2bcd357f2a216116d7cfec9f564
c0d4569c240a5bcc59f2104c19acbbc34813689e
'2011-10-28T03:12:16-04:00'
describe
'58341' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSK' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
9352052a62c9d65f10d46b5228de7c8c
84b4442990f4f73eb066e42c1878aa4bfb4e5660
'2011-10-28T03:12:35-04:00'
describe
'4387500' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSL' 'sip-files00068.tif'
4247af12381a6f9daa990f22083e109d
ea6e68b65c0e32821471639feb0b400b9ea2d2c1
'2011-10-28T03:13:00-04:00'
describe
'20297' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSM' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
5799ad97e9c9d885516ec283ffafd8ff
6c1c7e83b83e47203c89fee59cb8b65879b9a412
'2011-10-28T03:14:27-04:00'
describe
'547110' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSN' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
87a0c78191587ddbbdbfa51af01e6260
3c28d433f49060cc03699790811798c52fa3e47b
describe
'183256' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSO' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
6511e7e1fee04527568958287c8e30c5
f0edf9cbf71e0c1569a1726cb37c887cdd89db3a
describe
'48544' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
0c68abe10d84f65e47b9e295aa4f3922
254db6c528fc9fd664f9efa5d9227db81e5f62bf
describe
'4387204' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSQ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
f1731145ce854a369dcc94323d85fe74
c911b1a8854a8446e7ee12400f19a641b9bb1518
describe
'18772' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSR' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
598f452ad1694f884b49d73c5dd8a17e
5d16271f1fd25a9ff94c99782ba60d47b18b998d
'2011-10-28T03:11:44-04:00'
describe
'547154' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSS' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
f580f340d518853d6dcae949538adb57
fc52feb7ce964484ec70df0a2eb72b1ddf1f2668
describe
'175947' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGST' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
ef6935bedabb07511f4daa6d04ef614d
958aef8b6bbe7434a53a750ad373e5b957cf77aa
'2011-10-28T03:11:07-04:00'
describe
'59990' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSU' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
cb2e5f263453dcfc92e52ad6907e9248
f17c8a5ef2819a89ec8d32db1a7a9563ffdc95a4
describe
'4387860' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSV' 'sip-files00070.tif'
77eaa15d03c7843c47c6dff80c98f895
1e0b8ba963ef1e2614e28d384c79060591df1491
'2011-10-28T03:11:59-04:00'
describe
'20996' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSW' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
618ebd6418d59e2f99f0a61494932d22
81676d16310f1094b4bc4a796791b4711496fe93
'2011-10-28T03:11:18-04:00'
describe
'547160' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSX' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
bff98557ae0d9f030bdf2e75ac277790
9ec9af0a1374876b578353cb911428553a6e760a
describe
'180091' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSY' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
364a4ec844df54471591372bca4a9829
71af603a3facd443385d83fdaa66c3c8ee0c45ed
describe
'55319' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGSZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
ed22cacdc280086b07822a44ace5805f
c12a5253ad9df4edef5948c04adf7061f49a6a32
describe
'4387772' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b434cc56a14571a78329818c56eead26
4cd5748465a230d100be34b8a3ec13f1a773f9c3
describe
'20475' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTB' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
14d3dc99b2d793487a1276bc85cb9303
080a106fbaa798d636e00cb8444d962fee357ce8
'2011-10-28T03:14:46-04:00'
describe
'547172' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTC' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8afb4e06c1ad9b23ccfd3d5928f4abe2
8037e27564f7aa599aab7144ad1fb79f7823aa99
describe
'171697' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
7758d11846e6d9803c34c03734ad1b08
a3cd199a0752cdb29e5f0251368c73a8c320e32d
describe
'58715' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTE' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
fefc5f855cb042fd6c27dd3f16fe50dc
60d0f92d7f857a36fd87c6ffe66ad500f2bc067b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
af44cf68d356db29fa37e2cd4a2fdbcb
03c843b02fd65324932240b877bde28059699899
describe
'20560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTG' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
35063c887d8f185d1af078ce08937ad3
b98e28e1eb122fa6216fb98a47e6538f2d622b9c
describe
'547129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTH' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
7ef99eadf0d11d200bc866d47f2dd797
98a7f0a403ad6dafeca6c25e3c089f574665a3dd
describe
'170642' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTI' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
72528635f59b7cea9368df14cdfd132c
040f08b105bec224a97b0947057f5646bb4d9d72
'2011-10-28T03:11:32-04:00'
describe
'58001' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTJ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
46cbd5dfe3d160291ed119a442107035
15dfeba4f4163467ff8aabe02357296e9aa1c273
describe
'4387576' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTK' 'sip-files00073.tif'
b8ef02d962392d3ad75fbeb78eefa7e3
db5859500aa120ea47e3ca6340366c71e5517359
describe
'20650' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
9ac1b51652a72cac8ed0170184293512
4ae79e4b7182c99a5c0e006df5a9ddff618f82e0
'2011-10-28T03:12:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
56102bf503228f03bc77d66ab001b16e
81d149202529007f30b94820e5990299474de735
describe
'171895' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
04426640a67828777825d4cede492cea
57f68bae1363d571756f2b80c64534cbeb16de5b
describe
'58929' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTO' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
61ddd2f55868792d756441b24f27dd5a
6e838b21f0ae50f42e685073064b97bf1e6617c6
describe
'4387828' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTP' 'sip-files00074.tif'
944bad9a6c5d8e8eedac6943b0ef9a49
f9e2e2bae4c6159f9b74b9dac75aeeaa62f539b1
describe
'21136' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTQ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
9545fd96665bff36b497e85d6f47bcc2
f949e75f77ccd8e6aff09bb970725f19c59df9a1
'2011-10-28T03:10:56-04:00'
describe
'547151' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTR' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
210fc12f26d620002c4c45642256de9a
29e22c9fdfb1189d101ae8e8f5be55fa24ad200f
describe
'181600' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTS' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
ce742c059d703bcf3f224b2791bad663
fd741a5664c654db75f685dcff189d918bde7aa2
'2011-10-28T03:13:36-04:00'
describe
'55922' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTT' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
f883313f434d3e98eb18ebe21000ffb7
012632f62bbc755967d6a7495f97f15b9479de56
describe
'4387764' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
95a6c799e25e4e45b5ec3b03fd450c38
e2fe8771f48c55c1c7fe3e9b3eed2ba7b05cdda1
describe
'20503' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTV' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
a4f5c02da272bd29c936006150e62a80
0a4fb6b4b58f3869abf4313424cff09a0df8049b
describe
'547147' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTW' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
2ecb21607370033722d6df194d0fc3da
1debb1477de45b5adbaff699ca519f795553d603
describe
'171349' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTX' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
efbdf2c719f94d49f0ecd0afcacc1523
999d32e362e103954cf06c698f528a70a3df4843
'2011-10-28T03:12:41-04:00'
describe
'58888' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTY' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
921646f0faa0e85eda971e81dfa93502
c34a246d4e08e1651875cd02a0dd7f330cc7503f
'2011-10-28T03:12:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGTZ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
398f80c101c0b03ca04588c3c56ddf04
df2399b0fb8685abadb2074037072922a68f2677
describe
'20727' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUA' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
4464d1a1cdd6f43fcd07ffd404df8a53
8b4d8162db4f5db6ac8d0bac38d268b0f637b422
'2011-10-28T03:12:11-04:00'
describe
'545788' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUB' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
30e0b523a95edc20e1d2bfcd75d23bd5
68dd5e87cbdff897bd977efd0dc51d1fcbeab612
'2011-10-28T03:09:50-04:00'
describe
'173249' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUC' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
407160ed46b5d85c7aae461c63a2ba68
558b7bb547999c60da076eae34cc8285a9f7ec61
describe
'49687' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUD' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
50bcbc92255485738369f5363b5c959c
6b2d4f2c8980d76a76bb24706cfcc1cf58f7df51
describe
'4376452' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUE' 'sip-files00077.tif'
22d5d4cd4b70a9c93f8ba1317ec91db6
ca6db1c98aac2506ca084746cca50dd4d21b9567
'2011-10-28T03:14:23-04:00'
describe
'19318' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUF' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
c7b177100fa19332256c5e42f099d950
ed77cefd52da19dafbfd560f1144cc1ce4c181a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUG' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
dee0e67e3456794e6da278d938b6bde9
f188e8cfb6b733518093871c96cbc439fd9cb5bf
'2011-10-28T03:12:14-04:00'
describe
'169624' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUH' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
da7eba4bb070554af50920fe77803392
65d63a43ed634afdfb3ec783425e5cd8b49fd2b0
describe
'57572' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUI' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
862970ee4a1f89b5ae47987af7915267
c28fa2dbaf5f55b939d595723dc099edb1ff89db
'2011-10-28T03:11:04-04:00'
describe
'4387504' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUJ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
aeab0be6fa4ab19392ba97bfc24149c5
78bc9cd9eb8914c4809e768090ee0ea808423eef
describe
'19825' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUK' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
79a49838fe05e1e9295772da6d33974c
4d3c39bcbf2d436aaf2c51fcda1f7491eb9f8710
describe
'547125' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUL' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
e2698e1d24bbb08c7914a7456dcc9d3d
881bd85b37a0f0bcd4fced7266bed8233401f988
describe
'218228' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUM' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
c0796167c82aff3caf19dd001c17f4fa
bef686c482e5fbea23ac7c36ab8a895e20e057cf
describe
'57275' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cabc2ad4829fa4f3a48fbdd919c36afb
f42e8e01c8a6beff85ac3e0d3474e66a96297e51
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUO' 'sip-files00079.tif'
15880b9a484779bed226195da487c4c7
f3fcf7c668bd723ae6db9450b37f119e86c35ff5
'2011-10-28T03:10:49-04:00'
describe
'21257' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
9abd137af3e99b6e2bd3a531bc1bff6e
9adb164f4eddcb2cd5966f562dc1fc6dccb4cdbe
'2011-10-28T03:14:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUQ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
e7406ee088780f2fddcaa52564b8ec12
7579e2844b78c0df71f7d6665e638c5c84d8c2ec
'2011-10-28T03:12:45-04:00'
describe
'156478' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUR' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
27ead33eb2458db648008dc6fc609c82
6eadeb7af95f50b5d0d7566182dee6ac0994a51b
describe
'49576' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUS' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
81afc5ec7313b4e3b1df247974ca0297
f8eaf4bf19298c8a8dc07d83a40b53d526660dbf
describe
'4387160' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUT' 'sip-files00080.tif'
db0f735c6250b35b4f05d7085fc59c9f
29587051b924a5f07d7eea3e6e93b701192a9b77
describe
'18814' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUU' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
747dfaac7365666029bbca3a73a2f031
de72b47c43878b9b81758895820c1fbc82417192
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUV' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
a4d4b57f7ca43fd96bf24ff844578c2c
c32ab93ae35cf4927ec6ee6b78f7ddb99a24362b
describe
'170586' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUW' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
f7293fb7930ba0064f4a5bbfddcff53b
3a81276fa97bb0c33520a3eb5774d3ac6636c675
'2011-10-28T03:13:32-04:00'
describe
'56753' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUX' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
209c6c2906896cf84ace126cc88df16c
5bfb20995b5da05a164262017ec561278efc1ce0
'2011-10-28T03:12:25-04:00'
describe
'4387408' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUY' 'sip-files00081.tif'
bc9889399155f61219ea85f233f5be2b
7994eb940a540f93293389f77604655954c67ec9
describe
'20112' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGUZ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
54d610463a0712935acc0387e14603f6
48678a7c6925459d7ea1e1e70fe51cd3266f64f4
describe
'547135' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVA' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
24dc2e10eed64713365cdcf2ff96ac50
469eed092fb958d0182b743e572289128867334b
describe
'168630' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVB' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
9d9f9e79a5243b8106b10ac881dd07db
4264920f9549ced08744b70df9fcc0ae091f8911
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVC' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
97af017fb842baeabab0c7feea890eee
c93fb725390257344246353ef35f349e92b8c24f
describe
'4387936' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVD' 'sip-files00082.tif'
b8a1ddcffc47266f1696ca1ff3ec7515
cce5a9b3da2d3bf634254959cdbc87d20088323b
describe
'20847' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVE' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
9ccb87f0efaa730d1425e842e47bd7e6
3c812949237b31231808911c688450b3e5d0ac8a
'2011-10-28T03:09:47-04:00'
describe
'541529' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVF' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
21dc703a8e4877f3c4ea60850e0f9325
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describe
'191839' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVG' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
25d23ca583967a5ed76d3f45662e6ee7
06207d2d4fa5b23b4f47def41c67bcafa6cee4ec
describe
'55274' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVH' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
0c763c2f2fd4cc73fdb30bf7b1dda6dc
69fde7b4f1fed61b51dde0abafdca11b939839a2
describe
'4343948' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVI' 'sip-files00083.tif'
8d9660e578c7c088b45df05c887b46af
33ab0eb92542a3e31bbdfbc73fc65c34a5449561
describe
'21042' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVJ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
82265868a9503ec7579ad70d14edaeb4
865ca315590606dc271d27973e8ab1a8c65f94ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVK' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
c41dcef3035180dd09dba12727a3bcab
0b24a26447764158e335e2fb64c747d7e281b639
describe
'176846' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVL' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
71ff21273384b3d7023b33a8a51211ed
723c2cb454e6f33e56573338a236d38a58cf6e18
describe
'60896' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVM' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
09caab6509f30683c1b637448f025da7
db485d9dc1e85690277b582ff69eed631609d980
describe
'4387904' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVN' 'sip-files00084.tif'
7aa892d01bbfe69fcadb96152012acf4
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describe
'21572' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVO' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
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describe
'534056' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVP' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
c566e7f8ca05c27b0ce3d88dbcf000a8
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describe
'184455' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
c7c00a07d3ca22cd6fecde52bfc23b57
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describe
'59037' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVR' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
690fc4fa31ec92efca028effebc980fc
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describe
'4283892' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
5c237d1afa8c22560e1ca5514a0b2f7f
76b2f121e51955b2a55cab9e13e9b11217fb3922
describe
'20944' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVT' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
3d9920bb96c05dd1c3e08b7d84cf3922
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describe
'547139' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVU' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
9f0a2aa0d90b69dc4db14e7e292fa29e
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describe
'171664' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVV' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
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describe
'58251' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVW' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
e9f03642cd5093523f29cf80bd6a3620
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describe
'4387540' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVX' 'sip-files00086.tif'
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describe
'20432' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVY' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
f89e0cfe1f03f0f253a0a7095f29c4a6
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describe
'547102' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGVZ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
f1df6ec0d21933922977deb61a6159d6
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describe
'196741' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWA' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
73126a2ced48ae95ee2016ee09ccf3a8
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describe
'52141' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWB' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
2bcef08c742157246eeef98548d87260
838c658cbf8fc83df5d0fe9f35c77151260fc1d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWC' 'sip-files00087.tif'
8f8104cbdf5ddd8881b392bcb83b8afe
e3cd1c0d42098735a6d41fdc4942e72c8b9589e8
'2011-10-28T03:12:13-04:00'
describe
'20341' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWD' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
9e0890633cd387c34419663235d6be2e
035c8fbb210c62e159a63a202f450c1e00225888
'2011-10-28T03:10:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWE' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
ad1d65f53cf8605c206c04a80697c09a
1dc422bfd954168d0e6114a4b10375345f784a53
'2011-10-28T03:10:34-04:00'
describe
'174538' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWF' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7ee871297c567ee025ab874d7726f663
cb86ab3f0d4cdd47c75eb9df87c3b6f3f314ccec
describe
'58563' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
c8db9f09b1b5f0b77859cab02dd3e81c
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describe
'4387656' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
bc83b666e6f61122e620ce928f87a82a
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'2011-10-28T03:09:38-04:00'
describe
'20501' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
a864696459ee0291981082377dce1d5d
cfb6a0dd2cda98d7f1308458afd14a1081bcf96a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWJ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
3a45828da3df52ad6bee2c6841393958
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describe
'184346' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWK' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
368d45fdc303dbbd7d9e7a2effda65c9
355d6097422b2c5341092afe8c16b729697dfc0d
describe
'55576' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWL' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
51f37b75c3d19b46a324f42fe12665c7
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describe
'4387848' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWM' 'sip-files00089.tif'
97c7fc7ae94c5fb8ec415140a615982c
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describe
'20589' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWN' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
11d3d80ab07ce283fcd4bfd29c95694e
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describe
'536746' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWO' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
887b1ec6a0c2ab23d99925859d4889fc
4a3f12f8b4727bf30cf3754480cd1efea7314130
'2011-10-28T03:12:27-04:00'
describe
'176659' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWP' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
598dcad373b3796ec9cad93f21a32944
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describe
'62576' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWQ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
6d87183527883d6e0718b74d5b46dd0f
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describe
'4304636' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWR' 'sip-files00090.tif'
b678aa5b95ede310e694acb9d25ff79c
253479cdbd9da70ee21b78736b3d9aa1c409bba2
'2011-10-28T03:12:43-04:00'
describe
'21733' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWS' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
c00782b044c75e09ba48f1f178fa4b51
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describe
'540979' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWT' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
b20ccdd76172c914962f27ae371c781e
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'2011-10-28T03:13:34-04:00'
describe
'175995' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWU' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
53eb8a66f1658327b6ce22942e1184a5
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describe
'61124' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWV' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
46a460334f685d6c15e6aa2c9cb4ac10
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describe
'4338740' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWW' 'sip-files00091.tif'
cf2ec2ed04fc5e748911a3ff48cfb397
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describe
'21570' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWX' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
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describe
'548698' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWY' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
9eb0e7fbdeae50bd743da417a5c3a257
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describe
'171957' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGWZ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
f127c295639bf48ffb2b928f53a8ee9f
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describe
'57140' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXA' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:10:15-04:00'
describe
'4399868' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXB' 'sip-files00092.tif'
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describe
'20259' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXC' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
3e9ef46dd6c6e6edd7d8bb3e27904d51
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'2011-10-28T03:12:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXD' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
cbde30b118bf9a639b0a2879ee8cd824
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describe
'209616' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXE' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
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describe
'54456' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXF' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
7bad2ababf0d92299f51da01212e31cf
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'2011-10-28T03:09:53-04:00'
describe
'4387892' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXG' 'sip-files00093.tif'
eb26391222cec81cddc1d36fd457957c
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describe
'20239' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXH' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a687aafa1c0f0d4cee5244d06b5a2dd1
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describe
'538831' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXI' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c436da104ff5d63c9f592130df3a2dbf
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describe
'173316' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXJ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:10:41-04:00'
describe
'59002' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXK' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
8b02019303c072ab91e5adb92023c06a
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describe
'4321428' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXL' 'sip-files00094.tif'
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'2011-10-28T03:11:49-04:00'
describe
'20710' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXM' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
60de53be6ee8ee6ba572a0cd7cc1503b
1d4892af035668b9ca5fb263e94bd4561a642aa1
'2011-10-28T03:12:04-04:00'
describe
'534744' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXN' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
2f91376d0d6b0981f34cd1417f2dc9d8
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'2011-10-28T03:11:58-04:00'
describe
'175351' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXO' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
63156c926c27e341a87057b58d2b6822
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describe
'59390' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXP' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
32505d3ac6bb355c736568f04936b71b
6e20c14f1cdd63e1d16e0af2d094d01fbe806580
describe
'4288540' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXQ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
0522523048ef946bcde9267203e8f257
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describe
'20751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXR' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
74226cb2459acfc49f3c21a64bbd1dbc
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXS' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
89c2b5d7dda2f9e2e01cd7697de1e780
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describe
'174678' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXT' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
68fc583f85d24fbe7eb273d7f72d72aa
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describe
'59304' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXU' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
24cc40ca02188b076c34722ccb39e9ea
457079fdc65041ff59e4aa59389151b4157fa710
'2011-10-28T03:12:53-04:00'
describe
'4387568' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXV' 'sip-files00096.tif'
861e419345a4070270ca89df9fc08072
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'2011-10-28T03:11:03-04:00'
describe
'20535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXW' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
97b1263935ae2996e251f058b8e07890
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describe
'536717' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXX' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
ad257539d4ee1174792184d02c5de482
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describe
'188956' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
29fe73c262758a3c65052b6fa90ed6bf
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'2011-10-28T03:10:03-04:00'
describe
'59507' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGXZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
dc5b76fb6abf125e1b6ef28172928714
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describe
'4304716' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
26046f6d4ee9f46e6d669bbb6202bc70
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describe
'21727' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
b4d5f5f834f29c2c6060745cb73330b0
ec2afce81edcdc8f046e2e33abd078d283c9e7b6
'2011-10-28T03:09:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
198af8dd99fdcc8de6be229f22637003
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describe
'175355' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
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describe
'60251' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
ebd1cca710d0dc78d7f460d31e9762d6
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYF' 'sip-files00098.tif'
b656d5cc764ce9eb317c5bfee0a4c77c
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describe
'20987' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYG' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a620591d6503432bb37c2fd504e147fe
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describe
'547059' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYH' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
ab215ef8f8f3d3b388839e6971b18b40
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'2011-10-28T03:10:33-04:00'
describe
'159108' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYI' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
40174244775cfabf499325595b8dc21f
8e5662a91c1ffcd3f15ecb93201b1b28e1548865
'2011-10-28T03:13:58-04:00'
describe
'49244' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYJ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
d878cb105a66e5971df9961ee095efb8
c3de00a513dc2292a96f1e0ae03f074ae6234e43
describe
'4387384' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYK' 'sip-files00099.tif'
8d3887ded2cee09c16702cd499cfde5b
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describe
'19104' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
95cb17007505a8471ca1d542650c378c
63c228450bcf777d5615629457e514abc6346bd7
'2011-10-28T03:12:37-04:00'
describe
'559653' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYM' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
a816ed67e8d94fdf6235561b80d8a9fb
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describe
'153397' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYN' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
63179572fc3dea53c37f43e8f1172cd8
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describe
'47789' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYO' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
b51fc59a5df545583a49670ff15be564
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'2011-10-28T03:12:46-04:00'
describe
'4487408' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYP' 'sip-files00100.tif'
ab725d9d22eb2422812bd4185a5a8e21
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describe
'19189' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYQ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
5d24d3bb72ecf9e03af584918f2f32cb
305a29617c7eeb638a70df7274c79140a92eae48
'2011-10-28T03:14:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYR' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
ec2166663085fc54995e9b0415ac622c
e1c686b55b03f5bbde9c8f7834654b97e33a3bc2
describe
'175610' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYS' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
480eb70c5847c6ab979de8c9aedb8bbd
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describe
'58455' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYT' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
819bb8e0deeccfc70917595fc5c29832
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describe
'4387664' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYU' 'sip-files00101.tif'
cbc1bfb60eaa41ccca0e2d72122a7832
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describe
'20479' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYV' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
f4ef69d39e84840aa6173fb0d95cd309
c537ef3eb3ad52d829e5a9e1c9b49118c9cf0076
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYW' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
04356954d3b14d2ddf843244460e3f18
c509708ff461ca5363b386cd286af57ab4d3c34a
describe
'166621' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYX' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
81082e7410f9d7b094000481ecf4b65b
03ee984d3ff07847dc483082842a6dec51259973
'2011-10-28T03:12:42-04:00'
describe
'57212' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYY' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
d6665edd51bfd4443d7dfe12b02ffef7
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describe
'4387376' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGYZ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
9ad0ece6561ced13253188aa1719afae
2f7e7a48a7646c00b6ad7293ac3b0e2944e54473
'2011-10-28T03:11:55-04:00'
describe
'19955' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZA' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
acd9d3d08c96490d8e5aa3a0735d683f
b089e3bb3a7a8b30afb8a91cde3d2a44fb6e00bf
describe
'547121' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
17167b5c60bed4832fd419b740d2a6ec
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describe
'166996' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZC' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
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describe
'57405' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZD' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
a9bbf2e7d46390a44bee081eea3d0273
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describe
'4387484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZE' 'sip-files00103.tif'
23cec46bd95a3dc533ff5a6701df9c37
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describe
'20277' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZF' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
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describe
'547170' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZG' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d66c9ce7b9f81d2c09707d7a91edc5ac
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describe
'169434' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZH' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e013a42cb84c3e5977e8b4b1f69fafd4
9337ed752ce9c0429956f4fc344a31e6324cd9a2
'2011-10-28T03:10:01-04:00'
describe
'57832' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZI' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
bcacc2ff28e4ce417d3e4108e7ab067b
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describe
'4387632' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZJ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
c73189ff6afa05927cdfe6f9dc5a6645
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describe
'20288' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZK' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
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describe
'547179' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZL' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
97a285bd6c48bf290f918dc16c2ed80e
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describe
'176106' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZM' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
8394930c869b3d91729ea80e5ffcb516
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describe
'60219' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
a9bc349f1b96a210ecb11ce10a5c851a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZO' 'sip-files00105.tif'
47445173cff2e0e314f91b2eca11febd
f280efb785a189ade9a9b938cfecf5644022c20c
'2011-10-28T03:11:29-04:00'
describe
'21139' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZP' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
dd2ffd156b4e072c3d6684fbe7e1bce2
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'2011-10-28T03:14:16-04:00'
describe
'547165' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZQ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
81e4b29c204b294653a5f2e7c3fcc6ff
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describe
'174332' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZR' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
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describe
'60903' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZS' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
19a6c8189c39ff349b8dae08e0eb7414
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZT' 'sip-files00106.tif'
3cfeaac2ca0e7c31c7686255018b5a3e
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'2011-10-28T03:12:00-04:00'
describe
'21673' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZU' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
b06b0f8f59a202ed31fbd0e9d3bb9844
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describe
'547136' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZV' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
17d1712a8e6524c6cf1137ee503654a9
c7740a3e7fad17ea4635e1e7c13c6a3948527b25
'2011-10-28T03:10:42-04:00'
describe
'171333' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZW' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
ed8e5d4b0303f5975965703c56b24f86
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describe
'59508' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZX' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
9339798e486bc10e9f18a015a27f7851
14889887ec665095bf3fbca724e75da825d3ae91
'2011-10-28T03:13:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZY' 'sip-files00107.tif'
f6438461f75e82492d18cba218c34fb2
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describe
'21337' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAGZZ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
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describe
'555724' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
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describe
'166753' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAB' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
c4197bcc4cf51a7fe84d5f079983a803
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describe
'57233' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAC' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
44898d6c20be975d4e106beb38005f4a
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'2011-10-28T03:13:24-04:00'
describe
'4456652' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAD' 'sip-files00108.tif'
a1b46bc0289890becde6a8c7a3d1673f
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describe
'20816' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAE' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
8d30325a71b7b234b79a5fede45a89b0
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAF' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
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describe
'175881' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAG' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
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describe
'54683' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAH' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387876' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAI' 'sip-files00109.tif'
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describe
'20584' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAJ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
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describe
'547061' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAK' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
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describe
'169572' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAL' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
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describe
'57252' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAM' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
a060cf7bcb1c431653536ba2f002b9f4
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describe
'4387560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAN' 'sip-files00110.tif'
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describe
'20476' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAO' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAP' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
d4f576e1bf7c5877539187f96ad20b36
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describe
'177361' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAQ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
c3d313c9c21eee02e9aa52a8551fe7ec
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describe
'47580' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAR' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ce9c2bf031c2bba49135a57ced5b8191
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describe
'4387372' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAS' 'sip-files00111.tif'
cb331087d69f09ab7e062ddda77f13a9
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describe
'18741' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAT' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
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describe
'540647' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAU' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
1b870568ba367b78feb028c791f7f28f
9fda8cb7879441679da80a0c26660b1d20bdd9d4
'2011-10-28T03:14:17-04:00'
describe
'171716' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAV' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
cec9d8a063fd113f1bd187fb1345634e
2c4f5b4018e2dae38b8cedf9e5bb15a8f58325d5
'2011-10-28T03:14:22-04:00'
describe
'57652' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAW' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
4901f1e752546c1b0d2b0b646274932a
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describe
'4335480' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAX' 'sip-files00112.tif'
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describe
'20268' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAY' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHAZ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
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describe
'175715' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBA' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
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describe
'59087' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBB' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387820' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBC' 'sip-files00113.tif'
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describe
'20613' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBD' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
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describe
'547101' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBE' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
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describe
'174901' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBF' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
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describe
'60716' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBG' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4388212' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
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describe
'21815' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBI' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBJ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
a3576fcf8de31ed1e05e1bad65ae1c09
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describe
'181624' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBK' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
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describe
'61958' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBL' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4388136' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBM' 'sip-files00115.tif'
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describe
'21638' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBN' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
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describe
'547079' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
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describe
'173952' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f4b6ef289182dfaf0071a962ddbc79d0
519d75a5c8c7f836f982e4fd5f2e1c8a1803bdba
'2011-10-28T03:14:12-04:00'
describe
'59335' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBQ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387672' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBR' 'sip-files00116.tif'
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describe
'20950' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBS' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
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describe
'561350' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBT' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
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describe
'215738' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBU' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
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describe
'59630' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBV' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4502996' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBW' 'sip-files00117.tif'
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describe
'22834' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBX' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
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describe
'184089' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHBZ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
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describe
'61860' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCA' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCB' 'sip-files00118.tif'
907c0dd89d2e24eb18a5f047bb08d72c
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describe
'21351' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCC' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
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describe
'569900' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCD' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
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describe
'216437' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCE' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
b58cccb703ef5e48289e28c7bce69dd4
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describe
'57265' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCF' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
05a0236b0d2495514e878767d9e5ee1b
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describe
'4570400' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCG' 'sip-files00119.tif'
53f7ed442cff3f5432c3bf67a2f80800
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describe
'21385' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCH' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
cb50b37aeff43cf5294a930056a6c627
b2a91aa296302b2a09d85dedaf6329a04e5726d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCI' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
8990806b90fd60a2ac16ee6a5d01d4b4
4162e4485557000f2ef0df3faa4525dec021b8e4
describe
'173172' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCJ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
3fd488697d5d96ced6aa544fe3340007
f1834064464f70ca08f2d2a4295f808549aa59b1
describe
'58773' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCK' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
3844649bfc504e8cabdf6951802a0f47
53f0d787e8a0444cc4cb716ffe1af656ad8e4af7
describe
'4387628' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCL' 'sip-files00120.tif'
f767f0884abc18e2d18c71c592b60553
9759c12228f33ce8deace7c2100367836f2da2a3
'2011-10-28T03:09:51-04:00'
describe
'20507' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCM' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
2c5584aec272485cbb9ade8a3c17056a
199df851ac878616392c904788445409b8bab936
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
137ea24673493f0baf0bebc8311664a8
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describe
'173988' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCO' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
2e5538133121283660a166eb09278f17
ba481c28459515c13bf4cbd1c59aa603544d129c
describe
'58194' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCP' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
0ad102d10ada261f8fd48085ca5f614b
08adce5514be2034963031a7af965e49045d4b19
describe
'4387580' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCQ' 'sip-files00121.tif'
e759d25a6d9630a91172bc185c5a8322
c7c8212ae6d28bb19e5f5f757af207cafccdfe33
'2011-10-28T03:09:34-04:00'
describe
'20388' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCR' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
202f54781e191e8180e510c018abba94
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describe
'547115' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCS' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
1fa06382f624b6a884f08f229c546ebf
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describe
'177650' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCT' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
32e5db09d95506cc2c95e7416f8f14ac
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describe
'62260' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCU' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
037f2f97bfe62571a9758e909179fbd0
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describe
'4388348' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCV' 'sip-files00122.tif'
de463a04b01d2a74644744931115b7d5
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describe
'22244' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCW' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
3b08beb5e0d91663b6f2314374f514df
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCX' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
3d9e728ec5c98ca4df04fb12b5a8205c
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describe
'177717' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCY' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
6a49cb765fa90fc285cc30552cded90b
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describe
'60959' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHCZ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
4310593e092a5af26e583d99b99c858b
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describe
'4388088' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDA' 'sip-files00123.tif'
a95183c61a765ed6aa9f026346b0b810
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describe
'21535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDB' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
5361562c8845181aef836b7a44f488a4
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDC' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
36c84e56ad5bb3185fdf90e8087ec992
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describe
'168074' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDD' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
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describe
'56792' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
afcfa3de6935ff7ba874c4f190f53e5a
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describe
'4387476' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDF' 'sip-files00124.tif'
9a34f92bf2efedead4fec5bbe0f9daa8
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describe
'20052' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDG' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
85efdc11c8bd9c1cf21e1182f5453809
5aba97ac416215de1f98cfc94a9171e61ee390e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDH' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
189eb7fe13a20e5cf0e2a4c11fca7b0a
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describe
'164145' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDI' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
f172bc811fd2a79d5af75276d8ac9128
907d6086ed7a913fdb7629f22e090d2aae319a33
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDJ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
2df5be4c34dc5c554b778358558ec679
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDK' 'sip-files00125.tif'
13748d390ac2a1a0dfa182b19943c191
e19487105b5d364f027f846d6cf6cb563858494a
'2011-10-28T03:09:45-04:00'
describe
'20025' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDL' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
74fae42ed3deb2ac10353cd55d7b774c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDM' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
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describe
'178585' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDN' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
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describe
'61225' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387972' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
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describe
'21525' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDQ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDR' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
a6252db7862bc3aab0da00acd3c8cd7c
afdb10152c41199cc39399edade61d974f0eae97
'2011-10-28T03:14:35-04:00'
describe
'174808' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDS' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
bcff08789f1240309f03ea588a8cb0ef
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describe
'58677' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDT' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:14:33-04:00'
describe
'4387608' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDU' 'sip-files00127.tif'
3da6fb33d924f5372084b177cb63797b
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDV' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
b410553a2c4c0a471d889034acaacb16
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDW' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
46ff9b6422bd849aaa24af697a6a6234
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describe
'171450' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDX' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
0b7e59e3dae64c386e5d49753553605b
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describe
'58580' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDY' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
5bb1830615de9ec35e2904d178932eae
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describe
'4387668' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHDZ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
7c37585ae03b74bd5c8283abf5b0d7f8
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describe
'20913' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEA' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
e74f6c529a897ea4038c2be5acdeb971
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describe
'174928' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEC' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
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describe
'59869' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHED' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387704' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEE' 'sip-files00129.tif'
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describe
'21074' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEF' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
1abd49c53a0ab507e1d773df43906ee4
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describe
'547067' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEG' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
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describe
'178751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEH' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
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describe
'60788' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEI' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
7a2f205715c28f9d9ec993f6f6d5eb6f
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEJ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
30f51fc987990076864b325174b6d02c
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describe
'21260' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
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describe
'561347' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEL' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
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describe
'177808' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEM' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
1a623a4b754f5de9b7d9984c395396bb
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describe
'47675' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
2c50339f04e8a97911a24c78e4428e7b
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describe
'4501484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEO' 'sip-files00131.tif'
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describe
'18650' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEP' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
69f339b8a6016a69a93f6673c8af2861
dcb8ab956dae955487bd614f6e238fd33a7b911e
'2011-10-28T03:14:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEQ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
893dd2c5e40df8845f9ff27d7d22fe4a
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describe
'167145' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHER' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
e2ab4f8e46b72d53df6881c1591d6bc9
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describe
'54107' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHES' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
a5f6594f2a1f45a1c57f4c6447368ed7
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHET' 'sip-files00132.tif'
41d25f6ffe313680ce906cce64e89198
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describe
'21108' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEU' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
b17f260c45a4cde5e393f4f4d9a6899c
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describe
'547098' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEV' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
73c99110b4c14bd485d97a7b110f57ac
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describe
'176879' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEW' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
f3078670963a98d49854874c155b8f44
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'2011-10-28T03:14:15-04:00'
describe
'59074' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEX' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
d2b576da0765c790ad5b8a3aaf9e2e58
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEY' 'sip-files00133.tif'
bf0f1e5f8a7cc1cc262bf7b8290c9945
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describe
'21647' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHEZ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFA' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
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describe
'172250' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFB' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
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describe
'58154' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFC' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
2c49b203b49f2c7d6716fee09e191e84
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFD' 'sip-files00134.tif'
cc43df5b9f6af6932009c26e3b3cbce5
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describe
'20364' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFE' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
4ba7588c5c0f910a681685c71e3035c6
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFF' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
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describe
'177063' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFG' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
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describe
'60229' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFH' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387916' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFI' 'sip-files00135.tif'
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describe
'21382' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFJ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
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describe
'547039' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFK' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
226a4128dcf7798904b8a95138f2f9b7
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describe
'178265' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFL' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
6414931dee6d8c43d5ce60591b76ab3b
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describe
'62320' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFM' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
d216198e36f18d589e5936fd45ceabad
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describe
'4388128' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFN' 'sip-files00136.tif'
085c130c7804327ca2d77aa855e7dcba
04859f6771c5dc91ce4d8c71f39194f6d2aa2b2d
'2011-10-28T03:13:23-04:00'
describe
'21950' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFO' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
be48ea2662144c5fa314bb27e0306892
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFP' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
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describe
'174792' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFQ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
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describe
'59773' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFR' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387732' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFS' 'sip-files00137.tif'
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describe
'20897' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFT' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFU' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
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describe
'173291' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFV' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:14:11-04:00'
describe
'59770' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFW' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFX' 'sip-files00138.tif'
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describe
'21084' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFY' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHFZ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
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describe
'170776' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGA' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
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describe
'59332' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGB' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGC' 'sip-files00139.tif'
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describe
'21085' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGD' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGE' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
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describe
'166273' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGF' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
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describe
'57460' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGG' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGH' 'sip-files00140.tif'
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describe
'20422' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGI' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
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describe
'556084' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGJ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
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describe
'189740' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGK' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:10:58-04:00'
describe
'52732' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGL' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4459112' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGM' 'sip-files00141.tif'
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describe
'20006' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGN' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
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describe
'547118' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGO' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
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describe
'182427' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGP' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
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describe
'61053' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGQ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387896' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGR' 'sip-files00142.tif'
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describe
'21192' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGS' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:09:27-04:00'
describe
'538173' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGT' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
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describe
'172915' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGU' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
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describe
'52318' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGV' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4316312' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGW' 'sip-files00143.tif'
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describe
'19936' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGX' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGY' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
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describe
'174102' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHGZ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHA' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'21086' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHC' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHD' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
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describe
'179741' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHE' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
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describe
'60101' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHF' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHG' 'sip-files00145.tif'
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'2011-10-28T03:13:44-04:00'
describe
'21153' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHH' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHI' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
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describe
'145587' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHJ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
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describe
'49755' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHK' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'18511' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHM' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
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describe
'532635' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHN' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
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describe
'173514' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHO' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
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describe
'53171' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHP' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4271712' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHQ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
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describe
'20512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHR' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHS' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'57391' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHU' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387468' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHV' 'sip-files00148.tif'
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describe
'20403' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHW' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHX' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
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describe
'180864' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHY' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
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describe
'62857' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHHZ' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-10-28T03:12:47-04:00'
describe
'21904' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIB' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
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describe
'547113' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIC' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
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describe
'177619' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHID' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
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describe
'62026' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4388080' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIF' 'sip-files00150.tif'
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describe
'21971' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIG' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
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describe
'547090' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIH' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
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describe
'170285' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHII' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
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describe
'54612' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIJ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIK' 'sip-files00151.tif'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIM' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
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describe
'167674' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIN' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
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describe
'59017' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIO' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIP' 'sip-files00152.tif'
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describe
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describe
'547157' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIR' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'59326' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIT' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'20844' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIV' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIW' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
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describe
'179485' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIX' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
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describe
'61396' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIY' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387988' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHIZ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
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describe
'21532' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJA' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJB' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
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describe
'183631' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJC' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
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describe
'63894' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJD' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4388412' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJE' 'sip-files00155.tif'
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describe
'22313' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJF' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
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describe
'547131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJG' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
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describe
'167415' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJH' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
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describe
'57376' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJI' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJJ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJK' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJL' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
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describe
'168357' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJM' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
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describe
'55637' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387808' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJO' 'sip-files00157.tif'
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describe
'20863' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJP' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJQ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
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describe
'179913' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJR' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
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describe
'62254' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJS' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4388000' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJT' 'sip-files00158.tif'
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describe
'21949' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJU' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJV' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
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describe
'175413' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJW' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
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describe
'60303' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHJX' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKA' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
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describe
'177146' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKB' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
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describe
'61687' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKC' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'547095' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKF' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
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describe
'170243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKG' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
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describe
'58521' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKH' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'20702' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKJ' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKK' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
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describe
'156228' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKL' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
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describe
'46655' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKM' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKP' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
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describe
'178525' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKQ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
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describe
'62516' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKR' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'22289' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKT' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
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describe
'547093' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKU' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
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describe
'173941' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKV' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
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describe
'59283' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKW' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKX' 'sip-files00164.tif'
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describe
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describe
'547123' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHKZ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'59092' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLB' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLD' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLE' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
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describe
'168102' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLF' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
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describe
'58338' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLG' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-10-28T03:11:48-04:00'
describe
'20383' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLI' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
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describe
'540000' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLJ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
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describe
'170892' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLK' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
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describe
'60472' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLL' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4330776' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLM' 'sip-files00167.tif'
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describe
'21341' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLN' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
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describe
'547141' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLO' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
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describe
'177608' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLP' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
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describe
'59367' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLQ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:12:51-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-28T03:14:43-04:00'
describe
'20685' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLS' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
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describe
'531477' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLT' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
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describe
'185884' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLU' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
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describe
'64009' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLV' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4262560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLW' 'sip-files00169.tif'
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describe
'22307' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLX' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
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describe
'547119' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHLY' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'60877' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMA' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMB' 'sip-files00170.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'146647' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHME' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
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describe
'42748' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMF' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4386772' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMG' 'sip-files00171.tif'
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describe
'16956' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMH' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMI' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
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describe
'175619' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMJ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
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describe
'59513' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMK' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387604' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHML' 'sip-files00172.tif'
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describe
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describe
'543378' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMN' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
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describe
'190085' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMO' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
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describe
'55289' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMP' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4359396' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMQ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
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describe
'20564' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMR' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
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describe
'547128' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMS' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
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describe
'166299' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMT' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
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describe
'57024' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMU' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387496' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMV' 'sip-files00174.tif'
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describe
'19996' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMW' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMX' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
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describe
'168517' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMY' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
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describe
'58404' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHMZ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387612' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNA' 'sip-files00175.tif'
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describe
'20595' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNB' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
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describe
'547155' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNC' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
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describe
'176209' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHND' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
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describe
'60369' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNE' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNF' 'sip-files00176.tif'
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describe
'20768' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNG' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
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describe
'541821' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNH' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
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describe
'171547' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNI' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
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describe
'53636' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNJ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4345204' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNK' 'sip-files00177.tif'
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describe
'20836' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNL' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNM' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
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describe
'174277' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNN' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNO' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
a84442b02d6d5f90a64fa31d5d77cce4
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'2011-10-28T03:13:14-04:00'
describe
'4387748' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNP' 'sip-files00178.tif'
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describe
'20886' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNQ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:13:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNR' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
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describe
'177098' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNS' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
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describe
'62321' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNT' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4388328' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNU' 'sip-files00179.tif'
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describe
'22140' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNV' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNW' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
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describe
'160131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNX' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
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describe
'56676' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNY' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387564' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHNZ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
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describe
'20113' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOA' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOB' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
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describe
'150077' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOC' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
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describe
'46775' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOD' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOE' 'sip-files00181.tif'
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describe
'18612' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOF' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOG' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
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describe
'174179' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOH' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
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describe
'59824' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOI' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'21099' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOK' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
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describe
'176510' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOM' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
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describe
'61024' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHON' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387944' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOO' 'sip-files00183.tif'
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describe
'21463' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOP' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOQ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
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describe
'178121' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOR' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
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describe
'61281' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOS' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387920' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOT' 'sip-files00184.tif'
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describe
'21379' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOU' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOV' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
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describe
'165459' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOW' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
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describe
'51757' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOX' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387444' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOY' 'sip-files00185.tif'
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describe
'19197' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHOZ' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPA' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
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describe
'181854' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPB' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
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describe
'64247' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPC' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4388332' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPD' 'sip-files00186.tif'
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describe
'22290' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPE' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPF' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
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describe
'141842' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPG' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
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describe
'49118' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPH' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387208' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPI' 'sip-files00187.tif'
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describe
'18937' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPJ' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
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describe
'547130' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPK' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
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describe
'179395' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPL' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:12:28-04:00'
describe
'60094' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPM' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387804' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPN' 'sip-files00188.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPO' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
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describe
'547109' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPP' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
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describe
'157455' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPQ' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
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describe
'46848' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPR' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387508' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPS' 'sip-files00189.tif'
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describe
'18742' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPT' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
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describe
'547162' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPU' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
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describe
'136846' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPV' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
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describe
'42634' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPW' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4386956' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPX' 'sip-files00190.tif'
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describe
'17808' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPY' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHPZ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
3fe991a150810f13f50ed4fb808ce7d0
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describe
'154072' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQA' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
782a8e841e6060191aaa13787020da47
92653d6ff87b4609f03e3c1d3515adc9fce65870
'2011-10-28T03:13:20-04:00'
describe
'43338' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQB' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
ade6998d58665047f1ea8e3b2ca1ebea
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describe
'4386928' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQC' 'sip-files00191.tif'
a148e32c64d82776721eb61c80978acb
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describe
'17334' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQD' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQE' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
b9008bfc80862472eecc7ecd7510157c
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describe
'167501' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQF' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
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describe
'57132' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQG' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387420' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQH' 'sip-files00192.tif'
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describe
'19943' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQI' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
cfbc5bf5f9cfb395399bcc5d0c73937b
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describe
'539991' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQJ' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
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describe
'184652' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQK' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
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describe
'50558' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQL' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4330268' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQM' 'sip-files00193.tif'
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describe
'18892' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQN' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
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describe
'536247' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQO' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
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describe
'171462' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQP' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
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describe
'54286' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQQ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4302252' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQR' 'sip-files00194.tif'
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describe
'20671' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQS' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQT' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
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describe
'153798' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQU' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
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describe
'45726' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQV' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQW' 'sip-files00195.tif'
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describe
'18641' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQX' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQY' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
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describe
'173719' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHQZ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
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describe
'54198' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRA' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRB' 'sip-files00196.tif'
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describe
'20082' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRC' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
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describe
'547114' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRD' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
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describe
'219245' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRE' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
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describe
'56532' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRF' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRG' 'sip-files00197.tif'
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describe
'21049' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRH' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
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describe
'538227' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRI' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
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describe
'206562' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRJ' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
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'2011-10-28T03:13:52-04:00'
describe
'56762' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRK' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4316888' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRL' 'sip-files00198.tif'
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describe
'21132' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRM' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
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describe
'534704' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRN' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
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describe
'175097' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRO' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
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describe
'59185' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRP' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4287504' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRQ' 'sip-files00199.tif'
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describe
'20062' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRR' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
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describe
'525623' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRS' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
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describe
'179414' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRT' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
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describe
'60677' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRU' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4215576' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRV' 'sip-files00200.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRW' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRX' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
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describe
'150529' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRY' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
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describe
'43752' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHRZ' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387012' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSA' 'sip-files00201.tif'
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describe
'17550' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSB' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
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describe
'554239' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSC' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
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describe
'142638' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSD' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
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describe
'50654' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSE' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4444480' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSF' 'sip-files00202.tif'
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'2011-10-28T03:09:46-04:00'
describe
'18991' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSG' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
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describe
'547127' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSH' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
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describe
'182316' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSI' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
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describe
'63761' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSJ' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4388188' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSK' 'sip-files00203.tif'
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describe
'22387' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSL' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
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describe
'547142' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSM' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
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describe
'175774' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSN' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
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describe
'60605' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSO' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387948' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSP' 'sip-files00204.tif'
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describe
'21497' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSQ' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
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describe
'547014' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSR' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
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describe
'140511' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSS' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
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describe
'43558' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHST' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4386860' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSU' 'sip-files00205.tif'
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describe
'17556' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSV' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSW' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
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describe
'172682' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSX' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
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describe
'59638' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSY' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387836' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHSZ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
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describe
'20885' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTA' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTB' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
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describe
'139886' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTC' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
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describe
'41577' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTD' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4386900' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTE' 'sip-files00207.tif'
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describe
'17267' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTF' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
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describe
'547104' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTG' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
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describe
'176565' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTH' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
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describe
'60260' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTI' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4387968' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTJ' 'sip-files00208.tif'
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describe
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describe
'547134' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTL' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
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describe
'143256' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTM' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
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describe
'41167' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTN' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
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describe
'4386668' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTO' 'sip-files00209.tif'
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describe
'16504' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTP' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTQ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'60644' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTS' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'21468' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTU' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTV' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
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describe
'182634' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTW' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
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describe
'53835' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTX' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTY' 'sip-files00211.tif'
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describe
'20309' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHTZ' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUA' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'57129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUC' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'20097' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUE' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
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describe
'547086' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUF' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'41005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUH' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'15134' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUJ' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
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describe
'538216' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUK' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'64031' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUM' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'22096' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUO' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUP' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUU' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUX' 'sip-files00216.tif'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHUZ' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVE' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVJ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'54630' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVL' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'19739' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVN' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVO' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVR' 'sip-files00220.tif'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVT' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'22167' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVX' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
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describe
'547105' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVY' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
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describe
'174991' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHVZ' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'20548' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWC' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
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describe
'554224' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWD' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
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describe
'156427' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWE' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
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describe
'44069' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWF' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'17106' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWH' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
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describe
'547074' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWI' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
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describe
'176313' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWJ' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
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describe
'60398' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWK' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'547037' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWN' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
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describe
'155388' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWO' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
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describe
'42844' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWP' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'543614' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWS' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
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describe
'174583' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWT' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
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describe
'59774' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPZfileF20081115_AAAHWU' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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CAP-TURE OF FRAN-CIS I, OF FRANCE BY CHARLES Y; BPAIN,
HEROES OF HISTORY

IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE



By AGNES SADLIER a

AUTHOR OF ‘‘ A HISTORY OF IRELAND IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE”

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS



NEW YORK ;
A. L. BURT COMPANY, PUBLISHERS ae
Burt’s One Syllable Histories

Bound in handsome cloth binding. Covers in

Colors. Each Volume Profesely Illustrated.

HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. By Mrs.
HELEN W. PIERSON.

HISTORY OF ENGLAND. By Mrs. HELEN W. Pier-
SON.

HISTORY OF FRANCE. By Mrs. HELEN W. PIERSON.
HISTORY OF GERMANY. By Mrs. HELEN W. PIER-
HISTORY OF RUSSIA. By HELEN AINSLIE SMITH.
HISTORY OF IRELAND. By AGNEs SADLIER.
HISTORY OF JAPAN. By HELEN AINSLIE SMITH.
HISTORY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT. By Jose-

PHINE POLLARD.
HISTORY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT. By Josz-

PHINE POLLARD.
HEROES OF HISTORY. By AGNES SADLIER.
BATTLES OF AMERICA. By JosEPHINE POLLARD.
LIVES OF THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED
STATES. By Mrs. HELEN W. PIERSON.

A. L. BURT COMPANY, New York.



Copyright, 1891,
By JOSEPH L. BLAMIRE.
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

HEROES OF THE BIBLE, . . 5 5 < : ° e . ° ‘
CHAPTER II.

HEROES OF PERSIA AND OF GREECE, A 5 f 5 s . . *

CHAPTER III.

HEROES OF Rome, . eee 5 fs : 3 . . . °
CHAPTER IV.

HEROES OF THE MIDDLE AGES. From A.D. 70oo TO A.D. 1500, . 4 e
CHAPTER V.

HEROES OF THE CRUSADES, . 5 a - 5 - Fs é ° 5
CHAPTER VI.

HEROES OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. From A.D. 1500 To A.D. 1600, .

CHAPTER VII.

HEROES OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. From A.D. 1600 To A.D. 1700, -

CHAPTER VIIL.

HEROES OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. From A.D. 1700 TO A.D. 1800, .

CHAPTER IX.
HEROES OF THE NINETEENTH CentURY. From A.D. 1800 TO THE PRESENT TIME,

PAGE

x3)

29

51

94

. 140

181

196

2

-_
&





LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE

Cyrus, King of Persia, . . . . 13
A Persian Palace, . ‘ eee - 15

A Rock Grave in Persia, F ‘ Seay
Miltiades, . g 3 fs . . elO
Themistocles, . 7 sti ie : 21
Types and Costumes of Early Grea
Life. : 6 3 ‘ $2123)

Pericles, . 7 . . ° : sie
Alexander the Great, “ i 5 27

Roman Eagle, . . 4 : : 2420
Horatius Cocles, : . S : SRST
Coriolanus, i ‘ : . : Lo 32
The Gauls in Rome, . : : - 33
The Roman Forum, . . fj 35
Interior of the Pantheon, : ; PhS 7,
Hannibal, . 5 : ‘ : - 39
The Appian Way, near Rome, F 32 AT
Julius Cesar, . : : s : 45)
Tomb of Augustus Czesar, . . - 46

Augustus Cesar, ‘ : é .
Constantine the Great, . 3 : . 48
Arch of Constantine in Rome, . - 49
The Huns, : . ° . é - 53
Arabs and Tartars, . : A . se b7
Charlemagne, . . . . - 58
Charlemagne at the School of the Palace, 59
Charlemagne Before Narbonne, . - 60
Death of Roland, . é ; : - 63

A Knight Made by the Dead Hand of

PAGE

Roland, 65
A Viking (Sédndina nen Pigs), - 69
Landing of the Danes in England, . a Hl
Raid of the Northmen, . 5 : 3573
Alfred the Great, Z ‘ 2 - 74
Canute, ‘ 3 E 2 3 32 70
Canute and the Sea, : : 3 7;
Ancient Round Tower, . . 4 279)
Brian Boru on the Plains of Clontarf, . 81
The Four Courts, Dublin, 5 , . 83
Landing of William the Conqueror, 87
Harold, the Last of the Saxon Kings, gI
The Burial of William, A 93
In the Time of the Crusades, . 3 94
Jerusalem, Showing the Mosque of Omar, 103
At the Time of the Crusades, . - 105
Triumphal Entry of Richard I. and

Philip Augustus into Acre, . é . III
Richard’s Farewell to the Holy Land, . 113
Edward L., . . 11g
Robert Bruce, . 3 e : ‘ . 125
Edward III,, : Fs 2 fs A - 126
Death of Edward III., . 4 : 27,
Henry the Fifth, : . i : - 135
“Welcome, Welcome, Harry of France

and: Englands cease en on eee E37,
Columbus, ; é é fs e - 141
Queen Isabella, ; 5 . 41
Vill

List of Llustrations.

PAGE PAGE
Hernando Cortes, . . 16145] “Death.of Turenne, ace 555 ee 192
Pizarro, . CNS A é - 151 | The Duke of Marlborough, . . . 195
Charles V., és sos ‘ . 156 | Peter the Great, 2 Beal te , - 199
Francis I., See eRe +. 159 | Charles XII. Seine the Conditions of
William the Silent). sone rO5 bo BOGE ts Sy ise) “ae aor
The Dykes in Holland, erg Frederick the Gar oN et hae ee 6203
Henry IV., : ; .17I General Wolfe, . . . . e + 205
Gustavus Vasa,. . . . 175 | Montcalm, Fish eee. oe pn ecereas
Ivan the Terrible, 179 George Washington, . . . - 207
The Count de Tilly Gloating Ore the Napoleon, Emperor, PRK ST eee
Massacre, ; f . . 183 | Battle of Trafalgar, . . . . . 211
Gustavus and His Queen Entering Mu- Death of Nelson at Trafalgar, ; i212
nich, ‘ 3 : . 184 | Wellington, i 2 - eo217,
Death of Gustavus Nicioiis: - 185 | Oliver Hazard Perry, . . ° - 219
Louis XIV., - 185 | Robert E. Lee, . 7 oF, . e225
Louis XIV. and His Coie . 188 | William T. Sherman, e a © . 224
The Great Condé, . 189 | Philip Henry Sheridan, . eis . 224
William III. Receiving the Aicopa - 190 | General Grant, . ° . . . » 225
William III. of Orange and Queen Mary, 191 | William L., . ooo ae eet at fone ed
PREFATORY.



When it is seen that a book of the size of “ Heroes
of History” treats of the most famous of those who
have gained their laurels “on the tented field,” from
Joshua down to General Gordon, it will readily be
recognized that the sketch of each one must neces-
sarily be slight. It is nevertheless hoped that the book
may be of real service in establishing correctly in the
minds of its youthful readers the main points of his-
tory—the causes which led these men to wage war
and where, when, with whom and against whom they
fought—and thus impart that general knowledge
which is sure to quicken the taste for wider reading

on the same subjects.
AGNES SADLIER.

New York, August, 1891.


\


Heroes ot History.

CHAPTER - I.
HE-ROES OF THE BI-BLE*

A he-ro, as no doubt you know, is one who has
done great deeds for his land or for our race. Peace
has her he-roes as well as war; men who in times
which tried men’s souls stood firm in the cause of right,
or by their great thoughts brought calm out of storm.
It is not of these though that this book will tell, but
of those who won their fame on the fields of war.

Josh-u-a. The first he-ro of whom we know much
more than his name was Josh-u-a. He was a He-
brew, but born in E-gypt, while his race dwelt there
as slaves. When Mo-ses brought them out of that
tand, and they were in the des-ert, Josh-u-a’s wise,
good words’ made him dear to Mo-ses, so that when —
the time came for that great man to die, he put his
hands on Josh-u-a, and made him chief in his place.

* Full particulars of the lives and deeds of the Bible Heroes will be found in Rout-
LEDGE’S ONE-SYLLABLE HisToRY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT.
8 Fleroes of [History.

Then Josh-u-a led the He-brews, as God told him,
to the Land of Prom-ise. It was to be theirs, but
they had to fight for it, and wrest it from the strong
bad na-tions that held it. They went past the stream
of the Jor-dan and came to the strong town of Jer-1-
cho. Then their souls grew weak, and they said it
was too strong to take. But Josh-u-a, whose trust in
the Lord naught could shake, made them all march
round the walls once a day for six days, and make no
sound as they went. Then, on the next day, all the
priests went with the men, and bore the Ark. ‘They
went round six times and. made no sound. ‘Then they
went round once more, but this time they gave a great,
long shout, while the trump-ets were blown. And at
once the walls fell down, and Josh-u-a took the town.
He had to fight a great deal though ere he won the
Land of Prom-ise. One time he had to meet five
kings with a great force. It was late in the day ere the
tide of strife was seen to turn for the He-brews, and
Josh-u-a was in fear lest the foe should get more men
ere the next day. So he plead with God to make the
day last till his men had beat the foe so that they would
not dare to face them more. And God heard him; »
the day did not fade to night till few of the foe were
left. So he kept on, a true he-ro, in his course, till at
last the rich, fair Land of Prom-ise was won, and dealt
out mid the tribes of Is-ra-el. And Josh-u-a kept the
Gideon. 9

rule till his death, and gave proof that he was as great _
in the arts of peace as in the arts of war. :
Gid-e-on. For a long time the He-brews dwelt
in the place which he had won, till they set up false
gods in the place of the true God, who then let new

foes spring up and smite them with a strong hand. In

their fear they plead with God to save them, so at last
He sent an an-gel to a poor youth whose name was
Gid-e-on, to tell him to come forth and save Is-ra-el.
Gid-e-on, who was of mean birth, was loath to take

the words for truth, and sought as a sign from God

that the fleece of wool which he should spread on the
eround might be wet with dew while all the ground
was dry. ‘And it was so. Then he sought one more
sign; that the fleece might keep dry while all the ground

was wet. And God gave him this sign too. So he

went to the camp. ‘Then God told him to let all the
men go home who had a wish to do so; and a great
throng went. ‘Then God told him to bring his band to
drink at a stream, and to send home all those who bent
down their mouths to the stream to drink, but to keep
those who brought up the wa-ter to their mouths in

_ their hands. This test left him but 300 men, for most





knelt down to drink at their ease.. Then Gid-e-on
made three small bands of these, and gave to each
man a trump-et and a pitch-er with a light in it. At
mid-night he led them to the camp of the foe, and all
10 fleroes of History.

blew a great blast oftheir trump-ets, and made a wild
clang with their pitch-ers, while they cried out with a
loud voice, “The sword of the Lord and of Gid-e-on!”’
When the foe heard the shout and the noise, and saw
the bright light, and could not tell whence it came,
they were struck with fear and fled. But all the tribes
of Is-ra-el went out and cut them off, and put most of
them to death. And then Is-ra-el had peace for a long
time, and Gid-e-on kept the rule till his death.
Sam-son. Then a fierce foe, the Phil-is-tines,
smote the Is-ra-el-ites, and beat them so that they had
lost all hope, when God. made a strong man of the
name of Sam-son fight them and save Is-ra-el. Sam-
son was not so good as Josh-u-a, or Gid-e-on. He
fell in love with a fair Phil-is-tine wo-man whose name
was De-li-lah, and she got him to tell her that the cause
of his great strength was in his long hair, which God
had said should not be cut. But while he slept, De-
li-lah cut it, and the Phil-is-tines took him with ease.
They put his eyes out, and kept him in jail, but on a
great feast-day they brought him out that all might
mock at him. But the blind Sam-son, whose hair had
grown and with it his strength, told the boy who led
him to place him by the two strong posts that held up
the hall. The boy did so, and Sam-son broke down
the posts, and slew all who were in the hall, and thus

died with his foes.
David. II

Da-vid. This was the next great he-ro of the He-
brews. He was but a poor boy who kept his sheep
on the hill-sides, till Sam-u-el was sent by God to make
him king in-stead of the bad king Saul. As he was

~~ not to reign till Saul died though, he kept on at his old

life. Is-ra-el was once more at war with the Phil-is-
tines, at this time, and Da-vid was sent to the camp
with food for his broth-ers. And while there he saw
a huge man come down from the hill on which stood
the foe’s camp, and mock the Is-ra-el-ites, and heard
that all stood in too much fear of him to go down in
the vale and fight him. But Da-vid felt no fear, and
got leave to fight him. So he took his staff, and chose
five smooth stones from the brook, and put them in his
scrip. Then he ‘took a sling in his hand, and went
down to where huge Go-li-ath stood in his strong,
bright coat of mail. He was in a great rage when he
saw how small a thing the youth brought to fight him
with; but Da-vid paid no heed to his treats, but as
he ran to meet him, took a stone from his scrip and
put it in his sling, and with it dealt Go-li-ath so strong
a blow in the face, that he fell to the ground. Then
Da-vid took his sword and cut off his head. Great -
was the joy of the Is-ra-el-ites when Da-vid came back
with Go-li-ath’s head! But the foe, full of fear, ran
off and left their camp to them. Da-vid’s fame grew
12 fleroes of fTistory.

so great that the king, Saul, could not bear him, and
tried to kill him, so that Da-vid had to flee and hide |
in caves and holes till Saul died. ‘Then he was made
king, and put down all Is-ra-el’s foes, and made her a
strong rich na-tion.

Ju-das Mac-ca-be-us. It was long ere the He-
brews saw his like—not till near the time of Christ,
when they were great no more, but bent neath the
rule of strange kings. One of the worst of these was
An-ti-o-chus, who did his best to make them bow
down to the false gods whom he held in place of the
One and True God. So a brave priest, Mat-a-thi-
as, told all who had zeal for the true faith to flee with
him to the great hills. A great throng did so, and he
soon had a strong force. At his death, his son Ju-das,
who was so brave and strong that he got the name of
Mac-ca-be-us, or the Ham-mer, was made head in his
place, and fought so well that he got back a good part
of theland. At length An-ti-o-chus sent his best men
of war, at the head of a great force, to put them down.
The strife was fierce, but Ju-das won the field, and so
kept on till at last he was slain in a great fight, when
he had but few men to help him. But his life had
been so grand in its aim, that, though short, it was not
in vain; for his broth-ers, whom he had made to feel
as he did, fought on till they made their land for quite
a time great and free.
ee

C. YTUS. 13

a

_ CHAPTER IL
_ HE-ROES GF PER-SIL-A AND OF GREECE.

Cy-rus. If you
were asked to tell of
Per-si-a, no doubt you
would say that it is a
land in the south-east
of A-si-a, whose head
man bears the name of
the Shah, and that
there is not much else
to tell of it. And this
would be true of it
now. But once it was
not so; ere Christ
came on earth, Per-
Si-a was a great land,
\ | and had her he-roes
CY-RUS, KING OF PER-SI-A. like the rest of the Ta
| : tions. The first of

these was Cy-rus. A strange tale is told of his youth.
At the time of his birth, Per-si-a was neath the rule
of the Medes. The king’s name was As-ty-a-ges,
and Cy-rus was his grand-son, In a dream he saw


14 fleroes of Llistory.

that Cy-rus would one day take his throne from him,
so he told Har-pa-gus, one of the chief men of his
court, to put him to death. So Har-pa-gus gave the
child to a herds-man of the king, and told him to put
it on a bleak hill till it died. The man took it to his
own home, where he found that his own child had just
died. And when his wife saw the fair, strong babe,
she would not let him take it from her. So the man
put out his own dead child on the hill, and kept the
young prince. ‘Time went on; he grew to bea strong
boy, and was so bright that all the rest of the boys let
him lead in the games. One day they had a sham
fight, and when one of the boys did not do as Cy-rus
told him, he beat him well with a stick. ‘The boy ran
home and told his father, who was a man of high rank,
and he told the king, who had the boy brought to him.
At sight of him, the king knew from his age, and his
proud mien, that he must be his grand-son. So he
sent for Har-pa-gus and the herds-man, and got the
truth from both. As he thought that his dream had
been borne out by the fact that the boys had made Cy-
rus king at play, he let him live, but he got the son
of Har-pa-gus, and had him cut up, and the parts put
on a dish on the board, when he had Har-pa-gus to
sup with him. When he grew up, Cy-rus, whose fa-
ther was a Per-si-an, and whose heart was thus full of
love for that race, got them to rise and throw off the
Cyrus. . 15

yoke of the Medes, and make him king in his grand-
fa-ther’s place. He made Per-si-a great, for he brought
all the lands in A-si-a neath -her sway. There was a
king in Lyd-i-a, a land far to the north-west, whose
name was Croe-sus, and who was so rich that to “be





A PER-SIAN PAL-ACE.

as rich as Croe-sus” got to bea prov-erb. He sought
to check Cy-rus in his course, and came to fight him
with a great host. But Cy-rus beat him, and kept him
for the rest of his life. The next feat of this great king
was to take Bab-y-lon. This great town was so large
as to take in 12 square miles on each side of the Eu-
16 Heroes of ffistory.

hra-tes, a great, broad, swift stream—it was girt
round by thick, high walls, with great gates of bronze,
and was rich and grand with the fine houses of its
kings, and its great men, and its fair gar-dens, built
row on row, high in the ar. To look at it, one would
have thought no one could take it; but Cy-rus, when
he had laid siege to it for two years, found a way to
do it, and made a plan which has made him rank mid
the great men in war of all time. There was a lake
near by, to which a ca-nal led from the Eu-phra-tes.
- Both of these were dry, for the stream was kept from
them by a great brick dam. But one long, dark night,.
when a great feast was held in the town, he set his men
to workto tear down this dam. Thus the great stream
was made to turn its course, and leave in the midst of
the town through which it ran a dry bed. All the
streets that came to an end at the stream had strong
gates to keep out all the foe who might have tried to
get in the town by boat; but when the men of Cy-rus
came down the dry bed of the stream, they found one
of them at which they could get in, and thus get to the
heart of the town. Mean-while, in the great hall of
his pal-ace, lit by soft lights and full of rich scents, the
king sat ata great feast with his chief men round him.
All at once the cry that the foe was on them rang out,
but too late. From hall to hall, from feast to feast,
street to street, the men of Cy-rus had sped, and slew
Cyrus. 17.

each and all, till at last they burst in-to where the king
was and slew him on the steps of his throne (s.c. 538).
Cy-rus was now so great that he took the name of the
“king of the world.” This great man met his death



A ROCK GRAVE IN PER-SI-A,

where he spent most of ‘his life, on the field of war.
He went to put down a fierce tribe to the north, but
was slain, it is said, by a wo-man, who flung his head
in a bowl of blood, that he might drink his fill. °His

son, Cam-by-ses, who now came to the throne, is
18 Heroes of History.

thought to have been mad, yet he brought more lands
neath the sway of Per-si-a. When he died, he left no
son, but a man whose name was Smerd-is said he was
the son of Cy-rus, and got the throne. Not a few
thought that he was a man of low birth who had had
his ears cut off for a crime. He kept them wrapt up
in the day, but they got his wife to feel at night, and
she found that he had none; so he was put to death.
Da-ri-us. Of those who now thought they had a
right to the throne was Da-ri-us, one of the late king’s
kin. He said to the rest who laid claim, that they
should all ride forth in the morn ere the dawn broke,
and that he whose horse should be the first to neigh
when the sun rose, should be king. This was done,
and the horse of Da-ri-us gave a loud neigh as the sun
rose, and the rest got down and made a bow to him as
their king. Da-ri-us was born to rulemen. He made
fine roads through the land, built great towns, and kept
a strict, but not harsh rule. But he had a great wish
to add still more lands to his vast realm, and most of
all, to take Greece, for some of the men who dwelt
there had lent help to some foes of Da-ri-us in A-si-a.
Now Greece, small as it looks on the map, was a great
land ere Christ came on earth. The Greeks had
thought out their own civ-il-i-za-tion, and taught it to
the rest of the world. They had great men who gave
to the world the best thoughts that it knows; while
Miltiades. 19

more gave it tne best things in art. Greece was made
up of a lot of small states, bound, not as our states
are, by a bond which makes all stand up for each, and
each for all, but by a sort of loose league which left
each free to help the rest or
not, as she chose. “The two
chief states were Ath-ens and
Spar-ta, but one of these was
sure to choose black if one
chose white, so they could
not be said to be friends. It
was Ath-ens which had
made Da-ri-us swear to
break her might, and, true to
his word, a vast fleet was
soon seen on the sea, led by
his chief men of war. Now
Ath-ens was but a small
place, not half the size of
Rhode Isl-and—that is, not
as big as a large farm in the
~West—but her men had
great pluck. So they clad
them-selves in brass and steel, and set off to meet the
foe.
Mil-ti-a-des. At length they came to the Plain
of Mar-a-thon, 22 miles out from Ath-ens. Huge



MIL-TI-A-DES,
20 Fleroes of History.

mounts and bare hills guard it on all sides, save one
where the bright blue sea breaks on the beach. The
great fleet of the foe rode in sight. It was the rule in
Ath-ens for a fresh man to lead each day, and by
good luck, on this day it was Mil-ti-a-des, He made
a long line of the men, and ere the foe had all got on
shore, with a great burst of song, they came down on
them with a run, and bore a great mass of them to the
ground with their spears. A long, fierce fight then
took place, but when at length the foe strove to get
back to their boats, the Greeks set scores of them on
fire. But at last they got off, and made straight for
Ath-ens. But Mil-ti-a-des led his men back to the
town in time to keep the foe from it. So they set
sail for A-si-a (490 3c). Mil-ti-a-des did not live
long; he died of a wound he got in war; but his name
will live till the end of time. Da-ri-us tried no more
to bring Greece neath his sway, but gave his time
to the arts of peace till his death. But his son Xer-
xes (Zerks-sez) set out to take it at the head of a great
host.

Le-on-i-das, the Spar-tan, and The-mis-to-cles,
the A-the-ni-an. Not a few of the states said they
would not band with the rest to meet him; that he
was too strong. But Ath-ens and Spar-ta stood firm,
and a few small ones cast in their lot with them.
Now Spar-ta was a state where the first and last end
Themestocles. 21

was war; they paid no heed to trade, but taught their
boys in all ways to bear pain and give no sign that
they were hurt. Their fare was but black beans and
broth. So you may judge
that though her men were
few, they were worth a
great deal in time of war.
Led by Le-on-i-das, then
king, they now took the
held. Up to this time,
Ath-ens had fought but
land fights; but The-mis-
to-cles, a great and shrewd
man, had got her to build
a fleet. So the A-the-ni-
ans were to fight the foe
at sea, and the Spar-tans
on land, but for peace
sake, they let the men of
Spar-ta lead. In due time
Xer-xes came, set a grand
land force on the shores of
Greece and made straight ©
for Ath-ens. But on the
way he had to lead them through a small pass twixt
the cliffs and the sea, which bore the name of Ther-
mop-y-lz, or Hot-Gates, from the fact that hot

Z (ak
FF tA
me Oe

i
Vf

WON
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NS

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i

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y
Nyy’
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22 Fleroes of History.

springs were near by. Here Le-on-i-das, the Spar-
tan, took his stand with but a small force. In vain
the foe tried to break through; for two days he kept
them back, but then a false Greek led them by a
small lone path round the mount, and brought them
on the brave Spar-tan’s rear. Some fled at sight of
the foe, but three hun-dred stayed with Le-on-i-das
and fought till they were slain (nc. 480).

Xer-xes now swept on to Ath-ens. All fled as he
drew near to the fleet, andfrom it saw their homes burn.
These ships — now the sole hope of Greece — lay in
a small bay made by the coast of Ath-ens and two
isles, one of which, Sal-a-mis, gave its name to the
great sea-fight which now took place. When the
vast fleet of Xer-xes bore down on the Greek fleet,
some were in sore fear and sought to get off, but The-
mis-to-cles sent word of this plan to Xer-xes, and ‘he
put a guard at the mouth of the bay to keep his prey
safe till the morn. When the Greeks found that they
were in a trap they knew they must do or die, so
in the morn a Greek ship made a dash at one of the
foe’s. The rest went to her help, and soon the bright
_ bay was a scene of fierce strife and blood, while from
his gold throne, on the base of a hill on the shore,
Xer-xes kept the scene in view. But the size and
bulk of the foe’s ships made them no match for the
small, light boats of the Greeks in so small a plac’:




























































































































































































































































































































































TUMES OF EAR-LY GRE-CIAN LIFE,

TYPES AND COS
24 Heroes of Flistory. —

and at last they had to flee, and thus, thanks to The-
mis-to-cles, the Greeks won the great sea-fight of Sal-
a-mis (Bc. 480). 7

On this blow Xer-xes set off for home, but left a
large force, led by one of his best men, Mar-do-ni-us,
to keep up, tte war.

Pau-sa-ni-as, the Spar-tan, and A-ris-ti-des,
the A-the-ni-an. The two foes met once more on
the plain of Pla-te-a. The Spar-tans were led by
Pau-sa-ni-as, one of the kin of the great Le-on-1-das,
and the A-the-ni-ans by A-ris-ti-des, the Just. | Fierce
and long was the fray, but at last Mar-do-ni-us fell,
and then the Per-si-ans fled and left all their tents, full
of rich things, to the Greeks.

Greece was now safe from the Per-si-ans, but Ath- -
ens was a heap of burnt houses, so The-mis-to-cles
set to work to build it up. He was a man full of
craft and guile, but put these to the use of his land
and strove hard to make her great and strong. Pau-
sa-ni-as, of Spar-ta, who was sent to fight the Per-si-
ans, got to like their soft ways of life, and to loath
the hard life of Spar-ta, and at last told Xer-xes he
would help him to take Greece. His plot was found
out; he was brought back to Spar-ta and tried, but
set free for want of proof. But he was soon at
his old tricks, and this time there was so much proof
that he fled to a tem-ple to be safe, and there died for
_ Pelopidas and Epaminondas. j 25

want of food. I grieve to say that it was soon found
at Ath-ens that the great The-mis-to-cles had had

Z part in the schemes of Pau-sa-ni-
as, and he fled to Per-sia, where
he died.

The course of P4ga-ni-as, and
still more that of The-mis-to-cles,
is a sad proof of how great a mind
and how vile a soul a man can
have !

Ath-ens now grew great neath
the rule of a great and wise man
of the name of Per-i-cles, while in
war her men were led by Cimon.
But when Per-i-cles died, Al-ci-bi-
a-des came to the front and got the
men of Ath-ens to do things which
made the state weak. Spar-ta rose
and got to be the chief state of
Greece, and kept a harsh rule o’er
all the rest. By a trick she got her
men in a strong fortress of Thebes
and kept that town by force for
three years. |

Pe-lop-i-das and .E-pam-i-non-das of
Thebes. These were two brave youths of Thebes,
who made up their minds to free their town, So



PER-I-CLES,
20 aa Fleroes of History.

Pe-lop-i-das and a band of youths dressed up like
girls, and put wreaths of. pine and fir on their heads,
and went round from. houseto house where the Spar-
tans dwelt and put them to death. Then they took
a it-ress by storm, and put the rest of the Spar-
Jout, and“Ipeed Thebes. But Spar-ta would not
“hebes go, and went“to war. So E-pam-i-non-
das led the men of ‘Fhebes to meet them. A great





fight took place at Leuc-tra, where E-pam-i-non-das

vave proof how finé-a mind he had for war. This
fieht broke the might of Spar-ta, and Thebes got to
he the thief town of Greece for a time. Through all

their lives Pe-lop-i-das and E-pam-i-non-das strove to

o make Thebes great, and both these dear friends died

ons ‘the field of war.

Phil-ip of Mac-e-don. Wher Thebes was
thus left with no head, there dwelt in Mac-e-don,
a land to the north of Greece, a king of the name of
Phil-ip. The folks of Mac-e- Jon were not keen like
the Greeks, but were rough and plain, and knew
naught of books or art.” But Phil-ip had spent three
years of his youth at Thebes and learned how to
make war from E-pam-i-non-das. | So he set to work
now to gain all Greece, and bit by bit he built up his
strength. He gave aid ta Ath-ens in her wars, but
all the while drew the chains round her. In vain De-
mos-the-nes made great speech on speech to rouse
Alexander the Great. Poa oe 24

them to a sense of what was to come; Phil-ip kept
on, and soon had all Greece at his feet. But at the



AL-EX-AN-DER THE GREAT,

height of his fame he was slain at a great feast held
when his daugh-ter was wed,
28 i fTeroes of History.

Al-ex-an-der the Great. Phil-ip’s crown was
set on the head of his son Al-ex-an-der, but 20 years
‘of age. This king stands at the head of the war
he-roes of the world. His first feat was to start to
take Per-si-a. He set sail for A-si-a, and met the Per-
si-ans at the stream of the Gran-i-cus, and beat them
(334 nc). Then he kept on and met the foe led by
their king, Da-ri-us, at a place named Is-sus, and
beat them so that the king took to flight (333 Bc).
‘ On swept Al-ex-an-der in his wake, while each great
town threw wide its gates to him, and at last came up
with the king when he was near death from a wound
made by one of his own men. A-lex-an-der was now
head of the great realm of Per-si-a, but his wish was
to rule the world. So he set his face to the south,
to the great, strange land of In-di-a. Over great
mounts, past great streams, by huge hosts of men
who sought to stay his course, he swept, and was
close to its bounds when his men, worn out with all
they had done, said they would not go one step more.
So he had to turn back, and went to Bab-y-lon to
rest for a time. But as his great joy was to spend
the whole night with his chief men, and drink a great
deal of wine as they spoke of the fields they had
won, it is not strange that, with his great toils, his
strength gave out. He grew weak and ill, and died
at the age of 32 years, and left his vast realm with no
head,
Floratius Cocles. 29

CHAPTER IIL.
HE-ROES OF ROME.
While these things

took place in Greece
and A-si-a, anew na-
tion, the Ro- mans,
grew great in It-a-ly.
At first they were
neath the rule ot
kings, but at last they
got such a bad king
that they drove him
out, and made up
their minds to trust
the rule to two men
Wa }whom they would call
~con-suls, and who

i
a should hold it for one
RO-MAN EA-GLE,
year.

Ho-ra-ti-us Co-cles. Tar-quin, the king, would
not yield to his fate, but tried hard to get back to
his throne. At last he got the aid of Lars Por-se-na,
a great king, who came down on Rome with a great
force. Now there was but one bridge by which he




30 Fleroes of History.

=. could cross the
= fee stream of the Ti-
——=———-- ber to Rome, and
so a brave man,
Tlotrti-us Go-
bets cles, said he
ould 20 to ‘ne fas end of the bridge
EE from Rone and hold it: while the
= rest cut it down. And there he stood
with his great axe, and kept the foe
back till he heard the great crash, and
saw the bridge float down the Ti-ber;
then, all -clad- in stiff, strong mail as
he was, he sprang in the stream ind
3 swam back to Rome. The state had
a stat-ue of him set up, and gave
him as much land as he could plow
, ina day.
Cor-i-o-la-nus. The true name of
is man was Mar-cus, and, while still a mere boy, he
got the crown of oak for sav-ing the life of a man in
a great fight, and was known for the rest of his life
as Cor-i-o-la-nus. But though he fought war on
war for Rome, and made her foes shake at the sound
of his name, he had the fault of pride. He was of
high birth, and his mien to those of low birth was
harsh and proud. So they grew to hate him, and


Cortolanus. 31



HO-RA-TI-US CO-CLES.

when he sought to be con-sul they would not let
him have the post. So, ina rage, he went off, but
32 fleroes of fTistory.

was soon back at the gates of Rome at the head
of her worst foe—the Vol-sci-ans. In their fear,
the Ro-mans sent forth his moth-er and his wife
with his chil-dren to beg him to spare them. He
had been deaf to all else, but when they plead he
gave way, and, with
a burst of tears, cried
out, ‘“Moth-er, thou
hast saved Rome,
but lost thy son.”
He then led the foe
to their home, where,
it is said, they put
him to death. (488
B.C. )
Cin-cin-na-tus.

The next he-ro of
Rome was Lu-ci-us
Quin-ti-us, who got
the name of Cin-cin-
na-tus from the fact
that he wore his hair
in long curls. Ata time when a strong foe of Rome,
‘the At-qui-ans, had got round the troops of Rome,
and held them fast, the chief men of Rome sent for
him to come and keep the rule till he had made
Rome safe. He was found at work at the plow on



COR-I-0-LA-NUS,
Cincinnatus. 33

his smca!l farm, but he set off for Rome at once, as
soon as he heard the bad news. Then he made all



THE GAULS IN ROME.

the men give up all else, and go with him to seek-
the foe. He set off at their head, and went so fast
34_ fleroes of [Tistory.

that ere the foe knew where they were, they were
shut in by his troops. They had to yield, and as
a sign that they did so, Cin-cin-na-tus set up two
spears in the ground, and on the top laid one to
meet both. ‘Then he made the foe pass neath this
yoke. In the short space of 24 hours this was all
done! For this great act, Cin-cin-na-tus got a tri-
umph; that is, he rode through the gates of Rome
and all through its streets in a grand char-i-ot, with
a wreath of lau-rel on his head, while all the chiefs:
of the foe were led first in chains, and all their flags
and the rich spoils which were won from them were
borne by the troops, so that all might see them.
When this grand scene was past, Cin-cin-na-tus went
to his home to taste once more the sweets of the peace
he had won. (458 Bc)

Ca-mil-lus. This is one of the best men we meet
with in the tale of Rome. He won war on war for
her, and brought rich, strong towns neath her sway.
He was great of soul, too, for even when he laid siege
to a town, a man who kept a school there sought to
please him by a base act, and brought all the boys to
his camp. But Ca-mil-lus had his hands tied, and
. told the boys to flog him home, and so great was the
Joy of the foe to see their boys safe that they flung
wide the gates of their town to Ca-mil-lus, and made
friends with the Romans. But though Rome gave





fleroes of [History

him tri-umphs, and rang with his praise, he had foes,
and some of these said that in a late war he had kept
some of the spoils. So he left Rome, with a wish
that they might soon need him. It was not long ere
the Gauls, a fierce tribe from the north, swept in great
hordes to Rome, led by their chief, Bren-nus. Rome
sent a force to beat them back; but in vain. And
now the loss of Ca-mil-lus was felt; and in sore dread
all fled, save a band of young Sen-a-tors, and a few
more young men, who went in the Cap-i-tol and made
it fast. But the old Sen-a-tors who could not fight
went to the Fo-rum and took their seats in their chairs,
with their i-vo-ry scep-tres in their hands, there to wait
for the foe. When the Gauls got to Rome, they
found no one in streets or homes, and went on till they
came to the hall where they found this band of old men
straight and still in their chairs. At first they stood
in awe at the strange sight, but at last one grew so
bold as to go up and take hold of one of the old men’s
white beards. At once the Sen-a-tor struck the Gaul
with his scep-tre, and then they were all slain! Then
the Gauls set fire to Rome, to all but the Cap-i-tol,
which stood on a steep hill which they durst not climb,
for fear of the bold, small band of Romans on top who
could hurl them down. One night they tried to get
up by stealth, and would have done so, for the man
on watch was in a deep sleep, but that some geese


-ON,

THE

N-

PA

THE

-RI-OR OF

E





-T

IN
38 Heroes of [istory.

made a loud noise, and woke one of the Sen-a-tors,
who woke the rest and made all rush out in time to
hurl the first Gaul down, who, as he fell, bore the rest
with him down the cliff. Mean-time those who had
left Rome, had sought out Ca-mil-lus and made him
take the chief rule once more. So he was soon at the
gates of Rome, with a strong force, drove out the foe,
and made all set to work to build up Rome once more.
His death did not take place for 25 years more, and
all that time he was chief man in Rome, and gave
proof that he was as great in the arts of peace as in
war. He died of a plague (365 zc.)

As time went on, Rome grew great and strong, and
brought more lands neath her sway. But one great
town came near her in strength or might—this was
Carth-age, on the coast of Af-ri-ca. Her wealth had
been made in trade, so she had great fleets of ships,
which Rome had not. It was not long ere the two
found cause for strife. To fight Carth-age at sea was
now the dream of the men of Rome; but as they
had no ships, and knew not how to build them, it
would seem to most minds a mad one. But just at
this time the sea threw on their coast a ship of Carth-
age. At once they set to work. Trees were cut
down and 120 ships built like it, while bands of men
were put on a long bench with oars and taught how
to row on dry land. Att last these bold Ro-mans
keg ihe ee 39

set out in these rude boats to meet the best men
on the sea, then in the world. They were led by Du- ©
il-i-us and they beat the men of Carth-age, who had
EOimes toe meet them -— ?
with scorn.
Reg-u-lus. Kome
now sent out a great
fleet, led by Reg-u-
lus, one of her con-
suls. Carth-age sent
as great a fleet to meet
it, led by Ham-il-car,
and a great sea-fght
took place, and the
Romans won. They
then went on land to
fake Carth-age._- In
the first fights they
won, but then Reg-u-
lus lost,.and the men
of Carth-age took him.
They then sent him to
Rome to say on what terms they would make peace.
But when Reg-u-lus got there, he told the Sen-ate
not to yield to Carth-age, and went back and told
them that Rome said no to her terms. In their rage
they put the brave man in a cask stuck full of sharp












ne

ia

HAN-NI-BAL
40 fTLeroes of LListory.

nails, and made it roll down hill, and thus put to
death a true he-ro (250 8). But the war went on
for nine years, and then peace was made.

Han-ni-bal, of Carth-age. When a few years
went by, the war broke out once more. The men of
Carth-age were led this time by Han-ni-bal, who
stands mid the first war-men of all time. He came
at the head of a great land force, whom he led o'er
the Alps to Rome.

Fa-bi-us. One of the best men whom Rome
sent out to keep him back from Rome was Fa-bi-us.
His plan was to use up all the food near the foe, and
to keep him in dread by quick moves on him here
and there, but not to fight on a field face to face.

Still, Han-ni-bal did not lose ground. He won
fight on fight, but did not go to Rome for though his
men tried to urge him, he knew how hard it would be
to take it. So the war went on till at last a young
man of the name of Scip-i-o came to the front. Save
one more, whom I will tell of in time, Scip-i-o was the
best man Rome had in all her days. His plan was
to take the war to Af-ri-ca, and thus make Han-ni-bal
go home to save Carth-age. So he set out and fought
the men of Carth-age, so that in great fear they sent
for Han-ni-bal to come home and save them from the
Ro-mans. He did so, and met Scip-i-o on the field
of Zam-a. Long and fierce was the fight, but Rome




THE AP-PI-AN WAY, NEAR ROME.
1 fleroes of Listory.

won, and Carth-age at last was at her feet (203 Bc).
Scip-i-o, when he came back to Rome, had a grand
tri-umph, and got the name of Af-ri-can-us put to his
own.

Ju-gurth-a, of Africa. The next strong foe whom
Rome found in Af-ri-ca was this prince. He took the
throne of Nu-mid-i-a from the right heir, and though
Rome gave him her aid and tried hard to put Ju-
gurth-a down, ‘he beat all her troops by his skill in
war, or by bribes.

Mar-i-us. At length Rome sent out a man of
low birth and rude in his ways, but of great skill in
war, to take Ju-gurth-a. This was Mar-i-us.
Though low-born, he had great aims and sought to
be made con-sul. Then he wed with one of high
birth, and thus made his way. But his hate for men
of high birth, who had made a mock of his birth and
his aims, was great, as you will see. He made an end
of the war, and brought Ju-gurth-a to Rome to grace
his tri-umph. Then this poor king was cast in a
dark jail, to die of lack of food.

Sul-la was a young man of high birth who had
been in the war neath Mar-i-us, and his friends said,
was the one who took King Ju-gurth-a. So a feud
sprang up twixt Sul-la and Mar-i-us. Sul-la was
not nice to look at; there were great sores on his red

fee, and his keen blue eyes had a fierce glare; but
Sulla. 43

the troops had a deep love for him, for his ways with
them were kind. But just at this time huge hordes
of the fierce Celts and Ger-mans bore down on Rome,
and both Mar-i-us and Sul-la were sent out to fight
them, and for atime, to beat them was their sole
thought. But when this was done the feud sprang
up once more. Rome's prime need was now for a
man who was great in the arts of peace, to fix things
which had gone wrong. But Mar-i-us, though he
was made con-sul, did not do much to put things
right. When a fresh war broke out twixt Rome and
Pon-tus, a land of A-si-a, those of high birth thought
Sul-la should lead the troops, and those of low birth
thought Mar-i-us should do so. The troops stood
by Sul-la; Mar-i-us in vain made up a force of slaves;
he had to flee for his life. When Sul-la was gone to
the East, Mar-i-us came back, and with his friend
Cin-na, put him-self at the head of a great throng of
the low class, and put scores on scores of the high
class to death. It was not long ere Mar-i-us died
(z.c. 83), but the war went on till Sul-la came back.
Fierce and full of blood were the scenes that then
took place. The corpse of Mar-i-us was torn from
its tomb and cast in a stream. Throngs of the low
class were put to death, and bands of the rich as well
—all whom he thought were not with him. Then
Sul-la made new laws, and all the chief men of Rome
44 fTeroes of [listory.

said these were good, for they stood in too much fear
of him to say no. At last he went off to his fine
home, out of Rome, where he spent the rest of his
life and died (s.c. 78).

Pom-pey. A host of great men now came to the
front in Rome, and it got to be hard work with each
to hold his place. One of the best of these was Pom-
pey, who put down the last of the men with Mar-
1-us, in Spain, and when he came back to Rome got
a triumph and the name of The Great. He then got
him-self and his rich friend Cras-sus made con-suls.

Ju-li-cus Cz-sar. “This was the great-est Ro-
man of them all.” He was of the kin of the proud
wife of Mar-i-us, and a man born to rule men. His
fame was not made so soon as Pom-pey’s, and at this
time he paid court to that great man whom all Rome
had a deep love for. At length Pom-pey was sent
off to A-si-a to put down the foes of Rome, and
Cze-sar was sent to rule Spain. The two got back
to Rome near the same time, and with Cras-sus,
made a league to help each other. Cze-sar was made
con-sul, and at the end of his term was sent to bring
Gaul (France) neath the yoke of Rome. For the
next nine years he was at war, in which his skill was
so great that he ranks with Han-ni-bal and Al-ex-
an-der. Hewrote books, too, in which he has told in
a plain, pure style all that he did. When he had got

~»
Julius Cesar. eS
Gaul neath his rule, f
he took Switz-er-land,
beat the Ger-mans and
went to Brit-ain, where
he got the tribes of the
Brit-ains to bend to
him, though not for
long. His fame was
now far more than that of
Pom. pey, who, with men in
Rome, sought to bring to
pass his fall. Cze-sar knew
this, and so when word was
sent to him to dis-band his
troops and come to Rome,
he said he would if Pom-
pey, who was near Rome
with quite a large force,
would do so with his. No fo
heed was paid to this, but {
he was told once more _.
by the con-suls, who \
were friends of Pom-
pey, to dis-band his,
troops, or Rome would
look on him as her ||
foe. So he saw that)
his death was meant, = 8 S
and at the head of his JU-LI-US een












46 fleroes of TT estory.

troops came to Rome, while all the chief men fled,
and put him-self at the head of things. The troops
af Pom-pey left him and came to Cz-sar, and Pom-

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































TOMB OF AU-GUS-TUS C#-SAR.

pey fled. When he had been made con-sul and
made things right at Rome, Cze-sar went in search
of Pom-pey, and found him in Thrace, a land north
of Greece. They had a great fight, but Cze-sar
a a aT a ee

:

—_ ee ee

Augustus Cesar. 47

beat and Pom- 2
pey fled tog
E-gypt, where
he was slain in.
a war in which
he took part
twixt the young
queen Cle-o-pa-tra and
her broth-er (sc. 48).
Cze-sar went there and
brought back peace,
and gave the crown to
Cle-o-pa-tra neath the
sway of Rome. Then
he came back to Rome
and was made con-sul
once more. The men
who had been with
Pom-pey broke out in
war in Af-ri-ca, but he
went there and put them
down, and at last was
head of Rome, the queen
of the world, and at}
peace. No man had}
such honor paid him as |
Cze-sar. But he was
mild in his time of rule, |
and set to work to make





AU-GUS-TUS C-SAR,
48 fTeroes of fistory.

Rome great and strong. But he had no lack of foes.
In vain he said hehad no wish to be king; they said he
had set his heart on a crown and a throne, and so
they made a plot to kill
him, and slew him as
-he stood 3 in the sen-ate
hall. One of those in
the plot was his great
friend Bru-tus, and it is
said that as he fell he
cried out, “And thou
too, Bru-tus.” (Bc. 44.)

Au-gus-tus. His
death brought on fresh
war twixt the men of
». Cze-sar, led by Marc
s@@ An-to-ny, and his foes,
led by Bru-tus. The
end of it all was that
Oc-ta-vi-us, of the kin
of Cze-sar, put down
all the rest and made
him-self the first Em-
pe-ror of Rome. He
did much to make Rome fine and great, and gave

great help to all the arts. At length Rome gave him

ie 5
the name of Au-gus-tus, which means sa-cred. It



CON-STAN-TINE THE GREAT,




























ROME.

CON-STAN-TINE IN

ARCH OF


2 Heroes of History.

was in his reign that Christ was born. At his death,
he left Rome strong and at peace (14 a.v.),

_Con-stan-tine the Great. Of the rest of those
who sat on the throne of Rome Ti-tus, Tra-jan, Au-
re-li-an and Al-ex-an-der Se-ve-rus made the most:
fame in war till the time of Con-stan-tine. He was
the first to grant peace to the Christ-i-ans, whom the
rest had put to death in fierce ways. It is said that
when he was in a fierce fight with Max-en-ti-as, who
sought to keep the crown from him, a cross of fire
was seen in the sky, which bore on it these words in
Greek: “In this con-quer.” When he got to the
throne he made his home at Con-stan-ti-no-ple, in
place of Rome, and did much to spread the true faith.
A sad blot on this great man’s life is that he lent his
ear to false tales of his son Cris-pas, and had him
put to death. He died in the year 336 a.v., while in the
field at war with the king of Per-si-a, and left the
realm to his three sons. 3
The Goths. 51

Crea Lye
HE-ROES OF THE MID-DLE A.GES.

FROM A.D. 700 TO A.D. 1500.

As the years went by, Rome, once so great and
strong that she had most of the known world neath
her sway, grew weak. Long ere Con-stan-tine came
to the throne, a strong wild tribe of the name of the
Goths came down from their home in Nor-way and
Swe-den, and spread o’er the rest of Eu-rope. Some
made their home on the vast steppes which stretch
from the Black Sea to the Bal-tic Sea, and were
known as the East Goths, and more found a place to
dwell near the Alps and the stream of the Dan-ube,
and were known as the West Goths. But to gain
these homes, the strong Goths had to drive out of the
lands they took the Ger-man tribes who had dwelt
there, and these had to go south to seek new homes.
Thus they came like a great wave on the north
bounds of the realm of Rome. At first she was yet
too strong to give way, and time on time beat them
back, but at last they took from herland on the Dan-
ube, and dwelt there.

As time went on, the Goths grew less wild and
rough, and not a few took the faith of Christ; and no
oe Lleroes of Fistory.

‘doubt all would have gone well in time, had it not
been for a strange new foe who now swept down on
Eu-rope. This was the Huns, a tribe whose home
was in the north of A-si-a, on the vast plains which
stretch from’ Rus-si-a to. Chi-na; but who. one day
took it in their heads to see the world. The Huns
were not wild in their ways or in their looks. When
at home they dwelt in tents in which they kept their
steeds as well; but when on the move, the men ate,
and drank, and slept on horse-back: and thus kept
their legs in this shape so much, that they got bent
out like a bow. They were short, strong men, with
coarse thick lips, straight black -hair like wire, small
round eyes black as sloes, and skins the hue of gold.
They ate nuts and raw meat, and did not seem to
know what lack of food, or thirst, or cold meant.
Their wives and chil-dren, who were just as foul to
sight and smell in all ways, rode back of them in huge
vans. Near-ly four hundred years from the time that
Christ had been on earth, this vast, fierce horde of
Huns came to Eu-rope, swept o’er Ger-man-y, and
then made their home in Da-ci-a, a land whose great
plains of grass no doubt put them in mind of the
home they had left, and which has since been known
as Hun-ga-ry. Just as the Goths had made the Ger-
man tribes give up their lands and move south, so the
Goths now had to make room for the Huns. They






NS,

THE HU


54 fleroes of flistory.

fled to the bounds of Rome, and plead for leave to
dwell in her realm. They got it, and 200,000 Goth-
men came oer the Dan-ube. But those who had
charge of them did not treat them or their kin right,
and they got to look on Rome as a foe, and not a
friend. ‘They made war on her, went east to the cap-
i-tal, met the Em-pe-ror Val-ers at the head of a great
force, and slew him in the fierce fight which took place
(378 A.D.),

The-o-do-si-as the Great then came to the
throne. He made peace with the Goths, got great
bands of them to serve as his troops, and gave them
lands to dwell on. But when he was dead, they broke
out once more, and, led by their chief A-lar-ic, swept
her realm, came to the gates of Rome, took it and
gave it to his men to sack for six days. (410 ap.)
No doubt at this time much was lost that no gold
could give back to the world, but no church was hurt,
nor those who had gone in them to be safe.

Up to this time, the Huns, who were the cause of
all this strife, had staid in their new home. But now
a man got to be their chief whose name was At-ti-la,
but whose joy and pride it was to be known as the
Scourge of God. So, at the head of his wild horde,
he swept to the south, and left fire and blood as the
marks of his track. He came to Gaul, and there was
met by a great force of Ro-mans and tribes they had
Clovis. = § 55

got to help them. A fierce fight took place, but the

Eluns lost. At-ti-la went off from Gaul, and made:
his way to Rome. As he drew near its walls, he

was met by the Pope Leo I., who got him to draw off

his men and go back. From this time, the Huns are’

lost sight of. |

Clo-vis. On Christ-mas night (406) a horde of
Ger-man tribes made their way o’er the Rhine, and
made their home in Gaul. One of these tribes was
the Franks, and as years went on, one of their chiefs,
whose name was Clo-vis, put down the rest of the
tribes, threw off the last trace of the yoke of Rome,
and built up a great realm which got the name of
France from the Franks. Clo-vis had wed a good
maid, Clo-tilde, who held the faith of Christ, and
once, when in sore straits in a great fight, he cried out
to the God of his wife to help him. Then the tide of
strife was seen to turn for him, and he won the field.
So, one day, with great pomp and state, Clo-vis and

3000 of those neath his rule, went through the streets .

of the old town of Rheims (rem) to the spot where
the priests gave bap-tism, and took the faith of Christ.
This brave chief brought more and more lands neath
his sway, till at his death France and a large part of
Ger-man-y made up his realm. Butnone of Clo-vis’
sons, nor of their kin, had his good traits. All his
line were weak, poor things, who could not cope with
66 Fleroes of History.

the needs of the realm, but left all their work to men
whom we should call Prime Min-is-ters, but who
were known in that day as May-ors of the Pal-ace.
The kings were seen but once a year, when they rode
on a car drawn by ox-en, with their crowns on, o’er
their long, fair hair, which fell to their waists. As
they did naught the rest of the year, save eat, and
drink, and sleep, and have a good time, they got the
name of the slug-gard kings. |

Charles Mar-tel (or the Ham-mer) was May-or
of the Pal-ace, when a great host of the Ar-abs made
their way to Eu-rope, took Spain and the south of
France, and would have got all the realm, had not he
gone to meet them with a great force, and beat them
at Tours (a.p. 732). For the rest of his life, this brave
man was king in all save name. He gave life or
death, made war or peace, just as if he were on the
throne. But he did not seek to bear the name; no
doubt he thought that it had grown so mean a thing in
the eyes of the Franks, that it would not add much
to him. So the poor heirs of Clo-vis were left in
peace on the throne till he died. __ :

Pep-in the Short, his son, was not of the same
mind, though. He had hard work to keep the realm
safe from the wild tribes near by, and as he flew from
point to point, no doubt he thought he had’ to work
too hard to keep his goose of a king safe on his throne.














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































AR-ABS AND TAR-TARS,
58 fleroes of L[istory.



Scr ee
{UNS









CHAR-LE-MAGNE.

So at last he sent to
the Pope to ask,
“Who is king, he
who rules, or ie Sho
wears fe crown?”
“He who rules, of
COU SiC) -salde the
Ropers litataicah
cried the small man
with a great will, and
lost no time, but sent
the last of the slug-
gard kings to dwell
in a house of monks.
‘Then Pep-in got the
crown put on_ his
head and the name
of king.
Char-le-magne,
or Charles the Great
was the son of Pep-
in, and stands one of
the first of the great
men of all times.
Great in war, he was

still more great in peace, for in that rude, rough age, he
sought to have wise laws made, and to have the young
»



















if A
ol











CHAR-LE-MAGNE AT THE SCHOOL OF THE PAL-ACE,
60 fTeroes of [istory.

of all ranks taught by wise men. He had, all his life,
a deep love for wise men, and for books.. The first
great feat of Charles was to march on the Sax-ons,
They were a strong, wild tribe who dwelt in the north
of Ger-man-y, mid the great hills, whence they would
bear down on those who dwelt in the low lands, and



CHAR-LE-MAGNE BE-FORE NAR-BONNE,

burn the towns and the crops. So, at the head of his
troops, Charles went to a point in the great mounts
where a huge hill of red sand-stone rose on each
side like the post of a door. This was known as the
West-pha-li-an gate, for a path led up from here to
the heart of the Sax-ons’ land. On one of these red

<
Roland. 61

hills was the strong home of their chief, Wit-te-kind.
Charles did not take long to make this good for
naught, and then went on to Pad-er-born. He tore
down their great fane which stood at this place, and:
had the great false god put down deep in the ground.
But, ere he had time to do more, he had to go off to
It-a-ly, to fight the Lom-bards, who dwelt there and —
had tried to throw off his yoke. The next year he
went back to Sax-on-y, built a home there, and told
all the Sax-on chiefs to come and hail him as their
king. All did so, save Wit-te-kind, but he went off,
out of the land, to bide his time to strike. He had
not long to wait, for Charles had soon to go off to
Spain, to help the E-mir of Ar-a-gon, who had sought
his aid. Ere he set out for home he had brought a
great part of Spain neath his rule. 3
Ro-land. As Charles led his troops home through
the great range of hills, the Pyr-e-nees, which shut
out France from Spain, he put his rear guard in
charge of Ro-land, one of his kin. The line of the
troops had to stretch out to great length, for great
walls of rock rose up on each side of a small path,
and so Ro-land and his men were left far to the rear.
The foe knew this would be so, and they hid in the
holes in the rocks at a spot they thought would be
the best for their bad work; and when Ro-land and
his men got there, sprang out on them. The brave
62 fleroes of History.

Franks, thus caught in a trap, fought well, but to no
use; they were all slain. But the brave Ro-land
thought of those who had gone on, and in his death
throes he brought his great horn Du-ran-dal to his
lips, and blew a great blast which was heard a great
way off, to warn them that the foe was on their track.
Then the brave youth died, but his fame dwelt in the
hearts of the Franks. The tale of how he died was
told in hall and hut, and was made the theme of a
song, the “Song of Ro-land,” which was sung as the
troops went to fight. When Charles got home, he
heard that the Sax-ons had been at their old work
once more. Wit-te-kind had come to his own, as
soon as Charles had gone, and led them like a scourge
through the land up to the walls of Co-logne. The
great king was soon in the midst of them, and built
ten great forts, and bore off some of their chief men as
a pledge on their part to keep the peace. Then he
told a great band of them to go with his own men to
fight a fresh foe, the Slavs, The Sax-ons went off
with joy and speed with the Franks, but one day, in
a pass mid the hills, fell on the Franks and slew them.
Great was King Charles’ wrath when he heard this,
and he made up his mind to teach the Sax-ons once
for all that they had met one to whose yoke they
must bend, if not by fair means, then by stern ones.
He came o’er the Rhine, laid waste their land with
c
Faas
a MS

-LAND

°
4
ke
°
x
ao
io2]
Q


64° fleroes of EHistory.

fire and sword, and put to death 4000 who would not
take the faith of Christ. Their chief Wit-te-kind
made a last stand, but Charles beat him, and then at
last the fierce chief gave up and came to the camp of
Charles, and said he would be of the faith of Christ.
It is said that it was in a small church near his home
which Charles had torn down that Wit-te-kind bent
his neck to the yoke of Christ. And so at last the
Sax-ons, so long the scourge and pest of the north,
were brought to feel that war was not the sole end of
lite. As time went on they grew to set some store by
the things of peace; new towns sprang up, and homes
for the monks, each with its church and school, where
their boys and girls learnt the things they should know.

Now I will go back and tell why Charles had to
go to It-a-ly. The king-of the Lom-bards, in It-a-ly,
Des-i-de-ri-us, had schemes to put down Charles.
With this end in view he had sought to get Pope
A-dri-an to crown the two sons of Charles’ broth-er in
his stead. When the Pope said he would not, Des-
i-de-ri-us lost no time, but bore down on Rome at
the head of a great force. The Pope sent off to beg |
Charles to come to his aid, but as he knew some time
must go by ere Charles could get to him, he had new
strong gates put up, and laid in a great store of food.
When Charles got word of the Pope’s sore strait, he
sent word to Des-i-de-ri-us not to dare to raid Rome,
Charlemagne. 65

or he would march with a great force to make him
give up such a plan. But the Lom-bard king did
naught but jeer at his threat, and kept on. At once
Charles led his force o’er the Alps, and was on Des-
i-de-ri-us ere he knew it. He fled to Pa-vi-a, at
which town Charles left one of his men with a large



A KNIGHT MADE BY THE DEAD HAND OF RO-LAND.

force to keep him shut up, and went on to Rome,
where he was met with great joy. It must have been
a grand sight to see Charles, who was a tall man, near
sev-en feet high, with a grave, grand look, ride through
the streets on his fine steed, while songs and shouts rent
the air, at the head of his long train, in his rich robes
66 Heroes of fHistory.

of pur-ple and gold, with a crown bright with gems on
his head. At the Church of St. Pe-ter, he got off his
horse and bent his lips to each step as he went up to
where, at the great door, the Pope stood to bless and
thank him for his prompt aid.

In a short time Charles got hold of Des-i-de-ri-us,
and made him leave the world, and dwell in a house
of monks. Then at Mil-an, the Pope set on the
great king’s brow the i-ron crown of the Lom-bards,
which is said to have been made out of one of the
nails which held Christ to the cross. Charles had
not been at home long, when one of the kin of Des-i-
de-ri-us sought to stir up the Av-ars who dwelt in
Hun-ga-ry, to make raids on Charles’ realm. He
was soon in the field, drove them back, and brought
the land now known as Aus-tri-a neath his rule.
With all this vast realm to watch and guard, this wise
king still found time to think of things that would
make those in it grow in the arts of peace. He got
as wise a man as the world had in that age, the monk
Al-cu-in, to leave Eng-landand teach the Frank youths.
He brought men from It-a-ly to teach them how to
sing. But though the song-schools were set up, I
grieve to say they were the cause of no great pride
or joy to the good king, for he says the sound the
youths made when they tried to sing was like the
howls of wild beasts. He found more cause to be
Charlemagne. 64

glad when he went to the schools and heard them at
their tasks. But one day when the mas-ter told him
that the sons of the men of rank did not get up their
tasks as well as did those of low birth, his face grew
red and his eyes shone with wrath, and in stern tones
he told them that if they thought that their rank and
wealth made them not need to learn from books, they
should find how far they were from the truth, for
they should gain naught from him, if he found that
they did not do their tasks well!

Charles did his best to make the poor through his
vast realm_get their rights. With this end in view,
he made wise laws and rules, and saw that they were
kept. He did all that he could, too, to make trade
grow. He dwelt at Aix-la-Cha-pelle, where he built
a great church, still to be seen, much the same as it
was in his day, and at In-gel-heim, where he built a
bridge o’er the Rhine.

I will now tell of the last great act of this great
king’s life. In the year 800 the Pope, Leo IIL.
was hurt by a band of men who had made a league
to put him down. Charles’ wrath was great when
he heard that these had gone so far as to lay hands
on the Pope, and he set off at once for Rome, where
he soon put things right. Then came the last grand
scene of this great king’s life. He went to High
Mass on Christ-mas day, and when it had been sung,
68 : fleroes of fistory.

the Pope came to where he sat in state with all his
chief men round him, and set a crown on his head,
and gave him the name of Em-pe-ror of the West.
(A.D. 800.)

Charles had the grief to see all his sons die save
one, Lou-is, and when he grew old he sent for all
the chief men of his great realm, and got them to say
that they would be true to this youth as their king,
Then he told Lou-is to take the crown as a gift from
God, from him, and from the na-tion, and try to reign
well. In a few years from this time this wise and
brave king died. (Jan. 28, 814.)

The North-men. While the faith of Christ had
been taught through most parts of Eu-rope by this
time, there was a race in the far north who still held
to their old false gods. They dwelt in Scan-di-na-
vi-a (Nor-way and Swe-den), but the worst and most
fierce of them had their homes in Den-mark, and on
the south coast of the North Sea, in what we know
as Hol-land and Ger-man-y ; bleak lands, full of mists
and fogs, where wild storms make the sea lash the
flat coasts, from which it is so hard to keep it out.
They were huge strong men, with white skins, fair
hair, and bright blue eyes, who drank deep at their
rude feasts, while their bards sang of their feats in
war. It was the boast of some of these sea-kings
that “they slept neath no roof and drank ale by no
Northmen, 69

hearth.” War was their chief joy and they made it
their trade, and thought that bliss in the life to come
would be to be at war all the time. As their land
was poor and did not Da ETS So
yield much, their way a
was to sail off in their

small ships to some
rich land, sail up the
streams to the towns
on the banks, take all
they could bear off,
ANG SOUT tne. est:
You may well think
that they were held in
dread by all the folks
of Eu-rope, who gave
them the name of |
Northmen or Vi-kings
(veek-ings). ~°This
means creek-men, for
they kept their boats
in creeks. Ere
Charles died, he had
wept to see their a
dark ships off his coasts, and, no doubt, it was at
the thought that when his strong hand should be
still in death, there would be none to hold them in




































































































70 Heroes of History.

check. And his thought was true, as we shall see.
But they did not plague France till they had
brought much woe on Eng-land and Ire-land. So
far as their raids on Eng-land went they were no
new thing, for, 449 years ere this time (449 AD.) great
war-bands of them, led by Hen-gist and Hor-sa, their
great chiefs, had come down on it, took it from the
Brit-ons, and made their homes there. Ass time went
on they took on the faith of Christ, and had but
just learnt to prize the things of peace when their
fierce kin swept down on their coasts for prey and
spoil. But the Eng-lish rose to fight the Danes—
this was the name they gave the North-men—and
thus men of one blood and one speech were at war.
For years, with gain and loss on each side in turn,
they went on, but at last the Danes got a great part
of Eng-land neath their rule, and it did not seem as
if aught could now keep the whole from them. But
this dark hour had its great man in Al-fred, king of
-Wes-sex, one of the realms in which Eng-land was
split. From a boy he had been on the field of war,
so that when he came to the throne he could now put
to use what he had learnt in that hard school. At
first things did not go well, and he had to buy peace
for three years, which gave him time to breathe; but,
just as he thought, at the end of that time Guth-rum,
then chief of the Danes, was back in the land with
Northmen. ui

the whole strength of the North-men. They swept
through the land, and were soon in Wes-sex, and
took the town of Ex-e-ter. At break of spring Al-





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































LAND-ING OF THE DANES IN ENG-LAND.

fred fixed his force close round the town, while he
got a fleet of ships to keep all help by sea from them.
So at last the Danes had to give up the town, and
72 Fleroes of Listory.

swore to leave Wes-sex. They went off, and Al-fred
let his troops go to their homes, and all was well,
when, all at once, the Danes burst on the land once
more with fire and sword. Al-fred had to flee and
hide in the woods with his small band, and live as
best he might. Thus, one day, he had to rest in the
hut of a poor herds-man, whose wife had put some
cakes on the fire to bake, while she went off to. do
some tasks. No doubt the good dame thought that
as the king was close to the fire he would not let
them burn. But the king’s mind was on his bow
and shafts, to see if they were fit to fight with, and he
paid no heed to the food. Soon the smell of burnt
cakes rose in the hut, and as the dame ran to the fire
to see how much harm had been done, she cried out
in great wrath that it was but just he should watch
the cakes when he was so glad to eat them.

In this dark time, too, he is said to have put on the
dress of a bard, and gone with his harp to the camp
of the foe, to see how strong they were. All this
time he got more and more men in his force, and at
last, with the first burst of spring, he set out to march
on the Danes. As he went, fresh bands of his men
came to him. When he came to where the great
host of Danes were, he went at once to fight, and
made them yield to him. Their chief, Guth-rum,
took the faith of Christ, and the Danes swore to make


RAID OF THE NORTHMEN,
74 fleroes of Flistory.

war no more on Wes-sex. This peace, which was
kept, was known as the peace of Wed-more, where
it was sworn to (A.D. 878).

For the rest of his life this great king made the
good of those neath
his rule the sole
| end of his life. He

did> -his> =best- to
guard his realm, for
he made a fleet, the
first Eng-land had,
and thus may be
said to have been
the one to found
her might at sea.
He also made wise
laws, “so-- that the
rich and the strong
should not crush
the poor and the
weak. He set up
schools for those of
low as well as for
those of high birth. He had a deep love for books,
and he knew not a few sweet songs by heart. He
found time mid the cares of state, too, to write books,
some out of his own head, and some in Eng-lish from



HSS
ey
mA

NY ih



AL-FRED THE GREAT.
Sweyn, of Denmark. 75

the Lat-in tongue. In 886 the Danes made one
more great raid, but Al-fred, in a short time, drove
them back, and took a large part of their realm from
them. ‘This blow broke their might for some years,
and when they came back once more, led by their
chief, Hast-ing, he beat them, and drove them from
the land. A few years from this time, this brave
and wise king, one of the best, if not the best, Eng-
land has had, died (a.v. gor).

Sweyn, of Den-mark. But the land had by no
means seen the last of the Danes. Though king on
king of the line of Al-fred fought them, naught could
break the might of this fierce foe. At last, when Al-
fred had been dead near 100 years, a great fleet bore
a host of Danes to Eng-land’s coasts, led by their
king, Sweyn. Eth-el-red then sat on the throne of
FEng-land, and in his dread lest the Danes who dwelt
in his realm should rise and join with their kin, he
had them all put to death on one day. When the
news of this rash act got to Sweyn’s ears, he swore to
wrest the realm from king Eth-el-red. He swept
through its length and breadth with fire and sword,
and then went off to his own land, but was soon back
with a great fleet. The beaks of his ships were of
brass, the sterns bore beasts of gold. On the head
of each mast was the shape of a bird, or a man, or of
a bull, or a great fish. As he led his troops through
76 - - Heroes of History.

the land, town on town bent to his yoke, and at last
Eth-el-red had to flee o’er the sea to France, and
leave his realm to Sweyn.

Ca-nute, the Dane. Sweyn was now king of
Eng-land in all

save the name; but
as he died when
Eth-el-red had
been but a_ few
months gone, he
did not get the
crown put on his
head. He left a
son, Ca-nute; but
a large part of the
realm rose to keep
the crown from this
young prince of the
foe. They sent for
Eth-el-red to come
back to his own.
Eth-el-red was so
slow that he was
known as the Un-read-y; but for once in his life he
went with speed, and was on Ca-nute’s track ere he
knew it. Fierce strife went on for some time. The
son of Eth-el-red, a brave, wise prince, Ed-mund,

bY GO

i] WY,



CA-NUTE.
Canute. 17





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































who was so strong that he got the name of I-ron-
sides, gave that king great aid, and when Eth-el-red
died, had the crown put on his head at Lon-don.
Ca-nute did the same at South-amp-ton, and thus
78 fleroes of [istory.

Eng-land had two kings. They kept up the war;
but at last, in a great fight at As-ling-don, the
Danes won. Then the two kings met on a small
isle in the stream of the Sev-ern, and made two parts
of the land. Ed-mund was to rule the South, and
Ca-nute the North. But the brave Ed-mund, who
had fought so well for his own, soon died, and Ca-
nute got to be king of the whole land. He had the
crown put on his head at Lon-don, and swore that he
would be just to all in his rule. Then he said that
Danes and Eng-lish must held no’ grudge, but give
up strife and dwell in peace. As time went on, Ca-
nute rose from a mere wild fierce chief with a-thirst for
blood, to be a wise and mild king. He took on the
yoke of Christ, and then made a law that all the rites
of the old faith of the Danes, with its false gods, must
be seen no more in the land. He saw that the laws
were kept; that the poor had their rights. His first
aim was to win the love of those neath his rule. He
brought the poor land, rent so long with strife, peace,
and, as he said, “strove to lead a right life in all
things.” And so it came to pass that when he died,
the Eng-lish felt deep grief for this good king, whom
they once held in such dread. (a.v. 1035.)
Bri-an Bo-ru, of Ire-land. Of course, when the
Danes gave Eng-land such fierce, hard times, they did
not leave a land so close to her as Ire-land in peace,
Brian-Boru. 79

you may besure. It was in 790, just a few years from
the time that they swept down on Eng-land, that their
dark ships were first seen on the low, gray waves of
the I-rish Chan-nel as they swept the shore, then up
the streams to the broad lakes which stud the
heart of Ire-land; while the wail of
pain, the red glare of fire, and the
sight of blood, told where their path
had lain. This was but the first of
a long tale of strife and woe. It was
of small use to beat them back ; more
and more they came, till at last they
had all the spoil of the land fast in
towns which they built at points on
the coast. Thus Cork, Lim-er-ick,
. Wex-ford and Dub-lin were all first
the strong-holds of the
Danes. At last great
_ piles of stone, which got












ers, were built through
the land; and when the
prows of the foe’s ships
were seen on the sea, the
s strong men made haste to
8o : Fleroes of Listory.

who were too ill or weak or old to fight, in these
strong keeps, while they went off to meet the foe.
As years went on, and the might of the Danes grew,
the I-rish did not learn to view them in the same way
as the Eng-lish. As has been said, the North-men
found in Eng-land their own kin, who spoke the same
tongue, and thus it was not hard for a strong king
like Ca-nute to make one nation of both. But from
first to last, the I-rish had naught but hate for them.
At last a time came when the Danes found their
match. In those days Ire-land was made up of five
small realms, each with its own king; while at Ta-ra
dwelt the kings of Ul-ster, the O'Neills, who were
Ard-reaghs, or head kings, and kept rule oer all
the land. Now the man who was to give the
death-blow to the Danes’ might was Bri-an Bo-ru,
king of Mun-ster. When he came to the throne, |
men found that some one who knew how to rule
was at the helm of state. But what they had yet
to find was, that he had made up his mind to be
chief king; not the shade of a chief king, as most
of them had been, but a true king, who would make
him-self felt in the land. To bring this to pass, he
had to wrest the crown from the chief king, Mal-
a-chy, the head of the strong clan of the O’Neills,
and break the might of the Danes — no slight tasks.
But Bri-an lost no time; he set to work at once to


Se ERAS Sea ees

BRI-AN BO-RU, ON THE PLAINS OF CLON-TARF,
ap

So flerocs of History.

break the might of some foes near him, and _ then,
step by step, fought his way till at last he sat as Ard-
reagh in the hall of Ta-ra, while Mal-a-chy, who,
though brave —for he wore a col-lar of gold which he
had won from the Danes — seems to have been a mild
man, went off to his small realm of Meath. Then
Bri-an went through the land, made the kings pay
him trib-ute, so that he got to be known as “ Bri-an of
the Trib-ute,’” and set to work to make the arts of
peace grow.. He beat back the Danes, and for 12
years the land had a taste of the joys of peace. The
burnt homes of the monks were built up; men set to
till the soil; roads were built, each with a bridge
where there was need; and forts rose here and there.
But as the king grew old, the Danes grew bold once
more. Att last they made up their minds to strike one
grand blow, and, with this end in view, sent off for
bands of their fierce kin in all the lands near by to aid
them. Bri-an, on his side, gave all his mind to a
like task, and soon had a strong force neath his flag.
One of the first of his chiefs was Mal-a-chy, king of
Meath, who, like a true man, did not let his own
wrongs keep his hand still when his land had need of
it. So Bri-an led his men down to the strand of
Clon-tarf, which lies north of Dub-lin, and here, at
dawn on Good Fri-day (4.p. 1014), the Danes and
they met. All day the fight went on till the sun went


Brian Boru. $3

down the crest and was soon to sink. Then at last the

Danes broke and-fled; some to their ships, some
to the great woods not far off. As one ran, he came
to the tent where the old king, too old to fight, had
staid to pray. The beams of the low sun fell on his
bent white head and long white beard. As he stood -
to gaze, a Dane who had caught up with him said,
“That is the king.” At this news, Bir-dar, the first
Dane, caught up his axe and made a rush on Bri-an.
The old king, who in his day knew no peer in strength
in the land, half rose
from his knees and
smote the Dane on the
legs with his sword.
But Bro-dar dealt him

==> —_—_—_——SSS===S
SSS















THE FOUR COURTS, DUB-LIN,
S4 Heroes of Histery.

such a blow on the head that he laid him dead.
He then fled to the woods, but was caught next day
and put to death. So fell the great king Bri-an in
the hour when the foe fell, and deep was the grief
of those neath his rule as they bore him to Ar-magh,
where he was laid to rest (4.D. 1014).

Will-iam the Con-quer-or. I have told you
that Charles the Great wept when he saw the dark
ships of the Danes near his coasts. He would have
wept more could he have seen what was to come to
pass, for the fate of Eng-land and Ire-land was in
store for France, as the kings of his line found to
their cost. At last, in the year g11, Charles the Sim-
ple, then king of France, made up his mind to give
the Danes a part of France, and thus save the rest
from their raids. So he gave them a great tract in
the north, and gave his own daugh-ter to their chief,
Rol-lo, as his wife, when he took the faith of Christ.
The part of France where the North-men dwelt got
to be known in time as “ North-men’s Land,” or
Nor-man-dy. As the years went by they grew less
fierce and wild; the old Norse tongue died out and the
French tongue was heard in its stead. They grew
strong in the faith of Christ; grand homes for monks
rose in the glades of the woods, and on the roads
crowds were seen as they made their way each year
to pray at some shrine of fame. Neath the rule of
William the Conqueror. 85

its dukes, as those who held the rule were known,
Nor-man-dy got to be rich and strong, and though a
part of the realm of France, and neath the rule of its
king, was in truth just as free as if it were bound by
no such tie. But the time had now come when it
was to play a part in the tale of Eng-land, and form
a bond which was to last for a long time, and cause
great woe and pain to more men and their kin than
we can count, ere there should rise one with mind
and strength to break it.

Will-iam of Nor-man-dy, whose chief work it was
to bring Eng-land and Nor-man-dy neath one crown,
stands in the first rank of the great men of all time.
His youth was hard, for he was but a child when he
got to be duke, and the fierce, proud lords were wont
to chafe neath the yoke of a child, the more so as he
was of low birth on the side of his moth-er. She was
but the child of a tan-ner, and won the love of Duke
Rob-ert, Will-iam’s sire, as she stood to wash clothes
in a small brook near the road. But Will-iam’s
strong will was more than a match for his lords, and
made him gain all his ends. He was so strong that
no man could bend his bow. At times he was hard,
as to the men of A-len-con, a town with whose men
he was at war. In scorn of his low blood they hung
raw hides on their walls, with loud cries of “ Work
for the Tan-ner.” To pay them for this scorn, Will-
86 FLeroes of L[fistory.

iam tore out the eyes and cut off the hands and feet
of some men of theirs whom he had in his camp, and
flung these in the town. The way that Will-iam
came to set his thoughts on the throne of Eng-land
was this: when Ca-nute the Dane died he left two
sons, who both wore the crown of Eng-land in turn, but
left no heirs, so that the crown then went to their half
broth-er, Ed-ward, who was of the line of Al-fred the
Great. He had dwelt for a long time with Will-iam
and grown fond of him, and it was from there that he
came to Eng-land. But though mild and so good
that he is known as a saint, Ed-ward found it hard to
rule the Eng-lish. He had been so long in Nor-man-
dy that all his tastes, ay, the tongue he spoke, were
strange to those of his own land, and he had to lean on
his chief man, Earl God-win, whose daugh-ter he had
wed, for help. When God-win died his son Har-
old took his post, and did much to make the land
rich and strong. But while things stood thus, Har-
old went for a sail one time, but was swept on the
shores of Nor-man-dy. The chief on whose lands
he was cast gave him to Duke Will-iam, who told
him that while King Ed-ward had dwelt at his court
they had been as if of the same blood, and that when
he went to take his place on the throne of Eng-land
he gave his word that he would leave the crown at
his death to Will-iam. The duke then went on to
















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































LAND-ING OF WILL-IAM THE CON-QUER-OR,, }
88 Heroes of [Hustory.

tell Har-old that ere he would set him free he must
swear an oath on part of the bones of a saint to help
him to make Eng-land his. So Har-old swore; but
when he got back home he paid no heed to his oath,
and when the king died got all the chief men in the
realm to make him king. When news of this got
to Nor-man-dy the duke’s rage was great, and he
built a great fleet and set sail for Eng-land. The
duke’s ship was the Mo-ra, and was the gift of his
wife. The fleet had to lie still for quite a time for
want of a wird, but at last the breeze blew from the
right point, and the fleet made for the shores of Eng-
land. They got to land in Sus-sex. As soon as the
great news came to the ears of King Har-old he set
off with his troops, who were all in oreat glee, for they
had just won in a great fight with the Danes, so that
they felt sure they could beat this new foe. In the
dim dawn of a morn in the fall, Duke Will-iam
led his men to meet the king, who took his stand on
a hill near Has-tings—the hill on which Bat-tle now
stands. A fine, strong force were the men of Eng-
land that day as they stood in deep ranks with their
king and his rich flag in their midst, each with his
great gray, sharp axe and his strong shield. Still as
death kept the dense throng, while the Nor-man force
‘came on: first those who shot shafts from their great
bows, next those who fought with the lance, and then,
William the Conqueror. 89

last of all, the men on horse-back. In front of all
rode a bard, who threw his sword in the air and
caught it as he sang the song of Ro-land. As they
drew near they rent the air with their great war-cry,
“God is our help!” Then from the Eng-lish came
back theirs; ‘“‘ Christ's Rood!” which means cross.
Then they met, but the Eng-lish stood firm as a rock
neath the sweep of the wave. And so the hours wore
on in fierce strife, and it was hard to tell which side
would win. But the duke did not lose head nor
heart; he kept his troops up to their work, and once,
when a cry went up that he was slain, he tore his hel-
met from his head and cried out, “I live, and by God’s
help will yet win.” His chief aim was to get the flag
of the king in his hands, but each time he got near it
he was thrust back. At last he made a feint of flight,
and when he had drawn off a great band in his track,
made a great dash back, and for the first time broke
through ‘the dense mass which rose like a wall round
it. Near and more near he drew, hard though the
Eng-lish fought to keep him back. Att last, as the
sun went down the sky, a shaft struck King Har-old
in the eye, and he sank dead neath his flag, for which
a fierce fight went on oer his corpse. But the Eng-
lish had lost heart, and in a short time fled and left
the field to the foe (4.p. 1066).

When he had won this first great step he lost no
go Fleroes-of History.

time, but made his way to Lon-don, and had the
crown put on his head mid shouts of “ Yea, yea,’ from
the Eng-lish. Then he let them see that he had not
come to change aught, but to keep the rule they had
‘known. So that he could be just to all he tried hard
to learn the Eng-lish tongue, but in vain; he had to
give up the task. But when the new king went. off
for a while to Nor-man-dy, the men of Eng-land rose
here and there to throw off his yoke. Will-iam was
soon back and put them down, but found that the
end was not yet. Sweyn, king of Den-mark, made
up his mind to wrest Eng-land from the Nor- mans,
and swept up one of her streams with a great fleet.
All Eng-land rose as one man to greet and j join with
him. Great was Will-iam’s wrath, but he did not
lose his head. He went to the Danes, gave them a
huge bribe to give no help to the Eng-lish, and then
swept down on the north, and swept it so with fire
and sword that it had no roof nor food for man nor
beast. The last to hold out was Her-e-ward, a brave |
Eng-lish lord, who took his stand with a small force
in the fen or marsh lands near E-ly, and did such
brave deeds that they seem like things that have been
made up to read of in books. At last Will-iam sent
word to him that he would give him his life and leave
to dwell a free man where he chose if he would lay
down his arms, So Her-e-ward, who saw that all
William the Conqueror. gI

hope was past, and that it was best for Eng-land for
him to give in, took an oath to be true to Will-iam,
and broke up his camp.

The land was now Will-iam’s, who: had had such
hard work to win it that »
he may in truth bear the \ §
name by which he is
known —the Con-quer-
or. His first great work.
was to set to work aL
find out just how much §
land was in his realm, |
and to count all the}
towns and those whos
dwelt in them. When}
this was done it was all}
set down in a_ book®*
which was known as 2g
Dooms - day Book, a =
judg-ment day book, for Ne
it was from it that the a oe
king wes to judge how HAR-OLD, a A OF THE SAX-ON KINGS.
large a tax each man”
should pay. He got great sums by the tax which
he put on things which had had none till he came.
He made new ” laws, too, one of which was that the
fires and lights had to be put out at the sound of






g2 Lfleroes of History.

a bell which rung each night at the hour of eight.
Fis love for the great deer was great, and he laid
waste a great tract of ground to make a vast woods
for them to roam in, and where he might hunt.
In spite of all his harsh acts, his reign brought
great good to Eng-land. The men there were gross
in their ways, the lords fierce, with no thought save
of field sports and food and strong drink. The Nor-
man lads were, on the whole, mild in their ways,
though just as brave, and knew more of books and
the fine joys of life. Their monks and priests were
wise, good men, of meek ways and good lives. One
of them was Lan-franc, a monk whose great mind
and saint-like ways made him dear to Will-iam, who
made him Arch-bish-op of Can-ter-bur-y. In. this
great post he did much good, for when all fell back
and dare not face the fierce king, Lan-frane would
plead with him to spare those who had drawn down
his wrath. And the king would at all times speak to
Lan-franc and smile on him as he did to no one
else. The last part of this great king’s life was sad.
His son Rob-ert was the cause of much woe to him.
This youth went so far as to lead a force to fight him
with, and gave him a wound in the fray. At last he
went to fight the King of France, and as he rode
through a town which he had set on fire, his horse
shied and threw him, This hurt him so much as to
William the C ongueror. 93

cause his death.
As he lay on his
bed, the thought of
all the harm he had
done rose in_ his
mind. No home
nor church had he
been wont to spare,
and as he thought
of this in his death
hour he gave great *
sums to build some
of these up once
more, and large
alms to the poor.
At last one morn;
as the great bell of
a church near by
rang the hour of
prime, he said that
he gave his soul to the Bless-ed Vir-gin, that she
might make his peace with Christ, and then he died.
(A.D. 1087.)



THE BUR-I-AL OF WILL-IAM.
94 fleroes of fiistory.

CHAPTER V.
HE-ROES OF THE CRU-SADES.
~The Cru-sades. We have now come to the time

when the he-roes won their great fame in wars fought

in the Ho-ly Land for the tomb of Christ. And I











pe ee
7 .UNTRN7

IN THE TIME OF THE CRU-SADES.

will tell you how these came to be fought. As you
know, the Ho-ly Land was that where Christ was
born, dwelt and died. Now, it was quite in vogue in
the Mid-dle A-ges for folks to go there to press the soil
which the feet of Christ once pressed, and pray at Je-
- Mahomet. 95

ru-sa-lem and Beth-le-hem. The Ho-ly Land is part
of Syr-i-a, a land which, when Christ was on earth,.
was neath the rule of Rome. For more than 600
years from that time Rome kept her grasp on it,
when the Ar-abs took it from them.

Ma-hom-et. These Ar-abs, who dwelt in A-ra-
bi-a, in A-si-a, rose to might neath the rule of Ma-
hom-et. This man was born in the year 569, and
when he was 4o years of age made out that he had
been told by God to found a new faith. Up to this
time the Ar-abs had held fire or stars as gods, or
had gods of wood, but Ma-hom-et now said that
there was but one God, whose name was Al-lah, and
that he was his proph-et. So he set down all that God
had said in a book, to which he gave the name of the
KXo-ran, which means The Book, and it got to be for
those who held his faith just what the Bi-ble is to us.
So Ma-hom-et went to preach and call on all to be
of the true faith, and though at first he made but
small way, as time went on his faith spread through
the land, and he was soon at the head of a great host
and built up a great empire. The sole good in the
faith of Ma-hom-et was that he got his race to cast down
their gods of wood and clay, and turn from sun and
moon and stars to place their faith in one true God: but:
of all its faults the worst was that it made the sword:
the chief means of the spread of their faith. All who
96 fleroes of [istory.

would not be of their faith must die. As Ma-hom-et
told all his troops that if they died on the field of war
they would go straight to heav-en, they found their
chief joy in war, and as time went on spread from
A-ra-bi-a o'er the lands of A-si-a and Af-ri-ca. As
Syr-i-a, which held the Ho-ly Land, was close to it,
the Ma-hom-e-tans soon made up their minds to
take it. A vast force was made fit to march there,
when Ma-hom-et died. As he left no son, his chief
men had to chose one of them to take his place.
Their choice fell on A-bu Bek-er. He choose to be
known as the Ca-liph—that is, one who has the place
of Ma-hom-et—and it is by this name that the king
of the Mos-lems was from that time known. He
was wise and just in his rule, but he was an old man
and soon died, when O-mar was made ca-liph in his
place. He was a wise but stern man, quick to think
and prompt to act, and town on town in Syr-i-a threw
wide its gates to him. At last he laid siege to Je-ru-
sa-lem. Those who dwelt there did their best to hold
it, and when one of O-mar’s host blew a trump and
told them the terms on which the ca-liph would spare
the town, they said no to them with scorn. Four
months went by, and the state of those in Je-ru-sa-
lem grew worse and worse, and at last they had
to yield. But they sought one boon: it was that
the ca-liph would come to take the town from them.




Mahomet. 97

To those who dwelt in the pomp and wealth of
Rome, the great chief was a queer sight when he did
come. He was a plain man with a bald head, clad
in coarse wool garb, and his throne was the ground
in a tent of hair-cloth. The chief men of Je-ru-sa-
lem went out to himas he sat not far from its gates, gave
up the town to him, and wrung these terms from him:
Those who held the faith of Christ were to build no
new church, and no cross must be shown in church
or street. The bells of each church might toll, but
they must not be rung. Those who held the faith
of Christ must not dress like Mos-lems, nor part their
hair like them, nor use their tongue. They were to
rise when a Mos-lem came where they were, and not
sit down till he sat down first. They were not to sell
wine or bear arms, or ride save on a steed’s bare
back, and must have no one to serve them whom the
Mos-lems had once had.

These were hard terms—were they not ?—for the
proud hearts of those who dwelt in Je-ru-sa-lem to
ac-cept? But they had to say yes to them, and the
caliph then left them free in their faith and in the
use of each church, (4D. 637.)

The ca-liph was in good faith and meant well to
those who held the faith of Christ, for'as the pa-tri-
arch, as the head of the church was known in Je-ru-
sa-lem, led him through its streets they went in a
98 Heroes of LHistory.

great church, and while there the hour came when
all Mos-lems have to pray. He said so to the pa-
tri-arch, who told him to pray where he was. ‘ No,”
said O-mar, so he was led from it to a church close by.
«Pray here,’ said the pa-tri-arch. ‘‘ No,” said O-mar
once more, and went out and knelt on the steps.
When he had done he told the pa-tri-arch that if he
had knelt to pray in their church his men would have
made it a mosque—the name the Mos-lems gave a
church.

As time went on, the rush of pil-grims grew great
once more when they found they could come and go
in peace. All went well for near 500 years, when
a new force swept up from the heart of A-si-a. These
were the Turks, a wild, rough tribe who had bent to
the faith of Ma-hom-et when the Ar-abs swept o’er
A-si-a, and as the Ar-abs’ might grew weak, they
grew strong and got to be the prop of the faith of
Ma-hom-et, and took land on land where the Ar-abs
had kept rule. The branch of the Turks which took
Syr-i-a was the Sel-juks, and the Chris-tians who
dwelt there soon learnt to their cost that they were not
like the Ar-abs. They had to bear all kinds of rude,
harsh things, and their lives were scarce safe. Sad
as their lot was, the fate of those who went from Eu-
rope to pray in Je-ru-sa-lem was worse. Hard as
the way had been in the past, they knew they were
- Mahomet. 99

safe if they could once reach there; but now they
went one hun-dred, and came back ten, or one, to freeze
the blood or make the hearts of those who heard them
bleed as they told of all they had had to bear.

This was too bad a state of things to last long.
The thought that the tomb of Christ was in the grasp
of such brutes as the Turks made the hearts of those
who held the faith of Christ burn with the wish to
wrest it from them.

Just at this time a man who led a most ho-ly life
went to the Ho-ly Land and saw the woes of the pil-
grims. He made a vow that when he came back to
FEu-rope he would fan the flame of wrath till it made
men rise and fight for the tomb of Christ! This
man’s name was Pe-ter, and he was known as the
Her-mit, from his way of life, for he dwelt in a lone
place, far from the din of life. He first of all sought
the pope, who was as warm for the plan as he was,
and he was quick to bless him and speed him on
~ his way. So through the length and breadth of
the lands of Eu-rope went Pe-ter, and plead with
such strength and fire that he swept all with him.
Vast throngs hung on his words, and gave back tears
and cries to his sobs and groans. Then the pope
held a great coun-cil at Cler-mont, in France, and at
its close made a speech to the vast throng, in which
he told them how great and good a thing it would be
100 fleroes of fistory.

to go forth to fight for such a cause. The chords
in the heart of all those who heard him were struck
by his words, and they cried out as if with one voice,
“Tt is the will of God! It is the will of God!” The
die was now cast. Vast throngs made haste to put
on the red cross, the sign that they gave their lives to
the work. And in a short time Pe-ter led out of
France the first great band. But when they had got
as far as the plains of Hun-ga-ry they had to break up
for lack of food.

But a band of 60,000, led by God-frey of Bouil-lon
(boo-é-yon), a great and brave knight, Duke of Lor-
raine, and some more great chiefs, of whom the best
were Hugh, Count of Ver-man-dies, Rob-ert of Nor-
man-dy, Will-iam the Con-quer-or’s son, Rob-ert,
Count of Flan-ders, Ste-phen, Count of Char-tres,
Bo-he-mund of Ta-ren-tum, and his cousin Tan-cred,
made their way to A-si-a Mi-nor and took the town
of Ni-cze-a from the Turks. Then they fought them
once more and beat them, and then made their way
to Je-ru-sa-lem. On their way they took the town
of An-ti-och, and put one of their chiefs, Bo-he-
mund of Ta-ren-tum, to rule it. When the force of
God-frey got to the walls of Je-ru-sa-lem they were
but 21,000 out of 60,000. But they were full of zeal
and set to work to storm the town, and at last took it.
(July 15, tog2.) God-frey was made king of Je-ru-
Second Crusade. IOI

sa-lem, but he would not put on a crown where
Christ had worn a wreath of thorns. And here the
Cru-sa-ders left him in his new realm with but a small
force, and went back to Eu-rope. This was the
bright end of the First Cru-sade.

The brave and good God-frey did not live but a
year, and at his death the crown was put on the head
of his broth-er Bald-win, who kept the post for 18
years. And so it went on: the great chiefs of the
Cru-sade or some of their kin sat on the throne for
near 100 years.

Sec-ond Cru-sade. This was brought to pass by
a great man, the head of a home of monks in France,
whose name was Ber-nard. In his youth he had
flung from him fame and wealth and might to serve
God as a poor monk. In the year 1145 the Turks,
who had grown strong and bold once more, took the
town of E-des-sa, in Syr-i-a, which was held by the
Chris-tians, and put all in it to death. In vain the
Chris-tians tried to take it back; they lost each time,
and at last they sent for help to Eu-rope. And so
Ber-nard took up the great cause, and went from
town to town and plead with all who heard to go
forth and save the tomb of Christ from the hands of
the Turks. Great throngs put on the cross as a
sign they would do so, and went forth to the Ho-ly
Land, but they were not well led, and vast throngs
102 FHleroes of History.

grew ill and came back to their homes no more.
Thus the Sec-ond Cru-sade came to an end in naught.

Third Cru-sade. Sal-a-din. At this time a
young man got to be king of the Turks whose name
was Sal-a-din. He had a strong wish to take Je-ru-
sa-lem from the Chris-tians, and so led a great force
to its gates. The town was full, but there were
but few troops in it. Sal-a-din had his mind made
up that it must fall, and though he had all the means
on his side to bring this to pass, still he sent word to
those in the town that if they would give up to him in
peace, he would give them new homes in the Ho-ly
Land. But they would not yield, and held out for 14
days. Then their food was all gone, and they had to
throw wide the gates to Sal-a-din. He was mild in
this great hour ; he let the wives and chil-dren of the
men pass through his camp as they went out of the
town, and when the queen and her maids drew near,
went to them and spoke words of cheer. They said
they thought not of their lands or goods, but of their
hus-bands and sons. Then Sal-a-din said he would
give them back these dear ones, and gave a large sum
in alms for those who were left with none to take
care of them. 3

Midst the crash of mu-sic and the wave of flags
Sal-a-din rode through Je-ru-sa-lem at the head of
his troops. On he went to the great mosque of
Saladin. 103

O-mar, o’er which the Chris-tians had put a great
cross which shone in the sun-light. A wail of grief
rose as from far off as the Chris-tians saw the cross
torn down and flung in the mire, while the cres-
cent, the sign dear to the hearts of those who held the
faith of Ma-hom-et and seen on all their flags, took







=



,

.tts, CRU-SAD-ERS’ FIRST SIGHT OF je. RU-SA-LEM.

its place to gleam where the cross had shone for so
long. Streams of rose wa-ter ran through the mosque
to make it clean and pure ere they thought it fit to
pray in, for in their eyes the fact that it had been
made use of by Chris-tians as a church had made it
vile.

When this news of the fall of Je-ru-sa-lem got to
104 Heroes of History.

the ears of the kings of Eu-rope their hearts burnt
with the wish to win it back. A great host put on
the cross, which was of a white hue for the En-glish,
red for the French and green for the men of Flan-
ders. Things stood still for a while, though, till a new
king came to the throne of Eng-land.

Rich-ard Coeur de Lion. ‘This was Rich-ard,
who by his great feats won the name of the Lion
Heart. He was the great-grand-son of Will-iam the
Con-quer-or, and like him in so far that he was brave
in war, and so strong that few were a match for him.
From the first he was set on the war, and soon met
Phil-ip Au-gus-tus, the king of France, in that land,
and with a great host at their back the two kings set
off for the East.

Fred-er-ick Bar-ba-ros-sa. The third great
king who took the field with them was Fred-er-ick
Bar-ba-ros-sa, or Red Beard, who sat on the throne
of Ger-man-y. He was one of the best kings since
Charles the Great, and things would have gone well
with him all his life if he could have made up his mind
to just rule his own land and not try to rule It-a-ly
as well. But he held that he was the heir of Charles
the Great, who had had that land neath his sway, and
that it was but right he should have it too. So when
the men there rose to try and free their land from his
rule, he would go there and put them down, and




















































































































































































































































































AT THE TIME OF THE CRUSADES.
106 fleroes of History.

while he was at this task, things would go wrong at
home, so you may know his life was not one of peace.

One cause of this lay in the fact that Fred-er-ick
was of the line of the Ho-hen-stauf-fens, one of the
chief fam-i-lies of the realm, who got this name from
the fact that the first of them, who from a poor knight
got to be Duke of Swa-bi-a, built his home on a high
hill. They held a great part of the land neath their
sway, and the town of Waib-ling-en, too, so that they
got the name of Waib-ling-ers. The next great fam-
i-ly in the land was the Welfs, who got their name
from the first of their line who bore it. Their head
was the Duke of Ba-va-ri-a, who held Sax-o-ny, too,
neath his rule. These fam-i-lies were all the time at
war, in which the great towns of It-a-ly took part,
and as the I-tal-ians could not say the words Welf
or Waib-ling-er they made them Guelph and Ghib-
el-line, which was as near to them as they could come.
The years went on; these wars died out, but the
I-tal-ians kept the names and made use of them in
the wars ‘twixt their great towns, and thus the words
came to mean things that were far from what they
had meant at first. When the first one of the line
of Ho-hen-stauf-fens (Con-rad III.) got to the throne
he thought he could not be safe with so great and .
strong a lord as Hen-ry the Proud, who was then the
head of the Welfs, so he drove him out of his
¢
frederick Barbarossa. 107

lands, and kept him out till he died—in a year. But
he left a young son who got the name of Hen-ry the
Li-on, and his uncle Welf of Ba-va-ria took up the
lad’s cause and fought hard to bring him back to his
own. So things stood when Fred-er-ick the Red
Beard came to the throne, and to make all glad and
bring back peace, he gave back to Hen-ry the Li-on
Ba-va-ri-a and Sax-o-ny, the land of his sires. So
Hen-ry was his friend and gave him help in his wars, _
and all went well foratime. But there came a storm.
Old Duke Welf, who had fought so well for Hen-ry
the Li-on, was now old and blind. But he had no
mind to be sad as well ; so he made all the chief men
near by come to his great home at Mem-ing-en, and
stay for weeks at a time to feast and dance as much
as they chose. Now, to keep house for guests on
such a scale as this needs a great store of gold; and
so good Duke Welf found, for he was soon head and
ears in debt. He sent off to Hen-ry the Li-on for
help, but that young man was deaf to his suit. Then
he tried the Em-pe-ror, and Fred-er-ick sent him a
great pile of gold. So when he died Duke Welf left
all his lands to Fred-er-ick. This made Hen-ry the
Li-on wild with rage, but he hid it and bode his time.
It soon came: Fred-er-ick found he had to go to
It-a-ly once more to quell a war there, and told Hen-
ry to bring his troops and go with him. He did so,
108 fferoes of ffistory.

but on the way Fred-er-ick fell ill, and then Hen-ry
said he would leave him in the lurch if he would not
yield up to him the lands left by Duke Welf. In
vain Fred-er-ick plead with him to be true to him
and to his land; though he went so far as to kneel
and pray to him, he could not move the cold, hard
man. Then the Em-press Be-a-trice, who could not
bear to see her great spouse brought so low, told him
to rise. “God,” she said, “will help you and pun-
ish the Welf some day.” A fierce fight then took
place with the Lom-bards—that is, the men of It-a-ly
—and in the hour of his liege’s sore need, Hen-ry the
Li-on took off his troops and left those of Fred-er-
ick to be cut up. Scarce did the Em-pe-ror get off
with his life, and when he got back to Ger-man-y he
put Hen-ry neath the ban of the em-pire, and gave the
Duch-y of Ba-va-ri-a to a good prince of his own.
He took Sax-o-ny from him too, and left him naught
but Bruns-wick, and it is through the House of
Bruns-wick that the Queen of Eng-land can trace her
blood back to the Welfs.

It was in his old age that the news of the fall of Je-
ru-sa-lem came to Fred-er-ick. It made his great
heart burn with the wish to wrest it back, so he went
forth at the head of a huge host to the East, to join
Rich-ard of Eng-land and Phil-ip of France. But it

was not his fate to fight for Je-ru-sa-lem. On the way
Frederick Barbarossa. 109

there, as he made his way through a stream in A-si-a,
he was drowned. (ap. 1190.) When the news of
his death got to Ger-man-y none could hold it to be
true. For a long time it was thought that this great -
king with the red beard was not dead, but sat in a
cave in a great hill in the land, by a stone ta-ble
through which his beard had grown, and there would |
sit till some hour of per-il came to the land, when he
would rise and come forth to save it.

It was not till Fred-er-ick had been some time dead
that Rich-ard of Eng-land and Phil-ip of France got
to the Ho-ly Land. They came to A-cre—a town
still held by the Turks, though the Chris-tians had
tried to take it from’them for some time—near whose
gates the Chris-tian host was drawn up on a plain,
while on the heights not far off were the troops of the
Turks, neath Sal-a-din’s black flag. At once the
kings set to work; Rich-ard was ill, but he had his
bed borne out so he could tell his men just how to
set to work to take the town. In vain Sal-a-din sent
word to those in it to try and hold out till a new force
came to join him; they had to yield and throw wide
their gates to Rich-ard and Phil-ip. They made
hard terms with Sal-a-din too: he had to give his
word to give up the true cross, and to pay in the
space of 40 days a great sum of gold. The two kings
rode in state through the town, and their flags were
T10 fLeroes of L£Listory.

seen oer it. Then Phil-ip of France said that he
had done his part, and went home to France. At
the end of for-ty days Sal-a-din had not kept his word,
so Rich-ard, to show that he meant what he said, put
a great throng of Sal-a-din’s men whom he held to
death, as he had told him he would do. Then he
led his force through the land and beat the foe, so
that at last Sal-a-din said he would give up a large
part of the Ho-ly Land to him. But Rich-ard said
no—he must have all, and went on to Je-ru-sa-lem.
But now, when it might have been won by a bold
stroke, all would not act as one man. Some of the
chief men said that if they took it so soon the troops
would think their vow had been kept and go off home,
and thus the great part of the land would be left to
the foe. This strife soon brought the end. Rich-ard
had hot words with these great lords, and they went
off home and left him in the lurch. Then he got
word, too, that he must go home if he had a wish to
hold the crown. So he thought it best to ask of Sal-a-
din but two things—to give up the true cross and
Je-ru-sa-lem. But Sal-a-din said he would not give
them up; so Rich-ard made a last stroke for them.
He swept on Je-ru-sa-lem, and the Turks fled from
his path, but took care to spoil all the wells as they
went. In that hot, dry land this was the cause of
fierce pangs of pain to Rich-ard’s troops, and at last






















































































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II2 fleroes of History.

the king had to give up all thought of his great plan.
He went to the top of a hill whence he could see Je-
ru-sa-lem, but held up his shield to keep from his
eyes the sight of it, for he held he was not fit to gaze
on it, since he could not wrest it from the yoke of
those who did not hold the faith of Christ. He then
broke up his troops, and kept but a small band,
at the head of which he rode to A-cre. It had
been laid siege to by Sal-a-din, and was just in his
clutch when Rich-ard came up and drove the Turks
off. Great was their shame when they found how
small a band had made them fly, and they soon rode
back. The fight went on for some time; Rich-ard’s
horse was slain, so that he was flung to the ground,
but so brave did Sal-a-din think him that he sent two
steeds to let him go on. In the end the Chris-tians
won, and Rich-ard got the best terms he could wring
from Sal-a-din: a truce of eight years and three
months, and the right for all Chris-tians to go to Je-
ru-sa-lem free of tax in that time. Rich-ard then set
sail for home. As his ship left the shores of Pal-es-tine
he cast a long, last glance on that land so dear to his
heart, and flung out his arms as if to touch it, while he
cried out that he left it in the care of God, in the hope
that he would grant him life and strength to come back
and win it yet. The king’s fleet had gone on, and the
ship which bore him met a great storm and he was




































































-LY LAND.

THE-HO

ARD’S FARE-WELL TO

CH

RI
ii4 Heroes of Listlory.

cast on the shore near Ven-ice, so that he had to pass
through the realms of his foes—the lords who had
left him in Pal-es-tine—to get home. They all bore |
him a grudge for his proud ways and_ bold, harsh
words to them, and he knew if they caught him they
would clap him in jail till a huge sum was paid for
him to be set free. Still he thought he might get
through. So he had his beard shorn off and put on
the garb of a pil-grim, and in this guise got on safe
till he came to the small realm of May-nard, one of the
kin of the chiefs of Pal-es-tine —Con-rad of divre==
whose death, Rich-ard’s foes said, he had brought to
pass. So when Rich-ard sent his man to May-nard
with the gift of a ru-by ring to ask for leave to pass
through his lands, May-nard thought the gem was so
fine that it could come from none but a king. So he
said to the man, “This is the king of Eng-land.
Tell him he may come to me in peace.” But Rich-
ard put no faith in these words, and fled in the night.
He went on safe then till he got near Vi-en-na, when
he sent a boy to buy food. The boy, who had a good
deal of gold, let it be seen and at once was caught,
brought to the chief men of the place, and put to
fierce pain to make him tell from whom he came.
When they wrung the truth from him they sent off
troops to guard the house, took Rich-ard, and put
him in a strong cas-tle, where the em-per-or, Hen-ry
Richard /. 5 i15

VI, said he must stay. The news that he was held
thus made all the folks in Eng-land feel sad, save his
broth-er John, who now felt sure of the crown. The
em-per-or would not tell where he was, but true
hearts went to seek for the spot, and it is said that
one of these, Blon-del, his bard, of whom he was
most fond, soon found it. The pope’s aid was then
sought to make Hen-ry give up his prey, and at last
Rich-ard was brought to plead his cause to the chief
men of the Ger-man realm. This he did so well that
they said they saw no cause why he should be kept
in jail. So at last Hen-ry said he might go free if he
would pay a large sum of gold. Those at home.
made haste to raise a part of this by tax, and it was
paid down, and Rich-ard set off for his realm. Great
was the joy of the Eng-lish to see their king, and they
made so great and fine a show to mark it that the
Ger-mans who had been sent with the king said to
him, “Ah, if our king had seen all this, he would not
let you off for so small a sum!” Rich-ard could not
rest long at peace. He was soon off to France to
pun-ish John and the false French king who had let
him aid in his plans to take the crown from Rich-ard.
But one day, when he had laid siege to a cas-tle, a
shaft that bore stuff on it to make it kill struck him,
and he knew that he must die. So he told them to
lay his corpse at the feet of his sire, but to send his
116 Heroes of History.

heart to Rou-en, a town that had been true and
stanch to him all his life. (a.0. rr99.) His fame did
not die out for a long time in Pal-es-tine, and when
a Turk’s horse shied he would say, “Dost thou
think King Rich-ard is in that bush?” and when
babes cried their moth-ers would hush them with the
words, “If you are not good I will take you to King
Rich-ard.”’

Lou-is IX. of France. Two more cru-sades
were fought, but there was not much won by them.
But the wish to gain the tomb of Christ dwelt in all
true hearts, and at last Lou-is IX. of France, the best
king that land had in the Mid-dle A-ges, led out
a great host to fight for it. They went by way of
E-gypt, and at first did well, for they took the town of
Da-mi-et-ta from the Turks. But when they tried to
take Cai-ro they found it too much for them and had
to fall back and fight as they went, for the fierce
Turks kept on their track. At last the good king,
whose strength was worn out in feats as great as those
done by Rich-ard of the Li-on Heart, fell in a swoon,
from which he woke to find that he was in the hands
of the foe with a great band of hismen. Buthe kept
his trust in God, and his mien to the foe was most
brave and cool, They said he might go free if he
would give up the forts the Chris-tians held in Syr-i-a.
He said they were not his to give. They told him
Lous LX. 114

that if he would not yield they would twist his
limbs all out of shape and bear him from town
to town as a show. He said they might do so
if they would—he was theirs. At last he was told
that he might, go free if he would pay a great sum,
and his lords with him if he would bear as great
a one for them. He said it was too much for him,
but he would pay for the lords, for it would be a
poor thing for a king of France not to pay to get
those neath his rule free. Then the king of the
Turks, struck by these brave words of the good king,
took off one-fifth from the sum which the Turks
set on him, and at last King Lou-is was free. But
still he could not bear to turn home. He wrote
to Hen-ry III. of Eng-land to come and help him
fight for the tomb of Christ, and though his chief
lords left him, he clung for quite a time to the hope
that help would be sent him to wage war for the great
cause. At last, when he saw that it was a vain hope,
he went, clad in a rough, poor garb, as far as Naz-a-reth.
But though the king of the Turks gave him leave to
go and pray at the tomb of Christ, he would not do
it: he held he was not fit to have sight of it since he
had not won it from the Turks. At last he came back
to France, but the hope that he might yet free the
Ho-ly Land dwelt in his heart. And so when six-
teen years had gone by and bad news came from there
118 fleroes of Listory.

which made the pope call on all the kings of Eu-rope
to go forth and try to wrest it from the Turks, Lou-is
was one of the first to take the field. He set out with
a great band of troops for the Ho-ly Land by way of
Af-ri-ca, and Prince Ed-ward of Eng-land said he
would join him in a short time. King Lou-is set sail
for Af-ri-ca, but as soon as he and his troops got to
shore a plague broke out. One of the first it struck
was Lou-is, and full of peace and calm joy, the great,
good and brave king gave up his pure soul to God.
(i D..1270.)

Ed-ward I. of Eng-land. When this prince got
to Af-ri-ca and found the king dead he did not change
his plans, but led on to the Ho-ly Land. He took
Naz-a-reth, but it was the last fight he was to win.
He took ill, and when he was still weak a man came
one day to his tent with a letter from one of the chief
Turks of the land, who he said had a wish to change
to the faith of Christ. As he read, the man sprang
on him and tried to kill him. But the prince flung
him to the floor and slew him. But the dag-ger
which the Turk had thrust in the prince bore stuff
which was sure to kill if by chance the wound did not.
It is said that when the prince’s wife El-ea-nor heard
of it she put her lips to the wound at the risk of her own
life, and drew out all the blood that held the bad stuff.

We do not know if this tale be true or not, but we do
Edward I. £19

know that the prince got well. But he saw that
there was naught to be done in the Ho-ly Land
then, and there was great need of him in Eng-land ;
so when he had
made a peace for
ten years he set
sail for home. On
the way he got
news of his sire’s
death, so when he
set foot on his own.
land it was as its
king. As soon as
he had’ the crown
put on his head,
Ed-ward at once
set to work to try
and rule the land
well, so that he
stands mid the best
of her kings. One | Sa ne

of his first cares

was to give the land good laws and mend old ones that
had flaws in them. Up to his time Par-lia-ment had
been made up of men of high rank, but he changed.
this so that men of all grades sat in it—men from


120 fleroes of LHistory.

the towns to tell what kind of laws those who dwelt
there or were in trade had a wish to see made, and
gen-tle-men from the coun-ties to tell what those who
held land had a mind for, and in this way Par-lia-ment
got strong and the folks at last got a voice in the realm.
The king sent, too, for men to come from lands where
the folks knew how to make cloth out of wool to show
the Eng-lish how to do it, so that they would have to
send all their wool out of the land; and they learnt
so well that since it has been one of the chief trades
of the land.

Though the king found time to do all these things,
he was most of the time at war. He first fought the
Welsh, who, in their wild high-lands in the west,
were all the time on the watch to sweep down on the
Eng-lish to fight them. Ed-ward, while still but a
prince, had made them bend to the rule of his sire and
call him their king, but when he came to the throne
they would not hail him as king, but sought neath
one of their chiefs, known as the Lord of Snow-don,
to fling off his yoke. Ed-ward soon made them
yield and brought back peace, but they soon burst out
once more. ‘hen Ed-ward made up his mind that
Wales should be his, once for all. So he went to
Wales with a great band of troops and drove the
Prince of Wales, or Lord of Snow-don, in one of his
forts and held him there, till at last the prince made
Edward T. I21

a raid and fell in the fight. With him died the war,
and from that time Wales has been a part of Eng-
land, and the king’s eld-est son has borne the name
of Prince of Wales.

Ed-ward had a great war with Scot-land, too,
which came to pass in this way: Long ere Ed-ward
came to the throne a Scotch king— Will-iam the
Li-on—fell in: the hands of the Eng-lish in a fight,
and to get free said that his lords might hold their
lands from the Eng-lish king in place of him. This
was kept up for a time, but at last the Scotch bought
the right back from Eng-land for a sum of gold, but
said they would hold Eng-land’s king as their chief
lord still in name. At last a king of Scot-land left
the crown to his sole heir—a girl—his grand-child,
and daugh-ter of the King of Nor-way, so that she
was known as the Maid of Nor-way. But on the
way to Scot-land she died, and then no less than
thir-teen heirs sprang up to claim the throne. The
three chief ones said they would leave it to Ed-ward
of Eng-land to choose a king from them. He chose
John Ba-liol, and the Scotch took him as king. But
Ed-ward did not stop here. He went on to make
some laws for the Scotch, which they found not at all
to their taste, and when Ba-liol said yes to them,
they made him take it back and say no. War at
once broke out. Ed-ward swept through Scot-land,
122 fTeroes of fistory.

and most of the large towns threw wide their gates to
let him in. Ba-liol was sent to Eng-land and put in
eyail. }
Will-iam Wal-lace. In this dark hour, while
Scot-land lay neath the heel of a strange king, there
rose a chief whose name still sends a thrill through
the hearts of the Scotch. This was Will-iam Wal-
lace, a poor knight who had got a few men round
him. But his skill was so great in war, and he was
so brave and strong, that more and more men put
their trust in him and fought neath his lead. He
made raids here and there, and the Eng-lish-men
whom Ed-ward had left in the chief posts in the land
got a dread of him, and sent word to Ed-ward to
send troops to put this new foe down. A great force
came and met Wal-lace near the town of Stir-ling.
When the Eng-lish gen-er-al saw how strong a place
Wal-lace held, he tried to win him by fair words to
give up his plan of war. But Wal-lace said he must
and would fight; “his one wish was to set his land
free.” A great fight then took place and the Scotch
won. The foe was swept from the land, and Wal-
lace was put at the head of things, but it was hard for
him to do much with the king gone, and the chief lords
with him. But he did his best to make the trades
erow and make the land rich and strong, till he heard
that Ed-ward J, was on his way to meet him with a
Robert Bruce. 123

large force. Wal-lace had no men to meet him in the
field,'so he drove off all that could walk and laid the.
land waste so no food could be found by the foe. For
a time this plan did well, but through a false Scot
Wal-lace was found by Ed-ward at Fal-kirk and had
to fight. His skill was great, but his men were few,
and he was beat. Naught came of it to Ed-ward, for
he had to drag his worn-out troops back to his own
land. But year on year he came back with a great —
force, and at last got all the land back piece by piece,
and all the chief men save Wal-lace. He was kind
to all, and said he would spare all lives save that of
Wal-lace. In vain he was plead with; all he did
was to hold out boons to those who would give up
Wal-lace to him. Att last he was found in Glas-gow,
put in chains and sent to Lon-don, where he was |
tried and put to death in the most fierce way.
Rob-ert Bruce. But Ed-ward had not won his
end, though Wal-lace was dead. There was a chief
in Scot-land of the name of Rob-ert Bruce, who had
in his veins the blood of her kings and in his heart a
love for her which made him but bide his time to free
her: ss Phege was a ichiet there of the name or
Co-myn, who held to King Ed-ward. One day
Bruce and Co-myn had a talk, and Bruce spoke of
the land’s poor state, and at last said that Co-myn
should take his lands and help him to be king, or he
“124 fleroes of FHistory.

would take Co-myn’s lands and help him to be king.
But Co-myn said he must be true to King Ed-ward.
Then they grew warm, and Bruce flung the charge
in Co-myn’s face that he told all he could find out to
the foe of his land. Co-myn threw back taunts at
Bruce, and the end was that Bruce drew a dag-ger
and slew Co-myn. Bruce could not now turn back;
so at the head of a few men he drove out some of
Ed-ward’s chief men, and had the crown put on his
head at Scone. Fierce was Ed-ward’s wrath when
he heard this. Old and sick though he was, he came
at the head of a great host to Scot-land, and by
chance came on Bruce’s men and beat them. Bruce
scarce got off, and had to flee with a price on his
head from place to place. At last he went to Ire-
land, where he staid fora time. Then he came back,
and with his small band met and beat the Eng-lish
troops. He then got more men to stand by him, and
made them fit to meet Ed-ward, who was on his
way, when the news came that the great king was
dead; lis son, -Ed-ward 41 , got the crown, but
was a weak king with no skill in war, and Bruce soon
put him to rout in the great fight of Ban-nock-burn
(June 23, 1314). Peace was now won, but Bruce did
not rest here. He swept through parts of Eng-land
with his troops till he taught the Eng-lish to look on
cot-land as a free land with the same rights as she






































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ERT BRUCE.

ROB
126 fTeroes of fistory.

had. He then set to work for the good of the Scotch,
and was a good king—wise and good to all—and
when he died (ap. 1329) their woe was great. He
has a grand tomb in the Ab-bey of Dun-ferm-line



BD-WARD III.

which tells how
good and great he
was, and his name
still lives with that
of Wal-lace in the
hearts of the Scotch.

Ed-ward III.
of Eng-land. As
I have said, Ed-
ward) lhe was=a
poor king, but his
son Ed-ward III.
was like his grand-
sire. As he grew
up he saw that his
moth-er, Queen
Is-a-bel-la, was not
a good wom-an,
and made much of

a bad man of the name of Mor-ti-mer, who had done
all he could to aid her to put the king—his fa-ther
—to death. So he made his plans, and got his friends
to come one night and kill Mor-ti-mer, and then he
Edward Il, 127

put the queen in a strong house, which she could
leave but to walk in a park, and there she was kept
till she died. The first thing Ed-ward did when he
came to the throne was to try and take Scot-land
from King Rob-ert Bruce, but in vain. He and his
troops had to come back as they had set out. So he
gave up that plan
and cast his eyes on
France, to whose
crown he said he
had a claim in this
way: In France no
queens can reign,
and the French king
had died and left no
son. But Ed-ward
said that though
his moth-er could
not reign, she was
the daugh-ter of a king of France and could give
him the right to that throne. But the French did
not see the force of this, and gave the crown-to Phil-
ip of Va-lois, whose claim was through a French
prince of the blood. So Ed-ward made up his mind
to fight for it, and was soon in France with a large
force, while Phil-ip came to meet him with one as
large. The kings met in Nor-man-dy, at a small



DEATH OF ED-WARD III.
128 fTeroes of History.

place of the name of Cre-cy, but just as they drew
up their troops to fight a wild storm burst. The air
grew black as pitch; great flocks of birds flew o’er
the heads of the troops, and the rain fell in streams,
while the roar of thun-der and the flash of light-ning
put dread in their hearts. Still the fight went on.

The Black Prince. The Eng-lish king’s young
son, the Black Prince, who got this name from the
col-or of his suit of mail, which was of this hue, was in
the thick of the fight, and one time when he was sore
pressed those near him sent to the king for help.
“Has he sought help?” said the king, and when told
that he had not, “then,” said he, “he shall have no
help from me. Let the boy win his spurs.” The
French king, on his side, fought well, too. Some of
his near kin were slain; his dear friends fell round
him, and at last one of his men took his steed by the
rein and led him off the field by force. Ed-ward,
who did not know that the French king had gone off
in the dark, and that the field was his, told his men
to light fires and stand firm at their posts, where they
did’ stay till it was found out that the French were
gone. Thea Ed-ward let them rest. His son came
to meet him, and the king gave him great praise and
told him that if he but kept on as he had done that
day he would show that he was his true son and a
fit heir to the crown.
The Black Prince. 129

Close on this great fight came good news from
home to King Ed-ward. The Scots had thought
they had a fine chance to make a raid on Eng-land,
but Ed-ward’s queen, Phi-lip-pa, was too much for
them. She had a fine force to meet them, and the
end was that the Scotch king, Da-vid, was caught by
her troops and brought to Lon-don and put in jail
there. |

Ed-ward now tried to take the French town of
Cal-ais. It held out a long time, but in the end had
to give in to the Eng-lish king, who then said he
would hang them all. But the Black Prince plead —
with him till he gave in so far as to say that if six of
the men of Cal-ais would give up their lives he would
spare the rest. At this news one brave man of the
name of St. Pierre stood forth and said he would
die for the folks of the town. Five more were soon
found, and the six brave men went out with ropes
round their necks to the Eng-lish camp. Ed-ward
met them with stern words and sent for the man to
hang them. But his queen, who had just come to
join him, fell down at his feet and would not rise till
he said he would spare their lives. Then she took
them to her tent, put rich clothes on them, gave them
each a large sum of coin and sent them home. King
Ed-ward was fond of war, and had a great wish to
be known as a brave, strong knight, as well as a
130 fleroes of [Tistory.

great king. So once in a fight he put on a dress
like that worn by the plain men in the ranks, and
fought with them. He chose out a tall, strong French
knight to fight with, and in a short time was brought
to his knees. But he did not give up, and in the end
took him and brought him and a lot more in the
camp. There, that night, he made a great feast, and
while they were at it made known to them who he
was, and put a crown of pearls on the head of one of
the brave French knights. The war went on for a
long time, and Ed-ward had to go home to see his
realm, so he left the Black Prince at the head of the
troops in France. The French king, Phil-ip, was
now dead, and his son John was king in his place.
The Black Prince met him at a place of the name
of Poi-tiers, and a great fight took place. The
Black Prince won, and got the French king in his
hands and took him to Lon-don. Wild was the joy
of the folks of that town as he went through it; bright
rugs were hung from the win-dows and rich gold
plate was shown, while at each short space a rich
arch of bloom rose o’er his head, and all the time the
air was rent with shouts of joy. King Ed-ward met
his son with great pomp and deep joy, and gave the
French king a rich house to dwell in, where he died.

The war with France was brought to a close.
King Charles of France gave up a large part of
The Black Prince. i131

France to Ed-ward, who sent the Black Prince to
rule it. He made his court at Bor-deaux. Things
went on quite well for nine years, and then Don Pe-
dro, king of Cas-tile, who was at war with the king
of Ar-a-gon, sought the help of the Black Prince.
Now Cas-tile and Ar-a-gon are both parts of Spain,
but they were not neath the same king as they are
now, but were each a small realm neath its own king.
The prince said he would help Don Pe-dro, and
took a large force to Spain and won a great fight
for him, but when he came back he found the French
in his realm full of wrath at the tax put on them for
the war in Spain. They had all the time been sore
at heart at the fact that they had been torn from
France and put neath a prince of Eng-land, and now
they sought the help of King Charles of France to
free them and take them back. He had no troops
and no coin to get up a force, but he had great '
craft, and he tried all means to stir up the flame of
their hate for the prince, who grew ill and was
seen to waste day by day. At length, when he had
got troops and felt that he was a match for the prince,
the French king sent word to the Black Prince to
come to his court and show cause why he should put
so great a tax on those neath his rule, and the prince
said he would, but with a casque on his head and
60,000 men at his back. This meant war, and deeds
132°. = fleroes of History.

came quick on words. King Ed-ward sent a great
band of troops led by one more of his sons, but
Charles let them sweep through France and meet
all the ills of the cold months in some great hills which
they had to cross. Then he got the king of Ar-a-gon,
whom he had fought for, to send a fleet and beat the
Eng-lish by sea. But it was the French king’s great
luck to have in his realm a man who had such skill
in war as to cause dread in the hearts of all his foes.
_ Ber-trand du Guesc-lin (gha4-Zn). This was
a poor knight who was born in Brit-ta-ny of a proud
old race, one of whom of the same name, Ber-trand
du Guesc-lin, had been on the First Cru-sade. He
was a most plain babe, and as he grew up was rough
and bold, and all the time at strife’ with those near
him, till at six-teen years of age he ran off from
home and took part in the feuds which at that time
were kept up all the time twixt some great lords.
His fame grew as time went on, till at last the king
heard of him and took him to serve him, and when
the war broke out made him head of his troops in
spite of the fact that he plead hard not to be put in
so grand a post. But the king would not let him off,
and to let all see how much he thought of him,
made him sit next to him at his meals and gave him _
lands and gifts. He now led the troops of France
to the field, but true to the king’s plan, which he
Bertrand du Guesclin. 133

thought was most wise, he did not meet the Eng-lish
in a great fight, but hung on them so as to do them
all the harm he could and save his own men. This
kind of war went on for eight years, and then the
Black Prince laid siege to the town of Li- -moges,
and when he took it put all those in it to death.
This harsh act made the French hate the Eng-lish
more and more, and made them long more and more
to free their land from their yoke. At last the Black
Prince grew too ill to lead the troops, and had to make
a truce and go back to his own land, where he died.
A year went by, and then the once great he-ro, Ed-
ward III., who was now in an old age full of shame,
the slave of a vile dame, died too. He was left by
this wretch and his ser-vants on his bed in his death
hour, and there a good old priest found him and
knelt down to pray With him, and staid there till he
died.

The truce came to an end at the time of the
old king’s death, and Charles V. and Du Guesc-lin
went to work once more with a will. For four
years more the war was kept up, but with no great
gain for France or her foe, and then the brave Du
Guesc-lin died in camp at six-ty-six years ofage. Itis
said that a town to which he laid siege at the time
was to have thrown wide its gates to him the next
day, and when the man in charge heard that he was
134 Heroes of History.

dead he would yield the keys of the town to no one
else, but laid them down on Du Guesc-lin’s bier.
4b. 1380.) [wo months went by, and then the king
to whom this brave knight had been so true was
laid in the tomb near him, in the great Ab-bey of St.
De-nis, in Paris. The crown of France was put on
the head of his young son, not yet twelve years of
age, who in due time took his seat on the throne as
Charles VI.

Hen-ry V. of Eng-land. When Ed-ward III.
died in Eng-land, the son of the Black Prince came
to the throne and was known as Rich-ard II]. He
did not keep up the war with France, but made a
truce year by year. At length, when his first wife
died he sent to Charles VI. to ask for one of his
young daugh-ters as his wife. The eld-est, Is-a-bel,
was sent to Eng-land, and a truce was made for twen-ty-
five years twixt the two lands. But ere the small
queen was of an age to wed the king Rich-ard had
lost his throne. All his life he had paid no heed to
what those neath his rule thought and did just what
he would, and so they grew to hate him, and the end
was that he was put in jail, where he was put to death,
and one of his kin put on the throne in his stead.
This king, Hen-ry IV., had too much to do to keep
his place to think of the war in France, but when he
died and his son came to the throne he cast his eyes








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































HEN-RY THE FIFTH.

at once on France. This son, Hen-ry V., had been
known in his youth as the Mad-cap Prince who spent
all his time at games and play with men far from him
in rank, but when he came to the throne he shook
136 fleroes of History.

them all off and gave proof that he was of the
stuff of which the best kings are made. He had
scarce beena year on the throne when he put forth the
old claim to the throne of France. A month went by,
and then this shrewd young prince said he would
waive his claim to the throne for a large part of France
and the hand of the Prin-cess Kath-a-rine, daugh-ter of
Charles VI., with a great sum of coin. But France
would not yield all that this proud king sought, though
she was in sore straits. Her king, Charles VI., was
mad; now and then a gleam of sense would come to
him, but it would soon fade. The land was rent with
feuds; each of her chief men had a strong wish to be
at the head of things, and those who were not tried
to put spokes in the wheels of the one who was. The
queen, Is-a-bel, was bad too, which made things worse.
This state of things made Hen-ry V. all the more sure
that he could win France, so he set sail for her shores
with a great force, and came to land not far from the
mouth of the Seine. When news came to the court
of France that he was in the land with his troops, all
strife came to an end for the time. All the chief men
met, and the king, who just then had a gleam of sense,
thought with them that it was best to give the foe war.
So all of them save the king and his three sons set off
with the troops to the north, and sent word to the
Eng-lish king to know on what day and at what place
flenry V. 137

he would meet to fight them. “TI shall be found where
you seek to cut off my march,” the king sent word
back. So they tried to stop him near a small town of
the name of Ag-in-court (A-zen-coor). ‘The fray was



““WEL-COME, WEL-COME, HAR-RY OF FRANCE AND ENG-LAND!”

long and fierce; both sides fought well and did brave
feats, but the field of Ag-in-court was the Eng-lish
king’s at the end. (Oct. 25, 1415.) The loss of the
French was great; not a few of the kin of the king
138 fleroes of Fistory.

and a throng more of great lords of the realm, with
8000 plain men, lay dead on the field of Ag-in-court.
Hen-ry now went home, and then the feuds twixt
France’s chief men burst out once more, and he came
back and kept up the war till he had won quite a large
part of the north of France. All the time things got
worse and worse in France, and at last the court had
to sue for peace to Hen-ry, who said he would make
peace if he got the French king’s daugh-ter as his wife
and the French crown on the king’s death, and was
let rule the realm each time that the king was mad.
And Hen-ry got all this; he wed the Prin-cess Kath-
a-rine with great pomp, and then set out to wrest some
towns from her broth-er, the Dau-phin Charles, who
would not yield to him as his sire had done. For
three years the war was kept up twixt him and Hen-ry,
and then the Eng-lish king fell ill and died. (a.p 1422.)
He left a young son, Hen-ry VI., who was known as
the heir to the French crown. The Eng-lish, led by
the late king’s broth-er, the Duke of Bed-ford, tried
hard to win and keep the land of France for him, but
the men of France, though poor and in sore straits,
still tried to throw off their yoke. But the Eng-lish
were too strong; they took town on town, and it was
soon seen that France must yield. The mad king
was dead, but his son, Charles VII., was shut up in a
small town, and saw that if the Eng-lish took the
flenry V. 139

great strong town of Or-le-ans, to which they had at
length laid siege, he must flee from France or fall in
their hands; for to win the rest of France would take
them but ashort time. But in this dark hour a young
maid, the child of plain, poor folks, heard a voice which
told her to go forth from her home and free France.
She did so. She went to the king and told him she was
sent to lead him to the great church at Rheims to have
the crown put on his head. She then freed Or-le-ans,
beat the foe back from point to point, and did lead the
king to Rheims as she had said. Her work now done
she would have gone home, but the king made her stay.
She kept up the war, but in one fight fell in the hands
of the Eng-lish. Their hate for her was great; and
she had foes mid the French, too, who made cause
with the Eng-lish. They said she was a witch who
had done all her feats by the aid of the dev-il, and they
made up a court which tried her and said she must
die. So one fair morn they led out the maid who had
done so great a work for her land, and bound her to
a high stake where all the vast throng could see her
and burnt her to death. (May 30, 1431.) But they
could not make things once more as they were ere she
came. ‘The war went on for twen-ty-six years, but all
the wealth and strength of Eng-land could not win
back the land of France. The Duke of Bed-ford

died, and then Par-is rose and threw wide its gates to
140 fleroes of L1istory.

King Charles. Town on town in the north did the
same, and day by day, piece by piece, the French
drove the Eng-lish from the soil of France. The war,
which had gone on for one hun-dred years, came to an
end at last in 1453, and left the Eng-lish with not one
foot of French ground save Cal-ais.

CHAPTER VI.
HE-ROES OF THE SIX-TEENTH CEN.-TU-RY.

FROM A.D. I500 TO A.D. 1600.

Just a few years ere the dawn of this age, Chris-to-
pher Co-lum-bus, with the aid of Is-a-bel-la, Queen of
Spain, set out to cross the At-lan-tic in hopes that he
would land on the shores of In-di-a, and thus have
all the rich things of that land brought by this quick
route to Eu-rope, in place of the old slow one on
land. He did not dream that a great land lay twixt
Eu-rope and A-si-a, so when he came to strange
shores he gave it the name of In-di-a, and to this day
these parts bear the name of the West In-dies.

Great was the joy in Spain when he got back with
the news of the great land which he had brought
neath the crown of Spain. Dreams of gold got to

|
_ Hernando Cortes. 141

turn the heads of the
young men of all ranks,
and Co-lum-bus, who
had found it such hard
work to find men to go
with him when he went
on his first trip, could
not choose mid _ those
who strove to find a
place in his ships when
he set sail once more.



CO-LUM-BUS.

Her-nan-do Cor-tes.
There was one youth in Spain
at this time who was but eight
years old when Co-lum-bus
got back to Spain from his
first trip, but no doubt his
quick, bright mind took in
much that was said of the
strange, new birds, ani beasts,
3 and fine woods, and strange
Eee en with their red skin, that


142 fleroes of [Listory.

were seen in the streets as Co-lum-bus went through
the land to the court to tell of the strange shores which,
they said, would be sure to teem with gold. Time
went on, and the boy, Her-nan-do Cor-tes, grew to bea
wild youth, who was more of a curse than a prize in
the eyes of his kin. He went to col-lege, but did
not stay to go through his course, though he learnt
some Lat-in and could write good prose, and spent
his time in the way he thought he could get most from
out of life. At last he took a freak to go to the New
World, so he left his plain, good home and set sail
one fine day for its shores.

He was but nine-teen years of age when he set foot
on the soil of Hay-ti. A young man who knew him
came to greet him and told him he was sure to get a
grant of land. “But I do not want to till the soil,”
he said. “I want gold.” He dwelt here and then
in Cu-ba for a time, where he wed a fair maid, who,
like him, had come out from Spain. At last news
came of a great realm to the west, of the name of
Mex-i-co, where gold was to be found. The gov-ern-
or of Cu-ba made up his mind to send a force to add
it to the crown of Spain, and chose Cor-tes to lead it.
And now Cor-tes’ cup of joy was full: the great
schemes which had sped through his brain for years
he could now work out. He set sail and swept
round the shores of Yu-ca-tan, through the Gulf of
fernando Cortes. 143

Mex-i-co, till he got to a point on the coast of Mex-i-
co where he thought it safe to land. Ere he got time
to do this, a light boat shot out from the shore with
a band of Mex-i-cans. As Cor-tes had with him a
Mex-i-can slave who had been sold to the Span-iards,
a maid whose name was Ma-ri-na, he could speak
with them through her, for she had learnt the Span-
ish tongue. They brought fruits and flow-ers and
bits of gold, and told him that the land was neath the
rule of a king of the name of Mon-te-zu-ma, who dwelt
sev-en-ty leagues from the coast, and that there was a
great deal of gold where he dwelt.. On the next
morn (A-pril 21, 1519) he brought all his force to
land on the spot where the town of Ver-a Cruz now
stands. The peo-ple of Mex-i-co were known as
the Az-tecs, and the land as the Az-tec Em-pire, at
this time, though we know it now as Mex-i-co.
Cor-tes learnt that an Az-tec had kept rule o’er that
part of the land where he was, and that next day he
would wait on him to find out why and whence he
came. The next day a lord came with a great
train, and Cor-tes gave a feast at which he told the
lord he had come from a far land, from a king as
great as his, with gifts as signs of his good will.
While they spoke he saw one of the Az-tecs draw
the men, their dress and arms, so that the king could
see from this sketch what kind they were. This was
144 : fLeroes of History.

just what Cor-tes had a “fb for, so he had the steeds
brought out and made the troops act as if they were
at war, and had the men fire the great guns off.
To the Az-tecs, who then saw a horse for the first
time, this was a queer sight; but when they saw the
smoke and flame rush from the guns and the great
balls tear their way through the trees of the woods,
they were struck with dread. But though some gave
vent to it, more hid it, and of these was the Az-tec
lord. He and Cor-tes took leave with rich gifts to
each of their kings, and the Az-tec told his race to
give Cor-tes all he should ask for till he heard from
the king. The Az-tec Em-pire at this time was
vast and rich, and its kings dwelt in great pomp, like
those of the East. The Az-tecs had made quite a
step in civ-il-i-za-tion. They had courts to take care
of the rights of the folks, and the judge of each court
held his place for life. They did not know how to
read or write, as we do, but they made a sketch of
what they had to tell, which they could read just as
fast as we read words. This was known as pic-ture-
writ-ing. They knew quite a good deal of a-rith-me-
tic, though the way they had to count seems rude to
us, and had made some steps in as-tron-o-my. They
knew how to till the soil, and brought the streams,
with great skill, to wet the dry lands. Their chief
crop was maize, or In-di-an corn, but the ba-na-na
Hernando Cortes. 145

and the ca-ca-o, from which choc-o-late is made, grew
with small care. They knew how to work in gold,
tin, lead, cop-per, and sil-ver, with a skill which made

the gold-smiths of Spain stare. But what they didbest
of all was to take

the feath-ers from
their bright, rich
birds and paste
them on fine cot-
ton web, and thus
make robes for the
rich, cur-tains for
their rooms, and
or-na-ments for.
the tem-ples. But %
the great blot on
the Az-tecs was }
the fact that in the #




or omen = Whey
held that there
was but one Great Lord, who made the world, but
they thought there was a great band of gods to serve
him, whom he had put in charge of the winds, the
sea-sons, and the arts of man. Of them the most
fierce was the god of war, and on his feast his tem-
146 Heroes of /Tistory.

ples, which were the best in the land, ran with the
blood of those slain in his honor. This kept the
Az-tecs at war near all the time so that they might
gain men to put to death.

Since the time that the Span-iards had come to the
New World, now near thir-ty years, there had come
to the land of the Az-tecs strange tales of these men
from a far-off shore, and there seems to have been a
dread in most of their minds that a great change was
at hand. So now, when the news came to the king
that the Span-iards were there, some of his chief
men thought it best to crush them by force or fraud,
and some said to make friends with them. Mon-te.
zu-ma took a half-way course. He sent men from
his court with rich gifts, but bade Cor-tes and his
men not to come near the cap-i-tal. This was the
worst thing he could have done, for by it they saw his
wealth and saw, too, how weak he was. One of
these gifts was a plate of gold as large as a car-riage
wheel, on which rich plants were cut.

When these men had gone the Span-iards lost
heart, so Cor-tes drew the plan of a town which was
soon built and known as Ver-a Cruz, and which
made a strong place for them to flee to in case things
went wrong with them. Then he had all the ships
sunk save one. When the men found this out they
cried out that he had led them to be slain like sheep.
Hernando Cortes. 144

But he told them that all who were in fear of what might
come to pass might take the last ship and sail off,
but as for him, he would play his part to the end.
Thus did he touch the right chord. They said they
would stand by him till death, and as the old dreams
of gold woke once more they gave a great shout, ‘“‘ To
Mex-i-co! to Mex-i-co!”

There was a small state of the name of Tlax-ca-la
which had kept free of the yoke of the Az-tecs. It
lay on the road to the town of Mex-i-co, and Cor-tes
sought leave to pass through it. But ere they had said
yes or no the Span-iards had a fierce fight with them
and beat them. ‘Then they made friends with them,
and got a large force to join them to beat their old
foe, the Az-tecs. Thus the Span-iards swept on to
the cap-i-tal, and took town on town as they came.
On his throne, mid the hills, Mon-te-zu-ma’s heart.
was full of dread. At last the Span-iards came in
sight of the fair cap-i-tal of the Az-tecs, Mex-i-co,
which lay like a pearl on the heart of the great lakes.
High o’er all its roofs rose the hill of Cha-pul-te-pec,
on which was the home of its king.. As they drew
near they were met by a train of lords with gifts of
gold and robes of rich furs and feath-ers, to say that
if they would turn back the king would give four
loads to Cor-tes and one to each of his men and a
sum each year to their king. But naught could stay
148 Heroes of History.

them now, and they kept on till they came to a bridge
near the gates of the town. Here Mon-te-zu-ma
‘came to meet them, borne in a pa-lan-quin by his
great lords. It shone with gold, and o’er his head
was a can-o-py of rich feath-er work, bright with
gems and hung with rich fringe. When he came
near he got out, and while all his own men bent low
he came to meet Cor-tes. He wore a cloak rich with
gems, and from his head hung long green plumes.
He spoke to Cor-tes in a kind, grave way, and said
he was glad to see him in his cap-i-tal, to which Cor-
tes gave him thanks for this speech and for his rich
gifts. Then Mon-te-zu-ma got in his pa-lan-quin
- once more and was borne back to the town. The
' Span-iards went in their track and got a fine house
to dwell in. Mon-te-zu-ma gave them rich gifts,
and said he knew they were of a race more great and
wise than his, and that he would rule his realm in the
name of their king. But this did not suit Cor-tes.
He knew he was in the heart of a strange land, and
that if he did not make a bold stroke all he had done
would be of nouse. So he got Mon-te-zu-ma to leave .
his own grand home and come. to dwell in his. This
was too much for the once great and proud ‘king.
Each day he grew more low and weak in mind; but
he was full of good will for the Span-iards in all his
orief, for it was not their fault that this had come to
Hernando Cortes. - 149

pass, he said—it was his fate. He gave them all
his great store of gold and swore to be true to their
king, to whom he gave up all his rights. It would
now seem that Mex-i-co had been won. But when
Cor-tes went on to strike a blow at their faith, he
found it was not so. All the way the souls of the
Span-iards had been made sick by the sight of the
tem-ples with their stains of the blood of men, and it
made them long to tear down these fierce gods and
make each of their homes a shrine of the true God.
But when the Az-tecs heard of this plan they gave
signs that they would fight. Just at this time, too, came
news that the gov-ern-or of Cu-ba had sent a force led
by a man of the name of Nar-va-ez, who was to take
Cor-tes’ place. Cor-tes set off to the coast, met and
beat Nar-va-ez, and was soon back in Mex-i-co,
where he found the Az-tecs in arms. Full of rage,
which they had long kept back, they fought for their
land and their shrines so well that the Span-iards were
in sore straits. At last they plead with Mon-te-zu-
ma to speak to the Az-tecs and try to calm them.
At first sight of him they were still, but when they
found from his words that he was on the side of the
foe, the tide of their wrath rose high once more.
«Base man!” they cried; “‘ you are fit but to weave
and spin,” and threw stones and shafts at him. One
stone struck him on the head, and he died in some
(50 Lleroes of [History.

days of the wound. One of his kin then took his.
place as king and led the war, and drove the Span-
1ards out of the town; but Cor-tes got more men
from Tlax-ca-la and put them down and won the land
of Mex-i-co. He now set to work to rule it with
great pomp, and staid there till he heard that his
foes had tried to turn his king from him. So he set
off for Spain, where the king met him in a most kind
way. He then came back to the New World and
went to the north, where he found out the Gulf and
-land of Cal-i-for-ni-a; but spies were on his track, so
he went back to Spain once more. He was now
old and worn out, and thé king paid small heed to
him, and he made up his mind to come back to Mex-
i-co; but on the way to the coast he died at Se-
ville. (aD. 1547.)

Fran-cis Pi-zar-ro. This man, who was of low
birth and did not know how to read or write, owes his
fame to the fact that he won for the crown of Spain
the rich land of Pe-ru. When a boy he was but a
swine-herd, but this way of life did not suit his bold
mind, so he set sail, like scores of young men, for the
New World. He was at Pan-a-ma when he heard
of Cor-tes’ great deeds in Mex-i-co, and the thought
came to him that south o’er the great hills there might
be a rich land like Mex-i-co. So with three more
men of his own stamp and too men to fight with
Francis Pizarro. 151

them he set sail for the south. They went through
a great deal ere they heard of such a land as they.
were in search of; but when at last they did they
were wild with joy. He kept on the coast of Pe-ru,
and the men who dwelt there were glad to see him and
told him of the great king, the In-ca, who kept rule
oer the land and who ARDn,
dwelt in a grand court We
in the midst of the realm.
At length, when he had
found out all that he had
a wish to know, he went
back to Pan-a-ma and
thence set sail for Spain,
where he got leave from
the king to try and win |
the land of Pe-ru, and ¥ !
was made gov-ern-or of \&
itin case he didso. He EN Mh
set sail for Pan-a-ma.at erence
once, and thence with a small force set off for Pe-ru.
Pe-ru, like Mex-i-co, was the home of a race who
had made not a few steps in civ-il-i-za-tion, Their
grand roads, cut in some spots through deep hills, and
their great, strong stone forts and fine tem-ples, parts
of which are still to be seen, show this. No man
held land. It was split in three parts, one of which


el? Heroes of History.

was held for the sun—whom they held to be a god
one for the In-ca, his high priest, and one for
all the folks. The lands of the sun gave the means
by which his tem-ples and grand rites were kept up,
as those of the In-ca did for his court and all his state
and pomp. The rest was dealt out in shares midst the
men, each of whom had to wed when he got to a fit
age. Then he got a lot of land, and more as each
child was born. But ere the men could till their own
land, they had to till first the lands of the sun, then
those of the In-ca, and next those of the sick and
the old. In the same way their great flocks of sheep
and lla-mas were the sun’s and the In-ca’s. When
they were slain each year the wool was kept by the
men of the In-ca, and as much was dealt out to each
man as he or his had need for. All had to work for
all; none were left to starve if too old to work or too
sick, but none might lead a life of ease, and no man
could grow rich, for he could earn naught. Their
faith taught them that there was one God, lord of all,
but they did not raise shrines to him. Next to him
they held to be the sun. The great tem-ple of the
sun was at Cuz-co, where the court was. It was the
pride of the land, and was said by those who went in
it to be a mine of gold, for each part shone with it.
Gold was to them “the tears wept by the sun,” but
they did not use it for coin, and did not dream how
Francis Pizarro. 153

much it was thought of in far-off parts of the world.
They laid on the shrine of the sun gums of sweet
scents, grain and flowers, and shed the blood of
beasts to please him, and at rare times the blood of a
man. They did not know as much of as-tron-o-my
as the Mex-i-cans, but knew well how to win from
the earth its best fruits. They knew, too, how to
weave cloth, work in gold and tin and copper, and
could cut gems as if they were clay. The king was —
the In-ca, who was high priest of the sun as well.
His dress was of fine wool of a rich hue, and he wore
a mass of rich gems. Round his head were folds on
folds of wool with a fringe of a red hue, while two
plumes of a rare bird stood up from it to mark his
rank. The birds which gave these plumes were
found in a wild place in the hills, and it was death to
take or kill them, as they were kept for naught but to
yield the head-gear of the king.

At the time Pi-zar-ro drew near the land was
rent with war. Two broth-ers, sons of the late king,
had been at strife, and one, At-a-hu-all-pa, had just
won and got the throne. But the hour which saw
him great was to see him low. Pi-zar-ro came on.
with speed to where the In-ca was. He went to see
him, and told him whence and why he came. The
In-ca said he could not talk that day, as he kept a
fast, but next day he would go to see them, and till
154 fleroes of History.

then they were to stay in a large house in the square
of the town. The Span-iards then took leave. Late
the next day the In-ca came to- see them. He
brought but a few men with him, and as he meant to
stay all night in the town, bade his men fix a house
for him near the Span-iards, which was known as
the ‘“‘ House of the Snake,” from the fact that a snake
was cut on its walls. Just a short time ere the sun
set he came in the town in great state, borne mid
songs of joy on a gold throne, clad in rich robes
bright with gems. But when he got to the square
not a Span-iard was to be seen save a priest, who
told him of the true faith, which, if he would take,
he said the Span-iards’ great king, Charles, would
leave him on his throne to rule in his name. Dark
grew the brow of the king as this speech was told to
him. ‘TI will hold my throne from no man,” he said,
“and as for my faith, I will not change it. There
is my God,” he went on, with a proud look at the
bright sun as it went down the sky. He then went
on in wrath to say the Span-iards must tell him the
cause of their strange acts, when a gun was shot off
and at once all the Span-ish force set on the In-di-
ans. Fierce was the fight round the throne, but at
last the Span-iards got the In-ca. He told them that
‘ve would fill the room in which they put him with
sold if they would set him free, and they let him
Charles V. of Germany. 155

think they would till they got it, and then they said
they had proof that he meant to rise with his race to
throw off the yoke of their king, and had him put to
death. Pi-zar-ro then went to Cuz-co and put the
half-broth-er of the king on the throne. He then
went and built the town of Li-ma, near the coast.
The new In-ca rose, too, to put down the Span-
iards, but Pi-zar-ro beat him. One of his own men,
Al-ma-gro, then broke off from him and fought him,
but Pi-zar-ro beat him and slew him, too. Pe-ru was
now his. But in this proud hour the son of Al-ma-
ero made the war burst out once more, and led a
band to the house where Pi-zar-ro was and slew him.
(A.D. 1541.)

Charles I. of Spain and V. of Ger-man-y.
I must now tell of the king of Spain for whom these
far-off lands were won. He was the grand-son of
Fer-di-nand and Is-a-bel-la of Spain on one side,
and of Max-i-mil-i-an of Aus-tri-a as well. He got
the crown of Spain when but six-teen years old, and
in four years from that time the em-per-or, Max-i-mil-
1-an, died. This broke the peace of Eu-rope and made
long and fierce wars, and I will tell you why. Max-i-
mil-i-an could give and did give to Charles the realm
of Aus-tri-a, Bel-gi-um and Hol-land, and a great deal
more of the land of Eu-rope, but he could not give him
the rights or name of Em-per-or of Ger-man-y or “of
156 — : Heroes of History.

the West.” This was the gift of sev-en e-lect-ors : the
prince or e-lect-or of Bran-den-burg, the king of Bo-
he-mi-a, the e-lect-ors of Sax-o-ny and the Pa-lat-i-

















































































































































































CHARLES V.

nate, and the arch-bish-ops of May-ence, Treves and |
Co-logne. These men could choose the prince they *
thought best for the post. Of those who sought to

Ue
Francis I. of France. 157

get it were Charles of Spain, Fran-cis I. of France,
and Hen-ry VIII. of Eng-land. When the e-lect-
ors met in due time at Frank-fort, their choice fell on
Fred-er-ick of Sax-o-ny, but he would not take the
post. He said they must bear in mind that Sol-y-man
the Mag-nif-i-cent had just come to the throne of the
Turks —a great prince from whom Eu-rope had
much to dread. It was no weak prince with small
lands that must hold the chief post in Eu-rope at
such a time, but one whose means and might would
be fit to cope with such a foe. Such was Charles,
he said, part of whose realm lay where it would feel
the first blow of the Turk as he came in-to Eu-rope,
and who spoke the tongue and was of the blood of
Ger-man-y. So all gave their vote to Charles and
made him Em-per-or of Ger-man-y.

Fran-cis I. of France. There were now three
young brave kings on the three great thrones of Eu-
rope, Charles, Fran-cis, and Hen-ry VIII. of Eng-
land, and they kept it in a stir till their death. Fran-
cis of France had a strong wish to get back the town
of Mil-an, in It-a-ly, to the French crown, which had
lost it in the last reign. So he set oft with his troops,
but when he got to the Alps—those great hills which
cut off France from It-a-ly—he heard that a great
force of Swiss, in the pay of the foe, was to meet him
on his way through them. This was sad news to
158 fleroes of History.

Fran-cis ; and as he sat in his tent and tried to think
what was best to do, he heard that a man of low rank,
whose work it was to till the soil, had come to the
camp and said he would lead the French o'er the
Alps by a way in which they would not meet the
Swiss. The king knew not if it was right to trust to
him, but one of his chief men and the pride of his
troops, the great Che-val-ier Ba-yard, said he would
go with the man and see if what he said could be done
or not. He found that it could, and though in spots
the troops had to make the road with a vast deal of
pains, the French got past the Alps. Now Co-lon-
na, the head of the troops of Mil-an, had not the least
dread that they would come, for, he said, so well
would the Swiss guard the Alps that if the French
did not fly o’er them, he knew not how they would
get past. But one day, as he sat down to eat in a
small town, he heard a cry, “The French! The
French!” and there was the foe in the street. They
took him and his men, and then swept on to the town
of Mar-ign-an-o. Here a fierce fight took place (Sept.
13, 1515), in which the French won, and put the foe to
flight with great loss. As was his wont, Ba-yard was
in the thick of the fray, and when it was o’er the king
sought out this great knight, “with-out fear and with-
out re-proach,” and knelt down at his feet, and said
Ba-yard should make him a knight. “But, sire,”
Francis L. of France. 159








said Ba-yard, “so
great a king is a
knight.” ‘No,
said the king, “one
Mmust@ “earn “his
knight-hood, and I
have done so in this
fight.” So Ba-yard
laid his sword on
the king and made
him knight, but
said he would not
use the blade more.
save to cut down «
the foes of Christ. =
Fran-cis was i
the lord of Mil-an,
~and = friends wiih
Charles, but in
three years’ time,
when both sought -
to be made em-:
per-or, they fell out,
and Fran-cis gotz
to be friends with.
Hen-ry VIII. of
Eng-land in his _
nace They met oe
to have a talk ata SAEs” FRAN-CIS
160 | Fleroes of [Tistory.

place twixt the towns of An-dres and Guis-mo, in the
north of France, and so fine did the kings and their
courts make it that itis known as the Field of the Cloth
of Gold. | They left with proofs of good-will on each
side, but Fran-cis woke from his dream of trust in
Hen-ry when he heard that on his way home he had
met his foe Charles and had a talk with him.

Long ere the Frenchking had got Mil-anin his grasp
the em-per-ors of Ger-man-y had held it, and Charles
V. had his mind made up to get it back. To this
end he gave bribes to the Con-sta-ble de Bour-bon,
who was of the kin of Fran-cis, and held by him in
deep trust, to come and fight on his side. He did so.
Fran-cis was now in sore straits. King Hen-ry had
made a league with Charles, and the troops of these
two kings swept down on France on the north, south
and east. But Fran-cis was a match for all, and
drove them out of France. Bour-bon then led his
troops to Mil-an, took Mil-an from the French, and
made them fall back on the way to France. The rear
of the troops was in charge of Ba-yard, who with a few
men kept off the foe from the rest of the troops. At
last this brave knight got a wound which he felt would
kill him. So he told his men to place him neath a
tree with his face to the foe, and then with his eyes on
the guard of his sword, which was of the form of a
cross, he gave all his thoughts to God. And thus
francis L. of France. 161

Bour-bon found him when he rode up, and told him
how sad it made him feel to see him so. ‘“ Feel not
for me,” cried the brave knight; “feel for those who
are false to their king, their land, and their oath.”
‘Then he died, and his corpse was sent home to France.
So great was his fame that it was met in each town
as if it were that of a king, on its way to his home,
where it was laid to rest with great pomp.

Fran-cis had now lost all he had in It-a-ly, but
Charles would not rest here. He strove to get hold
of the port of Mar-seilles, so that he could get to the
heart of France when he chose. But the brave folks
of that town, with the aid of the king’s troops, drove
him back. Fran-cis now made a bold strike for his
lands in It-a-ly. He took Mil-an, and then laid siege
to the town of Pa-vi-a; but here the troops of Charles
beat him, and bore him off to Spain and kept him in
jail there.

But though Charles had now got the best of the
French king, he was far from at peace. It was but a
few years since Lu-ther had made a split in the church,
and all Ger-man-y was rent with strife. The prince
of one realm held to the old creed, while those neath
his rule were stanch in the new; or while the prince of
the next place held to Lu-ther, those in his land
were warm for the pope. Charles, lord of all, was true
to the old faith, and fought all those who held the new.
162 fleroes of Fistory.

In the midst of all this, the poor men whose life-work
it is to till the soil, stung by the fierce wrongs done to
them by those of high rank, rose and fought them.
Wild and fierce were the deeds done in the Peas-ants’
War, as it was known (a.D. 1526), ere it was put down.
Great was the grief in France o’er the fact that their
king was in jail. Ass time went on his health gave way,
and at last he lay near death. But just then Charles V.
camein. They hada talk, and Fran-cis said he would
give up Bur-gun-dy to Charles, pay a large sum, and
give up ail claim to Mil-an if he were set free. So
Charles let him go, and when he sprang once more on
French soil, he swung his hat with its long plumes o’er
his head and cried, “Once more I amaking!” But once
in his own court, he said he had been made give in to
Charles, so was not bound to keep to his word. So
the war broke out once more. So much had the folks
of It-a-ly grown to hate Charles by this time that they
now, with Pope Clem-ent at their head, took sides
with the French king. So Bour-bon led a vast host
_of Charles’ troops through It-a-ly with fire and sword,
to sack Rome. In the fight at its gates Bour-bon
was slain. Charles said he had not meant his men to
act in such a way, and the pope made up with him.
But the wars twixt Fran-cis and Charles went on all
the same. A fresh dread of the Turks was now felt.
Sol-y-man the Mag-nif-i-cent led his troops as far as
Francis 1. of France. 163

the town of Vi-en-na, and laid siege to it. The brave
men then drove him back, and from that time Charles
V. kept a watch on the Turks, and did not let them
in Eu-rope. He led a force to Tu-nis, on the shore
of Af-ri-ca, and freed those who held the true faith
and were in chains there. This won him the good-
will of all Eu-rope, while Fran-cis, who madea league
with Sol-y-man to get aid in his wars, has put a dark
blot on his life by the act. The French king did not
mean to let Mil-an go, so though he was now at peace
with Charles, he sought grounds to fight once more.
These were not hard to find, and Charles, who had
made a league with Hen-ry of Eng-land, was soon in
France once more at the head of a vast force. But as
in the first years of his reign Fran-cis had won a great
fight o’er Charles, so he was now to beat him at the
close of his reign in the great fight of Cer-1-solles.
(AD.1544.) Peace was then made. War would have
burst out once more, no doubt, but ere a long time
more had gone by Fran-cis and Hen-ry were both
dead. (aD. 1547.) Fran-cis had a deep love for the
things of peace as well as for war. He had great
love for men who had skill in the fine arts, and brought
them to his court and gave proof of how much he
thought was due to them.

“When Charles V. sought the aid of each Prot-es-
tant prince to help him fight the Turks, he told them
164 fTeroes of Flrstory.

they might hold their creed in peace, but when he
had put the Turks down, he said none must dare to
spread the new faith. This led to a long, fierce war,
which came to an end in 1552 with the Peace of Pos-
sau. Four years from that time Charles V. gave up
the crown to his son Phil-ip, and went to live in a
home of monks in Spain, where he died. (4. 1558.)

Will-iam the Si-lent. In the time of Charles V.
the lands which we know as. Hol-land and Bel-gi-um
were known as the Low Coun-tries. They were
made up of a lot of small states, each neath the rule
of its own prince, each of which had its own court
and made its own laws, but held to a league with the
rest, which was in some faint way like the bond which
links our own States. Thus there was one court to
rule all their courts, and in times of great storm and
stress each state sent a priest, a lord, and one man of
plain rank to some town to see what was best to be
done. ‘These men were known as the States-Gen-er-
al, but they could make no laws; all they could do was
to plead with the king for their rights. The men of the
Low Coun-tries had won the soil with great toil from
the sea, and had made great wealth by the arts of
peace. Their broad plains were thick with large towns,
the scenes of brisk trade. The head of these was Ant-
werp, which was to the rest of Eu-rope what Lon-don
is in our day. At her quays lay ships of all climes,
William the Stlent. 165

and men of each race were seen in her streets. The
Low Coun-tries had been part of the great realm of

Charles V., and he had been dear to their hopes, for



WILL-IAM THE SI-LENT.

he was born there, and had the frank, free ways dear
to their hearts. But his son Phil-ip was cold and
proud, and made a hedge of pomp and state twixt
166 Fteroes of Listory.

him and them, and as soon as he had heard their oaths
to be true to him, put his sis-ter, Mar-ga-ret of Par-ma,
to reign in his name, and set off for Spain, which he
made his home for the rest of his life. As time went
on things did not go wellin the Low Coun-tries. The
men there thought Phil-ip broke in on their rights, and
when at length he set up the court of the In-qui-si-
tion, to seek out those who held the new faith, there
was a wild burst of rage. As I have said, the
Low Coun-tries’ chief end was trade, and to this end
Jews, Lu-ther-ans, Cal-vin-ists and all sorts of men
were let dwell there in peace. So they said to have
a stern court like that in their midst would kill their
trade. But the king would not hear. He was as
firm as a rock in the faith of Rome, and said it must
be the sole faith in the land. Nor would he have
a change in the laws which they felt press on them.
The end of this was that there grew up a league, in
which those of all faiths took part, which had for its
end to get the rights of the land back. Four hun-dred
of the league set off for Brus-sels, and told the re-gent
of their views. Mar-ga-ret told them she would tell the
king and leave it to him to say yes or no. When she
had seen the band of them she got quite a start, but
one of her lords told her not to mind them, for they
were but a set of beg-gars. This was told by a lord
of the name of Bre-de-ro-de at a great feast to the
William the Silent. 167
league, and then some one gave a great shout, “Vi-
vant les Gueux!” (Long live the beg-gars.) Then
Bre-de-ro-de went out of the room and came back with
a staff and a bowl of wood such as those who had to

































































































































































































































THE DYKES IN HOL-LAND.

beg made use of, and these went from hand to hand
round the board, while each man swore to give his
life and goods for the cause, and the hall rang with
mirth. And from this time the men of the league
were known as the “Gueux.” As time went on things
168 Heroes of History.

grew worse, and some of the men of the new creeds
did their best to rouse the minds of men to a scorn of
the old faith, till they got to such a pitch that they
burst in the great, grand church-es and tore down the
choice works of art from their walls, and burnt or tore
them to shreds. Up to this time Will-iam, who was
known as Prince of Or-ange, from a town of France
which had been left to him, had held with the men of
the Low Coun-tries in their plans. He was one of the
great lords of the land, and dwelt in a fine house
in Brus-sels, and led a free, gay life, but for all this
kept his thoughts so close that he got to be known as
“the Si-lent.” Two more great lords, Eg-mont and
Horn, thought as he did. But when they saw the
bad work of the mob, Eg-mont and Horn, who were
firm in the old faith, drew back, and great throngs with
them. Or-ange, in whom no faith had deep root, had
no care save for the law. AMll gave the re-gent no rest
till she gave leave to those of the new faith to meet
just as did those of the old faith. But there was a
great change when the king sent troops to Mar-ga-
ret. Then she took all the towns which shut their
gates, and made them bend to her will. Then she
said all the great lords must take an oath to do as
the king said. Or-ange would not take this, and when
he heard that the Duke of Al-va was on his way with
a great force to put down the men of the Low Coun-
Don John of Austria. 169

tries, he lost no time, but set off to his lands in Ger- ~
man-y. Hard and fierce was the rule of Al-va in
truth. His court was known as the Coun-cil of Blood.
He put to death the great lords Eg-mont and Horn,
and scores more, while a great throng fled from the
land so poor that the name of Gueux was too true
for a jest. Al-va’s course made Or-ange seek, at ll
costs, to slay him. He got a band of troops to fight
by land, and got some men of mark to man ships
with crews and fight the foe by sea. These men were
known as “‘ Beg-gars of the Sea.” For long years
the war went on twixt Spain and the Low Coun-tries,
and I will turn from it now and tell of the brave
deeds wrought in the south.

Don John of Aus-tri-a. This great man was
the son of Charles V., who at his death gave him in
charge to Phil-ip. He grew up at court, and was
wild to win fame on fields of war. So the king let
him go to put down the Moors, who just then rose in
Spain, and he did this so well that he put him in
charge of the troops to drive back the Turks. The
pope, Pi-us V., had made up a league with Ven-ice
and Spain for this work, and when all had been made
fit set off for the port of Mes-si-na, in It-a-ly, where
his ship lay with the great fleet. The name of it
was the Ae-a/, and it was built for strength and speed,
but was done up in a style that made it seem more fit
170 fTeroes of fistory.

to have a nice sail in than for war. Shapes of birds
and beasts were cut on it and on the long stern, and
all gilt, while long silk bands of rich hues swept to
and fro in the soft air. On a fine day in the fall of
the year the vast fleet stood out to sea. One of the.
pope’s chief men, clad in rich robes, stood on the mole
to bless each ship as it went by. As they went by
coasts in which they could see the work of the, Turks
in the bare fields and burnt towns, they grew strong
in their will to drive them back. At length Don John
heard that the Turks were in the gulf of Le-pan-to,
and made for it. At length one morn the watch sung
out, “A sail! A sail!” and soon told that all the Turks’
fleet was in sight. At once Don John had a gun set
off—the sign of war—while at the same time the
great flag of the league was swung out to the air.
On came the 250 ships of the Turks with their bright
gilt prows bright in the sun. It was just near noon,
and all was still as death, save for the guns which both
set off. At last the yells of the Turks rose, and they
met. Fierce and long was the fight, and great the
loss of blood, but Don John won, and the Turks got
a blow which long broke their might. (Oct. 7, 1571.)
The fame of Don John grew high for this feat, and
Phil-ip thought he might win back the Low Coun-
tries. So he put him in the place of Al-va. But he
did not give him great or prompt aid, and step by
flenry LV. of France. 171

step those lands got
free. At last they *‘
said they would not
hold to the crown of.
Spain. Things were. ~~
in this pass when
Don John died. (a.v.
15/78.) Or-ange kept
up the war, but a
price was set on his
head of 25,000 gold
crowns, and a base
wretch shot him fi
dead. (4D.1584.) In
time the south part of @
the Low Coun-tries ‘
came back to Spain,
but Hol-land and the
rest of the north kept

a free state.

Hen-ry IV. of
France. Hen-ry:
ITI., king of France, ©
and grand-son of
Fran-cis I., had no
son. The next heir
was Hen-ry of Na-: HEN-RY IV,







172 . fleroes of Ffistory.

varre, a small state on the edge of France and Spain.
He was of the faith of Cal-vin, or a Hu-gue-not. For
a long time the wars had been kept up twixt the men
of the old and new faiths, and when this state of things
came to pass, the pope said Hen-ry could: not have
the crown of France if he did not take the old faith.
Those of the old faith then made a league to keep him
out, and chose for their head the Duke of Guise, or
Bal-a-fre, as he was known from a scar on his cheek.
France was rent in three bands, the king’s (Hen-ry
III.) band, Bal-a-fre’s band, and Hen-ry of Na-
varre’s band. The poor, worn-out king, who thought
he had more to dread from Bal-a-fre than from Na-
varre, had Bal-a-fre put to death, which made things
worse, and drove him to join hands with the Hu-gue-
nots. But he was soon slain by a monk of the name
of Clem-ent. The Hu-gue-nots now made Hen-ry
of Na-varre king of France, but he had to fight for it
with the men of the league. He was a brave man,
and had great skill in war, and at last won the great
fight of I-vry. He told his troops to watch for his
white plume in the fight and go where it led. So
bright and frank and gay were his ways that his men
had a deep love for him when he won this fight... (ap.
1590.) At length his friends, who saw what a good
king Hen-ry would make, got him to turn to the old
faith, and one day he went in great state to the Church
Hugh O'Neill of Ireland. 173

of St. Den-is, in Par-is, and made his act of faith.
In a few years he put a stop to the Hu-gue-not wars
by the E-dict of Nan-tes, which gave them the right |
to serve God in their own way. All things now had
a fair look in France, for no king had been so dear to
all ranks. But one day, as he rode through the
streets, a man made a rush at him and gave him two
blows in the side with a knife and slew him. (4D.
1610. |

- Hugh O’Neill of Ire-land. While Hen-ry IV.
was king in France, a brave man rose in Ire-land,
stung by the wrongs done to his kin. The O'Neill,
as he was known, at first did well, and won lots of —
towns from the Eng-lish; so Queen E-liz-a-beth sent
the Earl of Es-sex to puthim down. This brave man
felt for the wrongs of the O’Neill and his race, and
they met, far from their troops, at a small stream, and
had a talk which made them good friends. But the
queen, who did not think Es-sex had done much to
check O’Neill, brought him home, and sent Lord
Mont-joy in his place. This harsh, fierce man fought
the I-rish with fire and sword, and tore up the seeds
from the ground, so as to leave them naught to eat,
that they might starve to death. This plan did its
work well, and the yoke of Eng-land was soon once
more on the land from sea to sea. Spain tried to
give aid, and sent fif-ty ships to the port of Kin-sale,
174 fleroes of History.

but the Eng-lish lay twixt them and the O'Neill.
One of the I-rish chiefs, O’Don-nell, got round by
way of the bogs, and he and the Span-iards made
a dash at the camp of the Eng-lish. But the Eng-
lish beat, and the men of Spain had to sail for home.
O’Neill fled to the north, where he soon came to
terms, for he saw the game was up. He gave up
the name of “the O’Neill,’ and was known as the
Earl of Ty-rone, and gave his word to take no more
aid from strange na-tions to throw off the yoke of

Eng-land. Then they left him in peace with his
lands. But spies were on his track, and at last they
got up a tale that he was at work in a plot to free his
land. His friends, whe knew that it was made up to
take his life and lands, made him and his friend, the
Earl of Tyr-con-nel, flee to Rome, where they dwelt
till their deaths. The O'Neill died in 1615.

- Gus-ta-vus Va-sa of Swe-den. In this age
there was brave work done in the far north, in Swe-
den, by a brave young lord. For more than one hun-
dred years ere his time Nor-way, Swe-den and Den-
mark had all been neath the rule of the king of the
Danes. As time went on these kings of the Danes
grew harsh to the Swedes, and they grew to long fora
king of their own. So at last they tried to set one up.
This made the king of the Danes full of rage, and as
Gustavus Vasa of Sweden. 17 5

he was strong and great, he put a stop to their work,

and had nine-ty of the chief lords of the land brought













A MON-ARCH IN DIS-GUISE.

out in the great square at Stock-holm, where their
heads were cut off. Sick and full of dread at this
176 LTeroes of fistory.

sight, the folks shrunk off to their homes, but found
they were not to close their eyes on the scene, for rain
came down in streams, and bore the blood of the slain
from the square through the streets past their homes.
So this sight got to be known as the “ Blood Bath,”
and from that time the hate of the Swedes for the king
of the Danes grew fierce, and kept them from peace
or rest till they could throw off his yoke. The hour
had now come; and the man was at hand. At the
time of the “blood bath,” a young lord was hid in
one of the great woods of Swe-den, where he did
work in the guise of a farm-er. Then he went to
work in the mines, where he heard of the death of his
sire, who was slain with the rest of the great lords.
So he at once set to work to urge the men who were
at work with him in the mines to rise up and free the
land. At length he told them who he was, and soon
had quite a band of brave, strong men at his back.
The Danes tried to turn the Swedes from him, and
said he was a reb-el, but it was of no use, they clung
to him more and more. So Chris-tian, the king of
the Danes, sent a force of 8000 men to put him down.
They were led by the gov-ern-or whom Chris-tian
had put to rule the Swedes, and when the troops had
got to a wild, bare part of the land, where Gus-ta-vus
and his men were, he could not make out where all
the Swedes whom he saw drawn up to fight came_
Ivan the Terrible of Russia. 177

from, nor where they got food in so poor a place.
When he said this to his men, they told him that
when the Swedes could get naught else they drank of
the springs, and ate bread made from the bark of the
fr-tree. «Then if this be so we may as well go back,”
said the chief of the Danes, “for no mere men like us
could hope to beat men who live on wood and wa-
ter.” So he led his men back to where they came
fom, When this news spread it put hope in the
hearts of all ranks, and the plain, strong men whose
work it was to till the land left their ploughs to join
Gus-ta-vus’ ranks. He soon had 20,000 men neath
his flag, and each field he won brought more. And
so bit by bit the whole of the land was freed from the
yoke of the Danes. In the mean time the Danes
crew sick of King Chris-tian and his harsh, fierce
acts, so they took him from the throne and put him
in jail. Then the lords of the Swedes met and cast
votes for king, and the choice fell on Gus-ta-vus Va-
sa, as was but just and right. So, mid great joy, the
crown was set on this brave young lord’s head, and
he kept the rule till his death (A.D. 1560).

I-van the Ter-ri-ble of Rus-sia. Rus-sia, too,
that great land next to Swe-den, had her great man
in this age, though his fame is not of a nice kind, as
you may see by his nick-name. Long ere his time,
in the south part of what we know as Rus-sia, a race
i78 Heroes of Listory.

of the name of Slavs had built towns, and no doubt
would have come in time to be a great state but for
the fact that they were all the time at war. So at
last they sent to the Swedes for a chief to rule them,
and one of the name of Ru-rik came with a band of
North-men (4D. 862). The Slavs gave the name of
Russ to these new men; hence the word Rus-sia.
From that time the line of Ru-rik kept the rule, till
a vast horde of Tar-tars came from A-si-a, sent by
Gen-ghis Khan (jen-gis kawn), who had fought his
way to be king of a large part of that land, but
sought to rule the whole world. ‘As there is but
one sun in the sky,” said this proud man, “so there
should be but one king on earth.” So fierce and
swift were the Tar-tars at their work, that the Rus-
sians had no time to fight. “Town on town was burnt;
bags full of ears cut from the heads of men were sent
to their king as a proof of how well they did their
work. At length news came that the Grand Khan
was dead, so the chief of the Tar-tars went back to
Chi-na to see to his own share of the spoils; but ere he
went he built a grand pal-ace, and gave it the name
of the Gold-en Tent, and the lands which he kept
round it the Gold-en Horde. He left each prince of
Rus-sia to rule his own realm, but as his slaves, and
if feuds rose twixt them they had to come to the Gold
Tent to have them set right. This meant no slight
loan the Terrible of Russia. 179

thing, for the way was long, o’er wild steppes, on which
some died of thirst on the way. More could not get
the rich gifts which the men of the khan had to get
ere they would let them in the court, and more yet
were put to death ere ,

they could say a word é)

in their own cause, if
some foe had got the
ear of the khan ere
they came. But as
the years went on
the khans lost their
strength; their lands
were cut up mid a
great throng of small -
kings, and Rus-sia 7;
erew strong. Each
prince made a league
with the rest, and at
its head was the
Grand Prince, who
dwelt in Mos-cow;
and so when a new knan came to the throne and sent
his im-age, to ask for gold, the grand prince flung it



- I-VAN THE TER-RI-BLE.

down on the ground and broke it with his feet. Then

he slew all the khan’s men save one, whom he sent

back to the khan to tell what he had done. This
180 Heroes of History.

prince was I-van (e-van) the Great, and he freed Rus-
sia. This new line of kings were proud and fierce, but
the worst of them was I-van the Ter-ri-ble, who came
to the throne in 1533. He got this name when but
thir-teen years of age, from the fact that he had one of
his lords torn to death by hounds for some act which
did not please him. In place of Grand Prince, he had
men call him Czar. I-van was brave in war, and drove
the Tar-tars from a great part of the land, and won
the whole course of the great stream of the Vol-ga.
He brought the Cos-sacks, a race which dwelt on the
banks of the Don, neath his rule too. But these feats
could not make up for his harsh, fierce ways. One
time he made up his mind to slay the folks of the town
of Nov-go-rod, who had told him how bad he was.
So he set off, but when he got to its gates he was met
by a good old priest, with the face of a saint, who with
stern voice and mien bade him pause, for if he tore but
one hair from the head of a child in the town, he should
die by a stroke from on high. As he spoke the sky
grew dark and a storm rose. And the bad king, full
of fear, drew back and left the town in peace. But in
time he grew wroth once more with the town, and now
there was no brave priest to save it. I-van put 60,000
men to death, so that the streets ran with blood. But
in his old age this man, who had shown that he was.
at best but a brute, did a deed which was the fit crown
Wallenstein of Germany. 181

of such a life. He had but one son, who was dear to
him as the sole heir of the vast realm he had built up.
But one day, in a rage, he struck the youth a blow
with his great i-ron staff, and slew him on the spot.
Great was his grief. All he had won was as naught
to him, and he had made up his mind to leave the
throne and go to live in a home of monks when death
laid its hand on him. (aD. 1584.)

CGHAPLER: Vil:
HEROES OF THE SEV-EN-TEENTH CEN-TU-RY.

From A.D. 1600 To A.D. 1700.

Wal-len-stein of Ger-man-y. In this land the
strife twixt those of the old and of the new faiths went
on, and led to the Thir-ty Years’ War, which got its
start in this way: In the land of Bo-he-mi-a those of
the new faith had put up a church in two parts of the
land held by the Arch-bish-op of Prague, who was of
the old faith. The Em-per-or Mat-thi-as told his men
to close them. Those of the new faith rose to have
this not done, and when they were at war thought they
might as well keep it up to get a king for their own
o

182 fleroes of History.

land, and make it free from Aus-tri-a, of which it was
apart. So they got a prince of the new faith, Fred-
er-ick, to rule them, but the troops of the Em-per-or
beat them in a fight at the White Hill, and Fred-er-
ick, who was known as the Winter King, from the fact
that his reign was but for that time, fled. Then Chris-
tian, king of Den-mark, took up arms for his cause, and
those of the old faith, who had made a league, chose
a man of the name of Til-ly to lead their troops. Then
Count Wal-len-stein, of Bo-he-mi-a, said to the Em-
per-or Fer-di-nand, who had come to the throne on
the death of Mat-thi-as, that he would get up a band
of men and fight for him. At first Fer-di-nand thought
he was mad, but soon found he was a shrewd man who
could make his great scheme work. He was soon in
the field with 30,000 men, beat those of the new faith,
and drove the king of Den-mark from the land. But
Wal-len-stein’s men soon got to be the dread of the
land. They were paid men who had no care for
whom they fought, and whose chief end was spoil.
So at last the chief men of the league got Fer-di-nand
to put Til-ly in Wal-len-stein’s place. So Wal-len-
stein went off to his home, where he dwelt like a king.

Gus-ta-vus A-dol-phus of Swe-den. Til-ly
bore hard on the troops of the new faith, so their chief
men sought the aid of Gus-ta-vus A-dol-phus of Swe-
den, who came with a large force. When Fer-di-nand
Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden. : 183

heard of it he said, with a laugh, “This is but a snow
king, who will soon melt.” But Gus-ta-vus swept

== ‘ih sli”



Kea SSS SS
eee NR

THE COUNT DE TIL-LY GLOAT-ING O-VER THE MAS-SA-CRE.

through the land, made Til-ly flee, and drove out those
of the old faith from their homes. At last he beat
I S4 fleroes of #, eslory.

Til-ly in a great fight at Breit-en-feld. Til-ly was
slain, and near all the land fell in Gus-ta-vus’ hands.




OW aX = = =



GUS-TA-VUS AND HIS QUEEN EN-TER-ING MU-NICH.

But the greed of his men made the folks hate them,
and once they made up a band and hid in the birch
fem Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden. 185



BFE ee EES tome SaaS

DEATH OF GUS-TA-VUS A-DOL-PHUS.

woods, and as the Swedes went by made a rush out
on them and slew a great mass. Ass the snow king
186 Lleroes of History.

would not melt, and Til-ly was dead, Fer-di-nand
had to call Wal-len-stein once more to his aid. The
count made terms more like a king than aught else,
but Fer-di-nand had to yield to them. jWal-len-stein
was soon in the field with a large force, and went to
meet Gus-ta-vus at Furth, near the quaint old town
of Nu-rem-berg, and kept him shut up there for quite
a time, till at last he made a dash out and was beat.
In two months’ time these two great men met on the
held of Lutz-en. On the day of the fight a thick fog
hid each side from sight. But Gus-ta-vus, clad in his
buff coat and his white hat with its green plume, led
the way. But he got caught in a knot of Wal-len-
stein’s men, who shot him dead. (a.v. 1632.) Mad
with rage, the Swedes fought till night came on; then
a lot of fresh troops came up for Wal-len-stein, and
they fell back and left him the field. Wal-len-stein,
who could not be said to have won the fight, then
went off to his home. The Swedes made no move
and he kept so still that doubts sprang up in the minds
of the chief men of the old faith as to his truth. At
last they got to feel so sure that he was in league with
the foe that they took him from his post as head of the
troops. One night some of his own men burst in his
room, where he was in bed, and slew him, with a cry
that he was false to the cause.

Lou-is XIV. of France. This great king kept
i

_â„¢

hi



LOU-IS XIV,
188 fleroes of £1. istory.

Eu-rope in a stir all through the last half of this age.
His first great war was fought to get hold of that part
of the Low Coun-tries which was still held by Spain,
and which he said was his queen’s, who had been a
prin-cess of Spain. He made up this claim to keep



LOU-IS XIV. AND HIS COURT.

it from the grasp of Aus-tri-a, to whom it should have
gone by right.

Tu-renne and Con-dé. These were his chief
men of war, and so great was their skill that they made
France reach a high point of fame. In one year they
had won Bel-gi-um and a great stretch of land on the
east of France to her realm. In dread, Hol-land and
Swe-den made a league to check France, and made
Turenne and Conde. 189



THE GREAT CON-DE.

her give up the lands on the east. This act of the
Dutch drew Lou-is’ wrath on them, and he swept

Hol-land with his troops. The Dutch, who had two
190 fLerves of History.

men of the name of De Witt at the head of things,
drove them out, and put a new man in their place.
Will-iam, Prince of Or-ange. This was the
man whom the Dutch chose, and a good choice they
made, He was ofthe line of Will-iam the Si-lent, and
much like him. He had the dykes cut, so that the sea



WILL-IAM III. RE-CEIV-ING THE BISH-OPS.

swept o'er the land, and the French had to flee. . Hol-
land could bear this, for her chief wealth was in her
ships, then at the head of the trade of the world. Then
Will-iam got Spain, Aus-tri-a, Prus-sia and Ger-
man-y to fight France. Tu-renne led his part of the
troops of France o’er the Rhine to meet the troops of
the al-lies, and won field on field, but at last in a fight
oe — Yi
i
NG:

y

“s

|













































































Ri ;

RY,

OF OR-ANGE AND QUEEN MA

IAM III.

WILL-
































DEATH OF TU-RENNE.

in the heart of Ger-man-y he was slain by a chance
ball. (July 27, 1675.)

The Prince of Con-dé had been sent to wage the
war in Hol-land. He met the Prince of Or-ange in
John Sobteskt of Poland. 193

the great fight of Se-nef, which cannot be said to have
been won by him or Or-ange. On Tu-renne’s death
Con-dé was sent to take his place, and while the king
was hard at work in the north, where he took three
great towns, Con-dé did well in the south, and won
Al-sace for the king. But both foes were soon glad
to make peace, and Con-dé went off to his grand home
in France, where he died in 1686. For the next ten
years Louis XIV. gave his time to arts of peace, and
made France great in all ways.
John So-bi-es-ki of Po-land. The Turks were
still the scourge of parts of Eu-rope, and in the year
1683 they came as far as Vi-en-na, and tried hard to
take that town. The Em-per-or Le-o-pold fled, and
though the brave men of Aus-tri-a did their best to
hold it, it was clear that they must soon give it up if
they did not get help. So Le-o-pold sent to So-bi-
es-ki, the brave king of Poland, who had fought the
Turks so well that they had learnt to dread his name,
to ask him to come and drive them back. He didso,
and news was sent to Vi-en-na to try and hold out
yet a while, for help was on the way. So each day a>
watch was set on high points, to catch the first glimpse
of it asit came. And at last one morn in the fall, as
the mist rose from the land, a great force was seen, and
at their head rode on a bay horse a strong, well-built
man, past the prime of life, with dark hair, eyes and
| 194 Fleroes of fHistory.

beard, clad in blue, while a man near him bore on the
end of a lance a white plume. This was John So-bi-
es-ki, who had not been born to the throne of Po-land,
but had won it by his brave acts. On he came with
his face to the camp of the Turks at the gate of the
town. A fierce fight took place, whose end was the
rout of the Turks. Their camp, with all its rich spoils,
fell in the hands of the Chris-tians. But So-bi-es-k1
did not stop here. He drove the Turks with great
loss back to their own bounds, and broke their might.

I will now go back to the king of France, who soon
brought on war once more. He laid claim to parts of
Ger-man-y, and Will-iam of Or-ange, to stop him, got
Aus-tri-a, Prus-sia and Spain to make a league, known
as the League of Augs-burg—the town where it was
made. Lou-is soon made war on the league, but the
same year that he did so (1688) Will-iam of Or-ange
got to be king of Eng-land in place of James II., whom
the Eng-lish drove out. Lou-is took the part of James
II. and tried hard to get him back his throne.

The Duke of Marl-bor-ough. In the nine
years’ war of this league Will-iam’s best man of war
was Gen-er-al Church-ill, who had fought well for
James II., and whom Will-iam, as soon as he got the
crown of Eng-land, made the Duke of Marl-bor-ough.
He was a brave man and had great skill in war, but
was full of craft and true to none. James had thought
The Duke of Marlborough. | 196

him true as steel till he heard he had gone to Will-
iam; and while he fought for Will-iam he wrote to



THE DUKE OF MARL-BOR-OUGH.

James in France, to pave the way to bring him back
to his own. Will-iam met James II. and his troops
196 fleroes of History.

at the stream of the Boyne, in Ire-land (Ju-ly 1, 1690),
and beat them, and James went off to France and gave
up all hope of the throne. In two years’ time the Eng-
lish fleet, neath Ad-mi-ral Rus-sell, beat the French
in the great sea fight of La Hogue (May 18, 1692).
There was not much else of note done in this war, and
it was brought to an end by the Peace of Rys-wick.

CHAPTER VIII.
HE-ROES OF THE EIGH-TEENTH CEN.-TU-RY.
From A.D. 1700 To A.D. 1800.

Prince Eu-gene of Sa-voy. The peace twixt
Will-iam and Lou-is did not last long. They had
made a bond that when the king of Spain died his
crown should go to the E-lect-or of Ba-va-ri-a, while
Lou-is’ grand-son, who had a claim on it, should get
the isles of Sic-i-ly in its place. But when, in 1700,
_ the king of Spain died, he gave his crown to Lou-is’

, - grand-son, and that king let him take the throne of

Spain. As this made the race of Lou-is too strong,
Prus-sia, Aus-tri-a, Eng-land, Hol-land and 5a-

voy made a league to fight France and Spain. In
Prince Eugene of Savoy. 197 .

the year 1702 King Will-iam was killed by a fall from
his horse, but Queen Anne, who got the throne of
-Eng-land in his place, let Marl-bor-ough lead her
troops. Aus-tri-a had a great man of war, too, in
Prince Eu-gene, who fought with him. This prince
had been born in France, and when he grew up tried
to get a place in the troops of France, but Lou-is
would not give it to him. So he left there:and went
to Aus-tri-a, where the Em-per-or Le-o-pold gave
him a place in his troops to fight the Turks. He
did great things and won great fame in that war, and
thus got the troops of Aus-tri-a to lead in the war of.
the Span-ish suc-ces-sion, which now broke out.
He first fought and beat the French in It-a-ly, and
then led his troops to join the Eng-lish led by Marl-
bor-ough. In views, plans and tastes he was much
like the duke, and thus they got on well and did
great things. The first great field they won from
France was Blen-heim (Aug. 3, 1704). For this
Eng-land gave the duke a grand house in a great
park, to which he gave the name of Blen-heim.
Prince Eu-gene then fought the French in It-a-ly
and got it from their grasp. Then the field of war |
got to be the Low Coun-tries, when the prince and
the duke beat the French in three great fights — Ra-
mil-lies (1706), Ou-de-narde (1708), and Mal-pla-quet
(1709). But the next year Queen Anne took Eng-
198 Heroes of Fistory.

land out of the league, then Hol-land went too, so
Aus-tri-a had to make peace with France. (ap. 1714.)
The duke’s wife had been Queen Anne’s great
_ friend, but she was so proud she tried to rule the queen
in all things, so at last she cast her off and put the
duke from his post as head of the troops, and the
last years of the great Marl-bor-ough’s life were spent
far from camp and court. He died in 1722. Lou-is
XIV. had died in 1715, so the sole great man of this
war left was Prince Eu-gene, who fought the wars of
Aus-tri-a till his death in 1736. He beat the Turks
on the field of Pe-ter-war-dein in 1716, and took
the strong town of Bel-grade from them the next
year. He was a good man who read good books
most of his spare time, and when all had been made
fit for a great fight he sat down in his tent and read
just as if he was at home.

Pe-ter the Great of Rus-sia. This strange
king came to the throne in 1689. He knew he had
a great land, but that the folks had to learn all sorts
of trades and arts ere it could take high rank in the
world. So he at once learnt to be a sail-or, to give
the men heart to man ships and sail out to strange
seas. Then he set off to Hol-land and learnt how
to build ships and all sorts of trades.

Charles XII. of Swe-den. Pe-ter had a great

wish to have a way from his realm to the heart of
Charles X11. of Sweden, ° — - 199

Eu-rope through the Bal-tic Sea, but as Swe-den runs
far down in it, he knew she could make it hard for his
ships to get through that way if she chose. So when
Charles XII., a youth, came to the throne of Swe-den,
he tried with Po-land and Den-mark to wrest his realm



from him. But Charles, young as he was, had great
skill in war. He beat Den-mark and made her sue
for peace, then swept on Pe-ter with a force of 8000
Swedes and beat him in the great fight of Nar-va.
(a.p.1700.) He then beat Po-land and was on his way
200 Fleroes of LHistory.

to Rus-sia, when he met Ma-zep-pa, the chief of the
Cos-sacks, who said he and his men would fight for
him. Ma-zep-pa was a Pole, and in youth had been
the page of a lord who, for some act of his which
made him wroth, had him bound on the back of a
wild horse, which was set free to roam where he might.
The steed bore Ma-zep-pa to the great plains where
dwelt the Cos-sacks, who were kind to him and
made him their chief. His plan to help Charles did
not work well, for Pe-ter got wind of it and so took
means to keep them back. The long march wore out
Charles’ troops, so Pe-ter beat him in the fight of Pol-
ta-va (1709), and he had to flee to the Turks. He
staid with them for some years and tried to make
Tur-key fight Rus-sia, and at last she did, but was
soon beat and made peace (1711). When Charles
came back to his own land at last he fought Den-mark
and tried to take Nor-way from her, but was slain at
the siege of Fred-er-icks-hall (1718). Pe-ter got to be
lord of the Bal-tic, ports were built, and trade was
kept up with the rest of the world. — He gave the rest
of his time to the things of peace; built schools, made
laws for the good of the folks, and tried in all ways to
make them less wild and rough. He met his death
by his wish to help a boat in sore need, which made
him jump in a cold lake and catch a cold which gave
him his death (1725).
Frederick the Great of Prussia. 201

Fred-er-ick the Great of Prus-sia. In ae the
Em-per-or of Aus-tri-a died. He had no male hers,







































































CHARLES XII. STAT-ING THE CON-DI-TIONS OF PEACE.

so left the crown to his daugh-ter, Ma- ri-a [he-re-sa.
This made the war of ane Aus-tri-an suc-ces-sion
202 fleroes of fistory.

break out at once. France, Spain and Prus-sia all
had an eye on some part of the poor queen's realm,
and meant to wrest it from her. Eng-land and Hol-
land stood by her. The first to move was Fred-er-ick
of Prus-sia, who took Si-le-sia. When the war had
gone on for eight years peace was made, and Fred-
er-ick was let keep his prize, but the queen all the
time meant to get it back, and in 1756 made a league
with France and Spain to fight him for it. Rus-sia
and Swe-den said they would fight him too, so he got
Eng-land to aid him with coin. Then he fought the
whole of the rest of Eu-rope for seven years, and
in that time won the great fights of Low-o-sitz (1756),
Prague, Ros-bach and Leu-then (1757), Zan-dort
(1758), and Lig-nitz and Tor-gau (1760). He lost great
fights too, and at last thought it was all up with him.
But just then Pe-ter III. got the throne of Rus-sia
(1762). He was a great friend of Fred-er-ick and
gave great aid to him. France then gave up the war
and made peace with Eng-land, and Aus-tri-a, whom
the Turks tried to plague once more, gave up the war
too, and made peace whose terms left Si-le-sia in the
firm grasp of her great king. For the rest of his life
Fred-er-ick strove to cure the ills which the long war
had brought to his realm and make her rich and
great. He died in 1788. 3

Gen-er-al Wolfe of Eng-land. In the sev-en
General Wolfe of England. 203

years war France and Eng-land fought in the New

World as well as in the Old. At first the French



FRED-ER-ICK THE GREAT,

made great head-way, but when the great Pell got to
be Prime Min-is-ter of Eng-land he sent out a new
man, Gen-er-al James Wolfe. He made up his mind
204 ‘ Feroes of History.

to try and take Que-bec, which was held by the brave
Mont-calm. But this strong town of the north, on the
steep crags o’er the stream of the St. Law-rence, held
out small hope to him who would wrest her from the
French. But Wolfe’s keen eye at last made out a
small path up the cliffs by which at night he led his
troops, and at dawn the French saw them drawn
up on the Plains of A-bra-ham, back of the town.
For long hours the fight went on, and was not won by
the Eng-lish till both brave gen-er-als had got wounds
and been borne back to die 1n their camps. Att last the
cry, “They run! they run!” smote the ear of Wolfe.
“Who run?” said hein faint tones. “The French,”
he wastold. ‘Praise be to God!” he cried; “I die
hap-py.” When Mont-calm was told he could live but
a few hours he said it was well, as he should not live
to see Que-bec in the hands of the Eng-lish. Ina few
hours these brave men were both dead (1759), and
from that time Eng-land has kept Can-a-da as part
of her realm.

George Wash-ing-ton. It was in this war
that we first hear of him who was to play so great
and grand a part in the world, and leave a name
which can-not die. He was young, but gave such
proofs of nerve and skill when he tried to save the
troops whom Brad-dock had, in spite of him, caused
to fall in the snare laid by the French and In-di-ans
G corge Wash eng ton.

in 1755, that when the
col-o-nies found they
must go to war to get
their rights (1775), Con-
gress made him com-
mand-er-in-chief of the

ar-my of the U-nit-ed |

Col-o-nies. On Ju-ly
3 of that year he stood
neath an elm which
still stands on Cam-

Wy
Hf TAP
DANO

YY

Ha
AW









=
Ses

=

SS

a

SS

bridge Com-mon,
Mas-sa-chu-setts, and
took com-mand. He
had hard work in store
for him, he knew, to
fight the well-trained
troops of a rich land
with a throng of ill-
clad, ill-paid men who
knew naught of war,
but his great soul did
not shrink from the
206 L[leroes of Llistory.

task. His plan was not to meet the foe so much
in reg-u-lar fights as to steal on him and to wear
him out by long waits. The first great fight he won
was at Tren-ton, when, just as the foe thought
he had fled, he came back in the storm one dark,
cold night o’er the Del-a-ware, and took the foe
and their camp (Dec. 26, 1776). Eight days from
this he won the field of Prince-ton (Jan. 3, 1777),
and made glad all hearts. This year the foe beat
Wash-ing-ton at the Bran-dy-wine Riv-er, and took
Phil-a-del-phi-a, from which Con-gress had to flee,
but the gloom spread by this news fled when it
was heard that a great force of the foe had had to
yield to Gen-er-al Gates at Sar-a-to-ga (Oct. 17,
1777). This was the great point from which the tide
of war was seen to turn. France, who saw the col-
o-nies had some chance to win, made a bond to help
them, and as there was peace in Eu-rope some fine,
brave men of rank came to A-mer-i-ca and sought
leave to fight in the ranks of her troops. One of
these was La-fay-ette, a fine young French lord,
who gave his coin as well as his soul to the work,
and was so bright and full of cheer that he was most
dear to his men. Though the col-o-nies had no
na-vy, some brave men took what ships there were and
fought the foe as best they could. One brave young
man—Paul Jones—got a ship from the king of
Pe
ELL
BEE Sy

BALE op
Lg
MOE
SSSA Epes i
LS Gipighagsi Mid dteigttia
gees Meee Meee oe a
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Cote.



GEORGE WASH-ING-TON,
208 : - Heroes of L£7istory. |

_ France, to which he gave the name of Bon-homme

Rich-ard, or Poor Rich-ard, and with it beat and
sunk the great Eng-lish frig-ate Se-va-g7s off the
east coast of Eng-land (Sept. 22, 1778). For the
next few years the war went on in the South for the
most part, and though Wash-ing-ton was the soul of
it, he did not fight in it till a great French fleet led
by Count de Grasse came out to Ches-a-peake Bay.
Then Wash-ing-ton, by a feint, kept his plans from
Clin-ton, who was in New York, and kept strict
watch on him, and left his camp on the Hud-son and
stole off with his troops to the South. Here, with
the aid of the French, he laid siege to York-town,
where the Eng-lish troops were led by Lord Corn-
wal-lis. For twen-ty-one days the Eng-lish held out
neath the storm of shot and shell from land and
sea, but then when great holes were made in the
walls Corn-wal-lis knew there was no hope and gave
up his sword to Wash-ing-ton (Oct. 19, 1781). This
was the last great fight of the war; peace soon came
and the U-nit-ed States took their place mid the na-
tions of the world. You know the rest of Wash-ing-
ton’s life—how he gave his help to make a con-sti-tu-
tion for his land, and how when she chose him to
serve as her first pres-i-dent he did it, as he did all
the rest of his acts, so well that on his death he
stood “first in peace, first in war, first in the hearts
of his coun-try-men” (Dec. 14, 1799).
Napoleon Bonaparte. - 209

Na-po-le-on Bo-na-parte. While the U-nit-ed
States had all the joys of peace, France, who lent her |
such great aid to gain them, was swept by a wild



NA-PO-LE-ON, EM-PER-OR.

storm known as the Rev-o-lu-tion. Wild with the
wrongs of long, long years, and led by bad men to
take the worst way to get their rights, the men of

'
210 Heroes of History.

France rose and made no pause till the king and
queen and vast throngs of folks of high rank were put
to death, the old faith cast off, the old laws made null
and the land made a re-pub-lic. All Eu-rope felt
that a stop ought to be put to such streams of blood as
were shed, and a league was made to fight France by
Aus-tri-a, Prus-sia, Hol-land, Eng-land, Spain and
Rus-sia. She had in her men of war a young man
of the name of Na-pol-eon Bo-na-parte, who was
born in Cor-si-ca but had been in a war-school in
France. When he was of fit age he got a place in
her troops, and rose step by step and at last got a
branch of the ar-my to lead. When he had done good
work in Eu-rope, he sought leave to go to E-gypt to
gain that land for France. The French D1-rec-to-ry,
as the band of men who kept the rule in France were
known, said yes, and he set off with a great fleet and
40,000 men.

Ad-mi-ral Nel-son. Eng-land sent out a fleet to
fight Na-po-le-on. The com-mo-dore in charge of it
was Ho-ra-ti-o Nel-son. When he got to the Nile
he found that the French had more ships than he, but
he soon set this right, for he got round some of the
large French ships and beat them so they set sail and
went off. By the time this was done it was dark, but
the fight went on by the glare of the can-non and Nel-
son beat (1798). His next great fight was at Co-pen-


oS

“SS

FAL-GAR,

TLE OF TRA

BAT
212 ‘ Heroes of History.

ha-gen, where he was sent to fight the Danes, who had
made a league with France. "While he was in the
thick of the fight Ad-mi-ral Par-ker, whose ship had
struck on some shoals, gave him a sign with a flag to
put a stop to the fight. Nel-son had but one eye, SO
he Os his glass to his blind eye and said he saw no





DEATH OF NEL-SON AT TRA-FAL-GAR.

g, and kept on till he won and brought the war
with the Danes to an end (1800). In the mean time
Na-po-le-on had got France to turn out the Di-rec-
to-ry and make a new form of gov-ern-ment with three
con-suls at the head of it. Of course he was First
Con-sul, and as such met the great new league made

by Eng-land, Rus-sia and Aus-tri-a to fight him.

9
Napoleon Bonaparte. 21

CHAPTER TX.
HEROES OF THE NINE-TEENTH CEN-TU-RY.

From A.D. 1800 To A.D. 1goo.

When this age broke on the world the gaze of all
was on Bo-na-parte to see what his next move would
be. He did not leave them long in doubt, but made’
haste o’er the Alps to It-a-ly with his troops, and beat
the Aus-tri-ans so on the field of Ma-ren-go that he
tore the whole of It-a-ly from their grasp (June 14,
1800). In the last month of the same year the Aus-
tri-ans met with a great rout at Ho-hen-lin-den, in their
own land, and so Aus-tri-a had to sue for peace and
give as its price the whole left bank of the Rhine to
France (Feb. 9, 1801). Rus-sia gave up too, and
Eng-land, who could not gain her end of her own self,
made peace the next year, to the great joy of all
(March 27, 1802). Bo-na-parte then set to work to
heal the wounds which the long wars had dealt France.
He threw wide each church which had long been shut
up, brought back the priests, and gave leave to all to
hold the faith they chose in peace. The old laws
which France had made null in her mad time were
brought in use once more, but the things which had
214 Fleroes of Listory.

been at the root of some of the wrongs of the poor folks
were left out. Good roads were built for trade, and
neath the new rule the folks got to breathe once more
in peace. But Bo-na-parte, whose end was to have
the crown set on his head, did all things with a view
to it. France had come to loathe the name of king
so much that he did not dare take it, but he made up
his mind to make France an em-pire, and reign and
leave a name like Charles the Great. Soon May 18,
1804, he was made by vote em-per-or of France. In
the last month of the same year he made the pope
come to France and set the crown on his head. His
scheme now was to make the whole of Eu-rope part
of his realm, with each king and prince as his vas-sal.
So he sent his troops to Han-o-ver to take it. This
was a sign for Eng-land to get Rus-sia, Aus-tri-a and
Swe-den to league with her to fight France. Prus-
sia was too full of hate for Aus-tri-a to join, and so
kept a base peace. The first great fight of the war
was at sea, twixt the fleets of Eng-land, led by Lord
Nel-son, and the French, led by Ville-neuve. It took
place at Cape Tra-fal-gar, off the coast of Spain, and
went on for four hours. At the end, just as the
French had to strike their flag, a ball struck Nel-son,
and he died in a short time (Oct. 21, 1805), with the
words on his lips, ““Thank God, I have done my
du-ty!” If he lost at sea, Bo-na-parte had naught but
Andreas Hofer. 215

gain on land. He beat the Aus-tri-ans and Rus-sians
at Aus-ter-litz (Dec. 2, 1805). This fight was known
as the Bat-tle of the Three Em-per-ors, for the Rus-
sian, Aus-tri-an and French em-per-ors were all there.
He won more fights, so that at last Aus-tri-a had to sue
for peace and give up a lot of her lands to France.

An-dre-as Ho-fer. The Tyr-ol in the Alps had
been part of Aus-tri-a, but now she had to give it up
to make part of Ba-va-ri-a, whose prince held it of
France. But one brave man, Ho-fer, had no mind to
see his brave, free land thus torn from the realm of
which she had so long been a part. With the help of
his friend Speck-bach-er and a monk, Fa-ther Has-
ping-er, he led the men of the Tyr-ol to fight the foe.
In the heart of their dear hills these brave men won
in a score of fights, and took their chief town, Inns-
bruck, from the Ba-va-ri-ans. A great French mar-shal
was sent with a great force to put them down, but
- Ho-fer led his men to meet him at Berg I-sel and beat
them with great loss. Aus-tri-a made peace, but still
the Tyr-ol held out till at last the French got all the
towns and the main roads in their hands, and lack of
food took their strength from them. Then a base
witch—a false friend of Ho-fer—gave him up to Bo-
na-parte, who had him shot (4D. 1810).

But one realm now dare brave Bo-na-parte— Eng-
land. He did his best to hurt her in her trade—a
216 . Heroes of Fistory.

sore point—and got all the kings of Eu-rope to close
their ports to her ships. Rus-sia would not do this,
so Bo-na-parte set out for Rus-sia with a great force.
He got there, but met none to fight him—the Rus-
sians went back as he came, and led him o’er their
bleak plains till he got to the great town Mos-cow,
which he found lone and still. Allhad fled. He and
his troops went in, but in a short time found the town
was on fire—for the Rus-sians had set it on fire in
their wish to work harm to the French. For some
time Bo-na-parte made a pause here in the hope that
the Em-per-or Al-ex-an-der would send to sue for
peace, and thus found the Rus-sian win-ter on him
ere he knew. The snow lay deep on the vast plains
when he set his face to the south, and there was no food
for his vast host. Scores fell by the way—the vast
mass went like snow neath the sun—and at last when
they got to a great stream, with the Rus-sians on their
flanks, Bo-na-parte left them to take their chance and
went off. But a small band got back to their homes.

Prus-sia, with the help of Rus-sia, now rose to
fight Bo-na-parte. But he beat them in two great
fights — Lutz-en and Bautz-en. Then Aus-tri-a
took ahand in. They made some gain, but then Bo-
na-parte beat the al-les at Dres-den (4.0. 1813). The
next great fight was at Leip-zig, and is known as the
“Bat-tle of the Na-tions” from all who took part.
eG, Duke of Wellington. = 217



WEL LING-TON.

It went on for four days, and Bo-na-parte was beat
with great loss (Oct. 16-19, 1813). From that time
Ger-man-y -was free from his yoke. "

Duke of Wel-ling-ton. While this went on,
Eng-land had sent Sir Ar-thur Wel-les-ley, one of
218 | LTeroes of Listory.

her best men of war, to lift the yoke of the French from
Spain. He beat them in the great fights of Tal-a-ve-ra
(1809), Bu-soc-o (1810), Sal-a-man-ca (1812), and at
last drove them from the land by the fight of Vit-to-
ri-a (1813). The al-lies now sought to make peace
with France, but Bo-na-parte.said no, and fought on.
So Blu-cher, a great Prus-sian gen-er-al, came o’er the
Rhine to join the rest of the al-lies, who were by this
time on French soil, and they all made for Par-is.
They took it, and took the crown from Bo-na-parte,
and set it on the head of the heir to the French throne
of the old line of kings. Bo-na-parte was sent to rule
the smuill isle of El-ba (1814). In the fall all the
kings met to give back to each what Bo-na-parte had
got from them; but in the midst of all their talk the
news fell like a bomb that Bo-na-parte was back in
France. The troops stood by him, and he set out to
meet the al-lies| He met Blu-cher at Lig-ny, and
beat him with great loss, and then swept on to meet
the Eng-lish, who, led by Wel-les-ley (who had now
been made Duke of Wel-ling-ton), took their stand at
Wa-ter-loo, in Bel-gi-um. The fight went on from
noon till eight at night. Blu-cher and his men strove
to get there through roads full of mud, but the field
had been won by the brave Eng-lish ere the great part
of them got there, and all they could do was to help
chase the French (June 18, 1815). Bo-na-parte fled
Oliver Hazard Pory. 219
to Par-is, gave up his crown, and gave him-self up
to the Eng-lish. He was sent to live on the lone,
bleak isle of St. Hel-en-a, where he died in 1821.



Gay on een eee
Ol-i-ver Haz-ard Per-ry. While this great war
went on, the U-nit-ed States was drawn in-to war

with Eng-land. Its cause was that Eng-land said she
had the right to stop our ships and take off men that
220 F1 evoes of L1vstory.

she said were Eng-lish. The A-mer-i-cans would
not stand this, and made war. Strange to say, the
great deeds of this war were done on sea by small
ships. The best of our men were Cap-tains Hull,
Law-rence, De-ca-tur, and Per-ry, who was sent to
Lake E-rie to fight the foe there. He had five
new ships built, and gave fight to the Brit-ish fleet.
His own ship, the Law-rence, soon had her sides
beat in, but he got off in a small boat to the /z-ag-a-
va, and burst through the foe’s line inher. In a short
time the foe gave in. He sent word to his chief, “We
have met the foe, and they are ours” (Sept. 1o,
1813).
Gar-i-bal-di. From the time Rome lost the rule
_of the world, It-a-ly has been fought for—first by wild
tribes, and then by France, Spain and Aus-tri-a. In
the time of Bo-na-parte, who sought to tear it from the
grasp of Aus-tri-a, the Arch-duke John of Aus-tri-a
told the I-tal-ians if they would fight a-gainst Bo-na-
parte they should have a con-sti-tu-tion of their own
that would give them their rights, and keep them free.
But when they did so, and the war was past, and.
Aus-tri-a no more in fear of her dread foe, she drew
It-a-ly’s chains as tight as ev-er. “Then there grew up
a fierce hate of for-eign rule, and a great throng of men
made up a band, who were known as the Car-bo-na-ri,
or Char-coal Burn-ers, whose chief end was to free
Garibaldz. - 221

her. When a man sought to be of it he had to pass

through strange, dread scenes, and was shown the
sort of death he would meet if he told aught of the
plans of the band. ‘They did much harm and small
good, and at last Charles Al-bert, king of the isle of
-Sar-din-i-a and a part of the main land of It-a-ly, said
that the men of the land must fight to free her. So
in 1848 he made war on Aus-tri-a, but that foe was too
strong for him, and the cause was lost—for a time.
Then Charles Al-bert told his chief men that he meant —
to give up his crown to his son, Vic-tor Em-man-u-el.
Now the pope, as the head of the church, the Prince
of Peace on earth, could not and would not take part
in the war. This had drawn on him the hate of the
Car-bo-na-ri. They made haste to rush to arms, slew
Ros-si, one of the pope’s chief men, who was firm in
his plans, and made up new plans, chief of which was ~
that the pope must go to war with Aus-tri-a. When
he said no, their threats and acts grew so fierce that
he had to leave Rome, and went to Ga-e-ta, in the
realm of Na-ples. Then Gar-i-bal-di, a man who his
friends gave the name of “‘the Lib-er-a-tor,” led a band
of rev-o-lu-tion-ists to Rome. Their cry was “A
u-ni-ted It-a-ly, with Rome for cap-i-tal.”. The rule -
of the pope was done a-way with; Rome was made
a re-pub-lic, with a man of the name of Maz-zi-ni as
lead-er and Gar-i-bal-di as one of the heads of the
222 fTeroes of Listory.

troops. Mean-time the pope had plead for aid to the
Cath-o-lic na-tions. Brave men from each land made
haste to It-a-ly to fight for him, and France sent an
ar-my, which laid siege to Rome. Gar-1-bal-di gave
proof of great skill in the way he held Rome; but it
fell, and he and his men fled. He went to New York,
where he dwelt for some years. AA man now came to
the front in It-a-ly whose name was Ca-vour. He was
Vic-tor Em-man-u-el’s chief man of state, and all things
done in It-a-ly were by his will. In 1859 Vic-tor Em-
man-u-el made war once more with Aus-tri-a, and in
five months had made his land free, and was king of
a great part of It-a-ly. Gar-i-bal-di, who had come
home and fought in this war at the head of a corps
which bore the name of the “ Hunt-ers of the Alps,”
made up his mind, at its end, to wrest the realm of ©
Na-ples from its king, Fran-cis. No doubt it was
Ca-vour who made up the plan, but he let all the world
think it was Gar-i-bal-di’s work, to save the name of
his king. When Gar-i-bal-di took Na-ples, and drove
the king out, he set to work to rule it; but ina short
time Ca-vour made him give it up to form part of the
realm of It-a-ly, and he went off to his home, with a
pen-sion from the king. In1867 he tried in the same
way to tear Rome from the pope and make it part of
the realm of It-a-ly. This did not please the king, who
had him put in jail; but he got free, and led his men
Fleroes of the War for the Union. 227,

to try it once more. He met the pope's troops, with
their French allies, at Men-tan-a, but lost the field
(aD. 1867). This was the last great thing he tried to
do, though he fought and spoke and wrote much for
like ends. He died in 1882.

He-roes of the War for the Un-ion. The
clash of arms had scarce
grown still in Eu-rope
when it broke out in the
U-nit-ed States. Some
of the States of the
South thought that the
North did not treat them
right, and made up their
minds to leave the Un-
(Otis At oirst men
thought it would not be
much, but when Gen-
er-al Rob-ert Lee got to 7
be head of the troops” -
of the South, with “Stone-wall Jack-son” as his chief
man, they saw it was to be a fierce and long war.
It went on with gain and loss on each side till the
North got the right men to lead her troops— Grant,
Sher-man and Sher-i-dan. You know the tale so well
that I need not go o’er it here—how in 1864 Grant
fought Lee in Vir-gin-i-a, and drove him step by step



ROB-ERT E. LEE,
224 fferoes of Fistory.

to Rich-mond, where he
kept him while Sher-man
went off. with a vast ar-
my and swept through the
South — which he laid
waste as he went—to the
sea; and Sher-i-dan kept
the Con-fed-er-ate Gen-



N

PHIJ,-IP HEN-RY SHER-I-DAN,

AY
WN AY
AN



WILL-IAM T. SHER-MAN.

er-al Ear-ly and his ar-
my shut up in the Shen-
an-do-ah Val-ley, so he
could not help Lee. In

gy the first part of 1865
\

Grant made his lines
@\stretch out to the south,
\ so that Lee had to stretch

\\
Wy
YS

Payhis out too to face them.
ty

Grant could do this, he
had such throngs of men,
Heroes of the War for the Union. B25
but Lee had too few for it, and left his lines so weak
that Grant (A-pril 2, 1865) took Rich-mond, from
which Jef-fer-son Da-vis, the Con-fed-er-ate Pres-i-



GEN-ER-AL GRANT,

dent, fled at night with his chief men. Lee then tried
to make his way south, but his men were worn out,
and Grant was close on him, so he gave him-self and
his ar-my up to Grant at Ap-po-mat-tox Court House
226 Fleroes of EHiastory.

(A-pril 19, 1865). They made good terms—for all
Grant did was to make them all pass their word not to
bear arms a-gainst the U-nit-ed States. This was the
end of the war, and in May all the brave men of the
North went to their homes, proud in the thought that
slave-ry was no more a blot on their fair land, for
though it had not been fought for that end, still the
war brought to pass the free-dom of the ne-groes.
The men of the South set to work to build up a new
South on the ruins of the old, and all the land felt
how good and sweet a thing peace was, when they
heard that war was a-bout to break out in Eu-rope
once more.

Will-iam I, Em-per-or of Ger-man-y. In
the year 1870 the throne of Spain had no king, and a
Prus-sian prince, Le-o-pold, tried to get it. Now
France, as in the old days when Fran-cis I. did not
want Charles V. to rule Ger-man-y and Spain, had no
mind to let these two lands join, lest they crush her.
So her em-per-or, Na-po-le-on III., went to war. Le-
o-pold gave up his plan, but the French would go on
with the war. All the states of Ger-man-y cast in
their lot with Prus-sia, and were in the field ere France
had got her force there. Von Molt-ke, who had charge
of the Prus-sians, sent them in three great parts. The
French were led by Na-po-le-on, and won in the first

fight, but when led by Gen-er-al Mac-Ma-hon, at
William I., Emperor of Germany. 227

Weis-sen-berg, lost. One branch of the Ger-mans
was led by Fred-er-ick, the crown prince, and he
beat the French at Worth, and thus made free the



WILL-IAM I.

path to France. From this time all the fights took
place on French soil, and though Mac-Ma-hon and
Ba-zaine fought well at the head of the French troops,
the skill shown by Von Molt-ke in the way he made
228 fleroes of Fistory.

use of his was too much for them, and at last the
French got caught in a trap at Se-dan, and had to
hoist the white flag, as a sign they gave up (Sept.
1, 1870). Na-po-le-on sent his sword to the king of
Prus-sia with these words, “As I have not died at
the head of my troops, I hand my sword to your maj-
es-ty.’ The next day the king sent Bis-marck, chief
man of state, to make terms. As Na-po-le-on would
not treat of peace, all the troops had to yield as pris-
on-ers of war. Na-po-le-on was sent to Ger-man-y.
When the news got to Par-is a rev-o-lu-tion broke
out, and France was made a re-pub-lic.. The Ger-
mans made haste to Par-is, and lay round it like a
half-moon, but the French would not yield it. At this
point a man of the name of Gam-bet-ta got out of
Par-is by means of a bal-loon, and sought to raise
troops to drive the Ger-mans from France. But he
knew naught of war, and tried to rule the men who
led the “raw” troops, so that much did not come of
it. One of his plans was to take the war to Ger-
man-y, and thus force the Ger-mans to go back to save
it. So Gen-er-al Bour-ba-kai led a force of 100,000
men to the Rhine, but Gen-er-al Werd-er, who learnt
of the plan, got in the way with a force of 35,000 men,
and beat the French ar-my, which was three times its
size. At length the French saw it was of no use to
keep up the war, and so made peace (March 15,
William I., Emperor of Germany. 229

1871). France had to give up part of her realm— Al-
sace and Lor-raine—to Ger-man-y, and pay her a
great sum of coin. Till this was done Ger-man-y was
to hold some of the forts round Par-is. But ere this
could be done a new rev-o-lu-tion broke out in Par-is.
The Com-mune, made up of a mob of the worst class,

took the rule of things in their own hands, and kept
out the re-pub-li-can gov-ern-ment, who had to lay
siege to it. When the Com-mune had to yield at last
they tried to set fire to all the great build-ings and
church-es, so as to die neath their walls. Since that
time France has been a re-pub-lic. All the states of
Ger-man-y now saw that all their woes had come from
the fact that they were split in such small states, and
made up their minds to make one great em-pire of all,
and give its crown to the king of Prus-sia. So it was
done, and on Jan. 1, 1871, at Ver-sailles, in France,

the men sent from all the states gave him the name of
Em-per-or of Ger-man-y. To keep up its might Ger-
man-y has since kept up a great ar-my, and each man
has to pass at least one year and most three years in
it. The cost of this great force is great, and makes
the folks pay a large tax, so if there is a gain in one
way, there is a loss in an-oth-er. But the Em-per-or
Will-iam, who lived till March 19, 1888, had the deep
love of all his peo-ple, and his death, ‘old as he was,

was felt as a great loss.
230 Heroes of History.

Gen-er-al Gor-don. This is one of the few true
he-roes whose names are seen on the page of his-to-ry.
He was an Eng-lish-man, but spent a great part of

~his life in Af-ri-ca. For some years he kept the rule
o’er a part which bears the name of the Sou-dan, or
the Land of the Blacks, right neath the great des-ert.
Its cap-i-tal is Khar-toum. He would go from point
to point of this vast land, to see if the poor folks had
their rights, and mete stern, swift pun-ish-ment to those
who did them wrong. The worst thing he had to fight
was the slave-trade. Men who made it their means
of life would search through the land to bear off all
they could lay hands on to sell as slaves. In 1881 a
man known as E] Mah-di, or the False Proph-et, tried
to build up a great realm as Ma-hom-et had done.
He put up his flag, and though at first he met with
loss, his men’s faith in him kept up, and scores of
fierce free tribes from the des-ert fought for him.
Gor-don fought him, and then, in the hope that Eng-
land would send him more men to break his might
with, fell back to Khar-toum and held it. Eng-land
did send a large force, but it was a long way and a
hard way to Khar-toum, and throngs died as they
went. El] Mah-di’s first great aim was to drive the
Eng-lish out. So he tried his best and took Khar-
toum ere the Eng-lish got there. Gor-don was slain
while he was read-ing his Bi-ble, it is said. But
General Gordon. 231

El Mah-di’s death soon took place, too, and the war
came to an end. But Gor-don’s name can-not die.
It is writ-ten in let-ters of light o’er Af-ri-ca, and
on the roll of those good great ones of the earth who
have had a true love for their fel-low-men, and have
made it their chief aim to serve them.

END.

TNeDE xX.

Alexander the Great, 28.

Aristides, the Athenian, 23.

Augustus, 48.

Black Prince, The, 128.

Bonaparte, Napoleon, 209.

Brian Boru of Ireland, 78.

Bruce, Robert, 123.

’ Cesar, Augustus, 51.

Cesar, Julius, 44.

Camillus, 34.

Canute, the Dane, 76.

Charlemagne, 58.

Charles I. of Spain and V. of Germany. 155.
Charles XII. of Sweden, 198.
Cincinnatus, 32.
Clovis,,55.

Condé, Prince, 188.
Constantine the Great, 50.
Coriolanus, 30.

Cortes, Hernando, 141.
Crusades, The, 94.
Crusade, Second, Io1.
Crusade, Third, 102.
Cyrus, King of Persia, 13.
Darius, King of Persia, 18.
David, 11.

Davis, Jefferson, 225.
Edward 1. of England, 118

Edward III. of England, 126.
Epaminondas of Thebes, 24,
Eugene, Prince of Savoy, 196.
Fabius, 40.

Francis I. of France, 157.
Frederick Barbarossa, 104.
Frederick the Great, 201.
Garibaldi, 220.

Gates, General, 206.

Gideon, 9.

Gordon, General, 230.

Grant. U. S., General, 224.
Guesclin, Bertrand du, 132.
Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden, 182.
Gustavus Vasa of Sweden, 174.
Hannibal of Carthage, 4o.
Henry IV. of France, 171.
Henry V. of England, 134. ©
Hofer, Andreas, 215.

Horatius Cocles, 29.

Ivan the Terrible of Russia, 177.
Jackson (“‘ Stonewall”), General, 223.
Jones, Paul, 206.

Joshua, 7.

Judas Maccabeus, 12.

Jugurtha of Africa, 42.
Lafayette, General, 206.

Lee, Robert, General, 223:

we,
234

Leonidas, the Spartan, 20.
Louis 1X. of France, 116.
Louis XIV. of France, 186.
Mahomet, 95.
Marlborough, Duke of, 194.
Marius 42.

Martel, Charles, 56.
Miltiades of Athens, 19.
Montcalm, General, 204.
Napoleon Bonaparte, 209.
Nelson, Admiral, 210.
Northmen, The, 68.
O’Neill, Hugh of [reland, 173.
Pausanias, the Spartan, 23.
Pelopidas of Thebes, 24.
Pepin the Short, 56.

Perry, Oliver Hazard, 219.
Peter the Great of Russia, 198.
Philip of Macedon, 26.
Pizarro, Francis, 150.
Pompey, 44.

Regulus, 39.

Lndex.

Richard Coeur de Lion, 104.
Roland, 61.

Saladin, 102.

Samson, 10.

Scipio. 40.

Sheridan. Philip, General, 224.
Sherman, W. T., General, 224.
Sobieski. John, of Poland, 193.
Sulla, 42.

Sweyn of Denmark, 75.
Themistocles, the Athenian, 20.
Theodosias the Great, 54.
Turenne, General, 188.
Wallace. William, 122.
Wallenstein, 181.

Washington, George, 204.

i Wellington, Duke of, 217.

William I., Emperor of Germany, 226
William, Prince of Orange, 190.
William the Conqueror, 84.

William the Silent. 164.

Wolfe, General, 202.
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