Citation
Larry Gilbert, or, Persevere and win

Material Information

Title:
Larry Gilbert, or, Persevere and win
Added title page title:
Persevere and win
Creator:
Reeves, S. K. ( Author, Primary )
Gall & Inglis ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Gall & Inglis
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
192 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Farmers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Perseverance (Ethics) -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prayer -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1891 ( rbprov )
Baldwin -- 1891
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Plates printed in color.
Statement of Responsibility:
by S.K. Reeves ; with illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026931644 ( ALEPH )
ALH6990 ( NOTIS )
182861708 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




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AT SCHOOL IN WINTER.—p. 99,



LARRY GILBERT:

Persebere and Win,
BY
S. K. REEVES.

GHith Ellustrations,

GALL & INGLIS.
London: Edinburgh:

25 PATERNOSTER SQUARE, 20 BERNARD TERRACE.



¢

CONTENTS.



CHAPTER PAGE
I, LARRYS HOME, . : : : : : : 5
fll CARRY, SPROULATERS 9 IG
II. SCHOOL DAYS, 8
IV. FOES WITHOUT, . : : : : : a 40
V. CHRISTMAS, . : : . 5 5 el . 53
VI. TURNING A NEW LEAF, . A 5 : % 2 Gi,
VIL EFFORTS FOR GOOD, . . . . . . 80
VIII, PRAYER ANSWERED, : ‘ : : ° . 92
IX, CHANGES, 5 : 6 A : : : - 108
XK. LARRY IN TROUBLE, : : s 0 . - 123
XI. THE PRISONERS, . 3 : : : 5 . 144
XIL WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR, . : 5 : - 162

XIII. THE REWARD OF THE JUST, . 5 : 5 . 176



LARRY GILBERT.

= S

CHAPTER IL.
LARRY’S HOME.

ETWEEN two large hills, on the eastern
slope of the Blue Mountain, is a green,
wooded, and narrow valley, through which,

thirty years ago, were scattered small, irregular
farms,

To those who love nature in its simplicity there
was much that was pleasant in the landscape. In
the spring the fragrance of apple blossoms filled
the air, and the whitewashed fences and newly-
made garden-beds showed that the farmers

_ were not so taken up with their rougher work
5



. ; LARRY GILBERT, ae

fer they ‘could not find time. to make hoiite
attractive. eS

About two-thirds of the way down the ‘valley
was the homestead of Mrs. Gilbert, a bright, dapper
little woman, who was blessed with good health,
and who, by dint of hard work, had managed,
since the death of her husband, to support herself
and her little grandson, Larry.

Fifty years before, Mrs. Gilbert had come as a
bride to this mountain home, rich in nothing
besides love and faith in the husband of her choice.
Together they had toiled, and year by year fields
were cleared, trees planted, and additions made to
farm buildings, implements, and stock.

Children had been added to the household,
bringing plenty of care; but *mother-love was
plentiful too, and the little ones thrived under
her faithful guidance. There were many years
of comfort in the low, red farm-house, and ‘then
came a season of sorrow. The angel of death
crossed the threshold and carried away three of
the children, making a dreary blank in this happy
home. Only one son was left to cheer and com-
fort the hearts of the stricken parents. John



+» . LARRY’S HOME: ° ~ ae

“Gilbert grew. to bea man, He had been working :

as a “hired man” on another farm for the past |

year, but his father’s health was failing, and for ~

this reason he brought his wife to the old home-
stead, instead of renting another farm and begin-
ning anew. :

“ Father and you shall rest now,” he said to his
mother. “You have served your day and genera-
tion. My Mattie is a good housekeeper, and I can
manage the farm.”

But God’s ways are not as our ways. Mr.
Gilbert’s health did not improve during the winter, _
and in the early spring he was laid to rest by the
little graves in the churchyard at Marleyville.
Two years after, Mrs. Gilbert was alone with her
grandchild, heron having been killed by the fall-
ing of a tree in the woods, and the young mother
dying at the birth of her little boy.

This child, who had received the name of
Lawrence from his grandfather, but who was
familiarly called Larry, was a great comfort to his
grandmother. Every one said it was a good thing
for the old lady that her mind, after so much
trouble, could rest upon this little one, and that



8 LARRY GILBERT. s,

her hands had some one besides herself to busy
themselves about. But they did not all realise
her true source of comfort. When the stay of her
earthly hopes was removed, her spiritual strength
was renewed, and amid all her sorrow and loneliness
God’s sympathy and love were ever present, as she
believed and trusted the promise, “ Even to your
old age I am He; and even to hoar hairs will
I carry you.”

As it was impossible for the old lady, at her
time of life, to oversee the working of the farm,
she was advised to sell most of her wood and
meadow land, retaining the house and a field and
orchard, besides an acre or two of woodland. .

‘Tt was a lonely spot, but it was home, and all -
the dearer for the tender associations connected
with it. The strictest economy was needful, for
it was very little that Mrs. Gilbert could earn by
spinning yarn and knitting stockings to sell in the
store at Marleyville, and it was by hard work
that she contrived to feed and clothe herself and
Larry.

Young Larry’s mind was not troubled by thoughts
on domestic economy. Going to the woods for



-LARRY’S HOME, 9

dry sticks with which to kindle the fire, and to the
spring near the house for water, feeding the chickens
and pigs, taking the cow to pasture in summer,
and in winter preparing her food by cutting up
potatoes or turnips, or mixing what his grandmother
called a warm “mash,” was about all he attempted
in a useful way.

The rest of his time was spent in chasing the
squirrels, which were plentiful in the woods ;
watching the birds, their habits and different styles
of building, and taking as much interest in their
welfare as if he was their landlord, to whom they
owed regular dues for rent. He never willingly
hurt a living thing of the harmless sort. His
mind was thoroughly in tune with nature; he
loved God’s world, and his want of young com-
panions made him fond of out-door pets. He let
them rove in their freedom; or if he caught
them it was only to stroke their fur or feathers,
and then to release them, to go to their chosen,
homes. — .

It was seldom that strangers visited the valley ;
but one day, in the early fall, some young sports-
men from a distant city passed through the



10 LARRY GILBERT.

woods, and the rapid succession of shots heard by
Larry as he took the cow to pasture, filled him
with alarm, and sent him home in great haste, with
his face glowing with excitement, and crying out, -
as he entered the house: “Oh! grandmother,
there are some wicked men in the woods, with
guns, and they are killing the birds, and rabbits,

and squirrels.” r

As the reports from the guns became loud and
frequent, Larry threw himself upon the floor,
sobbing, and holding his ears, that he might not

hear the hateful sounds.
“Soon there came a knock upon the door, which
his grandmother answered—Larry turning around
only long enough to see a young man enter,
carrying a gun, and then hiding his face again in
his hands.

The young man asked if he could purchase a pie
and some milk, and as Mrs. Gilbert happened to
have both in the house, she invited him to take a
chair till she could get them.

_ While she was absent, the stranger said to Larry:
“Well, my boy, I see you have come to grief;
what is the matter ?”



LARRY’S HOME. 11

Receiving no answer, he said to Mrs, Gilbert :
“Has your little boy hurt himself?”

“Oh, no,” she said, “ he’s only grieving over the
- birds and little creatures you’ve shot. He loves
them like brothers and sisters; for, poor little
fellow,” she said, looking compassionately at Larry, .
“he’s only got me.”

The young man was deeply touched. That any
one should grieve for the loss of birds or wild
game, was a new thought.

“Well, it seems as if I had been trespassing,”
he said at length, with a half laugh, “so I must
pay my fine ;” and he handed a gold piece to the
old lady, who looked at Larry and shook her
head.

“Yes, you must keep it,” the young man said,
seeing her reluctance. “ Buy him something with
it that he will like; and tell him I'll promise
never to shoot on his grounds again.”

Larry was afraid to look up for fear he should
see some of his slaughtered pets; but when he
heard the gate click after the visitor, he got up,
still looking very sorrowful.

“T wouldn’t have taken it,” he said, glancing



12 LARRY GILBERT. |

at the gold piece which lay in his grandmother's
hand. “I should feel as if I was like Judas if I
did; it’s the price of blood.”

“Hush, lad,” she replied, “you must not feel
nor speak in that way. It’s no uncommon thing
for young men to be fond of hunting and shooting;
few of them have got such tender, loving hearts as
you have, my boy. The young fellow was right ©
sorry, too, when he saw how grieved you were, and
he promised that he would never come hunting in
these woods again.”

“Yes, but some one else may, and the poor
little things will be scared and worried, and they
can never have such happy times again as they
have had.”

“The little creatures don’t bear malice, Larry ;
for they have no minds to treasure up the evil
doings of others, so they will not be brooding over
troubles to come, but will make themselves happy
in the present ; and if you are as wise as they you
will follow their example, and profit by the words
of the Bible: ‘Sufficient unto the day is the evil
thereof.’”

Larry was still somewhat vexed that his grand-



LARRY’S HOME, 13

mother was not more angry with the young man,
and he said rather petulantly : “T don’t see why
you are always trying to find out verses in the
Bible about: everything. I am sure you can’t
find any place where it says it.’s right to kill the
birds.” . :
“No, it does not say anywhere that such things
are right—I mean, that for mere sport, life may be
taken away—but we know, from what the Saviour
Himself says, that birds were killed and after-
wards sold. Let. me read it to you. ‘Are not
two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of
them shall not fall on the ground without your
Father.’”

Larry was of a cheerful disposition, and it
was not long before his merry laugh was again
heard. When he went to the woods he found
his pets apparently as full of life as ever.
There were no signs of mourning among the
robins; the other birds sang and _ twittered
among the branches; the squirrels chased each
other over the trees, and the rabbits came out
to the edge of the wood to enjoy the sunshine,
and to nibble the fresh grass and plantains



14 LARRY GILBERT.

which grew abundantly there, just as they used
to do.

In pleasant weather, Mrs. Gilbert and Larry
sometimes walked on Sunday to attend church
at Marleyville, starting early in the morning,
carrying their lunch with them.

After church was over they would seek a
shady place to eat their dinners, and then start
leisurely homeward, often resting by the way.
Occasionally they had an opportunity of riding.
part of the way with one of the neighbours.

During these walks the old lady made the
stories of the Bible familiar to him. The Ten
Commandments and their teachings were strongly
enforced, and, more than all, Christ and His
examples, His life upon the earth, His character
and work, often formed the subject of her
instructions.

She had already attained the allotted age of
threescore years and ten, and she felt that now,
while in his youth, and while her life was
spared, the foundation of her boy’s character must
be laid, upon which might grow up a life which
would prove beneficial to himself and others.



LARRYS HOME. 15

Larry looked upon his grandmother as superior
to all the rest of the world, and never for a
moment thought of disputing her teachings, or
disobeying her commands. |



CHAPTER IIL

LARRY SPECULATES,

NE day Larry found on the road a dull and
0 rusty pocket-knife with one blade. He
sharpened it on a whetstone which had
been his grandfather’s, and found himself cutting
sticks and his fingers alternately. He even gave
a thrust with it in the side of the earthen pitcher
he was taking to the spring for water, and was
immediately rewarded with a sight he had not
expected—a hole large enough to put his finger
in.
“What will grandmother say?” was his first
thought. ‘How can I mend it ?” was his second.
Walking on to the spring he mixed a plaster of
clay and smeared it well over the outside of the hole,
Then he stood the jar under the bark trough, his _

eyes glistening as he saw the water nearing the
16.

























































































LARRY AT THE SPRING.



LARRY SPECULATES. 17

top of the pitcher, when suddenly the plaster gave
way and out gushed the water from the hole,
exciting first his dismay, and then his admiration
at the beauty of the jet.

Larry stood for a while in a “brown study.”
and these were the thoughts that ran through
his brain: “That jar is no use to grandmother;
I'll ask her to let me keep it here, for it looks
real pretty with the water running in and out.
But now I will have to come twice with the quart
cup, for she Il not let me carry her good pitcher,
and the tin bucket is old and leaky.”

Larry’s cogitation was broken in upon at this
point by his grandmother, who came to see why
he tarried so long with the water.

_ “Why, the child has broken my earthen jar!
and I’ve had it nigh on to twenty years! Did
you strike it against something ?”

“T ran my knife into it. I thought the old
thing was tough,’ stammered Larry.

Grandmother was not a good hand at scolding ;
she only said—

“Larry, child, you must learn to be more care-

ful Where am I going to get another jar?
oe



18 LARRY GILBERT.

And a new tin bucket is out of the question.
You will have to carry the quart cup now, for
the iron tea-kettle is too heavy for you.”

“T know it,” said Larry, who had already come
to that conclusion ; but from that time he began
to wonder how he could earn enough moneys not
to buy an earthen pitcher, but a bright tin pail
with a handle, such as he had seen on a tin-peddler’s
cart. ‘The way opened before him sooner than he
had hoped.

Some days after this, as Larry, with his hands ,
in his pockets, went whistling along the road,
he saw something glistening in the sun some
distance before him. ‘Bunning to the*spot he
picked up half-a-dozen tin dippers and graters —
tied together with a string, which he knew must ;
belong to the man whose waggon was slowly
ascending a hill in front of him.

Calling out at the top of his voice, “ Hallo !
halloo!” and then running with all his might, he
succeeded in attracting the man’s attention, who
stopped his waggon at the top of the hill. eo

Larry was heartily thanked by the tinman, who me

“handed him five cents. e =



oe

LARRY SPECULATES. : 19

“Ts there anything in my line your folks would
like to have?” he asked. “If so, I'll sell it
cheap to you.”

-“How much is that tin pail?” asked Larry, :
pointing to one on the top.

“The price is fifty cents (two shillings), but

I will sell it to you for forty. Do you want a
pail 2”
“T broke grandmother's pitcher, the one
I always carried when I went for water, and
she won’t let me carry the big pitcher she’s got,
for fear I'll break it, so I have to carry water
from the spring in the quart cup. Do you know
anything’ I can do so as to earn money to buy
"a pail?” he earnestly asked, looking up in the
man’s face.

* «Well, now, let’s see; you aren’t very big,

- _ but:you might pick yarbs, I reckon.”

© Yarbs!” repeated Larry, “what’s yarbs?”
“Pennyroyal, peppermint, hoarhound, catnip,

and such like.”

eee Yes, yes,” said Larry, eagerly, “we call them

vherbs.- I know them all; and wild cherry bark,

that’s powerful good for weakly folks—so grand-

ge



20 LARRY GILBERT.

mother says. But who wants to pay money for
such things when they are picked ?”

“There is a drug-storeman in Medford, where
I go for my tins; I think he would buy some, if
they are of the right sort. And I’ll tell you what
I will do. Ill be back this way next week, and
if you will have a lot of these things we spoke of
ready tied in bunches, I'll try and sell them for
you. When you raise half enough money, I will
let you have the pail, and trust you for the rest.
How will that suit you?”

“T’ll do it,” said Larry, with a confident shake
of his brown head. “Ill gather a lot to-day.
Here, take these five cents ; that will be so much
towards it.”

“But I gave you those for yourself.”

“No, they’re for the pail; if I kept them ~
I might lose them,” said Larry, in such a deter-
mined voice that the tinman took the money, and
then they parted.

“What is luck, grandmother?” asked Larry,
as he watched the shortcake baking on the round
iron griddle hanging over the fire, and which was
to serve for his supper.



LARRY SPECULATES. 24

“There is no such thing as luck in this world,
my boy ; though I don’t deny the word is often
used. If we succeed in anything, it is the Lord’s
doing, and the credit belongs to Him; for the
man is not living, smart as he may be, who can
manage things in this world according to his own
liking. There is Bible for that too: ‘A man’s
heart deviseth his way; but the Lord directeth
his steps.’ But what started you to thinking
about luck, Larry ?”

Larry was not quite ready to divulge his secret,
so he replied: “Oh, I was only thinking about
it. But I guess, grandmother, the shortcake is
burning—it smokes.” —

Grandmother bustled about and turned her
cake, and the subject was dropped.

Larry lay awake a long time that night, think-
ing of his project, and he fully determined not to
let his grandmother know of it until he should
come into the house carrying the new pail filled
with water. He said to himself: “It will make
her pretty near jump out of her shoes to
see it,’ and at the thought of her surprise he
chuckled aloud with laughter, which brought the



22 LARRY GILBERT.

old lady to his bedside to see what was the
matter.

“Twas only a funny thought, nothing else,
grandmother,” and Larry turned over toward the -
wall, pressing the coverlet against his mouth; for
fear the secret would pop out in spite of him.

An old market basket, which he put away in
the barn, held his treasures after he had. collected
them ; and, after days of watching, he was rewarded
one morning by seeing the tinman and his cart.

“You have got a nice lot, my boy ; you must
have been pretty spry to get such an assortment.
Well, I’ll do the best I can for you ; look for me
back about Thursday, and if I have luck, as I said
before, in selling, you ‘ll get your pail.”

Larry looked gravely at the man. “Grand-
mother says there is no such thing in the world
as luck ; she says it is the Lord who brings things
’ around.” ‘ :

The man looked at him curiously for a moment;
then he said, as he tapped his horse with his —
whip, “I guess your grandmother’s logic is a)
near right,” .

It is not to be wondered at that Larry’s mind



LARRY SPECULATES, 23

was in a state of agitation during the week. On
account of his restlessness, his grandmother was
sure that he was going to be ill, for he laughed
and talked even in his sleep, and when awake,
would frequently fall into such a “ brown study ”
that she had to speak several times before he
heard her.

When Thursday morning came, and Larry left
the table, having scarcely eaten a bite of breakfast,
grandmother needed no other proof; and hastily
mixed him a bowl of “ feverfew tea,” which she
obliged him to drink.

She would even have persuaded him to go to
bed, but that was not to be thought of; and after
some coaxing, he prevailed upon her to let him
walk to the. top of the hill.

Almost as soon as Larry caught sight of the
tinman, he read good news in his face,

“Here’s your pail,” he* said, handing it out,
“and here’s your change,” counting out fifteen
cents into Larry's hand. “The drugman at
Medford bought the whole lot, and paid me fifty
cents, besides the five I had, And he says he ‘ll
take as much more wild cherry, and if you can



24 LARRY GILBERT,

get some slippery elm and sassafras root, he'll
take them too; and he says, too, that he’s had no
better lot brought in since he kept store, than —
what you sent him.”

““T can get most anything out of these old
woods,” said the boy, his eyes sparkling at his
success. ‘I don’t know slippery elm, but grand-
mother does, and she has lots of other things in
the garden—sage, and lavender, and sweet mar-
joram, and feverfew ;” and then Larry made the
man laugh heartily, by telling him how he had to
drink @ bowlful of the tea, because he had been
so excited that his grandmother thought he was
getting a fever.

Larry wanted the tinman to keep the fifteen
cents for his trouble, but he refused. “I see
youve got grit,” he said; “that’s what I like in
a boy. I was turned loose when I was a young-
ster—father and mother died ; and I am glad to
give you a liftif Ican. It will be a full month
or more before I am on this road again, but I
won't fail to stop when I do come.”

“Tl be ready for you. That’s grandmother’s
house in the hollow; and just you stop if you



LARRY SPECULATES. 25

don’t see me, will you? And os thank you very
much for selling them for me.’

“ Enough said ; good-bye till I see you again.”

“Now grandmother shall have her pail of
water.” The water never looked so sparkling as
it did dancing about in the new tin pail, and Larry
admired it more and more.

The old lady was just as much ‘surprised as
Larry thought she would be. She had to sit down
on a chair and hear the whole story, and at the
sight of money earned by her own little boy she
even shed tears. They were tears of joy, she told
him, for Larry could not understand what there
was to cry about. —

“T’ll not fret another minute,” she said. “ When
my needs were many and my faith was growing
weak, the Lord sent me help by the hands of this
child. I will put my trust in Him from this time
forth and for ever.”

Gathering herbs and barks proved a source of
some revenue to our friends in the cottage.

Grandmother was very particular to gather her
herbs on a dry and sunny day, and when the
blossoms were in a proper state. She only gathered



26 LARRY GILBERT.

the best, and gave such good satisfaction that the
druggist agreed to take the supply he needed
chiefly from her, and to pay her a fair price for
them.

Tony Myers, the tinman, who became a friend
of the Gilbert family from the time he first became
- acquainted with Larry, instead of making Marley-
ville his stopping-place for the night as heretofore
now drove on to the Widow Gilbert’s, where he
_ was always sure of meeting with a kind recep-
tion.

Grandmother interested herself about him at
once. She insisted on doing his mending and
knitting his stockings, in return for many kind-
nesses bestowed by Tony, who, besides. paying for
his lodging and disposing of the herbs, brought
many a little package of tea and spices, with now
and then a piece of tin-ware as he saw it was
needed.

“Tt’s more like a home to me than any I have
had for many a year, and even my old nag enjoys
his quarters here, for when we come to the lane, he
turns into the stable of his own accord.”

The old earthen pitcher kept its place under



LARRY SPECULATES. 27

the spring a long while, and many and many a
time, as Larry watched the water flowing into its
mouth, and out of the opening, he said, “My!
but it was a good thing for us that morning
when I ran my knife through grandmother's old

29

jaz.



CHAPTER IIL

SCHOOL DAYS.

N the corner of one of the bureau drawers was
d a woollen stocking, which Larry had long
since outgrown. In the foot of this, tied
with a string, Mrs. Gilbert kept the money she had
saved toward her boy’s schooling. Here were
small bits of money Larry had received as presents,
or for slight serviccs rendered to one and another
—the gold piece given by the sportsman, two old
Spanish dollars that had belonged to Grandfather
Gilbert, but which his wife thought none too
precious to be used for his grandson’s benefit.
Added to these were smaller sums which Mrs.
Gilbert had been able to save from her housekeeping
expenses.
It had been a great trial for the grandmother

to bring her mind to decide the question of sending
28



SCHOOL DAYS, 29

Larry four miles to school. There was none
nearer ; but no sooner had she decided to send
him the next winter term, and made some inquiry
in regard to it, than she learned that the wise
ones of the county had made arrangements to
build a school-house at the “The Four Corners,”
scarcely a mile from her door.

While the house was building, Larry made
frequent visits to it, and once or twice induced
his grandmother to walk thither after the evening
work was done.

The last time they went, the school-house was
finished, excepting that it wanted a coat of red
paint.

As the door was locked, Larry, with the aid of
some logs and bits of timber, managed to form a
standing-place under one of the windows, and
having first taken a peep himself, helped up his
grandmother, that her eyes might take a view of
the teacher's platform at one end of the room, and
the rude desks and benches along its sides. In
the boy’s eyes, and. in hers too, the room appeared
to have everything needed ; and Larry’s eyes
sparkled as, with a knowing nod, he asked, “ Now,



30 LARRY GILBERT.

granny, wouldn’t you think a boy could learn
most everything in such a nice place as that ?”

“Tt is a nice room, to be sure, lad,” she re-
sponded warmly ; “but little help it will be to you
or any other, if you idle your time and don’t: set
your mind to learning. And, after all, it is the
Lord who giveth wisdom. I trust it is a godly
man that will have charge of you—one that will
train your heart as well as your mind. There
will be many temptations, and maybe I have done
wrong in keeping you so close with me. It’s an
‘untried world for you, my boy, and many a battle
you will have to fight when your old grandmother
cannot be near to take your part,” and the old
woman’s voice trembled with the thought.

«But can’t the Lord help me?” asked Larry.

“Of course He can, my child; keep close to
Him, and I’ll have no fear for you. It is to those
who are steadfast, who persevere to the end, and
make the best use of the talents they have, that
the Lord will say, ‘Well done, good and faithful ©
servant ; thou hast been faithful over a few things,
I will make thee ruler over many things; enter
thou into the joy of thy Lord.’” .



SCHOOL DAYS. ol

Larry never forgot that evening walk and
conversation; and into his prayer that night
entered the supplication: “Lord, take care of me
every day when I go to school; help me to fight
my battles with the world; and to do the best I
can to learn.”

Larry had plenty of work to do in the interval ;
but when the last day of September came it found
the cellar stored with wood, the potatoes dug and
housed, the corn in the barn, and the apples put
in barrels in the loft. Hanging on the back of a
chair near the bed were the new clothes Mrs.
Gilbert had taken such pains in making, and
which Larry was to put on in the morning.

That night Larry tossed upon his bed, and
could not sleep for thiriking of the good in store
for him on the morrow. And when, toward
morning, he fell into a slumber, it was to dream
of battles with giants and all sorts of strange
adversaries. Now, with David, he was picking
stones from the brook to fling at the Philistine
giant ; now, with the sword of Gideon, he was
moving victoriously toward the enemy. Even
in his dreams he remembered his grandmother's

%



32 LARRY GILBERT.

admonitions, and when he began to be hard
pressed, and it seemed as if one took hold of him
who was about to kill him, he called out im a
loud voice: “In the Lord put I my strength,”—
and awoke to find his grandmother shaking him
by the elbow.

“Oh, granny!” he exclaimed, as he rubbed his
eyes and looked about him, “I thought my
battles had begun.”

Larry’s anticipations of school were not quite
so buoyant when he found that his grandmother’s
old enemy, the rheumatism, had attacked one of
her ankles. ‘Though she could manage to hobble
about the house, a long walk was out of the
question ; consequently she could not go to school
with him, and “help him,’ as he said, “to get
things started.” It was important that he should
be present the first day, so nothing better could
be done than wait for another boy, Johnny Briggs,
to go with him.

Johnny lived full half-a-mile in the ‘other
direction, and was, as Mrs. Gilbert would say,
“anything but a good boy; but then, poor child,”
she would add, “who can wonder at that? He



SCHOOL DAYS, ~ 35

has had such ungodly examples set him so much
of his life.” She had carefully kept Larry from
his influence, but companionship could not now -
be avoided, and she again wondered if she had
not been unwise in. keeping Larry so closely to
her side, and a tear dropped at the thought that
she could shelter her one little lamb no longer.

Johnny came along rather late, and to his care
Mrs. Gilbert confided Larry. ‘“You’ve been to
school before, Johnny,” and she pressed an apple
into his hand; “and maybe you can now and
then give my boy an inkling of what he is
expected to do, if the child’s at a loss.”

“‘He won't be so green after he’s been there a
couple of weeks,” responded Johnny, consolingly ;
“school is the place toxget the starch out of a
fellow.”

When the two boys arrived at the school-house,
they found the scholars had been called together.
There were fifteen present who had given their
names and had their seats assigned to them.

“ Come forward to the desk,” said Mr. Meredith,
the teacher, as the two boys entered the door.

Johnny took the lead with a shuffling step, giving
c



34 LARRY GILBERT.

a side grin to such scholars as he recognised on
his way.

The teacher gave one displeased glance at the
untidy dress of Johnny, and adding his name to
his list, directed him to a seat. Then he turned
to’Larry, As his keen glance took in at once the
bright face and neat dress, a feeling of relief
crossed his mind,

Larry gave a little nod with his head, at the
same time touching the curly lock of hair which

“hung over his forehead, just as he had been

directed to do by his grandmother. Then he
gave his name, and stood waiting for further
orders.

“Well, my boy,” asked Mr. Meredith, when he
had laid aside the book in which he had been
entering the names of the scholars, and in a tone
which showed that he liked the looks of the lad
before him, “what do you propose to do in this
new school-house ?”

Larry did not quite understand the question,
but he hesitated only a moment, then in a clear
voice he said—

“Fear God, and keep His commandments, sir.”



SCHOOL DAYS. 85

There was complete silence in the school-house
for a few moments, then a half-suppressed giggle
by Johnny Briggs, ended in an audible laugh
around the room.

Larry started at the sound, and looking inno-
cently at the teacher asked, “Wasn't that the
right answer, sir ?”

“Tt was a first-rate answer, my boy,” replied
Mr. Meredith, with feeling. “If all my scholars
would make the same resolve, and keep it, I
could promise you a very pleasant, harmonious
school this whole winter, for it would imply that
each one would do his duty to himself and his
companions. No scoldings or punishment of any
kind would then be necessary on my part, for all
remissness in study and attendance could be
easily accounted for. Why cannot we have this
happy state of things—the golden rule in con-
stant daily exercise among us?”

There was, of course, no reply, but Mr.
Meredith, no longer at a loss, took from his
pocket a small Testament, and said, “I will open
the exercises of the school this morning with
reading and prayer. ‘To-morrow I will expect,



36 LARRY GILBERT.

those of you who can read to be provided with a
Testament or Bible, when we shall read in turn.”

“T’m glad,” thought Larry, “that he’s one of
grandmother's sort;” and he listened with reverent
attention while Mr. Meredith read a chapter and
engaged in a short prayer. ‘

After this, classes in spelling, reading, and
arithmetic were formed, the scholars keeping
tolerable order until recess was announced, when
girls and boys started pell-mell for the door, and
were out before the voice of their astonished
teacher could be heard.

Making a note of these things as something to
be corrected at another time, he saw Larry quietly
leaving the room. “That boy will be my right-
hand man; if it were not for him, I believe
I should be thoroughly discouraged with the
material I have to work with.”

“Here comes the preacher,” called out George
Barton, the biggest boy in school. ‘Come, climb
this stump and give us another sermon.”

_ Larry did not see the joke at all “I don’t
know how to preach. You didn’t think they ever
made preachers of such little fellows as me, did



SCHOOL DAYS. _ 37

you now ?” and Larry’s laugh rang out so glee-
fully that it started the girls and then the boys
into a laugh also, so that Mr. Meredith, wondering
what the fun was about, went out of the school-
house to see for himself. :

__ His presence checked their mirth. “Laugh
away,” said he; “tell me what the joke is and
I will laugh too.”

“Why,” said Larry, almost bubbling over again
at the thought, “the boys don’t know me very
well, and George thought I was a little preacher,”
and his merry laugh sounded out again, starting
the rest, Mr. Meredith joining them.

- He saw at once that Larry’s simplicity and
good nature would stand him in good stead; and
enable him to ward off many sly taunts that
would be given him. For the boy’s own sake, it
would be better that he should take his own part,
trusting to time and a better understanding to
smooth over ordinary difficulties, while he would
try to be at hand and see there was fair play.

When the laugh was over, he said, “ Though
you are not a regular preacher, Larry, I agree
with George that you preached us all a very good



38 LARRY GILBERT.

sermon this morning ; one to which I hope we
- will all give good heed.”

Mr. Meredith returned to the school-room, and
George, who was looked up to as a wit by many
of the other boys, finding his first shot had fallen
harmless, thought he would try again, and was
just going to ask the boy about his tailor, when.
Larry, who was standing near, handed him a red
apple. “Take that home to your little Susy, will
you, George? She was at our house once with
your mother, and I made her a dolly out of a corn
cob, and tied a little gourd on for a head, and
_ dressed it in a cabbage leaf and grass ribbons,
and she liked it ever so much. What a pretty
little girl she is ; her eyes are just as bright as a
bunny, ain’t they ?” ia

Larry had fairly out-generalled his opponent
without knowing it. George loved this. sister
Susy better than he did anything in the world.
His heart warmed to hear her praised, and the
retort he intended died on his lips, and with a
confused look he started for the school-house, as
the bell summoned them to enter.

It was not until Larry had eaten his supper



SCHOOL DAYS. © 39°

that night and talked with his grandmother over
the events of the day that he understood what |
Mr. Meredith meant by his having preached a
sermon to himself and the scholars.

“Keep my boy as Thou hast kept him this
‘- day, dear Lord,” prayed the grandmother that
‘hight. And thus ended Larry's first day at
school, :



CHAPTER IV.

FOES WITHOUT.

TELL you what it is, grandmother, Mr.
{ Meredith is a ‘bully’ teacher, and no mis-
take ;—a real good one, I mean,” said Larry,
catching his grandmother’s eye, which showed her
‘ disapproval.
“The boys all talk that way, though, and hear-
ing them, the words come into my mind, and
I say them without thinking.”
“That does not make it right, my dear. But |
what is it you like so much in Mr. Meredith?”
“Qh! I can hardly tell you; I like everything
he does. Then he seems to know so much.
There isn’t a single question the scholars ask. but |
‘the can answer. The other day, when it- rained
hard at recess, so that we could not go out to

play, he drew a picture of an elephant on the
40 ee



FOES WITHOUT. AL
blackboard, and he told us all about the animals,
where they come from, and what they eat, and he
told us lots of stories that he had read in books
about them.

“And he can play ball as well as George, or

aE

any of the big boys, and-he can run so fast that



not one of the boys can catch him.’ And he has
promised to go with us on Saturday afternoon for
chestnuts. I told him about our big tree in the
woods, and that I was sure there were chestnuts
enough on it for the whole school, and he said
I might be the leader and show them the way.
George Barton did not like that very much, and
after school he got me to show him the tree, to
see if it is better than one he knows about. The |
chestnuts will be about right by Saturday—that
_ will give them three more hard frosts. The girls
"are not going—only the boys. Mr. Meredith
says he’ll take the girls walking some other
day.”

“You may ask Mr. Meredith to come home
~ with you to supper on Saturday evening. I have
never seen him, and I would like to get acquainted
with him.” :



42 LARRY GILBERT.

Larry was delighted at this proposition. “It
will be bright moonlight, too, and he won’t mind
walking home in the evening.”

“Or, if he would rather, he can stay all night
and sleep in the room,” said. his grandmother.

“The room” was one adjoining the kitchen,
and, like it, could be entered from the outside by
a door. .The walls were whitewashed, the paint
was lead colour, the carpet was made of woven rags
of every sort and hue. A plain bureau, with a
white cover, above which hung a small looking-
glass, stood on one side of the room opposite an
open fireplace. Four rush-bottomed chairs and a
high, curtained, feather-bed, covered with a bright,
pieced quilt, completed the furniture. A front
window, and. one back, let in the light. From the
one you saw the tall old forest trees which lined
the opposite side of the road ; the other showed in
summer the low bench with its bee-hives, and the
garden beds with their flower borders and sweet-
smelling herbs.

The kitchen was a large room, containing in
one corner the grandmother's bed, almost shielded
from view by its dark curtains, a large spinning-



FOES WITHOUT. 43

wheel, whose busy hum was heard on most winter
days, a dresser in one corner, which held all. the
crockery, a chest, a table, and a few chairs.

Opening from this room, and extending over
one end of the back porch, was a small room large
enough to contain a single bed for Larry, and one
chair. The attic at the present time was used
only as a store-room.

Mr. Meredith accepted the invitation with
pleasure. He had a great desire to see Mrs.
Gilbert, who, he was sure, was not an ordinary
woman, as the religious and moral training she
had given her grandson plainly showed. He had
not found any kindred spirits among the few
acquaintances he had made outside of the school.
The farmers in the neighbourhood were, in the
main, plain, hard working men, hospitable, but
practical, and unsympathic in their views. Mr.
Meredith coming from the home of a tender, loving
mother and warm-hearted sister, missed, more
than anything else, the affectionate sympathy to
which he had been accustomed.

Larry rose by daybreak on Saturday morning,
and after kindling the fire and hanging the tea



44 LARRY GILBERT.

kettle on the crane above it, started to the woods
to assure himself that the chestnuts were in a
proper condition, and to cut some of the under-
brush away with his hatchet, so that the falling
chestnuts might not find hiding-places among it.

He reached the place and looked at the tree,
scarcely believing his own senses. Some one, and
more than one, had evidently been there before
him. The ground was trampled about, and the

~ tree had been beaten by experienced hands. The —
ground was covered with empty burrs, but scarcely
one was to be seen upon the tree. Hastening
home, he burst into the kitchen where his grand-

~mother was getting breakfast, and told her the
sad news,

“Did you show the tree to any of the boys?”
she asked.

“To no one but George Barton;” and then, as
if suddenly enlightened, he added, “and I believe
it was George that stole them. He wasn’t at
school on Thursday ; he had been with his father
to Marleyville, he said, and had bought himself
a new sled with his own money, the mean thief!
Ill tell the teacher, see if I don’t.”



FOES WITHOUT. 45

~ “J don’t think I would, Larry,” mildly inter-
posed his grandmother. ‘George seems to have
a, kind of grudge against you, and it will not mend
it any to complain of him.”

« But, grandmother, how about the chestnuts ?
George has done it on purpose to make the
teachers and scholars laugh at me He thinks
I won’t find it out till I take them to the tree,
and that then they will have to go to the place
that he picked out.”

“Tecan arrange all that for you. There is more
than one chestnut tree on our ground, though you
have never seen them. When your father was
two.or three years older than you are now, he
picked several bushels, and your grandfather took
them to Medford when he went with grain. I
have been thinking we would try and gather some
this year, and send them with Tony the next time
he comes. Shell barks, too, will bring a good
price. We will hurry through our breakfast, and
still have time before school for me to go with you
to the place I spoke of, so that you will have no
trouble in finding it.”

Larry’s face grew bright in a minute. “You



46 LARRY GILBERT,

are the best grandmother in the whole world,”
said he, throwing his arms around her neck; “I
don’t know what I could ever do without you.”

Again Larry tripped through the woods with
his hatchet in hand, his grandmother leading the
way. She passed the big chestnut tree, and on
the other side of a clump of pines at the left were
two large chestnut trees filled with nuts.

“Tt’s queer 1 never saw these before,” said
Larry, “and so near the others too; but then I
never have been any farther in the woods than the
big chestnut tree.”

““Tt’s because you are a good and obedient boy
that I like to give you pleasure whenI can. Now
you must go back and get your dinner-basket, and
- go to school.”

The homes of the boys were so far apart that
they had agreed to bring their. dinners, and start
on the chestnut hunt as soon as school was over,
eating their lunch as they walked.

There was certainly a look of exultation on
George’s face as they were nearing the wood > but

when Larry suddenly turned off before they came

to the spoiled tree, and walked rapidly in another __ |



FOES WITHOUT. 47

direction, George called out: “Here, old fellow,
you are on the wrong road. I know the way
about your woods better than you do yourself.
Come on, Mr. Leader, this is the way.” And he
turned in the direction of the tree with a very
confident air.

The teacher and boys stopped and looked
toward Larry.

“T am going right,” said he. “I did intend to
take you to that tree George speaks of, but some
people were there early on Thursday morning and
helped themselves to the chestnuts.” He looked
at, George as he spoke, and it happened that Mr.
Meredith, too, was looking, and both saw the signs
of guilt he betrayed. Nothing more was said as
Larry led them to the new place.

There was a loud cheer from the boys as they
saw the trees laden with the bristling balls, and
joy was painted on every face but one. |

George Barton was again baffled in his efforts
to mortify Larry. Did the boy bear a charmed
life? or why was it that every attempt he made
against him recoiled upon himself ? George,
.;,With the help of their hired man, whom he had



48 LARRY GILBERT.

led to believe that permission had been granted
by Mrs. Gilbert, had robbed the chestnut tree—
his first motive being to bring Larry into ridicule ;
his second, to make a little money for himself
by the theft.

He did not suppose Larry knew of any other
tree which had not been already stripped, and to
have him turn the plot so completely on himself
by taking them to even a better place than he had
first intended, was a very bitter mortification to him.

He tried to make the best of it, as he did not
want to be suspected of having interfered, so his
laugh rang out the loudest of all the company,
and only one suspected how very uncomfortable
he really was.

When the shadows began to lengthen, Mr.
Meredith said it was time to separate; and, after
wishing one another “good-bye,” all but Mr.
Meredith, Larry, and Johnny Briggs moved off
with their filled baskets, while these three walked
slowly through the woods towards Larry’s home.

“This is an uncommonly fine old wood,” said
the teacher, looking up at some of the tall trees

they were passing.



FOES WITHOUT. 49

“Isn't it?” replied Larry, with an admiring
nod. “I think, Mr. Meredith, there is not any-
where such another. An acre of it belongs to
grandmother; and Mr. Spering, who bought most
of the farm-land after grandfather died, cuts wood
for us on the shares, spring and fall. I mean,”
said Larry, seeing Mr. Meredith did not under-
stand, “he brings us one load of wood after it is
cut, and then takes the next to his own house.”

“Then the chestnut trees are on your own
ground ?”

“Yes, sir; but I never saw the trees we went
to to-day till this morning. Grandmother never
allows me to go farther in the woods than this
big chestnut tree we are coming to. She is
always afraid something will happen to me; for
if I should die she would be all alone. This
morning when I told her some one had taken all
the chestnuts from this tree she told me of the
two we went to to-day, and showed me where they
were. I am afraid she will never let me try to
cut down trees; she don’t even like me to stand
by when the men are chopping; for my father

was killed by a falling tree.”
; D



50 LARRY GILBERT.

“She was awfully scared about his going to
school,” broke in Johnny; “she wanted me to
kind o’ help him through, but I think he can take
pretty good care of his own self; don’t you, Mr.
Meredith ?”

“JT think he can, indeed,” said the teacher
smiling. “If he lives up to the sermon he
preached us the first day of school, he has a good
Friend above who will never fail him, though all
the world should turn against him.”

“There’s Larry’s house, and there ’s his grand-
- mother,” said Johnny, pointing towards them.
The old lady stood in the doorway shading her
eyes from the setting sun, and peering forward to
see if they were coming.

With kindly courtesy she came down the front
path and opened the gate as they approached,
giving the teacher a cordial welcome to her
cottage.

She bade Johnny wait a moment, and Mr.
Meredith, from the window, saw her hand him an
apple and a generous slice of gingerbread.

“T see you know how to give the cup of cold

water,” he said, as she came in.



FOES WITHOUT. : 51

“JT am interested in the child,” she replied;
“and then I doubt whether he will get enough
to satisfy his hunger when he reaches home. -
His father went along the road half-an-hour ago
so drunk that he was scarcely able to walk. His
wife was once tidy and active, but an intemperate
husband and a large family unprovided for, seems
to have turned her into an irritable and thriftless
woman.” g

“Johnny shows his training,” replied Mr. Mere-
dith ; “but he seems very tractable, and I do not
despair of instilling into his mind some principles
which may lead him to a better life.”

When Larry found that Mr. Meredith intended
sending his chestnuts to his sister at Medford, he
insisted upon adding to them all that. he had
himself gathered. Mr. Meredith accepted this
offer with the understanding that he might assist
them on the next Saturday, when they expected
to gather their nuts for market.

“Tony Myers expects to be with us that day,
too. He will stay over Sunday, and Monday he
will take our nuts with him and sell them for us
at Medford.” 7}



52 LARRY GILBERT.

Larry told Mr. Meredith how his first acquaint-
ance with Tony was made, and the latter said he
should be very glad to know one who had proved
himself to be such a valuable friend.

In Mr. Meredith’s next letter to his sister he
wrote: “TI find Mrs. Gilbert, Larry’s grandmother,
areal mother in Israel. She is a sensible, practical
woman, a true Christian, full of faith and of the
Holy Ghost. Since I have met her I have lost
some of that feeling of loneliness which has
possessed me ever since J came into this mount-
ainous region, and I feel quite sure that a longer
acquaintance with her will only increase the esteem

in which I hold her and her grandson Larry.”



CHAPTER VY.
CHRISTMAS.

ARRY, with Tony’s help, had made a sled,
which, from the time the first snow fell,
he drew to school every morning. Tony

was not a born carpenter; the sled was in truth
a very rude, lop-sided affair, though in the owner’s
estimation it was a perfect treasure. It must go
to somewhere at the bottom of the hill when once
it was started, although it had @ fashion of veering
off from a straight line, and now and then PURINE
over and giving the rider an upset.

Larry did not mind that, nor the laugh and
ridicule that George Barton tried to excite in the
rest of the scholars. Larry was generous, too,
and boys like Johnny Briggs, who would never

have intimated to George that they would like to
53



54 LARRY GILBERT.

ride upon his sled, had no backwardness in asking
Larry for that favour. —

Mr. Meredith was a keen observer. He saw
that Larry, though delighting in the sport himself,
was always willing to share his sled with the
younger and poorer children, while he had never
once seen” George's sled leave the hands of its
owner,

One morning Mr. Meredith received a letter
from his sister, and one sentence of it read in this
way :

“You must thank your friend Larry over and
over again for his chestnuts. I never saw any so
large and fine. I am greatly interested in: your
account of the boy, and I mean to send him a nice
Christmas present. I shall depend upon you to
tell me what will suit him best. My idea is not
so much a useful present as one that will give
him real pleasure; for, from your account, I
should judge he has never been favoured with
many games or toys.” :

In return, Mr. Meredith wrote: “Enclosed find
one dollar (4s.). Add it to the sum you mean to
expend, and buy as handsome a sled as you can



CHRISTMAS. 55

find for the money. Joseph Martin, who keeps
the variety store corner Fourth and Berkley, is a
good friend of mine, and will select one for you.
Send it to my address two days before Christmas,
to Marleyville, by way of the Medford stage.”

Larry's Christmas times were never seasons of
plenty. A yarn tippet, stockings, and «mittens, a
couple of dough-nuts and ginger-cakes, which
Grandmother Gilbert cut into odd shapes intended
to represent men, horses, and birds, and which,
as they never came in those shapes at any other
season, had always excited Larry’s profound
admiration, were the best of his gifts.

There was great boasting among the boys at
school as to their expected gifts at the coming
Christmas. George talked a great deal about a
fine knife he had been promised. “It’s to be a
regular three-blader ; the little blade, sharp as a
razor, will cut a hair; the large blade will go
through a board slick as a weasel.”

“T never knew a weasel could go through a
board,” innocently remarked Larry.

The boys laughed, but George made no reply.

“ My aunt is going to give me a pair of ban-



56 LARRY GILBERT.

tams,” said Joe Brown. “And IJ will have a
Newfoundland dog,” said Charlie Taylor.

So one and another told their expectations until
poor Johnny Briggs, who couldn’t remember a
time when he had fared better on that day than
any other, asked :

“What ll you get, Larry?” _

“A pair of mittens, I guess, and maybe a new
rithmetic, if grandmother can spare the money.”

“T’d like to see anybody give me mittens or
school-books,” said George, contemptuously ; “I’d
pitch ’em in the fire.”

“You seemed to like the mittens grandmother
gave you last Christmas; anyhow you wore
them.”

“She knit ‘em to pay for the sausage and apple-
butter mother took to your house,” said George,
sharply. “Your granny pays for what she gets
in yarn,” he added with a drawl.

“Your mother didn’t want any pay for what
she brought,” said Larry, touched by George’s
sneering tone. ‘She said she never could pay
grandmother for helping her to nurse little Susy
through that spell of sickness ; and I’d have been



CHRISTMAS, 57

real sorry if Susy had died that time,” and Larry’s
voice fell.

George now felt as if he was choking. Could
he ever forget that day when he lay stretched
upon the garret floor suffering such sorrow as he
had never felt before? when even the doctor had
given his sister up, and poor little Susy’s breath
seemed like the dim flame of a candle just ready
“to go out! And he remembered when he had
heard a step on the stairs, how he had stopped his
ears that he might not hear the announcement he
was so sure would follow; and then a hand had
been laid tenderly on his bowed head, and kind
Mrs. Gilbert had made him understand that Susy’s
life was likely to be spared to them.

The whole scene had flashed before him in a
moment, and he turned away from Larry witout
another word.

Again Larry gained a victory.

There had been an abundance of snow all through
December, and the sleighing was excellent. Tony
arrived in his sleigh the night before Christmas ;
and, for some reason or other, he came without

bells upon his horse, though he admitted to Larry



58 LARRY GILBERT.

he had them safe in the sleigh-box. This was the
reason that Larry, who had been listening for the
sound of the bells, did not know his friend had
arrived until he heard him stamping the snow
from his feet at the back door. Tony was not
alone, for behind him stood Mr. Meredith. The
two stepped into the kitchen.

“T hope, Mrs. Gilbert, you will not send me
away, though I come without an invitation from
you. I had one from my friend Tony.”

“And I-hope, grandmother,” broke in Tony,
“you ll not think less of your Christmas present
because it comes the night before,” at the same
time placing a large covered basket on the table.
“Jl tell you at once, the master is ’sponsible for
the most of it; I only put in a morsel of sugar
and. tea, and the like.”

“You are both heartily welcome,” said grand-
mother, shaking them by the hand; “and Larry,
I know, is happy to see his two best friends, as
he calls you.”

The guests did not seem inclined to leave the
warm kitchen, where the large logs in the fite-
place were sending up showers of hickory sparks.



CHRISTMAS. 59

“Youll not be in my way if you’d rather stay
here than go in the room,” said the grandmother,
as she drew out upon the hearth some hot coals,
and placed upon them her gridiron, on which she
had put some beef-steak to broil, which she had
found in the basket.

Larry spread the table, filled the kettle, and
helped in every way he could. Mr. Meredith and
Tony, in the meantime, had withdrawn to one
side of the stand upon which lay the family
Bible.

“TI wish I was better posted in some things in
this book,” said Tony. “It’s only lately I’ve
cared for the sight of it, only since I’ve known
Grandmother Gilbert and Larry. But, Mr. Mere-
dith, ‘seein’ is believin’,’ and when you see one
as lives the Bible right out in her daily life and
conduct, as you may say, you can’t doubt its
truth any longer. At least that’s my case.
Larry’s grandmother took me in hand the first
chance she got, and she never stopped till she
got me willin’ to own my guilt and sue for pardon.
There’s a verse somewhere that says you must
give a reason for the hope that isin you. Now,



60 LARRY GILBERT,

_ there’s many an idle fellow that ll take and twist
and turn Scripture till he seems to make white
black and black white, and then he says, ‘ Explain
that, Tony, if you can ;’ and maybe I'll be so
dumbfounded that I haven’t a word to say, unless
it is, ‘Get thee behind me, Satan; thou savourest
not of the things which are of God.’ Some time
I would like you to explain two or three hard
points, if you will.” ;

“T will gladly give you any help I can, Tony.
To understand everything in the Bible would
make it needful that we should have the wisdom
of the Creator, and there are many things in the
sacred Word which, if we cannot understand, we
must still admit to be true. In a higher state all
will be made known to us. As Christ said to
Peter, ‘What I do thou knowest not now, but
thou shalt know hereafter” A parent may under-
stand the cause of the sound which comes from
his little child’s toy, but it is a mystery to the
child; his powers of mind are not able to grasp
the idea; and many children have cut up their
little drums to see where all the noise comes
from. And so with difficult doctrines; they are



CHRISTMAS. 61

not mysteries to God, but truths clear and certain,
though dark to me. To me, this thought only
causes me to love and adore my heavenly Father
the more, knowing that I do not put my trust
and confidence in the declarations of a feeble and
short-sighted being like myself, but on One far
above all human power.”

The conversation closed here, for grandmother's
‘supper was on the table, and the strangers were
invited to draw up their chairs and partake of it.

After the meal was over: Mr. Meredith unfolded
a plan about which he had been thinking for some

time. It was to try to obtain the consent of the
"school directors to allow him to start a Sunday
school in the red school-house.

Mrs. Gilbert and Larry were delighted.

“TI think there will be no difficulty in obtain-
ing scholars,” said Mr. Meredith; “but, excepting
yourself, I know of no one I can get for a
teacher.”

“I think Mrs. Barton for one will be willing.
She lives quite near the school, and I think she
is a true Christian. The Bartons have been a
worldly family ever since I knew them, but I’ve



62 ' LARRY GILBERT.

seen a great change in the mother since the
severe sickness of her little girl.”

_ “T am glad to know about her, and ae
certainly see her. George is one of my trials at
school, and partly for this cause I have been
remiss in visiting them.” ess

Mrs. Gilbert mentioned two or three others
who might be willing to assist in teaching, and
Mr. Meredith decided, if the way was clear, to
organise the school the first Sabbath in the new
year.

Larry had been so excited with company that
he had gone to bed without hanging up his
stocking for the fairies, but his grandmother
going to the chest, brought out a yarn stocking,
which she hung on a nail near the fireplace,
having first put in the new mittens and cakes,
Tony looked at Mr. Meredith, who nodded, and
then quietly opened the outside door, which he
shortly again entered, carrying a sled on which
lay many packages. The sled, so different from
any she had ever seen before, caught the grand-
~ mother’s eye, and she exclaimed, ‘“ Where in the
world did that come from !”



CHRISTMAS. 63

“My sister sends it to ere for a Christmas
present in return for the nuts he sent her. This
Bible I bought for him myself. I feel indebted
to him every day ; his influence in school is worth
more than I can tell you.”

“And I, too, got him a book,” said Tony,
“ I think every American boy should know about
him. And here is some candy the druggist sent.
I happened to be in his store, and he’s always
particular when he sees me to ask after ‘his little
herb boy’ When he found I was coming right
here he made up this parcel for Larry. And,
grandmother, here’s a shawl for you. It was
in a store window in Medford, and the minute I
set eyes on it, I says to myself, ‘That’s Granny
Gilbert, and no mistake ;’ so here it is, and I hope
you ‘ll like it.”

Grandmother could scarcely find words to tell
her thanks. “God bless you both for your kind-
ness to the widow and fatherless. This will be,
God willing, the happiest Christmas my boy has
ever seen.”

And so it proved. The next morning Larry



64 LARRY GILBERT.

both laughed and cried at the sight of his treas-
ures. “Oh, Mr. Meredith!” “Oh Tony!” he
exclaimed, as he thanked them over and over
again.

“Now I'll give my old sled to Johnny. I'll
take it right up before breakfast.”

Grandmother willingly assented; she had a
pair of mittens for Johnny, and Mr. Meredith,
knowing his need, had bought a stout pair of
boots for him. Besides these presents a basket
was tied on the sled, containing potatoes and
apples. A wood sled happened to be passing
just as Larry was starting, and the driver will-
- ingly stopped to let him mount on it, so that
by holding the rope he could pull the sled after
him. *

«You are out early,” said the man.

“Tam only going up to Mrs. Briggs’s. I got
a present of a beautiful new sled this morning,
and J am going to take my old one to Johnny;
and then I have some things besides for them
in the basket. Mr. Briggs spends all his money
_ for drink, and I guess they are pretty poor.” -

“T reckon they are,” said the man thought-









A CHRISTMAS GIFT TO JOHNNY.—p. 64.



CHRISTMAS. 65

fully. “I used to do something to help them
now and then, but it’s like putting water in a
leaky vessel. Briggs’s wife is a cousin of mine,
and I don’t suppose it is hardly right to blame
her for mismanagement. It’s likely my wife
would change as much as she has if she had a
drunken husband to live with. Here isa dollar
you can put in her hand (mind you don’t let
her worthless man see you do it), and say to her
Hiram Black sent it; and you can say, too, if
nothing happens more than I know at present,
that early next week I'll throw her off a load of
wood.”

It is almost needless to say that Larry’s visit
to the Briggs family that morning brought a.
ray of comfort to the mother’s heart, and hap-
piness to the children, who often went to bed
with their hunger unsatisfied. Johnny had
never felt so rich in his life before To
have three Christmas presents, when he did
not expect one, was as surprising as it was
delightful.

Of course Larry’s sled at school made a sensa-

tion ; even George Barton had to admit it was a
. E



66 B LARRY GILBERT.

perfect beauty, and that Larry was not such a fool,
after all, to send his nuts away, as he had thought .
him. “It seems to me that fellow is always
getting ahead of the rest of us, and without trying
to do it either,” said George to one of the boys.
“Who would have thought that for a few quarts
of chestnuts he would have got a present like
that ?”



CHAPTER VI.

TURNING A NEW LEAF.

Mw MEREDITH for some time had known
that Johnny Briggs was a drunkard’s son,
and his heart often ached for the poorly-

clad boy who came shuffling into the school-house

day after day, bearing the signs of great poverty

and neglect at home. .

His chief endeavour was to try and instil right
principles into Johnny’s mind, and help him to-
feel, amid all his discouragements and wretched-
ness, that there was a better life beyond, if he
chose to live for it.

“It matters not,” he said to Johnny one day,
“so far as your future life is concerned, how far
down your father has sunk in sin and degrada-
tion; he has not the power to crush you, unless

you give your consent. Many a boy has turned
67



68 LARRY GILBERT.

from an evil example, and gone upward in life
until he became a man highly esteemed and
respected,” :

Johnny was a little fellow for his years, with
lines on a face made sober and old by want of.
sufficient food and proper care. He attached
himself to Mr. Meredith at once, and though,
for want of proper discipline, he was at first
somewhat disorderly, under Mr. Meredith’s firm
administration he settled down into a docile and
exemplary scholar.

It took some time to move Johnny from his ©
listlessness, but after awhile the light drifted into
his soul, and he began to have aspirations for
something better than his old life, and to struggle
to break the web of circumstances which held him
so closely.

He had many talks with his teacher on the sub-
ject, who strongly urged him to try to bring about
a reform at home; and one afternoon, as they
walked together on their way from school, Mr.
Meredith begged him to begin at once.

“But, Myr. Meredith, I don’t know how to
begin,” said Johnny, despairingly. “I never saw



TURNING A NEW LEAF. 69

it look nice at our house as it does at Granny
Gilbert’s. Everything is upside down, or broken,
or cracked ; the children haven’t got even as good
clothes as I have, and mother goes about cross and
bad, and hasn’t a good word even for the dog.
She says we children are the pests of her life, and
she wishes many a time that she was dead, for she
says she ’ll never get any rest till they make her a
bed in the churchyard. Then father is drunk so
often, and he and mother quarrel, and sometimes
he beats her. I don’t think, Mr. Meredith,” he
added, as the full state of the case presented
itself to his mind, “that I’ll ever be able to make
things straight at home.”

“<*T can do all things through Christ, which
strengtheneth me,’” repeated Mr. Meredith.
“Nothing is too hard for God. We will both
pray to Him to show us what to do. Here we
are at Mrs. Gilbert’s door. We will go in and
state our case to her. I have great faith in her
opinions and advice.”

Mrs. Gilbert received them with her usual
cordiality, and was interested in what they had to

say.



70 . LARRY GILBERT.

“T have often thought of doing something for
my neighbour Briggs’ family,” she said; “I can
see things are growing worse every day. It truly
grieves me to see Mr. Briggs as-he generally is
when he passes, and to remember what he was
when he first moved up to that place. Johnny,
here, was a baby, and Mrs. Briggs was a tidy,
smart, woman. She used to ride to church with
us now and then. After they had lived there for
three years they left the neighbourhood ; and five
years later, when they came back, there was a
great change in them both. I thought Mrs.
Briggs did not make me very welcome when
I went to see her, and as she never comes here,
I have been satisfied to let matters rest between
us. But I can see now that I ought to have per-
severed, and I might have helped to keep up her
courage, if nothing else. I often think, if the
Lord should be as mindful of our shortcomings
as we are of those about us, who of us could
stand? and I know I have not laid the interests
of this family before the Lord,” said the old lady,
humbly. “I have been slack concerning the
promises, although I know that with the Lord



TURNING A NEW LEAF. 71

there is always forgiveness and plenteous redemp-
tion.”

“There is no better time than now,” said
Mr. Meredith, “for His ear is always open unto
our ery.” And they knelt down in the kitchen,
Mrs. Gilbert, Mr. Meredith, Johnny, and Larry,
who had come in while they were talking. The
teacher made a most fervent appeal for the father
of the wretched family, that the desire for strong
drink be taken away; and for the mother he
prayed that patience might be given to her in her
afflictions. And then he prayed for Johnny, that
he might be an instrument in His hands of
lightening his mother’s burdens, and leading his
father to a better life.

“Now, Johnny,” said Mrs. Gilbert, when they
had risen, “ you had better go home ; your father
may need his supper; I saw him pass shortly
before you came in. He may have had something
to drink, but he did not stagger. Perhaps you
can coax him to stay in to-night. Show him
what you are studying; he has good learning,
your father has; I heard him say he went to
school steadily when he was a boy till he was



72 LARRY GILBERT.

sixteen. But as likely as not there is nothing in
the house for you to eat, and I am afraid I have
but little to send either. Here is a dish of baked
apples, and a fresh loaf of bread, and enough
coffee for a cup for your father and mother. I'll
put them in Larry’s pail; they ll be handy to
carry. Now, step along, my son,” patting him on
the back.

On reaching home Johnny found his mother
outside the house, trying with a dull axe to cut
~ some of the wood Mr. Black had brought.

“ Here, mother, give me the axe; that’s too
hard work for you. Take these pieces and put in
the stove, and I’ll be right in with more, and
we ll have supper.”

“There’s little you’ll find to eat. Your father

is in, and clamouring too. Why don’t he bring



something we can eat? the lazy, drunken 2

“Qh, don’t, mother; don’t talk so to-night.
I’ve got a nice supper here in the pail. Granny
Gilbert gave it to me; and there is coffee for you
and father. I’m going to be a better boy,
mother, and be a help to you; and maybe both
of us together will be able to save father.”



TURNING A NEW LEAF, 73

The mother did not reply. Her lips quivered,
and merely shaking her head, she took the pail
and went into the house.

Mrs. Briggs had lost the little ambition she
once had. She managed to exist, and that was
all. At times there was an unsatisfied longing
for something better—a craving for sympathy,
and at other times a desire to get away from her
toil and misery and lie down and rest. But one
day was like another, and she went on working
and drudging more like a machine than a human
being, always irritable and fault-finding ; although
beneath the crust of harshness there was really a
feeling of tenderness for her family.

Johnny’s words stirred her feelings, and had
put some life into her efforts while brushing up
the hearth, washing the faces of the younger
children, and giving a more orderly look than
usual to the table.

Johnny saw the improvement ata glance, and
gave an encouraging nod to his mother. Having
thrown down the wood, he walked right over to
the window where his father sat.

“I’m real glad you are home to-night, father ;



74 LARRY GILBERT,

I’ve brought my slate home, and I want you to
help me with my sums. You will, won’t you ?”

“Sums! I’ve got to go out,” said the man,
moodily, “if that woman ever gets me a bite to
eat. I don’t know as I’ll wait any longer for
her,” and he made a half motion to rise.

The quick words in reply which Mrs. Briggs
was about to utter were stopped by an imploring
look from her boy.

“Qh, father, smell the coffee! It will be ready
in a minute; we’ve a good supper to-night.
Don’t go; I’m so sorry it wasn’t ready sooner.
I was slow in getting the wood cut.”

i Why can’t the lazy thing cut her own wood ?”

“’Cause,” said Johnny, interrupting, “I’ve
elected myself to be wood-chopper in the Briggs
family ; and Sam’s to be chip-picker, ain’t you,
Sam ?” addressing his younger brother. a

There was certainly something the matter with
Johnny. ven the father, blunted in his natural
feelings, could not help seeing how changed he
was from the idle, impudent boy he had usually
been. :

“See here, father, these are the sums—all that



TURNING A NEW LEAF. 75

page in compound addition. Granny Gilbert says
you were a master hand in doing arithmetic when
you were a boy.”

“Well, give us your pencil, and let me try.”
In a few minutes Mr. Briggs had finished the
sums.

“What good figures you make,’ exclaimed
Johnny. “They’re every bit as good as Mr.
Meredith’s; look, mother; see, Sam. Now, ain’t
they nice figures? After supper you ll show me
a little about the sums; I don’t see how you got
that answer.”

There was less sparring than usual at the table.
The mother felt restrained, and even Mr. Briggs
found himself growing better tempered under the
reviving influence of the coffee, which for a time
~ took away the intense thirst for strong drink
from which he was suffering.

The wind sounded cold and dreary as it whistled

around the house, and the unusual comfort and ©

warmth. within doors all aided in making it easier
for Johnny to carry out his plan of enticing his
father to remain at home.

After he had explained the sums, Mr. Briggs



76 LARRY GILBERT.

was induced to draw a horse on the slate for Sam, -
and then an eagle, while the warm praises of his
children, as new as they were evidently sincere,
made him feel more contented than he had felt
for weeks. When little Joe actually climbed upon
his father’s knee—a seat he could not remember
ever having occupied before—Johnny gave another
bright little nod to his mother, to which she
returned only an incredulous smile, as if she knew
too well that such a state of things would not last,
and that her husband would soon be as bad
as ever.

But hopeful Johnny thought he saw the victory
won, and his heart grew buoyant, as a happy
home in the future seemed to him already cer-
tain; a home that Mr. Meredith might come and
visit, and where he might kneel down and pray
as he had done that day at Grandmother Gil-
bert’s.

Johnny kept awake until his father had gone to
bed, and then, with a prayer of earnest thanks-
giving for what the Lord had enabled him to do,
and asking for help in the future, he crept into
his bed alongside of Sam, and went to sleep.



TURNING A NEW LEAF. U7

The mother remained by the fire watching the
embers die out one by one. “If I hadn’t seen
this thing tried so many times before I might
almost have a morsel of hope, but I can’t feel
there is any luck like that for me this side of the
grave. And then there’s Johnny. I never saw ~
a child change as he has. I wouldn't be a bit
surprised if he was getting ready for some kind
of sickness. I am sure he wouldn’t act so
unnatural if he was right well. The idea of his
thinking he can save his father! Haven't I
pleaded with the man on my bended knees to let
the vile drink alone, and what did I ever get but
abuse and curses?” and the thought roused again
the angry nature of the woman, and put to flight
all her tender feelings.

“T knew you might just as well expect water
to run up hill as to think he was going to change
his ways all of a sudden,” was the salutation
‘Johnny received from his mother in the morning.

“Why, mother ! you don’t mean father’s gone ?”

“Gone! indeed he’s gone; could hardly wait
for daylight. But what’s the use of your taking
on like that? It isn’t the first time in your life



78 LARRY GILBERT.

you have heard of your father going to the dram-
shop.”

For Johnny, with his head resting against the
table, sobbed bitterly. He had been so hopeful,
and this was a cruel disappointment.

* Oh, mother!” he said atlast. “I did think
my prayers for father were going to be answered.
I thought he would eat his breakfast, and then
I would go with him and coax him past the
tavern, on to the place where he works. Then
I meant to wait for him to-night after school and
bring him home. I thought maybe Mr. Meredith
would come with me; he would know well how
to talk to him.”

“There is no use,” replied the mother, “not the
least in the world, in wasting your time, or words,
or prayers, on an old sot like him. It has been
tried too often. As to your praying, it is no more ;
than idle wind. The Lord takes no account of
such as we are, or He would have righted matters
in this house long ago. We are all in the same:
boat, and likely to be so as long as we live; and
if death is a long sleep, as some say, the sooner it
comes to some of us the better.”



TURNING A NEW LEAF. 79

>

“Tll never give up praying,” said Johnny.
“Mother,” he said, turning suddenly to her, “I’ve
started out on the Lord’s side; I am not going
back ; I am going to stick to Him through every-
thing, and I know He’ll carry me through. And
you mustn't think that death is only a sleep ; it
isn’t so. It is going to be a dreadful time for them
that’s gone against the Lord Jesus all their lives
when they leave this world. They will then be
judged for every wicked thing they’ve done, and
there will be nobody to take their part. Do,
mother, try to be a Christian ; it will make your
troubles so much lighter if you have Jesus for your
friend.”

Mrs. Briggs did not answer a word. She put
Johnny’s breakfast on the table, and then dressed
the younger children, her mind agitated with new
thoughts, while Johnny’s words kept ringing in
her ears: “Do, mother, try to be a Christian !”

———rf+- ——_



CHAPTER VIL

EFFORTS FOR GOOD.

AVING determined to start a prayer meeting
i in the neighbourhood, Mr. Meredith had
for some time been looking about for a
suitable place in which to hold it. It must. be
central and of good size.

Failing to satisfy himself, he walked one even-
ing to the little red cottage to consult Mrs. Gilbert
on the subject. He found her at home, and
almost immediately stated his business. “I am .
ina dilemma, Mrs. Gilbert,” he added, “and, as
usual, come to you to help me out of it.”

Grandmother thought a moment before she
spoke : “ Mrs. Hunter’s back room would be a very
suitable place, and I haven't a doubi that it could
be had once a-week. She has small children,
and seldom gets out to church, and will, I think;

80.

”



EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 81

enjoy having a prayer-meeting brought into her
house.”

“Mrs. Hunter’s!” replied the teacher in a tone
expressing great surprise ; “do you mean at the
tavern !”

“Yes,” said she, smiling at his look ; “and I am
truly astonished if you have to learn from me how
different. the atmosphere in Mrs. Hunter’s back
room is from that in Mr. Hunter’s front one.

“Tf you do not object,” she continued, “as it
is moonlight, and I feel uncommonly well, we
_ might walk over there and see about it at once.
I shall be glad to have the meetings commence.
I have had one or two talks with Mrs. Briggs
lately ; the woman is wonderfully softened. The
Spirit is evidently striving with her, and though
she tries to resist it, she cannot shut her eyes to
the knowledge that the Spirit of the Lord has
come and taken up His abode in the heart of her
child. I think Johnny may induce her to attend
the prayer meeting, though for many reasons she
would refuse to go to church.”

The tavern was midway between Mrs. Gilbert’s

and the school-house, a little to the left of the
F



82 LARRY GILBERT.

direct road. Crossing a fence near the house was
along narrow trough, which conducted a stream
_ of running water into a large horse-trough. Near
this was the sign-post, about ten feet high, on which
was a square board, hung loosely in a frame, which,
when it felt the force of the wind, swung and
ereaked lazily to and fro. Superstitious travellers
had more than once been startled by the sound on
a dark night; but the sight of it in the daytime
had encouraged the heart of many a stranger
seeking for rest and refreshment.

Upon this sign was painted the picture of an
animal, which might have answered for a horn-
less cow or a bear. The older folks considered it
a cow, but the children believed it to be a bear,
and stoutly defended that idea when it was
assailed. Hiven the landlord did not know what.
it had been intended for, as it had been put up
long before his time. :

The true name, however, was not at all essen-
tial, as the place always went by the name of
“The Cross Roads,” or “ The Tavern.”

It was a place of some note in the eyes of the
farmers round about, as there elections and county



EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 83

meetings were generally held, and the bar-room
was also found to be a convenient place where any
public measure of the day which came up for dis-
cussion, could be defended or condemned.

In front of the tavern was a long, low porch
with wocden benches each side of the door which
opened directly into the bar-room.,

Mrs. Gilbert led the way round to the side of
the house, and opened a door into a small entry
at the rear of the bar-room. On the other side
was the waiting and dining-room, a large and
cheerful apartment, and here they found Mrs.
Hunter and her two children.

After some conversation, the visitors made
known the object. of their visit, and having heard
what they had to say, Mrs. Hunter at once gave a
cordial assent to their proposition.

“ Perhaps on consulting your husband you may
find it necessary to change your mind,” said
Mr. Meredith, who feared the lady might be
rather premature in taking so little time to
consider.

“T think not, but perhaps it will be as well to
speak of it to James while you are here. Jack,”



84 LARRY GILBERT,

to one of the children, “ask your father to step
here a moment.”

Mr. Hunter answered the summons at once,
shook hands warmly with Mrs. Gilbert, and also
with Mr. Meredith, to whom he said—

“Glad to make your acquaintance, sir; you’re
doing a good work among the youngsters in the
neighbourhood, I hear. Mr. Barton says there has
never been so orderly a school, to his knowledge,
in the county. In another year we will have one
to send I hope. Mother here is tender with her
‘boys, but I tell her we can’t keep them wrapped
in cotton all their lives.”

Mrs. Hunter told him why she had summoned
him from the bar-room, and though a half-amused
and doubtful look passed over his face, he promptly
answered, “ You shall do just as you like about it, .

lary.”

. “You see, Mr. Meredith,” turning to him as he
spoke, “I tell mother she shall do just as she
pleases with this part of the house, provided she
don’t interfere with me at the other end. I call
that fair and square; don’t you? I know,” he

continued, breaking into the subject for which, for



EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 85

some reason, he always in the presence of certain
people felt an apology or explanation necessary,
“there’s many a one calls liquor-selling a mean
business, and tries to run it down; but if a man
don’t buy his drinks from me he will go some-
where else for them, and if he uses more than is
good for him I am not to blame, for that is his
own look-out. Salt is a good article of food, used
in moderation, and yet I’ve been informed if
taken in large quantities it is a poison, and a man
can swallow enough of it to kill him; but that is
no reason why the stores should not keep it for
sale, and sell as much as is called for ; isn’t that
_ so?” and Mr. Hunter showed by his manner that
he considered this to be conclusive.

“Every man must decide these questions with
his own conscience,’ replied Mr. Meredith.
“There would always be one especial obstacle in
my way that would deter me from selling liquor,
and that is a verse in the Bible which reads, ‘ Woe
unto him that giveth his neighbour drink, that
puttest thy bottle to him, and makest him
drunken. I should be afraid, Mr. Hunter, to have

that curse resting on me.”



86 - LARRY GILBERT.

“When you come to Bible quoting, mother will
likely sympathise more closely than I can, but no
- doubt there are many subjects about which we
wouldn’t disagree; step in again to see us some-
time soon, and we'll hunt them up. Just now

>

I’ve some one waiting for me;” and the good-
natured landlord withdrew to his own more con-
genial apartment.

Mr. Hunter was a kind husband and father,
and very temperate for a man in his position,
never drinking to excess himself, and even striv-
ing at times to persuade some of his friends
and neighbours to refrain when he saw they
had already drunk more than was good for
them.

But where there is one who has sufficient force
of character to keep from the worst forms of
drunkenness, there are many who, having acquired ,
a taste for liquor, yield to a craving for more,
utterly reckless of the consequences.

And such had been Mr. Briggs. Like other
men, when he first began the habit of drinking he
had self-repect which restrained him from being
known as a drunkard, but, as the habit grew upon



EFFORTS FOR GooD. 87

him, his moral nature was weakened by the
increased appetite, and when poverty began to-
show itself in the family, instead of this being an
incentive to retrace his steps, the man became
selfish, deceitful, and a tyrant to those whom he
should have protected and cherished.

“What a power for evil in this world is the
whisky business,” said Mr. Meredith, as they were
returning to the cottage. ‘ How many loop-holes
of escape it has, and how very hard it is to make
any impression upon those who are its avowed
friends and supporters! I do really think that
Satan’s power would be cut down one-half, could
we see this enemy to religion destroyed.”

“We must wait the Lord’s own time,” said .
Mrs. Gilbert. “We know that the day is coming
when all the kingdoms of this world shall become
the kingdoms of our Lord and of His Christ, and
for this blessed coming we must work and wait.
The liquor traffic has come before me as a great
evil all my life, and is connected with my first
memories of childhood. You have heard, I sup-
pose, of the Whisky Rebellion of Pennsylvania ?”

“TI know there was such a rebellion, but my



88 LARRY GILBERT.

knowledge is very imperfect. I shall be very glad
to hear your account of it. Did you live in the
neighbourhood of it?”

‘I was born in Washington County, Penn-
sylvania, where my father was a small landholder.
It was shortly after the Slave Question War, when
all kinds of merchandise were very dear, and money
was very scarce. Indeed, everything that was
obtained outside of our own raising was got by
exchanging such things as we had for others that
we needed from a distance. One of the chief
articles of exchange was the whisky made from
the spare rye. A certain amount of grain was
kept for family use, and the rest, when distilled into |
whisky, was sent to Harrisburg and Philadelphia,
and exchanged for salt, sugar, iron, or whatever
was needed by the settlers.”

“ Why didn’t they sell the grain without going .
to the trouble of distilling it ?”

“For this reason: all cartage was done on the
backs of horses, for there were no carriage roads of
any account. Now, I have heard my father say
that while a horse could carry on his back but
four bushels of grain at a time, he could carry the



EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 89

product of twenty-four bushels of grain when
- turned into alcohol.”

“Ah, yes; I see,” said Mr. Meredith.

“Nearly every one in the neighbourhood owned
a Still, and the time for making the whisky was
looked forward to with great anxiety and expecta-
tion, as it was the source from which so many
comforts were obtained. At first there was no
tax demanded, but as greater quantities of whisky
were distilled, the Government began to think they
ought to have some of the benefit, so collectors
were sent out into the counties with orders to collect
the tax on all the whisky manufactured. At this
the settlers became very angry. They held meet-
ings, at which they determined to resist what they
considered oppression. Liberty poles were raised,
speeches were made against what was called unjust
taxation, and when the officers appeared they were
resisted everywhere, and many of them met with
violence. A marshal and collector named Biddle
and Johnson were tarred and feathered, then
whipped and blindfolded and run into the woods.
Another collector was visited by a man dressed as
Beelzebub, accompanied by several others, Coming



90 LARRY GILBERT.

to the door of his house they called on him to come
out, but having a great deal of pluck, and being
armed with pistols, he declared he would shoot the
first one who entered his door. In this way he
kept them off. He afterwards prosecuted the
person he supposed had acted as Beelzebub, but
as he failed to prove his case it did no good, and
only aroused such a state of feeling against him
that he had to leave the county to save his life.

“They shaved the head of Graham, another
- collector, and after cutting off his horse’s mane and
the hair of the tail, bade him mount and ride off.
There were a number of others who lost their lives.
_ The trouble lasted a long while, and then, as the
Government sent soldiers and was determined to
be obeyed, some of the most sensible of the people,
my father among them, began to see that if the
laws of the country were resisted in one point they
might be in others, and this would make a bad.
state of society. Meetings of the most respectable
distillers were held, and they agreed to obey the
laws.”

“ And so this was the great Whisky Insurrection
in Pennsylvania,” said Mr. Meredith, who had



EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 91

listened with great interest as Grandmother Gilbert
recounted the experiences of her early days.

“J was only a child of ten years of age,” she
said, “ but those early times as I recall them seem
very clear to my mind. I was the youngest of ten
children, and 1 am the only survivor. I left that
part of the country when I was eighteen years of
age, was married, and came here with my husband.
We never returned to my former home. This
place has ever since been my home. Parts of the
country, no doubt, seem to you quite rude and
uncultivated, but sixty years ago it was all a forest,
and a great deal of labour was necessary before we
could consider ourselves at all comfortable.”



CHAPTER VIII.

PRAYER ANSWERED.

Mw BRIGGS had, in his own strength, made

many resolves to reform, particularly in
days gone by, when he still retained some
self-respect, and flattered himself that those who
knew of his weakness were very few. Now
that he had fallen from his once respectable con-
dition, and was known as a drunkard, he cared
little for appearances. Besides, his slovenly home
and ill-tempered wife, though made so by his
own neglect and -unkindness, were, he tried to
satisfy himself, sufficient excuse for seeking a
refuge in the tavern, and spending his earnings
there. :
He had not been altogether insensible to
Johnny’s pleadings for the past two weeks, even

though he had often silenced him with cross words,
92

o



PRAYER ANSWERED. 93

and more than once struck him, bidding him never
to open his lips on the subject again.

Johnny, by the grace of God, had started out
in the Christian life, and was willing to endure
hardships like a good soldier, if he might at last
gain his heart’s desire, and see his father a reformed
and converted man. j

His discouragements were very great. Some-
times he thought his father was really growing
worse all the time, and if it had not been for the
kind and encouraging words of Mr. Meredith and
Grandmother Gilbert, he would have been led to
despair of ever doing any good at home.

And yet in the home there was visible im-
provement.

Mrs. Briggs, for Johnny’s sake, now strove to
add some brightness to their poverty-stricken
dwelling. The house was cleaner; and Johnny’s
cheery voice exclaiming, «Why, mother, how nice
your room looks; Granny Gilbert’s floor and
tables are not whiter than yours,’ was sufficient
compensation for all the labour bestowed.

Johnny little knew how his mother watched
every word and action, and as his Christian life



94 LARRY GILBERT.

daily impressed itself upon her mind, the more
_ desponding and despairing did she become in
regard to herself. ;

The entreaty, “Do, mother, try to be a Christ-
ian,” and the knowledge that Johnny’s prayers
were daily offered for her, came to her mind
continually. Bible verses that she had long
forgotten came back to her, bringing in their
train conversations, sermons, and instructions of
other days, so that the poor woman, now awakened
to a sense of her sinfulness, found herself groping
in darkness, without a ray of light to shine upon
her path.

She often determined to confess her wretched-
ness to Johnny, but when he mentioned the
subject of religion to her, as he was often in the
habit of doing, her proud heart refused to respond}.
and so day after day passed, her feeling of guilt
becoming deeper and her hopes for a better life
fainter.

When told of the prayer meeting to be held at
Mrs. Hunter’s she suddenly resolved to go. Any
change was better than this continual state of
unrest. She had opened Johnny’s Testament one



PRAYER ANSWERED. 95

_ day, and this verse met her eye: “Except ye
repent, ye shall all likewise perish.” She hastily —
closed the book, but the verse continued to haunt
her. Surely nothing she would hear at the
prayer meeting could make her feel worse than
she already felt.

Instead, therefore, of opposition, or a total want
of interest, as he had expected, Johnny was
surprised and gratified to find his mother willing,
as soon as he proposed it, to go with him to the
meeting.

The result may be anticipated. When a soul
becomes conscious of guilt, and realises its utter
‘inability to reform of itself, Christ’s love and
pardoning mercy are very near to that poor one,
He stands waiting to be gracious.

Mr. Meredith chose for the subject of his
remarks the first evening, “The Return of the
Prodigal Son.” When he had told the touching
‘story, and dwelt upon the different parts of it, .
he said, “If there is any poor prodigal here
to-night, who has wandered far from his Father's
house and now desires to return, he may not
linger nor fear to come; the Father stands



96 LARRY GILBERT,

with loving arms outstretched to welcome you;
He has waited long, He is waiting still, Will you
not come ?”

Johnny grasped his mother’s hand, “Do,

N52

mother!” he said, with an intense entreaty in his
voice. ’

The poor woman dropped her head upon her
hands and sobbed aloud.

_ The sense of God’s love and forgiveness came
upon the stricken woman as a flood of light, and
she could have exclaimed, ‘ Whereas I was blind,
now I see.” She wondered she had so long
striven against the Saviour, and refused to accept
the love so freely offered to sinners.

She was very humble and quiet on her way
home. “I hope, Mrs. Gilbert,” she said, “you
will forgive all my coldness, and receive my
thanks for your kindness to Johnny. There
have been times when I would have been willing
to see him as idle and deceitful as he used to be,
for when I saw the child so tender and helpful, so
‘grieved when he did wrong, it was a continual
reproach to me. I could not doubt, as I had
once tried to do, that there was truth in religion.



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'2011-10-15T09:20:48-04:00'
describe
'35049' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBO' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
992dacece8ec06ed3e856e31712c4501
614e6468f74bac2fc8126093ebbb87cab52698bf
'2011-10-15T09:22:02-04:00'
describe
'2520340' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBP' 'sip-files00005.tif'
00daf5ee9f1c4ebb6e29f514d9c7c203
e4507bc4dce47a5008c2315513104b4797d9b54a
describe
'238' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBQ' 'sip-files00005.txt'
ef606c32ba20203597aea54678726bab
978a4f2ee123bfa23a247754a360261581ee398f
'2011-10-15T09:22:32-04:00'
describe
'24130' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBR' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
273ece82ddaa152d7c30c8b076dd3454
8d3eeb9385e39fdfd3c657e420166b8931d9a5e1
'2011-10-15T09:22:21-04:00'
describe
'312530' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBS' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
80b93100444bf7f60b8a94464e586dfa
ef977baeba0aa1ee93cbbba199b53349a9c01628
'2011-10-15T09:23:16-04:00'
describe
'94569' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBT' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
038b5d8b61b10c88ecad48c4c2c7231d
b2cfa04e60b7b0c83b42c7c44afb7b450ad90d78
'2011-10-15T09:21:58-04:00'
describe
'9799' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBU' 'sip-files00007.pro'
bb5c7dd4bff4f0c2598f89fb13e72c43
028f6d6ae91a9a090e0f7fade6251edcd9c9bf0c
describe
'39092' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBV' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
4eb3776170f3afb9c1ddd2fb0eadb326
d9ca5dca52c2b0ff3379bb617e7025109a411df8
'2011-10-15T09:19:33-04:00'
describe
'2520612' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBW' 'sip-files00007.tif'
2a445c47f60e3fdf4e577c0154cb059c
c86a8e6bfaa20080a4c10232e9a68d296c4a8dec
'2011-10-15T09:21:19-04:00'
describe
'533' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBX' 'sip-files00007.txt'
fbece82016bed5e82fc3d6e55985f696
803d2528832c98638c788cddbeebf33a6a99dcb8
'2011-10-15T09:20:31-04:00'
describe
'25751' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBY' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
d84a440d01afc2494fbce6f2f50a1776
6a1da7cecbfd0617aecafdefe873613117bb7f1a
describe
'312389' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUBZ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
e7ae12751c2e149433467e9b065a30a0
7ebd0bd3c21bc14cbdb6ee9869932d31931bf077
'2011-10-15T09:21:31-04:00'
describe
'119887' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
1ca0cb325d25bbb45e825ffa46c0cbf3
7eaff0076b4ba9b37390fbea0ca55419224afc81
'2011-10-15T09:23:52-04:00'
describe
'13625' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCB' 'sip-files00009.pro'
dc6c20f423c5bd143527a0e86b5699eb
efde3364fbd4dba61f54cb43894d63c655cb3ed9
'2011-10-15T09:21:48-04:00'
describe
'48521' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCC' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
d2770f50940330ea0169a3dc0106683e
f9b6d7520880b6dfbdb424f30b09632851b588f0
'2011-10-15T09:21:35-04:00'
describe
'2521408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCD' 'sip-files00009.tif'
4df71c41ef52827facd4b4c32de4eb58
41e9190130d81d77e0fa25ba1a33946e1385859e
'2011-10-15T09:23:48-04:00'
describe
'651' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCE' 'sip-files00009.txt'
112dc63efdbbe6d50d24ca8f0f0c3684
86a8abe5903b3f27cdc3b3c2028dc5ee4c32ae8a
describe
'28012' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCF' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
ca062e4391b48b06ab12f31a5fc43572
cce6141e49de927aaf018908b245a84ba670fd44
'2011-10-15T09:20:26-04:00'
describe
'312628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCG' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
a77636993007a88b3ac0e97b0f7e8ece
3085f40c82916be67df6c77e9fb7db6b3fd420bc
'2011-10-15T09:20:53-04:00'
describe
'177652' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCH' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a609872534196be6880a8b8feba7a48a
4a2ca3cd6fad2973e8bf66f2939c09ed306cdc30
'2011-10-15T09:20:42-04:00'
describe
'28705' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCI' 'sip-files00010.pro'
9812c4ff6901ee53dd094101c4a21a2f
0e514c4e8a7fca757fd915a2d4930060d44eea1f
'2011-10-15T09:20:08-04:00'
describe
'71580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
79c13bad3d72394202319c5ebf1a97ac
523064f4c28c6da3975bcf3ce22ffbcc1cbd8c28
'2011-10-15T09:23:42-04:00'
describe
'2523672' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCK' 'sip-files00010.tif'
267d4cb70268ce69cdbdadca20401c55
6355bdd49a9faf5f4fcc864449795cefeb33227a
'2011-10-15T09:20:39-04:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCL' 'sip-files00010.txt'
2462865a7c81405cbe7de5db5c85df05
17562cac365e426dd328bfee03aefe97d1a7ed38
'2011-10-15T09:21:23-04:00'
describe
'34854' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCM' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
8173dbd098cdab74761bb8673364212c
06c5c23b619f80c574f96db71a886783ec2bee04
'2011-10-15T09:23:10-04:00'
describe
'312641' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCN' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
86778ef32b636919d15c2ce8b8a759dd
e1278cfcfd2f8513c19f852428026c795679691e
describe
'176614' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCO' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
2bc70b0686c9de456a8537bd7412d4b0
cd8af1e612f5f332f9da84963e0f5f4856ccd270
'2011-10-15T09:20:50-04:00'
describe
'29008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCP' 'sip-files00011.pro'
2a172ad098aae4cbc2ec9c1d4833b639
da102ea903c2726f8a0d752f842c76a3972d8d48
'2011-10-15T09:23:23-04:00'
describe
'71292' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCQ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
c61c4c5824ee9bf0993b9886aeb2b218
dadb56cd7568929e87f5079d0963b2ac51abeca3
'2011-10-15T09:19:22-04:00'
describe
'2523492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCR' 'sip-files00011.tif'
1a88e42890f490842b709622361408e1
86ff5578c441e6a0d5a16d96281d9b178fb9c7fd
'2011-10-15T09:21:40-04:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
ca77e1fc8e271a9b8872af9a64b57493
adbdf7b26ba7fb04c4367272c09469eaa13a8dfc
'2011-10-15T09:21:26-04:00'
describe
'34973' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
2a9d6c1f0de8b6f0cfba844bca29b302
8aadf8888517186380ddf39e0bb41109acea6531
'2011-10-15T09:22:05-04:00'
describe
'312653' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCU' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
f3d369eb4a5799db2c152fe7c1b5e97a
7510a25ba9c7f767d56c16affbeba23f201f5448
'2011-10-15T09:23:01-04:00'
describe
'173317' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
b3e6fae58debe536bb611983e7cf2d2b
67a464803c0a261eeb12c9fea81fb30fbdeea582
'2011-10-15T09:20:36-04:00'
describe
'28886' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
4753488078de68d11167818fe7d3040e
5b00ba6c79dc1b18c035e6cea127d29758079cbf
'2011-10-15T09:23:30-04:00'
describe
'69867' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
39588c5069f483073c002864772a867c
b3cf5e76822455867b2e6dc71e69e1f7f4b5a98d
'2011-10-15T09:22:25-04:00'
describe
'2523568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
4588d1be57cffd5919af0fce1105edbd
5764ac0b17371020adc3db09f0bf5507b8c4de02
'2011-10-15T09:19:58-04:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUCZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
721eeb4fd3f541161d1c5a111e57affb
544d613c7c8d55595b6385cfe50a6bb4b63a9719
'2011-10-15T09:19:50-04:00'
describe
'34832' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDA' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
0627fc2b91a061b8082d1f5cef08d95b
0da12d29de43f7c0dc3aba490ea2fe404c2027fb
'2011-10-15T09:23:21-04:00'
describe
'312643' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDB' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
43e51cd402772109c3986546456baed9
e963dd9081f2649b4e4289e1995a2f137929bd2f
'2011-10-15T09:20:41-04:00'
describe
'174652' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDC' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
89f83ec0b3f8a4e65061eda9245bb19b
38674883e079828b5d854bc4ec866efb3dca5bac
'2011-10-15T09:20:38-04:00'
describe
'28892' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDD' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9249922a59fd3c93cafab69928a8368d
5bfca03a4fd2b8b7cfc63babdf3262c69720a219
'2011-10-15T09:19:46-04:00'
describe
'71488' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDE' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
dcc32d5b2a5718017ccb212766482435
42d04703e1d2c6e5bf90b891d2b52a50be759799
'2011-10-15T09:20:28-04:00'
describe
'2523368' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
412f459820672903b27c82b7561cd7ab
23c160a8ef40cffc54bb2f7681f4f50409dcfce4
'2011-10-15T09:23:09-04:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
5a0f0d676c2383b6376bd2aa8acacf9f
ffbfe624e5ab04a35a8be38687a26a0532c34581
'2011-10-15T09:22:14-04:00'
describe
'34989' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDH' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
28d1bd235eadac86f0bf8f16197a088f
71f80a7dc9738cf8a2f851592d741ff8c5278961
'2011-10-15T09:20:13-04:00'
describe
'312568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDI' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
b5aa220519d2e6046da2e9af1b39bf97
0d08b39318a83a81f7d5be522e04d411fbbd5e93
'2011-10-15T09:23:35-04:00'
describe
'167535' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
134cedec47972a1ebeaaa71627323a91
71901c34519de21ff23303cfd712ae038d9cf754
'2011-10-15T09:20:11-04:00'
describe
'26888' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDK' 'sip-files00014.pro'
614e316304b3cd3a0807e4cf66c34d7d
fe17fb367bf36e6a4e62db6d64b0b377876f3d91
'2011-10-15T09:22:27-04:00'
describe
'67627' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDL' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
6d8ad3cdec90f240b2cc125f3342160f
3494253f6ed226b30fa43d5efff3a004d5b48e19
'2011-10-15T09:19:51-04:00'
describe
'2523512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDM' 'sip-files00014.tif'
acea861ab57c2cb480d66d19dacb3c8b
318006f0bcc2ffb993cba782d743bf9828260fa2
'2011-10-15T09:22:00-04:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDN' 'sip-files00014.txt'
54ec573c56ea9b9c1a0d083f85007319
ec5839ed4117ddf5c569819a2743237c61e46d52
'2011-10-15T09:19:23-04:00'
describe
'34251' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDO' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
21e69ff19604bb3507083a1a5c34d0cb
1e76290f7a314316d25698352fc2ad189e4b22a4
describe
'312545' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDP' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
39132f53309da3f9c719b16c183fafda
2187813dd9568d421be1899b635eac8e9558592e
describe
'166284' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c728370a9b16e1c5025edeb3c3712659
3700ca3f941346b9ef1a79dccb4b9d5fe11bb7f1
'2011-10-15T09:19:49-04:00'
describe
'27159' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
2c16af2abbae50a6674f426bd2a16faa
720c163b2fdad4c202da14452ac7038360bf244a
'2011-10-15T09:20:02-04:00'
describe
'66272' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDS' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
ee91af668a0c15a34b4d938440f42e16
2b2e2c087f8ce055e41811e5ea848da20d6d709a
'2011-10-15T09:19:32-04:00'
describe
'2523188' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDT' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0da6dd53081b35fe0e9c61f857f3e897
37c6480b610788f20beb772ba5266b78ed57783a
'2011-10-15T09:22:56-04:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDU' 'sip-files00015.txt'
37ff1ed0a009746720f67a080d5e42f5
594ddd3df5a871768969509cd941007429f06496
'2011-10-15T09:21:39-04:00'
describe
'34214' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
f450e1169b517474871daf24a153366b
fe558f665e8d2aec7f058e0208802ea47870d7f3
'2011-10-15T09:22:24-04:00'
describe
'312605' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDW' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
68c230c9c93ad5442c5f6f69145f4fcc
27f61da8735ccb674a583f5fd82b32ba3991e041
'2011-10-15T09:20:52-04:00'
describe
'167811' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDX' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
0907bbd0f9b13a1c0f6da208895ef86b
b1e952fbe4600628a32ea6f5b947e79ebc0eea42
'2011-10-15T09:19:56-04:00'
describe
'27872' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDY' 'sip-files00016.pro'
8f9b2a3a09a3b7da9f8fc641d207954c
3208fac8b20510b7a8ff18746d3ab46c1b08f3bd
'2011-10-15T09:20:55-04:00'
describe
'68868' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUDZ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
f281f9dfd356988f71b196d6e39f180d
7745b365400fb002aef386ac4fb57c3999017ebc
'2011-10-15T09:23:15-04:00'
describe
'2523700' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEA' 'sip-files00016.tif'
673ab0d7642f72b6648b9f93cb5057d4
2fb767c9b419ca75ff38ffb963d127f25b63d4e4
'2011-10-15T09:19:40-04:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEB' 'sip-files00016.txt'
7e68bfeba43c8d3799972bdf24cc55bf
bceed3356c6c81f6612641f3f5cc1f68316c7fd8
'2011-10-15T09:22:40-04:00'
describe
'34466' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEC' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
f90ac13725a43421b161ee89b81941f5
c6812bed80993434dddd8cfc72b92bfc7dfe0bf8
'2011-10-15T09:23:38-04:00'
describe
'312664' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUED' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
3945e8fcb05b66b352f4b9a49f8e65a4
992cba0c6e813036ff77a536cbe7adc32fcb6ee7
'2011-10-15T09:23:37-04:00'
describe
'167766' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEE' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
782c1d88d95448b7cd438a41bb9ba80d
d8cee8c6c21296969a7d0684906d8211907769b5
describe
'27899' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEF' 'sip-files00017.pro'
53a72582c36cb38f012fb034cf9161f0
014a83c6758d6c43fb0a0c21d33007528cdd38e8
'2011-10-15T09:22:34-04:00'
describe
'69137' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEG' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
2b9b4fb24491580794ca872adae09624
d439387b4ab4ea78a429fa4381bb5c6160dc1cab
'2011-10-15T09:20:06-04:00'
describe
'2523428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
f3c7aab51855c569e19dc9812737c5e0
43a467fcb23709b1b6a96c205948a9a6176c365d
'2011-10-15T09:21:43-04:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
8f390f430ba70056bd47fed6e142623e
4538c1b2988c8a1324b3eaf52d28fff058ad69e0
'2011-10-15T09:21:03-04:00'
describe
'34629' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEJ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
2ddbc73e6848495b41bc9dad7dbd578d
be79896b265b7b75dcaf71fb3242664f2b86db36
describe
'312648' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEK' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
fd46eea3667b0101489a85d7caf3a9c7
e70d2acf547ecc08c5f827a4b3b5de80441736cd
'2011-10-15T09:22:55-04:00'
describe
'165175' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEL' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
8ab1fe81a942cf250db1715c542bde9f
725c903221ab13764e876e1735764eb2b401b032
'2011-10-15T09:23:33-04:00'
describe
'27237' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEM' 'sip-files00018.pro'
4581ef4785b37c9752061e347a006ddd
665538d1a2c0cc64145a7164d7e3f45b681b06ff
describe
'67568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEN' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d169f20dadf488be1b5bf4b6ee689c05
813b4d86524b1a0159e065033819975177ce86f6
'2011-10-15T09:23:18-04:00'
describe
'2523664' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEO' 'sip-files00018.tif'
c26519f3dc8beca0a1b8131001dbf14b
ff974162bbd5eb66599a814aff8850421b9674ad
'2011-10-15T09:22:42-04:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEP' 'sip-files00018.txt'
0e0d10d9eb5105acaa95a7774d72c63e
ecb2bea9e15f3b8a8471ee6f9bb3bb8dedbc8e9d
describe
'34276' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEQ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
c4666f773ff6908882e43659b79cc796
824f34e4301475f993365f8c9e26c6b660607c73
describe
'312622' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUER' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
d463c342bc23574f77cc17633b6e6605
29f350b8cdd28865fa3f2672671ca16774a874af
'2011-10-15T09:21:37-04:00'
describe
'76543' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUES' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
470aee0b92a3584eda7bb05ccdc3f42a
53577d095c0651a3fbaf4c22a279309106114146
'2011-10-15T09:19:29-04:00'
describe
'5014' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUET' 'sip-files00019.pro'
15ff7a01f3bcbd4ccf475e0f7837f6ea
7212a0f2c59ad993fa9a3491b1aad31ad9aae958
'2011-10-15T09:20:12-04:00'
describe
'32633' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEU' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
195523c1986754cb944771f16c9b223e
e63aafd78367f7651b28b7c2c1e86694ede888fc
describe
'2519584' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEV' 'sip-files00019.tif'
f8305ece15b374d8f29dc47f6b1bbffb
10d8afdd072fc4b5753482f49225d463d966ecb9
'2011-10-15T09:22:45-04:00'
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEW' 'sip-files00019.txt'
24754bee923cffd97154e011db1ba01a
5368c6dfb35185ccfcb653b0f9950a2a645db8df
'2011-10-15T09:23:04-04:00'
describe
'22174' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEX' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
83842cc16b30c458bc3ea6cc53b0f164
92fddf69b87d63c399d4d1b54a56dddecc015a06
'2011-10-15T09:22:09-04:00'
describe
'312655' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEY' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
fcfd76f4bf1b3673f3ff4569b61942bf
f1253a5fac846ec3a432e7d579241b652e0c3fc1
'2011-10-15T09:20:04-04:00'
describe
'134246' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUEZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
0f6fd7b6d525b064e34f4543640c4186
9f8e28253b324bcff7ed99a7b6c8343fa2453bf3
describe
'19684' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFA' 'sip-files00020.pro'
94e12ba522a3c8138275bab649dea94b
ea0e3f2951ed9702b4d9aa841d48b35cf210818b
describe
'55869' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
8aa86ca9b25c97ebff55babef4dddccf
133905f8db69c38d4a2b80822908931433a67103
'2011-10-15T09:19:31-04:00'
describe
'2522104' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFC' 'sip-files00020.tif'
26253b3b7cc634b681ffadc80687675d
ff5302ca934881de7ea7e390fbc988da696eecce
'2011-10-15T09:20:59-04:00'
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFD' 'sip-files00020.txt'
83ac692f3df3d29feeb709868be85560
0002f4c0427cc1021bca824258cc531a6f8ee43b
'2011-10-15T09:23:19-04:00'
describe
'30028' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFE' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
b49bb5a564aad34b2893c4b5c37f8740
002d92f99712c1d776d7ef77f978a10e3ac65a8f
describe
'312524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFF' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
076fca6e5f9f36550777153276efa170
a123fa0dbe48a7d10183de51d214892d431c36bb
'2011-10-15T09:21:14-04:00'
describe
'257080' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFG' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
3f5745b099c31496cc087563fadaf53d
a028ccc7ec258157aa48b408479f2af285b6f0ce
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFH' 'sip-files00021.pro'
e1e6721a65d9ce094f6f34fc9fe24ebe
a3a63e5c353effd9da1baa08b76d4cf19b23a4c9
'2011-10-15T09:20:51-04:00'
describe
'75396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFI' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
30a4c08d1660e519a34c1867487b39f2
03cc7e42f74c229058ba9740b9d5c2544fb5abf8
describe
'2523784' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFJ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
864e964706bd0ac665464cd2fedfe38b
2e6ba725ebb85196425b23699f7361116964771e
'2011-10-15T09:21:30-04:00'
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFK' 'sip-files00021.txt'
00bb9d71c35a434d59d0728f925bda15
8b65b54c593c9f07587fa20c69bce723af3914a4
'2011-10-15T09:22:30-04:00'
describe
'34723' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFL' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d590557770db6a21d6bfb969060abed0
35d41c12c2a58359eba30e01426db4a83f5422af
describe
'312499' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFM' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
71026052affe254726021299f702da44
10565cd3b17a2e51fbdabbaef6cc32ff131c4988
'2011-10-15T09:23:06-04:00'
describe
'168713' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
17f83d4014d71fe451c4152eabfa53e5
a433d32de6d560ed7690bc314be74701c9fd8291
'2011-10-15T09:22:44-04:00'
describe
'27427' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFO' 'sip-files00023.pro'
1c2209e098542ac29c9934c3c2038b6b
ddf4210faa644d733a6738e9edb9dc3077c6d1e8
'2011-10-15T09:23:36-04:00'
describe
'68016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
3c19302a539ae31e8ff6b57d6e2b95ec
8de436a25267335e3d965429f0410915c059665d
'2011-10-15T09:19:45-04:00'
describe
'2523424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFQ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
95ce56539e1f343c522d276f4a86053d
e08422bad25ddc31ca00700e5675c3336f971dd0
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFR' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ebf3b34b9cb0ba8e7de02a505dd80c05
a5ff830e782772afa60b9fb30a3158e8baf1f524
'2011-10-15T09:21:32-04:00'
describe
'34010' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFS' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
eaeb8fb9cf2e057c98e410aca36af907
2e6f814dbc4a0bfd5855cb8b6073819c06427dbe
'2011-10-15T09:23:34-04:00'
describe
'312642' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFT' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ed57f3de806ef2287d203df31e3a73b1
c921a39abe8284b95e9d596757373023266a8b08
'2011-10-15T09:20:00-04:00'
describe
'176050' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFU' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
825a5604ce65740687967f9f7f197795
7c20040df19a2fffac4504f15d2f8bcda79ee244
'2011-10-15T09:22:12-04:00'
describe
'28218' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
e75243d5eccb9986bbc80cab83dcc489
0f764e2c527fcd677450023a1f19a3ac747b8efa
'2011-10-15T09:20:03-04:00'
describe
'70268' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
da3b2b91e3bbc60b3235f63ba67472b6
ca9e39292bd7b2267b434702b5fddc3fbd5416e6
'2011-10-15T09:20:45-04:00'
describe
'2523776' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
d7f42edac96b8333d700aab3e5710a55
08dd2a7716c59bd131db8620bd3200e203ddeb04
'2011-10-15T09:23:02-04:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFY' 'sip-files00024.txt'
bf2febd2edd429396c51e5bc0848068d
356b51b3f505d42b17feb4c536b9459b88dd549e
'2011-10-15T09:20:34-04:00'
describe
'35424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUFZ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
ce3908fb0657ae3baf8bf35ccbde4c77
073f4bf07778f4960f5228745609e4470dc29cf4
'2011-10-15T09:20:22-04:00'
describe
'312623' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGA' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
07263105e32e032b73fb85123fe58ae0
aac17ca2575c82370b2a716324689a2d1a05c4f7
describe
'162309' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
bec17b4019aac55553660deafae676c1
c9cd1a8f71c38125ded11a316830fee70f8e66f4
'2011-10-15T09:22:46-04:00'
describe
'25690' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGC' 'sip-files00025.pro'
7623d2abe07a66f1185c0c9458cd7b83
3d19ce572dc3a9ab9fee4bddcb1eea6cd1cdbb6d
'2011-10-15T09:22:36-04:00'
describe
'66007' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
331a1c1858af1ed0bf01df813509cd3c
ce0c29f5f3add81afc11e608fd341c3b86c32d81
describe
'2523688' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
323eca2164b748b181dab98ab48ba72d
c12e1c71122169871c218ceabbdc32db360702fb
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGF' 'sip-files00025.txt'
bc36fabac2d4d30311438ea25e85ad18
e1e5d647063fdb5ea35255d8f96519085eb85112
'2011-10-15T09:19:21-04:00'
describe
'34408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGG' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
a253d036240decbff3d833064755dafa
13f2501231352152a2959a09efe44050780866c1
'2011-10-15T09:19:28-04:00'
describe
'312609' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
b7ea8482e12916dc103498d477fd7bed
2bbc4bba332c9be6e2741bc7d848372c7cdf64f1
describe
'164515' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGI' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
ae869c902c3d99d4bb38b2eb5f9a36ca
4f759949d19d53e76e880229ae7455d2f4e31569
describe
'27203' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGJ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
96f16e44a95343137008cfcc69f0de5e
ac65dc40b8e4103869748cfc8e0e222164eda911
'2011-10-15T09:22:17-04:00'
describe
'66912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGK' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
0999ba87299d6a3c2a6d9c2bd2ff21a2
9a7fd869401bf40a711ab44c09ee664a39f28504
'2011-10-15T09:21:49-04:00'
describe
'2523536' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGL' 'sip-files00026.tif'
04efba7fc599ab9f83ff36534edf514c
966045702cc84762e00bcd425d4732edde1bd3a0
'2011-10-15T09:22:37-04:00'
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGM' 'sip-files00026.txt'
47b6793c9f98debb75859b7199ac6e8a
421c0338bc0dd0a73dd8f0d7ee4f75d4f7ef2f7e
describe
'34270' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGN' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
f6330e04eb03249d36a260d2aafc9b00
a5b735a99e0ace53702325f371d8b6d1281a1582
'2011-10-15T09:20:24-04:00'
describe
'312400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGO' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
340f584f436db2f3a385b049c2163e60
fcc8b3278dc3a480c03c9f19555194ec7589945b
describe
'169839' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGP' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
7bb200fa9e5927dba927f387a61fc30a
5b9685e2425f048f90fbf84dfe3478711eb6e1ae
'2011-10-15T09:20:40-04:00'
describe
'28407' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGQ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
1f3fb31229c14b93683303539780632a
55063024f0271ba0e8f0d0aa8cab467e69f32d77
describe
'70946' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGR' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f60301b327b556b62c461082f06cb4c1
6533c23e2d190d6ea2544ae0e0dcd196c715f288
describe
'2523464' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGS' 'sip-files00027.tif'
22bf8542349c92c031c7afe40ffa48a9
638147b21d44eeea1af27f64a6408100d50b14ad
'2011-10-15T09:23:24-04:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGT' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d593d0473509a8d7ade313663a1b181a
3dffe86f9ccde6d8386ee3347adf076822ff7f4e
'2011-10-15T09:23:49-04:00'
describe
'34746' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGU' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
b1d4b4d72f89f0688b6e402dcf96f705
2e63ec603fb4ecc5259d9014136057bf00083fc2
describe
'312629' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGV' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
c633a56f45c9d6302fdeb00dfa58c97d
949592be6e654e26af0016ba49f45df15c234ee7
'2011-10-15T09:22:13-04:00'
describe
'169538' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGW' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
22b79ebac44121e277ad8eeba954791d
1e90096fec99bce355da2d75bd6d256b26b02680
describe
'27333' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGX' 'sip-files00028.pro'
4979a9e2a3d11bfbeec6045f66be2066
32a030aaab23812e02143614c016ea1826c79620
'2011-10-15T09:22:35-04:00'
describe
'68786' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
227b044fca2ef3dd03ee747b7829098c
80286315d8bd08af4a637143a65676f81ea9b0a9
'2011-10-15T09:20:35-04:00'
describe
'2523612' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUGZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
22dd93744ac0e082cdb2da913936404e
9d87066cf1c5741800b59f6bfe0e97f544300341
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHA' 'sip-files00028.txt'
cbd07e6e9be5b15565a0b09043debefa
436565338a94bd6c149bb4e17c8dd67f5818c00f
'2011-10-15T09:21:46-04:00'
describe
'34501' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHB' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
25d081b6d60997200abcfe8b76508723
3227cf21196aae8d8c8bd1cbdb566fdf3a7c3d7d
'2011-10-15T09:23:22-04:00'
describe
'312500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
4eadeb8ea7f0b4e6a17bac940fed13f3
7a2b11f7c65c1d95c15b2456f9e37441b30e1ecd
'2011-10-15T09:21:47-04:00'
describe
'171483' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHD' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
5aa9a8f9f731c21dda38faaede62549c
a490af4f3dadb0ce37d31c45db6b5505e632730e
describe
'27889' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHE' 'sip-files00029.pro'
8e9e9d9bcf5dbde8d86da191e821b276
416f1de6dbbe55c3f4158ee229d95a34f2a2c4b6
'2011-10-15T09:23:26-04:00'
describe
'68834' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHF' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
b1031d00ce0172f513d70bdd9ccb3067
6d0fa924f5ae890fe15eb2154c54fc7cfbaef249
describe
'2523412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHG' 'sip-files00029.tif'
c942a423e454b89f0772a7aaa34e5b6e
777da1055f2eadd340f5a5b16f75ea24a5c2b38d
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHH' 'sip-files00029.txt'
c8f90ea60cd9503639959eb85618fa33
01a6ee6ee7b6b444f37b365b7216549fc9980d6f
describe
'34800' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHI' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d147feb293a389e343b50854bbd1fa66
f3ab183c119274eb5d1e97ef09868341c2979885
'2011-10-15T09:23:40-04:00'
describe
'312665' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ed48bae79b01bd7a5078e11fefa3682d
9aaea4fdd4a558fb0122fcf7875b25e60a689c54
'2011-10-15T09:19:38-04:00'
describe
'169555' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHK' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
16bfe1ec7104acff749aa7ec78570ab1
65b69ab27795158b9a9c4a4fb384c4d59af6965e
describe
'28315' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHL' 'sip-files00030.pro'
40d2beaf356fd8f62b6fc94dffa425e9
09edb603d16474150a6d0af7295d713b080f18b4
describe
'69404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHM' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0cd8dae1518a13cacc643d30af716ef2
6cfcb8d5cd48874feace804dceb657a871e70f2e
'2011-10-15T09:22:58-04:00'
describe
'2523296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
d87c0569b20168ca90f252b83c9b960b
1a033addcd981568ecc3cbd7196b72652fd217bd
'2011-10-15T09:23:27-04:00'
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
d441ff06c34a29230265e1c557d6698a
f6f82c17ca70c11d1545792be5a829dc35cbdee5
describe
'34337' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHP' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
65e0e33d827c430a899f494c8b6f4fd3
d3d151a077868eaa219599491c1180e3e584bfb0
describe
'312564' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e77a56b5cda7af7cd8b0845a1f64dd90
9bfcb540bb6d1626adfd6dbfd5172b548514b03d
'2011-10-15T09:22:08-04:00'
describe
'168191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
4b95d26ad49442c2544b515e49136ec8
19ecb275a424a2f037070ed247acc1bef8e9582d
'2011-10-15T09:19:48-04:00'
describe
'27637' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
6b107804d99c96f0448c76b17da67e1f
994fbb2082e4c49d506acc9078e7454a80999cd3
describe
'67339' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHT' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
0b7b8daa1d0fd35057b33e303e980e16
dbb844e46061acf6405caa6326e36a7865e90e24
describe
'2523404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
20f873c32423925e2ae2111b157014c0
cf5235344f8ad1e0807568ac964b69e1607ffd3b
'2011-10-15T09:20:37-04:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
a00c937801091d48c1d2a49fd63da2bc
1367fede1d2b330d525f96245cff99e5175c1273
'2011-10-15T09:20:01-04:00'
describe
'34209' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
dd8b7cd7625b6cab572f9bc3a9824a53
80373075c03195d6985dd71268d30e9e3e3772f2
'2011-10-15T09:22:11-04:00'
describe
'312617' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
f34770087c73b530d438a20c064d55ca
9162dea2803ffb859fbe921f5945ee3ffdc16989
describe
'168827' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHY' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
41a405319d104bd04a271a4c2cb293cc
84ca7ee79bc7a2b34dc8f9914ff8097bcedcbc32
describe
'27195' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUHZ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
eb730600fe2761f18da74d9579ed62a7
8b1f73f7a6bb27a611c7b058c3dcb93c957f25a9
describe
'68286' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIA' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
6828fdcb81795d681573aaf849e78a15
d05ec123b4a4d8fc6580b4a3c164bfd2b5235edd
describe
'2523352' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIB' 'sip-files00032.tif'
f628fc890ab89feac994796b03ff9ef7
7de6f7382145e59cb499aa85c5fddf832f69ec87
'2011-10-15T09:19:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIC' 'sip-files00032.txt'
aa785028af1ad7d46132296cbd5f848f
53b3b77d4ea67630c2dc486a18b997a14c06d261
'2011-10-15T09:20:33-04:00'
describe
'34211' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUID' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
11509ce665fc82f45b33a7fd2a34ed84
06781ac89dbaad7c81e4dc9afb2a309e601de568
'2011-10-15T09:22:53-04:00'
describe
'312594' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIE' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
cd8cc61509a23ec7886c98c802b1c289
2feb371004ff650b46fdcc0e47fcbebdd3f1ed6c
'2011-10-15T09:22:31-04:00'
describe
'88715' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIF' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
5f0994853046277d909597ae64fef53d
dc9011c8ea60193148d2157dfd6c19dc35e2ef37
describe
'6978' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIG' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ad41dbd127010eb3d4e828da5d319332
a5597f19584f9114b137159d08233505b983a209
'2011-10-15T09:22:07-04:00'
describe
'36547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIH' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
2711b4de1395e4cb6f604656e0b17ba2
74444ccc7c37eeea0f7e8b6c6428a1c6957eda7e
describe
'2519968' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUII' 'sip-files00033.tif'
4ac81e897e7da06903044bcfd52f12d0
efce37a8eadf8939b9dc8cc628be86a73237760b
'2011-10-15T09:19:20-04:00'
describe
'300' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIJ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
b3d613837f9977c17ad81d91d573517e
3d3ba9190352ca35ab17ac21fab0c5ca66825597
describe
'23345' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIK' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
cb4217ec9e3134eeea14107f428aa9c7
ccc031712652eab321dac4408530d47b668e831b
describe
'312657' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIL' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
17e3bccf069ebc9cc9a0d7ab16bea0be
c4f6dfb2b9d52317de6ce8c052f1242e5b25a079
'2011-10-15T09:22:41-04:00'
describe
'136811' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIM' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
93a832cfe42d2e2a91c0f1e8ce459fb7
a7a2b02ec7d1a60da8e408fc3c6e87922e9c7e4b
'2011-10-15T09:22:47-04:00'
describe
'20042' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIN' 'sip-files00034.pro'
5cd87c50b8068821ee2d7c125413bafe
6514e8bcd19b44ef57b2ccc4b01e27ebcf30e136
describe
'56065' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIO' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
d24c03e251caa0c3a30a923744fef904
180e74cabc2b3400056a7ba56a46f305465ba9ff
describe
'2522092' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIP' 'sip-files00034.tif'
3e0e659e91f7134299b2d183b5b897d2
4e0b634a17863698177b33c0f29fbce1008f8766
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIQ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
b8895d2245c5671ffc522cfcaa2140e7
48a943fb09f164fcc86e4e7cb2e8c9fc0670be56
describe
'29948' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIR' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
fe7a839f94fbb939e05cc86120b12bda
a226e4918f651c2a0fb9c951655ee6621321f4ad
describe
'312652' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIS' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
7259ea9ec6425977ee7ceb29dec02f44
8ce7a83965d754088f8a32ae904bc9ab193fb5e9
describe
'166963' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIT' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
376f569a46855462cb0ee09252096db5
ab15af2a6bb04fc382348f0e1f6c9bcbcc5bfb1e
'2011-10-15T09:21:55-04:00'
describe
'27845' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIU' 'sip-files00035.pro'
80bedfbf9b5a643a8965ba15fea1a5ea
03a84a3f35a0c8e1cc41f80eeef1bbba12de39d0
'2011-10-15T09:22:39-04:00'
describe
'69491' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIV' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
e291960885372a787bc3a1ffacd95fca
0634e20925a331c3ba864fc793b030ec73f53e0f
'2011-10-15T09:20:46-04:00'
describe
'2523384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIW' 'sip-files00035.tif'
65ad3cb11d903ef52714439cc8f01b64
0d53fc8da970d25794046ef3d5b7aed02236f4c9
'2011-10-15T09:21:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIX' 'sip-files00035.txt'
4eb0d0b9d04d454a8a79f9bef62b522a
f974429987ba2e6300b3bb684be22570e170d9d1
describe
'34667' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIY' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
bb464f8f016ecc3628180a5f5d8be42d
7bab4e325014789631e916acf9b62b45c58793db
describe
'312542' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUIZ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
f58cc74a148ee18815d3662fbd1f2ae1
349e68310c37f32847b7cafa7cc83e3953b4d80a
'2011-10-15T09:20:16-04:00'
describe
'173577' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJA' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
0e0036aa47dbcd95ffd36bcafa886f75
9ea6c1f676967c7d2a64dbc535ffa99ba284a045
describe
'30094' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJB' 'sip-files00036.pro'
10fa239c269cdcb332e34e7b238ae055
0cf1b6d1364b52db439f12877ac64d2d729c1762
describe
'72567' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
73a70039800c5fa410bba54db647cae4
a473c06be4cd4eb8b421c1677e032e3154ed956f
describe
'2523756' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJD' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ce10ac30c212a63be4d7e728795d9511
47e904a662b93fb51f5324e7d5143cc10cf3b151
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJE' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c048e7b5bc336d11d73a20ce58f67592
926cc93db7f46894443c268bcbe40161f5182359
'2011-10-15T09:21:41-04:00'
describe
'34855' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJF' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
f33ebb5bf289276ab02b5b696a96fd84
c64e55b8928dc0a84b9fe6afe9be5ae81ddda48e
describe
'312625' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
7f1bf28201cc95481933d227f2e10030
6490e0bea045da00c61521fa9fa146fc0f1df6f0
'2011-10-15T09:20:32-04:00'
describe
'174938' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJH' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
2fad7f5a2fe64b6c20cb304c57792526
a10cb44282629c329c8d8be2afe837b7ef94a513
describe
'28986' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
77b2908597fc8a8408657f4a48699579
553a3958570db1cf12588a39ca9bbf797b4c42f1
describe
'70894' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
fe7d634100262ab3b318b4a86fa04652
19ca91ef7cbe5e80a5a9015131a458ae8ed2dfc8
'2011-10-15T09:22:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJK' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c6293637d3d814ee638b3522b306f685
a281696dfa410d5255d89c2db4f38529fc26f6bb
'2011-10-15T09:22:48-04:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJL' 'sip-files00037.txt'
33026d906fb7f549c9de66d08ef71962
79692b33c7c4d9a538bd91a01ae03dce155f5311
describe
'34928' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJM' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
2065f3bc2f7e02f852b1fc78a15f2382
4f614f9498fe1755c6215905b0a7b516e0a6d7e4
'2011-10-15T09:23:25-04:00'
describe
'312649' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJN' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
1d82281e6cd40e92243577b6eb686d7a
317c92e68cb4142ebc3d50e99eb22c3377193239
describe
'163817' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
a92768754b15582c19647d3d6dec0d7a
bc8869d3ec47570a193b34e84314a06e6fde95a0
describe
'27561' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJP' 'sip-files00038.pro'
ab207eba9318aac6933e38dc02739db4
d95dd045a75db54d8890609b9b2d6d3e03a6b06f
'2011-10-15T09:21:25-04:00'
describe
'67294' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJQ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
4c3c245bd050887bf2c513e70e419779
f8180a0c5460226ddfea4bf46929c2068fa20c8e
'2011-10-15T09:23:39-04:00'
describe
'2523264' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
0467693c2d53d532a853265e13b14b7a
b027ca5f6b33ea5cd9a7086e16d2bac5fac6b66b
'2011-10-15T09:22:18-04:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJS' 'sip-files00038.txt'
cae59811a9a61656c59383985d0b9ce3
eb0891d84886e9add915c7edda5fb856787731b8
describe
'34428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJT' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
d7b2da2fec1f56c10d7a9fa90d76be2c
240d8cff89e20a0d58be1c5df1a8b337700bf144
'2011-10-15T09:23:45-04:00'
describe
'312654' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a80b0ebbf538d1633e0f6efbb8a77c72
6c15c3b9958275afb8123ae076e215f85b53326e
describe
'171550' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5dceac288ef3f2783f6d60dd68244307
bdb8ba5a86e48cfcf9e2e3e06fc79f0a44e9d45d
describe
'28861' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJW' 'sip-files00039.pro'
28d92ca2eeeecc46fbe5d2d71ae41867
06c383973fdad67a894630c0f0aa28ab6bd377d7
describe
'70547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJX' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
6b084ec61148ef17c3905423cb24c872
d640c74bba708d2f5633d6596b08d02e6aa5aa92
'2011-10-15T09:23:07-04:00'
describe
'2523416' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJY' 'sip-files00039.tif'
8adf39123b77ce02e90924adaa06b4d2
d533515aa0064368cd1cde64bf9d96ec77cbf9af
'2011-10-15T09:21:05-04:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUJZ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
165ae3b15d5cb95cdf48ced1ff841be8
a84ae9e7e33abe2beb3472f9f8b01a2956778005
describe
'34794' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKA' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
6095b288c2be506d02d63db6f8c4c758
1e2ca413d4b2912091569691f1a79c52c101c8fd
describe
'312627' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKB' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
a56e80246c9d9b6c83f48ede4f9d6810
fefda1fd7444758d2e00b267793ce49f33fc4f15
'2011-10-15T09:22:04-04:00'
describe
'156412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
d50da0a4dec2c7e828c794ebf885e623
180bbcfbdbb5f78838adc256d18a0b3c20dc079e
'2011-10-15T09:19:55-04:00'
describe
'25689' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKD' 'sip-files00040.pro'
b31f4837e68654ae1cbcca4cd9c73269
54fa36bc9630475e1fc516dbf28bb8c2782d9658
'2011-10-15T09:21:50-04:00'
describe
'65388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKE' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
acc50ce87c6732198e477c2f95479684
5377b2719c90737bed5a20ed49e4bff4ae368ea2
describe
'2523436' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKF' 'sip-files00040.tif'
c9b552b5651b36aa02c74ba0c960c849
e33389df6f21e2e6a542b78baa865505d87a8f21
'2011-10-15T09:23:53-04:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKG' 'sip-files00040.txt'
f96807621f06d3a85c1a9dcc76b6b29c
c3e58df6b73d396b697ea98e2d1334bce98b5c8c
describe
'34074' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKH' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
e470fab1521825ed48a4bf342202b899
af445d98f4b0cd2843bdc0f383cbf7472bf4c887
describe
'312620' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKI' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
6c742a650b5dc1e4fb21a58e1a773e80
926b21ba21b60190aa3fdc5b7c6cb4e65a117673
'2011-10-15T09:20:49-04:00'
describe
'161470' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c28140a8900b71e42ae017d87c607085
470cb2499dfd80bb212c3dee7ba6a8e486a1eb9e
describe
'27777' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
befca828708955ba3b2ade42bc36b729
02cadcc8bca51f14c51a33358392db65f795a2cc
'2011-10-15T09:23:44-04:00'
describe
'68065' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKL' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a2501b1c8a1ad076a4ddf97d1952ad72
ff6093929ca03ccaaee8bf31d4b8edc091332031
describe
'2523288' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
a5c68217da2f989b3a35c58a2119b10b
ba431491ef79c3abeb0dfd37e5acfe1f4788442f
'2011-10-15T09:20:10-04:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
d0bb2a4bce131034aa60273f2e0b010f
24176632c3c41ac7f7a331625170cb431ab576bd
'2011-10-15T09:20:20-04:00'
describe
'34201' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
559b90bdca8a348905c89e8eb19f6934
a6026d8f540973b2e40b27d6198c2f5177aaa96d
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
98eccc158abbcf505580e1b2ee8d4d4b
5c592130ba708769efe71045b280d14c456411ad
'2011-10-15T09:21:38-04:00'
describe
'168163' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
04ce8b31501bc3d58d7cc217f45ba230
5ccf7cf02bd36610d396e77ddbbc9d6d4d6f83eb
describe
'28593' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
b381815811053b3c5a404fb38f745978
62a92e55f3a414179accc530fe08d959ec790e96
describe
'67738' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
69f77f266e7b7f68601f97326504d98e
54a1e8f347fa746786fd35d71edddbf1cd63b6cf
describe
'2523236' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
5c669b85e5b52f408fa04b0266eefd24
5d0f51827baf34991231a5fd29b874654291b30e
'2011-10-15T09:19:53-04:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
4a4faacf3d80120109bc10cde7792983
154125abe54db4d0e92015aa54830891f634bc20
describe
'33968' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
db2699e40c308a993ab952b67659fa35
0e3a92d7b3b4a7975f2382e37069fc4582ab72a0
describe
'312658' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ac87794f2038c4c159fca26a38391db0
31702d2794ab89829e7cca208e36cc1dee6d3410
describe
'167235' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
bdf334903b7580d0efd739736b588e04
3bc5cdd847c0b748ae15cbbd48108c8be310ff09
describe
'28484' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
4fcbe60e7518a0add6a8d121c5be2271
609b4638cb35e43031aa77b92fb7ea4128d82324
describe
'70011' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUKZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
f359c2219787cca2916722a15e882153
52a80b6fcf98ebb4b844901b131f88201d5c1b0e
describe
'2523452' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
b9c224503dae19703296673116dd64d1
8ac8aa3bc09f0d35c122c7860c02d95f032c538a
'2011-10-15T09:22:16-04:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
bfabc0d614416b8be4fdc86d0e6324a8
be132993e8dd9595cead176eef3a29a405a89c95
describe
'34562' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
508d3d5114f27c07bba2bed95a2eea17
9e7de4faf6c6f2bd48026e0f309728d545bf7636
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
eae776ac76c53ca9e55f296ac7a69519
1e20b38a2ef7b9394d9f791bade8c62e181072b2
describe
'167372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
abd8eaddace2c349eb66234e088aea9f
b32792d0b806ed20ee29d25a04489eee62e91504
describe
'28665' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
bfd463e35e93164a72cfd43a15ee942f
1a9f360bf8f5a05cbd92964d6e997c8519220154
describe
'69807' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULG' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
faeeec9b677c973ea5174f0afa5276dd
e46816740354b9abba0be7c43b50a4a2f1a270d5
describe
'2523252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
2a7094eef0e11e1c45e1904b47fab977
a6d0e46c2561085eaae481f07acf3bdec0d0c069
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
c07b31c57e5b8585e0a13c2a5be379a3
8918d363ce13668047c7eb3086e0286ef8a29981
'2011-10-15T09:20:05-04:00'
describe
'34400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULJ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
fc639a832b6ae32843597e9a23bfb735
d03801a28b0fbf5af614cc0b42225a07af9cefd8
describe
'312526' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
224627077b3e026bb7673a3219afbaa8
a49220a6bdeacab422d6ab8fdd03959137f5ee82
describe
'90113' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
abbeb2c5154c320db9744be877438912
0234696b07f42a138d5ecd0a0a9e7fe4eacb9426
describe
'8865' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULM' 'sip-files00045.pro'
4a6eb4cf7da844cb06014494f6c1f30d
86137d850a5901e89f58aa7cb965d92434e3f063
'2011-10-15T09:19:59-04:00'
describe
'39155' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULN' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
f33ff2043e5cfc050c7956e4ed2101b0
d1b397ed749a1476b0c07d7972324c6c805019e6
describe
'2520228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULO' 'sip-files00045.tif'
c44a3a982c749b1c3e32d417459c9a6c
75c2640e87408dd2118505df02f672fb5fdb32dd
describe
'388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
19c3c903d79f31c9e50fc2f47b6fa7ac
2a474dc6a2456bb308badc14f5fe6af0003458eb
'2011-10-15T09:21:34-04:00'
describe
'24395' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULQ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
2a28a90bb9bb723d2eb7cbc1d3f086cb
a5b5cab8f0cfb94041c1b2ed477c39fbbe960390
'2011-10-15T09:19:26-04:00'
describe
'312531' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
53a87fb4af12277b051a8a14405c719e
61b4f3af43fb3fc0ee211dd75a266f08feb43d92
'2011-10-15T09:22:26-04:00'
describe
'135641' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULS' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
d1a175762cc253061ae005248418a852
e9b4be360e1e2817bf8264f4e229742a1da6e8ad
'2011-10-15T09:23:00-04:00'
describe
'18870' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULT' 'sip-files00046.pro'
330150bf7cfc114d61086e337c659378
daebe1e9cfd786f6595aef74d7d697ccadd0185e
'2011-10-15T09:19:47-04:00'
describe
'55935' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULU' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
39b4175486da2a116a92effb94c084ca
7f6104dbb502cf9a538015bf065ee905a768ab16
describe
'2522300' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULV' 'sip-files00046.tif'
ab0427ba4e888b6f21d2dec7b91d26b1
42cf0917ccc16001bee064cef1dc9baa1abcb5bd
'2011-10-15T09:20:43-04:00'
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULW' 'sip-files00046.txt'
48c4be30f9d33fa82a9485fe9ca9774c
cb6745b800e84a03a1ba322c9d839c498552a326
describe
'30670' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULX' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
bd79d6a1142898cc02fb8ea349b21ff4
a41f35ff6fcb21ecc0a51d0093c092d2a625722c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULY' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
13070dc137606d73ca49bbc16fa356e6
3d74627009db878759d443463fa91aaaad407a30
describe
'165785' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABULZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
24cf521deaeaa7b66a1ddc60d12c5d01
f84c63e7bcb495d970ce88eaebd80e25d9638fdf
describe
'27347' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMA' 'sip-files00047.pro'
c2106dc81a920e2f534178a95e9e0db4
e27febc0674d33f23bd88f010967590ed39c259a
describe
'69970' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
e36bd84fccc4dbccc16048fa40c3942e
76cc725e802578ddb96cdf6ff90c893d9adb0c6f
'2011-10-15T09:21:20-04:00'
describe
'2523448' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMC' 'sip-files00047.tif'
1eaaa3ce3d93159ce7c9d8ccf1c311c0
e2d920521f41b1047c74dda0778e894d0077f5e4
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMD' 'sip-files00047.txt'
33a22b5594c3a3d5cfad487984aadafd
192825f050006a35b0acffb8638d533209bc86ba
describe
'34308' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUME' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
239f2c76eeaaae89c83d66cb88dac794
fcf0c808fa37435c4a481e17a353f76d1486f5d2
describe
'312611' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMF' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
5162bc3cac314349730ce669a92ec7ff
1f0a59af8d74e4a2b11166dadb215463fc9cef29
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMG' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
eb4d7f401b54e8459bfb77eabb194cba
7013b81477742cc4e0368495d0dcdc11f52cfc0c
describe
'29522' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMH' 'sip-files00048.pro'
f54051d46f6804f0ab456d45e37e4bab
229242649ddf06993fbb8663fa3e44e92c23aa6a
describe
'70309' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMI' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
6013f44c774ca41450e05e4e61d7309f
32dfdb83d3d99fa22f9df7e0163aef031962c0c6
'2011-10-15T09:19:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMJ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
2f6f210f9e165c2efbac4874a76b3987
3837c21ddc21da79d0fcdf4e384c2698e93bb240
'2011-10-15T09:21:01-04:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMK' 'sip-files00048.txt'
949377c5b13c084f6ce6abacf5a8b6a4
1370e58ec5512837d31dcd81ba3ac4bafbb02fb1
describe
'34329' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUML' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
7ed6de070461d4356946a31d7ddbd12c
934a89fd9fbfb0dcad917e1f01b7d13edef7b54f
describe
'312639' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMM' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
0b9518e65c92651887003454db1a0134
ab6ad5be45bd8d565e7a3c401ea2dbd0ad55055e
'2011-10-15T09:23:32-04:00'
describe
'173907' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMN' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
444de7b1fe5b2d6ffe0833f1020ce825
cd2d3918c6e1da9ab6521980a11e88da4210860c
describe
'28977' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMO' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c793ddb321611adb84cae5dbf39930b9
b6e2abe35b3ef74c940a6cc8b62a4552de3bbb07
describe
'69935' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
dd7df4c28fc7ab246f6db3b984e02556
6cbf99360a4dd019acb6675dd3c385e50eb2f192
describe
'2523280' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMQ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c88fdbeff931897f74640ee0e918d5d7
cf4cd26c62bb430d908e5ad378a213cd2ae82794
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMR' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5cf78787434df315e90c94759bf529eb
2a192179d56486b7a0936650c9aaee4ea385da66
describe
'34455' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMS' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
ac950acfd92057c51d73dc8a5529861e
17f501714104ab40d2537a9440556172aff47fae
describe
'312606' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMT' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
e5c776692c3de08736233c3cfefbe629
c94e52023d7cc85f00611b6a9a96ef9f1effee4f
describe
'174919' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMU' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
762b58793f6afbe3da76286eeff376ec
c9fcd506352038361c53518072fbbe144afcbbc7
describe
'28170' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMV' 'sip-files00050.pro'
275abba76ac22c5731dc6765f3ca7a53
39f9123f49037ea333ef5df96398ccef5a3fd0e0
describe
'67857' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMW' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
bcd08fdae18c11d2069c72f5353334e4
e1968b6620dbce82bee85bbb9f81dccc6153873f
describe
'2523256' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMX' 'sip-files00050.tif'
234ffd53181857b517dc9470f89c87b6
1b9fbfc056716bf7c20c592a9b90f22fc105f2f2
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMY' 'sip-files00050.txt'
dd1171d3f7f3954e849f13118509fbff
655f302d350d36a5a2fbc175700fe80e17ab18e5
describe
'34239' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUMZ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
a09f10fee6dea71678f03e5fb0a0147f
9d5e918460f12515150bdf74f218440da465dc01
describe
'312327' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNA' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
6810dc0fccbf86342979a899ceef2517
b3c708308c112862a0031e57dae6ed8571928c81
describe
'171631' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNB' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
b831e57d10cca9ba8f4f5d4be51fc614
5930dde8cd47471c54d8c54fe1be631b056f00c1
describe
'28416' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNC' 'sip-files00051.pro'
8acee7c028ef74962eda22d4c0233455
730572b1599055b1beb8481bc599eb90e635f95e
describe
'68463' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUND' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
49847240e40abcd547378a8c656c1fb4
f259ed5a622f01be1e76457b4e64b1fe992e7e8a
'2011-10-15T09:22:38-04:00'
describe
'2523248' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNE' 'sip-files00051.tif'
2521d4e4f485d6400a8c7dac5f4a8368
4f4e92f1c275fb31d4f9d4d65021c48625b20be1
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNF' 'sip-files00051.txt'
98927166eb67ca7c85458ac2f8548721
5f677c114c538f6157c95c6ba776e0562caaff5e
describe
'34103' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNG' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
2de813a0388321d66b276b8f22c457d8
2f8f3831ec87612046c50202f361ae9c1398ff8a
describe
'312661' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNH' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
e982205dc51272ae885eaae2f4257d9b
67a6174e877142c0404484ce8741a2eca09b1859
describe
'170389' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNI' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
0dbb3f9f064085f8bc7a1de9c74a04a4
be44873482248806f9b2a3b34574000ade14f21b
describe
'28340' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNJ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
714ab64c6de2d2bd4480dd975b11d994
521472b5dd813ba6ad74c4cdf893f8ea7bb72118
describe
'68601' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNK' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
c9f7e9101cdeb77dc7cb01003652a76e
82f87a19b336560f62ce0ea94e35dc7bae52c92e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNL' 'sip-files00052.tif'
7fd1f307c6f3666b3639737d4378de9b
3f1e224cc61a9a104b8dc7707e42ad2426856c75
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNM' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8062a1844ccec6d4ee5ca4055e80dc61
cefd09c7974fa28b6bdfa4a76299b7b1c1d0a3c9
describe
'34184' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNN' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
7a731c8a93133313827e6a406a02a6f9
d6acc656f021acfe7ef01845a2e4ea7889123370
describe
'312640' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNO' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b039224ad96c4f82e350f4bd9db26644
8dcbf4f7b5279d68b9e61c7cbc1e7ea8fdc91b5b
describe
'166261' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNP' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
3b8e52486c3b4638991facc6d3246247
4487d8d2be76a4f6eed861b0175eb94de37ea71e
describe
'27862' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNQ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
3d604b9a683490c89948965f173ecdf9
202221797392104bd91b947cc097177b2924a68d
'2011-10-15T09:20:44-04:00'
describe
'68581' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNR' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f57ff0c3ecca6a0faed1e1c79804affc
cb26c1d3787ca3a23fae0f4887f096700a653795
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNS' 'sip-files00053.tif'
819face4fd07df932c08629deb69c3d6
c84d5eb781827cac731c9ac37856768c4494deb7
'2011-10-15T09:22:33-04:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNT' 'sip-files00053.txt'
c97afd4c3fc9ea9cb402bd6fdbc11179
d33ce6359b31578efd6c2536e6bd0255bfd65141
describe
'34275' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNU' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
dd48f589aa85eef80d30145a74c67b68
b003a28095c1c1076d0e798b98139b15dd421ae5
describe
'312318' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNV' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
9703923ea7b33672ece01b38c7ca2adf
6d4b70be68c3616e2184db1bfce90e5cf5c4c13d
describe
'173404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNW' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
599f595c91e38a9b0422367ac8b4d62e
7d0745fd25777a98482fcfd9e7083a84597c66ca
'2011-10-15T09:21:56-04:00'
describe
'28098' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNX' 'sip-files00054.pro'
5b586b5db28723808d479c8391845fe1
ad58e88fabea48bb365615e45d95da18bcf356be
describe
'68317' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNY' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
635e402d7bb02db096656632ec31910c
a151d34a28ce3daa7c410821b73118df6942b3e1
'2011-10-15T09:23:08-04:00'
describe
'2521404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUNZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
f648ff32e319905c721a61e82147049b
d866b1555b48cf004e0fae72e61541d6758abbf5
'2011-10-15T09:20:17-04:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOA' 'sip-files00054.txt'
63385a681be60241e03438340cf303c9
4a5d99e84f6217623f934db235268ba4b25c023d
describe
'34140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOB' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
38c9946c799ecb82873687e0e0b21c96
e38467b9da29f4889b484ce19261a982a89f5b02
describe
'312543' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOC' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
348c4706668112d4c131e3e21cbdce11
87d47746b927b74a40c211273bfdf65fdb9001f9
describe
'168002' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOD' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
2ae02ec0e05bdcafee2b9297cdcea9ac
52775511474bc07481567c57e918c4001ad19ab9
describe
'28477' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOE' 'sip-files00055.pro'
48ad9184fd24fb11873ccb9facd3be35
b9fce3a4f432cc16c6dd828026bdbd4e936ac359
'2011-10-15T09:22:23-04:00'
describe
'69296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOF' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
0335a1aad9230cb027e8686eebd26505
99221a005a2bcaeb311a06f3b9c6f7668cd1f73b
describe
'2523304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOG' 'sip-files00055.tif'
31de3245d16b42cd9af6910a25649928
2468b93cd7c3fbe9af7a3bb917e740c413f99cc6
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOH' 'sip-files00055.txt'
7f22083f158c44831bda8312b547f013
e578e67eef58a94e230a16227b37203372c3b8e8
'2011-10-15T09:22:50-04:00'
describe
'34436' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOI' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
6feabe19437885f1d4eb1e57f7537ccc
99c3c85ce23ee900a3e1f19142e35a89a8a4144b
describe
'312190' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOJ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
b9cf841f6eee4447a1cddae33c0f19b3
1251573c370b74a97cc22a8fa4ade194330c1ccc
describe
'166754' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOK' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
fbe8ff823c1f19e3efe0006fbe9de9d9
1d309b42cd35cf353044234d9cd2ce93d69b9606
'2011-10-15T09:22:01-04:00'
describe
'26369' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOL' 'sip-files00056.pro'
a891984eecf57c46869c5d384a2c4a7b
6fbc4ccf85815dfd02227b6eb1c87904c0748656
describe
'66904' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOM' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
e88c89de5ab21a02b0263f5942958709
5394d4e021fc6bf596d1f9cd00d34d6f0225709b
describe
'2521204' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUON' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c5e2e2edb3e42ecbf4d352a828ff42bd
18ee8dbd06b1818923acbb5c7961e4506b7477cb
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOO' 'sip-files00056.txt'
aab874454559f0c1a6002adbd7eafd8b
7bf6d219c95ece871625743a5df1be5bd35e829e
describe
'33403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOP' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
73f0300675f0fc6eae5710b53a133d7f
4b4e328562bf88f88fc827fbcefa7fecf87f5b6b
describe
'312484' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOQ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
a26c572b8ea83b69b707df05972621d7
7d8939abfac6a0dff4f37a4812aacfa0d9752dc1
describe
'169243' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOR' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
0dcf34e9b573e59e4515b39855294f22
08e8b651b204676b8a4bb84fa455d587e7e9beff
'2011-10-15T09:23:05-04:00'
describe
'27676' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOS' 'sip-files00057.pro'
a06483bf13b374abe607c05b9f4a5609
53bdbf58e4020d08549b21fe8f9ff038a0471012
'2011-10-15T09:21:08-04:00'
describe
'68179' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOT' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
14aa943c707526883eec7cb05f7272ab
385a62637df8c41764806f48b33c97ecae359c67
'2011-10-15T09:23:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOU' 'sip-files00057.tif'
e1c964db5544716cca874c266f102198
bcacc808a3bbd70db5038b5de1c38ac6bcc2abc8
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOV' 'sip-files00057.txt'
b381fd00ec0a52bc8705315a5a9fa91b
c3d9827ddff4ca25245be5e7e2de267d769039e8
describe
'33749' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOW' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
8e26d2a26c2e4545e2bd9f01ff5feebc
5edf67ea15a1bcc79adfdaefd202f770bd96783e
describe
'312376' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOX' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
e7f034faeee0bbf54a4a29bf3c00924e
7db1b3652661f73b0787247d0ad291c84c632aaa
describe
'133217' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOY' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
a1c48873089725c6629395de4116b724
b5011ce68f2c795c45a5d7c854659daf764a9b64
'2011-10-15T09:23:12-04:00'
describe
'18035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUOZ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
e23f1757c76432297dd3719f4e23ee4e
9a3d2424d1c8dc89e3bcd695f05e8c912409ee37
'2011-10-15T09:21:36-04:00'
describe
'53067' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPA' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
3ee00c37be4b1e063b0ba69cb06525aa
202feac4050386c97711023f14f2b4cbc3d3ad85
'2011-10-15T09:21:45-04:00'
describe
'2519496' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPB' 'sip-files00058.tif'
1bd7f301c3daca0e7ef7fb92f7c44755
83c3135723c697b7e2ccfa3f9ae198d8d560ee31
'2011-10-15T09:22:57-04:00'
describe
'717' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPC' 'sip-files00058.txt'
367ec36687bd647ef92d7264aadd86a3
34e790868579877ef37e865dc11c65fbe8f028c2
describe
'28612' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPD' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c6d7ed6ea41ac2bf8e319fbaa3f95634
e7acdcf1b46c0f45d9be4eb6dc87e4c95faacc84
describe
'312650' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPE' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
457ded6e467fbca3652635558e6ddc78
329008d12ca6ed2e791cd0143c72c675a9274df5
describe
'135454' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPF' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
db371c708351b61315a261a85a75f133
2281f984f8d237a83a208d1ee1beb8e1e6e75801
describe
'19194' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPG' 'sip-files00059.pro'
45cede305b281c20fe932268fed07dd5
0e38df0d1369ad291d2df3404b519bba25206058
describe
'54558' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPH' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
97a72a99332cdf8b0a30b801a66995e5
4eca82cc2b7ae14599974e9301d5de99c3d7060f
describe
'2521912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPI' 'sip-files00059.tif'
9d3a2f9dae8cd0924dae35f1488362c2
8b9d2efcd83de4bd6f3218bbcf59149b5f642dcc
'2011-10-15T09:22:29-04:00'
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPJ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
5756c96003ffb086b13686dfe67b64f6
f226f1c677955fce8f89d5503d84e2049c040b75
describe
'29635' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPK' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
25d02f6a4e4ecd9381a37458add32627
88bd5b68f5b71b11b6a0f02f865808ba316b6504
describe
'312395' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPL' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
75ef659e478c248ef759e0f9c8220ab9
1c0f98f6b626eb5c0dd23c348bf4963a78aa4dfd
describe
'167425' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPM' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
1559bc5341eb304ef596e3a0e9397d8b
5a4506d0b4bdaaa43593b28b626ccf03a3351413
'2011-10-15T09:23:56-04:00'
describe
'26752' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPN' 'sip-files00060.pro'
88a261103313224d6279092f3d6bdd11
942c116969889d2e5ab0dd4d44ac82dd2f4f3095
describe
'67025' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPO' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
46f694f9127a340e4f891ce58be498f9
d370247acf1aac02a047e516fd4c45a074c85ea2
describe
'2523572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPP' 'sip-files00060.tif'
c022e4c9deff8500c950021351f65dfb
426592be3a08df31465b2bf1878efa503fe16a0c
'2011-10-15T09:23:54-04:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPQ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7d400825cd98ba4695a7fcb246e0ec4a
9293fc893c71692cce444a269af50f2bbb9ce72f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPR' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
eb8bd9739d8761c0d27b8ec11b9e8164
1c97f5752e6c76f4bf9a481c92b2098af855066f
'2011-10-15T09:21:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPS' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
fcf944af7c2934df06806139f657efbe
fe689103ddb17f653b255cb189407280ff27bd4b
describe
'174082' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPT' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e1c2e7ae8a837c0ab6a899d1f7fc0526
2044c549eb0c35291144e0e5ee7f9dee3d1fbc5d
describe
'29159' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPU' 'sip-files00061.pro'
818626905c0696cbd9219458ae5af786
fec90bd80e719918be36b45013a522966c22c123
describe
'69799' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPV' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3375aeee4a360e321ae48ed307d00ce1
4fec1e28889cfeedb02c924bd27719e69fdee96e
'2011-10-15T09:21:16-04:00'
describe
'2523220' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPW' 'sip-files00061.tif'
395268f1e8fffc84bd456a9ae1ea4d19
cb5110240079416fa773ce919993a343f174d658
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPX' 'sip-files00061.txt'
fbb2468510ae83d1f24837d500ec4ee4
bd13864da5183543f0969d269510c8567af91c1c
describe
'34096' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPY' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
40e67be58ae96740ac173c5aabae76ee
08c75f514ebdb10356c702ee1519e42e787e2e90
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUPZ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
8cf94d636c952319649a5297c59205dc
fb64268c50d89df92c5fe87640ac4a653885665a
describe
'166146' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQA' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
874df5a2fd3ea809a66dd71e188e4895
f000dc554685bb2b4c9e130033b29d76fc7b6394
describe
'26629' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQB' 'sip-files00062.pro'
220b59f2df31b7e267a35d16e74c4fd6
544bda182e4e1f53e5e4d22b2024dee07472434b
describe
'66878' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQC' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a635dc841106a050df4aefa4d7027524
5c3cf25a029c35412ac2b4f72ba7054ed19ef4bd
describe
'2523388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQD' 'sip-files00062.tif'
e51a1bc32b68a4ef97bc154a5f3ec8dc
c34a5238157c36a9e2e7dcfb7658a38cd25b4572
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQE' 'sip-files00062.txt'
60fccc87010cc5d2f8e82f4f95227ace
09e4e935a3f3bff82c9acdbfa206a52bde2b9ccf
'2011-10-15T09:22:22-04:00'
describe
'33855' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQF' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
6618aebde1f1d4cdc3e03475f2de8a9d
173321a1d5ad3b70c1c0d1e6da26339bee41dcc7
describe
'312601' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQG' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
def913107b7e38182ee150f936bd232f
d3ef122af5e4cef447c48e32c55decf71933161b
'2011-10-15T09:19:39-04:00'
describe
'168054' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQH' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
923a37fa58851b9b220010b94161b133
0023facf60f8e7c1f1280d18cc34628254009615
'2011-10-15T09:23:29-04:00'
describe
'28076' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQI' 'sip-files00063.pro'
d4bc2f5009c8fb961ff02ec7f7b92bf2
447698d19a01b8411b017bfd9ddccf4af48a3861
describe
'68967' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
0d3009dc79b546d558c0506e84ad9735
9aaefe8fd06c8903d9eeb70f9235d9d96ba63230
'2011-10-15T09:19:54-04:00'
describe
'2523308' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQK' 'sip-files00063.tif'
cbed40051fce3b3c8c68e90089d41a04
324eb7a82a7b040219727a796b9bd8e9d90e9fcc
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQL' 'sip-files00063.txt'
50c11c576fabd23b069590b1e1953f90
1b10de068555aebd272e9035ff3fb84663784295
'2011-10-15T09:22:15-04:00'
describe
'34320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQM' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
b145a751a06a4090f7e0358437010ca5
048a3f26599ea1a2e19156488ffaa60112a1fbc2
describe
'312596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQN' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
d7996c30438657b2473360f64f21fcfa
9b35e957e48df97d3a42f59f048c5928f95ac0b2
describe
'173048' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQO' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
74072496ba592908ff4bd47c259f08e7
a74ef220a7d1e6b8479e66477d79bbfd01d12453
describe
'28285' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQP' 'sip-files00064.pro'
f0ae2d4587a432702edb2022fa49e6bd
bc085f41773a2bb74c152214b2717bf1cff064c5
describe
'68999' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQQ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1d7dd2106de65e3ffd4e01ad0ffbddee
fe34199edf9b4050715193f74f9e95ccee920726
describe
'2523272' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQR' 'sip-files00064.tif'
6cf2f300dbc95f2f85b764c61dcec416
77165fca773e4535718a9ac1c718934c74ca6a75
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQS' 'sip-files00064.txt'
46b58957954c03a52db6617d9b3db1e2
cf31dac1b88d8df3afed35355e54b9bffd3773ff
'2011-10-15T09:19:30-04:00'
describe
'34280' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQT' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
043243d64d88ae1bce0e20cd85f7e0cb
ce2e0a45f9b7b15a6bb5e3c5763d6dad26401003
'2011-10-15T09:21:04-04:00'
describe
'312644' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
949dd18d2c41f56ccdbe324a1357d975
bdc1b4a55a85fb272f590dd5094b53f1a7ee7371
'2011-10-15T09:21:54-04:00'
describe
'170294' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQV' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
713ade9cfe601565be104ba798e48fe5
c375f6492fd7683c328a42f12f4880a76d685f51
describe
'28349' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQW' 'sip-files00065.pro'
15494dd62d1b3759803e5111df8eac40
a0b1f502bbb640f6fad8da420fc07ab61a39c2ca
describe
'67910' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQX' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
1da07240cae01537876d7bbe9bb717b3
659cdd159b7adc4e636c03222fdf656a63d0d43e
'2011-10-15T09:20:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQY' 'sip-files00065.tif'
b52cfdf4bf6b68bc1da4eea5ad956dec
9527b85de61e64a9a6511d452aa14c9c4f48178b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUQZ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8093c9e1ec97884aa9e61c878bbe16b4
df788090896d3266988b24ec0215d9d30f80b0c7
describe
'34200' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURA' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
50d33c8a7ecde67193ddd55bb28c1540
0c88aed473c7bafe219796ce71bbf554d578567c
'2011-10-15T09:20:47-04:00'
describe
'312378' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURB' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
688ad3c9d77f4eff91ec0547cf4b431f
081e8db9ef80a2739f3533134061d783901a8e0d
describe
'177466' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURC' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
d9592c82faa498c48a1aba92b34e7837
16d7e28cb52ddc8894d14088a32a8ce0a383ba13
describe
'29857' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURD' 'sip-files00066.pro'
89ff7a9b4b231739fe7984a92e7a80e0
6689c91bcec19271817d3ed6b270ed4398ceee88
'2011-10-15T09:21:53-04:00'
describe
'71357' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURE' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
8bfc52b7e5844823fb6a63dc82935d59
1ba0df34cf9da85da276a230a057e07cd0c75b96
describe
'2521776' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURF' 'sip-files00066.tif'
4c1f57db18e7afed899f85d744c805c8
8b62b7d68f7e606c065cba8280e567e0a17e9fe9
'2011-10-15T09:19:42-04:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURG' 'sip-files00066.txt'
f16de2f563bee9c676aa465530daa365
1b3b624d17a9c24094047ee230d7a03fca37fb50
describe
'35108' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURH' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
06367e8bf1607770ab229deca6c9564a
3971a8773250059793a76272bd0164c47f169303
describe
'312535' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURI' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
795f8d08979e02639b3603f05867f953
e13986458ec01610c3f33ae66ac3f18b9be6f4e7
describe
'169818' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURJ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
8dc1be08c946924c3a8c4b09084e7536
68eb7a3c4ad408dcbc6ea09b765feeb2e252b625
describe
'28134' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURK' 'sip-files00067.pro'
3acbc153edf88a4cbdbc9a383f41258b
a28bc449c9f83494348c0d4b7d92d07352f5ab54
describe
'67945' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURL' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d31f747ee979292c0693ab2c1f78b03d
359f58eabc9a31219bb08f6499c76dea1eafe32e
'2011-10-15T09:21:18-04:00'
describe
'2523240' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURM' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4353added5b0b4ce01dc6a235fb2f062
c98902a5f81d0bb550c2d61f716c7d5d82d89d33
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURN' 'sip-files00067.txt'
873654facd0e4054ed781a1841fe72c6
5b01b13ab7d5ee5231ef6b7d8c1427992789bf58
describe
'34024' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURO' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e2a4395761c31ae0d44ad33ea3f6f3ce
242fee262017496e206095e122fc96aec987733c
describe
'312520' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURP' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
92cfa2d9798c6d47b24a3816b36354bf
7325641e2a958e21cc18a4822903dc2ce1f679a6
describe
'170000' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURQ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
84e2ce1f8be87b921fea60fb1518ae77
5e2b2c14b80038cb1a2095d94743f8c0ef018b5a
'2011-10-15T09:20:56-04:00'
describe
'27581' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURR' 'sip-files00068.pro'
0e391798883f7fe6c4dca87f37191be4
18e1ce25eefb73e5ecec809092b3d58a3a7a855c
describe
'68166' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURS' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
ae63b95be940da47f24db9594599644c
a97ed95331112e847148b5574a09bd39dab6c7be
'2011-10-15T09:23:31-04:00'
describe
'2523472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURT' 'sip-files00068.tif'
dba6873489070fd01a41260b90f971f6
736cd6a081df880d0bbcc95efad613dbc5ee4d2b
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURU' 'sip-files00068.txt'
118e61c9ad89b6069e83c5a828100244
918144ee42047570323298c792a36fdeb0c7cbb1
'2011-10-15T09:22:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURV' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
ca9354f77ae6551072762042640a1642
4579c08bc1db48f6d29ababa4b685e4fc3a7875c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURW' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
b1948956986b91fb4ea2cb82b8b44f56
1c7be2ec0d340792c9d5f1a94c443d2834addd89
describe
'168298' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURX' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
d2d89680630b1ff0f48a0f171c69371e
6dc8d4f9d9eed2255a6553217c08433b1dce7445
describe
'27708' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURY' 'sip-files00069.pro'
ed66687696bcf28cabf30a97311877cd
83e4455c53ac0635aaecec95601d46dcded48246
'2011-10-15T09:23:28-04:00'
describe
'67999' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABURZ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
aebd403bb952efed9b3242b2e3e6e53f
d19cd36125f9c60e1f02782c5a2f59773bb31726
describe
'2523316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSA' 'sip-files00069.tif'
0e0a27e70eb50f9f2249ed9767ef540b
7a62887d17337dd516fdc041d41ad2b95071ea26
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSB' 'sip-files00069.txt'
cebc2ad145ad21074f14571c8d4593de
ca84141c823eadec77abd8d16e13effc73f15213
describe
'33853' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSC' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b76edb6d2a7cddce25a13b0886cc1cf3
4e97f89bd7190bdc0bf132ad4e86b65e27db0e08
describe
'312645' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSD' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
359e4c1ea59f1be00f3c9ff3a4cbb61c
e3d3661a15c2c6da0b47d8c3dd186c4543bf5e9c
'2011-10-15T09:20:15-04:00'
describe
'165096' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSE' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
25aa2c135f0ed33e43ff72bc61929d2b
77530ac91134a1e50e73805b3183dd65ed74f438
describe
'26855' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSF' 'sip-files00070.pro'
3741020938d857dbd1c0c848bc6182c0
e414d30acd7483ad21d2fd102915cd8f6f87feca
'2011-10-15T09:20:27-04:00'
describe
'68074' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSG' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
98107828a221a02c8dcd81169b1ebdf2
c3a551dd089472d42c6dc4e20214ffa745e63499
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSH' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e1f2c19b9c2f7f8b8ba5bc44a1a2a634
a7c56c147ef6ddac8184faec784fc38458d51e0f
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSI' 'sip-files00070.txt'
5736b056d8a8ff35040c332c4ddc1831
ccf8db568c18aa85bd71d3e2a633fcdc1e6b86fd
describe
'34355' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSJ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
ef370eb4b19137fb481279f440a56d57
34347cf7ce000e7e21fe7c82693327d366974bd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSK' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
a49bd18299235c2c9bb0dafc77f5dd8f
9d5ef7aeb5b3b9fd6e23aeb107d984d0ba30b13c
'2011-10-15T09:20:54-04:00'
describe
'247556' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSL' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
8649b9e983c5e36ffb8db4c023ca60c9
3a633f7379df957c469fd535880c3396621f62da
describe
'2508' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSM' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3add99649739283e613cea8d4088f6f1
1f8e17485400cb8e7e2291cbdf380857f82353a6
describe
'70040' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSN' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
94bca41447542dfb88df0ecf530719a5
c2cda5b340e1c58b68155a355bd90db8ddfe9f34
'2011-10-15T09:23:50-04:00'
describe
'2523096' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSO' 'sip-files00071.tif'
4c53038caf52a4f91d1fdd16d459369a
dbd00084270eabf2862ea336e0442f67a9be0dc8
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSP' 'sip-files00071.txt'
5f225aedbd2f799b2cb254373adc6bfc
863e762ab713e4e27e2c33d17ebe3ba051be93f9
describe
'32857' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSQ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
58c60bb7d6a446d8732a366ffdbf669a
e9a217725d2ed1006855c3c1fd192d19ec42bd4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSR' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
d81c2e546fd4e5def9a95eafa1914481
55ae06fd802d10e16a978c2d16f9032eee15f806
describe
'169656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSS' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
6df825e573a4fc01e2a5f8cb9a5b1adf
2d91894c1506001d50a492845daa590cf45ae556
describe
'27739' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUST' 'sip-files00073.pro'
5a3af8b8f9194cd5579c5dcc41bcecbd
ee052cd900ff2ba5335bb37e93f61e50d9ffb886
describe
'67252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSU' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
0af7ec4fcd3a8f72d98631b5cc77e121
5123a5acf71575bf63c4cf8e0fb5e9c5cfba406c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSV' 'sip-files00073.tif'
e17496b84498b7adabc3a3ec27698b6e
fe0aa0fd5502cc166dc99615e71ad5273e0ba043
'2011-10-15T09:22:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSW' 'sip-files00073.txt'
a54150e8ca3da7e8d7e67d07a63f9672
1a648f2c43af2b4e4bbae9bef0bb1e41afcbc5ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSX' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
981943168a88258c9466d720032ccaa1
4a839f32dfbd1077551c10f03149b295d4aba717
describe
'312307' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSY' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
c6fff0cbf6feaf4e563e657c08be95b4
1d5b6154b1e6455b791381ed9ffd21f8508504a2
'2011-10-15T09:22:20-04:00'
describe
'101162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUSZ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
8d00627939778c53db571176248cc9a0
36c041169102c9219c706a0aedb0ba332a1852c7
describe
'10118' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTA' 'sip-files00074.pro'
167f2aa1a574719623238febdd4ca09f
befe9e0ea8a933e6de74f7606c96c6ec523f6293
describe
'39763' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTB' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
4014a7335337ac0a91f63a1d729dd704
262105ce7593494bc4de83d234a1b1db1f6bcc26
'2011-10-15T09:19:43-04:00'
describe
'2520316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTC' 'sip-files00074.tif'
552a2e9c558e60468224b2cdb1c67503
55d9a45032fa83498573b7bd76cb6f3a1396de42
describe
'409' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTD' 'sip-files00074.txt'
143e1bf939f1c10f76d39f41d33a9df3
972eda38afceb305accbd88d7f5bd04000fbd8be
describe
'24630' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTE' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
ee7b08a3cabff05d637db221040983ee
5eaf84a756a73439d65e6a50d4cefb9850108f58
describe
'312634' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTF' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
751e2604f686fcdfe15aeac5d74cb842
e2989899f7364a612327b176ad566191a0053481
describe
'137569' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTG' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7163b1868c6353b383d62dee46ea8a57
0f7ff234ce742e182f0839634ba7f658cd0df354
describe
'19228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTH' 'sip-files00075.pro'
0534a9a21792b309623cc70b912e3169
ae9b81d0c224908ce9131bab4a42271f441f171d
describe
'54089' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTI' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
7968dab813a23b47e967cabae4557428
b7dc84ee974be8a11c7fa190bd8b2f72b9866703
describe
'2521936' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTJ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
0409afe8200e5b060cfffc4c3b02e7f8
fed11e408fdf79f971749dd11f49e471911b8a02
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTK' 'sip-files00075.txt'
1ad67fb636b4db80070bf479d100ca25
7b3644c02258ce68a3ad05aa90463653afe5b55b
'2011-10-15T09:19:36-04:00'
describe
'29752' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTL' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
6fa5bd6b1c417aaea0036713c18d8b49
0b86bb50fb83fc993eff054b67c039edde42bb15
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTM' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
85a03769ba60e5303138c02819062784
f5020ccbb5eab2a30bcceeb4a680df25776c34fd
describe
'168961' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTN' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c8daac1be8180b04fc136d86aa6c0a25
de5ec9886a9a3fe9ed3b0afc6afccd8c98613881
describe
'27396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTO' 'sip-files00076.pro'
1f29ce3ff6c36c421fb4e84f1e6501ee
88a472fc971fcd50edd126d7aa7cad7b4bd14e5d
describe
'67100' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTP' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
d684a5d1ec82c1c272c71964da4c56be
ca71ccd4261b2e08cb4a9f5859bfd9feba21a527
'2011-10-15T09:22:59-04:00'
describe
'2523160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTQ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
510be3c3376554091ec6c537282bb739
c09729a00446bc8c5014078d08e2cb2d11d03a9b
'2011-10-15T09:21:52-04:00'
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTR' 'sip-files00076.txt'
ab7743e61c7af50648a3f698079009f1
783bbcc5c11a46f8c7b2512cf9db78b46647b878
'2011-10-15T09:23:46-04:00'
describe
'33790' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTS' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
a589a603431e89d608ba3093e233a07c
2f4ac116c702e6d92cf6c9745ffe3790e10a1e35
describe
'312546' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTT' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
85065f5df169893068d1ad5df35657ef
581c6e2cc7da8c7a67ec57bcf8d9bef0790eaf64
'2011-10-15T09:21:10-04:00'
describe
'170212' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTU' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
04cd646887f1ad1a74dde55655c8b1ae
e7bb90ed5e7ff77fd2ce1cce42bcc0abbb1e98ee
describe
'28318' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTV' 'sip-files00077.pro'
be851ac8d31fc841bc2d50722c85445e
3f56c0be7aee6e5aa3d148881283520f2534a18a
'2011-10-15T09:23:20-04:00'
describe
'67361' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTW' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
3f6d151e8fd624ff27ebeccedb3ae927
c8144252ce98f6306f7caf37e02893951965bb0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTX' 'sip-files00077.tif'
61d2f2ee545f18ddf0adad71fad0d80c
2c22058298cb478c0230c604ac5a42439c12035d
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTY' 'sip-files00077.txt'
21495ee0b5f9ebeaa09d1b2e894888b5
160c722b89931f6537994b9cfd2cb57e0cdab3a8
describe
'33550' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUTZ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
833486b9d204d71d9d877c6c2d4190ed
170a5f52b43c3fe72fcdd894cca18d977f84b217
describe
'312589' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUA' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
9f8f66fbbb8d72318446312055ab01f0
f3ffe0007b16754b195026aa4193fb39e5eb8d6a
describe
'176149' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUB' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
afc06929c74ba9d8bc38644acde033e3
867cd46a8a535b0c793048331f80bc04aff605b7
describe
'30252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUC' 'sip-files00078.pro'
a470463aba69c68cb4e73992c017fff7
f38ada77a7d793a2eb98d19257c27edf85d261c3
'2011-10-15T09:19:37-04:00'
describe
'71169' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUD' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
beaf4df4874525b6e973fac8de958811
f29d0a28364051bf9c0c8d6a0904ee49055803bb
describe
'2523640' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUE' 'sip-files00078.tif'
d5c2f65792d3d21475fbb0d0f5615433
76e8b866cef144b88f50543a3afeb77ac26ba6bc
'2011-10-15T09:23:03-04:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUF' 'sip-files00078.txt'
cd1fad45493bc336c06882c6ad19ac01
b23d611640b4aac830b888a0adf3e0132e61de15
describe
'34870' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUG' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
2a3aba585783f9d80151a5c8c96b0e10
5223771f0eeff64b5ad5d0de5a6d86a70dd753b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUH' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
50b2066a10ddbd956ec81a6e3d51735f
2c2f602bca8e055798e2ddbb6ba7df8296f7d0b5
describe
'172116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUI' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
9e914bd3994d2a40907a60d72253ff04
56ee57bd16770dbaffd1246d7c5ba343d95b3ce5
describe
'28054' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUJ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
cdfd0446a2494b9771df1e0ec244729d
e83a90ebfcbd91d540e7ce48ea3bedb9ea33e96c
describe
'69386' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUK' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
fb9a55c6ccaf5fcd263e9211cae8bb4f
b89681e772d2811a70ada9cf0996a64e30e5a32d
describe
'2523336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUL' 'sip-files00079.tif'
d922994542e34456a9b7988d8ec31530
6bfa961ddcee2b82dca7227e33f1da60098ba7cd
'2011-10-15T09:21:13-04:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUM' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7863e797d54aa62c9d367f343895ba9e
4756a70105d8ab1676da3ec166aaae6246855afd
describe
'34261' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUN' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
1566e7a5b20e950cea5098f981180c80
c8cb79cda7960cac513c4958721df831a782d9cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUO' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
bc189b819b804993aa48f8326a26890e
f928fc13d4b36edc623463ebb3a323ed3e5b0063
describe
'170670' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUP' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
f988e38b398a0c69e9233bee493b02f8
fa07a524e0d8f5fa6edd4d7f7f9c3d62374a41e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUQ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
44aa8f23fb50408ace835224946987f1
3f158cfae91ebf2498e119a0888479a3d004bb9a
describe
'67019' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUR' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f41f1218eba81af7e8fd2dc7e27a95ed
fec345822da93516ab02b98adde154525fec79f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUS' 'sip-files00080.tif'
2ec98f5749cfafa8e3bdd09e5edebe9c
6c5d5a04f0406bc311d0b0e3a6346b678a6f69e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUT' 'sip-files00080.txt'
c6349896cedc46299597a6e1f5b14ab8
36a2674f7b74da262f2963bbfb68f7eb2733a78e
'2011-10-15T09:21:57-04:00'
describe
'34471' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUU' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
a395b24bada6ac1aa89d3739e4e915f5
ad45237d88b23fd9333fa4182daa4c697eda463e
describe
'312401' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUV' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
84505c21fd40a268e7982ef2c315209f
ab188547ffe3ee0ce9efacd1900c2a8917e205e6
describe
'173261' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUW' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
2dc6665f03f5f16a070b4459c8cedb04
6560849d546a100610b6a2bc101c6abd462d30d1
describe
'28169' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUX' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f989542459f7dd2d8b12ab67f4e44b09
2acf865544cb804fcf8c4e0bb893752e0ef5908d
describe
'67056' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUY' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e9bf005efdb0b5b7fef94a742f3cd2f7
c0fee0e3be5b4c9bb2a0baf752493281575ea768
'2011-10-15T09:19:44-04:00'
describe
'2523116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUUZ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
be3c3a9598c5521e16d1ba0fe3bb4275
6facd394fd36765e7550511c1b1ed4f0b83e9608
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVA' 'sip-files00081.txt'
951c24b3194272ec06d3b3cf21b43ca0
1402e3cb17a4c868472b34119cc29d20559eb5d5
describe
'33897' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVB' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
96feceeb4f396d34af00ce8ecf4c1973
a4b2c1c4bb94727702ce1ea4117d191936c449f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVC' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
172378284894806e9ca7c8e089efbf92
3e7f75c9cc765aff8b50bdd624da73dd26091b30
describe
'159775' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVD' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ced21e139054b497f9290a49de969d36
c763917a39be5f34553d5e593984d72cef3cc266
describe
'27348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVE' 'sip-files00082.pro'
b33b2304903a3127b1cb8a498c0880c0
8670e042d482a1a1927cae92c89d87cef451d419
describe
'66604' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVF' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
e1f348e7bd9c61caf9e1f6a4121b3dd0
f822d03130aaa1d00f60c700a7374afcf1d98943
describe
'2523468' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVG' 'sip-files00082.tif'
6b4ac873f38522ae300ebda50b49221b
b94f246cd638723eabb73a0683fe18d02765c472
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVH' 'sip-files00082.txt'
0260b530ec97b152943b8b7c403b09ea
376db6674db46b05e27953af92e350ac20ff8d17
describe
'34433' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVI' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
65f7a6aa511d427af3bc415bccb30668
e726ed58bc9578d98755efbc036b3717763e7881
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVJ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
564ccf30b1c29a81ce3865e2337b8f1f
a266c86346851282357406bcadb4a74c173fef3b
describe
'155692' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVK' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
db6d593b5475c3c2a05a806489ea213d
b8ea69e2310a12c9ba77fa55b0e3b48a34d776b0
describe
'26465' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVL' 'sip-files00083.pro'
cd4b2a820fd6105fdd1c5fdb8dbb3644
e82dfbb7c14875ebd3f46af1f0847048de14a310
describe
'66122' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVM' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
b518efa95bab9d938d105cdbe552105c
c50b3f2a05a9fcb69acc0056333e3f1c51b5a9e9
describe
'2523328' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVN' 'sip-files00083.tif'
6e3a1291602cd9f8dab62dba463d2615
0d3f5f5d2a452e738ec3c231c1a46263b236f218
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVO' 'sip-files00083.txt'
290b5f86aedb9fbf411e6c85a7623385
a92e863b561a19697efb67a1fd1a44f1185e2a4a
describe
'34248' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVP' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
ab29360558a98be4669b7c7ba7abe506
3795315c1ea9aaa6d384881f38309996cdda3e31
describe
'312483' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVQ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
354ff770fcf57fb61884b6ef29556b24
89b80a7db08098ffcd1a16e4601a17b3bad17a55
describe
'171784' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVR' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
3ba999e5072d7924045cd72ee02f832f
0389f4cabb26209c3ff67599ce26491c9356916b
describe
'28154' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVS' 'sip-files00084.pro'
eb9890e6be2c99acdfd8801f79e9c580
d90386f483d805397db335e7ea8e533a83180339
describe
'69262' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVT' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
bb15fadb8e73b70215e1b84023cc6c13
1add9e773eb853d839201fb7ffbbe5ed79f841f5
describe
'2523232' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVU' 'sip-files00084.tif'
0116c71ea9db9e663312dc36e7a4d957
3ff8e96bbd060a7fdae860d19a5a2e27c9795e0d
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVV' 'sip-files00084.txt'
75dff0e0e11592c219d0a1b003fe2cc3
a10fefc798a9b859083fc250c51317a8678b373c
describe
'34117' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVW' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
3caf2c3d1ba01d78d259345b5291dbd7
b3ab37327b43b8ccc131a4828c1f164ff1c7e87c
describe
'312391' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVX' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
45563033b71ccda9d11146cf193cf08c
658b9ed3ac627858cdd71e05bf9f29d84adf75a8
describe
'173951' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVY' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
334862dec1982fd453d09dff33348e5b
d688829bcf9f545ef721b4f35a7c3be014c14b5a
describe
'29768' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUVZ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
0e1dbb7328668b15636b39627f085a20
ceaaea756c9da9a5241ff0e87a996a4118090fd9
'2011-10-15T09:22:52-04:00'
describe
'70008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWA' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
0eeae38024fdae1cccc7e7b04a1105ab
9db02d8a297a048d3623c52a0c53932c03fa0414
describe
'2523548' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWB' 'sip-files00085.tif'
52c348106c6bca10d305827f8c687586
f947d31b64a02074f1dc94ead514f86641b66330
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWC' 'sip-files00085.txt'
2fb6c689bfb135028c708db423ce39eb
5643af4f171c4d0440a73c5991466b0a204c42f6
describe
'34826' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWD' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
6ae22a41b7cc11d2c8295d0ed7e29d0a
5e2dd8e99b95f7c6a2e30a16913f1c456f55f6b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWE' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0b9f78c50380af67e8bea64f8c7c5754
79fe730d01b78622dc4c3235eeb5862e2d4fe70d
describe
'167442' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWF' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
28e5c63961c76fab37f7de315288bb6a
8a45cad0a69e5163fdfb34522e432a55b092d812
describe
'28060' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWG' 'sip-files00086.pro'
7b35cbe2af63db7606f906d540016c21
494b6e46493236adc467dc9710c7930c95932f72
'2011-10-15T09:19:25-04:00'
describe
'67256' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWH' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
3dc836590f214a26abdb2ed8b0570312
ac4805c3b145d76d4e4fcac6ae42ac86fd01b7d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWI' 'sip-files00086.tif'
52165a0109901e1f4eb35bcca0cc81ea
5d07c65f81edf2b67d2ee9c4df09a3be2770e9e2
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWJ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
e2b30cba87a07636b62bcc2a9f113d24
7ca8b1d985e3f9d3fa9e4025e4634146b9327fe3
describe
'33985' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWK' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
6778076c869c8ca86eb3034bf3d70d1b
0acc5ea0ea695cabb30b2b87fbd0372fb51cadff
describe
'312582' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWL' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
ccbf6ff8b7cd10ab464386c9271c04a5
485a2a197aafbde882b6317ccc62af8584fe6979
describe
'151812' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWM' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9170e1b34034beb514cd347e481b851d
6f272027fdd7e49b818d1270571787c88d4d9863
describe
'23621' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWN' 'sip-files00087.pro'
52763b7f72645da5f4e83fbdc5bedfa9
e188f86e1e2bbe982bab065e96b18ba65f7f34fa
describe
'60570' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWO' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
4130ca7db3a1a90d4325dac007c8d409
1e54e26c0be128c1dfaa82e344ae88c3c3652415
describe
'2522456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWP' 'sip-files00087.tif'
63d2c4e038d9ed9e654d7a6666a17ce4
364d10a4e90a4d6f973cbca80a9315e820bbaf36
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWQ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
f43ab2f89917ef10333235da6099ff01
e1c7c8b0c6ae7a96e2854aa89e2cb6d73c5be920
describe
'31685' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWR' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
108bf81913c25a204bd6f049f01165a3
4b31e45683317b8cf94200f1a3db9fedac3a18fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWS' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
29464edddfb1576e5eba90eb1124b665
11faf06cd708a7c272fe3a8c6ce43cc000743742
describe
'137016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWT' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
43a76752f06161a9ca2aa2c43a53fe25
1b2de82e8b911664928aeab86d07825766f2e5bb
describe
'19858' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWU' 'sip-files00088.pro'
4ccc1609c8303ae136785156bfba96bd
d6274b8939e0b54c30bd4c937bcc8b5bb12e693d
describe
'56109' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWV' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
e0d3f5645d987fc05871a40ce6d37890
73340b76edc272da1ece6f7f13ae0b45a9285745
describe
'2522116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWW' 'sip-files00088.tif'
acbf6d1c117cb72e3702e868e845dbf2
1ba5288c5b88dabb903a4351c8f9a4d85d547eb1
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWX' 'sip-files00088.txt'
99a58b80914a196c610daf05e3f43737
d3b83c40d0d475102cbc757bcfa7760d46126d62
describe
'30235' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWY' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
5aa1267a650dd025071a586f493dac1b
c78eaa63d1194f564065dfc5c2ac36a269a8e95b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUWZ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
93046a29d3efc5296de88249b0bdf8fb
dc9e781e03c0379a3fd0194cb3892d1f2e6cb685
describe
'166988' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXA' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
4fb2e05b54ba747e9f0cb2e723116970
0c299b84b3b23a992a8a6c470bb805d994f56a72
describe
'27977' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXB' 'sip-files00089.pro'
351571452f4249f641a1fc2f9163f5f6
6e374ef2ac9543614b9917d448398243841bd53d
describe
'67323' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXC' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
336d0c7343a65f0df49f8d6e9099d878
f39e79e3731ed44f89686c59ad7b9decb5f9ebe4
describe
'2523356' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXD' 'sip-files00089.tif'
05a5f96421b49d00d18b30522393b9a2
f93c13463672b468bed67679de3dcba1b6fa50df
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXE' 'sip-files00089.txt'
4134900edb09a54b7e0438e95576e1f0
5c5c747b4d06fe6e80eecf87d22e1938735dc7fa
describe
'34244' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXF' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
683aae8c7f338c00e4657b3ac84663fb
fe44bd4ee5f934ee4686c3d9c74abd06d74f3331
describe
'312637' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXG' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
7cfde6ca5e6c5c153ee690c15691d69d
9b76a15641bd1aae0b0f7978f8726c15494f0569
describe
'169957' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXH' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
55c5f0ff616a7437396ff4ff78df1ef8
048b9b181bb0394b51c59ca78ab98e13b776614b
describe
'29472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXI' 'sip-files00090.pro'
d00652c88ed9808242b084bb20a93ff6
f02387bd529bf2ddb05a808b698b1ea71dba121b
describe
'69680' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXJ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
a331d01cfbb44dc4e8f92cc27a257548
c869a6fc1bdec17d6bdcdcf6d535bb19f3cb7709
describe
'2523564' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXK' 'sip-files00090.tif'
c6b5158536ad989cdcc74d59cb51835a
d92c0b11646ed64df180f9615f4a28ee25dce7c0
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXL' 'sip-files00090.txt'
61d02217ff5bfb6836ff817115182322
0c475e3df5c84296a5969c1d180368205882b3a6
describe
'34534' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXM' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
55188a64a8def5ae0f5991cfa91de204
a46b3ea34173d4f9787c3256da4b19749e42d82c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXN' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
91151a1106faf2cd2ce8005c8528b665
15cb5d52cdc7b67c359f9ebd10148ed9f5bbb26e
describe
'163918' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXO' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
f3ed4559965684c8cf9e21009383fdab
bd167b2697b9a929799c795b875015078ac87f0f
describe
'27935' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXP' 'sip-files00091.pro'
54cadcb882d7f9399055f88412955772
e17c057b8be003d9c7bfc28d4429bbd8f882da42
describe
'66147' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXQ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e6cc76005e5b04efd7b5f26161f74640
a3b31726afe8103fe65fe1b56be9cc77f3abc225
describe
'2523176' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXR' 'sip-files00091.tif'
a6f8db506a0ff57e3ac918d08c2f4905
928b88676a138ff3825d3ff92a841f84663d590b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXS' 'sip-files00091.txt'
17673b83c33f0a8e740cd60b3b6f6881
f5ba81a5cbf93f3d32d18d9c3eec5a836673fa5d
describe
'33547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXT' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
59e6900d774712bbb8d6063c73b349b4
b047476a68a143ab065ef90bd55232e2386b164d
'2011-10-15T09:21:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXU' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
30dbbfd7af00fa02a80b5588d1ff81d0
ab635c5592a0c0260c0fd2ee6da81cacf60ff79f
describe
'167165' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXV' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
72008a43ab85e5ca5ccea9d1a11dc1d1
d62d4eb3b39ff75b2ec36e5a1f7079609683f5ef
describe
'27946' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXW' 'sip-files00092.pro'
60deb42430275dab18b11d433ae741d9
4ddc7ac5e80c26d305513b3fdc219584f0ad0b43
describe
'68427' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXX' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
e8e212c3544e93cf1879fb94e815e789
1f6d0984a7cbd70080c6b47a5dec7e47f1ef88ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXY' 'sip-files00092.tif'
570f0f99804c281cfa53d4db944aeda6
7f649b9124d988ee248735c6816aa668812cf3e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUXZ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
15738cbd9e755dfb87d1aab357425b8f
f31d5971491bdb2acabc0268e7c49fef3b33fb95
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYA' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
b5316aaa6eff131516eacf8762d55e13
e77ee30d76880f8915898382713ca2a1e7a395c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYB' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
69a2005ce300523a28be95c7ac9001dc
fc6a71dce27256a9f129da424ba75faad562833b
describe
'174582' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYC' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
cc3aeb785219fcabe02b78175d611817
cffd6561965280859d89d5a3b7ffc746060be474
describe
'30146' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYD' 'sip-files00093.pro'
24271443ce0e4064b23538171ad918be
f5bfe67dd2ee87af78c8b7de1f4fc347dd4cd6dd
describe
'71412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYE' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
93c6352902c1b8ff6066b904a9060dba
07e0f96d89bb358239f57d63027be585bd5b1132
describe
'2523552' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYF' 'sip-files00093.tif'
30c1019bad515d68aa75617370f95723
8428298bdeb8f53673f219ccbb013b74eda2ff3c
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYG' 'sip-files00093.txt'
31d2ba0d3b5a86183be543f3c790ceac
719d0ef6f0c49486397f716d115ae3e4d1f518dd
describe
'34432' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYH' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
fe625ba1d8ea7313504eab2babcc1746
8e20814ba0087ca5d36cf3a1cd60f6aca9469727
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYI' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c26aa600cd3b149c8dd79aa3d72326dd
9718b0f98fb2f12ea247a10ad05e01eaf7e3d2fa
describe
'164252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYJ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
d4355448d7dd35654f1775a1fc91eb33
9ff953f003ea9453cf021b870433676c4d350dcf
describe
'27876' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYK' 'sip-files00094.pro'
400e7f366342e093545bd38ee3afd474
aa5a365a002f57d91b4b61efbf332ebf01717028
describe
'66737' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYL' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f11836f9cd49a0e918aba54844621aa8
be4569d320670b3e3ab850b2e51b453136618305
describe
'2523312' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYM' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ba3a8863c728de887d32e4b95a5e2b41
3f816e4df38b4ae64ffa5420635378a8af9dcca9
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYN' 'sip-files00094.txt'
7ab99072a2a0e9add0fe0cb239b185ec
5b11f8f0735dfbfe319fb28789874edff17a12ab
describe
'33813' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYO' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
2373fe5636ac7b4375d6bea5f86b1785
21f3734aa868897761d4702b214cc6388cf41e7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYP' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
1af7fbdeafa53ffa553a168fb9194547
8f42758df02df7c9c30e8a68cfe656636a409d0d
describe
'173316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYQ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
084cee4dae9f11d5bbd2dbc14eb690cf
bca085dfb03b11722c5beb4092bab471caa2515e
describe
'29835' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYR' 'sip-files00095.pro'
1774ad6858de917d3492c851ce6bf1eb
3fcb21ea36503e8e5e52968f709a47e18f4e6f1c
describe
'69952' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYS' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
c212475d797572332c60f0268b50db60
368e61701aec6607eb46c8566c19a71b956a32a0
describe
'2523500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYT' 'sip-files00095.tif'
8d3333c8216da95e551865d7d4614508
38cfa836749c03dacafaf195d7ae84233d06f563
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYU' 'sip-files00095.txt'
a0da31c96083f4977d3674f8dbaea15a
7698237b99a64ac839cfddce0fd687f3983618eb
describe
'34583' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYV' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
2bf0a0d4b276d23ca750159a95cc2e7e
63d0bfcf290ba8fa46ad5665901a593a4a1b904d
describe
'312624' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYW' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
aba5d5acd3cd8e5b8e3f1a0bf7702728
382984117ea42e146f0eea0606cffb23ac6cb34f
describe
'173834' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYX' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
4805f62ad59c713e4fb0aaf420d0934a
04fd2c68ba73d42698da805b9416e54bd97c7566
describe
'29296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYY' 'sip-files00096.pro'
038945ed7388ed8eb1c24f1d3e8c560a
c60ea6c71c93fd8cdc2ff326a8a2f9f2c6d8b5fc
describe
'68951' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUYZ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
ce4a4570f4e06f3e11ce3a5015af4452
9eb0744d076cb6af4171fa6d9c95db8c13f63610
describe
'2523504' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZA' 'sip-files00096.tif'
d7df078e06c0056b8050c8b196519b8e
ba197f3223b7712743fb0be921607e814e560418
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZB' 'sip-files00096.txt'
6af09e6cdf8a8e17405a8076ca4f102d
af1224b6966d1f82f4283728069e37794fe51333
describe
'34421' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZC' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
67d455f449fdf953ee22bb6de0677e99
e8f31132643dd1086c32b2ea99cc3e91601eceba
describe
'312584' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZD' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
18b51a7c56bef3a969c354f9a3fe7345
e372b834ebe031f87dfd30aa43048c14584282aa
describe
'177891' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZE' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
5a9cfda35a3082c3b1b0dc6fbf246d41
32846d72a31586ea22f581a65a85378fa25cb8a8
'2011-10-15T09:23:13-04:00'
describe
'30195' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZF' 'sip-files00097.pro'
8f34dbc73d68c5c2d267b5635ff09dd3
a7f0b203dba5af0ea9a487270b9aac0ff7d55e0c
describe
'69914' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZG' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
c20c25e82140e594323a40eca7bba19d
be1c3e361734a6998d808d912bce45703ff7ff11
describe
'2523332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZH' 'sip-files00097.tif'
b78ab0545df5e6d207b80ffa70a44d7c
59a8c242812c537286c5f60c528ff59c4c1c89c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZI' 'sip-files00097.txt'
8f741f593c056da6c352bc2d0762107b
5af21494cb50963bbb982796035d8656dd9ec1d0
'2011-10-15T09:19:41-04:00'
describe
'34249' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZJ' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
043686b30329fc52f1cd21ae3bd67720
33d00c163178e7782ce7ab1e3b3d800a548ea00f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZK' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
716590d3759f1f95fa215af7ec324043
6f73da59c2251f5579caf34afe7944c22862032c
'2011-10-15T09:21:24-04:00'
describe
'175880' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZL' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
2e0b1f793340f47616ba6918cd0b7eb0
af333b8a5df0e6b92efdf1ec44db89d0f619b85c
describe
'30261' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZM' 'sip-files00098.pro'
1b584a50511a10f4b4225dde4d8f0d40
10a5871e17b53e1dd1531fab2b232fe2f8a53f6c
'2011-10-15T09:20:58-04:00'
describe
'70798' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZN' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
39bc4f8bdb95bccecbbca0c7d2b690fd
987700497aa47b961c910b7d7b16201bedf2c4eb
describe
'2523600' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZO' 'sip-files00098.tif'
85fa2456e501038cc78245cfee2cdb4d
4c8c064e5fe64f19df7af2dae1721c2a104897fd
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZP' 'sip-files00098.txt'
27368beba9e6db2efba8a0d7c9018803
c754c1459f48ecca4a86a3800f0cdf3724943e51
describe
'34608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZQ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
c4137c86a361a2f3694479b005c2e4a8
638de0601a9143807ab5ceb5d3c9bc06673f8435
describe
'312480' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZR' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
6e6c2eed3a59f0cd8709bc4a4034e038
e9b2a59291d2a8a4f03b24c481308b0bd602b26f
describe
'127315' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZS' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
584550534f4ad68f91fa6e109408cc06
7c31b2c9ba2ecf5496416e877e673194401b8f79
describe
'18352' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZT' 'sip-files00099.pro'
c6aff9442fbc520788aa6cc2cfa5fca9
8687df4190b6d9e30b76646d06eec6ab18c3d73c
describe
'50800' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZU' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
2008bed1e0fa75a13bfa0f439efe3cab
bc78f07a1f728349aa1861516afbf9e2783249e7
describe
'2521528' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZV' 'sip-files00099.tif'
a64d3a8aca8d4ce2841a54f30bc6568e
60556d2906744dea7c7b9a2a977f823ae0572214
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZW' 'sip-files00099.txt'
5a3f15ecbbff22cf81f0043454f9dd06
9d2045e33eed254087f53aa64386739506c81880
describe
'28418' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZX' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
e834d2dfe2191638b7724475f2108163
5cd31807691ae5ad4b5c5eb897fc953c851a1cf7
describe
'312579' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZY' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
d3299ae633531672a2cd0c478a35214c
90a3e4ffb35497a1efa06fed1c653fc29d5a438b
describe
'135743' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABUZZ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
7d73507faf777d01ee73062b396530fe
68d6f265ba34d882c4db75eee5dac0efc6359cd9
describe
'19532' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAA' 'sip-files00100.pro'
dda5c98affa5862d8f7071621641e197
ade74e581ddc05eae0eafb92df907871c9a14064
describe
'55420' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAB' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
3d911acb4a49772f398b7c82747da11e
f48be73edaaf26cd23c270b69ccb297769458339
describe
'2521984' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAC' 'sip-files00100.tif'
7a7600fb88c1ceac424f3ac08c3bfc4f
dcc711ea1c556cab5826f35c4e86b8fad4fbd919
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAD' 'sip-files00100.txt'
3a5d69a916c2a3afa4405474bceb628f
6dbd33ecaf0410fb00665ecd86cafa6319ea2d9b
describe
'30085' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAE' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
4dc1841bd4055b560a72bc614d50548d
a069ce6940bafb453a2fb6438aa6b721825bd43a
describe
'312593' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAF' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
d45ca63519bf2f1e566ba1fb193c56df
0dafc1e3b16a5abfc52b417badb5760ca9a904ad
describe
'168444' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAG' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
32845c673cde381d34d48fab0d246a80
8d54704a09b98b36914cf44671f84e21a159eb3a
describe
'28068' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAH' 'sip-files00101.pro'
ffb27275874b1683cb96ad36b67d1f88
0f20458a5f4d1f006b04b990ea435f33ed3047fa
describe
'69080' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAI' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
f1b2fb16d9f96bf22ef29703b2e44720
f5bcb87410a5bce67011f31c38eec1212338eb6c
describe
'2523148' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAJ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
a70d9e3376fa71fe21cd7f0f76db4293
6f310842c3c909a4873b3fbf378abe98f81a8edf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAK' 'sip-files00101.txt'
0d386412adc33cbdaf3a9c19f4355786
66aeb28534791efb23c09af237c873cea4b39152
describe
'34045' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAL' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
ebd965a96f9083d2a6c12bad9069d0ae
553da39168e5a61cadcca138dd0d3ada007efc53
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAM' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
a8504fce017904de9dd710926c24b9ba
79d44e8c69515cb9b12fea16ea8e2e90d659bc02
describe
'164765' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAN' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f8d7528dc934afe2fdb45d3ec13bcf46
f2d20898e52ffc2e2dee0d4ac883d1c0a77f3430
describe
'27802' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAO' 'sip-files00102.pro'
9ea744391f285379fcf2cdd649f4e283
90e8b07a9bbab39933e7e71c9143cbaf93b5ca36
describe
'66049' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAP' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
9924dfedb091c800e50a096d18f8271b
6cb8603c702594e94b1b295b8933e2eb18f9abb7
describe
'2523376' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAQ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
448269e986e1d0be91d8746dc904ceb9
79ed1d9148e2a642f8f29d1a9d5d8bd3ea921532
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAR' 'sip-files00102.txt'
13fa7d6aed53f390b2fccd2cec747047
ffd7efcd9aa086cbc1880cdd07d49a2f283ee8dc
describe
'34088' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAS' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
f00ad18ea83dede63f610ec9e9ef7b12
0c82924f3cff17fea43220922a72deb4f56f6f7b
describe
'312586' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAT' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
900def8cbb53edbc845b088560225278
1e68ed80dd0c43c67221c9b5bfd5da177561854e
describe
'165051' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAU' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
c2b7889831303ed409941592da1d5073
4bd382522a526d1c250acfbaa4a014d4fb51e420
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAV' 'sip-files00103.pro'
36bcaa214a937dcd496b4a8f94c1bc17
9fea856d6aee8c5872653689dc75723c372454dc
describe
'68038' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAW' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
2384756934f7724cf16e72c0d08aee2f
8c81ac30f1de0496f6d0656e120a4fccbbb74deb
describe
'2523344' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAX' 'sip-files00103.tif'
38f85e50ba747ac306a81d29e4f99ccc
29679ea6a232a73e7a9f71ad0e86e74ce0e6c87c
'2011-10-15T09:22:10-04:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAY' 'sip-files00103.txt'
534ff8a24e8ae326c130d161ef786455
36a2470b61ffeb45b5ba5b76b3db1eeb80e2946e
describe
'34295' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVAZ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
980b8ca7b54baec3d24a74312fd1c684
6f93d9c8452bccc534f46f0480bb806561addbe6
describe
'312638' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBA' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
198af0ba41c7a63290ae8aaec7a577f6
e21c6edccd3527492a334590f6689c1ea38c8475
describe
'163555' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBB' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
7227ef3e30d47bf8d73fe738a69f6e8c
aa5c9b4222b4238eb2a2c46de0fd1d18c74d1248
'2011-10-15T09:23:41-04:00'
describe
'27166' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBC' 'sip-files00104.pro'
32ecc579f2890479e520813bc5ec351c
8d5425f204a87150a056a5c50c2d055c5c45004a
describe
'67237' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBD' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
8447c30253fe2aea3cd5940804b12ed4
06ad10cddcf6ed0f2878619a315e49fc67cd449b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBE' 'sip-files00104.tif'
70968452e8d8bce02163ad542f240019
1e28369107cad15e6aed077bb05a7c436fed5e3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBF' 'sip-files00104.txt'
226d26bba315c0ccb6b66257d2338db8
615d6bc0ca5a4b3ba34a47dd8bf5c9c65e761734
describe
'33901' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBG' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
ba446d23d0b98430f434931261ab5de1
8510e61270b1caff121a3f78328c22d9207375af
'2011-10-15T09:20:18-04:00'
describe
'312663' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBH' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
cbddaa95efe280dea59600c1c177cd5e
23a6ea3d834dfda565eb1559caeb40f077a1b853
describe
'161904' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBI' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
15b814769e92a39add94def4404edd57
c360578480cf3737c01ab61d899fc1878df5141b
describe
'27170' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBJ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
f0c569d076dc2d7ac888513d4e44b02a
69532f7cb4b35679d7b114a7b729f67c992a52e3
describe
'65943' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBK' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
64922adc9e5f84dbaf33cf2ac8545ad1
5bf2eedf94d954bdfb8554c2fcc32e740066b70e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBL' 'sip-files00105.tif'
726d9d613da29abc924a6d68fdc47170
b05137822bc363bcc478b096dfff41261b9437d9
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBM' 'sip-files00105.txt'
198f1fb5b074a7335d0ee6330c1a3b41
6634415888b2486193771866022ad08f2ad54d70
describe
'33602' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBN' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
f943145b7f2fc7dd86545a34dd51eb35
e8dc0db6875ff2e63efc125cacff8247e6c9cbd5
'2011-10-15T09:21:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBO' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
812a573987de4c0f06a977bb9f8b3266
53dab4fc2fc8f5e25c30501fe7ff8cfc5aaaab65
describe
'165979' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBP' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
5786de8082109f8cc00b30fcc1fcb68f
ced28dd9340d0574f9a1b2d99a62f7e303f0caca
describe
'27732' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBQ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
863d15920662c963b962ae52b9ccab40
1d4b5d78979eb64ea092440b4690327908d1ef6c
'2011-10-15T09:21:02-04:00'
describe
'67684' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBR' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
85d1948cf57026695cbf98a62ca75c51
e19151e669b70f902691f701d166740be00784b7
describe
'2523484' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBS' 'sip-files00106.tif'
6c4b7f060a3850e1f6784129dab25e9b
8a68088159d0f7c634c23bc443375355391782bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBT' 'sip-files00106.txt'
071eb8a508655392e7c2c86c87aff532
d2700d53e8a46f3f41fb972d845ba7df75803b3a
describe
'33662' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBU' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
6ec4686e41f98d342cbbc9b8b8f2b420
2edd38667b5a06e2b8f1f5a2d71c22594f3b19ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBV' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
d00b54feede213b8161a3be765c1e955
f494ea305079c85a681b00238e4c0d0474a0696d
describe
'167420' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBW' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
a7a5bd2cc4675d1493894fa917eb677d
88debbb529379d3bda822b06a2bf713ca26d91c2
describe
'28289' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBX' 'sip-files00107.pro'
2cb6be49c8858b41823462f5fb7c41fd
64a1a86751b38994e4a0fe089db83a30130b50d5
describe
'68564' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBY' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
83ef06d75c52811c29200c79a561f3cb
9ed4fe6504a90f84e6428ad367a23fe4ad281547
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVBZ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
7a39775ecdaec07f6c26abc030a77c88
433741354f135c249ed66003bbe603cd32127421
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCA' 'sip-files00107.txt'
5d50280b709ae9456a6c85ea55fb438e
2470b87dda4da9f0f44ad166d4f4bca5bcbbb698
describe
'34384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCB' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
aa7915751fc99964e0b7549bafb0d6e3
cbb51c9543082b9737cf937a720569991d4fc6a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCC' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
ee62dded84a77cf4a44981ca4dc1fa4d
d5274c4575917f9cdb210e7f1a13e926b0e40d4a
describe
'160081' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCD' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
f71e2ee40aae0b1e75f33e33e9dc1853
3059b4971aa7a092dab4e92f53ed128d2bfed485
describe
'27150' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCE' 'sip-files00108.pro'
9d1ddecdcc4981c13f70711f5c2eee57
800ee884aba392222fec18fa82cceedd975bf90d
describe
'66029' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCF' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
f97d3c9df3b9e7e953ab203ad52356d2
dc637903e8dec63774089bb06061cc925572dcef
describe
'2523584' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCG' 'sip-files00108.tif'
b3b24984cd39fb21b5d3e186e641cc22
e5c3b3d6a725ebd7e18c0b504bb9e553cff760c4
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCH' 'sip-files00108.txt'
3ec2dd3e1d18daf6c50214f8665501b6
a7bc78035bd7480c617cef5a2d3caececc158419
describe
'34102' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCI' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
9eb8f04185bb6318583d8b3f553bd9cd
70d6031863cedc5b89e443d2a025630c90c47a46
describe
'312626' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCJ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
9e5ec627f6f383b47a64d95a0d3bbecd
4f3c74b50488ca7296d46530b9aed4d8e05e9764
describe
'156866' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCK' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
9d94644fe338fc0760345705fd627e2d
73179b954e033aff065372a014a435312dfb9e0f
describe
'26606' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCL' 'sip-files00109.pro'
6da7b6dcb5dc34ecc5548a4e2e08d697
ba9a4a8e31bbe32125fd32278a9ffb94b5690110
describe
'66254' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCM' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
4984304054efb4f718615e39222f49d5
c1c0a736d0dab4e3b1a189bdfa4bdb695cffa292
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCN' 'sip-files00109.tif'
3df920d82806ccda0a6cd8117f22c754
864db36cf52f74ecdd47aea8a84941a262cf1231
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCO' 'sip-files00109.txt'
4788d48108d67a9acff96590bfbdeba4
7afcb34fb4119afa002d0804dc909f85e5499ac7
describe
'33519' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCP' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
85ad87d2e9498d653e6d086a1c964536
236e786c58e69ff75f165d6a6effc2ce2b5632fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCQ' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
2e98aae1c1602ab876ff4bb2c1a91545
5a4af746609e6bd571a852a3505694b41b547587
describe
'169227' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCR' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
003d1f07b4fa1b11844e523a5aaef66c
823ec911dd907030b55842c35736d577b584393b
describe
'29229' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCS' 'sip-files00110.pro'
d0b6af0b45c5d684f07de6ab291d11d0
a9d958523af49b0fdf75738bcc1611bf0164ad10
describe
'70665' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCT' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
e1c46a60fdd224b5b10bb421d772d001
e7d2af5d36a5993c87db73c4284c0314150bf41e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCU' 'sip-files00110.tif'
81b6945df205706daa0982849af5b29d
dc73f43bdf98eb6a161fc5a966fff247517fd438
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCV' 'sip-files00110.txt'
2c283619fd7e8f6354164f047d06a1ac
2327f5bd58943ab9a0d2db37138c88b9a42e7ce2
describe
'34514' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCW' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
aa1e379403c32e08b87dd4b41c77eb8e
63038e4b378b9cc5e69b68f35ae9be87c627a78c
describe
'312591' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCX' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9c8b516fbadea67589c5e01649acb59f
f876c9cc94027dcb1f3b378b2daea45096261d91
describe
'170354' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCY' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
f9f24f49cf266c1c6fa71a7961f6ff7b
7c48965286dfdd218afc88d3daa45f707fc16ae1
describe
'29162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVCZ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
e25b1a43d74de5bab1004aceae56d705
0d0341f97bade55e5dbb10c2ff0605d2dd43cd8a
describe
'69344' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDA' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
79d5d39cb010a78f8c0094212ffe6ee9
d3e91d5416ab0e1c4c34a0d830e6fe25b0fc4643
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDB' 'sip-files00111.tif'
e93aa0e3c6d824c729c851b114f51d55
561029ddf646cb70fdb7ac8b6fa55e0324a5d99b
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDC' 'sip-files00111.txt'
f32cc10311524862f2d3ee7cab60ceb3
d30d0fcd3d367b940b7035730878564bb280da5b
describe
'34487' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDD' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
d5f24b47b471a75699828ff99e14f8e6
94f7bb2c057aee63a5303347fb2631c8cc76bb83
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDE' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
3813c29dabd77990a7937dd7035a044b
f376075ca6e09c71a3fcbbd761ac9568d2740820
describe
'168592' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDF' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
c502ea069ec794a560fd21e1103e4712
0b6f53cca29d6bff85660385d4149cfe04588602
describe
'28566' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDG' 'sip-files00112.pro'
b705efd53bc1b6d0176d48daa88805de
b9f3931075be6f6fc1616ab0ca61b5bc4f70f193
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDH' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
60f7566f273ac08ea8aa3a8afef4ee1b
ec54da590ad93e1b42a5be2e7286406c5795941c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDI' 'sip-files00112.tif'
9e776ca4d21f2904366b3d0f9410f821
875f0a9cf3306de46c2578438dbcdee039178d03
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDJ' 'sip-files00112.txt'
4072a94874c2ed55e09ee0405dcf60bd
4cccba82c3e5d17d6757b7e9c956e2dbbd57617a
describe
'34596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDK' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
56e67d678e84b7e9c55e62a663350cea
fbe29d002e289028001d79d2e0ff821130173fcc
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDL' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
1c9b020747f09a5a9ac60b20991842e8
d7fadad96500de66e89dc93375732d644bf54668
describe
'167059' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDM' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
f71d787f8fd3eebba23001fd7425add4
897d1d9bc5472b1203ba0ccc56e795d47a9c1b8b
describe
'29264' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDN' 'sip-files00113.pro'
83cd62c9d35f099586ef187bb7a31662
1b664e6f7a92b6c5faa0316e9bb26420ce53345e
describe
'70041' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDO' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
ab57017c85d88b17f644d08095e56c34
cd1d710ac43ceac8095344ff608560bbaa7540cd
describe
'2523392' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDP' 'sip-files00113.tif'
44d20280578e8bdb2b2dab6492efd51c
790196c3f19c9fccc9b74d6ea85018dde3c4753b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDQ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
f628aa82e8f0f1fbf737e0e358a411a0
4a2dc774a2a94170c4ca5728a8305f4a4c518335
describe
'34452' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDR' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
c6b7e59b25f1886504036191022708a6
255af6c6152a75738be9bcead2d6ed62d5c88643
describe
'312396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDS' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
de1abd5c8f9fe55bd2d6d99f93289239
7dad2b36ce01760325514dcaf912f3c341404b9a
'2011-10-15T09:21:07-04:00'
describe
'164177' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDT' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
93fa1d9d7b6fb1dcff9e831f283af1a1
2aa63aa7acaa36fef3563c6e92dcf4b5ace2bfbf
describe
'27612' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDU' 'sip-files00114.pro'
4cc2eff07444be00c8ffe0dc7f50e61e
fca030b329eed9e97646a5d13be9d030aa47f1ee
describe
'66966' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDV' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
884a45d0b9efb6e82809981d521f1a4e
341b2535d349a36cb8abc0b2392244792618476d
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDW' 'sip-files00114.tif'
94e1a1150916bd9eb531f6513ff0513e
61bec59888402d0ec8c3bdb7bf736dbb8ae36a3d
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDX' 'sip-files00114.txt'
67462ca6523fb44b8eaece1a77949639
35f01bffb1942b2701df96f58f1dc6261132efa5
describe
'33931' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDY' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
cb159edd1c1443c7b3ecdf4516f50fda
1dbc4aa204d62cf9b9f00a43402085d60e3d5bc6
describe
'312635' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVDZ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
f2ac66544018783dd1772b5e7b6d8570
f9521c3f5519578d364f934e063f5bf376d660b7
describe
'82507' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEA' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
c2cda31880e501da8845003666248e4b
40b12da67c8364fd3489253f2f961e63616caefc
describe
'6916' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEB' 'sip-files00115.pro'
46dbaf3b48298565455c9014ae771364
b9b32c7688fa0cf2f89f88bc4971fdbeb72deb4a
describe
'34693' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEC' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
a67cebf8a443f95cf0c0c782d852679f
a92a76c62ad11ff58e94e8746eab31e6f1c8c289
describe
'2519932' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVED' 'sip-files00115.tif'
9193fa429a16c4d37e30983b575b42fc
f87946b312c6a629b9af445fff236e6e591547fb
'2011-10-15T09:21:29-04:00'
describe
'299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEE' 'sip-files00115.txt'
940f08ecdafcde6f64f261ed0cf0e6fd
c018b706acaecf9c79577c3ebdda619598e268b3
describe
'23218' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEF' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
354c0e91a44cc1a81ed5592246314476
2af3f3d32b33a5582a5360e6947cb0db2792bdf1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEG' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
04e0cab51c4188a879da2c637deb3e64
b1382ed822904526f30f0c005a2d764c30a7239f
describe
'123174' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEH' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
b5ddc8b7a7ed9327c38f51db901c9a5f
0594a39ad48a97e98e02a5f3b30b6948ed1ba824
describe
'17242' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEI' 'sip-files00116.pro'
c041cb938c66ea91586eb27a9e13f86a
b6e304954ed6a0107b8eee07cdaf251f176ac254
describe
'51843' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEJ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
a1c4a1875af7c18290f0f29d418ba2b7
2d11801a620ae13c7f3e03585ba1d56b22cc91fd
describe
'2521964' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEK' 'sip-files00116.tif'
c643057d3f579476e10c76a551afcb20
26bd8af78f80d025e15895bd3feacf0ce98c252a
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEL' 'sip-files00116.txt'
0f713159595317dafdb71b2d8a4f2752
894f3953311fbe7346f2df12c50a61e3fc6288fe
describe
'29309' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEM' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
bd9b6d423da6c91c2fed964452b9f1fd
f32c9b751b1542f570c6841b379b0197e6de9150
describe
'312656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEN' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
336773ca812d228a26587efb9a627acf
9c131985450032665459e822022d8d9f59dc1fb2
describe
'152439' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEO' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
b6f6c54c63501e413691d30598b80d73
40df65fd8958ebf5dd723f6badfce2be0bcfb627
describe
'25290' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEP' 'sip-files00117.pro'
21b9266e165639c696ac5b7bf1d77723
5de673871eea87c49fefa5e33ae62c6c38780152
describe
'63933' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEQ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
1b18971e5fec604baedc051a0f50ad98
6978498d73ad917aee81e2ada87b6b7560cf7a7a
describe
'2522916' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVER' 'sip-files00117.tif'
d37b65979af104b78bf91600170ba3dc
35d6ee10531d2ceb0b5f9ab281c87c779b890c2f
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVES' 'sip-files00117.txt'
88c8c24a6d60aec248a52293b7bc7431
30fdf9a386f1db072ecfdd018052072c8b063bb2
describe
'33181' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVET' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
45f8d287a780a4d7c0fcb377b3e3b5a2
a18ceb81eb394bedaec1ed824857821051f8544f
describe
'312407' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEU' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
9dc2a354fa6ebb8e0e60718ef0a45cd9
240576d716a5ace5614e0da54c59db38196dc664
describe
'163046' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEV' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b89b608281384468a76e3b05ae044c4d
662192752362a36b9075d18b7affbcea3ae22c10
describe
'27587' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEW' 'sip-files00118.pro'
77ba1ed3663986254d58dcbe73fc042b
531d72745da93247c1172528421325dfb459355c
describe
'65598' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEX' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
84f673b83b71060681fc05705f938f05
6e30a80e2f31c3ba1ff8ee49f396371511903197
describe
'2521288' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEY' 'sip-files00118.tif'
fe58f35fca0162fe2bd2633f3d8626e0
e0a1322f9446f4d3ba757e1b3b50a07ba2cd27eb
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVEZ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
56275c9db0cf7d78fce111efccc75345
0d75653b590a21fb12f0f0737ff86c87c1a3d2ea
describe
'33956' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFA' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
cf417f6b075e5904fcace087b3c941a9
c4671ea4333a74abf0de4fd92205b499da51cbdd
describe
'312631' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFB' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
f8056561545fea33df3924daffb29290
dcb32dbb149afefbc1e2ef2d772dccdb61257909
describe
'156017' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFC' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
44f95c7fa6cf7a8760b68f52ef01aa18
3373e02635b55fff4d8bf5bbca79dcfaa9e93c6d
describe
'25492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFD' 'sip-files00119.pro'
b52420ab0cab36adaa12ba1aa84ea599
d7412a8685739ece01f3e42ad8997ce0aa654770
describe
'63815' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFE' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
7c7c12a0cde407fe97c7288f1ffca04f
18d04871e273eb51a5b09e1a47878a741827d72b
describe
'2522836' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFF' 'sip-files00119.tif'
9f3c5f7a0282031f13f3b5579c92f399
8058b659089b3780e684c98df7487d8c1494fd4a
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFG' 'sip-files00119.txt'
d8c054241d740ea295b49a01a339ee08
c6660ada746ea907bf0031feaa600b9707bebf0d
describe
'33093' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFH' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
b0810148f5daa4c8648c2279d72d10df
7b5b9beda1bb7560cdc4bf96b95e94f88f29c466
'2011-10-15T09:23:51-04:00'
describe
'312382' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFI' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
de8ffec60856c4b51b8166fbbb738081
d6298d6affcbad5231eb225555acc570a5fda94f
describe
'165687' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFJ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
223a5a53ec63b25ae6105433b3ba4f44
70608169fc6f6e20ae8897631675d1e6eefc3a70
describe
'28136' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFK' 'sip-files00120.pro'
4737b6fdda7c936555ff8e41f68529b1
bf74201c5b36f58cb6505cf727c46fa04444efa0
describe
'68051' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFL' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
acaac1d41a7e4804b9e61c915aad9724
c55749148406e780fedca3ae9f85acc1b6023469
describe
'2521436' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFM' 'sip-files00120.tif'
fe1a243fb4282295b2d6427d4570b971
797011d3021aecca0573772528bd31ac9013574f
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFN' 'sip-files00120.txt'
43b630f33df03323b947172c9d467655
638dfa2e1baaddb356af8e97d04299fee08c79b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFO' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
d40d70a40f5eb6ab4b7d5ce919c14152
dd602bfea07349175ceb026b5c8d309c9cdf8a09
describe
'312659' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFP' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
1733f82db99b04ac056bab3841438d10
9c6412dafc57edc82a8644bad65ba797c1a15e84
describe
'150777' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFQ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
8264dc2aacc1f4d9d40660d4bd7c12cf
a81bfcb3ab52959256ad2781fc649bd74e4ec8fd
'2011-10-15T09:21:59-04:00'
describe
'25003' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFR' 'sip-files00121.pro'
589c318120c9302d5f802992784759b9
798bd00fe61be963d0b3a2423a39c4ca706b394b
describe
'63737' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFS' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
cfaa534a270007e704e0474955a713c3
3e8e46a9905b5a9f04eca270df5d0eb6a9203712
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFT' 'sip-files00121.tif'
7b701e9f296ceede2b951e080c2622c1
2b0ba4cc1c16dec17dbcc933fba696709d9c7c87
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFU' 'sip-files00121.txt'
71619e6c85599367b268370bcc809644
16247ffe277e7655924641217c8b0c20d5d93d4d
describe
'33940' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFV' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
b7c70d148577e215c7da2e8f12b78cf0
6a4d86aa1002ab7d44e14ade3c04ab0340da4782
describe
'312414' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFW' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a76c06c912540d745fc641714e0119ef
cf56d0620efaaf22afaf93aa46f3c98ec9c398f0
describe
'164637' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFX' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
ae4b67bd115ec97fb2c1d3ed0ea7e884
3ae3dea6aeb0a40b5e8673bdfa398d1656745b4c
describe
'28724' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFY' 'sip-files00122.pro'
0ee3847505b2c6a2afe04e0cf619b6f3
99a0b41a6014fba746fdc082ebab36daf7005ed2
describe
'69987' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVFZ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
ae34d11e115923defd06f5ec06b478f8
872ae944964c182a41895456135cd4cee198b35e
describe
'2521712' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGA' 'sip-files00122.tif'
df1f14906358e897359fab9b79f14669
375c5b2315a06171af51d12dc6494cf11800fb8c
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGB' 'sip-files00122.txt'
fc2fc8abf1740b3a14334c55cb9b1f44
2695f03ff9e1d6b94ff792f3be9216a5371c5aa4
describe
'34797' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGC' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
2a183d055677db543943651bd8bfe383
bfd0fb863847200eb6913b7480586c2de5f6734d
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGD' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
7664784938585795ef54907e9b0645c3
6e8f634db6665f8e4fbbbbe9e47d5452d56d5080
describe
'161967' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGE' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
a30f2f35a4ddba34f2f086d009f3fb32
299db78d31674214859bc72386eb82ba30fb0b84
describe
'28013' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGF' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e1e7c8ea631c015080b0d3050151d7d0
07c8e5d9ce4357fab55802d50113769ab222afc8
describe
'67605' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGG' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
00f97f60a066b0faa4495dea06f6e4b1
2058cebdb46551e4d28e3ddf530f177274982053
describe
'2523360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGH' 'sip-files00123.tif'
5ac1e19c93e90090522389870aa22525
8ec8feec7da447d8bb1e971607ca8ba7254abb03
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGI' 'sip-files00123.txt'
e5a6f342d33901b1d8a03422c83c8e16
342aa2b66e86e9e3df307c53e25b2ebe8b1fa022
describe
'34223' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGJ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
9576373a307f2d7cc831a6095705b731
028874b4875454ed2c370b1edd750864c883311e
'2011-10-15T09:21:51-04:00'
describe
'312602' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGK' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
ed59dc2824abd755d2b2044dfd3cee31
ce8520d33f73785dd84b59e0fcac70f5d0f8f3d5
describe
'169080' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGL' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
cf0dc5dcb3414b3fbb2a5fd6f5bac75b
18fd281a7743d12b5242c8edc5236ef7a56300b9
describe
'30031' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGM' 'sip-files00124.pro'
4a086e01322a4d93331d58e969563f93
b8d4c2a5ff1f8291e895894e40cc48c33c526a4a
describe
'69360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGN' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
3edc34efd05645a3a4b49b2ec21153cb
cb0d5185adc7c9e30f66ad3aaf841ba39b81fd14
describe
'2523556' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGO' 'sip-files00124.tif'
aef5171c1bce43034e991715ace49702
6281fe2c231e29e5d9ca75efd298e728828c1c9e
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGP' 'sip-files00124.txt'
2a375807610bc051bb6dbb685e6b8d89
5816cb71c25fcebd63a29823082ecc69ed5ea250
describe
'34738' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGQ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
6f885795f301e2ca51537f4208424c25
399c7acd8d29677f081a57d870be2bb453905df6
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGR' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
3ab785830aea777a620bbc8ab54a457e
7a3586fc77e2716725946255729179949d93056a
describe
'164916' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGS' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
b16331b973a62de5e684fda2c82f7056
a2dc6bac5b4dc61aeafc5e1e4eb9533f6943b9d1
describe
'28833' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGT' 'sip-files00125.pro'
1ad0c5bce763647ca682f388dbc9306f
959c5a1ceac9722cf89a1e048c5eb02d84e23bd0
describe
'70167' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGU' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
1bc23c7d7e821113c8963540798d2b94
0260b2d69be75df799b59d38660530ebe2e64fbf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGV' 'sip-files00125.tif'
8615a5c0886182e9a8e0f9b3313edf9c
a36cf850ffd9e7ce921f336598d31229c3f9597c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGW' 'sip-files00125.txt'
d48a422eecad5960475440cbd16ce601
da8f15c4fb5b82d9a2e6a7f6a3eb7ef65c47f983
describe
'34479' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGX' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
35cb2e27a78832a429107d1895cf9136
d76f33ec07f4acb107efffa85b5c56b4340c9879
describe
'312633' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGY' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
08499b1517d49c82d351d9b59d5d3f8c
916baff777e52a06f9fe8202840d90ccaece2fb8
describe
'169390' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVGZ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
2ac5ab1f889c11cadac1685f066eebb8
8331f6a6f827c979cbea521337de52fcfceb1a4b
describe
'29293' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHA' 'sip-files00126.pro'
6fa151ba52640b837f567152cd807df2
70a14be55fff15126e41c81bae183a5f8e9dfcfd
describe
'69559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHB' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
0b64e9ef52d7abdeb35e7a7cba4d5cc9
f44bd6c7aff425225c37fefe092f0273b4112966
describe
'2523676' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHC' 'sip-files00126.tif'
0c2537c83811c12bf1884c0d6d34c76b
1e485fb53f827fe1f477e1b83ec6f3527a783583
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHD' 'sip-files00126.txt'
4c5d9c857efa07631150da4685364572
9849af4d314eab684adce05c4af2440618693b7f
describe
'34756' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHE' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
546d93fb95d5bc27c2480028988ea178
5645d169c1e8678ddc487527b820d556a84c9a20
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHF' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
d8e8e3dbf1376f302265a9cf4e337565
4a7a1af32c61b21572ec818afe5b83a2a62d2e14
describe
'160082' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHG' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
725f12baaafec08a041103e54bb06e93
721c949ce38f7805a27a8588c99a8d28068a355c
describe
'27367' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHH' 'sip-files00127.pro'
22a0891d7bbb4af1704026498cbc314b
9bcd4a6ec9ab31872579981603879a3b27be4093
describe
'66804' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHI' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
e8fedede84a7d2e4494e27cd5e6e6a90
e5d2f0ccbcf434ebb1622c864c1973b927b11670
describe
'2523060' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHJ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
bcc5339deb32a421325d96216aff17d5
5bb89c338b690310871912db9998898fc079a576
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHK' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c0765907802adf86e949561c7330cdd5
aefaa9a82150afa47c20f5d5ce8baeefbc59cacf
describe
'33604' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHL' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3f7e801f52a8e7271773a3e4eb898f1b
ab0a376eb0e5ef1d2dc267a42aaceb9e1e1dab80
'2011-10-15T09:20:19-04:00'
describe
'312585' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHM' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
7342f8c58e2ed452371cba1d39c3a6c3
61b2c5c5ffae57c63d96bb90a460becb55ad7b3b
describe
'162274' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHN' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
c9c1d3fe9fcebea46ce5983353937e8a
4881d8b182bbea107942d03f71c4b79719c7f6cd
describe
'28156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHO' 'sip-files00128.pro'
738411a8798906def3227d0d3a13065a
80f242f327ade83c7b3fd5ddb03ed43e2fdae46e
describe
'67594' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHP' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
51f4b21cd65ef057a0e6baafac527b1f
bc15266d8b013ca534e17b18aa23226e4c704dda
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHQ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
dcf2594b4c64aeb83cb52a4bee44c94f
8f4ff368f72a1ada400e92d1d32e165042476850
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHR' 'sip-files00128.txt'
348d6065425cb67095d47953bdeea595
8208b495519bc44bfc5d440b16abb731d3514eb7
describe
'34165' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHS' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
1f68ed7352761f3f1a531e31c7451588
30b52d49a203501e4e931e34ab258857d0f90b10
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHT' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
24a2a2ac3e10e02c467ffec6cfd41ec2
40eb11c05707def38fd2a8526604db41eb5669c1
describe
'167899' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHU' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
1c0ad9a5fb47035acaa8f86ec4167ba7
4e53f2c50bfe77bc760e4b5195b4b33a0cf1654d
describe
'30138' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHV' 'sip-files00129.pro'
b58965fc46bbf768e1b79627687d7dc2
070e1a8071e76a648a76f2afdf1782743df2804a
describe
'71420' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHW' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
e180066baeadf1ab03f5d495061788fa
ec4575828ab52ee710f824ccf71e5c3ee4d75fd6
describe
'2523324' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHX' 'sip-files00129.tif'
9953a59f6d8ec959dd89eb9b59f30818
4fefdd39fddd1b9937025e662b59cb4416a4ca8c
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHY' 'sip-files00129.txt'
3655b615162b7dfcedb458ba1838f1d4
802ee1ecec666c775a74cf9adb936eb90f57a7d0
describe
'35048' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVHZ' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
19de23580639931fe9d1b0b34b5228d1
b4edcd6f717695ca932a42e3ff9e5bd2429f7cc2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIA' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
2d82923f71b8096cde30918832aa01f7
d0ecba7ae765b4ead5baab81fe5df555eb8532e0
describe
'136467' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIB' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
7d0102d75e3cc6f0b41dcde9e6245bb1
b18fa802319ad995e494a8c2234349b2f3788820
describe
'19787' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIC' 'sip-files00130.pro'
6819453cca9e7add4008706c4e5f96d8
f2f2ba6bd82437617975646efc1061395d9ce02e
describe
'55876' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVID' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
592bdd3e9aa837d820252b344741e705
a642d7c58e2149c39c1fa80470e39fb57aad8190
describe
'2522156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIE' 'sip-files00130.tif'
701dda4134c8e4eaba1fa4755eded7d0
6364ec0450ef84e8bd3f90042b58081d97880cc1
describe
'791' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIF' 'sip-files00130.txt'
04d846747600dd5366b8fa6638e5420d
5b90c35a4abf7cf69ddecd38f9cd8f0548c22222
describe
'30482' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIG' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
dd5609a534debdccc2a0909cb5665e7f
b35edaca1cccb0b352172e5b4f27b28fc457b29f
describe
'312565' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIH' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
d7f9fe0dfab8e21541d6a93fa44c1534
1059d292d0c022583931ee2bca98361802903358
describe
'130948' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVII' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
a628f2516dd3306a05a26c65e3d1a93e
09ea3d08873d5b7f5253f6a90644ed6a965cfa44
describe
'18744' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIJ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
76ed778e20ca683946bdadbc685e667c
3866c22c556c2f20524a27c792791d0dc4c42717
describe
'54194' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIK' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
bd5479a4779c16caec89e3dc63701e3f
96da7da64ffab2537f79fd67d6d87db5155ebef9
describe
'2522016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIL' 'sip-files00131.tif'
9716b27dcd2af2d52d1ed31bb4b648e3
153150a26b633f7bc4dd909aeb8d67367306e311
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIM' 'sip-files00131.txt'
7140ce30483ca7fd71cfd4d76c517e72
cca2f8a1f97549aaac1947bd6bc649e41dea6fb7
describe
'29623' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIN' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
b0384887698a8da7b68c796a3b39e257
39b7d07dc83789fa1a5033aa98aebe1f006258e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIO' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
88a5e842fe3d20c6c4953a66b988d64a
8b0df6e3275316da56f504ce864c015b5a10205b
describe
'163208' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIP' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
6a23a684f94bcccfdc9dde071b6a667f
72a324888196c44fbf47c64fc00532c11801e271
describe
'27660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIQ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
3d64f00b6a60db48a161f9af5e90f1df
763628616270b041e59386f98ba1e0cbd5d9db89
describe
'66001' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIR' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
0d9023b9409e91bd587a6072887b56e2
3ee4226dd99e00b9bf83c145e38074cc28b5fe7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIS' 'sip-files00132.tif'
8aa1975353dd67d2fdb92055f88feb4d
6cd7f1a0c2e6bdcd86396c237d45b26f69643794
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIT' 'sip-files00132.txt'
86b1ab07ce681f52b7ce96157d44cb24
0834ef0b908489633495cb62e7c1acba474b549e
describe
'33722' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIU' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
1c463620f85facba764801471cb61dc8
c54bcda6490c5be08545b9277aab5be186110583
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIV' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
3fb1a8f2d8fe0f7bf6296b4b88ec9646
19ec254242d9afe3986a3afe002a5001cfa6cc17
describe
'155906' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIW' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
b6ae74f1ae4242e88f9fdee4f99b4000
812501c3efc60f3b0b81ccf8551d8c77d8df2d05
describe
'26276' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIX' 'sip-files00133.pro'
6d6730ff016de5d8e9e8303ae674d8bd
abe44d1d9fb5e97d19431efbf38a4b593a0a6ddf
describe
'65497' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIY' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
f00b21018a07c161038f36dd0eaba448
35838e9a99d46ddf6a7e9acb561152c57c828b0a
describe
'2523156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVIZ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
fec29958ec8c438c5e5772d46afd4af8
c65b4d6eece06606249614a9ee689bfcaf4a5e53
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJA' 'sip-files00133.txt'
0e4c876bb9affbf6b467ed38b2ef9f1d
9ad854ebdc0a24aa25c686fc4ed290682974547b
describe
'33914' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJB' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
3bc4c2fea0c839de7d1536db622f2306
bcb64b46f37ed5885980799f3636709a30a83138
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJC' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
4f7604376ad6e7044ff479e27c0319f7
ff940196af478e59de36d371e903bff8c6b3b259
describe
'173405' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJD' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
c6575589f31651960930a7998ed5a397
a4e99568f1425cdcaddf60c0b73bc560e415ee57
describe
'27164' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJE' 'sip-files00134.pro'
acd1cdc539ebe3d7ec7135ea46f55050
aba03232b7c84b45c537496207f1ec53335244b4
describe
'69216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJF' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
1139930465a5d57cea4da97e369aff04
e88b843be7fc93f1acccd5dd661219f47a9d6857
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJG' 'sip-files00134.tif'
bf2a308bc589a10df54763e2b49356e5
416f782d62c24901778969f7017d42b56bb1208a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJH' 'sip-files00134.txt'
25eebc266a0f3d7d11099128bcadfd10
07b76f898427ecf4287ac472d7343c8aa2edf6ef
describe
'34474' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJI' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
4d4070110d0dbbb6606a7846d8b5fd64
c34bb56ada140ee9c485933f23b22e23d813ca65
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJJ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
69cd2895a1690b886561dc456a7097c8
8ec3b37c0883128f1085f9d7b1f079449f2ab8d8
describe
'176417' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJK' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
269cda5cdbe93c029fe7582879627054
224d04cdb38446fba07c1abc7bdcdfed303a2a13
describe
'29775' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJL' 'sip-files00135.pro'
d1fc5a1df203f6395bd3c49f6154d44a
65b77ea76522e86dfe54432b4b4aa22716ee6dee
describe
'70486' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJM' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
11161200b299c1ea49fdc37bb7a23492
34c45a1e727fabeb0a78ab6f05b3c6d13fb676c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJN' 'sip-files00135.tif'
82aef744bbb62b649dddf86e2e163619
888bfa630307723320a7d11311bfca4dd6e25251
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJO' 'sip-files00135.txt'
8ed33f4915f594bb8d54107e32ca0954
349affd63a63a06bc6061b91bc6a64262061d172
describe
'34497' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJP' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
389e782999ffad33797e1d9668452320
fcb652671bd2291f6498f55fd4e3cc9ed0d49aeb
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJQ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
24e6e8baf7fd75c0924ad20dc036bf38
41649388cb5c9ab91e1a886a11d4d9e0798af60a
describe
'164329' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJR' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
8b38ac0ed1603c429a9a06b1fd783600
097f438dcdae25c37c2b6435b2836c5966186e00
describe
'28458' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJS' 'sip-files00136.pro'
bae4dc86374f77dfd8a76e9d51ad1c23
9b98ca3abd7de2989e6a9e1e6763f09288f60c8b
describe
'69030' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJT' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
3faa9d01eb7c350496769a90194e4548
4d5f96fa8a8ac15a1862c68a6163e7ca08b8856e
describe
'2523576' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJU' 'sip-files00136.tif'
91a6b80a9821fdc93f486650349c69b7
464ee53c7fa23d0dbd9180a12d82904abdd9d79d
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJV' 'sip-files00136.txt'
c3fa0cd45e72db2ffe3b5e3f76e61f1d
88d3165dbde95a85b219fcabab9c79a6bee7b906
describe
'34627' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJW' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
3e26046891763513f62a02a5f1a01610
9ffcd272c300d4ed480279737d16aed5a89e8192
describe
'312630' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJX' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
fc6531ccdfe39f68972e586feafe9615
68f76bcc0721e8bae8bc5a225733f34c9709491c
describe
'166613' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJY' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
8d0d5d4ec3a4c2146523537665ec6094
4dcf0a4c8f978d203f0fb154b123d2eb30ce255e
describe
'27536' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVJZ' 'sip-files00137.pro'
0297210506c839ecdb5ad9b036a469c5
b0d5ec458a319e8c2264b8a07c102316eb6ef5a1
describe
'68694' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKA' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
a02ecc1dce0e470ad39f8fcd3f85f8c3
4a22b1d1436cc4d56c0f8461b5ca3fce77ef20e0
describe
'2523224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKB' 'sip-files00137.tif'
69044d03ed108b41da1d4c1cb32957ad
f624305fa082e60131518e8d6065e4039883a766
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKC' 'sip-files00137.txt'
a14cc4dfc6b227a1a47cdc93c20b7534
f6b40d512417fff2c87c84eaeac3dda9cc17a8b4
describe
'34388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKD' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
7d6b1d61ce28a01418b2cc5db33786ca
223a9cf3b05e59386fdc41c366ef128d559b5b37
describe
'312516' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKE' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
0bc7971c43e1ecb376978a8cdeecf44c
0044dc3d6599292116efe93a31bfd09ea7a8cf49
describe
'172560' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKF' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
9bf6d243da4cdcaaaf56e39f36ddc977
2426ed33836d958b1f344ae3c0d9d1cce09b425c
'2011-10-15T09:19:52-04:00'
describe
'29512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKG' 'sip-files00138.pro'
bd56acd71e4131499c338e3b41b25a40
c61818646252bf9b5cda6173fab0b7cb32438d25
describe
'70857' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKH' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
58a3d384755bee8fdaf1529fd4f0c47f
60301392ab29facaee3d39a66bdb70f031bf86c7
describe
'2523816' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKI' 'sip-files00138.tif'
ca866a71b8c981bbf52b253e97ad29b1
7aa5ad96ea094755f6aeabcdd5734c93ebbc7d5a
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKJ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
5c3364c706b093ed36bcfbbe29b53312
1ee55270a64eca4908140b3356e9b38d368a6846
describe
'35109' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKK' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
83ed027a38e7e2460dabe1abdbcdb692
2ac08db051f3d582b379500e16b6f4a7fa6373ca
describe
'312536' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKL' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
76ed8ada55c442c2d2aeff4da063d3b5
d42f48f9e199cb6deb76dcb28dc9aaaef9748b6c
describe
'170373' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKM' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
a2b1247bd5b3ba17753a5cb6deed5637
229560c7402dcc4e94930479e2e37853ab0ba134
describe
'28942' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKN' 'sip-files00139.pro'
74b39381f351b28e0286ce6c339877eb
a0f95aca03f3adf34c9132e02b98d2f35ddc60cb
describe
'70395' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKO' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
b96628ecbe5c516efe370276fd963f67
541afb881dd5cb299deb3fd74a12b3ae85c0174f
'2011-10-15T09:20:23-04:00'
describe
'2523440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKP' 'sip-files00139.tif'
c07227090c71c769d8515f2899b5e24d
1aefe727427855312c09b4ebabf86620683a4271
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKQ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
6bda6c6bc3b19791e84b526ba4d3ebbe
7727da427c5789fba40c2d56de3956c2d619c784
describe
'34631' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKR' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
cc7b1bb031b25667684269b447f0d03d
bd6899f9e954f3564a88a957c9e604076daf1bd4
'2011-10-15T09:22:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKS' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
80a065a71098cea039e862b3b8d9cf87
4932565ad2f561330cfecb330961e4830bcd901b
describe
'163192' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKT' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
2093ee40ca2a151af1b1ec98b52f3e16
573790aaf18b8635fbbc9018dc83698197ebd3b1
describe
'25828' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKU' 'sip-files00140.pro'
a8282da60e23bffaa7ac7459a15b92a1
c43fceb96c550e0db99313967b67f482ec8afe33
describe
'67118' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKV' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
3e6a952cf351757deb23829b4eb551c9
af9cf45aa6d317fd8a3553670d4152e649895b87
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKW' 'sip-files00140.tif'
e08c2dc62f5a44abfa6e3d86eff94dc0
ccd7f32c9e5fcbff795d233fcbf57c0862056483
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKX' 'sip-files00140.txt'
0b6dfb7acebdf130985e906bedb09a57
370e1e22a03663cdda68278dc25a8dc97e1df4ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKY' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
a3cee62b5eb29901b8bd030be4dcb067
cfdfa38158243d3f4385cd45d610339da23b59ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVKZ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
51d825709e9002f035b56cd1abdbdfff
b0369212d18522bc2ea2688768f63936135124ed
describe
'170449' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLA' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
27d8e8077780cee19e6e33da7d16ca2d
7bb7a2c71f57b2a009653982707c6817c33fb6cd
describe
'28284' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLB' 'sip-files00141.pro'
778b319ce30524d8789884b1a2b15fe1
d3f9f9bbe7b0118a099c27a37ed7c3a02ca3ddc4
describe
'69355' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLC' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
7d7697a8d1669d5d4fab3048b69bafa1
19c628acd3e483a426d36ed41bd51eeb9b5bff06
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLD' 'sip-files00141.tif'
669b19092cc759ff428ad43974669ffa
1f98bb9fd966de93bc6710f439925a97f002b27b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLE' 'sip-files00141.txt'
3de086a543a24eff0334f1aba817459c
1253a5a012428700466760d9b089c7ca4525a731
describe
'34310' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLF' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
2bb274c5d5cc54b253c79ac5202c297b
6c8a0bb9b33aa6b87eaae059f5178e7fff773c0b
describe
'312619' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLG' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
7431ef5082069a15ab217014dd97aca7
fb2d6eaaf99964ac689d3783a205871bfe1de308
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLH' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
bcf6d7653e92eb9dc5cff1c280147a87
66aa386075d21ef0e1e58170fc5f92583b7c967f
describe
'28014' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLI' 'sip-files00142.pro'
d5df7fe3a9f2a62791f9e87820117610
502b3985f4431face38f9d2883a8753bfa0427de
describe
'68935' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLJ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
524c398a40a4d077bf783c46e8af68ee
2459b45a23b16bd3328a534bab3c79fe11b45393
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLK' 'sip-files00142.tif'
a3f7a2b02d30972d5f657b65a7f057ff
6fef05a3d134d639773eb7effb3b8f194b916c81
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLL' 'sip-files00142.txt'
01cbff6edc2cecb979f3551415d012a6
40cd884a79cdceec50de53a94bea463a1476601d
describe
'34575' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLM' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
97501120b596aca47febdc9c74fdbbb8
40728d8304fd1abe3d724283d6077da139d94200
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLN' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
4f2f2dd67ddba45fb4a18c9da178091d
70e4ea230a67dbd2777feb261ecfb07c41474a5e
describe
'149277' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLO' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
2ca99e5dc48d1af49137b7424c45f7f3
96211656e709acda5a001ef60c3e88d718666207
describe
'23596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLP' 'sip-files00143.pro'
eaa650b9dde29b2e730ff76eee2db6ee
ba78f07075890de112e3b73fdea984c800f82981
describe
'61722' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLQ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
139f819df39c85e6e1fd36332d39d539
7fadaa86590b0b3359428fc73e61d43e7208a4ba
describe
'2522988' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLR' 'sip-files00143.tif'
d3f3b4761828407ddd46558ffa43e568
d30ed627da486ff3c98664fb8d10024893e41f5a
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLS' 'sip-files00143.txt'
6c00dc80521f2be81028cc8b40975fd2
13409a6dbac674eac59804eef9dcf327031b088f
describe
'33299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLT' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
3f9bd15d604d30092bae9062db96cfa4
0c00f3530b1a8167b5df6c0b66813da22bd022e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLU' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
df3a0f0bb94af8342419a4d16c9b92ed
f25cf6f9667fd447d949a06d84e5de644081637a
describe
'161899' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLV' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
d0e5a933946ade0e3ee2af9baf49735e
c905a10ecf3801e641ef124d742a40b97560b522
describe
'25853' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLW' 'sip-files00144.pro'
9a6aa2dae5695af3f1747bc6eaf39160
8fb926939309e69c5cb8e2e4aa92ba478b1dc23b
describe
'65258' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLX' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
5479b2c883f42f89e2f3c1f6a3dee12b
eadc6bb06fce08018777899cc905661b9013f1af
describe
'2523276' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLY' 'sip-files00144.tif'
df5ce0c8cf36446ad48e5da129098dab
660b33ae3445a1a9e8a47783f89ccf16dd6df107
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVLZ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
e1fd01026d546ba7406eed92e34c07be
8fd5553187c5b6577b8f798e95f71a6bdbb2e61f
describe
'33917' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMA' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
7815430672a4d7cdb2a042fa952781dc
87e7955ad3a98d8740f9c5c3898050af62418dab
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMB' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
bbacc95c8f76015e726f07cde7927287
0a206847bae7cbd846ef499726609dd5826edffa
describe
'158538' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMC' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
c66fa4692f1ff76e78a6acab1b0180ab
638f70552678f7dd7eca79905871c7268e2aef1b
describe
'24672' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMD' 'sip-files00145.pro'
e1ad6fabcb1bdcb66676cc96bad49b1b
0594f604d643e26ca9fd9b3f3ce2bf63647c2603
describe
'64812' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVME' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
cfe85a936d0ffeefb8ac568e825f29b4
4481fda38b98de57a2c2c603dbfc8d3b38e1a863
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMF' 'sip-files00145.tif'
840efb4320eb4e496cad324c78c21362
1d744591b53ec5ec6d4af53d9433bf870cbcfc73
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMG' 'sip-files00145.txt'
61585b26c8971b58750e8bf621c7f81f
ae19d647dd1e548f04f27e0334887b5f99348a2c
describe
'34252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMH' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
05c3adeb804f8a458ecebe1f23a7f482
84bf9ee7c70370df10743805a574dfdcd15913ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMI' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
dd0b9bf6800bb6d7af7d01a544b57044
3e744cee8462c45707e30e1436c197bf5e799106
describe
'161458' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMJ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
c5f754b002fd99c0abe42818aea4b966
ffddfc58e83f8e0d7698c236e80886872f0d6a99
describe
'25553' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMK' 'sip-files00146.pro'
e52b1e33d84f7604bffa033219f49832
c301f56d766904c6cd7d43b5b4236c1ec66ae508
describe
'64893' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVML' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
ee797d0c3bd16b3cd03fd945c75e5519
3c80970147ea1ae14db3f002122aa0b936011c7f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMM' 'sip-files00146.tif'
44d9778d12a2a20c1a6ffe4c2dab092f
984eae85b348c3961a7146180168ba227332762f
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMN' 'sip-files00146.txt'
a95be338013f8a820c8d5a99646f8ea8
94e8224344f94037a78b89670543cf801809afcb
describe
'33758' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMO' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
6122d70ff8f01af449a4d11875c3d8fb
d63822a1099b0ff5ea06864fd40c9fbaa60517ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMP' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
7ef353b894c54f0a10250ebd95d7138e
00ec968036b495c52e9f572e0675645bb1af359d
describe
'164822' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMQ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
a9c1ca79670329dd646bbb7016f59060
595391f2b943754d8ee3d2de60a8e911a9022d12
describe
'27723' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMR' 'sip-files00147.pro'
cfc46c67c69543980485e17fd1d60dbd
54e32dbaa9e99f9575f2769f01663b3d60d140e5
describe
'66778' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMS' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
9bc43362a24f340dbcc4e1640fca3cc4
8056836edf0bba2436a568373826e2d0e9fe4ba7
describe
'2523200' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMT' 'sip-files00147.tif'
0e4008f05c4de06d789152db52fe4d86
f4097f04909dfe34725e1091232c3b64201aa347
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMU' 'sip-files00147.txt'
dd3578b40140529e3b31f5bc7c9bccd9
6ddfd66a465e1d64ee470848a0a4427dfce75f04
describe
'33741' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMV' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
9f08c18d5fb4f80504542036f7ec6190
00dcaef6aee2880a8f91cc0e4288612af16bbc3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMW' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
b2d845bc67700cbea06835dfc7d635a2
24701266e8910b948d3fc859a28f8f7f14abd02b
describe
'84211' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
f439a365c5b434060acf675c15455c39
944a0ab9e0f1f72dd15ea8b62077b0d4d8701194
describe
'6293' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMY' 'sip-files00148.pro'
02522d4bc12a025cab28d382347cd2f5
a4fc1bf6ef400eff21255dd72a0b703b91928e44
describe
'33430' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVMZ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
b10d22d2cbd70820718381986b5b25e6
4bb7637f250ee946717f91f208858d8585f433a6
describe
'2519704' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNA' 'sip-files00148.tif'
dcec9cf49a30677b9df6ebe874a107b9
6033b9f141a38989cf3ec4c8985dc92a177d7e0d
describe
'254' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNB' 'sip-files00148.txt'
0327abed71cf7f6c42419a6d10c51d7a
9120da03b8359b7a9b22d2e728b39e031d7e1d8b
describe
'22386' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNC' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
201a78ebefd6d7a28d708d6eef11bcbf
b58ede5a292c3544c785b1206c50960813207cb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVND' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
6538f88855fbd885b01afdab8a4f3173
471a0a6fdde235125f6dd5f1864f193b7fe0ad9c
describe
'134946' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNE' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
98468b3a7daea801b804b1128bba2321
874cbc3fda087bd4b98a971876cdc20eb1fae51b
describe
'19751' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNF' 'sip-files00149.pro'
9e90cc4cb012ced39a2bba4255a9007a
eeea6045fd21c2153989b3e7ff2bd9e60d8ebd9a
describe
'56005' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNG' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
0e62e8595eb2efdd8aaac847a2cbd0c7
bd30c3acb7001195aedaba0d4871db7c365b3a81
describe
'2522172' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNH' 'sip-files00149.tif'
c0680f393481f2ab9a20f5fd4d402743
a0d53cc160fe721a2d1c92eb779bd939a7adabd2
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNI' 'sip-files00149.txt'
23ab642208f8a60ddc743239ecc7614b
ce3e3926f832aafe22c6087bce305ef36f09e78b
describe
'30125' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNJ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
bd4b421555cdd248d2ddca265347c6be
def3f19dfb64dc2ddbcbf6890a65432b76cee595
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNK' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
e034bc34287231001d7bbb7dd7070ee4
510ebe5a4bd2194ab8b52f1384a3bfe8e5ed9815
describe
'162087' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNL' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
62432280f29fa029ca89b9f3b43d957c
081f823063d5ecf9dc786ac4b1c48f0e8922106d
describe
'27912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNM' 'sip-files00150.pro'
b2df3875927b440ec920a9eae34eb4d7
70ab1003550fc4b153f6faca528e2b86a0c9cf13
describe
'68027' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNN' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
e63081d5250adb9fc12ae8ed1c418f3a
e319a4bfc46bd4af4304fab5ebce2a1fa1759c2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNO' 'sip-files00150.tif'
078700b6d1de4642455f14f0f1b42633
a298ff80e0202bcd7046c53e5499416ef67781b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNP' 'sip-files00150.txt'
2addd8fec9721ff1433e4c913f37ca8d
46a870100c1a44935a13fe15d1233b1ff79c7d4d
describe
'34533' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNQ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
c06b9d0ede725e7bb63c7a7181951187
32bd42c24f7cad9865e5f40b2322bda36c12d89f
describe
'312570' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNR' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
757988a8e62713ff21171ffb16747974
ed692622cc712435b6e1fe0c62cfd8338810b938
describe
'109886' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNS' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
bd1997e69deff2231e594a4f18ca718f
a745569a1b96663b8d3098e61000933f05566288
describe
'3077' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNT' 'sip-files00151.pro'
0bc8060b4260ea16464d2519771027bb
ab8022060b577a8eeb3ba343dd715c96925815a9
describe
'43451' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNU' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
9870238fa2b1409f94ca0bd86cf2891e
98c890f1c0325c65f8d5853c78df32634b2c5628
describe
'2524084' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNV' 'sip-files00151.tif'
d996c09cb6a61c024dee8ec6a7090fee
34c874889b79492bdc4bdf775630c5cae5bfca30
describe
'203' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNW' 'sip-files00151.txt'
769b3f2e851f1ee914d873bd109b9a83
f9b5fad9492f98ea2972444b3f1642df8ef72960
describe
'28122' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNX' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
b3671438d8bfd2c4b80d6e649fa83c20
2d56a65cdfeba878cfbe916c791f9cf1459a9602
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNY' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
3d14baeabc29c58db96c021d70679681
03420e5435eb17494784947d59c463ac60bd7031
describe
'176435' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVNZ' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
2f3d0eda623d1f94b2e6d467afbbb225
103bce579a5dbf1b935ed662a22f55dd2c1e072e
describe
'30718' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOA' 'sip-files00153.pro'
19daf1dec185ab209e45574c8e3ea4f9
50425d413397afbaf6034a889cb1c159d8c86479
describe
'72732' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOB' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
3ad1b2d0795255768596975d9d3c9d39
e6dbedb0e86028c439badc2f9147c0c1cb0ffe27
describe
'2523456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOC' 'sip-files00153.tif'
c511006d364c856a7a5341b094f01633
e280776bc8208a08fe5faa96546446b5e5b66dc5
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOD' 'sip-files00153.txt'
a30b9c59cbbf6f6b8b4bcfda5ed549a7
c8c3df3987620504bed831423a42a82db73407dd
describe
'35019' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOE' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
bdaca352b4f85b7a76783fd3ca0e9c8c
75083bac198986dfecf45baba8d89af3baa9a82d
describe
'312408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOF' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
968181b8bf5aa0fa8d0912864da10ad1
0e349425ab354268d1a7b71ad210067953107642
describe
'167158' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOG' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
287c0e5c0be70263fb07249fc9a4a95a
82bba051c2eb9291efcdeac28ac1012ec641babc
describe
'27989' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOH' 'sip-files00154.pro'
e9554b8ed7385c4a5d1b0bd2230b48b3
787536d0640c21882b89264b5d23f4e1ac00c26b
describe
'68438' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOI' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
2b068129391582a1b220d9d2a5a44707
f33795449df3ac078d8ee62f749db6d51ba40e0c
describe
'2521544' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOJ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
4754f86cd8e95bf152543a52d9127a1c
5134c6cfcbe31f7fb33db4d18f13a44272858769
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOK' 'sip-files00154.txt'
14b3b116402ffdd1312e94b9bdc0ec4b
73e078658005607816ff1ab25fd820ca48eac46e
describe
'34107' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOL' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
a873c54b57f6d1d21c15c6ca71989dc9
cb01315c1ea795a4e69f6103f1f1b04330459a26
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOM' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
2a125cb7a24c26a99cdc9aee8ebab7bc
69ed6e3cd8aa5dc183de8a189c883d4d30c60927
describe
'156280' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVON' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
d85098507b5a240e40228df0b0f0e86c
ae97c6eadb181f71ee57a49548ab3be21c671cb3
describe
'25585' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOO' 'sip-files00155.pro'
0df22a81bbfeaa8a8b3210dc3a9aa6d8
255072e01e8b535b1b75a046a17ab1261c94850c
describe
'66072' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOP' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
02e28eb1c95e29974ab27fcc81aaca97
70351975689b765942e87c34b747c51a2f62728e
describe
'2523136' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOQ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
9b03a5e051c1cc574637f3e05c55275b
0620d7568b86f8e97b6637aad30e22827ec9b899
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOR' 'sip-files00155.txt'
16c0812562afdbc2016c33b4efafce68
ceaab449c339025d862d5a1b5eb1c9d3e3e2c6fe
'2011-10-15T09:23:14-04:00'
describe
'33827' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOS' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
7606f5ec56153565dcaf335c86f1de8d
d55a6df63d4dedb19d06e7734532cb3baa48748a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOT' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
4e5e57774bd874689b9ef0b4a2751e88
cd600d4dbfc1e8858e528bbb7a36149b1a194ea3
describe
'164099' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOU' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
6957b8d7b316f6c315c05bc4ac09c4ed
7201ba62ebb06c4d6d3ad8ab0ddb7888922acfd3
describe
'27250' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOV' 'sip-files00156.pro'
5d7560b198eec7b20e6e78d4200fd8fd
6e6e9bf73d355a489060647f3f32a582b9b9cfe3
describe
'69143' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOW' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
2edd89fd2d3cbb35b65c315eaec9922b
5eb3d4bc6711c925e0443e57f3809f9d34404531
describe
'2521668' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOX' 'sip-files00156.tif'
fbb2af049d6f73bdfcb81444089c6321
20338c11a22704ad337ed6818a8defe30e1c6fe7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOY' 'sip-files00156.txt'
34f6e893409f944cbcdceacc88fe627a
8541aa19c229feea2a2e827d1d170ce4ced18e7e
describe
'34570' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVOZ' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
d30529ed537379a6934ed7645185d4cf
240bec983089cfe789e8c9845faa0fecdcbc4bde
describe
'312660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPA' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
37274b194f6e4f846ad0d069464b3289
677703b20ef8231aca6e344a59f509faba43217a
describe
'167119' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPB' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
fd8f20a0a4b54d69674a0b2bec158695
ebc631e1e485ede610f5f54f13e1930b58b2f61e
describe
'29424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPC' 'sip-files00157.pro'
e3d15f74f64b02547bacd50538dc3917
522ac87b096d4e646054ea6549e305127624b4c9
describe
'69958' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPD' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
4be56e9918ad62c805516dad50403123
04d7d180605923a9addf547502d578b7f8f8b5db
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPE' 'sip-files00157.tif'
2d84335a0de66efabc3a788dd080964c
5a2271607ab3477e6c25129ea3511e89a0c52fe2
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPF' 'sip-files00157.txt'
758b9a9f238b488807764148aae6fb13
17ff6a306b58b281e8bb4abd5535b44bebcc0fc7
describe
'34848' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPG' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
be0e44d5a17a6742bd1d76223c85085a
6acd5357c04f6118cc975dceaab01275ace7a44c
describe
'312413' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPH' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
c606237bfcee1d0cb86d7f137defc73b
87f506b13de599e53a93e7c6c83a82c88f3fff99
describe
'166801' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPI' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
88d1c839f107e681b5552a8819d12cd3
2ddf87dacba1a5af04b5f3aa2b7ebf30317029d7
describe
'28941' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPJ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
eaa6ddbb11c522ff2d53807138e6942a
023edd0556bb543f07ca862a907329697c8b150d
describe
'68597' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPK' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
e9a263757d9da5cb0bf70993526402c4
5b729874b85f8514e3912071072e0bac3fd33aaa
describe
'2521572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPL' 'sip-files00158.tif'
0f1175afebacd7357265e80ca5691d8b
891d92c91730df417e02e95384ca78d6ad03710d
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPM' 'sip-files00158.txt'
0503f5c589b6d7a797b94f498cce13e9
62221c249f786ef525877eb7033793c772fbcad3
describe
Invalid character
'34716' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPN' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
23446aac8d50eafccb7f68f99deb6239
d9b4677ba9d8862ecb10e93dfea60098cb3f441e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPO' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
a987bed7898b9d9fccf3e1e05ad7ca8f
b645197f4a5e8e743826e99da212cdaa31b11e80
describe
'167615' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPP' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
d803160364cc505bc9603816e6d7a0ce
042522736bddaac168cd788ccd4e2c60f1135896
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPQ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
6dfc73a8035eb100d4fdab0ca0fc3212
219ec5613757be4c4042582b66e5b0f72fec63ee
describe
'70425' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPR' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
80c8cb783cafac2ea8be72ab0dc1beaf
8b059edecb50981976a1d054bac93a6addeb7a22
describe
'2523780' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPS' 'sip-files00159.tif'
f1b6f37210c4c2a7d376019b15e4af28
6737eb8669a4499774305b21862f047866579ca2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPT' 'sip-files00159.txt'
7fc39ab7f0dc4d3c1c90fa2cbc035766
ef74912f0996f8745671d62c084ab7ac677fe519
describe
'35035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPU' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
a8c1f7bd4d1967cf253d8e2e4f67575b
0d00b3db00a4708bc2925618d2f7972112471215
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPV' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
489aba9e6c6a8a9cc0e57a5a40f2a649
6f133fa8eef92a68e9a3122f2bd2150779fc285a
describe
'162594' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPW' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
e57dae09f3632cc2e1d1ad11f85e05c9
7d414f4b41ccd6507303e156f77d66b89cf3d91a
describe
'26322' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPX' 'sip-files00160.pro'
31dd2435bccc946aef7f8316edadccbf
61804de23c888969cd172fcb9d2b406394337fb7
describe
'66358' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPY' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
be994c3309e17a398f449ea1391215a3
a8de3b004776488d67ed0048c01e821d1ea51a2d
describe
'2521524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVPZ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
fd6191ca2ab9e95d79a860f2d9c04392
c661a0aaeb79a140bed8fce20f6aa66a70d59ebf
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQA' 'sip-files00160.txt'
078c2a9e04d2f1242de533006721f65b
517d0434b4728007c4b34362ac3c2eee42adf638
describe
'34547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQB' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
b41d8e0bdc047074e2d2a644873740cb
abd743bca2fa22df4033f414d6b8fef0186c5d65
describe
'312599' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQC' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
311e200fe74548f54af6ee10653a9b1e
030e6f897dd0f3475f46c9603488f084a5e87a07
describe
'167750' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQD' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
52944e6a38c8dcb56a3b99c97c96876d
91f99a8b5b3e78b7f4309922d2a4b4741ec376e8
describe
'28753' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQE' 'sip-files00161.pro'
e8a08ac07a03f557e1954afc55fc0ec8
a520373db08d698f7dd433ac66acb6d04f774d08
describe
'67954' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQF' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
4d94715a908b0b151d64555b5aa8937d
a61d62a1648e70fad90a58a8ebe9100abbed09dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQG' 'sip-files00161.tif'
9f6e98e9a4fad3c742c33a1109ef14d6
7e61676065f23c74e2fb445a8b2382705353e487
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQH' 'sip-files00161.txt'
507352afd351ec22f620214c8eecab64
b0cf042e6756457dc6e06feb43ccaa9a4942991d
describe
'34232' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQI' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
ad00fb2f94cf1cad35ea67e91056871b
6d83d3a816c3a071c2995dc8ebbfb7c57ef4943e
describe
'312607' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQJ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
508f3119f56afd5930aa4d03590af9c7
92798685d4cac5d3e3a5139555f8efb51f376c95
describe
'162665' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQK' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
149671fd7269671679ba51c900c2b769
4056ff4e123a875be3dbfb39e909f48a378a1647
describe
'25247' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQL' 'sip-files00162.pro'
e8642f498faefe31fc81ffe2f10797d7
e5655a2543792474e02cb2d8bebab49350292cdb
describe
'65302' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQM' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
c5dd3999afce90da6fe9a30f113624ae
f58d50c9d83936aa2542e556fdb29c8bf42ab2aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQN' 'sip-files00162.tif'
190e88d02b1d8a43f5838af217b9ee21
6635cfb34241ddf91660b1bc50defa6e6e49c5fc
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQO' 'sip-files00162.txt'
bbb001c6b8b1fb2034ff92774eb1a284
eaf21f3ead9c5b86368de61154ccbacf3e14e7e9
describe
'34178' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQP' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
343ee020852458b0e3acd147b6015e29
f011751d393682d410b557ac0cf3c136732851b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQQ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
b613149fb7a37e130c59429c9b198074
069583f960c93548822056fec95b19f32511a9ca
describe
'174147' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQR' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
9eb6d9fa3a01492a5ce86b34113bdcc0
f4fc954b62e2b741f212e79892fe948e65b99c5b
describe
'29047' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQS' 'sip-files00163.pro'
10097f7f33a49bc41848196f8d21bb97
b0f10a4758264ee9c97df86b4cbf8af00c0ae3b1
describe
'70891' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQT' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
25580fc90caeaef2c44564b486a5ec43
f358522cc5f1f26a22407e4839d4d453f5b922af
describe
'2523396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQU' 'sip-files00163.tif'
ff632f9b1b270565844390c6759219be
39061c68addd916cf1d4267d369b8ee1750496f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQV' 'sip-files00163.txt'
7e0da23a327cf812b6c7a26b30ab94f7
b964fa2f4831baf0d240d5c608187b9b5d6b6798
describe
'34935' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQW' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
092cc906d7a7955539d1ba8b32ec4263
f3fb6dc70db01890c5c8ed5d317abbdd503eee92
describe
'312651' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQX' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
709b55784459700da1fbecf5c47ecb65
eb47211b3555f2e16706e7ad79dd1b36ae08faa3
describe
'166411' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQY' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
d37a8bd34ebeef4bc8ef8a70564b2e51
b188f3dfa1b463ec8cdf8d73b1d8843a4c72661e
describe
'27689' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVQZ' 'sip-files00164.pro'
99b860b416401d1038de839b8194f645
5b5ba8a6c4a810cd1ba2b1d724b520f973945dbe
describe
'67636' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRA' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
fb3d83fe13e3312cf927cde4a44f1272
cad8fbc6267020b6e12ff4bb4627f9be0590350e
describe
'2523196' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRB' 'sip-files00164.tif'
2ffbfcd5efabb08aed76f932efc1b76b
9208803004b32709502f4096a1988980fd65ec08
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRC' 'sip-files00164.txt'
f1a952bfd258de402f13bf9a8755c317
c3df9cf4aa2b692e5f1a809f50496c1bef79877f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRD' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
4a97d0b6980cb556950039fcf05cf3e3
9c1ae7589d2613f7453be844fc99b7a92eb3e6bc
describe
'312662' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRE' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
6bd930fa8e49ea64df7477f2afeb5f22
39b1be9bae875e8ffaa2c38dd5f07fb7bae59a1c
describe
'157325' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRF' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
ce32f65319faffeb0fee996da5b97529
02b9a5f4dd05041617cf304dac571dd6391a9677
describe
'25503' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRG' 'sip-files00165.pro'
984b5e90890fa79a1d7fbe7970ae844f
8942b06dc21e1f8aa994690379064bad53aaa375
describe
'65285' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRH' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
c84a9fbfda4e9d53dc96cff4847ede90
55ecb6cfd7a55c2e86e1fd8d127e8437e6669347
describe
'2523048' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRI' 'sip-files00165.tif'
bf75a413df54c874b3c567cf10d02440
3ab690a3ee3a80b4817c5d4b6eb3c86f1eeafd55
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRJ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
ba0f232b4fe2bd34d7aaeb59385a3340
696fea3b104de3b3a6bb9c8a50b461d92960496d
describe
'33993' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRK' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
d2a3122d670696d1f30f409fa219e0e7
5da8e67ddb5e71a00ce973c8068a062d96e8f7b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRL' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
9740ea8bdfdbbc3b672a906c3bf176ff
eae44eb8fa4417477aafaa16f37dbf363cc4db8c
describe
'155431' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRM' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
6765c9e9731dadc7fd018d6f81f4db91
d05f00443829e3db237f6ec21503816c8c1065c6
describe
'23228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRN' 'sip-files00166.pro'
1b8c0757ded6ec03c00a9c37e44675b6
37185e260ab5e6f2a521a7693a00e5854475a9d2
describe
'62855' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRO' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
8d9e941a53379ad049e101740f15b96a
518311615cb1ec08025fdcffa6c5d38e488d3d20
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRP' 'sip-files00166.tif'
8015db4a8d2ba0d459e64c15e6b5bdf4
1eacfa9dbe3bd41e8916edf1bced30433d6f98cc
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRQ' 'sip-files00166.txt'
467a315614ce462bb499caf1f210a9c6
bc511a9a859c24484b407942aaf8e8e186b3d677
describe
'33555' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRR' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
2cd7cf304267591d87a1a09741fb937b
9b26016429ac45ab16bafaf1fa598cd97bac451b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRS' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
6c7df7a8eb4214be1f09b96e74003993
b2cf9290a93cf39aacfc5db460d0e4cc6f9f5dc4
describe
'167837' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRT' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
0a4a2024fe28bcab279f46e5a16bebb4
a408768974db97939275f89493cc185fc70b4b06
describe
'27847' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRU' 'sip-files00167.pro'
214460b82ddd609656153ab6dc4d1b1d
37d6e816b1eb4c3466dd9173d802343087991111
describe
'69187' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRV' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
05519507bff603ff63abfe95b806d415
f2c46139471ed9d57302365c5ac805224ebe61f0
describe
'2523216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRW' 'sip-files00167.tif'
8646b9153fed5bb80a5c34c9538280e0
8b3e99a30b7e3bb682c2e7d002c37ff60c89447a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRX' 'sip-files00167.txt'
4ae42381acfbb38b00bd9ea6e5ad7d4e
b5ebbf3cb87fe417d7d10db1438b6edb5f39cd30
describe
'34192' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRY' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
b1c17e201fd8c67c8e63b9d22a5240d7
0934c1ca3084d8f1d8c0eb60b793cc1f1d4ade61
describe
'312592' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVRZ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
95a8fd24fd0b2e7f9a8194d19b46e7a3
06c8e5704d3fd90eadd1e79624c3130aa5b1ad0c
describe
'164710' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSA' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
b2314463b13978785f3a040b77002ae8
8eaed4af516db2350bbb88d94a1044e2acf4c73d
describe
'26924' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSB' 'sip-files00168.pro'
5dbb1e24a30c8479874015a32358efbd
cc84be00acf25d923cb63d1ab7a18f232272ba49
describe
'69682' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSC' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
f79d60deba8bf16e2f909f27d96c4370
d8d0af0c8f6e18dc8e2ea6a1651160ee6b26ebb8
describe
'2523764' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSD' 'sip-files00168.tif'
1ba91d9d1a31bf51e1215203d2417147
25c6a905a26b6a7e2cbb6d490dcd00e68d358a27
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSE' 'sip-files00168.txt'
64f37c0a5fb6c9284f3177fd4d307ccb
ad7b4e7ee71ea7ad18981b28a5d156ac2e71a76a
describe
'35352' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSF' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
32859e27987205240e06b49a7631b631
65a36d7213f3d19de950d1c72d1379f7704f8cc3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSG' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
21d38d1273e6686640aeda467f7944ec
3d7e4e4ad9296827290b4a8c30d6ec3932598e78
describe
'168088' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSH' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
c366859589977ac5e15ec742844c8c06
72df9a9a4ef03570d125ab96ea16fb1147954061
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSI' 'sip-files00169.pro'
75cfae24139080073c2f1b9ec0e23741
8f9ad0f1d2b426bedf83ae87f8afc44b016476b5
describe
'69946' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSJ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
8c466932c02c2206ef6bb39cad569570
ef2ca59e7d7b2fafaad367bc873dabc3d7ca5b27
'2011-10-15T09:20:29-04:00'
describe
'2523340' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSK' 'sip-files00169.tif'
cd65f41248c9886605681d5107a27b11
5f81cf6deaa05640703e1308760c51b288704e4b
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSL' 'sip-files00169.txt'
2b26f4f9832c23d5b85344058d3cfaab
32fa73d7ccd87f41a116a72bd4e2a3773d649a11
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSM' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
3d2f36213252b7888563907044b3bae3
84f04882b0b01fc9cc932fbd6d04b4d95458ce0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSN' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
5435090cd4a00733a0539f673c0d058a
e0e7d363adc0a699073be3f57ca3cb5adbdf0aa6
describe
'162900' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSO' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
c2bb147bdb36acd2e2409cc7200ee72b
6f153e733a75dfc59955d2f6f0e6c63524248574
describe
'25374' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSP' 'sip-files00170.pro'
8014cd5de5ca91d53377d2bc66730559
283692ef4bbad58e71a5cee14ef651f6fcb42430
describe
'65363' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSQ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
3b0a05012fc60ab9c3c316ec72268c01
2042a18f335dd2e49f6fef1eaa354098106200d6
describe
'2523544' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSR' 'sip-files00170.tif'
3ba89ce752b8f8b4c58b1ce5346fb7e2
32783c6f560be5b599bf7306d53c67f0f821f764
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSS' 'sip-files00170.txt'
0c6a3e97a97dfed351a48114a71ab731
ba80137fc97fb51b7b33597ce65ddf985844624a
describe
'34318' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVST' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
5061b18bc1bd7e5e88a535de80faeff7
0d3840f00af4264b8949fd1597bd09bbf106970b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSU' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
d1f8bcfde20af4a041e4e86b0aa058d9
c7fb337921c6363a256cdc2bbe3d7db9037e97db
describe
'92067' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSV' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
6ecab77d8038fbcd237a49585f7f70f8
dda8b114683dfd8575286ec0e9843405871b2b35
describe
'8775' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSW' 'sip-files00171.pro'
2b62c9570999261cc0ca4d3fc753989f
e5f0578573acc24086a0a2b5efdedea09b2931b8
describe
'37255' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSX' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
bf532cda09b4d5f893c9f76cb1c48ef8
a0e5962b976d08764d0669cd4968fd695c60f45b
describe
'2520080' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSY' 'sip-files00171.tif'
4000c837d0aa42f570dc1a83817add26
833eecd3f1c828015e678cb9b7cdf7e79d7b9996
describe
'349' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVSZ' 'sip-files00171.txt'
b30b3d5cec34b42598d8ae44c6dc62c5
98f319460601352b5dece7b7ed5e6b002478f4f1
describe
'23824' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTA' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
8e2f1443991dd25383eee18e95dcfd4e
15cbedca31117a35aad76efb5bd96bf523d2de66
describe
'312632' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTB' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
4ee7590e152ac48ece95e68a0d8512d0
cb6f10e687eacf017ffa10391b3d1df01e42ea97
describe
'141500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTC' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
c39ba3ad2f01a94641ea4db03d6625ef
be9835d7c7cf709d30bd8572669bb0b812787e47
describe
'19670' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTD' 'sip-files00172.pro'
7f4badfe274d91b1bee9105d29784d25
ddeb3e4907b9369e39c9534a373b8ba81b582e1c
describe
'56578' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTE' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
bf5cb4d8b997748bf83d9b61a0a0460d
430d9cc28a5e76d8ad7e296503f0f50c30eaa0ce
describe
'2522064' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTF' 'sip-files00172.tif'
8f3c45c672af77df8e709bcf336aaf59
4adf135e71475e8ebe1463af37d111af054011d1
describe
'828' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTG' 'sip-files00172.txt'
3de7718df49daccce08eaa509952eafb
2150055831a504d46b516d131dd604d4e0e24f5b
describe
'30239' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTH' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
fcb8dcdadf2c910ab593d4ac9a89dd1a
a06117ea0350dcb2299d603f2d1e7ecc11a1141b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTI' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
ba2f0be411f1561cd314708672ef61f5
3348cbea2ff6707afd65f8f178906c09180595af
describe
'164483' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTJ' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
d0485ef6cf76fa98e51e27496eb31ae4
0bb5ac83fb1b1698b6f34219cbe3b588e7773467
describe
'26650' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTK' 'sip-files00173.pro'
1820cc1d050f0d0fc4fb2af6cceb63b1
633a099939dffe6715dea48a136015f71180dcef
describe
'66500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTL' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
e7aad4d0a4a6c730aad5c1665b18541d
c1fc7151138483fa8ddc0d0d8d20ecce2b0bdc1d
describe
'2523540' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTM' 'sip-files00173.tif'
e7f846cd54918e406dd15ecfa3fa2f59
52fdf032aa1b6ebfdd9dadbea00def6312323452
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTN' 'sip-files00173.txt'
d254a71d95abf871be4601122c31e092
bf9ca928069545f7ab811476aaa214a26fe8e95e
describe
'34145' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTO' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
3fc55b0ddfb69e941e95a0b8078a2032
a39a51e5674e15210239e3b84a9a333d9a46a848
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTP' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
534f5c531173d4d76b42f0686484feec
07245890662a403c344b28af2f04698cb5436aeb
describe
'169597' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTQ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
a8754e942608ae2f313a5cabae2b03f8
45a6b65e76387fe59d3ec5bb864504437758cdba
describe
'28454' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTR' 'sip-files00174.pro'
c92c152384921253ad2b980e2541fce0
d2da512d1951381a0be1d184de90dc83bd760f24
describe
'69542' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTS' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
1af7f4e0a7d75b9f3c8ed2ea82719d18
cb78aab04497ef0ef4681c5118d0fcdbf81e1208
describe
'2523192' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTT' 'sip-files00174.tif'
d24bc4156ad11f58809f37476e8f6b46
d447a1f7f4c386d27e6661f785a182cb0e9a9133
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTU' 'sip-files00174.txt'
69c6ed7d6063c59b228218c304ee73bc
add13146035de7f1b382579ef45a756d75b30c7d
describe
'34311' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTV' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
4659d454e0375e8d7beebfe550dd5f5d
81213f7cfa3329a583c7107220cfe43d9d4aaf6d
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTW' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
a4a6d03860ec86d42937b77f4cd783a7
4380cd6307a306e1e54a973ad59ec740ddee6fda
describe
'176485' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTX' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
3b29f90107c82a471a6e26fa5b38a307
a66cbff322791924996482606d10fb672e8efb1c
describe
'30157' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTY' 'sip-files00175.pro'
fd29422c61a6e7a673d1adb6f31ff23c
544003066a63b1d7062c0e726903c3290f3fec46
describe
'70636' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVTZ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
0bf8964f14646bacfd9c58df94b5f300
ca2aeb0d4724439c88ca8a8ef8517c7446625102
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUA' 'sip-files00175.tif'
31f9cbb27bbd7ba60270dd60bc15169f
193a06c96ee865c37dfa614c3d6409974af49c69
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUB' 'sip-files00175.txt'
d557fd3e422379cb5ae01a8095793881
d6e1b433c7c9e3ab5605d4293df72e1e4c79c938
describe
'34525' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUC' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
e98b23231fd8004e1f0049af7895f7b3
2eec8631ba7e377ed70eea155b557412edee2d26
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUD' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
e86a652f0b4f725c85f6b58da509d5be
617c41d80189fba5f3506959bd66b2a99ce9355e
describe
'171193' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUE' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
5ea83c7a6ecccd0396e71dd527491d02
73127c66faea444dae629b8dde3736119f8cc5a7
describe
'27764' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUF' 'sip-files00176.pro'
7bd82bc59195e1c9c4e10576563f7cb7
7960c9bdf5ec98b740d4b5f7596b15eb176648be
describe
'67103' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUG' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
59874ac5f84fa2a957faa5c1d840f87b
5207ed9ef923c2979d63d9c120169bcd3239d699
describe
'2523560' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUH' 'sip-files00176.tif'
aeb9a3dfe7749f04a9f4d282fe074007
4e881a3bb3cf8ab3760bc7b42eee1fef0522493c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUI' 'sip-files00176.txt'
27e22c15aef6adad22b8a2101bdcc0a7
5f655f2a66e75b5a20a3e12e58e60484630cc969
describe
'34287' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUJ' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
d68f599c64bf36d8ab211baafb233655
aa93cc09c20e702adb0ad5832c2052431bd8aed3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUK' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
082c27963a54bcfdf594cff0bcf14290
59930e55860808a6e4cbbabb01da18343bf63844
describe
'167594' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUL' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
6aed970d004e2bba320782a797c6b245
cdf95a9766af873a08e18846b8899058bb8c75fa
describe
'26713' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUM' 'sip-files00177.pro'
32cad9963486f2dbd0a13d5267b227bb
2af5b11e20629c9e81f97fc41316a9a80f2b7f90
describe
'64835' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUN' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
cc44c32a152e84da199096fd3174cb1e
448087fe994cad9439358f08f066da3cd66fe967
describe
'2523124' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUO' 'sip-files00177.tif'
d02d196c7c94d86f6bcb3407adfb7f0d
e07e25ccc9be2a3c0390e145ea23a7579f5fe078
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUP' 'sip-files00177.txt'
bf64673074c98660b9f6153239ffd514
6f000999872f70485f176a631cfb66c80c995574
describe
'33485' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUQ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
9b6a3d786143ef504d467d28b8eceb1b
31fec47aac6b44d7e8acb90e9efa66d901ed5046
describe
'312360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUR' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
1ae9a7359366a5113e8a1cb75c93d311
ae11b86d08c3b857a185134bc6628bf017040d93
describe
'172136' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUS' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
407e03f3618a15773a5ce2fd4f927d3e
035f53cc28659a89aa761d28520b4344d12ad31d
describe
'28498' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUT' 'sip-files00178.pro'
c6878590ab0be659cab3e27ce2b1ae8b
190d8125fd9eb9dd646bc2107256bd09e4cf55a4
describe
'70542' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUU' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
a9958607c3980ce011748a3fc85e6f27
9e29a2ad0ce04b993d605874cb677daed45e0b7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUV' 'sip-files00178.tif'
b9ca0cebdc8c4c17554e4579de5abddc
2aac7ff5b1a7680572b00b63d3d5aa2d2f46201f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUW' 'sip-files00178.txt'
c91aa45ada32c1766a035612205fb737
a2173467b10cad6403a72d2a4523457558b3d041
describe
'34707' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUX' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
e2f095b64b826c1cf8a32a3d825bc00f
6db8a6a02cf7599008254a8d9946e91c7b1b60da
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUY' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
456d103e9f0261e859451b4143c52630
1d36479544dd4cf7ea98d3bfce0a9acdca189253
describe
'169673' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVUZ' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
23d45fe79b98a439bb38b3989054ba90
ab6c46d943d012dd12d4c9f27e3c1b589cd16926
describe
'28834' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVA' 'sip-files00179.pro'
3a6e306ed8214de7323e1e0bf9784abf
6a3b1a3677720ce9cd8ca3fb6efdd4d2fcc65493
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVB' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
dd5effb29d6b56e22f7c0aa40d552ce8
5ac059ab60ad3be4c59636ca5d03079e7deab830
describe
'2523284' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVC' 'sip-files00179.tif'
b934da1216373aa236de6c2b6d624f84
d97998d99034ed15ad5f4d0692cee46de7b8cd34
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVD' 'sip-files00179.txt'
bcd1a0afb60c8df0aab97217c4713c10
475ca3900b0cd8c52477bf3f53b08b1d5a89bf33
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVE' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
649f287ebb58c0320acdd70ba583a5ac
e2c8e074cbceb0965e255fd8133d3a2511980518
describe
'312578' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVF' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
e2f6c510caabcdfeec967d2316f28e95
aeeb0795a90815a94355c6a90052b96dba65ce17
describe
'176794' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVG' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
f346cbcc6e078a2925b12034db3a1882
7edecdbf5e154a2623c5a93901d59d440efd3f80
describe
'29214' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVH' 'sip-files00180.pro'
5d24ed4bbba452c41fe7e43940fe8d98
aaf0a494e0c8471e55fbfbb66bdc002baa7c9cac
describe
'69442' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVI' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
8747286e6921b763ae07cf485560464b
f41b1bffecf892326f7366cf7c564686f8b39668
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVJ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
6c8d4ba5a58b039e67a8b5d5cd286daf
8e66d537a4f9ca7cf90de7bf8f7614facf1d0bb1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVK' 'sip-files00180.txt'
83353ea6789c2ef9c9fe6ea8e81e0de0
2d3274727a9e19bd4d9561887e210df4645b1a97
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVL' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
c53d7faab03fdf763eeabfca113677f7
b5258fb1fba94ef0ee7c96cbdfb818dfe8abd43e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVM' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
6a6dac07c1993933a4ae6dc66eae2512
34da779338bd50eb0e794336ad852a9df6a61f10
describe
'171912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVN' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
81986db16a932145d9f5ef2ef80c09cb
1e421f41f5701797e975479d0eed845d98c4d802
describe
'28245' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVO' 'sip-files00181.pro'
df3baeb6186577c94026beb93c711cb6
aacd6e0f49127ca515ca2abcdd26e92764c5b4a6
describe
'68547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVP' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
39d9380d7e20f2673ad92e7238a185ae
5e339f8a5886d1b37ffc42a35de7622bda99da2f
describe
'2523348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVQ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
49b076aeacf29d6559ec60ebb209f5e9
a836b9833834b7b10ab36c4fb0b65c10d3c4915c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVR' 'sip-files00181.txt'
539371ff3053afbf4d4068a7978999b6
29383c121b992fe6bd13cae86408d537638d79b5
describe
'34299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVS' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
15753cdb0d9297ccd095500096bd98c1
d5ad2d714716e73498b60d7ba21dfdc01cac0107
describe
'312428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVT' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
99caf6c2205018a5c53e4bdebc35e61e
09af8d662a1607ef061c3ddc04dde38f158e39e0
describe
'174210' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVU' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
03c83806e292aa015116b852700f47c3
3a5deaf22ee2aaa75e01dedb0c32232bbe1ce9ce
describe
'29728' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVV' 'sip-files00182.pro'
8fa14fe18dd65c878824ed124a11c5cf
a4ef04d896a954158a9f98e255587b2ce67473cf
describe
'69632' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVW' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
a1b467e3d48c06cdae206b9e1e33c5fa
7250f78a054900f5568d6a2a9c3b4b36ca9caf24
describe
'2523132' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVX' 'sip-files00182.tif'
c596cb82aef49ebe1b5fc22f33a2f0ba
c93c0bdf1638488a2b4f56873abff8684ff55733
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVY' 'sip-files00182.txt'
c363d8149e805330709fb1ac80c6f7ad
d66bf96800ee3ece29344051474b74928971636b
describe
'34426' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVVZ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
527c5214920d0ddb8a05c17994ab06e3
35bf419a838828706b58107c65d2e46352f83ee5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWA' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
125c6d012ddc47c8f4d7c07d66a6552b
39bc32483244f60e13b32b87e73200aeb5301ca0
describe
'174009' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWB' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
7703a41ae989b4966f20840b13b96834
78571712fe5072ab793a6f76a336e509d15c66a9
describe
'29814' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWC' 'sip-files00183.pro'
5ee31684a1586f38bec19398c0a19e07
c31e1d1a73889921ddf020b79389a0cf214f1563
describe
'70245' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWD' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
bdfc38bbd13134d2e3afb184d922c040
091f4cd90d876f8f2db1c3bf78e9a5e462bba017
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWE' 'sip-files00183.tif'
a32130e5b1303158dbdd3ba1a922d3d3
1730a5474a9f844f5a963a2a92326124eee05b4c
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWF' 'sip-files00183.txt'
fe14391a22a6158479cf51e0e36b2214
e97da196ad9957205fd1329bfe62660928b3838b
describe
Invalid character
'34901' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWG' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
40ca4d504bbe897e1dea00cff41af109
59fbbff89073b71b802c12e436593d126766bcf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWH' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
0ce64db681e1574e51f778b1fd5c28e9
369f787fba43f254dd1be312c7db80caf633bf84
describe
'179734' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWI' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
b5a4fb573969dbd0d807cb5938e2adc9
859f276c363f4d7ea08239cc1a505a1e6f3836d7
describe
'29846' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWJ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
f453a994cbe431dd256e834c859027bd
e47454873435740e0e85dd004414c69c1c0c13fc
describe
'71044' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWK' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
c4a691581c6785a71e0f2a93dedb970d
44a1370c22c85d09b2b951d83da62f8aad248bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWL' 'sip-files00184.tif'
e523fa525152a3b5b04f33fe205245fe
28a658c07370f2e2f19dee30e8af4c9f93cea49f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWM' 'sip-files00184.txt'
ae0bac8d2eb7a06ed193da48ef503692
e5a40046602135f74c8dbe7201a7f8ff060f7629
describe
'34628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWN' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
3cc9f55495b372a4ab7382c647a4f8cb
d67a644fdaf05399353d1345297d109010ff9c19
describe
'312470' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWO' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
271b3d318ee4b4b3c402ce6b8d11bf26
7359a509e3fce9cfc805fed230f71cebe79b0d8c
describe
'130817' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWP' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
f58b1a9b39abfad5fe58c42d82a98291
0b1faeb8c55640bae5609eff3c5c654edc647877
describe
'18083' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWQ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
025408e28164f6902a555da0a022e4f2
34d10e12c178486061bce7ddb584e7342cbcc049
describe
'52117' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWR' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
0942bfa8ffa68d46f3d9576dc901114c
000ec12c1526d3a5090f441cde859b1873036e21
describe
'2521568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWS' 'sip-files00185.tif'
f4e6fea55a518ccc056face117ac0b8d
ce9a2a9a657276935147e2517bbbc7c8ce716b49
describe
'733' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWT' 'sip-files00185.txt'
eb0195af9ab152701f6b656c1c83bc4d
6e63516c89e9bff4339676921773295f6c81aaa0
describe
'28638' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWU' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
b91712a6a1d144bbf52690a404c453b7
31fe7aec2f8543bcb4f657ce63b844c01aa895fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWV' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
14d1edc4184c3011543cc6dc33d9b0dd
0c89e7ff6a5d3689abcee258a122bc8bc6aa4cd7
describe
'138570' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWW' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
3384ea13521e56f82b993a9ed58cfda6
997592f2b0ec5ac85979142a6f2b56e916c878a5
describe
'20548' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWX' 'sip-files00186.pro'
f13fa2d2d8cca09d52217f6e01e4c476
b86d2402f2b4e48192d06636620f4f5e4b91acc9
describe
'56543' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWY' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
f1cc0853e9f07e0f6dd8953b4266895f
79e44c1ed6cd3f3068e13a773facfc1beaa55363
describe
'2522032' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVWZ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
c9030022995c5ae5740321891afa6480
abbcb04519a0d4b75f418079fb58efc273167144
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXA' 'sip-files00186.txt'
c9da10a91606ae9e0a3d59f47fa8322b
65fc99c5c00c28c0cb369f0039170e50b31a16f2
describe
'30100' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXB' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
c284cbe2014e54ce80949b805aafe21a
bff58e60ada2c8dde622fcc08823e290ab4efe93
describe
'312610' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXC' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
dabf0426fdb359f42cc969bea1014106
89e67c637a91802fb24f6caa767e27ad06e4a952
describe
'165632' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXD' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
786a5f2472d093729fbdbb2befbf5281
fb8b26f72a6fc52cdc0fb13a455dee5e21bb46f3
describe
'27421' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXE' 'sip-files00187.pro'
e6f4dd62256f0c389599ac4e879f3b3f
650ca1abff142602ebdfd8c4b9ced286cb5fe7ec
describe
'69184' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXF' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
33a01be2170d4979774ea79f82d93d12
41fcd45151dcc85d507c52b9a2d4fe14c81fdd52
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXG' 'sip-files00187.tif'
9bcc204a697c6b1616b9689b2b5062ad
22c4d1b59b07182b786a072d3524d7694609ade8
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXH' 'sip-files00187.txt'
ffc7037d982052ffe65c0c2248b02586
58953773c02e50a59b18eb0fdc833922900df6a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXI' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
e42a5ef9cd860d36ca9a3b6174a27208
598e246304689e315744bccd4315c4328b4e2236
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXJ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
69cec1508228dd502b21b12e1ed2d819
c90689266c38173e4e7634bfe38f9385121f943c
describe
'171799' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXK' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
2a73945640431aa952bd3bc4a38edf8f
3f8e699cdab407c7866ba5f227f73e92d6b2fa17
describe
'28802' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXL' 'sip-files00188.pro'
f7b6873898d9e932178cfe8e44e92c4e
5724d0170f9cacccbc71d415cb3b57d1febb7c88
describe
'70264' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXM' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
dc53d0ee43ee7a11ef378565893b7cd0
462974072ca96bf007b3542aecaa0b54b35ec615
describe
'2523716' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXN' 'sip-files00188.tif'
737161611b17333c1af918eb2bca3b97
8e8072820034b843b018a82754fe4943f86765d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXO' 'sip-files00188.txt'
6b12a706b51ef6c99210c6459ad49df7
9ccc01d8f08621e5afa7068a60595f00fe040ba7
describe
'35084' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXP' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
d3a4a8991e62e661a31878d946c80c70
73a49a6c88ab9942db6431c1476675e8cd97fa8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXQ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
e7dffa4bfa0e93f38b74eb259b80a889
9cab686d44f4f23bb659e9505fb064111f58b4b6
describe
'161113' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXR' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
45efdf82d3f74bedf34c509e5d6d55d3
d79a764aa538bcfd3b8e6486c9a61d56d25f2525
describe
'26704' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXS' 'sip-files00189.pro'
6ebf351b15f3cc62bd7a1be85f38330b
5d51dac36585dadb2dab8696dd487b7cdd6e39da
describe
'67497' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXT' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
f78f7524b495cc135f1e9653f10580fd
fdb2ca026eec2579ce273d32fa8c02679cff0630
describe
'2523588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXU' 'sip-files00189.tif'
a8af1ad8b0ef15d3370e77c19adf68d0
9df92e7443e22e1eb2095add195d8fd912258698
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXV' 'sip-files00189.txt'
25ed57340dfb55bd9e8534efc86036df
47a397b45bb943769a452a6f1f5db56febfb81e8
describe
'34594' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXW' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
fb544a20f771a4846508a6023211b653
3b20a90540c31854289c7fa16e56027fd6d492db
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXX' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
6dfb6d8d963fd7aed92747f2a2f80037
1dfbf5a2078fcd01908f78d9c8b3a5ff989539a4
describe
'171583' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXY' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
8c95811e09d616887a3a200b572365d9
c8a48b9222e7f148d9ef247e6cf57b6649747eb4
describe
'27986' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVXZ' 'sip-files00190.pro'
19315bae08492f52253d0db15f4ed32d
3bef51fa5ae2f8d18fb192b14508309c53f3b52c
describe
'69716' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYA' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
9deea8b65ce47e2c5af509c9b0f40a9d
29f1c248cea25c2c2cd62b0b5fca6631fdda1857
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYB' 'sip-files00190.tif'
d7affa0e38169bc0abfaec70e93a3971
5c69ba244b25a0aa2eb450bc224c5488c3454109
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYC' 'sip-files00190.txt'
fa9d4bd98c73060536c8abcbac6bc57a
a1e9a42407b11376d499574205651083e32bd748
describe
'34641' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYD' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
86538eefb85cf7c5dcee93d4a22b8cc6
3c6c0b03fc5f11e1c19902442003b700a3687f94
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYE' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
58fdb84e4119256ddc7c2b9aabe38f6a
24bc8070e2de46bfcfcb3b69b22674ce2caaf6f8
describe
'162338' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYF' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
80398ab433f3b0d2d50ca87ea060ea53
e8c6e69f078f8d94b517d1f162f312bb4be05a39
describe
'26911' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYG' 'sip-files00191.pro'
2627db505a36cefea422c32ed96e2d4c
e40608f395aa799782375dcdfc7c07fe2315e6b6
describe
'66594' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYH' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
2cc3fc0430b1277c483d1ba0098c63f9
8781f31f6eb3c31c8e8df7fabc9d55336f3846b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYI' 'sip-files00191.tif'
b61b17033cbb655df975884384c0d971
15cd6540e2d646495ab3520c1feba434cda51bcf
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYJ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
96ae62af438b3f2b4c3d5b515e3f66b4
4c1a5fc5ce0185ce2149c857738168997f187ea1
describe
'33950' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYK' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
acfa8c709ea5ee14b3aec26a3d9ed7db
b93d65e41a74585534b109ae1c001928ca300396
describe
'312534' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYL' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
b327e5b34218a721e61281554a8d6564
89cd9021dfc3f3cf14a98d0b3725b4f673dddbda
describe
'170104' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYM' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
460d8cdcb13a112d3a5a61d176334abf
169f84ab1a93dd444258f3ab0001e41a4468a068
describe
'27289' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYN' 'sip-files00192.pro'
5d1b17ce8bbb7eb835698abea2f40833
3b17347b76505f10eef0f90c0abc0514858992c5
describe
'69639' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYO' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
f678d6de9f20fe65e69adfa573596546
d09e8a63c9caae35e22c36f9a2cf5ecd9e248b5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYP' 'sip-files00192.tif'
92e649441446ed1de4925c0736745c8d
8d322d484584c236d278ff7b614da890b841f12f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYQ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
70fa5ae43b32db783eff80e9d4e45d45
787fddc8292b6a47f5fa1e86e26c613038204f99
describe
'34799' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYR' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
23c7f7447b7c59cc9b2fe3fc83d40202
b5be2f91516b21e26e668904aef6b89e8b94bc63
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYS' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
220a7325798f61073131da588ad41cc6
b13504a03343834542986f0c9022e04dab99bacc
describe
'178640' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYT' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
2ae0f2420f080eeee560b5e04e797d49
954c98479ea6b71a6a25ca88593485e0ab7440ea
describe
'29873' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYU' 'sip-files00193.pro'
0cf993b597ea3ad655eacea37862e308
f6a28d900fbe05c7d8dfaf4228f4e416b03674f9
describe
'71622' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYV' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
4722cf9f839cb736ce9478325769936f
58d531d878335bd21d814ae1b44abf24696ae814
describe
'2523692' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYW' 'sip-files00193.tif'
82d8f5d973f6c57fd7fd42bc49b1c293
e2cad69dc314d42f5ca14884bbf4cf134bd80590
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYX' 'sip-files00193.txt'
59643b8ec74337ef802fc392d6a1eff5
27344e675ff28aa6ef5c7676bb909192cd85fd42
describe
'35346' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYY' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
816667b90b02b22ef27ee86b22891e49
d8ed64556cdcaffe2bddb310389454cda2209250
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVYZ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
ffe1f644d3a0c0682564e10ddcf2bcd2
fa79fe361f28a1554da46ab093c996799f9b2e34
describe
'172641' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZA' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
020e88b03c105536b6265804826e2cbe
08259a6f657a12f641a913bdf071ad858aac4e3d
describe
'30555' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZB' 'sip-files00194.pro'
8103d364a819808024aa182a5c959899
2d33e53ac1a9429e6d0b01a99477ced5d1bc5746
describe
'72228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZC' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
8c72489ea445d6cc2f8ae798acd79d0a
4441bff6b361ffd8e7be71d390bb0589a0fb7fb1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZD' 'sip-files00194.tif'
df3dd7c8e15cde02bc56a75d0f906031
64683bf2e2fd469908ba7d435e9909f6b9670596
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZE' 'sip-files00194.txt'
88b287da536188240e123e0187776621
78354c3c5019bd167e807fd756fd65f16eeb9420
describe
'34981' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZF' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
4af38e4889c5f76113ed0706867eff83
d56bc2001a2dd104e96dd581872db7286bd874ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZG' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
c922b84ab8568299b34fa5f658719f56
785d913e0e2d5a43b79977e593ceee60e742ddb1
describe
'166369' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZH' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
9f023f007444ab327989e445e35e0547
6144a69f3114e4402baeeb8fd1c8b7eae59c5ba2
describe
'28693' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZI' 'sip-files00195.pro'
125387428fd7ba13782e52790cdc88e4
d717a72dd59bccf0e148e751726560f8cac37a00
describe
'70004' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZJ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
196a3e160fe6ad86086b59e2c89935de
96590a4c0c04a57f87382c2271e01fe0724eb183
describe
'2523656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZK' 'sip-files00195.tif'
70b89f48173e62797b53d9e396224b86
f7c12e4adc3d29ecc7b9bc97cbc520ebb772fd94
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZL' 'sip-files00195.txt'
34d73a72d98ae597dc55c0473d81ca22
80e2f39d3a0cc7dbad3f701a00efaecca09ed2a4
describe
'34875' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZM' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
e1af8b68244943babe46144941a7c224
726047782904d6e50299f9dfbe143ecb6716f003
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZN' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
09329ee0f539e017ecb80ad464c21799
c47db94cc3717863016dd486f52e479ac324f04b
describe
'174839' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZO' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
f8ea75780210dae33d3353906a4efbad
fc17610a408ad2e54a79b85669bc19e112c87f9d
describe
'27838' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZP' 'sip-files00196.pro'
01266a5f18859eaea75b4e69a063baf5
d2e3d3995322a12baae4d018dc40e7b4c1b6d5f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZQ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
70b2183479afbc8e875548b3b334d071
b58777ed0d4e5b378629be9e7a925b36a953f2c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZR' 'sip-files00196.tif'
0fc355456f371fee0518551b1a30fada
ffb0cd73a31cfc0319541e64c2661e4d7db2e1ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZS' 'sip-files00196.txt'
600ee6b5891132ca8ce858456e30ac90
2acf0032da8c16a5afd2303a0e84901a9689fd05
describe
'34527' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZT' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
a40e2d6634a1ca1e97969e1088d55e89
f377506221ed6377041aa9508a3eb30a6f7590dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZU' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
7bf73aafe42035754932c4ce3eaa2552
f44c5afede58bb2466bf1124e7e7bdd435e60307
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZV' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
d7a2255ef2c9d68c40c959eb607c63c1
5f8e1118863801bac0f15ebba4dcde9898e6d88e
describe
'29150' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZW' 'sip-files00197.pro'
37d12166dd58d1f819b149ed58063a8a
7de3cd22f970f42adb0719ecad5348626563b8ec
describe
'71611' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZX' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
df99454fafb16ad1d968cc6e65d081b1
41a588b48c7b85503a0900264ccd1cd4ec39631f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZY' 'sip-files00197.tif'
b8d4c298193a8fc675b6a845f6a20129
3b749556a2667b656b0847ac264f11463d415139
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABVZZ' 'sip-files00197.txt'
d7c35771ce6bdeddab50967839901f7f
3793c1a4270b981289b41508adecaa59ffa5c9df
describe
'34821' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAA' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
31792904b2d8f81db1261e8aac230b8b
3f17bd142d7dbb7e6e0801bdc8d70ce3fbd57eae
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAB' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
87e2108db14f2e7296ee8c83fd68053c
fb0ef459b7f69ef48fa65d163d528c22a8a9d569
describe
'176723' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAC' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
99c14a4bb5062b2284becd9d362d6619
5817ec0daab3072b2af00bf9a28ffba8ccf2b55b
describe
'29042' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAD' 'sip-files00198.pro'
d95f3b6e57828b2fc897b33fbbc2194b
585ebfb63d6e455fa2c84c9b917462edcffdba0a
describe
'70961' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAE' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
fca483eace7a7a6d3c8838108c90bb3d
c155a5f90a9afe37c7bd312de0bbf9680ad23c4c
describe
'2523432' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAF' 'sip-files00198.tif'
7ca5febadbc0ed42c19c531064ea08f9
1f242d350024bd000c8c195e3e9e530d8b6c5e71
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAG' 'sip-files00198.txt'
a31265e8ac9a8ffb64626b472c077815
6d9ff651a22fd51b730165e3604c466da4aab681
describe
'34734' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAH' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
8631d4b97375dcf5410c461cde025a38
ec2bd05f92617ebaac186cb9c6623433c7a4ac5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAI' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
6dbfa0c0c9eb7e3cc6a69b1e15138d0a
cd84ebbc557fa873ded8f3db66f78e3060f1415f
describe
'166554' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAJ' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
d5ac037e8f1f6639f99f39a164a95a26
1b92c23d9b5ac1c608b91eba3af81f244b7bf77b
describe
'27162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIUfileF20080409_AABWAK' 'sip-files00199.pro'
15e8a7ced4caef2006572c241bb0bdb6
4144d1db59fda5ad16d27b6ed6accac073bb37aa
describe
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The Baldwin Library

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AT SCHOOL IN WINTER.—p. 99,
LARRY GILBERT:

Persebere and Win,
BY
S. K. REEVES.

GHith Ellustrations,

GALL & INGLIS.
London: Edinburgh:

25 PATERNOSTER SQUARE, 20 BERNARD TERRACE.
¢

CONTENTS.



CHAPTER PAGE
I, LARRYS HOME, . : : : : : : 5
fll CARRY, SPROULATERS 9 IG
II. SCHOOL DAYS, 8
IV. FOES WITHOUT, . : : : : : a 40
V. CHRISTMAS, . : : . 5 5 el . 53
VI. TURNING A NEW LEAF, . A 5 : % 2 Gi,
VIL EFFORTS FOR GOOD, . . . . . . 80
VIII, PRAYER ANSWERED, : ‘ : : ° . 92
IX, CHANGES, 5 : 6 A : : : - 108
XK. LARRY IN TROUBLE, : : s 0 . - 123
XI. THE PRISONERS, . 3 : : : 5 . 144
XIL WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR, . : 5 : - 162

XIII. THE REWARD OF THE JUST, . 5 : 5 . 176
LARRY GILBERT.

= S

CHAPTER IL.
LARRY’S HOME.

ETWEEN two large hills, on the eastern
slope of the Blue Mountain, is a green,
wooded, and narrow valley, through which,

thirty years ago, were scattered small, irregular
farms,

To those who love nature in its simplicity there
was much that was pleasant in the landscape. In
the spring the fragrance of apple blossoms filled
the air, and the whitewashed fences and newly-
made garden-beds showed that the farmers

_ were not so taken up with their rougher work
5
. ; LARRY GILBERT, ae

fer they ‘could not find time. to make hoiite
attractive. eS

About two-thirds of the way down the ‘valley
was the homestead of Mrs. Gilbert, a bright, dapper
little woman, who was blessed with good health,
and who, by dint of hard work, had managed,
since the death of her husband, to support herself
and her little grandson, Larry.

Fifty years before, Mrs. Gilbert had come as a
bride to this mountain home, rich in nothing
besides love and faith in the husband of her choice.
Together they had toiled, and year by year fields
were cleared, trees planted, and additions made to
farm buildings, implements, and stock.

Children had been added to the household,
bringing plenty of care; but *mother-love was
plentiful too, and the little ones thrived under
her faithful guidance. There were many years
of comfort in the low, red farm-house, and ‘then
came a season of sorrow. The angel of death
crossed the threshold and carried away three of
the children, making a dreary blank in this happy
home. Only one son was left to cheer and com-
fort the hearts of the stricken parents. John
+» . LARRY’S HOME: ° ~ ae

“Gilbert grew. to bea man, He had been working :

as a “hired man” on another farm for the past |

year, but his father’s health was failing, and for ~

this reason he brought his wife to the old home-
stead, instead of renting another farm and begin-
ning anew. :

“ Father and you shall rest now,” he said to his
mother. “You have served your day and genera-
tion. My Mattie is a good housekeeper, and I can
manage the farm.”

But God’s ways are not as our ways. Mr.
Gilbert’s health did not improve during the winter, _
and in the early spring he was laid to rest by the
little graves in the churchyard at Marleyville.
Two years after, Mrs. Gilbert was alone with her
grandchild, heron having been killed by the fall-
ing of a tree in the woods, and the young mother
dying at the birth of her little boy.

This child, who had received the name of
Lawrence from his grandfather, but who was
familiarly called Larry, was a great comfort to his
grandmother. Every one said it was a good thing
for the old lady that her mind, after so much
trouble, could rest upon this little one, and that
8 LARRY GILBERT. s,

her hands had some one besides herself to busy
themselves about. But they did not all realise
her true source of comfort. When the stay of her
earthly hopes was removed, her spiritual strength
was renewed, and amid all her sorrow and loneliness
God’s sympathy and love were ever present, as she
believed and trusted the promise, “ Even to your
old age I am He; and even to hoar hairs will
I carry you.”

As it was impossible for the old lady, at her
time of life, to oversee the working of the farm,
she was advised to sell most of her wood and
meadow land, retaining the house and a field and
orchard, besides an acre or two of woodland. .

‘Tt was a lonely spot, but it was home, and all -
the dearer for the tender associations connected
with it. The strictest economy was needful, for
it was very little that Mrs. Gilbert could earn by
spinning yarn and knitting stockings to sell in the
store at Marleyville, and it was by hard work
that she contrived to feed and clothe herself and
Larry.

Young Larry’s mind was not troubled by thoughts
on domestic economy. Going to the woods for
-LARRY’S HOME, 9

dry sticks with which to kindle the fire, and to the
spring near the house for water, feeding the chickens
and pigs, taking the cow to pasture in summer,
and in winter preparing her food by cutting up
potatoes or turnips, or mixing what his grandmother
called a warm “mash,” was about all he attempted
in a useful way.

The rest of his time was spent in chasing the
squirrels, which were plentiful in the woods ;
watching the birds, their habits and different styles
of building, and taking as much interest in their
welfare as if he was their landlord, to whom they
owed regular dues for rent. He never willingly
hurt a living thing of the harmless sort. His
mind was thoroughly in tune with nature; he
loved God’s world, and his want of young com-
panions made him fond of out-door pets. He let
them rove in their freedom; or if he caught
them it was only to stroke their fur or feathers,
and then to release them, to go to their chosen,
homes. — .

It was seldom that strangers visited the valley ;
but one day, in the early fall, some young sports-
men from a distant city passed through the
10 LARRY GILBERT.

woods, and the rapid succession of shots heard by
Larry as he took the cow to pasture, filled him
with alarm, and sent him home in great haste, with
his face glowing with excitement, and crying out, -
as he entered the house: “Oh! grandmother,
there are some wicked men in the woods, with
guns, and they are killing the birds, and rabbits,

and squirrels.” r

As the reports from the guns became loud and
frequent, Larry threw himself upon the floor,
sobbing, and holding his ears, that he might not

hear the hateful sounds.
“Soon there came a knock upon the door, which
his grandmother answered—Larry turning around
only long enough to see a young man enter,
carrying a gun, and then hiding his face again in
his hands.

The young man asked if he could purchase a pie
and some milk, and as Mrs. Gilbert happened to
have both in the house, she invited him to take a
chair till she could get them.

_ While she was absent, the stranger said to Larry:
“Well, my boy, I see you have come to grief;
what is the matter ?”
LARRY’S HOME. 11

Receiving no answer, he said to Mrs, Gilbert :
“Has your little boy hurt himself?”

“Oh, no,” she said, “ he’s only grieving over the
- birds and little creatures you’ve shot. He loves
them like brothers and sisters; for, poor little
fellow,” she said, looking compassionately at Larry, .
“he’s only got me.”

The young man was deeply touched. That any
one should grieve for the loss of birds or wild
game, was a new thought.

“Well, it seems as if I had been trespassing,”
he said at length, with a half laugh, “so I must
pay my fine ;” and he handed a gold piece to the
old lady, who looked at Larry and shook her
head.

“Yes, you must keep it,” the young man said,
seeing her reluctance. “ Buy him something with
it that he will like; and tell him I'll promise
never to shoot on his grounds again.”

Larry was afraid to look up for fear he should
see some of his slaughtered pets; but when he
heard the gate click after the visitor, he got up,
still looking very sorrowful.

“T wouldn’t have taken it,” he said, glancing
12 LARRY GILBERT. |

at the gold piece which lay in his grandmother's
hand. “I should feel as if I was like Judas if I
did; it’s the price of blood.”

“Hush, lad,” she replied, “you must not feel
nor speak in that way. It’s no uncommon thing
for young men to be fond of hunting and shooting;
few of them have got such tender, loving hearts as
you have, my boy. The young fellow was right ©
sorry, too, when he saw how grieved you were, and
he promised that he would never come hunting in
these woods again.”

“Yes, but some one else may, and the poor
little things will be scared and worried, and they
can never have such happy times again as they
have had.”

“The little creatures don’t bear malice, Larry ;
for they have no minds to treasure up the evil
doings of others, so they will not be brooding over
troubles to come, but will make themselves happy
in the present ; and if you are as wise as they you
will follow their example, and profit by the words
of the Bible: ‘Sufficient unto the day is the evil
thereof.’”

Larry was still somewhat vexed that his grand-
LARRY’S HOME, 13

mother was not more angry with the young man,
and he said rather petulantly : “T don’t see why
you are always trying to find out verses in the
Bible about: everything. I am sure you can’t
find any place where it says it.’s right to kill the
birds.” . :
“No, it does not say anywhere that such things
are right—I mean, that for mere sport, life may be
taken away—but we know, from what the Saviour
Himself says, that birds were killed and after-
wards sold. Let. me read it to you. ‘Are not
two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of
them shall not fall on the ground without your
Father.’”

Larry was of a cheerful disposition, and it
was not long before his merry laugh was again
heard. When he went to the woods he found
his pets apparently as full of life as ever.
There were no signs of mourning among the
robins; the other birds sang and _ twittered
among the branches; the squirrels chased each
other over the trees, and the rabbits came out
to the edge of the wood to enjoy the sunshine,
and to nibble the fresh grass and plantains
14 LARRY GILBERT.

which grew abundantly there, just as they used
to do.

In pleasant weather, Mrs. Gilbert and Larry
sometimes walked on Sunday to attend church
at Marleyville, starting early in the morning,
carrying their lunch with them.

After church was over they would seek a
shady place to eat their dinners, and then start
leisurely homeward, often resting by the way.
Occasionally they had an opportunity of riding.
part of the way with one of the neighbours.

During these walks the old lady made the
stories of the Bible familiar to him. The Ten
Commandments and their teachings were strongly
enforced, and, more than all, Christ and His
examples, His life upon the earth, His character
and work, often formed the subject of her
instructions.

She had already attained the allotted age of
threescore years and ten, and she felt that now,
while in his youth, and while her life was
spared, the foundation of her boy’s character must
be laid, upon which might grow up a life which
would prove beneficial to himself and others.
LARRYS HOME. 15

Larry looked upon his grandmother as superior
to all the rest of the world, and never for a
moment thought of disputing her teachings, or
disobeying her commands. |
CHAPTER IIL

LARRY SPECULATES,

NE day Larry found on the road a dull and
0 rusty pocket-knife with one blade. He
sharpened it on a whetstone which had
been his grandfather’s, and found himself cutting
sticks and his fingers alternately. He even gave
a thrust with it in the side of the earthen pitcher
he was taking to the spring for water, and was
immediately rewarded with a sight he had not
expected—a hole large enough to put his finger
in.
“What will grandmother say?” was his first
thought. ‘How can I mend it ?” was his second.
Walking on to the spring he mixed a plaster of
clay and smeared it well over the outside of the hole,
Then he stood the jar under the bark trough, his _

eyes glistening as he saw the water nearing the
16.






















































































LARRY AT THE SPRING.
LARRY SPECULATES. 17

top of the pitcher, when suddenly the plaster gave
way and out gushed the water from the hole,
exciting first his dismay, and then his admiration
at the beauty of the jet.

Larry stood for a while in a “brown study.”
and these were the thoughts that ran through
his brain: “That jar is no use to grandmother;
I'll ask her to let me keep it here, for it looks
real pretty with the water running in and out.
But now I will have to come twice with the quart
cup, for she Il not let me carry her good pitcher,
and the tin bucket is old and leaky.”

Larry’s cogitation was broken in upon at this
point by his grandmother, who came to see why
he tarried so long with the water.

_ “Why, the child has broken my earthen jar!
and I’ve had it nigh on to twenty years! Did
you strike it against something ?”

“T ran my knife into it. I thought the old
thing was tough,’ stammered Larry.

Grandmother was not a good hand at scolding ;
she only said—

“Larry, child, you must learn to be more care-

ful Where am I going to get another jar?
oe
18 LARRY GILBERT.

And a new tin bucket is out of the question.
You will have to carry the quart cup now, for
the iron tea-kettle is too heavy for you.”

“T know it,” said Larry, who had already come
to that conclusion ; but from that time he began
to wonder how he could earn enough moneys not
to buy an earthen pitcher, but a bright tin pail
with a handle, such as he had seen on a tin-peddler’s
cart. ‘The way opened before him sooner than he
had hoped.

Some days after this, as Larry, with his hands ,
in his pockets, went whistling along the road,
he saw something glistening in the sun some
distance before him. ‘Bunning to the*spot he
picked up half-a-dozen tin dippers and graters —
tied together with a string, which he knew must ;
belong to the man whose waggon was slowly
ascending a hill in front of him.

Calling out at the top of his voice, “ Hallo !
halloo!” and then running with all his might, he
succeeded in attracting the man’s attention, who
stopped his waggon at the top of the hill. eo

Larry was heartily thanked by the tinman, who me

“handed him five cents. e =
oe

LARRY SPECULATES. : 19

“Ts there anything in my line your folks would
like to have?” he asked. “If so, I'll sell it
cheap to you.”

-“How much is that tin pail?” asked Larry, :
pointing to one on the top.

“The price is fifty cents (two shillings), but

I will sell it to you for forty. Do you want a
pail 2”
“T broke grandmother's pitcher, the one
I always carried when I went for water, and
she won’t let me carry the big pitcher she’s got,
for fear I'll break it, so I have to carry water
from the spring in the quart cup. Do you know
anything’ I can do so as to earn money to buy
"a pail?” he earnestly asked, looking up in the
man’s face.

* «Well, now, let’s see; you aren’t very big,

- _ but:you might pick yarbs, I reckon.”

© Yarbs!” repeated Larry, “what’s yarbs?”
“Pennyroyal, peppermint, hoarhound, catnip,

and such like.”

eee Yes, yes,” said Larry, eagerly, “we call them

vherbs.- I know them all; and wild cherry bark,

that’s powerful good for weakly folks—so grand-

ge
20 LARRY GILBERT.

mother says. But who wants to pay money for
such things when they are picked ?”

“There is a drug-storeman in Medford, where
I go for my tins; I think he would buy some, if
they are of the right sort. And I’ll tell you what
I will do. Ill be back this way next week, and
if you will have a lot of these things we spoke of
ready tied in bunches, I'll try and sell them for
you. When you raise half enough money, I will
let you have the pail, and trust you for the rest.
How will that suit you?”

“T’ll do it,” said Larry, with a confident shake
of his brown head. “Ill gather a lot to-day.
Here, take these five cents ; that will be so much
towards it.”

“But I gave you those for yourself.”

“No, they’re for the pail; if I kept them ~
I might lose them,” said Larry, in such a deter-
mined voice that the tinman took the money, and
then they parted.

“What is luck, grandmother?” asked Larry,
as he watched the shortcake baking on the round
iron griddle hanging over the fire, and which was
to serve for his supper.
LARRY SPECULATES. 24

“There is no such thing as luck in this world,
my boy ; though I don’t deny the word is often
used. If we succeed in anything, it is the Lord’s
doing, and the credit belongs to Him; for the
man is not living, smart as he may be, who can
manage things in this world according to his own
liking. There is Bible for that too: ‘A man’s
heart deviseth his way; but the Lord directeth
his steps.’ But what started you to thinking
about luck, Larry ?”

Larry was not quite ready to divulge his secret,
so he replied: “Oh, I was only thinking about
it. But I guess, grandmother, the shortcake is
burning—it smokes.” —

Grandmother bustled about and turned her
cake, and the subject was dropped.

Larry lay awake a long time that night, think-
ing of his project, and he fully determined not to
let his grandmother know of it until he should
come into the house carrying the new pail filled
with water. He said to himself: “It will make
her pretty near jump out of her shoes to
see it,’ and at the thought of her surprise he
chuckled aloud with laughter, which brought the
22 LARRY GILBERT.

old lady to his bedside to see what was the
matter.

“Twas only a funny thought, nothing else,
grandmother,” and Larry turned over toward the -
wall, pressing the coverlet against his mouth; for
fear the secret would pop out in spite of him.

An old market basket, which he put away in
the barn, held his treasures after he had. collected
them ; and, after days of watching, he was rewarded
one morning by seeing the tinman and his cart.

“You have got a nice lot, my boy ; you must
have been pretty spry to get such an assortment.
Well, I’ll do the best I can for you ; look for me
back about Thursday, and if I have luck, as I said
before, in selling, you ‘ll get your pail.”

Larry looked gravely at the man. “Grand-
mother says there is no such thing in the world
as luck ; she says it is the Lord who brings things
’ around.” ‘ :

The man looked at him curiously for a moment;
then he said, as he tapped his horse with his —
whip, “I guess your grandmother’s logic is a)
near right,” .

It is not to be wondered at that Larry’s mind
LARRY SPECULATES, 23

was in a state of agitation during the week. On
account of his restlessness, his grandmother was
sure that he was going to be ill, for he laughed
and talked even in his sleep, and when awake,
would frequently fall into such a “ brown study ”
that she had to speak several times before he
heard her.

When Thursday morning came, and Larry left
the table, having scarcely eaten a bite of breakfast,
grandmother needed no other proof; and hastily
mixed him a bowl of “ feverfew tea,” which she
obliged him to drink.

She would even have persuaded him to go to
bed, but that was not to be thought of; and after
some coaxing, he prevailed upon her to let him
walk to the. top of the hill.

Almost as soon as Larry caught sight of the
tinman, he read good news in his face,

“Here’s your pail,” he* said, handing it out,
“and here’s your change,” counting out fifteen
cents into Larry's hand. “The drugman at
Medford bought the whole lot, and paid me fifty
cents, besides the five I had, And he says he ‘ll
take as much more wild cherry, and if you can
24 LARRY GILBERT,

get some slippery elm and sassafras root, he'll
take them too; and he says, too, that he’s had no
better lot brought in since he kept store, than —
what you sent him.”

““T can get most anything out of these old
woods,” said the boy, his eyes sparkling at his
success. ‘I don’t know slippery elm, but grand-
mother does, and she has lots of other things in
the garden—sage, and lavender, and sweet mar-
joram, and feverfew ;” and then Larry made the
man laugh heartily, by telling him how he had to
drink @ bowlful of the tea, because he had been
so excited that his grandmother thought he was
getting a fever.

Larry wanted the tinman to keep the fifteen
cents for his trouble, but he refused. “I see
youve got grit,” he said; “that’s what I like in
a boy. I was turned loose when I was a young-
ster—father and mother died ; and I am glad to
give you a liftif Ican. It will be a full month
or more before I am on this road again, but I
won't fail to stop when I do come.”

“Tl be ready for you. That’s grandmother’s
house in the hollow; and just you stop if you
LARRY SPECULATES. 25

don’t see me, will you? And os thank you very
much for selling them for me.’

“ Enough said ; good-bye till I see you again.”

“Now grandmother shall have her pail of
water.” The water never looked so sparkling as
it did dancing about in the new tin pail, and Larry
admired it more and more.

The old lady was just as much ‘surprised as
Larry thought she would be. She had to sit down
on a chair and hear the whole story, and at the
sight of money earned by her own little boy she
even shed tears. They were tears of joy, she told
him, for Larry could not understand what there
was to cry about. —

“T’ll not fret another minute,” she said. “ When
my needs were many and my faith was growing
weak, the Lord sent me help by the hands of this
child. I will put my trust in Him from this time
forth and for ever.”

Gathering herbs and barks proved a source of
some revenue to our friends in the cottage.

Grandmother was very particular to gather her
herbs on a dry and sunny day, and when the
blossoms were in a proper state. She only gathered
26 LARRY GILBERT.

the best, and gave such good satisfaction that the
druggist agreed to take the supply he needed
chiefly from her, and to pay her a fair price for
them.

Tony Myers, the tinman, who became a friend
of the Gilbert family from the time he first became
- acquainted with Larry, instead of making Marley-
ville his stopping-place for the night as heretofore
now drove on to the Widow Gilbert’s, where he
_ was always sure of meeting with a kind recep-
tion.

Grandmother interested herself about him at
once. She insisted on doing his mending and
knitting his stockings, in return for many kind-
nesses bestowed by Tony, who, besides. paying for
his lodging and disposing of the herbs, brought
many a little package of tea and spices, with now
and then a piece of tin-ware as he saw it was
needed.

“Tt’s more like a home to me than any I have
had for many a year, and even my old nag enjoys
his quarters here, for when we come to the lane, he
turns into the stable of his own accord.”

The old earthen pitcher kept its place under
LARRY SPECULATES. 27

the spring a long while, and many and many a
time, as Larry watched the water flowing into its
mouth, and out of the opening, he said, “My!
but it was a good thing for us that morning
when I ran my knife through grandmother's old

29

jaz.
CHAPTER IIL

SCHOOL DAYS.

N the corner of one of the bureau drawers was
d a woollen stocking, which Larry had long
since outgrown. In the foot of this, tied
with a string, Mrs. Gilbert kept the money she had
saved toward her boy’s schooling. Here were
small bits of money Larry had received as presents,
or for slight serviccs rendered to one and another
—the gold piece given by the sportsman, two old
Spanish dollars that had belonged to Grandfather
Gilbert, but which his wife thought none too
precious to be used for his grandson’s benefit.
Added to these were smaller sums which Mrs.
Gilbert had been able to save from her housekeeping
expenses.
It had been a great trial for the grandmother

to bring her mind to decide the question of sending
28
SCHOOL DAYS, 29

Larry four miles to school. There was none
nearer ; but no sooner had she decided to send
him the next winter term, and made some inquiry
in regard to it, than she learned that the wise
ones of the county had made arrangements to
build a school-house at the “The Four Corners,”
scarcely a mile from her door.

While the house was building, Larry made
frequent visits to it, and once or twice induced
his grandmother to walk thither after the evening
work was done.

The last time they went, the school-house was
finished, excepting that it wanted a coat of red
paint.

As the door was locked, Larry, with the aid of
some logs and bits of timber, managed to form a
standing-place under one of the windows, and
having first taken a peep himself, helped up his
grandmother, that her eyes might take a view of
the teacher's platform at one end of the room, and
the rude desks and benches along its sides. In
the boy’s eyes, and. in hers too, the room appeared
to have everything needed ; and Larry’s eyes
sparkled as, with a knowing nod, he asked, “ Now,
30 LARRY GILBERT.

granny, wouldn’t you think a boy could learn
most everything in such a nice place as that ?”

“Tt is a nice room, to be sure, lad,” she re-
sponded warmly ; “but little help it will be to you
or any other, if you idle your time and don’t: set
your mind to learning. And, after all, it is the
Lord who giveth wisdom. I trust it is a godly
man that will have charge of you—one that will
train your heart as well as your mind. There
will be many temptations, and maybe I have done
wrong in keeping you so close with me. It’s an
‘untried world for you, my boy, and many a battle
you will have to fight when your old grandmother
cannot be near to take your part,” and the old
woman’s voice trembled with the thought.

«But can’t the Lord help me?” asked Larry.

“Of course He can, my child; keep close to
Him, and I’ll have no fear for you. It is to those
who are steadfast, who persevere to the end, and
make the best use of the talents they have, that
the Lord will say, ‘Well done, good and faithful ©
servant ; thou hast been faithful over a few things,
I will make thee ruler over many things; enter
thou into the joy of thy Lord.’” .
SCHOOL DAYS. ol

Larry never forgot that evening walk and
conversation; and into his prayer that night
entered the supplication: “Lord, take care of me
every day when I go to school; help me to fight
my battles with the world; and to do the best I
can to learn.”

Larry had plenty of work to do in the interval ;
but when the last day of September came it found
the cellar stored with wood, the potatoes dug and
housed, the corn in the barn, and the apples put
in barrels in the loft. Hanging on the back of a
chair near the bed were the new clothes Mrs.
Gilbert had taken such pains in making, and
which Larry was to put on in the morning.

That night Larry tossed upon his bed, and
could not sleep for thiriking of the good in store
for him on the morrow. And when, toward
morning, he fell into a slumber, it was to dream
of battles with giants and all sorts of strange
adversaries. Now, with David, he was picking
stones from the brook to fling at the Philistine
giant ; now, with the sword of Gideon, he was
moving victoriously toward the enemy. Even
in his dreams he remembered his grandmother's

%
32 LARRY GILBERT.

admonitions, and when he began to be hard
pressed, and it seemed as if one took hold of him
who was about to kill him, he called out im a
loud voice: “In the Lord put I my strength,”—
and awoke to find his grandmother shaking him
by the elbow.

“Oh, granny!” he exclaimed, as he rubbed his
eyes and looked about him, “I thought my
battles had begun.”

Larry’s anticipations of school were not quite
so buoyant when he found that his grandmother’s
old enemy, the rheumatism, had attacked one of
her ankles. ‘Though she could manage to hobble
about the house, a long walk was out of the
question ; consequently she could not go to school
with him, and “help him,’ as he said, “to get
things started.” It was important that he should
be present the first day, so nothing better could
be done than wait for another boy, Johnny Briggs,
to go with him.

Johnny lived full half-a-mile in the ‘other
direction, and was, as Mrs. Gilbert would say,
“anything but a good boy; but then, poor child,”
she would add, “who can wonder at that? He
SCHOOL DAYS, ~ 35

has had such ungodly examples set him so much
of his life.” She had carefully kept Larry from
his influence, but companionship could not now -
be avoided, and she again wondered if she had
not been unwise in. keeping Larry so closely to
her side, and a tear dropped at the thought that
she could shelter her one little lamb no longer.

Johnny came along rather late, and to his care
Mrs. Gilbert confided Larry. ‘“You’ve been to
school before, Johnny,” and she pressed an apple
into his hand; “and maybe you can now and
then give my boy an inkling of what he is
expected to do, if the child’s at a loss.”

“‘He won't be so green after he’s been there a
couple of weeks,” responded Johnny, consolingly ;
“school is the place toxget the starch out of a
fellow.”

When the two boys arrived at the school-house,
they found the scholars had been called together.
There were fifteen present who had given their
names and had their seats assigned to them.

“ Come forward to the desk,” said Mr. Meredith,
the teacher, as the two boys entered the door.

Johnny took the lead with a shuffling step, giving
c
34 LARRY GILBERT.

a side grin to such scholars as he recognised on
his way.

The teacher gave one displeased glance at the
untidy dress of Johnny, and adding his name to
his list, directed him to a seat. Then he turned
to’Larry, As his keen glance took in at once the
bright face and neat dress, a feeling of relief
crossed his mind,

Larry gave a little nod with his head, at the
same time touching the curly lock of hair which

“hung over his forehead, just as he had been

directed to do by his grandmother. Then he
gave his name, and stood waiting for further
orders.

“Well, my boy,” asked Mr. Meredith, when he
had laid aside the book in which he had been
entering the names of the scholars, and in a tone
which showed that he liked the looks of the lad
before him, “what do you propose to do in this
new school-house ?”

Larry did not quite understand the question,
but he hesitated only a moment, then in a clear
voice he said—

“Fear God, and keep His commandments, sir.”
SCHOOL DAYS. 85

There was complete silence in the school-house
for a few moments, then a half-suppressed giggle
by Johnny Briggs, ended in an audible laugh
around the room.

Larry started at the sound, and looking inno-
cently at the teacher asked, “Wasn't that the
right answer, sir ?”

“Tt was a first-rate answer, my boy,” replied
Mr. Meredith, with feeling. “If all my scholars
would make the same resolve, and keep it, I
could promise you a very pleasant, harmonious
school this whole winter, for it would imply that
each one would do his duty to himself and his
companions. No scoldings or punishment of any
kind would then be necessary on my part, for all
remissness in study and attendance could be
easily accounted for. Why cannot we have this
happy state of things—the golden rule in con-
stant daily exercise among us?”

There was, of course, no reply, but Mr.
Meredith, no longer at a loss, took from his
pocket a small Testament, and said, “I will open
the exercises of the school this morning with
reading and prayer. ‘To-morrow I will expect,
36 LARRY GILBERT.

those of you who can read to be provided with a
Testament or Bible, when we shall read in turn.”

“T’m glad,” thought Larry, “that he’s one of
grandmother's sort;” and he listened with reverent
attention while Mr. Meredith read a chapter and
engaged in a short prayer. ‘

After this, classes in spelling, reading, and
arithmetic were formed, the scholars keeping
tolerable order until recess was announced, when
girls and boys started pell-mell for the door, and
were out before the voice of their astonished
teacher could be heard.

Making a note of these things as something to
be corrected at another time, he saw Larry quietly
leaving the room. “That boy will be my right-
hand man; if it were not for him, I believe
I should be thoroughly discouraged with the
material I have to work with.”

“Here comes the preacher,” called out George
Barton, the biggest boy in school. ‘Come, climb
this stump and give us another sermon.”

_ Larry did not see the joke at all “I don’t
know how to preach. You didn’t think they ever
made preachers of such little fellows as me, did
SCHOOL DAYS. _ 37

you now ?” and Larry’s laugh rang out so glee-
fully that it started the girls and then the boys
into a laugh also, so that Mr. Meredith, wondering
what the fun was about, went out of the school-
house to see for himself. :

__ His presence checked their mirth. “Laugh
away,” said he; “tell me what the joke is and
I will laugh too.”

“Why,” said Larry, almost bubbling over again
at the thought, “the boys don’t know me very
well, and George thought I was a little preacher,”
and his merry laugh sounded out again, starting
the rest, Mr. Meredith joining them.

- He saw at once that Larry’s simplicity and
good nature would stand him in good stead; and
enable him to ward off many sly taunts that
would be given him. For the boy’s own sake, it
would be better that he should take his own part,
trusting to time and a better understanding to
smooth over ordinary difficulties, while he would
try to be at hand and see there was fair play.

When the laugh was over, he said, “ Though
you are not a regular preacher, Larry, I agree
with George that you preached us all a very good
38 LARRY GILBERT.

sermon this morning ; one to which I hope we
- will all give good heed.”

Mr. Meredith returned to the school-room, and
George, who was looked up to as a wit by many
of the other boys, finding his first shot had fallen
harmless, thought he would try again, and was
just going to ask the boy about his tailor, when.
Larry, who was standing near, handed him a red
apple. “Take that home to your little Susy, will
you, George? She was at our house once with
your mother, and I made her a dolly out of a corn
cob, and tied a little gourd on for a head, and
_ dressed it in a cabbage leaf and grass ribbons,
and she liked it ever so much. What a pretty
little girl she is ; her eyes are just as bright as a
bunny, ain’t they ?” ia

Larry had fairly out-generalled his opponent
without knowing it. George loved this. sister
Susy better than he did anything in the world.
His heart warmed to hear her praised, and the
retort he intended died on his lips, and with a
confused look he started for the school-house, as
the bell summoned them to enter.

It was not until Larry had eaten his supper
SCHOOL DAYS. © 39°

that night and talked with his grandmother over
the events of the day that he understood what |
Mr. Meredith meant by his having preached a
sermon to himself and the scholars.

“Keep my boy as Thou hast kept him this
‘- day, dear Lord,” prayed the grandmother that
‘hight. And thus ended Larry's first day at
school, :
CHAPTER IV.

FOES WITHOUT.

TELL you what it is, grandmother, Mr.
{ Meredith is a ‘bully’ teacher, and no mis-
take ;—a real good one, I mean,” said Larry,
catching his grandmother’s eye, which showed her
‘ disapproval.
“The boys all talk that way, though, and hear-
ing them, the words come into my mind, and
I say them without thinking.”
“That does not make it right, my dear. But |
what is it you like so much in Mr. Meredith?”
“Qh! I can hardly tell you; I like everything
he does. Then he seems to know so much.
There isn’t a single question the scholars ask. but |
‘the can answer. The other day, when it- rained
hard at recess, so that we could not go out to

play, he drew a picture of an elephant on the
40 ee
FOES WITHOUT. AL
blackboard, and he told us all about the animals,
where they come from, and what they eat, and he
told us lots of stories that he had read in books
about them.

“And he can play ball as well as George, or

aE

any of the big boys, and-he can run so fast that



not one of the boys can catch him.’ And he has
promised to go with us on Saturday afternoon for
chestnuts. I told him about our big tree in the
woods, and that I was sure there were chestnuts
enough on it for the whole school, and he said
I might be the leader and show them the way.
George Barton did not like that very much, and
after school he got me to show him the tree, to
see if it is better than one he knows about. The |
chestnuts will be about right by Saturday—that
_ will give them three more hard frosts. The girls
"are not going—only the boys. Mr. Meredith
says he’ll take the girls walking some other
day.”

“You may ask Mr. Meredith to come home
~ with you to supper on Saturday evening. I have
never seen him, and I would like to get acquainted
with him.” :
42 LARRY GILBERT.

Larry was delighted at this proposition. “It
will be bright moonlight, too, and he won’t mind
walking home in the evening.”

“Or, if he would rather, he can stay all night
and sleep in the room,” said. his grandmother.

“The room” was one adjoining the kitchen,
and, like it, could be entered from the outside by
a door. .The walls were whitewashed, the paint
was lead colour, the carpet was made of woven rags
of every sort and hue. A plain bureau, with a
white cover, above which hung a small looking-
glass, stood on one side of the room opposite an
open fireplace. Four rush-bottomed chairs and a
high, curtained, feather-bed, covered with a bright,
pieced quilt, completed the furniture. A front
window, and. one back, let in the light. From the
one you saw the tall old forest trees which lined
the opposite side of the road ; the other showed in
summer the low bench with its bee-hives, and the
garden beds with their flower borders and sweet-
smelling herbs.

The kitchen was a large room, containing in
one corner the grandmother's bed, almost shielded
from view by its dark curtains, a large spinning-
FOES WITHOUT. 43

wheel, whose busy hum was heard on most winter
days, a dresser in one corner, which held all. the
crockery, a chest, a table, and a few chairs.

Opening from this room, and extending over
one end of the back porch, was a small room large
enough to contain a single bed for Larry, and one
chair. The attic at the present time was used
only as a store-room.

Mr. Meredith accepted the invitation with
pleasure. He had a great desire to see Mrs.
Gilbert, who, he was sure, was not an ordinary
woman, as the religious and moral training she
had given her grandson plainly showed. He had
not found any kindred spirits among the few
acquaintances he had made outside of the school.
The farmers in the neighbourhood were, in the
main, plain, hard working men, hospitable, but
practical, and unsympathic in their views. Mr.
Meredith coming from the home of a tender, loving
mother and warm-hearted sister, missed, more
than anything else, the affectionate sympathy to
which he had been accustomed.

Larry rose by daybreak on Saturday morning,
and after kindling the fire and hanging the tea
44 LARRY GILBERT.

kettle on the crane above it, started to the woods
to assure himself that the chestnuts were in a
proper condition, and to cut some of the under-
brush away with his hatchet, so that the falling
chestnuts might not find hiding-places among it.

He reached the place and looked at the tree,
scarcely believing his own senses. Some one, and
more than one, had evidently been there before
him. The ground was trampled about, and the

~ tree had been beaten by experienced hands. The —
ground was covered with empty burrs, but scarcely
one was to be seen upon the tree. Hastening
home, he burst into the kitchen where his grand-

~mother was getting breakfast, and told her the
sad news,

“Did you show the tree to any of the boys?”
she asked.

“To no one but George Barton;” and then, as
if suddenly enlightened, he added, “and I believe
it was George that stole them. He wasn’t at
school on Thursday ; he had been with his father
to Marleyville, he said, and had bought himself
a new sled with his own money, the mean thief!
Ill tell the teacher, see if I don’t.”
FOES WITHOUT. 45

~ “J don’t think I would, Larry,” mildly inter-
posed his grandmother. ‘George seems to have
a, kind of grudge against you, and it will not mend
it any to complain of him.”

« But, grandmother, how about the chestnuts ?
George has done it on purpose to make the
teachers and scholars laugh at me He thinks
I won’t find it out till I take them to the tree,
and that then they will have to go to the place
that he picked out.”

“Tecan arrange all that for you. There is more
than one chestnut tree on our ground, though you
have never seen them. When your father was
two.or three years older than you are now, he
picked several bushels, and your grandfather took
them to Medford when he went with grain. I
have been thinking we would try and gather some
this year, and send them with Tony the next time
he comes. Shell barks, too, will bring a good
price. We will hurry through our breakfast, and
still have time before school for me to go with you
to the place I spoke of, so that you will have no
trouble in finding it.”

Larry’s face grew bright in a minute. “You
46 LARRY GILBERT,

are the best grandmother in the whole world,”
said he, throwing his arms around her neck; “I
don’t know what I could ever do without you.”

Again Larry tripped through the woods with
his hatchet in hand, his grandmother leading the
way. She passed the big chestnut tree, and on
the other side of a clump of pines at the left were
two large chestnut trees filled with nuts.

“Tt’s queer 1 never saw these before,” said
Larry, “and so near the others too; but then I
never have been any farther in the woods than the
big chestnut tree.”

““Tt’s because you are a good and obedient boy
that I like to give you pleasure whenI can. Now
you must go back and get your dinner-basket, and
- go to school.”

The homes of the boys were so far apart that
they had agreed to bring their. dinners, and start
on the chestnut hunt as soon as school was over,
eating their lunch as they walked.

There was certainly a look of exultation on
George’s face as they were nearing the wood > but

when Larry suddenly turned off before they came

to the spoiled tree, and walked rapidly in another __ |
FOES WITHOUT. 47

direction, George called out: “Here, old fellow,
you are on the wrong road. I know the way
about your woods better than you do yourself.
Come on, Mr. Leader, this is the way.” And he
turned in the direction of the tree with a very
confident air.

The teacher and boys stopped and looked
toward Larry.

“T am going right,” said he. “I did intend to
take you to that tree George speaks of, but some
people were there early on Thursday morning and
helped themselves to the chestnuts.” He looked
at, George as he spoke, and it happened that Mr.
Meredith, too, was looking, and both saw the signs
of guilt he betrayed. Nothing more was said as
Larry led them to the new place.

There was a loud cheer from the boys as they
saw the trees laden with the bristling balls, and
joy was painted on every face but one. |

George Barton was again baffled in his efforts
to mortify Larry. Did the boy bear a charmed
life? or why was it that every attempt he made
against him recoiled upon himself ? George,
.;,With the help of their hired man, whom he had
48 LARRY GILBERT.

led to believe that permission had been granted
by Mrs. Gilbert, had robbed the chestnut tree—
his first motive being to bring Larry into ridicule ;
his second, to make a little money for himself
by the theft.

He did not suppose Larry knew of any other
tree which had not been already stripped, and to
have him turn the plot so completely on himself
by taking them to even a better place than he had
first intended, was a very bitter mortification to him.

He tried to make the best of it, as he did not
want to be suspected of having interfered, so his
laugh rang out the loudest of all the company,
and only one suspected how very uncomfortable
he really was.

When the shadows began to lengthen, Mr.
Meredith said it was time to separate; and, after
wishing one another “good-bye,” all but Mr.
Meredith, Larry, and Johnny Briggs moved off
with their filled baskets, while these three walked
slowly through the woods towards Larry’s home.

“This is an uncommonly fine old wood,” said
the teacher, looking up at some of the tall trees

they were passing.
FOES WITHOUT. 49

“Isn't it?” replied Larry, with an admiring
nod. “I think, Mr. Meredith, there is not any-
where such another. An acre of it belongs to
grandmother; and Mr. Spering, who bought most
of the farm-land after grandfather died, cuts wood
for us on the shares, spring and fall. I mean,”
said Larry, seeing Mr. Meredith did not under-
stand, “he brings us one load of wood after it is
cut, and then takes the next to his own house.”

“Then the chestnut trees are on your own
ground ?”

“Yes, sir; but I never saw the trees we went
to to-day till this morning. Grandmother never
allows me to go farther in the woods than this
big chestnut tree we are coming to. She is
always afraid something will happen to me; for
if I should die she would be all alone. This
morning when I told her some one had taken all
the chestnuts from this tree she told me of the
two we went to to-day, and showed me where they
were. I am afraid she will never let me try to
cut down trees; she don’t even like me to stand
by when the men are chopping; for my father

was killed by a falling tree.”
; D
50 LARRY GILBERT.

“She was awfully scared about his going to
school,” broke in Johnny; “she wanted me to
kind o’ help him through, but I think he can take
pretty good care of his own self; don’t you, Mr.
Meredith ?”

“JT think he can, indeed,” said the teacher
smiling. “If he lives up to the sermon he
preached us the first day of school, he has a good
Friend above who will never fail him, though all
the world should turn against him.”

“There’s Larry’s house, and there ’s his grand-
- mother,” said Johnny, pointing towards them.
The old lady stood in the doorway shading her
eyes from the setting sun, and peering forward to
see if they were coming.

With kindly courtesy she came down the front
path and opened the gate as they approached,
giving the teacher a cordial welcome to her
cottage.

She bade Johnny wait a moment, and Mr.
Meredith, from the window, saw her hand him an
apple and a generous slice of gingerbread.

“T see you know how to give the cup of cold

water,” he said, as she came in.
FOES WITHOUT. : 51

“JT am interested in the child,” she replied;
“and then I doubt whether he will get enough
to satisfy his hunger when he reaches home. -
His father went along the road half-an-hour ago
so drunk that he was scarcely able to walk. His
wife was once tidy and active, but an intemperate
husband and a large family unprovided for, seems
to have turned her into an irritable and thriftless
woman.” g

“Johnny shows his training,” replied Mr. Mere-
dith ; “but he seems very tractable, and I do not
despair of instilling into his mind some principles
which may lead him to a better life.”

When Larry found that Mr. Meredith intended
sending his chestnuts to his sister at Medford, he
insisted upon adding to them all that. he had
himself gathered. Mr. Meredith accepted this
offer with the understanding that he might assist
them on the next Saturday, when they expected
to gather their nuts for market.

“Tony Myers expects to be with us that day,
too. He will stay over Sunday, and Monday he
will take our nuts with him and sell them for us
at Medford.” 7}
52 LARRY GILBERT.

Larry told Mr. Meredith how his first acquaint-
ance with Tony was made, and the latter said he
should be very glad to know one who had proved
himself to be such a valuable friend.

In Mr. Meredith’s next letter to his sister he
wrote: “TI find Mrs. Gilbert, Larry’s grandmother,
areal mother in Israel. She is a sensible, practical
woman, a true Christian, full of faith and of the
Holy Ghost. Since I have met her I have lost
some of that feeling of loneliness which has
possessed me ever since J came into this mount-
ainous region, and I feel quite sure that a longer
acquaintance with her will only increase the esteem

in which I hold her and her grandson Larry.”
CHAPTER VY.
CHRISTMAS.

ARRY, with Tony’s help, had made a sled,
which, from the time the first snow fell,
he drew to school every morning. Tony

was not a born carpenter; the sled was in truth
a very rude, lop-sided affair, though in the owner’s
estimation it was a perfect treasure. It must go
to somewhere at the bottom of the hill when once
it was started, although it had @ fashion of veering
off from a straight line, and now and then PURINE
over and giving the rider an upset.

Larry did not mind that, nor the laugh and
ridicule that George Barton tried to excite in the
rest of the scholars. Larry was generous, too,
and boys like Johnny Briggs, who would never

have intimated to George that they would like to
53
54 LARRY GILBERT.

ride upon his sled, had no backwardness in asking
Larry for that favour. —

Mr. Meredith was a keen observer. He saw
that Larry, though delighting in the sport himself,
was always willing to share his sled with the
younger and poorer children, while he had never
once seen” George's sled leave the hands of its
owner,

One morning Mr. Meredith received a letter
from his sister, and one sentence of it read in this
way :

“You must thank your friend Larry over and
over again for his chestnuts. I never saw any so
large and fine. I am greatly interested in: your
account of the boy, and I mean to send him a nice
Christmas present. I shall depend upon you to
tell me what will suit him best. My idea is not
so much a useful present as one that will give
him real pleasure; for, from your account, I
should judge he has never been favoured with
many games or toys.” :

In return, Mr. Meredith wrote: “Enclosed find
one dollar (4s.). Add it to the sum you mean to
expend, and buy as handsome a sled as you can
CHRISTMAS. 55

find for the money. Joseph Martin, who keeps
the variety store corner Fourth and Berkley, is a
good friend of mine, and will select one for you.
Send it to my address two days before Christmas,
to Marleyville, by way of the Medford stage.”

Larry's Christmas times were never seasons of
plenty. A yarn tippet, stockings, and «mittens, a
couple of dough-nuts and ginger-cakes, which
Grandmother Gilbert cut into odd shapes intended
to represent men, horses, and birds, and which,
as they never came in those shapes at any other
season, had always excited Larry’s profound
admiration, were the best of his gifts.

There was great boasting among the boys at
school as to their expected gifts at the coming
Christmas. George talked a great deal about a
fine knife he had been promised. “It’s to be a
regular three-blader ; the little blade, sharp as a
razor, will cut a hair; the large blade will go
through a board slick as a weasel.”

“T never knew a weasel could go through a
board,” innocently remarked Larry.

The boys laughed, but George made no reply.

“ My aunt is going to give me a pair of ban-
56 LARRY GILBERT.

tams,” said Joe Brown. “And IJ will have a
Newfoundland dog,” said Charlie Taylor.

So one and another told their expectations until
poor Johnny Briggs, who couldn’t remember a
time when he had fared better on that day than
any other, asked :

“What ll you get, Larry?” _

“A pair of mittens, I guess, and maybe a new
rithmetic, if grandmother can spare the money.”

“T’d like to see anybody give me mittens or
school-books,” said George, contemptuously ; “I’d
pitch ’em in the fire.”

“You seemed to like the mittens grandmother
gave you last Christmas; anyhow you wore
them.”

“She knit ‘em to pay for the sausage and apple-
butter mother took to your house,” said George,
sharply. “Your granny pays for what she gets
in yarn,” he added with a drawl.

“Your mother didn’t want any pay for what
she brought,” said Larry, touched by George’s
sneering tone. ‘She said she never could pay
grandmother for helping her to nurse little Susy
through that spell of sickness ; and I’d have been
CHRISTMAS, 57

real sorry if Susy had died that time,” and Larry’s
voice fell.

George now felt as if he was choking. Could
he ever forget that day when he lay stretched
upon the garret floor suffering such sorrow as he
had never felt before? when even the doctor had
given his sister up, and poor little Susy’s breath
seemed like the dim flame of a candle just ready
“to go out! And he remembered when he had
heard a step on the stairs, how he had stopped his
ears that he might not hear the announcement he
was so sure would follow; and then a hand had
been laid tenderly on his bowed head, and kind
Mrs. Gilbert had made him understand that Susy’s
life was likely to be spared to them.

The whole scene had flashed before him in a
moment, and he turned away from Larry witout
another word.

Again Larry gained a victory.

There had been an abundance of snow all through
December, and the sleighing was excellent. Tony
arrived in his sleigh the night before Christmas ;
and, for some reason or other, he came without

bells upon his horse, though he admitted to Larry
58 LARRY GILBERT.

he had them safe in the sleigh-box. This was the
reason that Larry, who had been listening for the
sound of the bells, did not know his friend had
arrived until he heard him stamping the snow
from his feet at the back door. Tony was not
alone, for behind him stood Mr. Meredith. The
two stepped into the kitchen.

“T hope, Mrs. Gilbert, you will not send me
away, though I come without an invitation from
you. I had one from my friend Tony.”

“And I-hope, grandmother,” broke in Tony,
“you ll not think less of your Christmas present
because it comes the night before,” at the same
time placing a large covered basket on the table.
“Jl tell you at once, the master is ’sponsible for
the most of it; I only put in a morsel of sugar
and. tea, and the like.”

“You are both heartily welcome,” said grand-
mother, shaking them by the hand; “and Larry,
I know, is happy to see his two best friends, as
he calls you.”

The guests did not seem inclined to leave the
warm kitchen, where the large logs in the fite-
place were sending up showers of hickory sparks.
CHRISTMAS. 59

“Youll not be in my way if you’d rather stay
here than go in the room,” said the grandmother,
as she drew out upon the hearth some hot coals,
and placed upon them her gridiron, on which she
had put some beef-steak to broil, which she had
found in the basket.

Larry spread the table, filled the kettle, and
helped in every way he could. Mr. Meredith and
Tony, in the meantime, had withdrawn to one
side of the stand upon which lay the family
Bible.

“TI wish I was better posted in some things in
this book,” said Tony. “It’s only lately I’ve
cared for the sight of it, only since I’ve known
Grandmother Gilbert and Larry. But, Mr. Mere-
dith, ‘seein’ is believin’,’ and when you see one
as lives the Bible right out in her daily life and
conduct, as you may say, you can’t doubt its
truth any longer. At least that’s my case.
Larry’s grandmother took me in hand the first
chance she got, and she never stopped till she
got me willin’ to own my guilt and sue for pardon.
There’s a verse somewhere that says you must
give a reason for the hope that isin you. Now,
60 LARRY GILBERT,

_ there’s many an idle fellow that ll take and twist
and turn Scripture till he seems to make white
black and black white, and then he says, ‘ Explain
that, Tony, if you can ;’ and maybe I'll be so
dumbfounded that I haven’t a word to say, unless
it is, ‘Get thee behind me, Satan; thou savourest
not of the things which are of God.’ Some time
I would like you to explain two or three hard
points, if you will.” ;

“T will gladly give you any help I can, Tony.
To understand everything in the Bible would
make it needful that we should have the wisdom
of the Creator, and there are many things in the
sacred Word which, if we cannot understand, we
must still admit to be true. In a higher state all
will be made known to us. As Christ said to
Peter, ‘What I do thou knowest not now, but
thou shalt know hereafter” A parent may under-
stand the cause of the sound which comes from
his little child’s toy, but it is a mystery to the
child; his powers of mind are not able to grasp
the idea; and many children have cut up their
little drums to see where all the noise comes
from. And so with difficult doctrines; they are
CHRISTMAS. 61

not mysteries to God, but truths clear and certain,
though dark to me. To me, this thought only
causes me to love and adore my heavenly Father
the more, knowing that I do not put my trust
and confidence in the declarations of a feeble and
short-sighted being like myself, but on One far
above all human power.”

The conversation closed here, for grandmother's
‘supper was on the table, and the strangers were
invited to draw up their chairs and partake of it.

After the meal was over: Mr. Meredith unfolded
a plan about which he had been thinking for some

time. It was to try to obtain the consent of the
"school directors to allow him to start a Sunday
school in the red school-house.

Mrs. Gilbert and Larry were delighted.

“TI think there will be no difficulty in obtain-
ing scholars,” said Mr. Meredith; “but, excepting
yourself, I know of no one I can get for a
teacher.”

“I think Mrs. Barton for one will be willing.
She lives quite near the school, and I think she
is a true Christian. The Bartons have been a
worldly family ever since I knew them, but I’ve
62 ' LARRY GILBERT.

seen a great change in the mother since the
severe sickness of her little girl.”

_ “T am glad to know about her, and ae
certainly see her. George is one of my trials at
school, and partly for this cause I have been
remiss in visiting them.” ess

Mrs. Gilbert mentioned two or three others
who might be willing to assist in teaching, and
Mr. Meredith decided, if the way was clear, to
organise the school the first Sabbath in the new
year.

Larry had been so excited with company that
he had gone to bed without hanging up his
stocking for the fairies, but his grandmother
going to the chest, brought out a yarn stocking,
which she hung on a nail near the fireplace,
having first put in the new mittens and cakes,
Tony looked at Mr. Meredith, who nodded, and
then quietly opened the outside door, which he
shortly again entered, carrying a sled on which
lay many packages. The sled, so different from
any she had ever seen before, caught the grand-
~ mother’s eye, and she exclaimed, ‘“ Where in the
world did that come from !”
CHRISTMAS. 63

“My sister sends it to ere for a Christmas
present in return for the nuts he sent her. This
Bible I bought for him myself. I feel indebted
to him every day ; his influence in school is worth
more than I can tell you.”

“And I, too, got him a book,” said Tony,
“ I think every American boy should know about
him. And here is some candy the druggist sent.
I happened to be in his store, and he’s always
particular when he sees me to ask after ‘his little
herb boy’ When he found I was coming right
here he made up this parcel for Larry. And,
grandmother, here’s a shawl for you. It was
in a store window in Medford, and the minute I
set eyes on it, I says to myself, ‘That’s Granny
Gilbert, and no mistake ;’ so here it is, and I hope
you ‘ll like it.”

Grandmother could scarcely find words to tell
her thanks. “God bless you both for your kind-
ness to the widow and fatherless. This will be,
God willing, the happiest Christmas my boy has
ever seen.”

And so it proved. The next morning Larry
64 LARRY GILBERT.

both laughed and cried at the sight of his treas-
ures. “Oh, Mr. Meredith!” “Oh Tony!” he
exclaimed, as he thanked them over and over
again.

“Now I'll give my old sled to Johnny. I'll
take it right up before breakfast.”

Grandmother willingly assented; she had a
pair of mittens for Johnny, and Mr. Meredith,
knowing his need, had bought a stout pair of
boots for him. Besides these presents a basket
was tied on the sled, containing potatoes and
apples. A wood sled happened to be passing
just as Larry was starting, and the driver will-
- ingly stopped to let him mount on it, so that
by holding the rope he could pull the sled after
him. *

«You are out early,” said the man.

“Tam only going up to Mrs. Briggs’s. I got
a present of a beautiful new sled this morning,
and J am going to take my old one to Johnny;
and then I have some things besides for them
in the basket. Mr. Briggs spends all his money
_ for drink, and I guess they are pretty poor.” -

“T reckon they are,” said the man thought-






A CHRISTMAS GIFT TO JOHNNY.—p. 64.
CHRISTMAS. 65

fully. “I used to do something to help them
now and then, but it’s like putting water in a
leaky vessel. Briggs’s wife is a cousin of mine,
and I don’t suppose it is hardly right to blame
her for mismanagement. It’s likely my wife
would change as much as she has if she had a
drunken husband to live with. Here isa dollar
you can put in her hand (mind you don’t let
her worthless man see you do it), and say to her
Hiram Black sent it; and you can say, too, if
nothing happens more than I know at present,
that early next week I'll throw her off a load of
wood.”

It is almost needless to say that Larry’s visit
to the Briggs family that morning brought a.
ray of comfort to the mother’s heart, and hap-
piness to the children, who often went to bed
with their hunger unsatisfied. Johnny had
never felt so rich in his life before To
have three Christmas presents, when he did
not expect one, was as surprising as it was
delightful.

Of course Larry’s sled at school made a sensa-

tion ; even George Barton had to admit it was a
. E
66 B LARRY GILBERT.

perfect beauty, and that Larry was not such a fool,
after all, to send his nuts away, as he had thought .
him. “It seems to me that fellow is always
getting ahead of the rest of us, and without trying
to do it either,” said George to one of the boys.
“Who would have thought that for a few quarts
of chestnuts he would have got a present like
that ?”
CHAPTER VI.

TURNING A NEW LEAF.

Mw MEREDITH for some time had known
that Johnny Briggs was a drunkard’s son,
and his heart often ached for the poorly-

clad boy who came shuffling into the school-house

day after day, bearing the signs of great poverty

and neglect at home. .

His chief endeavour was to try and instil right
principles into Johnny’s mind, and help him to-
feel, amid all his discouragements and wretched-
ness, that there was a better life beyond, if he
chose to live for it.

“It matters not,” he said to Johnny one day,
“so far as your future life is concerned, how far
down your father has sunk in sin and degrada-
tion; he has not the power to crush you, unless

you give your consent. Many a boy has turned
67
68 LARRY GILBERT.

from an evil example, and gone upward in life
until he became a man highly esteemed and
respected,” :

Johnny was a little fellow for his years, with
lines on a face made sober and old by want of.
sufficient food and proper care. He attached
himself to Mr. Meredith at once, and though,
for want of proper discipline, he was at first
somewhat disorderly, under Mr. Meredith’s firm
administration he settled down into a docile and
exemplary scholar.

It took some time to move Johnny from his ©
listlessness, but after awhile the light drifted into
his soul, and he began to have aspirations for
something better than his old life, and to struggle
to break the web of circumstances which held him
so closely.

He had many talks with his teacher on the sub-
ject, who strongly urged him to try to bring about
a reform at home; and one afternoon, as they
walked together on their way from school, Mr.
Meredith begged him to begin at once.

“But, Myr. Meredith, I don’t know how to
begin,” said Johnny, despairingly. “I never saw
TURNING A NEW LEAF. 69

it look nice at our house as it does at Granny
Gilbert’s. Everything is upside down, or broken,
or cracked ; the children haven’t got even as good
clothes as I have, and mother goes about cross and
bad, and hasn’t a good word even for the dog.
She says we children are the pests of her life, and
she wishes many a time that she was dead, for she
says she ’ll never get any rest till they make her a
bed in the churchyard. Then father is drunk so
often, and he and mother quarrel, and sometimes
he beats her. I don’t think, Mr. Meredith,” he
added, as the full state of the case presented
itself to his mind, “that I’ll ever be able to make
things straight at home.”

“<*T can do all things through Christ, which
strengtheneth me,’” repeated Mr. Meredith.
“Nothing is too hard for God. We will both
pray to Him to show us what to do. Here we
are at Mrs. Gilbert’s door. We will go in and
state our case to her. I have great faith in her
opinions and advice.”

Mrs. Gilbert received them with her usual
cordiality, and was interested in what they had to

say.
70 . LARRY GILBERT.

“T have often thought of doing something for
my neighbour Briggs’ family,” she said; “I can
see things are growing worse every day. It truly
grieves me to see Mr. Briggs as-he generally is
when he passes, and to remember what he was
when he first moved up to that place. Johnny,
here, was a baby, and Mrs. Briggs was a tidy,
smart, woman. She used to ride to church with
us now and then. After they had lived there for
three years they left the neighbourhood ; and five
years later, when they came back, there was a
great change in them both. I thought Mrs.
Briggs did not make me very welcome when
I went to see her, and as she never comes here,
I have been satisfied to let matters rest between
us. But I can see now that I ought to have per-
severed, and I might have helped to keep up her
courage, if nothing else. I often think, if the
Lord should be as mindful of our shortcomings
as we are of those about us, who of us could
stand? and I know I have not laid the interests
of this family before the Lord,” said the old lady,
humbly. “I have been slack concerning the
promises, although I know that with the Lord
TURNING A NEW LEAF. 71

there is always forgiveness and plenteous redemp-
tion.”

“There is no better time than now,” said
Mr. Meredith, “for His ear is always open unto
our ery.” And they knelt down in the kitchen,
Mrs. Gilbert, Mr. Meredith, Johnny, and Larry,
who had come in while they were talking. The
teacher made a most fervent appeal for the father
of the wretched family, that the desire for strong
drink be taken away; and for the mother he
prayed that patience might be given to her in her
afflictions. And then he prayed for Johnny, that
he might be an instrument in His hands of
lightening his mother’s burdens, and leading his
father to a better life.

“Now, Johnny,” said Mrs. Gilbert, when they
had risen, “ you had better go home ; your father
may need his supper; I saw him pass shortly
before you came in. He may have had something
to drink, but he did not stagger. Perhaps you
can coax him to stay in to-night. Show him
what you are studying; he has good learning,
your father has; I heard him say he went to
school steadily when he was a boy till he was
72 LARRY GILBERT.

sixteen. But as likely as not there is nothing in
the house for you to eat, and I am afraid I have
but little to send either. Here is a dish of baked
apples, and a fresh loaf of bread, and enough
coffee for a cup for your father and mother. I'll
put them in Larry’s pail; they ll be handy to
carry. Now, step along, my son,” patting him on
the back.

On reaching home Johnny found his mother
outside the house, trying with a dull axe to cut
~ some of the wood Mr. Black had brought.

“ Here, mother, give me the axe; that’s too
hard work for you. Take these pieces and put in
the stove, and I’ll be right in with more, and
we ll have supper.”

“There’s little you’ll find to eat. Your father

is in, and clamouring too. Why don’t he bring



something we can eat? the lazy, drunken 2

“Qh, don’t, mother; don’t talk so to-night.
I’ve got a nice supper here in the pail. Granny
Gilbert gave it to me; and there is coffee for you
and father. I’m going to be a better boy,
mother, and be a help to you; and maybe both
of us together will be able to save father.”
TURNING A NEW LEAF, 73

The mother did not reply. Her lips quivered,
and merely shaking her head, she took the pail
and went into the house.

Mrs. Briggs had lost the little ambition she
once had. She managed to exist, and that was
all. At times there was an unsatisfied longing
for something better—a craving for sympathy,
and at other times a desire to get away from her
toil and misery and lie down and rest. But one
day was like another, and she went on working
and drudging more like a machine than a human
being, always irritable and fault-finding ; although
beneath the crust of harshness there was really a
feeling of tenderness for her family.

Johnny’s words stirred her feelings, and had
put some life into her efforts while brushing up
the hearth, washing the faces of the younger
children, and giving a more orderly look than
usual to the table.

Johnny saw the improvement ata glance, and
gave an encouraging nod to his mother. Having
thrown down the wood, he walked right over to
the window where his father sat.

“I’m real glad you are home to-night, father ;
74 LARRY GILBERT,

I’ve brought my slate home, and I want you to
help me with my sums. You will, won’t you ?”

“Sums! I’ve got to go out,” said the man,
moodily, “if that woman ever gets me a bite to
eat. I don’t know as I’ll wait any longer for
her,” and he made a half motion to rise.

The quick words in reply which Mrs. Briggs
was about to utter were stopped by an imploring
look from her boy.

“Qh, father, smell the coffee! It will be ready
in a minute; we’ve a good supper to-night.
Don’t go; I’m so sorry it wasn’t ready sooner.
I was slow in getting the wood cut.”

i Why can’t the lazy thing cut her own wood ?”

“’Cause,” said Johnny, interrupting, “I’ve
elected myself to be wood-chopper in the Briggs
family ; and Sam’s to be chip-picker, ain’t you,
Sam ?” addressing his younger brother. a

There was certainly something the matter with
Johnny. ven the father, blunted in his natural
feelings, could not help seeing how changed he
was from the idle, impudent boy he had usually
been. :

“See here, father, these are the sums—all that
TURNING A NEW LEAF. 75

page in compound addition. Granny Gilbert says
you were a master hand in doing arithmetic when
you were a boy.”

“Well, give us your pencil, and let me try.”
In a few minutes Mr. Briggs had finished the
sums.

“What good figures you make,’ exclaimed
Johnny. “They’re every bit as good as Mr.
Meredith’s; look, mother; see, Sam. Now, ain’t
they nice figures? After supper you ll show me
a little about the sums; I don’t see how you got
that answer.”

There was less sparring than usual at the table.
The mother felt restrained, and even Mr. Briggs
found himself growing better tempered under the
reviving influence of the coffee, which for a time
~ took away the intense thirst for strong drink
from which he was suffering.

The wind sounded cold and dreary as it whistled

around the house, and the unusual comfort and ©

warmth. within doors all aided in making it easier
for Johnny to carry out his plan of enticing his
father to remain at home.

After he had explained the sums, Mr. Briggs
76 LARRY GILBERT.

was induced to draw a horse on the slate for Sam, -
and then an eagle, while the warm praises of his
children, as new as they were evidently sincere,
made him feel more contented than he had felt
for weeks. When little Joe actually climbed upon
his father’s knee—a seat he could not remember
ever having occupied before—Johnny gave another
bright little nod to his mother, to which she
returned only an incredulous smile, as if she knew
too well that such a state of things would not last,
and that her husband would soon be as bad
as ever.

But hopeful Johnny thought he saw the victory
won, and his heart grew buoyant, as a happy
home in the future seemed to him already cer-
tain; a home that Mr. Meredith might come and
visit, and where he might kneel down and pray
as he had done that day at Grandmother Gil-
bert’s.

Johnny kept awake until his father had gone to
bed, and then, with a prayer of earnest thanks-
giving for what the Lord had enabled him to do,
and asking for help in the future, he crept into
his bed alongside of Sam, and went to sleep.
TURNING A NEW LEAF. U7

The mother remained by the fire watching the
embers die out one by one. “If I hadn’t seen
this thing tried so many times before I might
almost have a morsel of hope, but I can’t feel
there is any luck like that for me this side of the
grave. And then there’s Johnny. I never saw ~
a child change as he has. I wouldn't be a bit
surprised if he was getting ready for some kind
of sickness. I am sure he wouldn’t act so
unnatural if he was right well. The idea of his
thinking he can save his father! Haven't I
pleaded with the man on my bended knees to let
the vile drink alone, and what did I ever get but
abuse and curses?” and the thought roused again
the angry nature of the woman, and put to flight
all her tender feelings.

“T knew you might just as well expect water
to run up hill as to think he was going to change
his ways all of a sudden,” was the salutation
‘Johnny received from his mother in the morning.

“Why, mother ! you don’t mean father’s gone ?”

“Gone! indeed he’s gone; could hardly wait
for daylight. But what’s the use of your taking
on like that? It isn’t the first time in your life
78 LARRY GILBERT.

you have heard of your father going to the dram-
shop.”

For Johnny, with his head resting against the
table, sobbed bitterly. He had been so hopeful,
and this was a cruel disappointment.

* Oh, mother!” he said atlast. “I did think
my prayers for father were going to be answered.
I thought he would eat his breakfast, and then
I would go with him and coax him past the
tavern, on to the place where he works. Then
I meant to wait for him to-night after school and
bring him home. I thought maybe Mr. Meredith
would come with me; he would know well how
to talk to him.”

“There is no use,” replied the mother, “not the
least in the world, in wasting your time, or words,
or prayers, on an old sot like him. It has been
tried too often. As to your praying, it is no more ;
than idle wind. The Lord takes no account of
such as we are, or He would have righted matters
in this house long ago. We are all in the same:
boat, and likely to be so as long as we live; and
if death is a long sleep, as some say, the sooner it
comes to some of us the better.”
TURNING A NEW LEAF. 79

>

“Tll never give up praying,” said Johnny.
“Mother,” he said, turning suddenly to her, “I’ve
started out on the Lord’s side; I am not going
back ; I am going to stick to Him through every-
thing, and I know He’ll carry me through. And
you mustn't think that death is only a sleep ; it
isn’t so. It is going to be a dreadful time for them
that’s gone against the Lord Jesus all their lives
when they leave this world. They will then be
judged for every wicked thing they’ve done, and
there will be nobody to take their part. Do,
mother, try to be a Christian ; it will make your
troubles so much lighter if you have Jesus for your
friend.”

Mrs. Briggs did not answer a word. She put
Johnny’s breakfast on the table, and then dressed
the younger children, her mind agitated with new
thoughts, while Johnny’s words kept ringing in
her ears: “Do, mother, try to be a Christian !”

———rf+- ——_
CHAPTER VIL

EFFORTS FOR GOOD.

AVING determined to start a prayer meeting
i in the neighbourhood, Mr. Meredith had
for some time been looking about for a
suitable place in which to hold it. It must. be
central and of good size.

Failing to satisfy himself, he walked one even-
ing to the little red cottage to consult Mrs. Gilbert
on the subject. He found her at home, and
almost immediately stated his business. “I am .
ina dilemma, Mrs. Gilbert,” he added, “and, as
usual, come to you to help me out of it.”

Grandmother thought a moment before she
spoke : “ Mrs. Hunter’s back room would be a very
suitable place, and I haven't a doubi that it could
be had once a-week. She has small children,
and seldom gets out to church, and will, I think;

80.

”
EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 81

enjoy having a prayer-meeting brought into her
house.”

“Mrs. Hunter’s!” replied the teacher in a tone
expressing great surprise ; “do you mean at the
tavern !”

“Yes,” said she, smiling at his look ; “and I am
truly astonished if you have to learn from me how
different. the atmosphere in Mrs. Hunter’s back
room is from that in Mr. Hunter’s front one.

“Tf you do not object,” she continued, “as it
is moonlight, and I feel uncommonly well, we
_ might walk over there and see about it at once.
I shall be glad to have the meetings commence.
I have had one or two talks with Mrs. Briggs
lately ; the woman is wonderfully softened. The
Spirit is evidently striving with her, and though
she tries to resist it, she cannot shut her eyes to
the knowledge that the Spirit of the Lord has
come and taken up His abode in the heart of her
child. I think Johnny may induce her to attend
the prayer meeting, though for many reasons she
would refuse to go to church.”

The tavern was midway between Mrs. Gilbert’s

and the school-house, a little to the left of the
F
82 LARRY GILBERT.

direct road. Crossing a fence near the house was
along narrow trough, which conducted a stream
_ of running water into a large horse-trough. Near
this was the sign-post, about ten feet high, on which
was a square board, hung loosely in a frame, which,
when it felt the force of the wind, swung and
ereaked lazily to and fro. Superstitious travellers
had more than once been startled by the sound on
a dark night; but the sight of it in the daytime
had encouraged the heart of many a stranger
seeking for rest and refreshment.

Upon this sign was painted the picture of an
animal, which might have answered for a horn-
less cow or a bear. The older folks considered it
a cow, but the children believed it to be a bear,
and stoutly defended that idea when it was
assailed. Hiven the landlord did not know what.
it had been intended for, as it had been put up
long before his time. :

The true name, however, was not at all essen-
tial, as the place always went by the name of
“The Cross Roads,” or “ The Tavern.”

It was a place of some note in the eyes of the
farmers round about, as there elections and county
EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 83

meetings were generally held, and the bar-room
was also found to be a convenient place where any
public measure of the day which came up for dis-
cussion, could be defended or condemned.

In front of the tavern was a long, low porch
with wocden benches each side of the door which
opened directly into the bar-room.,

Mrs. Gilbert led the way round to the side of
the house, and opened a door into a small entry
at the rear of the bar-room. On the other side
was the waiting and dining-room, a large and
cheerful apartment, and here they found Mrs.
Hunter and her two children.

After some conversation, the visitors made
known the object. of their visit, and having heard
what they had to say, Mrs. Hunter at once gave a
cordial assent to their proposition.

“ Perhaps on consulting your husband you may
find it necessary to change your mind,” said
Mr. Meredith, who feared the lady might be
rather premature in taking so little time to
consider.

“T think not, but perhaps it will be as well to
speak of it to James while you are here. Jack,”
84 LARRY GILBERT,

to one of the children, “ask your father to step
here a moment.”

Mr. Hunter answered the summons at once,
shook hands warmly with Mrs. Gilbert, and also
with Mr. Meredith, to whom he said—

“Glad to make your acquaintance, sir; you’re
doing a good work among the youngsters in the
neighbourhood, I hear. Mr. Barton says there has
never been so orderly a school, to his knowledge,
in the county. In another year we will have one
to send I hope. Mother here is tender with her
‘boys, but I tell her we can’t keep them wrapped
in cotton all their lives.”

Mrs. Hunter told him why she had summoned
him from the bar-room, and though a half-amused
and doubtful look passed over his face, he promptly
answered, “ You shall do just as you like about it, .

lary.”

. “You see, Mr. Meredith,” turning to him as he
spoke, “I tell mother she shall do just as she
pleases with this part of the house, provided she
don’t interfere with me at the other end. I call
that fair and square; don’t you? I know,” he

continued, breaking into the subject for which, for
EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 85

some reason, he always in the presence of certain
people felt an apology or explanation necessary,
“there’s many a one calls liquor-selling a mean
business, and tries to run it down; but if a man
don’t buy his drinks from me he will go some-
where else for them, and if he uses more than is
good for him I am not to blame, for that is his
own look-out. Salt is a good article of food, used
in moderation, and yet I’ve been informed if
taken in large quantities it is a poison, and a man
can swallow enough of it to kill him; but that is
no reason why the stores should not keep it for
sale, and sell as much as is called for ; isn’t that
_ so?” and Mr. Hunter showed by his manner that
he considered this to be conclusive.

“Every man must decide these questions with
his own conscience,’ replied Mr. Meredith.
“There would always be one especial obstacle in
my way that would deter me from selling liquor,
and that is a verse in the Bible which reads, ‘ Woe
unto him that giveth his neighbour drink, that
puttest thy bottle to him, and makest him
drunken. I should be afraid, Mr. Hunter, to have

that curse resting on me.”
86 - LARRY GILBERT.

“When you come to Bible quoting, mother will
likely sympathise more closely than I can, but no
- doubt there are many subjects about which we
wouldn’t disagree; step in again to see us some-
time soon, and we'll hunt them up. Just now

>

I’ve some one waiting for me;” and the good-
natured landlord withdrew to his own more con-
genial apartment.

Mr. Hunter was a kind husband and father,
and very temperate for a man in his position,
never drinking to excess himself, and even striv-
ing at times to persuade some of his friends
and neighbours to refrain when he saw they
had already drunk more than was good for
them.

But where there is one who has sufficient force
of character to keep from the worst forms of
drunkenness, there are many who, having acquired ,
a taste for liquor, yield to a craving for more,
utterly reckless of the consequences.

And such had been Mr. Briggs. Like other
men, when he first began the habit of drinking he
had self-repect which restrained him from being
known as a drunkard, but, as the habit grew upon
EFFORTS FOR GooD. 87

him, his moral nature was weakened by the
increased appetite, and when poverty began to-
show itself in the family, instead of this being an
incentive to retrace his steps, the man became
selfish, deceitful, and a tyrant to those whom he
should have protected and cherished.

“What a power for evil in this world is the
whisky business,” said Mr. Meredith, as they were
returning to the cottage. ‘ How many loop-holes
of escape it has, and how very hard it is to make
any impression upon those who are its avowed
friends and supporters! I do really think that
Satan’s power would be cut down one-half, could
we see this enemy to religion destroyed.”

“We must wait the Lord’s own time,” said .
Mrs. Gilbert. “We know that the day is coming
when all the kingdoms of this world shall become
the kingdoms of our Lord and of His Christ, and
for this blessed coming we must work and wait.
The liquor traffic has come before me as a great
evil all my life, and is connected with my first
memories of childhood. You have heard, I sup-
pose, of the Whisky Rebellion of Pennsylvania ?”

“TI know there was such a rebellion, but my
88 LARRY GILBERT.

knowledge is very imperfect. I shall be very glad
to hear your account of it. Did you live in the
neighbourhood of it?”

‘I was born in Washington County, Penn-
sylvania, where my father was a small landholder.
It was shortly after the Slave Question War, when
all kinds of merchandise were very dear, and money
was very scarce. Indeed, everything that was
obtained outside of our own raising was got by
exchanging such things as we had for others that
we needed from a distance. One of the chief
articles of exchange was the whisky made from
the spare rye. A certain amount of grain was
kept for family use, and the rest, when distilled into |
whisky, was sent to Harrisburg and Philadelphia,
and exchanged for salt, sugar, iron, or whatever
was needed by the settlers.”

“ Why didn’t they sell the grain without going .
to the trouble of distilling it ?”

“For this reason: all cartage was done on the
backs of horses, for there were no carriage roads of
any account. Now, I have heard my father say
that while a horse could carry on his back but
four bushels of grain at a time, he could carry the
EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 89

product of twenty-four bushels of grain when
- turned into alcohol.”

“Ah, yes; I see,” said Mr. Meredith.

“Nearly every one in the neighbourhood owned
a Still, and the time for making the whisky was
looked forward to with great anxiety and expecta-
tion, as it was the source from which so many
comforts were obtained. At first there was no
tax demanded, but as greater quantities of whisky
were distilled, the Government began to think they
ought to have some of the benefit, so collectors
were sent out into the counties with orders to collect
the tax on all the whisky manufactured. At this
the settlers became very angry. They held meet-
ings, at which they determined to resist what they
considered oppression. Liberty poles were raised,
speeches were made against what was called unjust
taxation, and when the officers appeared they were
resisted everywhere, and many of them met with
violence. A marshal and collector named Biddle
and Johnson were tarred and feathered, then
whipped and blindfolded and run into the woods.
Another collector was visited by a man dressed as
Beelzebub, accompanied by several others, Coming
90 LARRY GILBERT.

to the door of his house they called on him to come
out, but having a great deal of pluck, and being
armed with pistols, he declared he would shoot the
first one who entered his door. In this way he
kept them off. He afterwards prosecuted the
person he supposed had acted as Beelzebub, but
as he failed to prove his case it did no good, and
only aroused such a state of feeling against him
that he had to leave the county to save his life.

“They shaved the head of Graham, another
- collector, and after cutting off his horse’s mane and
the hair of the tail, bade him mount and ride off.
There were a number of others who lost their lives.
_ The trouble lasted a long while, and then, as the
Government sent soldiers and was determined to
be obeyed, some of the most sensible of the people,
my father among them, began to see that if the
laws of the country were resisted in one point they
might be in others, and this would make a bad.
state of society. Meetings of the most respectable
distillers were held, and they agreed to obey the
laws.”

“ And so this was the great Whisky Insurrection
in Pennsylvania,” said Mr. Meredith, who had
EFFORTS FOR GOOD. 91

listened with great interest as Grandmother Gilbert
recounted the experiences of her early days.

“J was only a child of ten years of age,” she
said, “ but those early times as I recall them seem
very clear to my mind. I was the youngest of ten
children, and 1 am the only survivor. I left that
part of the country when I was eighteen years of
age, was married, and came here with my husband.
We never returned to my former home. This
place has ever since been my home. Parts of the
country, no doubt, seem to you quite rude and
uncultivated, but sixty years ago it was all a forest,
and a great deal of labour was necessary before we
could consider ourselves at all comfortable.”
CHAPTER VIII.

PRAYER ANSWERED.

Mw BRIGGS had, in his own strength, made

many resolves to reform, particularly in
days gone by, when he still retained some
self-respect, and flattered himself that those who
knew of his weakness were very few. Now
that he had fallen from his once respectable con-
dition, and was known as a drunkard, he cared
little for appearances. Besides, his slovenly home
and ill-tempered wife, though made so by his
own neglect and -unkindness, were, he tried to
satisfy himself, sufficient excuse for seeking a
refuge in the tavern, and spending his earnings
there. :
He had not been altogether insensible to
Johnny’s pleadings for the past two weeks, even

though he had often silenced him with cross words,
92

o
PRAYER ANSWERED. 93

and more than once struck him, bidding him never
to open his lips on the subject again.

Johnny, by the grace of God, had started out
in the Christian life, and was willing to endure
hardships like a good soldier, if he might at last
gain his heart’s desire, and see his father a reformed
and converted man. j

His discouragements were very great. Some-
times he thought his father was really growing
worse all the time, and if it had not been for the
kind and encouraging words of Mr. Meredith and
Grandmother Gilbert, he would have been led to
despair of ever doing any good at home.

And yet in the home there was visible im-
provement.

Mrs. Briggs, for Johnny’s sake, now strove to
add some brightness to their poverty-stricken
dwelling. The house was cleaner; and Johnny’s
cheery voice exclaiming, «Why, mother, how nice
your room looks; Granny Gilbert’s floor and
tables are not whiter than yours,’ was sufficient
compensation for all the labour bestowed.

Johnny little knew how his mother watched
every word and action, and as his Christian life
94 LARRY GILBERT.

daily impressed itself upon her mind, the more
_ desponding and despairing did she become in
regard to herself. ;

The entreaty, “Do, mother, try to be a Christ-
ian,” and the knowledge that Johnny’s prayers
were daily offered for her, came to her mind
continually. Bible verses that she had long
forgotten came back to her, bringing in their
train conversations, sermons, and instructions of
other days, so that the poor woman, now awakened
to a sense of her sinfulness, found herself groping
in darkness, without a ray of light to shine upon
her path.

She often determined to confess her wretched-
ness to Johnny, but when he mentioned the
subject of religion to her, as he was often in the
habit of doing, her proud heart refused to respond}.
and so day after day passed, her feeling of guilt
becoming deeper and her hopes for a better life
fainter.

When told of the prayer meeting to be held at
Mrs. Hunter’s she suddenly resolved to go. Any
change was better than this continual state of
unrest. She had opened Johnny’s Testament one
PRAYER ANSWERED. 95

_ day, and this verse met her eye: “Except ye
repent, ye shall all likewise perish.” She hastily —
closed the book, but the verse continued to haunt
her. Surely nothing she would hear at the
prayer meeting could make her feel worse than
she already felt.

Instead, therefore, of opposition, or a total want
of interest, as he had expected, Johnny was
surprised and gratified to find his mother willing,
as soon as he proposed it, to go with him to the
meeting.

The result may be anticipated. When a soul
becomes conscious of guilt, and realises its utter
‘inability to reform of itself, Christ’s love and
pardoning mercy are very near to that poor one,
He stands waiting to be gracious.

Mr. Meredith chose for the subject of his
remarks the first evening, “The Return of the
Prodigal Son.” When he had told the touching
‘story, and dwelt upon the different parts of it, .
he said, “If there is any poor prodigal here
to-night, who has wandered far from his Father's
house and now desires to return, he may not
linger nor fear to come; the Father stands
96 LARRY GILBERT,

with loving arms outstretched to welcome you;
He has waited long, He is waiting still, Will you
not come ?”

Johnny grasped his mother’s hand, “Do,

N52

mother!” he said, with an intense entreaty in his
voice. ’

The poor woman dropped her head upon her
hands and sobbed aloud.

_ The sense of God’s love and forgiveness came
upon the stricken woman as a flood of light, and
she could have exclaimed, ‘ Whereas I was blind,
now I see.” She wondered she had so long
striven against the Saviour, and refused to accept
the love so freely offered to sinners.

She was very humble and quiet on her way
home. “I hope, Mrs. Gilbert,” she said, “you
will forgive all my coldness, and receive my
thanks for your kindness to Johnny. There
have been times when I would have been willing
to see him as idle and deceitful as he used to be,
for when I saw the child so tender and helpful, so
‘grieved when he did wrong, it was a continual
reproach to me. I could not doubt, as I had
once tried to do, that there was truth in religion.
PRAYER ANSWERED. 97

I feel that I have a new life to lead. JI have
been a very poor helpmate to my husband,
Perhaps if I had led a better life he would never
have fallen so low. Pray for us, Mrs. Gilbert,
and for me, that my faith may not fail, and
that I may begin a new life in my family, and
try, by God’s help, to mend the evil I have
done.”

Grandmother Gilbert’s heart was deeply touched
at the blessed result of the first prayer meeting,
and she assured Mrs. Briggs of her prayers and
help in every way. As an evidence of her good-
will she insisted that Mrs.- -Briggs should stop at
the cottage to take something home for their
breakfast, although by doing so she ould have
to stint herself and Larry.

The prayer meetings were kept up as regularly
as the weather would permit.

Mr. Briggs found nothing now to complain of
at home. His wife’s kindness smote him to the
heart. She and the children often succeeded in
enticing him to remain for an evening, but prob-
ably the next day he would return as much

intoxicated as ever.
G
98 Ys LARRY GILBERT.

The winter and spring months passed, and
school closed with the beginning of summer, to
open again the first of October, under Mr.
Meredith’s faithful teaching. .

His presence likewise gave renewed vigour to
the Sunday school and prayer meeting, and the -
little company of disciples began to see some good
results from their efforts. Mrs. Barton and her
daughter returned to the good way, and others
attended regularly who were, as Mr. Meredith
hoped, not far from the kingdom,

Cold weather came early, and the winter
threatened to be severe. Snow fell and remained
long upon the ground, and were it not that the
children were inured to hardships and exposure,
the school would have been poorly attended.

City children, who walk to school over nicely
cleaned pavements, have little idea of the hard-
ships undergone by numbers of their country
brothers and sisters, who often bravely trudge
to school, a mile or more, through snow and
sleet.

There had already been a covering of snow on
the ground, which the sleighs and teams had
PRAYER ANSWERED. 99

reduced to a hard, smooth road. About noon one
day the snow began again to fall, and by the
time-Mr. Meredith dismissed school in the after-
noon, the tracks were covered, and nothing
but the grey lines of the wooden fences and the
leafless trees remained to break the broad white
waste,
_ The boys left their sleds at school, and taking
their dinner baskets and a book or two, started
for home. They waded along, pelting each other
now and then with snowballs, not minding the
wind which kept lifting the dry snow and tossing
it about in drifts. Johnny stopped at the tavern
door, and looked in. He asked no questions, for
the one he expected to see appeared not to be
there, and he closed the door and trudged on.
Mr. Hunter knew what the boy meant when he
cast his inquiring eyes around the room. The.
landlord gave a half contemptuous look at the
drunken man lying behind the counter out of sight
of the door.

“There was no use in letting on he was here,”
he thought to himself; “the man is too drunk to
do either good or evil, in fact too drunk to walk.”
100 LARRY GILBERT.

It had got to be quite a common thing for Johnny
to stop on his way home for his father. He never
said anything to Mr. Hunter, but kindly and
gently urged his father until, sometimes after
waiting a long while, the man would be willing to
start.

Mr. Hunter began to feel reproached whenever
he saw J ohnny, but he excused his own share
in the matter by saying, “The man will have
liquor, and if he can’t get it at one place, he will
at another.”

Two hours after, when Mr. Briggs got up on his
feet and asked for another. drink, Mr. Hunter
refused. “Briggs, you cannot have another drop
here to-night. Your boy was in after you some
time ago. It’s a bad night, and if you don't
want to die on the road you'll, keep what little
wit you have to take you home. Take my advice,
and wash your face and head in this water, and
rub it dry, and I’ll bring you in a bowl of hot
coffee ; it will do you more good than whisky
to-night.”

In the meanwhile Johnny had walked as far
as Grandmother Gilbert’s, when he was called
PRAYER ANSWERED. 101

in by her to warm himself, and to eat a bowl of
hot bread and milk which she had made for
him.

“You did not stop for your father?” she in-
quired.

“T looked in, but he had gone on home.”

“Perhaps so, though I did not see him pass.”

The days were short, and it was growing dark;
so Johnny, now quite comfortable, set off for
home. He had his afternoon’s work to do, and so
he hurried on. He had brought in the water and
wood to the house when he thought of his father,
and, on asking, found he had not come home.
He ate his supper of bread and roast potatoes,
and then asked his mother for a pair of dry
stockings, as he meant to go out and see if he
could find his father. “I will likely meet him ;
there will be some moonlight.”

His mother tried to discourage him. “It’s quite
likely your father will not start out to-night, and
you have only just come in yourself.”

Johnny felt as if he must go, so his mother
wrapped him up as well as she was able, and
kissed his forehead as he left her.
102 LARRY GILBERT,

Johnny found the snow more blinding than
before; the wind whirled it around at a fearful
rate, and it was sometimes hard to keep on his
feet. He saw nothing of his father ; in fact, he
could see but a few feet in front of him. When
he went by Mrs. Gilbert’s he walked near the gate
to look if he could see Larry; but the curtain
was down, and after taking a few steps in the yard.
without seeing any one, he turned and went on.
While he was loitering near the cottage, his father
passed on the other side of the road; the soft
‘snow deadened the sound, and neither was aware -°
of the presence of the other, and they went on in
opposite directions.

Johnny began to feel very cold and numb; the
wind was in his face, stinging and biting him, and
the snow being deep, it made the walking very
tiresome. Two or three times he stumbled and
fell, but, getting up and clapping his hands to
strike off the snow, he struggled on. Finally he
slipped into a large drift, which threw him on his
face. He staggered up, went a few steps, and fell
again. He felt so tired and so sleepy it was a
relief to lie still.
PRAYER ANSWERED, 103

By this time his father had reached home, and
learned that Johnny had gone in search of him.

“T was not looking out for him,” he said to his
anxious wife, “but I don’t see how I could have
passed him if he had been on the road. It’s an
awful night out—too bad for any boy. I dare-
say he has stopped at Granny Gilbert’s ; I’ll go
that far at any rate, and if he’s not there I'll go
on and walk back with him. Never fear,” he
added, seeing his wife’s tears, “1711 not come back
without him.” oe

Mr. Briggs was thoroughly sobered now, and
_ he walked on down the road at a much faster gait
than he had previously taken. He reached Mrs.
Gilbert’s, and found Tony there, who had arrived
that evening, and they were all sitting around the
comfortable kitchen fire. When the man learned
from Mrs. Gilbert that Johnny had not been there
since he went home from school, and that he
thought his father had gone home before him, his
face flushed with alarm.

“J just got home and learned that the boy had
started after me,” said Briggs; “it’s a bad night

to be out, and I must go on and see after him.”
104 _ LARRY- GILBERT.

“Just wait a minute,’ said Tony, drawing. on
his boots. “I’ll hitch up my sleigh ; and if you
have a lantern, grandmother, 1’ll take it along.”
Mr. Briggs and Tony got in the sleigh, Tony driv-
ing slowly, and Mr. Briggs holding out the lantern,
while both looked carefully as they went along.
Presently they came to the snow-drifts. “He’s
been through that,” said Tony, pointing to a place
where the snow had been disturbed. They went
on very slowly ; in a moment Tony handed the
reins to Mr. Briggs. “Just hold the horse, I think

>

I see him ;” and, jumping out, he found Johnny
lying prostrate, half-covered with snow, and un-
conscious. He wrapped a blanket around the
boy. ‘Put the lantern in the bottom of the
sleigh, and take him in your arms,” he said ; but _
when the father felt the still cold face, he sobbed

aloud,— -

“Oh! my child is dead ; I’ve killed him !”

“T hope not,” said Tony ; “we shall soon have
him home,” and turning the horse he drove home
quickly. “Will you stop at grandmother's ?”

“No; home. Take him to his mother,” was all
the man could say.
PRAYER ANSWERED. 105

Mrs. Briggs met them at the door. Her face
had a most agonised expression as they carried
Johnny in.

- “Strip off his wet clothes ; rub him well, and
wrap him in warm blankets,” said Tony. “I'll
put up the horse, and come right back. I feel
some motion at his heart; he will come around.
. Put a little warm drink to his lips as soon as he can
swallow.” Tony soon returned, and in an hour’s
time Johnny opened his eyes and said a few words,
and then fell into a heavy sleep. “I guess he’ll
do now,” said Tony. “I promised grandmother
I’d come back and let her know how he is; I'll
bring her up in the sleigh in the morning. I don’t
mind the walk; the moon is out bright as day,
the wind has lulled, and it has stopped snowing.” _

But morning found J ohnny a very sick boy,
delirious with fever. When Tony and Mrs. Gil-
bert entered the kitchen he was crying out, |
“Father, father, where are you? the snow is so

deep. Take my hand. Oh, I cannot pull you out!”
And so he kept up these heartrending cries, har-
rowing to those who heard, and more than all to
the poor father who sat near the bed in an agony
106 LARRY GILBERT.

of grief. Tony went for the doctor, who looked
very seriously at the boy before him. For some
days it seemed very doubtful whether his life
would be spared. The neighbours came in, Mr.
and Mrs. Hunter among the rest, all bringing
substantial gifts. It appeared as if Johnny was
somewhat sensible for a moment or two. He
called out—

“Mr. Hunter, please do not give father any more
whisky, he’s lying drunk under the snow. I
have tried so hard to pull him out. There he is
in the tavern ; come home, father! I'll take you;
don’t be afraid. Don’t give him more drink, Mr.
Hunter.”

“I never will,” said Mr. Hunter solemnly. “I_
never will sell another drop to you or any one
else,” turning to Mr. Briggs, “I see the evil it
has brought to your household, and I have yet
to see the good it has done to any one. Let this
be a turning point in your life, as it is one in
mine, and just as soon as you can work, I have
a job for you at my house.”

Johnny’s recovery was not very rapid. Sam
told the news almost in one breath. “ Father’s
PRAYER ANSWERED. 107

signed the pledge, he’s got steady work, and I
have a pair of new shoes, and the women have
been quilting, and we have just heaps of warm
covers now.”

Johnny looked at his mother and smiled, “ God
has heard and answered our prayers.”
CHAPTER IX.

CHANGES.

FTER Mr. Meredith left the school, another
A teacher came. A good and trustworthy
man he proved to be, although, as he
was much older and much more reserved than
Mr. Meredith, it was not easy for the scholars
to maintain the same degree of intimacy
with him that they had with their former
teacher.

For three winters Larry continued with Mr.
Morris, the new teacher, steadily improving and
growing, as his grandmother firmly believed, in
grace as he did in knowledge.

It was on one bright morning in May that his
school life was suddenly cut short.

A voice sounded from the open door of the

school-room :
108
CHANGES. . 109 .

“Master, can Larry Gilbert come home? His
grandmother ’s sick.”

Larry arose hastily in his seat, and receiving
an assenting nod from the teacher, seized his cap,
and was soon outside questioning Joe Briggs, who —
had brought the message.

‘ Mother’s there,” said Joe, “and father’s gone
to Marleyville, and will tell the doctor to come
right off. Some kind of a fit I think it is.
Mother went in to see her, and found her on the
floor.”

Larry, shocked at the news, hurried home, fear-
ing he scarcely knew what. He turned very white
as he saw his grandmother lying upon the bed,
pale and insensible.

Mrs. Briggs comforted him as well as she could,
telling him she hoped much from the doctor's
visit,

“Your grandmother has been an uncommonly
healthy woman all her life, and has a first-rate
constitution. She has likely overworked herself
and brought on this attack.”

When the doctor arrived, and had examined
his patient, Mrs. Briggs did not gather as much
110 ' LARRY GILBERT.

encouragement from his words and manner as she
had expected.

He pronounced it a case of partial paralysis, and,
finding Mrs. Gilbert could swallow, he adminis-
tered certain remedies, which in the course of an
hour had the desired effect. Mrs. Gilbert opened
her eyes and looked around anxiously until her
glance rested on Larry, who went at once to her
bedside, while Mrs. Briggs followed the doctor out
to the gate.

“T am afraid our good old friend is not going to
get over this,” he said, in answer to Mrs. Briggs’s
question. “Her powers of life are exhausted ;
there is but little action about her heart, nothing,
in fact, to work on. She will be likely to sink
away gradually ; will probably be conscious as long
as she lives, which at the most will not. be more
than two or three days, perhaps not so long.”

Mrs. Gilbert asked for a cup of tea, and Larry
was preparing it when Mrs. Briggs came into the
room.

The clear gaze of the sick woman met hers as
she entered, and”seemed to gain from her at once
the doctor’s decision. .
CHANGES. aie

She pointed to Larry, then beckoned Mrs. Briggs
to her.

“How long?” she whispered.

“Perhaps two or three days,” Mrs. Briggs
tremulously answered.

“Tt is well,” the old lady calmly replied, and
closing her eyes, her lips moved in prayer.

Larry prepared the tea as his grandmother
liked it, and brought it to her.

“Tt will do you good, I know,” and he inclined
the cup and held it to her lips. i

She drank a little, and then motioned to him
to put it upon the table. When he came back to
her she took his hand, and held it very closely,
and her eyes rested lovingly upon him, though
she did not speak.

Mrs. Briggs in the meanwhile busied herself
in making the room neat and tidy, and then
asked Larry if she should not send for Mrs. Hunter
or Mrs. Barton; but he said he knew that Mrs.
Hunter had a sick child, and Mrs. Barton had gone
to Medford that morning.

“T am not at ali afraid to stay with grand- .
mother, now that she is so much better. I know
112 LARRY GILBERT.

what medicines to give her. You have been very
kind to stay with us so long, but now I know
they must need you at home.”

“T suppose they do,” said Mrs. Briggs; “but
Tam loth to go and leave you.” Then she went
to the bedside, and leaning over, she kissed the
forehead of her aged friend, while the tears filled
her eyes. ‘ You never in this life can know the
good you have done to me and mine. The Lord
only can reward you.” Then she kissed Larry,
and said, “Good night, my boy ; never forget that
God is your refuge and strength.”

Larry ate his supper, and then drew the stand
which held the Bible near to the bedside. .

“The 90th Psalm and the 14th chapter of
John,” whispered his grandmother.

As he read, the lips of the sick woman moved
in unison. Then she fell asleep, and remained
quiet most of the night. Toward morning she
began to move, and Larry found she was very
uneasy. He used the remedies she suggested,
and her face gradually grew more quiet,
and the features shone with such a happy,
peaceful expression, that it seemed to the
CHANGES. 1138

watching boy there were sure signs of improve-
ment.

Suddenly her eyes unclosed and she looked at
Larry.

“ You are better, grandmother,” he said, joyfully
springing to her side.

“T am going to leave you, my precious Larry,”
she feebly replied. “My summons has come.
Promise me, my boy, that all your life long you
will try to keep close to the Lord Jesus. Promise !”
The words came faintly.

“Yes, grandmother, I will, God helping me,
I will,” sobbed Larry. Her lips moved as if to
reply ; no sound was uttered, but a smile came
over her face, lighting it up for a moment, and
then Larry was—alone.

Tony Myers, having had business in Marleyville
the night before, called at the cottage early the
next morning.

He wondered at the unusual stillness of the
house. “It’s uncommon,” he said to himself,
“for grandmother to be sleeping after five o’clock
in the morning.” He wondered still more when

no answer was made to his first knock upon
ul
‘114 LARRY GILBERT.

the door. Another, still louder, brought Larry,
looking so unlike himself that Tony started in
alarm.

When Larry sobbed out his sad story, Tony
dropped into a chair, and holding Larry close in
his arms, wept with him. To Tony, so long bereft
of near friends, Mrs. Gilbert had become almost a
second mother.

“She seemed to have a feeling the last time
I was here, that she wouldn’t be long for this
world, but I didn’t think it,’ said Tony. ‘She
wanted me then to promise to act’ a brother's part
to you, if ever you should be left alone; and II
do it, Larry, though 1 never can do the half, no,
nor the quarter, that she’s done for me. The
world holds no truer friend than she has been to
me; and many another will say the same.”

It is needless to dwell upon the'sad time. In
almost every house Mrs, Gilbert had been a min-
istering angel, giving freely her time, assistance,
or sympathy as it was needed, and her loss was
felt, by all to be a great calamity. And yet, how
happy the exchange for her! “For ever with the
Lord.” Who could wish to call her back from the
CHANGES. 115.

joy of heaven to the trials of earth? Even Larry,
so suddenly bereft, so lonely and heart-broken,
knew that she was happier in the presence of her
Saviour.

Many homes were opened to the boy for the
present, and many propositions were made con-
cerning his future welfare. None of them suited
him go well as the proposal of Tony, which was.
that he should sell enough of the wood land
to pay present expenses, rent out the cottage,
and then go himself to Medford and get a situa-
tion. 25

“You can get a place as office-boy or clerk,
I haven't a doubt ; and if you are steady and
faithful, as I am quite sure you will be, your
getting up in the world is only a question of
time. I’ve always thought since you traded for
that tin pail that a merchant’s life was going to
suit you better than farming. My life would have
been very different if I had attended to my books
when I was young and had the chance. Then
when I did go to work, like many another young
fellow, I was not contented.to be in a low situation
at first, but I wanted to begin at the top of the

4 its
116 LARRY GILBERT,

ladder instead of starting on the lowest round and
climbing up the natural way. So I was dissatisfied
‘with everything I tried, and went from one busi-
ness to another, frittering away my time, and now
that I have found out my mistake I am too old to
begin my life over again. It’s true, though, that
‘a rolling stone gathers no moss.’ ”

Mr. Briggs agreed to rent the cottage and piece
of wood land, also to give Larry part of the price
in advance, so that he could pay the expense of
his grandmother’s funeral, and have enough to buy
the clothing needful for the new sphere he had
marked out for himself.

When Larry handed the money to Tony, asking
him to pay the undertaker, he was told that the
neighbours had agreed among themselves to settle
that bill. “As for the tombstone, I will see to
that myself; and one of the Bible verses she loved
so well shall be upon it.”

“We also think,” continued Tony, “that it will
be something of a risk for a country boy like you
to go to town just when the warm weather is com-
ing on; so, if you are willing, the farmers will give
you work. till fall, and I will in the meantime be —
CHANGES. 117

looking around, whenever I am in Medford, for a
suitable place for you.”

Larry considered this sound advice, and was well
satisfied to follow it, finding a home wherever he
had work to do, all through the warm summer
days, giving satisfaction to those who employed
him. :

In the following September Larry went to
Medford. A great many places of business were
visited and many advertisements were answered
before a suitable situation was found. And the
one he did secure placed him in a lower position
than Tony wished. There was nothing very
stimulating to a young man’s ambition in making
and keeping fire in three large stoves, sweeping
floors and dusting goods and shelves, but the firm
of Layton & Mannering was one of the best. They
were very strict in their requirements, but just and
honest: in all their dealings, and advanced their
clerks as they increased in usefulness, and as the
way was opened. The compensation for the first
year was small, scarcely enough to pay the board ;
and Tony, taking all things into consideration, was
inclined to dissuade Larry from accepting it.
118 LARRY GILBERT.

“Tt isn’t well to be proud,” said he, “ but there’s
such a thing as selling one’s-self too cheap. They
don’t appreciate you. You are worth twice what
they offer.” :

«I suppose it ¢s the lowest round of the ladder,”
said Larry, smiling ; “but you advised me once to
start from there and climb up. If I can get a
cheap and respectable boarding place I feel very
desirous of taking this situation. . You know
I have a little spare money, and with strict
' economy I can get along for a year, hoping for
better wages after that.”

« As for a boarding house, I have settled that.
My cousin, with whom we stayed last night, is
willing to take you at a low figure. - She is a
widow, and as she has no children, she thinks
you will be company for her.” Tony did not
mention that he had desired the widow to ask a
low board, as, for the present, he would pay part
of it himself, for this Larry was not to know.

Tony made no further effort to deter Larry from
accepting the situation offered him, and that after-
noon the arrangements were made, and the next

morning found him at his post in the wholesale
CHANGES. 119

dry goods house of Layton & Mannering, to begin
as a Jack-of-all-work, and work his way up in time
to a clerkship. ‘i

Mr. Layton was son-in-law to Mr. Mannering,
and the latter being advanced in life, and some-
what infirm, made only occasional visits to the
store. Mr. Layton, the active partner, was a man
of strong will and great energy. He was punctual
and methodical himself, and required those he
employed to be so.

Larry soon found, if he wanted to give satis-
faction to his employer, it was necessary to have
his fires always in good condition, coal-scuttles
out of sight, ashes swept up, and stove-blacking
applied as frequently as the stoves became dingy.
It was a little awkward at first, but Larry, natur-
ally neat, did his best, and in a short time Mr.
Layton found no cause to complain of the new
boy ; on the contrary, he was satisfied in every
particular.

Though Larry stood in awe of Mr. Layton, he
admired him very much, and his interest was
increased by a circumstance that occurred shortly
after entering his store.
120 LARRY GILBERT.

Under Mr. Layton’s direction he was engaged
in his private office cleaning out a desk, when a
gentleman was shown in whom Mr. Layton
addressed as Mr. Phelps.

After some conversation the latter said: “1 am
going with a small party on a gunning excursion ;
next week ; suppose you join us.”

“Tt is impossible for me to leave my business
just now; but even if I could, I would need a
stronger inducement. I was effectually cured
of my fondness for hunting for mere sport some
seven years ago, and have not since been able
to get up the least enthusiasm for the sport.”

“Were you so unfortunate as to get wounded 2?”
asked Mr. Phelps.

“Not at all,” responded Mr. Layton. ‘Two
college chums and I took stage to Marleyville,
and then, with. our guns, started down the
mountain on foot. Rabbits, squirrels, quails, and
robins were as thick as blackberries, and our
trophies were numerous. About noon we came
alongside of a little low house, and seeing a
good-natured looking old woman at the window,
I went in to purchase some pie and milk; my
CHANGES. | 121

friends, in the meantime, seating themselves on
the opposite side of the road, under the shadow
of some of the finest old oaks I ever saw. The
old lady had left the room to get what I wanted,
and then I heard more plainly a sound which had
struck me when I first entered the house. . Look-
ing around, I saw a lad of eight or nine years
lying flat upon the floor, his face hid from sight.
He was sobbing in a piteous sort of way, and I
asked the woman, when she came up, if he was
sick; and this was her answer: ‘He’s crying,’ she
said, ‘for the loss of the things you’ve killed.
The birds and squirrels are dear to my boy as
brothers and sisters, for he has only me.’

“No sneak-thief ever felt meaner than I did
at that moment, and I got out of the house as
quickly as possible. I did not fire another gun ;
T could not do it. The picture of that child
. suffering for my mere sport was before me all
the time. I can see him now. I have always
felt that some time or other I would take that
trip again, and though I do not know the name
of the occupants of that little red house, I could
easily find the place. I would like to know what
122 LARRY GILBERT.

has become of that boy. My wife laughs at my
interest in him; says, when we find him we will
adopt him.”

“Rather a hasty conclusion to come to,” said
Mr. Phelps ; “grace in the boy does not always
prove grace in the man. I have always known
you to be a soft-hearted fellow, and in fact was
somewhat so myself when I was a youngster, but.
I am bravely over it, and not proof against firing
a gun when I have plenty of game.” :

The gentleman soon after left the office, and
Larry remained to wonder over the strange coinci-
dence which had brought Mr. Layton and himself
together after what had happened so many years
before.

“Sometime, when I know him better,’ he
thought, “I will tell him that I am the boy he
wants so much to see again.” |
CHAPTER X.

LARRY IN TROUBLE.

Mw LAYTON found no reason to alter the

good opinion he had formed of his new -
office-boy. Larry proved, on further
acquaintance, to be as trustworthy and particular
as first, He would have found real enjoyment in
his work if it had not been for the spirit of
mischief indulged in towards him by two or three
of the clerks. This of course, only occurred in
Mr. Layton’s absence.

Besides the bookkeeper and head-clerk, there
were three other assistants employed by the firm
—Mark Gunning, Tom Garner, and Fred Wilson.

Mark, being the oldest and biggest, was looked:
up to by the younger clerks, and had acquired
considerable influence over them by his patronis-

ing manner.
123
124 LARRY GILBERT,

Fred Wilson was but a few months older than
Larry, and only one year previous had taken his
place in the store quite as unskilled and ignorant
of mercantile life as he. Mark and Tom, with the
others, had played off jokes upon him, and had
ridiculed and teased the new comer. Nothing
more serious had been done than hiding his
brooms and dusters in out-of-the-way places, sprink-
ling small quantities of dirt in his coal buckets,
and other tricks of like nature.

Larry bore similar annoyances as well as he
could, doing his duty as far as he understood it,
and never replying to the sneering comments
made upon almost every act he performed in the

- store. !

Tn his former troubles with George Barton, how
often his grandmother had said, ‘‘ Remember, son,
it takes two to make a quarrel.”

The promise he had made her on her dying
bed, to keep close to the Lord Jesus, was ever —
-present in his thoughts, and he always felt as if
her spirit was watching near him, reminding him
of his duty, and pointing him to the source of all:
strength.
LARRY IN TROUBLE. 125

“Here, blackey, polish my boots,” called out
Mark one morning just after Mr. Layton had left
the store.

“Do them tip-top, for I am going to take a
handsome young lady to the theatre this evening.
Look out they don’t muss your hair,” and he
threw them toward Larry, hitting him on the leg.

Larry paid no attention, but went on laying
some wrapping paper smoothly on the shelf, as he
had been directed by Mr. Layton,

“Do you hear me!” thundered Mark. “Polish
those boots.”

“Mr. Layton would not wish me to leave this
work ; but if you choose, I can ask him when he
comes in.”

“Tt is not necessary to consult me on the
subject,” remarked a voice at Larry’s elbow. “As
Mr. Gunning has been in the habit of blacking
his own boots, it will be well for him to continue
to do so,” and Mr. Layton passed into his office
to get a paper he had forgotten.

The bookkeeper, Mr. Boynton, gave a quiet
smile; he was not sorry to see Mark’s imperti-
nence receive a rebuke. The younger clerks
126 LARRY GILBERT, -

laughed outright when the front door again
closed behind Mr. Layton.

Mark, humiliated and angry, turned away with
feelings of hatred toward Larry, who had thus
unwittingly exposed him.

“You got the best of him that time,” whispered
Tom. |

Larry smiled in reply; there was a sense of
satisfaction in seeing Mark humbled, and in
having Mr. Layton know how overbearing and
disagreeable he was. But he did not continue
this train of thought very long; well he knew
that his grandmother would have said, “Charity
suffereth long and is kind.” It seemed as if he
almost heard her dear voice that moment saying
it. “Yet, dear me,” he thought, “it is not an
easy thing in this place to practice it.”

The winter wore slowly away, and Larry, now
accustomed to his work, grew more contented,
notwithstanding a feeling of loneliness. The
woman with whom he boarded was kind in her
way, but thoroughly close and calculating. If
Larry was provided with sufficient food well-
cooked, and had his clothing washed and mended
LARRY IN TROUBLE. 127

in proper season, she felt her obligations to him
were at an end ; so differently did her Christianity
appear when compared with his grandmother's,
that it gave him no comfort.

“You had better be saving your money, instead
of spending it so freely,” she said to Larry one
morning, when he was calculating how much he
would be able to take to church to put in the
missionary collection, ‘For my part,’ she con-
tinued, “I mostly stay at home collection days,
or go to some other church. Charity begins at
home; and the Bible itself says, if you do not
provide for those of your own household, you are
worse than an infidel. IfI was to get laid on a
bed of sickness, or lose the little I’ve got, I’d like
to know who would look after me, or turn a hand
to keep me out of the poorhouse ?”

“T don’t believe what we give to the cause of
Christ ever makes us poorer,” said Larry, timidly ;
“at least that was grandmother’s idea, and the
rule she went by. ‘Freely ye have received,
freely give,’ was a favourite text with her.”

“When people get old and childish they do

and say many a thing that common-sense folks
128 LARRY GILBERT.

would say is foolishness. But give what you. like ;
IT don’t pretend to lay down the law for you.
Advice is cheap, and I give it for what it is worth,
and you can follow it or let it alone, as you
please.”

Such talks as these, though they did not- in-
fluence Larry, made him feel uncomfortable ; and
was it-any wonder he longed for the loving
companionship he had lost ?

He had seen Tony but once since he had
entered the store, and then it was to bid him
“good-bye” on his way to California.

“T’ve planned a three years’ trip,” Tony had
said, “and then I hope to come back for life,
T have a cousin near Los Angeles, who is raising
stock, and he gives me a first-rate offer of wages,
besides paying my way. From what he writes,
honest men must be scarce, or else he is very
suspicious. There is just one thing to keep me
from accepting his offer, and that is the thought
of leaving you. I called in to see your governor
the other day, when you were out, and he told me
you gave good satisfaction, and that it would be
your own fault if you lost your place. I feel
LARRY IN TROUBLE. 129

tolerable easy on that score,” said Tony, laughing :
“and so, as I had to answer at once, I wrote,

accepting the offer. But how do you get on with
‘those other chaps ?”

“There is only one of them,” said Larry, “ with
whom I have any trouble.”
~ “You mean that thin-looking chap that has a
hair-line on his upper lip, and walks about with a
pen over his ear? He tried to be saucy with me,
but I shut him up quicker than a clam-shell.
The scamp! If I thought he was going to perse-
cute you, I’d try and settle him before I leave.”

“Never mind me,” said Larry, laughing at
Tony’s earnestness ; “he can’t really do me any
injury, and I shall take pains to keep out of his
way.”

“Tell Mr. Layton if he don’t behave,” said
Tony ; “you’ve got rights that other people are

. bound to respect, even if you are young.”

“Mr. Layton is not a man who would encourage
tale-telling, and I wouldn’t for anything trouble
him. I think he has already had an insight into
Mark’s way of acting and talking,” and Larry

related the affair about the boots.
g ;
130 LARRY GILBERT

“Served him right,” said Tony, laughing
heartily ; “ only it will make Mark twice as anxious
to impose on you, if he can do it in an underhand
way ; but stand up for your own rights, and give
him as good as he gives you.”

“There is a better way than that, hich I’m
striving to follow: I’m trying to keep to the
golden rule; in other words, to ‘kill him with
kindness,’ as grandmother would say.”

“And grandmother was right ; and you'll doa
heap better, Larry, to remember her advice than
to listen to mine, which, though well meant, is
not wise, as I can see myself. There is a good
deal of old Adam in me yet, although I’ve enlisted
in the army of the Lord, and hope to die a con-
queror ; there will have to be a daily fight as long
as I live. You must pray for me, Larry; for
there’s a deal of wickedness where I’m going, by
all accounts; and if I don’t influence others for
good, they are bound to influence me for bad.
You ’ve got a precious legacy in old grandmother's
life and lessons ; I only wish I had them all at ay
finger-ends as you have.”

Parting with Tony was a real trial to Larry
LARRY IN TROUBLE. 131

Tony had been so identified with his past life, that
it was like cutting the last of his old associations
and throwing him entirely among strangers.

Tony informed him that he had been making
inquiries about Mr. Meredith, who had been
married six months previous, and had gone to
Europe with his wife and father-in-law. “They
may return in three months, or, more likely, not
for six,” he said. “The old gentleman is in poor
health, and they are now stopping at some place
in Germany, where there are some famous baths.
The doctors say if the sick man stays he is
likely to be cured ; so that’s the way the matter
stands. But the time will soon slip around, and
when you have Mr. Meredith to go to, you will
not miss me;” and Tony’s voice was half joking,
half earnest.

“You made a great mistake in saying that,
Tony; when Mr. Meredith returns, I shall not
expect him to take the interest in me he did when
I was a scholar. He has others nearer to him to
think about; but we two are alone, and if you
were both here, I would go to you for advice
before I would to Mr. Meredith.”
1382 LARRY GILBERT.

“Now, would you?” said Tony, his honest face —
glowing with delight; “well, if you can’t talk to
me, you can write; and mind, you are to let me
know everything that happens. I’d feel easier if
that fine squirt of a clerk was well out of your

“way. would be the thing for him. His time would then
be so taken up in admiring himself, that he
wouldn’t be likely to go out of his way to bother
other people.”

Tony felt so badly that he tried to keep up
his own spirits, as well as Larry's, by joking,
while the evening wore on. The hack arrived
at the door to take him and baggage to the
station.

He gave Larry’s hand a farewell grasp, and
rushed out to the hack without speaking a
word.

- For some weeks matters moved on smoothly at
the store; but Mark, envious of Larry’s growing
popularity, hated him in -his most inward heart,
and determined to do all he could to get rid of
him.
Before Larry came, Mark considered himself
LARRY IN TROUBLE. 133

a favourite with Mr. Layton, but now, if there
were any special messages to be taken, or im-
portant errands to do, they were entrusted to
Larry.

It provoked Mark that Mr. Layton should find
Larry so much more prompt in his errands than
he had been, for though he had always a plausible
excuse to render when Mr. Layton noticed his long
absence, he imagined sometimes his word was
doubted. And well he might, for it had been
Mark’s habit, as soon as he left the store, to light
a cigar, and then saunter along, stopping in front
of a theatre to examine a play-bill, or to go into
a saloon to take a glass of ale, or something
stronger, when invited to do so, And now his
close confinement in the store was another griey-
ance, which he wrongfully charged to Larry.

He had for some time been seeking a way in
which he might injure his rival, and change Mr.
‘Layton’s good opinion of him, and when suddenly
the chance appeared, he at once took advantage
of it. .

Passing Mr. Layton’s office door and glancing |
in, he noticed the seal ring which he always wore
184 LARRY GILBERT,

lying on the table. He had for some reason
removed it from his finger, and had forgotten it
when he left the store.

Larry was also out, and Mr. Boynton, with his
back turned, was busily engaged in writing. No
one was in sight, and Mark, putting the ring in
his pocket, went quietly to his desk. He was
very familiar with Mr. Layton’s handwriting, and,
for reasons best known to himself, had lately been
trying to imitate it. What he did must be done
quickly ; Larry would soon be in. He accordingly
wrote a short note to a neighbouring pawnbroker,
asking him to oblige him by sending back the
amount usually allowed for such an article, and to
address the package inclosing the money and
receipt to Mr. Layton.

The package was securely sealed. Seeing
Larry pass the window, Mark stepped to the door
and handed him the packet. “Mr. Layton left
word that you were to take this to the place
directed, and wait for an answer.”

Larry went off with it, and Mark again took
his seat, pretty sure that he had not been observed
by Mr. Boynton.
LARRY IN TROUBLE. 185

The next moment Mr. Layton came in and
walked directly to his office.

He looked about and then came out. “Has
. any one been in my office since I left ?” he asked
of Mark.

“No one but young Gilbert, I think,” he
replied.

«Where is he ?”

“T believe he went out some time ago,” said
Mark. “He was in the office a short time ago,
then he went out; he looked as if he had been
in mischief, he coloured so when I spoke to
him.” Hea

“T cannot think it possible,” said Mr. Layton,
“that that boy is a thief, and yet some one has
taken a valuable ring. I remember perfectly
placing it on my desk.”

“T don’t believe any charge of dishonesty can
lie on him,” said Mr. Boynton, who was called in ;
“he is not that kind of boy. But here he comes
to answer for himself.”

Larry came in, and coloured slightly as he
observed the grave looks cast upon him by the
three persons standing together.
136 LARRY GILBERT.

Mr. Layton addressed him at once. ‘“ What
did you do with the ring I left upon my desk 2?”

“Your ring? I did not see it, sir.”

“Have you been in the office since I went out ?”

“ Only to get the letters you directed me to take
to Mr. Mannering.”

“Young man,” said Mr. Layton, sternly, “you —
are the only person who has been in my office
since I left it. ‘The ring was there when I went
out; it is not there now. I can come to but one
conclusion, you either have it about you now,
or you know where it is. So confess without
delay.”

Larry breathed a prayer for help. “Mr. Layton,
God knows I neither saw nor touched your ring.
T have never in my life taken anything that did
not belong to me.”

There was no wavering in Larry’s look now,
and it carried conviction to Mr, Boynton’s mind,
but he said nothing.

“That all sounds fair enough,” said Mr. Layton,
“but I must have my ring, which is beyond money
value to me. You will not object, of course, to be -
searched ?”
LARRY IN TROUBLE. 137

“J have no objection,’ said Larry; and he
immediately took off his coat and handed it to
him.

The first thing Mr. Layton touched was the
receipt and money returned from the pawnbroker.

“ What is this ?” he asked, noticing the address.

“The packet I just brought you from My.
Nathan’s,” and seeing Mr. Layton’s look of
astonishment, he added, “ Mr. Gunning gave me
the packet, and told me to wait for a receipt, and
that is it.”

“Whew,” said Mark, raising his eyebrows -and
affecting great surprise.

“Can you explain this?” asked Mr. Layton,
turning to Mark.

“Tt is the first I have heard of it,” he replied.

Mr. Boynton noticed the look of indignant
astonishment which Larry turned on Mark as he
said, “ Didn’t you give me this packet to take
to Mr. Nathan ?”

“Certainly not,” said Mark coolly. “Mr,
Boynton can ae) that I have not left my desk
this morning.”

“T have been very busily engaged myself,” eel


138 LARRY GILBERT.

Mr. Boynton slowly ; “I did not notice, however,
that you were absent from your desk.”

Mark, thinking a bold stroke necessary, professed
to get angry, and said in a sharp tone to Larry :
“You needn’t lie about me, young man ; I won't
stand it.”

Meanwhile Mr. Layton had opened the packet,
and found the sum of ten dollars and a check for
the ring for thirty days.

“We are getting to the root of the matter now.
Come,” he said to Larry, “we will go to Mr.
Nathan’s.”

Mr. Nathan at once acknowledged that he had
received the ring from Larry, and produced the
note, which, to Mr. Layton’s surprise, appeared to
be in his own handwriting, and incensed him more
than ever against Larry.

“You might have known,” he said to Mr.
Nathan, “that I never would borrow money in
this way.”

“T asks no questions ; it ish not my business,”
said the Jew. “I accommodates many very rich
gentlemen and ladies sometimes, when they wants
a little money for a short time.”
LARRY IN TROUBLE. 139

“ Well, here’s your money, and you will please
return me my ring,” said Mr. Layton, wishing to
cut the matter short.

The exchange was made, and Mr. Layton and
Larry went, not to the store, but to a police
station, where Larry was handed over for trial.

“Why,” said Mr. Layton to the officer, “I have
never taken a boy that I have trusted so fully,
and have never been so deceived.”

“The worst offenders we have are the sly ones,
with meek countenances,” was the reply.

Poor Larry tried several times to say something
in his own defence, but Mr. Layton would not
listen, and the boy could only console himself by
the thought, “ There is One above who knows my
innocence, and whom [I can trust to save me.”

Mr. Layton, in talking over the matter with
Mr. Mannering, said, “I could have forgiven the
fellow after I got the ring, but his copying my
handwriting showed such a systematic plan of
deceit that he no doubt would have committed a
forgery on us if I had not dealt with him according
to law. The punishment may be a lesson to
hie
140 LARRY GILBERT.

Larry’s protestations of innocence were unavail-
ing. ‘The trial before the magistrate was a short
one; the evidence was deemed conclusive, and
Larry received the sentence of three months in the
county prison,
CHAPTER XI.
THE PRISONERS,

HE web Mark had woven was so skilfully
I executed that it caught his victim just as
§ he intended it should. If conscience did
chide him as he thought of the last beseeching
look Larry cast upon him, it was too late now to
yield ; besides, for his own security, it was necessary
to have so strict a defender of morals entirely
out of the way. Three months would soon pass.
Mr. Layton, he concluded, would not investigate
any further, and Larry, when free, would drift
into some other business, or—what was most
likely—leave the town altogether.
The officer who took charge of Larry to the
prison found that he was different from those
usually assigned to his care.

He looked curiously at the silent boy at his
; 141
142 LARRY GILBERT.

side, and said, “ You don’t seem to have many
friends ?”

“ My best friend is the Lord above,” said Larry,
“and He will not allow an innocent boy to suffer,
only so far as He sees best.”

“He talks more like a preacher than a jail-
bird,” thought the man ; “ blest if I don’t believe
there’s a snarl in the law in this case.” Then
aloud: “If there’s any message to anybody, or
anything I can do for you, I’ll see to it. Here’s
my number, and if there is anything I can do for
you, you can leave word with the jailer; he’s a
friend of mine, and I see him now and then. My
name is Sam Norton.” ;

Larry felt the better for this friendly talk, and
it was not until he was locked behind the prison .
doors that he fully realised his situation—so
friendless and alone, shut up in jail as a common
criminal. Refusing anything to eat, he threw
himself upon the hard pallet pointed out to him,
and wept as he had not done since the death of
his grandmother.

Feeling somewhat relieved by his tears, Larry
felt he must look his situation in the face. He


























The wheel of fortune at its lowest.—p. 142.
THE PRISONERS. 143

had not lost his self-respect, for he was innocent.
Apart from the disgrace, he knew his greatest
punishment would be his being entirely shut in
from out-door life. Then came thoughts of the
dear old home—woods where he had been with
the birds and rabbits, a ranger free to go and
come. Now, like a caged bird, he was to be shut
up from the air and sunlight of heaven. Then a
better spirit came. Was he not God’s child?
Could not his heavenly Father do what He pleased
with His own? ‘Text after text came to his mind,
and with the sweet words, “Come unto Me all ye
that labour, and are heavy laden, and I will give
you rest,” Larry committed himself to the care of
his best Friend, and fell into peaceful slumber.

He dreamed that his grandmother came to him,
holding the same old Bible, and pointed to a verse
in Genesis: ‘Fear not, I am thy shield, and thy
exceeding great reward.” It was so vivid, he
remembered it when he awoke, and it comforted |
him, The different cells opened into a hall which
led to one large room, and after Larry got up he
walked out to see who were his companions, and
also to get his breakfast, which the jailer told him
144 LARRY GILBERT.

would be handed him in the other room, for he
now felt hungry.

There was an old man, his hair white and his
limbs tottering, evidently old in crime as in years.
The first word he uttered was an oath. There was
one middle-aged man, three young men, and two
or three boys younger than himself.

“The top of the morning to you,” said one of
them as-he caught Larry’s eye.

“Shake hands, my darling; we don’t wait for
introductions here. This is Liberty Court, or
Rogue’s Retreat, just which you choose to call it,
and a new face is as welcome as the flowers in
May, a dish of baked beans, and last but not least,
- a chaw of tobacco. There is only one thing we
won’t stand,” seeing that Larry was not inclined
to reply, “and that is to have fellers come in here
puttin’ on airs. This is what we does to them,”
and in a minute Larry found himself caught up
in a sort of chair formed by the hands of two of
the men, who, after tossing him about, gave him
a send up into the air. Larry gave a spring,
turned a back somerset, and came down on his
feet.
THE PRISONERS. 145

This act won their admiration. “I thought
you was too good-lookin’ for a spooney,” said the
one who had before addressed him. “We'll git
up a circus some day for our mootual benefit.
Boots there, when he’s blacked, can dance like a
South Carliny nigger.”

Larry showed no interest in the recital, and the
fellow with a sneer turned away, while the boy ~
scanned the countenances of the other inmates,
and started as he caught the eye of one earnestly
regarding him. It was Luke Engel, a former
porter at the store, who had left for some
cause unknown to Larry. He held out his hand
to him, and his voice trembled as he said, “I
did not expect to find any one here that I
knew.”

“T never thought to see yow here,” said Luke,
in the utmost surprise. “How did it happen ?”

“You may be sure I did not come of my own
accord, but circumstances were too strong for
me.” f

“And I bet you’re innocent of what they
charged you with ; now ar’nt you, honest ?” asked

Luke.
K
146 LARRY GILBERT,

“Tam,” answered Larry, looking frankly at his
questioner ; “but with it all they proved me guilty,
and put me here for three months.”

“What were you charged with ?”

Larry narrated the events.

«And Mark himself swore against you; now,
didn’t he ?” :

“Yes.”

“Well, it’s by his kind help I’m cooped up
here,” and a scowl of hatred crossed his face.
“He bamboozled me at first; said we ought to
be friends, as we were named Mark and Luke,
after the old apostles. Then after a while he
spread out the temptation, and I, poor fool, didn’t
see he was making a cat’s-paw of me. If that
fellow’s ever come up with, as he surely will be,
he will get in a deeper dungeon, and for a longer
time than we have. All 1 hope is that my old
mother will never hear of me until I am safely
out of this, It’s amazing to me that Mr. Layton
would have believed you a thief. Why, I saw you
hand him a quarter-dollar you picked up in the
sweepin’s. Now, I don’t think at any time in my
life, but, if it had been me, I’d have kept that
THE PRISONERS. 147

quarter. I go on the principle that ‘findin’s is
keepin’s.”

“There is a better rule than that, Luke ; it is
‘Do unto others as you’d have them do to you.”

Luke’s face worked a little as he said, “I learned
that at a Sunday school once, but I don’t know
as I’ve thought of it for five years. I was not
always such a rough character as I am now. My
mother is a good woman; she took pains to teach
me what is right. All the time I lived at home
I never missed church or Sunday school. But
I gave her no rest till she agreed to let me come
to Medford. I told her it would be no time at all
till I’d earn enough to rent a room or two, and
then I would send for her. Poor old soul! And~
I have not written a word for three months or
more, and she may be worrying herself sick for
not hearing from me, likely thinking I’m dead;
but even that news would hurt her less than to
know I’m a jail-bird. Somehow the thought of
it hurts me worse since I saw you.”

“JT shouldn't wonder, Luke, if you may live to
be thankful that the Lord stopped you right off,
instead of letting you go on in sin. This may be
148 . LARRY GILBERT.

the turning point in your life, and when you get
out of this place ce will leave the old life ae:
_and begin anew.”

“T can’t say. I know I'll be a fool if I let
myself be twisted around again, as I allowed Mark
to do. If the Lord sent me here, it’s no more
than I deserve; but that He should allow an
innocent fellow like you to suffer, that’s what
puzzles me.” é

“He had a reason for it,” said Larry. “Perhaps
He has a work for me to do, even in this jail.”

“You've done me good already. Before I saw
you I felt as if I didn’t care what became of me.
I’ve never been much of a hand to swear, but
I’ve done it right along since I came here.
There are some pretty hard customers here. That
‘slim one that coughs so is ‘Slippery Dick’; he
says he’s been a thief since he was six years old.
But I heard the jailer say it’s hardly likely he’Il
live to get out of this. He’s a fellow that’s been
' brought up on the street, and mixed with the
worst kind of people. He says he’s stole as high
as three hundred dollars (£60), and now he’s
locked up for stealing a pair of boots.”
THE PRISONERS. _ 149

Larry looked with interest at the boy, who sat
leaning against the wall, playing cards with two
men. He felt a strong compassion for him. He
noticed how his hard cough racked his frame,
and the spasm of pain that passed over his face.

The boy caught his look and made a grimace.
“Purty, ain't I? When I get my trunk, I'll
give you a pictur to remember me by.”

A boy like Larry could not be thrown into
such company without being insulted twenty
times a day. He bore it all without reply, and
begged Luke, who was inclined to take his part,
not to notice anything they did or said. “Let
them call me Parson if they like; it don’t hurt
me.”

Larry won the jailer’s good-will by showing
kindness to his litéle girl, who sometimes came
to the bars when the meals were brought. She -
had been crying once over a broken toy, and
when Larry mended it for her she became his
staunch friend, and called him the good boy, and .
insisted on sharing her candy and nuts with him.
She handed him one day a large piece of molasses
candy, and after she had gone out of sight, Larry
150 LARRY GILBERT.

handed it to Dick, saying, “Maybe it will ease
your cough.”

“There’s pepper in it, or I bet you’d keep it
yourself,” said Dick, suspiciously taking a small
bite. “Why, it’s first-rate! I bet there isn’t
a fellow here that wouldn’t have eat it himself.
I’ve nothing to give you but a brass ring and a
pack of cards.”

“T want nothing. I’ve felt sorry to see you
so sick, Your cough don’t seem to get any
better.”

“No,” with an oath, “it gets worse every day ;
if I could sleep, I’d get a little strength, but I’m
awake more than half the night.”

“What do you think about when you lie
awake ?” asked Larry.

“You might think I would go over my old
tricks with some of the fellows I used to know,
but I don’t. There was one time, when I was
sent by two of my particular friends to a house
in the country. They wanted to know just about
what fastenings they had to their back doors, and
how the land lay inside; so I took the early
morning for it. Awhile before I got to the house,
THE PRISONERS. 151

T crossed over a little spring on a foot log. The
grass on its sides was green, and all through it
were lots of buttercups and mint and water-cresses
along the edge, and do you know, it has seemed
to me a hundred times, if I could lie down on
that bank, and have a drink of that cool water,
I’d be willin’ to die. The sight of it comes to
me night after night. I can see yet that green
grass dotted over with posies, and the sun shinin’
down on it and making sparkles in the water,
and hear the tricklin’ sound it made as it went
over the stones.”

“Tf you can see it and hear it from here you’ve
good eyes and ears,” replied one of the men, with
a coarse laugh, as he sauntered away.

“Dick,” said he, “there’s a better place wait-
ing for you than that sunny bank, if you'll only
take it.”

“What place? what do you mean ?” he asked.

As clearly and simply as he could, Larry told

the story of the Heavenly Home, and the Saviour
; waiting to receive all who were willing to come.

“Tf there is such a place it might do for some,

but it wouldn’t suit me. I’m not fit to be with
152 LARRY GILBERT.

them pious ; and if I was to get to the good place, _
I wouldn’t stand their throwin’ up to me what a
wicked feller I’d been. No; I jist want a place
to rest, and get rid of this awful pain.”

“But the Lord Jesus did not come to save the
good ; he died only for sinners. Can you read ?”

“No; only a word here and there.”

Larry took his Testament from his pocket, and
read the account of the crucifixion, and made his
simple comments about the thief on the cross,
who at the last had put his trust in the se
Saviour.

He thought he made some impression, but not
wishing to tire him, Larry left him to his own
thoughts.

Larry had been in prison nearly four weeks,
when he learned there would be preaching on the
next Sabbath.

“A parson comes the first Sunday in the month.
We’re to have a young man to-morrow; the
governor told me his name, but I forget it,” said
Luke.

“Do the prisoners like it? and are they willing
to listen ?” asked Larry.
THE PRISONERS, _ 153

“They can’t help themselves ; they ’d be locked
up if they didn’t behave; and anything, you
know, for a change. That fellow they call Jake
has the best voice you ever heard. The preacher
last month was old, and his voice sounded like a
jews harp; but he handed books to them that
could read, and the first tune was an old one,
and you should of heard Jake sing; he just took
the lead, and the preacher gave up entirely, and
just let Jake engineer the tune through, and he
did it well, I tell you. It was ‘Jesus, Lover of my
Soul’ ”

“T know it,” said Larry.

Four weeks’ confinement had made its impress
upon the lad. He strove to be contented with
his lot; to close his ears to the vile talk con-
tinually uttered in his hearing; to do his duty
to himself as well as to the souls around him ; but
the whole experience was so uncongenial that he
pined under it. His appetite failed, and the
jailer told his wife he was afraid the little chap
would be on the sick list. ‘He don’t complain,
but it’s clear to see he’s heart-sick. He seems to ©
have no outside friends. Sam Norton asks after
154 LARRY GILBERT,

him now and then, but he never saw him till he
brought him here.”

Larry looked forward to the preaching with
interest, and when the time came, made himself
as neat as he could for the two o’clock service in
the large room, where he was the first one to take
his seat.

A bell was rung five minutes before two,
when every man was expected to be in his place.
There were none, perhaps, in the whole number
who looked forward to the service with any real
desire, besides: Larry and Iuke, unless it was
Dick. Dick had heard a former preacher speak
of Heaven and hell, but it made no impression
upon him. Since the frequent talks Larry had
held with him, he felt as if he would like to know
more.

He knew he was not getting better. He was
losing strength ; his cough was worse, and he was
never free from pain. The words of Larry, “ Dick,
there’s a better place waiting for you than that
sunny bank, if you'll only take it,” came to him. ~
often. “If there’s such a place, and I can get
it, why not try for it? That thief was likely as
THE PRISONERS. 155

big a rascal as ever I was. If the Lord helped
him, maybe He won’t turn agin’ me; and if He
don’t help me I’m past all help in this world ;”
and so utterly helpless and miserable was he that
the tears came into his eyes, as he sat in one
corner leaning on an old cushion placed against
the wall. ou

Larry sat near him—he chose a back seat, for
he was ashamed any minister should see him in
such a place, and class him with the rest, whose
evil lives and habits were seen in their counten-
ances. .

“Let not your hearts be troubled, ye believe in
God, believe also in me.” ,

Larry started at the sound, and leaned forward
to get a good view, and saw his old friend,
Mr. Meredith. A sudden dimness came over his
eyes, and, for the first time in his life, he fainted
away. :

There was commotion in the back of the room ;
heads were. turned. Luke rose to his feet and
started back.

“What is the matter?” asked the jailer, as
Mr. Meredith paused ‘in his reading.
156 LARRY GILBERT.

“ Parson’s got a fit,’ said Jake.

The jailer and Luke carried Larry near the
door, and laid him down on a settee, that he
might get some air.

Mr. Meredith glanced toward him, and ache
came forward.

“Can it be that this is Larry Gilbert ?”

“That is his name,” said the jailer.

“The: best boy I ever knew. What has brought
him here?”

“Tt is not my place to judge,” said the jailer ;
“but I’ve thought some time that there was a
mistake about this case.”

“He’s told me all about it,” said Luke; “he’s --

innocent, but he can’t prove it.”

“He’s coming to now; he’ll tell me himself,
by-and-by,” said Mr. Meredith, going towards ©
Larry, whose eyes were open.

“How are you, my dear boy?” he said, warmly
clasping the hand held out to him between both
of his own. ;

‘Mr. Meredith, I am an innocent boy,” was
Larry’s reply.

“T believe it, Larry ; we will have a talk after
THE PRISONERS. 157 *

awhile. Now, these men are waiting, I had better
continue the service.” He took his former position
and finished reading the chapter he had com-
menced, and then made a prayer, in which he
besought the help of Almighty God for any present
who needed special help—assistance beyond the
power of man to give. ‘And, our Father,” he
said, “we know that Thou hast knowledge, and
though man may err, Thou hast all wisdom, and
canst discern all things ; therefore wilt Thou bring
light and comfort where now we are in dark-
ness,” 2

After this he gave an address on the words in
Isaiah, “Surely He hath borne our griefs and
carried our sorrows,” making it plain and prac-
tical The men, for the most part, listened
attentively. Dick’s longing eyes were fastened
on the speaker ; his heart was hungering for the
truth.

Mr. Meredith would have seated himself by —
Larry when the service was ended, but ‘the latter
urged him to go over and talk with Dick. “He
listened to every word you said, and I think he
will be glad to hear you talk to him.”
~ 158 LARRY GILBERT,

Larry went over to the place where Dick was
sitting. “This is an a friend of eee I have
not seen for a long time.”

«<’T was the sight of him that made you keel
over, I reckon,” was the reply.

“T suppose it was. Iam going to leave him
with you a while ; he wants to talk with you.”

“T am not werry good company just at the
present time,” retorted Dick with a leer, “but I ‘ll
do my purtiest to intertain your friend, bein’ as
how I’m under some obligations to you.”

Larry turned away, but Mr. Meredith saw at
once through the assumed carelessness.

“My poor boy,” said he, “do you know that
you are very ill, and that it may be the Lord’s
will, before very long, to take you from this
world ?”

Dick’s countenance changed. “Yes, I’ve got
to cave under with this dreadful pain and coughin’
all the time. Nobody knows how poorly I am
better than I do myself.”

“Then,” said Mr. Meredith, “as people when
about to go on a journey make preparation for it,
and decide the place they are going, let me ask
THE PRISONERS. 159

you what are your plans for this journey, which
"we must all take sooner or later ?”

“T wish I knew,” said Dick with great earnest-
ness. Then he told the story of the mossy bank
and the running stream, as he had told it to
Larry ; “and Parson, he says when I told him,
‘There’s a better place waitin’ for you, Dick, if
you ll only take it’ Now, Mister, I want to find
that place, for I’m "feared to die. I’ve done
heaps of wickedness, and I’d be willin’ to do
anything to make up for it, but you see here
I am, hardly able to crawl about, and I can
do nothin’, nothin’ at all,” and the tears, forced
from the poor boy’s eyes, trickled slowly down
his cheeks.

“The Lord Jesus came to save those who can-
- not save themselves, those who are willing to let
Him do everything for their salvation. When He
says, ‘Come unto Me, ye that labour and are
heavy laden, and I will give you rest,’ He means
it ; and this is your case. Just tell the Lord you
cannot save yourself, that you want your sins for-
given, and that you want a home in heaven.
Believe that He is able to do all this, and the
160 ' LARRY GILBERT.

loving Saviour will fill your heart with peace, and
when you leave this world, will take you to live

for ever with Him. Do you think you can do this, _

Dick?”

“Tl try,” said the boy, with quivering lip, his
eyes filled with a new light.

“Would you not be more comfortable in your
bed than sitting here?”

“It’s: too dark and gloomy in the cell; it’s

better out here.” :

“Perhaps you may have your bed moved. I'll
speak to the jailer about it.” ;

The jailer was quite willing to change the bed,
and also to give a more comfortable mattress.
“JT will send some drops to ease your cough, and
some fruit, and will come to see you very soon
again.”

Dick looked his thanks, but made no reply.

Mr. Meredith then held a long conversation
with Larry, when the latter gave him a history of
his life since he came to Medford.

“IT know Mr. Layton very well; he is an
honest, upright man, and has been deceived.

You may be very sure, Larry, I will not cease
THE PRISONERS. 161

my endeavours until I see you righted. In the
meanwhile, do not grieve over your situation.
I think God has blessed you even here, in per-
mitting you to bring one soul to Him, and for this
you should rejoice. And now, good-bye for the
present, my dear boy; you will hear good news
from me, I hope, before long.”
CHAPTER XII.

_ WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR.

i HERE: was a large company assembled in
- Mr. Layton’s fine mansion, and among the
guests were Mr. and Mrs. Meredith. During
the evening, among the gentlemen the conversa-
tion turned upon the rapid growth of crime in
large cities, and the many youthful criminals.
“There is certainly great need of Reform
Schools,” said one, “so that the young should
not be thrown into prison among old and hard-
ened offenders, whose companionship not only
‘nurses their tendencies to sin, but naturally leads
them, when their term of service is ended, to
leave the prison greater adepts in vice than when
they entered.” |
“TJ have seen a great deal of prison life within

the last two years,” said Mr, Meredith, “and I
162 F
WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR. 163

have known but one case to the contrary ; and
that was yesterday at the prison, where I peau
in the afternoon.”

“Let us hear it, by all means,” said Mr.
Layton.
“When I was up in the country, teaching
school, I became quite intimately acquainted with
an old lady and her grandson. She was truly a
mother in Israel, and without exception a most —
exemplary Christian character. Her grandson
partook of her spirit. He was my best pupil,
faithful and honest in every duty, and I left them
with sincere regret. You may judge, then, what
my feelings were yesterday, on finding that boy
in the prison, committed on a charge of larceny.
I had just commenced reading a chapter, when
some confusion in the back of the room caused me
to stop. A fainting boy was carried ‘past me to
the door near which I was standing, and on
glancing at him I discovered my young friend,
Larry.” ‘
“You cannot mean Larry Gilbert,’ spoke up
Mr. Layton, hastily.

“Certainly, I do; and when he recovered, and
164 LARRY GILBERT.

looked at me with the truthful eyes I never could
question, and said: ‘Mr. Meredith, I am innocent,’
I at once replied, ‘My dear Larry, I - believe
you.’”

“You are altogether too hasty in your con-
clusions,” said. Mr. Layton. ‘It grieved me
exceedingly to have that boy imprisoned, but the
evidence was conclusive. You would have said so
yourself had you been present. Because a boy
brought up in the country, away from vice and
temptation, shows no evidences of dishonesty, we
cannot conclude that when removed from the care
of watchful guardians, and made to pass through
the crucible of town life, exposed to every tempta-
tion, he will still continue upright and honest.”

“JT had not finished all I had to say of Larry,”
said his friend. “ But first let me ask you, had
you ever before this time had reason to find fault
with him ?”

“No. I must say that previously to this I
considered him the best boy I ever had in my
employ. But this fact provoked me more thap
anything else, that while he was outwardly so
faithful, he was secretly learning to copy my hand-
a WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR. 165

writing, until at last he was able to sign my name
so that those most familiar with it would have
been deceived. When he was searched,.and the
money and pawn-ticket found on him, he accused
Mark Gunning, a clerk who has been with me
three years. Of course the latter denied positively
having had anything to do with it, and was quite
enraged at the accusation.”

“My opinion, however, is that when the matter
comes to be thoroughly sifted, as I intend it shall
be, Mark Gunning will be proved the guilty one ;”
and he related what Luke had told him of the web
Mark had woven about him.

“ But,” continued Mr. Meredith, “though Larry
has been but one month in prison, he has vindi-
cated himself there. There is not a man or boy,
from the jailor down, who has not acquitted him
in their own minds. And his influence over the
prisoners has been most salutary. Luke will come
out of the prison a very different man from the one
who entered; and Dick, a poor boy dying with
consumption, whose days are numbered, through
the long ages of eternity will have reason, I hope,
to bless Larry’s faithfulness to his soul. And, Mr.
166 LARRY GILBERT.

Layton, your acquaintance with Larry took place
much longer ago than you think. Do you remem-
ber in a hunting excursion in the Blue Mountains,
your coming across a boy you saw grieving over
the game you had killed ?”

“T do, very well ; that boy and his grandmother
made a lasting impression on my mind. I don’t
remember, though, that I ever mentioned the fact
to you.”

“You never did. Larry told me he heard you
mention the occurrence to Mr. Phelps, who came
into your office to invite you to accompany
him on a gunning expedition, and recognised
himself and grandmother. I have heard the old
lady speak: of the incident myself.”

“Can it be possible! Why, if he had made
himself known I would not have prosecuted him
so hastily. As it is, I will do all I can to get him
released.”

“ His innocence must be fully proved first, and
you must be positively convinced of it, before Larry
can receive any kindness from you. I have not
been idle to-day, and all I have been able to dis-
cover satisfies me that I am on the right track for
WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR. 167

the real offender. Will you kindly allow me to
push some ideas I have without your co-operation
for the present ?”

“ Certainly ; do your best, and be assured no
one will rejoice more than I, if you can make out
that boy innocent.”

“Mr. Boynton is still with you ?”

“Yes ; and I may say that he has always thought
the circumstance of Larry’s guilt and his previous
good conduct very conflicting and mysterious.
He has blamed himself for being so engrossed that
morning with his work that he heard or saw noth-
ing that occurred outside of his desk. He was so
thoroughly impressed with Larry's goodness that
he will hail with delight anything that looks
towards his exculpation.”

“J will see him the first thing in BG morning,”
said Mr. Meredith.

When he entered Layton & Mannering’s store
the next morning, Mr. Meredith addressed himself
at once to Mark Gunning. The young man was
at his desk, and at the moment was looking over
a newspaper, which he lowered as Mr. Meredith
approached him.
168 LARRY GILBERT.

“ Are you Mr. Mark Gunning?”
“That is my name,” replied Mark, affably ;
“what can I do to serve you ?”

“I met an acquaintance of yours at the prison

on Sunday, when I preached there—Luke Engel”
—and he looked steadily at Mark.

Mark’s face changed, but almost ae ‘

recovering himself and twirling his moustache, he
said in a very indifferent tone, “ Yes, we had ; a
fellow here of that name not a great while ago, but
he turned out a scapegrace, and I naturally now
do not reckon him as one of my acquaintances.”

“T was in hopes that you knew something that
would tend to lighten his sentence. In talking
with him about his crime, he said you were the
only person who could make it easier for him, but
he doubted your willingness to do it.”

“He’s a rascal!” retorted Mark angrily, “and
unless you have a better subject to converse about
than he, I must ask you to excuse me, as I have
some pressing matters to attend to,” and laying
down the paper, he opened a ledger, at the same
time dipping his pen in the inkstand.

“I might mention Larry Gilbert, but as I pre-
WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR. 169

sume he would be quite as distasteful a subject
as Luke, I will not trespass further upon your
time,” and bowing, Mr. Meredith walked at once
to Mr. Boynton, with whom he requested a few
moments’ conversation in the private office.

It is needless to go into the particulars of this
conversation. Mr. Meredith related all he knew
of Larry, his positive belief in his innocence, and
his suspicions against Mark.

Mr. Boynton showed himself willing to do all
that he could in Larry’s behalf.

“T have had misgivings myself in regard to
Mark,” he said, “and have not been satisfied in
respect to his uprightness for some time—not
since I heard that he had been a heavy loser at
the gaming table. He certainly has no money of
his own to squander.”

As for Mark, while the two gentlemen were
thus engaged, he sat idly drumming with his pen-
handle upon the desk, rapidly taking in the
situation. Could it be that any possible clue of
his guilt could have reached them? Where was
his fancied security ? Already the officers of the
law might be upon his track. Of late, when he
170 LARRY GILBERT.

thought at all of the reckless career he was leading,
it had seemed to him that the time might come
when he would have to drop all and fly. He had
been getting deeper and deeper into debt, and the
money he had been “borrowing” from the firm,
he could see no possible means of replacing.
What could he do but leave, while it was in his
power to do so?

_ But to do this he must have money. For
Mark to plan was todo. Hastily filling out two
cheques for five hundred dollars each, and signing
Mr. Layton’s name, he said to one of the clerks he
was going out on business, and hastened to call
at two different banks, from which he drew the
money. Mr. Mannering was not well, and Mr.
Layton was absent from town for the day, and
circumstances seemed to favour the deceiver.

When Mark returned to the store he was happy
to find Mr, Boynton and Mr. Meredith still engaged
in conversation, and when they came out shortly
afterward, they found him apparently very busy
_ at his work. He did not look up, and Mr. Mere-
dith passed out without speaking. .

Mark had covered up deficiencies in his accounts

{
WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR, 171

as skilfully as he was able, and he was well aware
that it would take some application to discover the
extent of his fraud. ;

“Boynton will try to get hold of my books the
first chance he gets, see if he don’t,” and a gleam
of satisfaction crossed his face at his own acute-
ness, when, after he had locked his desk and was
preparing to go home for dinner, Mr. Boynton
remarked: “Perhaps you had better go out col-
lecting this afternoon—there are several accounts
which are behind.” _

Mark took the cue at once, Mr, Boynton little

thinking he was giving Mark just the chance he
_ wanted.
“Here is the key of the desk, Mr. Boynton,”
“‘said Mark, purposely handing him the wrong one,
“in case you need to refer to my books,” and the
two walked out of the store together.

When they separated, Mark went to a livery
stable and ordered a carriage and fast horse to be
left at his boarding-house in half-an-hour ; then
to his room, making a hasty toilet and placing a
few things in a valise; then to the dining-room to
take a hurried dinner. He informed his landlady
172 LARRY GILBERT.

that he was going on a collecting tour in the
country, and would not be home till late.

By the time he had finished his dinner the
carriage was at the door. He nodded a careless
good-bye to his hostess, who stood at the window
watching him, and drove off in a direction exactly
contrary to that he really meant to take. Making
a circuit of the outskirts of the town, he was soon
on the right road, and lashing his horse to its
utmost speed, by half past one he had reached a
way station, with little time to spare before the
arrival of the next train.

He first paid a boy for taking the horse and
carriage to a village four miles distant, telling him ~
it was to be left at the hotel, where the owner
would call for it.

Mark was very artful. By exercising this trait
he had many times saved himself from exposure ;
but his good fortune now failed him. After some
delay, Mark’s desk was opened, and Mr. Boynton,
by patient investigation, discovered his criminality.
‘He found enough the first afternoon to satisfy
himself there had been wrong-doing, but when the
next morning came and the culprit did not appear,
WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR. 1738

and later in the day, when Mr. Layton was made
aware of the false cheques issued in his name, no
further proof was needed. A thorough examina-
tion was now made, the result of which brought
out the fact that Mark Gunning was indebted to
the firm for money fraudulently taken to the
amount of three thousand dollars (£600).

A reward was offered, detectives were put on
his track, and in three weeks’ time he was brought
back, tried, and finally received sentence of five
years in the penitentiary. Poor Mark, like many
another, did not fully realise his sin until he was
suffering the punishment for it. Filled with a
sense of shame and degradation, he could now
bemoan his folly. He had bartered his liberty
and his reputation for the pleasures and whims of
a moment. He looked with disgust at his past
course, because, with all his acuteness, he had not
mancuvred better, and kept himself out of the
power of the law. :

If anything like true contrition visited him, it
was when he thought of two old people in the
country, whose idol he had been, who had toiled
to educate him, and to whom the news of his guilt
174 LARRY GILBERT.

came like a stroke of lightning.. In his success he
had been ashamed of this old father and mother :
now they were his only friends. His old mother
had whispered, as she sobbed her farewell at the
door of the jail, “ Cheer up, my dear boy ; father
and I will be thinking of you always, and will save
what money we can to give you another start when
the time is up.” But even while the proofs of
their love moved him, he would pace up and down
his cell exclaiming angrily, “Why did they give
me my own way in my childhood? Why was
I praised and flattered, and never punished? It
is their fault that I am here.” With Mark
Gunning’s career we have nothing more to do;
we can only hope that he came from prison wiser
than when he entered.

Is it not too true that the crime of gambling
with borrowed funds is very common? Do we
not read continually of men absconding with stolen
funds, besides leaving a record of falsehood and
forgery behind them? How can we account for
it? It comes from the great desire to have more
money than can be patiently and honestly earned. |

But more than all is the want of faithful parental
Re

WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR. 175

education, enforcement of the golden rule in its
length and breadth, the inculcation of the ingrained
honesty which would scorn to benefit one’s-self by
another’s loss. Francis Quarles, in his advice to
_ parents, says: “Be very vigilant over thy child
in the April of his understanding, lest the frosts
of May nip his blossoms. While he is a tender
twig, straighten him; while he is a new vessel,
season him ; such as thou makest him, such com-
monly shalt thou find him. Let his first lesson
be obedience, and his second shall be what thou
wilt. Season his youth with the love of his
Creator, and make the fear of his God the begin-
ning of his knowledge.”
CHAPTER XIII.
THE REWARD OF THE JUST.

ARRY was kept advised by Mr. Meredith of
matters in town; of Mark Gunning’s
disappearance, the proofs of his guilt, and

"his final arrest.

Messrs. Layton, Mannering, and Boynton all
came to visit him, and to express their regret that
they had been so incapable of detecting the true
from the false. Of course, when Mark was con-
victed, there was no difficulty in procuring a writ
of release for Larry, and with deep feelings of
thankfulness, he prepared to spend his last night
in jail. As he lay on his bed, too much excited
to sleep, he felt how forcibly the hand of Providence
could be seen in all; how the heaviest cross may
become a burden easily borne, and what had

seemed a most painful affliction had in reality been
176
THE REWARD OF THE JUST. 177

an honour, in giving him an opportunity of being
a messenger of grace. The joy he felt in Dick’s
conversion, the hope he had of Luke’s reformation,
was more than compensation for his unjust im-
prisonment. The anger he had first felt toward
Mark had disappeared, and he now felt truly sorry
for him, knowing how very irksome and almost
unbearable imprisonment would be to one of his
temperament.

“You look quite bright this morning,” said
the jailer to Larry, as he brought in the break-
fast. “I suppose you count on leaving us before
night. We'll miss him, Dick, old fellow, won't
we?” Z

Dick’s lip trembled, but he made no reply.

“When I get out, I’ll not forget him,” said
Larry, laying his hand caressingly on Dick’s
shoulder ; “I'll come and see you as often as I
can get off.”

“Youll not have very often to come,” said
’ Dick in trembling tones, striving to keep back the
tears. It was not strange that he should be
moved at parting with Larry. He did not re-

member his parents, and he had never before had
M
178 LARRY GILBERT.

a friend. “I know by my feelin’s,” he continued,
“that I’ve got to cave in afore long, but I’m not
afraid to go; the sooner the better,”’—his eyes
brightening at the thought, and a wan smile
crossing his lips. ;

The jailer’s eyes were dim as he turned away. ~
No greater proof of the truth of Christianity could
be shown him than what he had already witnessed
—*Slippery Dick” as he was two months ago,
and now. Even his countenance had:changed.
So coarse and forbidding at first ; now humble and
_ peaceful. The very atmosphere of the prison
seemed different. The vile talk and oaths of some
of the men now made Dick shiver. “Don’t do it,
boys,” he would beg, “if you can help it; I know
I’m. not the one to preach, for I’ve been worse
than any of you, but it hurts me to hear it now,
and you ll feel sorry for it too when you come, as
I have, to your dying bed. Larry ’s on the right
track ; pes him, and forget all the bad I’ve
told you.”

A note was handed Larry from Mr. oe
saying, “I send you some choice fruit for the
sick boy, and a basket full, which you can
- THE REWARD OF THE JUST. 179

distribute to the rest*of the men as a parting
present from yourself, I will come in_ the
carriage for you at three o'clock, and take you
to my ee which must be your home for the
present.’

Larry was most thankful for this generosity,
and passed the fruit around with an unsparing
hand, bringing forth hearty expressions of good-
will from all, and or with three cheers for
“the parson.”

Larry’s friends had also made better provi-
sion for Dick, having obtained permission for
his removal to the jailer’s house, where
he could have a quiet room with better
attention. The bed was placed near a window,
so that from his pillow he could look out upon
the blue sky and the green fields beyond.
It seemed to the sick boy like a fore-
taste of the heavenly rest for which he was
_ longing.

Before taking him to his own house, Mr.
Layton drove to certain stores, where Larry was
fitted with a complete wardrobe.

When they entered the store next morning,
180... LARRY GILBERT.

Mr. Layton took Larry to Mark’s desk. “This
will be your work now,” he said. .“ You may find
it a little difficult at first, but Mr. Boynton will
be happy and ready to instruct you in all that is
needful.”

When Mr. Layton left, the other clerks crowded
around him, eager to clasp his hands and welcome
him back. “You deserve to be promoted,” they
said. “To think of Mark’s keeping. you shut up
more than a month!” said Tom. “TI should
think if he were near you, you would feel like
wringing his neck.”

“No,” said Larry, “I did at first feel angry at
him, but now I truly pity him. It’s bad enough
to be shut up in prison with a clear conscience,
but it must be a hundred times worse to be there
knowing you deserve the punishment, and have
brought it upon yourself.”

Dick grew weaker every day, and his appetite
failed. His cough was troublesome, but he did
not suffer much pain. He was often feverish and
restless, and at times his mind would wander.
In imagination he would be lying upon the green,
sunny bank which had made such a lasting im-
THE REWARD OF THE JUST. 181

pression on his mind, and he would dip his hands,
as if to bathe his face in the clear water of the
running brook. ;

Then often he would start and murmur:
« that sunny bank, if you’ll only take it.’ I’m
going to it, I’m going to it!” and with bright-
ening eyes and joyful smile he would el his
hands in delight.

Mr. Layton could not do enough for Larry,
to atone for the rons which had been done
him.

Finding that Dick was very near his end, and
knowing how comforting Larry’s presence was to _
him, he often had the carriage brought to the
door of the store at noon, so that Larry could
take out some delicacy to Dick, while he remained
to take dinner with the jailer’s family. Mr.
Layton told him he could always remain until the
carriage came for him, and very often he was
permitted to stay until evening, reading and
talking with the dying boy.

The last day came. All pain and restlessness
had passed away. He did not notice Mr. Mere-
182 LARRY GILBERT.

dith or Larry, who sat near him, but lay as if in
a peaceful slumber. After a while he opened his
eyes. He tried to put out his hand, but he was
‘unable, and his eyes alone gave a gleam of
welcome. Then he whispered low, “And He
showed me a pure river of water of life, clear
as crystal, better than the brook; I am goimg
to it, Larry.” These were his last words; and
Dick, the poor, homeless wanderer, had gone,
in the clear hope of entering the mansions
above.

Mr. Meredith improved the occasion the next
Sabbath in the prison. He pressed home the
truth that a change was needful; that death was
unavoidable ; that, though the life had been
hitherto bad, Jesus was the sinner’s friend; that
He was near, and ready to receive all who would

- repent and come to Him.

“You know,” said he, “ what Dick was when
he came here; you know what he was before he
left; it is only God’s grace that can change a
heart as his was changed, and make him long to :
leave this world, with the sure hope of a better ©
life beyond the grave.” ~
“THE REWARD OF THE JUST. 183.

And light came into other minds which had
been darkened by sin; some, who had been
accustomed to scoff, now began to pray, and
the love of Christ was seen in making Dick's.
death a means of leading some of his old
associates to repentance and a better life.

Letters passed quite regularly between Larry
and his friend Tony. The latter was not told
of Larry’s imprisonment until it was all over,
when a full account of all the circumstances was
given him, and we can well imagine his surprise
on hearing that. a boy so nearly perfect as he con-
sidered Larry, could ever have been in prison
for supposed theft. When the three years were
nearly up which Tony had fixed upon as the
time of his absence, Larry received this letter
from him, which occasioned him bitter Sorrow :—

“The time has at last come, my dear Larry,
when I must tell you what I have not acknow-
ledged before, that my own days on earth are
numbered, The doctors say that my lungs are
nearly gone, and that nothing can be done for me.
‘T have been declining for about a year, hoping all
‘the time that my health would take a turn and
184 LARRY GILBERT,

that I would recover in this new country, where
the weather is generally so strengthening for
invalids. It was not so to be. I have just one
wish, and that is, to reach home again and have
my bones laid in the Marleyville graveyard, if
possible under the shadow of the same old tree
where lie the remains of my blessed old friend. I
expect to start in the next steamer, which will be
due in New York about the 15th of next month,
and if you could manage to meet me there, ’twould
_ be a comfort to me. I have sent to Mr. Meredith,
by this mail, a copy of my last will and testament.
I have made you my heir. You need not hesitate

to take it for fear of wronging any one. I have
~ no one near of kin, and such relations as I have
are well able to take care of themselves. When
I promised grandmother to take care of you,
I determined to do for you the same as if you
were my brother, in case I died first. I want you
to take the money, and if you can, buy back the
land of the old farm which was sold at your
grandmother's death, and use what is left to ‘fix
up the old house and barn, renew the fences, and
put things in as good condition as possible.”

he
%

THE REWARD OF THE JUST. 185

Tony’s wishes were respected. Larry met him
in New York and accompanied him to his cousin’s,
Larry’s former boarding place. Here he had a -
comfortable room, and during the few weeks he
lingered, was soothed by the ministrations of kind
and loving friends, until, the last struggle ended,
he was laid at rest under the spreading oak at
Marleyville.

Larry remained with Mr. Layton several years,
serving him well and growing in the estimation of
all who knew him. He was advanced from one
point of trust to another until he was made head
clerk, Mr. Boynton having resigned the position to
go into business for himself,

One day Larry was called to a consultation in
Mr. Layton’s office.

“T have called you in,” said Mr. Layton, “to
help me to decide a very important matter. You
have reached a time of life important to every
young man, and it is fitting that you should look
to having a business of your own. I have two
‘propositions to make, I intend to retire from
active mercantile life. My father, as you know,
left the business some time ago. I am his only
186 LARRY GILBERT.

child, and I have no children of my own, and my
means'are more than sufficient for my wants. I
now wish to offer you my present business here ; or
I will dispose of this business to persons who are
ready to take it, and set you up in the same
occupation in Marleyville, if you would rather
settle there.” :

“My kind friend,” said Larry, “you have
already befriended and helped me more than I can
ever repay. I cannot think of accepting such a
proposition. Owing to your generosity my expenses
have not been heavy, and I have saved money
each year I have been with you ; besides, I have
an income from the farm.” a

“Yes, yes; that may all be so,” interrupted
Mr. Layton, “ but it can make no difference so far
as my offer is concerned. I must have my way
in this. You have been nearly the same as a son
to me these late years, and I have intended for
a long time to do this. I only want to know in
which place you would rather make your future
home ?”

“In Marleyville is the resting-place of my own
people,” said Larry ; “and I have thought if the
THE REWARD OF THE JUST. 187

way was ever opened I would like to reside there.
Besides, it is near to the old home-farm, which
I shall never give up as long as I am able to keep
it. Thanks to my friend Tony, it is in good
repair, and the added acres bring me in a larger
rent.” .

Larry’s decision was what Mr. Layton had
anticipated, and he lost no time in accompanying
an architect to Marleyville, where an eligible site
was chosen, and a plan given for a substantial
building suitable for mercantile business. Mr.
Layton also bought a fine lot adjoining, in which
he had shade and fruit trees planted, and furnished
a plan for a handsome and convenient cottage.
“T shall hold this in my own hands for the
present,” he said to the architect, “and when
Larry finds for himself a worthy helpmeet, and
makes for himself a home, I will furnish it, and
present it to him as a wedding gift.”

A year from this time Larry was installed in
his new store. Among his helpers were two of
our old friends, Johnny Briggs and Luke Engel.
Luke had married and brought his old mother
home to live with him. He strives to make up to
188. LARRY GILBERT

her in kind and loving service his neglect of the
past. He has never told her of his past history ,
but once, when she was praising him for his good-
ness, he said, “I don’t deserve it, mother; but
one thing I want you to do, and that is to pray
_ daily that the blessing of God may rest upon my
employer, Mr, Gilbert. He was ‘the means of
saving me from worse than death, and all I am
I owe, under God, to him.”
* x Ok % %

Let us advance ten years in our story. Lawrence
Gilbert, Esq., is one of the solid men of Marley-
ville. His business is flourishing; he is at the
head of every good work in the town. He is the
minister's “right-hand” supporter and confiden- :
tial friend, a leader in the Sunday school, and a
willing friend and adviser to all who need his
‘services, He occupies the handsome, well-
furnished residence next the store; and his wife,
the presiding genius of his home, whom he calls
Susie, reminds us so forcibly of the little black-
eyed Susie Barton who won his youthful admira-
tion, that we conclude she is the same person.

A carriage has driven up to the door, and we
THE REWARD OF THE JUST. 189

can recognise Mr. and Mrs. Layton as they alight,
assisted by our old friend Larry, now, in appear-
ance and manners, as perfect a gentleman as he
was a worthy citizen.

“ How are you, Luke?” and Mr. Layton shook
hands with Luke Engel, as he took the carriage
round to the stable.

“Mr. Layton is a welcome guest. He interests
himself in all that pertains to the welfare of
Larry’s family. The children call him “ grandpa,”
as he has desired them to do, and Larry himself
entertains for him and his wife the filial feeling
of a son.

Mr. Meredith and his family are also frequent
’ visitors at the Marleyville Cottage. He, as well
as Mr. Layton, has a namesake there, for Larry
could think -of no better names for his two boys
than those of his two best friends.

Occasionally the families all join together and
make a visit to the old farm-house where the
Briggs family still resides. Thrift and neatness
are seen everywhere, and Mrs. Briggs looks far
younger and brighter than she did twenty years
before.
190 LARRY GILBERT.

Mr. Briggs, assisted by his boys, bestows good
cultivation upon the land. The best fruit and
choicest vegetables are all sent to Mr. Gilbert at
Marleyville, and Larry responds by sending many
a substantial token of good-will to them in
return,

There has been improvement in all the farms
near Marleyville. There are some new farm-
houses and barns; the fences have been put in
good repair, and a turnpike road now takes the
place of the old mountain road of other days. A
daily stage runs between an inland town (the
terminus of a railroad) and Medford, and in the
summer it is usually filled with city people
_ and their children, wishing to rusticate for
a few months in a country home among the
mountains.

At “The Four Corners” a temperance house
is kept by Mr. Hunter. Just opposite the hotel
is a little frame church, where weekly service is
held by the minister from Marleyville. A flour-
ishing Sunday school is attached, of which Mr.
John Briggs is superintendent. Mr. Meredith and
Lawrence Gilbert often visit it, and yearly contri-
THE REWARD OF THE JUST. 191 —

butions in books, papers, and cards, are made by
them to the school. Mm Layton seems almost as
much interested in Larry’s old home as they
do; and when the three families join together
and make a visit to the old farm-house, Mrs.
Briggs feels honoured by their coming, and gives
them generous entertainment. Here everything
reminds Larry of his beloved grandmother, and ~
he is taken back in imagination to the days of his
childhood.

Mrs. Briggs carefully cultivates the little garden,
with its herbs and borders of old-time flowers, and
Larry never enjoys a bouquet better than the one
which she has ready for him to take to Marleyville
on his return. ~

As his boys increase in years they love to
visit. the old woods, where the squirrels leap
about in their wildness, and where the chestnut
trees still flourish and furnish nuts for winter
evenings. ae

The spring still flows in the old place, and the
boys and their father never fail to take a drink of
the cold, pure water whenever they come near it.
With pleasure they listen to the story of his early


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