Citation
Gladys, or, The sisters charge

Material Information

Title:
Gladys, or, The sisters charge
Portion of title:
Sisters charge
Creator:
O'Byrne, E
Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Glasgow ;
Edinburgh ;
Publisher:
Blackie & Son, Limited
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
128, 8 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Selfishness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Happiness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Trust in God -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1891 ( rbprov )
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Ireland -- Dublin
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in sepia.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by E. O'Byrne.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026893880 ( ALEPH )
ALH5499 ( NOTIS )
182860915 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library

LE oop fe
Z Vy Ler 2 fi fe EOE OYUy Bown P23}?
CUO? 77 1H os Prog: CUE) GILT, car PURLEY PIFL,

Ur. tym, Yp: KOE i Ze TZ ar
WIL. 29 san niff area
TTT S ty

| _Noane "9 Givog tooKag"

Ser Aaa es Lie Maa

oa
DBEO POMC PEO Peo ME OP ODO ko rs







GLADYS.
SP?











536

GLADYs AND HER BROTHER AT THE WISHING-TREE,



GLADYS:

OR THE SISTER’S CHARGE

BY

E. O'BYRNE.



BLACKIE & SON, Limrrep,
LONDON, GLASGOW, EDINBURGH, AND DUBLIN,







Chap.

IT.
III.

IV.

VI.
VII.
VIII.
Ix.

XI.

XII.

XIII.

XIV.

CONTENTS.

HERSELF, .

Her MorTHeEr,
Her Broruer,
Tue WISHING-TREE,
Tue TROUBLE,
Tue Ripe,
SoLDIERs, .

In EprnsureH, .
THE WINTER, .
Bay,
SEPARATION,
“Cur SoHooL,” .
Pray oF Action,

WInpine UP,

Page

13
19
27
40.
50
61
72
86
92
99

. 107
. 116
. 121











CHAPTER L

HERSELF.

shining in a cloudless-sky. The air was
sultry, the flowers breathed sleepy odours,
the birds were still; it was surely altogether too
hot a day for any living thing to be busy. Why!
the field-workers were dozing under hedges, and
carts on the road moved lazily, the atmosphere
was thick and heavy with dreams.

Whrenly House, gleaming white among its
surrounding dark green, looked peaceful and in
keeping with the day. All the windows stood
open, and awnings shaded them; all around was
stillness, save when some white-capped maid
moved leisurely from one room to another, or
passed the windows drawing the awnings lower,
or stopped to speak. to a footman half asleep in

T was noon of a July day, and the sun was
\

al



8 GLADYS.

the hall. But what is this! Here are two win-
dows in the full glare of the sun, upper-storey
windows, with neither awning nor blind! The
sun pours mercilessly through them into a
spacious still room, blazes on the brass grate and
irons, and searches in vain for speck or dirt on
the white uncarpetted floor, or about the old-
fashioned heavy furniture. Everything has a
white, clean character though the heat is intense.

Sitting on the floor of this room, and in the
hottest spot almost that she could have chosen, -
was a little girl of about eight or nine years of
age, whose thick brown hair at present falls over
and hides her face, which is bent low on some
work of an apparently absorbing nature. It is
sewing, and the little red hot fingers fly in and
out untiringly. The article on which she is at
work is a doll’s coat, ulster shape, and she seems
to be expending care and pain upon it, uncon-
scious or careless of the heat, for she never thinks
to draw the blinds. Now and then she tosses
back her heavy hair, giving to view for a second
a flushed cheek, and shadowy look as of dark
eyes or eyelashes, and then the head is bent again
more earnestly than ever.

Beside her on the floor are a little work- box,
some shavings of cloth and work things, and a



HERSELF. 9

bird’s cage, which however has its awning right
enough; and the wise little inmate has made up
his mind, that watching his mistress occasionally
with one sleepy eye is as much as could possibly
be required of him on a day like this.

The little girl in threading her needles pauses
sometimes to say a few tender words, to which
the bird lazily responds; then again there is still-
ness.

The glaring noon passes; for more than two
hours the child sits hard at work, then a heavenly
breath passes through the room, drawing from
her an unconscious sigh of relief. The birds’
voices sound from without in glad chorus, a bell
rings in the distance, then the door opens and a
servant looks in.

“Miss Gladys! Oh, younaughty girl. Sitting
there still, and never moved since dinner-time.
What are you doing?”

“None of your business,” is the ungracious re-
tort. ‘You go along and don’t worry.”

“Where is your nurse?”

“Dunno. Yes I do, though. I think she went
to the farm.”

Then the maid disappeared. The girl tossed
back her hair defiantly and went on with her
work again. :



10 GLADYS.

Presently a child’s voice was heard calling—
whistling and shouting. The little girl paused
again, raising her head now with the expectant
air of one listening to a beloved and familiar
sound; her little plain flushed face and beautiful
eyes became glorified by an expression of deep
and powerful love. The shouts and whistling died
away, the look faded, once again she bent over
her sewing. Another half hour passed, and then
the sound of wheels in the gravel raised the busy
head again, but with a very different expression.
“There's Mama,” she said; “now I must stop and
go.” But though she reiterated this statement
more than once, a full half hour passed before she
made any movement; then the work was finished
and she rose, and at the same moment the door
opened, and a tall woman in cloak and hat
entered, hot and dusty. -

“Miss Gladys!” she exclaimed fretfully. “Oh,
you troublesome child. Not ready, and her lady-
ship’s bell will ring this moment. What have
you been doing? I never knew such a trouble-
some, naughty girl.”

“ Are you tired, Nurse? You do look hot. Was it
nice at the farm? is Jenny’s leg better? and how
is the little sick cow?” was Gladys’ placid answer.

The nurse threw off her bonnet and jerked



HERSELF, : jl

down the blinds. “The room is like an oven, and
I suppose you have been sitting here since dinner.
What have you been doing?”

“This! Look, it is finished. Isn’t it nice?” And
she held up the little ulster, now completed even
to the small tweed buttons and hood, with an ©
expression of pride. The nurse, a good-natured
creature, looked, and forgot her anger in admira-
tion.

“Well, well, and you did all this! You are the
cleverest child with your needle I ever knew.
And little pockets and all, dear me! Did you cut
it out yourself?”

“No, Baby’s tailor did. It’s for Baby’s monkey. —
T hope he'll like it.”

“Likeit! He doesn’t deserve it. If he don’t, it’s
my belief you'll spoil him. Take care he doesn’t
turn ungrateful, Miss Gladys, and give you small
thanks for your pains.”

“Oh rubbish, Nurse. You talk like a goose.
Baby is the best boy ever lived.”

“Well, well, so his mother thinks—”

“Yes and his sister, and that’s enough,” said
Gladys with a sharp imperious accent of command,
the more effective with the servants because she
was usually so easy under their frequent attacks.
And now she finished gathering her things, hung



12 GLADYS.

up the bird’s cage, and passed into an inner room,
whence issued sounds of splashing and clatter
enough for a whole regiment of soldiers, and in
a short time she reappeared, looking bright and
fresh, in a white dress, silk stockings, and bronze
slippers, her thick brown tangle brushed and
shining, and her poor cheeks and hands carmine.

“Oh, Nurse, I wonder will my cheeks and hands
always be so red,” she said with a sigh. “How I
wish they were waite or pretty pink like Baby’s
and Mama’s.

“Hurry down, like a good child,” said the
nurse; “her ladyship’s bell hasn’t rung yet. And
as for red cheeks, my dear, it’s an honest healthy
colour, that’s my belief.”

“Bosh!” was Gladys’ retort as she left the
room. Passing along a bare passage she opened
a baize door, and here’the region of uncarpetted
floors and old-fashioned furniture ended. It was
like entering fairy-land. Her small slippers sank
into the rich carpets noiselessly; dim light from
painted windows fell upon her, dying her white
dress with amber and purple, and a great crimson
stain across her little heart; marble statues
answered the wistful question of her eyes with
classic unmoved calm. Down two flights of stairs
she went, then entered a wide hall filled with the



HER MOTHER. 13

perfume of exotics and the glory of the afternoon
sunlight.
At that moment a bell rang sharply.

CHAPTER IL
HER MOTHER.

N one of the cool shaded rooms two ladies sat;

or, rather, one of them lay on a couch, breath-

ing languid rejoicings over the coolness, while

the other, a stylish, cool, breezy-looking young

lady, arranged a dainty tea-service just brought
in, and prepared to pour out tea.

“T saw your boy in the gardens, Gladys,” she
said as she did so; “he is a lovely fellow.”

“Ts he not?” said the other with an expression
of earnestness on her handsome but habitually too
languid face. “Oh, every one thinks him lovely.
What should I do without him? Oh, thank you,
Florence. It is too lazy of me to allow you to do
all that; but you are so energetic.”

“Yes, and lazy people always have to be served
some way,” said the young lady laughing. “But
what about your little girl? I have not seen her
yet.”



14 GLADYS.

“Qh,” said the mother in a tone of contempt
and indifference, “she is an enfant terreble. I
don’t know what to make of her. I dread to
think of the time when she will be grown-up.”

“Why, dear?”

“Oh, she is so plain, poor thing. So odd, was it
not, Florrie, that I should have a plain child, and
the boy so handsome?”

“But, Gladys, I heard she had a fine figure and
beautiful eyes.”

“She may have. I never noticed anything but
that she is very plain, and her face and hands
always, my dear Florrie—always crimson. Had
I known it when she was born I should have had
her called Carmina. It has given me quite a dis-
like to my own name.”

Florence glanced at her friend with a good deal.
of contempt in her bright eyes.

“Is she fond of the boy?” she asked pre-
sently.

“Oh, very, I believe,” returned her friend half
grudgingly, half enviously; “but indeed I see al-
most nothing of her except that she comes in and
goes out with the tea-things. I think it refines
children’s manners to have them in the drawing-
room occasionally, and she can really serve tea
and behave quite respectably now,”



HER MOTHER. 15

“Ts she shy?”

“Oh, not at all. She says anything, anything
she likes. It gives me palpatations sometimes
really to hear her. She is not a favourite at all;
never will be, ’'m sure. Now Baby, every one
dotes upon him.”

“T wish he would make his appearance again.
Isn’t the cool delicious?”

“Delicious! Oh, thatreminds me. Would you
kindly ring, dear, please: the child will be wait-
ing, I daresay.”

Florence rang the bell, and at thats instant
Gladys appeared.

_She came forward and spoke to her mother’s
friend, watching her all the time with dark dis-
trustful eyes.

“Where have you been all day, Gladys?” her
mother asked.

“Up in the nursery.”

“ All day!”

“Yes. I was sewing.”

“Sewing! What?”

“A coat for the monkey—Bahe’s monkey.”

Then she helped -herself very calmly to tea
and cake, and took a low chair. Her mother
gave a hopeless little glance at her friend, then
continued: “Where is Baby?”



16 GLADYS.

“I dunno. I heard him about an hour or more
ago. He was shouting around somewhere.”

“T wish you had found him and brought him
in for some tea.”

“T should have; but you see Nuss says it’s
sheer folly giving him tea and heavy cake now,
It spoils his appetite for his supper, she says.”

“ And how about you?”

“T dunno. She says I’m as strong as a horse.”
And thereupon she took another piece of heavy
cake and ate it up rapidly, as though to prove it.

At this juncture one or two gentlemen entered,
hoping they did not intrude. And the lively
young lady helped them to tea, and Lady Whrenly
assured them they did not, and Gladys regarded
them with the distrustful look she had for all her
mother’s guests.

They sat down and began amusing themselves,
as so many grown-up people do, with teasing the
little girl. But Gladys, with a child’s instinct,
felt herself to be the butt of some of her mother’s
guests, and retorted with a quick suspicious bitter-
ness, which was sad, because so unchildlike.

“Well, Gladys, and what have you been doing
to-day—eh?” inquired one.

“Working,” returned Gladys, polite but laconic.

“Working! Insuch weather, not really! And
(536)



HER MOTHER. 17

what were you working at—ploughing or mowing
or digging ?”

“T was making a coat fora monkey. I think
it would suit you.”

There was a hearty laugh at this; but Lady
Whrenly reproved Gladys for rudeness. The
little girl continued her meal perfectly unmoved
by censure or applause.

Another young gentleman attempted a jocular
vein. “Well, Miss Gladys, where have you been
in hiding from all your admirers to-day? and
where is that wild pony I saw you riding last?”

“JT am thinking of changing it for a donkey,”
said Gladys, “home bred;” and it was impossible
to tell from her manner whether she spoke in
innocence or malice. There was another laugh,
and in the confusion occasioned by her father’s
entrance with some guests, Gladys, having finished
her tea, quietly escaped.

This one hour in the afternoon was the only
time her mother ever required her to put in an
appearance, and often the only occasion on which
Gladys saw her mother for days or weeks.

It had never been an hour of any pleasure or
happiness to Gladys; but she had characteristically
come to look upon it as a matter of business, and
gf course it was always a consoling reflection tq

(536) _&



18 GLADYS.

remember the tea and cake. At any other time
of the day she did her utmost to escape meeting
either her mother or such friends as happened to
be staying in the house, knowing well that the
sight of her gave as little pleasure to them as
they gave.to her.

She had long known her mother’s indifference,
and half words coldly and carelessly dropped in
her presence left her with a pretty correct esti-
mate of what her mother considered her.

“A plain creature, poor thing, with such red
cheeks and hands, and so odd.”

There was under all this a strength and sweet-
ness in Gladys which kept these bitter things
from rankling; and which made her, while she re-
venged herself, bear no malice.

And then, as she said to herself, she had Baby.
Was that not enough for anyone!

Later that evening Florence sat in her friend’s
dressing-room, idling away a few minutes before
dressing for dinner.

“JT think you are quite wrong, Gladys,” she
was saying. “She is a very clever child, and I
am almost certain she will grow very hand-
some yet. Why, what numbers of red-faced chil-
dren you see. And then she has beautiful eyes.”

“Well, dear, you may be right, but you saw



HER BROTHER. 19

yourself how odd and sharp she is; not childlike
at all.”

“Oh, that will be wit when she grows up if she
is good-looking.” ;

“Well, Iam glad it is a long way off yet, and
in the meantime she really is not much in my
way.”

“ And she seems to be a good child.”

“JT don’t know. I hear her fighting with her
maids sometimes. There, do have done about
her, Florrie. What will you wear to-night? Sir
Archie is here, remember.”

In the meantime Gladys had gone in search of
her brother.



CHAPTER [II
HER BROTHER.

HE went swiftly back to the region of carpet-
less floors and old furniture, the only part of
the house that was home to her, and there she
was not long in tossing off her finery, and doning
leather shoes and linen frock. The nursery was
delightfully cool now, and the nurse preparing
tea looked cheerful and good-humoured. “ Where
is Baby, Nurse?” Gladys inquired



20 "GLADYS.

“Indeed I don’t know, Miss Gladys; and here
is his tea almost ready. I wish you would go and
look round for him, my dear.”

Gladys seized her sun-bonnet and ran off, down
a little flight of stairs and out by a side door,
across a lawn and away through shrubbery paths,
calling loudly as she went, but receiving no an-
swer.. After the confinement all day the evening
breeze was. delicious, and the evening sunlight
fair and lovely to the girl’s eyes; for Gladys was
gypsy-like, and always happiest under the open
sky.

“Baby! Baby! Baby!” her voice sounded
through the grounds, as she emerged from the
shrubbery and ascended a smooth grassy slope,
and cast her keen young eyes around.

There was the house back there, and she could
see the lawn in front of the drawing-room win-
dows, and one or two ladies and gentlemen who
had evidently come through the French windows
to enjoy the air. Could Baby be there? No he
was not. She ran down the other side, and turn-
ing off into a side avenue reached the stables. A
long fruitless search and inquiry left her hot and
breathless, and with but one more ‘unsearched
haunt—the gardens.

“Well, Nurse will be in a rage, but I can’t help



HER BROTHER. 21

it,’ she thought as she turned towards them.
“That stupid Minnie should not have jetty him;
his supper will be cold.”

The gardens were very still, but her first call
was answered by a yell of woe which sent her
flying in its direction, breathless and alarmed.
On the floor of a summer-house she found her
brother, roaring in such distress that for a time
it was difficult to make out what the matter was.
Gladys squatted down beside him, wrapping her
arms around his sobbing form.

“What is it? Baby, why you are crying?”

“T’ve lost it,” said the boy between his sobs,
which were redoubled at sight of a comforter.

“What, dear? What have you lost?”

“My pencil—my little blue one. I was draw-
ing lovely horses with it, an’ it dropped,” and then
he sobbed again.

Gladys looked around, and soon perceived that
the stone floor of the summer-house was adorned
with sundry blue scratches, faintly resembling
telegraph poles and wires, but which the happy
imagination of childhood had converted into noble
and prancing chargers; but she could see no signs
of the instrument of art by which they had been
executed.

“Look here, Baby,” she then said, “ Nurse sent



22 GLADYS.

me out to look for you. Your supper was ready,
and it must be cold now. Won't you come?”

“No. I want my pretty blue pencil.”

“But Ive made the coat for your monkey so
pretty. Won't you come and see it?”

“No. I want to draw more horses.”

“But, Baby, Nurse will be angry. See, if you
come I will give you my little white knife.
Don’t cry any more. Do come.”

“Oh, but I want it ever so.”

“Very well, if you will come now I will come
back and look for it and find it for you.”

“Will you? and here for the first time he
ceased his sobs altogether, tossed back his long
golden curls, and raised a tear-stained. but most
lovely face, with hope once more lighting two
liquid eyes. “ Well, will you carry me on your
back?”

. “Yes. Get up on the seat.”

Then the mourner rose to his feet, and proved
to be almost as tall as his sister but much slighter;
none the less far too heavy a burden for the
little girl.

She did not seem to think so. Getting him on
her back, she carried him with surprising ease
over the lawns and through the shrubbery paths
until they reached the nursery wing, then she



HER BROTHER. 23

put him down on his feet, and they went in at
the little door together.

The nurse and Gladys relieved themselves by
scolding the maid who should have had charge
of the boy during the afternoon; and the baby,
in delighted contemplation of his knife and the
coat for the monkey, forgot his troubles. His
“Dear Sissy!” repeated delightedly two or three
times were sufficient reward to Gladys for her
long day of toil, and much amusement was created
when they got poor “ Puck” and fitted on his new
coat.

“Won’t you take it down to let Mama see it?”
the sister asked. But Baby declared no; he didn’t
like the people to stare, and the ladies to say
lovely boy and touch his hair.

“Td rather have you, Sissy, than all of them.”

“ Not than Mama!” said Gladys horrified. “Qh!
you mustn’t say that, Baby.”

“But I do like you best,” the boy maintained.
“You do everything for me, and Mama has always
those nasty ladies with her.”

Gladys felt this to be treason on Baby’s part
when the ladies made so much of him, but she
did not know very well what to say in their de-
fence. “I am going to look for your pencil,
Baby,” she therefore changed the subject by say-



94 GLADYS.

ing. “You'll be in bed before I come back, but I'll

come in time to tell you the story before you go

to sleep.” And as the nurse led the little boy off
' Gladys left the house once more.

It was after nine o'clock now; a dewy misty
night, but beautiful and still, She had little hopes
of finding the pencil, but meant to do her best. As
she went thoughtfully along the shrubbery paths
her nose sniffed cigar smoke, and warned her to get
out of the way. Some of the gentlemen having
an after-dinner stroll, It was no unusual thing
for her to cross them thus in the evening, though
it was always her care not to be seen. She now
withdrew into the thick shrubbery, and so re-
mained easily concealed, while the voices and
steps drew near and passed, and she heard one
voice say: “I only heard it to-day, but I believe
it is a fact. Whrenly didn’t like to tell Lady
Whrenly before.”

“A governorship, did you say?”

“Yes, I believe so. In the East Indies some-
where. Croom, I think.”

“Will Lady Whrenly go with him?”

“T believe so, but not the children. I have
heard it’s a very unhealthy place.”

Then the voices and steps died away, and Gladys
came out on the path with a stunned and guilty



HER BROTHER. 25

feeling. What was this she had heard! Her
father got a governorship in the Hast Indies!
And her mother and father going away and she
and Baby left behind! It could not be, it seemed
such a strange, unreal thing.

.No one could put two and two together so well
as Gladys, and as she thought she did remember
scraps of conversation about its being the thing
her father would like,” and “difficulties,” and her
mother “not liking the idea.” Now these hints
were taking shape and form in this terrible
way.

She reached the summer-house, and sought in
summer light for the bit of treasured pencil, and
more fortunate than she had hoped, found it sunk
between two uneven stones. She put it in her
pocket and went back towards the house. On
some sudden impulse she went to the front before
the drawing-room windows. The room was a
blaze of light; her mother, beautifully dressed,
with other gay ladies, sat and lounged round,
talking, flirting, and fanning themselves.

“She certainly does not know,” the child
thought, “or she would not look so. She would
not be sorry to leave me, but oh, poor Mama, what
would she do without Baby!”

Then she went quickly back. to her own



26 GLADYS.

quarters. “Master Bernardin has been watching
for you,” said the nurse.

Gladys went into the little boy’s room, and
sitting on the edge of his bed held his hand.

“Who was I telling you about, Baby?”

“ David, what watched the sheep and killed the
giant.”

“ Ah, yes; very well,” and in her own childlike
words she told him those wonderful Bible stories,
which ever afterwards were to have for the boy
the mysterious and magic charm of early and
beloved associations.

Oh! long, long afterwards he must remember
the loving dark eyes that watched him, the hand
that held his through childish fears, and all the
untiring care and work.

He was quite right when he said he loved her
best; it was the child after all mpe was doing
the mother’s work.



THE WISHING-TREE, 27

CHAPTER IV,

“The Wishing-tree.
If fairy tales were true
And fortune were my hap.”
UT even while she was telling of David, and
holding her brother’s hand, Gladys’ mind
was dwelling upon the words she had overheard.
And when at last the thick dark lashes lay at
rest on the soft cheeks, and the boy’s gentle
breathing and meekly folded hands told of child-
hood’s blessed rest, the little girl left his bed-side,
and passing into the empty nursery now flooded
with moonlight, went over to the window, threw
it open, and kneeling down before it rested her
elbows on the sill, and looked out at the still
night-land she so dearly loved.

The words had lost their reality for her now,
and seemed like a dream; she could not imagine
their life different from what it had been as far
as she could remember. London in the season,
and sometimes Brighton for autumn and winter,
were the only changes she had ever known.
Once a dread thought came to her, and made her
start to her feet with a cry. “What if Mama
should take Baby and leave me! Oh! surely,
surely she never, never would.” Though she



28 GLADYS,

did not guess it, her rosy cheeks were pale
enough now. It seemed to her if that happened
she could not live. She thought it all over again,
trying to remember all the words she had heard,
which were already fading from her memory.

She must have remained at her window for a
long time, for by and by she heard a clock strike
ten, and rose to her feet. “Nurse will be coming
up from her supper in a minute, and will rage,”
she thought.

Raging was the habitual attitude of the ser-
vants towards her, though in reality they had no
authority over her; and she was well aware that
she ruled. One reason was that the servants
knew how useless it was to make any appeal to
Sir Ralph or Lady Whrenly. “If they cannot
keep the children in order without annoying me
they must go,” was Lady Whrenly’s command.
And, secondly, the maids had learned to dread the
days in which “ Miss Gladys took it into her
head to be wicked.”

So poor Gladys, in spite of her servants, was but
little looked after and got small attention.

Now she went to bed with no loving good-
nights and kisses from dear voices and faces, to
be with her in her dreams.

And certainly she said no prayers.



THE WISHING-TRER. 29

Next morning the words seemed more dream-
like than ever. She slept rather late, and when
she wakened found the sunlight streaming be-
tween chinks of the blinds, and heard the sound
of Baby’s voice from the nursery, where he was
engaged in earnest conversation, not to say alter-
cation, with Nurse.

“T won't go with Minnie—so there! She’s
horrid. I ran away from her yesterday when she
was talking to Robert in the yard, and I met a
lady—no, two ones, and she said, ‘Hadn’t I not no
maid.,’”

“Naughty, naughty boy,” came the nurse’s
voice; “you must stay with Minnie to-day. Now
go on and finish your breakfast.”

“T sha’n’t go with Minnie, I tell you. I’m going
with sister. Dll ask her to take me to the Wish-
ing-tree. Iknowshe will. And I’ve got a beauti-
ful wish to wish. No, I don’t want an egg; take
it away, it’s horrid. Give me some honey, please.”

“You cannot go to the Wishing-tree to-day;
one of the ladies has asked to have Miss Gladys
with her. So you must be a good boy, and stay
with Minnie.”

“No I won't,” in most decided tones, and with
the banging of a spoon on a plate for emphasis.
“« And I'll ask sister nat to go with the lady, but



30 _ GLADYS,

to take me; and I know she will. Is sister still in
bed, Nurse? Wonder why she’s not up. Shall I
go and see?”

At this Gladys sprang out of bed, and coming
to the door declared she did not think it was so
late, and she would be in a minute, and then dis-
appeared. And sounds of splashing, and a violent
racket among the furniture, informed all whom
it might concern that she was engaged on her
ablutions; and by and by she appeared, fresh and
rosy, with well-brushed hair and bright eyes, a
by no means unpleasant picture, in spite of Lady
Whrenly’s cold and unmotherly opinion.

She was very eager to hear this bit of wonder-
ful news about being invited to go with one of
the ladies. It was so very unheard of a thing;
never had it happened before. Who could have
been so very unwary?

She made immediate inquiries of the nurse,

while Baby, having despatched an excellent break-
fast (his mother thought he was delicate and had
no appetite), listened also, only beginning and
ending with, “ But Sister isn’t going, I know. She
is going to take me to the Wishing-tree. Won't
you, Sister?”

Now, it must be confessed Gladys was some-
what tempted. It appeared Miss Florence had



THE WISHING-TREE. 31

taken a fancy to the little girl, and had asked
leave to have her company for the next day in a
riding expedition to some famous ruins. Gladys
rode well, and knew every place round, her mother
said.

It was so charming to poor Gladys to find any-
one wanted her company, and she was delighted
with the idea of acting cicerone, and she loved
riding; altogether it was very tempting. But
Baby’s great entreating eyes were on her. “You
won't go, Sister, to leave me?” Her hands were
playing lovingly with his yellow ringlets. “Do
you want to go very much to-day, Baby?”

“Oh yes, Sister. I must wish my wish to-day.”

“When was I wanted, Nurse?”

“Twelve sharp, Miss Gladys. You were to
take lunch with Lady Crony when you had seen
the ruings.”

Still more tempting. Gladys regarded her
brother wistfully; he no less pleadingly watched
her.

“No time for both,” she said. “Oh, Baby—”
there was a little pause, her brows were gathered,
then her face cleared. “Very well, dear, we will go
to the Wishing-tree.”

“Miss Gladys!” said the nurse horrified. “What
message am I to send to her ladyship?”



32 GLADYS.

“None; I will send a message myself. And you
can send Minnie to the farm about the dairy
things, for I will look after Mr. Bernardin to-day.”

Baby gave a jubilant whoop and careered
round. “Oh, you good Sister, I do love you!” he
exclaimed. “ You’re better than anyone else. We
will go to the dear Wishing-tree. I am so glad.”

Gladys steadily finished her bread and honey.
Her face was rather sulky, and she made no
answer to Baby’s many joyous questions; but we
must remember she was swallowing a great deal
more than honey with her bread.

As soon as her breakfast was finished she went
determinedly out by the baize door, into the
region of fairy-land, and down the soft wide
stairs. In the hall she met a servant.

“Miss Gladys, what are you doing here?”

-exclaimed the maid, quite amazed at so unusual
a sight.

“Mind your own business,” retorted Gladys
crossly, “and tell me where are Lady Whrenly
and the other ladies.”

“Not down yet, of course, you naughty girl;
and you better run back to your nurseries—bless
the child!” The last exclamation was given ina
tone of alarm as Gladys suddenly darted through
the hall and out at an open glass door,



THE WISHING-TREE. 33

Through it the child had seen her mother’s
friend walking on the lawn, with her little Prince’
Charlie gambolling round her feet. Gladys went
up to her with a quiet self-possession which had
nothing of forwardness in it.

“Good-morning, Miss Dighton,” she said. “I
came to thank you for asking me to ride with
you to-day. I should have liked it very much—
wmmensely,” she added with amusing emphasis.

“Then I hope we will enjoy our ride,” said
Florence, smiling at the little girl’s earnest face.
“Ts your Mama down yet?”

“Oh, I don’t know. How should I? I never
come down here except I have some special mes-
sage. I think Jane said breakfast was at ten, or
was supposed to be. What I wanted to say was,
I am so sorry I could not go with you.”

“ You cannot come?” said Florence, half amused,
half annoyed.

“T should have liked it very much,” repeated
Gladys, “but Baby wants me to take him to the
Wishing-tree.”

“Oh! and could Baby not go with the maid?”

“ He doesn’t like her; neither do JI. She is leav-
ing.”

“And you would rather go to the Wishing-

tree?”
(536) c



34 GLADYS.

Gladys stopped puzzled, she was not accus-
tomed to analyse her actions. “I think I would
rather have ridden,” she said slowly; “but you
see—Baby—”

Florence watched her truthful expressive face
for a moment, then she said kindly:

“Very well, Gladys; then we will ride another
day. Do you think you could come to-morrow?”

“Oh yes, I’m sure I could!” exclaimed the little
girl joyously. “ Youare very kind. You see, if I
have time to make other arrangements for Baby
he will be quite good. Perhaps Mama would have
him to-morrow.”

“T will try and manage it,” said Florence good-
naturedly. Gladys beamed. “Now, it is not ten
yet, so perhaps we might have a run round to the
garden for flowers.”

“Oh, I should like it,” said Gladys; then she
suddenlystopped. “No I can’t; there’s that hateful
Mr. Philips—yes, and Sir Archibald. I’m off”
And she vanished with inconceivable rapidity,
leaving Florence to face the two gentlemen alone,
and somewhat discomfitted at the sudden depar-
ture of her little companion.

Gladys was soon back in the nursery.

“Now, Baby,” she said, “we must get every-
thing ready, and our lunch packed, Get on your



THE WISHING-TREE, 35

thick shoes, and I'll go downstairs and hunt up
something good to eat. Will you take Puck?”

“No; but ring for Minnie, please, Sister, to come
and put on my shoes.”

In about an hour the two were ready to set out,
Nurse having proved unusually amiable as to
provisions, feeling, in truth, a weight off her mind —
with regard to the spoilt heir, who would, she
knew, be all right and good so long as he was
with his sister. Gladys was only two years older
than her brother, but she was many years older
in experience, the boy being childish; so that
while the little girl was allowed to go and come
at will the boy never went unattended, though
Gladys most frequently proved to be the atten-
dant, and that was considered perfectly safe and
right.

So they went into the sunlight hand in hand,
gloriously happy and untroubled, Gladys with
the basket and Baby bearing a stick; and those
vague, unpleasant words had quite vanished from
the little girl’s mind.

The Wishing-tree was a good two miles dis-
tant; quite a day’s expedition there and back to
the two little people. It stood on a rocky knoll
in the very heart of a great corn-field, belonging
to one of the farms. A splendid tree for climbing;



36 GLADYS.

and wonderful were the stories told about it, and
its power to grant wishes. It was said that when
you crouched in the great hollow of the old trunk,
and wished your wish, the tree-fairies floated
with it up to the topmost twigs among the broad
cool leaves; and when the evening came the air-
fairies came along on the evening breeze, and bore
the wish away to the great fairy who grants all
wishes. Often the children had looked and
peered about for a sight of the wonderful elves,
but always fruitlessly; for you must know that
the fairies only show themselves to those who
have ceased to have any wishes.

The children had the shade of their own
wooded grounds for a good part of the way, then
the dusty road and the burning sun, and then the
cool shady lanes and by-ways, and here they are
at the great field in the midst of which stands
the Wishing-tree.

A narrow pathway between two walls of golden.
corn leads to it, and down this alley the two
children go, glad that their journey is so nearly
ended. Great red poppies and corn-flowers stand
out and nod to them, and tall dog-daisies tempt
them to venture a step or two into the thinner
corn, Baby longs to stop, but Gladys pulls
him on and up the little steep rock unto the



THE WISHING-TREE, 37

grassy knoll, and into the shadow of the Wishing-
tree.

Both plump themselves down with great sighs
of relief, and Gladys pulled off her sun-bonnet
and Baby’shatexclaiming, “Oh, isn’t this delicious!
Now we'll have our dinner.”

Both were ready for it after their long walk,
and until they had conscientiously emptied the
basket neither alluded to their wishes. Then
Gladys said, “ Will you go inside and wish, Baby?”
and she rose to her feet and took a survey of the
yellow sea around her, motionless in the burning
noon sun.

“Yes, won't you, Sister?”

“No, I’m going to climb up into the branches
and wish from there.”

“Oh!—and have you got a good wish, Sister?”

“JT think so—I don’t know,” Gladys looked a
little uncomfortable here. “Have you?”

“Oh yes, a beauty. I’ve been thinking of it all
night and day. Do you think I'll get it?”

“T don’t know. You mustn’t tell it to anyone,
or you won't. Now, you wish first.”

The little boy rose, a most solemn and impor-
tant expression on his beautiful little face, then
he disappeared into the hollow of the tree, shut
his eyes tight, and wished in tones so audible



38 GLADYS.

that they easily reached Gladys’ ear, and alarmed
her with a sense of eaves-dropping and guilt.

“Oh fairies, I want a little puppy dog like
Miss Dighton’s, ever so, ever so.” |

Then he reappeared with the air of having
relieved his mind of a great burden.

Gladys made no remark, and was soon up
among the branches wishing in her turn. Poor
little Gladys, was her wish much wiser?

“ Oh fairies, I want beautiful white cheeks and
hands like Mama’s and Baby’s.”

Well, she got her wish long afterwards.

They played for an hour under the Wishing-
tree as children play; changing the knoll into a
besieged camp, a lion’s den, a nest of safety in a
wilderness of danger, an oasis of rest in a great
land of trouble, and then, when all their games
were played, in the first cool of the afternoon,
and the lengthening of their shadows, they went
home.

Nurse was in the nursery with Baby’s supper
ready, and the usual warning for Gladys. “ Hurry,
my dear. Jam glad you have had a nice day, but
hurry and dress; her ladyship’s bell will wring
directly. Come now, Master Bernardin, and take
your supper.”

In a short time Gladys came out of her room,



THE WISHING-TREE. 39

dressed in white again, and looking very graceful
in her lace and pretty shoes.

“Oh, Nurse, Iam so tired. I wish I might take
my tea with Baby. My arms ached with that
basket. I hope there won’t be many horrid ©
people there to plague.”

The ringing of the bell at that moment sent
her off in a hurry, and settled the question.

In the drawing-room she found only Miss
Dighton, and she could not help thinking the
lively young lady looked rather grave. She made
no inquiry after her mother, as her absence was
nothing unusual; but took her tea and answered
Florence’s questions as to her day, and then
inquired if they would ride to-morrow.

“IT do not know,” Miss Dighton answered.
“Your mother is not very well, Gladys, and she
wants you to go to her as soon as you have
finished your tea.”

Gladys felt greatly surprised but did not show
it, and some guests entering -just then she was
left alone, and finished her tea in silence. “Where
is Mama?” she then asked of Miss Dighton, and
being told went quietly away to her mother’s
dressing-room. ‘

As she approached it the sound of voices made
her hesitate. “If it’s Papa I won’t go in, but if



40 GLADYS.

it’s only Jervis I will,” she thought, and ap-
proached close and listened for a second to
ascertain. She heard her mother’s voice sobbing
piteously.

CHAPTER V.
THE TROUBLE, .

REATLY appalled Gladys drew back, con-
templating a sudden bolt, but before she
had time to execute her purpose the door was
thrown violently open, and her father almost
tumbled over her. He straightened himself, and
cast upon her that look of ludicrous indignation
with which a man will regard even an article of
furniture which has almost caused his downfall.
The child meanwhile looked at him coldly but
fearlessly. There was no affection between them,
and Gladys took more pains to avoid him than
anyone else. On his side the haughty gentleman
had no affection to spare for the little plain girl
he scarcely ever saw; all his affection was given
to his wife, of whose beauty he was extremely
proud, and he had also a certain pride in his son
—as a noble heir, nothing more.
“Go to your mother, child,” he said hastily,



THE TROUBLE. 41

“she wants you;” and then did what Gladys
wanted to do—bolted, with every appearance of
relief. Then the little girl turned and entered
the room. Here the sight which met her eyes
was so unusual and so terrible that for a few
seconds her presence of mind forsook her, and she
stood bewildered and staring with the door in
her hand. Her mother, her languid, haughty,
cold mother, lay face downward on the couch, in
an attitude which to Gladys’ practised eyes be-
spoke what she would have called a “tearing
passion ” in anyone but her mother. The face was
hidden in the little white hands, the hair was
lying in beautiful but disorderly profusion over
the pillows, one little shoe was lying in the
middle of the floor (it really looked as though
she had tried to kick someone, and had only
succeeded in knocking off her little shoe). The
whole attitude was quite familiar to Gladys.
Why! was it not Baby’s favourite attitude when
Nurse, Minnie, or some other offender had gone
against his lordly will!

But Baby’s sobs never had such a ring in them
as these. They smote poor Gladys to her tender
heart. She had never seen her mother cry, never

“seen her even deeply agitated that she could
remember, not even when the little fair two-year-



42 GLADYS.

old sister, so like Baby, with such sunny clusters
round her white brows, lay so quietly asleep in
her little coffin; even then Gladys remembered
her mother had been quite calm though very
white. But she was not calm now. She sobbed
and moaned and muttered, angry as well as
sorrowful it would seem; for presently she raised
a tear-stained face, and seeing Gladys said, “Oh,
it’s you. . Are you going to leave that door open,
may I ask?” in such very sharp tones that Gladys
closed the door with more than usual alacrity,
and then went over to the couch.

“Did you want me, Mama? Are you troubled
about anything?” she asked.

“Yes, I want you, sit down. I am very much
troubled; your father has treated me shamefully.”
Of course poor Gladys could only stare at this.
Which she did. Her mother after the statement
took refuge in her pillows for a few seconds, then
resumed: “Treating me like a child; every one in
my own drawing-room knowing before me. A
wretched, unhealthy, barely civilized place,—oh,
dear! oh, dear!” She turned once more to her
pillows for comfort. Gladys had a strange pang.
She began to feel what might be coming, a vague
memory of the words she had heard the night
before came back to her; she clasped her hands



THE TROUBLE. 43

tight and sat up straight. “But, Mama, what is
it?” she said.

' “What is it! I have been treated shamefully,
shamefully; and then when everything was
arranged to the very date of our departure, to
come and tell me, and that I must leave him
behind. It was shameful! shameful!” There was
_ room for nothing but her own personal trouble
in Lady Whrenly’s heart. Gladys felt this in-
stinctively. To ask questions was useless, she
must pick up the news as she could.

“ Are we going away, Mama?”

“ As though it were not bad enough to have to
leave England, and go to that wretched unhealthy
place, but I must leave my boy,’—Gladys’ heart
gave a great bound,—* my beautiful boy, the only
thing I care for or love—oh, dear! oh, dear!” Once
more she buried her face, moaning and sobbing, ~
while her little daughter watched her, puzzling
out what she had heard, and feeling guilty that
her mother’s sorrow should give her so much joy.
“T can’t help it,” she thought. “I could not live
without him, and Mother can. I am sorry for
her.” ;

“No society, no comfort,—all for his wretched
extravagance and getting into debt. And not to
take Baby with me—oh!”



44 GLADYS.

“Where are you going, Mama?”

“To the East Indies. A wretched place, a dread-
ful place—Coom or Croom, I don’t know and I
don’t care which.”

“What is Papa going there for?”

“He has gota governorship. He doesn’t care.”

“What are Baby and I to do, Mama?”

“How doI know? Don’t worry so with ques-
tions,” returned her mother with the petulance
which had been charming in the lovely heiress
and only child, but which the world had long
since ceased to see anything of in the cold and
stately Lady Whrenly. “Do you think I have no-
thing to do but think of you and where you are
to stay? How selfish people are.” Down went
the head again.

Gladys was silenced; and for a long time her
mother did not speak. By and by the sobs grew
fainter and fewer, then stopped altogether. The
little girl sat patiently still, only amusing herself
by glancing round the room, which, though her
mother’s, was an unknown land to her.

At last Lady Whrenly rose, and going to the
toilette-table gathered her hair, made use of
various small, sweet-scented bottles, put on her
cast-off shoes, and then came and sat down once
more.



THE TROUBLE. AB

“The reason I sent for you, Gladys,” she said,
still with some lingering fretfulness in her tone,
“is because, when I leave, you will be the only
one to look after my darling boy.”

From the mother’s tone one would have
thought Gladys was twenty; from the child’s
face one would have thought she was fifty.

“ This house is to be let. Your father—who has
treated me shamefully—thinks it will be better
looked after in every way, let, than with a care-
taker. I intend to leave here at once; at the end
of the week, in fact, if I can get rid of all these
people. We sail for the East Indies in September,
and I will be engaged up to the last moment—
making visits.” She spoke as though making
visits was a business of the last importance to
mankind. Gladys could not feel deeply interested,
and was longing for permission to get away for
a last game with her brother, when her mother’s
next words brought her into a bolt upright posi-
tion, terror and entreaty in her dark eyes. “I
shall take Baby with me; I will not part from
him till the last moment, my darling boy. Your
father thinks you had better go at once to Edin-
burgh to your aunt, Miss M‘Arthur; Baby will go
to you after we have sailed—”

“Oh! Mama—



46 GLADYS,

“Hush! don’t interrupt me. You constantly in-
terrupt me, and it is very rude. I want you to
promise me to take the greatest care of your
brother; he will have no one but you, poor dar-
ling. I believe you are very fond of him, and good
to him, and that issome comfort tome. Stay with
him constantly, allow no one to grieve him; I
trust to you to stand between him and all trouble.
Above all things do not let him forget. me—”

“Oh, yes; Mama, yes; but— “began the child
with trembling eagerness.

“Did I not ask you not to interrupt me?” in-
quired her mother with some asperity. “You have
no feeling, or you would not interrupt me when
my heart is so sorely troubled about the future
of my darling boy. Oh, my darling, how can I
leave you!” Poor Gladys clasped her hands
tight, and struggled to choke back the terrible
lump in her throat, and the great blinding tears
which this second rebuff and the terror in her
heart brought. Lady Whrenly was, of course, too
much engaged with her own thoughts to notice.
“Do not on any account let him forget me. Talk
to him of me, tell him how I love him, show him
my photograph, and when he is old enough—we
may be away some years, I hope they will be few
—teach him to write to me. You will do this,



THE TROUBLE. 47

Gladys?” The mother seemed quite to forget that
she was talking to a mere child, but a few years
older than the boy, to whose childish memory a
year would be a long time, and who could hardly
be expected to remember much, or talk much, of
the mother she so seldom saw. Happily for her-
self these thoughts did not trouble Lady Whrenly,
and of course Gladys felt herself quite capable.

“Mama,” she said, “I will do all you say if only
you will not separate Baby and me. Oh, Mama,
don’t, please don’t! It would break my heart. Oh
think how dreadful for me to have to go to Edin-
burgh all alone—” The desolate prospect was
too dreadful, and the tears which she had bravely
struggled to master flowed down her cheeks.

Her mother could not remain altogether un-
touched. “I don’t see how I could take you both.
Your father certainly thought that would be best,”
she said feebly and fretfully. “Don’t cry, child.
What is it you want?”

“Don’t send me away alone,” cried the child.
Take me with you, Mama. I have never been
away from Baby a day—oh!”

“Oh, dear!” cried the mother petulantly. “I
don’t know what I’m to do, I’m sure. Your father
certainly thought that would be best. I don’t see
how I ean take two children with me,” and she



48 GLADYS.

looked with peevish and uncomplimentary doubt-
fulness at her little daughter.

As though her good fairies were determined to
do their best for her, Gladys at that moment
raised two dark tear-filled eyes and a pale deso-
late little face to her mother’s, “Oh, Mama, don’t,
please don’t, send me away from Baby!” she
pleaded.

“T believe after all Florence was right,” her
mother reflected. “If she had not such a high
colour she would be beautiful.”

“Mama, I would be no trouble,” the child con-
tinued. “You don’t know all I could do. You
would not need to bring a second maid, I could
always have Baby ready when you wanted him.
I nearly always dress him; and I know always
what suits him best, I do indeed. I can make
him prettier than anyone, I can indeed, Mama;
and besides,” she added naively, “I could coax
him always to go.”

Her mother looked at her for a moment, un-
decided and yet touched by the womanly earnest-
ness, and the loving, pleading eyes. “What an
extraordinary child,” she thought. “I wonder how
old she is; I quite forget.” Then aloud she said,
“Very well, I will speak to your father about it.
He certainly said he thought the other plan best.



THE TROUBLE. 49

_ However—gracious!—oh child, don’t be so impet-
uous.” For Gladys had sprung upon her with a
sudden bound, and got her arms round her neck
willy nilly, and was hugging and kissing her.
“Oh thank you, Mama! I know it’s all right now.”
Innocently attesting her certain and utter dis-
belief in that convenient appeal to “your father.”
“TI will be so good, I will never let Baby forget
you, I'll tell him forever how lovely you were,
and how every one said so, and I'll read him all
your letters at his prayers. Oh,” eried this odd,
precocious creature, “what a weight you have
taken off my heart!”

Immensely to her own surprise Lady Whrenly
kissed her little daughter before she dismissed
her, light hearted now, to tell Baby the strange
. news. “She is affectionate,” the mother thought .
by way of excuse, “and honest, and she will take
care of my boy; and perhaps it is best to take
her with me. How strange if Florence should
turn out to be right about her looks after all!”

(536) D



50 GLADYS.

CHAPTER VI.
THE RIDE.

AISSY, Sissy, hurry! Miss Dighton’s in the hall
an’ the horses is at the door. Miss Dighton’s
all ready an’ talkin’ to Sir Archibald. Hurry,
Sissy!” Thus gasped Baby as he dashed into his
sister’s room, where she stood, her body twisted
and bent, her cheeks flaming, and the veins swol-
len in her little hands, struggling to fasten the
hooks at the side of her habit.

Anyone else who had interrupted her at this
critical and trying moment would have received
a rather unceremonious answer, but her control
must be very far gone beforeshe spoke impatiently
to Baby. She only straightened herself with a sigh
and said, “I can’t help it, Baby. Oh, dear, I am
hot. Why do they put the hooks at the side. See,
Baby, you run for that stupid goose Minnie. Tell
her to come here at once; I’ve rung for her three
times. She’s gossiping most likely with one of the
men. Run and bring her here, dear; I can’t get
this hooked,” and gathering up the long skirt she
sank exhausted into a chair, while the little boy
bustled off in a great state of excitement and
righteous indignation.



. THE RIDE. 51

Gladys having had time to “prepare” the little
boy, he was quite willing she should go with
Miss Dighton; especially as she had left him vari-
ous consolations in the form of coveted treasures
of hers. So he had busied himself since breakfast
by worrying all the men in the yard about getting
the horses ready, and had finally ridden round to
the hall-door in triumph on Gladys’ pony, and
thence flown up to tell her all was ready. -

In a few moments Gladys heard the shrill
sweet voice scolding in most commanding tones,
and then the little boy entered, followed by the
good-humoured but lazy maid, who soon put the
refractory hooks into the eyes, gave the little
girl’s hair a final brush, set on the little cap, and
Gladys, with her gloves and whip in her hands,
hastened down to the hall, Baby attendant, help-
ing her with her skirts in a masterly fashion,
which came near to land her on her nose more
than once.

Miss Dighton, looking very handsome in her
dark habit, was sauntering round and round the
gravel with Sir Archibald, and did not seem to
have found Gladys unpunctual, though the groom
who was to ride with them had been more than
five minutes waiting with the horses:

Florence greeted the little girl kindly. Sir



52 GLADYS.

Archie mounted both ladies, and then good-
naturedly placing Baby on his shoulder raced to
a little knoll, from whence they could see them to
the avenue gates, and so waved them a last adieu.

Gladys was too much of a little lady to have
consciously asked her new friend any question
likely to embarass her, but though clever and
precocious beyond her years, she was after all
only a child, and it did not strike her to connect
Sir Archibald in any way with the additional
lovely colour in Miss Dighton’s cheeks. Looking
back, therefore,and waving her whip to the exalted
Baby, she remarked: “Oh Miss Dighton, look
back; Sir Archie has Babe on his shoulder and
they're waving good-bye from the mound I
didn’t think he was such a nice man; but he must
be when he’s so good to Baby. There, they have
gone and you never looked. Don’t you think he
must be, Miss Dighton?”

“ Must be what, dear?”

«A nice man—Sir Archie, I mean?”

“Yes, dear, I think he must.” The answer was
given rather hastily. “Now, Gladys, you must be
guide. How pleasant itis. We will have the shade
of the trees, for it is so hot.”

It was indeed one of July’s loveliest days, and
Gladys, who was extremely fond of riding, was



THE RIDE. 53

in the highest spirits, and chattered freely, a rare
thing for her with a stranger. Florence, at first
rather abstracted and dreamy, soon listened
amused to the strangely wise remarks, and odd
little bits of sense which were interspersed through
all the talk.

The news of Sir Ralph and Lady Whrenly’s ~
departure was of course public now, and Gladys
spoke of it, always alluding in the most handsome
terms to her mother. It was amusing and at the
same time touching to Florence, to see how the
little girl’s whole heart was full of gratitude for
the kindness which had,as she expressed it, “taken
such a weight off her heart.”

«Won't you be very sorry to leave your home?” -
the young lady asked.

“Oh yes,” returned Gladys, “it will be terrible;
but you see it would have been so much worse if
they had sent me away to Scotland at once,
without Baby! But Mama has settled all that,”
loftily, “and that has taken all the dreadfulness
away from it, you know.” Her sunny gratitude
left no room for repining. “Baby and I are going
visiting with Mama; and I can look after him, you
know, and give Mama no bother. I really think
Mama is lovely, beautiful! and I don’t mean to
let Baby forget her; Ican tell you, I don’t. Iam



54 GLADYS.

going to get all the photos of her I can, and Pll
make Baby kiss them every night, just after his
prayers, and Ill tell him how pretty she is, and
oh! everything,” she ended comprehensively, and
gathering up the reins she had rather neglected.

“You are to be a little mother to Baby.”

Gladys face grew very grave. “Yes,” she said
thoughtfully, “I must, not forget Mama’s words.
She said I was to stand between him and all
trouble; and I want to have him beautiful and
- good for her when she comes back. Will it be
very hard, ] wonder. Sometimes I have a feeling
here, like a big sigh.” She smiled a little and
laid her hand on her heart. It was evident to
Florence she had accepted the responsibility in
no shallow childish spirit. She looked with grave
tender eyes at the little puzzled face, for Gladys ~
found it hard to express her thoughts.

“Who will take care of you?” the young lady
thought. “Who will guide and soothe you in all
childhood’s many little. troubles and woes. Not
that grumpy old Miss M‘Arthur, if I remember
her rightly. Brave little Gladys, I will do what I
can—I will tell you of the Master who helps little”
children.”

“There!” cried Gladys’ voice, jovoraly breaking
in upon these grave thoughts; “there are the ruins



THE RIDE. 5d

now, Miss Dighton. Let us have a canter on this
turf. We will have to leave the horses with Jay
at the old gate, and then I will tell you all about
the castle. Come.”

Gladys proved herself a very able and intelli-
gent guide. Florence wondered where the child
could have learned it all, knowing how seldom
any of her mother’s guests took any notice of her.
She had, however, little time for calm reflection;
for Gladys besides being intelligent was terribly
nimble, and made no allowance for Miss Dighton’s
maturer years, or the fact that a young lady
cannot bundle her skirts round her waist in the
same ungraceful but easy fashion as a little girl.

She struggled and panted as she tried to follow
her small guide’s active and bird-like movements,
and to retain the thread of the narrative which
Gladys continued to pour forth, without appa-
rently any want of breath from her exertions.

“Come along, Miss Dighton,” sounded the
cheerful voice from some far height, where Gladys
retained a most uncertain and coggly footing.
“Once you are up here you will be all right.
This way leads to the secret staircase, by which
the young lady, Leline, escaped with her baby.
Very few know the way, but I can show it you.
Come along.”



56 GLADYS.

“Qh, Gladys!” cried Florence in despair, “I
can’t get up to youthere. Are you sure you are
quite safe? I could never climb.”

“Safe? Oh, it’s perfectly safe,” returned the
voice. ‘“Can’t you climb? You won't get to the
staircase any other way; and once you're at the
top of em you havea lovely view. Of course,”
apologetically, “there are one or two stairs miss-
ing; but what can you expect in aruin? And
then you can make a good spring if you’re worth
anything,” in an argumentative tone. The in-
ducements, however, were not sufficiently strong
to encourage Florence to make the attempt; and
indeed she was rather anxious about the little
girl, and begged her tocome down. After a little
further parley Gladys obeyed, but somewhat re-
luctantly. “It would have been a triumph for
you, you know,” she said regretfully, as she stood
once more on the green grass beside her friend,
“because so few of them can manage the stair-
case; and Captain Vandeleur, who was staying
with us last summer, fell and broke his arm
once when he went up.”

This seemed to Miss Dighton anything but an
additional inducement. “Then, Gladys,” she said,
“do you not think it might be dangerous for
you? Does your mother know?”



THE RIDE. 57

“Mama! Oh no; I never gowiththem, you know.
It isn’t dangerous, not the least; Captain Vande-
leur was stupid. No one need fall who takes care.
Well, never mind the staircase; if you come I will
show you Sir Ralph’s tomb.” There was an utter
absence of any boasting tone over her superior
knowledge and courage about the little girl, so
different from the ordinary child, that Florence
was drawn to her more and more.

“ How did you come to know all this, Gladys?”
she asked when, the pleasant inspection over, they
rested for a short time on a shady bank before
remounting.

Gladys looked up with the deep soft expression
in her dark eyes, which so often spoke far more
than all her childish powers of expression. “Ah!”
she said, “it was Captain Harry.”

“ Captain Harry?”

“Yes. Perhaps you don’t know him. How differ-
ent he was from the others.” The contemptuous
tone was certainly not very complimentary to
“the others.” “He was here last summer. He
nearly always took me with him. It was he told
me all about every place round, and taught me
to climb. Ah! he was nice.” There was great
depth and heartiness here in spite of the words.
Florence watched her as she clasped her hands



58 GLADYS.

round her knees and continued: “He told me
he once had a little sister like me, and she died.
That was very sad. It was lovely to hear him
talk. He taught me to jump on horseback, and
a great lot of things. Mama said he was a fanatic
or a lunatic or something. He always carried about
a little Bible with him, and read it a great lot.
I thought he was braver and grander than any-
one. I want Baby to be like him. He has gone to
India. Tow sorry I was.”

“Did he read you out of his little book?”

“Yes, some. I loved to hear him read, but I
didn’t understand much. I was littler then, of
course. Why, I’m nearly nine now.”

“Yes, Gladys, you are nearly nine,’ Florence
said gravely, putting her arm round the little girl,
“and I want to speak to you of some things you
will understand now. Have you a little Bible,
dear?”

“No, not of myown. I’ve a little prayer-book
though, and there are lots of Bibles in the house.”

“Yes, dear; but I want you to have a little one
of your own as Captain Harry had, and I want
you to read out of it as he did. Do you know
what made your Captain Harry so brave and
grand?”

“ No—but he was.”



THE RIDE. 59

“It was because he loved and obeyed Jesus,
and took him for his first great-captain. He was
a soldier of the cross, and he found all his orders
in his little Bible.”

There was a little silence, Gladys was listening
very earnestly. “And you, dear,” Miss Dighton
then went on, ‘“‘you are going away—soon—from
your home into a new strange life, and you
have to take care of Baby and shield him from
troubles; but what will you do, Gladys, when the
troubles come to yourself? Even little girls must
have troubles, dear,—little worries, and crosses,
and trials of temper. How will you find out then
to do right and to know what is right? You must
do as your Captain Harry did. You must take
Jesus for your captain, and find out his orders
from your little Bible. And you must pray to
him, and ask him to help you in all things, and
give him all your troubles, and then your heart
will be light.”

“Pray to him! and give him all my troubles!”

“Yes, little one. You know he is always
near.”

“Always? Even here—in the sunlight—now?”

“Yes, dear.” Instinctively both looked around
at the calm and lovely scene. Through the foliage
they could see glimpses of meadow-land bathed



60 GLADYS.

in sunlight, and beside them the ruins of the old
castle spoke silently and sadly of the past.

“T like it,” said the child at last; “it seems
strange, but it is nicer than church.” Then she
looked solemnly at her new friend, “Is he your
captain, Miss Dighton?”

It was an innocent question; yet Florence
coloured, then looked gently at the little girl.
“Tt is always easier to teach than to learn, Gladys.
But yes, he is my captain; though I fear I am
not a very good soldier. But you will be one,
will you not?”

“T must think of it all,” said the child steadily.
“You see it is strange, not being in church.”

Florence smiled at the grave answer. “Yes,
dear,” she said, “think of it; and think also of
these words of his which he spoke to his
disciples when they were troubled: ‘Lo, I am
with youalway.” The earnest little face lighted
as at the sound of familiar music. “Oh, I remem-
ber, lremember! Captain Harry used to say Hooke
Yes, it is beautiful.”

“Never forget it, Gladys: he is with you al-
ways.”

It was time to go back to the horses; indeed
they had left themselves but short time to ride
to Lady Crony’s, where they were to have lunch.



SOLDIERS. 61

Gladys was thoughtful, and did not chatter
much on the way. She seemed to be pondering

with more than a child’s earnestness on what she
had heard.

——__

CHAPTER VIL
SOLDIERS.

OME hours later they were riding home at a
smart trot in the cool of the afternoon. “ We
will just get home in time for you to dress for
tea, Gladys,” Miss Dighton said; “and I have en-
joyed seeing the ruins very much, thanks to you.”
“Tam very glad. I wonder if Baby has missed
me much. But he is always so good when one
has time to prepare him. Mama has so many
P.P.C. calls to make I’m sure she would be en-
gaged all day. I hope she won’t be tired,” said
Gladys, her gratitude prompting her to most un-
wonted solicitude with regard to her mother, and
which sounded comical to Florence when con-
trasted with the little girl’s heretofore most
supreme indifference.
They were, however, a little late. As they rode
up the avenue they saw groups standing in and
out of the French windows, and a second later Sir



62 : GLADYS.

Archie hastened forward, followed closely by Baby ~
with Florence’s little dog clasped uncomfortably
tight in his arms, and as Sir Archie dismounted
Miss Dighton, Gladys slipped swiftly to the
ground and rushed to her brother.

“Oh, Sissy! I’m so glad you’re back. But me and
the little dog an’ Sir Archie has been having such
fun. It’s a dear little dog—isn’t it, Sir Archie?
and haven’t we had fun?”

There was a little fuss and talk while the horses
were led away, and then, much to Gladys’ surprise,
Lady Whrenly herself appeared at one of the
windows with a tiny cup and saucer in her hand.
“Come, Florie,’ she said, “and have some tea
first; I'm sure you're thirsty and tired. You had
better come also, Gladys.”

Poor Gladys was so overcome at the unusual
compliment, for never before had she been per-
mitted to enter the drawing-room unless dressed,
that her cheeks out-bloomed the roses, and she
had scarcely a retort for one of the gentlemen
who came to tease her as to the day’s exploits.

Baby, in blue plush and point lace, with his
golden curls flying, soon came to her with a mul-
titude of questions, and an amount of information
which he expected her to find very interesting.

“What did you see at the roons, Sissy? Sir



SOLDIERS. 63

Archie took me to town with him; and mother
was in town,and took me visitin’. Then Sir Archie
came in the carriage with us, and when we got
home he got me Miss Dighton’s little dog. Do
you think it’s a pretty dog, Sissy? I do I
wonder if Miss Dighton has a lot of little dogs
like that at her home. Do you know, Sissy?”

And much more of a like nature, until “Sissy”
finished her tea and left the drawing-room; and
the beautiful little figure and gold curls flitted
away in search of the interesting little dog.

“Lo, I am with you alway.” Over and over |
again the little girl kept repeating these words,
as she went back to her nursery and changed her
habit for. one of her usual cool holland wrappers.
What beautiful strong sweet words they were!
She felt that as they came back to her with
dim memories, which yet grew clearer as she
thought of her loved and honoured friend. True
to her purpose she sat down at her wide open
window, and with the sweet summer fragrance
coming up to her she tried to “think of it all.”
But little children as a rule do not think and
reason, and Gladys’ “thinking” was chiefly re-
peating to herself words of Miss Dighton’s which
had impressed her.

“Pray to him—give your troubles to him—do



64 GLADYS,

as Captain Harry did—and, ‘Lo, I am with you
alway.” But after all was not this very good
thinking?

“Let him be my captain,” she said at last.
“Oh, yes! I will; and I will try to be his little
soldier. Butwhen? Must I wait till next Sunday
in church, I wonder? I will ask Miss Dighton
when I see her.” She had been at her window
some time, and now she felt rested and rose.
“Where is Baby,I wonder? I heard the gong some
time ago. I must go and see.”

Her search was not far. She found the little
fellow sitting on their door-step, still devotedly
hugging Miss Dighton’s little dog; the poor little
animal having given up protesting as a bad job.

“T am going to the hill walk to see the sunset,
Baby,—will you come?” she asked. “Let us put
the poor little dog to bed; you couldn’t carry it,
and I’m sure it’s tired.”

“Tt’s such a dear little dog,” he said, resigning
it with a sigh.

Gladys, as she took the little dog to Miss Digh-
ton’s maid, remembered Baby’s wish at the Wish-
ing-tree, and longed with all her heart for power
to give him what he wanted.

“ Ask Mama, Baby,” she said when she rejoined
him, and hand in hand they started for the hill



SOLDIERS. 65

together; “perhaps she could get you a little dog
like that.”

“Ah! but it wouldn’t be such a dear little dog,”
he said despondently; “an’ it’s name wouldn't be
Fiddle.” And he sighed at the thought.

“But you could eall it Fiddle, couldn’t you?”

He shook his head, as one sadly but firmly con-
vineed. “’T'wouldn’t be the same, Sister.”

“Well, ’'d ask Mama anyhow,” said Gladys en-
couragingly. “Now we must hurry, Baby, or we
won't see the sunset.”

Standing on a bank, leaning against the low
branch of a tree, both children watched the sight
which both instinctively loved; the gorgeous
masses of gold and crimson and purple sink
down, leaving the pale blue summer sky and the
faint silvery stars.

And, as she watched, the light seemed to come
from the very sunset into little Gladys’ heart, and
all her thoughts became bright and clear, point-
ing one way. For when little children who can-
not reason open their souls to God, he pours in
light, often, as the sun pours light on the up-
turned faces of the flowers, and then they grow—
the flowers and the souls of the children—right
up to God. -

«Lo, I am with you alway.’ Here—now.

(588) : zg



66 GLADYS.

Then why should I wait for puny or church?
I will be his little soldier now.”

A certain awe and grandeur seemed to pass
into the child’s soul. She straightened her slight
form and clasped tighter the little hand which
she must guide and guard, and then she looked
down into the lovely little face raised inquiringly
to hers.

“What are you thinking of, Sister, that makes
syou seem so big and tall?”

“Tam ininina of Jesus,” she answered point-
ing upward, “and how I will be his soldier. And
you too, Baby; we will be soldiers together, and
Jesus will be our captain.”

“Soldiers!” said Baby somewhat dubiously.
“Soldiers have got to fight, Sir Archie told me.”
Then suddenly brightening up he added briskly,
“Ob yes, but we're both going to be soldiers.
Well, then, you'll do all the Aghune, won't you,
Sissy ?”

How willingly she would if that were in her
power. The dew was on the grass as they went
slowly back to the house, and one soldier—the
one who did not like fighting—was triumphantly
mounted on the back of the other.

Nextmorning Gladys laystretched at full length
under the shade of one of the great trees in the



SOLDIERS. 67

park with a book, the leaves of which she kept
turning over and over, rather as in search of some-
thing than reading. Twice Baby came to her,
and twice she steadily repulsed him. “Sissy’s
looking for eomernne: Baby; as soon as ever she
finds it she'll come.”

And with this consolation the little boy was
obliged to depart.

Miss Dighton, passing from the gavden to the
house, caught sight of a large sailor hat swinging
to a branch, and going over to investigate, she
found Gladys lying under the tree.

“Ah! Gladys, I was wondering if I should see
you. Are you very busy?” she asked.

Gladys sprang up joyfully. “Oh, Miss Dighton,
I was just wondering if I should get a chance to
see you. I thought you had gone out with Mama.
Pray sit down. Here’sa shawl, sit on this, Baby
left it.”

Miss Dighton sat down. “ “And what were you
busy at—reading?” .

Gladys looked up disconsolately. “This is
Nurse’s Bible,” she began explanatorily in a dole-
ful tone, “and I’ve been looking and looking for
those words all morning, and I can’t find them;
and I thought it would be full of beautiful things,
but I can’t find any, and I don’t understand it.”



68 GLADYS.

« Ah! you must not be discouraged, dear. Have
you thought of it all, then? and have you made
up your mind?”

“Yes, I will be his soldier,” said the little girl
softly. “But it is not so easy to find the orders as
I thought.”

“What orders did you want, dear?”

“Oh, I don’t know; and I thought I could find
these words, ‘Lo, I am with you.”

“Come with me, then; I think I can help you.
All the rest will come easy if you have made up
your mind.”

They went into the house together to Miss
Dighton’s rooms; the young lady took from a.
drawer two books of medium size, beautifully
bound. “This is a little Bible for you, Gladys,”
she said. “I want you to read it, and learn to love
it. And this other book is to help you to do that;
it was prepared for. little ones like you. See,
there is a message, a promise, or an order for
every day in the year, for you from your captain:
one for each day that you may think over and
love; and there is a verse beneath each explaining,
and a few words to tell you the meaning of some
words. Will not that make it easier for you, dear?”

Gladys’ face beamed. “Oh, Miss Dighton, how
good you are—such beautiful little books! I will



SOLDIERS, ; 69

love them and take care of them. You see, in
church I can’t hear anything almost, I am so far
back, and the man speaks so funny; but now I
have the orders here for myself.”

“Yes. And, little one, day by day, as you try to
love Jesus and follow him, all will become clear
to you. But it is not a light thing, Gladys, that
you have undertaken. It will not do only to say
you are his soldier. You must obey him. ‘Ifa
man love me, let him keep my words, that is
what he said.”

_ “Oh!” cried Gladys, “a funny soldier I should
_ be if I did not obey orders. Iam going to be a
real soldier, not a make-believe.”

Florence looked almost wistfully at the earnest,
eager little face. “And some seed fell upon good
ground,” she said to herself. “The message seems
to have brought her nothing but joy. I wish my
heart were only as-trustful as hers.”

Gladys had no doubts. She looked at her new
Bible with much pride. ‘ Now,” she said “I’ve a
Bible, and a little prayer-book, and a book of
orders, all for myself; I ought to be a good soldier.
Oh, Miss Dighton, will you show me those words
in my own Bible, please?”

Florence found out the words, and Gladys read
them with glad recognition: “‘ Lo, I am with you



70 GLADYS.

alway, even unto the end of the world.” Well, that
is nice: to the very end of the world. After all,
Edinburgh will not seem too faraway now.” She
put a mark in at the place, then rose and threw
her arms round her friend. “It was good of you,”
she said, kissing her with earnest kisses. “And
you must be a soldier, of course; for you are work-
ing for your captain, and getting more soldiers
for him—I will do it too.” The little girl never
guessed what words of comfort she had spoken
to the young lady’s earnest but doubting heart.

“And now,” said Florence in a lighter tone,
“there is something else I want to talk to you
about. You know I am going away to-morrow?”

“Yes; lam sosorry. But we are going in a few
days too.”

“Well, do you know if Baby would like my
little dog Fiddle?”

Gladysblushed. She was a sensitive and delicate-
minded little girl, and she had almost a sense of
guilt that her wish and Baby’s should have been
so accurately guessed. She did not speak.

But whether Baby had gone to his mother with
his woe, or even given broader and more direct
hints, it was plain Miss Dighton knew her little
dog was a coveted treasure. She went on, “I heard
him admiring it immensely, and I know you



%
SOLDIERS. 71

would teach bim to be good to it. So, Gladys, I
think I will leave Fiddle behind, and you can
‘give him to Baby. Don’t you think he would like
it?”

“Oh, Miss Dighton, I know he would. It seems
quite odd you should want to give it to him;
because—but I will tell you all about it.”

She related the story of the Wishing-tree, at
which Florence laughed. “Well, poor little fellow,
I am glad he should have his wish,” she said.
“We must get a big pasteboard card, Gladys, and
paint Fiddle’s name on it. Don’t you think he
will like that?”

“Oh, Miss Dighton, how good you are! Dear
little Baby, how delighted he will be to have his
wish come true.”

“Very well. Do you think you could get the
card-board and we will print it now, and you will
take care of it?”

Gladys flew on eager wings to Nurse, and soon
returned to Miss Dighton with the required paper,
on which Florence printed in large letters: “Lost,
Stolen, or Strayed. Whoever finds me must take
good care of me. My name is Fiddle.”

“That is splendid. Now for a ribbon, and you
can put this round Fiddle’s neck after I am gone.
Why, Gladys, there is the gong for lunch, and I



72 GLADYS.

haven’t arranged a single flower. Now I must
”?
run.



CHAPTER VIIL
~ IN EDINBURGH.

NE chill morning in the end of September
Gladys found herself with her brother, her
maid, and their piles of luggage standing in the
Caledonian Station, feeling so fatigued and weary
as scarcely to have strength left to bid the friends
who brought them good-bye. The fine cold rain
which fell depressed them, and. when they ‘had
been put into the cab, Baby, who was cross as
well as tired, fell heavily against his sister and
started a long list of wailing complaints. “ Where's
Fiddle, Sissy? Oh dear, Grayson’s crushing him;
you take him, Sister. Oh dear, I wonder is’-Puck
quite comfortable. Oh dear, I’m so tired. Look at
the horrid rain, Sissy. Oh dear, isn’t it ugly?”
The rattling of the cab, the weight of Baby,
and her own weariness almost overcame the little
girl’s usually sunny temper under irritations. To
be cross with Baby was, however, an impossibility.
So she put an arm round him and did her best
to soothe him, while the maid made herself com-
fortable and dozed until the cab stopped at one



IN EDINBURGH. 73

of the finest houses in Moray Place. The door was
opened, and the children roused themselves, got
their pets, and entered the house with the maid.
They were shown into a morning-room by a.
stolid-looking man, and then it seemed as though
they were forgotten. Weary as they were the
time seemed very long to them, and the house
terribly silent. Grayson had once more made her-
self comfortable and was half asleep, and Baby ,
began to cry. Gladys’ spirits sank lower and lower.
At last a maid came, who asked them to follow
her as Miss M‘Arthur would see them. Gladys
wiped the little boy’s tears, begged him to be
brave, and, administering a poke in a very differ-
ent temper to the drowsy Grayson, followed her
aunt’s servant out of the room, and up a wide
flight of stairs, and into a large and very hand-
some room. at a fire, so bright and clean that it might have
been a painted one, Gladys thought, but for the
warmth and cheerfulness it diffused around.
Miss M‘Arthur merely looked up as the chil-
dren entered, and watched them calmly and coldly
as they advanced up the room.. Tired and travel-
stained as they were they walked gracefully, and
Baby looked lovelier than ever. “Handsome
children, both,” was the lady’s inward comment.
“Spoilt, too, I can tell at a glance; that won't do



74 GLADYS.

here.” No it would not, for Miss M‘Arthur was
herself a spoilt child thoroughly matured; and
when there is a grown spoilt child in a house the
little growing ones haven't a chance, you know.

Miss M‘Arthur, a daughter of Sir Ralph’s step-
father, was a lady who for something over fifty
years had been accustomed to consider herself
first and only; and had not been long in arriving
at the conclusion that nothing else in the world
was of any consequence in comparison. She was
not without good qualities. She was very fond of
her father’s stepson, and in spite of her dislike
to children was the first to offer to take care of
Gladys and Bernardin when she heard - the
Whrenlys were going abroad. But she was very
selfish; and being very wealthy was arrogant and
overbearing, and ruled a very despot in her own
establishment. Now, there must have been a
good deal of all this in her face; for Gladys no
sooner beheld her than she straightened herself
as stiff as a telegraph-pole, clenched one hand and
grasped Baby tightly by the other. But the
stern face had a very different effect on Baby,
who crouched against his sister and once more
began to ery.

“ Decidedly spoilt,” said Miss M‘Arthur. Then
she held out her hand, “How-are you Gladys?
I am glad to see you. Is this your brother?”



IN EDINBURGH. 75

“T am quite well, thank you; but we are both
tired. Won’t you shake hands, Baby?”

“No,” bawled Baby in a pet.

“Why is he crying? What did you call him?”

“His name is Bernardin, but we always call
him Baby.”

“Baby! He is much too big for that. Such a
big boy should be called by his name.”

“ Oh, but it isn’t like that,” said Gladys eagerly.
“Tt isn’t in a baby-way atall. He used to be called
Bernie when he was little, little; and he couldn’t
speak plain, and called it Baby and sometimes
Babe. It’s from his name, not baby-way at all.”

Miss M‘Arthur failed to see the distinction.
“Tt doesn’t matter,” she returned with a slight
sneer, “he is too big; I don’t like boys to be
childish. You must call him Bernard or Bernardin
now.”

“Indeed I sha’n’t,” said Gladys quickly and
not very respectfully. “I shall always call him
Baby.”

“Gladys!” returned Miss M‘Arthur in a tone
of great displeasure, “I hope you are not wilful.
There is only one will in this house; my word is
law. You must learn that at once. Bernardin,
come and shake hands and stop crying; that is
babyish at least.”

But Baby declined to do either, and Miss



76 GLADYS.

M‘Arthur turned from him with a look of con-
tempt and put some questions to Gladys with
reference to their journey, and their father and
mother. Then she rang the bell, and when the
maid came dismissed them, telling Gladys she
would send for her later in the day; and with a
great sense of relief both children found them-
selves in the lobby, and Baby looked up tearfully
and declared vengefully and paradoxically, “I
ain’t a baby at all, and I'll always be Baby.
Sha’n’t I, Sissy?”

“Yes, darling.”

“T hate her, Sissy. Aren’t they going to give
us nothin’ to eat?”

“Yes, presently. Don’t cry any more, dear
Baby,” and choking back something dangerous in
her own throat the little girl trudged up another
flight of stairs.

The cold welcome of her new guardian had
greatly hurt and puzzled the child. Such petty
bickering was quite new to her; she had known
- nothing of that in the elegance of her old home.

Her father and mother might have been negli-
gent, but at least they had never tried her temper
with trifling and meaningless contradictions and
vexations. That a lady should take exception at
such a trifle as a child’s name puzzled her by its
smallness of spirit, and hurt her by its unkindness.



IN EDINBURGH. V7

“His own name that we all loved to call him at
home; how unkind of her!” thought the little
girl sadly. And then added in another tone, “I
will always call him Baby.”

The .nurseries into which they were shown
were pleasant enough—two rooms opening into
one another with fine wide windows and a good
view.

Baby stopped crying at once at sight of the
breakfast-table, at which Grayson was already
busy preparing coffee and bread and butter with
a strange servant, with whom she was engaged
in earnest conversation, apparently, for she was _
wide awake now.

Quite at home on the hearth-rug was Fiddle, at
sight of which Baby was so delighted that he
forgot his fatigue and hunger in his surprise.
“Why, Sister, dolook! Fiddle hadn’t no ugly lady
to go see, so he’s quite happy. Dear, sweet, little
Fiddle!” and he squatted beside him and gathered
the reluctant little animal into fond but uncom-
fortable arms.

The Scotch girl gazed at him in deep admira-
tion. “Did ye ever see the like? They was tellin’
me below stairs what bonny children they was;
but I never saw a child to match that boy—and
the voice of him, too! Bonny wee thing, I’m sure
he’s tired to death. And Miss looks tired enough



78 GLADYS.

too; and the mistress I suppose would keep them
talking to her half an hour, when they should
have been getting their breakfasts and into their
beds. Well, here’s everything ready now.” She
bustled about good-naturedly, getting everything
for the tired little travellers, and afterwards
helped Grayson to put them to bed, where they fell
asleep without loss of time, and travelled in giant
trains, with cross old maids, on stone rails, back
to the old and now deserted home.

Gladys wakened some hours later with a dim
consciousness that some one was talking not far
off; and her second discovery, which was almost
instantaneous with the first, was that she was
now alone in the bed in which she had fallen
asleep with her arm round Baby. She opened
her eyes wide and looked round, too drowsy and
comfortable to do more, and saw that the room
had evidently been put in order, that is to say,
useful order—garments hung behind the door, the
half open door of a wardrobe showed Gladys
some well-known frocks, the trunks which had
cumbered the floor were gone, and the whole room
had that air of life about it which only habi-
tation can give. Thoroughly wakened now, and
with all her weariness slept away, our heroine
raised herself on her elbow and looked round, and
decided that she liked the room, and then listened



IN EDINBURGH. 79

with that keen expression on her face to the
sounds which came through the wide open door
from the adjoining room. Baby was evidently
holding forth in style, and the Scotch girl, who.
had helped Grayson to unpack (during which
proceeding much contemporary history had been
exchanged between them), was led completely -
captive by his Southern sweetness, and every now
and then called upon Grayson, who was present,
to join her in her admiration.

“T don’t like her,’ came in distinct tones. “I
don’t believe she’s my aunt, she’s ever so ugly.”

There was some faint expostulation here, and
some laughing too, and an exchange in an under-
tone between Grayson and Maggie.

“Ts Sister sleeping still?” demanded Baby next;
“T want to go and see. Just look at Fiddle, he
ain’t been sleeping a bit the whole time. I was so
sleepy; I'm not sleepy now. Is Sister ’wake, I
wonder?”

At this Gladys sprang from the bed, and
laughing ran to the open door. “Yes, ’m awake
now, Baby, and just coming. What o'clock is it,
Grayson, I wonder?”

It was well on in the afternoon; and, with the
remark that it felt funny to wake in the afternoon,
Gladys turned back to the bed-room and dressed
herself.



80 GLADYS.

She had not quite finished when Grayson
appeared with the information that Miss M‘Arthur
had gone out driving, and if they would promise
not to be troublesome Maggie would take them
through the house.

This was a delightful prospect to both children,
restless and unsettled as they were, and in the
shortest possible space of time they were follow-
ing their good-natured cicerone into that land of
wonder, which every new house is to infant minds.
Fiddle, borne aloft in his master’s’ arms, was
evidently quite above being moved by anything
so trivial.

So they went from room to room, lobby to
lobby, upstairs and downstairs, the children draw-
ing comparisons with home, far from favourable to
Moray Place. The furniture was handsome but
heavy and sombre, and an air of gloom pervaded
the empty rooms in spite of their size and
grandeur.

“Oh, how different it is from home!” the
children exclaimed again and again. And Baby
declared he liked the kitchen best.

A clock struck five as they were returning from
the latter region, and Maggie told them they must
hurry, as their tea would be ready and Miss
M‘Arthur might be expected any moment. And
sure enough, they had scarcely reached the



BP

‘

IN EDINBURGH. 81

entrance-hall when the bell rang loudly, and
Maggie in great terror picked Baby up in her
arms, and, bidding Gladys “fly,” panted up the
stairs with as much tremor and expedition as
though some monster. were at her heels.

Gladys snatched up Fiddle, and stifling her
amusement until she reached the first landing,
paused there, and heard the footman open the
door and then her aunt’s voice: “Give the things
to Quivers, Macintosh, and send her to me.”

“ What a horrid voice!” thought the child, and
she turned and went after Maggie with a sense
of relief at leaving it behind.

Tea was ready in the nursery, and the children
were in good spirits after their travels and race;
but in the midst of their talk and laughter a
damper fell. Quivers appeared, bearing a message
that Miss M‘Arthur would see Miss Whrenly
after tea, and Mr. Bernard was to go to bed at
half-past seven.

Both Gladys and Baby looked rebellious. The
little boy had not been accustomed to go to bed
so early, and resented such a “ baby-hour;” and
Gladys was not overjoyed at the prospect of
meeting her aunt again.

So tea was finished very slowly, and it was not
. until a second peremptory message had come to
the nursery, that Gladys, accompanied by Baby

(536) FE



82 GLADYS.

as far as the stairs, went down to her aunt’s
room.

Miss M‘Arthur had taken tea, and was resting
before dressing. Her first remark when Gladys
entered was an inquiry as to why she was not

dressed.
_ Gladys apologized, and explained that she only
dressed when she went to the drawing-room.

“Tn future always dress,” said Miss M‘Arthur;
“T may send for youor I may not. If I should I
would not like my friends to see you as you are
now.”

Gladys made no remark, but she sighed. Miss
' M‘Arthur continued: “I have engaged a good
governess for you in the meantime. She will
teach you both, and walk with you; but I do not
approve of resident governesses.””

Gladys felt sincerely thankful.

“She will be here every morning at nine
o'clock. You will breakfast at eight; to rise early
is the best thing in the world for young children.”
Miss M‘Arthur herself never breakfasted before
eleven o'clock on any account.

“You must always obey your governess and
nurse. I must hear no quarrelling or disturbance.
LT hope you do not quarrel with your brother.” At
this Gladys’ disdain was so great that she smiled.

“J will not have any quarrelling,” continued the



IN EDINBURGH. 83

aunt more severely, mistaking the smile. “My
word is law here, and must be obeyed at once.
If Bernard is troublesome there is a cane in the
house—”

Up to this Gladys had been sitting watching
her, aunt, with quiet wonder at the orders and
Miss M‘Arthur’s manner, but now her eyes flashed,
and rising from her seat she exclaimed indig-
nantly: “There may be fifty canes in the house,
but no one would dare to touch LEN one
would dare!”

And as she stood with clenched hands and
angry eyes fearlessly regarding the wrathful lady,
each recognized in the other an antagonistic
spirit, and the unspoken and, for Gladys, almost
instinctive thought was “Who will be strongest?” -

After a pause Miss M‘Arthur spoke very sternly:
“IT am very much shocked and surprised at
your disrespectful and rude behaviour; and on
the very day of your arrival! I wonder very
much what my brother would say! I see what
you require, and what you shall have—a strict
eye and hand upon you. Go now, and consider
yourself in disgrace until you can apologize for
-your rudeness; and remember, you are always to
go to bed at half-past eight.” And Gladys went
away with a weight upon her heart which op-
pressed her heavily. Unkindness and neglect she



84 : GLADYS.

had known, but then she had recognized it and
made allowances for it in the freedom of her
home; but this was unkindness which called _it-
self justice, against which there was to be no
appeal, and from which there was no escape, and
which she was bound to obey. She felt she
could not go back to the nursery, where Baby
was playing with Fiddle and eager for a story.
The tears came to her eyes when she thought of
him. Would anyone dare to touch him; beautiful,
frail Baby, whom she had promised her mother
to shield! Her heart burned as she thought,
“What could I do against them all? Oh, I hate
her, I hate her. What would pretty little
Mama think?” “Mama” gained immensely by
comparison with “Aunt.” “But they would
never dare!”
Tempted by a half open door at the end of the
corridor she entered the room, and shutting the
door after her went over to the window, with
some vague idea of soothing her mind and the
turmoil she was in. With every moment she grew
more spiritless and weary, and her prospects
seemed darker and sadder. “ Breakfast at eight
and lessons at nine—always to sit. in a tight dress
after tea—no pony, or trees to climb, no anything
nice—and that hateful—oh!—but they—she—
never would dare! Such a big dreary house, and



IN EDINBURGH. 85

we must never go from our own rooms, and no
one we love, and—ah!”

What was it came through all the complainings
like a ray of sunlight, or a strain of sweet music,
and changed in a moment the expression of the
little girl’s face? .

“ forget sosoon! Did I not promise to be His soldier!
Won't He take care of Baby!”

With a glad and-trustful smile on her little
face now, she knelt down by the window and
buried her dark head in her hands.

It was nearly an hour later when she went
upstairs. Baby was in bed and asleep, and it was
time for her to go to bed.

She went into the tiny room, a dressing-room
off her own, where her brother lay in his little
bed. She looked tenderly at him, then bent and
kissed him.

«Lo, I am with you alway. With you and
with me, Baby. Why should I be afraid?”



86 GLADYS,

CHAPTER IX.
THE WINTER.

FEW days passed, and the children fell into

- their new places and became accustomed
to their new lives as children so quickly learn to
do. The servants, glad to have children in the
house, made much of them, and foolishly, though
unintentionally, rather encouraged them to rebel
against what they called their hardships, instead
of helping them to obey their aunt.

This was especially bad for Baby, making him
more dependent than ever; and Gladys at first,
in her gratitude for all kindness to him, could not
see this. The little girl herself soon found that,
in spite of her many “orders” and “law,” Miss
M‘Arthur personally troubled herself little about
them as a rule, and when their governess was
gone they could occupy their time pretty much
as they liked.

Miss Anderson the governess was a middle-
aged lady, rather cold and unsympathetic, expect-
ing them always to do their lessons perfectly, and
almost never speaking to them during their mid-
day walk or at meal-times. At first Gladys used
to petition to be taken to the various places of
historical interest of which she had heard. Miss



THE WINTER. 87

Anderson said no; and all the memory Gladys
retained of these walks was “houses and houses
and the gardens of the squares.” Only once, and
then by Miss M‘Arthur’s special command, were
they taken down Princes Street.

Miss Anderson came at nine o'clock in the
morning, and did not leave until five. Day after
day—sums, history, geography, French, walk,
dinner, preparation; and then how thankfully
they saw her depart, and hastened to wash away
ink-stains and tear-stains, and watch, with great
sighs of thankfulness that the long weary day
was over, for Maggie and the consoling tea.

Their life was very dull and quiet, and a hard
change from the light and freedom and gaiety of
their English home. There was a coldness and
calmness about Miss Anderson which chilled
away any thought of merriment in lesson hours;
and once when Baby in a moment of mischievous
exuberance squeezed his wet sponge over his
unfinished. sums, and afterwards declined to say
he was sorry, she punished him so severely that
Gladys, with a horrified memory of her aunt’s
words, and noticing how strong Miss Anderson
looked, besought him not to do it again, and
strove herself in every way to set him a good
example. :

Sunday was if possible a more trying day than



88 GLADYS.

any of the others. Miss M‘Arthur, as I said, was
religious—a rigid Presbyterian. She went to
church herself twice every Sunday, and to a meet-
ing in the evening. The children were taken to
church twice, and were made to join a select Sun-
day class; besides which they had long Biblelessons
to learn at home. These Miss Anderson heard on
Monday morning.

Being a soldier in these times was hard work
for Gladys. At first she had thought she would
learn, and get help at church, and hailed with
delight the idea of the Sunday-school; but she
did not understand the Scotch service, and fared
little better in the class, and in both places her
mind was kept very anxious lest Baby should
fidget, or lest Miss M‘Arthur should see him if he
_ did. She feared her aunt; but it was not for
herself.

But she had the true soldier spirit, and troubles
only made her firmer and stronger and more in-
dependent; and in each of the long and toilsome
days was one happy time, drawn out as long as
possible. This came between Babe’s bed-time and
her own.

It was not only a pretty sight, but amusing
and instructive, to see how the little girl spent
this hour. When Bernardin with much difficulty
had been got to bed, Gladys with an armful of



THE WINTER. 89

photographs, her Bible, and text-book came and
seated herself on his bed.

“ Are you sleepy, Baby?”

“No,” indignantly. “I hate going to bed so
soon.”

“Have you said your prayers?”

“Yes, Sissy.”

“ And you said ‘God bless Mama?’”

“Yes.”

“Now you must kiss the photos—‘good-night.’”

Some dozen photographs of the beautiful Lady
Whrenly, in all imaginary costumes and attitudes,
were solemnly kissed, and then Baby lay down
once more, and Gladys renewed her catechism.

“You remember Mama, Baby?”

“Yes, Sister.”

« Wasn't she lovely?”

“Lovely.”

“Won't you always love her with all your
might, and never forget her?”

“Oh, yes.”

“Now I must tell you about her.”

At first while her mother was still fresh in
Gladys’ memory these anecdotes were veracious
and simple enough; but as the winter months
went on, and Lady Whrenly grew dim in the
minds of her little children, the anecdotes grew
wonderfully, and the mother became in the lov-



90 GLADYS.

ing and somewhat imaginary reminiscences of
the little girl, the most beautiful, tender, loving
mother that ever children had. And thus in the
young mind of the boy a fair and lovely ideal
was formed and grew, and the far and distant
“Mama,” became the fairy-mother whose coming
home would make life a dream of joy.

By and by, as he listened to Gladys’ flowing
accounts of the dear English home, and the free-
dom and happiness there, and all “ Mama's” won-
derful deeds, his eyes grew heavy and he drifted
easily from the waking dreams to the sleeping ones,
holding his sister’s hand.

Then the letters and the photographs were
carefully put away, and the little Bible opened
and read, and then the little guide-book, and lastly,
kneeling beside the sleeping brother, the little
girl prayed her earnest childish prayers that
she might be a true soldier, and know always the
right thing to do.

“Then at half-past eight she went quietly to
bed.

The winter passed in unbroken monotony.
The children had no share in the Christmas fes-
tivities. They received a number of handsome
presents, and these diverted them for a short
time; and the kindly servants did their best to
give them a treat, and begged leave (and got it)



THE WINTER. 91

to take them down Princes Street. This, and the
three days’ holidays, made a little break; but after
that the long, long weeks passed solemnly, and
oh so slowly! and all exactly the same.

Watching for the foreign letters was Gladys
one interest, and they were read and re-read to
Baby, with copious comments, until they fell to
tatters.

At last one day there was no fire in the
nursery, and when Gladys asked for an explana-
tion the maid said, “ Why, Miss, it’s most summer;
you don’t need a fire no longer. *Tisn’t cold.”

“Neither it is,’ said Gladys uninterestedly.
“ But summer—it doesn’t feel like summer, and I
never noticed tie spring at all” And she
. thought of the long sweet springs in England;
the hunting for first snowdrops, first primroses,
all the firsts of the early flowers. And now it
was almost summer, and she had not even noticed
the leaves come on the trees. She turned away
from the empty grate with a great sigh.

The long winter had told upon her in a way
she never guessed; and had she looked into the
looking-glass with a scrutinizing eye, she would
have noticed a perceptible difference in the colour
of her once so rosy cheeks,



92 GLADYS,

CHAPTER X.
BABY.

HE summer was spent by the children at

Portobello. They were in lodgings there

with a maid, Miss M‘Arthur having gone visiting
in the Highlands.

Baby was perfectly happy, having no lessons,
or indeed anything disagreeable to do; and Gladys
was happy because he was happy. He soon
regained his failing appetite, and his laugh was
as merry as ever; but there was a sad and
subdued look. about the little girl which the long
summer of freedom on the yellow sands scarcely
chased away. The truth was, the child-mind
was all puzzled about things right and wrong,
and the shadow of a great fear for Baby’s sake
always hung over her, and she had no one to turn
to in her perplexity. Instinctively she felt the
servants, kind as they were, could not understand
or help her. Her little books and her mother’s
letters were her great sustainers. If ever a little
girl tried hard to grope her way, through the
mist and twilight of her childish mind along the
path of right, it was Gladys. Often she was very
frightened, very weary, almost despairing, but
she never once thought of turning back. She



BABY. 93

had no one to speak cheering and encouraging
words to her; but the beautiful light from God
was in her heart, and she knew that it was light,
and with all her childish strength she strove to
make it shine.

To make Baby happy, to make him forget all
darker memories, to bring back the sweet con-
fident and winning manner which he had lost
under the stern rule of the governess, and, above
all, to write to her mother of him and to tell him
of his mother, these to her were solemn duties,
and she performed them well. Her letters to
Lady Whrenly showed a motherly solicitude
about her brother that was pathetic; there was
hardly ever a word about herself in any of them.

By the end of September they were all back in
town at work again; the anxious look was deeper
on Gladys’ little face, and Baby was quiet and
dull. The weather was very cold, and there was
every appearance of a long early winter.

Though the children had now been a year with
their aunt, they felt-no more at home with her
than during the first week after their arrival,
Once or twice they had been brought downstairs
to see visitors or old friends of their father; but
as they had both been very much admired, Miss
M‘Arthur (though she was not displeased at the
admiration) would not have them often, Admira-



94 GLADYS.

tion was bad for children, she said. They had
also been invited to some juvenile festivities; but
Miss M‘Arthur did not approve of this either, and
the invitations were declined. So what wonder
then, when their lives in the beautiful city were
so dull and cheerless, that their hearts went ever
more lovingly to the beautiful English home: to
Baby now a dim but glorious vision, a fairy-land
which the future was to realize.

One morning in. October a stately message
came for Gladys. Swift ablutions and a clean
pinafore caused a short delay, and then Gladys
went downstairs to her aunt’s morning-room.

The interview was destined to begin with a
calm and end with a storm. Miss M‘Arthur was
wont to make the same curious mistake as Lady
Whrenly did, and speak to Gladys as though she
were grown-up. The little girl fully appreciated
this, and her firm and confident answers and bright
determined eyes, whenever she instinctively felt
a contest was coming on, were in the greatest
contrast to her habitually anxious wistful look.

“TJ have been considering,” said Miss M‘Arthur,
“whether it would not be a good thing for you
to go to boarding-school this winter.” Gladys
showed no alarm; considering was not a danger-
ous word with her aunt. “But I have decided,”
continued the lady, “that another winter of home-



BABY. 95

life ”—she did not in the least mean to be satirical
—“will not be bad for you. Miss Anderson tells
me you are progressing in most branches, and
that you are studious and obedient. I am very
glad to hear it.”

These gracious and condescending words were
the first commendation Gladys had ever received
from her aunt, and she was pleased with them.
A beautiful frank smile came to her face, and
Miss M‘Arthur seeing it, made a half pause before
continuing:

“JT think, therefore, that another winter with
Miss Anderson will be good for you; but for
Bernard—”

She was obliged to pause again, which she did
sternly, for Gladys gave a little start and cry, and
her face changed sadly. Anxiety, anger, fear, and
a terrible sense of helplessness were all there. She
did not speak.

“Bernard,” continued Miss M‘Arthur, “is not
doing well. Miss Anderson tells me he idles away
his time, and is not making any advance at all.
This is very bad.”

Gladys listened on thorns, her startled eyes on
her aunt’s face.

“T have therefore decided that school is the
best thing for him, and I will send him shortly;
a good boys’ school.”



96 GLADYS.

“ A boys’ school for Baby!” cried Gladys now,
in a tone of passionate resistance. “It would kill
him! I will not let him go! Mama gave him to
me; I will write to Mama! I will take him away!”
she continued wildly. “He is only seven—a baby,

_and not strong! He was always afraid of boys! .
Mama never would allow it—never! How could
you think of such a cruel thing?”

“How dare you speak to me in such a way?”
cried Miss M‘Arthur, and with all the unreasoning
anger of an old spoilt child she poured forth on
the little girl a storm of utterly irrelevant and
very angry words, which it would serve no good
purpose for me to put down here. Gladys let
the storm fall upon her in silence, but far from
alarmed, and when at last Miss M‘Arthur paused
breathless she said firmly, “Aunt, Baby must not
goto school. Mama would not allow it if she knew.
He is too young and too delicate, and I know it
will hurt him. Let him stay with me and I will

_ teach him myself. Oh!” she said, pleading in her
earnestness, “I know he will learn from me, and
it would break his heart and mine if he were sent
to school.”

Miss M‘Arthur ought to have been touched, but
she was not; she was all in arms for her own
insulted dignity, and determined Gladys should
be punished.



BABY. 97

“Nonsense!” she said harshly. “This is the
result of the way you have been spoiled, especially
Bernard. Go back to your lessons now, and send
your brother to me.”

“What are you going to do to him?” cried
Gladys, whose mind was in such a confused and
indignant state against her aunt that she would
have believed her capable of anything at that
moment.

“Do as you are told,” said Miss M‘Arthur
sharply; and Gladys, choking with indignation,
left the room.

Her words had their effect upon her aunt, how-
ever, to this extent, that instead of sending the boy
to Fettes College or Loretto,as sheat first intended,
she concluded to send him to a private school, for
a year at least. Having made up her mind on
this point, she sat frowning and stern awaiting
the little boy’s appearance.

He was a long time coming; but at last there
was a fustling outside the door, the subdued sound
of voices, and then the door opened and Bernardin
entered.

The tall slight figure in man-o’-war suit, the
abundant silky golden ringlets, the almost perfect
little face, the pathetic little mouth and great:
dark eyes, full at present of fear and dislike, all
formed a strikingly beautiful picture.

(536) G



98 GLADYS.

“Why, he is as tall as many boys of ten,” said
Miss M‘Arthur to herself in a tone of justification.
“And he is too big for all that hair,” she added,
with small appreciation of the golden crown.
“Come here, Bernard,” she said aloud.

Bernardin went.

“You are now too old a boy to remain any
longer with a governess, and J am going to send
you to school, where you will be with other boys
and learn to be clever.” All this she said ina
rather gracious and conciliatory tone; Baby only
stared.

“You will have other nice little boys to play
with, and a nice master to teach you to be a good
boy.” Baby frowned. “You will go there in a
few weeks; but you will get home every Saturday
to see your sister, if you are a good boy.”

Still the child never spoke, and Miss M‘Arthur,
at first pleased, became irritated. “Come, Bernard,
have you lost your tongue? Where are your man-
ners? Why do you not speak?”

There was a brief silence, and then the great
house resounded with yells, which prove abun-
dantly that whether Baby had lost his tongue or
not his lungs were in excellent order. Miss
M‘Arthur tried to scold; she might as well have
scolded the hurricane. Then most unwarily she
attempted a little shaking, viciously administered,



Full Text
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FILES
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'SHA-1' da320bd86af4f4c3e5fd38c36f4f2c14b78a557b
EVENT '2011-10-16T20:19:29-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
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describe
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'2011-10-16T20:19:52-04:00'
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'2011-10-16T20:20:01-04:00'
describe
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describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
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'2011-10-16T20:17:01-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:17:04-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:18:22-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:20:24-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:18:52-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:20:05-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:19:18-04:00'
describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKEW' 'sip-files00008.txt'
a371281388f56a8d47041569184a2732
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'2011-10-16T20:17:49-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-10-16T20:18:44-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:19:40-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-10-16T20:20:12-04:00'
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describe
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'2011-10-16T20:19:35-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:19:53-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:19:19-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:19:36-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:17:00-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-10-16T20:18:59-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-16T20:20:13-04:00'
describe
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2d57edf4d873a0b054672b7d131d315b
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describe
'19647' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFM' 'sip-files00011.pro'
20acb274cd65e7a6a8a277a7725f283c
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'2011-10-16T20:17:56-04:00'
describe
'62075' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFN' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
f49b0c52b510db0609ff13a0795718ed
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'2011-10-16T20:19:57-04:00'
describe
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e1e2064e4e3b28e8e0a9a72e35b88760
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'2011-10-16T20:18:43-04:00'
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFP' 'sip-files00011.txt'
473b70e9c118faf2dffa72ed941a5fb7
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'2011-10-16T20:18:02-04:00'
describe
'30985' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFQ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
6f9656043dac5fb3370dc93080079517
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describe
'304407' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFR' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
a0b0ab72aecebe618ad66a1be9ceb8f7
0121557717feb73d23b86572eb15ffafdbf7666a
describe
'195293' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFS' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
2a77d314310854ff3689372979af7ae5
366d9be28fe988c7547de886cf026357f071b6c6
'2011-10-16T20:18:38-04:00'
describe
'33595' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFT' 'sip-files00012.pro'
271a477c97c3b0415b04e4aaf65188ab
07dd3c875f6f315aa0ec7abfabc07ed589b40f2b
'2011-10-16T20:17:48-04:00'
describe
'72550' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFU' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
33581cd6333b515b7ccdb2e16e0509f6
dd51de0875e43c63f9a5e63c7d47066e9e8b55d9
'2011-10-16T20:18:54-04:00'
describe
'2457764' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFV' 'sip-files00012.tif'
143b87e47431e5f57c5aea695dbc379f
0300707ffe113410436d1ac4793d133af57e769b
'2011-10-16T20:17:20-04:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFW' 'sip-files00012.txt'
e18320a883d33921a3689c2768a9a19e
2cee425973b08b26abc4f6688ea701cd757c9884
'2011-10-16T20:19:42-04:00'
describe
'33787' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFX' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
e6887855bcea29bf1f2e38cdd91f8952
eabf695546b4b31345ea19410f6e0e1325e63fba
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFY' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
20f63e00d512e0afa03f4a8dc6f64d7b
30cb460f382a616e1a8e398f3106234321d59eb5
'2011-10-16T20:19:00-04:00'
describe
'181439' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKFZ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
86815be30d0df66934fe6d06084f6491
2dc0a8f705875323b1a99eef8b948795a7bfdb55
'2011-10-16T20:18:17-04:00'
describe
'28281' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGA' 'sip-files00013.pro'
22525c524b47cdb899c803f4e1936f25
a4c574f87fa1ac4d7ba1a5f0e56a663a1deccfa3
'2011-10-16T20:18:19-04:00'
describe
'65221' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGB' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
9a3fbf75d1390c0d777b663b33456eff
251a7ed14ca4c447b51bdbbce230530689cc3d22
'2011-10-16T20:20:22-04:00'
describe
'2457180' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
71f8ff9416465380e40fb3d35c4e0d82
8641d8cced1d554731323f129a8ead5d06c2cda4
'2011-10-16T20:19:10-04:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGD' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d48f1a6cbfd704c7f4f97a04773dd4d6
9e649609979d00288b3aa64b0b8ef046c6387bc4
describe
'32386' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGE' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
65ffd735ef8d1da8ae782e44c39519d2
00ebf9f4fd5b842575ba53ea3086a686a0afddd9
'2011-10-16T20:17:16-04:00'
describe
'304397' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
9fcdbdb3de573acb9d83c334cc8d205c
218d37d05562fc807a29966df323f3276700efd5
'2011-10-16T20:19:06-04:00'
describe
'188580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGG' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
07c277e01033404c55fa5ea2263d2d82
dcf1a6b4abbd67b1f50dcf202e3ba1c913f9fcc3
'2011-10-16T20:18:10-04:00'
describe
'32518' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGH' 'sip-files00014.pro'
6cfb3cfe700c1330fc8da752bd433a65
dac965a57e4e72254f66238963511c55b2871756
describe
'70416' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGI' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
51ac788c73430a509e092fd204e0ccdf
e84c4a4ce19651425efd8339b72451f91e481876
'2011-10-16T20:19:34-04:00'
describe
'2457236' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
6db2ead98ccdfbb30a9031ffa5aaccca
f9f4971abc22d369a124aac2ba7d724dec7742da
'2011-10-16T20:20:03-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
0746e89fd76b40aaf2b011f8da2ad465
2f8cb99aa546c947026069bd6550a0af79194d0c
describe
'32816' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGL' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
54245cb4298500edbecce6ace36d08f8
5cfe8151c458c671cb544a1e8c0f0c1fd3ef831d
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d58d43a5b3e3eb2326e0823bbddce7fd
097ea086add774b467f644a4cfa0c6598b8b4e3b
'2011-10-16T20:17:11-04:00'
describe
'180199' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
1b222ff48146480bcb3b68673e470b5f
5833d5276acb5d4314a7262734bc32be843a4d5b
describe
'30144' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGO' 'sip-files00015.pro'
5818b22839a689b8bb44050ada233b4d
285b3fc8aecc223bb1c41f0c7865e682d7e30fb7
'2011-10-16T20:17:08-04:00'
describe
'67002' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
66e972b4a853f8262a9aadade542a932
0b3df557ce365542383ed4685d960edc5ae7e729
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGQ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d0e0a95cc7961243ed33dce2f17f1b7e
627ec90f884643ff57280f15e94c9605df4063f1
'2011-10-16T20:17:09-04:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGR' 'sip-files00015.txt'
841e4bb54d8b1a412d93246cbf46a5b9
c21a60cda76b62755583e31d4c948cd0fadf8cd7
'2011-10-16T20:19:17-04:00'
describe
'32372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGS' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
9d9b1e80216aedc6055445fbf5f469e2
5f4f2c6fde901985002179ab5a84fc1f46cd8fbd
describe
'304297' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGT' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
76fc51c63493cd9aa1c98fb9e76a5e76
65be940b2ff9719d94d6a222f9322021b50195b4
'2011-10-16T20:16:58-04:00'
describe
'194081' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
501605a9abd38b816a5532d3700d468f
23bbd8142ee243ab79a0952ab706d795de456c76
'2011-10-16T20:19:15-04:00'
describe
'32880' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
0f88e65573121ca5b439440c0c352c17
44af51db0621d8a2d4d00609b298ae408fdc70d9
describe
'70980' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
cadfc875ea0f1091714e11e52caf543f
291a93df0c307e1e9ea74a2cbb6207873081ebdd
'2011-10-16T20:17:06-04:00'
describe
'2457628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGX' 'sip-files00016.tif'
dfd9a13086cc18199fe5ade8685acff5
22375a61fb70eb2bee9f686c9f3ea8f4170332df
'2011-10-16T20:19:27-04:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGY' 'sip-files00016.txt'
60f7970c3c223c672b7107068b65d90e
33a4ffd33dee9de97885ef340006e4e0ad5f3fec
'2011-10-16T20:16:55-04:00'
describe
'33452' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKGZ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
f7bff0f995b4e110871f2eb8480d9a0f
69b3d4292441d0e5f4ec6031a88663e7d5bc6fbc
'2011-10-16T20:20:19-04:00'
describe
'304332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
87f2f544eb8738e302494353bbbc00be
b68602c22302eca59123ff9d97535a814e50d56b
'2011-10-16T20:19:59-04:00'
describe
'165708' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHB' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
5ec052e6b458d9feab4eb4dc6e5d3aab
0944476648cc55f700c51458ba0c73ddbda51558
describe
'24462' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHC' 'sip-files00017.pro'
29a0449de2f8487ede6cbb5b6b49ad4b
b8cd29390330cc2b40ca295726bcedc86e19fe0b
describe
'61236' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHD' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
474f29c6967a97d0a1f88d337f51b6ae
c647b78c43d92962366c88da4f3e3837c19d5528
'2011-10-16T20:17:31-04:00'
describe
'2456864' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
bb43209bae63b954d12328c01dce46af
305bc70557e0ed48ab7126d374cd6b1f79d8f604
'2011-10-16T20:18:18-04:00'
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHF' 'sip-files00017.txt'
4bbb1c6afe6cee96c57e68cff23dc1c6
9fcad0a4074d872411ff50cf4810e2801d964300
'2011-10-16T20:18:49-04:00'
describe
'30680' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHG' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
f4db7cf448402732eaa2d34c84c73793
a81ac3ad185d0ab40502b50ddd469576932e821b
describe
'304336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHH' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
2bfc64fb8ac43f809af043a678094e19
d431e2df4ea0885ed36dcb7519d9144e7ee61d96
describe
'176469' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHI' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
8416209352e3f8b05953279e21be9e10
10f0737435b7b9b6d1994e7143f0546b52f01d60
describe
'29173' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHJ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
d540d6e5c57aa72ce7782ba64909064a
a72938cd8ce00b71220398bb7e656417bada8f4b
describe
'65766' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHK' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
444fc9371062f001f643fdc3a952e7ef
91b5900a5d2e1c4fa26f6567265e51ec52d7a701
describe
'2457248' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHL' 'sip-files00018.tif'
084ae0713848c9b44de0037f78f99537
2fdf3b405cb543763b19b702c42c9637a81a7c11
'2011-10-16T20:18:13-04:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHM' 'sip-files00018.txt'
2b1d1c94c90bad99f4041272b00c17ee
c96484cb4c00214152ffcc11e207dc0f5c77eb5f
'2011-10-16T20:19:23-04:00'
describe
'32652' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHN' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
d6b6b1d9a2a285c5a3b750fdbdf5e7d4
f543f54ccf4e740dbb0dcd3b95559ce368e1d12f
'2011-10-16T20:18:46-04:00'
describe
'304418' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f37d04e1f808c6eb3d7af58f79359876
e58d184fe89c879a852a40b980ad91319ed58af5
describe
'162769' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHP' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ac0ec07739a5dd81edcd5ea91bcdf7f9
b4716bc074c74f1d8dcd3e9aded4db0bae8d5d00
'2011-10-16T20:20:02-04:00'
describe
'24031' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
2fabc81acfbb4e5ea56265fccdee1e36
8c1607c97c3c4119d9fc11becfbc7fd1da0dbbbd
'2011-10-16T20:19:14-04:00'
describe
'61247' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHR' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
eebd0ab49d5a62edbe1e7e4c2a57685e
14de23112a236ebc5270ad1ed0868a58e7103ce4
describe
'2456872' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHS' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b4af482f57f9f7c3fff46f20e8bcd1f6
6db9aa4ede99a167a83d470ab5b1291a622bca07
'2011-10-16T20:19:50-04:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHT' 'sip-files00019.txt'
93e3edeb57a2ad60e6a6410e1cd1ae30
d7ebabf992cefed5701a832e481dfa63fee3b23e
'2011-10-16T20:17:27-04:00'
describe
'31375' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHU' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
3a9b007bb51579eac535f0674997cf7e
a18a9c768a6f2bc2584117edb4e1638dc1061309
describe
'304391' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHV' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
2198c00490e5c84b1222269f33edc89b
31f4a7727e5b1023bd24d29dcca7cf1bdc2570e4
'2011-10-16T20:19:24-04:00'
describe
'186346' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1644cf5b565929f36052b932fca5e467
1e76c211726f04cd3739b64bb1461162c515c9dd
'2011-10-16T20:19:46-04:00'
describe
'31026' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
0e93684af2c9cc704e60e9603641df0c
4e5a8dfd060c9aa047ca51477f37c82698c2cb04
'2011-10-16T20:18:06-04:00'
describe
'69537' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
2c2739bb2ae8abe2cf7b503f45c498d8
680e64e6be3b0ea4ab5c1df6edb49550ade1c017
'2011-10-16T20:18:40-04:00'
describe
'2457304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKHZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
fe2cf495c26bab4e3eec750ff73722fb
43d4f2a3d6cde2bb83a59809d0135aad2fc5b60d
'2011-10-16T20:19:16-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
79a2d0d74e72a154d4b406e28ed49342
ec65cd5a2dc87d02cede5a741d49cb427367d10d
describe
'32502' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIB' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c64c376306a755fb7ffdd35a85c20916
6e9f37f62ae9cd110d4b6b64e86cc7beae0e0e5f
'2011-10-16T20:17:45-04:00'
describe
'304285' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
74c11155208299297480c72f760e1227
3b4e4ef09607c9dc791c396b33fa4fb71bbd3aa6
describe
'189224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKID' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
dbbdcc16c42037c43215e7fd3bcd589e
bb1ad1f71490cf213076b9e34ddf681f6560d9bf
'2011-10-16T20:19:02-04:00'
describe
'30622' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIE' 'sip-files00021.pro'
0b6483f166d8b6d18aae647594e208eb
5e547348dda7a75e80285a73ef00ec3fa03dae92
describe
'69192' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIF' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
4875461c8942b6f37e7f57e47d9c4fb8
6cc68d8d7e36140e38ae9c14de05a93ff244d6ca
describe
'2457276' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIG' 'sip-files00021.tif'
34a30d11e3f1562e742aba7675ef387e
058c6b300ed0364c72c54c5da8dd289f3dbaeb32
'2011-10-16T20:17:10-04:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIH' 'sip-files00021.txt'
87dd0e34d85b50f2c093ab92eea0ddc5
3e11aa514faf1e6470161de030444185d24cbc5b
'2011-10-16T20:20:18-04:00'
describe
'32882' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKII' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
56c9398acc311b44cc7eaae281de5075
c04d7f9b3ef22c912d1f8efc2fb7bf7dba96bcee
describe
'304383' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIJ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
42d3c29ffb641cc7e846d1a9e9e26c6a
6fff36a76ff13cee19e8524a5e72c9cbbfe6d8cd
'2011-10-16T20:20:00-04:00'
describe
'183366' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIK' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
3ddfe8d187a37b7003630cf0d6539fd0
83fd2058d0e0b5ac22689f7e6d951d5a6802dd12
'2011-10-16T20:17:29-04:00'
describe
'30849' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIL' 'sip-files00022.pro'
f31dd4421b001fb5974561d0fb4ffd6d
58437749aa67770c988d577e92427f00a313eece
'2011-10-16T20:17:22-04:00'
describe
'68296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIM' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
ea5d279c7d76837867c8ba27b653b854
7fd38514e3962c5b5d78ca65a3d46c3666646333
'2011-10-16T20:19:41-04:00'
describe
'2457372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIN' 'sip-files00022.tif'
76c8bad325e119005213d06dcd23f483
0d2ece50d9cc36489915ce1be1d5e6eb6685ac54
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIO' 'sip-files00022.txt'
f3f15e348d983769a256e1bf82fe8844
a78dd3787b64c779a66402f9b8eeea6ca054a949
'2011-10-16T20:20:25-04:00'
describe
'32961' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIP' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
a6a758c8e38a49a538dc4e5be61959fa
b2baaec1ad1e50881d785d66e050e17478a4f8ca
'2011-10-16T20:18:47-04:00'
describe
'304367' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIQ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7d69d67af485fa3635329402cb063815
87a758842c886440b1cf0d4071ed1cc3aaec2501
'2011-10-16T20:18:31-04:00'
describe
'159281' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIR' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
8b4538b731c06aef35ae626b458d102d
44464da47ba1ab7beb97de63ff7ed5b63f443521
'2011-10-16T20:18:15-04:00'
describe
'23312' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIS' 'sip-files00023.pro'
00da47f0581123c9b52f66fd0404dcf4
d2d40b45787613cab15a825b4fc35031f443de5c
describe
'61111' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIT' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
721b3093ccb59dc15d2e6074fc4eb1b0
c2330370a476af0ae92abceb850b18adc47beb6b
describe
'2456944' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIU' 'sip-files00023.tif'
73e84f5bc50a3799545ac3db3cbec14e
70be745631655728716982dce8fad6103f53fae2
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIV' 'sip-files00023.txt'
14aee7f21746ed3cd9fba400cf544e43
d6d0a7f62c06481d987985a2adc2b96825023359
'2011-10-16T20:18:33-04:00'
describe
'30882' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIW' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
f5d67cbe3a9207b305ccfa254db9fbfb
520a9e655ceb024555017a6aea79ef93fac5a2a3
'2011-10-16T20:18:29-04:00'
describe
'304386' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIX' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ec7267e49ab2e3a2d911c894efa654c9
c4a6c892ea73d286223aade6a766fbfd755179ff
'2011-10-16T20:19:21-04:00'
describe
'189825' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIY' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
6396b0d31e8c2ccbc04a5e9eeea31f1f
e1a0ee82d6a3cdd12e65d705708326a55a01a96b
describe
'31280' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKIZ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
9f3ec0e00084a4e1c0c4f442fda199f3
a12894f983722b34cf7b239772bfb1e23fc74a4b
'2011-10-16T20:17:34-04:00'
describe
'70518' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJA' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
a6175799a05214bbba22a0a5b9858772
c15abf776a2172e29d29008eeee6b215f3bd69d4
describe
'2457360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJB' 'sip-files00024.tif'
f020886951e689f7d7776ca4a12a87c5
d50f44f23404e5f7dcbd7269e161fc6b0be43fa9
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJC' 'sip-files00024.txt'
705e58787136e290627c52c2b4b2e1d6
b9acd6a8bdb31c49f197fd64c2f1bb76363001ff
describe
'33198' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJD' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
acdaa92e44e79633b9adeeb103fa9d55
c55463a6c950dac0b350197e62ac06a360d68b44
describe
'304141' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJE' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
bd1733fd02bd30b64834c905c9f60b3c
04f246c3eea513c5a6fc8663d627a802a17d6bce
describe
'188802' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJF' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
0019c02912a3f733271f01c4f31f1d03
69d89313234949b9650d318ec6e2554d355e3d92
'2011-10-16T20:18:24-04:00'
describe
'30812' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJG' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f444e9435cd0d216f4039fc75e303223
878a0da989eb5636aa9d15ea075913748d8107a2
describe
'69377' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJH' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
072e230f11bc0423db6a47877557238d
dbcd751d8ed8b2279c37ce1a9995c81ad3903a11
describe
'2457364' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJI' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4fc8f90212241068899aea30e6beb31b
29b9c414babd4a5f3dbad803b984c85874554443
'2011-10-16T20:18:36-04:00'
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJJ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
ca622affd7103c9619eac3f77e72f226
4b2f6ba3965ec571662007d1d232b6e22db3c80f
describe
'32992' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
6845a393ebd3182168e16d6ee6d754a1
619b8e9b794e717c101762f7fd260271891e7a4c
describe
'304410' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJL' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c6d111144465404a1e8372acaa2f44d8
39aa047a19c2c79ac53b26b31bf38be1781a63eb
'2011-10-16T20:20:15-04:00'
describe
'175360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJM' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c191fc7092e1e2f837a1012005ed5a4f
7949a2fdddb1f47d58ebe19b41ce801c83b9cb74
'2011-10-16T20:18:12-04:00'
describe
'28981' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJN' 'sip-files00026.pro'
793bb65274d41291ce089a4e8e6681c1
c7579952e9b702032e6ab010aea6563c8a11a1bf
'2011-10-16T20:18:41-04:00'
describe
'66352' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJO' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
fe31f77bc2c3cdf969ae8af5c985ba06
429471a69e3c9d57dc677d2fde5e0ffe271d9e67
describe
'2457160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e3a29a87318090a4eb4bc5059307bec4
c97aa5d19baf7d8565d068a0644bcba55dd7d1f2
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJQ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
6565c2c68f73c46a2b2f71e918acdca9
c3a4cf578deab2c47e67dec1034ace49c01fe44a
'2011-10-16T20:17:54-04:00'
describe
'32446' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
b46295a51d63674b123c345d9de88510
002e2c214770bffd94df7e88a96a7880d95c1521
describe
'304313' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
494d85da631637eeb34e2904d7d7042e
267495aa4083d3c636138dfad7b4125c40eb5e5b
'2011-10-16T20:17:46-04:00'
describe
'184685' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJT' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
21fd44d26731a98751957b65589a774d
221c165103aaf82ee5792fc1412621ba16b89066
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJU' 'sip-files00027.pro'
534ff0daed12d5fd1be71686fa1007e1
2bce5860b7efebce431d44fbedfe2a610f42a9f3
'2011-10-16T20:18:32-04:00'
describe
'69577' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJV' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
8a8c799f002754b4852b836ecc5e840e
05d6edc39a0475a7b6921f36d32a14b1941236c9
'2011-10-16T20:17:13-04:00'
describe
'2457696' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJW' 'sip-files00027.tif'
dd5357e729526d11f2b821bce22ab67f
c0c1de9152e26d37ad103fdb19c1b01a4b913969
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJX' 'sip-files00027.txt'
fcd741c6ae27ebc6bd6d9625c795cb17
2bc60b03bbff47ee5103404683db0b2ad116fa29
'2011-10-16T20:18:16-04:00'
describe
'33125' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJY' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c76eeead7acb2883eb7461fc02332126
10803fc27a323fa3b3354ac0f670d58b7a8f5d01
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKJZ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
10b4c1ca79ab9e134b3b48431dac9ba4
f60cbf38580ae5b8a5ddc9996d33b6239be70ce3
'2011-10-16T20:17:37-04:00'
describe
'186130' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKA' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e62a6e63822c314e162fa98704ddead1
f26635b4f362609090323ac78caf690b4b1a79fe
describe
'31501' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
eebc8bfc93b56278ea45ff9a9d985ad8
d6888ecc97ddb30b2a10b6d96ab43140cde85cbf
describe
'69820' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKC' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
81a8c9279cfc2dfa9fb38a615ae17ce2
8db9295e32a56efbc9d0625c91b104509b0ae6ea
describe
'2457308' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKD' 'sip-files00028.tif'
762a254189c8e616fd97c32fbd3c8825
1817e09350e4ece67a3613da4d4d5a4e99df1090
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKE' 'sip-files00028.txt'
c1a8d53ce9d4f507ed9f05454412fef6
a044192a11ea5a9572260551ea95c69ce1c980e7
'2011-10-16T20:19:49-04:00'
describe
'33001' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKF' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
67d5502c0d5e5ed13d2f58d722937b1b
476f41eaad87321a275e5cace44e4642cb56a86e
describe
'304326' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
dbd434ef391ecc0fe89a8087d595ec1f
2459b07def9e38ee73207831633cb330695cfc99
describe
'190558' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
c9d5447670ec6bb39a98279c7fe53923
25caa08b2e72174ae3e9f98637cdebffa93311a3
describe
'31093' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKI' 'sip-files00029.pro'
d56b373579de70a56266ff91f80df680
dcc0b115106667b3441d2b6f08af3993978202f4
'2011-10-16T20:18:34-04:00'
describe
'70293' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKJ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
1af9c1a9d345bd637838f66ba243d477
032c86ebd9e0278d43aedfeaa56f5175d26a4eb7
'2011-10-16T20:20:10-04:00'
describe
'2457604' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKK' 'sip-files00029.tif'
7e82b1f3b4222a59dffcf86a54d6ccf6
1e38d53920a7414caaa80c209b08a27c11747c7d
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKL' 'sip-files00029.txt'
d3b74b48dc7cd33d99c4c9d18bef5660
b16fec5d8bd11c953e709fbdc79c5f0252ccff4d
describe
'32927' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKM' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
cd6028787f10c079331cb21f065b942d
1e424572dded8b4740a5a3b01f0a55c747ae90bc
describe
'304362' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKN' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
d4c1391925f492041a4e8ea90aec4463
4afd05835e40240d114989a03707d3f3047b5992
describe
'141505' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKO' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
7cd95a8c65bb49e245f550a6eaddea00
22edced6ad8b140b44553f6dc98f7539962aacce
describe
'19884' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKP' 'sip-files00030.pro'
65a223f9eaab6f42d2184bd5fba826d4
5e466e0966670dc0cb4993ce46a4c88ecc940de9
describe
'53381' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKQ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
6aafdcab459d22a27231d0c1753d60c6
8ce8b573d8b694e0374fb75433ce781f9291388e
describe
'2455996' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKR' 'sip-files00030.tif'
340bf4ff2720bf60c4e93c955aa9f2c0
06c56afb10c3d0ca3d0152fe59c06dbde6e0c6fa
'2011-10-16T20:17:07-04:00'
describe
'796' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKS' 'sip-files00030.txt'
61e663b33febab8948db868d0d35e630
6d6a2d381b0ae80f9462025fbfc937a5103c69f2
describe
'28513' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKT' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
3c8131fd58b3a360486cfd45a1a72106
882b45c9285e9e2b6cbdf2a93983735079038e80
'2011-10-16T20:19:54-04:00'
describe
'304295' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
bf86bae87fd172ef6e941bd3bf69675c
21c4432ae85861dd8630ce9f2ad2d9b0af11c68b
'2011-10-16T20:18:37-04:00'
describe
'174336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKV' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
3a5733b0f3399d68e83206c98e20f342
b3d15566619dac919094f56fd5c1d167f4931fbc
describe
'29066' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKW' 'sip-files00031.pro'
e790581886370321334362c42ca7869f
704add3df973eb431ee40e039cb61a514e17aba9
'2011-10-16T20:18:42-04:00'
describe
'65864' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKX' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a518014b6248ad52ff1b2233c7bea33e
93ad696e459db133a510370bf8a726c0941bc9cc
describe
'2456892' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKY' 'sip-files00031.tif'
98ef4b3ce0268e315bd471c855163231
ff93325f68427a26db9999a55e6e49a6a88b8fef
'2011-10-16T20:19:26-04:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKKZ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
962a0477dbd3b26264c425786c323048
22e0c66b6c69da0b78cfbb0d2aae7bf610587199
'2011-10-16T20:18:20-04:00'
describe
'31778' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLA' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
dd34eac8873aee4aba26e36c0705c669
62d3f5fa6ab7899846ffb8f6ce05c6c8938c031f
'2011-10-16T20:18:57-04:00'
describe
'304415' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLB' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
201861230d5abcfc89d1d030cec31eb2
3faa6fc5d392b66fdc46c23cbe7096e2ec598e96
describe
'184358' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLC' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
bf819ef30a3d3dcafc22237ee3b6c7cf
925ef063dc3d50b9e0b37bf328678f4ff5f7b3ee
describe
'31001' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLD' 'sip-files00032.pro'
a646ec47cfbb7d81d03576435f2fd93a
e52e8518583a0c9a8f79fc23e30a36e8aa055900
'2011-10-16T20:18:21-04:00'
describe
'68391' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
08af952a3192dd68468eb015f983ca0f
24dac9787856c50020c764b336fc175526cd0699
describe
'2457232' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLF' 'sip-files00032.tif'
6cd5e01958a2ada3023a0df7c43fe0b8
ae76dae6d121497e81c2a2dc259e6d56b43ce720
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLG' 'sip-files00032.txt'
662cedc5cdfb84065092e4a21fd15776
2d536f24f726fe7fc50790658b7947c85ba14208
'2011-10-16T20:19:08-04:00'
describe
'32770' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLH' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
57e67e64d8c48071ac4cf71f1ad5641f
6552bac796241610a00c8e871c6a3afb9362ad2f
'2011-10-16T20:18:09-04:00'
describe
'304354' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLI' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
8f588937f5bf9e30e5a2556956893179
263094b1ee681435cb3b3598d870a2da76007e2e
describe
'184986' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
acc7bfb3430de800adff8b9dbe9d2320
30a999be545903ba409e6bcc96c81f5cf085108c
describe
'30827' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
3445b79328f2857e04e1af59c1419b03
df190a2b6e9bd115e2285c74be689875e45254bf
'2011-10-16T20:19:20-04:00'
describe
'69367' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
2aaf67556e9e0a501b1907b0db399bcd
4bf16007a5595946d7995e6243260612f0b3a43e
describe
'2457456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
451358da9344311b7e2bb5be048ed121
819208a6155a42d64c4b38b3e02825f917eec425
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLN' 'sip-files00033.txt'
19e55682cfab4946e498bc01f7b749f9
608adb52121ae0649bc4253a3b57666c7b5d454d
'2011-10-16T20:17:47-04:00'
describe
'32888' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLO' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
d5efcd8219d2df8920bbd843c0af7854
ccd9aeda62421e40cdad43e3de004a531dda6936
describe
'304399' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b79869f531a099a4dcd748d95b33ceae
8e639de7f8b475d0bc781f0cf2f7585d4370eeaa
'2011-10-16T20:18:28-04:00'
describe
'186565' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLQ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
d6464db7e7b9fa1b808c9317d61c4a72
256cd265f4556fda07ad3110ad9ca2d69356392a
'2011-10-16T20:18:53-04:00'
describe
'31292' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLR' 'sip-files00034.pro'
23d4019c7fcc9b309fe2f432637b1b8a
c22d68ee3eb62ea067afe8f1e014b2acc92ed5ea
describe
'69237' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLS' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
2269838c478980bf255f18db46982a70
2670ba6c795536e620fc778ddc4124e04e2025f7
describe
'2457440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLT' 'sip-files00034.tif'
9846cb0cd1a7dbeb80893ad3aa3c8cac
38f8e7cb7dcf2251251da2faeaec5ae7dc3c764e
'2011-10-16T20:18:25-04:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLU' 'sip-files00034.txt'
ef9d8339c98b64e7451db864c21ee105
047e24e1d97668ffe11395a05b33e517cc560971
describe
'33210' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLV' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
0014057df2b54b633c24a73c0c453268
2d136e80082b77a52fbe5aefbac0b59a7afcbe5e
'2011-10-16T20:18:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLW' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
54deb335fab831a4d6f41b0908f12f87
b1bc8c762ef6f24438bf8eaec808c0f3e97431a7
'2011-10-16T20:17:59-04:00'
describe
'179504' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLX' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a94cde6451ae48b45a78e20f69ae1374
508e1b13a941728b1e036a50784cb31414504859
describe
'29068' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLY' 'sip-files00035.pro'
29c27a5c481baaec265f3c952cae554c
06cf2ef760c014eaca7fd5d6f2e2a300651838dd
describe
'67267' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKLZ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
5dd93874b722c1e1f56c2d3675d1b97d
1dfe4aaa061653110764997f0788fb8c1444e435
describe
'2457344' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMA' 'sip-files00035.tif'
dc86661016779ce25e263d4c633d05ea
8f09afcaae6e2c360929b89b7cac84d2e0483787
'2011-10-16T20:20:08-04:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMB' 'sip-files00035.txt'
28633e2b9162f706cdddfe43ee31387e
36d29895d0da93a21a1c8e954ba880e0bbfb189f
describe
'33020' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMC' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
5a073c61f9471eddd27922ccfa877654
c7efff0bca243f42d60b96af19df06fda7ff00d3
'2011-10-16T20:20:07-04:00'
describe
'304406' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMD' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
6c03ec273b788dc005c1af487e53e9ac
121c1657b2f12f4ac4bd00fa540b663156dd13c9
describe
'185729' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKME' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
ceabcfa77c01259bca1165696ce5754b
a99d6912bf5ab2f447305bf62ae2965a6daec108
describe
'30619' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d2da5051475f516bec64454894404e55
cfccb225f548dc5bddb6f90835e90a0d041953ee
'2011-10-16T20:19:22-04:00'
describe
'68821' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMG' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
3aaa9edff8dada729c74b2a669f4ccca
a99930a6ddc0216b82fbfc9090b56eec9a679bff
describe
'2457348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
a1e290e47b4b054d2015cce3b05f3d5a
8662fdd602b76665ee18d95f3095ded8d685cec9
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
7e302a8690fe4d01caa0137e3ce89471
462fd1d1490110ac8201c6715186ce8089731b2b
describe
'32955' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMJ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
77d427d21902cfe554b9695ab4c94485
a0cacc253bcce61e342355a810bcbe4d8ca26a0e
describe
'304287' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMK' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
d2094d1743bfabc25ce5ef40084db6a6
5b9b6c83ed79372f736638c88ee15a8210ba362d
'2011-10-16T20:19:11-04:00'
describe
'180599' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKML' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
59af7881230f75f4d18b9ebebdd5e99a
e49ba3ea48faedc527a92458ae4a6137ebc5e232
'2011-10-16T20:20:20-04:00'
describe
'28353' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMM' 'sip-files00037.pro'
c6140d748e049292b1906ba33ab4bece
933b7b24433bb818350bf16f2796ed1f0c409f28
describe
'65832' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMN' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
94f72785927c26bbcaa235ac63c271f2
0b99f23c337ef37ea85c0a3b40ee30c7539b6b76
describe
'2457168' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMO' 'sip-files00037.tif'
6714c5d6bd9b414858965352ddab9d2d
c236be0cf346012f385fda5c7255193779993358
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMP' 'sip-files00037.txt'
0d08ece94881078e0166b8309193d272
012b8e7392143e3659eecbfedfc1fb8724d223cc
'2011-10-16T20:17:58-04:00'
describe
'32503' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMQ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
5dfd2fba0e5855eff19f9bb35c99a081
8ef3257e444730a7e5b4df874a2bdfc4a608aa2c
describe
'304394' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMR' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
fc399c3e0a6cf9316e236226c92269bd
b16d31a431206352a4597ae45ab33c3f0078d23e
'2011-10-16T20:17:21-04:00'
describe
'180223' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMS' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
eee0b01c13057bba6b20b0dd180f7a4f
1c78c1d423109044cf2bedd82d309bdd781bf29d
describe
'30360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMT' 'sip-files00038.pro'
aff257226f1e9d372703336540873b28
eb0f15fe18c070d0dca8a859526cae9dea94604a
'2011-10-16T20:18:48-04:00'
describe
'67628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMU' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
4ef865a4163a43739ba90403afbe9b1e
e8f860f231ac08d89f4fe8a0309a04cd57867b78
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
df382c36d19330b61c1b13574f93848c
3ba6143b5382ccb11f27641fa3de05830d305697
'2011-10-16T20:19:38-04:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMW' 'sip-files00038.txt'
446c4033666b89674f659f12dc102edb
592c78f765f4a38522d865694b1886760ecf57e7
'2011-10-16T20:19:12-04:00'
describe
'32059' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
f8508eaa93212ebeaee00679394f05ad
d386e0d860c7d3d940a62b7f2d4dac95a7761185
describe
'304234' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a86731421f629d8b5db457ad614590d1
6c2e3ca54aaab6b495d3a73f3e2fb2e9ec79a24c
'2011-10-16T20:18:03-04:00'
describe
'187454' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKMZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
2f544c5a1defd8bca12cee0ab06e8399
c981b40df219bd44fb1b9b32d69241b8df512ddb
describe
'31874' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1cf61c7fc913edb14466e5b0bf3e53ee
99fc20944a6e81b63879a717f5b39de5fe11550c
describe
'70610' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNB' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
8167980745003c78f420a4ad2d19f9b4
9d042171d6c8f1dd18f0fe62477f21881d1e51e7
describe
'2457452' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
e3f39166dc37626bc1918c325793620f
ae73c0443e2286ad33b60011d39696f929548faa
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKND' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c48c49e8ccb83fce2791e61f31c865cf
a8555552e4cc9b33a5c42bdbb33a068142f29c1d
describe
'32928' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNE' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
fdf20d9035e198571b15f3d3f7e91c44
99123c2419aa71aa9610507fbcf80bfb204b8608
describe
'304308' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
03988466ea621e6d994d563f6b4cbba3
4a24579a7026243a72f5fbc5a98cac50714b8d74
describe
'192601' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
ae47f00dd2bb8a50e71637db1d126880
6b562017d01fc65b749f40379131ab72510123a1
describe
'32909' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
d00a1c160db9cb3557a77c3c8efa5ba7
09d3d30dcc51eb61aadb4d0bd450d4ab74c18f90
describe
'71214' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNI' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
f5e0b5061b299d05d942a09d7a2620f3
0af984414f9296299fcc1c75f2fc2a726ef27536
describe
'2457340' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1babd5fa9f665a6ca73d19fd47c14efe
8ce3cc9f561bb590fc0c7afca2f9e4367b93db90
'2011-10-16T20:20:14-04:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
f4685177ff42a8adeef6bcb799f5c71b
710ba17ba7a643021ed7a1421cda03cc2e0b186d
describe
'32651' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
a3f32c30f6c031df5a187e606c60c5c9
544a28d82048ab257ab145f14120d0661a91ad38
'2011-10-16T20:17:55-04:00'
describe
'304355' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
bf71ccfb160e7bc6742df5fcb9520f2d
b217f42b07e6e9308c74e3295f0f1ed9a6972b5f
describe
'185658' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNN' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
25e690e84ba778455d9d1120f9ed46da
2030def536891fc45ad796a285526fd38fc4f6ca
describe
'29853' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNO' 'sip-files00041.pro'
12ba6cfdfd662d5818838c1bc963a0fc
de5927640a3221889ea4c2fada44d4e414102af1
describe
'68383' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
bbdec76837b810daf14e1136d2afcea0
b2306319d2189f8971e806371833a29f189fe233
describe
'2457576' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNQ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8a3666a462372f6c33107759e3574dc9
2059bd637c778ce94c1c181fbc117a5bbef69c2e
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNR' 'sip-files00041.txt'
a2c95adcf82dcae6bd4953d4984385f6
5d7fab40158cb0f6d4793e137d310a0694f0a9ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNS' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
062b1b797c1648b622519a3bff10617f
a77fa94c53042def2a8fff688ce96b668afd6359
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
053b415a0c1314544a510ac5d4dc2669
81b9203d934f501b02c124be3da4271f50e1e8eb
describe
'179579' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
2a73b3af08cf5852fdc50c32c851886e
5595ff658440abb634a188cdc78c51799ca75446
'2011-10-16T20:19:47-04:00'
describe
'30299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNV' 'sip-files00042.pro'
07bd8dbe6415e4c8d54577a8dcf679a3
e9c4711db304659aab899de15aa955ced47a3937
describe
'68569' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e6a24cfffa76d067d9b2208291c1036b
94fbd2be8f5d0566e8fee352691330eaf9e94de2
'2011-10-16T20:18:58-04:00'
describe
'2457356' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
3d7f3173a549eedc79700a602ccb76ec
9234ec6fd29ea0158657c41dd99ac238bc5d95d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNY' 'sip-files00042.txt'
723f5a04780e880fb4b43dd15c338ad2
a5bd51fc276dac6b2ebaa0b7d62058464d72cf90
'2011-10-16T20:17:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKNZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
90edbc6d91cb41c7f00ed6179cc188fe
d256b8e2932a57332f13f4caf39ffdfddfdf0e63
'2011-10-16T20:19:31-04:00'
describe
'304411' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
e2426ce0d3e3ed4cffea7df13547da36
211868c20d4f67d3a01c888d95fc12a0d06b8580
'2011-10-16T20:18:26-04:00'
describe
'183589' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOB' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ffa04cc8ea0799b967411a7cc5052920
27ce9573250c707068339f2a3b284a3a9b775450
'2011-10-16T20:18:01-04:00'
describe
'30521' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOC' 'sip-files00043.pro'
e88bd4c6e79e364da78a6b4470e0aa9c
7205b59505129615f00f93c2bfbc3edd6130be4a
'2011-10-16T20:20:06-04:00'
describe
'68867' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
d3529e8aa1f1988581c7ca843d077051
f095e48dc83d1fe2695a7d0e69c0e07e0685b3c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOE' 'sip-files00043.tif'
96bf9229209539de3e39cec9423c250a
6c6bb2fa92fbbf19f4e05fe0025ee8e29c0d07f5
'2011-10-16T20:17:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOF' 'sip-files00043.txt'
676ed247686b547f41a97ebd5ba876ed
b42dc012feba32b5611fa000025ce2bbe7662003
describe
'32993' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOG' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
3321ea291e4aa4d875e87d919b087dec
c39352094771f3dc5971c1416e163343ded8d5d3
describe
'304409' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOH' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
c13fdb41df9de8a8da16d47ac33ef82d
cf48fc3d4afdd8e391831dd91487bc8b9769f2bf
describe
'174451' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOI' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
013a9afc56d972e774b10b4986a845c5
337b611c61800a4dda74de7096188f9985fb0607
describe
'27006' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOJ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
f30d4f111aabbd6b6c1952cb71c5a10c
e33eb7a229d8ad8cdd586b37eb370ccbd7bbaeda
describe
'64025' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOK' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
fa3015bd43f227657016b32f80985783
41d6844ea1bd1cf44ef590ca0c954d14afef73cd
describe
'2456740' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOL' 'sip-files00044.tif'
c5332b9cf842d4f64192cbf9cc773131
38bddf5aef563a6c8e882fd358740cad4de1f8ff
'2011-10-16T20:18:27-04:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOM' 'sip-files00044.txt'
9f1d9fb498f25436cf1e1f9ac8dcab29
e371da95c944674981746633d34ab57ba14520d5
describe
'31329' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKON' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
eb0268d0119a1bb5455843ae638e0d77
4428e8599a4f544e5d1d401b9a91c63c5bb483d5
describe
'304412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
a32c90b5481cc545245d5a021d902904
6c46c035ecb009d3c3edf4b29c2ccbcadd7d9ec5
describe
'195278' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c0acd7cb6557164cca946c4e8c617ccd
21ed908b24c75832c088f2b4735e0a5d40c992c8
describe
'32881' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
247c0e6bb6dbc8802075273700e390ee
c439db04aa1d7f33b42b7d17219e5ef61bdd21b1
describe
'72544' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
292e3c97500aa4e04490a5e6b5868597
265eee89224bc3ebca837c72cc6ceb3aa948755a
describe
'2457656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
bff61b6ff309d1c1e1ea00274d80541c
930dfe622bc5bb053536badd4d3a8a1cf1879f74
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
1df8e60d43e9c09b1138b6117f022390
18b95fc2a6601450261e34cb57d443b2342931e1
describe
'33401' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9d1be40c6352748f97c2e3387db72818
18974666884f880490e249b22b3828f14f57ffe8
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
cde22aaf282738bb00a519be02536f75
8af08d879ed44cf98d23313de806f787dd0c1386
describe
'189893' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
b805f7a021434af187cda4bb3d55bb27
50249c762a3e606a5083ff7df375746b028e0763
describe
'32752' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
7f232f286aa871dbd2b171978f3d4595
f7f456e0110e4f3713c14913ba77e916398786a0
'2011-10-16T20:19:05-04:00'
describe
'71456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
644b9328aa6c468664032344897190a9
a67bd3c8cec3b2474fcbf64fbe459838a5ddbfd9
describe
'2457424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKOZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
06f49a40c268433789b822432fa086e1
36f05c55030505088ea546646aaf3029b6c44144
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3a669b3ce2630939e3c06c0fbf1cd5db
23cc98a29a5843632689d1e78eb6ca121467b99c
describe
'33393' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPB' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
f3ea9de6b0a41d9ac9f429c76dd89073
1e14a3959d9a171093f644738f1ed1808233b600
'2011-10-16T20:18:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
fb15868e7ce09a9444b019716e75d8f4
24d60cf7bc65243438692895afe2b00d0e2a5fa1
describe
'184816' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
2697b6d3a6acc5845cf6f07c91a725a9
9c8ac2ce377e71139c25606ce8336980657efe21
describe
'30314' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPE' 'sip-files00047.pro'
2173be3e55f4bce0b205324f29c86375
4b4aa0ac0880c1799340e48e85e1109aa05a3ca8
'2011-10-16T20:18:39-04:00'
describe
'69195' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
eebe6e28bc525e54ddf2b665eda50be7
0a3bcb9c74ea14c915d96e2bfea595bc4b39cb51
describe
'2457492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
829f5db5e201eb3b84a03ea9c6083030
868952b23d7688834ad1ba6d106a6f48ebc14c5c
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPH' 'sip-files00047.txt'
bc6a6ea9c4180e077812c64c28e2ee4d
dfff0ec1bb21d4bfd6b377a50166f356b263def3
describe
'32876' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e0d5f49f1c07a85b8a0a74385791d0a9
04e8ad9bd99ee00b93bd2f1e72a341a22f1b5bd7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPJ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
27b8ba8674ecd3cb351f9e2ae944bb5e
8469bcbc5942a4f9e8fcf166048f04c86e0629f7
describe
'182553' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
333fd755f24e1db29c04078446bdf731
267c26fe9a6d640b2cdc780100cda67a8adc0292
describe
'29581' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPL' 'sip-files00048.pro'
855cba49e5f3124c05a759abac6bd2a8
0b0861e8e7d6530189f350809bfbcb38e1afee7d
describe
'67214' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
041a1c76cd9a5b755acd285f68a0c201
0ae8d50af18fcea833dc86b458a5ccd73c27ea94
describe
'2457128' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
131f0300efeab302fc9ab5c2d6ab4083
b5fc70815863da73499711267168caee07b2e2b6
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
8d394c0f5d40ca2740856dc2c128981d
6ba99eed3155bf1e8ed64b30753b311537ade300
describe
'32281' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPP' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
ae1a08efe5c1abf21df6c723e41aff12
75ce3105d7451d70f2b1b5fbdee337d5ac2ed94f
describe
'304327' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
a8cb8cf40817d3321e8a5cf63e9f45b9
b34c3ad54f06fcd7198c94b25e83ddca107bdba4
describe
'193075' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a8b442db453f5bab4312a1e8edfa36a3
f10a19c53a2612504fdeb456cc4510ca5c0cce24
describe
'32254' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPS' 'sip-files00049.pro'
284329745478be500c20c27518979ac9
922bff8c03773f4aee71eeab55b411848fc0094d
describe
'70136' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPT' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
097b96d82f3ed6869309a10aab851ef4
f5cf99a4b17c4595a3568992eb27eb0f0009abe4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
6c324baf1e97ba7cb5b54f1e9acd1005
feb6d927832798b24bfb158ebc8d4acf9f4eec6b
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPV' 'sip-files00049.txt'
3147a7ac9506dbcc9264c6c66da24d1f
152ebb4a2088421f2a66864912e436c2232a5a82
describe
'32458' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPW' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1c00f98658f6dbe4d0c19632b0a4724a
cc0ea66e7141502e08cd766e00ea165223c887a0
'2011-10-16T20:20:17-04:00'
describe
'304358' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
c1bea2f7b072f8f171d58b79ca8797e3
6a955d4071e22036314321035cd3d93d78429483
describe
'188229' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b3715a42481efe65aebc939fc707c0db
ba75624cdb1a387c0ce1bd4296368fea0271388a
describe
'33131' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKPZ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
c31f482d21a9d2a7dbbcb87303bbdccb
14999355fc13799c46f7ffc3eea00d1ee06e40a2
describe
'70529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
da6dfadfd0c33fa6abdfd11883e92686
0f7b2075786e08d7541e9a96fbc0262edc50a166
describe
'2457192' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
6ef98bcc154a874a5d3c30fb72bcdec2
dfd19b7b072601838984493029b72cf4198d068a
'2011-10-16T20:18:00-04:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
52ba8a16cd5bfa022eff2df3e333640f
1b46567b3b1f3aa729c949831b67e5bf21b4fc47
describe
'32720' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQD' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
46ea735a73a212a1b36934f4e45ce079
69daf67bbd15d226a2cf8264e843fb94c865b9c8
'2011-10-16T20:19:32-04:00'
describe
'304315' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
06774569ffda689e74da98e72f067306
8af27368a0406c007a7f4ba86437e81f5ae64f9c
'2011-10-16T20:17:18-04:00'
describe
'191335' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
9d6e466b6deffbdb45c16b378ebcd247
20f13045edebda42106812dbc449c64be659a1e1
describe
'32956' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQG' 'sip-files00051.pro'
6d82fd5b9986e41b35449346ad909fae
9fb54fff9773ef0fd9476d39361776739c430064
describe
'70292' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQH' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
7c6da796e6657f2e55efadcedac05054
05495ac1bb53d315c9d4c7422e5c5b82072c98cf
describe
'2457524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
c2573f60244e57acb35083d85bade19b
c50e12e093a9ff6d62dfbe91c470826c89388797
'2011-10-16T20:17:53-04:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQJ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
827eca96055aec9ea9cfbc9790999a5e
93d82160168e6bc90cb9bd1e1b8ac10abbe12fcb
describe
'33054' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
271bece6ec335f44d8e602756704fc5c
9a62d96ae96ba86e353b20ae25550d9d1d1d4f62
describe
'304356' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQL' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
29f1b1f8136ef68463d45e0746696006
81e8e34467401fcb56f1997d3254be3318830cb5
describe
'191153' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
340ded5e896f6c66e184b5d7692802ae
e72efc52b5471ab61349f516a78d74c1dee36e6a
describe
'31112' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
2b939c439f036c63cf1fca19c58c97b4
5d88388a3e78a239e67aa733e7616c15ea88c984
describe
'69601' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
54ae664c7c0bd9e7437d74dfe1b518ea
8765070b5081fceabe21555d3b1aee67d5496cfb
describe
'2457320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e5dc7109d6781583b5eeae26526a4080
0d76ed3117ca6aa5706f5e010e365d6ff85c2b28
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
5933d38869e38c7b0d4e00bd03ff4032
08cf58963e092b82dc5d5635348e0dccf8f4cc12
describe
'33002' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
92c252847ee02e1730a8da9d49e39fe1
1860ff7db0e9034bae4d185f82bff635b15ae679
describe
'304404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
ac2f28fcd40319b19243b7a3007006ec
df0784d6e9480ffa26bb8c61af7851795df26276
'2011-10-16T20:19:37-04:00'
describe
'174179' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
d32e4bc5c1558a27ca6a1d470a44be2d
eecd59de2b98f3629df1f2074ffd556765b3d10d
describe
'26001' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
e7caa7daf82408bbe31024a1b65459d4
5dcf6a0006d08fa472999c9a6685f46944c9adeb
describe
'63026' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
70b7965a4808b3d0fec6dcba141bfd20
2e36823baa100ac91c5662e6090c78db20a28eda
describe
'2456524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
c505f6853ccc2ab6d9017c0773aaf8fe
20c1ddc3f2d548490e2a2c3da82ecb7c8a01f807
'2011-10-16T20:19:44-04:00'
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
22283749e37dd386d6e1a617c0777bfc
60035e96de5ec1014554750c87bc9f4d8d4889c5
describe
'30603' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
cc65a45e9e7b640dd9e91dc3c5ffe0ca
48a03b899a2101bb7a6693ba4f250a41419f599d
describe
'304371' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKQZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
1ba9ac4bfef3139c5bc5167a42087e74
c0f56aba925cc60adb5d6e48eafec9473e97e536
describe
'179232' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a1319fab85857d7731aef99edfa3e1cb
ed1d3aac82da75ab534c858dc6a1894f387e70f2
describe
'29237' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
1eb1597d56bebd007f68572905139950
232d84a4b883a6677245f9b98fb45dd7bfd032dc
'2011-10-16T20:17:15-04:00'
describe
'65904' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
e1ebb9788832fecf094dc9cc54ed4c51
3c3136ba7b318ac94798fae11b965e54a10bb249
describe
'2456924' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
2f0d19b22a5d58ba2b605932d2e5153b
ccdbd54ca5414a9b1f1512e60e7be23e821999ef
'2011-10-16T20:19:25-04:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRE' 'sip-files00054.txt'
ec44a45d60eed25fe9a0ee44df9ffa9d
3bd051a74b6c530dad628c3922715e8b61de1278
describe
'31709' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
7f1f507810e52888b77124ce81a22748
6bfc22dc348124625acd7339937d2b7ac5b08371
describe
'304414' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
f05be855520ae0361288b9ec71ff7cbd
09036ae04d8172fc028579fb52de1bb5f182762c
describe
'194952' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
419112018a55e694e717f2bc682784e6
18dd32d5b9a930175b5ac38ab4be3c74c8d1c30c
describe
'32834' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRI' 'sip-files00055.pro'
9211b0acf90356db6528b5f104d58640
0ebf44f9cbf8c27dd535fdaf6b906a230d943e6f
describe
'71526' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
18b7f57769811eb6db51bde6b3542da1
90b3e76ee70cc2b739599d319682468cec399c3b
describe
'2457704' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
16e8bba73d043fb94178a149a654fb4f
c703778ab479f7cb6ce96b0f36bd89c0c2c08bbb
'2011-10-16T20:17:40-04:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
845e521224c5fefeb4da5874f3ed5483
934e91623bdd1dfcf74b7b0cefdd3c10e0d31840
describe
'33168' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
6b299127a09f80857902c2faa06ee218
c5cdb8090027b89b6ed71c9f3678beae7820f071
describe
'304388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
45c6599e3afc240ec6d25873ce28c3f0
7e4522fc1bc694eafdf0d04475f1c67bb006cc48
'2011-10-16T20:20:16-04:00'
describe
'192949' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
8719028532b71856eecf6d5035a90f3e
1ff6229e2badfd0fc94beb465f7697494ba16ca8
describe
'31741' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
67be585d743ba07b2dd406249d49ce33
a5c411ab1e674c2b77069e6077ebd661762e0484
describe
'70645' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
806aa4c5b47b60e1981708454b00edc4
14b7fc65c9eda2c4411803f22accc18da41e7776
'2011-10-16T20:18:30-04:00'
describe
'2457584' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
221f16bcf4314c3169733823c80fc4c2
357a2d8d046f78cd42a9279be08ea9220695ac17
'2011-10-16T20:17:33-04:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
35d561af30972e8751afb9c36eb56c34
0f578e27fa7c569cbd747337c270e7557b1f8552
describe
'33134' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
7cd456fcabcbe193e9ab349250f11210
a707d7733103bffab736ec408ee545cd682b5891
describe
'304325' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
0391cae543fd0d8bd145571ff2a39133
b88a2dc4f46ee7d2dc964ca0afa15698e4cadd33
describe
'194603' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
5f8714e291eadd4c57a0c98e8844d20d
40c674f21ff72767de7d65b70f473924cf197790
describe
'32394' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
790f502671f23f7876ea864de23a9158
43e116b7a6a9d2fbd8af9ff47e7ee5ddbc1151e1
describe
'71291' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
ea90dd4d3fa0ba4c558a050846643a30
534f1ac7e7602e51bf29cbc5510bf1a2199af230
describe
'2457596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
0241e12afc9859b9ccd2a3cf68cecf62
a05a3ff979e74d8927e4e50f856b7dd688d65da2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKRZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
f3d3191b06fab318e5f734d1d7d0ab16
8d8baaa223b2a9afffb4094484b66a8ae9d1a439
describe
'33196' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
dca299c5f36278b20061cb2e1814d4dc
c569ca923746b9b280a1a624563468c03e6991bc
describe
'304401' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
44a712826f7030e635b172fed40c2b3c
d8361bb9518b4ce0a4a8717a3a89a475e2ed9cf4
describe
'193920' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
7721601705c5f3268aef7fa9a53dc2a4
9085c843b56aeaf93e78a6055dff8f69909cf8d8
describe
'32959' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSD' 'sip-files00058.pro'
c5230172097e015e0416e80799cd7124
3d2e2bf47a7614ebdba0d38437b8ac361017c9b0
describe
'71370' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
089e3ff5a872bdf34c918e40d73ff1a8
fb9276656516850b20b483545bf777d79ec9b19b
describe
'2457444' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
c1b6d3ba4cd87a7b03a315c61a82a0c9
21e8091fcf1f37987455cae074c73d0947885531
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
37d4c42c32b23dd1377059a7f8ef3a25
b5a5996e5683b7ff0a05ac5e83da41faff2e4131
describe
'33296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
f1354208712747bc37182d8f4d5a1023
1a5cb6fcc2d62b879fe805ab7864a51720f1cd09
'2011-10-16T20:16:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
2ffac0cc7dddbcf23963f889c3e090dc
806be39d3e49039fac4449b26d86ceb1b03bc015
describe
'192687' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
bb777324f0bf043940d1fffc7b0b259b
1e72ff78f1fa19576e47e8776ecafec3b58d50cb
describe
'32559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
7c8976f0213b0b1d2a547571d2ce3d45
0c59933aa218b53ac4d1b78ebf15a5dac7b75732
describe
'70413' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
e68e6deb1b7355e5463361db2c453980
4ae7444ed3b47c60505126594fc2a221fbdf3c83
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
f72be7095e16a43475d4aa8db2f0c495
c7066a15d63bdd2bb521f5829c9ca9ab2b81b4db
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
442af679a61ca94e2920c9ce6a888ef5
6f1a2b5f6801160e188451100c834c5d4e549919
describe
'32790' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
c18903a410a405f7075729f9ac1d53f4
dabb94ac2d0cc895d47d7355149055cac5c0b801
describe
'304641' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
22b4a015a10570cea5f5ff7257116c70
80f1eac286e01b0fd6eb620d3fe362b5f3457aef
describe
'191694' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
9e012820428774d0882683d6c2f38680
9b472a8d0e45b3739f797b0ba4fc030650ca3fd1
describe
'32223' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSR' 'sip-files00060.pro'
5650799a267dcc2816bfce862e85335d
18c66ab2a80de12a6d69978d98db379f001edaa3
describe
'70955' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
395d8b43ca2c6bcb4261310c7034f1f3
ef95186c1fb7d2af08bca1565f62e135988629fa
describe
'2459408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKST' 'sip-files00060.tif'
02149d5e5162f9a6ace3eca8d903fd39
496dcdb8a1d58507f4d24df37ee5a84df5b080c8
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSU' 'sip-files00060.txt'
0d04b0681734753bb0b282e05a18f29f
0ef414a287242a72dc5af2980f5c7f791d91405a
describe
'32815' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
ae50d1993189df00ed6680b47a587413
552c997e90d1e664427c0439ea875f6fbc0a69f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
bf389899912407051857ce6ce2e2486b
83641f11abc7d103c8e164d73f1c017f95889097
describe
'190428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
289662ff17da0ea36e94762a83afa44c
e18cf049b3eb80a049b732de64c6f87aaebd41c1
describe
'30328' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
749dd65789f0b80002522a34dba2df8b
ef78a52cf06b504d40143dd0c49588ef34b3458c
describe
'70435' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKSZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3bf1eec09f188e3a5a5a1c27ac2fe366
a38548c56075c903e517a6f65c42f71718083e77
describe
'2457432' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
915d4a0448172d5eb0df2611ed820897
c080c65842479a032e7b7febd199863fe793eac5
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
165a5e5525650666c6e790356426b4e6
106b7232f72c7cab5669ce658ced2c745db5913d
describe
'32734' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
5d20d180db195df8157bf2ef9ea4af1a
a103087656670df1c1bdbd88d137df687ce400e9
describe
'304340' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
18c31ed0af54e95f47339335296037bb
e4b8d31ec80d44f5e46d5f79c5c3022f63398afd
describe
'181011' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b17906aaf6a6b1ef028531eadebe04b9
fc498202d18b7feaa911300939c6e72d3e058dfe
describe
'29903' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
d5b3019112c9593a4c24f269db263832
030d410d2ee33c999a6cc04a5ee4c450f2b3a261
describe
'67071' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
f1083ec229ea88414d3e7c8a2417dae5
564befcda47b7c552877c56c86c650135d693d13
describe
'2457148' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
819ce3754e181d815a018ac6ed8b6d8b
976f0f072cff6cdbb5b9d8dc3e7873a27089a17c
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
aa6e3221649df93eaebe99c382864e0f
6906eec5cf31f3ee577815efffc8452b7730baf9
describe
'32252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
e2da450d2e8239a95bbd70d48eaabce6
54cea494f70bbeb86636c2b109e696996246ead8
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
cedf27d43ea72786097784a0e0cce0ad
74cbc375248af7b5d55b0b73430a531ed8b40c0e
describe
'186362' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
811bec5e1632b5d1a815ea728bc766cf
6be8656460216e923255632dc5831b1368fefac6
describe
'30864' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
86b61912324a7bae436b44e34d0c90e3
dd5a9b4e9a1f69d28fb82a39d3baa225c43d7985
describe
'68711' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
19f29ae0b42f367a937febcc8ccfc0d3
465ccbccc5083247ecb0120caf367bb1fd3159c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
9a034dfad9ffaf1aae7ce7196ca95647
b66b0783c682a127c1e01605050cb66b5c3c6202
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e5d69ceaf494d6b55f6e5bcc54d89bf5
387a9a4994e1287b46d1d88b5e8a6310468e8b24
describe
'32806' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
babd1b24b901cab5abfd93f55da4f961
338a75c12f9f8e0c3a4554823bd03fdc0c07e16c
describe
'304310' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
4f3a1ba493ec16c9905dd79c451d7cd0
a9c5044184b831da040b22dc580beb86352d7cff
describe
'181979' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
e8fc62083c896c6316f14bfd6841d6af
8d70419ea54f5cc62131d112242653d0a2156b74
describe
'30686' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
206b63c5ec0fc5ddc2f402b6ef364812
1b4a72b06797eee1593e58224556b17a4a028767
'2011-10-16T20:20:09-04:00'
describe
'68109' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
20ef0a3165ed8eee86f20938b1cc3c58
ee69d6e0e2dbe7f9c21b3b9e82b671189cc689b6
describe
'2457244' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
20b055cff005e5a6029d86a872e982a7
427dd5f35f99a1e28ccad2979b6985de3e6b46da
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTW' 'sip-files00064.txt'
48bd0c9a2d1ecb731bd0d8683ade9006
ec76bccf613672ecd04d2ab11fb4a5e5f8db1279
describe
'33026' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTX' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
7ccb10f3618071f5520684b9b7e7c45a
ca1eae2bc14d39279a3f730355ffd23febe0871d
describe
'304368' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
6497d3dcad4025e6f2b3f0c15e283334
0b5e4adfb49f2fe4c868b652c595874a6ab6a5a5
describe
'172304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKTZ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
e725ecd719ec215e8301416de9a2881a
733647e428dc844aa078d81351a0d88a869a2221
describe
'26278' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
8a9f61d069f218b2963492b43df7a07e
584c2789f2f6e45f0ccd7792e2876084c8231ea9
describe
'64123' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
76604e22f7eb4f28674ae85809dd5118
242522e7ae2abf18505491d30ef56902068593e8
describe
'2456976' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
72a2d8d3c3079216228b24eb15c119d2
3101b7e686986dd046c913e569d15e1641d774e4
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUD' 'sip-files00065.txt'
ee14fcabf79fbcdc2b469e243248d811
b1d9d847c8d9423dfe2033ceae961f6e0c7cee4a
'2011-10-16T20:19:04-04:00'
describe
'31401' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
e6769a037fd65ef7d59916994bcbb48c
5f846075282e57a611daf41868d04d8cf6fbf339
describe
'304613' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
6f029b4a7df3681fb0dcddaf7dfcf9ea
8d90802a6d178ce42202b817c670ef2d329fa3ba
describe
'190299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
d9d4d00e39a859ce07d75e2935a313ee
8b50228a89b83bb53104e3ceccd311652b5ad703
describe
'32950' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
2e5b255e72aa7711ef149642a07e3f85
b9fc4afa33bec0b87b94ed8488c031a5b02f3497
describe
'70910' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
cbe2db59cf61bbbea8238bda1702af39
82f4190b8571acac05642203f59ee2ed15e3a964
describe
'2459540' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
8d7ef767d52e35903a55d1400924bdbd
6cd27faf647ad42eba7c38ebe06c2a5e8e8ed795
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
1d7ce2717378281295be4b48d57be395
06d0f45e276dbc859d7d40d750e3a6dec1c34e80
describe
'33045' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
c21ce73981c72fdd970cb25319825ada
d51d569da0e7adbe087d32d8f83dd6523ea383f6
describe
'304342' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
6a4ef47e4e16c050fbdb75854f9e03cf
594eda689e507fd9ac2cba7b3298b2df88f7a236
describe
'192372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUN' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
9f229a8a5c2ef2cfc9e988b47013e735
cc7f570ed7f270aa290f98bb32baf605b456b9d1
describe
'32585' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
672912821294a2a667679425a0565e68
4277f9e31b9634f296920631e1259272c2b98a32
describe
'71412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
3b7f27adf045eaaef425a6d2523cc2de
b1d2ec671ec91049d89db66c49617ce038be0fe7
'2011-10-16T20:20:04-04:00'
describe
'2457644' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
5ecc245e56b7742c0e0471c90085602d
862eb52356d591bfcb8ec8c43604250ea9e845e3
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
75c91acaab3452080a61decfff6bbb6d
3b61e14f072bef68b47d35f218bbc1bf7093ab61
describe
'33251' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUS' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
29da2b76dc8fe64eb9c0ab06c9da99fa
e44abef090fb8b344451802100f3780733582214
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUT' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0675665cd8d935539c6e5636c528eb70
56c6554cbde079b614326b23eb4b83ec9eefadf4
describe
'185931' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
6352b0c1c2d6dba4133eceb9a5e76840
32ea62eb42177909ec6d82fa3a19a28cf1859cec
describe
'30747' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
9ea4f0188a3235a57bd0affcae2689c2
69cfd407d51c46ad1670bfe32cc6c84600f81613
describe
'68736' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
c1ffbd7f98ba2c2cd2ee2fff09747d89
acb0535dd3cbbf4806d752c56f1497b5e02b2f00
'2011-10-16T20:17:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUX' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a47aa66089332caa5aeb8bba5f3c3b9f
e22570b9f0dd513fd6aabc4a6e333b651a69debb
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
9dad3c55bf46490373fe5c1fa66e8c87
715638db0f6936931fe698a7fd65db8816a3b6be
describe
'33107' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKUZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
517435f188dedc57b1cbc5175752b9d9
dadebdb6c26090e750993194824b51a6019b2dad
describe
'304417' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ec5d8a1c170c79ca9569d62614c57cf4
f4b0c161bb86d5d79ccd6901753767d17f8a59cc
describe
'185525' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
1da07f93c677cb2ad418e0b13a564d37
7c8c593a8f79a879445ddf6d6a89458d6b55f557
describe
'30951' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
bfc8de6aeff902975b62576ff8f80355
2b5ac04985a54e1e6d9172ad84d4925b91c3d8d0
describe
'68162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
bf16fa5634b0088332c5e3ce1d236c6b
11a8678be425c8a9ced0a9e7ac102689209fc895
describe
'2457420' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
efdcfffe65da9ff6ec765c73353d3681
bdc913d110b0ce0e345b286e8719fccb925ff63b
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVF' 'sip-files00069.txt'
f4fdb26b1660eb33434823907528eff0
229eaea779edd7a75e27fc782f57837829d38afa
describe
'32461' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
fa4c02b68b2912cfdc663202c5899a91
7530e0992f19d603336f7ff5abd0bbfe56892824
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
abea8b0dc7d1aa699c962974a296ea31
8df5beb74e4cecdf45959d28d4a48630bd6c3e3e
describe
'180697' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
f6ad5c10f909c4176defc2a8ec3eada5
859bff954c508a3279d704506727556b33378814
describe
'30180' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
85491ad18c5c07518c44569a6c47cda1
f8128d71fe2085723d101fe4f29bd7986003b92b
describe
'66921' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
ea9b215cbf1969996a6253da73c61791
d38293c0c2849db7844a2ccde04b6b99da07a9cf
describe
'2457132' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
bac1a1e70c2ffd5e0117389d4861b71d
405f70176aa2b2ed2c5db649d0db4a478a13cb7c
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
5f11adfad222b17713e267fc4993466f
61e88cb216cf1669cd909950c4450ad5477cf8a9
describe
'32148' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVN' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
4bd37df3821abb32742dcb5feb203021
ae6871eb1779736065f46c29dccafe8d71719beb
describe
'304405' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
c1635cef2400df010001b91f6b9365a0
bc0486508a235b06556d9095509a7dac9513072a
describe
'184014' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVP' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
9ab6849074ae89c9b5f71bdb2e9c9930
cbfdfe6b8a61aee9b98859e2640d2fb93e5fb12c
describe
'30322' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
d437e3026f8aa93015b38c21e5d1ae50
928c12b654cd4f977d66de304de9353dc7959b8c
'2011-10-16T20:16:57-04:00'
describe
'68075' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
9f04230fd58badf3f359a9bce5792e23
b82ba68599e3900333a04779a3f4363ac38e14dc
describe
'2457560' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVS' 'sip-files00071.tif'
99d377b6ba10b6c3c792a9b5855a873f
cd7695a6a06fefd70915dac2e519b1905b9f98e9
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVT' 'sip-files00071.txt'
d83abbdd8a191c39da1e39286a84b28c
65f4e7ebee155c30374ad9c3d8eb2e1ed2e181f6
describe
'32793' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
faffbf5242461e34c7880a1334c6aa12
fc5c5461ae150c4c82bc771bb4a3ba990c9118b5
describe
'304353' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
61fe5adfd0e810ba7f0586e40a6658a2
620322456698c6dd7810b90d37bf237bdadee188
describe
'184699' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
773bc826113cafcfc7d3a4c417c855e9
0fd6ea2679a05c99131fd174f01a4b82e85c108d
describe
'30996' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
41e06a311cc777f3eaeb658c58decf26
a778850d90b6efffcc7890cfdaa7257c6873fabf
describe
'68206' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
175c3390ca5757d7efa3ce93b4cb4ad0
eb911ef117d7ff55ac928d05e41f608097ece04c
'2011-10-16T20:17:30-04:00'
describe
'2457200' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKVZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
805e32b35760b31b7e4642627cb1b91c
96f03261945ab047a14a39860a5d2d4d324337b2
'2011-10-16T20:18:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
3f8ed27d0e648b1a98af9bbfccd66769
d64490dc7d7d937adefc5332db739d0bf4dfd256
describe
'32727' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWB' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
4219c1b3ab736a4806eee572a2b137f2
dcf635d61abae9f371c12774284d56254a014fe9
describe
'304408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
ebd3f8e01ee821ced90827b99d6ccb01
769782f62f36cd86214f3afa48e4d101b5343279
describe
'187923' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWD' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
b0ff8e477062f5f6bc6f92abeaaed5fd
fc56a2325fdee28734bf345bb51a665e6a4f3a63
describe
'31729' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWE' 'sip-files00073.pro'
8398adc24f5c8038ccc7edf40356c739
0060a344d6c61b65c0dda5334806d3f86671389d
'2011-10-16T20:18:35-04:00'
describe
'69241' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWF' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
7fae17bf21b5ceff657c446105cfd9a3
a727db0e350fdc487629c3b5f4ba64a1a8d7d7a3
describe
'2457252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
6ba19bc5f4c2c84a0fc7b9df09ab6489
90d670cfe3d221a46bae1329ef7954e434a37ca8
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWH' 'sip-files00073.txt'
7a877bbe275682a32ec98a6f9b58be6e
939c04dc38beaf0d1b07a9008ced6349cdbe7abd
describe
'32580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
8996a5140a1dca1a2d288305b3144038
3c7f318de236943a1d39e684205b5e625d9fccb6
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWJ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
842953a7d8bb3c9260509251eca208c1
56f10bcc4eda0350f6e9ec8a785547f21e87177a
describe
'186081' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWK' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
c76d01b618ced11af6d9b212c5ba63a3
69bea8ff75db5d3daf652fc44691ecbeea1076de
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWL' 'sip-files00074.pro'
14d9e718b469b76b6a5ec84778ed51c6
1232f6f27d773089a97230c106b99ac6bc08cc35
describe
'69345' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
39eee66ef64149eb1508d3de5de2dd65
cdc56fd0819edc71e8ff2fba466e8e36336ee76d
describe
'2457272' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWN' 'sip-files00074.tif'
4bfde98fa10322e1cd0098c532f052c9
27787de5b6c63d4bee3a30ddf2bf3b0effcb37cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWO' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f00d61263574de1d78780c8de91acba2
3fd4258d9cdb5ab4348953b0ef974c75a93c2413
describe
'32710' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWP' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
de46fe9cb0e06e667986aabe8fffd209
55bad5a3394ce9020e78b24831d00666b5e39224
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWQ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
3d0cb559da0a0ef079c79e02238a7569
898832247c3850270ffa7b9ab2ac307fb9020714
describe
'181220' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWR' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
f60b102d23389fa6f67ac34b09afde6a
5fb204c43252d5537dd243469cc2981f86614a21
describe
'30141' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWS' 'sip-files00075.pro'
2cd8b9b64a55612d0950453e4c77f947
292bb61422f360847287aa529aa35db1946cb59d
describe
'67449' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWT' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
4f8478d3e0b4a9fe4e9f133e61a77d54
6805cd50a34b12393a815aff34e59ae7430b5baf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c351c1043d2cf8e332b17778bf412ab3
75455b0b2d3869c78ab19a466a313d7f1a16c06e
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWV' 'sip-files00075.txt'
5ba7ac49ffcc7afc5f1c8499499b0adf
a5d6f1bb9bc8378708841ed507251f2f2539c895
describe
'32320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWW' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
0a5495cab322f95c171fbd20585e01d1
4e20c0da7eda4c69114e284987746834b697567e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
7361d46d25ca14d066767cf4a1a83ccb
1a464afdfd5716327e661c161c9c24b8a95bde77
describe
'180807' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
a176c311213ca2d2baffd12f1f2b8817
07155a50f7b94849765c21c3820f70bc71e2c9d7
describe
'29036' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKWZ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
35fb4dc4927bf50c1ee6350bd38e50ca
e4d6ea6895fbe431843688fb6e79640b8daf58b0
describe
'65491' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
594bad8c152f0c46eac495de6302acd1
3bc7674b5e902d13e589a3744dff02b32fce2646
describe
'2456624' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXB' 'sip-files00076.tif'
af785a5deff7f53f46967761bee581be
2a359f600fa6540d42e472757adb133aecb2512f
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXC' 'sip-files00076.txt'
7a342f40f561c7bd6f5226abf17c9584
cf1d92225d5c24d797a5ec7e4946f97842786c6c
describe
'30909' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
12d780b23323cd5bbeb325283c73cd39
6693ebee929edf336475f6fb546bb4520e50b9e9
describe
'304419' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXE' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b0d5169afd45501de5e375798ae5c2ef
76326fb1bddeb4cf9ece2cf881aa908c47816a45
'2011-10-16T20:19:39-04:00'
describe
'203440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXF' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
dfa71e39d9f8ef85f344bab53fe24a0b
23074c9696b545b5c7d53a98baf7a192ccc7b259
describe
'35068' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXG' 'sip-files00077.pro'
a48c1c1495c2c95978617a8e233de57d
748366658b799534d6bab5ed48b548db63100363
describe
'73381' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXH' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
990bbd630079829bf944185022186425
cdfef8a15b118eecc815079b017ba18f26ca016e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXI' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f7616e19ebee21afc99799d9b23a0a39
456b74afe04789540a2d0ae38b90e1bf7727fb16
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXJ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
f71492e8e537d36d7c2b51d24e821b1f
5fea0bd2c451b6e53d9b8393cdc99c341391fd34
describe
'33238' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
480ddcaee1a8bc925b645d60b7075167
31273be02eca0b41d133a3ceb25ab2c5844d54f8
describe
'304378' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXL' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
f2be08d73204eab37df1b9b8340d4fa5
29ba065e58f6ce69abc9dd5cf66c257e823e721e
describe
'192657' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXM' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
884a987e1bc1a10748ac8debfad7f009
e7ca4af67ede18b9888b5950f673ca7f16bddbb4
describe
'34466' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXN' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1aeba18a9e3bb6e261636b0a87aa0eb6
09a09e79a5611132e150a001cdf4822b7dd68060
describe
'71052' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXO' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
fd3e4035382703332838dea06033ee51
1abb814f487e2b7f43beef9a0a1246b25e8a14ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
9ded98fd53aea650abd63ab3011deac5
bea760e1344d8f0b5810276c13272eb898749d5d
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
0fd606abd19774a467f4da2ab3c2d0fd
159f878c61c1af9a55b0dd075369f2c1b7cc53ac
describe
'33030' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
aca5b6ee0652300d36513e9df44c33b4
5de7b0351b44897fb3c950276ab693bdc4940f02
describe
'304377' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
153ebf675ed86a52dad365ed21feb040
0138962fd53b9b9ba290fa44fe10b67e4c70f712
describe
'181273' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
63fa9b6e56b3b6d46b382cf560e2239a
dcf0436a85456287ec490db36c340cec5314e598
'2011-10-16T20:20:23-04:00'
describe
'29962' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
fc578e7506bb81880d2714bea17c7dd0
2e881bfa2a578abb5ef59f5586ac9d84631d8664
describe
'66927' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cf5ac0f2efb6f86d32c0fddc20399a9e
c070a0268f5dd259f3deff67cff1cb635053b651
describe
'2457176' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
9e1a281305e7f3d333ef1e06b3cff674
156a27e3ff9fcc62efe9ed4fdceed75ade5d6980
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
35a6569760992ce806c823eae130f5d8
8b07872fe0cc5c09a373a7896ceb4b955bb5ee8e
describe
'32330' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
b4cc62d4ecaf581337856b5a03ec9558
0d5fb79bfa96d60d3edb67c575e84fb5357e3147
describe
'304375' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKXZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
6f3f9bc18bd30a47802e6c3df6c3b7f7
8bb4876a02bd1e9d81196c0ce627f64f711847e5
describe
'189170' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
043b72393fb83b114971753963555524
f20e772c421f21aa6c7ae904afd588a0ac211689
describe
'32104' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
5241324aa8724dd2a1d1bbe75373d52f
224bdcad4aad794626e4cc1c24f66559291344a2
describe
'68471' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
acb7a0ca146cfb18811fa3a326fcc292
e57f6c87cdfc29aaa8fd1f098486364618f44a6e
describe
'2457072' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYD' 'sip-files00080.tif'
680e180d526341e7c417570d328de5d5
87403078972c5b912bd73c7b048389330fadc4c6
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYE' 'sip-files00080.txt'
90be1f84c7225cea67a08b9b4dfcc856
22c653b7c2c3fb94f5846633a2d30c22a2529e76
describe
'32464' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
6a0391549b174096d27b4c9b9d6baecd
be97904c2ec22022dd98e52cba04c4121b3ea957
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d799a802e3b61e8787956ee96d218bef
f77ad1d3700a38ef5f8abadc90c5ffb1cef09ac7
describe
'192927' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYH' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
0261b848b37787c02ec9e2a8b36457dc
f6ba274a8ca6d17340a575fe9a630a592bf3b83a
describe
'31659' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYI' 'sip-files00081.pro'
d6f0b36ba659f58603479b8a23ce3596
dbcbd5a9df62fde9e4dbeb8c4858b923d6a5f53c
describe
'69398' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYJ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
cb056888a37f73250b61c83a7415af23
f95bb8bf59e52a350172fb506a9c974ef41f87e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYK' 'sip-files00081.tif'
443a8c1091f032243fd7d59c681f8af7
ef688d2226bfe05638ce9fa140713815d1230608
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYL' 'sip-files00081.txt'
151cc97f2760b4d83e8cb8bd08529492
5413468bb43a2bf091d321dadc3c923f771c55f7
describe
'33034' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
af3edad8489c2a1e52cffc655ff2bbae
50a15f945dc51bad9762d99798fa8993b42a8b2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
a11da5e966a23367821e3f883b96b7e3
bcddbe137bfc745f89a7c47d1fc65500531565c6
describe
'197110' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
0146411ccc0dffa72b6c2b1c2cd9ca68
499759ea23e98e5373d71e4f61267060a041a1d6
describe
'35035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
9e4ebaa1a025b9d374d19374e10ca7ba
dbe7dc34be02b213fd9c6a267036b5ee4dad7fbb
describe
'72122' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYQ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
3eef62c28ee7e7f795daa0f3e4179678
198f314da4c73e244369d90f1f3b0f53fd1658fc
describe
'2457228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYR' 'sip-files00082.tif'
c6bf5fd22749c1f1eb7052254e175ee4
9c7846a10673f38fae90b1afe8d0af315e079a45
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYS' 'sip-files00082.txt'
327fbc5f5dcf53549c73789baa7e06df
a8d32e52cc3004e3231cbd3fac479ecb6cc700c9
describe
'32550' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYT' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
e5fa603f4ebd995c3da88846305d7bd7
7c9af8d9a1da3cfc63ed9422e77e300078df4778
describe
'304416' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
6b03c5a1cfdf315126df6a21b982f58d
86399b9ae1870578c20b202067c1e13767ccf9d5
describe
'188401' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYV' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c85fe2ac8b7a3ecc7b80d6576a8a8f57
b4412cc8708a740f4f7a48949d08de66bf1b7f14
describe
'31434' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYW' 'sip-files00083.pro'
8a90bfaaa9a83068c70baafd40934198
b4b0597317ca7102e474a77cfce003468055646b
describe
'68716' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYX' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
bf003012b0a119bf866b7efefffced87
60801409f2f7efc3c713b15d5c8dbeeef1388728
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
843690a51afeb02daa6b64432dd61954
eb74e95545a8a9d3c83529cde14dfc9d51a350d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKYZ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
849764b82864387f62384fa89465c278
3c09ea4e282f5235f6c0e52ae970fe073cc7a844
describe
'32487' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
07c199fc708056f31b327eda905f02ed
a5c73bd018d9b2288cfcb1b2ba0e7dd8d796d787
describe
'304403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZB' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
f67b0de420ccb97dc0bc1a7c170c7dde
2b457e16e323e5f091a708db725a83fee8d296f6
describe
'191889' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
f9cdf24fad21f8a1d950de907a0242a2
bee0dc5152b4b37e459459f0d790a9634635390c
'2011-10-16T20:19:30-04:00'
describe
'31707' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZD' 'sip-files00084.pro'
d8dd52b6a7015e2237d5f02a2cad0b91
4f515ea7419c272181b8dd8fc1fa4c5c547652c9
describe
'69793' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
1f7bebc60840074f299e4a05678bb257
24cd666c4b1b63aa5570741db96776b126d22788
describe
'2457208' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
802898d6794319ab76462d44be903439
c67bf6394fde07c4b7553d10766d17ae590323ae
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZG' 'sip-files00084.txt'
98683766b24450edd72c68830712cee5
e51cc3e65f9a6e00a71dc6e3717b135150c74df2
describe
'32616' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
487b1c90bfce87f98bd9a195570dd502
ba5a0c4fbc34b5d1989f54d0ff17a60fe4e71294
describe
'304384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZI' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
464bed5a8bc7e1f5d1facf609b50ec3b
6f6cd9be022994e3d830a4d92f60cc7c679690c5
describe
'196031' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ff9a5b47c9065781d3e6b772cb553383
ca1049d4ccd364e23d32f7350ba06566ac3b4c0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZK' 'sip-files00085.pro'
d3cbbb7beba7120bb35d69d7c5a4cd60
262800b66f374d7ef4c94175abaf1ace364ff32d
describe
'71499' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
8cc4fee14f23cca6339a25f7af8c354e
4a9b0133d8feae766d17519cb6d43ae10bc4e077
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
51890ac55039ed40f7b01de0b487459c
a5b84db9dda41d0339bbce42c74058ac14d7b6b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZN' 'sip-files00085.txt'
e94967e8462dcde76d8092f4b687d8fe
438f93a641e5cbc5f1c00806adde021c8a8dec79
describe
'33260' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
8cdff38c57755e7e9497e9cbca25fec8
5d0007bd22e73f82fdfcaa97f7e33885bcb9c6f3
describe
'304323' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
2c93f644bf95313072fd72c2cd129598
f7ba215b2081ed69ed0222b3fa5cd74b61ea0277
describe
'182126' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
e7e55cdadbcad4300106b3ff1f16cc34
7616221ab1f7ddece80917ffd05fff0d5ecff628
describe
'30427' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZR' 'sip-files00086.pro'
bc547caca9a60f9ec364c91b402d8632
360f877ee20e0e8dab56b4257947026544346d1a
describe
'67559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
fa882b6af07a648a1457db2c7c453dea
3b6d18fe184ee1e3ce7207edafebf45f3e984394
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
637698f69b99508f61b0f982a0230b33
c715668ed2308ab8965b0d8645a804c018fe7d94
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZU' 'sip-files00086.txt'
db6df96ca7b5ac52e87b6b65fc9d535b
c03bc451d1559b5e595df3c7de81abdc4bfbb4c0
describe
'32566' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZV' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
863ef631c75930db7af24a86a997fb7b
e9ec012466f1e77a8f555a7c2425e4773ad3827e
describe
'304275' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZW' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
3952f185d619853160e1976697661287
a689f49961163202883feeee0c15ac1594f9cc8c
describe
'189960' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
14520046043672dd732e89beac1bad19
b1099a18b6262988851589ed412ce326cddd3a8c
'2011-10-16T20:19:43-04:00'
describe
'32572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZY' 'sip-files00087.pro'
092f92e6d47f675c85060bd39e14a494
5d77aa75bbb465e5f96fe1671dcce9c35094183f
describe
'70590' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABKZZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
43aae868b186651f996aa1834895deb7
5c54c4a511166a5b090a73cc77d40d0a5b31e063
describe
'2457652' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
398f9112b8a3d8448e7c5aa9f5bde696
37cc29962188f642c806494a2cfbf996df2402c1
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
4295d0e5fae52a8503b694a04d2b0126
606252e3c92c09fcdd6886ccee800439ccdb39d1
describe
'33302' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
049c5dd2de25e1b439f827aa76771345
69d59fb491a96918aed8598033570fec52704572
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAD' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
64fa0d22245c013898715efc0ed31452
50fc8bd760562a9a0151da8ddf08568b039f91d1
describe
'196302' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
0850bd042ac770777f6825012cf31d90
f13f1f786bcd60fb372abf1aac5016c184c2907f
describe
'33160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
f7b3309a4c92915cd8975d0927670928
71183805c16fcb85155c957eabe9102ab99cd52e
describe
'71237' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
4238a9199aba61ee01d2a9d8f9b47607
4bd00d62050e0f31b0f410ab091d0782ab74e8dc
describe
'2457224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
7968edf2e0d73006beeb7758b1f1f562
3ca905690fe07135e9df2f3e6fceb387341170b9
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
3c03c9b71f74e4b67ee044e236d53d49
0f5e83b0ff5191a7f5853ddd62fbd66ee0fa1309
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
17731bdbe70c716341502543f38e7c06
c064057752b8725af1cda752fe76683de4768944
describe
'304337' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
b07c683e7b11d49134df4fff262f5c02
355491de1d1c593951ce4e154cdbed3459d92f16
describe
'156746' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
5e4c31020efb9b002e2f845e136fd3c0
19af8ec56c656c8aea4de6305aa6407ad4746fc7
describe
'22468' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAM' 'sip-files00089.pro'
487321afa7995baea0a51c756fc15911
dcfc53d5164e1c33981c9b28eb89ec3848a3c110
describe
'56062' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAN' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
ec4938b055d6443d0c3a75b4e8f817e1
623fc96b408ff0a982337185ab114ce7dbafe0b7
describe
'2456248' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
2953f34ad072d974c8d57fae56de3404
8fed010d0cede12c97fffdc8b72323f26abcccfe
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAP' 'sip-files00089.txt'
91120fba5816aa3a2ce8bc53c8d8a8aa
acfad5edb028784f17c1f1d6db9310ebe3326f21
describe
'29412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAQ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
f4ab622e9fc4e37edec275b13a36ad66
933a8cf733f8f25d3f27bcf32f93027da6352f7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAR' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
8e1d006fa5eba39ad3bda7a1e28f9d06
8cd06ac4e358fe3353215f4cfb7701cd97315186
describe
'178546' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAS' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
4def5f1b293aa042131255f878ffb0b1
7815d1c5beb1840c603acee172d3c1ddf52651b7
describe
'29892' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAT' 'sip-files00090.pro'
93499aac79d62d67c024a41818e15163
fee3dae357344da70a70cebd095ca81042300595
describe
'65915' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAU' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
200d8078fc06318cb1ffda49d244eb2b
6e6d86d50aa1ce34ea0d8d1c36af476272ce30f9
'2011-10-16T20:17:38-04:00'
describe
'2456952' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAV' 'sip-files00090.tif'
1f3543a013835aed45ecfa3eb61a2752
db0c060baf67732742fe090ee49a85fabadc16f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAW' 'sip-files00090.txt'
9111570bf42e67e92d9912e32ed6ff3c
2fcb6ab886fe40a5790a34fa5b04dd5f4fcd7c80
describe
'31603' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAX' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
6f53fb97190201b40a519eee791c0348
3d664d04e57fea724078a7cebddf7afd33f95c45
describe
'304335' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAY' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
595f2963ea31db64849218e156d90868
a29dd45fbc03dc263b500dd213c2a062de5b46d9
describe
'191072' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLAZ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8797771c193c9e6cf89cf41ec8b41530
a4641af84c2812e3b43fe6aa9b142e6c0857ae29
describe
'33023' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBA' 'sip-files00091.pro'
bd54f538328a090fc4af4a71f1edfaa5
c19125d43b176fa12409ce8c7651aa8aa3ccf24f
describe
'70392' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBB' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
8feb038ed8df619b8b85b749ae26ce9e
20732ef219aabf712d01e1dba70a872de37f363b
describe
'2457468' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBC' 'sip-files00091.tif'
c09b0012c3a1c3d0a06b405c548a8044
49538bba23966bc64aaaee1cdba92865a15e6df0
'2011-10-16T20:17:23-04:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBD' 'sip-files00091.txt'
8ff1f54ee4b0bb1bf20aef2a4c5b58dc
4e237c52d49f2f38de0b9d614119e8edc53e2d35
describe
'32777' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBE' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
533df9a5752e94e7c71b97c16fce2c5d
1de363336f46e89b197af5bd6fd2c77ad433536b
describe
'304630' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
c300add052e463f42e974c5c032950aa
62da49d0f1e87eab7bd1c6a2710d2143a1e2d81d
describe
'190090' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
5c4700d340acbb31585eb1325995b97b
98311262def91fe3fe062e8d4200b1f7ff49eb71
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBH' 'sip-files00092.pro'
86646e47c96e2afdfd83f0944587e0dd
f1b01ea97a2b62bad4652c922c714b79f59769ce
describe
'69480' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBI' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
e16c8b6dacfbb781c0b83a8228974f5d
5f62e268a74fd4da1bdb434bbe9dadd5617ebe70
describe
'2459204' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBJ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
7faf64a03b38b8fb3242b8cc569c223b
1eb5639a5628dfd74694b0f3d10dc718e8e51670
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
e18cdbc5208189c129df15b3121a16f5
2396a0a38d03c1515ced053c1c94a2e300221693
describe
'32723' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBL' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
f5e9d81669381e360c19eb1724d81f52
d90db3beafa4cfc093e46efcd76acda1cb226034
describe
'304374' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBM' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
58f19203a4a41b14ded94b5343c75f60
e2d5f550370a533d2dff022f012aeb2cd29eb92c
describe
'166533' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBN' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
e4dc5ac0245b5903454f041ab831570b
c8f3027790d76a385e325b7e7f5ccff0a004c350
describe
'24785' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBO' 'sip-files00093.pro'
bc590f0003b53d297ac038503fe05eda
9ffb11e8290bb95c1f6977d7de3430f5e853b12c
describe
'61666' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
9b24b44629bc52b4808ed430c0f580e1
d5f1559c7f2d3f074362db8baeee248155368647
describe
'2456732' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBQ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
5c3a6856da5ba556bbd618b73bfb9a56
e376bf6538eb6f73e4e1e75045d1a253a910dc59
'2011-10-16T20:18:14-04:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBR' 'sip-files00093.txt'
0c9cad036618f210b0b9283e4c9ef767
830b78722b2758f195f94d8be147392d43b7721b
describe
'30733' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBS' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
f5b8118ffbb33415df5ae645226849c1
ce9cdcf6b43070c013397794d844e518b947bea5
describe
'304651' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBT' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
728ed6fea8bb0b02b12a39095d089645
d3576f924cd59c184de90061017a7a2521a4eacb
describe
'187012' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBU' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
9e1ff4fd43ee50d74c330ed9a9a3388f
d0636408c5babbf1d4558f4178f14de5af663753
'2011-10-16T20:17:03-04:00'
describe
'32594' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBV' 'sip-files00094.pro'
4dacc281ecdb1a8dcf79d129e98f9ce3
897659a53661cec1109845c4e0ef65487ff54775
describe
'68229' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBW' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
851c0b671c0c7c9745ac308819a4527b
99d1572d41e0ddf1e950d8a888b1a6d3376af198
describe
'2459280' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBX' 'sip-files00094.tif'
851461f16a151c188970b7304b2518a7
268c9c541003388afe7e769c225f3fd244127ed5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBY' 'sip-files00094.txt'
c2e3ad544f7dcb26be93cdc4a1a9165c
4142d9bd65805fd84393a5f6da5fc155c9a553e3
describe
'32722' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLBZ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
dd66eb33d995c745d5e14348dff070a2
a9a8f852967da6187b514cecd8e69cf21b320889
describe
'304366' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCA' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
c6ad48b3ac1d155bf3bb7d9641e0ea69
4e90968c4f7995dbf07c356c11b6b345532bf262
describe
'181432' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCB' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
acb6816499616ed878d4792b149ad693
5de3ef13c7d9bd54d37fa8629a4f1ac94ef47584
describe
'30709' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCC' 'sip-files00095.pro'
d85a1ecf5b4246e3ae191163728feceb
df12714b2c7b80b05ed4b5d11eb4d6520778be96
describe
'67019' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCD' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
2c48b023fca463624dc7f05b8ba7a924
b434faf7fb324fc4222139fe1e0a03e5894e621e
'2011-10-16T20:17:44-04:00'
describe
'2456996' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCE' 'sip-files00095.tif'
f76363f043fe2e5e256378a75f39f57c
89c3c643f5cdbab600dc06c05af79206371e9f33
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCF' 'sip-files00095.txt'
31688f0e4f7f5daabcd5f7411c6e3699
82ba84d17ff110848fdb1b10e5eb8757d075b7ed
describe
'32085' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCG' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
2115cee2976b6054b01e1d5c841d5476
0b9d6860f3aa260137132b84a39f3afd89e44509
describe
'304650' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCH' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
cfcb16be19e077ed331607dd042cd5ce
3d16deb7f41b6b34a4be7ac969fe7e7f88a3c2ac
describe
'182295' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCI' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
de38461348fef40e87a959dadb0529cf
9a488ab707b749df4789931fb73a69eba5291050
describe
'29463' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCJ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
c3600dd1f8874613b26a70858d7a79bb
33320f2001490bf8ab8196bba5221604fe567cf0
describe
'66417' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCK' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
3c07f7a016b35a7aa2f63c8e5e6c18e8
ed98477ec59fcab6f17a68b60e5e5ac2d05987dd
describe
'2458796' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCL' 'sip-files00096.tif'
5cb81a43904ff60d231b4756667be0bd
8223f98ed571c39d7d8a7ad73430d8ec5cd26ec2
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCM' 'sip-files00096.txt'
0138947ff651ae01885363f7ba466059
ea2cb349bbc29454cac49b56c3dc595b9d6c2ae8
describe
'32030' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCN' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
b6117a3f9e40d2b5e822cb215a5edc92
91d926d7924bed33b2638ab711d29f6c9e021952
describe
'304270' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCO' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
cd14cfddb1e9b3e7e26e7d74b56e3247
709d5510a366f5eb21be924a15e0b81a97ee1667
describe
'198021' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCP' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8e72dc899da62532194d03614f70655b
d852839b6db9cddd2c4699f05292cc00ecbee852
describe
'33798' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCQ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
f2fb2da405a25918ed5139ac80fb2159
678fa5f6a56b9f8bf793da7d4a665e5a0839f69b
describe
'72617' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCR' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
85dfb25a003d86c2f25df88d3c651013
63df4746b80c9e9303214f39806b33ce1ae774d0
describe
'2457536' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
a0d8356dcbfd8475a0e812d2fab3dee2
c09c89843a35794ddeacd0b02ec149e831aeb896
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCT' 'sip-files00097.txt'
890e75398907ab4d2ddf6343ce05041e
ce195e1c59bb9649402f7bdb07c89207c54e1b70
describe
'33154' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCU' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
435067dde677a1bfcbd03752905010fc
7ae9e61bcdeddb2196c0039cbda46df9de26a7a5
describe
'304547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCV' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
d032c4afdaa94a9e2868ca7bc880cad8
ecdf436472375a2bcb1229c49e7b2c663f6d1fc2
describe
'195925' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCW' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
136adb846fa98a65a736653fed90071e
d1e889b4032a6cbde4df57dc5eee82b3c68a8c05
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCX' 'sip-files00098.pro'
a5a78e792da6afe1b86d88217b8a106a
1d930ac24a5f2810a32f32d27d656c6968515f0c
describe
'71307' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCY' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
5619e39b3a319f8b26d02ce224511276
ba57fabd566cf8517f812a7c54e35cd47d8410a9
describe
'2459156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLCZ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
203629b9da2190676928fc381358e153
d8a124147b16e37411bd92877e4bde8d93f9f703
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDA' 'sip-files00098.txt'
355afc6f7083c70cb745a663013967b5
a6ed69263902e2d166b0d799daf3167c3f77845f
'2011-10-16T20:20:11-04:00'
describe
'33167' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDB' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6ddd7fed66162a218dbbc1a4d2c8cb36
9cc34cf9cfe85cc23b88446a213dd26e9fdcb1f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDC' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
80dd55a1a01bd8ac8f39c63f6178b02d
65f2c5a70800280b3959a24006fa4d818b239dd5
describe
'176334' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDD' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
80d5af624d106d260dbf9fcce6b0c556
38d0b780afec396c5e7a7f9dbdac3f68d3ea1bd2
describe
'29710' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDE' 'sip-files00099.pro'
8b67f507e378de40050108ad2c446a8c
4f06c8a25286c1b43b5d3331bcd9a744b4dc4550
describe
'64521' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDF' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
d96594e3bc49b0ab70660e93b60bd2ad
13406fa27ce3e06ef4f0f35146e31b294cfe5988
describe
'2457048' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDG' 'sip-files00099.tif'
6cf7b6c0e692345c10ac59f0804f1b4a
f9cecd001ad06bce4dde3c1f41ac280af1a5d12c
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
f064aca0caa2b77d3cff0e65e2ea1468
b238e8bbabd1783b037b6b2da6277ac579798d9a
describe
'32142' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDI' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5f07510367f497316ee0e61bcb751f64
bf80599299b545d6222820053e9d0c16d2e33c78
describe
'304574' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDJ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
02c0f7d789a4eb38fee905af85639d7d
b87869ced402690222493af42aa7dc7dbfdba5ef
describe
'193127' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDK' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
f52def2d768dbdc0bf489d7d92a8f753
06a6e368f11d2778c9c21e1c8c538e5487ceace4
describe
'33146' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDL' 'sip-files00100.pro'
07a8844e8d5964d1e8959231fbf34f4e
3212cd417a7aa3a1648b5d1164524ad3ae3e949c
describe
'70446' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
b36cc709ed20d9b01b0deefd9869a269
b9b4ed7a32dcfde12634d4076d5472c04d01542a
describe
'2459096' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDN' 'sip-files00100.tif'
af32cc6cea6471d7a5682081b8134e6e
e49cb4936cbc2a70846858f4673edda580415fe5
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDO' 'sip-files00100.txt'
ac34a08e324b4bbe61d3927959860f54
ab5a72a92f967f600b06c25ac26bbea1b5e54056
describe
'32862' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDP' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
afa2bd9d0e0b039b5c9c969911149250
6a663f06ed9b4634a88a1466da0ef1aa39bb8ba3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDQ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
79a038108b879da4693fdd9785737884
564d13f68a8dc4905c40c5398bf277ed5c0cea16
describe
'189235' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDR' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
90d83c61798cdf71995615a195c7332e
62edabbc9404a6f30f4e3930a78eec50f50c79de
describe
'31704' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDS' 'sip-files00101.pro'
71b43a6019cbe63e322c2efbbd6bd81d
3cb4208758c3795033a63092ba9151e6c0d9bce8
describe
'68558' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDT' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
0e2689f6827abc202f9f43231fb0f819
76e95cf7bff6a026be80a03d1094555efc045fc8
describe
'2457268' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDU' 'sip-files00101.tif'
50993b9e183d8357698c1800a1e6f1f0
05950531ad13c2ceb05b836b90537c19e5b1ff2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDV' 'sip-files00101.txt'
f5d6db08b8187aef59f5e8ba2ace276f
755212cf0c85343c0f8e11b814a6397f52b09963
describe
'32756' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDW' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
df53da6b14398ace8b92e63900fd9327
e22a2bc82a3fc38f12fb74a1a1f78ca46b2a0ff1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDX' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
f9dd5cb6e79ae03b7341e87173ad9d7a
8019ae6ca4b23526bea9947ef0c624e6a17fd694
describe
'188891' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
e95aaea302351451764efa0be4aa213a
45674043f4d56bc1f77d8dbfa38c2826d760c571
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLDZ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
edb040318fd00e1f476ce049d9542b12
f78a04f0e9383e2e235b8f20dd83fdd24987b701
describe
'69336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEA' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
177d2a0e725c2339b637e0ed873be49d
39cf060df1797ed698965a65d1be6e4a6f7236be
describe
'2459084' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
93610ea6f35975cc5896a4d7a39d0504
aafa56cf21ba4d1810568a7c1ad5c6dba8e4d552
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEC' 'sip-files00102.txt'
c07c5dbdfa24e0e719d237a11f356840
6b5e52554c028c8fd633c9937a5332bd65eb0e5c
describe
'32617' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLED' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
df26eff2e25a287cebad96a34954f0bd
37e058a910e6fdec873fdbd355511689eaa4f3b9
describe
'304290' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
a507fe3cf30b4bb4525d573f49adb3b9
eecf52294c6b2d1b2d0a458d4efa1c650ce8032a
describe
'174157' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
202233a10e481cd7b2a7841b719f8850
3efebfdda5584f0412bd4f26b9b7511194247b29
describe
'27848' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEG' 'sip-files00103.pro'
b6bad3fdcc3bd8bf72a378a8037671c3
cad1d172b4f1ac7e7f6db551bb23d5f2c640f3d0
describe
'64211' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEH' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
caddeddcad5528347fab62706f21c2b6
168fdf0275b96391f718c820688d47b1da374da2
describe
'2456808' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
d5424e0be140e5818e9635602d432dd2
a3c752b8b8c1dd34c4694e11a7ddee899c83bb3a
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEJ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
ab541256cffd6ccc2fb22f8c77fc0f3f
2745ec66dd8e62d8067adaec1f084c75c035992a
describe
'30900' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
156d635138e539399f912bbb30169533
54823a31f284b06c592553e149599bf662402359
describe
'304647' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
b660daef5cd929e30947a8a8b3d3e775
d305140bfd736d0b3ecb095a1efa67606e118844
describe
'191262' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
077226d6b19d5c7634ef91e377c61609
54f3d4c97503d8c3233bc7dfb2b0899e4d953783
describe
'32475' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
53eaf12a99959179edf8cca5e4f4b06d
ba99edbfa2820b1608a9bbb0e138f19d08f84e41
describe
'70401' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
01f8d5ed70347c936b792be5377f51df
0ccbd83435b995288c41229a010adc0d33a17044
describe
'2459128' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
edb6167be1f9226ced01daed52f3cc12
ec28e831f7923782c68570b660fbf943a0014b11
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
cf82ab21e1675a71b15068ceff3540d9
389343f4532551f440d6e68d738a8ac43957b49b
describe
'32772' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLER' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
4f04c51f4e6b54d73f054c44d0be5b24
89fab2ce5a0b7548d9d2245caf3903bba91a2e54
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLES' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
c182dfa6a271dc2d6e62721efa7cc438
3e71e07946f717834caee9987545ad68d7a355b8
describe
'196480' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLET' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
7fce1f51baf08114b3adf2032dedfc6d
f492b1d75dbf99f5f73ed1de41bb6f295d6e85f3
describe
'33613' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEU' 'sip-files00105.pro'
8b94ab2209db3dfbb97642c1afd72e9d
8cf1e9c43eefa75ce8a83e59dc85c266d7ee7ed1
describe
'70012' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEV' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
91814e452e9c1da3822848d447c9358d
e8f5f14482305333bc4e9950fed1858c04eed770
describe
'2457464' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEW' 'sip-files00105.tif'
576a1c8f44a1b06e18e86c07042d2eaf
95e30c70d1d17080d22a5a45a88de91963f70ffb
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
572364288c0110293a55e2b95361fa89
6dd1c088a82bc7ddec7e4b743d8c8968e821011c
describe
'32960' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEY' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
f843e1491cdb9aef8480d0d638dea27d
1adc1701bcf4d0deb56f7eb40e0e54ff2e733739
describe
'304642' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLEZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
201b93249daeb5baa6546ab37e95b413
d820f565846c3d37b5b80f718ac56d8eb60dc0eb
describe
'195198' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
f7d10b78a104fadd8974d2435b85d5f4
5a7ea44ebbdbd5aebc02ce09504aa204ca7843ff
describe
'34276' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFB' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c432a28e1f7e1bfc2b3a59d3e249c457
55af491aa7ad66d355590db57a5997d327583f7d
describe
'71260' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFC' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
3031c97d62e0b1cfd8dcd5feafc4a7f5
fbfc5285102388c17fcc854f6d66a61daf5cf6b5
describe
'2459308' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFD' 'sip-files00106.tif'
84f498467b17cef85b5779ee59dd3a82
a5a388b663ebc4a7975a180ccb264030d612056f
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFE' 'sip-files00106.txt'
1b9216f7d67264f187be22e2e38c6a17
23501eec2325a947ff542e32313448c211b673b6
describe
'33035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFF' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
56b842784f763c7fdd2164c1de94d420
d41a8d6974918acf1f71281c00d3e06acc021ffa
describe
'304349' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFG' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
b5c237762fc83618cf6cc9c0cd25d2c2
26888920d29693a60e921926b2e9eb7c1566cb3d
describe
'199597' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
770194f81b32fc29dbfa03f4e5f2f749
f504bca48e57c35d2c3648c52fdf7b6a6309b824
describe
'34781' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFI' 'sip-files00107.pro'
4b6a07a509329b0043d8eedc58ccf299
286a861fd9387dbe3c7feae61d67face727cd594
describe
'73434' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFJ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
25a3f991ca43f6569a915453f6970c41
4f7cc37f69449e98cde3155ca1e5101e545b746c
describe
'2457328' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFK' 'sip-files00107.tif'
095d6c70f4d97584ec84376e9593c15a
b591088d64edf35e14b0b190321760d879ce9355
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFL' 'sip-files00107.txt'
46644dd2de45dc106c26e2fede576328
940ed32d87141210f259684377cc59e3337e23bf
describe
'33258' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFM' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c39236afaccfa42243f201778eab52d5
1d640902e690778df7c3388a3d20b816e9f446a3
describe
'304445' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFN' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
de0e463b6700273a8278da2657c3b6da
9e4fccc280f4ede7837b30f8a8677b8bf5046049
describe
'193466' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFO' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
473f5b2a72e11d30fb0035a0396a88bf
5d78286ac0ed5ec6e7176ab08865859451038eec
describe
'32715' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFP' 'sip-files00108.pro'
e7d916f7bbbd8692fe733139989e74b5
808b6a448afb8f26c8f2358a7a273573f6d17267
describe
'70713' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFQ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
10df4dfdd49407bd44e2b1b371a24f12
86da97cbfa09e1376275c14987d98d18a8eceda1
describe
'2459524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFR' 'sip-files00108.tif'
7680d4f8402d27649ed139513746a53c
4f09bb5cbd473e405ca95232766b52cc6278a9bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFS' 'sip-files00108.txt'
fd9032a7758de4df3837412b6e406b88
a02281dff48e17c1546d9043e570cb4cfaaa341b
describe
'33189' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFT' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
3d0048082c0f8978cba6808103bedc6a
89ae3c013265bbc68de261f901719bd5dfb45a00
describe
'304351' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFU' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
648ba0efefe8f520e688e4326987ef33
eb38bddb1b1c258c8a6c813d9130db6423894d2f
describe
'194387' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFV' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
5d1f775d17f86761ecdb492d7975a21a
d47e5a736dd8e7f2b1297c8e6ae3632be31f356b
describe
'32555' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFW' 'sip-files00109.pro'
c55736c0dc923221082321440189169c
98d2d883b15da54da00e1e8ceb070c662a14e9a2
describe
'70784' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
f6df82c9fccbf6c9482c7b7463c2d508
00183276e33dac071f300a033ff68c42caedf659
describe
'2457480' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFY' 'sip-files00109.tif'
a4f342c55f60d95cf42b438041e06726
516b59f2d2b8f1f15e935cae556e28f99a8a26e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLFZ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
869685bdca0b9882fdbdb30b7656afd3
f58d78fcd57a2081c69a294d50eb13b292730d92
describe
'33180' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGA' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
d93e101ddaebe6a51a043d292f6f367d
68d2c5d171363f73b9f7bebc678c185ec369396a
describe
'304634' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGB' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
142108482307775f8886190d0dc82cae
530c5bc10690a6537d0b3ebd4f68a62ea198aadd
describe
'190717' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGC' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
4996aab0fe8fc0486fa64c81e21cfdcd
949674c3e1205b633f868c91211acade45d258a4
describe
'32938' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGD' 'sip-files00110.pro'
fa1669c9836856ca25524ca8e80b8a51
2c073e52e4615e8278688cffc8ac3200d579b7ba
describe
'70004' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGE' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
81f133446e7d6095e6da6b7acc6d31e1
858117699c74da97237166fadcb33022043a2769
describe
'2459160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
2cbef83e7c38d895da93dcf4f5a33351
9307af09a882bde0745a4fcbba6031d18415fb16
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
aaa8c5058e8e104693750855e82fdd88
251506916170ca5912d0a309a9dd81eef0a595c0
describe
'33015' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGH' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
31d1e073d3b3fe1220f4edc9c36870d3
b362f86a99556ef620c922fa1b6c467144ce2e11
'2011-10-16T20:17:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGI' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
109ffec02de53fd263af6be5b36c3e84
6266058f4769ae0578124b9053362ca586ca9163
describe
'173853' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGJ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
e04f3d1c2ec49eb54dca9af1bf5ddd46
6b6781a4e76ed8b75d2a2649b3029b641f24f57d
describe
'27349' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGK' 'sip-files00111.pro'
a84f7d4d54821624c489e053740142a7
08e6984bb5d0daf40cee212ae6b037e1a8a6f4c3
describe
'64313' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGL' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
71fdfcc3b246ed0ed484cc2e05d706b5
dbb3c7ffb7041cf6dff82312875e230ba22a3784
describe
'2457008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGM' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1de7ce62745a4c50e4e38fe6edd4270a
1e940401ae745ac35abc2e30fd02358098f95ec3
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGN' 'sip-files00111.txt'
da24889634528318bd169b7a7d1f4f23
c1f9cb867cc698e4bde1d95da30f56dd394f9e53
describe
'31515' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGO' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
9418da02e32d076c1be36e1bac047399
4b6d9b01a7df0c58ea44d8482795f6b981592dac
describe
'304599' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGP' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
d87988c4e033b78b2e453e1cfea16eb9
56c9badaad66c8d3cb138d0cc8d0b1d719550da4
describe
'196041' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
35e9b09016a2507c957d0475e9749941
bed65296e6f8d5a77f1be9bfba7e61f13ae51f3f
describe
'33407' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGR' 'sip-files00112.pro'
04da5a37d93ef5dc66597b06c3acb7be
5b87769810a702c8da59ffcfed26bf6eeea5ac47
describe
'70636' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGS' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
94e023af3b6091d004e4ace6647ebecf
899887cfa6bf6aca1f4f4eb4d4425a193a22616d
describe
'2459140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGT' 'sip-files00112.tif'
fc922bf2eb79e2db48012a1f2708fac8
6000df3ecd4aeeb4fedf62e681041f05aadd7e2b
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGU' 'sip-files00112.txt'
24d8d323150c32d46840d581cc352189
7c2ee2e88f4003006ee3d2c2c8541879cfdb123b
describe
'33159' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGV' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
9be8c929c50b4f6ec608c69582d4aa6e
0c646db22cd8b60f72624f92fb74ba8e52a1c47d
describe
'304276' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGW' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
2da1af958f175659ed05d4c61dbcf01b
6f91c2d456c3c2ffecfd6cf6ce850f57ffd89566
describe
'188717' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGX' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
3ccc410ecb447227af17fb3e0d825ed2
ea88a9a18cbe78651326ea8f7c1c0d7ea9b328b9
describe
'31065' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGY' 'sip-files00113.pro'
689a6966fb46904e7f49c5fb002d64a6
6dd7d536aa29ffff25c785c680283adb47f88e69
describe
'68175' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLGZ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
61319ab1a39d003cdf60f4f0928270f9
9f7b653f677214ec2453f4b92e18c1d9edee5253
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHA' 'sip-files00113.tif'
a604394300a6a63969362d0cff1562c7
e94861ec35abe83bf4bdffa9f996ed898e035372
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHB' 'sip-files00113.txt'
37ee04f3489db96541817f8deb6c495c
25e40b1fa0c554af82ea3b8ce8100f14215f2cd3
describe
'32365' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHC' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
55d15f10165b7f943c4b3fe2cf8ce1c4
9b09a399d29d7340dafaf05a2abe166279d7a22a
describe
'304582' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHD' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
fe3c591a579a12bd33f08d1b162fd1f0
2f3a73139abaa47114a15481fb40b661f918d57b
describe
'184552' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
de00a29fb1123a60446b0f04395d6a87
6d6c251e7cff1672f3dede8ae996599a607b9a78
describe
'31678' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHF' 'sip-files00114.pro'
82709d880a0ef0c88312966834cb923e
1f72b759492d9659eb366dc776d78ee555eec99b
describe
'67877' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHG' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
f908156f35e1726b6bfd6a2035ffb884
e7c33df0e67958375e0c1bd11bcd289a8b799526
describe
'2458880' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
a0794b4159ab59454221646b31313064
e3daaca3758a2f1fea05b4d664a5564c21f21c93
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
bc5d486ae71c3858fb9a7e67b8a19ffa
c7d2d7c5d86531c1628628fc64e94f155ddea91e
describe
'32113' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHJ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
495cdb83f06690210d8c28399d2e93ef
879f6c54d800a7b8a38fbe72e7b56ccd2564d8be
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHK' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
2e7680e4868f16461163a8bba333ae7f
19db73c388f0f5956457cf9658d786882aaf5eef
describe
'193221' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHL' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
0f9c62cf3ec7b7159cc197e79894ba92
eca1c1f75a8e79312447a7805edb6cc8c439fe70
describe
'33769' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHM' 'sip-files00115.pro'
c881cf95ed9a9c436acddd3e3bfee992
3878e724f27793a370192c77d0131202f81c6dfe
describe
'71174' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHN' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
3ba36a53b51e3a43b782ef78a4fd3519
bd26681c3c9935446c4c29b70d624f536960d7d5
describe
'2457404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHO' 'sip-files00115.tif'
88c811fd11bd3c9fd50fee94d7c244a9
4aa68dd9dc50593eae9f88e2c886865248d68976
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHP' 'sip-files00115.txt'
e8179a5154605129a55343040690c8e7
2be97f4f0301ff1e3b94c030c2671324acb08a54
describe
'33404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHQ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
516982ceb1c8654259caa67025e1f0a6
3a3b0a28ac79e11a467edc8cb5bbeb76c40c7801
describe
'304636' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHR' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
e8f7ae93777d078075cd372925fa0fbd
76d9062fffe1b9970f7567a0f9569afbb299ac9e
describe
'190469' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHS' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
2d40e4324bebe6228fc12a4226fa7e4c
2466b0a2ae4e11aa49be5c6e143362aa1641d955
describe
'30921' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHT' 'sip-files00116.pro'
b8314643b053af2896dff1ad780332d3
0824f841291a14c11a1c0e1362584d3e2e920cfc
describe
'70159' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHU' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
70d17f7be30635cf5690d150cb3ffea6
ff33711063979a7f885ca11a364b120caa62d13a
describe
'2459332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHV' 'sip-files00116.tif'
41798a32e5117d8970b4414ba3aedb04
29be9d19f9128013df7255fc39ed2b216dbc21ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHW' 'sip-files00116.txt'
62d9f4a07bc615011e810cdfea6803b5
9f2b4a11ffc898a3bcc7e6a8221d1d7434e949ba
describe
'32637' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHX' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
90a4f6d496d325e6c4838fdc68cab955
4d336522dbc76b5ca6987bc90a7c8830e6f10da8
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHY' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
24c8c47fd62b39d9116fe8297f2296f4
604b3fb2874e9cb14b76829ed86c5ee85fe0fc12
describe
'193257' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLHZ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
14d37037cf72d17915f459ab4dd50ec3
52c1d92144233feb8af022e3f18e38e5cb079866
describe
'32258' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIA' 'sip-files00117.pro'
1710a4a6e7f4f499170a45352f49a85d
8b42b26f1f8997d874cfdf872d05703c26e3aeae
describe
'69636' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIB' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
356f8d68b5ea3ca0b63c08562328f6be
745e5675bb2839700b172869929a17c1b7bd3d87
describe
'2457488' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIC' 'sip-files00117.tif'
440282145c58720151c59f02077142f8
b40fff1d517aafa2773c23811d5528805e278653
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLID' 'sip-files00117.txt'
c4a9083a1a2142a8e9001ff54f53ffe8
993e97f9dc4ba6150e68c51d17c52785aa3c5b0e
describe
'32849' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIE' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
dfb0e6776da4ae31da66ccd3a8da60a6
c0a9e91047464a3c5a42567ccdcd4ee5969bd8f1
describe
'304581' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIF' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
ffb4a45d6ede0ea5c0fcdfcf11771957
35efb6e7d997d26eda8c5858a3225b0031cbd6b3
describe
'188495' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIG' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
f6ab921f9c08e9302c57a4bf5af5fbd9
f1c6f3508622ade12b082d20734e940a9e8260a8
describe
'32636' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIH' 'sip-files00118.pro'
b279750d02733780d77d0d6b934ecb3d
daf7084e7959cbcb769c509242780f3174061a6a
describe
'69294' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLII' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
50d5e916175cd7a4f0ee87f2c55f3b9e
5a7111563092e43029fcaba2ceee21286139fe88
describe
'2459116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIJ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
9d7fa5f055d7f45e9db4d71b4319826c
7c149b43863a63722fe67bc10e19083f5f9c0cf4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIK' 'sip-files00118.txt'
28e23d0d69d7b29f993767020713cb57
bf1abea423171bd2ae39c0d7dad8c22a96780363
describe
'32890' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIL' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
93f17b9ff5e87bbefc932271eb5f1ba3
4cb8d6207f1c7fa2027f737e379161d55ef03718
describe
'304372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIM' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
47c4f90604b55a2ed9cd5a647e905a2a
9d00948a744a512e06217da2d8dd18f64e976ca1
describe
'183076' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIN' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
7c8eb0e09329c61869e2abc61915758c
36cb075d08753a9ceae81d22901dd00744e32f4e
describe
'30947' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIO' 'sip-files00119.pro'
3edfefe83770d26d7b0f4ced83eef2ec
d4bc84342224c03944634a0b24793c275ca9ba5c
describe
'68151' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIP' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
236bdf5873c40ad3d4785e136ed3dd4c
c59e17335cd46ac2a99e25061a2939503b9a574c
describe
'2457284' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIQ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
d3a645be0a774ec54df45f4cca13e5d7
2607bc88959b2dd23d91224ec953f09c275e03b3
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIR' 'sip-files00119.txt'
b83cabd45caf1ad4c896d821ba46f4dc
e3f592682d349533e6639a3e32c8a0742266b5f2
describe
'32369' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIS' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
bfa5dc85dc4ec16972313a5d0f2c140c
6bd9c8d4bda04a0e6deb36e283fb47ac96fbf033
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIT' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
8f3947a84574b7e9f521f9d6df1ac510
f1e23bac3ec74da1f1dd86682e67857093432fde
describe
'153512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIU' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
f2832d46bde130f65ebf5cfc8d09d478
d1e48cc9a6bd48c5652f7da9647519123ef54688
describe
'21682' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIV' 'sip-files00120.pro'
1bfc79d283097657743a77559995af4f
6d5e28763a7cd261ae3bffedebc46f4f7015962f
describe
'57055' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIW' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
f7a220f667b049ea5576bf5edf5e9b62
4c180b7937787f3301c7fce927619d960d3fb9f5
describe
'2458264' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIX' 'sip-files00120.tif'
67af8363c1cb2a980288aed0af1d8727
e465fa6ee79d071aef89e21ca4d0a3073166095f
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIY' 'sip-files00120.txt'
f1786a20f32c995c8d138482b78262d5
3fb950deb77d08e721087611b086d125507cca8f
describe
'29788' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLIZ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
3fc56b60980bcf3daaaf043ad3b5424a
30e36748878d26b354bf9346cd9bbc61bac8e363
describe
'304376' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJA' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
d6eb09ed134518ff7f177d1bbc134232
d7f59c9d0065c36aa9121518fe069a1f1981ae88
describe
'192912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJB' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
dbfa1d8e00f5a7361ef83ddfa2ed945f
b8636f14d9bbf209aac28e1534a4c99a682c96d1
'2011-10-16T20:17:19-04:00'
describe
'33086' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJC' 'sip-files00121.pro'
0d44dca801d95820d5a8b53d06c1b93f
0085cbe53d9d8727c8811972207e151a53e58514
describe
'70321' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJD' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
67f80cc56027b654da6cd0983d48f2c4
01e28ebfeb66b8139c09ea2acf4849d4f96229d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJE' 'sip-files00121.tif'
02aa7e771662f88046b067c05f57b809
4e3526de94eee2958602676f7dd8777efcb610de
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJF' 'sip-files00121.txt'
660900a70532c44c8a6f9ae38008d10a
d89c931e7442355af15aa7ee06e87ea9005afcd1
describe
'32924' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJG' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
1a3553bf9534c735961e7f5217542e60
a308efec6cd10302e689943197eb9a9f46f0eaee
describe
'304659' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJH' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
e574ec07cbad05305c199d790ee56d59
0aee05ec9af0f0b324834c2a5014bae68a5e6d9a
describe
'191298' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJI' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
640fd58957415f3dee10c67d492b8891
afda626b3c74bb01aa4b541cad589b20c90d2ca6
describe
'32981' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJJ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
18b9a2a0b3c61cd561131b413a6b1466
4286c39d3cf5861d844cf732e47e6c22644d6f53
describe
'69217' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJK' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
132a0784b1441ee3d58f66420484a0f4
ffc56580a265e0f1d32bd9d5b00dcce11697fdca
describe
'2459008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJL' 'sip-files00122.tif'
f10d36528300c8aab5955bac7bb93388
ce62826c499e0fde67eb7b0a911cad5b33d82ffa
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJM' 'sip-files00122.txt'
4b675326b02e8fb6e25ace6985bcce08
12cb7bdcca6d899f13342eab4da772c7c9afb1e5
describe
'32381' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJN' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
36511a842fc9d7751ba310f31cbf7750
e09fc7475640a15429436b861e1b3c97e2cc07f1
describe
'304387' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJO' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
1d3ef581d0ccde8a7efe62f3885ce44e
f9b8c9020acf53d2022e3be8f8f5ab7f510f3ff0
describe
'187922' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJP' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
6cfb4137426234b31229eb9335fe0347
045b4ee318467b91d1ec52c0dd91cb1aa4090fd3
describe
'32317' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJQ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
70055c45c934ba1d136354aabfead6a1
8df8ed101dc698480a870c96ea6bf054d5befc84
describe
'69633' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJR' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
21fbe7ee065e73e2cbc3ed59e3638355
c60261979b56f2105b7688788bbea4e8e1d8e4d4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJS' 'sip-files00123.tif'
b30d28a26053e8d52f07818444fc14f4
c2cb885755b53fd1fac5b6255284c6992c4687a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJT' 'sip-files00123.txt'
61b435a435c1280fc4185025a0cfec12
9b29206f4893b45acbfffd6f29b522f07b6465db
describe
'32716' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJU' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
d8e7d1a0dd8a0b12b653f5dc75f80861
f65ba865e8a397c5d1e68f01ad20cc8bc36e4c05
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJV' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
b4f36811c08ad6510a6a322782484a0c
d48a91d0930a4a85d8f6340de4ec86d54e76f22a
describe
'177773' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJW' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
77d41fcfb40eb674eaeda51dff7a5c62
70e2a48e9f5408a343533c97c7438289fd236054
describe
'28270' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJX' 'sip-files00124.pro'
c6e3c7ef69ab74cd7324706641a8da26
45e7a3d866619b13ea9bf953a9de0262d45206a6
describe
'64098' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJY' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b1f8294d7920434b741559d7bde05854
c40c8a26a20636284d81e748ef06a00a47097447
describe
'2458820' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLJZ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
694eb3c96f67b677eb0ab9f9e5fe9252
1ecc2623458714aa1c93c68622f74a2307e5fdbe
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKA' 'sip-files00124.txt'
d6ea34ae274ea4ccffae6d5f27fdc2d7
eaa6c365c0846362376e4c084d9a3c34f99b0f00
describe
'32082' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKB' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
467a31cd760dc8ef826e364db7c95a92
e1eaf6d6144fe11f0c64805ba1f67b5f4a3e8084
describe
'304152' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKC' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
623d0f3ec0c3276da1655a977baa150f
fbecec34e27c9ebb4d4a82d38c5448c9d44181f3
describe
'179560' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKD' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
357bd803d491ea8c6367a595ed06a0f4
f161fc95d39c235431e9abd0eb9881c2d0caf96d
describe
'27847' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKE' 'sip-files00125.pro'
9a7b1f40221e68d51c2edfb1c609173a
b0f1f32b1a674d7af23ef3291cd8a4aebaae5500
describe
'64566' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKF' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
5d2997446c3fed23b5f58abaa0fa4558
1c4ec4b8343bb2740c6454dc92be151408f9d55c
describe
'2456752' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKG' 'sip-files00125.tif'
15e493585affc6cdd08d533e4832494b
02bd2a04ffb872526bc1dd5732a0c75ff80a8d72
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKH' 'sip-files00125.txt'
0e1a9d2f92530dac8d1f8478bbdf53c6
523d64c7602ba45eab8b15e9bbd518d4f9295861
describe
'31043' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKI' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
c49170a77e2cdbd440612f942f0c324f
dd4ac52d437911527516f0dd246dcee6924fd5d5
describe
'304379' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKJ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
5e972dc1689bdd9e8f9fcbb4918baf17
70525d2b6f20aa76a6413f9fbc80acb691ba77d1
describe
'192294' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKK' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
979d951a0abc6fec8bd2d9ab836efeaa
a804687a233addfcbf7d584a8a10ad138d2c0d71
describe
'33908' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKL' 'sip-files00126.pro'
93a14e0280485fb48e39b86a77a76987
c8f05507eb9ec44de331f5a17ec26f60b1caee7c
describe
'69297' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKM' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
6dec38e145cd51daa05707793ff3ee22
aa1e167ee0a619a33e476536ca9973d37f4ed722
describe
'2457068' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKN' 'sip-files00126.tif'
027499bfb742bd9eb148bbedfd489043
41cdba759ee9acd2051ece58f8647ab75bc08ea3
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKO' 'sip-files00126.txt'
ca2520a28590ce06ea3dbdee241eece7
aeeca24f4b9172e92dfa1914169ecd437a1dea0c
describe
'32473' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKP' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
416bd89b057d35b72a3ee073e1fc5282
3258d5e20abcf1ffd2a65e01d111ecae6455b238
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKQ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
fb634f2a2499d58b1fd540af84c805ee
566f56ae4c8cef4634a4f45f75d5c5f61ee47b84
describe
'197521' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKR' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
396d2c9bab81c212e25fac6d50161b77
76960e87bab9653f948e06d7df8b7a0d151bc65f
describe
'33875' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKS' 'sip-files00127.pro'
b7ecc199e0f87e1fa0213523aefe516e
2f556b44ca4905c998939796291cfacc4576cffe
describe
'71238' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKT' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
b4332c4fa15e569c66bb4aa8a2aac146
14948b221e6d9fcb138ad872ce5a8eb448d3ffb4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKU' 'sip-files00127.tif'
5562c069ce94cfae3899cc17f8c9c2a2
374e99e8cea035c36ab38f5b4e9e2b448429a567
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKV' 'sip-files00127.txt'
e8423ad298df3510d9dfb012c6d166ca
803fbb733e5d297c7668d3d78736c7a2c38e144a
describe
'32642' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKW' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
501056f5a513128dceeb05aaa69ae25a
1849a20a1737146b4d28797cca5312b84d5d0b4b
describe
'304319' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKX' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
38cf754459dba36c520a7c7870e338d9
673d39977de60fbc8137efab93378cfc9a611ba4
describe
'198284' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKY' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
01bdcf60b4340284216934174c8d47f3
8aa03ad7c4e6dcdac3f9440f803552401efae11e
describe
'34680' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLKZ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
b667a99cdaac8c489b4609e6b82c3a5c
4110dfc4a22c414c7e0e8ea17a926c4b26f12e59
describe
'71995' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLA' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4d739b533a3594951adb0c6d85ba1824
10c29859e269897ef6308831c8e7520eacd9b4f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLB' 'sip-files00128.tif'
524ea08089e88876b044c901cc112062
0331cd5ac613df7e4ee138474fec460bf6ddce40
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLC' 'sip-files00128.txt'
f6924577897a8bfc32b01d6a1f4d9495
363d517b5a8f355f43f5d4e4486ce71aa4d63e34
describe
'33435' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLD' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
277023fd199f673724a4c12a95ec6166
9d6d3cef097080aac327a21e5c0e0b7b46a743c5
'2011-10-16T20:17:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLE' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
bd523888d2f7a2ccb6521dd7737f3b82
3d2731d8739c42d6daecce68bbe7da0c9af1e939
describe
'191194' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLF' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
a49f4e4be957393405f99e100bd047d0
a7c046633d68995ac3108a0be3b4671cbcf35b7c
'2011-10-16T20:17:32-04:00'
describe
'31638' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLG' 'sip-files00129.pro'
5f2ce5408cba95e0ff3cf6e0b36049bb
1139362a303aff001eab430384cbe9e24cef38ba
describe
'69851' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLH' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
270bb2de2421d55bfb42f554cf971404
03211a5a1ae6cd4fb3e2fee99ed977109e258a66
describe
'2457400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLI' 'sip-files00129.tif'
5beb284bff7232552a3bff11ba92982c
c5907cb45b1afd712c536d883f9382327da32635
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLJ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
2baab0b4736374d3d090bc9c3ba950ad
528b0a72d4d3859f8bd80bc9d1400d60f4a62a18
describe
'32812' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLK' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
e7945b92f80dd8a29e65b3f309d1e697
19ce2951c4c0a5bb84b7826320155b1e748aa76e
describe
'304357' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLL' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
5c673d23e71f09ca4702923e5a905d10
66eb2f2ae9598e257f8b318f4903753e312c6239
describe
'190628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLM' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
6c3381c4223afb0882853234917407a4
86cb9d00158dfd6547d0da40f70a2644249f017c
describe
'33861' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLN' 'sip-files00130.pro'
ec586d4103aa5f25d33cd0436dd12a00
cd525a2a0c9124ff66765738f0415558626d171d
describe
'70246' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLO' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
853e54904e5cd44204ff3045eeb9b808
22f1dec8d590cf1ee35c5992c501648bcd6606d9
describe
'2457140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLP' 'sip-files00130.tif'
332950130820d695cda10bb27008747b
2c8bf97ca741a629605a01cd0d3e744dbd1f8677
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLQ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
9b22e064f7aa07f69ab2148588784c25
d153b8f3eb58e116829ac1756327f3b789c51bf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLR' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
2c550830ad78b0d41c8a83768bf5a0d6
3cb1e8a8e1cfb4eab111ad86095a53db5db2ae98
describe
'304361' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLS' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
0603ac42a36aa5bd6403be8a9ff4d68e
20ad5b594a868617c93cb6c6872694f3c523dcae
describe
'182985' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLT' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
82947ced9193dde2383060f69fb4e083
f9a514ffaa062df2126ee14f97895ae3825a5726
describe
'30706' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLU' 'sip-files00131.pro'
7438af41763d07b76702c2164f5e40ae
c01e921bf687d5a9e7f7d2b043e543de400bc254
describe
'68014' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLV' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
a12676d8c45632de730c0e4fb7653e52
c02725db966ba1b03a187f6d5de4c1e1191689de
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLW' 'sip-files00131.tif'
cab6006e2c9fbf2bec3bc1404d10a2cd
45a977fc045a363e2b13f8e03b1efc7a9a56d2b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLX' 'sip-files00131.txt'
443995e1ad051147591342e0181e8886
38325986aacbc11903cc59d193366a06f4051400
describe
'32166' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLY' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
cb75bfcbf86ff9fe97ce6e538e4b6a3b
a480224f65a06cacb2f63d00fbf89acd505fec01
describe
'304304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLLZ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
63c13c0783dae044f39f9b3057bcc3c5
de0843ad2fd2da8ddb889d541d59630882dbbfec
describe
'104590' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMA' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
de6ce0c4b59866c1a4baf0d5b5417bc8
17a1a335b60e54845ff8792f4d3ff7cf64065984
describe
'8121' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMB' 'sip-files00132.pro'
dab29a8c9fe5c3572f037053987707d9
993a2b7c5737b0b6a1116b1638a9e0ac8467505b
describe
'37040' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMC' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
b7a9835d7a165ffd6b84e63e8d5593ad
74d36b08deb0724dbf0b28eec8afcf60b6ffb83c
describe
'2453860' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMD' 'sip-files00132.tif'
1071d02177422ff94056f4ca0cba608f
710bf551d81f9ea4432b62b0e3a649bca265f7b2
describe
'362' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLME' 'sip-files00132.txt'
aa625c95a36e19a767f9aa8c485b0f3a
f36f14f5f6c61330ceb3dc812f1bd6e0eceb7ee1
describe
'22944' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMF' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
f0c20f89501b27be7011b50dcfdeb5b8
31ac48827afc1ec608f36adb0cbb42d1dc9b7ac5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMG' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
577c9d4fbc8b1a59cc3e030446ed6634
81eb3d924c5da32b50c56f3b2a20c6d2ecc9495f
describe
'191467' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMH' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
d055d885a02a5a26331e70a882e7bd60
72601141d4ee0f1e426aa32d4dcfef32922ad3fa
describe
'42726' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMI' 'sip-files00133.pro'
4727f5626f2b5ff75e0fdfc68135d695
039682dba57e5b801571e9e74756c9aeb99c7999
describe
'68621' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMJ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
05b385c8bee941959e23cfb639a8a6d1
b43cf28eb3f201e7d6887335f7b35cff07c5db0e
'2011-10-16T20:17:43-04:00'
describe
'2457752' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMK' 'sip-files00133.tif'
b13728ae2f627524473aaea713044148
f81efa22aa6c3ce824ba780eab0b0ed318463673
describe
'1910' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLML' 'sip-files00133.txt'
8766d48c1cffb5651adeaca042b588a8
a80a72a034197d517fc53d73a7e8dea64c651273
describe
'33726' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMM' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
8a8ed0cdf0be314173b5096e6f39e385
2d697e456c55b705d2b63ca3c905c09870b50949
describe
'304622' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMN' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
8a4a4bc47fda3d5249f306420dcee3a7
5a3452d1c6d905ae48b80b409728876a7cf35b80
describe
'214509' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMO' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
b67dd714a825d26cc9c8e6460ffd0b2c
d9f870fdaad3f3a3bfa5873be2f930023a1d6c66
describe
'52346' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMP' 'sip-files00134.pro'
d55954c3309c95d3749387d6d1551ddb
4dee2d4191207b36aa841e9974c1b032825e4ca5
describe
'75841' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMQ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
61e434d273ff1eb7dba36a0adc32c977
473bb5d76ced3298f870a699271d579d4231e2d4
describe
'2460228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMR' 'sip-files00134.tif'
84a8458a4d00cae12aa8f7c0050f20f3
0ac0b5d464864246d3eb274faddea42f0027f2f8
describe
'2215' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMS' 'sip-files00134.txt'
3533f41f94232a8d948ec4c2a7325875
a5f86f7375caacba16fb1bff71d5a005dacb7a7b
describe
'35246' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMT' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
15df77a634490f85c64ca7e59de23cc3
610fe07aa6c0d7d361dd6100bc2e4810f30c3e0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMU' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
931b30b8ea06f10622e196a2f4b2d0b6
ea0e64d8d2314bfe881135d74f05e3757c4e0734
describe
'192498' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMV' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
57acbc1bb77a5fe9b7b8687f048acac7
078387b0605c005a2accd98371753f52df44845b
describe
'40491' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMW' 'sip-files00135.pro'
33ca47bfdb4f5f3183df8645c5148e9a
566b5905a009e59e5f2b555a8349b0588de4a9bb
describe
'68699' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMX' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
becdfd649c9259453b1acd90bc3b8b1c
168e52fb0f7ead3c4c34f3de344be50997c478fa
describe
'2457500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMY' 'sip-files00135.tif'
7eda51e3ee59ab6f256c824abb6119da
eb5e71f9b269111bacf3849e8230bd5cdaef23cb
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLMZ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
0242cbb26a041db83afe3f756bfd7f17
98f2f981030b0ac87510aec603c792973a142dc7
describe
'33094' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNA' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
a11d8ae330fc0c10f443242d8e353ba1
c975097ad9a8dfea67b1a4872ee39c6b7930a57d
describe
'304611' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNB' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
366a4331f4eb9236afe358c4657c9a26
47558a5dba4fe599cae2c9893bc7097804f0a938
describe
'208542' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNC' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
0bd3de29b874160f2a6bc7d362e36a36
d3ae85b239f91f032c047a20d65d254844b06aa6
describe
'52103' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLND' 'sip-files00136.pro'
df17877878e1980527c60b5bc1e1df52
706b3a786c64f3da547753e0fa7888dddfa7d7cd
describe
'73931' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNE' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
7ad6b725d54e958067d3c684f216277f
bbba597f96ed83a8146bbd98c796a7b2b9f00efe
describe
'2459828' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNF' 'sip-files00136.tif'
49f596e236766aebea64cc03de6aaa39
bc21cadc404e7dea85ec81f4a6498980a7f8d9b9
describe
'2255' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNG' 'sip-files00136.txt'
49a5c6121414ade0ee8eadad7938b669
a7edfbce9bbc318b1ee3f66b87058c6c915c6d38
describe
'34384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNH' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
bcfb6f5bc507bb0d6edf2f457bd0ee97
b89514ef0350bb6062bc9f3689855631098ef3bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNI' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
550345cc04313a6cac8c1e73b30ff6b5
5ec7e76183853849eee7be7cf5c3eb5c98039dbe
describe
'193478' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNJ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
c3fe5f43d20fe32efe4bbe2daac14adc
445e308ac4bbb1cbb323dd1f022f54049f9be950
describe
'48717' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNK' 'sip-files00137.pro'
901d9dd70eaff8716d34fa317c72fdc4
84218c04d5c5d4d7e486803c90100ab8f9e4ce67
describe
'71003' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNL' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
67ef4150ccfffa502916623267ed6700
4d7e0e7632b267beb86277e980abeb4e3aecf20e
describe
'2457720' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNM' 'sip-files00137.tif'
4ffeef6c0fa10328f6208d2cf825adf6
226bac929ba700fa1fb4c038e18c67b7198bc0f3
describe
'2145' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNN' 'sip-files00137.txt'
baae5ba428ce0d486cf6ca380aebcdf6
ab018e8bb858a69bfb9bfd645082eea8bec629a9
describe
'33949' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNO' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
4bd3333df9d0e6b9388c4afa51c3d2c8
4f0666b5fdbf367a22eaf28f63e051cf6260b491
describe
'304652' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIPfileF20080409_AABLNP' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
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The Baldwin Library

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CUO? 77 1H os Prog: CUE) GILT, car PURLEY PIFL,

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DBEO POMC PEO Peo ME OP ODO ko rs




GLADYS.
SP?








536

GLADYs AND HER BROTHER AT THE WISHING-TREE,
GLADYS:

OR THE SISTER’S CHARGE

BY

E. O'BYRNE.



BLACKIE & SON, Limrrep,
LONDON, GLASGOW, EDINBURGH, AND DUBLIN,

Chap.

IT.
III.

IV.

VI.
VII.
VIII.
Ix.

XI.

XII.

XIII.

XIV.

CONTENTS.

HERSELF, .

Her MorTHeEr,
Her Broruer,
Tue WISHING-TREE,
Tue TROUBLE,
Tue Ripe,
SoLDIERs, .

In EprnsureH, .
THE WINTER, .
Bay,
SEPARATION,
“Cur SoHooL,” .
Pray oF Action,

WInpine UP,

Page

13
19
27
40.
50
61
72
86
92
99

. 107
. 116
. 121





CHAPTER L

HERSELF.

shining in a cloudless-sky. The air was
sultry, the flowers breathed sleepy odours,
the birds were still; it was surely altogether too
hot a day for any living thing to be busy. Why!
the field-workers were dozing under hedges, and
carts on the road moved lazily, the atmosphere
was thick and heavy with dreams.

Whrenly House, gleaming white among its
surrounding dark green, looked peaceful and in
keeping with the day. All the windows stood
open, and awnings shaded them; all around was
stillness, save when some white-capped maid
moved leisurely from one room to another, or
passed the windows drawing the awnings lower,
or stopped to speak. to a footman half asleep in

T was noon of a July day, and the sun was
\

al
8 GLADYS.

the hall. But what is this! Here are two win-
dows in the full glare of the sun, upper-storey
windows, with neither awning nor blind! The
sun pours mercilessly through them into a
spacious still room, blazes on the brass grate and
irons, and searches in vain for speck or dirt on
the white uncarpetted floor, or about the old-
fashioned heavy furniture. Everything has a
white, clean character though the heat is intense.

Sitting on the floor of this room, and in the
hottest spot almost that she could have chosen, -
was a little girl of about eight or nine years of
age, whose thick brown hair at present falls over
and hides her face, which is bent low on some
work of an apparently absorbing nature. It is
sewing, and the little red hot fingers fly in and
out untiringly. The article on which she is at
work is a doll’s coat, ulster shape, and she seems
to be expending care and pain upon it, uncon-
scious or careless of the heat, for she never thinks
to draw the blinds. Now and then she tosses
back her heavy hair, giving to view for a second
a flushed cheek, and shadowy look as of dark
eyes or eyelashes, and then the head is bent again
more earnestly than ever.

Beside her on the floor are a little work- box,
some shavings of cloth and work things, and a
HERSELF. 9

bird’s cage, which however has its awning right
enough; and the wise little inmate has made up
his mind, that watching his mistress occasionally
with one sleepy eye is as much as could possibly
be required of him on a day like this.

The little girl in threading her needles pauses
sometimes to say a few tender words, to which
the bird lazily responds; then again there is still-
ness.

The glaring noon passes; for more than two
hours the child sits hard at work, then a heavenly
breath passes through the room, drawing from
her an unconscious sigh of relief. The birds’
voices sound from without in glad chorus, a bell
rings in the distance, then the door opens and a
servant looks in.

“Miss Gladys! Oh, younaughty girl. Sitting
there still, and never moved since dinner-time.
What are you doing?”

“None of your business,” is the ungracious re-
tort. ‘You go along and don’t worry.”

“Where is your nurse?”

“Dunno. Yes I do, though. I think she went
to the farm.”

Then the maid disappeared. The girl tossed
back her hair defiantly and went on with her
work again. :
10 GLADYS.

Presently a child’s voice was heard calling—
whistling and shouting. The little girl paused
again, raising her head now with the expectant
air of one listening to a beloved and familiar
sound; her little plain flushed face and beautiful
eyes became glorified by an expression of deep
and powerful love. The shouts and whistling died
away, the look faded, once again she bent over
her sewing. Another half hour passed, and then
the sound of wheels in the gravel raised the busy
head again, but with a very different expression.
“There's Mama,” she said; “now I must stop and
go.” But though she reiterated this statement
more than once, a full half hour passed before she
made any movement; then the work was finished
and she rose, and at the same moment the door
opened, and a tall woman in cloak and hat
entered, hot and dusty. -

“Miss Gladys!” she exclaimed fretfully. “Oh,
you troublesome child. Not ready, and her lady-
ship’s bell will ring this moment. What have
you been doing? I never knew such a trouble-
some, naughty girl.”

“ Are you tired, Nurse? You do look hot. Was it
nice at the farm? is Jenny’s leg better? and how
is the little sick cow?” was Gladys’ placid answer.

The nurse threw off her bonnet and jerked
HERSELF, : jl

down the blinds. “The room is like an oven, and
I suppose you have been sitting here since dinner.
What have you been doing?”

“This! Look, it is finished. Isn’t it nice?” And
she held up the little ulster, now completed even
to the small tweed buttons and hood, with an ©
expression of pride. The nurse, a good-natured
creature, looked, and forgot her anger in admira-
tion.

“Well, well, and you did all this! You are the
cleverest child with your needle I ever knew.
And little pockets and all, dear me! Did you cut
it out yourself?”

“No, Baby’s tailor did. It’s for Baby’s monkey. —
T hope he'll like it.”

“Likeit! He doesn’t deserve it. If he don’t, it’s
my belief you'll spoil him. Take care he doesn’t
turn ungrateful, Miss Gladys, and give you small
thanks for your pains.”

“Oh rubbish, Nurse. You talk like a goose.
Baby is the best boy ever lived.”

“Well, well, so his mother thinks—”

“Yes and his sister, and that’s enough,” said
Gladys with a sharp imperious accent of command,
the more effective with the servants because she
was usually so easy under their frequent attacks.
And now she finished gathering her things, hung
12 GLADYS.

up the bird’s cage, and passed into an inner room,
whence issued sounds of splashing and clatter
enough for a whole regiment of soldiers, and in
a short time she reappeared, looking bright and
fresh, in a white dress, silk stockings, and bronze
slippers, her thick brown tangle brushed and
shining, and her poor cheeks and hands carmine.

“Oh, Nurse, I wonder will my cheeks and hands
always be so red,” she said with a sigh. “How I
wish they were waite or pretty pink like Baby’s
and Mama’s.

“Hurry down, like a good child,” said the
nurse; “her ladyship’s bell hasn’t rung yet. And
as for red cheeks, my dear, it’s an honest healthy
colour, that’s my belief.”

“Bosh!” was Gladys’ retort as she left the
room. Passing along a bare passage she opened
a baize door, and here’the region of uncarpetted
floors and old-fashioned furniture ended. It was
like entering fairy-land. Her small slippers sank
into the rich carpets noiselessly; dim light from
painted windows fell upon her, dying her white
dress with amber and purple, and a great crimson
stain across her little heart; marble statues
answered the wistful question of her eyes with
classic unmoved calm. Down two flights of stairs
she went, then entered a wide hall filled with the
HER MOTHER. 13

perfume of exotics and the glory of the afternoon
sunlight.
At that moment a bell rang sharply.

CHAPTER IL
HER MOTHER.

N one of the cool shaded rooms two ladies sat;

or, rather, one of them lay on a couch, breath-

ing languid rejoicings over the coolness, while

the other, a stylish, cool, breezy-looking young

lady, arranged a dainty tea-service just brought
in, and prepared to pour out tea.

“T saw your boy in the gardens, Gladys,” she
said as she did so; “he is a lovely fellow.”

“Ts he not?” said the other with an expression
of earnestness on her handsome but habitually too
languid face. “Oh, every one thinks him lovely.
What should I do without him? Oh, thank you,
Florence. It is too lazy of me to allow you to do
all that; but you are so energetic.”

“Yes, and lazy people always have to be served
some way,” said the young lady laughing. “But
what about your little girl? I have not seen her
yet.”
14 GLADYS.

“Qh,” said the mother in a tone of contempt
and indifference, “she is an enfant terreble. I
don’t know what to make of her. I dread to
think of the time when she will be grown-up.”

“Why, dear?”

“Oh, she is so plain, poor thing. So odd, was it
not, Florrie, that I should have a plain child, and
the boy so handsome?”

“But, Gladys, I heard she had a fine figure and
beautiful eyes.”

“She may have. I never noticed anything but
that she is very plain, and her face and hands
always, my dear Florrie—always crimson. Had
I known it when she was born I should have had
her called Carmina. It has given me quite a dis-
like to my own name.”

Florence glanced at her friend with a good deal.
of contempt in her bright eyes.

“Is she fond of the boy?” she asked pre-
sently.

“Oh, very, I believe,” returned her friend half
grudgingly, half enviously; “but indeed I see al-
most nothing of her except that she comes in and
goes out with the tea-things. I think it refines
children’s manners to have them in the drawing-
room occasionally, and she can really serve tea
and behave quite respectably now,”
HER MOTHER. 15

“Ts she shy?”

“Oh, not at all. She says anything, anything
she likes. It gives me palpatations sometimes
really to hear her. She is not a favourite at all;
never will be, ’'m sure. Now Baby, every one
dotes upon him.”

“T wish he would make his appearance again.
Isn’t the cool delicious?”

“Delicious! Oh, thatreminds me. Would you
kindly ring, dear, please: the child will be wait-
ing, I daresay.”

Florence rang the bell, and at thats instant
Gladys appeared.

_She came forward and spoke to her mother’s
friend, watching her all the time with dark dis-
trustful eyes.

“Where have you been all day, Gladys?” her
mother asked.

“Up in the nursery.”

“ All day!”

“Yes. I was sewing.”

“Sewing! What?”

“A coat for the monkey—Bahe’s monkey.”

Then she helped -herself very calmly to tea
and cake, and took a low chair. Her mother
gave a hopeless little glance at her friend, then
continued: “Where is Baby?”
16 GLADYS.

“I dunno. I heard him about an hour or more
ago. He was shouting around somewhere.”

“T wish you had found him and brought him
in for some tea.”

“T should have; but you see Nuss says it’s
sheer folly giving him tea and heavy cake now,
It spoils his appetite for his supper, she says.”

“ And how about you?”

“T dunno. She says I’m as strong as a horse.”
And thereupon she took another piece of heavy
cake and ate it up rapidly, as though to prove it.

At this juncture one or two gentlemen entered,
hoping they did not intrude. And the lively
young lady helped them to tea, and Lady Whrenly
assured them they did not, and Gladys regarded
them with the distrustful look she had for all her
mother’s guests.

They sat down and began amusing themselves,
as so many grown-up people do, with teasing the
little girl. But Gladys, with a child’s instinct,
felt herself to be the butt of some of her mother’s
guests, and retorted with a quick suspicious bitter-
ness, which was sad, because so unchildlike.

“Well, Gladys, and what have you been doing
to-day—eh?” inquired one.

“Working,” returned Gladys, polite but laconic.

“Working! Insuch weather, not really! And
(536)
HER MOTHER. 17

what were you working at—ploughing or mowing
or digging ?”

“T was making a coat fora monkey. I think
it would suit you.”

There was a hearty laugh at this; but Lady
Whrenly reproved Gladys for rudeness. The
little girl continued her meal perfectly unmoved
by censure or applause.

Another young gentleman attempted a jocular
vein. “Well, Miss Gladys, where have you been
in hiding from all your admirers to-day? and
where is that wild pony I saw you riding last?”

“JT am thinking of changing it for a donkey,”
said Gladys, “home bred;” and it was impossible
to tell from her manner whether she spoke in
innocence or malice. There was another laugh,
and in the confusion occasioned by her father’s
entrance with some guests, Gladys, having finished
her tea, quietly escaped.

This one hour in the afternoon was the only
time her mother ever required her to put in an
appearance, and often the only occasion on which
Gladys saw her mother for days or weeks.

It had never been an hour of any pleasure or
happiness to Gladys; but she had characteristically
come to look upon it as a matter of business, and
gf course it was always a consoling reflection tq

(536) _&
18 GLADYS.

remember the tea and cake. At any other time
of the day she did her utmost to escape meeting
either her mother or such friends as happened to
be staying in the house, knowing well that the
sight of her gave as little pleasure to them as
they gave.to her.

She had long known her mother’s indifference,
and half words coldly and carelessly dropped in
her presence left her with a pretty correct esti-
mate of what her mother considered her.

“A plain creature, poor thing, with such red
cheeks and hands, and so odd.”

There was under all this a strength and sweet-
ness in Gladys which kept these bitter things
from rankling; and which made her, while she re-
venged herself, bear no malice.

And then, as she said to herself, she had Baby.
Was that not enough for anyone!

Later that evening Florence sat in her friend’s
dressing-room, idling away a few minutes before
dressing for dinner.

“JT think you are quite wrong, Gladys,” she
was saying. “She is a very clever child, and I
am almost certain she will grow very hand-
some yet. Why, what numbers of red-faced chil-
dren you see. And then she has beautiful eyes.”

“Well, dear, you may be right, but you saw
HER BROTHER. 19

yourself how odd and sharp she is; not childlike
at all.”

“Oh, that will be wit when she grows up if she
is good-looking.” ;

“Well, Iam glad it is a long way off yet, and
in the meantime she really is not much in my
way.”

“ And she seems to be a good child.”

“JT don’t know. I hear her fighting with her
maids sometimes. There, do have done about
her, Florrie. What will you wear to-night? Sir
Archie is here, remember.”

In the meantime Gladys had gone in search of
her brother.



CHAPTER [II
HER BROTHER.

HE went swiftly back to the region of carpet-
less floors and old furniture, the only part of
the house that was home to her, and there she
was not long in tossing off her finery, and doning
leather shoes and linen frock. The nursery was
delightfully cool now, and the nurse preparing
tea looked cheerful and good-humoured. “ Where
is Baby, Nurse?” Gladys inquired
20 "GLADYS.

“Indeed I don’t know, Miss Gladys; and here
is his tea almost ready. I wish you would go and
look round for him, my dear.”

Gladys seized her sun-bonnet and ran off, down
a little flight of stairs and out by a side door,
across a lawn and away through shrubbery paths,
calling loudly as she went, but receiving no an-
swer.. After the confinement all day the evening
breeze was. delicious, and the evening sunlight
fair and lovely to the girl’s eyes; for Gladys was
gypsy-like, and always happiest under the open
sky.

“Baby! Baby! Baby!” her voice sounded
through the grounds, as she emerged from the
shrubbery and ascended a smooth grassy slope,
and cast her keen young eyes around.

There was the house back there, and she could
see the lawn in front of the drawing-room win-
dows, and one or two ladies and gentlemen who
had evidently come through the French windows
to enjoy the air. Could Baby be there? No he
was not. She ran down the other side, and turn-
ing off into a side avenue reached the stables. A
long fruitless search and inquiry left her hot and
breathless, and with but one more ‘unsearched
haunt—the gardens.

“Well, Nurse will be in a rage, but I can’t help
HER BROTHER. 21

it,’ she thought as she turned towards them.
“That stupid Minnie should not have jetty him;
his supper will be cold.”

The gardens were very still, but her first call
was answered by a yell of woe which sent her
flying in its direction, breathless and alarmed.
On the floor of a summer-house she found her
brother, roaring in such distress that for a time
it was difficult to make out what the matter was.
Gladys squatted down beside him, wrapping her
arms around his sobbing form.

“What is it? Baby, why you are crying?”

“T’ve lost it,” said the boy between his sobs,
which were redoubled at sight of a comforter.

“What, dear? What have you lost?”

“My pencil—my little blue one. I was draw-
ing lovely horses with it, an’ it dropped,” and then
he sobbed again.

Gladys looked around, and soon perceived that
the stone floor of the summer-house was adorned
with sundry blue scratches, faintly resembling
telegraph poles and wires, but which the happy
imagination of childhood had converted into noble
and prancing chargers; but she could see no signs
of the instrument of art by which they had been
executed.

“Look here, Baby,” she then said, “ Nurse sent
22 GLADYS.

me out to look for you. Your supper was ready,
and it must be cold now. Won't you come?”

“No. I want my pretty blue pencil.”

“But Ive made the coat for your monkey so
pretty. Won't you come and see it?”

“No. I want to draw more horses.”

“But, Baby, Nurse will be angry. See, if you
come I will give you my little white knife.
Don’t cry any more. Do come.”

“Oh, but I want it ever so.”

“Very well, if you will come now I will come
back and look for it and find it for you.”

“Will you? and here for the first time he
ceased his sobs altogether, tossed back his long
golden curls, and raised a tear-stained. but most
lovely face, with hope once more lighting two
liquid eyes. “ Well, will you carry me on your
back?”

. “Yes. Get up on the seat.”

Then the mourner rose to his feet, and proved
to be almost as tall as his sister but much slighter;
none the less far too heavy a burden for the
little girl.

She did not seem to think so. Getting him on
her back, she carried him with surprising ease
over the lawns and through the shrubbery paths
until they reached the nursery wing, then she
HER BROTHER. 23

put him down on his feet, and they went in at
the little door together.

The nurse and Gladys relieved themselves by
scolding the maid who should have had charge
of the boy during the afternoon; and the baby,
in delighted contemplation of his knife and the
coat for the monkey, forgot his troubles. His
“Dear Sissy!” repeated delightedly two or three
times were sufficient reward to Gladys for her
long day of toil, and much amusement was created
when they got poor “ Puck” and fitted on his new
coat.

“Won’t you take it down to let Mama see it?”
the sister asked. But Baby declared no; he didn’t
like the people to stare, and the ladies to say
lovely boy and touch his hair.

“Td rather have you, Sissy, than all of them.”

“ Not than Mama!” said Gladys horrified. “Qh!
you mustn’t say that, Baby.”

“But I do like you best,” the boy maintained.
“You do everything for me, and Mama has always
those nasty ladies with her.”

Gladys felt this to be treason on Baby’s part
when the ladies made so much of him, but she
did not know very well what to say in their de-
fence. “I am going to look for your pencil,
Baby,” she therefore changed the subject by say-
94 GLADYS.

ing. “You'll be in bed before I come back, but I'll

come in time to tell you the story before you go

to sleep.” And as the nurse led the little boy off
' Gladys left the house once more.

It was after nine o'clock now; a dewy misty
night, but beautiful and still, She had little hopes
of finding the pencil, but meant to do her best. As
she went thoughtfully along the shrubbery paths
her nose sniffed cigar smoke, and warned her to get
out of the way. Some of the gentlemen having
an after-dinner stroll, It was no unusual thing
for her to cross them thus in the evening, though
it was always her care not to be seen. She now
withdrew into the thick shrubbery, and so re-
mained easily concealed, while the voices and
steps drew near and passed, and she heard one
voice say: “I only heard it to-day, but I believe
it is a fact. Whrenly didn’t like to tell Lady
Whrenly before.”

“A governorship, did you say?”

“Yes, I believe so. In the East Indies some-
where. Croom, I think.”

“Will Lady Whrenly go with him?”

“T believe so, but not the children. I have
heard it’s a very unhealthy place.”

Then the voices and steps died away, and Gladys
came out on the path with a stunned and guilty
HER BROTHER. 25

feeling. What was this she had heard! Her
father got a governorship in the Hast Indies!
And her mother and father going away and she
and Baby left behind! It could not be, it seemed
such a strange, unreal thing.

.No one could put two and two together so well
as Gladys, and as she thought she did remember
scraps of conversation about its being the thing
her father would like,” and “difficulties,” and her
mother “not liking the idea.” Now these hints
were taking shape and form in this terrible
way.

She reached the summer-house, and sought in
summer light for the bit of treasured pencil, and
more fortunate than she had hoped, found it sunk
between two uneven stones. She put it in her
pocket and went back towards the house. On
some sudden impulse she went to the front before
the drawing-room windows. The room was a
blaze of light; her mother, beautifully dressed,
with other gay ladies, sat and lounged round,
talking, flirting, and fanning themselves.

“She certainly does not know,” the child
thought, “or she would not look so. She would
not be sorry to leave me, but oh, poor Mama, what
would she do without Baby!”

Then she went quickly back. to her own
26 GLADYS.

quarters. “Master Bernardin has been watching
for you,” said the nurse.

Gladys went into the little boy’s room, and
sitting on the edge of his bed held his hand.

“Who was I telling you about, Baby?”

“ David, what watched the sheep and killed the
giant.”

“ Ah, yes; very well,” and in her own childlike
words she told him those wonderful Bible stories,
which ever afterwards were to have for the boy
the mysterious and magic charm of early and
beloved associations.

Oh! long, long afterwards he must remember
the loving dark eyes that watched him, the hand
that held his through childish fears, and all the
untiring care and work.

He was quite right when he said he loved her
best; it was the child after all mpe was doing
the mother’s work.
THE WISHING-TREE, 27

CHAPTER IV,

“The Wishing-tree.
If fairy tales were true
And fortune were my hap.”
UT even while she was telling of David, and
holding her brother’s hand, Gladys’ mind
was dwelling upon the words she had overheard.
And when at last the thick dark lashes lay at
rest on the soft cheeks, and the boy’s gentle
breathing and meekly folded hands told of child-
hood’s blessed rest, the little girl left his bed-side,
and passing into the empty nursery now flooded
with moonlight, went over to the window, threw
it open, and kneeling down before it rested her
elbows on the sill, and looked out at the still
night-land she so dearly loved.

The words had lost their reality for her now,
and seemed like a dream; she could not imagine
their life different from what it had been as far
as she could remember. London in the season,
and sometimes Brighton for autumn and winter,
were the only changes she had ever known.
Once a dread thought came to her, and made her
start to her feet with a cry. “What if Mama
should take Baby and leave me! Oh! surely,
surely she never, never would.” Though she
28 GLADYS,

did not guess it, her rosy cheeks were pale
enough now. It seemed to her if that happened
she could not live. She thought it all over again,
trying to remember all the words she had heard,
which were already fading from her memory.

She must have remained at her window for a
long time, for by and by she heard a clock strike
ten, and rose to her feet. “Nurse will be coming
up from her supper in a minute, and will rage,”
she thought.

Raging was the habitual attitude of the ser-
vants towards her, though in reality they had no
authority over her; and she was well aware that
she ruled. One reason was that the servants
knew how useless it was to make any appeal to
Sir Ralph or Lady Whrenly. “If they cannot
keep the children in order without annoying me
they must go,” was Lady Whrenly’s command.
And, secondly, the maids had learned to dread the
days in which “ Miss Gladys took it into her
head to be wicked.”

So poor Gladys, in spite of her servants, was but
little looked after and got small attention.

Now she went to bed with no loving good-
nights and kisses from dear voices and faces, to
be with her in her dreams.

And certainly she said no prayers.
THE WISHING-TRER. 29

Next morning the words seemed more dream-
like than ever. She slept rather late, and when
she wakened found the sunlight streaming be-
tween chinks of the blinds, and heard the sound
of Baby’s voice from the nursery, where he was
engaged in earnest conversation, not to say alter-
cation, with Nurse.

“T won't go with Minnie—so there! She’s
horrid. I ran away from her yesterday when she
was talking to Robert in the yard, and I met a
lady—no, two ones, and she said, ‘Hadn’t I not no
maid.,’”

“Naughty, naughty boy,” came the nurse’s
voice; “you must stay with Minnie to-day. Now
go on and finish your breakfast.”

“T sha’n’t go with Minnie, I tell you. I’m going
with sister. Dll ask her to take me to the Wish-
ing-tree. Iknowshe will. And I’ve got a beauti-
ful wish to wish. No, I don’t want an egg; take
it away, it’s horrid. Give me some honey, please.”

“You cannot go to the Wishing-tree to-day;
one of the ladies has asked to have Miss Gladys
with her. So you must be a good boy, and stay
with Minnie.”

“No I won't,” in most decided tones, and with
the banging of a spoon on a plate for emphasis.
“« And I'll ask sister nat to go with the lady, but
30 _ GLADYS,

to take me; and I know she will. Is sister still in
bed, Nurse? Wonder why she’s not up. Shall I
go and see?”

At this Gladys sprang out of bed, and coming
to the door declared she did not think it was so
late, and she would be in a minute, and then dis-
appeared. And sounds of splashing, and a violent
racket among the furniture, informed all whom
it might concern that she was engaged on her
ablutions; and by and by she appeared, fresh and
rosy, with well-brushed hair and bright eyes, a
by no means unpleasant picture, in spite of Lady
Whrenly’s cold and unmotherly opinion.

She was very eager to hear this bit of wonder-
ful news about being invited to go with one of
the ladies. It was so very unheard of a thing;
never had it happened before. Who could have
been so very unwary?

She made immediate inquiries of the nurse,

while Baby, having despatched an excellent break-
fast (his mother thought he was delicate and had
no appetite), listened also, only beginning and
ending with, “ But Sister isn’t going, I know. She
is going to take me to the Wishing-tree. Won't
you, Sister?”

Now, it must be confessed Gladys was some-
what tempted. It appeared Miss Florence had
THE WISHING-TREE. 31

taken a fancy to the little girl, and had asked
leave to have her company for the next day in a
riding expedition to some famous ruins. Gladys
rode well, and knew every place round, her mother
said.

It was so charming to poor Gladys to find any-
one wanted her company, and she was delighted
with the idea of acting cicerone, and she loved
riding; altogether it was very tempting. But
Baby’s great entreating eyes were on her. “You
won't go, Sister, to leave me?” Her hands were
playing lovingly with his yellow ringlets. “Do
you want to go very much to-day, Baby?”

“Oh yes, Sister. I must wish my wish to-day.”

“When was I wanted, Nurse?”

“Twelve sharp, Miss Gladys. You were to
take lunch with Lady Crony when you had seen
the ruings.”

Still more tempting. Gladys regarded her
brother wistfully; he no less pleadingly watched
her.

“No time for both,” she said. “Oh, Baby—”
there was a little pause, her brows were gathered,
then her face cleared. “Very well, dear, we will go
to the Wishing-tree.”

“Miss Gladys!” said the nurse horrified. “What
message am I to send to her ladyship?”
32 GLADYS.

“None; I will send a message myself. And you
can send Minnie to the farm about the dairy
things, for I will look after Mr. Bernardin to-day.”

Baby gave a jubilant whoop and careered
round. “Oh, you good Sister, I do love you!” he
exclaimed. “ You’re better than anyone else. We
will go to the dear Wishing-tree. I am so glad.”

Gladys steadily finished her bread and honey.
Her face was rather sulky, and she made no
answer to Baby’s many joyous questions; but we
must remember she was swallowing a great deal
more than honey with her bread.

As soon as her breakfast was finished she went
determinedly out by the baize door, into the
region of fairy-land, and down the soft wide
stairs. In the hall she met a servant.

“Miss Gladys, what are you doing here?”

-exclaimed the maid, quite amazed at so unusual
a sight.

“Mind your own business,” retorted Gladys
crossly, “and tell me where are Lady Whrenly
and the other ladies.”

“Not down yet, of course, you naughty girl;
and you better run back to your nurseries—bless
the child!” The last exclamation was given ina
tone of alarm as Gladys suddenly darted through
the hall and out at an open glass door,
THE WISHING-TREE. 33

Through it the child had seen her mother’s
friend walking on the lawn, with her little Prince’
Charlie gambolling round her feet. Gladys went
up to her with a quiet self-possession which had
nothing of forwardness in it.

“Good-morning, Miss Dighton,” she said. “I
came to thank you for asking me to ride with
you to-day. I should have liked it very much—
wmmensely,” she added with amusing emphasis.

“Then I hope we will enjoy our ride,” said
Florence, smiling at the little girl’s earnest face.
“Ts your Mama down yet?”

“Oh, I don’t know. How should I? I never
come down here except I have some special mes-
sage. I think Jane said breakfast was at ten, or
was supposed to be. What I wanted to say was,
I am so sorry I could not go with you.”

“ You cannot come?” said Florence, half amused,
half annoyed.

“T should have liked it very much,” repeated
Gladys, “but Baby wants me to take him to the
Wishing-tree.”

“Oh! and could Baby not go with the maid?”

“ He doesn’t like her; neither do JI. She is leav-
ing.”

“And you would rather go to the Wishing-

tree?”
(536) c
34 GLADYS.

Gladys stopped puzzled, she was not accus-
tomed to analyse her actions. “I think I would
rather have ridden,” she said slowly; “but you
see—Baby—”

Florence watched her truthful expressive face
for a moment, then she said kindly:

“Very well, Gladys; then we will ride another
day. Do you think you could come to-morrow?”

“Oh yes, I’m sure I could!” exclaimed the little
girl joyously. “ Youare very kind. You see, if I
have time to make other arrangements for Baby
he will be quite good. Perhaps Mama would have
him to-morrow.”

“T will try and manage it,” said Florence good-
naturedly. Gladys beamed. “Now, it is not ten
yet, so perhaps we might have a run round to the
garden for flowers.”

“Oh, I should like it,” said Gladys; then she
suddenlystopped. “No I can’t; there’s that hateful
Mr. Philips—yes, and Sir Archibald. I’m off”
And she vanished with inconceivable rapidity,
leaving Florence to face the two gentlemen alone,
and somewhat discomfitted at the sudden depar-
ture of her little companion.

Gladys was soon back in the nursery.

“Now, Baby,” she said, “we must get every-
thing ready, and our lunch packed, Get on your
THE WISHING-TREE, 35

thick shoes, and I'll go downstairs and hunt up
something good to eat. Will you take Puck?”

“No; but ring for Minnie, please, Sister, to come
and put on my shoes.”

In about an hour the two were ready to set out,
Nurse having proved unusually amiable as to
provisions, feeling, in truth, a weight off her mind —
with regard to the spoilt heir, who would, she
knew, be all right and good so long as he was
with his sister. Gladys was only two years older
than her brother, but she was many years older
in experience, the boy being childish; so that
while the little girl was allowed to go and come
at will the boy never went unattended, though
Gladys most frequently proved to be the atten-
dant, and that was considered perfectly safe and
right.

So they went into the sunlight hand in hand,
gloriously happy and untroubled, Gladys with
the basket and Baby bearing a stick; and those
vague, unpleasant words had quite vanished from
the little girl’s mind.

The Wishing-tree was a good two miles dis-
tant; quite a day’s expedition there and back to
the two little people. It stood on a rocky knoll
in the very heart of a great corn-field, belonging
to one of the farms. A splendid tree for climbing;
36 GLADYS.

and wonderful were the stories told about it, and
its power to grant wishes. It was said that when
you crouched in the great hollow of the old trunk,
and wished your wish, the tree-fairies floated
with it up to the topmost twigs among the broad
cool leaves; and when the evening came the air-
fairies came along on the evening breeze, and bore
the wish away to the great fairy who grants all
wishes. Often the children had looked and
peered about for a sight of the wonderful elves,
but always fruitlessly; for you must know that
the fairies only show themselves to those who
have ceased to have any wishes.

The children had the shade of their own
wooded grounds for a good part of the way, then
the dusty road and the burning sun, and then the
cool shady lanes and by-ways, and here they are
at the great field in the midst of which stands
the Wishing-tree.

A narrow pathway between two walls of golden.
corn leads to it, and down this alley the two
children go, glad that their journey is so nearly
ended. Great red poppies and corn-flowers stand
out and nod to them, and tall dog-daisies tempt
them to venture a step or two into the thinner
corn, Baby longs to stop, but Gladys pulls
him on and up the little steep rock unto the
THE WISHING-TREE, 37

grassy knoll, and into the shadow of the Wishing-
tree.

Both plump themselves down with great sighs
of relief, and Gladys pulled off her sun-bonnet
and Baby’shatexclaiming, “Oh, isn’t this delicious!
Now we'll have our dinner.”

Both were ready for it after their long walk,
and until they had conscientiously emptied the
basket neither alluded to their wishes. Then
Gladys said, “ Will you go inside and wish, Baby?”
and she rose to her feet and took a survey of the
yellow sea around her, motionless in the burning
noon sun.

“Yes, won't you, Sister?”

“No, I’m going to climb up into the branches
and wish from there.”

“Oh!—and have you got a good wish, Sister?”

“JT think so—I don’t know,” Gladys looked a
little uncomfortable here. “Have you?”

“Oh yes, a beauty. I’ve been thinking of it all
night and day. Do you think I'll get it?”

“T don’t know. You mustn’t tell it to anyone,
or you won't. Now, you wish first.”

The little boy rose, a most solemn and impor-
tant expression on his beautiful little face, then
he disappeared into the hollow of the tree, shut
his eyes tight, and wished in tones so audible
38 GLADYS.

that they easily reached Gladys’ ear, and alarmed
her with a sense of eaves-dropping and guilt.

“Oh fairies, I want a little puppy dog like
Miss Dighton’s, ever so, ever so.” |

Then he reappeared with the air of having
relieved his mind of a great burden.

Gladys made no remark, and was soon up
among the branches wishing in her turn. Poor
little Gladys, was her wish much wiser?

“ Oh fairies, I want beautiful white cheeks and
hands like Mama’s and Baby’s.”

Well, she got her wish long afterwards.

They played for an hour under the Wishing-
tree as children play; changing the knoll into a
besieged camp, a lion’s den, a nest of safety in a
wilderness of danger, an oasis of rest in a great
land of trouble, and then, when all their games
were played, in the first cool of the afternoon,
and the lengthening of their shadows, they went
home.

Nurse was in the nursery with Baby’s supper
ready, and the usual warning for Gladys. “ Hurry,
my dear. Jam glad you have had a nice day, but
hurry and dress; her ladyship’s bell will wring
directly. Come now, Master Bernardin, and take
your supper.”

In a short time Gladys came out of her room,
THE WISHING-TREE. 39

dressed in white again, and looking very graceful
in her lace and pretty shoes.

“Oh, Nurse, Iam so tired. I wish I might take
my tea with Baby. My arms ached with that
basket. I hope there won’t be many horrid ©
people there to plague.”

The ringing of the bell at that moment sent
her off in a hurry, and settled the question.

In the drawing-room she found only Miss
Dighton, and she could not help thinking the
lively young lady looked rather grave. She made
no inquiry after her mother, as her absence was
nothing unusual; but took her tea and answered
Florence’s questions as to her day, and then
inquired if they would ride to-morrow.

“IT do not know,” Miss Dighton answered.
“Your mother is not very well, Gladys, and she
wants you to go to her as soon as you have
finished your tea.”

Gladys felt greatly surprised but did not show
it, and some guests entering -just then she was
left alone, and finished her tea in silence. “Where
is Mama?” she then asked of Miss Dighton, and
being told went quietly away to her mother’s
dressing-room. ‘

As she approached it the sound of voices made
her hesitate. “If it’s Papa I won’t go in, but if
40 GLADYS.

it’s only Jervis I will,” she thought, and ap-
proached close and listened for a second to
ascertain. She heard her mother’s voice sobbing
piteously.

CHAPTER V.
THE TROUBLE, .

REATLY appalled Gladys drew back, con-
templating a sudden bolt, but before she
had time to execute her purpose the door was
thrown violently open, and her father almost
tumbled over her. He straightened himself, and
cast upon her that look of ludicrous indignation
with which a man will regard even an article of
furniture which has almost caused his downfall.
The child meanwhile looked at him coldly but
fearlessly. There was no affection between them,
and Gladys took more pains to avoid him than
anyone else. On his side the haughty gentleman
had no affection to spare for the little plain girl
he scarcely ever saw; all his affection was given
to his wife, of whose beauty he was extremely
proud, and he had also a certain pride in his son
—as a noble heir, nothing more.
“Go to your mother, child,” he said hastily,
THE TROUBLE. 41

“she wants you;” and then did what Gladys
wanted to do—bolted, with every appearance of
relief. Then the little girl turned and entered
the room. Here the sight which met her eyes
was so unusual and so terrible that for a few
seconds her presence of mind forsook her, and she
stood bewildered and staring with the door in
her hand. Her mother, her languid, haughty,
cold mother, lay face downward on the couch, in
an attitude which to Gladys’ practised eyes be-
spoke what she would have called a “tearing
passion ” in anyone but her mother. The face was
hidden in the little white hands, the hair was
lying in beautiful but disorderly profusion over
the pillows, one little shoe was lying in the
middle of the floor (it really looked as though
she had tried to kick someone, and had only
succeeded in knocking off her little shoe). The
whole attitude was quite familiar to Gladys.
Why! was it not Baby’s favourite attitude when
Nurse, Minnie, or some other offender had gone
against his lordly will!

But Baby’s sobs never had such a ring in them
as these. They smote poor Gladys to her tender
heart. She had never seen her mother cry, never

“seen her even deeply agitated that she could
remember, not even when the little fair two-year-
42 GLADYS.

old sister, so like Baby, with such sunny clusters
round her white brows, lay so quietly asleep in
her little coffin; even then Gladys remembered
her mother had been quite calm though very
white. But she was not calm now. She sobbed
and moaned and muttered, angry as well as
sorrowful it would seem; for presently she raised
a tear-stained face, and seeing Gladys said, “Oh,
it’s you. . Are you going to leave that door open,
may I ask?” in such very sharp tones that Gladys
closed the door with more than usual alacrity,
and then went over to the couch.

“Did you want me, Mama? Are you troubled
about anything?” she asked.

“Yes, I want you, sit down. I am very much
troubled; your father has treated me shamefully.”
Of course poor Gladys could only stare at this.
Which she did. Her mother after the statement
took refuge in her pillows for a few seconds, then
resumed: “Treating me like a child; every one in
my own drawing-room knowing before me. A
wretched, unhealthy, barely civilized place,—oh,
dear! oh, dear!” She turned once more to her
pillows for comfort. Gladys had a strange pang.
She began to feel what might be coming, a vague
memory of the words she had heard the night
before came back to her; she clasped her hands
THE TROUBLE. 43

tight and sat up straight. “But, Mama, what is
it?” she said.

' “What is it! I have been treated shamefully,
shamefully; and then when everything was
arranged to the very date of our departure, to
come and tell me, and that I must leave him
behind. It was shameful! shameful!” There was
_ room for nothing but her own personal trouble
in Lady Whrenly’s heart. Gladys felt this in-
stinctively. To ask questions was useless, she
must pick up the news as she could.

“ Are we going away, Mama?”

“ As though it were not bad enough to have to
leave England, and go to that wretched unhealthy
place, but I must leave my boy,’—Gladys’ heart
gave a great bound,—* my beautiful boy, the only
thing I care for or love—oh, dear! oh, dear!” Once
more she buried her face, moaning and sobbing, ~
while her little daughter watched her, puzzling
out what she had heard, and feeling guilty that
her mother’s sorrow should give her so much joy.
“T can’t help it,” she thought. “I could not live
without him, and Mother can. I am sorry for
her.” ;

“No society, no comfort,—all for his wretched
extravagance and getting into debt. And not to
take Baby with me—oh!”
44 GLADYS.

“Where are you going, Mama?”

“To the East Indies. A wretched place, a dread-
ful place—Coom or Croom, I don’t know and I
don’t care which.”

“What is Papa going there for?”

“He has gota governorship. He doesn’t care.”

“What are Baby and I to do, Mama?”

“How doI know? Don’t worry so with ques-
tions,” returned her mother with the petulance
which had been charming in the lovely heiress
and only child, but which the world had long
since ceased to see anything of in the cold and
stately Lady Whrenly. “Do you think I have no-
thing to do but think of you and where you are
to stay? How selfish people are.” Down went
the head again.

Gladys was silenced; and for a long time her
mother did not speak. By and by the sobs grew
fainter and fewer, then stopped altogether. The
little girl sat patiently still, only amusing herself
by glancing round the room, which, though her
mother’s, was an unknown land to her.

At last Lady Whrenly rose, and going to the
toilette-table gathered her hair, made use of
various small, sweet-scented bottles, put on her
cast-off shoes, and then came and sat down once
more.
THE TROUBLE. AB

“The reason I sent for you, Gladys,” she said,
still with some lingering fretfulness in her tone,
“is because, when I leave, you will be the only
one to look after my darling boy.”

From the mother’s tone one would have
thought Gladys was twenty; from the child’s
face one would have thought she was fifty.

“ This house is to be let. Your father—who has
treated me shamefully—thinks it will be better
looked after in every way, let, than with a care-
taker. I intend to leave here at once; at the end
of the week, in fact, if I can get rid of all these
people. We sail for the East Indies in September,
and I will be engaged up to the last moment—
making visits.” She spoke as though making
visits was a business of the last importance to
mankind. Gladys could not feel deeply interested,
and was longing for permission to get away for
a last game with her brother, when her mother’s
next words brought her into a bolt upright posi-
tion, terror and entreaty in her dark eyes. “I
shall take Baby with me; I will not part from
him till the last moment, my darling boy. Your
father thinks you had better go at once to Edin-
burgh to your aunt, Miss M‘Arthur; Baby will go
to you after we have sailed—”

“Oh! Mama—
46 GLADYS,

“Hush! don’t interrupt me. You constantly in-
terrupt me, and it is very rude. I want you to
promise me to take the greatest care of your
brother; he will have no one but you, poor dar-
ling. I believe you are very fond of him, and good
to him, and that issome comfort tome. Stay with
him constantly, allow no one to grieve him; I
trust to you to stand between him and all trouble.
Above all things do not let him forget. me—”

“Oh, yes; Mama, yes; but— “began the child
with trembling eagerness.

“Did I not ask you not to interrupt me?” in-
quired her mother with some asperity. “You have
no feeling, or you would not interrupt me when
my heart is so sorely troubled about the future
of my darling boy. Oh, my darling, how can I
leave you!” Poor Gladys clasped her hands
tight, and struggled to choke back the terrible
lump in her throat, and the great blinding tears
which this second rebuff and the terror in her
heart brought. Lady Whrenly was, of course, too
much engaged with her own thoughts to notice.
“Do not on any account let him forget me. Talk
to him of me, tell him how I love him, show him
my photograph, and when he is old enough—we
may be away some years, I hope they will be few
—teach him to write to me. You will do this,
THE TROUBLE. 47

Gladys?” The mother seemed quite to forget that
she was talking to a mere child, but a few years
older than the boy, to whose childish memory a
year would be a long time, and who could hardly
be expected to remember much, or talk much, of
the mother she so seldom saw. Happily for her-
self these thoughts did not trouble Lady Whrenly,
and of course Gladys felt herself quite capable.

“Mama,” she said, “I will do all you say if only
you will not separate Baby and me. Oh, Mama,
don’t, please don’t! It would break my heart. Oh
think how dreadful for me to have to go to Edin-
burgh all alone—” The desolate prospect was
too dreadful, and the tears which she had bravely
struggled to master flowed down her cheeks.

Her mother could not remain altogether un-
touched. “I don’t see how I could take you both.
Your father certainly thought that would be best,”
she said feebly and fretfully. “Don’t cry, child.
What is it you want?”

“Don’t send me away alone,” cried the child.
Take me with you, Mama. I have never been
away from Baby a day—oh!”

“Oh, dear!” cried the mother petulantly. “I
don’t know what I’m to do, I’m sure. Your father
certainly thought that would be best. I don’t see
how I ean take two children with me,” and she
48 GLADYS.

looked with peevish and uncomplimentary doubt-
fulness at her little daughter.

As though her good fairies were determined to
do their best for her, Gladys at that moment
raised two dark tear-filled eyes and a pale deso-
late little face to her mother’s, “Oh, Mama, don’t,
please don’t, send me away from Baby!” she
pleaded.

“T believe after all Florence was right,” her
mother reflected. “If she had not such a high
colour she would be beautiful.”

“Mama, I would be no trouble,” the child con-
tinued. “You don’t know all I could do. You
would not need to bring a second maid, I could
always have Baby ready when you wanted him.
I nearly always dress him; and I know always
what suits him best, I do indeed. I can make
him prettier than anyone, I can indeed, Mama;
and besides,” she added naively, “I could coax
him always to go.”

Her mother looked at her for a moment, un-
decided and yet touched by the womanly earnest-
ness, and the loving, pleading eyes. “What an
extraordinary child,” she thought. “I wonder how
old she is; I quite forget.” Then aloud she said,
“Very well, I will speak to your father about it.
He certainly said he thought the other plan best.
THE TROUBLE. 49

_ However—gracious!—oh child, don’t be so impet-
uous.” For Gladys had sprung upon her with a
sudden bound, and got her arms round her neck
willy nilly, and was hugging and kissing her.
“Oh thank you, Mama! I know it’s all right now.”
Innocently attesting her certain and utter dis-
belief in that convenient appeal to “your father.”
“TI will be so good, I will never let Baby forget
you, I'll tell him forever how lovely you were,
and how every one said so, and I'll read him all
your letters at his prayers. Oh,” eried this odd,
precocious creature, “what a weight you have
taken off my heart!”

Immensely to her own surprise Lady Whrenly
kissed her little daughter before she dismissed
her, light hearted now, to tell Baby the strange
. news. “She is affectionate,” the mother thought .
by way of excuse, “and honest, and she will take
care of my boy; and perhaps it is best to take
her with me. How strange if Florence should
turn out to be right about her looks after all!”

(536) D
50 GLADYS.

CHAPTER VI.
THE RIDE.

AISSY, Sissy, hurry! Miss Dighton’s in the hall
an’ the horses is at the door. Miss Dighton’s
all ready an’ talkin’ to Sir Archibald. Hurry,
Sissy!” Thus gasped Baby as he dashed into his
sister’s room, where she stood, her body twisted
and bent, her cheeks flaming, and the veins swol-
len in her little hands, struggling to fasten the
hooks at the side of her habit.

Anyone else who had interrupted her at this
critical and trying moment would have received
a rather unceremonious answer, but her control
must be very far gone beforeshe spoke impatiently
to Baby. She only straightened herself with a sigh
and said, “I can’t help it, Baby. Oh, dear, I am
hot. Why do they put the hooks at the side. See,
Baby, you run for that stupid goose Minnie. Tell
her to come here at once; I’ve rung for her three
times. She’s gossiping most likely with one of the
men. Run and bring her here, dear; I can’t get
this hooked,” and gathering up the long skirt she
sank exhausted into a chair, while the little boy
bustled off in a great state of excitement and
righteous indignation.
. THE RIDE. 51

Gladys having had time to “prepare” the little
boy, he was quite willing she should go with
Miss Dighton; especially as she had left him vari-
ous consolations in the form of coveted treasures
of hers. So he had busied himself since breakfast
by worrying all the men in the yard about getting
the horses ready, and had finally ridden round to
the hall-door in triumph on Gladys’ pony, and
thence flown up to tell her all was ready. -

In a few moments Gladys heard the shrill
sweet voice scolding in most commanding tones,
and then the little boy entered, followed by the
good-humoured but lazy maid, who soon put the
refractory hooks into the eyes, gave the little
girl’s hair a final brush, set on the little cap, and
Gladys, with her gloves and whip in her hands,
hastened down to the hall, Baby attendant, help-
ing her with her skirts in a masterly fashion,
which came near to land her on her nose more
than once.

Miss Dighton, looking very handsome in her
dark habit, was sauntering round and round the
gravel with Sir Archibald, and did not seem to
have found Gladys unpunctual, though the groom
who was to ride with them had been more than
five minutes waiting with the horses:

Florence greeted the little girl kindly. Sir
52 GLADYS.

Archie mounted both ladies, and then good-
naturedly placing Baby on his shoulder raced to
a little knoll, from whence they could see them to
the avenue gates, and so waved them a last adieu.

Gladys was too much of a little lady to have
consciously asked her new friend any question
likely to embarass her, but though clever and
precocious beyond her years, she was after all
only a child, and it did not strike her to connect
Sir Archibald in any way with the additional
lovely colour in Miss Dighton’s cheeks. Looking
back, therefore,and waving her whip to the exalted
Baby, she remarked: “Oh Miss Dighton, look
back; Sir Archie has Babe on his shoulder and
they're waving good-bye from the mound I
didn’t think he was such a nice man; but he must
be when he’s so good to Baby. There, they have
gone and you never looked. Don’t you think he
must be, Miss Dighton?”

“ Must be what, dear?”

«A nice man—Sir Archie, I mean?”

“Yes, dear, I think he must.” The answer was
given rather hastily. “Now, Gladys, you must be
guide. How pleasant itis. We will have the shade
of the trees, for it is so hot.”

It was indeed one of July’s loveliest days, and
Gladys, who was extremely fond of riding, was
THE RIDE. 53

in the highest spirits, and chattered freely, a rare
thing for her with a stranger. Florence, at first
rather abstracted and dreamy, soon listened
amused to the strangely wise remarks, and odd
little bits of sense which were interspersed through
all the talk.

The news of Sir Ralph and Lady Whrenly’s ~
departure was of course public now, and Gladys
spoke of it, always alluding in the most handsome
terms to her mother. It was amusing and at the
same time touching to Florence, to see how the
little girl’s whole heart was full of gratitude for
the kindness which had,as she expressed it, “taken
such a weight off her heart.”

«Won't you be very sorry to leave your home?” -
the young lady asked.

“Oh yes,” returned Gladys, “it will be terrible;
but you see it would have been so much worse if
they had sent me away to Scotland at once,
without Baby! But Mama has settled all that,”
loftily, “and that has taken all the dreadfulness
away from it, you know.” Her sunny gratitude
left no room for repining. “Baby and I are going
visiting with Mama; and I can look after him, you
know, and give Mama no bother. I really think
Mama is lovely, beautiful! and I don’t mean to
let Baby forget her; Ican tell you, I don’t. Iam
54 GLADYS.

going to get all the photos of her I can, and Pll
make Baby kiss them every night, just after his
prayers, and Ill tell him how pretty she is, and
oh! everything,” she ended comprehensively, and
gathering up the reins she had rather neglected.

“You are to be a little mother to Baby.”

Gladys face grew very grave. “Yes,” she said
thoughtfully, “I must, not forget Mama’s words.
She said I was to stand between him and all
trouble; and I want to have him beautiful and
- good for her when she comes back. Will it be
very hard, ] wonder. Sometimes I have a feeling
here, like a big sigh.” She smiled a little and
laid her hand on her heart. It was evident to
Florence she had accepted the responsibility in
no shallow childish spirit. She looked with grave
tender eyes at the little puzzled face, for Gladys ~
found it hard to express her thoughts.

“Who will take care of you?” the young lady
thought. “Who will guide and soothe you in all
childhood’s many little. troubles and woes. Not
that grumpy old Miss M‘Arthur, if I remember
her rightly. Brave little Gladys, I will do what I
can—I will tell you of the Master who helps little”
children.”

“There!” cried Gladys’ voice, jovoraly breaking
in upon these grave thoughts; “there are the ruins
THE RIDE. 5d

now, Miss Dighton. Let us have a canter on this
turf. We will have to leave the horses with Jay
at the old gate, and then I will tell you all about
the castle. Come.”

Gladys proved herself a very able and intelli-
gent guide. Florence wondered where the child
could have learned it all, knowing how seldom
any of her mother’s guests took any notice of her.
She had, however, little time for calm reflection;
for Gladys besides being intelligent was terribly
nimble, and made no allowance for Miss Dighton’s
maturer years, or the fact that a young lady
cannot bundle her skirts round her waist in the
same ungraceful but easy fashion as a little girl.

She struggled and panted as she tried to follow
her small guide’s active and bird-like movements,
and to retain the thread of the narrative which
Gladys continued to pour forth, without appa-
rently any want of breath from her exertions.

“Come along, Miss Dighton,” sounded the
cheerful voice from some far height, where Gladys
retained a most uncertain and coggly footing.
“Once you are up here you will be all right.
This way leads to the secret staircase, by which
the young lady, Leline, escaped with her baby.
Very few know the way, but I can show it you.
Come along.”
56 GLADYS.

“Qh, Gladys!” cried Florence in despair, “I
can’t get up to youthere. Are you sure you are
quite safe? I could never climb.”

“Safe? Oh, it’s perfectly safe,” returned the
voice. ‘“Can’t you climb? You won't get to the
staircase any other way; and once you're at the
top of em you havea lovely view. Of course,”
apologetically, “there are one or two stairs miss-
ing; but what can you expect in aruin? And
then you can make a good spring if you’re worth
anything,” in an argumentative tone. The in-
ducements, however, were not sufficiently strong
to encourage Florence to make the attempt; and
indeed she was rather anxious about the little
girl, and begged her tocome down. After a little
further parley Gladys obeyed, but somewhat re-
luctantly. “It would have been a triumph for
you, you know,” she said regretfully, as she stood
once more on the green grass beside her friend,
“because so few of them can manage the stair-
case; and Captain Vandeleur, who was staying
with us last summer, fell and broke his arm
once when he went up.”

This seemed to Miss Dighton anything but an
additional inducement. “Then, Gladys,” she said,
“do you not think it might be dangerous for
you? Does your mother know?”
THE RIDE. 57

“Mama! Oh no; I never gowiththem, you know.
It isn’t dangerous, not the least; Captain Vande-
leur was stupid. No one need fall who takes care.
Well, never mind the staircase; if you come I will
show you Sir Ralph’s tomb.” There was an utter
absence of any boasting tone over her superior
knowledge and courage about the little girl, so
different from the ordinary child, that Florence
was drawn to her more and more.

“ How did you come to know all this, Gladys?”
she asked when, the pleasant inspection over, they
rested for a short time on a shady bank before
remounting.

Gladys looked up with the deep soft expression
in her dark eyes, which so often spoke far more
than all her childish powers of expression. “Ah!”
she said, “it was Captain Harry.”

“ Captain Harry?”

“Yes. Perhaps you don’t know him. How differ-
ent he was from the others.” The contemptuous
tone was certainly not very complimentary to
“the others.” “He was here last summer. He
nearly always took me with him. It was he told
me all about every place round, and taught me
to climb. Ah! he was nice.” There was great
depth and heartiness here in spite of the words.
Florence watched her as she clasped her hands
58 GLADYS.

round her knees and continued: “He told me
he once had a little sister like me, and she died.
That was very sad. It was lovely to hear him
talk. He taught me to jump on horseback, and
a great lot of things. Mama said he was a fanatic
or a lunatic or something. He always carried about
a little Bible with him, and read it a great lot.
I thought he was braver and grander than any-
one. I want Baby to be like him. He has gone to
India. Tow sorry I was.”

“Did he read you out of his little book?”

“Yes, some. I loved to hear him read, but I
didn’t understand much. I was littler then, of
course. Why, I’m nearly nine now.”

“Yes, Gladys, you are nearly nine,’ Florence
said gravely, putting her arm round the little girl,
“and I want to speak to you of some things you
will understand now. Have you a little Bible,
dear?”

“No, not of myown. I’ve a little prayer-book
though, and there are lots of Bibles in the house.”

“Yes, dear; but I want you to have a little one
of your own as Captain Harry had, and I want
you to read out of it as he did. Do you know
what made your Captain Harry so brave and
grand?”

“ No—but he was.”
THE RIDE. 59

“It was because he loved and obeyed Jesus,
and took him for his first great-captain. He was
a soldier of the cross, and he found all his orders
in his little Bible.”

There was a little silence, Gladys was listening
very earnestly. “And you, dear,” Miss Dighton
then went on, ‘“‘you are going away—soon—from
your home into a new strange life, and you
have to take care of Baby and shield him from
troubles; but what will you do, Gladys, when the
troubles come to yourself? Even little girls must
have troubles, dear,—little worries, and crosses,
and trials of temper. How will you find out then
to do right and to know what is right? You must
do as your Captain Harry did. You must take
Jesus for your captain, and find out his orders
from your little Bible. And you must pray to
him, and ask him to help you in all things, and
give him all your troubles, and then your heart
will be light.”

“Pray to him! and give him all my troubles!”

“Yes, little one. You know he is always
near.”

“Always? Even here—in the sunlight—now?”

“Yes, dear.” Instinctively both looked around
at the calm and lovely scene. Through the foliage
they could see glimpses of meadow-land bathed
60 GLADYS.

in sunlight, and beside them the ruins of the old
castle spoke silently and sadly of the past.

“T like it,” said the child at last; “it seems
strange, but it is nicer than church.” Then she
looked solemnly at her new friend, “Is he your
captain, Miss Dighton?”

It was an innocent question; yet Florence
coloured, then looked gently at the little girl.
“Tt is always easier to teach than to learn, Gladys.
But yes, he is my captain; though I fear I am
not a very good soldier. But you will be one,
will you not?”

“T must think of it all,” said the child steadily.
“You see it is strange, not being in church.”

Florence smiled at the grave answer. “Yes,
dear,” she said, “think of it; and think also of
these words of his which he spoke to his
disciples when they were troubled: ‘Lo, I am
with youalway.” The earnest little face lighted
as at the sound of familiar music. “Oh, I remem-
ber, lremember! Captain Harry used to say Hooke
Yes, it is beautiful.”

“Never forget it, Gladys: he is with you al-
ways.”

It was time to go back to the horses; indeed
they had left themselves but short time to ride
to Lady Crony’s, where they were to have lunch.
SOLDIERS. 61

Gladys was thoughtful, and did not chatter
much on the way. She seemed to be pondering

with more than a child’s earnestness on what she
had heard.

——__

CHAPTER VIL
SOLDIERS.

OME hours later they were riding home at a
smart trot in the cool of the afternoon. “ We
will just get home in time for you to dress for
tea, Gladys,” Miss Dighton said; “and I have en-
joyed seeing the ruins very much, thanks to you.”
“Tam very glad. I wonder if Baby has missed
me much. But he is always so good when one
has time to prepare him. Mama has so many
P.P.C. calls to make I’m sure she would be en-
gaged all day. I hope she won’t be tired,” said
Gladys, her gratitude prompting her to most un-
wonted solicitude with regard to her mother, and
which sounded comical to Florence when con-
trasted with the little girl’s heretofore most
supreme indifference.
They were, however, a little late. As they rode
up the avenue they saw groups standing in and
out of the French windows, and a second later Sir
62 : GLADYS.

Archie hastened forward, followed closely by Baby ~
with Florence’s little dog clasped uncomfortably
tight in his arms, and as Sir Archie dismounted
Miss Dighton, Gladys slipped swiftly to the
ground and rushed to her brother.

“Oh, Sissy! I’m so glad you’re back. But me and
the little dog an’ Sir Archie has been having such
fun. It’s a dear little dog—isn’t it, Sir Archie?
and haven’t we had fun?”

There was a little fuss and talk while the horses
were led away, and then, much to Gladys’ surprise,
Lady Whrenly herself appeared at one of the
windows with a tiny cup and saucer in her hand.
“Come, Florie,’ she said, “and have some tea
first; I'm sure you're thirsty and tired. You had
better come also, Gladys.”

Poor Gladys was so overcome at the unusual
compliment, for never before had she been per-
mitted to enter the drawing-room unless dressed,
that her cheeks out-bloomed the roses, and she
had scarcely a retort for one of the gentlemen
who came to tease her as to the day’s exploits.

Baby, in blue plush and point lace, with his
golden curls flying, soon came to her with a mul-
titude of questions, and an amount of information
which he expected her to find very interesting.

“What did you see at the roons, Sissy? Sir
SOLDIERS. 63

Archie took me to town with him; and mother
was in town,and took me visitin’. Then Sir Archie
came in the carriage with us, and when we got
home he got me Miss Dighton’s little dog. Do
you think it’s a pretty dog, Sissy? I do I
wonder if Miss Dighton has a lot of little dogs
like that at her home. Do you know, Sissy?”

And much more of a like nature, until “Sissy”
finished her tea and left the drawing-room; and
the beautiful little figure and gold curls flitted
away in search of the interesting little dog.

“Lo, I am with you alway.” Over and over |
again the little girl kept repeating these words,
as she went back to her nursery and changed her
habit for. one of her usual cool holland wrappers.
What beautiful strong sweet words they were!
She felt that as they came back to her with
dim memories, which yet grew clearer as she
thought of her loved and honoured friend. True
to her purpose she sat down at her wide open
window, and with the sweet summer fragrance
coming up to her she tried to “think of it all.”
But little children as a rule do not think and
reason, and Gladys’ “thinking” was chiefly re-
peating to herself words of Miss Dighton’s which
had impressed her.

“Pray to him—give your troubles to him—do
64 GLADYS,

as Captain Harry did—and, ‘Lo, I am with you
alway.” But after all was not this very good
thinking?

“Let him be my captain,” she said at last.
“Oh, yes! I will; and I will try to be his little
soldier. Butwhen? Must I wait till next Sunday
in church, I wonder? I will ask Miss Dighton
when I see her.” She had been at her window
some time, and now she felt rested and rose.
“Where is Baby,I wonder? I heard the gong some
time ago. I must go and see.”

Her search was not far. She found the little
fellow sitting on their door-step, still devotedly
hugging Miss Dighton’s little dog; the poor little
animal having given up protesting as a bad job.

“T am going to the hill walk to see the sunset,
Baby,—will you come?” she asked. “Let us put
the poor little dog to bed; you couldn’t carry it,
and I’m sure it’s tired.”

“Tt’s such a dear little dog,” he said, resigning
it with a sigh.

Gladys, as she took the little dog to Miss Digh-
ton’s maid, remembered Baby’s wish at the Wish-
ing-tree, and longed with all her heart for power
to give him what he wanted.

“ Ask Mama, Baby,” she said when she rejoined
him, and hand in hand they started for the hill
SOLDIERS. 65

together; “perhaps she could get you a little dog
like that.”

“Ah! but it wouldn’t be such a dear little dog,”
he said despondently; “an’ it’s name wouldn't be
Fiddle.” And he sighed at the thought.

“But you could eall it Fiddle, couldn’t you?”

He shook his head, as one sadly but firmly con-
vineed. “’T'wouldn’t be the same, Sister.”

“Well, ’'d ask Mama anyhow,” said Gladys en-
couragingly. “Now we must hurry, Baby, or we
won't see the sunset.”

Standing on a bank, leaning against the low
branch of a tree, both children watched the sight
which both instinctively loved; the gorgeous
masses of gold and crimson and purple sink
down, leaving the pale blue summer sky and the
faint silvery stars.

And, as she watched, the light seemed to come
from the very sunset into little Gladys’ heart, and
all her thoughts became bright and clear, point-
ing one way. For when little children who can-
not reason open their souls to God, he pours in
light, often, as the sun pours light on the up-
turned faces of the flowers, and then they grow—
the flowers and the souls of the children—right
up to God. -

«Lo, I am with you alway.’ Here—now.

(588) : zg
66 GLADYS.

Then why should I wait for puny or church?
I will be his little soldier now.”

A certain awe and grandeur seemed to pass
into the child’s soul. She straightened her slight
form and clasped tighter the little hand which
she must guide and guard, and then she looked
down into the lovely little face raised inquiringly
to hers.

“What are you thinking of, Sister, that makes
syou seem so big and tall?”

“Tam ininina of Jesus,” she answered point-
ing upward, “and how I will be his soldier. And
you too, Baby; we will be soldiers together, and
Jesus will be our captain.”

“Soldiers!” said Baby somewhat dubiously.
“Soldiers have got to fight, Sir Archie told me.”
Then suddenly brightening up he added briskly,
“Ob yes, but we're both going to be soldiers.
Well, then, you'll do all the Aghune, won't you,
Sissy ?”

How willingly she would if that were in her
power. The dew was on the grass as they went
slowly back to the house, and one soldier—the
one who did not like fighting—was triumphantly
mounted on the back of the other.

Nextmorning Gladys laystretched at full length
under the shade of one of the great trees in the
SOLDIERS. 67

park with a book, the leaves of which she kept
turning over and over, rather as in search of some-
thing than reading. Twice Baby came to her,
and twice she steadily repulsed him. “Sissy’s
looking for eomernne: Baby; as soon as ever she
finds it she'll come.”

And with this consolation the little boy was
obliged to depart.

Miss Dighton, passing from the gavden to the
house, caught sight of a large sailor hat swinging
to a branch, and going over to investigate, she
found Gladys lying under the tree.

“Ah! Gladys, I was wondering if I should see
you. Are you very busy?” she asked.

Gladys sprang up joyfully. “Oh, Miss Dighton,
I was just wondering if I should get a chance to
see you. I thought you had gone out with Mama.
Pray sit down. Here’sa shawl, sit on this, Baby
left it.”

Miss Dighton sat down. “ “And what were you
busy at—reading?” .

Gladys looked up disconsolately. “This is
Nurse’s Bible,” she began explanatorily in a dole-
ful tone, “and I’ve been looking and looking for
those words all morning, and I can’t find them;
and I thought it would be full of beautiful things,
but I can’t find any, and I don’t understand it.”
68 GLADYS.

« Ah! you must not be discouraged, dear. Have
you thought of it all, then? and have you made
up your mind?”

“Yes, I will be his soldier,” said the little girl
softly. “But it is not so easy to find the orders as
I thought.”

“What orders did you want, dear?”

“Oh, I don’t know; and I thought I could find
these words, ‘Lo, I am with you.”

“Come with me, then; I think I can help you.
All the rest will come easy if you have made up
your mind.”

They went into the house together to Miss
Dighton’s rooms; the young lady took from a.
drawer two books of medium size, beautifully
bound. “This is a little Bible for you, Gladys,”
she said. “I want you to read it, and learn to love
it. And this other book is to help you to do that;
it was prepared for. little ones like you. See,
there is a message, a promise, or an order for
every day in the year, for you from your captain:
one for each day that you may think over and
love; and there is a verse beneath each explaining,
and a few words to tell you the meaning of some
words. Will not that make it easier for you, dear?”

Gladys’ face beamed. “Oh, Miss Dighton, how
good you are—such beautiful little books! I will
SOLDIERS, ; 69

love them and take care of them. You see, in
church I can’t hear anything almost, I am so far
back, and the man speaks so funny; but now I
have the orders here for myself.”

“Yes. And, little one, day by day, as you try to
love Jesus and follow him, all will become clear
to you. But it is not a light thing, Gladys, that
you have undertaken. It will not do only to say
you are his soldier. You must obey him. ‘Ifa
man love me, let him keep my words, that is
what he said.”

_ “Oh!” cried Gladys, “a funny soldier I should
_ be if I did not obey orders. Iam going to be a
real soldier, not a make-believe.”

Florence looked almost wistfully at the earnest,
eager little face. “And some seed fell upon good
ground,” she said to herself. “The message seems
to have brought her nothing but joy. I wish my
heart were only as-trustful as hers.”

Gladys had no doubts. She looked at her new
Bible with much pride. ‘ Now,” she said “I’ve a
Bible, and a little prayer-book, and a book of
orders, all for myself; I ought to be a good soldier.
Oh, Miss Dighton, will you show me those words
in my own Bible, please?”

Florence found out the words, and Gladys read
them with glad recognition: “‘ Lo, I am with you
70 GLADYS.

alway, even unto the end of the world.” Well, that
is nice: to the very end of the world. After all,
Edinburgh will not seem too faraway now.” She
put a mark in at the place, then rose and threw
her arms round her friend. “It was good of you,”
she said, kissing her with earnest kisses. “And
you must be a soldier, of course; for you are work-
ing for your captain, and getting more soldiers
for him—I will do it too.” The little girl never
guessed what words of comfort she had spoken
to the young lady’s earnest but doubting heart.

“And now,” said Florence in a lighter tone,
“there is something else I want to talk to you
about. You know I am going away to-morrow?”

“Yes; lam sosorry. But we are going in a few
days too.”

“Well, do you know if Baby would like my
little dog Fiddle?”

Gladysblushed. She was a sensitive and delicate-
minded little girl, and she had almost a sense of
guilt that her wish and Baby’s should have been
so accurately guessed. She did not speak.

But whether Baby had gone to his mother with
his woe, or even given broader and more direct
hints, it was plain Miss Dighton knew her little
dog was a coveted treasure. She went on, “I heard
him admiring it immensely, and I know you
%
SOLDIERS. 71

would teach bim to be good to it. So, Gladys, I
think I will leave Fiddle behind, and you can
‘give him to Baby. Don’t you think he would like
it?”

“Oh, Miss Dighton, I know he would. It seems
quite odd you should want to give it to him;
because—but I will tell you all about it.”

She related the story of the Wishing-tree, at
which Florence laughed. “Well, poor little fellow,
I am glad he should have his wish,” she said.
“We must get a big pasteboard card, Gladys, and
paint Fiddle’s name on it. Don’t you think he
will like that?”

“Oh, Miss Dighton, how good you are! Dear
little Baby, how delighted he will be to have his
wish come true.”

“Very well. Do you think you could get the
card-board and we will print it now, and you will
take care of it?”

Gladys flew on eager wings to Nurse, and soon
returned to Miss Dighton with the required paper,
on which Florence printed in large letters: “Lost,
Stolen, or Strayed. Whoever finds me must take
good care of me. My name is Fiddle.”

“That is splendid. Now for a ribbon, and you
can put this round Fiddle’s neck after I am gone.
Why, Gladys, there is the gong for lunch, and I
72 GLADYS.

haven’t arranged a single flower. Now I must
”?
run.



CHAPTER VIIL
~ IN EDINBURGH.

NE chill morning in the end of September
Gladys found herself with her brother, her
maid, and their piles of luggage standing in the
Caledonian Station, feeling so fatigued and weary
as scarcely to have strength left to bid the friends
who brought them good-bye. The fine cold rain
which fell depressed them, and. when they ‘had
been put into the cab, Baby, who was cross as
well as tired, fell heavily against his sister and
started a long list of wailing complaints. “ Where's
Fiddle, Sissy? Oh dear, Grayson’s crushing him;
you take him, Sister. Oh dear, I wonder is’-Puck
quite comfortable. Oh dear, I’m so tired. Look at
the horrid rain, Sissy. Oh dear, isn’t it ugly?”
The rattling of the cab, the weight of Baby,
and her own weariness almost overcame the little
girl’s usually sunny temper under irritations. To
be cross with Baby was, however, an impossibility.
So she put an arm round him and did her best
to soothe him, while the maid made herself com-
fortable and dozed until the cab stopped at one
IN EDINBURGH. 73

of the finest houses in Moray Place. The door was
opened, and the children roused themselves, got
their pets, and entered the house with the maid.
They were shown into a morning-room by a.
stolid-looking man, and then it seemed as though
they were forgotten. Weary as they were the
time seemed very long to them, and the house
terribly silent. Grayson had once more made her-
self comfortable and was half asleep, and Baby ,
began to cry. Gladys’ spirits sank lower and lower.
At last a maid came, who asked them to follow
her as Miss M‘Arthur would see them. Gladys
wiped the little boy’s tears, begged him to be
brave, and, administering a poke in a very differ-
ent temper to the drowsy Grayson, followed her
aunt’s servant out of the room, and up a wide
flight of stairs, and into a large and very hand-
some room. at a fire, so bright and clean that it might have
been a painted one, Gladys thought, but for the
warmth and cheerfulness it diffused around.
Miss M‘Arthur merely looked up as the chil-
dren entered, and watched them calmly and coldly
as they advanced up the room.. Tired and travel-
stained as they were they walked gracefully, and
Baby looked lovelier than ever. “Handsome
children, both,” was the lady’s inward comment.
“Spoilt, too, I can tell at a glance; that won't do
74 GLADYS.

here.” No it would not, for Miss M‘Arthur was
herself a spoilt child thoroughly matured; and
when there is a grown spoilt child in a house the
little growing ones haven't a chance, you know.

Miss M‘Arthur, a daughter of Sir Ralph’s step-
father, was a lady who for something over fifty
years had been accustomed to consider herself
first and only; and had not been long in arriving
at the conclusion that nothing else in the world
was of any consequence in comparison. She was
not without good qualities. She was very fond of
her father’s stepson, and in spite of her dislike
to children was the first to offer to take care of
Gladys and Bernardin when she heard - the
Whrenlys were going abroad. But she was very
selfish; and being very wealthy was arrogant and
overbearing, and ruled a very despot in her own
establishment. Now, there must have been a
good deal of all this in her face; for Gladys no
sooner beheld her than she straightened herself
as stiff as a telegraph-pole, clenched one hand and
grasped Baby tightly by the other. But the
stern face had a very different effect on Baby,
who crouched against his sister and once more
began to ery.

“ Decidedly spoilt,” said Miss M‘Arthur. Then
she held out her hand, “How-are you Gladys?
I am glad to see you. Is this your brother?”
IN EDINBURGH. 75

“T am quite well, thank you; but we are both
tired. Won’t you shake hands, Baby?”

“No,” bawled Baby in a pet.

“Why is he crying? What did you call him?”

“His name is Bernardin, but we always call
him Baby.”

“Baby! He is much too big for that. Such a
big boy should be called by his name.”

“ Oh, but it isn’t like that,” said Gladys eagerly.
“Tt isn’t in a baby-way atall. He used to be called
Bernie when he was little, little; and he couldn’t
speak plain, and called it Baby and sometimes
Babe. It’s from his name, not baby-way at all.”

Miss M‘Arthur failed to see the distinction.
“Tt doesn’t matter,” she returned with a slight
sneer, “he is too big; I don’t like boys to be
childish. You must call him Bernard or Bernardin
now.”

“Indeed I sha’n’t,” said Gladys quickly and
not very respectfully. “I shall always call him
Baby.”

“Gladys!” returned Miss M‘Arthur in a tone
of great displeasure, “I hope you are not wilful.
There is only one will in this house; my word is
law. You must learn that at once. Bernardin,
come and shake hands and stop crying; that is
babyish at least.”

But Baby declined to do either, and Miss
76 GLADYS.

M‘Arthur turned from him with a look of con-
tempt and put some questions to Gladys with
reference to their journey, and their father and
mother. Then she rang the bell, and when the
maid came dismissed them, telling Gladys she
would send for her later in the day; and with a
great sense of relief both children found them-
selves in the lobby, and Baby looked up tearfully
and declared vengefully and paradoxically, “I
ain’t a baby at all, and I'll always be Baby.
Sha’n’t I, Sissy?”

“Yes, darling.”

“T hate her, Sissy. Aren’t they going to give
us nothin’ to eat?”

“Yes, presently. Don’t cry any more, dear
Baby,” and choking back something dangerous in
her own throat the little girl trudged up another
flight of stairs.

The cold welcome of her new guardian had
greatly hurt and puzzled the child. Such petty
bickering was quite new to her; she had known
- nothing of that in the elegance of her old home.

Her father and mother might have been negli-
gent, but at least they had never tried her temper
with trifling and meaningless contradictions and
vexations. That a lady should take exception at
such a trifle as a child’s name puzzled her by its
smallness of spirit, and hurt her by its unkindness.
IN EDINBURGH. V7

“His own name that we all loved to call him at
home; how unkind of her!” thought the little
girl sadly. And then added in another tone, “I
will always call him Baby.”

The .nurseries into which they were shown
were pleasant enough—two rooms opening into
one another with fine wide windows and a good
view.

Baby stopped crying at once at sight of the
breakfast-table, at which Grayson was already
busy preparing coffee and bread and butter with
a strange servant, with whom she was engaged
in earnest conversation, apparently, for she was _
wide awake now.

Quite at home on the hearth-rug was Fiddle, at
sight of which Baby was so delighted that he
forgot his fatigue and hunger in his surprise.
“Why, Sister, dolook! Fiddle hadn’t no ugly lady
to go see, so he’s quite happy. Dear, sweet, little
Fiddle!” and he squatted beside him and gathered
the reluctant little animal into fond but uncom-
fortable arms.

The Scotch girl gazed at him in deep admira-
tion. “Did ye ever see the like? They was tellin’
me below stairs what bonny children they was;
but I never saw a child to match that boy—and
the voice of him, too! Bonny wee thing, I’m sure
he’s tired to death. And Miss looks tired enough
78 GLADYS.

too; and the mistress I suppose would keep them
talking to her half an hour, when they should
have been getting their breakfasts and into their
beds. Well, here’s everything ready now.” She
bustled about good-naturedly, getting everything
for the tired little travellers, and afterwards
helped Grayson to put them to bed, where they fell
asleep without loss of time, and travelled in giant
trains, with cross old maids, on stone rails, back
to the old and now deserted home.

Gladys wakened some hours later with a dim
consciousness that some one was talking not far
off; and her second discovery, which was almost
instantaneous with the first, was that she was
now alone in the bed in which she had fallen
asleep with her arm round Baby. She opened
her eyes wide and looked round, too drowsy and
comfortable to do more, and saw that the room
had evidently been put in order, that is to say,
useful order—garments hung behind the door, the
half open door of a wardrobe showed Gladys
some well-known frocks, the trunks which had
cumbered the floor were gone, and the whole room
had that air of life about it which only habi-
tation can give. Thoroughly wakened now, and
with all her weariness slept away, our heroine
raised herself on her elbow and looked round, and
decided that she liked the room, and then listened
IN EDINBURGH. 79

with that keen expression on her face to the
sounds which came through the wide open door
from the adjoining room. Baby was evidently
holding forth in style, and the Scotch girl, who.
had helped Grayson to unpack (during which
proceeding much contemporary history had been
exchanged between them), was led completely -
captive by his Southern sweetness, and every now
and then called upon Grayson, who was present,
to join her in her admiration.

“T don’t like her,’ came in distinct tones. “I
don’t believe she’s my aunt, she’s ever so ugly.”

There was some faint expostulation here, and
some laughing too, and an exchange in an under-
tone between Grayson and Maggie.

“Ts Sister sleeping still?” demanded Baby next;
“T want to go and see. Just look at Fiddle, he
ain’t been sleeping a bit the whole time. I was so
sleepy; I'm not sleepy now. Is Sister ’wake, I
wonder?”

At this Gladys sprang from the bed, and
laughing ran to the open door. “Yes, ’m awake
now, Baby, and just coming. What o'clock is it,
Grayson, I wonder?”

It was well on in the afternoon; and, with the
remark that it felt funny to wake in the afternoon,
Gladys turned back to the bed-room and dressed
herself.
80 GLADYS.

She had not quite finished when Grayson
appeared with the information that Miss M‘Arthur
had gone out driving, and if they would promise
not to be troublesome Maggie would take them
through the house.

This was a delightful prospect to both children,
restless and unsettled as they were, and in the
shortest possible space of time they were follow-
ing their good-natured cicerone into that land of
wonder, which every new house is to infant minds.
Fiddle, borne aloft in his master’s’ arms, was
evidently quite above being moved by anything
so trivial.

So they went from room to room, lobby to
lobby, upstairs and downstairs, the children draw-
ing comparisons with home, far from favourable to
Moray Place. The furniture was handsome but
heavy and sombre, and an air of gloom pervaded
the empty rooms in spite of their size and
grandeur.

“Oh, how different it is from home!” the
children exclaimed again and again. And Baby
declared he liked the kitchen best.

A clock struck five as they were returning from
the latter region, and Maggie told them they must
hurry, as their tea would be ready and Miss
M‘Arthur might be expected any moment. And
sure enough, they had scarcely reached the
BP

‘

IN EDINBURGH. 81

entrance-hall when the bell rang loudly, and
Maggie in great terror picked Baby up in her
arms, and, bidding Gladys “fly,” panted up the
stairs with as much tremor and expedition as
though some monster. were at her heels.

Gladys snatched up Fiddle, and stifling her
amusement until she reached the first landing,
paused there, and heard the footman open the
door and then her aunt’s voice: “Give the things
to Quivers, Macintosh, and send her to me.”

“ What a horrid voice!” thought the child, and
she turned and went after Maggie with a sense
of relief at leaving it behind.

Tea was ready in the nursery, and the children
were in good spirits after their travels and race;
but in the midst of their talk and laughter a
damper fell. Quivers appeared, bearing a message
that Miss M‘Arthur would see Miss Whrenly
after tea, and Mr. Bernard was to go to bed at
half-past seven.

Both Gladys and Baby looked rebellious. The
little boy had not been accustomed to go to bed
so early, and resented such a “ baby-hour;” and
Gladys was not overjoyed at the prospect of
meeting her aunt again.

So tea was finished very slowly, and it was not
. until a second peremptory message had come to
the nursery, that Gladys, accompanied by Baby

(536) FE
82 GLADYS.

as far as the stairs, went down to her aunt’s
room.

Miss M‘Arthur had taken tea, and was resting
before dressing. Her first remark when Gladys
entered was an inquiry as to why she was not

dressed.
_ Gladys apologized, and explained that she only
dressed when she went to the drawing-room.

“Tn future always dress,” said Miss M‘Arthur;
“T may send for youor I may not. If I should I
would not like my friends to see you as you are
now.”

Gladys made no remark, but she sighed. Miss
' M‘Arthur continued: “I have engaged a good
governess for you in the meantime. She will
teach you both, and walk with you; but I do not
approve of resident governesses.””

Gladys felt sincerely thankful.

“She will be here every morning at nine
o'clock. You will breakfast at eight; to rise early
is the best thing in the world for young children.”
Miss M‘Arthur herself never breakfasted before
eleven o'clock on any account.

“You must always obey your governess and
nurse. I must hear no quarrelling or disturbance.
LT hope you do not quarrel with your brother.” At
this Gladys’ disdain was so great that she smiled.

“J will not have any quarrelling,” continued the
IN EDINBURGH. 83

aunt more severely, mistaking the smile. “My
word is law here, and must be obeyed at once.
If Bernard is troublesome there is a cane in the
house—”

Up to this Gladys had been sitting watching
her, aunt, with quiet wonder at the orders and
Miss M‘Arthur’s manner, but now her eyes flashed,
and rising from her seat she exclaimed indig-
nantly: “There may be fifty canes in the house,
but no one would dare to touch LEN one
would dare!”

And as she stood with clenched hands and
angry eyes fearlessly regarding the wrathful lady,
each recognized in the other an antagonistic
spirit, and the unspoken and, for Gladys, almost
instinctive thought was “Who will be strongest?” -

After a pause Miss M‘Arthur spoke very sternly:
“IT am very much shocked and surprised at
your disrespectful and rude behaviour; and on
the very day of your arrival! I wonder very
much what my brother would say! I see what
you require, and what you shall have—a strict
eye and hand upon you. Go now, and consider
yourself in disgrace until you can apologize for
-your rudeness; and remember, you are always to
go to bed at half-past eight.” And Gladys went
away with a weight upon her heart which op-
pressed her heavily. Unkindness and neglect she
84 : GLADYS.

had known, but then she had recognized it and
made allowances for it in the freedom of her
home; but this was unkindness which called _it-
self justice, against which there was to be no
appeal, and from which there was no escape, and
which she was bound to obey. She felt she
could not go back to the nursery, where Baby
was playing with Fiddle and eager for a story.
The tears came to her eyes when she thought of
him. Would anyone dare to touch him; beautiful,
frail Baby, whom she had promised her mother
to shield! Her heart burned as she thought,
“What could I do against them all? Oh, I hate
her, I hate her. What would pretty little
Mama think?” “Mama” gained immensely by
comparison with “Aunt.” “But they would
never dare!”
Tempted by a half open door at the end of the
corridor she entered the room, and shutting the
door after her went over to the window, with
some vague idea of soothing her mind and the
turmoil she was in. With every moment she grew
more spiritless and weary, and her prospects
seemed darker and sadder. “ Breakfast at eight
and lessons at nine—always to sit. in a tight dress
after tea—no pony, or trees to climb, no anything
nice—and that hateful—oh!—but they—she—
never would dare! Such a big dreary house, and
IN EDINBURGH. 85

we must never go from our own rooms, and no
one we love, and—ah!”

What was it came through all the complainings
like a ray of sunlight, or a strain of sweet music,
and changed in a moment the expression of the
little girl’s face? .

“ forget sosoon! Did I not promise to be His soldier!
Won't He take care of Baby!”

With a glad and-trustful smile on her little
face now, she knelt down by the window and
buried her dark head in her hands.

It was nearly an hour later when she went
upstairs. Baby was in bed and asleep, and it was
time for her to go to bed.

She went into the tiny room, a dressing-room
off her own, where her brother lay in his little
bed. She looked tenderly at him, then bent and
kissed him.

«Lo, I am with you alway. With you and
with me, Baby. Why should I be afraid?”
86 GLADYS,

CHAPTER IX.
THE WINTER.

FEW days passed, and the children fell into

- their new places and became accustomed
to their new lives as children so quickly learn to
do. The servants, glad to have children in the
house, made much of them, and foolishly, though
unintentionally, rather encouraged them to rebel
against what they called their hardships, instead
of helping them to obey their aunt.

This was especially bad for Baby, making him
more dependent than ever; and Gladys at first,
in her gratitude for all kindness to him, could not
see this. The little girl herself soon found that,
in spite of her many “orders” and “law,” Miss
M‘Arthur personally troubled herself little about
them as a rule, and when their governess was
gone they could occupy their time pretty much
as they liked.

Miss Anderson the governess was a middle-
aged lady, rather cold and unsympathetic, expect-
ing them always to do their lessons perfectly, and
almost never speaking to them during their mid-
day walk or at meal-times. At first Gladys used
to petition to be taken to the various places of
historical interest of which she had heard. Miss
THE WINTER. 87

Anderson said no; and all the memory Gladys
retained of these walks was “houses and houses
and the gardens of the squares.” Only once, and
then by Miss M‘Arthur’s special command, were
they taken down Princes Street.

Miss Anderson came at nine o'clock in the
morning, and did not leave until five. Day after
day—sums, history, geography, French, walk,
dinner, preparation; and then how thankfully
they saw her depart, and hastened to wash away
ink-stains and tear-stains, and watch, with great
sighs of thankfulness that the long weary day
was over, for Maggie and the consoling tea.

Their life was very dull and quiet, and a hard
change from the light and freedom and gaiety of
their English home. There was a coldness and
calmness about Miss Anderson which chilled
away any thought of merriment in lesson hours;
and once when Baby in a moment of mischievous
exuberance squeezed his wet sponge over his
unfinished. sums, and afterwards declined to say
he was sorry, she punished him so severely that
Gladys, with a horrified memory of her aunt’s
words, and noticing how strong Miss Anderson
looked, besought him not to do it again, and
strove herself in every way to set him a good
example. :

Sunday was if possible a more trying day than
88 GLADYS.

any of the others. Miss M‘Arthur, as I said, was
religious—a rigid Presbyterian. She went to
church herself twice every Sunday, and to a meet-
ing in the evening. The children were taken to
church twice, and were made to join a select Sun-
day class; besides which they had long Biblelessons
to learn at home. These Miss Anderson heard on
Monday morning.

Being a soldier in these times was hard work
for Gladys. At first she had thought she would
learn, and get help at church, and hailed with
delight the idea of the Sunday-school; but she
did not understand the Scotch service, and fared
little better in the class, and in both places her
mind was kept very anxious lest Baby should
fidget, or lest Miss M‘Arthur should see him if he
_ did. She feared her aunt; but it was not for
herself.

But she had the true soldier spirit, and troubles
only made her firmer and stronger and more in-
dependent; and in each of the long and toilsome
days was one happy time, drawn out as long as
possible. This came between Babe’s bed-time and
her own.

It was not only a pretty sight, but amusing
and instructive, to see how the little girl spent
this hour. When Bernardin with much difficulty
had been got to bed, Gladys with an armful of
THE WINTER. 89

photographs, her Bible, and text-book came and
seated herself on his bed.

“ Are you sleepy, Baby?”

“No,” indignantly. “I hate going to bed so
soon.”

“Have you said your prayers?”

“Yes, Sissy.”

“ And you said ‘God bless Mama?’”

“Yes.”

“Now you must kiss the photos—‘good-night.’”

Some dozen photographs of the beautiful Lady
Whrenly, in all imaginary costumes and attitudes,
were solemnly kissed, and then Baby lay down
once more, and Gladys renewed her catechism.

“You remember Mama, Baby?”

“Yes, Sister.”

« Wasn't she lovely?”

“Lovely.”

“Won't you always love her with all your
might, and never forget her?”

“Oh, yes.”

“Now I must tell you about her.”

At first while her mother was still fresh in
Gladys’ memory these anecdotes were veracious
and simple enough; but as the winter months
went on, and Lady Whrenly grew dim in the
minds of her little children, the anecdotes grew
wonderfully, and the mother became in the lov-
90 GLADYS.

ing and somewhat imaginary reminiscences of
the little girl, the most beautiful, tender, loving
mother that ever children had. And thus in the
young mind of the boy a fair and lovely ideal
was formed and grew, and the far and distant
“Mama,” became the fairy-mother whose coming
home would make life a dream of joy.

By and by, as he listened to Gladys’ flowing
accounts of the dear English home, and the free-
dom and happiness there, and all “ Mama's” won-
derful deeds, his eyes grew heavy and he drifted
easily from the waking dreams to the sleeping ones,
holding his sister’s hand.

Then the letters and the photographs were
carefully put away, and the little Bible opened
and read, and then the little guide-book, and lastly,
kneeling beside the sleeping brother, the little
girl prayed her earnest childish prayers that
she might be a true soldier, and know always the
right thing to do.

“Then at half-past eight she went quietly to
bed.

The winter passed in unbroken monotony.
The children had no share in the Christmas fes-
tivities. They received a number of handsome
presents, and these diverted them for a short
time; and the kindly servants did their best to
give them a treat, and begged leave (and got it)
THE WINTER. 91

to take them down Princes Street. This, and the
three days’ holidays, made a little break; but after
that the long, long weeks passed solemnly, and
oh so slowly! and all exactly the same.

Watching for the foreign letters was Gladys
one interest, and they were read and re-read to
Baby, with copious comments, until they fell to
tatters.

At last one day there was no fire in the
nursery, and when Gladys asked for an explana-
tion the maid said, “ Why, Miss, it’s most summer;
you don’t need a fire no longer. *Tisn’t cold.”

“Neither it is,’ said Gladys uninterestedly.
“ But summer—it doesn’t feel like summer, and I
never noticed tie spring at all” And she
. thought of the long sweet springs in England;
the hunting for first snowdrops, first primroses,
all the firsts of the early flowers. And now it
was almost summer, and she had not even noticed
the leaves come on the trees. She turned away
from the empty grate with a great sigh.

The long winter had told upon her in a way
she never guessed; and had she looked into the
looking-glass with a scrutinizing eye, she would
have noticed a perceptible difference in the colour
of her once so rosy cheeks,
92 GLADYS,

CHAPTER X.
BABY.

HE summer was spent by the children at

Portobello. They were in lodgings there

with a maid, Miss M‘Arthur having gone visiting
in the Highlands.

Baby was perfectly happy, having no lessons,
or indeed anything disagreeable to do; and Gladys
was happy because he was happy. He soon
regained his failing appetite, and his laugh was
as merry as ever; but there was a sad and
subdued look. about the little girl which the long
summer of freedom on the yellow sands scarcely
chased away. The truth was, the child-mind
was all puzzled about things right and wrong,
and the shadow of a great fear for Baby’s sake
always hung over her, and she had no one to turn
to in her perplexity. Instinctively she felt the
servants, kind as they were, could not understand
or help her. Her little books and her mother’s
letters were her great sustainers. If ever a little
girl tried hard to grope her way, through the
mist and twilight of her childish mind along the
path of right, it was Gladys. Often she was very
frightened, very weary, almost despairing, but
she never once thought of turning back. She
BABY. 93

had no one to speak cheering and encouraging
words to her; but the beautiful light from God
was in her heart, and she knew that it was light,
and with all her childish strength she strove to
make it shine.

To make Baby happy, to make him forget all
darker memories, to bring back the sweet con-
fident and winning manner which he had lost
under the stern rule of the governess, and, above
all, to write to her mother of him and to tell him
of his mother, these to her were solemn duties,
and she performed them well. Her letters to
Lady Whrenly showed a motherly solicitude
about her brother that was pathetic; there was
hardly ever a word about herself in any of them.

By the end of September they were all back in
town at work again; the anxious look was deeper
on Gladys’ little face, and Baby was quiet and
dull. The weather was very cold, and there was
every appearance of a long early winter.

Though the children had now been a year with
their aunt, they felt-no more at home with her
than during the first week after their arrival,
Once or twice they had been brought downstairs
to see visitors or old friends of their father; but
as they had both been very much admired, Miss
M‘Arthur (though she was not displeased at the
admiration) would not have them often, Admira-
94 GLADYS.

tion was bad for children, she said. They had
also been invited to some juvenile festivities; but
Miss M‘Arthur did not approve of this either, and
the invitations were declined. So what wonder
then, when their lives in the beautiful city were
so dull and cheerless, that their hearts went ever
more lovingly to the beautiful English home: to
Baby now a dim but glorious vision, a fairy-land
which the future was to realize.

One morning in. October a stately message
came for Gladys. Swift ablutions and a clean
pinafore caused a short delay, and then Gladys
went downstairs to her aunt’s morning-room.

The interview was destined to begin with a
calm and end with a storm. Miss M‘Arthur was
wont to make the same curious mistake as Lady
Whrenly did, and speak to Gladys as though she
were grown-up. The little girl fully appreciated
this, and her firm and confident answers and bright
determined eyes, whenever she instinctively felt
a contest was coming on, were in the greatest
contrast to her habitually anxious wistful look.

“TJ have been considering,” said Miss M‘Arthur,
“whether it would not be a good thing for you
to go to boarding-school this winter.” Gladys
showed no alarm; considering was not a danger-
ous word with her aunt. “But I have decided,”
continued the lady, “that another winter of home-
BABY. 95

life ”—she did not in the least mean to be satirical
—“will not be bad for you. Miss Anderson tells
me you are progressing in most branches, and
that you are studious and obedient. I am very
glad to hear it.”

These gracious and condescending words were
the first commendation Gladys had ever received
from her aunt, and she was pleased with them.
A beautiful frank smile came to her face, and
Miss M‘Arthur seeing it, made a half pause before
continuing:

“JT think, therefore, that another winter with
Miss Anderson will be good for you; but for
Bernard—”

She was obliged to pause again, which she did
sternly, for Gladys gave a little start and cry, and
her face changed sadly. Anxiety, anger, fear, and
a terrible sense of helplessness were all there. She
did not speak.

“Bernard,” continued Miss M‘Arthur, “is not
doing well. Miss Anderson tells me he idles away
his time, and is not making any advance at all.
This is very bad.”

Gladys listened on thorns, her startled eyes on
her aunt’s face.

“T have therefore decided that school is the
best thing for him, and I will send him shortly;
a good boys’ school.”
96 GLADYS.

“ A boys’ school for Baby!” cried Gladys now,
in a tone of passionate resistance. “It would kill
him! I will not let him go! Mama gave him to
me; I will write to Mama! I will take him away!”
she continued wildly. “He is only seven—a baby,

_and not strong! He was always afraid of boys! .
Mama never would allow it—never! How could
you think of such a cruel thing?”

“How dare you speak to me in such a way?”
cried Miss M‘Arthur, and with all the unreasoning
anger of an old spoilt child she poured forth on
the little girl a storm of utterly irrelevant and
very angry words, which it would serve no good
purpose for me to put down here. Gladys let
the storm fall upon her in silence, but far from
alarmed, and when at last Miss M‘Arthur paused
breathless she said firmly, “Aunt, Baby must not
goto school. Mama would not allow it if she knew.
He is too young and too delicate, and I know it
will hurt him. Let him stay with me and I will

_ teach him myself. Oh!” she said, pleading in her
earnestness, “I know he will learn from me, and
it would break his heart and mine if he were sent
to school.”

Miss M‘Arthur ought to have been touched, but
she was not; she was all in arms for her own
insulted dignity, and determined Gladys should
be punished.
BABY. 97

“Nonsense!” she said harshly. “This is the
result of the way you have been spoiled, especially
Bernard. Go back to your lessons now, and send
your brother to me.”

“What are you going to do to him?” cried
Gladys, whose mind was in such a confused and
indignant state against her aunt that she would
have believed her capable of anything at that
moment.

“Do as you are told,” said Miss M‘Arthur
sharply; and Gladys, choking with indignation,
left the room.

Her words had their effect upon her aunt, how-
ever, to this extent, that instead of sending the boy
to Fettes College or Loretto,as sheat first intended,
she concluded to send him to a private school, for
a year at least. Having made up her mind on
this point, she sat frowning and stern awaiting
the little boy’s appearance.

He was a long time coming; but at last there
was a fustling outside the door, the subdued sound
of voices, and then the door opened and Bernardin
entered.

The tall slight figure in man-o’-war suit, the
abundant silky golden ringlets, the almost perfect
little face, the pathetic little mouth and great:
dark eyes, full at present of fear and dislike, all
formed a strikingly beautiful picture.

(536) G
98 GLADYS.

“Why, he is as tall as many boys of ten,” said
Miss M‘Arthur to herself in a tone of justification.
“And he is too big for all that hair,” she added,
with small appreciation of the golden crown.
“Come here, Bernard,” she said aloud.

Bernardin went.

“You are now too old a boy to remain any
longer with a governess, and J am going to send
you to school, where you will be with other boys
and learn to be clever.” All this she said ina
rather gracious and conciliatory tone; Baby only
stared.

“You will have other nice little boys to play
with, and a nice master to teach you to be a good
boy.” Baby frowned. “You will go there in a
few weeks; but you will get home every Saturday
to see your sister, if you are a good boy.”

Still the child never spoke, and Miss M‘Arthur,
at first pleased, became irritated. “Come, Bernard,
have you lost your tongue? Where are your man-
ners? Why do you not speak?”

There was a brief silence, and then the great
house resounded with yells, which prove abun-
dantly that whether Baby had lost his tongue or
not his lungs were in excellent order. Miss
M‘Arthur tried to scold; she might as well have
scolded the hurricane. Then most unwarily she
attempted a little shaking, viciously administered,
SEPARATION. 99

but a few well-directed kicks and bites caused
her to retire precipitately and ring the bell, and
at the same moment Gladys rushed into the room
at the head of several servants. There was a
hubbub of scolding and screaming, and a sym-
pathetic throng bore Baby from the field, leaving
Miss M‘Arthur panting and indignant.

CHAPTER XI.
SEPARATION.

LL resistance, however, proved vain. Miss
M‘Arthur was of opinion that the sooner so
dangerous a boy was out of the house the better
for all; and preparations were begun at once.
These weeks before Baby’s departure were weeks
of misery to Gladys, whose fears on his account
were vague but enormous; and there was no one
to put things to her in a cheerful light, which
means so much to children, as every one knows.
The little boy himself took it all much more
calmly, and, except when he came in contact. with
his aunt, when he invariably relieved himself by
screaming like a little fury, everything to him
was the same as ever. His new suits of manly
cut gave him great pleasure, and he was proud
100 GLADYS:

to have his hair cut; while to Gladys all these
preparations were terrible. She, herself, had
cheated the hair-dresser, and cut the beautiful
golden hair, packed it in a box, and sent it to her
mother; but though she had done it in heaviness
of heart, it was only play to Baby.

At last, however, came the last day that they
would have together, and Miss M‘Arthur graci-
ously sent up word they might have a holiday,
and the servants took care that they should have
plenty of dainties. They were very happy; but
when for the last time Gladys sat on her little

brother’s bed, with her bundle of letters and her .

little books and photographs, her heart was full
and sore, with a depth of soreness that should
not belong to childhood.

“T will give you one of Mama to take with
you, Baby, and you will kiss her every night—
won't you, Sonny? And oh, darling, you won't
forget you are a little soldier? And you must say
your prayers and be a good boy, and learn your
lessons, and remember sister is always, always
thinking of you and loving you. And by and
by we will all grow up, and Mama will come
home, and we will go back to dear beautiful
Whrenly, and everything will be happy and
nice.”

“Yes, Sissy. - 1 wish it was now,”
SEPARATION. 101

“And I’ve printed on the ticket the words for
you. They are Jesus’ own words to his soldiers,
so you will never feel lonely. ‘Lo, I am with you
alway. Baby; isn’t it nice?”

“Yes, Sissy.” But the eyes were growing heavy
now, and the little round shorn head turned over
on the pillow. Then Gladys, taking his little hand
and putting her head down beside his, crooned
softly till he fell asleep.

- When the time for parting really came, however,
Gladys was by far the more self-possessed of the
two. It wasasad parting. Baby clung round
her neck, sobbing and crying in a way that was
very different from his passionate angry out-
breaks. “Oh! I don’t want to leave you, I don’t
want to leave you, Sissy,” he sobbed. “What will
I do at night? and what will you do without me,
Sissy? Oh! oh!”

Poor Gladys tried to comfort him, but the de-
solate picture was too real before her own eyes,
and at last she broke down and cried with him.
“Oh, Sissy, come with me! Won’t you come with
me, Sissy, in the cab? Don’t leave me, Sissy dear!”
the poor little fellow pleaded. And Gladys, in
spite of her aunt’s order to the contrary, put on
her hat and jacket and went with him to the
school—a private school at the south side.

' “Don’t ery. You will come home on Saturday,
102 GLADYS.

darling,” she whispered. But this was only Tues-
day, and to loneliness a week is a long, long time.

Baby went with a tolerable show of courage
up to the school, and Gladys was driven back to
Moray Place. Her aunt was out, and Miss Ander-
son was not there that day, so she escaped blame
or punishment; and the servants sympathized,
and made much.of her. She wandered, with
Fiddle in her arms, through the great house. The
handsome rooms, beautifully furnished and warm >
and bright, mocked her; for to her they were
empty as the grave. The light of her life was
there no longer to cast brightness.on them; her
heart was sore and hungry. Yes, she was a soldier,
and she knew Jesus was with Baby and with her;
still she was very, very lonely. And oh how still
the great house was! And Fiddle kept watching |
and watching, and she knew he was wondering
where dear sweet Baby was. Then she went up
to the nursery and put away all his little things,
tidied his little room, and at last knelt down be-
side his little bed. That was a long, long prayer;
and if Fiddle heard sobs, and saw tears streaming
from the dark upraised eyes, and if he saw the
little hands clasped and stretched beseechingly
upward, he certainly never told, and was only
more tender and anxious in his attentions that
evening.
SEPARATION. 103

What a long, long week that seemed! How
lonely and desolate! The lesson hours with Miss
Anderson were bad, but the tea-time and the
leisure-time were far worse. Let her try as she
waquld Gladys could not turn her mind to her
work; and she had no one, on whose love and
wisdom she depended, to show her ‘that work,
hard busy work, of mind or body, is the very
best thing for a sore heart. Miss Anderson’s
' fault-finding when the lessons were badly learned
only irritated her, and turned her from them in
disgust. A long letter to her mother was a little
relief, and saving up everything in the way of
goodies for Saturday was a little more, and pray-
ing and reading her little books were best of all.
And so at last, though never so slowly and grudg-
ingly, that first Saturday came, and Gladys was
allowed to go to the school and bring Baby
home. For this purpose Miss M‘Arthur lent her
brougham. When at last she really had her arms
round Baby’s neck once more, it seemed to Gladys
that no matter what happened she could never
let him go again. They were being driven back
to Moray Place, and after kissing and hugging
one another heartily Gladys.looked at him criti-
cally: ‘Do you like school, Baby, my weenie?”
she asked with inexpressible tenderness, and use-
ing the oldest and fondest of her endearing terms.
104 GLADYS.

“No, Sissy; it isn’t nice,” he said, but rather as
though he found it difficult to state his opinion.
“The boys aren’t nice, they call me ‘the lamb,’
I wonder why?”

“ Are you littler than they, Baby?” -

“Qh, no; some of them are not as tall as I, but
they have fatter legs. They said mine were like
skewers.”

“Were they cruel to you, Sonny?”

He seemed puzzled for a minute, and then he
said: “No, they didn’t beat me. They threw
things at me though, and scolded me, and called
me names. They weren’t nice, Sissy.”

By and by all his little troubles came out.
They were not great troubles; grown-up people
would have thought them not at all bad for the
little boy. For, you know, grown-up people had
far more to suffer when they were young than
little people ever suffer now; and they don’t tell
us what they suffered then but what they think
now. But to Gladys Baby’s troubles were terrible
things, and she wrapped her arms closer round
him and kissed him. “ Never mind, darling, you'll
grow a big clever boy, and Sissy will be proud
of you. And never tell tales, Baby; it’s mean. And
don’t mind being called bad names; names never
hurt if they’re not true, my weenie. And don’t for-
get about being a soldier. But you are one; Sissy
SEPARATION, . 105

thinks you are just the bravest little brother
ever was. And we're going to have a lovely after-
noon and a lovely tea.”

How could Baby but be refreshed by such
courage and love as this. New courage came to
him, he felt cheered and comforted, the boys
faded for the time; he forgot his troubles and
was happy.

The nursery was made delightfully cheering,
the servants were full of sympathy. The tea was
quite exceptional, and sitting by the fire after-
wards, pouring his troubles into listening ears,
and with tender arms round him, he seemed even
to gather a certain satisfaction from the past,
though it did not by any means extend to-his
contemplation of the future. Yet he was not
without a certain amount of courage, and one little
incident which he related in his usual baby-way,
and without any idea that he had behaved well,
gave Gladys great joy.

“Yes, Sissy, I said my prayers,” he said, “and
kissed Ma-ma’s photograrf; but the boys laughed
and said nasty things. I didn’t like it. But it
wouldn’t matter to God, would it, Sissy?”

~ “No, my darling, God could hear you; and I
knew you would be brave and say your prayers.”

After that the weeks were not quite so long to
Gladys. Saturdays always came, of that she was
106 GLADYS.

sure, and Baby with it. The weather didn’t matter.
She grew interested in her lessons, and was so
quiet and graceful in her behaviour that her aunt
could not help noticing it, and had her downstairs
oftener in the evening, and even took her out
driving once or twice.

So the winter went on. Gladys grew pale and
thin, but then her aunt explained she was grow-
ing very fast. And Baby had a timid, hunted
look about his face, but otherwise he was more
independent and boyish in his talk; and this
amused and delighted Gladys, so that she did not
understand the other, or indeed often see it. He
told his troubles still, but not in the old way; the
boys were “fellows,” and some were “sneaks,”
and some were “ cads,” and some were “ bounces.”
The-masters he designated by familiar and disre-
spectful soubriquets, and this he extended to
Gladys’ governess, whom he presently styled “Old
Hard-and-fast,” to Gladys’ horror and secret

amusement. But, indeed, she was altogether
_ charmed by his manly airs,

Christmas came and went. The holidays were
very brief, and Gladys was long at work, even,
before Baby went back to school. Miss M‘Arthur,
who disliked the boy who had screamed and
kicked her, regarded his departure with great
satisfaction.
“CUT SCHOOL.” 107

All January the snow lay deep on the ground;
the cold was intense. The beginning of February
brought no change, and Gladys pined and longed
for a sign of milder weather; for Baby complained
of the cold at school.

It was on the second Saturday of February
that a terrible thing happened. For the Saturday
came and wore away, and there was no sign of
Baby.

CHAPTER XII.
-“QUT SCHOOL.”

OR some time before the Christmas holidays,
Baby had been considered sufficiently inde-
pendent to come from school on the Saturdays,
and to return there, by the tramway cars and
walking: He had been rather proud of his pro-
motion; though it had, of course, put a stop to
Gladys going to meet him. But she had almost
won a promise from her aunt that in the spring,
“if she were good,” a vague but never omitted
stipulation, she might be trusted to go and meet
him, and to this both looked. forward and antici-
pated with many bright dreams.
But this Saturday that Baby did not come was
a terribly severe cold day, and on these occasions
108 GLADYS.

he had his aunt’s permission to.take a cab; and
Gladys, who was suffering from cold, sat in the
window watching and listening, her heart full of
anticipation and delight.

Allher little preparations were made. The room
was just as Baby liked it, and there was every-
thing he liked for tea; and a nice package of good
things to take back to school, besides all her extra
pocket-money. And Fiddle was newly washed,
with a new ribbon, and sat on her lap listening
and watching too.

But it was all in vain, for Baby did not come.
The time passed. She grew impatient, then fretful,
then anxious, and by and by the cold and the
headache, which she would never have noticed if
Baby had come, grew very bad; and weary with
watching and sick with hope deferred, and a host
of unanswerable questions and anxieties, she got
through the evening as best she could, and sick-
hearted. went to bed.

She tossed about feverishly for a long, long
time before she could go to sleep, and the next
day she fretted herself ill with anxiety, yet it
never occurred to her to mention the matter to
her aunt; Miss M‘Arthur did not love Baby, and
would only pooh-pooh her anxieties, and she could
not bear that. Had all eternity dropped into
Sunday? No, it passed, and Monday came with
“QUT SCHOOL.” 109

new life and hope, and passed also. Still the
little girl was silent. It might be that Baby had
a cold and could not get out on Saturday, and had
not been able to write.

It was five o’clock on Wednesday. Miss Ander-
son had just gone, and Miss M‘Arthur was out,
- and Gladys was trying to solace herself by
wandering through the house and showing. the
pretty things to Fiddle, and talking to him about
Baby. She had reached the hall and passed into
her aunt’s little morning-room, when a bark from
Fiddle attracted her attention. The little dog
was. on a chair at the window and evidently
greatly excited. Gladys went over and looked,
then with a cry of delight rushed into the hall
again and opened the door, and with a gurgle
clutched her brother in her arms.

“Oh, Baby, ’'m delighted! Did they let you
come to-day because you couldn’t come on Satur-
day? Oh, how anxious I was!”

“ Hush, Sissy,” said the boy in a stern new tone,
which made her start and look at him. “Is that
old Grump in or out?”

“Out, dear. Why?”

“Tm thankful for that. And Old Hard-and-
fast’s away?”

“Yes, just a few minutes ago. Come upstairs.
Baby, what isthe matter?” Her tone had changed
110 GLADYS.

too, and was apprehensive. She held his arm as
they went upstairs and marvelled that he did
not speak. When they were in the nursery he
threw down his hat and turned to her: “Gladys,
I’ve cut school.”

“You've what?”

“Cut school—left school!” impatiently.

“Left school! For altogether—for good?”

“T don’t know; that depends.”

“Oh, Baby, Baby! what have you done?”

“T don’t want the servants to see me, or any-
one; I don’t know how I'd have got in if you
hadn’t opened the door.”

« Never mind that now, none of them saw you.
Maggie and Grayson are out, and none of the
others come up here. What is it, Baby?”

“TH tell you, Pll try and tell you. Oh, Sissy!”
Those words were the first sign of breaking down
he had given. Then he went on quickly: “I’m the
youngest at school, you know, and the thinnest.”
This might have sounded comical enough to an
outsider, but Baby was right in stating it, for it
was to the point. “I’m taller than a lot of the
fellows; but the next youngest is over ten, I’m
only eight. Last Saturday the big boys said
they wanted me, and I needn’t send for a cab. I
said I’d got to go home to my sister, and I couldn’t |
stay. The biggest boy at our school is fifteen,
“CUT SCHOOL.” 111

and he’sasbigasaman. The big boysare brutes.”
There was a little pause and he seemed to be
breaking down a little again; the first flush of
excitement had died away and he was ghastly
pale. “Go on, Baby darling, go on,” Gladys said,
with absorbing anxiety and eagerness.

“They wanted me to get them the key of the
cellar. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart were out for the
day; and some of the big boys don’t belong to
Edinburgh, and they stay in school the Saturdays
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart go out, and they do—
sneaky mean things.” The white refined face
expressed disgust. “They wanted to put me
through the little wee window that lets you into
the store-room, and hand them out figs and
preserves and everything; and the key of the
cellar, it’s kept there.” Another breathless pause.
“There’s another window to the store-room, but
it’s shut; this un’s so little, it’s always open. And
I said I wouldn't.”

“My brave soldier! The wicked boys!”

“Then they beat me,’ went on Baby rapidly.
“M‘Dougall isa brute. Oh! they beat me awful,
Sissy. Im sure there’s scars all over me yet. I
thought I must be bleeding to death, like the
slave in Uncle Tom's Cabin I'm reading just now;
but I never cried, An’ it couldn’t have been blood,”
reflectively, “for my clothes didn’t stick when
112 GLADYS.

I was taking them off.” This picture so affected
Gladys that she buried her face in her hands and
eried, “Oh, Baby, Baby! Oh, I would like to kill
those wicked boys!”

“Never mind, I didn’t cry. You see, all the other
fellows were too big to go through the window,”
he went on with graphic disconnection, “and they
said they’d make me. They took me out, and
pushed me through the window head first, and I
fell to the floor. The window was a good height
from the floor, and I got hurt. And I handed them
the things and the key,” he ended with amazing
calmness.

“Oh, Baby! that was wrong. Oh, Baby! how
could you?”

But the boy did not fully understand his guilt;
to him it was only that fate had been too strong
for him. “I couldn't help it, Sissy; they said they'd
kill me. They said if Mr. Stewart found me he
would half kill me, and then expel me. I was
frightened, Sissy; and they had beat me so badly,
I was all sore.”

“Poor darling. The wicked wretches. Oh, Baby!
but that was a dreadful thing to do. You should
have stayed till Mr. Stewart came and then have
told him.”

“But you said I was never to tell ales Sissy;
and they said they would kill me,”
“CUT SCHOOL.” 113

Ah! will the grown-up people never under-
stand the confusion which a great fear and a good
principle will make in a childish heart. I think
that it was not altogether want of courage that
led Baby wrong. I think had he seen his way
clear, and been sure of Gladys’ approval, he
would have had courage; but he did not see his
way. “And after all Mr. Stewart found out.”

“Found out! Oh, Baby!”

“Yes, about the things being taken; but he does

_not know how they got them. And so, oh Sissy!
all the little boys are to have a letter from their
friends to say where they were on Saturday. And,
oh, Sissy! M‘Dougall says it’s my only chance.”

“What is your only chance?”

“To say I was here.”

“ But, Baby, it would not be true.”

“No; but M‘Dougall says he'll kill me if I tell.
Oh, Gladys, what shall I do? he is such a brute.
And he took my wrist to-day and turned it round

. until it was—oh!” and he held out his slender

delicate wrist.

A passionate exclamation passed Gladys’ lips;
and then she clasped her hands tight, and her
eyes seemed to glow with burning thoughts.
Like a flash it passed through her mind that her |
aunt did not know Baby had not been with her
on Saturday. She had only to say he was with

(586) u
114 GLADYS.

her, and the note would be written and Baby
saved from ill-usage and punishment. And then
she knew it would not be true; and how could
she be a true soldier and tell a lie? But how
could she let her frail brother, her mother’s charge
to her, bear the threefold punishment which
would be inflicted on him by his aunt, master,
and cowardly school-fellow? She looked at him.
Such a slight, frail-looking creature (he did, by
the by, look much more fragile than he was,
. though he was by no means robust)—those mourn-
ful eyes, that pathetic mouth: how could she let
him bear more punishment? It was a terrible
struggle; would her courage fail her? If she could
have borne the beatings and the punishment how
willingly she would have done so, but to be false
and untrue how could she?

“Baby, did Mr. Stewart allow you out now?”

“No, MDougall said I must go; and I must go
back quick, it was all found out to-day. What
shall I do, Sissy? Mr. Stewart is going to write
to-morrow, I think.”

She went to him and put her arm round him
lovingly. “Baby,” she said, “we are soldiers, aren’t
we?”

“Yes, Sissy,” he said with an impatient sigh.
Another boy would have been angry perhaps, but
Sissy was always a great and wise person to him.
“GUT SCHOOL.” 115

“And we have dangers to face, and we must
not be cowards. Oh, Baby, we must not tell a
falsehood!”

“No, Sissy; but I don't know what to do.”

“Let us ask Jesus.”

They knelt down together, and one at least
prayed earnestly. When they rose Gladys looked
her own brave self again.

“Baby,” she said, “will you stay with me? I
am afraid to let you go back to that wicked boy.
Stay here to-night and I will send a message to.
Mr. Stewart, and in the morning I will go and
see him and tell him all about it.” She looked
quite queenly in her dignity as she said these
words. Baby looked at her with admiration.

“But what about Aunt?” he said.

“T do not think we need tell her,” said Gladys,
with, it must be acknowledged, some inward
qualms.

It was too gréat a temptation to the little boy,
who was worn out with excitement and harsh
treatment. If anyone could protect him “Sissy”
would; she was so wise, and good, and strong.
And as for Gladys, in spite of those uneasy feel-
ings she did honestly believe she was doing what
her mother would have wished. Without more
ado it was decided Baby should stay, and the two
now turned their attention to making out a plan
116 GLADYS.

of action; and in spite of all dangers poor Baby
had a sense of security and rest.

CHAPTER XIII.
PLAN OF ACTION.

HE first thing to be decided was how to send

a note to Mr. Stewart. The writing of it

was easy enough, so Gladys said, and indeed

talked of it in such a calm and assured way that

Baby felt it was quite the proper and regular

thing to do. So Gladys, who did not want to
waste time, wrote, with great care:—

“DEAR MR. STEWART, .
“My brother is with me, and will stay
until to-morrow, so you need not be anxious
about him. I will call to see you to-morrow and
explain.
“Believe me, Yours truly,
“GLADYS WHRENLY.”

This was scarcely finished when a sound of
footsteps alarmed the innocent culprits. Gladys
pushed Baby towards the bed-room, whispering,
I fear, some injunction about the wardrobe, and
“PLAN OF ACTION.” ; 117

then went out to reconnoitre, with a beating
heart. .

To her great delight, and a little to her surprise,
‘she saw Maggie, who had returned earlier than
expected, and was now bringing up the tea.

“Oh, Maggie! I am so delighted it is you; Gray-
son is so kind, but she never knows. Come in
quick, I have so much to tell you.” She had
soon taken Maggie into full confidence, and a tall
thin form was dragged ‘out of the wardrobe, and
kissed and-hugged in a rough but very consoling
way, by the warm-hearted Scotch girl.

Then the letter was shown, and Maggie read it
with great admiration, and at once said:

“See, Miss Gladys, Ill take it. The mistress I]
not be in till late, she’s at a lecture; and Grayson
ll be in in no time. None of them downstairs
knows he’s here. I'll leave everything up for you
before I go, and then you needn’t let anyone in
but Grayson. Ill take the cars, Miss, and be back
in no time.”

There was another hugging match, and then
after a little delay Maggie departed, and the two
children gave their undivided attention to the
tea-tray. They were a little nervous at odd
sounds, but that wore off, especially when Maggie
returned and Grayson had been taken into con-
fidence. So the night passed. Miss M‘Arthur
118 GLADYS.

returned late and very cross and went straight
to bed, little thinking that upstairs a fair and a
dark head lay on Gladys’ pillow, and the happy
brother and sister were dreaming of home.

For the first few minutes after they were
awake next morning the two could think of
nothing but the delight of being together, then
there was a terrible time of doubt as to what
was the best thing todo. Both felt pretty brave
as long as they were together, and some of their
plans Paak quite a horoie tinge.

- They had wakened very early, and so long as
everything seemed far off it was easy to plan.
But when Maggie came to tell them breakfast
was ready they had to face the stern realities of
the day, and the immediate and pressing question
arose, “Miss Anderson would be here directly
after breakfast, and how was Gladys to get away
to see Mr. Stewart?”

“Miss Anderson never would let me, and she’d
- be sure to find you were here, Baby; and then
you know, if I don’t go early Mr. Stewart will
be sending for you.” |

Baby, who was putting finishing touches to his
hair, looked rather helpless. Before he had time
to answer Maggie gave a second tap, and putting
in her head said: “Come away, my bonnie dearies,
Ive hot buttered toast for you, and eggs.”
“PLAN OF ACTION.” 119

“Our prayers, Baby; come and say our prayers,”
Gladys said, and the two knelt down together.
When they rose the sister said, “I always feel
braver after I've said my prayers; don’t you,
Baby? It’s like going to the captain and getting
an order, and having courage given you at the
same time.”

“T prayed for God to make it all right,” said
Baby. “He will, won't he?”

“Yes,” returned the practical little soldier, “but
not unless you obey him; you must do your
share, you know. Come in now, we must take
breakfast quickly.” They went into the nursery
and set to work; but both were silent and
thoughtful. Then Gladys said, “I say, Baby, I
think I see the right way now. I’ve béen seeing
it more and more since I said my prayers. We
must tell Aunt.”

Baby dropped his toast and looked up in con-
sternation. “Oh, Sissy!”

“Yes, Baby, let me do it, dear. P’m sure when I
tell Aunt all she'll forgive me, and I’m sure she will
_ make it all right for you; she has been quite kind
to me lately, and I know she hates sneakiness.
And, Baby, I think it’s right she should know.”

“But, Sissy, she'll be so angry with me.”

“No she won’t, for I'll take all the blame. And,
Baby, if she 7s angry we'll stand it, and be brave,
120 - GLADYS.

and I know she'll make it all right with Mr.
Stewart.”

“Yes; but M‘Dougall. He’ll kill me, Sissy; ate
said he would. de

“Will he? Do you mean to say Mr. Stewart
won't look after him!”

Gladys was silent a moment, and then, with-
out in the least knowing she was doing so, she
appealed to all the little boy’s finest instincts:
“Well, Baby, J think that would be right. What
do you think we should do yourself?”

There was a good long pause.

“Sissy, we'll do what you say. After all the
licking wasn’t so awfully bad, I bilieve I could
stand ’nother.”

He was growing strong, you see, and idee his
share of the fighting too.

The next thing was to see Miss M‘Arthur at
once, and keep up courage.

“Shall I go with you, Sissy?”

“No, dear, you might startle Aunt. Ill go and
tell -her all first, and then you'll come;:and you
must be very nice, won’t you darling?”

“Tl try.”

“Very well, and now I’m off. Don’t be afraid
of Miss Anderson if she comes; you can give
Fiddle his breakfast and tidy around,” and with
a little more lingering she left the room.
WINDING UP. ~ 121

CHAPTER XIV.
WINDING UP.

OTH children had been too much occupied
with their own engrossing troubles to hear
the fuss and arrival which was just then taking”
place downstairs, and as the hall was in its usual
state when she reached it, Gladys did not hesitate
to enter her Aunt’s morning-room. There she
paused for one instant while the expression of
her face changed from firm determination to great
delight, and then she sprang forward with a cry
of joy: “Oh, Miss Dighton! Miss Dighton!”

Florence rose quickly from the chair in which
she had been seated talking to Miss M‘Arthur
and hastened to embrace the little girl, saying
tenderly, “So you do not forget me, my dear little
Gladys? I am very glad. But I am not Miss
Dighton now.” And she smiled at the puzzled
little face looking up to hers as she sat down
. again and drew the little girl to her side.

Miss M‘Arthur looked half inclined to resent
Gladys’ intrusion, but neither her niece nor
lady Denny seemed to remember her at the
moment.

“Not Miss Dighton!” said Gladys. Then witha
122 GLADYS,

new light on her face, “Why, you don’t mean that
you married Sir Archie?”

“Yes, that’s just what I do; and Sir Archie and
I are both anxious to have two little friends of
ours with us for a little, and so I have come to
see what Miss M‘Arthur says.”

“How did you come downstairs, Gladys?”
inquired Miss M‘Arthur. “Were you sent for?”

Gladys face fell about a mile as the few seconds’
forgetfulness of trouble fled, and she remembered
Baby upstairs. “No, Aunt,” she said, “I came
to see you; I have a great deal to tell you.”

“Well, I think I haven't time to hear it all just
now,” her aunt replied, but not angrily; “it would
not probably interest Lady Denny.”

“But, Aunt, it is very important, if Lady Denny
would excuse me.” Then she looked with the
beautiful expressive eyes Florence remembered
so well, into her friend’s face. “It is about dear
Baby, who is in great trouble through the fault
of some big, cowardly boys.” Her aunt gave an
impatient exclamation, Gladys’ eyes grew more
earnest and entreating. “Please let me tell you
now, Aunt, because it will be too late if I do not.”

Florence pressed her arm closer round the
slender waist, and Miss M‘Arthursaid impatiently,
“Well, well, what is this great trouble?”

Then Gladys told it all, well and steadily,
WINDING UP. 123

nought extenuating and nought setting down in
malice. Several times Florence could not refrain
from exclaiming indignantly, and, to do Miss
M‘Arthur justice, she was so angry at the conduct
of the big boys that she almost overlooked Baby’s
fault, and absolutely never noticed the fact of his
having come home and stayed a night without
her knowledge. She was a spoilt child, and, you
see, spoilt children don’t allow any one to be un-
just but themselves. Then Baby was sent for,
and acquitted himself so well that in a short
time he and Gladys were dismissed, light hearted,
to the nursery, to retail their triumph to Maggie
and Grayson. G

Florence and Miss M‘Arthur then held a little
consultation, and it was decided that Gladys and
Baby should pay the proposed visit to England;
their education would go on as usual, and Baby
would feel more fitted for school after a time.

For Florence had heard from her friend Gladys
—the old Gladys—and it was her last letter which
had sent her down to Scotland. Lady Whrenly,
. Indeed, had begged her to go, saying her little
daughter’s letters had been so sad and anxious
since the boy had been sent to school. There
was a great deal in the tone of the letter which
pleased Florence, but with one paragraph she
was especially delighted:
124 GLADYS.

“Oh, Florrie, you do not know how I watch -
for Gladys’ letters, or what a revelation they are
to me; I think I never knew the child till now.
Such a sincere, loving, earnest little creature, what
a comfort she would be to me here! There is one
thing, when I get her to myself again I shall
know how to value her. Do go and see them,
Florrie. If they are miserable have them with
you for a while; if they are really unhappy I am
sure you will let me know.”

In reply to this letter Florence wrote a short
time after to her friend: “The children are with
me here in England, as happy as possible; they
were miserable because they were separated. I
do not think Miss M‘Arthur understands children
very well, though I’m sure she meant to be kind.
I have engaged a tutor who will keep Baby in
order, which, as he is a darling, he does not need,
and he and Gladys are as happy as the day.
Gladys is simply splendid. A sweet, true, little
Christian girl without a single ‘air’ or bit of cant
about her; further (remember I warned you),
she is going to be a little beauty, and you will
and ought to be proud of her in every way.

“Now, I have a plan to propose. Will you let
the children stay with me? Archie’s young
brother will be here, and the three will be edu-,
cated together until the two boys go to school in
WINDING UP. 125 ~

a year or two; Gladys will be with me, and I
know they will be happy. I know Miss M‘Arthur |
will not mind, for we had a long talk about it,
and they can pay her a visit now and again.”

Now I have only a few words to add, for
Florence’s letter tells nearly all.

Lady Whrenly was overjoyed at the proposal,
and the children, when they heard the good news,
could scarcely believe it.

Miss M‘Arthur was very glad to get rid of them,
but on the whole she was very kind; and I must
add that in the future when they came to visit
her she grew very fond of them.

They stayed with Lady Denny for more than
two years in her beautiful home in Cornwall,
where they were very happy with their kind
friend and little playfellow Rex Denny, and all
paid loyal allegiance to the awfully funny little
dark-eyed baby that came to Florence one spring.

At the end of that time a wonderful piece of
news came. In the far away East Indies Lady
Whrenly had another little girl, and both were
coming home in the summer..

And now it is another July day, like the one
on which we first saw Gladys, and again all the
windows and doors are open; and, white and cool-
looking among its dark foliage, Whrenly seems
126 GLADYS.

to dream the hot hours away. Is everything
asleep, then? A fresh and merry laugh rings out,
and then “Oh, Baby, Baby!” Opposite the draw-
ing-room windows, under the shade of a tree,
sits a beautiful little girl of thirteen or fourteen
years of age, dressed: in white, and with dark
hair hanging about her shoulders; and in her
lap, and pulling wildly at her hair, and crowing
triumphantly, is a baby. It is Gladys and her
little sister Muriel. All the world may be sleepy
and drowsy with this hot weather, but not they.
They are playing and laughing, while Fiddle, who
has never been able to make up his mind about
the baby, blinks at them from the rug on which
he is dozing peacefully.

Time passes; a little cool breeze comes up.
Baby Muriel is tired of play and has fallen asleep.
A lady comes to one of the windows.

“Come, Gladys,” she calls gently; “tea is ready.
Do you see no sign of the boys?”

Tt is the beautiful Lady Whrenly. Beautiful
still, but more faded than she should be by only
four years in the East Indies. Indeed she is not
in good health at all, though growing stronger
since she came home. In every other way she
is changed for the better. Gaiety has lost its
charms for her, and in those lonely years abroad
she has learned to know what home and her
WINDING UP. 127

children’s love is to a mother; and more, to know
the true loving heart of her little daughter, which
gave love and obedience so freely, expecting no-
thing in return.

Unexpected good fortune enabled Sir Ralph
to leave the East Indies, and it was with a very
thankful heart Lady Whrenly saw her home
again.

Now she stands at the window, watching the
tall handsome girl come towards her with the
baby in her arms.

“No, Mama, not a sign of them. I think I'll
take baby to Maggie, she is sleeping now.”

And she leaves the room and carries the lovely
sleeping baby to the dear old nurseries, where
Maggie and Grayson reign jointly and happily.

When she returns to the drawing-room a merry
but noisy couple are retailing their exploits to
Lady Whrenly. Baby, still keeping tremendously
tall, and awfully thin, and wonderfully lovely,
rushes towards her at once, holding out an ex-
tremely small fish. “Oh, but we nearly caught one
six times as large,” he says pathetically, and thus
proving himself a true angler in embryo; “didn’t
we, Rex?”

And Gladys is heartless enough to laugh as
Rex nods vehement assent.

So we will leave them there in the sunlight,
128 GLADYS.

united and happy. Do you ask me if all Gladys’
troubles were over? I tell you, no; we will have
troubles so long as we live. But Gladys has laid
in a great stock of courage, and she knows where
to take all her troubles; and believe me, my chil-
dren, that is the only way.

THE END.
4 SELECTION OF
BLACKIE & SON’S

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The Hermit Hunter of the Wilds. By Dr. Gorpon Sraszzs.
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as Ambition: A Story for Children. By Evenyn Evererr
REEN,

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The Brig ‘‘Audacious.” By Auan Coz.

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Jasper’s Conquest. By Exizasera J. Lysacur.

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Gutta-Perecha Willie: The Working Genius. By GzorcE Mao

Donatp, LL.D.

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2 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.

The Lads of Little Clayton. By R. Srsap.

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Ten "Boys who lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now. By Janz
ANDREWs. With 20 Illustrations.
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A Waif of the Sea: Or the Lost Found. By Katz Woop.
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Miss Willowburn’s Offer. By Saran Dovpyey.
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‘A Garland for Girls. By Louisa M. Axcort.
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Brothers in Arms; A Story of the Crusades. By F. B. Harrison.
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The Ball of Fortune. By Caartes Pzarcz.
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Miss Fenwick’s Failures. By Esmé Sruarr.
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Gytha’s Message: A Tale of Saxon England. By Emma Lasuim.
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PavLy. ‘
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The Family Failing. By Dartry Datz.

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' BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 3



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.

The Stories of Wasa and Menzikoff: The Deliverer of Sweden,
and the Favourite of Czar Peter. .

Stories of the Sea in Former Days.
Tales of Captivity and Exile.

Famous Discoveries by Sea and Land.
Stirring Events of History.

Adventures in Field, Flood, and Forest.

BLACKIE’S TWO SHILLING SERIES.
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Sam Silvan’s Sacrifice: The Story of two Fatherless Boys. By
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A Warrior King; A Boy’s Adventures in South Africa, By J.
EVELYN.
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Susan. By Amy Wa ron.

“A clever little story, in which the authoress shows a great deal of insight into
children’s feelings and motives.”—Pall Mall Gazette.

Linda and the Boys. By Czormsa Ssupy Lownpzs.
“Ts full of the kind of humour that children love.”—Liverpool Mercury.
Swiss Stories for Children and those who Love Children.
From the German of Mapam Sprrr. By Lucy WHEELOOK.
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Aboard the “Atalanta.” By Henry Farra.

“We doubt if any boy after reading it would be tempted to the great mistake
of running away from school under any pretext whatever.”—Practical Teacher.

The Penang Pirate. By Joun C. Huronzson.
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Teddy: The Story of a “Little Pickle.” By Joan C. Hurcuzson.

«There is real humour in the tale.”—The Times.
4 BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



TWO SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

Warner’s Chase: Or the Gentle Heart. By Anniz S. Swan.

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New Light through Old Windows. A Series of Stories illus-
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The Hawthorns. By Auy Watton.
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Dorothy’s Dilemma: A Tale of the Time of Charles I, By Cano-
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“An exquisitely told story. The heroine is as fine a type of girlhood as one
could set before our little British damsels of to-day.”—Christian Leader.

The Squire’s Grandson: A Devonshire Story. By J. M. Cazz-
WELL.
“Cannot fail to favourably impress all young readers.”—Schoolmaster.
Insect Ways on Summer Days in, Garden, Forest, Field, and
Stream. By Jenner? Humpureys. With 70 Illustrations.
“‘A charming book for young people.”—Schoolmaster.
Magna Charta Stories: Or Struggles for Freedom in the Olden
Time, Edited by AnrHUR GILMAN, A.M.
“A book which ought to be in the hands of all boys.” Educational News.

The Wings of Courage; Axp Tus Croup-Srinner. Translated

from the French of Grorcz SAND, by Mrs. Corxran,

“Mrs. Corkran has earned our gratitude by translating into readable English
these two charming little stories.”—Atheneum.

FOR THE YOUNGER CHILDREN.
Adventures of Mrs. Wishing-to-be. By Aticz Corxran.
“Simply a charming book for little girls.”—Saturday Review.
Our Dolly: Her Words and Ways. By Mrs. R. H. Reap.
“Prettily told and prettily illustrated.”—Guardian.

Fairy Fancy: What she Heard and Saw. By Mrs. R. H. Reap.
“The authoress has very great insight into child nature ”"—Glasgow Herald.
BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR: YOUNG PEOPLE. 5



TWO SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

Four Little Mischiefs.

By Rosa MuLHoLianpD.

“A charming bright story about real children.”— Watchman.

Little Tottie, and Two Other Stories,

By Tuomas ARcHER.

“The book is a most alluring prize for the younger ones.”—Schoolmaster.

Naughty Miss Bunny. By Crara Mutsorzanp.
“This naughty child is positively delightful.”—Land and Water.

Chirp and Chatter; Or, Lessons rrom Frenp anD TREE. By

Altce BANKS.

With 54 Illustrations by Gorpon Browns.

“A nicer present for a child one could not select.”—Glasgow Herald.

BLACKIE’S EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES.
In Crown 8vo, cloth extra, each with Tinted or Coloured Tllustrations.

Tales of Daring and Danger. By
G. A. HENTY.

The Seven Golden Keys. By JAMES
E, ARNOL

The eee, be a Queen.

ROWSELL.

Joan’s Adventures at the North
Pole and Elsewhere. By ALICE
CORKRAN.

Filled with Gold. By JENNIE PER-
RETT,

By Mary

Edwy: Or, Was he a Coward? By
ANNETTE LYSTER.

The Battlefield Treasure.
BAYFORD HARRISON. '

Yarns on the Beach. By G. A.
HENTY. -

By F.

ATerrible Coward. By G. M. FENN.

The Late Miss Hollingford. By
Rosa MULHOLLAND.

Our Frank, and other Stories. By
AMY WALTON.

The Pedlar and his Dog. By Mary
C. ROWSELL.



Into the Haven. By ANNIE 8S, SWAN.

Tom_Fineh’s Monkey. By J. C.
HUTCHESON.

Our General: A Story for Girls. By
ELIZABETH J. LYSAGHT.

Aunt Hesba’s Charge.
BETH J. LYSAGHT.

By Order of sured Maude. By
Lovisa CRow.

Miss Grantley § Girls, and theStories
she told them. By THOS. ARCHER.

ane eeounless oe Little Tim. By
GREGSON

Down and ae Hse
Gow

By Enza-

By GREGSON

The Happy Lad. By B. ByGRNSON.

The Patriot Martyr, and other Nar-
ratives of Female Heroism.

Madge’s Mistake. By ANNIE E.
ARMSTRONG.

Box of Stories. By HoRACE HAppy-
MAN,

When I was a Boy in China. By
YAN PHou LEE.

“’We are able to recommend one and all of these; their excellence is remarls

able.”—Schoot Guardian.
6 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BLACKIE’S SHILLING SERIES.

Square 16mo, 128 pp., elegantly bound in cloth, with Frontispieces in
Colours.

Mr. blpseombess Apples, By JULIA
A eee ; against Her Will, By
EMA LESLIE,

An Emigrant Bo *s Story. 5B:
AscoTT R. Hove. “d >: 2

The Castle on the Shore, By Isa-
BEL HORNIBROOK.

John a’ Dale. By Mary C. RowsELL,
Jock and his Friend. By Cora
LANGTON.

Gladys: ¢ Oe que Sister's Charge. By
In the gunnce Holidays,

NETT HUMPHREYS,
How the Strike Began.
LESLIE.

By JEN-
By EMMA

Tales from the Russian of Madame
Kubalensky.

Cinderella’s Cousin, By PENELOPE.
Their New Home. By A. 8. Fenn.
dJanie’s Holiday. By C. REDFoRD.

The Children of -Haycombe. By
ANNIE §. FEW

The pRB OE of the **Petrel.” By

The Wise Beinceeel By M. HARRIET
M. Capss.

A Boy Musician: Or, the Young Days
of Mozart.

Hatto’s Tower.
SRLL.

Fairy Lovebairn’s Favourites. By
J. DICKINSON.

By Mary C. Row-

Alf Jetsam. By Mrs. Gro. CUPPLEs.
The Redfords, By Mrs. G. CupPuus.
Missy. By F. BAYFoRD HARRISON.
Hidden Seed. By Emma LESLIE.

' Jack’s Two Sovereigns, By ANNIE
8. FENN.

Ursula’s Aunt. By ANNIE S. FENN.
A pie Adventurer, By GREGSON
OW.

Olive Mount. By ANNIn 8S. Fenn.

Three Little Ones, By C. Laneron.

Tom Watkins’ Mistake. By Emma
LEsLre.

Two Little Brothers. By M. Har-
RIET M. CAPES.

The New Boy at Merriton.

The Blind Boy of Dresden.

Jon of Iceland: A True Story.

Stories from Shakespeare,

Every Man in his Place.

Fireside Fairies and Flower
Fancies,

To the Sea in Ships.

Little Daniel: a Story of the Rhine.

Jack’s Victory: Stories about Dogs.

Story of a King: By one of his Sol-
diers.

Prince Alexis, or Old Russia.
Sasha the Serf: Stories of Russian
Life.

True Stories of Foreign History.

_“The stories are without exception highly interesting, and all enforce some
desirable truth. Teachers should make a note of this excellent series,”—Teachers’

Aid.
BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN. 7
a
THE NINEPENNY SERIES OF BOOKS FOR
CHILDREN.

Neatly bound in cloth extra, Each contains 96 pages and a Coloured
Tilustration.

Things will Take a Turn; By
BEATRICE HARRADEN.

Max or Baby. By Ismay THorn.

The wrest Thimble: and other Stories.
By Mrs. MUSGRAVE.

J ack a-Dandy; or the Heir of Castle
Fergus, By E. J. LYsagut.

A Day of Adventures By CHAR-
LOTTE W’

The Golden pe and other Stories.

Hans the Painter. By Mary ©.
ROWSELL.

Little Troublesome.
HORNIBROOK.

My beady. May. By Harriet Bourt-

By ISABEL

A eis Hero.
GRAVE.

Prince Jon’s Pilgrimage, By
JESSIE FLEMING.

By Mrs. Mus-

By FRANCIS CLARE. eed se _Ambition By JENNIE
The Queen of Squats. By IsaBEL
HORNIBROOK. Senpent ae Drummer Boy. By
By EMwa ‘ARY C. ROWSELL.

Shuecks: A Story for Boys.
LESLIE. my the Mersey.
GEORGE CUPPLES.

A Blind Pupil. By ANNIE S. FENN.
Lost and Found. By Mrs. CarL
ROTHER.

By Mrs.
Sylvia Brooke. By M. Harriet M.
CAPES.

‘The Little Cousin. By A. 8, Fenn.

In Cloudland. By Mrs. MuseRAvVE.

Jack_and the Gypsies, By KATE
‘Woon.

Fisherman Grim. By Mary C.
ROWSELL.

“They are admirably adapted for the young. The lessons deduced are such
as to mould children’s minds in a good groove. We cannot too highly commend
them for their excellence.”—Schoolmistress.

SOMETHING FOR THE VERY LITTLE ONES.
Fully Illustrated. 64 pp., 32mo, cloth, Sixpence each.
Tales Easy and Small for the Youngest of All. In no word will you see more
letters than three. By JENNETT HUMPHREYS.

Old Diek Grey and Aunt Kate’s Way. Stories in little words of not more than
four letters. By JENNETT HUMPHREYS.

Maud’s Doll and Her Walk. In Picture and Talk. In little words of not
more than four letters. By JENNETT HUMPHREYS.

In Holiday Time. And other Stories. In little words of not more than five
letters. By JENNET? HUMPHREYS.

Whisk and Buzz. By Mrs. A. H. GARLIOK.
8 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.

THE SIXPENNY SERIES FOR CHILDREN.
Neatly bound in cloth extra. Each contains 64 pages and a Coloured Cut.

A Little Man of War, By L. £.
TIDDEMAN,

Lady Daisy. By CAROLINE STEWART

Dew, By H. Mary WILSON.

Chris’s Old Violin. By J. LocKHART.

Mischievous Jack, By 4. CoRKRAN.

The Twins. By L. E. TIppEMAN.

Pet’s Project. By Cora LANGTON.

The Chosen Treat. By ©. Wrarr.

Little Neighbours, By A. S. Fenn.

Jim. By CHRISTIAN BUREE.

Little Curiosity: Or, A German Christ-
mas. By J. M. CALLWELL:

Sara the Wool-gatherer,

Fairy Stories: told by PENELOPE.

A New Year’s Tale. By M.A.CURRIE.

Little Mop, By Mrs. Bray.

The Tree Cake, By W. L. Rooper.

Nurse Peggy, and Little Dog Trip.

Fanny’s King. By DarLry DALE.

Wild Marsh Marigolds, By D. DALE.

Kitty’s Cousin. By Hannan B.
MACKENZIE.

Cleared at Last. By Julia Gop-
DARD.

A Year with Nellie. By A. 8. FENN.

Little Dolly Forbes, By Do.

The Little Brown Bird. A Story of
Industry.

The Maid of Domremy.

Little Eric: a Story of Honesty.

Uncle Ben the Whaler.

The Palace of Luxury.

The Charcoal Burner.

Willy Black: a Story of Doing Right.

The Horse and His Ways.

The Shoemaker’s Present.

Lights to Walk by.

The Little Merchant.

Nicholina: a Story about an Iceberg.

A SERIES OF FOURPENNY REWARD BOOKS,
Each 64 pages, 18mo, Illustrated, in Picture Boards.

A Start in Life. By J. LockHarr.

Happy Childhood. By AIMéE DE
ENOIX DAWSON.

Dorothy’s Clock, By Do.
Toddy. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.

Stories about my Dolls. By FELICIA
MELANCTHON.

Stories about my Cat Timothy.
Delia’s Boots. By W. L. Rooper.
Lost on the Rocks. By R. Scorrer.

A Kitten’s Adventures. By CAro-
LINE STEWART.

Holidays at Sunnycroft. By ANNIE
8. SWAN.

Climbing the Hill, By Do.
A Year at Coverley. By Do.

Phil Foster. By J. LockHart
Papa’s Birthday. By W. L. Roopmr.
The Charm Fairy. By PENELOPE.
Little Tales for Little Children.
By M. A. Currie. a
Worthy of Trust. By H. B. Mac.
KENZIE.
Brave and True. By Greason Gow.

The Chiidren and the Water-Lily,
By JULIA GODDARD.

Poor Tom Olliver. By Do.
Maudie and Bertie. Grecson Gow.
Johnnie Tupper’s Temptation. Do.

Fritz’s Experiment. By Levirra
M‘LINTOCK.

Luey’s Christmas-Box.

** A Complete List of Books for the Young, prices fram 4d. to 7d, 6d.,
with Synopsis of their Contents, will be supplied on Application.

LONDON: BLACKIE & SON: GLASGOW, EDINBURGH, AND DUBLIN.
Se