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The Hanoverian period

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Title:
The Hanoverian period standard VII ; a reader and a textbook in one
Series Title:
Royal English history readers
Creator:
Gardiner, Samuel Rawson, 1829-1902
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
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T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
287 p. : ill., ports, maps. ; 19 cm.

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Kings and rulers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Battles -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Queens -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Textbooks -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Textbooks ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

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Publisher's advertisements precede text.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
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Bien









Code 1890. ;



The Royal
ENGLISH HISTORY
READERS

A New Series of HisroRICAL READERS prepared to meet the
latest requirements of the Education Code.

Beautifully Hlustrated, with Maps, Notes and Meanings,
Summaries, and Genealogical Tables.

Each Book is a Reader and Text-Book in One.

SIMPLE STORIES OF ENGLISH HISTORY for Sranparo II.
This Book contains a series of Stories relating to English History told in the
simplest language. The youngest child who is able to read can understand
them; and they are so arranged that they form_a groundwork for future
stages in this subject. 128 pages, cloth boards. Price 9a.

STORIES FROM EARLY ENGLISH HISTORY for Stanparp III.

In this Book our Country’s Story, from Roman Times to the Norman Con-

quest, is told in the form of a continuous narrative. Care has been taken

not to enter into details beyond the understanding of children who are yet

unable to look upon History as more than a series of interesting.and stirring
events. Cloth boards. Pricers. :

STORIES AND BIOGRAPHIES from 1066 to 1485 for Sranparp IV.

This Book contains the History of England from the Norman Conquest to the
Death of Richard the Third. Leading Men and Great Events have received
special attention. This, and the following volumes of the Series, are un-
usually rich in striking portraits of our Sovereigns and other important .
persons. Cloth boards. Price rs. 3d.

THE TUDOR PERIOD for Sranparp V. : :

The Biographies of Leading Persons are given separately in this Book.
Cloth boards. Price rs. 6a.

THE STUART PERIOD for Stanparp VI.

Special reference is made to the Civil War and to the functions of Parliament.
Numerous Biographies are also given. Cloth boards. Price rs. 6d.

THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD for Stanparp VII.

The growth of the British Empire receives special attention, and all important
Biographies are given. Cloth boards. Price rs. 6d.

T. Netson anv Sons, London, Edinburgh, and New York.





|

TO TEACHERS..

THE Code Requirements for Standard
~ VIL. are—* THE Hanoverian PERIob,
with special reference to the acquisition and
growth of the colonies and foreign posses-
sions of Great Britain. Biographies of six
eminent writers or statesmen.”

This Book fully meets the Requirements
of the Education Department asa Standard
Reader. (



|












Her Majesty THE QUEEN,

1819.

Born







THE ROYAL ENGLISH HISTORY READERS.

THE

HANOVERIAN
ae eer»

STANDARD VII.

A Reader and Text Book in One.







Royal School Series



T. NELSON AND SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New York

1891 :







BRP ee Pe
BESEBRRER RE RE SS ene ee Yn E

23.

bo bo
Ss &

GEORGE .THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE

CONTENTS.

*,° The Asterisks indicate Poetical Pieces. .

FIRST.—1.,
FIRST.—IL.,
FIRST.—III.,
FIRST.—Iv., >.
SECOND.—I.,

SECOND.—IL.,

THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN,* sit

GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE

. GEORGE THE

GEORGE THE

. GEORGE THE
. GEORGE THE

GEORGE THE

. GEORGE THE
. GEORGE THE

GEORGE THE

SECOND.—III.,

SECOND.—IV.,
SECOND.—V.,
THIRD.—I.,
THIRD.—IL.,
THIRD.—IIL.,
THIRD. —IV.,
THIRD.—Y.,
THIRD.—VI.,
THIRD.—VIL.,

THIRD.—VIIL.,

. BATTLE OF THE BALTIC, *
. GEORGE THE

THIRD.—IX.,

NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR,*

GEORGE THE

THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE,”™
. GEORGE THE

THIRD.—xX.,

THIRD.—XI.,

THE RETREAT FROM MOSCOW,~*

GEORGE THE

THIRD.—XIL.,

©

18
21
25
30
385
43
45
51
54
53
61
67
69
73
76
84
87
90
93
96
98
101
104



vill CONTENTS.

27.
28.
29.
30.
3.
32.
33,
, 84,
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42,
43,
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
Bl.
52.
53.

EXERCISES ON ALL THE LESSONS IN THE BOOK.

GEORGE THE THIRD.—xXIII.,
WATERLOO, *

GEORGE THE THIRD.—XIV., ..

THE MARINERS OF ENGLAND,*
GEORGE THE FOURTH.--I.,

GEORGE THE FOURTH.—Il., ..
WILLIAM THE FOURTH.—1., ..
WILLIAM THE FOURTH.—IL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—I., 5
VICTORIA’S TEARS,*

QUEEN VICTORIA.—IL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—IIL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—IV.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—V., 8 ae
THE WARDEN OF THE CINQUE PORTS,”
QUEEN VICTORIA.—VI.,
BALAKLAVA,*

QUEEN VICTORIA.—VIL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—VIIL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—IX.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—x.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—XL.,

‘QUEEN VICTORIA.-—XII.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—XIII.,

PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY,
HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.—I., :
HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.—IL., ..

CHIEF DATES,
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD,
GENEALOGICAL TREE,

107
112
116
122
125
129
182
136
142
145
148
152
156
159
163
166
V1
173
177

. 182

188
192.
195
198
201
209
212

217
263
270
288



THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.

—_—_—_—_4



HOUSE OF HANOVER.

(SIX SOVEREIGNS.)

1. GEORGE I., great-grandson of James I.......... 1714-1727 : 13 years.
2GHORGERIL Somme eee sere 1727-1760: 33 years.
3. GEORGE III, grandson... eee 1760-1820: 60 years.
4 GEORGE IV., som... eee 1820-1830: 10 years.
5. WILLIAM IV., brother....... 000.0... 1830-1837: 7 years.

6. VICTORIA, niece 20.0 oo... cece cecececeeeeeeeees 1837,

1. GEORGE THE FIRST.—I.
1714 to 1727: 18 YEARS.

1. The House of Hanover, which began with
George the First, was related to the House of
Stuart, which ended with Queen Anne. Elizabeth,
the daughter of James the First, married a German
Prince named Frederick, Elector-Palatine, and their
grandson became King George the First.

2. All Queen Anne’s children had died before
their mother; and the Bill of Rights, passed in
1689, had shut out her half-brother, James the
Pretender, the son of James the Second, from the
throne. The Act of Settlement, passed in 1701,
had declared that Queen Anne should be succeeded
‘by the Electress Sophia of Hanover, the grand-
daughter of James the First, and -her children.



10 GEORGE THE FIRST.

The Bill of Rights took the British crown from the
Stuarts, and the Act of Settlement gave it to the
House of Hanover.

3. George the First, son of the Electress Sophia,
who died two months before Queen Anne, was
Elector of Hanover, formerly a kingdom of Northern
Germany, but now part of Prussia. He became
King of the United Kingdom also, at the age of
fifty-four. “Elector” was the name given to each of
seven German princes who had votes in the election
of the Emperor of Germany.

4. George the First succeeded to the British
throne as quietly as if he had been the son of the
former Sovereign. Those who wished to see a strong
and peaceful Government in the land received his
proclamation with great satisfaction, for they felt that
now there was little danger of the country being
ruled by another Stuart. The new King could not
speak English, and had to leave the government for
the most part in the hands of his ministers. This
gave Parliament more power than it had ever pos-
sessed before, and helped to make the King’s power
less ever’ afterwards.

5.' The Whig party had been most in favour of the
accession of George. . Many of the Tory party, who
had charge of the government at the time of Queen
Anne’s death, were Jacobites; and they had already
begun to plan in favour of the Pretender, when the
Queen suddenly died, and they found themselves
unprepared to take any action on his behalf. It is
said that no one dared even to raise his voice for
the Pretender.



GEORGE THE FIRST. ' TI



GEORGE THE FIRST.

6. George at once turned the Tories out of office,
and placed his friends the Whigs in power. The
Duke of Marlborough again became commander-in-
chief of the army; and Robert Walpole, who had
been expelled from the House of Commons. during
Queen Anne’s reign, was made a minister. Walpole
continued as a minister, with a very short interval,



12 GEORGE THE FIRST.

for twenty-eight years, during twenty of which he
was Prime Minister. His chief skill lay in finance,
or dealing with money, and in keeping the accounts
of the country in good order.

7. The Jacobites, who had been scheming for the
restoration of the Stuarts in the person of the Pre-
tender, took alarm. The Earl. of Oxford was im-
prisoned for two years in the Tower. Lord
Bolingbroke (Henry St. John) and other Jacobite
leaders fled to France. For fear of a rising among
the friends of the Pretender in various parts of the
country, the army and navy were made ready for
war. . aS
8. The Riot Act was passed in 1715, to be used as
a means of preventing a Jacobite rising. This Act
says that if twelve or more persons shall remain
together for one hour, after they have been ordered
to disperse or break up by a magistrate, they shall
be held guilty of crime. After giving such notice,
the magistrate has power to use force to make the
people obey him. He may then order soldiers to
shoot those who refuse, or he may seize and im-
prison them. The Riot Act is in force to this day.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 217.

2. GEORGE THE FIRST.—IL.

1. The “'Fifteen” is the name given to a Jacobite
rebellion which took place in 1715. There was
good cause to fear a rising in favour of the Pre-
tender. He was in France preparing to invade this

f

“re



GEORGE THE FIRST. 13

country, and there were many here who were ready
to fight for him when he came. Riots had taken
place when the Tory ministers were put out of |
office, and many things had happened to show how
strong. was the feeling of some of the people in
favour of the Stuarts.

2. The death of Louis'‘the Fourteenth of France,
from whom the Jacobites had hoped to get help,
did much to discourage them. A rising in Scot-
land, however, was arranged. The Earl of Mar, by
the orders of James, gathered ten thousand High-
landers round him at Braemar. At their head he
marched southward, and took possession of Perth.

3. The Duke of Argyle, at the head of the
King’s army, met the Highlanders at Sheriffmuir.
Neither side won a victory, but the battle was
sufficient to prevent the Jacobites from going
further south. They retreated to Perth as quickly
as they could.

4. The rising in Scotland put the Government
on their guard. Several gentlemen and noblemen
in the west of England who were known to favour |
the Stuarts were put in prison. By this prompt
action the chances of a successful rebellion were
soon at an end. The Duke of Ormond, who had
come from France to lead the movement, went back
to that country with the news that nothing could
be done.

5. The Jacobites of the north a England had
been called out at the same time by the Earl of
Derwentwater and Mr. Foster, the Member of Par-
liament for Northumberland. Only a few answered



14 GEORGE THE FIRST.

to the call, They were joined by some Scottish
nobles, among whom were Lord Kenmure and Lord
Nithsdale, and by eighteen hundred Highlanders
sent by the Earl of Mar. On the same day that the
Battle of Sheriffmuir was fought in Scotland, the
rebels in the north of England were forced into
Preston, in Lancashire, where, after a time, they
gave themselves up to the King’s troops.

6. About a month after the Battle of Sheriffmuir
the Pretender landed at Peterhead; but he came
without the much-needed help from France which
was expected by his followers. Even then he did
‘not act wisely. He wasted his time preparing to be
crowned at Perth, when he ought to have been
fighting for the crown he wished to wear.

7. Hearing that the Duke of Argyle was ad-
‘vancing, the Pretender retreated northward to the
town of Montrose. There he and the Earl of Mar
took ship for France, leaving their followers to take
care of themselves. The leaders of the party were
taken prisoners. Some of them, among whom were
the Earl of Derwentwater and Lord Kenmure, were
put to death; others lost their estates; and more
than a thousand were banished to America. Lord
Nithsdale was sentenced to die along with Lords
Derwentwater and Kenmure, but, the night before
the execution, he escaped from the Tower by the
help of his brave and devoted wife.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 218.



GEORGE THE FIRST. 15

3, GEORGE THE FIRST.—III.

1. The Septennial Act was passed in 1716 to
allow a Parliament to continue in existence seven
years. The Parliament sitting at the time would
be three years old in 1718, and by a law (the
Triennial Act, passed in 1694) a new Parliament
had to be elected at least every three years. The
putting down of the Jacobite rising had made the
Whig party stronger than ever. The ministers,
however, did not think,it would be wise to have a
general election while the country was in such an
excited state. They therefore passed the Septennial
Act. This Act is still in force, though it was only
intended to be a temporary measure. As a rule,
however, Parliaments do not last longer than five
or six years.

.2. The Quadruple Alliance was made by Great
Britain, Germany, France, and Holland against
Philip, King of Spain, to force him to carry out the
Treaty of Utrecht, made in 1713, after the War of
the Spanish Succession.

3. The ministers of the King quarrelled about
the forming of this alliance. Walpole left the Min-
istry, and remained out of office for about three
years. The allies were too strong for Philip. He
was able, however, to send a fleet to Scotland to
help the Pretender. All the ships but two were
wrecked, and Philip was forced: to seek peace shortly
afterwards in 1720.

4, The South Sea Bubble, in 1720, was the name
given to a great trading scheme which was intended



16 GEORGE THE FIRST..

to help the Government to pay the interest on the
National Debt. It will be remembered that the
wars of William the Third had burdened the country
with a heavy debt which had never been paid.
The debt had now grown to the large sum of
£53,000,000, for which the Government had to pay
as interest more than £3,000,000 every year. This
was nearly half of the whole income of the country,
and it became a heavy burden. Many plans were
formed to make the burden lighter, but the one best

’ known is the South Sea Scheme.

5. The South Sea Company had been formed for
the purpose of carrying on trade in the South
Seas. To have the sole right of trading in that
part of the world, the Company agreed to give the
Government a large sum of money at once, and
£800,000 every year, to help to pay the interest
on the National Debt. In order to persuade people
to buy shares in the scheme—that is, to lend the
Company money to work with—the managers spread
abroad stories of the great wealth to be found in the
golden islands of the South Seas. Hundreds, both
rich and poor, ran to buy shares, and money flowed
fast- into the hands of the Company. The people
went mad about it, and some even paid £1,000 for
a share that had at first cost only £100.

6. The success of the South Sea Company seemed
to be so great that many other companies were
started. Everybody wanted to make money in
some easier and quicker way than by working for
it. The money was spent, and little trade was

done. At last the bubble burst. It was found
(888)



GEORGE THE FIRST. 17



SIR ROBERT WALPOLE.

that those who were in the secret had sold their
shares when the price was at its highest. This
caused great alarm, and those who held shares were
now as eager to sell as they had been to buy. No
one would take the shares at any price. The Com-
pany was broken up, and hundreds of persons who
had invested all their money were ruined.

7. Sir Robert Walpole, who had left the Ministry

(883) 9



18 GEORGE THE FIRST.

three years before, had never believed in the South
Sea Scheme; and as he was well skilled in money
matters, he now came forward to advise the country.
He divided the loss between the Bank of England,
_the East India Company, and the Government.
Some of the ministers had to resign for having
taken money from the founders of the Company.
Those who had taken a leading part in it had to
sell all they possessed to repay the shareholders.,

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 219.

4, GEORGE THE FIRST.—IV.

1. Sir Robert Walpole was the first adviser of the
Sovereign who was called Prime Minister. There
had: always been one of the Monarch’s advisers or
ministers who had held the chief place. In Norman
and early Plantagenet times it was the Justiciav.
Then this post was held by the Chancellor, Claren-
don being the last great Chancellor.

2. When it became the practice to choose all the
ministers in power at the same time from the
political party that had a majority in the House of
Commons, they acted together much more than they

_ had formerly done, and this gave them the name of
the Ministry, and their leader was known as the
Premier or Prime Minister. ;

3. The Ministry, the Government, or the Cabinet,
as it is called now, generally consists of from twelve
to fifteen persons, chosen by the Prime Minister

- from the leading members of his party or supporters



GEORGE THE FIRST, 19

in both Houses of Parliament. When Parliament
meets after a general election, the leader of the
party that is-in a majority in the House of Com-
mons takes the office of Premier, and selects the
Ministry from the majority. If, therefore, the people
have elected more Conservative than Liberal mem-
bers, the-Cabinet or Government will be Conserva-
tive; if more Liberals be elected, the Cabinet will
be Liberal. In this way the people, when they are
electing members of Parliament, are really deciding
who shall govern them.

4. Walpole was Premier for twenty years.
The people trusted him, and were willing that he
should have his own way. By freely giving money
and titles of honour, he won over to his side those
who might have given him trouble. He used to
say, “Every man has his price.” He meant that
the vote of every man could be bought, if only its
price could be found out. He always tried to keep
the country out of war, and did all that he could to
improve trade and manufactures. On the whole,
everything went well with the country as long as
Walpole was Prime Minister. In 1722 he had to
deal with a small Jacobite plot, set on foot by
Francis Atterbury, Bishop of Rochester. Atterbury
was banished for life, and spent the rest of his days
in France. ;

5. The death of the King took place suddenly
while he was travelling in Hanover. George and
his wife, Sophia of Zell, had not been good friends.
He used her very harshly, and kept her for thirty-
three years shut up in a castle in Hanover; even



20 ; GEORGE THE FIRST. -

her own children were not allowed to see her. She
died there only a few months before him. They
had one son, George the Second, who succeeded his
father.

6. The chief authors during this reign were
Daniel Defoe, who wrote the famous story Robinson
Crusoe, in which he describes a shipwrecked sailor’s
life and adventures on a desert island; Dean Swift,
who wrote a satire on English society in the form —
of a story which he called Gulliver's Travels ;
Isaac Watts, who composed his Divine and Moral
Songs ; and James Thomson, the author of a poem
called The Seasons.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 220.



DANIEL DEFOE.



GEORGE THE SECOND. 21

5. GEORGE THE SECOND.—1I.
1727 To 1760: 33 YEARS. .
1. George the Second, the son of George the First,
was forty-four years of age when he became King.



GEORGE THE SECOND. 2 .

Unlike his father, he could speak the English lan-
guage. His wife, Caroline of Anspach, in Bavaria,



|
'
!



29 GEORGE THE SECOND.

was a good and clever woman. She had great in-
fluence over him, and with her advice he was able
to govern well. They had two sons—Frederick,
Prince of Wales, whose son was afterwards George
the Third, and William, Duke of Cumberland. Sir
Robert Walpole was at first set aside by the King;
but Caroline, who was Walpole’s friend, obtained
his restoration to power, and he continued to be
the chief minister of the Crown fone the first
fifteen years of this reign.

2. An Excise Bill was introduced in 1733, for at
this time there was a great deal of smuggling car-
ried on. Goods on which a’ tax should have been
paid were brought secretly into the country. Wal-
pole therefore proposed to bring wine and tobacco
under the law of Excise—that is, to allow no one
to deal in them without a license. The merchants
cried out that if this Excise Bill became law, their
business would be ruined. When Walpole saw how

_ many were against the Bill, he decided to with-

draw it aes than lose his power.

3. The Porteous Riot took place in 1736 in con-
nection with Wilson and Robertson, two smugglers
who had been condemned to death for breaking into
a custom-house and carrying off a large sum of money
to repay themselves for the seizure of their contra-
band goods. They were confined in the Tolbooth
Prison, Edinburgh; and on the Sunday before they
were to be hanged, Wilson bravely helped Robertson
to escape. The mob of Edinburgh were so delighted
with Wilson’s act that they pelted the hangman and
the soldiers when the smuggler was brought out to ‘



GEORGE THE SECOND. 23.

be hanged. Captain Porteous, who was in command
of the City Guard, told his men to fire on the crowd,
and several persons were killed. —

4. Porteous was tried for murder, and condemned
to death ; but an order came from London to put
off his execution. The people thought that the
King meant to pardon him; and so one night they
broke into the Tolbooth Prison, dragged Porteous
out, and hanged him on a dyer’s pole in the Grass-
market. When the King and his ministers knew
what had been done, they were very angry. Bill was brought into Parliament to break down
the city wall and take away the charter of Edin-
burgh; but the Scottish Members of Parliament spoke.
so. strongly against it that the Bill was withdrawn,
- and the city was punished with a fine of £2,000.
The story of the Porteous Riot is told in Sir Walter
Scott’s novel, the Heart of Midlothian. .

5. The death of Queen Caroline took ree in
1737, and Walpole lost a warm friend and sup-
porter. After this his’ work was not so easy or
his power so great. Neither the King nor the
Prince of Wales liked him, and those who were
against him in Parliament found an able leader in
William Pitt, afterwards Earl of Chatham.

6. A War with Spain broke out in 1739. The
Spaniards had at this time large colonies in South
America, and they would only allow British ships
to trade with them under very hard conditions.
One thing the British would not agree to—that
was, to allow the Spanish the right to search all
British vessels found near their colonies. In vain



24 GEORGE THE SECOND.

Walpole tried to arrange the difficulty without
fighting. War was declared, to the great joy of
the people. When Walpole heard the London bells
ringing because the war had begun, he said, “ They
may ring their bells now; they will soon be wring-
ing their hands.”

7. Walpole was right, for the war was not a
success. A great fleet and army under Admiral
Vernon and Lord Wentworth failed to take Carta-
gena, a sea-port of New Granada, in South America,
chiefly because the leaders could not agree among
themselves. Commodore (afterwards Lord) Anson
was sent out with ships to help Vernon, but he
failed in his object. He did not return to England

‘for three years. During this time, though he had

lost all his ships but one, he had sailed round the
world, capturing Spanish treasure-ships containing
£300,000. ;

8. The retirement of Walpole took place in 1742,
after he had been Prime Minister for twenty years.
Though he had opposed the Spanish War from the
first, yet he was blamed for its failure; and when
the new Parliament met in 1741, he found that he
had not a sufficient majority of supporters in the
Commons to carry on the government, and there-
fore he resigned his place as Premier. The King
made him Earl of Orford in 1742; and he died in
1745.

9. The War of the Austrian Succession began in
1741, before the war with Spain had come to an
end. Charles the Sixth of Austria had died in
1740, and left a will making his daughter, Maria-



GEORGE THE SECOND. 25

Theresa, Queen of the countries over which he had
ruled. The Elector of Bavaria wanted to take
Hungary from her, and the King of Prussia took |
Silesia, while the King of France said she had no
right to rule at all. The British, alarmed for
Hanover, took the part of Maria. King George
crossed to the Continent with an army, and put the
French to flight in a battle near Dettingen, on the
river Main (1748). This was the last time that
a British King was under the fire of an enemy.
Two years later his second son, the Duke of Cum-
berland, was beaten by Marshal Saxe at Fontenoy,
in Belgium. After years of fighting, Maria-Theresa’s
claims were acknowledged by all the Powers.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 220.

XN

6. GEORGE THE SECOND.—IL

1. The “Forty-five” is the name given to a
Jacobite rising in 1745. Charles Edward (“ Bonnie
Prince Charlie ”), the young Pretender, the ‘son of
James, the old Pretender, who had been promised
the support of France, came to Scotland to make
another attempt to win back the throne the Stuarts
had lost. He landed with seven officers at Moi-
dart, on the Inverness coast, and many of the
Highland chiefs, the most noted of whom was
Cameron of Lochiel, gathered round him. Though
these chiefs thought that the attempt was badly
planned, they felt themselves bound in honour to
support the Prince. With seven hundred men he



26 ‘GEORGE THE SECOND.

_. moved southward, and at Perth he was proclaimed

Regent for his father. The people of Edinburgh
gave him a hearty welcome, and he took up his
abode in Holyrood Palace. The Castle of Edin- —
‘burgh, however, held out for King George.

2. Sir John Cope -was in the north, near Inver-
ness, with the King’s army when Charles marched
southward. He embarked his troops at Aberdeen,
and took them'by sea to Dunbar, where he landed
them on the same day that Charles entered Edin-
burgh. Marching out of Edinburgh, the Prince
found the Royal troops at Prestonpans. Round
their watchfires the clansmen waited for the dawn
of day; and almost before there was light enough
to see their way, they crossed a marsh that sepa-
rated the two armies, and made a dash at the Royal
troops. The first rush of the Highlanders won the
battle. They fired their pistols, and dashed on with
their claymores. The King’s army broke, and fled
to Berwick, with Sir John at its head.

3. Charles returned to Edinburgh, where he
wasted the time in banquets and balls. He spared
no pains in his attempts to please the Scottish
people; but he allowed the eagerness of his fol-
lowers to cool. Six weeks after his victory,
Charles set out for London with an army of five
thousand men. If he had only pressed on to
London, he might have driven George from the
throne; but the delay gave the King time to muster
his forces. Charles crossed the Border, took Car-
lisle, and marched to Derby. The help he had ex-
pected to receive on the way never came. Almost





GEORGE THE SECOND. 27

hemmed in by thirty thousand men under General
Wade, who was marching from the east, and the
Duke of Cumberland, who lay to the south, Charles
began the homeward march. On his way to the
north he gained a victory over the Royal troops at .
Falkirk, in Stirlingshire; but he was still driven
northwards, and had to seek shelter among the
Grampians.

4, The Battle of Culloden was fought in 1746.
Charles fell back on Inverness, and the Duke of







Fortrose,









Cumberland, at the head of the Royal army, followed
him. Charles made his last stand at Culloden.
The Highlanders, sword in hand, rushed on the first
line of. the Royal troops, and broke it, only to finda
second and a third ready to withstand their attack.
In less than an hour they were completely beaten.
‘One part of the army yielded at Inverness; the
other scattered and disappeared in the glens from
which, the clansmen had come. The victory was so
complete that the Pretender’s hopes and courage
melted away. :



28 GEORGE THE SECOND.















































































CAIRN ON CULLODEN MOOR.

5. Charles fled to the hills, and wandered about
for five months. Although a reward of £30,000
was offered for his head, and hundreds of persons,
some of whom were very poor, knew where he was
hiding, no one would give him up. The most fam-
ous of those who helped him to escape was Flora
Macdonald. She dared every danger, and even
risked her own life, to protect him. At last he
escaped to France; but when peace was made with
that country, he had to seek refuge in another land.

6. The sufferings of the Highlanders did not end
with their defeat at Culloden. Those parts of the
country from which the followers of Charles had
come were overrun by the King’s soldiers. Cum-



GEORGE THE SECOND. 29

berland spared none on whom he could lay his
hands. . His cruelty earned for him the name of
“ Butcher.” The country was wasted with fire and
sword; the men were hunted down on the moun-
tains; their houses were pulled down, and the
women and children were left to die of hunger and
. cold. The clans were broken up, forts were built,
and the people were forbidden to wear the High-
land dress. About eighty of the chief Jacobites
were executed, among whom were Lord Kilmarnock,
Lord Balmerino, and Lord Lovat.. Flora Macdonald
was put in prison for a year. This was the last
Jacobite rising. The Stuarts never again tried to
regain their throne.

"y, The last of the Stuarts died on the Continent.
James, the old Pretender, died in 1766. Charles
Edward spent his later days in Rome, under the
title of Duke of Albany. The gallant young sol-
dier, the “ Bonnie Prince Charlie” of song’ and
story, became a broken-down drunkard. He died
in 1788. His brother Henry, Cardinal of York,
the last male of the Stuart line, died nineteen years
later. The two brothers were buried in the Church
of St. Peter at Rome. The marble monument over
their grave records their rank as Charles the Third
and Henry the Ninth, two names not found? in the
roll of British Kings.

8. The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748 Toate
the war of the Austrian Succession to a close, all
parties being thoroughly tired of the conflict. The
husband of Maria-Theresa was acknowledged as Em-
peror of Germany. The Pretender and his family



30 THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN,

were banished from France, and the House of Han-
over acknowledged as rightful Bove er of the
United Kingdom.

9. A change in the Calendar was made in 1752.
Since the days of Julius Cesar each year had been
reckoned eleven minutes too long, and this had at
length caused the British date to be eleven days .
behind the right time. To make the reckoning
right, eleven days were dropped in 1752—+the 3rd
of September being called the 14th. The people
at first disliked the change, and called upon the
Government to give them back their eleven days.
The calendar was also arranged so that the year
should commence on the first day of January
instead of the 25th March as hitherto. Pope
Gregory had long before adopted the new style
—that is, had made this change in all Roman
Catholic countries; but England, “being Protestant,
had refused to do so. Russia is at present the
only country in Europe that still reckons by the
old style.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 222.

7. THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN.

1. The ruined castle of Invergarry stands on a
rock on the banks of Loch Oich, in Inverness-shire,
close to the confluence of the river Garry with the
lake. The crag on which the castle is built was
the ancient ‘gathering-place of. the Macdonells of
Glengarry, and so its name, “The Rock of the



THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN. 31

Raven,” was given to the slogan or war-cry of the
- clansmen.

2. At the ommnenestient of Prince Charles
Edward’s rash enterprise, the Prince spent a night
there in August 1745. Once again Charles slept
in that castle, on the morning after the fatal fight
of Culloden. A few days afterwards, the deserted
fortress fell a prey to the destroying army of
Duke William of Cumberland. | Its strength resisted
in some measure the flames with which it was
assailed, and the blackened and ivy-grown bulwarks
still rear themselves grandly over the blue waters
of Loch Oich.

3. It appears that the chief of Glengarry himself
took no part in the rising, nor did his eldest son,
who was absent in France. The younger son was
the leader, and the intended scapegoat for the
family ; but the Government was too angry to
attend to distinctions of so doubtful a character,
and, accordingly, in the succeeding vengeance, the
Macdonells of Glengarry suffered bitterly for their
disaffection.

4, In 1794, the Macdonells were formed into a
Government corps, under the command of their
chieftain; but this regiment being disbanded in
1802, the principal part of the clan removed to
Upper Canada, where they have given to many
scenes the same beloved names as those borne by
the glens of their fathers. The remnant of these
Macdonells live peaceably in their old locality; nor
is there in all Scotland a more interesting or beauti-
ful district than that of Glengarry.



32 THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN.











Beware of Macdonell, beware of his wrath!

In friendship or foray, oh, cross not his path !

He knoweth’no bounds to his love or his hate,

And the wind of his claymore is blasting as Fate.

Like the hill-cat that springs from her lair in the rock,

He leaps on his foe—there is death in the shock ;

And the birds of the air shall be gorged with their

prey, _

When the chief of Glengarry comes down to the fray,

With his war-cry, “ The Rock of the Raven !”



THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN. . 383

: 6.
The eagle he loveth dominion on high,
He dwells with his kindred alone in the sky ;
Nor heedeth he, sailing at noon o’er the glen,
The turbulent cares crak dissensions of nien.
But the Raven exulteth when strife is at hand,
His eyes are alight with the gleam of the brand ;
And still, when the red pare cross goeth round,
And gathers Clan Colla at fortified mound,

The first at the tryst is the Raven.

7.
On the Rock of the Raven, that looks o’er the flood,
All scathed with the cannon, all stained with the
blood,

Had old Invergarry long baffled the snows,
The gales of the mountain, the league of its foes ;
And imal its bulwarks confronted the tide,
And safely the skiff in their shadow could ride,
For upwards and downwards, as far as the sight,
That castle commanded the vale and the height,

From its eyrie, the Rock of the Raven. -

8.
But woe for Duke William! his doom shall be bale
When against him in judgment upriseth the Gael ;
When they cry how green Albyn lay weltering in gore
From western Loch Linnhé to Cromarty’s Piorer
How the course of the victor was marked on the Elect
By the black wreathing smoke hanging down like a
shroud :

O’er the hut of the vassal, the tower of his lord;
For the fire worketh swifter than carbine or sword,
And giveth more joy to the Raven.

(888) 3



34 THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN.

; 9.
Then downcast was Colla, sore smitten with dread,
And hunted for sport with the fox and the gled;
While old Invergarry, in silence forlorn,
Resounded no longer the pipe and the horn.
But the Raven sat flapping his wings in the brake,
When the troops of Duke William marched down by
the lake:
Their march was at sunset—at dawning of day
In smouldering heaps were those battlements gray,
And the castle was left to the Raven.
10. :
From mountain and loch hath departed its sway ;
Yet still the old. fortress defieth decay :
The name of Duke William is foul with disgrace,
But the bastions he fired are firm in their place ;
And the clansmen he scattered are gathered again,
The song and the dance are restored to the glen ;
And the chief of Glengarry hath builded his halls
On. the low woody beach, in the shade of those walls
_ ‘That frown from the Rock of the Raven.
11.
And still hath Macdonell the soul of his sires,
And still hath Clan Colla the old Gaelic fires ;
For the pulse beateth strongly for honour and pride,
As it throbbed in their breasts who for léyalty died.
With peace and with plenty the valleys rejoice,
And the wind hath forgotten the slogan’s dread voice;
And the home of the Gael is as tranquil and bright
As Loch Oich when it sleeps on a blue summer’s night
At the foot of the Rock of the Raven.

: Mrs. D. OGILVIE.
- EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 228.



/

GEORGE THE SECOND. 35

8 GEORGE THE SECOND,—III.

1. The Pelhams-—Sir Henry Pelham and his
brother, the Duke of Newcastle—became the lead-
ing ministers in 1743. Sir Robert Walpole had
resigned the office of Prime Minister in 1742, and
was succeeded by the Karl of Wilmington. Then
Sir Henry Pelham became Prime Minister. He was
a very good man of business; and his brother, the
Duke, knew how to keep people in good humour
and get their votes. So, by obliging everybody,
the brothers managed to keep in power for nearly
twenty years. When Sir Henry died, in 1754, the
Duke became Prime Minister.

2. William Pitt, called the Great Commoner, after-
wards made Earl of Chatham, entered Parliament
in 1735. He had gained some influence in Wal-
pole’s time, and under the Pelhams he rose quickly
to a high position. He did not possess the King’s
favour; but as the ministers would not continue in
office without him, George had to leave him alone.

3. The Seven Years’ War began two years after
the death of Henry Pelham. The British were
attacked by the French on the Continent, in
America, and in India. At first everything seemed
to be going wrong, and the people were in despair,
till Pitt came forward, after the loss of Minorca, and
said, “I know that I can save the nation, and that
no one else can.”

4. In 1757 he was made Foreign Secretary, and
though Newcastle was Prime Minister, Pitt was
really the head of the Government. He was one of



386° GEORGE THE SECOND.



WILLIAM PITT, EARL OF CHATHAM.

the greatest and most powerful ministers that the
country has ever had. The people trusted him
more than all the other members of the Govern-
ment, and the management of the war was left
entirely in his hands. Unlike Sir Robert Walpole,
he hated bribery, and never made a wrong use of
public money. He was a very eloquent speaker,
and this alone gave him great influence in the House
of Commons. It was during the Seven Years’ War
that our successes in North America and in India
made Pitt’s name famous throughout the world.

5. The British Empire had made considerable pro-
gress in the one ‘hundred and fifty years from 1600
to 1750. Our navy had greatly improved, and our



GEORGE THE SECOND. 37

’

180 180 $40 120_ 10. + 40 20

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mea GRECNLAND
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Fam
ALAS en ———
(United States Terrjtory) a
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| ge pores Sear
dust eriash ST

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120 100 80 60
(Each Square 1,000 miles.)
NORTH AMERICA.

ships were ploughing every sea; our commerce
had increased at a rapid rate; and many of our
countrymen had gone forth to other lands to trade
and to colonize. Our nearest neighbour at home
was France, and in spite of the “silver streak ” that
separated us, we had often quarrelled and fought
on the continent of Europe. When we settled



38 GEORGE THE SECOND.











Eastern
Sioux







abroad, the French were our neighbours there also,
for they planted colonies alongside of ours. In
North America and in India, Britain and France -
quarrelled and fought till, in the end, the French
were defeated, and these two great countries were
added to the British Empire.

6. The British Colonies in North America had be-
come a-very important part of the empire. You
will remember that in the’reign of Queen Elizabeth
Sir Walter Ralegh had planted an English colony on
the shores of North America. He called it Virginia,
in honour of the virgin Queen. During the follow-
ing reigns other colonies were planted all along the
Atlantic coast of North America. . Among these



/
GEORGE THE SECOND. 39

were the New England States, founded by the Pil-
grim Fathers in the reign of James the First. These
colonies had grown in number and in population till
now, in George the Second’s reign, we find thirteen
of them, containing more than a million well-to-do
people, managing their own affairs, but under gover-
nors appointed by the King of Great Britain.

7. The French Colonies in North America were chiefly
on the great river St. Lawrence, and were then
called Lower Canada, which is now known as the
Province of Quebec. The French wished to keep in
their hands all the trade carried on with the Indians
who dwelt between the British colonies and the
great river Mississippi. . To do this they built a
chain of forts along the river Ohio. If their plans
had been successfil, they would have confined the
British settlers to a narrow strip of country along
the sea-coast. This led to fighting between the
British and the French colonists, each wanting to
be master in America. Pitt was eager to drive the
French out of that continent.

8. The English East India Company was formed in
1600, towards the end of Elizabeth’s reign. While
some of our countrymen were sailing west to plant
colonies in America, others were sailing east to trade
with the people of India. They had at this time
no thought of becoming the rulers of that great
country. The Portuguese and the Dutch were
already there, and wished to keep out other
Europeans.

9. Little by little, however, the English made
good their footing. Their first establishment was





2




40 GEORGE THE SECOND.






fan



Sf
ie
Dethi js 3

seve ore




a *
oN
on

nah
Hyderabad

























































































































































































































































































































(Zach Square 500 227les.)

OUR INDIAN EMPIRE.

on one of the islands. In 1640 Madras was °
founded ; and when Charles the Second received
Bombay as part of his wife’s dowry, he handed it
over to the Company. In 1698 Calcutta was
founded ; and thus in George the Second’s reign the
Company possessed three factories or trading centres
—at Bombay, Madras, and Calcutta? Here forts



GEORGE THE SECOND. 4]

had been built for the protection of the Company’s
warehouses, and were guarded by a few sepoys or
paid native soldiers.

10. A French East
India Company had been |
started in 1664 at Pon-
dicherry, on the east
coast, about one hun-
dred miles south of
Madras. The French,
our neighbours at home,
were now our rivals
both in America and
in India.

11. The British and
_ the French traders in L
India ‘were very jealous of each other; and when
war broke out be-
tween the home
countries — Great
Britain. and
France—the
French Govern-
ment in India
tried to drive out
the British and
seb up a great
French Empire in
that country.
' 12. For ‘some
time the French
were successful. They destroyed the British fac-

























42 GEORGE THE SECOND.



LORD CLIVE.

tory at Madras in 1746, and carried off the mer-
chants and clerks as prisoners. But when the war
in Europe came to an end, two years afterwards,
Madras was again given up to the English Company.

13. Robert (afterwards Lord) Clive, a clerk in the
English East India Company’s service, was among
the captives at the taking of Madras; but he
escaped, and entered the army in 1746, where he
soon became famous for his daring and bravery.
In 1751, with a small force, he seized Arcot, in
Southern India, where he stood a famous siege by
a French and native army, in which he came off
victorious. To this man we owe our Indian Empire.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 224.



GEORGE THE SECOND. 43

9. GEORGE. THE SECOND. —IV.

1. The Seven Years’ War began in. 1756, and ended
in 1768. All the great powers of Europe took .
part in this conics France, Austria, and Russia
joined against Frederick the Great of Prussia, and
Great Britain took the part of Prussia for the de-
fence of Hanover. Many battles were fought on
the Continent which do not belong to British his-
tory. Our share of the conflict took place chiefly
in India and in America. _.: -

9. The capture of Minorca, one of the Balearic
Islands, in the Mediterranean, took place at the
beginning of the war. This island had been taken
by the British from Spain in 1708. In 1756 it
was blockaded by a powerful French fleet. British fleet, under Admiral Byng, was sent out to
relieve it. Thinking that his force was not strong
enough, the admiral sailed away to Gibraltar, and
Minorca was taken by the French. The people of
this country were so angry that Byng was tried
for neglect of duty and condemned to death. He
was shot on the deck of a man-of-war at Portsmouth
in 1757.

3. The Nabob of Bengal, a native prince, attacked
the British settlements on the Ganges in 1756..
Fort William, at Calcutta, abandoned by its gover-
nor and the commander of its troops, fell into his
hands, upon which he ordered all the British pris-
oners to be thrust into a small room oy eighteen
feet long and fifteen feet wide.

4, The Black Hole of Calcutta, as this chamber was



4A GEORGE THE SECOND.

afterwards called, was packed with one: hundred
and forty-six persons, who were locked up all night.
Suffering all the agonies of heat, thirst, and suffoca-
tion, they endeavoured in vain to bribe the guards
to transfer some of them to another room. In vain
they begged for mercy, and tried to burst open the
door, Their jailers only mocked them, and would
do nothing. “Then the prisoners went mad with
despair, trampled each other down, fought to get at
the windows, and implored the guards to fire upon
them.” Next morning only twenty-three came out
alive. |

5, The Battle of Plassey avenged this cruel deed.
Clive, who was in England when the outbreak took
place, hurried to the scene of action. Landing in
December, he captured a fortress ten miles below
Calcutta; and then forcing his way with only two
thousand four hundred men to Calcutta, he held it
against: the Nabob with forty thousand men. In
Time Clive met the Nabob in battle at Plassey,
ee miles north of Calcutta, and with less than
four thousand men he defeated an army of sixty
thousand. The Nabob was taken PreQHeE and
afterwards put to death.

6. This victory gained for Britain the large and
fertile Province of Bengal, and made us masters of
India. Several other battles were fought, and in
1760 Clive again returned home. While he had
been extending the British power in Bengal the
French were gaining ground at Madras. Fort St.
David, which protected that place, was taken, but
the town itself held out. Shortly afterwards the



GEORGE THE SECOND. - AB

power of the French was greatly weakened by the
Battle of Wandewash, in which they were defeated
by Sir Eyre Coote. The fall of Pondicherry in the
following year destroyed their hopes of forming a
French Empire in India.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 225.

10, GEORGE THE SECOND.—V.

.1. The capture of Quebec was decided upon by
Pitt, and he sent to Canada a very gallant general



GENERAL WOLFE.

named James Wolfe. Pitt himself planned the
campaign, and ordered Wolfe to take the French
capital of Canada. This was a hard thing to do, as



46 GEORGE THE SECOND.





on tne
re °o%

t
Britis he ons
efimy ty SE

[Lending



a











































































































Quebee was a very strong fortress built on high
rocks, at the foot of which runs the river St. Law-
rence, and was held by the French under General
Montcalm. At first unsuccessful, Wolfe began to
think that he should have to give up the attempt to
take the city. At last he thought of a daring plan,
which he set about carrying out at once.

2. Outside of Quebec there is a table-land, called
the Heights of Abraham, which overlooks the city.
A zigzag path leads from the river to the top of
these heights. The narrow landing-place at the foot
was left almost unguarded, for the French general
never dreamed that an enemy would come upon
him by that way. During the night, Wolfe took
his soldiers in boats down the river, and landed
them at the foot of the cliffs. Silently they climbed
the zigzag path, and when morning broke they were ~

















































































































































































































































































































































































































AS,



WOLFE’S COVE.



48 GEORGE THE SECOND.

all ready for battle on the plain.above. The French
were taken completely by surprise, yet they ad-
vanced with great bravery.

3. The steadiness of the British won the day.
The French broke, and fled for safety to the town.
Wolfe was killed in the moment of victory. When
he felt that his wound was mortal, he said, “ Hold
me up; do not let my brave fellows see me fall!”
As he rested in the arms of one of. his officers, the
British general heard him say, “ See, they run!”
“Who run?” asked Wolfe. “The enemy, sir; they
give way everywhere.” “Now, God be praised; I
die happy.” These were the hero’s last words.
Montcalm was also wounded, and died the next day.
Quebec was given up four days afterwards. In the
following year Montreal and the whole of Canada
passed into the hands of the British.

4. The Battle of Minden was fought in 1759.
The French were defeated by Prince haat of
Brunswick. From dawn to noon the battle con-
tinued, British guns and bayonets contributing much
to the defeat of the enemy. A month later, Admiral
Boscawen shattered a French fleet in a naval action
off Cape Lagos, in the south of Portugal. Another
French fleet was also destroyed by Admiral Hawke
off the rocky coast of Brittany.

5. George the Second died suddenly of heart dis-
ease in the seventy-seventh year of his age. He
was a good King, and his homely manners and
kindly ways made him a favourite with his people.
Frederick, Prince of Wales, had been struck by a
cricket ball and killed some years before, leaving





















































































































































































DEATH OF WOLFE.



50 GEORGE THE SECOND.

nine children, the eldest of whom came to the
throne as George the Third.

6. The Methodists were founded by a number of
men who desired to bring about a revival in religion.
At the beginning of the reign the Nonconformists,
as the chief religious bodies outside the Church of
England were called, were the Independents, the
Presbyterians, the Baptists, and the Society of
Friends. The members of the Established Church
were far more numerous than the Nonconformists ;
but the Church itself was not in a satisfactory con-

dition.

7. In.1730 a band of Oxford students, led by
John Wesley, his brother Charles, and a famous
preacher named George Whitefield, formed themselves
into a society for the purpose of bringing about the
revival they so much desired. From their methodi-
cal or regular meetings for worship, and because of
their strict religious lives, they received the name of

Methodists. At first Wesley had no intention of
separating from the Church; but as the clergy would
not recognize the movement, meetings were held in:
the open air and in barns till chapels were built,
and at length the Methodists formed themselves into
a Separate communion. ;

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 226.



GEORGE THE THIRD. 51



ll, GEORGE THE THIRD.—I.

1760 To 1820: 60 Years.

1. George the Third, son of Frederick, Prince of
Wales, and grandson of George the Second, was
twenty-two years of age when he became King.
The two Georges who had reigned before him had
been born and brought up in Germany; but the
young King was an Englishman. In his first speech



52 GEORGE THE THIRD.

to Parliament he said, “I glory in the name of
Briton.” ;

2. Great Britain had now become the leading
nation in the world; but France still struggled for
the mastery, and the Seven Years’ War continued.
The French made overtures for peace, hoping to
detach Britain from her alliance with Prussia.
Pitt, however, continued firm in his attachment to
Prussia. To make matters worse, the French put
forward a statement of Spanish claims against the
_ British Government, and urged the settlement of
these claims at the same time as the conclusion of
peace. The paper was sent back to France with
an intimation that the French Government must
not presume to meddle between Great Britain and
Spain. ,

3. The Family Compact was the result of these
strained relations between Great Britain and France.
Pitt soon learned that the Kings of France, Spain,
and Naples had jomed together against Great
Britain. They all belonged to the Bourbon family,
or royal house of France, and the agreement was
called the Family Compact. They were to aid one
another against all their enemies, and chiefly against
Great Britain. Pitt wished to declare war at once
against Spain, and boldly strike the first blow by
attacking the Spanish colonies: But George, by the
advice of the Earl of Bute, who had been his tutor,
and who had great influence over him, refused to
allow this; on which Pitt resigned.

4, War with Spain followed in 1762, for that
power was quite ready to carry out the terms of .



GEORGE THE THIRD. 53

the Family Compact. Bute became Prime Minister,
and Parliament voted large sums of money to carry
on the war. In the East and West Indies one place
after another belonging to France and Spain fell into
our hands. At length both France and Spain asked |
for peace. Bute was willing to grant their request,
because he was getting alarmed at the growth of the
National Debt, which had risen to £132,000,000.

5. The Peace of Paris, in 1763, put an end to the
war. It left Canada, which had been won by
Wolfe in 1759, and other places in North America,
in the hands of Britain; but Pondicherry, taken in
1761, was restored to the French. The people
were angry, because they thought too much had
been given back to France and Spain. When Bute
saw that the feeling of the country was against.
him, he resigned, and his place was taken by George
Grenville.

6. John Wilkes, who was a member of Parlia-
ment and the editor of a newspaper called the
_ North Briton, was sent to the Tower of London in
1768, for stating in his paper that the King had
told a lie in a speech from the throne. Under the
Habeas Corpus Act Wilkes was set free; but he
was turned out of the House of Commons, and out-
lawed. After being away in France for a time he
came back, and the people, who regarded his treat-
ment as unlawful, elected him four times as Member
of Parliament for Middlesex; but the House of
Commons would not let him take his seat.

7. Determined to stand up for freedom of speech,
the people still took his part, and made him



54 GEORGE THE THIRD.

Lord Mayor of London in 1774. In the end
the House of Commons had to yield and allow
Wilkes to take his seat. While this agitation was
going on, the printers and publishers of the “ Let-
ters of Junius” were tried and acquitted. These
letters appeared in the Public Advertiser, and con-
tained violent attacks on the King and the Prime
Minister for interfering with the freedom of election.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 226.

12. GEORGE THE THIRD.—II.

1. The Stamp Act, passed in 1765, caused a quarrel
with our American colonies, which ended in their
separation from the mother country. The Govern-
ment at home claimed the right of taxing them
without their permission. The late war had cost
a large sum of money, and as much of it had
been spent on behalf of the colonies, Grenville
thought that they ought to help to pay the bill.
A Stamp Act was therefore passed, by means of
which he hoped to raise the amount he wanted
from America.

2. This Act required that all legal documents,
such as deeds, wills, notes, and receipts, should be
_ written on paper bearing Government stamps, for
which a payment was required. The Americans
answered that they were willing to give money of
their own free will, but that they would not be
forced to pay taxes which they had no share in
levying, as they sent no members to the British



GEORGE THE THIRD. 55

Parliament. Grenville resigned, and his successor,
the Marquis of Rockingham, repealed the Stamp
Act.

3. New taxes were imposed on the American
colonists in 1767. Pitt, who was now Earl of
“Chatham, had warned the Government against the
Stamp Act, and told them what would happen.
He was strongly against taxing the colonists at all;
but the ministers, led by the Duke of Grafton,
Prime Minister, and Charles Townshend, Chancellor
of the Exchequer, had not yet learned wisdom.
They therefore imposed new taxes on tea, lead,
glass, and other things which were sent to America.
Chatham left the Ministry, and two years later the
_ Duke of Grafton gave way to Lord North.

4. It was not because the taxes were large that
the Americans refused to pay them, for they were
very small, but because the colonists considered that
the home Government had no right to tax them at
all. The King was more to blame than any of his
ministers. He would not give way in what he
thought was his right as Sovereign of the colonies.

5. The Boston Tea-Party, as it is called, brought
matters to a crisis. — In December 1773 ships ar-
rived in Boston harbour with cargoes of taxed
tea, upon which a number of men dressed like
Indians went on board and emptied three hundred
and forty-two chests of tea into the water. Asa:
punishment, the Government ordered the port of
Boston to be closed. The object of this was to
ruin the Boston merchants by preventing the land-
ing of goods there.



56 GEORGE THE THIRD.

6. In the following year twelve men, chosen
from each of twelve States (to which a thirteenth
was afterwards added), met in congress at Phila-
delphia, and sent an address to the King, asking
him to withdraw the taxes; but the King refused.
Jhatham (Pitt) said to the Lords that it was folly
to force taxes in the face of a continent in arms. —
Edmund Burke bade the Commons take care lest
they broke that tie of kindred blood which, light as
air though strong as iron, bound the colonies to the
mother land.

7. The American War of Independence was now
fought out to the bitter end. It was ten years since
the passing and withdrawing of the Stamp Act.
Everything’ had been tried to bring about a settle-
ment, but the foolishness of the King had made
all efforts vain. War began, and went on for nearly
eight years. The King found that he could get
Lord North to do much as he wished, and so he
kept him in power during the whole American
War. :

8. The first campaign began in 1775 at Lexington,
near Boston, between a few British soldiers and |
some American riflemen. The colonists, who were
used to shooting deer in the forests, soon proved .
their skill, and they now shot down men with
deadly aim. The British lost more than twice as
many men as the Americans. The Americans next
besieged the British under General Gage in Boston, |
and a battle took place on Bunker’s Hill, near the
town, where the Americans had thrown up earth-
works. They were forced to retreat, but they did



GEORGE THE, THIRD. 57

1
4b. CHAMPLAIN

Saratoga, } Lexington
















Neagara Falls



BUNMER'S HILL XS

plbanyiels e
BOSTON

NEW YORK
Brandywine

Philade\phia
Baltimore,

WASHINGTON a

Richmond,

Yorktowne





not lose heart. They now saw that they could
hold their own when they met the: best British
troops on equal terms.

9. George Washington was made commander-in-
chief of the American army. He had done good
service for the British in Canada in their struggle
‘with the French in the Seven Years’ War. Now
he had but one thought, one desire, and that was
to secure the freedom of his country. “First in
war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his
countrymen,” was said of him. He was in favour
of union with Great Britain, till he saw that it was
no longer possible.

10. The invasion of Canada was the second great
event in the campaign of 1775. General Montgomery

~ \



58 GEORGE THE THIRD.



GEORGE WASHINGTON.

took Montreal, on the St. Lawrence, and Colonel
Arnold joined him before Quebec, on the same river.
They were beaten back from that fortress, and
Montgomery was slain.

11. In the second campaign, in 1776, the British,
‘under General Howe, were early in the year forced
by the cannon of the Americans to leave Boston,
which the British army had held, and sail to Halifax.
Washington then hurried to New York, where he
had reason to expect the next attack.’

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 227.

13. GEORGE THE THIRD.—IIL

1. The Declaration of American ‘Independence was
made in 1776. Up to this time the Americans had
_ been fighting for their liberties as British subjects, but



GEORGE THE THIRD. 59

the war had weaned them from the mother country.
On the 4th of July, the Congress of Americans met
at Philadelphia and drew up the “ Declaration of
Independence,” in which they declared themselves
no longer subjects of King George. In August of ©
the same year, General Howe, reinforced by his
brother, drove Washington from New York, and
planted the British flag on its batteries.

2. The third campaign opened in June 1777. A
victory at Brandywine River, and the capture
of Philadelphia, raised hopes in Britain that the
Americans would be forced to yield. But a great
disaster changed these hopes into fears. General
Burgoyne, who was marching from Canada to join
Howe at New York, was surrounded at Saratoga,
on the Hudson river, and forced to surrender. This
was the turning-point of the war in favour of the
Americans. —

3. The fourth campaign, in 1778, saw a change in the
British commanders, General Howe was succeeded
by Sir Henry Clinton, who abandoned the city of
Philadelphia, and moved toward New York, which
he reached in safety. Washington then threw a
line of cantonments around the city, and so the
opposing forces spent the winter. It was during
this year that Chatham, while speaking, in spite of
age and illness, against a proposal to grant inde-
pendence to the colonies, fell in a fit on the floor of -
the House of Lords, and was carried to bed, from
which he never rose. During the fifth campaign no
event of any importance took place.

4, The sixth campaign, in 1780, resulted in the



60 GEORGE THE THIRD.

capture of Charleston, the capital of South Caro-
lina, by the British. In that year Arnold, an
American officer, deserted and became a general in
the British service. Major André, a British officer
who had arranged the affair, being taken by the
Americans, was hanged as a spy by the orders of
Washington, though many tried to turn the Ameri-
can eedes from his stern purpose.

5. During the seventh campaign, in 1781, Lord
Cornwallis was shut up in Yorktown, and forced to
surrender with seven thousand men. This was the
decisive blow; for although the war went on for
another campaign, the American colonies were now
really severed from the British Empire.

6. The Treaty of Versailles was signed in’ 1783.
In November of that year George the Third entered
the House of Lords, and with a faltering voice read
a paper in which he acknowledged the independence
of the United States of America. He closed his
reading with the prayer that neither Great Britain
nor America might suffer from the separation. By
the Treaty of Versailles the thirteen United States
of America were declared to be a free nation. They
became a Republic, and chose George Washington
as their first President.

7. War in Europe had taken place during the
latter part of the American struggle. France,
Spain, and Holland had been in arms against Great
Britain. Russia, Sweden, and Denmark had formed
an armed neutrality, which meant that they were
ready to attack us when they thought it was safe
to do so.

!



GEORGE THE THIRD. 61

8. The chief event of the war was the un-
successful siege of Gibraltar for three’ years (1779—
1782) by the French
and Spaniards. The
besiegers were re-
ceived with a warm
British welcome of ¢
red-hot shot, and
completely repulsed.
Since then this great
rock-fortress has been
in the hands of the
British. The Treaty
of Versailles not only ended the American War,
but it also put an end to the fighting in Europe.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 228.









.14. GEORGE THE THIRD.—IV.

1. Lord Clive was compelled by ill-health to leave
India for England in 1760. During his absence
several victories were gained, but in other respects
things began to go wrong. The natives became
more and more unfriendly, because they were un-
fairly treated by the Kast India Company’s servants.
The native princes began to assume an Independent
manner, and to throw off their allegiance to the
British.

2. When Clive returned. to India as Governor of
Bengal in 1765, he found everything in disorder.
The government was disorganized, and the very.



62 , GEORGE THE THIRD.

existence of the Company threatened. With a
vigorous hand he at once began to reform. the
service, putting down abuses that had crept in, and
placing the government on a new footing. He
concluded a favourable treaty with the Mogul Em-
peror, and, after great labour, managed to put
things right. But in doing so he aroused much
ill-will against himself.

3. On his return to England, Clive was charged
by his enemies with haynes abused his powers. It
was nothing to them that He had gained an empire,
and made the natives happier under British rule
than they had been under their own Kings. They
set themselves to hunt him to death, and they
succeeded ; for although the House of Commons
acquitted him, he was so worried by all that he
had gone through, that he put an end to his own
life in 1774, at the age of forty-eight.

4, Warren Hastings, the Governor of Bengal, be-
. came, in 1773, the first Governor-General of India.
He had been in the Company’s service for more
than twenty years, and had passed through the
various grades with credit and success. The idea
of a British sovereignty in India had long before
taken root in his mind, and therefore, when he
found himself at the head of affairs, he eagerly
acted upon his convictions. He did not deal so
fairly with the natives as Clive had done, but, on
the whole, he ruled justly and well. He carried on
a great war with the Mahrattas, who lived far
inland, and overthrew Hyder Ali, the Sultan of
Mysore.



GEORGE THE THIRD. 63



EDMUND BURKE.

5. When Hastings returned to England in 1785,
he was put on his trial, as Clive had been. He
was charged before the House of Lords with having
hired out British troops to put down free native
princes, and also with having forced native princes
to give him large sums of money. The trial_lasted
nearly eight years, from 1788 to 1795. The great
orators Burke, Fox, Sheridan all spoke against him ;
but Hastings was found not guilty. The trial left
him penniless. He spent the rest of his days in
retirement, on a pension allowed him by the East
India Company. ,

6. William Pitt (the younger), the second son of
William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, was at this time a



G4 GEORGE THE THIRD.



CHARLES JAMES FOX.

young man of twenty-four. He had only been a
member of Parliament for about two years when
the Commons thoroughly discussed the question
“ How to govern India.” The charges made against
Lord Clive had shown that those who held power
in India were not so just and merciful as they
ought to have been, and that many acts of oppres-
sion were constantly taking place. The East India
Company had been the rulers of British India ever
since they had received their charter from Queen
Elizabeth in 1600.’ The Company had done much
for India, but they were unable or unwilling to
check the evils which were caused by those. who
went out there only to make money.



GEORGE THE THIRD. 65



WILLIAM PITT (THE YOUNGER),

7. Pitt opposed the plans of the ministers for
the government of India, and a hard battle was
fought in the House of Commons. ‘Though so
young, Pitt showed great ability, and spoke so
eloquently that he at length won the day. Gradu-
ally he gained the confidence of the nation, and at
the Geren election of 1783 he secured such an
eee ane majority, that he was in power for
nearly. the remainder of his life. He was the
youngest man ‘who had ever filled the important
office of Prime Minister. .

8. One of the first uses Pitt made of his Parone
was to settle the government of India. In 1784
he passed an Act appointing a Board of Control,

(888) 5



66 GEORGE THE THIRD.



TIPPOO SAIB.

which consisted of six privy councillors appointed
by the Crown, the principal Secretaries of State,
and: the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Board
ruled the country, leaving the East India Company
free to carry on the trade for which it was_first
formed. This arrangement continued in force till
1858.

9. Lord Cornwallis succeeded. Hastings as Gover-
nor-General of India. He carried on war against
‘Tippoo Saib, the son of Hyder Ali, and in 1792
forced him to yield. Tippoo renewed the fight in
1799; but the town of Seringapatam was stormed

s



GEORGE THE THIRD. 67

by Sir David Baird, and Tippoo was slain. Colonel
Arthur Wellesley, afterwards Duke of Wellington,
was Governor of Mysore, and took a leading part
in. the campaign. He showed here the beginnings
of that military skill which afterwards made him
so famous.

10. Captain James Cook was a famous British
sailor who, while Hastings was building up our
power in India, was adding largely to the empire
in another quarter of the globe) He may be
regarded as the founder of the great Australian
colonies; for he made three voyages round the
world, exploring the South Seas and the coast of
Australia. He was killed in 1779 at Hawaii, one
of the Sandwich Islands, by the spear of a treacher-
ous native,

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 229.

15. GEORGE THE THIRD.—V.

1. The Reform of the House of Commons had begun
to engage the attention of the popular leaders, who
said that Parliament ought really to. represent the
people. Not one person in fifty throughout the
kingdom had the right to vote, and those who had
votes sold them freely to the highest bidder. Pitt
declared that the House of Commons represented
not the nation, but “ruined towns, noble families,
wealthy individuals, and foreign potentates.”

2. The King had far too much influence over
_ Parliament and the Ministry; therefore, in 1780,



68 GEORGE THE THIRD.

a motion was passed in the House of Commons de-
claring “that the power of the Crown has increased,
is increasing, and ought to be diminished.” A Bill
proposing annual Parliaments, manhood suffrage, and
electoral districts was introduced into the House of
Lords; but it did not pass. Manhood suffrage meant
that every man of full age (twenty-one)-should have
a right to vote for members of Parliament, and
electoral districts meant the division of the country
into equal parts for the election of members.

3. The Gordon Riots took place in 1780. Some
of the severe and unjust laws that had been passed
against the Roman Catholics were now repealed.
They were allowed to acquire land, and their priests
were permitted to say mass. These concessions
raised a strong feeling in the country, and Lord
George Gordon, escorted by sixty thousand persons,
presented a petition to Parliament against them.
When the petition was rejected, great riots took
place in the capital. For some days London was
at the mercy of a furious mob, which set fire to
Roman Catholic chapels, plundered houses, broke
open Newgate- prison, and set the prisoners free.

4. No one was safe unless he wore a blue ribbon
to show that he was a Protestant, and chalked “ No
Popery ” on the door of his house. It is said that
one person, to make doubly sure, wrote “ No religion
whatever.” stroyed, many lives were lost, and the riot was not
_ put down till the soldiers fired on the mob, A
description of these events is given in Charles
Dickens’s novel Barnaby Rudge.



GEORGE THE THIRD. : 69

5. The Slave Trade, begun in Queen Elizabeth’s
reign, now came before Parliament for the first
time. Horrible tales were told of how negroes
were seized in Africa, packed in ships, carried
across the Atlantic, and sold to work as slaves .in
the West Indies and in America. It is said that
in the beginning of George the Third’s reign no
jess than fifty thousand blacks were carried off
every year in British ships. William Wilberforce
brought in a Bill, and tried to persuade Parliament
to stop the slave trade; but the slave merchants,
who had their headquarters in Liverpool, got the
Bill thrown out. It was eighteen years before the
slave trade was abolished.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 230.

16. GEORGE THE THIRD.—VI.

1. The French Revolution, which began in 1789,
was the greatest event of the eighteenth century.
For many years the French had been growing
weary of the great burdens laid on them by their
Kings and nobles. The laws were unjust, and the
taxes were not fairly levied on all ranks alike.
Tradesmen, farmers, and labourers were made to
pay heavily, while nobles got off without paying
anything. Until near the close of Louis the Four-
teenth’s reign, the people had looked upon their
Sovereigns with loyalty and affection, as their pro-
tectors against the aristocracy, and the promoters of,
the national glory.



70 . GEORGE THE THIRD.

2. In the reign of his successor, Louis the Fif-
teenth, the French lost even their respect for a
King who traded upon the distress of his subjects.
He bought up corn, and held it till the price was
raised, and then sold it to the starving people. This
was never forgotten or forgiven. When the royal
family—Louis the Sixteenth, his wife, and child—
were led captive to Paris in 1789, they were greeted
_ with the ery, “The baker, his wife, and the little

apprentice.”

3. Unable longer to bear the burden of poverty,
and finding that no relief was to be obtained from
their rulers, the people rose in rebellion against all
in authority. The mob of Paris stormed the great
French prison called the Bastille, and set the pris-
oners free. They also put to death their rulers
and many of their leading men. All France was
drenched in blood. The Reign of Terror, as it is
called, lasted for more than a year.

4. In 1792 the French set up another form of
government, without a monarch, called a Republic,
and sent a message to the British people offering to
help them to do the same. In the following year
they beheaded their King and Queen, Louis the

Sixteenth and Marie Antoinette. All the revolts
against the Republic were put down with much
cruelty and bloodshed.

5. In La Vendée many brave deeds were done,
but nothing could stand against the forces of the
Republic. The people of Toulon obtained the help
of a British force from some British ships; but they
were driven out, and the town nearly blown to pieces,



GEORGE THE THIRD. 71

by a young French (Corsican) officer, named Na-
poleon Bonaparte, afterwards the famous Emperor.

6. The French Revolution caused much fear
amongst our leading men. Would the movement —
against those in authority extend to this country,
and the poor and the ignorant be induced to follow
the example of their neighbours across the Channel?
Such might have been the case had not wise changes
been made from time to time to improve the condi-
tion of the British people. It was the refusal of
these reforms in France that had done all the mis-
chief there. Fox was in sympathy with the Revolu-
tion. He thought the French people had done right
to put down the selfish nobles who had oppressed
them. Burke spoke strongly on the other side.
He saw how much evil might happen in a country
when law and order were overturned.

7. War with France began in 1793. The other
countries of Europe felt that the French had carried
matters too far in upsetting existing authority, and
Great. Britain, Spain, Holland, Austria, Prussia,
Russia, and several smaller states, united against
them. Pitt, hoping the storm would soon pass
over, did not wish to interfere; but the offer of
the French to help the British against their “ tyran-
nical” Government, and the cruel deeds done in
France, had set the mass of the people against that
country, and the cry was in favour of war.

8. The British were for the most part successful
at sea, and in the East and West Indies; but on the
continent of, Europe they, along with the Austrians
and Prussians, were driven back by the French, In



‘72 GEORGE THE THIRD.

the following year Holland, Prussia, and Spain were
forced to make peace with France, leaving Austria,
Russia, and Great Britain to carry on the war.

9. Two Mutinies in the British Royal Navy took
place at this time—the one at Spithead, near the
Isle of Wight, and the other at the Nore, in the
mouth of the Thames. The sailors asked for better
food, better pay, and kinder treatment. Those at
Spithead returned to their duty at once on their
wishes being granted. At the Nore, the mutiny
was not put down till their leader, who called
himself Rear-Admiral Parker, and several others
had been hanged.

10. The Battles of St. Vincent and Camperdown
were won in 1797. The French, Spanish, and
Dutch hoped that by uniting their fleets they
would be able to defeat our fleet and invade the
British Islands. While the Spanish fleet of thirty-
two ships was on its way to join the French fleet
at Brest, it was met off Cape St. Vincent by Ad-
miral Jervis and Commodore Nelson with twenty-
one ships. The Spaniards were defeated, and driven
back to Cadiz, with the loss of four of their finest .
vessels. For this victory Jervis was made Earl St.
Vincent, and Nelson became Admiral. Later in the
year Admiral Duncan met and scattered the Dutch
fleet off the village of Camperdown, in Holland.
This fleet was intended to join a French expedition
to Ireland, to help the rebels there to obtain separa-
tion from England.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 281.



GEORGE THE THIRD. 73

17. GEORGE THE THIRD.—VIL.
1. Ireland was in a very unsettled state at this

time. The Ulster “plantation” in 1611 was the

beginning of Protestant ascendency in the island.
In the reign of Charles the First, Thomas Went-
worth, afterwards Lord Strafford, worked out his
scheme of tyranny called “Thorough” in Ireland,
and treated with savage cruelty every man who
dared to show the least trace of an independent spirit.

2. One good thing Wentworth did for Ireland
was to import a quantity of flax-seed, which laid
the foundation of the Irish linen trade. He also
cleared the Irish Sea of pirates, so that goods might
be safely conveyed from Ireland to Britain.

3. The Rebellion of 1641 was the result of bad
government. The iron rule of Wentworth alone
had kept down the growing discontent; and when
that was at an end, the flame burst forth in Ulster.
There a terrible rising took place, accompanied by
a massacre of Protestants. Men, women, and chil-
dren were ruthlessly torn from home and murdered.
or driven away. From thirty to forty thousand
persons are said to have been killed.

4. Cromwell, in 1649, put down those in arms for
Charles the Second with a strong hand. His stern
and terrible soldiers passed through the land in &
whirlwind of fire and slaughter. Town after town
was taken, and massacre followed massacre. As
fire and sword and starvation did their terrible
work, the people felt indeed that “the curse of
Cromwell” was upon them. After that terrible



74 GEORGE THE THIRD.

visitation, Ireland lay exhausted, helpless, and des-
olate.

5. James the Second, in 1689, hoped to win back
his lost throne by the help of the Roman Catholics
in Ireland. He landed at Kinsale, and got together
_ an army of thirty thousand men, with which he laid
siege to Londonderry, but failed to take it. William
the Third landed in 1690, and defeated him in the
Battle of the Boyne. The Treaty of Limerick put
an end to the rebellion. That treaty was not kept;
the Ivish Parliament, which consisted chiefly of
Protestants, refused to pass it.

6. Penal Laws were passed in 1696 by the En-
glish Parliament, which expelled the Roman Catho-
lics from the Irish Parliament, and prevented them
from holding any office in the state or the army.
Roman Catholics were obliged to have their children
taught in Protestant schools, forbidden to carry arms,
not allowed to practise as solicitors, and, except in
special cases, forbidden. to marry with Protestants.
When these laws failed, stronger laws were made
to keep land and learning from the Roman Catholics.

7. In 1733 Roman Catholics were disfranchised
—that is, their right to vote for members of town
councils and Parliament was taken away. For fear
that British farmers should suffer, no Irish - cattle
and no dairy produce were allowed to be imported
into Britain. The Irish had a good trade in wool,
but it was destroyed in the interests of the British
wool trade. The results of all this persecution and
oppression have been felt to this day, and the Irish
people have been taught to believe that all the evils



GEORGE THE THIRD. 75

they suffer have come from their connection with
England.

8. In the reign of George the Third an Irish Par-
liament sat in Dublin, but no Roman Catholic was
allowed to be a member of it; and as the majority
of the people were Roman Catholics, they felt that
they were not fairly treated by England. The
success of the- French Revolution had caused the
Trish to become very restless. Many of them wanted
to be free from Great Britain; so when the French
offered to help them, they accepted the offer.

9. The United Irishmen, a great secret society
formed to throw off British rule, rose in revolt.
They were met by General Lake on Vinegar Hill,
in County Wexford, and defeated. The rising was
not well timed, as the French help they had looked
for had not come. Owing to a storm only a very
small part of the French fleet reached Ireland, and
it was too late to be of any use. A small French
force landed on the shores of Mayo, but the soldiers
were all taken prisoners. .

10. The Union of Great Britain and Ireland was
completed in 1801. To bring about a better state
of things in Ireland, ib was decided to unite the
two Parliaments, and have but one Parliament for
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
After much discussion and the free use of bribes
the union was agreed to. Ireland was to send
thirty noblemen to the House of Lords, and one
hundred—-now one hundred and three—members
to the House of Commons. Free trade was to
be established between Great Britain and Ireland.



76 GEORGE THE THIRD.

The union came into force on the 1st of January
1801.

11, Catholic Emancipation was proposed by Pitt
‘in 1801. He thought that the union was a good
time to do away with the laws that would not allow
a Roman Catholic to be a member of Parliament or
to fill.a public office. The King refused to allow
any change to be made, and Pitt gave up the office
“he had held for seventeen years. The next Prime
Minister was Henry Addington. He remained in
office only three years, when Pitt again returned to
power in 1804; but he had to agree to put off his
plan for the relief of the Roman Catholics.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 282.

18. GEORGE THE THIRD.—VIII.

1. Napoleon Bonaparte, the young French olen
who had driven the =
British out of Toulon
in 1793, had risen
quickly, and was now
at the head of the
French army. He be-
lieved that the best
way to weaken Great |
Britain was to attack
India. As the shortest
road to that country,
called the overland ————————
route, eee through Egypt and down the Red Sea,



























































































GEORGE THE THIRD. 77



NAPOLEON BONAPARTE,

he sailed for Alexandria with a large fleet and a
powerful army. On his way he took Malta without
firing a shot. When he arrived in Egypt, he met
and defeated an Egyptian army near Cairo, on the
Nile, in the Battle of the Pyramids, in 1798. Before
the battle the great French general pointed to the
pyramids and said to his army, “Soldiers, remember
that from these pyramids forty centuries look down
on your deeds.”

2. Admiral Nelson followed the French to Egypt.
Napoleon was the greatest soldier France ever had,









































































































































BATTLE OF THE PYRAMIDS.



GEORGE THE THIRD. 79



ADMIRAL NELSON.

but his plans were upset by our greatest sailor. In
Aboukir Bay, at the mouth of the Nile, Nelson
completely destroyed the French fleet. Nelson was
wounded during the battle, and when he was carried
below from the deck of his ship a doctor ran to
attend him. “No,” said the admiral; “I will take
my turn with my brave fellows.” His wound
proved to be a slight one.

3. Napoleon led his soldiers from Egypt into Syria
to meet a Turkish army that was gathered there.
He tried to take the town of Acre; but the Turks,
aided by a British force under Sir Sidney Smith,
were able to hold their own, and the French were



x

80 | GEORGE THE THIRD.

forced to retreat. Napoleon now returned to France,
when he was made First Consul, or President of the
French Republic. His army, which had returned
to Alexandria, was defeated there two years after-
wards, in 1801. In this battle Sir Ralph Aber-
cromby, the British leader, was slain. Napoleon

- next Jed an army against Austria, and defeated her

twice—at Marengo and at Hohenlinden, in 1800—
forcing her to accept his terms of peace.

4, The Northern League was now formed against
us by Russia, Prussia, Sweden, and Denmark, leaving
= — us to struggle alone
SSS with Mranes The

| bombardment of






O kronberg a | eee Copenhagen by Nel-
SB asi ae son in the Battle of
: a the Baltic caused the
Frederichsborg aeeeeeeeen , | Danes to submit to
eS our terms and with-

=

ey = draw from theleague.
The defeat of the
Danes and the death
of the Emperor of
Russia caused the
league to be broken
= up, and a _ general
peace was signed at Amiens in 1802. The peace
did not last long. Malta had been taken by, the
British in 1800, and because we would not give it
up at once the war began again. In 1804 Na-
poleon was made Emperor of the French, with the
title of Napoleon the First.









GEORGE THE THIRD. 81

5. Napoleon threatened to invade Great Britain in
1803. He had grown so powerful that Great,
Britain, Russia, Austria, and Sweden united against |
France and Spain. -
Napoleon’s plan was
to get the British
men-of-war out of
the way, in order |
that he might invade ==
this country. To = = =
draw Nelson with | Z
his fleet away from
the English Channel
Napoleon sent the =
French fleet out to sea, as if to cross the Atlantic
to attack the West Indies. Nelson followed; but the
French turned back without being seen, and’ joined
the Spanish fleet at Cadiz.

6. Nelson returned from the West Indies to
England; but when he heard where the combined
fleets of France and Spain lay, he sailed to join
Admiral Collingwood, who had been watching them.
The French and Spanish ships left the harbour of
Cadiz, and on the 21st of October they were met
by Nelson off Cape Trafalgar. The British fleet
bore down on them in two columns, the one led by
Nelson in the Victory, and the other led by Colling-
wood in the Royal Sovereign.

7. Before the Battle of Trafalgar began, Nelson
made his last signal from the mast-head of his ship.
At the time it roused the seamen to do great deeds,
and even now our hearts are stirred when we read

(s88) 6

























































































82 GEORGE THE THIRD.



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CAPE TRAFALGAR.

the noble words, “England expects every man to do
his duty.”

8. In the midst of the foe the rigging of the
Victory got entangled with that of the Redoubtable.
One of the riflemen in the rigging of the French
ship saw a one-armed officer with many stars on his
breast on the deck of the Victory. He fired, and
the officer fell shot through the shoulder. That.
shot was the death-stroke of Lord Nelson. To the
captain of his ship he said, “They have done for
me at last, Hardy ; my back-bone is shot through.”
Three hours later he died, but not till he knew
that he had won a great victory. His last words
were, “Thank God, I have done my duty.” His



GEORGE THE THIRD. 83





























































\
THE DEATH OF NELSON. {\~

body was taken to England, and buried in St. Paul’s
Cathedral, in London, amidst the tears of a whole
nation. : ;

9. The Battle of Trafalgar at once freed Great
Britain from all fear of an invasion. The fleets of
the enemy were not only defeated, they were de-
stroyed. New ships would have to be built and



84 BATTLE OF THE BALTIC.

a new race of seamen reared to man them before
. they could make another attack on the shores of
our island home.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 233.

19. BATTLE OF THE BALTIC.

1. In 1800 the Northern States — Russia,
Prussia, Denmark, and Sweden—formed a league
against Great Britain. To separate Denmark from the
league, and to prevent the Danish ships from aiding
France, a fleet of eighteen vessels, under Sir Hyde
Parker and Admiral Nelson, was sent to the Baltic.

2. Nelson undertook, with the ships under his
command, to destroy the forts of Copenhagen. The
_ battle took place on April 2nd, 1801. After a
struggle of four hours, the Danes yielded. In the
heat of the fight Parker signalled to Nelson to stop
firing; but Nelson put his telescope to his blind
eye, and ordered his own signal for “closer action ”
to be nailed to the mast. at

3. Of Nelson and the North
Sing the glorious day’s renown,
When to battle fierce came forth
All the might of Denmark’s crown,
And her arms along the deep proudly shone ;
By each gun the lighted brand,
In a bold, determined hand,
And the Prince of all the land
Led them on.



BATTLE OF THE BALTIC. 85

4, Like leviathans afloat,

Lay their bulwarks on the brine ;
While the sign of battle flew

- On the lofty British line:
It was ten of April morn by the chime:
As they drifted on their path,
There was silence deep as death,
And the boldest held his breath
For a time.

5. But the might of England flushed
To anticipate the scene ;

And her van the fleeter rushed
O’er the deadly space between.
“Hearts of oak!” our captains cried; when

each gun ;
From its adamantine lips
Spread a death-shade round the ships,
Like the hurricane eclipse .
Of the sun.

6. Again! again! again !
And the havoe did not slack,
Till a feeble cheer the Dane
To our cheering sent us back ;—
Their shots along the deep slowly boom ;
Then ceased—and all is wail,
_As they strike the shattered sail,
Or, in conflagration pale,
Light the gloom.

7. Out spoke the victor then,
As he hailed them o’er the wave:



86

10.

BATTLE OF THE BALTIC.

“Ye are brothers! ye are men!
And we conquer but to save ;
So peace instead of death let us bring:
But yield, proud foe, thy fleet,
With the crews, at England’s feet,
And make submission meet
To our King.”

. Then Denmark blessed our chief,

That he gave her wounds repose ;

And the sounds of joy and grief

From her people wildly rose,

As Death withdrew his shades from the day,
While the sun looked smiling bright

O’er a wide and woful sight,

Where the fires of funeral light

Died away.

. Now joy, Old England, raise !

For the tidings of thy might,

By the festal cities’ blaze,

While the wine-cup shines in light;
And yet, amidst that joy and uproar,
Let us think of them that sleep,
Full many a fathom deep,

By thy wild and ey steep,
Elsinore !

Brave hearts! to Britain’s pride
Once so faithful and so true,
On the deck of fame that died,
With the gallant, good Riou.



GEORGE THE THIRD. 87

Soft sigh the winds of heaven o’er their
grave ! . :
While the billow mournful rolls,
And the mermaid’s song condoles,
Singing glory to the souls
Of the brave ! UMP RETTS
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 234.

20. GEORGE THE THIRD.—Ix.

1. The Battle of Austerlitz was fought in 1805.
While Great Britain was successful at sea, Napoleon
was successful on land. At Ulm he forced an
Austrian army to surrender, and at Austerlitz he
defeated the combined armies of Russia and Austria.
This defeat broke up the alliance which Pitt had
made with Russia, Austria, and Sweden. -

2. William Pitt died in January 1806, at the age
of forty-six years. He was worn out with worry
and hard work. The defeat at Austerlitz, which —
broke up the alliance he had made, was his death-
blow. . It is said that when Pitt heard the news he
laid aside a map he was studying, and said sadly,
“Roll up the map of Europe.” He had earned for
himself the regard of his countrymen by his faith-
ful life and upright service. He was buried in
Westminster Abbey.

3. Charles James Fox was the most important —
member in the new Ministry, though Lord Gren-
ville was Prime Minister. It did not last long, but
. It did one good thing—it put an end to the dread-



88 GEORGE THE THIRD.

ful slave trade, and British ships were no longer
allowed to carry off negroes to be sold as slaves,
But the friends of the slaves had not yet finished
their work. They had to fight for twenty-seven
years longer before all the slaves in the British
colonies were set free, in 1833. In September, Fox
died, aged fifty-seven. He too was laid in West-
minster Abbey, beside his great rival Pitt.

4, The Prussians were defeated at Jena in 1806.
Great Britain again, for the fourth time, made an
alliance against France. This time her allies were
Russia, Prussia, and Saxony. Napoleon struck the
first blow~at Prussia. At Jena he won a great
victory, and a large part of Prussia fell into his
hands.

5. The Berlin Decree was issued in 1807. All
Europe, except Russia and Great Britain, now lay
at the feet of Napoleon—the one strong in her
snowy steppes and thick forests of pine, and the
other safe within her island shores, securely guarded
by her wooden walls.. From Berlin, Napoleon sent
forth his famous “ Berlin Decree,” in which he for-
bade all trade between Great Britain and the Con-
tinent, and ordered all British subjects found in
countries held by France to be made prisoners of
war. The British Government replied by sending
out “Orders in Council,” forbidding trade with
France and her allies. A

6. George Canning now came to the front. The
“ Ministry of all the talents,” as Grenville’s govern-
ment was called, proposed to allow Roman Catholics
to be officers in the army and navy. The King



GEORGE THE THIRD. 89



GEORGE CANNING.

refused to agree to this, and asked all the mini-
sters to resign. They did so, and a new Ministry
was formed, with the Duke of Portland as Prime
Minister and George Canning as Foreign Secretary.
The Chief Secretary of Ireland was Sir Arthur
Wellesley—the man who stands out as the hero
of his time.

7, The Treaty of Tilsit was made in 1807. Napo-
leon defeated the Russians and Prussians at Eylau ;
and in the same year the Russian and French Em-
perors’ met on a raft on the river Niemen, and there
drew up the Treaty of Tilsit. Russia and Prussia
both agreed to carry out the Berlin Decree, and so
help Napoleon to ruin the trade.of England. Can-



90 NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR.

ning knew that Napoleon meant to seize the fleets ~
of Denmark and Portugal, and use them against
Great Britain ; so, when he heard of this treaty, he
sent out a fleet that bombarded Copenhagen, and
. seized the Danish ships of war.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 235.

21, NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR.

1. In 1803 Napoleon resolved upon the invasion
of Great Britain, and brought together a vast army
for that purpose at Boulogne. This step of Napo-
leon’s aroused among Britons a warm feeling of
- patriotism, and 300,000 men offered themselves as
volunteers to resist the enemy if they should land.
It was thus that Napoleon’s “banners at Boulogne
armed in our island every freeman.”

2. Napoleon seems to have doubted whether an
attack on Britain would be successful, and as he
was eager to punish Austria, he suddenly gave up
his design of invading this country, and marched
his army to the banks of the Danube.

3. The story told in the following verses hap-
pened when Napoleon and his army were at
Boulogne. A British sailor, who was a prisoner,
wishing to gain his freedom, escaped in an empty
barrel. He was caught by the Frenchmen, and
was taken before Napoleon. When asked why he
_ had risked his life in that way, he replied that he
had a strong desire to see his mother, from whom
he had been long parted: Napoleon was so pleased



NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR. 91

with his courage and dutiful conduct that he set
him at liberty.

4,

Napoleon’s banners at Boulogne:
Armed in our island every freeman ;
His navy chanced to capture one
Poor British seaman.

. They suffered him—TI know not how—

Unprisoned on the shore to roam;
And aye was bent his longing brow
On England’s home.

. His eye, methinks, pursued the flight

Of birds to Britain half way over,
With envy—they could reach the white
Dear cliffs of Dover.

. A stormy midnight watch, he thought,

Than this sojourn would have been dearer,
If but the storm his vessel brought
To England nearer.

. At last, when care had banished sleep,

He saw one morning, dreaming, doating,
An empty hogshead from the deep
Come shoreward floating.

. He hid it in a cave, and wrought

The livelong day, laborious, lurking,
Until he launched a tiny boat
By mighty working.



92

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR.

Heaven help us! ‘twas a thing beyond
ee wretched: such a wherry
Perhaps ne’er ventured on a pond,
Or crossed a ferry.

For ploughing in the salt sea field,

It would have made the boldest shudder ;

Untarred, uncompassed, and unkeeled,
No sail—no rudder!

From neighbouring woods he interlaced
His sorry skiff with wattled willows ;
And thus equipped he would have passed”

The foaming billows.

But Frenchmen caught him on the beach,
His little Argo sorely jeering ;
Till tidings of him chanced to reach
Napoleon’s hearing.

With folded arms Napoleon stood,
Serene alike in peace and danger,
And in his wonted attitude
Addressed the stranger :—

15.“ Rash man, that wouldst yon Channel pass

On twigs and staves so rudely fashioned,
Thy heart with some sweet British lass
Must be impassioned.”

16.“ I have no sweetheart,” said the lad ;
- . “But, absent long from one another,



GEORGE THE THIRD, 93

Great was the longing that I had
To see my mother.” :

17.“ And so thou shalt!” Napoleon said ;
“Ye’ve both my favour fairly won:
A noble mother must have bred
So brave a son.”

18. He gave the tar a piece of gold,
And with a flag of truce commanded
He should be shipped to England Old
And safely landed.

19. Our sailor oft could scantly shift
To find a dinner plain and hearty ;
But never changed the coin and gift
Of Bonaparté. CGaMppEtt.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 236.

22, GEORGE THE THIRD.—X.

1. The French invaded Portugal in 1807. That
country had always been friendly to Great Britain,
and when Napoleon sent out the Berlin Decree
Portugal would not agree to it. The French Em-
peror therefore sent General Junot, with 30,000
men, to take Lisbon. The royal family fled to.
Brazil, in South America (at that time a Portuguese
dependency), and Junot held Portugal in the name
of Napoleon. This was-the beginning of the great
Peninsular War, so called because it was fought in







94 | GEORGE THE THIRD.

Spain and Portugal, which form a great peninsula
south-west of France.

2. The French invaded Spain in 1808 The King
of Spain had, a quarrel with his eldest son, and































































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asked Napoleon to advise him what to do. The
Emperor, hoping to get Spain into his own hands,
sent for both the father and the son. Having per-
suaded the King to give up his crown, he sent the
son as a prisoner to another part of France, and



GEORGE THE THIRD. 95

then made his own brother Joseph King of Spain.
This brother he had already made King of Naples,
but he now gave that Einediom to one of his.
generals named Murat.

3. The Spaniards rose in arms, and asked Great
Britain to help them. In 1808 Sir Arthur Welles-
ley, who afterwards became Duke of Wellington,
was sent to the Peninsula with an army of 10,000
men. He landed in Portugal, and defeated the
French at Vimiera, north of Lisbon. Soon after
this Sir Hew Dalrymple took the chief command,
and by the Convention of Cintra, a small town near
Lisbon, allowed the French to leave Portugal with
all their arms and warlike stores. For making
this agreement, Sir Hew was recalled and censured, .
and his place was taken by Sir John Moore. Wel-
lesley was also recalled, but was freed from blame.

4. A French army having been made prisoners
by the Spaniards, Napoleon marched another army
into Spain, beat the Spaniards, and entered Madrid.
Sir John Moore, expecting the Spaniards to join
him against the French, marched his army into the
heart of Spain. The Spaniards did not help him,
and he had‘to retreat before a much larger army
than his own under Marshal Soult. The sufferings
of the British army during that backward march
are past description. Moore offered battle before he
reached the shore, but Soult would not fight.

5. The Battle of Corunna was fought in 1809. The
British reached Corunna, in the north-west of Spain,
before the ships which were to take them off had
arrived. The French were close upon them, and



96 THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE.

there was nothing to prevent a battle being fought.
The French were defeated, but Sir John Moore.was
killed by a cannon ball. His hasty burial by night
on the battle-field is beautifully told in Wolfe’s

poem.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 286.

23. THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE.

1 Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note,
‘As his corpse to the ramparts we hurried ;
Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot
O’er the grave of the hero we buried.

2. We buried him darkly at dead of night,
_ The sods with our bayonets turning,
By the struggling moonbeams’ misty light,
And the lantern dimly burning.

3. No useless coffin enclosed his breast,
Not in sheet nor in shroud we wound him;
But he lay like a warrior taking his rest,
With his martial cloak around him.

4, Few and short were the prayers we said,
And we spoke not a word of sorrow ;
But we steadfastly gazed on the face of the dead,
And we bitterly thought of the morrow.

5. We thought, as we hollowed his narrow bed,
. And smoothed down his lonely pillow,



THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE. 97

































































































































































































































































































































































































































BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE.

That the foe and the stranger would tread o’er
his head,
And we far away on the billow.
(S88) 7



98 GEORGE THE THIRD.

6. Lightly they'll talk of the spirit that’s gone,
And o’er his cold ashes upbraid him ;
Bui little he'll reck, if they'll let him sleep on
In the grave where a Briton has laid him!

7. But half of our heavy task was done
When the clock struck the hour for retiring ;
And we heard the distant and random gun
That the foe was sullenly firing.

8. Slowly and sadly we laid him down,
From the field of his fame fresh and gory ;
We carved not a line, and we raised not a stone—
But we left him alone with his glory!

WOLFE.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 287.

24, GEORGE THE THIRD.—XI.

1. Wellesley returned to Portugal in 1809 with a
fresh army. He drove the French out of Oporto,
at the mouth of the Douro, and then pushed on to
Madrid. On the way he met the French at Tala-
vera, and defeated them. For this victory he was
made Lord Wellington. Unable to reach Madrid in
the face of the large French forces that guarded
the city, Wellington retreated into Portugal.

2. The French tried to drive the British to their
ships, but in the Battle of Busaco in 1810 they
were beaten back with great loss; and Wellington
retreated to Torres Vedras, where he threw up lines
of defence from the Tagus to the Atlantic so strong



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23.

bo bo
Ss &

GEORGE .THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE

CONTENTS.

*,° The Asterisks indicate Poetical Pieces. .

FIRST.—1.,
FIRST.—IL.,
FIRST.—III.,
FIRST.—Iv., >.
SECOND.—I.,

SECOND.—IL.,

THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN,* sit

GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE
GEORGE THE

. GEORGE THE

GEORGE THE

. GEORGE THE
. GEORGE THE

GEORGE THE

. GEORGE THE
. GEORGE THE

GEORGE THE

SECOND.—III.,

SECOND.—IV.,
SECOND.—V.,
THIRD.—I.,
THIRD.—IL.,
THIRD.—IIL.,
THIRD. —IV.,
THIRD.—Y.,
THIRD.—VI.,
THIRD.—VIL.,

THIRD.—VIIL.,

. BATTLE OF THE BALTIC, *
. GEORGE THE

THIRD.—IX.,

NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR,*

GEORGE THE

THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE,”™
. GEORGE THE

THIRD.—xX.,

THIRD.—XI.,

THE RETREAT FROM MOSCOW,~*

GEORGE THE

THIRD.—XIL.,

©

18
21
25
30
385
43
45
51
54
53
61
67
69
73
76
84
87
90
93
96
98
101
104
vill CONTENTS.

27.
28.
29.
30.
3.
32.
33,
, 84,
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42,
43,
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
Bl.
52.
53.

EXERCISES ON ALL THE LESSONS IN THE BOOK.

GEORGE THE THIRD.—xXIII.,
WATERLOO, *

GEORGE THE THIRD.—XIV., ..

THE MARINERS OF ENGLAND,*
GEORGE THE FOURTH.--I.,

GEORGE THE FOURTH.—Il., ..
WILLIAM THE FOURTH.—1., ..
WILLIAM THE FOURTH.—IL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—I., 5
VICTORIA’S TEARS,*

QUEEN VICTORIA.—IL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—IIL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—IV.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—V., 8 ae
THE WARDEN OF THE CINQUE PORTS,”
QUEEN VICTORIA.—VI.,
BALAKLAVA,*

QUEEN VICTORIA.—VIL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—VIIL.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—IX.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—x.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—XL.,

‘QUEEN VICTORIA.-—XII.,

QUEEN VICTORIA.—XIII.,

PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY,
HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.—I., :
HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.—IL., ..

CHIEF DATES,
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD,
GENEALOGICAL TREE,

107
112
116
122
125
129
182
136
142
145
148
152
156
159
163
166
V1
173
177

. 182

188
192.
195
198
201
209
212

217
263
270
288
THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.

—_—_—_—_4



HOUSE OF HANOVER.

(SIX SOVEREIGNS.)

1. GEORGE I., great-grandson of James I.......... 1714-1727 : 13 years.
2GHORGERIL Somme eee sere 1727-1760: 33 years.
3. GEORGE III, grandson... eee 1760-1820: 60 years.
4 GEORGE IV., som... eee 1820-1830: 10 years.
5. WILLIAM IV., brother....... 000.0... 1830-1837: 7 years.

6. VICTORIA, niece 20.0 oo... cece cecececeeeeeeeees 1837,

1. GEORGE THE FIRST.—I.
1714 to 1727: 18 YEARS.

1. The House of Hanover, which began with
George the First, was related to the House of
Stuart, which ended with Queen Anne. Elizabeth,
the daughter of James the First, married a German
Prince named Frederick, Elector-Palatine, and their
grandson became King George the First.

2. All Queen Anne’s children had died before
their mother; and the Bill of Rights, passed in
1689, had shut out her half-brother, James the
Pretender, the son of James the Second, from the
throne. The Act of Settlement, passed in 1701,
had declared that Queen Anne should be succeeded
‘by the Electress Sophia of Hanover, the grand-
daughter of James the First, and -her children.
10 GEORGE THE FIRST.

The Bill of Rights took the British crown from the
Stuarts, and the Act of Settlement gave it to the
House of Hanover.

3. George the First, son of the Electress Sophia,
who died two months before Queen Anne, was
Elector of Hanover, formerly a kingdom of Northern
Germany, but now part of Prussia. He became
King of the United Kingdom also, at the age of
fifty-four. “Elector” was the name given to each of
seven German princes who had votes in the election
of the Emperor of Germany.

4. George the First succeeded to the British
throne as quietly as if he had been the son of the
former Sovereign. Those who wished to see a strong
and peaceful Government in the land received his
proclamation with great satisfaction, for they felt that
now there was little danger of the country being
ruled by another Stuart. The new King could not
speak English, and had to leave the government for
the most part in the hands of his ministers. This
gave Parliament more power than it had ever pos-
sessed before, and helped to make the King’s power
less ever’ afterwards.

5.' The Whig party had been most in favour of the
accession of George. . Many of the Tory party, who
had charge of the government at the time of Queen
Anne’s death, were Jacobites; and they had already
begun to plan in favour of the Pretender, when the
Queen suddenly died, and they found themselves
unprepared to take any action on his behalf. It is
said that no one dared even to raise his voice for
the Pretender.
GEORGE THE FIRST. ' TI



GEORGE THE FIRST.

6. George at once turned the Tories out of office,
and placed his friends the Whigs in power. The
Duke of Marlborough again became commander-in-
chief of the army; and Robert Walpole, who had
been expelled from the House of Commons. during
Queen Anne’s reign, was made a minister. Walpole
continued as a minister, with a very short interval,
12 GEORGE THE FIRST.

for twenty-eight years, during twenty of which he
was Prime Minister. His chief skill lay in finance,
or dealing with money, and in keeping the accounts
of the country in good order.

7. The Jacobites, who had been scheming for the
restoration of the Stuarts in the person of the Pre-
tender, took alarm. The Earl. of Oxford was im-
prisoned for two years in the Tower. Lord
Bolingbroke (Henry St. John) and other Jacobite
leaders fled to France. For fear of a rising among
the friends of the Pretender in various parts of the
country, the army and navy were made ready for
war. . aS
8. The Riot Act was passed in 1715, to be used as
a means of preventing a Jacobite rising. This Act
says that if twelve or more persons shall remain
together for one hour, after they have been ordered
to disperse or break up by a magistrate, they shall
be held guilty of crime. After giving such notice,
the magistrate has power to use force to make the
people obey him. He may then order soldiers to
shoot those who refuse, or he may seize and im-
prison them. The Riot Act is in force to this day.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 217.

2. GEORGE THE FIRST.—IL.

1. The “'Fifteen” is the name given to a Jacobite
rebellion which took place in 1715. There was
good cause to fear a rising in favour of the Pre-
tender. He was in France preparing to invade this

f

“re
GEORGE THE FIRST. 13

country, and there were many here who were ready
to fight for him when he came. Riots had taken
place when the Tory ministers were put out of |
office, and many things had happened to show how
strong. was the feeling of some of the people in
favour of the Stuarts.

2. The death of Louis'‘the Fourteenth of France,
from whom the Jacobites had hoped to get help,
did much to discourage them. A rising in Scot-
land, however, was arranged. The Earl of Mar, by
the orders of James, gathered ten thousand High-
landers round him at Braemar. At their head he
marched southward, and took possession of Perth.

3. The Duke of Argyle, at the head of the
King’s army, met the Highlanders at Sheriffmuir.
Neither side won a victory, but the battle was
sufficient to prevent the Jacobites from going
further south. They retreated to Perth as quickly
as they could.

4. The rising in Scotland put the Government
on their guard. Several gentlemen and noblemen
in the west of England who were known to favour |
the Stuarts were put in prison. By this prompt
action the chances of a successful rebellion were
soon at an end. The Duke of Ormond, who had
come from France to lead the movement, went back
to that country with the news that nothing could
be done.

5. The Jacobites of the north a England had
been called out at the same time by the Earl of
Derwentwater and Mr. Foster, the Member of Par-
liament for Northumberland. Only a few answered
14 GEORGE THE FIRST.

to the call, They were joined by some Scottish
nobles, among whom were Lord Kenmure and Lord
Nithsdale, and by eighteen hundred Highlanders
sent by the Earl of Mar. On the same day that the
Battle of Sheriffmuir was fought in Scotland, the
rebels in the north of England were forced into
Preston, in Lancashire, where, after a time, they
gave themselves up to the King’s troops.

6. About a month after the Battle of Sheriffmuir
the Pretender landed at Peterhead; but he came
without the much-needed help from France which
was expected by his followers. Even then he did
‘not act wisely. He wasted his time preparing to be
crowned at Perth, when he ought to have been
fighting for the crown he wished to wear.

7. Hearing that the Duke of Argyle was ad-
‘vancing, the Pretender retreated northward to the
town of Montrose. There he and the Earl of Mar
took ship for France, leaving their followers to take
care of themselves. The leaders of the party were
taken prisoners. Some of them, among whom were
the Earl of Derwentwater and Lord Kenmure, were
put to death; others lost their estates; and more
than a thousand were banished to America. Lord
Nithsdale was sentenced to die along with Lords
Derwentwater and Kenmure, but, the night before
the execution, he escaped from the Tower by the
help of his brave and devoted wife.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 218.
GEORGE THE FIRST. 15

3, GEORGE THE FIRST.—III.

1. The Septennial Act was passed in 1716 to
allow a Parliament to continue in existence seven
years. The Parliament sitting at the time would
be three years old in 1718, and by a law (the
Triennial Act, passed in 1694) a new Parliament
had to be elected at least every three years. The
putting down of the Jacobite rising had made the
Whig party stronger than ever. The ministers,
however, did not think,it would be wise to have a
general election while the country was in such an
excited state. They therefore passed the Septennial
Act. This Act is still in force, though it was only
intended to be a temporary measure. As a rule,
however, Parliaments do not last longer than five
or six years.

.2. The Quadruple Alliance was made by Great
Britain, Germany, France, and Holland against
Philip, King of Spain, to force him to carry out the
Treaty of Utrecht, made in 1713, after the War of
the Spanish Succession.

3. The ministers of the King quarrelled about
the forming of this alliance. Walpole left the Min-
istry, and remained out of office for about three
years. The allies were too strong for Philip. He
was able, however, to send a fleet to Scotland to
help the Pretender. All the ships but two were
wrecked, and Philip was forced: to seek peace shortly
afterwards in 1720.

4, The South Sea Bubble, in 1720, was the name
given to a great trading scheme which was intended
16 GEORGE THE FIRST..

to help the Government to pay the interest on the
National Debt. It will be remembered that the
wars of William the Third had burdened the country
with a heavy debt which had never been paid.
The debt had now grown to the large sum of
£53,000,000, for which the Government had to pay
as interest more than £3,000,000 every year. This
was nearly half of the whole income of the country,
and it became a heavy burden. Many plans were
formed to make the burden lighter, but the one best

’ known is the South Sea Scheme.

5. The South Sea Company had been formed for
the purpose of carrying on trade in the South
Seas. To have the sole right of trading in that
part of the world, the Company agreed to give the
Government a large sum of money at once, and
£800,000 every year, to help to pay the interest
on the National Debt. In order to persuade people
to buy shares in the scheme—that is, to lend the
Company money to work with—the managers spread
abroad stories of the great wealth to be found in the
golden islands of the South Seas. Hundreds, both
rich and poor, ran to buy shares, and money flowed
fast- into the hands of the Company. The people
went mad about it, and some even paid £1,000 for
a share that had at first cost only £100.

6. The success of the South Sea Company seemed
to be so great that many other companies were
started. Everybody wanted to make money in
some easier and quicker way than by working for
it. The money was spent, and little trade was

done. At last the bubble burst. It was found
(888)
GEORGE THE FIRST. 17



SIR ROBERT WALPOLE.

that those who were in the secret had sold their
shares when the price was at its highest. This
caused great alarm, and those who held shares were
now as eager to sell as they had been to buy. No
one would take the shares at any price. The Com-
pany was broken up, and hundreds of persons who
had invested all their money were ruined.

7. Sir Robert Walpole, who had left the Ministry

(883) 9
18 GEORGE THE FIRST.

three years before, had never believed in the South
Sea Scheme; and as he was well skilled in money
matters, he now came forward to advise the country.
He divided the loss between the Bank of England,
_the East India Company, and the Government.
Some of the ministers had to resign for having
taken money from the founders of the Company.
Those who had taken a leading part in it had to
sell all they possessed to repay the shareholders.,

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 219.

4, GEORGE THE FIRST.—IV.

1. Sir Robert Walpole was the first adviser of the
Sovereign who was called Prime Minister. There
had: always been one of the Monarch’s advisers or
ministers who had held the chief place. In Norman
and early Plantagenet times it was the Justiciav.
Then this post was held by the Chancellor, Claren-
don being the last great Chancellor.

2. When it became the practice to choose all the
ministers in power at the same time from the
political party that had a majority in the House of
Commons, they acted together much more than they

_ had formerly done, and this gave them the name of
the Ministry, and their leader was known as the
Premier or Prime Minister. ;

3. The Ministry, the Government, or the Cabinet,
as it is called now, generally consists of from twelve
to fifteen persons, chosen by the Prime Minister

- from the leading members of his party or supporters
GEORGE THE FIRST, 19

in both Houses of Parliament. When Parliament
meets after a general election, the leader of the
party that is-in a majority in the House of Com-
mons takes the office of Premier, and selects the
Ministry from the majority. If, therefore, the people
have elected more Conservative than Liberal mem-
bers, the-Cabinet or Government will be Conserva-
tive; if more Liberals be elected, the Cabinet will
be Liberal. In this way the people, when they are
electing members of Parliament, are really deciding
who shall govern them.

4. Walpole was Premier for twenty years.
The people trusted him, and were willing that he
should have his own way. By freely giving money
and titles of honour, he won over to his side those
who might have given him trouble. He used to
say, “Every man has his price.” He meant that
the vote of every man could be bought, if only its
price could be found out. He always tried to keep
the country out of war, and did all that he could to
improve trade and manufactures. On the whole,
everything went well with the country as long as
Walpole was Prime Minister. In 1722 he had to
deal with a small Jacobite plot, set on foot by
Francis Atterbury, Bishop of Rochester. Atterbury
was banished for life, and spent the rest of his days
in France. ;

5. The death of the King took place suddenly
while he was travelling in Hanover. George and
his wife, Sophia of Zell, had not been good friends.
He used her very harshly, and kept her for thirty-
three years shut up in a castle in Hanover; even
20 ; GEORGE THE FIRST. -

her own children were not allowed to see her. She
died there only a few months before him. They
had one son, George the Second, who succeeded his
father.

6. The chief authors during this reign were
Daniel Defoe, who wrote the famous story Robinson
Crusoe, in which he describes a shipwrecked sailor’s
life and adventures on a desert island; Dean Swift,
who wrote a satire on English society in the form —
of a story which he called Gulliver's Travels ;
Isaac Watts, who composed his Divine and Moral
Songs ; and James Thomson, the author of a poem
called The Seasons.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 220.



DANIEL DEFOE.
GEORGE THE SECOND. 21

5. GEORGE THE SECOND.—1I.
1727 To 1760: 33 YEARS. .
1. George the Second, the son of George the First,
was forty-four years of age when he became King.



GEORGE THE SECOND. 2 .

Unlike his father, he could speak the English lan-
guage. His wife, Caroline of Anspach, in Bavaria,
|
'
!



29 GEORGE THE SECOND.

was a good and clever woman. She had great in-
fluence over him, and with her advice he was able
to govern well. They had two sons—Frederick,
Prince of Wales, whose son was afterwards George
the Third, and William, Duke of Cumberland. Sir
Robert Walpole was at first set aside by the King;
but Caroline, who was Walpole’s friend, obtained
his restoration to power, and he continued to be
the chief minister of the Crown fone the first
fifteen years of this reign.

2. An Excise Bill was introduced in 1733, for at
this time there was a great deal of smuggling car-
ried on. Goods on which a’ tax should have been
paid were brought secretly into the country. Wal-
pole therefore proposed to bring wine and tobacco
under the law of Excise—that is, to allow no one
to deal in them without a license. The merchants
cried out that if this Excise Bill became law, their
business would be ruined. When Walpole saw how

_ many were against the Bill, he decided to with-

draw it aes than lose his power.

3. The Porteous Riot took place in 1736 in con-
nection with Wilson and Robertson, two smugglers
who had been condemned to death for breaking into
a custom-house and carrying off a large sum of money
to repay themselves for the seizure of their contra-
band goods. They were confined in the Tolbooth
Prison, Edinburgh; and on the Sunday before they
were to be hanged, Wilson bravely helped Robertson
to escape. The mob of Edinburgh were so delighted
with Wilson’s act that they pelted the hangman and
the soldiers when the smuggler was brought out to ‘
GEORGE THE SECOND. 23.

be hanged. Captain Porteous, who was in command
of the City Guard, told his men to fire on the crowd,
and several persons were killed. —

4. Porteous was tried for murder, and condemned
to death ; but an order came from London to put
off his execution. The people thought that the
King meant to pardon him; and so one night they
broke into the Tolbooth Prison, dragged Porteous
out, and hanged him on a dyer’s pole in the Grass-
market. When the King and his ministers knew
what had been done, they were very angry. Bill was brought into Parliament to break down
the city wall and take away the charter of Edin-
burgh; but the Scottish Members of Parliament spoke.
so. strongly against it that the Bill was withdrawn,
- and the city was punished with a fine of £2,000.
The story of the Porteous Riot is told in Sir Walter
Scott’s novel, the Heart of Midlothian. .

5. The death of Queen Caroline took ree in
1737, and Walpole lost a warm friend and sup-
porter. After this his’ work was not so easy or
his power so great. Neither the King nor the
Prince of Wales liked him, and those who were
against him in Parliament found an able leader in
William Pitt, afterwards Earl of Chatham.

6. A War with Spain broke out in 1739. The
Spaniards had at this time large colonies in South
America, and they would only allow British ships
to trade with them under very hard conditions.
One thing the British would not agree to—that
was, to allow the Spanish the right to search all
British vessels found near their colonies. In vain
24 GEORGE THE SECOND.

Walpole tried to arrange the difficulty without
fighting. War was declared, to the great joy of
the people. When Walpole heard the London bells
ringing because the war had begun, he said, “ They
may ring their bells now; they will soon be wring-
ing their hands.”

7. Walpole was right, for the war was not a
success. A great fleet and army under Admiral
Vernon and Lord Wentworth failed to take Carta-
gena, a sea-port of New Granada, in South America,
chiefly because the leaders could not agree among
themselves. Commodore (afterwards Lord) Anson
was sent out with ships to help Vernon, but he
failed in his object. He did not return to England

‘for three years. During this time, though he had

lost all his ships but one, he had sailed round the
world, capturing Spanish treasure-ships containing
£300,000. ;

8. The retirement of Walpole took place in 1742,
after he had been Prime Minister for twenty years.
Though he had opposed the Spanish War from the
first, yet he was blamed for its failure; and when
the new Parliament met in 1741, he found that he
had not a sufficient majority of supporters in the
Commons to carry on the government, and there-
fore he resigned his place as Premier. The King
made him Earl of Orford in 1742; and he died in
1745.

9. The War of the Austrian Succession began in
1741, before the war with Spain had come to an
end. Charles the Sixth of Austria had died in
1740, and left a will making his daughter, Maria-
GEORGE THE SECOND. 25

Theresa, Queen of the countries over which he had
ruled. The Elector of Bavaria wanted to take
Hungary from her, and the King of Prussia took |
Silesia, while the King of France said she had no
right to rule at all. The British, alarmed for
Hanover, took the part of Maria. King George
crossed to the Continent with an army, and put the
French to flight in a battle near Dettingen, on the
river Main (1748). This was the last time that
a British King was under the fire of an enemy.
Two years later his second son, the Duke of Cum-
berland, was beaten by Marshal Saxe at Fontenoy,
in Belgium. After years of fighting, Maria-Theresa’s
claims were acknowledged by all the Powers.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 220.

XN

6. GEORGE THE SECOND.—IL

1. The “Forty-five” is the name given to a
Jacobite rising in 1745. Charles Edward (“ Bonnie
Prince Charlie ”), the young Pretender, the ‘son of
James, the old Pretender, who had been promised
the support of France, came to Scotland to make
another attempt to win back the throne the Stuarts
had lost. He landed with seven officers at Moi-
dart, on the Inverness coast, and many of the
Highland chiefs, the most noted of whom was
Cameron of Lochiel, gathered round him. Though
these chiefs thought that the attempt was badly
planned, they felt themselves bound in honour to
support the Prince. With seven hundred men he
26 ‘GEORGE THE SECOND.

_. moved southward, and at Perth he was proclaimed

Regent for his father. The people of Edinburgh
gave him a hearty welcome, and he took up his
abode in Holyrood Palace. The Castle of Edin- —
‘burgh, however, held out for King George.

2. Sir John Cope -was in the north, near Inver-
ness, with the King’s army when Charles marched
southward. He embarked his troops at Aberdeen,
and took them'by sea to Dunbar, where he landed
them on the same day that Charles entered Edin-
burgh. Marching out of Edinburgh, the Prince
found the Royal troops at Prestonpans. Round
their watchfires the clansmen waited for the dawn
of day; and almost before there was light enough
to see their way, they crossed a marsh that sepa-
rated the two armies, and made a dash at the Royal
troops. The first rush of the Highlanders won the
battle. They fired their pistols, and dashed on with
their claymores. The King’s army broke, and fled
to Berwick, with Sir John at its head.

3. Charles returned to Edinburgh, where he
wasted the time in banquets and balls. He spared
no pains in his attempts to please the Scottish
people; but he allowed the eagerness of his fol-
lowers to cool. Six weeks after his victory,
Charles set out for London with an army of five
thousand men. If he had only pressed on to
London, he might have driven George from the
throne; but the delay gave the King time to muster
his forces. Charles crossed the Border, took Car-
lisle, and marched to Derby. The help he had ex-
pected to receive on the way never came. Almost


GEORGE THE SECOND. 27

hemmed in by thirty thousand men under General
Wade, who was marching from the east, and the
Duke of Cumberland, who lay to the south, Charles
began the homeward march. On his way to the
north he gained a victory over the Royal troops at .
Falkirk, in Stirlingshire; but he was still driven
northwards, and had to seek shelter among the
Grampians.

4, The Battle of Culloden was fought in 1746.
Charles fell back on Inverness, and the Duke of







Fortrose,









Cumberland, at the head of the Royal army, followed
him. Charles made his last stand at Culloden.
The Highlanders, sword in hand, rushed on the first
line of. the Royal troops, and broke it, only to finda
second and a third ready to withstand their attack.
In less than an hour they were completely beaten.
‘One part of the army yielded at Inverness; the
other scattered and disappeared in the glens from
which, the clansmen had come. The victory was so
complete that the Pretender’s hopes and courage
melted away. :
28 GEORGE THE SECOND.















































































CAIRN ON CULLODEN MOOR.

5. Charles fled to the hills, and wandered about
for five months. Although a reward of £30,000
was offered for his head, and hundreds of persons,
some of whom were very poor, knew where he was
hiding, no one would give him up. The most fam-
ous of those who helped him to escape was Flora
Macdonald. She dared every danger, and even
risked her own life, to protect him. At last he
escaped to France; but when peace was made with
that country, he had to seek refuge in another land.

6. The sufferings of the Highlanders did not end
with their defeat at Culloden. Those parts of the
country from which the followers of Charles had
come were overrun by the King’s soldiers. Cum-
GEORGE THE SECOND. 29

berland spared none on whom he could lay his
hands. . His cruelty earned for him the name of
“ Butcher.” The country was wasted with fire and
sword; the men were hunted down on the moun-
tains; their houses were pulled down, and the
women and children were left to die of hunger and
. cold. The clans were broken up, forts were built,
and the people were forbidden to wear the High-
land dress. About eighty of the chief Jacobites
were executed, among whom were Lord Kilmarnock,
Lord Balmerino, and Lord Lovat.. Flora Macdonald
was put in prison for a year. This was the last
Jacobite rising. The Stuarts never again tried to
regain their throne.

"y, The last of the Stuarts died on the Continent.
James, the old Pretender, died in 1766. Charles
Edward spent his later days in Rome, under the
title of Duke of Albany. The gallant young sol-
dier, the “ Bonnie Prince Charlie” of song’ and
story, became a broken-down drunkard. He died
in 1788. His brother Henry, Cardinal of York,
the last male of the Stuart line, died nineteen years
later. The two brothers were buried in the Church
of St. Peter at Rome. The marble monument over
their grave records their rank as Charles the Third
and Henry the Ninth, two names not found? in the
roll of British Kings.

8. The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748 Toate
the war of the Austrian Succession to a close, all
parties being thoroughly tired of the conflict. The
husband of Maria-Theresa was acknowledged as Em-
peror of Germany. The Pretender and his family
30 THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN,

were banished from France, and the House of Han-
over acknowledged as rightful Bove er of the
United Kingdom.

9. A change in the Calendar was made in 1752.
Since the days of Julius Cesar each year had been
reckoned eleven minutes too long, and this had at
length caused the British date to be eleven days .
behind the right time. To make the reckoning
right, eleven days were dropped in 1752—+the 3rd
of September being called the 14th. The people
at first disliked the change, and called upon the
Government to give them back their eleven days.
The calendar was also arranged so that the year
should commence on the first day of January
instead of the 25th March as hitherto. Pope
Gregory had long before adopted the new style
—that is, had made this change in all Roman
Catholic countries; but England, “being Protestant,
had refused to do so. Russia is at present the
only country in Europe that still reckons by the
old style.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 222.

7. THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN.

1. The ruined castle of Invergarry stands on a
rock on the banks of Loch Oich, in Inverness-shire,
close to the confluence of the river Garry with the
lake. The crag on which the castle is built was
the ancient ‘gathering-place of. the Macdonells of
Glengarry, and so its name, “The Rock of the
THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN. 31

Raven,” was given to the slogan or war-cry of the
- clansmen.

2. At the ommnenestient of Prince Charles
Edward’s rash enterprise, the Prince spent a night
there in August 1745. Once again Charles slept
in that castle, on the morning after the fatal fight
of Culloden. A few days afterwards, the deserted
fortress fell a prey to the destroying army of
Duke William of Cumberland. | Its strength resisted
in some measure the flames with which it was
assailed, and the blackened and ivy-grown bulwarks
still rear themselves grandly over the blue waters
of Loch Oich.

3. It appears that the chief of Glengarry himself
took no part in the rising, nor did his eldest son,
who was absent in France. The younger son was
the leader, and the intended scapegoat for the
family ; but the Government was too angry to
attend to distinctions of so doubtful a character,
and, accordingly, in the succeeding vengeance, the
Macdonells of Glengarry suffered bitterly for their
disaffection.

4, In 1794, the Macdonells were formed into a
Government corps, under the command of their
chieftain; but this regiment being disbanded in
1802, the principal part of the clan removed to
Upper Canada, where they have given to many
scenes the same beloved names as those borne by
the glens of their fathers. The remnant of these
Macdonells live peaceably in their old locality; nor
is there in all Scotland a more interesting or beauti-
ful district than that of Glengarry.
32 THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN.











Beware of Macdonell, beware of his wrath!

In friendship or foray, oh, cross not his path !

He knoweth’no bounds to his love or his hate,

And the wind of his claymore is blasting as Fate.

Like the hill-cat that springs from her lair in the rock,

He leaps on his foe—there is death in the shock ;

And the birds of the air shall be gorged with their

prey, _

When the chief of Glengarry comes down to the fray,

With his war-cry, “ The Rock of the Raven !”
THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN. . 383

: 6.
The eagle he loveth dominion on high,
He dwells with his kindred alone in the sky ;
Nor heedeth he, sailing at noon o’er the glen,
The turbulent cares crak dissensions of nien.
But the Raven exulteth when strife is at hand,
His eyes are alight with the gleam of the brand ;
And still, when the red pare cross goeth round,
And gathers Clan Colla at fortified mound,

The first at the tryst is the Raven.

7.
On the Rock of the Raven, that looks o’er the flood,
All scathed with the cannon, all stained with the
blood,

Had old Invergarry long baffled the snows,
The gales of the mountain, the league of its foes ;
And imal its bulwarks confronted the tide,
And safely the skiff in their shadow could ride,
For upwards and downwards, as far as the sight,
That castle commanded the vale and the height,

From its eyrie, the Rock of the Raven. -

8.
But woe for Duke William! his doom shall be bale
When against him in judgment upriseth the Gael ;
When they cry how green Albyn lay weltering in gore
From western Loch Linnhé to Cromarty’s Piorer
How the course of the victor was marked on the Elect
By the black wreathing smoke hanging down like a
shroud :

O’er the hut of the vassal, the tower of his lord;
For the fire worketh swifter than carbine or sword,
And giveth more joy to the Raven.

(888) 3
34 THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN.

; 9.
Then downcast was Colla, sore smitten with dread,
And hunted for sport with the fox and the gled;
While old Invergarry, in silence forlorn,
Resounded no longer the pipe and the horn.
But the Raven sat flapping his wings in the brake,
When the troops of Duke William marched down by
the lake:
Their march was at sunset—at dawning of day
In smouldering heaps were those battlements gray,
And the castle was left to the Raven.
10. :
From mountain and loch hath departed its sway ;
Yet still the old. fortress defieth decay :
The name of Duke William is foul with disgrace,
But the bastions he fired are firm in their place ;
And the clansmen he scattered are gathered again,
The song and the dance are restored to the glen ;
And the chief of Glengarry hath builded his halls
On. the low woody beach, in the shade of those walls
_ ‘That frown from the Rock of the Raven.
11.
And still hath Macdonell the soul of his sires,
And still hath Clan Colla the old Gaelic fires ;
For the pulse beateth strongly for honour and pride,
As it throbbed in their breasts who for léyalty died.
With peace and with plenty the valleys rejoice,
And the wind hath forgotten the slogan’s dread voice;
And the home of the Gael is as tranquil and bright
As Loch Oich when it sleeps on a blue summer’s night
At the foot of the Rock of the Raven.

: Mrs. D. OGILVIE.
- EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 228.
/

GEORGE THE SECOND. 35

8 GEORGE THE SECOND,—III.

1. The Pelhams-—Sir Henry Pelham and his
brother, the Duke of Newcastle—became the lead-
ing ministers in 1743. Sir Robert Walpole had
resigned the office of Prime Minister in 1742, and
was succeeded by the Karl of Wilmington. Then
Sir Henry Pelham became Prime Minister. He was
a very good man of business; and his brother, the
Duke, knew how to keep people in good humour
and get their votes. So, by obliging everybody,
the brothers managed to keep in power for nearly
twenty years. When Sir Henry died, in 1754, the
Duke became Prime Minister.

2. William Pitt, called the Great Commoner, after-
wards made Earl of Chatham, entered Parliament
in 1735. He had gained some influence in Wal-
pole’s time, and under the Pelhams he rose quickly
to a high position. He did not possess the King’s
favour; but as the ministers would not continue in
office without him, George had to leave him alone.

3. The Seven Years’ War began two years after
the death of Henry Pelham. The British were
attacked by the French on the Continent, in
America, and in India. At first everything seemed
to be going wrong, and the people were in despair,
till Pitt came forward, after the loss of Minorca, and
said, “I know that I can save the nation, and that
no one else can.”

4. In 1757 he was made Foreign Secretary, and
though Newcastle was Prime Minister, Pitt was
really the head of the Government. He was one of
386° GEORGE THE SECOND.



WILLIAM PITT, EARL OF CHATHAM.

the greatest and most powerful ministers that the
country has ever had. The people trusted him
more than all the other members of the Govern-
ment, and the management of the war was left
entirely in his hands. Unlike Sir Robert Walpole,
he hated bribery, and never made a wrong use of
public money. He was a very eloquent speaker,
and this alone gave him great influence in the House
of Commons. It was during the Seven Years’ War
that our successes in North America and in India
made Pitt’s name famous throughout the world.

5. The British Empire had made considerable pro-
gress in the one ‘hundred and fifty years from 1600
to 1750. Our navy had greatly improved, and our
GEORGE THE SECOND. 37

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180 180 $40 120_ 10. + 40 20

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120 100 80 60
(Each Square 1,000 miles.)
NORTH AMERICA.

ships were ploughing every sea; our commerce
had increased at a rapid rate; and many of our
countrymen had gone forth to other lands to trade
and to colonize. Our nearest neighbour at home
was France, and in spite of the “silver streak ” that
separated us, we had often quarrelled and fought
on the continent of Europe. When we settled
38 GEORGE THE SECOND.











Eastern
Sioux







abroad, the French were our neighbours there also,
for they planted colonies alongside of ours. In
North America and in India, Britain and France -
quarrelled and fought till, in the end, the French
were defeated, and these two great countries were
added to the British Empire.

6. The British Colonies in North America had be-
come a-very important part of the empire. You
will remember that in the’reign of Queen Elizabeth
Sir Walter Ralegh had planted an English colony on
the shores of North America. He called it Virginia,
in honour of the virgin Queen. During the follow-
ing reigns other colonies were planted all along the
Atlantic coast of North America. . Among these
/
GEORGE THE SECOND. 39

were the New England States, founded by the Pil-
grim Fathers in the reign of James the First. These
colonies had grown in number and in population till
now, in George the Second’s reign, we find thirteen
of them, containing more than a million well-to-do
people, managing their own affairs, but under gover-
nors appointed by the King of Great Britain.

7. The French Colonies in North America were chiefly
on the great river St. Lawrence, and were then
called Lower Canada, which is now known as the
Province of Quebec. The French wished to keep in
their hands all the trade carried on with the Indians
who dwelt between the British colonies and the
great river Mississippi. . To do this they built a
chain of forts along the river Ohio. If their plans
had been successfil, they would have confined the
British settlers to a narrow strip of country along
the sea-coast. This led to fighting between the
British and the French colonists, each wanting to
be master in America. Pitt was eager to drive the
French out of that continent.

8. The English East India Company was formed in
1600, towards the end of Elizabeth’s reign. While
some of our countrymen were sailing west to plant
colonies in America, others were sailing east to trade
with the people of India. They had at this time
no thought of becoming the rulers of that great
country. The Portuguese and the Dutch were
already there, and wished to keep out other
Europeans.

9. Little by little, however, the English made
good their footing. Their first establishment was


2




40 GEORGE THE SECOND.






fan



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seve ore




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(Zach Square 500 227les.)

OUR INDIAN EMPIRE.

on one of the islands. In 1640 Madras was °
founded ; and when Charles the Second received
Bombay as part of his wife’s dowry, he handed it
over to the Company. In 1698 Calcutta was
founded ; and thus in George the Second’s reign the
Company possessed three factories or trading centres
—at Bombay, Madras, and Calcutta? Here forts
GEORGE THE SECOND. 4]

had been built for the protection of the Company’s
warehouses, and were guarded by a few sepoys or
paid native soldiers.

10. A French East
India Company had been |
started in 1664 at Pon-
dicherry, on the east
coast, about one hun-
dred miles south of
Madras. The French,
our neighbours at home,
were now our rivals
both in America and
in India.

11. The British and
_ the French traders in L
India ‘were very jealous of each other; and when
war broke out be-
tween the home
countries — Great
Britain. and
France—the
French Govern-
ment in India
tried to drive out
the British and
seb up a great
French Empire in
that country.
' 12. For ‘some
time the French
were successful. They destroyed the British fac-






















42 GEORGE THE SECOND.



LORD CLIVE.

tory at Madras in 1746, and carried off the mer-
chants and clerks as prisoners. But when the war
in Europe came to an end, two years afterwards,
Madras was again given up to the English Company.

13. Robert (afterwards Lord) Clive, a clerk in the
English East India Company’s service, was among
the captives at the taking of Madras; but he
escaped, and entered the army in 1746, where he
soon became famous for his daring and bravery.
In 1751, with a small force, he seized Arcot, in
Southern India, where he stood a famous siege by
a French and native army, in which he came off
victorious. To this man we owe our Indian Empire.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 224.
GEORGE THE SECOND. 43

9. GEORGE. THE SECOND. —IV.

1. The Seven Years’ War began in. 1756, and ended
in 1768. All the great powers of Europe took .
part in this conics France, Austria, and Russia
joined against Frederick the Great of Prussia, and
Great Britain took the part of Prussia for the de-
fence of Hanover. Many battles were fought on
the Continent which do not belong to British his-
tory. Our share of the conflict took place chiefly
in India and in America. _.: -

9. The capture of Minorca, one of the Balearic
Islands, in the Mediterranean, took place at the
beginning of the war. This island had been taken
by the British from Spain in 1708. In 1756 it
was blockaded by a powerful French fleet. British fleet, under Admiral Byng, was sent out to
relieve it. Thinking that his force was not strong
enough, the admiral sailed away to Gibraltar, and
Minorca was taken by the French. The people of
this country were so angry that Byng was tried
for neglect of duty and condemned to death. He
was shot on the deck of a man-of-war at Portsmouth
in 1757.

3. The Nabob of Bengal, a native prince, attacked
the British settlements on the Ganges in 1756..
Fort William, at Calcutta, abandoned by its gover-
nor and the commander of its troops, fell into his
hands, upon which he ordered all the British pris-
oners to be thrust into a small room oy eighteen
feet long and fifteen feet wide.

4, The Black Hole of Calcutta, as this chamber was
4A GEORGE THE SECOND.

afterwards called, was packed with one: hundred
and forty-six persons, who were locked up all night.
Suffering all the agonies of heat, thirst, and suffoca-
tion, they endeavoured in vain to bribe the guards
to transfer some of them to another room. In vain
they begged for mercy, and tried to burst open the
door, Their jailers only mocked them, and would
do nothing. “Then the prisoners went mad with
despair, trampled each other down, fought to get at
the windows, and implored the guards to fire upon
them.” Next morning only twenty-three came out
alive. |

5, The Battle of Plassey avenged this cruel deed.
Clive, who was in England when the outbreak took
place, hurried to the scene of action. Landing in
December, he captured a fortress ten miles below
Calcutta; and then forcing his way with only two
thousand four hundred men to Calcutta, he held it
against: the Nabob with forty thousand men. In
Time Clive met the Nabob in battle at Plassey,
ee miles north of Calcutta, and with less than
four thousand men he defeated an army of sixty
thousand. The Nabob was taken PreQHeE and
afterwards put to death.

6. This victory gained for Britain the large and
fertile Province of Bengal, and made us masters of
India. Several other battles were fought, and in
1760 Clive again returned home. While he had
been extending the British power in Bengal the
French were gaining ground at Madras. Fort St.
David, which protected that place, was taken, but
the town itself held out. Shortly afterwards the
GEORGE THE SECOND. - AB

power of the French was greatly weakened by the
Battle of Wandewash, in which they were defeated
by Sir Eyre Coote. The fall of Pondicherry in the
following year destroyed their hopes of forming a
French Empire in India.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 225.

10, GEORGE THE SECOND.—V.

.1. The capture of Quebec was decided upon by
Pitt, and he sent to Canada a very gallant general



GENERAL WOLFE.

named James Wolfe. Pitt himself planned the
campaign, and ordered Wolfe to take the French
capital of Canada. This was a hard thing to do, as
46 GEORGE THE SECOND.





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Quebee was a very strong fortress built on high
rocks, at the foot of which runs the river St. Law-
rence, and was held by the French under General
Montcalm. At first unsuccessful, Wolfe began to
think that he should have to give up the attempt to
take the city. At last he thought of a daring plan,
which he set about carrying out at once.

2. Outside of Quebec there is a table-land, called
the Heights of Abraham, which overlooks the city.
A zigzag path leads from the river to the top of
these heights. The narrow landing-place at the foot
was left almost unguarded, for the French general
never dreamed that an enemy would come upon
him by that way. During the night, Wolfe took
his soldiers in boats down the river, and landed
them at the foot of the cliffs. Silently they climbed
the zigzag path, and when morning broke they were ~














































































































































































































































































































































































































AS,



WOLFE’S COVE.
48 GEORGE THE SECOND.

all ready for battle on the plain.above. The French
were taken completely by surprise, yet they ad-
vanced with great bravery.

3. The steadiness of the British won the day.
The French broke, and fled for safety to the town.
Wolfe was killed in the moment of victory. When
he felt that his wound was mortal, he said, “ Hold
me up; do not let my brave fellows see me fall!”
As he rested in the arms of one of. his officers, the
British general heard him say, “ See, they run!”
“Who run?” asked Wolfe. “The enemy, sir; they
give way everywhere.” “Now, God be praised; I
die happy.” These were the hero’s last words.
Montcalm was also wounded, and died the next day.
Quebec was given up four days afterwards. In the
following year Montreal and the whole of Canada
passed into the hands of the British.

4. The Battle of Minden was fought in 1759.
The French were defeated by Prince haat of
Brunswick. From dawn to noon the battle con-
tinued, British guns and bayonets contributing much
to the defeat of the enemy. A month later, Admiral
Boscawen shattered a French fleet in a naval action
off Cape Lagos, in the south of Portugal. Another
French fleet was also destroyed by Admiral Hawke
off the rocky coast of Brittany.

5. George the Second died suddenly of heart dis-
ease in the seventy-seventh year of his age. He
was a good King, and his homely manners and
kindly ways made him a favourite with his people.
Frederick, Prince of Wales, had been struck by a
cricket ball and killed some years before, leaving


















































































































































































DEATH OF WOLFE.
50 GEORGE THE SECOND.

nine children, the eldest of whom came to the
throne as George the Third.

6. The Methodists were founded by a number of
men who desired to bring about a revival in religion.
At the beginning of the reign the Nonconformists,
as the chief religious bodies outside the Church of
England were called, were the Independents, the
Presbyterians, the Baptists, and the Society of
Friends. The members of the Established Church
were far more numerous than the Nonconformists ;
but the Church itself was not in a satisfactory con-

dition.

7. In.1730 a band of Oxford students, led by
John Wesley, his brother Charles, and a famous
preacher named George Whitefield, formed themselves
into a society for the purpose of bringing about the
revival they so much desired. From their methodi-
cal or regular meetings for worship, and because of
their strict religious lives, they received the name of

Methodists. At first Wesley had no intention of
separating from the Church; but as the clergy would
not recognize the movement, meetings were held in:
the open air and in barns till chapels were built,
and at length the Methodists formed themselves into
a Separate communion. ;

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 226.
GEORGE THE THIRD. 51



ll, GEORGE THE THIRD.—I.

1760 To 1820: 60 Years.

1. George the Third, son of Frederick, Prince of
Wales, and grandson of George the Second, was
twenty-two years of age when he became King.
The two Georges who had reigned before him had
been born and brought up in Germany; but the
young King was an Englishman. In his first speech
52 GEORGE THE THIRD.

to Parliament he said, “I glory in the name of
Briton.” ;

2. Great Britain had now become the leading
nation in the world; but France still struggled for
the mastery, and the Seven Years’ War continued.
The French made overtures for peace, hoping to
detach Britain from her alliance with Prussia.
Pitt, however, continued firm in his attachment to
Prussia. To make matters worse, the French put
forward a statement of Spanish claims against the
_ British Government, and urged the settlement of
these claims at the same time as the conclusion of
peace. The paper was sent back to France with
an intimation that the French Government must
not presume to meddle between Great Britain and
Spain. ,

3. The Family Compact was the result of these
strained relations between Great Britain and France.
Pitt soon learned that the Kings of France, Spain,
and Naples had jomed together against Great
Britain. They all belonged to the Bourbon family,
or royal house of France, and the agreement was
called the Family Compact. They were to aid one
another against all their enemies, and chiefly against
Great Britain. Pitt wished to declare war at once
against Spain, and boldly strike the first blow by
attacking the Spanish colonies: But George, by the
advice of the Earl of Bute, who had been his tutor,
and who had great influence over him, refused to
allow this; on which Pitt resigned.

4, War with Spain followed in 1762, for that
power was quite ready to carry out the terms of .
GEORGE THE THIRD. 53

the Family Compact. Bute became Prime Minister,
and Parliament voted large sums of money to carry
on the war. In the East and West Indies one place
after another belonging to France and Spain fell into
our hands. At length both France and Spain asked |
for peace. Bute was willing to grant their request,
because he was getting alarmed at the growth of the
National Debt, which had risen to £132,000,000.

5. The Peace of Paris, in 1763, put an end to the
war. It left Canada, which had been won by
Wolfe in 1759, and other places in North America,
in the hands of Britain; but Pondicherry, taken in
1761, was restored to the French. The people
were angry, because they thought too much had
been given back to France and Spain. When Bute
saw that the feeling of the country was against.
him, he resigned, and his place was taken by George
Grenville.

6. John Wilkes, who was a member of Parlia-
ment and the editor of a newspaper called the
_ North Briton, was sent to the Tower of London in
1768, for stating in his paper that the King had
told a lie in a speech from the throne. Under the
Habeas Corpus Act Wilkes was set free; but he
was turned out of the House of Commons, and out-
lawed. After being away in France for a time he
came back, and the people, who regarded his treat-
ment as unlawful, elected him four times as Member
of Parliament for Middlesex; but the House of
Commons would not let him take his seat.

7. Determined to stand up for freedom of speech,
the people still took his part, and made him
54 GEORGE THE THIRD.

Lord Mayor of London in 1774. In the end
the House of Commons had to yield and allow
Wilkes to take his seat. While this agitation was
going on, the printers and publishers of the “ Let-
ters of Junius” were tried and acquitted. These
letters appeared in the Public Advertiser, and con-
tained violent attacks on the King and the Prime
Minister for interfering with the freedom of election.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 226.

12. GEORGE THE THIRD.—II.

1. The Stamp Act, passed in 1765, caused a quarrel
with our American colonies, which ended in their
separation from the mother country. The Govern-
ment at home claimed the right of taxing them
without their permission. The late war had cost
a large sum of money, and as much of it had
been spent on behalf of the colonies, Grenville
thought that they ought to help to pay the bill.
A Stamp Act was therefore passed, by means of
which he hoped to raise the amount he wanted
from America.

2. This Act required that all legal documents,
such as deeds, wills, notes, and receipts, should be
_ written on paper bearing Government stamps, for
which a payment was required. The Americans
answered that they were willing to give money of
their own free will, but that they would not be
forced to pay taxes which they had no share in
levying, as they sent no members to the British
GEORGE THE THIRD. 55

Parliament. Grenville resigned, and his successor,
the Marquis of Rockingham, repealed the Stamp
Act.

3. New taxes were imposed on the American
colonists in 1767. Pitt, who was now Earl of
“Chatham, had warned the Government against the
Stamp Act, and told them what would happen.
He was strongly against taxing the colonists at all;
but the ministers, led by the Duke of Grafton,
Prime Minister, and Charles Townshend, Chancellor
of the Exchequer, had not yet learned wisdom.
They therefore imposed new taxes on tea, lead,
glass, and other things which were sent to America.
Chatham left the Ministry, and two years later the
_ Duke of Grafton gave way to Lord North.

4. It was not because the taxes were large that
the Americans refused to pay them, for they were
very small, but because the colonists considered that
the home Government had no right to tax them at
all. The King was more to blame than any of his
ministers. He would not give way in what he
thought was his right as Sovereign of the colonies.

5. The Boston Tea-Party, as it is called, brought
matters to a crisis. — In December 1773 ships ar-
rived in Boston harbour with cargoes of taxed
tea, upon which a number of men dressed like
Indians went on board and emptied three hundred
and forty-two chests of tea into the water. Asa:
punishment, the Government ordered the port of
Boston to be closed. The object of this was to
ruin the Boston merchants by preventing the land-
ing of goods there.
56 GEORGE THE THIRD.

6. In the following year twelve men, chosen
from each of twelve States (to which a thirteenth
was afterwards added), met in congress at Phila-
delphia, and sent an address to the King, asking
him to withdraw the taxes; but the King refused.
Jhatham (Pitt) said to the Lords that it was folly
to force taxes in the face of a continent in arms. —
Edmund Burke bade the Commons take care lest
they broke that tie of kindred blood which, light as
air though strong as iron, bound the colonies to the
mother land.

7. The American War of Independence was now
fought out to the bitter end. It was ten years since
the passing and withdrawing of the Stamp Act.
Everything’ had been tried to bring about a settle-
ment, but the foolishness of the King had made
all efforts vain. War began, and went on for nearly
eight years. The King found that he could get
Lord North to do much as he wished, and so he
kept him in power during the whole American
War. :

8. The first campaign began in 1775 at Lexington,
near Boston, between a few British soldiers and |
some American riflemen. The colonists, who were
used to shooting deer in the forests, soon proved .
their skill, and they now shot down men with
deadly aim. The British lost more than twice as
many men as the Americans. The Americans next
besieged the British under General Gage in Boston, |
and a battle took place on Bunker’s Hill, near the
town, where the Americans had thrown up earth-
works. They were forced to retreat, but they did
GEORGE THE, THIRD. 57

1
4b. CHAMPLAIN

Saratoga, } Lexington
















Neagara Falls



BUNMER'S HILL XS

plbanyiels e
BOSTON

NEW YORK
Brandywine

Philade\phia
Baltimore,

WASHINGTON a

Richmond,

Yorktowne





not lose heart. They now saw that they could
hold their own when they met the: best British
troops on equal terms.

9. George Washington was made commander-in-
chief of the American army. He had done good
service for the British in Canada in their struggle
‘with the French in the Seven Years’ War. Now
he had but one thought, one desire, and that was
to secure the freedom of his country. “First in
war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his
countrymen,” was said of him. He was in favour
of union with Great Britain, till he saw that it was
no longer possible.

10. The invasion of Canada was the second great
event in the campaign of 1775. General Montgomery

~ \
58 GEORGE THE THIRD.



GEORGE WASHINGTON.

took Montreal, on the St. Lawrence, and Colonel
Arnold joined him before Quebec, on the same river.
They were beaten back from that fortress, and
Montgomery was slain.

11. In the second campaign, in 1776, the British,
‘under General Howe, were early in the year forced
by the cannon of the Americans to leave Boston,
which the British army had held, and sail to Halifax.
Washington then hurried to New York, where he
had reason to expect the next attack.’

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 227.

13. GEORGE THE THIRD.—IIL

1. The Declaration of American ‘Independence was
made in 1776. Up to this time the Americans had
_ been fighting for their liberties as British subjects, but
GEORGE THE THIRD. 59

the war had weaned them from the mother country.
On the 4th of July, the Congress of Americans met
at Philadelphia and drew up the “ Declaration of
Independence,” in which they declared themselves
no longer subjects of King George. In August of ©
the same year, General Howe, reinforced by his
brother, drove Washington from New York, and
planted the British flag on its batteries.

2. The third campaign opened in June 1777. A
victory at Brandywine River, and the capture
of Philadelphia, raised hopes in Britain that the
Americans would be forced to yield. But a great
disaster changed these hopes into fears. General
Burgoyne, who was marching from Canada to join
Howe at New York, was surrounded at Saratoga,
on the Hudson river, and forced to surrender. This
was the turning-point of the war in favour of the
Americans. —

3. The fourth campaign, in 1778, saw a change in the
British commanders, General Howe was succeeded
by Sir Henry Clinton, who abandoned the city of
Philadelphia, and moved toward New York, which
he reached in safety. Washington then threw a
line of cantonments around the city, and so the
opposing forces spent the winter. It was during
this year that Chatham, while speaking, in spite of
age and illness, against a proposal to grant inde-
pendence to the colonies, fell in a fit on the floor of -
the House of Lords, and was carried to bed, from
which he never rose. During the fifth campaign no
event of any importance took place.

4, The sixth campaign, in 1780, resulted in the
60 GEORGE THE THIRD.

capture of Charleston, the capital of South Caro-
lina, by the British. In that year Arnold, an
American officer, deserted and became a general in
the British service. Major André, a British officer
who had arranged the affair, being taken by the
Americans, was hanged as a spy by the orders of
Washington, though many tried to turn the Ameri-
can eedes from his stern purpose.

5. During the seventh campaign, in 1781, Lord
Cornwallis was shut up in Yorktown, and forced to
surrender with seven thousand men. This was the
decisive blow; for although the war went on for
another campaign, the American colonies were now
really severed from the British Empire.

6. The Treaty of Versailles was signed in’ 1783.
In November of that year George the Third entered
the House of Lords, and with a faltering voice read
a paper in which he acknowledged the independence
of the United States of America. He closed his
reading with the prayer that neither Great Britain
nor America might suffer from the separation. By
the Treaty of Versailles the thirteen United States
of America were declared to be a free nation. They
became a Republic, and chose George Washington
as their first President.

7. War in Europe had taken place during the
latter part of the American struggle. France,
Spain, and Holland had been in arms against Great
Britain. Russia, Sweden, and Denmark had formed
an armed neutrality, which meant that they were
ready to attack us when they thought it was safe
to do so.

!
GEORGE THE THIRD. 61

8. The chief event of the war was the un-
successful siege of Gibraltar for three’ years (1779—
1782) by the French
and Spaniards. The
besiegers were re-
ceived with a warm
British welcome of ¢
red-hot shot, and
completely repulsed.
Since then this great
rock-fortress has been
in the hands of the
British. The Treaty
of Versailles not only ended the American War,
but it also put an end to the fighting in Europe.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 228.









.14. GEORGE THE THIRD.—IV.

1. Lord Clive was compelled by ill-health to leave
India for England in 1760. During his absence
several victories were gained, but in other respects
things began to go wrong. The natives became
more and more unfriendly, because they were un-
fairly treated by the Kast India Company’s servants.
The native princes began to assume an Independent
manner, and to throw off their allegiance to the
British.

2. When Clive returned. to India as Governor of
Bengal in 1765, he found everything in disorder.
The government was disorganized, and the very.
62 , GEORGE THE THIRD.

existence of the Company threatened. With a
vigorous hand he at once began to reform. the
service, putting down abuses that had crept in, and
placing the government on a new footing. He
concluded a favourable treaty with the Mogul Em-
peror, and, after great labour, managed to put
things right. But in doing so he aroused much
ill-will against himself.

3. On his return to England, Clive was charged
by his enemies with haynes abused his powers. It
was nothing to them that He had gained an empire,
and made the natives happier under British rule
than they had been under their own Kings. They
set themselves to hunt him to death, and they
succeeded ; for although the House of Commons
acquitted him, he was so worried by all that he
had gone through, that he put an end to his own
life in 1774, at the age of forty-eight.

4, Warren Hastings, the Governor of Bengal, be-
. came, in 1773, the first Governor-General of India.
He had been in the Company’s service for more
than twenty years, and had passed through the
various grades with credit and success. The idea
of a British sovereignty in India had long before
taken root in his mind, and therefore, when he
found himself at the head of affairs, he eagerly
acted upon his convictions. He did not deal so
fairly with the natives as Clive had done, but, on
the whole, he ruled justly and well. He carried on
a great war with the Mahrattas, who lived far
inland, and overthrew Hyder Ali, the Sultan of
Mysore.
GEORGE THE THIRD. 63



EDMUND BURKE.

5. When Hastings returned to England in 1785,
he was put on his trial, as Clive had been. He
was charged before the House of Lords with having
hired out British troops to put down free native
princes, and also with having forced native princes
to give him large sums of money. The trial_lasted
nearly eight years, from 1788 to 1795. The great
orators Burke, Fox, Sheridan all spoke against him ;
but Hastings was found not guilty. The trial left
him penniless. He spent the rest of his days in
retirement, on a pension allowed him by the East
India Company. ,

6. William Pitt (the younger), the second son of
William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, was at this time a
G4 GEORGE THE THIRD.



CHARLES JAMES FOX.

young man of twenty-four. He had only been a
member of Parliament for about two years when
the Commons thoroughly discussed the question
“ How to govern India.” The charges made against
Lord Clive had shown that those who held power
in India were not so just and merciful as they
ought to have been, and that many acts of oppres-
sion were constantly taking place. The East India
Company had been the rulers of British India ever
since they had received their charter from Queen
Elizabeth in 1600.’ The Company had done much
for India, but they were unable or unwilling to
check the evils which were caused by those. who
went out there only to make money.
GEORGE THE THIRD. 65



WILLIAM PITT (THE YOUNGER),

7. Pitt opposed the plans of the ministers for
the government of India, and a hard battle was
fought in the House of Commons. ‘Though so
young, Pitt showed great ability, and spoke so
eloquently that he at length won the day. Gradu-
ally he gained the confidence of the nation, and at
the Geren election of 1783 he secured such an
eee ane majority, that he was in power for
nearly. the remainder of his life. He was the
youngest man ‘who had ever filled the important
office of Prime Minister. .

8. One of the first uses Pitt made of his Parone
was to settle the government of India. In 1784
he passed an Act appointing a Board of Control,

(888) 5
66 GEORGE THE THIRD.



TIPPOO SAIB.

which consisted of six privy councillors appointed
by the Crown, the principal Secretaries of State,
and: the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Board
ruled the country, leaving the East India Company
free to carry on the trade for which it was_first
formed. This arrangement continued in force till
1858.

9. Lord Cornwallis succeeded. Hastings as Gover-
nor-General of India. He carried on war against
‘Tippoo Saib, the son of Hyder Ali, and in 1792
forced him to yield. Tippoo renewed the fight in
1799; but the town of Seringapatam was stormed

s
GEORGE THE THIRD. 67

by Sir David Baird, and Tippoo was slain. Colonel
Arthur Wellesley, afterwards Duke of Wellington,
was Governor of Mysore, and took a leading part
in. the campaign. He showed here the beginnings
of that military skill which afterwards made him
so famous.

10. Captain James Cook was a famous British
sailor who, while Hastings was building up our
power in India, was adding largely to the empire
in another quarter of the globe) He may be
regarded as the founder of the great Australian
colonies; for he made three voyages round the
world, exploring the South Seas and the coast of
Australia. He was killed in 1779 at Hawaii, one
of the Sandwich Islands, by the spear of a treacher-
ous native,

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 229.

15. GEORGE THE THIRD.—V.

1. The Reform of the House of Commons had begun
to engage the attention of the popular leaders, who
said that Parliament ought really to. represent the
people. Not one person in fifty throughout the
kingdom had the right to vote, and those who had
votes sold them freely to the highest bidder. Pitt
declared that the House of Commons represented
not the nation, but “ruined towns, noble families,
wealthy individuals, and foreign potentates.”

2. The King had far too much influence over
_ Parliament and the Ministry; therefore, in 1780,
68 GEORGE THE THIRD.

a motion was passed in the House of Commons de-
claring “that the power of the Crown has increased,
is increasing, and ought to be diminished.” A Bill
proposing annual Parliaments, manhood suffrage, and
electoral districts was introduced into the House of
Lords; but it did not pass. Manhood suffrage meant
that every man of full age (twenty-one)-should have
a right to vote for members of Parliament, and
electoral districts meant the division of the country
into equal parts for the election of members.

3. The Gordon Riots took place in 1780. Some
of the severe and unjust laws that had been passed
against the Roman Catholics were now repealed.
They were allowed to acquire land, and their priests
were permitted to say mass. These concessions
raised a strong feeling in the country, and Lord
George Gordon, escorted by sixty thousand persons,
presented a petition to Parliament against them.
When the petition was rejected, great riots took
place in the capital. For some days London was
at the mercy of a furious mob, which set fire to
Roman Catholic chapels, plundered houses, broke
open Newgate- prison, and set the prisoners free.

4. No one was safe unless he wore a blue ribbon
to show that he was a Protestant, and chalked “ No
Popery ” on the door of his house. It is said that
one person, to make doubly sure, wrote “ No religion
whatever.” stroyed, many lives were lost, and the riot was not
_ put down till the soldiers fired on the mob, A
description of these events is given in Charles
Dickens’s novel Barnaby Rudge.
GEORGE THE THIRD. : 69

5. The Slave Trade, begun in Queen Elizabeth’s
reign, now came before Parliament for the first
time. Horrible tales were told of how negroes
were seized in Africa, packed in ships, carried
across the Atlantic, and sold to work as slaves .in
the West Indies and in America. It is said that
in the beginning of George the Third’s reign no
jess than fifty thousand blacks were carried off
every year in British ships. William Wilberforce
brought in a Bill, and tried to persuade Parliament
to stop the slave trade; but the slave merchants,
who had their headquarters in Liverpool, got the
Bill thrown out. It was eighteen years before the
slave trade was abolished.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 230.

16. GEORGE THE THIRD.—VI.

1. The French Revolution, which began in 1789,
was the greatest event of the eighteenth century.
For many years the French had been growing
weary of the great burdens laid on them by their
Kings and nobles. The laws were unjust, and the
taxes were not fairly levied on all ranks alike.
Tradesmen, farmers, and labourers were made to
pay heavily, while nobles got off without paying
anything. Until near the close of Louis the Four-
teenth’s reign, the people had looked upon their
Sovereigns with loyalty and affection, as their pro-
tectors against the aristocracy, and the promoters of,
the national glory.
70 . GEORGE THE THIRD.

2. In the reign of his successor, Louis the Fif-
teenth, the French lost even their respect for a
King who traded upon the distress of his subjects.
He bought up corn, and held it till the price was
raised, and then sold it to the starving people. This
was never forgotten or forgiven. When the royal
family—Louis the Sixteenth, his wife, and child—
were led captive to Paris in 1789, they were greeted
_ with the ery, “The baker, his wife, and the little

apprentice.”

3. Unable longer to bear the burden of poverty,
and finding that no relief was to be obtained from
their rulers, the people rose in rebellion against all
in authority. The mob of Paris stormed the great
French prison called the Bastille, and set the pris-
oners free. They also put to death their rulers
and many of their leading men. All France was
drenched in blood. The Reign of Terror, as it is
called, lasted for more than a year.

4. In 1792 the French set up another form of
government, without a monarch, called a Republic,
and sent a message to the British people offering to
help them to do the same. In the following year
they beheaded their King and Queen, Louis the

Sixteenth and Marie Antoinette. All the revolts
against the Republic were put down with much
cruelty and bloodshed.

5. In La Vendée many brave deeds were done,
but nothing could stand against the forces of the
Republic. The people of Toulon obtained the help
of a British force from some British ships; but they
were driven out, and the town nearly blown to pieces,
GEORGE THE THIRD. 71

by a young French (Corsican) officer, named Na-
poleon Bonaparte, afterwards the famous Emperor.

6. The French Revolution caused much fear
amongst our leading men. Would the movement —
against those in authority extend to this country,
and the poor and the ignorant be induced to follow
the example of their neighbours across the Channel?
Such might have been the case had not wise changes
been made from time to time to improve the condi-
tion of the British people. It was the refusal of
these reforms in France that had done all the mis-
chief there. Fox was in sympathy with the Revolu-
tion. He thought the French people had done right
to put down the selfish nobles who had oppressed
them. Burke spoke strongly on the other side.
He saw how much evil might happen in a country
when law and order were overturned.

7. War with France began in 1793. The other
countries of Europe felt that the French had carried
matters too far in upsetting existing authority, and
Great. Britain, Spain, Holland, Austria, Prussia,
Russia, and several smaller states, united against
them. Pitt, hoping the storm would soon pass
over, did not wish to interfere; but the offer of
the French to help the British against their “ tyran-
nical” Government, and the cruel deeds done in
France, had set the mass of the people against that
country, and the cry was in favour of war.

8. The British were for the most part successful
at sea, and in the East and West Indies; but on the
continent of, Europe they, along with the Austrians
and Prussians, were driven back by the French, In
‘72 GEORGE THE THIRD.

the following year Holland, Prussia, and Spain were
forced to make peace with France, leaving Austria,
Russia, and Great Britain to carry on the war.

9. Two Mutinies in the British Royal Navy took
place at this time—the one at Spithead, near the
Isle of Wight, and the other at the Nore, in the
mouth of the Thames. The sailors asked for better
food, better pay, and kinder treatment. Those at
Spithead returned to their duty at once on their
wishes being granted. At the Nore, the mutiny
was not put down till their leader, who called
himself Rear-Admiral Parker, and several others
had been hanged.

10. The Battles of St. Vincent and Camperdown
were won in 1797. The French, Spanish, and
Dutch hoped that by uniting their fleets they
would be able to defeat our fleet and invade the
British Islands. While the Spanish fleet of thirty-
two ships was on its way to join the French fleet
at Brest, it was met off Cape St. Vincent by Ad-
miral Jervis and Commodore Nelson with twenty-
one ships. The Spaniards were defeated, and driven
back to Cadiz, with the loss of four of their finest .
vessels. For this victory Jervis was made Earl St.
Vincent, and Nelson became Admiral. Later in the
year Admiral Duncan met and scattered the Dutch
fleet off the village of Camperdown, in Holland.
This fleet was intended to join a French expedition
to Ireland, to help the rebels there to obtain separa-
tion from England.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 281.
GEORGE THE THIRD. 73

17. GEORGE THE THIRD.—VIL.
1. Ireland was in a very unsettled state at this

time. The Ulster “plantation” in 1611 was the

beginning of Protestant ascendency in the island.
In the reign of Charles the First, Thomas Went-
worth, afterwards Lord Strafford, worked out his
scheme of tyranny called “Thorough” in Ireland,
and treated with savage cruelty every man who
dared to show the least trace of an independent spirit.

2. One good thing Wentworth did for Ireland
was to import a quantity of flax-seed, which laid
the foundation of the Irish linen trade. He also
cleared the Irish Sea of pirates, so that goods might
be safely conveyed from Ireland to Britain.

3. The Rebellion of 1641 was the result of bad
government. The iron rule of Wentworth alone
had kept down the growing discontent; and when
that was at an end, the flame burst forth in Ulster.
There a terrible rising took place, accompanied by
a massacre of Protestants. Men, women, and chil-
dren were ruthlessly torn from home and murdered.
or driven away. From thirty to forty thousand
persons are said to have been killed.

4. Cromwell, in 1649, put down those in arms for
Charles the Second with a strong hand. His stern
and terrible soldiers passed through the land in &
whirlwind of fire and slaughter. Town after town
was taken, and massacre followed massacre. As
fire and sword and starvation did their terrible
work, the people felt indeed that “the curse of
Cromwell” was upon them. After that terrible
74 GEORGE THE THIRD.

visitation, Ireland lay exhausted, helpless, and des-
olate.

5. James the Second, in 1689, hoped to win back
his lost throne by the help of the Roman Catholics
in Ireland. He landed at Kinsale, and got together
_ an army of thirty thousand men, with which he laid
siege to Londonderry, but failed to take it. William
the Third landed in 1690, and defeated him in the
Battle of the Boyne. The Treaty of Limerick put
an end to the rebellion. That treaty was not kept;
the Ivish Parliament, which consisted chiefly of
Protestants, refused to pass it.

6. Penal Laws were passed in 1696 by the En-
glish Parliament, which expelled the Roman Catho-
lics from the Irish Parliament, and prevented them
from holding any office in the state or the army.
Roman Catholics were obliged to have their children
taught in Protestant schools, forbidden to carry arms,
not allowed to practise as solicitors, and, except in
special cases, forbidden. to marry with Protestants.
When these laws failed, stronger laws were made
to keep land and learning from the Roman Catholics.

7. In 1733 Roman Catholics were disfranchised
—that is, their right to vote for members of town
councils and Parliament was taken away. For fear
that British farmers should suffer, no Irish - cattle
and no dairy produce were allowed to be imported
into Britain. The Irish had a good trade in wool,
but it was destroyed in the interests of the British
wool trade. The results of all this persecution and
oppression have been felt to this day, and the Irish
people have been taught to believe that all the evils
GEORGE THE THIRD. 75

they suffer have come from their connection with
England.

8. In the reign of George the Third an Irish Par-
liament sat in Dublin, but no Roman Catholic was
allowed to be a member of it; and as the majority
of the people were Roman Catholics, they felt that
they were not fairly treated by England. The
success of the- French Revolution had caused the
Trish to become very restless. Many of them wanted
to be free from Great Britain; so when the French
offered to help them, they accepted the offer.

9. The United Irishmen, a great secret society
formed to throw off British rule, rose in revolt.
They were met by General Lake on Vinegar Hill,
in County Wexford, and defeated. The rising was
not well timed, as the French help they had looked
for had not come. Owing to a storm only a very
small part of the French fleet reached Ireland, and
it was too late to be of any use. A small French
force landed on the shores of Mayo, but the soldiers
were all taken prisoners. .

10. The Union of Great Britain and Ireland was
completed in 1801. To bring about a better state
of things in Ireland, ib was decided to unite the
two Parliaments, and have but one Parliament for
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
After much discussion and the free use of bribes
the union was agreed to. Ireland was to send
thirty noblemen to the House of Lords, and one
hundred—-now one hundred and three—members
to the House of Commons. Free trade was to
be established between Great Britain and Ireland.
76 GEORGE THE THIRD.

The union came into force on the 1st of January
1801.

11, Catholic Emancipation was proposed by Pitt
‘in 1801. He thought that the union was a good
time to do away with the laws that would not allow
a Roman Catholic to be a member of Parliament or
to fill.a public office. The King refused to allow
any change to be made, and Pitt gave up the office
“he had held for seventeen years. The next Prime
Minister was Henry Addington. He remained in
office only three years, when Pitt again returned to
power in 1804; but he had to agree to put off his
plan for the relief of the Roman Catholics.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 282.

18. GEORGE THE THIRD.—VIII.

1. Napoleon Bonaparte, the young French olen
who had driven the =
British out of Toulon
in 1793, had risen
quickly, and was now
at the head of the
French army. He be-
lieved that the best
way to weaken Great |
Britain was to attack
India. As the shortest
road to that country,
called the overland ————————
route, eee through Egypt and down the Red Sea,
























































































GEORGE THE THIRD. 77



NAPOLEON BONAPARTE,

he sailed for Alexandria with a large fleet and a
powerful army. On his way he took Malta without
firing a shot. When he arrived in Egypt, he met
and defeated an Egyptian army near Cairo, on the
Nile, in the Battle of the Pyramids, in 1798. Before
the battle the great French general pointed to the
pyramids and said to his army, “Soldiers, remember
that from these pyramids forty centuries look down
on your deeds.”

2. Admiral Nelson followed the French to Egypt.
Napoleon was the greatest soldier France ever had,






































































































































BATTLE OF THE PYRAMIDS.
GEORGE THE THIRD. 79



ADMIRAL NELSON.

but his plans were upset by our greatest sailor. In
Aboukir Bay, at the mouth of the Nile, Nelson
completely destroyed the French fleet. Nelson was
wounded during the battle, and when he was carried
below from the deck of his ship a doctor ran to
attend him. “No,” said the admiral; “I will take
my turn with my brave fellows.” His wound
proved to be a slight one.

3. Napoleon led his soldiers from Egypt into Syria
to meet a Turkish army that was gathered there.
He tried to take the town of Acre; but the Turks,
aided by a British force under Sir Sidney Smith,
were able to hold their own, and the French were
x

80 | GEORGE THE THIRD.

forced to retreat. Napoleon now returned to France,
when he was made First Consul, or President of the
French Republic. His army, which had returned
to Alexandria, was defeated there two years after-
wards, in 1801. In this battle Sir Ralph Aber-
cromby, the British leader, was slain. Napoleon

- next Jed an army against Austria, and defeated her

twice—at Marengo and at Hohenlinden, in 1800—
forcing her to accept his terms of peace.

4, The Northern League was now formed against
us by Russia, Prussia, Sweden, and Denmark, leaving
= — us to struggle alone
SSS with Mranes The

| bombardment of






O kronberg a | eee Copenhagen by Nel-
SB asi ae son in the Battle of
: a the Baltic caused the
Frederichsborg aeeeeeeeen , | Danes to submit to
eS our terms and with-

=

ey = draw from theleague.
The defeat of the
Danes and the death
of the Emperor of
Russia caused the
league to be broken
= up, and a _ general
peace was signed at Amiens in 1802. The peace
did not last long. Malta had been taken by, the
British in 1800, and because we would not give it
up at once the war began again. In 1804 Na-
poleon was made Emperor of the French, with the
title of Napoleon the First.






GEORGE THE THIRD. 81

5. Napoleon threatened to invade Great Britain in
1803. He had grown so powerful that Great,
Britain, Russia, Austria, and Sweden united against |
France and Spain. -
Napoleon’s plan was
to get the British
men-of-war out of
the way, in order |
that he might invade ==
this country. To = = =
draw Nelson with | Z
his fleet away from
the English Channel
Napoleon sent the =
French fleet out to sea, as if to cross the Atlantic
to attack the West Indies. Nelson followed; but the
French turned back without being seen, and’ joined
the Spanish fleet at Cadiz.

6. Nelson returned from the West Indies to
England; but when he heard where the combined
fleets of France and Spain lay, he sailed to join
Admiral Collingwood, who had been watching them.
The French and Spanish ships left the harbour of
Cadiz, and on the 21st of October they were met
by Nelson off Cape Trafalgar. The British fleet
bore down on them in two columns, the one led by
Nelson in the Victory, and the other led by Colling-
wood in the Royal Sovereign.

7. Before the Battle of Trafalgar began, Nelson
made his last signal from the mast-head of his ship.
At the time it roused the seamen to do great deeds,
and even now our hearts are stirred when we read

(s88) 6






















































































82 GEORGE THE THIRD.



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CAPE TRAFALGAR.

the noble words, “England expects every man to do
his duty.”

8. In the midst of the foe the rigging of the
Victory got entangled with that of the Redoubtable.
One of the riflemen in the rigging of the French
ship saw a one-armed officer with many stars on his
breast on the deck of the Victory. He fired, and
the officer fell shot through the shoulder. That.
shot was the death-stroke of Lord Nelson. To the
captain of his ship he said, “They have done for
me at last, Hardy ; my back-bone is shot through.”
Three hours later he died, but not till he knew
that he had won a great victory. His last words
were, “Thank God, I have done my duty.” His
GEORGE THE THIRD. 83





























































\
THE DEATH OF NELSON. {\~

body was taken to England, and buried in St. Paul’s
Cathedral, in London, amidst the tears of a whole
nation. : ;

9. The Battle of Trafalgar at once freed Great
Britain from all fear of an invasion. The fleets of
the enemy were not only defeated, they were de-
stroyed. New ships would have to be built and
84 BATTLE OF THE BALTIC.

a new race of seamen reared to man them before
. they could make another attack on the shores of
our island home.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 233.

19. BATTLE OF THE BALTIC.

1. In 1800 the Northern States — Russia,
Prussia, Denmark, and Sweden—formed a league
against Great Britain. To separate Denmark from the
league, and to prevent the Danish ships from aiding
France, a fleet of eighteen vessels, under Sir Hyde
Parker and Admiral Nelson, was sent to the Baltic.

2. Nelson undertook, with the ships under his
command, to destroy the forts of Copenhagen. The
_ battle took place on April 2nd, 1801. After a
struggle of four hours, the Danes yielded. In the
heat of the fight Parker signalled to Nelson to stop
firing; but Nelson put his telescope to his blind
eye, and ordered his own signal for “closer action ”
to be nailed to the mast. at

3. Of Nelson and the North
Sing the glorious day’s renown,
When to battle fierce came forth
All the might of Denmark’s crown,
And her arms along the deep proudly shone ;
By each gun the lighted brand,
In a bold, determined hand,
And the Prince of all the land
Led them on.
BATTLE OF THE BALTIC. 85

4, Like leviathans afloat,

Lay their bulwarks on the brine ;
While the sign of battle flew

- On the lofty British line:
It was ten of April morn by the chime:
As they drifted on their path,
There was silence deep as death,
And the boldest held his breath
For a time.

5. But the might of England flushed
To anticipate the scene ;

And her van the fleeter rushed
O’er the deadly space between.
“Hearts of oak!” our captains cried; when

each gun ;
From its adamantine lips
Spread a death-shade round the ships,
Like the hurricane eclipse .
Of the sun.

6. Again! again! again !
And the havoe did not slack,
Till a feeble cheer the Dane
To our cheering sent us back ;—
Their shots along the deep slowly boom ;
Then ceased—and all is wail,
_As they strike the shattered sail,
Or, in conflagration pale,
Light the gloom.

7. Out spoke the victor then,
As he hailed them o’er the wave:
86

10.

BATTLE OF THE BALTIC.

“Ye are brothers! ye are men!
And we conquer but to save ;
So peace instead of death let us bring:
But yield, proud foe, thy fleet,
With the crews, at England’s feet,
And make submission meet
To our King.”

. Then Denmark blessed our chief,

That he gave her wounds repose ;

And the sounds of joy and grief

From her people wildly rose,

As Death withdrew his shades from the day,
While the sun looked smiling bright

O’er a wide and woful sight,

Where the fires of funeral light

Died away.

. Now joy, Old England, raise !

For the tidings of thy might,

By the festal cities’ blaze,

While the wine-cup shines in light;
And yet, amidst that joy and uproar,
Let us think of them that sleep,
Full many a fathom deep,

By thy wild and ey steep,
Elsinore !

Brave hearts! to Britain’s pride
Once so faithful and so true,
On the deck of fame that died,
With the gallant, good Riou.
GEORGE THE THIRD. 87

Soft sigh the winds of heaven o’er their
grave ! . :
While the billow mournful rolls,
And the mermaid’s song condoles,
Singing glory to the souls
Of the brave ! UMP RETTS
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 234.

20. GEORGE THE THIRD.—Ix.

1. The Battle of Austerlitz was fought in 1805.
While Great Britain was successful at sea, Napoleon
was successful on land. At Ulm he forced an
Austrian army to surrender, and at Austerlitz he
defeated the combined armies of Russia and Austria.
This defeat broke up the alliance which Pitt had
made with Russia, Austria, and Sweden. -

2. William Pitt died in January 1806, at the age
of forty-six years. He was worn out with worry
and hard work. The defeat at Austerlitz, which —
broke up the alliance he had made, was his death-
blow. . It is said that when Pitt heard the news he
laid aside a map he was studying, and said sadly,
“Roll up the map of Europe.” He had earned for
himself the regard of his countrymen by his faith-
ful life and upright service. He was buried in
Westminster Abbey.

3. Charles James Fox was the most important —
member in the new Ministry, though Lord Gren-
ville was Prime Minister. It did not last long, but
. It did one good thing—it put an end to the dread-
88 GEORGE THE THIRD.

ful slave trade, and British ships were no longer
allowed to carry off negroes to be sold as slaves,
But the friends of the slaves had not yet finished
their work. They had to fight for twenty-seven
years longer before all the slaves in the British
colonies were set free, in 1833. In September, Fox
died, aged fifty-seven. He too was laid in West-
minster Abbey, beside his great rival Pitt.

4, The Prussians were defeated at Jena in 1806.
Great Britain again, for the fourth time, made an
alliance against France. This time her allies were
Russia, Prussia, and Saxony. Napoleon struck the
first blow~at Prussia. At Jena he won a great
victory, and a large part of Prussia fell into his
hands.

5. The Berlin Decree was issued in 1807. All
Europe, except Russia and Great Britain, now lay
at the feet of Napoleon—the one strong in her
snowy steppes and thick forests of pine, and the
other safe within her island shores, securely guarded
by her wooden walls.. From Berlin, Napoleon sent
forth his famous “ Berlin Decree,” in which he for-
bade all trade between Great Britain and the Con-
tinent, and ordered all British subjects found in
countries held by France to be made prisoners of
war. The British Government replied by sending
out “Orders in Council,” forbidding trade with
France and her allies. A

6. George Canning now came to the front. The
“ Ministry of all the talents,” as Grenville’s govern-
ment was called, proposed to allow Roman Catholics
to be officers in the army and navy. The King
GEORGE THE THIRD. 89



GEORGE CANNING.

refused to agree to this, and asked all the mini-
sters to resign. They did so, and a new Ministry
was formed, with the Duke of Portland as Prime
Minister and George Canning as Foreign Secretary.
The Chief Secretary of Ireland was Sir Arthur
Wellesley—the man who stands out as the hero
of his time.

7, The Treaty of Tilsit was made in 1807. Napo-
leon defeated the Russians and Prussians at Eylau ;
and in the same year the Russian and French Em-
perors’ met on a raft on the river Niemen, and there
drew up the Treaty of Tilsit. Russia and Prussia
both agreed to carry out the Berlin Decree, and so
help Napoleon to ruin the trade.of England. Can-
90 NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR.

ning knew that Napoleon meant to seize the fleets ~
of Denmark and Portugal, and use them against
Great Britain ; so, when he heard of this treaty, he
sent out a fleet that bombarded Copenhagen, and
. seized the Danish ships of war.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 235.

21, NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR.

1. In 1803 Napoleon resolved upon the invasion
of Great Britain, and brought together a vast army
for that purpose at Boulogne. This step of Napo-
leon’s aroused among Britons a warm feeling of
- patriotism, and 300,000 men offered themselves as
volunteers to resist the enemy if they should land.
It was thus that Napoleon’s “banners at Boulogne
armed in our island every freeman.”

2. Napoleon seems to have doubted whether an
attack on Britain would be successful, and as he
was eager to punish Austria, he suddenly gave up
his design of invading this country, and marched
his army to the banks of the Danube.

3. The story told in the following verses hap-
pened when Napoleon and his army were at
Boulogne. A British sailor, who was a prisoner,
wishing to gain his freedom, escaped in an empty
barrel. He was caught by the Frenchmen, and
was taken before Napoleon. When asked why he
_ had risked his life in that way, he replied that he
had a strong desire to see his mother, from whom
he had been long parted: Napoleon was so pleased
NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR. 91

with his courage and dutiful conduct that he set
him at liberty.

4,

Napoleon’s banners at Boulogne:
Armed in our island every freeman ;
His navy chanced to capture one
Poor British seaman.

. They suffered him—TI know not how—

Unprisoned on the shore to roam;
And aye was bent his longing brow
On England’s home.

. His eye, methinks, pursued the flight

Of birds to Britain half way over,
With envy—they could reach the white
Dear cliffs of Dover.

. A stormy midnight watch, he thought,

Than this sojourn would have been dearer,
If but the storm his vessel brought
To England nearer.

. At last, when care had banished sleep,

He saw one morning, dreaming, doating,
An empty hogshead from the deep
Come shoreward floating.

. He hid it in a cave, and wrought

The livelong day, laborious, lurking,
Until he launched a tiny boat
By mighty working.
92

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR.

Heaven help us! ‘twas a thing beyond
ee wretched: such a wherry
Perhaps ne’er ventured on a pond,
Or crossed a ferry.

For ploughing in the salt sea field,

It would have made the boldest shudder ;

Untarred, uncompassed, and unkeeled,
No sail—no rudder!

From neighbouring woods he interlaced
His sorry skiff with wattled willows ;
And thus equipped he would have passed”

The foaming billows.

But Frenchmen caught him on the beach,
His little Argo sorely jeering ;
Till tidings of him chanced to reach
Napoleon’s hearing.

With folded arms Napoleon stood,
Serene alike in peace and danger,
And in his wonted attitude
Addressed the stranger :—

15.“ Rash man, that wouldst yon Channel pass

On twigs and staves so rudely fashioned,
Thy heart with some sweet British lass
Must be impassioned.”

16.“ I have no sweetheart,” said the lad ;
- . “But, absent long from one another,
GEORGE THE THIRD, 93

Great was the longing that I had
To see my mother.” :

17.“ And so thou shalt!” Napoleon said ;
“Ye’ve both my favour fairly won:
A noble mother must have bred
So brave a son.”

18. He gave the tar a piece of gold,
And with a flag of truce commanded
He should be shipped to England Old
And safely landed.

19. Our sailor oft could scantly shift
To find a dinner plain and hearty ;
But never changed the coin and gift
Of Bonaparté. CGaMppEtt.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 236.

22, GEORGE THE THIRD.—X.

1. The French invaded Portugal in 1807. That
country had always been friendly to Great Britain,
and when Napoleon sent out the Berlin Decree
Portugal would not agree to it. The French Em-
peror therefore sent General Junot, with 30,000
men, to take Lisbon. The royal family fled to.
Brazil, in South America (at that time a Portuguese
dependency), and Junot held Portugal in the name
of Napoleon. This was-the beginning of the great
Peninsular War, so called because it was fought in




94 | GEORGE THE THIRD.

Spain and Portugal, which form a great peninsula
south-west of France.

2. The French invaded Spain in 1808 The King
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asked Napoleon to advise him what to do. The
Emperor, hoping to get Spain into his own hands,
sent for both the father and the son. Having per-
suaded the King to give up his crown, he sent the
son as a prisoner to another part of France, and
GEORGE THE THIRD. 95

then made his own brother Joseph King of Spain.
This brother he had already made King of Naples,
but he now gave that Einediom to one of his.
generals named Murat.

3. The Spaniards rose in arms, and asked Great
Britain to help them. In 1808 Sir Arthur Welles-
ley, who afterwards became Duke of Wellington,
was sent to the Peninsula with an army of 10,000
men. He landed in Portugal, and defeated the
French at Vimiera, north of Lisbon. Soon after
this Sir Hew Dalrymple took the chief command,
and by the Convention of Cintra, a small town near
Lisbon, allowed the French to leave Portugal with
all their arms and warlike stores. For making
this agreement, Sir Hew was recalled and censured, .
and his place was taken by Sir John Moore. Wel-
lesley was also recalled, but was freed from blame.

4. A French army having been made prisoners
by the Spaniards, Napoleon marched another army
into Spain, beat the Spaniards, and entered Madrid.
Sir John Moore, expecting the Spaniards to join
him against the French, marched his army into the
heart of Spain. The Spaniards did not help him,
and he had‘to retreat before a much larger army
than his own under Marshal Soult. The sufferings
of the British army during that backward march
are past description. Moore offered battle before he
reached the shore, but Soult would not fight.

5. The Battle of Corunna was fought in 1809. The
British reached Corunna, in the north-west of Spain,
before the ships which were to take them off had
arrived. The French were close upon them, and
96 THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE.

there was nothing to prevent a battle being fought.
The French were defeated, but Sir John Moore.was
killed by a cannon ball. His hasty burial by night
on the battle-field is beautifully told in Wolfe’s

poem.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 286.

23. THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE.

1 Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note,
‘As his corpse to the ramparts we hurried ;
Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot
O’er the grave of the hero we buried.

2. We buried him darkly at dead of night,
_ The sods with our bayonets turning,
By the struggling moonbeams’ misty light,
And the lantern dimly burning.

3. No useless coffin enclosed his breast,
Not in sheet nor in shroud we wound him;
But he lay like a warrior taking his rest,
With his martial cloak around him.

4, Few and short were the prayers we said,
And we spoke not a word of sorrow ;
But we steadfastly gazed on the face of the dead,
And we bitterly thought of the morrow.

5. We thought, as we hollowed his narrow bed,
. And smoothed down his lonely pillow,
THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE. 97

































































































































































































































































































































































































































BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE.

That the foe and the stranger would tread o’er
his head,
And we far away on the billow.
(S88) 7
98 GEORGE THE THIRD.

6. Lightly they'll talk of the spirit that’s gone,
And o’er his cold ashes upbraid him ;
Bui little he'll reck, if they'll let him sleep on
In the grave where a Briton has laid him!

7. But half of our heavy task was done
When the clock struck the hour for retiring ;
And we heard the distant and random gun
That the foe was sullenly firing.

8. Slowly and sadly we laid him down,
From the field of his fame fresh and gory ;
We carved not a line, and we raised not a stone—
But we left him alone with his glory!

WOLFE.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 287.

24, GEORGE THE THIRD.—XI.

1. Wellesley returned to Portugal in 1809 with a
fresh army. He drove the French out of Oporto,
at the mouth of the Douro, and then pushed on to
Madrid. On the way he met the French at Tala-
vera, and defeated them. For this victory he was
made Lord Wellington. Unable to reach Madrid in
the face of the large French forces that guarded
the city, Wellington retreated into Portugal.

2. The French tried to drive the British to their
ships, but in the Battle of Busaco in 1810 they
were beaten back with great loss; and Wellington
retreated to Torres Vedras, where he threw up lines
of defence from the Tagus to the Atlantic so strong
GEORGE THE THIRD. — 99:



DUKE OF WELLINGTON.

that he could not be successfully attacked. The
French therefore withdrew to Spain.

3. Wellington returned to Spain for the third
time in 1812. The two great fortresses on the
borders of Spain and Portugal were Ciudad Rodrigo
(Theoo-dad Rod-re“go) and Badajoz (Bad‘a-hos).
Both of these he took by storm; and then defeating
the French in the great Battle of Salamanca, he
found the way open to Madrid.

4. In 1813 Wellington again beat the French
at Vitoria. So complete was this victory that it.
100 ’ GEORGE THE THIRD,

decided the Peninsular War. The British drove
the French across the Pyrenees, out of Spain, and
following them into France, overtook them at
Toulouse, and finally defeated them in 1814.

5. Napoleon invaded Russia in 1812, while the
fighting was going on in the Peninsula. He led
an army of nearly half a million men into the
heart of the Czar’s dominions. The burning of
Moscow by the Russians, that the French might not
get shelter within its walls, forced the invaders to
retreat, followed by the Russian army. That
retreat in winter over the frozen plains completely
destroyed Napoleon’s army. Only 20,000 men re-
turned to France, leaving 400,000 lying dead under
the snows of Russia.

6. Napoleon abdicated the throne of France in 1814.
With his armies driven out of the Peninsula and
destroyed in Russia, he was at length forced to fight
for his own throne. He had kept Europe in con-
stant strife for years at a cost of millions of money
and more than a million of lives. The whole Con-
tinent was against him. At Leipsic he was de-
feated by the united armies of Russia, Prussia,
Austria, and Sweden, and followed to Paris, where
he agreed, by what is known as the First Treaty
of Paris, to give up his throne. The fallen Em-
peror was sent to the island of Elba in the Medi-
terranean. Wellington was made a Duke, and
received the thanks of both Houses of Parliament,
and a present of £400,000.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 237.

.
THE RETREAT FROM MOSCOW. 101

















































































































25. THE RETREAT FROM MOSCOW.
1, Homeward by hundred thousands, column-deep,
Broad square, loose squadron, rolling like the
flood
When mighty torrents from their channels leap,
Rushed through the land the haughty multi-
tude,
Billow on endless billow: on through oor
O’er rugged hill, down sunless, marshy vale,
The death-devoted moved, to clangour rude
Of drum and horn, and dissonant clash of mail,
Glancing disastrous light before that sunbeam pale.
OQ’: THE RETREAT FROM MOSCOW.

2. Again they reached thee, Borodino! | Still
Upon the loaded soil the carnage lay,
The human harvest, now stark, stiff, and chill ;
Friend, foe, stretched thick together, clay t
clay: |
In vain the startled legions burst away—
The land was all one naked sepulchre ;
The shrinking eye still glanced on grim decay,
Still did the hoof and wheel their passage tear
Through cloven helms and arms, and corpses mould-
ering crear.

3. The field was as-they left it; fosse and fort
Steaming with slaughter still, but desolate—
The cannon flung dismantled by its port:
Each knew the mound, the black ravine whose
strait
Was won and lost, and thronged with dead, till
Fate
Had fixed upon the victor—half undone.
There was the hill, from which their eyes elate
Had seen the burst of Moscow’s golden zone.
But death was at their heels—they shuddered, and
rushed on.

4. The hour of vengeance strikes. Hark to the gale! _
As it bursts hollow through the rolling clouds,
That from the north in sullen grandeur sail
Like floating Alps. Advancing darkness broods
Upon the wild horizon ; and the woods,
Now shrinking into brambles, echo shrill,
As the gust sweeps them; and those upper floods
THE RETREAT FROM MOSCOW. 103

Shoot on their leafless boughs the sleet-drops
chill,

That on the hurrying crowds in freezing showers -

distil.

5. They reach the wilderness! The majesty
Of solitude is spread before their gaze,
Stern nakedness—dark earth and wrathful sky :
If ruins were there, they long had ceased to
blaze ;
If blood was ened: the ground no more eae
Even by a skeleton, the crime of man:
Behind them rolls the deep and drenching haze,
Wrapping their rear in night; before their van
The struggling daylight shows the unmeasured
desert wan.
6. Still on they sweep, as if their hurrying march
Could bear them from the rushing of His wheel
Whose chariot is the whirlwind. Heaven's clear
arch |
At once is covered with a livid veil:
In mixed and fighting heaps the deep clouds reel :
Upon the dense horizon hangs the sun,
In sanguine light, an orb of burning steel:
The snow wheels down through twilight, thick
and dun.
Now tremble, men of plood—the- peor has
begun !

7. The trumpet of the northern winds has blown,
And it is.answered by the dying roar
104 GEORGE THE THIRD.

Of armies on that boundless field o’erthrown.
Now in the awful gusts the desert hoar
Is tempested—a. sea without a shore,
Lifting its feathery waves! The legions fly ; —
Volley on volley down the hailstones pour :
Blind, famished, frozen, mad, the wanderers die;
And, dying, hear the storm but wilder thunder by.

: G.. CROLY.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 238.

26. GEORGE THE THIRD.—XII.

1. The Burdett Riots took place in 1810. The
years of fighting had drained Great Britain both of
men and money, and the burden of the wars lay
heavily on the people. They had to pay so much
in taxes, and food was so dear, that thousands could
not. get enough to eat. So few of the people had
_ votes for electing members of the House of Commons
that they had no means of making themselves heard
in Parliament.

2. Sir Francis Burdett, member of Parliament for
Westminster, said that votes should be given to a
greater number of the people, and he wrote a book
finding fault with the House of Commons. For
this he was put in prison; but the people took his
part, held public meetings, and broke out into riots
in London. He was kept in the Tower from April
till June. '

3. The Prince of Wales became Prince Regent in
1811. The King, who had several times gone out of
GEORGE THE THIRD. 105

his mind, now became hopelessly insane, and blind-
ness came upon him. The appointment of a regent
became necessary, and Parliament laid down the
conditions under which the Prince should perform
the duties of this office.

4, Trade was bad at this time, for not only had
our wars cost us a great deal of money, but they
' had also done great harm to our commerce.:» Less
business was done at home, because people had ‘not
much money to spend, and fewer goods were sent
abroad, because the war closed a great many ports
to our merchants. The bad harvests of 1810 and
1811. caused a scarcity of food, and men out of
work were seen everywhere.

5. In some towns there were. great riots to put
down the use of machinery; for the people said it
was doing work that should be done by men and
women. Under the name of Luddites—a term
derived from Ned Ludd, an idiot, who some time
before had broken some machinery—the rioters
spread destruction and alarm throughout the weav-
ing districts of Nottinghamshire and. Lancashire,
their chief outrages being directed against the stock-
ing and lace frames. Warehouses and mills were
attacked, and machines were broken by bands of
angry workmen, who could not get employment.
It was not till some of them were imprisoned and
others hanged that the riots ended.

6. The Prime Minister was shot. in 1812 in the
lobby of the House of Commons. The murderer
was a bankrupt shipbroker named Bellingham, whose -
business had been ruined by the war. He con-
106 GEORGE THE THIRD.

sidered that the Premier, Mr. Perceval, was the cause
of his misfortunes, and so he resolved to kill him.
Lord Liverpool became Prime Minister, and Robert
Peel was Secretary for Ireland. While in this office
he organized the new police. force, which received
the name of “ Peelers,” after their founder.

7. A War with the United States began in 1812.
It arose out of the British “Orders in Council,”
which had been made in answer to the “Berlin
Decree” of Napoleon. The Decree and the Orders
together had well-nigh destroyed the trade of
America, and caused much distress on both sides of
the Atlantic. Great Britain also claimed the right
of searching the ships of the United States for
deserters from the Royal Navy. On these two
grounds war was, begun. The Americans crossed
into Canada, but failed to do any harm.

8. The British burned the public buildings of
Washington, the capital of the United States. A
fight took place between the Shannon and the
Chesapeake, the former a British and. the latter an
American man-of-war. Although the Shannon was
the smaller of the two, the Chesapeake was boarded
and taken within a quarter of an hour. The British
were driven back with some loss at New Orleans,
on the Mississippi. The Treaty of Ghent brought

. the war to an end in December 1814.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 289.
GEORGE THE THIRD. 107

27. GEORGE THE THIRD.—XIII.

/ 1. Napoleon left Elba in 1815 while a Congress was
sitting at Vienna trying to bring order out of the
confusion: which his wars had caused in Europe.
Within twenty days he was once more Emperor of
France. The anger and alarm which this news
caused all over Kurope were very great. The British
Parliament voted £90,000,000 for Napoleon’s over-
throw. Wellington was put at the head of eighty
thousand men, while the Prussians sent one hundred
and ten thousand under Bluchey.

2. Wellington's plan was to join the Prussians, aa
then march to Paris. Napoleon wished to fight each
army separately before they could unite. 02 the
15th of June he crossed the frontier from France
into Belgium. The British were at Brussels, while
the Prussians were at Ligny, some miles distant.

3. On the evening of the 15th June, Wellington
heard that Napoleon was on the way to meet him.
Word was passed round to his officers, who were
present at a ball given by the Duchess of Richmond.
He wished to reach Quatre Bras, a place about
twenty miles off on the highroad from Charleroi to
Brussels, before the French army could come up
with him. Quatre Bras means “four arms,” and is
so called because two main roads cross each other
there. One road leads to Ligny, where the Prus-
sians were, and Wellington wished to get to this
point to join with them before Napoleon could get
between the two armies.

4. On the 16th of June, Napoleon divided his
108° GEORGE THE THIRD.





a Haye Sainte
See
N



Charleroi





army into two parts. With one he went himself
along the road from Charleroi to Ligny to meet the
Prussians, and he sent the other under Marshal Ney
to Quatre Bras to meet Wellington. The Prussians
were driven away to the north beyond Ligny, along
the road towards Wavre, and thirty-five thousand
men under Grouchy were sent after them to keep
them from getting nearer to Wellington.

. 5. At Quatre Bras Ney was driven back by the
British ; but when Wellington heard that the Prus-
sians were unable to come to him by the Ligny road,
GEORGE THE THIRD. 109

he fell back on Waterloo, from which another road led
to Wavre, where the Prussians now were. Napoleon
had taken a cross-road from Ligny to the one on
which the British were moving. Wellington, who
was before him, drew up his army along a slight
ridge which crosses the road to Brussels at right
eles Here, if anywhere, Blucher would be able
to join him.
6. The Battle of Waterloo was fought on Sunday,
the 18th of June. Much rain had fallen the night
before, and the morning was still wet when the men



WATERLOO





on both sides rose to get ready for the fight. The
armies faced each other on two gentle slopes, across
which ran the highroad to Brussels. In the hollow
between was the farm-house of La Haye Sainte, and
towards the west, on the northern slope, was the
mansion-house of Hougoumont. Around these build-
ings the hottest fighting took place.

7. The battle began about eleven o’clock in the
forenoon. Napoleon knew he was a ruined man
110 GEORGE THE THIRD.

unless he could break the dark red masses between
him and Brussels. He kept to one plan of action—
a storm of shot and shell, and then a rapid charge
of horse on the British squares. -

“¢On! on!’ was still his stern exclaim ;
‘Confront the battery’s jaws of flame !
Rush on the levelled gun !
My steel-clad cuirassiers, advance !
Each Hulan forward with his lance,
My Guard—my Chosen—charge for France,
France and Napoleon !’
Loud answered their acclaiming shout,
Greeting the mandate which sent out
Their bravest and their best. to dare
The fate their leader shunned to share.”

8. The British met every charge like the. rocks
. that surround their native coast.

“ But Hz, his country’s sword and shield,
Still in the battle-front revealed,
Where danger fiercest swept the field,
Came like a beam of light ;
In action prompt, in sentence brief—
-* Soldiers, stand firm,’ exclaimed the Chief,
‘England shall tell the fight !’”

9. Between four and five o'clock the Prussians,
who had outmarched Grouchy, were seen in the
wood to the east of the field. This caused Napoleon
to make his last. great effort. He brought up the
Old Guard of France, who had been kept behind,
and were now fresh for work. When they were
GEORGE THE THIRD. ‘ lil



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































©

‘ BELLEROPHON.”

BONAPARTE GOING ON BOARD THE

within fifty yards of the top of the ascent the
British Guards started to their feet, and drove them’
down the hill.

10. Wellington himself now rode forward with the
Tae WATERLOO.

words, “Let the. whole line advance.” This was
done, and the great mass that had stood on the hill
since morning swept forward, and drove back
towards France what remained of the grand army.
Forty thousand French, sixteen thousand Prussians,
thirteen thousand British and Germans were killed—

“Rider and horse, friend, foe, in one red. burial blent !”

11. Napoleon, who turned pale when he saw his
favourite Guard broken by the fire of the British,
cried, “They are mixed together!” and fled. The
fallen Emperor afterwards gave himself up to the
British, and-was received on-board the Bellerophon.
He was sent a prisoner to the lonely island of St.
Helena, which lies in the South Atlantic Ocean,
twelve hundred miles from the coast of Africa.
There he remained a captive for six years, and died
in 1821. His remains were removed to France in
1840.

12. The Second Treaty of Paris put an end to the
long and terrible war, which had lasted twenty-two .
years. When the war began the National Debt was
£239,000,000; now it had grown to the enormous
sum of £860,000,000.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 240.

28. WATERLOO.

1. On the night of June 15, 1815, a grand ball
was given by the Duchess of Richmond at Brussels,
and was attended by many of the officers of the
WATERLOO. - . 113.

British army. During the evening news arrived
that Napoleon was marching on the capital of Bel-
_gium. The officers were privately summoned from
the ball-room, and the army marched before day-
break. The Battle of Waterloo was not fought till
the 18th. In this extract (taken from a long poem
called Childe Harold's Pilgrimage) Lord Byron
describes the breaking up of the ball, and the re~-
sults of the battle,

2. There was a sound of revelry by night,
And Belgium’s capital had gather ed then
Her beauty and her chivalry, and bright
The lamps shone o’er fair women and brave
men ; :
A thousand hearts beat happily; and when
Music arose with its voluptuous swell, —
Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again,
And all went merry as a marriage bell ;
But hush !—hark!—a deep sound ststlace like ‘a.
rising knell.

3. Did ye not ren it ?—No; ’twas but the wind,
Or the car rattling o’er the stony street ;—
On with the dance! let joy be unconfined ;
No sleep till morn, when youth and pleasure
meet
To chase the glowing tone with flying feet :—
But hark! that heavy sound breaks in once more,
As if the clouds its.echo would repeat ;
And nearer, clearer, deadlier than: before !—.
Arm! arm! it is—it is—the cannon’s opening roar !
(888) ' aes Qi
114 WATERLOO.

. Within a windowed niche of that high hall

Sate Brunswick’s fated chieftain: he did hear
That sound the first amidst the festival, ;
And caught its tone with Death’s prophetic ear ;
And when they smiled because he deemed it near,
His heart more truly knew that peal too well
Which stretched his father on a bloody bier,

And roused the vengeance blood alone could quell :

He rushed into the field, and foremost fighting fell.

5.

Ah! then and there was hurrying to and fro,
And gathering tears, and tremblings of distress,
And cheeks all pale, which but an hour ago
Blushed at the praise of their own loveliness ;
And there were sudden partings, such as press
The life from out young hearts; and choking
sighs
Which ne’er might be repeated ;—who could guess
If ever more should meet those mutual eyes,

Since upon night so sweet such awful morn could

rise ?

. And there was mounting in hot haste: the steed,

The mustering squadron, and the clattering car
Went pouring forward with impetuous speed,
And swiftly forming in the ranks of war ;
And the deep thunder, peal on peal afar ;

And near, the beat of the alarming drum
Roused up the soldier ere the morning star ;
While thronged the citizens with terror dumb,

Or whispering, with white lips—“The foe! They

{??

come, they come
WATERLOO. 115

7. And wild and high the “ Camerons’ gathering” rose!
The war-note of Lochiel, which Albyn’s hills
Have heard—and heard, too, have her Saxon foes.
How in the noon of night that pibroch thrills,
Savage and shrill! but with the breath which fills
Their mountain-pipe, so fill the mountaineers
With the fierce native daring which instils
The stirring memory of a thousand years:

And Evan’s, Donald’s fame rings in each clansman’s

ears !

8. And Ardennes waves above them her green leaves,
Dewy with Nature’s tear-drops, as they pass,
Grieving, if aught inanimate e’er grieves,

Over the unreturning brave—alas !
Ere evening to be trodden like the grass
Which now beneath them, but above shall grow

_ In its next verdure, when this fiery mass
Of living valour, rolling on the foe,

And burning with high hope, shall moulder cold and

low!

~9. Last noon beheld them full of lusty life ;
Last eve in beauty’s circle proudly gay ;
The midnight brought the signal-sound of strife ;
The morn, the marshalling in arms; the day,
Battle’s magnificently stern array !
The thunder-clouds close o’er it, which, when rent,
The earth is eovered thick with other clay,
Which her own clay shall cover,—heaped and pent,

Rider and horse, friend, foe, in one red burial blent!

Byron.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 241.
116 GEORGE THE THIRD.

29, GEORGE THE THIRD.—XIV.

1. The Peace of 1815 found the country in great
distress. As we have already seen, hundreds of
thousands of lives had been lost, and this made the
country less able to bear the burden which was laid
upon it. Commerce was almost completely stag-
nant. The weight of taxation was very great,
owing to the enormous debt which the country had
incurred. Food was dear, wages were low, and.
work was scarce. It was well that James Watt
had got his steam-engine to work, and that Ark-
wright and others had made their spinning frames
and looms before this time, else it is likely that the
strain would have been too great for the country to
bear.

2. The introduction of machinery driven by
steam was not at first regarded as a blessing by the
working-classes. Their means of livelihood were
taken away, and skilled workmen could not earn
more than a few shillings a week. At length, how-
ever, factories were built; population. increased ;
cities sprang up; wealth grew apace. Manchester,
Leeds, Sheffield, Liverpool, and other great centres
of industry made the north of England a new
country. But much suffering had to be endured
before these happy results were seen.

3. The Corn Act of 1815 was passed in the inter-
ests of British farmers and landowners. During
the war only a small quantity of corn had come in
from abroad, and therefore it had become very dear.
To keep it from getting cheaper when the war was

N
GEORGE THE THIRD. 117

over, a law was passed forbidding the importation
of foreign grain until wheat had risen to eighty
shillings per quarter. This gave the British farmer
more for his corn, but made food very dear, even
when the harvest was good. Many persons were
unable to get enough to keep them alive, or to keep
up their strength for work. This law therefore
made the country poorer. Riots took place in the
larger towns, which led to great destruction of
property and some loss of life.

4, “Bread or Blood” was the motto borne on the
flags of labourers who gathered in large numbers at
Brandon, Bury, and Warwick to fix the price of
grain and meat, and to pull down the houses of
butchers and bakers. Soldiers had to assist in
putting down the rioters, and thirty-four of them
were sentenced to death, but only five were exe-
cuted.

5. The Reform of the House of Commons was again
called for, and. this time more loudly than ever.
The difficulties and sufferings of the people caused
them to think that their distress was the result of
bad government, and hundreds of petitions for Re-
form—some of them with thirty thousand signa-
tures—were sent to Parliament. From this time
there was continual agitation in the country, till, in
1832, a Reform Bill gave more of the people votes
in the election of the House of Commons. |

6. As riots and unlawful meetings continued to
be held all over the land, strong means were
tried to put them down. The Habeas Corpus Act
was suspended, and some of the ringleaders were
11s GEORGE THE THIRD.

hanged. Things grew worse for the next two years.
Those who were out of work met together in large
numbers. They thought and openly said that all
things were done for the good of the upper classes,
while the poor were left to starve. A band of
workmen set out to walk from Manchester to Lon-
don to lay their hardships before Parliament. They
‘took with them a blanket each in which to sleep
by the wayside. This got for them the name
of “Blanketeers.” They were stopped by the
~ troops.

7. A great Reform meeting was held in St.
Peter’s Field, Manchester, and from the neighbour-
ing towns large bodies of men marched to the city
bearing flags on which were instribed—* Universal
Suffrage ;” “Equal Representation or Death ;” “No
Corn Laws;” “Annual Parliaments;” “Vote by
Ballot,” etc. When they had all gathered, there
were present one hundred thousand persons to ask
for Reform. The soldiers were sent to scatter them
and take Orator Hunt, who was the chief speaker,
prisoner. Then followed a dreadful scene of con-
fusion. Great numbers of people were trodden
down by the horses; some were killed, and many
wounded. This was called in scorn the “ Battle of
Peterloo.”

8. The death of George took place at Windsor
Castle in 1820. For many years he had -been
blind, deaf, and insane. “All light, all reason, all
sound of human voices, all the pleasures of this
world of God, were taken from him.” He was
eighty-one years of age, and had been King for
GEORGE THE THIRD. 119

almost sixty years. No other King or Queen has.
been so long upon the throne. He was a good man,
and in many ways a good King. In spite of his
fondness for power, he did his best for the good of
his people, and was himself liked by them. | His.
homely way of living won for him the name of
“ Farmer George.”

9, The Princess Victoria, the daughter of the Duke
of Kent, the fourth son of the King, was born at
Kensington Palace on the 24th of May 1819. In
January of the following year the Duke of Kent
died, six days before his father the King. There
were now but two persons—her uncles George and
William—between the baby Princess and the British
throne. In eighteen years they had passed away,
and the British Empire was once more ruled over
by a Queen. ;

10. A great many famous persons lived during this
reign. Robert Burns, the national poet of Scotland,
wrote the Cottar’s Saturday Night; Lord Byron
wrote Childe Harold ; William Cowper wrote the
Task and John Gilpin; and Thomas Gray wrote
the Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Sir Walter
Scott wrote the Lady of the Lake, Murmion, and
also the Waverley Novels; Oliver Goldsmith wrote _
the Deserted Village and the Vicar of Wakefield ;
Dr. Johnson was the author of a great dictionary ;
Hume wrote a History of England; and. Gibbon
was the author of Lhe Decline and Fall of the
Roman Empire.

11. Among the inventors of the reign were ©
James Watt, who improved the steam-engine, and


OLIVER GOLDSMITH
1728-19774
Noveuist, Port, ETc.

He wrote The Vicar of Wakefield, The
Deserted Village, etc.



EDWARD GIBBON

1737-1794
HISTORIAN ,
He wrote The Decline and Fall of the

Roman Empire, etc,







SAMUEL JOHNSON
1709-1784
LEXICOGRAPHER

He wrote «f Dictionary of the English Language,
Lives of the Poets, etc.



ROBERT BURNS
31759-1796
Poet

He wrote The Cotter's Saturday Night,
Scots Wha Hae, ete.



GREAT AUTHORS


WILLIAM COWPER Lorp Byron

1731-1800 1788-1824
Port Port
He wrote The Task, History of Fok He wrote Childe Harold,
Gilpin, ete ete.









Str WaLTER Scott ROBERT SOUTHEY
1771-1832 1774-1843
NovELisT AND PorT - Poerr (Laureate)
He wrote The Waverley Novels (Ivanhoe, etc.) ' He wrote The Curse of Kehama, Life
Lady of the Lake, Marmion, ete. ~ of Nelson, ete.





PREAT fPUTHORS
122 THE MARINERS OF ENGLAND. ,

Arkwright, Crompton, and Hargreaves, who in-
vented machines for spinning and weaving. Sir
Humphry Davy invented the safety-lamp for
miners; gas was first used’ for lighting purposes ;
Josiah Wedgwood founded “the Potteries ;” John
Smeaton built the famous Eddystone Lighthouse,
and Sir William Herschel discovered a new planet,
now called Uranus.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 242.

30. THE MARINERS OF ENGLAND.

1. This song, all except the second verse, was
written just before the Battle of the Baltic took
place, when it was probable that Britain would have
to fight with the countries that had formed the
Northern League.

2. The southern and eastern coasts of England
were at that time defended by towers; but the
poet declares that it is not on our forts, but on our
ships and sailors, that we must rely. The enemy
must be met and defeated before they can land
on our shores. This was what really took place.
Britain at once made an attack on the Leagued
Powers, and in the Battle of the Baltic gave them
a decided check by capturing the Danish fleet.

3. Ye mariners of England,
Who guard our native seas,
Whose flag has braved a thousand-years
The battle and the breeze !
THE MARINERS OF ENGLAND. 123

Your glorious standard launch again,
To match another foe,

And sweep through the deep
While the stormy tempests blow ;

While the battle rages loud and long,
And the stormy tempests blow.

4. The spirits of your fathers

Shall start from every wave !

For the deck it was their field of fame,
And ocean was their grave:

Where Blake and mighty Nelson fell,
Your manly hearts shall glow,

As ye sweep through the deep
While the stormy tempests blow ;

While the battle rages loud and long,
And the stormy tempests blow.

5. Britannia needs no bulwark,
No towers along the steep ;

Her march is o’er the mountain waves,
Her home is on the deep:

With thunders from her native oak
She quells the floods below,

As they roar on the shore
When the stormy tempests blow ;

When the battle rages loud and long,
And the stormy tempests blow.

6. The meteor-flag of England
Shall yet terrific burn,
124 THE MARINERS OF ENGLAND.

Till danger’s troubled night depart,
And the star of peace return.
Then, then, ye ocean-warriors !
Our song and feast shall flow
To the fame of your name,
When the storm has ceased to blow;
When the fiery fight is heard no more,
And the storm has ceased to blow.
THomas CAMPBELL.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 248.




GEORGE THE FOURTH. 125



31. GEORGE THE FOURTH.—I.
1820 To 1830: 10 rEaRs,

1, George the Fourth was the eldest son of George
the Third. He had already ruled for nine years as
Prince Regent during the illness of his father, and
therefore his coming to the throne caused no change.
Lord Liverpool, who had been in office for about
eight years, continued in power.
126 GEORGE THE FOURTH.

2. George and his wife, Caroline of Brunswick,
were not on friendly terms. During most of their
married life they had lived apart; but when Caro-
line heard that her husband had succeeded to the
throne, she came from Italy to England to claim
her place as Queen.

3. The King asked the House of Lords to declare
that she was no longer his wife; but this was so
strongly opposed by Henry Brougham, who acted
as counsel for Caroline, that George withdrew the
case, to the great joy of the people, who were
nearly all on her side. On the day that he was
crowned Caroline went to Westminster Abbey, but
she was turned away from the door. This blow
was more than she could bear; she became very
- ill, and nineteen days later she died.

4, The Cato Street Conspiracy, in 1820, grew out of
the troubles of the time. The people had been
growing very restless during the latter part of the
last reign. The long wars and bad trade had
caused much suffering, and loud outcries were made
at the way in which the government of the country
was being carried on. Soon after George became
King a plot was formed to kill the ministers, set
London on fire, and throw open the prisons. By
this wild plan a few desperate men hoped to bring
about a change in the government.

5. The plot was discovered, and the parties to it
were found in a hay-loft in Cato Street, London. A
fight took place, and a policeman was killed; but the
plotters were made prisoners. Thistlewood, the leader,
and four others were hanged; the rest were transported.
GEORGE THE FOURTH. 127

About the same time a rising of Glasgow weavers
was put down by a body of Pecan and volun-
teers.

6. King George visited Ireland in “1801, He was
received by the people with great joy. He was the
first British King who had gone to Ireland on a
visit of peace. The condition of Ireland, pinched
by famine and disease, was then attracting great
attention. Much had been done for the suffering
land by its viceroy, the Marquis of Wellesley, who
_ was clear-sighted enough to acknowledge the justice
of the Roman Catholic claims.

7. The King visited Scotland in 1822, and spent
thirteen days in that country. During this visit
he received the sad news that one of Re ministers
—Lord Castlereagh, Marquis of Londonderry—had
committed suicide. Mr. George.Canning took Lord
Castlereagh’s place as Foreign Secretary, and this
event marked the turning-point for the better in
the affairs of the country.

8. Three great questions now engaged the public
mind; for, though many changes had taken place
in the government of the country since the Stuarts
had striven for sole power and had lost the crown,
there were yet many changes to be carried out
before the people would be satisfied. Three things
in particular were demanded :—

(1.) Freedom of trade—to alter such laws as the
Corn Act of 1815, which put a heavy tax on im-
ports from other countries, and so hindered trade
by making things dear.

(2.) Roman Catholic Banca ont allow
128 °GEORGE THE FOURTH.

Roman Catholics to hold public offices and to be-
come members of Parliament. et

8 as
A :
Laranear Hi









(3.) Reform Eh ~
of- Parliament
—to give the
right of voting
for members of
the House of
Commons to a
larger number
of people, and
to take mem-
bers from small villages and
give them to large towns
which had grown up in re
cent years,

9. The First Burmese War
took place in 1824. The Brit-
ish, who had settlements in Burma, a part of
Farther India, complained of ill-treatment on ‘the


’ GEORGE THE FOURTH. . 129

part of the Burmese. A war followed, and Rangoon
was taken. The following year the ,whole sea-coast
-on the east of the Bay of Bengal was added to our
Indian Empire, and was called British Burma.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 244.

32, GEORGE THE FOURTH.—II.

1. Liverpool and Canning died in 1827. Canning
succeeded Liverpool as Prime Minister in the early
part of the year. Robert Peel and the Duke of
Wellington opposed him, because for some years he
had taken the side of the Roman Catholics. He
was, however, supported by Henry (afterwards
Lord) Brougham and others of the Whig party in
the House of Commons. Canning did not live long
after he became Premier. He was worn out with
hard work, and died within four months. Lord
Goderich was the next Prime Minister.

_ 2, War with Turkey took place in 1827. The Turks
had ruled over Greece for about four hundred years,
but for the past five years the Greeks had been
striving to obtain their freedom. Great Britain,
France, and Russia were on the side of Greece, and
in October 1827 the combined fleets of these coun- —
tries, led by Admiral Codrington, defeated those
of Turkey and Egypt in the Battle of Navarino.
After this Greece became free, and was formed
into a kingdom. She has had a King of her own
since 1832.

x 3. The.Repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts was

(888) 9
130 GEORGE THE FOURTH.

carried in 1828. ‘The Turkish War and the un-
satisfied demands of the people caused Lord Gode-
rich to resign, after he had been Prime Minister
only five months. The Duke of Wellington took
his place, and Robert Peel and Lord Palmerston
were two of the ministers. The Test and Corpora-
tion Acts, passed in the reign of Charles the Second,
to prevent those who were not members of the
Church of England from holding public offices, were
still in force. Lord John Russell proposed that
those Acts should be done away with. Peel and
Palmerston opposed him; but Russell had the people
with him, and the Acts were repealed. This impor-
tant step in the direction of religious freedom gave
Dissenters their rights, though Roman Catholics
were still excluded.

'4. Daniel O'Connell, who was a great orator, and
who had obtained much influence over the people,
was the leader of the Irish. He determined to do
away with the law which prevented Roman Catho-
lics from being members of Parliament. He was
elected as member for County Clare; but when he
presented himself in the House of Commons, he
was not allowed to take his seat because he was
a Roman Catholic.

5. The Roman Catholic Emancipation Act was now
forced from the Ministry of the Duke of Welling-
ton. The election of O’Connell had caused a great
stir, not only in Ireland, but also among the friends
of freedom in England. Both Wellington and Peel
desired to keep the law as it was, but, afraid of a
rebeilion in Ireland, they gave way, and Roman
GEORGE THE FOURTH. 13I

Catholics were placed on an equal footing with their
Protestant fellow-subjects.

6. The new Police were organized in 1829. Although
the population of London was now a million and a
half, it still had no efféctive police. The guardians
of the peace were mostly infirm old men, who spent
much of their time dozing in sentry-boxes. During
the last year of the reign, Sir Robert Peel passed a’
Bill which provided a new and thoroughly efficient
force of police. From their founder, they were called
in derision “ Bobbies” and “ Peelers.”

7. The death of George took place in 1830, at the
age of sixty-eight. From his fine manners and
fondness for dress, he was called “the first gentle-
man in Europe.” He was not worthy of the name,
for he was neither kind in heart: nor pure in life.
Having no children to succeed him, the crown
passed to his brother William, Duke of Clarence.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 245.
132 WILLIAM THE FOURTH.

: 33. WILLIAM THE FOURTH.—1.
2 ~ 1830 To 1837: 7 YEARS.

1. William the Fourth, the third son of George
the Third, and brother of George the Fourth, was
sixty-five years old when he became King. His
wife, Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, in Germany, by
her pure and useful life, set a good example to
all around her.

2. Revolution or Reform was now the question of
the day. The people had waited, and hoped, and
pleaded with one Government after another, but all
in vain. . Revolutions on the Continent helped to
bring about the desired reform in Great Britain.
Again the French people rose against their rulers,
and drove Charles the Tenth, who had been made
King some years after the Battle of Waterloo, out
of the country. Belgium also separated from
Holland, to which it had been united.

3. This stir among other nations caused the
people of Great Britain to demand, more than ever,
the reform of the House of Commons; and the
Government was now more ready to give heed to
their call. A new Parliament met towards the end
of the year, and a great many of its members were
' in favour of a change. The Duke of Wellington,
-who would not agree to it, gave way to a Whig
Ministry, of which the leaders were Earl Grey and
Lord John Russell.

4. Before a-Bill passes through the House of
Commons or the House of Lords, it has to be
voted on three times. Each time is called a “ read-
WILLIAM THE FOURTH. 133



WILLIAM THE FOURTH.

ing” of the Bill; and unless at each reading it’ has
a majority in its favour—that is, has more votes
for it than against it-—it does not pass.

5. A Reform Bill was brought into the Home of
Commons by Lord John Russell on the Ist-of
March 1831. The first reading had only one more
vote for it than against it. This majority was not
“184 — WILLIAM THE FOURTH.

large enough to enable the Government to carry
the Bill through all its stages. They therefore |
brought the Parliament to an end, and a new House
of Commons had to be chosen. Riots took place
in various parts of the country. In Birmingham
bells were muffled and tolled; Nottingham Castle
was fired; and in Bristol the mob took possession
of the city, and set the prisoners free. In these
riots some lives were lost, and a good deal of prop-
erty was destroyed.

6. The General Election was a time of great ex-
citement. The people, roused, and terribly in
earnest, returned a new House of Commons packed
with reformers. The Bill was easily carried there ;
but the House of Lords, after a fierce debate of five
nights, refused to pass it. At once the excitement
of the people broke out again in riots.

7. Without loss of time the Bill was brought in
again in the House of Commons, and again sent to
the House of Lords. The Lords were still so much
against it, that Earl Grey asked the King to create
as many new Lords who would vote for it as would
carry it through the House. The King was not
willing to do this, and Earl Grey therefore resigned
office as Prime Minister.

8. The Duke of Wellington was called upon by
the King to become Premier. The people, who had
set their minds upon having the Bill passed, were
in an angry mood, Even the memory of Waterloo
did not shield the Duke from outrage by the mob
of London. Wellington failed to form a Ministry
—that is, he could not persuade enough leading
WILLIAM THE FOURTH. 138

men to take office with him. to carry on the govern-
ment—and therefore Earl Grey had to be recalled.
The King was now willing to create new Lords, but
they were not needed. One hundred members of
the House of Lords who had formerly voted against
the Bill stayed away, and it was carried.

9. The changes made by the Reform Act were very
great :—

(1.) Many places——called pocket or rotten
boroughs—in which there were few voters, lost the
_ right of sending members to Parliament. The most
noted case was that of Old Sarum, near Salisbury,
where not a single house then stood.

(2.) Large towns, like Birmingham, Leeds, Man-
chester, and Sheffield, which had grown up within
the last hundred years, received for the first time
the right of choosing members of Parliament. _

(3.) The right of voting was given to a greater
number of persons. In towns those who owned
or lived in a house for which a rent of £10 a year
was paid, and in counties those who owned houses
or lands worth £10 a year, or who paid a rent of at
least £50, were allowed to vote.

10. These changes brought the House of Commons
and the country to a better understanding with
each other. - Instead of acting only for the good of
the few who formerly chose the members, the re-
formed House began to work for the good of all.
It had become the “People’s House of Parliament.”
A Reform Bill for Scotland, and another for Ireland.
were passed in the same year.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 246.
136 WILLIAM THE FOURTH,

' 34, WILLIAM THE FOURTH.—II.

1. Slavery in the British Empire was abolished in
1833. William Wilberforce had struggled for forty-
five years to obtain freedom for the slaves in the
West Indies. The slave trade had been done away -
with in 1807, but there were still eight hundred
thousand slaves under British rule. This means
that although negroes were no longer allowed to be
carried across the ocean in ships from Africa to
‘America, yet there were still slaves who had been
formerly carried off in this way.

2. The reformed Parliament set the slaves free,
and agreed to pay the slave owners £20,000,000
to make up for their loss. The slaves were not al-
lowed to leave their masters at once: They were
bound to work on for five years, but they were to
be paid wages for their services. Three days after
the passing of the Act, Wilberforce died, at the age of
seventy-five. He lived to know that his life’s work
was done. To him chiefly is due the glory of
abolishing slavery in the British dominions. He
was buried in Westminster Abbey. ©

3. A new Poor Law was passed in 1834. Earl Grey,
who had been Prime Minister since the Reform Act
passed, now left the Ministry, and Lord Melbourne
took his place. His first work was the making of
a new Poor Law. The money needed ‘to relieve the
poor of the country had risen to £8,000,000 a year.
“Much of this was given to men and women who
were strong enough but too lazy to work. By the
new law help was not to be given to those who
WILLIAM THE FOURTH. 137

were able to work, unless they were willing to go
to the poor-house, and there work for a living.

4. Trade Strikes now began to take place on a
serious scale. Since the time of Edward the Third
workmen had been forbidden by law to unite even
for the protection of their own interests. Their
wages were also fixed. These laws were done away
with in 1825. Thereafter trades-unions sprang up |
all over the country, and this led to many disputes
between masters and workmen. In 1834 the
tailors of London refused to work unless they re-
ceived better wages. The weavers of Leeds and the
calico-printers of Glasgow did the same. In each
case, while the struggle lasted, the loss of wages led
to great suffering on the part of the workmen and
their families.

5. The Municipal Reform Act was passed in 1835.
The number of changes which had taken place in so
short a time began to alarm the King. He there-
fore changed his ministers, and Robert Peel became
Prime Minister. Peel, however, had not a majority
in the House of Commons, and a new election did
not help him.’ At the end of four months, Lord
Melbourne came back to power. The first thing the
new Parliament did was to reform the town eres
of England and Wales, as well as those of Scotland
and Ireland. The right of choosing councillors was
given to those who paid rates in the towns. The
councillors chose the magistrates from among them-
selves.

6. Coaches were the chief means of travelling up
to about the year 1825. Goods were conveyed in
138 WILLIAM THE FOURTH.





TRAVELLING ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO.

waggons drawn by horses over tram-roads or in
boats on the canals. Now a greater and quicker
moving power was needed; for the use of steam in
manufacturing goods had caused a great increase in
the trade of the country, and there was no rapid
means of conveyance. To meet this want travelling
engines or locomotives were built to run over iron
roads or railway lines. '

7. The first Railway in England was built by
George Stephenson from Stockton to Darlington in
1825, but the trains on it ran at the rate of only
five or six miles an hour. He then made a rail-
way from Liverpool to Manchester, and built engines
that were able to run at the rate of thirty miles an
hour. The line was opened with a procession of
trains in the presence of the Duke of Wellington
and an immense gathering of people, September 15,
1830. This was the beginning of the great railway
system now spread all over the country. In 1838
WILLIAM THE FOURTH. 139























STEPHENSUN’S ENGINE, THE ‘‘ ROCKET.”

the Atlantic was crossed by a steamer for the first
time. —

8. William died on the 20th of June 1837, at the age
of seventy-two. When a young man he had been
for some time a sailor, and was called the “Sailor
King.” He was warm-hearted and simple in man-
ners, and his people loved and trusted him. He left
no children. ;

_ EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 247.


Sir Isaac NEWTON JOHN SMEATON
1642-1727 1724-1792

PHILOSOPHER AND MATHEMATICIAN Civit ENGINEER
Discovered the law of gravitation. Built Eddystone Lighthouse.









SiR RICHARD ARKWRIGHT JosiaH WEDGWOOD
1732-1792 1730-1795
INVENTOR Porter anp INVENTOR



Invented the spinning-jenny. Founder of our Invented Wedgwoodware. Founder.of our
cotton manufacture, f pottery trade,

PREAT JNVENTORS, §o.




. james Watt Str Humpury Davy



1736-1819 1778-1829
INVENTOR AND ENGINEER CHEMIST

Improver of the steam-engine, | Invented the miner's safety-lamp.





GEORGE STEPHENSON Str WILLIAM HERSCHEL
1781-1848 1738-1822
ENGINEER ASTRONOMER



Invented the locomotive steam-engine,
ee [

GREAT JNVENTORS, §c.

Discovered the planet Uranus.


142 QUEEN VICTORIA.



35. QUEEN VICTORIA.—I.
1837.

1. Queen. Victoria is the daughter of Edward, Duke
of Kent, the brother of William the Fourth, and the
fourth son of George the Third. In her lineage
Queen Victoria ropiesents nearly the. whole past
sovereignty of the land. The blood of Cerdic the
first Saxon King and of William the Conqueror
QUEEN VICTORIA. 143



THE PRINCE CONSORT.

flows in her veins. The young Queen ascended the
throne, June 20th, 1837, a month after her eighteenth
birthday. Her father died in 1820, but she had
been carefully trained by her mother, the Duchess
of Kent, for her high position.

2. In 1840 ie Majesty married her cousin,
Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, a duchy of
Central Germany. He received the title of Prince
Consort. He died in 1861. Their family consisted
of four sons—Albert Edward (Prince of Wales),
Alfred, Arthur, and Leopold; and five daughters—
Victoria, Alice, Helena, Louise, and Beatrice. Two-
are dead—the Princess Alice in 1878, and Leopold,
Duke of Albany, in 1884.

3. The Prince Consort was about three months
144 QUEEN VICTORIA.

younger than the Queen. He was a man of con-
siderable learning, and of a strong and active mind.
His training had been such as to fit him for the
high and difficult position he had now to fill. His
influence over the Queen, and the wisdom with which
he guided her actions and his own, did much to
bring about the prosperity of the present reign.

4, Hanover is no longer ruled over by the British
Sovereign. By the accession of George the First, in
1714, the crowns of Britain and Hanover were
united; but when Queen Victoria came to the throne,
Hanover became a separate kingdom, as there is in
that country a law, called the Salic Law, against
any woman wearing the crown. This change was
regarded with favour by the people of England, for
the possession of Hanover had several times drawn
us into war. Ernest, Duke of Cumberland, fifth
son of George the Third, then became its King.
Hanover was afterwards added to Prussia, because it
took the part of Austria in the war of 1866.

5. Lord Melbourne, who was Prime Minister when
William died, continued in office; for the young
Queen needed his advice and guidance in all public
affairs. He was a kindly, easy-going man, who
believed in letting things remain as they were as
long as possible. This could not last, for many of
the people were in great want. Wages were low,
food was dear, workrooms were unhealthy, and many
of the houses of the poor were unfit to live in. He
continued in office till 1841, when the House of
Commons went against him, and he had to resign.
Sir Robert Peel was the next Prime Minister. —
VICTORIA’S TEARS. 145

6. A new order of things came in with the acces-
sion of Queen Victoria. The Georges and William
the Fourth had insisted on changing their ministers
or chief political advisers when they pleased, without
giving Parliament any reason for the change. That
practice, the last vestige of personal government—
that is, the Crown acting without the advice of the
nation—died with the late King.

7. With the coronation of Queen Victoria the
principle was established that henceforth the Sove-
reign of the British Empire cannot remove a Prime
Minister or his Cabinet without the consent of the
House of Commons; nor, on the other hand, would
the Sovereign now venture to retain a Ministry
which-the Commons refused to support. Custom,
too, has decided that the Sovereign must sanction
any Bill approved by Parliament. Queen Anne
was the last Monarch who vetoed a Bill.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 247.



36. VICTORIA’S TEARS.

1. Queen Victoria is the only child of Edward,
Duke of Kent, fourth son of George the Third. She
was born on 24th May 1819. Her father died in
June 1820, and the Princess was therefore marked
- out from infancy as heir to the throne.

2. On the death of her uncle, William the Fourth,
in 1837, Victoria was proclaimed Queen, with the
greatest joy in all parts of the country. The cere-
mony of the proclamation took place with the usual

(888) é 10
146 . VICTORIA’S TEARS.

pomp in the court-yard of St. James’s Palace. As
the trumpets sounded, and the guns boomed, and
the assembled thousands cheered, the young Queen
turned to her mother, threw her arms around: her
neck, and wept like a child!

3. “O maiden! heir of Kings !
A King has left his place ;
The majesty of Death has swept
All other from his face :
And thou upon thy mother’s breast
No longer lean adown,’
' But take the glory for the rest,
And rule the land that loves thee best !”
The maiden wept—
She wept to wear a crown!

4. They decked her courtly halls ;
_ They reined her hundred steeds ;
They shouted at her palace gate,
* A noble Queen succeeds !”
Her name has stirred the mountain’s sleep,
Her praise has filled the town ;
And mourners God had stricken deep
Looked hearkening up and did not weep.
Alone she wept,
Who wept to wear a crown! ©

5. She saw no purples shine,
For tears had dimmed her eyes ;
She only knew her childhood’s flowers:
Were happier pageantries !
VICTORIA’S TEARS, 147

And while the heralds played their part,
Those million shouts to drown,

“ God save the Queen!” from hill to mart,
She heard through all her beating heart,
And turned, and wept—

She wept to wear a crown!

6. God save thee, weeping Queen !
Thou shalt be well beloved !
_ The tyrant’s sceptre cannot move
As those pure tears have moved!
The nature in thine eyes we see
That tyrants cannot own—
The love that guardeth liberties :
Strange blessing on the nation lies,
Whose Sovereign wept—
Yea, wept to wear a crown!

7. God bless thée, weeping Queen,

With blessing more divine !

And fill with happier love than Earth’s
That tender heart of thine !

That when the thrones of Earth shall be
As low as graves brought down,

A piercéd hand may give to thee

The crown which angels shout to see !—

Thou wilt not weep
To wear that heavenly crown.
: ELizaBETH BARRETT BROWNING.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 248.
148 QUEEN VICTORIA.

37. QUEEN VICTORIA.—II.

“1. The Corn Law of 1815, which put a tax upon
corn from abroad, had given place to another in
1828. By the new law, called the Sliding Scale
Act, the tax grew less as corn. became dearer; but
still the effect was to keep corn from being brought
into the country. The landlords and farmers were
in favour of the tax, as it made the price of corn
higher, and enabled the farmer to pay a higher rent.

2. Richard Cobden and John Bright, both remark-



RICHARD COBDEN.

able as public speakers, formed the Anti-Corn Law
League at Manchester in 1838, and commenced a
erusade against the tax. They were called free
traders, because they wanted trade to be free. They
believed that food ought to be bought in the cheap-
QUEEN VICTORIA, - 149



JOHN BRIGHT.

est markets in the world, and that if this were done
the country would be richer and the people more
comfortable.

3. The famine in Ireland in 1845 and 1846 was
caused by the failure of the potato crop, which sup-
plied the people of Ireland with a great part. of
their food. The poor people sold everything they
had, and lived upon turnips and cabbages, or any-
thing else they could get; and even then, many. of
them were often without food for days. Fever
broke out among them, and more tinea. two thousand
persons died. |

4, After a time, kind-hearted people in Great
Britain, Ireland, and America were able to help the
starving people; and their own priests worked day
150 . QUEEN VICTORIA.

and night to lessen the distress. Parliament also
voted large sums of money to buy food. Fortun-
ately the harvest of 1847 was good, and this put
an end to the “hunger,” as the people themselves
called it, but Ireland felt its effects for a long time.

5. The Repeal of the Corn Law took place in
1846. The famine in Ireland, which lasted for two
years, led Robert Peel, who was then Prime Minister,
to see that it was wrong to hinder food from coming
freely into the country. He resigned office, think-
ing it better that the men who had all along been
on the side of free trade should bring in the measure.
Lord John Russell, however, could not get a Ministry
together, and Peel had to come back to office.

6. In 1846 he carried a motion in the House of
Commons, by which the duty on corn was entirely
abolished at the end of three years, while in the
interval the tax was lowered to four shillings: per
quarter, and in 1849 it fell to one shilling, The.
repeal of the Corn Law made many of Peel's friends
turn against him and form themselves into a party
called “ Protectionists.” Lord Stanley, afterwards
the Earl of Derby, was their leader.

7. The Chartists were a body of men. who began
about this time (1839)to demand as the right of every
man six things included in “The People’s Charter.”
They said that the Reform Bill of 1832 had not
gone far enough in giving votes. The mass of work-
ing people were still without the right of voting at
elections, and they were EATS unrepresented in
Parliament.

8. The six points of the Charter were :—
QUEEN VICTORIA. 151

(1.) That every man should have a vote.

(2.) That votes should be given by ballot. In
this plan for secret voting, the voter puts a X
opposite the name of the candidate for whom he
votes, but does not sign his name, or in any way
show by whom the vote has been given. This
secures the voter from the interference or influence
of those who wish to obtain his vote.

(3.) That there should be a new Parliament every -
year. This would cause members to please their
constituents to obtain re-election.

(4.) That members of Parliament should be paid
for their service. This was to enable men ‘who had
to earn their living to become members of Parlia-
ment if elected.

(5.) That every man, whether he was the owner
of property or not, should be held fit to be chosen
as a member of Parliament.

(6.) That the country should be divided into equal
districts, each of which should choose one member of
Parliament. Thus every man’s vote would be of as
nearly an equal value as possible.

9. A band of Chartists, led by John Frost, who
had once been a magistrate, raised a riot at Newport,
in Monmouthshire. In this riot some lives were lost.
Frost and two others-were sentenced to death, but
they were afterwards transported for life.

10. The Penny Post was established in 1839, Be-
fore that time the postage paid for sending letters
was very high. The charge on a letter from London
to Edinburgh was one shilling and a penny. Row-
land Hill proposed a plan by which letters might be
152 QUEEN VICTORIA.

sent to any part of the British Isles for a penny.
The plan was adopted, and proved so successful that
it has since been improved. We can now send a
letter for a penny, and a post-card or a newspaper
for a halfpenny, to any part of the British Islands.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 249.

' 38, QUEEN VICTORIA.—III,

1. The First Afghan War raged from 1839 to
1842. Afghanistan lies on the north-west of India,
with only a range of mountains between the two
countries. The Russians have large possessions in
Asia, and for a long time they have been adding to
these till their empire borders on the northern side -
of Afghanistan. The British have long feared that
the Russians would try to take possession of India
if they ever got the chance. We have, therefore,
always aimed at keeping them out of Afghanistan,
and at being ourselves friendly with the rulers of
that country.

2. Shah Shoojah, the ruler of Afghanistan, who
was a friend of the British, was driven from his
throne by Dost Mohammed. In 1839 a British
army marched into Afghanistan, took Kandahar,
Cabul (the capital), and other cities, and replaced
Shah Shoojah. The British army then returned to
India, leaving soldiers to guard some of the Afghan
towns.

3. In 1841 Akbar Khan, the son of Dost Mo-
hammed, surrounded the British in Cabul. There
QUEEN VICTORIA. 153







TURKESTAN

DELHI®O






ae t
°Ajmere - a4





was a rising of the people in the city, and some of
the British leaders were killed. A few weeks later
Sir William Macnaghten and several officers, who
had been invited to visit Akbar to negotiate, were
put to death by the Afghans. The British then left
Cabul, Akbar promising to, protect them on their
way back to India.
4. Between Cabul and Jelalabad, at the head of
the Khyber Pass, which connects Afghanistan with
India, there is a distance of ninety miles. The
154 QUEEN VICTORIA.





































































































































































AFGHANS FIGHTING,

British had to march over the steep hills covered
with snow. They had women and children with
them to care for. Fierce Afghans posted on the
rocks attacked the retreating troops and shot them
QUEEN VICTORIA. 155

down without mercy. The women and children
were then given up to Akbar Khan. He could
keep them beside him in safety, but he could not
restrain his followers when beyond his reach from
attacking the British.

5. The men bravely marched on, but it was to
their death. A few days later one man, Dr. Bry-
den, wounded and half dead, riding a worn-out pony,
entered Jelalabad. He was the only one left to tell
the tale. Four thousand five hundred soldiers and
twelve thousand camp-followers lay dead in the
passes of those snow-covered mountains.

6. The Afghans then tried to take Jelalabad, but
they failed to do so. The British held out till help
arrived, General Pollock having bravely fought his
way through the Khyber Pass. “ Having relieved
Jelalabad, he marched on to Cabul, and recovered
those who had been left behind when the soldiers
retreated. He then threw down the city walls, and
returned to India. In 1855 Dost Mohammed made a
friendly alliance with the British. He died in 1863.

7. War. broke out between Turkey and Egypt in
1839, while these things were going on in Afghani-
stan. As this war hindered British trade in the
neighbourhood of the -Black Sea, we were led to
take part in it. The Egyptians could not be driven
out of Syria till the town of Acre had been taken by
the British fleet. Shortly after this the Turks, who
claimed Egypt as part of their empire, agreed that
Meheniet Ali and his heirs should be settled as
rulers of that country.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 249.
156 : QUEEN VICTORIA.

'39. QUEEN VICTORIA.—IV.

1. War took place with China on account of the
opium trade. Opium is a drug that grows in India,
and is sent to China and other countries, where it is
either smoked or swallowed in small pieces. The



— SE Sra Chinese Government
| ese . Yay ae co had passed a law for-
pews" 2% bf a") bidding opium to be
SSS | brought into their
country, because it was
hurtful to those who
used it. This law hin-
dered British merchants
from carrying on the
| opium trade. Many
cargoes of opium which
British traders tried to
smuggle into China
were destroyed, and
several British subjects
were thrown into
prison.

SSS 2. In 1840 a war
was begun to compel the Chinese to alter the law.
Hong-Kong, an island east of the entrance to Canton
River, was taken; and the British received the
right to trade with Canton and four other towns
—Amoy, Foochoo, Ningpo, and Shanghai—on the
sea-coast. Peace was restored in 1842. It was a
disgraceful thing for Great Britain to force the sale
of a hurtful drug like opium on the Chinese people.


















QUEEN VICTORIA. 157

3. The Union of the two Canadas took place in
1841. For some years the people of Canada had
been demanding greater freedom in the manage-
ment of their own affairs. There were many
French in Lower Canada, and they disliked being

EG
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VF

i
it

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under British rule. The minister at home, how-
ever, would not listen to the Canadians, who at last
made up their minds to fight. But the fighting did
not last long, and there was little loss of life.

4, Another rising in the following year among the
French of Lower Canada was as quickly put’ down.
Parliament saw, however, that something must be
done to bring this state of things to an end, and an |
Act was passed in 1841 which made Upper and
Lower Canada into one province.

5. War broke out in India in 1843. While the
war was going on in Afghanistan, Sindh, which lies
near the mouth of the river Indus, in the north-west
of India, had been held by a British army. The
158 QUEEN VICTORIA.













Ameer, or ruler, did not like this, and therefore he
determined to force the British to leave his country.
He surrounded the house in which the British
minister dwelt at Hyderabad. Major Outram, who
had only one hundred men with him, held the place
for a time, and then, with great skill; withdrew in
safety, and joined the main army under Sir Charles
Napier. A few days later the British won the
Battle of Meeanee; and after another victory at
Dubba, Sindh was given up to Britain, and has ever
since been part of British India.

6. War in the Punjab began in 1845. This country,
which lies farther up the Indus, is called the Punjab
or “five waters,” because it is watered by five rivers
—the Indus and its tributaries, the Jhelum, the
Chenab, the Ravee, and the Sutlej. Its people aré
called Silhs.
QUEEN VICTORIA. 159

7. One of their rulers, Runjeet Singh, had been
a friend of the British; but when he died, in 1839,
a great fight for the throne began. During the
struggle an attack was made on a British force
which lay at Moodkee, in 1845, and the Sikhs were
beaten. They were, however, no mean foes. They
rode splendid horses, and they had been taught to
handle their guns by officers from Europe.

8. The British made an attack upon their camp
at Ferozeshah, and took it after two days’ hard
fighting. The Sikhs fled across the Sutlej, which is
the farthest east of the five rivers. In 1846 the
winning of two battles by the British at Aliwal and
Sobraon opened the way to Lahore, the capital of
the Punjab, where a treaty was made. A second
Sikh War took place in 1849. The British won
the Battles of Chillianwalla and Goojerat, and the
Punjab also was then added to our Indian Empire.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 250.

40. QUEEN VICTORIA.—V.

1. The Income Tax was imposed in 1842. For
several years the income of the Government had
not been sufficient. This was one of the causes
that brought about the resignation of Lord Mel-
bourne in 1841. To meet the expenditure, Peel
levied a tax of sevenpence on every pound of in-
come earned by all persons throughout the country
having incomes above a certain amount. It gave
him more money than he needed, but with the
160 QUEEN VICTORIA.

surplus he was able to lessen some taxes which
were greatly hindering trade. There were many
kinds of goods which could not be brought into
the country without the payment of io taxes.
The duty was lowered, and by this means many
articles became cheaper, trade improved, and the
wants of the people were better supplied. He did
not, however, deal with the tax on corn till 1846.

2. The Repeal of the Union was the object of a
great agitation in Ireland in 18438. Daniel O’Con-
nell, who in 1829 had entered the House of Com-
mons as Member for County Clare, was at the head
of the movement. He held great meetings in Ire-
land, and the people coliected money at the doors of
Roman Catholic chapels to enable him to carry on
the movement. The meetings were often so large
as to endanger public safety, and soldiers were
employed to keep order. O’Connell and others
were tried on a charge of conspiracy and sedition,
and ordered to be kept in prison for two years.
They were soon, however, set free. O’Connell died
at Genoa in 1847. His body was brought home,
and was followed through the streets of Dublin by
thousands of his sorrowing countrymen.

8. The Disruption of the Church of Scotland took
place in 18438. During the reign of Queen Anne
a law called the Patronage Act was passed for
Scotland. In every parish one man, called the
patron, had the right of saying who was to be the
minister, and the Church court was bound to put
him in, even against the wishes of the people. The
popular party in the Church denied the right of the
QUEEN VICTORIA. 161

patron to do more than withhold the stipend or salary
payable to the minister. They maintained the inde-
pendence of the Church Courts in their own sphere.

4, At last, in consequence of a decision in the
House of Lords against the popular party, a great
many people left the Established Church and formed
the Free Church of Scotland—that is, free from
connection with the State. This was called the
Disruption.

5. The death of Sir Robert ‘Peel took place in 1850.
When Peel proposed to deal with the Corn Law,
many of his old friends deserted him. They joined
the Whigs in a vote against him on the very day
that his Corn Bill passed the House of Lords. Lord
John Russell then became Prime Minister. As long
as Sir Robert Peel lived, he assisted Lord Russell
to set trade free. In the midst of his labours for
the public good he was thrown from his horse and
killed in 1850.

6. A monument was erected to Sir Robert Peel
in Westminster Abbey. On it are inscribed the
closing words of the speech he made when he re-
signed the office of Prime Minister. They refer to
the part he took in repealing the Corn Law. “It may
be that I shall leave a name sometimes remembered
with expressions of goodwill in the abodes of those
whose lot it is to labour and to earn their daily
bread by the sweat of their brow, when they shall
recruit their exhausted strength with abundant and
untaxed food, the sweeter because it is no longer
leavened with a sense of injustice.”

7. The Great Exhibition was held in London in

(888) 11
162 QUEEN VICTORIA:

1851. Prince Albert, the Queen’s husband, saw
that it would be a benefit to bring together speci-
mens of the best kind of work and material from
all parts of the world, so that they could be seen
side by side with those of our own country. For
this purpose the “Crystal Palace,” a building of
glass and iron, was erected in Hyde Park, London,
in which to hold the “ World’s Fair.”



































it) AO
EAOHl i
tt



CRYSTAL PALACE.

8. For five months, day after day, wondering thou-
sands thronged the courts of the vast building.
The Exhibition gave a great impulse to every
branch of manufactures and of arts, and caused a
kindlier feeling to prevail among the nations who
for peaceful ends gathered under the same roof.
Since then Exhibitions have been held in many of
the large cities of Europe and America.

9. The Duke of Wellington died in 1852 at Walmer
Castle, at the age of eighty-three. He was one of
the greatest generals that ever lived. The people
were proud of him, and called him the “ Iron Duke.”
THE WARDEN OF THE CINQUE PORTS. 163:

the “ Hero of a hundred fights.” He was buried in.
St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, beside Lord Nelson. —
and other national heroes.

10. A change of Ministers took place in 1852.
Lord Russell resigned, and the Earl of Derby then
formed a Conservative Ministry, with Benjamin.
Disraeli as Chancellor of the Exchequer. Derby —
resigned in the following year, and what is called
a coalition Ministry was formed, in which there
were men of both parties. Lord Aberdeen was.
Premier, and the Ministry also included Lord Pal-
merston, Lord John Russell, and William Ewart.
Gladstone. :

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 251.

41, THE WARDEN OF THE CINQUE PORTS.

1. In the time of William the Conqueror England.
had no navy, and therefore five ports in Kent and.
Sussex, lying opposite to France, were set apart to-
protect the coast. These were Sandwich, Romney,
Hastings, Hythe, and Dover. Because they were
five in number, they received the name of Cinque
Ports—cing being the French word for five. Win-
chelsea and Rye were afterwards added.

2. In early times the duties of these ports were
to supply such shipping as was required to defend
the coast. In the reign of Edward the First they
had to place at the King’s disposal not less than
- fifty-seven fully-manned ships, and support them at
their own cost for, fifteen days at a time. In
164 THE WARDEN OF THE CINQUE PORTS.

return for these services, the ports had no taxes to
pay, and they had the right of ‘making their own
- bye-laws.

3. The officer in command of the ports is called
the Lord Warden. His headquarters is at Walmer
Castle, near Deal, in Kent. The Duke of Wellington
was Warden from 1828 till his death. On Sep-
tember 13th, 1852, he retired to rest in his usual
health, though then in his eighty-fourth year.
_ Being always an early riser, his servant called him
at six o'clock next morning as usual. The duke
said he was not well, and asked to see a doctor.
An hour. or two later he lost. his speech, and be-
came insensible. In the afternoon he gently passed
away.

4. A mist was driving down the British Cannel:
The day was just begun,
And through the window-panes, on floor and
panel
Streamed the red autumn sun.

5. It glanced on flowing flag and rippling pennon,
_ And the white sails of ships ;
And, from the frowning rampart, the black cannon
Hailed it with feverish lips.

6. Sandwich and Romney, Hastings, Hythe, and
Dover,
Were all alert that day,
To see the French war-steamers speeding over,
When the fog cleared away.
10.

11.

12.

THE WARDEN OF THE CINQUE PORTS. 165

. Sullen and silent, and like couchant lions,

Their cannon through the night,
Holding their breath, had watched in grim de-
fiance
The sea-coast opposite.

. And now they roared at drum-beat, from their

stations
On every citadel ;
Each answering each with morning salutations,
That all was well.

. And down the coast, all taking up the burden,

Replied the distant forts,
As if to summon from his sleep the Warden
And Lord of the Cinque Ports.

Him shall no sunshine from the fields of azure,
No drum-beat from the wall,

No morning-gun from the black fort’s embrasure,
Awaken with their call.

No more surveying with an eye impartial
The long line of the coast,

Shall the gaunt figure of the old Field-Marshal
Be seen upon his post.

For in the night, unseen, a single warrior,
In sombre harness mailed,

- Dreaded of man, and surnamed the Destroyer,

The rampart-wall has scaled.
166 QUEEN VICTORIA.

13. He passed into the chamber of the sleeper,
The dark and silent room; —
And as he entered, darker grew and deeper
The silence and the gloom.

14. He did not pause to parley or dissemble,
But smote the Warden hoar ;—
“Ah! what a blow! that made all England
tremble,
And groan from shore to shore.

415. Meanwhile, without, the surly cannon waited,
The sun rose bright o’erhead ;
Nothing in Nature’s aspect intimated
That a great man was dead !

LoncFreLiow.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 252.

42. QUEEN VICTORIA.—VI. |

1. The Crimean War disturbed Europe from 1854
‘to 1856. War arose between Russia and Turkey
‘from a quarrel about the treatment of pilgrims to
‘the holy places at Jerusalem. The Czar of: Russia
made this an excuse for claiming protection over
-all members of the Greek Church within the Turk-
ish dominions. Turkey rejected the demand. Other
«questions also had to be settled between the two
countries. The Russians had long looked on Con-
stantinople as a desirable possession, and they were
cprepared to spend a large sum of money and risk a
QUEEN VICTORIA. 467

great many lives to obtain that city. The Turks
were foolish and the Russians headstrong. Nicho-.
las, Emperor of Russia, who was head of the Greek
Church, marched an army into Turkey. — Great
Britain and France took the side of Turkey. They
were afraid that if Turkey was defeated, Russia
would become too strong in the south of Europe.

2. The allied troops were landed at Varna, a
seaport of Bulgaria; but they were not needed there,
as the Turks were able to defend themselves on the
Danube. It was therefore resolved to break Russia's
power in the Black Sea. The fleets were sent there,
and began by attacking Odessa, a Russian port.
Admiral Sir Charles John Napier with another fleet
sailed to the Baltic Sea. He tried to take Kron-
stadt, on the Gulf of Finland, the fortress which
guards St. Petersburg, but he had to give up the

. attempt.

3. The Crimea, a small peninsula stretching out
into the Black Sea, was the chief theatre of the
war. A British and French army of fifty-one
thousand men, led by Lord Raglan and Marshal St.
Arnaud, landed at Eupatoria, on the west side of
the Crimea, in September 1854. In marching south-
ward to Sebastopol, a stronghold in the Crimea,
they came upon a Russian army nearly as large as
their own. It was strongly placed on a rising
ground beyond the river Alma, and they had to
cross right in the face of it.

4, The Battle of the Alma was fought on the
20th of September, six days after the landing of
the allied armies. In three hours the British and
168 _ QUEEN VICTORIA.



































































































































































French were on the other side of the river, and had _
climbed the heights, driving the Russians. before
them towards their great stronghold Sebastopol.
If Lord Raglan had had his own way, the allies, as
the British and French were called, would have
followed the Russians into the city.

5. The French leader, who was himself very ill,
considered his men too worn out to do this, and the
two armies encamped to the south of the city.
Their ships and stores were lying behind them at
Balaklava, a seaport of the Crimea about six miles
farther south. It took them a whole month to get
ready to storm Sebastopol. In that time the Rus-
sians had made it so strong that they were able for
a time to hold out against the allied armies.

6. The Battle of Balaklava was fought on the
25th of October 1854. The Turks failed to stand
QUEEN VICTORIA. 169

their ground, and the Russian horsemen had nearly
broken in upon the British lines, when they were
brought to a stand by Sir Colin Campbell, after-
wards Lord Clyde, at the head of the 93rd High-
landers. The usual way of meeting a charge of
cavalry is to form a square, so that the men may
face outwards on every side, and thus prevent the
horsemen from getting behind to cut them down.

7. Sir Colin, knowing that he could trust his
men to stand firm, did not form them into a square,
but kept them in two long lines, the one behind
the other-—“a thin red streak topped with a line
of steel.” By the fire from their rifles alone they
drove back the enemy. The heavy British horse—
the Scots Greys, Enniskillens, and Dragoon Guards—
were standing ready, and they at once dashed
among the Russian horsemen with such force that
in five minutes they scattered a host three times
their own number.

8. The Charge of the Light Brigade was made on
the same day. After the defeat of the Russian
horsemen, their whole army was drawn up behind
a guard of thirty guns about a mile and a half
from the allies. By some blunder the Light Bri-
gade received an order to charge the whole Russian
army. Right down the slope they rode in the face
of the guns. On they went, fired at on both sides
as well as in front. They reached the battery, cut ~
down many of the gunners, and then “all that was ~
left of them-—left of ‘six hundred,” rode back. Of
six hundred and seventy men who went out only
one hundred and ninety returned.
170 QUEEN VICTORIA.















































































“‘SABRING THE GUNNERS THERE.”

9. This famous charge produced a great effect
on the enemy, by showing what British troops would
dare to do. “It is magnificent, but it is not war,”
said a French general.

“ When can their glory fade?
Oh! the wild charge they made!
All the world wondered.
Honour the charge they made!
Honour the Light Brigade,
Noble Six Hundred !”

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 253.
BALAKLAVA, 171





































































































































































43, BALAKLAVA.

1. Many a deed of faithful daring may obtain no
record here—
Wrought where none could see or note it, save
the one Almighty Seer.

2. Many a deed, awhile remembered, out of memory
needs must fall,
Covered, as the years roll onward, by oblivion’s
creeping pall.
172
3.

“I

BALAKLAVA.

But there are which never, never to oblivion
can give room,

Till in flame earth’s records perish, till the thun-
der peal of doom :

. And of these, through all the ages married to—

immortal fame,
One is linked, and linked for ever, Balaklava,
with thy name ;

. With thine armies three that wondering stood

-at gaze and held their breath,
With thy fatal lists of honour and thy tourna-
ment of death.

. O our brothers that are sleeping, weary with

your great day’s strife,

On that bleak Crimean headland, noble predoal .

of life,

. Eyes which ne’er beheld you living, these have

dearly mourned you dead—
All your squandered wealth of valour, all the
lavish blood ye shed.

. And in our eyes tears are springing, but we bid

them back again :
None shall say, to see us weeping, that we hold
your offering vain ;

. That for nothing in our sentence did that holo-

caust arise,
With a battlefield for plac and with you for
sacrifice. ,
QUEEN VICTORIA. 173

10. Not for nought: to more than warriors armed
as you for mortal fray,
Unto each that in life’s battle waits his Captain’s
word, ye say—

11.“ What by duty’s voice is bidden, there where
duty’s star may guide,
Thither follow, that accomplish, whatsoever else
betide.” ;

12. This ye taught; and this your lesson solemnly
in blood ye sealed :
Heroes, martyrs, are the harvest Balaklava’s

heights shall yield.
R. C. TRENCH.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 254.

44, QUEEN VICTORIA.—VII.

1. The Battle of Inkermann was fought on the
morning of the 5th of November. Hidden by the
mist of a winter morning, from fifty to sixty thou-
sand Russians climbed the hill, on the top of which
was a British force of not more than eight thousand
men,

2. The British were scattered here and there
along the hill-side in small bodies, little dreaming
that the enemy was close upon them. They were
short of powder too, which made things worse ;
and there was no time to unite, and still less to
form any plan of defence. Each party had to do
174 QUEEN VICTORIA.

what it could to defend itself. Yet the British
held their own for some hours until the French
came to their
help. Inkermann
was called the
“soldiers vic-
tory;” because it
was more by the
bravery of the
men than by the
plans of their
leaders that the
enemy was de-
feated.

3. The suffer-
ings of the sol-
diers were terri-
ble; for winter
was now coming
on, and it was
a foe harder to
| fight than even
the Russians had

== * been. Although
there were ae laden with food and clothes at
Balaklava, not more than six miles away, the men
were dying of cold and hunger. The rain had made
the roads so bad that nothing could be dragged
over them. The tents of the soldiers were blown
away, and more men died of cold and hunger and
sickness than were killed in battle. The news of
this roused great anger at home. The ministers



at












































































































































QUEEN VICTORIA. . 175



LORD PALMERSTON.

were displaced, and Lord Palmerston was put at
the head of a new Government.

4. Florence Nightingale, whose name has become
a household word, and forty-two nurses, went out
to care for the sick. Miss Nightingale visited
hospital and camp, and like an angel of mercy
everywhere ministered to the wounded and the
dying. One sick soldier said that owing to the
large numbers in the hospital all could not receive
her care. “ Yet,’ said he, “we could kiss her shadow
as it fell, and lay our heads on our pillows content.”

5. Nicholas, the Czar or-Emperor of Russia, died
on the 2nd of March 1855; but the war went on
all the same under his son Alexander. During the
176 QUEEN VICTORIA.

war Sardinia, having joined the Anglo-French alli-
ance, helped to win a great battle on the banks of
the Tchernaya, a river in the Crimea.

_ 6. The British and French leaders were changed
more than once. Marshal St. Arnaud died after
the Battle of the Alma. He was succeeded by .
Canrobert, who in turn gave place to Pelissier.
Lord Raglan died of cholera in June 1855, and was
sueceeded by General Simpson, who in turn gave
place to Sir William Codrington.

7. Sebastopol was taken at last. From April to
September 1855 shot and shell were poured upon
it. On the 8th of September, after the French
had taken the Malakoff Tower and the British had
seized the Redan, parts of the fortifications of
Sebastopol, the Russians, finding they could not
hope to hold out much longer, left the southern
side of the city. They continued to hold the north-
ern side across the harbour till peace was made.
The ships of the Russians were sunk in the harbour,
and their great stronghold was left a heap of ruins.

8. The Treaty of Paris brought the war to an
end in 1856. In the meantime the war had been
carried on in other places. British ships were in
the Baltic; and Sir William Williams held Kars, a
town of Armenia, near the Caucasus Mountains,
for a long time against great odds. Russia was
thus crippled at all ‘points, and at last sought for
peace. This great struggle added £50,000,000 to
our National Debt, and Britain lost more than
twenty thousand lives.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 254.

‘
QUEEN VICTORIA, 177

45. QUEEN VICTORIA.—VITI.

1. Our Indian Empire had grown very large, as
native states had been added from time to time.
The army by which the British hold India is made
up of British soldiers and sepoys, or native soldiers.
The. Hindus, or people of India, are divided into
classes, called castes. Each caste has its own rules
of life; and those who disobey them lose caste,
which means that their neighbours will not speak -
to them or have anything to do with them. There
are some things which they must not eat or even’
touch. One of these is cow’s flesh; and out of this -
great troubles arose.

2. While Lord Canning was Governor-General,
some of the sepoys declared that the cartridges, or
little packets of powder and bullets with which
they loaded their rifles, were greased with cow’s
fat. Those who believed this would not use them
for fear of losing caste. Some of the sepoys were
punished for refusing. Their comrades set them
free, and then the sepoys in a body rose in rebellion.

3. The Indian Mutiny, as it was called, began
near Delhi on the 10th of March 1857. After
killing some Europeans, and burning their houses, .
the rebels set out for Delhi (formerly the capital of
the Mogul Empire). Before the clerks at the tele-
graph office were killed, they had been able to send
the news to Lahore in the Punjab. This enabled
_ the authorities to make preparations beforehand,
and so prevent any disturbance there. Delhi, which
was full of sepoys, was besieged by about three

(888) . 12
178 QUEEN VICTORIA.







Cawnpore
e





Gwali
i alior





thousand Europeans from June till September,
when it was taken by Sir John Lawrence.

4, The Massacre of Cawnpore took place in 1857.
When the mutiny broke out, there were about a
thousand British men, women, and children in
Cawnpore, a town on the Ganges. These took
refuge in a hospital near the city. Here they were
attacked by a large number of sepoys under Nana
Sahib. They held out for three weeks, and then,
trusting to the promise of the sepoy leader, they
left their place of refuge.

5. The British embarked in boats, intending to
float down the Ganges to Allahabad, a strong for-
tress at the junction of the Jumna and the Ganges ;
QUEEN VICTORIA. 179





























































































































IF

it

Ht

i

p
ZN
CW

am
ll

ee
i



THE MEMORIAL AT CAWNPORE.
but no sooner were they on board than the sepoys:
shot down all the men but four, and made prisoners
of about two hundred women and children. A few
180 QUEEN VICTORIA.

days afterwards the hapless captives were cruelly
murdered: by Nana Sahib’s orders, and their bodies
were thrown into a’ well neat the hospital.

6. The Relief of Lucknow was gallantly accom-
plished in 1857. The sepoys had revolted and
surrounded the Residency—a house enclosed in
grounds—in which Sir Henry Lawrence and the
Europeans had taken refuge. Colonel Havelock,
who had arrived at Cawnpore too late to save the
victims of Nana Sahib’s cruelty, pushed on to
Lucknow with two thousand eight hundred men, to
relieve his fellow-countrymen there.

7. Sir James Outram, Havelock’s superior officer,
joined him, but would not take the command
of the little army from him. “To you,” he
said to Havelock, “shall be left the glory of
relieving Lucknow, for which you have already
struggled so much.” Step by step the British
fought their way through bands of rebels gathered
to oppose them, and at last entered cee in
triumph.

8. Havelock and Guten soon found that the
women and children could not be removed in the
face of the enemy, who again closed around the
city. Two months later Sir Colin Campbell, after-
wards Lord Clyde, arrived with a larger army, and
took all to a place of safety. Worn out with the
hard work he had done, the brave Havelock died
shortly afterwards. Delhi had already been re-
taken, and the mutiny came to an end with the
fall of Bareilly in 1858.

9. The Government of India was altered in 1858.


Sir CHARLES NAPIER Sir JouHn LawRENCE

1782-1853 1811-1879
SOLDIER InpIAN CIvit SERVANT
Indian general. Annexed Sindh. Helped to put down the Indian Mutiny,

Viceroy of India, 1863-68,

Str HENRY HAVELOCK SIR JAMEs OuTRAM
1795-1857 1803-1863
SOLDIER

Relieved and defended Lucknow during SOLDIER
the Indian Mutiny. Helped to put down the Indian Mutiny.



GREAT SOLDIERS, §c.
182 QUEEN VICTORIA.

A Viceroy, assisted by a council of fifteen, was placed
over the country to rule in the name of Quéen
Victoria. The minister or member of the home
Government who has charge of Indian affairs is
called the Secretary for India. A further change
was made when, in 1876, the Queen was declared |
' to be “ Empress of India.”

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 255.

46. QUEEN VICTORIA.—IX.

1. A change of Ministry took place before the
mutiny was put down in India. A plot had been
formed in England to kill the French Emperor.
Lord Palmerston brought in a Bill to make the
punishment for such crimes much -heavier than it
was. The Bill did not pass; he withdrew from
office, and Lord Derby became Prime Minister.
During the time he was in power, an Act was
passed which gave the Jews the right to become
members of Parliament. Lord Palmerston again
returned to power when Lord Derby resigned in
1859.

2. Chinese Wars broke out in 1856 and 1860.
There had been peace with China since 1842; but
about the end of 1856 the Chinese seized a ship
which carried the British flag. A war was begun
to punish them for this, and Canton was taken in
-the following year. In 1858 peace was’ restored,
and British subjects who had passports were allowed
to go allover China. About the same time Japan,
QUEEN VICTORIA. 183



WILLIAM EWART GLADSTONE,

which had hitherto been closed to foreigners, was
thrown open for trade.

3. A third war took place with China in 1860,
when the British and the French marched to Pekin,
and captured the summer palace of the Emperor.
They were about to bombard the city when the
Chinese yielded. Kooloon, a district opposite Can-
ton, was given over to the British. '

4. A Second Reform Act was passed in 1867.
Lord Palmerston died in October- 1865, in his
eighty-first year. Earl Russell became Prime
Minister, with Mr. Gladstone as leader of the House
184 QUEEN VICTORIA,



BENJAMIN DISRAELIL

of Commons. In the following year a Reform Bill
was brought in; but as the House of Commons
would not pass it, Karl Russell resigned, and Lord
Derby became Prime Minister for the third time,
with Mr. Disraeli as leader of the Commons.

5. Disraeli brought in a Reform. Act, which was
passed in 1867. The chief feature of this Act was
household suffrage. It gave a vote for members of
Parliament to every householder who lived in a
borough, and to lodgers who paid a rent of £10 a
year. In counties, votes were given to householders
who paid a rent of £12 in England and £14 in
Scotland. In Ireland a vote was given to house-
holders who paid a rent of not less than £4. Seven
new members were given to Scotland, making sixty
QUEEN VICTORIA. 185

inall. In 1868 Mr, Disraeli beeame Prime Minister;
but finding that the elections for a new Parliament
were going against him, he resigned, and Mr. Glad-
stone took his place.

6. The Dominion of Canada was formed in 1867.
We have already seen that Upper and Lower
Canada were made into one province in 1841.
Another and greater change took place in 1867.
In that year all the provinces in North America,
except Newfoundland, were formed into one group,
called the Dominion of Canada. Each province
kept its own Assembly for carrying on its own
affairs, but a united Parliament: for the whole
Dominion was established. This Parliament meets
in Ottawa, the capital; and there the Governor-
General resides. In 1885 there was a rebellion of
Indians and half-breeds—children of Indians and
whites—in the North-west. The rising was put
down, and the leader, Louis Riel, was hanged.

7. An Abyssinian War took place in 1868. Theo-
dore, King of Abyssinia, a country in the east of
Africa, near the Red Sea, had put some British
people into prison, and refused to give them up.
In 1868 an army was sent from India to set them
free. The rock-fortress of Magdala was taken by
storm. When the soldiers entered it they found
that the King had shot himself. The leader of the
army, Sir Robert Napier, was made Lord Napier of
Magdala.

8. An Ashantee War broke out in 1874. The
Ashantees, a warlike people who live near the west.
coast of Africa, had become very troublesome to
186 QUEEN VICTORIA.

































































































































































































































































KING THEODORE OF ABYSSINIA.

British traders and others in their neighbourhood.
Sir Garnet Wolseley was sent with a small army to
QUEEN VICTORIA. _ 187















punish them. He defeated the natives in two
battles, and took and burned Coomassie, their chief .
town, after which their King signed a treaty of
peace.

9. New Laws for Ireland were passed in 1869,
1870, and 1881. The majority of the Irish were
Roman Catholics, and they objected to the Protestant
Church being called the National Church. The
new Parliament, which met in the end of 1868,
passed an Act in 1869 to disestablish the Irish
Church. This placed Protestants and Roman Catho-
lics in Ireland on an equal footing. An Irish Land
Act followed in 1870, and another in 1881. These
Land Acts did much to better the position of Irish
tenants, who could not then be turned out of their
holdings without receiving payment for any im-
provements they had made,

'
188 QUEEN VICTORIA.

10. Two Education Acts were passed—one for
England in 1870, and another for Scotland in 1872.
These Acts said that School Boards should be formed
to provide schools for all the children in the land,
and that every child above a certain age must
attend school.

Il. The Ballot Act was passed in 1872. It
allows votes to be given secretly at the election of
members of Parliament, Town Councils, and School
Boards. ;

12. A new Parliament met in 1874, which was
as much against Mr. Gladstone as the former had
been against Mr. Disraeli. They had therefore to
change places, and Mr. Disraeli became Prime
Minister a second time. .

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 2585.

47. QUEEN VICTORIA.—X.

; 1. War between Russia and Turkey broke out -

again in 1877, and the Turks were defeated. They
had treated Bulgaria, a subject province, so badly
that no other nation came to their help; but Britain
sent her fleet to Constantinople, and Indian soldiers
were brought to Malta, to prevent Russia from
entering the Turkish capital.

2. When the fighting was nearly over, Britain
undertook to help the Turks against any attack
in Asia, if they would govern better at home. The
island of Cyprus was placed under British rule, that
they might have a footing near at hand. Peace
QUEEN VICTORIA. 189

was made at.Berlin in 1878, and signed by all the
Powers of Europe. Turkey had to allow some of
her finest provinces to govern themselves.

3. A Second Afghan War occurred in 1878. The
people of Afghanistan, never very warm in their
friendship for Great Britain, seemed about this time
to be leaning more towards the Russians. This
alarmed the British rulers in India. Shere Ali, the
Ameer, having refused to receive a British embassy,
war was declared, and a British army took Kanda-
har and Cabul. Shere Ali died shortly afterwards.
His son, Yakoob Khan, submitted to the British,
and a treaty was made.

4, After this, Sir Louis Cavagnari, the British
envoy, who had gone to see that the treaty: was
carried out, was murdered by the Afghans, and
fighting began again. General Roberts immediately
marched on -Cabul, and, defeating the Afghans, he
entered the city, and ordered the murderers of
the British envoy to be hanged. Yakoob Khan
was sent as a prisoner to India. While General
Roberts was at Cabul, the Afghans almost destroyed
a small British army, and then besieged Kandahar.
Roberts at once set out with all the forces at his
command, The British troops marched a distance
of three hundred and twenty miles, across a barren
country, in twenty-three days, relieved Kandahar,
and won the Battle of Mazra.

5, The Election of 1880 went against Mr. Disraeli,
now Lord Beaconsfield, and he had once more to
give place to Mr. Gladstone, who in 1880 became
Prime Minister for the second time. The Afghan
190 QUEEN VICTORIA.





ae





iT





































(Each Square 500 miles.)

War was brought to an end in 1881, and Lord
Beaconsfield died the same year.

6. A Zulu War was brought about by the rohasal
of Cetewayo, the King of fhe Zulus in South Africa,
to disarm and disband a large army he had gath-
ered on the borders of the British colony of Natal.
British troops were sent against the Zulus, and at
first our soldiers, under Lord Chelmsford, were
severely beaten. Highty British soldiers bravely
- QUEEN VICTORIA. 191

held a place called Rorke’s Drift against four thou-
sand Zulus, and saved Natal from invasion.

7. In the end the British defeated the Zulus at
Ulundi. Cetewayo was taken prisoner and sent to
Cape Town. After a visit to England, the Zulu
King was restored to his throne in 1883. Another
chief defeated him in 1884, and Cetewayo died the
same year. Since then Zululand has been added
to the British Empire. The Prince Imperial of
France, the only son of the Emperor Napoleon the
Third, who was an exile in England, joined the
British troops in the Zulu War, and soon afterwards
was slain. :

8. A Transvaal War broke out in 1880. When
Cape Colony became a British possession, the Boers,
or Dutch settlers, founded other colonies farther
north, in order to be out of the reach of British
rule. They wanted freedom for themselves and
power to make the natives slaves. At last they
crossed the Vaal, a large tributary of the Orange
River, and founded the Transvaal, which was added
to the British Empire in 1877. In 1880 the Boers
rose in revolt, and defeated the British under General
Colley at Laing’s Neck, Ingogo,and Majuba Hill, in
the Transvaal. In the last battle Colley and many
British officers were slain. After this the Boers
were allowed the right of self- “government, but
under British control. The Transvaal region is
now called the South African Republic. :

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 256.
192 QUEEN VICTORIA.

48. QUEEN VICTORIA.—XI.

1. War in Egypt began in 1882 with a military
revolt, under Arabi Pasha, which overthrew the
Egyptian Government. As the Suez Canal—which
is now the highway between England and India—
is in Egypt, it is necessary that that country should
be friendly with Great Britain. A fleet under
Admiral Seymour was sent to put down the re-
bellion, and the forts at Alexandria, a seaport of
Lower Egypt, were destroyed. General Wolseley
gained a great victory at Tel-el-Kebir, and then |
put the Khedive or ruler of Egypt on his throne
again. Arabi was sent a prisoner to Ceylon.

2. After this an Arab revolt, headed by a chief
_ who called himself.the Mahdi or Messiah, broke out
in the Soudan, a land to the south of Egypt, under
Egyptian rule. This led to more fighting, in order
to defend Suakim, on the coast of the Red Sea, and
relieve Tokar, which was held by Egyptian troops.
The Arabs, under Osman Digna, one of the Arab
leaders next in rank to the Mahdi, fought bravely
with spears and swords; but the British army
under General Graham gained the Battles of Teb
and Tamasi.

3. General Gordon—popularly called “Chinese
Gordon,” on account of services in China—who
had at one time been Governor of Khartoum and
knew the ways of the people, consented to go to
the Soudan to treat with the rebels and relieve the
Egyptian garrisons. . He went almost alone to
Khartoum, which lies at the junction of the White






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194 QUEEN VICTORIA.



GENERAL GORDON.

Nile and the Blue Nile, fifteen hundred miles above
its mouth. Gordon failed in his peaceful mission,
and had to defend himself against the followers of
the Mahdi, who besieged the town.

4. The British Government sent a force of ten
thousand men under Lord Wolseley to relieve Gor-
don. In whale-boats manned by Canadian boat-
men the British made their way to Korti. As the
river makes a great bend at this point, a part of
the army, under General Stewart, then marched across
the desert, and defeated the Arabs at Abu Klea.

5. Another battle was won near Metammeh, in
which Stewart was mortally wounded and Colonel
QUEEN VICTORIA. 195

Burnaby killed. The way to the Nile was now
clear; but when General Wilson steamed up the
river to Khartoum, he found that the place had
been taken by the Arabs, and that Gordon had
been killed two days before (January 28, 1885).

6. As Osman Digna still threatened Suakim,
General Graham returned to the coast of the Red
Sea with a large force. His army was joined by
a body of volunteers from New South Wales—the
first occasion of Australian troops sharing in the
defence of the empire. Osman Digna was driven
off, and his force was dispersed. The British forces
soon afterwards withdrew to Egypt proper, where
some still remain.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 257.

49, QUEEN VICTORIA.—XII.

1. Troubles in Ireland have largely engaged the
attention of the British Government in recent years.
The Union of the Parliaments of Great Britain and
Treland in 1801 did not make the Irish contented
with British rule) As we have seen, Daniel
O’Connell tried to obtain a repeal of the Union in
1843, but failed in his attempt.

2. In 1865 a plot was discovered which had the
same end in view. Those who were parties to it
were called Fenians. To prevent them from doing
harm, the Government set aside the Habeas Corpus
Act, so that they might put the leaders of the plot
in prison without trial till the danger was past.
196 QUEEN VICTORIA.

Many of the leading Fenians, including Stephens,
the “Head Centre,” or chief, and O'Donovan Rossa,
were banished. ;

3. Home Rule for Ireland has gradually become a
burning question. In what form it will be granted
yet remains to be seen. ‘The disestablishing of the
Trish Church, and the passing of the Land Acts in
1869 and 1870, did not satisfy the Irish people.
They demanded a Parliament of their own in Dublin
to manage the affairs of Ireland. Charles Parnell
became the Home Rule leader.

4. A Land League was formed by Parnell and
Michael Davitt, which advised the farmers to keep
their lands, but not to pay full rent for them. Bad
harvests in 1878 and 1879 gave rise to much ill-
feeling among the farmers, and caused them to look
upon the landlords as their enemies. Landlords and
their agents were defied. The cattle and goods of
those who obeyed the law and disobeyed the League
were destroyed. Shopkeepers were forbidden to
supply with food and clothing those who opposed
the Land League. This was called “boycotting,”
from a Captain Boycott, who was one of the first
to be so treated. The law was openly broken, and
it seemed as if the country was ee towards,
civil war.

5. A new Land Act was passed in 1881 which’
gave the farmers a good deal more than the Act of
1870. A Land Court was set up to fix a fair rent
to be paid by farmers, and fixity of tenure and
free sales were granted. Fixity of tenure means
that a tenant Gannot be put out of his farm unless
QUEEN VICTORIA. 197

’ for not paying the rent. Free sale means that
when any one wants to leave his farm, he may sell
the goodwill of it to any one who will buy it, and
the landlord must let it to that person at the rent
already fixed. Yet Ireland was not satisfied. The
Land League had to be put down by force of law,
and Parnell and other leaders were imprisoned for
a time.

6. In 1882 a dreadful crime was committed in
the Phoenix Park, near Dublin. Lord Frederick
Cavendish, the Chief Secretary for Ireland, and
Mr. Burke, the Under Secretary, were murdered in
open day in the middle of the park. The mur-
derers belonged to a set of men who had made up
their minds that the people of Ireland and Great
Britain should never be friends if they could help it.

7. The plot was made known by James Carey, a
member of the Dublin Town Council, who had been
one of the gang. .The murderers were tried and
hanged. An Act then passed for the prevention of
crimes was fearlessly carried out by Earl Spencer,
and during his time, for two years, things became
much better.

8. The Irish in America sent thousands of pounds
to the funds of the League, and to pay the Irish
Members of Parliament while in London. A band
of wicked men tried to frighten the people ‘of
London by blowing up buildings with dynamite, a
powerful explosive substance. Such was their bitter
feeling that they did not care whether those whom ¢
they killed had done them any harm or not.

9. In 1884 they blew to pieces a part of the build-
a

198 QUEEN VICTORIA.

ings in Scotland Yard, the headquarters of the London
police. In the beginning of 1885 three explosions
took place almost at the same time—in the House |
of Commons, in Westminster Hall, and in the Tower
of London. For taking part in those fearful crimes
two men were sent to prison for life, and others
were imprisoned for shorter periods.

10. A third Burmese War occurred in 1885.
Theebaw, the King of Burma, dealt so harshly
with British subjects who lived in his country, that
an army was sent against him. He was dethroned,
and Burma was annexed to our Indian Empire,
January 1, 1886.

' EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 258.

50. QUEEN VICTORIA.—XITII.

1. A Scottish Secretary was appointed in 1885.
Formerly Scottish business was done by the Home
Secretary, who had also charge of English business.
He was almost always an Englishman, and knew
very little about the wants of the Scottish people,
and had more work than he could do. The result
was that Scottish business did not receive proper
attention ; and therefore an Act was passed creating
a Scottish Department, with a Secretary of State at
its head. The Duke of Richmond and Gordon was
the first Secretary for Scotland.

_ 2. Scottish crofters, or occupiers of small bits of
land in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, de-
manded a change in the land laws. The success of
QUEEN VICTORIA. 199

the Irish caused the Scottish crofters to try some
of the methods that the sister country had found
successful. They did not kill the landlords, but
they stopped the messengers of the law from sery-
ing notices on those who had not paid their rents ;
and some of them took possession of land which
they said had been taken from them years before.
A number of persons were sent to inquire into their
complaints, and an Act was passed which made
many of the changes asked for by the crofters. _

8. The Reform Act of 1884 placed country or
county householders on the same footing as house-
holders in towns. Now, every householder who is
of full age, and has paid his poor rates, and lodgers
who pay not less than £10 a year for their rooms,
have the right to vote for members of Parliament.

4. A Redistribution Act was passed in 1885,
which divided the country into districts, each of
which should choose one member. The Act took
members from small towns, and gave them to those
towns and counties which had not a fair share of
representation. Twelve additional members were
given to Scotland, and two members were taken
away from Ireland and given to England. The
number of members to be returned to the House of
Commons was raised from _658 to 670. Of these,
England and Wales return 495, Scotland 72, and
Treland 103.

5, Mr, Gladstone and Lord Salisbury have been in
turn. Prime Minister several times. Soon after the
passing of these Acts, Mr. Gladstone was defeated in
the House of Commons, and Lord Salisbury became
200 QUEEN VICTORIA.

Prime Minister. The Conservatives had not a
majority, .so they dissolved Parliament, and a new
election took place near the end of 1885... Early
in the new Parliament Lord Salisbury was defeated,
and Mr. Gladstone became Prime Minister for the
third time. Unable to carry his Irish Home Rule
‘and Land Purchase Bills, Mr. Gladstone dissolved
Parliament. Another election took place in July
1886. Mr. Gladstone failed to gain a majority, and
Lord Salisbury again came into power.

6. Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, or the fiftieth year of
her reign, was completed on the 21st of June 1887.
This term has been exceeded by only two reigns in
the long line of English Sovereigns. Henry the
Third reigned fifty-six years, and George the Third
reigned sixty years. Her Majesty’s Jubilee was
celebrated with great rejoicings, not only at home,
but in all parts of the British Empire. The Queen,
with the members of the royal family, attended a
thanksgiving service in Westminster Abbey, where,
in the presence of foreign Kings and Princes, and
representatives from all parts of her dominions, she
returned thanks to Almighty God for the blessings
of a long reign.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN!
‘EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 259.
PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 201

51. PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

1. Towns were in a wretched condition at the
beginning of the nineteenth century. As yet there
were no drains, and the narrow streets were strown
with all kinds of filth. Gas was still unused, and
in the winter nights the dim light of a few oil-
lamps was all the traveller had to guide his footsteps.
Houses were not numbered as now, but were marked
by signs swung above the doors bearing such names
as “The White Hart,” “The Golden Bull,” and “ The
Spread Eagle.”

2. Stage-coaches, with their scarlet-coated drivers,
coneerel passengers from place to place. In town,
when people went visiting, they were carried in
sedan chairs. Cities and towns had been growing
slowly. London had only one million inhabitants
when the century opened ; Manchester with Salford,
110,000; and Glasgow, 100,000. Now the popula-
tion of London is four million, and that of Liver-
pool, Manchester, and Glasgow each half a million.

3. Manufactures had made but little progress at
the end of the last century. Work was still done
chiefly by the hand. Machines were few, and Watt
had only lately discovered the power of steam.
True, in 1769 Arkwright had invented a spinning-
machine, and in 1787 Cartwright had produced the
first power-loom for weaving; but a new century
had begun before the cotton and linen trades really
became active.

4. Now steam was brought into use, and the
hand-loom weavers found their occupation gone.
202 PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

Rapidly the cotton trade came to the front: large
factories sprang up, and the workmen who had
cried out against steam found that there was still
plenty of work for them. Woollen and linen mills
soon followed. Year after year has seen improve-
ments worked, out upon the machines, and huge
- factories have sprung up over all the country, giving
work to thousands.

5. The amount of coal required to feed the steam-
engines and the iron furnaces opened up the new and
important industry of mining. Steam is now em-
ployed in the manufacture of almost everything under
the sun; and to its power Britain owes her position
as the first manufacturing nation in the world.

6. Trade and Commerce have been greatly increased

‘and extended by the use of steam in conveying
goods by land and by water. In 1811 the first
steam-boat, the Comet, was launched on the Clyde -
by Henry Bell; and in 1819 the Atlantic was for
the first time crossed by a steamer. In 1830
George Stephenson placed the Rocket, the first
successful locomotive, on the railway between Liver-
pool and Manchester.

7. Steam-ships can now cross to America in eight
days, and railway trains can travel from London
to Edinburgh in as many hours. Our fathers looked
with fear upon the terrible pace of fifteen or twenty
miles an hour: we sit at ease and read our news-
paper while we are being borne along at the rate of
sixty. The “wooden walls” of Old England, as
our navy used to be called, has now no meaning:
our ships are built of iron and steel.


CAPTAIN Cook Munco Park
1728-1779 : 1771-1805
SAILOR 1

Sailed round the world and discovered the
Sandwich Islands. Explored the Gambia and the Niger.

AFRICAN TRAVELLER





Sir JOHN FRANKLIN DaviD LIVINGSTONE
1786-1847 1813-1873
SAILOR AFRICAN MISSIONARY AND TRAVELLER

Explored the Arctic Regions and discovered | Discovered the Lake Ngami, the Zambesi,
the North-west Passage. and crossed the African continent.



: PREAT TRAVELLERS, §c.
204 PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. —

8. Gas was introduced in the beginning of the
century. In 1807 it was tried in the streets of
London, but the people did not like it. They said
it would ruin the oil trade of the country. Slowly,
however, it worked its way into streets and houses:
the oil trade was not ruined, and life was made
much more pleasant. Even machines are now
worked by its power.

9. The first telegraph message was flashed from
Euston Square to Camden Town in 1837. Electric-
ity, one of nature’s greatest wonders, had been
mastered. Wires soon stretched over all the
country. In 1858 Britain was joined to America
by a line laid under the Atlantic. For only a few
weeks it stood the test, and then ceased to act.
Hight years later, from the deck of the Great
Eastern, the largest steam-ship of the age, the new
Atlantic cable was successfully laid. Line after
line followed, cable after cable, till the earth was
circled, and science had triumphed over space.

10. But other wonders were in store. In 1877
the telephone was invented, and has since been
adopted in almost every town. A year or two
later, and electricity yielded a light brighter than
that of a hundred gas-jets. At the Giants’ Cause-
way, in the north of Ireland, a railway is worked
by an electric engine.

‘11. And now, in 1891, the phonograph is almost
made perfect; whereby a speech may be stored up
in a box and given out at some future time, word
for word; in the very tones in which it was first
spoken. Photography, introduced in 1839, is now


WILLIAM WORDSWORTH
1770-1850
Port (Laureate)

He wrote The Excursion, Lucy Gray,
We are Seven, etc.



Lorp MacauLay
1800-1859
HIsTORIAN AND PoET

He wrote a History of England, The Lays
of Ancient Rome, etc.



1811-1863
NoveEListT

He wrote Vanity Fair, Pendennis, The
Four Georges, etc.







WiitiiAmM M. THACKERAY

——

CHARLES DICKENS

1812-1870
NoveE.ListT

He wrote The Pickwick Papers, David
Copperfield, etc.



PREAT fFUTHORS
206 PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

ranked as a fine art. Sewing-machines are to be
found in nearly every house; while in the harvest-
field the hook and the scythe have given way to the
reaping-machine.

12. Discovery and Adventure have induced Britons
to brave the dangers of land and sea in search of
the unknown. In 1845 Sir John Franklin left
England, and perished in 1847 with all his men
amid the ice while in search of the north-west
passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Six years
later-the voyage was successfully made by Maclure.

13. In Africa the discoveries of Livingstone,
Speke, Baker, Grant, and Stanley have made their
. names for ever famous. Livingstone explored the
Zambezi and the country between that river and
the Nile. Speke, Grant, and Baker explored the
Nile from its source to the sea.- Stanley found
Livingstone in 1871, and opened up the Congo for
purposes of trade. In 1889 he returned from
another great journey in “Darkest Africa,’ the
object of which was the relief of Emin Pasha, a
-German in the service of the Khedive, who had
been surrounded by native tribes. Thomson has
explored the Masai country west of Zanzibar, and a
British trading company has just been formed to
open it up.

14. In Australia, Captain Sturt in 1829 traced
the course of the tributaries of the Murray River ;
and in 1860-61 Burke and Wills crossed the con-
tinent from south to north, but perished on the
return journey. A line of telegraph now stretches
across the continent.




THomas CARLYLE
1795-1881
MorRA.Ist AND HISTORIAN

He wrote Sartor Resartus, The French
Revolution, a History, ete.





_ JOHN RUSKIN
1819
ART CRITIC

He has written Modern Painters, The Seven
Lanips of Architecture, etc.





ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON
1809
Poet (Laureate)

He has written Tie Queeest ofthe May, Dora, The
Charge of the Light Brigade, etc.





Fen ois



RoBeRT BROWNING

-1812-1889
PoET

He wrote How they Brought the Good News
Srom Ghent, The Pied Piper of Hamelin, etc.

2 —i





PREAT AUTHORS
208 PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

15. Great Authors have been so numerous in the
nineteenth century that only a list of them can be
given here.

8. T. COLERIDGE (1772-1834)—a poet of the Lake school—chief works,
The Ancient Mariner, Christabel.

THOMAS CAMPBELL (1777-1844)—a poet—author of Pieasines of
Hope, Hohenlinden, Battle of the Baltic, and Mariners of En-

gland.

ROBERT SOUTHEY (1774-1843)—a Lake poet— Laureate (1813- Se
author of poems, and prose works, Life of Nelson.

SIR WALTER SCOTT (1771-1832)—novelist and poet—chief poems,
Lay of the Last Minstrel, Marmion, and Lady of the Lake—author
of the Waverley Novels: Ivanhoe, etc.

LORD BYRON (1783-1824)—romantic poet—author of Childe Harold’s
Pilgrimage, the:Giaour, and the Corsair.

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH (1770-1850)—chief of Lake poets—Laureate
(1843-1850)—lived at Rydal Mount—chief poem, The Excursion.

THOMAS MOORE (1779-1852)—Irish lyric poet—author of Irish Melo-
dies, Lalla Rookh, an Eastern tale, etc.

SAMUEL ROGERS (1762-1855)—a London a —wrote Plea-
sures of Memory and Italy.

FELICIA HEMANS (1794-1835)—lyric poetess—chief wi ork, Forest Sane”
tuary, Graves of a Household, Voice of Spring, etc. :

CHARLES LAMB (1775-1834)—clerk in India House—essayist—chief
work, Essays of Elia.

HENRY HALLAM (1777-1859)—historian—author of Constitutional
History of England and Literature of Europe.

SIR DAVID BREWSTER (1781-1868)—wrote Letters on Natural Magic
and a Life of Newton—famous for his discoveries in optics.

LORD MACAULAY (1800-1859)—historian and poet—chief works, His-
tory of England, Lays of Ancient Rome.

LORD LYTTON (Sir Edward Bulwer)—(1805-1872)--novels, Rienzi,
Last of the Barons, Caxtons, etc.; plays, Richelieu, Lady of Lyons.

THOMAS CARLYLE (1795-1881)—native of Dumfriesshire—moralist °
and historian—author of Sartor Resartus, French Revolution, and

; Frederick the Great.

CHARLES DICKENS (1812-1870)—novelist—wrote Pickwick Papers, Old
Curiosity Shop, David Copperfield, etc.

ROBERT BROWNING (1812-1889)—poet-—author of How they Brought
the Good News from Ghent.

JOHN RUSKIN (born 1819)—art critic—author of Modern Painters, etc.

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON (born 1809)—Poet-Laureate—author of
The Queen of the May, In Memoriam, Idylis of the King.
HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW. 209

“WILLIAM M. THACKERAY (1811-1863)—novelist and lecturer—author
of Vanity Fair, Esmond, The Newcomes. :

HUGH MILLER (1802-1856)—journalist and geologist—author of the
Old Red Sandstone, Footprints of the Creator.

GEORGE ELIOT (1819-1880)—novelist and poetess—wrote Adam Bede’

and Romola, novels, and The Spanish Gipsy, a dramatic poem.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 260.

52. HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.—L

1. The Ancient Britons inhabited our island two
' thousand years ago. Britain was then the home of
half-savage races, who were little known beyond the
narrow seas that kept them apart from the people
of other lands.

2. Coming of the Romans: 55 B.C. and 43 A.D._-The
Romans came and conquered part of Britain, and
ruled over it.for nearly four hundred years. They
taught the people how to make better food, better
clothes, and better houses. They built roads, and
bridges, and towns, and made the land more com-'
fortable to live in.

3. Coming of the English: 449 A.D.—After the
Romans had gone away, English tribes came from
the other side of the North Sea and conquered the
country. They drove the Britons into Wales and
Cornwall, and settled in the land. They formed a
number of small separate kingdoms; but at last all
were united, and the country began to be called
by the proud name of England—the land of ‘the
English, | -

4. Coming of the Danes: 787.—After a time another

(888) 14
210 HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.

people, called the Danes, crossed the North Sea and
fought with the English for the possession of the
land. For a time they-were masters of England,
and Danish kings sat on the English throne. At
last the English and the Danes, who were really of
the same race, became friendly, and settled side by
side, and grew into one people.

5. Coming of the Normans: 1066.—Next the Nor-
mans came from Normandy, in the north of France.
Their leader, William, Duke of Normandy, became
William the Conqueror, King of England. The

' Normans who settled in England by-and-by mixed

with the English, and all became one people.

6. Conquest of Ireland: 1172._F or many years after
the Norman Conquest, England, Wales, Scotland, and
Ireland were independent of one another, and had
each its own rulers. Henry the Second invaded
Treland, and called his son John the “ Lord of Ire-
land.” Henry the Highth was the first English
King who took the title of King of Ireland.

. 7. Conquest of Wales: 1282,—Many of the English

_ Kings tried to conquer Wales; but in their moun-

tain fastnesses the Welsh kept their freedom till
Edward the First invaded the land. Then they
were defeated, their Prince was slain, and his title,
“ Prince of Wales,” given to Edward’s eldest son. —
8. Union with Scotland: 1603—The Kings of
England tried in vain to conquer Scotland. At
length the union of the two countries came about
in a more peaceful manner- James the Fourth of —
Scotland married the daughter of Henry the Seventh
in 1502. One hundred and one years afterwards,
HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW. - 211

yo

NORWA yf

i
CHRISTIANIA, 2

i

IRELAND

puaun

2 BERNE]

J SWITZERL
3

when Henry’s son, Henry the Eighth, and his chil-
dren, Edward, Mary, and Elizabeth, were dead,
Henry the Seventh’s great-great-grandchild in Scot-
land—James the Sixth—became King of both
countries. He was the first King of the United
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 261.

K

ee,



io}
v
212 HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.





. SS
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UNYTED STAT

NeW Oelean
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53, HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.—IL.

1. Victoria, Queen and Empress.—Queen Victoria
is the ruler of the United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland—that is to say, the British Islands
form one kingdom under one Sovereign. But they
are only a small part of the British Empire, which
is seventy times as large as the British Islands.
Our Queen rules over one-sixth of all the land
HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW. 218








sear? op Y st enol
evens e
ios
2 AY
me









Yop et
Baya Me
Bip. ie



of the globe. She is the Queen of England and
Wales, of Scotland, of Ireland, of Canada in North
America, of Cape Colony and other parts of Africa,
of Australia, and of New Zealand. She is also the
Empress of India. a

2. Our Foreign Possessions have been acquired in
various ways—by conquest, by cession, by purchase,
and by settlement. Gibraltar was taken from
Spain; Newfoundland was ceded by France; New
214 HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.

Zealand was bought from the natives; and Aus-
tralia was settled or colonized.

3. One hundred years ago Great Britain was
often at war with other countries, especially France
and Spain. Her strength lay in her navy, and a
common way she took against her enemies was to seize
on some of their colonies or foreign possessions. In _
this manner Great Britain acquired many of the ©
West India Islands, taken from Spain by the great
sailors of Elizabeth’s reign. Thus also Cape Colony
was taken from the Dutch. Sometimes strong
places were seized by Britain to obtain command
of the seas, to provide shelter for her ships, and to
be used as store-houses for her commerce. For
such reasons Gibraltar, Malta, and Aden were
seized and fortified.

4, Conquest of India: 1757—In the reign of Queen
Elizabeth a company of merchants, called the English
East India Company, was formed to trade with the
people of India. When George the Second was
King, war broke out in that country, first between

‘the British traders and the French traders, then
between the British and the natives. A great vic-
tory was gained at the Battle of Plassey, in Bengal,
1757. This made us masters of India.

5, India remained for many years under the rule
of the East India Company, but after the great In-
dian Mutiny in 1857 the rule of that Company was
brought to an end, and the country was placed ~
under the direct control of the British Sovereign. In
1876 Queen Victoria was declared to be “ Empress
of India.” The Indian Empire includes the whole
HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW. 215

peninsula of Hindustan, and the mainland as far as
to the Himalaya Mountains. In extent it is twenty-
five times the size of England and Wales.

6. Conquest of Canada: 1759—In the reign of
Queen Elizabeth, English people settled on the shores
of North America. From time to time these colonies
grew, until in George the Second’s reign there were
thirteen States. The French had also founded
colonies in Canada. A quarre] broke out between
the British and French colonists. In 1759 the
French were defeated by General Wolfe, who took
Quebec from them, and all Canada passed into the
hands of the British.

7. In the reign of George the Third, the Ameri-
can colonists quarrelled with the British Govern-
ment. War followed, and in the end the thirteen
States were formed into a separate country, called
the United States of America; but Canada re-
mained a part of the British Empire. Canada has
grown till it forms a Dominion nearly as large as
Europe, stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

8. Colonies in Australasia: 1788—In the reign of
George the Third, Captain Cook, a famous English
sailor, landed on a small island on the north of
Australia, and took possession of it in the name of
‘the British King. In 1788 the British flag was
hoisted on the shores of Sydney, now the capital
of New South Wales. Till 1868 several places in
Australia were used as jails or penal settlements, to
which prisoners were sent from this country.

9. New Zealand came under British rule m
1840, when a treaty was made with the native
216 HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.

chiefs. Before that date, however, whaling and
trading ports and missionary stations had long ex-
isted on its shores. Britain now owns part of the
large island of New Guinea, to the north of the
Australian continent. a

10. Colonies in Africa.—Our colonies in Southern
and Western Africa have been settled at various
times. The chief of them is Cape Colony, which is
three times the size of Great Britain. It has been
part of the British Empire since 1815. British
rule now covers nearly the whole of South Africa.

11. Government of the Colonies.—The colonies and
dependencies have their own affairs administered by
resident governors and councils appointed by the
Queen, and controlled in London by a Secretary of
State. The more populous and older colonies have
Parliaments chosen by the people.

12. Colonial Extension.—The British colonies have
in some cases been greatly extended during late years.
Every year thousands of Englishmen, Scotsmen, and
Irishmen go to these countries to settle there as
farmers or merchants. Thus the growth of the
British Empire abroad, at first due to war, is now
due to emigration and the spread of commerce.

13. British History.—British history shows us,

first, how the different countries in the British

Islands became one kingdom under one Sovereign.
Then we see how, little by little, the British Empire
grew larger and more powerful, until it has become
the largest and most powerful State the world has

ever seen.
EXERCISES on the Lesson, page 262.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.



1, GEORGE THE FIRST.—L

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Hanover, now a province in the north-west of Prussia, was formerly
a kingdom of Northern Germany. It was under the same ruler
as Great Britain until the death of William the Fourth. (See
page 144.) Hanover‘was annexed to Prussia in 1866.

Elector-Palatine, the ruler of the Palatinate, an old ppoyince in
Germany.

2 Bill of ‘Rights (1689), gave Parliament absolute power over taxation,
the army, law courts, and the succession to the crown.

James the Pretender. One who unjustly lays claim to an office or
a title is called a pretender. James Stuart, son of James the
Second, claimed to be James the Third of England and Eighth
of Scotland. James is known as the ‘“‘Old Pretender,” and
his son Charles.as the ‘‘ Young Pretender.”

The Act of Settlement provided chiefly that, after Anne, the succes-
sion to the British throne should lie with the Princess Sophia of
Hanover and her heirs, being Protestants of the Church of
England.

3 Electress, a title at one time given to certain German princesses.

5 Whig......Tory, ‘were the names of the two parties in the state,

Jacobites. From Jacobus, Latin for James. There were three
Jacobite rebellions—1689, 1715, 1745.

6 Turned the Tories out of office, took the government of the country
out of their hands and: gave it to the Whigs.

Duke of Marlborough (1650-1722), a great English general.

Robert Walpole. See page 286.

Prime Minister, the chief or first minister of the Crown. (See
page 18.)

7 Earl of Oxford (Robert Harley). See page 278.
218 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS,

SUMMARY.

The House of Hanover, which began with George the First, de-
scended from James the First through his daughter Elizabeth. The
Act of Settlement (1701) settled the British crown on the Electress
Sophia of Hanover, daughter of Elizabeth, and her heirs.

George the First (1714-1727), Elector of Hanover, became also King
of the United Kingdom. Having to leave the government of the
country for the most part in the hands of his ministers, the power of
Parliament was greatly increased.

The Whig Party, being in favour of the accession of George, was
placed in charge of the government, and the Tories, who were in
favour of the Pretender, were turned out of office.

The Jacobites took alarm. The Earl of Oxford was imprisoned.
Lord Bolingbroke and other Jacobite leaders fled to France.

The Riot Act (1715) gave magistrates power to disperse meetings by
force.



2. GEORGE THE FIRST.—II.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Earl of Mar, John Erskine. He died at Aix-la-Chapelle in 1732.
Braemar, a village in Aberdeenshire.

3 Duke of Argyle (1678-1743) was grandson of the Earl of Argyle who
was beheaded in 1685. He served under Marlborough, and also
helped to bring about the union of the English and Scottish
Parliaments.

Sheriffmuir, in Perthshire, north-east of Stirling.

4 Duke of Ormond (1665-1745) was lord-lieutenant of Ireland. He
superseded Marlborough as commander-in-chief for a time.

6 Peterhead, a fishing town on the east coast of Aberdeenshire.

7 Montrose, a sea-port of Forfarshire, -

He escaped from the Tower in his wife’s clothes, she staying be-
hind in his stead.
SUMMARY.

“The ’Fifteen” is the name given to a Jacobite rising in 1715, in
favour of the Pretender. The Earl of Mar raised a Highland army
and captured Perth, but his advance was checked by the Duke of
Argyle at Sheriffmuir. Some of the leading Jacobites in England
were imprisoned; and a rising in the north, under Lords Derwent-
water, Kenmure, and Nithsdale, was crushed at Preston. James
landed in Scotland, but with the Earl of Mar he was obliged to flee
back to France. Derwentwater, Kenmure, and other leaders were
executed, and many were banished. Nithsdale escaped.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS, 219
38. GEORGE THE FIRST.—III.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Septennial, from the Latin septem, seven, and annus, a year;
lasting or continuing seven years.

Triennial, from the Latin tres, three, and annus, a year; lasting or
continuing three years.

Temporary measure, a measure, act, or law lasting for a time only.

2 The Quadruple Alliance, so called because four countries joined in
it. Quadruple, from the Latin quadra or quatuor, four, and
plico, I fold ; fourfold,

The Treaty of Utrecht (1713) provided that the French and Spanish
crowns should never be united, and that the French King should
recognize the Protestant succession in Britain and expel the Pre-
tender from France. The part of the treaty which Philip broke
referred to the affairs of Italy.

The War of the Spanish Succession was carried on to prevent the
union of the French and Spanish crowns.

3 The allies, those on the same side — Great Britain, Germany,
France, and Holland. ,
4 South Sea, the South Pacific Ocean.
The National Debt is at present nearly 700 million pounds sterling.
6 The bubble burst, the Company failed, or was unable to pay its
way.

Were in the secret, knew that the failure was about to take place.

7 The Bank of England; the largest and wealthiest banking establish-
ment in the world, was founded by a Scotsman named William
Paterson, and received a royal charter in 1694. :

The East India Company, a Company formed in 1599-1600 to
carry on trade between England and India. This Company
governed India till the Mutiny. In 1858 the Queen assumed
direct sovereignty, and the Company came to an end in 1874.
(See page 181.)

SUMMARY.

The Septennial Act (1716), which took the place of the Triennial
Act, is still in force. It allows a Parliament to last seven years.

The Quadruple Alliance of Great Britain, Germany, France, and
Holland, forced the King of Spain to carry out the Treaty of Utrecht
(1718).

The South Sea Bubble (1720) was a great trading scheme intended
to help to pay the interest on the National Debt.
220 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

The South Sea Company agreed to:pay the Government large sums
of money for the sole right of trading in the South Seas. The Com-
pany soon failed, and hundreds of people were ruined.

Sir Robert Walpole wound up the affairs of the Company.



4. GEORGE THE FIRST.—IV.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Clarendon, Edward Hyde, Earl of (1608-1674), statesman and his-
torian, was chief adviser to Charles the First. During the
Commonwealth he joined Charles the Second in Holland. At
the Restoration he returned with Charles and was made Lord
Chancellor. Five Acts, which he was instrumental in passing,
are called the Clarendon Code.

8 Conservative...... Liberal, the names now given to the two great
political parties in the country. Conservative has taken the
place of Tory, and Liberal the place of Whig.

5 Zell, a town of Hanover. :

6 Daniel Defoe (1663-1731) was a political writer and novelist.

Swift, Dr. Jonathan (1667-1745), Dean of St. Patrick’s, Dublin, was
a political, satirical, and miscellaneous writer.

Isaac Watts (1674-1748), Nonconformist minister, was a famous
writer of hymns. -

James Thomson (1700-1748), civil servant and poet.

SUMMARY.

Sir Robert Walpole was the first adviser of the Sovereign who was
called Prime Minister. The chief ministers or members of the
Government were now called the Ministry, Government, or Cabinet.
They are chosen from the party which has a majority in the House of
Commons. Walpole was Premier for twenty years. He always tried
to keep the country out of war, and encouraged trade and manufactures.

The death of the King took place i in Hanover.

The chief authors of the reign were Daniel ee Dean Swift,
Isaac Watts, and James Thomson.



v

5. GEORGE THE SECOND.—I.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Bavaria, one of the states of the German Empire.
2 Excise, taxes on some things made at home, and on permission
granted to deal in tea, tobacco, wine, spirits, etc.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 221

2 Smuggling, bringing articles into the’ country without paying the
duty or tax upon them.
License, permission granted on payment of a sum of money.
3 Contraband goods, goods on which the lawful duty has not been
’ paid; smuggled goods.
4 Grassmarket, a large square in Edinburgh.
Charter of Edinburgh, the written deed which makes Edinburgh a
city.
Sir Walter Scott. See page 285. oe
5 William Pitt (Earl of Chatham). See page 283.
6 Right to search. The Spaniards claimed the right to search British
' ships, to prevent goods from being smuggled into Spanish
colonies, d
7 Commodore, a naval officer next in rank to an admiral.
Lord Anson. See page 271.
9 Silesia, a province in the south-east of Prussia.
Dettingen, a village of Bavaria.
Powers, chief European countries.

- SUMMARY.

George the Second (1727-1760), son of George the First,. married
Caroline of Anspach. She had great influence over the King, and .
kept Walpole in power.

An Excise. Bill was introduced in 1733, but the opposition to it was
so great that it had to be withdrawn,

The Porteous Riot in 1736 arose from the sympathy of the Edin-
burgh people with a condemned smuggler named Wilson. When the
City Guard was attacked at the execution, Captain Porteous rashly
“ordered his men to fire on the crowd, and several persons were killed.
Porteous was condemned to death, but was respited by the Crown,
upon which the mob broke into his prison and hanged no in the
Grassmarket.

The death of Queen Caroline in 1737 made Walpole’s pon less
secure. He was opposed by William Pitt.

A war with Spain broke out in 1739 against Walpole’s. wishes,
and an expedition against the Spanish colonies in South America
failed.

The retirement of Walpole followed the failure of the war, He
was made Earl of Orford, and died in 1745.

The War of the Austrian Succession began in 1741. "Britain
helped Maria-Theresa to defend the Austrian crown against France
and Prussia. King George won the Battle of Dettingen: The
British were beaten at Fontenoy.
'

222 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.
6. GEORGE THE SECOND.--II.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Pretender. See note, page 217.
Lochiel, a district in Inverness-shire.
Regent, one who governs a kingdom in the name of a Sovereign.
2 Dunbar, a town on the coast of Haddington.
Prestonpans, eight and a half miles east of Edinburgh.
Clansmen, men belonging to the different Highland clans or
families.
Claymores, large two-handed swords.
3 Banquets, feasts; dinners, suppers, etc.
Grampians, a range of mountains stretching across Scotland from
Argyleshire to Aberdeenshire.
4 Culloden, or Drummossie Moor, eight miles north-east of Inverness.
5 Flora Macdonald. On her release she went with her husband to
North America. She returned home again, and died in Skye.
7 Cardinal, a prince in the Roman Catholic Church.
8 Aix-la-Chapelle, in western Prussia, on the frontier of Belgium.
German name, Aachen.
’ 9 Calendar, a register of the year in which the months, weeks, and
days are set down in order.
Julius Cesar (100 B.c. to 43 B.c.) was a great Roman general.
Pope Gregory (544-604) was the first to send Christian monks to
Britain.
SUMMARY.

The “Forty-five” in 1745 was a Jacobite rising, headed by Charles
Edward, the Young Pretender. He gathered a Highland army, and
after a victory at Prestonpans marched into England. Hemmed in
by the royal troops, he was forced to retreat.

The Battle of Culloden was fought in 1746 and crushed the rising.

Charles escaped to France.

' The sufferings of the Highlanders were very great. The Duke of
Cumberland ravaged the country with fire and sword. Many oe the
Jacobite leaders were executed or imprisoned.

The last of the Stuarts was Henry, Cardinal of York, who died j in
1807.

The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748 ended the War of the
Austrian Succession.

A change in the Calendar was ee in 1752. Eleven days were
dropped, and the year was arranged to begin on the Ist of. January
instead of the 25th of March. .
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. : 223

7. THE ROCK OF THE RAVEN.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Invergarry means the mouth of the Garry. The valley is called
Glen Garry, whence the name of the clan, and also of a well-
lmown Scottish cap. Loch Oich, into which the Garry flows,
is between Loch Ness and Loch Lochy, and forms part of the
Caledonian Canal. ;

2 Duke William of Cumberland, second son of’ George IJ. Hecom-
manded the royal army at Culloden.

Bulwarks, strong walls or fortifications.

3 Scapegoat, from escape and goat. The name given to the goat on
which the Jewish high priest laid his hands, confessing the
sins of the people, after which the animal was allowed to
escape into the wilderness (Lev. xvi. 10). The term is applied
to one who bears the blame of others. In this case the family
were prepared to sacrifice the second son, in order that the rest
might escape.

4 Disbanded, dismissed from service.

6 Turbulent, wild; angry; disorderly.

Dissensions, quarrels ; battles.

Red burning cross, the “fiery cross” sent round to gather the
clansmen for war. It consisted of a rude cross of light wood,
the ends of which were burned and extinguished in the blood
of a goat slain for the purpose. Whoever received the cross
was bound to carry it with all haste to the next village.

Clan Colla, the Macdonell clan.

Tryst, meeting-place.

7 As far as the sight, as far as the eye could s see.

Eyrie (7-ray), nest.

8 Bale, misery.

Albyn, Scotland.

Loch Linnhe (Zin/-nay), an arm of the sea in Argyleshire ; the out-
let of the Caledonian Canal on the west coast.

Cromarty’s shore, on the Moray Firth, the outlet of the Cale-

-donian Canal on the east coast.

Carbine, short gun.

9 Gled, kite; a kind of hawk or falcon found in Scotland.

Pipe, bagpipe.

10 Bastions, walls of the castle.

Hath builded his halls, The modern house of Glen Garry lies

lower down on the bank of the lake.
224 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

8, GEORGE THE SECOND.—III.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Sir Henry Pelham (1696-1754), ) two brothers who both occupied
Duke of Newcastle (1693-1768), } the post of Prime Minister.

4 Foreign Secretary, one of the ministers who manages the relations
of Great Britain with foreign countries.

5 Colonize, found or begin new countries.

“ Silver streak,” English Channel.

6 Sir Walter Ralegh (1552-1618) was a statesman, scholar, and
warrior. He was imprisoned by James the First for thirteen
years on a charge of treason, but released, and three years

_after executed on the old charge.
The Pilgrim Fathers, a number of English Puritans who emigrated
to North America in 1620, where they settled and founded the
New England States.

7 St. Lawrence, one of the largest rivers of North America. It has

a course of 2,150 miles.
Mississippi, a river 3,200 miles long, in the United States, flowing
south into the Gulf of Mexico. :
Ohio, a tributary of the Mississippi.
9 Madras, a sea-port on the east coast of British India.
Bombay, a sea-port on the west coast of British India.
Dowry, the money, etc., which a woman brings to her husband at
her marriage.
Calcutta, the capital of British India, on the Hovelye one of the
mouths of the Ganges.
10 Pondicherry, south-west of Madras.
13 Robert Clive. See page 274.



2

SUMMARY.

The Pelhams. The Earl of Wilmington succeeded Walpole as
Prime Minister. After him came Sir Henry Pelham, and then his
brother the Duke of Newcastle. The two brothers kept in power for
nearly twenty years.

William Pitt, called the Great Commoner, afterwards Earl of
Chatham, held an important position under the Pelhams. He was
not liked by the King.

The Seven Years’ War with France was fought on the Continent, in
America, and in India. At first everything went against ane British,
until Pitt got control of the war.

The British Empire had increased greatly since 1600. Britain and
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 225

France quarrelled about North America and India, The French
were defeated, and these two great countries were added to the
British Empire.

The British Colonies in North America in the reign of George the
Second included thirteen states, with more than a million inhabitants.

The French Colonies in North America were chiefly on the river St.
Lawrence. Then called Lower Canada, they are now known as the
province of Quebec. Pitt was eager to drive the French out of
America.

The English East India Company, formed in 1600, had three
factories or trading centres—at Bombay, Madras, and Calcutta.

A French East India Company was settled at Pondicherry, south
of Madras. The French tried to drive the British out of India.

Robert (afterwards Lord) Clive was the first to check the French.
‘He seized Arcot, and defended it sonia them. To Clive we owe our
Indian Empire.



9 GEORGE THE SECOND.—IV.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Blockaded, besieged ; closed around.
Gibraltar, called the ‘‘ Key to the Mediterranean,” is a rock fortress
in the south of Spain. It has belonged to the British since
1704. :
3 Bengal, in the north-east, is one of the largest divisions of British
India.
Ganges, the holy river of the Hindus, in the north of India, is one
of the largest rivers of Asia.
6 Wandewash, between Madras and Pondicherry.

SUMMARY.

The Seven Years’ War began in 1756.. France, Austria, and Russia
joimed against Prussia and Great Britain.

The capture of Minorca by the French occurred early i in the war.
Admiral Byng was executed for not relieving it.

The Nabob of Bengal, a native prince, attacked the British settle-
ments by the Ganges in 1756.

The Black Hole of Calcutta is the name given to a small room in
which the Nabob of Bengal confined 146 British prisoners. Only 23 .
came out alive.

The Battle of Plassey, won by Clive in 1757, gained for the British
the large province of Bengal, and laid the foundation of our Indian
Empire. . :

(888) 15
226 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

10. GEORGE THE SECOND.—V.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Quebec, the oldest city in Canada; at that time the capital of the
French possessions there. It stands on the north bank of
the St. Lawrence.

James Wolfe. See page 287.
Campaign, a war carried on during a set time of the year, or fora
‘particular purpose.

8 Montreal, on the St. Lawrence; in the province of Quebec, is the
largest city in the Dominion.

4 Minden, in the north-west of Germany, on the river Weser.

Brunswick, a state of North Germany.
Brittany, or Bretagne, an old province in the north-west of France.

7 John Wesley (1703-1791), a clergyman of the Church of England

who founded the Wesleyan Methodist Church.

SUMMARY.

The capture of Quebec, the French capital of Canada, by Wolfe
(1759), made the British masters of Canada. Montreal and the whole
of Canada surrendered to the British in the following year.

The Battle of Minden, in 1759, was a victory over the French in
which British troops assisted. The British admirals destroyed two
French fleets in this year.

George the Second died at the age of seventy-six, and was suc-
ceeded by his grandson, George the Third.

The Methodists arose from a revival in the Church of England
begun by two brothers, John and Charles Wesley, and George White-
field. As the Church refused to recognize the movement, the rene
dists formed themselves into a separate sect.



ll. GEORGE THE THIRD.—I.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

8 Family Compact, so called because Louis the Fifteenth of France,
Charles the Third of Spain, and Ferdinand of Naples were all
descended from Louis the Fourteenth of France, and were there-
fore of the same family.

Earl of Bute (1713-1792), a favourite of George the Third; for a
‘ short time Premier.
5 George Grenville. See page 277.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 227

6 Habeas Corpus Act, passed in 1679, to prevent any one from being
kept in prison without a trial.
Outlawed, not protected by the law.
7 The “Letters of Junius,” a series of letters on public affairs,
appeared in the Public Advertiser, beginning in January 1769.
The authorship was kept secret, and has never been clearly
made out.
Interfering with the freedom of election, trying to influence or con-
trol the decision of the electors.

SUMMARY.

George the Third was the son of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and
grandson of George the Second. The Seven Years’ War was not over
when he came to the throne.

The Family Compact was a league between France, Spain, and
Naples against Great Britain. 7

War with Spain began in 1762. The British captured many places
belonging to France and Spain in the East and West Indies.

The Peace of Paris, in 1763, ended the Seven Years’ War. Britain
kept Canada and other places in America. The anger of the people
at the Peace forced Bute to resign. He was succeeded by George
Grenville.

John Wilkes, a member of Parliament, was turned out of the House
of Commons and outlawed for accusing the King of telling a lie in his
speech from the throne. After he had been re-elected several times,
the House of Commons had to take him back.

The “Letters of Junius” were violent attacks on the King and
his ministers. The publishers were tried and acquitted.



12. GEORGE THE THIRD.—II.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Marquis of Rockingham (1730-1782), Prime Minister 1765.
Repealed, declared no longer to be law.
3 Duke of Grafton (1736-1811), Prime Minister 1766.
Chancellor of the Exchequer, the minister who has charge of the
country’s money.
Lord North (1732-1792), Prime Minister 1770.
4 Home, British. E :
5 Boston, on the east coast of North America, the capital of Massa-
chusetts (United States).
Indians. When Columbus discovered America, he thought that it
formed part of India. He therefore called. the tribes then in-
228 . EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. |

habiting the continent Indians. Their descendants are called
American Indians.
6 Philadelphia, in Pennsylvania, the second city of the United
States.
Edmund Burke. See page 273.
Kindred blood, those who belong to the same family.
9 George Washington, born in Virginia, 1732. First President of
the United States, 1789 ; re-elected 1793. Retired 1797 ; died
1799.
10 Colonel Arnold. ‘See next lesson.
11 Halifax, a sea-port on the Atlantic, is the capital of Nova Scotia.

SUMMARY.

The Stamp Act, passed in 1765, made the Americans pay their share
of the-cost of the Seven Years’ War. The colonists refused to be taxed
by the British Parliament, and the Act was repealed.

New taxes were imposed on tea and other things.

The Boston Tea-Party, composed of men dressed as Indians, threw
a cargo of taxed tea overboard in Boston Harbour. The Government
closed the port. A Colonial Congress met and petitioned in vain
against the tax. ‘

The American War of Independence lasted nearly eight years
(1775-83). =

The first campaign began in 1775 at Lexington. The Americans
were defeated at Bunker’s Hill.

George Washington was made commander-in-chief of the American
army. ‘

The invasion of Canada, in 1775, by’ Montgomery and Arnold
failed.

In the second campaign, in 1776, the British, under General Howe,
were driven from Boston. ae 5



13. GEORGE THE THIRD.—III.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Congress, the American Parliament.

Batteries, places on which guns are fixed and from which they are
fired.

2 Brandywine River, in Pennsylvania and Delaware States.
Saratoga, in New York State.

3 Cantonments, military stations.

4 South Carolina, one of the United States. 5 :

6 Versailles, a town in France, ten miles south-west of Paris.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 229

6 Republic, a form of government without a monarch, in which the
power is in the hands of men chosen by the people. :
President, the head of a republic.
7 Armed neutrality, ready to fight, but taking the side of neither
party.
SUMMARY.

The Declaration of American Independence was made in-1776.
Tn this year Washington was driven from New York.

The third campaign opened in June 1777. The British won a
victory at Brandywine River and captured Philadelphia. The sur-
render of General Burgoyne at Saratoga was the turning- point of the
war in favour of the Americans.

The fourth campaign, in 1778, was remarkable for the siege of
New York by Washington. While speaking in a debate on America,
in this year, Chatham fell down in a fit. He died shortly afterwards.

During the fifth campaign nothing of importance happened.

The sixth campaign, in 1780, placed Charleston in the hands of the
British. F

During the seventh campaign, in 1781, Lord Cornwallis sur-
rendered at Yorktown. This really ended the war, though another
campaign was fought.

The Treaty of Versailles was. signed in 1783. It declared the
thirteen United States of America a free nation. They established a
republic, and chose Washington as the first President. :

War in Europe was ended by the Treaty of Versailles. France,
Spain, and Holland had helped the colonies against England. Gib-
raltar resisted a three years’ siege by French and Spaniards.



14, GEORGE THE THIRD.—IV.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Mogul Emperor, the sovereign of the empire founded in India by
the Moguls in the sixteenth century. It ended in 1806.
4 Warren Hastings. See page 278.

Mahrattas, a native Hindu race.

Hyder Ali, 2 Mohammedan, the son of a petty chief in Mysore,
who made himself master of that state, and handed down the
title of rajah to his son, Tippoo Saib.

Sultan, title of certain Eastern sovereigns.

Mysore, a state of Southern India.

5 Fox. See page 276.
Sheridan (1751-1816), statesman, wit, and dramatist.
230 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

9 Seringapatam, a strongly-fortified town of Mysore, British India.
Colonel Arthur Wellesley. See Wellington, page 286.
_ 10 Sandwich Islands, a group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean.

SUMMARY.

Lord Clive was absent from India from 1760 to 1765. When he
returned he restored order, but made many enemies, who brought him
to trial before the House of Commons for having abused his powers.
Though acquitted, he was so worried over the trial that he committed
suicide.

Warren Hastings was the first Governor-General of India. He
conquered the Mahrattas, and overthrew Hyder Ali of Mysore. He
also was tried before the House of Commons for misgovernment in
India, and acquitted ; but the trial left him penniless.

William Pitt (the younger) became Prime Minister in 1783, and
retained that position for nearly the remainder of his life. He ap-
pointed a Board of Control to govern India, while the Hast India
Company confined itself to trading.

Lord Cornwallis, the next Governor-General of India, put down
Tippoo Saib, who was killed at the capture of Seringapatam. Colonel
Arthur Wellesley displayed great military skill here.

Captain James Cook made many voyages of discovery in the South
Seas. He was murdered in the Sandwich Islands in 1779.

a

15. GEORGE THE THIRD.—V.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Foreign potentates, persons of great power belonging to other
countries.
2 Diminished, made less; weakened.
3 Concessions, yieldings.
Escorted, accompanied.
Newgate Prison, in London, is mentioned as a prison as far back as
the thirteenth century. It has been twice rebuilt.
4 Charles Dickens. See page 275. +
5 William Wilberforce. See page 287.

SUMMARY.

The Reform of the House of Commons was much needed, as the
House did not represent the people. In 1780 a motion was passed de-
claring that the power of the Crown was increasing, and ought to be
diminished. A Reform Bill was introduced in the House of Lords,
but was defeated.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 231

The Gordon Riots, in 1780, were the result of the repeal of the
penal laws against Roman Catholics. A petition to Parliament, pre-
sented by Lord George Gordon and sixty thousand people, was re-
jected. For some days London was at the mercy of the mob,

The Slave Trade with Ameriva was discussed by Parliament. Will-
iam Wilberforce tried to get it stopped, but this was not done till
eighteen years afterwards.



16. GEORGE THE THIRD.—VI1.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Revolution, a violent change of the government.

Aristocracy, nobility ; upper classes,

5 La Vendée, a district in the west.of France.

Toulon, chief naval station of France on the Mediterranean.

Corsican. Corsica is a large island in the Mediterranean belonging
to France.

Napoleon Bonaparte, the greatest military genius of modern times,
was born at Ajaccio in Corsica in 1769. He overran Italy, beat
Austria and Prussia, subdued the Netherlands and Spain, and
invaded Russia. In 1804 he became Emperor of the French.
In 1814 he retired to Elba. In 1815 he returned, but he was
defeated by Wellington at Waterloo. He was banished to St.
Helena, and died there in 1821. 5

9 Mutinies, rebellions in the army or the navy.

10 St. Vincent, a cape at the south-western point of Portugal.
Camperdown, on the coast of Holland, north-west of Amsterdam.
Brest, the chief naval station of France on the Atlantic.

Nelson. See page 281.

Cadiz, a strongly-fortified sea-port in the south-west of Spain.

SUMMARY.

The French Revolution, which began in 1789, was the greatest
event of the eighteenth century. For many years the French people
had been very heavily taxed and kept down by the tyranny of the
nobility. In 1789 the people rose in revolt. A year of bloodshed,
known as the Reign of Terror, followed. In 1792 a republic was ~
established, and the King and Queen were beheaded soon after.

Great alarm was felt lest the British should follow the example of
the French.

War with France began in 1798. All the great powers were at first
united against her, but within a year Holland, Prussia, and Spain
were forced to seek peace.
232 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

Two mutinies in the British Royal Navy took place at this time.
- The demands of the men were agreed to, but the mutiny at the Nore
was not put down till the leaders had been hanged.

The Battles of St. Vincent and Camperdown were won in 1797. In
the former a Spanish fleet was beaten at Cape St. Vincent by Admiral
Jervis and Commodore Nelson. Off Camperdown, in Holland, Ad-
miral Duncan defeated the Dutch.



17. GEORGE THE THIRD.—VII.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 The Ulster ‘‘ plantation,” was the planting or settling in Ulster of
English and Scottish colonists, to whom James the First gave
the land which had been taken from Irish chiefs.

Thomas Wentworth (1593-1641), Earl of Strafford, was impeached
in 1640, and executed in the following year.

3 Ruthlessly, without mercy or pity.

5 Kinsale, a sea-port of Cork, on the south coast of Ireland.

Londonderry, the county town of Londonderry, on the north coast
of Ireland.

Boyne, a river of Ireland which flows into the Irish Sea.

Limerick, on the Shannon, is the county town of Limerick.

6 Solicitors, lawyers.

11 Catholic Emancipation, allowing Roman Catholics to Hee a seat
in Parliament, and to hold public offices.

SUMMARY.

Ireland was in an unsettled state during this reign. Wentworth
(Harl of Strafford) had ruled with great tyranny in the reign of
Charles the First, but he did good in starting the Irish linen trade,
and in clearing the Irish Sea of pirates.

The Rebellion of 1641 was the result of his bad Boveriment as Thou-
sands of Protestants were massacred in Ulster.

Cromwell, in 1649, put down with great severity all who wére in
arms for Charles the Second.

James the Second, in 1689, raised an army in Ireland to recover his
' throne. His siege of Londonderry failed, and William the Third de-
feated him in the Battle of the Boyne. The Treaty of Limerick ended
the rebellion.

Penal Laws, passed in 1696, prevented Catholics from holding any
office in the state or the army. In 1738 the franchise was taken from
them. After the Revolution, the Irish accepted the offer of French
help to free them from Great Britain.

o
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 233

In the reign of George the Third the Irish were very discontented,
because no Roman Catholics were allowed to sit in the Irish Parlia-
ment.

_ The United Irishmen organized a revolt, which was crushed at
Vinegar Hill. The French help arrived too late.

_ The Union of Great Britain and Ireland was completed in 1801.
By this union Ireland sent members to the British Parliament, and
free trade was established between Great Britain and Ireland.

Catholic Emancipation, or the repeal of the severe laws against
Roman Catholics, was proposed, by Pitt in 1801, but was not passed.

18. GEORGE THE THIRD.—VIII.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Alexandria, a city of Egypt, founded by and named after Alexander
' the Great.
Malta, an island in the Mediterranean. It is one of England’s most
important ocean fortresses.
Cairo, the chief city of Egypt, south-east of Alexandria. The
pyramids are on the opposite side of the Nile from Cairo.
Nile, the most famous river of Egypt, is about 3,000 miles long.
Battle of the Pyramids, so called because it was fought in sight of
the great pyramids of Egypt.
Forty centuries look down. This means that the pyramids were
four thousand years old.
2 Aboukir Bay, between Alexandria and the western mouth of the Nile.
3 Syria, the country at the east end of the Mediterranean, of which
Palestine is a part.
Acre, on the coast of Syria, near the foot of Mount Carmel. It is
famous for the number of its sieges.
Marengo, in the north of Italy, south-east of Turin.
Hohenlinden, a village of Bavaria, 20 miles east of Munich.
4 Bombardment, firing on a town with cannon.
Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark. —
Amiens, on. the Somme, north of Paris.
6 Trafalgar, midway between Cadiz and the Strait of Gibraltar.
8 Rigging, masts and ropes.
Stars, medals,

SUMMARY.
Napoleon Bonaparte, the commander of the French army, resolved

to attack India. On his way thither he defeated an Egyptian army
in the Battle of the Pyramids in 1798.
234 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

Admiral Nelson followed the French to Egypt, and destroyed
Napoleon’s fleet in Aboukir Bay in 1798.

Napoleon led his soldiers from Egypt into Syria, and Besieced
Acre, but had to retreat. He returned to France, and was made
First Consul. His army went back to Egypt, where the British de-
feated it at Alexandria in 1801. Napoleon’s invasion of Austria in
1800 forced her to make peace.

The Northern League, formed against Britain by Russia, Prussia,
Sweden, and Denmark, was soon broken up by the defeat of the

‘Danes at Copenhagen and the death of the Emperor of Russia.
Napoleon was made Emperor of France in 1804.

Napoleon threatened to invade Great Britain in 1803. Great
Britain, Russia, Austria, and Sweden were now allied against France
and Spain. The united fleets of France and Spain were defeated by
Lord Nelson off Cape Trafalgar.

Before the Battle of Trafalgar began, Nelson signalled to the fleet
—‘ England expects every man to do his duty.” In the fight that
followed the French and Spanish fleets were destroyed, but Lord
Nelson was killed.



¢

19. BATTLE OF THE BALTIC.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

3 The North, the Northern League—Russia, Prussia, Sweden, and
Denmark.

The might of Dénmark’s crown. Denmark was at that time a
strong naval power.

The Prince of all the land. The Prince Regent of Denmark com-
manded the Danish forces. In 1801 he succeeded to the throne
as Frederick the Sixth.

4 Leviathans, huge sea-monsters.

Bulwarks, the sides of war-ships. ,
Sign of battle, the flag which gave the order for close action._
Line, war-ships.

Ten of April morn, ten o’clock on an April morning.

Chime, church clocks of Copenhagen.

Might, fleet.—Flushed, was eager.

Anticipate, looked forward to.—Van, leading ships of the fleet.

. The fleeter rushed, sailed more quickly.

Adamantine, hard as a diamond.—Lips, mouth of the cannon.

Death-shade, the clouds of smoke caused by the cannon.

Hurricane eclipse, the darkness caused by thick clouds during a
great storm hiding the light of the sun.

6 Boom, sound heavily ; the noise made by the firing of big guns.

o
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS, 235

6 Conflagration, flame. Some of the Danish ships were set on fire.
7 Victor, Nelson.—Hailed, called to. ;

Ye are brothers. When some of the Danish ships which had
struck their colours fired upon the boats sent to take possession
of them, Nelson wrote to the Crown Prince: ‘The brave Danes
are the brothers, and should never be the enemies, of the En-
glish.”

8 Our chief, Nelson.—Shades, gloom o1 or sorrow.
9 Festal cities, cities rejoicing on account of the victory.

Elsinore, a town and sea-port of Denmark.

10 Riou (Ree-ow). Captain Riou was killed in the battle.

Mermaid, an imaginary sea-animal, having the upper part like a
woman and the lower part like a fish.

Campbell, Thomas (1777-1824), poet.

20. GEORGE THE THIRD.—Ix.



NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Austerlitz, in Moravia, north-east of Vienna.
Ulm, in Wiirtemberg, on the Danube, south-east of Stuttgart.
4 Jena (Yana), in Saxe-Weimar, south-west of Leipsic.
5 Berlin, capital of Prussia.—Decree, order given by one in authority.
Steppes, the name given to those extensive plains which stretch
across many parts of Russia.
Wooden walls, ships.
6 George Canning. See page 273.
Duke of Portland (1738-1808), Prime Minister 1807.
7 Tilsit, Eylau, towns in the east of Prussia.
River Niemen, or Memel, near the Russian frontier of, Prussia, and
flowing into the Baltic. =

SUMMARY.

The Battle of Austerlitz, in 1805, ended in the defeat of the com-
bined Russian and Austrian armies, and broke up the alliance against
France.

William Pitt died in 1806. The news of Austerlitz was his death-
blow.

Charles James Fox was the leading man in Lord Grenville’s Ministry,
which put an end to the slave trade.

The Prussians were defeated at Jena in 1806. By this victory a
large part of Prussia fell into the hands of Napoleon.

The Berlin Decree, issued by Napoleon, forbade all trade between
the Continent and Great Britain. In return, the British forbade trade
with France and her allies.
236 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

George Canning now came to the front. Because the King refused
to allow Roman Catholics to be officers, Grenville resigned, and the
Duke of Portland and George Canning formed a new Ministry. :

The Treaty of Tilsit was made in 1807. It broke up the alliance
against Napoleon. Russia and Prussia agreed to carry out the Berlin
Decree. The British seized the Danish fleet to keep it from falling
into Napoleon’s hands.



21. NAPOLEON AND THE SAILOR.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

4 Boulogne, a sea-port in the north of France. >
Every freeman, every man, for all were free.
5 Unprisoned, free.
Aye, always.
7 Sojourn, stay ; imprisonment.
8 Doating, dwelling fondly on the subject.
9 Livelong, whole.
10 Wherry, a light ferry-boat.
11 Uncompassed, without a mariner’s compass to show the chief points.
12 Sorry, poor ; frail.
Watiled, plaited.
Equipped, provided.
13 Zoe ship. The Greeks tell a story of Jason gailing to find the
“golden fleece ” in a ship called Argo.
14 Attitude, manner.
18 Flag of truce, a white flag, as a sign of peace for a cares



22. GEORGE THE THIRD.—X.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Lisbon, on the Tagus, the capital of Portugal.

Brazil, a country of South America. The King returned to Portu-
gal in 1821, but his son Don Pedro was crowned as Emperor of
Brazil in 1822. Brazil is now a republic.

Peninsular War. So called because it was fought in Spain and Por-
tugal, which form a large peninsula south-west of France.

2 Naples, in the Mediterranean, on the west coast of Italy.
3 Vimiera, north of Lisbon.

Convention, treaty ; agreement.

Cintra, a small town in Portugal, near Lisbon.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS, 237

3 Censured, blamed; found fault with.
Sir John Moore. See page 281..
Madrid, the capital of Spain.
5 Corunna, a sea-port in the north-west of Spain.
Wolfe, Charles (1791-1823), an Irish clergyman and poet.

SUMMARY.

The French invaded Portugal in 1807 because Portugal refused to
carry out the Berlin Decree. This was the beginning of the Penin-
sular War.

The French invaded Spain in 1808, and Napoleon’s brother Joseph
was made King of Spain. Sir Arthur Wellesley was sent to help the
Spaniards. He defeated the French at Vimiera in 1808.

The Battle of Corunna was fought in 1809. The French were de-
feated by Sir John Moore, who was killed:



23. THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Not a drum, etc., there was no music.
Corpse, dead body.
Ramparts, mound or earthen fort.
Discharged, fired.
Farewell, parting.
2 Bayonets, daggers or short swords fixed at the end of guns.
3 Shroud, winding-sheet.—Martial, soldier’s.
5 Narrow bed, grave.—Billow, sea.
6 Ashes, dead body.—Upbraid, blame.
7 Random, aimless.—Sullenly, in gloomy anger.
8 Fame, glory.—Gory, bloody.
Carved, cut out.



24, GEORGE THE THIRD.—XI.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Oporto, a sea-port of Portugal, noted for a strong red wine, which
has received from it the name of port.
Douro, a large river forming part of the boundary between Spain
and Portugal. :
Talavera, south-west of Madrid.
2 Busaco, between the mouth of the Tagus and that of the Dotto.
238 - EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

2 Torres Vedras, a village north-west of Lisbon. Wellington’s line
of defences extended from the Tagus to the Atlantic.
Tagus, a large river of Spain and Portugal.
3 Ciudad Rodrigo, a strongly-fortified town on the border of Spain.
Badajoz, a town of Spain on the Guadiana.
Salamanca, north-west of Madrid.
4 Vitoria, in the north of Spain, not far from the border of France.
Pyrenees, an extensive range of mountains forming the boundary
between France and Spain.
Toulouse, in the south of France.
5 Moscow, former capital and the holy city of Russia.
6 Leipsic, in Saxony.
First Treaty of Paris. The boundaries of France were to be the
same as at January 1, 1792. Great Britain retained Malta.
Elba, in the Mediterranean, between Corsica and Tuscany.

SUMMARY.

Wellesley returned to Portugal in 1809, and drove the French from
Oporto. His victory at Talavera gained him the title of Lord Wel-
lington. He marched on Madrid, but had to retreat into Portugal
again. In 1810 he was victorious at Busaco, and then intrenched
himself at Torres Vedras.

Wellington returned to Spain in 1812, stormed Ciudad Rodrigo
and Badajoz, won the great battle of Salamanca, and entered Madrid.
The next year he beat the French at Vitoria, and drove them across
the Pyrenees, finally defeating them at Toulouse in 1814.

Napoleon invaded Russia in 1812 with nearly half a million men.
The Russians burned Moscow, and,the French had to retreat in the
middle of winter. They lost 400,000 men.

Napoleon abdicated the throne of France in 1814. He was de-
‘feated at Leipsic by Russia, Prussia, Austria, and Sweden. He was
forced to make the First Treaty of Paris, by which he gave up his
throne and retired to Elba. Wellington was made a duke.



25. THE RETREAT FROM MOSCOW.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Broad square, loose squadron, forms of bodies of troops.
Dissonant, harsh-sounding.
2 Borodino, a village and river of Russia, 75 miles from Moscow. Here
the French, on their way to Moscow, defeated the Russians.
Carnage, the soldiers slain in battle.
Startled legions, retreating army.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 239

2 Naked sepulchre, uncovered Doral place
Hoof and wheel, horse and gun-carriage. - es
Helms and arms, helmets and weapons.
3 Fosse and fort, ditch and wall, or mound of earth.
Dismantled, out of its position. !
Port, hole in the wall through which the cannon is fired.
Strait, narrow passage.—Elate, flushed with success.
Moscow’s golden zone. The city is famous for its churches, many
of which have gilded domes.
Death was at their héels, they were in danger of dying from starva-
tion and cold.

4 The hour of vengeance strikes, the time has come when the invader

shall be punished.
Darkness broods, clouds gather.

6 Still on they sweep, etc. Verses 6 and 7 describe the terrible storm
of wind, hail, and snow which completed the -destruction of
Napoleon’s splendid army.

Sanguine, blood-red.



26. GEORGE THE THIRD.—XII.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

3 Insane, mad; unable to reason or think.
6 Shipbroker, an agent who buys and sells ships.
Mr. Perceval (1762-1812), Prime Minister 1809.
Lord Liverpool (1770-1828), Prime Minister 1812.
Robert Peel. See page 282.
7 Deserters, men who desert or run away.
8 Washington, the capital of the United States of North America;
named after General Washington.
New Orleans, on the Mississippi, the chief city in the south-western
States of North America.
Ghent, a town in Belgium.

SUMMARY.

The Burdett Riots took place in 1810. Sir Francis Burdett said
that more of the people should have votes to elect members of Parlia-
ment. For this he was put in prison, on which the people broke out
into riots.

The Prince of Wales became Regent in 1811, as the King had grown
hopelessly insane. :

Trade was bad, owing to the effects of the war and a poor harvest.
The Luddites broke into riots against the introduction of machinery.
240 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

The Prime Minister was shot in 1812 in the lobby of the House
of Commons. His name was Perceval. Lord Liverpool succeeded
him, and Robert Peel was made Secretary for Ireland.

A war with the United States from 1812 to 1814 arose about the
Orders in Council and the right of search claimed by England. An
American invasion of Canada failed. The British burned Washing-
ton, but failed to take New Orleans. The Treaty of Ghent ended
the war.



91, GEORGE THE THIRD.—XIIL.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Congress, an assembly consisting of representatives from the Great
Powers.
Vienna, capital of Austria.
Blucher (1742-1819), a distinguished Prussian general, whose eager-
ness in battle gained for him the name of “Marshal Forward.”
2 Brussels, the capital of Belgium.
Ligny (Zeen“ye), in Belgium, south-east of Brussels.
3 Quatre Bras (Katr Brah’), 20 miles south of Brussels, and 10 from

Waterloo.
Charleroi (Sharl-rwa’), a fortified town of Belgium, on the Sambre,
near the border of France. -

4 Wavre, 15 miles south-east.of Brussels.

5 Waterloo, 10 miles south of Brussels. :

6 La Haye Sainte, south of the village of Waterloo. Opposite to it
was the farm-house of La Belle Alliance.

Hougoumont, south-west of Waterloo.

7 Cuirassiers, cavalry armed with a cuirass, a defensive covering for
the breast. ,

Hulan, light cavalry.—Mandate, command ; order.

Their leader shunned. Napoleon directed the battle, but did not
take part in it.

8 He, Wellington.

Sword and shield, defender and protector.

Beam of light. Wellington’s presence on any part of the battle-field
had the same cheering effect on his soldiers that a beam of light
has in darkness.

‘Prompt, quick ; soon decided.

In sentence brief, not given to much speaking.

England, etc. Riding up to a regiment which was hard pressed, the
duke ‘said, ‘‘ Stand fast, Ninety-fifth! What will they say in
England?”
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 241

SUMMARY.

Napoleon left Elba in 1815, and was again made Emperor of the
French. The British under Wellington and the Prussians under
Blucher united to overthrow him.

Wellington’s plan was to join Blucher and march on Paris. Napo-
leon wished to defeat each army before they could unite.

At Quatre Bras the French were driven back by Wellington. To
make sure of the Prussians joining him, Wellington retired to Waterloo.

The Battle of Waterloo was fought on Sunday, the 18th of June.
Wellington and Blucher utterly defeated the French. Napoleon was
sent a prisoner to St. Helena, where he died in 1821.

The Second Treaty of Paris ended the war with France. The
British National Debt had grown to £860,000,000.



28. WATERLOO.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Revelry, merry-making.

Belgium’s capital, Brussels.

Beauty and chivalry, “‘ fair women” and ‘‘ brave men.”

Voluptuous, pleasant ; delightful.

Knell, death-signal.

8 Unconfined, unbounded ; without limits.

Flying feet, dancing.

4 Niche, corner. \

Brunswick’s fated chieftain, the Duke of Branaeice who was
killed when leading the advanced guard. His father was killed
in battle when the French defeated the Prussians at Auerstadt
in 1806.

Prophetic, foreboding.

Vengeance, desire to return injury for injury.-—Quell, satisfy.

5 Mutual eyes, eyes exchanging glances.
6 Mustering, gathering.

Impetuous, furious ; wild; headlong.

7 Camerons’ gathering, the war-note of the Cameron Highlanders
(79th Highlanders) played on the bagpipes.

War-note of Lochiel. Lochiel was the chief of the clan Cameron.

Albyn’s hills, highlands of Scotland.

Her Saxon foes. The Camerons fought against the English in sup-
port of the Stuarts.

Pibroch, air played on the bagpipes.

Mountaineers, dwellers among mountains ; highlanders.

Instils, implants; teaches.

(888) . 16
242 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

7 Evan’s, Donald’s fame. Evan Cameron of Lochiel fought at Killie-
crankie, 1689. His grandson Donald was severely wounded at
Culloden, 1746.

8 Ardennes, the forest or wood which lies between Brussels and
Waterloo.

Inanimate, without life.
Next verdure, next growth of grass above the graves of the slain.

9 Marshalling, arranging in order of battle.

Rent, divided.—Other clay, dead bodies.—Pent, packed together. —
Blent, mingled.
Byron, Lord. See page 273.

29. GEORGE THE THIRD.—XIV.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Stagnant, at a standstill.
James Watt (1736-1819), a great civil engineer.
Arkwright, Sir Richard (1732-1792), an inventor of machinery.
Others. The inventions of Arkwright (water-frame, 1769), Cromp-—
ton (mule, 1779), and Cartwright (power-loom, 1785), had im-
proved the cotton manufacture.
2 Apace, quickly.
3 Wheat. For several years back the price of wheat had averaged
50s. per quarter. Its highest price since 1815 was 96s. 11d. in
1817. The highest price reached during the century was 126s.
6d. in 1812. i
4 Brandon, in Suffolk.—Bury, town in Lancashire.
Warwick, county town of Warwickshire.
6 The Habeas Corpus Act was suspended—that is, persons could be
imprisoned without trial.
Ringleaders, leaders of men in an illegal act.
7 Universal Suffrage, giving every man a vote.
Equal Representation. See page 199.
_9 Fourth son. The descendants of George the Third are given on
page 288.
10 Robert Burns. See page 278.
William Cowper. See page 274.Thomas Gray. See page 277.
Oliver Goldsmith. See page 277.—Dr. Johnson. See page 279.
Hume, David (1711-1769), philosopher, historian, and miscellaneous
writer.
Gibbon, Edward (1737-1794), historian.
11 Crompton, Samuel (1753-1827), inventor of the spinning-machine.
Hargreaves, James, died 1778. Inventor of a spinning-machine.
Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829), a famous chemist.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 243

11 Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795), founder of the pottery trade.
John Smeaton (1724-1792), civil engineer.
The Eddystone Lighthouse, in the English Channel, near Plymouth.
Sir William Herschel (1738-1822), astronomer.
Uranus, the largest planet, is over seventy times as large as the
Earth.

SUMMARY.

The Peace of 1815 found the country in great distress. Commerce
was ruined, taxation was heavy, and the introduction of steam
machinery made work scarce for a time.

The Corn Act of 1815 prohibited the importation of corn until the
price was very high. This raised the cost of bread. The starving
people rose in riot in all the towns.

“Bread or Blood” was the motto of the rioters all over the country.

The Reform of the House of Commons was loudly called for. Strong
measures had to be taken to put down riotous meetings. A great
meeting in Manchester was broken up by the soldiers, and many
persons were killed. This was called in scorn the “Battle of Peter-
loo.”

The death of George took place in 1820.

The Princess Victoria, daughter of George’s fourth son, was born in
1819. Her father died the next year.

A great many famous persous lived during this reign. The chief
writers were Burns, Byron, Cowper, Scott, Gray, Goldsmith, Hume,
Gibbon, and Johnson. Many inventions and discoveries were made,
the chief being spinning and weaving machines. Lighting by gas was
introduced.

30. THE MARINERS OF ENGLAND.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

Mariners, seamen ; ocean warriors.
3 Native seas, seas around the coast of Britain.
Braved, defied ; stood out against.
A thousand years, for several hundreds of years: not exactly ten
hundred.
Launch, let fly.
Match, fight against.
Sweep, sail fast, carrying everything before you.
4 Start, rise up.
Field of fame, place where they made themselves famous.
Blake, Robert (1598-1657), one of England’s most daring seamen.
244 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

5 Bulwark, wall of defence.

No towers along the steep, no fortresses along the shore for its
defence,

Mountain waves, waves running high as-mountains.

With thunders from her native oak, with the roar of cannon from
her wooden ships. The old men-of-war were made of wood,
and were therefore called ‘‘the wooden walls of England.”
Men-of-war are now made of iron and of steel.

Quelis,. calms.

6 Meteor-fag. The ships of England darted swiftly from place to
place, like meteors, or shooting-stars, across the sky.

Terrific burn, frighten our enemies.

Fiery, fierce.



31. GEORGE THE FOURTH.—I.

: NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Brunswick, a state of North Germany.
3 Henry Brougham. See page 272.
Counsel, advocate ; pleader in a court of law.
5 Transported, banished ; sent out of the country.
Yeomanry, mounted volunteers.
Volunteers, those who perform military service voluntarily and
without payment.
6 Viceroy, one who rules in the name of the Sovereign.
Marquis of Wellesley, brother of the Duke of Wellington; was
Governor-General of India in 1797.
7 Castlereagh (1769-1822), Robert Stewart, Marquis of Londonderry ;
best known as Lord Castlereagh.
8 Imports, goods brought into a country.
Emancipation, freedom: in this case from an unjust law.
9 Burmese, the people of Burma.
Rangoon, a town of Burma.
Bay of Bengal, the part of the Indian Ocean east of India.

SUMMARY.

George the Fourth (1820-1836) was the eldest son of George the
Third. He acted as Regent for nine years before his father died.
His wife was Caroline of Brunswick.

The Cato Street Conspiracy, in 1820, was a plot formed to ill the
ministers, set London on fire, and throw open the prisons. It was dis-
covered, and the leaders were either executed or transported.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 245

King George visited Ireland in 1821. The Marquis of Wellesley
was doing much to relieve the distress in that country.

The King visited Scotland in 1822. At this time Canning again
became Foreign Secretary.

Three great questions engaged public attention. They were—l.
Freedom of trade. 2. Roman Catholic Emancipation. 3. Reform of
Parliament.

The First Burmese War took place in 1824. Some British settlers
were ill-treated by the Burmese. This led to war, and British Burma
was added to our Indian Empire.



32. GEORGE THE FOURTH.—II.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Lord Goderich (1782-1859), afterwards Earl of Ripon.
2 Navarino, a town and bay in the south-west of the Morea in Greece.
3 Repeal, recall; withdrawal.
Test Act, passed in 1673, required all persons who held public
appointments to be members of the Church of England.
Corporation Act, passed in 1661, required all town councillors and
magistrates in boroughs to be members of the Church of En-
gland.
Lord John Russell. See page 284,
Dissenters, those who had left or did not agree with the established
Church.
Excluded, shut out.
6 Sentry-boxes, small sheds to shelter them when on guard.
Efficient, good ; fit for their duty.
7 William, Duke of Clarence. The list of descendants of George the
Third is given on page 288.

SUMMARY.

Liverpool and Canning died in 1827. Canning succeeded Lord
Liverpool as Prime Minister early in the year, but died shortly after-
wards, and Lord Goderich succeeded him.

War with Turkey took place in 1827. Britain, France, and Russia
took the side of Greece against Turkey, and defeated the fleets of
Turkey and Egypt in the Battle of Navarino. Greece obtained her
freedom.

The Repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts was carried in 1828
by the Duke of Wellington’s Ministry.

Daniel O’Connell, the leader of the Irish people, was not allowed
246 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

to take his seat in the House of Commons, because he was a Roman
Catholic. /

The Roman Catholic Emancipation Act had to be passed by the
Government for fear of a rebellion in Ireland.

The new Police were organized in 1829 by Sir Robert Peel.

The death of George took place in 1830. He was a weak King and
a bad man.



33, WILLIAM THE FOURTH.—I.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Saxe-Meiningen, a duchy of Germany, between Gotha and Coburg.

2 Charles the Tenth of France, after he was driven from his throne,
resided for some time at Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh.

5 Mufiied, covered so as to subdue the sound.

Tolled, rung with slow and regular strokes.
Fired, set on fire.

6 Debate, discussion ; talk about.

9 Pocket or rotten boroughs. Called “‘ pocket” because the owners
of the land chose the members who sat for them in Parliament ;
“rotten ” because of the corrupt system of election.

Old Sarum, in Vriltshire, two miles from Salisbury, which is ‘‘ New
Sarum.” :
SUMMARY.

William the Fourth (1830-1837), was the third son of George the
Third, and brother of George the Fourth. His wife, Adelaide of
Saxe-Meiningen in Germany, was a good woman.

Revolution or Reform was the cry of the day. Revolutions in
France and Belgium excited the people. Wellington, who was against
reform, resigned, and Earl Grey succeeded him.

A Reform Bill was brought into Parliament, but not passed. Par-
liament was dissolved amid great excitement and rioting.

The General Election returned a House of Commons which passed
a Reform Bill. The House of Lords, however, refused to pass it. Lord
Grey resigned, and Wellington tried to form a Ministry, but failed.
Grey returned to office, and the Reform Bill was passed by both
Houses. :

The changes made by the Reform Act of 1832 were important. 1.
Rotten boroughs lost:their members. 2. Many large towns were re-
presented for the first time. 3. The right of voting was given to a
greater number of persons. Reform Bills for Scotland and Ireland
were passed in the same year.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. QA7

34. WILLIAM THE FOURTH.—II.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Slave trade, importing negroes from Africa and selling them as
slaves.

3 Lord Melbourne. See page 280.

4 Trades-union, a body of workmen of any trade or branch of manu-
facture united to secure the conditions most favourable for
labour, and the redress of any of their grievances.

Calico-printers, those who print patterns or figures on cotton cloth.

5 Municipal, belonging to the government of a town or city.

Election, choosing of members by the people for a new Parliament.
Town Council, the governing body in a town, elected by the rate-
payers. i :

7 George Stephenson (1781-1848) was a great engineer.

SUMMARY.

Slavery in the British Empire was abolished in 1833, thanks to the
efforts of William Wilberforce. £20,000,000 was paid to slave owners.

A new Poor Law was passed in 1834 by Lord Melbourne, who suc-
ceeded Lord Grey as Prime Minister. Relief was only to be given to
those living in poor-houses,

Trade Strikes became frequent after the repeal in 1825 of the laws
against trades-unions.

The Municipal Reform Act was passed in 1835, and gave the right
of voting for town councillors to those only who paid rates in the
towns. :

Coaches and canal boats were the chief means of conveyance till
1825.

The first Railway was built in 1825. In 1838 the. first steamboat
crossed the Atlantic.

William died on the 20th of June 1837, leaving no children to suc-
ceed him. i



. 85. QUEEN VICTORIA,—1I.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Lineage, line of descent.

Sovereignty, royal families.

Cerdic, the founder of Wessex, an old Saxon kingdom.
2 Prince Consort, See page 270.
248 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

2 Albert Edward, Prince of Wales,- married Alexandra, Reece of
the King of Denmark.

Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, married Marie, daughter of the Czar
of Russia.

Arthur, Duke of Connaught, married eanee Margaret, daughter of
Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia.

Leopold, Duke of Albany ; died 1884.

Victoria, Princess Royal of England, married the Crown Prince of
Germany ; became Empress of Germany in 1888, but her hus-
band lived only a few months after becoming Emperor.

Alice, married Prince Louis of Hesse; died 1878.

Helena, married Prince Christian.

Louise, married the Marquis of Lorne, the eldest son of the Duke
of Argyle.

Beatrice, married Prince Henry of Battenberg.

6 Vestige, trace; remnant.
7 Sanction. The consent of the Sovereign is necessary before an Act
; becomes law. It is given by signing each Act. °
Vetoed, refused to sign.
SUMMARY.

Queen Victoria began to reign in 1837. She was the daughter of
Edward, Duke of Kent, the fourth son of George the Third, and
niece of William the Fourth. She married her cousin, Prince Albert
of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. He died in 1861.

The Prince Consort, as Prince Albert was called, had a great and
good influence over the Queen.

Hanover passed to the Duke of Cumberland, the fifth son of George
the Third, as no woman could be ruler of that country..

Lord Melbourne remained in office till 1841, when Sir Robert Peel
became Prime Minister.

A new order of things has been established in this reign. The
practice of changing ministers whenever the Sovereign pleases has
been given up. The Sovereign must sanction any Bill approved by
Parliament.



36. VICTORIA'S TEARS.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 St. James’s Palace, one of the royal palaces in London. The
British Court is still known as the Court of St. James.

3 Majesty of Death. Death is a monarce who exercises Fovercign
sway over all.

5 Purples, royal robes. Purple is pecieded as a royal clot
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS, 249

5 Pageantries, sights; spectacles.
Heralds, officers who read proclamations.
7 Piercéd hand, the hand of Christ.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1809-1861), well-known English
poetess, was the wife of Robert Browning.

37. QUEEN VICTORIA.—II.



NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Richard Cobden. See page 274.—John Bright. -See page 271.
Crusade, expedition to recover the Holy Land. Hence any enter-
prise undertaken with zeal.
6 “ Protectionists,” those who were in favour of fannie imported corn
to protect or keep up the price of home-grown corn. :
Earl of Derby. See page 275.
8 Their constituents, the voters in their constituency or electoral
district.
9 John Frost returned to England in 1856, and died in 1877.
10 Rowland Hill (1795-1879), the originator of the penny postage
system. ‘
SUMMARY.

The Corn Law gave place in 1828 to the Sliding-Scale Act, hich
made the amount of the tax depend on the price of corn.

Richard Cobden and John Bright formed the Anti-Corn-Law
League against the tax in 1838.

The famine in Ireland in 1845 and 1846 was caused by the failure
of the potato crop. The people suffered greatly. Parliament voted
money to relieve the distress.

The Repeal of the Corn Law was carried in 1846 by Sir Robert Peel.

The Chartists demanded six things as the people’s Charter :—1.
That every man should have a vote. 2. Voting by ballot. 8. A new
Parliament every year. 4. Payment of members of Parliament. 5.
That every man, whether he was the owner of property or not, should
be held fit to be chosen as a member of Parliament. 6. That the
country should be divided into equal districts, each of which should
choose one member of Parliament. ;

The Penny Post was established in 1839 for the British Islands. It
was proposed by Rowland Hill.

38. QUEEN VICTORIA.—III.



NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Kandahar, south-west of Cabul.
.8 Negotiate, try to come to an agreement.
250 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

4 Jelalabad, east of Cabul.
7 Acre, properly St. Jean d’Acre, on the coast of Syria.
Mehemet Ali (1769-1849), Pasha of Egypt. He made his country a
powerful kingdom, all but independent of the Sultan of Turkey.

SUMMARY.

The First Afghan War lasted from 1839 to 1842. The British
restored Shah Shoojah to his throne, from which he had been driven
by Dost Mohammed. In 1841 Akbar Khan, son of Dost Mohammed,
forced the British to retreat from Cabul, but promised to protect them
on their way to India. The retreat ended in a massacre, only one
man escaping. General Pollock fought his way from India, took
Cabul and destroyed its walls. In 1855 Dost Mohammed made an
alliance with the British.

War broke out between Turkey and Egypt in 1839. Great Britain
helped the Turks, and captured Acre for them. In the end Mehemet
Ali and his heirs were settled as rulers of Egypt.

39, QUEEN VICTORIA.—IV.

‘



NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Opium, the juice of the white poppy, chiefly cultivated in India
and in Turkey.
2 Hong-Kong, now a British colony, is an island eight miles long and
from two to six broad.
Canton, one of the chief cities of China. -
5 Indus, one of the largest rivers in India, rises in the Himalaya
Mountains, in Thibet. F
Hyderabad, not far from the mouth of the Indus.
Meeanee, Dubba, near Hyderabad.
4 Porozeshan, } Villages of North-West India.
Aliwal, on the Sutlej.
Sobraon, a village of North-West India.
Lahore, a city on the river Ravee.
Chillianwalla, Goojerat, north-west of Lahore.

SUMMARY.

War took place with China from 1840 to 1842, to force opium on
the Chinese people. The island of Hong-Kong was taken, and the
British received the right to trade with certain ports in China.

The Union of the two Canadas took place in 1841. Two rebellions
had broken out there, and to quiet the country the Government passed
a law-making Upper and Lower Canada one province.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 251

War broke out in India in 1843, in Sindh. The war ended in Sindh
being made part of British India.

War in the Punjab began in 1845. It arose from an attack on
British troops during a civil war among the Sikhs. A treaty was
made at Lahore. A second Sikh War took place in 1849, after which
the Punjéb was added to our Indian Empire.



40. QUEEN VICTORIA.—V.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Surplus, money left over after the cost of government had been
paid.
2 Conspiracy, plotting or scheming against the Government.
Sedition, offence against the State next to treason ; making a com-
motion in the State.
Genoa, a city in the north-west of Italy.
8 Disruption of, breaking away from.
6 Recruit, restore ; renew.
Leavened, mixed ; made bitter.
9 Walmer Castle, near Deal, in Kent.

10 Conservative. This political party is so called because its leading
principle is to conserve or preserve the constitution, and to op-
pose changes.

Benjamin Disraeli. See page 275.

Coélition Ministry, a Ministry made up of men belonging to more
than one party.

Lord Aberdeen. See page 270.

Lord Palmerston. See page 282.

William Ewart Gladstone. See page 276.

SUMMARY.

The Income Tax was imposed in 1842 on every pound of income
above a certain amount. It was first introduced by Sir Robert Peel.

The Repeal of the Union was the object of a great movement in
Ireland headed by O’Connell. The leaders were imprisoned, but soon
set free.

The Disruption of the Church of Scotland took place in 1843, when
those of its members who objected to State interference in the affairs
of the Church formed the Free Church of Scotland.

The death of Sir Robert Peel took place in 1850. He had been suc-
ceeded as Prime Minister by Lord John Russell.

The Great Exhibition in London in 1851, the idea of Prince Albert,
was a great success.
252 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

The Duke of Wellington died in 1852, aged eighty-three. He was
buried in St. Paul’s Cathedral.

A change of ministers took place in 1852. Lord Russell was suc-
ceeded by Lord Derby, who gave way the next year to Lord Aberdeen.



41, THE WARDEN OF THE CINQUE PORTS.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

4 Driving, being forced by the wind. ,
British Channel, between England and France, generally called
the English Channel.
Panel, woodwork on the wall.
Streamed, shone down.
5 Pennon, small flag or streamer.
Frowning rampart, walls of a fort or battery mounted with cannon.
Feverish lips, cannon mouths hot with firing.
6 Alert, on the watch.
7 Sullen (cannon), dark ; gloomy-looking.
Couchant lions, cannon with muzzles raised are likened to animals
ready to spring on their prey.
Grim defiance, readiness to fight. ;
Opposite, of France. ,
8 Roared at drum-beat. At the beating of drums in the forts or
citadels morning guns were fired.
Morning salutations. The morning gun was a kind of greeting,
as ‘*Good morning,” or “ Allis well!”
9 Burden, saying—that is, each gun seemed to say the same thing.
Distant forts, of all the ports.
Summon, call; rouse.
Warden, Wellington.
10 Azure, blue sky.
Embrasure, opening in a wall for cannon.
11 Surveying, looking around.
Eye impartial. Wellington was an impartial commander. He
looked on all alike, and did not favour one more than another.
Gaunt figure, body worn thin with age.
. Field-Marshal, an officer of the highest rank in the army.
12 A single warrior. Death is here described as a warrior in sombre
harness mailed—that is, clad in dark armour.
Surnamed, also called.
The Destroyer. See Exodus xii. 23.
Rampart-wall, wall of the fort.
Scaled, climbed.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 253

14 Parley, talk; a name given to a conference between enemies.
Dissemble, hide his purpose. ,
Hoar, white with age. is
15 Surly, ill-natured looking.
Aspect, appearance.
Intimated, told ; made known.
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth (1807-1882), famous American poet,
wrote Eacelsior, Psalm of Life, Hiawatha, etc.



42, QUEEN VICTORIA.—VI.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Holy places, places connected with sacred history.
Constantinople, the capital of Turkey.
2 Danube, second largest river of Europe, flows through a large part
of Germany and Austria.
Odessa, a Russian sea-port on the Black Sea.
St. Petersburg, the capital of Russia, is named after Péter the
“Great, by whom it was founded in 1703. :
3 Theatre, seat; battle- “ground.
Lord Raglan ’(1788-1855), as Sir Fitzroy Somerset, served in the
Peninsular War.
Sebastopol, the Gibraltar of the Black Sea.
Alma, a river in the Crimea.
6 Sir Colin Campbell (Lord Clyde). See page 274.

SUMMARY.

The Crimean War arose from a quarrel between Russia and Turkey.
Great Britain and France took the side of Turkey, to prevent Russia
becoming too strong in the south-east of Europe. Sir Charles Napier
was sent with a fleet to take Kronstadt, in the Gulf of Finland, but
failed.

The Crimea was tlie chief seat of the war. The allies landed there
and marched on Sebastopol.

The Battle of the Alma, in 1854, was a great victory for the British
and French.

The Battle of Balaklava was fought about a month later, and was
won by the British cavalry.

The Charge of the Light Brigade was the most famous incident in
the battle, if not in the war. By mistake six hundred men were
ordered to charge the whole Russian army. Only one hundred and
ninety survived. :
254 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.
43, BALAKLAVA.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Almighty Seer, God.

2 Oblivion’s creeping pall, forgetfulness.
3 Thunder peal of doom, judgment day.
4 Married, linked as in marriage.

5 Armies three, British. French, Turks.
6 Prodigais of life, reckless of life.

8 Vain, of no use.

9 Holocaust, offering or sacrifice.



44. QUEEN VICTORIA.—VII.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Inkermann, a town in the Crimea.
4 Ministered, attended.
5 Sardinia, an island in the Mediterranean, lying west of Italy.

Anglo-French alliance, the union between Britain and France

against Russia. :
6 Cholera, a very painful and deadly disease.
8 Kars, a city of Armenia; besieged by the Russians in 1855 and 1877.

Great odds, much larger numbers.

Crippled, weakened ; disabled.

: SUMMARY.

The Battle of Inkermann was called the ‘soldiers’ victory.” The
Russians surprised a British force early one morning. With the
greatest difficulty the British held their own until the French came to
their help.

The sufferings of the soldiers from cold, hunger, and sickness were
terrible. This roused such anger at home that the Government was
turned out of office, and a new one was formed by Lord Palmerston.

Florence Nightingale went out with a band of nurses to attend to
the sick and wounded.

Nicholas, the Czar or Emperor of Russia, died in 1855, but his son
continued the war. Sardinia joined the allies.

The British and French leaders were changed several times. Lord
Raglan, General Simpson, and Sir William Codrington were the
British generals. '

.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 255

Sebastopol was taken at last by assaults on the Malakoff Tower
by the French and the Redan by the British.
The Treaty of Paris ended the war in 1856.



45, QUEEN VICTORIA.—VIII.

NOTES AND MEANINGS,

3 Delhi, on the Jumna, one of the most important towns of Northern
India.

Lahore, a city in the north-west, on the river Ravee.
Sir John Lawrence (1811-1879), Indian civil servant.

5 Jumna, a river of India. It joins the Ganges at Allahabad.
Hapless, unfortunate.

6 Lucknow, a town on the Goomtee, a tributary of the Ganges.

8 Bareilly, a town between Delhi and Lucknow.

SUMMARY.

Our Indian Empire is held by an army of British soldiers and sepoys.
The sepoys rebelled because their cartridges were greased with cow’s
fat, which no Hindu may touch.

The Indian Mutiny began with the capture of Delhi.

The Massacre of Cawnpore, in 1857, was the result of treachery by
Nana Sahib. After three weeks’ siege the British left the town with
a promise of protection, but were foully murdered.

The Relief of Lucknow by Colonel Havelock, with a small force,
took place in 1857. Havelock himself was then shut up in Lucknow,
but relieved by Sir Colin Campbell. The Mutiny ended in 1858.

The Government of India was, in 1858, put into the hands of a
viceroy and a council of fifteen. In 1876 the Queen was declared
‘*Himpress of India.”



46. QUEEN VICTORIA.—IX,

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Passports, written warrants granting permission to travel in a
foreign country.
3 Pekin, the capital of China.
Bombard, attack with cannon.
6 Ottawa, on the river Ottawa, a tributary of the St. Lawrence.
Half-breeds, those born of parents of different races.
7 Magdala, a hill fortress of Abyssinia.
956 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

8 Ashantee, a native kingdom, on the Gold Coast, north of the Gulf
of Guinea.
Sir Garnet Wolseley. See page 287.
9 Holdings, small farms.

10 School Board, a committee or number of men elected by the rate-
payers in a town or parish to take care of the education of the
district.

SUMMARY.

A change of Ministry took place during the Mutiny—Lord Derby
becoming Prime Minister till 1859, when Lord Palmerston returned
to power. é

Chinese Wars broke out in 1856 and 1860. Canton was captured.
Peace was made in 1858. In the third Chinese war, in 1860, the British
and French marched to Pekin: the Chinese yielded, and Kooldgn was
given to the British.

A Second Reform Act, establishing household suffrage, was passed
in 1867 by Lord Derby. and Mr. Disraeli. It added to the number of
voters both in town and country. Benjamin Disraeli became Prime
Minister, and was succeeded by William Ewart Gladstone in 1868.

The Dominion of Canada was formed in 1867 by the union of all
the North American provinces except Newfoundland.

An Abyssinian War, in 1868, was brought to an end by the capture
of Magdala.

An Ashantee War, in 1874, was carried on by British troops under
Sir Garnet Wolseley, who burned Coomassie, the chief town of Ashan-
tee, and forced the King to make peace.

New Laws for Ireland disestablished the Irish Church, and im-
proved the position of tenants.

Two Education Acts for England and Scotland required all children
above a certain age to attend school.

The Ballot Act of 1872 established secret voting.

A new Parliament in 1874 drove Mr. Gladstone from office, and
Mr. Disraeli became Prime Minister again.



47, QUEEN VICTORIA —X.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Malta, an island in the Mediterranean belonging to Great Britain.
2 Cyprus, an island in the Mediterranean ; noted for its fruits.
Berlin, capital of the German Empire.
Finest provinces, Bulgaria, Montenegro, Roumania, Servia, and
Bosnia.
3 Leaning more, more favourable.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 257

3 Ameer, the title of the ruler of Afghanistan.

Embassy, a body of ambassadors, or people sent on state business
from one government to another.

4 Envoy, a person sent in the name of the British Government to
transact business with a foreign ruler or government.

6 Zulu. Zululand is north-east of Natal.

7 Ulundi, in Zululand.

Prince Imperial (1856-1879). Prince Louis Napoleon (Bonaparte),
the only son of the Emperor Napoleon the Third.

8 Transvaal, a state north of the river Vaal, founded by Dutch Boers
(farmers) in 1848. Its independence was declared in 1852. It
was annexed to the British possessions in 1877, but is now the
South African Republic. )

Laing’s Neck, Ingogo, Majuba Hill, in the Transvaal.

SUMMARY.

War between Russia and Turkey broke out in 1877. Great Britain
did not help Turkey, but was ready to interfere if the Russians entered
the Turkish capital. The island of Cyprus was placed under British
rule. The Peace of Berlin in 1878 ended the war.

A Second Afghan War arose from a refusal of the Ameer to receive
a British envoy. A treaty was made, but war soon broke out again on
the murder of Sir Louis Cavagnari. General Roberts took Cabul,
and by a famous march relieved Kandahar.

The Election of 1880 placed Mr. Gladstone at the head of the
Government instead of Mr. Disraeli.

A Zulu War was fought against Cetewayo, the King of the Zulus,
in 1878. The principal events of the war were the defeat of the
British under Lord Chelmsford, the gallant defence of Rorke’s Drift,
the defeat of the Zulus in the Battle of Ulundi, and the death of the
Prince Imperial. Cetewayo was taken prisoner, was restored to his
throne in 1888, was defeated by a rival chief, and died in 1884.

A Transvaal War broke out in 1880. The Boers of the Transvaal
rebelled. After defeating the British at Laing’s Neck, Ingogo, and
Majuba Hill, they were allowed self-government.



48. QUEEN VICTORIA.—XI.

NOTES AND MEANINGS,

1 Tel-el-Kebir (Ke-beer’), 26 miles west of Ismailia, which is on the
Suez Canal.
Ceylon, an island belonging to Great Britain, at the EOushen ex-
tremity of India.
2 The Mahdi, called Mohammed Achmet.
(888) 17
258 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

2 Soudan, a wide and thickly-peopled region in Africa, south of the
Sahara or Great Desert.—Tokar, south of Suakim,
8 General Gordon. See page 277.
Khartoum, at the junction of the White Nile and the Blue Nile.
4 Korti, about 120 miles above Dongola.

Abu Klea, ]. ;
5 area in the Bayuda Desert, between Korti and Shendy.
SUMMARY.

War in Egypt began in 1882, when Arabi Pasha overthrew the
Egyptian Government. The: British captured Alexandria, and beat-
ing the rebels at Tel-el-Kebir, restored the Khedive. Soon after, a
revolt in the Soudan, headed by the Mahdi and Osman Digna, was
crushed by the defeats of the rebels at Teb and Tamasi.

General Gordon was sent to Khartoum. He had to defend himself
against: the Mahdi. General Wolseley went to relieve him. After
the Battles of Abu Klea and Metammeh, General Wilson sailed up
the Nile, and found that Khartoum had fallen into the Mahdi’s hands
two days before, and that Gordon was killed (January 28th, 1885).

49, QUEEN VICTORIA.—XII.



NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Fenian. The name is said to be derived from Fion or Finn Mace-
Coul, one of Ossian’s heroes.

Habeas Corpus Act, passed in 1679 to secure that prisoners shall be
tried within a given time. When it is suspended, men can be
arrested and kept in jail without a trial.

6 Lord Frederick Cavendish, a son of the Duke of Devonshire, and
brother of the Marquis of Hartington. He succeeded Mr. W.
E. Forster as Chief Secretary for Ireland.

7 Carey. He was sent abroad for safety ; but was followed, and mur-
dered on board ship.

Earl Spencer, Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland.

. § Westminster Hall now forms the entrance-hall of the Houses of Par-
liament. For seven hundred years the High Courts of Justice
were held in it.

SUMMARY,

Troubles in Ireland have lately been the subject of much attention.
In 1865 the Fenians conspired to repeal the Union, and the leaders
were banished.

Home Rule for Ireland, or the establishment of an Irish Parliament
to manage Irish affairs, has been the demand of that country for some
years. Charles Parnell was made the Home Rule leader.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 259

A Land League, in favour of the farmers against the landlords, was
formed by Parnell and Michael Davitt. Those who opposed the
League were boycotted, and had their cattle killed.

Anew Land Act, passed in 1881, gave Irish tenants fair rents, fixity
of tenure, and free sale. The Land League continued till it was put
down by law. |

In 1882 Lord Frederick Cavendish, Chief Secretary for Ireland, and
Mr. Burke, the Under-Secretary, were murdered in the Phcenix Park,
Dublin. A Prevention of Crimes Act was passed. Some Irishmen
fron. America tried to blow up Scotland Yard, the House of Com-
mons, Westminster Hall, and the Tower of London with dynamite.

A third Burmese War led to that country being annexed to the
Indian Empire in 1886.

50. QUEEN VICTORIA.—XIII.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Highlands and Islands, the northern part of Scotland, and the
islands on the west coast.
Messengers of the law, sheriff officers.
4 Redistribution, a new arrangement of districts for choosing mem-
bers of Parliament.
Returned, elected.
5 Land Purchase Bill, a Bill to give the Government power to buy
the land from the landlords and sell it to the tenants.
6 Jubilee, every fiftieth year among the Jews (Lev. xxv. 11); any
‘season of public festivity and rejoicing.

SUMMARY.

A Scottish Secretary and a Scottish department were created in
1885.

Scottish Crofters imitated the Irish tenants, and got some of their:
grievances redressed. 5

The Reform Act of 1884 placed voters in towns and counties on the
same footing. j

A Redistribution Act, of 1885, divided the country into equal elect-
oral districts.
_ Mr, Gladstone and Lord Salisbury have been in turn Prime Minister
several times. Mr. Gladstone gave way to Lord Salisbury in 1885,
but after an election which soon followed he was called back to power.
In 1886 he was defeated over his Home Rule Scheme, and Lord Salis-
bury again came into office.

Queen Victeria’s Jubilee in 1887 was celebrated all over the British
Empire with great rejoicings.
260 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.
51. PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

Nineteenth century, 1801-1900.
2 Stage-coaches, coaches that run regularly between two stages or
places.
Sedan chairs, covered chairs carried on poles, for one person.
3 Cartwright, Dr. Edmund, a clergyman; chiefly known from his
valuable invention of the power-loom. Died 1823.
Power-loom, a machine for weaving cloth, worked by steam.
4 Hand-loom, a machine for weaving cloth, worked by the hand.
6 Locomotive, travelling engine.
9 Telegraph, an instrument for sending messages 5 along wires from
one place to another by means of electricity.
Euston. Square, Camden Town, places in London.
Electricity, the force which shows itself in lightning and in many
other ways.
Cable, 2 wire or number of wires twisted together, through which
telegraphic messages are conveyed under the ocean.
Science, special knowledge.
10 Telephone, an instrument which conveys sound or words along
wires from one place to another.
11 Phonograph, an instrument by means of which sound ‘may be
recorded and reproduced.
Photography, the art of taking likenesses of persons and places by
- means of the action of light on certain prepared substances.
18 Zambezi, a great river of Hastern Africa.
Congo, a great river of Western Africa.
“Darkest Africa,” the title of Stanley’s book in which he gives an
account of his Emin Pasha Relief Expedition.
Khedive, the king or ruler of Egypt.

SUMMARY.

Towns were in a wretched condition at the beginning of the nine-
teenth century. They were dirty and badly lighted. Stage-coaches
and sedan chairs were the chief means of conveyance. Many cities
and towns increased in size and population.

Manufactures, aided by steam and numerous inventions, made
rapid progress. Britain is now the first manufacturing nation in the
world.

Trade and Commerce have been rere increased and extended by
railways and steam-boats.
EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS. 261

Gas was introduced in the beginning of the century, and is now
used in every part of the land.

The first telegraph message was sent in 1887. Telegraph wires.
now circle the earth, and messages may be sent round the world.

But other wonders were in store. The telephone now bears messages
from town to town ; electricity yields a light brighter than a hundred.
gas jets; the phonograph records and reproduces our words ; photog:
raphy has been greatly improved ; while sewing-machines and reaping-
machines are in everyday use.

Discovery and adventure have produced a list of brave travellers
and explorers in the Arctic Regions, in Africa, and in Australia.

Great authors have been very numerous in every department of
literature.



52. HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.—I.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

1 Narrow seas, the English Channel and the North Sea.

2 Four hundred years, 43 to 410.

3 English tribes, Saxons, Jutes, and Angles.

7 Mountain fastnesses, strong places among the mountains. .

SUMMARY.

The Ancient Britons were a half-savage people who inhabited our
island two thousand years ago.

Coming of the Romans: 55 B.C. and 43 AD. The Romans ruled |
over a part of Britain for nearly four hundred years.

Coming of the English: 449 A.D. English tribes from the other
side of the North Sea conquered South Britain, and called it England.

Coming of the Danes: 787. The Danes invaded England, and
Danish Kings sat on the English throne. At last the Danes and the
English became one people.

Coming of the Normans: 1066. William, Duke of Normandy, be-
came King of England, and.the Normans became part of the English
race.

Conquest of Ireland: 1172. Henry the Second invaded Ireland,
and Henry the Highth called himself King of Ireland.

Conquest of Wales: 1282. Edward the First conquered Wales, and
called his eldest son Prince of Wales.

Union with Scotland: 1603. James the Fourth of Scotland married.
the daughter of Henry the Seventh in 1502. Their great-grandchild,
James the Sixth of Scotland, became the first King of the united
kingdom.
262 EXERCISES ON THE LESSONS.

53. HOW THE BRITISH EMPIRE GREW.—II.

NOTES AND MEANINGS.

2 Cession, having been surrendered or given up.
3 Strong places, forts and harbours.
Store-houses, places for keeping supplies of food and coal for ships,
and goods for trading.
6 Colonies, bodies of people who have left their native land and have
settled down in other countries.
11 Dependencies, places under British rule and not inhabited by
British people, such as India.
Administered, managed ; carried on.
12 Emigration, leaving one’s own country to settle in another.

SUMMARY,

Victoria, Queen and Empress, rules over the British Empire, which
is seventy times as large as the British Isles.

Our foreign possessions have been acquired by conquest, by cession,
by purchase, and by settlement.

Conquest of India: 1757. The English Hast India Company was
formed in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. A great victory at Plassey
in 1757 made us masters of India. In 1876 Queen Victoria received
the title of Empress of India. i

Conquest of Canada: 1759. General Wolfe defeated the French at
Quebec, and Canada passed into the hands of the British. In the
reign of George the Third, the American colonists formed the United
States of America.

Colonies in Australasia: 1788. The British flag was first hoisted
on the shores of Sydney. New Zealand became part of the British
Empire in 1840,

Colonies in Africa have been settled at various times ;' the chief of
them is Cape Colony.

The government of the colonies is carried on by resident governors
with councils, ete.

Colonial extension has made rapid progress during late years.
Emigration and commerce have aided in the growth of the British
Empire.

British history shows the progress and growth of the British
Empire, until it has become the largest and most powerful state in the
world.
CHIEF DATES.



HOUSE OF HANOVER.

George I. (great-grandson of James I.)..........0- « L714-1727















Earl of Halifax Prime Minister........... oe 14
Lord Bolingbroke fled to France .............:0::0 wee L715
Jacobite Rebellion in Scotland (The “‘ "Fifteen ”) we. L715
Retreat of the Jacobites at Sheriffmuir....... we 1715
Jacobites defeated at Preston.............. . 1715

Riot Act passed.......... ce ececceeeeeeeeeeeee vee 1715
Sir Robert Walpole Prime Minister (1)... wee L715
Septennial Act passed............... s- L716
Earl Stanhope Prime Minister. . 1717
Lord Sunderland Prime Minister
Quadruple Alliance (Britain, Cera aS and Holland)












against Spain... eee % Ssoeebiianna es Gant cel (AG
The South Sea Bubble............ ..-. 1720
Walpole Prime Minister (2)...........:.0::cceeceeeseescereneeeeeeens vee 1721
Bishop Atterbury banished for forming a Jacobite plot... eel 722
The Spaniards unsuccessfully attacked Gibraltar ........000.0........ 1727
George IT. (only son of George D.) ..ccccccccceceeccccsn cee tecseetseneeaes 1727-1760
The Excise Bill introduced, and then withdrawn.....................5 1733
William Pitt (afterwards Earl of Chatham) entered Parliament.. 1735
The Porteous Riot in Edinburgh z 1736
Death of Queen Caroline ............cccccccccssssseeecesseeeseeeeanens ...- 1737
John Wesley founded the Wesleyan Methodist Pees ahaa 1738
War with Spain... eee .... 1789-48
War of the Austrian Succession ...........0ceeceeee pecs TAQ,
Walpole resigned, and was made Earl of Orford.. we. 1742
Harl of Wilmington Prime Minister.................. w+. 1742
Sir Henry Pelham Prime Minister............ wee 1748
George ITI. defeated the French at Dettingen. ..............0c cee 1743

Anson completed his voyage round the world, begun in 1740...... 1744

Death of Walpole (Harl of Orford)

' Britain made peace with Prussia ..........ccccceeeeeseseceeeeneeeseeees

The British, Dutch, and Austrians were defeated by the French
absMlontenoy.. mcccce. suisecnecssetencensneueaanenersssee nada paeseactrmenew ere 1745

Second Jacobite Rebellion (The ‘‘ "Forty-five ”)............:0::cebesees 1745


264 CHIEF DATES.

Royal army defeated at Prestonpans .............ccccccseececeeeeeseeaeneee 1745



Prince Charles reached Derby.

Royal forces defeated at Falkirk ............ccccccccccccceecccceececeeeeeeers 1746
Final defeat of Prince Charles at Culloden. .....00000...cccceeeeeeee. 1746
Earl of Bath Prime Minister........0..0..0..0cccccecceseeeesceeceeceecntaeeens 1746




Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. 0.000.000... ccceeeceecee ese eeneeneecereneeahawen ers 1748
Correction of the Calendar. ...........cccceeccceeececeeecceueteeesteuescsenseeee 1752

~ Duke of Newcastle Prime Minister (1)...........ccccecesceecceeeeeeeeeeee 1754
Seven Years’ War began Be
Surrender of Minorca.......



Black Hole of Caloutta...000..0.0c: cc eeeseeees sneer nen teneteeneteeneneeeees 1756
Duke of Devonshire (with Pitt) Prime Minister............00...0.0... 1756
Duke of Newcastle (with Pitt) Prime Minister (2)............0....... 1757









Clive’s victory at Plassey..........-..ccccccecsssseeeeccseeearpeetsesseesseeanete 1757
Defeat of the French at Quebec by Wolfe... ceeeecseeeee ene 1759
Defeat of the French at Minden, in Prussia...............c0c00cceeeceeee 1759
ConquestiofiCanadank a y.c7 py sctssencsete ces mac tecere en ian ne eaters 1760
George IIL. (grandson of George IL.).. 0... t ce eeeecee ee aes 1760-1820
Pondicherry taken from the French...........1.. cscs eeeceecce eee eeeeeeens 1761
The Family Compact (France, Spain, and Naples against
SBSPIGAATI 3. chee eee is Face seanae eens Siena nem caana te hanty ee eet ee
Earl of Bute Prime Mimister.........00...0ccecccceccecsesseeceeceeceeateneess
"PEAGEXOLNE ar isittre seis tev ete inne aa ous SPaenc ieee See enone sas maaan
George Grenville Prime Minister ;
John Wilkes sent to the Tower...........000.00
Clive returned to India as Governor of Bengal.................c.eseeee 1765
American Stamp Act passed ............00. ces gas ieee nen omavace coe 1765
Marquis of Rockingham Prime Minister (1)................cseseeeeeeeeee 1765
The Stamp Act repealed..........cccecccccecce cece cee seeseeeeeseeseeeetees 1766
Duke of Grafton (with Chatham) Prime Minister ...........0000000.. 1766
Death of James Stuart, the Old Pretender..................ccceeceeeeees 1766
Taxes imposed on tea, glass, etc., imported into America........... 1767
Lord North Prime Minister. ...... 000.00 ....cceeceescceece ree eeeeeee 1770
All American taxes, except that on tea, remitted............00..00. 1770
Warren Hastings first Governor-General of India .............0...0. 1773

Cargo of taxed tea thrown into Boston harbour by the colonists.. 1773
First Congress of colonists held at Philadelphia; a Declaration of
Rights was drawn up, and trade with Britain was suspended. 1774

Wilkes allowed to take his seat in Parliament........0.....0....::0eeee 1774
American War of Independence began......... .. 1775
Battle of Lexington ........0....0..0 cee .. 1775
Colonists defeated at Bunker’s Hill........... .. L775



Americans invaded Canada and took Montrea: a
British driven from Boston.............00:cccccccecsenesseecveceesaceesseneseses 1776
«

CHIEF DATES. 265

Declaration of American Independence... rH . 1776
British victory at Brandywine River, and eapure a ‘Phila-
elphiss-aeaes state staerancee aaseteat vate wie caca reeiten carer nares bases
Surrender at Saratoga ..........ieceeecssessecseesesceveeseneeesesseeeeree eee
Death of Pitt, Earl of Chatham ................cccccesecsseeeseeeeseee eeeees
Siege of Gibraltar by the French and Spanish fleets ...
The Gordon ‘* No Popery ” Riots in London..............
War in the Carnatic begun by Hyder Ali
Surrender of the British at Yorktown.......00.....cccceeeeeseeeeeeeeeee
Marquis of Rockingham Prime Minister (2)...
Earl of Shelburne Prime Minister ..............ccccccceeeeee
Independence of the United States acknowledged
Treaty. of JViersailles: (cc cccicsese coded os dn eeeetai Sheases oceveenrn ees
Duke of Portland Prime Minister (1)...
William Pitt Prime Minister (1)..........
Board of Control formed for India.......0.... ee
Lord Cornwallis became Governor-General of India...








Commercial Treaty with France. ..........0....cccseeseeeeneee . 1787
Trial of Warren Hastings began...................beceeeecceseeeee seen eenens 1788

William Wilberforce introduced a Bill for the Abolition of the

Sa VOURTAG Grist se eee taiites soeena see Sienees et enue errata
Death of Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender.
Outbreak of the French Revolution .......0.....00.-.: cee
Canada divided into two Provinces, Upper and Lower..
Republic established in France..................









War with France.............c::sceeeceeeeeeee ee w. 1798
Naval Mutiny at the Nore... 0.2.0.0... ccccses cesses ceneeesee sen aeeeeeceseanees 1797
Admiral Jervis’s and Lord Nelson’s victory off Cape St.
NANCOD Gan. eSestece se siws sexes seus eetasics sans an teeemirs eeteesesege Teas sass 1797
Defeat of the French and Dutch fleets off Camperdown. we. 1797
Trish Rebellion quelled at Vinegar Hill......... -.-- 1798

Nelson defeated the French in the Battle of the Nile..
Tippoo Saib killed at the capture of poataagos





The French retreated from Acre..............0:00cc000 .. 1799
Malta taken by the British ....000..0000occcccsseeeeeeeccceceeceeneececeneaenees 1800
A Northern League formed by Russia, Prussia, Sweden, and
| Denmark against Britain....0...000..0 ccc ccccccceseeneeeeeeeeeceeeeseeeeee 1800
Napoleon Bonaparte defeated the Austrians at Marengo’ and
DET OhenLindenier: atc seen esheets etic arin eR ence meetin ees 1800
Union of the Parliaments of Great Britain and Ireland... 1801
Defeat of the French at Alexandria....... ha tte 1801

Nelson destroyed the Danish fleet at Copenhagen ..
Henry Addington (Lord Sidmouth) Prime Minister .. aoe
IRedce: of sAmiensiaretex sick cs seecsn ee erusiorene aceuwveasamese teem aranene reenase 1802
War with France renewed .............cccceeescceee seeceeeeseeeeneeeesaeeeeees 1803
266 CHIEF DATES.



A Mahratta War broke out in India... eccceeesseessseceeeeeeeeeees 1803
William Pitt Prime Minister (2) ao
Napoleon became Emperor of France, as Napoleon I... veveeree 1804
Nelson defeated the French and Spanish fleets at Trafalgar, but

was killed in the fight 2.0.0.0... eeceeeeeeeeceeeeceeeenensenerssneeane 1805

Napoleon defeated the Russians and Austrians at Austerlitz...... 1805
Lord Grenville Prime Minister
Death of Pitt and of Wox......0.......-csecesosenneseasecesesecceascaseseecosees
A new Alliance against France was formed by Britain, Russia,
SPNUSe] aye ANG (SAX OU Wed ree torte ce Mes eococeersese saree eae 1806
Napoleon defeated the Prussians at Jena .............00c00ccecesesseeeees 1806
Berlin sD ecreerissuied waco sstereoeek mere d es eas eae Nee ae eee
Duke of Portland Prime Minister (2)....
Mreatysot Lilettss cots ssceaessscevekeuns :











The Peninsular War
French Invasion of Spaiti..........cccccccccccecccsesessesssssssesensnsansceeees
Sir Arthur Wellesley (afterwards Duke of Wellington) defeated

the French at Vimiera...........0.ccccceecccessccsccssccecesceseeesesceees 1808
French defeated at Corunna; death of Sir John Moore............. 1809
French defeated at Talavera; Wellesley made Lord Wellington. 1809
Spencer Perceval Prime Minister ............0.c0ccccsscccccceceeceeseeceeeee 1809
French defeated at Busaco............:cccceccccccsssesseeececeeeeeeneeans ... 1810
Duke of Wellington intrenched himself at Torres Vedras 1810
The Burdett Riots in London... .ccccccceeccececcceeetesseetennestees 1810
George, Prince of Wales, made Regent....... ... 1811
Defeat of the French at Fuentes d’Onoro .... ». 1811
British victory at Barrosa. 00.0... ceccceceecceceeeeneeecceeseceeaseeeeess 1811
Wellington took Ciudad Rodrigo and Badajoz.........0..cccceeeee 1812
Wellington defeated Marmont at Salamanca
Spencer Perceval, Prime Minister, shot.........








Earl of Liverpool Prime Minister ........00.0... cee csceeesseseeeeeeeaee
Napoleon invaded Russia............:ccsseeeseecceeaeeeseeseeseceeeeeetaae ones 2
War with the United States..........0.....0006
Wellington defeated the French at Vitoria..
Napoleon defeated at Leipsic
Wellington’s victory over Soult at Toulouse..............:ccceeeeeees
Napoleon sent to Elba...........cecceccccsseeeeeeseeenes

First Treaty of Paris.......
Wellington made a Duke.
Congress at Vienna.........
Treaty of Ghent............ccccclecceceeeeeeeeeeeee
Napoleon left Elba, and returned to Paris...
Final overthrow of Napoleon at Waterloo...
Napoleon banished to St. Helena................ Ys
Second Treaty of Paris.......c.ccccccscssssseeecscoceseesecssectucnsussecesersce i
CHIEF DATES.

WorntActipassedivecce nee oy eee tees scte teats eet oe mead eee
Reform of the House of Commons demanded.. ae
The OB lanketeersisrasewrorcusects 1eccceer Mater coer ar eeeis team
Disturbance, called the ‘ Battle of Peterloo,” in St. Peter’s



Fields, Manchester..............cccssceesessceecteceeeeeaneseeessstseseeeees 1819
Victoria, daughter of the Duke of Kent, was born..................... 1819
George IV. (eldest son of George IIL.) ........cceccceecesccceeeenennenes 1820-1830



Cato Street Conspiracy .............c...
Trial of Queen Caroline .....
Death of Queen Caroline...
The King visited Ireland
The King visited Scotland .............0.000.
First Burmese War. .............
The First Railway opened..... a
Death of Lord Liverpool..............cceeseceeceee cesses ceeeeeeeseeeneeeeneeenes
George Canning Prime Minister..............cceeeseeseeneneeeeseeeeeees
Death of Canning 2.0.0.0... es
Viscount Goderich Prime Minister
Combined fleets of Britain, France, and Russia destroyed the
Turkish and Egyptian fleets at Navarino.
Duke of Wellington Prime Minister.
Test and Corporation Acts repealed.........












Roman Catholic Emancipation Act passed Rear a teknahied
New Police organized by Sir Robert Peel ..............ecceceeeeeeeeeee eee
William IV. (third son of George IIL.).......0cccceeeee serene 1830-1837
Harl Grey Prime Minister. ............cccccccccceseecceceseceesseseeeessseseenss 1830
Reform Act passed............ccccccccceecessseaeneens 1832

Slavery abolished in the British Empire
Lord Melbourne Prime Minister (1)...... ts
New Poor Law passed .........ccc.cccsseceeees ... 1834
Sir Robert Peel Prime Minister (1) ....

Lord Melbourne Prime Minister (2)... ... 1835
Municipal Reform Act passed .............cccccceeee i dt eh eee seen 1835
Victoria (daughter of. Edward, Duke of ee fourth son of George

PET Peg anito wel ens esccersss sre sssuysaeee caoes seer ess atk geese 1837
Hanover separated from Great Britain ..0.0.c. cece ... 1837

Anti-Corn Law League formed by Cobden and Bright... ... 1838
The Chartist agitation began..........cccesscceseeseeceeereees ... 1838
The Penny Post founded by Rowland Hill ...........cccceessseceeeet 1839.
First Afghan Wat.........0:ccccsssecceeeeesenneee ... 1839-42

War between Turkey and MGV pt vacenstavencsicsctecouasereteetore einer eee 1839
iWrariwithy@hiniarcaccccdksrescresteoctoereecccecnesceecerspermivemsesestrer ae 1840-42
268 : CHIEF DATES.

Queen Victoria inarried her cousin, Prince Albert ............ccccee 1840
Upper and Lower Canada umited ............ eee eee eeeeerer eee eeees 1841
Sir Robert Peel Prime Minister (2) ............cc..cscccsesceeeceeeeeeesenes 1841
































Tucome Wax Am Posed, 22ers. este vedas (aneactacsesscstecsesecnan vase seenstenceme 1842
War broke ‘outiin sliders. c2)c2srs.c5 20 qt tes se cee seme sone see sucess eae 1843
Agitation in Ireland for the Repeal of the Union; O’Connell

ATVOSEC Oat ava eevee oes ane ae tise cgts Wisee eee reetaae hana weneg oe Deaetne totane 1843
Disruption of the Church of Scotland............20.:c:cccccceeeeeseeeeeeees 1843
First Sikh War broke out. .......0.0..ceeccccccsesesseeeeeeceeeeenaeaaeeeereeee 1845
Sikhs defeated at Aliwal and Sobraon.... seve 1846
Repeal of the Corn Laws .............:ceseeecceeeeceaccennseeneretececseneatenes 1846
Lord John Russell Prime Minister (1)............cceccceeccecceaeeeereeeees 1846
Potato Famine in Treland ...............:ccccecscceesceeeeeceeceeeecansbeneevess 1846
Death of O'Connell at Genoa..... wee 1847
Second: Sileh War begana. sess, svee sve seerssscisestrees sn ceeestite nests 1848
Sikhs defeated at Chillianwalla and Goojerat; Punjab added to

ux Indian Mim pire ssi. cecges ioe asi seuss sieatensad tea tesvavesseseceestaadones 1849
Death of Sir Robert Peel... cccccceeeecceeccneneaeeeeneneetsenaeeeeeres 1850
The Great Exhibition in London ..... veo 1851
Earl of Derby Prime Minister (1)..............::ccceecceeeeneeeteneceneeeeee 1852
Death of the Duke of Wellington..... seen. 1852
Harl of Aberdeen Prime Mimister..................csseeceeceeeeeeeeeteeeneee 1852
Second Burmese War.............ccecceeeeseneeeceeceeecteenersgenteneeeseeeeenes 1852
Crimean War .........00- cece Teak Seaee eevee shaven sseanioteaa cornee eee 1854-56
Russians defeated at the Alma ............cccceecceeeeeeeeeseeeeeeeeeeeeeetee LB54
Battle of Balaklava (Charge of the Light Brigade)..............0...... 1854
Russians defeated at Inkermann ..............0...ccceeeeee cee eeeeeeenteeteee 1854
Lord Palmerston Prime Minister (1)...0....0.c:cccceeeeeeeeeeeeceeeneeeeees 1855
Sebastopolistormed'.: 2. sc25.2.5.3 e852 nc sce si cont coc sp ooe sa detgeesdeseeensaedese 1855
Mreatys OF MP ALIS needa: cocretse mi oterae ras meron av eataceuarais cateetens eats 1856
New: War. with @ hinaiytscst.cepes sbaeck ocean, ee ake ce aa eat vineneeaees 1856
The Indian Mutiny.... 1857
Massacre of Cawnpore .............::cseeeeeeeeeeeee es ws. 1857
Relief of Lucknow by Havelock and Outram ...............:::ccceee 1857
Earl of Derby Prime Minister (2)...............c0ccccceeee ccc eeeeeeseeeeetee 1858
Mutiny in India put down by Lord Clyde... ccc cerns 1858
East India Company abolished 200.000.0000. bic eeecee cee cee cece ee eee nates 1858
Jews allowed to sit in Parliament .............cceccceeceeeeeeneeeeececereeenee 1858
Lord Palmerston Prime Minister (2) ....... -....cccccceecceeeeeeesseeeeeee 1859
Volunteer Movement began .............ccessseeeceecectee eee aeneeseeeeeeeaeuee 1859
Third Chinese War.......... a... 1860
Convention of Pekin.........0.....ccccceeeeceeeeeeseeenes erent eae 1860
Commercial Treaty with France brought about by Mr. Cobden... 1860
American Civil War wee 1861-65



Death of Albert, the Prince Consort ........02...c:::cesteececsseeeeeenen ees 1864
CHIEF DATES. 269

Lord John Russell Prime Minister (2).....
Habeas Corpus Act suspended in Ireland
Earl of Derby Prime Minister (8)............c:.ccceccseeseeesseesseteeeeees
The Atlantic Cable laid between Valentia (Ireland) and New-

foundland
Second Reform Act passed
Benjamin Disraeli (afterwards Lord Beaconsfield) Prime







Ministers (1s) Sect. aeane vere en eerraceeret ni Reattara rare Mu ene eRe ys 1867
Dominion of Canada formed by the union of all the North
American Provinces, except Newfoundland ..................00005 1867



FAW YSSINIAT WATS etcin ry sesh destino soanen re ae teers Seer ait eae eee ea 1868
William Ewart Gladstone Prime Minister (1) ...........0...c0cccceee 1868
Disestablishment of Irish Church Act............c.ccccceeceeeseetetseseaes 1869
First Irish Land Act passed..............c:cccccceeccccssseeeseseuenescssenreee 1870 ~

Elementary Education Act passed for England and Wales......... 1870
The Ballot Act passed ............ccccccccsccesereesceenen ences
Elementary Education Act passed for Scotland...
Death of David Livingstone, the African ee and
















INSPIOTEP RS eierestcreere teres cael cvetreveeteoseeinetees ‘ saeee ss OT
Ashantee War.. As AOR | Bi Sh eae, 0 eel canine, se Ui 1874
Benjamin Disraeli Prime Minister (2).....0.......ccccccceeeececeeneeesenees 1874
Queen Victoria proclaimed Empress of India.................::eeee 1876

wiWartin thei rans vaal ioc ssssveccssstecchitestacesveavs.vivecsestenecesoete terse 1877
War between Russia and Turkey began................c0cccceseeeeeenenees 1877
Treaty of Berlin ended the Russo-Turkish Wav..............::0::0006 1878
Second sAtehana war ucsscserenenaecsseescostvaeseasaanerssasaae sretere mies 1878



AANA AY ees teintast reer eee OER rrr ACR OTSPRS CIAO EMC Cred LEER asa 1878
William Ewart Gladstone Prime Minister (2)... er 1880
Second Transvaal War............:::ceee arate uss cosee see 1880
Second Irish Land Act ‘passed Sect Peenaerectemeevee 1881
Death of Lord Beaconsfield (Benjamin Disraeli)... . 1881

Murder of Lord Frederick Cavendish and Mr. Burkes: in 1 Dublin.. 1882
Prevention of Crimes Act passed ........0ccccccceeceeseeenennetseeneneeaes 1882
War in Egypt: Battle of Tel-el-Kebir.....00.0... cesses 1882

War in the Soudan.............. estas Scere Tea on ener Mee 1883
Third Reform Act passed............eccceceessecsseeeeteeeeseeeeeeeeeesessenaee 1884
General Gordon killed at Khartoum ve 1885
Redistribution Act passed. ............cccccesseeceececeeaeeeeetentaneseceeeeenes 1885
Lord Salisbury Prime Minister (1). ............ccesceeccssesssseeseeeesseseee 1885
William Ewart Gladstone Prime Minister (G) Bearescossabeciaseee costo 1886
Lord Salisbury Prime Minister (2)............ 1886

Jubilee of Queen Victoria... sec eee cette ete tence cece ates 1887
CHIEF PERSONS
OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.



ABERDEEN, GEORGE, EARL OF (1784-1860), a Scottish peer and
statesman, was born in the same year as Lord Palmerston. They
were. both educated at Harrow and Cambridge, and both entered
Parliament.in 1806—Palmerston as a member of the House of Com-
mons, and Aberdeen as a representative peer of Scotland in the House
of Lords. In 1813 he was sent as ambassador to Vienna, and in the
following year he signed the Treaty of Paris. He was raised to the
British peerage as Viscount Gordon in 1815. He first took office
under the Duke of Wellington in 1828, when he became Secretary
of State for Foreign Affairs. Except for a short time, he remained
out of office for eleven years after the fall of the Wellington Ministry.
In 1841 he was Foreign Secretary under Sir Robert Peel, and became
one of the leaders of the Free Trade party.

In 1852 the state of parties required what is ealled a Coalition
Ministry—that is, a Ministry the members of which belong to differ-
ent parties in the House. Lord Aberdeen succeeded in forming his
famous Coilition Cabinet, which included men of eminent abilities
and statesmen of large experience, such as Lords Russell, Palmer-
ston, and Granville, and Mr..Gladstone. The new Ministry was ex-
tremely popular for a time, but the bad management of the Crimean
War led to the resignation of Aberdeen in 1855, after which he lived
in retirement.

ALBERT, PRINCE CONSORT (1819-1861), born at Ehrenberg, near
Coburg, in Saxony, was the second son of the Duke of Saxe-Coburg-
Gotha. He was carefully educated along with his elder brother, and
showed great fondness for natural history, chemistry, painting, and
music. The Prince first met his cousin, Queen Victoria, in 1836, and
they were married in 1840. The Prince Albert received the title of
Royal Highness, and obtained the rank of field-marshal. Then be-
gan for Prince and Queen a life of great happiness and noble earnest-
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD. 271

ness. Few men could have filled so wisely or usefully the difficult
position in which the Prince was now placed. He did not interfere
in the government of the country, but he advised the Queen in times
of difficulty ; and he did much good by the help he gave to art and
science, to industry and education. Whatever he considered to be
for the good of the country received his warmest support; and in him
the labouring classes had a true and firm friend. }

Coming to England as a foreigner and as the husband of the Gusen,
he had many jealousies to overcome, and at first his trials were neither
few nor slight ; but his wise moderation and calm self-restraint brought
him through all difficulties. The title of Prince Consort was at length
given to him, and from that time he took his rightful position at her
Majesty’s side as an English Prince.

The work in connection with which Prince Albert’s name is best
known was the great Exhibition of 1851, which in so many ways as-
sisted the arts and manufactures of our own and other countries. He
was actively engaged in promoting a second Exhibition, to be held in
1862, when he caught a chill, which passed into typhoid fever; and
he died on the 14th December. After his death the people realized
that a great man had passed away. He was indeed a prince who, in
the words of the Poet-Laureate, wore ‘‘ the white flower of a blame-
less life.” A grand monument to the memory of “Albert the Good”
was erected in London, as a mark of the gratitude of the British nation
for his work.

ANSON, GEORGE, LORD (1697-1762), was a famous naval com-
mander. On the outbreak of war with Spain in 1739, he received the
command of a small fleet of vessels, with orders to inflict whatever in-
jury he could on the Spanish commerce and colonies in South America.
Sailing from England in 1740, he doubled Cape Horn in the following
year. In 1744 he returned to England with only one ship, but with
£500,000 of Spanish treasure. He had completed a voyage round the
world in three years and nine months. In 1747 he was placed in com-
mand of the Channel Fleet, and utterly defeated the French off Cape
Finisterre. For these services he was made Lord Anson. He was
afterwards made Admiral of the Fleet and Commander-in-Chief of
the British Navy.

BRIGHT, JOHN (1811-1889), a politician who took a leading part in
the Anti-Corn-Law agitation, was the son of Jacob Bright, a cot-
ton spinner and manufacturer at Rochdale, Lancashire. The family
were members of the Society of Friends. While a young man, Bright
took great interest in public questions, and addressed meetings on tem-
perance and Parliamentary reform. With Cobden he took part in
an extensive Free-Trade agitation in 1839; and in 1843 he was elected
972 CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.

Member of Parliament for Durham. Four years later he was returned
for Manchester ; and in Parliament he eagerly advocated Free Trade.
Like Cobden, he was a member of the Peace Society, and spoke
strongly against the Crimean War in 1854. Rejected by Manchester,
he was elected for Birmingham in 1857, and assisted in the overthrow
of Lord Palmerston’s Government. Though he was a cotton manu-
facturer, and his own business suffered severely on account of the
war, he warmly supported the North in the great American struggle
which ended in the abolition of slavery in the United States. In
1868 he accepted office as President of the Board of Trade, under Mr.
Gladstone as Prime Minister; but in 1870 he was obliged to retire in
consequence of a serious ailneas: He afterwards took office as Chancellor
of the Duchy of Lancaster ; and was appointed Lord Rector of Glas-
gow University in 1880. Unable to support the Government in its
Egyptian policy, he retired from office in 1882. In the following
year a series of popular demonstrations were held in Birmingham to
celebrate John Bright’s completion of twenty-five years as member
for that city. In 1886 he opposed the Home Rule policy of Mr.
Gladstone. He was regarded as one of the most eloquent speakers of
his time. :

BROUGHAM, HENRY, LORD (1778-1868), was an eminent statesman
and lawyer. He was at first a member of the Scottish bar, but went to
the English bar in 1808. Soon afterwards he entered Parliament as a
Whig, and distinguished himself by his eloquence. He became Can-
ning’s most powerful rival, but was defeated by him at the Liverpool
election in 1812. He added greatly to his popularity by his successful
defence of Queen Caroline in 1820, He had always been the friend of
Reform, and when Earl Grey came into office in 1880, Brougham was
created a peer and made Lord Chancellor, which office he continued to
hold till 1834. In that year Lord.Grey’s Government was succeeded
by that of Sir Robert Peel. When the Whigs returned to power,
Brougham was not included in the Cabinet. From that time till his
death he kept aloof from party politics, and devoted himself to philan-
thropic objects and to, social and legal reform. Brougham was one of
the earliest Genunbabars to the Edinburgh Review, and throughout his
long life devoted much time to literary and scientific pursuits.

BROWNING, ROBERT (1812-1889), was one of the greatest poets of the
age. He published Parace?sus in 1835, and in the following year Straf-
ford, atragedy. Neither this drama nor The Blot on the Scutcheon,
produced in 1843, proved successful on the stage. He has also written
Pippa Passes, Dramatic Lyrics, Men and Women, The Ring and the
Book, and other poems. Browning died at Venice in 1889, His wife
was Elizabeth Barrett Browning, the poetess, who died in 1861, :
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD. 273

BURKE, EDMUND (1730-1797), was a philosopher and statesman.
He went to London in 1750 to study law, but soon found that litera-
ture was more to his taste. He first attracted notice by his essay on
The Sublime and Beautiful, published in 1756. Some years later he
became Private Secretary to Lord Rockingham, and in 1765 he entered
Parliament. He opposed North’s policy towards the American
colonies, and while the war was going on he advised Parliament to
recognize their independence. In 1782 be became Paymaster-
General in the Rockingham Ministry. He took a prominent part
in the impeachment of Warren Hastings, speaking with great elo-
quence. His most famous work is his essay on the French Revolution.

BURNS, ROBERT (1759-1796), is regarded as the national poet of
Scotland. He struggled through life as ploughman, small farmer,
and exciseman, but was never successful. Sickness, debt, and ir-
regular habits brought him to an early grave. He was a true poet
of nature. His best-known works are Scottish Songs, his lines Zo a
Mountain Daisy and To a Mouse, Tam o’ Shanter, and the Cottar’s
Saturday Night. ;

BYRON, GEORGE GORDON, LORD (1788-1824), a famous English
poet, was born in London, and educated at Harrow and Cambridge.
His first volume of poems was called Hours of Idleness. He lived a
restless and wandering life, chiefly abroad. The publication of Childe -
Harold’s Pilgrimage, his greatest poem, began in 1812. He also wrote
Manfred (a tragedy), Don Juan, The Prisoner of Chillon, and Turkish
tales in verse—as, The Corsair, The Giaour. In 1828 he sailed for
Greece to aid the Greeks in their war of independence, and died there
in the following year.

CANNING, GEORGE (1770-1827), statesman and orator. He at first
went to the bar, but in 1793 he entered the House of Commons, and
resolved to make politics his profession. He ably supported Pitt, and
became his Under Secretary of State. In the Portland Ministry, Can-
ning was Foreign Secretary in 1807. He blamed Lord Castlereagh for
the failure of the Walcheren expedition. The result was a duel, in
which Canning was wounded, and both had to leave the Ministry.
When Castlereagh committed suicide in 1822, Canning succeeded him
as Foreign Secretary in the Liverpool Ministry. He became Premier
in 1827, but died before the end of that year.

CARLYLE, THOMAS (1795-1881), philosopher and historian, was one
of the greatest English prose writers of the nineteenth century. He
was born at Ecclefechan in Dumfries-shire. On leaving Edinburgh
University he became a teacher. In 1818 he gave up teaching and

(888) 18
274 CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.

devoted himself to literary work. Among the best-known of his pro-
ductions are Sartor Resartus, the French Revolution, and the Life of
Frederick the Great, ‘‘The Chelsea Sage,” as he was called, died at
Chelsea, at the age of eighty-six.

CLIVE, ROBERT, LORD (1725-1774), the founder of the British Em-
pire in India, began life as a clerk in the East India Company’s ser-
vice; but tiring of his work, he entered the army. In 1751 he took
Arcot with 500 men, and held it with 300 against 10,000. In 1757 he
defeated the Nabob of Bengal at Plassey, thus avenging the Black
Hole of Calcutta. This victory laid the foundation of the British power
in the Fast. On his return to England he was made a peer. Clive went
out to India again in 1764 to put down abuses in the government.
In 1778 he was charged by the House of Commons with having abused
his power. He was honourably acquitted, but was so worried that
he committed suicide in 1774. i

CLYDE, COLIN CAMPBELL, BARON (1792-1863), entered the army in
1808, and served in the Peninsula, in North America, in China, and
in India. He distinguished himself greatly at. Chillianwalla and
Goojerat in 1849. He commanded the Highlanders in the Crimean
War, and rendered valuable service at the Alma. At Balaklava he
repelled a charge of Russian cavalry with his Highlanders drawn up
in line. In 1857 he was sent to India to quell the Mutiny, and was
rewarded for his success with the title of Baron Clyde.

COBDEN, RICHARD (1804-1865), was partner in a cotton factory in
Manchester. He travelled in Europe and America, and published
the results of his observations in pamphlets. About 1838 he began,
with John Bright, to agitate for the repeal of the Corn Laws, and
formed the Anti-Corn-Law League. In 1841 he entered Parliament,
and in 1846 he saw his labours crowned with success. Sir Robert
Peel gave Cobden the whole credit of the measure which repealed the
Corn Laws. His countrymen presented him with £70,000. In 1859
he negotiated a commercial treaty with France, the object of which
was to promote intercourse between the two countries. Throughout
life Cobden was the consistent advocate of a peace policy.

COLERIDGE, SAMUEL TAYLOR (1772-1834), one of the ‘‘ Lake Poets 2
(the others were Wordsworth and Southey), was born in Devonshire.
His chief poems are the Ancient Mariner and Christabel (a fragment).
He also wrote a series of Lectures on Shakespeare.

COWPER, WILLIAM (1781-1800), an eminent English poet, was born
in Hertfordshire, He was the author of The Task, John Gilpin, and
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD. 275

other favourite English poems... He contributed nearly seventy.
hymns to Newton’s Olney collection. He suffered during the greater
part of his life from fits of insanity. Southey, his biographer, calls
him ‘‘the best of English letter writers.”

DERBY, EDWARD, EARL OF (1799-1869), an eminent statesman,
was born in Lancashire. He was elected Member of Parliament at
the age of twenty-one, was a member of Canning’s Ministry in 1827,
and was Chief Secretary for Ireland under Lord Grey. He took
a leading part in promoting the Reform Bill of 1832, and also in abol-
ishing slavery in 1833. He was thrice Prime Minister. His last
Government passed the Reform Bill of 1867. He was one of the
most brilliant orators of his day, and made himself a name in litera-
ture by his translation of Homer’s Iliad in blank verse.

DICKENS, CHARLES (1812-1870), one of the most popular of En-
glish novelists, was born at Portsmouth. He was first employed in a
lawyer’s office, but soon began to write and report for newspapers.
His first book, called Sketches by Boz, made him famous as a humor-
ist. On the establishment of the Daily News, Dickens was appointed
chief editor. In 1856 he started a popular magazine under the title
of Houschold Words, and three years later changed the name to All
the Year Round. This paper he edited till his death. He wrote a
number of novels, among which are Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist, and
David Copperfield. In his later years he gave readings from his works
both in England and America. He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

DISRAELI, BENJAMIN, EARL OF BEACONSFIELD (1804-1881), was
an eminent statesman and novelist. It was intended that he should
study law, but he soon decided to make literature his profession,
_and in 1826 he published his first novel, Vivian Grey. After spending
some time in foreign travel, he gave his attention to politics. He was
at first a Liberal, but soon became a Conservative. He was elected
Member for Maidstone in 1837. When making his maiden or first
speech in Parliament, the House laughed at him and refused to listen.
The young member grew angry, and said that the day would come
when the members of that House would be glad to listen to him; and
come it did. Disraeli supported Peel until he proposed the abolition
of the Corn Laws, and then he became the leader of the Protectionists.
With other opponents of Sir Robert Peel, he formed the Young En-
gland Party. In 1852 he was Chancellor of the Exchequer under Lord
Derby. The Ministry being defeated in the following year, he was
out of office till 1858, when he again became Chancellor of the Ex-
chequer. He distinguished himself by his able opposition to the
Palmerston Ministry. In'1866 Derby and Disraeli returned to power
276 CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.

and passed the Reform Bill of 1867. The following year Derby re-
tired, and Disraeli became Premier; but he resigned in a few months,
and the Liberals came into power, with Gladstone as Prime Minister.
In 1874 Disraeli became Premier a second time, and continued in office
for six years. During this period he was made Earl of Beaconsfield.
When ‘the Conservatives were defeated in the General Election of
1880, Beaconsfield resigned, and Gladstone once more returned to
power, Lord Beaconsfield’s best-known novels are Lothair, Coningsby,
and Sybil.

FOX, CHARLES JAMES (1749-1806), a celebrated: statesman and
orator, entered the House of Commons at nineteen. His first speech
was made against allowing Mr. Wilkes to take his seat. He was
for a time a member of Lord North’s Ministry, but in 1774 he
joined Burke in denouncing the policy adopted towards the North
American colonies. In 1782 he joined the Rockingham Ministry as
Foreign Secretary; but on Rockingham’s death he withdrew, and
helped the Conservatives to turn out the Shelburne Ministry. Fox
and North then formed a codlition Ministry, which was overthrown
after a few months by the opposition to Fox’s India’ Bill. When
Pitt came into power, Fox headed the opposition, and a long contest
began between these rivals. At this time Fox took a prominent part
in the impeachment of Warren Hastings. On the outbreak of the
French Revolution, he sympathized with the demands of the French
people for liberty. This led to a breach with Burke, who violently
denounced the Revolution. For some years afterwards Fox lived
in retirement, collecting materials for his History of the Reign of
James II. On the death of Pitt in January 1806, Fox and Grenville
formed a Ministry. Fox induced the House of Commons to pass re-
solutions abolishing the slave trade. He also contemplated a peace
with France, but he did not live to see it accomplished.

GLADSTONE, WILLIAM EWART, a famous statesman, orator, and
author, was born in Liverpool in 1809. When twenty-three he was
elected Member of Parliament for Newark, and two years later he
accepted the post of Junior Lord of the Treasury in Peel’s Govern-
ment. At this time hé was a Conservative. He held several offices
in Peel’s second Ministry, and was Chancellor of the Exchequer under
Lord Aberdeen and Lord Palmerston. When Palmerston died in
1865, Lord Russell succeeded him, and Gladstone became leader of the
Liberal party in the House of Commons. In 1868 he became Pre-
mier, and remained in office till 1874. During this period Gladstone
disestablished the Irish Church, and passed the Ballot Act and other
measures. In 1874 Gladstone was succeeded by Disraeli ; but-in 1880
the Liberals gained a large majority in the General Election, and
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD. 277

Gladstone again returned to power, but was defeated in 1885. In 1886
he was Prime Minister for the third time, but was defeated in the
same year on his Bill for Home Rule in Ireland. Gladstone is almost
as famous a literary man as a politician. He is one of the greatest
living authorities on Homer and Greek and Assyrian literature.

GOLDSMITH, OLIVER (1728-1774), was born at Pallas, near Long-
ford, Ireland: He attended Trinity College, Dublin, and. the Uni-
versities of Edinburgh and Leyden. He led a wandering and adven-
turous life, travelling over Europe, paying his way by playing his
flute. On his return-to England he was arrested in his lodgings in
London for debt, and he had to sell the manuscript of his famous
novel, The Vicar of Wakefield, to pay his rent. His chief poems are
The Deserted Village and The Traveller.

GORDON, CHARLES GEORGE (1833-1885), a famous British soldier
and philanthropist, was born at Woolwich. He joined the army in
1852, and served in the Crimean War. He commanded the Chinese
army in the Taeping rebellion, which he succeeded in completely crush-
ing. He showed good generalship and very great bravery in this war,
often leading his troops into battle with no weapon but a walking-stick.
After this he was known as Chinese Gordon. On his return to En-
gland he was made a colonel. From 1874 to 1879 Gordon Pasha, as
he was now called, was Governor of the Soudan under the Khedive of
Egypt. In 1882 he was again sent to the Soudan to try to make
terms with the rebel Mahdi. He was besieged in Khartoum, and gal-
lantly held the town for a whole year. The British force sent to
rescue him arrived two days too late—Khartoum had’ fallen, and
Gordon was murdered. Gordon was a man of very fine character.
He was a true Christian soldier, and the Bible was his constant com-
panion. ‘

GRAY, THOMAS (1716-1771), a famous poet, was born in London.
He was educated at Eton and Cambridge, where in 1768 he became
Professor of Modern History. His Elegy written in a Country Church-
yard is considered to be one of the most perfect poems in the English
language.

GRENVILLE, GEORGE (1712-1770), a prominent statesman, was a
younger brother of Richard Grenville, Earl Temple, and a brother-
in-law of the elder Pitt. After holding various subordinate posts, he
was Prime Minister from 1763 to 1765. He began the famous contest
with John Wilkes; and introduced the Stamp Act, which led to the
American War. His third son, George, Lord Grenville, was Premier
in 1806. :
278 CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.

GREY, CHARLES, EARL (1764-1845), a famous statesman and re-
former. He introduced the question of Parliamentary reform in the
House of Commons in 1797. He was Prime Minister when the Re-
form Act of 1832 was passed. He also helped to abolish the slave trade
(1807), and to carry through the Roman Catholic Relief Act (1829).

HARLEY, ROBERT, EARL OF OXFORD (1661-1724), was a statesman
of Queen Anne’s time. He had a great knowledge of Parliamentary
law and practice, and was elected Speaker of Anne’s first Parliament.
In 1704 he joined Godolphin’s Ministry, and became Secretary of
State; but in 1708 he changed parties, and became a leader of the
Tory opposition. The Whigs at this time had become very un-
popular, and the trial of Sacheverell led to their downfall and a
change of Government. A Tory Ministry was formed by Harley and
St. John in 1710. On the conclusion of the Treaty of Utrecht,
Harley was made Earl of Oxford and:a Knight of the Garter. He
was the last to bear the title of Lord High Treasurer of Great Britain;
henceforth the chief adviser of the Sovereign was known as the First
Minister of the Crown or the Prime Minister. In 1714 St. John
(Bolingbroke) drove him from office. George the First became King
in 1714, and in the following year Oxford was impeached and sent to
the Tower, charged with intriguing with the Pretender. After two
years’ imprisonment he was released. He spent the remainder of his
life in retirement.

HASTINGS, WARREN (1732-1818), was the first Governor-General
of India. He went out to India as a writer in the Civil Service in
1750. In 1757 he served under Clive as a volunteer. Having
mastered several of the Indian languages, he was frequently employed
on diplomatic missions, and soon became rich. He returned to En-
gland in 1764; but lost his money, and had toreturn to India. In 1772
he was made President of the Supreme Council of Bengal, and in 1773
Governor-General of India. His government was one of great vigour.
He organized the native states, subdued those that were hostile, and
consolidated the British power in India. His great struggles were
against the Mahrattas and Hyder Ali of Mysore. , In 1785 he resigned,
and returned to England, where he was charged with having abused
his power and oppressed the native princes. His trial lasted for seven
years, and was conducted by Burke, Fox, and Sheridan, the greatest
orators of the day. At length, in 1795, he was acquitted, but the
trial left him penniless. He retired with a pension from the East
India Company, and spent the remainder of his life at the old seat of
his family at Daylesford.

HAVELOCK, SIR HENRY (1795-1857), was a gallant British soldier,
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD. 279

as distinguished for his simple Christian earnestness as for his bravery.
He spent most of his lifein India. He served in the Burmese War,
the Afghan War, and several wars against the native tribes in India.
He is chiefly famous for the bravery he displayed in suppressing the
Indian Mutiny. In two months he gained nine victories and relieved
Lucknow, but was himself shut up in that city until relieved by Sir
Colin Campbell. Havelock died shortly afterwards, worn out by the
hard work which he had done.

HEMANS, FELICIA DOROTHEA (1794-1835), was a well-known
English poetess. When fifteen years of age she published her first
volume of poems. Her finest piece is the Forest Sanctuary ; but she.
is better known by her shorter poems, such as The Graves of a House-
hold, The Voice of Spring, etc.

a

HOOD, THOMAS (1798-1845), was a celebrated humorist and pathetic
poet. Besides humorous pieces, he wrote many other poems, the
chief of which are The Song of the Shirt, The Bridge of Sighs, and the
Dream of Eugene Aram. On his tombstone, in Kensal Green ceme-
tery, is the inscription, “‘ He sang the Song of the Shirt.”

HUNT, LEIGH (1784-1859), was an English poet and essayist. He
and his brother John were in 1812 sentenced to a fine and two years’
imprisonment for some remarks against the Prince Regent. Many of
his friends visited him in his prison, among whom were Byron, Moore,
Shelley, and Keats. His chief works are the Story of Rimini, in verse;
A Legend of Florence, a drama; and prose essays, sketches, etc.

JOHNSON, DR. SAMUEL (1709-1784), a famous author, was born at
Lichfield, in Staffordshire. He was at first employed as an assistant
in a school; but after a time he took to literature, and lived chiefly
in London. His chief works are Lives of the Poets; Rasselas, a ro-
mance; and Zondon, a poem. His most famous work is his Dictionary
of the English Language.

LAMB, CHARLES (1775-1834), a celebrated essayist and humorist, was
born in London. For many years he was in the employment of the Kast
India Company, from which he retired on a pension of £450 a year.
He was a friend of Coleridge, Wordsworth, Southey, and many other
distinguished writers. He is best known by his Essays of Elia.

LIVINGSTONE, DAVID (1818-1873), the greatest of African trav-
ellers, was born at Blantyre, in Scotland. He was the son of poor
parents, but educated himself at Glasgow University, and became a
medical missionary. He went to South Africa in 1840, and did not
280 CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.

return to England till 1856. Two years later he went again, and re-
mained for six years. Going out once more in 1865, he was not heard
of for six years until found by Stanley, who had been sent out to search
for him. Stanley found the great explorer at Ujiji in 1871. The two
travellers remained together for four months. When they parted
Stanley brought home Livingstone’s journals and letters. Livingstone
was never again seen by a white man. He died at Ilala, near Lake
Bangweolo, but his body was brought to England, and buried in
Westminster Abbey. Et

LYTTON, EDWARD BULWER, BARON (1805-1873), was a cele-
brated English novelist. He produced a series of brilliant novels,
including Pelham, The Last Days of Pompeti, The Caxtons, etc. He
also wrote the Lady of Lyons, a popular play. He was raised to the
peerage as Baron Lytton in 1866. He-sat in the House of Commons,
first as a Whig, but afterwards as a Conservative. He was Colonial
Secretary under Lord Derby.

MACAULAY, THOMAS BABINGTON, LORD (1800-1859), a celebrated
historian and essayist, was born in Leicestershire. He wrote many
essays, chiefly historical and political, for the Edinburgh Review.
He was called to the English bar in 1826, and four years later entered
Parliament. ‘For nearly three years he held a legal appointment in
India. On his return, in 1839, he entered Parliament a second time.
He held office in the Melbourne Ministry. His chief works are the
Lays of Ancient Rome and a History of England, which was left un-
finished at his death.

MELBOURNE, WILLIAM LAMB, VISCOUNT (1779-1848), a cele-
brated statesman, entered the House of Commons in 1805, and joined
the Whigs. He was called to the House of Lords on the death of his
father in 1828. He was Home Secretary in Lord Grey’s Ministry,

_ and when Grey retired Melbourne became Prime Minister. He held
this office for nearly seven years.

MONTAGUE, CHARLES, EARL OF HALIFAX (1661-1715), a states-
man and poet, was educated at Westminster School and Cambridge.
He joined in the invitation to William of Orange, and was a member
of the Convention and of the Parliament which followed it. He was
appointed Lord of the Treasury in 1691, became Chancellor of the Ex-
chequer in 1694, and First Lord of the Treasury in 1697. He was one
of the greatest finance ministers England has ever had, and was the
first to borrow money on the National Security. He thus originated
the Nationa] Debt. He also adopted and carried out Paterson’s pro-
posal of a Bank of England. He was twice impeached by the Tories
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD. 281

on a charge of obtaining grants of money and offices by fraudulent
means. George the First created him Earl of Halifax in 1714. He
died in the following year.

MOORE, SIR JOHN (1761-1809), was a distinguished general. He
entered the army at the age of fifteen, and served with great distinc-
tion in the West Indies and in Egypt; but the action on which his
fame rests was his skilful retreat with the whole of his army towards
Corunna, pursued by the French under Soult. When the British
reached the coast of Spain, a battle had to be fought before they could
reach their ships. The British were victorious, but their general was
killed.

NAPIER, SIR CHARLES JAMES (1782-1853), was a distinguished
soldier. He fought in the Peninsular War and in the war with the
United States in 1812. In 1841 he went to India as commander-in-
chief. In 1843 he conquered Sindh, and took a prominent part in
arranging its government.

NELSON, VISCOUNT HORATIO (1758-1805), ‘‘the greatest sailor
since the world began,” was.born in Norfolkshire. He entered the
navy in his twelfth year, and three years later he sailed in an expedi-
tion to the Arctic Ocean. In.1793 he sailed to the Mediterranean as
commander of the Agamemnon. He became a commodore in 1796,
and after the Battle of St. Vincent rose to the rank of rear-admiral.
He lost his right arm in an attack on Santa Cruz, having previously
lost his right eye in an engagement. In 1798 Nelson attacked and
completely destroyed the French fleet in Aboukir Bay. For this
victory he was made a peer, with the title of Baron Nelson of the
Nile. In 1801 he was second in command of the expedition sent
against the Danes, and destroyed the Danish fleet at Copenhagen.
As a reward for his services he was made a Viscount. In 1803 he

. blockaded Toulon for two years. The French fleet managed to get
past him, and sailed for the West Indies. Nelson followed, but
missed the French, who sailed back to Europe. On his return Nelson
crushed the combined fleets of France and Spain at the Battle of
Trafalgar in October 1805. The admiral was fatally wounded, and
expired at the moment of victory.

NEWTON, SIR ISAAC (1642-1727), was the greatest of English
natural philosophers. Soon after leaving Cambridge, where he had
greatly distinguished himself, he propounded his new theory of light
and colour. ‘While sitting in his garden in his native village, the fall
of an apple turned his thoughts to the law of gravitation. This was
his greatest discovery. He was amember of the Convention Parlia-
282 CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.

ment, and in 1696 was appointed Warden of the Mint, of which he
was afterwards Master. He was President of the Royal Society for
twenty-five years, and he received knighthood from Queen Anne.
He was buried in Westminster Abbey, where a monument was
erected to his memory. When Newton’s friends spoke to him about
his great knowledge and the wonderful discoveries that he had made
he said, “‘To myself I seem to have been as a child playing on the
sea-shore, while the immense ocean of truth lay unexplored before
me.” Of this prince of philosophers Pope wrote,—

“‘ Nature and all her works lay hid in night:
God said, Let Newton be—and all was light.”

O'CONNELL, DANIEL (1775-1847), the great agitator of Irish inde-
pendence, was admitted to the Irish bar in 1798. He distinguished
himself by his public speeches against the Irish Union. For twenty-
six years he devoted all his energies to the cause of Roman Catholic
Emancipation, and at length in 1829 his labours were crowned with
success. From that time till 1843 he struggled for the repeal of the
Union. In that year he was convicted of sedition, but an appeal to
the House of Lords prevented his imprisonment. From that time his
influence with his countrymen declined. He died_at Genoa, in Italy.

PALMERSTON, HENRY TEMPLE, VISCOUNT (1784-1865), was a
celebrated statesman. He entered Parliament in 1806, and was made
a Junior Lord of the Treasury in 1807. In 1809, though only twenty-
five, be became War Secretary. From 1809 till his death in 1865—
fifty-six years—he was a member of every Administration with four
exceptions—the two headed by Sir Robert Peel, and the two headed
by the Earl of Derby. He was War Secretary almost continuously
from 1809 till 1830. He was Foreign Secretary in all the Liberal
Ministries from 1830 till 1851. He was Home Secretary from 1852
till 1855. He was twice Premier—1855 till 1858, and 1859 till 1865.
He began public life as a Conservative, but under the influence of
Canning his views became more liberal. He advocated Roman
Catholic Emancipation, but at first opposed Parliamentary Reform.
His chief work was done as Foreign Secretary, where he got the rep-
utation of great energy in conducting foreign affairs. He was Prime
Minister during the Crimean War.

PEEL, SIR ROBERT (1788-1850), was a celebrated statesman. He
entered the House of Commons in 1809 as a Conservative, and soon
took a subordinate post in the Perceval Ministry. From 1812 till
1818 he was Chief Secretary for Ireland. He was.twice Home Secre-
tary (1822 and 1828), and twice Prime Minister (1834 and 1841). He
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD. 283

opposed Roman Catholic Emancipation as long as he could; but when
he saw that the peace of the country was in danger he gave way, and
carried the Relief Act (1829). He opposed Parliamentary Reform,
and at first opposed the Repeal of the Corn Laws ; but his opinions
changed, and he carried the Repeal Act (1846). During his later years
in office he introduced many important reforms. He entirely aban-
doned. his Conservative policy, which lost him many of his supporters
and broke up his party. His followers, at first called Peelites, were
soon absorbed in the Liberal party. His opponents formed the Pro-
tectionist party, which in a few years assumed the name of Conserva-
tive. Peel died from the effects of a fall from his horse.

PITT, WILLIAM, EARL OF CHATHAM (1708-1778), was a distin-
guished statesman and orator. He was for some time in the army,
but in 1734 he entered Parliament, and distinguished himself by his
attacks on Walpole. He held posts in the Pelham Administrations
till 1756, when he joined the Duke of Devonshire in forming a Min-
istry, which, however, did not last long. Both George the Second
and the Duke of Cumberland disliked Pitt, and he was dismissed
in 1757; but it was found impossible to form a Ministry without
him, and the King yielded. Pitt and the Duke of Newcastle then
formed a Ministry. While Pitt was in office, Canada was conquered,
and the English armies were successful in all parts of the world. In
1761 he resigned, because his advice of a declaration of war against
Spain was rejected. He was recalled to office along with the Duke
of Grafton in 1766, and was made Earl of Chatham. While Pitt
was ill, the Chancellor of the Exchequer proposed those taxes which
afterwards led to the American War. Chatham resigned in 1768. He
opposed the measures taken against the colonists, but would not re-
cognize their independence. While addressing the House of Lords on
this subject in 1778 he fell down in a fit, which led to his death shortly
_ afterwards.

PITT, WILLIAM (1759-1806), the younger, a famous statesman, was
the second son of the Harl of Chatham. He entered Parliament in
1781, and although only twenty-one years of age, he at once took a-
prominent place among the foremost men in the House. In 1782 he
became Chancellor of the Exchequer in Lord Shelburne’s Ministry.
In the following year he became Premier, although under twenty-five
years of age. He continued in power for eighteen years. He con-
cluded the Treaty of Versailles with France and the United States, re-
modelied the government of India by establishing the Board of Con-
trol, concluded a commercial treaty with France, advocated the
abolition of the slave trade and Roman Catholic Emancipation, and
united England and Ireland. During the French Revolution he ruled
284 CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD.

with firmness and wisdom. -As long as it was possible he maintained
the strict neutrality of England; but when peace was broken, he
prosecuted the war with energy. During his early career he was in
favour of Parliamentary Reform, but the excesses of the French
Revolution made him change his opinion. In 1801 he proposed
Roman Catholic Emancipation; but the King objected, and Pitt
resigned. He returned to power in 1804. He died early in 1806, and
was buried beside his father in Westminster Abbey.

RUSSELL, LORD JOHN (1792~1878), a leading statesman, was a son

of the Duke of Bedford. He was not quite twenty-one when he entered °

Parliament as Member for ‘Tavistock. He soon showed that he had
considerable skill as a Parliamentary debater, but his feeble health
compelled him to retire from Parliament for a short time. Re-entering
Parliament in 1818, he assumed the leadership of his party on the ques-
tion of Parliamentary Reform—a position which he held for nearly half
acentury. In 1821 Russell delivered a great speech on the subject of
Reform, and in favour of adding a hundred members to the House of
Commons, to be returned by the great manufacturing and trading
centres of the kingdom. His motion was not successful at the time;
but so well did the young statesman acquit himself that Canning
complimented him upon having “‘a brilliant career of Parliamentary
distinction before him.” In 1828 he carried the repeal of the Test
and Corporation Acts, though strongly opposed by Peel and Palmer-
ston. After this Lord John assisted in other measures of religious
liberty. In 1830 he took office under Earl Grey, and it fell to his lot
to construct a Reform Bill, for which the whole country was wildly
clamouring. So sweeping were the changes it proposed to make
that the Conservatives regarded the measure as hopeless, and it is
said that when the Bill was read “‘ there never was such a scene in the
House neither before nor since.” A long, fierce contest followed.
“The Bill, the whole Bill, and nothing but the Bill,” cried Russell
and his followers; and although it tcok a long time to bring
the King and the peers to reason, success at length crowned the

efforts of the reformers, and the Reform Bill received the royal,

assent in 1832. Lord John Russell was now the foremost statesman
of the time. He next gave his attention to the Irish Church ques-
tion, and declared that in justice to Ireland this grievance should
be removed. Under Lord Melbourne he took office as Home Secre-
tary in 1835. This post he exchanged for that of Secretary of State
for War and the Colonies, which he held till 1841. In 1846 Sir Robert
Peel carried an Act for the Total Repeal of the Corn Laws ; but in the
same year the Government was defeated, and Lord Russell became
Prime Minister. This office he held till 1852. After this he held
office in various Ministries under Lord Aberdeen and Lord Palmer-
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD. 285

ston, until, in 1865, when Palmerston died, Russell once more became
Prime Minister. He was raised to the peerage as Earl Russell in
1861, and retired from official life in 1866. He spent the last years of
his life in domestic retirement and literary pursuits. He died at the
age of eighty-six, having bridged over by his Parliamentary experience
the chasm between two generations of public men whose careers had
never touched. His unwearied exertions on behalf of civil and religi
ous liberty have given him an honourable and a distinguished place in
the history of his country.

SCOTT, SIR WALTER (1771-1832), a great Scottish novelist and
poet, was born in Edinburgh. He was a, lawyer by profession, but
spent most of his time in writing. His poems—The Lay of the Last’
Minstrel, Marmion, and The Lady of the Lake—made him famous. In
1814 he issued his first-novel, called Waverley; others followed rapidly,
the whole series being known as the Waverley Novels. The most
popular of these are Ivanhoe, The Heart of Midlothian, and Rob Roy.
In 1811 he bought the estate of Abbotsford on the Tweed. In 1820 he
was made a baronet. The latter part of his life was saddened by the
failure of a publishing firm in which he was a partner. From 1826 till
his death he wrote hard to pay off the debt. Much of it was paid in
his lifetime, and the remainder soon after his death. The great
amount of work which he had done told on his health, and he was
ordered abroad; but his strength was failing fast, and he hurried home
to Abbotsford, where he soon afterwards died. He was buried in
Dryburgh Abbey, near Melrose.

SHELLEY, PERCY BYSSHE (1792-1822), an eminent poet, was born
in Sussex. He wrote a number of Jong poems, but he is best known
by his shorter pieces, such as The Skylark and The Cloud. He was
drowned in the Gulf of Spezzia in Italy.

SOUTHEY, ROBERT (1774-1843), an eminent poet and writer, was
born at Bristol. He was one of the Lake School of poets. He was
the author of more than one hundred volumes of poems, history, travels,
etc. He was Poet-Laureate from 1813 till his death. His chief works
are Thalaba, Life of Nelson, and histories of the Peninsular War,
Brazil, and Portugal.

ST. JOHN, HENRY, VISCOUNT BOLINGBROKE (1678-1751), was a
famous writer and statesman. In 1704 he became Secretary of War,
but in 1708 he went into opposition with Harley against Marlborough.
In 1710 he again went into office with Harley, but they soon quarrelled,
and Harley was driven from power in 1714. In 1715 St. John fled to
France, and became James’s chief adviser. He returned to England
286 CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD,

in 1723, and though he was not allowed to interfere in Parliament, he
had great political influence. He was a strong opponent of Sir Robert
“Walpole.

TENNYSON, ALFRED, LORD, Poet-Laureate, was born at Somerby,
Lincolnshire, in 1809. At Cambridge, in 1829, he gained the Chancel-
lor’s medal for a poem on Timbuctoo. He published a volume of
poems in 1830, and another volume in 1833, in which were the Miller’s
Daughter and Locksley Hall. This made him the most popular poet of
his time. Among his subsequent poems are In Memoriam, Maud, The
Idylls of the King, Enoch Arden, and two tragedies, Queen Mary and
Harold. He was appointed Poet-Laureate in 1850, in succession to
Wordsworth. He was made a peer in 1884.

THACKERAY, WILLIAM MAKEPEACE (1811-1863), a well-known
novelist, was born at Calcutta. At the age of seven he was brought
to London for his education. He chose the profession of an artist,
but losing his fortune he took to literature. At first he wrote for
various journals, but it was not till 1846 that his novel Vanity Fair
made him famous. He wrote many other novels, the best-known
being Pendennis, Esmond, and The Virginians.

WALPOLE, ROBERT, EARL OF ORFORD (1676-1745), was a famous
statesman. Entering Parliament in 1701, he was appointed Secretary
of War in 1708. On the retirement of Harley and St. John he joined
the Ministry, and became the leader of the Whig party in the House
of Commons. When the Tories returned to power, he was expelled
from the House and committed to the Tower on a charge of dishonest
practices. On the accession of George the First, Walpole returned to
office. In 1715 he became First Lord of the Treasury, and in 1721 he
was again Prime Minister. His firm and skilful measures restored the
confidence of the nation after the bursting of the South Sea Bubble.
He was Prime Minister of England for more than twenty years.

WELLINGTON, ARTHUR WELLESLEY, DUKE OF (1769-1852), a dis-
tinguished soldier and statesman, was the third son of the Earl of
Mornington. His military career began in India, where he gained the
great victory of Assaye in 1803. In 1807 he entered Parliament, and
became Secretary for Ireland. He was sent to Portugal in 1808,
where he defeated Junot at Vimiera; but being dissatisfied, he re-
signed his command. He returned to the Peninsula the following
year, and began that series of brilliant victories which broke the
French power in Spain. For his great services he received the title
of Duke of Wellington. In 1815 he defeated Napoleon at Waterloo.
He became Prime Minister in 1828. He was at first opposed to Roman

m
CHIEF PERSONS OF THE HANOVERIAN PERIOD. 287 -

Catholic Emancipation ; but he withdrew his opposition, and carried
the Act of 1829. He was also opposed to Reform, and resigned in
1830 when he found that there was a majority of Reformers in the
House of Commons. He tried to form a Tory Ministry in 1832, but
failed. He held office under Sir Robert Peel, and helped in the repeal
of the Corn Laws.. He continued the trusted adviser of the Queen
till his death.

WILBERFORCE, WILLIAM (1759-1833), was an eminent philan-
thropist. When a school-boy of fourteen he wrote a letter to a York
newspaper denouncing the “traffic in human flesh,” as he called
slavery. Having inherited a large fortune, he resolved to devote his
life to negro emancipation. For twenty years he pressed the cause on
the attention of Parliament, and aided it by his purse and his pen.
He only lived to see the grand work which he had undertaken accom-
plished. His son Samuel became Bishop of Oxford and afterwards
of Winchester.

WOLFE, JAMES (1727-1759), was a celebrated soldier. He fought in
the war of the Austrian Succession, and also at Falkirk and Culloden
in the ’45 rebellion. In 1759 Pitt gave him the command of the expe-
dition against Quebec, and he died on the Plains of Abraham in the
moment of victory.

WOLSELEY, GARNET, VISCOUNT, a famous general, is the son of
Major Garnet Wolseley. He was born in 1833. He entered the army
in 1852, took part in the second Burmese War, served in the Crimea
and was wounded at the siege of Sebastopol, engaged inthe siege
and capture of Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny, and was employed
in 1860 in the Chinese War. He commanded in the Ashantee War of
1874; and in 1882 he was sent in command to Egypt, where his forces _
successfully stormed’ the lines of Tel-el-Kebir and captured Arabi
Pasha. For these services he was made a baron and a general. In
1884 Wolseley was sent with an. expedition to relieve Khartoum,
where the Mahdi held General Gordon prisoner; but before his arrival
the place had fallen. On returning to England he was made ‘Viscount
Wolseley. ;

WORDSWORTH, WILLIAM (1770-1850), was the chief of the Lake
Poets, so called because they lived near the lakes of Cumberland. His
greatest poems are The Excursion and The Prelude, but he is best
known by such simple poems as Lucy Gray, We are Seven, and Ruth.
He became Poet-Laureate in 1843.
ENEALOGY OF THE HOUSE OF HANOVER.





rae I,
fiat rank see Net ar Ns es eee

| Ht
George II. Sophia-Dorothea,
Queen of Prussia, mother of,
Frederick the Great.













Frederick, Prince of Wales. William, Six others.
(Died 1751.) Duke of Cumberland.
|
George III. Seven other children.
| | | | | |
George IV. Frederick, Charlotte, William IV. Edward, Ernest, Duke of Adolphus,
Duke of York. Queen of Duke of Kent. Cumberland, Duke of Cambridge.
(Died 1827.) Wiirtemberg. King of Hanover.
(Died 1828.) ae
Charlotte, Charlotte, Victoria. George. George. Augusta. Mary.
Princess of Wales. Elizabeth. | .
(Died 1817.)
eel
Victoria Adelaide, Albert Edward, Alice, Alfred, Helena, Louise, Arthur, Leopold, Beatrice,
Dowager-Empress Prince of Pr, of Hesse. Duke of’ Princess of Marchioness Dukeof Duke of Albany. Pr. of Bat-

of Germany. Wales. (Died 1878.) Edinburgh. Schelswig-Holstein. of Lorne. Conngught. (Died 1884.) tenberg.






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'2011-10-07T16:36:24-04:00'
describe
'31924' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVQ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
ab35aee376c7351e5d8ad3a9414e2ce8
67d1fca527f9ef075c59a67ba7e9075b728e23ab
'2011-10-07T16:41:48-04:00'
describe
'322584' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVR' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
2379ea19a15404dde47403fbee34013f
fb015b6bb5b5a12c737cc212da65e9087da48a1d
'2011-10-07T16:34:56-04:00'
describe
'77861' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVS' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
2617ce72b71a4ce6d1a41272abc0fabd
09854c66d5081dcac451cde6d6ba8acea1214f2a
'2011-10-07T16:38:31-04:00'
describe
'8693' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVT' 'sip-files00006.pro'
f1d67d82a52d1edcd6f8525e8f947eeb
e8876f848ada1b023c10bba273d622e1efcdbb31
'2011-10-07T16:39:58-04:00'
describe
'29974' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVU' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
20090511f8b9d1e6154e7412b0bf709d
32c7dc04671966894e0316f4e40bfbd0cec012c1
describe
'2599164' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVV' 'sip-files00006.tif'
8906a0009624c65db1641f20de272cd3
6323891f14906867c8f656ceb543769175139842
'2011-10-07T16:24:49-04:00'
describe
'423' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVW' 'sip-files00006.txt'
24c2bf948ee36e0cbfb36e6ae7efaa55
e7ab73143c47dfb384413961c9539e719d308da8
'2011-10-07T16:41:34-04:00'
describe
'20896' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVX' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
5c3e09606c419f74cd1ff72e6895b448
f432c70b50888ac6bf23df1955e8b8046a15d75b
'2011-10-07T16:26:38-04:00'
describe
'322212' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVY' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
4504dfc884abbacadec743acf43ec5d5
e0ffe6ef2f85470748550f538b00aed17876cf2b
'2011-10-07T16:34:13-04:00'
describe
'51469' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGVZ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
a5556642564179dc04e89d7bf170e383
d9a1b5fdcc66f321495f89e664f0a3be00ea4388
'2011-10-07T16:22:49-04:00'
describe
'22627' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWA' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
63236fe74b9cc8957c33ee255b94527e
8b9787506e30a36c5039ab3602a195bb82e9a6b0
'2011-10-07T16:39:38-04:00'
describe
'2598524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWB' 'sip-files00007.tif'
b7a54c7fecd5dee6f34c201054efbac2
8c1f69f3df6c34287acce74a99c81b7c35f13f21
'2011-10-07T16:42:51-04:00'
describe
'18774' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWC' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
fdc492eb91ed035e69ac505774a22a8d
05265a1e851d2f0214364534be13ecf3f31c7135
'2011-10-07T16:26:33-04:00'
describe
'322665' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWD' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
55e19554940ef0b00c0003b62bb08b9e
d1a5e1a4a0c8e1cf467f04a7e4d84231e340198a
'2011-10-07T16:39:32-04:00'
describe
'186328' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWE' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
795b357b5100a1a77128d0a5ee866aca
3c5972b4c02fd3962a93112adbb58dc785ffc984
'2011-10-07T16:37:28-04:00'
describe
'2060' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
b9fbebff910ed05d1af2421521bbb0ec
28f1d975ab2895ea1d6226d5a994b523421351e0
'2011-10-07T16:35:45-04:00'
describe
'57993' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
8c0b28cb0592dad5c5fe2ec77d9fdfc9
a1213364dd9a720b1b46a1e0aed4e87b6ff09107
'2011-10-07T16:33:39-04:00'
describe
'2602152' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWH' 'sip-files00008.tif'
4d6c9e1fdedba9ae726998ef9e699fe6
97274cb28440be3e55f6c5d00ad5738dae29d8e6
'2011-10-07T16:23:14-04:00'
describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWI' 'sip-files00008.txt'
039055a1ce20c7f6e3c78665e6b414d8
e01d26c1331f6471429091683d3361302bc90d86
'2011-10-07T16:40:08-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'29489' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWJ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
0b6d57621f0f6bea6e81a8753883eef8
9dc6a4868d7c5bcdd9525f5a75ca6d2a665a5de4
'2011-10-07T16:28:57-04:00'
describe
'322651' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWK' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
7a54e43c36532ec994f4a91312f0bd33
2f358f4868537788d0885b6cb99bbc6d503e9910
'2011-10-07T16:34:02-04:00'
describe
'87492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWL' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
379bd9a24443f51fe4203de96b7a5762
1dacdd7ed916356b3e34da4e3390921f99617a6c
'2011-10-07T16:26:39-04:00'
describe
'4837' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWM' 'sip-files00009.pro'
baf7610bcd2f4462bab8f7609b820a9a
2e7001ee7bbc3fa7b2f1f37d45b381e62afea82f
'2011-10-07T16:34:05-04:00'
describe
'36008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWN' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
20ec67a19a21074fbf6f31e8d207a24a
35f4bb5a15bc3cd8e5d730d9dcc31dd0f660b31c
'2011-10-07T16:35:13-04:00'
describe
'2600176' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWO' 'sip-files00009.tif'
2fc107e15f1aa586536a22ab0ad1e61a
54b105e9e681109f2cf1e7ea7555150a0ae90db7
'2011-10-07T16:28:40-04:00'
describe
'343' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWP' 'sip-files00009.txt'
76e49fbff3cd41e5a14b3f800cf76703
7566eb727870dd73b0f7ddb839b2a7c5bbf47579
'2011-10-07T16:32:45-04:00'
describe
'23767' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWQ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
468a5cefcfee8266985a28cab92044a8
7028c81f18d010af0adadb57d59cd8ee9d15f838
'2011-10-07T16:32:12-04:00'
describe
'322550' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWR' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
81b601a023f28c7d135004877fc708dd
fd5767e1ee92f7bcc8f741ac25b501774e323d6a
'2011-10-07T16:33:31-04:00'
describe
'59841' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWS' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
b65fa2bac82f939e22ee6a5d9d24192f
31875d9960641526c3ef98124aed8c966fb3bc79
'2011-10-07T16:31:11-04:00'
describe
'23069' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWT' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a689902cefc78cdf5b5befc337a17e59
2b8226b59bec421316218e51bcb5f6ed3b656161
'2011-10-07T16:23:56-04:00'
describe
'2598500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWU' 'sip-files00010.tif'
edd96219c73af95f0ccace676aceeb2a
c39978bfa22a16bb23c7c49e386273928ceb3d6d
'2011-10-07T16:23:52-04:00'
describe
'18726' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWV' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
894d8798cbef03d0bb7d086c1442d358
14c9f27507619131bdae4df37b0f211313fd8db0
'2011-10-07T16:29:00-04:00'
describe
'322654' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWW' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
7eadc171e77fab22011db4083cc73d3f
94cf188e4ea9e66afb70096632cc0d406b033271
'2011-10-07T16:27:01-04:00'
describe
'130487' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWX' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
1871eab749bde1738a5d8c3d1ff0f09a
16e9142b9c732a5b6ae11c12046bfe22f3aec59d
'2011-10-07T16:25:06-04:00'
describe
'23790' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWY' 'sip-files00011.pro'
f8437add7aef0169c82574d83ebec938
d420afc35e85d77a42a4897f727a193a73422a95
'2011-10-07T16:35:39-04:00'
describe
'50247' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGWZ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
a45c938003d808721fc0f403cd656edb
ed724041369fbd750c71d5e5d9bddd328e0f3517
'2011-10-07T16:39:07-04:00'
describe
'2601180' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXA' 'sip-files00011.tif'
d2cba5be08f85a36824b93d8719c12af
a3a4ff13f82488a97b622495ce7ac1087b482e5f
'2011-10-07T16:44:03-04:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXB' 'sip-files00011.txt'
08c77495c882788e9707c5798ed78bf8
2cb3443ad723703b669daf609d8c48d4c1318b18
'2011-10-07T16:28:03-04:00'
describe
'26560' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXC' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
fede7aa1f7704ac79ab7cf4dd47fb1fe
e25303b5597ae7fe165189dc039a7dc898c84809
'2011-10-07T16:25:01-04:00'
describe
'322656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXD' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
bd9e155eb8ac92eae10345b48254917b
37739859fa2813f05b5c4e9ca840477f671ac713
'2011-10-07T16:42:13-04:00'
describe
'126977' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXE' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
2bc061e6d528acd25c0fda1d0c4b0276
30c2d338fd9e8143f679c249e936e2dc2c223f02
'2011-10-07T16:24:21-04:00'
describe
'46562' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXF' 'sip-files00012.pro'
45ea56eb20e9bf81ac4ca96638d9e947
c7c5fd4c1570bba34b51e2095b8d05bace070e6f
'2011-10-07T16:38:38-04:00'
describe
'53998' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXG' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
e01f1266871ef08bc620d2c9c128b349
0f8f8d6bd1eb0c851c1328d6542a523c1915d0dd
'2011-10-07T16:36:56-04:00'
describe
'2601508' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXH' 'sip-files00012.tif'
2de9ee9a6e1a8f76c6d55efd84b6cc41
bb895e680c003b3321f7960500e77634336b851f
'2011-10-07T16:34:08-04:00'
describe
'2038' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXI' 'sip-files00012.txt'
504aaf543ce80970b278025da30b3014
bc2788c8da839261572f2e9af57a13b8e15b80fc
'2011-10-07T16:41:59-04:00'
describe
'27705' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXJ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
150681f6034306431e65be968371e642
f1306f9a6cdaf647c570ec98e9c9ea027ca2608c
'2011-10-07T16:28:07-04:00'
describe
'322639' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXK' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
46e1f8e913c3f6ff446574aa7807d7d8
2e166a91ec6cdcae2b00a9c8faa97f42a66b0b4d
'2011-10-07T16:37:05-04:00'
describe
'154057' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXL' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
98bd583aff73af5c3c21af9695b2ed92
dd51bfdeaf547506e1e0c55ca27f92dd1a57d95e
'2011-10-07T16:33:34-04:00'
describe
'31191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXM' 'sip-files00013.pro'
0cb5578d87a0025cced9688410fbddcf
4fe6aa67bb925ac3b9a52e0fb61aef93e91524d0
'2011-10-07T16:37:48-04:00'
describe
'60683' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXN' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0c14bc5b102f044a6a83dd3325cde8be
b393abc5cbb7650bb10c13ccfae0f09cfdbeda37
'2011-10-07T16:34:27-04:00'
describe
'2602304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXO' 'sip-files00013.tif'
8135e5f35b4b30bdb09345c7f6430487
9c144924354e7ba8fa6dfdae06e5a572a1ea7e0c
'2011-10-07T16:37:04-04:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXP' 'sip-files00013.txt'
fed2cdc57545bd72e5aebf1b88e8076d
6ddf2f1fbbe3c71746fe387e41f9224159a94001
'2011-10-07T16:42:35-04:00'
describe
'30403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXQ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
07ee6e5d99ea024a88f774e5de32743c
2b21eea065ac28039f9b3a0add4be0b25e667cf0
describe
'322653' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXR' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
6ddee0174d3c91d632b642df5a5a2ac3
aa48071b8cea44165be6515460a1e257444178bf
'2011-10-07T16:26:06-04:00'
describe
'202374' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXS' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
22d1da85a6363cf77106808dc40dce5b
d33b6c43019ce1696be33482d556135e4b05ba18
'2011-10-07T16:41:42-04:00'
describe
'39440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXT' 'sip-files00014.pro'
303cfdb417ecbac6cce8f17d2d8f4b2b
6bfa76db0f35249612d09a3d669c9807e95ca878
'2011-10-07T16:38:42-04:00'
describe
'76376' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXU' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
a9fff38a7f3aab45b3cb9f788420298c
e5512e5a1751a88a06bff2f7c52e88f2a39e8a19
'2011-10-07T16:38:02-04:00'
describe
'2603564' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXV' 'sip-files00014.tif'
c6d1d35789989bf1a9092da828e761bd
2f4e48233024c7bd74a416eb5aed33cb0c85444d
'2011-10-07T16:37:14-04:00'
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXW' 'sip-files00014.txt'
43e3785654e9f40365cc2cbed5e51093
9460c161627bae695e66812428810a659bdc83cd
'2011-10-07T16:37:31-04:00'
describe
'34106' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXX' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
aa5ceca01142723adef5970d5668c31f
bf2e60a3bcb87ebff88cc5fc677ebab697a0dd5a
'2011-10-07T16:23:18-04:00'
describe
'322572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXY' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
5891d4bd47af68213f80222e340bd067
901787dc098f0d031f445d24d0959713deac2750
'2011-10-07T16:31:13-04:00'
describe
'220506' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGXZ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a15e725aad141f13d15045fdd5208ef4
160aaa68ff999046d43af009a2c09228274eb534
'2011-10-07T16:43:14-04:00'
describe
'10202' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYA' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f1f04bd58b5438ad9e86fb25a43d6163
b95b3911c14d784bfb6803cebb801485fab77edc
'2011-10-07T16:30:25-04:00'
describe
'69352' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYB' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
a09fa1b7bf1caddc2b0bcf7591d95eaa
abfcc09ed58d4b407570dcf57357a69c1dd38142
'2011-10-07T16:43:48-04:00'
describe
'2603260' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
71feeeecd2bf3dfd44dc0cf510f2c86b
8d5f8c4b2bfc2d9a5dfc3d841b8bb452e9afe614
'2011-10-07T16:41:26-04:00'
describe
'430' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYD' 'sip-files00015.txt'
8018a105ac6510d429c7af71b65de9ca
e872380882bf1b1342cf1b1a218e4ffe197f14d6
'2011-10-07T16:28:22-04:00'
describe
'32596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYE' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
d3e63d24e91fd29988d4965913b8e892
5793029ac84eeac2fbd0c7effdff5cfdb4c38519
'2011-10-07T16:33:23-04:00'
describe
'322545' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYF' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
c720d54477319c16f83700ba4814a813
8843b6a84f079999bdde93553d1e4b4b6dae310f
'2011-10-07T16:37:06-04:00'
describe
'182746' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
2c5013a8858acb357b19dcaa4734fcfc
1172a8c23f3924d21a634223e150b3c4b4f23e38
'2011-10-07T16:25:40-04:00'
describe
'35869' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYH' 'sip-files00016.pro'
fee217558387aac4971cf4c72e5d5adb
8215b18dbb48abd7d7f083c37d474fe3e597692b
'2011-10-07T16:26:24-04:00'
describe
'73151' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYI' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
9e6acc72e885bdd70dbbee680bbe208a
a33b9af421c7eb28b636bffa9cbfd30f1993e100
'2011-10-07T16:28:26-04:00'
describe
'2603684' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYJ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
b5772b731153d3cc00a7ab88feafb179
1a19de31ebbb14e9c5a2da62275ada2636a77c38
'2011-10-07T16:34:50-04:00'
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYK' 'sip-files00016.txt'
45f4985d997477a73cb68f680ad6a165
2efd5bc0dfc31afa34e083e7f12bc0cdcc3c94e4
'2011-10-07T16:39:39-04:00'
describe
'34044' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYL' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
dbc14c4641c6b42ce625fbf510fa1160
cb1aa7569102fb1b765eeff7f55f331f955f5be9
'2011-10-07T16:26:13-04:00'
describe
'322607' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYM' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
c04ebef89e652a30777519b590ad3d67
560fdd425acd0848306410a90181b9b2074cc04b
'2011-10-07T16:44:15-04:00'
describe
'194708' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYN' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
e7c376eff59ee2fc192b51c34d56cef6
f2b7654fb136aeff625f984659364c75103b952b
'2011-10-07T16:37:36-04:00'
describe
'37803' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYO' 'sip-files00017.pro'
a426fe04610e61e4d52550202d794842
ae6a330d9dd023cec4a0f4dc62b03e3e1afd6883
'2011-10-07T16:25:17-04:00'
describe
'76380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
2fd30c640d365af112f760c67e297fff
28b6bb390e7066f14950b15f86e7445d20dc9b1a
'2011-10-07T16:27:14-04:00'
describe
'2603720' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYQ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
b9273ff332548b0900440e5846ff876b
93c23d933355f6590a25b47bbb9a03f7ec160d01
'2011-10-07T16:25:02-04:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYR' 'sip-files00017.txt'
c3536cdab953a82e3701eaf01771b07b
fa9d4db5a6d8d07373969d312c6d19073cfd7e98
'2011-10-07T16:39:05-04:00'
describe
'34514' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYS' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
9b8ca05bbc89cd2445cb8af4341dc656
bd5320f01520b53c52b187806b772f692b61de7b
'2011-10-07T16:26:25-04:00'
describe
'322591' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYT' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
3814010a911bffdcdf5ef51d4fbfe61d
0e6bfe853d53b2568614d263f03ba7081c8dcdfe
'2011-10-07T16:26:15-04:00'
describe
'196253' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYU' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
4611ae8ff21467cac10a77c99dcc4719
7a03b6996a4ddd14735d14685459b15851dd924d
'2011-10-07T16:32:25-04:00'
describe
'36320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYV' 'sip-files00018.pro'
2fb773964e646478c0afccab0bc4685d
203b7efaafcad8fd458aa277846b6d49404ef660
'2011-10-07T16:37:58-04:00'
describe
'73303' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYW' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
b9e4f31e76235787f7a787ff3df1d997
1184477ab2c6ab38dc53942647c31faa3c0e5823
'2011-10-07T16:27:57-04:00'
describe
'2603052' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYX' 'sip-files00018.tif'
925dba7e9624a10ae29dee8249d341e1
22f43cbd4293508a405541a912e993993dc5239c
'2011-10-07T16:42:45-04:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYY' 'sip-files00018.txt'
88100e2ec5d0e45d585c0c11c826e981
21547b99dc5791b8912381c8d1df92f40a545295
'2011-10-07T16:27:34-04:00'
describe
'33021' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGYZ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
1037df204ab9f62c95cb1caddd710b67
69b71e0a5f2e8ffb00cdf306d85494ad0b536cf0
'2011-10-07T16:29:36-04:00'
describe
'322644' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZA' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
5d70f743ded30640aaefd64d7a61e05d
919ce269badbf3ba6f316c3a364eabc7423c7a76
'2011-10-07T16:22:27-04:00'
describe
'195238' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZB' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
de662262c15e4d1b22ee252e4a610438
5bd6a603663e2e77472864a2129c45954f0255fc
'2011-10-07T16:24:14-04:00'
describe
'37405' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZC' 'sip-files00019.pro'
d85fa95c6ca45944ac225b5d7745b0ed
6873a274754f25d989f0524705059e8141f9724d
'2011-10-07T16:37:21-04:00'
describe
'74027' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZD' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
4a1c1792aa442b56d6909db95aab93ff
7fe0c63791778e44bf564a5df4d5ff8eb3d6466d
'2011-10-07T16:36:17-04:00'
describe
'2603324' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZE' 'sip-files00019.tif'
440a10c1cb04cc9adc01955626fd0d23
ce29e2cb4409f62fd3b1a6d0e3dc71c50f0c9452
'2011-10-07T16:28:15-04:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZF' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8c4a975e7aab4c011c399bf233f3b4e5
ed8d253d2869212ffb2599df829e58f83673d8a1
'2011-10-07T16:28:34-04:00'
describe
'33822' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZG' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
31cb7cac575ed3cfba2384622e83e3e8
6a45871b3c2d4915ce412c0dea4ee94f49d9cf73
'2011-10-07T16:31:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZH' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
5a65148053a57ca3efb2b98e8f4dc374
a44f34fdf8f38f05c0a40f86351e5f1abccf2f62
'2011-10-07T16:32:48-04:00'
describe
'205995' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZI' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
80a6ba533b4a1e0215e77e1a1f7f618c
7195c90d615c69f962f9c0399798bfc4285d0a57
'2011-10-07T16:32:06-04:00'
describe
'40579' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZJ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
9e1cec729d12e24836a6e859db8f1c58
42bf9cabcfc5bb42157038d7b0234e1e23a0e207
'2011-10-07T16:42:49-04:00'
describe
'78455' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZK' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
156e33e042c1c942873ea36e6aedf32c
c9d0f724f89068a3ef8945e6ca5ff73ee50c9402
'2011-10-07T16:31:05-04:00'
describe
'2603508' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZL' 'sip-files00020.tif'
2bcb9cf2ebe21327f570cb26ca5ea430
3a57f55b2a6cf8e262c56f7f7666d73c37bea871
'2011-10-07T16:35:31-04:00'
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZM' 'sip-files00020.txt'
bdeabf3e93d5374bed7787fc78bb839c
9f94ca50f357eaffd393fd65dbec5f461794c23e
'2011-10-07T16:30:56-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34523' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZN' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
ca05f3e93b7ec384573613ec08d566cc
0bd920cf49f162faa731c9153c9d85968ddcd941
'2011-10-07T16:34:20-04:00'
describe
'318610' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZO' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
f2291885e5d76d5d9e9b6a73bb686429
beb635176383e9dc0a681addddd118948c155354
'2011-10-07T16:38:08-04:00'
describe
'217343' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZP' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
440b32bcaa2ce1b97d4588bd21999296
fb8a5405dcd7182cde404248d4c20f86b2ca08fb
'2011-10-07T16:31:04-04:00'
describe
'12008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZQ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
5e44ff8e3e74b25b22f1b2314af6874b
d721737a2b07c2830c74cce55a222f4fd1a4bd7e
'2011-10-07T16:27:35-04:00'
describe
'68899' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZR' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
35416341e7858ffeff53b845c57a9f7a
790d066fce25c28ef5f645317b2dfd6f313cd735
'2011-10-07T16:22:30-04:00'
describe
'2570788' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZS' 'sip-files00021.tif'
6f3391dc9b9156f7dec683f0e123e54b
fd0c69bf27c80437a51817108304fbcfdf829e07
'2011-10-07T16:44:06-04:00'
describe
'524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZT' 'sip-files00021.txt'
7bb976f65a0840ba9c20595705137415
2a17e1337ac8556ef8675ae58deeb7363e408541
'2011-10-07T16:41:32-04:00'
describe
'32147' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZU' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
88fd3cc3b5e2edae0dddc5cd7dbc1bc5
93a67eb0ba53f1e321778c545b73a4d2c130e4ea
'2011-10-07T16:41:22-04:00'
describe
'322508' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZV' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
f4e0185d5d1013c55b4ba45de2dad4b6
9629fa9fa3627fbc51d9b9316c537d9e7ff4616d
'2011-10-07T16:27:58-04:00'
describe
'193648' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZW' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
7fe6a3e23253d9136231f1c21665a82d
c1e4cf2918c18660d45560ae183963751b692957
'2011-10-07T16:36:28-04:00'
describe
'36391' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZX' 'sip-files00022.pro'
2806981ffc587a5f5423b94b681bc0a9
3e719940433877cdc367060d89ba6416feaeccf6
'2011-10-07T16:30:15-04:00'
describe
'73115' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZY' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
a1ef1a23ddffed1689f7845eaa6f8956
e579caaeeb3c058eb8a308a80771217473ce658f
'2011-10-07T16:32:38-04:00'
describe
'2603452' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABGZZ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
f1317b0d9ca3db2ea56848c7c3848f03
df6b9826520cd68e4139a025177745095d28e862
'2011-10-07T16:39:15-04:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAA' 'sip-files00022.txt'
de61075cde28f2743c441e5e76a85fab
f4ca690fe05d01912bb90a854175803685b3e9f9
'2011-10-07T16:33:45-04:00'
describe
'33377' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAB' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
4c7ce99d010681f7ed6b4b782db21c4d
5e19336d71303e6c13f13c88126b86f36abbabb7
'2011-10-07T16:27:43-04:00'
describe
'315634' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAC' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
d5d8b57fb9427d42f51f079c60606a01
c8daa320b70a31528970e67f06cb00b94dba6c00
'2011-10-07T16:23:11-04:00'
describe
'209470' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAD' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
af0f334b54bd26777443425e2cab8d3e
96946f59d2a8a4fe5033d24488b05ccf453a15cf
'2011-10-07T16:25:30-04:00'
describe
'40002' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAE' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5f6de48efd585500aaff7505e885472f
1a5ce65152413432ec203b587ede7c00cb10a245
'2011-10-07T16:39:41-04:00'
describe
'79824' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAF' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
686cd5f5b400beae9d0819e3291b795b
457b20d13a63e778c7c7fbd20f62cf97d4941e69
'2011-10-07T16:26:31-04:00'
describe
'2547752' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAG' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e3209bea7937d01248c8eb31d8c28858
4b0ab61e3b646b117f0be1a2602c9a82d812d8ec
'2011-10-07T16:28:36-04:00'
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAH' 'sip-files00023.txt'
b757f9d656622489cff3a9ba9e8bcb63
d8f8f2aa9d42bfcd2ba4f756b352facf0c94441d
'2011-10-07T16:24:24-04:00'
describe
'35549' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAI' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
810251b8cdda85dcb4d43a8936811fa4
ddff26ad0b5d7fbf225f43eea114224859bb622c
'2011-10-07T16:38:45-04:00'
describe
'322652' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAJ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
36ebbd0158a1a8a87d4716f36b2338fd
503427c1a0d5b5b4128417541b36f8f168cbd23c
'2011-10-07T16:40:43-04:00'
describe
'159918' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAK' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
170404a1cd3e627c41a5cb29cf9f079c
e38fc104186893b758a12c0dd93aebb37a45d042
'2011-10-07T16:28:38-04:00'
describe
'17052' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAL' 'sip-files00024.pro'
a283a3fa78b056d59b0fe860c48ded04
c30e1c033874e42f90e8673399ed327c8663d728
'2011-10-07T16:36:10-04:00'
describe
'58543' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
8fcb38ac952f28b64654dbfd110b5ad7
e954a3025316264edc08fb11303f14b05be5ae78
'2011-10-07T16:35:35-04:00'
describe
'2602216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAN' 'sip-files00024.tif'
42b331b17c0df3c3eb685f3bd6184997
7a840d05a20c8e57d46ac15c2b4347f5814f0385
'2011-10-07T16:40:42-04:00'
describe
'693' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAO' 'sip-files00024.txt'
4f78277830ecaa38bd35eb23d84a2926
7518ce32c4eabdbb7f4bd4e2b5fa14365668500b
'2011-10-07T16:34:43-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29643' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAP' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
0675303b5442d2bb6b1814fcb0526f7a
b578655a46a43b5c3cb33a370aa7e531d870263d
'2011-10-07T16:23:20-04:00'
describe
'315640' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAQ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
934dcf4d1e4051f63cb926c1587ad16a
90a9cdbb11e8bd79884c6343770bbe0a04424c44
'2011-10-07T16:31:38-04:00'
describe
'209899' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAR' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
221a7bbe07f1986b0c279a27a83123e0
9cff260e6a6be60b729654b0cf0aefd66c37ca47
'2011-10-07T16:25:16-04:00'
describe
'8583' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAS' 'sip-files00025.pro'
bfc1e9b4e3e161ffc6cd228d610d3663
d4c422425adc4b87c27b48c3963662e939f0b60f
'2011-10-07T16:23:17-04:00'
describe
'65348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAT' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
56a074e566b589197fa0a698a98f90d6
f6b5ed8c489c3ba8ac71428c1dc1906b15bcfdf4
'2011-10-07T16:25:47-04:00'
describe
'2546672' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAU' 'sip-files00025.tif'
228584e7378de6b36bccb3ecb30f5b6b
11d0c4ed10bd4aa5ba82a73389d107eba4aad6f8
'2011-10-07T16:22:47-04:00'
describe
'434' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAV' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d22b91ee15fda48427269daa53bee01a
a00d41b09f10979bc7fd570b246efe612c201fda
'2011-10-07T16:36:06-04:00'
describe
'31529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAW' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
801e23c8cf14706f2a5ae21b842f2751
4c9f68a7cdf8e48459e0ba08637c11ae41546798
'2011-10-07T16:24:20-04:00'
describe
'322614' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAX' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
31bbc7d85fc513d2b5ecfb07fe682b1c
4749a0c802abb164718d70a4fc5539a1dfb1f781
describe
'210222' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAY' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
2f3c973751c4b77f1f20c8e5c7daee45
1045f1817ad4ff165e34955ad240acb2ea6507ef
'2011-10-07T16:38:54-04:00'
describe
'41494' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHAZ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
3d13cbd9dd340ab6afacfeb7e231b389
b7e89f7f811101ae3ced99b3b0d84cf4d6b28914
describe
'79896' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBA' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
7347abde461968dc3742d5c538ad2fc6
9ef83689372110d6c5fdfdb909882758f5bf56dd
'2011-10-07T16:25:25-04:00'
describe
'2604116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBB' 'sip-files00026.tif'
7733b6e2a428faac6054c99159a098b8
766408cefcaea2432c919b782bed598709f81f23
'2011-10-07T16:32:43-04:00'
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBC' 'sip-files00026.txt'
7c091c97e2bb5cec5281905fb2a3a61e
4e90f0f0cc4c6344afca30777fa676048f7678d5
'2011-10-07T16:35:15-04:00'
describe
'35395' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBD' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
cf12ed04fce7aa8a3e8b4c9d66d12e6d
50f5b46545e99278b4a2e45f43824d8464cbf653
'2011-10-07T16:43:01-04:00'
describe
'318597' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
1a3ffdfb6bf563bd109088042f455e50
202da0080cd6fe1b7ec4d03d97c5c0802f28e133
'2011-10-07T16:36:53-04:00'
describe
'210531' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBF' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
b31e4477963631d60d3ba23d9832fc84
5eac92e7463f41ef67efc6cb271799c028ceab29
'2011-10-07T16:25:03-04:00'
describe
'40281' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBG' 'sip-files00027.pro'
968af2f10a35e50022f782437064f5e1
ea82078452c4b2254740d62a36d135e67fb44c6e
'2011-10-07T16:39:46-04:00'
describe
'80639' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBH' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
90d0964e6557f856e13ec519c46e68cd
f20f5cc486605228af64478f5aefc7e189f7ca92
'2011-10-07T16:26:56-04:00'
describe
'2571804' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBI' 'sip-files00027.tif'
6419c8b39288118083219825a2b303e3
3719bbab8e829d56dc21581303d5e6a4d013e3b2
'2011-10-07T16:22:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBJ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
0cf06461e0786148dabdae17e376413b
a2b2ed0c2169015a525e1db90c50256689810a82
'2011-10-07T16:39:19-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'35325' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBK' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
1db30dd5da4c29d1ecd75d1339dbbc86
93dd08257669fa390a3f4e59f3e827e8401ab7e1
'2011-10-07T16:24:18-04:00'
describe
'322664' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBL' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a5fe7b59218b529765d3653b678e9b91
f4dac59cd0f2af5e58a47067a14d0e1165d81709
'2011-10-07T16:29:52-04:00'
describe
'198848' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBM' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
5db57a3cad10a4ffbd3738f01a1eb5da
80e037f0638e68a6e6d1d19e2c542396003b161d
'2011-10-07T16:40:33-04:00'
describe
'38730' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBN' 'sip-files00028.pro'
0477ea56cb7c272928e6a9a7145a2025
8bcb101c3b5b2aa600207a9dc08dc8d4de283192
'2011-10-07T16:43:23-04:00'
describe
'77992' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBO' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
23f7e59e626e1ab87a6021edafca0407
515b6c66ff1dafadfc1142005313f4edb383104e
'2011-10-07T16:39:14-04:00'
describe
'2604120' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
72b0e5284fb501e1ac76a93f2bcafacb
7b94da639fadd4e10bd52d3901866cdcadfe48fe
'2011-10-07T16:30:02-04:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBQ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
3841dab4ac409acc51f260965870dff2
efe8c0f0f06345cfb3fbb505c9510eeb64a96b6b
'2011-10-07T16:42:42-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'35539' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBR' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
884d2700c966bd648108337a1cceee5a
9af6ba447a318ba9f4f0a8c6677a709bd0ed561b
'2011-10-07T16:26:52-04:00'
describe
'313564' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBS' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
1b04b6e55072f8ac140637fc1251372b
93ac0de83c09dea62c1e4afd0a64a36d2960fe08
'2011-10-07T16:26:03-04:00'
describe
'193101' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBT' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
43e91b6ac44cefce1163c86874f8334f
16da74c4352532519d5b97db28d3afcd9c76bfb7
'2011-10-07T16:28:49-04:00'
describe
'36163' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBU' 'sip-files00029.pro'
149c40702dbffb386674e0325429723d
271d4e797a707b65753f311960f0728cd9ed0a6a
'2011-10-07T16:35:06-04:00'
describe
'75588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBV' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
a610a3cfa8613d1ab99891dfedeb4ba4
22e8d7adea800df65dec1ed23c40211d9d84be16
'2011-10-07T16:40:55-04:00'
describe
'2531480' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBW' 'sip-files00029.tif'
054462cb0f704d256ccd92a5feed47ac
4ec841ec768c726f01beee510f04b090ab03b05a
'2011-10-07T16:44:08-04:00'
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBX' 'sip-files00029.txt'
3ca3ab88c9db068d644811cce63e4538
cd2b23eb8f1bcab4d2a1479d4df4585f67c83526
'2011-10-07T16:25:50-04:00'
describe
'34562' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBY' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1581c17e6cbb8917c60119bed316deae
31725d71af788a50eb0110a839f9e924dce9d8e9
'2011-10-07T16:31:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHBZ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
4472130b5d259289a63ce37566f46860
11c5f2ca2bd96235c9964ab242c9543256ccda04
'2011-10-07T16:25:58-04:00'
describe
'208310' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCA' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
8335165be4de5bde261c109b1dd752dd
60f9a69fb0263efa55eece438d03c3df881551a9
'2011-10-07T16:36:39-04:00'
describe
'40777' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
c2ffcdd3eebe3ab35783afec9871fecf
f67365ddce93870e6d5f23eee30819761709a753
'2011-10-07T16:30:18-04:00'
describe
'79266' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
725dc4057f0cde0f74c5a30588248944
452db87ca4b850f4c261d4f6b102a65fcb5dcbfd
'2011-10-07T16:33:18-04:00'
describe
'2603664' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCD' 'sip-files00030.tif'
8219ba4dc57fcdece2372ddef54aa745
7fde81045c456be6669c62a05b2980440e4e8d99
'2011-10-07T16:29:07-04:00'
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCE' 'sip-files00030.txt'
04a45c6f47c898336884a49d462427c2
d7f026a8fb72ae8094206564056bcc6d303a0be2
'2011-10-07T16:43:15-04:00'
describe
'35168' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCF' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
8801599c7774cba75b7b63225df1ae98
a27cc426055a623706d16faffcddd690921cbcb2
'2011-10-07T16:35:11-04:00'
describe
'315580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCG' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e961d566e4c67f25e00f2752c2319f17
80dde7c1a3e4a606eb12ac1442298f6c7bc1df02
'2011-10-07T16:28:45-04:00'
describe
'187161' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCH' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
2ecea587a8604ad3d2cdde8f1f050417
3d7ee77cde40b1fdaedf68af6c2ea63d11564bbf
'2011-10-07T16:32:17-04:00'
describe
'27500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCI' 'sip-files00031.pro'
9bd33ef67e13d432533deb204c8581d4
54788e24bb1ba9cef4ebd18ab38019f4758f470e
'2011-10-07T16:28:47-04:00'
describe
'71452' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCJ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
c82e6a769b1aef51b88bad635a89776e
19e1766c7b98637763e9d707ba6cfb060349b000
'2011-10-07T16:41:51-04:00'
describe
'2547116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCK' 'sip-files00031.tif'
69f52bdbc32c1f2ee30cbc5f90256910
f00416e77daa29afa7811f06b1d21d2b80a69296
'2011-10-07T16:34:12-04:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCL' 'sip-files00031.txt'
7ec9a7e1c09edf0ecb83839355b5bd5b
3c6694ac1d9fcf726d21afcd42f750b76ece92ae
'2011-10-07T16:44:23-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'33402' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCM' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
4b4d723980d14a495eee7209d4887fb4
4f6402c9fc07dae0ae0342756856fcdd41eb584d
'2011-10-07T16:33:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCN' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
98aecb3b0b4cab131d8818a5cbe02d5f
a5c2555e571d9f5b848ab02814caa6b6f9e1d6dc
'2011-10-07T16:42:33-04:00'
describe
'178854' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCO' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
42e59adb2b3b4459e1a6c662d15bca4a
051c0d7059292082f71c938fb3e6084c0bc8e649
'2011-10-07T16:43:43-04:00'
describe
'19373' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCP' 'sip-files00032.pro'
6549ba91d67cdb45c7d3350d95403261
ed0a7f3f1a3cac4397068664788204114e3c8c23
'2011-10-07T16:40:31-04:00'
describe
'64981' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCQ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
eb939728f26d8fbff51a713b6fbe6aa1
02de7e93e51c0ee83b76d836926a84b4d2b7be6c
'2011-10-07T16:28:51-04:00'
describe
'2602680' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCR' 'sip-files00032.tif'
b6f82448bf0f1fc358642b9b78a776b8
b5725f39d46b70de9e65c391b6e5c8bc31a46e00
'2011-10-07T16:42:56-04:00'
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCS' 'sip-files00032.txt'
7f19ac3f8e77f30238066534ba91efd8
542faef8fee5a6cbd7b87c3d83119c3722108c79
describe
Invalid character
'31087' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCT' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
72a3d2fbd7f02eeb0a18a7ecd057020f
27f9e29d2caf05ff6d38e38370507e5a0af04098
'2011-10-07T16:22:32-04:00'
describe
'313631' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCU' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
1967aca1254e4291a112b3e19fa0011e
4514792e2eb7e52e00fcea05e230ba107f9bd031
'2011-10-07T16:29:44-04:00'
describe
'205171' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCV' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
b35595f217bf391fa018efb31e109778
cd89e459d73896569ed9f76fa1d104d7ff2ad5de
'2011-10-07T16:38:13-04:00'
describe
'39622' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCW' 'sip-files00033.pro'
f764c224806918de682f6a985402e2b9
50f1d169e18887788aaa6067dc25c4e9524eedfc
describe
'79580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCX' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
a96d1d060536453fec7849c5eb873eb0
8b3e85fa7276231493e105df2903fbcbd69bda61
'2011-10-07T16:40:27-04:00'
describe
'2531800' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCY' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0d1b8fd46cf8476409b73f30dcb2ad51
c8fda153e9cfc6076f5b800d2863477e8c2b24ad
'2011-10-07T16:32:36-04:00'
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHCZ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
1f72c91bbf4bca2aa1e66ad47c6c23b0
1ab69bbda0c9bfe68240c5a4cebb38ca37098410
'2011-10-07T16:25:41-04:00'
describe
'35338' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
097350a751e189d18859dfeb01fb993d
f1e35ef3e4328216462d2a078f102108c8400995
'2011-10-07T16:25:51-04:00'
describe
'313628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
dc023d46f45fa3e6f0cdf0c774075c68
032f1bfd1b0f036773673a970a0b9d987b2624ff
'2011-10-07T16:25:31-04:00'
describe
'190971' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
6f38214c1668aaf724731b59b6799c03
965935edbe653e9192a434219c05bc1086cf1ad3
'2011-10-07T16:40:49-04:00'
describe
'34698' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDD' 'sip-files00034.pro'
2ca1a9a93fbd7484aeec80f9613d8cd0
319f7e5a2f2e807de8538246be7af212feb47ad6
'2011-10-07T16:33:51-04:00'
describe
'73740' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDE' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
16ec47cfa83075d72001eeea2e531d6e
59d96e53db2aae9322499e5eced00602f8ad1faf
'2011-10-07T16:26:08-04:00'
describe
'2531056' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
aab0eacf5974a049794f6eb0570891bf
0a793772a2996de19a933634ba19cd3c4fb6ab2c
'2011-10-07T16:33:55-04:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
4e222d251cbc0c797506dcfd7105b2c9
85ca33d8974b5048fabf7d39846890e30523ffcb
'2011-10-07T16:40:52-04:00'
describe
'33698' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f82daf04daec722a9d39a3efebdfefab
c9ba056b75e6ed9ddc7c236c21a97da5411eaca1
'2011-10-07T16:35:29-04:00'
describe
'311880' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
11e0697ce0522712ebae18c3c40e0818
6b8c4b275c9805f8cca87a627a3628b8b0f97a73
'2011-10-07T16:22:48-04:00'
describe
'203807' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDJ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
8dcea2ae5e1e3e9c4da5411d2806dfe9
e0321609f193d609ae2c45a316428a76fca8e611
'2011-10-07T16:32:14-04:00'
describe
'38403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDK' 'sip-files00035.pro'
02c74da4aa15345caa370fc16594e7b6
78d713149902a8e0b7f63bf3170080ac4933f600
'2011-10-07T16:29:46-04:00'
describe
'77121' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDL' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
71aab7211a2f502f232f77b805c0f0d2
3fa363983cac9d3eaa2ca217ad5d76c6697104b6
'2011-10-07T16:33:22-04:00'
describe
'2517412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDM' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1136438096d7281aa186ef1d6590d7be
b9aea80b804fcaa02225fb1d0a33b50353ea7e8e
'2011-10-07T16:40:05-04:00'
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDN' 'sip-files00035.txt'
c78fb0432fb79c95bce432b07bbe208c
abcf1c3ae73d2ac52d4b6108d87bc865d43c437c
'2011-10-07T16:23:42-04:00'
describe
'34753' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDO' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
3c060a6a82962df01fea4634bb3882bb
6bf1309896e9065cb48a276e50133a4d8158bc85
'2011-10-07T16:42:48-04:00'
describe
'314621' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDP' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
bf0158cd3af7aed72356abf3a9e0fcbe
2b589754e623c74f47068c2d7f5545f6c7aab33d
'2011-10-07T16:28:08-04:00'
describe
'203514' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDQ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
8f5c3fd1be8b857d26f4444066ab8224
46e8b73ab12569e4c3b6e02ac68e219107c6a1f2
'2011-10-07T16:33:49-04:00'
describe
'12657' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDR' 'sip-files00036.pro'
e76c02f4b074bdd24b3a0354f733ba6e
358baab87867780017e8a2b8db1bbfe7d0e505b5
'2011-10-07T16:38:44-04:00'
describe
'70195' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDS' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
7d28a69b3610994723f66c19d64750e8
e7e6c7e82c80ecfbd28f5fc1884b7a4310ea0c3b
'2011-10-07T16:24:04-04:00'
describe
'2539268' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDT' 'sip-files00036.tif'
c5dc8fe1069356044ba304aa354e8a8c
38e39dd878f61ec9fcb6612dcc8bcc3ed3efe5e1
'2011-10-07T16:23:45-04:00'
describe
'537' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDU' 'sip-files00036.txt'
cf9c00044fdfcc61639d203194befe00
42dc68bed82b63b5751b6c4ddc794ed9545c5642
'2011-10-07T16:27:05-04:00'
describe
'33830' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDV' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b75055c38a5f058c18c740857954469d
c5603b8f83212552b53ae46d7692aa7eeeaa807b
'2011-10-07T16:22:05-04:00'
describe
'309571' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDW' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
95d1bcec2cc2ce8d464f58d8c90951cf
847d7d1cd6dc0e52ffd6e6c2fc0101b3473fed52
'2011-10-07T16:23:43-04:00'
describe
'189573' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
7c530183eea10846f0754a73bb1fe0fa
9ee37517d5cfcbd6b67b0adf9cc54f44754f9ef2
'2011-10-07T16:37:47-04:00'
describe
'34282' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
93a4f0a24b83751e81234e49af303e67
f4b6b5b5729ef4a0277627f9fe15f81a53bdbe75
'2011-10-07T16:22:21-04:00'
describe
'71682' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHDZ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a8f474e36d69e888d2af1488ca179075
f8b77e7ae88b5c58e81fba9bf091d904fcce3135
'2011-10-07T16:33:13-04:00'
describe
'2499108' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
eafebca5ce1c1527c29e7fa4efec366d
59302f0baa7867de9fac3efe1217cd87feebead0
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEB' 'sip-files00037.txt'
bb6d31300b1125f3decdb00d7219755e
f5728d265914ebcc1de823dde3fab8c50022bf85
'2011-10-07T16:26:43-04:00'
describe
'33887' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEC' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
063045ade3f21d1badf4e161364c7069
340cb66da2cabda71b1e2390c808499b60c9d1f4
'2011-10-07T16:34:38-04:00'
describe
'312586' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHED' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
beaa08d6553cb9cde8c22c10e873cd69
f06ae873363047507e0d918c94bc832914756bdb
'2011-10-07T16:28:44-04:00'
describe
'190673' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEE' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
6272ceac5ff151942b0a9dc4820a8546
a9bb517e1fa7349fd28421c0c0782d25109196dd
'2011-10-07T16:36:38-04:00'
describe
'36718' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEF' 'sip-files00038.pro'
89bf521b9921a38a54ccd7ffe844475e
a04fd7a7638915270b2b2665fdc7c72a45ad7a70
'2011-10-07T16:29:49-04:00'
describe
'72156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
b589ba31a1e0ff5ed25de24c635cc352
5c8881eba0c77f9db53bcd1b0efe0c7993459483
'2011-10-07T16:43:59-04:00'
describe
'2523196' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEH' 'sip-files00038.tif'
1537406dac9602d7eac6c4a08feb3f60
3184383f03ebeeb14540e2e23b5a9a5236158e1d
'2011-10-07T16:22:57-04:00'
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
64a502fb82704f7c5d997368892f5575
bd2984559482a9a14f0d14fc7ad765d0852a8462
'2011-10-07T16:24:45-04:00'
describe
'33964' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEJ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
38fa03cd365581aef23e36c08bfe75c2
622c144c83d8ecb56c56ff2aec54f9486b7115a2
'2011-10-07T16:36:05-04:00'
describe
'306872' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
91d80b17f45c84572bf89316c6c93f17
a2fc7e4866446d53d4bd43c026f77b1cda476d4c
'2011-10-07T16:22:13-04:00'
describe
'197798' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEL' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
cfa0b3f57002e1c75de2d99084047a9c
1693abc8e21c8f1b375c2033bc456f173905c3d5
'2011-10-07T16:34:25-04:00'
describe
'37960' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEM' 'sip-files00039.pro'
5f7269dcd221025aea984ca4dd2b717d
79be400bfe847349a8178815901c9a172f208a04
'2011-10-07T16:33:42-04:00'
describe
'78170' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEN' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
38c80f6a5066060abba21ae4289e5be0
ccac55ad1fdda4499306ca1eb937cb86ef54d000
'2011-10-07T16:35:55-04:00'
describe
'2477380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEO' 'sip-files00039.tif'
3b56c345229ba41e525fed26c93078e6
fccfdf11ebf460b33b7fbe2ef8e2c6891ae4bf0e
'2011-10-07T16:31:36-04:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEP' 'sip-files00039.txt'
6ade8ea95e4eb1bad286c859e854a958
eb18116c3b911a77eb8b7bb3b76553c87926c28a
'2011-10-07T16:36:15-04:00'
describe
'35475' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEQ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
1808676a5c463da2b1156d9513e28c3b
f78a783c9d30fa7c24a86235fcc7f0955b270075
'2011-10-07T16:36:16-04:00'
describe
'322559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHER' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ded20b7852c0854d89a48d07273faec8
c46947d44bc1d7592d3e3cbc344ac3618f1655f0
'2011-10-07T16:26:04-04:00'
describe
'183338' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHES' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3d85819e0008b321add67468084cf3de
462a435ab61e0dddd8b4132a068d39bc1b89f34e
'2011-10-07T16:43:03-04:00'
describe
'19762' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHET' 'sip-files00040.pro'
8c2dd6533caf310cf82f64a037197fb0
2dba5350b993cbddfa71d10c2abb02921c480e15
'2011-10-07T16:25:00-04:00'
describe
'63262' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEU' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
004b7e29f3b20d97119c89ed78c5a796
42c08b6caeb2fb0a410af99e050199eae8550ad9
'2011-10-07T16:42:34-04:00'
describe
'2602472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEV' 'sip-files00040.tif'
4c1588e0f238138fed6855cf83b4c0f9
21a0592337bc10ddfabfedf1dcbd3d9884a5c4ae
'2011-10-07T16:24:31-04:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEW' 'sip-files00040.txt'
c2ba0b70e2a636a8b52e3b97c5914087
d517e92682b6fe8f5af159a396b0ca597d5d64f5
'2011-10-07T16:36:48-04:00'
describe
'30563' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEX' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
40c93c55d73bc83104fba0de7181e1ec
04b0487a2166b30677b88587849c0b33426bf111
'2011-10-07T16:28:19-04:00'
describe
'322886' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEY' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
4fd424f9ebc766a7a948c14568dc013c
ae1cf707a0eeee19f69dcf926aa87a9815346c71
'2011-10-07T16:34:53-04:00'
describe
'225512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHEZ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
ab229482c30f706e1089ff8992f74887
407bd064adfa05487ec02567555ecd1bc721fc06
'2011-10-07T16:37:57-04:00'
describe
'10608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFA' 'sip-files00041.pro'
2761f0b0adbf3e8f0136b86d67e0dc3c
c82a5fc37029cc7cce532257ceccc04451feb5b7
'2011-10-07T16:40:03-04:00'
describe
'73006' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFB' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
6eaf7bb938aa9aea5064aa872dd6d86b
3c1a7448d87f17ca3d7ae2ee53938a4121dedef6
describe
'2605524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFC' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8f7bb319cc2772055a72762cbd1edcca
ae59ba5b2b88921c15e6b14fbba1ea64e2fbee68
'2011-10-07T16:39:02-04:00'
describe
'447' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFD' 'sip-files00041.txt'
545d822714768124311c0c6a954d97be
fe4442f23bad682838bb99d1d9d5f8579189abcb
describe
'33706' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFE' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
50d634d7d8e9f875444dc8a2eebc37d5
ed0856fb87c34309b2da106939dc22217f1845c8
'2011-10-07T16:23:07-04:00'
describe
'322579' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFF' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
1075956643065576bd3f77dd653427a2
9b086a82e047600c4617551f4487c818d1ea2fae
'2011-10-07T16:39:51-04:00'
describe
'205392' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFG' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
5703b25a2a0a70c5a230f03589ace65f
d001562aca8f3ef7fa8985f9acfb4501b7187c24
'2011-10-07T16:31:20-04:00'
describe
'18588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFH' 'sip-files00042.pro'
1634e96dcb215e2cc290adbad3538ca1
c9ae34f23e368ff840aa45e0faafb5bc1de59c35
describe
'71225' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFI' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
2e625de302292e65c14b4e7468cda11f
915de2933860dd32b6330102d824868a59287dc7
'2011-10-07T16:38:11-04:00'
describe
'2603316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFJ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f7928891c308e123b71811f0231caaa9
60773971c0d9653ac7114515a1d9a12115898597
'2011-10-07T16:42:07-04:00'
describe
'733' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFK' 'sip-files00042.txt'
ab827d3a747afe37c56a03b14b499c14
09bfeec464a3d5979b9f10ca66dd31040517055f
'2011-10-07T16:35:36-04:00'
describe
'33176' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFL' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
f33f30a484a0eb3397afdbd1d748995b
49fd6cd013fe0bcff095830a3aac4ee4cae046c2
'2011-10-07T16:28:56-04:00'
describe
'322915' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFM' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
483841fbe5bc7dba979246e00c73596a
bcca3e4038c5851d3e1116a0dac4aa5d5a4f0954
'2011-10-07T16:36:14-04:00'
describe
'206056' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFN' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
9c245afcbfa56dc50a93f1a31936e24b
d389f68309cf6c7f8f54a3412a648bb52b4d1801
'2011-10-07T16:43:00-04:00'
describe
'40622' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFO' 'sip-files00043.pro'
266614d787018db81e03d20c090415ee
52d006aad1fc85e91d07a0f4d6e8f7f824357726
'2011-10-07T16:25:39-04:00'
describe
'78677' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFP' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
5235bece760f63577bce6c952d4530c7
e993737c0fbfeb808bac6aff5a28dcb3642048af
'2011-10-07T16:44:37-04:00'
describe
'2605960' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFQ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
55b903515599056922072f30d89f262e
7c5b1c8aa299907100d0387495e7ea4c0bdf5f45
'2011-10-07T16:36:32-04:00'
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFR' 'sip-files00043.txt'
a0ca4814dc180cbff035a5bf85795a01
869c1ef7258198eb89f68ed6715307e8b82ee033
'2011-10-07T16:26:17-04:00'
describe
'35262' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFS' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
f66237dcb6ed7911f0526eb573b7e07e
9cd2a8c0415886e901d910ecb0a34cb5fd939049
'2011-10-07T16:43:37-04:00'
describe
'322648' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFT' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
fb9464bc994e68f93105ec40753c6b97
3d5191dee831b45d8c79ebad384c7e22b6c9ca95
describe
'236867' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFU' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
684bbdce5b44dfb07d95b3faee0d6276
d01e633cf1fad151e9164a35fb37ce294afbd2fa
'2011-10-07T16:32:59-04:00'
describe
'12598' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFV' 'sip-files00044.pro'
6dcc37753e558d247f16bb9a598d99d4
2df7eab878fd909ad0f47dfa8c09f4d64a2c85fb
describe
'75926' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFW' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
29567a3a3c7f275c88e4d759057887c5
1ab8682f294bf3dc042b75f2603ca092fb3f6b3f
'2011-10-07T16:36:49-04:00'
describe
'2603512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFX' 'sip-files00044.tif'
ff95e982a6fd4e4290479853781c375a
57facec10ec9013186dd62c7fdffd3a7f1f88cbd
'2011-10-07T16:38:16-04:00'
describe
'652' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFY' 'sip-files00044.txt'
1732b25834e5bc7a7ee963e7c210658f
e6dfda25e35ff7a96133fe94cda1d80f0702630b
'2011-10-07T16:28:12-04:00'
describe
'34405' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHFZ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
cc48fe9d26d514025d69b554724d93dd
98da445eb60a917a51f3f276a7d5cf60de78d702
'2011-10-07T16:22:23-04:00'
describe
'322903' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGA' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
ebc2994f58caa214d76c1a0d3fdc68be
125ad5e06bea240ec990dcaf7f39b7baf15d17a0
describe
'191875' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGB' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
5fcf210fc485bc512e696d10e7978f4f
cefa55cb95d8beb693f34ceb24096ad9a8459473
describe
'23304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGC' 'sip-files00045.pro'
32104cb49e27615ed6e2ecfaa98698ea
3e3b8d9b79066d52d032af53b4ad013c6c64a01e
'2011-10-07T16:42:12-04:00'
describe
'69188' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGD' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
e4d971c9f53d156e1bfda3cdf715854d
2a1552aa89d8440ac182a78721a521a8bd68416a
'2011-10-07T16:32:09-04:00'
describe
'2605144' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGE' 'sip-files00045.tif'
132c6597d58cf4381fac306ce3f90b43
776bed4c545a65271d331900a3054bb9831f1d2d
'2011-10-07T16:22:12-04:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGF' 'sip-files00045.txt'
ccff1c908421595e2661872eafd7d711
2460da1ce7123d6865ab16e5c6917776f8d54362
'2011-10-07T16:37:25-04:00'
describe
'33020' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGG' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
1732b376237ab16e556fabbd4e360ac0
1216b6b25de7cfc3c93280de6a877fde8ac64090
'2011-10-07T16:28:58-04:00'
describe
'322631' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGH' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5de32e1847f1927ec93e8fa330800e02
e444e49d836f6582939978b345afcfb656b5daea
describe
'174117' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGI' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
11fbe06b23f83ccad0f8066f15e4f17a
ebee7c5ab3c55d2f6e867e51b4004c4e82197e02
'2011-10-07T16:38:14-04:00'
describe
'18473' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGJ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
8154edbb4c80c8f07db3962e8edc445a
cf8f1c5f0867990dbfdf560c866418a09d1b4ee3
'2011-10-07T16:25:46-04:00'
describe
'62365' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGK' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
6b8b1002bb09722dae8ec42f944a97a1
8c6ff9e0f36d5915a380a0f0100b2dc2918180d7
'2011-10-07T16:43:12-04:00'
describe
'2602388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGL' 'sip-files00046.tif'
d839672105b37d923e4435f72bff1456
94371c48223f5581f356786840fb471840b91925
describe
'759' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGM' 'sip-files00046.txt'
a3226428cbb8e2453462587a9e06c8b6
c6e2254132978affb24b52c5c09c505d8fe9ee22
'2011-10-07T16:27:06-04:00'
describe
'30729' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGN' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
1ac5ed22f364a02b999c0ecbc24a64df
e4f1d688b74313ee1b3403398e4f70a9aca41180
'2011-10-07T16:29:23-04:00'
describe
'322604' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGO' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
51a7bdb699c777f4fffb9844683a4c6e
3c028470755e8874ee2fb3e35d1e7e4a24177670
'2011-10-07T16:44:05-04:00'
describe
'195317' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGP' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
6bcb790b0a7f8bdcd7fca0b1944c3cdf
4f4c6fef211212a84d052fb329b6ace276f53636
'2011-10-07T16:24:05-04:00'
describe
'38208' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGQ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
954dc6f185666988d7b0fa43c30bfb09
9a8f7ecb755ef2eb28fd599829413a9b035969c1
'2011-10-07T16:26:11-04:00'
describe
'74810' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGR' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
fe3b8075e073076cb5e2a34a62afb307
5433fba8d5819ac230d894bdb22813eb1ccc655c
'2011-10-07T16:25:26-04:00'
describe
'2603420' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGS' 'sip-files00047.tif'
786633552b9dbe75323ef488bea45cee
ad69f3f5ba09f8185da96e99dc1e7a3ad500db49
'2011-10-07T16:24:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGT' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f8e40f557701eb1c2004c01ee7f34d89
9aefa41dfd8157d7e1004bbde276a32032ee4dc6
'2011-10-07T16:41:28-04:00'
describe
'33906' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGU' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
f1b034c32d06cbee8fb50330e02eb679
2014d815b223c6dc7bcc3828f232d78fe3fdf67f
'2011-10-07T16:34:26-04:00'
describe
'322661' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGV' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
0b47ccca0f34165c89455ded242b2a89
58d51562569a4ecaebd6334afb281f696c1bc192
'2011-10-07T16:41:45-04:00'
describe
'202083' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGW' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
684d0e82c9ae0fb6298c56dd6509d295
c12b1b67f0d0a179b0addf7655881aa17039a855
'2011-10-07T16:23:13-04:00'
describe
'40123' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGX' 'sip-files00048.pro'
2d6c1ea57e9341fd43e0dc431e973dcd
45c3ad3c1e4adfc6d1b6016e2b5efa7bbccc748a
'2011-10-07T16:25:35-04:00'
describe
'78716' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGY' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
54dfa425c5618d7b55ef65ef9a97c3e2
5bdc0a70366c8ea69548551bb2095d7a89ab0a24
describe
'2603712' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHGZ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
5606fbee1afcb29efaac9b39dbc8fe4d
3c34dc46cc80cb32d1c7f4a4c65fe590ffdee7c1
'2011-10-07T16:42:15-04:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHA' 'sip-files00048.txt'
bcdba693e2cb13add9b00824ff07a376
e56442c7a7cef9ba6c4f045b9b3da1528e3e88b2
'2011-10-07T16:41:29-04:00'
describe
'34715' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHB' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
17b8363896996b1f8bfb6cbb0c654dcf
3a3ee94555b62891f38c7edef0baf868cc67bd73
'2011-10-07T16:25:57-04:00'
describe
'322522' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHC' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
7c117a8db3d0838bc6c72fc2e0b4eade
e4b2a7bede3418c00206bc22edbe616a5c649a5c
'2011-10-07T16:35:04-04:00'
describe
'160608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHD' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
0aa098552a682ef6b3125550c57e14f5
40473d515c8e753aedb1199dd4870736cae6c77a
'2011-10-07T16:30:27-04:00'
describe
'14836' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHE' 'sip-files00049.pro'
0cc33c3f5992f27be2051a9aac05cbb8
95acc61d220e9d7de3ebd0dbd312e4fd7dadcb02
'2011-10-07T16:43:39-04:00'
describe
'57967' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHF' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
140cf50c2d2cff869593a2186227253e
f4826c9efbf6633930429f1782cfd0df6002e7ad
'2011-10-07T16:22:22-04:00'
describe
'2602160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHG' 'sip-files00049.tif'
a5b2d2dcbe3066882ad19f8d3c0d90d4
cf6c9b876171eab5dc4592d2dd432895fbd56c40
'2011-10-07T16:35:52-04:00'
describe
'655' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHH' 'sip-files00049.txt'
fc68ab7353726342f7a749687143b445
c383484305e661b862f642f0f96f9511cd8b7a72
describe
'29572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHI' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
a4b4fa4dff63536ee626a180ab32938d
e61a9192f310cbc3392a2f3472759e55b320398e
'2011-10-07T16:23:15-04:00'
describe
'322647' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHJ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
5ba9b4760ffde1d978329c2c063f6b8d
27f5126b2275ce642a27aebcccea26a1cf976490
describe
'203035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHK' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
6b4009f0fd993344dbc8553395e4b703
48d97c88928779fbc120e68930af054bc8fce6b7
describe
'36445' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHL' 'sip-files00050.pro'
2872b3c357e587691e833c0ffa536458
2d40e929fc7043f91ade6d8562b3efa388954496
'2011-10-07T16:25:23-04:00'
describe
'71852' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHM' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
b5f1daf987363204c10ddc9f3869ecc8
afdd3611a0f0a40db4716166a480a82a1066e327
'2011-10-07T16:29:43-04:00'
describe
'2603188' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHN' 'sip-files00050.tif'
cd8dcc1ff815202a4cae60e963a5c9a6
676b34539c74bce0ba129904b680282ca09192db
'2011-10-07T16:32:58-04:00'
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHO' 'sip-files00050.txt'
e5bd4633cb3f3c29869fd2e22556fbf3
d6f7503f18425cacb4addf0eb18ef26a65ed0742
describe
'33476' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHP' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
0806998b7b2e98cc8d455a889772b24c
d61ee901499c5e43f4c66da95644d5a1322eb9f2
'2011-10-07T16:27:18-04:00'
describe
'322898' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHQ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
2d701f1bc877bf52bb35ff8bcae5091b
5712af886c5be69138d00a37a57ba109a14464fe
describe
'253379' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHR' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
4c384afcdde99ff0cffb703397d899f7
a999aede73df259f795331b0f375995be621b4ee
'2011-10-07T16:26:54-04:00'
describe
'601' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHS' 'sip-files00051.pro'
1dc78bf61e552b0ac6813cae03bb6514
fc30a5299c6655719bf70a85da8ea6e4d9e6b0db
'2011-10-07T16:40:04-04:00'
describe
'72922' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHT' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
113ff3b32dde929cec1782e53d767c4e
d5628edc82c809561d3311aef618d09d9ba9c311
'2011-10-07T16:37:18-04:00'
describe
'2605468' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHU' 'sip-files00051.tif'
c38b8c70a033e3fdff3ade4b8b49f790
c15cfb4f4ef47b221917ed726bb3535afb47fcbe
'2011-10-07T16:41:20-04:00'
describe
'178' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHV' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a5a06006eb32067dcbd97225ff64a6ae
04a42090b95c339d4cfebddb396c169f181b2b6d
'2011-10-07T16:24:55-04:00'
describe
'33095' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHW' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
f1a3fd047086419d08862dd01fcbba55
2e47c81e1dd06ac4adc81beb8dac36bca6e751df
'2011-10-07T16:43:41-04:00'
describe
'322655' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHX' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
0ac85b6c06d4904f9362f9d52dd8555b
1af3f80eec0f3a87af7aa898873f218dd429a7d6
'2011-10-07T16:37:10-04:00'
describe
'205173' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHY' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
f5fd1d35f1d1694e2ab6deaf14e512a4
90b2aa19ff1824956b95684125ff37cb4061589a
'2011-10-07T16:31:53-04:00'
describe
'40464' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHHZ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
ae8bae884d1228a58246593302188eb6
28389e299b4347135edc67399fd22abd54f2f373
'2011-10-07T16:23:00-04:00'
describe
'78120' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIA' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
dc0fc310715e33ad423f9112e0a3dfe7
08708d6efc42bea8cef7278b86c844759bc4a98a
'2011-10-07T16:28:35-04:00'
describe
'2603776' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIB' 'sip-files00052.tif'
a18ded2dd334723dd5bc5399bac00243
27fab7729859ad49934f2cf5c4a423647e0145a9
'2011-10-07T16:26:10-04:00'
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIC' 'sip-files00052.txt'
90fc407360980d2c92dd78767cae34d6
2bb51f99afa9f6d3e86c9aa277aa91c83ba68ed4
'2011-10-07T16:32:39-04:00'
describe
'34471' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHID' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
af76297633c6af63419a07eb3473fd95
da887d99bd0d9bf06b6d8df4ac773b33efe08f54
'2011-10-07T16:37:01-04:00'
describe
'322764' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIE' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e41e6d8780fb18e2fc817c15001918fc
9584c1ccd0bc2bb5a600706a7b12ed38db26a060
describe
'299209' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIF' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
cab5551d26ec581ef0560e1bda562233
049fe50edc87361d713e3cbec19ac6c4f712c2c4
'2011-10-07T16:25:44-04:00'
describe
'3139' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIG' 'sip-files00053.pro'
6a9c74cd57f2bc86b822ea4071a10d94
0d77a873b472c8bf6cc5659e3b3d33f12c2e176d
'2011-10-07T16:29:37-04:00'
describe
'83786' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIH' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
c2dbc14707ccd66c7db4b4fda3c70dc8
42d2828027d4dafe66b363f34a43dda8c6fa8393
'2011-10-07T16:36:59-04:00'
describe
'2606472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHII' 'sip-files00053.tif'
175676cf40d2833d93ef056558feee2c
1fca4c93d2bcae699efda361dfec50be9c7912aa
describe
'244' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIJ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
7baae28c6dd55cb5003776113fedf064
7250a67ed0c96a10a22b9e972e8eab9ba6942b0d
describe
'36171' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIK' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
46ab9b0b0a894fd9638dda0661902be3
34bba042249b639bf13598ae901f14e992c8f4ae
'2011-10-07T16:27:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIL' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
6453fe77c2d8307530e0a8c0e21e34fe
fa2a0163ecf8e06d810377f9d0ca8c9c45fbe303
'2011-10-07T16:43:26-04:00'
describe
'170028' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIM' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
132983c73e73a537276b941cd930fe1e
7a512389c938ec56df53a20420ec696cce2ce193
describe
'32054' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIN' 'sip-files00054.pro'
e8eb092fc6bbaa7fd03f18f40305e762
67c76236ee4a7f182348833bb991fdd5d7cab210
'2011-10-07T16:37:26-04:00'
describe
'66722' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIO' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
9428371aa9457d14278cdb1a9fe3e143
3fec994ca29b5503c4a6f5fb50e9ba82e53b1ff5
'2011-10-07T16:41:11-04:00'
describe
'2602968' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIP' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c7bcf4da3b9151ed25a809be7606a90e
a5c184ff3923b018793166e98f9051f548b73c98
'2011-10-07T16:42:01-04:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIQ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2e492c111b6b486a3b3514d891d39931
fe5324a37bf095c73cfd5c07bf76500883e41bf5
'2011-10-07T16:40:21-04:00'
describe
'31730' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIR' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
dfe70028d5c97e82de039490b867f9db
a9a8407d186f24d7515cea63f5de08e94147068f
describe
'322576' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIS' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
559113a758cefc472f7589c856e252a7
144ae82719b13563869567020ca2ab6e2e78d028
'2011-10-07T16:41:16-04:00'
describe
'204390' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIT' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
caa2e83db0dc02e710e7b9671fdea85b
20c34247f63082adf933cb87cebe286b438137e7
describe
'9341' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIU' 'sip-files00055.pro'
11eea938cba3e771bc84ca6ee8f09468
26011e79b3cd4d90efc7b35e8fb6361c80bf6e4f
'2011-10-07T16:23:06-04:00'
describe
'64709' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIV' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
380800d2d7eb3d589a497ce1d7a2c9c0
26b0a3ff7e9195b5dca5e3a926de586e179e6543
'2011-10-07T16:36:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIW' 'sip-files00055.tif'
bccbd86ef85f353ee082f24d620d8e36
5b2ff01a42da72f637c0b2d61114d2206f2b5507
'2011-10-07T16:43:06-04:00'
describe
'399' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIX' 'sip-files00055.txt'
fb4acad55a058ff5342d69efb94259f0
d2d8ee685a3c4fa1bf8b0fa62aa3857817a08a6e
describe
'31082' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIY' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
b8ed3b6346c331b2f706606bda43f022
91ef3bed599f8c6e1f62a58f58e0f469e0ec2e6a
describe
'322643' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHIZ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
70ba38ecb600b3762650e1afa6f4c731
6ff118bbf361ad4adc9be75a847f51fa943d1f3e
'2011-10-07T16:22:51-04:00'
describe
'196966' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJA' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
cf48f678376ec52edb5d593b09c0e943
d568ebcd21b5c3a2ef0c0423b6bdf6472dfb46d2
'2011-10-07T16:43:25-04:00'
describe
'39388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJB' 'sip-files00056.pro'
fb8e821bcd0a7f0c2403a3e1fdc81c0a
813ce4edfd6f60df67cfc59c6da7c95c4e267070
'2011-10-07T16:30:40-04:00'
describe
'76529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJC' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b3f649e659f273d6a0692b6c333b9b5d
1a8d10b076beb4c3071d53898a44d386f2bb09dc
'2011-10-07T16:23:46-04:00'
describe
'2603580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJD' 'sip-files00056.tif'
3eb4568f360f48cebf3c034833e8e870
679cc3ab0fc326158666a52eca38fd40b7b71ddf
'2011-10-07T16:38:29-04:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJE' 'sip-files00056.txt'
f5d9680dbf22fc06f45a5e7d225f21a1
ef6ca1be2307023350cc661f94d900953e582623
'2011-10-07T16:41:07-04:00'
describe
'34338' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJF' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
b08f23d42507e7dcbd5278fcfe597917
3e7fdd699b55e364e3e3efb9f0d808e979410275
'2011-10-07T16:23:05-04:00'
describe
'322800' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJG' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
497ad0b9eeba35f77c17a146a314bfe1
5d45121789b477d6dcb70746e5adab1c3106c58b
'2011-10-07T16:41:31-04:00'
describe
'203174' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJH' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
dfe0b55076a800f3de2fe13e572757f6
de204cf7ffa035bceab879f41b39061c92acf0a6
'2011-10-07T16:23:02-04:00'
describe
'40178' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJI' 'sip-files00057.pro'
abe886e9b4ace00cce277dda720afcf1
f347d8f3cf1e73809cce02b174f1f17e81273e9e
describe
'78382' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJJ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
b9b7cd4e9a3c4d61a9e9bbcd304e8b06
a838b46261589098a53d321aeec26ddc7fb9553f
describe
'2605928' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJK' 'sip-files00057.tif'
ca7dce013f39b08704881756334a2b6d
ebf966ae6f6b1f2d97257efd29cf88a0f4ab4e61
'2011-10-07T16:24:47-04:00'
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJL' 'sip-files00057.txt'
f8cafd212eb8445f99211378753a3699
817714eb4f7ad6fef50088300b302bc3a6afaaab
'2011-10-07T16:29:10-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34845' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJM' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
3fb913c19fe711e74707e156b0cb2aa1
40d69995d8d32cc8f14d243240735b55afb27c9c
'2011-10-07T16:31:49-04:00'
describe
'322581' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJN' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c142b3ec425837f43c2b7a9269a8a757
f76c2bdd11cb633d697abea770fa6b751a2a1d5e
'2011-10-07T16:27:13-04:00'
describe
'180754' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJO' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
720d093b5f129ae5f55f2c7f8bb1dab0
f6f0fccfefac7a85e71cda40f741da4d21398dd2
'2011-10-07T16:41:14-04:00'
describe
'35510' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJP' 'sip-files00058.pro'
c61e58089fec1ec819c12cd978eacf0a
bac7aa3d6b2696b658ac42af3769af5032338c2d
'2011-10-07T16:36:22-04:00'
describe
'72101' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJQ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
a67cabc4d5045c9363c0d40a24b68786
49a1fc168b994e497739277e5b4dc45f5aae78f2
describe
'2603248' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJR' 'sip-files00058.tif'
277bfb172d8f6bbd716b61aa77dccc52
20f513a30d1fb606e920bc97f6708722623810d9
'2011-10-07T16:32:05-04:00'
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJS' 'sip-files00058.txt'
9c3699651737e722b7d173cba50a7e3e
de3606b132803215d0c8569f27d11a51428144d1
'2011-10-07T16:40:41-04:00'
describe
'33447' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJT' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
414985c711c186002837fdf26db3a7a7
83486781b30700f74a2ef7821a94983d640a2a62
'2011-10-07T16:39:24-04:00'
describe
'322660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJU' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
e09511caae905f3a85f45ffe87cf938d
e28b5b7b365ab7c1b5abb91ec4ec0a79de574327
'2011-10-07T16:28:31-04:00'
describe
'196602' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJV' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
462a4d92dd484d59561836eab4252b7d
2d600a9c70279a7f6c5636cff3b5f3fde4d2866d
'2011-10-07T16:24:38-04:00'
describe
'38772' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJW' 'sip-files00059.pro'
78e9b4d93495e28e49e78bbf6d166a4a
e11147a28f48626dc14791eb132d208685c13bbe
describe
'76672' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJX' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
838e027c608b0fa8ccf62c75207ef8be
9856a6405cf8d6fdf0d9f0b5c503a9d9171b1da8
'2011-10-07T16:25:59-04:00'
describe
'2603804' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJY' 'sip-files00059.tif'
d2414453d9144b0b4c4cd20f81bed0ee
5a32029d486d218506f1b993ea13066ea307a329
'2011-10-07T16:25:52-04:00'
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHJZ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
635420ad24af22256f0fca3812d209c5
66bb02d4cb7858d0f49c9e0d3377becc3663af44
describe
'34758' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKA' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
d901a5f64b82cdf97e6ca588d7313485
5aeff61c9f237d990927fa731a3ffbf6658b9a99
'2011-10-07T16:34:14-04:00'
describe
'322608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKB' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
d75abddd41d68095b1be9996173079d1
54583e2018686682e3f476bf2e4dd3db0eee9574
'2011-10-07T16:28:00-04:00'
describe
'195982' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKC' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
b84ef5763e72615807395d189ed88473
3cfb43012d09eedebc55497d30e4b550ae159f69
'2011-10-07T16:35:38-04:00'
describe
'39460' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKD' 'sip-files00060.pro'
d89ce17e2041a8bb1722b48071ae0f5e
b388af34396d1e987339413e8c3b84482a8f06e0
'2011-10-07T16:25:42-04:00'
describe
'76041' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKE' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
3b1380873cb1b8452d2f76b4ffdd105b
22b1a29965b23e9dab490dac9d385b297d34f810
'2011-10-07T16:43:18-04:00'
describe
'2603408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKF' 'sip-files00060.tif'
2bc67e0276a58b378e0c831ee92931ed
81c49d2d15f6c04970b269994885a377ff049e96
'2011-10-07T16:27:29-04:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKG' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d2ce75f0d32a936861acd28574b713be
21a9285ae9afaf73243fb82cd8e78cca2f5d3a9e
'2011-10-07T16:29:57-04:00'
describe
'34216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKH' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
7fc649b37b37f232927342c418417241
fe2a91a4a6ff58f68f45e5841509ff7daea559b7
'2011-10-07T16:34:10-04:00'
describe
'322640' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKI' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
3798ca9e239116978f469c4261c6d7f8
b875c9a326135b7e7eeff751d86ad882e1a096ce
'2011-10-07T16:25:10-04:00'
describe
'167411' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKJ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
8ca39f37448d8ec11cd0613e63e96700
0ebbb3badfe3313c635fbb25bf1b653c058b7d07
'2011-10-07T16:25:04-04:00'
describe
'18217' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKK' 'sip-files00061.pro'
6c51fb2b49bcad732b9cec1bbe2fd63a
b050655c4854bcfa504f71479dfbc5a73c240737
'2011-10-07T16:41:30-04:00'
describe
'62294' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKL' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
849f5b6558d9ecadff6889a75b2d34a1
ad5f0eb01f4d1e31e6ec4182b724a3e61d88dc6f
'2011-10-07T16:31:16-04:00'
describe
'2602568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKM' 'sip-files00061.tif'
08c7bd4611368d0e22304b8bd0e1d6be
2b5b9d51342bf66f8ac450ec8a3494db1ca9d0cd
'2011-10-07T16:31:29-04:00'
describe
'727' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKN' 'sip-files00061.txt'
8cf7f931022724bd1e978f479a88186e
9a9997dad2348576d07c13e2f42a8a10cd915cc9
'2011-10-07T16:29:11-04:00'
describe
'30917' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKO' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
db7c082b3f76aae32ccd493bfd7d4577
145ed8094126ca97046f74bb96a5116d4e99de13
describe
'322585' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKP' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
6ff4a68cf1bf36f454849b70f2e9630f
a1f244c77cda611ce47655596853708b685fe0d7
describe
'154692' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKQ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
c7bb98b8d960329ca63946f00e27c327
47c60cc06bb99f2ef6297dcb373565686c28021e
'2011-10-07T16:24:58-04:00'
describe
'18865' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKR' 'sip-files00062.pro'
9383d72039fda35541995b5660c5a4e0
67a37505ee38e49b734f459ffafedb154117c7c5
'2011-10-07T16:24:56-04:00'
describe
'58391' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKS' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a55c3987dc3ae7c9dbbf116fe1cb2cde
beb527ad88f1d81c5cd480da573ff31d656827a5
'2011-10-07T16:44:22-04:00'
describe
'2602204' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKT' 'sip-files00062.tif'
1594c60509c609539cfe2b6ee40de7af
9d5b7cb3551968d95d93ccf386e4b5f4084edb36
'2011-10-07T16:43:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKU' 'sip-files00062.txt'
15cb62afafda7cca70963446b880b522
3b606200f775e598ce381820723d9ffd08ea012c
'2011-10-07T16:35:48-04:00'
describe
'29795' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKV' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
c3cb6ad197c671453c6222826c30f38e
6472f0d309dd1258c73bd95d0345d7c47444ba7f
describe
'322636' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKW' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1bb42853dbb257921fad3e40bbf341fe
2057df9ca72eb495c90e18d401f28d88037b5cf1
describe
'199132' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKX' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
5660ebd5a6152d46c1f8826dea514bf2
d154cfcd9e0110d7063b4b6fd22642dd71af9444
describe
'39905' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKY' 'sip-files00063.pro'
a4112578a3e5a58da740bfb4ef4b4413
15466c2e00d6558001495f750f232eb67585784f
'2011-10-07T16:42:02-04:00'
describe
'77201' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHKZ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
6781f78861f5a9c28c67ca1ff531663d
364f32944f9f32613a022cc3dc685e4a7ffb6f7e
'2011-10-07T16:26:02-04:00'
describe
'2603888' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLA' 'sip-files00063.tif'
adf2b166b3600823dbde609c8559a025
68923bda4d9e6f54023ed7616f5464a4d3ff1c6a
'2011-10-07T16:39:18-04:00'
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLB' 'sip-files00063.txt'
143c7417a53361cb44b5ad67d0178074
ca3d5aa2925fa05aba180f840b9ac2de6c632a23
'2011-10-07T16:41:52-04:00'
describe
'34764' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLC' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
be7be79a3250edf8f3e6392ceef2cc54
4ff15eea52f62514fe31ccd20c49f98a929d8e4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLD' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
d16070536eeedcfd6ef2c43463cee414
f4f4ba725a5e66ae26e6d99d25341a1a4df96d84
'2011-10-07T16:24:30-04:00'
describe
'196259' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLE' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
192d1579499fb2ca53771fd4cd24320d
936b40b1bf91c26c87d6b5830d9ab49f8b9be394
'2011-10-07T16:42:14-04:00'
describe
'39644' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLF' 'sip-files00064.pro'
c1a08c0f6b800f293348d5cb859da52f
69e871f6929e03fb94b34fb090f22f8293c8d7b1
describe
'76489' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLG' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
68989f008229145d5918e87847ea7968
8cb50ee476c15ee3648547b0d042b638cf77d14a
describe
'2603668' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLH' 'sip-files00064.tif'
3e42a713ed8daa96a6947a30041b8b26
3f0cdefe71d341a016da6c35414d5c6988ccac47
'2011-10-07T16:31:14-04:00'
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLI' 'sip-files00064.txt'
337adaacdfee0262ee97fe85239a4ee9
08a22882c575d5e3da829cc595b71e8d3aeb5970
'2011-10-07T16:28:18-04:00'
describe
'34131' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLJ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
44dda1cd992438c2a289c485b47f805e
2da563630edf2b8a9b08601d00362af4555c56e3
'2011-10-07T16:33:15-04:00'
describe
'322561' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
3ab1c848b76b2b2cb00736d8e7531516
02ede3839cd82c55ea32d5c010da45a0844a9076
'2011-10-07T16:32:22-04:00'
describe
'182190' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLL' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
9eac95a27b1a91314985e6599f1eb5b5
05a0959a3c0b9cab2a04cba667abb4e37fa27314
'2011-10-07T16:32:34-04:00'
describe
'27333' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLM' 'sip-files00065.pro'
bb152da27bc627539d401ec109942561
ba3dbd5e6cd7746cb0ab2d5d2283f377285a3e0b
'2011-10-07T16:22:40-04:00'
describe
'68930' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLN' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
5a6816cdd0b6e257caa816a42dd8cf80
265e793b53543f19e6e10cd4fb35f9a773a2e598
'2011-10-07T16:27:12-04:00'
describe
'2602860' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLO' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e3c80798ee1306b54d5b8a62b2e02e89
f39f4dbc55368c95637c5dd3a4b13c45e73e2ccd
'2011-10-07T16:26:58-04:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLP' 'sip-files00065.txt'
ae21b3647a0972cac12ad03e3985cb68
a7fae83b121ef30f37690852c192c53e1a2c2ae7
'2011-10-07T16:29:27-04:00'
describe
'32482' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLQ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
335494886c2c4706aba0ed39d8949cc3
eed7785bc72e14f40dd5bb2f212187db94e3bc2c
'2011-10-07T16:22:42-04:00'
describe
'322610' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLR' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
66802053e6367747605aee32fbc53802
649e6d5cb3b6de446d0002eb49795bd4f6b72556
'2011-10-07T16:26:30-04:00'
describe
'194639' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLS' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
18d0b150c4d21f12ecca456b8de7c12d
196d422aa2e2e9dfebd2d49ae3341c5ce713e4e7
'2011-10-07T16:22:43-04:00'
describe
'39144' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLT' 'sip-files00066.pro'
8ed7446d1a9a3979bda4685571435bad
22a9617893b9c192a8994fc1d0b774361d31238e
describe
'76186' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
e7b420f578ac2cc2c0df48a71b4955c2
c9ebf569982f6dfacf222e15fc922b7b69d9ffd8
describe
'2603600' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLV' 'sip-files00066.tif'
9b7256ef107cfd674f2493fc536e869d
d8f948c81c84ee840e6b854da4f2ab87a7cfefbc
'2011-10-07T16:22:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLW' 'sip-files00066.txt'
b02a4d392093e83114acc7dfb0ff3d4d
70364448a513f1470e747b0eeff32e98c35d8acc
'2011-10-07T16:25:36-04:00'
describe
'34066' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLX' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
90b02b41413b064ff41e6c87b7efabbb
7e53dba197cc63c4e65a4793967bfb7bd5663621
describe
'322540' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
05e720c90286b7006bb0e68757babcf0
d21a095c2d4a484536ce450948d91536294dfac1
describe
'160994' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHLZ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
7920969277194a20e5bea63ea03b90e3
9f1bdbb5cce80bb2b46dc4dd4aa0e937362d6df7
'2011-10-07T16:24:33-04:00'
describe
'18253' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMA' 'sip-files00067.pro'
9f683787b515b3fa31259782c14957f9
1d6517a5d4122ee24e71b210ad0e7b8bf9b89459
describe
'58626' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMB' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1b09250609c52b8cfc5157366b4b20ba
2f06764b72ee82644a3bd42f38084a7452de884f
'2011-10-07T16:41:08-04:00'
describe
'2602276' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMC' 'sip-files00067.tif'
9338aac6a6fbae6d5898315c933d9abc
50a96f3ab7dec5cdf179ba186d4e033b5f0e7021
'2011-10-07T16:44:33-04:00'
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMD' 'sip-files00067.txt'
08ae69d83ff6a19c50bdeb6d30e0be18
341405dc358c59dd1977d2653eb82a3038e40fd5
describe
'30011' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHME' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
1d0f0aee90054dd6782f6d08718608b8
6c7da93dccf1a7cf3a0f602d2fb621095129eefd
'2011-10-07T16:27:17-04:00'
describe
'322663' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMF' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b5ed8fb3f87708c3d86546e5597cb117
5128493c1153bfe47c7cccd9ae6c084492f4053e
'2011-10-07T16:24:02-04:00'
describe
'171098' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMG' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ef8e850b8f69da4be15d4215101d9d72
e477f51a4c03672bcc660cdb48620dab9d79e3f7
'2011-10-07T16:41:06-04:00'
describe
'18575' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMH' 'sip-files00068.pro'
8ec30de32f3ee54256ace03dd21f8c34
e86145c717b83fb2c4ceafe6cf2f0b29cf0e6037
'2011-10-07T16:32:07-04:00'
describe
'59968' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMI' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b2f4c13c0bc3bad46918bc5879bd2bd6
99ff3d04b98988d4b6b22e4e24fb4976630c6bee
'2011-10-07T16:30:43-04:00'
describe
'2602020' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
8f63b07d771b1f7e851aa12770cdbf6a
141301b319fab417de9f5910b5bfd0c20fd9c1c5
describe
'790' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMK' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a175e4af8f8095db3dae6e0ea19d34e8
e735d82e1ce480f097ce9f4221ea7046ac6dc190
'2011-10-07T16:38:25-04:00'
describe
'29488' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHML' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
39a2f1a8f39f1bc0dcafb4e0f721f741
2a05bd29030520dd1aec71d3c12739914af6ba96
'2011-10-07T16:39:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMM' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
37286601a3c8d138db9eed56371251eb
8d25fa84ea48e710fc695917676bdb54cac5b1ef
'2011-10-07T16:28:21-04:00'
describe
'173522' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMN' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
7992073477cfd61c07f941fa826f985d
e14d21b9296aaf0235fe9c2c64db24cb7c760886
'2011-10-07T16:32:11-04:00'
describe
'19185' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMO' 'sip-files00069.pro'
476a5b9de177d2a7a6e50540b1a233c3
7421265a53c813f1aaba44b00705b9db4b80bc66
'2011-10-07T16:31:10-04:00'
describe
'60311' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c63c3e88c6964c5063d212ba40f71031
02d874ffc7703e50ee0b5595979eee13cb40fc5a
'2011-10-07T16:22:58-04:00'
describe
'2602156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMQ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
f65bd1743cebc48e5df2e518d826dbb7
76c37db8f436134e1b00c24ca9417088681a7c26
'2011-10-07T16:43:21-04:00'
describe
'802' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMR' 'sip-files00069.txt'
c38706fd12788c193b61ccc981eb1f54
801319c4b2089fb45808b96fdfc70118c8a6cf99
'2011-10-07T16:26:14-04:00'
describe
'29809' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMS' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ffc04e526cdd20c95046ef6d44b7ce78
a9bb8b9bfe892e69cffb22bbd7ac91652d554451
'2011-10-07T16:38:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMT' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
0b0bbd0bdf30159aa49f388adf6df89f
cdd2e6b80338b87a1e6ddbe4cff65540acfefa47
describe
'166980' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMU' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
bd121575a46e119f30836aca066e562a
371379f8bd20f69befadbbb6c62f75401dd66432
'2011-10-07T16:34:54-04:00'
describe
'15887' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMV' 'sip-files00070.pro'
8638b01d5b5c9ef4b6919c5bc7268a60
60147e98c3a2b79543544fa259a3aa99f9525186
'2011-10-07T16:38:28-04:00'
describe
'58999' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMW' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
b8c54b1ce75c760ba9da4851b798037c
3d3820f94850dd2b5ccad8fe8d38235efba53c2d
describe
'2602348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMX' 'sip-files00070.tif'
85be3eea556e9828119ba82e4dab9fde
2706c43b507d5fcbf8c6a2beeab64ce5a1e31288
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMY' 'sip-files00070.txt'
18233e069bb4d8f7df4b9577c028ea65
35cf33e158f405f78dd17dd16813f98ae614f4a7
'2011-10-07T16:33:11-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29872' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHMZ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
5ef742c7265758ce00740bc63ceff147
ba6dd66b98beaf6bc31159bb8b9ab011f3461eeb
'2011-10-07T16:34:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNA' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
2764b60238a9e28747f7396d7a89316c
e52e20d695b2e1984ff145a63fb51aa0b3c1a9f1
'2011-10-07T16:44:10-04:00'
describe
'182136' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNB' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
bb311b5511be970ca7a8ea9d8b8b57a0
1c24452c4b378c4c244f4bff0b572c2412fa9440
describe
'34303' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNC' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4de736336292df91e0f00e66635eccb9
666a6d4385fca64008604e408119fe11577d0a60
describe
'71515' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHND' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
8b626ad3f5239b6794883e4370d00234
686f5b1fdea2815ce07ac9d574075a221d4403cf
describe
'2603360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNE' 'sip-files00071.tif'
11329884661794c10558ea9e594e92f1
bb4e43c701513f09185176a78ad1597e3d5e2e69
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNF' 'sip-files00071.txt'
c0242d15011bc25547080738a0605982
9044045e9ead17e7ee204b66b270e0c565c3c2ad
'2011-10-07T16:27:49-04:00'
describe
'33380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNG' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
48c2892d35bad7fb8b557a48ab2cac89
928d231477e565a695d356d5239b616507cb7a6b
'2011-10-07T16:23:03-04:00'
describe
'322564' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNH' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
3e3117017ed785e1012e1282bc725d28
ce127f16178f07de93311f2e90d3edaa9012e5c8
describe
'205895' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNI' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
3d917275abfc98d7fd81b35dbf6e1866
7a73c857a0577b93873bb3c3da1a497e9bea0b78
'2011-10-07T16:29:45-04:00'
describe
'42056' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNJ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
31640e7301e99f682f16ebdf7db8e7c4
afaff13fbdda69714ee7139ac317c3a71b72aac2
'2011-10-07T16:31:07-04:00'
describe
'78315' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNK' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
58ee657a1d673aded7305381c68fca2a
290c86feb4860c4a4dfbef34965ce6815947713e
'2011-10-07T16:40:24-04:00'
describe
'2603348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNL' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e5980aa2b50b7297cb4b804df6281469
7f4d09588f6193024cb5e2134f2d99773e2b7b6a
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNM' 'sip-files00072.txt'
1c31b52609d0169a901e974fa42bf73f
ea5612ef12c9e5e7f228eafc44641e4c6141ea59
'2011-10-07T16:37:24-04:00'
describe
'34281' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNN' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
2a8268ea87768bee98b26fe4f29d159e
a085d909f4e09d75bef5fe8a018cd703c030ae82
'2011-10-07T16:36:08-04:00'
describe
'322650' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNO' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
6568b8af8ba2db3c6b9667a9809d190e
c9c1b1f6ec9f137df482b0298884f3f3f3a91236
describe
'185764' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNP' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
dbc903596093a2fb25ce17e108781eeb
c79ba842f9ef6e0e0d1f3b321269405e46067b88
'2011-10-07T16:24:32-04:00'
describe
'35423' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNQ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
d7fa359f4ff5a5fc03174eb9a79aa7c2
da94aa305bf6068b005ef50faf0c977ee9079b1b
'2011-10-07T16:37:32-04:00'
describe
'71755' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNR' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e269106429e5adcc5674d0c85c805852
ef3bc76a116ddf0621ecf5a9e1f2cddc13bd9976
'2011-10-07T16:32:41-04:00'
describe
'2603120' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNS' 'sip-files00073.tif'
41388069169625ef8cb5f49e050c074f
c41800dd8fba7b87eeb05ddb8a286437be6f25db
'2011-10-07T16:38:26-04:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNT' 'sip-files00073.txt'
9035b13af92d9b02dac656fa5f36dbd1
756622ba4dfb3c0ee4ffbffb33c1edac91759777
describe
'32842' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNU' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
45e544c6355d23299a3cc8bcd73cc471
0919dd6f0c59f7e61acf3cb32d1e3d1a2292e250
'2011-10-07T16:43:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNV' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
663950d521319df1f8a1e0294618ce6e
bf78496251ddd2545916815286d479d30dba6ea2
'2011-10-07T16:25:27-04:00'
describe
'197261' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNW' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
7c487249375e56548f236993f8faae57
e8605c8bfc0a47d272679fd80c873469b1a8197d
describe
'40259' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNX' 'sip-files00074.pro'
6c38eb4836d193ac351ed8353cdcd1a0
4dabbc8a68656fcc2aaec57f8284bce34456852c
'2011-10-07T16:29:15-04:00'
describe
'76566' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNY' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
1a64cae90a4bf6f638ca40e4f6fe352c
f527b2307d2807a26046756a65dc8ec608945d03
'2011-10-07T16:35:14-04:00'
describe
'2603468' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHNZ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
f8f6c0f0f17d9bbf409e96feb02078a8
ad391ef025348a8422a28fd8180888979660535c
'2011-10-07T16:43:52-04:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOA' 'sip-files00074.txt'
a810bf064ab8d4285661914145d2d72d
7a683e8730b069ab2b1e7863c25b70d68b6ff11b
'2011-10-07T16:34:17-04:00'
describe
'34299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOB' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
1f4276be38bcac2507635f7f20dc8dc8
9ba6e870850e8d5926b34663277cbabc043b5269
'2011-10-07T16:23:34-04:00'
describe
'322625' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOC' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
6f0c0fad034fd6d9f2af44124bf9a3fc
7b9c8518328bab65a40ca9f5ee5aed551853a0f8
'2011-10-07T16:32:40-04:00'
describe
'204251' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOD' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
ec9c8e58c02390c222c3a68b67e5b0b8
915a0f14f0218ec6858fd30faa3848aa36682189
'2011-10-07T16:26:20-04:00'
describe
'41306' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOE' 'sip-files00075.pro'
4b1d45d068cd8eb1f28e9085ef59a197
7406aed2fb3d586ce724e2d7052f12e6e08be415
'2011-10-07T16:30:09-04:00'
describe
'77887' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOF' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
33b1a00917b6480133d037fe2a50574f
a1f1de9d52ee67798c583a20afe5e2ec8b3afb12
describe
'2603524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOG' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c7fe39108ff47f287fbf5e57b6df6c23
1de3877bf212ea35f0d0ecc96145ea244df39b29
'2011-10-07T16:38:19-04:00'
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOH' 'sip-files00075.txt'
8ccfde3c6d8d53b53a4d5b61164cac76
518ce1844f95d04ccb45479d86d08e11d59f38ea
'2011-10-07T16:33:36-04:00'
describe
'34332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOI' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
9b5057637a203f693a5e466b9843db69
3b96278e683ee847ca47071f313ad150b394a6ae
'2011-10-07T16:30:17-04:00'
describe
'322583' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOJ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
338e82e41990661505e085fb541dec1d
c708e1e6096c2b691791f7c5abdacb69c7d828af
'2011-10-07T16:42:30-04:00'
describe
'193162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOK' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
5b4a0868670820616636a2a1ec164097
fd562d34dc3de22f4579eeed166f7a5d65b72ee6
'2011-10-07T16:34:46-04:00'
describe
'38596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOL' 'sip-files00076.pro'
918d974bea38c21f5b1677227faca194
8b885649e076c110f5ebe64149dbccdfed56b0ab
'2011-10-07T16:23:27-04:00'
describe
'74375' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
0debc80594f94cfafc17662fc4ef2825
cdc59215a421ebd6aa955717128ac88ae6c6cc97
'2011-10-07T16:26:00-04:00'
describe
'2603264' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHON' 'sip-files00076.tif'
854895e051232ac3d2e28e0c0ae43cad
d3df0700dae8b9ee83526ea855032686d242db7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOO' 'sip-files00076.txt'
037bb542c6c0454db92aea73c924baab
20608f0ee2bb1195347ed4cd010ff74d20b3463a
'2011-10-07T16:43:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOP' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
f1d5b72c8a93ad80853a82a63880434d
265f0f6c9bc39556cee7cd7853e575e746c08760
'2011-10-07T16:35:23-04:00'
describe
'322629' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOQ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
d0a68de66a6a5b413edded4c93535c2c
42de5b0a5d74bb45f901d147e0eb7b3c6a135c3a
describe
'196543' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOR' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
6a9a8ac3d78b56a5db5fb69dc039cb40
a2eca42e5b7b57c326987be94f918184c655c3fe
'2011-10-07T16:23:24-04:00'
describe
'39277' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOS' 'sip-files00077.pro'
1d2024bf1a6a6e4d2cd4ff5a8c27b651
28516243201bbf11683afa4591da90bd21e70554
describe
'75756' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOT' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
cccdc37b3bfb5b6693c9531bea4f9d47
2d534917226db7db00b47e6ff6a9140fc22c1723
'2011-10-07T16:25:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOU' 'sip-files00077.tif'
2322bb63640e48c0c22422ea0247a4eb
7fec9e05c907b93f0a9a3713609453cae7587211
'2011-10-07T16:42:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOV' 'sip-files00077.txt'
9e3cd3ddfd5fe7cca454306347671668
db0edd7bafa7cce79d662f46b2167f418fb1a695
'2011-10-07T16:29:58-04:00'
describe
'33949' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOW' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
eb0906599747a044c15a2f884bff75ce
374ae716ce3e72b0787a5cd24a034b3a20536b7f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOX' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
2178c4c9a5aaef0934d8688297e6c7bf
e2f2a9e3ec5a88a29785862574806192e96eef4e
'2011-10-07T16:39:50-04:00'
describe
'202504' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOY' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f5d775911f604902341b0e53b79cad1f
03c87f154ea92c7b10c7225c2c4dbac1624c8c9e
'2011-10-07T16:29:06-04:00'
describe
'41611' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHOZ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
93b6d751d0a16b030df88b83418a0c2c
9b1ccffce7498a7d5f027b9a1724550f3bdd8fb6
'2011-10-07T16:27:40-04:00'
describe
'77597' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPA' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
8359a0b3d42d21d322a7774a62b71f06
b25297ceb5c65119d52f9a3244be5266a9924f49
'2011-10-07T16:28:05-04:00'
describe
'2603624' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPB' 'sip-files00078.tif'
63237f6e191c1bfd9d6785d1918671fe
801df4971f1fdb94ed3e51591b587e80599cb6b9
'2011-10-07T16:27:42-04:00'
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPC' 'sip-files00078.txt'
2ea223b2f76cf5e3e2db11052f97f326
b9a0e7bd5ba0827f80012a916a7d5b77afe4d967
'2011-10-07T16:36:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPD' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
a1696b3bb4a906b2e496556d3e9a1f1d
900b33a45354facf0469d7385239cfaa3c23577e
'2011-10-07T16:26:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPE' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
0b8785d364df280c1dc5444a9cdcbba4
cd47dad4fd4052a54733cdc7ab331194201fb3c1
'2011-10-07T16:22:55-04:00'
describe
'194850' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPF' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
f98a24b244846f9396a7c3b7488267d6
516b6820c5e013c9dfbca3e6891dc8e7c135a1a1
'2011-10-07T16:28:32-04:00'
describe
'39667' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPG' 'sip-files00079.pro'
f4f7f3419561243af6e7fa402d6cb1a7
9f80b8be7818335b27533a942f86c7763f4f36af
'2011-10-07T16:43:42-04:00'
describe
'76886' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPH' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
5cec2a31402f1db5a905348a9f629911
92407dd1c5711ea1d83c221e278ce3154797823e
'2011-10-07T16:41:43-04:00'
describe
'2603476' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPI' 'sip-files00079.tif'
5adb4bbd5724d5c491368f9b700004e1
fcfb4863e77e8368fb56d94cd565001f33e4b1f8
'2011-10-07T16:41:57-04:00'
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPJ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
fc9e400e4b4da8c4547f99661fe997d3
8b9d415acb291898a4b7751b6782792be7b4437a
'2011-10-07T16:22:39-04:00'
describe
'34160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPK' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c8d2f301c6fb9bba629d9b77b57ac4c4
c0e8a60e127238df9a16ed624d0fb486246ba34c
'2011-10-07T16:39:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPL' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
86b6d59f73de8f289d4807db94df6f5a
c6103da00af6218362997a65155ca831ec883d72
describe
'180518' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPM' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
0cceefbf6ccf51cfbe510fce911258cf
e1e6a4982046bb3e5cbeffe6b76a5cc2578e85c5
'2011-10-07T16:24:26-04:00'
describe
'27064' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPN' 'sip-files00080.pro'
1f15259df27d599eb8d33afea911848f
13196aa3825911a2d43eba81c63cb968057d98f1
describe
'68545' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPO' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
7a0d5f7df4ffea3eb1e3756542ddd88d
5e6dfd64a7239d13d404a768c0a5a7fdea2fec66
'2011-10-07T16:37:16-04:00'
describe
'2602988' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPP' 'sip-files00080.tif'
9dde55dd046a1c4d4ff1ce7082d8796d
130a43e7e2a6096de9b9300554b89e58491980ba
'2011-10-07T16:38:21-04:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPQ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
ceaf22feb082f2c69f64c3c1427986f3
fa4ded47380ff2bed7f34d1c8cb931a558e65a24
describe
'32936' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPR' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
f87afcd1f8eb1665d9ee61ced03fc221
38a0ded5c69f98f13b5efd43d67dbd7be9967b7b
'2011-10-07T16:30:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPS' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
c1746c32278a31b8f76e0066ec96dfa7
05f9a186845f739bd966ec814827515845053ad7
'2011-10-07T16:32:44-04:00'
describe
'189500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPT' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
f617a9d6ffc630dc1c51706e76b47e1a
aee1108a69e82616aa71f0f07d0d34adad7521dd
describe
'14688' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPU' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f91654915b56b977ce4409d685baf969
f6332a6b26078bfb506f5d717eeebaf1cb15049a
describe
'64543' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPV' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
c20a48d059deaf42e9e4cded0605f836
91f775c8f85c487c7304beabb5a0f1bcea060289
'2011-10-07T16:44:26-04:00'
describe
'2602528' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPW' 'sip-files00081.tif'
b02ac00f02bdb6c0d76cdcc77da92c06
e055fe37b553921d8bf9c4a2735f4313e3a1a5b3
'2011-10-07T16:33:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPX' 'sip-files00081.txt'
b33cf69164d88007ed325c70e76ff8a7
0b4e5a2963b5ca9c7cd4398e64075c997e7022c7
'2011-10-07T16:31:55-04:00'
describe
'30926' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPY' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
ae0e18f8e532fce15d6e8ff0000f4df2
5311b29f8d8349629d51615b6be0d3712a957b36
'2011-10-07T16:23:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHPZ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b9fcb5c47123549c3e4ea40d64cd37e1
3e6cef522622f9c38162317c4c47e5d672b840f6
describe
'193150' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQA' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
bde54b44a77a488b373261c6c37e6917
1486924ab4541cac68f5cf3529cc855022d075c5
'2011-10-07T16:34:32-04:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQB' 'sip-files00082.pro'
e1200e83e8e5f76c1008804036ad6b39
d182ae76828f25ebb6539dca85221aafa961b081
'2011-10-07T16:33:57-04:00'
describe
'63111' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQC' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
b3da8e9f2d1d1cd69926f97c26236f03
7bcff5939399cb4b1d6a1a5325d0794b7bcdea13
'2011-10-07T16:31:22-04:00'
describe
'2602912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQD' 'sip-files00082.tif'
33e27262bf6060e514b16b2c335519e1
f18621cbba8b3956ce1c3350d9ddffae3bbd0c63
'2011-10-07T16:35:17-04:00'
describe
'153' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQE' 'sip-files00082.txt'
fbaea639d3c65905e9814e282e584410
bd2b56e2cb05605b1baed64050db39c6b3e84eaa
describe
Invalid character
'31380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQF' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
51d5541496288c68c1bd7994fb3c6002
cd56e69b56a6189ff645fbd76059937bfd94fdf5
'2011-10-07T16:42:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQG' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
c7fb5c0f1f0e9244abe6b6fed9acf1a2
bae274cd82522c880273472a0e6a5467e4c49ba8
'2011-10-07T16:40:06-04:00'
describe
'169732' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQH' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
e908517a5c542134db5fbcffd287de77
188b05e7a679986afa1f4300eda2d43e3f9bbec7
'2011-10-07T16:36:29-04:00'
describe
'17252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQI' 'sip-files00083.pro'
166dac850d294055e77c5a6c1cb9fb2c
ea0fe3a9a84da9cc8fae91fbb1256c60675f5b97
'2011-10-07T16:36:26-04:00'
describe
'60850' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQJ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
2b57d44978b1f3749f01812579d4fcad
a12a42212e69c399ef1fb1a3c6cce52ee5679ceb
describe
'2602500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQK' 'sip-files00083.tif'
1d64d3c572e433b536b96df33a3db0e8
6e95eb7eaf76c84cd2e46069ad41b7d6178b4b74
'2011-10-07T16:25:22-04:00'
describe
'705' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQL' 'sip-files00083.txt'
44776196cb5355d09c54de14edef7c09
5de3989768f454fee6306d4e9ecbd5446dfe83f5
'2011-10-07T16:27:11-04:00'
describe
'30294' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQM' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
4e07304dee0b1dd7427a7ee77c731741
214abd469de1b59db318b7225095045c0dcf5836
'2011-10-07T16:42:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQN' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
1aedb8bc517950dd2f0d3aa6346e3129
cac8786cd237d1fcda4c6b3d36a7add2847d437e
'2011-10-07T16:39:25-04:00'
describe
'193187' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQO' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
b47ac8ff8a30bb65720e558bd9b137bc
ba8296b86c20b01699bd3eebdcfda04f43d14860
describe
'31771' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQP' 'sip-files00084.pro'
374e70ed2c4491df6d5dfb0dc565e337
538f1c2ebb03e443f0b931f7961371953c31fa81
describe
'71376' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQQ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d7c84003b6efc22fcd128deb50378742
dc413180186378c4db92ec9deedb71e66c897dda
'2011-10-07T16:27:59-04:00'
describe
'2603160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQR' 'sip-files00084.tif'
552052f366d3b6e4d380019778bf3aab
295f9a750a576f0fb97b6af41b4c620d85afde38
'2011-10-07T16:34:59-04:00'
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQS' 'sip-files00084.txt'
e009a7139b59f947bbc6f8e33ae00c53
9b84085f5e3743fbed7a95c134a2969c8c062f9c
'2011-10-07T16:24:19-04:00'
describe
'32957' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQT' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
bc9fd0f4194ba3d5f54b3295f83ab7b5
08fec43f8622c0440fa91ec09fad4a2cabbecacc
'2011-10-07T16:36:36-04:00'
describe
'322914' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQU' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
b487c929a6f3fc50add4dbe07c044ef7
9f99e8eeb8481c6065010dc13257ac68a653858a
'2011-10-07T16:41:21-04:00'
describe
'201850' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQV' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
147107d30bfebbc6ed764a5e46fb731a
ae1c66c549f9a43969265b878adcf944a0d39d75
'2011-10-07T16:38:35-04:00'
describe
'34631' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQW' 'sip-files00085.pro'
22cce3b3a7e26120cc1dff08331dae73
bfdf72ffd1e3e06a89864f58d153b594e4803254
describe
'74050' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQX' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
fe70a5847502c7eb8b4b1d0f78e07790
175477f303e4fd803e460966c7c346a380e0d0a2
'2011-10-07T16:33:32-04:00'
describe
'2605476' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQY' 'sip-files00085.tif'
1b3658b23df4a5010b44e72a93e36a95
769ce1ed85a80c60f8f5ea25dc3f8b47025380a1
'2011-10-07T16:25:12-04:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHQZ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ba24b2bda4fbb41526dc31e8ba5a57a7
21c48bc8de2c20fce22d84c6758db08363077082
'2011-10-07T16:33:10-04:00'
describe
'33835' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRA' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
b129ac943d55e785dc7881d4e40da8a7
960c5be1cca6eabe10a179c88b8ba4bbc6fc8ff1
describe
'322908' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRB' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
09da4c3bf0930a5348008221ee19ce3b
36b87a5f855de2f4bc9a597f6d91d0f219319248
'2011-10-07T16:22:10-04:00'
describe
'210837' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRC' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
0abdc8a686a2d7493e01abcf87123854
69356e652c962239e2a50155086965fee47d66ba
describe
'18201' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRD' 'sip-files00086.pro'
cc503f249d895faf616a49240bb7aecc
dbef6696856730cb596c0de26ed40bef0545f81f
'2011-10-07T16:28:23-04:00'
describe
'70030' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRE' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
48e7a80b38cb532e333257edac140463
64adae246df3de0c0cea84de9f43739024399837
'2011-10-07T16:40:34-04:00'
describe
'2605136' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRF' 'sip-files00086.tif'
38f5db02187c7310ac853957444dd02f
9ba8cbfbce5ca13196747956aede28936a0a9cf4
describe
'738' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRG' 'sip-files00086.txt'
920e0d1e49533f15a411aa2a3e5c43b8
6d1dba18e7cf182f55fdec7244f88f9f32bfbaae
'2011-10-07T16:26:23-04:00'
describe
'32722' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRH' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
885f011d61e71740ff97e312ebe93ec4
67e4d4faf449583c7a444677c45c7d6b460b3fe0
'2011-10-07T16:32:15-04:00'
describe
'322361' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRI' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
ca578cb1d2807f7969c768225b744567
add6e89760c6d916ec4e10d80ada36132d0031af
'2011-10-07T16:27:30-04:00'
describe
'236748' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRJ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
0dfb8dc30b6a8e76a7b2dc42d2f29155
bfceb93f0323864e713c48c7481cf5c3d59361ec
describe
'8633' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRK' 'sip-files00087.pro'
c914c7bbf8566b9ce2df6eb5e8afa0d5
b70abbb0cbd6c6d59d558e043485415e9867d31d
describe
'74223' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRL' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
a6c13c3c61e4e1c26f04c26612e28d13
b08f4be4af6b128fb1d410be827c68acc76458dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRM' 'sip-files00087.tif'
6aab0487071d803e1cad661fd3bff876
fbba33b8f31af868a6248d78029eb3c42a9243c9
'2011-10-07T16:39:30-04:00'
describe
'348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRN' 'sip-files00087.txt'
4351eacb7e835f491635e761ea8abfe5
27b539af3805f08e624f700b599aeb853d691043
'2011-10-07T16:43:44-04:00'
describe
'34230' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRO' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
3b44dbbd7ec136db01391f920fd129ac
f83e64b43c8395a894d626321c84df15ddad82a9
'2011-10-07T16:37:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRP' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
a61af7da4a1a46af6f6afd1e76513a84
ae51c4ec46f71627a778f34ea9a7d04034d44b4f
'2011-10-07T16:39:16-04:00'
describe
'166349' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRQ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
355a751f2d05e88e9e242453cd5c7df3
7253b74d7997448e7e51275e2a07556bb4caca07
'2011-10-07T16:22:50-04:00'
describe
'30074' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRR' 'sip-files00088.pro'
de94419276e5cdfccc51eadab78d4cd7
3a890e472b4c00fe0c686c469b54710523da1034
'2011-10-07T16:33:28-04:00'
describe
'64064' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRS' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
5460f566577e66764265b4243faff829
9a89d3da593a7cb35f0a803c53d5669c71d8e907
'2011-10-07T16:27:04-04:00'
describe
'2602584' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRT' 'sip-files00088.tif'
ee1fb26f74543c6e54bc16c8b0723d75
5f3cb91029352d7aeae20d0e292f23edd445252d
'2011-10-07T16:38:34-04:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRU' 'sip-files00088.txt'
c26d05bfa3e34fe47aa3716403142bfa
0f18705c99001e4b630326842caf28b3f62928eb
'2011-10-07T16:24:37-04:00'
describe
'31257' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRV' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
9c558f650cffe0418c3131b685e42d35
cce14c52f35f7a66f8c6b35804ac3f01c93f6fc1
'2011-10-07T16:31:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRW' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
38b5d5c0f7f52c8a70e07fc7648d64a8
3b7980f3a14e3352b5789e8f637042c59f2b2b94
describe
'142414' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRX' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
0f08218c886da80a3f32b19d1a2328ae
7ed47ee9f9b646e8e319fbad994371ce43c0fb1f
'2011-10-07T16:23:55-04:00'
describe
'23769' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRY' 'sip-files00089.pro'
d63b55d8a730741c1f7106682f446e84
3ade9fd732e0e529bb09160f01bd3405a7a89d03
'2011-10-07T16:31:24-04:00'
describe
'55118' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHRZ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
9ef474aefed8cbb96634cbeb3f322b8a
744ad0ad1eb42ac376e02fce5757089ba745df04
'2011-10-07T16:36:07-04:00'
describe
'2602008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSA' 'sip-files00089.tif'
9604044ba008f9c3b8c2f87634044152
d4d130433847cd36be8a6dbe280bbf935c942112
'2011-10-07T16:38:17-04:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSB' 'sip-files00089.txt'
c03088a0f32586d540a7aa5c8f1f21ca
527a75d2921e55059a081cc5470b0675dc408832
describe
'28862' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSC' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
5f9d333f25f5fedf79cc6ea6f275272a
5edb567d90132f1235ac66272527ec43384a7e81
describe
'322616' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSD' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
8f955a37c3672d95cee011a0cd33225e
9bfb4e810f3366e2d9f93e2ce38b864b3b3bf4c0
'2011-10-07T16:23:51-04:00'
describe
'140251' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSE' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
75fad78b1774e28936b80fea03315bf2
74566ede55e3a896c7a1f1a1bf5da7b10cd45d67
'2011-10-07T16:26:32-04:00'
describe
'23968' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSF' 'sip-files00090.pro'
be0077f66d377493c26769b09a29e6f9
1656554082b4d8afd0c5ab1577ef0a273a2e248e
'2011-10-07T16:24:48-04:00'
describe
'54875' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSG' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
e250504854ddb25308602caa71aa110d
596ea66740c9859ca913585605ba5c049e97a109
'2011-10-07T16:32:28-04:00'
describe
'2601896' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSH' 'sip-files00090.tif'
aa3552a2df7c7741b44dcfc7b709a808
8c3cc01b46630633d3dda2bcf758edac9b244623
'2011-10-07T16:24:23-04:00'
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSI' 'sip-files00090.txt'
7bb4739491e685e1350a1f34c5e6c1a5
414c770ce037c7d91374a974b46d26c8463b6377
describe
'28879' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSJ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
b3f5e72dc45bfb1ebd4d2af4f2954790
f15df155aed2a9eeb24d05557b8df88ba4b8c262
'2011-10-07T16:37:49-04:00'
describe
'322612' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSK' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
74251e899d780ba9afecf4f36874aaf0
e452ecef57a69416db19874a5d5bb750ddfc353a
'2011-10-07T16:31:56-04:00'
describe
'172945' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSL' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
b96355838887f293e7578cf9a041d1eb
48bc75646210418c8e190466d27830808eb06975
'2011-10-07T16:24:39-04:00'
describe
'32783' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSM' 'sip-files00091.pro'
8ee8f89bd0df80d8f62d41fcbff4b7d0
9dc5786af3466e8de759947f742f4099c9cc4eb2
'2011-10-07T16:42:26-04:00'
describe
'68412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSN' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
902e11ac4b174ca2d910307a65cdbf7e
4ce9165fe1f76e1282636bcfbc8ec47ee6cf221e
'2011-10-07T16:32:53-04:00'
describe
'2603232' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSO' 'sip-files00091.tif'
b41e7dbad982c200fd840a0a5a7d4d30
f4a51fe272fe5af7b1f5e57c3d837a99342565ed
'2011-10-07T16:31:02-04:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSP' 'sip-files00091.txt'
af00f56150dde8a11225abdec6a01aa4
c11a07127dab390c57869de555c12e5b089f8ade
describe
'32678' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSQ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
d17d02e060b02d361fca77b90f90592f
f0fc9053ae05b78f5fa48a64736e6a351d27deab
'2011-10-07T16:39:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSR' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
d102f5338c4712febbc8739f23c99de5
843e9707d75f1e14e04dfe3abd33077d8d7ec101
describe
'198563' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSS' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
15ca0978fe7765f1f164859cdb1cb7f2
717eb5f020cb8cfbf20b12c8642f5eac34cfb024
describe
'40282' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHST' 'sip-files00092.pro'
c1c67d1d36d6ae18ceb8c667a3c8a04a
9ea4f20cf2a5db8b9c1fffafb5857825e25fa563
describe
'76347' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSU' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
dea72b36eda1c9139768495949137781
e341f0f0c4a5ace4919cc7469c48b46c3e856bb4
describe
'2603496' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSV' 'sip-files00092.tif'
3ac032042db72aa1dd9a1b52b4e70cf9
f42a3d56a4a849433d5c6c61e9db00284863ce11
'2011-10-07T16:23:29-04:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSW' 'sip-files00092.txt'
f9a158fa27be21af4f737f1b02b2a868
33989d3778c8d48158d1ba1621a139fedb5a0306
describe
'34419' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSX' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
7e86438ee46345cbdfde6adffd170e36
475f538b8165b33cbe1d0182e50875560fbd2564
'2011-10-07T16:28:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSY' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
b201d9c552000bdb292e36b3892bcef7
6c54cd495ab59c50eacb194a536af9a8a73a1bef
'2011-10-07T16:42:21-04:00'
describe
'171918' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHSZ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
60e299c4cd941b54841d6f8d816a5ac8
4dd3d5538b1baa6a7f6086d841184c8005b7b2ed
'2011-10-07T16:42:28-04:00'
describe
'18316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTA' 'sip-files00093.pro'
0633875d275805be5821ab530df243af
e6fe1a74e17c6db397983f9916018bd856e7a310
'2011-10-07T16:37:43-04:00'
describe
'60358' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTB' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
3fd8a5e8da4c4531ec24985c06e10082
643db4a149c372e72c60d59e96365a4dbbdfed43
'2011-10-07T16:36:42-04:00'
describe
'2602408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTC' 'sip-files00093.tif'
47256e2a4dfc3c949c5872f58ee2a2b5
f637eefef4a3ed47de2cedf007b28df9e51b7bcb
'2011-10-07T16:38:00-04:00'
describe
'730' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTD' 'sip-files00093.txt'
ef85fb15532db3ad10912a13708c1d11
89ca63211f64f2d631dcff6600924c038eeffac1
'2011-10-07T16:24:52-04:00'
describe
'30288' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTE' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
025513fa4acc0f5b40ca62c06d323b31
e01543c4a6a3112c907c2c5ac7064254accc093f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTF' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
029b6bc94c7b457e7c9a8ee15457741f
44faca13995a0c13f7a2056254846d4c67371e00
'2011-10-07T16:33:09-04:00'
describe
'188843' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTG' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
1915edcf59f9950b64843094a577387b
ae3e8c9b27ae695e18cfd9a4740dfaa9544a0bef
'2011-10-07T16:42:58-04:00'
describe
'35678' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTH' 'sip-files00094.pro'
81dd5ee8b75b6a85c9be287e0f7be4d0
6961854f68d5929c9e4f56c626b7f5a498ace2e6
'2011-10-07T16:27:21-04:00'
describe
'73738' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTI' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
7eda46096e5caed7216f8037cae4da92
1ee2ad5b89c95efe15e7374f044d4ffeefe1b361
'2011-10-07T16:44:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTJ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
58520bf051467a93f0df5f85acc2c0f9
38fdefe368e0064b57193c5181b43c27f3b69386
'2011-10-07T16:44:07-04:00'
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTK' 'sip-files00094.txt'
c06e6a2528a817521a444d1899e19204
68cf69245e5fd79ccfce0a7ab3c09b4b04b0e26f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTL' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
0c5e53daabf23e860c1c2988ecb9cadb
52d4bc23f8bb4105c11d0593c0150a02ec37a4b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTM' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
49ddd6df9c397891b4ea263362be47f1
b082df2ce0a60d7b538a40ff7c36bdb50c65ff22
'2011-10-07T16:28:10-04:00'
describe
'142507' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTN' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
70f749e004e237389692504a06723c7e
173c94f823acc262ab2b11690332114db3168885
'2011-10-07T16:31:51-04:00'
describe
'23145' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTO' 'sip-files00095.pro'
96e5902f57c428bb7b4826b67cc96811
3c77ce913741220a600b6b82d8891357b026db64
'2011-10-07T16:34:19-04:00'
describe
'56262' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTP' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
eda27b76191c5d5ec745769eddfecdcd
40e9280854704f63a55936b13aaea0a077c71a71
'2011-10-07T16:33:08-04:00'
describe
'2602272' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTQ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
265c619e38bbbee724466c0b2bdeffe5
c9d2bbaa222a0f126618853c526bd98c53ce8e7d
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTR' 'sip-files00095.txt'
e7216d9efe26a2638809321df2b2ca2c
ce1eb5aeb64865bd5b785139efe23672e03d368f
'2011-10-07T16:23:48-04:00'
describe
'29467' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTS' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
d8252a9ade032d045fc5a12707535ece
9b045756018d767859e28b5047004a040a186f7e
'2011-10-07T16:31:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTT' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
69f6f21883755223b6f6bdf97495f1be
b9aa6ff0d63f2d72cf41d6bca8c80fcd6b74f3ef
'2011-10-07T16:34:24-04:00'
describe
'151513' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTU' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
94bb6ebbb436f295459df07c1034e774
fe63dd3a6c69e11a713771f3309112bb7dfa4adb
describe
'24431' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTV' 'sip-files00096.pro'
6ea5fc88546582ec9fd607a571f943fa
f733e90efa9cc87a8afb2841d0644a6598706a1b
describe
'58853' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTW' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
b2f2df86d1aee3083946c82bc80c81a3
b3c8c91ec8b73eca7f5f15a0aea74d2be54e249e
'2011-10-07T16:36:00-04:00'
describe
'2602332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTX' 'sip-files00096.tif'
0cc9f7657b360082110c655d55d92cbc
fefc7a26725a749902c6ac26c82f50acae7a4f4d
'2011-10-07T16:24:25-04:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTY' 'sip-files00096.txt'
566b89f7b281f342d71a4ba0b3258ca0
a7e9d8eabfdee59363f0495d3c5759f863f4c771
'2011-10-07T16:29:09-04:00'
describe
'30046' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHTZ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
aa6473884ef2b9cefa2c0df55a552318
d5ba087b9ea7e99ed6d04ebe2a8c7a735b9ae530
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUA' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
390f2a9138bd3ed3e44748abc96e4b20
27c3fa56ca70dc557f950c10630cde8193045391
describe
'164469' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUB' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8bb311108db4f001fcbfc9776826514c
f17964981f22e9bac99320f47cea95df08cfa863
'2011-10-07T16:43:02-04:00'
describe
'26608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUC' 'sip-files00097.pro'
0649cfd6711f32dffcd7750216132aaa
2d52d92e744a6b5df46e8ba21f3e57909b675e99
'2011-10-07T16:35:03-04:00'
describe
'63257' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUD' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
b3549bbcd3d0ea7a6ba229a8a86e8901
0400f5488eacec502041cc6ef747421141c77f41
describe
'2602748' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUE' 'sip-files00097.tif'
7ed3ed5988c0ce0e91b776ee595d4f7b
952a9ceaad3d7c299e95ba3c70f894c50d8fc381
'2011-10-07T16:23:12-04:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUF' 'sip-files00097.txt'
47afca8ff7b30cce8ea938cf7e5501b1
80d7c85072bda5f90ebe7ed80b251fe600bad99a
'2011-10-07T16:39:54-04:00'
describe
'31113' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUG' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
12810eac98245e20a033d8b928620f9f
1875512437125756721b8f67d4671baacce7fe09
'2011-10-07T16:38:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUH' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
911c15d3b9a140bcd32448aa25861238
f102f3b4f0a9521ffa28bbbc7d212fd9690c6264
'2011-10-07T16:35:44-04:00'
describe
'206530' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUI' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
47ac1b39e81117e6903a936f54d2d4ba
f27e18dfde747e06f299d007e4decb3817831dbb
'2011-10-07T16:23:41-04:00'
describe
'18784' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUJ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
169409ef7f03ee04e6682ab825f39031
522b9230b7f1f1c239bfdb24acaca93860c1ecbf
'2011-10-07T16:37:55-04:00'
describe
'74227' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUK' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
a43054cfd13662c53aa7b4d02b63ad66
fc7b0c8f2ee0904724a3b5a57d2a78b5bc4cbdfb
'2011-10-07T16:29:30-04:00'
describe
'2603892' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUL' 'sip-files00098.tif'
1cd45ddb56bbb743c55b2a3f202d2fe0
402a51309ecd52fcd35d07786bb7b8f7902ce881
'2011-10-07T16:40:22-04:00'
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUM' 'sip-files00098.txt'
2652b5ceda21d2ddcd4b9bab5b2a3b7f
328d1dc88f1ce2536375ec3978948db2123dfb2e
'2011-10-07T16:35:49-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34718' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUN' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
0c509b0e1379de60b5649dc528e30f86
5807903fedac2ba2c1ce9a8b597236698f333352
'2011-10-07T16:22:07-04:00'
describe
'322906' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUO' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c72fa5da6c28781b50e8a2a142a025bc
3a113a73e7733fee3d5b445be6f1882a3c02e69a
'2011-10-07T16:26:40-04:00'
describe
'203882' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUP' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
c21ca42a7a6a6cc6dc357b2a877a0c97
eba7ca71e904c0975ab715330117ac4713c5dc85
'2011-10-07T16:34:57-04:00'
describe
'40296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUQ' 'sip-files00099.pro'
54165c2ff2d681ba7c6503e18e770ffe
84fa74b1a9c12a74d21b48229121cfd2e3123dc4
'2011-10-07T16:39:11-04:00'
describe
'79344' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUR' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
01e3bae4f3f258b97d3e19d840b7d620
1ee79eec92010e7e71155ae21aef901dd58b5781
'2011-10-07T16:24:13-04:00'
describe
'2606080' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUS' 'sip-files00099.tif'
74325b44a935f8be30227cace20eb7c2
a252097ff6df93d8953c6a87629877fcf81d8f84
'2011-10-07T16:42:32-04:00'
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUT' 'sip-files00099.txt'
4397497213bf62b282467f5edf82c5cd
9ea70e33910221c94ae028e196bca2c0cb64473e
'2011-10-07T16:31:46-04:00'
describe
'35321' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUU' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
637b01977fc1a9378656bdf477ccf652
7592fe1476128e122e5e9471a1d95ca00c15e674
'2011-10-07T16:34:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUV' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
26ebb772f30a22caa3afd15b5b6fab6f
383d3aa522101aa788427ae874a7f65fefe9141b
describe
'158238' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUW' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
d79615394c6d818f581538f002705513
ee56d43f49272964b47fcc425cae888e06916c5f
'2011-10-07T16:36:40-04:00'
describe
'27491' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUX' 'sip-files00100.pro'
10ee4ebf43814e2251e4d2f0484a22bb
06b298551a65ca45dd23907465698ebd97240d9d
'2011-10-07T16:42:54-04:00'
describe
'62030' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUY' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
edd2f230a34e33df00b3e28dd7fb3554
5078f6c9a1d01106b405db7c6e0690db02310664
describe
'2602608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHUZ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
3a40b3820c5175243f6a83b2c5ca55ab
358703f5df26c03c31776037a87c569774a2d68f
'2011-10-07T16:30:39-04:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVA' 'sip-files00100.txt'
f7879a4123125edf7ce18ff065bfa6b7
77b07ebcd6c4ade65d5ac804137083affdfe6f35
describe
'31131' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVB' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
65ae16f775bc9bf473b70b40a4f07e1d
658fbf858c42d4ac234e8f9d135195d3fdcc38fb
'2011-10-07T16:23:58-04:00'
describe
'322638' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVC' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
955c0f48d1108fafbac83e5d4d2a9f69
d9c9c4ebfb6addb67624d0fbd3dce1955a494405
'2011-10-07T16:24:07-04:00'
describe
'230783' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVD' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
6e67058fb5d5410f5f3fd44dbe61e5de
45a75c1e2b177856ffbefb2c1b7a656f9589cb3a
'2011-10-07T16:41:05-04:00'
describe
'4477' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVE' 'sip-files00101.pro'
a65f8b89807b6347c98d27a563a4e16c
2a63e21afbd0e8f57c62b1cdcc935f0abf044cbe
'2011-10-07T16:41:58-04:00'
describe
'70300' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVF' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
1c8869c01eaa81fd4abffe912bd6daa9
5511228003d5b7ef27c2cf5caafaee7a1f2f1d78
'2011-10-07T16:23:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVG' 'sip-files00101.tif'
d8a7fc200d17700af9ec831501fec89d
e64b453b103e1115c375c42cb6f9dd7e8c22a8b4
'2011-10-07T16:28:43-04:00'
describe
'242' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVH' 'sip-files00101.txt'
bffbca0d4cd36543f4032de9631cf3b1
09943d974cc6dfd509f0f31cf9d648bcba0f5408
'2011-10-07T16:27:20-04:00'
describe
'33557' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVI' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
c6058f939405df6d75c0bda82493bf02
8a57f45d381ae98fc542527259e43165716a7904
'2011-10-07T16:27:16-04:00'
describe
'322632' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVJ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
24cb7cc88c545048998c7c251dae7ee2
dbac8b7cec302e9fc16346cd8e156943735f83d8
'2011-10-07T16:32:33-04:00'
describe
'174228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVK' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
63ade8fee0779fb386b6f30bd766eada
9fbb343cf6c984a9f0cf50b6e77f6da7018157ff
'2011-10-07T16:37:19-04:00'
describe
'31249' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVL' 'sip-files00102.pro'
dc490bba2049343fd5983467dc891d5c
913baded54b32c37a2ef3cb20de75ed10817308a
'2011-10-07T16:38:20-04:00'
describe
'68145' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVM' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
8d7e12ff082f52be3e4748358ce68896
94695cd58fabfa7c3c1a9cf389de640d655d680d
'2011-10-07T16:29:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVN' 'sip-files00102.tif'
ef11fbe5eab1143bfd85e6ce27585456
c2a4d29b202fec536820d01f86d9fab31f5c1a7f
'2011-10-07T16:31:01-04:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVO' 'sip-files00102.txt'
cfbd1d0003d20961853fac32109d0a1a
bac13717bdc582e297762200310d673471f74a6a
'2011-10-07T16:29:13-04:00'
describe
'32552' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVP' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
191beeebb59e8932de85a8a4ab2d9849
d8be98935dee14b3b3ebc156671c458ab662a1a6
'2011-10-07T16:33:52-04:00'
describe
'322528' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVQ' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
aa733c05746fef8324e67d4647c8ea87
96b2c42507bdee6f0cf3b41c4a65e71ac87bc74e
describe
'184346' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVR' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
21ed21ee8151e9f6d8ca2206d3dd566b
84a49d9340d38304fe74104ec99f6b1fcd657f88
'2011-10-07T16:27:50-04:00'
describe
'14284' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVS' 'sip-files00103.pro'
7adb06a80a9448159d56dcd4a6040eab
98ee72e64028f31e7d04b9541cffc3c629712470
'2011-10-07T16:27:23-04:00'
describe
'61684' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVT' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
a557f656179cfdcc0e6d69062ba3a8f9
fa9c68574f90d0ec4144a863ffb38b34045144c9
describe
'2602400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVU' 'sip-files00103.tif'
7dfaacd4579488d299c596e476c657b9
6f855e4541fb9a63ae35e7f8eb742d61a1975f5a
describe
'577' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVV' 'sip-files00103.txt'
d1c7543badabd9955d28dadfa832d453
13d15ee9a9c84cf69bea11364d22bb91d3fc3873
'2011-10-07T16:26:59-04:00'
describe
'30344' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVW' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
c454308aa8db178e355c793115733bea
6d12f7aff417c2abf87cfbb3571c1e307036124f
'2011-10-07T16:25:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVX' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
1736f5cdc0eb7a649b99f7f3dab90362
75fdd7c1d7bc14ccf198b4333d19b05e6e1fe47e
'2011-10-07T16:39:31-04:00'
describe
'197552' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVY' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
bd7835b5cd70121829fd378346e7d82e
080966f4d5f11472badacfa7bbf001140e45cfac
'2011-10-07T16:32:19-04:00'
describe
'38824' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHVZ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
ce6501a2e516d85bb652744e9729b06a
b1f60f939e118d1d8b786121521b7f95a0542de2
'2011-10-07T16:29:28-04:00'
describe
'75015' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWA' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
e78b36acb28fb89bb5ecf20aa52693bb
8ebfd7b58b89eb35e86373295e10b6b1f301bac0
'2011-10-07T16:43:04-04:00'
describe
'2603592' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWB' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e91f6c0b87e55b722d1edbbe779439a8
e573c1aecaf697c80f8858710e591b80d16b91f6
'2011-10-07T16:43:13-04:00'
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWC' 'sip-files00104.txt'
08f402a1e799cac13789a6b1d5b73af5
94c333b531af3bda5319832a765ea817c0bf309e
'2011-10-07T16:22:53-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'33883' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWD' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
eb940d7473cb7505987881eab9449972
79a75aba83da686d52d6718c42438f3b8f111ee1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWE' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
0157a02e7ce11c6fe213af7228984114
34403e8974aabb62f2810540a82f6bd6a7f98ad4
'2011-10-07T16:23:35-04:00'
describe
'187896' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWF' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
49257f5661bf8336760f622c3ed06bfc
297aad61a1e1083dbd321e987086c5440e3cbaa7
'2011-10-07T16:30:54-04:00'
describe
'12832' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWG' 'sip-files00105.pro'
0caee06b8f4e6ca00a7e4107ac34fe5a
2ca6feac44862ae9b0a4fdf32fc9b899ceaafbf4
'2011-10-07T16:31:15-04:00'
describe
'64189' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWH' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
449373cf52b865110c8cc5ff995c0e94
4b5c7b39010cf03e6e87bb204b3f4f9068b681b9
'2011-10-07T16:24:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWI' 'sip-files00105.tif'
40d348790f124429b4f736e69fd3306f
94b072a9dea02ead294f4d11fe4b11d6062d83ce
'2011-10-07T16:24:53-04:00'
describe
'558' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWJ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
3bbe77c2df5cbd4579e66efb4b6bdcde
8944e98af4ddd5c59a790dab75311080d9b3c295
describe
'31304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWK' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
3a8f9e386fdbc1f8558e824013675fdb
fdfc44e7b240f142b499d48b876eaf70918d86d2
'2011-10-07T16:38:24-04:00'
describe
'322618' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWL' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
c0ac20f8bdb9916f7e5845548cf56dfa
b5c53f97e64027a724372bff1ffcc9f30cec2e8f
'2011-10-07T16:36:21-04:00'
describe
'170500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWM' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
3d11935d9d01f78625667c7d53ba40d7
f24fb80322d33a7cc58e86c94daf70608c14e8de
'2011-10-07T16:22:38-04:00'
describe
'31687' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWN' 'sip-files00106.pro'
4e4137c84e200f81e968e4d356c8d236
ae2dde199107544810cea46807844ffa78f90885
'2011-10-07T16:39:35-04:00'
describe
'65633' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWO' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d2b3370656a292c252a98c0fa1f75b72
9f7f031839ca91d3e6aab42fe4e2b04c522da3eb
'2011-10-07T16:22:15-04:00'
describe
'2602820' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWP' 'sip-files00106.tif'
840383df4e6ca5dc972e1c58a88d10ee
1452a9ee3005c68f7bb4e529fa4c0d4e1483e932
'2011-10-07T16:25:14-04:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWQ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
0aff4b826a50ae8e300bf934050659f3
f3d9f008552acdd29cdfe8cab3d33328e0f86057
'2011-10-07T16:27:33-04:00'
describe
'31898' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWR' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
46ed65d89e323e3c34d60a29450f98b4
d19950942117c7ec839198137c7fad49ed7da02c
'2011-10-07T16:39:20-04:00'
describe
'322658' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWS' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
88a48f0122c89d81f79a949421dcbe36
00feea996ccdf59cbef88db533884e94b68e95da
'2011-10-07T16:30:57-04:00'
describe
'159620' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWT' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
ac7e42e13c12964ebc9f0dad3e4e4cfa
ff2b54db6ae1f09844cc7b70f12f11d9ab0c6cb7
'2011-10-07T16:23:38-04:00'
describe
'28188' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWU' 'sip-files00107.pro'
445e71f7c21331847114b2a9f40138bc
d69e1974a2a080226a9713f02ce2711786ca761c
'2011-10-07T16:37:15-04:00'
describe
'62698' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWV' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
d503d3e3998edda5c89bf1da8a3b9587
7d738a3451ef998c85d5fdad762e3afb274174f2
'2011-10-07T16:39:21-04:00'
describe
'2603100' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWW' 'sip-files00107.tif'
dc39eab3f7d9a78747dbe5ad05f8e370
9ce8c70d16e8a02807ff21a6c65e022ee41fc54b
'2011-10-07T16:39:43-04:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWX' 'sip-files00107.txt'
92f3cf8b71dbd1647a3101741c8a05d9
d177afb291c3f01e34b4215997773526232d7387
'2011-10-07T16:37:53-04:00'
describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWY' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
6943443201230368a46c8f802a45b57d
44207b40594a45e4dd0511bd30da0ffa5728cc1c
'2011-10-07T16:44:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHWZ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
437102e12b235c837f38b01a1e656e91
319324d99dc747dc97f4fc68d5e2241fe1c064ce
describe
'186305' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXA' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
7593be9dc6a6a245ec84e8e63888c6a9
4193961312d6e0ea51b4af75c4780e64667ac389
'2011-10-07T16:38:18-04:00'
describe
'33279' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXB' 'sip-files00108.pro'
165398253a159fe0f956c311ff6b05f8
4ba810e24844ae30db7561aadb26b8e3f5813e27
'2011-10-07T16:40:59-04:00'
describe
'70894' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXC' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
91edad171d1b9410e021f549c43b5806
e7e9c87340f29ffacca22a124d36a91dfe557616
describe
'2603224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXD' 'sip-files00108.tif'
804934e172fda84d6193276b1272575f
fd4e4845a91d6857c7d00ec46ee51be024ef1d6f
'2011-10-07T16:35:25-04:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXE' 'sip-files00108.txt'
c999dadd027c22e1e447b6be241785ef
39f40015e96bef5409ee218cf39c3936e329479d
'2011-10-07T16:43:53-04:00'
describe
'33294' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXF' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
6ad36967644863d8e840a159a56fb78d
503b967b31d3b90f714dae1b878f824c122eee09
'2011-10-07T16:25:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXG' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
dc1466e65f37492c4b2e0ab534fd9c5a
f505d099a82c4ef94519569508e858677d2e97ef
describe
'211810' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXH' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e778c21f50c0bb9ce2acc84464df3520
10e302e286dc69327426996b3c38407dc0e32355
'2011-10-07T16:24:22-04:00'
describe
'39196' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXI' 'sip-files00109.pro'
4860cfe58e1df7d9511671b4b6a29729
0b371a0a16df2e4523455bd218f9efdbb41cd4cd
'2011-10-07T16:30:31-04:00'
describe
'79257' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXJ' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
55bea27f784091c9ceac0824b16f32dc
0ff93d75949f4e6f6473c0492abacc9c86d615d3
describe
'2603796' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXK' 'sip-files00109.tif'
c1fa3cd246d4b5d87fdc87a63031fe24
7b71a220067009bf2efb1ea94f0c33ec6dc4cc82
'2011-10-07T16:30:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXL' 'sip-files00109.txt'
dbe841cce7c2c7c6458b59c9e25e3f43
003c02e843a9166bfc6bc65ca44f163e8295357d
'2011-10-07T16:33:24-04:00'
describe
'34884' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXM' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
dfd77a4fc9d49869a3d22ee9b69a462f
24e5a2b569f614554ad39f97ddbd6c160d88a70c
'2011-10-07T16:35:21-04:00'
describe
'322646' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXN' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
69652ae569d0a73f5e3fd8a4bb21be5c
8b88a62ff8dab10e4f42ece883c380ee9e9db297
'2011-10-07T16:29:32-04:00'
describe
'185096' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXO' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
c8a2e27b350e19d315be3eebecf1bef6
ca558863fd1a17f9b762ea66760a58ca226d3253
'2011-10-07T16:22:45-04:00'
describe
'35424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXP' 'sip-files00110.pro'
bcf245d832c69940ac47f6499ec34400
bac9f66cb83fe22c89d616842faea5e3ebee657c
'2011-10-07T16:23:19-04:00'
describe
'71290' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXQ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
13221b02db4de0adff29f19aea8d7f54
828169ef571a81cd8d1cb6a5029766410488d1e9
'2011-10-07T16:42:06-04:00'
describe
'2602892' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXR' 'sip-files00110.tif'
a9e702940934dbc239d3ed018323f6c7
96bb1d8c1f548fed29b07161d1ab39747da652e8
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXS' 'sip-files00110.txt'
12311e63bb48ea27c47a34764207d3f3
021d99031e6f88da6e75f1c5af419dd4a6d04413
describe
'32716' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXT' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
9f2506ddd3c6c0707eb89df7dc8ee9df
6ecb05ffe67ff19f2018014e49c713eaf53b8aa5
'2011-10-07T16:28:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXU' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e8ab1a134390cbb77ab72f137bb5d012
2975f41c34f5f9dc4220649584bfbc6fbd77426b
'2011-10-07T16:36:27-04:00'
describe
'196441' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXV' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
5056910e4614da1eaa300c2afeaf79a5
bb19558e54c95e947bd7fd9f9cd7affe4196bb15
describe
'38607' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXW' 'sip-files00111.pro'
678ea3882dc5b15c65203d82d06eaa28
db0d815616599337168ac3762f597806728b3479
describe
'75953' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXX' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
d167e672c00b368df76ca2d097f7fc48
8e4d86d5dea5224a27da5a103722ca07a539ba95
'2011-10-07T16:29:59-04:00'
describe
'2603740' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXY' 'sip-files00111.tif'
b542775e77d263d3ccbe378ef06a9804
efc09d37de372b6bddc9f2d55059087b8437f470
'2011-10-07T16:24:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHXZ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
4934c829c933fb81223a2852afe538fe
c634b5e99b4f6e890735659f8a05124a2f84bce4
'2011-10-07T16:30:42-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34357' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYA' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
3edb98e1273baa866dc63bc5a4a19cd2
0fa62c3fda98834cb494d89da77b633588cbd3c4
'2011-10-07T16:25:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYB' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
90c2f8075a9569cc285118467b2176fc
a1ccc1eaa25fd44432ba62565b0450071ab293dd
'2011-10-07T16:38:30-04:00'
describe
'146962' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYC' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
421158c1462951bf2ac1fc386d02ad7d
549f8ed3ccbde7024d99c00f021a7c39d5f6046f
'2011-10-07T16:41:55-04:00'
describe
'14581' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYD' 'sip-files00112.pro'
d911635d34b6ff5e90a9763fff3c57c0
17f9f560ac67f39d55bc5622fa7b767013990a1b
describe
'56778' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYE' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
6c91eff2f24cc0ad3697fac9f1369ea9
249cc4c68af3ba6a70d5f444b2af1d1d266519b3
'2011-10-07T16:22:29-04:00'
describe
'2602252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYF' 'sip-files00112.tif'
6bc139db59e42589f4e66e4584fe20a0
3cae06bec37b0f65030f67ba68a4705188379b4a
'2011-10-07T16:31:58-04:00'
describe
'576' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYG' 'sip-files00112.txt'
c96915f52115d162b2f77610aba7e2c0
746a0bfc4cf77c218e24d6a9df9b13cd49fe9d40
'2011-10-07T16:34:29-04:00'
describe
'29790' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYH' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
33d0ab5730bb6f92a23828478ca1ebe1
48f28175565ae0227d803489e5ec3e5c5d97ebc9
describe
'322624' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYI' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
42cdff2f1e2e700d2f47940b9cc82a90
c230f03a2b0dc57f0586dbed6a873ea0e8dfd2a7
'2011-10-07T16:38:06-04:00'
describe
'191286' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYJ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
2602aa8ab9e314a3f7f87ef734453585
fc55fc72c5db559ab6ca31ed6e6917ec4b6a8285
'2011-10-07T16:43:45-04:00'
describe
'29657' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYK' 'sip-files00113.pro'
654774cf08e54e8235515d971e4a8333
09b81e027bc1098e7729cb8d4c21b58acb345c2a
'2011-10-07T16:25:54-04:00'
describe
'70445' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYL' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
b2cdce5bd22cf68a131785f1320dc869
be41aa4067007ad00395b9133dc67d0afe1caf58
'2011-10-07T16:35:19-04:00'
describe
'2603212' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYM' 'sip-files00113.tif'
3c526d4289ed8d482352e662ac1b1fcb
db39e47bd13bf134298fc81dbc5b995447202f0f
'2011-10-07T16:33:48-04:00'
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYN' 'sip-files00113.txt'
2c7f1f657db40a33aab9af8e61222ae1
726241d7fb459732403928c87ab0467908438a2b
describe
Invalid character
'33032' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYO' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
d45bb90f288f1051f1a85e7f855de0d8
972594b5da4cb50561867ae9567c74818c09c140
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYP' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
d0d9c28cad17e6ea0f07890cd353f42e
6e9b79491e04ea6ac72c715f2e7e01e50a6ce8ee
'2011-10-07T16:36:45-04:00'
describe
'165281' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYQ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
4585c48f65b6c69755e6175c19c7a366
0291ae663f7c81a40d425562f3bb399dcf027a38
'2011-10-07T16:23:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYR' 'sip-files00114.pro'
d345662f20a811c92330624a2f8b79dc
f54614cbe0ec58cbba491d2cb51f4186d634e21c
'2011-10-07T16:42:00-04:00'
describe
'64194' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYS' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
8e9db68455281fdb5a9fefbe03b1db43
5e2933f0ed9e075bac0277d88598494aeb933a6c
'2011-10-07T16:30:11-04:00'
describe
'2602712' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYT' 'sip-files00114.tif'
dbf6f88c4ffa1e3692342e3879154888
3fe258d34ed0e36eaf78a0a1b7448d07e22f787e
'2011-10-07T16:39:09-04:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYU' 'sip-files00114.txt'
498d366996e606b051dee5bf52e3b284
371c3217a24820c1407dd27bc59bb31fe11d70ae
describe
'31272' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYV' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
98a7353cf4e8e16219607ded0b7abef0
7d43f8683a96ed547c3b930186c636266afbaf8f
'2011-10-07T16:34:55-04:00'
describe
'322600' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYW' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
e1cf71e2b706563618a99dd3e74e3f98
c765fa8270e2f2402937024b01c6b750cb71efba
describe
'250934' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYX' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
239c91bcaea23a06fcd124c9acb85e78
18e9213645f3c0a12cc79642cffbf61fb330a1cb
'2011-10-07T16:27:28-04:00'
describe
'6208' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYY' 'sip-files00115.pro'
cece4624c4ae746cc04a162b82fe6bf2
6870620b77c2b28bc866bcd652c383b4ef4068cb
'2011-10-07T16:36:04-04:00'
describe
'74743' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHYZ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
8184706489a6b8a53a88f95a889e2607
e91651e2e64211efea4cee01b03201604f5df6ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZA' 'sip-files00115.tif'
88c2f1bef931085c8185af49dde4bd97
3ebab8102ce47a84f913b2397a2f6c47a600e952
'2011-10-07T16:30:13-04:00'
describe
'262' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZB' 'sip-files00115.txt'
700e0bb835b1de562413b12dbf9c2fda
db06af1eabda5b5b2f8bccbe561ee85a84b01426
describe
'33390' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZC' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
b0393bda81ef69c53f6391c0ee68a358
a07c0f006e946fb972a269d9943291c01639ae24
describe
'322628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZD' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
6dbd8936c930e12d3158384645e1e7f1
0e4a525a7c9a81d290c6958ecfb280319c0f2e37
describe
'183724' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZE' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
aa79932134786c98a158bf76839fd3d5
e23b06918e4bc8c630dfd134599fd9edfa8c7f3c
'2011-10-07T16:41:40-04:00'
describe
'33610' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZF' 'sip-files00116.pro'
62368f4e6f1d1b780198accec5cd48d0
27362bf38040bcf50b1a1293d709988fd0d16d2d
describe
'70436' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZG' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
d7f8fce3d183878df8c6b82585d3f8f6
5782b5cd698d25c724abe8fd4a13c494eb09ea1b
describe
'2603128' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZH' 'sip-files00116.tif'
5dfe774a3f8537c51bd764c2cd791c40
5d8e4477a6a31b6c59012e4cdfe09b46d522e51a
'2011-10-07T16:24:15-04:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZI' 'sip-files00116.txt'
4f85a5febb36bca9e02ed203605c1b30
5cc09f1a65adf46f3a22631e5352c05d71f2ed74
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZJ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
5775fa4b4bafa976882c704e1169a4a5
6613891b1d2ad6e430a0f59e61c4954393fe26dc
'2011-10-07T16:29:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZK' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
3441c64a23388cf4d169cda6d0a573a9
3f344ae9e3152add465dcfb3e3f9c00b1cf87978
'2011-10-07T16:25:18-04:00'
describe
'184914' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZL' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
823e35bdca341f08f7720ab37a76bff4
29b6ad0df255f641f8a0c0eef040b49fae24ccfc
'2011-10-07T16:29:48-04:00'
describe
'33197' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZM' 'sip-files00117.pro'
cf7375ec48f0394d1ace45e298ad488e
dda640665ffa30a8f867720c4e6bbd8ec5f03200
'2011-10-07T16:24:54-04:00'
describe
'70337' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZN' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
8824f24c77f0a24f3cf4751f928e7d06
a2853efaa8bc058844c1c3e705c0fc4e4716effb
describe
'2603280' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZO' 'sip-files00117.tif'
688269c1c455ca67b1bb2a5fa6254766
3375667970c3defcaf2480df9487b2b1cbaed2b3
'2011-10-07T16:36:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZP' 'sip-files00117.txt'
47e668c1bed79b4027229dd5ae18bbf0
b6ae3a8b969328a553d3684540de3e96c3c7cbb4
'2011-10-07T16:29:39-04:00'
describe
'33177' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZQ' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
cf55e20bbf81c548d863ab284f86a34c
db78366accdb7f7a804b743794737720c5868230
'2011-10-07T16:29:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZR' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
b936e6d5a832af7ad9182f4af46c8da9
00eac43b3c55081e78a8ee10166327a3833cb78b
describe
'183057' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZS' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
8f32e2ceb0d68c766cc0b770a630d09c
77ed4380537d11866e651ca7d013e148e76ddf89
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZT' 'sip-files00118.pro'
f0d932c71d9bd009b761d58d4ea122ab
188103fdcdeb55df6d22c11705c314ee05a5e9d8
describe
'69302' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZU' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
13e859dc9e71ea5187c99386f0019c90
e66e7b45557f72b05620540ee8f9784abbe41470
'2011-10-07T16:26:29-04:00'
describe
'2603012' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZV' 'sip-files00118.tif'
be8fe210c4349a42d1f56d86cba4abb4
7a69a7fdc5a246b35a02a70d61df2e99608a61b2
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZW' 'sip-files00118.txt'
12bb769bbc9f5e4e09e4f1284620d6fc
0b73ad0c4967953356d914b9957ae5ce5ab44dce
describe
'32253' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZX' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e8cd4074aef904fabfc90bef8fb81ac3
c1c42b965a389fb057319e5bca16575781734579
'2011-10-07T16:43:55-04:00'
describe
'322529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZY' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
9cea8a50c59b11456aaae1728f062cae
7fe4f97230ec3c5032e32be73496b8e5d974349f
'2011-10-07T16:26:22-04:00'
describe
'181686' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABHZZ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
409f146ded57a627c19b172c7c23d154
804eac6ae8a177e2fb8252dacd05d1e0c4a64004
'2011-10-07T16:40:38-04:00'
describe
'34091' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAA' 'sip-files00119.pro'
11f7fba5d2994e2df8cc51252b0367b8
de1d90112b1e292ca1d3bb5fb917c22bd5d75102
describe
'68554' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAB' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
e11a8469b9ab6c4b82161b817cb358d4
0c2ca15e7c47d0ce4cba69ef0620b63d995360f8
'2011-10-07T16:39:56-04:00'
describe
'2603092' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAC' 'sip-files00119.tif'
ad41e0fd4b87bef18e8942f65d735763
29e1753fd82b9449f2ea134849ed683cc66db4c4
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAD' 'sip-files00119.txt'
fa0c94c60777466f40b9e4d3dc993c93
2da3f5e95169a88d4e1e821357f80b62e40adc1a
'2011-10-07T16:30:06-04:00'
describe
'32200' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAE' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
48af20fcd314b6e3e3245e7e906fa3da
f03fd568c14226b3c43ef0ae0ef452062fd40bf4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAF' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
2a68c17bb6f0d5c82ffcdac86dc775f8
9c8104947033311ad43c45dd7ecb898b4d835a62
'2011-10-07T16:34:31-04:00'
describe
'194545' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAG' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
9103f2e914549d20630629d5d23e452e
3daf3edd9e43181a83fab9f84ebfd777ba69d70e
'2011-10-07T16:33:33-04:00'
describe
'38433' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAH' 'sip-files00120.pro'
10ec8b2e73518b2f189538885ade0af4
d2232653e1c312edfb10448147d41f4633556a71
'2011-10-07T16:36:55-04:00'
describe
'75019' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAI' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
0e446307c3f1f0fc1c1ab4b7edeaa575
33559dbf87a14425c88b7540f41001be15c1f96e
describe
'2603568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAJ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
7f2ef2796df78eda068c4916ccc92a76
e848b804f9091ade46083324210f24c16471969f
'2011-10-07T16:24:44-04:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAK' 'sip-files00120.txt'
194a340bb31c3707c6b0beac9d7ae98d
df605afca68cf73b7c62f194e18dee670526cdbc
'2011-10-07T16:26:05-04:00'
describe
'33792' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAL' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
b203f6c9fdc1c354aa89d19d850b7bba
82197e68242d07084cbc4facd9c50c2e1617b6cc
'2011-10-07T16:25:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAM' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
78e36f92779b2eb04441b92d4956be94
7b83485bc20f8485fcee31fdaa6c9ceffc33c5ae
describe
'199370' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAN' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
8904ec58c113ae5d53f5c1198bcce118
411485f55c597fa6a2fe1bf7f43ad2d8a73575f4
'2011-10-07T16:39:00-04:00'
describe
'39918' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAO' 'sip-files00121.pro'
564df17bb6fbcea9a0c48a824c3487ba
85962b31aea7f7b920894b1a8c1bb282c856b609
describe
'76414' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAP' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
efa488a4ca46b025317d6d8d9db38ca9
3f53ae7ae29b4eef9312c3c1a34415b62a3dcd9a
'2011-10-07T16:40:23-04:00'
describe
'2603656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAQ' 'sip-files00121.tif'
5a9227619dd967cf977e7b6417e7bfce
cac59b018e6d1a74b4e63e88269207d4a2cd0b41
'2011-10-07T16:32:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAR' 'sip-files00121.txt'
1f8ad314d453837083c0d360c81cca95
30d1403cf111a62091ce0e27152d18245f7d5f21
'2011-10-07T16:23:33-04:00'
describe
'34324' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAS' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
eeec7d22cf6de434eb56fb8ea534f05b
fa4c389779820bf722d76356a0269ef074c3210c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAT' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
066192cc93fb3bf47333c832cf2f55cf
96474cd4ed8f13e2fcebfd75547e02c6d2b89fb1
'2011-10-07T16:39:44-04:00'
describe
'196628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAU' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
a08792caf52cd84a0fb32e37efee2ed9
2d2050b501fb811d4dfc072959af0e6c012f44e3
'2011-10-07T16:38:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAV' 'sip-files00122.pro'
ed0801f03f4cccac3260eff7f4d32aaf
00b88ddb753fa7a41c85836b70660b9eaa9ed3e3
'2011-10-07T16:40:01-04:00'
describe
'76054' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAW' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
383217bb157d93a968008ba65eddb9b0
733b8ccfaa78b50218994c0f8c6606f788814f92
'2011-10-07T16:34:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAX' 'sip-files00122.tif'
432c3c3f528c31dd84c04fb4ee12532a
8808446fb62eaa26508e72822489bdb628f3d64a
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAY' 'sip-files00122.txt'
7c0a7ca3b588564d8291b6ec608a91c1
5994921e385294e769fd2fdc8a34dadb9c7297b2
describe
'34507' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIAZ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
5e0800081fb230436132340fd01cab0b
76ad8d91b2c2329656d45dbd1862eb30577abd1d
'2011-10-07T16:24:09-04:00'
describe
'322586' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBA' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
b32b2d28a097dfd60fe41784ff97812d
534e74ab5752f3fd9dc8af765d5eaa4415ed6d25
'2011-10-07T16:41:56-04:00'
describe
'198354' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBB' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
c55a1217408a96f031e8ed972e7e7a29
ed810ea233e73c66440809a45e34508ce93cb99c
'2011-10-07T16:42:29-04:00'
describe
'37930' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBC' 'sip-files00123.pro'
5dedf7c88b6d221c9da692f505f3955c
09b4a372d78793e3b5d9c8e666c01165b3641692
describe
'76445' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBD' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
787cb4da22f74a4e23337c43969180ee
5552d1427d81f11ff9a572d78493d5a424474a7c
'2011-10-07T16:40:26-04:00'
describe
'2603868' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBE' 'sip-files00123.tif'
1346411cda86d47056e60b6b33d2ddae
1926954cc9d16a439de65de1cad3dec7035c3a61
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBF' 'sip-files00123.txt'
ee133bb6736be0c4d7b1b9b5ca5b33c1
2fd74c48804aeea8cd9a19b34a4924f8bc4aecb3
'2011-10-07T16:41:19-04:00'
describe
'34677' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBG' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
457792355c43ed2e47b5594823b8985e
29003c16ca2d50519482112163f7023016e02fb1
'2011-10-07T16:40:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBH' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
6e877b21446dc9db3a0760a39ce64d1f
4620c4fea0f71024e1e8981753f814cd843cf994
'2011-10-07T16:26:18-04:00'
describe
'209129' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBI' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
c300b92d73dbb43e2f03065dc8831713
10ac5566e5cbffad81f81d8e5cde5a69fdb98487
'2011-10-07T16:43:49-04:00'
describe
'9309' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBJ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
579441ffe96c0167b79181c14e75f04a
ed9c5e7d2e15263cfdb8977d7fbba9fb0bfe065f
'2011-10-07T16:24:11-04:00'
describe
'69228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBK' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
99a3316d997050ac96934c3cac2d06e9
524f6c66a5f62ac26d7e19ab3ade13d380225c05
describe
'2603984' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBL' 'sip-files00124.tif'
c9aece203f30281b1772d073de8f0b39
c87ac6509354f01ff8ecfeead0704380e5489c35
'2011-10-07T16:40:54-04:00'
describe
'526' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBM' 'sip-files00124.txt'
78de9e3f0e3d54f2e80dcd56e53f70dd
5990e062f9c37a31fb8165cc104bc95b943dcaff
describe
'34472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBN' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d36710c296d82e12ebd4b634d000d6f5
fa0cf3e4c36312a4361e8f0c625c3eaf743276a2
'2011-10-07T16:22:24-04:00'
describe
'322480' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBO' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
4d668bd33cb5b3cae94262d2cd4d03a1
74a99beda2578db0a8b00860b06ec00ea96d2ccc
'2011-10-07T16:31:31-04:00'
describe
'210529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBP' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
613ac883e3a5fd9eed216828402e8738
a2a427a07b99a2bfdde15161d40360339ff36df0
describe
'14035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBQ' 'sip-files00125.pro'
931c7d40c16bff6c3910ed39f6fe0901
c9c70cecd102475574706bebde1e8250453f721c
'2011-10-07T16:32:49-04:00'
describe
'69304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBR' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
2f480a45ee4e46469f3ac1e9951a4cfa
50875ae5ab7f279c6f4fa1db5fc7a605e3e52a87
'2011-10-07T16:25:13-04:00'
describe
'2603972' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBS' 'sip-files00125.tif'
5fcf3a44ae04dc58dd32fe9e1469fa54
fdd54049103f1b4a4576e6183ad73e1b9d6a9f69
'2011-10-07T16:38:53-04:00'
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBT' 'sip-files00125.txt'
3451b2e30a30afef764619d24fda99d0
899745f76693db740cf0a5eb0c8e9013b78ac275
describe
'34439' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBU' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
87e1ea782513c71863a30418e68a7e19
82e226b9e434ef59c5ac28184fd04a006199a240
'2011-10-07T16:35:01-04:00'
describe
'322637' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBV' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
b2582c8f2024685378097ba139308086
039a21038f11fdd5eeb6fcf9308609aa1fa5dfec
'2011-10-07T16:35:08-04:00'
describe
'175053' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBW' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
beb5c15a71d3ea6e9a45936a8f5c6c0f
243d334254e7194a62a107a101b3083d04f43910
'2011-10-07T16:34:36-04:00'
describe
'31678' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBX' 'sip-files00126.pro'
77b0af85f16fa0bb77268a0cec1440b5
8b5371d23760a2198f6e7c0228d098f5bffc5bb4
'2011-10-07T16:29:56-04:00'
describe
'68028' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBY' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
3dad97bce787c321f99971db78ebc26b
6c66e0c9c07ce9a28bc4a6cbad825175a489a521
describe
'2603040' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIBZ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
1cee8154dec5292e96fa37bda02ec344
8e88f979164564734582c41904234d6a82dc7fd8
'2011-10-07T16:40:50-04:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICA' 'sip-files00126.txt'
d9a03b932f29c39550d3a3e0a296120b
3ece3be5b3d34890d179dc700529b5fe72d54474
'2011-10-07T16:43:09-04:00'
describe
'32355' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICB' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
03cef0a94b0284e33223857f19419fd6
da8406ddabda4227ec755b89962eabc81ee6f836
'2011-10-07T16:36:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICC' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
9c03ae25b39b607483ac6554468fe474
ad04944152dff5182bf8d0475747c00b4e32d7f8
'2011-10-07T16:34:49-04:00'
describe
'143759' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICD' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
2ff096398e8cda58cdecb53ad318c038
7c99b7c235a91a375f84c48a2560232d4de7e01f
'2011-10-07T16:26:28-04:00'
describe
'23936' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICE' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3282c1880246b81988b5a36c45105b53
486ec66ba274ce690f11d52bc96f85c3e4ca8e86
'2011-10-07T16:40:02-04:00'
describe
'55881' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICF' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
3f927c42075d3d91f3cfb2d76a4922b1
e149ac378f1a173bca07b7262aabc3a94aa0f28d
describe
'2601920' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICG' 'sip-files00127.tif'
8d5b341bda0f87afd08db4f2d0b4515c
b441c09dd2591f662df11d4d996b97534c7ac489
'2011-10-07T16:32:35-04:00'
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICH' 'sip-files00127.txt'
f8781dba668e9b890440c4626842f761
569f9ee746ebfb645ec53335d1ecc556feec9bf1
describe
'28895' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICI' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
6725d19a87f30509408f0a94dfbb5ad6
2bcfb74de0a8ec688837a0ad104591d53aa5ec52
'2011-10-07T16:27:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICJ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
5254d283539d1d5627eb8f2df83b9886
f51d60dbcb50a0f5c8f1a80034fa5f7d7c459767
describe
'154788' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICK' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
09852c2f3478b0594b1c3cdce2b61899
ac655a74075cf3d7709f50e5480232968c5b72e4
'2011-10-07T16:37:23-04:00'
describe
'10168' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICL' 'sip-files00128.pro'
1efaa3ae6b1cb5a2f64f6614b3e7e135
7562477e666a0dd5c5461cf9c8dd4c41f2a89df3
describe
'52628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICM' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
15d23f4a5febf6d6d9a10460b7c30f55
fd57128447d17c984fad32fed7a9e9f267f54d71
'2011-10-07T16:24:42-04:00'
describe
'2601488' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICN' 'sip-files00128.tif'
1a430625c58bf5d9f389e4a88cefad3d
532187a61fab4e672fe9b788aae887a91a3b536a
'2011-10-07T16:26:07-04:00'
describe
'611' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICO' 'sip-files00128.txt'
1c5178ead64a82ff34c4ab7f962a94e2
9fb6584e726c028c3f15c907e21e904cff0f5db6
'2011-10-07T16:42:08-04:00'
describe
'27648' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICP' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
1df93c14c9a3fa5f90c7c03029d0ef55
24c825392373778bf58b48571df085d60d50bff1
describe
'322582' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICQ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
60c708136ca52d87c779891383b0b58f
3e8eceb486e3a0973a255c4521bc4112efb66b35
describe
'208371' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICR' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
fa0e1777387b654728c37437a8ff291e
250a2c2d2274afb00a31b1d76944c2798c785f4c
'2011-10-07T16:43:31-04:00'
describe
'11213' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICS' 'sip-files00129.pro'
bb36dec5dfc1bb2760dca1827cb89a14
3a4591463ee81906184126c8f2de7a4e01a74bfa
describe
'65742' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICT' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
5e28659de6e1c29d9bec372727b32a3a
a9d53fb823a059ec897648e2bc4e8ae482313184
'2011-10-07T16:34:52-04:00'
describe
'2602788' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICU' 'sip-files00129.tif'
21138810d1f6bc98c3be5c98634046fb
8ec35ad8247d82e9c28fbc4aee58026042dafd4f
describe
'559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICV' 'sip-files00129.txt'
eca27d02ea11a06dfad68ff68045d36f
e243b381ab9f182bccb5169ee6c60ddd3dace68f
'2011-10-07T16:37:33-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31301' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICW' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
071148f80194f020a6e3e54b8142ba6b
b1a18a765cd7c57c1f452457983ec36484b63eba
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICX' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
8dc3f982c849696e7d112c48243546f2
bec5c7ebbd63dfd5a62c53a7cd61fc188eac27d6
describe
'201501' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICY' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
fa97e05212aeb0c67543018898844559
622e2cd26b96aad211cd3c60d2a538a3192b0e82
'2011-10-07T16:32:29-04:00'
describe
'40561' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABICZ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
a5d3b5d149cb6742d97cacb4280ebf5e
2567be05769bca5cda92c9553608f587f0f0afcb
'2011-10-07T16:24:51-04:00'
describe
'77802' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDA' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
5dfb9a245ef0305e9f1bba6b908b585e
c7b0c9b3d49de9c8b20cacd366e81c583821a684
'2011-10-07T16:27:27-04:00'
describe
'2603852' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDB' 'sip-files00130.tif'
d9e431d2dad77820b4ee06759626367d
1147eed378a08b7a15b04e2b69d8f8f0eb271669
'2011-10-07T16:34:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDC' 'sip-files00130.txt'
e4c1c072b24516e06c9cde2812927d6d
7df41d7fe53b64b2f71ac88294977c5b5c2f1cb8
'2011-10-07T16:34:39-04:00'
describe
'34598' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDD' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
e377ced9f30ebdb872b2489d4707a267
c83bfc85693510d1559072bb73d427c2e2793579
'2011-10-07T16:22:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDE' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
9ad4e2908a61086321b082198cfb60d6
f7489fee495bdeac24851d7a0f3e581be18f314a
'2011-10-07T16:33:58-04:00'
describe
'195153' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDF' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
c6154a73af467c77cea8ba15e7ff8245
1db67590de2c03556ec1b1c92d772753b9db9004
describe
'38154' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDG' 'sip-files00131.pro'
3daa972159f94ee637bc794bdf387d88
a518abf04ab76b93be82343ad398ec0331c06873
describe
'75451' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDH' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
4144f86f4fa9f488d55e7b2320b4478b
9677d76fb0e9f24a2ab70adc196b7ed1c473fd95
describe
'2603696' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDI' 'sip-files00131.tif'
28938b1718adeed6c0dd1aa842bc2563
77aca414b44117f3e29d1ea3ab0f40bcc0266521
'2011-10-07T16:29:25-04:00'
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDJ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
d5f84260ca692fca735532f352783245
7f44aa3102429fec851058ce27dc113a0efbbcc4
'2011-10-07T16:32:57-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34209' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDK' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
f2046dcb035e048e38d37458b2f87769
3e4e7c794a4338097c60bc79499243e22c38f0ae
'2011-10-07T16:32:30-04:00'
describe
'322594' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDL' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
8d3417c364eb1952357eacf68da6b53a
3b57d42afec7799803ab9ae878d43c7663f264f2
'2011-10-07T16:30:49-04:00'
describe
'190222' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDM' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
7466f2e739a91296158279e18efcd7d4
ff09216d48d8f2ed10e8082b76c0b79fa4004d1e
'2011-10-07T16:36:13-04:00'
describe
'15207' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDN' 'sip-files00132.pro'
7e3151dbb0a3d73acf67b953e3a5bf66
0ddb6e69b5cec881ac2a50f741bc397b88c9d966
describe
'67404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDO' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
ce1e0e60e7003a77f134fd7d8c0ffe94
8d8f07205b8486eb27cc2a479df4e1df5ca2fd8c
'2011-10-07T16:33:26-04:00'
describe
'2603184' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDP' 'sip-files00132.tif'
6282662e0116973ca921330ac308c514
899310adffc97a8e266d9716187247aeeb87881f
describe
'689' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDQ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
87eee335b724c8a039bf26d796bbfd8b
f90bceed171765a967059110dbaf86af06f2e9ab
'2011-10-07T16:28:24-04:00'
describe
'32828' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDR' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
3118e7a959b0ec531fadf4084f5960a6
827019a209de0bc6b7fe6817dccfc1051659cb46
'2011-10-07T16:30:16-04:00'
describe
'322574' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDS' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
d20dedc034f7d5bf34cc163e77e20d7d
0ca9b547480ae4908efa43f43e7eb2e196818f9a
'2011-10-07T16:33:17-04:00'
describe
'195518' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDT' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
df6671af310ef77d1b62c11491f65c79
be90b5dce28ff18629b14f42eaf74bca7f1c8542
'2011-10-07T16:29:26-04:00'
describe
'36095' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDU' 'sip-files00133.pro'
ee8af7fe865c5896eecf4026b1a4f1ef
72d718d5cb68cf7639eb2c375f2a8219a00d484d
describe
'74451' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDV' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
7a4258fdbdfa4a745d84df3da0b93022
2cd12ba78eaeda7dc412e43888a5b47b127406c8
'2011-10-07T16:22:26-04:00'
describe
'2603736' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDW' 'sip-files00133.tif'
4f273fc90402ed613eb3500f0e0d92af
d042ee688e129481728cd07cfcbf93b8e3aca04d
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDX' 'sip-files00133.txt'
baf0471e3a853c3c9c0586d35159f77b
ea3e2e8a880d6718ab0d152086a1594e74b43bea
'2011-10-07T16:37:44-04:00'
describe
'34558' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDY' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
cce21c5e7ebdcc9abbdbeb6b5832c66c
29980b0039ad45b4921d013b8889faa4ba8826c4
'2011-10-07T16:35:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIDZ' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
adf16dbdc824e9347614f6001fc91381
a41045f8b9084a252bf46de2ae41d7d96401e938
describe
'202263' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEA' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
d92f48eebf564d57a48f2277cfec5ac6
fee0eb6cd8b5b57607d258b9c9b498baa7d746f2
'2011-10-07T16:39:26-04:00'
describe
'40018' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEB' 'sip-files00134.pro'
38ce3e4a6cc6d2cceab22e9981f01018
87bcd1544f6e2d22173860bfefe6d720dfffd2d0
describe
'77087' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEC' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
8f0342f490facfaf514095dedb1834d5
82ebce2c933089ca13b4a8779d61f2756dac561b
'2011-10-07T16:23:21-04:00'
describe
'2603488' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIED' 'sip-files00134.tif'
2204c0efc2094ef66ca528cfeadea432
38bef11b9b0d5eeded0f63b4d5f9cde134440802
'2011-10-07T16:28:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEE' 'sip-files00134.txt'
ba23054cd40aa499d7c5c297ad92a9e4
c60671e3643df831b8e0615e2d880b320d7c7057
describe
'34365' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEF' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
27024bfaccaf96b17df5fce34bc15932
6acf2d504024d93d5097006209894eb5a88a9272
'2011-10-07T16:23:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEG' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
713f95c6a26c3b6fd4017ef6c57320f9
740c8846ce4fe1300cd35165baf5225193d6084d
'2011-10-07T16:31:27-04:00'
describe
'145958' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEH' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
d67bf181cfe750dab809b857c4d37b6a
9a60ead31a2646da5601824a1b51715fa409676a
'2011-10-07T16:38:46-04:00'
describe
'24336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEI' 'sip-files00135.pro'
580dbbba238a8df4ae3b64fa433b7424
3d4c30aa21bec1b94768a561829f5aee68b265f9
'2011-10-07T16:42:46-04:00'
describe
'56229' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEJ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
acebb046d58453989600c347fcb024c8
2dc3c327db891071fb116b949769a0ab5fbefde0
'2011-10-07T16:39:22-04:00'
describe
'2601728' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEK' 'sip-files00135.tif'
1fd2fe12f3235cf926894fa9e19d008d
7f6ee25481d617dddcf00879a3b1d82205c8c4ef
'2011-10-07T16:30:38-04:00'
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEL' 'sip-files00135.txt'
09bbe9b738bfbf7b2bcb20b8743285a5
bf85ce57386d9a2e404352c909d326c845e51514
'2011-10-07T16:41:17-04:00'
describe
'28701' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEM' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
4ff2ae56266056e6bb49ab65fe312cb0
814063f0de94ebd3ec3ab9f0a7fc1b9b88f0dffa
'2011-10-07T16:28:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEN' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
7275fce2e35e4e8ec1bbec724186cd4a
fc0bac9943dfa4b4ed57941876514eb49079da9a
describe
'189944' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEO' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
478f478c4edacda5a0c67ba2d4ce33b3
d4492e86ada014edc5245495281adc9790b59d1c
'2011-10-07T16:43:56-04:00'
describe
'36866' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEP' 'sip-files00136.pro'
d9b00eafdb3cee28c64ada3d8b987ee5
bee9b12c10ca508efd94ed360bd30a8e6f273e9e
'2011-10-07T16:37:13-04:00'
describe
'73850' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEQ' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
eb0122e34b4a1b2e6ea5b97cedf09a2f
3c97eb374cb2bf7ceaab24ac6f4f01cba17d184e
describe
'2603292' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIER' 'sip-files00136.tif'
1e7b67d8a634d1a3b7e1471ec07afe12
b438cedc8b0d783e384e0e02881efecb6d08a7e9
'2011-10-07T16:35:05-04:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIES' 'sip-files00136.txt'
34384b5facbf8a7bc32ed66a578fcac2
e13fc4b309f3a7b11010c9e6d595fac522095a02
describe
'33744' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIET' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
cc6b462775e252cc3ada63e33bcd736e
223dd10b07d9140f64d4541cefd45d73476d2b86
'2011-10-07T16:28:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEU' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
b5484b6647da19ec573353b54248a901
f9082add3a390c2be7b7159126f6af3054c32a41
describe
'197941' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEV' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
36a93585c74f6042a5ea6f6b3cf19467
98d37ef2b06e612c77d423222cd4e76708d96dc1
'2011-10-07T16:43:50-04:00'
describe
'10062' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEW' 'sip-files00137.pro'
83d1f057f7c9eb32a91de95561f6020a
c8482ac2ed4010833368e8f434d9ce6d87cb238e
'2011-10-07T16:26:36-04:00'
describe
'64817' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEX' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f0b848e3a78cf08365c00be3799b37f2
245965fb84e36b8e9f93763d2b98695eb6a57ea7
'2011-10-07T16:27:54-04:00'
describe
'2602716' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEY' 'sip-files00137.tif'
db83216bc8642fce10dff36ab1a0ede9
3e79817f35fea5adcf9b0d629ad580ad7e4d0f68
'2011-10-07T16:43:32-04:00'
describe
'422' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIEZ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
9a004fbc21f72a8aea972e8c037546ed
7987eef0a858aab69a7e816b1243ab6574582740
describe
'30981' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFA' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
bd77126a6ef0886869ab0761086ba840
8a73d9f99fb81c1ca4fcb994846996f730ec5579
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFB' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
75acf5f9e549b222b440bc4348c846a5
b536d15f8172f6d0d02458ec085fc123e06a1a96
'2011-10-07T16:22:20-04:00'
describe
'200106' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFC' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
765985581728d99ee3f5271344ebbe16
86651a4558cca6e85f2dea40b454c4b1d9b561c1
'2011-10-07T16:41:38-04:00'
describe
'40380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFD' 'sip-files00138.pro'
5d3bfc39dd58b0f076ae0074ebb0f3a8
33347c97d12972bcde590ee9a0c2e89234e4640b
'2011-10-07T16:29:12-04:00'
describe
'77160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFE' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
65567e30be49bd977a87bdeca29bfeb8
ef431bb4f3250baff10328adbc15a0569a45e11c
'2011-10-07T16:41:49-04:00'
describe
'2603604' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFF' 'sip-files00138.tif'
077ae163631d8b10939233d3fc03298e
8e64bc68e812f548ecbcf6e855b76eb40a84603c
'2011-10-07T16:23:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFG' 'sip-files00138.txt'
d59c5806e7c912a97d24f97218c0f193
1b654186c67156f5d9717c3a1e91e215e09a4666
'2011-10-07T16:26:47-04:00'
describe
'34547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFH' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
5a114b96df8d6c201895dd03b3c1e378
f6210e1a2f6808f04f5ecfeab286fc2731465b3d
describe
'322603' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFI' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
a8522d6ab2b00c5a2bf6888724b5ab7c
a5821d10df82ba37a6815fc83bb5f01c694b2049
'2011-10-07T16:22:28-04:00'
describe
'195677' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFJ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
6b144487e200651c2943bc038fb9c80f
8821687484f7b0f8033fa7900b094f735d179880
'2011-10-07T16:25:28-04:00'
describe
'39130' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFK' 'sip-files00139.pro'
780f41f79c33d1c4829811d2c41d0eda
4ef2d2e6e22b36122faeb9d127af627f2c56b015
describe
'75967' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFL' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
32d39d91824616e599433412da7fd8f0
4d94aa066f5567c847d1122ae07c05cd8af8f5a7
'2011-10-07T16:22:11-04:00'
describe
'2603824' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFM' 'sip-files00139.tif'
57a8f16eb99f2f09d42be9cb8b13ec7b
31323305afb54354b92e3968e735bf036a1b1574
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFN' 'sip-files00139.txt'
4a7f4f4849aeec6f6a1a7205a344fa61
c95ae63c50cfd1c6b9c1286b566e12ed9047072c
describe
Invalid character
'34384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFO' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
38d1c6570077281ddddee4b0466919cc
f56fd39799b2e9a9eca6e90f4da187574d828b5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFP' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
4226d0661a508d66ac919a62d1468231
6003462808ad5b76de26cfdc61f5bdec5d834f33
describe
'194951' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFQ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
7bdc3d39a51e2ec92ca2cf009e4129fc
efcc230dc802980cff277ece383466efc1062fef
'2011-10-07T16:37:38-04:00'
describe
'39791' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFR' 'sip-files00140.pro'
4635942c65a33d1d27b3436de6ed5c7b
0a8478e470546b30e450a196328fba34c8a5d3fa
'2011-10-07T16:44:36-04:00'
describe
'75902' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFS' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
fdbca20d7b6f90ca0527d0f10c19b0cf
e6e3499571f9888dc010fcd1f3b449f18fab615f
describe
'2603504' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFT' 'sip-files00140.tif'
41cf85006293cf51abc164c340568da7
3c129e56cfe64c66645c50966e3dc2943f4f4fb5
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFU' 'sip-files00140.txt'
0b5530999221f903eda9255bfef0e1e6
53e3a978ebd7939183480bc6550ebcee78ada324
'2011-10-07T16:24:03-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFV' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
ffcce13e2e9c191f2f2ae30e74d5f0a3
7d060baf86920ed7e99909838dce5bac36df49c3
'2011-10-07T16:27:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFW' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
9ecb27f57011eb9f8a68d4db130ca55c
2ee7a9d8d173681d5ad87d4e803cf27079080db8
describe
'199365' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFX' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
d89ddda39561b0b94fd50da3b8ab2649
8d42fe39ba08a18a95c27eedd6c55c8793c9bbf9
'2011-10-07T16:31:32-04:00'
describe
'40203' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFY' 'sip-files00141.pro'
9ac1a29c93c42fc878b2e654c9309411
150ab83dd9c49dcfd39a8ee9682657f35dbd6d81
'2011-10-07T16:26:50-04:00'
describe
'76937' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIFZ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
d2e37283c940e56ec95321ea33d41349
e8b4bcc0b2df72e8cb351f5a0258dacdca3ab9c9
'2011-10-07T16:24:40-04:00'
describe
'2603808' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGA' 'sip-files00141.tif'
a6070f10e4e43ea6481e79fd79e6d2c5
f309b307791ffbef067678c6049d7ddfd82ad468
'2011-10-07T16:28:20-04:00'
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGB' 'sip-files00141.txt'
c7a7fd7e0d0a591d9a882cb6853eb1e8
ee174de8493130b58e4d94b34cbf33be753a863d
describe
'34509' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGC' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
481b16253faea02a5171a80002fc5502
772e5dedfce9fda18b54c09b12fe01756e75b9ec
'2011-10-07T16:31:26-04:00'
describe
'322601' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGD' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
8707154676504b5cf361bcc95c2f4756
745bee0f3d43f12eafd5e0278bac3fe1c0ee6476
'2011-10-07T16:33:46-04:00'
describe
'205976' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGE' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
d25c43e80a80b48e261602980759b569
c79fb8e9bbfe70fda5fc4f585033c1f649b5a284
'2011-10-07T16:30:46-04:00'
describe
'25624' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGF' 'sip-files00142.pro'
dcaf997d387fe3e9b444c7008463770a
0755147dcdffd5c0ee5e7f3b5c9d3ccc9336558c
describe
'75603' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGG' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
a9b3c83cf171d934739932df59880c29
7cb19d110a29593d036f2209aa66af5e1dca73c1
'2011-10-07T16:44:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGH' 'sip-files00142.tif'
df4a0e738139732bd2f0e8c5791964e5
dab27551c46688e3a1ef8114b973a91fb90f86ae
'2011-10-07T16:33:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGI' 'sip-files00142.txt'
71b32c227dfe483b845f7d1f49333312
46053413d19f78f4582ace866f19e0219d037707
describe
'34167' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGJ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
372fb27fbd3ea9d5b531127d9a69412a
522353f9706ab31a6b87578a40deae5452f22fb3
'2011-10-07T16:24:01-04:00'
describe
'322546' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGK' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
b9b0f9dcb3631ee0ecb0cca2ff277d8e
5c4278dec56c1b701ca278c3d79ec8fd8afb8171
describe
'133385' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGL' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
1de724f0b18c8b17208e46e7aec2fd5b
dfe46b95aded3d530dab6a6b19eac5afc5df6167
'2011-10-07T16:24:00-04:00'
describe
'11428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGM' 'sip-files00143.pro'
02f51e1d4fe6035f79e7f21bd9c1d92a
74f4ca181fbb4ed76173b4aed56f6ffe1ebb2650
describe
'48807' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGN' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
2a7df4fb8bb6da44dfe7a4090ed1de74
52f1e9aff1bd756e1b6d429ceb8b3625c4076e23
'2011-10-07T16:30:23-04:00'
describe
'2601676' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGO' 'sip-files00143.tif'
c06e21116c0135ba2c847eeb665291c5
8be92e3efafa18b993f1bd0c274a37657f05b7e4
'2011-10-07T16:30:08-04:00'
describe
'471' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGP' 'sip-files00143.txt'
aa1a221f71b3e7ef3c3e68cafd700b77
710507a5ecf19f51954361aa2526298ed77048e8
'2011-10-07T16:24:57-04:00'
describe
'27675' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGQ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
3ecb0059744e669d337e9e4d023c9d1f
46546803b40ce228c6c8b3f0796a36fbee95af0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGR' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
76e61bb8f218fec76f429303337cfe1a
5370c2f8c7b4f3aa85963a5bada692be171236fb
describe
'207451' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGS' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
e7f7108873217f0a327a3cafa6961b60
9d9e9b810949610f2c06dd842077ab0f290c3f16
'2011-10-07T16:33:05-04:00'
describe
'10275' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGT' 'sip-files00144.pro'
ea5aff359bbca738b02545609469a2af
aa24c8fc8d40037d54818006d5515ef8c272364f
'2011-10-07T16:36:11-04:00'
describe
'70558' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGU' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
680a4a005aaf3de4544b8423c7ce50fc
2af7cee31f43909a723f71db3d16d058dd170aeb
describe
'2603904' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGV' 'sip-files00144.tif'
9c832c5b4bdea592a806c90d12deb563
22b2dbd814a5db206c306b915f250e473d5d790d
describe
'567' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGW' 'sip-files00144.txt'
55ac1efc436c69838248f370706a3bb3
bab46f54f66ab24e64be0ec6f033f0dd0c948f21
describe
'34618' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGX' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
b920fe0551c309dfadae01d5608f6085
be29497dea2e3dc1b812cc7bb71c12b237827791
'2011-10-07T16:24:29-04:00'
describe
'322525' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGY' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
18174a6ad106ca93aa5564fcd0c01f44
1b79a3be6b482ab3d94f6313ad2a6602b4408b5f
'2011-10-07T16:40:57-04:00'
describe
'189347' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIGZ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
4787e8d424b109e82463a9b0bb8d8a1c
ad09e418c88f96e644e7d9614f9003479cfc85ca
'2011-10-07T16:25:08-04:00'
describe
'7544' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHA' 'sip-files00145.pro'
a5134b47732a9779bf761a2a64637d7b
eadbbfc73f8b13802067e8126850209eb0ccac48
describe
'65773' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHB' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
693a62dcc6ca237fa979b1d2bea1cd2c
da3a57520dd4bf4c992c003ea595b7c20106c076
'2011-10-07T16:31:42-04:00'
describe
'2603760' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHC' 'sip-files00145.tif'
7d5fe9eaabaa75788e97cc412260fece
089247faeb9d64256522d8c242bf813450f51740
describe
'428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHD' 'sip-files00145.txt'
fdd2906088f791fbf8dfae9267f4d0c2
54fa95754abcd2c55a008d2d0bfaca7f017b4282
describe
'33866' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHE' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
23bd2aa35f24c4c9b4f9813fab49e0b1
319649f8c93d255734f86815a779bbeed3be6ed3
'2011-10-07T16:44:34-04:00'
describe
'322442' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHF' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
71917633b576e2e5fffb4540a9cf15de
fd90d948fe28dcdf8d00ca151c5475bde81371ea
'2011-10-07T16:32:18-04:00'
describe
'194439' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHG' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
f21dcb6830657ab9a19e0d8dfd19c5de
6f1f4baaef0ccab13068cdf881ed4c95ff9f9033
describe
'9093' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHH' 'sip-files00146.pro'
89be3bd8f70d8407bc491f04cb8a2717
460cfd19d914de025a7df98e225c07dabce680c6
describe
'63071' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHI' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
283edfe9b67144fbd74df1855ca74e65
15ac74e76f32d0917d000698233af9ff40c19f22
'2011-10-07T16:43:38-04:00'
describe
'2602888' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHJ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
8f52ff66b89516ece35bc94ddd0706bb
63f3c1a8b8c4956b31d03f6a78b8ea39fc3c9309
'2011-10-07T16:23:44-04:00'
describe
'396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHK' 'sip-files00146.txt'
9dbcbaec80be05d3c893113b18d2387e
ff53bd637b03e7dd94a62dcdc814b09b7d9cda66
'2011-10-07T16:26:45-04:00'
describe
'31511' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHL' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
acdec6ffa58c81661107bcf4fd279cec
6c3175250cb8cf6e64929b170617204f24c3c9e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHM' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
aa03c40e1991e056388635a807af637f
12b3cdddb1822ec5ddcdeb26e58a86e97538a888
'2011-10-07T16:29:08-04:00'
describe
'169045' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHN' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
d882a2fcfef11bc7d6219e024197194e
34335ce2729569cf4754e1583943a4496b0a986a
'2011-10-07T16:22:17-04:00'
describe
'19285' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHO' 'sip-files00147.pro'
6fcb7980f8212d4f60a5e5408cad74d4
ff9d831a0060f1761eab32015a66b08d9deb003f
describe
'59898' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHP' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
a9cb8f98d988e2104f875ca903a384df
ac13138dbb230ffc75b2abaaf6110f0d0ff296e7
describe
'2602460' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHQ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
9591d9ee0188e99a67407b3ae7f0d7de
ed4e6217ac530f1ce4b597efc6d95c97b7b037e4
describe
'785' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHR' 'sip-files00147.txt'
6f450f7e573ed167588eb950e871db26
f376ce3c0ce6272667545fb6f3170e7eaa5665ea
'2011-10-07T16:37:30-04:00'
describe
'30462' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHS' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
d9e2f7790351d7cca1fbb62c863abf18
e99711294ccd301e331adb5145229a2e49d4b6a2
'2011-10-07T16:26:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHT' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
b319cb165c3f893b10cad4f9d1f1381c
a360662f430c96450d8178d497b2ad123888d4a5
'2011-10-07T16:22:18-04:00'
describe
'205414' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHU' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
e375e0f7a860624fd4b50ff85f6850a9
48c992e1cc9da27096b5ba59a18441fa6c7b4fb9
'2011-10-07T16:29:05-04:00'
describe
'41921' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHV' 'sip-files00148.pro'
8e27db6760276448a8fe321a01b5bc97
eeb92e1eec5c199ad554f124d74991a20271722e
'2011-10-07T16:41:25-04:00'
describe
'78603' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHW' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
8fbdb5d7ef833491536d20f73eac11ed
feb562d7469ac2067890a36d22b5396ea2baf1bf
'2011-10-07T16:31:50-04:00'
describe
'2603544' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHX' 'sip-files00148.tif'
4b9e7f5cd66db4cb1550a9ba80063623
a483477288dabeedc08a54741a5454b8e7ad2e63
'2011-10-07T16:23:10-04:00'
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHY' 'sip-files00148.txt'
f5c6ef4fb208ec6e688da71ceee7c7be
9d3b8c142a0a560fc174936987eb82b2f5e3a646
'2011-10-07T16:23:16-04:00'
describe
'34595' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIHZ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
4c0ed138d2a96ab971d1dcbdf79c6cfc
8763b79b90d9b23bd6b1e30879eb22a7ea775f87
'2011-10-07T16:42:17-04:00'
describe
'322634' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIA' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
f3bb414b80dbdeb03ffd02ac6bc6c96b
4a4b4baedb5a3664e8b5a6df7b8e54cccebb35b9
describe
'188589' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIB' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
4856decd2bed44917714de80158c7ced
ccc31f9315aa31296b84f9a1f6ae0c1d6782f945
describe
'36951' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIC' 'sip-files00149.pro'
60758856142fbdc12e308028bc93915b
41dd65bd6f9cf8046fe1bf38690e68d1166e0834
'2011-10-07T16:33:47-04:00'
describe
'72641' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIID' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
d943b2c217996ee843fb3482b9acb681
475f14fd30596c26968c4a68a6652b6cad3b3af6
'2011-10-07T16:24:27-04:00'
describe
'2603376' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIE' 'sip-files00149.tif'
7989b4b581718f91754c1f6ddb8d23b6
fb1d377960c2d650af7d393162cae7725db0aafe
'2011-10-07T16:36:37-04:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIF' 'sip-files00149.txt'
7f55eccbb45dae9206c0598985ef54df
5f3718474b84051e8cd1abd3c01237b196d7d85b
describe
Invalid character
'33400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIG' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
2857c36b6c9d19f3953041a613b1b66f
ea350cb0389a264a2b9c719e9ccb22f526887b4d
'2011-10-07T16:33:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIH' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
285ee14e12330e3eeb695e31d353b6e6
84218b68984a486f4a12e4684b0cb836f31ecef7
describe
'151852' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIII' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
6f920b9c9f4a53a0f76a76d47dee042b
ac1ad755e1d795ca3585d8b16c40f91b637d833a
describe
'25805' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIJ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
0025f9cecef3b83dacb209bbea1ea433
1259013219bdfd8743de70a54fe46af1b0e49e50
'2011-10-07T16:23:04-04:00'
describe
'59470' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIK' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
7f729f9dade02483c546a1cf3c4a4005
72ad807cff33d606ef73a5e02c08e59c5d89a7f4
'2011-10-07T16:30:20-04:00'
describe
'2602168' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIL' 'sip-files00150.tif'
cfd7ddf587262b9597bf7f1942c85f0b
4a2cd17e4eb1691960786b229fc32cc2dd5e284b
'2011-10-07T16:29:19-04:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIM' 'sip-files00150.txt'
030d7abede7be78f4ed0e4967294dc87
af3e034f290df372680f805c696ac9e66ef9be81
describe
'29919' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIN' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
b6038c8113f52121d69d0932d0444d26
ce1d96bc6c08c085cd72dde24205296659b00f01
describe
'322627' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIO' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
70c6df9d7045c7e0aed22d161c592508
a31be9c3bb9b3273299fe701fc1d155469a74d81
describe
'143593' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIP' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
7959cf9b5d903c5f6ff5c7a3f07ebf09
89f602cd2e61aa2ce58ca0b2844a8f91700cb1b7
describe
'24163' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIQ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
ea95471da78a74015dd4c63c0dee0a43
7e9f1ddc0dbf27ee1b12d24fa6917cc028049c01
'2011-10-07T16:25:45-04:00'
describe
'56900' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIR' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
11dc71f49362bcf65c32bd9dff004bc1
cae79c07252c6e147299a29a75516a0a132fb233
'2011-10-07T16:32:08-04:00'
describe
'2601980' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIS' 'sip-files00151.tif'
0fea06f4354590c42ce38e6b2f8d1d80
01a9758b50158bc760c542bca9c965f3dd275a2f
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIT' 'sip-files00151.txt'
6299434f6988b198752f7ef716d5cf69
c6979e6715b810198b30069fc496a81d25ee78ab
'2011-10-07T16:32:54-04:00'
describe
'29151' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIU' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
da68443df8c175319329f9f4dc645e8b
d73a2417774727d3136024acdee482ee04b36d21
describe
'322597' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIV' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
a5959385746663382ae9f5751e8cce79
5d9bb75eea75566a9c81ad2a39ab1f759345c8d4
describe
'164987' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIW' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
4c706b1a9f54399c0864a58592c53fe9
3a394c02b212d8c53e939380b0739de0ab53eb71
'2011-10-07T16:35:51-04:00'
describe
'20502' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIX' 'sip-files00152.pro'
5f6a282271f29d0c9640fcc265991145
c063492925115875300989154d2524b233867150
'2011-10-07T16:37:03-04:00'
describe
'60320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIY' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
5fca9f7f281f40180297bedd30733e43
db66beb7a6b0e5f34a83c2bad45998b062f79ed4
describe
'2602424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIIZ' 'sip-files00152.tif'
1834d02f45d4933944a10033e9a3500b
1c76c41feaf93907a3b692bb0fcd0fe72f736de3
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJA' 'sip-files00152.txt'
f8c48ef89d0ebb66b3eb1348af7c1a98
fcc5dfbaca119a27b6e3787ef7851d9e07b945b0
'2011-10-07T16:34:11-04:00'
describe
'30264' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJB' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
e72040e27247c6f3773af04a160485fc
df1f8ec6a1e5c9aba6587ac59d010ee2c3404083
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJC' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
1b5156e5ebf778a7dd5b35c550e37688
60787376c5bc763a9791a04c5bd0a27c78aa7dff
'2011-10-07T16:32:21-04:00'
describe
'174659' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJD' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
92d88fc985ffdd8ebff1218359de39b7
571910e802e183eba26751cff971a85f4f365300
describe
'19090' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJE' 'sip-files00153.pro'
1fe1c0d45a9950871e2cceded62698d4
999afa35add448eca1ff1fc1ccfd7ed68513dfbf
'2011-10-07T16:30:59-04:00'
describe
'61561' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJF' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
02c2cd9c71ccf5b16ae8abeb04833300
c8cde5ea110a45b77f6fb8b7bf757a8bb11bc145
describe
'2602588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJG' 'sip-files00153.tif'
a84aa2149d78bf12a99bf0ee719fc764
f9699dde462a1533ae189c5fb6ef461fd38d6bcd
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJH' 'sip-files00153.txt'
33ae20762dca28aa1c0de1b7937001b1
a6240996ae24600223c2c724bfd50fd4a6df9f95
describe
'30679' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJI' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
afe0e5b299e873f8e5fce8204ec33fc6
d2fe4479a22915988e12d028cde43205fc271b55
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJJ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
a4005be96a1c0d488b34c683d222b8c7
fb75f99231f4bea8a7ef0bfe2819066e96a0c16b
describe
'201916' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJK' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
a2c8e407d8569179eb47fc7141488c7d
acdc93abcf4189e13b917933ff320988ad0fc4d7
'2011-10-07T16:30:47-04:00'
describe
'41368' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJL' 'sip-files00154.pro'
1c4816fd097a145e91498e4565d6f68f
075c05f9053c29c2545c89ed47694157e229ae58
'2011-10-07T16:32:01-04:00'
describe
'77628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJM' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
1c9a44359d6f13c7d0ffab1c05a1a715
30fd305bb5e4d612a102aa2dc7b2c4de13329931
'2011-10-07T16:38:32-04:00'
describe
'2603588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJN' 'sip-files00154.tif'
c51ab5ed94e18087453a9319c29827b5
eb5c6280fa5825031f6b40faa84715862a2d3f70
'2011-10-07T16:34:34-04:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJO' 'sip-files00154.txt'
6d03f424c0345aa966858e544a5a4664
0c1b415c79b5108d17a552f99a42b114e2874488
describe
'34726' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJP' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
df9d1c445619b157a9c57b9cd5bd09b8
7a2aa0880fce202d72ef4dba7da422eb5c9f8303
'2011-10-07T16:36:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJQ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
61bef4d8a12039f247a440dc19494db8
71ed475e8900f6829538a28c5e1c5b5aa95da685
'2011-10-07T16:35:07-04:00'
describe
'194700' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJR' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
e6d0b346581e6a5469c9ab1532506d02
76957ef34cc1c4ad9d75f9d0ae0a348ae05cb01d
describe
'39190' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJS' 'sip-files00155.pro'
0cf4f0bb69e3d2e5b18885df46f4e366
350093430e6876a9ce3eea1c5152b612c7b62fec
describe
'75880' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJT' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
630c10f7afe9df76ba8ffc4c9f9b8307
ce9a82b3f769d5be267df89a924ed62a44f28462
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJU' 'sip-files00155.tif'
633a0b67a53f7d48f8d51e2a53c0144a
19915a6a919fa35200f0d92575b2c15dd0bbf29d
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJV' 'sip-files00155.txt'
34807f2864b41efe17d05d4716a4c2e8
b50c1736fd05e0543ba82e734b35741c4d1222c1
describe
'34430' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJW' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
d9792e10609a0a6bebd50b4a95031e27
bfb144f97cc91f973c98e5125d03d370ae257840
'2011-10-07T16:40:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJX' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
8997201317013c9d1e5afdc86f6adde0
4ddf548430a1976beeb4de24191437bdd6a599ee
describe
'188572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJY' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
50312dc87adcc151e959f551c9a4d6e8
e5c9e3c8dcf36f17328f690713676c3b28d02e7d
describe
'35010' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIJZ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
abdcc85074570ba2ec96b394832bf585
be11d6e4b3f6ef6099b14f47f794c3e62e12217e
'2011-10-07T16:39:42-04:00'
describe
'71871' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKA' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
4db806fd898995991d06a9520a06b06f
0f126b7f6beaea9aead4c4bd177102743220a4fb
describe
'2603216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKB' 'sip-files00156.tif'
0564451e7066aae170757b4475ce0f96
0b2a3b38391c7c3bf47b8e2cb3da734e983a8e6c
'2011-10-07T16:25:21-04:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKC' 'sip-files00156.txt'
a5614db34ae144dbdca68d7eb69b45ae
2c557dc01c702d4816b44739eb1b150dfad06232
'2011-10-07T16:41:18-04:00'
describe
'33142' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKD' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
8b745a4ccbeea8ab4cf1effa62cd1a98
b22828656f7e0ad502f47c7325862c94e681bb4c
'2011-10-07T16:32:32-04:00'
describe
'322449' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKE' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
f64029d8c13de09c2dae50cf3036be79
048fa244959525a947f92d5d026c0ba479406d4c
describe
'167621' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKF' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
1b850aa5928bf0b42dd3ac40f610cc2f
e4be1ada1db2b1564d9ea698966c7b9c80522b92
'2011-10-07T16:35:53-04:00'
describe
'12975' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKG' 'sip-files00157.pro'
ea1d4b10a7008e18c2ace08af155d60c
525eb3a61a00881613c2d434622e49160eda998f
describe
'62410' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKH' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
2778851108187bdb8bcb085ceeb6a586
f4ae217703ccbcf7af5f263f1d00f2f2f855b115
'2011-10-07T16:38:52-04:00'
describe
'2602876' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKI' 'sip-files00157.tif'
0e915b4ad1d09729e66fadf181ecb6f6
9b6784799051f2bbb1fc09c6ec3d3a871a1c0c87
'2011-10-07T16:37:42-04:00'
describe
'518' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKJ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
267f6c067d51f0b3efdcd2d2ae483d3b
9db580f3e10a2545ea746d66ce362de10f574001
describe
'31862' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKK' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
5a86b113c6afa8fa861712d78cdd32be
e2db279d57ebca720f60ca92fff153bcd8073759
'2011-10-07T16:41:27-04:00'
describe
'322790' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKL' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
5a826137cdd1b8fa460bb8242f3d56ad
54ef74696d7ef784c81a664c000849132e8a3fed
describe
'241835' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKM' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
8395b098659e80062943a91370b35446
31d8e5ea9f57d53c41730821450df824d1f8e272
'2011-10-07T16:38:01-04:00'
describe
'8800' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKN' 'sip-files00158.pro'
27f63dc94d8d2192a631c3e8d4c09e87
37de05a13e3d1229eabcbe93b32237a2151b4b59
describe
'75033' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKO' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
89b4beebfb39d4bc8c0c9fb71c593df2
3695cb678cb4415a311ee7ca5e204e77b578d245
describe
'2605704' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKP' 'sip-files00158.tif'
0a5935a74b9aca92118812cbf916a0b1
14ae09f6ba43bd03ef3d3bef7622a37514b88519
'2011-10-07T16:36:19-04:00'
describe
'505' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKQ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
4f1cedaa5476033934b5b4fc4be34476
8fb4ba90eb92dee40b805fc33d2ad21597383256
'2011-10-07T16:22:25-04:00'
describe
'34440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKR' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
d8fa8a6d30144d7e919c8236c0d40d18
cc82369697ff10a7acb99fae144524d7248bf422
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKS' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
1b14cfb645a49746caefa53ae7011829
8f9ff32df9269278cb757b96420683f8319d8a34
'2011-10-07T16:43:33-04:00'
describe
'199883' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKT' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
1175adeb5b0a9affe45b808ecded4cda
7493ec3eaec70eb5f10cba7458601a63636e035d
describe
'39591' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKU' 'sip-files00159.pro'
cdec4eafcaea867563826200fd8b2111
a10d7ef3d72bd19c567e70c3dc321f5723516dd0
'2011-10-07T16:41:50-04:00'
describe
'77095' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKV' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
45460a2516f41408c8ea8ea9e439a0bd
5612101fd7a971a231e55d427ff0beaa2b546d3d
describe
'2603724' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKW' 'sip-files00159.tif'
a87d43c022b366528734a4c1d8ff54b1
60f8b23b79a31fcff9abe290f858357f17cf8eb5
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKX' 'sip-files00159.txt'
abf31bae533140b361e1490ad006f345
0c38e296c1cc688f01df88b0daf0226bc38ce633
'2011-10-07T16:34:48-04:00'
describe
'34247' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKY' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
eedabc99b7608bb8ca00320b1f9e8327
2279cfd8bda233133707e2094b68e6eb97b9167c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIKZ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
521e6366365920dfa5f3d13e4cfc7b34
3ab5ae7c565ed231dbee264274e997608942100a
'2011-10-07T16:38:58-04:00'
describe
'196806' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILA' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
3be14273f972bcc452d4bddf97d43bf6
283ca5e1ee195a3ebe6e55b6cd1ad87cae58645e
'2011-10-07T16:29:17-04:00'
describe
'30306' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILB' 'sip-files00160.pro'
72e5798e3f630ec3af1c7b9bdade39e6
3fbdb28ef33085e1a2c4e36bb94b2c1a192b5bf9
describe
'72841' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILC' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
16df92b0637e92602e6ec3a7bdebaa21
432d230fd195ea49066b654fb6d414b62c5bd838
'2011-10-07T16:26:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILD' 'sip-files00160.tif'
9c6c4de1ad1492bd6dd2f15ed4bddfd9
2bc06874016b8ad0937c37abc4b79ac920ffacb4
'2011-10-07T16:36:01-04:00'
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILE' 'sip-files00160.txt'
7fe91c650abe66a2bf0ac3925fc85279
0b87690a1584320dd52e15fc6f1820c142891d35
'2011-10-07T16:43:58-04:00'
describe
'33728' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILF' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
94dcd93ce09277a185d78cf066c7db1d
b974229af12a837e49fcbe7b990ea1918985e2fd
describe
'322605' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILG' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
5754eb68e14fdf42caee8caa83193df3
0c3d1a16b2efc0b40d0c31a93aafdc36b59a1321
'2011-10-07T16:31:03-04:00'
describe
'181180' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILH' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
70faa9a60fbac4ca72c67e97f6ca2346
f0317521b103cf9ca472b67363da7cd286514840
'2011-10-07T16:23:31-04:00'
describe
'24849' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILI' 'sip-files00161.pro'
53a7d18a9abbca3b7897e7a321db4ffd
3b8c34383f68cd75c331f2089bb3ce13ec429f3b
describe
'68463' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILJ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
daaef9ace7a95c38a85c70c88ca6db04
6555c229bbc5e893c11a9a9c4af5d2e75357e80b
describe
'2603204' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILK' 'sip-files00161.tif'
6fea62fbe58dc18ebb51910cf21f21c1
cbab19728325784a9e0547d668a419cdebba0e24
'2011-10-07T16:25:24-04:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILL' 'sip-files00161.txt'
31d5defd8de53cd7580c7aa62da8dd8a
2e1ad3db7a977db45147ad450f91ec5cb7c8ba91
'2011-10-07T16:35:41-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'32669' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILM' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
dce09119707b0d2d9b1c353babe17fd8
9187629bf984bcdbbeccfeeb50d2758f6e2dae0b
'2011-10-07T16:26:09-04:00'
describe
'322611' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILN' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
d8c490c0dea6e2e20b81ec6cb4fbdc4c
1d25bfada6bbdac1c88cf504814082cf622e8c04
describe
'193881' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILO' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
d87e8a0bf78365c04218d2d05396fa5e
34642dc52bb9d11d73707fa8dbdf498de5793800
describe
'22701' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILP' 'sip-files00162.pro'
222cac1666333f5aab751eb6cb2d3ad5
8bc9864167adabbcc1bcaafccdac39c44b11903d
describe
'72769' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILQ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
9f038d9e2d8b1239db0d9f11d6233970
44e2b4aed244dad5e11a75e3e4ae1779b8203da9
describe
'2603572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILR' 'sip-files00162.tif'
829f561b89bc64912c6699c836bb2454
57f47810f89e9709fb8d737009212c5629d71f3b
'2011-10-07T16:35:34-04:00'
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILS' 'sip-files00162.txt'
6da68cb37b1358516fc50fe1917a3e7a
3df51e675c92a03a1aacb610ebbba8c1136b7aa1
'2011-10-07T16:27:08-04:00'
describe
'33927' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILT' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
340f5e13d4e689db91381010e04a4be1
f0827c36b827d82dda50c2ee1ef1c563b14691a3
'2011-10-07T16:27:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILU' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
81bfbc0d01337adcfa3f3eed44707cad
e5072b91cabfedaf4fb768295b121673e7d4eb50
describe
'190112' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILV' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
5255c2953c439ae2ae300bf35ed5d40b
5ac77de951ddbb700927c498c743633264f74c82
describe
'36053' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILW' 'sip-files00163.pro'
f478da8da9b00bec4fde286a0913186e
14c84d6eeea395486c56a690cd211f7312b21b90
describe
'73127' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILX' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
e7e77f03d99a95e219f6b02367656f72
3f33b7b07a31efd54f07327b24d44e99e3d9be45
'2011-10-07T16:33:03-04:00'
describe
'2603440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILY' 'sip-files00163.tif'
1a79f5cf46c0249a8293eaed5882e2dc
b0843284c1c8ef6e0c888cc69d44fb79ee3e62ef
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABILZ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
73bbaffe7d193e8ec897032041627504
9bc1ee6d3e3f7cee4e4211e0c824c2896a6f6299
describe
'33662' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
362a69993cf87408d5f8cd7f4a15718b
5f868b7ed2151b1cae820c34ce943fb7a835ebdf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMB' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
d7eda1fae6a0aea593b31feed189a254
a81ade0d07f34831505565208b4db61e3753c5f5
describe
'204960' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMC' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
96d35b03a090e232067e4640f77795b1
f02362f4726fcff1c4ff55f736793ba70b5c9298
'2011-10-07T16:34:44-04:00'
describe
'41161' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMD' 'sip-files00164.pro'
21efc2cb85e1c4715f41a9f41deb11a1
de4421f08e3d75bc2454b996cb96bce42d39deef
'2011-10-07T16:39:08-04:00'
describe
'78118' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIME' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
ad98dc24545dde99263bfd32373e64b5
c6661a813ea10857b9fef477240d2461d4cc6d85
describe
'2603608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMF' 'sip-files00164.tif'
ae26164c33d28520d5f2ebaf95562ef9
6c6490c1b9f1cdef36c4217e004b95c5bcb21e4d
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMG' 'sip-files00164.txt'
73131fecb8ea98eb16e5234d8896ff9a
17263ecada711f9dffcb70e2ebc9964e0f25eeb2
describe
'34490' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMH' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
e37f2b7466161cf7aa840957a43632e7
625c1357bef180caed8ac4505fa9992106891607
'2011-10-07T16:30:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMI' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
c37f53d574dd3dc29d7122f8e8253c70
a2c46807e9b70cb67252722ab52141c4cd8da263
describe
'199521' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMJ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
b23c8f74f102b5ab9036a0296f748120
a23c3c827667d75f1965a25332bf3531e84936d1
describe
'40498' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMK' 'sip-files00165.pro'
fc32af8f80495d489a1553a510da59c4
b0616bfe77263068264f53a4139ec1f3e26f48b4
describe
'78102' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIML' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
d210ef49627c290d9a3b1598bf25fbdf
b178acd2a7019cd4eb90fde71fbe01520fa461d7
'2011-10-07T16:38:27-04:00'
describe
'2604032' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMM' 'sip-files00165.tif'
bbccffceb86c4090370e7cb9a9aedddd
5ae0b93644a0f0bbfe7d9f0184f070094c9f5cd4
'2011-10-07T16:24:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMN' 'sip-files00165.txt'
128f68bf07073be38ae02137f1b9a227
a805ac83735b093529f99db29ad3e153f6129160
describe
'35352' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMO' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
86c992c550d08ea26185705165b10345
087aff5b02323a1867ffa95352821c99b3d6bc93
'2011-10-07T16:32:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMP' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
6e42757f1a72527950ad31467e53ba94
30e33a47cd06b2ec99ee27819d1f3df49ecea346
describe
'200906' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMQ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
219bd4b1c573b6c826ded340405461ac
91281fd09a64806b89a74262e68b00ccc8a301aa
'2011-10-07T16:22:37-04:00'
describe
'25439' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMR' 'sip-files00166.pro'
2c476b8567bdd2632f01ab033789223d
7b02bbf60b78b1340031514ec62b5966ce668961
describe
'72929' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMS' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
87333d5c455b6e33fc3fe7b29e44c1f9
4e32ba645971b3a3bf8a7a54e510f08fa68c91a8
'2011-10-07T16:43:28-04:00'
describe
'2603388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMT' 'sip-files00166.tif'
4618936e54622f4277132740bede2d49
fdfe02805f426c619c0ecc48f6b8f08da5c86115
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMU' 'sip-files00166.txt'
591babe0d15f44d2a53f483eb0c32754
98c06b78ab1185e5adfe04a819961facf4a645b5
describe
'33926' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMV' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
217bcdd5df96d3ce7f8bb77a06bd92dc
d50ac4cf9ef1ee5722425bd22b1afe94b2866453
'2011-10-07T16:37:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMW' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
b15b83dba9dd14765f65b408ec4743b1
73db5bf6dfc8e37c5568cc1bbd216d0ecc0498f4
describe
'186907' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMX' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
786288bfa61477c76573830bd5642972
a431cbe7bf62dd3c995471d7b35ee6bfafcb10d3
describe
'35580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMY' 'sip-files00167.pro'
6625042f6a3b325d10ed4005d55f1885
1730b958467e5c19b07fff13497218cf193123b7
describe
'73910' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIMZ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
497c728a23ab428beddc410d69a2aa08
2450512e5298c2831bafa391c83a0c64895f3dfb
'2011-10-07T16:35:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINA' 'sip-files00167.tif'
11f5e7b4f07a0d57b995445759fe3ccc
19c13bc73ef77faa7e6cf691a3dc4dc3d5fe9352
'2011-10-07T16:28:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINB' 'sip-files00167.txt'
a18c9ddf8293f69a833af42ac9912f80
0d31ccabef9887329c21017a2ed959a6cba3cc90
'2011-10-07T16:42:40-04:00'
describe
'33998' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINC' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
632efda97426d166541a63bfc0bcc13c
f08dedfa90c4d8460a27d4ed4f6e2fa11ddb6d12
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIND' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
70a680826a37fb7aca971be08cfebce3
ddee35e5b6af5ece8012e0c1fdf9ac381bc1a169
'2011-10-07T16:42:24-04:00'
describe
'168359' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINE' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
643369f2a56efd0aed32dfc76cb2fcce
58cadc0bdc82a0728e3dbd6d0f8d8d6f23568e83
'2011-10-07T16:27:51-04:00'
describe
'30473' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINF' 'sip-files00168.pro'
fc2e87788be522816e5beb58bff6ccfe
4242eab57551af87844bd70c0ec27f00189b0cca
describe
'66024' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABING' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
517e527797b8c97dac15f4e75babfb58
c00622eb056e7bfa3f6e47907ce5b41028036fcf
'2011-10-07T16:31:41-04:00'
describe
'2603032' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINH' 'sip-files00168.tif'
2d2d0f43ac9514f27b1aa086cdac86fd
8c2f612848d6a6cff8793f347e5b7602f41b8c0b
'2011-10-07T16:34:35-04:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINI' 'sip-files00168.txt'
503313ef32bff15a4ed526813751cb03
504dbb39837f5d60fb6502c1bc034457c4e10ac0
'2011-10-07T16:25:07-04:00'
describe
'32698' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINJ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
c138d82470ff7a8ff54c58e05559b28d
24829a7bd8aa2cbcede13678d1fcdc93b7aa7e9b
describe
'322558' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINK' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
2ec5a4e8ba384e37e72c3f64213f0d95
8e012789fd92b7675bfacdfb4c5257545e7fde14
describe
'146570' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINL' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
f2d386d374afa390682339e6396164d5
9f7245a77a677ba4447c2a528d7bf606fc1d6ec8
describe
'24286' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINM' 'sip-files00169.pro'
fbf245e67d89c3eee8a7378681686435
c15dce17c12a37fa4b7f57a414c20495fb2137f0
'2011-10-07T16:30:37-04:00'
describe
'57483' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINN' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
0a3d73a6f34ec502434e3c46b057c05a
f5049405d6cba323edabf66a64af3df93828ccdf
'2011-10-07T16:41:04-04:00'
describe
'2602448' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINO' 'sip-files00169.tif'
e16506a8f389f946081017a2369c8f5f
951d6db4f9be1423a41f441eab6590f9236b9793
'2011-10-07T16:29:54-04:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINP' 'sip-files00169.txt'
14e6e16732c673565446c3ca1722567e
c91c613ffdc2e40fa4d3c721a461e80c3ed8fc9d
describe
'30656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINQ' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
6d200e988e5ce200ec93234d39fad386
6672b6fe2ba1b985ffa66bec8e5c4e9f35487654
'2011-10-07T16:27:47-04:00'
describe
'322635' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINR' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
24130287298384ddc80cdfae57425648
65cdeff4073b1ca6d02f42f95a51683c10fa3ec7
'2011-10-07T16:44:12-04:00'
describe
'161459' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINS' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
0c97e6b56b5b7ba0a99ae6a2f9af2377
1ad714375d5b6736cc9c26bc2231db32ef7bc301
describe
'28222' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINT' 'sip-files00170.pro'
24da76b92682d4c1cfc80af68abf8bd2
2218ebeb1529fd3880dc3b4896f493caedc09abf
describe
'63428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINU' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
36e814ee3e562d6fa4d242faa3351604
f3e7103143c1eafd03e53f96858a9fa4b314a616
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINV' 'sip-files00170.tif'
eeec3b3fdfad34a84de9f5cd584d3a3a
6e76b929476afc5e22d09214136a036108dc2fa5
'2011-10-07T16:35:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINW' 'sip-files00170.txt'
8bdd695c0e424ae44deb8fb2fa874ab6
0fe40ca239d983083bbd65b2ee561a52ae7bda0e
describe
'31734' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINX' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
bf05f5efc58e4759541e641ec03e3e15
b5d2cfbf73bdcda2737bbfd2fd2b9f19e5370fbf
'2011-10-07T16:38:48-04:00'
describe
'322641' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINY' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
837a2bc84ed10d7198c65da10dc352b7
678203471cea1a2f80e1136ced7833800a6389e8
describe
'201358' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABINZ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
4b2d57d32982cba1815906609e839816
ed197f7eea18825bcd60a4bf326761c17b718519
'2011-10-07T16:32:04-04:00'
describe
'39995' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOA' 'sip-files00171.pro'
363b067bb6730a94bea4b18ffedd7ed4
c74998c23f17dc4e537bc716863529b5a3beb9f1
'2011-10-07T16:24:41-04:00'
describe
'77573' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOB' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
942ff51d61cbbd295851dfdecc09d594
4727697c68752ba68a4a194a2824b85fa11b2784
describe
'2603932' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOC' 'sip-files00171.tif'
3abd05a2694999c130ad2479637f6c4f
619407b5c4a1af446ff085c6e9d954c9e1e296ff
'2011-10-07T16:44:18-04:00'
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOD' 'sip-files00171.txt'
b52a1be5e926623c4800e77fd165f19a
a8bed58800748293dcba51575767ab81da0926e8
describe
'35116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOE' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
6fd84186519fc660ea60d14978a247c9
37b1639323729681f550dd22b0bdd9d0ec993733
describe
'322518' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOF' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
67d498e38bc686a293b713229827dbbb
b925e9798b9ece0b12da280ec821a46b28aa2b38
'2011-10-07T16:22:09-04:00'
describe
'182449' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOG' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
3f3b1639897f861f33f3e2b512eca08c
0fe2619f8719b506ae4c6972411dedccee48876a
'2011-10-07T16:41:41-04:00'
describe
'22120' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOH' 'sip-files00172.pro'
327965a60b98131200a1cb1abccbd6c4
6a0995ddbf83be065c5b8ef2bd535446d67ec4fc
describe
'69180' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOI' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
4a507676c527c24feb33a93dc9871e06
a35b14d292acf6a5f3966221dc303ce6160d5e96
'2011-10-07T16:29:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOJ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
8ad3ffe7a8fdc8097b2acb8f294d9a23
cc7a49d9e3fb0d6bf99b4ee953d0e509676bd78d
'2011-10-07T16:35:30-04:00'
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOK' 'sip-files00172.txt'
223de0a6f9a237d4a4c93a1d0961891b
d4522d382643cdcb8f1076adfc9e716883447703
'2011-10-07T16:38:57-04:00'
describe
'33127' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOL' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
03354cada0ebde42fe302d5380b869b1
a2b5af01bc0537900e531ed4b2399028eed52a38
'2011-10-07T16:39:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOM' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
4014ad659d1f2383cd5fecb7f9d45aef
1bef6a7b2600ac32a04c3b3d3b768d033ada000d
'2011-10-07T16:23:36-04:00'
describe
'200604' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABION' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
c1f425e65d78260af9195b76c2df1cf3
793afa2627b11723b60cfca284ab24f4db69f978
'2011-10-07T16:23:39-04:00'
describe
'40224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOO' 'sip-files00173.pro'
093e66a959f730ab4a1523fde5d2dd4c
c13ea522955c29ca232d51d3be513153e4c08899
'2011-10-07T16:43:34-04:00'
describe
'77862' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOP' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
fa00aed2e7280f1ab115fb2c8c136df5
93d02b096b8f04ae83374c3266b4a92355387233
'2011-10-07T16:28:14-04:00'
describe
'2603860' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOQ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
5a4b0a37ea88df3c894c6b011833d19b
87a43021b9f09ded6d8e01a879de7c1cb970d32a
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOR' 'sip-files00173.txt'
19c265ebf3e08b00c3a26ad2fc0cb623
1889fddaf953e085a64f44f46fae80aa9258917f
'2011-10-07T16:39:33-04:00'
describe
'34733' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOS' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
24e431e9cf9fda6450e0d71028f2ee8f
610dab86a8533e1349902e3165a0c6751db8888e
'2011-10-07T16:31:45-04:00'
describe
'322565' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOT' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
81f17bb3a909c95a9b30c3552edeb94b
fd6129a665f0404ca491a7310031d7bda399b56e
'2011-10-07T16:31:44-04:00'
describe
'202984' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOU' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
8eacf53f4c5932d7cf1d5ea8280c2da0
9c02668edc60dcbead8208ae49e18b40f91e3cc3
'2011-10-07T16:24:59-04:00'
describe
'11174' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOV' 'sip-files00174.pro'
a566b921ddbf30f0184109047d70e718
1d56a9a00634b48f71e724641df2956aa57d488b
describe
'66021' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOW' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
eb646f13d85396dd097b4c7df084fc09
498ac09cc03318490efc63fc8e67e778f265e482
describe
'2602960' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOX' 'sip-files00174.tif'
d94ddfc5b09718c2d9f6760b3f31678a
861e0a270b6ec0f83d2c4c9cd0747112e3953532
describe
'547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOY' 'sip-files00174.txt'
e2fd4f6a2eeb12f774d7090ee8eda2de
b368c3314ea09db3496d513e519a76429fd044a0
describe
'32099' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIOZ' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
43455ad5b8873fb35e4617e98dbfd79f
031dac32707c420a95a4f83270d5aa95249b7af0
'2011-10-07T16:30:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPA' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
e2c78ebbd7523c1abf80793ba82e3425
4d72ca207db683c92dde44e1d25620e8fbbff092
describe
'212795' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPB' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
b0206a4ff0fdbc674f79a27479b04a1b
561612bc65dabd2a47cd27b0dda25172b37c4211
describe
'8379' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPC' 'sip-files00175.pro'
47e0854f040552e0365948dac62546bd
84dc5a512384433854135224a84f81c2c2c94bcf
'2011-10-07T16:26:26-04:00'
describe
'67051' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPD' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
110bcf2b9fa7d2552cc35a2da45d2048
472259c9fd9066ee7bfb4889721cfee21c2ffd3e
'2011-10-07T16:41:46-04:00'
describe
'2603396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPE' 'sip-files00175.tif'
bfec875cf8b2f2f5fb4af87b6f263d78
5e81450fb81658946ad525fbc6eeb3834600b156
'2011-10-07T16:44:19-04:00'
describe
'409' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPF' 'sip-files00175.txt'
9b7295c2ed14172487f736e9f22244fe
d0588d418a85e5b47c743d93c26d440c54efb5e7
'2011-10-07T16:37:37-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'32843' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPG' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
00bd66cfa68f8ff2f18e9bdb9dd3077a
9f9830b25b0496373b5689d77d799509380295b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPH' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
d443cd39621d341c0e962dec7e672bd5
83edd3a443edb1cdb9328e084a73ea500dcc8612
describe
'141632' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPI' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
bbe659b87561a5b07b8320c038a53820
a04e88b5ed9e8abf39c223a488b180502f7cae10
'2011-10-07T16:36:25-04:00'
describe
'25103' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPJ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
64270ba91d4d8de808f75a074ca6a9b6
9d7ef7e0d169f6893c2e29bf0b16c66630b96821
'2011-10-07T16:25:49-04:00'
describe
'59273' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPK' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
a4fb43238d5543cb6ca5cdcb19793882
9bb90dcf9bed0d36b3522c5f366fec2ed731f9f5
describe
'2602656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPL' 'sip-files00176.tif'
e6af40214104ff94a598bb1c6aaad051
be6e8b0432e060e0af92ac900bd5b7fedaa187af
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPM' 'sip-files00176.txt'
22b0360c2c28ee4e07abf2d9cbbcf9a7
93c2faff9ce2c0305627423e75cbe054ec114363
describe
'31347' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPN' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
91ea94a69d57d7af75dd3cacbf101c2d
39dbca7dc94893fb7dd7a3ef32214da3ba1720e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPO' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
323f4cc966f0a1ec9ccc8eb420644e7e
54bf92d640c7ba28b778d2ae8a486cb637b90965
'2011-10-07T16:38:56-04:00'
describe
'152666' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPP' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
39139cd952bb2753d55e26e758dc4081
16641e3ccf65b0a1e8ff8960090a5c3a3b260143
'2011-10-07T16:31:59-04:00'
describe
'27410' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPQ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
c4d432921537c8e3440da23f4901c31f
9e123ef0bdea7ac39a17186ec902171645332f4e
'2011-10-07T16:31:43-04:00'
describe
'62367' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPR' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
79da058ddf601adae5b5a5f6bb56a56f
c6ef5d97a538bddb956eec1dcc169e051ea68155
describe
'2603044' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPS' 'sip-files00177.tif'
53204ae4d5fe97a07579329e9fa17e57
04e62e5b5096ba6d3a2392b9a155175688b43d85
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPT' 'sip-files00177.txt'
fafe232ff2ebd9a65bad100bcd66a923
0588ae023add6621415f37b1002f8234b37f566e
describe
'31721' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPU' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
62f52f0c69e5a79adf8648cbf8b478a9
71204dcbb3f70e9eac89cc0b3ebef29612ad21ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPV' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
47e840e6d34c9aeac196a63972d9458e
cef9175e18191aa63e4e24f1a4f180a921c9b375
describe
'192706' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPW' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
bb868350222c917f6c54eb194989dea3
e4ec4475781ae37542ecd682e17aeeecabef8c5b
'2011-10-07T16:33:59-04:00'
describe
'27165' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPX' 'sip-files00178.pro'
2888047e332b224ee16cd6d27b34728a
08afb29aa64d4434a92b8edf7a112391d9ec97cf
'2011-10-07T16:38:10-04:00'
describe
'69277' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPY' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
95c001e8026322f841c7c98fb2c978cd
b99979aa151f984933068beed60348b0354c29ea
describe
'2602948' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIPZ' 'sip-files00178.tif'
fe859d12135d3e0e78ad6cb9ef5e3faa
cc3c1db70d5c1d9ac483ddf7f89cb813e709f5fa
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQA' 'sip-files00178.txt'
ac74aaf49e4ecfe879a8dc80693baf0f
e94ac2a9e314ef9010a3ddc6b704d251f00b4a0f
describe
'32775' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQB' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
3a6258318300034cd323ab5393bfb87e
e76d539b7faaedbbb09d6c2f2ff2087775461a86
'2011-10-07T16:27:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQC' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
4e8ae995130640323648c19dd20c03e0
b2fda129db38cb42ffef7775899b779ab0f3e710
describe
'173316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQD' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
9b9afc30152468233b2a9b95fc80be5d
836e4a57948e5ad6a2fde6e8a0dbba442e04bc7f
'2011-10-07T16:40:53-04:00'
describe
'18710' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQE' 'sip-files00179.pro'
beff2e9abe46975842ea29a4b790d0a7
e6c66f769826116543009a6a834555650d6b3f13
describe
'60815' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQF' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
075231898bf7d917739e6ee97612db84
a1daf71536678c5f96ec5ff76077c7086ed730b6
'2011-10-07T16:24:34-04:00'
describe
'2602404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQG' 'sip-files00179.tif'
e5952c4ec07e6a990c960934ac58eabe
b730c2b8535693edd3ea8d27a3a71bd59f2d72f2
'2011-10-07T16:36:03-04:00'
describe
'766' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQH' 'sip-files00179.txt'
366260a0d16aac401318d1b83cfbf767
26ca74847fe0ed9f1d5361f3a8dccea17f720019
'2011-10-07T16:42:16-04:00'
describe
'30309' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQI' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
e66deba8e99998d01dd59c1a8d26e31b
76b3fe0950802025051d053f563a12209e26c91d
describe
'322645' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQJ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
227bdd1d91103a7298d299792fa1b4eb
2910413f729fa9b300e050104b98b43f54bf4335
describe
'195970' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQK' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
0c3cf81d46d88f926331255c56ac3436
ccccdd8fe2d98d83a68992d0ca4fdeffe338879c
describe
'39159' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQL' 'sip-files00180.pro'
7a32658dc44dcc8cc474b27fb929224a
f7d0eac89aff25f19105db4345bd28c44d39ed04
describe
'76581' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQM' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
c68175fe25eaf413004224a0a233eb90
6f182d7a60f573e54ed9a1cdbdf82e98b38c1598
describe
'2603536' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQN' 'sip-files00180.tif'
0daf38ebe3ef443cadb78b2838f98ac4
ca62c4114150a11dca419148c944289404c6eb71
'2011-10-07T16:38:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQO' 'sip-files00180.txt'
a7c2942c83f5e7ba7d61c7efd94f5443
45deb6374bf1be964aaf03e2406ab2a463e4a0a6
'2011-10-07T16:28:53-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34711' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQP' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
cdd0fc3bd64eea744654947edc2b10e4
7d7ea66cb259b413c1f34d2e72ed587d693cc142
describe
'322535' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQQ' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
e29d4a84355b43778433dc5371a3ec9b
ad259c81e576deda5867b60d937b869ff688afb4
describe
'195888' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQR' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
c177811c86bcb59cddc2de75c4c9a430
37d8e34a6663ecef5ec2e5f93009f73c142db498
describe
'40249' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQS' 'sip-files00181.pro'
2fef197e7f9e3dd9abdf7f244a6d4b55
2ee5cad22bfc157c75952ae6a0941474b1807d16
describe
'76980' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQT' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
b1c780136481bcb87d53a41538e7011e
703eda0d39bbc9cad0cff7554503c5fe9795aed0
'2011-10-07T16:25:15-04:00'
describe
'2603928' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQU' 'sip-files00181.tif'
0b8a14595e5518b0ec671cc0b125aea2
252df0f8f568677d3aed7594a63abc60c729bbf3
'2011-10-07T16:41:44-04:00'
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQV' 'sip-files00181.txt'
d7376a6dff0391854fe82fd36859c1fb
07004d904294d9c5b16965641160a1a860c72f8c
describe
'35081' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQW' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
2b6e3d75a4feb61ed7c5ce3db1927af8
24193341f589bb237fc30ac448e3c7b92d77119b
'2011-10-07T16:41:36-04:00'
describe
'322492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQX' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
0347aae9886338f1de87933f61d5083a
e3290f83525caa16c645344fa274e7190e64c793
describe
'153773' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQY' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
d76d2bd6b18968d48a072c8c2fe264e0
d574790eb49ba7f556e469635d3da702515afbed
'2011-10-07T16:44:00-04:00'
describe
'17714' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIQZ' 'sip-files00182.pro'
bbc1a91be8975c6dba2ae2b366e20c47
b66c3652b8a8a90ae142b28f7cfb43489d5fe576
describe
'60394' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRA' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
4746e174c7f750fb38e1226f0b4accf1
ac06165b7c7c9df458b4650a9772401eca351109
describe
'2602784' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRB' 'sip-files00182.tif'
9bb123f281c978a1b2c068a113c62c6f
febb8282a2c338f1cc964d6eb4ee6f8ff81c657a
describe
'700' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRC' 'sip-files00182.txt'
9ad87d380830f19642fa9821cf4ede1a
09946d9e587b201dadf7e3ed7f89093dc5371f2d
'2011-10-07T16:36:58-04:00'
describe
'31448' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRD' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
4d426e5d834ae09f7f438beeffc31bcb
657403595a4c45b33331ab7f63af3af1fad932d3
describe
'322617' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRE' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
f8faa1276f8a89dd37ab0553c00a39e1
5b7ff6e44aedbc2b0f7fcc1e09a163933ee89048
describe
'212350' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRF' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
e9230becb412a7ad77403f380cd6c348
e95896cf97f19051998b67f71dac5c3d024d7dcd
describe
'5207' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRG' 'sip-files00183.pro'
d3e5b28d153eefaef088ea07c686abe9
381b52c1caa94d73551b05e68cb77408b9224b52
describe
'66008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRH' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
e4313fbedb385a1aa12afe79f7c1bc3b
bebddb62e8148feb2fb5c543dbb2a4296479a872
describe
'2603240' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRI' 'sip-files00183.tif'
fe3cf7d28d1e3ac764790e1e3d114cae
029aa8a0e49112cdd94ff28d0a9116b2876145e9
'2011-10-07T16:33:06-04:00'
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRJ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
5a39396a946c4df972772c9320434102
f7780c26b0e4e4cb35e0b7258791d7f55d024a53
describe
'31933' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRK' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
44c479a4e8a0bdad07a693915734aa98
b9dd9d74ead9534d0caaedf0f482a15388a8267e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRL' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
bfb9f99caaa0520b4a2efc86704fc834
49fb39ad87d313ee1d49e4d7fb6462538edf1909
'2011-10-07T16:42:23-04:00'
describe
'194721' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRM' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
e95f14e1234f3511bac657afc4baba65
8d736ce85513d18ebd3ae701a7c81f5b51025761
describe
'38554' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRN' 'sip-files00184.pro'
5d81001f9553bf7a69f1276f65747810
86e912fbb62ddb978dc165b7adb36d908bd98b9d
describe
'77435' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRO' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
d2fed40968805df5fcd572b75f524297
07d3fb863520db25d3745c3f32c1f25136a4226c
describe
'2603968' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRP' 'sip-files00184.tif'
7ef2ce8fee8c1bc3729c08e6958458ed
9048daa9b65e71010fd7acf24786a580ae270bd6
'2011-10-07T16:38:36-04:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRQ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
8ba635bcc94f7a588e91fa370294369b
7c6d014184bd2275924f7cd22d9c2f0f711c5996
'2011-10-07T16:24:28-04:00'
describe
'34797' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRR' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
a0c43be0d6d02f532cc7319723e71a32
c07ee1d84cdfcbe8d8658577bd32df5949dd5019
'2011-10-07T16:25:33-04:00'
describe
'322472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRS' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
28c9172d2ab7ac82fb14aba8e9d80627
a34ba3b84ef09ec4596d77fa58776ec23711ea5a
'2011-10-07T16:36:09-04:00'
describe
'197326' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRT' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
76fbaa9d24d5e101f7b55fda2f05dc74
ddc8ad5b9fb41c3be13cb9d4fcc8ccd8011353e3
'2011-10-07T16:23:54-04:00'
describe
'9888' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRU' 'sip-files00185.pro'
bc84ec78d16292f67cf2c46b51bf47de
93237ce827f4f2bea8f0844c1cd975a53ebb9ab3
describe
'68053' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRV' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
dc249fccfc3be97e958aae2f5879849f
8c9cfb8c40bfd854669da07d4ce68838d0d9b161
describe
'2604012' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRW' 'sip-files00185.tif'
dbff422474c53b87a9098a4eb1669fb5
7e48005a6f5a5be447a68e2c16a9c3f763b07326
'2011-10-07T16:44:31-04:00'
describe
'550' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRX' 'sip-files00185.txt'
2a26821e3c0fba1cfa42cbb07e25a4a3
b15e4221ce8bf1f230d1645309fe8d8d7644c278
'2011-10-07T16:36:30-04:00'
describe
'35050' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRY' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
95128865dd7360aef4b79b4b6f20c412
3557e17d96916142b6437425d1a94d82af643651
describe
'322901' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIRZ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
117e4f910135b03f6a4800a5f7328042
096dd5c020f59192232c3d81f7a2956cf524730d
'2011-10-07T16:24:36-04:00'
describe
'183462' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISA' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
93870094fbac78b8e537883ed1552879
5fbcb944de42f3dc276ebfd32b846ff24946effd
describe
'34273' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISB' 'sip-files00186.pro'
cebcfd9268751035e6868b44c4374900
1dbe591376028de89e979eaa925958a3cabcac5d
'2011-10-07T16:26:21-04:00'
describe
'72512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISC' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
c3306ed0d7df4189df9ffafb2d7cb812
7023dc9c90d0d571bb932a133374ed8dcaf61fbf
'2011-10-07T16:34:07-04:00'
describe
'2605532' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISD' 'sip-files00186.tif'
3d064a0262759429c9cecc3ed4edd67a
2319adc1a1044201e7e1beaeaa2742a4986818ab
'2011-10-07T16:27:41-04:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISE' 'sip-files00186.txt'
2c0e05d2cd0794d5650da595cd6ddf47
e97197497ece50e86ab7282e2220978b64ed32eb
describe
'33442' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISF' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
2237ca82b4f9953287afcdc47a87e52d
12018d9968b670c96006b44ba64878c6aeb67b73
'2011-10-07T16:31:37-04:00'
describe
'322642' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISG' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
b46cf4f22906129978dbf5089d995ac9
2bbc22da2ecd9ede345719c453b5f4e22c733f45
'2011-10-07T16:28:30-04:00'
describe
'181149' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISH' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
988e101ebb78ce04c81a665d1099fd32
759b5528a694f5700d333df62fb17e57b09b290a
describe
'15346' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISI' 'sip-files00187.pro'
1776a14cc75263b9aa015a3a79cdb660
48efb21b90bc1f9f4756f1fb3addfdf8c577c795
describe
'61408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISJ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
2a64505983c261057fa5545c94d825c7
671e20d1ba192651624e0f79e18ce17e1746dbc8
'2011-10-07T16:22:41-04:00'
describe
'2602548' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISK' 'sip-files00187.tif'
2534c019fa1c68f2629077918968da3f
527cc026c60a2f8ef19298f0f407581600c5380c
describe
'630' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISL' 'sip-files00187.txt'
f823fc962cdf9b84a7444534095b1619
1d14b5dba3eed5322d693af5ead265e5971dc638
describe
'30605' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISM' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
72ba44967b117d37dcc70e94942c591c
837be82cafe9a5c1293d7a05af1d2c160d19cdb3
describe
'322659' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISN' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
c0b6512516f2e0daea3a8e9c69ceaf1e
b33e08adc33569680f9c83cfca89389c5b941102
'2011-10-07T16:30:10-04:00'
describe
'173750' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISO' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
b96ccebf69844e60b83c0003de0b273b
346f8ad712722f77cfc2f21a75eb680c6a96d50a
describe
'20995' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISP' 'sip-files00188.pro'
a5f3cfdc0f0da2e6fd9d3f8e253368b6
c6d70bb0538c9d8b86d8b81feac7d634cadf6d5d
describe
'62090' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISQ' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
16407b216897fa29b2812ab24d5d38e8
d96cf1c6dfeb0b49cf49dcd68b59f1f816866a0a
describe
'2602508' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISR' 'sip-files00188.tif'
8aa1a1c4e8adeb25eaf754fe249835c3
e692d2e618cb967216f4820cf99769eb473b50d6
'2011-10-07T16:30:44-04:00'
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISS' 'sip-files00188.txt'
529c50c2efea8d0afbec579538a35f72
9e5f656f8e4b856ed41441bf596f343a5b68a110
'2011-10-07T16:42:19-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'30493' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIST' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
fc7066ae8a3c2bc14c8ddad9fe0f22cb
db976f9536024c81d49f9411e8af026bc4bf8a33
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISU' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
1ef521cbb514ee3286ea1e000617bde3
49e00c0f21700d551ba8994f6eaeef0163966851
'2011-10-07T16:43:11-04:00'
describe
'199642' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISV' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
a40d6640add0c0b7b5f9942a04647b97
c5eaf8571297ba2845d2b65c0fba249db1edcd7f
'2011-10-07T16:42:43-04:00'
describe
'39026' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISW' 'sip-files00189.pro'
6228eaafbf389762c75cc3a738a4d824
2f68094783eb05efe968aa58d3d28b360641425a
describe
'77675' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISX' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
d0a70d45021f9072a6b60ceb804b80cd
29b2e2752d2ce564a6c74e4e70ed4be6a90f7def
describe
'2603920' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISY' 'sip-files00189.tif'
2a007e9a645e7fe54fa1fa9b2ae90706
979c6cdb4500a6c25fa93247a9bb18b9331148b2
'2011-10-07T16:36:52-04:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABISZ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
a02f7fe18a28cd830f470a86704ae54c
d4600b2da492d612b7f8a22991323559260d3a6c
'2011-10-07T16:30:32-04:00'
describe
'34917' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITA' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
eb1fa53cbbc387982455feabb1509c6c
8eee299e29369f081979fd056cd52b299eb7aa31
describe
'322602' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITB' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
a32898e33863fa3fb9ef81d3ea9e1f9c
1008c7659d2c18e25a33cd2bbdffb7cf66dcb0c7
describe
'225930' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITC' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
75007a671fab0ecd6dd26bb29d1577af
bfdc989031bb84857979d7c32d924ec20c2d465c
describe
'4290' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITD' 'sip-files00190.pro'
769c3bb1d8d153e086e1a566bb78b547
6df043de45de2ef54daa9c5c9d1642beb56870a5
'2011-10-07T16:36:20-04:00'
describe
'68400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITE' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
e6cf583d0d2cd7db5e0aa8fa6c133b38
17260a03ff5935d93b1d44048a9712a186f3687c
describe
'2602908' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITF' 'sip-files00190.tif'
f9d38fc711d45b28188fff884823882c
d0e54313c78a8c74151969e2b480f6bf9ed58668
'2011-10-07T16:27:53-04:00'
describe
'191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITG' 'sip-files00190.txt'
457eb623a80359ccb5c595bdbf5c21a7
460b52355c1c25ab7a33f37111ab33d8a4e8a50d
describe
'31823' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITH' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
aab1123f658aa439d7751f9974301fad
d99fec1d2772a0796e49b4a20996895d965b725f
'2011-10-07T16:23:26-04:00'
describe
'322365' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITI' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
c6ef79cbdb0d8e7b01a75a8b4ccefc33
03e4ebba431c48b217c0790276200d20689fafbf
'2011-10-07T16:25:48-04:00'
describe
'171628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITJ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
71d30d6ada6446f13fd27b358f9a375d
59215244cfba025603a1b1c7efb941b86a890be1
describe
'20533' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITK' 'sip-files00191.pro'
c2bad011a965607440523538966764ae
c75169ac68e7d7943a7db2110381b9c4ec8c8e1c
describe
'64383' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITL' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
ed115c969378542a583d3afe7f62d2ed
99fc3066cc8b1c7130c4afd089e8c34e54efe2a4
describe
'2602660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITM' 'sip-files00191.tif'
a5844c583fbb255fb6b7445f75bc535f
f3291b483365a8bab46d087b82ed2256a475c938
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITN' 'sip-files00191.txt'
8c0250274d33b6fb9abcff34940ccba9
ba4767be23f146629056b098a79c47f65b95fd3f
'2011-10-07T16:25:09-04:00'
describe
'31502' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITO' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
0714fb4536d85c83e3d5d253bb50aa97
1578a0c380bc6601f7a504fd648f3df25a23c5d1
'2011-10-07T16:35:58-04:00'
describe
'322623' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITP' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
10159b443580dbcb8f69165f311dfd22
484db0acac34d7e8378dbb88fbc4031665492d1c
'2011-10-07T16:23:28-04:00'
describe
'179824' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITQ' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
6c36f49f78a95c72a6eb4be145e1828d
53f303e79f1da829094bd5e6e143087f8f9f9826
'2011-10-07T16:31:57-04:00'
describe
'33681' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITR' 'sip-files00192.pro'
c5f2302a4d5cd64e5af5e27df5fccd15
859d89e8f9b36f2c3424343187fccd880c415df6
describe
'70100' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITS' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
a5e6be541cd8832b07b82ca26ee9dfe3
6f79c29dd4c563ef4b2a5fa7904a4a67c23aa7b6
describe
'2603332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITT' 'sip-files00192.tif'
13b344987ddac099da0c6baea5055a7a
0b3295a50937f7d7ba17670e6836855382211634
'2011-10-07T16:33:01-04:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITU' 'sip-files00192.txt'
227d75a4476e1c3a62b03247795d827d
e4544d862b6da0dce99a7581e70a8cd663d3e5e0
'2011-10-07T16:28:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITV' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
fe3da431ba5e7d569c41432151692f31
022f2765ffcf603adfc18afef4a845161b795610
'2011-10-07T16:39:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITW' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
312ae795f858f796cea9517c0dd3a2d1
8abe13cc73c6faa15f9b2d42c74682cf9a91a0d3
'2011-10-07T16:26:57-04:00'
describe
'203403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITX' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
4d2a236912f07f466adee1e77d48749b
4341ed0b9b123b586eed1d37d166d852c565b9c1
describe
'40299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITY' 'sip-files00193.pro'
92fa7a935d570eba38f004e9cbbd8d15
714e56b2a006181f1808cfbd1f900047f64e8891
'2011-10-07T16:38:51-04:00'
describe
'78849' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABITZ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
d90282b984c1db5c139e33bda7c4826f
01d4bbbabfae8d8047ad8e4684fb22792a6a1bd7
'2011-10-07T16:44:11-04:00'
describe
'2603988' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUA' 'sip-files00193.tif'
012c5b0562c919deeaa406c4b9829659
95b3ed2b3125a3d5537a663bfd14c255cc22992b
'2011-10-07T16:33:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUB' 'sip-files00193.txt'
62a5e48d1ec171c95edd3334d6642e83
d6f85d70fd6c039e09b11684f0cf76075cc99e0e
'2011-10-07T16:28:02-04:00'
describe
'35162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUC' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
62dc8f8c6ec155be5a4d75519a384766
7ca40367ff2a3b7e0e7d066fa1389c6e9a34a1b0
describe
'322523' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUD' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
1ba0860a29b1d2d6681b286c8bd0d05b
5119f29b8e6ed7494586fed3146f2315f0002718
describe
'213874' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUE' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
7d31d04963cf8f0deb090c8e70488c74
7cfc0029ffffafd36635ee8737c8b72f76191b56
describe
'17291' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUF' 'sip-files00194.pro'
c1dbfd7f59ec205d6e807ce5703613c8
d5716431eb202dd3f91c2f998ebc2d3344d6d4b1
'2011-10-07T16:34:41-04:00'
describe
'71509' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUG' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
3b99acf1927db0b43bb7794a48521022
c67edca5ffe4b0b2a4e8aefe4e4c5c864dc0eea2
'2011-10-07T16:23:57-04:00'
describe
'2603596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUH' 'sip-files00194.tif'
a400da51e10603fd898c0e677a655877
b0469c281799b4631460f90704d6c15ed6801d7c
'2011-10-07T16:36:35-04:00'
describe
'817' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUI' 'sip-files00194.txt'
6c973f47a6d36ad57cd37293b413c4c8
cd30e59e1a70e9fa880d0915b67529cc926f5abd
describe
Invalid character
'33804' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUJ' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
222cbea5dcbf4be26fd2e0f0ad3e8b12
d01b617c9d7ffa50ba540e53ae0b3458715528cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUK' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
73759326781de08fdd41f00659359a51
d8c5a467b21dc7639817ebfc430ca7b154fedee5
'2011-10-07T16:26:27-04:00'
describe
'192429' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUL' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
b6bbd22675564296816f18d70773ddd1
8b83c0acad97260f6e8b56adc24c073d571f4b42
'2011-10-07T16:31:30-04:00'
describe
'37247' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUM' 'sip-files00195.pro'
eb4497c4dc2a796cafc0eba976f96684
30672e79a4a358bb01d49c09a5ad28499cb4ace3
describe
'74015' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUN' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
b1461022256ee024210d17879d730487
bf5e132d67355bcccd6518812a8b5dbd48a11b8a
describe
'2603480' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUO' 'sip-files00195.tif'
ab4d4f635113d28db7889561cf29b747
fb7a5d28267930d04bf254220f45ae6f3f38f8d0
'2011-10-07T16:37:40-04:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUP' 'sip-files00195.txt'
abf95b3acc37a25d7c5b3c93fa3353e2
c01876b8509d2127087d177362fc9b25a4ca1010
describe
'33672' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUQ' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
1374aef3037bb8c708c7144170d84772
db299ee6f9ec689689688048d43e3555dd9fcf1e
'2011-10-07T16:44:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUR' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
ab9bd4eafd7810e575b91c5b8dec7e5c
630bd876622ffa297810e2d8c200aa4a1261c197
'2011-10-07T16:32:24-04:00'
describe
'191931' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUS' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
cc2a9d098e52d9a17bc6a5bec145d410
b8a9b32688a2ed5d2209633c45a427ecc28152ca
describe
'38224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUT' 'sip-files00196.pro'
702d2ae7b3390f98dc1d919c0a414fc3
a9bf39beaab89ef48c8194b6fedd6fbe45523460
describe
'76139' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUU' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
e9b514fb80e57d8348022977f8f329fd
e1e918720a74a43e6496260893c452111f3585de
describe
'2603828' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUV' 'sip-files00196.tif'
55ed19e6891a18619d5378a76becabf5
2785da40e6646128c3b201a00b8e977f70034911
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUW' 'sip-files00196.txt'
45bcd4010b5d673b8b8ee8fc001fdb12
5d3b5626d08a6ca0a01482c64b65e97ebf694dab
describe
'34259' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUX' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
92c001761a8943032fffaec0816ee307
61d419ebf5830af3e275f29e94b74bb6eeaa60bb
describe
'322609' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUY' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
44bde60f67d300beb9a6b141c47b8827
469ba1565bde78c5ca128b36d4fd563361c3967c
'2011-10-07T16:30:50-04:00'
describe
'149510' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIUZ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
923982a63dcf47c16c66f187bb193e3f
7ffa22158a98c32b0fa8bd1e786ea3413794c3c5
'2011-10-07T16:35:46-04:00'
describe
'390' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVA' 'sip-files00197.pro'
62814eec5502d15fdc2bb0326356be78
b59c28a6c4d4418dd0298a6ed74d52109194819b
describe
'56410' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVB' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
010c7a84cf6134f0ae6e3d3a103a75f8
552d9c2144c60b72fa0091a69376a539406d15fe
'2011-10-07T16:32:47-04:00'
describe
'2602572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVC' 'sip-files00197.tif'
02816ed0ccc999cb4a119a8ab5709117
40d25233277e6a6f93b7176646799bb9f6b8e598
describe
'42' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVD' 'sip-files00197.txt'
235e1141df7f2911e65b19fa92b49c22
41ab8e530cf42ce79493bdf5df2fd98f05e1d700
describe
'30671' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVE' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
a87f0cd27ebd753d0aeed734e74837bb
6a32fbb015ee4921351732daa19493bf4c7a6bc7
'2011-10-07T16:38:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVF' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
173973fb65b39d55f997c72ab6317325
712fa1f41e2e77f512d6c710b292b549a86e3ce5
'2011-10-07T16:33:21-04:00'
describe
'172201' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVG' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
c71bc7d2c8b6dee3ba57fae50016b029
d3757ef89a3917de871c439ca4ddb1e8829a6b12
'2011-10-07T16:26:35-04:00'
describe
'17567' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVH' 'sip-files00198.pro'
596b1853c941bf8092e3110e77f551d4
39973cb64994f1e43129c34c25d8a196efad0c55
'2011-10-07T16:29:33-04:00'
describe
'61578' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVI' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
fb529cbd5a1a9a61b1376ab4740cb702
a7cc3ac921d0b038db93a0148c52e1821e3430f4
'2011-10-07T16:27:31-04:00'
describe
'2602600' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVJ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
2509dd79b00fbbd7d7958d4efd11cf5c
c6963be485a60b81aeb3386433d28474249d915b
'2011-10-07T16:28:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVK' 'sip-files00198.txt'
4e4d99784232ab3b7a7692071ced0571
3d9ac27f0dde7c4f8973379e67f3a2c8504659e3
'2011-10-07T16:25:05-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'30553' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVL' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
37130e7c5657bab2a9c089f694dbff54
218f3e6bcc1d884ed5b3feba69a398271acbe39f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVM' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
8737ad75321bbac49012ef22f8e6069c
df6e0172208db93dcdcded2119869c40cdc64f1e
describe
'183191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVN' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
8877a16b1c57e62df74e615e30520733
dcd29c00ebf5862c33198dbac1b29dc8ad54147a
'2011-10-07T16:34:42-04:00'
describe
'34856' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVO' 'sip-files00199.pro'
416aae6d4ec3ce89564465b8fc05150a
e1f82d755e411efbee9258da4f7f79a42d0440b7
describe
'71159' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVP' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
53416d39cb4ad81108c96476cb46ed2e
b027142b7236970d1ab0de3e4bb45825a0d0ef8c
'2011-10-07T16:25:34-04:00'
describe
'2603132' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVQ' 'sip-files00199.tif'
4521d6c8ef4e399c7a462d6e787f07f8
f30ecacdaf03a7e1d7a48c8f3cd890cfa39d5915
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVR' 'sip-files00199.txt'
54b4e93abdcb33db9fc458fabf932cbb
015286a6554aceb8943a4e56aaf1be1cb5730005
'2011-10-07T16:37:17-04:00'
describe
'33007' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVS' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
1337975df19565e98e39c5d771c9983c
2a325d5195ae637a0a748d83c0f8e9e76096efdd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVT' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
ad0740d244e2251033e0ccc18f91b0e9
aa412f950e7c0850c08147ba959432bf9ae6a456
'2011-10-07T16:37:54-04:00'
describe
'204220' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVU' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
fc49c349a1ef926b26ba90406b4b1b3a
af965bb4cfb7f60e745a864cd369c8311ff3cbfb
'2011-10-07T16:35:00-04:00'
describe
'39538' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVV' 'sip-files00200.pro'
9dc6304be6394464c7dbec48d0a4e290
98fefd635402038f7db88de61b30aea5e62d4a7a
'2011-10-07T16:33:40-04:00'
describe
'77725' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVW' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
a9d91caa86e7da5a1a1eb2040197cf14
b1e28d20c8386d01b07dec397fa2818c31a149bc
'2011-10-07T16:40:29-04:00'
describe
'2604036' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVX' 'sip-files00200.tif'
3db8943178ad3cdafb1a3346c1adbd44
7d25e38dbec28f710ee7201afab352777a3441ca
'2011-10-07T16:25:56-04:00'
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVY' 'sip-files00200.txt'
731eacbc585fbf6587f0e74fe6d7244f
7d08efc07e6f7d0aec0795ff071bb89c8f2d6654
describe
'35054' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIVZ' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
060c9baede7274c8f81316c3efa26ff5
7e3a115ce8fbb115d1336e11b8d82f2c0503ad5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWA' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
34032344cdf0b003b26d2241a5e4f1b7
de0fb988063bdca547aea220670cfe501d9459c7
describe
'203450' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWB' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
f0ce51788bb235b347e2e75b72b38046
9c75fc09cf3342fc2987c680d61a357aab16dd8b
describe
'39128' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWC' 'sip-files00201.pro'
8a37b99c882a73ff6687f036a9b1f4b7
405f766d43482ef874376922b4118ade6adc91c6
describe
'77681' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWD' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
cedb36d19e6e427511da7bf2b2fc27b2
5944f28b992d0591e5c8464789fc098dfd0f2d84
describe
'2603576' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWE' 'sip-files00201.tif'
6f5493e3cc0c883d0912ec14f0983348
c1f29835ea785ad16f0f827478e0d86bdeb26b91
'2011-10-07T16:35:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWF' 'sip-files00201.txt'
1d644869579a90dec5f908ebf6e2b5a3
e72661cfbcf56958b5cafbf3d96cafee7d27cd6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWG' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
b7035131a9e8a5a3ee143bdd9f505558
959059b84a634b851cee66b6bbcbe69c3b73b746
describe
'322907' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWH' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
32791f2e5c50b9f7f95fee037c5ace44
b4da0961c25c931d2e7e5c270364411aa7610bd2
describe
'185676' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWI' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
cb0838e37354fd8afee5d66d56b9488a
42644995a81224fa766abe2f42703ccac4a4ec3b
'2011-10-07T16:32:52-04:00'
describe
'35615' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWJ' 'sip-files00202.pro'
2e8b60665e358ab05c3708615056f989
3ccc5e977b81f4b102b2086ab0c5ac95440b7159
'2011-10-07T16:27:09-04:00'
describe
'72806' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWK' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
af137bc4b4839ab94b8e8571ffa31cd0
565a25b7654bd92d3b19383f058baf75860ff908
'2011-10-07T16:38:47-04:00'
describe
'2605580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWL' 'sip-files00202.tif'
d561843c6672c8078d7cee398447c224
784bf4ac51da0b51bd4b11d72229ac8c1334b357
'2011-10-07T16:22:35-04:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWM' 'sip-files00202.txt'
0c73a2e948433d202ef18bd7ebbcaafb
10b9a52e2bc1f12a41e5fcdcfacbf7cbd48f239c
describe
'33549' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWN' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
3c2f06b6569e355bb9a2681fa844a844
fdb935e2ec8de6c32bfe3b2eee4465ae5f15a3cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWO' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
8253b1488a94763395885225e2a164d4
6c47080c69114a352309bc60846905078506d736
'2011-10-07T16:38:59-04:00'
describe
'202880' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWP' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
c7639adcfd484428c2950cb59af2e086
a518cb8879d07fdb98a3bbb39f90bb58f1fec2ef
'2011-10-07T16:34:28-04:00'
describe
'40271' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWQ' 'sip-files00203.pro'
23b235409b4772fe3e65ea6a6b18cf55
b19169bfc82bdc6af01a6e76f704a55ad2a60fbd
'2011-10-07T16:35:50-04:00'
describe
'77531' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWR' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
2f54772f7e3c580a91923f9579808242
12b3bffb3025bb795dc9ede921260b3871d1c807
describe
'2603704' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWS' 'sip-files00203.tif'
6a515aa45cb1b3179ffa33520df428a3
e8407f5318a107611dcc8d3cf343f4b70779f104
'2011-10-07T16:24:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWT' 'sip-files00203.txt'
99aa5c1dd224f38317cc9d0443bad59d
094299ca076dd25db43814a49faaa9896ec63b2b
'2011-10-07T16:23:32-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34670' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWU' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
79db74b696d40bdcef0231ee686b1cb3
87044bece9d8bb21d812b8b7f2c16ccf0734c41e
describe
'322829' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWV' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
3a7b273d587a27ee68e193d8c5261c11
138537b4f1f1d592aa6a1a4f83e98efbe52db317
describe
'181946' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWW' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
2ee698a56bf4922e057c923eb5c09a80
b5d3fe5f9872b2240e17c5a14c7cbc6a9b820a42
'2011-10-07T16:31:35-04:00'
describe
'32287' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWX' 'sip-files00204.pro'
b4972687616c4f94dda0fae4b019c59a
c1de6aa9895111b9421b241c63e3a88dc3616a7c
describe
'68146' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWY' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
f2b39f3f48e47bd9e4bf779d4bd1b002
cc41e46006ea949e67fd9507371011fdd05c1198
'2011-10-07T16:34:30-04:00'
describe
'2604592' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIWZ' 'sip-files00204.tif'
1e1f0c7f31ca44d328e44714ad9f9955
e7e9d2e5ef534b2a608abc475c3717b6b7a3c2ed
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXA' 'sip-files00204.txt'
5574f4689e0d0aa0676c35ee1e6829c8
311a7f8fb2f608fd7423a6936bc433509187753a
'2011-10-07T16:42:57-04:00'
describe
'31589' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXB' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
e515b752deab9665f2f10ef0be21d195
9149f690ac3e17cbf2f0ab08a019143c519cbcac
'2011-10-07T16:24:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXC' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
095e3174aecbc666e6d981be1bdc6f0d
5ff6cd86f1edc374fdbf73d48261525bbdc955f0
describe
'204447' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXD' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
680e89512667c05bdee4ff0beb22da2b
d85e76c2f95633b5fbcc0157de23f49b401ac161
describe
'38830' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXE' 'sip-files00205.pro'
0e2eeb6fecafbd41a477c05275b426bc
53dccf26e47ec603828f8664f3e8660d32e00b89
describe
'77000' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXF' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
185811b519bfdbae0899140d51b607a9
3e7a75ab5f3a3ee3dfd037c14d18d790f986e88f
'2011-10-07T16:43:36-04:00'
describe
'2603552' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXG' 'sip-files00205.tif'
a4578af4191b0d33c8991c291af3104f
67b89cef9889eb17c1631a33e3bd81feb7efdd02
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXH' 'sip-files00205.txt'
34c02ab79be859a245ce150dc83635c2
eeeee10fa6a9a2bdcf7521b1394eebb85793d8ba
'2011-10-07T16:29:29-04:00'
describe
'34493' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXI' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
a16fd9be79580da317539e310ce3cf79
f3d770d15476ee5dd8944ddfaa7d239b20b77a11
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXJ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
6d5945159b537fce7b7e2d1b77b0018f
a49d0d8c86cec6c30faaf308877a9de022e13d73
describe
'204509' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXK' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
2f410839611940b824eed1e2494bbaf6
f14eeca3877c15f6c05930d8b6c81602f05d6f74
describe
'40660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXL' 'sip-files00206.pro'
a987db0bd53c0b8a5f21a0ce12bc8dd3
e33bfb6c34fa37fd60ba1d36dd89c2fbf7ee44f0
describe
'79004' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXM' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
d961746715bf6889bbc07f9f5b08e1a2
bc57229344bcff8f8745689896ca48422e11bfcf
'2011-10-07T16:32:27-04:00'
describe
'2606016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXN' 'sip-files00206.tif'
e8371d60bb405fa15a86ef70af4d8f64
57fc15eb200e7470573eb2805fb2f7ca1ca29373
'2011-10-07T16:31:08-04:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXO' 'sip-files00206.txt'
2953d757d58d9fa3f030bd35290068ee
2055ff26d9d797a6241ca6559455078f4b3b4c7d
describe
'35140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXP' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
4ab65b570b07a9fbb794c8e4ae3e5f7e
147c9f37ff92dbd0fdae8ee4c56b9ae02ff31ed8
describe
'322555' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXQ' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
9f17cf5a29723d78093b6580be042ee0
ec25e05b827a7d9ce6eda58ce221d9e0e7e168d3
'2011-10-07T16:36:02-04:00'
describe
'197097' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXR' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
2f3f43954c0b2a36905dec3f68ef1178
24de45262a36ac45e621e410f865d31e98b70141
'2011-10-07T16:31:18-04:00'
describe
'11337' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXS' 'sip-files00207.pro'
4935f21550994b0aee9a3553ac99324b
f3d3ee6842b15a9f0d7255b97b9886ad77bac6b2
describe
'68845' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXT' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
e5f5947236b76a0bba606e088524873f
063caafdb299a8a76ed917d63fa9844de4599db2
'2011-10-07T16:26:37-04:00'
describe
'2603996' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXU' 'sip-files00207.tif'
b7ff9b8ec14fe894e5dca540f54d72d5
8666dad41d221e204ae692dcceba067f36f55560
describe
'632' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXV' 'sip-files00207.txt'
1b8e841238f4ddf4c9d0a96ad39bae47
bf648530ab4da61a996adc7ba807e86b8863e976
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXW' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
59037daa7c7a96df04431a25b3dad513
1fb91aef1a316778228ee7ed5196cce913562751
'2011-10-07T16:24:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXX' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
2e60eeca42243bc286073f84bdd8099e
8124ef08e59b4bfd8237063bf762659ab33e4271
'2011-10-07T16:24:16-04:00'
describe
'200868' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXY' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
524366316c531f4593a1e7a3a7e2bef9
445d15b68368c7ad2f2e63b28669d34dfd067756
describe
'40690' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIXZ' 'sip-files00208.pro'
a9d2186060f90d7bf2c45ca4b8f6b5b0
c5fbc6a1405a12bd6bd8bb8b4a75d396ccd18373
describe
'78852' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYA' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
a91d9653ce7c972e0b60cf566e54ef84
98b86ff4ed7c9e1f0bf722298a4192fae3271546
describe
'2606052' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYB' 'sip-files00208.tif'
f4136ab33d1aa80d207b484b44793676
48ae0271660d661b843a0300e59c5f3bda8713bb
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYC' 'sip-files00208.txt'
63ae5aa1de3606913aea4acb1663b336
d5cecfac8a66dfdaf6be54bf4b902b58a7069afa
describe
'35188' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYD' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
e8a952cba9a253e5521ad4254c6d5928
e873e16d87a1715b39d2b6050eed39795d5a50aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYE' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
b04f695eaa20db680fb46584bf1ccdce
80244a3378f7f12396f48186321d55f99c36d5c1
'2011-10-07T16:34:51-04:00'
describe
'202869' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYF' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
55bf0c23a4a5cdaebadef7f171aacb27
214e41dd8aaed279acb33611ffb19e39df616b5c
describe
'11121' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYG' 'sip-files00209.pro'
fa988b9eca9d50045d5a967a6977dd05
7fb79bd51d919398b305ee2a561c699c43df9772
'2011-10-07T16:35:59-04:00'
describe
'69325' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYH' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
e9a9b3c91e6615195e751ffc1c905f94
2b7fff0219f35362301d75aaf06a00623f83a482
describe
'2604068' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYI' 'sip-files00209.tif'
f7f0d059b1400c0428a994fdf8591044
dd83c6c3befc3e7aa180ec4fddeaded7081f0ec0
'2011-10-07T16:41:23-04:00'
describe
'631' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYJ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
83932e4f9ecf561bd9de1b3ca9817b91
0c9c1f3edc7934b8039f1044fd2cffcb908f4959
describe
'34823' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYK' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
24e679ab1a1dc3af20e7cee9a14f197d
eb542d93536da5c7dff6e54e7bfb5bfc286ca641
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYL' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
2cb12ba5c702a673db1d1dc67c72ad2a
5f942db1ae62ad457f0b3452994fea4906fb5cd7
'2011-10-07T16:23:53-04:00'
describe
'197628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYM' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
94f3dea29a6e0dd735f97fa93ae81744
9e54e0e9724c8673958b4596b697613b6503bf33
describe
'39303' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYN' 'sip-files00210.pro'
17e4a09e2628b386bec133256db502aa
a57b5aa11f9d2edd1b5e8303767f1508f77d4b9c
describe
'76454' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYO' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
bbcd60f6d4f3683d654ecad4f7a9fe86
419ccfe274fc752302d50d1afdd3ed0545f87eb1
describe
'2605824' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYP' 'sip-files00210.tif'
6407e088baf101f01a2fc931ee59cba0
e0041a3841d25cbff8d93fdaefb06edfdc7b4b66
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYQ' 'sip-files00210.txt'
613ddea23d5c14bede64d7bece3a0162
445c0149db2b3b4e8c71f83db070ecee4fbeaaf3
describe
'34710' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYR' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
d72d2224a3144df9fc30b567ac560c7d
5488836c7db5db2fb5111162883ccf7d07510d5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYS' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
1b47055f890b7ace460cafc653012c0d
59ae4590b227d545ec965121d097507f49134a40
'2011-10-07T16:37:27-04:00'
describe
'209660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYT' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
8ff75d1e2eba906cb50688cc82ff920b
5e025052d573db1bf82eb3e2f009affa7b31f174
'2011-10-07T16:34:21-04:00'
describe
'9858' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYU' 'sip-files00211.pro'
0821294b81f899036aebc63a56e9ac26
c20519b0de1cb1ae69d617701ca344f37dd1b3f1
'2011-10-07T16:30:36-04:00'
describe
'69930' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYV' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
a0319a71e9bfd8e35113894ef7f513b9
7730db374724fe4be46d69f913507c0e1b314f40
describe
'2604104' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYW' 'sip-files00211.tif'
6aeaef8015ca363472ca23489b987dd4
3929aa7e2be41b1f079db72ab55577358b4447d9
describe
'548' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYX' 'sip-files00211.txt'
b2160c9074210fa3d32769a9e113f67f
49b2ec3f2b2e398874e776182eb90a9b59ef915c
'2011-10-07T16:37:46-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34720' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYY' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
7ef503d09ae52b95ea3d91a137392023
34eb9b386d84c894eaaf125322a288efa85717b1
describe
'322916' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIYZ' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
3603ddaf5bcabddb403e5b23687047c8
0b95715811750e1a3468ef68cf56077342c7f55a
describe
'216857' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZA' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
ec46d03ca3facc7d736c6ae3e1a6e4f7
dd87c83e3f14ae661642ffcb427defb0e924fed3
'2011-10-07T16:30:45-04:00'
describe
'56762' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZB' 'sip-files00212.pro'
38f5dd0208674777307b8e58bd2a6a37
47e33a72abb5fc4a97adf0ee7f1e3df104f31ffb
'2011-10-07T16:31:34-04:00'
describe
'75695' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZC' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
72f52f12d5c9d5ecd6a5bfe28a0400c2
764d9d84d4c83be828ee8e95b66b59f390ee5b09
'2011-10-07T16:44:17-04:00'
describe
'2605776' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZD' 'sip-files00212.tif'
eb38dfcab812c89d1ed3cd7bcb2caecc
ed785fb615c3a22c30ac531c0cd1bb4964467294
'2011-10-07T16:35:28-04:00'
describe
'2390' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZE' 'sip-files00212.txt'
055ba8f4c2cb6f6355ef4ad06f1fc901
971ffb58303a42d20918c56088e0817473fe51ea
describe
'34682' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZF' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
e3a0d6e18982b858811a789696546246
9ab02682762d9f683df4b3c2c7a1e0a192f88920
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZG' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
8890fb4d664ea6e5604129e7142a5efc
cd55da06328f41e3e9acb88a2b15ff502c9d11c0
describe
'189569' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZH' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
04d60e7f67cec128fa0a5d9a31f7276b
524597ee348272ac1feda98c23c0c578a740433b
'2011-10-07T16:34:18-04:00'
describe
'37367' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZI' 'sip-files00213.pro'
eade35032dce3f01a5c9df66472e1275
df9e1c5faef0382edc66d6a300df43ba879a136a
describe
'70268' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZJ' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
2a6fde38742550c5df8014025ad829e4
c933d8669ae2e0d62a7717be6eb06765423166e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZK' 'sip-files00213.tif'
eadc1971d14662601bc875952df51a15
a4328ca63897a212861a959c2d5b3fb8d12f6dc3
'2011-10-07T16:23:23-04:00'
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZL' 'sip-files00213.txt'
a06403cb1961f58a9285edcb09ff1673
33e9478c7b72ee021ba1ac7a86183144c9a0740e
describe
'33562' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZM' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
cd5b4a7104c82304e220121ab5da217f
5d46642ed9256b52c30cfb4def8c1d9cd0f6cb44
'2011-10-07T16:37:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZN' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
90e9d3e64998f15147b27353cf58b0bf
1f4f5f5e99aa67ad26e4611b8c9f5ba6a8c882ca
'2011-10-07T16:22:08-04:00'
describe
'210668' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZO' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
c6288440d16124c47cf45b6a0fb18c7d
a5ae680abd419f4c9630a12b1b874523d4d3868b
describe
'41304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZP' 'sip-files00214.pro'
81bb89630974702e504d5226a4f18d99
438cb0354924d412d7c8bda2540ac2ceff8b9aaa
'2011-10-07T16:34:47-04:00'
describe
'80513' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZQ' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
e5105e29a8d73243cdb9ebee383aaf82
c13922e65f8981c0d31c0fdf29dc3082d664db1c
describe
'2606128' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZR' 'sip-files00214.tif'
47411e1c0f8baf2e1ed07b67c73f2e03
cf1d3d7f3c785dc9f262d5ec95184b2a900b9af1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZS' 'sip-files00214.txt'
074a4447a7dbc75f117b79403c9d2112
19de5e23a1fdf84460158392be1e545015f242ba
describe
'35412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZT' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
36a5d2a50b294236a0a12150f824744d
191f64479ae58f9c1dbc5b3fe4a8c62d6f760a2a
'2011-10-07T16:33:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZU' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
53776a3912ab513d2b66f52b4dc8760f
a4f31af61183d399a70285dc356f5aea0e4e7ed1
describe
'198880' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZV' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
5c0e020bc529dbbcefb19060b77ff9af
384785dcc87d1b54d4c53da03c13c37788707769
describe
'9001' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZW' 'sip-files00215.pro'
e7707eade8910383dfa6d489d9b82a2c
a3bfe3b2f5545d64b073b466fb6ebf047405fcb9
describe
'67110' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZX' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
19cfaa4c98562d90937f7df1b2af15d0
1079f659684a6549e5a78a033706b372f1a3a399
'2011-10-07T16:39:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZY' 'sip-files00215.tif'
3974386defcbc23f989643ea25feac5f
86ed10220ccaa8a78fcc93fb503f8750b9396388
describe
'368' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABIZZ' 'sip-files00215.txt'
56ed74d654fccf065a80f9f693e33312
17b06b4b2a1d87629e3eebd11d166b1a954f19d1
describe
'32897' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAA' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
d5b4841217987dbde423be1b795d22aa
bd04969fd0212c5a524cef5c75bab06033d16550
describe
'322909' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAB' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
9cf4197d4eba7d3f79c51bfeba8ddc63
db407fbbf08a602570c9e764f7576988ea2d84cc
describe
'206375' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAC' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
3ff9c03ed7127fed1a7a7a2a25ce14ad
fa989ecb1583420c178b9904f071d98cbc584dd4
describe
'10956' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAD' 'sip-files00216.pro'
d66eb7c3d4d9612d3202f6a1a6439726
7effc5c0d35b179e12ed073dfc81f902cb435eae
describe
'67308' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAE' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
eafe99691db13a44aafe50a966d49696
7b142008a5131821ca626fd86d722babdcc38351
describe
'2604952' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAF' 'sip-files00216.tif'
b83cfe71fb076969b34db150390812ed
84405fc6b96a5e05698996d112348dfca714bee9
'2011-10-07T16:22:54-04:00'
describe
'438' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAG' 'sip-files00216.txt'
619e155a8f24ae85fe78b30875f35570
4657d14dbf75e406ab75d653ec80c7295a09284b
describe
'31861' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAH' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
593a1d6adfb401e6d635e09144bd7089
2018f17211c14e6388b715ed82b6a3ff8f04c64c
'2011-10-07T16:39:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAI' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
5a825a3018e29e42cd534a7128d1e22f
7908a8e5b8fd874c49015a4d3a26c86ede853fd3
describe
'212904' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAJ' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
1267a910df2a44b94aaabdd85d84f6ee
b40f1eff745cc384f69206c0a02a7d53e9d1026f
describe
'12501' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAK' 'sip-files00217.pro'
c135cc52cf4961727e1f5a3a05393229
a745d023c5c0e16943a385d040cc85b5b9f803bb
describe
'70914' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAL' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
895219384e044011b2e01b7a58596423
14bbb15d8565f018526a3d6cd0febd7899b4e2be
describe
'2603392' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAM' 'sip-files00217.tif'
e7d366e57f18ce88f1bf5f3db3f72c14
a3cab5531a5d760f633fcb7ae5fec1baa3a14383
'2011-10-07T16:39:48-04:00'
describe
'673' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAN' 'sip-files00217.txt'
b3e5953c91a97a0608c20ce13f5d45a9
eb7f9f1c9d50d0ef839ab1fa249b6e1402045414
describe
'32944' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAO' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
2861feae4a81969faae7a59b0302bcc5
c41003bfa481a0cdc238fd19817dc7a8b686db29
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAP' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
87f702d87a7b5dffd8c8b55950e42bf2
7d7d3b4a3b80e17eca7022388979dcf7c3a7862c
describe
'201336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAQ' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
bbf92b3be2660ce4f19f74e99aa7f744
9b18312c55319c3150ec366ade1b709de2c550d1
describe
'41220' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAR' 'sip-files00218.pro'
ce14c7a247fe25eafe107b3c5a64130c
5fc878fcc9c92c03ab7b1ac337ad9be0b0e928ec
describe
'78740' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAS' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
764a3cf8502672c344c8f09ee9a20c90
e6dae6df10db69e7bf17a577a6b936fdd870e282
'2011-10-07T16:23:30-04:00'
describe
'2605912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAT' 'sip-files00218.tif'
3faa606b873be31c9931ad644200e71b
1550fc947e8d71c9008007afed10c7c5ea45adf0
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAU' 'sip-files00218.txt'
d8f0a55af98452f1f543868e116834f2
bc319c6ddd13773d172e44a40d27d540b3ad0404
describe
'34913' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAV' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
f253655fb5b5936b873a1748e0f4c37d
801cf9aced3ceeb636d451948f2dc3933e26d49d
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAW' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
7bfcc449353a4bd46f6832cadf314575
ffcff1edf09e79c7bf9487b8b7bb7b5f9e3fbd31
describe
'202286' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAX' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
f8175f380b95c67e5d04b2447cd66285
aa375b2d7e1fb105ced108898935d0df23d4a862
'2011-10-07T16:43:19-04:00'
describe
'41049' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAY' 'sip-files00219.pro'
ae7d635a794e2a07f3ea267900b42c01
5c150f837e3fa78b2f0fecf92bd78eebf4048114
describe
'78596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJAZ' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
e8d3ec359d7cc64dc43be9370d646c8b
8bef19814706e0707ccab0129b51d1eeac2c3db2
'2011-10-07T16:41:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBA' 'sip-files00219.tif'
a4cd4d2d44cd2d499d2cc634c0e52836
661da398ff5f722aae3ddb71688311dbae14be27
'2011-10-07T16:37:34-04:00'
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBB' 'sip-files00219.txt'
2385e3179c4874acb05d85226d15bf1c
3b14477cc69bd85ef0d7c9253553f7306fd7b7b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBC' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
3ca98c06ade6089cde38f5759d2ae8e3
ac38513286114f004931184ae0db90f20d303736
describe
'322897' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBD' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
d9b3699ebc0081213f4f7f70cc485905
2dcd4b8e9b19a789f75d872f1c1dba77a047c449
'2011-10-07T16:39:37-04:00'
describe
'202516' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBE' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
b5b039468bd61192ba807c9ee4d43c5b
0014c5b5ddd0155cd0dd4e31c4911b545529c194
'2011-10-07T16:32:56-04:00'
describe
'40087' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBF' 'sip-files00220.pro'
c946dab1837861cae22f9d487885fd0e
040cfa087786439b53827f37e7ef6f9f4a38a9e1
describe
'78033' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBG' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
15de7135a9ee0d29f315e40327809ace
bc069c1c7d8e632a00ce16fd2d575f25eadf460f
describe
'2605808' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBH' 'sip-files00220.tif'
9834ab8375f4cbe39ec6fd0c7e567f68
2bea43b3e9b3b2a47f5906b355b9788cd11a8d23
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBI' 'sip-files00220.txt'
57ff6f8c9a6fe9ca071d326cd692faf5
0d27bca2ed9cd94fd7a02746b747e5431d21167f
describe
'34508' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBJ' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
dd30185b9e027745945982c2ca93a891
48ceedf2e62fb51375f72c6911ba32b6a1297ce7
'2011-10-07T16:40:39-04:00'
describe
'322588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBK' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
dcdf7daa07f22618aede3dbc6e32780e
7b9dfc6795e4b83440b7a7aeea23c4768e44788d
describe
'164649' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBL' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
38bd0583b89e8d0785a30eec1af44871
a5df419fb9ccc58cc4f0dab65086eebc3578601e
describe
'39448' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBM' 'sip-files00221.pro'
8d604787360542e24b744f7b36cbbe56
1e4fab2f980bebd33cf53b10a81b8cefb1af7846
'2011-10-07T16:37:08-04:00'
describe
'59162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBN' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
3891e86557f5e235cdef6ac783a0de8f
a87024ac929d27495f165f87f8d4f7388e466351
describe
'2602488' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBO' 'sip-files00221.tif'
39b5171560e7d2a4d029282bab497355
9e4a92c8f31efbb55969d96ba7e184d35dac6d7d
'2011-10-07T16:25:20-04:00'
describe
'1773' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBP' 'sip-files00221.txt'
578d3ca4e1b1a4930ca72ef345a35c57
e2865ab170e5900ad4ee55f908c09dbd2cd69177
describe
'30296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBQ' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
605870bb359dcebda3a5bd67e24fa4c2
2fb9f23db9b83aaf4f6e620e5d0f54a7ec41d968
describe
'322911' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBR' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
63d71897b827d9b63f79516caae95e76
e79b5816759063fd11f6b540af116fc2e7aa4a04
describe
'201863' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBS' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
128867558116d6576ebef0007c7dc53a
5cca7d59fb52e0631f80e841dc798a9d59d5d6d3
describe
'55075' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBT' 'sip-files00222.pro'
11cdfc04dfa05b7242c456cb9c22bde6
aeb4e44a81a2180ca2a65709d9d9d1e4055073d0
describe
'71082' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBU' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
87913cad05d6d2f6c1c9170143bdaba0
3bca03269f85c7cf2170cc3e977541cb9e8850c1
describe
'2605296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBV' 'sip-files00222.tif'
2c3ee002acd0109fcccea89f3aa7142f
8fcf0e4c136b8dd84a8afa64a62bc4f8d0e4fabf
'2011-10-07T16:22:52-04:00'
describe
'2375' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBW' 'sip-files00222.txt'
4c2747fea2b77328270752f8a73e6adf
53f971085f6466a66467a736fcbf4dc4e147f208
'2011-10-07T16:25:29-04:00'
describe
'33572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBX' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
1fdab1cc9f97b0f46d1949acb857c765
2156a6411a24ab0b916d2a4e2988a5997df260b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBY' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
7b606088c31e39faa79dcb14d033cdbf
6d3c8772089d919a2308fb4080fada5943cb7656
'2011-10-07T16:38:12-04:00'
describe
'192968' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJBZ' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
908b2c795d66fe3da7e4b906a5a5990f
15da0751db1214bcd28699b249f7b221d6274627
describe
'51113' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCA' 'sip-files00223.pro'
6dc84ee63fb384e0eb51a871b57fbc79
23fd77c561e06a3d436f4a25052f15dc09f49d82
describe
'68989' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCB' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
4f251ac00c675ab0c895784c39dc4030
7e789384f5ff394cde5de3272acd42849a1b0858
'2011-10-07T16:29:20-04:00'
describe
'2603140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCC' 'sip-files00223.tif'
32080cbd7c8a9ef81670e6045a758e92
6387b689646ecb698c0054984f02362208026c0f
describe
'2300' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCD' 'sip-files00223.txt'
796f5796d15ec7643ccb4130858ec814
361c3ef7d672663a9561ec95d900be8800715ae3
describe
'32885' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCE' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
fa8aed6eb2319db16bf5746b4bd5f868
af5eb72fcefdfe2352e8b8050a597a03d122fcc4
describe
'322861' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCF' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
19e80b41ec51245883184a0b61ee9ec8
7d4ac91613fedee3d9cdfd3318dae76f21e69857
describe
'190077' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCG' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
9a82ffd43fcb805176de65a83f1b2316
ddd14f44749565a9eba3b2e6db9db353ace742e9
'2011-10-07T16:29:22-04:00'
describe
'48603' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCH' 'sip-files00224.pro'
da960add3c3023a3f9fe3e0b2e076794
94c6eb18fbf7a8a198aa50b3af3455c865c142c0
'2011-10-07T16:40:30-04:00'
describe
'68742' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCI' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
28bff74407463dfb596144d6178c6c99
73a0dec01dcff5d726fcbdd466da0501bfab1681
describe
'2605488' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCJ' 'sip-files00224.tif'
9c84e22cc403b06e78f722bcd2d1482e
0db87e4225c51d5434b131072915e88df7344658
'2011-10-07T16:43:22-04:00'
describe
'2154' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCK' 'sip-files00224.txt'
707763c57afb9ea6342836ce9acb1817
77e1e0da25d1f70cdaaa4c12b3c0b47d43ffbe16
describe
'32896' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCL' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
3d9ff4b9c265366d9216fc66c2508fb8
871945115a0c216e792ae5ff9ffa37ebf67b7473
'2011-10-07T16:29:40-04:00'
describe
'322484' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCM' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
5a8ca77a9165b805182eefdd8cb072b9
92c186b05b62eec0b5cc0e8262d6b174926653e7
describe
'193117' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCN' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
803fabd18bad8af9672fb6578b3fdf4b
203aacec464ca3be2e1ca84d131ce27b2bcf341a
'2011-10-07T16:33:56-04:00'
describe
'50872' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCO' 'sip-files00225.pro'
fc96f07a0298c12c7473d6beda2b29b0
ae9066f2a73a4783fcb284943488752575aa81c0
'2011-10-07T16:23:40-04:00'
describe
'68834' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCP' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
62e826a6f364898bc6f8ac47ce800066
1840309b1aad77b71ff6a1872734ab85b26f9896
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCQ' 'sip-files00225.tif'
3cf69c347351d5d7d0615efd1b70eee4
299d688dc33fe48afac76e0de8952210a59be630
'2011-10-07T16:27:37-04:00'
describe
'2199' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCR' 'sip-files00225.txt'
aab29923c7454d7cfbe3bc81265fdd17
9be626bc53e3327b2b267f2beba340b80a4dd4b4
describe
'33004' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCS' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
6db2d8d84d4b5a738f6e1e71c623313c
c9427460284ff098c3006ef7a7a123420135f8db
describe
'322892' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCT' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
48d613fd0378104fad2bcd0c910e649f
4df6e3e302a0991098344dbda2ae874e174cafa0
'2011-10-07T16:41:54-04:00'
describe
'187800' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCU' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
4c12a8ddb318df8e8473f79e129b14fe
8a1e584845958075c6c6e92b2920068eaa5e4884
describe
'49164' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCV' 'sip-files00226.pro'
447b2d57ee983ef82a83c3c0bc822c3b
d4572d6c815628d07f8ed5f27b9a1f058c804b19
describe
'67803' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCW' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
5c091b42207a91a829e17a4e2a397beb
59f8ff1eb5ec92d8bf42836328699a3e0aa45ca0
'2011-10-07T16:43:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCX' 'sip-files00226.tif'
2d466dc1588cfc8413f3434f68c6e808
0c5b4e064d27ea76021eac30389585f0fdb5cb71
describe
'2124' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCY' 'sip-files00226.txt'
f323f46cf7069f2a012d3967e50ead3f
9075604e2d31ade61b21d919a47ab49135119515
'2011-10-07T16:22:36-04:00'
describe
'32920' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJCZ' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
afc7ee28de455f425a5379e15ecbdf63
29d2cda3fcf0c962f2c1215cf59e8dba55061c58
'2011-10-07T16:39:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDA' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
d7b66ab60120a151ec8d1433ab90cdad
a704187ae2852986bcdf896ee1fee57025d8a5e9
describe
'180951' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDB' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
b86553c681ae30c7b7e6ce8700e8cd09
5387c2c494411aacc68cce294b8b8801624035e5
'2011-10-07T16:30:58-04:00'
describe
'47183' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDC' 'sip-files00227.pro'
72f2dea79278ae4f2f1aac7fe5365ebe
538312b75c255d4d6e28d2e2208e77bff98afc01
describe
'64822' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDD' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
07a631fa8ef4d659b33694af18641fce
c8957835ca8ce7c928c529c2d3630ab5438d45dd
describe
'2602900' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDE' 'sip-files00227.tif'
09a8f198a0e6ca541aabd2bc6a8ebec6
71fb70196f5f0c60eeb62f3fbb3db13f09707f2e
describe
'2122' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDF' 'sip-files00227.txt'
c63d3f3bec2025404f25e5c155915057
eb121e791404c14d7a11641dfc8cf6257ac54493
describe
'31559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDG' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
9f649b405eb89ea125225633cb4db51e
3a5500c9a540a10ea9dffc3f7857c946076f6a0e
describe
'322912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDH' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
a22e4a9fe46dec79800a32337b89cacd
1b8ad077fdf4c9ad7ae9fde98a891344f8cb371e
describe
'186156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDI' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
20db0c47e6d87a050bc39a4a3c2d430f
ca40a4a6e526ad1744e315d16b15db8680c043c4
describe
'48904' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDJ' 'sip-files00228.pro'
c69d02e225bc5918023c75a08fd57217
2d9b99509388994da359511e7c4530e06c1a707a
'2011-10-07T16:42:36-04:00'
describe
'67516' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDK' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
4a5dfc02ace8f2a9df11608993a43ef7
4a0953c1c50a5573016e0a1ef9bd1efaa3e662e6
describe
'2605528' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDL' 'sip-files00228.tif'
5c9117f92c79429ae4d1984d72633aac
0353f3308a802a919bae98860bd0060c58d25038
describe
'2161' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDM' 'sip-files00228.txt'
6ac8405b93c727319701c491c60e7ed4
32b27bf871ed3ccfc7dec4a8cb676f11d46ba6fb
describe
'32849' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDN' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
5fa2dade71f8b440e40cb330aacacb9f
19d67a18f21966b010f4f9d317b093f1768349f9
describe
'322557' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDO' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
ee1cc9c8929298a04d4a426af0fd4cb6
8f90f59184dd9b2c418182c7acac0654771e7224
describe
'191495' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDP' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
3c6c555047145509f17bd37681d70a4a
03368a4ac3534e939364abfdb7d8d5150d017c01
'2011-10-07T16:37:22-04:00'
describe
'49720' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDQ' 'sip-files00229.pro'
89a96801011bc2cf5a47ec989a0367ab
b8074c35660777b3f11d7874f05659e77205515d
describe
'69662' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDR' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
03522ce42236927ff0c3a02d901a5324
cc2c792072d3ba64c3562a40e0397bf630c50c6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDS' 'sip-files00229.tif'
c8f2001bfd6ded9a9f2ed55253267cce
6281942b2fc6a95d00ae9ef79ad6e986c6203c22
describe
'2181' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDT' 'sip-files00229.txt'
eb0fd617e89aff75d88987c8335aee90
09d17b6ec23a028f62d1d2754333f1a735626d8c
describe
'33219' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDU' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
38cfea8c5264c044efe95e98c94171e3
9b9524257fa614582fb118d72c844b5c1fc8d4c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDV' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
c983caa84a8ee4207cef5769fbc023b0
0d8598d9e6c1833157c0fd87f668aef97a4db504
describe
'181591' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDW' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
5c17b020b3eea98b068368fbe8b6274a
1d9a11356cb68481cbfe9b05f30eafd20a377644
describe
'45425' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDX' 'sip-files00230.pro'
6afde5afd1a0fbb3410b50f5163bee0c
561bf127a55501d576bec5e3386f65b55d6427b0
'2011-10-07T16:25:43-04:00'
describe
'66728' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDY' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
2e413cf1aae64d3192e1832ac0e1c738
146082e5ea4ce5766c1f64de2f94bf6a7ebf118c
describe
'2605372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJDZ' 'sip-files00230.tif'
5a6bf5dcd1b3d5004a3095aca88ee543
608a1eed7fc5034b072259209f1804b30449259f
'2011-10-07T16:33:07-04:00'
describe
'2011' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEA' 'sip-files00230.txt'
0a821bc05d88681eb8bda07afab2a3cc
6eebbe3f9c4906db4605687d377c2c59ebe02a0e
describe
'32456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEB' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
765c42acfb08bba8d55fd520383ecade
dde63fe77b93df3a80b9a78e2c2d4cb6df6bcc1f
'2011-10-07T16:38:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEC' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
2899012474690a80ed544ae5ac4c3a55
e591cdfdf3af20746d25d69ec81486506c6b7799
describe
'190103' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJED' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
4ffd7b5cc72ff851a37647cfebf82748
b4ecd06787cd51f950b4c989820afc49f96a8fdc
describe
'49192' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEE' 'sip-files00231.pro'
afca00fe83af8628856d74a357080e2a
f6c31640390b4ba813b5817a629613f8db0c6dc4
describe
'68568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEF' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
68624138b465721e0713bd92cf7e7de3
3ebaa34956181b16bcffcfc7022711f21622844a
'2011-10-07T16:26:55-04:00'
describe
'2603400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEG' 'sip-files00231.tif'
9649b652728ec76bfd594efbe2c4cea5
2e70eb62d42c7888408c19936c93e1c01d20629f
describe
'2163' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEH' 'sip-files00231.txt'
0b1b89c5702dc0eda8f9ff1c0edec819
4cf24c2571eae02e63f21660fe51e6c8a51fa915
describe
'32992' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEI' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
4e887fd57a5e6f53201cd6f5b70e7974
0af23d36f9c5be82cdc122afd56320deda5ce7b6
describe
'322842' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEJ' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
cd24ebddc0dc00714ec2f405879329db
40399a2f28925d84f4db5cae3a8e246b7e9af0d3
describe
'178755' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEK' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
ecdf59ceb84355b9f80d59c4c7e6ecbd
fc893445b5c4bea48a38b0a6c7bed5f27631a80e
'2011-10-07T16:40:47-04:00'
describe
'43928' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEL' 'sip-files00232.pro'
ede8ef3b8db2e70e4346d2906cf458c4
851fd5a9121a1d53eae485d200b03fabbe1615c2
describe
'65075' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEM' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
69bf895d4cefd68a8b7fcf5a64d3b53e
09e3ce64e42f5d3822c646066675023befba2bb2
describe
'2605300' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEN' 'sip-files00232.tif'
031d46cabfc6e63c8f99739949f83b3a
5223483ceaed06d6c0ef330729c9dcf146d1a06f
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEO' 'sip-files00232.txt'
04ca8ded051e9a83e65e11cee3c1040b
a8f4a1ae88d52452ab9835f4a4b19bc06af11414
'2011-10-07T16:44:28-04:00'
describe
'32840' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEP' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
44f44f74699adbe031767640646d8f90
4c58bf7e208451706b927396b340b691d1633863
describe
'322515' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEQ' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
c263ede93ddc5d670bbd8a44ff7c3b2e
b3411157429f5c14f5ac5be2ff6ff330ac73c611
'2011-10-07T16:31:21-04:00'
describe
'190848' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJER' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
056d2cfc2e49dfb21ec8da5bd3e6d86d
6eb931638d92913c121d597b20138fa08fe2d996
'2011-10-07T16:30:12-04:00'
describe
'49702' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJES' 'sip-files00233.pro'
4d8d35c662ec045603b120996557e300
c1c037df60ccf2b26bb4f62ea1fdf2e67e2cec9e
describe
'68841' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJET' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
10c46b79166f80428b87b9c9c5d95cdd
e9c817e7d901e137ecb7ea97c3967b9654cb7d08
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEU' 'sip-files00233.tif'
9fd27b7b70dcad85030fcd0394363f18
c1f84bd19225292d9625aa9c6b266f9659a7e323
describe
'2172' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEV' 'sip-files00233.txt'
59e1c3910c8bb99159a8ea10f5e63ed7
cb12788f2444b9f0403d4d28a204f752f776934e
'2011-10-07T16:26:16-04:00'
describe
'33157' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEW' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
428a6f4197a1ce49d8e69fb7746b9331
2642f04281afe459bd529b52db4c0ad94d5ccb2f
describe
'322849' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEX' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
3176c5488f6bcc5d3a241dd4c826154e
9060c62e014a24820e0eb5ab128e99829266d7a7
describe
'188971' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEY' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
f66f5fbf6b8dd83113221e94b401c40d
d9ad2bfca30a521339c5fc8ffdaef9f92c1f6ef0
describe
'49548' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJEZ' 'sip-files00234.pro'
767accd57ea437d637549588f03728b9
ea604e33d6a32fee2729c0062f4376507a862946
'2011-10-07T16:41:15-04:00'
describe
'68021' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFA' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
413de32f76689127449b1367a58509be
2e303fd0505555f3cc766715ab76e369d3466d81
describe
'2605588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFB' 'sip-files00234.tif'
9459a003465f75a675512f87dbafd248
8d0bcff29cc15e72bbdeff1947813895f4056ab1
describe
'2140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFC' 'sip-files00234.txt'
2620069b83e3350811a35e89c9a2391e
97b0b06edaecdc4d2ddda832e957d6b6462ca921
'2011-10-07T16:22:16-04:00'
describe
'33052' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFD' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
3b331481c761a65e9ec87273425e038c
309a37445a3fa3b4f03e637c1a03ee4594709ecf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFE' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
4eea524542a14633b61b55e1983bbfea
9492984eb61497d7cee6223f27861f09ccb23189
describe
'195909' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFF' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
36bcea37bd6b3673b0b3487c2d06649a
896c199323be12bfd816f5810d6d2cd9f59d77ab
describe
'52766' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFG' 'sip-files00235.pro'
41e01b8dce76ef99b5295bffdf259f42
c86174140146a5019974b2a20c1f31dbfa08622f
'2011-10-07T16:44:32-04:00'
describe
'69405' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFH' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
0bb1eb5250ef61050acf0f2457583a90
a93a18e91fb455f80a96127a286aef7324fb6321
describe
'2603252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFI' 'sip-files00235.tif'
487ae10e24852de18e4b79190651d19b
aaccfe4cbc0a837a2a505a1bbf8dac1091584fb2
describe
'2316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFJ' 'sip-files00235.txt'
cd85ad305556eddddf56fd487d523cc6
ec85022a59cf9f65ca8bfbf6ff8a0301fa696f29
describe
'32822' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFK' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
1049df3f10fe6cb1916f1a3a87b111c9
ed9a48c1251e699497263e213c9321689983fcf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFL' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
83361e969d59e6012860685b0a4134ab
e3801090792f89a53cf343310d3f79385020404c
describe
'195923' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFM' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
c52d3dd7f504b99dcb5363ad06216bab
c8809cd72565b776c37d06abc85a91566c3fc2f0
describe
'53239' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFN' 'sip-files00236.pro'
0405e24f948c82facb7145596131419e
512972ac8eda3e0eb9b9dff60006ef7fc5fe2cf0
describe
'69963' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFO' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
9cefdd2b1c1ee1d17cbd926d517ece8e
698723591137c4e796625f74bf230c5c72fdcbdb
describe
'2605344' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFP' 'sip-files00236.tif'
4253d4db28d482a816e12564f182ee6d
65e2b8a864b789bf1f4588e302850048ab4d339c
'2011-10-07T16:29:02-04:00'
describe
'2302' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFQ' 'sip-files00236.txt'
9faf14fc193a25c0c2f91340cdf9c16f
a14948e7009d69b3136cdddab7efa25ba9c54e64
'2011-10-07T16:35:54-04:00'
describe
'33430' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFR' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
28002f6ffbfc09557a23bf35d9e8c461
904f97e8b85541c1c6d150ee5e2d3a866db14135
'2011-10-07T16:23:49-04:00'
describe
'322649' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFS' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
00aa03a3b358ce02a2d370f323a3c191
2fa006a9193625aa278b7d57bcbc4377f4429cb1
describe
'186950' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFT' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
a185947d5a2d7a52e647ab90015dee60
f2157b95e0b742e8617241ac47eba422a18854c5
describe
'49624' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFU' 'sip-files00237.pro'
31b8c25edea72d407a71e690f0a76aa2
ecf7b162d7ce121ca1ffdccaa5bd7321ef27f2c3
'2011-10-07T16:44:24-04:00'
describe
'67813' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFV' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
b5d2fcdf3ce6e2178462a142dee98176
59debf846325b1ea947755c446dfe4101fbf50b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFW' 'sip-files00237.tif'
10a8bfc9840e338452283367d6648923
a8971648a0aa31d05d043c44f0dbac291095f672
'2011-10-07T16:43:05-04:00'
describe
'2192' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFX' 'sip-files00237.txt'
dda6c11da01866ccfd53b5342f936e44
b9875176a165a8fdf5f47042e39574326c04dba2
describe
'32974' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFY' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
58555aca83c55df31d56a6cde57663de
43f80d5737db519c7f525edc95c5b9ca1c715477
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJFZ' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
6f5e051990b8c5b1e0d1d24487c83791
f2a89ca1dfb77baf74de1646f00752fd9d6f235a
'2011-10-07T16:37:50-04:00'
describe
'195733' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGA' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
f55cde2f6101d1633e93e8e36ba7ca7d
faabfa89b55c7e9911b317406bc246b4be54b72f
'2011-10-07T16:39:36-04:00'
describe
'52971' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGB' 'sip-files00238.pro'
f1ea33adfa927f8110055f21acf6c2f2
3ea0ccdd4f7dce630312309cc0805a4d142d8cb8
describe
'71341' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGC' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
e2d0bc9fb7346a75566af6a36167a395
80b7ec524fff62c1fea861e4534a7ac6547eeb35
'2011-10-07T16:44:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGD' 'sip-files00238.tif'
7c3b3c0e3e01f2d0430dc7ba829fa7a8
95c7f85650b42f3b8cd651e5222466e18294eeaf
'2011-10-07T16:25:11-04:00'
describe
'2263' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGE' 'sip-files00238.txt'
38727e7aa853ff35f618cd50129e574b
645006393e7f3c31797fb8582a93c0b58d6ac47d
describe
'33667' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGF' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
02ac881e411e904c5bb69d22f3d669ec
9eec32b51e053359ae50dc9ffca188f2ad85b60a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGG' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
5a63f7466192a8e45cb8aed741c8a7b1
ac490209cfe062312056b68a7ef3369bfb9be145
describe
'186925' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGH' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
e13b517a6fbcf959b44f98b0c4d8055f
7b0c210743a63c4ec66587a8716faf341f8596df
describe
'49304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGI' 'sip-files00239.pro'
d494d5840709d99132097d1bfe45de65
c998ff99ba35033e8c9fb6358d06ac85a6921710
'2011-10-07T16:23:37-04:00'
describe
'67130' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGJ' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
e6b519d76fb553eac1d7f1bf14a0bf16
85ab6606160eeffeaf202ff66b5c3cb8db161da6
describe
'2603320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGK' 'sip-files00239.tif'
f29aa446e7703c83c4d0fbe019ba63d6
10c51ad73a078b5d27537b140bc0b6f0963fa184
describe
'2158' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGL' 'sip-files00239.txt'
89ad48ad2647de454f566a5a17355887
81770f0362a2a53996bce3abe295f09556b14d1d
describe
'32829' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGM' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
7d2217abf9d862bb9fa1be0edf63b4fb
039dbe1e0c58c9bd05e003dd9b4cf9b5d852d2f3
'2011-10-07T16:22:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGN' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
5b84a2118500ec5cca6940ad75d66cde
2ee029b533c5e0018a2aef5b4f44ed849d584dd1
'2011-10-07T16:25:38-04:00'
describe
'170242' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGO' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
6685ff39347a421ad826ceb8999805bf
944148fb7e2d59cd777ec31d29013615ba2dd59c
'2011-10-07T16:42:38-04:00'
describe
'40784' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGP' 'sip-files00240.pro'
5dd593b0e533e1d74532b1f743fce337
4b4e205993f26b6b1659a45c6f84b04d8a09c7bb
describe
'61712' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGQ' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
6c07eae7f36cf1aedb604d497b84f99e
baed437190dd957a23af008742d253ecf9ecf10c
describe
'2604904' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGR' 'sip-files00240.tif'
c0b50e343f739e2e0c238cd84ad1ef6b
64133b70f298f032c32cd88d8252bf87ce46e512
'2011-10-07T16:42:18-04:00'
describe
'1801' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGS' 'sip-files00240.txt'
6c15a31553a208a8ff1697952864842c
f3838dd23fc860e6eed5fec6ab15eac325222bad
describe
'31499' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGT' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
846263b8a729e8e250c7f895ecd6cbe5
8bafee68a3450d311a2fddf2ef914a2fc1cab1be
'2011-10-07T16:33:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGU' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
97b5166a4668b6676069fb0985f3f6f2
8213fd783de3c5eec7737ad1f2ac8a0a999feac6
describe
'164391' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGV' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
01b541beda56bb128c4f586bccddba20
f1311918743a09d57c09368d617b1965c775c1c3
'2011-10-07T16:38:40-04:00'
describe
'36920' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGW' 'sip-files00241.pro'
ab4fe44bd18280137912b360e3b3fbe6
8413a7c76bc65b752ff025a66a9d1c4309ca04bd
describe
'61313' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGX' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
4073526fdc61366412f41c44ade969c6
4236159e1538c11c6e721bb03b9df11a58b45512
describe
'2602832' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGY' 'sip-files00241.tif'
81d447990d88db8aa19bf295ad124964
de8ca8d28e20e25020b0027a8f6c619bce4089bb
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJGZ' 'sip-files00241.txt'
6724542a8bec923f7f2cc6fb74e37781
2cc405be90c61d7c6745e33210da05a8b5768021
describe
'31091' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHA' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
e690fa2955dc7c57a88076bba39bac9b
fa56a89344ab41188413410ad4cab7bef5aafe81
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHB' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
765a0e2110bceec421810c65ea6017f9
1c8c09a55c9f4a045261802a4ac62ea533d7b545
describe
'195054' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHC' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
854cd4c13c5c1ccc9aa782dd2908a7e7
db8c4d3f5b9c4d2484a2d0bb16d2cb7bf188a616
'2011-10-07T16:27:22-04:00'
describe
'52763' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHD' 'sip-files00242.pro'
d50d540dfcbfa272d9ca09c787dae997
591369d1aad2aa4e9b4d02386c18afe2479ee91e
describe
'69003' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHE' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
2899c9e7972da394b73810bd92ea0894
5d94f0e0584ce6e1b05cbc6223e982ea973b29f1
describe
'2605288' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHF' 'sip-files00242.tif'
477963695a16fd557b009b66f34fb350
64adc32491775de0b8dd384c6b8adf335aecf882
describe
'2265' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHG' 'sip-files00242.txt'
4b59c3c06a374b8bbe211e67d95c806f
7a467acfee49020c68b3dca6616eb5f838960428
describe
'33161' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHH' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
ff743d0df4b388f496d0fda141f17e78
f5f3464d512e78d23f2c42058fc5569af6d906d2
describe
'322626' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHI' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
96800cec782c96086feeb6bfa966938f
2493139e804cbae55b3d7c604b4858e47bf6b7db
describe
'174991' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHJ' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
c5f09131a74c1d764cddfb0da2c3e19a
37ab821c34dfe63a00c1954cb930914f1d97ed2d
'2011-10-07T16:31:06-04:00'
describe
'45071' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHK' 'sip-files00243.pro'
2ad0db3bcc351aea1b3c0afc8e519f90
c34ff6951cb206289a6d011cbc3f92d438c3bb2d
describe
'64318' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHL' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
f84dd4f05d70e7a737d0eb708748d97f
71fe14c4af9d6eee9779bc6b76449c59d322dc0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHM' 'sip-files00243.tif'
4215ee268ec871d410fb60dd2f484842
f4bf751bb6aff4c7f1680d3e21f3eec7f808a508
'2011-10-07T16:29:14-04:00'
describe
'1989' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHN' 'sip-files00243.txt'
cdc4ead70d1d0d631b847eba4288f353
b4483c449d8612b20c88b88b3906cedeab930153
describe
'32339' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHO' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
56b55064a4dbe5f675a1101220368c56
bad4bf8e152464bc100863b0d32093aa2dbbddfb
describe
'322884' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHP' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
8b8941f94e68e0ba037957ba85b34576
dc2e01169f5c361277e27b0143cd92f8ab65d637
'2011-10-07T16:40:20-04:00'
describe
'186399' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHQ' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
ab8713a937de82abecb257e6e7c0c38c
dc5e0fd661b4d53c76af654ef5242413f67f3ec9
'2011-10-07T16:27:25-04:00'
describe
'47544' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHR' 'sip-files00244.pro'
1d65502094a8ac4f81d68b158d676c01
0f833ef3d73281030da7c0ace8deee5429869465
'2011-10-07T16:22:44-04:00'
describe
'66189' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHS' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
d4814a12e9e15e9391b32a20b9607b11
a4c5b3d2920a22a3f9060402b0dc9fa2df9e19d9
describe
'2604940' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHT' 'sip-files00244.tif'
52652369b96109d369aa5b8335790592
fca2fbbd33cb1aad55d7b3d2bfc8d40b431afe92
describe
'2071' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHU' 'sip-files00244.txt'
35b092bdb5b49063120c158cf34027e3
f53d197f89de61e9fbdba1a822aa09bbe2e0aaad
'2011-10-07T16:30:48-04:00'
describe
'32322' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHV' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
0fc2ef69d0fc4360e4e63ec2f70cd840
4c6585ca720f973dc1abee47d043e3a78eb405f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHW' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
5f34383cd99da9b1acb04f9a5500cc06
cb68960b7d26a43e14509b38488c1aa6c58a8c7b
describe
'185779' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHX' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
78aaa768487ef359ebf4ce984e5eba89
4fcfd83cbd708a88003352fbebb5c852019136a0
describe
'45949' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAINfileF20080409_AABJHY' 'sip-files00245.pro'
1cbe3705e7