Citation
The Crofton boys

Material Information

Title:
The Crofton boys
Creator:
Martineau, Harriet, 1802-1876
Fitzgerald, M ( Illustrator )
Edinburgh Press ( Printer )
George Routledge and Sons, Ltd ( Publisher )
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publisher:
George Routledge and Sons, Limited
E.P. Dutton and Co.
Manufacturer:
Edinburgh Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
238 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boarding schools -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Boarding school students -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
School stories -- 1895 ( local )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1895 ( local )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre:
School stories ( local )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
with forty illustrations by M. Fitzgerald.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
05778894 ( OCLC )
ALG8118 ( NOTIS )

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The Baldwin Library





THE CROFTON BOYS





BY THE SAME AUTHOR

Uniform with this Volume.



THE PEASANT AND THE PRINCE.
FEATS ON THE FIORD.
THE SETTLERS AT HOME,
THE BILLOW AND THE ROCK.
eo















Tue Crorron Boys.

“Who was it that pulled you? Was it 1

53



THE
CROFTON BOYS

BY

HARRIET MARTINEAU

Ty

ASM MING ag
\\. 4a










WITH FORTY ILLUSTRATIONS BY M FITZGERALD

LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS, Limires

BROADWAY HOUSE, LUDGATE HILL



New York: E. P. DUTTON AND CO.









CONTENTS.

WN

CHAPTER

I.

II.
ill.
Iv.
Vv.
Vi.
VII.
VIII.
IX

XI.
XI.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.

ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL - : '
WHY MR. TOOKE CAME. 2 . '
MICHAELMAS DAY COME . .
MICHAELMAS DAY OVER °

CROFTON PLAY. ° . °

FIRST RAMBLE . ° °

WHAT IS ONLY TO BE HAD AT HOME

A LONG DAY . . 2 °
CROFTON QUIET . ° * 3 3

. LITTLE VICTORIES . Set eerie

DOMESTIC MANNERS . . D ° °
HOLT AND HIS DIGNITY 4 a ‘
TRIPPING. . : 2 ' > e
HOLT AND HIS HELP ., ' > 2
CONCLUSION . ce 2 ‘ > =

Page

2E
29
44
60
79
110
126
144
160
176
185
200
224
233





:
:
4
:
:

a i i nf





THE CROFTON BOYS.

CHAPTER I.

ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL.

M R. PROCTOR, the chemist and druggist, kept his

shop and lived in the Strand, London. His chil-
dren thought that there was never anything pleasanter than
the way they lived. Their house was warm in winter, and
such a little distance from the church, that they had no
difficulty in getting to church and back again, in the worst
weather, before their shoes were wet. They were also con-
veniently near to Covent Garden Market; so that, if any
friend dropped in to dinner unexpectedly, Jane and Agnes
could be off to the market, and buy a fowl, or some vege-
tables or fruit, and be bark again before they were missed.
It was not even to% far for little Harry to trot with one of his
sisters, early on a summer’s morning, to spend his penny
(when he happened to have one) on a bunch “€ flowers, to

I



2 THE CROFTON BOYS.



lay on papa’s plate, to surprise him when he came in to
breakfast. Not much farther off was the Temple Garden,
where Mrs. Proctor took her children every fine summer
evening to walk and breathe the air from the river; and
when Mr. Proctor could find time to come to them for a turn



MR. PROCTOR.

or two before the younger ones must go home to bed, it
seemcd to the whole party the happiest: and most beautiful
place in the whole world—except one. They had once been
to Broadstairs, when the children were in poor health after
the measles; and for ever after, when they thought of the
waves beating on the shore, and of the pleasures of growing
strong and well among the sea-breezes, they felt that there —





ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 3



might be places more delightful than the Temple Garden ;
but they were still very proud and fond of the grass and
trees, and the gravel walks, and the view over the Thames,
and were pleased to show off the garden to all friends from
the country who came to visit them.



MRS. PROCTOR.

The greatest privilege ot all, however, was that they could
see the river without going out of their own house. There
were three back windows to the house, one above another ;
and from the two uppermost of these windows there was
what the children called a view of the Thames. There was
a gap of a few yards wide between two high brick houses,
and through this gap might be seen the broad river, with
vessels of every kind passing up or down. Outside the

I—2



4 THE CROFTON BOYS.



second window were some leads, affording space for three or
four chairs; and here it was that Jane and Agnes liked to
sit at work, on certain hours of fine days. There were times
when these leads were too hot, the heat of_the sun being
reflected from the surrounding brick walls ; but at an earlier
hour before the shadows were gone, and when the air blew
in from the river the place was cool, and the little girls de-
lighted to carry their stools to the leads, and do their sewing
there. There Philip would condescend to spend a part of
his motnings, in his Midsummer holidays, frightening his
sisters with climbing about in dangerous places, or amusing
them with stories of school pranks, or raising his younger
brother Hugh’s envy of the hoys who were so happy as to
be old enough to go to school at Mr. Tooke’s, at Crofton.
‘The girls had no peace from their brothers climbing about
in dangerous places. Hugh was, if possible, worse than
Philip for this. He imitated all Philip’s feats, and had some
of his own besides. In answer to Jane’s lectures, and the
entreaties of Agnes, Hugh always declared that he had aright
to do such things, as he meant to be a soldier or a sailor;
and how should he be able to climb the mast of a ship, or
the walls of a city, if he did not begin to practise now?
Agnes was almost sorry they had been to Broadstairs, and
could see ships in the Thames, when she considered that, if
Hugh had not seen so much of the world, he might have
been satisfied to be apprenticed to his father, when old
enough, and to have lived at home happily with his family.
Jane advised Agnes not to argue with Hugh, and then, per-





ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL, 5



haps, his wish to rove about the world might go off. She
had heard her father say that, when he was a boy, and used
to bring home news of victories, and help to put up candles
at the windows on illumination nights, he had a great fancy
for being a soldier; but that it was his fortune to see some
soldiers from Spain, and hear from them what war really was,
just when peace came, and when there was no more glory to
be got, so that he had happily settled down to be a London
shopkeeper—a lot which he would not exchange with that

of any man living. Hugh was very like papa, Jane added;
" and the same change might take place in his mind, if he was
not made perverse by argument. So Agnes only sighed, and
bent her head closer over her work, as she heard Hugh talk
of the adventures he meant to have when he should be old
enough to get away from Old England.

There was one person that laughed at Hugh for this fancy
of his—Miss Harold, the daily governess, who came to keep
school for three hours every morning. When Hugh forgot
his lesson, and sat staring at the upper panes of the window,
in a reverie about his future travels ; or when he was found
to have been drawing a soldier on his slate instead of doing
his sum, Miss Harold reminded him what a pretty figure a
soldier would cut who knew no geography, or a sailor who
could not make his reckonings, for want of attending early
to his arithmetic. Hugh could not deny this; but he was
always wishing that school-hours were over, that he might
get under the great dining-table to read “ Robinson Crusoe,”
or might play at shipwreck, under pretence of amusing little



6 THE CROFTON BOYS.



Harry. It did make him ashamed to see how his sisters got
on, from the mere pleasure of learning, and without any idea
of ever living anywhere but in London, while he, who seemed
to have so much more reason for wanting the very knowledge
that they were obtaining, could not settle his mind to his
lessons. Jane was beginning to read French books for her
amusement in leisure hours, and Agnes was often found to
have covered two slates with sums in Practice, just for
pleasure, while he could not master the very moderate lessons
Miss Harold set him. It is true, he was two years younger
than Agnes; but she had known more of everything that he
had learned, at seven years old, than he now did at eight,
Hugh began to feel very unhappy. He saw that Miss Harold
was dissatisfied, and was pretty sure that she had spoken to
his mother about him. He felt that his mother became more
strict in making him sit down beside her, in the afternoon,
to learn his lessons for the next day ; and he was pretty sure
that Agnes went out of the room because she could not help
crying when his sum was found to be all wrong, or when he
mistook his tenses, or when he said (as he did every day,
though regularly warned to mind what he was about) thai
four times seven is fifty-six.

Every day these things weighed more on Hugh’s spirits;
every day he felt more and more like a dunce; and when
Philip came home for the Midsummer holidays, and told al]
manner of stories about all sorts of boys at school, without
describing anything like Hugh’s troubles with Miss Harold,
Hugh was seized with a longing to go to Crofton at once,





ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 7



as he was certainly too young to go at present into the way
of a shipwreck or a battle. The worst of it was, there was
no prospect of his going -yet to Crofton. In Mr. Tooke’s
large school there was not one boy younger than ten; and
Philip believed that Mr. Tooke did not like to take little





HUGH LONGS FOR CROFTON.

boys. Hugh was aware that his father and mother meant to
send him to school with Philip by-and-bye; but the idea of
having to wait—to do his lessons with Miss Harold every
day till he should be ten years old, made him roll himself
on the parlour carpet in despair.

Philip was between eleven and twelve. He was happy at
school; and he liked to talk all about it at home. ‘Tnese



8 THE CROFTON BOYS.



holidays, Hugh made a better listener than even his sisters ;
and he was a more amusing one—he knew so little about
the country. He asked every question that could be
imagined about the playground at the Crofton school, and:
the boys’ doings out of school; and then, when Philip
fancied he must know all about what was done, out came
some odd remark which showed what wrong notions he had
formed of a country life. Hugh had not learned half that
he wanted to know, and his little head was full of wonder
and mysterious notions, when the holidays came to an end,
and Philip had to go away. From that day Hugh was
heard to talk less of Spain, and the sea, and desert islands,
and more of the Crofton boys; and his play with little
Harry was all of being at school. At his lessons, meantime,
he did not improve at all.

One very warm day, at the end of August, five weeks
after Philip had returned to school, Miss Harold had stayed
full ten minutes after twelve o’clock to hear Hugh say one
line of the multiplication-table over and over again, to cure
him of saying that four times seven is fifty-six; but all in
vain: and Mrs, Proctor had begged her not to spend any
more time to-day upon it.

Miss Harold went away, the girls took their sewing, and
sat down at their mother’s work-table, while Hugh was
placed before her, with his hands behind his back, and
desired to look his mother full in the face, to begin again
with “four times one is four,” and go through the line
taking care what he was about. He did so; but before he





ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL 9



came to tour times seven, he sighed, fidgeted, looked up at
the corners of the room, off into the work-basket, out into
the street, and always, as if by a spell, finished with “four
times seven is fifty-six.” Jane looked up amazed; Agnes
looked down ashamed ; his mother looked with severity in
his face. He began the line a fourth time, when, at the
third figure, he started as if he had been shot. It was only
a knock at the door that he had heard—a treble knock,
which startled nobody else, though, from the parlour door
‘being open, it sounded pretty loud. ~~

Mrs. Proctor spread a handkerchief over the stockings in
her work-basket; Jane put back a stray curl which had
fallen over her face; Agnes lifted up her head with a sigh,
as if relieved that the multiplication-table must stop for this
time; and Hugh gazed into the passage through the open
door, when he heard a man’s step there. The maid an-
anounced Mr. Tooke, of Crofton; and Mr. Tooke walked
in. :
Mrs. Proctor had actually to push Hugh to one side—so _
directly did he stand in the way between her and her visitor.
He stood, with his hands still behind his back, gazing up at
Mr. Tooke, with his face hotter than the multiplication-table
had ever made it, and his eyes staring quite as earnestly as
they had ever done to find Robinson Crusoe’s island in the
map.

“Go, child,” said Mrs. Proctor; but this was not enough.
Mr. Tooke himself had to pass him under his left arm before
he could shake hands with Mrs. Proctor. Hugh was now



Io THE CROFTON BOYS.

covered with shame at this hint that he was in the way ; but
yet he did not leave the room. He stole to the window, and
flung himself down on two chairs, as if looking into the street
from behind the blind; but he saw nothing that passed out
of doors, so eager was his hope of hearing something of the
Crofton boys—their trap-ball, and their Saturday walk with
the usher. Not a word of this kind did he hear. As soon
as Mr. Tooke had agreed to stay to dinner, his sisters were
desired to carry their work elsewhere—to the leads, if they
liked—and he was told that he might go to play. He had
hoped he might be overlooked in the window, and unwillingly
did he put down first one leg and then the other from the
chairs, and saunter out of the room. He did not choose to
go near his sisters, to be told how stupidly he had stood in
the gentleman’s way ; so when he saw that they were placing
their stools on the leads, he went up into the attic, and then
down into the kitchen, to see where little Harry was, to play
at schoolboys in the back yard,

The maid Susan was not sorry that Harry was taken off
her hands, for she wished to rub up her spoons and fill her
castors afresh, for the sake of the visitor who had come in.
The thoughtful Jane soon came down with the keys to get
out a clean table-cloth, and order a dish of cutlets, in xddition
to the dinner, and consult with Susan about some dessert ;
so that as the little boys looked up from their play they saw
Agnes sitting alone at work upon the leads.

They had played some time, Hugh acting a naughty boy
who could not say his Latin lesson to the usher, and little





ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 1



Harry punishing him with far more words than a real usher
uses on such an occasion, when they heard Agnes calling
them from above their heads. She was leaning over from
the leads, begging Hugh to come up to her that very moment.
Harry must be left below, as the leads were a forbidden
place for him. So Harry went to Jane, to see her dish up
greengage plums, which he must not touch; and Hugh ran
up the stairs. As he passed through the passage his mother
called him. Full of some kind of hope (he did not himself
know what), he entered the parlour, and saw Mr. Tooke’s
eyes fixed on him. But his mother only wanted him to shut
the door as he passed—that was all. It had stood open, as
it usually did on warm days. Could his mother wish it shut
on account of anything she was saying? It was possible.

“Qh, Hugh !” exclaimed Agnes, as soon as he set foot on
the leads. ‘What do you think ?—But is the parlour door
shut? Who shut it?”

“Mother bade me shut it as I passed.”

“Qh, dear!” said Agnes, in a tone of disappointment ;
“then she did not mean us to hear what they were talking
about.”

“What was it? Anything about the Crofton boys? Any-
thing about Phil?”

“T cannot tell you a word about it. Mamma did not know
I heard them. How plain one can hear what they say in that
parlour, Hugh, when the door is open! What do you think
I heard mamma tell Mrs. Bicknor, last week, when I was
jumping Harry off the third stair?”



12 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“ Never mind that. Tell me what they are talking aboat
now. Do, Agnes.”

Agnes shook her head.

“Now do, dear.”

It was hard for Agnes to refuse Hugh anything, at any
time, more still when he called her “ dear,” which he seldom
did; and most of all when he put his arm round her neck,
as he did now. But she answered,

“JT should like to tell you every word, but I cannot now.
Mamma. has made you shut the door. She does not wish
you to hear it.” |

“Me! Then will you tell Jane?”

“Ves. I shall tell Jane, when we are with mamma. at
work.”

“That is too bad!” exclaimed Hugh, flinging himself.
down on the leads so vehemently that his sister was afraid
he would roll over into the yard. ‘What does Jane care
about Crofton and the boys to what I do?*

“There is one boy there that Jane cares about more than
you do, or I, or anybody, except papa and mamma. Jane
loves Phil.” E

“Oh, then, what they are saying in the parlour is about
Phil.”

“T did not say that.”

“You pretend you love me as Jane loves Phil! and now
you are going to tell her what you won’t tell me! Agnes, I
will tell you everything I know all my whole life, if you will
just whisper this now. Only just whisper—or, I will tell you





ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 13



what! Iwill guess and guess; and you can nod or shake
your head. That won't be telling.”

“For shame, Hugh! Phil would laugh at you for being
agirl, if you are so curious. What mamma told Mrs. Bicknor
was that Jane was her right hand. What do you think that
meant exactly?”

“ That Jane might give you a good slap when you are so
provoking,” said Hugh, rolling over and over, till his clothes
were covered with dust, and Agnes really thought once that
he was fairly going over the edge into the yard.

“There is something that I can tell you, Hugh; some-
thing that I want to tell you, and nobody else,” said Agnes,
glad to see him stop rolling about, and raise himself on his
dusty elbow to look at her.

“Well, come, what is it?”

“You must promise beforehand not to be angry.”

“ Angry! when am I angry, pray? Come, tell me.”

“You must—you really must—I have a particular reason
for saying so—you must learn how much four times seven
is. Now, remember, you promised not to be angry.”

Hugh carried off his anger by balancing himself on his
head, as if he meant to send his heels over, but that there
was no room. From upside down, his voice was heard
saying that he knew that as well as Agnes.

“Well, then, how much is it?”

“Twenty-eight, to be sure. Who does not know that?”

“Then pray do not call it fifty-six anv more. Miss
Harold 2





14 THE CROFION BOYS.

“‘There’s the thing,” said Hugh. “When Miss Harold
is here, I can think of nothing but fifty-six. It seems to
sound in my ears, as if somebody spoke it, ‘four times seven
is fifty-six.’”

“You will make me get it by heart too, if you say it so
often,” said Agnes. “You had better say ‘twenty-eight’
over to yourself all day long. You may say it to me as
often as you like. I shall not get tired. Come, begin now
—‘four times seven ee
“TI have had enough of that for to-day—tiresome stuff!

Now I shall go and play with Harry again.”



“ But wait—just say that line once over, Hugh. I have
a reason for wishing it. I have, indeed.”

‘Mother has been telling Mr. Tooke that I cannot say
my multiplication-table! Now, that is too bad!” exclaimed
Hugh. “And they will make me say it after dinner! What
a shame!”

“Why, Hugh! you know mamma does not like—you
know mamma would not—you know mamma never does

-anything unkind. You should not say such things, Hugh.”

“ Ay, there! you cannot say that she has not told Mr.
Tooke that I say my tables wrong.”

“Well, you know you always do say it wrong to her.”

“JT will go somewhere. I will hide myself. I will run to
the market while the cloth is laying. I will get away, and
not come back till Mr. Tooke is gone. I will never say my
multiplication-table to him!”

“Never?” said Agnes, with an odd smile and a sigh. “How:



















ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 15

EES

ever, do not talk of running away, or hiding yourself. You
will not have to say anything to Mr. Tooke to-day.”

“How do you know?”

“T feel sure you will not. I do not believe Mr. Tooke will
talk to you, or to any of us. There you go! You will be
in the water-butt in a minute, if you tumble so.”

“J don’t care if Lam. Mr. Tooke will not come there to
hear me say my tables. Let me go!” he cried, struggling,
for now Agnes had caught him by the ankle. - “If I do
tumble in, the water is not up to my chin, and it will bea
cool hiding-place this hot day.”

“But there is Susan gone to lay the cloth, and you must

_ be brushed, for you are all over dust. Come up, and I will
brush you.”

Hugh was determined to havea little more dust first. He
rolled once more the whole length of the leads, turned over
Jane's stool, and upset her work-basket, so that her thimble
bounded off to a far corner, and the shirt-collar she was
stitching fell over into the water-butt.

“There! what will Jane say?” cried Agnes, picking up
the basket, and peeping over into the small part of the top

of the water-butt which was not covered.

“There never was anything like boys for mischief,” said
the maid Susan, who now appeared to pull Hugh in, and
make him neat. Susan always found time, between laying
the cloth and bringing up dinner, to smooth Hugh’s hair,
and give a particular lock a particular turn on his forehead
_ with a wet comb,



16 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“Let that alone,” said Hugh, as Agnes peeped into the
butt after the drowning collar. “I will have the top off this
afternoon, and it will make good fishing for Harry and
me.”

Agnes had to let the matter alone, for Hugh was so dusty
that she had to brush one side of him while Susan did the
other. Susan gave him some hard knocks while she assured
him that he was not going to have Harry up on the leads to
learn his tricks, or to be drowned. She hardly knew which
of the two would be the worst for Harry. It was lucky for
Hugh that Susan was wanted below directly, for she scolded
him the whole time she was parting and smoothing his hair.
When it was done, however, and the wet lock on his forehead
took the right turn at once, she gave him a kiss in the very ©
middle of it, and said she knew he would be a good boy
before the gentleman from the country.

Hugh would not go in with Agnes, because he knew Mr.
_ Tooke would shake hands with her, and take notice of any
one who was with her. He waited in the passage till Susan
carried in the fish, when he entered behind her, and slipped
to the window till the party took their seats, when he hoped
Mr. Tooke would not observe who sat hetween Agnes and
his father. But the very first thing his father did was to pull
his head back by the hair behind, and ask him whether he
had persuaded Mr. Tooke to tell him all about the Crofton
boys.

Hugh did not wish to make any answer; but his father
said “Eh?” and he thought he must speak; so he said that





ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 17





Phil had told him all he wanted to know about the Crofton
boys.

“Then you can get Mr. Tooke to tell you about Phil, if
you want nothing else,” said Mr. Proctor.

Mr. Tooke nodded and smiled; but Hugh began to hand
plates with all his might, he was so afraid that the next
thing would be a question how much four times seven
was.

The dinner went on, however, and the fish was eaten, and
the meat, and the pudding; and the dessert was on the table,
without any one having even alluded to the multiplication-
table. Before this time, Hugh had become quite at his ease,
and had looked at Mr. Tooke till he knew his face quite
well.

Soon after dinner Mr. Proctor was called away on business;
and Hugh slipped into his father’s arm-chair, and crossed
one leg over the other knee, as he leaned back at his leisure,
listening to Mr. Tooke’s conversation with his mother about
the sort of education that he considered most fit for some
boys from India, who had only a certain time to devote to
school learning. In the course of this conversation some
curious things dropped about the curiosity of children from
India about some things very common here—their wonder
‘at snow and ice, their delight at being able to slide in the
winter, and their curiosity about the harvest and gleaning,
now approaching. Mr. Proctor came back just as Mr. Tooke
was telling of the annual holiday of the boys at harvest-time,
when they gleaned for the poor of the village. As Hugh

3



18 THE CROFTON BOYS.

had never seen a corn-field, he had no very clear idea of
harvest and gleaning; and he wanted to hear all he could.
When obliged to turn out of the arm-chair, he drew a stool
between his mother and Mr. Tooke, and presently he was
leaning on his arms on the table, with his face close to Mr.
Tooke’s, as if swallowing the gentleman’s words as they fell.
This was inconvenient; and his mother made him draw back
his stool a good way. Though he could hear very well,
Hugh did not like this, and he slipped off his stool, and
came closer and closer.

“And. did you say,” asked Mr. Proctor, “that your
youngest pupil is nine?”

“Just nine ;—the age of my own boy. I could have
wished to have none under ten, for the reason you know of.
But——”

“T wish,” cried Hugh, thrusting himself in so that Mr
Tooke saw the boy had a mind to sit on his knee,—“ I wish
you would take boys at eight and a quarter.”

“That is your age,” said Mr. Tooke, smiling and making
room between his knees.

“ How did you know? Mother told you.”

“No; indeed she did not,—not exactly. My boy was
eight and a quarter not very long ago; and he-——”

“ Did he like being in your school?”

“He always seemed very happy there, though he was so
much the youngest. And they teased him sometimes for
being the youngest. Now you know, if you came, you would
be the youngest, and they might tease you for it.”



ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL, 19



“J don’t think I should mind that. What sort of teasing,
though ?”

' “Trying whether he was afraid of things.”



Sa)

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PARTING ADVICE,

“What sort of things?”

“Being on the top of a wall, or up ina tree. And then

they sent him errands when he was tired, or when he wanted

to be doing something else. They tried too whether he

could bear some rough things without telling.”



20 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“And did he?”

“Yes, generally. On the whole, very well. I see they
think him a brave boy now.”

“T think I could. But do not you really take boys as
young as I am?”

“Such is really my rule.”

It was very provoking, but Hugh was here called away to
fish up Jane’s work out of the water-butt. As he had put it
in, he was the proper person to get it out. He thought he
should have liked the fun of it; but now he was in a great
hurry back, to hear Mr. Tooke talk. It really seemed as if
the shirt-collar was alive, it always slipped away so when he
thought he had it. Jane kept him to the job till he brought
up her work, dripping and soiled. By that time tea was
ready,—an early tea, because Mr. Tooke had to go away.
Whatever was said at tea was about politics, and about a
new black dye which some chemist had discovered; and
Mr. Tooke went away directly after.

He turned round full upon Hugh, just as he was going.
Hugh stepped back, for it flashed upon him that he was
now to be asked how much four times seven was. But Mr.
Tooke only shook hands with him, and bade him grow
older as fast as he could.

wc he





CHAPTER II.

WHY MR. TOOKE CAME.

AFTER tea the young people had to learn their lessons for
the next day. They always tried to get these done, and the

books put away, before Mr. Proctor came in on his shop
: being shut, and the business of the day being finished. He
liked to find his children at liberty for a little play, or half an
hour of pleasant reading ; or, in the winter evenings, for a
dance to the music of his violin. Little Harry had been
known to be kept up far too late, that he might hear the
violin, and that his papa might enjoy the fun of seeing him
run about among the rest, putting them all out, and fancying
he was dancing. All believed there would be time for play
with papa to-night, tea had been so much earlier than usual.
But Agnes soon feared there would be no play for Hugh.
Though Jane pored over her German, twisting her forefinger
in the particular curl which she always twisted when she was
deep in her lessons; though Agnes: rocked herself on her
chair, as she always did when she was learning by heart; and

2i



22 THE CROFTON BOYS.



though Mrs. Proctor kept Harry quiet at the other end of
the room with telling him long stories, in a very low voice,
about the elephant and Brighton pier, in the picture-book,
Hugh could not learn his capital cities. He even spoke out
twice, and stopped himself when he saw all the heads in the
room raised in surprise. Then he set himself to work again,
and he said “ Copenhagen” so often over that he was not
likely to forget the word; but what country it belonged to he
could not fix in his mind, though Agnes wrote it down large
on the slate, in hopes that the sight of the letters would help
him toremember. Before he had got on to ‘“‘Constantinople,”
the well-known sound was heard of the shop-boy taking the
shop-shutters out of their day-place, and Mr. Proctor would
certainly be coming presently. Jane closed her dictionary,
and shook back her curls from over her eyes; Mrs. Proctor
put down Harry from her lap, and let him call for papa as
loud as he would; and papa came bustling in, and gave
Harry a long toss, and several topplings over his shoulder,
and yet Hugh was not ready.

“Come, children,” said Mr. Proctor to Agnes and Hugh,
“we have all done enough for to-day. Away with books
and slates !”

“But, papa,” said Agnes, “ Hugh has not quite done. If
he might have just five minutes more, Miss Harold ”

‘Never mind what Miss Harold says! That is, you girls
must; but between this and Michaelmas sy





He stopped short, and the girls saw that it was a sign
from their mother that made him do so. He immediately



WHY MR. TOOKE CAME, 23

proceeded to make so much noise with Harry, that Hugh
discovered nothing more than that he might put away his
books, and not mind Miss Harold this time. If she asked
him to-morrow why he had not got down to “Constantinople,”
he could tell her exactly what his father had said. So, merry
was Hugh’s play this evening. He stood so perfectly upright
on his father’s shoulders, that he could reach the top of his
grandmamma’s picture, and show by his finger-ends how
thick the dust lay upon the frame; and neither he nor his
father minded being told that he was far too old for such
play: :

In the midst of the fun, Hugh had a misgiving, more than
once, of his mother having something severe to say to him
when she should come up to his room, to hear him say his
prayer, and to look back a little with him upon the events
of the day. Besides his consciousness that he had done
nothing well this day, there were grave looks from his mother
which made him think that she was not pleased with him.
When he was undressing, therefore, he listened with some
anxiety for her footsteps, and, when she appeared, he was
ready with his confession of idleness. She stopped him in
the beginning, saying that she had rather not hear any more
such confessions. She had listened to too many, and had
allowed him to spend in confessions some of the strength
which should have been applied to mending his faults. For
the present, while she was preparing a way to help him to
conquer his inattention, she advised him to say nothing to
her, or to any one else, on the subject; but this need not



24 THE CROFTON BOYS.





prevent him from praying to God to give him strength to
overcome his great fault.

“Oh, mother, mother!” cried Hugh, in an agony, “you
give me up! What shall I do if you will not help me any
more?”

His mother smiled, and told him he need not fear any
_ such thing. It would be very cruel to leave off providing
him with food and clothes, because it gave trouble to do so;
and it would be far more cruel to abandon him to his faults
for such a reason. She would never cease to help him till
they were cured ;. but, as all means yet tried had failed, she
must plan some others; and, meantime, she did not wish
him to become hardened to his faults by talking about them
every night when there was no amendment during the
day.

Though she spoke very kindly, and kissed him before she
went away, Hugh felt that he was punished. He felt more
unhappy than if his mother had told him all she thought of
his idleness. Though his mother had told him to go to
sleep, and blessed him, he could not help crying a little, and
‘wishing that he was a Crofton boy. He supposed the
Crofton boys all got their lessons done somehow, as a matter
of course ; and then they could go to sleep without any un-
comfortable feelings, or any tears.

In the morning all these thoughts were gone. He had
something else to think about, for he had to play with
Harry and take care of him while Susan swept and dusted |
the parlour; and Harry was bent upon going into the shop,



WHY MR. TOOKE CAME. 25

a place where, according to the rule of the house, ne child
of the family was ever to set foot till it was old enough to be
trusted, nor to taste anything there, asked or unasked. There
were some poisonous things in the shop, and some few nice
syrups and gums; and no child could be safe and well there
who could not let alone whatever might be left on the
counter, or refuse any nice taste that a good-natured shop-
man might offer. Harry was as yet far too young; but as
often as the cook washed the floor-cloth in the passage, so
that the inner shop door had to be opened, Master Harry
was seized with an unconquerable desire to go and see the
blue and red glass bowls which he was permitted to admire
from the street as he went out and came in from his walks,
Mr. Proctor came down this morning as Hugh was catching
Harry in the passage. He snatched up his boys, packed
one under each arm, and ran with them into the yard, where
he rolled Harry up in a new mat which the cook was going
to lay at the house door.

There!” said he. “Keep him fast, Hugh, till the pas-
sage door is shut. What shall we do with the rogue when
you are at Crofton, I wonder?”

“Why, papa! he will be big enough to take care of himself
by that time.”

“Bless me! I forgot again,” exclaimed Mr. Proctor, as
he made haste away into the shop.

Before long, Harry was safe under the attraction of his
basin of bread and milk; and Hugh fell into a reverie at the
breakfast-table, keeping his spoon suspended in his hand as



26 THE CROFTON BOYS.



he looked up at the windows, without seeing anything. Jane
asked him twice to hand the butter before he heard.

‘He is thinking how much four times seven is,” observed
Mr. Proctor; and Hugh started at the words.

“T tell you what, Hugh,” continued his father; “if the
Crofton people do not teach you how much four times seven
is when you come within four weeks of next Christmas Day,
I shall give you up, and them too, for dunces all.”

All the eyes round the table were fixed on Mr. Proctor in
an instant.

“There now!” said he, “I have let the cat out of the bag.
Look at Agnes!” and he pinched her crimson cheek.

Everybody then looked at Agnes, except Harry, who was
busy looking for the cat which papa said had come out of
mamma’s work-bag. Agnes could not bear the gaze, and
burst into tears.

“ Agnes has taken more pains to keep the secret than her
papa,” said Mrs. Proctor. “The secret is, that Hugh is
going to Crofton next month.”

“ Am I ten, then?” asked Hugh in his hurry and surprise.

“Scarcely, since you were only eight and a quarter yester-
day afternoon,” replied his father.

“T will tell you all about it by-and-bye, my dear,” said
his mother. Her glance towards Agnes made all the rest
understand that they had better speak of something else
now. So Mr. Proctor beckoned Harry to come and see
whether the cat had not got into the bag again, as she was
not to be seen anywhere else. It is true, the bag was not



WHY MR. TOOKE CAME. 27

much bigger than a cat’s head; but that did not matter to
Harry, who never cared for that sort of consideration, and
had been busy for half an hour, the day before, in trying to
put the key of the house door into the keyhole of the tea-
caddy.

By the time Agnes had recovered herself, and the table
was cleared, Miss Harold had arrived. Hugh brought his
books with the rest, but, instead of opening them, rested his
elbow on the uppermost, and stared full at Miss Harold.

“Well, Hugh!” said she, smiling.

“T have not learned quite down to ‘Constantinople,’”
said he. ‘Papa told me I need not, and not to mind you.”

“Why, Hugh ! hush!” cried Jane.

“He did,—he said exactly that. But he meant, Miss
Harold, that I am to be a Crofton boy,—directly, next
month.”

“Then have we done with one another, Hugh?” asked
Miss Harold, gently. - “ Will you not learn any more from
me?”

“That is for your choice, Miss Harold,” observed Mrs.
Proctor. ‘Hugh has not deserved the pains you have
taken with him; and if you decline more trouble with him
now he is going into other hands, no one can wonder.”

Miss Harold feared that he was but poorly prepared for
school, and was quite ready to help him if he would give his
mind to the effort. She thought that play, or reading books
that he liked, was less waste of time than his common way
of doing his lessons; but if he was disposed really to work,



28 THE CROFTON BOYS.





with the expectation of Crofton before him, she was ready to
do her best to prepare him for the real hard work he would
have to do there.

His mother proposed that he should have time to consider
whether he would have a month’s holiday or a month’s work
before leaving home. She had to go out this morning. He
might go with her, if he liked; and, as they returned, they
would sit down in the Temple Garden, and she would tell
him all about the plan.

Hugh liked this beginning of his new prospects. He ran
to be made neat-for his walk with his mother. He knew he
must have the wet curl on his forehead twice over to-day,
but he comforted himself with hoping that there would be
no time at Crofton for him to be kept standing to have his
hair done so particularly, and to be scolded all the while,
and then kissed, like a baby, at the end.





CHAPTER III.

MICHAELMAS DAY COME.

Hues was about'to ask his mother again and again
during their walk why Mr. Tooke let him go to Crofton
before he was ten, but Mrs. Proctor was grave and silent;
and though she spoke kindly to him now and then, she did
not seem disposed to talk. At last they were in the Temple
Garden, and they sat down where there was no one to over-
hear them, and then Hugh looked up at his mother. She
saw and told him what it was that he wanted to ask.

“Tt is on account of the little boys themselves,” said she,
“that Mr. Tooke does not wish to have them very young,
now that there is no kind lady in the house who could be like
a mother to them.”

“ But there is Mrs. Watson. Phil has told me a hundred
things about Mrs. Watson.”

“Mrs. Watson is the housekeeper. She is careful, I know
about the boys’ health and comfort ; but she has no time to
attend to the younger ones, as Mrs. Tooke did—hearing

29



30 THE CROFTON BOYS.

their little troubles, and being a friend to them like their
mothers at home.”

“There is Phil——”

“Yes, you will have Phil to look to. But neither Phil nor
any else can save you from some troubles you are likely to
fave from being the youngest.” y

“Such as Mr. Tooke told me his boy had—being put on
the top of a high wall, and plagued when he was tired, and
all that? I don’t think I should much mind those things.”

*So we hope—and so we believe. Your fault is not
cowardice——”

Mrs, Proctor so seldom praised anybody that her words
of esteem went a great way. Hugh first looked up at her,
and then down on the grass—his cheeks glowed so. She
went on,—

“You have faults—faults which give your father and me
great pain; and though you are not cowardly about being
hurt in your body, you sadly want courage of a better kind—
courage to mend the weakness of your mind. You are so
young that we are sorry for you, and mean to send you where
the example of other boys may give you the resolution you
want so much.”

“All the boys learn their lessons at Crofton,” observed
Hugh.

“Yes; but not by magic. They have to give their minds
to their work. You will find it painful and difficult to learn
this, after your idle habits at home. I give you warning that
you will find it much more difficult than you suppose; and



MICHAELMAS DAY COME, 31



I should not wonder if you wish yourself at home with Miss
Harold many times before Christmas.”
Mrs. Proctor was not unkind in saying this. She saw that









IN THE TEMPLE GARDENS,

Hugh was so delighted about going that nothing would de-
press his spirits, and that the chief fear was his being dis-
appointed and unhappy when she should be far away. It
might then be some consolation to him to remember that
she was aware of what he would have to go through. He



32 : THE CROFTON BOYS.

now smiled, and said he did not think he should ever wish
to say his lessons to Miss Harold as long as he lived. Then
it quickly passed through his mind that, instead of the leads
and the little yard, there would be the playground; and
instead of the church bells, the rooks ; and instead of Susan
with her washing and combing, and scolding and kissing,
there would be plenty of boys to play with. As he thought
“of these things, he started up, and toppled head over heels
on the grass, and then was up by his mother’s side again,
saying that he did not care about anything that was to
happen at Crofton ;—he was not afraid,—not even of the
usher, though Phil could not bear him.

“If you can bring yourself to learn your lessons well,”
said his mother, “‘ you need not fear the usher. But remem-
ber, it depends upon that. You will do well enough in the
playground, I have no doubt.”

After this, there was only to settle the time that was to
pass—the weeks, days, and hours before Michaelmas Day ;
and whether these weeks and days should be employed in
preparing for Crofton under Miss Harold, or whether he
should take his chance there unprepared as he was. Mrs.
Proctor saw that his habits of inattention were so fixed, and
his disgust at lessons in the parlour so strong, that she
encouraged his doing no lessons in the interval. Hugh
would have said beforehand that three weeks’ liberty to
read voyages and travels, and play with Harry, would have
made him perfectly happy; but he felt that there was some
disgrace mixed up with his holiday, and that everybody



MICHAELMAS DAY COME, 33

would look upon him with a sort of pity, instead of wishing
him joy; and this spoiled his pleasure a good deal. When
he came home from his walk, Agnes thought he looked less
happy than when he went out, and she feared his spe
were down about Crofton.

His spirits were up and down many times fauene the next
three weeks. He thought these weeks would never be over.
Every day dragged on more slowly than the last; at every
meal he was less inclined to eat, and his happiest time was
when going to bed, because he was a day nearer Crofton.
His mother, foreseeing just what happened, wished to have
kept the news from him till within a week of his departure,.
and had agreed with Mr. Proctor that it should be so.. But
Mr. Proctor hated secrets, and, as we see, let it out imme-

' diately.

At last the day came ;—a warm, sunny autumn ay. on
which any one might have enjoyed the prospect of a drive
into the country. The coach was to set off from an inn in
Fleet Street at noon, and would set Hugh down at his
uncle’s door in time for dinner, the distance being twenty-
eight miles, His uncle’s house was just two miles from the
school. Phil would probably be there to meet his brother,
and take him to Crofton in the afternoon.

How to get rid of the hours till noon was the question.
Hugh had had everything packed up, ovér which he had
any control, for some days. He had not left himself a
plaything of those which he might carry; and it frightened
him that his mother did not seem to think of packing his:

3



34 THE CROFTON BOYS.



clothes till after breakfast this very morning. When she
entered his room for the purpose, he was fidgeting about,
saying to himself that he should never be ready. Agnes
came with her mother, to help ; but before the second shirt
was laid in the box, she was in tears, and had to go away ;
for every one in the house was in the habit of hiding tears
from Mrs. Proctor, who rarely shed them herself, and was
known to think that they might generally be suppressed,
and should be so.

As Hugh stood beside her, handing stockings and hand-
kerchiefs to fill. up the corners of the box, she spoke as she
might not have done if they had not been alone. She said
but a few words; but Hugh never forgot them.

“You know, my dear,” said she, “that I do not approve
of dwelling upon troubles. You know I never encourage
ay children to fret about what cannot be helped.”

There was nothing in the world that Hugh was more
certain of than this.

“ And yet I tell you,” she continued, “that you will not
be nearly so happy at Crofton as you expect—at least, at
first. It grieves me to see you so full of expectation”

“ Does it indeed, mother?”

“Tt does indeed. But my comfort is ”

“You think I can bear it,” cried Hugh, holding up his
head. “You think I can bear anything.”

“T think you are a brave boy, on the whole. But that is
not the comfort I was speaking of, for there is.a world of
troubles too heavy for the bravery of a thoughtless child like





MICHAELMAS DAY COME. 35

you. My comfort is, my dear, that you know where to go
for strength when your heart fails you. You will be away
from your father and me; but a far wiser and kinder Parent
will be always with you. If I were not sure that you would
continually open your heart to Him, I could not let you go
from me.”

“T will—I always do,” said Hugh, in a low voice.

“Then remember this, my boy. If you have that help,
you must not fail. Knowing that you have that help, I
expect of you that you do your own duty, and bear your
own troubles like aman. If you were to be all alone in the
new world you are going to, you would be but a helpless
child; but remember, when a child makes God his friend,
God puts into the youngest and weakest the spirit of a man.”

“You will ask Him too, mother; you will pray Him to

be



make me brave, and—and

“ And what else?” she inquired, fixing her eyes upon him.

“ And steady,” replied Hugh, casting down his eyes ; “for
that is what I want most of all.”

“Tt is,” replied his mother. ‘I do, and always will, pray
for you.”

Not another word was said till they went down into the
parlour. Though it was only eleven o’clock, Miss Harold
was putting on her bonnet to go away; and there was a
plate of bread and cheese on the table.

_“Lunch!” said Hugh, turning away with disgust.
“Do eat it,” said Agnes, who had brought it. “ You had
_no breakfast, you know,”
ee



30 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“Because I did not want it; and I can’t eat anything now.”

Jane made a sign to Agnes to take the plate out of sight;
and she put some biscuits into a paper bag, that he might
eat on the road, if he should become hungry.

Neither Miss Harold nor Hugh could possibly feel any
grief at parting, for they had had little satisfaction together ;
but she said very kindly that she should hope to hear often
of him, and wished he might be happy as a Crofton boy.
Hugh could hardly answer her ;—-so amazed was he to find
that his sisters were giving up an hour of their lessons on his
account,—that they might go with him to the coach !—And
then Susan came in about the cord for his box, and her eyes
were red;—and, at the sight of her, Agnes began to cry
again ; and Jane bent down her head over the glove she was
mending for him, and her needle stopped.

“Jane,” said her mother gravely, “‘if you are not mending
that glove, give it to me. It is getting late.”

Jane brushed her hand across her eyes, and stitched away
again. Then she threw the gloves to Hugh without looking
at him, and ran to get ready to go to the coach.

The bustle of the inn-yard would not do for little Harry.
He could not go. Hugh was extremely surprised to find
that all the rest were going,—that even his father was smooth-
ing his hat in the passage for the walk,—really leaving the
shop at noon on his account! The porter was at his service
too,—waiting for his box! It was very odd to feel of such
consequence. &

Hugh ran down to bid the maids good bye. The coox



MICHAELMAS DAY COME, 37



had cut a sandwich, which she thrust into his pocket, though
he told her he had some biscuits. Susan cried so that little
Harry stood grave and wondering. Susan sobbed out that _
she knew he did not care a bit about leaving home and
everybody. Hugh wished she would not say so, though he
felt it was true, and wondered at it himself. Mr. Proctor
heard. Susan’s lamentations, and called to her from the pas-
sage above not to make herself unhappy about that, for the
time would soon come when Hugh would be home-sick
enough.

Mr. Blake, the shopman, came to the shop-door as they
passed, and bowed and smiled; and the boy put himself in
the way, with a broad grin; and then the party walked on
quickly.

The sun seemed to Hugh to glare very much, and he
thought he had never known the streets so noisy, or the
people so pushing. The truth was, his heart was beating so
he could scarcely see; and yet he was so busy looking about
him for a sight of the river, and everything he wished to bid
good. bye to, that his father, who held him fast by the hand,
shook him more than once, and told him he would run
everybody down if he could,—to judge by his way of walk-
ing. He must learn to march better, if he was to be a sol-
dier; and to steer, if he was to be a sailor.

_.There were just two minutes to spare when they reached
the inn-yard. The horses were pawing and fidgeting, and
some of the passengers had mounted ; so Mr. Proctor said
he would seat the boy at once. He spoke to two men who



38 THE CROFTON BOYS,

were on the roof, just behind the coachman; and they
agreed to let Hugh sit between them, on the assurance that
the driver would iook to his concerns, and see that he was
set down at the right place.

“Now, my boy, up with you!” said his: father, as he
tnrned from speaking to these men. Hugh was so eager,
that he put up his foot to mount, without remembering to
bid his mother and sisters good bye. Mr. Proctor laughed —
at this; and nobody wondered ; but Agnes cried bitterly;
and she could not forget it, from that time till she saw her
brother again. . When they had all kissed him, and _ his
mother’s earnest look had bidden him remember what had
passed between them that morning, he was lifted up by his
father, and received by the two men, between whom he
found a safe seat.

Then he wished they were off. It was uncomfortable to
see his sisters crying there, and not to be able to cry too, or
to speak to them. When the coachman was drawing on his
second glove, and the ostlers held each a hand to pull off
the horse-cloths, and the last moment was come, Mr.
Proctor swung himself up by the step, to say one thing
more. It was—

“TI say, Hugh,—can you tell me,—how much is four
times seven?”

Mrs. Proctor pulled her husband’s coat-tail, and he leaped
down, the horses’ feet scrambled, their heads issued from
the gateway of the inn-yard, and Hugh's family were left
behind. -



MICHAELMAS DAY COME. 39.

In the midst of the noise, the man on Hugh’s right hand
said to the one on his left,

“ There is some joke in that last remark, I imagine.”

The other man nodded; and then there was no more
speaking till they were off the stones, When the clatter
was over, and the coach began to roll along the smooth
road, Hugh’s neighbour repeated,

“There was some joke, I fancy, in that last remark of
your father’s.”

“Ves,” said Hugh.

Are you in the habit of saying the multiplication-table
when you travel?” said the other. “If so, we shall be
happy to hear it.”

“Exceedingly happy,” observed the first.

“T never say it when I can help it,” said Hugh; “and I
see no occasion now.”

The men laughed, and then asked him if he was going
far.
“To Crofton. I am going to be a Crofton boy,” said
Hugh.

“ A what? Where is he going?” his companions asked
one another over his head. They were no wiser when
Hugh repeated what he had said, nor could the coachman
enlighten them. He only knew that he was to put the boy
down at Shaw’s, the great miller’s, near ey miles along
the road.

“ Eight-and-twenty,” said Hugh, in correction; “and
Crofton is two miles from my uncle’s,”



4o ' THE CROFTON BOYS.

“ight-and-twenty. The father’s joke lies there,” observed
the right-hand man.

“No, it does not,” said Hugh. He thought he was among
a set of véry odd people,—none of them knowing what a
Crofton boy was. A passenger who sat beside the coachman
only smiled when he was appealed to; so it might be con-
cluded that he was ignorant too; and the right and left-hand
men seemed so anxious for information, that Hugh told
them all he knew ;—about the orchard and the avenue, and
the pond on the heath, and the playground; and Mrs.
Watson, and the usher, and Phil, and Joe Cape, and Tony
Nelson, and several others of the boys.

One of the men asked him if he was sure he was going for
the first time,—he seemed so thoroughly informed of every-
thing about Crofton. Hugh replied that it was a good thing
to have an elder brother like Phil. Phil had told him just
what to take to Crofton, and how to take care of his money,
and everything.

“Ay! and how do the Crofton boys take care of their
money ?”

_ Hugh showed a curious little inner pocket in his ReKes
which nobody would dream of that did not know. His
mother had let him have such a pocket in both his jackets ;
and he had wanted to have all his money in this one now, to
show how safely he could carry it. But his mother had
chosen to pack up all his five shillings in his box,—that
square box, with the new brass lock, on the top of all the
luggage. In this pocket there was only sixpence now,—the



MICHAELMAS DAY COME. 41

sixpence he. was to give the coachman when he was set
down.

Then he went on to explain that this sixpence was not out
of his own money, but given him by his father, expressly for
the coachman. Then his right-hand companion congratu-
lated him upon his spirits, and began to punch and tickle
him; and when Hugh writhed himself about, because he
could not bear tickling, the coachman said he would have
no such doings, and bade them be quiet. Then the pas-
sengers seemed to forget Hugh, and talked to one another
of the harvest in the north, and the hopping in Kent. Hugh
Jistened about the hopping, supposing it might be some new
game, as good as leap-frog; though it seemed strange that
one farmer should begin hopping on Monday, and that
another should fix Thursday, and that both should be so
extremely anxious about the weather. But when he found
it was some sort of harvest-work, he left off listening, and
gave all his attention to the country sights that were about
him. ay ee : eS

He did not grow tired of the gardens, gay with dahlias
and hollyhocks and asters; nor of the orchards, where the
ladder against the tree, and the basket under, showed that
apple-gathering was going on; nor of the nooks in the fields,
where blackberries were ripening ; nor of the chequered sun-
light and shadow which lay upon the road; nor of the
breezy heath where the blue ponds were ruffled ; nor of the
pleasant grove where the leaves were beginning to show a
tinge of yellow and red, here and there among the green.



42 THE CROFTON BOYS.



Silently he enjoyed all these things, only awakening from
them when there was a stop to change horses.

He was not thinking of time or distance when he saw the
coachman glance round at him, and felt that the speed of
the horses was slackening. Still he had no idea that this
was any concern of his, till he saw something that made
him start.

“Why, there’s Phil,” he exclaimed, jumping to his feet.

“This is Shaw’s mill, and there is Shaw; which is all I
have to do with,” said the coachman, as he pulled up.

Hugh was soon down, with his uncle and Phil, and one
of the men from the mill to help. His aunt was at the
window too; so that altogether Hugh forgot to thank his
companions for his safe seat. He would have forgotten his
box, but for the coachman. One thing more he also forgot.

“I say, young master,” said the driver; “remember the
coachman. Where’s your sixpence ?”

“*Oh, my sixpence !” cried Hugh, throwing down what he
held, to feel in his curious inner pocket, which was empty.

“Lest you. find a hole in your pocket, here is a sixpence
for you,” cried the right-hand passenger, tossing him his own

sixpence. “Thank you for teaching us the secret of such a
curious pocket.”

The coachman was impatient, got his money, and drove
off, leaving Hugh to make out why he had been tickled, and
how his money had changed hands. With a very red face,
he declared it was too bad of the man; but the man was
out of his hearing, and could never know how angry he was, _



MICHAELMAS DAY COME. 43

“A pretty story this is for our usher to have against you,
to begin with,” was Phil’s consolation. ‘Every boy will
know it before you show yourself; and you will never hear
the last of it, I can tell you.”

“Your usher!” exclaimed Hugh, bewildered.

“Yes, our usher. That was he on the box, beside coachee.
Did not you find out that much in all these eight-and-
twenty miles?”

“ How should I? He never told me.”

Hugh could hardly speak to his uncle and aunt, he was
so taken up with trying to remember what he had said, in
the usher’s hearing, of the usher himself, and everybody at
Crofton.



HUGH’S AUNT.





CHAPTER IV. .

MICHAELMAS DAY OVER.

Mrs. SHaw ordered dinner presently ; and while it was
being served, she desired Phil to brush his brother’s clothes,
as they were dusty from his ride. All the while he was
brushing (which he did very roughly), and all the first part
of dinner-time, Phil continued to tease Hugh about what he
had said on the top of the coach. Mrs. Shaw spoke of the
imprudence of talking freely before strangers; and Hugh
could have told her that he did not need such a lecture at
the very time that he found the same thing by his experience.
He did wish Phil would stop. If anybody should ask him
a question, he could not answer without crying. Then he
remembered how his mother. expected him to bear things ;
and he almost wished he was at home with her now, after
all his longing to be away. This thought nearly made him
cry again; so he tried to dwell on how his mother would
expect him to bear things; but neither of them had thought
that morning beside his box, that the first trial would come

44



MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 45





°

from Phil. This again made him so nearly cry that his
uncle observed his twitching face, and, without noticing him,
said that he, for his part, did not want to see little boys wise

















DRESSING FOR DINNER.

tefore ihey had time to learn; and that the most silent
companions he had ever been shut up with in a coach was
certainly the least agreeable; and he went on to relate an
adventure which has happened to more persons than one.
He had found the.gentleman in the corner, with the shaggy



46 THE CROFTON BOYS,

coat, to be a bear—a tame bear, which had to take the
quickest mode of conveyance, in order to be at a distant fair
in good time. Mr. Shaw spun out his story, so that Hugh
quite recovered himself, and laughed as much as anybody
at his uncle having formed a bad opinion of Bruin in the
early twilight, for his incivility in not bowing to the passenger
who left the coach.

After dinner, Phil thought it time to be off to Crofton.
de had missed something by coming away at all to-day, and
he was not going to run the chance of losing the top of the
class by not having time to do his Sallust properly. Mrs.
Shaw said they must have some of her plums before they
went, and a glass of wine; and Mr. Shaw ordered the gig,
saying he would drive them, and thus no time would be lost
though he hoped Phil would not mind being at the bottom
of every class for once to help his brother, seeing how soon a
diligent boy might work his way up again. Phil replied that
‘that was not so easy as people might think, when there was .
one like Joe Cape determined to keep him down, if he could
once get him down.

“TJ hope you will find time to help Hugh up from the
bottom, in a class or two,” said Mr. Shaw. “You will not
be too busy about your own affairs to look to his, I suppose.”

“Where is the use of my meddling?” said Phil. “He
can’t rise for years to come. Besides-——-”

“Why can’t rise?” exclaimed Hugh, with glowing cheeks.

“That is right, Hugh,” said his uncle. “Let nobody —
prophesy for you till you show what you can do.”



MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 47



“‘Why, uncle, he is nearly two years younger than any boy:
in the school; and———”

“And there is little Page above you in algebra. He is
about two years younger than you, Phil, if I remember right.”

Hugh could not help clapping his hands at the prospect
this held out to him. Phil took the act for triumphing over
him, and went on to say, very insultingly, that a little fellow
who had been brought up among the girls all his life, and
had learned of nobody but Miss Harold, could not be ex-
pected to cut any figure among boys. Hugh looked so
grieved for a moment, and then suddenly so relieved, that
his kind uncle wondered what was in his mind. He took
the boy between his knees, and asked him.

Hugh loved his uncle already, as if he had always known
. him. He put his arms round his neck, and whispered in
his ear what he was thinking of:—his mother’s saying that
God could and would, if He was sought, put the spirit of a
man into the feeblest child.

“True!—quite true! I am very ae you know that, my
boy. That will help you to learn.at Crofton, though it is
better than anything they can teach you in their school-
room.”

Mrs. Shaw and Phil looked curious; but Mr. Shaw did
not repeat a word of what Hugh had said. He put the boy
away from his knees, because he heard the gig coming
round,

Mrs. Shaw told Hugh that she hoped he would spend some
of his Sundays with his uncle and her; and his uncle added



48 THE CROFTON BOYS.





that he must come on holidays as well as Sundays,—there
was so much to see about the mill.

Phil was amused, and somewhat pleased, to find how exactly
Hugh remembered his description of the place and neigh-



- HUGH FINDS A SYMPATHIZER.

bourhood. He recognized the duck-pond under the hedge
by the roadside, with the very finest blackberries. growing
above it, just out of reach. The church he knew, of course,
and the row of chestnuts, whose leaves were just beginning
to fall; and the high wall dividing the orchard from the play-
ground, That must have been the wall on which Mr.'Tooke’s



MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 49



little boy used to be placed to frighten him. It did not look
so very high as Hugh had fancied it. One thing which he
had never seen or heard of was the bell, under its little roof
on the ridge of Mr. Tooke’s great house. Was it to call in
the boys to school, or for an alarm? His uncle told him it
might serve the one purpose in the day, and the other by
night; and that almost every large farm thereabouts had such
a bell on the top of the house.

The sun was near its setting when they came in sight of
the Crofton house. A long range of windows glittered in the
yellow light, and Phil said that the lower row all belonged
to the school-room—that whole row.

In the midst of his explanations Phil stopped, and his
manner grew more rough than ever—with a sort of shyness
in it too, It was because some of the boys were within
hearing, leaning over the pales which separated the play-
ground from the road.

“T say; hallo there!” cried one. “Is that Prater you
have got with you?”

“ Prater the second,” cried another. ‘He could not have
had his name if there had not been Prater the first.”

“There; there’s a scrape you have got me into already!’
muttered Phil.

“Be a man, Phil, and bear your own share,” said Mr.
Shaw; “and no spite, because your words come back to you.”

The talk at the palings still went on, as the gig rolled
quietly in the sandy by-road.

* Prater!” poor Hugh exclaimed. “What a name!”

4



50 THE CROFTON BOYS.





“Yes; that is you,” said his uncle, “ You know now what
your nickname will be. Every boy has one or another; and
yours might have been worse, because you might have done
many a worse thing to earn it.”

“But the usher, uncle!”

“What of him?”

*“ He should not have told about me.”

‘Don’t call him ‘Prater the third,’ however. Bear your
own share, as I said to Phil,and don’t meddle with another’s.”

Perhaps Mr. Shaw hoped that through one of the boys
the usher would get a new nickname for his ill-nature in
telling tales of a little boy, before he was so much as seen by
hiscompanions. He certainly put it into their heads, whether
they would make use of it or not.

Mr. Tooke was out, taking his evening ride; but Mr. Shaw
would not drive off till he had seen Mrs. Watson, and intro-
duced his younger nephew to her, observing to her that he
was ‘but a little fellow to come among such a number of
rough boys. Mrs. Watson smiled kindly at Hugh, and said
she was glad he had a brother in the school, to prevent his
feeling lonely at first. It would not take many days, she
hoped, to make him feel quite at home. Mr. Shaw slipped
half a crown into Hugh’s hand, and whispered to him to try
to keep it safe in his inner pocket. Hugh ran after him to
the door, to tell him that he had five shillings already—safe
in his box; but his uncle would not take back the half-crown.
He thought that, in course of time, Hugh would want all the
money he had:



MICHAELMAS DAV OVER. gt



-

Mrs. Watson desired Phil to show his brother where he
was to sleep, and to help him to put by his clothes. Phil
was in a hurry to get to his Sallust; so that he was not sorry
when Mrs. Watson herself came up to see that the boy’s
clothes were laid properly in the deep drawer in which Hugh
was to keep his things. Phil then slipped away.

“Dear me,” said Mrs. Watson, turning over one of Hugh’s
new collars, “we must have something different from this.
These collars tied with a black ribbon are never tidy. They
are always over one shoulder or the other.”

“ My sisters made them; and they worked so hard to get
them done,” said Hugh.

“Very well—very right; only it is a pity they are not of
a better make. Every Sunday at church I shall see your
collar awry; and every time you go to your aunt’s, she will
think we do not make you neat. I must see about that. Here
are good stockings, however—properly stout. My dear, are
these all the shoes you have got?”

“T have a pair on.”

“Of course; I don’t doubt that. We must have you
measured to-morrow for some boots fitter for the country
than these. We have no London pavement here.”

And so Mrs. Watson went on, sometimes approving and
sometimes criticising, till Hugh did not know whether to cry
or to be angry. After all the pains his mother and sisters
had.taken about his things, they were to be found fault with
in this way! ;

When his box was emptied, and his drawer filled, Mrs.

4-2



52 THE CROFTON BOYS.

Watson took him into the school-room, where the boys were
at supper. Outside the door the buzz seemed prodigious,
and Hugh hoped that in such a bustle nobody would notice
him. Here he was quite mistaken. The moment he entered
there was a hush, and all eyes were turned upon him, except
his brother’s. Phil hardly looked up from his book; but he
made room for Hugh between himself and another boy, and
drew the great plate of bread within reach. Mrs. Watson
saw that Hugh had his basin of milk; and he found it a
good thing to have something to do while so many eyes were
upon him. He felt that he might have cried if he had not
had his supper to eat.

The usher sat at the top of the table, reading. Mrs. Watson
called his attention tc Hugh, and Hugh stood up and made
his bow. His face was red, as much with anger as timidity,
when he recognized in him the passenger who had sat beside
the coachman.

“Perhaps, Mr. Carnaby,” said Mrs. Watson, “you will find
something for this young gentleman to do, when he has had
his supper, while the rest are learning their lessons. To-
morrow he will have his own lessons; but to-night——”

“There is always the multiplication-table,” replied Mr.
Carnaby. “The young gentleman is partial to that, I fancy.”

Hugh reddened, and applied himself to his bread and milk.

“Never mind a joke,” whispered Mrs. Watson. “We won’t
plague you with the multiplication-table the first evening. I
will find you a book or something. Meantime, there is a
companion for you—I forgot that.”



MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 53

The good lady went down the room, and brought back a
boy who seemed to be doing all he could to stop crying.
He dashed his hand over his eyes every minute, and could



THE FIRST NIGHT AT SCHOOL.

not look anybody in the tace. He had finished his supper,
and was at a loss what to do next, as he had only arrived
that morning, and did not know anybody at Crofton. His
name was Tom Holt, and he was ten years old. °

When they had told their names and ages, and where.



54 THE CROFTON BOYS.



they came from, the boys did not know what to say next, and
Hugh wished Phil would stop murmuring over his Sallust and —
looking in the dictionary every minute; but Mrs. Watson did
not forget the strangers. She brought them Cook’s Voyages
out of the library to amuse themselves with, on condition of
their delivering the book to. Mr. Carnaby at bed-time.

The rest of the evening passed away very pleasantly.
Hugh told Holt a great deal about Broadstairs and the
South Sea Islands, and confided to him his own hopes of
being a sailor, ‘and going round the world, and, if possible,
making his way straight through China, the most difficult
country left to travel in, he believed, except some parts of
Africa. He did not want to cross the Great Desert, on
account of the heat. He knew something of what that was
by the leads at home, when the sun was on them. What
was the greatest heat Holt had ever felt? Then came the
surprise. Holt had last come from his uncle’s farm; but he
was born in India, and had lived there till eighteen months
ago. So, while Hugh had chattered away about the sea at
Broadstairs, and the heat on the leads at home, his com-
panion had come fourteen thousand miles over the ocean,
and had felt a heat nearly as extreme as that of the Great
Desert. Holt was very unassuming too. He talked of the

‘heat of gleaning in his uncle’s harvest-fields, and of the
kitchen when the harvest supper was cooking; owning that
he remembered he had felt hotter in India. Hugh heaped
questions upon him about his native country and the voyage).
and Holt liked to be asked; so that the boys were not at all



MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 55.



like strangers just met for the first time. They raised their
voices in the eagerness of their talk, from a whisper so as to
be heard quite across the table, above the hum and buzz
of above thirty others, who were learning their lessons half
aloud.

At last Hugh was startled by hearing the words “ Prater,”
* Prater the second,” He was silent instantly, to Holt’s great
wonder.

Without raising his eyes from his book, Phil said, so as to
be heard as far as the usher,

“Who prated of Prater the second? Who is Prater the
third?”

There was a laugh which provoked the usher to come and
see whereabouts in Sallust such a passage as this was to be
found. Not finding any such, he knuckled Phil’s head, and
pulled his hair, till Hugh cried out,

“Oh, don’t, sir! Don’t hurt him so!”

“Do you call that hurting? You will soon find what
hurting is, when you become acquainted with our birch.
You shall have four times seven with our birch Let us



see—that is your favourite number, I think.”

The usher looked round, and almost everybody laughed.

“You see I have your secret;—four times seven,” con-
tinued Mr. Carnaby. “‘What do you shake your head
for?” ee

“Becaise you have not my secret about four times
seven.”



56 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“ Did not I hear your father? Eh?”

“What did you hear my father say? Nobody here knows
what he meant, and nobody need know, unless I choose to
tell—which I don’t. Please don’t teaze Phil about it, sir,
for he knows no more about it than you do.”

Mr. Carnaby said something about the impertinence of —
little boys, as if they could have secrets, and then declared
it high time that the youngsters should go to bed. Hugh
delivered Cook’s Voyages into his hands, and then bade
Phil good night. He was just going to put his face up to
be kissed, but recollected in time that he was to leave off
kissing when he went to school. He held out his hand,
but Phil seemed not to see it, and only told him to be sure
to lie enough on one side, so as to leave him room, and that
he was to take the side of the bed next the window. Hugh
nodded and went off, with Holt and two more who slept in
the same room.

The two who were not new boys were in bed in a minute;
and when they saw Hugh wash his face and hands, they sat
up in bed to stare. One of them told him that he had
better not do that, as the maid would be coming for the
light, and would leave him in the dark, and report of him if
he was not in bed. So Hugh made a great splutter, and did
not half dry his face, and left the water in the basin; a thing
which they told him was not allowed. He saw that the
others had not kneeled down to say their prayers—a practice
which he had never omitted since he could say a prayer,



MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 57



except when he nad the measles. He knew the boys were
watching him, but he thought of his mother, and how she
had taught him to pray at her knee. He hid himself as well
as he could with the scanty bed-curtains, and kneeled. He
could not attend to the words he said while feeling that
eyes were upon him, and before he had done, the maid came
in for the candle.

She waited; but when he got into bed she told him that
he must be quicker to-morrow night, as she had no time to
spare waiting for the candle.

Hugh was more tired than he had ever been in his life.
This had been the longest day he had ever known. It
seemed more like a week than a day. Yet he could not go
to sleep. He had forgotten to ask Phil to be sure and wake
him in‘time in the morning, and now he must keep awake
till Phil came, to say this. Then, he could not but ask him-
self whether he liked, and should like, being at school as
much as he expected; and when he felt how very unlike
home it was, and how rough everybody seemed, and how
Phil appeared almost as if he was ashamed of him, instead
of helping him, he was so miserable he did not know what
to do.

He cried bitterly—cried till his pillow was quite wet,
and he was almost choked with his grief; for he tried
hard not to let his sobs be heard. After a while he felt
what he might do. Though he had kneeled he had not
really prayed; and if he had, God is never weary of prayers,



58 THE CROFTON BOYS.

—— —



It was a happy thought to Hugh that his very best Friend
was with him still, and that he might speak to Him at any
time.

He spoke now in his heart; and a great comfort it was.
He said,

“O God, I am all alone here, where nobody knows me;
and everything is very strange and uncomfortable. Please
make people kind to me till Iam used to them; and keep
up a brave heart in me, if they are not. Help me not to
mind little things; but to do my lessons well, that I may get
to like being a Crofton boy, as I thought I should. I love
them all at home very much—better than I ever did before.
Make them love me, and think of me every day, particularly
Agnes, that they may be as glad as I shall be when I go
home at Christmas.”

This was the most of what he had to say; and he dropped
asleep with the feeling that God was listening to him.

After a long while, as it seemed to him, though it was only
-an hour, there was a light and some bustle in the room. It
was Phil and two others coming to bed.

“Oh, Phil!” cried Hugh, starting bolt upright and winking
with sleep, “I meant to keep awake, to ask you to be sure
and call me in the morning, time enough—quite time enough,
please.”

The others langhed; and Phil asked whether he had not
seen the bell as he came, and what it should be for but to
ring everybody up in the morning,



MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 59

“But I might not hear it,” pleaded Hugh.

“Not hear it! Youll soon see that.”

“Well, but you will see that I really do wake, won’
your”

“The bell will take care of that, I tell you,” was all he
could get from Phil.



HUGH PLEADS FOR HIS BROTHER,





CHAPTER V.

CROFTON PLAY.

Hucu found, in the morning, that there was no danger of
his not hearing the bell. Its clang-clang startled him out of
'asound sleep; and he was on his feet on the floor almost
before his eyes were open. The boys who were more used
to the bell did not make quite so much haste. They yawned '
a few times, and turned out more slowly; so that Hugh had
the great tin wash-basin to himself longer than the rest.
There was a basin to every three boys; and, early as Hugh
began, his companions were impatient long before he had
done. At first they waited in curiosity to see what he was
going to do after washing his face; when he went further,
they began to quiz; but when they found that he actually
thought of washing his feet, they hooted and groaned at him
tor a dirty brat.

“Dirty!” cried Hugh, facing them, amazed—* dirty for
washing my feet! Mother says it is a dirty trick not to wash
all over every day.”

60



CROFTON PLAY. 61



Phil told him that was stuff and nonsense here. There
was no room and no time for such home doings. The boys
all washed their heads and feet on Saturdays. He would
soon find that he might be glad to get his face and hands
done in the mornings.

The other boys in the room were, or pretended to be, so
disgusted with the very idea of washing feet in a basin, that
they made Hugh rinse and rub out the tin basin several
times before they would use it, and then there was a great
bustle to get downstairs at the second bell. Hugh pulled
his brother’s arm, as Phil was brushing out of the room, and
asked, in a whisper whether there would be time to say his
prayers.

“There will be prayers in the school-room. You must be
in time for them,” said Phil. ‘You had better come with
me.”

“Do wait one moment, while I just comb my hair.”

Phil fidgeted, and others giggled, while Hugh tried to part
his hair, as Susan had taught him. He gave it up, and left
it rough, thinking he would come up and do it when there
was nobody there to laugh at him.

The school-room looked chilly and dull, as. there was no
sunshine in it till the afternoon; and still Mr. Tooke was not
there, as Hugh had hoped he would be.. Mrs. Watson and
the servants came in for prayers, which were well read by the
usher; and then everybody went to business—everybody but
Hugh and Holt, who had nothing to do. Class after class
came up for repetition; and this repetition seemed to the



62 THE CROFTON BOYS.



new boys an accomplishment they should never acquire.
They did not think that any practice would enable them to
gabble as everybody seemed able to gabble here. Hugh
had witnessed something of it before; Phil having been
wont to run off at home, “Sal, Sol, Ren et Splen,” to the
end of the passage, for the admiration of his sisters, and so
much to little Harry’s amusement, that Susan, however busy
she might be, came to listen, and then asked him to say it
again, that cook might hear what he learned at school.
Hugh now thought that none of them gabbled quite so fast
as Phil, but he soon found out, by a glance or two of Phil’s

to one side, that he was trying to astonish the new boys. It
is surprising how it lightened Hugh’s heart to find that his
brother did not quite despise or feel ashamed of him, as he
had begun to think, but that he even took pains to show off.
He was sorry, too, when the usher spoke sharply to Phil,
and even rapped his head with the cane, asking him what
he spluttered out his nonsense at that rate for. Thus ended
Phil’s display; and Hugh felt as hot, and as ready to cry, as
if it had happened to himself.

Perhaps the usher saw this, for when he called Hugh up,
he was very kind. He looked at the Latin grammar he had
used with Miss Harold, and saw by the dogs’-ears exactly
how far Hugh had gone in it, and asked him only what he
could answer very well. Hugh said three declensions, with
only one mistake. Then he was shown the part that he was
to say to-morrow morning; and Hugh walked away, all the
happier for having something to do, like everybody. else



CROFTON PLAY. 63



He was so little afraid of the usher, that he went back to
him to ask where he had better sit,

“Sit! Oh, I suppose you must have a desk, though you
have nothing to put in it. If there is a spare desk, you shall
have it; if not, we will find a corner for you somewhere.”

“Some of the boys whispered that Mrs. Watson’s footstool,
under her apron, would do; but the usher overheard this,
and observed that it took some people a good while to know
anew boy, and that they might find that a little fellow might
be as much of a man asa big one. And the usher called
the oldest boy in the school, and asked him to see if there
was a desk for little Proctor. There was; and Hugh put
into it his two or three school-books and his slate, and felt
that he was now indeed a Crofton boy. Then, the usher was
kinder than he had expected; and he had still to see Mr.
Tooke, of whom he was not afraid at all; So Hugh’s spirits
rose, and he liked the prospect of breakfast as well as any
boy in the school.

There was one more rebuff for him first, however, He
ran up to his.room to finish combing his hair, while the
other boys were thronging into the long room to breakfast.
He found the housemaids there, making the beds; and they
both cried “Out! out!” and clapped their hands at him,
and threatened to tell Mrs. Watson of his having broken
rules, if he did not go this moment. Hugh asked what
Mrs. Watson would say to his hair, if he went to breakfast
with it as it was. One of the maids was good-natured
enough to comb it for him for once, but she said he must



64 THE CROFTON BOYS.



carry a comb in his pocket, as the boys were not allowed to
go to their rooms, except at stated hours.

At last Hugh saw Mr. Tooke. When the boys entered
school at nine o’clock, the master was:at his desk. Hugh
went up to his end of the room with a smiling face, while
Tom Holt hung back; and he kept beckoning Tom Holt
on, having told him there was nothing to be afraid of.
But when at last Mr. Tooke saw them, he made no difference
between the two, and seemed to forget having ever seen
Hugh. He.told them he hoped they would be good boys,
and would do credit to Crofton; and then he asked Mr.
Carnaby to set them something to leam. And this was all
they had to do with Mr. Tooke for a long while.

This morning in school, from nine till twelve, seemed the
longest morning these little boys had ever known. When
they remembered that the afternoon would be as long, and
every morning and afternoon for three months, their hearts
sank. Perhaps, if any one had told them that the time
would grow shorter and shorter by use, and at last, when
they had plenty to do, almost too short, they would not
have believed it, because they could not yet feel it. But
what they now found was only what every boy and girl
finds.on beginning school, or entering upon any new way of
life.

Mr. Carnaby, who was busy with others, found it rather
difficuit to fill up their time. When Hugh had said some
Latin, and helped his companion to learn his first Latin
lesson, and both had written a copy and done a sum, Mr.



CROFTON PLAY. 65



Carnaby could not spare them any more time or thought,
and told them they might do what they liked, if they only
kept quiet till school was up. So they made out the ridicu-
lous figures which somebody had carved upon their desks,
and the verses, half rubbed out, which were scribbled inside;
and then they reckoned, on their slates, how many days
there were before the Christmas. holidays—how many school-
days, and how many Sundays. And then Hugh began to
draw a steamboat in the Thames, as seen from the leads of
his father’s house; while Holt drew on his slate the ship in
which he came over from India. But before they had done,
the clock struck twelve: school was up, and there was a
general rush into the playground.

Now Hugh was really to see the country. Except that
the sun had shone pleasantly into his room in the morning,
through waving trees, nothing had yet occurred to make him
feel that he was in the country. Now, however, he was in
the open air, with trees sprinkled all over the landscape, and
green fields stretching away, and the old church-tower halt
covered with ivy. Hugh screamed with pleasure; and nobody
thought it odd, for almost every boy was shouting. Hugh
longed to pick up some of the shining brown chestnuts
which he had seen yesterday in the road, under the trees;
and he was now cantering away to the spot, when Phil ran
after him, and roughly stopped him, saying he would get into
_a fine scrape for the first day if he went out of bounds.

Hugh had forgotten there were such things as bounds, and
was not at all glad to be reminded of them now. He sighed

5



66 THE CROFTON BOYS,



as he begged Phil to show him exactly where he might go

and where he might not. Phil did so in an impatient way,

and then was off to trap-ball, because his party were waiting
for him.

The chestnut-trees overhung one corner of the playground
within the paling, and in that corner Hugh found several
chestnuts which had burst their sheaths, and lay among the
first fallen leaves. He pocketed them with great delight,
wondering that nobody had been before him to secure such
a treasure. “ Agnes should have some; and little Harry
would find them nice playthings. They looked good to
eat too, and he thought he could spare one to taste; so he
took out his knife, cut off the point of a fine swelling chest-
nut, and tasted a bit of the inside. Just as he was making
a face over it, and wondering that it was so nasty, when
those which his father roasted in the fire-shovel on Christmas
Day were so good, he heard laughter behind him, and found
that he was again doing something ridiculous, though he
knew not what; and in a moment poor Hugh was as un-
happy as ever.

He ran away from the laughing boys, and went quite to
the opposite corner of the playground, where a good number
of his schoolfellows were playing ball under the orchard
wall. Hugh ran hither and thither, like the rest, trying tc
catch the ball, but he never could do it; and he was jostled.
and thrown down, and another boy fell over him; and he
was told that he knew nothing about play, and had bette:
move off,



_ CROFTON PLAY. 67

eeeren err ES RE

He did so with a heavy heart, wondering how he was ever
to be like the other boys, if nobody would take him in hand
and teach him to play, or even let him learn, Remember.
ing what his mother expected of him, he tried to sing, to



A BITTER DISCOVERY,

prevent crying, and began to count the pales round the

playground for something to do. This presently brought |

him tc a tree which stood on the very boundary, its trunk

serving, instead of two or three pales. It was only a twisted

old ap,.€-tree, put the more twisted and gnarled it was, the

nore it looked like a tree that Hugh could climb; and he
5—2



68 THE CROFTON BOYS.



had always longea to climb a tree. Glancing up, He saw
a boy aweadv there, sitting on the fork of two branches,
reading.

“Have you a mind to come up?” asked the boy.

“Ves, sir, I should like to try to climb a tree. I never
did.”

“Well, this is a good one to begin with. I'll lend you a
hand; shall 1?”

“Thank you, sir.”

“Don’t call me ‘sir. I’m only a schoolboy, like you. I
am Dan Firth. Call me Firth, as I am the only one of
the name here. You are little Proctor, I think—-Proctor’s
brother.”

“Yes; but, Firth, I shall pull you down if I slip.”

“Not you; but I'll come down, and so send you up to
my seat, which is the safest to begin with. Stand off.”

Firth swung himself down, and then, showing Hugh where
to plant his feet, and propping him when he wanted it, he
soon seated him’ on the fork, and laughed good-naturedly
when Hugh waved his cap over his head, on occasion of
being up in a tree. He let him get down and up again
several times, till he could do it quite alone, and felt that
he might have a seat here whenever it was not occupied by
any one else.

While Hugh sat in the branches, venturing to leave hold
with one hand, that he might fan his hot face with his cap,
Firth stood on the rail of the palings, holding by the tree,
and talking to him. Firth told him that this was the only



CROFTON PLAY. 69



tree the boys were allowed to climb, since Ned Reeve had
fallen from the great ash and hurt his spine. He showed
what trees he had himself climbed before that accident, and
it made Hugh giddy to think of being within eight feet of .
the top of the lofty elm in the churchyard, which Firth had
thought nothing of mounting,

“Did anybody teach you?” asked Hugh.

“Yes; my father taught me to climb, when I was younger
than you.”

“And had you anybody to teach you games and things,
when you came here?”

“No; but I had learned a good deal of that before I
came, and so I soon fell into the ways here. Have you
anybody to teach you?”

“No—yes—why, no. I thought Phil would have showed
me things; but he does not seem to mind me at all.” And
Hugh bit his lip, and fanned himself faster.

‘Ah! he attends to you more than you think.”

“Does he? Then why—but what good does it do
me?” ; :

“What good? His holding off makes you push your own
way. It lets you make friends for yourself.”

“T have no friends here,” said Hugh.

“Yes, you have. HereamI. You would not have had
me, if you had been at Proctor’s heels at this moment.”

“Will you be my friend, then: ”

“That 1 wil.”

“What, 2 great poy like you, that sits reading in a tree!



70 THE CROFTON BOYS.



But I may read nere beside you. You said there was room
for two.”

“Ay; but you must not use it yet,—at least, not often,
if you wish to do well here. Everybody knows I can play
at anything. From the time I became captain of the wall
at fives, I have had liberty to do what I like, without question.
But you must show that you are up to play, before they will
let you read in peace and quiet.”

“But how can I, if—i 2



“Once show your spirit,—prove that you can shift for
yourself, and you will find Phil open out wonderfully. He
and you will forget all his shyness then. Once show him
that he need not be ashamed of you ”

_ “Ashamed of me!” cried Hugh, firing up.

“Yes. Little boys are looked upon as girls in a school
till they show that they are little men. And then again, you
have been brought up with girls,—have not you?”

“To be sure; and so was he.”

“And half the boys here, I dare say. Well, they are
called Bettys til 2

“TI am not a Betty,” cried Hugh, flashing again.

“They suppose you are, because you part your hair, and
do as you have been used to do at home.”

“What business have they with my hair? I might as wel)
call them Bruins for wearing theirs shaggy.”

“Very true. They will let you and your hair alone when
they see what you are made of; and then Phil will——”

“ He will ov‘ me when 1 don't want it; and now, when









CROFTON PLAY, 7

el ern en

he might ip me, there he is, far off, never caring about
what becomes of me.”

“Oh, yes, he does. He is watching you all the time. You
and he will have it all out some day before Christmas, and
then you will see how he really cares about you. Really
your hair is very long,—too like a girl’s. Shall I cut it for
your”

“T should like it,” said Hugh, “but I don’t want the boys
to think I am afraid of them, or to begin giving up to
them.”

“You are right there. We will let it alone now, and cut
it when it suits our convenience.”

“What a nice place this is, to be sure!” cried Hugh, as
the feeling of loneliness went off. “But the rooks do not
make so much noise as I expected.”

“You will find what they can do in that way when spring
comes,—when they are building.”

“ And when may we go out upon the heath, and into the
fields where the lambs are?”

“We go long walks on Saturday afternoons ; but you do
not expect to see young lambs in October, do you?”

“Oh, I forgot. I never can remember the seasons for
things.”

“That shows you are a Londoner. You will jearn all
those things here. If you look for hares in our walks, you
may chance to see one; or you may start a pheasant ; but
take care you don’t mention lambs, or goslings, or cowslips,
or any spring things, or you will never hear the last of it.”



72 LHE CROFTON BOYS.





“Thank you; but wnat wili poor Holt do? He is from
India, and he knows very little about our ways.”

“They may laugh at him; but they will not despise him,
as they might a Londoner. Being an Indian, and being a
Londoner, are very different things.”

‘““ And yet how proud the Londoners are over the country.
It is very odd.”

“ People are proud of their own ways all the world over,
You will be proud of being a Crofton boy by-and-bye.”

“ Perhaps I am now, a little,” said Hugh, blushing.

“What, already? Ah! you will do, Isee. I have known
old people proud of their age, and young people of their
youth. I have seen poor people proud of their poverty ; and
everybody has seen rich people proud of their wealth. I
have seen happy people proud of their prosperity, and the
afflicted proud of their afflictions. Yes, people can always
manage to be proud: so you have boasted of being a Lon-
doner up to this time, and from this time you will hold your
head high as a Crofton boy.”

-“Hlow long? Till when?”

“Ah! till when? What next? What ao you mean to be
afterwards 2”

“A soldier, or a sailor, or a great traveller, or something
of that kind. I mean to go quite round the world, like
Captain Cook.”

“Then you will come home, proud of having been round
the world; and you will meet with some old neighbour who
boasts of having spent all his life in the house he was born in.”

ory



CROFTON PLAY. 73



“Qld Mr. Dixon told mother that of himself, very lately.
Oh, dear! how often does the postman come?”

“You want a letter from home, do you? But you left
them only yesterday morning.”

“*T don’t know how to believe that,—-it seems such an
immense time! But wnen does the postman come?”

‘* Any day when he has ijetters to bring,—at about four in
the afternoon. We see him come, from the school-room;
but we do not know who the letters are for till school breaks
up at five.”

“Oh, dear!” cried Hugh, thinking what the suspense
must be, and the disappointment at last to twenty boys,
perhaps, for one that was gratified. Firth advised him to
write a letter home before he began to expect one. If he
did not like to ask the usher, he himself would rule the
paper for him, and he could write a bit at a time, after his
lessons were done in the evening, till the sheet was full.

Hugh then told his grievance about the usher, and Firth
thought that though it was not wise in Hugh to prate about
Crofton on the top of the coach, it was worse to sit by and
listen without warning, unless the listener meant to hold his
own tongue. But he fancied the usher had since heard
something which made him sorry; and the best way now
was for Hugh to bear no malice, and remember nothing
tore of the affair than to be discreet in his future journeys.

*What is the matter there?” cried Hugh. “Oh, dear!
something very terrible must have happened. How that boy
is screaming!”



74. THE CROFTON BOYS,



“Tt is only Lamb again,” replied Firth. ‘“ You will soon
get used to his screaming. He is a very passionate boy—I
never saw such a passionate fellow.”

“ But what are they doing to him?”

“Somebody is putting him into a passion, I suppose,
There is always somebody to do that.”

“What a shame!” cried Hugh.

N65 51 see no wit in it,” replied Firth. ‘Anybody may
do it. You have only to hold your little finger up to put
him in a rage.”

Hugh thought Firth was rather cool about the matter.
But Firth was not so cool when the throng opened for a
moment, and showed what was really done to the angry boy.
Only his head appeared aboveground. His schoolfellows
had put him into a hole they had dug, and had filled it up
to his chin, stamping down the earth, so that the boy was
perfectly helpless, while wild with rage.

“That is too bad!” cried Firth. ‘That would madden
a saint.”

And he jumped down from the paling, and ran towards
the crowd. Hugh, forgetting his height from the ground,
stood up in the tree, almost as angry as Lamb himself, and
staring with all his might to see what he could. He saw
Firth making his way through the crowd, evidently remon-
strating, if not threatening. He saw him snatch a spade
from a boy who was flourishing it in Lamb’s face. He saw
that Firth was digging, though half a dozen boys had thrown
themselves on his back, and hung on his arms. He saw



CROFTON PLAY. I



HUGH TO THE RESCUE,

that Firth persevered till Lamb had got his right arm out of
the ground, and was striking everything within reach. Then

ne saw Firth dragged down and away, while the boys made
a circle round Lamb, putting a foot or hand within his reach,
and then snatching it away again, till the boy yelled with
tage at the mockery.



76 THE CROFTON BOYÂ¥s.



Hugh could look on no longer. He scrambled down
from the tree, scampered to the spot, burst through the
throng, and seized Lamb’s hand. Lamb struck him a heavy
blow, taking him for an enemy ; but Hugh cried “TI am your
friend,” seized his hand again, and tugged till he was first
ted and then black in the face, and till Lamb had worked
his shoulders out of the hole, and seemed likely to have the
use of his other arm in a trice.

Lamb’s tormentors at first let Hugh alone in amazement;
but they were not Jong in growing angry with him too.
They hustled: him—they pulled him all ways—they tripped
him up ; but Hugh’s spirit was roused, and that brought his
body up to the struggle again and again. He wrenched
himself free, he scrambled to his feet again, as often as he
was thrown down; and in a few minutes he had plenty of
support. Phil was taking his part, and shielding him from.
many blows. Firth had got Lamb out of the hole; and
the party against the tormentors was now so strong that they
began to part off till the struggle ceased. Firth kept his
grasp of the spade; for Lamb’s passion still ran so high that
there was no saying what might be the consequences of
leaving any dangerous weapon within his reach. He was
still fuming and stamping, Hugh gazing at him the while in
wonder and fear.

“There stands your defender, Lamb,” said Firth, “ think-
ing he never saw a boy in a passion before. Come, have
done with it for his sake; be a man, as he is. Here, help
me to fill up this hole—both of you. Stamp down the earth,



CROFTON PLAY. 77



Lamb. Tread it well—tread your anger well down into it.
Think of this little friend of yours here—a Crofton boy only
yesterday !”



A FRIEND GAINED.

Lamb did help to fill the hole, but he did not say a
word—not one word to anybody, till the dinner-bell rang.
Then, at the pump, where the party were washing their hot
and dirty and bruised hands, he held out his hand to Hugh,

muttering, with no very good grace,



78 THE CROFTON BOYS.



——

“T don’t know what made you help me, but I will never
be in a passion with you,—unless you put me out, that is.”

Hugh replied that he had come to help because he never
could bear to see anybody sade worse, He always tried at
home to keep the little boys and girls off “ drunk old Tom,”
as he was called in the neighbourhood. It was such a shame
to make anybody worse! Lamb looked as if he was going
to fly at Hugh now; but Firth put his arm round Hugh’s
neck, and drew him into the house, sayiny in his ear,

“Don’t say any more that you have no friends here. You
have me for one; and you might have had another—two in
one morning—but for your plain speaking about drunk old
Tom.”

“Did I say any harm?”

“* No—no harm,” replied Firth, laughing. “ You will do,
my boy—when you have got through a few scrapes. I’m
vour friend, at any rote.”







CHAPTER VIL

FIRST RAMBLE.

Hucu’s afternoon lessons were harder than those of the
morning; and in the evening he found he had so much to
do, that there was very little time left for writing his letter
home. Some time there was, however; and Firth did not
forget to rule his paper, and-to let Hugh use his ink, Hugh
had been accustomed to copy the prints he found in the
voyages and tfavels he read; and he could never see a
picture of a savage but he wanted to copy it. He was thus
accustomed to a pretty free use of his slate-pencil. He now
thought that it would save a great deal of description if he
sent a picture or two in his letter; so he flourished off, on
the first page, a sketch of Mr. Tooke sitting at his desk at
the top of the school, and of Mr. Carnaby standing at his
desk at the bottom of the school.

The next evening he made haste to fill up the sheet, for
he found his business increasing upon his hané< so fast that

79



80 THE CROFTON BOYS.



he did not know when he should get his letter off, if he did
not dispatch it at once. He was just folding it up, when
Tom Holt observed that it was a pity not to put some words
into the mouths of the figures, to make them more animated ;
and he showed Hugh, by the curious carvings of their desks,
how to put words into the mouths of figures. Hugh then
remembered having seen this done in the caricatures in the
print-shops in London, and he seized on the idea. He put
into Mr. Tooke’s mouth the words which were oftenest
heard from him, “Proceed, gentlemen;” and into Mr.
Carnaby’s, *‘ Hold your din.”

Firth was too busy with his sense-verses to mind the little
boys, as they giggled, with their heads close together, over
Hugh’s sheet of paper; but the usher was never too busy to
be aware of any fun which might possibly concern his dignity.
He had his eye on the new boys the whole while. He let
Hugh direct his letter, and paint up a stroke or two which
did not look so well as the rest; and it was not till Hugh
was rolling the wafer about on his tongue that he interfered.
Mr. Carnaby then came up, tapped Hugh’s head, told him
not to get on so fast, for that every letter must be looked
over before it went to the post. While saying this, he took
the letter and put it into his waistcoat pocket. In vain
Hugh begged to have it again, saying he would write another.
The more he begged, and the more dismayed Tom Holt
looked, the less Mr. Carnaby would attend to either. Firth
let himself be interrupted to hear the case; but he could do
nothing in it. It was a general rule, which he thought every



FIRST RAMBLE. 81



boy had known; and it was too late now to prevent the
letter being looked over.
Mr. Carnaby was so angry at the liberty Hugh had taken













REPORTED FOR MISCONDUCT.

with his face and figure, that, in spite of all prayers and a

good many tears, he walked up the school with the letter,

followed by poor Hugh, as soon as Mr. Tooke had taken

his seat next morning, Hugh thought that Holt, who had

put him up to the most offensive part of the pictures, might

have borne him company; but Holt was a timid boy, and
6



Sa THE CROFTON BOYS.



he really 1ad not courage to leave his seat. So Hugh stood
alone, awaiting Mr. Tooke’s awful words, while the whole of
the first class looked up from their books, in expectation of
what wasto happen. They waited some time for the master’s

. words for he was trying to help laughing. He and Mr.
Carnaby were so much alike in the pictures, and both so
like South Sea Islanders, that it was impossible to help
laughing at the thought of this sketch going abroad as a
representation ot the Crofton masters. At last, all pa. ties
laughed aloud, and Mr. Tooke handed Hugh his wafer-glass,
and bade him wafer up his letter, and by all means send it.
Mr. Carnaby could not remain offended, if his principal was
not angry; so here the matter ended, except that Hugh
made some strong resolutions about his future letters, and
that the corners of the master’s mouth were seen to be out
of their usual order several times in the course of the
morning.

This incident, and everything which haunted Hugh’s mind
and engrossed his attention, was a serious evil to him; for
his business soon grew tobe more than his habit of mind
was equal to. In afew days, he learned to envy the boys
(and they were almost the whole school) who could fix their
attention completely and immediately on the work before
them, and relax as completely when it was accomplished.
When his eyes were wandering, they observed boy after boy
frowning over his dictionary, or repeating to himself, earnestly
and without pause; and presently the business was done,
and the learner at ease, feeling confident that he was ready

a



FIRST RAMBLE. 83



to meet his master. After double the time had assed,
Hugh was still trying to get the meaning of his lesson into
his head—going over the same words a dozen times, without
gaining any notion of their meaning—suffering, in short,
from his long habit of inattention at home. He did now try
hard ; but he seemed to get only headaches for his pains,
His brother saw enough to make him very sorry for Hugh
before ten days were over. He might not, perhaps, have been
struck with his anxious countenance, his frequent starts, and
his laying his head down on the desk because it ached so,
if it had not been for what happened at.night. Sometimes
Hugh started out of bed, and began to dress, when the elder
boys went up with their light, only an hour after, the younger
ones, Sometimes he would begin saving his syntax in the
middle of the night, fancying he was standing before Mr.
Carnaby ; and once he walked in his sleep as far as the head
of the stairs, and tren suddenly woke, and could not make
~ out where he was. Phil should have told Mr. Tooke of
these things: but Hugh was so very anxious that nobody
should know of his “tricks” (as the boys in his room called
his troubles), that Phil only mentioned the matter to Mrs.
Watson, who had known so many bad sleepers among little
boys, and had so little idea that the habit was anything new,
that she took scarcely any notice of it. She had his hair
cut very short and close, and saw that he took a moderate
supper, and was satisfied that all would be well. Hugh did
not patt with his hair till he had joked himself about ils
length, as much as any one could quiz him for it. When he

6—2



84 THE CROFTON BOYS.





to

had pulled it down over the end of his nose, and peeped
through it, like an owl out of an ivy-bush, he might be sup-
posed to part with it voluntarily, and not because he was
laughed at.



CROPPED.

Phil’s observation of his brother’s toil and trouble led him
to give him some help. Almost every day he would hear
Hugh say his lesson—or try to say it; for the poor boy
seldom succeeded. Phil sometimes called him stupid, and
sometimes refrained from saying so, whatever he. might
think; but there really was very little difference in the result,
whether Phil heard the lessons beforehand or not; and it
gave Joe Cape a great advantage over Phil that he had no
little brother to attend to. Considering how selfish rivalship
is apt to make boys (and even men), it was perhaps no
wonder that Phil sometimes kept. out of Hugh’s way at the
tight hour, saying to himself that his proper business was to



FIRST RAMBLE, 85



do his lessons, and get or keep ahead of Joe Cape; and
that Hugh must take his chance, and work his own way, as
other boys had todo. This conduct might not be wondered
atin Phil but it hurt Hugh, and made him do his lessons
all the worse. He did not like to expose his brother’s un-
kindness to any one, or he would oftener have asked Fisth
to help him. Firth, too, had plenty of work of his own to
do. More than once, however, Firth met the little lad,
wandering about, with 1: grammar in his hand, in search
f the hidden Phil; and then Firth would stop him, and sit
down with him, and have patience, and give him such clear
explanations, such good examples of the rules he was to
learn, that it all became easy, and F'ugh found his-lessons
were to him only what those of other boys seemed to them.
Still, however, and at the best, Hugh was, as a learner, far
too much at the mercy of circumstances—the victim of
what passed before his eyes, or was said within his hearing.
Boys who find difficulty in attending to their lessons ate
sure to be more teased with interruptions than any others.
Holt had not the habit of learning; and he and Hugh were
continually annoyed by the boys who sat near them watching
how they got on, and making remarks upon them. One
day, Mr. Tooke was called out of the school-room to a
visitor, and Mr. Carnaby went up to take the master’s place
and hear his class. This was too good an opportunity for
the boys selow to Jet slip; and they began to play tricks,—
most of them directed against Hugh and Tom Holt. One
boy, Warner, began to make the face that always made Holt



86 THE CROFTON BOYS.



laugh, however he tried to be grave. Page drew a caricature
of Mrs, Watson on his slate, and held it up; and Davison
took a mask out of his desk, and even ventured to tie it un,
as if it had not been school-time.

“T declare I can’t learn my lesson—'tis too bad!” cried
Hugh.

“Tis a shame!” said Tom Holt, sighing for breath after
his struggle not to laugh. ‘‘ We shall never be ready.”

Hugh made gestures of indignation at the boys, which
only caused. worse faces to be made, and the mask to
nod.

‘We won't look at them,” proposed Holt. “Let us cover
our eyes, anc not look up at all.”

Hugh put his hands before his eyes, but still his mind’s
eye saw the grinning mask, and his lesson did not get on.
Besides, a piece of wet sponge lighted on the very page he
was learning from. He looked up fiercely, to see who had
thrown it. It was no other than Tooke, who belonged to
that class—it was Tooke, to judge by his giggle, and his
pretending to hide his face, as if ashamed. Hugh tossed
back the sponge, so as to hit Tooke on the nose. Then
Tooke was angry, and threw it again, and the sponge passed
backwards and forwards several times, for Hugh was by this
time very angry,—boiling with indignation at the hardship of
not being able to learn his lesson, when he really would if
he could. While the sponge was still passing to and fro,
Mr. Carnaby’s voice was heard from the far end of the
room, desiring Warner, Page, Davison, and Tooke to be



FIRST RAMBLE, ; 87



quiet, and let the boys alone till Mr. Tooke came in, when
Mr. Tooke would take his own measures.

Hugh, wondering how Mr, Carnaby knew, at that distance,
what was going on, found that Holt was no longer by his

















WORRYING THE TUNIORS,

side. Ina moment, Holt returned to his seat, flushed and
out of breath. A very slight hiss was heard from every form
near, as he came down the room.

“Oh, Holt! you have been ielling tales!” cried Hugh,

“Telling tales!” exclaimed Holt, in consternation, for
Holt knew nothing of school ways. “TI never thought of
that. They asked me to tell Mr. Carnaby that we could nog
learn our lessons,”



88 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“They! Who? Iam sure I never asked you.”

“No, you did not; but Harvey and Prince did,—and
' Gillingham. They said Mr. Carnaby would soon rake those
fellows quiet; and they told me to go.”

“You hear! They are calling you ‘tell-tale.’ That will
be your name now. Oh, Holt, you should not have told
tales. However, I will stand by you,” Hugh continued,
seeing the terror that Holt was in.

“*T meant no harm,” said Holt, trembling. ‘Was not it a
shame that they would not let us learn our lessons?”

“Ves, it was—but——”

At this moment Mr. Tooke entered the room. As he
passed the forms, the boys were all bent over their books,
as if they could think of nothing else. Mr. Tooke walked
up the room to his desk, and Mr. Carnaby walked down the
toom to 47s desk; and then Mr. Carnaby said, quite aloud,

“Mr. Tooke, sir.”

“Well.”

Here Holt sprang from his desk, and tan to the usher and
besought him not to say a word about what Warner’s class
had been doing. He even hung on Mr. Carnaby’s arm in
entreaty; but Mr. Carnaby shook him off, and commanded
him back to his seat. Then the whole school heard Mr.
Tooke told about the wry faces and the mask, and the
trouble of the little boys. Mr. Tooke was not often angry,
but when he was, his face grew white, and his lips trembled,
His face was white now. He stood up, and called before
him the little boy who had informed. Hugh chose to go



FIRST RAMBLE. 89



with Holt, though Holt had not gone up with him about
the letter the other day; and Holt felt how kind this was.
Mr. Tooke desired to know who the offenders were; and as
they were named, he called to them to stand up in their



VAIN FER CEaRON
places. Then came the sentence. Mr. Tooke would never
forgive advantage being taken of his absence. If there were
boys who could not be trusted while his back was turned,
they must be made to remember him when he was out of
sight, by punishment. Page must remain in school after
hours, to learn twenty lines of Virgil; Davison twenty;
Tooke forty-——”

Here everybody looked round to see how Tooke bore his
father being so angry with him.



go 2HE CROFTON BOYS,





«Please, sir,” cried one boy, “I saw little Proctor throw
a sponge at Tooke. He did it twice.”

“Never mind,” answered Tooke. “I threw it at him first.
It is my sponge.”

“And Warner,” continued the master, as if he had not
heard the interruption, “considering that Warner has got oft
too easily for many pranks of late,—Warner seventy.”

Seventy! The idea of having anybody condemned,
through him, to learn seventy lines of Latin by heart, made
Holt so miserable, that the word seventy seemed really to
prick his very ears. Though Mr. Tooke’s face was still white,
Holt ventured up to him.

“Pray, sir-——”

“Not a word of intercession for those boys!" said the
master. “I will not hear a word in their favour.”

“Then, sir. »

“Well?”

“IT only want to say, then, that Proctor told no tales, sir
I did not mean any harm, sir, but [ told because——”

“ Never mind that,” cried Hugh, afraid that he would now
be telling of Harvey, Prince, and Gillingham, who had per-
suaded him to go up.

“T have nothing to do with that. That is your affair,”
said the master, sending the boys back to their seats.

Poor Holt had cause to rue this morning for long after.
He was weary of the sound of hissing, and of the name
“tell-tale ;” and the very boys who had prompted him to ge
- up were at first silent, and then joined against him. He





FIRST RAMBLE. 91

complained to Hugh of the difficulty of knowing what it
was right to do. He had been angry on Hugh’s account .
chiefly; and he still thought it was very unjust to hinder
their lessons, when they wished not to be idle; and yet they
were all treating him as if he had done something worse
than the boys with the mask. Hugh thought all this was true;
but he believed it was settled among schoolboys (though
Holt had never had the opportunity of knowing it) that it
was a braver thing for boys to bear any teasing from one
another than to call in the power of the master to help. A
boy who did that was supposed not to be able to take care
of himself; and for this he was despised, besides being dis-
liked, for having brought punishment upon his companions.

Holt wished Hugh had not been throwing sponges at the
time—he wished Hugh had prevented his going up, He
would take good care how he told tales again.

“You had better say so,” advised Hugh, “and then they
will see that you had never been at school, and did not
know how to manage.”

The first Saturday had been partly dreaded, and partly
longed for, by Hugh. He had longed for the afternoon’s
ramble, but Saturday morning was the time for saying tables,
among other things. Nothing happened as he had expected.
The afternoon was so rainy that there was no going out;
and, as for the tables, he was in a class of five, and “four
times seven” did not come to him in regular course. Eight
times seven did, and he ‘said “fifty-six” with great satis-
faction. Mr. Carnaby asked him afterwards the dreaded .



92 THE CROFTON BOYS.



question, but he was on his guard; and as he answered it
right, and the usher had no‘ found out the joke, he hoped
he should hear no more of the matter.

The next Saturday was fine, and at last he was to have
the walk he longed for. The weekly repetitions were over
dinner was done, Mr. Carnaby appeared with his hat on, the
whole throng burst into the open air and out of bounds,
and the new boys were wild with expectation and delight.
When they had passed the churchyard and the green, and
were wading through the sandy road which led up to the
heath, Firth saw Hugh running and leaping hither and
thither, not knowing what to do with ais spirits, Firth
called him, and putting his arm round Hugh’s “eck, so as
to keep him prisoner, said he did not know how he might
want his strength before he got home, and he had better
not spend it on a bit of sandy road. So Hugh was made to
walk quietly, and gained his breath before the Deere heath
was reached.

On the way, he saw that a boy of the name of Dale,
whom he had never particularly observed before, was a good
deal teased by some boys who kept crossing their hands
before them and curtseying like girls, talking in a mincing
way and calling one another Amelia, with great affectation.
Dale tried to get away, but he was followed, whichever way
he turned,

‘What do they mean by that?” inquired Hugh of Firth

“ Dale has a sister at a school not far off, and her name is
Amelia; and she came to see him to-day, Ah! you have.



FIRST RAMBLE. 53





not found out yet that boys are laughed at about their sisters,
particularly if the girls have fine names.”

“What a shame!” cried Hugh; words which he had used
very often already since he came to Crofton.

He broke from Firth, ran up to Dale, and said to him, in
a low voice, “I have two sisters, and one of them is called
Agnes.”

“Don’t let them come io see you, then, or these fellows
will quiz you as they do me. As if I could help having a
sister Amelia!” i

“Why, you are not sorry for that? You would not wish
your sister dead, or not born, would you?” ;

“No; but I wish she was not hereabouts: that is, I wish
she had not come up to the pales, with the maid-servant
behind her, for everybody to see. And then, when Mr,
Tooke sent us into the orchard together, some spies were
peeping over the wall at us all the time.”

«I oe wish Agnes would come,” cried Hugh, “ and I
would :

“Ah! you think so now; but depend upon it, you would
like much better to see her at home. Why, her name is



finer than my sister's. I wonder what girls ever have such
names for !”

“T don’t see that these names are finer than some boys’
names. There’s Frazer, is not his name Colin? And then
there’s Hercules Fisticuff—”

“Why, you know—to be sure you know that is a nick
name?” said Dale.



Full Text


Steere

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shat

Pi

Phebe fab


The Baldwin Library


THE CROFTON BOYS


BY THE SAME AUTHOR

Uniform with this Volume.



THE PEASANT AND THE PRINCE.
FEATS ON THE FIORD.
THE SETTLERS AT HOME,
THE BILLOW AND THE ROCK.
eo












Tue Crorron Boys.

“Who was it that pulled you? Was it 1

53
THE
CROFTON BOYS

BY

HARRIET MARTINEAU

Ty

ASM MING ag
\\. 4a










WITH FORTY ILLUSTRATIONS BY M FITZGERALD

LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS, Limires

BROADWAY HOUSE, LUDGATE HILL



New York: E. P. DUTTON AND CO.






CONTENTS.

WN

CHAPTER

I.

II.
ill.
Iv.
Vv.
Vi.
VII.
VIII.
IX

XI.
XI.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.

ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL - : '
WHY MR. TOOKE CAME. 2 . '
MICHAELMAS DAY COME . .
MICHAELMAS DAY OVER °

CROFTON PLAY. ° . °

FIRST RAMBLE . ° °

WHAT IS ONLY TO BE HAD AT HOME

A LONG DAY . . 2 °
CROFTON QUIET . ° * 3 3

. LITTLE VICTORIES . Set eerie

DOMESTIC MANNERS . . D ° °
HOLT AND HIS DIGNITY 4 a ‘
TRIPPING. . : 2 ' > e
HOLT AND HIS HELP ., ' > 2
CONCLUSION . ce 2 ‘ > =

Page

2E
29
44
60
79
110
126
144
160
176
185
200
224
233


:
:
4
:
:

a i i nf





THE CROFTON BOYS.

CHAPTER I.

ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL.

M R. PROCTOR, the chemist and druggist, kept his

shop and lived in the Strand, London. His chil-
dren thought that there was never anything pleasanter than
the way they lived. Their house was warm in winter, and
such a little distance from the church, that they had no
difficulty in getting to church and back again, in the worst
weather, before their shoes were wet. They were also con-
veniently near to Covent Garden Market; so that, if any
friend dropped in to dinner unexpectedly, Jane and Agnes
could be off to the market, and buy a fowl, or some vege-
tables or fruit, and be bark again before they were missed.
It was not even to% far for little Harry to trot with one of his
sisters, early on a summer’s morning, to spend his penny
(when he happened to have one) on a bunch “€ flowers, to

I
2 THE CROFTON BOYS.



lay on papa’s plate, to surprise him when he came in to
breakfast. Not much farther off was the Temple Garden,
where Mrs. Proctor took her children every fine summer
evening to walk and breathe the air from the river; and
when Mr. Proctor could find time to come to them for a turn



MR. PROCTOR.

or two before the younger ones must go home to bed, it
seemcd to the whole party the happiest: and most beautiful
place in the whole world—except one. They had once been
to Broadstairs, when the children were in poor health after
the measles; and for ever after, when they thought of the
waves beating on the shore, and of the pleasures of growing
strong and well among the sea-breezes, they felt that there —


ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 3



might be places more delightful than the Temple Garden ;
but they were still very proud and fond of the grass and
trees, and the gravel walks, and the view over the Thames,
and were pleased to show off the garden to all friends from
the country who came to visit them.



MRS. PROCTOR.

The greatest privilege ot all, however, was that they could
see the river without going out of their own house. There
were three back windows to the house, one above another ;
and from the two uppermost of these windows there was
what the children called a view of the Thames. There was
a gap of a few yards wide between two high brick houses,
and through this gap might be seen the broad river, with
vessels of every kind passing up or down. Outside the

I—2
4 THE CROFTON BOYS.



second window were some leads, affording space for three or
four chairs; and here it was that Jane and Agnes liked to
sit at work, on certain hours of fine days. There were times
when these leads were too hot, the heat of_the sun being
reflected from the surrounding brick walls ; but at an earlier
hour before the shadows were gone, and when the air blew
in from the river the place was cool, and the little girls de-
lighted to carry their stools to the leads, and do their sewing
there. There Philip would condescend to spend a part of
his motnings, in his Midsummer holidays, frightening his
sisters with climbing about in dangerous places, or amusing
them with stories of school pranks, or raising his younger
brother Hugh’s envy of the hoys who were so happy as to
be old enough to go to school at Mr. Tooke’s, at Crofton.
‘The girls had no peace from their brothers climbing about
in dangerous places. Hugh was, if possible, worse than
Philip for this. He imitated all Philip’s feats, and had some
of his own besides. In answer to Jane’s lectures, and the
entreaties of Agnes, Hugh always declared that he had aright
to do such things, as he meant to be a soldier or a sailor;
and how should he be able to climb the mast of a ship, or
the walls of a city, if he did not begin to practise now?
Agnes was almost sorry they had been to Broadstairs, and
could see ships in the Thames, when she considered that, if
Hugh had not seen so much of the world, he might have
been satisfied to be apprenticed to his father, when old
enough, and to have lived at home happily with his family.
Jane advised Agnes not to argue with Hugh, and then, per-


ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL, 5



haps, his wish to rove about the world might go off. She
had heard her father say that, when he was a boy, and used
to bring home news of victories, and help to put up candles
at the windows on illumination nights, he had a great fancy
for being a soldier; but that it was his fortune to see some
soldiers from Spain, and hear from them what war really was,
just when peace came, and when there was no more glory to
be got, so that he had happily settled down to be a London
shopkeeper—a lot which he would not exchange with that

of any man living. Hugh was very like papa, Jane added;
" and the same change might take place in his mind, if he was
not made perverse by argument. So Agnes only sighed, and
bent her head closer over her work, as she heard Hugh talk
of the adventures he meant to have when he should be old
enough to get away from Old England.

There was one person that laughed at Hugh for this fancy
of his—Miss Harold, the daily governess, who came to keep
school for three hours every morning. When Hugh forgot
his lesson, and sat staring at the upper panes of the window,
in a reverie about his future travels ; or when he was found
to have been drawing a soldier on his slate instead of doing
his sum, Miss Harold reminded him what a pretty figure a
soldier would cut who knew no geography, or a sailor who
could not make his reckonings, for want of attending early
to his arithmetic. Hugh could not deny this; but he was
always wishing that school-hours were over, that he might
get under the great dining-table to read “ Robinson Crusoe,”
or might play at shipwreck, under pretence of amusing little
6 THE CROFTON BOYS.



Harry. It did make him ashamed to see how his sisters got
on, from the mere pleasure of learning, and without any idea
of ever living anywhere but in London, while he, who seemed
to have so much more reason for wanting the very knowledge
that they were obtaining, could not settle his mind to his
lessons. Jane was beginning to read French books for her
amusement in leisure hours, and Agnes was often found to
have covered two slates with sums in Practice, just for
pleasure, while he could not master the very moderate lessons
Miss Harold set him. It is true, he was two years younger
than Agnes; but she had known more of everything that he
had learned, at seven years old, than he now did at eight,
Hugh began to feel very unhappy. He saw that Miss Harold
was dissatisfied, and was pretty sure that she had spoken to
his mother about him. He felt that his mother became more
strict in making him sit down beside her, in the afternoon,
to learn his lessons for the next day ; and he was pretty sure
that Agnes went out of the room because she could not help
crying when his sum was found to be all wrong, or when he
mistook his tenses, or when he said (as he did every day,
though regularly warned to mind what he was about) thai
four times seven is fifty-six.

Every day these things weighed more on Hugh’s spirits;
every day he felt more and more like a dunce; and when
Philip came home for the Midsummer holidays, and told al]
manner of stories about all sorts of boys at school, without
describing anything like Hugh’s troubles with Miss Harold,
Hugh was seized with a longing to go to Crofton at once,


ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 7



as he was certainly too young to go at present into the way
of a shipwreck or a battle. The worst of it was, there was
no prospect of his going -yet to Crofton. In Mr. Tooke’s
large school there was not one boy younger than ten; and
Philip believed that Mr. Tooke did not like to take little





HUGH LONGS FOR CROFTON.

boys. Hugh was aware that his father and mother meant to
send him to school with Philip by-and-bye; but the idea of
having to wait—to do his lessons with Miss Harold every
day till he should be ten years old, made him roll himself
on the parlour carpet in despair.

Philip was between eleven and twelve. He was happy at
school; and he liked to talk all about it at home. ‘Tnese
8 THE CROFTON BOYS.



holidays, Hugh made a better listener than even his sisters ;
and he was a more amusing one—he knew so little about
the country. He asked every question that could be
imagined about the playground at the Crofton school, and:
the boys’ doings out of school; and then, when Philip
fancied he must know all about what was done, out came
some odd remark which showed what wrong notions he had
formed of a country life. Hugh had not learned half that
he wanted to know, and his little head was full of wonder
and mysterious notions, when the holidays came to an end,
and Philip had to go away. From that day Hugh was
heard to talk less of Spain, and the sea, and desert islands,
and more of the Crofton boys; and his play with little
Harry was all of being at school. At his lessons, meantime,
he did not improve at all.

One very warm day, at the end of August, five weeks
after Philip had returned to school, Miss Harold had stayed
full ten minutes after twelve o’clock to hear Hugh say one
line of the multiplication-table over and over again, to cure
him of saying that four times seven is fifty-six; but all in
vain: and Mrs, Proctor had begged her not to spend any
more time to-day upon it.

Miss Harold went away, the girls took their sewing, and
sat down at their mother’s work-table, while Hugh was
placed before her, with his hands behind his back, and
desired to look his mother full in the face, to begin again
with “four times one is four,” and go through the line
taking care what he was about. He did so; but before he


ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL 9



came to tour times seven, he sighed, fidgeted, looked up at
the corners of the room, off into the work-basket, out into
the street, and always, as if by a spell, finished with “four
times seven is fifty-six.” Jane looked up amazed; Agnes
looked down ashamed ; his mother looked with severity in
his face. He began the line a fourth time, when, at the
third figure, he started as if he had been shot. It was only
a knock at the door that he had heard—a treble knock,
which startled nobody else, though, from the parlour door
‘being open, it sounded pretty loud. ~~

Mrs. Proctor spread a handkerchief over the stockings in
her work-basket; Jane put back a stray curl which had
fallen over her face; Agnes lifted up her head with a sigh,
as if relieved that the multiplication-table must stop for this
time; and Hugh gazed into the passage through the open
door, when he heard a man’s step there. The maid an-
anounced Mr. Tooke, of Crofton; and Mr. Tooke walked
in. :
Mrs. Proctor had actually to push Hugh to one side—so _
directly did he stand in the way between her and her visitor.
He stood, with his hands still behind his back, gazing up at
Mr. Tooke, with his face hotter than the multiplication-table
had ever made it, and his eyes staring quite as earnestly as
they had ever done to find Robinson Crusoe’s island in the
map.

“Go, child,” said Mrs. Proctor; but this was not enough.
Mr. Tooke himself had to pass him under his left arm before
he could shake hands with Mrs. Proctor. Hugh was now
Io THE CROFTON BOYS.

covered with shame at this hint that he was in the way ; but
yet he did not leave the room. He stole to the window, and
flung himself down on two chairs, as if looking into the street
from behind the blind; but he saw nothing that passed out
of doors, so eager was his hope of hearing something of the
Crofton boys—their trap-ball, and their Saturday walk with
the usher. Not a word of this kind did he hear. As soon
as Mr. Tooke had agreed to stay to dinner, his sisters were
desired to carry their work elsewhere—to the leads, if they
liked—and he was told that he might go to play. He had
hoped he might be overlooked in the window, and unwillingly
did he put down first one leg and then the other from the
chairs, and saunter out of the room. He did not choose to
go near his sisters, to be told how stupidly he had stood in
the gentleman’s way ; so when he saw that they were placing
their stools on the leads, he went up into the attic, and then
down into the kitchen, to see where little Harry was, to play
at schoolboys in the back yard,

The maid Susan was not sorry that Harry was taken off
her hands, for she wished to rub up her spoons and fill her
castors afresh, for the sake of the visitor who had come in.
The thoughtful Jane soon came down with the keys to get
out a clean table-cloth, and order a dish of cutlets, in xddition
to the dinner, and consult with Susan about some dessert ;
so that as the little boys looked up from their play they saw
Agnes sitting alone at work upon the leads.

They had played some time, Hugh acting a naughty boy
who could not say his Latin lesson to the usher, and little


ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 1



Harry punishing him with far more words than a real usher
uses on such an occasion, when they heard Agnes calling
them from above their heads. She was leaning over from
the leads, begging Hugh to come up to her that very moment.
Harry must be left below, as the leads were a forbidden
place for him. So Harry went to Jane, to see her dish up
greengage plums, which he must not touch; and Hugh ran
up the stairs. As he passed through the passage his mother
called him. Full of some kind of hope (he did not himself
know what), he entered the parlour, and saw Mr. Tooke’s
eyes fixed on him. But his mother only wanted him to shut
the door as he passed—that was all. It had stood open, as
it usually did on warm days. Could his mother wish it shut
on account of anything she was saying? It was possible.

“Qh, Hugh !” exclaimed Agnes, as soon as he set foot on
the leads. ‘What do you think ?—But is the parlour door
shut? Who shut it?”

“Mother bade me shut it as I passed.”

“Qh, dear!” said Agnes, in a tone of disappointment ;
“then she did not mean us to hear what they were talking
about.”

“What was it? Anything about the Crofton boys? Any-
thing about Phil?”

“T cannot tell you a word about it. Mamma did not know
I heard them. How plain one can hear what they say in that
parlour, Hugh, when the door is open! What do you think
I heard mamma tell Mrs. Bicknor, last week, when I was
jumping Harry off the third stair?”
12 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“ Never mind that. Tell me what they are talking aboat
now. Do, Agnes.”

Agnes shook her head.

“Now do, dear.”

It was hard for Agnes to refuse Hugh anything, at any
time, more still when he called her “ dear,” which he seldom
did; and most of all when he put his arm round her neck,
as he did now. But she answered,

“JT should like to tell you every word, but I cannot now.
Mamma. has made you shut the door. She does not wish
you to hear it.” |

“Me! Then will you tell Jane?”

“Ves. I shall tell Jane, when we are with mamma. at
work.”

“That is too bad!” exclaimed Hugh, flinging himself.
down on the leads so vehemently that his sister was afraid
he would roll over into the yard. ‘What does Jane care
about Crofton and the boys to what I do?*

“There is one boy there that Jane cares about more than
you do, or I, or anybody, except papa and mamma. Jane
loves Phil.” E

“Oh, then, what they are saying in the parlour is about
Phil.”

“T did not say that.”

“You pretend you love me as Jane loves Phil! and now
you are going to tell her what you won’t tell me! Agnes, I
will tell you everything I know all my whole life, if you will
just whisper this now. Only just whisper—or, I will tell you


ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 13



what! Iwill guess and guess; and you can nod or shake
your head. That won't be telling.”

“For shame, Hugh! Phil would laugh at you for being
agirl, if you are so curious. What mamma told Mrs. Bicknor
was that Jane was her right hand. What do you think that
meant exactly?”

“ That Jane might give you a good slap when you are so
provoking,” said Hugh, rolling over and over, till his clothes
were covered with dust, and Agnes really thought once that
he was fairly going over the edge into the yard.

“There is something that I can tell you, Hugh; some-
thing that I want to tell you, and nobody else,” said Agnes,
glad to see him stop rolling about, and raise himself on his
dusty elbow to look at her.

“Well, come, what is it?”

“You must promise beforehand not to be angry.”

“ Angry! when am I angry, pray? Come, tell me.”

“You must—you really must—I have a particular reason
for saying so—you must learn how much four times seven
is. Now, remember, you promised not to be angry.”

Hugh carried off his anger by balancing himself on his
head, as if he meant to send his heels over, but that there
was no room. From upside down, his voice was heard
saying that he knew that as well as Agnes.

“Well, then, how much is it?”

“Twenty-eight, to be sure. Who does not know that?”

“Then pray do not call it fifty-six anv more. Miss
Harold 2


14 THE CROFION BOYS.

“‘There’s the thing,” said Hugh. “When Miss Harold
is here, I can think of nothing but fifty-six. It seems to
sound in my ears, as if somebody spoke it, ‘four times seven
is fifty-six.’”

“You will make me get it by heart too, if you say it so
often,” said Agnes. “You had better say ‘twenty-eight’
over to yourself all day long. You may say it to me as
often as you like. I shall not get tired. Come, begin now
—‘four times seven ee
“TI have had enough of that for to-day—tiresome stuff!

Now I shall go and play with Harry again.”



“ But wait—just say that line once over, Hugh. I have
a reason for wishing it. I have, indeed.”

‘Mother has been telling Mr. Tooke that I cannot say
my multiplication-table! Now, that is too bad!” exclaimed
Hugh. “And they will make me say it after dinner! What
a shame!”

“Why, Hugh! you know mamma does not like—you
know mamma would not—you know mamma never does

-anything unkind. You should not say such things, Hugh.”

“ Ay, there! you cannot say that she has not told Mr.
Tooke that I say my tables wrong.”

“Well, you know you always do say it wrong to her.”

“JT will go somewhere. I will hide myself. I will run to
the market while the cloth is laying. I will get away, and
not come back till Mr. Tooke is gone. I will never say my
multiplication-table to him!”

“Never?” said Agnes, with an odd smile and a sigh. “How:
















ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 15

EES

ever, do not talk of running away, or hiding yourself. You
will not have to say anything to Mr. Tooke to-day.”

“How do you know?”

“T feel sure you will not. I do not believe Mr. Tooke will
talk to you, or to any of us. There you go! You will be
in the water-butt in a minute, if you tumble so.”

“J don’t care if Lam. Mr. Tooke will not come there to
hear me say my tables. Let me go!” he cried, struggling,
for now Agnes had caught him by the ankle. - “If I do
tumble in, the water is not up to my chin, and it will bea
cool hiding-place this hot day.”

“But there is Susan gone to lay the cloth, and you must

_ be brushed, for you are all over dust. Come up, and I will
brush you.”

Hugh was determined to havea little more dust first. He
rolled once more the whole length of the leads, turned over
Jane's stool, and upset her work-basket, so that her thimble
bounded off to a far corner, and the shirt-collar she was
stitching fell over into the water-butt.

“There! what will Jane say?” cried Agnes, picking up
the basket, and peeping over into the small part of the top

of the water-butt which was not covered.

“There never was anything like boys for mischief,” said
the maid Susan, who now appeared to pull Hugh in, and
make him neat. Susan always found time, between laying
the cloth and bringing up dinner, to smooth Hugh’s hair,
and give a particular lock a particular turn on his forehead
_ with a wet comb,
16 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“Let that alone,” said Hugh, as Agnes peeped into the
butt after the drowning collar. “I will have the top off this
afternoon, and it will make good fishing for Harry and
me.”

Agnes had to let the matter alone, for Hugh was so dusty
that she had to brush one side of him while Susan did the
other. Susan gave him some hard knocks while she assured
him that he was not going to have Harry up on the leads to
learn his tricks, or to be drowned. She hardly knew which
of the two would be the worst for Harry. It was lucky for
Hugh that Susan was wanted below directly, for she scolded
him the whole time she was parting and smoothing his hair.
When it was done, however, and the wet lock on his forehead
took the right turn at once, she gave him a kiss in the very ©
middle of it, and said she knew he would be a good boy
before the gentleman from the country.

Hugh would not go in with Agnes, because he knew Mr.
_ Tooke would shake hands with her, and take notice of any
one who was with her. He waited in the passage till Susan
carried in the fish, when he entered behind her, and slipped
to the window till the party took their seats, when he hoped
Mr. Tooke would not observe who sat hetween Agnes and
his father. But the very first thing his father did was to pull
his head back by the hair behind, and ask him whether he
had persuaded Mr. Tooke to tell him all about the Crofton
boys.

Hugh did not wish to make any answer; but his father
said “Eh?” and he thought he must speak; so he said that


ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL. 17





Phil had told him all he wanted to know about the Crofton
boys.

“Then you can get Mr. Tooke to tell you about Phil, if
you want nothing else,” said Mr. Proctor.

Mr. Tooke nodded and smiled; but Hugh began to hand
plates with all his might, he was so afraid that the next
thing would be a question how much four times seven
was.

The dinner went on, however, and the fish was eaten, and
the meat, and the pudding; and the dessert was on the table,
without any one having even alluded to the multiplication-
table. Before this time, Hugh had become quite at his ease,
and had looked at Mr. Tooke till he knew his face quite
well.

Soon after dinner Mr. Proctor was called away on business;
and Hugh slipped into his father’s arm-chair, and crossed
one leg over the other knee, as he leaned back at his leisure,
listening to Mr. Tooke’s conversation with his mother about
the sort of education that he considered most fit for some
boys from India, who had only a certain time to devote to
school learning. In the course of this conversation some
curious things dropped about the curiosity of children from
India about some things very common here—their wonder
‘at snow and ice, their delight at being able to slide in the
winter, and their curiosity about the harvest and gleaning,
now approaching. Mr. Proctor came back just as Mr. Tooke
was telling of the annual holiday of the boys at harvest-time,
when they gleaned for the poor of the village. As Hugh

3
18 THE CROFTON BOYS.

had never seen a corn-field, he had no very clear idea of
harvest and gleaning; and he wanted to hear all he could.
When obliged to turn out of the arm-chair, he drew a stool
between his mother and Mr. Tooke, and presently he was
leaning on his arms on the table, with his face close to Mr.
Tooke’s, as if swallowing the gentleman’s words as they fell.
This was inconvenient; and his mother made him draw back
his stool a good way. Though he could hear very well,
Hugh did not like this, and he slipped off his stool, and
came closer and closer.

“And. did you say,” asked Mr. Proctor, “that your
youngest pupil is nine?”

“Just nine ;—the age of my own boy. I could have
wished to have none under ten, for the reason you know of.
But——”

“T wish,” cried Hugh, thrusting himself in so that Mr
Tooke saw the boy had a mind to sit on his knee,—“ I wish
you would take boys at eight and a quarter.”

“That is your age,” said Mr. Tooke, smiling and making
room between his knees.

“ How did you know? Mother told you.”

“No; indeed she did not,—not exactly. My boy was
eight and a quarter not very long ago; and he-——”

“ Did he like being in your school?”

“He always seemed very happy there, though he was so
much the youngest. And they teased him sometimes for
being the youngest. Now you know, if you came, you would
be the youngest, and they might tease you for it.”
ALL THE PROCTORS BUT PHIL, 19



“J don’t think I should mind that. What sort of teasing,
though ?”

' “Trying whether he was afraid of things.”



Sa)

ere

i

1
i \

ies
=A
ZZ

ZZ

=
gs

Se

LEE
ie
LE



PARTING ADVICE,

“What sort of things?”

“Being on the top of a wall, or up ina tree. And then

they sent him errands when he was tired, or when he wanted

to be doing something else. They tried too whether he

could bear some rough things without telling.”
20 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“And did he?”

“Yes, generally. On the whole, very well. I see they
think him a brave boy now.”

“T think I could. But do not you really take boys as
young as I am?”

“Such is really my rule.”

It was very provoking, but Hugh was here called away to
fish up Jane’s work out of the water-butt. As he had put it
in, he was the proper person to get it out. He thought he
should have liked the fun of it; but now he was in a great
hurry back, to hear Mr. Tooke talk. It really seemed as if
the shirt-collar was alive, it always slipped away so when he
thought he had it. Jane kept him to the job till he brought
up her work, dripping and soiled. By that time tea was
ready,—an early tea, because Mr. Tooke had to go away.
Whatever was said at tea was about politics, and about a
new black dye which some chemist had discovered; and
Mr. Tooke went away directly after.

He turned round full upon Hugh, just as he was going.
Hugh stepped back, for it flashed upon him that he was
now to be asked how much four times seven was. But Mr.
Tooke only shook hands with him, and bade him grow
older as fast as he could.

wc he


CHAPTER II.

WHY MR. TOOKE CAME.

AFTER tea the young people had to learn their lessons for
the next day. They always tried to get these done, and the

books put away, before Mr. Proctor came in on his shop
: being shut, and the business of the day being finished. He
liked to find his children at liberty for a little play, or half an
hour of pleasant reading ; or, in the winter evenings, for a
dance to the music of his violin. Little Harry had been
known to be kept up far too late, that he might hear the
violin, and that his papa might enjoy the fun of seeing him
run about among the rest, putting them all out, and fancying
he was dancing. All believed there would be time for play
with papa to-night, tea had been so much earlier than usual.
But Agnes soon feared there would be no play for Hugh.
Though Jane pored over her German, twisting her forefinger
in the particular curl which she always twisted when she was
deep in her lessons; though Agnes: rocked herself on her
chair, as she always did when she was learning by heart; and

2i
22 THE CROFTON BOYS.



though Mrs. Proctor kept Harry quiet at the other end of
the room with telling him long stories, in a very low voice,
about the elephant and Brighton pier, in the picture-book,
Hugh could not learn his capital cities. He even spoke out
twice, and stopped himself when he saw all the heads in the
room raised in surprise. Then he set himself to work again,
and he said “ Copenhagen” so often over that he was not
likely to forget the word; but what country it belonged to he
could not fix in his mind, though Agnes wrote it down large
on the slate, in hopes that the sight of the letters would help
him toremember. Before he had got on to ‘“‘Constantinople,”
the well-known sound was heard of the shop-boy taking the
shop-shutters out of their day-place, and Mr. Proctor would
certainly be coming presently. Jane closed her dictionary,
and shook back her curls from over her eyes; Mrs. Proctor
put down Harry from her lap, and let him call for papa as
loud as he would; and papa came bustling in, and gave
Harry a long toss, and several topplings over his shoulder,
and yet Hugh was not ready.

“Come, children,” said Mr. Proctor to Agnes and Hugh,
“we have all done enough for to-day. Away with books
and slates !”

“But, papa,” said Agnes, “ Hugh has not quite done. If
he might have just five minutes more, Miss Harold ”

‘Never mind what Miss Harold says! That is, you girls
must; but between this and Michaelmas sy





He stopped short, and the girls saw that it was a sign
from their mother that made him do so. He immediately
WHY MR. TOOKE CAME, 23

proceeded to make so much noise with Harry, that Hugh
discovered nothing more than that he might put away his
books, and not mind Miss Harold this time. If she asked
him to-morrow why he had not got down to “Constantinople,”
he could tell her exactly what his father had said. So, merry
was Hugh’s play this evening. He stood so perfectly upright
on his father’s shoulders, that he could reach the top of his
grandmamma’s picture, and show by his finger-ends how
thick the dust lay upon the frame; and neither he nor his
father minded being told that he was far too old for such
play: :

In the midst of the fun, Hugh had a misgiving, more than
once, of his mother having something severe to say to him
when she should come up to his room, to hear him say his
prayer, and to look back a little with him upon the events
of the day. Besides his consciousness that he had done
nothing well this day, there were grave looks from his mother
which made him think that she was not pleased with him.
When he was undressing, therefore, he listened with some
anxiety for her footsteps, and, when she appeared, he was
ready with his confession of idleness. She stopped him in
the beginning, saying that she had rather not hear any more
such confessions. She had listened to too many, and had
allowed him to spend in confessions some of the strength
which should have been applied to mending his faults. For
the present, while she was preparing a way to help him to
conquer his inattention, she advised him to say nothing to
her, or to any one else, on the subject; but this need not
24 THE CROFTON BOYS.





prevent him from praying to God to give him strength to
overcome his great fault.

“Oh, mother, mother!” cried Hugh, in an agony, “you
give me up! What shall I do if you will not help me any
more?”

His mother smiled, and told him he need not fear any
_ such thing. It would be very cruel to leave off providing
him with food and clothes, because it gave trouble to do so;
and it would be far more cruel to abandon him to his faults
for such a reason. She would never cease to help him till
they were cured ;. but, as all means yet tried had failed, she
must plan some others; and, meantime, she did not wish
him to become hardened to his faults by talking about them
every night when there was no amendment during the
day.

Though she spoke very kindly, and kissed him before she
went away, Hugh felt that he was punished. He felt more
unhappy than if his mother had told him all she thought of
his idleness. Though his mother had told him to go to
sleep, and blessed him, he could not help crying a little, and
‘wishing that he was a Crofton boy. He supposed the
Crofton boys all got their lessons done somehow, as a matter
of course ; and then they could go to sleep without any un-
comfortable feelings, or any tears.

In the morning all these thoughts were gone. He had
something else to think about, for he had to play with
Harry and take care of him while Susan swept and dusted |
the parlour; and Harry was bent upon going into the shop,
WHY MR. TOOKE CAME. 25

a place where, according to the rule of the house, ne child
of the family was ever to set foot till it was old enough to be
trusted, nor to taste anything there, asked or unasked. There
were some poisonous things in the shop, and some few nice
syrups and gums; and no child could be safe and well there
who could not let alone whatever might be left on the
counter, or refuse any nice taste that a good-natured shop-
man might offer. Harry was as yet far too young; but as
often as the cook washed the floor-cloth in the passage, so
that the inner shop door had to be opened, Master Harry
was seized with an unconquerable desire to go and see the
blue and red glass bowls which he was permitted to admire
from the street as he went out and came in from his walks,
Mr. Proctor came down this morning as Hugh was catching
Harry in the passage. He snatched up his boys, packed
one under each arm, and ran with them into the yard, where
he rolled Harry up in a new mat which the cook was going
to lay at the house door.

There!” said he. “Keep him fast, Hugh, till the pas-
sage door is shut. What shall we do with the rogue when
you are at Crofton, I wonder?”

“Why, papa! he will be big enough to take care of himself
by that time.”

“Bless me! I forgot again,” exclaimed Mr. Proctor, as
he made haste away into the shop.

Before long, Harry was safe under the attraction of his
basin of bread and milk; and Hugh fell into a reverie at the
breakfast-table, keeping his spoon suspended in his hand as
26 THE CROFTON BOYS.



he looked up at the windows, without seeing anything. Jane
asked him twice to hand the butter before he heard.

‘He is thinking how much four times seven is,” observed
Mr. Proctor; and Hugh started at the words.

“T tell you what, Hugh,” continued his father; “if the
Crofton people do not teach you how much four times seven
is when you come within four weeks of next Christmas Day,
I shall give you up, and them too, for dunces all.”

All the eyes round the table were fixed on Mr. Proctor in
an instant.

“There now!” said he, “I have let the cat out of the bag.
Look at Agnes!” and he pinched her crimson cheek.

Everybody then looked at Agnes, except Harry, who was
busy looking for the cat which papa said had come out of
mamma’s work-bag. Agnes could not bear the gaze, and
burst into tears.

“ Agnes has taken more pains to keep the secret than her
papa,” said Mrs. Proctor. “The secret is, that Hugh is
going to Crofton next month.”

“ Am I ten, then?” asked Hugh in his hurry and surprise.

“Scarcely, since you were only eight and a quarter yester-
day afternoon,” replied his father.

“T will tell you all about it by-and-bye, my dear,” said
his mother. Her glance towards Agnes made all the rest
understand that they had better speak of something else
now. So Mr. Proctor beckoned Harry to come and see
whether the cat had not got into the bag again, as she was
not to be seen anywhere else. It is true, the bag was not
WHY MR. TOOKE CAME. 27

much bigger than a cat’s head; but that did not matter to
Harry, who never cared for that sort of consideration, and
had been busy for half an hour, the day before, in trying to
put the key of the house door into the keyhole of the tea-
caddy.

By the time Agnes had recovered herself, and the table
was cleared, Miss Harold had arrived. Hugh brought his
books with the rest, but, instead of opening them, rested his
elbow on the uppermost, and stared full at Miss Harold.

“Well, Hugh!” said she, smiling.

“T have not learned quite down to ‘Constantinople,’”
said he. ‘Papa told me I need not, and not to mind you.”

“Why, Hugh ! hush!” cried Jane.

“He did,—he said exactly that. But he meant, Miss
Harold, that I am to be a Crofton boy,—directly, next
month.”

“Then have we done with one another, Hugh?” asked
Miss Harold, gently. - “ Will you not learn any more from
me?”

“That is for your choice, Miss Harold,” observed Mrs.
Proctor. ‘Hugh has not deserved the pains you have
taken with him; and if you decline more trouble with him
now he is going into other hands, no one can wonder.”

Miss Harold feared that he was but poorly prepared for
school, and was quite ready to help him if he would give his
mind to the effort. She thought that play, or reading books
that he liked, was less waste of time than his common way
of doing his lessons; but if he was disposed really to work,
28 THE CROFTON BOYS.





with the expectation of Crofton before him, she was ready to
do her best to prepare him for the real hard work he would
have to do there.

His mother proposed that he should have time to consider
whether he would have a month’s holiday or a month’s work
before leaving home. She had to go out this morning. He
might go with her, if he liked; and, as they returned, they
would sit down in the Temple Garden, and she would tell
him all about the plan.

Hugh liked this beginning of his new prospects. He ran
to be made neat-for his walk with his mother. He knew he
must have the wet curl on his forehead twice over to-day,
but he comforted himself with hoping that there would be
no time at Crofton for him to be kept standing to have his
hair done so particularly, and to be scolded all the while,
and then kissed, like a baby, at the end.


CHAPTER III.

MICHAELMAS DAY COME.

Hues was about'to ask his mother again and again
during their walk why Mr. Tooke let him go to Crofton
before he was ten, but Mrs. Proctor was grave and silent;
and though she spoke kindly to him now and then, she did
not seem disposed to talk. At last they were in the Temple
Garden, and they sat down where there was no one to over-
hear them, and then Hugh looked up at his mother. She
saw and told him what it was that he wanted to ask.

“Tt is on account of the little boys themselves,” said she,
“that Mr. Tooke does not wish to have them very young,
now that there is no kind lady in the house who could be like
a mother to them.”

“ But there is Mrs. Watson. Phil has told me a hundred
things about Mrs. Watson.”

“Mrs. Watson is the housekeeper. She is careful, I know
about the boys’ health and comfort ; but she has no time to
attend to the younger ones, as Mrs. Tooke did—hearing

29
30 THE CROFTON BOYS.

their little troubles, and being a friend to them like their
mothers at home.”

“There is Phil——”

“Yes, you will have Phil to look to. But neither Phil nor
any else can save you from some troubles you are likely to
fave from being the youngest.” y

“Such as Mr. Tooke told me his boy had—being put on
the top of a high wall, and plagued when he was tired, and
all that? I don’t think I should much mind those things.”

*So we hope—and so we believe. Your fault is not
cowardice——”

Mrs, Proctor so seldom praised anybody that her words
of esteem went a great way. Hugh first looked up at her,
and then down on the grass—his cheeks glowed so. She
went on,—

“You have faults—faults which give your father and me
great pain; and though you are not cowardly about being
hurt in your body, you sadly want courage of a better kind—
courage to mend the weakness of your mind. You are so
young that we are sorry for you, and mean to send you where
the example of other boys may give you the resolution you
want so much.”

“All the boys learn their lessons at Crofton,” observed
Hugh.

“Yes; but not by magic. They have to give their minds
to their work. You will find it painful and difficult to learn
this, after your idle habits at home. I give you warning that
you will find it much more difficult than you suppose; and
MICHAELMAS DAY COME, 31



I should not wonder if you wish yourself at home with Miss
Harold many times before Christmas.”
Mrs. Proctor was not unkind in saying this. She saw that









IN THE TEMPLE GARDENS,

Hugh was so delighted about going that nothing would de-
press his spirits, and that the chief fear was his being dis-
appointed and unhappy when she should be far away. It
might then be some consolation to him to remember that
she was aware of what he would have to go through. He
32 : THE CROFTON BOYS.

now smiled, and said he did not think he should ever wish
to say his lessons to Miss Harold as long as he lived. Then
it quickly passed through his mind that, instead of the leads
and the little yard, there would be the playground; and
instead of the church bells, the rooks ; and instead of Susan
with her washing and combing, and scolding and kissing,
there would be plenty of boys to play with. As he thought
“of these things, he started up, and toppled head over heels
on the grass, and then was up by his mother’s side again,
saying that he did not care about anything that was to
happen at Crofton ;—he was not afraid,—not even of the
usher, though Phil could not bear him.

“If you can bring yourself to learn your lessons well,”
said his mother, “‘ you need not fear the usher. But remem-
ber, it depends upon that. You will do well enough in the
playground, I have no doubt.”

After this, there was only to settle the time that was to
pass—the weeks, days, and hours before Michaelmas Day ;
and whether these weeks and days should be employed in
preparing for Crofton under Miss Harold, or whether he
should take his chance there unprepared as he was. Mrs.
Proctor saw that his habits of inattention were so fixed, and
his disgust at lessons in the parlour so strong, that she
encouraged his doing no lessons in the interval. Hugh
would have said beforehand that three weeks’ liberty to
read voyages and travels, and play with Harry, would have
made him perfectly happy; but he felt that there was some
disgrace mixed up with his holiday, and that everybody
MICHAELMAS DAY COME, 33

would look upon him with a sort of pity, instead of wishing
him joy; and this spoiled his pleasure a good deal. When
he came home from his walk, Agnes thought he looked less
happy than when he went out, and she feared his spe
were down about Crofton.

His spirits were up and down many times fauene the next
three weeks. He thought these weeks would never be over.
Every day dragged on more slowly than the last; at every
meal he was less inclined to eat, and his happiest time was
when going to bed, because he was a day nearer Crofton.
His mother, foreseeing just what happened, wished to have
kept the news from him till within a week of his departure,.
and had agreed with Mr. Proctor that it should be so.. But
Mr. Proctor hated secrets, and, as we see, let it out imme-

' diately.

At last the day came ;—a warm, sunny autumn ay. on
which any one might have enjoyed the prospect of a drive
into the country. The coach was to set off from an inn in
Fleet Street at noon, and would set Hugh down at his
uncle’s door in time for dinner, the distance being twenty-
eight miles, His uncle’s house was just two miles from the
school. Phil would probably be there to meet his brother,
and take him to Crofton in the afternoon.

How to get rid of the hours till noon was the question.
Hugh had had everything packed up, ovér which he had
any control, for some days. He had not left himself a
plaything of those which he might carry; and it frightened
him that his mother did not seem to think of packing his:

3
34 THE CROFTON BOYS.



clothes till after breakfast this very morning. When she
entered his room for the purpose, he was fidgeting about,
saying to himself that he should never be ready. Agnes
came with her mother, to help ; but before the second shirt
was laid in the box, she was in tears, and had to go away ;
for every one in the house was in the habit of hiding tears
from Mrs. Proctor, who rarely shed them herself, and was
known to think that they might generally be suppressed,
and should be so.

As Hugh stood beside her, handing stockings and hand-
kerchiefs to fill. up the corners of the box, she spoke as she
might not have done if they had not been alone. She said
but a few words; but Hugh never forgot them.

“You know, my dear,” said she, “that I do not approve
of dwelling upon troubles. You know I never encourage
ay children to fret about what cannot be helped.”

There was nothing in the world that Hugh was more
certain of than this.

“ And yet I tell you,” she continued, “that you will not
be nearly so happy at Crofton as you expect—at least, at
first. It grieves me to see you so full of expectation”

“ Does it indeed, mother?”

“Tt does indeed. But my comfort is ”

“You think I can bear it,” cried Hugh, holding up his
head. “You think I can bear anything.”

“T think you are a brave boy, on the whole. But that is
not the comfort I was speaking of, for there is.a world of
troubles too heavy for the bravery of a thoughtless child like


MICHAELMAS DAY COME. 35

you. My comfort is, my dear, that you know where to go
for strength when your heart fails you. You will be away
from your father and me; but a far wiser and kinder Parent
will be always with you. If I were not sure that you would
continually open your heart to Him, I could not let you go
from me.”

“T will—I always do,” said Hugh, in a low voice.

“Then remember this, my boy. If you have that help,
you must not fail. Knowing that you have that help, I
expect of you that you do your own duty, and bear your
own troubles like aman. If you were to be all alone in the
new world you are going to, you would be but a helpless
child; but remember, when a child makes God his friend,
God puts into the youngest and weakest the spirit of a man.”

“You will ask Him too, mother; you will pray Him to

be



make me brave, and—and

“ And what else?” she inquired, fixing her eyes upon him.

“ And steady,” replied Hugh, casting down his eyes ; “for
that is what I want most of all.”

“Tt is,” replied his mother. ‘I do, and always will, pray
for you.”

Not another word was said till they went down into the
parlour. Though it was only eleven o’clock, Miss Harold
was putting on her bonnet to go away; and there was a
plate of bread and cheese on the table.

_“Lunch!” said Hugh, turning away with disgust.
“Do eat it,” said Agnes, who had brought it. “ You had
_no breakfast, you know,”
ee
30 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“Because I did not want it; and I can’t eat anything now.”

Jane made a sign to Agnes to take the plate out of sight;
and she put some biscuits into a paper bag, that he might
eat on the road, if he should become hungry.

Neither Miss Harold nor Hugh could possibly feel any
grief at parting, for they had had little satisfaction together ;
but she said very kindly that she should hope to hear often
of him, and wished he might be happy as a Crofton boy.
Hugh could hardly answer her ;—-so amazed was he to find
that his sisters were giving up an hour of their lessons on his
account,—that they might go with him to the coach !—And
then Susan came in about the cord for his box, and her eyes
were red;—and, at the sight of her, Agnes began to cry
again ; and Jane bent down her head over the glove she was
mending for him, and her needle stopped.

“Jane,” said her mother gravely, “‘if you are not mending
that glove, give it to me. It is getting late.”

Jane brushed her hand across her eyes, and stitched away
again. Then she threw the gloves to Hugh without looking
at him, and ran to get ready to go to the coach.

The bustle of the inn-yard would not do for little Harry.
He could not go. Hugh was extremely surprised to find
that all the rest were going,—that even his father was smooth-
ing his hat in the passage for the walk,—really leaving the
shop at noon on his account! The porter was at his service
too,—waiting for his box! It was very odd to feel of such
consequence. &

Hugh ran down to bid the maids good bye. The coox
MICHAELMAS DAY COME, 37



had cut a sandwich, which she thrust into his pocket, though
he told her he had some biscuits. Susan cried so that little
Harry stood grave and wondering. Susan sobbed out that _
she knew he did not care a bit about leaving home and
everybody. Hugh wished she would not say so, though he
felt it was true, and wondered at it himself. Mr. Proctor
heard. Susan’s lamentations, and called to her from the pas-
sage above not to make herself unhappy about that, for the
time would soon come when Hugh would be home-sick
enough.

Mr. Blake, the shopman, came to the shop-door as they
passed, and bowed and smiled; and the boy put himself in
the way, with a broad grin; and then the party walked on
quickly.

The sun seemed to Hugh to glare very much, and he
thought he had never known the streets so noisy, or the
people so pushing. The truth was, his heart was beating so
he could scarcely see; and yet he was so busy looking about
him for a sight of the river, and everything he wished to bid
good. bye to, that his father, who held him fast by the hand,
shook him more than once, and told him he would run
everybody down if he could,—to judge by his way of walk-
ing. He must learn to march better, if he was to be a sol-
dier; and to steer, if he was to be a sailor.

_.There were just two minutes to spare when they reached
the inn-yard. The horses were pawing and fidgeting, and
some of the passengers had mounted ; so Mr. Proctor said
he would seat the boy at once. He spoke to two men who
38 THE CROFTON BOYS,

were on the roof, just behind the coachman; and they
agreed to let Hugh sit between them, on the assurance that
the driver would iook to his concerns, and see that he was
set down at the right place.

“Now, my boy, up with you!” said his: father, as he
tnrned from speaking to these men. Hugh was so eager,
that he put up his foot to mount, without remembering to
bid his mother and sisters good bye. Mr. Proctor laughed —
at this; and nobody wondered ; but Agnes cried bitterly;
and she could not forget it, from that time till she saw her
brother again. . When they had all kissed him, and _ his
mother’s earnest look had bidden him remember what had
passed between them that morning, he was lifted up by his
father, and received by the two men, between whom he
found a safe seat.

Then he wished they were off. It was uncomfortable to
see his sisters crying there, and not to be able to cry too, or
to speak to them. When the coachman was drawing on his
second glove, and the ostlers held each a hand to pull off
the horse-cloths, and the last moment was come, Mr.
Proctor swung himself up by the step, to say one thing
more. It was—

“TI say, Hugh,—can you tell me,—how much is four
times seven?”

Mrs. Proctor pulled her husband’s coat-tail, and he leaped
down, the horses’ feet scrambled, their heads issued from
the gateway of the inn-yard, and Hugh's family were left
behind. -
MICHAELMAS DAY COME. 39.

In the midst of the noise, the man on Hugh’s right hand
said to the one on his left,

“ There is some joke in that last remark, I imagine.”

The other man nodded; and then there was no more
speaking till they were off the stones, When the clatter
was over, and the coach began to roll along the smooth
road, Hugh’s neighbour repeated,

“There was some joke, I fancy, in that last remark of
your father’s.”

“Ves,” said Hugh.

Are you in the habit of saying the multiplication-table
when you travel?” said the other. “If so, we shall be
happy to hear it.”

“Exceedingly happy,” observed the first.

“T never say it when I can help it,” said Hugh; “and I
see no occasion now.”

The men laughed, and then asked him if he was going
far.
“To Crofton. I am going to be a Crofton boy,” said
Hugh.

“ A what? Where is he going?” his companions asked
one another over his head. They were no wiser when
Hugh repeated what he had said, nor could the coachman
enlighten them. He only knew that he was to put the boy
down at Shaw’s, the great miller’s, near ey miles along
the road.

“ Eight-and-twenty,” said Hugh, in correction; “and
Crofton is two miles from my uncle’s,”
4o ' THE CROFTON BOYS.

“ight-and-twenty. The father’s joke lies there,” observed
the right-hand man.

“No, it does not,” said Hugh. He thought he was among
a set of véry odd people,—none of them knowing what a
Crofton boy was. A passenger who sat beside the coachman
only smiled when he was appealed to; so it might be con-
cluded that he was ignorant too; and the right and left-hand
men seemed so anxious for information, that Hugh told
them all he knew ;—about the orchard and the avenue, and
the pond on the heath, and the playground; and Mrs.
Watson, and the usher, and Phil, and Joe Cape, and Tony
Nelson, and several others of the boys.

One of the men asked him if he was sure he was going for
the first time,—he seemed so thoroughly informed of every-
thing about Crofton. Hugh replied that it was a good thing
to have an elder brother like Phil. Phil had told him just
what to take to Crofton, and how to take care of his money,
and everything.

“Ay! and how do the Crofton boys take care of their
money ?”

_ Hugh showed a curious little inner pocket in his ReKes
which nobody would dream of that did not know. His
mother had let him have such a pocket in both his jackets ;
and he had wanted to have all his money in this one now, to
show how safely he could carry it. But his mother had
chosen to pack up all his five shillings in his box,—that
square box, with the new brass lock, on the top of all the
luggage. In this pocket there was only sixpence now,—the
MICHAELMAS DAY COME. 41

sixpence he. was to give the coachman when he was set
down.

Then he went on to explain that this sixpence was not out
of his own money, but given him by his father, expressly for
the coachman. Then his right-hand companion congratu-
lated him upon his spirits, and began to punch and tickle
him; and when Hugh writhed himself about, because he
could not bear tickling, the coachman said he would have
no such doings, and bade them be quiet. Then the pas-
sengers seemed to forget Hugh, and talked to one another
of the harvest in the north, and the hopping in Kent. Hugh
Jistened about the hopping, supposing it might be some new
game, as good as leap-frog; though it seemed strange that
one farmer should begin hopping on Monday, and that
another should fix Thursday, and that both should be so
extremely anxious about the weather. But when he found
it was some sort of harvest-work, he left off listening, and
gave all his attention to the country sights that were about
him. ay ee : eS

He did not grow tired of the gardens, gay with dahlias
and hollyhocks and asters; nor of the orchards, where the
ladder against the tree, and the basket under, showed that
apple-gathering was going on; nor of the nooks in the fields,
where blackberries were ripening ; nor of the chequered sun-
light and shadow which lay upon the road; nor of the
breezy heath where the blue ponds were ruffled ; nor of the
pleasant grove where the leaves were beginning to show a
tinge of yellow and red, here and there among the green.
42 THE CROFTON BOYS.



Silently he enjoyed all these things, only awakening from
them when there was a stop to change horses.

He was not thinking of time or distance when he saw the
coachman glance round at him, and felt that the speed of
the horses was slackening. Still he had no idea that this
was any concern of his, till he saw something that made
him start.

“Why, there’s Phil,” he exclaimed, jumping to his feet.

“This is Shaw’s mill, and there is Shaw; which is all I
have to do with,” said the coachman, as he pulled up.

Hugh was soon down, with his uncle and Phil, and one
of the men from the mill to help. His aunt was at the
window too; so that altogether Hugh forgot to thank his
companions for his safe seat. He would have forgotten his
box, but for the coachman. One thing more he also forgot.

“I say, young master,” said the driver; “remember the
coachman. Where’s your sixpence ?”

“*Oh, my sixpence !” cried Hugh, throwing down what he
held, to feel in his curious inner pocket, which was empty.

“Lest you. find a hole in your pocket, here is a sixpence
for you,” cried the right-hand passenger, tossing him his own

sixpence. “Thank you for teaching us the secret of such a
curious pocket.”

The coachman was impatient, got his money, and drove
off, leaving Hugh to make out why he had been tickled, and
how his money had changed hands. With a very red face,
he declared it was too bad of the man; but the man was
out of his hearing, and could never know how angry he was, _
MICHAELMAS DAY COME. 43

“A pretty story this is for our usher to have against you,
to begin with,” was Phil’s consolation. ‘Every boy will
know it before you show yourself; and you will never hear
the last of it, I can tell you.”

“Your usher!” exclaimed Hugh, bewildered.

“Yes, our usher. That was he on the box, beside coachee.
Did not you find out that much in all these eight-and-
twenty miles?”

“ How should I? He never told me.”

Hugh could hardly speak to his uncle and aunt, he was
so taken up with trying to remember what he had said, in
the usher’s hearing, of the usher himself, and everybody at
Crofton.



HUGH’S AUNT.


CHAPTER IV. .

MICHAELMAS DAY OVER.

Mrs. SHaw ordered dinner presently ; and while it was
being served, she desired Phil to brush his brother’s clothes,
as they were dusty from his ride. All the while he was
brushing (which he did very roughly), and all the first part
of dinner-time, Phil continued to tease Hugh about what he
had said on the top of the coach. Mrs. Shaw spoke of the
imprudence of talking freely before strangers; and Hugh
could have told her that he did not need such a lecture at
the very time that he found the same thing by his experience.
He did wish Phil would stop. If anybody should ask him
a question, he could not answer without crying. Then he
remembered how his mother. expected him to bear things ;
and he almost wished he was at home with her now, after
all his longing to be away. This thought nearly made him
cry again; so he tried to dwell on how his mother would
expect him to bear things; but neither of them had thought
that morning beside his box, that the first trial would come

44
MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 45





°

from Phil. This again made him so nearly cry that his
uncle observed his twitching face, and, without noticing him,
said that he, for his part, did not want to see little boys wise

















DRESSING FOR DINNER.

tefore ihey had time to learn; and that the most silent
companions he had ever been shut up with in a coach was
certainly the least agreeable; and he went on to relate an
adventure which has happened to more persons than one.
He had found the.gentleman in the corner, with the shaggy
46 THE CROFTON BOYS,

coat, to be a bear—a tame bear, which had to take the
quickest mode of conveyance, in order to be at a distant fair
in good time. Mr. Shaw spun out his story, so that Hugh
quite recovered himself, and laughed as much as anybody
at his uncle having formed a bad opinion of Bruin in the
early twilight, for his incivility in not bowing to the passenger
who left the coach.

After dinner, Phil thought it time to be off to Crofton.
de had missed something by coming away at all to-day, and
he was not going to run the chance of losing the top of the
class by not having time to do his Sallust properly. Mrs.
Shaw said they must have some of her plums before they
went, and a glass of wine; and Mr. Shaw ordered the gig,
saying he would drive them, and thus no time would be lost
though he hoped Phil would not mind being at the bottom
of every class for once to help his brother, seeing how soon a
diligent boy might work his way up again. Phil replied that
‘that was not so easy as people might think, when there was .
one like Joe Cape determined to keep him down, if he could
once get him down.

“TJ hope you will find time to help Hugh up from the
bottom, in a class or two,” said Mr. Shaw. “You will not
be too busy about your own affairs to look to his, I suppose.”

“Where is the use of my meddling?” said Phil. “He
can’t rise for years to come. Besides-——-”

“Why can’t rise?” exclaimed Hugh, with glowing cheeks.

“That is right, Hugh,” said his uncle. “Let nobody —
prophesy for you till you show what you can do.”
MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 47



“‘Why, uncle, he is nearly two years younger than any boy:
in the school; and———”

“And there is little Page above you in algebra. He is
about two years younger than you, Phil, if I remember right.”

Hugh could not help clapping his hands at the prospect
this held out to him. Phil took the act for triumphing over
him, and went on to say, very insultingly, that a little fellow
who had been brought up among the girls all his life, and
had learned of nobody but Miss Harold, could not be ex-
pected to cut any figure among boys. Hugh looked so
grieved for a moment, and then suddenly so relieved, that
his kind uncle wondered what was in his mind. He took
the boy between his knees, and asked him.

Hugh loved his uncle already, as if he had always known
. him. He put his arms round his neck, and whispered in
his ear what he was thinking of:—his mother’s saying that
God could and would, if He was sought, put the spirit of a
man into the feeblest child.

“True!—quite true! I am very ae you know that, my
boy. That will help you to learn.at Crofton, though it is
better than anything they can teach you in their school-
room.”

Mrs. Shaw and Phil looked curious; but Mr. Shaw did
not repeat a word of what Hugh had said. He put the boy
away from his knees, because he heard the gig coming
round,

Mrs. Shaw told Hugh that she hoped he would spend some
of his Sundays with his uncle and her; and his uncle added
48 THE CROFTON BOYS.





that he must come on holidays as well as Sundays,—there
was so much to see about the mill.

Phil was amused, and somewhat pleased, to find how exactly
Hugh remembered his description of the place and neigh-



- HUGH FINDS A SYMPATHIZER.

bourhood. He recognized the duck-pond under the hedge
by the roadside, with the very finest blackberries. growing
above it, just out of reach. The church he knew, of course,
and the row of chestnuts, whose leaves were just beginning
to fall; and the high wall dividing the orchard from the play-
ground, That must have been the wall on which Mr.'Tooke’s
MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 49



little boy used to be placed to frighten him. It did not look
so very high as Hugh had fancied it. One thing which he
had never seen or heard of was the bell, under its little roof
on the ridge of Mr. Tooke’s great house. Was it to call in
the boys to school, or for an alarm? His uncle told him it
might serve the one purpose in the day, and the other by
night; and that almost every large farm thereabouts had such
a bell on the top of the house.

The sun was near its setting when they came in sight of
the Crofton house. A long range of windows glittered in the
yellow light, and Phil said that the lower row all belonged
to the school-room—that whole row.

In the midst of his explanations Phil stopped, and his
manner grew more rough than ever—with a sort of shyness
in it too, It was because some of the boys were within
hearing, leaning over the pales which separated the play-
ground from the road.

“T say; hallo there!” cried one. “Is that Prater you
have got with you?”

“ Prater the second,” cried another. ‘He could not have
had his name if there had not been Prater the first.”

“There; there’s a scrape you have got me into already!’
muttered Phil.

“Be a man, Phil, and bear your own share,” said Mr.
Shaw; “and no spite, because your words come back to you.”

The talk at the palings still went on, as the gig rolled
quietly in the sandy by-road.

* Prater!” poor Hugh exclaimed. “What a name!”

4
50 THE CROFTON BOYS.





“Yes; that is you,” said his uncle, “ You know now what
your nickname will be. Every boy has one or another; and
yours might have been worse, because you might have done
many a worse thing to earn it.”

“But the usher, uncle!”

“What of him?”

*“ He should not have told about me.”

‘Don’t call him ‘Prater the third,’ however. Bear your
own share, as I said to Phil,and don’t meddle with another’s.”

Perhaps Mr. Shaw hoped that through one of the boys
the usher would get a new nickname for his ill-nature in
telling tales of a little boy, before he was so much as seen by
hiscompanions. He certainly put it into their heads, whether
they would make use of it or not.

Mr. Tooke was out, taking his evening ride; but Mr. Shaw
would not drive off till he had seen Mrs. Watson, and intro-
duced his younger nephew to her, observing to her that he
was ‘but a little fellow to come among such a number of
rough boys. Mrs. Watson smiled kindly at Hugh, and said
she was glad he had a brother in the school, to prevent his
feeling lonely at first. It would not take many days, she
hoped, to make him feel quite at home. Mr. Shaw slipped
half a crown into Hugh’s hand, and whispered to him to try
to keep it safe in his inner pocket. Hugh ran after him to
the door, to tell him that he had five shillings already—safe
in his box; but his uncle would not take back the half-crown.
He thought that, in course of time, Hugh would want all the
money he had:
MICHAELMAS DAV OVER. gt



-

Mrs. Watson desired Phil to show his brother where he
was to sleep, and to help him to put by his clothes. Phil
was in a hurry to get to his Sallust; so that he was not sorry
when Mrs. Watson herself came up to see that the boy’s
clothes were laid properly in the deep drawer in which Hugh
was to keep his things. Phil then slipped away.

“Dear me,” said Mrs. Watson, turning over one of Hugh’s
new collars, “we must have something different from this.
These collars tied with a black ribbon are never tidy. They
are always over one shoulder or the other.”

“ My sisters made them; and they worked so hard to get
them done,” said Hugh.

“Very well—very right; only it is a pity they are not of
a better make. Every Sunday at church I shall see your
collar awry; and every time you go to your aunt’s, she will
think we do not make you neat. I must see about that. Here
are good stockings, however—properly stout. My dear, are
these all the shoes you have got?”

“T have a pair on.”

“Of course; I don’t doubt that. We must have you
measured to-morrow for some boots fitter for the country
than these. We have no London pavement here.”

And so Mrs. Watson went on, sometimes approving and
sometimes criticising, till Hugh did not know whether to cry
or to be angry. After all the pains his mother and sisters
had.taken about his things, they were to be found fault with
in this way! ;

When his box was emptied, and his drawer filled, Mrs.

4-2
52 THE CROFTON BOYS.

Watson took him into the school-room, where the boys were
at supper. Outside the door the buzz seemed prodigious,
and Hugh hoped that in such a bustle nobody would notice
him. Here he was quite mistaken. The moment he entered
there was a hush, and all eyes were turned upon him, except
his brother’s. Phil hardly looked up from his book; but he
made room for Hugh between himself and another boy, and
drew the great plate of bread within reach. Mrs. Watson
saw that Hugh had his basin of milk; and he found it a
good thing to have something to do while so many eyes were
upon him. He felt that he might have cried if he had not
had his supper to eat.

The usher sat at the top of the table, reading. Mrs. Watson
called his attention tc Hugh, and Hugh stood up and made
his bow. His face was red, as much with anger as timidity,
when he recognized in him the passenger who had sat beside
the coachman.

“Perhaps, Mr. Carnaby,” said Mrs. Watson, “you will find
something for this young gentleman to do, when he has had
his supper, while the rest are learning their lessons. To-
morrow he will have his own lessons; but to-night——”

“There is always the multiplication-table,” replied Mr.
Carnaby. “The young gentleman is partial to that, I fancy.”

Hugh reddened, and applied himself to his bread and milk.

“Never mind a joke,” whispered Mrs. Watson. “We won’t
plague you with the multiplication-table the first evening. I
will find you a book or something. Meantime, there is a
companion for you—I forgot that.”
MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 53

The good lady went down the room, and brought back a
boy who seemed to be doing all he could to stop crying.
He dashed his hand over his eyes every minute, and could



THE FIRST NIGHT AT SCHOOL.

not look anybody in the tace. He had finished his supper,
and was at a loss what to do next, as he had only arrived
that morning, and did not know anybody at Crofton. His
name was Tom Holt, and he was ten years old. °

When they had told their names and ages, and where.
54 THE CROFTON BOYS.



they came from, the boys did not know what to say next, and
Hugh wished Phil would stop murmuring over his Sallust and —
looking in the dictionary every minute; but Mrs. Watson did
not forget the strangers. She brought them Cook’s Voyages
out of the library to amuse themselves with, on condition of
their delivering the book to. Mr. Carnaby at bed-time.

The rest of the evening passed away very pleasantly.
Hugh told Holt a great deal about Broadstairs and the
South Sea Islands, and confided to him his own hopes of
being a sailor, ‘and going round the world, and, if possible,
making his way straight through China, the most difficult
country left to travel in, he believed, except some parts of
Africa. He did not want to cross the Great Desert, on
account of the heat. He knew something of what that was
by the leads at home, when the sun was on them. What
was the greatest heat Holt had ever felt? Then came the
surprise. Holt had last come from his uncle’s farm; but he
was born in India, and had lived there till eighteen months
ago. So, while Hugh had chattered away about the sea at
Broadstairs, and the heat on the leads at home, his com-
panion had come fourteen thousand miles over the ocean,
and had felt a heat nearly as extreme as that of the Great
Desert. Holt was very unassuming too. He talked of the

‘heat of gleaning in his uncle’s harvest-fields, and of the
kitchen when the harvest supper was cooking; owning that
he remembered he had felt hotter in India. Hugh heaped
questions upon him about his native country and the voyage).
and Holt liked to be asked; so that the boys were not at all
MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 55.



like strangers just met for the first time. They raised their
voices in the eagerness of their talk, from a whisper so as to
be heard quite across the table, above the hum and buzz
of above thirty others, who were learning their lessons half
aloud.

At last Hugh was startled by hearing the words “ Prater,”
* Prater the second,” He was silent instantly, to Holt’s great
wonder.

Without raising his eyes from his book, Phil said, so as to
be heard as far as the usher,

“Who prated of Prater the second? Who is Prater the
third?”

There was a laugh which provoked the usher to come and
see whereabouts in Sallust such a passage as this was to be
found. Not finding any such, he knuckled Phil’s head, and
pulled his hair, till Hugh cried out,

“Oh, don’t, sir! Don’t hurt him so!”

“Do you call that hurting? You will soon find what
hurting is, when you become acquainted with our birch.
You shall have four times seven with our birch Let us



see—that is your favourite number, I think.”

The usher looked round, and almost everybody laughed.

“You see I have your secret;—four times seven,” con-
tinued Mr. Carnaby. “‘What do you shake your head
for?” ee

“Becaise you have not my secret about four times
seven.”
56 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“ Did not I hear your father? Eh?”

“What did you hear my father say? Nobody here knows
what he meant, and nobody need know, unless I choose to
tell—which I don’t. Please don’t teaze Phil about it, sir,
for he knows no more about it than you do.”

Mr. Carnaby said something about the impertinence of —
little boys, as if they could have secrets, and then declared
it high time that the youngsters should go to bed. Hugh
delivered Cook’s Voyages into his hands, and then bade
Phil good night. He was just going to put his face up to
be kissed, but recollected in time that he was to leave off
kissing when he went to school. He held out his hand,
but Phil seemed not to see it, and only told him to be sure
to lie enough on one side, so as to leave him room, and that
he was to take the side of the bed next the window. Hugh
nodded and went off, with Holt and two more who slept in
the same room.

The two who were not new boys were in bed in a minute;
and when they saw Hugh wash his face and hands, they sat
up in bed to stare. One of them told him that he had
better not do that, as the maid would be coming for the
light, and would leave him in the dark, and report of him if
he was not in bed. So Hugh made a great splutter, and did
not half dry his face, and left the water in the basin; a thing
which they told him was not allowed. He saw that the
others had not kneeled down to say their prayers—a practice
which he had never omitted since he could say a prayer,
MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 57



except when he nad the measles. He knew the boys were
watching him, but he thought of his mother, and how she
had taught him to pray at her knee. He hid himself as well
as he could with the scanty bed-curtains, and kneeled. He
could not attend to the words he said while feeling that
eyes were upon him, and before he had done, the maid came
in for the candle.

She waited; but when he got into bed she told him that
he must be quicker to-morrow night, as she had no time to
spare waiting for the candle.

Hugh was more tired than he had ever been in his life.
This had been the longest day he had ever known. It
seemed more like a week than a day. Yet he could not go
to sleep. He had forgotten to ask Phil to be sure and wake
him in‘time in the morning, and now he must keep awake
till Phil came, to say this. Then, he could not but ask him-
self whether he liked, and should like, being at school as
much as he expected; and when he felt how very unlike
home it was, and how rough everybody seemed, and how
Phil appeared almost as if he was ashamed of him, instead
of helping him, he was so miserable he did not know what
to do.

He cried bitterly—cried till his pillow was quite wet,
and he was almost choked with his grief; for he tried
hard not to let his sobs be heard. After a while he felt
what he might do. Though he had kneeled he had not
really prayed; and if he had, God is never weary of prayers,
58 THE CROFTON BOYS.

—— —



It was a happy thought to Hugh that his very best Friend
was with him still, and that he might speak to Him at any
time.

He spoke now in his heart; and a great comfort it was.
He said,

“O God, I am all alone here, where nobody knows me;
and everything is very strange and uncomfortable. Please
make people kind to me till Iam used to them; and keep
up a brave heart in me, if they are not. Help me not to
mind little things; but to do my lessons well, that I may get
to like being a Crofton boy, as I thought I should. I love
them all at home very much—better than I ever did before.
Make them love me, and think of me every day, particularly
Agnes, that they may be as glad as I shall be when I go
home at Christmas.”

This was the most of what he had to say; and he dropped
asleep with the feeling that God was listening to him.

After a long while, as it seemed to him, though it was only
-an hour, there was a light and some bustle in the room. It
was Phil and two others coming to bed.

“Oh, Phil!” cried Hugh, starting bolt upright and winking
with sleep, “I meant to keep awake, to ask you to be sure
and call me in the morning, time enough—quite time enough,
please.”

The others langhed; and Phil asked whether he had not
seen the bell as he came, and what it should be for but to
ring everybody up in the morning,
MICHAELMAS DAY OVER. 59

“But I might not hear it,” pleaded Hugh.

“Not hear it! Youll soon see that.”

“Well, but you will see that I really do wake, won’
your”

“The bell will take care of that, I tell you,” was all he
could get from Phil.



HUGH PLEADS FOR HIS BROTHER,


CHAPTER V.

CROFTON PLAY.

Hucu found, in the morning, that there was no danger of
his not hearing the bell. Its clang-clang startled him out of
'asound sleep; and he was on his feet on the floor almost
before his eyes were open. The boys who were more used
to the bell did not make quite so much haste. They yawned '
a few times, and turned out more slowly; so that Hugh had
the great tin wash-basin to himself longer than the rest.
There was a basin to every three boys; and, early as Hugh
began, his companions were impatient long before he had
done. At first they waited in curiosity to see what he was
going to do after washing his face; when he went further,
they began to quiz; but when they found that he actually
thought of washing his feet, they hooted and groaned at him
tor a dirty brat.

“Dirty!” cried Hugh, facing them, amazed—* dirty for
washing my feet! Mother says it is a dirty trick not to wash
all over every day.”

60
CROFTON PLAY. 61



Phil told him that was stuff and nonsense here. There
was no room and no time for such home doings. The boys
all washed their heads and feet on Saturdays. He would
soon find that he might be glad to get his face and hands
done in the mornings.

The other boys in the room were, or pretended to be, so
disgusted with the very idea of washing feet in a basin, that
they made Hugh rinse and rub out the tin basin several
times before they would use it, and then there was a great
bustle to get downstairs at the second bell. Hugh pulled
his brother’s arm, as Phil was brushing out of the room, and
asked, in a whisper whether there would be time to say his
prayers.

“There will be prayers in the school-room. You must be
in time for them,” said Phil. ‘You had better come with
me.”

“Do wait one moment, while I just comb my hair.”

Phil fidgeted, and others giggled, while Hugh tried to part
his hair, as Susan had taught him. He gave it up, and left
it rough, thinking he would come up and do it when there
was nobody there to laugh at him.

The school-room looked chilly and dull, as. there was no
sunshine in it till the afternoon; and still Mr. Tooke was not
there, as Hugh had hoped he would be.. Mrs. Watson and
the servants came in for prayers, which were well read by the
usher; and then everybody went to business—everybody but
Hugh and Holt, who had nothing to do. Class after class
came up for repetition; and this repetition seemed to the
62 THE CROFTON BOYS.



new boys an accomplishment they should never acquire.
They did not think that any practice would enable them to
gabble as everybody seemed able to gabble here. Hugh
had witnessed something of it before; Phil having been
wont to run off at home, “Sal, Sol, Ren et Splen,” to the
end of the passage, for the admiration of his sisters, and so
much to little Harry’s amusement, that Susan, however busy
she might be, came to listen, and then asked him to say it
again, that cook might hear what he learned at school.
Hugh now thought that none of them gabbled quite so fast
as Phil, but he soon found out, by a glance or two of Phil’s

to one side, that he was trying to astonish the new boys. It
is surprising how it lightened Hugh’s heart to find that his
brother did not quite despise or feel ashamed of him, as he
had begun to think, but that he even took pains to show off.
He was sorry, too, when the usher spoke sharply to Phil,
and even rapped his head with the cane, asking him what
he spluttered out his nonsense at that rate for. Thus ended
Phil’s display; and Hugh felt as hot, and as ready to cry, as
if it had happened to himself.

Perhaps the usher saw this, for when he called Hugh up,
he was very kind. He looked at the Latin grammar he had
used with Miss Harold, and saw by the dogs’-ears exactly
how far Hugh had gone in it, and asked him only what he
could answer very well. Hugh said three declensions, with
only one mistake. Then he was shown the part that he was
to say to-morrow morning; and Hugh walked away, all the
happier for having something to do, like everybody. else
CROFTON PLAY. 63



He was so little afraid of the usher, that he went back to
him to ask where he had better sit,

“Sit! Oh, I suppose you must have a desk, though you
have nothing to put in it. If there is a spare desk, you shall
have it; if not, we will find a corner for you somewhere.”

“Some of the boys whispered that Mrs. Watson’s footstool,
under her apron, would do; but the usher overheard this,
and observed that it took some people a good while to know
anew boy, and that they might find that a little fellow might
be as much of a man asa big one. And the usher called
the oldest boy in the school, and asked him to see if there
was a desk for little Proctor. There was; and Hugh put
into it his two or three school-books and his slate, and felt
that he was now indeed a Crofton boy. Then, the usher was
kinder than he had expected; and he had still to see Mr.
Tooke, of whom he was not afraid at all; So Hugh’s spirits
rose, and he liked the prospect of breakfast as well as any
boy in the school.

There was one more rebuff for him first, however, He
ran up to his.room to finish combing his hair, while the
other boys were thronging into the long room to breakfast.
He found the housemaids there, making the beds; and they
both cried “Out! out!” and clapped their hands at him,
and threatened to tell Mrs. Watson of his having broken
rules, if he did not go this moment. Hugh asked what
Mrs. Watson would say to his hair, if he went to breakfast
with it as it was. One of the maids was good-natured
enough to comb it for him for once, but she said he must
64 THE CROFTON BOYS.



carry a comb in his pocket, as the boys were not allowed to
go to their rooms, except at stated hours.

At last Hugh saw Mr. Tooke. When the boys entered
school at nine o’clock, the master was:at his desk. Hugh
went up to his end of the room with a smiling face, while
Tom Holt hung back; and he kept beckoning Tom Holt
on, having told him there was nothing to be afraid of.
But when at last Mr. Tooke saw them, he made no difference
between the two, and seemed to forget having ever seen
Hugh. He.told them he hoped they would be good boys,
and would do credit to Crofton; and then he asked Mr.
Carnaby to set them something to leam. And this was all
they had to do with Mr. Tooke for a long while.

This morning in school, from nine till twelve, seemed the
longest morning these little boys had ever known. When
they remembered that the afternoon would be as long, and
every morning and afternoon for three months, their hearts
sank. Perhaps, if any one had told them that the time
would grow shorter and shorter by use, and at last, when
they had plenty to do, almost too short, they would not
have believed it, because they could not yet feel it. But
what they now found was only what every boy and girl
finds.on beginning school, or entering upon any new way of
life.

Mr. Carnaby, who was busy with others, found it rather
difficuit to fill up their time. When Hugh had said some
Latin, and helped his companion to learn his first Latin
lesson, and both had written a copy and done a sum, Mr.
CROFTON PLAY. 65



Carnaby could not spare them any more time or thought,
and told them they might do what they liked, if they only
kept quiet till school was up. So they made out the ridicu-
lous figures which somebody had carved upon their desks,
and the verses, half rubbed out, which were scribbled inside;
and then they reckoned, on their slates, how many days
there were before the Christmas. holidays—how many school-
days, and how many Sundays. And then Hugh began to
draw a steamboat in the Thames, as seen from the leads of
his father’s house; while Holt drew on his slate the ship in
which he came over from India. But before they had done,
the clock struck twelve: school was up, and there was a
general rush into the playground.

Now Hugh was really to see the country. Except that
the sun had shone pleasantly into his room in the morning,
through waving trees, nothing had yet occurred to make him
feel that he was in the country. Now, however, he was in
the open air, with trees sprinkled all over the landscape, and
green fields stretching away, and the old church-tower halt
covered with ivy. Hugh screamed with pleasure; and nobody
thought it odd, for almost every boy was shouting. Hugh
longed to pick up some of the shining brown chestnuts
which he had seen yesterday in the road, under the trees;
and he was now cantering away to the spot, when Phil ran
after him, and roughly stopped him, saying he would get into
_a fine scrape for the first day if he went out of bounds.

Hugh had forgotten there were such things as bounds, and
was not at all glad to be reminded of them now. He sighed

5
66 THE CROFTON BOYS,



as he begged Phil to show him exactly where he might go

and where he might not. Phil did so in an impatient way,

and then was off to trap-ball, because his party were waiting
for him.

The chestnut-trees overhung one corner of the playground
within the paling, and in that corner Hugh found several
chestnuts which had burst their sheaths, and lay among the
first fallen leaves. He pocketed them with great delight,
wondering that nobody had been before him to secure such
a treasure. “ Agnes should have some; and little Harry
would find them nice playthings. They looked good to
eat too, and he thought he could spare one to taste; so he
took out his knife, cut off the point of a fine swelling chest-
nut, and tasted a bit of the inside. Just as he was making
a face over it, and wondering that it was so nasty, when
those which his father roasted in the fire-shovel on Christmas
Day were so good, he heard laughter behind him, and found
that he was again doing something ridiculous, though he
knew not what; and in a moment poor Hugh was as un-
happy as ever.

He ran away from the laughing boys, and went quite to
the opposite corner of the playground, where a good number
of his schoolfellows were playing ball under the orchard
wall. Hugh ran hither and thither, like the rest, trying tc
catch the ball, but he never could do it; and he was jostled.
and thrown down, and another boy fell over him; and he
was told that he knew nothing about play, and had bette:
move off,
_ CROFTON PLAY. 67

eeeren err ES RE

He did so with a heavy heart, wondering how he was ever
to be like the other boys, if nobody would take him in hand
and teach him to play, or even let him learn, Remember.
ing what his mother expected of him, he tried to sing, to



A BITTER DISCOVERY,

prevent crying, and began to count the pales round the

playground for something to do. This presently brought |

him tc a tree which stood on the very boundary, its trunk

serving, instead of two or three pales. It was only a twisted

old ap,.€-tree, put the more twisted and gnarled it was, the

nore it looked like a tree that Hugh could climb; and he
5—2
68 THE CROFTON BOYS.



had always longea to climb a tree. Glancing up, He saw
a boy aweadv there, sitting on the fork of two branches,
reading.

“Have you a mind to come up?” asked the boy.

“Ves, sir, I should like to try to climb a tree. I never
did.”

“Well, this is a good one to begin with. I'll lend you a
hand; shall 1?”

“Thank you, sir.”

“Don’t call me ‘sir. I’m only a schoolboy, like you. I
am Dan Firth. Call me Firth, as I am the only one of
the name here. You are little Proctor, I think—-Proctor’s
brother.”

“Yes; but, Firth, I shall pull you down if I slip.”

“Not you; but I'll come down, and so send you up to
my seat, which is the safest to begin with. Stand off.”

Firth swung himself down, and then, showing Hugh where
to plant his feet, and propping him when he wanted it, he
soon seated him’ on the fork, and laughed good-naturedly
when Hugh waved his cap over his head, on occasion of
being up in a tree. He let him get down and up again
several times, till he could do it quite alone, and felt that
he might have a seat here whenever it was not occupied by
any one else.

While Hugh sat in the branches, venturing to leave hold
with one hand, that he might fan his hot face with his cap,
Firth stood on the rail of the palings, holding by the tree,
and talking to him. Firth told him that this was the only
CROFTON PLAY. 69



tree the boys were allowed to climb, since Ned Reeve had
fallen from the great ash and hurt his spine. He showed
what trees he had himself climbed before that accident, and
it made Hugh giddy to think of being within eight feet of .
the top of the lofty elm in the churchyard, which Firth had
thought nothing of mounting,

“Did anybody teach you?” asked Hugh.

“Yes; my father taught me to climb, when I was younger
than you.”

“And had you anybody to teach you games and things,
when you came here?”

“No; but I had learned a good deal of that before I
came, and so I soon fell into the ways here. Have you
anybody to teach you?”

“No—yes—why, no. I thought Phil would have showed
me things; but he does not seem to mind me at all.” And
Hugh bit his lip, and fanned himself faster.

‘Ah! he attends to you more than you think.”

“Does he? Then why—but what good does it do
me?” ; :

“What good? His holding off makes you push your own
way. It lets you make friends for yourself.”

“T have no friends here,” said Hugh.

“Yes, you have. HereamI. You would not have had
me, if you had been at Proctor’s heels at this moment.”

“Will you be my friend, then: ”

“That 1 wil.”

“What, 2 great poy like you, that sits reading in a tree!
70 THE CROFTON BOYS.



But I may read nere beside you. You said there was room
for two.”

“Ay; but you must not use it yet,—at least, not often,
if you wish to do well here. Everybody knows I can play
at anything. From the time I became captain of the wall
at fives, I have had liberty to do what I like, without question.
But you must show that you are up to play, before they will
let you read in peace and quiet.”

“But how can I, if—i 2



“Once show your spirit,—prove that you can shift for
yourself, and you will find Phil open out wonderfully. He
and you will forget all his shyness then. Once show him
that he need not be ashamed of you ”

_ “Ashamed of me!” cried Hugh, firing up.

“Yes. Little boys are looked upon as girls in a school
till they show that they are little men. And then again, you
have been brought up with girls,—have not you?”

“To be sure; and so was he.”

“And half the boys here, I dare say. Well, they are
called Bettys til 2

“TI am not a Betty,” cried Hugh, flashing again.

“They suppose you are, because you part your hair, and
do as you have been used to do at home.”

“What business have they with my hair? I might as wel)
call them Bruins for wearing theirs shaggy.”

“Very true. They will let you and your hair alone when
they see what you are made of; and then Phil will——”

“ He will ov‘ me when 1 don't want it; and now, when






CROFTON PLAY, 7

el ern en

he might ip me, there he is, far off, never caring about
what becomes of me.”

“Oh, yes, he does. He is watching you all the time. You
and he will have it all out some day before Christmas, and
then you will see how he really cares about you. Really
your hair is very long,—too like a girl’s. Shall I cut it for
your”

“T should like it,” said Hugh, “but I don’t want the boys
to think I am afraid of them, or to begin giving up to
them.”

“You are right there. We will let it alone now, and cut
it when it suits our convenience.”

“What a nice place this is, to be sure!” cried Hugh, as
the feeling of loneliness went off. “But the rooks do not
make so much noise as I expected.”

“You will find what they can do in that way when spring
comes,—when they are building.”

“ And when may we go out upon the heath, and into the
fields where the lambs are?”

“We go long walks on Saturday afternoons ; but you do
not expect to see young lambs in October, do you?”

“Oh, I forgot. I never can remember the seasons for
things.”

“That shows you are a Londoner. You will jearn all
those things here. If you look for hares in our walks, you
may chance to see one; or you may start a pheasant ; but
take care you don’t mention lambs, or goslings, or cowslips,
or any spring things, or you will never hear the last of it.”
72 LHE CROFTON BOYS.





“Thank you; but wnat wili poor Holt do? He is from
India, and he knows very little about our ways.”

“They may laugh at him; but they will not despise him,
as they might a Londoner. Being an Indian, and being a
Londoner, are very different things.”

‘““ And yet how proud the Londoners are over the country.
It is very odd.”

“ People are proud of their own ways all the world over,
You will be proud of being a Crofton boy by-and-bye.”

“ Perhaps I am now, a little,” said Hugh, blushing.

“What, already? Ah! you will do, Isee. I have known
old people proud of their age, and young people of their
youth. I have seen poor people proud of their poverty ; and
everybody has seen rich people proud of their wealth. I
have seen happy people proud of their prosperity, and the
afflicted proud of their afflictions. Yes, people can always
manage to be proud: so you have boasted of being a Lon-
doner up to this time, and from this time you will hold your
head high as a Crofton boy.”

-“Hlow long? Till when?”

“Ah! till when? What next? What ao you mean to be
afterwards 2”

“A soldier, or a sailor, or a great traveller, or something
of that kind. I mean to go quite round the world, like
Captain Cook.”

“Then you will come home, proud of having been round
the world; and you will meet with some old neighbour who
boasts of having spent all his life in the house he was born in.”

ory
CROFTON PLAY. 73



“Qld Mr. Dixon told mother that of himself, very lately.
Oh, dear! how often does the postman come?”

“You want a letter from home, do you? But you left
them only yesterday morning.”

“*T don’t know how to believe that,—-it seems such an
immense time! But wnen does the postman come?”

‘* Any day when he has ijetters to bring,—at about four in
the afternoon. We see him come, from the school-room;
but we do not know who the letters are for till school breaks
up at five.”

“Oh, dear!” cried Hugh, thinking what the suspense
must be, and the disappointment at last to twenty boys,
perhaps, for one that was gratified. Firth advised him to
write a letter home before he began to expect one. If he
did not like to ask the usher, he himself would rule the
paper for him, and he could write a bit at a time, after his
lessons were done in the evening, till the sheet was full.

Hugh then told his grievance about the usher, and Firth
thought that though it was not wise in Hugh to prate about
Crofton on the top of the coach, it was worse to sit by and
listen without warning, unless the listener meant to hold his
own tongue. But he fancied the usher had since heard
something which made him sorry; and the best way now
was for Hugh to bear no malice, and remember nothing
tore of the affair than to be discreet in his future journeys.

*What is the matter there?” cried Hugh. “Oh, dear!
something very terrible must have happened. How that boy
is screaming!”
74. THE CROFTON BOYS,



“Tt is only Lamb again,” replied Firth. ‘“ You will soon
get used to his screaming. He is a very passionate boy—I
never saw such a passionate fellow.”

“ But what are they doing to him?”

“Somebody is putting him into a passion, I suppose,
There is always somebody to do that.”

“What a shame!” cried Hugh.

N65 51 see no wit in it,” replied Firth. ‘Anybody may
do it. You have only to hold your little finger up to put
him in a rage.”

Hugh thought Firth was rather cool about the matter.
But Firth was not so cool when the throng opened for a
moment, and showed what was really done to the angry boy.
Only his head appeared aboveground. His schoolfellows
had put him into a hole they had dug, and had filled it up
to his chin, stamping down the earth, so that the boy was
perfectly helpless, while wild with rage.

“That is too bad!” cried Firth. ‘That would madden
a saint.”

And he jumped down from the paling, and ran towards
the crowd. Hugh, forgetting his height from the ground,
stood up in the tree, almost as angry as Lamb himself, and
staring with all his might to see what he could. He saw
Firth making his way through the crowd, evidently remon-
strating, if not threatening. He saw him snatch a spade
from a boy who was flourishing it in Lamb’s face. He saw
that Firth was digging, though half a dozen boys had thrown
themselves on his back, and hung on his arms. He saw
CROFTON PLAY. I



HUGH TO THE RESCUE,

that Firth persevered till Lamb had got his right arm out of
the ground, and was striking everything within reach. Then

ne saw Firth dragged down and away, while the boys made
a circle round Lamb, putting a foot or hand within his reach,
and then snatching it away again, till the boy yelled with
tage at the mockery.
76 THE CROFTON BOYÂ¥s.



Hugh could look on no longer. He scrambled down
from the tree, scampered to the spot, burst through the
throng, and seized Lamb’s hand. Lamb struck him a heavy
blow, taking him for an enemy ; but Hugh cried “TI am your
friend,” seized his hand again, and tugged till he was first
ted and then black in the face, and till Lamb had worked
his shoulders out of the hole, and seemed likely to have the
use of his other arm in a trice.

Lamb’s tormentors at first let Hugh alone in amazement;
but they were not Jong in growing angry with him too.
They hustled: him—they pulled him all ways—they tripped
him up ; but Hugh’s spirit was roused, and that brought his
body up to the struggle again and again. He wrenched
himself free, he scrambled to his feet again, as often as he
was thrown down; and in a few minutes he had plenty of
support. Phil was taking his part, and shielding him from.
many blows. Firth had got Lamb out of the hole; and
the party against the tormentors was now so strong that they
began to part off till the struggle ceased. Firth kept his
grasp of the spade; for Lamb’s passion still ran so high that
there was no saying what might be the consequences of
leaving any dangerous weapon within his reach. He was
still fuming and stamping, Hugh gazing at him the while in
wonder and fear.

“There stands your defender, Lamb,” said Firth, “ think-
ing he never saw a boy in a passion before. Come, have
done with it for his sake; be a man, as he is. Here, help
me to fill up this hole—both of you. Stamp down the earth,
CROFTON PLAY. 77



Lamb. Tread it well—tread your anger well down into it.
Think of this little friend of yours here—a Crofton boy only
yesterday !”



A FRIEND GAINED.

Lamb did help to fill the hole, but he did not say a
word—not one word to anybody, till the dinner-bell rang.
Then, at the pump, where the party were washing their hot
and dirty and bruised hands, he held out his hand to Hugh,

muttering, with no very good grace,
78 THE CROFTON BOYS.



——

“T don’t know what made you help me, but I will never
be in a passion with you,—unless you put me out, that is.”

Hugh replied that he had come to help because he never
could bear to see anybody sade worse, He always tried at
home to keep the little boys and girls off “ drunk old Tom,”
as he was called in the neighbourhood. It was such a shame
to make anybody worse! Lamb looked as if he was going
to fly at Hugh now; but Firth put his arm round Hugh’s
neck, and drew him into the house, sayiny in his ear,

“Don’t say any more that you have no friends here. You
have me for one; and you might have had another—two in
one morning—but for your plain speaking about drunk old
Tom.”

“Did I say any harm?”

“* No—no harm,” replied Firth, laughing. “ You will do,
my boy—when you have got through a few scrapes. I’m
vour friend, at any rote.”




CHAPTER VIL

FIRST RAMBLE.

Hucu’s afternoon lessons were harder than those of the
morning; and in the evening he found he had so much to
do, that there was very little time left for writing his letter
home. Some time there was, however; and Firth did not
forget to rule his paper, and-to let Hugh use his ink, Hugh
had been accustomed to copy the prints he found in the
voyages and tfavels he read; and he could never see a
picture of a savage but he wanted to copy it. He was thus
accustomed to a pretty free use of his slate-pencil. He now
thought that it would save a great deal of description if he
sent a picture or two in his letter; so he flourished off, on
the first page, a sketch of Mr. Tooke sitting at his desk at
the top of the school, and of Mr. Carnaby standing at his
desk at the bottom of the school.

The next evening he made haste to fill up the sheet, for
he found his business increasing upon his hané< so fast that

79
80 THE CROFTON BOYS.



he did not know when he should get his letter off, if he did
not dispatch it at once. He was just folding it up, when
Tom Holt observed that it was a pity not to put some words
into the mouths of the figures, to make them more animated ;
and he showed Hugh, by the curious carvings of their desks,
how to put words into the mouths of figures. Hugh then
remembered having seen this done in the caricatures in the
print-shops in London, and he seized on the idea. He put
into Mr. Tooke’s mouth the words which were oftenest
heard from him, “Proceed, gentlemen;” and into Mr.
Carnaby’s, *‘ Hold your din.”

Firth was too busy with his sense-verses to mind the little
boys, as they giggled, with their heads close together, over
Hugh’s sheet of paper; but the usher was never too busy to
be aware of any fun which might possibly concern his dignity.
He had his eye on the new boys the whole while. He let
Hugh direct his letter, and paint up a stroke or two which
did not look so well as the rest; and it was not till Hugh
was rolling the wafer about on his tongue that he interfered.
Mr. Carnaby then came up, tapped Hugh’s head, told him
not to get on so fast, for that every letter must be looked
over before it went to the post. While saying this, he took
the letter and put it into his waistcoat pocket. In vain
Hugh begged to have it again, saying he would write another.
The more he begged, and the more dismayed Tom Holt
looked, the less Mr. Carnaby would attend to either. Firth
let himself be interrupted to hear the case; but he could do
nothing in it. It was a general rule, which he thought every
FIRST RAMBLE. 81



boy had known; and it was too late now to prevent the
letter being looked over.
Mr. Carnaby was so angry at the liberty Hugh had taken













REPORTED FOR MISCONDUCT.

with his face and figure, that, in spite of all prayers and a

good many tears, he walked up the school with the letter,

followed by poor Hugh, as soon as Mr. Tooke had taken

his seat next morning, Hugh thought that Holt, who had

put him up to the most offensive part of the pictures, might

have borne him company; but Holt was a timid boy, and
6
Sa THE CROFTON BOYS.



he really 1ad not courage to leave his seat. So Hugh stood
alone, awaiting Mr. Tooke’s awful words, while the whole of
the first class looked up from their books, in expectation of
what wasto happen. They waited some time for the master’s

. words for he was trying to help laughing. He and Mr.
Carnaby were so much alike in the pictures, and both so
like South Sea Islanders, that it was impossible to help
laughing at the thought of this sketch going abroad as a
representation ot the Crofton masters. At last, all pa. ties
laughed aloud, and Mr. Tooke handed Hugh his wafer-glass,
and bade him wafer up his letter, and by all means send it.
Mr. Carnaby could not remain offended, if his principal was
not angry; so here the matter ended, except that Hugh
made some strong resolutions about his future letters, and
that the corners of the master’s mouth were seen to be out
of their usual order several times in the course of the
morning.

This incident, and everything which haunted Hugh’s mind
and engrossed his attention, was a serious evil to him; for
his business soon grew tobe more than his habit of mind
was equal to. In afew days, he learned to envy the boys
(and they were almost the whole school) who could fix their
attention completely and immediately on the work before
them, and relax as completely when it was accomplished.
When his eyes were wandering, they observed boy after boy
frowning over his dictionary, or repeating to himself, earnestly
and without pause; and presently the business was done,
and the learner at ease, feeling confident that he was ready

a
FIRST RAMBLE. 83



to meet his master. After double the time had assed,
Hugh was still trying to get the meaning of his lesson into
his head—going over the same words a dozen times, without
gaining any notion of their meaning—suffering, in short,
from his long habit of inattention at home. He did now try
hard ; but he seemed to get only headaches for his pains,
His brother saw enough to make him very sorry for Hugh
before ten days were over. He might not, perhaps, have been
struck with his anxious countenance, his frequent starts, and
his laying his head down on the desk because it ached so,
if it had not been for what happened at.night. Sometimes
Hugh started out of bed, and began to dress, when the elder
boys went up with their light, only an hour after, the younger
ones, Sometimes he would begin saving his syntax in the
middle of the night, fancying he was standing before Mr.
Carnaby ; and once he walked in his sleep as far as the head
of the stairs, and tren suddenly woke, and could not make
~ out where he was. Phil should have told Mr. Tooke of
these things: but Hugh was so very anxious that nobody
should know of his “tricks” (as the boys in his room called
his troubles), that Phil only mentioned the matter to Mrs.
Watson, who had known so many bad sleepers among little
boys, and had so little idea that the habit was anything new,
that she took scarcely any notice of it. She had his hair
cut very short and close, and saw that he took a moderate
supper, and was satisfied that all would be well. Hugh did
not patt with his hair till he had joked himself about ils
length, as much as any one could quiz him for it. When he

6—2
84 THE CROFTON BOYS.





to

had pulled it down over the end of his nose, and peeped
through it, like an owl out of an ivy-bush, he might be sup-
posed to part with it voluntarily, and not because he was
laughed at.



CROPPED.

Phil’s observation of his brother’s toil and trouble led him
to give him some help. Almost every day he would hear
Hugh say his lesson—or try to say it; for the poor boy
seldom succeeded. Phil sometimes called him stupid, and
sometimes refrained from saying so, whatever he. might
think; but there really was very little difference in the result,
whether Phil heard the lessons beforehand or not; and it
gave Joe Cape a great advantage over Phil that he had no
little brother to attend to. Considering how selfish rivalship
is apt to make boys (and even men), it was perhaps no
wonder that Phil sometimes kept. out of Hugh’s way at the
tight hour, saying to himself that his proper business was to
FIRST RAMBLE, 85



do his lessons, and get or keep ahead of Joe Cape; and
that Hugh must take his chance, and work his own way, as
other boys had todo. This conduct might not be wondered
atin Phil but it hurt Hugh, and made him do his lessons
all the worse. He did not like to expose his brother’s un-
kindness to any one, or he would oftener have asked Fisth
to help him. Firth, too, had plenty of work of his own to
do. More than once, however, Firth met the little lad,
wandering about, with 1: grammar in his hand, in search
f the hidden Phil; and then Firth would stop him, and sit
down with him, and have patience, and give him such clear
explanations, such good examples of the rules he was to
learn, that it all became easy, and F'ugh found his-lessons
were to him only what those of other boys seemed to them.
Still, however, and at the best, Hugh was, as a learner, far
too much at the mercy of circumstances—the victim of
what passed before his eyes, or was said within his hearing.
Boys who find difficulty in attending to their lessons ate
sure to be more teased with interruptions than any others.
Holt had not the habit of learning; and he and Hugh were
continually annoyed by the boys who sat near them watching
how they got on, and making remarks upon them. One
day, Mr. Tooke was called out of the school-room to a
visitor, and Mr. Carnaby went up to take the master’s place
and hear his class. This was too good an opportunity for
the boys selow to Jet slip; and they began to play tricks,—
most of them directed against Hugh and Tom Holt. One
boy, Warner, began to make the face that always made Holt
86 THE CROFTON BOYS.



laugh, however he tried to be grave. Page drew a caricature
of Mrs, Watson on his slate, and held it up; and Davison
took a mask out of his desk, and even ventured to tie it un,
as if it had not been school-time.

“T declare I can’t learn my lesson—'tis too bad!” cried
Hugh.

“Tis a shame!” said Tom Holt, sighing for breath after
his struggle not to laugh. ‘‘ We shall never be ready.”

Hugh made gestures of indignation at the boys, which
only caused. worse faces to be made, and the mask to
nod.

‘We won't look at them,” proposed Holt. “Let us cover
our eyes, anc not look up at all.”

Hugh put his hands before his eyes, but still his mind’s
eye saw the grinning mask, and his lesson did not get on.
Besides, a piece of wet sponge lighted on the very page he
was learning from. He looked up fiercely, to see who had
thrown it. It was no other than Tooke, who belonged to
that class—it was Tooke, to judge by his giggle, and his
pretending to hide his face, as if ashamed. Hugh tossed
back the sponge, so as to hit Tooke on the nose. Then
Tooke was angry, and threw it again, and the sponge passed
backwards and forwards several times, for Hugh was by this
time very angry,—boiling with indignation at the hardship of
not being able to learn his lesson, when he really would if
he could. While the sponge was still passing to and fro,
Mr. Carnaby’s voice was heard from the far end of the
room, desiring Warner, Page, Davison, and Tooke to be
FIRST RAMBLE, ; 87



quiet, and let the boys alone till Mr. Tooke came in, when
Mr. Tooke would take his own measures.

Hugh, wondering how Mr, Carnaby knew, at that distance,
what was going on, found that Holt was no longer by his

















WORRYING THE TUNIORS,

side. Ina moment, Holt returned to his seat, flushed and
out of breath. A very slight hiss was heard from every form
near, as he came down the room.

“Oh, Holt! you have been ielling tales!” cried Hugh,

“Telling tales!” exclaimed Holt, in consternation, for
Holt knew nothing of school ways. “TI never thought of
that. They asked me to tell Mr. Carnaby that we could nog
learn our lessons,”
88 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“They! Who? Iam sure I never asked you.”

“No, you did not; but Harvey and Prince did,—and
' Gillingham. They said Mr. Carnaby would soon rake those
fellows quiet; and they told me to go.”

“You hear! They are calling you ‘tell-tale.’ That will
be your name now. Oh, Holt, you should not have told
tales. However, I will stand by you,” Hugh continued,
seeing the terror that Holt was in.

“*T meant no harm,” said Holt, trembling. ‘Was not it a
shame that they would not let us learn our lessons?”

“Ves, it was—but——”

At this moment Mr. Tooke entered the room. As he
passed the forms, the boys were all bent over their books,
as if they could think of nothing else. Mr. Tooke walked
up the room to his desk, and Mr. Carnaby walked down the
toom to 47s desk; and then Mr. Carnaby said, quite aloud,

“Mr. Tooke, sir.”

“Well.”

Here Holt sprang from his desk, and tan to the usher and
besought him not to say a word about what Warner’s class
had been doing. He even hung on Mr. Carnaby’s arm in
entreaty; but Mr. Carnaby shook him off, and commanded
him back to his seat. Then the whole school heard Mr.
Tooke told about the wry faces and the mask, and the
trouble of the little boys. Mr. Tooke was not often angry,
but when he was, his face grew white, and his lips trembled,
His face was white now. He stood up, and called before
him the little boy who had informed. Hugh chose to go
FIRST RAMBLE. 89



with Holt, though Holt had not gone up with him about
the letter the other day; and Holt felt how kind this was.
Mr. Tooke desired to know who the offenders were; and as
they were named, he called to them to stand up in their



VAIN FER CEaRON
places. Then came the sentence. Mr. Tooke would never
forgive advantage being taken of his absence. If there were
boys who could not be trusted while his back was turned,
they must be made to remember him when he was out of
sight, by punishment. Page must remain in school after
hours, to learn twenty lines of Virgil; Davison twenty;
Tooke forty-——”

Here everybody looked round to see how Tooke bore his
father being so angry with him.
go 2HE CROFTON BOYS,





«Please, sir,” cried one boy, “I saw little Proctor throw
a sponge at Tooke. He did it twice.”

“Never mind,” answered Tooke. “I threw it at him first.
It is my sponge.”

“And Warner,” continued the master, as if he had not
heard the interruption, “considering that Warner has got oft
too easily for many pranks of late,—Warner seventy.”

Seventy! The idea of having anybody condemned,
through him, to learn seventy lines of Latin by heart, made
Holt so miserable, that the word seventy seemed really to
prick his very ears. Though Mr. Tooke’s face was still white,
Holt ventured up to him.

“Pray, sir-——”

“Not a word of intercession for those boys!" said the
master. “I will not hear a word in their favour.”

“Then, sir. »

“Well?”

“IT only want to say, then, that Proctor told no tales, sir
I did not mean any harm, sir, but [ told because——”

“ Never mind that,” cried Hugh, afraid that he would now
be telling of Harvey, Prince, and Gillingham, who had per-
suaded him to go up.

“T have nothing to do with that. That is your affair,”
said the master, sending the boys back to their seats.

Poor Holt had cause to rue this morning for long after.
He was weary of the sound of hissing, and of the name
“tell-tale ;” and the very boys who had prompted him to ge
- up were at first silent, and then joined against him. He


FIRST RAMBLE. 91

complained to Hugh of the difficulty of knowing what it
was right to do. He had been angry on Hugh’s account .
chiefly; and he still thought it was very unjust to hinder
their lessons, when they wished not to be idle; and yet they
were all treating him as if he had done something worse
than the boys with the mask. Hugh thought all this was true;
but he believed it was settled among schoolboys (though
Holt had never had the opportunity of knowing it) that it
was a braver thing for boys to bear any teasing from one
another than to call in the power of the master to help. A
boy who did that was supposed not to be able to take care
of himself; and for this he was despised, besides being dis-
liked, for having brought punishment upon his companions.

Holt wished Hugh had not been throwing sponges at the
time—he wished Hugh had prevented his going up, He
would take good care how he told tales again.

“You had better say so,” advised Hugh, “and then they
will see that you had never been at school, and did not
know how to manage.”

The first Saturday had been partly dreaded, and partly
longed for, by Hugh. He had longed for the afternoon’s
ramble, but Saturday morning was the time for saying tables,
among other things. Nothing happened as he had expected.
The afternoon was so rainy that there was no going out;
and, as for the tables, he was in a class of five, and “four
times seven” did not come to him in regular course. Eight
times seven did, and he ‘said “fifty-six” with great satis-
faction. Mr. Carnaby asked him afterwards the dreaded .
92 THE CROFTON BOYS.



question, but he was on his guard; and as he answered it
right, and the usher had no‘ found out the joke, he hoped
he should hear no more of the matter.

The next Saturday was fine, and at last he was to have
the walk he longed for. The weekly repetitions were over
dinner was done, Mr. Carnaby appeared with his hat on, the
whole throng burst into the open air and out of bounds,
and the new boys were wild with expectation and delight.
When they had passed the churchyard and the green, and
were wading through the sandy road which led up to the
heath, Firth saw Hugh running and leaping hither and
thither, not knowing what to do with ais spirits, Firth
called him, and putting his arm round Hugh’s “eck, so as
to keep him prisoner, said he did not know how he might
want his strength before he got home, and he had better
not spend it on a bit of sandy road. So Hugh was made to
walk quietly, and gained his breath before the Deere heath
was reached.

On the way, he saw that a boy of the name of Dale,
whom he had never particularly observed before, was a good
deal teased by some boys who kept crossing their hands
before them and curtseying like girls, talking in a mincing
way and calling one another Amelia, with great affectation.
Dale tried to get away, but he was followed, whichever way
he turned,

‘What do they mean by that?” inquired Hugh of Firth

“ Dale has a sister at a school not far off, and her name is
Amelia; and she came to see him to-day, Ah! you have.
FIRST RAMBLE. 53





not found out yet that boys are laughed at about their sisters,
particularly if the girls have fine names.”

“What a shame!” cried Hugh; words which he had used
very often already since he came to Crofton.

He broke from Firth, ran up to Dale, and said to him, in
a low voice, “I have two sisters, and one of them is called
Agnes.”

“Don’t let them come io see you, then, or these fellows
will quiz you as they do me. As if I could help having a
sister Amelia!” i

“Why, you are not sorry for that? You would not wish
your sister dead, or not born, would you?” ;

“No; but I wish she was not hereabouts: that is, I wish
she had not come up to the pales, with the maid-servant
behind her, for everybody to see. And then, when Mr,
Tooke sent us into the orchard together, some spies were
peeping over the wall at us all the time.”

«I oe wish Agnes would come,” cried Hugh, “ and I
would :

“Ah! you think so now; but depend upon it, you would
like much better to see her at home. Why, her name is



finer than my sister's. I wonder what girls ever have such
names for !”

“T don’t see that these names are finer than some boys’
names. There’s Frazer, is not his name Colin? And then
there’s Hercules Fisticuff—”

“Why, you know—to be sure you know that is a nick
name?” said Dale.
94° THE CROFTON BOYS.



“Ts it? I never thought of that,” seplied Hugh. “ What
is his real name?”

“Samuel Jones. However, there is Colin Frazer—and
Fry, his name is Augustus Adolphus; I will play them off the
next time they quiz Amelia. How old is your sister Agnes?”

Then the two boys wandered off among the furze-bushes,

talking about their homes; and in a little while they had so

opened their hearts to each other, that they felt as if they
had always been friends. Nobody thought any more about
them when ofice the whole school was dispersed over the
heath. Some boys made for a hazel copse, some way
beyond the heath, in hopes of finding a few nuts already
ripe. Others had boats to float on the pond. A large
number played leap-frog, and some ran races, Mr. Carnaby
threw himself down on a soft couch of wild thyme, on a
rising ground, and took out his book. So Dale and Hugh
felt themselves unobserved, and they chatted away at a
great rate. Not but that an interruption or two did occur.
They fell in with a flock of geese, and Hugh did not much
like their appearance, never having heard a goose make a
noise before. He had eaten roast goose, and he had seen
geese in the feathers at the poulterers’; but he had never
seen them alive, and stretching their necks at passengers.
He flinched at the first moment. Dale, who never imagined
that a boy who was not afraid of his schoolfellows could be
afraid of geese, luckily mistook the movement, and said,
“ Ay, get a switch,—a bunch of f*«ze will do, and we will
be rid of the noisy things.”
FIRST RAMBLE. 95

eet



ee

He drove them away, and Hugh had now learned, for
ever, how much noise geese can make, and how little they
are :o be feared.

They soon came upon some creatures which were larger
= d stronger, and with which Hugh was no better acquainted.
Some cows were grazing, or had been grazing, till a party of
boys came up. They were now restless, moving uneasily
about. so that Dale himself hesitated for a moment which
way to go. Lamb was near,—the passionate boy, who was
nobody’s friend, and who was therefore seldom at play with
others. He was also something of a coward, as any one
might know from his frequent bullying. He and How
happened to be together at this time; and it was then
appearance of fright at the restless cows which frightened
Hugh. One cow at last began to trot towards them at a
pretty good rate. Lamb ran off to the right, and the two
little boys after him, though Dale pulled at Hugh’s hand to
make him stand still, as Dale chose to do himself. He
pulled in vain—Hugh burst away, and off went the three
boys, over the hillocks and through the furze, the cow
trotting at some distance behind. They did not pause till
Lamb had led them off the heath into a deep lane, different
from the one by which they had come. The cow stopped
at a patch of green grass, just at the entrance of the hollow
way, and the runners therefore could take breath.

“Now we are here,” said Lamb, “I will show you-a nice
place,—-a place where we can get something nice. How
thirsty I am!”
96 THE CROFTON BOYS,





And so am I,” declared Holt, smacking his dry tongue.
Hugh’s mouth was very dry too, between the run and the
fright.

“Well, then, come along with me, and I will show you,”
said Lamb.

Hugh thought they ought not to go farther from the heath,
but Lamb said they would get back by another way,—through
a gate belonging to a friend of his. They could not get
back the way they came, because the cow was there still.
He walked briskly on till they came to a cottage, over
whose door swung a sign; and on the sign was a painting
of a bottle and a glass, and a heap of things which were
probably meant for cakes, as there were cakes in the
window. Here Lamb turned in, and the woman seemed
to know him well. She smiled, and closed the door behind
the three boys, and asked them to sit down; but Lamb said .
there was no time for that to-day,—she must be quick. He
then told the boys that they would have some ginger-beer.

“But may we?” asked the little boys.

“To be sure; who is to prevent us? ‘You shall see how
you like ginger-beer when you are thirsty.”

The woman declared that it was the most wholesome
thing in the world; and if the young gentleman did not
find it so, she would never ask him to taste her ginger-beer
again. Hugh thanked them both, but he did not feel quite
comfortable. He looked at Holt, to find out what he
thought; but Holt was quite engrossed with watching the
woman untwisting the wire of the first bottle. The cork
FIRST RAMBLE. 97



did not fly: indeed, there was some difficulty in getting it
out; so Lamb waived his right, as the eldest, to drink first;
and the little boys were so long in settling which should





REFRESHMENT,

have it, that the little spirit there was had all gone off before

Hugh began to drink, and he did not find ginger-beer such

particularly good stuff as Lamb had said. He would have

liked a drink of water better. The next bottle was very

brisk, so Lamb seized upon it, and the froth hung round
7
08 THE CROFTON BOYS.



his mouth when he had done; but Holt was no better off
with his than Hugh had been. They were both urged to
try their luck again. Hugh would not; but Holt did once,
and Lamb two or three times. Then the woman offered
them some cakes upon a plate, and the little boys thanked
her, and took each one. Lamb put some in his pocket, and
advised the others to do the same, as they had no time to
spare. He kept some room in his pocket, however, for
some plums, and told the boys that they might carry theirs
in their handkerchiefs, or in their caps, if they would take
care to have finished before they came within sight of the
usher. He then asked the woman to let them out upon the
heath through her garden gate, and she said she certainly
would when they lad paid. She then stood drumming with
her fingers upon the table, and looking through the window,
as if waiting.

“Come, Proctor, you have half a crown,” said Lamb.
“ Out with it!”

“My half-crown!” exclaimed Proctor. “You did not say
- I had anything to pay.”

“As if you did not know that, without my telling you!
You don’t think people give away their good things, I
suppose! Come,—where’s your half-crown? My money is
all at home.”

Holt had nothing with him either. Lamb asked the
woman what there was to pay. She seemed to count and
consider; and Holt told Hugh afterwards that he saw Lamb
wink at her. She then said that the younger gentlemen had
FIRST RAMBLE. 99

had the most plums and cakes. The charge was a shilling
apiece for them, and sixpence for Master Lamb—half a
crown exactly. Hugh protested he never meant anything
like this, and that he wanted part of his half-crown to buy a
comb with; and he would have emptied out the cakes and
fruit he had left, but the woman stopped him, saying that
she never took back what she had sold. Lamb hurried him
too, declaring that their time was up; and he even thrust
his finger and thumb into Hugh’s inner pocket, and took
out the half-crown, which he gave to the woman. He was
sure that Hugh could wait for his comb till Holt paid him,
and the woman said she did not see that any more combing
was wanted, the young gentleman’s hair looked so pretty as
it was. She then showed them through the garden, and
gave them each a marigold full blown. .She unlocked her
gate, pushed them through, locked it behind them, and left
them to hide their purchases as well as they could. Though
the little boys stuffed their pockets till the ripest plums
burst, and wetted the linings, they could not dispose of
‘them all, and they were obliged to give away a good
many.

Hugh went in search of his new friend, and drew him
aside from the rest to relate his troubles. Dale wondered
he had not found out Lamb before this, enough to refuse
to follow his lead. Lamb would never pay a penny. He
always spent the little money he had upon good things, the
first day or two; and then he got what he could out of any
one who was silly enough to trust him,

J—2
100 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“ But,” said Hugh, “the only thing we had to do with
each other before was by my being kind to him.”

“That makes no difference,” said Dale.

“ But what a bad boy he must be! To be sure, he will
pay me, when he knows how much I want a comb.”

“He will tell you to buy it out of your five shillings. You
let him know you had , five shillings in Mrs. Watson’s
hands.”

“Ves; but he knows how I mean to spend that,—for
presents to: carry home at Christmas. But I’ll never tell
him anything.again. Oh, Dale! do you really think he will
never pay me?”

“ He never pays anybody; that is all I know. Come,—
forget it all, as fast as you can. Let us go and see if we can
get any nuts,”

Hugh did not at all succeed in his endeavours to forget
his adventure. The more he thought about it, the worse it
seemed ; and the next time he spoke to Holt, and told him
to remember that he owed him a shilling, Holt said he did
not know that,—he did not mean to spend a shilling; and
it was clear that it was only his fear of Hugh’s speaking to
“Mrs. Watson or the usher that prevented his saying outright
that he should not pay it. Hugh felt very hot, and bit*his
lip to make his voice steady when he told Dale, on the way
home, that he did not believe he should ever see any part
of his halfcrown again. Dale thought so too; but he ad-
vised him to do nothing more than keep the two debtors up
ta the remembrance of their debt. If he told so powerful a


FIRST RAMBLE. 101

person as Firth, it would be almost as much tale-telling as
if he went to the master at once; and Hugh himself had
no inclination to expose his folly to Phil, who was already
quite sufficiently ashamed of his inexperience. So poor
Hugh threw the last of his plums to some cottager’s chil- .
dren on the green, on his way home; and, when he set foot
within bounds again, he heartily wished that this Saturday
afternoon had been rainy too, for any disappointment would
have been better than this scrape.

While learning his lessons for Monday, he forgot the whole
matter ; and then he grew merry over the great Saturday
night’s washing; but after he was in bed, it flashed upon
him that he should meet Uncle and Aunt Shaw in church to-
morrow, and they would speak to Phil and him after church,
and his uncle might ask after the half-crown. He determined
not to expose his companions, at any rate; but his uncle
would be displeased; and’ this thought was so sad that
Hugh cried himself to sleep. His uncle and aunt were at
church the next morning ; and Hugh could not forget the
ginger-beer, or help watching his uncle; so that, though he
tried several times to-attend to the sermon, he knew nothing
about it when it was done. His uncle observed in the
chutchyard that they must have had a fine ramble the day
- before; but did not say anything about pocket-money.
Neither did he name a day for his nephews to visit him,
though he said they must come before the days grew much
shorter, So Hugh thought he had got off very well thus far.
In the afternoon, however, Mrs. Watson, who invited him
102 ‘THE CROFTON BOYS.



and Holt into her parlour, to look over the pictures in her
great Bible, was rather surprised to find how little Hugh
could tell her of the sermon, considering how much he had
remembered the Sunday before. She had certainly thought
that to-day’s sermon had been the simpler, and more inte-
resting to young people, of the two. Her conversation with
Hugh did him good, however. It reminded him of his
mother’s words, and of her expectations from him ; and it
made him resolve to bear, not only his loss, but any blame _
which might come upon hin, silently and without betraying
anybody. He had already determined, fifty times within
the twenty-four hours, never to be so weakly. led again, when
his own mind was doubtful, as he had felt it all the time
from leaving the heath to getting back to itagain. He began
to reckon on the Christmas holidays, when he should have
five weeks at home, free from the evils of both places,—
from lessons with Miss Harold, and from Crofton scrapes.

It is probable that the whole affair would have passed over
quietly, and the woman in the lane might have made large
profits by other inexperienced boys, and Mr. Carnaby might
have gone on being careless as to where the boys went out
of his sight on Saturdays, but that Tom Holt ate too many
plums on the present occasion. On Sunday morning he was
not well; and was so ill by the evening, and all Monday,
that he had to be regularly nursed ; and when he left his
bed, he was taken to Mrs. Watson’s parlour,—-the comfort-
able, quiet place where invalid boys enjoyed themselves.
Poor Holt was in very low spirits; and Mrs. Watson was so
FIRST RAMBLE. 103

i

kind that he could not help telling her that he owed a shilling,

and he did not know how he should ever pay it; and that

Hugh Proctor, who had been his friend till now, seemed on
. asudden much more fond of Dale; and this made it harder
~ to be in debt to him.













































SUNDAY AFTERNOON.

The wet, smeared lining of the pockets had told Mrs,
Watson already that there had been some improper indul-
gence in good things; and when she heard what part Lamb
had played towards the little boys, she thought it right to tell
Mr. Tooke. Mr. Tooke said nothing till Holt was in the
school again, which was on Thursday; and not then till the
little boys had said their lessons, at past eleven o’clock. They
were drawing on their slates, and Lamb was still mumbling
over his book, without getting on, when the master’s awful
voice was heard, calling up before him Lamb, little Proctor,
and Holt. All three started, and turned red; so that the
104 THE CROFTON BOYS.



school concluded them guilty before it was known what they
were charged with. Dale knew,—and he alone; and very
sorry he was, for the intimacy between Hugh and him had
grown very close indeed since Saturday.

The master was considerate towards the younger boys.
He made Lamb tell the whole. Even when the cowardly
lad “bellowed” (as his schoolfellows called his usual mode
of crying) so that nothing’ else could be heard, Mr. Tooke
waited, rather than question the other two. When the whole
story was extracted, in all its shamefulness, from Lamb’s own
lips, the master expressed his disgust. He said nothing about
the money part of it—about how Hugh was to be paid. He
probably thought it best for the boys to take the conse
“quences of their folly in losing their money. He handed
the little boys over to Mr. Carnaby to be caned—“To
make them remember,” as he said; though they themselves
were pretty sure they should never forget. Lamb was kept
to be punished by the master himself. Though Lamb knew
he should be severely flogged, and though he was the most
cowardly boy in the school, he did not suffer so much as
Hugh did in the prospect of being caned—being punished
at all. Phil, who knew his brother’s face well, saw, as he
passed down the room, how miserable he was—too miserable
to cry; and Phil pulled him by the sleeve, and whispered
that being caned was nothing to mind—only a stroke or two
across the shoulders. Hugh shook his head, as much as to
say, “It is not that.”

No—it was not the pain. It was the being punished in
LAIRST RAMBLE. 105



open school, and when he did not feel that he deserved it.
How should he know where Lamb was taking him? How
should he know that the ginger-beer was to be paid for,
and that he was to pay? He felt himself injured enough
already; and now to be punished in addition! He would
have died on the spot for liberty to tell Mr. Tooke and
everybody what he thought of the way he was treated. He
had felt his mother hard sometimes; but what had she ever
done to him compared with this? It was well he thought
of his mother. At the first moment, the picture of home in
his mind nearly made him cry—the thing of all others he
most wished to avoid while so many eyes were on him; but —
the remembrance of what his mother expected of him—her
look when she told him he must not fail—gave him courage.
Hard as it was to be, as he believed, unjustly punished, it
was better than having done anything very wrong—anything
that he really could not have told his mother.

Mr. Carnaby foresaw that a rebuke was in store for him
for his negligence during the walk on Saturday; and this
anticipation did not sweeten his mood. He kept the little
boys waiting, though Holt was trembling very much, and still
weak from his illness. It occurred to the usher that another
person might be made uncomfortable, and he immediately
acted on the idea. He had observed how fond of one another
Dale and Hugh had become; and he thought he would
plague Dale a little. He therefore summoned him, and
desired him to go and bring him a switch, to cane these
boys with,
106 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“T have broken my cane; so bring mea stout switch,”
said he. “Bring me one out of the orchard; one that will
lay on well—one that will not break with a good hard stroke;
—mind what I say—one that will not break.”

“Yes, sir,” replied Dale, readily ; and he went as if he was
not at all unwilling.

Holt shivered. Hugh never moved.

It was long, very long, before Dale returned. When he
did, be brought a remarkably stout broomstick.

“This won’t-break, I think, sir,” said he.

The boys giggled. Mr. Carnaby knuckled Dale’s head as
he asked him if he called that a switch.

“Bring me a switch,” said he. “One that is not too
stout, or else it will not sting. It must sting, remember,—
sting well. Not too stout, remember.”

“Yes, sir,” said Dale; and away he went again.

He was now gone-yet longer ; and by the time he returned
~ everybody's eyes were fixed on the door, to see what sort of
a switch would next appear. Dale entered, bringing a straw.

“T think this will not be too stout, sir,”

Everybody laughed but Hugh—even Holt.

There was that sneer about Mr. Carnaby’s nose which
made everybody sorry now for Dale; but everybody started,
Mr. Carnaby and all, at Mr. Tooke’s voice, close at hand.
How much he had seen and heard there was no knowing;
but it was enough to make him look extremely stern.

“ Are these boys not caned yet, Mr. Carnaby?”

“No, sir;—-I have not—I——”
FIRST RAMBLE. 107







“ Have they been standing here all this while?”
“Ves, sir. I have no cane, sir. I have been sending



“T ordered them an immediate caning, Mr. Carnaby, and
not mental torture. School is up,” he declared to the boys
at large. ‘You may go—you have been punished enough,”
108 THE CROFTON BOYS.



he said to the little boys. “Mr. Carnaby, have the goodness
to remain a moment.”

And the large room was speedily emptied of all but the
master, the usher, and poor Lamb.

“The usher will catch it now,” observed some boys, as
the master himself shut the door behind them. “ He will
get well paid for his spite.”

“What will be done to him?” asked Hugh of Dale, whom
he loved fervently for having saved him from punishment.

“Oh, I don’t know; and I don’t care—though he was
just going to give my head some sound raps against the
wall, if Mr. Tooke had not come up at the moment.”

“But what wz// be done to Mr. Carnaby?

“Never mind what; he won't be here jong, they say.
Fisher says there is another coming; and Carnaby is here
only till that other is at liberty.”

This was good news, if true, and Hugh ran off, quite in
spirits, to play. He had set himself diligently to learn to
play, and would not be driven off; and Dale had insisted
on fair scope for him. He played too well to be objected
to any more. They now went to leap-frog; and when too
hot to keep it up any longer, he and Dale mounted into the
apple-tree to talk, while they were cooling and expecting the
dinner-bell.

Something happened very wonderful before dinner. The
gardener went down to the main road, and seemed to be
looking out. At last he hailed the London coach. Hugh
and Dale could see from their perch. The coach stopped,
FIRST RAMBLE. » 109



the gardener ran back, met Mr. Carnaby under the chestnuts,
relieved him of his portmanteau, and helped him to mount
the coach. . :

“Ts he going? Gone for good?” passed from mouth to
mouth all over the playground. ‘

“Gone for good,” was the answer of those who knew to
a certainty. !

The boys set up first a groan, so loud chat perhaps the
departing usher heard it. Then they gave a shout of joy, in
which the little boys joined with all their might— Hugh
waving his cap in the apple-tree.




CHAPTER VII.

WHAT IS ONLY TO BE HAD AT HOME.

Huceu got on far better with his lessons as he grew more
intimate with Dale. It was not so much that Dale helped
him with his grammar and construing (for Dale thought
every boy should make shift to do his own business) as that
he liked to talk about his work, even with a younger boy,
and so, as he said, clear his head. was above Hugh’s comprehension, and much of his repeti-
tions mere words; but there were other matters which fixed
Hugh’s attention, and proved to him that study might be
interesting out of school. When Dale had a theme to write,
the two boys often walked up and down the playground for
half an hour together, talking the subject over, and telling
of anything they had heard or read upon it. Hugh presently
learned the names and the meanings of the different parts
of atheme, and he could sometimes help with an illustration
or.example, though he left it to his friend to-lay down

Ile
WHAT IS ONLY TO BE HAD AT HOME. 111





the Proposition, and search out the Confirmation. Dale’s
nonsense-verses were perfect nonsense to Hugh, but his
construing was not; and when he went over it aloud, for
the purpose of fixing his lesson in his ear, as well as his
mind, Hugh was sorry when they arrived at the end, and
eager to know what came next,—particularly if they had to
stop in the middle of a story of Ovid's. Every week, almost
every day now, made a great difference in Hugh’s school
life. He still found his lessons very hard work, and was
often in great fear and pain about them; but he continually
perceived new light breaking in upon his mind: his memory
served him better; the little he had learned came when he
wanted it, instead of just a minute too late. He rose in the
morning with less anxiety about the day, and when playing,
could forget school.

There was no usher yet in Mr. Carnaby’s place, and all
the boys said their lessons to Mr. Tooke himself, which
Hugh liked very much when he had got over the first fear.
A writing-master came from a distance twice a week, when
the whole school was at writing and arithmetic all the after-
noon, but every other lesson was said to the master; and
this was likely to go on till Christmas, as the new usher, of
whom, it was said, Mr. Tooke thought so highly as to choose
to wait for him, could not come before that time. Of course,
with so much upon his hands, Mr. Tooke had not-a moment
to spare; and slow or idle boys were sent back to their
desks at the first trip or hesitation in their lessons. Hugh
was afraid, at the outset, that he should be like poor Lamb,
£12 THE CROFTON BOYS.



who never got a whole lesson said during these weeks, and
he was turned down sometimes, but not often enough to
depress him. He learned to trust more to his ear and his
memory; his mind became excited, as in playing a game;
and he found he got through, he scarcely knew how. His
feeling of fatigue afterwards proved to him that this was
harder work than he had ever done at home, but he did not
feel it so at the time. When he could learn a lesson in ten
minutes, and say it in one; when he began to use Latin
phrases in his ‘private thoughts, and saw the meaning of a
rule of syntax, so as to be able to find a fresh example out
of his own head, he felt himself really a Crofton boys and
his heart grew light within him.

The class to which Hugh belonged was one day standing
waiting to be heard, when the master was giving a subject
and directions for an English theme to Dale’s class. The
subject was the Pleasures of Friendship. In a moment
Hugh thought of Damon and Pythias, and of David and
Jonathan,—of the last of whom there was a picture in Mrs,
Watson’s great Bible. He thought how happy he had been
since he had known Dale, and his heart was in such a glow,
he was sure he could write a theme. He ran after Mr.
Tooke when school was over, and asked whether he might
write a theme with Dale’s class) When Mr. Tooke found.
he knew what was meant by writing a theme, he said he
might try, if he neglected nothing for it, and wrote every
word of it himself, without consultation with any one.

Hugh scampered away to tell Dale that they must not
WHAT IS ONLY TO BE HAD AT HOME. 113



talk over this theme together, as they were both to do it;
and then, instead of playing, he went to his desk, and wrote
upon his slate till it was quite full. He had to borrow two
slates before he had written all he had to say. Phil ruled
his paper for him, but before he had copied one page, his
neighbours wanted their slates back again,—said they must
have them, and rubbed out all he had written. Much of the
little time he had was lost in this way, and he grew wearied.
He thought at first that his theme would be very beautiful,
but he now began to doubt whether it would be worth any-
thing at all; and he was vexed to have tired himself with
doing what would only make him laughed at. The first
page was well written out,—the Confirmation being properly
separated from the Proposition ; but he had to write all the
latter part directly from his head upon the paper, as the
slates were taken away, and he forgot to separate the Con-
clusion from the Inference.

He borrowed a penknife, and tried to scratch out half a
line; but he only made a hole in the paper, and was obliged
to let the line stand. Then he found he had strangely for-
gotten to put in the chief thing of all,—about friends telling
one another of their faults,—though, on consideration, he
was not sure that this was one of the Pleasures of Friend-
ship; so, perhaps, it did not much matter. But there were
two blots, and he had left out Jonathan’s name, which had
to be interlined. Altogether, it had the appearance of a very
bad theme. Firth came and looked over his shoulder, as
he was gazing at it, and Firth offered to write it out for him;

8
114 THE CROFTON BOYS.



and even thought it would’ be fair, as he had had nothing to -
do with the composition; but Hugh could not think it would
be fair, and said, sighing, that his must take its chance. He
did not think he could have done a theme so very badly.

Mr. Tooke beckoned him up with Dale’s class, when they
catried up their themes, and, seeing how red his face was,
the master bade him not be afraid. But how could he help
being afraid? The themes were not read directly. It was
Mr. Tooke’s practice to read them out of school hours,
On this oceasion, judgment was given the last thing before
school broke up the next morning.

Hugh had never been more astonished in his life. Mr.
Tooke praised his theme very much, and said it had sur-
prised him. He did not mind the blots and mistakes, which
would, he said, have been great faults in a copy-book, but
were of less consequence than other things in a theme.
Time and pains would correct slovenliness of that kind, and
the thoughts and language were good. Hugh was almost
out of his wits with delight; so nearly so that he spoiled his
own pleasure completely. He could not keep his happiness
to himself, or his vanity; for Hugh had a good deal of
vanity,—more than he was aware of before this day. He
told several boys what Mr. Tooke had said, but he soon
found that would not do. Some were indifferent, but most
laughed at him. Then he ran to Mrs. Watson’s parlour and
knocked. Nobody answered, for the room was empty; so
Hugh sought her in various places, and at last found her in
the kitchen, boiling some preserves.
WHAT IS ONLY TO BE HAD AT HOME, 1158



“What do you come here for? This is no place for you,”
said she, when the maids tried in vain to put Hugh out. .

“T only want to tell you one thing,” cried Hugh; and he
repeated exactly what Mr. Tooke had said of his theme.



WRITING THE THEME,

Mrs. Watson laughed, and the maids laughed, and Hugh
left them, angry with them, but more angry with himself.
They did not care for him,—nobody cared for him, he said
to himself; he longed for his mother’s look of approbation
when he had done well, and Agnes’ pleasure, and even
Susan’s fondness and praise. He sought Dale. Dale was
. in the midst of a game, and had not a word or look to spare .
till it was over. The boys would have admitted Hugb. for
8—2
116 THE CROFTON BOYS.



he could now play as well as anybody; but he was in no
mood for play now. He climbed his tree, and sat’ there,
stinging his mind with the thought of his having carried his
boastings into the kitchen, and with his recollection of Mrs.
Watson’s laugh.

It often happened that Firth and Hugh met at this tree,
and it happened now. There was room for both, and Firth
mounted, and read for some time. At last he seemed to
be struck by Hugh’s restlessness and heavy sighs; and he
asked whether he had not got something to amuse himself '
with. ;

“No, I don’t want to amuse myself,” said Hugh, stretching
so as almost to throw himself out of the tree.

“Why, what’s the matter? Did not you come off well
with your theme? I heard somebody say you were quite
enough set up about it.”

‘“‘Where is the use of doing a thing well, if nobody cares
about it?” said Hugh. “f don’t believe anybody at Crofton
cares a bit about me—cares whether I get on well or ill—
except Dale. If I take pains and succeed, they only laugh
at me.”

“Ah! you don’t understand school and schoolboys yet,”
replied Firth, “To do a difficult lesson well is a grand
affair at home, and the whole house knows of it. But it is
the commonest thing in the world here. If you learn to feel
with these boys, instead of expecting them to feel with you
(which they cannot possibly do), you will soon find that they
care for you accordingly.”
WHAT IS ONLY 10 BE HAD AT HOME. 117



Hugh shook his head.
“You will find in every school in England,” continued
Firth, “that it is not the way of boys to talk about feelings
--about anybody’s feelings. That is the reason why they
do not mention their sisters or their mothers—except when
two confidential friends are together, in a tree, or by them-
selves in the meadows. But, as sure as ever a boy is full of
action—if he tops the rest at play—holds his tongue, or
helps others generously—or shows a manly spirit without —
being proud of it, the whole school is his friend. You have
done well, so far, by growing more and more sociable, but
you will lose ground if you boast about your lessons out of
school. To prosper at Crofton you must put off home, and

make yourself a Crofton boy.”

“J don’t care about that,” said Hugh. “TI give it all up.
There is nothing but injustice here.”

“Nothing but injustice! Pray, am I unjust?”

‘No—not you—not so far. But——”

“Ts Mr. Tooke unjust?”

“ Ves—very.”

‘Pray how, and when?”

“ He has been so unjust to me, that if it nad not been for
something, I could not have borne it. Iam not going to
tell you what that something is: only you need not be afraid
but that I can bear everything. If the whole world was
against me ”



“Well, never mind what that something is; but tell me
how Mr. Tooke is unjust to you.”
118 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“He punished me when I did not deserve it; and he
praised me when I did not deserve it. I was cheated and
injured that Saturday; and, instead of seeing me righted,
Mr. Tooke ordered me to be punished. And to-day, when
my theme was so badly done that I made sure of being
blamed, he praised me.”

“This might be injustice at home,” replied Firth, “because
parents know, or ought to know, all that is in their children’s
minds, and exactly what their children can do. A school-

“master can judge only by what he sees. Mr. Tooke does
not know yet that you could have done your theme better
than you did—as your mother would have known. When
he finds you can do better, he will not praise such a theme
again. Meantime, how you can boast of his praise, if you
think it unjust, is the wonder to me.”

“So it is to me now. I wish I had never asked to do
that theme at all,” cried Hugh, again stretching himself
to get rid of his shame. “ But why did Mr. Tooke order me
to be caned? Why did he not make Lamb and Holt pay
me what they owe? I was injured before; and he injured
me more.”

“You were to be caned because you left the heath and
entered a house, without leave—not because you had been
cheated of your money.”

“But I did not know where I was going. I never meant
to enter a house.”

“ “But you did both; and what you suffered will prevent
your letting yourself be led into such a scrape again. As
WHAT IS ONLY TO BE HAD AT HOME, 119

for the money part of the matter—a school is to boys what
the world is when they become men. They must manage
their own affairs among themselves. T he difference is, that
here is the master to be applied to, if we choose, He will
advise you about your money, if you choose to ask him; but
for my part, I would rather put up with the loss, if I were
you.” ‘

“* Nobody will ever understand what I mean about justice,”
muttered Hugh.

“Suppose,” said Firth, “while you are complaining o.
injustice in this way, somebody else should be complaining
in the same way of your injustice.”

“Nobody can——fairly,” replied Hugh.

“Do you see that poor fellow, skulking there under the
orchard-wall ?”

“What, Holt?”

“Yes, Holt. I fancy the thought in his mind at this
moment is that you are the most unjust person at Crofton.”

“1! unjust!”

“Yes; so he thinks. When you first came, you and he
were companions. You found comfort in each other while
all the rest were strangers to you. You were glad to hear,
by the hour together, what he had to tell you about India,
and his voyages and travels. Now he feels himself lonely
and forsaken, while he sees you happy with a friend. He
thinks it hard that you should desert him because he owes
you a shilling, when he was cheated quite as much as

”
.

you
1200 THE CROFTON BOYS.

“Because he owes me a shilling!” cried Hugh, starting to
his-feet, “as if 2

Once more he had nearly fallen from his perch. Firth
caught him; and then asked him how Holt should think
otherwise than as he did, since Hugh had been his constant
companion up to that Saturday afternoon, and had hardly
spoken to him since.

Hugh protested that the shilling had nothing to do with
the matter; and he never meant to take more than sixpence
from Holt, because he thought Lamb was the one who
ought to pay the shilling. The thing was, he did not, and
could not, like’ Holt half so well as Dale. He could not
make a friend of Holt, because he wanted spirit—he had no
courage. What could he do? He could not pretend to be
intimate with Holt when he did not like him; and if he
explained that the shilling had nothing to do with the matter,
he could not explain how it really was, when the fault was in



the boy’s character, and not in his having given any par-
ticular offence. What could he do?

Firth thought he could only learn not to expect, anywhere
out of the bounds of home, what he thought justice. He
must, of course, try himself to be just to everybody; but he
must make up his mind in school, as men have to do in the
world, to be misunderstood—to be wrongly valued; to be
blamed when he felt himself the injured one, and praised
when he knew he did not deserve it.

“But it is so hard,” said Hugh.
WHAT IS ONLY TO BE HAD AT HOME, 121

‘And what do people leave home for but to learn hard
lessons?”

“ But still, if it were not for. ”

“For what? Do you see any comfort under it?” asked



Firth, fixing his eyes on Hugh.

Hugh nodded, without speaking.

“That One understands us who cannot be unjust?”
whispered Firth. “JI am glad you feel that.”

“Even home would be bad enough without that,” said
Hugh. “And what would school be?”

“Or the world?” added Firth. ‘But do not get cross,
and complain again. Leave that to those who have no
comfort.”

Hugh nodded again. Then he got down, and ran to tell
Holt that he did not want a shillling from him, because he
thought sixpence would be fairer.

Holt was glad to hear this at first; but he presently said
that it did not much matter, for that he had no more chance
of being able to pay sixpence than a shilling. His parents
were in India, and his uncle never offered him any money.
He knew indeed that his uncle had none to spare; for he
had said in the boy’s hearing, that it was hard on him to
have to pay the school bills (unless he might pay them in
the produce of his farm), so long as it must be before he
could be repaid from India. So Holt did not dare to ask
for pocket-money ; and for the hundredth time he sighed
over his debt. He had almost left off hoping that Hugh
would excuse him altogether, though everybody knew that
122 THE CROFTON BOYS.

Hugh had five shillings in Mrs. Watson’s hands. This fact,
and Hugh’s frequent applications to Lamb for payment, had
caused an impression that Hugh was fond of money. It was
not so; and yet the charge was not unfair. Hugh was ready
to give if properly asked; but he did not relish, and could .
not bear with temper, the injustice of such a forced borrow-
ing as had stripped him of his half-crown. He wanted his five
shillings for presents for his family; and for these reasons,
and not because he was miserly, he did not offer to excuse
Holt’s debt, which it would have been more generous to
have done. Nobody could wish that he should excuse
Lamb’s.

“When are you going to your uncle’s?” asked Holt. “I
suppose you ave going some day before Christmas.”

“On Saturday, to stay till Sunday night,” said Hugh.

‘And Proctor goes too, I suppose?”

“Ves, of course, Phil goes too.”

“ Anybody else?”

“We are each to take one friend, just for Saturday, to
come home at night.”

“Oh, then you-will take me? You said you would.”

“Did I? That must have been a long time ago.”

“But you did say so—that, whenever you went, you would
ask leave to take me.”

‘I don’t remember any such thing. And I am going to
take Dale this time. I have promised him.”

Holt cried with vexation. Dale was always in his way.
Hugh cared for nobody but Dale; but Dale should not go
WHAT 1S ONLY £0 BE HAD AT HOME, 124

to Mr. Shaw’s till he had had his turn. He had been
promised first, and he would go first. He would speak
to Mrs. Watson, and get leave to go and tell Mr. Shaw,
and then he was sure Mr. Shaw would let him go.



RECRIMINATION,.

Hugh was very uncomfortable. He really could not
remember having made this promise, but he could not be
sure that he had not. He asked Holt if he thought he
should like to be in people’s way, to spoil the holiday by
going where he was not wished for; but this sort of re-
monstrance did not comfort Holt at all. Hugh offered
124 THE CROFTON BOYS.



that he should have the very next turn, if he would give
up now.

“T dare say! And when will that be? You know on
Sunday it will want only nineteen days to the holidays, and
you will not be going to your uncle’s again this half-year.
A pretty way of putting me off!”

Then, as if a sudden thought had struck him, he cried,

* But Proctor has to take somebody.”

“Ves; Phil takes Tooke. They settled that a week ago.”

“Oh, cat t you ask him to take me?”

“No, I shall not meddle with Phil. Besides, I am glad
he has chosen Tooke. Tooke behaved well to me about
the sponge that day. Tooke has some spirit.”

This put Holt in mind of the worst of his adventures
since he came to Crofton, and of all the miseries of being
shunned as a tell-tale. He cried so bitterly as to touch
Hugh’s heart. As if thinking aloud, Hugh told him that
he seemed very forlorn, and that he wished he would find
a friend to be intimate with. This would make him so
much happier as he had no idea of; as he himself had
found since he had had Dale for a friend.

This naturally brought out a torrent of reproaches, which
was followed by a hot argument; Holt insisting that Hugh
ought to have been his intimate friend, and Hugh asking
how he could make a friend of a boy who wanted spirit.
They broke away from one another at last, Hugh declaring
Holt to be unreasonable and selfish, and Holt es
Hugh cruel and insulting,
WHAT IS ONLY TO BE FAD AT HOME, 125

ae



Of course Mrs, Watson would not hear of Holt’s going to
Mr. Shaw, to ask for an invitation for Saturday. He was
told he must wait till another time.. It was no great conso-
lation to Holt that on Sunday it would want only nineteen
days to the holidays, for he was to remain at Crofton. He
hoped to like the holidays better than school-days, and to
be petted by Mrs, Watson, and to sit by the fire, instead of
being forced into the playground in all weathers; but still
he could not look forward to Christmas with the glee which
other boys felt.




CHAPTER VIII.

A LONG DAY.

Hucu, meantime, was counting the hours till Saturday.
Perhaps, if the truth were known, so was Phil, though he
was too old to acknowledge such a longing. But the climb-
ing about the mill,—the play encouraged there by his uncle
and the men,—his uncle’s stories within doors, his aunt’s
good dinners,—the fireside, the picture-books, the talk of
home, altogether made up the greatest treat of the half-year.
Phil had plenty of ways of passing the time. Hugh began
along letter home,—the very last letter, except the short
formal one which should declare when the Christmas vaca-
tion should commence. Hugh meant to write half the
letter before Saturday, and then fill it up with an account of
his visit to his uncle’s.

The days were passed, however, when Hugh had the
command of his leisure time, as on his arrival, when his
hours were apt to hang heavy. He had long since become

126
A LONG DAY. 127



too valuable in the playground to be left to follow his own |
devices. As the youngest boy, he was looked upon as a
sort of servant to the rest, when once it was found that he
was quick and clever. Either as scout, messenger, or in
some such capacity, he was continually wanted; and often
at times inconvenient to himself. He then usually remem-
bered what Mr. Tooke had told him of his boy, when Tooke
was the youngest,—how he bore things—not only being put
on the high wall, but being well worked in the service of
the older boys. Usually Hugh was obliging, but he could
and did feel cress at times. He was cross on this Friday—
the day when he was so anxious to write his letter before
“going to his uncle’s. On Saturday there would be no time.
The early mornings were dark now, and after school he
should have to wash: and dress, and be off to his uncle’s,
On Friday then, his paper was ruled, and he had only to run
across the playground to borrow Firth’s penknife, and then
nothing should delay his letter.

In that run across the playground he was stopped. He
was wanted to collect clean snow for the boys who were
bent on finishing their snow man while it would bind. He
should be let off when he had brought snow enough. But
he knew that by that time his fingers would be too stiff to
hold his pen, and he said he did not choose to stop now.
Upon this Lamb launched a snowball in his face. Hugh
grew angry,— or, as his schoolfellows said, insolent. Some
stood between him and the house, to prevent his getting
home, while others promised to roll him in the snow till he
128 THE CROFTON BOYS.



yielded full submission. Instead of yielding, Hugh made
for the orchard wall, scrambled up it, and stood for the
moment out of reach of his enemies. He kicked down such .
a quantity of snow upon any one who came near, that he
held all at bay for some little time. At last, however, he
had disposed of all the snow within his reach, and they were
pelting him thickly with snowballs. It was not at any time
very easy to stand upright for long together upon this wall,
as the stones which capped it were rounded. Now, when
the coping-stones were slippery after the frost, and Hugh
nearly blinded with the shower of snowballs, he could not
keep his footing, and was obliged to sit astride upon the wall.
This brought one foot within reach from below;-and though
Hugh kicked, and drew up his foot as far and as often as he
could, so as not to lose his balance, it was snatched at by
many hands. At last one hand kept its hold, and plenty
more then fastened upon his leg. They pulled—he clung.
In another moment, down he came; and the large heavy
coping-stone, loosened by the frost, came after him, and fell
upon his left foot as he lay. ;

It was a dreadful shriek that he gave. Mrs. Watson heard
it in her store-room, and Mr. Tooke in his study. Some
labourers felling a tree in a wood, a quarter of a mile off,
heard it, and came running to see what could be the matter.
The whole school was in a cluster round the poor boy ina
few seconds. During this time, while several were engaged
in lifting away the stone, Tooke stooped over him, and said,
with his lips as white as paper,
A LONG DAY. 129



“Who was it that pulled you,—that got the first hold of
you? WasitIy Oh! say it was not I.”
~ “Tt was you,” said Hugh. “ But never mind! You did’ not

















- HUGH MEETS WITH AN ACCIDENT

mean it.”—He saw that Tooke’s pain was worse than his
own, and he added, in a faint whisper,‘ Don’t you tell, and
then nobody will know. Mind you don’t!”

One boy after another turned away from the sight of He
foot, when the stone was removed. Tooke fainted, but, then,

9
130 THE CROFTON BOYS.

so did another boy who had nothing to do with the matter.
Everybody who came up asked who did it; and nobody
could answer. Tooke did not hear; and so many felt them
selves concerned, that no one wished that any answer should
be given.

“Who did it, my dear boy?” asked Firth, bending ove!
him.

“Never mind!” was all-Hugh could say. He groaned in
terrible pain. .

He must: not lie there; but who could touch him? Firth
did, and he was the right person, as he was one of the
strongest. He made two boys pass their handkerchiefs
under the leg, and sling it, without touching it, and he lifted
Hugh, and carried him across his arms towards the house.
They met Mr. Tooke, and every person belonging to the
household, before they reached the door.

“To my bed!” said the master, when he saw, and in an
instant the gardener had his orders to saddle Mr. Tooke’s
horse, and ride to London for an eminent surgeon, stopping
by the way to beg Mr. and Mrs. Shaw to come, and bring
with them the surgeon who was their neighbour, Mr. An-
nanby. .

“Who did it?” ‘Who pulled him down?” passed from
mouth to mouth of the household.

“He won’t tell—noble fellow,” cried Firth. ‘ Don’t ask
him. Never ask him who pulled him down. You will -
never repent it, my dear boy,” whispered Firth.

. Hugh tried to smile, but he could not help groaning
A LONG DAY. 131





again. ‘There was a suppressed groan from some one else.
It was from Mr. Tooke. Hugh was sadly afraid he had, by
some means, found out who did the mischief. But it was
not so. Mr. Tooke was quite wretched enough without that.

Everybody was very kind, and did the best that could be
done. Hugh was held up on the side of Mr. Tooke’s bed,
while Mrs, Watson took off his clothes, cutting the left side
of his trousers to pieces without any hesitation. The master
held the leg firmly while the undressing went on; and then
poor Hugh was laid back, and covered up warm, while the
foot was placed on a pillow, with only a light handkerchief
thrown over it.

It was terrible to witness his pain, but Mr. Tooke never
left him all day. He chafed his hands, he gave him drink,
he told him he had no doubt his mother would arrive soon,
he encouraged him to say or do anything that he thought
would give-him ease.

“Cry, my dear,” he said, “if you want to cry. Do not
hide tears from me.” :

“T can’t help crying,” sobbed Hugh ; “but it is not the
pain—not only the pain; it is because you are so kind!
“Where zs Phil?” he said at last.

“ He is so very unhappy, that we think he had better not
see you till this pain is over. When you are asleep, perhaps.”

“Oh, when will that be?” and poor Hugh rolied his head
on the pillow.

“George rides fast; he is far on his way by this time,”
said Mr. Tooke, “And one or other of the surgeons will

Q—2
132 THE CROFTON BOYS.



soon oe here, and they will tell us what to do, and what to
expect.”

“Do tell Phil so—will you?”

Mr. Tooke rang the bell, and the message was sent to
Phil, with Hugh’s love.

“Will the surgeon hurt me much, do you think?” Hugh
asked. “I will bear it. I only want to know.”



GEORGE OFF FOR THE DOCTOR.

“T should think you hardly could be in more pain than
you are now,” replied Mr. Tooke. “TI trust they will relieve
you of this pain. I should not wonder if you are asleep
to-night as quietly as any of us, and then you will not mind
what they may have done to you.”

Hugh thought he should mind nothing if he could ever
be asleep again.

_ He vas soon asked if he would like to see his uncle and
aunt, who were come. He wished to see his uncle, and
‘A LONG DAY. 133





Mr. Shaw came up with the surgeon. Mr. Annanby did
scarcely anything to the foot at present. He soon covered
it up again, and said he would return in time to meet the



THE DOCTOR.

surgeon who was expected from London. Then Hugh and
his uncle were alone.
Mr. Shaw told him how sorry the boys all were, and how
they had come in from the playground at once, and put
themselves under Firth to be kept quiet ; and that very little
dinner had been eaten; and that, when the writing-master
134 THE CROFTON BOYS.

arrived, he was quite astonished to find everything so still,
and the boys so spiritless; but that nobody told him till he
observed how two or three were crying, so that he was sure
something was the matter.

“Which? Who? Whois crying?” asked Hugh.

“Poor Phil, and I do not know who else,—not being
acquainted with the rest.”

“How glad I am that Dale had nothing to do with it!”
said Hugh. ‘He was quite on the other side of the play-
ground.”

“They tell me below that I must not ask you how it
happened.”

“Oh, yes! you may. Everything except just who it was
that pulled me down. So many got hold of me that nobody
knows exactly who gave ¢he pull, except myself and one
other. He did not mean it; and I was cross about playing
- with them ; and the stone on the wall was loose, or it would
not have happened. Oh, dear! oh, dear! Uncle, do you think
it a bad accident?”

“Yes, my boy, a very bad accident.”

“Do you think I shall die? I never thought of that,”
said Hugh. And he raised himself a little, but was obliged
to lie back again.

“No; I do not think you will die.”

Will they think so at home? Was that the reason they
were sent to?”

“No; I have no doubt your mother will come to nurse
you, and to comfort you; but——” i
A LONG DAY. — 135



“To comfort me? Why, Mr. Tooke said the pain would
soon be over, he thought, and I should be asleep to-night.”

“Ves; but, though the pain may be over, it may leave
you lame. ‘That will be a misfortune; and you will be glad
of your mother to comfort you.”

“Lame!” said the boy. Then, as he looked wistfully in
his uncle’s face, he saw the truth,

“Qh, uncle! they are going to cut off my leg.”

“Not your leg, I hope, Hugh. You will not be quite so
lame as that; but I am afraid you must lose your foot.”

“Was that what Mr. Tooke meant by the surgeon’s
relieving me of my pain?”

“Ves, it was.”

“Then it will be before night. Is it quite certain, uncle?”

“Mr. Annanby thinks so. Your foot is too much hurt
ever to be cured. Do you think you can bear it, Hugh?”

“Why, yes, I suppose so. So many people have. It is
less than some of the savages bear. What horrid’ things
they do to their captives,—and even to some of their own
boys! And they bear it.”

“Yes; but: you are not a savage.”

“ But one may be as brave, without being a savage. Think
of the martyrs that were burnt, and some that were worse
than burnt! And they bore it.”

Mr. Shaw perceived that Hugh was either in much less
pain now, or that he forgot everything in a subject which
always interested him extremely. He told his uncle what
he had read of the tortures inflicted by savages, till his uncle,
136 THE CROFTON BOYS.

already a good deal agitated, was quite sick; but he let him
go on, hoping that the boy might think lightly in comparison
of what he himself had to undergo.. This could not last
long, however.. The wringing pain soon came back; and
as Hugh cried, he said he bore it so very badly, he did not
know what -his mother would say if she saw him. . She had
trusted him not to fail; but really he could not bear this
much longer.

His uncle told him that nobody had thought of his
having such pain as this to bear; that he had often shown
himself a brave little fellow; and he did not doubt that,
when this terrible day was over, he would keep up his
spirits through all the rest.

Hugh would have his uncle go down to tea, Then he
saw a gown and shawl through the curtain, and started up;
but it was not his mother yet. It was only Mrs. Watson
come to sit with him while his uncle had his tea.

Tea was over, and the younger boys had all gone up to
bed, and the older ones were just going, when there was a
ring at the gate. It was Mrs. Proctor; and with her the
surgeon from London.

“Mother! Never mind, mother!” Hugh was beginning
to say; but he stopped when he saw her face,—it was so
very pale and grave. At least, he thought so; but he saw
her only by firelight; for the candle had been shaded from
his eyes, because he could not bear it. She kissed him
with a long, long kiss; but she did not speak.

“T wish the surgeon had come first,” he whispered, “and
A LONG DAY. 137

then they would have had my foot off before you came.
When z7/7 he come?”

“He is here,—they are both here.”

“Oh, then, do make them make haste. Mr. Tooke says
I shall go to sleep afterwards. You think so? Then we
will both go to sleep, and have our talk in the morning.
Do not stay now,—this pain is so bad,—I can’t bear it well
at all. Do go, now, and bid them make haste, will you?”

His mother whispered that she heard he had been a_
brave boy, and she knew he would be so still. Then the
surgeons came up, and Mr. Shaw. There was some bustle
in the room, and Mr. Shaw took his sister downstairs, and
came up again, with Mr. Tooke.

“Don’t let mother come,” said Hugh.

“No, my boy, I will stay with you,” said his uncle.

The surgeons took off his foot. As he sat in a chair,
and his uncle stood behind him, and held his hands, and
pressed his head against him, Hugh felt how his uncle’s
breast was heaving,—and was sure he was crying. In the
very middle of it all, Hugh looked up in his uncle’s face,
and said,

“Never mind, uncle! I can bear it.”

He did bear it finely. It was far more terrible than he
had fancied; and he felt that he could not have gone on
a minute longer. When it was over, he muttered some-
thing, and Mr. Tooke. bent down to hear what it was.
It was—

“T can’t think how the Red Indians bear things so.”
138 THE CROFTON BOYS.

His uncle lifted him gently into bed, and told him that
he would soon feel easy now.

“Have you told mother?” asked Hugh.

“Yes; we sent to her directly.”

“How long did it take?” asked Hugh.

“You have been out of bed only a few minutes—seven
or eight, perhaps.”

“Oh, uncle, you don’t mean really?”

“Really; but we know they seemed like hours to you.
Now, your mother will bring you some tea. When you
have had that, you will go tosleep: so I shall wish you good
night now.”

“When will you come again?”

“Very often, till you come to me, Not a word more
now. Good night.”

Hugh was half asleep when his tea came up, and quite so
directly after he had drunk it. Though he slept a great deal in
the course of the night, he woke often—such odd feelings
disturbed him. Every time he opened his eyes, he saw his
mother sitting by the fireside; and every time he moved in
the least, she came softly to look. She would not let him
talk at all till near morning, when she found that he could
not sleep any more, and that he seemed a little confused
about where he was—what room it was, and how she came
to be there by firelight. Then she lighted a candle, and
allowed him to talk about his friend Dale, and several school
affairs, and this brought back gradually the recollection of
all that hed happened.
A LONG DAY. . 139

“TJ don’t know what I have been about, I declare,” said
he, half laughing. But he was soon as serious as ever he
was in his life, as he said, “ But, oh! mother, tell me—do
tell me if I have let out who pulled me off the wall.”

“You have not—you have not indeed,” replied she. “I
shall never ask. I do not wish to know. I am glad you
have not told, for it would do no.good. It was altogether
an accident.” ;

“So it was,” said Hugh; “and it would make the boy so
unhappy to be pointed at. Do promise me, if I should let
it out in my sleep, that you will never, never tell anybody.”

“TI promise you. And I shall be the only person beside
you while you are asleep till you get well. So you need not
be afraid. Now, lie still again.”

She put out the light, and he did lie still for some time;
but then he was struck with a sudden thought, which made
him cry out,

“Oh, mother, if I am so lame, I can never be a soldier or
-a sailor. I can never go round the world!”

And Hugh burst into tears, now more really afflicted
than he had. been yet. His mother sat on the bed beside
him, and wiped away his tears as they flowed, while he told
her, as well as his sobs would let him, how long and how
much he had reckoned on going round the world, and how
little he cared for anything else in the future, and now this
was just the very thing he should never be able todo! He
had practised climbing ever since he could remember, and
now that was of no use; he had practised marching, and
140 THE CROFTON BOYS.

now he should never march again. When he had finished
his complaint there was a pause, and his mother said,

“ Hugh, do you remember Richard Grant ?”

“What, the cabinetmaker? ‘The man who carved so
beautifully ?”

“Yes, Do you remember——No, you could hardly have
known, but I will tell you. He had planned a most beauti-
ful set of carvings in wood for a chapel belonging to a
nobleman’s mansion. He was to be well paid—his work
was so superior; and he would be able to make his parents
comfortable, as well as his wife and children. But the
thing he most cared for was the honour of producing a
noble work which would outlive him. Well, at the very
beginning of his task, his chisel flew up against his wrist,
and the narrow cut that it made, not more than half an
inch wide, made his right hand entirely useless for life. He
could never again hold a tool; his work was gone, his
business in life seemed over, the support of the whole
family was taken away, and the only strong wish Richard’
Grant had in the world was disappointed.”

Hugh hid his face with his handkerchief, and his mother
went on:

“You have heard of Huber.” ;

“The man who found out so much about bees. Miss
Harold read that account to us.”

“Bees and ants. When Huber had discovered more
than had ever been known before about bees and ants, and
when he was sure he could learn more still, and was more
A LONG DAY. 14!



and more anxious to peep and pry into their tiny homes,
and their curious ways, Huber became blind.”

Hugh sighed, and his mother went on:

“Did you ever hear of Beethoven? He was one of the -
greatest musical composers that ever lived. His great, his
sole delight was in music. It was the passion of his life.
When all his time and all his mind were given to music, he
became deaf—perfectly deaf; so that he never more heard
one single note from the loudest orchestra. While crowds
were moved and delighted with his compositions, it was all
silence to him.”

Hugh said nothing.

“ Now, do you think,” asked his mother,—and Hugh saw
by the grey light that began to shine in, that she smiled —
“do you think that these people were without a heavenly
Parent?”

“Oh, no! But were they all patient?”

“Yes, in their different ways and degrees. Would. you
say that they were hardly treated? Or would you rather
suppose that their Father gave them something more and
better to do than they had planned for themselves?”

“He must know best, of course; but it does seem hard
that that very thing should happen to them. Huber would
not have so much minded being deaf, perhaps; or that
musical man being blind; or Richard Grant losing his foot,
instead of his hand: for he did not want to go round the
world.”

“No doubt their hearts often eaelled within them at their
142 THE CROFTON BOYS.



disappointments; but I fully believe that they found very
soon that God's will was wiser than their wishes. They
found, if they bore their trial well, that there was work for
their hearts to do, far nobler than any work that the head
can do through the eye, and the ear, and the hand. And
they soon felt a new and delicious pleasure, which none but
the bitterly disappointed can feel.”

“What is that?”

“The pleasure of rousing their souls to bear pain, and of
agreeing with God silently, when nobody knows what is in
their hearts. There is a great pleasure in the exercise of
the body,—in making the heart beat, and the limbs glow, in
a run by the sea-side, or a game in the playground; but
this is nothing to the pleasure there is in exercising one’s
soul in bearing pain,—in finding one’s heart glow with the
hope that one is pleasing God.”

“Shall I feel that pleasure?”

“Often and often, I have no doubt,—every time that you
can willingly give up your wish to be a soldier or a sailor,—
or anything else that you have set your mind upon, if you
can smile to yourself, and say that you will be content at
home.—Well, I don’t expect it of you yet. I dare say it
was long a bitter thing to Beethoven to see hundreds of
people in raptures with his music, when he could not hear —
a note of it. And Huber-—”

“But did Beethoven get to smile?”

“Tf he did, he was happier than all the fine music in the
world could have made him.”


A LONG DAY. ; 143



“T wonder—Oh! I wonder if I ever shall feel so.”

“We will pray to God that you may. Shall we ask Him
now?”

Hugh clasped his hands. His mother kneeled beside the
bed, and, in a very few words, prayed that Hugh might be
able to bear his misfortune well, and that his friends might
give him such help and comfort as God should approve.

“Now, my dear, you will sleep again,” she said, as she
arose.

“Tf you will lie down too, instead of sitting by the fire
Do, mother.”

She did so; and they were soon both asleep.

TERT

iG

my



A LOVING NURSE.


CHAPTER IX.

CROFTON QUIET.

THE boys were all in the school-room in the grey of the
morning —no one late. Mr. Tooke was already there.
Almost every boy looked wistfully in the grave face of the
_ master; almost every one but his own son: he looked down;
and it seemed natural, for his eyes were swollen with crying.
He had been crying as much as Proctor; but, then, so had
Dale.

“Your schoolfellow is doing well,” said Mr. Tooke, in a
low voice, which, however, was heard to the farthest end of
the room. “His brother will tell you that he saw him
‘quietly asleep ; and I have just seen him so. He deserves
to do well, for he is a brave little boy. He is the youngest
of you, but I doubt whether there is a more manly heart
among you all.”

There was a murmur, as if everybody wished to agree to
this. That murmur set Phil crying again.

144
CROFTON QUIET. 14h



—

“As to how this accident happened,” continued the
master, “I have only to say this. The coping-stone of the
wall was loose, had become loosened by the frost. Of that
I am aware. But it would not—it could not have fallen, if
your schoolfellow had not been pulled from the top of the
_ wall. Several hands pulled him, as many as could get a
hold. Whose these hands were, it would be easy to ascer-
tain; and it would not be difficult to discover whose was
the hand which first laid hold, and gave the rest their grasp.
But—” How earnestly here did every one look for the next
words !—“ But your schoolfellow considers the affair an
accident—says he himself was cross.”

“No! No! We plagued him,” cried many voices.

“Well! he is sure no one meant him any harm, and ear-
nestly desires that no further inquiry may be made. For his
part, nothing, he declares, shall ever induce him to tell who
first seized him.”

The boys were about to give a loud cheer, but stopped
for Hugh’s sake, just in time. There was no want of signs
of what they felt. There was no noise, but there were
many tears. .

“TI do not think that a promise of impunity can be any
great comfort to those concerned,” continued Mr. Tooke;
“but such comfort as they can find in it, they may. Both
from my wish to indulge one who has just sustained so great
a misfortune, and because I think he is right, I shall never
inquire,—never wish to know more than I do of the origin
of this accident. His mother declares the same, on the part

10
146 THE CROFTON BOYS.



of both of his parents. I hope you will every one feel your:
selves put upon honour, to follow my example.”

Another general murmur, in sign of agreement.

“The only thing you can now do for your schoolfellow,”
concluded the master, “is to be quiet throughout the day.
As soon as he can be removed, he will be carried to Mr.
Shaw’s. ‘Till then, you will take care that he loses no rest
through you.—Now, first class, come up.”

While this class was up, Phil’s neighbour began whisper-
ing; and the next boy leaned over to hear; and one or two
came softly up behind: but, though they were busily engaged
in question and answer, the master’s stern voice was not
heard (as usual when there was talking) to say “Silence,
there!” His class saw him looking that way, once or twice;
but he took no notice. Phil had seen his brother, and was
privileged to tell.

“So you sawhim! Did you get areal good sight of him?”

“Ves, I stayed some time; half an hour, I dare say.”

‘What did he look like? Did he say anything?”

“Say anything!” cried Dale; ‘why, did you not hear he
was asleep?”

“What did he look like, then?”

“He looked as he always does when he is asleep, as far
as I could see. But we did not bring the light too near, for
fear of waking him.”

“Did you hear—did anybody tell you anything about it?”

“Yes; my mother told me whatever I wanted to know.”

“What? What did she tell you?”
CROFTON QUIET. 147.



“She says it will not be so very bad a lameness as it might
have been --as if he had not had his knee left. That makes
a great difference. They make a false foot now, very light ;
and if his leg gets quite properly well, and we are not too
much in a hurry, and we all take pains to help Hugh to
practise walking carefully at first, he may not be very lame.”



* Oh! then, it is not so bad,” said one, while Tooke, who
was listening, gave a deep sigh of relief.

“Not so bad!” exclaimed Phil. ‘“ Why, he will never be
so strong—so able and active as other men. He will never
be able to take care of himself and other people. He will
be so unlike other people always; and now, waile he is a
boy, he will never. ”

The images of poor Hugh’s privations and troubles as a
schoolboy weze too much for Phil;-and he laid down his


148 THE CROFTON BOYS.



head on his desk, to hide his grief. As for Tooke, he walked
away, looking the picture of wretchedness.

‘“‘When will you see him again?” asked Dale, passing his
arm round Phil’s neck.

“To-day, if he is pretty well. My mother promised me
that.”

“Do you think you could get leave for me too? I would
not make any noise, nor let him talk too much, if I might
just see him.”

“Tl see about it,” said Phil.

As Mrs. Proctor was placing the pillows comfortably, for
Hugh to have his breakfast, after he was washed, and the
bed made nicely smooth, he yawned, and said he was sleepy
still, and that he wondered what o’clock it was. His mother
told him it was a quarter past ten.

“A quarter past ten! Why, how odd! The boys are
half through school, almost, and I am only just awake !”

“They slept through the whole night, I dare say. You
were awake a good many times; and you and I had some
talk. Do you remember that? or has it gone out of your
head with your sound sleeep ?”

“No, no: I remember that,” said Hugh. “But it was
the oddest, longest night !—and yesterday too! To think
that it is not a whole day yet since it all happened! Oh!
here comes my breakfast. What is it? Coffee?”

“Yes: we know you are fond of coffee; and so am I.
So we will have some together.”

“How comfortable!” exclaimed Hugh; for he was really
CROFTON QUIET. 149

hungry ; which was no wonder, after the pain and exhaustion
he had gone through. His state was like that of a person
recovering from an illness—extremely ready to eat and drink,
but obliged to be moderate.

When warmed and cheered by his coffee, Hugh gave a
broad hint that he should like to see Phil, and one or two
more boys—particularly Dale. His mother told him that
the surgeon, Mr. Annanby, would be coming soon. If he
gave leave, Phil should come in, and perhaps Dale. So
Hugh was prepared with a strong entreaty to Mr. Annanby
on the subject; but no entreaty was needed. Mr. Annanby
thought he was doing very well; and that he would not be
the worse for a little amusement and a little fatigue this
morning, if it did not go on too long. So Phil was sent for,
when the surgeon was gone. As he entered, his mother
went out to speak to Mr. Tooke, and write home.

She then heard from Mr. Tooke, and from Firth and
Dale, how strong was the feeling in Hugh’s favour—how
strong the sympathy for his misfortune throughout the
school. Hugh had seen no tears from her; but she shed
them now. She then earnestly entreated that Hugh might
not kear what she had just been told. He felt no doubt of
the kindness of his schoolfellows, and was therefore quite
happy on that score. He was very young, and to a certain
degree vain; and if this event went to strengthen his vanity,
to fill his head with selfish thoughts, it would be a misfortune
indeed. The loss of his foot would be the least part of it.
Tt lay with those about him to make this event a deep injury
150 THE CROFTON BOYS.



to him, instead of the blessing which all trials are meant by
Providence eventually to be. They all promised that, while
treating Hugh with the tenderness he deserved, they would
not .poil the temper in which he had acted so well, by
making it vain and selfish. There was no fear meantime of
Phil’s doi.g him any harm in that way; for Phil had a great
idea of the privileges and dignity of seniority, and his plan
was to keep down little boys, and make them humble; not
being aware that to keep people down is not the way to
make them humble, but the contrary. Older people than
Phil, however, often fall into this mistake. Many parents
do, and many teachers; and very many elder brothers and
sisters.

Phil entered the room shyly, and stood by the fire, so that
the bed-curtain was between him and ‘Hugh.

“Are you there, Phil?” cried Hugh, pulling aside the
curtain.

“Yes,” said Phil; ‘how do you do this morning?”

“Qh, very well. Come here. I want to know ever so
many things. Have you heard yet anything real and true
about the new usher?”

“No,” replied Phil. “But I have no doubt it is feally
Mr. Crabbe who is coming; and that he will be here after
Christmas. Why, Hugh, you look just the same as usual!”

“So I am just the same, except under this thing,” pointing
to the hoop, or basket, which was placed over his limb to
keep off the weight of the bed-clothes. “I am not hurt
anywhere else, except this bruise;” and he showed a black
CROFTON QUIET. 1st



bruise on his arm, such as almost any schoolboy can show
almost any day.

“That’s nothing,” pronounced Phil.

“The other was, though, I can tell you,” declared Hugh.

“Was it very, very bad? Worse than you had ever
fancied ?”

“Oh! yes. I could have screamed myself to death. I
_ did not, though. Did you hear me, did anybody hear me
call out?”

“JT heard you—just outside the door there—before the
doctors came.”

“ Ah! but not after, not while uncle was here. He cried
so! I could not call out while he was crying so. Where
were you when they were doing it?”

“Just outside the door there. I heard you once—only
once; and that was not much.”

“But how came you to be there? It was past bedtime.
Had you leave to be up so late?”

“T did not ask it; and nobody meddled with me.”

“ Was anybody there with you?” ;

“Yes, Firth. Dale would not. He was afraid, and he
kept away.”

“Oh! is not he very sorry?”

“Of course. Nobody can help being sorry.”

“Do they all seem sorry? What did they do? What do
they say?”

“Oh! they are very sorry; you must know that,”

“ Anybody more than the rest?”
152 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“Why, some few of them cried; but I don’t know «nat
that shows them to be more sorry. It is some people’s
way to cry, and others not.”

Hugh wished much to learn something about Tooke; but,
afraid of showing what was in his thoughts, he went off to
quite another subject.

“Do you know, Phil,” said he, “you would hardly
believe it; but I have never been half so miserable as I was
the first day or two I came here? I don’t care now, half so
much, for all.the pain, and for being lame, and Oh! but
I can never be a soldier or a sailor—I can never go round
the world! 1 forgot that.”

And poor Hugh hid his face in his pillow.

“Never mind!” said Phil, stooping over him very kindly.
“Here is a long time before you; and you will get to like
something else just as well, Papa wanted to be a soldier,
you remember, and could not; and he is as happy as ever
he can be, now that he is a shopkeeper in London. Did
you ever see anybody merrier than my father is? I never
did. Come! cheer up, Hugh! You will be very happy
somehow.”

Phil kissed him; and when Hugh looked up in surprise,
Phil's eyes were full of tears.

“Now I havea good mind to ask you,” said Hugh, “some-
thing that has been in my mind ever since.”



“ Ever since when ?”
“Ever since I came to Crofton. What could be the
reason that you were not more kind to me then?”
CROFTON QUIET. 153



“JT! not kind?” said Phil, in some confusion. ‘“ Was not
I kind?”

“No. At least I thought not. I was so uncomfortable,
—I did not know anybody, or what to do; and I expected
you would show me, and help me. I always thought I could
not have felt lonely with you here; and then when I came,
you got out of my way, as if you were ashamed of me, and
you did not help me at all; and you laughed at me.”

. “No; I don’t think I did that.”
“Yes, you did, indeed.”
“Well, you know, little boys always have to shift for them-

”?



selves when they go to a great school

“ But why, if they have brothers there? That is the very
thing 1 want to know. I think it is very cruel.”

“T never meant to be cruel, of course. But—but—the
boys were all ready to laugh at me about a little brother that
was scarcely any better than a girl ;—and consider how you
talked on the coach, and what ridiculous hair you had,—and
what a fuss you made about your money and your pocket,—
and how you kept popping out things about Miss Harold,
and the girls, and Susan.”

“You were ashamed of me, then.”

“Well, what wonder if I was?”

“And you never told me about all these things, You let
me learn them all without any warning, or any help.”

“To be sure. That is the way all boys have to get on,
They must make their own way.”

“Tf ever little Harry comes to Crofton,” said Hugh, more
154 THE CROFTON BOYS.



to himself than to Phil, “1 will not leave him in the lurch,
—I will never be ashamed of him. Pray,” said he, turning
quickly to Phil, --are you ashamed of me still?”

“Oh, no,” protested Phil. “You can shift for yourself,—
you can play, and do everything like other boys, now.
You——”

He stopped short, overcome with the sudden recollection



that Hugh would never again be able to play like other
boys,—to be like them in strength, and in shifting for him-
self.

“Ah! I see what you are thinking of,” said Hugh, “1
am so afraid you should be ashamed of me again, when I
come into the playground. The boys will quiz me ;—and if
you are ashamed of me——” ;

‘Oh, no, no!” earnestly declared Phil. ‘“ There is nobody
in the world that will quiz you ;—or, if there is, they had
better take care of me, I can tell them. But nobody will
You don’t know how sorry the boys are. Here comes Dale.
He will tell you the same thing.”

Dale was quite sure that any boy would, from this time for
ever, be sent to Coventry who should quiz Hugh for his
lameness. There was not a boy now at Crofton who would
not do anything in the world to help him.

“Why, Dale, how you have been crying!” exclaimed
Hugh. “Is anything wrong in school? Can’t you manage
your verses yet?”

“I'll try that to-night,” said Dale, cheerfully. “Yes, Ill
manage them. Never mind what made my eyes red; only,
CROFTON QUIET. 15s



if such a thing had happened to me, you would have cried,
—TI am sure of that.”

“Yes, indeed,” said Phil.

“ Now, Proctor, you had better go,” said Dale. “One
at a time is enough to-day; and J shall not stay long.”

Phil agreed, and actually shook hands with Hugh before
he went.

“ Phil is so kind to-day!” cried Hugh, with glee; “though
he is disappointed of going to Uncle Shaw’s on my account.
And I know he had reckoned on it. Now, I want to know
one thing,—where did Mr. Tooke sleep last night? for this
is his bed.”

Dale believed he slept on the sofa. He was sure, at least,
that he had not taken off his clothes; for he had come to
the door several times in the course of the night, to know
how all was going on.

“Why, I never knew that!” cried Hugh. “I suppose I
was asleep. Dale, what do-you think is the reason that our
fathers and mothers and people take care of us as they do?”

“ How do you mean?”

‘“Why, Agnes and I cannot make it out. When we were
by the sea-side, mother took us a great way along the beach,
to a place we did not know at all; and she bade us pick up
shells, and amuse ourselves, while she went to see a poor
woman that lived just out of sight. We played till we were
quite tired; and then we sat down; and still she did not
come. At last, we were sure that she had forgotten all about
us; and we did not think she would remember us any more:
156 THE CROFTON BOYS,

—

and we both cried. Oh! how we did cry! Then a woman
came along, with a basket at her back and a great net over
her arm; and she asked us what was the matter; and when
we told her, she said she. thought it was not likely that
mother would forget us. And then she bade us take hold
of her gown, one on each side, and she would try to take us
to mother; and the next thing was mother came in sight.
When the woman told her what we had said, they both.
laughed; and mother told us it was impossible that she
should leave us behind. I asked Agnes afterwards why it
was impossible ; and she did not know; and I am sure she
was as glad as I was to see mother come in sight. If she
really never can forget us, what makes her remember us?”

Dale shook his head. He could not tell.

“ Because,” continued Hugh, “we can’t do anything for

anybody, and we give a great deal of trouble. Mother sits
up very late, sometimes till near twelve, mending our things.
There is that great basket of stockings she has to mend,
once a fortnight! And papa works very hard to get money ;
and what a quantity he pays for our schooling, and our
clothes, and everything !”

“Everybody would think it very shameful if he did not,”
suggested Dale. ‘If he let you go ragged and ignorant, it
would be wicked.” ;

“But why?” said Hugh, vehemently. “That is what I
want to know. We are not worth anything. We are nothing
but trouble. Only think what so many people did yesterday!
My mother came a journey; and Uncle and Aunt Shaw came;
CROFTON QUIET. 157

and mother sat up all night; and Mr, Tooke never went to
_ bed,—and all about me! I declare I can’t think why.”

Dale felt as if he knew why; but he could not explain it,
Mrs. Proctor had heard much of what they were saying.
She had come in before closing her letter to Mr. Proctor, to
ask whether Hugh wished to send any particular message
home. As she listened, she was too sorry to feel amused.
She perceived that she could not have done her whole duty
to her children, if there could be such a question as this in
their hearts—such a question discussed between them, un-
known to her. She spoke now; and Hugh started, for he
was not aware that she was in the room.

She asked both the boys why they thought it was that
before little birds are fledged, the parent birds bring them
food, as often as once in a minute, all day long for some
weeks. Perhaps no creatures can go through harder work
than this; and why do they do it? for unfledged birds,
which are capable of nothing whatever but clamouring for —
food, are as useless little creatures as can be imagined,
Why does the cat take care of her little blind kitten with so
much watchfulness, hiding it from all enemies till it can take
care of itself? It is because love does not depend on the
value of the creature loved—it is because love grows up in ©
our hearts at God’s pleasure, and not by our own choice;
and it is God’s pleasure that the weakest and the least
useful and profitable should be the most beloved, till they
become able to love and help in their turn.

“Is it possible, my dear,” she said to Hugh, “that you
158 THE CROFTON BOYS.



did not know this,—you who love little Harry so much, and
take such care of him at home? I am sure you never
stopped to think whether Harry could do you any service
before helping him to play.”

“No; but then——”

“ But what?”

“He is such a sweet little fellow, it is a treat to look at
him. Every morning when I woke I longed to be up, and
to get to him.”

“That is, you loved him, Well: your papa and I love
you all, in the same way. We get up with pleasure to our
business—your father to his shop and I to my work-basket—
because it is the greatest happiness in the world to serve
those we love.”

Hugh said nothing; but still, though pleased, he did not
look quite satisfied.

‘Susan and cook are far more useful to me than any of
you children,” continued his mother, “and yet I could not
work early and late for them with the same pleasure as
for you.”

Hugh laughed ; and then he asked whether Jane was not
now as useful as Susan.

“Perhaps she is,” replied his mother; “and the more she
learns and does, and the more she becomes my friend, the
more I respect her: but it is impossible to love her more
than I did before she could speak or walk. There is some
objection in your mind still, my dear. What is it?”

-“Tt makes us of so much consequence,—so much more
CROFTON QUIET. 159



than I ever thought of,—that the minds of grown people
should be busy about us.”

“There is nothing to be vain of in that, my dear, any
more than for young kittens, and birds just hatched. But
it is very true that all young creatures are of great conse-
quence; for they are the children of God. When, besides
this, we consider what human beings are,—that they can
never perish, but are to live for ever,—and that they are
meant to become more wise and holy than we can imagine,
we see that the feeblest infant is indeed a being of infinite
consequence. This is surely a reason for God filling the
hearts of parents with love, and making them willing to
work and suffer for their children, even while the little ones
are most unwise and unprofitable. When you and Agnes
fancied I should forget you and desert you, you must have
forgotten that you had another Parent who rules the hearts
of all the fathers and mothers on earth.”

Hugh was left alone to think this over, when he had
given his messages home, and got Dale’s promise to come
again as soon as he could obtain leave to do so. Both the
boys were warned that this would not be till to-morrow, as
Hugh had seen quite company enough for one day. Indeed,
he slept so much, that night seemed to be soon come.

o> db Sy


CHAPTER X.

LITTLE VICTORIES.

TuoucH Mr. Tooke was so busy from having no usher,
he found time to come and see Hugh pretty often. He
had a sofa moved into that room; and he carried Hugh,
without hurting him at all, and laid him down there com-
fortably beside the fire. He took his tea there with Mrs.
Proctor, and he brought up his newspaper, and read from
it anything which he thought would amuse the boy. He
smiled at Hugh’s scruple about occupying his room, and
assured him that he was quite as well off in Mr. Carnaby’s
room, except that it was not so quiet as this, and therefore
more fit for a person in health than an invalid. Mr. Tooke
not only brought up plenty of books from the school library, .
but lent Hugh some valuable volumes of prints from his
own shelves.

Hugh could not look at these for long together. His
head soon began to ache, and his eyes to be dazzled, for he

160
LITTLE VICTORIES. - 161



was a good deal weakened. His mother observed also that
he became too eager about views in foreign countries, and
that he even grew impatient in his temper when talking
about them.

“My dear boy,” said she one evening after tea, when she
saw him in this state, and that it rather perplexed Mr.
Tooke, “if you remember your resolution, I think you will
put away that book.”

“¢Oh, mother !” exclaimed he, “ you want to take away the
greatest pleasure I have!”

“If itis a pleasure, go on. I was afraid it was becoming
a pain.”

Mr. Tooke did not ask what this meant; but he evidently
wished to know. He soon knew, for Hugh found himself
growing more fidgety and more cross the further he looked
in the volume of Indian Views, till he threw himself back
upon the sofa, and stuffed his handkerchief into his mouth,
and stared at the fire, struggling, as his mother saw, to help
crying. ‘I will take away the book, shall I, my dear?”

“Yes, mother. Oh, dear! I shall never keep my vow, I
know.”

Mrs. Proctor told Mr. Tooke that Hugh had made a
resolution which she earnestly hoped he might be able to
keep ;—to bear cheerfully every disappointment and trouble
caused by this accident, from the greatest to the least,—
from being obliged to give up being a traveller by-and-bye,
to the shoemaker’s wondering that he wanted only one shoe,
Now, if looking at pictures of foreign countries made -him

It
162 THE CROFTON BOVS.

less cheerful, it seemed to belong to his resolution to give
up that pleasure for the present.’ Hugh acknowledged that
it did; and Mr. Tooke, who was pleased at what he heard,
carried away the Indian Views, and brought instead a very”
fine work on Trades, full of plates representing people
engaged in every kind of trade and manufacture. Hugh
was too tired to turn over any more pages to-night; but his
master said the book might stay in the room now, and when
Hugh was removed it might go with him, and as he was
able to sit up more, he might like to copy some of the
plates.

“Removed!” exclaimed Hugh.

His mother smiled, and told him that he was going on so
well that he might soon now be removed to his uncle’s.

‘‘ Where,” said Mr. Tooke, ‘you will have more quiet and
more liberty than you can have here. Your brother, and any
other boys you like, can run over to see you at any time;
and you will be out of the noise of the playground.”

“T wonder how it is there is so little noise from the play-
ground here?” said Hugh.

“Tt is because the boys have been careful to make no
noise since your accident. We cannot expect them to put
themselves under such restraint for long.”

“Oh, no, no! I had better go. But, mother, you—you
—Aunt Shaw is very kind, but——”

“‘T shall. stay with you as long as you want me.”

Hugh was quite happy.

“But how in the world shall I get there?” he presently-
LITTLE VICTORIES. 163.



asked. “It is two whole miles; and we can’t lay my leg up
in the gig: besides its being so cold.” ,
His mother told him that his uncle had a very nice plan



for his conveyance. Mr. Annanby approved of it, and
thought he might be moved the first sunny day.

“ What, to-morrow ?”

“Ves, if the sun shines.” :

Mr. Tooke unbolted the shutter, and declared that it was
such a bright starry evening that he thought to-morrow:
would be fine.

II—2
164 THE CROFTON BOYS.



The morning was fine; and during the very finest part of -
it came Mr. Shaw. He told Hugh that there was a good
fire blazing at home in the back room that looked into the
garden, which was to be Hugh’s. From the sofa by the fire-
side one might see the laurustinus on the grass-plot,—now
covered with flowers; and when the day was warm enough
to let him lie in the window, he could see the mill, and all
that was going on round it. :

Hugh liked the idea of all this; but he still looked
anxious.

“Now tell me,” said his uncle, “what person in all the
world you would like best for a companion.”

“Tn all the world!” exclaimed Hugh. “Suppose I say
the Great Mogul!”

“Well; tell us how to catch him, and ve will try. Mean-
time, you can have his picture. I believe we have a pack of
cards in the house,”

“But do you mean really, uncle.—the person I should
like best in all the world,—out of Crofton ?”

“Yes; out with it!”

“T should like Agnes best,” said Hugh, timidly.

“We thought as much. I am glad we were right. Well,
my boy, Agnes is there.” ;

“ Agnes there! Only two miles off! How. long will she
stay ?” eae ie

“Oh, there is no hurry about that.: We shall see when you
are well what to do next.” j eames Neca
“ But will she stay till the holidays?”
LITTLE VICTORIES. 165



“Oh, yes, longer than that, I hope.”
“ But then she will not go home with me for the holidays ?”
-- Never mind about the holidays now. Your holidays
begin to-day. You have nothing to do but to get well now,
and make yourself at home at my house, and.be merry with
Agnes. Now shall we go, while the sun shines? Here is
your mother all cloaked up in her warm things.”

“Oh, mother! Agnes is come,” cried Hugh.

This was no news, for it was his mother who had guessed
what companion he would like to have.. She now showed
her large warm cloak, in which Hugh was to be wrapped;
and his neck was muffled up in a comforter.

“But how am I to go?” asked Hugh, trembling with this
little bustle.

“Quietly in your bed,” said his uncle. “Come, I will
lift you into it.” SS

And his uncle carried him downstairs to the front door,
where two of Mr. Shaw’s men stood with a litter, which was
slung upon poles, and carried like a sedan-chair. There
was a mattress upon the litter, on which Hugh lay as com-
fortably as on a sofa. He said it was like being carried in
a palanquin in India,—if only there was hot sunshine, and
no frost and snow.

Mr. Tooke, and Mrs, Watson, and Firth shook hands with
Hugh, and said they should be glad to see him back again ;
and Mr. Tooke added that some of the boys should visit
him pretty often till the breaking-up. Nobody else was
allowed to come quite near; but the boys clustered at that
166 THE CROFTON BOYS.



side of the playground, to see as much as they could. Hugh
waved his hand, and every boy saw it, and in a moment
every hat and cap was off, and the boys gave three cheers,—
the loudest that had ever been heard at Crofton. The most

surprising thing was that Mr. Tooke cheered, and Mr. Shaw ,
too. The men looked as if they would have liked to set
down the litter and cheer too, but they did not quite do that.
They only smiled as if they were pleased.

There was one person besides who did not cheer. Tooke
stood apart from the other boys, looking very sad. As the
litter went down the by-road he began to walk away; but
Hugh begged the men to stop, and called to Tooke. Tooke
turned, and when Hugh beckoned, he forgot all about
bounds, leaped the paling, and came running. Hugh said,

““T have been wanting to see you so! but I did not like
to ask for you particularly.”

“TJ wish I had known that.”

~“Come and see me, do,” said Hugh. “Come the very
first, won’t you?”

“Tf I may.”

“Oh, you may, I know.”

“Well, I will, thank you. Good bye.”

And on went the litter, with Mrs. Proctor and Mr. Shaw
walking beside it. The motion did not hurt Hugh at all; .
and he was so warmly wrapped up, and the day so fine, that
he was almost sorry when the two miles were over. And
yet there was Agnes out upon the steps; and she sat beside
him on the sofa in his cheerful room, and told him that she
LITTLE VICTORIES. 167



‘had nothing to do but to wait on him and play with him.
She did not tell him yet that she must learn directly to
nurse him, and, with her aunt’s help, fill her mother’s place,











TRYING THE NEW CRUTCHES

because her mother was much wanted at home; but this~
was in truth one chief reason for her coming.

Though there was now really nothing the matter with
Hugh—though he ate, drank, slept, and gained strength---

x
168 THE CROFION BOYS,





his mother would not leave him till she saw him well able
to go about.

The carpenter soon came, with some crutches he had
borrowed for Hugh to try; and when they were sure of the
right length, Hugh had a new pair. He found it rather
nervous work at first, using them ; and he afterwards laughed
at the caution with which he began. First, he had some-
body to lift him from his seat, and hold him till he was firm
on his crutches. Then he carefully moved forwards one
crutch at a time, and then the other; and he put so much
strength into it, that he was quite tired when he had been
once across the room and back again. Every stumble
made him shake all over. He made Agnes try; and he was
almost provoked to see how lightly she could hop about;
but then, as he said, she could put a second foot down to
save herself, whenever she pleased. Every day, however,
walking became easier to him; and he even discovered,
when accidentally left alone, and wanting something from
‘the opposite end of the room, that he could rise, and set
forth by himself, and be independent. And in one of these
excursions it was that he found the truth of what Agnes had
told him—how much easier it was to move both crutches
together. When he showed his mother this, she said she
thought he would soon learn to do with only one.

Hugh found himself subject to very painful feelings some-
times—such as no one quite understood, and such as he
feared no one was able to pity as they deserved. A sur-

prise of this sort happened to him the evening before his
LITTLE VICTORIES. 169



father was to come to see him, and to fetch away his
mother. It was the dark hour in the afternoon, the hour when
Mrs. Proctor and her children enjoyed every day a quiet
talk, before Mr. Shaw came to carry Hugh into his aunt’s
parlour to tea. Nothing could be merrier than Hugh had
been ; and his mother and Agnes were chatting, when they
thought they heard a sob from the sofa. They spoke to
Hugh, and found that he was indeed crying bitterly.

‘“‘What is it, my dear?” said his mother. ‘“ Agnes, have
we said anything that could hurt him?”

“No, no,” sobbed Hugh. ‘JI will tell you presently.”

And presently he told them that he was so busy listening
to what they said, that he forgot everything else, when he
felt as if something had got between two of his toes; un-
consciously he put his hand down, and his foot was not
there! Nothing could be plainer than the feeling in his
toes; and then, when he put out his hand, and found
nothing, it was so terrible—it startled him so.

It was a comfort to him to find that his mother knew all
about this. She came and kneeled beside his sofa, and
told him that many persons who had lost a limb considered
this odd feeling the most painful thing they had to bear for
some time; but that, though the feeling would return occa-
sionally through life, it would cease to be painful. When
he had become so used to do without his foot as to leave
off wanting or wishing for it, he would perhaps make a joke
of the feeling, instead of being disappointed. At least she
knew that some persons did so who had lost a limb
170 THE CROFTON BOYS,



This did not comfort Hugh much, for every prospect had
suddenly become darkened. He said he did not know how
he should bear his misfortune ;—he was pretty sure he could
not bear it. It seemed so long already since it had hap-
pened! And when he thought of the long long days, and
months, and years, to the end of his life, and that he should
never run and play, and never be like other people, and
never able to do the commonest things without labour and
trouble, he wished he was dead. He had rather have died.

Agnes thought he must be miserable indeed, if he could
venture to say this to his mother. She glanced at her
mother’s face; but there was no displeasure there. Mrs.
Proctor said this feeling was very natural. She had felt it
herself, under smaller misfortunes than Hugh's ; but she had
found that, though the prospect appears all strewn with
troubles, they come singly, and are not worth minding after
all. She told Hugh that, when she was a little girl, very lazy
—fond of her bed—fond of her book—and not at all fond
of washing and dressing

“Why, mother, you!” exclaimed Hugh.

“Yes; that was the sort of little girl I was. Well, I was
in despair, one day, at the thought that I should have to
wash, and clean my teeth, and brush my hair, and put on
daily every article of dress, every morning, as long as I lived.
There was nothing I disliked so much; and yet it was the
thing that must be done every day of my whole life.”

“Did you tell anybody?” asked Hugh.

“No: I was ashamed to do that; but I remember I cried.



EE
LITTLE VICTORIES. 71



You see how it turns out. Grown people, who have got to
do everything by habit, so easily as not to think about it,
wash and dress every morning, without ever being weary of
it. We do not consider so much as once a year what we are
doing at dressing-time, though at seven years old it is a very
laborious and tiresome affair to get ready for breakfast.”

“Tt is the same about writing letters,” observed Agnes.
“The first letter I ever wrote was to Aunt Shaw; and it
took so long, and was so tiresome, that, when I thought
of all the exercises I should have to write for Miss
Harold, and all the letters that I must send to my relations
when I grew up, I would have given everything I had in the
world not to have learned to write. Oh! how I pitied papa,
when I saw sometimes the pile of letters that were lying to
go to the post!”

“And how do you like corresponding with Phil now?”

Agnes owned, with blushes, that she still dreaded the task
for some days before, and felt particularly gay when it was
done. Her mother believed that, if infants could think and
look forward, they would be far more terrified with the
prospect of having to walk on their two legs all their lives,
than lame people could be at having to learn the art in part
over again. Grown people are apt to doubt whether they
can learn a new language, though children’ make no difficulty
about it: the reason of which is, that grown people see at
one view the whole labour, while children do not look
beyond their daily task. Experience, however, always brings
relief. Experience shows that every effort comes at its
172 THE CROKION BOYS.



proper time, and that there is variety or rest in the intervals,
People who have to wash and dress every morning have
other things to do in the after-part of the day; and, as the
old fable tells us, the clock that has to tick, before it is worn
out, so many millions of times as it perplexes the mind to
think of, has exactly the same number of seconds to do it in,
so that it never has more work on its hands than it can get
through. So Hugh would find that he could move about
on each separate occasion, as he wanted; and practice
would, in time, enable him to do it without any more thought
than it now cost him to put all the bones of his hands in
order, so as to carry his tea and bread and butter to his
mouth.

“ But that is not all—nor half what I mean,” said Hugh.

“No, my dear; nor half what you will have to make up
your mind to bear. You will have a great deal to bear,
Hugh. You resolved to bear it all patiently, I remember:
but what is it that you dread the most?”

“Oh ! all manner of things. I can never do things like
other people.”

“Some things. You can never play cricket, as every
Crofton boy would like to do. You can never dance at
your sisters’ Christmas parties.”

“Oh, mamma!” cried Agnes, with tears in her eyes, and
the thought in her mind that it was cruel to talk so.

“Goon! goon!” cried Hugh, brightening. “You know
what I feel, mother ; and you don't keep telling me, as Aunt
Shaw does (and even Agnes sometimes), that it won't signify
LITTLE VICTORIES, 173



much, and that I shall not care, and all that; making out
that it is no misfortune hardly, when I know what it is, and
they don’t.”

“That is a common way of trying to give comfort, and it
is kindly meant,” said Mrs. Proctor. “But those who have
suffered much themselves know a better way. The best
way is not to deny any of the trouble or the sorrow, and
not to press on the sufferer any comforts which he cannot
now see and oy If comforts arise, he will enjoys them
as they come.”

“ Now then, go on,” said Hugh. “What else?”

“There will be little checks and mortifications.continually
—when you see boys leaping over this, and climbing that,
and playing at the other, while you must-stand out, and can
only look on. And some people will pity you in a way you
don’t like; and some may even laugh at you.”

“Oh, mamma!” exclaimed Agnes. -

“I have seen and heard children in the street do it,”
replied Mrs. Proctor. ‘This is a thing almost below
notice; but I mentioned it while we were reckoning up
our troubles.”

“Well, what else?” said Hugh.

“Sooner or later, you- will have to follow some -way of
life, determined by this accident, instead of one that. you
would have liked better.. But we need not: think of this
yet :—not till you have become quite accustomed: to. a
lameness.” Shae

“Well, what else?”
274 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“T must ask you now. I can think of nothing more;
and I hope there is not much else, for indeed I think here
is quite enough for a boy-—or any one else—to bear.”

“T will bear it, though,—you will see.”

“Vou will find great helps. These misfortunes, of them-
selves, strengthen one’s mind. They have some advantages
too. You will be a better scholar for your lameness, I
have no doubt. You will read more books, and have a
mind richer in thoughts. You will be more beloved ;—not
out of mere pity; for people in general will soon leave off
pitying you, when once you learn to be active again; but
because you have kept faith with your schoolfellows, and
shown that you can bear pain. Yes, you will be more
loved by us all; and you yourself will love God more for
having given you something to bear for His sake.”

“T hope so,—I think so,” said Hugh. “Oh, mother! I
may be very happy yet.”

“Very happy; and, when you have once made up your
mind to everything, the less you think and speak about it,
the happier you will be. It is very right for us now, when it
is all new, and strange, and painful, to talk it well over; to
face it completely; but when your mind is made up, and
you are a Crofton boy again, you will not wish to speak
much of your own concerns, unless it be to me, or to Agnes,
sometimes, when your heart is full.”

“Or to Dale, when you are far off.”

“Yes,—to Dale, or some one friend at Crofton. But there
is only one Friend that one is quite sure to get strength from,
LITTLE VICTORIES. 175

a LL Oe

—the same who has given strength to all the brave people
that ever lived, and comfort to all sufferers. When the
greatest of all Sufferers wanted relief, what did He do?”

“He went by Himself, and prayed,” said Agnes.

“Ves, that is the way,” observed Hugh, as if he knew by
experience.

Mr. Shaw presently came, to say that tea was ready.

“I am too big a baby to be carried now,” cried Hugh,
gaily. “Let me try if I cannot go alone.”

“ Why,—there is the step at the parlour door,” said Mr,
’ Shaw, doubtfully. “At any rate, stop till I bring a light.”

But Hugh followed close upon his uncle’s heels, and was
over the step before his aunt supposed he was half-way across
the hall.. After tea, his uncle and he were so full of play,
that the ladies could hardly hear one another speak till Hugh
was gone to bed, too tired to laugh any more.




CHAPTER XI.

DOMESTIC MANNERS.

ArTEeR Mr. Proctor had come and was gone, and Mrs.
Proctor was gone with him, Hugh began to wonder why
Tooke had never paid the visit he had promised. Several
boys had called; some to thank Hugh for balls that he had
quilted ; some to see how he got on; and some to bring him
Crofton news. Mr. Tooke had fastened his horse up at the
door, in passing, and stepped in for a few minutes, two or
three times a week ; but it was now within six days of the
holidays, and the one Hugh most wished to see had not
appeared. His uncle observed his wistful look when the
door-bell rang, and drew his conclusions. He said, on the
Wednesday before the breaking-up, that he was going to
drive past the Crofton school; that it was such a fine day
that he thought Hugh might go with him, and perhaps they
might persuade some one to come home to dinner with
them. .

176
DOMESTIC MANNERS. 17)





Hugh had never enjoyed the open air more than during
this drive. He had yet much to learn about the country, and
it was all as beautiful as it was new. His uncle pointed out
to him the fieldfares wheeling in flocks over the fallows; and
the rabbits in the warren, scampering away with their little

eee

Ui
i







all













WAITING FOR MR. TOOKE,

white tails turned up; and the robin hopping in the frosty
pathway ; and the wild ducks splashing among the reeds in
the marshes. They saw the cottagers’ children trying to
collect snow enough from the small remains of the drifts to
make snow-balls, and obliged to throw away the dirty snow
that would melt, and would not bind. As they left the road,
and turned through a copse, because Mr. Shaw had business:
with Mr, Sullivan’s gamekeeper, a pheasant flew out, whirring
from some ferns and brambles, and showed its long tail-
feathers before it disappeared over the hedge. All these
sights were new to Hugh: and all, after pain and confine-
ment, looked beautiful and gay.
r2
i78 THE CROFTON BOYS.



Mr. Shaw could not stop for Hugh to get out at Crofton;
so; when his arrival was seen, the boys were allowed to go
out of bounds, as far as the gig, to speak to their school-
fellow. Mr. Shaw asked ‘Tooke to mount, and go home
with them for the day; and Tooke was so pleased,—so
agreeably surprised to see Hugh look quite well and merry,
that he willingly ran off to ask leave, and to wash his face,
and change his jacket. When he had jumped in, and
Hugh had bidden the rest good bye, a sudden shyness
came over ‘his poor conscious visitor; and it was not lessened
by Mr. Shaw telling Tooke that he did not do credit to
Crofton air,—so puny as he seemed ; and that he looked at
that moment more like one that had had a bad accident
than Hugh did. When Mr. Shaw perceived how the boy’s
eyes filled with tears in an instant, he probably thought
within himself that Tooke was sadly weak-spirited, and
altogether more delicate than he had been aware of.

Hugh was full of questions about Crofton matters, how-
ever; and long before they reached Mr. Shaw’s they were
chattering as busily as possible. But then it was all spoiled
to Tooke again by seeing Hugh lifted out, and his crutches
brought to him, and Agnes ready to take his hat and cloak,
instead of his being able to run about, doing everything for
himself.

’ The sofa had been left in Hugh’s room, and there was a
fire there every afternoon for him and Agnes, that their aunt
might have the parlour to herself till tea-time. The three
young people went, therefore, to this room after dinner.
DOMESTIC MANNERS, 179



Agnes felt > little uncomfortable, as she always did when
any Crofton boys came. They had so much to say to each
other of things that she did not understand, and so very
little to say to her, that she continually felt as if she was in
the way. When she proposed, as usual, that Hugh should
go through his exercises in walking and running (for she
was indefatigable in helping him to learn to walk well, and
superintended his practice every afternoon), he refused
hastily and rather rudely. Of course she could not know
that he had a reason for wishing not to show off his lame-
ness before Tooke, and she thought him unkind. He might
indeed have remembered to ask her before to say nothing
this afternoon about his exercises. She took out her work»
and sat down at some distance from the boys; but they did
. hot get on. It was very awkward.. At last the boys’ eyes
met, and they saw that they should like to talk freely if
they could.

“Agnes,” said Hugh, “cannot you go somewhere, and
leave us alone?”

“T hardly know where I can go,” replied Agnes. “I
must not disturb aunt; and there is no fire anywhere
else.”

“Oh, I am sure aunt won't mind, for this one afternoon.
You can be as still as a mouse; and she can doze awe): as
if nobody was there.”

“T can be as still as a mouse here,” observed Agnes,
“T can take my work to that farthest window ; and if ‘yout
whisper, I shall not hear a word you say. Or, if-I do hear

12—2
180 THE CROFTON BOYS. .

a word, I will tell you directly. And you will let me come,
now and then, and warm myself, if I find I cannot hold my
needle any longer.”

“No, no; that won’t do. We can’t talk so. - Do just go,
and see whether aunt cannot let you be there for this one
afternoon.”

Agnes did not like to refuse anything to Hugh; but she
hesitated to take such a bold step as this. In his eagerness,
Hugh requested the same favour of Tooke; but Tooke,
more anxious than even Agnes to oblige, had not courage
for such an errand. Hugh snatched his crutches, and
declared he would go himself. But now Agnes gave way.
She gathered up her work, and left the room. Hugh little
imagined where she went, this cold, darkening December
afternoon. She went to her own room, put on her cloak,
and walked up and down till tea was ready, without fire or
candle, and not very happy in her mind.

Meanwhile the boys basked before a glowing fire. Tooke
began directly to open his full heart.

“Was that true that your sister said at dinner, about your
always longing so to come to Crofton?”

“Ves.”

_ “How sorry you must be that you came! How you
must wish you had never seen me!”

“T knew there would be things to bear whenever I came,
and particularly while I was the youngest. Your father told
me that ; and one of the things that made me want to come
more than ever was his telling me how you bore things
DOMESTIC MANNERS. 181

when you were the youngest—being set on the top of that
wall, and so on.”

‘Indeed, indeed, I never meant to hurt you when I
pulled your foot—I suppose you are quite sure that it was I
that gave the first pullP Are you?”

“Why, yes; I am-sure of that; and so are you: but I
know very well that you meant no harm; and that is the
reason I would not tell. After what you did about the
sponge, I could not think you meant any harm to me.”

Tooke could not remember anything about a sponge;
and when he was told, he thought nothing of it. He went
on:

“Do you think you shall never tell anybody, as long as
you live, who pulled you first ?”

“Never,” said Hugh, “unless I tell it in my sleep; and
that is not likely, for I never think about it in the daytime,
—or scarcely ever; and when I can run about again, I dare
say I shall never think of it at all.”

“But will you ever run about ?”

“ Oh, yes, finely! you will see. I shall begin first with a
little stick-leg, very light. Mother is going to send some
for me to try. When I am a man, J shall have one that
will look like a real foot; but that will not be so light as
the one you will see me with after the holidays. But you
do not half know what I can do now, with my crutches.
Here, I will show you.” °

As he flourished about, and played antics, Agnes heard
the pit-pat of his crutches, and she thought she might as
182 THE CROFTON BOYS.



well have been there, if they had told all their secrets, and
had got to play. But the noise did not last long, for Hugh’s
performances did not make Tooke very merry; and the
boys sat down quietly again.

“Now, I'll tell you what,” said Tooke. “Iam a bigger
and stronger boy than you, without considering this accident.
T’ll take care of you all the time you are at Crofton; and
always afterwards if I can. Mind you that. If anybody
teases you, you cali me,—that’s all. Say you will.”

““Why,’said Hugh, “I had rather take care of myself.
I had rather make no difference between you and every-
body else.”

“There, now! You don’t forgive me, after all.”

“YT do,—upon my word I do. But why should I make
any difference between you and the rest, when you did not
mean me any harm,—any more than they? Besides, it
might make people suspect.”

“Well, let them. Sometimes I wish,” continued Tooke,
twisting himself about in the uneasiness of his mind, “some-
times I wish that everybody knew now. They say murderers
cannot keep their secret. They are sure to tell, when they
cannot bear it any longer.”

“That is because of their consciences,” said Hugh.
“But you are not guilty of anything, you know. I am
sure I can keep a secret easily enough when I am not to
blame in it.”

“Yes! you have shown that. But——”

“Come! don’t let us talk any more about that.—Only
DOMESTIC MANNERS. 183,



just this. Has anybody accused you? Because I must
know—I must be on my guard.”

“Nobody has said a word, because my father put us all
upon honour never to mention it; but I always feel as if all
their eyes were upon me all day, and sometimes in the
night.”

“Nonsense! I don’t believe anybody has pitched on
you particularly. And when school opens again all their
eyes will be on me to see how I manage. But I don’t
mean to mind that. Anybody may stare that likes.”

Hugh sighed, however, after saying this; and Tooke wat
silent. At length he declared,—

‘““Whatever you say against it, I shall always take your
part; and you have only to ask me, and I will always run
anywhere, and do anything for you. Mind you that.”

“Thank you,” said Hugh. ‘Now tell me about the
new usher; for I daresay you know more than the other
boys do. Holt and I shall be under him altogether, I
suppose.”

“Ves; and you will be well off, by what I hear. He is
as little like Mr. Carnaby as need be.”

All the rest of the afternoon was taken up with stories of
Mr. Carnaby and other ushers, so that the boys were sur-
prised when the maid came to tell them that tea was ready.

Agnes was making tea. Hugh was so eager to repeat to
his uncle some of the good stories that he had just heard,
that he did not observe, as his aunt did, how red his sister’s
fingers were, and how she shivered still.
184 THE CROFTON BOYS,



“My dear,” said Mrs. Shaw, “you have let these boys
keep you away from the fire.”

“Yes, aunt. Never mind! I shall be warm enough
presently.”

“But you should not allow it, Agnes. How are they
ever to learn manners if they are not made to give way to
young ladies while they are young? Boys are sure to be
rude enough, at any rate. Their sisters should know better
than to spoil them.” ;

While poor Agnes’ hardships were ending with a lecture,
Hugh was chattering away, not at all aware that he had
treated his sister much as Phil had treated him on his
going to Crofton. If any one had told him that he was
tyrannical, he would have been as much surprised as he had
been at Phil’s tyranny over him. He did not know indeed
that his sister had been in the cold and in the dark; but
he might have felt that he had used her with a roughness
which is more painful to a loving heart than cold and dark

- ness are to the body.




CHAPTER Xi.

HOLT AND HIS DIGNITY,

THERE was no reason now why Hugh should not go to
church. He and his crutches went between his uncle and
aunt in the gig one way, and between his uncle and Agnes
home again; and he could walk up the aisle quite well.
He had been pleased at the idea of attending church again,
and had never thought of the pain of being stared at for
his lameness. This pain came upon him as he entered the
church ; and as he went up towards his-uncle’s pew, and saw
the crowd of Crofton boys all looking at him, and some of
the poor people turning their heads as he passed, to observe
how he got on, he felt covered with confusion, and wished
that he had waited one more Sunday, when the Crofton
boys would have been all gone, and there would have been
fewer eyes to mark his infirmity. But better thoughts soon
arose, and made him ashamed of his false shame; and
before the service was over he felt how trifling is any mis-

185
186 THE CROFTON BOYS.



fortune while we are friends with God, in comparison with
the least wrong-doing which sets us at a distance from Him.
He could not but feel after church that he had rather, a
thousand times, be as he was than be poor Lamb, who
slunk away from him, and hid himself behind the other
-boys,—his mind sore and troubled, no doubt, about his
debt, and his cheating transaction, so long ago. Hugh
asked some of the boys to bring up Lamb, to shake hands
before parting for the holidays; but he would not come,
and wriggled himself out of sight. Then Hugh recollected
that he could forgive Lamb as well without Lamb’s knowing
it; and he let him alone. :

Then there was Holt. He and Holt had parted on
uneasy terms; and Holt now looked shy and uncomfort-
able. Hugh beckoned to him, and asked him whether he
was really to remain at Crofton all the holidays.

“Ves,” said Holt. ‘I am the only one not going home,
unless you are to stay hereabouts. Even Tooke is to be at
his uncle’s in London. When do you go home?”

“Not quite yet ;—not at the beginning of the holidays,”
said Hugh, hesitating, and looking up at his uncle. For,
in truth, he did not know exa~tly what was planned for him,
and had been afraid to ask.

His uncle said, very kindly, that he was not going to part
with Hugh till school opened again. He would recover
his full strength better in the country; and his aunt had
promised his parents that he should be a stout boy again
by the time he was wanted at Crofton.
AOLT AND HIS DIGNITY. 187



This was what Hugh had dreaded to hear; and when he
thought that he should not see his parents, nor little Harry,
for so many months, his heart sank. But he was still in the
church ; and perhaps the place helped him to remember his
mother’s expectation that he should not fail, and his own
resolution to bear cheerfully whatever troubles his misfortune
brought upon him, from the greatest to the least. So when
he heard his uncle saying to Holt that he should ask Mr.
Tooke to let him come and spend two or three weeks at his
house, he said so heartily that he hoped Holt would come,
‘hat Holt felt that whatever discontent had been between
them was forgiven and forgotten.

Phil went home, of course; and when Holt arrived at
Mr. Shaw’s, Agnes also returned to London, that she might
see something of Phil. Then the two boys were glad to be
together, though Hugh would rather have had his dear
friend Dale for a companion; and Holt knew that this was
the case. Yet Hugh saw, and was glad to see, that Holt
was improved. He had plucked up some spirit, and was
more like other lads, though still, by his own account, too
much like a timid, helpless foreigner among the rough
Crofton boys.

All the boys had some lessons to prepare in the holidays,
Every one who had ever written a theme had a theme to
write now. Every boy who could construe had a good
piece of Latin to prepare; and all had either Latin or
’ English verses to learn by heart. Mrs. Shaw made a point
of her young visitors sitting down every morning after
a THE CROFTON BOYS.

breakfast to their business; and Hugh was anxious to spare
no pains this time about his theme, that, if he was to be
praised, he might deserve it. He saw that Holt could not
fix his attention well, either upon work or play; and one
morning, when Hugh was pondering how, without knowing
anything of history, he should find a modern example to
match well with his ancient one (which he had picked up
by chance), Holt burst upon his meditation with,

“T have a good mind to tell you what has been upon
my mind this ever so long.”

“Wait a minute,” said Hugh. “T must find my example
first.”

No example could he find, to his satisfaction, this day.
He gave it up till to-morrow, and then asked Holt what was
on his mind. But Holt now drew back, and did not think
he could tell. This made Hugh press; and Hugh’s press-
ing looked like sympathy, and gave Holt courage: so that
the thing came out at last. Holt was very miserable, for he
was deep in debt, and the boys never let him alone about
it; and he did not see how he should ever pay, as nobody
was likely to give him any money.

** Remember, it is only sixpence that you owe me—not a
shilling,” said Hugh. :

Holt sighed. Perhaps he had hoped that Hugh would
excuse him altogether. He explained that this sixpence was
not all, nor the chief part. He told that, when the whole
school was on the heath one Saturday, they had seen a
balloon rising at a distance, and some boys began betting
HOLT AND HIS DIGNITY. 189



about what direction it would move in when it ceased to
rise perpendicularly. The betting spread till the boys told
him he must bet, or he would be the only one left out, and
would look like a shabby fellow.

“And you did?” exclaimed Hugh. “ How silly

“Vou would have done it, if you had been there.”

“No I should not.”

“Yes, you would. Or, if you had not, it would have been

1?

because of ——I know what.”

“ Because of what, pray?”

“Because of something the boys say about you. They
say you are very fond of money.”

“TI! fond of money! I declare I never heard of such a
thing.”

“Well, you know you made a great fuss about that half-
crown.”

“As if it was about the money!” cried Hugh. “I should
not have cared a bit if my uncle had asked me for it back
again the next day. It was the being cheated. That was
the thing. What a shame ”

“ By-the-bye, did your uncle ever ask what you did with
that half-crown?”

“No; but he will next week, at the January fair. He
will be sure to ask then. What a shame of the boys to say
so, when I forgave u

He remembered, just in time, that he had better not
boast, or speak aloud, of having forgiven Lamb his debt in





secret. He resolved that he would not say another word,
‘190 THE CROFTON BOYS.



but let the boys see that he did not care for money for its
own sake. They were all wrong, but he would be above
noticing it; and, besides, he really had been very anxious
about his half-crown, and they had only mistaken the reason.

“‘ How much did you bet on the balloon?” he inquired ot
Holt.

“A shilling; and I lost.”

“Then you owe eightdéenpence.”

“But that is not all. I borrowed a shilling of Mereditk
to pay school fines BY

“What for?”

“Chiefly for leaving my books about. Meredith says I
promised to pay him before the holidays, but I am sure I



never did. He twitted me about it so that I declare I would
have fought him, if I could have paid him first.”

“That’s right,” exclaimed Hugh, “Why, Holt, what a
different fellow you are! You never used to talk of fighting.”

“But this fellow Meredith plagued me so! If it had not
been for that shilling, I would have knocked him down.
Well, here is half a crown altogether ; and how am I ever to
get half a crown?”

* Cannot you ask your uncle?”

“No; youknow I can’t. You know he complains about
having to pay the bills for me before my father can send the
money from India.”

“T suppose it would take too long to ask your father.
Yes; of course it would. There would be another holidays
before you could have an answer ; and almost another still.
HOLT AND HIS DIGNITY. IgI



I wonder what Uncle Shaw would say. He is very kind

”



always, but it might set him askin

“ And what should I do, staying here, if he should be
angry and refuse? What should I do every day at dinner?”

“TI know what I would do?” said Hugh, decidedly. “I
would tell Mr. Tooke all about it, and ask him for half a
crown.”

“Mr. Tooke! Oh! I dare not.”’

-“T dare,—in holiday-time. He is your master,—next to
being your father, while your father is so far away. You had
better ask Mr. Yooke, to be sure.”

“What, go te Crofton, and speak to him? I really want
not to be a coward,—but I never could go and tell him.”

“Write him a letter, then. Yes, that is the way. Write
a letter, and I will get one of my uncle’s men to carry it, and
wait for an answer; and then you will not be long in sus-
pense, at any rate.”

“T wish I dare!”

Holt was not long in passing from wishing to daring,
He wrote a letter, which Hugh thought would do, though
he rather wished Holt had not mentioned him as instiga-
ting the act. This was the letter:

“THe MIL, January 6th.
‘DER SIR,

“JT am very unhappy; and Proctor thinks I had
better tell you what is upon my mind. 1 owe some money,
and I do not see how I can ever pay it, unless you will help
192 THE CROFTON BOYS.



me. You know I have owed Proctor sixpence for ginger-
beer, this long time; and as Lamb has never paid him his
share, Proctor cannot excuse me this debt. Then I owe a
boy a shilling, lent me for school fines; and he never lets
me alone about it. Then I was led into betting a shilling
on a balloon, and I lost; and so I owe half a crown. If
you would lend me that sum, sir, I shall be obliged to you
for ever, and I shall never forget it.
“Yours respectfully,
“THomas HOt.”

Mr. Shaw’s man George carried the letter; but he brought
back neither letter nor money; only a message that Mr.
Tooke would call; which put Holt into a great fright, and
made Hugh rather uneasy.

There was no occasion for this, however. Mr. Tooke
came alone into the room where the boys were sitting; and
neither Mr. nor Mrs. Shaw appeared during the whole time ~
of his visit; a thing which was rather odd, but which the
boys were very glad of. When Mr. Tooke had told them
a little of some new boys expected after the holidays, he
said,

“Well, now, Holt, let us see what can be done about
your affairs.” k

Holt looked uneasy, for it seemed as if Mr. Tooke was
not going to lend him the money,—or give it, which was
what he had hoped, while using the word “lend.”

“Tam glad you asked me,” continued Mr. Tooke 3 “for
HOLT AND HIS DIGNITY. 193



people, whether they be men or boys, can usually retrieve
their affairs when they have resolution to face their difficulties.
There is no occasion to say anything about how you got
into debt. We must consider how you are to get out of it.”

“That is very kind indeed!” exclaimed Holt.

“As to my lending you half a ctown,” continued Mr.
Tooke, “that would not be helping you out of debt; for if
you had had any prospect of being able to pay half a crown,
you would not have needed to apply to me at all.”

Holt sighed. Mr. Tooke went on,

“T cannot give you the money. I have less to give away
than I should like to have, for the sake of the poor people
round us. I cannot pay for a bet and school-fines while the
children of our neighbours want clothes and fire.”

“No, sir, certainly,” said both the boys.

“What do people do, all the world over, when they want
money?” asked Mr. Tooke. Holt looked puzzled. Hugh
smiled. Holt was hesitating whether to guess that they put
into the lottery, or dig for treasure, or borrow from their
friends, or what. Having always till lately lived in India,
where Europeans are rather lazy, and life altogether very lan-
guid, he did not see, as Hugh did, what Mr. Tooke could mean.

“When men come begging to our doors,” said Mr. Tooke,
“what is the first question we ask them ?”

Holt still looked puzzled, and Hugh laughed, saying,

“Why, Holt, you must know very well. We ask them
whether they cannot get work.”

“Work!” cried Holt,

13
194 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“Yes,” said Mr. Tooke. “The fathers and uncles of
both of you work for what money they have; and so do I;
and so does every man among our neighbours who is satisfied
with his condition. As far as I see, you must get the money
you want in the same way.”

“Work!” exclaimed Holt again.

“ How is he to get work?” asked Hugh.

“That is where I hope to assist him,” replied Mr. Tooke.
“Are you willing to earn your half-crown, Holt?”

“‘T don’t know how, sir.”

“Widow Murray thinks she should have a better chance
for a new lodger if her little parlour was fresh papered ; but
she is too rheumatic to do it herself, and cannot afford to
engage a workman. If you like to try, under her directions,
I will pay you as your work deserves.”

“But, sir, I never papered a room in my life.”

“No more had the best paperhanger in London when he
first tried. But if you do not like that work, what do you
think of doing some writing for me? Our tables of rules
are dirty. If you will make good copies of our rules for all
the rooms in which they hang, in the course of the holidays,
I will pay you half a crown. But the copies must be quite
correct, and the writing good. I can offer you one other
choice. Our school library wants looking to. If you will
put fresh paper covers to all the books that want covering,
write the titles on the backs, compare the whole with the
catalogue, and arrange them properly on the shelves, I will
pay you half a crown.” i
HOLT AND HIS DIGNITY. 198



Holt’s pleasure in the prospect of being out of debt was
swallowed up in the anxiety of undertaking anything so new
to him as work out of school. Hugh hurried him on to a
decision.

“Do choose the papering,” urged Hugh. “I can help
you in that, I do believe. I can walk that little way, to
widow Murray’s; and I can paste the paper. Widow
Murray will show you how to do it; and it is very easy,
if you once learn to join the pattern. I found that, when
_ Ihelped to paper the nursery closet at home.”

“Tt is an easy pattern to join,” said Mr. Tooke.

“There, now! And that is the chief thing. If you do
the library books, I cannot help you, you know. And
remember, you will have two miles to walk each way; four
miles a day in addition to the work.”

“He can sleep at Crofton if he likes,” said Mr. Tooke,

“That would be a queer way of staying at Uncle Shaw’s,”
observed Hugh.

“Then there is copying the rules,” said Holt. “I might
do that here; and you might help me, if you liked.”

“Dull work!” exclaimed Hugh. “Think of copying the
same rules three or four times over! And then, if you
make mistakes, or if you do not write clearly, where is your
halfcrown? I don’t mean that I would not help you, but
it would be the dullest work of all.”

Mr. Tooke sat patiently waiting till Holt had made up
his mind. He perceived something that never entered
Hugh’s mind: that Holt’s pride was hurt at the notion of

13—2
19 THE CROFTON BOYS.



doing workman's work. He wrote on a slip of paper these
few words, and pushed them across the table to Holt, with
a smile—

© No debtor's hands are clean, however white they be:
Who digs and pays his way—the true gentleman is he.”

Hoit coloured as he read, and immediately said that he
chose the papering job. Mr. Tooke rose, tossed the slip of
paper into the fire, buttoned up his coat, and said that he
should let widow Murray know that a workman would wait
upon her the next morning, and that she must have her
paste and brushes and scissors ready.

“ And a pair of steps,” said Hugh, with a sigh.

“Steps, of course,” replied Mr. Tooke. “ You will think
it a pretty paper, I am sure.”

“ But, sir, she must quite understand that she is not at all
obliged to us,—that is, to me,” said Holt.

“Certainly. You will tell her so yourself, of course.”

Here again Helt’s pride was hurt; but the thought of
being out of Meredith’s power sustained him.

When Mr. Tooke was gone, Hugh said to his com-
panion,

“T do not want you to tell me what Mr. Tooke wrote on
that paper that he burned.- I only want to know whethet
he asked you to choose so as to indulge me.”

“You! Oh, no! there was not a word about you.”

“Oh! very well,” replied Hugh, not sure whether he was
pleased or not. :
HOLT AND HIS DIGNITY. 197

















THE QUESTION SETTLED.

The next morning was so fine that there was no difficulty
about Hugh’s walking the short distance to the widow
Murray’s ; and there, for three mornings, did the boys work
diligently, till the room was papered, and two cupboards
into the bargain. Holt liked it very well, except for two
198 THE CROFTON BOYS.

things: that Hugh was sure he could have done some diffi-
cult corners better than Holt had done them, if he could
but have stood upon the steps; and that widow Murray did
so persist in thanking him, that he had to tell her several
times over that she was not obliged to him at all, because
he was to be paid for the job.

Mr. Tooke came to see the work when it was done, and
returned to Mr. Shaw’s with the boys, in order to pay Holt
his half-crown immediately, and yet so that the widow should
not see. Hugh’s eye followed Mr. Tooke’s hand as it went
a second time into his pocket; and he was conscious of
some sort of hope that he might be paid something too.
When no more silver came forth, he felt aware that he
ought not to have dreamed of any reward for the help he
had freely offered to his companion; and he asked himself
whether his schoolfellows were altogether wrong in thinking
him too fond of money, and whether he was altogether right
in having said that it was justice that he cared for, and
not money, when he had pressed his debtor hard. How-
ever this might be, he was very glad to receive his sixpence
from Holt. Ashe put it in his inner pocket, he observed
that this would be all the money he should have in the
world when he should have spent his five shillings in fairings
for home.

Holt made no answer. He had nothing to spend in the
fair; still less, anything left over. But he remembered that
he was out of debt,—that Meredith would twit him no more,
—and he began to whistle, so light-hearted, that no araount
HOLT AND HIS DIGNITY, 199



of money could have made him happier. He only left off
whistling to thank Hugh earnestly for having persuaded him
to open his heart to Mr. Tooke.




CHAPTER XIII

TRIPPING,

WHEN the day came for returning to Crofton, Hugh would
have left his crutches behind at his uncle’s, so much did he
prefer walking with the little light stick-leg he had been
practising with for a fortnight. But his aunt shook her head
at this, and ordered the crutches into the gig. He still walked
slowly and cautiously, and soon grew tired; and she thought
he might find it a relief at times to hop about on his crutches.
They were hidden under the bed, however, immediately on
his arrival; so anxious was Hugh to make the least of his
lameness, and look as like other boys as possible, both for
Tooke’s sake and his own. When the boys had’ been all
assembled for one day, and everybody had seen how little —
Proctor could walk, the subject seemed to be dropped, and
nothing was talked of but the new usher. So Hugh said to
himself; and he really thought that he had fully taken his
place again as a Crofton boy, and that he should be let off

200
TRIPPING. 201





all notice of his infirmity henceforth, and all trials from it,
except such as no one but himself need know of. He was
even not quite sure whether he should not be a gainer by i‘
on the whole. He remembered Tooke’s assurances of pro-
tection and friendship; he found Phil very kind and watch-
ful; and Mrs. Watson told him privately that he was to be

"free of the orchard. She showed him the little door through
which he might enter at any time, alone, or with one com-
panion. Here he might read, or talk, and get out of sight
of play that he could not share. The privilege was to be
continued as long as no mischief was done to anything within
the orchard. The prospect of the hours, the quiet hours,
the bright hours that he should spend here alone with Dale,
delighted Hugh; and when he told Dale, Dale liked the
prospect too; and they went together, at the earliest oppor-
tunity, to survey their new domain, and plan where they
would sit in spring, and how they would lie on the grass in
summer, and be closer and closer friends for ever.

Holt was encouraged to hope that he should have his turn
sometimes; but he saw that, though Hugh cared more for
him than before the holidays, he yet loved Dale the best.

While Hugh was still in spirits at the thought that his
worst trials were over, and the pleasure of his indulgences to
come, he felt very complacent; and he thought he would
gratify himself with one more reading of the theme which he
had written in the holidays,—the theme which he really
believed Mr. Tooke might fairly praise,—so great had been
the pains he had taken with the composition, and so neatly
202 THE CROFTON BOYS.



was it written out. He searched for it in vain among his
books and in his portfolio. Then he got leave to go up to
his room, and turn over all his clothes. He did so in vain;
and at last he remembered that it was far indeed out of his
reach,—in the drawer of his aunt’s work-table, where it had
lain ever since she had asked him for it, to read to a lady
who had visited her.

The themes would certainly be called for the first thing
on Mr. Tooke’s appearance in school, at nine the next
morning. ‘ The duties of the early morning would leave no
one any time to run to Mr. Shaw’s then. If anybody went,
it must be now. The first day was one of little regularity;
it was only just beginning to grow dusk; any willing boy
might be back before supper; and there was no doubt that
leave would be given on such an occasion. So Hugh made
his way to the playground as fast as possible, and told his
trouble to his best friends there,—to Phil, and Holt, and
Dale, and as many as happened to be within hearing.

“Never mind your theme!” said Phil. ‘Nobody ex-
pected you to do one; and you have only to say that you
left it behind you.”

“Ttis not that,” said Hugh. “I must show up my theme.”

“You can’t, you know, if you have not it to show,” said
two or three, who thought this settled the matter.

“ But it is there: it is at my uncle’s, if any one would go
for it,” said Hugh, beginning to be agitated.

“Go for it!” exclaimed Phil, “What, in the dark,—
this freezing afternoon?”
TRIPPING. 203



“Tt is not near dark ; it will not be dark this hour. Any-
body might run there and back before supper.”
He looked at Dale; but Dale looked another way. For



HUGH’S DISTRESS ABOUT HIS THEME,

asmoment he thought of Tooke’s permission to appeal to
him when he wanted a friend; but Tooke was not withia
hearing, and he dismissed the thought of pointing out
Tooke to anybody’s notice. He turned away as Phil
204 THE CROFTON BOYS.



repeated that it was quite certain that there would be no
bad consequences from his being unprovided with a theme,
which was not one of his regular lessons.

Phil was not quite easy, however; nor were the others
who heard; and in a minute they looked round for Hugh.
He was leaning his face upon his arms against the orchard
wall, and when, with gentle force, they pulled him away,
they saw that his face was bathed in tears. He sobbed out,

“TI took such pains with that theme,—all the holidays!
And I can’t go for it myself.”

There were loud exclamations from many against Phil,
against one another, and against themselves; and now
everybody was eager to go. Phil stopped all who had
started off, saying that it was his business; and the next
moment Phil was at Mr. Tooke’s study door, asking leave
of absence till supper.

“Little Holt has been beforehand with you,” said Mr.
Tooke. ‘I refused him, however, as he is not so fit as
you to be out after dark. Off with you!”

Before Phil returned ‘it struck Hugh that he had been
very selfish, and that it was not a good way of bearing his
trial to impose on any one a walk of four miles, to repair a
piece of carelessness of his own. Nobody blamed him;
but he did not like to look in the faces round. him, -to
see what people thought. When Phil returned, fresh and
hungry from the frosty air, and threw down the paper, saying,
“There is your theme, and my aunt is very sorry.” Hugh
said,
TRIPPING. 205



“Oh, Phil, and I am so sorry too! I hope you are no
very tired.”

“ Never mind,” replied Phil. ‘There is your theme.”

And with this Hugh was obliged to be satisfied, but it left
him exceedingly uncomfortable—sorry for Phil—disappointed
in Dale—and much more disappointed in himself. The
thought of what Holt had wished to do was the only pleasant
part of it, and Hugh worked beside Holt, and talked with
him all the evening.

Hugh felt the next morning as if he was never to have
any pleasure from his themes, though they were the lesson he
did best. This one was praised quite as much as the former
one, and he did not this time tell anybody what Mr. Tooke
had said about it; but the pleasure was spoiled by the
recollection that his brother had run four miles on account
of it, and that he himself must have appeared to others
‘more selfish than he thought them. He burned his theme
that he might the more easily forget all about it, and the
moment after he had done so Phil said he should have kept
it, as other boys did theirs, for his parents to see.

Mr. Crabbe was just such a master as it was good for the
little boys to be under. He did not punish capriciously, nor
terrify them by anything worse than his strictness. Very
strict he was, and he thus caused them some fear every day;
for Holt was backward, and not very clever; and Hugh was
still much less able to learn than most other boys. But all
felt that Mr. Crabbe was not unreasonable, and they always
knew exactly how much to be afraid of. Whether he had
206 THE CROFTON BOYS.



inquired, or been told, the story of Hugh’s lameness they
did not know. He said nothing about it except just asking
Hugh whether it tired him to stand up in class, saying that
he might sit at the top or bottom of the class, instead of taking
places, if he chose. Hugh did find it rather fatiguing at
first, but he did not like to take advantage of Mr. Crabbe’s
offer, because it so happened that he was almost always at
the bottom of his classes, and to have withdrawn from the
contest would have looked like a trick to hide the shame,
and might have caused him to be set down as a dunce who
never could rise. He thanked Mr. Crabbe, and said that if
he should rise in his classes, and keep a good place for some
time, he thought he should be glad to sit instead of stand-
ing, but meantime he had rather be tired. Then the feeling
of fatigue went off before he rose, or saw any chance. of
rising.

This inability to do his lessons so well as other boys was a
deep and lasting grief to Hugh. Though he had in reality
improved much since he came to Crofton, and was now and
then cheered by some proof of this, his general inferiority
in this respect was such as to mortify him every day of his
life, and sometimes to throw him almost into despair. He
saw that everybody pitied him for the loss of his foot, but
not for this other trouble, while he felt this to be rather the
worst of the two; and all the more because he was not sure
himself whether or not he could help it, as every one else
seemed certain that he might. When he said his prayer in
his bed, he earnestly entreated that he might be able to bear
TRIPPING. 207



the one trouble, and be delivered from the other; and when,
as the spring came on, he was found by one friend or another
lying on the grass with his face hidden, he was often praying
with tears for help in doing this duty, when he was thought
to be grieving that he could not play at leaping or foot ball,
like other boys. And yet the very next evening when the



SILENT PRAYER,

n~

whole school were busy over their books, and there was
nothing to interfere with his work, he would pore over his
lesson without taking in half the sense, while his fancy was
straying everywhere but where it ought—perhaps to little
Harry, or the Temple Gardens at home, or to Cape Horn, or
Japan—some way farther off still. It did not often happen
now, as formerly, that he forgot before morning a lesson well
learned overnight. He was aware that now everything de.
208 THE CROFTON BOYS.



pended on whether he was once sure of his lesson, but the
difficulty was in once being sure of it.

Finding Phil’s kindness continue througn the first weeks
and months of the half-year, Hugh took courage at last to
open his mind pretty freely to his brother, offering to do
anything in the world for Phil, if he would only hear him
his lessons every evening till he could say them perfect,
Phil was going to plead that he had no time, when Hugh
popped out,

“The thing is that it does not help me to say them to
_ just anybody. Saying them to somebody that I am afraid
of is what I want.”

“Why, you are not afraid of me?” said Phil.

“Yes I am—rather.” .

“What for?”

“Oh, because you are older; and you are so much more
of a Crofton boy than I am—~and you are very strict—and
altogether——”

“Yes, you will find me pretty strict, I can tell you,” said
Phil, unable to restrain a complacent smile on finding that
somebody was afraid of him. “Well, we must see what we
can do. I will hear you to-night, at any rate.”

Between his feeling of kindness and the gratification of his
vanity, Phil found himself able to hear his brother’s lessons
every evening. He was certainly very strict, and was not
sparing of such pushes, joggings, and ridicule as were neces-
sary to keep Hugh up to his work. Those were very provok-
ing sometimes; hut Hugh tried to bear them for the sake of

1
TRIPPING. 209



‘the gain. Whenever Phil would condescend to explain, in
fresh words, the sense of what Hugh had to learn, he saved
trouble to both, and the lesson went off quickly and easily ;
but sometimes he would not explain anything, and soon
went away in impatience, leaving Hugh .. the midst of his
perplexities. There was a chance, on such occasions, that
Firth might be at leisure, or Dale able to help, so that, one
way and another, Hugh found his affairs improving as the
spring advanced ; and he began to lose his anxiety, and to .

' gain credit with the usher. He also now and then won a

place in his classes.

Towards the end of May, when the trees were full of leaf,
and the evenings sunny, and the open air delicious quite up
to bed-time, Phil became persuaded, very suddenly, that
Hugh could get on by himself now; that it was not fair that
he should be helped ; and that it was even hurtful to him to
rely on any one but himself. If Phil had acted gradually
upon this conviction, withdrawing his help by degrees, it
might have been all very well ; but he refused at once and
decidedly to have anything more to do with Hugh’s lessons,
as he was quite old and forward enough now to do them by
himself. This announcement threw his brother into a state
of consternation not at all favourable to learning, and the
next morning Hugh made several blunders. He did the
same every day that week, was every afternoon detained
from play to learn his lessons again, and on the Saturday
morning (repetition day) he lost all the places he had gained,
and left off at the bottom of every class.

14
210 THE CROFTON BOYS.



What could Mr. Crabbe suppose but that a sudden fit of
idleness was the cause of this falling back? It appeared so
to him and to the whole school; and poor Hugh felt as if
there was scorn in every eye that looked upon his disgrace.
He thought there could not be a boy in the school who did
not see or hear that he was at the bottom of every class.

Mr. Crabbe always desired to be just; and he now gave
Hugh the opportunity of explaining, if he had anything to
say. He remained in the school-room after the boys had
left it, and asked Hugh a question or two. But Hugh
sobbed and cried so bitterly that he could not speak so as
to be understood ; and he did not wish to explain, feeling
that he was much obliged to Phil for his former help, and
that he ought not to complain to any master of its being now
withdrawn. So Mr. Crabbe could only hope that next week
would show a great difference, and advise him to go out
with the rest this af moon, to refresh himself for a new
effort.

Hugh did not know whether he had not rather have
been desired to stay at home than go out among so many
who considered him disgraced. It really was hard (though
Holt stood by him, and Dale was his companion as usual)
to bear the glances he saw, and the words that came to his
ear. Some boys looked to see how red his eyes were, some
were surprised to see him abroad, and hinted at favouritism
because he was not shut up in the school-room. Some
asked whether he could say his alphabet yet; and others
whether he could spell “dunce.” The most cruel thing of
TRIPPING. at



- all was to see Tooke in particularly high spirits. He kept
away from Hugh; but Hugh’s eye followed him from afar, and
saw that he capered and laughed, and was gayer than at any
time this half-year. Hugh saw into his heart (or thought he
did) as plain as he saw to the bottom of the clear stream in
the meadows, to which they were bound for their afternoon’s
sport.

“T know what Tooke is feeling,” thought he ‘He is
pleased to see me lowered, as long as it is not his doing.
He is sorry to see me suffer by my lameness, because that
hurts his conscience; but he is pleased to see me wrong and
disgraced, because that relieves him of the feeling of being
obliged to me. If I were now to put him in mind of his
promise, to stand by me and protect me—I declare I will—
it will stop his wicked joy—it will make him remember his
duty.”

Dale wondered to see Hugh start off, as fast as he could
go, to overtake the foremost boys who were just entering the
meadow, and spreading themselves over it. Tooke could,
alas! like everybody else, go faster than Hugh; and there
was no catching him, though he did not seem to see that
anybody wanted him. Neither could he be made to hear,
though Hugh called him as loud as he could shout. Holt
was So sorry to see Hugh hot and agitated, that he made no
objection to going after Tooke, though he was pretty sure
Tooke would be angry with him. Holt could run as fast as
anybody, and he soon caught the boy he was pursuing, and
told him that little Proctor wanted him very much indeed,

14—2
212 THE CROFTON BOYS.



that very moment. Tooke sent him about his business,
saying that he could not come; and then immediately pro-
posed brook-leaping for their sport, leading the way himself
over a place so wide that no lesser boy, however nimble, -
could follow. Holt came running back, shaking his head,
and showing that his errand was in vain. Tooke was so full
of play that he could think of nothing else, which was a
shame.

“Ah! and you little know,” thought Hugh, “ how deep a
shame it'is.”

With a swelling heart he turned away, and went towards
the bank of the broader stream which ran through the
meadows. Dale was with him in a moment,—very sorry for
him, because everybody else was at brook-leaping,—the
sport that Hugh had loved so well last autumn. Dale
passed his arm round Hugh’s neck, and asked where they
should sit and tell stories,—where they could best hide
themselves, so that nobody should come and tease them.
Hugh wished to thank his friend for this; but he could not
speak directly. They found a pleasant place among the
flowering reeds on the bank, where they thought nobody
would see them; and having given Holt to understand that
they did not want him, they settled themselves for their
favourite amusement of story-telling.

But Hugh’s heart was too full and too sick for even his
favourite amusement; and Dale was perhaps too sorry for
him to be the most judicious companion he could have at
such a time. Dale agreed that the boys were hard and
TRIPPING. 213



careless; and he added that it was particularly shameful to
bring up a boy’s other faults when he was in disgrace for
one. In the warmth of his zeal, he told how one boy had
been laughing at Hugh’s conceit about his themes, when he
had shown to-day that he could not go half through his



. syntax; and how he had heard another say that all that did

not signify half so much as his being mean about money.

Between Hugh’s eagerness to hear, and Dale’s sympathy,

five minutes were not over before Hugh had heard every

charge that could be brought against his character, and

knew that they were all circulating this very afternoon. In

his agony of mind he declared that everybody at Crofton

hated him,—that he could never hold up his head there,— .
that he would ask to be sent home by the coach, and never

come near Crofton again.
214 THE CROFTON BOYS.



Dale now began to be frightened, and wished he had not ~
said so much. He tried to make light of it; but Hugh
seemed disposed to do something decided ;—to go to his
Uncle Shaw’s, at least, if he could not get home. Dale
earnestly protested against any such idea, and put him in
mind how he was respected by everybody for his bravery
about the loss of his foot.

“Respected? Not a bit of it!” cried Hugh. “They
none of them remember; they don’t care a bit about it.”

Dale was sure they did.

“T tell you they don’t. I know they don’t. I know it
for certain ; and I will tell you how I know. There is the
very boy that did it,—the very boy that pulled me from the
wall—Oh! if you knew who it was, you wozld say it was a
shame!”

Dale involuntarily sat up, and looked back, over the tops
of the reeds, at the boys who were brook-leaping.

© Would you like to know who it was that did it, Dale >?’;

“Yes, if you like to tell; but—And if he treats you ill,
after the way you used him, he cannot expect you should
consider him so. Besides, I am your best friend; and I
always tell you everything !”

“Yes, that you do. And he has treated meso shamefully
to-day! And I have nobody to speak to that knows. You
will promise never—never to tell anybody as long as you
live ?”

“To be sure,” said Dale.

** And you won't tell anybody that I have told you?”
TRIPPING. 218



“To be sure not.”

“Well, then——”

Here there was a rustling among the reeds which startled
then: both, with a sort of guilty feeling. It was Holt, quite
out of breath.

“T don’t want to interrupt you,” said he, “and I know
you wish I would not come; but the others made me come.
The biggest boys lay that the second size can’t jump the
brook at the willow-stump ; and the second size boys want
Dale to try. They made me come. I could not help it.”

Hugh looked at Dale, with eyes which said, as plainly as
eyes could speak, “ You will not go—you will not leave me
at such a moment?”

But Dale was not looking at his face, but at the clusters
of boys beside the brook. He said,

“You will not mind my going, just for one leap. It will
hardly take a minute. I shall not stay fora game. But I
must have just one leap.”

And he was off. Holt looked after him, and then towards
Hugh, hesitating whether to go or stay. Hugh took no
notice of him; so he went slowly away, and Hugh was left
alone.

He was in an extreme perturbation. At the first moment,
he was beyond measure hurt with Dale. He did not think
his best friend would have so reminded. him of his infirmity,
and of his being a restraint on his companions. He did not
think any friend could have left him at such a moment. .
Then it occurred to him, :
216. THE CROFTON BOYS.



“What, then, am I? If Dale was selfish, what was I? I
was just going to tell what would have pointed out Tooke
to him for life. .I know as well as can be that it was all
accident his pulling me off the wall; and yet I was going
to bring it up against him; and for the very reason why I
should not, because he has not behaved well to me. Iwas’
just going to spoil the only good thing I ever did for any-
body:in my life. But it is spoiled —completely spoiled. I
shall never be able to trust myself again. It is all by mere
accident that it is not all over now. If Holt had not come
that very instant, my secret would have been out, and I
could: never have got it back again! I could never have
looked Tooke in the face any more. I don’t know that I
can now, for I am as wicked as if I had told.”

Dale came back presently, fanning himself with his cap.
As he plunged into the reeds, and threw himself down beside
Hugh, he cried,

“T did it! I took the leap, and came off with my shoe-
soles as dry as acrust. Ah! they are wet now; but that is
with another leap I took for sport. I told you I should
not be long gone. Now for it! Who-did it?”

“T am not going to tell you, Dale, not now, nor ever.”

‘Why, that is too bad! Iam sure I stay beside you often
enough, when the others are playing: you need not grudge
me this one leap, when the boys sent for me, too.”

“Tt is not that, Dale. You are very kind always in staying
beside me ; and I do not wish that you should give up play
for my sake half so much as you do. But I was very, very
TRIPPING. 217



wrong in meaning to tell you that secret, I should have
been miserable by this time if I had.”

“But you promised. You must keep your promise.
What would all the boys say if I told them you had broken
your promise ?” :

“Tf they knew what it was about, they would despise me
for ever meaning to tell—not for stopping short in time.
That was only accident, however. But my secret is my own
still.”

Dale’s curiosity was so strong, that Hugh saw how dan-
gerous it was to have tantalized it. He had to remind his
friend of Mr. Tooke’s having put all the boys upon honour
not to inquire on this subject. This brought Dale to him-
self; and he promised never again to urge Hugh, or encou-
rage his speaking of the matter at all. They then went to
story-telling ; but it would not do to-day. Hugh could not
attend, and Dale could not invent, while there was no sym-
pathy in his hearer. He was presently released, for it struck
Hugh that he should like to write to his mother this very
afternoon. His heart was heavy, and he wanted to tell her
what was in it. Mr. Crabbe gave him leave to go home, and
Dale was in time for plenty more play.

Hugh had the great school-room all to himself, and as the
window before his desk was open, he had the pleasure of the
fresh air, and the smell of the blossoms from the orchard,
and the sound of the waving of the tall trees in the wind,
and the cawing of the rooks as the trees waved. These
things all made him enjoy scribbling away to his mother, as
218 THE CROFTON BOYS.

well as finding his mind grow easier as he went on. Besides,
he had not to care for the writing, for he had met Mr. Tooke
by the church, and had got his leave to send his letter with-
out anybody’s looking at it, as he had something very par-
ticular to say. He wrote,—

“DEAR MOTHER,—

“Tt is Saturday afternoon, and I have come home from
the meadows before the rest, to tell you something that has
made me very uneasy. If I had told anybody in the world
who pulled me off the wall, it should and would have been
you, that night after it happened; and I am afraid I should
have told you, if you had not prevented it, for I find I am
not to be trusted when I am talking with anybody I love very
much. I have not told yet, but I should have told Dale if
Holt had not run up at the verymoment. It makes me very
unhappy—almost as much as if I had let it out, for howdo I
know but that I may tell a hundred times over in my life, if
I could forget so soon? I shall be afraid of loving anybody
very much, and talking with them alone, as long as I live.
I never felt the least afraid of telling till to-day, and you
cannot think how unhappy it makes me. And then, the
thing that provoked me to tell was that boy’s being surly to
me, and glad that I was in disgrace this morning, for doing
my lessons badly all this week—the very thing that should
have made me particularly careful how I behaved to him,
for his pulling me off the wall was only accident, after all.
TRIPPING. 219



Everything has gone wrong to-day, and I am very unhappy,
and I feel as if I should never be sure of anything again ; and
so I write to you. You told me you expected me not to fail,
and you see I have, and the next thing is that I must tell
you of it
“Your affectionate son,
“Huen Proctor.

“«P.S,—Phil has been very kind about my lessons, till this
week [zzterlined|, when he has been very busy.

“ P.S,—If you should answer this, please put ‘ private’ out-
side, or at the top; and then Mr. Tooke will not read it,
nor anybody. But I know you are very busy always, so I do
not quite expect an answer.”

When the letter was finished and closed Hugh felt a good
deal relieved, but still not happy. He had opened his heart
to the best friend he had in this world; but he still felt
grievously humbled for the present, and alarmed for the
future. Then he remembered that he might seek comfort
from a better Friend still, and that He who had sent him
his trial could and would help him to bear it with honour
as well as with patience. As he thought of this, he saw that
the boys were trooping home along the road, and he slipped
out and into the orchard, where he knew he might be alone
with his best Friend. He stayed there till the supper-bell
220 THE CROFTON BOYS.



yang; and when he came in it was with a cheerful face. He
was as merry as anybody at supper, and afterwards he found
his lessons more easy to him than usual. The truth was that
' his mind was roused by the conflicts of the day. He said
his lessons to Phil (who found time to-night to hear him)
without missing a word. When he went to bed he had
several pleasant thoughts. His secret was still his own,
though by no merit of his ; to-morrow was Sunday, likely to
be a bright, sweet May Sunday; his lessons were quite
ready for Monday, and possibly there might be a letter from
his mother in the course of the week.

Mrs. Proctor was in the midst of her Monday morning’s
business (and Monday morning was the busiest of the week)
when she received Hugh’s letter. Yet she found time to
answer it by the very next post. When her letter was handed
to Hugh, with the seal unbroken, because “ private” was
written large on the outside, he thought she was the kindest
mother that ever was to have written so soon, and to have
minded all his wishes. Hier letter was: —

“Dear Hucy,—

“ There was nothing in your letter to surprise me at all,
for I believe, if all our hearts were known, it would be found
that we have every one been saved from doing wrong by
what we call accident. The very best people say this of
themselves, in their thanksgivings to God, and their con-
fessions to one another. Though you were very unhappy
TRIPPING. 221



on Saturday, I am not sorry that these things have happened,
as I think you will be the safer and the wiser for them.
You say you never till then felt the least afraid of telling.
Now you know the danger, and that is a good thing. I
think you will never again see that boy, whoever he may be,
without being put upon your guard. Still, we are all sadly
forgetful about our duty; and, if I were you, I would use
every precaution against such a danger as you have escaped
—it makes me tremble to think how narrowly. If I were
you, I would engage any friend I should become intimate
with the whole time of being at school, and perhaps after.
wards, never to say a word about the accident, or, at least,
about how it happened. Another way is to tell me your
mind, as you have now, for you may be sure that it is my
wish that you should keep your secret, and that I shall
always be glad to help you to do it.

“ But, my dear boy, I can do but little, in comparison
with the best Friend you have. He can help you without
waiting for your confidence,—even at the very instant when
you are tempted. It is He who sends these very accidents
(as we call them) by which you have now been saved. Have
you thanked Him for saving you this time? And will you not
trust in His help henceforward, instead of supposing yourself
safe, as you now find you are not? If you use His strength,
T feel that you will not fail. If you trust your own intentions
alone, I shall never feel sure of you for a single hour, nor be
certain that the companion you love best may not be yout
worst enemy, in breaking down your self-command. But,
222 THE CROFTON BOYS.



as you say you were very unhappy on Saturday, I have no
doubt you did go for comfort to the right Friend, and that
you were happier on Sunday.

“Your sisters do not know that I am writing, as I consider
your letter a secret from everybody but your father, who
sends his love. You need not show this to Phil; but you
can give him our love. Your sisters are counting the days
to the holidays; and so are some older members of the
family. As for Harry, he shouts for you from the yard -
every day, and seems to think that every shout will bring
nearer the happy time when Phil and you will come home.

; “Your affectionate mother,

“ Jane Proctor.”

Hugh was, of cc:rse, very glad of this letter. And he
was glad of something else ;—that he had done the very
things his mother had advised. He had engaged Dale not
to tempt him on this subject any more. He had opened ©
is heart to his mother, and obtained her help; and he had
sought a better assistance, and a higher comfort still. It was
so delightful to have such a letter as this,—to be so under-
stood and aided, that he determined to tell his mother all
his concerns as long as he lived. When, in the course of the
holidays, he told her so, she smiled, and said she supposed
he meant as long as she lived, for she was likely to die long
before.he did.. Hugh could not deny this; but he never
liked to think about it ;—he always drove away the thought
TRIPPING. 223



though he knew,.as his mother said, that this was rather
cowardly, and that the wisest and most loving people in the
world remember the most constantly and cheerfully that
friends must be parted for a while, before they can live
together for ever.



WRITING HOME,


CHAPTER XIV.

HOLT AND HIS HELP.

Noruine more was heard by Hugh, or any one else, of
Lamb’s debt. The creditor himself chose to say nothing
about it, so much was he annoyed at being considered fond
of money; but he was sure that Lamb’s pockets were filled
from time to time, as he was seen eating good things in
by-corners when everybody knew that his credit with his
companions, and with all the neighbouring tradespeople,
was exhausted. It was surprising that anybody could care
so much for a shilling’s worth of tarts or fruit as to be at the
trouble of any concealment, or of constantly getting out of
Hugh’s way, rather than pay and have done with it. When
Lamb was seen munching or skulking, Firth sometimes asked
Hugh whether he had got justice yet in that quarter; and
then Hugh laughed; and Firth saw that he had gained
something quite as good,—a power of doing without it
good-humouredly, from those who were so unhappy as not
to understand or care for justice.

224
HOLT AND HIS HELP, 225



In one respect, however, Hugh was still within Lamb’s
power. When Lamb was not skulking, he was much given
to boasting; and his boasts were chiefly about what a great
man he was to be in India. He was really destined for

r

pp tui ly)
hy af





i] i

' A GREEDY SCHOOL-MATE,

India; and his own opinion was that he should have a fine
life of it there, riding on an elephant, with a score of servants
always about him, spending all his mornings in shooting, and
all his evenings at dinners and balls. Hugh did not care
about the servants, sport, or dissipation, and he did not see

15
226 THE CROFTON BOYS.





why any one should cross the globe to enjoy things like these
which might be had at home. But it did make him sigh to
think that a lazy and ignorant boy should be destined to
live among those mountains, and that tropical verdure of _
which he had read—to see the cave-temples, the tanks, the
prodigious rivers, and the natives and their ways, of which
his imagination was full, while he must stay at home, and
see nothing beyond London as long as he lived. He did —
not grudge Holt his prospect of going to India, for Holt
was an improved and improving boy, and had, moreover, a
father there whom he loved very much; but Hugh could
never hear Lamb’s talk about India without being ready to
cry.

“Do you think,” he said to Holt, “that all this is true?”

“Tt is true that he is to go to India. His father has interest
to get him out. But I do not believe he will like it so well
‘as he thinks. At least, I know that my father has to work
pretty hard—harder than Lamb ever worked, or ever will
work.” ;

“Oh, dear! I wish I could go and do the work; and I would
send all the money home to him (except just enough to live
upon), and then he might go to dinners and balls in London

-as much as he liked, and I could see the Hindoos and the
cave-temples.”

“That is another mistake of Lamb’s—about the quantity
of money,” said Holt. ‘I do not believe anybody in India
is so rich as he pretends, if they work ever so hard. I know
my father works as hard as anybody, and he is not rich, and
HOLT AND HIS HELP. 227

I know the same of ‘several of his friends. So it is hardly
likely that such a lazy dunce as Lamb should be rich unless
he has a fortune here at home, and if he had that, I do not -
believe he would take the trouble of going so far, to suffer
by the heat.”

“T should not mind the heat,” sighed Hugh, “if I could
go. You must write to me, Holt, all about India. Write '
me the longest letters in the world, and tell me everything |
you can think of about the natives, and Juggernaut’s car.”

“That I will, if you like. But I am afraid that would
only make you long the more to go—like reading Voyages
and Travels. How I do wish, though, that you were going
with me by-and-bye, as you let me go home with you these
holidays.”

It was really true that Holt was going to London these
holidays. He was not slow to acknowledge that Hugh’s
example had put into him some of the spirit that he had ©
wanted when he came to Crofton, languid, indolent, and
somewhat spoiled, as little boys from India are apt to be;
and Hugh, for his part, saw now that he had been impatient ,
and unkind towards Holt, and had left him forlorn, after ~
having given him hopes that they were to be friends and
companions. ‘They were gradually becoming real friends
now, and the faster because Holt was so humble as not to be
jealous of Hugh’s still liking Dale best. Holt was satisfied
to be liked best when Dale could not be had, and as this
was the case in the Midsummer holidays, he was grateful to .
be allowed to spend them with the Proctors.

15 2
228 LHE CROFTON BOYS.





Hugh was so thankful for his father’s kindness in giving
him a companion of his own age, and so pleased to show
. Holt little Harry, and the leads, and the river, and his shelf
_ of books, and Covent Garden Market, and other wonders of
London, that any unpleasant feelings that the boys had ever
entertained towards each other were quite forgotten, and
they grew more intimate every day. It touched Hugh's
heart to see how sorry Holt was for every little trial that
befell him on coming home, altered as he was. Agnes her-
self did not turn red oftener, or watch more closely to help
: him, than Holt did. Hugh himself had to tell him not to
mind when he saw the shop-boy watching his way of walking,
or little Harry trying to limp like him, or Susan pretending
to find fault with him, as she used to do, as an excuse for
' brushing away her tears. Holt was one of the first to find
out that Hugh liked to be sent errands about the house or
_ In the neighbourhood, and it was he who convinced the
family of it, though at first they could not understand or
believe it at all. When they saw, however, that Hugh, who
used to like that his sisters should wait upon him, and to be
very slow in moving from his book, even at his mother’s
desire, now went upstairs and downstairs for everybody, and
tried to be more independent in his habits than any one else,
they began to think that Holt knew Hugh’s mind better

than even they, and to respect and love him accordingly.

. There was another proof of friendship given by Holt, more
difficult by far; and in giving it, he showed that he really
had learned courage and spirit from Hugh, or in some other
HOLT AND HIS HELP. 22h

—



way. He saw that his friend was now and then apt to do
what most people who have an infirmity are prone to—to
make use of his privation to obtain indulgences for himself,
or as an excuse for wrong feelings; and when Holt could not
help seeing this, he resolutely told his friend of it. No one
else but Mrs. Proctor would see or speak the truth on such
occasions; and when his mother was not by, Hugh would ~
often have done selfish things unchecked, if it had not been
for Holt. His father pitied him so deeply, that he joked ©
even about Hugh’s faults, rather than give him present pain.
Phil thought he had enough to bear at Crofton, and that
: everybody should let him alone in the holidays. His sisters
humoured him in everything, so that if it had not been for
. Holt, Hugh might have had more trouble with his faults
than ever, on going back to Crofton.
“Do you really and truly wish not to fail, as you say,
Hugh?” asked Holt.
“To be sure.”
“Well, then, do try not to be cross.”
“T am not cross.”
“T know you think it is low spirits. I am not quite sure
of that; but if 1 is, would not it be braver not to be low |
_ in spirits ?”
Hugh muttered that that was fine talking for people that
- did not know.
“That is true, I daresay, and I do not believe I should .
” be half as brave as you; but I should like to see you quite
brave.”
230 THE CROFTON BOYS.



“Tt isa pretty thing for you to lecture me, when I got
_ down those books on purpose for you,—those Voyages and
Travels. And how can I look at those same books now,
and not v

Hugh could not go on, and he turned away his head.

“Was it for me?” exclaimed Holt, in great concern.
“Then I am very sorry. I will carry them to Mrs. Proctor,
and ask her to put them quite away till we are gone back
to Crofton.” 4

“No, no. Don’t do that. I want them,” said Hugh,
finding now that he had not fetched them down entirely on
_ Holt’s account. But Holt took him at his word, and
carried the books away, and succeeding in persuading Hugh



that it was better not to look at volumes which he really
almost knew by heart, and every crease, stain, and dog’s-ear
of which brought up fresh in his mind his old visions of
foreign travel and adventure. Then, Holt never encouraged
any conversation about the accident with Susan, or with Mr.
: Blake, when they were in the shop; and he never pretended
. to see that Hugh’s lameness was any reason why he should
have the best of their places in the Haymarket Theatre
(where they went once), or be the chief person when they

capped verses, or played other games round the table, in the
5 evenings at home. The next time Hugh was in his right
mood, he was sure to feel obliged to Holt; and he some-
times said so.

“TI consider you a real friend to Hugh,” said Mrs,
Proctor, one day when they three were together. “I have
HOLT AND HIS HELP. 231



dreaded seeing my boy capable only of a short effort of
courage;—bearing pain of body and mind well while every-
body was sorry for him and ready to praise him, and then
failing in the long trial afterwards. When other people are
leaving off being sorry for him, you continue your concern |
for him, and still remind him not to fail.”

“Would not it be a pity, ma’am,” said Holt, earnestly, ,
“would it not be a pity for him to fail when he bore every-
thing so well at first, and when he helped me so that I don’t
know what I should have done without him? He made
me write to Mr. Tooke, and so got me out of debt; and a:
hundred times, I am sure, the thought of him and his secret :
has put spirit into me. It would be a pity if he should fail
without knowing it, for want of somebody to put him in
mind. He might so easily think he was bearing it all well,
as long as he could talk about his foot, and make a joke of
being lame, when, all the while, he might be losing his
temper in other ways.”

“Why, how true that is!” exclaimed Hugh. “I was
going to ask if I was ever cross about being lame; but I
know I am about other things, because I am worried abont
that, sometimes.”

“It is so easy to put you in mind,” coneinued Holt, “ aad
we shall all be so glad if you are brave to the very end



“TJ will,” said Hugh. ‘Only do you go on to put me in



mind
“ And you will grow more and more brave, too,” observed
Mrs. Proctor to Holt.
232 THE CROFION BOYS.



Holt sighed, for he thought it would take a great deal of
practice yet to make him a brave boy. Other people
thought he was getting on very fast.



So

REMOVING THE OLD FAVOURITE,


CHAPTER XV.

CONCLUSION.

Tue longer these two boys were together, the more they
wished that they could spend their lives side by side; or, at
least, not be separated by half the globe. Just before the
Christmas holidays some news arrived which startled them
so much that they could hardly speak to one another about
it for some hours. There was a deep feeling in their hearts
which disposed them to speak alone to the Ruler of their
lives, before they could even rejoice with one another.
When they meditated upon it, they saw that the event had
come about naturally enough; but it so exactly met the
strongest desire they had in the world, that if a miracle had
happened before their eyes, they could not have been more
struck.

Holt’s father wrote a letter to Mr. Proctor, which reached
its destination through Mr. Tooke’s hands; and Mr. Tooke
was consulted in the whole matter, and requested by Mr.
Proctor to tell the two boys and Phil all about it. These

233
2340 THE CROFTON BOYS.

three were therefore called into Mr. Tooke’s study one day
to hear some news.

The letters which Mr. Tooke read were about Hugh.
Mr. Holt explained that his son’s best years were to be
spent, like his own, in India; that his own experience had
made him extremely anxious that his son should be asso-
ciated with companions whom he could respect and love;
and that he had long resolved to use such interest as he
had in bringing out only such a youth, or youths, as he
could wish his son to associate with, He mentioned that
he was aware that one lad now at Crofton was destined for
“India==—-

“That is Lamb,” whispered the boys to each other.

But that he did not hear of any friendship formed, or
likely to be formed, with advantage between his son and this
young gentleman.

“No, indeed !” muttered Holt.

There was one boy, however, Mr. Holt went on to say, to
whom his son seemed to be attached, and concerning whom
he had related circumstances which inspired a strong interest,
and which seemed to afford an expectation of an upright
manhood following a gallant youth.

Here all the boys reddened, and Hugh looked hard at
the carpet. '

This boy had evidently a strong inclination for travel and
adventure ; and though his lameness put military or naval
service out of the question, it might not unfit him for civil
service in India. If Mr. Tooke could give such a report of
CONCLUSION, 235



GOOD NEWS FOR HUGH,

his health, industry, and capability as should warrant his
being offered an appointment, and if his parents were willing
so to dispose of him, Mr. Holt was anxious to make arrange-
ments for the education of the boys proceeding together, in
order to their being companions in their voyage and subse-
236 THE CROFTON BOYS.



quent employments. And then followed some account of
what these arrangements were to be.

“Now, Proctor,” said Mr. Tooke to the breathless Hugh,
“you must consider what you have to say to this. Your
parents are willing to agree, if you are. But if,” he con-_
tinued, with a kind smile, “it would make you very unhappy
to go to India, no one will force your inclinations.”

“ Oh, sir,” said Hugh, “1 will work very hard—I will work
as hard as ever I can, if I may go.”

“Well, you may go, you see, if you will work hard. You
can consider it quietly, or talk it over with your brother and
Holt; and to-morrow you are to dine at your uncle’s, where
you will meet your father; and he and you will settle what
to write to Mr. Holt, by the next ship.”

“And you, sir,” said Phil, anxiously—“Mr. Holt asks
your opinion.”

“My opinion is that your brother can be what he pleases.
He wants some inducement to pursue his learning more
strenuously than he has done yet——”

“T will, sir. I will, indeed,” cried Hugh,

“T believe you will. Such a prospect as this will be an
inducement, if anything can. You are, on the whole, a brave
boy; and brave boys are not apt to be ungrateful to God
or man; and I am sure you think it would be ungrateful,

both to God and man, to refuse to do your best in the situa-
"tion which gratifies the first wish of your heart.”

Hugh could not say another word. He made his lowest
bow, and went straight to his desk. As the first-fruits of


CONCLUSION. 237



his gratitude, he learned his lessons thoroughly well that
‘night; much as he would have liked to spend the time in
dreaming.

His father and he had no difficulty in settling what to
write to Mr. Holt; and very merry were they together when
the business was done. In a day or two, when Hugh had
had time to think, he began to be glad on Tooke’s account,
and he found an opportunity of saying to him one day,

“T never should have gone to India if I had not lost my
foot ; and I think it is well worth while losing my foot to go
to India.”

“Do you really? or do you say it because——”

“J think so really.” And then he went off into sucha
description as convinced Tocke that he was in earnest,
though it was to be feared that he would be disappointed
by experience. But then again, Mr. Tooke was heard to say
that one chief requisite for success and enjoyment in foreign
service of any kind was a strong inclination for it. So Tooke
was consoled, and easier in mind than for a whole year past.

Hugh was able to keep his promise of working hard.
Both at Crofton and at the India College, where his educa-
tion. was finished, he studied well and successfully ; and
when he set sail with his companion, it was with a heart free
from all cares but one. Parting from his family was certainly
a great grief; and he could not forget the last tone he had
heard from Agnes. But this was his only sorrow. He was,
at last, on the wide sea, and going to Asia. Holt was his
dear friend. He had left none but well-wishers behind.
238 THE CROFTON BOYS.



His secret was his own (though, indeed, he scarcely remnem-
bered that he had any secret); and he could not but be

conscious that he went out well prepared for honourable
duty.

THE END.

—— eee

PRINTED AT THE EDINBURGH PRESS, 9 AND II YOUNG STREET,
ADNIALIO


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'2011-10-16T09:12:47-04:00'
describe
'57195' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEFY' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
2b65b41edc8025cf59c60dad99a4e1f4
9d1fdaeb504fe7c98a50d7a620c2e3fc84f8031a
'2011-10-16T09:16:27-04:00'
describe
'9271364' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEFZ' 'sip-files00001.tif'
37f01ae680710dc7fae20ae975ebc1cb
d7451cccd0fd886f21d10a84515ea5a05f71e798
'2011-10-16T09:10:50-04:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGA' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-16T09:19:40-04:00'
describe
'25454' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGB' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
2b053f853cbd304b0467d16fcb72b19e
fad79ff221edbe147d8290ebed01454117e81190
'2011-10-16T09:09:46-04:00'
describe
'404707' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGC' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
63cfb31dc6520f86ab1420c7c804e465
9f1a52a1f2eb51dfe7afeaeb169a375b83c384ac
'2011-10-16T09:08:57-04:00'
describe
'110663' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGD' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
67e341bf994e9493a3400ffa494b9e43
ac1c2e315cd8fcd41c6bfdf83b6775d316b68a68
'2011-10-16T09:18:33-04:00'
describe
'36477' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
bc2f9a0f91728bd55ac89fa0974eb4d1
547308411c7772286a8040e199adbc1780509351
'2011-10-16T09:11:50-04:00'
describe
'9731432' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
1849d6db223eb5c7940e81198b5f4184
eff31c3e667bb44c1a02753101dbc8b5996cfa9e
'2011-10-16T09:09:58-04:00'
describe
'23082' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGG' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
9940d9143e25ea50fb30348c10e21987
272563f29e7fff9c10132d2925a0eba70f22b0c9
'2011-10-16T09:15:17-04:00'
describe
'351122' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGH' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
7e1b68a7ebb1236238f3c18f8ed251c1
8a8476d85c446718ee281e6622c40c696a77488d
'2011-10-16T09:11:13-04:00'
describe
'87993' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGI' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
3ae3b945d3a2d802b596a8061cf42472
a576321d3cf6ae09725778ec98a19ba2632a694f
'2011-10-16T09:13:00-04:00'
describe
'766' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGJ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
70292c05681220e15f40897b95e251ad
1ec733a0039087b95b60f3ad441a3676d0c30346
'2011-10-16T09:11:05-04:00'
describe
'30940' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGK' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
7cb94abd202b230089dfa9c19509d163
f37683bf8c20455857db6e1b2834639879cc17a2
'2011-10-16T09:12:36-04:00'
describe
'2827928' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGL' 'sip-files00005.tif'
3ea8e77ab37a8503d89a24d14f94a758
e9a3b24846e33058aa5380a53583880175cf125e
'2011-10-16T09:10:26-04:00'
describe
'54' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGM' 'sip-files00005.txt'
5127d1c33fa19d0ff8d914d5415b627e
6ee99fc1cfc3eac9bd0cb0f42316a851bb35ea98
'2011-10-16T09:09:27-04:00'
describe
'21559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGN' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
31494c96c1d99a3ab154741cd29dc51a
e6eb835868cb7ff09896ff508acd60434793eb78
'2011-10-16T09:10:04-04:00'
describe
'351246' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGO' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
0a8ceda1c6889c6bd7bae8791a42e45c
6085f3b1c78d4cc62b6766a11bdfc4af37ff0b77
'2011-10-16T09:16:03-04:00'
describe
'86452' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGP' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
0441ea3022db824dd672bdc5dc0c7e14
bfce626e0aa0c20ba0c3d616f91d5d9389d835fb
'2011-10-16T09:13:46-04:00'
describe
'3849' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGQ' 'sip-files00006.pro'
4118adc5b1d79adaefb3b2b17fdaeb51
a5d70dbb719849e230ea80134e447370c61b6b67
'2011-10-16T09:14:43-04:00'
describe
'30961' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGR' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
572b1401a1554134316a5a342b0e2fc5
7dcb2909bf16830fba3886d03b200e42ae06baf0
'2011-10-16T09:12:16-04:00'
describe
'2828032' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGS' 'sip-files00006.tif'
69fe9e6445974b5834d72e5ccccf2eea
b3f4a83ddcac8f13c7977f553974193ea82719aa
'2011-10-16T09:14:57-04:00'
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGT' 'sip-files00006.txt'
b54884794a2204b70d7310dbb7847f5a
64401cbfd97f242946f352e3814d685c490113a6
'2011-10-16T09:11:36-04:00'
describe
'21617' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGU' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
54c8a1c3dfe16270780d0f75356d8b93
6238f5da9573763e2d951c5628a4e2b6ab038311
'2011-10-16T09:13:52-04:00'
describe
'360773' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGV' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
7a6b0c28e6087f69b496ad9b45e6b4b2
445c82c88bfece017a55b60861ddd06b0430d5e7
'2011-10-16T09:12:25-04:00'
describe
'237340' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGW' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
d32c43d5ad58c0132d2ef63a18ae61ff
b3266dc43f96efa529e791dd2d393490d00e8152
'2011-10-16T09:12:20-04:00'
describe
'3720' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGX' 'sip-files00008.pro'
4b213c94559ac5e9d8ba190796a95264
5ae3e9a84d4840a0b35b5039181c32ae7f7a9ae9
'2011-10-16T09:18:14-04:00'
describe
'66050' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGY' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
a80d5ee60ae501a38c254e40fc45d4bb
6579c21b5915cce14c948f9d438fb38fb801aa72
'2011-10-16T09:09:20-04:00'
describe
'8680328' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEGZ' 'sip-files00008.tif'
8d3c3ae603e3269f1f233028e7c285db
64ec03584a0b5562c857ed13564885fb44753342
'2011-10-16T09:11:17-04:00'
describe
'212' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHA' 'sip-files00008.txt'
b54243defc3e7329effc60928f40af93
49a8c8a6ec7ce263c7ccb387ac78dde31cb1472e
'2011-10-16T09:15:40-04:00'
describe
'32467' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHB' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
5378ec955175078ec397d5900a43c6a3
3ebd8ada04bdfd3dc18044164dc6caca457417c9
'2011-10-16T09:12:21-04:00'
describe
'351249' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHC' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
3e64c818204b88d067106e01fee0796a
603256f1e10d6a15d3eea29c9b2a3b092b0d8da1
'2011-10-16T09:10:23-04:00'
describe
'149568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHD' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
555b072594af493863ffa6171b703ec4
ee84b97ef0b51461d2ec8a5e78efa8bf5177da76
'2011-10-16T09:08:54-04:00'
describe
'5079' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHE' 'sip-files00009.pro'
682c2cd129b72f13f79765ee53d9561c
44e95345215f0642ea21e2abf194bc02638d0cde
'2011-10-16T09:13:50-04:00'
describe
'50200' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHF' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
e95934a567f988fcc7cd877d68697fd6
be28a3acde7f9604b5674785d642b782ce146aca
'2011-10-16T09:17:40-04:00'
describe
'2830384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHG' 'sip-files00009.tif'
e7439282cca3c349aaac302f74e60b8d
0e3fc83072ddeda30f65d811cd844845bf11656f
'2011-10-16T09:10:05-04:00'
describe
'266' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHH' 'sip-files00009.txt'
2c014f4f4402847e22501abe34556c06
573d0f60dce73c3a9f088ed9b424372591e2b3c5
'2011-10-16T09:18:58-04:00'
describe
'28848' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHI' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
f24e859f472cadf07500e5a058b74b2d
e8c014ed68c56e05ec441b9e24ddff31395f3bfb
'2011-10-16T09:13:27-04:00'
describe
'351445' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
ccd207216d59e9b4998795293174cf36
93fa19e292adc1a63520e50644df2309e337c910
'2011-10-16T09:12:27-04:00'
describe
'129627' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHK' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
4497af477a235f5066bf3f46167234d8
2749f3eadc6201d53df87ddd1a8e0a82a60a111e
'2011-10-16T09:19:24-04:00'
describe
'15765' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHL' 'sip-files00011.pro'
f4108494144943df233e293b677d6743
758e4f7e4f90b1fe890d52adc21275fead0d3e18
describe
'48770' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
203bf529438004a0fc8ad9039ad847c8
3885217e594f58c3893027938bb477919b4d1016
describe
'2832144' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHN' 'sip-files00011.tif'
1d86fa8834d7de673c0920f08eeb8c02
2fbe75fd37210bab9611645f4a398194f7d455ad
'2011-10-16T09:13:07-04:00'
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHO' 'sip-files00011.txt'
062e86315a77a49daa916f058bb30984
46a9758142dfad1c2c4e608de12f1615f31659c3
'2011-10-16T09:16:10-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'28231' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHP' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
97e2227023ef7f33fdd1b3ebee96dcc8
b8dca7d28d1050f4ed8dc6e46436a618533555cf
'2011-10-16T09:10:39-04:00'
describe
'350963' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHQ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7753693c989573143e7613f4f686be85
a664b10c9cc430a25d50dc674b1d55e3c9a781cc
'2011-10-16T09:11:38-04:00'
describe
'165093' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHR' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
1acba5b4d9f43a4e6d7940a9b6b96303
15826b02e21deaceb335243214a0ae47935e2ad5
'2011-10-16T09:11:55-04:00'
describe
'22337' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHS' 'sip-files00013.pro'
5c1ad11d5f67ff361cf082c0adcdf716
e3e73c176e6e263c007eebaa20ad4b8fedfd1326
'2011-10-16T09:11:31-04:00'
describe
'60925' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHT' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c7a3e47024d2637f713876ab0029bb45
0cabbc7a3feec48ae6ee89840d1a9e62ad22d814
'2011-10-16T09:12:57-04:00'
describe
'2831212' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHU' 'sip-files00013.tif'
25fe0d067ab21d007047c5932de4a9db
fa2a73bd985e8972823251098f473fd7cb7e74a6
'2011-10-16T09:09:05-04:00'
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHV' 'sip-files00013.txt'
060bbe440b081f5d8a7e308ca69a59f9
c0e704ebcac63780fdbbe4c6684422d8494e2f97
'2011-10-16T09:10:13-04:00'
describe
'31035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHW' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
47948255ec70ec571d03a83205d96df7
369b4e6e56fac7493defb6926c831ccd9dcd7e6e
'2011-10-16T09:12:30-04:00'
describe
'351240' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHX' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
c13d070821eb6a93ab124be8378a5266
757636af0aa547722a45b89be3eab456817a3cbe
'2011-10-16T09:17:22-04:00'
describe
'173231' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHY' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
00a1ec6c76c1cde14f2a286ac29a69bb
d066384033985cff9a96d603475291b8bd1a3c2f
'2011-10-16T09:17:16-04:00'
describe
'19242' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEHZ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
8a3897625da7096007092a5e0fd714fa
aefa54fe71104e5f971e5c354d42e139e7a3ee40
'2011-10-16T09:14:23-04:00'
describe
'61766' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIA' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
45a52913714c4245e0d92a5073d2f798
4e8b443cda1aa4251984b8cc8f95fc5ff5b90846
'2011-10-16T09:11:56-04:00'
describe
'2831016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIB' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1f1fefc48d95bdd72e1eec0a21e16db4
e861e776b28eb6cd0b6cf9c0011ce0e4c29571c9
'2011-10-16T09:13:26-04:00'
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIC' 'sip-files00014.txt'
6da1a04117f688f39d440bbd47495961
387aba2b3cd51814dd55189a6f10438ecdba1835
'2011-10-16T09:14:40-04:00'
describe
'31163' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEID' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
39b811dec72179a39540da5fd0f5b35e
e49caacd7bb7ac1548fa919a3d22838bc796e06e
'2011-10-16T09:15:03-04:00'
describe
'351234' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIE' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
b857657030236cc1a6863930f9c95964
2e22adbba3ca002f0852e2cbcd901dac3cbdd2a4
'2011-10-16T09:14:45-04:00'
describe
'168759' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIF' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
abdf73e89dd0fa83c30095d51a77b91d
c988a97147232e68307bd68e3b0d6d2fd29c5994
'2011-10-16T09:09:09-04:00'
describe
'19549' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIG' 'sip-files00015.pro'
9c27c61c7000c8ca8e4c8da8ae21bf3e
2bfa074ac2ffcb28579455ead0c1d9486dcb017c
describe
'61027' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIH' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
0c07b3049ad7b54e3679849e0580ea1b
6ccb6726edc9e75eba5d2e509c1898968e8a8a35
'2011-10-16T09:16:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEII' 'sip-files00015.tif'
589f7f390faf6eb6abdf5a8a63ac9008
01c0674a3df2c08360b6880efd8cf783305b4ee5
'2011-10-16T09:16:57-04:00'
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIJ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
16da5bfa1b43fbd5a10093f7b23aca1b
82caf5fb62fcbc723406dad0e9118dfdc043531c
'2011-10-16T09:19:28-04:00'
describe
'31403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIK' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
8e2aec66f3670f451e556792b971cadf
38477e78c284bfde1f67e61a61d50ceb7cae7516
'2011-10-16T09:10:17-04:00'
describe
'351218' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIL' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
2810c7f0c3ee4206ba6e9363de4f7be9
f7c5fb253316f19feb3d6e77eb5171d002586904
'2011-10-16T09:09:54-04:00'
describe
'202361' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIM' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
759f5689fbdc918400192c8537054478
cbd0d314b9016e75040725433b58793e15850258
'2011-10-16T09:18:12-04:00'
describe
'42260' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIN' 'sip-files00016.pro'
643fc06b230b4e1ee8a73de361f2cc85
036a2f6f1206cae2722f031e5645390e441af90d
'2011-10-16T09:10:27-04:00'
describe
'76091' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIO' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
2cbf9b957fd3d65c5fb01d3fbe80325d
f8bb0be98a712e22b820192625b83fcdc33a7f8b
'2011-10-16T09:18:53-04:00'
describe
'2832068' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIP' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2e9c2b53cd5714d3d015c78cd2e6afe1
09fca6bd567acf90898225eefcdf18dc06019130
'2011-10-16T09:17:43-04:00'
describe
'1724' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIQ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
01507531ce9b39975386eafa0c469ff5
d11d0fe24362aec504b231e993f0354b65eae417
'2011-10-16T09:19:38-04:00'
describe
'35063' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIR' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
5aa89a818c367b0d5f04216755f45f04
d1c2973fc29bc0cb09d3eb0851ff84e8e6176415
'2011-10-16T09:12:40-04:00'
describe
'351233' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIS' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
147095a3725cf2e4420bda939821eae9
a9188bf14a2c0bcc310f9486f50d63d640532c57
'2011-10-16T09:10:14-04:00'
describe
'210244' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIT' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
78f625c92c6777b12b1d24a0ca5b5cbf
f093788bfde2b6c527f6312ed09d034d6d97c9d0
'2011-10-16T09:15:06-04:00'
describe
'42657' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
33dcffc533b49c8276f9c85676fce8cb
050c703326a7f299af9f74757844deb51e270c4a
'2011-10-16T09:19:14-04:00'
describe
'79028' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIV' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
916992d9fe16ae9f11602dbf4bddc9e2
dbcc9bf9787f155afcb97c254e4746f4abafedd0
describe
'2832260' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
bece3c344c696c61473d1f36f3897147
3c085a58e026b83e49a26e8ff24984d88f8de248
'2011-10-16T09:11:40-04:00'
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIX' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cc8a0956b83c225732bcbd32a273dc98
911b9a534648d136c6fd82c26117f5af5800d1f3
'2011-10-16T09:15:37-04:00'
describe
'35305' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIY' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
8bac3187ab0048a4f4fd88396cc0f317
6f547cb32b7bc0273f156788cfefe0a1a43b71ca
'2011-10-16T09:18:41-04:00'
describe
'351223' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEIZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
11a2ee56bd4357a13e4b5ace3131a5d5
0e91ab6d5fd3863b9bbc946e1090d0f197b2b562
'2011-10-16T09:10:57-04:00'
describe
'200379' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJA' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
95c63d426079986705812fb759d12651
ae95fddaef4b4848f327556dd7161ebc18c46999
describe
'41350' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJB' 'sip-files00018.pro'
19bf44629fa23e4b9a39f91e5a152508
4e8abb4430282b6a69f631027544bc3c4aa65c07
'2011-10-16T09:15:02-04:00'
describe
'77297' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
152fcee1fd9ec0c62c8a2a5e9792b48b
f77db8126184b585a6cca3e6951efdeb39741a3b
'2011-10-16T09:18:44-04:00'
describe
'2832100' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
1816e03ae64f77836522447b811118b3
13b443b0e3fca823d540528914c70805376f3654
'2011-10-16T09:11:07-04:00'
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJE' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1b5723e451d84764341580211a40e6b0
0a0843cb94ffac981d7c6a58bb7079f10830ab32
'2011-10-16T09:13:35-04:00'
describe
'34996' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJF' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
5145a76be0b5cd9ca0161ba2ac226a8b
82f00ab9d1c91ccf2736e587600d247389829127
'2011-10-16T09:15:23-04:00'
describe
'351219' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJG' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
efa72368bd95b472719aaf4dbb3d41da
8b0b602f120976afbf8077e6dfedeac66dea464c
'2011-10-16T09:15:45-04:00'
describe
'186678' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJH' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
036b57b52a3070381d41b68df63c9920
8cab7d65a3994a962b70c93558824dfba197d4e6
'2011-10-16T09:11:19-04:00'
describe
'18625' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJI' 'sip-files00019.pro'
58aa4d5f05ca7a5c59cd4beeb65e8d3a
3adcc193d5ced7752281db45320ec23c1817ffec
describe
'64288' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJJ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
1cd2fb34eb5000c9ce76e20708ada936
3dbef03f8fc22f63fc16898a71edcd6c06cbabb7
'2011-10-16T09:10:34-04:00'
describe
'2831380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJK' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b7c1b7b2388de51a86345860e0e53463
908be5c339b6e91a2ce95e2626a2d26ae270e291
'2011-10-16T09:17:10-04:00'
describe
'765' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJL' 'sip-files00019.txt'
123060e4d3bbb139c1213a08320c3841
a2ac9f087f91ea18f00bdebb6f7b27667f7acc89
describe
'32139' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJM' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
d8c7c78029b21eb1e6a9dc9d00b19584
dddaad9d15b6ae52b4514dfa3ea8d4e0142ebd7a
'2011-10-16T09:11:34-04:00'
describe
'351168' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJN' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f30b3dfc960b2e9297b6d0234d8986ef
83ce32a7970e896fadc809b3b94a27b370f04e9b
'2011-10-16T09:08:53-04:00'
describe
'199754' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJO' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
55c0c1e2e59fcde2b670862c4ba5a111
fa5157174554d22536b3c4e24b4388455c1e6ffd
'2011-10-16T09:18:31-04:00'
describe
'39209' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJP' 'sip-files00020.pro'
dcb2439fb63bc5e1d68a7c49a296b3ac
27a1b1bb5a36c31e702a2e9f20a66a9ba9918634
'2011-10-16T09:17:18-04:00'
describe
'76055' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJQ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
be73e2a70af9e000bc70bb706ecee521
5cf0c31e0e76c0142df72e6085b2aa0836bf568a
'2011-10-16T09:13:11-04:00'
describe
'2832020' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJR' 'sip-files00020.tif'
235f35d8c1b5d6b50ed5724de3474f4e
33b681fa38f7676c9fda69d151a3129d4bfa1278
'2011-10-16T09:14:47-04:00'
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJS' 'sip-files00020.txt'
aaab030adbbc59a49f4c22f64359a774
110337386a64292c8e301ab31be0167c9a61c1ed
'2011-10-16T09:09:02-04:00'
describe
'34682' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJT' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
52642a640e8f5b38ad1212900f4cad76
d839bfa86b73ceed81bb78356365249cb81ada5b
'2011-10-16T09:16:45-04:00'
describe
'351459' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJU' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
3355327b5de2c4daf3c936b7770fc51a
5311b754b3ccaa2bd7dd070018dee46f132bc946
'2011-10-16T09:17:04-04:00'
describe
'200005' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJV' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
7c02023b607e76ba5eef2e615b113bb7
bcab3855faa7e1974fe5e04ca93b327e29a747b4
'2011-10-16T09:14:34-04:00'
describe
'39821' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJW' 'sip-files00021.pro'
5493c65f1ecb8e039247112447a847eb
2e3ff6f0ab9b222929480ab4fe65b68db167a989
describe
'73855' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJX' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
ec856200539d8ddf75a4fe0aaca8bd92
c7f1482964be2837f039cf4848d00e9366a056dc
'2011-10-16T09:09:50-04:00'
describe
'2834440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJY' 'sip-files00021.tif'
8b0822133984e7cd50fb234f74772ead
5118b1d7353d500998dd91d9b142840e22b9f7da
'2011-10-16T09:13:06-04:00'
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEJZ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f5811740ecac5783661b8ffa82858231
f1d2c5823b3099e3873f795d6e8a58c3f7e45c03
'2011-10-16T09:09:51-04:00'
describe
'34985' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKA' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
b0110a94d35fb4d57f0d776a79baf723
e6e7ac492900214ed2e0e1325a4c6c3cdd337308
'2011-10-16T09:15:46-04:00'
describe
'351243' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKB' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c3d2d72eda8bbc422c42fe3141056094
b194535ebd8d352f169c59a2488d2cc0095694e4
'2011-10-16T09:16:52-04:00'
describe
'200993' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKC' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
d67fb62841b14773c7491ba4950fdf86
853aa6c888dcf8e8dd8102d5681c5f21f0551049
'2011-10-16T09:19:10-04:00'
describe
'41462' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKD' 'sip-files00022.pro'
44d356ea63aeb9d8bdd03a852868c7e9
3f04cc4a10a8db504be668b818a38aae1510449a
'2011-10-16T09:18:39-04:00'
describe
'76841' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKE' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
0897799c7a84d45f023ed4cc2607c62c
82c6a35234b4a7247b6746bf3ee3b02af330c8b3
describe
'2832104' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKF' 'sip-files00022.tif'
808c1dc985b404076dc80a49ba91089d
3c68a39ad38a18742ac4391e852fc9351ca369dc
'2011-10-16T09:14:11-04:00'
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKG' 'sip-files00022.txt'
b54a91ca8452b8984c3546ede3f82b08
fec40152c39ee49799981a1bd3d290f283646f63
'2011-10-16T09:16:00-04:00'
describe
'35103' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKH' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
fd635ced1d4e897d008dbeff01c6aa2d
20b6714895abd951e3339a2c0d550c12ae6069cf
describe
'351492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKI' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
bed1950f9eea66f6c49775b3531d90dd
c645376793239d7beb2dd5f9a449791618baaabe
'2011-10-16T09:09:04-04:00'
describe
'195025' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKJ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2394aa4e5d487c1c5ae1fb2550948e60
9773fe49f3263f2513acd4d405cd1cbe000b294c
'2011-10-16T09:12:10-04:00'
describe
'36714' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKK' 'sip-files00023.pro'
8ff93381d4a65ae8a78f3bc4c48fb704
ed031d05997a3b35875cd34512fa91b344e747f5
'2011-10-16T09:10:25-04:00'
describe
'73674' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKL' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
ec3d551e4832bef884c86198f7ad9a63
48b7847b4819f9ccbfe72f6dc29ea2c6a5788b37
'2011-10-16T09:18:02-04:00'
describe
'2834272' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
c9e41cec3117a489aa63398e4071612e
87c023bb6c8ef723d0fed29833b3e2223030c0bb
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKN' 'sip-files00023.txt'
622e90294f46185bd1e340b64b499485
b6eb0245b2c4f36332d47d3431aeea74b46a6bc7
'2011-10-16T09:16:06-04:00'
describe
'34794' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKO' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
462776a7f266bb1252fe329fdbe5c87a
7e97b363b55ae408027c6146810cefa36a10c6d8
'2011-10-16T09:09:37-04:00'
describe
'351224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
0acf1d59f236550cafe9d60c933123d8
c38f88e27fd746839a1957da4fc0b5f6081cfd62
'2011-10-16T09:17:27-04:00'
describe
'176529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKQ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
6009d9f9c19b64f5e745d04db3a4fcec
076337447de0cf59b590dc0b132f21ecbfd6c01c
'2011-10-16T09:18:20-04:00'
describe
'30857' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKR' 'sip-files00024.pro'
79a7e707d75b85a1adbebeaf2d665677
20cae8ee3dc81c84cac9567fdd8b851f8acd153e
'2011-10-16T09:14:06-04:00'
describe
'65390' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKS' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
bcfd21c75ff333f9b300b99bfd245abb
064c879c9ac96687cee91d41ed741d22c71c0854
describe
'2831692' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c69f84dc3712649485086e5331b0b77a
165e1a9c3660f1c22b181bfa3b4a31d99395e7ec
'2011-10-16T09:15:43-04:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKU' 'sip-files00024.txt'
b00df52caad8737080f68ea878b4ede6
eac4a191af4ff9d66683768479cd455863f7f3ae
'2011-10-16T09:16:21-04:00'
describe
'33174' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKV' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
487636b5289d25c45d2cb3f51b4a2ca9
7ab3a3ae940a313c43fdf3d1dd08e7fa064c5717
'2011-10-16T09:12:12-04:00'
describe
'351514' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKW' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
905f4dd5b39a52e71641405436012d82
d6e82427c4945e2a095f8c457c443460bbfb3924
'2011-10-16T09:10:30-04:00'
describe
'191477' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKX' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
ebb1635fb3535ec1618ccaf3f865997d
2bfb333d034cd45681d82a061a23fe2f82df72e1
'2011-10-16T09:14:41-04:00'
describe
'35836' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKY' 'sip-files00025.pro'
a076d548b5d38014b13aff287e2126c8
b3af6815c2781f6be262b48bd41b4295e36a970d
'2011-10-16T09:13:24-04:00'
describe
'71022' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEKZ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f3635f645f63149f1f0cdea3be96c843
5bad1cce90bb08f8a2e0c08531b91676320e3d92
'2011-10-16T09:19:34-04:00'
describe
'2834232' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELA' 'sip-files00025.tif'
8435ba77e38591345180db7fe4f3dc56
f7e2568ebbd43c61b3648e8e6a7c816bb7044720
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELB' 'sip-files00025.txt'
cd05196f0496f2f35222ad011cd5241e
d82239c42081fc07c154208e52dbde471ef842b9
'2011-10-16T09:12:00-04:00'
describe
'34481' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELC' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ebc120cc70ac8d6e1b2cc47723cac956
4bf769aca174d236f8c55fc1f8b835f3daf8fd80
'2011-10-16T09:18:04-04:00'
describe
'346394' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELD' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c4892e0b9b627fba08dfb74951fba3ad
e863b29f607d533693dc2a71fab6ec5774ff273c
'2011-10-16T09:09:15-04:00'
describe
'183529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
83c30c7b700eaf31d961ce6c285589b6
27f7ad9e95533f13aa6721d683ed220ba3e92cb4
'2011-10-16T09:11:46-04:00'
describe
'35046' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELF' 'sip-files00026.pro'
be4baae27df7fa7a0cb8d108999161e8
ff606aa3fcfa091ef65f421379bdfa1c85df2223
'2011-10-16T09:17:17-04:00'
describe
'70458' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELG' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
033216953091d0174d9eef0679cd4b2f
4a9e0cc863437b420d96a33fc62013b394c9b262
'2011-10-16T09:10:11-04:00'
describe
'2793260' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELH' 'sip-files00026.tif'
03c7f31038c266be523439da1cac6d63
dcc62aeaf8f0acc82aa187af2eedadb4ce63b8e6
'2011-10-16T09:10:44-04:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELI' 'sip-files00026.txt'
7a7716ea5cb428dfaee14770cd010dd1
5dfbd8573d3d1b0647086613ae58e1c885f287ad
'2011-10-16T09:11:57-04:00'
describe
'34355' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELJ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
4fb1fdcd2b8b8bd40f5dbcf26c6faf8b
150b28534771bf2f12f34527da7393bf005d7485
'2011-10-16T09:17:46-04:00'
describe
'346607' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELK' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
16cb41f94584c80cd26c5d93eb6f3a05
9aeb5d4313c16192bf31b68586535ecb9f4f1e8c
'2011-10-16T09:17:59-04:00'
describe
'191109' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELL' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
adf1aa1a36750fde78c5902c92bbc5cd
c67bbe06b7ac6b72b6b8aed17624c15df79db624
'2011-10-16T09:09:22-04:00'
describe
'36325' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELM' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d0efed4c53dc96bb37528b830f3c9401
93705b998eddbcbbae8eed78de9388a5a3a42ef5
'2011-10-16T09:10:56-04:00'
describe
'72083' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
544ae50b404b20db20bf529b4180ed1a
8f68e032eda4d74f56b8bea99caadbb00410dd5a
describe
'2795632' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
f7f4ff885d7674650efac804484dd795
96eb13aef50ed7f8e3645f4bb350e8caec1af304
'2011-10-16T09:13:17-04:00'
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELP' 'sip-files00027.txt'
23a938b71ecc1822882d039c9719ce90
b2dd1daf206ac2620cad8a71a793d0c0a16d4db0
'2011-10-16T09:16:56-04:00'
describe
'34793' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELQ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
cf67bdc55649b3dd070026ff6fcdb25e
d7fdecbb66cd0dd07e4dd2a80db77c502fa77f2a
'2011-10-16T09:13:56-04:00'
describe
'346396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELR' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
9c66d5e8e38eec052ce18e2e626ef8e4
82f904de46ca9c0c82154bdc99e5a260cf4e6fd3
'2011-10-16T09:17:51-04:00'
describe
'197694' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELS' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ec367cbbcc6b538e9f02a50ac3108963
08873835a8296020319f889608051c17826d6031
describe
'38629' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELT' 'sip-files00028.pro'
5eed7f44e093c6b750a2c794f7c90490
3b79cf8f41caacd701c5c5c2de0d5f694b646d00
'2011-10-16T09:18:07-04:00'
describe
'73899' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
4d20a1675163561ffc7be0c33cf4c4ba
ea5a437a56b7e9c8ad3bdb348e404ec75a77c72a
'2011-10-16T09:17:02-04:00'
describe
'2793348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELV' 'sip-files00028.tif'
2c52e0743e69439efd7bd3aa1a7aa921
a2c9c1830471cb5b2241188ec58bb0a4fbe2502f
'2011-10-16T09:09:24-04:00'
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELW' 'sip-files00028.txt'
350f480be778627d591c40a5096b8f20
3a68ca91bf79b69cc95f8ed198666991a4efbb32
'2011-10-16T09:10:33-04:00'
describe
'34893' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELX' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
bbead9334a6124fcb40f036861ab74e2
8f4c506be055307e968b16ea3846e4f4eefd7257
'2011-10-16T09:17:53-04:00'
describe
'346304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELY' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
ae57d38fbaf709c91ec21cb18a44b2a4
d2031e697b22dc39c047667b0780af7b9f4f3b3d
'2011-10-16T09:12:56-04:00'
describe
'197443' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABELZ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
ec8d9a10ffa7d569e25d4a545a77db4f
438bfdf0208aa2e1861ac75c5aece55294e2f0ce
'2011-10-16T09:18:38-04:00'
describe
'37258' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
c73d63cf05254676ff6b6c4389081a8f
90b3345f6ccc39afed650d36852f10bdf47a5539
'2011-10-16T09:16:07-04:00'
describe
'73639' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
677416131e6ea9a27f434b5b12227c04
a49bf8d29d6742ad4e5a760d9cb227c9141b2d34
'2011-10-16T09:19:22-04:00'
describe
'2793560' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMC' 'sip-files00029.tif'
15f71b647966ead20afb391094b4ec83
8cf1d3ce6f99d30687c1b96324447d3f94703667
'2011-10-16T09:19:12-04:00'
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMD' 'sip-files00029.txt'
508dcd54690f717c5ebd071b869071e7
4bd263902425fab9a3cc71ac5c1e25489c184921
describe
'35226' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEME' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
b4f5c2fa1e7c309f2763cf8d561fe7ab
e5a2fcde3ea258aba36709fb7a5df61e8ceb9505
'2011-10-16T09:10:49-04:00'
describe
'346384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMF' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
32f0bfb628eb02f43069dab9052d10e9
3af584db0f010fa98438836b2edb81cceef82b96
describe
'183428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMG' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
b2e8a6126d738fa3783e055c34bba906
a94cbf78287d73bd0ce28237de565a3080a987b8
'2011-10-16T09:12:35-04:00'
describe
'35179' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMH' 'sip-files00030.pro'
e09b34c4c31483248e9683a888ce3e75
9ba1f69b2abaf17bd09f34db539e108a933b6f22
describe
'69659' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMI' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
a358b0b40446b8359266ced6b522a242
19b4f81bac2b0f249086d7b592e033d13830aa6f
'2011-10-16T09:12:34-04:00'
describe
'2793100' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMJ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
04cb5e1ceb4f1bae5a02fa20aa57e347
54dd8cdef000f567c8395d7e3e1ccf5486f88f96
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMK' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f8d2e64ec4b8be77ac0e51c168e1d7e5
33d2427b97976337cd836c406b3f19c93efab5c1
'2011-10-16T09:17:07-04:00'
describe
'33835' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEML' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
44ed4eda42f31bb1cf372046b6f14f5f
5ca090e02bb95405f5a0756a538c47cb289846dd
'2011-10-16T09:19:18-04:00'
describe
'346661' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
b7be50470d426ced50942697c1ff3100
5eaeed31205dcc0b680318d583c47ed3b63987e5
'2011-10-16T09:15:50-04:00'
describe
'182628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMN' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
df4faa825afb0136bf9cc9960fdf20fd
dd3f68bc3b15113185e4fafd9d6a19cbb193ed20
'2011-10-16T09:15:56-04:00'
describe
'10151' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMO' 'sip-files00031.pro'
da9f5e7ed6644fdf0843777779a5fea3
9b94c1803a50ea29aa9bf61bd490941afcba3153
'2011-10-16T09:12:51-04:00'
describe
'59895' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMP' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
fbd8aa4993471655eca2ac8632616388
eb0b952c223ab64befe75d7da2e3719a751cdf70
describe
'2794620' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMQ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
856d52ad1b57553e4ed4a9a213bf2a33
022539f4aa8a24091114ec859119262376d37a72
describe
'431' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMR' 'sip-files00031.txt'
332f2b26f0e2abefc9c6254f5d3149bf
daea0db7c61b77d79f27ac2cdc8b9d9b2fe2f568
'2011-10-16T09:15:15-04:00'
describe
'31475' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMS' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
7e0cb8a18a296f6dbddee7df2e2abd1b
6ba967984b3a23aee945532feefcbdc5d8cb3dd2
'2011-10-16T09:16:01-04:00'
describe
'346323' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMT' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
6f899a17546770dd24e2e96c94b9ff42
1db667520327c7e3c2a17460584054cc48b87a43
describe
'171316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMU' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
42c934a3a6f13400040d5baa115a375b
0cd3c407a7d99340a086bb24a50050cb5af68701
'2011-10-16T09:17:26-04:00'
describe
'29319' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMV' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c1ac03879ade7de4be564b1a9432b654
cba77004a95c49f072c3ad3bd5da6eb0debe3632
'2011-10-16T09:14:51-04:00'
describe
'64130' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMW' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
0798b1f4cb4eba7e95b877e517856674
9234e7d1d55c718bcd841fbe587b0cda662aa645
'2011-10-16T09:09:06-04:00'
describe
'2792744' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMX' 'sip-files00032.tif'
1ea542c0d917b8eecb9d548505704631
2cbf1fc5d69c30543d129a712f3c53e3a084d124
'2011-10-16T09:16:36-04:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMY' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e51a33132490f35ffc1d618ed9bf51f5
ceff0e661cd46f1f1694c6d1cdf1d1cf718bf3ef
'2011-10-16T09:09:39-04:00'
describe
'32533' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEMZ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
44426684765071f2ffc00561b660b705
96298248c240ca1d9b949be3bd184b08292b315f
'2011-10-16T09:09:12-04:00'
describe
'346603' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENA' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
23bcc3d635ac09fcb351395229ddcdab
bc074df179f5731ffac96ef13ba16c5194b77f2c
'2011-10-16T09:13:55-04:00'
describe
'173822' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENB' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
89b33c458ae041bcc8029b4691b86763
beae23e5c87a675b4bbbbbea256d263a138f03bc
'2011-10-16T09:09:44-04:00'
describe
'27110' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENC' 'sip-files00033.pro'
1a897b6caf78c89211679cb71548ad0d
93c008e3430e4adf27a94f42d576343d6338ca37
'2011-10-16T09:09:32-04:00'
describe
'63110' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEND' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7ee84096ef05ea9a695cd6e79eaf3ffc
4f6ef5848b62ab12f1b6d6fd39e5e5c4c0fb45e8
'2011-10-16T09:19:29-04:00'
describe
'2794456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENE' 'sip-files00033.tif'
ae143f6ee13a05d640c0a42bf736789f
ed2c92736f06fbed757dca4965ad953d2083d9c7
'2011-10-16T09:09:16-04:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENF' 'sip-files00033.txt'
d7c2bc478fe271d2cbd03ef893c66929
936283703292fe872dddb284d6a9dd7a5bb97aed
describe
'31097' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENG' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
7168dde79aca660af55e5940a3ccd931
2bf929155f271a59b6f8c153ad4d610afbec5641
'2011-10-16T09:10:51-04:00'
describe
'346416' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENH' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
efc9a43fc1e3b368d4894d592fc7f3dd
c48dbb8374b5ace13f49ca1031eab500db718c1b
'2011-10-16T09:11:08-04:00'
describe
'195244' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENI' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
e44f0e38fa0471b3fbb2133826c7d543
d70178acbeef0db9da5953ebe63bfe32276cfaf4
'2011-10-16T09:13:38-04:00'
describe
'40132' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENJ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
6a7cbcaf7d92fccbed7bde13fe2f7a1d
a4be39e1e4dfcbb13b1056b04612da4dba6ef2f9
describe
'72587' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENK' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
cbb15aaafa046003bec1e719c18c954a
7340b1b70c45bc3eab9e4c32d51bf9efc1b3af36
'2011-10-16T09:10:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENL' 'sip-files00034.tif'
fe3e2c0873856934cf43cddc49d1d1a8
63e9734ded706956e341031203d632a1707f1272
'2011-10-16T09:16:47-04:00'
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENM' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2f4672e8d2c58374cac5b3f408289ba4
b09d047e9b1cfd17f9d7712c7e1290a79a97c77d
'2011-10-16T09:11:11-04:00'
describe
'34394' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENN' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
eaa900293f33688e7f083f1ba8b372a1
f95546f024ca3b5e493ad619b20f547e7c97eded
describe
'346420' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENO' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
dc096fd3ebe198d99eb9c6ca5679aeda
a87b9c1031b4ab9f7773185a393e9e39e171d2d0
'2011-10-16T09:17:06-04:00'
describe
'197320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENP' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
f26f614fd288b683831802664f1f404c
bb08b07c40b68eb69218fbe4a133e5bcd2628781
'2011-10-16T09:16:09-04:00'
describe
'40155' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENQ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
3d8ac0572e5e74d5de809f1d10da98c2
5fd6c373c8b027774508c6ebae9db04075a9da45
'2011-10-16T09:09:03-04:00'
describe
'76438' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENR' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
80b9d13ae7c419ffa3ebc6997cbaf889
b26087f60b0564c8aadd72f41bae57a7284f9539
'2011-10-16T09:18:49-04:00'
describe
'2793636' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENS' 'sip-files00035.tif'
61ec2309430f27e3421eefaba6bc0158
75f70d4ba7982af0167b6d6a506d6a1cb9052da6
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENT' 'sip-files00035.txt'
c9338219a3d17d543e1c5d158ac93ab8
834c7daa66ed4b94a92d18437f675abce5824ef2
'2011-10-16T09:09:34-04:00'
describe
'35437' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENU' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
469f244174b00433856bfe0a89417aa0
a6820fa099aa5f99015c716d369b4cde5f9d1458
'2011-10-16T09:17:08-04:00'
describe
'346319' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENV' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
fe7099e6964df20be25b417eb96da3d9
3e1bcb7dffadeeab3dae177d3d3c14a6edc8655e
'2011-10-16T09:18:42-04:00'
describe
'193366' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
5b44c307e3c130c4e092027f2b3f69fc
90b0b16151ef2d03f2d267069d046c70cf645e97
'2011-10-16T09:19:03-04:00'
describe
'37837' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENX' 'sip-files00036.pro'
0a15ba505e9b60bb29ee07d35732822c
a5a524eff694168ab5b96629f69fbe48ecb0280c
'2011-10-16T09:16:46-04:00'
describe
'73558' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENY' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
c07da9fb9735506344020db1ee0b6f37
374e97a0946aff15dd94045d9ff3f45f73fb1f11
'2011-10-16T09:09:45-04:00'
describe
'2793320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABENZ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
6d35c95fc87659af3ef51efcb6e854c7
42b94a6a2d36faaddd2a1b33b72b4c3f10ec3078
'2011-10-16T09:10:00-04:00'
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOA' 'sip-files00036.txt'
e4453fac906059c30311d0ba238dc1db
c41f7243a1a510071655e7e1385e7bb9e54511f9
'2011-10-16T09:09:30-04:00'
describe
'34926' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOB' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
debe7451cc393b1fa819e7e25f48db8b
7e1224fa8226d495f2c6f1beeb4c6e92dd289d43
'2011-10-16T09:19:19-04:00'
describe
'346390' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOC' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f8368b3362209cb6a1799f58b0697dd8
9a2bddc330d6bf7ce31068698f936be59f0c779a
'2011-10-16T09:09:43-04:00'
describe
'196685' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOD' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
d7e1c87bd5a4ae0e49958da728bbbec6
91210f8c578c493a6c4358a00a4daf99f2802d06
'2011-10-16T09:13:49-04:00'
describe
'39551' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOE' 'sip-files00037.pro'
49dd0d79614a3cefef0be74bc19112a9
f02fa1039ed3d088d78edd3f31e3a268605236f3
'2011-10-16T09:15:47-04:00'
describe
'73936' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOF' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
682889c4c88fd1c18ddaf39748c3c50f
6c3ce54251da148b548d329205609096ad0c7212
describe
'2793424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOG' 'sip-files00037.tif'
1969ddeb2025986bf931ba15e290eff5
4b6f923d8ded516e10d67318312bc485c7f5af51
'2011-10-16T09:09:00-04:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOH' 'sip-files00037.txt'
645f46a1c00590cea2582565366ac517
6bdd5392ba4da31b97bc7cc2d222df36276869f5
'2011-10-16T09:16:11-04:00'
describe
'35248' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOI' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
220498187dc30d07165fa542c135d53e
8b9c9b800eb594189e299d202658f7b16de940ef
'2011-10-16T09:09:23-04:00'
describe
'346314' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOJ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
017e5cdc69e0e57d11e28ad7fee33236
63ddf3a684b5f3ccd73d7e7e1ae1217a82346c0a
'2011-10-16T09:15:09-04:00'
describe
'185164' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOK' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
2dc0c7f8156ac666b10faa3f774b509c
5c22de86fc42937b155d63f7f3b8309271b5eb45
'2011-10-16T09:10:20-04:00'
describe
'36795' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOL' 'sip-files00038.pro'
e17df92006bef8af6ef24533ea28ea99
073debda7ea4eb9264112257baff71122b76ed02
describe
'71197' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOM' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6eb70bf03d38733936025bc73d6e1271
ce084571f346fc2f7a864bb3962723a559218ec2
'2011-10-16T09:09:28-04:00'
describe
'2793512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEON' 'sip-files00038.tif'
69d63d2ecaec00fa50ca70ee76ca6187
0e65aa600ca28c608139d98390774d355d0f1e43
'2011-10-16T09:13:31-04:00'
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOO' 'sip-files00038.txt'
659505c5c40279311a990bd38c3f3a95
370da8d551866397f6f790ef364d012d22dbda3e
'2011-10-16T09:13:41-04:00'
describe
'34947' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOP' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
995e89fc73fe3ddbc6eb5a463b125b7c
5fcadaa925736e54c986f192b56e6c4fababf11c
describe
'346412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOQ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
ab1bb217bb1c03e7c0b76d9d3767a9d0
a26f8b2ae7f604b41e62cc9c05b0f1e7695ff626
'2011-10-16T09:08:58-04:00'
describe
'185881' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOR' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
9f9830bebc9d3325f2ef3ead3d7a00a3
4fe7d4754297c901355e046597a72cd5b5a385d6
describe
'35582' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOS' 'sip-files00039.pro'
007bfb970b722e026a691f09c049e4e7
598d04989ded3e230c084dbc6c5ef4cf6e79bf54
'2011-10-16T09:18:54-04:00'
describe
'71341' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOT' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9cf40ac8709db54a8d3dfd8892015bb8
9089c5a9a230dad698fdf0fe6e7feffeaa0d8442
'2011-10-16T09:09:57-04:00'
describe
'2793272' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOU' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b94e09d695d02d3c8644b5dc2c83e6c8
2841676fecdce0c7e7484953d20a0b50e9de57d9
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOV' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c5fa11fad0f97fa01cefd23fca3686ec
f641ecb45ad44301a31088b3d00cf378a91b67bb
'2011-10-16T09:13:32-04:00'
describe
'34747' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOW' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
7a92ee2e42aacd31bf4869ecade32346
1a185e48a123ab4b31b6210d1a08e360d13fd593
describe
'346401' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOX' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
3a8712fef056be9f16d1169b80d53972
07de73809bf0aab4e2de92a4a203d00995222ca4
'2011-10-16T09:13:30-04:00'
describe
'148421' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOY' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
beb66703b99519ba83c5d2e113333cf1
1a5812cfd09b066f94a3329005a1d77207a52649
'2011-10-16T09:11:00-04:00'
describe
'21925' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEOZ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
53fe7e92a519be6dd0495df5fc905104
7402058c76db03973524ee84ff9b256046dc0eda
'2011-10-16T09:10:29-04:00'
describe
'54457' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPA' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
cd47578e1a6f6dbdc26f70c965974a84
db5a3042d2a9d40f39e6452765abd3c97d9c688f
'2011-10-16T09:15:11-04:00'
describe
'2791656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPB' 'sip-files00040.tif'
53dcd47f5586340c9dce79902d4c9d42
84f78283f22739487e27da332b8e1b3f830be082
'2011-10-16T09:18:56-04:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPC' 'sip-files00040.txt'
a5829c662aa70fffc573aaa78abc430e
1fffa7dbc0bcc5a8d8b71b59531b7c887891b8d6
'2011-10-16T09:09:49-04:00'
describe
'28828' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPD' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
eff12780dd43b05e12a14e99e53a5d2c
b830b6e51848601b16567d55b7ea33326a3affcb
'2011-10-16T09:11:59-04:00'
describe
'346393' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPE' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
dfcf6dd642ddb894eb14a6c80adec500
097b09d7080dfaff133a199c054d1c067cf5e1e8
describe
'164414' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPF' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c56da4fc36b6e90772829bb1dbadf9be
b77d6c26bd121d35ff052122cf69412af68af4ad
'2011-10-16T09:09:19-04:00'
describe
'24169' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPG' 'sip-files00041.pro'
2ff9492e86091f2f66b49db29e3ca328
e35710dc51c9980dc328d8b4bae7117abd024a12
describe
'60491' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPH' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c69ff3d571a2a2f80db01713e0625706
70944b88f26b905c401482d9b6ac053958f13350
'2011-10-16T09:14:19-04:00'
describe
'2792228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPI' 'sip-files00041.tif'
eba75dabe405ebaa4b0d2b4f4d79a0c9
a44c5a53c5e1bf635716643c7d0fc613bec70cee
'2011-10-16T09:11:54-04:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPJ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
99f3d7abdc93b83092a29875195ddc8d
56d2acde69c6aabf5d123443afe465257520b75a
'2011-10-16T09:09:17-04:00'
describe
'30895' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPK' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
27fa01a6a8cbc73519a879b3d49a0d87
2255411a6119c49c116557cfddea50e6b6aec1dd
'2011-10-16T09:12:15-04:00'
describe
'346400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPL' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
5d35e65e5d514567aedb2364602f9bbd
2f6d901fb5995be8c22b53a5c8ec25ba123f86a9
describe
'175980' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPM' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f26862cb3cfd593b399e29d5a21eb488
14d6329c31842d78e95b2979d318bc3c25c1693c
'2011-10-16T09:16:35-04:00'
describe
'33714' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPN' 'sip-files00042.pro'
d480611115fbfc487fedb4f5289114ad
bbd8e0843e86556b58a9df0232b6b820ce9d21ed
'2011-10-16T09:10:31-04:00'
describe
'68476' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPO' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
c15cccfc164c61c0c5ea7484a54b99a3
fd7ec8a522cd6b5db5bec24273ca565188b6e05c
'2011-10-16T09:17:31-04:00'
describe
'2793016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPP' 'sip-files00042.tif'
621e533862192e8d1ba83cc09bb39d25
2eeb26dfe03db007ee8e31829fec782981533366
'2011-10-16T09:11:33-04:00'
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPQ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
6108a476cecab40cb4628779370ddbd8
339368964b666d5da4167426675f92eea3c7f8e3
describe
'33450' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPR' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
00013bce4aa43dab37300bdcb5180eb6
e2ab98d2342113e32ed11262b88a904317acc5f8
'2011-10-16T09:14:54-04:00'
describe
'346679' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPS' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
9a0b2f8f253bca7081295f12d3ce7dc6
0dc5fcec2cf0d687fe8e42b43fbe4cab10d4e4b0
'2011-10-16T09:16:15-04:00'
describe
'185695' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPT' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
010723e363934670dc366a6ece134571
3dad7209546cf264e3f878bf3babda87255248b7
describe
'12716' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPU' 'sip-files00043.pro'
83cf22a93d1dfec94ea5429030d9363f
540748462c0cb1facbc38b26f0da28b1fff1dd46
'2011-10-16T09:17:52-04:00'
describe
'63004' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPV' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
3f45eb6ad1350e75becda9e38ce118a4
3f2bec99ed20d1ff63d919f38c4eac6eee3887b6
'2011-10-16T09:16:16-04:00'
describe
'2794804' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPW' 'sip-files00043.tif'
1ae52fc7ac927a8b8d82f7a39747d395
c1799fef27e4ad207cb2992cdec609eac18d4ebb
'2011-10-16T09:11:45-04:00'
describe
'514' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPX' 'sip-files00043.txt'
38fa260e73cb6d65ab2f3209a4ba97d7
d5060749cdfc77014ee4bfd97ef04940cca67bdb
'2011-10-16T09:18:18-04:00'
describe
'32137' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPY' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
e7888fcfcffa2bff69e0ec393272c270
96e341079f3650f04719c630d498a6c96dc56559
describe
'346334' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEPZ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
3dc873b16d7e55ce9b62a63fe46cf558
f7025a0b9e61361af31d4534157c0446f238d117
'2011-10-16T09:12:26-04:00'
describe
'199237' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQA' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
4e0e44a83ea0531dd5fd8da1bee12596
02fd5bb9d23ede5aaaaef0292b63d70e2d05d087
'2011-10-16T09:09:59-04:00'
describe
'41403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQB' 'sip-files00044.pro'
4d2d6a57021f1c2099fc8c5b54071267
f554e442db3b52cf12e20c8f13444db0190fca30
describe
'73843' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQC' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c209ac7f4bed128cd444939833d5a752
2181ef77a7e613aacc7bc6e6721498f389cb8bd0
'2011-10-16T09:11:18-04:00'
describe
'2793524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQD' 'sip-files00044.tif'
cafe139aa8ba41655c2280a55091b801
5de7f3e83e50c048f314b0038a3286b50a56f7d6
'2011-10-16T09:14:13-04:00'
describe
'1634' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQE' 'sip-files00044.txt'
2b1b20f36df75cde4fb96aedc1bca8b3
d7a8f1616ad175a7ca974f11812bcc57856aaabe
'2011-10-16T09:18:43-04:00'
describe
'35371' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQF' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
97347cc95eeb67cde325bbcdb82e303d
dabae314b243e335ae7333826c117b0ef6d19385
describe
'346595' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQG' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
0c3b8b701df3145d16e5478d27042e0b
c9ed986a37ef3008d729b312100f61fa845ecee9
'2011-10-16T09:11:41-04:00'
describe
'197113' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQH' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
7e9df594e111b068d6bf4b858790d31f
6c4c4f44c14171003e29401129f6a40008bb8789
describe
'38482' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQI' 'sip-files00045.pro'
7124984e612a7fa9632ec45223cf2606
6f0b6011764e9a625fa495abf1709ef47b63936e
'2011-10-16T09:12:09-04:00'
describe
'74437' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQJ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
0cc04b03e67af060939f545dc42b7cc3
2e2c1756b783dd98cc93d8e37b4f43c956d5d577
describe
'2795352' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQK' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b9d4b09cc19de24e2dfc18013285823b
8068e7d13a71de104cfc4026d2765f682ba26360
'2011-10-16T09:17:23-04:00'
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQL' 'sip-files00045.txt'
f8565176b28e6c4395f9c9bf2a2b160b
f2e98c2b67d6b2901e28f5c6b840a14cd33d16c0
'2011-10-16T09:10:15-04:00'
describe
'34695' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQM' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
167271857f75531a1a2b66ff71859555
3c6fdd29c624350b7c92a28f16821daaa02773a4
'2011-10-16T09:12:24-04:00'
describe
'346371' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQN' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
aab68b1811c8ea9a77d24bd3f536d7cb
d4a7c9e7f96bb31020fa3385d0ec45f1b60d7954
describe
'185336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQO' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
1c15383b75e48c70d02f6180f95c2842
d9467a709e52feb0c4382c4b1a5a86b11772bfe0
'2011-10-16T09:11:39-04:00'
describe
'37171' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQP' 'sip-files00046.pro'
0230a3abb8e1493addad834b793d4abc
1f2feeb8e761fa969151eafa45ac05d893c94333
describe
'71158' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQQ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
30d74b15032e1c19918ba7b74787acc0
4035a7fddeee545110735811df0408cf4247a60f
'2011-10-16T09:14:35-04:00'
describe
'2793396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQR' 'sip-files00046.tif'
5bc8cb7382413f01c072578cd46f05cc
d7f85f56627b204a5b93434703cfda980c214b4e
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQS' 'sip-files00046.txt'
d659bd18fbed7e9567ecb42fe0f70663
a53ed7ea83fb6c7507662d806775c0bff6dd17e6
'2011-10-16T09:09:10-04:00'
describe
'34780' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQT' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
238b72e2dc260aa5bf138056269fb41a
7a49d60917d412296675ed0f6a887a0b13935ba1
'2011-10-16T09:09:13-04:00'
describe
'346561' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQU' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
431027ecce188cf8ed179ae64072d622
62e82867a2da8ad35912f28d7ac974f0e98a7cfe
'2011-10-16T09:14:08-04:00'
describe
'183837' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQV' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
4bd1ea5e773d2e3492781adb015bbef1
4e5c97aabdf3149c325b06eff88093fd60cafb7c
'2011-10-16T09:19:32-04:00'
describe
'35145' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQW' 'sip-files00047.pro'
1f345136af85a3caeab6d02814fbfa25
9965c09e3f10d76433a41887bdbfbf5ead1ac660
describe
'70635' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQX' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
867e8a9924f0cced97213a830bf9cffc
18ec8f812860252961475eb7fa4fa1a4f7091e7d
'2011-10-16T09:10:10-04:00'
describe
'2795384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQY' 'sip-files00047.tif'
983b6145f2276026ff40779640ba5d7b
ef7f95fbae1b1c6d113c420392010db056ba7c85
'2011-10-16T09:16:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEQZ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
295c81f92ba63965dca025b1f2200afc
eaf8baae64e759fbc9fa944213a83fdaefa55e0a
describe
'34117' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERA' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
48ddb2414a8b1e5d9e74a2adb154f28f
8f5144faf71f5ce2217b95759e1aec5852bdbb75
describe
'346419' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERB' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
bd38174ec69215197b88e51829612298
53d3532b999882e401b903c84d8c564af68e36e9
'2011-10-16T09:16:08-04:00'
describe
'197361' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERC' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e7e5ef8216d73db98b1a28ca9eea6bd0
f7e88efe56fb1d40898657d5e0c4ffe7ae683b3a
describe
'39262' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERD' 'sip-files00048.pro'
7ed1ecedd0328c84ffedb008d9d54541
d86e2e8c615f238e39aa34d8aa75e9b790b19df1
'2011-10-16T09:10:19-04:00'
describe
'73913' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERE' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
de1c5cd18545a4d651b8c36e71a86989
32d35e7cb3c3c8fa8ed79d96b32a75f1ac97430e
'2011-10-16T09:11:22-04:00'
describe
'2793544' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERF' 'sip-files00048.tif'
e91369a5129fdd178b4b25cb77134dfe
2caf8d92ad67d604cd66ec867b34d9a59bab9f68
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERG' 'sip-files00048.txt'
5381cfb1d95deef2a046f918643d69e0
e9e12194db55eb3cd43ed8817c3da7d9510ee959
'2011-10-16T09:11:12-04:00'
describe
'35374' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERH' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
d3aa087a0ca50ec65e45b2f94b5a1899
160314d0c6bb2c411c03fdc435083df7f3e36a3c
describe
'346590' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERI' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
73ce79792516f712581759ee60f88fa7
0be0b65e0917c77ce242ae12624cf00c1fe31eff
'2011-10-16T09:15:28-04:00'
describe
'196299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERJ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
e9d05f689c285d3aad54cfe663778346
514c06807a5839cfebf319c3c6b2b5aab131bfff
'2011-10-16T09:09:53-04:00'
describe
'39377' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERK' 'sip-files00049.pro'
a635e79d210ccbafea9ac6d27330f36f
ca141de1b3467386dc8ba87a54e107dab95c07c3
'2011-10-16T09:15:26-04:00'
describe
'73954' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERL' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
0053287fd64c73fa80401aa8727aa868
66923f1dbcafa98d4c14af0df4d9aab425320ead
'2011-10-16T09:11:32-04:00'
describe
'2795548' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERM' 'sip-files00049.tif'
d74e90d403df14cea7624ccdfe2e0c51
588a0fb1354da4d5b187aa9e32d419d6d1b87eed
'2011-10-16T09:10:12-04:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERN' 'sip-files00049.txt'
319a76a3779e29743d124aa6d81cd89c
e113bdabe84fe9b9cad586b741a2e17d2df23dfc
describe
'35129' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERO' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
ec7836dbf6d7094909e38a2537a9a236
ea0c3086f169cd15e8366d942c5bb4bd195036d4
describe
'346404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERP' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
e540a7304bdfa476ccf436adb1182da2
da54950463d70ca22525c37aa750755596181752
'2011-10-16T09:15:20-04:00'
describe
'181390' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERQ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
71499a0d659e2e6c1789f5ea349ae015
7974e85de127e4c543c7bf948bad0bfab2ae35b4
'2011-10-16T09:12:50-04:00'
describe
'36794' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERR' 'sip-files00050.pro'
8dcf6e9befe0b9a7f49710b5de8f7c5e
dc05aa49b7889bd72e8214fce2293851bd99020a
'2011-10-16T09:15:05-04:00'
describe
'70432' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERS' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
4c3762aefe1edb09fde7dae79ddefab0
39969fe9c6e72d7f55cb2d0d8aaf68d8a14179f7
'2011-10-16T09:19:08-04:00'
describe
'2793508' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERT' 'sip-files00050.tif'
159775be6bff8b07afc4873cbd2186b9
ff58f1b00dccc5ad892c12b18512628a8b5bb051
'2011-10-16T09:18:21-04:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERU' 'sip-files00050.txt'
8a24eed433fe220096d542e9d7c85760
8327aac93321125411537686cef2b885efbee452
'2011-10-16T09:14:39-04:00'
describe
'34629' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERV' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
a2acde71dc2aa1415522825674f1e730
306d90201ef72815bd9dc38e1c4173d0adeeba39
'2011-10-16T09:18:01-04:00'
describe
'346686' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERW' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
0951f064c334c9eb26c5ebe1de4458c3
0acf11b07d9cdbd869fa7ee17a5c6b2f3900f6f8
describe
'166468' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERX' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
a55e5ae3562fc53dd8dd10cbb19fa5cf
f8a47d1b57fff3c698a28c3e2d15d6af4f587fc4
'2011-10-16T09:15:27-04:00'
describe
'30788' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERY' 'sip-files00051.pro'
3cc0020a93343246028853182d0b0e1f
ce795c150c78acab42d9dc9d911fb667b0b5285b
'2011-10-16T09:12:48-04:00'
describe
'66696' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABERZ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
3532278de7ae0ad4b8508399f697b5af
6fc44b4bfec1746147f6c257236cb9ac239673ab
'2011-10-16T09:10:28-04:00'
describe
'2795312' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESA' 'sip-files00051.tif'
d4cf55b8734140eda8fefd354fedda9f
02b66aded08e2004eb4d5b5927e286749fa58446
'2011-10-16T09:09:47-04:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESB' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1d2723d9ea96205a0518b06a93601afa
d2a957a4d1b3ce5ac358d848b55faf2b056548a7
describe
'33401' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESC' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
2d58abf4fe12f1b5677235eb2e15c968
7ccff02470641467be3d25febb615bb696528291
describe
'346302' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESD' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
960fd3c5752015f380f6ad1b8456dc1c
7a24cf9cc427a9723c963c139ae304de7ae81983
describe
'193760' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESE' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
baf0ce8fbee8d4e7e5bff8044a2f4e92
f6893995ea1e74bd918acc477c0728a1f3f5316b
'2011-10-16T09:17:42-04:00'
describe
'37207' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESF' 'sip-files00052.pro'
d4ef68ee4b43744e06e63bec9ebec7d6
460b70336b27753131fd725d2601377427361d60
'2011-10-16T09:09:40-04:00'
describe
'72850' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESG' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
885a8b573157277109ce611d13187b5d
d51d0b5cd53d46d8c5375e954a7d9812e9dbdc46
describe
'2793292' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESH' 'sip-files00052.tif'
146fc7a234aefc805df1fc11d35ae0eb
61a3056a0e1a2d3da4de44cf10166f729e157f23
'2011-10-16T09:17:58-04:00'
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESI' 'sip-files00052.txt'
9915f861060cf53f69ae5bf4b2fbc575
c010855e7f8f6c06a754b522e416685365b47b85
describe
'34296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESJ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
e8b965aaf9bb3bddf8d33f8b7f81eb8e
5b7873d80d0eb9e18fb4954d14f2a413b81adaac
'2011-10-16T09:10:06-04:00'
describe
'346673' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESK' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
2d0ffa1150f8795df8b648f9d77b5c97
fd14fa5b84243981ab236c611d1f06d987656ba2
describe
'198171' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESL' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
0d9183e6f04e116f9d04f2decee2769f
079d9a7206473098993c5f5ba9e720ad2ca11b74
'2011-10-16T09:16:53-04:00'
describe
'39822' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESM' 'sip-files00053.pro'
94afc6eb9c7b814ee76b6fa6a8ccf005
280b6d69ad7e68180b9916401b60ab46ec503930
describe
'73344' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESN' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
d3d6d0ac26b54a08326737e8cbe97efc
a5747e0aae5ee2e479a204ab3eb277a5829db62f
'2011-10-16T09:09:08-04:00'
describe
'2795400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESO' 'sip-files00053.tif'
773fcdac454a96672e9a44c3888b2d4b
34d794a75080ee470f52fac686c5ac20add1359c
'2011-10-16T09:11:09-04:00'
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESP' 'sip-files00053.txt'
523b23f27901e78425bcdc1503026afc
ad9d612f49d1c75ad38ad5af38591369dddec1fb
'2011-10-16T09:17:36-04:00'
describe
'34560' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESQ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
00718491e86f1b48d24db401930b2cd3
85ed556ae5540223d1926e2fdc9984f200e2ddea
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESR' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
5997051e0d1308bb8b340ba37a20b188
476918c1ea10fa32d211c21dc5fdc9454862f81d
describe
'191406' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESS' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a5e1bfb5f6b5c700e9a7e49126b919f8
4ae4ac6931ed626df713f307fd52e5b2c1a8a650
'2011-10-16T09:10:09-04:00'
describe
'37743' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEST' 'sip-files00054.pro'
747700aea0b6d99a7d02fae04fe3ce4d
bde63bffb0f5cc05fcf2a3118919c64e2c34549a
'2011-10-16T09:16:37-04:00'
describe
'73176' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESU' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
2edc2c106b3ab8be1e94957bda2162c5
08b67a72f09e18b98f40947d244215cc45b5c902
'2011-10-16T09:12:45-04:00'
describe
'2832372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESV' 'sip-files00054.tif'
ece412890a6cedf12ac0b338bfad0d11
f105202ef4a4bbe20d25b6d61994332553dad8a3
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESW' 'sip-files00054.txt'
bf01d8a164174110157851d40190f5f3
137bd2e2d6d14c78c5953dedceacf8dc034ac3ca
describe
'34642' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESX' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
b4e80add6089b9e729440cacbf3332e8
1f229057b6fd74e83613a5bd87416f85b67621b6
'2011-10-16T09:10:35-04:00'
describe
'346356' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESY' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
366d1b4e18875e842fa350efa22e9cd2
4629ed02af7b3326c988d9ec416b702668714c6d
describe
'144682' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABESZ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
37fdb44cfe3e9e577b08f913f056645c
645a95433d9e0f897d2608a024128a0882cc59e1
'2011-10-16T09:13:10-04:00'
describe
'16828' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETA' 'sip-files00055.pro'
356ef7a17b658eac62dadddfbfef44be
f4fbf02597fabbfeed1fe1c5cd89710a536d0458
describe
'53397' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETB' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c18a4d52595314998e062f9ff5928627
d109e32139bdc398648c4bccfeb67197c897a5fb
describe
'2791816' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETC' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b85ec7160891fd71327b062af87d8e61
345b5d8fd18d283ac706de470b4863751222d3a4
describe
'705' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETD' 'sip-files00055.txt'
c4c392dd5480649ae179b9d6d5823989
22fc86db652bee86e4f63340c516f4a2fbd90936
'2011-10-16T09:13:29-04:00'
describe
'29312' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETE' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
13c7d35d7115b8fef39ea62280f98521
cd1d3cb06a4af52786b086ab9a042f8a56eaf004
'2011-10-16T09:17:47-04:00'
describe
'346417' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETF' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ce1c22748d679c30150832e47f5ab70e
54076f032f8484ade5961f35525934f40b18245c
describe
'174012' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETG' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
ce14319d72018c51554e35736b852b6e
49c1b18f614713c81b424c21d6cf09362a6cf14a
'2011-10-16T09:09:18-04:00'
describe
'26726' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETH' 'sip-files00056.pro'
7eb21ed04528a14ed7bb626bf31dc9a4
f9b87afc752461a93a860d46ef52b22666445e5d
describe
'62491' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETI' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
6131f229c2b2489eac79d44312afd98e
b8d54db7b3d0f3da5e4f7400f06cdd31bb4582fc
describe
'2792308' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETJ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f1b86da3ba8fdc87df9096e5194cd3fc
784d2e319187ea248278794ee7293e08ba0614d0
'2011-10-16T09:17:49-04:00'
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETK' 'sip-files00056.txt'
1045d997128c567c9d86d53e10f3dd8c
afde1c4d10f88f559f2ca5371b3d227f7acaaf31
describe
'31213' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETL' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
9dccfe7e5507d2c4f7d61aa355054348
c83fdef0c54446b4fcae24fe06c548b6d5d05127
'2011-10-16T09:09:33-04:00'
describe
'346421' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETM' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
ef85e38e031438a4d8679eaae75d1c0f
7b3989259ddacdcc84f6f240b846efa54d7a478d
'2011-10-16T09:17:41-04:00'
describe
'192781' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETN' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
03d45e467424530a58990812010ab357
24c9867ab0c1db0d16f5780c9b18fb58e42950c7
describe
'13033' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETO' 'sip-files00057.pro'
fdcfbae071f1da65efe76e51cf88bb46
00d2559e278d426e89c6925db63679f13ebb98d8
describe
'65006' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETP' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
c3bf2b388820faafff5e3c6b0c99d029
a1be3ca3a3bc28fa5e7642d368f68ef67b5dc5f3
'2011-10-16T09:10:02-04:00'
describe
'2792852' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETQ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
914c42ea6bd2cab525f714535c04c93c
80575608c80b18d5857b8c13002b2a5450230a8e
describe
'539' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETR' 'sip-files00057.txt'
b660f3f6180b470fcb750a44aa0c7d1f
09273c5bcc71cfdfa769018e8e1999b94d4ea6c6
'2011-10-16T09:15:01-04:00'
describe
'32740' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETS' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
77bde34c7c3b38cc6b79907ec8b1ff4a
7d6b82f9cc6db15a00e2cb3eeb0edb2d3027f61d
'2011-10-16T09:15:41-04:00'
describe
'346358' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETT' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1c7468b711987a614bf93f32bd9b946f
cf59cc2c8044975d759fbf3a11ac593be21ef406
'2011-10-16T09:10:43-04:00'
describe
'194617' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETU' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
c198d58c1f9538341e831ff9b961fdf2
d1bf3ce1856f67577539b3810fb6b17affdf5116
describe
'38715' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETV' 'sip-files00058.pro'
352d8ebe96003ace09aa97d42bdc0fb7
b912404c4915af6cace24137b95838fd918fa64a
describe
'74029' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETW' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e0669ebdda5d2d8b279f548dc140102a
c063f4874132803e7328df55bee71d54af299b6d
'2011-10-16T09:09:11-04:00'
describe
'2793384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETX' 'sip-files00058.tif'
d10bab8d642ce9c6970600bc014b579e
5b344db2c8a7645c6a48e329dec966cc3ea0bc70
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETY' 'sip-files00058.txt'
acf4dbc726bd241d999853b116dcda44
e515e7703386c6c16c251e8ab384828a6ca81669
describe
'34673' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABETZ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
a7e251cd62545bc7d9aa68c28e9e11db
243dbfc5be2166b7c2984c6b90cc59f0ec9afe22
describe
'346346' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUA' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
f2b19366f8bc3764f94cfa0ae9087fa6
f82a249545ca81277fc38775190bedde9a4c41e2
describe
'187735' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUB' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
7d0608aa01b04ada7c704b3efcc93104
e66dead02d8ab4a41a176c4bc1cfe8e17cfe0739
describe
'37448' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUC' 'sip-files00059.pro'
8916536fe50d8d4ea3a493e520bbcf7e
39d6b7556ff8544d0461f604f8c4b882a708ccbe
describe
'72681' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUD' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
1e2cf1973958e9bee6ef14c98de196e0
8412320e7f73578a1c2c9bab164c5f0455cf681f
describe
'2793344' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUE' 'sip-files00059.tif'
2e60ee6cbd42e7844c18a062429244f3
bbab63d2b56064df6796d893a36b9714a00513be
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUF' 'sip-files00059.txt'
47638c1174b14c3ad42ceedc6668f0de
d03e706af3d627155310a6a9a1c4d9d7f04321dc
'2011-10-16T09:17:28-04:00'
describe
'35070' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUG' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
978d2871923e10a55c1c429d506ec621
eb7b1d6dfd0ed4a541569e28e22657fab719e883
describe
'346381' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUH' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
861841686d46dbe2362e35e78b3e919b
0ba6761ac21e02b1dfc44ba7d394c9c82383139e
'2011-10-16T09:10:53-04:00'
describe
'175105' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUI' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
4ad3fbec17e7441c287928e957ddf01f
612e8fe09554f9399bc7316a3ca9e8bddb544c19
describe
'16005' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUJ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
7375e36e11371cd1d1f35436b71f4140
bf83bcc003381a3ac2dff11727850644a750f1fd
'2011-10-16T09:10:03-04:00'
describe
'59171' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUK' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
e889686ecb1e06f4efbba0e454ff1c6b
da1deb80b31978ba21d1496a28bdacd43f3678f3
describe
'2792108' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUL' 'sip-files00060.tif'
cc6d10be915839e4dc362b4817aec71f
3ce507aedf56a9265245982913a1e6e985b08ef0
'2011-10-16T09:15:52-04:00'
describe
'656' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUM' 'sip-files00060.txt'
b8e1a102d8d0e741552abb0acd6428f9
b2fc1fd806f687ad32024bd20cc041336c4866df
'2011-10-16T09:11:35-04:00'
describe
'30727' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUN' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
828f31a2207b0fe235eedc0650b282c6
296554e47e363d6ec1d4a9f7d7bb6df3e3988d9f
'2011-10-16T09:16:22-04:00'
describe
'346631' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUO' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
dee0a6b99ab516d91810f6fdfe15557f
4b1eb0f5afafefff0cafd56e68db0773fbb80dfe
'2011-10-16T09:14:58-04:00'
describe
'185351' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUP' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
3dbb5af01839045c302199f03c79c997
c098c5fdb02a5b36f136f341a0acadfaf27611de
describe
'37173' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUQ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
bdde14861a1065ac11fd239437b2bcaa
30bcf13497af47338bf4e7ab4787a14472174a1d
describe
'71582' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUR' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c6db771c1484a1ffb4766f4d7a4abaec
197b89e5a3362a052dc81f35570acc848e812a2b
describe
'2795728' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUS' 'sip-files00061.tif'
a50548949461faa0e1057d9563b92117
3ff1c2ef5f66168895d47efe1108a9f5f76fb517
'2011-10-16T09:16:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUT' 'sip-files00061.txt'
c67649d947e86ce43c26929fa4bdb805
e7cf8e097407120d0845bb4f1682016bccca3abc
describe
'35332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUU' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
f9e0bfd3f9f268ff6f905de00bc45399
b9781d663ed731db6853478746ea64e2d374237f
'2011-10-16T09:13:57-04:00'
describe
'346322' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUV' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4429afbb874811f9cc98202575449136
80fe6fb3a8bc46eb4dc0888b4f765c9c10f223f1
describe
'191193' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUW' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
0807ff5dfe251eb0fd6fe7b6282c28dd
ce764ddde8b5ea0586440fa690dd5d69bebe37fc
'2011-10-16T09:12:52-04:00'
describe
'37183' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUX' 'sip-files00062.pro'
9ce61681a6830b19869f2f566e569582
d94da14f60c230895de6c95daad205aa8043c207
'2011-10-16T09:12:58-04:00'
describe
'72010' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUY' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
0391333d767e9649fc84e78996d10c90
1db4e1ae839924edb6cae11f726b9c314724af08
'2011-10-16T09:14:22-04:00'
describe
'2793244' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEUZ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
f181a2b7b306446654ea3fc2eea188bf
93c4498d89a0da96c6c9b56dcff425c1310d8e7d
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVA' 'sip-files00062.txt'
c43facb670f908ba67463e9e2dd68dae
efef611970b4a341d9c6e661b27e5657d29f0e7e
describe
'34019' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVB' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
23f934918679c4489dab70482e9af15d
fc94543e39156820120cc7a8cf68ab815c44036b
describe
'346612' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVC' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1f331ada3532170ef4d11a02dba01db4
6ce491898c7f676f2db01434a02774914a14762d
describe
'193046' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVD' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
4780467149165d1d0643433bcea1d9ae
4f93b1cc727f1bcb57a0b106f681709538425b8d
describe
'38378' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVE' 'sip-files00063.pro'
913af4505236797abfeadaf8554afe6d
ac298f4851ed36d4fb6744595658c236dc225558
describe
'72086' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVF' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
da6a109927f15a476baf4f5bdade754b
7fe6a095bd47d7a6c888593cbb3a2b59e24358ab
describe
'2795412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVG' 'sip-files00063.tif'
cd5943ecf80895b3a11addaeb2748e83
4ce8b4f8af14cea65d43bf5200f599efd1d6ccad
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVH' 'sip-files00063.txt'
87be07c1e9d491b6cdd50597c9391090
d5e88ea1ed3e8c4165a8d4d5e6c91a219a3dc3e0
'2011-10-16T09:16:33-04:00'
describe
'34843' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVI' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
2ec7c84f596d741da84a47ab362bd5fc
02f3a54e7dd606d2c04a2ae3dd3b64c6f43a0162
'2011-10-16T09:08:59-04:00'
describe
'346341' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVJ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
6e081189c4819de67559603f8a0fcc97
0a02758064ab2a970b877d666d57cec178b70722
describe
'195400' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVK' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
0655bbaa19c617bb5f73b5bd3db0c5c0
6614713d45827af080e72c6c67c5c14818228f77
'2011-10-16T09:14:21-04:00'
describe
'39616' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVL' 'sip-files00064.pro'
357370f590f3ff962d7e1f517e0bf0d1
a159946ceb616b515eee6f8fe52d5e37e52cdb9d
describe
'74902' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVM' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ceaf117b55aa7a86fd7c03202eddc9fb
8c2f929017d4499d80b78fc1646e7c4688f167e1
describe
'2793516' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVN' 'sip-files00064.tif'
7145b428e14cf11aa927669f691f68cc
dc8436c81166e001a2d5d5cf4ae9731956a0580b
'2011-10-16T09:14:59-04:00'
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVO' 'sip-files00064.txt'
652096280aa98b0300868707463fbf89
def554aa0753cd3a92d61b5647bb905a8ba5f7d3
describe
'35308' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVP' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
acab5aceea9d146a294627b669567c37
509b9b9a16eb3bf7f9abb0f1c7497bf12ed03815
describe
'346262' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVQ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
1dbea71c3e47b01d30145b628ef19faf
caa26a5df7c6547f6fda7889d23ea7e2a3f09bd3
'2011-10-16T09:15:55-04:00'
describe
'196380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVR' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
94e21afbd1a10d325c9e8f2e0a41c2ba
9721900169768d7f287391d1564184bd1082351b
'2011-10-16T09:19:13-04:00'
describe
'12944' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVS' 'sip-files00065.pro'
9ce75a32ca357187eaca20aa7d7d14d0
b44e222a0cc388d17f65397f3a0b04f283fe95df
describe
'65177' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVT' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
5ec45a46ef2236f4e76f1d84754850a6
8912f887a39ca88f4fc485251c57fbdb7fd69b17
describe
'2792940' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVU' 'sip-files00065.tif'
9cfd4836019a427fd647c3e8ba292fd0
6580cb5dfb39c13159b9d8dbce0d248633a4711c
describe
'550' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVV' 'sip-files00065.txt'
38b452b9e099dab1a0125a1e5fa3ce30
ee78e8d07e272d7d67e12e5ba042bbd7df797f2d
'2011-10-16T09:14:02-04:00'
describe
'32858' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVW' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
1525b13edad27e659261893f59d49187
f8bf7a2126afa2e1789550deca5ce5bbe2c576a8
'2011-10-16T09:18:32-04:00'
describe
'346392' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVX' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
62e09fb47894bddbc609bfd224ca28eb
50a28aaa1faa6f752ef680cd71a6bc0e2c42abfd
describe
'205151' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVY' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
2580aaf4c429f69e712fb0871682e6ad
bef44cf4ee02181548eb409da02b4b42a607ddbd
describe
'42753' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEVZ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
f9b59c413993aac7520072da96bc7dbc
56b4bf8b70971f062c6e6d3627786e9f89c81d36
describe
'77020' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
7c4679491017777ff680f509b00719f7
88a16cb462fbecfc1695963aebfe7d59be65fd16
'2011-10-16T09:10:48-04:00'
describe
'2793340' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWB' 'sip-files00066.tif'
ccabc5c86faf6a23672e06ee6dd7ec20
43a3d3c98b8d54bda0a2071f8ee0d5038ac4d6df
'2011-10-16T09:10:59-04:00'
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWC' 'sip-files00066.txt'
d2b689e8d66a974704f08d1f8bf59f1a
e394ea46804239915b6ddcca77636f6f4ff8c2a0
'2011-10-16T09:09:48-04:00'
describe
'35123' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWD' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
1c598602779e184402d78229d965eefd
3fd65a2874f666fe041dfedd02d5ae0ef97c49e6
'2011-10-16T09:09:21-04:00'
describe
'346307' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWE' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
6af6c56eedeacd6324a7b22d3eaf0c6c
f36f8271edef5282f6190abffb592d4aad934626
describe
'176138' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWF' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
39096c1867983664d042b1bdc51a428b
d7cf9ff9501175f01ed8653d61ad1f1ce98e6570
'2011-10-16T09:15:07-04:00'
describe
'32023' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWG' 'sip-files00067.pro'
9af530c2c2b3a126039e7bc1e80f32ec
02b8f9920a999a8fe0b4bbe74921690017092b6b
describe
'67087' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWH' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
bf27b43a376bac2e6a5b303f134b49ae
8a894ddfc5fe55abde2dc21617ea3cddfb1218cd
describe
'2792864' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWI' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f51aebb94211a4e34860bf08acf01949
4288ef13c7b94b05b13fee2d7b0d23d9373d3e86
'2011-10-16T09:15:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWJ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
471586661b10a2abeeffcdf9ef596c42
15e8aede59d5c884e52081f17540a1875ad14e17
describe
'33574' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWK' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
ead1115381dab8dc25c03abdb84fcadc
e7b8ba2c56bbaadba157171aca71296ce787795a
describe
'346407' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWL' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
57993db2832848063370fa1c42a832e4
5eb312239ce67a4de7be51a677bbd9ba806b7ef2
describe
'192564' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWM' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
bd475a9595be1ad4a518a70d74013022
d8e1442b074c4fc86bdd61980f32f7ac3f3fffea
'2011-10-16T09:12:22-04:00'
describe
'37616' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWN' 'sip-files00068.pro'
60a2ab4815a6e9fd10da1ee32117c589
6daf1ba61a28985ef069a6d89a68aacfc2a6159b
'2011-10-16T09:12:41-04:00'
describe
'73995' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWO' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
de70c7df523d4a528345eadf25754b14
797d53be38e605ee5ea02e919a8b4914b4b1e39e
'2011-10-16T09:18:30-04:00'
describe
'2793556' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWP' 'sip-files00068.tif'
28329ab54db2802a652a28761c717ecb
28afb91b710cf319b45739c044098b8d1b34feef
'2011-10-16T09:18:15-04:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWQ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
f64e1d7387e88eff1d9f56e3c97ea58d
58b516011be26af437e637c24496db24965d531a
describe
'34827' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWR' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
e4cbb8b25a30279ccaf67841dc2e445b
9eccfd8140515c3725ff3efe9b92b67cdfe4715f
'2011-10-16T09:16:59-04:00'
describe
'346313' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWS' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
1b24d3468afe6140ce3ecfaf0aa15b3b
92bbb323b0788431588276b8c02879d703fb62d9
describe
'189783' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWT' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
62946032588bd7876906f9d04dad680e
f72948203983c164cc7008bbc2f9d7071eb6e5d8
'2011-10-16T09:12:23-04:00'
describe
'37402' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWU' 'sip-files00069.pro'
65fb09fe90ba1ae9ffee260703d0a862
1c30c6c3d9eaf2deaba4dc6452a3e43b812bb0d7
'2011-10-16T09:18:59-04:00'
describe
'72413' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWV' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
0824d60fcc7fa416883173e85eaa388e
4430cd47c008fb48732e3d4cf1a05befd5132bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWW' 'sip-files00069.tif'
f8dc4b4dd5d5e4c61cf668aab75657e7
ab6339e03f37ef106c70f98f780a9a3d7a2fb47d
'2011-10-16T09:14:52-04:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWX' 'sip-files00069.txt'
334e3262bec1fb224349752e3a5a2eb3
d5825e2125ca2b9d4b48013960a6a4c87dbc1a9b
'2011-10-16T09:14:56-04:00'
describe
'35027' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWY' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
a02f13d7d726a4de0e4100b1c7011a70
719ffe46be5588923cc91a84b8e19b842d2913e9
'2011-10-16T09:14:37-04:00'
describe
'346387' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEWZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5395c1939051340e935cf48b84454afd
9cdf9cc506fe32e2b1086cdeb8cb44be465385d7
'2011-10-16T09:10:21-04:00'
describe
'183241' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
76e6a851b31086bda424eabf81e3b4a3
c90087c31bb8da02a6a77fd5f1475540942ff8ec
'2011-10-16T09:12:38-04:00'
describe
'34127' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXB' 'sip-files00070.pro'
85938570db3f47801eda6b68c5a0cfe3
209a3eb077744d567fd13002213ba1d4620363f5
'2011-10-16T09:12:03-04:00'
describe
'68553' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
9c46d30043d6cc351e76af0df3f67398
c1386ce387424eceb04227c964721d3c8d5e024b
describe
'2793264' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b4273e02a1d39bd220451b104a2b1d25
005a6c2e7156e171a39185daf56f7da7b4680603
'2011-10-16T09:16:34-04:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXE' 'sip-files00070.txt'
582d5c83026fece95646061f9820375a
f75b135c5229ab0978d2c452c446130e162ce323
'2011-10-16T09:12:46-04:00'
describe
'33894' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXF' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
19ece7e7bec3047a205b021d0ab6f1b6
a750ac2de357ffcdf367cc72526744934b0fd53b
describe
'346368' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXG' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
b8326621f6d892e4d3b459f201f7a651
95ab118168c4141afd70cd303a9e708780138dcf
'2011-10-16T09:18:05-04:00'
describe
'147425' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXH' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
fa1291fd1e749a4873aad9d87dff1fed
d86d3a2f6e94fdf06bd7a5c021fa1131f2786119
'2011-10-16T09:18:23-04:00'
describe
'7448' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXI' 'sip-files00071.pro'
1e1fa332efb58ee8faaaf8576c72ffd3
8ef7e206151144b82774391f722935f5999f775f
describe
'50067' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXJ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
710e6d335b6e1d302889bbf56066a817
26f1fb2781cc79f468084a5ce60e72115d3a0a09
'2011-10-16T09:16:43-04:00'
describe
'2791472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXK' 'sip-files00071.tif'
f075d9f3726a02fca768b329c4f8e248
460a533adef5120b2561ff7d23daf96a70d84c91
describe
'334' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXL' 'sip-files00071.txt'
fdc3aab9a5cbdbca2816720a0be992c3
a7dcf3d44ae16b85d66db857c9eaf01fa8dbfd8c
'2011-10-16T09:13:05-04:00'
describe
'28008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXM' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
3ee5b46ab8348a325c20f3f689ad9903
bfaa7b2af89c0491ef133a0bae40276a034507dc
describe
'346268' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXN' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
e66abdf120312018e435dede4522a646
77fbec3bca3603cb18c91aaf3140d7695372249e
describe
'161278' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXO' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
2469930682ce7065b65f022769657c14
064e0510404c33b9d49a0e81db64d0e7f1991eaa
describe
'24592' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXP' 'sip-files00072.pro'
1a953f8140f79f397430bde6eea6d162
80b293808e1c4e0da8efea3e63e81aba17a31d6d
describe
'61407' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXQ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
f63de17f3d953e5bc35de507e64698ab
59983043a24ca6f63599cc451edf4f3ed0d29c56
describe
'2792664' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXR' 'sip-files00072.tif'
4c77abd28beb6526bf42db06cdec66e1
2bc930f21984a1ce57014341e3839244e42620b8
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXS' 'sip-files00072.txt'
17372727adb0f4c2eae502c1a3db1eaa
ad8c96964b589b23894d7ec7b4b5c33643f866b7
describe
'31777' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXT' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
344253471643fdc5f70e9666a9e0d7da
7d22c4b58f6c736d3ebcb4b22415da38856ae4cc
describe
'346324' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXU' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
4ffa3b1c7dfe3ee696ec832b0555a21f
49dd18f28da1ff507eca9de982a0e650b5f83999
'2011-10-16T09:11:20-04:00'
describe
'190558' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXV' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
811cd21613bb2cc572f3dc5baab540b3
c7d8b0a6713ae90cf909058093e798e9d0b8af44
'2011-10-16T09:15:13-04:00'
describe
'37284' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXW' 'sip-files00073.pro'
49fe238f36ee977b63bf3d034ab67808
0906a61a0092abe1a66bb63385fe94f3f6c33ca5
'2011-10-16T09:11:30-04:00'
describe
'72422' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXX' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
d719047261724a76f0e777deb3684edd
80902df31664e0edea1988637af4420a891cc036
'2011-10-16T09:12:19-04:00'
describe
'2793484' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXY' 'sip-files00073.tif'
7b59f75d07e282f20353a72268730976
b2b0b258718f00b334318c55fd4ff51228651215
'2011-10-16T09:15:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEXZ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
8223df142585056b03befd8a05dd6f74
3013ad7085040684ce75beecc763be85364ce880
'2011-10-16T09:11:06-04:00'
describe
'35169' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYA' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
bd1fc6a62406a6c832c49820c4999894
35c379f2a756306596a0dc6093b38fed82babc05
describe
'346386' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYB' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
55556b5487831e726b91fe32a156318a
8eb398865ebda1f72567ab31084f4d815893296e
'2011-10-16T09:15:08-04:00'
describe
'201387' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYC' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
0a63eb66d9c8cad15a7bfff31f1fc282
9221c2a2ca2d2a7d9bc79b8cf5dbadc201f24543
describe
'42107' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYD' 'sip-files00074.pro'
7bf441d6ea0179a5845aeefa5d4bf01a
32e0d27516c04b40ee7cc11195a4c39959ed6e66
describe
'77482' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYE' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
c810cdc40713af7a172e7509c9b36382
5c42909de0eccea14b9971edbf3b065797442b07
describe
'2793712' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYF' 'sip-files00074.tif'
37ad283735f0b59432d050acff0ca40b
9f86a6724613ebb4a75f63acfdde45b76fcfee89
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYG' 'sip-files00074.txt'
294c0d5b9a452e2bf08ff633c3870811
a308fefd1737f36373e90c799e38c02049f2542f
describe
'35911' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYH' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
d7c12702efad1cb47f85272b766ca709
f3393b4e9f42465073db0c8665c734a09447d698
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYI' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
4bbec2e11fb86fd29b1baca3a288d41a
55b4f07c99ecad614a67e5dfbcf32280095efbf3
'2011-10-16T09:15:12-04:00'
describe
'197373' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYJ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
d8aa37aa77f2987816dec33fb4411830
b02ec2270fb73a8e143d4f0e5985c7f8502693a8
describe
'40780' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYK' 'sip-files00075.pro'
296e5d934450a6da87cf192ff925dc18
c1977518d131722050cf5527a38a7e6cd7c78bef
'2011-10-16T09:15:25-04:00'
describe
'76507' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYL' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
43089274e38c16ffc454ba9edf784b61
c6825a49358d4c9b09c9a06dffa40f709181161b
describe
'2796016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYM' 'sip-files00075.tif'
fe414ebe7875d67163061efcb5d29fdb
34e63f4c201c4d91224f8f147925cd815111edb7
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYN' 'sip-files00075.txt'
7124a218d649db3cc6f65c772263d559
e1691a480f41d5c22eacb36f242373e47df66369
describe
'35899' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYO' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
474d45e581569a7b8b96835e0b50c81b
01258c95549bf05b81217096a336af3b048fbec0
'2011-10-16T09:13:33-04:00'
describe
'346299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYP' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
55fc940aaab59b532c7d6b1fff21ac0b
23a68f7422754c7d5ab4cb72a4cdffb6c93666f6
describe
'197114' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYQ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
ce8509c4fcf1d07e5aa38c96a99e1188
bba8ac13691a74190cdf72bb19562044dee4d8eb
describe
'39811' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYR' 'sip-files00076.pro'
59b808e49f703aee20e6547d3455012f
155219ae0407420d9cc70c1e7cd47922cacfa0e3
describe
'75852' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYS' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
1ad9fd524808a54784757bf236041369
327001bf7dad33962aecb3067fb2ecca5530cc30
describe
'2794040' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYT' 'sip-files00076.tif'
2ff98cbceceb19c271fdc6e891132207
27a52556259d53c758fba1a2c2b3fe3fd99f23f6
'2011-10-16T09:10:01-04:00'
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYU' 'sip-files00076.txt'
2e536009be4434bd01766269256705e6
9a0d7fa2644c0264c378b76396dfe6fc239c3782
'2011-10-16T09:15:48-04:00'
describe
'36293' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYV' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
1053f461455d7b28c6f092917a9055b0
18972867e242c58fa902ddbcd4e0e73a2d595810
'2011-10-16T09:12:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYW' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
5fc7aff0bde1338b60aac2679a05c77b
d96656ebc93b13b6a58ea8b3569667781ead1985
describe
'203162' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYX' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
803e9cd3cf9011452a885d7e75a9d933
004f763ef54613a7e863d0e76fa0f53c932ffb03
'2011-10-16T09:12:05-04:00'
describe
'40573' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYY' 'sip-files00077.pro'
574595aa21addf85f3f97f14f2072591
8524f81bb61fa07f9730f62008655e494be0d696
describe
'76902' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEYZ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
8653bcfccbf00a02a9636c93643d11e2
2551d11d3e81ea002e9c4e91a9e40fe57b106298
'2011-10-16T09:16:02-04:00'
describe
'2793420' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZA' 'sip-files00077.tif'
e5be47727f4727ac355c282b8164c1e2
876081962691027f61c116ef98f13212d906aad6
'2011-10-16T09:17:03-04:00'
describe
'1694' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZB' 'sip-files00077.txt'
4dbf14ed3bdfa1ce7da9ad30c2fad859
b03b44b6e7b7fdc2c7d0ea452afd230c51c87876
'2011-10-16T09:09:29-04:00'
describe
'35531' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZC' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
ca5aaedfbf94cb271b1261ffd8e33e4d
fcfda8e22aa328aff2a534c3d79cb207611d7a6c
describe
'346415' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZD' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
0bf83fd4c529f99f21980920ff0d9365
37f37a6b427ff0d5997cd8c115b867c4fb21bfe5
'2011-10-16T09:13:47-04:00'
describe
'195227' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZE' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
12fcaf3bbcf483b4c182934fa1fc50a3
9c9835d747f47c01de1aaf5135820a2694fcc738
describe
'39288' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZF' 'sip-files00078.pro'
4cb97312cd11fbc00e40ddc31119d587
e1da2af5a03c3195f2ab06fcb5f12fdc60beac6c
describe
'74527' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZG' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
248fcea56360861adb3900708ce3a275
42269b8a3e362547449a9dbcc74a953bcb976d03
'2011-10-16T09:12:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZH' 'sip-files00078.tif'
abb7c499d40fc167ccd4feabb70582d4
1db90d5d59ff8f231e70ec8e493e2e19c74e1016
'2011-10-16T09:19:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZI' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b5b86e55b5d7d879bd53c6a57ba4e14f
a9d6bb14eff35a1fefc5f3bc3d5cafee981ceac2
describe
'35223' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZJ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
463697444a4471347e42e67099bb0ad0
d7c25fd9ee176b027b434bba07f49f8ddc576e08
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZK' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
d42f958c88dc56deeb92642905c4cab1
83d6b815b19fd55f2dd007cddebbc27c2d9ac611
'2011-10-16T09:09:42-04:00'
describe
'189549' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZL' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
2fd1c52d7d9c8866aac2426ed42817cf
bd5c135f4e1a071494423e0319a801d1c8a9906e
'2011-10-16T09:18:46-04:00'
describe
'16397' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZM' 'sip-files00079.pro'
6b15db9b48ba1ea44060dfc425c66db8
8fff8bec833c95d62556fe29a217de162d2db612
'2011-10-16T09:13:19-04:00'
describe
'64455' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
3a2ea0cf39cd326731e122d77f65fd78
0dafa8d6f6509f2b53781b8c63f4c87be833745f
describe
'2792724' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZO' 'sip-files00079.tif'
65400395265a40b22152218d2e617f09
03fc5fa6c3093002011232b2050a886e546ebb53
describe
'741' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZP' 'sip-files00079.txt'
cc179b5e03828f99be291bb7f75a2c4f
18b9da11728c03bcf41c183b7651dc48c2793c92
describe
'32266' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZQ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
7062879b31908b13c49812d4cb195443
0d6493d63b038358b843efd1f928f53d9c9f01a9
describe
'346327' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZR' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
e88b11b57f01bf7c10d0843c87e594b7
a74f36437bc86bdbdbc84301a695ca7504dafd9e
'2011-10-16T09:15:00-04:00'
describe
'176639' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZS' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
17bd2304d615c8a0a0676085bc50a0ca
6bc8740d67eedc33eeb30356285b391f61bf181a
describe
'33699' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZT' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9ce39ef661a3368caf0e80acc1a5eb4b
7d1addb5d1c9f8360dfad60bc092add6b98920eb
describe
'67746' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZU' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
5c894ed3c71d4619d5176c4273034505
5f668e4dfa68d88c028ed2d870a7575578385e08
describe
'2793308' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZV' 'sip-files00080.tif'
eadb6de52b22d5ffb3471e9acb5c3e51
41c34a355d4415708a85be7639a3e89c5c0917fc
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZW' 'sip-files00080.txt'
d02369f68e04cb86abf7f5a4c6d9b1df
16f27f316c593d5874ce4f81eb9362610ab02811
describe
'34217' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZX' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
27b83f90f05ec520cafde55e8959bf77
d0f7c9b2c45b990ab2f924350f9d645f66a5a0f2
'2011-10-16T09:09:35-04:00'
describe
'346418' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZY' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
8f3bf64bf910325cc5954aa75130f8a3
1d4d544f502e051cc4848cbe4d9d675e5b38b028
'2011-10-16T09:09:52-04:00'
describe
'173190' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABEZZ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
c7f3b6da215eb5cbc4fd49c2d2730616
7bbb07a45b8e6e8037378e5b1edc394ce6ad54e1
describe
'31386' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAA' 'sip-files00081.pro'
e31c16e2b93d58bb51c049dfe18fb5a9
bad3487a3c0532d0f49d298360703fd4a7351e46
'2011-10-16T09:15:59-04:00'
describe
'65469' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAB' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
3e558dd5676bb8fd12899e7b2043aa50
0953437c2a55e15fde4fdf033561213e2d83e637
describe
'2792976' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAC' 'sip-files00081.tif'
3e1019d5f1f14bf4e21bc0023b5e2143
85321b0bc27567be4a7404dcf048fc9b2ffac539
'2011-10-16T09:16:23-04:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAD' 'sip-files00081.txt'
7b4fa6e54da7eced4bc6e73814c40a27
93adc2a240d1f5261b1fa55087617b427cec8a3c
'2011-10-16T09:17:01-04:00'
describe
'33667' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAE' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
a982c1367ac1e31d06e7931f991a7a74
45c8ee4011537634f420054266227b48a50a18e7
'2011-10-16T09:17:13-04:00'
describe
'346413' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAF' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b217a68aec0b53a34ded66f9ab343388
e137596dc1fbffb43531c995a30147a6a57f29ac
describe
'182763' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAG' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
3eb4beb6abc9ab48e6a06c95ae47afd0
78365beb899f0f1e4e27fab489c878d69add15fd
'2011-10-16T09:14:38-04:00'
describe
'35562' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAH' 'sip-files00082.pro'
91514a984d03f7f49e5b5efe39c9969e
41dd87f9189e9e2109aa767ebb9dd9d97dff2317
describe
'67879' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAI' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
3cdf3161c2262ea88b9c17e51fb737ff
3fa0cd072f5a7b6461aa5447bb7770c5d3415e1b
describe
'2793032' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAJ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
bfd44d079069894f52b2bcd1d3e1762c
39bb06fc30d9dc82212b2482ac7052daaed3b61f
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAK' 'sip-files00082.txt'
38c753d1b08b096a009190463a83f6a4
a71633f425fb7e95decf611007b6a277eb6b2974
describe
'33748' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAL' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
5073f1b4f20e6d5cbca44d992723d276
506120ef585ef01ad7f5ce15e411f3377799834c
describe
'346329' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAM' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
8c76e7987e176a461f11c5e7278bab6c
d79b7effeba71a8d72efc18490ddc5b05085818b
describe
'177772' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAN' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
3c54858de1c725735e8b05f74c5f0b88
80cf5be786abbad7f9bf9dc9009aa2ea9b5a7f94
describe
'33621' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAO' 'sip-files00083.pro'
ac10c4b31bae6332bbb31c80bc50f393
83af74e1b7fe8baa5b6eaa4919bf254305295cf1
describe
'67976' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAP' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
fbecb3c9b34d3b9021c571c3896b14da
c930ccca83bff4329d3f0bfbfc249e59abb96b86
'2011-10-16T09:15:54-04:00'
describe
'2793068' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAQ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
73f17d0ec62cb7c7d40abe10a57b271b
d544f510ebc38496e03613db4612e5387f2e2cf4
'2011-10-16T09:11:10-04:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAR' 'sip-files00083.txt'
bc810229c9e7694a62af02232ed05db2
2342f6c1ce6a4e403d286811319c635a38f4e3d7
describe
'33827' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAS' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
9fefe44ec485345d958c9932156d6001
a9aa30e99b0636887801085a984c1d43becfb614
'2011-10-16T09:18:57-04:00'
describe
'346315' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAT' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
fee7b13524195f07475ca46c7b96de7a
731c9fbda63f0742c3dff30913f8f6ac5864e721
describe
'182302' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAU' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
a5cab0cd94422feec829b2f0ba4b5a15
39fb3d7b5016ae5e54f1b8f5e0a8e62aca46b6b5
'2011-10-16T09:13:42-04:00'
describe
'35195' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAV' 'sip-files00084.pro'
8edabf6dbdaff9c7243fc45dfc68d0d2
3ce6217fd71b62d22120e4f58676ef365efa0ef5
describe
'70063' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAW' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
de8c9dbd0a515cb328654c352eceff28
7aa6264c44e8cdfec59cf9d7c66c1041339d63c3
describe
'2793004' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAX' 'sip-files00084.tif'
6cac4854822cc2d221bb153402e16551
f6f19eee39366981a07e6dbbd9763e275ac0451c
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAY' 'sip-files00084.txt'
8522a9860fda3100875ad54b3a2c8d51
7c96a989c2e2f7aa71c1abd8f304c7286be930fa
'2011-10-16T09:12:11-04:00'
describe
'33757' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFAZ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
4b6b5b77f72c9c3450f21789da072c79
e9f383fad1205eb17252815e3b5ec51abfd3ba41
'2011-10-16T09:11:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBA' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
7fe61fce308a736d6465a63abda162bb
ef5a6fd6fcb0ead94c4d4c801f93077b1479b3d5
'2011-10-16T09:09:07-04:00'
describe
'188523' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBB' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
e68dee32dcb7199e2e7aa9d3dac23fdb
d0dc521cf644637365b07fb2d6e8abb5db0a68aa
'2011-10-16T09:11:29-04:00'
describe
'38252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBC' 'sip-files00085.pro'
dbf0f05f18db45ad886cb8132db692fa
e226a57df04b86d5ba922bb586b0d081fb68d935
describe
'71395' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBD' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
21b1fb7250136236ebe82d3465677373
c90fdc28831b116359d6071cc73c9b23d0bca3f1
describe
'2793184' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBE' 'sip-files00085.tif'
e69d5a180b2ea56c64efd3648357315f
e6e53d6c82868c60911a91ff49825ca80b9c4063
'2011-10-16T09:12:02-04:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBF' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b43ab850e093832295778241d11693f0
234fe0c8e2412afb3004451392f1a4d7e8a4f91a
'2011-10-16T09:19:30-04:00'
describe
'34549' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBG' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
c3dcf6d8db7710d793155fd3d152d680
87cc62308d7db3a51ad032c126b58f8c74995b47
describe
'346397' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBH' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
a15d8efe1cb746a31395afb6a7feb9b8
740b0ccb211f62fee11e2a85f56aa22e82a8b446
'2011-10-16T09:09:26-04:00'
describe
'190608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBI' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
2605c442b9aa3704f659063586154b32
cc36f073a46a92c90202e7a44517370cda5637e0
'2011-10-16T09:16:14-04:00'
describe
'36182' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBJ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
b5c8d0de9f26aa5ccbcbe42607110f93
9be0cf5b21e747eeae310e22a6fcbae7e2f1cfef
describe
'72505' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBK' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
a36130d23d30d7065234246e7183fbd6
6e07fafe3fc2052a29a80a0510c9ca503e87188d
describe
'2793504' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBL' 'sip-files00086.tif'
31143e32b27a0ccc6403c0c91e196d63
88e5a28924722ad62ba16447d04066b0f06eb3c9
'2011-10-16T09:15:22-04:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBM' 'sip-files00086.txt'
7bb947f750da39ae47b199e00ba50e96
f2ff959b27e7671e7c5859a8be3ec55eacfa5be1
describe
'34997' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBN' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
8ea2fadb7ca383173c56ca4da258543e
d3e4f0e8a5dde0d414c2f690b1a78b1744fec65e
describe
'346399' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBO' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
402b1729135a140137b03e8847ee0a47
7d84ce9b026a8e14e9a3a5b8f032cde0405677f0
describe
'244936' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBP' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
e1febe52164198e6883aac2a03e3428d
0a7021b0c95529135f554b17f32e6a0fb132f09a
'2011-10-16T09:10:55-04:00'
describe
'9414' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBQ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
b4603ecab909f409bcfb27669595cdf2
2826354a75b19635efe0c520d5adf8fdfd285e7f
'2011-10-16T09:08:52-04:00'
describe
'76913' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBR' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
cd63317827362cfc37311f01208b0d9c
b8d448f7431cca7352b9c7fcf4ff7e4593369f5e
describe
'2794164' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBS' 'sip-files00087.tif'
8bf26c0906065a6573a73a5f5803b14c
9ee2198d8ff46b5ff1eb5150db7e49be28559681
describe
'404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBT' 'sip-files00087.txt'
638a46e37d07b4ca256541fb3caf2ce5
ea41251fe436d2667bfdb585508c99e8c5914f51
describe
'36843' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBU' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
020b1aece95e275496bf0bed68dac744
e279cf10823aca9374e96c2ef4b6b15988ed38cf
describe
'346274' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBV' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
6771c001a292c203795932861ac4ef0c
b2ac16b51d3fe2bbdbcd1bac3b612b974ad31632
describe
'195358' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBW' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
604dca3ca3b53618f2e9e441694909a5
25519cda0f60517ca33af241ecedfb6dc5362790
'2011-10-16T09:14:16-04:00'
describe
'40428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBX' 'sip-files00088.pro'
c1972c4603c896bbf5a96f590db4e7c6
b35b7c6337a64ec561de48661ec75fc26b1eff35
describe
'73622' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBY' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
91f4adfeb46c0b173fd4f0a42b3a4b19
71a70cb086e5cccf9d83d9c8e4a7fd9bbb21b1e9
describe
'2793372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFBZ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
dec8c410cd15225daf5989d612514c56
3131730e860648f966e52ca2322866f37a414e2d
'2011-10-16T09:15:53-04:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCA' 'sip-files00088.txt'
208f4ff66483fd1ca9a2fe44df16904f
e9d3d226f931eaa2ee4655853a6d585fce34c03f
describe
'35089' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCB' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
650f4b5545e8e4b956761dc9ad0974f4
6d0348ca0817b236b0d38f09ff36fc7f20f38265
'2011-10-16T09:19:00-04:00'
describe
'346366' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCC' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
8449fb458c20f0539eb8b7469925543e
786eff9db48b237d1a669ee99f6261782fdc3738
describe
'187860' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCD' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
9fb9c864946ec5ee51569c6862853720
503bad0216cdb40b910912a633070abcf8c2de76
describe
'11593' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCE' 'sip-files00089.pro'
06b4cbd1c07289f9c72d00a3c43b5f1b
18c34e73d5e9ced1ca3301982c685e01647b7d92
describe
'63195' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCF' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
60e4975fc2db35a2ee5d4b557afd5778
f0245eb4a2f7b69550fcb663d97f84ffa6950129
describe
'2792916' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCG' 'sip-files00089.tif'
f839cbc3a1efd85aa1a799a75ddd08bd
7c5e80bfb3d4b3fb0805357fcc958a15607f90f7
'2011-10-16T09:14:01-04:00'
describe
'504' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCH' 'sip-files00089.txt'
65473689b1addff2249e8b2554dc085d
33fa6f37913f3b55655bd02470b2c5ba22ff77de
'2011-10-16T09:17:56-04:00'
describe
'32615' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCI' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
44fee3a3268aaaf1b96b021cb1f06ca4
a84375379e717122f2959e0e3cb4d7edd1f2a6aa
describe
'346414' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCJ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
50b25737cd27b8c000d8bd2af016d50a
39eacd86b31066f9ad3e856f42bf1339eb7a94b5
'2011-10-16T09:12:55-04:00'
describe
'151765' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCK' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
066a249773eb5abc15c3c3e542e6b0a4
08cd6aff82875086910b002851f54ccba3286873
describe
'21802' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCL' 'sip-files00090.pro'
f6e630ce88289ffb039ef9e70a7127ec
fd6303a67472e8249ac2fc819a479898213852e3
describe
'55771' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCM' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
20817666a818d6caac4467f1a6d442d0
9491583978430520b37c4845ca01c76badb3ed48
describe
'2791684' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCN' 'sip-files00090.tif'
ff30c73cb7a183b5303c86c6965cda42
f1024fbbb9b0ef8964b5b41e2b029b138680d798
'2011-10-16T09:10:07-04:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCO' 'sip-files00090.txt'
effa107b1749ce0ab420cc142c3a6fd5
771d7b522f3a01602c9746abdf70131e60f407d3
describe
'29443' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCP' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
e35421abf911172362daf14e44ea9a54
4be2e3795d425379d6b194089105263d736e87e1
describe
'346238' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCQ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
71b6601ec1b93a0f32542966b5b70053
cdd9130c65de44af86f5d899adb12123939c06f9
'2011-10-16T09:09:55-04:00'
describe
'164820' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCR' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c02984168135d74acd2559787177188b
8e686f5deae41a5ed35692757e80cd088e6e2001
'2011-10-16T09:18:24-04:00'
describe
'24539' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCS' 'sip-files00091.pro'
1a60272b96fe2569bf3f217d3ba1f770
0b9ba09309b7e67bf895fe8690d2f9fb1ba5150a
describe
'60290' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCT' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
4dbd73e415a40b48937825c8920a3311
98bbc6e1954043fbbf8d2bf27e07f82a623fee7f
describe
'2792296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCU' 'sip-files00091.tif'
517ac463c30067bd6fe959697c9abb3e
b6c0f6644a96143f1e39f0ddf66979f97fdacc5a
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCV' 'sip-files00091.txt'
797d7dffe9c6cb8ea39e4c7fed4fa693
1905818378008bbe0aa99697a9e27c4e84d50b19
'2011-10-16T09:12:01-04:00'
describe
'30914' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCW' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
9f60571133a9b789d332eb7415df61cf
23b2236fad1b8ae9c75556d3830221868fb03414
describe
'346409' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCX' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4c48f4e00993cc1e6b1f1480e5938dbc
1c2652fffa60f556442d6683021442b13ffb32eb
describe
'198510' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCY' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
ef15aa16142e6ab5eaf4f5b8bc37e44e
36cfa97a483b96f8e60a7b62e581dd18cc4e45b7
describe
'41124' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFCZ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
cdff8149917e28184d08fcc6583eb567
a6b55ce6acada1facd42757f1e6c22b4c5111c30
describe
'75724' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDA' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
f3377c169d4ba642d33a51a1e572d991
b129da36f7831ca583ebdf1dc14f931257f9f346
'2011-10-16T09:11:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDB' 'sip-files00092.tif'
e2696c3a412d2aa75c4e01d146cb5184
a79f4ea1f5280a9f7bf46719a611cd4910b4b721
'2011-10-16T09:19:23-04:00'
describe
'1682' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDC' 'sip-files00092.txt'
851dc94110bec6bbe5c69660a15e7d46
a4ca39a754d0e52424fc8db74f393f0880821176
'2011-10-16T09:11:16-04:00'
describe
'35265' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDD' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
4699cde6e9a5e3d141f6d6a735c90efb
1ec329c8eed8d8cfb2bfeaf5be9602509df9040c
'2011-10-16T09:13:22-04:00'
describe
'346398' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDE' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
4f6c4e2460c0b07aebb220a69ed8de93
4111b5dd53028f066a6b3553affdf272a4b1bbfa
'2011-10-16T09:18:22-04:00'
describe
'218740' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDF' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
9bfafa79b2f8db89d7359261b42f7427
c67fb468016d6121afd932f70c3823afb3fe36a4
'2011-10-16T09:10:45-04:00'
describe
'14675' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDG' 'sip-files00093.pro'
6afaa4a4cc591cc2d75d9944aa51fb61
19e265ac64db75960f6222b2181c8730f0deff2c
describe
'71484' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDH' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
05035c82119f4ce4d2ca9d2ba69cfa2f
e50607107c600b3b361f985bd997a2cd957e48f5
'2011-10-16T09:16:31-04:00'
describe
'2793380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDI' 'sip-files00093.tif'
dcbdd18bd84c9c3f014377cdb534dc46
3cd84ad9e0e6c8798867f7fae646ba90b0ce098c
'2011-10-16T09:16:26-04:00'
describe
'662' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDJ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
81a7f06156c0793482a89ef4d6f972f4
58c38a183793e424d8e12e884cfeebdbfd9238b6
'2011-10-16T09:11:21-04:00'
describe
'34587' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDK' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
8d994eafe1fd5a1c56dc2667b9b07cfc
3173b3b04975caa2023a6a7c8e9ff9fa834c1e06
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDL' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
05d926e6eef5281d09c11fd450eeb1a4
90c3562528d2fc67c65cfa1616dec073df8f8f8b
'2011-10-16T09:12:32-04:00'
describe
'202117' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDM' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5d97ed0fec1efe8f190afc5ffd75ce2e
19dce837aeeed8442bd6a0c692269f49fb5445a5
describe
'42101' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDN' 'sip-files00094.pro'
688c9ae86e44d5bd4655c2f9787262fb
bf20618699c1aae0742fb0de83ca64ae19fa5a15
describe
'74887' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDO' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
a20e8de55da253e0935923091f6027e7
0166847e7117640e20d47f6db628aeac72f5d0bb
describe
'2793412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDP' 'sip-files00094.tif'
b8f4a000415a7a41f48108a6c302679a
10c994ca810dba1a2b051ed13d37f1be36bc35d6
describe
'1643' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDQ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
dbd151e08888f666b8fe2c9d8310731e
9f78912d664dad492dd2327fec6eae1dc87527ad
describe
'35061' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDR' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
acb6a93d6259635ab661d5250fbef4bd
7b462ad347c59be242edd181c1ab19e675f84272
'2011-10-16T09:18:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDS' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
19553b69320d75c729e14ffa5c74a34e
1349151c75d9853f847c7b9d0e027a6abd91bb51
describe
'206524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDT' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c938d12c1df79813894a62dc39f89a67
81d600991e5c3038004d44052ece191ecf543a26
describe
'41718' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDU' 'sip-files00095.pro'
b41bbe2e18cdb00c72935ff574e18a7c
f9310d5fdb69da710df29956b33dbaa1c6020477
describe
'76811' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDV' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
3f012d7a09e3fe5beeb2c8384cfa2d33
023a5373479b332b972c9124ebff83cf8a7c8efb
describe
'2793456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDW' 'sip-files00095.tif'
46f00143e0c825593aa19e9572b56888
95fe9155077ec32bac26aaad2883ef7c72824568
'2011-10-16T09:11:51-04:00'
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDX' 'sip-files00095.txt'
ba5c71257151cb9e6b0daee7b1dad733
9cee31079dfbb296bd9bd36de5f8fc2e72c69937
describe
'35691' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDY' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
e3d648483d9686fa7b88e6a8d0f7eab2
3518adf5a503175fa02e1aa4ac41743a92ad7efa
'2011-10-16T09:18:37-04:00'
describe
'346208' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFDZ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
13b920b2aeff726e60c91fb0b42a0576
92710443cb5a1f60d7f0614bc9b603e3608ac4d5
'2011-10-16T09:11:48-04:00'
describe
'164924' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEA' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
0991dc9f489ae382660be4b79dfeef50
11eeb992c001515b8dfdd8b3b863174e7c53e5ff
describe
'24215' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEB' 'sip-files00096.pro'
69b96ffc660ef0e6791121d08d19b7aa
0d05473568b5b133fc63df89e45cc8c22efcf3d8
describe
'60792' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEC' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
79daf8380d0fe9806447565a6ced18c1
b898f9dd17166e464721d84841c46d16a08278f9
describe
'2792348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFED' 'sip-files00096.tif'
ea7a0cead3e96e24b43c4d21ad8fedec
9b6b20cb77121c39729cf4d25fba1b6bc33da717
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEE' 'sip-files00096.txt'
00c7552521d9bec35ad08c04d1caa125
eb9fa009c07ca9275c2813f4718cfe7604a81787
describe
'31189' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
63b0d959f7206f8a28fcd3717bef5733
7b4b194b89bca5118daf3fb7b0686052086631bb
'2011-10-16T09:11:28-04:00'
describe
'346321' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEG' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
9e22639c27ec199a2640ebeaa30359a4
43e744adbd59197f8286a1d4138dca1321c43a6f
describe
'200586' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEH' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
ccd54bafd95588d28ea7f6d2d797cea3
26ecb6cb4b0bd6f50cca5da7073a0f958a8049b8
describe
'42270' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEI' 'sip-files00097.pro'
6bcfa0e7947a75591f1c12b84018aca5
6f09007ab9930b72258f1007f1d63dc7543c6348
describe
'76339' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEJ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
e9e2c173654e0d022c70a10c3ff24fd0
b59b6b55410a093d4fbc73b5f20db48b34ca7a7c
describe
'2793752' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEK' 'sip-files00097.tif'
6cd89cbc171eb1c2a290a78382354f49
8955d6381e007695123c7204caf68ff03f5af52e
describe
'1669' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEL' 'sip-files00097.txt'
64b9b9d76ccdd8e74c9b4da47d4ed3e7
988e7757e9e83b90eb2c1fd8cad83161f375feb6
describe
'35432' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEM' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
bd66eb1d4c8d360391674fb633926606
a208df61adfd9e6ddf03f30093385c2edca9a203
'2011-10-16T09:09:25-04:00'
describe
'346377' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEN' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
2532040671e28cf1ba02dd3ba242b980
d4c948de359214188704765965f6f1e7368694ac
'2011-10-16T09:19:37-04:00'
describe
'186358' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEO' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
af6d75d473e36ba8d969ccc8d20075d0
118c0c37ea15c1694929d4fe3cedab2636ab44a4
describe
'37130' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEP' 'sip-files00098.pro'
15f3c893a8d1c1fd6fc8216ea66c5a5e
4b480b9a05878159056e4d408cf23555f080884f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEQ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
518fa772513cd1938d224bee9358acbb
ac7909f5c797d5f9c7817bf17dbdb77f8f84cae0
describe
'2793276' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFER' 'sip-files00098.tif'
1cf331a7f29b7b0dbbe3a495a1566744
d776f1c1bc902851646904f06b3deeafa43948b5
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFES' 'sip-files00098.txt'
4e74b2593f5971bb7a349ea28c67c628
27e63cb67f89ff48987cac82fb1f7df86aba64bf
describe
'34504' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFET' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
226ade0f953d8bb082c4270d44286eda
6f24280728ca3217b5ce5042b30cd2922b89edb9
describe
'346261' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEU' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
fa0424b61b86499badc01faa6519ff94
ea57ed8773715bddd82ad688403757decf4edc5e
describe
'204553' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEV' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
d3a5dcd6fd1016569efeb78b86dd3f16
4d3b4fe3a3ef8c1d6557173c2385c81c316d08f2
describe
'17392' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEW' 'sip-files00099.pro'
0f8d0e65ac5cc23e07a7749b4c323413
9c236c1b8c732161d65f18d9dfe93fdb4121d24e
describe
'69118' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEX' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
8736411f92742be07f6aca2fedd81c19
3746f36d863799faf0ba6e0d0deca88d08df88e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEY' 'sip-files00099.tif'
e520bfbfe7ff7e1429841d40b011609b
9e08e2576652987bb55c23be8e3e348e5bc4df1a
describe
'731' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFEZ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
b300489f9a60bb0bf203acabc68f404e
df43e11154bc2f2534b0a8a36688b666c5f1d2e5
describe
'34679' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFA' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
a38ff00bb1229f33609684dd1da79288
ab3e89bd9abf7e3f0375d682db0fa962fc00aad1
'2011-10-16T09:15:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
e44df7e76289e597d2bd7caafddc3270
3c795c9ae531a085b4abea6e15949bbbef5e96dd
describe
'188778' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
601e927120788f8a216de0e555705d33
706d6ed141c0ed1cc49bdd958c8481850ac4d660
describe
'36896' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFD' 'sip-files00100.pro'
89e82dbbfbc0c5b61409953f5bd64142
6904f8647cf65c02e04dd75372f306387f46489c
describe
'72839' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFE' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
b9579d39ee121feb274ef5edaaa12c72
5306182e22f3c0ba948abff56cd12bc5c27e321b
describe
'2793568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFF' 'sip-files00100.tif'
6e535eb913c7c3ee4ad315b4040f0690
75877a7085a49a3e758bd373a64851b4bca77871
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
c0f56142d1137a9ad6b263c48d275107
b369aa698ea25788253026e5d53aa661c34fbcb5
describe
'35216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFH' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
8c0ea303eedbe8c2aa4114b754e4ca94
47f637bc6716d568c10c3c17b84c69044504f04e
describe
'346051' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
284b0ceffd0ecf7f66de1561a706d645
ef2727b4b6d8c568d94be52af3049fa82a510beb
describe
'166609' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFJ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
32dc2252a7ae0943e866810cc767cd11
a9907536b1b5145e0c217806be4d70d0c309cf74
describe
'18564' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
500b73cb55130a775d9babc637d0dce9
632d573578eaaf52f426e0e9ae9b48f96064e358
describe
'60353' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
d551c4cf917c10835b596cfc38602001
2576a6d068668c3adc74f71a6235e88c02f08475
'2011-10-16T09:14:05-04:00'
describe
'2792556' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
5ba6c055fc63a713839202cd7784700e
44e7496242e5399192cbc174b4fd2c439c6b0481
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
9fff77e60c68239094354000784c6302
bc41e7e403a90d1e34fe66b6248208bdd46103b9
describe
'32075' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFO' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
28de547bfffce046e3470bff92f532de
7a5a2af55edc467eed8c4c1b2ecd666eb6d8b88c
describe
'346388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFP' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
12fb6d4022be0beb3e18ce55d53a8a35
6e3f5ca2fe6b6a7c1004b33496446f7b35355bd9
describe
'182122' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
791b0b7b077c11f2f95e184f0b07c00f
71483d19048fa8a945f959d0edaf92bc84e6e431
describe
'33937' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFR' 'sip-files00102.pro'
d0ec85b1930716d5b2b0c673431858da
7a5f9830ac572a96e7c36f5421b8fdd4fa0ad829
describe
'69320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
23e777b31d4a806b91e2d7d3de24d43e
2242ab42620fecc229f1e9520c3ece0dc85f4f45
describe
'2793324' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
0ce642b4062fbd5cf35cac6db73b3cf6
9231cf9a64fc341345888620a6abd83157285872
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
069d031a38ced63404409f751c6b6866
cf00f1307cb15134809ec4345c872cf3bbd657ad
describe
Invalid character
'34336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFV' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
4aedd9693fa76e05d5ccdbcf08947d8f
f3e7ca695172f3d31564c4455c0ff2838c3271ef
'2011-10-16T09:10:46-04:00'
describe
'346338' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e49d1a37f473833535997a63d78bd196
6895cccdfbb0ce64f98a0ef57c99fd88712ec20b
describe
'200496' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFX' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
dcbe2120cd13f95c1824b180640136a6
3da91e4959e81a4224f2a7fd939ba105a75f505d
'2011-10-16T09:16:42-04:00'
describe
'41067' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
8719f8c9571cf8ab4761c53be7a2bdb8
bfcdb20de8bd2ad830ec31a3db36fecaa112fcd8
describe
'74283' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFFZ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
8bcf556cac2bab65412d562aec9e3d3e
b9c1a696295538c7f7ca3b4d39f558f85471068c
describe
'2793284' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
aeeeafce15a5fa27acb36aba84a6ac97
4d0d403b02651a3751300b425c300c447b921087
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGB' 'sip-files00103.txt'
1c59ab394310dd035871c52c3e60e9b5
944a9329e0bb5b51598010c46136451938543fe4
describe
'34655' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGC' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
57c7a5755d73a26dc61e586f27173961
c07a6f8aa824f2fe8c5545aa2946c5d5f26f7eab
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGD' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
1b07cf23324701e2bb524ba048c4cc9e
cd1187a58cb6ae9e82d99075a22ea20b836eb2cd
describe
'191462' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e495357c7cd08421ef8da45765f1b60e
082ada7aec5009a802ba8b28075770a1466f8782
'2011-10-16T09:17:57-04:00'
describe
'39233' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGF' 'sip-files00104.pro'
d2827298436a7086647a3c5012ac8275
390d4f671f062812095a368ad742e0a3bbb0634f
describe
'74191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGG' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
e3b915ab6440fbcdac553e8734ec1fe0
903621642d02e12fa6d3b9794e9c20692eff38b2
describe
'2793540' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGH' 'sip-files00104.tif'
0c20a0b2f2a2d2646a98734f78b79cca
50fc88c44e9d2f39289230beefe1ee38d9704c6e
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGI' 'sip-files00104.txt'
6cb849f06ed835164cc0fda53e5e00fa
40b42eb254560db56c7808a6c96198f75fb27609
describe
'35122' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGJ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
57e1bab1adbb9d8ce68f4df29be2512c
b0c398ce84669b79d79c685066431e8c0a0b5aea
describe
'346354' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGK' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
78bad443c58825365ac9b2a7a893a541
3572502bf68197d97fb7866ce3abac6b8980f8ce
'2011-10-16T09:16:49-04:00'
describe
'172313' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGL' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
2444619ab6364f861ea15a66b64574ea
711d7aaa1a8ead21bec4b18addde5cad3435f13c
describe
'33572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGM' 'sip-files00105.pro'
36eec439769d1934914c0d53831cdf03
fca6b5dd5e548270313b243300ac52a847579bd3
describe
'67759' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
484c220c39dcdd836e049c55bd37dc47
7f20be40700ef9d5c46b8494b8ca2ccc84b2f171
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGO' 'sip-files00105.tif'
eaae1d51fc839307fbc18f43abdf6897
d5298162efceab1092bd35f4bce5f606e9cbe07d
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGP' 'sip-files00105.txt'
fa781e71c4efc9742813f1f81850cf5f
dccfad370e9013a604c20037aae0dac7b5cacbf6
describe
'34238' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGQ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
1105bd8d2811e9eef27f5770a22e6dab
b9273a0ff7312ba6049287ef1abb65c46ed7d04c
'2011-10-16T09:12:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGR' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
d997b454c12760c269d20a1c28e534d1
41e4e3d2aeb50e58a2a02888114d0c0b5145351f
describe
'199846' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGS' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
4ea73b78e0ebfdd8a2d445bac74e7cb1
f0be24dffc04ff3823b3a587189cc4e2129d2478
describe
'40440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGT' 'sip-files00106.pro'
2085bb21c1634033e628c26093e55a19
31652ef3208c383e24c83e2c2bd516c31761abac
describe
'74728' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
48ded5ca75c552c4848111faf3b0c700
1322f3aa3911f2627f5666243fc74eaed89a148b
describe
'2793520' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGV' 'sip-files00106.tif'
9060898d34a3624c233dd6004e12ed1c
f090c4bcfcae437f31840513f94280fe796bb401
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGW' 'sip-files00106.txt'
283d7f047be2c24aeca068863014b0ef
392f14078e22fd7342a015e7011eb8504162e1f7
'2011-10-16T09:18:19-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'35016' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGX' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
67f1df83028e073cc5e6c19edb6ccb65
e851adf61080e23e1826601ec3474f59d21f1379
describe
'346269' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
07ca2cc30cd106f0ed979e98c30f5a38
992c37a6b006a323429afbcab43dae2808da2fd4
'2011-10-16T09:13:39-04:00'
describe
'196373' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFGZ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
6d04b440120598ef1151a76302ce111a
0bb6182a9c945ad3850f17dea5e2ae250ceb61d2
describe
'39429' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
6fcce8f5a897daa7c78b6bfd8429ccd0
ab6b57a76168598a7c4737cc77e8d371d9edba3b
'2011-10-16T09:10:52-04:00'
describe
'72958' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
a28f4a704bc8ebed6b2316b81bad5a09
94e76d35cb68e5e3193c01d890373aa7d1813327
'2011-10-16T09:16:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
eb50d5e92fb9bb0c9c80c16400406322
cc62342b9cb02e1399bdf9f0546242996742cfec
describe
'1587' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHD' 'sip-files00107.txt'
4fb940eab7b326b4d711ecc8620484eb
8c79e3a6a3cad957b6efc3e97b4fbeaebcfa89f4
'2011-10-16T09:14:32-04:00'
describe
'34332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHE' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
70bc968cc2bdf75a7ad790f2d174f947
192ab0774f84c5ceb3b6776bb15897c176a57972
describe
'346672' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHF' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
b837961062c4d58e3a5fd3bd2380d9a5
8db1c9533f0e7cf8562ceb9675d917435551b5a1
'2011-10-16T09:12:54-04:00'
describe
'187701' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHG' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
32a7e791b1ffe49c711f1b5e7a1a3b78
3b12c6401b5726dc8a90995242c658e961e1de42
describe
'38254' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHH' 'sip-files00108.pro'
f9d36ccdaf80573300777b9205e85b36
0ce9dd3a14039e85f72353d1a5a59334bebfdd01
describe
'72965' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHI' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
6074b84930dd25bd0d75cc195eaba889
1e806187f0f9a0ff96f785c3015058fc6a31cdc6
describe
'2795748' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHJ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
a6fe0be011aa76d0874c4c5cac285517
35e19fef29c4bd5d0f744b4147375a27229eb419
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
5d55adb298c365d4ccedcdb7ffc7c0b1
bfaac2eba8f8bfbf69c3811b2b0aa71f29bd604f
describe
'35191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHL' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
e11a6f25f1fe80d4229d9af547df2578
4d25961805db82cdd73c1f8839fe21460767cf60
describe
'346443' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHM' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
2c53bda69a7f922c4f8c59b4e6da8810
bce4ea8ae366004e1fe09613429fbd6fdcff3931
describe
'217759' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
95f44c286fece84438839832e5a27d63
a0991e947883c8e0527aefa6659a7645c5ef81f4
'2011-10-16T09:13:23-04:00'
describe
'13375' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHO' 'sip-files00109.pro'
647625f8399a384e9f1ad95b4e1493de
dcd0178bab5898e88587fb76f9890d0ae6c531f5
describe
'69699' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHP' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
ea4553df8f2d5a3b5134a3a86a89a32a
79538adfbc719fdbe39937ee7cda95f1a6c0cefc
describe
'2795368' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHQ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
436a1998eea24e6d5fa5054c0bb99527
72e49d0d06a8020d7bf2ee0809a444b6019bceaa
'2011-10-16T09:17:38-04:00'
describe
'535' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHR' 'sip-files00109.txt'
22fead62e7f69a9012fba561ad5a94b1
7bb31de97a1137f9e2d154704b2e128d467fc30c
describe
'33783' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHS' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
16df5c94491ba246ceede39caa9ec821
7c5a47ff7e2248cac7e202f021898104f89cdcdb
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHT' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
329a0d6660d8e2eadd01306fbb137636
bfc68dd1e0221a8ce636db558fb8b67fc4804386
describe
'187599' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHU' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
f1b4271393db350f37e297ba845a420f
9163ec119e3f7601ff78f50f63387ea525ca356d
describe
'37468' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHV' 'sip-files00110.pro'
c92d50ede305713f1c5fdd21f5f5f0a9
c585bb5bf70abe07c597519078599bc53c87894f
describe
'71677' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHW' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
7daddb6e353e5d3fa4247ae7be1cb6c4
433b6917f9d4dcbd557eccc9447c59ee492a3b34
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHX' 'sip-files00110.tif'
d0dfb3dd12755c1fa6b41108448883a2
2a5c9d117c8a2dadfc03b8d7cafe771b7d72ca9a
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHY' 'sip-files00110.txt'
4c47de2a889bf1097e804b6d02842c62
22b94423ee4cbf05b5fa086c59b910f0f8fc0a15
'2011-10-16T09:16:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFHZ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
30e58ae2dfac4fde2ab324ef1838e00d
e883c06c42156674bcd9fcda890bf8fdb1c81297
describe
'346311' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIA' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
5a7fd5f98720835edea04ebdebaa52db
abe36c04555ba4f0c21c1d1754bc944475bdef57
'2011-10-16T09:17:45-04:00'
describe
'192533' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIB' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
205162680dcd84efcb4df15cab095ae2
7828b6d9edbc4b87ba2b3c5881d11bfeaff7475e
describe
'38886' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIC' 'sip-files00111.pro'
f210d78054c1915728c51c430c4407e8
44b3426578ff3f704f7fc96e0f20c59c00ee8922
describe
'72436' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFID' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
c52b28b0ecf2cb55af730cea7be455fe
ca19d8e4e51bea2d9575c09d4408bfbfe5da93d5
describe
'2793120' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIE' 'sip-files00111.tif'
27c244e2cf0477b974953cd755c81d85
d07cf65382f99385091f2cef3a7374a811dede43
describe
'1667' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIF' 'sip-files00111.txt'
0429049d05e6f54caa66df5cd36a7824
b185bd7e8e192d16a752f0c7c7f086abb8a5a929
describe
'34489' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIG' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e4bdab2ed2293d214f0dc037550001f9
c1ddcd028610ed60c1480bf5b1e2882762cd07df
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
cb2414e416de1316de72d536a49f52b2
bd1815398ef30b086edd3831eeeb0b2613eac3d2
describe
'189848' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFII' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
170ad9ed7d827bd3de5926c7b3ac8dd7
9eaa317b54afa1acba8b93e5d37643608ee5c890
describe
'38085' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
0446a3f32978b0388375f2d1e3e6dc12
5dcfb5c7548633fd68ab2d544f380826c815ffad
describe
'70571' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
5f0907381aa4abd492661756c418a968
725d67f90e0d4c933b3e705b25f55dcf5f2ec70d
describe
'2793228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2b857a9cd9e5777234324ea5db68cf24
8c3fe593613eada075b3e676112eb349b1adc36a
'2011-10-16T09:19:01-04:00'
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
9e3bd6ec2e430e984657806acee68d8d
f8d1c339b536264d54a182bd1cdd8b265ea78bfd
describe
'34142' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIN' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
ba68dce3362023566533a39888aeea68
049c2e1d9ebe934b5fcff62797e3258001ff6f02
describe
'346360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIO' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
72b67409811649efc2b4ee8fc705d72c
c5f4a5cd59285653437051d1e8e6d05d406660dc
'2011-10-16T09:11:02-04:00'
describe
'201769' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIP' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
343a3197e1777a464457d9cc3afe9711
cd8b7550225a3485834efee3e6fc9f24b9e4fb6d
describe
'40488' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
4c1d9c188f8d2169ca591040a9c3fe8f
2376ee7d42ccaf6a94ea8948907e04bdd403c72c
describe
'74953' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIR' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
cbeea413c5a0b769a1ea1de758c8b745
83e1b9432860b3937ccce5545d26d2b8ce02b48f
'2011-10-16T09:15:18-04:00'
describe
'2793416' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIS' 'sip-files00113.tif'
80b581c2ad201c81ff1d3c1a200f0c8b
a99b4b76e68a0215bd211cb16fea81574beaf9e9
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIT' 'sip-files00113.txt'
dabff8d04412533e006ae12a605fd7e2
991336b5ec3c38854d8be7f3fad858538dec69df
describe
'34544' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
eee72bd8b2fc599e1162861a6ca362b1
8fa2545b454a6af7aac56e993de9246a926dd6b8
describe
'346332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIV' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
367c8955513d303a008a30ecbd4af971
720fb99e30397d466caca17842a1acf978f4720c
describe
'195367' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIW' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
d41197b5393d057ebbaa7c0b3075b717
95adfa415689a85256b78bf21ef53c001f8a98a2
'2011-10-16T09:10:18-04:00'
describe
'43092' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIX' 'sip-files00114.pro'
d6e30b20c0274a986f37fc5ba93b7302
286d4400618db4f428c32f654aaf81af6daf492f
describe
'74873' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIY' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
9d55f1f0b10a192ed0e6c2a71b9e6ef3
8149e758d4e62f25a98279f8d64aeaaf2121e8f4
describe
'2793444' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFIZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
185aeef86874e47ba0d9cada392bb697
a578f137b8a6e2f13e5f6005cdf7f185646417e3
'2011-10-16T09:19:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJA' 'sip-files00114.txt'
be5349c3a13209177d83b166b2475f8a
b40398cfd2a7a1a2a3abd0da2b1fc3d5f075b61b
describe
'35246' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJB' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
bcc41a625f9a221c67351b33ae2b3785
687f4488dddb6959b9401ec1cbf817fab84ce6fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJC' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
40aa8d95fea2ca2181c40a4642600135
e2fead88727f57d5f837f20d02ece5800d280a80
describe
'180435' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJD' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
b5b940e15f141cc74c9d349e0452f45b
0d152f6e21010f0655e5af891eff9174bf4c9f27
describe
'23960' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJE' 'sip-files00115.pro'
71ef81146053cab9cbf384a85444a6bc
0258673f19dfb2f586f988efad4772622c814637
describe
'65481' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJF' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
0d2df4e857cc2a9c34d5904a3b6c5ad3
d517b4e8f5f5209317c39e21623c6d1aa2a15d92
'2011-10-16T09:11:26-04:00'
describe
'2792736' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJG' 'sip-files00115.tif'
615d60d451346d0ef46fbf02b489f1d2
e7a1ff2183ae43f8cc2f6858f6acb48d57be2913
'2011-10-16T09:09:56-04:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
ec8128bb2b7192277584fc0ecc0f5736
cbbec5c9267e51b4b8dc5b599b1cb3d3431c47ba
describe
'32671' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJI' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
3265ff01eb2090b299ab3a3b2fc3bbb1
c674f6fbd7bdef1ef87034058d1dc8020e67878d
'2011-10-16T09:16:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJJ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
9d1701688c0f897c2a8816894d9c36fe
9259d1c15100c6ed961175c28986f55112f8808e
describe
'199952' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJK' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
a551fa423abc7adfc299fef53e29086b
da542cb69508c85604dfceedbbc34c58e5de503d
'2011-10-16T09:15:51-04:00'
describe
'39396' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJL' 'sip-files00116.pro'
811766cee310198ff5626b4841cfa370
cdfe620d699805338c028e6830e83b371b54476a
'2011-10-16T09:11:52-04:00'
describe
'74963' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJM' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
b703ece6f42f092afeaa6760d65c06b9
4f078880177071e0960871b88ac297d4db9c3845
describe
'2793296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJN' 'sip-files00116.tif'
f25a7e1470c29e74a7a5c4a7b60db0da
9da2396894f52f5d33d6e987ee141f4598cdc98b
'2011-10-16T09:09:38-04:00'
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJO' 'sip-files00116.txt'
be8a112109c4d1ad5f669b896d228d65
119865b9aab02d8268bea1fa6f81fabb1d47529f
'2011-10-16T09:11:43-04:00'
describe
'34687' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJP' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
f93286a3d729bf40feab8c562ef40884
d1f2ee8e374088624862b86f21f8973b5f4d4943
'2011-10-16T09:18:40-04:00'
describe
'346309' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJQ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
e50587a0223a6c255e6cc76acf50f2d3
45dad5b19e11ab39983ba055802400d7d5f0ea6a
describe
'198156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJR' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
f8431947a51dbca0d062a119ffb1ffd3
c9823574d6b5e974fc03ee9a38cc86056f71d914
describe
'39268' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJS' 'sip-files00117.pro'
e633cbc917b6a07abbd867d682730196
e79825f3122a8b7ccc7776dfb700ec21b98b603d
describe
'74419' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJT' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
e24f71099ea89cb8ccd9df84d4449d72
eedf45da5fea27afbeec8e3b37080878e0eadf28
'2011-10-16T09:14:49-04:00'
describe
'2793288' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJU' 'sip-files00117.tif'
ee7c714673229c07da13878fe0114663
2fa1bcd928988e98bf4575eff5447504a37f5da2
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJV' 'sip-files00117.txt'
54ff3c102f4c85f4c1166c5b2d954b79
d6fe6e8b47580f1a414a5e4fbd8122a3024ecb31
describe
'34810' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJW' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
1a0cbb7f311dbde17d5915627ef81a4d
fb5309ca22d4710954d640f5a3a5eb96372a279c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJX' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
8a6b384db2f5596b56b394dfaa04d121
77521cf8b4c5cdd191eb217a823cd99a22a3ec34
describe
'179791' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJY' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
53700dcfee709f4f48d5c1dfbd74f614
5e0f72a265eb2a97d298f85992ba2f3f92d0e4a4
describe
'36654' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFJZ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
db208b446177e71d5a159bf2e16de83f
844f9b0c6df0f222612f200c1a811d04a5cfa854
'2011-10-16T09:17:32-04:00'
describe
'69034' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKA' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
41a44bd801d5d360e0b100e2190b6db5
c3a127a9f0d645f4c3f8dd2a1601c31b659bf40e
'2011-10-16T09:08:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKB' 'sip-files00118.tif'
5a0c2d9e79fd7bdec981536a856c7db9
7e01a236affbd8b1a59170a8271a4106db4a6232
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKC' 'sip-files00118.txt'
df22754f02f01d19d4c21b602dd6e3f9
1f4de9be6cb7a4f319763c68eeebfff526a055be
describe
'33687' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKD' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
fd54072228513d7af0fcd80e979035a5
43402416c443ca75fe5c24483483d220714d4c23
'2011-10-16T09:10:36-04:00'
describe
'346372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKE' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
6be515e0d9cf931514f3a5da49a818c6
cd66cc0964264ed819f18f393a017d559a85563f
describe
'213068' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKF' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
a8f954f589d858224b1d45f2f1f7fbb5
5d0651bdf9a250003861d4ea0d947de5ff15e8c5
'2011-10-16T09:18:03-04:00'
describe
'9011' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKG' 'sip-files00119.pro'
96d06e26a83f5d23bdc27ce818305c8f
85d3712f367c8316f047cd7531a13fd285fa36c1
describe
'68655' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKH' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
d02c122ef7b3e57029da530e1644fd64
3bf67ed9a6cfd218a7c9f8ddc4f9c07cc32f5d99
'2011-10-16T09:10:24-04:00'
describe
'2793224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKI' 'sip-files00119.tif'
d7e052c876c306e2e91c77a0a867917e
15c7d851f798124814e3bf77c14058014e6737ee
describe
'380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKJ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
77a34ec21af0b176610d168f3a7f5ad5
ca3a25bfe3cafc170a844e31a3fb7a1f24fc320a
describe
'33628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKK' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
3881960d6a8a35d8b01fb4ea971a176e
b04139ca2d8aab510db586875d69e6e4bb6bb657
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKL' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
1daadfbfde6401937eb75e614546b5cf
8921b9d995f55da0559adecdca4ba6f1202d4d4a
'2011-10-16T09:18:55-04:00'
describe
'190454' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKM' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
79c7b4fa847064f8a33f512654c5c0be
d73873be921851a141df707a91cdb23faeee9a92
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKN' 'sip-files00120.pro'
b6f08ca7a740448c5ac6262169948621
cbe69deaca2c5c9a6e660985fd5a43e16e287ed8
describe
'71029' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKO' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
70911f2f1facd69289c80b4f30659c2a
b6604d5c69b41be80f6ca319d2beba20a199d4da
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKP' 'sip-files00120.tif'
b8487d162a2c528fe0a2be1e16655c59
67ec0885e37f40e9ee333f2b459e41d348bd676f
'2011-10-16T09:16:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKQ' 'sip-files00120.txt'
d1d55e263c6d36c26d8df6d6a102200a
d1b748c13ef562c17a4d014bad910d8ee50624d0
describe
'34494' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKR' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
50c113ace80829363edcc110db224758
22cec66930e4fb1ceb24eaea31123614e7782b2b
describe
'346085' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKS' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
38b5dbdc81f1bcae6562132df2492809
615389637b1c98098feacd0017aa06d7193dc0b0
describe
'186522' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKT' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
8100b8c036ebaa2a22d5a61cb1338837
c30e25698e0ddd4e5dcc093bccf61b7b049eace7
describe
'13498' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKU' 'sip-files00121.pro'
fa34487312565729c3a7de7ab17a7177
9a83daa254c0e8eb355871dba9fd54568989653a
describe
'60918' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKV' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
98a141f1519dbd21dddbe8ee6cf21da5
c55ba4e0876549343e3964dad5ff5734294aff0f
describe
'2792388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKW' 'sip-files00121.tif'
5274f6fb6db2d322e4421567e6e108cb
97ba33f51324151b2beb3cd6045f29346d481ad6
describe
'572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKX' 'sip-files00121.txt'
ede4c6e9bd2e559f5f3670920b192ac7
fb71ca85b473885540891f97f1c8bb636a7987aa
'2011-10-16T09:14:17-04:00'
describe
'31335' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKY' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
530113601d64bc43227ed17734d39ae4
6fb752a7e02743996a9c0fc540634ffe5cc9a56e
'2011-10-16T09:17:55-04:00'
describe
'346152' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFKZ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
b675b4c240fe7f5a4982ec62ff5d9600
f1e1de03d886d66ed0e8c79993a99f16733e87be
describe
'161912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLA' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
708e7f35bffb8ab041eb812af290466e
2eb614e58551857615db252cb6abc838364967b8
'2011-10-16T09:17:33-04:00'
describe
'25636' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLB' 'sip-files00122.pro'
8f179228802ac68174efd5c3b241691d
ac9accfee843047d36332cca4151448ff555f6b7
describe
'60224' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLC' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
35fe234e4c1fabdaf07970ec424955a7
2752e31c620e4c951d9ce84dfe83794d0ce417ae
'2011-10-16T09:16:32-04:00'
describe
'2792040' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLD' 'sip-files00122.tif'
526fee8c6efe5394a4911661f03feb6a
ca467f2da0ef0a48ad4e60054242539ee584555d
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLE' 'sip-files00122.txt'
3565dfae5dced6ebba68f52e01719d7f
787fbd15a0a80b42da10b766d98fd7a8dc3c9a88
describe
'30740' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLF' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
84c5890495874af27c7870481c064921
e13d5f67d297d798b7d1418efec49bbafc8b99fb
describe
'346257' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLG' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
76098ece1143cbdb468d6b5be4fb15c1
43f9b65514e7bd5e1341a939e316f12f25f8fc9c
describe
'196911' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLH' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
de795ab95d4e0ee256f678b2def7155b
9057d459e1bda480e7d772a5c2d88cf1d71d61a1
describe
'40970' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLI' 'sip-files00123.pro'
257b57fac67f68ec0e57fe25863164e1
a2e51bb6d7b87d6cee181c33e9240eea4cda2bcb
describe
'74815' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLJ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
1de62bf12d77f7c708be71663b3a391e
77638f76d0fbcaeed4913bd937639c6a9676c1a1
describe
'2793388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLK' 'sip-files00123.tif'
6d4f398a7d1ae2f48b2863e773dd040f
1240c02eaaaf9ddac1d806b63609912b4b04dc62
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLL' 'sip-files00123.txt'
4e4d26323454393da9bcd72e8aa5ea6a
b10014021eed30c0cf32be53ba415e9bdef64f26
'2011-10-16T09:13:36-04:00'
describe
'35024' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLM' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
7565d782aa68703ff41f31851e2c20c1
2773be1ee8c5d10e1cfe1092c8c8943923233df3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLN' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
b3040546f7da7ff4b64b5985f803c26e
b831914c3787a75680593e404ae629836655e186
describe
'194469' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLO' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
ee7f1e6fb4718e54c5f9bc68d65694c0
a0f1c1856ba3ce69edcea4df352c0e651012b619
describe
'41297' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLP' 'sip-files00124.pro'
0673915e819d861e828933aa49a01c4c
feff328c221f7706b90084a6db9793977d0de3a8
describe
'74466' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLQ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
1ea4b621dcf39f2f53deceb7a7b1a3c0
5bd2a52860b1c744894b2407e57bde999196b163
describe
'2793360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLR' 'sip-files00124.tif'
87b0607c93337fb747be64f0e8842294
d092ec82c2abab28b5639fdb1a0d66764c0b904d
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLS' 'sip-files00124.txt'
7fa3a8102d9b1c07486152f1616be3df
641e61bc46ebd112b449cb27db77e364010e1e74
describe
'34870' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLT' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b8d557b8d50fade4d4740caabaf233af
430658e066174e17944ce0b6e4440b43080e7e1c
'2011-10-16T09:10:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLU' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
dbbe932c126f0c4147f5d7700f0ed335
a3edd73cdcf2c5d29437d6b0a1a48bd006359721
describe
'197141' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLV' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
edcdc82ab6741aa46d3ed12c47b11a95
30ae2cbefb36ef8604b1c71653bd33530cfc38bf
describe
'41424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLW' 'sip-files00125.pro'
219bf51095eeb30f029d72945f4ce3a7
7c6d91611bc82e1122002803838fb893ee24c265
describe
'76311' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLX' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
99c366d33c02de262ab9bfa67ddf91a8
d64382aa4b35c637c7fee6fb89cc8b1d78e43832
describe
'2793596' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLY' 'sip-files00125.tif'
f766b3c931b9dd024fe90c63fd879d20
35481d4cb1878c3d728a5ea602762637884c5a1b
'2011-10-16T09:15:24-04:00'
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFLZ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
8fcd5727105f23eb877ebdc09ed4dfbc
68da7e3be874cc5e657a830fa79d6ba863da4220
describe
'35209' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMA' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
5b9cd186f8e80288cf39b6e48287ab63
aa12e74eb17153fb375acbf9df16a397d741fca8
'2011-10-16T09:13:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMB' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
b343e7eadcb2381dee1fa8417467bce3
12050bfd7f3b2783dc07643e4f7c86f9ff14c9cd
describe
'200497' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMC' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
0e037d8b2d281e458cd6dc9fad66a978
2b049874416cc3cc9cef74053f1bd5901b934953
'2011-10-16T09:18:48-04:00'
describe
'39962' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMD' 'sip-files00126.pro'
6ae85e844812dec73ba7e964086862c4
c1cf46714c5a658768cd084f6c92fabe4dbd0e74
describe
'75993' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFME' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
67244439d5af97100ca31719f041fc96
981a5149a19dbaa27abf477301cd66269eef21d4
describe
'2793496' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMF' 'sip-files00126.tif'
90c6a1311af0a63f5bec320b7df785e4
78e2296438f0c4da02bf0f9eafea6934d77caac3
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMG' 'sip-files00126.txt'
3472b2392966ca260357e07ad5c06a19
d0237302a84916be417ee1b621aa6d2d34ea2eef
'2011-10-16T09:19:43-04:00'
describe
'35282' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMH' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
705d6aa4604728fb801a8cbe16ae49fa
81e54feb9239af13c16b7bc07caa894028822d25
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMI' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
c2007820afb780a54000b05cccc34d3d
ecfdb949182eae3d83d92e1f92c363df72764c90
describe
'210843' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMJ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
bcd0b96ec992b7bc1061010584b66df0
c4cf6a0a93800c7717d9cfaa1f697e7c88031f34
describe
'18664' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMK' 'sip-files00127.pro'
9bb3df0927d9499ad5050a953fd5f357
cd3cf2fbb61baaf12d94aaa2b089fb1a1d8e9f11
describe
'72065' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFML' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
0ac126bae5aeb42faada0a88b7a00906
b2b4cea3bdf7df898878b0feabb64262f9a099da
describe
'2793648' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMM' 'sip-files00127.tif'
d04d114f02b8922c330ba3249ae6917f
c55af9b8de8d6540e8a5269823c21e9b6ba2251e
'2011-10-16T09:12:37-04:00'
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMN' 'sip-files00127.txt'
bebe827ec79666a4d5b28d2282c78a30
fb88a03540bb8f3cb8ef9cad6f14a7f36dc75c44
'2011-10-16T09:12:53-04:00'
describe
'35345' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMO' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
9acc5b46d5362539e6b71c34c41b08f0
a60239dc9f65271d69278c81bc0ae5dd389deb15
describe
'346389' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMP' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
43a47ade9c2c3f8c0a84753ffdb742b3
ca64f48741e482d3fd44a9030d47b24ba90a931a
describe
'183507' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMQ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
b4a79520053c990baea1d6da9f2749d7
412067b4b1e155af8016584a4abe33967804c25c
describe
'36922' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMR' 'sip-files00128.pro'
7546434e8df76015db1163bc8be46a0f
49e9ce9b81f1879769918dd0c4e36188530919bb
describe
'70337' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMS' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
85296f64d1068556f9616293a9a1791b
41d71b6626f5d8c6fa4102131e6c3253a338eaa3
describe
'2793672' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMT' 'sip-files00128.tif'
0ce5eda36e99959b5994c734bf7687ae
c08cca080b1166ad331f427c229bb1eb393ed866
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMU' 'sip-files00128.txt'
04beb7cf9c901bd8d47313f75377caf6
e58f7327fc497b942083b69418da4bfd16297a4b
'2011-10-16T09:15:16-04:00'
describe
'35032' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMV' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
d705137bc2a48402f1d891c5846f843c
5b6c380478a76e8cc95f8069d71ad05b8fbb003e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMW' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
c8ff720625441a1470f7a3d292d59fa8
790083677c31c595144bfdf01412c0adb9e55716
describe
'178246' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMX' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
66a586e01c0941626e0dd2c43576021a
ff177ef4b0b4e4fe755a26c3f6a7d327cde8bc8f
describe
'34149' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMY' 'sip-files00129.pro'
3c145a50dabff4f972ac4f3170ac6ba4
5e3d41071631fe49a95918bc5927f83ee857cf8e
describe
'68997' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFMZ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
242f07c700968ede8a0f3725be61d0ab
d4f4bbe847bc70dae0163185261f83de4fcc5fa8
describe
'2793160' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNA' 'sip-files00129.tif'
74bbe80575303ff2d77e6657f57854e9
2cb39f97d724f3f2a7dc6e7081d78038f705aae9
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNB' 'sip-files00129.txt'
b9ac29a0db74148b8d539061d1fdcfc7
b3f35d3676aef3174781407edfebcf3992144801
describe
'34239' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNC' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
bf2fb615a516985c396f6a459b0cd600
b11d1ad052dee5cb2f6b66755a3ed15dc1a73f75
'2011-10-16T09:12:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFND' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
c0a1f9daa0a4c2ad005e0ab82b93d024
ab21aeef5535dbc516115f67eeaa6cea44003eb9
'2011-10-16T09:09:31-04:00'
describe
'187278' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNE' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
003f354f3125ad9a8dc818ab8a45cfbb
35a66090ea4d3942927ccf799d815ae433816f06
describe
'35912' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNF' 'sip-files00130.pro'
240d80a28017495443042a09e2f538f6
3408b61c49acce2f39d2b54dea7eb30f4c3550e9
describe
'69749' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNG' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
95626cde63900bdd85d929b496626b68
db755be1e1980594142099708deedc5a9ff7cca6
describe
'2793216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNH' 'sip-files00130.tif'
5cbe6b7d20b87376925cf99a0f2daba0
44590f378f93000ffb86bd4f5d31f2a4c9165e18
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNI' 'sip-files00130.txt'
dbb1f79290e0638361ffb279165c4bbc
481fd14e6a0bbb4bb1c05844ab5ad6768c5eb221
describe
'34057' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNJ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
3d69f96cf7335ca427bcd4e58f703c5c
706505aa6b2eb7989577c764c5b653ca381fa5fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNK' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
01df7250ce8a4939d96758c26bf3c279
39ec98cf5d03f1b6abeffac866983dab5e8d468a
'2011-10-16T09:16:12-04:00'
describe
'179908' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNL' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
ec7dcd3cbb0e8a8c7ef700fae40ff327
da73df253203472c9fa5bd9444eb6c143e8f71eb
describe
'33039' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNM' 'sip-files00131.pro'
95227e99f86dc660a046153006cc1ba7
f499a21c6572f140b37fe6e01ca5bc2192749853
describe
'69250' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
e0600db90689e1c3ce58452a57f5e7dc
ff7909f948aa6acc5ea5ac0172d88ebefa31ac8b
describe
'2792932' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNO' 'sip-files00131.tif'
4bfdf492a4b9893920f6a119df8ac607
0a6d8b36a8ba322f567bbf146c1d5789ef2826d9
'2011-10-16T09:10:32-04:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNP' 'sip-files00131.txt'
615cfd5d59080159026740cb049699f1
8d1a4fea75dbf7a9efe55dc7160918306db912d0
describe
'33189' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNQ' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
0caff7ed5e463b5132833d77a0e0784d
1f5123d6593b9a90f51575a1c9fe7aa6d1e30e48
describe
'346347' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNR' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
6053c7b2f644f43a94dd9540b63d8e31
6cc44666146b65ae13a125e992bb6dd60deedbbd
describe
'184959' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNS' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
d6d88833bc770e090369a1dd7c4140ea
c61490ae6f23dfe949b6328649e2fc4a99345419
describe
'36086' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNT' 'sip-files00132.pro'
e4824dc715b75a7d729242d18d509957
31eee0b41cbb629f5439340dd2c099a7e0ff1b9f
describe
'70161' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
6a153812fbbe476f87ae189663d307b7
d190a46860caf8284ddb38d57d271802dbc6bb3a
'2011-10-16T09:15:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNV' 'sip-files00132.tif'
646fccb3b7b667e10dd4e4a11e31c699
f159b0889ca16042bf02e0f4d3e902a3e50d9700
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNW' 'sip-files00132.txt'
ead76ee52987955b94d52b049ac10060
e136cdaf6827e4d7589f2c2189645c76b22c4054
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNX' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
fc72ec6b2ae1b15c16b9ce0cda7839e8
554592cc1520cfb5a35928658e131cc8f885a1f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNY' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
2b5963a548b7539b8cdaf5b625158148
d1a2f83b78b2fc7085e132934e2d7f65cc7eb933
'2011-10-16T09:13:21-04:00'
describe
'182307' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFNZ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
4b6b02a0999c4b853846002741d4be00
aacc8567049af537ff10fab5622fa77f6c9d5519
'2011-10-16T09:15:19-04:00'
describe
'34496' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOA' 'sip-files00133.pro'
124a2b1d897325a96da29bde45cdd628
9d3eaeb7659be1b9862bae21b337c0f76595b686
'2011-10-16T09:09:41-04:00'
describe
'69537' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOB' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
c33ea5728b426d3642457426f8011880
815a5ae0358ca18292d9e86d01d62d0d9f239f95
'2011-10-16T09:18:06-04:00'
describe
'2793404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOC' 'sip-files00133.tif'
4eaed144fd5323ac79539627167a5200
b5ec8c2ccd32f3d57628c42eff75d55bc3ca75d0
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOD' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d498a94b4b756a49069a6248633e31e5
c92ba7d62119c1e04465a0eadb5001eab6ed37c2
describe
'34223' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOE' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
4d66323e310f744afdadd532d87e39a3
6b9a51844b052ee6362d969b3a988794280344c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOF' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
073e72dac65bfc598625be5a7c4e852a
d2fa02f4fde00d770befc6a401a18c774ec376f8
describe
'184333' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOG' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
b47a49e0a065ed1aff3a7a1059f69aaf
fd54f4482c1096511b43ff789a43d7cdc4f03be0
'2011-10-16T09:19:07-04:00'
describe
'34777' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOH' 'sip-files00134.pro'
9200204f4a011d6944d091147d9be145
bdca81ec837481837ba152da56fd7b19c2dbb50e
describe
'70482' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOI' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
eedf237697b6b0250d3b87d6ce26f77c
b84e6e63a18267dc71a719a9ddaae3e61c3c698b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOJ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
ec0bfeb991f3cc56e087803f48340d6b
35f9057c88307052961ac3b71add11602be5cd36
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOK' 'sip-files00134.txt'
bf67f1f881efe68237fc8e7e99dab1c5
d69eaa2eb345a96ed253eafe1b3157bd63697f95
describe
'34526' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOL' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
fcf7fbf724ee9777495a3dc784accb4b
2d2e88e90dce886177564f4acd9d215c09a4287e
describe
'346403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOM' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
da720557d820112b5c6a6b7f4f208ed8
ed517aceb142abe18a099ec66e238d37b3f447dc
describe
'169559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFON' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
f961e54c9217740a06d774ec61c55b37
3f679c8e33479a9b10dc125f166b42d2c891fab6
describe
'14948' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOO' 'sip-files00135.pro'
448c3fc26cb206531926e68dd3992729
fee3610947faa6019048ca802ba67cae5cf86234
'2011-10-16T09:11:15-04:00'
describe
'60038' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOP' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
0190ab1ee1c4ebe40993a1c23f55d185
a9266f10a6bc558049ec7839843a08dbc800dad2
describe
'2792436' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOQ' 'sip-files00135.tif'
84d655b5e9329450f18cef8df4386cdb
221ff2f5d9e417d0a6f5549300b73a2df67f400e
describe
'695' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOR' 'sip-files00135.txt'
bd82ec838a588c06f5c5e0053b498a4e
48c284ccd3c5a669973a846ce8a781569ad9e95e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOS' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
95fac41d9b888f9d09e4091e3e483b3f
32dd5e5888e325a1cf779d6ecd2b16b51152e0e7
describe
'346410' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOT' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
5f89582fe93c90b18ffaf440da994836
ce7c8f37d2f89818da048fcdd021626f91c383ea
'2011-10-16T09:13:58-04:00'
describe
'186348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOU' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
e97295374a33bb87dc09d9d774194001
02a2ea9d335670d497bc436e3c377ac2f5edca82
describe
'37157' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOV' 'sip-files00136.pro'
7d19aa4d00efd12c58de0091fb83c49f
842721057a2bd08510a9453a10b7f058c9892054
describe
'71181' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOW' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
ceff0ca7b247a15d907cce3d78220cc6
db8f4e77b12d711512e7ca7e11bfd5aa52052dce
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOX' 'sip-files00136.tif'
fa9501daf8581ae6d1c3577ab308a1e9
c714996a1cc113a7a0d6dd51c2f9a92992bf3f4a
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOY' 'sip-files00136.txt'
fecc591e2db72262a372025de842fe68
d780519c3ec0b7b8670e1c051fe765421be3f16d
describe
'34372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFOZ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
08233c5373800a4b6f74156e8e2639a9
a2b67335a1033c8135507be7ef13b1966716493d
'2011-10-16T09:14:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPA' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
0cb82680df515ac3a352cace5649f337
b62a56e235898c220a30f17532f9a6d7694333c4
describe
'142195' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPB' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
72d4b3867eee531c22b3e895709e1e79
0d72ce459780400f96a8ad75e3d36b55099d64e7
describe
'14734' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPC' 'sip-files00137.pro'
a6f4ce8ac7ada09a7a2ddeb17fc8259b
497765a660f1aea425c04154228197a7ffefcea6
describe
'52234' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPD' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
99417b5e220a7dbc11d7fcc5a9ed4876
cb4468780556d84ba9716220ed8dc0d74d205d7e
describe
'2791628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPE' 'sip-files00137.tif'
bc2d214ea66ef7999224c553e25f5958
3215fa7ced34351e04bbd8e1d57f4879c477d7a9
describe
'614' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPF' 'sip-files00137.txt'
4a739cea0ab375b3ffb4081c49855e5f
b1bba23e38426ad20ded3aaf0e9af3045f24458e
describe
'28548' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPG' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
a4b21fe757d0d9cdf273149cb478f932
3d7c448e62671ad20c57b637561a892baf0982e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPH' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
3908e474e1994d8faf32969f6ee7a681
402fbd24a37e26d81cbf408cac73c2e8487990f8
describe
'162894' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPI' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
62899066187059652358cc4dd3278e8a
dacb0c52c90ae52698206be1f2cb4facfb6c9a3d
describe
'23986' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPJ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
637ab2c794d3f56a7bc1e973edb9eeb9
53001a035d8c1e9810eb4893e17c8c34372f59c5
describe
'59388' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPK' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
c348c36d89fdc5192cf6cb8c31b3598d
72dc32784721f7e5d0c6b0e048ad8a31e40bb4fd
'2011-10-16T09:13:08-04:00'
describe
'2792172' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPL' 'sip-files00138.tif'
68d8b59b75695afa1afa27813aa1724c
052547a972a435c4985cda0ee4e406870101c6aa
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPM' 'sip-files00138.txt'
a3b5a9678e5db74274719228aaeee088
16f833a547631210158ee740ebac117233d7c6d4
describe
'30601' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPN' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
6ebdd8faece70aa627ad48eedccc4c20
2c02fb96fbab618b242e111ac92450d8e626eb19
describe
'346370' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPO' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
0714563970bd38ada3f76c2325116d71
01e8183a0a1acd2449746d9befc4f7b1fe630854
describe
'200117' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPP' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
faf603bacfca339888f7c2a2a356f1c7
13e21610e837420f869221344081a06c03c17122
'2011-10-16T09:09:01-04:00'
describe
'40336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPQ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
ec597ad22113b6b5803edec148791632
8e2c5199d41a386945e54f55cd27aab7a08c34f5
'2011-10-16T09:10:47-04:00'
describe
'76081' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPR' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
06671d3407b39c2d65efd9e2a868dd8a
4ae4885133aa1bafd9484bff911d929d3666c0c7
describe
'2793452' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPS' 'sip-files00139.tif'
8a54bece748199c9e1c97f3545a93b88
6334d5b30ffed189b64a764ad120088bc253c24b
'2011-10-16T09:11:25-04:00'
describe
'1697' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPT' 'sip-files00139.txt'
711dabeeecf1787ff7ea03354728a18d
15b9a530859a2e900563e88b1ea58a75246513d7
describe
'35625' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPU' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
83bd3e741e3e6006987ec4130d7c6290
75d0c9faa09b842711ad9de922ad9e8e39b22eac
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPV' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
0ef66c3dc2b1e8963398b064e787f597
dabd5166c0c403d8a4983e17306e8c2e05a9b584
describe
'195745' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPW' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
c6a9526f7adbce40cd6b14894c1fcbcf
ea4e160d50bdb659b8d9a388cb1330b44670532a
describe
'40492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPX' 'sip-files00140.pro'
5d2f56797cfb451e8f6409a2037ea204
7f92bfbfb9d585e9a83ba4f1a11e026a73cedc33
describe
'74372' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPY' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
8b695af797061f5f67876ad4f564e500
e8484794eab5fd756e9d4f83af14db286dcdfc04
'2011-10-16T09:18:13-04:00'
describe
'2793604' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFPZ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
870313209f73ec7ac2f9e900a8b432b0
596b1c75dee6ae741f15b7b2cbedf6d32cff93c1
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQA' 'sip-files00140.txt'
5c761dc68eeb3098faea79614757f84c
4bf041ada39a08505537eb841d9bd0e0d6392f16
'2011-10-16T09:11:49-04:00'
describe
'35474' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQB' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
f33490b3011399a8fd07f173db80e6c3
10579a6f666df8c99caab3c76030f19a7b94de0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQC' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
92230b9429fb4304131909a59478d879
47cb96a8bb243efdab2e29afc06b47342833cdfc
describe
'213992' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQD' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
bbb21b5ebb58c46e63b9bd216c521da6
148c7eea718e54c1085610ad825bbb29977fac8b
'2011-10-16T09:14:14-04:00'
describe
'12544' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQE' 'sip-files00141.pro'
b17be90a0fb137bb66adda6dab73beff
7e12125f852f668dcf8e51bb7c2732ece8865af4
describe
'69007' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQF' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
801f24479a127676eb94618629268f5e
8f66eee94d59f8636160c56e1cc713a967c9924e
describe
'2793440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQG' 'sip-files00141.tif'
4b6a85433f1c695e51021c7914e95e35
42281903b1c549dabd3e0c4922275856dbae04a1
describe
'543' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQH' 'sip-files00141.txt'
435e72dd55db06ff1bc1f3a905b7450f
f58be379502206fb84bf71a3dc42e0850a7710cc
describe
'34660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQI' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
f1d5eee572ac749fe4fb15954fb11a48
2cd64b7738db6002ac1c6fae468af42ffa04d974
'2011-10-16T09:14:18-04:00'
describe
'346367' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQJ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
e88e674ad7755a880f9e91e67e2e6821
0f65c94a55aeae3a59771aca4e3b075ea8fcd857
describe
'185250' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQK' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
bd1b36b8ebd7c3d0af15366922865ac5
58545b7327d49db748df26a349734efe253c969d
describe
'33784' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQL' 'sip-files00142.pro'
246570bc2225abd0706c4b337c8ec0cb
2e1dd2034dfedbfc822e7cce92104c8da92b34c8
describe
'69916' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQM' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
ae2a143f906dd7d869886e23370bf582
59dd4559ff6b9260c26f660111cf108257511968
describe
'2793336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQN' 'sip-files00142.tif'
6b52fbe17e48db6b71ffec660c54fad5
f82b3c401ecc5f4af2ebb97568bd259cb23a8157
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQO' 'sip-files00142.txt'
1aa65cd5c3b14eb2830187339d8eece6
e3901c2f482515cdb5b8be0739e08886c0034cb8
describe
'34657' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQP' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
e1ae7688ea38fb486ab45f0832f0e11c
a9e48c441fae7d75f600712b5843c0e8c574d3ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQQ' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
dc8e292bf8feabdff482e9e5ce91075d
9580f1ba6af78fb3a71b40bb6e8421eb90613575
describe
'189005' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQR' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
d2117e553b10c881b41a8b1c09f1cc41
e08c40958e830d1419c791b36fb305116ece7b2d
describe
'37045' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQS' 'sip-files00143.pro'
8f279a0a96a9546c002d2b49db1cef0d
45423484c26895df4d315c4b01557b082a15ff52
describe
'70735' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQT' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
85dfafcc1ed645eff006ebfa5e74bf21
717be715cfcb9b01726bed03fcf7537acd1d6b81
'2011-10-16T09:13:18-04:00'
describe
'2793168' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQU' 'sip-files00143.tif'
11fa7f5e996ea0b51f1c63881cfb09aa
ed231f8d8c12f61cd9a40004d65d15386524f340
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQV' 'sip-files00143.txt'
4bd992df5e667ae83a18e7d56bfd4c6a
78b7542887c8715a75c848588f43b367367291f4
describe
'34291' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQW' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
86e9df40832a28cf7200108c68780954
ad726663a1470a6f83afe59d77dfb3a801f68cce
describe
'346365' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQX' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
1357c28c3db4f1925ebe679da9736793
1174546abc56d06e8389ea60ae39d78bf86de8f4
describe
'166040' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQY' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
fe8ae814dd18749fe257bc675270507e
fd51ceaf5c7351178838f5f7c7104349ffb78f5b
describe
'19573' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFQZ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
2fefe872c15b087bd0154ad1d32ef61e
1e0010eee51eca23a9a8ec05cbad1da727c774bf
describe
'60524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRA' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
a11d38a3dec22549d34b1072b688390c
2f279eef905b818132cab9dab319a4ece6d4a79b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRB' 'sip-files00144.tif'
bf2aa9c1b54c7749ddab13949500eea8
ee92c74cdce5ecf7b55d0b7b438b0dafc4ea9788
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRC' 'sip-files00144.txt'
1d1260495e54a552dd282a6eac84de2b
79eb6bfe9a57bd1efad09a9f024168f1f250f388
describe
'32008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRD' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
e9c69839b8c2adc5e2b584bb2e0befe0
ceb19b0b93498cd37a2e15354f49276994691d5f
describe
'346198' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRE' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
b4de4f8f11e16edc1bf99a2fbcf45dda
f7ca99920af54fc03642072c12bd0c24309a355a
describe
'170856' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRF' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
e380b060fe2b14644716db7ca5d872c4
eb71f9fea839b13fd2e0efb5315cca8f61d0acb5
describe
'13330' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRG' 'sip-files00145.pro'
11d81514deebc4f3153569f401da2206
9e17f9857752b3b421a925b5054650d84d283f77
describe
'59248' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRH' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
04d6785f1ad0ddc0ce265ac116d6c02c
98f03c5d34552b87e2006badc5a42d58fddde6b0
describe
'2792392' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRI' 'sip-files00145.tif'
1334335672b2bd8a3fb0d6cf3345d4c8
324ddcf34328600f5948d0cf30ed0f6dd1474eba
'2011-10-16T09:14:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRJ' 'sip-files00145.txt'
a86f282a017a448dc9683e1cc2547674
b0bba16232ede3e921793698855c812bb65bf8d4
describe
'31133' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRK' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
6670bb9bedabe3f46c3e6c439b394b7c
041ca50c791c88d9d53291c027ea12d3b21bfcff
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRL' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
4f6eb4fabad0956959418fa270714041
5758967f045f350908db07f7c73f14d01f27ec77
'2011-10-16T09:11:58-04:00'
describe
'176738' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRM' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
699be25f764538f949c43419621560d8
6b667d4e09d1616d91ca700af6295accb11a5c73
describe
'32871' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRN' 'sip-files00146.pro'
05b36b66f94122c548d5ca9a2ed25f92
0240cb773b07ba61a7892a618c85c7876dc1d5b3
describe
'67680' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRO' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
70499c052e4fdeb0a29e07ef06e20386
6e4f66978315bf8d9dfc899e8674c77fb27f53f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRP' 'sip-files00146.tif'
8207a9957ede36c217b9b49d87402147
5366a7732c1a69e672dfcc5bf2460f1a7565f163
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRQ' 'sip-files00146.txt'
03501963ff18870cf8d418e237e02a75
fb36324fbcfd24ec711549e07cd600b796fd2147
'2011-10-16T09:13:54-04:00'
describe
'33889' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRR' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
f30e1679c8efa763da3c117e1a054c20
ab7503fbf29eba1ecf1b5f796cc3fa940bd77c3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRS' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
dcae44f17deccf23f8fa4fb9439686de
00f5ad555a3d117402dc3ad0b3c0c684024e5c8b
describe
'183371' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRT' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
f8637eeb160492865598486c8e25846f
ddce3923378f4b663ea558945472721e0d73fc2d
describe
'36043' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRU' 'sip-files00147.pro'
bf6ed47ad04249ed881fa4ed5f9205f1
b4f16832db498957807b707dfe3d90d87f33078a
describe
'69208' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRV' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
c54a69fd44b618d50941dadadd4769f5
1d8fbb76995ca8addaf902fa2c4ad25ef1d85eea
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRW' 'sip-files00147.tif'
edd5771d5a04e8fc1871aa5c6fab8b29
bdf2e76155f678f19658986a205c0d8157a2e16c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRX' 'sip-files00147.txt'
82b2bfcc9fc5510b1a9944e4a966cc97
5d080049e29c0e5141de6eebf7bf4034462c8378
describe
'34196' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRY' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
40a833e9bede95aea0362cdb9a0ba307
c7e388435711e10725c25420e1c314a82a70e2ef
'2011-10-16T09:12:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFRZ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
a0bfc2f56ada3a2cfda8c0f1ea819ee8
c7758ff95841900398e05074c19d522d1783b2f7
describe
'184722' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSA' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
074ddd9dd2479f6527fbaa5ee469366b
ce0deef6d0ab4113555fce445683f8539f8afcbe
'2011-10-16T09:11:44-04:00'
describe
'37245' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSB' 'sip-files00148.pro'
15ff6d01e4bbababb02a8814f504ccfe
917c6e0aae251a4dc9345545b1167ea7f5537988
describe
'72072' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSC' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
61fa0362047b6c8a591eeb60ebe3e1b8
0377ecc9462f670b5a55465b9d3ec3313822ebc6
'2011-10-16T09:15:36-04:00'
describe
'2793268' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSD' 'sip-files00148.tif'
27c74fcd62449f11dae483700fc28138
3e1fae9d3e8e9fe192fe32a8fc23545a1287b841
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSE' 'sip-files00148.txt'
b4527277267d03acf8b599a10e4782e3
45c3dd75183a793857c3fe3f38f343e90f730dc3
describe
'34245' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSF' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
1907dd7f69b6af8dafcdee2d0b29d788
5142ae1f5a0e03d3d1a6ee199c4ae36496a4dc20
describe
'346202' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSG' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
456a330e5a4a5857f5629ccd2eda70a1
b189496f3edf463a84a2adb55987b37bcbc7266f
describe
'171898' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSH' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
73b5c7f934f8ebc2e8fdabe52dd5624d
7140290c5cd758ae5f4481059b0dcb90985f8fe2
describe
'35059' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSI' 'sip-files00149.pro'
3ee817c3d3c5da88efe4defb3bf3c992
4c302bed57fc4aa8644e77e50a46299908eb2bed
describe
'68159' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSJ' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
295c7cf67f4478902382cac410998be6
5eefc3ba3ca09510e65611b73dda223ac308358e
'2011-10-16T09:13:25-04:00'
describe
'2793164' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSK' 'sip-files00149.tif'
58ab78a33ea04aa03ebb101f5e70d311
fe6779c6802d30f1de2208929ba3b9b50750e663
'2011-10-16T09:10:42-04:00'
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSL' 'sip-files00149.txt'
34277f22df899336522334c1f77a832f
41874d079905b6f94a9576cc1ecf97ad853d0759
describe
'33615' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSM' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d8c9f679f083fc1400e6f0d5108b737a
9b08b5e0d76b19024d5250e146654b167d349067
'2011-10-16T09:17:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSN' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
24a9540f57cae39144e6953a10a497fb
3be0565a2b0fd20863c8a6446fad14f93438c4bd
describe
'180987' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSO' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b893668149757370e003eeb6f11de371
61bdb53cbd4e9169c3bc994814d14966ebd4e1dc
describe
'33371' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSP' 'sip-files00150.pro'
66375c67cd2c84f213fa0526e2d59b50
d314a48c2d360f5df5a2d4317618b607cdd67b01
describe
'67787' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSQ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
11305b08e716b3c950ce8e846fb34be9
6fab14593305d6cd3fc607b8a8954015c002edbd
describe
'2793084' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSR' 'sip-files00150.tif'
c967c3df238b56aa407eca1f6fa31946
f40c149ad05082d199736a9f3f3e254a7739d36a
'2011-10-16T09:16:44-04:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSS' 'sip-files00150.txt'
5cdfc8e731ab14bf97f400c270f0b5ef
28ff9961dde86c12dfecd31d473b778578ca8759
describe
'33251' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFST' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
d4853b0aecb4137ffc2880fb0f591a63
f404a8a595482edf04d136cbd15e353354a5aa01
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSU' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
f20f8d3e961545b06ee8b56019334d9f
a1a3a2e74b3e522d4ddb646b1d2a831eb7e3104f
describe
'191097' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSV' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
f4c79d8666a9bc4f90a59122b38e60d5
67693b14d9aad535190aa3a515cae14a79a142c2
describe
'37696' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSW' 'sip-files00151.pro'
a1fec6f0c0d20d2643b921cf21d68c49
eddf124e8386bc910f9461dce5ff91e6e1fbb7ae
describe
'72252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSX' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
42bea2773054e2fe1c877b56e6264fb3
5ef99a8e78bd240167e36716063247e0e50842a1
describe
'2793392' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSY' 'sip-files00151.tif'
1659565282156006c60712f6437eaf41
90490b6dd2e0fa5e8970293654933dcc65d699df
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFSZ' 'sip-files00151.txt'
a53b3ddcb4279aa8178019444bc2f274
ede4d1cbc60479a5d920521401b5e71d61088b5f
describe
'34727' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTA' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
283661d8b7c4fabcd4b12222bc668b8e
ab63dba3dd4021b323c2ac7b3f588d1760aed2d7
'2011-10-16T09:16:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTB' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
6cae09d7e42891cf605c6c374d354106
e6984dcbd73242b921ca46f81bcc757a65aebe9e
describe
'183280' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTC' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
c6200794f6d3b51b5c1dd985e7f75f2b
25d70f062aea93ca3811cc2801b39f581b1b5fd5
'2011-10-16T09:12:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTD' 'sip-files00152.pro'
d5a6bc529c0d465c69dc2b9707a34750
aa1e65db9f90939cae6e52f41c1a6491fc29a5dc
describe
'70877' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTE' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
d3400ea6583c2e30343385c9387ca6cb
10db049e86e0164b182933b16e1cb26bb28dc3ab
'2011-10-16T09:16:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTF' 'sip-files00152.tif'
93ac9f2100156397a16b54c6d485998b
5d4172c6c1c350d8b1b19784926be4b316b091d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTG' 'sip-files00152.txt'
bbb484753cc8255b9a7b0aa1917b02ef
5eade918b584502d4abc9ba010edc5089c7d2fe3
'2011-10-16T09:16:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTH' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
388f410e70f9c5d3dbd18fc448125dff
a65b58890432209e19a7d767625a90317f9cc155
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTI' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
841e190dd7251234d77952bc6d124354
4d49cb0f89ff7e6cc442542450cb9226cc465c1a
describe
'178139' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTJ' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
25fcf810776923e7b09d2c53617d4c50
c790d4ec0e4e0bf1132c2c86b2f9249cd1209762
describe
'35837' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTK' 'sip-files00153.pro'
9b8aad834fb88689e04d3402c4d2039d
859a3b53d63289bba36ed21eadb677ce2bcc5470
describe
'68234' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTL' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
f58b6203165679b2945621441a5b350c
b9d6a0b888ff9195fd2c001a3fed4b69e8cebf61
describe
'2792992' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTM' 'sip-files00153.tif'
b856dfa13947af5cb63ea1264304d796
69dd430e37f54fa5c7909186bb8fef5a41eb5830
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTN' 'sip-files00153.txt'
e4314272184c5bcaac1c3351c935e5fe
c82299077039dccb58a5aa0ffa1f72d607e7ab9b
describe
'33472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTO' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
9f86002204039e9149e617ec1aa913fe
bae569c69df0d3a5d17afffdaa90b776ab18fbb7
describe
'346350' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTP' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
57bba8efe2d02c146f05167bd9445f02
6f251622caeb39c98a604a443d7dced3a0fa3e8c
describe
'187216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTQ' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
eae7d87b0c25d6441cd8852b59896118
4c26e4ac5746c95e86cd079021d989ac4dd06dd0
describe
'37066' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTR' 'sip-files00154.pro'
af33952eb9147ced1713ecf51151bd86
93bd766f5553d160c7317382c48fc84b3ba8cb07
describe
'70330' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTS' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
17b1c00187ef3eec9266401935cbb235
8e67efc627446eed369019386f2ca894514a6b8e
describe
'2793080' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTT' 'sip-files00154.tif'
65a5ab11156604c7f0b45f8ea0310a62
d45856a0b4cf41fa4a52f748322af4e600f77e31
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTU' 'sip-files00154.txt'
5bad342a59a835d8d5a497a02aa09483
32012f6f17d48c08e68955857d9bca86a1384c2a
describe
'33932' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTV' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
59ebaaab2e2ad3d1649c863319cf9309
d6a7b1dec3cf570f5685e386d317712a6836efc3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTW' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
0612137aa0cac6a73913c61ee4a00f68
46d24db15e8ddb890e55f5a972712dfe71b2bc36
describe
'171534' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTX' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
213bf05746d03ae344348a4c1e350e7e
cdc34025b2e2eb567465a1fd72863e32b4dd170a
describe
'14135' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTY' 'sip-files00155.pro'
79f256770d56f05ad9bfc70050b99b34
fe637d799a257d30d2a0e752b28b40ae280bdaa7
describe
'57843' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFTZ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
2ebd730a49504182de46f448e0d47ba2
45c698ae91bd307ac18fd512636581ad03ef9662
describe
'2792104' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUA' 'sip-files00155.tif'
cf344a425c923e2edee7cf83a28f9f20
80b56cc8fd740a52af13da12e7d4a6bf7758e775
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUB' 'sip-files00155.txt'
de1f4f56fd7e44fd25c7cf1057a5bbbc
e5db998f8468859f95181382b427ccc81e7632e1
describe
'30582' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUC' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
c980eb8f4a423b7e6a89f641bd026d49
309de937b68ac34ede0bb508988eb1478e1cc35d
describe
'346348' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUD' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
b6768cf7605ca1d9c66c95a2b9bb78b5
925019c4fb9d9a0c889de7024eb3715179e61149
describe
'152129' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUE' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
6d46931aa318e59b2c04ed84049fc709
cf1b52e33d1ddbf9ce845885c8994fb5bfb930d0
describe
'22153' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUF' 'sip-files00156.pro'
e9bf1a9f07971a4bbaec418c5de6b37c
5c3d53e6e102913eadc6f2950b9ac78c96e0a7be
'2011-10-16T09:12:07-04:00'
describe
'57523' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUG' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
8edc25a73bfead489fb5853159d97eb0
3c4438559f6c7469a1bbeb1950dadb382f412164
describe
'2792120' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUH' 'sip-files00156.tif'
252af35b0437ca17ab78fa7309f0a70e
08103b96fc27aa88486a22bde2a866ab93874af9
'2011-10-16T09:13:09-04:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUI' 'sip-files00156.txt'
5966e31eff5871188a59495893290d1f
2e8f7d6d577e5e7f67061d0d013e09fd3d40dd67
describe
'30247' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUJ' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
ed140d715d54980257b68537200d2f21
84578855fc071d271594cbd69f0df34853601efd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUK' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
fdc7a5ff71e81b30a9604c3fe12ccad4
9f75f816ce6debdbec919c42b511849afd90ee37
'2011-10-16T09:14:53-04:00'
describe
'193547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUL' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
2a7c497abb09fac4325955f8f3e61a78
8cb00db0e2b866d81183c35d8a2b0fd19e4cf4cc
'2011-10-16T09:10:38-04:00'
describe
'39708' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUM' 'sip-files00157.pro'
fe9607ca3cddacb08beecf8c23a7ea60
54e80e100bf051c49ddbdc4433dcf875330ae0f7
describe
'72692' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
f85e2c50a7fa58c7de5d06213a9b58dc
78da9c3c70b1bcb0088ada378ba5d5dca4d81ef7
'2011-10-16T09:18:50-04:00'
describe
'2793312' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUO' 'sip-files00157.tif'
c16035d1bb6af8029427b3a5681ace0a
7373b0130f2bff70b93ae4254d4b0c78e52e0838
'2011-10-16T09:09:14-04:00'
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUP' 'sip-files00157.txt'
7497d10e9dc481853507f7a8a26e0a68
ceb8dafe10d517dac96e437df884b7a584297fbe
describe
'34927' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUQ' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
97595264e39663cb5dcce7144cb1ebe8
f434f901098f450121c3482249f006116e55ba76
'2011-10-16T09:19:09-04:00'
describe
'346361' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUR' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
c270ba26f506d5738f10176fa2a2deeb
e89f8458dd28c2e5ac4509f7cfe333d425d5b194
describe
'186455' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUS' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
0bb18cfe062ec841ffd868a1fa586db6
de48bd9ca7ec834666b442f0a8855e5f79c4ec7b
'2011-10-16T09:18:51-04:00'
describe
'35756' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUT' 'sip-files00158.pro'
b858ab72891e54a190a16256365a3785
dc55025ae5ca685a2e476f4d3a221e06af27428a
describe
'71207' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUU' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
d0130e562ff30d75fdc2a723402e6fd1
c0a20a287a465f34c5a1a5942dbdc72944cc59b9
describe
'2793356' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUV' 'sip-files00158.tif'
dad11907793fd551c14a606e42b3df73
a78157f4f3c994c74848c4e8eea029417c2928d0
'2011-10-16T09:19:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUW' 'sip-files00158.txt'
3ff93a056aa9aef744d7cdf3627d8f39
59a4bfb6132b442ebbe6d8b4683cd8de057e584e
describe
'34751' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUX' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
8a5b6e1d0e1e691cbf0795104228c8b1
4c8c519457cdfa071124f5f82b7d2728dcc44922
'2011-10-16T09:15:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUY' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
a89de7540866f8527427d2550248bdc4
8ef9238e0c5b990574d785ca336e40f2ee92e741
describe
'178919' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFUZ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
0d6088ae481b1c5f029ad5218140aeeb
e24ec3346d111957879a73f71754b70d66cb9a01
'2011-10-16T09:13:20-04:00'
describe
'22032' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVA' 'sip-files00159.pro'
c828b1001285fb76916d46fd212d3177
c754ea3781c58f6a443163a5573fd424c31659c8
describe
'62823' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVB' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
e4706c4afff76e00046a2d6ec242c3ef
7dc7d10faaed50ad52e6c9cd44d34b09b1b22091
'2011-10-16T09:11:14-04:00'
describe
'2792700' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVC' 'sip-files00159.tif'
7ea36d354d524999d993d98158eef360
57fed977eedb4b7eea8c18a4b15dcf3b3d5754cb
'2011-10-16T09:18:11-04:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVD' 'sip-files00159.txt'
c4a8191c9480f5c07034b56b3e479972
8392d27dae31c892e69267e05dd524f9317c70f1
describe
'32694' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVE' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
ff2300a4ee76aa2d14239e44abfc04c1
812abfdaf196ac512fa66011f6f64bb726081274
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVF' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
7a38f2657a72e6c04354a92014b719ac
667ed49b488e705ee10cadbbf61372008508c691
describe
'184110' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVG' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
ca2326fae5011f8c6edc0a8466e9ff79
d2925cbc86554951d466272ac4fdafb4d4647793
describe
'35085' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVH' 'sip-files00160.pro'
210c5b1411fb38ed8a3a91475f742ec7
25263dcfa52627e079b45b0551be734c2e877682
describe
'69078' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVI' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
e01b648995098e454a5ec4e58ee1e2ca
a27d251312d0f3bf585d2333a31a3fc85b9441ff
describe
'2793436' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVJ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
c314ef1dcf9698a7f893d8a8deb43319
ade9cbd3f4e136459d5df96c33b4f4c686490b44
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVK' 'sip-files00160.txt'
1fdacc1716d23d0b91590af42d3687b2
733043c3883aa829fb68bd35c85e98a0e54a0eae
describe
'34383' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVL' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
072a42ae9450502240f111cea79e22ce
8b99e17785eb472ecfd28fefb00dad8e43dcf821
describe
'346353' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVM' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
a8abe23908767bcd549562f5bde83104
fb198f593e241b9ab94c9f92881b3a446559cb3d
describe
'200124' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVN' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
c7402f4556f5a62055bbd9f4e0453b92
e57f963f6e7cca2330c2849557f269e7b2294373
describe
'39833' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVO' 'sip-files00161.pro'
be44427ba4dbfa0bc2b091b0c886b6a9
6451c7fefe4390c63b80d0342b8dbecfc55edc73
'2011-10-16T09:12:42-04:00'
describe
'75035' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVP' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
d855f6a813584325c49e599e240fe234
7ec2fb895a700a0fa5d59e8c472fc96af3ef4463
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVQ' 'sip-files00161.tif'
509eb68b16245ae5059dcc6121429665
3922e60e82f35433e0ef01c5dd03d733b23e490e
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVR' 'sip-files00161.txt'
5be33df87d07a1270ad51ea38fc7e60e
e25622d5dcc14c588f55bf83490a0042fc1d7100
describe
'35231' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVS' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
d04d6a31b30e47ebf37447af685b1e3f
2d5edb69973f247070aef0d0c3b72ff73df4372c
describe
'346378' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVT' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
0bcc0e3c71eeb980bbd86a8bd5ab1317
7e50d7c1da82ab7eea0f04c387f1d8d17d0be06a
describe
'186456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVU' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
868618a26b47fe93ef29f2b4b789cc60
31f0faeec97ede6aa83d4ca1b77afe788ea1c3b3
describe
'37158' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVV' 'sip-files00162.pro'
6ff9af88c033149660fc58fdfc9ac8dc
9d24d08f0e9c5be2c38603f9466b5a81fff46135
describe
'71512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVW' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
a4fd8e7eff97057c92fa460da05ac3b7
2b0a8d678d4a92c914e0e0e389d297122aacb0cb
describe
'2793316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVX' 'sip-files00162.tif'
e7cb872ed4484137f19ca77c0d93c389
8b6d7237aea48a89d7a5c4aca09936d0fb3407a7
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVY' 'sip-files00162.txt'
45053059a567062098fbe48beda8a184
ead8f9e2bd16d9f78486fbaa9e2b7f62f2336129
describe
'34713' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFVZ' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
12150b70d6c863667d1d2bd72fc49101
283fc6fa388f66c9031d7467debff5b2b59dbb3d
'2011-10-16T09:14:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWA' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
a0bff2af51f491b360ec1b0beb70828c
c61960bc94cda7f4d0646dba0748399e37e57bac
'2011-10-16T09:17:39-04:00'
describe
'159772' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWB' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
84e858d73c4a0a89c1416c04216ed1ea
699f89cefe162c48df6c53c49d2bbd78e8d82f97
describe
'28866' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWC' 'sip-files00163.pro'
6b0c970034098b67fcd722a962865668
806cd61e9323e7df918b00947e8f49ea0c49eaa0
describe
'61208' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWD' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
d7de39e79fc90ff0cb561abd9fcbc05f
ac5489f96b1e7724ecbeb6d290d3f04faee9724d
describe
'2792588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWE' 'sip-files00163.tif'
2e39ea38ca6e8fb9b03de9b7e3dc98bb
988820c992d6d9ae0c47f7bc0076052883b1c7c1
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWF' 'sip-files00163.txt'
daa8bcfe1b62b2d5737362e245ebeee7
f3445118f13dee4b245d35bbc3b7315d136af23c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWG' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
8daa9af95268405e9cfb7588e62c0aea
0ba558245d58a582d3d7a837b37929f83e9e79f9
'2011-10-16T09:11:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWH' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
96caca656e96fef099cab2ac06992d8a
64fbe20346939f00f0b7fcd48aba1e3b736462f4
describe
'183678' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWI' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
df7f81cc101701f912f906cff371532d
b5a0413dca28960487cea410573c6748a9fe0cc4
'2011-10-16T09:15:10-04:00'
describe
'34184' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWJ' 'sip-files00164.pro'
3aa5f5d5920e4cc8314dde968fd7aea3
3ddfbde80d84f6acfefa21b75ae80c050bb947a8
describe
'69477' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWK' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
af045dea65c698f1e3d64c4b7eaef539
dc23417b74f5fb0db279baceb4cdb0c9fb8abf4b
describe
'2793108' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWL' 'sip-files00164.tif'
0ea4bacad898fd6b3d8f79aec5517c7f
77b2070cb9eea2f8478f797864f0b481ded2865f
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWM' 'sip-files00164.txt'
ac08b7ddd1149a054d2cc1bc39fd388e
9fb70e46f69c0c56a83f10781e3b32c86e0bd508
describe
'33722' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWN' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
1aeb93a65614a8915f47662591160b4b
47330a0c0200bb63feae08258285f32e0809b850
'2011-10-16T09:18:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWO' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
1dda2b7f77b1ba8321c91f791e2efd14
e1d336978069ea496855b3c138cf12ecc0e09e37
describe
'182508' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWP' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
ec67e86e4d211409ea5287ef7ae69248
8318eb623bd3ce76742e582ed97f718ffb8fa6ab
describe
'34427' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWQ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
5b1fb7a75ad33da773f7234017e713d0
21424de3eb7cfde8b7c0f52a36b8358387616826
describe
'69033' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWR' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
35cc4f6e1963b8d7bf68f3fb3dc5f3fb
f72db5b22498e5dc675a4d203229fc7233559b35
describe
'2792908' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWS' 'sip-files00165.tif'
c550d3781bb2c0dfdf9aca66fcd16c68
f2bdcdf42b099143ac0dfcee0b37bbec4fb75992
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWT' 'sip-files00165.txt'
aa5a534ac202853aca94ab971544f311
535459cef13c7c09be46610badcf0ea85cee6a27
describe
'33810' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWU' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
c4046116d719fcf5bd0f096f6257166a
c3b7cef74ec053a10e648d22f9162a3b3e400b78
describe
'346406' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWV' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
915212ce59d45f239cc0b5580793e907
0ceb8f2be25466ca996a91ab7b98c2a91b40ef49
'2011-10-16T09:17:37-04:00'
describe
'183142' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWW' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
7edc70a03d93d920e5dbb8849996c08c
8a7bbc6843aa0cac24546a09e80f66b904e09c87
'2011-10-16T09:14:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWX' 'sip-files00166.pro'
7f19f96a1e1324714e9bc6f692a58ff5
502b45f6d9c017b640dad147d8d0340753b6dbea
describe
'71704' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWY' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
ec79917475bdb06ac63bef0f0c6c5647
b0a235f48aa4b28c65f67d285732323ea4cc90ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFWZ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
8be941e44dfe47543517368d865e47b3
8e7895a2bf56b08f28a82cb0d7ca26f8936c2556
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXA' 'sip-files00166.txt'
f8755cd78cc8d914061584dbdaf16863
d6492f341d6379137ecc8d963b388e98fbda2273
describe
'34908' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXB' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
fb64341f3441ee1209eb07baa81181e7
bc9401baf9fe1d19a4d3024ce900aa1fa0a30ca1
describe
'346282' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXC' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
cd9ee1c680f51a55b8b348b46a6e3940
2452404f9bfe2e404839a5ea2cfdb81c8e606eaf
describe
'181872' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXD' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
4e7af75da16364cc8d85721dac3d65a7
cb678f0d40f7e3390c3821cec6298936f305a862
describe
'35069' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXE' 'sip-files00167.pro'
0d528f653c2ce511cb648a34c0036d26
83e46ec217d91dfb46fb64a0532bccedd239b584
describe
'68331' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXF' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
88ba0dd8d6b89ec50a6f9b46a8b8e892
bd7eef62ebc43530cfec9cb45780961fe35e9225
'2011-10-16T09:15:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXG' 'sip-files00167.tif'
88f90c3e66d516b36c0151efa6861b8f
462912a7b5d3cc33606a1b4330c8240b63aa4e57
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXH' 'sip-files00167.txt'
b73635c77229485dd42f4499cc43987c
23e0055a894a3c9b6289e5f401e815b9ee60a792
describe
'33928' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXI' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
b8605f7d76f128ca708229e6bdf3e6d5
01f5520477269af71f120b39f8c1dfdf55419fa3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXJ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
a1e727f4750ba5c4da21aa82647bf656
aa3681a6a46f890805a0c367822a01cff1aa9cd7
'2011-10-16T09:11:27-04:00'
describe
'196049' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXK' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
2225f6ccf5900af3cc32400a43097bab
4aa6ac6fef37eada1302dd383af74d06d60e1bf9
describe
'38448' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXL' 'sip-files00168.pro'
8284a8db80b7c864d814dc2a58009663
992d500ae5d0e3e0a7b7ca480d607011e1ccdcd7
describe
'73474' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXM' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
a67a806539efee2b8f312b6753e73c09
5490d65955a57719684ba17cd5e694a4d7d88f92
describe
'2793368' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXN' 'sip-files00168.tif'
cdbb174e57c648270805a11d5c3111f9
e3bfc44c6d4ea87b895025f8a63c969fd4d4fcd9
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXO' 'sip-files00168.txt'
170898141f46a791a283b0f8fffa7518
70b62ff0231df8ad3d032dc1b4c213ab7b795657
describe
'34842' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXP' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
43a2b248dc0cb0c739a28ef7b57b4890
a78dd1b594084139cbf98d6c92b0875676875569
describe
'346591' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXQ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
9762b74abc38972b3addd237c35d3c57
80b27d65c08e02fe086be94d85a950eb222560e2
describe
'200963' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXR' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
2033ccd1131b7e4ce6f92900fd5c4208
0ffdda4cadc0c49d28fdd135279fd310cf58ae60
describe
'41665' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXS' 'sip-files00169.pro'
7769abb67e0eec0e20d6c711e6e7464d
dd16f54e0aa8bf2e5cc336bd5b895bf108b4ed4a
describe
'74500' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXT' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
766bd37b1ffaf3bd65a89deb9bdf5d38
1ed49a5022e64bef557e95661c92831f41df0cdf
describe
'2795568' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXU' 'sip-files00169.tif'
a954a557723b82cb66aa70ea98daae00
881c25a2298df735a10ed2d5c29e39d88b94f31b
'2011-10-16T09:18:52-04:00'
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXV' 'sip-files00169.txt'
1d053e508e814e8fe7418ea40a362e18
0f14ffca7acd145cbeebf77ed5cc3f2ebab7cf90
describe
'34853' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXW' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
47f3ebd9f67410aff8872b14092737a7
506ca64d8839b59f53508853905ba1d022ff6404
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXX' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
a43b006e251930b3fda1582f2b61e3fe
f77119ffdc449737eb70dbdcbb9b6de7b0b82f44
describe
'175677' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXY' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
c6111a08fcb02229da40ad54f0129cc3
564b544e7da521f95a5bb28c78cbef1ab5bd5270
'2011-10-16T09:13:51-04:00'
describe
'33107' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFXZ' 'sip-files00170.pro'
d56137ea8d964ceeef58f337135aa671
c7bdbc0cb9ba093701c96c6b54c99e7b3f750932
'2011-10-16T09:11:24-04:00'
describe
'67025' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYA' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
1a91a926444956c82a4215952c58e82b
b9845dda920bb036186a3fdf85a4d1c25c791934
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYB' 'sip-files00170.tif'
c67dceb8924141ffbc4cbca279b89170
d520504523b4f42bc88c0fb409ade8d733cc76b7
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYC' 'sip-files00170.txt'
6a38c18e9e2008637f34507555851f5e
97a8809e63851f1953d9bb938d2e178a24390aa3
describe
'33410' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYD' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
06cbcc0a1555d57cb4b6bfbc42e5cd69
9b6335180cfc49aca91008c4c5240cc254867504
describe
'346683' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYE' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
ec91bc885ec954cda455e672dea1cb21
4b4a5f058d0b001868caab0340969a4e788bd888
describe
'178084' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYF' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
8220dffe86826ece93e859f49cf389fd
00ba9560c848f9848d9d0c37bcd945ccbb067a84
describe
'32529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYG' 'sip-files00171.pro'
8d19e3ac8a2bdbd22400cf2e05e5717d
fe93717ec836f4a24b71a34dfd98e119bc4176f3
describe
'67412' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYH' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
2d3aeac3d669e7c3f83ca666c91c3030
3f58222f94624b1f7a45ebc92c9c571999d91330
describe
'2794980' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYI' 'sip-files00171.tif'
d36db5887bf5ea008be483cc7882249d
134a3d9017b836816a63b5883920f9f2e9563db2
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYJ' 'sip-files00171.txt'
33f3fb3429412200de863ac9d33c12be
be1fe0078813a441ecfdf8fa42d8a2b9fba395da
describe
'32800' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYK' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
b61b6d0a6b6876924a39a3214ee8500f
46e3af84dbbda18e0d7212ef09751f5ec065a892
describe
'346179' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYL' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
0d4325cd1245d7bec08b851338d6a8de
9642ed4eda2264674b7cf74f1bae58284df5deeb
describe
'161013' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYM' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
41288b513add0654dcfacdaf4288ce63
4b0b4be13ffb7f79a2f4fd01020aa4881e2de70e
describe
'23440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYN' 'sip-files00172.pro'
bf3f35a35f6130f62b2da50a7540cbe9
660074f82e1c9f53d7841868ffc228c2002a080d
describe
'59065' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYO' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
770b02b03c80384a8d3b56183c4c0821
946ef61986ce323e8b29f16101b6d899f9760a99
'2011-10-16T09:12:29-04:00'
describe
'2792084' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYP' 'sip-files00172.tif'
457255ebaffe17d63c65e8dfa53ea581
4382ba0499491132e7f91f5bd71f22991cbc9183
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYQ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
6d928fc47987dea6919c783e9935f74d
b8bf42c67144cc969849b4aaa51def5043e7460d
describe
'30610' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYR' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
324cae4f97149989bd7d15355cb5659c
beef30420bbc7a71c0f28dd01334775412179503
describe
'346649' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYS' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
2b9492a682c156f199f80fadda6cca71
c7839e7e18fa9476cc0f19a54a4ef2af2eab2ab0
describe
'183310' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYT' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
8a68ec856097f7e5732f709e20cf42d3
fb253fb2595a42596375585b537bacbe4a53439e
describe
'37140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYU' 'sip-files00173.pro'
f26e45e3d4709d468beb5de2b3c2cc30
d291e6a49dc61712cc3c656c10dea07f20ead79a
describe
'70097' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYV' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
43e99b80176e32f4bd61c04a9c49ddf7
5d07ed48b7c71aaef7b92056fe91ac79b2bc5bd1
describe
'2795456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYW' 'sip-files00173.tif'
3aa79d6fa8feb6f45b6ba389feedcb7d
acf0641dfdfc69299e8103b71c972cc2ccd460f2
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYX' 'sip-files00173.txt'
6611c3544da34b9e0f9f2e662b5d3bb8
b45abce9d49479ed0f3d87538c3c166c99fcfd2d
describe
'34808' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYY' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
4385ca08971bd374f531cd44e15c5d62
bbfac4f0200ec6d0749cd196796daabed0d1117b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFYZ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
7cadb9d29793467141d08ec0d02ec976
f0cba986997cc7661aa16c2c915eb05ed40fce3e
describe
'183222' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZA' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
fa3aaa436cd655489833e44698c7ec04
5afc32b2be40e0c04019998ebe42ac04b1959f38
describe
'37083' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZB' 'sip-files00174.pro'
60f215dd49725ad2721609f7209a137f
fbe15e052b60731aa9a7bf1d1e78521a39a0146d
describe
'70856' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZC' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
39564989d09b81281836e822bd5436bf
f9784315fcb727bd3dc690bacfbaf7a123f23254
describe
'2793116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZD' 'sip-files00174.tif'
8065269dc049f0d3e03d11a61de50f89
05b6d6892a09d21387e635475854aaddc592c7ee
'2011-10-16T09:17:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZE' 'sip-files00174.txt'
887c8a1323617a69451453d7654f65bc
b8871786747de8e432af1c5e2efc051f6355ac38
describe
'34069' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZF' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
58684be98c6173a423d3ff5e0a81acbd
a8d387dcc8b3c2f5334f770a99cef8c48ad47a44
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZG' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
465ffaf6c11eb0dd972253c695b27a70
2019feaab0d3f97e2468771a43ea62f7a1daa189
describe
'168700' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZH' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
e8a7c066f1bb6bdc3321fbb5223f87d1
d968f6165d0701c5ad5a1fb6b9c7738bea5f492f
describe
'12831' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZI' 'sip-files00175.pro'
4b0ac217cbe1a6ea97ab8019ec2357ca
6f63e71f3f554522c1f09dacc16acec7b0ea6bee
describe
'58404' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZJ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
2d05720e5f925f7dfcc2618a21f8d5fe
00fcca044a67fe2e2dc051791e2f67ea1b3e8271
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZK' 'sip-files00175.tif'
c882e239e0ec32156e2799cd105f13e9
3236455838b5394c044316ed6253426c7b3f3346
'2011-10-16T09:12:49-04:00'
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZL' 'sip-files00175.txt'
b7559488a2816fef06787cf50fb20f5b
221cff54a7a29a9785a5a7c055a0a0a7d6118af5
describe
'31053' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZM' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
556e7ae2949c273cb23fa4b08385eb4f
44ed76ddf5d2089bdba1520023bae8bb26568c5d
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZN' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
15fce2701252ac0cd594d5def87a375f
b58d2c41ca437a8e205d86a7fb3e8f1e7e5f2d95
describe
'173634' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZO' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
b4eeafd0a55b36d06abcf9829e0e13e5
9c8558636e7f9cd88474107fa2b4e57d8e029c4f
describe
'31655' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZP' 'sip-files00176.pro'
9cc324a5e56094bf611527b3f4acf9b5
9676edeab1507c67bf996a7d9a5e8e4add964a16
describe
'66151' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZQ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
22c155a6381e8004c1aa361ab8d4df43
a2e432ae40de7c4bfdef666a3f0db6b18ae12d87
describe
'2793204' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZR' 'sip-files00176.tif'
00f07cde9a172528b9bf3dc0974e14d7
a4826763f1afaddebd7e999392739fba32109c48
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZS' 'sip-files00176.txt'
ae4dc6a4a40527f79663f6512e5c8094
9d0f0c1067746be95cfd302c5bbc886cbda48d26
describe
'33951' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZT' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
5b4af75001c6e1bb75250a84daa32538
a6cb5ddbecec94c7acf91a2dd4134d2819b807be
'2011-10-16T09:19:11-04:00'
describe
'346598' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZU' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
d6d42591096d9289c63da6541339a892
743aece8aacc1bf41e4883e80b035f9b654c1a45
'2011-10-16T09:13:44-04:00'
describe
'186601' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZV' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
a79fb04ac0e44fd9d79a9d4ec7fb2bb4
377232264ae6a958cbd7d2b083a1404fb1e7418a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZW' 'sip-files00177.pro'
09b4c2afc8e44771be93853accad305d
9061909a3dcf7ba0c8ef1591e96deb8d5eadff69
describe
'72896' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZX' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
28e85b964308aa1064437fa219b1d7cf
ac9bf431871717302196becf55d2f6c7cb1f8095
describe
'2795588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZY' 'sip-files00177.tif'
84f13b45215532f73a0c58c836144397
97a08e40e8484699f6c8969ec33b5a3e006895ce
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABFZZ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
bcb54500b02baa27d604fd4252ab2e45
89d66f6e802db5303df73c59432559bb0598ec97
describe
'34928' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAA' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
be6ced8dc1ed5bfe7ceac45e5ee5e6a1
288877daaf4340935d1217f28620a338be01ff22
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAB' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
2375caecdf91f087dbd8f232e5773674
f524ff929e58c32c6d1fa6d32eb5e5e5da95f643
describe
'186140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAC' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
ca27f24c83925390e3459eb42890300c
8c55fc006dfa0c1648857940932002a75108ec27
describe
'35431' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAD' 'sip-files00178.pro'
90f98f28c791e3fea836d3bddc26e822
94768c4a0342074b274406a6e8dfd90e487e3d18
describe
'70566' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAE' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
6d88471a998ce5f8196484d82c0bdfec
a98a2fe2394c3ab6c29811a2c3681eb0d4b45114
describe
'2793056' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAF' 'sip-files00178.tif'
41f18ab4870334513ff6605a6ec63153
12bb078e8efd000cd539166700ce95eee8d95702
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAG' 'sip-files00178.txt'
6b6edcde1d700308f57ebb2c0867a08f
97b424ea3d4771f8b0f9b25076e55b85b6bd93e8
describe
'33950' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAH' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
e001b650b5afa824434b357def0f9754
63605c0774c1f2944d1f7ec9604abf519b98da27
describe
'346411' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAI' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
443c4590454ba3e4f2fea82cdcc78e40
e55b5c9854548a0ec9436bfcb64f29a2dbe20121
describe
'193724' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAJ' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
0d7f4d673a11a7685bc479de89d93d4f
b42ba71a29934c1dd5fb25f44bcb58b9bea41745
'2011-10-16T09:15:42-04:00'
describe
'12091' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAK' 'sip-files00179.pro'
948941037a76ab60c70260a59df64003
5394cdc3eabc04e73ab66c7bd5976a92d40b4e47
describe
'62752' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAL' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
49c0e81c9be1cc8f16500d0c3e479e55
e705d1aa08aa9f2e6d6897b8e2e7db144ef95d09
describe
'2792528' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAM' 'sip-files00179.tif'
9a1d15165754dba3b8070e6a248a9369
57858e047914253334cd732678401954e8688554
'2011-10-16T09:17:21-04:00'
describe
'530' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAN' 'sip-files00179.txt'
03c40c656b58ac43446d235e926ca0ec
80d59dce44b6f1cdd7789b8615d3132116f3b589
describe
'31761' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAO' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
d7dca71bc18576072738204e71250c80
e27d1696e2de063cc06c165c52696ce9d84b8cca
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAP' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
6a9fec40afd2feee04a0852bf53037c2
e1585ec84052338795b20c94c4f6b269f6397521
describe
'196777' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAQ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
9d944425f1f32fb6bfbb2bd188f616f4
194d9f07a15fbd58cc1d7316b8a5efa0d8821905
'2011-10-16T09:12:17-04:00'
describe
'39236' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAR' 'sip-files00180.pro'
7510a141da80640ff43a82df6957c3ca
2f90f047706a03c530282bda7f1ad3c2819add9e
describe
'74234' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAS' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
a8edbd909efbc1b63bdef6e36b9c289b
714f5fe1e39ffc150111faabd9bae46b51f1153e
'2011-10-16T09:17:50-04:00'
describe
'2793252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAT' 'sip-files00180.tif'
9ac60a911882f5ab397bb5224571ef08
320627f882ba48397646f83a855ddd5c3af7bb44
'2011-10-16T09:18:08-04:00'
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAU' 'sip-files00180.txt'
21a459e07ee066ae4d633d149e018186
daf7b505e1eea5480316a476380fff24f1c35f0b
'2011-10-16T09:17:29-04:00'
describe
'34671' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAV' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
b275b3588bf07e7ecc687d3b58693508
bae555e1071888454a8caeb4f1ac9287ab4d96fe
'2011-10-16T09:18:45-04:00'
describe
'346330' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAW' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
748eaa91a6474efe7600629eaa219185
6f4f362e14dc69a9622d35046c5e2e1fcfb86d7b
describe
'195660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAX' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
7ab0fc622aa645092db7c970cead05c8
f4ff6032ba33a5dd5af63d6f2c41e21adde1d2bb
describe
'39667' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAY' 'sip-files00181.pro'
2144d3c9c1ae0e660650bb1b88421687
c2aa086c1e3a1e03c0419af1f239767322d6b694
describe
'73964' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGAZ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
780e9b89dcef216312b95143b924f734
3daa6118f1414a333eacf7d7421bb29d7278f4cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBA' 'sip-files00181.tif'
385385f29acf971ce75513d3457df235
2c106d092dde9ac67719ab3d751e251ebf9f7b12
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBB' 'sip-files00181.txt'
3af1e845ae7be29ee6cb8967c8af4d25
bd75a21c9c1cead65e75e85e9265888eb125c64c
describe
'35064' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBC' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
c228fbcda1ae877abc3b8ffc8a651ea0
122011201fefb1f76945b2e7d80d8b950a613203
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBD' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
26dc48298619c0e008041c139665cf70
93da348c6a8047edae35efee1b0e474b12ce3590
describe
'198984' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBE' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
46618c63013e868b1afeb889b1e4810a
bee9b2d78a3afd6b5cd817988909cf6f9f89f9bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBF' 'sip-files00182.pro'
9f0dbd9bfd62b700ddc75a36f2728eae
906e4583b00a534f5bc6477e00cc718294b363b5
describe
'74356' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBG' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
0dfe9e91c1898d7625963b169dab8abc
b3c80091e8b2897aceaffab631f33ab00237660a
describe
'2793480' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBH' 'sip-files00182.tif'
359d4dba88863198a51aad20f4dc1c3e
6ec598ee1fb211cd0ef3fe2a3ced14ff49e439e9
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBI' 'sip-files00182.txt'
725db33c059a3eedcefca1e9b52f678d
712bece37e07e246ccdc79219894d3bf5cf04c90
describe
'35364' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBJ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
6177e346658ff736ff479d37771fd6d1
e7ac34103a00c50b6ded18c9563d77bbc0c795c5
describe
'346306' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBK' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
47ac49b1bbcef367f0c9f20010e04e8c
9f2387240be29ce1c046b5470876c97feca07867
describe
'198726' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBL' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
6b6297f155af0fff2fb9fd9a5b3b5e83
97a6141c900b5f06743e9b09bdde4a82022afd42
describe
'40512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBM' 'sip-files00183.pro'
a593b95e2388d7dad7205f65b99052de
99323fb1faff37e78714d64a6a2c161f6ba2c176
describe
'74526' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBN' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
ea78f6a4a465fafdc885355bd78fbe64
04f70792054627d429bb523577cc81ca20b13b9f
describe
'2793608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBO' 'sip-files00183.tif'
79da22f82ecfa64351177f173d3e28a0
be4592276051d27beec1376f7b779d639ba8896f
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBP' 'sip-files00183.txt'
daf225a78128c0e6d4a16e143db4edcb
963894fe701165fcd2f078a2889bd8551b5c4163
'2011-10-16T09:17:30-04:00'
describe
'35106' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBQ' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
cc871f78431792baa1d7944133f0b6a2
007459afc738117618dd99ed3efa8cfa917f9b63
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBR' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
6977eebd0d3f9fdb64273c67f2b8a865
22bf339662d0939ad2a3f18801e68160f779fed2
describe
'188204' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBS' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
2294272b080f4da2ff06f07e1b233637
fbc5dbdf8adf413e00ef175c304bc3859c4f32bd
describe
'39135' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBT' 'sip-files00184.pro'
34435d195cec1a34a64c0a3e94993c0f
3dd6dde890c0e7aebdaeec3f241c71a6dcd791b4
describe
'72152' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBU' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
3bfaf6f773c392bfa2b17e04f8b41110
bf3db20b8aed2f6e5ed5e722fbcae7523d336a30
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBV' 'sip-files00184.tif'
a85c68ceb2221af0235ca1102a26cb25
8bca672429bd89892f774ee49b2c0882281c1fa0
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBW' 'sip-files00184.txt'
4852bd9b0d171dbcd7448235d89727d0
d3fadcda4ee06ae9567328069b1254fb0617fc2f
describe
'35121' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBX' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
54eae92a039acf4ccf23b3b400987060
0d9fe171fab3e9a75de4df9cddb0d130a4eb45fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBY' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
21238d8456de0690b81a151c111edbb6
753c162a40b9a9a7b28383882c6698ae51538e2a
describe
'176864' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGBZ' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
94937307e67ee785aeb3fde5c4c5e9cc
d4191163723f3a71b459ff549ff32d8303984233
describe
'33344' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCA' 'sip-files00185.pro'
bdb6d52321d4ac1fa0de5e65accd00d6
b8f8ad3d707b2186a2b59b3159e999b8f781763f
describe
'67825' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCB' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
996bb98325e345b3dcaa2db27bd5c0c2
59c09a20ab2687515b1ad03b72ab4f41fc1724b2
describe
'2793240' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCC' 'sip-files00185.tif'
1e83c17a690fdb252726f68da5b2ac59
f6136421c52a4bc445ddc0c8a282f15cd9862bba
'2011-10-16T09:11:04-04:00'
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCD' 'sip-files00185.txt'
17506f509ba3a52e50850d2fad5c2e2a
952494ff2e1700ba3b1effdcca49c78fcaea61ca
describe
'33904' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCE' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
3a3612b782f9557c84f678ac0d47836c
f324aec4fd3ca969fcad56e23d6d83e3ec6e9a63
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCF' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
4974f2b8459d37055a98781d19e47dbe
e3c6bc0931db89b83f34617bc9ab22391a6270d5
describe
'191316' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCG' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
a4b0c4b0adacd7e95df8f2720aa83468
0ebcb214018a3ea3b23bdd969652fbaae172f634
describe
'38228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCH' 'sip-files00186.pro'
8c335536cda96899f19a9d4f2f95b8e9
28aa2879fc07fda7e640d2c69efa5e5b69186eba
describe
'73963' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCI' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
71f22250d9c70a15f5f7907a737f94a1
192343798eea6f5cf05da5d23bb6a4bde1765874
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCJ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
eb26613a579e6a565cad7223af1bca03
ade5ef2ece0e5e9ea5245335bed694ee5408e573
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCK' 'sip-files00186.txt'
1245f9c651f70f266e45268f2d42df1b
a331d5dcd3fcd7991ca8195ea8a1a91ea80bc3c9
describe
'35424' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCL' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
68e5b5f5c02c8e290d24a6c034e4396f
ce8949291be4d0cefc83d0cf317d1079f96aecc6
describe
'346682' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCM' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
56b9caa5c9ec847a9938c32f940fd106
2c16ccce3a75d72d013156b7c46e9f20124b7497
describe
'162368' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCN' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
c392cf6589382a3824bf4c7be297484a
406469e7970a2ed15cb5787a755a39149b26916d
describe
'22571' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCO' 'sip-files00187.pro'
4fe1f916683f7faec49a4d4be0744aa8
85e6fd9bacbefe1192e90df54a77c6bb50a1479b
describe
'59385' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCP' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
da36806b4a2b443d6754c55d6a6fa97f
b4bebd76071cf9f36df8d86b6e5a1982cff1ab72
describe
'2794592' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCQ' 'sip-files00187.tif'
b4d210e14efd09223bb61f8bd8b0c183
13050311bd8f8e0fa01bf026e36691bbe9614e62
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCR' 'sip-files00187.txt'
5c372cf4ce36831dc25a2ad5d1fb0f34
0060d89c5e5e347a6bcddb74ef1207453b64d00a
describe
'31092' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCS' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
f80451cc9b554c45ba261ef0c8e3ddd6
cfdd6ff049e473f4f6b9ff326cec1f69b19bbbfa
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCT' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
5f23ec2a79e11f4a8fcef1db48150ee6
1167bc98869aa986f9291141979fdb172f12776b
'2011-10-16T09:19:39-04:00'
describe
'156923' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCU' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
bb64a36bb624bb9597868b335616c632
db240a37ecbaacb755a686d40f8b136d335af455
'2011-10-16T09:14:09-04:00'
describe
'23061' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCV' 'sip-files00188.pro'
95df0a64ff944f8419cd292a3677648c
418273fef682ff04536753d819837bf617a87cdd
describe
'59543' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCW' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
4e1b7bd7e8d011fe1faf784d128a66c9
dc825019b9d70af3ba4fc9d336534fea47651148
describe
'2792128' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCX' 'sip-files00188.tif'
c790246974310c37414140aebb8e8238
5ca1ea29a83b0ab6dce16958930c141950e09bcd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCY' 'sip-files00188.txt'
30f953e8739b5d1e70459d52effde2fe
3a2b63fa95ba99a7b0fe24de49e13ee1fa5cfa65
describe
'30769' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGCZ' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
68f8c5474fe18f23478dc781082e9275
5d1660b796c3ab1033e8ac044e269bf832812d06
'2011-10-16T09:17:05-04:00'
describe
'346665' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDA' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
29fd77ae1407ab8b56256cd15e86c288
ab327bc1997d5527f898a45e710d072bfc9483fe
describe
'195791' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDB' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
722be0c9dc7140393ebc80e2ea189434
06ff241246b3a0288c78906607287f3a5cbec394
describe
'25833' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDC' 'sip-files00189.pro'
dc538e65377c3dfaaef14f0940f7dbbd
2c6f5041ede98888504e296b34c2d883c2cd2e10
describe
'69461' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDD' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
c7ee5f50e396bc325ce8455893bd1495
3e4c152a2752b875fc156bca395f36335639ea06
describe
'2795320' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDE' 'sip-files00189.tif'
61d00ce98e783c2b4945fdb199770e40
d7aadd9799fc1040226e3a86e62c798b795879ea
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDF' 'sip-files00189.txt'
1635d5b9f1782488a0d298691cc0ed4b
79ad0e505ff981a59444767f5244d508a890f9e0
'2011-10-16T09:18:29-04:00'
describe
'33945' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDG' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
3e8c2112e8ed05028fbfe738abab24e3
6503cb3107ac700a49327b0b30833765f1aef167
describe
'346385' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDH' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
00e85369ec9b5eda678217db420957f3
55d74d258a49409a563692ea3d94ac5da3cece66
describe
'195281' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDI' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
8c081f6f8bf55e3386b5f6b63a78f598
cc79ba7058ca76e169bebead4ca451aa9aaa537f
describe
'41008' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDJ' 'sip-files00190.pro'
2a34ec2801df60768c2db4e7a6146e26
cc21b10d73df9e45b3825d133c9a1302644c9714
describe
'74883' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDK' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
3801c863719ebffee2f1e5c58c7d7ed7
b3864dc8ff92ab600f28352dba04cd2b48ef2634
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDL' 'sip-files00190.tif'
46f9d6e4ba0d240f233d63af663eb90a
6a7a28b448c1b22b4dadc6fb64d0ab325d30545d
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDM' 'sip-files00190.txt'
f584d928c3badf4622a115861ad98bf1
5e35f9dd0312aa4c0fec0914d5f0030661d92764
describe
'35507' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDN' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
8581d1e9c32aee6d874d88cf18eedcd2
f607c4e9921a5153176349e19bf7f4ab7ba8d3cf
describe
'346644' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDO' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
8bb59d1f68d4ae98ddab98d85dd412a4
437e5e683fcf29d46b59b949856921940b85faa6
describe
'184941' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDP' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
b2e66d7ea518da53eef47e68c7d6f035
cfeee4a0173b6d40a6e5ab477861cf317d38f9b0
describe
'36234' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDQ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
c127102d8c1fe61776f81be2a0911a3c
f60b18cad977cd008873a59d62d94c6a6790d18b
describe
'70252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDR' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
a0ef87be16bf95fe823382a907f32cbf
d73664266be1da6586d1151fe2997cad4149256c
describe
'2795524' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDS' 'sip-files00191.tif'
77e63aee8bc2e508e23356fcc3ce7dcd
11ceeb37bf0aa10076ba19e1023cdfed0369ea7b
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDT' 'sip-files00191.txt'
caf2c3e36c77f945033f554fdccb5774
3da317ddacc47fef41383f3ab7b3ddc4e367fffd
describe
'34906' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDU' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
075496b30a1deff66ed09d2abf8bf210
f0c8c769e996caf8597709e48532bd85b293b060
describe
'346312' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDV' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
a2c14b7fc8f0927b73e11d9ced2f0bf0
6bbe8c47180e68da262536000bcfa82254c8e0eb
describe
'187542' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDW' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
10265374ef46b77416753c7e6f5dbebb
5cdc5330f8384323a2cfa2582d62cb310f605ab9
'2011-10-16T09:16:30-04:00'
describe
'35211' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDX' 'sip-files00192.pro'
786911f9052df5b680c4337e370c190a
700efc8d0e6f86e6ad706cb6f3568240bbae9393
describe
'72080' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDY' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
b4488fe9711614e7bbe4c9c0f355d4fa
b6a69e557aab101e38ef251038ec593d19da8669
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGDZ' 'sip-files00192.tif'
952c026359c7c4826c1a08568519218e
2d2c03c01c1fc8fec2bd6a6deca63521a21847c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEA' 'sip-files00192.txt'
2be5e030e37e4a54617ffd538e2a5550
a8faa9f355e7fa79fb9d4d888c4a878c22f76f54
describe
'34666' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEB' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
ad64175d7cd9909505f66e227b29643a
31a33bf5a3d83768099412bcdb71c8e821069f77
describe
'346687' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEC' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
5d48a777261c82077f9cb0a39ccfa8f2
413ec874d5d452a8fd0b28fd96504687dbbb3131
'2011-10-16T09:19:15-04:00'
describe
'186207' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGED' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
54a2c38d9831cdab76f1cb4b328a678c
42a0819864c53eb79e956dfb4121f177e3d49509
describe
'36128' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEE' 'sip-files00193.pro'
74370af17d1853af23cd055a738f0a53
6caa7a805d4f67a292bd6c1ea885f41c8fb66d34
describe
'70417' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEF' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
b9de5b730309dcc284c0d00eb8086b49
57ee7c0b842ab626ae29833a9d6239b859b0eac2
describe
'2795440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEG' 'sip-files00193.tif'
32ececa55afa7fd319a5b53589d076eb
d43b546871d01546f0d542701c7504cb68818e97
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEH' 'sip-files00193.txt'
10ee1d36551ac7ce4eabd6670776b3e8
861cea776fb04b245a5f9cd83b72925d06af8082
describe
'34968' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEI' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
4dbd9a14b5bb30d3ba01d17ce56364be
3eb1d7598e3664974e5a1ac75f5003a15e7b985a
describe
'346336' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEJ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
2b666cd932e2bc957b83cb697104cef8
712cc620589b19ad980a0450e6739a8c4b3977b5
describe
'179460' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEK' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
a9dc5370bfa01ae50717cb842a70381a
30bafbfc92a8a2dcd901d77da5ccef0f9b669458
describe
'36101' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEL' 'sip-files00194.pro'
650defc71f010e05967d195dd6fed659
474944d880eacfe83107939d2b35d6f3130e04b3
describe
'69639' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEM' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
eca8bbf4ef10b0c98f5871b5a2216024
eb2d6bbbe853c542b7af5f13bd7b71214266c61c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEN' 'sip-files00194.tif'
d5f30a73e933dbfb179f074b99278e1a
dbdd63da9015d8f0b62effa97baf84334b95ac1e
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEO' 'sip-files00194.txt'
c9b96ddf4d679362aab1e8b4ee05e2d0
e7cecb7ea74b453ba7668b2908170fd57d4fe7b1
describe
'34256' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEP' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
a8326afa61d150936fee27eb69a6eed5
ba1475251f946556ba29f0e0d81af0dc7c014278
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEQ' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
4abd8295da65e34185f492d07e9003cd
457fee32076bde13e1f3260fa3d10d674e0da472
describe
'179581' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGER' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
7f5f6e14e49398e573ecce7a70fd5618
57995fedd4140ecfaa14570e4e410a2f849c7963
describe
'36323' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGES' 'sip-files00195.pro'
7a6d2e6e6c449aa749ab0914b6678bb5
6c5eef08fd93aab5ee9a8371e230fb59b9fb7f21
describe
'70492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGET' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
9f50dc86f4a0da97ffb825cd17fbb00c
82f07c7e0a98684b83b665d433975510df7d80cd
describe
'2793572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEU' 'sip-files00195.tif'
01369e2f015558246f59eab43b6813b1
d895a0f5cf8b7a08c2a1c08c9ab4a92a603b0ced
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEV' 'sip-files00195.txt'
53b5fcdcaaa01c8fd5f1047d2e40b0f2
b985dcc2e6dfc69792713d00e6891fb2b846e1bf
describe
'35385' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEW' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
6d6d89db6af65c84d26b0d6ff2c520f7
dd7558ad78bf8774a4a48d76b5d85679dd6edfbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEX' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
8fd395d61c455eb5f835794f5d01e0a9
e6e20950dad8d2049da9707244d3f1bf5ab7951c
describe
'169457' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEY' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
994449835c8d912089e76708798603e8
253ca3b2eb7d916c77ce5396540608417684b9cd
'2011-10-16T09:17:15-04:00'
describe
'23937' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGEZ' 'sip-files00196.pro'
f4581c6292fca919551242066bb6723f
2e3e976d374ea46d82aa57a6cea7376a21401d02
describe
'62725' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFA' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
6dcbfb6ef346985863676ab6b5ba35ad
0fc09f5bc4f8bbac5019596693b0c4ae5feff398
describe
'2792904' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFB' 'sip-files00196.tif'
2021fe7139ae5b15c6967da403e4e8f5
d8cd54b342d739dcb54098e5267484e9bb0a0caa
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFC' 'sip-files00196.txt'
f7e06b59239cd8d6185579cee55eeef6
6a5e140543e90fb9b09191f828e3922a6053bdbf
describe
'32494' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFD' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
fc13df2935e4f2b8acbbdd25afe0f85b
252e082c5433e7c79c79e30d7c22bfb5d827ac84
'2011-10-16T09:12:59-04:00'
describe
'346373' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFE' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
c0c8ed50de4f9eec90f0b32265874c82
a6b09c8c9ed4d2fc5a9fab0ebd77f21e3c0e7365
describe
'166824' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFF' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
3ad90d07a16294a6bc6aa33961c6150b
f331e3306a4960b396fa83fe3a7d74274fb8bec3
describe
'24765' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFG' 'sip-files00197.pro'
7580c5578b20a79f464a09ee9b35a04d
e9e5167cad0b197b4c8edd312c3a55f8843c38c9
describe
'61513' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFH' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
a8f137f08f55102043a27762a66c65c7
91dfee1a569075c612dd461c0d097a8d19ba60c6
describe
'2792324' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFI' 'sip-files00197.tif'
b2677035eca62f0fad5b7a665ad34013
c2a86484e23bf8da446bb03cda9b33a6d08b75f0
'2011-10-16T09:16:48-04:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFJ' 'sip-files00197.txt'
096ff9e09a6dac3c4fed08d190695bd7
e301c2197ed1637042dab31ebe5fbaa6add7c25e
describe
'31307' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFK' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
a0fa496b5d4e7c54f4ffca3b69c22a46
3fc593cda9f80454f1e1dfce5a94145f5cf53f68
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFL' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
59fdc6badb5d8096d16ab86349d7b3c9
b0bda8a73f214bca60fdd2b845860cdfb4a3e0be
describe
'191578' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFM' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
4d7ab87868ff599de5edb5c818bdb4d4
45fd88b76b8e9726e0672a1e99e2eea2c65cca35
describe
'37802' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFN' 'sip-files00198.pro'
c0b69b5f5c9cadb247b8650b73022cb5
3ee7a86685839a1c0d963b8946e8a41a74bbc0fc
describe
'73900' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFO' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
9a2a87dfe667cc43c811752973aa367d
5551dede52fb128dc33cb3238bcb6d9c33a791d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFP' 'sip-files00198.tif'
a8c889023e2c1720ef9bda564e3b57af
83439d3b84ab34b9f4756d0acfc95a5631d8037e
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFQ' 'sip-files00198.txt'
3b0c2f580332681172c84721dbda0564
13c5c2ed3f15abffb9d6e9709bb762ad00765b4e
describe
'35519' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFR' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
40c4a5cbd1a700e9cfa8aced91904f21
9fbe74ab493bfefb95b31b96b581dbeefc79e84e
describe
'346255' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFS' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
6a7b2bfe4e3e698e81bd703181fa8a6d
6f11b3cec8c124f4e02adf50ec93291657be145e
describe
'195797' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFT' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
54588e04c728fa7269a9ced8f98096de
d0addf1aff15d7ab899bfa0b3f6afdc6cd7c91a1
describe
'38964' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFU' 'sip-files00199.pro'
42567ab4c86d668c0ae8eb26f08ca8c3
e56ed10be3a5ed618110d1e3e3b0c51f5e19b0ba
describe
'74975' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFV' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
807f07fbf924160fc37cd0132c8e763d
170677c48a60b97a57b7e624bab6147d290d00c6
describe
'2793580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFW' 'sip-files00199.tif'
25b36f30a51f30acf28d91cebf1ae848
ad80018269b72523041cfd1bfbdea8d6c9e44bba
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFX' 'sip-files00199.txt'
5e2142d0d06574c3ea9022a20522be84
b85cccb6264920253344e91702e198b56c688c09
describe
'35700' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFY' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
b02d84a419e42a056f07403242e52c23
340b2e121b60913b11f31adf063444f0c7517e78
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGFZ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
47cc0ff71e342f8fff8be918e6ad9e18
d110b8f1fd9508b1f7265c87eb7b520190202bff
'2011-10-16T09:10:37-04:00'
describe
'192027' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGA' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
1971d5efdf25011226e247ea8bff596a
ddf75bff166b923195f9b0dfaa7ba6ead0771060
describe
'37121' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGB' 'sip-files00200.pro'
050819d10dd19bd143b755852720818c
7a1f4906c8f618f4f455fa4dc92c3d340d9b8d23
describe
'72265' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGC' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
e84111fbff786928f4ec93fd8d1a3841
1a68ea7eaf7dae81759868c3ec098f9fe177ff76
'2011-10-16T09:18:34-04:00'
describe
'2793676' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGD' 'sip-files00200.tif'
a95a71e669a5e01c1b2f9ef0c112be6f
3d5f2c5ccd6acab56f622639be459f4bee7c33d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGE' 'sip-files00200.txt'
3f21d9589a036c592b479b30bc0b5dfc
cca9c7e18246a95fa0c13e8a2fe01d04060c2289
describe
'35413' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGF' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
9d717b7619940f65813685acb4d3cea4
a423c82c24c4b569a8171f71543ca1cc332939e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGG' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
589f058623b027b4cc12e4689a6039f4
332f1d8097e323743fb9c737582a06c1ee0540a9
describe
'174537' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGH' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
b9b89bb0d3fb293a17d36fbca1e797a0
66e8a35edc69978cf948324b58f82dd202de0662
describe
'31273' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGI' 'sip-files00201.pro'
e8fae6f53eff9d8806887bcc75557e86
81e18a71f84d9462b4b0ffe70a1796842f32db71
describe
'64267' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGJ' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
a24846422a75438c9465e5d02ee5079a
8552e41a5cccc22755f573d398cbf97ff8472fc7
describe
'2793052' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGK' 'sip-files00201.tif'
d6473caa6372f78e8453fbabd27a641f
1bfa14b2f89997f93f2161e16aaa608ef650ff4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGL' 'sip-files00201.txt'
a9e63a8355062ffd198409e11f73c023
0e34555f7df8862062fd90906471681155d659fb
describe
'33495' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGM' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
a406ecff892cbfa53eb4679d7e733a23
ea97e05bacf33f4b9cd57dfa4a1bfc00499607e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGN' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
c356f434c82e86f3decdc1f4cd747630
c62b1173303e748f425a0360c217329869aaecfc
describe
'175385' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGO' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
e2e55c377ffcd2367b0bd12eee601a6a
877439ebc16642d0aeaf47a0cd826c9e4523b8f2
describe
'33580' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGP' 'sip-files00202.pro'
d6a82fe65718e4e925cf5d608ba66411
8545783a35e2457a1410571d889916f685219dd8
describe
'67482' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGQ' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
0758c2c6fb9866d91c77f3cc7de3119c
2e3616bb2f83d1c75703e5488a0c13d60f7caf0f
describe
'2793232' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGR' 'sip-files00202.tif'
e51350ab2ab7bfbb67f673eddeb7e326
c6e9b7701d919b31a6b4bc23041826ab9127ad37
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGS' 'sip-files00202.txt'
5eda34dd91779bc89e7ade73403495ab
b9c43d455d3d7419cfb6a2d297412960988ef8ea
describe
'33958' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGT' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
8378261a1a83cc02258a9efedfad26a3
dfc2310bf94330f5819805eaac02c8e829d4bafb
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGU' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
44d53f39fbb52c3086be90bd83f1ca04
3e894fac380583861f48f5abd8d564df6c0617ee
describe
'169276' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGV' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
096700a7d7d94088fd4f850f5fc43ade
09f1551cf4998e6352e1d6ac05adcc4c56091bc3
describe
'32561' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGW' 'sip-files00203.pro'
a9ad50985f0c7dff5d913e09fc87e514
ca4a945fb16c45f680f0aa6e92c9102c70f78812
describe
'66083' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGX' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
3b290d531a5fb33ec97a5d7d2423acba
49a66adb434aa0b5d1da1a0656e13d2d2b8f0cce
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGY' 'sip-files00203.tif'
c423f42ab64d5847cc3f48b2b137f9c8
60fc37a45ce4505d9c246f04fa1812344c70e96f
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGGZ' 'sip-files00203.txt'
4bbcc9e0933db74fac2ff190147f53d5
71bbaabbfe9540e319481687f4acf011c7ef0426
describe
'33034' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHA' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
157e97046cf2ca0401a5207ea062b680
156834f007a64672a8e29a79c68070871a7ddbbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHB' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
87c10779385e4fabbced5f2e0e9ca800
435daa7909329062d34cec9d3d1edb28a66700a7
describe
'181063' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHC' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
2314c44c591aa4ebe6a0665028014f30
a69bc2f780f30becded1a2cca14cf43d2a352c9e
describe
'33429' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHD' 'sip-files00204.pro'
67eac84f729c777082282a739250ce52
b60b47940368b8fb7c2ddd4daddd965c89fc80a3
describe
'69144' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHE' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
f5f96ff4137a6d5afd3c2619328e0b59
6935ffde5affc33c3cc91a8f03be2e2eab467c62
describe
'2793172' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHF' 'sip-files00204.tif'
0179dfed2f8904d25c234d8b346bb75c
e65b0c19899c348227109537e874510c59a229d2
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHG' 'sip-files00204.txt'
dc6aceead5d3067ecb5495ad171b8d97
6b2c0b7041de085b64676c0fbe86bd7f58e5b9bc
describe
'33975' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHH' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
d11060f97095d308b19b438ca871f712
940558660987eeeaa21b1a903e6362c113795201
'2011-10-16T09:13:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHI' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
7a2831faa23be2e0e32e5e52872e1d6c
4005a092703666657a392afc20bf18ac583be30f
'2011-10-16T09:19:20-04:00'
describe
'193736' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHJ' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
b3b832723c6cadaaeddef5b167b5b723
90604f44469ac53aa3bc6061b0728de4d1455eab
describe
'37618' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHK' 'sip-files00205.pro'
f91030c831811cd7a7e05ec672bb825f
c953a3b541d7c89b2e3629acc45d4331ae1019a0
describe
'71859' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHL' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
f34b6b4f86adb1b957552b4bf7730e48
c3a4dc6bf96be0c49c376fae61238e92599c738a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHM' 'sip-files00205.tif'
9961193d8f9019bf0510f4bb41131285
042ccf82ba8642c53d8378d90fbe16bca3ddcbf9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHN' 'sip-files00205.txt'
f4f0cbd20b747930f9aca82feaea9e43
5198554587432f083175c696022f3387d36e17cc
describe
'34491' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHO' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
cd3ec01807368ca4d6151bc45056e687
c998420fe4cb9fe51085045a0307bc5e00570f3c
'2011-10-16T09:12:43-04:00'
describe
'346559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHP' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
26e60040a08f5f3d2c75817a9399220a
11b16893f7227ef0320fb49e8cd8f8bdfedea1c1
describe
'186310' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHQ' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
9d7ce1d7efa4057fe12332eb6a24f6b4
5c52662f970191c0fed50d01f6a12d1373eeb1ae
describe
'38327' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHR' 'sip-files00206.pro'
a820c6f0dc2ddefdb587acfca317fe37
46382ef66dbca21aee55769326243412349915bd
describe
'70149' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHS' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
f5a03f7e2b22556297eccf1baf638d39
1f56cab23e6f431b24ca5453adba011fa41424dc
describe
'2795512' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHT' 'sip-files00206.tif'
2ecde343af17c734fd8a20341a75150b
9f857d2ac0ce9ff161226078c793f4588f37fc8d
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHU' 'sip-files00206.txt'
7a7f426fc41647fdf3a32352c000f065
1c39c6bc2121200715a5e8b0f26d204e32c3d075
describe
'34451' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHV' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
4e0b15cc2483b4d6e1a8eac3a0504a11
55a9fb13a3962a62dcc9818a1d754304d19ebb76
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHW' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
fee33590c63d0eb81db6058a6f9f5e14
fc697b4b610d9ffe70be050e5de0171af13d26dc
describe
'186608' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHX' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
fd9bde30938f08c0f94ac2acfbce1856
e3a17267f6282d7061a886799beb100811f8a864
describe
'36259' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHY' 'sip-files00207.pro'
958eb255124099adfa3953d9afa82b5c
894841cd0f7e15f8c9966a060e3b6eb51b7d74bf
'2011-10-16T09:19:02-04:00'
describe
'72094' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGHZ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
deb7f26f575fbbefc25c304e96510298
968b91c5e3704c6fcae2c31754f8a2bd16c8b905
describe
'2793592' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIA' 'sip-files00207.tif'
0d35f0e162d087c53bdaf0aa3a2a10a5
a7537a7eb8eccdbf646f866ed638a2db3ac50f9f
'2011-10-16T09:11:03-04:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIB' 'sip-files00207.txt'
ce548bed9e7fff893915c90876840413
9d76ea221e4a1d87d4b2bfb88c2b657b50b3d634
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIC' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
a4064f55b47d493919e7b026ebd3eb0e
7a482a6eca4097475bd027c5964386589e059c44
describe
'346667' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGID' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
7bf3dc12887888eaf67838f54c41645c
19094544222c27ce471e3c34fb0636f98a648584
describe
'177845' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIE' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
aafee8b7409102cadd8bea34b96e2d7a
d1f135be807e68a45b7570daaea38f3fd068dbf4
describe
'33901' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIF' 'sip-files00208.pro'
3aed7dfc1f21167da485add7b1284b05
aacf0c3bb1c5b80487f826f864e0c34d5a360e3b
describe
'68584' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIG' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
9af28396da208343bdbd2ab4c61e7cc1
b885d97bc7a3c68ffb93bc65fb72f87adf1f98f9
describe
'2795360' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIH' 'sip-files00208.tif'
0b263f3268945b6b1c52b74406431338
fb35d0a9f08ec55afdfe22d93cdf0253f0a75c91
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGII' 'sip-files00208.txt'
91abb1b1c6059ede85ab61ab2611ced4
bd235a3d0e491888780cb5a40fb83e9e715ecdfc
'2011-10-16T09:08:55-04:00'
describe
'33920' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIJ' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
6255c233cde4a0c21313ef5f0a40143f
d4f6d9f47e0801c46902bbf4748d34dd90c49c79
describe
'346592' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIK' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
acde6b05c3ff88a0745feda6508cf49d
088ad3cff4b49d8640b2596f53046347107fdede
describe
'223474' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIL' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
ba04855a42ede23a59bf4f49055ff879
8f7ecbb6882c710039f22a4e65c9ae80b1990b83
describe
'8704' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIM' 'sip-files00209.pro'
682d2d013bef8d41a85c6e0165fd2e32
67b68ccfa872917320c2d921694e7857e5a0836c
describe
'69355' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIN' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
976b304424e825f6bfb692316c9b108a
fe58b4c39edbdb73763ce9edc9e8ee6232ab7159
describe
'2795364' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIO' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d6793e15903721a078b03ac2629109fb
275bf3e76690f8e758c8aad92e9ad7371111694a
describe
'366' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIP' 'sip-files00209.txt'
3ce93f507a4effb9e3a392f82ed1d006
60d26df3bbdcb2152b6160dae8ff17134dc7ab6b
describe
'33795' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIQ' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
aabec82d43c47f3bff507ddf8c67b488
a3565e7af58b27f9d5da41edcc33ac1354dfbedc
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIR' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
58e8b1deedaecba2519b9fc7c28967c8
5cfbc0e9ef4551c848324b645d41fcf2915d190a
describe
'196870' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIS' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
479934a828659553a9c5abb8170de0a3
ea50d95920c73301ad636ceac0c132fb4bd40c8c
describe
'41031' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIT' 'sip-files00210.pro'
9cdf0f5d9d84beeed1d62c93808dcc5d
4c0726cdd5d0a1fcf5552a445ead179a30589e79
describe
'75465' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIU' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
994f5b34e3f7a193ad95981787bfebdb
a46fdffbdffa066fad23d0856cc770de2afd9b53
describe
'2793684' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIV' 'sip-files00210.tif'
420e266c13edbd659b085680d3414b93
af1aa659caff91370ffd12b2e1b4de8e8d4ed7f9
'2011-10-16T09:11:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIW' 'sip-files00210.txt'
36111c8708c9427a5a837f9d5a86993c
fc2d80415b272ece5373f451429f4712cd4975a7
describe
'35784' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIX' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
add41f22c914a9841987d0eef5e1ef58
968ac6dd13aa8f4d00fcc1d68223d04c78c87dd7
describe
'346229' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIY' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
2e4b8cbd35b178f5a1f0b5c3388f3d85
84c4eb8e84304e26b24913553b3fc0f29f713ada
'2011-10-16T09:19:31-04:00'
describe
'101327' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGIZ' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
4410900022cf6173cdb4c6eb24e57337
e332bd5e6d5943979d32e5b92b0f159fd8040d1b
describe
'4822' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJA' 'sip-files00211.pro'
c8faea8bea78a458260cf1aec79ef6e5
720487507829ab0473d896bc1ce37ecb67b377cb
describe
'35969' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJB' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
c23ed4c08b5bc98a5244e95037e9e504
df027bc9a55c74d0c1abdf77c0c126fff14564a2
describe
'2789984' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJC' 'sip-files00211.tif'
9c0f0804428924716647fa43dd0cb8c9
8692653615f2a0e8e63e10f8bbaf169a88b8d74c
describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJD' 'sip-files00211.txt'
a59c5df4e7faa6664413e0c672b1f841
cc90853ec2b3c886c6482656e8065591f2ebb15d
describe
'23722' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJE' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
1a24b611aaf559a2e0c50fc1ac93dde4
76c0b02db2de04fb699518374cb507f5e52604d8
describe
'346451' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJF' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
4813587342f55d6360df17c538873c83
9baff4089feef8ddaf1bac155adbd88dd2ef1d26
describe
'164137' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJG' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
eee243ff4f9007a118cd31992d146876
1d89df0d27c249e9aeccfca87f53583cc0193626
describe
'25621' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJH' 'sip-files00212.pro'
964fd5857cfebc74632e10d9aa24cfb1
fe487b9d25906a112a170cd74ed3692a4ec65756
describe
'59688' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJI' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
6e6e1728587f72e11a2dd667ba6c375e
5def7e26dccb760a018297a265f8eff9726a53de
describe
'2794292' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJJ' 'sip-files00212.tif'
18db810eab715f5a8351265143d10ebc
c0f4a9e282f3fcc19365a9535c7ed635cbc59bcc
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJK' 'sip-files00212.txt'
95bd4b742e04408d362cf520f4e8d4ac
3d6000288c22cb7fd11099db0938882074981ece
describe
'30790' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJL' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
5403d2550cbf91d6e39834fda0e5d61f
e3ddaa3b122d6bb1a6ea10f9687772f53e3c78ab
describe
'346597' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJM' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
42cee41a135b291e0a2e72aac7034f9b
8397357432e37c2566d718fc7dd5d9a66b2f4cc1
describe
'201321' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJN' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
704fa1e11f87b949f3cf049a2b0aff76
61190318b44ba3d5ea4487be9c5f99a16d777d62
describe
'41012' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJO' 'sip-files00213.pro'
1564bb2d0b8deb14497e194f7fdeda35
e5b351ba732f6180ef21c1306024897fa5ab0c49
describe
'76000' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJP' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
194500aa9e423c26b3602dff9b4181eb
bb73a3ebd9889c3970a3c2e1d5335c3e27e1443d
describe
'2795428' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJQ' 'sip-files00213.tif'
a596c3719b9c2365cf9bb10b2e8140a5
cacc73e0d98421017b1aa74de121a507762936b1
describe
'1679' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJR' 'sip-files00213.txt'
df870ef2753cf1028db7073f9dcc1ed4
78ccf4a3b176bfc56ca69fe3d1e7bdbdcad281a0
describe
'35234' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJS' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
14c0c73417a39a12946608201b49bf09
521823cd6c6c578d7992ddd454e1db725dc5a8c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJT' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
b0c09c3f5c9a9225656b975ded693218
fea83a22482b0139ea677648c1b606d96bfd2969
describe
'189906' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJU' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
c45cbc7af5d32e99d7ef4653e4ac8b17
f10c28b497f47d8b3162a5765a74df0f76a7eaa0
describe
'39237' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJV' 'sip-files00214.pro'
3981f82af1df1315bb99d732a58861cc
b59fa6f9a0d7757c4aa931b202ed3dce9d736f56
describe
'72571' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJW' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
85f832eceba84ba7294289e9734aec0d
aaba3363ab45c61fdaa6f5d7c6e29d44805ea46f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJX' 'sip-files00214.tif'
d6dff57c00c83e89f12b219f37f23b72
b2a7a1c289345d56f63b2f4a620ac1e4ff2c59fc
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJY' 'sip-files00214.txt'
cea5b4d23706fcd4952a2567314cf1fb
3e66ded704c338abadf471c7a099c0394b473468
describe
'34857' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGJZ' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
d56450f1abd2d6fffd49d2124698ac85
66a382314460609a1d0803f7feee3dc13bb87e9f
describe
'346681' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKA' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
942b717f19e8ce7d6fae648735c9266a
daa23444dc94f46b195713f595925f21f72dd2bc
describe
'212707' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKB' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
9b2e0559c067118dbf93d27979123763
9f4f3884335b618911a714e86661483200a66caf
describe
'12258' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKC' 'sip-files00215.pro'
b2d0353ae49751421c5ef66ab63c7268
7c8775f479e9cc77035f8a159b322518221c5598
describe
'70243' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKD' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
bd72a6e53b8fd50bef73fb3ffef1ebca
7a4176579c09706dc972a4d4b0fb3bbf4a6a2df4
describe
'2795660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKE' 'sip-files00215.tif'
5bb2f21e9949756b2d4a635883cfbcb7
13fd1dcc0ec560848d63bc47a94beacea88bf86a
describe
'654' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKF' 'sip-files00215.txt'
fa938cd75d2ad1db38c823ecf87a50d4
421892a7d479ccc229255044abe7007df4a0fb24
describe
'34649' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKG' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
980fadb1724d4b0d96ffbb6325e6e35d
5e2e6b9ed0e3e9d6967b1106694a621f10d2a0bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKH' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
cec05ec27515d72c2e60676554092912
692bfd239b151481531829493a9db5e92705c104
describe
'191787' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKI' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
9c783cf7aca100e340fe317bf31fea3c
f305c974dc4b038aef0e3461ba0c4d02866fb963
describe
'36962' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKJ' 'sip-files00216.pro'
477a7c537f275c0fa59b769dad813fb2
4731fa510f113cb6546ecbe1a8d04ea7231ea1dc
describe
'70815' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKK' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
f782e86e64100928a5966e586c6b71dd
5656c3478c154373d941ef657e494d1227c941cc
describe
'2793536' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKL' 'sip-files00216.tif'
343df41832855995b6f6276f30902923
475183cb6032151c7457b3820f926027d54ef249
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKM' 'sip-files00216.txt'
e780133d0c78303be726e2946262a013
37f7ba3c1b53a99c460b4ddfba6896c205c3ac86
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKN' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
5d311403a2172c9e66c17c427a84c917
7ea9ba0543a8f5aef9d021c99fb6adef9647ca05
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKO' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
fcf1bf9e40370b366d371de18e206659
df8bc8333d4bde235dde207989eb3b173805e7e1
describe
'196712' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKP' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
ecc59ea514f69628d78d963f154995ed
fd8d9bb7bf4ee4778dc4c3128d523e877134549a
describe
'38740' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKQ' 'sip-files00217.pro'
34ab54e6fbe5ab5e25bbf115483ed468
bc19861f270d9fb1245a341b51181f2f196fb5c1
describe
'73642' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKR' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
944bd4e2d1b389b14bb0bdc00c722bd8
0fb0bb2dc0e4ee6e459a618552aea8d11551f445
describe
'2795532' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKS' 'sip-files00217.tif'
c7f6f4d75d0bb2843fc26362d5be31f9
55d065f7873f339f569cb7696f93d78b914078e6
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKT' 'sip-files00217.txt'
851e73072ee36c9c5a96a08fbe1b8fb2
1c4a235a28f021b3200af509359beef81af96794
describe
'34869' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKU' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
48f5470c248ba0b2668154ed42d0d0d8
dab44a9c39408030b69cde2b80675da57e9c6757
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKV' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
dc34334da63c3887d056d12ecf02562e
6ee6a1db6022e9b68f0836d7bb46731e29b80ced
describe
'197814' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKW' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
339155cf7a3f12e83c89ae9850f2299a
8c63e2b75041a8a3f4ad8f6cbb5e27d50946c0e6
describe
'42814' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKX' 'sip-files00218.pro'
5155a8787ec5e54cedfe359adf193f0c
f4ffed644ac98ba6217782af90ee9aca3f563cad
describe
'75755' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKY' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
cc1ac3a27857d89b9b4e90ac4e4472d4
9b40b1f451ceb37d1f6514d8afb534bf8c197d3e
describe
'2793408' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGKZ' 'sip-files00218.tif'
fbff42663bb078d980c4033425288b7d
aef3e190906e42e2ab92b0ec8799c5169adf8ce4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLA' 'sip-files00218.txt'
585b1a641da3d0e9d2a2d75dca5f1146
a14b964a3d1e9a3a9a4cceed0af00993215f37ad
describe
'34935' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLB' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
738ae651e5fbc7cfe4b4bfa9f978dbe2
f4e31f74e0eec1d91e39eae67beec5330659986f
describe
'346676' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLC' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
edc1af7befdac145c77f179f56424668
889da3343061509dec2ed0d82e4de0df488e42ea
describe
'202547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLD' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
b499e56f694bb1aeb002b85adf559c98
daeb26c56322709e30e473cef4776bba04077270
describe
'22368' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLE' 'sip-files00219.pro'
ca94bcd540eedd17f51ba0c7cc901140
72aa64ab943288eb053c7b93cc853707796e5bb5
describe
'70446' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLF' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
61d46b804597a95865b50d8023c37093
ae048cbff463e39053f66403f23b8dc9d0ea38dd
describe
'2795444' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLG' 'sip-files00219.tif'
4a5494f3d864808f3f9a9b0cacb5b69f
40d4fa1987a327eaf51603ed9700cebbea8fad25
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLH' 'sip-files00219.txt'
22d78eb056bb125811e1a3c0d46e07c3
43720c10a9ff779d93e3d4ec81bcca95d7df91b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLI' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
512798dfb16935cf26f16217a6350d35
67b32cc449a4c6da4a9ac8248c9c47266edfa85a
describe
'346655' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLJ' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
23eaf8298569f4c698bfc50c64421ad2
903a05b60a0139ca51dacf5079f0b46bde0e4f5e
describe
'186427' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLK' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
4db0f341360589863cb0e417914fc395
e88ecca1189c5fe430846e1fb2af49122970385f
describe
'36439' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLL' 'sip-files00220.pro'
7114785ee69a948e05326e9a69d6d3a3
867bb291efa86f754418d1d147698d52233eb03d
describe
'69701' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLM' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
26a492d1a823030ea54a64a0548061f6
bbc0c9689d954301f82d544d369398405f4f4c6e
describe
'2795448' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLN' 'sip-files00220.tif'
78f537fa1f1b855b1c801701ba58594c
b2000449e6c98eda434994396c7f2df719174eae
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLO' 'sip-files00220.txt'
ea8d2c619559c0d3222f5f8b0bd776a0
bfd7d8ff9838f0c9a404728ea2d22d1c9a12f5c3
describe
'34299' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLP' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
11e1bfa706f68757c108a2ecfe1ecf5d
1e5fee88d53201022e95f1f4ee3a8c448ef12f97
describe
'346376' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLQ' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
48ef9dd98534f36995f21f9041c42b8d
3ab6c015ad3f0e3633f945b2176caa178eeb0a77
describe
'199858' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLR' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
f23283b97093ec1502421d6a6c45850a
65ba5047063bc7c330b844eb84d778b868a74c78
describe
'39975' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLS' 'sip-files00221.pro'
e61bf248510b9b76a73ff4a26cfcc221
dad3cdabfe3a96a1e4e564323df9c4d303d15960
describe
'74091' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLT' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
ef549432da8021cc39c7ce70568179d8
97fc60225fb6f03778a52ca43a9a7b5fe4758408
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLU' 'sip-files00221.tif'
fa7353ae9a67dc75a1cd0ab0b7df7cf9
d7ceccfa0cada9e1d6b075c4de2ae1bdf17fb44a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLV' 'sip-files00221.txt'
bdc61fbc6c18935ca6211107c05db850
cf33d79c5b136b7f70d82d8a1cb370d67292f085
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLW' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
d15eaedb6cc10c72b5747914c2a26955
f1d452ed136bfcf15d8b7b051485950120961dc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLX' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
df838b877a384493ac5962049da1b1eb
0efcffe3575ceb97d211d1746e594dae3559b6ce
describe
'197279' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLY' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
a91a2e868285b3ed54db4bc1a3063318
18066dfafa53ef86161a3f9ba605a333b6d88c58
'2011-10-16T09:18:00-04:00'
describe
'39674' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGLZ' 'sip-files00222.pro'
333dfd40fa82b5a265f74df7a15ab5ed
63ac8687bbd16d4738adfb03cbc6d395ff7d3e58
describe
'76713' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMA' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
ea9bb5f87f3243cc8ff52b2236559858
cf319c538a34e2fe652f7424f2c1d062881dcd5e
describe
'2795812' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMB' 'sip-files00222.tif'
176c73b714bea144c971142a73f3927d
21e101b83249a3a79befffb196e231a9779cebb8
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMC' 'sip-files00222.txt'
2f3ec3495af3250831bd95f1c382a09c
b8da1ea33f0d48f544ed335ca26ae21be7c1715c
describe
'35952' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMD' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
4127b5bda7808c2015bb2d0df5b83870
96921890b6eb83fd503bfac821893dac7eb4e76b
describe
'346650' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGME' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
8fff81885d43413374d5fbc15f1607e9
b2c47e77b410f1fa3e85f774b66ddc5cab8fcc90
describe
'192565' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMF' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
6e12dfd0ac4304c2460903a776124b62
691018023d9b31dadbd191909da2b396853f5cae
describe
'38970' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMG' 'sip-files00223.pro'
259f52a45bdec3e3878326787a7715c0
3757e76fe2f3ce0d9ecbbd1bca51471f6356cfda
describe
'72915' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMH' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
e974006608ce6d7814e202596c97dec8
d52906eff6f646d3d814d8e9955365061f71dee1
describe
'2795516' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMI' 'sip-files00223.tif'
63080ef09f139c152ef24007e2004ce3
5d556064122d833094a61ccd125f3ac71ce7eb05
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMJ' 'sip-files00223.txt'
14cbae238876b3cae333a58d97ff1620
8a87f7efe49671770fda37123df31e04dc1207af
describe
'34949' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMK' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
69e248a688bb899bc820a8b7c8d2325a
9b90337eda16e3fc78b002ecca9fa1cec62c84ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGML' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
60fd0831c88f43f26fa5c912ab492c22
449c14da346da1612dc121449189b17e104abea3
describe
'193812' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMM' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
735dc701bdc62abb9de587a08e74c332
32d5bbc9363ec75c7484c5140029a634e9f49681
'2011-10-16T09:13:28-04:00'
describe
'37436' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMN' 'sip-files00224.pro'
53ece6a729c0a093dcf5b74439fa81e0
665ca270ce32fbafe9bffe51d68d037889c2cce8
describe
'73784' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMO' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
5916096ed5a263ff2ec10cbca1e8fffd
4290e7f2f3d46465f82660e0226873455f33d6f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMP' 'sip-files00224.tif'
7b2b5b166ab9c6c60f515ddb92c64dfa
b3b95af4688baf4700847aadd5b4e551cfc3db3d
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMQ' 'sip-files00224.txt'
f7ca02f383c1e6bc6912dc5c854c6118
23d552d0202b86ba3a72f2ad0a5adb360f70bbd7
describe
'34922' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMR' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
499c866afcf57997c6bcba62d5ae5a4f
f1c7ee8ef2e6cae3f67bd374d5fd06afa4b4ddd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMS' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
3accbdbeb84911d59252aa3a9cc72560
3ceb9879fc6de1dcc27c916f48b01ba996a1b025
'2011-10-16T09:16:04-04:00'
describe
'200322' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMT' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
15729c2c093e8759b7f3c67d6ca5f738
e64cbb7badb99fa8e919d7287f7e3bcdb59c94ff
describe
'22717' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMU' 'sip-files00225.pro'
339debeaea335a2d76a7e01f88a41a0e
c45db59b44d7dd114f795ecbb208d1af28529f66
describe
'70514' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMV' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
cf89c754215b03212a2cace80b335d43
9ef9a524ad72e22defefec47fb8eb723fab50b1f
describe
'2795556' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMW' 'sip-files00225.tif'
4671b510da051d969d28fcc2e608088e
b0fb7faaf193d4ee37a3560f5f7f4ab42da216cb
'2011-10-16T09:13:48-04:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMX' 'sip-files00225.txt'
dc1a0aae442b4a25c08fdf9672f2fcc3
ee2b13823c71e562fd5d195883b3077f831be905
describe
'34818' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMY' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
7b46d35a58fd567a746976a65f830683
d82743e4dc7301daece029b288f25e125081e95e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGMZ' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
cce8690c2fa8f4f0d66f572678a018e1
1e221951560b92a76a90337546115d38e4b5457b
describe
'180137' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNA' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
7e91a0b9881941889dd476f8b0853154
1ec5db1a5ba09dfe52374017877ae3490b880017
describe
'35621' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNB' 'sip-files00226.pro'
ab86b8a9df1063db8264f934f5760b58
5f40cfa2433e2bfc79d3e6326d063e3fd5a10a7d
describe
'70478' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNC' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
d41ad9cbaef241e988b8b6860319d27f
3ef55321dd2ed5a7dbe0cdb3a1be910746fc59e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGND' 'sip-files00226.tif'
a86db4a648f91d302d5028ce9756c7f3
f274e621c450a2f1153694f571f72f6ae8e7c26b
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNE' 'sip-files00226.txt'
6f38d7aa329c0558349c1839575804f4
2fc89d7180318f12391045b693e978cd3ad90a6d
describe
'34953' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNF' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
749b99ce9808824d8d97f49aab54cfdb
454efdecd3eb8d5a673d8efa3ac499dd8d7cf4a2
describe
'346624' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNG' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
85979a13373b4f045b0294baf7267a69
5c1ebc574fd239cf84fd70e6d2d8eb5cb27ced2b
describe
'174365' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNH' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
fc88097bba5475c97c7072f8cf2bb8f2
768da97f8c97b52ad67281afbd83c0c640b76fcf
describe
'33226' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNI' 'sip-files00227.pro'
c8647221575ce1a7b8f268338da3449b
9e597bffd158ae5cbd2b4c7997947649f7e1ed38
describe
'67576' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNJ' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
966e7bd30ec1b20c261f7cd6fc8aeeb7
a522d12b3ae655c641fc095e4cb5762cb35ea9fe
describe
'2795216' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNK' 'sip-files00227.tif'
a8a57113c3e3e058a1bf8b1948bf9368
49b80c78fb87714df0c8bfbd30ba716bd95224f0
'2011-10-16T09:10:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNL' 'sip-files00227.txt'
0d3fa99127b57419e6b35178b5aaff10
62a421cb458d1542ae555e18022bd3674354eb26
describe
'33231' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNM' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
b4f81c9870c6329eb05e8b32110d9a0d
5f299eabb8a6587e7a9f235cc220757fb297de31
describe
'346582' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNN' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
e193d583d54d59a9e5d96c04ec77879c
50c14190bde78f873762002250d56c8d57740755
describe
'196051' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNO' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
11c5192c14cb86863a948fd5bc869e7c
cc34444cd0190a3c4d742541ab720381f3755ff4
describe
'39454' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNP' 'sip-files00228.pro'
50ad23c5b1f3a2e3e21e3746175868c7
1ad87ef53ad0cdf72ad5ccc4dd9775c442c56349
describe
'74090' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNQ' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
958c0b18865c0e6347f74f39841abe99
57fa355f3849f978ffef178ffff901fc1cb49677
describe
'2795584' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNR' 'sip-files00228.tif'
cf99ae616dd6177c4a91f716ae62b8a1
cdc3eec277225f8b3e855cec25e201ebd0555e65
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNS' 'sip-files00228.txt'
dfa4b620522e58fea6f63519a9d6ea27
0532b86662e72f5c4209dd043148c66591e60318
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNT' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
94f0f9e951677adab324ee8bee29c09b
b407e8947159a0d98765cc084fc1435b1aa2b3e2
'2011-10-16T09:19:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNU' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
8f1d90defaadf94989a5c2a370fcb4f9
a7d8beefc94320bbd36bf61dbbe6c4614489d490
describe
'192131' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNV' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
6433cbf75ee67e885a1c105ff9f12443
da32dd4fcb0b9b2a947a79da6e5a9781ab92f971
describe
'37779' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNW' 'sip-files00229.pro'
7f65f7265cd37dd9048faf7fc34ef75d
cad196181a950f0d43b860a90d795e844c2f957e
describe
'72069' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNX' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
8ce015cbebfb31f35938db751f3de273
ac16f0587fe90ef2d678a9ddb0b993dfe2a6ebe9
'2011-10-16T09:16:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNY' 'sip-files00229.tif'
27b0e12e8a2018f8ecc8417f980d04bb
7ba98c11d0b14c44f35927eb949fd0a563c6eacf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGNZ' 'sip-files00229.txt'
2dac6bff857ee7b459acfc73b09c51d6
5636e3d9f5a3a745f795d7447f1bb6fad0b4ef67
describe
'34323' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOA' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
05b0f4e1a2462a9a555d9393340130d0
3376d60212293d192b7f8b38fe2c74ab1acba048
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOB' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
abbb3cacb22b8397f613f3f5174b0dd4
318ca2faf3c5775bd938dcb3311ce5b12b6603cf
describe
'188095' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOC' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
ff1595e07f01ba0e12183d993445330c
7d88b56a642554c0675d60039f9e7aec34311dbe
describe
'37645' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOD' 'sip-files00230.pro'
3a698ec3938b3756dd572110d9253120
1bc666fe80a1b41c7fe5fbf54da7ebbcb9f90162
describe
'72191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOE' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
aa31f774e975fa9c1621ad70caf2f1cd
69d39d5d9430cd0321141dfe3b01669b12f33bcf
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOF' 'sip-files00230.tif'
1ebc474d0412f1436bc1e6ddc618e246
1d63b8742448ecd29bab6ff21967ef4cf6667b9a
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOG' 'sip-files00230.txt'
2c73ac976427cb04c25d3ebc59949588
e8a35d17fadee7eaaa671fc25c6b0daf86598a2b
describe
'34866' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOH' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
302b5fdac1b6fa45cdb89dfa8bf0de9a
9f596c9abe14aea1cac9c0cb9caed9aedb065953
'2011-10-16T09:18:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOI' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
b14f30ac3bc60cc0d61e5a42e3053b77
b1b1075ab305e89f0675e95cf965d89bd980af84
describe
'171472' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOJ' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
9d37d5a381e8efb53b3ccba32756aa63
198adb9dc56e6104514acebef9853eca130fe73a
describe
'31806' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOK' 'sip-files00231.pro'
868638ece5713a39a7c17356a41bd007
e853092ae6dca5a624f79a62d67d4551a3175355
describe
'66079' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOL' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
ba8c90f3e1cb3e2debd61a85799b302e
314e4b297fdbb18209823363ff9ead133e07d098
describe
'2792660' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOM' 'sip-files00231.tif'
3b7f92327a7775169fbbdfa0bd873856
ee064e58cd1efba206cd1ea874370b35d3e1daf9
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGON' 'sip-files00231.txt'
0a1ce9f229f6849efe1bac81e997aaff
f9c7de5f67e303234517bb66ce6f31535f63bcdc
describe
'32677' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOO' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
465fa8f2ffc0125188c5d5a29062497e
c6cf2cc9c4968ed13271934efd9c92a1fbe4ace5
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOP' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
53279466fc94d87174e382a02acb9374
8e2c6c4db26c9df8423d4ea3dcc2cf7d7a2ec05d
describe
'189228' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOQ' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
f8a704a2171e44cea29fff64f9f91afb
a117d31c35a54492e309ed731c8ed21fe92a472c
describe
'36666' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOR' 'sip-files00232.pro'
9871add5d05a0d344b8d598b7c532a4e
b709a9be2fc58a6ac9399625086ed38ae2ec63a9
describe
'70792' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOS' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
03988f7d8efee7ab9863f384e2950911
73daa61dddd7fac10dfd9aa7ba4f992b9c4d6a9e
describe
'2793048' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOT' 'sip-files00232.tif'
c3c1840c2676295b99740f52589f290f
0290968e6d3cda21dc927d23c9826bab1ba105a9
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOU' 'sip-files00232.txt'
4da59e2c7ceaa38fb9ca97f04cbf3adf
cc7722927ec12585645344e12f8f61c6589cfba1
'2011-10-16T09:18:10-04:00'
describe
'34011' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOV' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
ad15bece9f0ff2c1ee0681006e9f3e2d
01052e64385575de963728f55a9d9dadd69795be
describe
'346648' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOW' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
85ebbbb617b15c960add5ba7309515bf
1830e4c9a3d96dfdd7fbd39e84bfd84827c0a002
describe
'199490' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOX' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
7caefe83ab6dd70ae5dfefcd03e9a422
49132a43ceba1fa37e916614596c98ea15bfac9f
describe
'42306' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOY' 'sip-files00233.pro'
3561e73925a15f690badaf40269c64c8
07dbe76a43fa477fa1d58aa61bcdccd54c16eaae
describe
'75174' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGOZ' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
5f187f99e726afa31c19a377f41fb94c
71f521561bb0790bf02632f39e72c90a18a805f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPA' 'sip-files00233.tif'
695844274aaf9818b09849ee907a0434
8b9dbaa18a0cc1b32c0559cf294774e0027372c8
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPB' 'sip-files00233.txt'
fb4121ed07c58bebf608f6bdd0a309b8
a72c2ca3c69b5e53094919231cc0b373c5ddc513
describe
'35107' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPC' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
c5fbaef6522908e0adb58c70b5fada1e
820ef3538f59eb76f3f2c41262369a5bdc509b3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPD' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
5326ab8605219f30df2f2db2fe170053
6430e027713056d5c7951166274a75a84c7e422d
describe
'185382' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPE' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
8769c25005f1ff6e528cda957bceb500
96664f1858cc12188d4cb5610d9266a1db545648
describe
'35806' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPF' 'sip-files00234.pro'
09de875e9c4a1abb8365ba2bba334e4e
f47f50edda00ed5bc611b60b30950015497f96aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPG' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
fcc6b9f9300367b7cee6f100410063a6
e6bd30ddffc703b7b662d4217db60a267d8618fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPH' 'sip-files00234.tif'
13dc8c32c63dd6f0ab679d7d9bb5d25c
1988239fa047d34810600a14d3329ccaf8ce3855
'2011-10-16T09:16:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPI' 'sip-files00234.txt'
93636e2a0723d75bb56a1b1284bed25f
ca26a096be0bbb0594dd4c575c684a4428744bc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPJ' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
e440b548f2ed424b759c9bd9acd9f1be
8cb639440add299e1bc0f74d20083d7d634adf23
describe
'346635' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPK' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
109f31405b0f46e6c9fe4e13d33e57ab
83c3e41d478d35eb375d5d0418b74b273732a9ee
describe
'123985' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPL' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
55fbead53163310a560a3f65966a9548
88d4b73af6b1d6c8efb5c0dce53309cefb572607
describe
'7456' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPM' 'sip-files00235.pro'
cae239adb9bc3648f8ba7a2b7b19061b
610ff26004e26e097c80e8dc103634dee3e88552
describe
'43628' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPN' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
cd1b4fa02aaa7388116a0f307ee00722
a0ba56236554e4d20b6fae740c0203227c76dbc1
'2011-10-16T09:10:41-04:00'
describe
'2792848' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPO' 'sip-files00235.tif'
0e96cc9c33d27852e0fef7ef6bc27a60
01771a8fff8406a35398e184d71078121ffad9d5
describe
'345' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPP' 'sip-files00235.txt'
8e11d7fa974537f3b64d5be8a1266307
8ae28a52b6c4591fb87ddda9007ce75bc9be338d
describe
'26022' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPQ' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
75a4e12d73200669dac614b38e9e82a3
f10c7ccdeea20e64510d18fc8bf08bb59c8d6e07
describe
'346191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPR' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
d32a7a448efcdae6b5a7e5974d98ee15
857378e80c12a18d033dae3b3ee2632d7ebdefce
describe
'170118' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPS' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
44ee5cc40093463d1b6282e37ace3157
f574554477b6abb689d82a7cf8294111dcf1ecdf
describe
'25588' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPT' 'sip-files00236.pro'
f7edebdc20b5b97863392a246cb87464
fc78dc948a689b51c3cb06e6c0d27d62ae63f114
describe
'62384' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPU' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
0d304c407574cf24b025956b049fa2fa
855f978fb82e31b42bc3d5bc5022fd8a862f0ec7
describe
'2792612' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPV' 'sip-files00236.tif'
713ee0d58f0233666f4dcf21c6c37da7
2292254691f0430dca2bfcd8e1e21c8a96c46f83
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPW' 'sip-files00236.txt'
7275b045a18d759262573cb183314161
0fde5894195c1e2d84038741a9122c5d61bafeb0
describe
'31934' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPX' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
c38925ef957de677c558f9de2310ff7e
b81031f59648ad24fb966c0a65d9cea594dd556a
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPY' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
9fb912529b6da418d6213d01d4d11310
e1179cad52e54fbd6f3e3cba13ee7c4d52ba5604
describe
'167278' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGPZ' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
a9cb910e2df2b4dbe0b39bb7d4c3b709
85ca483340b73eb4792f19eba2c4cabf19729dad
describe
'14878' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQA' 'sip-files00237.pro'
eda9659c8cf93b005a97f1b9d807a8d4
3c35749edc1d82bc2b9612014902755c0b8de9da
describe
'58442' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQB' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
29c41a528c973fa6e36d2de057770238
014f5e3be0303df037cd01894fc3de8cb737a0d6
'2011-10-16T09:13:45-04:00'
describe
'2792116' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQC' 'sip-files00237.tif'
e96cec3a88805b8cbe4feec3e68de8a9
00437ba74be476759e638142e5e54e77b4003bb4
describe
'689' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQD' 'sip-files00237.txt'
457ab8614d6ba00373df6b1ac0793b53
cfd143cad9688c19e2f3c570be14dd9c628313f7
describe
'30984' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQE' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
80da0d19b0cc86997177194b096e2a33
7a95dde39974b12a23e180b2b0640ff22e50508e
describe
'346352' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQF' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
0cebbb6cacf6f727d30aad578535d94a
8b7ba2c75977c07a5a92403f4115db224265c7e3
describe
'194651' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQG' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
c38f0e3e6c6c703d70890f5b86fe12e9
4fe6b1c447b03446f0aa74b6c312d46a79d54d6c
describe
'38007' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQH' 'sip-files00238.pro'
44bc7de33465a67caa04ea62e7d09d98
3d686057ea1548ed576c912ffb2240769ebfc57a
describe
'72796' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQI' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
9319f2a6b17d4c3637ec8df31e88f0dc
e39b8d39bff95f7ed11c87a51a06ba78f3f155af
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQJ' 'sip-files00238.tif'
052a5ca96b0922211293ad491898e4f9
e424e12f0be35558d1ff9742aef37bdd0308df24
'2011-10-16T09:15:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQK' 'sip-files00238.txt'
dd0650d96774791aa75b64dd02d291f2
ebca747bf60e1a6c8e4d532378c2ef174eebaf10
describe
'35270' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQL' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
c4e908f6c7b9299a61483789bf53ccb5
69cce6269bd68e7fa6899d7a028bbd760810ade0
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQM' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
f73c9b18bf19947753500332ac206951
2d68649d48709938d431281415df2621d5e316ab
describe
'197783' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQN' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
e69b638eafe87420f118eea5379d21fb
ee48af75d05930c98018e3c5ca5f73ed671cb48b
describe
'39897' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQO' 'sip-files00239.pro'
53900a3332aae97d3d576c918c71294e
ef69e2fd831cb6625f6b8ccb835b5fa2b5ee9ea8
'2011-10-16T09:19:16-04:00'
describe
'74322' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQP' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
c87bca866fd3aff7e720e3acc4682b27
6e1c01b6a6349071115ca39c93da40a00d7556d1
describe
'2793460' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQQ' 'sip-files00239.tif'
0c92d7b9a3fc9622874c6a1bb51a95a1
853bae2c36fea180d7178851484f3354dbd04822
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQR' 'sip-files00239.txt'
847038906b11cff3d94b809b37cec129
2c1e9daf39a121f38196656f95fa6b993e3ca268
describe
'35153' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQS' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
cbd65ea3f93893a1df682b6bf831d37f
59d19fe17b0c512d4d506c72d7aac59b22edef15
'2011-10-16T09:10:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQT' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
32978c63955bc7acfb4d9a064a4501ac
ef1553e89879748500595c560a6f943890f0b47b
describe
'202971' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQU' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
f649404ec369d092868fbf7bad71613a
a48b587e75708615917f1fa8f157b9b195ac44ea
describe
'41848' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQV' 'sip-files00240.pro'
fb9c5b8a55e76bd542c571871f735461
43095b86ae85716645ddb507771b7ec55a865cd0
describe
'76800' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQW' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
30a4dfee36817197d9100b7b0d768d71
c9ce4b54b30e8c864774966ba5f26200a2465545
describe
'2793280' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQX' 'sip-files00240.tif'
d32acb83259d2ea68e6336f059cb15eb
18fd18e535596b737af9974028004dbcd7be3014
describe
'1721' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQY' 'sip-files00240.txt'
9f20e62ab3bb44e159ec789f0e808aee
a9104823378129dd1243dd2ecad7851366b5b3d0
describe
'35019' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGQZ' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
c4f2ea5fe248ecae8c3279978dc24d64
3cc9f6fa3f51741ee730610824514f2a1487973f
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRA' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
7a68a6e3ef79e65397502d141ee7258b
2142b63c5177300329d7c9496e42da14cbf33a7b
describe
'178573' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRB' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
73777ad22b6afc2a7b3f12119b739e97
3bc95a709290c469df14c1e95959a48abfc44be2
describe
'33980' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRC' 'sip-files00241.pro'
3a7230a476aae8452080af97c6e816d6
5fc84f3c3b1203a3470e62fb682ea63e427ff437
describe
'68221' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRD' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
21b8e43b71f0f20ecef6c45680681ce6
9cdd0963d41c9c90413654446c63ab14abd336c5
describe
'2793212' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRE' 'sip-files00241.tif'
e9488cb2dedf70bb633587df2fcfd3aa
2571b3a26428dc94620dead2a6395dfbda3ca2c2
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRF' 'sip-files00241.txt'
96a9a44e941cc6009dc0b4e6b2aa6eb3
2bbc03074452ec5b09d497bf9353fc9360b592a9
describe
'33393' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRG' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
5246033c0ce6d9fd9734a5ea137981d3
219bbddceaf53e4cd2459a9eceaaa6ca7b27ebed
describe
'346213' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRH' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
b0e3518e2df00689220e02baa43fc440
e6f7b00069065c2c238406a7530682fa0a68beda
describe
'192693' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRI' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
9367ddbe569f2ad7c49efe0a204a7e33
abf0a655e281171fbb2dfa4172dc78caf18bb069
describe
'38312' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRJ' 'sip-files00242.pro'
364d29fd791513227a29136a6a816990
95db8c8a961817479b6d342a4a97c454c3216d2c
describe
'71838' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRK' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
5b2a5d852cfdc9b9f1791225979fcdbc
5746677ce7c17fcfa540aa920e726eec3afab263
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRL' 'sip-files00242.tif'
742e9dc3eca250e40c239abed386fe70
55c4bf49d8a21801e50adbd5c89c32b1e21beae2
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRM' 'sip-files00242.txt'
f777bff1af929f85976011613d197623
6f9aebf77ca2afc10b56c338e83bff85a0f06124
describe
'34856' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRN' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
f45557f23e6c52b6eec9435cb8fc5ccf
dd2d19c8813c8ca7be79d649fe6ae758da50fc30
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRO' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
e6ac6e90fcb4afe3e071f2083bdbdc13
cb882402e6500304db4ae00c6a4ed071a80845fb
describe
'189537' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRP' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
7558ed973abdc2238c11508bfb6aa4e3
d42d9009a7ebe2e65a7417d4c2a5b3747868ea31
describe
'36646' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRQ' 'sip-files00243.pro'
2cddfa3c1cf539c17d8cab93c93ccd68
a97b9ab394d8d9488b95491bda54d9f669874a5f
describe
'70947' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRR' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
b7682e2ee955673151529b1bc4366072
af61ef18f364830c5e37f10c7dbc3017bb7c7177
describe
'2793128' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRS' 'sip-files00243.tif'
4eefa009eb115f27ff5988688d6313e6
ca5acf2161c283d1442fb1b2fa8ba1069db1d829
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRT' 'sip-files00243.txt'
814ad2dced10241755e1c3761fb3e7ca
d9606d48dc83be25be26c75b8041c15d8699af65
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRU' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
9e8b3e01916e7471c1062f43f6d84ff7
9d94ce761e4d38cb4717d6f4aa31c30a607cf34f
describe
'346296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRV' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
7f2bb111fcbfe84ebbfca5a79ca020e1
c01d2405e1e52a8e1db567f0b22feaa7b3e8d1c3
describe
'105643' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRW' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
95a282b4175422895597831321c09f7b
09ead8b3decc47a39c6f68c645a272dc7fc76b50
describe
'5361' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRX' 'sip-files00244.pro'
ea4282ad769447a8f1de854d1f658097
6f529c2fd96b60ca70895ec35140c1cc95dbea05
describe
'37999' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRY' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
39439b4971e59e723bc4e5e48295f80a
a265cdb589cff98e1bd7a1ce6e2e77d4d6828223
describe
'2790176' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGRZ' 'sip-files00244.tif'
849897291c08faac34ec9ba950d45046
a3fc1521fe5fa51bafbe889a7e0bacbfc4c90710
describe
'236' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSA' 'sip-files00244.txt'
7560b34889fe1a0a8a7fea60cafe8bce
f0d4c2f82d2b37883c6f58ca0240ae22a631b4e9
describe
'24011' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSB' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
208d2003e78ba3d569602f369a311534
ab0f0d2eb41a5248036f11845310f6c4e9bbac8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSC' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
18b3bc3adef29b5957025316a112fd1d
133b26b5cd2ef0580e7bcf3bb3580948cc50a5f4
describe
'159191' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSD' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
6f157fe8ae6c3f1fddc4fd3d4b3addb3
702da4495e8a069227f1b1644cdb423f508e15c3
describe
'25140' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSE' 'sip-files00245.pro'
1f2c8620e3feadbe2e968e8b70450ec8
0bc0b63a5b7b916b4540c228425f54a747fe7a15
describe
'59559' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSF' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
e159306eadda03e3d046f9bd1b5276cd
653e4687c73a06cfd631c941a0c6d078e68c53d9
describe
'2792252' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSG' 'sip-files00245.tif'
2e241bf21271bb325a728624d9452f7a
289c262420d70442233d07364c4a52597890dec9
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSH' 'sip-files00245.txt'
366228e6837a48d34ae1ceb938c8468c
da90c8032da8fc83b6a5b6d709d13d71b2fce973
describe
'30825' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSI' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
928839da268106cd937957afa7f8db72
7f55a25f44ccd44225cc982270e630caa0161c38
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSJ' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
8f80ba36d33dc5e6fcd176391252f23c
4639d169eccaedec218364a03a26e2f8e908d8e1
describe
'184403' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSK' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
81b4a79ae36fdd49d7514c1bd3305c0f
57434055cbb0a25d8f1b4da41ff600b5271f068d
describe
'35297' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSL' 'sip-files00246.pro'
5f7024cfee0c7baf7ec94b1d4e58e6e9
c4cb8bf28c1ade22783959b480b685abe7547d5e
describe
'69789' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSM' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
3278e5a5132488005b383816a7a98dd3
00e3608cfd1a097f0d8d6889a5dffaa41698b55f
describe
'2793304' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSN' 'sip-files00246.tif'
42f402861a981312c9af41a0932c9a7b
88f66b6b1a1edcadf2340024d0d3a7f5b37b6b7b
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSO' 'sip-files00246.txt'
78df0e36af6324f86c75afdf881d3a5f
5a3bcf8adbe5f8104756be85946e71a7eae92c98
describe
'34420' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSP' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
9b4db94e2a40f5160c2f47420e50c7ad
4396bd600828f4425407e4123f54fb3d8a7c6c5f
'2011-10-16T09:17:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSQ' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
6268260c54956dfc2e67437d887bb7bb
948e596fb654d954cd59534b27463132cdafe705
describe
'222295' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSR' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
75f06aee8921b3d3477d301b8597ecf2
202c1bd2b8d3e5812e9799b2b648995b96cadf79
describe
'8997' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSS' 'sip-files00247.pro'
5caddee881c526f1ed5b7669d87da14e
4d27d0e7a19b275f188f45fbf017473243418c92
describe
'69009' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGST' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
b01027cf5f6c3d67f1506372505529dc
3c08d160e3080115664bb807bcaf741a01a9d95d
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSU' 'sip-files00247.tif'
a3eb6dd54d4d155874bf14a97238147a
32639d39557d159aaf11d3e017a44a7b25480fc6
describe
'382' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSV' 'sip-files00247.txt'
b3cf108a4601789404c35cbe9897867f
04a453f52a6bc87ea718935f402b687ff700a282
describe
'33759' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSW' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
07303be11e7fec04c123254225539320
ea3a7d90fe8298680c1815d47ab1ff4b6d29147e
describe
'346343' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSX' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
247df6ee9a1f2f2b1f3057d7732ed181
57de782bbd4c31765c9bd1fa710821509c63eaa7
describe
'186444' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSY' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
f766a4703dfe3fd56d3df36801481653
bfe6c4b19e63d462b738134cef656b01f252a13a
describe
'37353' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGSZ' 'sip-files00248.pro'
a888898d6b084c981af75795cb5f1c7d
f5fc0a6fa223c01b3847e5d6caf2dd511d9bf39d
describe
'71603' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTA' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
b02015a42c212d791f3fce5071e1b11e
365f8a4af9d5fb4a14b4a3676d81e7ac4743f980
describe
'2793220' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTB' 'sip-files00248.tif'
3fed9b4de9985fca0c7bdf9aca25049e
c2f61e2e794f51134e8166f129fa7b4ef9441f13
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTC' 'sip-files00248.txt'
c3f97d6510c2628db12469e32250e26d
8560330d23b87bbb57af71a80b4c0effc33dc13f
describe
'34445' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTD' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
e8e46659c1632d12b3527bc49141caf4
b643a4e21945b01f075dff09089cb0436d433c96
describe
'346572' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTE' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
ea7f55dafa064ff52485be65892ae4b2
03a8349f9ccd2bda5234af6202c7b2884130367a
describe
'189506' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTF' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
16e269f7c4a18a4377eb389403f27087
7acc41504cef8c5fa25ed7f4d7ba4760fdf1bd33
describe
'39880' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTG' 'sip-files00249.pro'
9af2967ba765e426743c767b59e76cfe
015cda1cdffc281141b13ca0896be23904397054
describe
'71778' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTH' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
c9783ca6f4199e8f61fd2d96c41ff794
fa67a893e5381bd30ae6905d5d26ea4ecec853a0
describe
'2795340' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTI' 'sip-files00249.tif'
568098e73eda964389337e385b777124
e000cc34375c92e92c16e9dc40a2b20012b3b1bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTJ' 'sip-files00249.txt'
d8707ad11fc47498b34228055e51ea86
ce011598a84c0dc7db76f51eecb6a58ea7bed258
describe
'34173' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTK' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
0af3e53c8a785048b1847488f9b813ae
315dbc89a840e073c4cf23b77944fd4c09554db0
describe
'346156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTL' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
e2cbbc035c10bd8faa745cad168e0561
583734ebf9c0cfb00483f1a86aaea0c07c24b9ef
describe
'99609' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTM' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
8393d202bdedb080252cbecbd7ef4430
0c04cbd8919e1e8120a959ec3fdc1930863897bd
describe
'7156' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTN' 'sip-files00250.pro'
3ca96e49ce779f0aa774dc9fa73e2a17
bc8141f1207877ea0530a15c5361ae4b7eeba203
describe
'35466' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTO' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
502d138b8897644b0db3a04d98992d99
02baefbf643f9e4acf56e2ba5b561383d31e7074
describe
'2789612' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTP' 'sip-files00250.tif'
5cc379346a3903e10baad5df7e98f519
4fdbdb2aeba6ced9cc2d137e50a879a82abc6593
describe
'343' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTQ' 'sip-files00250.txt'
7354a8679ef7ca7112e010fca78b2589
df6ff3c432677e57ab3f8bf07e51e6fde497e9d1
describe
'22715' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTR' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
271cbc62db99136aa7e397e7cd6283a1
64ce06ca0a8a213ee825e59de219c24e3b06e48c
describe
'404310' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTS' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
7281b4087068ceee812af29a28dc1a82
0433f52e829a806b7d2e0b5915047af9988b9585
describe
'105496' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTT' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
d7cfd9f596d75c07a9a0b0afb0f5becb
f412a06b2820e0f2bf11fe0f447679eda873cebc
describe
'28796' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTU' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
666489dfaf340cf1a37c231783eff251
0ea9b24d78896864a2ca4414c6ec085006b4ad80
describe
'9712504' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTV' 'sip-files00251.tif'
ab38a1af3bf430356b0fb5348cfa99ae
deb6a6e28c7517412196349f6196597e88a48b54
describe
'15217' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTW' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
2ca271135cceb99d66b01d7d278e733b
4c7bd47d136ec4cdd2685cf0b267d9c6f2501f52
describe
'385296' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTX' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
75549dd3f4dfeaeb239f3d1716d5ed5d
506876314c47a48ca10ae8b71834f8893a208ede
describe
'183345' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTY' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
e8c05ab39072200616e6b338f15fa5e5
7500082b64bf4687c43326fbd8bc98978f79a0cb
describe
'38813' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGTZ' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
f8f55679d2546d7b4207c7880e1e9b8f
f224cfc67907ca8b9a0d2ec0be956ccead30c8bd
describe
'9256980' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUA' 'sip-files00252.tif'
0552c0facd1191f80e533a3cba985866
db660f2e327e64e6e4ef410bd0be08e0f2c367ac
describe
'14807' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUB' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
8fba726abe4aef5811d276733d05542b
5cf9ba1f05e6f5b947573fce8c805fac2f84b6be
describe
'111906' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUC' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
0987501800f5709ecd022b916160216f
4af99a943a9a5616adb6bd6a9f9ae45dfd1fcdd5
describe
'62150' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUD' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
d297b97c5c2f77b00ab8552115d3e1bd
05748230fa18cc0f02fefd9e96649d5265dba94c
describe
'28290' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUE' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
87eca2b56573816a47911e52d9b2b282
395762d16304cb3ed44b5823436826e5d317cb76
describe
'2704960' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUF' 'sip-files00253.tif'
186a632a9356255d0c0c82f21ff30765
31385cdc39f3385cd9d9af8c867f1b871271dfb4
describe
'22583' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUG' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
4d0aebce2e74d4b531d3d101bb3467be
4197301e908227c92654f01a2be91e6248b19942
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUH' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
83794bb1b1faf0cb3c8530145271c973
7f2168ad0ffb4f0f733459351f2e2221b154308e
describe
'407974' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUI' 'sip-filesUF00079981_00001.mets'
5651eec7296c9fdc3da56ba801d346cd
019958de7bca0fd1f6010f001bf554af3f45bb5e
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T03:40:51-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'529492' 'info:fdaE20080407_AAAAIMfileF20080409_AABGUL' 'sip-filesUF00079981_00001.xml'
7b4ef81bfd912d4fdc708ed092765c6a
059821d3249f1aca916b776120ffbc862e06ec32
describe
'2013-12-19T03:40:47-05:00'
xml resolution