Citation
Lucy Miller's good work

Material Information

Title:
Lucy Miller's good work
Series Title:
"Little Dot" series
Creator:
Knight ( Printer )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Manufacturer:
Knight
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
64, [16] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Salvation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Charity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Migrant labor ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Benevolence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Gratitude -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1891
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "Ursula's promise," "Travelling sixpence," etc.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026854493 ( ALEPH )
ALH3781 ( NOTIS )
182576549 ( OCLC )

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The Book of Bocks.

Springfield Stories.

Little Dot.

John Thompson's Nursery.

Two Ways to begin Life.

Ethel Ripon.

Little Gooseberry.

Fanny Ashley. |

Lhe Gamekeeper’s Daughter.

Fred Kenny.

Gid Humphrey's Study Table

Jenny’s Waterproof.

The Holy Welt.

The Travelling Sixpence.

The Three Flowers.

Lost and Rescued.

Lightbearers and Beacons.

Little Lottie.

The Dog of St. Bernard.

Isaac Gould the Waggoner. Bere

Uncie Rupert’s Stories for ie 5
Boys.

Dreaming and Doing.

Many Ways of Being Useful,

Rachel Rivers.

Lessons out of Sehoot.

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CE SIR a iain erp eictnnn n at wi prorennicnses ad lg a agg Be os ae ea



Lucy MiLLer’s Goop Worx.

BY THE AUTHOR. OF

“URSULAS PROMISE,” “TRAVELLING SIXPENCE,”

re

oe



THE RELIGIOUS TRACT: SOCIELY.

56, PATERNOSTER Row; 65, ST. PauL’s CHURCHYARD}
AND 364," Piccepicey.





CHAP. PAGE
I. NEW-COMERS . ‘ ‘ . 5
m FOOR CHARLIE. ‘ : 15
WI. A BRIGHT IDEA : 4 ores
IV. SPECIAL PLEADING ‘ ‘ 36
we BETTER DAYS... ‘ « do

VI. WORK REWARDED ‘ 56





LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

= eS

Cia dt ea A,

ficw-comers,

SUNNY-FACED little girl was Lucy
WN Miller; one of the children whom
the aged like to look on, and for
whom they whisper, “God bless you,’—one
of the children whose gentle, unselfish
character wins love from schoolmates and
playfellows, who gives comfort and help to
father and mother, and brightness to the
home, no matter if it is rich or poor.
The prettiest cottage in the village of
Brookfield belonged to the Millers; and
the garden, with the roses and pinks and



6 LUCY MILLERS “GOOD WORK.

climbing honeysuckle, was Lucy’s chief
care when school-hours were over. She
would get up early in the morning too,
when some young folks are so fond of
lingering in bed, and begin her task of
weeding and raking, or tying up the plants
which a rough night wind had injured; and
besides this, there was fruit to be gathered,
and taken to one of the large houses, where
it was gladly bought.

In this way Lucy could help her father
and mother to keep up their tidy home, by
earning a few shillings weekly; and you
may be sure that she was far happier than
a girl who thought only of herself, and
nothing at all of the hard-working parents
who had done everything for her in her
helpless infancy.

One of her pleasantest day-dreams was
of the time when school-days would be
over, and she could begin to work in
earnest. Already she had a hope that she
might get employed in the Squire’s family,
for the lady constantly visited the village
school, and had before now taken one of
the best scholars to be trained for service
in her own house.



NEW-COMERS. a

Having told you thus much of Lucy
Miller’s character, I need hardly say that
she was a child who, though not quite
twelve years old, had given her heart to
(od, and begun to serve Him earnestly.
If it had not been so, she could not have
lived so happily in her home, have yielded
such prompt obedience, have resisted so
well the temptations which beset us even
in early years, for without the help of the
Holy Spirit we can do nothing that is right
and pleasing in God’s sight.

I do not tell you, however, that this little
cirl was faultless ; there were times when
evil temper would rise, when an impatient .
word broke from her lips, when she felt it
hard to be good, and so very easy to yield
to evil. These are part of the struggles by
which we are to grow more pleasing to
God, more like His own dear children,
more conformed to the image of His be-
loved Son; our Lord: Jesus - Christ; and,
striviig as Lucy Miller strove, praying as
she trayed for pardon of every sin, and for
the Holy Spirit’s grace to do better, it is
certain that every day she must grow more
pleasing to her heavenly Father, who,



G BUCY MILLEK'S GOOD WORK,

looking down, saw each battle, each victory
over self and self-seeking.

I must now tell you a little about Brook
field, the village where Lucy had been born,
where her good mother had spent her own
childhood, and her father had lived from a
Foul 4f was a pretty place enough,
standing on a sloping hill-side, with a view
over miles of green meadows to the peaceful
view beyond—too pretty, so Mrs. Miller
often said, to be so godless and unchristian
a place (or Sibel i the midst of the
beauties of nature men’s hearts ought to
mise to “him who made all and. who
gave all.

There was an old church there, but few
indeed were those who gathered within its
walls witch Subday came.. There .was a
tiny chapel too, which some good man had
built, believing that many souls might be
helped heavenward by those simple services
and the plain teaching of divine truths;
but only a scanty sprinkling of the Brook-
field people could ever be seen there, the
greater number of them passing over
Sunday as if it was in nowise different from
any other of the days of the week.



NEW-COMERS. 9

inher own little: way, Lucy tried fo
imitate her good mother; and when Mrs.
Miller would seek to persuade some one or
other of the careless women round her to
join her in the public worship of God, Lucy
would coax some of the children to the
small Sunday-school which had _ been
started, hoping that there they might be
won, by the kindness of the teachers, to
learn the way to be truly happy and good.
In very few cases, however, would they be
persuaded by her, and even those who did
would only go for once, or at most twice,
and then tire of the trouble of learning and
listening, which was distasteful after their
habitual custom of idling the hours away.

There came, however, to Brookfield,
during the summer in which Lucy was
twelve years old, a family who were soon
noticed, even in that humble village, for
their excessive poverty; it showed itself
in their threadbare garments, in the wan
faces of father and mother, atid three
sickly-looking young children, and in their
dwelling in a cottage so dilapidated and
miserable that it had long been left as
unfit for use.



IO LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

Lucy Miller’s heart had warmed to them
from the day when as she tied up her roses
and carnations one fine evening, two tiny
pallid faces were pressed against the
palings, which she knew were strange in
Brookfield.

It was not a difficult matter to draw the
little creatures into conversation, and she
soon learnt that their name was Parsons
—Charlie and Nellie Parsons, that they
lived in the lane leading in the direction
of the distant town, and that they came
from London because’ their father had
found work to do in these parts.

A few strawberries dropped into each
grimy little hand brought a smile to the
children’s faces, and then they scampered
away homeward to tell their news to their
mother.

Lucy, too, was full of the meeting when
she sat down in the kitchen to rest after
Der work in the garden. “Oh, mother,
they looked so poor, so hungry,” she said;
“and they are so young—only four and
five years old, they told me. They live in
Long Lane, too; it must be that damp
cottage with all the windows broken, which





NEW-COMERS. II

has been empty so long, for there is only
the one there,”

“It is not a fit place for any hitmag
beings,” remarked Mrs. Miller. “ There
must be some mistake about it, I should
think, Lucy; but I shall have to go to the
town to-morrow, and I’ll go by the way of
Long Lane, and I shall see in a minute if
there are any signs of life about the place.
I should be sorry for any one to live there,
however poor.”

On the morrow, Lucy eagerly waited for
her mother’s return. She always liked to
hear what had been seen and done in those
rare visits to the town, which, compared
with Brookfield, seemed quite a large and
important place; but on this occasion all
her anxiety was respecting the broken-down
cottage in Long Lane, and the two sickly
children who she believed were living
there. |

“Well, mother,’ she exclaimed, as Mrs,
Miller came up to the gate. “Did you see
them ? cle it all trie >=

Yes, true “enough, answered (ite.
Miller. ‘“ Before I came up to the place I
saw that the door was open, and there were



[2 LUCY. MILLERS GOOD WORK.

signs of life about; and as I got quite near
Gee oF the most miserable, rageed little
creatures I ever saw ran out to look at me.
I made free to ask if the mother was in,
but they said no; and it turned out that
both the parents are working at the hay-
making, and the children shift for them-
selves meanwhile. I had put a good piece
of our home-made cake in my bag on the
chance of seeing them; dear! they were
pleased to be sure.”

~Oh, iother, that was good of you,”
said Lucy. “You ever told me you
thought of that.”

“Well, no, child,” and a smile passed
over the kindly face; “it is as well not fo
speak of every little good-natured idea that
comes into ones mind; the next thing
would be beginning to make much of it,
and take pride in oneself. ‘Let not the
left hand know what the right hand doeth,’
seems to have a very clear meaning, to my
mind, and ought to keep us from making
a show of what we do for others. After
all, it is little enough, Lucy; and God has
done so much for us.”

“That is what I have been thinking of



NEW-COMERS. :

all day,” replied the child. “I’ve you and
father and my nice home, and plenty to
eat, and good clothes to wear; while those
poor little things look so hungry and so
very miserable. I should like to help them,
mother, if I knew how.”

“It isn’t as if we were rich,” said Mrs.
Miller, thoughtfully; “though we have
food and to spare, your father works hard
out-doors, while ’'m working at home to
keep things together; and we’re glad even
of your help by tending the tat and
flowers, and getting them fit to sell. Still,
though we may be dependent on our own
toil, that is no reason for not helping those
that are poorer than ourselves; and if you
can do anything for those children in Long
Lane, child, | shall be lad to let you, 4
must find out a bit about the parents before
you go after them at all; but meanwhile,
as you are handy with your needle, you
might take that print frock you’ve grown
out of, and make something to cover them,
—they’re well nigh in rags now.”

Lucy Miller was not fond of sewing—it
was her most disagreeable task at the
village school; and even the necessary



14 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

repairs of her own clothing was so dis-
tasteful that it had been the most common
cause of her mother’s displeasure.

At the thought of altering that lilac print
frock, and making from it two little gar- |
ments for these tiny ragged creatures, her
face clouded over, but happily she remem-
bered who has said, ‘‘Inasmuch as ye do
Ht wnto-the least of these, ye do it unto
Mice. ang druvine far irom:.her heart the
feeling of vexation, she quickly agreed,
and begged her mother's help in beginning
the task.

No small self-denial was this for a girl
of twelve years, as my young readers
may imagine,—for Lucy’s leisure was brief
indeed when her gardening cares were over.
But she found that a good deal may be
accomplished, even if only a few moments
ate usec. by diligent fingers; and the
thought of the pleasure she should bring
upon those two sad childish faces quickened
her speed when sometimes it was nearly
flagging.



15

CHAPTER Ii.
Poor Charli,

S)EFORE Mrs. Miller found any good
opportunity of inquiring among the
Brookfield people, as to what they

knew of the inhabitants of the cottage in
Long Lane, Lucy learned that one of the
children was ill. The news had come to
her by means of Nellie’s little anxious
face, which peered through the palings, as
she was busy among her flowers one
morning early.

“Whiere.is your brother?” she asked,

having seen them together before.

“He eairt set. up, he’s=sick answered

the child.

“Oh, I am very sorry,” said Lucy, kindly,

“Ts your mother taking care of him ?”
“Mothers out, and fathers out, and

there’s only me,” was the response. “ Char-

lie’s crying too, and I thought you’d give



16 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

me some of those,’ and Nellie Parsons
pointed to the strawberry bed.

“Yes, [ will; I am sure 1 may, burd
want to tell my mother first;” and Lucy
ran into the cottage, and quickly returned
to the garden with Mrs. Miller following.

“Tell me what is the matter with your
little brother,” she said kindly ; butthe child
was shy, and, hanging down her head, only
muttered some unintelligible words, and
kept her eye fixed on the small. basket
which Lucy was rapidly filling with fruit.

“Shall I come home with you, and see
him?” continued Mrs. Miller; and this
time the little girl smiled as if the idea was
welcome.

“Tet me go.foo, said Lucy; but her
mother would not grant this request, feeling
that if the child was really ill, it might be
fever or other contagious sickness,

With Nellie as guide, Mrs. Miller went
to the cottage, and pushing open the door,
found a wretched state of things indeed.
There was scarcely an article of furniture
in the room, the damp chill of the place
was of itself enough to cause illness, and
down on a small mattress in the corner



POOR CHARLIE. r7

there lay the sick boy, his taneted ia
falling over his flushed face, and his arms
tossed out on the torn piece of Diane
which covered him.

He looked up as Nellie ran to him with
the little basket of strawberries; but at
the sight of a stranger following he began
to cry, partly from shyness, and partly
from weariness and pain.

“Don't cry!" said the kind woman,
coming forward. ‘Your Jittle sister has
brought something nice for you; and I
have walked with her on purpose to see
Ou.

After some persuasion, Charlie turned
his head round from the wall; and being
coaxed into eating one strawberry, another
and another followed until they were nearly
gone, and he began pressing the rest on
Nellie.

There was something touching in the
love of these young children, and in the
kind of protecting tenderness which the
eit) displayed for. her brother just ouc
year younger; doubtless, the strawberries
were tempting enough, but Nellie would

not touch one of them.
C 63



18 LUCY MILLERS: GOOD WORK.

“Mother left me some bread and a drop
Grimm, she said “You can’t eat bread
when you’re so sick, Charlie.”

Mrs. Miller looked round the dirty deso-
late room with a sorrowful face,—it was
so unfit to be the home of little children.
She judged by the boy’s appearance, that
the damp of the place and insufficient food
were the chief cause of his illness, and that
it was not of an infectious kind which could
be carried to her own Lucy; so she lingered
awhile to make him as comfortable as
circumstances would permit, and finally
left with a promise of returning in a few
hours to see if he was better.

Lucy’s mind was brimming over with
plans for aiding the poor family in the
cottage, when her mother had described
its emptiness and misery; her fingers flew
over the stitches which were yet wanting
to complete the little frock she had con-
trived for Nellie ; and there was time left
to pick some fresh fruit for the sick boy
before, to her great joy, she was allowed to
go and see him.

“Mother ! may I take a book of pictures,
moo’. she said, “di: remember whene,



POOR CHARLIE, 19

was ill.in bed, about three years ago,
nothing amused me but books; and I
dare say poor Charlie Parsons has never
seen many books,”

“No, indeed ; judging by the look of
things!” exclaimed Mrs. Miller. “I ex-
pect the child is as ignorant as a little
heathen, Lucy. But if you like to take a
book, and show him the pictures, I’ve
nothing to say against it, I’m sure.”

The little girl ran to her own neatly-kept
shelf, where were a goodly row of prettily
covered books, most of which had been
gained as prizes from both day and Sunday
schools. It was not a very easy matter to
make a selection; but at last she chose
one which had been her delight in very
early days when she was no older than
Charlie Parsons, and with her volume of
Lible Stories, she tripped happily down
Long Lane by her mother's side) “talking
all the while.

A sun-burnt woman stood in the cottage
doorway this time, a poor, weary, sad-faced
creature, who, after exchanging some words
with Nellie, came a step or two forward,
and spoke a few awkward thanks to Mrs,



20 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

Miller for being kind to her sick boy. “He
seems worse and worse,’ she said, awk-
wardly leading the way to the mattress in
the corner whereon Charlie was tossing to
and fro.

At the sight of his visitor of the morning
he paused in his fretful cry to smile a little ;
and when Lucy knelt down on the floor
beside him, and began talking pleasantly,
and tempting him to eat from the contents
of the basket on her arm, he soon forgot
his shyness, and was quite ready to be
amused with pictures or anything else.

Mrs. Miller meanwhile was listening to
the mother’s sad story—the story of want
and misery so pitiably common as we pass
through life. It seemed that they had not
always been so poorly off, though obliged
to toil for daily bread; but from illness,
loss of work, and a long series of misfor-
tunes, they had sunk to the rough life of
those who pass from hay-making to har-
vesting and hop-gathering, having no settled
home, and existing they scarce knew how
through the hardships of winter.

Just a simple word or two about God’s
help and care fell apparently on unaccus-



POOR CHARKLEE, 21

tomed ears, for Mrs. Parsons only shook
her head despondingly, and talked of her
‘ill luck,” as compared with the “good
luck of other people. *“Prayer's manage
to me, she added; “it’s forwenlemike.
Nor could Mrs. Miller turn her from this
conviction,

Lucy was finding the ignorance of the
children much what her mother had antici-
pated. “God; “Christ,” “heaven, swinen
words were spoken in connection with the
pictures, only brought forth a puzzled stare,
yet little Charlie's eyes were fixed eagerly
on Christ with the children of old gathered
round Him; and as the story was told of
the goodness of the Saviour of the world,
he sighed, and it seemed as if the small
wistful face expressed the wish, which has
come to so many of us, that there lived
some one now as gentle and as kind.

“He lives in beaven now,” JLucy “vas
explaining as her mother and Mrs. Parsons
ceased speaking, and turned to the group
in thé corner; “but Ile sees. mssalle you.
Charlie and Nellie, and me, and every one
of us, and He is sorry for us when we are
ill or sad.”



22 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

“Sorry for Charlie?” said the small
owner of the name.

“Yes; and He loves you very much,”
answered the elder girl, into whose face.
both children glanced up ; but then a little
confusion came over her as she perceived
that Mrs. Parsons was gazing at her won-
deringly; and laying down her book she
went to her mother’s side, saying, “I will
leave it for you and Nellie to look at after
fam gone, and I'll tell you more stories
when I come again.”

“And I’m sure I’m thankful to you for
looking in,” said the poor worn mother.
“It goes hard with me to leave him; but
we cant starve, and I must work while
there’s work to be done, for it’s soon enough
over.”

“Couldn't you get a better lodging ?”
asked Mrs. Miller.

Mrs. Parsons shook her head,—it was
plain that the tumbie-down cottage in
I.ong Lane was all that they could afford.

Lucy could talk of little else that evening.
She had seen many of the Brookfield people
careless about religion and forgetful of God;
but she was too young to have met with



POOR CHARLIE, 26

such utter ignorance of His very name as
that which existed in these children, and it
shocked her, :

“IT am sure they had never heard of
God, mother,” she explained. “Charlie
said, ‘Who is He?’ and Nellie only opened
her eyes wider than before. Doesn’t Mrs.
Parsons know, either 2”

“‘Perhaps—I cannot tell,” answered Mrs,
Miller, “She may have been taught in
her childhood, and grown careless and
forgetful in all her troubles; or she may
indeed never have known much more than
her own little girl and boy. However, it
is very certain that they have not come in
our way by chance. Perhaps God means
us to put a few better thoughts into their
minds, Lucy; and even by a picture or
two, and just what you can tell them about
it, the little creatures may get to under-
stand there’s some one great and good who
loves them. I wouldn’t be troubled too
much, dear, by finding them so ignorant,
Pve heard of many such; and it isa blessed
work to do for God, if they can be taught
to give a prayer and a thought for Him.”

“Oh, mother, I do not think of it quite



24 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

like that—something to do for God,” and
Lucy’s eyes sparkled. Perhaps had she
beén able to look back at the scene she
kad left, she might have seen that the
work had begun, for the little boy still
gazed at the pictured face of Christ, and
whispered now and then, “He lives in
heaven, and He loves Charlie—poor little
Charlie!”




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CHAPTER Tit

A Stig ee
Qu
sp was a difficult matter for Lucy Miller

now to give her mind to lessons or

her work as a little gardener. Had
she only followed her own inclinations, she
would have been constantly at the Parsons’
cottage ; and certainly her feet sped quickly
along the lane to reach it, as soon as she
felt nat, Wer small sound of city wae
done.

The children there were not: one whit
less eager for her appearance, for where
hunger and poverty make themselves felt,
older persons than Charlie and Nellie look
almost impatiently for the one friend who
brings help and kindness, First of all,
Lucy’s basket would be opened; and
though her mother, being a thrifty woman,
was able to contrive some economical
dinner for the Httle creatures at smal



206 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

cost, I must tell. you that Lucy -hersel@
gladly dispensed with many indulgences
(such as cakes and sweets, for which pence
used to be exchanged on the way to school),
for the sake of giving some treat to those
who had known none of the little treats
and pleasures of happier childhood.

But when the basket had been opened,
and some of its contents tasted, Charlie
would turn to the picture-book asking for
“2 story.”

It was now that Lucy found the value
of all she had learned from early infancy.
She could tell the little wondering listeners
of Christ as the Babe of Bethlehem; she
could describe to them that He—as a child
on earth—had not been rich or great, but
SO very, very poor. She was able @&
describe to them the miracles He had
wrought, the kindness He had _ lavished
upon all men, and particularly upon the
sorrowful and upon sinners. She could
repeat to them His gracious words; she
could tell them how He loved little
children ; and last of all she would come
to the story of His cruel sufferings and
shameful death. At this poiiut Charlie



A BRIGHT IDEA. 27

would cry, and Nellie look troubled; but
they were cheered by hearing how, upon
that first glad Easter Sunday, He rose
up out of the grave and went. back to
heaven.

It was only by slow degrees that Lucy
made them acquainted with the story of
Christ’s life and death, of course. She
had but a few spare hours; and besides,
to such very ignorant little learners, it is
not by one word or one story that a truth
becomes fixed in the heart.

But Mrs. Miller had put before her the
pleasant thought that in all this God’s
work was being done; that to make these
two young children understand that there
was a heaven above where they might
live for ever by-and-by ; that there was a
Saviour who had died for their sins, and
so gained them admittance there; that
this Saviour loved them, and was sorry
for all their griefs and sufferings,—all was
doing something for God, which might
bring forth fruit by-and-by.

And here I must tell you that Lucy had
dreamed many day-dreams of being a
useful woman in the time to come. She



28 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

had sat listlessly over a heap of stockings
which needed mending, and, like many
another girl of her age, forgotten the duty
of the moment in imagining herself visiting
the sick, braving great dangers in some
erand work, leaving home and country to
lead little heathen children to Christ. Oh!
I could not tell you half the bright visions
which came to her at such moments,—but
many of you will guess them quite easily.

But notwithstanding the faults of child-
hood, this little girl had a real love ige
God, a true desire to be guided by thm
Holy Spirit day by day; and so when she
found Charlie and Nellie Parsons so near
to her, and saw that she might help them
in SO many ways, she never knelt down at
night or morning without saying, “Oh,
my God, I thank Thee for giving me
something to do for Thee.”

With the help of better food little Charlie
was getting pretty well again, and by-and-
by was running about with his sister, as
when they first made their appearance in
Brookfield. But the haymakers’ work was
over, and their parents would be moving
off again, according to their usual habit.



A BRIGHT IDEA. 29

This troubled Mrs, Miller almost as
much as it troubled Lucy. “dt seems 4
miserable, shiftless sort of way,” she said
to her husband ; “I can’t myself see but
what some more respectable course might
be found for them. 1 yonder now if some
of the gentlemen round about the country
could take Parsons on as gardener, for he
learned gardening when he was a boy, and
kept to it for many years. Once get them
settled down in Brookfield, we might see
to the children a little; and who knows
but the parents might become steady, God-
fearing people ?”

Miller shookhis head doubtfully. “There’s
few gentlemen would take on a man who
has been wandering about and getting his
living anyhow. I daresay he couldn’t find
a friend to speak up as to his being even
honest and sober.”

“I think he is, father,” interrupted iewcy.
eagerly. “He came in once when I was
talking to Charlie, and he spoke so nicely
and seemed so fond of his little boy. He
wouldn't be chat if he was a bad drinking
man.”

“Well, no, you are in the right there,



30 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

oe, ‘repired’ Maller: “Alb-the same, f
don’t know a gentleman who would not
want a better sort of character—unless,
indeed, it was Mr. Severn at Stoke.”

Now Stoke was the name of a large
country house some two miles from Brook-
field, belonging to the richest gentleman in
the county—a place which assumed some-
thine. of ‘the character ofa’ palace in ‘the
eyes of the simple folk round about. But
if Mr. Severn was rich, he was equally
benevolent; no tale of sorrow had ever
been told to him in vain, no poor creature
Mad ever been turned trom his door
unhelped.

“Yes, Mr. Severn might—if any one
made bold to ask him,’ was Mrs. Miller’s
response. “ And as for gardening work, it
would seem there must always be plenty
@peut a place like Stoke.”

Lucy said nothing, but there was an
expression on her face which caused her
mother to exclaim, “ What are you thinking
or, child?”

“T was thinking I wish Mr. Severn knew
about Parsons, for he is such a good, kind
gentleman, I am sure he would give him



A BRIGHT IDEA. ‘21

work of some kind. And oh, mother, I
should be so very glad if they all stayed
here in Brookfield, and learned to be very
good and happy.”

“ Well, well—you should be off to Stoke,
and beg for your new friends,” said Miller,
laughing a little. “I don’t know how it is,
but lately, whenever I come in from work,
mother always says, Lucy has gone to the
children in Long Lane.”

“Oh, father, I haven’t been there so very
often!” she cried. “I have seen to the
flowers and the fruit, and all the other
things just the same; it is only in what I
call ‘play’ time I have been after Charlie
and Nellie.”

“I’m not complaining, child,” said Miller,
kindly. “I was only joking a little. God
forbid that ever I should grudge your
showing a kindness to any poor creatures
wiO. Need 16

The conversation turned on other sub-
jects; but< not so was “it with Lucy’s
thoughts. She could but busy her mind
with delightful pictures in which she saw
Mr. and Mrs. Parsons and their two
children dwelling happily and contentedly



32 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

in one of the neatest cottages of Brookfield,
or one of the pretty gardeners’ lodges at
Stoke.

“Mother,” she said, when they were
alone together next morning, “I have been
thinking a great deal,—and I’ve asked
God to help me if it was right,—and—oh,
do you think I really may do what father
said last night ?”

“What father said last night!” repeated
Mrs. Miller, who had well-nigh forgotten
the subject which had taken hold of her
child’s imagination. “What do you mean,
Lucy, for it seems to me he said a good
many things ?”

“T mean about poor Parsons and Mr.
Sever, continued the little girl, “Dont
you remember, mother, that when we were
saying that there must be plenty of work
about Stoke, and how nice it would be if
this man got work there, father said I had
Petter go to Mr. Severn and beg for him?”

“Oh, that was your father’s joking way,
as you might be sure,” replied Mrs. Miller.
“Tt would not be very easy for a child of
your age to go to Stoke, and ask to sce
such a gentleman as Mr. Severn.”



A BRIGHT IDEA. a3

“No, not easy,” said Lucy, reflectively ;
“but yet—oh, mother! every one says he is
so very kind that I don’t think he would
be angry with me.”

“I don’t say he would, dear; indeed, I
‘suppose Mr. Severn could not be very
angry with any one except for some just
cause; for he is a true gentleman, and
better still, a Christian. All the same,
Lucy, you would feel very frightened when
you fairly stood before him in one of his
grand rooms; and what could you say?
for we do not know that Parsons is to be
trusted, though we hope so.”

“IT should say how poor he was, mother,
and how by one thing and another, and
chiefly through the want of a friend to stand
by him, he had got down to such a wretched
way of life. And then, mother, I should
tell Mr. Severn about Charlie and Nellie—
how small and starved and miserable they
were ; and then I should try and say how
much we wanted to teach them about God
and good things, and how we were afraid
that, if they went on in their wild roving
life, they would never remember the few

things we have told them about Christ and
p 66



'@4° LUCY MILLERS GOOD’ WORK.

Beeven. Ohl Lf can’t believe that Mr.
Severn would refuse to help them.”

Mrs. Miller hesitated. Like Lucy, she
felt that the master of Stoke would almost
certainly befriend this poor family, and yet
she felt a repugnance, wnich she could
hardly explain, to her child becoming the
petitioner.

“It seems taking such a liberty,’ she
said at last. “A little: oirl, just the child
of homely working-folk, venturing to go
and ask to. see. Mr. ‘Severn... 1 can’t bear
the idea of it, Lucy; and yet ’tis hard to
hold you back from doing a service to
these poor creatures.”

“Mother, may I ask my teacher what
she thinks? She is always so wise and
kind.”

“ Ah, do,” answered Mrs. Miller, desiring
to be relieved of the entire responsibility
of the -Matter;. “Miss Wynne would
understand better than we do the ways
of gentlefolks, and I expect she knows
Mr. Severn. Ask her next Sunday after-
noon, Lucy.”

“Qh, mother! and this only Tuesday.
Please let me go and ask to see Miss



A BRIGHT IDEA, 35

Wynne this afternoon; she has told all
her class that she is a friend, and we need
never be afraid to run to her in a difficulty.
And this zs a real difficulty, mother; for

even you don’t seem quite sure about what
I ought to do”





























































CHAPTER Iv.
Special Pleading,



r RS. MILLER could not gainsay this
i statement, and she therefore agreed
to Lucy’s proposal of visiting the
lady who for some time had been her
Sunday-school teacher; indeed, she felt
almost the impatience of a girl in waiting
to hear the result.

“Well, child!” she exclaimed, when
Lucy teturned from her visit. But the
bright glad look upon her child’s face was
almost sufficient answer, even had she not
cried, “Oh, mother, Miss Wynne was so
kind! She says I had better go to Stoke,
and first of all she will write and ask Mr.
Severn to be so kind as to see me.”

“That is something gained, to be sure,”
eeewered Mrs. Miller. “I must own [I
shouldn’t like to have you turned from the
door by the servants saying their master



SPECIAL PLEADING. 37 ;

was not able to see you. But tell me what
Miss Wynne thought of this plan of yours.”
* Well) mother, she let me tell hersign
out what was in my mind, and then she
asked me several questions, especially as
to whether I’d prayed to God about it.
And last of all she said I had better go to
Stoke, and she would write to Mr. Severn,
begging him to see me to-morrow afternoon
—being Wednesday, and half-holiday.”
“To-morrow!” exclaimed Mrs. Miller.
“Well, then, [ must eet your clean print
frock ironed to-night, and my work forward,
so that I may walk to Stoke with you.”
“Oh, mother, will you really.co wath
me? That will make it so much easier,
for I am just a‘ little afraid,” said Lucy:
‘Tt seems as iff naust sit down now, and
think over and over what I had better say;
but Miss Wynne told me to leave it all to
the Holy Spirit, and He would put wie
right words into. my heart when the time
came. IJ! water my-flowers das usual
and I dare say Nellie and Charlie will
come round and watch meé-throush the
palings, as they did that first night I ever
saw them; and then I shall keep thinking



38 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

how happy perhaps I’m going to make
them, and so the time will pass, and [
shan’'t get frightened in thinking about
what is to happen to-morrow.”

Lucy’s programme proved pretty correct}
and while busy with her pinks and car-
nations, her two small favourites made
their appearance, in expectation of one of
their favourite stories. She told them of
Christ’s death,—they never seemed to
weary of it; and, as if following up some
idea in her own mind, she tried to explain
that though we are not asked to lay down
our lives for others, we must every one of
us try and help to serve those who need it.
I cannot tell you that these two tiny un-
trained children at all took in the lesson,
and besides she was not a very experienced
teacher. Butit seemed a comfort to herself
to reflect that on the morrow she—in her
own little way—was going to lay aside
fear and selfish considerations, to serve
others if she could.

“We're going away on Saturday,” said
Nellie, gravely. “There'll be no more
work for father and mother after Saturday,
so we're obliged to go away.”



SPECIAL PLEADING. 39

“How should you like to live in Brookfield
always?” Lucyasked them. “Wouldn’tit
be nice to have a pretty cottage instead of
the one in Long Lane, and a garden and
flowers, and clean frocks and pinafores ?”

Ihe children’s eyes seemed to express
that such a condition would indeed be
“nice,” but to them most certainly un-
attainable.

When bed-time came, the prospect before
her seemed one which would quite destroy
all Lucy’s chances of sleep. “I must do
what Miss Wynne told me,” she reflected ;
“I must keep saying, ‘O God, help me;’
and try to remember that as He is every-
where, He will be at Stoke with me. Mr.
Severn is a good, kind man who loves God,
so I need not be afraid.” |

She had recourse to these thoughts many
a time before her eyes closed in sleep.
When she awoke it was later than her
usual hour, and her mother stood by her
bed, saying, “ Well, child, it will be a fine
day for Stoke—unless you have altered
your mind.”

“I haven't done that, mother,” Lucy
answered. “ What does father say ?”



40 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

“Not much, dear—it isn’t his way to
have many words about a thing, as you
know. But I can tell his mind almost as
well as he could himself, and I feel pretty
certain he thinks you in the right.” |

‘“Mother, Im -sure -I.-must tbe,’ . said
Pic earnestly... (It isnt as though. it
was for myself I wanted anything; and
surely for others we ought not to be afraid
to ask even a great favour. Miss Wynne
was telling me last night that she 1s certain
we don’t think enough of Christ’s example
—of how He gave up all, and never once
pleased Himself. She thinks that people
are apt to make excuses, as if the Bible
did not mean exactly what it says in verses
such as ‘Whatsoever you would that men
should do to you, do ye even so to them.’
$m sure, mothers dear, that if you and
father were like Charlie’s parents, I should
like fo have you helped, even by a little
girl, to some happier way of life.”

*theres one thing which troubles me
even now,’ said Mrs. Miller, “and that is
fae fear of you coming home quite dis-
appointed. Thanks to Miss Wynne, I’ve
no doubt of Mr. Severn letting you see



SPECIAL PLEADING. AI

him, and tell your story ; but if he says he
has no work for Parsons, and so all you’ve
done is no use, how can you bear that,
Eucy: -

The child’s face clouded over; it was
the first idea that anything but success
could follow the effort she was guing to
make.

“Qh, mother, mother!” she exclaimed,
and the tears filled her eyes, “I never
thought of that! I only thought that if
once I ventured up to Stoke, and saw Mr.
Severn, all would be as happy as could be
for the poor Parsons. If he does say that
he has nothing for ” and here her voice
completely failed her, and she hid her face
on Mrs. Miller’s shoulder.

“Dear, dear!” cried the good mother,
fairly distressed at the effect of words
which she had only spoken as a safeguard
igainst an unproven difficulty. “Lucy,
don’t give way like this, when you have
been feeling so brave—almost as brave as
a young soldier. It only came into my
mind that such a thing might be as disap-
pointment, and you would do well to be
ready for it. Take heart, child, and hope





A2 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

for the best,—it’s all that any of us can
do.”

Lucy smiled a little, and tried to dismiss
her fear; but it was not a very successful
attempt, and during the hours which had
_to pass before the visit to Stoke she wished
more than once that she had never thought
of this great effort to be made for the
benefit of her friends in the broken-down
cottage of Long Lane.

It was a pretty walk from Brookfield to
Mr. Severn’s estate, leading.along the river
banks, with their willows drooping down-
ward to the stream, and so on until the
road was reached in which they saw the
splendid avenue of elms leading up to the
house. The grandeur of the place im-
pressed Lucy now as it had never done
so fully on other occasions, and she put
her hand within her mother’s with a
sudden fear.

“Oh, I wonder if I can,” she gasped ;
‘I wonder if I shall be able to say a word.”
Flowever she felt that retreat was not
possible, as by this time Miss Wynne’s
note must have reached the master of
stoke; so she controlled herself as best



SPECIAL PLEADING 43

she could, though her heart. throbbed
wildly as she heard the clanging of the bell
which would presently result in their ad-
mittance.

“Mr. Severn?” said the man, in answer
to ‘Mrs.’ Miller's inquiry. “adedent think
he can see you, but [ll ask;” and having
done so, he presently returned to bid the
mother and child follow him to the
library.

“So this is the little girl- whom Wiss
Wynne sent to see me,—sit down, my
dear,” was the kindly greeting; and at the
first glimpse of Mr. Severn’s face Lucy’s
courage revived, and stepping up to him
she began her story at once, a little after
the fashion of repeating a school lesson.

“If you please, sir, I hope you'll pardon
my boldness,” she said. “As I know you
are very good, I want you to be good toa
poor man who has not a friend in all the
world—not one, I really think.” |

“That is surely not quite true,” said Mr.
Severn, quietly; but seeing her puzzled
look he added, “I should think you are a
very good friend, if you have come here to
ask help for him.”



44 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

“Oh, I can’t be any one’s friend because
I'm not rich and great,” said Lucy. “But
Iam so sorry for them all; and his poor
little children are so very ignorant, that
unless they have a different sort of life,
they can never learn what is good and
Fient, Tan afraid.’

She paused a moment, and looked ap-
pealingly at the grave, kindly face before her,

Pr sce you. Mave taken. to special
preading, > saie Mr Severn; “ You dont
understand what that is, I dare say, yet.
But now answer me a few questions about
these poor creatures.”

It was not a difficult matter to under-
stand the history of Lucy’s poor friends,
and she had the satisfaction of seeing pity
for them in the expression of Mr. Severn’s
face. Tie tnined fo inquire a few par
ticulars of Mrs. Miller, and then looking
kindly at the child, told her she had done
wou to come to him.

“JT will give this poor fellow a fair chance
of work,” he said. “We can employ him
here, if not in gardening, in some other
way. And as for you, my little girl,—well,
tell me how you came to be so brave.”



SPECIAL PLEADING. As

“ Oh, sit, lm not very brave,’ said huey,
smiling and blushing; “indeed, I was afraid,
especially just when mother had rung the
bell. But I wanted to help Charlie ana
Nellie’s parents ; and as I knew you were
rich and kind, I thought I ought to come
when father and mother said I might.”

“Well, then, you may go home and send
this man to me. We will find them a tidy
cottage in Brookfield, for I have none empty
here ; and if he is steady and trustworthy,
I will be a good friend to him. God bless
you, child; and His blessing will rest on
you, I feel sure, for what you have done
to-day.”’

“Thank you, sir,” said Lucy, curtseying
and looking radiantly happy ; and as soon
as she found herself out in the elm avenue,
she skipped round her mother with delight,
saying, “Oh, I amsohappy! I never, never
was so happy before,—I never knew how
nice it is to help others, and all the nicer
when it has been a little hard!”



46

Gl APi Re ¥,
Better Hays.

1e ucY felt shy about taking the news to
= the cottage in Lone Lane: and-atter

a brief consultation, it was decided
that Parsons should not know exactly how
his good fortune had reached him.

“2 cece mm, and tell ham that ive heard
that Mr. Severn of Stoke Park has work
for Mim if lie likes to go for it,’ said .Mirs.
Paice. ima this she did: but in some
way the truth came out, and Lucy’s head
might have been almost turned by the
eratitude poured forth, if she had not striven
Sarcesty tO Yemember that, after all, the
kind impulse had been put into her heart
by God, and that all the good was His in al-
lowingher todo another little work for Him.

wit seems as if it could not be true”
said the poor woman, in whom hope had
well-nigh been crushed out by years of



BETTER DAYS. A7

sorrow. “It is as if the days were coming
back when we had a good roof to shelter
us, and food in plenty. It’s for the chil-
dren’s sake I’m so thankful,—the hardest
thing of all has been to see them many and
many a time cry for the food I hadn't got
for then.”

“Tt is God you must thank,” Mrs. Miller
would say, whenever she saw an oppor-
funity.. “Id dike to. ink, Wes. Parsons.
that now and then you gave a thought to
Him, and said a prayer.”

“ Ah, I’m not religious,” was the answer;
“But I’m thankful all the same.”

And if Lucy was a little discouraged
that there was no warmer feeling to God
in the hearts of these people, her mother
bade her hope on, and pray for something
better by-and-by.

“It may come suddenly,” she said, “or
it may be months and years in coming; for
God has a different way for all of us. But
His promise doesn’t change, Lucy; and if
you ask Him for what is good and right,
He is sure to grant it in the end.”

It was not difficult to find a house for
the Parsons, for the humblest little place



48 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

Brookfield contained was better than the
dilapidated dwelling in Long Lane. By
Mr. Severn’s kind help, the few necessaries
they must have were purchased ; and Lucy
Miller and her mother had the delight of
seeing their poor friends in a comfortable
home by the day when Parsons was to
begin his service at Stoke Park,

All this had not, however, taken place
unobserved by the Brookfield people, most
of whom uplifted their voices in condemna-
tion of the Millers. “Taking up with a
set of low haymaking folks,” they said;
“people who tramp the country, and lay
hands on all they can find. I wouldn’t let
a child of mine be with those two wretched
little creatures, as you let Lucy be, Mrs.
Miller ; you'll be sorry for it when it’s too
late,”

Or perhaps it was, “I can’t imagine what
Mr. Severn is thinking of—taking ona man
whom no one knows anything about, when
there are ever so many decent fellows
would be glad to get employed at Stoke.
‘Tis said too, Mrs. Miller, that your Lucy
went and begged work for Parsons. I
wonder she could be so bold, and she but



ee ee

BETTER DAYS. AQ

twelve years of age, and to a gentleman
like Mir. Severit:”’

At first the Millers were disposed to
resent all this rather warmly; but feeling
that it would soon be forgotten in some
fresher news, and that at any rate their
motives had been those of kindness to the
poor friendless family, they said little in
the way of excuse or explanation, trusting
that time would show that they had made
no mistake in what had been done.

“And now, mother, may 1 ask Mrs:
Parsons, to let the little children ss6 to
schcol,” said Lucy, on the evening when
the cottage in Long Lane was deserted.
“They would be so much happier learning
a little, than roaming about by themselves ;
but I forgot that their mother will be with
them now.”

“Yes, I’m glad to say,” replied Mrs.
Miller, “Tt’s bad when a woman has to go
out to work, and leave two babies like that
to care for themselves, Still, I dare say
we can persuade her to send them ‘to
school.”

Mrs. Parsons was easily persuaded —
gratitude to those who had taken pity on

iy

cia



50 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

her children would have moved her to do
even a harder thing to please them; so
Charlie and Nellie might have been seen
the next Monday morning trotting towards
the village school, under Lucy Miuiller’s
care, in pinafores which her busy fingers
had made, and with smiling, well-washed
faces, |

Just as easy, too, it proved to get them
among the other tiny ones who were
gathered together on Sundays to listen to
the stories which were not quite strange,
because Lucy had told them before, —
stories of those who were God's servants
in the olden time before Christ came into
the world, stories of that dear Saviour and
Eis work for sinners. There, too, they
learned the simple hymns which children
love; and when they tried to sing them
over to their mother, she remembered the
days when she too had learned such hymns,
when she too had learned about God, al-
though in the troubles of life she seemed
to have forgotten Him.

Thus, then, things went on during the
first few weeks in which Parsons was
employed at Stoke Park; and as he was



BETTER DAYS. 51

proving himself to be both sober and in-
dustrious, the Brookfield people ceased to
busy themselves with gloomy predictions
that he would “come to no goog.7?* 47
they said nothing in his favour, they did
not distrust him as at first.

The change which came over him and
his wife had something to do with this
better impression. They had ‘certainly
looked a miserable couple when first they
appeared in Long Lane; but now they
were fast gaining a healthy colour; and as
the woman had now leisure to work for
herself and her children, she was beginning
to get decent clothing together, and in this
both Mrs. Miller and Lucy were ready
helpers.

“Oh, mother, how fortunate it was that
I saw little Nellie and Charlie with their
poor pale faces looking in at me as I was
gardening,” the little girl would say. “I
suppose God brought them all here on
purpose for us to help them ?”

“es, indeed, if seems very plain that
was His doing,—it couldn't ‘happen by
chance,” ‘replied: Mrs. Miller, - “2 aish of
could see both Parsons and his wife thinking



52 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

more of God’s goodness, Lucy. They are
grateful enough to ws, but it is as if they
couldn’t look higher.”

“Perhaps they will by-and-by, mother,”
said the child, hopefully. “One day, when
Nellie was singing a hymn they often learn
at the Sunday school, I saw Mrs. Parsons
look sad, and presently she said to me,
‘xh, I used to love tHose things when
Pues a cuild, Id be cladif 1 could care
for them now.’ That shows she does
know a little about what is right, mother !”

“Yes, poor soul !”’ and Mrs. Miller looked
thoughtful, for her kind heart could not be
satisfied by helping these people in temperal
things, without leading them also to trust
in God, and make His will the rule of their
lives.

Lucy had now less need to spend her
leisure time in looking after little Nellie
and Charlie, and indeed her garden work
took up many hours. But she did not
forget her young favourites; and every
morning saw her walking with them to the
school, and taking them under her protec-
tion again when lessons were done.

It was on one such day that she found



BETTER DAYS. 53

trouble in the children’s home—the father
was ill, and their mother looked pale and
frightened, for on his health everything
Seemed, to depend.

Lucy’s kind little heart felt all the sym-
pathy that could be desired, and she ran
to her mother with the bad news, begging
her to come to Mrs. Parsons and comfort
ner in her trouble.

“Ah, I thought it was all too good to
last,” said the poor woman, who seemed
suddenly to have fallen back into her old
despondency ; “just as we were getting on
a little,and making things a bit comfortable
round us, this misfortune comes; and now
William will lose a good place, and what
we can do God only knows.”

“Do not despair,” said Mrs. Miller. “You
say well that God knows. He will take
care of you, and raise up your husband to
health again, if it is best for you. As for
losing a good place, I cannot believe that
such a kind master as Mr. Severn, will not
wait for him; and after all it may be only
a short illness,—what is it 2”

“A kind of a chill, so the doctor says,”
and Mrs, Parsons began to cry dismally ;



54 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

“but he must be very ill, for he has been
wandering in his head all night.” |

It proved indeed that Parsons was
seriously ill; and some days and nights
ensued which were bad enough to justify
the poor wife’s alarms. Nor could she take
any comfort in calling upon God to help
Be. No, ne, Ged will have nothing to
HO-with me, She reiterated...“ ’ve.quite
foreotten . Idim, and tymned from Him
these many years, and now He'll turn
fcom- me,”

It was very terrible to see her in this
state of mind; and when at last she con-
sented to see the minister, whom Mrs.
Miller spoke of as one of the “kindest
friends any one could need,” nothing that
he could say seemed to have any power
over her.

“Tf William gets well Pll think of being
religious,’ she answered. ‘‘ While he’s like
this, I feel too cast down to turn my
mind to anything but what is to become
of us.”

But when, in a few days, her husband’s
ailment changed for the better, Mrs. Par-
sons scemed but little inclined to remember



BETTER DAYS, 55

this half-promise; she was cheered and
thankful also to see him at all improved,
but she scarcely realized how much this
might be due to the prayers which others
had offered for her in her great sorrow;
and yet doubtless, like every other sorrow,

it was sent for the purpose of drawing her
to Gzod.



x
a



56

CHAPTER VE
Work Rewarded

ae ILLIAM PARSONS was up and out
again after his short, sharp illness,
and so the cloud which shadowed
his home had passed away. Once more,
ne went fo bis daily work: Once more
liitic Charite and Nellie ran meriity to
school; once more their mother’s face was
content, but she was as careless as ever
about her soul. |
But upon her husband a change had
fallen; and one evening after his return he
gai’, Gravely, “lim thinking, Mary, it’s
not without cause that all our trouble has
Pome, Vote It lay ill it seemed in my
mind that we had not got God on our side;
wed forgotten Him alike in our troubles
and in the blessings He’s given us lately.”
There was a pause, and then he added,
“There's many a thing I’d like to make
out; but I couldn’t speak so free to the

x



WORK REWARDED. 57

minister as to some one that’s not so far
above a working-man. Now, there’s that
child who has been as much a friend to us
aS any grown person. She seems to have
learned a good deal at school; I should
fancy she could make many a thing plain
to such as me.”

“‘There’s little doubt of that,” said Mrs.
Parsons; “she’s as sensible as a woman,
and yet there’s plenty of play in her like
in other children. I éxpect there’s not
many things in the Bible she doesn’t know.
I've heard her tell stories out of it to the
little ones which seemed as if she knew it
off most by heart.”

“TM eck er a tlie of. dave. caucl
Patsons; “for not beite a scholar I can’t
make out how a man is to turn over a new
leaf, and be religious. Yet it came plainly
before me when I lay ill, that it was what
I ought to do. I was afraid to die then,
Mary; downright afraid, though like many
another man, I’ve laughed at the thought
of death. I remembered every word I’d
ever heard about God; it seemed as if I
felt I might soon have to stand before
Him; and I said to myself, that if He’d



58 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

only spare my life, ’d make the rest of it
@ dilferent thing.”

“Well, somewhat the same thought was
in my mind,” said Mrs. Parsons. “‘I’ll try
and be religious if William gets better,’
was what I said to Mrs. Miller; but I’ve
not given it a thought since, and I don’t
know what we ought to do.”

This was how it happened that on Lucy
Miller’s next visit to her friends, she was
surprised by the unexpected request to
read them a little out of the Bible which
her mother had given Mrs. Parsons some
time before; and while she read, she could
not but notice the deep attention of her.
listeners. This took place again and again,
until it was an established custom that
after school-hours, and before night quite
closed in, Lucy should go to the cottage to
feag 2 littic.

At first she felt rather shy about
answering the questions which Parsons put
to her; but it was true that she had been
well taught from her early childhood, and
thus the plain, simple way of salvation was
as well understood by her as by many of
twice her years.



WORK REWARDED. 59

“There is not very much for you to de,
she would say again and again. “‘ Being
religious’ as you call it, really means that
you are going to think very much of God,
and try to do what He has commanded,
and love Him for His goodness. But, first
of all, we must be very sorry for our sins,
and believe that ‘they are forcivem “us
because Christ took them away by shedding
tis blood for ss.” tndeed,«- am teline
you quite right in this, for I have heard it
so often, and from those who know how to
teach we rieht.”

“Well, it sounds easy enough,” Parsons
would say slowly. “And yet—we’ve only
got to believe, you say, and nothing to do?”

“Nothing to do except believe, and love
God, and ask the help of the Holy spn
to make you avoid all that would displease
Him,” persisted “oucy. © Listen: te tia
text: “God so loved: the world tar.
sent His only begotten Son, that whoso-
ever believeth in Him should not perish, but
have everlasting life.”

““ Not perish!” repeated Parsons, “Well,
that was what troubled me sorely while I
was lying ill, not only dying and leaving



60 LUCY MILLERS GOOD. WORK

Mary and the little ones, but of what
would come after. For lying looking as it
ment pe at death, I felt it was not. the
end of things, like I and many a foolish,
unthinking manis apt tosay. I felt asif
there was everlasting misery beyond, and
I was fairly afraid. ‘Whosoever believeth’
—just read it once again, Miss Lucy ;”
and when she had done so, he remained as
if lost in thought even after the child took
her leave and went home.

Oh, mother she said tien, as she had
Safd before “1 feel as if I didnt know
now to answer him what he wants to be
told ; how I wish he would ask some one
older and wiser.”

“ Well, it might be better in some ways,”
feieimca iirs. Miller; “still, Lucy, it’s a
happy thing for even a child to say a word
for God. And then, after all, the way of
salvation isn’t hard or difficult ; it is meant
for children and simple folk, as well as for
Bee Ciever and great; and, thank God!
you have learned already what will make
us safe and happy in this world and the
pext.”’

“It would be pleasant to see Mr. and



WORK REWARDED. OI

Mrs. Parsons really Christians, wouldn’t it,
mother?” replied Lucy. “I tmimk ge
will be, for we have all prayed so much for
it, and God has promised to answer our
prayers if they age mone

“Yes ; He will answer usm. Bis own
time,” said Mrs. Miller. ‘And it seems
to me, Lucy, that you must just go on as
you do now, reading God’s Word to these
people, and leaving all the rest to Him.
Ah, child, many’s the time you’ve envied
the missionaries their work in foreign
lands, and wished you were a woman to
go and Nelp them but it is 4a litle ie
of a missionary’s work He is giving you
now, so be patient and thankful.”

Even older people than Lucy Miller
find “patience” hard to practise; and as
weeks went by, and no special fruit sprang
from her daily reading to Parsons, she
grew so weary that many a time, if she
had yielded to her feelings, she would have
made some excuse and given it up. This,
however, her conscience would not allow
her to. do. “Have you not promised 4a
serve God?” it whispered. “ Have you not
thought and dreamed over ways of pleasing



62 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

Him, and leading others to love Him; and
will you weary of this little trouble—this
easy task of reading His Holy Word to
one who cannot read for himself ?”

As these thoughts pressed on her, Lucy
resolved to persevere. Nevertheless, it was
a little wearying to a child to answer the
same questions so often, and go over
eround again and again, which, to one
taught as she had been, seemed so easy;
and thus it was indeed a happy evening
when Parsons greeted her with words she
had never heard from him before.

“Tt’s all clear now,” he said, suddenly ;
“as clear as noon-day to me. All you’ve
read and all you've told me seems easy to
believe, and Ill be a Christian from this
day. I and Mary too, for she sees as I do
that it’s the safe and only happy way for
us. Ah, child, it was a blessed day which
brought us to Brookfield with our little
ones! We had sunk down and down by
reason of trouble, and no one seemed to
care, no one held out a hand to help us
till Charlie told us that you had spoken
kindly to him, and Nellie fetched you to
see him ill on his little bed. And so from



WORK REWARDED. 63

one thing to another, though you are only
a child, you've been a good friend to us,
helping us for this world and the nex
God bless you, Miss Lucy Miller, and
reward you, as I’m sure He will.”

I can assure you that Lucy felt any little
trouble rewarded then, and she hurried
away to give the good news to her mother.
“Oh, mother, mother, how happy it is to
work for God!” she cried; “and after all
itis so easy. I will try all my life long to
do good to every one for His sake. I wii
ask Him that this—my first little work for
Him—may only be the beginning of other
fringes Ele will let me do. amd them che
ran away to her own small bedroom, for
there were feelings in her heart then which
she could not pour out to any ear but that
of our Father in heaven.

So my little story ends; and all I have
to add-is that should any one vicw cic
village of Brookfield, it would be impossible
to recognize in the respectable hard-work-
ing William and Mary Parsons the once
miserable tramping parents of little half-
starved Charlie and Nellie.

When the children are in bed at night,



64 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

you may see the father sitting down in the
tidy parlour of the home his own industry —
has gained, while his wife talks cheerfully
eet tie events of the day; Or at other
times—as in our picture—she will read to
him from Scripture some of the passages
which reached him first from the lips of
little Lucy Miller, whose good work has
been, as she hoped and prayed, only the
beginning of the service she rendered to
God, whom she had early chosen for her
Guide and for her Friend.









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ILLUSTRATED GIFT BOOKS FOR CHILDREN









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ALKATIVE FRIENDS

IN FIELD,
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Pipaifior 07 * Tonts Bennie,’ “ Till
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21 Uncle Rupert’s Stories for Boys

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Setma, the Turkish Captive.

Show your Colours.

True and False Friendship.

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70 Squire Bentley's Treat.

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74 Florence and her Frienas.

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Of;

and

69 The

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42 Angel’s Christmas.
13 Cottage Life; its Lights and Shadows.
44 The Raven's Feather.

——————EEe

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Bible Pictures for our Pets

Part I. OLpD TESTAMENT PICTURES.
Part II. New TESTAMENT PICTURES.





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coerce arse

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THE ROYAL PICTURE BOOKS.

The First of a New Series of Picture Books for very Little Children. A
Picture on every page; the Letterpress in very large type, and in
words of one and two syllables. Engravings by the best Artists.
Imperial 16mo. 6d, each in cloth.

1.—Our Queen, and other pictures.
2,—Charlie and his Pet, and other pictures.
3.—Little Kittens, and other pictures,
4.—Mamma’s Darling, and other pictures.







1/-BOOKS in LARGE TYPE

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15.

16.

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. Jessie’s






. Short and Sweet.

. I Never Thought of it.

. Father's Joy, and other Stories.
. A Sprig of Holly.

. Barbara’s Revenge.

; SIT Mo.

. Edith’s Second Thought, and

other Stories.

. Jack and Shag.
. thePrinces; in the Castle,and

other Stories. With

Engravings.

many

. Andy and his Books -or, the

Orphan Friends.

Roses, ‘and other

Stories.

. The Villaze Shoemaker.
. The Message of the Bells, and

other Stories.

The Lily of the Valley, and
other Stortes.

Tony the Tramp ; or, Good for
Nothing. By Mary E. Ropes.
Made Clear at Last; or, The
Story of a Ten-Pound Note.
By Mary E. Ropes, Author
of “Tony the: Tramp, ete.
Chrissy’s Glad News; or, A
Little Child shall lead them.



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BUUKS

IN CLOTH BOARDS.

+

EKach with Illustra-

Well printed,

blocked with colowred

anks. 4d. each.

PLLA IO

. Lily’s Adventure.
. Made on Purpose.

A Story of

Rus ian Life. By Salem

Hall.

. The White Rosebud, and the

Birthday Present.

2b Cares Secret

22. Madea Man of.

23. Winnie's. Golden -Key.; or,
The Right of Way. By J.

. In Golden London.

~ fob, ands eViper.

Saxby.

. Trapped on the Rocks; or,

Only a Word.

. Susie Wood’s Charge. By
Mary E. Ropes.
. Fisherman Niels. By Mrs. G.

Gladstone.

. Katy’s Resolution.
. Watchman Halfdan, and his

Little Granddaughter.
Mrs. George Gladstone.
By Mary

By

E.. Ropes.

. Sprats Alive Oh! By Harriette

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. The Lady Elfrida’s Escape.

By Alice King.
By Mrs.

aC

Cooper.





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Threepenny Reward Books.

A Series of 24mo. Books for the Young. With Covers printed,
back and front, tn Colours, on silver ground. Lach book tn clear type,
e e e Y e
with a Frontispiece Lngraving.





1 Phil Harvey’s Fortune. 13 Trixie and Her Cousin.
Zebis little: Iletty. 14 Kitty’s Concertina.

3 Jock the Shrimper. 15 In Father’s Place.

4 My Master’s Business. [Found | 16 Hilda and Her Pet.

5 How Charlie was Lost and | 17 The Way to Win.

6 Bessie Morton’s Legacy. 18 The Story of Nika.

7 Johan’s Christmas Eve. 19 Addie’s Children.

8 Jonnny’s Dream. 20 How Tom Gained the Victory.
9 Old Bagnall’s Ricks. 21 Gaspard’s Promise.
10 Widow Martin's Son. 2? Iucy.of the blall:
it The Sokhers Lesacy. 23 The Oatcake Man.

12 The Flat Iron. 24 Squat and his Friends.

Twopenny Reward Books.

Each containing 48 pages of clearly printed Letter-press, in simple
language for Children. With numerous Engravings, and tn attractive
coloured Covers. 2d. each.

1 Children’s Stories. 13 ‘The Round Robin.
2 Little Stories. 14 Elsie in the Snow.
3 Pretty Stories. 15 Mabel’s Mistake.
4 Pretty Stories. 16 Vhe Jackdaw’s Christmas Tree
5 A Mother’s Stories. 17 Angel Rosie.
6 A Sister’s Stories. 18 Faithful Andrew.
7 A Friend’s Stories. 19 Tim's Little Garden.
8 Pleasant Stories. 20 Between Sickle and Scythe.
9 Simple Stories. 21 Freddie’s New Home.
10 True Stories. 22 Kit and his Violin.
11 Useful Stories. 23 Flip, Mish, and Another.

12 Farewell Stories. 24 Jenny Wren’s Mite.

Aunt Mary's Packet of 7 Aunt Mary's Pretty Pages
Picture Stories oe for Little People.
Each Packet contains Twelve Books with Glazed Covers, tn Gold. Ful
of Pictures. Crown 8vo0. ts. the Packet.



New Penny Story-Books.
A New Series of Twelve attractively got-up Reward Books, each com-
4 prising 32 pages, with Cover in Colours, and Illustration. ls.the Packet
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. Where a Penny went to.

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. Ragged Robin.

By Mary E.
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SERIES

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38,

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60.

‘ May’ s Cousin.

» Billy the Acorn Gatherer.

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Attractively bound with Medallion on side.

- Ressie Mason’s Victories.
»- Dame Buckle and her Pet

The Gable House.
The Dangerous Guest. Story of 1745. By frances
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Fruits of Bible Lands. By
Mary K. Martin.
By Atthor of

‘Reuben TYouchett’s Grand-
daughter, ’

By

Fiorence E. Burch.

- The Banished Family, and the

Bohemian Confessor.

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Fisherman’s Orphans.

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monds. By Frances Browne.
Royal Banner; or,
Dragged in the Dust.

. Brave Archie.
46.

There’s a Friend for Little
Children. ByCharlotteMason.

. Michael the Young Miner.

- Bobs Trials and Tests. By
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Theo Lost Baby. A :Stoncwor

the Floods. By Emma Leslie.
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Ship.

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: Reuben Minton’ S ean Ice.

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yp EONS Mice
ginson.

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Great Reward. By Florence
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Missionary Rabbits.

Hilda; or, The Golden Age.

By Fina Leslie.

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the ‘ Little Dots’ could wish for nothing better.”—Somerset County

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OUR LITTLE DOTS’
ALIN INSU A Ti.
The Vearly Volume of

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Full of Pretty Pictures and Little Stories
m barge ype. Is. .6d. attractive col-
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handsome cloth gilt.
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S 2? bem | ae eer e ;
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& en a mss SS Spectator.



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From “Our LitTtLte Dots.’



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ONE PENNY. MONTHLY. *





SFE OI ITT

AND

| JUVENILE INSTRUCTOR.

WISI IDNIN DY IBLINI ASS LL\A SA

‘A pretty little illustrated periodical,
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sensible practice of giving children credit for
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and poetical pieces.”— Bockselles.

““As charming as. ever.”’—Zccksiastical





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CHUDS COMPANION

Juvenile Instructor Annual.

It is full of nice pictures and interesting
reading for young folks, with a coloured frontispiece.

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Lill the Sugar Melts.
The Story of a Geranium.
The Flying Postman.

The Money in the Milk.
The Cowstip Batt.

Fhe Little Model.

Mary Sefton.

Tates from over the Sea.
Lisetta and the Brigands.
Bessie Graham.

In his Father’s Arms.

Cosmo ana his Marmoset.
Patks with Unele Morris.
Herbert and his Sister.
Tacy Mitler’s Good Work.
Little Andy’s Legacy.























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The Baldwin Library

University
RMB vei
Florida


The Book of Bocks.

Springfield Stories.

Little Dot.

John Thompson's Nursery.

Two Ways to begin Life.

Ethel Ripon.

Little Gooseberry.

Fanny Ashley. |

Lhe Gamekeeper’s Daughter.

Fred Kenny.

Gid Humphrey's Study Table

Jenny’s Waterproof.

The Holy Welt.

The Travelling Sixpence.

The Three Flowers.

Lost and Rescued.

Lightbearers and Beacons.

Little Lottie.

The Dog of St. Bernard.

Isaac Gould the Waggoner. Bere

Uncie Rupert’s Stories for ie 5
Boys.

Dreaming and Doing.

Many Ways of Being Useful,

Rachel Rivers.

Lessons out of Sehoot.

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CE SIR a iain erp eictnnn n at wi prorennicnses ad lg a agg Be os ae ea



Lucy MiLLer’s Goop Worx.

BY THE AUTHOR. OF

“URSULAS PROMISE,” “TRAVELLING SIXPENCE,”

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THE RELIGIOUS TRACT: SOCIELY.

56, PATERNOSTER Row; 65, ST. PauL’s CHURCHYARD}
AND 364," Piccepicey.


CHAP. PAGE
I. NEW-COMERS . ‘ ‘ . 5
m FOOR CHARLIE. ‘ : 15
WI. A BRIGHT IDEA : 4 ores
IV. SPECIAL PLEADING ‘ ‘ 36
we BETTER DAYS... ‘ « do

VI. WORK REWARDED ‘ 56


LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

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Cia dt ea A,

ficw-comers,

SUNNY-FACED little girl was Lucy
WN Miller; one of the children whom
the aged like to look on, and for
whom they whisper, “God bless you,’—one
of the children whose gentle, unselfish
character wins love from schoolmates and
playfellows, who gives comfort and help to
father and mother, and brightness to the
home, no matter if it is rich or poor.
The prettiest cottage in the village of
Brookfield belonged to the Millers; and
the garden, with the roses and pinks and
6 LUCY MILLERS “GOOD WORK.

climbing honeysuckle, was Lucy’s chief
care when school-hours were over. She
would get up early in the morning too,
when some young folks are so fond of
lingering in bed, and begin her task of
weeding and raking, or tying up the plants
which a rough night wind had injured; and
besides this, there was fruit to be gathered,
and taken to one of the large houses, where
it was gladly bought.

In this way Lucy could help her father
and mother to keep up their tidy home, by
earning a few shillings weekly; and you
may be sure that she was far happier than
a girl who thought only of herself, and
nothing at all of the hard-working parents
who had done everything for her in her
helpless infancy.

One of her pleasantest day-dreams was
of the time when school-days would be
over, and she could begin to work in
earnest. Already she had a hope that she
might get employed in the Squire’s family,
for the lady constantly visited the village
school, and had before now taken one of
the best scholars to be trained for service
in her own house.
NEW-COMERS. a

Having told you thus much of Lucy
Miller’s character, I need hardly say that
she was a child who, though not quite
twelve years old, had given her heart to
(od, and begun to serve Him earnestly.
If it had not been so, she could not have
lived so happily in her home, have yielded
such prompt obedience, have resisted so
well the temptations which beset us even
in early years, for without the help of the
Holy Spirit we can do nothing that is right
and pleasing in God’s sight.

I do not tell you, however, that this little
cirl was faultless ; there were times when
evil temper would rise, when an impatient .
word broke from her lips, when she felt it
hard to be good, and so very easy to yield
to evil. These are part of the struggles by
which we are to grow more pleasing to
God, more like His own dear children,
more conformed to the image of His be-
loved Son; our Lord: Jesus - Christ; and,
striviig as Lucy Miller strove, praying as
she trayed for pardon of every sin, and for
the Holy Spirit’s grace to do better, it is
certain that every day she must grow more
pleasing to her heavenly Father, who,
G BUCY MILLEK'S GOOD WORK,

looking down, saw each battle, each victory
over self and self-seeking.

I must now tell you a little about Brook
field, the village where Lucy had been born,
where her good mother had spent her own
childhood, and her father had lived from a
Foul 4f was a pretty place enough,
standing on a sloping hill-side, with a view
over miles of green meadows to the peaceful
view beyond—too pretty, so Mrs. Miller
often said, to be so godless and unchristian
a place (or Sibel i the midst of the
beauties of nature men’s hearts ought to
mise to “him who made all and. who
gave all.

There was an old church there, but few
indeed were those who gathered within its
walls witch Subday came.. There .was a
tiny chapel too, which some good man had
built, believing that many souls might be
helped heavenward by those simple services
and the plain teaching of divine truths;
but only a scanty sprinkling of the Brook-
field people could ever be seen there, the
greater number of them passing over
Sunday as if it was in nowise different from
any other of the days of the week.
NEW-COMERS. 9

inher own little: way, Lucy tried fo
imitate her good mother; and when Mrs.
Miller would seek to persuade some one or
other of the careless women round her to
join her in the public worship of God, Lucy
would coax some of the children to the
small Sunday-school which had _ been
started, hoping that there they might be
won, by the kindness of the teachers, to
learn the way to be truly happy and good.
In very few cases, however, would they be
persuaded by her, and even those who did
would only go for once, or at most twice,
and then tire of the trouble of learning and
listening, which was distasteful after their
habitual custom of idling the hours away.

There came, however, to Brookfield,
during the summer in which Lucy was
twelve years old, a family who were soon
noticed, even in that humble village, for
their excessive poverty; it showed itself
in their threadbare garments, in the wan
faces of father and mother, atid three
sickly-looking young children, and in their
dwelling in a cottage so dilapidated and
miserable that it had long been left as
unfit for use.
IO LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

Lucy Miller’s heart had warmed to them
from the day when as she tied up her roses
and carnations one fine evening, two tiny
pallid faces were pressed against the
palings, which she knew were strange in
Brookfield.

It was not a difficult matter to draw the
little creatures into conversation, and she
soon learnt that their name was Parsons
—Charlie and Nellie Parsons, that they
lived in the lane leading in the direction
of the distant town, and that they came
from London because’ their father had
found work to do in these parts.

A few strawberries dropped into each
grimy little hand brought a smile to the
children’s faces, and then they scampered
away homeward to tell their news to their
mother.

Lucy, too, was full of the meeting when
she sat down in the kitchen to rest after
Der work in the garden. “Oh, mother,
they looked so poor, so hungry,” she said;
“and they are so young—only four and
five years old, they told me. They live in
Long Lane, too; it must be that damp
cottage with all the windows broken, which


NEW-COMERS. II

has been empty so long, for there is only
the one there,”

“It is not a fit place for any hitmag
beings,” remarked Mrs. Miller. “ There
must be some mistake about it, I should
think, Lucy; but I shall have to go to the
town to-morrow, and I’ll go by the way of
Long Lane, and I shall see in a minute if
there are any signs of life about the place.
I should be sorry for any one to live there,
however poor.”

On the morrow, Lucy eagerly waited for
her mother’s return. She always liked to
hear what had been seen and done in those
rare visits to the town, which, compared
with Brookfield, seemed quite a large and
important place; but on this occasion all
her anxiety was respecting the broken-down
cottage in Long Lane, and the two sickly
children who she believed were living
there. |

“Well, mother,’ she exclaimed, as Mrs,
Miller came up to the gate. “Did you see
them ? cle it all trie >=

Yes, true “enough, answered (ite.
Miller. ‘“ Before I came up to the place I
saw that the door was open, and there were
[2 LUCY. MILLERS GOOD WORK.

signs of life about; and as I got quite near
Gee oF the most miserable, rageed little
creatures I ever saw ran out to look at me.
I made free to ask if the mother was in,
but they said no; and it turned out that
both the parents are working at the hay-
making, and the children shift for them-
selves meanwhile. I had put a good piece
of our home-made cake in my bag on the
chance of seeing them; dear! they were
pleased to be sure.”

~Oh, iother, that was good of you,”
said Lucy. “You ever told me you
thought of that.”

“Well, no, child,” and a smile passed
over the kindly face; “it is as well not fo
speak of every little good-natured idea that
comes into ones mind; the next thing
would be beginning to make much of it,
and take pride in oneself. ‘Let not the
left hand know what the right hand doeth,’
seems to have a very clear meaning, to my
mind, and ought to keep us from making
a show of what we do for others. After
all, it is little enough, Lucy; and God has
done so much for us.”

“That is what I have been thinking of
NEW-COMERS. :

all day,” replied the child. “I’ve you and
father and my nice home, and plenty to
eat, and good clothes to wear; while those
poor little things look so hungry and so
very miserable. I should like to help them,
mother, if I knew how.”

“It isn’t as if we were rich,” said Mrs.
Miller, thoughtfully; “though we have
food and to spare, your father works hard
out-doors, while ’'m working at home to
keep things together; and we’re glad even
of your help by tending the tat and
flowers, and getting them fit to sell. Still,
though we may be dependent on our own
toil, that is no reason for not helping those
that are poorer than ourselves; and if you
can do anything for those children in Long
Lane, child, | shall be lad to let you, 4
must find out a bit about the parents before
you go after them at all; but meanwhile,
as you are handy with your needle, you
might take that print frock you’ve grown
out of, and make something to cover them,
—they’re well nigh in rags now.”

Lucy Miller was not fond of sewing—it
was her most disagreeable task at the
village school; and even the necessary
14 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

repairs of her own clothing was so dis-
tasteful that it had been the most common
cause of her mother’s displeasure.

At the thought of altering that lilac print
frock, and making from it two little gar- |
ments for these tiny ragged creatures, her
face clouded over, but happily she remem-
bered who has said, ‘‘Inasmuch as ye do
Ht wnto-the least of these, ye do it unto
Mice. ang druvine far irom:.her heart the
feeling of vexation, she quickly agreed,
and begged her mother's help in beginning
the task.

No small self-denial was this for a girl
of twelve years, as my young readers
may imagine,—for Lucy’s leisure was brief
indeed when her gardening cares were over.
But she found that a good deal may be
accomplished, even if only a few moments
ate usec. by diligent fingers; and the
thought of the pleasure she should bring
upon those two sad childish faces quickened
her speed when sometimes it was nearly
flagging.
15

CHAPTER Ii.
Poor Charli,

S)EFORE Mrs. Miller found any good
opportunity of inquiring among the
Brookfield people, as to what they

knew of the inhabitants of the cottage in
Long Lane, Lucy learned that one of the
children was ill. The news had come to
her by means of Nellie’s little anxious
face, which peered through the palings, as
she was busy among her flowers one
morning early.

“Whiere.is your brother?” she asked,

having seen them together before.

“He eairt set. up, he’s=sick answered

the child.

“Oh, I am very sorry,” said Lucy, kindly,

“Ts your mother taking care of him ?”
“Mothers out, and fathers out, and

there’s only me,” was the response. “ Char-

lie’s crying too, and I thought you’d give
16 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

me some of those,’ and Nellie Parsons
pointed to the strawberry bed.

“Yes, [ will; I am sure 1 may, burd
want to tell my mother first;” and Lucy
ran into the cottage, and quickly returned
to the garden with Mrs. Miller following.

“Tell me what is the matter with your
little brother,” she said kindly ; butthe child
was shy, and, hanging down her head, only
muttered some unintelligible words, and
kept her eye fixed on the small. basket
which Lucy was rapidly filling with fruit.

“Shall I come home with you, and see
him?” continued Mrs. Miller; and this
time the little girl smiled as if the idea was
welcome.

“Tet me go.foo, said Lucy; but her
mother would not grant this request, feeling
that if the child was really ill, it might be
fever or other contagious sickness,

With Nellie as guide, Mrs. Miller went
to the cottage, and pushing open the door,
found a wretched state of things indeed.
There was scarcely an article of furniture
in the room, the damp chill of the place
was of itself enough to cause illness, and
down on a small mattress in the corner
POOR CHARLIE. r7

there lay the sick boy, his taneted ia
falling over his flushed face, and his arms
tossed out on the torn piece of Diane
which covered him.

He looked up as Nellie ran to him with
the little basket of strawberries; but at
the sight of a stranger following he began
to cry, partly from shyness, and partly
from weariness and pain.

“Don't cry!" said the kind woman,
coming forward. ‘Your Jittle sister has
brought something nice for you; and I
have walked with her on purpose to see
Ou.

After some persuasion, Charlie turned
his head round from the wall; and being
coaxed into eating one strawberry, another
and another followed until they were nearly
gone, and he began pressing the rest on
Nellie.

There was something touching in the
love of these young children, and in the
kind of protecting tenderness which the
eit) displayed for. her brother just ouc
year younger; doubtless, the strawberries
were tempting enough, but Nellie would

not touch one of them.
C 63
18 LUCY MILLERS: GOOD WORK.

“Mother left me some bread and a drop
Grimm, she said “You can’t eat bread
when you’re so sick, Charlie.”

Mrs. Miller looked round the dirty deso-
late room with a sorrowful face,—it was
so unfit to be the home of little children.
She judged by the boy’s appearance, that
the damp of the place and insufficient food
were the chief cause of his illness, and that
it was not of an infectious kind which could
be carried to her own Lucy; so she lingered
awhile to make him as comfortable as
circumstances would permit, and finally
left with a promise of returning in a few
hours to see if he was better.

Lucy’s mind was brimming over with
plans for aiding the poor family in the
cottage, when her mother had described
its emptiness and misery; her fingers flew
over the stitches which were yet wanting
to complete the little frock she had con-
trived for Nellie ; and there was time left
to pick some fresh fruit for the sick boy
before, to her great joy, she was allowed to
go and see him.

“Mother ! may I take a book of pictures,
moo’. she said, “di: remember whene,
POOR CHARLIE, 19

was ill.in bed, about three years ago,
nothing amused me but books; and I
dare say poor Charlie Parsons has never
seen many books,”

“No, indeed ; judging by the look of
things!” exclaimed Mrs. Miller. “I ex-
pect the child is as ignorant as a little
heathen, Lucy. But if you like to take a
book, and show him the pictures, I’ve
nothing to say against it, I’m sure.”

The little girl ran to her own neatly-kept
shelf, where were a goodly row of prettily
covered books, most of which had been
gained as prizes from both day and Sunday
schools. It was not a very easy matter to
make a selection; but at last she chose
one which had been her delight in very
early days when she was no older than
Charlie Parsons, and with her volume of
Lible Stories, she tripped happily down
Long Lane by her mother's side) “talking
all the while.

A sun-burnt woman stood in the cottage
doorway this time, a poor, weary, sad-faced
creature, who, after exchanging some words
with Nellie, came a step or two forward,
and spoke a few awkward thanks to Mrs,
20 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

Miller for being kind to her sick boy. “He
seems worse and worse,’ she said, awk-
wardly leading the way to the mattress in
the corner whereon Charlie was tossing to
and fro.

At the sight of his visitor of the morning
he paused in his fretful cry to smile a little ;
and when Lucy knelt down on the floor
beside him, and began talking pleasantly,
and tempting him to eat from the contents
of the basket on her arm, he soon forgot
his shyness, and was quite ready to be
amused with pictures or anything else.

Mrs. Miller meanwhile was listening to
the mother’s sad story—the story of want
and misery so pitiably common as we pass
through life. It seemed that they had not
always been so poorly off, though obliged
to toil for daily bread; but from illness,
loss of work, and a long series of misfor-
tunes, they had sunk to the rough life of
those who pass from hay-making to har-
vesting and hop-gathering, having no settled
home, and existing they scarce knew how
through the hardships of winter.

Just a simple word or two about God’s
help and care fell apparently on unaccus-
POOR CHARKLEE, 21

tomed ears, for Mrs. Parsons only shook
her head despondingly, and talked of her
‘ill luck,” as compared with the “good
luck of other people. *“Prayer's manage
to me, she added; “it’s forwenlemike.
Nor could Mrs. Miller turn her from this
conviction,

Lucy was finding the ignorance of the
children much what her mother had antici-
pated. “God; “Christ,” “heaven, swinen
words were spoken in connection with the
pictures, only brought forth a puzzled stare,
yet little Charlie's eyes were fixed eagerly
on Christ with the children of old gathered
round Him; and as the story was told of
the goodness of the Saviour of the world,
he sighed, and it seemed as if the small
wistful face expressed the wish, which has
come to so many of us, that there lived
some one now as gentle and as kind.

“He lives in beaven now,” JLucy “vas
explaining as her mother and Mrs. Parsons
ceased speaking, and turned to the group
in thé corner; “but Ile sees. mssalle you.
Charlie and Nellie, and me, and every one
of us, and He is sorry for us when we are
ill or sad.”
22 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

“Sorry for Charlie?” said the small
owner of the name.

“Yes; and He loves you very much,”
answered the elder girl, into whose face.
both children glanced up ; but then a little
confusion came over her as she perceived
that Mrs. Parsons was gazing at her won-
deringly; and laying down her book she
went to her mother’s side, saying, “I will
leave it for you and Nellie to look at after
fam gone, and I'll tell you more stories
when I come again.”

“And I’m sure I’m thankful to you for
looking in,” said the poor worn mother.
“It goes hard with me to leave him; but
we cant starve, and I must work while
there’s work to be done, for it’s soon enough
over.”

“Couldn't you get a better lodging ?”
asked Mrs. Miller.

Mrs. Parsons shook her head,—it was
plain that the tumbie-down cottage in
I.ong Lane was all that they could afford.

Lucy could talk of little else that evening.
She had seen many of the Brookfield people
careless about religion and forgetful of God;
but she was too young to have met with
POOR CHARLIE, 26

such utter ignorance of His very name as
that which existed in these children, and it
shocked her, :

“IT am sure they had never heard of
God, mother,” she explained. “Charlie
said, ‘Who is He?’ and Nellie only opened
her eyes wider than before. Doesn’t Mrs.
Parsons know, either 2”

“‘Perhaps—I cannot tell,” answered Mrs,
Miller, “She may have been taught in
her childhood, and grown careless and
forgetful in all her troubles; or she may
indeed never have known much more than
her own little girl and boy. However, it
is very certain that they have not come in
our way by chance. Perhaps God means
us to put a few better thoughts into their
minds, Lucy; and even by a picture or
two, and just what you can tell them about
it, the little creatures may get to under-
stand there’s some one great and good who
loves them. I wouldn’t be troubled too
much, dear, by finding them so ignorant,
Pve heard of many such; and it isa blessed
work to do for God, if they can be taught
to give a prayer and a thought for Him.”

“Oh, mother, I do not think of it quite
24 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

like that—something to do for God,” and
Lucy’s eyes sparkled. Perhaps had she
beén able to look back at the scene she
kad left, she might have seen that the
work had begun, for the little boy still
gazed at the pictured face of Christ, and
whispered now and then, “He lives in
heaven, and He loves Charlie—poor little
Charlie!”




5 } ite }
Sea Wii i"
yer ‘ {
aS, Ae } TE ey 2
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ee

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38
C
CHAPTER Tit

A Stig ee
Qu
sp was a difficult matter for Lucy Miller

now to give her mind to lessons or

her work as a little gardener. Had
she only followed her own inclinations, she
would have been constantly at the Parsons’
cottage ; and certainly her feet sped quickly
along the lane to reach it, as soon as she
felt nat, Wer small sound of city wae
done.

The children there were not: one whit
less eager for her appearance, for where
hunger and poverty make themselves felt,
older persons than Charlie and Nellie look
almost impatiently for the one friend who
brings help and kindness, First of all,
Lucy’s basket would be opened; and
though her mother, being a thrifty woman,
was able to contrive some economical
dinner for the Httle creatures at smal
206 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

cost, I must tell. you that Lucy -hersel@
gladly dispensed with many indulgences
(such as cakes and sweets, for which pence
used to be exchanged on the way to school),
for the sake of giving some treat to those
who had known none of the little treats
and pleasures of happier childhood.

But when the basket had been opened,
and some of its contents tasted, Charlie
would turn to the picture-book asking for
“2 story.”

It was now that Lucy found the value
of all she had learned from early infancy.
She could tell the little wondering listeners
of Christ as the Babe of Bethlehem; she
could describe to them that He—as a child
on earth—had not been rich or great, but
SO very, very poor. She was able @&
describe to them the miracles He had
wrought, the kindness He had _ lavished
upon all men, and particularly upon the
sorrowful and upon sinners. She could
repeat to them His gracious words; she
could tell them how He loved little
children ; and last of all she would come
to the story of His cruel sufferings and
shameful death. At this poiiut Charlie
A BRIGHT IDEA. 27

would cry, and Nellie look troubled; but
they were cheered by hearing how, upon
that first glad Easter Sunday, He rose
up out of the grave and went. back to
heaven.

It was only by slow degrees that Lucy
made them acquainted with the story of
Christ’s life and death, of course. She
had but a few spare hours; and besides,
to such very ignorant little learners, it is
not by one word or one story that a truth
becomes fixed in the heart.

But Mrs. Miller had put before her the
pleasant thought that in all this God’s
work was being done; that to make these
two young children understand that there
was a heaven above where they might
live for ever by-and-by ; that there was a
Saviour who had died for their sins, and
so gained them admittance there; that
this Saviour loved them, and was sorry
for all their griefs and sufferings,—all was
doing something for God, which might
bring forth fruit by-and-by.

And here I must tell you that Lucy had
dreamed many day-dreams of being a
useful woman in the time to come. She
28 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

had sat listlessly over a heap of stockings
which needed mending, and, like many
another girl of her age, forgotten the duty
of the moment in imagining herself visiting
the sick, braving great dangers in some
erand work, leaving home and country to
lead little heathen children to Christ. Oh!
I could not tell you half the bright visions
which came to her at such moments,—but
many of you will guess them quite easily.

But notwithstanding the faults of child-
hood, this little girl had a real love ige
God, a true desire to be guided by thm
Holy Spirit day by day; and so when she
found Charlie and Nellie Parsons so near
to her, and saw that she might help them
in SO many ways, she never knelt down at
night or morning without saying, “Oh,
my God, I thank Thee for giving me
something to do for Thee.”

With the help of better food little Charlie
was getting pretty well again, and by-and-
by was running about with his sister, as
when they first made their appearance in
Brookfield. But the haymakers’ work was
over, and their parents would be moving
off again, according to their usual habit.
A BRIGHT IDEA. 29

This troubled Mrs, Miller almost as
much as it troubled Lucy. “dt seems 4
miserable, shiftless sort of way,” she said
to her husband ; “I can’t myself see but
what some more respectable course might
be found for them. 1 yonder now if some
of the gentlemen round about the country
could take Parsons on as gardener, for he
learned gardening when he was a boy, and
kept to it for many years. Once get them
settled down in Brookfield, we might see
to the children a little; and who knows
but the parents might become steady, God-
fearing people ?”

Miller shookhis head doubtfully. “There’s
few gentlemen would take on a man who
has been wandering about and getting his
living anyhow. I daresay he couldn’t find
a friend to speak up as to his being even
honest and sober.”

“I think he is, father,” interrupted iewcy.
eagerly. “He came in once when I was
talking to Charlie, and he spoke so nicely
and seemed so fond of his little boy. He
wouldn't be chat if he was a bad drinking
man.”

“Well, no, you are in the right there,
30 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

oe, ‘repired’ Maller: “Alb-the same, f
don’t know a gentleman who would not
want a better sort of character—unless,
indeed, it was Mr. Severn at Stoke.”

Now Stoke was the name of a large
country house some two miles from Brook-
field, belonging to the richest gentleman in
the county—a place which assumed some-
thine. of ‘the character ofa’ palace in ‘the
eyes of the simple folk round about. But
if Mr. Severn was rich, he was equally
benevolent; no tale of sorrow had ever
been told to him in vain, no poor creature
Mad ever been turned trom his door
unhelped.

“Yes, Mr. Severn might—if any one
made bold to ask him,’ was Mrs. Miller’s
response. “ And as for gardening work, it
would seem there must always be plenty
@peut a place like Stoke.”

Lucy said nothing, but there was an
expression on her face which caused her
mother to exclaim, “ What are you thinking
or, child?”

“T was thinking I wish Mr. Severn knew
about Parsons, for he is such a good, kind
gentleman, I am sure he would give him
A BRIGHT IDEA. ‘21

work of some kind. And oh, mother, I
should be so very glad if they all stayed
here in Brookfield, and learned to be very
good and happy.”

“ Well, well—you should be off to Stoke,
and beg for your new friends,” said Miller,
laughing a little. “I don’t know how it is,
but lately, whenever I come in from work,
mother always says, Lucy has gone to the
children in Long Lane.”

“Oh, father, I haven’t been there so very
often!” she cried. “I have seen to the
flowers and the fruit, and all the other
things just the same; it is only in what I
call ‘play’ time I have been after Charlie
and Nellie.”

“I’m not complaining, child,” said Miller,
kindly. “I was only joking a little. God
forbid that ever I should grudge your
showing a kindness to any poor creatures
wiO. Need 16

The conversation turned on other sub-
jects; but< not so was “it with Lucy’s
thoughts. She could but busy her mind
with delightful pictures in which she saw
Mr. and Mrs. Parsons and their two
children dwelling happily and contentedly
32 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

in one of the neatest cottages of Brookfield,
or one of the pretty gardeners’ lodges at
Stoke.

“Mother,” she said, when they were
alone together next morning, “I have been
thinking a great deal,—and I’ve asked
God to help me if it was right,—and—oh,
do you think I really may do what father
said last night ?”

“What father said last night!” repeated
Mrs. Miller, who had well-nigh forgotten
the subject which had taken hold of her
child’s imagination. “What do you mean,
Lucy, for it seems to me he said a good
many things ?”

“T mean about poor Parsons and Mr.
Sever, continued the little girl, “Dont
you remember, mother, that when we were
saying that there must be plenty of work
about Stoke, and how nice it would be if
this man got work there, father said I had
Petter go to Mr. Severn and beg for him?”

“Oh, that was your father’s joking way,
as you might be sure,” replied Mrs. Miller.
“Tt would not be very easy for a child of
your age to go to Stoke, and ask to sce
such a gentleman as Mr. Severn.”
A BRIGHT IDEA. a3

“No, not easy,” said Lucy, reflectively ;
“but yet—oh, mother! every one says he is
so very kind that I don’t think he would
be angry with me.”

“I don’t say he would, dear; indeed, I
‘suppose Mr. Severn could not be very
angry with any one except for some just
cause; for he is a true gentleman, and
better still, a Christian. All the same,
Lucy, you would feel very frightened when
you fairly stood before him in one of his
grand rooms; and what could you say?
for we do not know that Parsons is to be
trusted, though we hope so.”

“IT should say how poor he was, mother,
and how by one thing and another, and
chiefly through the want of a friend to stand
by him, he had got down to such a wretched
way of life. And then, mother, I should
tell Mr. Severn about Charlie and Nellie—
how small and starved and miserable they
were ; and then I should try and say how
much we wanted to teach them about God
and good things, and how we were afraid
that, if they went on in their wild roving
life, they would never remember the few

things we have told them about Christ and
p 66
'@4° LUCY MILLERS GOOD’ WORK.

Beeven. Ohl Lf can’t believe that Mr.
Severn would refuse to help them.”

Mrs. Miller hesitated. Like Lucy, she
felt that the master of Stoke would almost
certainly befriend this poor family, and yet
she felt a repugnance, wnich she could
hardly explain, to her child becoming the
petitioner.

“It seems taking such a liberty,’ she
said at last. “A little: oirl, just the child
of homely working-folk, venturing to go
and ask to. see. Mr. ‘Severn... 1 can’t bear
the idea of it, Lucy; and yet ’tis hard to
hold you back from doing a service to
these poor creatures.”

“Mother, may I ask my teacher what
she thinks? She is always so wise and
kind.”

“ Ah, do,” answered Mrs. Miller, desiring
to be relieved of the entire responsibility
of the -Matter;. “Miss Wynne would
understand better than we do the ways
of gentlefolks, and I expect she knows
Mr. Severn. Ask her next Sunday after-
noon, Lucy.”

“Qh, mother! and this only Tuesday.
Please let me go and ask to see Miss
A BRIGHT IDEA, 35

Wynne this afternoon; she has told all
her class that she is a friend, and we need
never be afraid to run to her in a difficulty.
And this zs a real difficulty, mother; for

even you don’t seem quite sure about what
I ought to do”


























































CHAPTER Iv.
Special Pleading,



r RS. MILLER could not gainsay this
i statement, and she therefore agreed
to Lucy’s proposal of visiting the
lady who for some time had been her
Sunday-school teacher; indeed, she felt
almost the impatience of a girl in waiting
to hear the result.

“Well, child!” she exclaimed, when
Lucy teturned from her visit. But the
bright glad look upon her child’s face was
almost sufficient answer, even had she not
cried, “Oh, mother, Miss Wynne was so
kind! She says I had better go to Stoke,
and first of all she will write and ask Mr.
Severn to be so kind as to see me.”

“That is something gained, to be sure,”
eeewered Mrs. Miller. “I must own [I
shouldn’t like to have you turned from the
door by the servants saying their master
SPECIAL PLEADING. 37 ;

was not able to see you. But tell me what
Miss Wynne thought of this plan of yours.”
* Well) mother, she let me tell hersign
out what was in my mind, and then she
asked me several questions, especially as
to whether I’d prayed to God about it.
And last of all she said I had better go to
Stoke, and she would write to Mr. Severn,
begging him to see me to-morrow afternoon
—being Wednesday, and half-holiday.”
“To-morrow!” exclaimed Mrs. Miller.
“Well, then, [ must eet your clean print
frock ironed to-night, and my work forward,
so that I may walk to Stoke with you.”
“Oh, mother, will you really.co wath
me? That will make it so much easier,
for I am just a‘ little afraid,” said Lucy:
‘Tt seems as iff naust sit down now, and
think over and over what I had better say;
but Miss Wynne told me to leave it all to
the Holy Spirit, and He would put wie
right words into. my heart when the time
came. IJ! water my-flowers das usual
and I dare say Nellie and Charlie will
come round and watch meé-throush the
palings, as they did that first night I ever
saw them; and then I shall keep thinking
38 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

how happy perhaps I’m going to make
them, and so the time will pass, and [
shan’'t get frightened in thinking about
what is to happen to-morrow.”

Lucy’s programme proved pretty correct}
and while busy with her pinks and car-
nations, her two small favourites made
their appearance, in expectation of one of
their favourite stories. She told them of
Christ’s death,—they never seemed to
weary of it; and, as if following up some
idea in her own mind, she tried to explain
that though we are not asked to lay down
our lives for others, we must every one of
us try and help to serve those who need it.
I cannot tell you that these two tiny un-
trained children at all took in the lesson,
and besides she was not a very experienced
teacher. Butit seemed a comfort to herself
to reflect that on the morrow she—in her
own little way—was going to lay aside
fear and selfish considerations, to serve
others if she could.

“We're going away on Saturday,” said
Nellie, gravely. “There'll be no more
work for father and mother after Saturday,
so we're obliged to go away.”
SPECIAL PLEADING. 39

“How should you like to live in Brookfield
always?” Lucyasked them. “Wouldn’tit
be nice to have a pretty cottage instead of
the one in Long Lane, and a garden and
flowers, and clean frocks and pinafores ?”

Ihe children’s eyes seemed to express
that such a condition would indeed be
“nice,” but to them most certainly un-
attainable.

When bed-time came, the prospect before
her seemed one which would quite destroy
all Lucy’s chances of sleep. “I must do
what Miss Wynne told me,” she reflected ;
“I must keep saying, ‘O God, help me;’
and try to remember that as He is every-
where, He will be at Stoke with me. Mr.
Severn is a good, kind man who loves God,
so I need not be afraid.” |

She had recourse to these thoughts many
a time before her eyes closed in sleep.
When she awoke it was later than her
usual hour, and her mother stood by her
bed, saying, “ Well, child, it will be a fine
day for Stoke—unless you have altered
your mind.”

“I haven't done that, mother,” Lucy
answered. “ What does father say ?”
40 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

“Not much, dear—it isn’t his way to
have many words about a thing, as you
know. But I can tell his mind almost as
well as he could himself, and I feel pretty
certain he thinks you in the right.” |

‘“Mother, Im -sure -I.-must tbe,’ . said
Pic earnestly... (It isnt as though. it
was for myself I wanted anything; and
surely for others we ought not to be afraid
to ask even a great favour. Miss Wynne
was telling me last night that she 1s certain
we don’t think enough of Christ’s example
—of how He gave up all, and never once
pleased Himself. She thinks that people
are apt to make excuses, as if the Bible
did not mean exactly what it says in verses
such as ‘Whatsoever you would that men
should do to you, do ye even so to them.’
$m sure, mothers dear, that if you and
father were like Charlie’s parents, I should
like fo have you helped, even by a little
girl, to some happier way of life.”

*theres one thing which troubles me
even now,’ said Mrs. Miller, “and that is
fae fear of you coming home quite dis-
appointed. Thanks to Miss Wynne, I’ve
no doubt of Mr. Severn letting you see
SPECIAL PLEADING. AI

him, and tell your story ; but if he says he
has no work for Parsons, and so all you’ve
done is no use, how can you bear that,
Eucy: -

The child’s face clouded over; it was
the first idea that anything but success
could follow the effort she was guing to
make.

“Qh, mother, mother!” she exclaimed,
and the tears filled her eyes, “I never
thought of that! I only thought that if
once I ventured up to Stoke, and saw Mr.
Severn, all would be as happy as could be
for the poor Parsons. If he does say that
he has nothing for ” and here her voice
completely failed her, and she hid her face
on Mrs. Miller’s shoulder.

“Dear, dear!” cried the good mother,
fairly distressed at the effect of words
which she had only spoken as a safeguard
igainst an unproven difficulty. “Lucy,
don’t give way like this, when you have
been feeling so brave—almost as brave as
a young soldier. It only came into my
mind that such a thing might be as disap-
pointment, and you would do well to be
ready for it. Take heart, child, and hope


A2 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

for the best,—it’s all that any of us can
do.”

Lucy smiled a little, and tried to dismiss
her fear; but it was not a very successful
attempt, and during the hours which had
_to pass before the visit to Stoke she wished
more than once that she had never thought
of this great effort to be made for the
benefit of her friends in the broken-down
cottage of Long Lane.

It was a pretty walk from Brookfield to
Mr. Severn’s estate, leading.along the river
banks, with their willows drooping down-
ward to the stream, and so on until the
road was reached in which they saw the
splendid avenue of elms leading up to the
house. The grandeur of the place im-
pressed Lucy now as it had never done
so fully on other occasions, and she put
her hand within her mother’s with a
sudden fear.

“Oh, I wonder if I can,” she gasped ;
‘I wonder if I shall be able to say a word.”
Flowever she felt that retreat was not
possible, as by this time Miss Wynne’s
note must have reached the master of
stoke; so she controlled herself as best
SPECIAL PLEADING 43

she could, though her heart. throbbed
wildly as she heard the clanging of the bell
which would presently result in their ad-
mittance.

“Mr. Severn?” said the man, in answer
to ‘Mrs.’ Miller's inquiry. “adedent think
he can see you, but [ll ask;” and having
done so, he presently returned to bid the
mother and child follow him to the
library.

“So this is the little girl- whom Wiss
Wynne sent to see me,—sit down, my
dear,” was the kindly greeting; and at the
first glimpse of Mr. Severn’s face Lucy’s
courage revived, and stepping up to him
she began her story at once, a little after
the fashion of repeating a school lesson.

“If you please, sir, I hope you'll pardon
my boldness,” she said. “As I know you
are very good, I want you to be good toa
poor man who has not a friend in all the
world—not one, I really think.” |

“That is surely not quite true,” said Mr.
Severn, quietly; but seeing her puzzled
look he added, “I should think you are a
very good friend, if you have come here to
ask help for him.”
44 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

“Oh, I can’t be any one’s friend because
I'm not rich and great,” said Lucy. “But
Iam so sorry for them all; and his poor
little children are so very ignorant, that
unless they have a different sort of life,
they can never learn what is good and
Fient, Tan afraid.’

She paused a moment, and looked ap-
pealingly at the grave, kindly face before her,

Pr sce you. Mave taken. to special
preading, > saie Mr Severn; “ You dont
understand what that is, I dare say, yet.
But now answer me a few questions about
these poor creatures.”

It was not a difficult matter to under-
stand the history of Lucy’s poor friends,
and she had the satisfaction of seeing pity
for them in the expression of Mr. Severn’s
face. Tie tnined fo inquire a few par
ticulars of Mrs. Miller, and then looking
kindly at the child, told her she had done
wou to come to him.

“JT will give this poor fellow a fair chance
of work,” he said. “We can employ him
here, if not in gardening, in some other
way. And as for you, my little girl,—well,
tell me how you came to be so brave.”
SPECIAL PLEADING. As

“ Oh, sit, lm not very brave,’ said huey,
smiling and blushing; “indeed, I was afraid,
especially just when mother had rung the
bell. But I wanted to help Charlie ana
Nellie’s parents ; and as I knew you were
rich and kind, I thought I ought to come
when father and mother said I might.”

“Well, then, you may go home and send
this man to me. We will find them a tidy
cottage in Brookfield, for I have none empty
here ; and if he is steady and trustworthy,
I will be a good friend to him. God bless
you, child; and His blessing will rest on
you, I feel sure, for what you have done
to-day.”’

“Thank you, sir,” said Lucy, curtseying
and looking radiantly happy ; and as soon
as she found herself out in the elm avenue,
she skipped round her mother with delight,
saying, “Oh, I amsohappy! I never, never
was so happy before,—I never knew how
nice it is to help others, and all the nicer
when it has been a little hard!”
46

Gl APi Re ¥,
Better Hays.

1e ucY felt shy about taking the news to
= the cottage in Lone Lane: and-atter

a brief consultation, it was decided
that Parsons should not know exactly how
his good fortune had reached him.

“2 cece mm, and tell ham that ive heard
that Mr. Severn of Stoke Park has work
for Mim if lie likes to go for it,’ said .Mirs.
Paice. ima this she did: but in some
way the truth came out, and Lucy’s head
might have been almost turned by the
eratitude poured forth, if she had not striven
Sarcesty tO Yemember that, after all, the
kind impulse had been put into her heart
by God, and that all the good was His in al-
lowingher todo another little work for Him.

wit seems as if it could not be true”
said the poor woman, in whom hope had
well-nigh been crushed out by years of
BETTER DAYS. A7

sorrow. “It is as if the days were coming
back when we had a good roof to shelter
us, and food in plenty. It’s for the chil-
dren’s sake I’m so thankful,—the hardest
thing of all has been to see them many and
many a time cry for the food I hadn't got
for then.”

“Tt is God you must thank,” Mrs. Miller
would say, whenever she saw an oppor-
funity.. “Id dike to. ink, Wes. Parsons.
that now and then you gave a thought to
Him, and said a prayer.”

“ Ah, I’m not religious,” was the answer;
“But I’m thankful all the same.”

And if Lucy was a little discouraged
that there was no warmer feeling to God
in the hearts of these people, her mother
bade her hope on, and pray for something
better by-and-by.

“It may come suddenly,” she said, “or
it may be months and years in coming; for
God has a different way for all of us. But
His promise doesn’t change, Lucy; and if
you ask Him for what is good and right,
He is sure to grant it in the end.”

It was not difficult to find a house for
the Parsons, for the humblest little place
48 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

Brookfield contained was better than the
dilapidated dwelling in Long Lane. By
Mr. Severn’s kind help, the few necessaries
they must have were purchased ; and Lucy
Miller and her mother had the delight of
seeing their poor friends in a comfortable
home by the day when Parsons was to
begin his service at Stoke Park,

All this had not, however, taken place
unobserved by the Brookfield people, most
of whom uplifted their voices in condemna-
tion of the Millers. “Taking up with a
set of low haymaking folks,” they said;
“people who tramp the country, and lay
hands on all they can find. I wouldn’t let
a child of mine be with those two wretched
little creatures, as you let Lucy be, Mrs.
Miller ; you'll be sorry for it when it’s too
late,”

Or perhaps it was, “I can’t imagine what
Mr. Severn is thinking of—taking ona man
whom no one knows anything about, when
there are ever so many decent fellows
would be glad to get employed at Stoke.
‘Tis said too, Mrs. Miller, that your Lucy
went and begged work for Parsons. I
wonder she could be so bold, and she but
ee ee

BETTER DAYS. AQ

twelve years of age, and to a gentleman
like Mir. Severit:”’

At first the Millers were disposed to
resent all this rather warmly; but feeling
that it would soon be forgotten in some
fresher news, and that at any rate their
motives had been those of kindness to the
poor friendless family, they said little in
the way of excuse or explanation, trusting
that time would show that they had made
no mistake in what had been done.

“And now, mother, may 1 ask Mrs:
Parsons, to let the little children ss6 to
schcol,” said Lucy, on the evening when
the cottage in Long Lane was deserted.
“They would be so much happier learning
a little, than roaming about by themselves ;
but I forgot that their mother will be with
them now.”

“Yes, I’m glad to say,” replied Mrs.
Miller, “Tt’s bad when a woman has to go
out to work, and leave two babies like that
to care for themselves, Still, I dare say
we can persuade her to send them ‘to
school.”

Mrs. Parsons was easily persuaded —
gratitude to those who had taken pity on

iy

cia
50 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

her children would have moved her to do
even a harder thing to please them; so
Charlie and Nellie might have been seen
the next Monday morning trotting towards
the village school, under Lucy Miuiller’s
care, in pinafores which her busy fingers
had made, and with smiling, well-washed
faces, |

Just as easy, too, it proved to get them
among the other tiny ones who were
gathered together on Sundays to listen to
the stories which were not quite strange,
because Lucy had told them before, —
stories of those who were God's servants
in the olden time before Christ came into
the world, stories of that dear Saviour and
Eis work for sinners. There, too, they
learned the simple hymns which children
love; and when they tried to sing them
over to their mother, she remembered the
days when she too had learned such hymns,
when she too had learned about God, al-
though in the troubles of life she seemed
to have forgotten Him.

Thus, then, things went on during the
first few weeks in which Parsons was
employed at Stoke Park; and as he was
BETTER DAYS. 51

proving himself to be both sober and in-
dustrious, the Brookfield people ceased to
busy themselves with gloomy predictions
that he would “come to no goog.7?* 47
they said nothing in his favour, they did
not distrust him as at first.

The change which came over him and
his wife had something to do with this
better impression. They had ‘certainly
looked a miserable couple when first they
appeared in Long Lane; but now they
were fast gaining a healthy colour; and as
the woman had now leisure to work for
herself and her children, she was beginning
to get decent clothing together, and in this
both Mrs. Miller and Lucy were ready
helpers.

“Oh, mother, how fortunate it was that
I saw little Nellie and Charlie with their
poor pale faces looking in at me as I was
gardening,” the little girl would say. “I
suppose God brought them all here on
purpose for us to help them ?”

“es, indeed, if seems very plain that
was His doing,—it couldn't ‘happen by
chance,” ‘replied: Mrs. Miller, - “2 aish of
could see both Parsons and his wife thinking
52 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

more of God’s goodness, Lucy. They are
grateful enough to ws, but it is as if they
couldn’t look higher.”

“Perhaps they will by-and-by, mother,”
said the child, hopefully. “One day, when
Nellie was singing a hymn they often learn
at the Sunday school, I saw Mrs. Parsons
look sad, and presently she said to me,
‘xh, I used to love tHose things when
Pues a cuild, Id be cladif 1 could care
for them now.’ That shows she does
know a little about what is right, mother !”

“Yes, poor soul !”’ and Mrs. Miller looked
thoughtful, for her kind heart could not be
satisfied by helping these people in temperal
things, without leading them also to trust
in God, and make His will the rule of their
lives.

Lucy had now less need to spend her
leisure time in looking after little Nellie
and Charlie, and indeed her garden work
took up many hours. But she did not
forget her young favourites; and every
morning saw her walking with them to the
school, and taking them under her protec-
tion again when lessons were done.

It was on one such day that she found
BETTER DAYS. 53

trouble in the children’s home—the father
was ill, and their mother looked pale and
frightened, for on his health everything
Seemed, to depend.

Lucy’s kind little heart felt all the sym-
pathy that could be desired, and she ran
to her mother with the bad news, begging
her to come to Mrs. Parsons and comfort
ner in her trouble.

“Ah, I thought it was all too good to
last,” said the poor woman, who seemed
suddenly to have fallen back into her old
despondency ; “just as we were getting on
a little,and making things a bit comfortable
round us, this misfortune comes; and now
William will lose a good place, and what
we can do God only knows.”

“Do not despair,” said Mrs. Miller. “You
say well that God knows. He will take
care of you, and raise up your husband to
health again, if it is best for you. As for
losing a good place, I cannot believe that
such a kind master as Mr. Severn, will not
wait for him; and after all it may be only
a short illness,—what is it 2”

“A kind of a chill, so the doctor says,”
and Mrs, Parsons began to cry dismally ;
54 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

“but he must be very ill, for he has been
wandering in his head all night.” |

It proved indeed that Parsons was
seriously ill; and some days and nights
ensued which were bad enough to justify
the poor wife’s alarms. Nor could she take
any comfort in calling upon God to help
Be. No, ne, Ged will have nothing to
HO-with me, She reiterated...“ ’ve.quite
foreotten . Idim, and tymned from Him
these many years, and now He'll turn
fcom- me,”

It was very terrible to see her in this
state of mind; and when at last she con-
sented to see the minister, whom Mrs.
Miller spoke of as one of the “kindest
friends any one could need,” nothing that
he could say seemed to have any power
over her.

“Tf William gets well Pll think of being
religious,’ she answered. ‘‘ While he’s like
this, I feel too cast down to turn my
mind to anything but what is to become
of us.”

But when, in a few days, her husband’s
ailment changed for the better, Mrs. Par-
sons scemed but little inclined to remember
BETTER DAYS, 55

this half-promise; she was cheered and
thankful also to see him at all improved,
but she scarcely realized how much this
might be due to the prayers which others
had offered for her in her great sorrow;
and yet doubtless, like every other sorrow,

it was sent for the purpose of drawing her
to Gzod.



x
a
56

CHAPTER VE
Work Rewarded

ae ILLIAM PARSONS was up and out
again after his short, sharp illness,
and so the cloud which shadowed
his home had passed away. Once more,
ne went fo bis daily work: Once more
liitic Charite and Nellie ran meriity to
school; once more their mother’s face was
content, but she was as careless as ever
about her soul. |
But upon her husband a change had
fallen; and one evening after his return he
gai’, Gravely, “lim thinking, Mary, it’s
not without cause that all our trouble has
Pome, Vote It lay ill it seemed in my
mind that we had not got God on our side;
wed forgotten Him alike in our troubles
and in the blessings He’s given us lately.”
There was a pause, and then he added,
“There's many a thing I’d like to make
out; but I couldn’t speak so free to the

x
WORK REWARDED. 57

minister as to some one that’s not so far
above a working-man. Now, there’s that
child who has been as much a friend to us
aS any grown person. She seems to have
learned a good deal at school; I should
fancy she could make many a thing plain
to such as me.”

“‘There’s little doubt of that,” said Mrs.
Parsons; “she’s as sensible as a woman,
and yet there’s plenty of play in her like
in other children. I éxpect there’s not
many things in the Bible she doesn’t know.
I've heard her tell stories out of it to the
little ones which seemed as if she knew it
off most by heart.”

“TM eck er a tlie of. dave. caucl
Patsons; “for not beite a scholar I can’t
make out how a man is to turn over a new
leaf, and be religious. Yet it came plainly
before me when I lay ill, that it was what
I ought to do. I was afraid to die then,
Mary; downright afraid, though like many
another man, I’ve laughed at the thought
of death. I remembered every word I’d
ever heard about God; it seemed as if I
felt I might soon have to stand before
Him; and I said to myself, that if He’d
58 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

only spare my life, ’d make the rest of it
@ dilferent thing.”

“Well, somewhat the same thought was
in my mind,” said Mrs. Parsons. “‘I’ll try
and be religious if William gets better,’
was what I said to Mrs. Miller; but I’ve
not given it a thought since, and I don’t
know what we ought to do.”

This was how it happened that on Lucy
Miller’s next visit to her friends, she was
surprised by the unexpected request to
read them a little out of the Bible which
her mother had given Mrs. Parsons some
time before; and while she read, she could
not but notice the deep attention of her.
listeners. This took place again and again,
until it was an established custom that
after school-hours, and before night quite
closed in, Lucy should go to the cottage to
feag 2 littic.

At first she felt rather shy about
answering the questions which Parsons put
to her; but it was true that she had been
well taught from her early childhood, and
thus the plain, simple way of salvation was
as well understood by her as by many of
twice her years.
WORK REWARDED. 59

“There is not very much for you to de,
she would say again and again. “‘ Being
religious’ as you call it, really means that
you are going to think very much of God,
and try to do what He has commanded,
and love Him for His goodness. But, first
of all, we must be very sorry for our sins,
and believe that ‘they are forcivem “us
because Christ took them away by shedding
tis blood for ss.” tndeed,«- am teline
you quite right in this, for I have heard it
so often, and from those who know how to
teach we rieht.”

“Well, it sounds easy enough,” Parsons
would say slowly. “And yet—we’ve only
got to believe, you say, and nothing to do?”

“Nothing to do except believe, and love
God, and ask the help of the Holy spn
to make you avoid all that would displease
Him,” persisted “oucy. © Listen: te tia
text: “God so loved: the world tar.
sent His only begotten Son, that whoso-
ever believeth in Him should not perish, but
have everlasting life.”

““ Not perish!” repeated Parsons, “Well,
that was what troubled me sorely while I
was lying ill, not only dying and leaving
60 LUCY MILLERS GOOD. WORK

Mary and the little ones, but of what
would come after. For lying looking as it
ment pe at death, I felt it was not. the
end of things, like I and many a foolish,
unthinking manis apt tosay. I felt asif
there was everlasting misery beyond, and
I was fairly afraid. ‘Whosoever believeth’
—just read it once again, Miss Lucy ;”
and when she had done so, he remained as
if lost in thought even after the child took
her leave and went home.

Oh, mother she said tien, as she had
Safd before “1 feel as if I didnt know
now to answer him what he wants to be
told ; how I wish he would ask some one
older and wiser.”

“ Well, it might be better in some ways,”
feieimca iirs. Miller; “still, Lucy, it’s a
happy thing for even a child to say a word
for God. And then, after all, the way of
salvation isn’t hard or difficult ; it is meant
for children and simple folk, as well as for
Bee Ciever and great; and, thank God!
you have learned already what will make
us safe and happy in this world and the
pext.”’

“It would be pleasant to see Mr. and
WORK REWARDED. OI

Mrs. Parsons really Christians, wouldn’t it,
mother?” replied Lucy. “I tmimk ge
will be, for we have all prayed so much for
it, and God has promised to answer our
prayers if they age mone

“Yes ; He will answer usm. Bis own
time,” said Mrs. Miller. ‘And it seems
to me, Lucy, that you must just go on as
you do now, reading God’s Word to these
people, and leaving all the rest to Him.
Ah, child, many’s the time you’ve envied
the missionaries their work in foreign
lands, and wished you were a woman to
go and Nelp them but it is 4a litle ie
of a missionary’s work He is giving you
now, so be patient and thankful.”

Even older people than Lucy Miller
find “patience” hard to practise; and as
weeks went by, and no special fruit sprang
from her daily reading to Parsons, she
grew so weary that many a time, if she
had yielded to her feelings, she would have
made some excuse and given it up. This,
however, her conscience would not allow
her to. do. “Have you not promised 4a
serve God?” it whispered. “ Have you not
thought and dreamed over ways of pleasing
62 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

Him, and leading others to love Him; and
will you weary of this little trouble—this
easy task of reading His Holy Word to
one who cannot read for himself ?”

As these thoughts pressed on her, Lucy
resolved to persevere. Nevertheless, it was
a little wearying to a child to answer the
same questions so often, and go over
eround again and again, which, to one
taught as she had been, seemed so easy;
and thus it was indeed a happy evening
when Parsons greeted her with words she
had never heard from him before.

“Tt’s all clear now,” he said, suddenly ;
“as clear as noon-day to me. All you’ve
read and all you've told me seems easy to
believe, and Ill be a Christian from this
day. I and Mary too, for she sees as I do
that it’s the safe and only happy way for
us. Ah, child, it was a blessed day which
brought us to Brookfield with our little
ones! We had sunk down and down by
reason of trouble, and no one seemed to
care, no one held out a hand to help us
till Charlie told us that you had spoken
kindly to him, and Nellie fetched you to
see him ill on his little bed. And so from
WORK REWARDED. 63

one thing to another, though you are only
a child, you've been a good friend to us,
helping us for this world and the nex
God bless you, Miss Lucy Miller, and
reward you, as I’m sure He will.”

I can assure you that Lucy felt any little
trouble rewarded then, and she hurried
away to give the good news to her mother.
“Oh, mother, mother, how happy it is to
work for God!” she cried; “and after all
itis so easy. I will try all my life long to
do good to every one for His sake. I wii
ask Him that this—my first little work for
Him—may only be the beginning of other
fringes Ele will let me do. amd them che
ran away to her own small bedroom, for
there were feelings in her heart then which
she could not pour out to any ear but that
of our Father in heaven.

So my little story ends; and all I have
to add-is that should any one vicw cic
village of Brookfield, it would be impossible
to recognize in the respectable hard-work-
ing William and Mary Parsons the once
miserable tramping parents of little half-
starved Charlie and Nellie.

When the children are in bed at night,
64 LUCY MILLER’S GOOD WORK.

you may see the father sitting down in the
tidy parlour of the home his own industry —
has gained, while his wife talks cheerfully
eet tie events of the day; Or at other
times—as in our picture—she will read to
him from Scripture some of the passages
which reached him first from the lips of
little Lucy Miller, whose good work has
been, as she hoped and prayed, only the
beginning of the service she rendered to
God, whom she had early chosen for her
Guide and for her Friend.









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PUBLISHED BY
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56, PATERNOSTER ROW,

LONDON.














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ILLUSTRATED GIFT BOOKS FOR CHILDREN









hy Pictures ied stories Illus-

e trative of Kindness to Animals.

oy EAR aie Ee EN,
Author of ‘‘Frutts of Bible Lands,” etc.

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Profusely Llustrated by Weir, Stacey,
Whymper, M. E. Edwards, I. G. Brittain,
and others. Quarto. ~2s. cloth boards.

ele ‘““A delightful book of anecdotes of Animals, very
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** Amusing as well as instructive.” —Lnelish Churchman.

wa first-rate book for children.”?—Pvesd yterian Messenger.
Oa Ol PR LI atl Yosef ee?

ALKATIVE FRIENDS

IN FIELD,
FARM, AND FOREST.

By MARY E. ROPES.

Pipaifior 07 * Tonts Bennie,’ “ Till
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‘The juveniles always like to read about

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In Pretty Cloth Covers

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1 The Book of Buoks : The Story
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2 Springfield Stories.
3 Little Dot. By Mrs. WALTON,
4 John Thomson’s Nursery.
5 ‘lwo Ways to begin Life.
6 Ethel Ripon. By G. E. Sar-
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12 Jenny’s Waterproof.

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16 Lost and Rescued.

17 Lightbearers and Beacons.

18 Little Lottie; or, the Wonder-
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19 The Dog of St. Bernard.

20 Isaac Gould, the Waggoner.

21 Uncle Rupert’s Stories for Boys

gee Dreaming and Doing.

a a Sar een oy PR et <



23

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BOSIOLRS shorn

92
&

Oo
34
Oo
36

40

“Children.

Many Ways of being Useful.
Rachel Rivers; or, What a
Child may Do.

Lessons out of School.

Setma, the Turkish Captive.

Show your Colours.

True and False Friendship.

Always Too Late, and other
Stories.

eueet Pictures drawn from
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1 Soldier Sam.
2 Stephen Grattans Faith. By

the Author of ** Christie Red-
fern’s Troubles.’’

David the Scholar.

Tired of Home.

Setting out for Heaven,

The Stolen Money, and other
Ballads.

Helen’s Stewardship,

Pat Riley’s Friencs.

Olive Crowhurst. Girls.

The White Feather,



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4 75 The Two Roses.

oe

45
46

Aunt Milly’ s Diamonds,
Our Cousin from India.
My Lady’s Prize, and Effie’s

Letter.

How the Golden Eagle was
Caught.

Emily’s Trouble, and what it
taught her.

Adopted Son, and other Stories

Till the Sugar Melts. By M.
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Story of a Geranium; or, The
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The Flying Postman.

The Money in the Milk.

Cowslip Ball, and other Stories.

Little Model, and other Stories.

56 Mary Sefton. By the Author

of ‘‘ The Two Roses.”

57 Tales from over the Sea.

58 Lisetta and the Brigands; or,
Saved by a Mule.

Bessie Graham.

In his Father’s Arms.
side Story.

Cosmo and his Marmoset.

Talks with Uncle Morris.

The Patched Frock.

Herbert and his Sister;
Not in One Shoe.

Tucy Miller’s Good Work.

Little Andy’s Legacy.

How the Gold Medal was Won,
and The Young Drovers.

Master Charles's Chair,
How it was Filled.
Little Kittiwake ;
Story of a Lifeboat.

70 Squire Bentley's Treat.

71 Jessie’ s Visit tothe Sunny Bank

72 Amy’sSecret. By Lu_y Byrr-

LEY.
73 The Children in the Valley.

74 Florence and her Frienas.

and

47
48

49
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51
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54
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60 A Sea-

Of;

and

69 The

Or,









41 Steenie Alloway’s Adventures.
42 Angel’s Christmas.
13 Cottage Life; its Lights and Shadows.
44 The Raven's Feather.

——————EEe

SERIES~—coxtinued.

By Mrs. WALTON.

76 Little Tenpenny.

77 Six China Teacups.

78 His Own Enemy.

79 ‘Vhree Firm Friends.

80 Empty Jam pot.

81 Patty and Brownie; or, The

Lord will Provide.

82 Two Weeks with the Greys.

&3 A Tale of Three Weeks.
EGLANTON THORNE,

My Brother and I.

The Ble sed Palm.

Hubert’s Temptation.

Pretty Miss Violet.

‘The Queen’s Oak.

Story of a Yellow Rose. ‘Told
by Itself. By JESSE PaGE.

The Blacksmith’s Daughter.

Daisy's [rust. by iso. PRATT

The Runaways.

Jack Silverleigh’s Temptation.

May Lynwood.

Tom’s Bennie. By M. E. Roprs

The See of the School.

97 Miss Pr:

98 The Be he was Told.

99 Gerty’s ‘Triumph.

100 ‘Vhe Missing Jug.

101 Granny’s Daring.

102 Grateful Peter’s New Year's
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A True Story of Long Ago.

The Little Midshipman.

How Arthur Found out the
Bechet.

The Pilgrim Boy, and other
Stories. By the Author of
‘*T think when I read that
Sweet Story of Old.”

By

84
85
86
87
88
89

90
91
92
93
94
95
96

103
104
105

106

107 Mabel’s White Kitten.

108 Keziah Taylor’s Donkey.

109 Sallie, a Little ie By
EpitTH CORNFORTH.

110 Willie Wills’ Wings. By

Mrs. G..S. REAWEY.


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Bible Pictures for our Pets

Part I. OLpD TESTAMENT PICTURES.
Part II. New TESTAMENT PICTURES.





With large Illustrations drawn by SELOUS, STANILAND,
WEBB, WATSON, HARRISON WEIR, DOWNARD, Dork,
and other well-known artists.

Quarto. Each Part complete in itself. In ornamental boards,
with cloth backs. 2s. each Part. Complete in One Volume,
4s, handsomely bound, with medallion on side, gilt edges.

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Our Little Dots’ Picture Scrap

Book. With Illustrations from
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S. Stacey, and others. Super Royal
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The Sweet Story of Old. A Sunday
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STRETTON

Author of
‘6 Tessica’s First Prayr ‘1

coerce arse

The whole of the books forming this
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New type

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Nobody Loves Me.
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Our Gracious Queen:
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Reduce from “ CurisTiz’s OLD OrGan.” cloth boards.





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FOR YOUNG READERS.

Each in very large type with Engravings. Small gto, 1s. with pretty
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When Jesus was Here among Men. By Mrs. E. M.
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The Name above every Name. By Mrs. E. M.
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Stories of Bible Children. A Sunday Book for very
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Sunday Afternoons at Rose Cottage. Bible Talks
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SL SVSS- LILI IND IIIS



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1.—Our Queen, and other pictures.
2,—Charlie and his Pet, and other pictures.
3.—Little Kittens, and other pictures,
4.—Mamma’s Darling, and other pictures.







1/-BOOKS in LARGE TYPE

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15.

16.

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. Jessie’s






. Short and Sweet.

. I Never Thought of it.

. Father's Joy, and other Stories.
. A Sprig of Holly.

. Barbara’s Revenge.

; SIT Mo.

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other Stories.

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many

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other Stories.

The Lily of the Valley, and
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Tony the Tramp ; or, Good for
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Made Clear at Last; or, The
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By Mary E. Ropes, Author
of “Tony the: Tramp, ete.
Chrissy’s Glad News; or, A
Little Child shall lead them.



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BUUKS

IN CLOTH BOARDS.

+

EKach with Illustra-

Well printed,

blocked with colowred

anks. 4d. each.

PLLA IO

. Lily’s Adventure.
. Made on Purpose.

A Story of

Rus ian Life. By Salem

Hall.

. The White Rosebud, and the

Birthday Present.

2b Cares Secret

22. Madea Man of.

23. Winnie's. Golden -Key.; or,
The Right of Way. By J.

. In Golden London.

~ fob, ands eViper.

Saxby.

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Only a Word.

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Gladstone.

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Little Granddaughter.
Mrs. George Gladstone.
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By

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By Alice King.
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ne

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A Series of 24mo. Books for the Young. With Covers printed,
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e e e Y e
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1 Phil Harvey’s Fortune. 13 Trixie and Her Cousin.
Zebis little: Iletty. 14 Kitty’s Concertina.

3 Jock the Shrimper. 15 In Father’s Place.

4 My Master’s Business. [Found | 16 Hilda and Her Pet.

5 How Charlie was Lost and | 17 The Way to Win.

6 Bessie Morton’s Legacy. 18 The Story of Nika.

7 Johan’s Christmas Eve. 19 Addie’s Children.

8 Jonnny’s Dream. 20 How Tom Gained the Victory.
9 Old Bagnall’s Ricks. 21 Gaspard’s Promise.
10 Widow Martin's Son. 2? Iucy.of the blall:
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3 Pretty Stories. 15 Mabel’s Mistake.
4 Pretty Stories. 16 Vhe Jackdaw’s Christmas Tree
5 A Mother’s Stories. 17 Angel Rosie.
6 A Sister’s Stories. 18 Faithful Andrew.
7 A Friend’s Stories. 19 Tim's Little Garden.
8 Pleasant Stories. 20 Between Sickle and Scythe.
9 Simple Stories. 21 Freddie’s New Home.
10 True Stories. 22 Kit and his Violin.
11 Useful Stories. 23 Flip, Mish, and Another.

12 Farewell Stories. 24 Jenny Wren’s Mite.

Aunt Mary's Packet of 7 Aunt Mary's Pretty Pages
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Each Packet contains Twelve Books with Glazed Covers, tn Gold. Ful
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“%



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There’s

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suChanrlte “Scotts “or.

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and How
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- Ben Holt’'s Good Name.

. Lisa Baillie’s Journal.

. Northcliffe Boys.

. The Little Orange Sellers.
. Georgie’s Prayer.

. Saddie’s Service.

. Nils’ Revenge.

Tale of Swe-
dish Life.

. Harry Blake’s Trouble.

. Cousin Jack’s Adventures,

. Hungering and Thirsting.

; Bhe-China’ Cup sor, 4ullens

Arial:

. How Tilly found a Friend.

. Charity s Birthdays lext.
.abhe Rescte,

5. Little Nellie’s Days in India.
. The Young Hop-Pickers.

. Motherless Bairns.

8. George Wayland.

. The Cinnamon Island and its

Castives,

. Caleb Gaye’s Success.
. Dark Days of December.
. The Big House and the Little

House ; or, The Two Dreams.

. Tim and his Friends.
. Ned the Barge-boy.
. Ragged Robin.

By Mary E.
oes ‘Se

SERIES

36.

ov.

38,

o9.
60.

‘ May’ s Cousin.

» Billy the Acorn Gatherer.

ane

. oquirrel ;

. Ihe Broken Strap;

Coloured Frontispiece and Wood Engravings.
Attractively bound with Medallion on side.

- Ressie Mason’s Victories.
»- Dame Buckle and her Pet

The Gable House.
The Dangerous Guest. Story of 1745. By frances
Browne.
Fruits of Bible Lands. By
Mary K. Martin.
By Atthor of

‘Reuben TYouchett’s Grand-
daughter, ’

By

Fiorence E. Burch.

- The Banished Family, and the

Bohemian Confessor.

. The Golden Street; or, The

Fisherman’s Orphans.

. The First of the African Dia-

monds. By Frances Browne.
Royal Banner; or,
Dragged in the Dust.

. Brave Archie.
46.

There’s a Friend for Little
Children. ByCharlotteMason.

. Michael the Young Miner.

- Bobs Trials and Tests. By
Mary E. Ropes.

. Tim Peglar’s Secret ; or, The
Wonderful Egg.

. Under the snow.
Theo Lost Baby. A :Stoncwor

the Floods. By Emma Leslie.
or, Back from a Far

Country. Byol 2 bureus

. Jkescued from the Baring

Ship.

. James Barton’s Pleasure Boat.
: Bennie, the Little Singer.

: Reuben Minton’ S ean Ice.

. Heartsease.

yp EONS Mice
ginson.

or. Her
Great Reward. By Florence
3. Burch.

Missionary Rabbits.

Hilda; or, The Golden Age.

By Fina Leslie.

IT





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Little Bovs and Girls.

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OUR LITTLE DOTS’
ALIN INSU A Ti.
The Vearly Volume of

Sue bartee Dors.”

Full of Pretty Pictures and Little Stories
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handsome cloth gilt.
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& en a mss SS Spectator.



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SFE OI ITT

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WISI IDNIN DY IBLINI ASS LL\A SA

‘A pretty little illustrated periodical,
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sensible practice of giving children credit for
being able to understand something better than
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iNvews.



‘“A per’ect treasury of interesting articles
and poetical pieces.”— Bockselles.

““As charming as. ever.”’—Zccksiastical





oS,
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CHUDS COMPANION

Juvenile Instructor Annual.

It is full of nice pictures and interesting
reading for young folks, with a coloured frontispiece.

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Is. 6d. attractive oloned boards; 2s. neat cloth; 2s. 6d.
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LONDON: KNIGHT, PRINTER, MIDCLE STREET, ALDEREGATE, E.C.





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Lill the Sugar Melts.
The Story of a Geranium.
The Flying Postman.

The Money in the Milk.
The Cowstip Batt.

Fhe Little Model.

Mary Sefton.

Tates from over the Sea.
Lisetta and the Brigands.
Bessie Graham.

In his Father’s Arms.

Cosmo ana his Marmoset.
Patks with Unele Morris.
Herbert and his Sister.
Tacy Mitler’s Good Work.
Little Andy’s Legacy.























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